Citation
The watch fires of '76

Material Information

Title:
The watch fires of '76
Creator:
Drake, Samuel Adams, 1833-1905
Lee and Shepard ( Publisher )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Typographer )
Rockwell and Churchill ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lee & Shepard
Manufacturer:
Typography by C.J. Peters & Son ; Presswork by Rockwell & Churchill
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 270 p., [12] leaves of plates : ill., port. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Armed Forces -- Officers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Presidents -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Battles -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Kidnapping -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Statesmen -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- United States -- Revolution, 1775-1783 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Samuel Adams Drake ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026673020 ( ALEPH )
ALG5798 ( NOTIS )
04823939 ( OCLC )
02002903 ( LCCN )

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Full Text




















BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Burgoyne’s Invasion of 1777. : . . .. . §$ .50
The Taking of Louisburg ........ 50
The Battle of Gettysburg . . ...... 50
Our Colonial Homes Illustrated . . . . . . 2.50
Old Landmarks of Boston Illustrated . : . 2.00
Old Landmarks of Middlesex Illustrated . . 2.00

Captain Nelson A Romance of Colonial Days 15
The Heart of the White Mountains Illustra’d 17.50
The Same Tourists’ Edition . . . . . . . 3.00
Qld Boston Taverns Paper .. . 5 225
Around the Hub A Boys’ Book about Reston Peaee TST.)
New England Legends and Folk Lore Illus’d 2.00
The Making of New England Illustrated . . 1.50
The Making of the Great West Illustrated . 1.50
The Making of Virginia and Middle Colonies. 1.50
The Making of the Ohio Valley States Ill’d 1.50
The Pine Tree Coast Illustrated . . . . . 1.50

Any book ix the above list sent by mail, postpaid,
on receipt of price, by

LEE AND SHEPARD Boston Mass.









“FIGHTING THEIR BATTLES OvER AGAIN”



THE WATCH FIRES
Cl 76

BY

SAMUEL ADAMS DRAKE



“ The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay,
Sat by the fire and talked the night away”

Ellustrated

BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET

1895



CopyYRIGHT, 1895, BY SAMUEL ADAMS DRAKE
All Rights Reserved

Tue WatcH Fires or ’76

TYPOGRAPHY BY C. J. PETERS & SON, BOSTON.

PRESSWORK BY ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL.





CONTENTS

THE PENSION AGENT. .

THe First TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION. *.

THE FLIGHT oF HANCOCK AND ADAMS.

THE OLD CocKED Hat

THE READING MINTUE-MEN
THE Kinc’s OWN REGULARS

THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA

ETHAN ALLEN

THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY .

GERMANTOWN...
CuHew’s House . .

HUBBARDTON ....

THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER. .

A ForRTUNATE DISCOVERY

A Moruer’s Love. ....

GENERAL GATES .

THE CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH

THE KIDNAPPING OF GENERAL PRESCOTT.

AT VALLEY FORGE. .

THE FIRE IN THE REAR:
CHRISTOPHER LUDWICK

Stony Point JAcKson .
EIGE-HIRING 9,5 =.
OLp Pur’s GALLows . .
THE SECRET SERVICE.

Davip Gray, THE DouBLeE Spy .

103
110
113
117
121
127
137
140

144

172

181



v1 CONTENTS

THE SPY AND THE INNKEEPER .
CHARLEY MORGAN. . .
WavswortnH’s ESCAPE

FEMALE HEROISM ..

Tue INTREPIDITY OF Miss Ross
THE Story oF A Tory. .
THE YOUNG SENTINEL

A TEMPERANCE SERMON

Our FRENCH ALLIES .

A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS

THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN

CARMEN BELLICOSUM. ....







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



vii

PAGE
“FIGHTING THEIR BATTLES OVER AGAIN” . Frontispiece
PORTRAIT OF WASHINGTON : Se gee eee ACL /C.
THE HEAD OF A PATRIOT . . E aan aNe 2)
BUNKER-HILL MONUMENT : SUSI Eas 7
THE First TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION . coe: 8
ComMBAT AT THE CONCORD BriDGE eels
Province House .. . ; e 15
Boston Boys GuyinG a BRITISH OFFICER ee 22)
Percy MARCHING Out, APRIL 19TH : 25
Russet, House, ARLINGTON, Mass P 30
Hosmer House, Concorp, Mass . 38
A BRITISH GRENADIER . er eat
“T Fert BACK DEPRIVED OF SENSE OR MotION” . , . 44
Tue Heap oF aA TRAITOR. . . , 55
WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE Go 69
CoLoniaL Frac . . . . 5 reer G20 5 : 80
Tue CHew Housr, GERMANTOWN Be ete 81
GENERAL BURGOYNE . . . 3 ae fewer CO,
AN AMERICAN RIFLEMAN . : eae. 97
AN AMERICAN SOLDIER . eae log
THE SILVER BULLET . ae ; 108
GENERAL Horatio Gares . eae : Poe 114
EQurEsTRIAN PoRTRAIT OF WASHINGTON 136
AVES TuRP ODN Ts NG Verena yates ine fae p 6 + 141
Ruins oF Fort Putnam, West Point. . . ae S 147
“STORMING oF Stony Point ... eee Sere 153



vill LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
InmMAN House, CAMBRIDGE, Mass'. . . . .... + 162
WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS, TAPPAN, N.Y... . . 2. 1970
WEAVOR: JORIN ANID 56 6 o 0 6 6 50 0.6 0-0-0 : 173
WASHINGTON’S TREASURE CHEST -. . ....., - 178
Gis IGANG, 5 5G 6 6 0 0° 0:0 6 6 6 6 , 153
SHR ISVS COOTON 5 5 oo 2 5 96 5.0 0 © 0 6 0 0 BOR
WASHINGTON’S SERVICE SWORD, AND STAFF. . . . . . . 207
IBIRICISH 2S OL DINE Race tea ie tet ee oer en emery ee NOT
WWASIETINIGMON) IBEW 5° 5-5 ceo 0 B96 bo 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 Bei
DNV AGT ETT RANT re oe ee ee ee 0)
HIS<@) GEC SVE AC er i sees ee ee mn 2
Doe! Nari Op 178 6 6 o 6 50 6 6 » 6 6 6 0 YO
WORESHONTN, Who a 6 co 0 0 0 0 0 00.0 a 6 6 0 9 0 0 Ae
CORBWWAGHS 9 5 oo 0 0 0 6 0 o oo 6 9 6 0 8 oo BBY
WHERE THE SURRENDER Took PLACE . . ..... . . 259
SVU. © IV VE NIT pe ea ees en et ee O

SHOWIN oo oo 0 6 0 6 6 6 6b 6 6 9 0 06 6 626 AM















WATCH FIRES OF ’76

THE PENSION AGENT

SOME years ago, in the course of my rambles
among the battlefields of old Middlesex, I chanced
to fall in with a hale old gentleman of seventy, or .
thereabouts, in whose company I spent very many
happy hours. He knew the history of all the older
families of the neighborhood by heart. He had
the open sesame to all the old houses, and in not
a few cases also held the key which unlocked
closed chambers and long unused closets, in which
the family skeleton was shut out from the knowl-
edge of a gossiping world.

He told me that he had formerly been a Revolu-
tionary pension agent. Though his clients were
all dead, his occupation gone, his interest in them
had suffered no abatement, and was easily aroused.
His: gray eye would light up whenever we ap-
proached some century-old cottage, as if the bare
sight of it had made him feel twenty years younger,

or had awakened some slumbering recollection.
I



2 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

When we knocked at the door, he seemed to
expect to see one of his former clients standing,
with extended hand, on the threshold. There
was a hesitation in his manner, in his speech,
which showed all too plainly how hard it was
to realize the passing of his own generation.
Together we gleaned the country round of its
secrets. Like another Old
Mortality, he would scrape
away the clinging mosses
from some weather-beaten
headstone with loving
hand, and fall into silent
communion with himself
over the fading inscription
of “A soldier of the Rev-
olution, mustered out.”

Then, as we loitered

homeward, he would tell .
: me some little anecdote,
Tur Heap or a Parrior OF some scrap of history,

which the incident had
called up, to all of which, it is certain, I eagerly
listened.

What a pity, thought I, that all the knowledge
this man has gathered, as it fell from the lips of
those veterans, should perish with him! Upon
this thought I spoke.

“You must have accumulated a vast fund of
information, first and last,’ I suggested,







THE PENSION AGENT 3

By way of reply he threw open a closet door,
and taking down from a shelf one of half a dozen
thick folios, he let it fall on the table before me.

A cloud of light dust rose and floated around
the room, as if we had wantonly disturbed the
ashes of the dead.

I turned over the leaves with a certain feeling
of respect. Muster-rolls, enlistment papers, sworn
affidavits, letters of identification, furloughs and
the like, followed each other in rapid succession.
It was like a disbanded army again collected with-
out order or organization. It was like the head-
stones in the old graveyard across the way.

Impressed with my.idea, I put my finger, at
hazard, on a name against which, in the margin,
there was only a cross. ‘“ Who was this man,
who thus makes his mark?” asked. “Was that
common?”

“Oh,” replied the pension agent, glancing over
my shoulder, “that was my first case. Queer old
chap, that. You should have seen him come hob-
bling in here one day on his crutch. I asked him
the usual questions, made out the application in
proper form, and told him where to sign his
name. He couldn’t do it because he had lost his
right arm, and could only make his mark with
his left. :

“J then asked him for his discharge papers or
other proofs of service.

“* Proofs, proofs,’ the old fellow repeated after



4 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

me, in high dudgeon, ‘here’s one,’ touching his
empty sleeve; ‘here’s another,’ pushing back his
long, scanty white hairs, so as to uncover a deep
scar on his seamy forehead ; ‘and here’s another,
somewhere hereabouts,’ he added, fumbling with
unsteady hand at the buttons of his waistcoat.
‘What more do you want ?’

“Of course I stopped him. ‘Nothing,’ said I
mildly, ‘you need nothing more to convince me ;
but the rules of the pension office are strict, you
see, and must be complied with.’ .

_ «<«T’yve got my gun and ca’tridge-box to home,’
he said doubtfully. ;

“T told him to go home and make search for
the necessary papers. ‘ By-the-by, how did you
lose your arm?’ J asked him as he was going.

“Me? lose my arm? Oh, I lost it at the
storming of Fort Montgomery by the British.
Youve heard tell of that?’ I nodded. ‘Ah,-
that was rough and tumble! We had a cannon
trained on them, loaded chock up to the muzzle
with every kind of thing we could rake and scrape
up, even to old spikes and horseshoes. I was
cannoneer. I was chuckling to myself a thinkin’

_ what kind of a grist we would give them, when up
they come a-hoorarin like time. Says I to my-
self, now’s your time, Jake; give it to ’em. Just
as I was touchin’ her off, a musket-ball from the
‘enemy broke this arm, thug! Like a fool I let
the match drop to the ground. “Steady,” says I



THE PENSION AGENT 5

to myself; “that cannon’s got to be fired.” I
snatched up the match with my left hand, saw it
was lighted, gave it a switch to make sure, and
touched off the piece at the very instant the
enemy were rushing into the fort, shouting, ‘‘ Give
the rebel rascals no quarter!’’ When the smoke
blew off, not a living soul was to be seen nowhere
near. You can tell them that’s why I have to
make my mark. I never learned how to write
with my left hand.’”

“Bravo! I hope he got his pension,” I cried.

“Oh, yes, he got it; but I had a deal of trouble
to establish his claim, all the same. Red tape is
no respecter of persons.”

“The hand that wrote this signature must have
shaken terribly,” I remarked, seeing that my host
had finished. ‘“ What do you make of it?” I
asked. :

“No wonder you're puzzled. That’s Starbuck
Ramsdell. The boys used to call him Old Buck-
ram, for short. ‘Joe,’ he used to say to me, ‘I’ve
settled down in three States. I left one leg in
the Jarseys, an arm in Virginny, and the rest of
me is here in old Massachusetts.’ He used to ask
the parson if he thought a man like him would -
find himself all together on resurrection day.

“Well, when Ramsdell applied to me for his
papers, I asked-him where he had served. Some-
how that question always nettled those old sol-
diers. They seemed to think you were playing



6 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

with them. Poor old Buckram! He was over
eighty, nearly blind, and hardly able to help
himself. He flew up in a moment.

“«Why, first,’ said he, ‘in the old French War. ,
Put that down.’

«««Qh,’ said I, ‘you can’t get a pension for that.
You must have served in the Revolutionary
army.’

« I was at Bunker Hill, afterwards at Long Island,
and the taking of the Hessians at Trenton. Have
you got that down?’

“¢Ves, in black and white.’

««That’s right. Then I was at the attack on
Germantown, in the battle of Monmouth, and
finally at the siege of Yorktown, in Virginia;
and,’ added the old man, his eyes rekindling with
the fire of 76, ‘I was the first American sentinel
placed at the quarters of Lord Cornwallis when
he became an American prisoner.’ ”

Before leaving him, I made my friend promise
to tell me as many more of these stories as he
could remember, and it was accordingly agreed
that we should meet every Thursday evening for

. the purpose; he meanwhile refreshing his memory
by a reperusal of his old documents; while I,
fully alive to the conviction that individual valor
and heroism had never had half the recognition
they deserved, made up my mind that love of
country could have no nobler inspiration than in







THE PENSION AGENT 7

these homely tales of the Continental rank and
file. Brave veterans! those of us who, in our
own generation, have striven to uphold the totter-
ing fabric that your devotion had reared, salute
you!





8 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION



On my part, I took good care that the pension
agent should not forget his promise. -

«Since you were here,” said he at our next
meeting, “I have been ransacking my memory as
well as my old documents ; and, as luck would have
it, I have found some minutes of several informal
meetings, held at the old village tavern, years and
years ago. In fact, I had forgotten all about
them. The tavern was a place of much resort
for my clients, the veterans; but at first it was
like pulling teeth to get them to talk at all; nor
would they until I had broken the ice myself.
Now imagine yourself in that tavern, and fancy
that you hear them talking through my lips,
if you can.” With this preamble he thus pro-
ceeded : —

“Among other relics of the old Revolutionary
times, sacredly preserved in the State House at
Boston, is an old king’s arm with a history. No
soldier would ever dream of carrying such a
clumsy affair nowadays; indeed, visitors are often



THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE “REVOLUTION 9

heard to remark that the gun looks as if it would
do greater hurt to the one who should fire it than
the'one fired at ; yet it was with just such weapons
as this that the battle was won and independence
achieved. I will give you the story of this mus-
ket as well as I can; because from seeing it ex-
hibited in so public a place, visitors are naturally
curious about it. :

“Now, this old rusty king’s arm is something
more than a musket. To be sure, I cannot well
explain the curious association that exists between
a thing made of wood, iron, and brass, and the
event in which it may have borne a part. But so
it is. I should call it a sort of conductor between
mind and matter. For instance, at the Springfield
arsenal you will probably see thousands of mus-
kets. Yet who cares for them? Now, with this
one it is different. It is a sort of talisman to the
memory. Give it but a rub, and, like the magi-
cian’s lamp in the tale, it whisks you away in an
instant across the gulf of time. The past lives
again, and you live in it.”

Thus spoke the pension agent, whose business
had often taken him to the State House, there to
delve among the musty archives of that past of
which he had become almost a part himself.

It is an episode of the Nineteenth of April,
1775 — the beginning of the war for independence,



10 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

the ending of British dominion over her American
colonies. If, now, it should appear that this very
musket had fired the first shot, people would look
upon it with almost superstitious awe. But of
that we are not quite certain. It may or may not
be so.

Everybody knows that Hancock and Adams
were staying at the Rev. Jonas Clark’s house on
the night of the 18th. Hancock’s sweetheart was
staying there too. You can put this and that
together as well as I.

During that afternoon several British officers
were seen riding up the main road in the town.
This aroused the suspicions of some of our people,
who knew them to be British officers, although
they were so disguised as to look like honest
men.

Very early in the morning word was brought
to Hancock and Adams that a British force was
on the way to Lexington, designed, it was sup-
posed, to get possession of their persons, and also
to destroy the military stores at Concord. In
fact, it could mean nothing else. First one mes-
senger rode up in hot haste, then another, both
with the same startling story —“The regulars
are coming!” “The regulars are coming!”

They had been seen getting under arms, had
been watched while crossing the bay, and were
now, no doubt, well on their march, which they
hoped and expected would be as complete a sur-



THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 11

prise as General Gage had meant it should be.
On their way up to Concord they could easily lay
hands on those two arch-rebels, Hancock and
Adams, clap a pair of handcuffs on each one of
them, destroy the stores, overawe the people by
this display of force, and presto, the infant rebel-
lion would be strangled in its cradle. That was
General Gage’s logic.

“Man proposes and God disposes.” The mes-
sengers had only succeeded in passing the pickets
by the skin of their teeth, and by hard riding had
got far ahead of the marching column, setting
the church bells ringing, rousing people in a fright
from their beds, and spreading the alarm as they
went, from village to village, and from door to
door. And still on they went.

All that, every schoolboy knows so well that
it is hardly worth while to repeat it here.

About that musket. John Parker, yeoman, was
captain of the Lexington company of minute-
men. There never was a better name given, as
every man was pledged to turn out at a minute’s
notice. Well, the alarm was soon spreading on
every side; and, as the enemy’s force was reported
to be very large, besides warning the minute-men,
messengers were sent off through the town, call-
ing out the regular militiamen as well. The church
bell on the green also struck up, sounding ten
times louder and more startling than it ever did in
the daytime. Lights were soon flashing in the



12 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

windows, windows went up, doors flew open, and
voices were heard timidly asking what was the
matter. No more sleep that night.

Captain Parker lived about two and a half
miles from the meeting-house on the Common,
which was the place of rendezvous agreed upon
in case of an alarm. He had been there late in
the evening to see Hancock and Adams about
calling out his men, in case it should be neces-
sary. Parker went to bed late, feeling quite ill.
About two o’clock he was called up by the mes-
sengers referred to, and went in haste to the meet-
ing-house. There he formed his company on the
Common, a little after daybreak, and ordered the
roll called. About a hundred and twenty men
-answered to their names, armed and equipped ;
but as some doubted the truth of the reports
brought in, Parker dismissed them, with the order
to be within call, ready to fall in at the tap of the
drum. Not long after, one of his own scouts re-
turned, bringing the startling news that the British
were close at hand.

Parker then ordered the drum beat in front of
the tavern, near by the Common. It is there
now. Seventy men fell in, were formed in four
platoons, and marched into the Common to the
music of a fife and drum. Parker’s nephew, Jona-
than Harrington, then a lad of sixteen, played the
fife that morning.

After forming his men in line, Parker ordered







THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 13

them to load with powder and ball. There was a
famous rattling of ramrods. When this was done,
he said, “ Men, don’t fire unless fired upon; but if
they want war, let it begin now and here.” He
then took his station at a little in front of the
company’s right wing, and waited.



CoMBAT aT THE CONCORD BRIDGE

Soon the British came marching up, in full view,
with Pitcairn on his horse at their head. Some
of Parker’s men were so terrified that they began
to slink off out of harm’s way. Seeing this, the
captain drew his sword, and calling on them by
name to come back, said he would order the first
man shot who should show the white feather.

You know what followed —the fire of the Brit-



14 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

ish, the return of the fire, the killing of eight of
Parker’s company, his order to them to disperse
and to take care of themselves.

After they were gone, the British soldiers gave
three loud cheers, and halted for half an hour or
so to eat their breakfasts, after which they marched
off at a quick step for Concord. But they came
back quicker.

Upon their leaving the ground, Captain Parker
and his men came back, took up the dead, looked
after the wounded, and tried to realize what had
happened. Bloodshed had happened ; death had
stricken down the flower of the little village ; war
had begun. Where would it all end?

Then it was that fear left the breast of every
‘true man, and thirst for revenge steeled every
true heart. The minute-men grasped their mus-
kets, and followed on after the royal troops. Cap-
tain Parker saw a British soldier, who had loitered
behind, sitting by the roadside. The man was too
far gone in drink to keep up with the marching
column. Parker instantly seized and disarmed
him. Besides his musket, he carried a knapsack,
blankets, haversack, and cartridge-box, with sixty
rounds of ammunition in it. Captain Parker kept
them as the spoils of war, as did also his son, and
so likewise his grandson, before they finally passed
into the keeping of the State of Massachusetts.
This is that very same musket.

“A great affair, truly,’ said I, when I saw he







THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 15

had finished his story, “to take away a helpless
man’s gun!”

“Never mind,’ he returned, with a quiet
chuckle, “it was the first trophy of the Revolu-
tion — the very first.”





16 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS

My father was town clerk, justice of the peace,
and general factotum for all the country round;
the man, in short, to whom everybody goes for
advice. He knew every family in the county —
knew all about them away back as far’as the first
settler of the name. After the battle of Lexing-
ton he took down the depositions of a number of
his townspeople whose houses had either been
burned or plundered, or both; for at that time it
was the very general expectation that these losses
would be made good to them.

Sometimes, of an evening, mother would glance
up from her knitting-work at father’s face, and if
she thought he was in the right mood, would say
to him, ‘‘ Father, why can’t you tell the children
about -those folks who used to live down by the
Hollow, on the Woburn road ?”’

“What folks ?”

“Oh, you know who I mean— those women
down there, who helped Hancock and Adams to
get away so cleverly on the night after the battle
was fought.”

We all knew that father was only making
believe, for he dearly loved to tell a story, and, for





THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS 17

that matter, few could tell one better. So we all
teased him to begin.

“Oh, that’s an old story,’ he would say
evasively.

“What if itis? I want these children to know
that the men-folks were not the only ones who
faced dangers, and went through hardships, for
their country’s sake,’ mother would very earnestly
reply.

As near as I can recollect, the tale ran about as
follows : —

It was late on that night of the Nineteenth of
April, 1775. Mrs. Vallette and her friend Mrs.
Reed were sitting over a few dying embers, in
their home at Lexington, with their infants in
their arms. The clock had struck eleven — guns”
had been heard throughout the day —the firing
had ceased ; and they sat talking over the perils
of the times, when Mrs. Reed said, “Hark! I
hear footsteps.”

“Tt is only the rustling of the trees, and we will
not be needlessly alarmed,” said Mrs. Vallette,
pressing at the same time her infant closer to her
heart, as if fearful it might be wrested from her,
and trying to assume a courage which she did
not feel.

At that moment a gentle rap at the door was
heard.

“ Who is there ?”’ asked Mrs. Reed, in a tremu-
lous tone, hardly above a whisper.



18 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

“Friends,” replied a low voice, speaking through
the small hole where the cord had been drawn in
to prevent the lifting of the latch outside, for few
doors had locks and keys in those simple times.

They immediately opened the door; and three
men, each muffled in a long cloak, entered in pro-
found silence.

“Do not be alarmed, ladies,” said one, in the
same low tone of voice; “we are friends to our
country, and are pursued by the enemy; we have
hid in the woods through the day, and have come
now to seek your bounty, and a shelter for the
night.”

« And these you should have with all my heart,”
said Mrs. Reed, whose countenance brightened
up when she found that instead of the dreaded
enemy, her guests were those distinguished pa-
triots, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and Paul
Revere. ‘But,’ she continued, ‘you would not
be safe here a moment. Why, the redcoats are
prowling around us in every direction ; they were
here only yesterday, eating up all my pies, and
bread and cheese, and because they could not find
enough at my neighbors’ to satisfy their hunger,
they must needs rip open their beds, and leave
their cider running out. Oh, sir, these are dread-
ful times !”’

“They are, indeed, madam,” said Mr. Hancock.
“But, gentlemen,” he said, turning to his com-
panions, “what shall we do, for it is certain we
are not safe here ?”





THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS 19

They looked at each other, but did not speak.

“ Flave you any neighbors,” asked Mr. Hancock,
“where we might find safety for the night?”

“None except my father,” replied Mrs. Reed,
“who lives five miles off, on the main road. It
would be dangerous for you to go by the road, and
you could not find your way through the woods ;
and we have neither man nor boy to guide you ;
they have all gone to fight the redcoats.”

“Will you stay alone and nurse my baby,”
asked Mrs. Vallette of her friend, “while I go
and show these gentlemen the way?”

She answered, “I will do so, though it is sad to
be alone in such dangerous times. But you must
not go; you are not able, you are lame, and never
walked a mile at once in your life; you must not
think of going on this wet night.” Mrs. Vallette
had had the misfortune to fall and break her back,
and was ever afterward an invalid and a cripple.

Mrs. Vallette made no reply ; she knew there
was not a moment to be lost ; so laying her infant
in the arms of her friend, she wrapped her riding-
hood ‘around her, and desired the gentlemen to
~ follow her.

When they saw this deformed little woman, not
more than four feet high, prepared to walk a dis-
tance of over three miles, they looked at each
other in astonishment; but not a word was spoken,
for the case was desperate.

Mrs. Vallette, taking the proffered arm of Mr.



20 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

Hancock, they went forward, the other two gen-
tlemen bringing up the rear. The rain which had
fallen for some days previous, had so swelled the
brooks, that the gentlemen were obliged at times
to lift Mrs. Vallette overthem. Thus wading and
walking, they reached the farm-house at about
three o'clock in the morning.

No sooner had they aroused the family, and
made known who they were and what they
wanted, than every one was up and in motion ;
and even the dog tried to show them by his gam-
bols that they should find protection. A blazing
fire soon shone forth on the hearth, and a plenti-
ful repast was provided; and notwithstanding the
gloominess of the times, a degree of cheerfulness,
and even humor, pervaded the little company.

At early dawn a carriage was prepared to con-
vey Mrs. Vallette home to her infant. Mr. Han-
cock politely lifted her into the carriage, and said,
“Madam, our first meeting has been in trouble-
some times. God only knows when these scenes
will end; but should we both survive the struggle,
and you should ever need a friend, think of me.”

“There, children,” said mother triumphantly.
“Tt was a woman who saved King Charles from
his enraged pursuers ; and it was a woman who
led the proscribed American patriots to a place
of safety.”

“Do tell!” said father dryly.



THE OLD COCKED HAT 21

THE OLD COCKED HAT

HeERE’s another story of Concord Fight, as told
by one of my pensioners.

A Boston boy, I was born in an old house on
Copp’s Hill, near the burying-ground, which, I can
promise you, I gave a wide berth after dark. I
lived with my grandparents, my own father hav-
ing been lost at sea. The old folks used to give
me the run of the house; and many is the romp.
I’ve had, playing hide-and-seek around the huge
chimney-stack in the garret, knocking my head
against the big, cobwebbed rafters, from which
all sorts of old cast-off clothes were hanging limp
and forlorn. How they did scare me!

Being a boy, what most charmed me in this
museum of antiquities was an old sword, with the
blade peeping out at the end of the scabbard, just
like Jim Bolles the tinker’s toes out of his boots.
It went beyond my small strength to draw it, so
firmly was the weapon rusted in the sheath; but
with it loosely belted round me, and dragging on
the floor behind me, and an old cocked hat —
which to my surprise fitted me exactly — stuck on
my head, I doubt if any veteran just returned
from victorious fields ever felt prouder than I.



22 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

But we know it is not the sword alone that
makes the soldier, any more than it is the dress
that makes the man.

One day, equipped as I have described, I ven-
tured down-stairs to where grandfather was sitting
by the fireside smoking his pipe, with one eye
shut, and with the other meditatively watching
the smoke slowly curling upward along the low
ceiling. At the clatter on the stairs, and the
queer figure I cut, the old man took his pipe from
his mouth, straightened himself up, and when I
had made him a mock salute, said with a quiet
chuckle, —

. Well,. lad, ready for action, I see. Do you
mean to attack our old four-post bedstead, or will
you try a bout with the pump, out in the back-
yard?”

“ But, grandpa,” said I, “where in the wide
world did you get this rusty old sword, and this
funny old hat?”

“Come here, boy,” said the old man; and tak-
ing from my head the thing which appeared so
ridiculous to me, he put his finger through a hole
I had not before noticed, and said very gravely,
“two inches lower, and the bullet would have
gone through my head.”

“Where? when?” I breathlessly exclaimed,
quite overcome by the thought of grandfather’s
narrow escape, as well as by the impressive way
in which he spoke of it.

d















Boston Boys GuyinG A BRITISH OFFICER







THE OLD COCKED HAT 23

“ At Concord Fight, in the year °75. You've
read of that,.my boy, in your Be book, I'll be
bound.”

“To be sure I have; and about General Gage
and Pitcairn, and the minute-men. It is also
called the Battle of Lexington. Oh, do, grandpa,
tell me all about it. You don’t know how I love
to hear you talk about war and battles.”

“Well, tis an old story. But sit down, my boy,
and.listen. You shall hear my first experience of
strife and bloodshed.

Grandfather gave the backlog a stir, refilled his
pipe, settled himself comfortably back in the old
rush-bottomed chair, and thus began : —

“T was just fourteen in April, ’75, and lived in
this same house, built by my grandfather a hun-
dred years before. On my way to and from
school, I passed every day the barracks of the
king’s soldiers, for at that time Boston was a gar-
risoned town. Some of them were always loiter-
ing about, and I grew quite accustomed to hear
myself called a young rebel by the redcoat gen-
try. But my cheeks would burn for many a long
hour after. I must not forget to mention that I
had got acquainted with a boy of about my own
age, called Tony Apthorp, drummer-boy of the
Welsh Fusileers, who now and then invited me
into the barracks, and had even taught me how to
beat the drum a little.

“One fine morning I started off for school, as



24 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

usual. When I got to the barracks, the redcoats
were forming out in the street as if for parade;
but even I, boy that I was, knew by their faces
that something unusual was going on. The ser-
geants were serving out ammunition, while the
goat of the corps, a prime favorite with us boys,
was loudly bleating in the barrack-yard. Such a
look as Tony gave me! not a bit like his usual
mocking expression. Even the surly old drum-
major let me pass without a word. I was lost in
wonder.

“While I stood looking at the men,— some of
whom were buttoning their gaiters, others trying
‘ the locks of their muskets, —an aid came down
the street at full gallop.

“«Ffalloo, there, Royals!’ said he; ‘where is
your officer ?’

« A sergeant stepped out of the ranks, and made
a salute. The officer then ordered the detachment
to march; but the men did not stir a step.

«Does he take us for raw recruits, like him-
self?’ growled some of those grizzled veterans.

“Tt is his excellency’s command,’ said the aid
angrily, starting off as fast as his horse could
carry him.

“«Vou should have said so at first, young
greenhorn,’ muttered the old sergeant, fixing his ~°
bayonet. ‘Come along, lads, come along; the
general must not be kept waiting.’

“The soldiers shouldered their firelocks, and











APRIL 19TH

?

ARCHING OUT

Percy M





THE OLD COCKED HAT 25

took their way towards the Common. I soon lost
sight of them in a turn of the street.

“ When I reached the schoolhouse door, I found
it shut fast. A group of wondering urchins were
loitering there, each asking the other the mean-
ing of these strange proceedings. But we were
true schoolboys, and, provided our holiday did not
disappoint us, cared not a button where it came
from. Just then an upper window. was thrown
open, and the schoolmaster called out to us : —

“ «Boys, war has begun ; school is dismissed!’

«« Some one proposed that we should follow the
‘rig’lars ;’ a proposal no sooner made than agreed
to. Away we scampered, in the route the troops
‘had just taken. By this time every one we met
seemed strangely excited ; and I scarcely remem-
bered that I would not have ventured above the
mill-bridge the day before, for fear of a sound
drubbing from the South End boys.

“When we came near the Common, a long line
of soldiers extended to the head of the mall in
Long-Acre, and in their midst were two brass
cannon I had so often gazed at with admiration
and awe. At command of Lord Percy, the rig’lars
shouldered their muskets, and moved off towards
the Neck. We boys followed on in the rear, tak-
ing care to keep a good distance behind the
marching column. I well remember that the fifes
struck up ‘ Yankee Doodle,’ as they often did, just
to plague our people,



26 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

“By this time the whole town knew that the
tig’lars had gone out the night before to destroy
the stores at Concord, and that Lord Percy had
been sent to re-enforce them. It was just as we
came to the George Tavern that I noticed a small
boy seated astride a fence, laughing so immoder-
ately I felt sure he must be a born idiot, for I
assure you I saw nothing to laugh at.

« «What are you laughing at, sirrah?’ demanded
his lordship sternly.

«To think how you'll dance to another tune
by and by,’ replied the young scape-grace, scam-
pering off, out of harm’s way.

“Lord Percy gave his horse the spur, and gal-
loped off to the front, as if these idle words had
called up something in his mind he would rather
have forgotten at that moment. If you should
ever read the old ballad of ‘Chevy Chase,’ you
will understand what I mean.

“We had got quite through Little Cambridge,
now Brighton, when an express from General
Gage overtook the troops. The courier rode
straight up to the earl, and, lifting his hat, deliv-
ered his errand in a few hurried words. His lord-
ship turned in his saddle, and exclaimed, —

“On! press on! God’s life, gentlemen! we
shall be too late!’

“Urged on by their officers, the soldiers marched
silently and with a quickened pace. The road
was deserted. Every house was shut up. Nota





THE OLD COCKED HAT 27

living soul was to be seen as we passed by. Now
and then our ears caught the sound of some dis-
tant alarm bell. Once in a while we even thought
we could catch the report of distant gunshots. At
hearing these ill-omened noises in the air, some of
our comrades began to lag behind, but a few of us
kept on, more because we wouldn’t give ourselves
the time to think, than from superior courage.
Boys will be boys, you know. We soon reached
the bridge leading to the colleges, and I heard
the word passed to halt, prime, and load. The
cannoneers lighted their matches. These orders
being executed, the troops impatiently awaited
the word to march; but it did not come. The
officers impatiently slashed the bushes by the
roadside with their swords, and demanded of each
other what was up.

“
“ «Then the rebels mean to make a stand here,’
said another.

“Tis what I most wish for, next to my din-
ner,’ ejaculated a third.

““My throat is full of this infernal Yankee
dust,’ observed a fourth, carrying his well-filled
canteen to his lips. ‘Here’s confusion to the
whole rebel crew!’

“The bridge was soon made passable, and the
troops crossed. Before we followed, I picked up
a handful of musket-balls where. they had stood.
At the colleges, an officer sternly forbade our fol-



28 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

lowing the column farther; and as we were thor-
oughly tired out, after quenching our thirst at a
neighboring well, we threw ourselves down upon
the grass to rest.

“The rig’lars were hardly out of sight, when the
roads in every direction seemed swarming with
men, some in little squads of two’s and three’s,
some with the semblance of military order, but all
armed with muskets or fowling-pieces, and every
one looking eager and determined. They halted,
by common consent, on the college green. An
angry murmur of many voices, every instant
growing more and more threatening, came out of
the throng, as their numbers increased. They
seemed undecided what to do next.

“«« The bridge is where we ought to have stopped
them,’ I heard one strapping fellow call out.

«So we might, if the planks hadn’t been piled
up on the wrong side; too bad, too bad!’

“A roar of rage and disappointment went up
from two hundred lusty throats. It subsided ina
moment, and I heard a voice, very calm, but clear
asa bell, speaking rapidly. Every word cut like
a whip-lash.

“ the two detachments from forming a junction, as
I hoped we might; but so long as we’re between
them and their quarters, shall we let them march.
back unscathed? Hark!’ The distant booming
of a cannon broke the stillness. The speaker, who



THE OLD COCKED HAT 29

had been standing quietly in the middle of the
minute-men, now pushed _ his way out of the
throng. Oh, he was a beautiful looking young
man, armed with a fusee and hanger.

“< Why do we stand here idle, when our
brethren are being slaughtered by the king’s
cut-throats? We have them between two fires.
Let all who are willing to strike one good blow
for liberty, follow me!’

“ How brave he looked as he said this, his eye
sparkling, his fine form drawn up to its full
height! I thought I had never beheld such an
heroic countenance.

“Ay, avenge them! Down with the bloody-
backs!’ shouted the multitude.

“Lead us on, Doctor!’ cried several voices ;
and I then knew it was Warren who had first
spoken,

“Waving his fusee toward the enemy, Warren
put himself at the head of our people, who started
off at a brisk pace up the road. As excited as the
rest, without a moment’s reflection, I joined them.
We soon heard firing at no great distance. By
our leader’s advice, we now made a circuit across
the fields so as to reach the road again unperceived
at a point where it descends from a great pile of
granite ledges into the plain. It is what military
men call a defile. Here we concealed ourselves
among the bushes and trees, on both sides of the
road, Indian fashion. The place where we lay



30 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

hid is known as the Foot of the Rocks, to this
day.

“Cannon firing now grew rapid and clearer.
At every peal my heart
gave a great thump;
but I tell you, boy, I
had little idea of what
was coming.

“«There they are!’
“Sure enough, there











RusseLL Housz, ARLINGTON, Mass.

With cellar-way showing bullet-holes. (Eleven Americans were killed at
this house.)

they were, coming down the narrow road in a
cloud of dust, and that cloud spitting out fire
right and left. Every house they came to was



THE OLD COCKED HAT 31

saluted with a volley; and we were maddened to
desperation by the sight of feeble womén, with
babes in their arms, flying shrieking across the
' fields, while these miscreants fired and hooted at
them, like so many demons let loose. Then up
would leap the red flames from the dwellings that
those poor, terrified creatures had just quitted.”

The old man had kept his pipe lighted, giving
now and then an angry whiff between whiles ; but
he had now got so worked up over his recollec-
tions, that he bit the stem of his pipe short off.

“Don’t stop, grandpa! How did it end?” J
exclaimed.

“Waal, boy, we just let the rig’lars clear our
hiding-place, and then, with a yell of rage, our
men fell on their rear. I forgot I had no earthly
weapon but a stout hickory stick, and shouted,
and rushed into the thickest of the mé/ée with the
rest. The first thing I knew, the soldiers faced
about, and gave us a volley slap in our faces. I
thought the day of judgment had come, sartin’
sure. How like fiends they looked, panting with
rage and heat, and with faces: begrimed with
powder and dirt! Well, I guess we looked as
wicked to them as they did to us.

“ An officer on horseback waved the rig’lars on,
his sword in one hand, his hat in the other.

“*Upon them, my gallant Fusileers! Give
them the cold steel! Drive the rebel pack to
their kennels !’



32 LHE WATCH FIRES OF "76

“*Down with the murderers! Kill the assas-
sins !’ we yelled back at them. I jest tell you,
bullets and curses flew thick and fast that day.
Oh, we peppered them good, and they know it!

“The soldiers were actually pushed along by
our onset, some falling every instant under the
deadly fire. Presently, a shot knocked the officer
from his horse, at which a cheer went up from
our side. Then we made another rush, and forced
the enemy toarun. A poor devil of a drummer-
boy was just in front of me. I sprang upon him,
and brought him to the ground. Lo and behold!
it was Tony, my chum of the Royals. It was the
work of an instant to take away his drum, put it
on, and then to follow the throng, beating the
charge like a drummer gone mad. My prisoner
kept close at my heels. Our people saw my
capture, and heard my drum. As for me, I
hurrahed myself hoarse, and got this hole in my
hat.”

Here the old man paused, quite breathless,

“Plague on’t!’’ he at length exclaimed; “here’s
my pipe gone out, and the fire too. What’ll
granny say?”





THE READING MINUTE-MEN 33

THE READING MINUTE-MEN

Tue pension agent now invited me to consider
myself as listening to the pensioners themselves.

Deacon Adoniram Short, who, by the way,
stood some six feet two in his blue yarn stock-
ings, having pleaded conscientious scruples against
drawing lots to see who should tell the next story,
was finally persuaded into telling one of his own
free choice. Like some other people whom I
have known, he only needed a little coaxing.
After leaning back in his chair as far as safety to
his long person would permit, and dovetailing his
hands together as a support to the back of his
very bald head, he delivered himself as follows :—

“TI s’pose, friends, you’ve all heard how Colo-
nel Barrett’s house, up in Concord town, was one
of the places where our ammunition was stored
agin’ the time when we should give it to the
British. If they'd only waited a little longer
they might have had it for nuthin’!

“Well, tew days before they come out, I
hauled an even ton of bullets, with my tew old
hosses, over from Reading. I lived in Reading
then, and done teaming when I could get it.



34 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

When I got to Colonel Barrett’s, they told me to
drive over yon into the rye-field, where some
men in their shirt-sleeves were hard at work dig-
ging a big hole in the ground. They told me to
dump the bullets into the hole, and I done it.

*« Vou don’t expect ’em to sprout without pow-
der, do ye?’ said I to one of the diggers, who
was shovelling the dirt back into the hole, and
stamping it down with his feet.

“« Dunno, mebbe so; some say they come up
first rate if you don’t plant too deep,’ he replied
with a sort o’ knowing wink at me. ‘At any rate,
they won't spile.’

“Waal, says I, winking back at him, ‘if that’s
so, I'll jest take a handful home for seed.’ So off
I drove.

“T b’longed to our minute-company. I was
corporal. Captain Brooks was our captain, Dave
Butters orderly sergeant. There was seventy-five
of us, all big, strong fellows, who didn’t take no
dare from nobody, either drillin’ or shootin’ at a
mark. Our captain was clear grit through and
through, if he was a doctor; and we all sot as
much by him as anybody could. And I guess he
did by us.

“After ['d put up my team, I went over to
have a little talk with the captain.

«Hello, Shorty, is that you?’ he sung out,
when I poked my head into his office. ‘Come

in.’



THE READING MINUTE-MEN 35

“*It’s me, Cap,’ says I, ‘and I’m goin’ to put a
flea in your ear.’ I then up and told him where
I had been, and what goings-on I had seen.

“His tone changed in a minute. ‘Corporal
Short, notify your platoon to report for duty at
the meeting-house after dark to-night. You know
where the key is kept?’ I nodded so; he went
on: ‘You keep watch by reliefs till sun-up. If
nothing happens by that time you can go home.
Take care I don’t catch one of you napping; if I
do, I'll break him. Now go warn your men. Off
with you!’

“There was mischief brewing. I see it in his eye.

“Nothing happened that night. The captain
didn’t come round, though, ’cause as soon’s ’twas
dark he’d saddled his old bay mare and rode off
to Boston full tilt. Next day he was back again,
lookin’ sober as a— as a—

“«Say deacon,’ some one suggested, seeing
Adoniram halting for a word.

“Well, deacon, then,’ Adoniram continued,
chuckling a little to himself. ‘Well, the cap’ he
came back chock full of something he’d picked up
in Boston. He rode round town as usual, making
calls on his patients, but somehow or other most
all his patients that day were minute-men. At
each house, it was noticed, he left the same pre-
scription: ‘To-night; Weston’s corner; sixty
rounds.’ At each house visited he received the
same response, ‘We shall be there.’



36 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“On his way home the captain stopped before
the minister’s gate. The parson came out lookin’
as stiff as a drum-major, and the two men held a
whispered talk together.

“The parson stood with his hand on the horse’s
mane, looking up into the young captain’s face till
he had done speaking.

“« These are fine words you have just spoken ;
but will you have the courage to repeat them to
others besides an old man like me?’

*««Tn the face
of all the world,
and even of my
Maker.’

“<«Well said.
I have waited
long for this
visit and for just
such areply. But —pardon me— if worst comes
to worst, do you think you can be cool on the
ground?’



PITCAIRN’S PISTOLS

“*T do not know. But you may depend upon
it, that if I do lose my head, it will always be at
the front.’

“*God be with you, then. Good-night.’

“¢ Good-night.’

“The men began stealing off for the rendez-
vous as soon as it grew dark, As I’d been on
duty all night before, the captain said he’d excuse
me, on my promise to be at the rendezvous bright
and early in the morning.



THE READING MINUTE-MEN 37

“T was just putting. the bridle on Old Calico,
when I heard the clatter of a horse going by the
house at a great rate, as if he’d run away. While
I was listenin’, somebody shouted out at the top
of his voice, ‘Turn out! turn out! the rig’lars are
comin’ !?

“Tn five minutes the meetin’-house bell struck
up at a lively rate. In ten, the whole village was
turned topsy-turvy. When I got outdoors every-
body was a-streakin’ it for the green, where the
courier sat on his steamin’ horse with a crowd
around him, all talkin’ and gesticulatin’ at once.
The parson he stood on the top step of the porch
with a gun in his hand.

“Just as I turned my horse’s head down the
road, my wife, Marthy, ran out to the gate. She
had one corner of her apron in her mouth, and
looked as if she was goin’ to bust right out cryin’.

“«Come back you, Adoniram,’ sez she. ‘You
ain’t goin’ off lookin’ so. How ’shamed I should
be to have you taken up dead with that old waist-
coat on.’

“TI got to the rendezvous: Nobody there, so
I pushed on quicker ; and a mile or two further
on, where the road crosses the Widow Peters’s
medder (she had money fell to her), I overtook our
boys. I put up my horse in her barn, and j’ined
the company.

“Whenever we halted for a minute or two’s
rest, we could hear the sound of distant bells or



38 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

blowin’ of horns, and now and then a gun-shot
would crack away. That made us move on all
the faster. We were 'fraid the fightin’ would
be. all over before we could take a hand in it.

“When we got to where our road and the
one from Chelmsford come together, we fell in
with Colonel Bridge, to whose regiment we be-
longed. -

“We were glad enough to see them, and they
us. .‘There come the man-eaters!’ we hollered
out to them.

“«What do you know about war? You never
fired a gun!’ they hollered back.

“The regiment, or as much of it as Bridge had
been able to get together, was also on the march
to Concord. Captain Brooks saluted, and reported
for orders. Colonel Bridge said to him, ‘I’m glad
you’ve come up, Captain: we will halt here, give
our men some refreshment, and then push on
for Concord.’ To this Brooks replied, ‘My men
have just refreshed themselves; and as I think
there is no time to be lost, with your leave,
Colonel, I will push ahead; and, as neither of -us
knows just what is going on over there, if I
should get into trouble, I shall know that you
are following me, and shall have you to fall back
upon.’ ‘You may go,’ the colonel replied, ‘ but
be careful not to get too far ahead.’

’“QOur captain then ordered us forward again.

“We had gone astrong mile, I should say, when





Hosmer House, Concorp, Mass.



THE READING MINUTE-~MEN 39

we met a courier, looking for us. In afew hurried
words he told the captain how matters stood, how
the enemy (for as such they had now shown them-
selves) had fired upon our men, how the fire had
been returned, and how, if we expected. to do any
good, now was our time. Nota man of us could
stand still. The news made us as skittish as a lot
of two-year-old colts.

“ As luck would have it, we had arrived in time
to intercept the villains.

“* Ride back, as hard as you can, till you meet
Colonel Bridge. Tell him what you've told me.
Don’t spare the spur. Away with you!’

“We halted only long enough to load. Every
man looked well to his priming. Every face was
set for what was coming. As I was feelin’ pretty
fresh, I was sent on ahead, with a file of men, to
see what we could scare up.

“When we had come quite near to the main road
from Concord to Lexington, we saw some seventy
or eighty men, making their way across a hillside,
which rose between us and the village. They
seemed to be watching us. ‘They were redcoats
retreating.

“Captain Brooks at first took these men for some
scattered party of ourown. The fact Is, they were
the enemy’s flankers. He therefore halted us,
until he discovered his mistake, which he soon
did upon seeing this flank-guard fall in with the
main body, to cross a bridge down the road, below



40 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

the hill which had hid them from us. The enemy
was in full retreat.

“Finding his position could not be outflanked,
Brooks then ordered us to advance to Merriam’s
Corner, where we were covered by a barn and
some stone walls (for all I know the old barn’s
there now).; and as soon as we were securely
posted, he gave the order to fire straight at the
crowded bridge, not more than twenty or thirty
rods off. We let ’em hev.

“ As the enemy were in a great hurry, they fired
only one volley at us in return. They shot wild.
Our men took deliberate aim, and every shot told.
After they had all crossed the bridge we followed
them up, loading and firing, and either on or near
it, nine dead bodies were lying where they had
fallen, unde: the unerring aim of the Reading
minute-men.” i

«That just about squared the account for those
of our men killed on Lexington Green, without
provocation, in the morning,” observed one of
the deacon’s most interested listeners.

“How great a matter a little fire kindleth,”
added another.









A BRITISH GRENADIER, 1775







THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 4l

‘THE KING'S OWN REGULARS

“One story’s good till another’s told,” said

Jotham Beard, contemplatively punching the fire
with his iron-shod staff. “Now, for my part, I
always like to hear both sides, then you can put
this and that together, and perhaps get the rights
of it.”
“Don’t you b’leeve what your own folks say?
I do,” remarked Reddy, rather testily. “Id
b’leeve the deacon, here, ten times over, before I
would a Britisher,” he added.

“That reminds me of the Dutch judge, out in
York State, who was trying a case of assault and
battery. He refused to hear the defendant’s
counsel, because he said he could decide the case
so much better by hearing only one side.”

There was a ripple of laughter at Reddy’s
expense. But he took it all in good part, though
vigorously maintaining his own opinion.

“Go on, Jotham, with your other side,” said
several voices. ‘“Court’s open, and the jury’s all
good men and true.”

“So be it, then. You know, I was second
officer of a Marblehead privateer. We cruised
out in the bay, looking for what we could pick up



42 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

in an honest way, and one day we gave chase to a
transport ship bound out. She gave us a long
chase; but at last we came up with her off the
Salvages, fired a shot across her bows, and ordered
her to heave-to. She hove to.

“When we boarded her the captain tried to
throw his mail-bag overboard ; but I fished it out
of the water with a boat-hook before it could
sink, and after we had taken our prize into port,
we went through the contents.

‘They were mostly letters from officers of the
British army to their friends at home. After
reading them through, we sent the whole batch to
General Ward, to do what he pleased with them.
Some, I believe, were eventually returned to the
writers, who probably chose a safer mode of de-
livery next time. I hope so. They had wives
and sweethearts over the water, those Britishers.
Though enemies, they were men. Why, some of
the letters had little keepsakes in them.”

“Yes, and I've got one of their little keepsakes
in my left leg now,’ growled the irreconcilable
Reddy.

“Come, no more interruptions; open your
budget, Jotham,” commanded the deacon author-
itatively.

« Sartain; here it is,’ Jotham returned, pro-
ducing a bundle of papers from his side pocket,
putting on his spec’s, and unfolding a sheet of
yellow foolscap. “Listen, all.”



THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 43

‘Boston, May 5, 1775.

«« Won't my dear Bess be more pleased with hearing I am
well and hearty, than with the account of all the world
besides? That I am so, God alone can, in his goodness,
account for... . The tale would last a winter's night, so
some Christmas, when we have exhausted all our gambols,
you shall have a history of our late frolic. At present, it
would seem we have the worst of the fight, for, however we
block up their port, the rebels certainly block up our town,
and have cut off our good beef and mutton, much to the dis-
comfiture of our mess.

‘** But while I get sufficient to sustain life, though of the
coarsest food, with two nights out of three in bed, I shall not
repine, but rejoice that fortune has given me a constitution
to endure fatigue, and prove that it is accident, not inclina-
tion, that has made me hitherto eat the bread of idleness.

“You will perceive that I write in a great hurry; probably
this will be finished by the side of my fortification — mine I
may safely call it, as ] am not only planner and director, but
partly executor — as often taking the spade as telling others
where toemploy it; which is attended with these good effects
— exercise to myself and encouragement to the men, who,
you will be pleased to hear, fly to execute that for me, which
for others would be done with a very bad grace, because I
set them a good example in not being afraid to work.

‘*T had three approving generals (Gage, Pigot, and Howe)
in favor of my work, with one of whom I dine to-morrow.

«I have now before me one of the finest prospects a warm
imagination can picture. My tent-door, about twenty yards
from a piece of water, nearly a mile broad, with the country
most beautifully tumbled about in hills and valleys, rocks
and woods, interspersed with straggling villages, with here
and there a spire peeping over the trees, and the country of
the most charming green that delighted eye ever gazed on.
Pity these infatuated people cannot be content to enjoy such



44 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

a country in peace! But alas! this moment their advanced
sentinels are in sight, and tell me they have struck the fatal
blow. Where it will end, but in their destruction, I cannot
see. Thank you for the pocket-pistol (the bottle and cup):
would that I had had it on the rgth of April for the sake of
my friends and self.

‘‘When Lord Percy’s brigade joined us there were very
few men had any ammunition left, and we were so fatigued
that we could no longer keep our flanking parties out; so
that we must soon have laid down our arms, or been picked
off by the rebels at their pleasure.”

“Well, I don’t see any bragging there,” re-
marked one of the listeners, when the reading was
completed. ‘“ We certainly had ’em on the run,”
he added triumphantly. ‘Let’s hear another

”

one.

“This one,” continued Jotham, “was written
after the Battle of Bunker Hill, and shows how
perilously near the writer came to leaving his
bones to moulder with the dust of so many of his
companions-in-arms. JI will read it.”

“© We had made a breach in their fortifications, which J’
had twice mounted, encouraging the men to follow me, and
was ascending a third time, when a ball grazed the top of
my head, and I fell back deprived of sense and motion.

“My lieutenant, Lord Rawdon, caught me in his arms,
and, believing me dead, endeavored to remove me from the
spot, to save my body from being trampled on. The motion,
while it hurt me, restored me to my senses, and I feebly
articulated, ‘ For God’s sake, let me die in peace.’













“YT Fett Back DEPRIVED OF SENSE OR MOTION”



THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 45

*‘ The hope of preserving my life induced Lord Rawdon
to order four soldiers to take me up and carry me to a place
of safety. Three of them were wounded while performing”
this office (one afterwards died of his wounds) ; but they suc-
ceeded in placing me under some trees, out of reach of the
rebel balls. A retreat having been sounded, poor Holmes
(my body servant), was running about like a madman, in
‘search of me, and luckily came to the place where J was lying,
just in time to prevent my being left behind; for when they
brought me to the water’s edge, the last boat was put off, the
men calling out that they would take no more! On Holmes’
hallooing out, ‘It is Captain Harris,’ they put back and took
me in.

«‘T was very weak and faint and seized with a severe shiv-
ering; our blankets had been flung away during the engage-
ment; luckily there was one belonging to a man in the boat,
in which, after wrapping me up, and laying me on the bot-
tom, they conveyed me safely to my quarters.

«The surgeons did not at first apprehend danger from the
contusion, notwithstanding the extreme pain I felt, which
increased very much if I attempted to lie down. A worthy
woman, seeing this, lent me an easy chair, but this being full
of bugs, only added to my sufferings. My agonies increas-
ing, and the surgeons, observing symptoms of matter form-

‘ing (which, had it fallen on the brain, must have produced
instant death, or at least distraction), performed the opera-
tion of trepanning, from which time the pain abated, and I
began to recover. But before the callous was formed they
indulged me with the gratification of a singular curiosity —
fixing looking-glasses so as to give me a sight of my own
brains. The heat of the weather, and the scarcity of fresh
provisions, added greatly to the sufferings of the wounded.
As patience was the only remedy for the former, I trusted to
it for relief; and for the latter, the attention of the surgeon,
and a truly benevolent family in Boston who supplied me
with mutton-broth, when no money could purchase it, was
a blessing for which I can never be sufficiently thankful.”



46 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“That seems a good sort of fellow,” the deacon
remarked.

“ You'll see a white blackbird, when you see
one,” interjected the incorrigible Reddy.

“Here’s another, written by an officer of the
52d, a right jolly fellow, ’ll be bound; for he
seems to have enjoyed a joke cracked even at the
expense of his own comrades.”

“During the winter of 1775-76, plays were acted at Bos-
ton twice a week, by the officers, and some of the ladies of
the town. A farce called ‘ The Blockade of Boston, written
by General Burgoyne, was on the stage. The enemy knew
the night it was to be performed, and made an attack on the
mill, at Charlestown, at the very hour that the farce began.
They fired some shots, and surprised and carried off a ser-
geant’s guard. We immediately turned out and manned the
works, and a shot being fired by one of our advanced sen-
tries, a firing commenced at the redoubt, and could not be
stopped for some time.

“An orderly sergeant, standing outside the playhouse
door, who heard the firing, immediately ran into the play-
house, got upon the stage, and bawled out at the top of his
lungs, ‘ Turn out! turn out! they’re hard at it, hammer and
tongs.’

“* The whole audience, supposing the sergeant was acting
a part in the farce, loudly applauded, and there was such a
noise, he could not, for some time, make himself heard.
When the applause was over he again cried out, ‘What the
dickens are ye all about? If ye won’t b’lave me, be gorra
you need only go to the door, an’ there ye’ll hear and see
both.’

‘If the enemy intended to stop the farce, they certainly



THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 47

succeeded, as the officers immediately left the playhouse to
join their regiments.”

“Where was the playhouse?” it was asked.

“Tn old Faneuil Hall.”

“Who wrote the letters?”

“The first two were written by Captain Harris,
afterward Lord Harris, the conqueror of Mysore,
in India. The last was from the pen of Lieu-
tenant Hunter, afterward a lieutenant-general.
Both fought their way up, through the interme-
diate grades, to high distinction. Both are dead.
. Peace to their ashes!”



48 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA

Wuen Thursday evening came round again,
there was quite a full turn-out of veterans, as the
word had been passed from house to house that
these talks were likely to prove much more inter-
esting than at first had been supposed. Some of
the old fellows were naturally talkative, some
grown garrulous with age, and some, who were
really the best informed of all, needed to be
drawn out. But that old feeling of brotherhood
in arms! Once aroused, it proved a talisman to
loosen all tongues. -

In order to overcome the feeling of awkward-
ness, or rather, perhaps, I should say of backward-
ness, which invariably showed itself at our first
coming together, I resolved to take upon myself
the part of spokesman. Fortunately I knew
_ where all the men had served, so that I was at no .
loss for a subject.

“Peleg,” said I, by way of an opening, “you
were with Allen at Ticonderoga. Come, we
would like to hear your account of that affair.
Are you ready?”

“Cocked and primed,” was the prompt reply.
“I can’t tell it as some of the rest could; but any-



THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 49

how, I. can give you the real Simon-pure facts
about the taking of ‘Ty,’ and if that will sarve, .
here goes.”

‘There were two men consarned in that affair
who were born leaders of men. You all know
who I mean. ‘Ethan Allen was one, Benedict
Arnold another.”

An ominous, though suppressed, growl ran
round the circle at the mention of the traitor’s
hated name.

“That’s right; give it to him,” resumed Peleg,
with an angry toss of the head, ‘“‘he’s no more a
friend of mine than of yours, though now that
he’s dead and gone, give the devil his due, say I,
for one.”

“Amen! he’s got it, or I’m a sinner,’ spoke
up Thody Rhodes testily.

“Ay, along with Judas Hiscarrot,” interposed
Remember Bowen, whose recollection of Scrip-
ture names was none of the clearest.

“How you do take me up. Let him go. He
was dog in the manger at ‘Ty’; but when it
came to fighting, Benedict Arnold would rather
fight than eat any time. Neither Allen nor Ar-
nold made the first move toward taking ‘Ty.’
That was done by some quiet, long-headed folks,
down ‘in Connecticut, who planned the whole
affair beforehand. They sent up spies to see how
the land lay ; saw how the thing might be done
’ by a bold dash, invited Allen to take hold with



50 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

his Green Mountain Boys, let the Massachusetts
folks know what they were up to, and Arnold got
a commission to raise men and go up and help
them. But all the men that Arnold raised, be-
sides himself, was his own servant. That, how-
ever made no difference with him. He was
bound to be there, men or no men.

‘“‘Now then, the leaders were on tenter-hooks
for fear the secret would get out before they were
good and ready. They knew it must be a sur-
prise or nothing ; so they took precious good care
not to beat any drums or blow any trumpets, but
just quietly mounted their horses and rode off to
Pittsfield, where they let some good men and true
into their plans, who in turn passed the word
round among their neighbors so quietly that,
presently, they rode out of Pittsfield with forty
men, for Bennington, — and there’s where I come
into the story.

““At Bennington they met Allen, who entered
into the spirit of the thing with all imaginable
ardor. Allen instantly set about raising his men.
Castleton was appointed as the place of rendez-
vous; for which place the party pushed on in
great spirits, now that the famous leader of the
Green Mountain Boys was so thoroughly enlisted
in the good cause. :

_“When we were all mustered at Castleton,
there were just two hundred and seventy of us.
Two hundred and thirty were Allen’s boys, who



THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA SI

*minded me of Robin Hood’s outlaws, such a
tough looking lot they were, all keen as briers
and wild as so many catamounts. It took Allen
to handle ’em. It was there that Arnold joined
us, with his re-enforcement of one, though to hear
him talk you’d have thought he had got up the |

-whole thing. With his accustomed impudence he

immediately laid claim to the command, by virtue
of his commission. Allen swore he never should
have it. Arnold vowed he would; and for a while
the sparks flew, because one was flint and the
other steel, and neither would give an inch.
Pretty way to begin by fightin’ among yourselves,
wasn’t it? But that was Arnold all over.
“Flowever, it was finally settled that Allen
should be first in command and Arnold second.
One party was sent off to Skenesborough, now

Whitehall, at the head of the lake, to secure

Major Skene with his negroes and tenants, who
might have given us trouble, as they belonged to
the other side of the dispute. You see, the thing
had so grown upon us that we had pretty much
made up our minds to make a clean sweep of
everything on. Lake Champlain.

“Allen had set the next morning to march for
‘Ty’ with his hardy band. It so happened, how-
ever, that something caused that plan to be
changed. That something was a man who came.
ridin’ up to our rendezvous with his horse all ina
lather.



52 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

“We.all crowded up round him. ‘ Where's
Ethan?’ says he.

«“ «Here I am,’ called back Allen, pushing his
way through the crowd. ‘Stand back there, you
fellows,’ he commanded in that big voice of his;
‘Noah Phelps and I must have a little talk to-
gether.’

“As the men didn’t move along quite so quick
as he thought they should, Allen gave one or two
of them a smart shove, by way of emphasizing his
words. But they took it all from him. He was
over six foot, long-limbed, and muscular ; and I’d
as soon have let a bear hug me as get into Allen’s
clutches, especially when he was a little riled.

«So you're back, Noah?’ Ethan said, when-his
men were out of earshot. ‘What’s the word?’

“«Good for us. The best. I’ve been in the fort.’

«« You have ?’

“Ves; I disguised myself as a countryman,
went boldly up to the sentinel, and told him I
wanted to be shaved by the fort barber. He
let me pass. I vowed and vum’d I never did
‘see such tarnal big guns before in all my born
days. “Take care you don’t care any of ’em
off with you,” says he, alaughin’ fit to kill him-
self. -“I couldn't,” says I, “onless I had father’s
ox-team and some of the boys to help me. How
many of ’em might there be, now?” I asked him.
‘Oh, about a hundred or so,” he replied, then
turned sharply on me with the question, ‘ What’s



THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 53

that to you ?”” — “Oh, nothin’,” I replied indiffer-
ently. “I was only wonderin’ what an all-fired
noise they would make if they was all touched
off at once.’

“«Come to the point,’ said Allen, rather im-
patiently.

“¢ All in good time, friend Ethan. The first
thing was to disarm suspicion. In the character
I assumed, of a simple, inquisitive, country lout,
they let me look about as long as I liked. Our
information was correct. They have not the
least suspicion of our plans. There are only
forty odd privates, besides half a dozen officers ;
but, in his talk while shaving me, the barber,
who, like his tribe the world ovet, is given to
babbling, let fall something about a re-enforcement
being expected from below. Ethan, we must be
beforehand with them.’

“By the tall pines of these hills, you say well,
Noah! It shall be this very night! Here’s for
Ticonderoga or a turf jacket!’ exclaimed Ethan,
turning away to give the necessary. orders.

“We were soon ready for the march. Every
man’s horn, bullet-pouch, and flints were care-
fully looked to. By the light of the stars we ,
stole noiselessly out of the little village, picked
up our picket, posted outside on the road we
were travelling, settled down into our leader’s long,
swinging stride, and were presently swallowed up
in the pitch-darkness of the surrounding woods.



54 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“ After a long, hard march we got to the lake
opposite the fortress the next evening. Here we
expected that the detachment sent to Skenesbor-
ough would join us, with what boats they had
been able to pick up at that place. But the night
wore away without news of them. This was the
ninth day of May. I remember it so well because
the next was my birthday, which I had promised
myself to celebrate (providing our expedition did
not fail), by making an assault on the larder and
cellars of Ticonderoga.

“With what few boats our scouts had ferreted
out along shore, eighty-three men of us crossed
the lake, and landed under the fortress just as
the east was brightening up a little. Allen first
formed us in three ranks, and then sent the boats
back for the rest. I confess that I felt a little
nervous when I saw them push off, leaving us
to take what the enemy might choose to give
us, either in cold lead or stiff hemp; for from
where we stood, screened by the cliffs above our
heads, the fortress loomed up dark and threaten.
ing, like some ancient castle, silent now, but ready
to spit out fire and flames as soon as we should
show ourselves. I know I was all of a shiver.

“But my teeth actually chattered in my head
when, instead of pushing on, as any man in his
sober senses would, Allen stepped out in front and
began making us a speech. A speech! and we
standing there at the imminent risk of discovery !





THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 58

I’ve heard that Allen first studied for a minister,
so he may have felt that morning like one of the
prophets of old, before leading his men forth to —
battle. But this was no time to preach. Men
fought then with darts and javelins, not powder
and ball. Pooh!



THE HEAD oF A TRAITOR

“All I can now recollect of what Allen said was
this : ‘You men that are not afraid to undertake
this adventure, poise your firelocks!’

“Every musket was instantly brought to a
poise,

“We were now faced to the right, and Allen,
with his drawn sword, put himself at our head.
Arnold did the same thing. He declared by all



56 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

that was good and great that he would go into the
fort first. Allen swore he should not. Here was
a pretty pickle. Two commanders quarrelling for
precedence within gunshot, ay, almost within ear-
shot, of the sentinels on the ramparts. For my
part, at that moment, I heartily wished both of
them at the bottom of the Jake.

“The dispute was finally compromised by let-
ting them march side by side. It is my firm
belief that Arnold would rather have seen the
expedition fail, than not to have carried his point.

“This war of words being over, we advanced
briskly up to the water-gate, where a sentry was
posted. This man snapped his musket at Allen,
looked as though he had seen a ghost, and then
took to his heels, we pushing on after him through
the covered way right into the fort, before he had
time to give more than one yell of wild alarm.
Once there, we formed in line on the parade, the
front rank facing one row of barracks on one side,
the rear rank those on the other, ready to fire at
any one who showed himself at a window. So
far, so good.

“The garrison being sound asleep, we gave
three rousing huzzas, that would have waked the
dead. If they heard us, they took good care to
keep quiet. If they saw us, they saw our guns
held at a ready. Ticonderoga, the gate of the
North, was ours without the loss of a man.

“The next thing was to secure the garrison.



THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 57

We had no trouble at all. One only of the sen-
tinels made a lunge at one of our officers with his
bayonet, giving him a slight wound. Allen in-
stantly gave the fellow a neat sword-cut over the
head, which made him drop his gun, and howl for
quarter. On being ordered to lead the way to the
commandant’s quarters, the fellow showed Allen
a pair of stairs leading up to the second story of
the barracks, which Allen immediately mounted,
two steps at a time, finding himself before a door
at the top. The door being locked on the inside,
Allen dealt it two or three furious blows with the
hilt of his sword, at the same time calling out to
the terrified commandant that if he did not in-
stantly come forth, the garrison should all be
put to the sword.

“ The bewildered commander did not hesitate to
open the door at this threat; although he stood
only in his shirt, with his breeches in his hand,
not having had time to pull them on. Without
more words Allen demanded the surrender of the
fort. sus

“«By what authority?’ asked the perplexed
Delaplace.

“¢In the name of the Great Jehovah and the
Continental Congress!’ was the bombastic reply.

-“ Still more astounded, for supposing he had
heard of the first, it was unlikely that he ever
had of the second, the commandant began to
stammer out some objections, which Allen, how-



58 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

ever, cut short by brandishing his naked sword
over the officer’s head, repeating his demand in
a still more peremptory voice. To this display
of force, the unlucky commandant incontinently
-yiélded. Orders were given for the garrison to
parade, as prisoners of war to the Great Jehovah
and the Continental Congress.

“While Allen was thus occupied, the rest of us
had not been idle. By command of our officers,
we had beaten down several of the barrack doors
without opposition, taking the soldiers within be-
fore they could muster in any force. We were
‘too overjoyed by our success to jeer at them, in
spite of the black looks they gave us. A more
mortified lot of men you never saw in your life
than the forty-six officers and soldiers we took
there on the ever glorious. 10th of May, 1775.”

“But what became of the other detachments ?”
it was asked when Peleg had finished.

“Oh, I forgot to say that Seth Warner crossed
over with the rearguard as soon as the boats had
got back, though not in time to take part in the
capture of the fort. Immediately upon his join-
ing us, he was sent off down the lake to Crown
Point, another strong fortress, built at a narrow
part of the Jake during the Old French War.
Warner got possession of it very easily. There
were only a sergeant and twelve men there. Glory
enough for one day !

“This was not all. There was an armed sloop



THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 59

at St. Johns, at the foot of the lake, with which
the enemy could, of course, keep control of the
water, if let alone. It was determined to take
her too. For this purpose a schooner was fitted
out, and put under the command of Arnold, who
had been a sailor, I believe. At any rate, he got
the chance he had been waiting for, to do some-
thing on his own hook. To make sure of their
prey, Allen sailed with some bateaux, along with
Arnold; but the wind came out fair and fresh, the
schooner outsailed the boats, and Arnold took the
sloop alone. That puffed him up like a peacock.”



60 THE WATCH PIRES OF ’76

ETHAN ALLEN

“Wasn't Allen a little cracked in the upper
story?’ asked Uncle Billy, without addressing
any one in particular.

“Well, if he was, I only wish for my part we'd
had a few more like him, that’s all. I call him
an original, I do,” said. Reddy, with his usual.
decision. ‘ What's your opinion?” he added,
turning to me.

Thus appealed to, I could only say that, in
my judgment, Allen was a singular compound
of courage and rashness, of shrewdness and self-
conceit, and of misdirected abilities. He was one
of those men who believe they are born to great
things; and such men are always a power, if per-
sonally brave, because courage and decision are
qualities all men admire, more especially in the
soldier. But then Arnold was thoroughly unprin-
cipled. Allen has always made me think of one
of Cromwell’s Ironsides. His talk was a strange
mixture of “local barbarisms, scriptural phrases,
and Oriental wildness, though often highly ani-
mated and forcible. So much, at least, I have
gathered from his own narrative, I finished, by
way of apology, for I saw the frowns gathering »



ETHAN ALLEN 61

upon the brows of my venerable hearers, who,
however, heard me through silently, if I may ex-
cept an occasional angry snort or grunt coming
from the right or left of my chair. -

Reddy tilted his chair back to the verge of
oversetting it, passed his big freckled hand over
his glistening bald head, gazed up at the ceiling,
as if I was beneath his notice, and blurted out the
question : —

“What was Greene ?”’

* The son of an anchor-smith.”

“ Knox?”

“ A bookseller.”

“Putnam ?”

“ A farmer and tavern-keeper.”

“Turned out pretty well, didn’t they?”

“None better.”

“Well, Squire, when you lay down the law at
education, don’t forget what our generals were
made of. Weren’t they all sons of the soil, like
Allen?”

“ Mostly so, I admit.”

“And had to get their growth by the hardest
kind of knocks ?”

“Tf you mean that experience was their teacher, .

”

yes.
“I think you said something about Cromwell's

Ironsides. - You never said a better thing. They
were the hard-handed yeomanry of England. We
fought their fight over here. They won theirs; so |



62 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

did we ours. As for Allen, I wouldn’t give a pis-
tareen for a man who hadn’t a little gunpowder
in him, eh, boys?”

There was a general murmur of assent, so I
held my peace. Reddy went on :—

“In a single night Allen, with his handful of
homespun soldiers, did what whole armies had
failed to do in the French War. It was a great
conception.”

“Yes; but not his,’ objected some one else,
who now took up the cudgels on the other side.
“Peleg told us how that was. To tell the truth,
I’ve about come to the conclusion that Allen’s
success at ‘Ty,’ turned his head. What could
have been more foolish than his attack on Mon-
treal, with only a hundred and ten men, and a
river a mile wide behind him?”

“He made a good fight, anyhow,” Reddy in-
sisted, apparently determined not to desert his
hero.

“And was taken prisoner for his pains,” was
the reply.

“Like some other folks I know of.”

“You mean me. I don’t mind your twitting
on facts, Reddy. Fortune of war. When I was
a prisoner in New York, Allen was there too,
so I saw him. often. To speak out plainly, the
British had treated him more like a wild beast
than a human being. I think it was because
they were afraid of him. But he was the same -





ETHAN ALLEN ; 63

old Allen still. They had kept him in irons, like

any criminal; but his spirit was just as untamed
as if he had been walking the wild woods of his
native hills.”

“ That’s the boy for me!” Reddy exclaimed in
triumph. “Never say die!”

“ How did he look after his long confinement?”
T asked.

“As you would naturally expect, very bad.
He had been brought from Halifax a short time
after that wretchedly managed business at Long
Island, where I was taken, and was paroled when
we were. Allen at that time looked like a once
robust man, worn down by hard usage and worse
fare, but he was then recovering his health and °
spirits. He wore a suit of blue, with a gold-laced
hat, presented to him by some gentlemen of Cork,
when Allen was there, in which he cut a very
passable figuré—for a rebel colonel. He used
to show us a tooth that had been broken by his
twisting off with it, in a fit of anger, the nail
which fastened the bar of his handcuffs; an act
which drew, from one of the astonished spectators,
the exclamation of ‘Hang the man; can he eat
iron?’ I soon became well acquainted with Allen,
and have more than once heard him relate his
adventures while a prisoner, exactly correspond-
ing, both in substance and language, with the
narrative he gave to the public in the year 1779.
I have seldom met with a man possessing in my



64 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

opinion a stronger mind, or whose mode of ex-
pression was more vehement and oratorical.”

_ “There!” exclaimed Reddy, turning to me
with every mark of triumph on his honest face;
“seein’s believin’, Squire, the world over.”

“ Anyhow, the taking of Ticonderoga was a most
costly victory for us,” I returned, “because it drew
our people on to attempt the conquest of Canada,
instead of confining their efforts to holding that
strong place alone. What happened? We lost
two. armies, three generals, and were kicked out
of Canada in the bargain.”

“Nothing venture, nothing have,” observed
Pelee. . “I. notice,’ he continued, “that none
of you have found out that Boston was taken at
Ticonderoga.”

Seeing that his remark was a puzzle, he pro-
ceeded to make it clear to us in this wise :—

“ At that time, as you all know, our New Eng-
land yeomanry had General Gage penned up in
Boston hard and fast; but their intrenchments
were without cannon, and their men without
powder. It could not be a siege; it was more
of a blockade. ‘Ty’ was taken in May. Things
lingered along until winter. Washington wanted
those cannon and mortars badly, but getting them
down to camp before there was snow on the
ground was not to be thought of. Even then
it was a task to make a man think twice. Just
you think of it yourselves,



ne TN eS ee Le ee eee TT a a ee

ETHAN ALLEN 65

“But where there’s a will there’s a way. Wash-
ington sent for Knox, who declared himself ready _
for anything. Dear me, I was just like him at
his age! Washington gave him his instructions,
some letters to friends at Albany, handed him
a wad of money, wished him success, and watched
the young colonel of artillery mount his horse and
ride off, with something of the feeling of having
asked him to perform a miracle.

“Tt is only miracles, after all, that can save
us, murmured the commander-in-chief to himself,
as he turned to his writing-table, loaded down
with piles of official correspondence, and set him-
self resolutely at work again.

“That was a proud day for Knox, a glorious one
for us, when the long train of ox-teams came
toiling down into Cambridge from across the
mountains. The whole army turned out to cheer
them as they passed by —twenty-fours, eighteens,
heavy mortars, shot, shell, and what not — with
Knox at their head, brown and ragged, but happy.
When they had come up abreast of the com-
mander-in-chief’s quarters, he with his staff stood
on the doorstep, clapping their hands. Knox
dismounted, threw the bridle over the hitching-
post, and walked up the flagged-walk to where
they stood.

“<«Flere are the guns from “Ty,” your Excel-
lency,’ was all he said, making his salute.

“


66 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

in bluff old Putnam, who was standing my with
a face wreathed in smiles.

‘“Washington grasped Knox’s hand, and piece
it warmly, ‘God has decreed that we should
succeed,’ he said, ‘since He has permitted a
miracle in our favor. This is more than I dared
to hope for. Colonel, you dine with us to-day.’

“«By your Excellency’s leave, there is a little
woman not far off who is expecting me.’

“The general smiled benignantly. ‘Ah! very
true. I forgot. Go and embrace her, and report
here to-morrow. General,’ turning to Putnam,
‘we will send the enemy the latest news from
Ticonderoga from the muzzles of their own

r99

guns.







THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY - 67

THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY

Ir was Christmas night. Four of us were sit-
ting round a blazing wood fire in the old tavern at
X. A wrinkled, white-haired man crouched over
the fire, rubbing his hard, bony hands together, in
the seat that by general consent was always left
vacant for him in the chimney corner.

There is always something about very old men
that inspires us with a feeling of awe. So we sat
silent now, although our tongues had been running
fast enough before this taciturn old fellow had
‘dropped in upon us. He said never a word.

After giving a meaning glance at the rest of us,
one of the boys spoke up: “ What makes you look
so glum, Uncle Billy? Brighten up, old man, and
tell us a story about the good old times of ‘sev-
enty-six.’.” ie i

“The good old times of ‘seventy-six,’” the old
man slowly repeated, “the good old times of ‘sev-
enty-six?’ You don’t know what you're talking
about.”’

Having said this, the old sergeant fell into a
brown study again. Our defeated companion ~
-nudged me.

“My grandfather was in the retreat from Long
Island,” I said, rather grandly I suppose.



68 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

“Was he?” retorted Uncle Billy: “I hope he
retreated in good order,” he added, with a grin of
disdain. ,

“Which would you rather do, fight the British
or Hessians?’’ my next neighbor asked, half iron-
ically, half in earnest.

At this question the old man fired up.
“Neither,” he replied, with decision. “Id rather
be a-settin’ here, by a warm fire, hearin’ other
folks tell about their explites. Ah, boys, boys,”
he continued, in a more gentle tone, “this is
the time o’ year when peace on airth and good
will toward men is the universal gospel, and
right it should be; but I’ve seen the time when
things were different, I can tell ye.”

We sat as still as mice, afraid to interrupt

. him.

“You want to hear about it? You shall. I
remember it as if it was yesterday, and yet it
was nigh on sixty year ago. How time does fly !

“Jt was at Trenton, the very last of December
‘seventy-six. The time for which most,of us had
enlisted was out — yes, and more too. Now, just
as we'd made up our mouths to go home, what
does Gin’ral Washington do but order our regi-
ment paraded. ‘God bless the man! he’s goin’ to.
give us all our discharge,’ was what we thought,
at first. Instead of that he made us a speech,
begging and entreating us to stay a month
longer.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE





THE OLD SERGEANTS STORY 69

“The drums beat up for volunteers. Not a
man stirred. What do you think? We were all
worn out. We were in rags. I know I was
nothin’ but skin and bone; for sence we licked
the Hessians and before, we'd been kept dancin’
back and forth, to and fro, up hill and down dale,
until we looked more like a pack of scarecrows
than good flesh and. blood. The only thing we
ever got a full meal of was fightin’; and most of
us wern’t hankerin’ for any more of that, you can
take your Bible oath on. Why, many’s the time
I’ve eat raw potato peelin’s, and glad to get ’em.
Now just look at it. For the last month we'd
been countin’ the days, one by one, when we
should go home —home! why it was like heaven!
And now to be asked to stop another month. It
was enough to turn a man to stone. ;

“J said not a man stirred in his tracks, didn’t
I? I know my backbone was stiff as a ramrod.
We stood there like graven images, deaf and
dumb, and never winked. |

“The gin’ral wheeled his horse, and rode along
in front of the regiment, very slow. Says he —
I give you his very words — ‘ My brave lads, your
country is at stake ; wives, homes, little ones, and
all you hold dear. I know you have worn your-
selves out with fatigues and hardship, and now
want to go home; but we know not how to spare
you. If you will only stay one month more, you
will render that service to the cause of liberty, and





70 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

to your country, which probably you can never do
under any circumstances. The present is em-
phatically the cvzszs, which is to decide our des-
tiny.” Oh, he was grand!

“The drums then beat for the second time.

“ The soldiers felt the force of the appeal and
showed it. One said to another, ‘I’ll stay if you
will.’ Others said, ‘We can’t go home under
such circumstances, can we?’ A few stepped
forward. Their example was quickly followed
by nearly all who were fit for duty, in the regi-
ment, amounting in all.to about two hundred
volunteers.

«¢ Shall these men be enrolled, sir?’ our colonel
asked.
“«No,’ said the gin’ral; ‘men who will act as |
they have don’t need any enrolment.’

“ Now, you must know that we were in a pretty
tight fix. There was Lord Cornwallis planted
squarely in our front, with men enough to eat us
all up. We stood lookin’ at each other across the
Assanpink. Three times the Hessians tried to
force their way across the bridge, and three times
our cannon drove them back. At last they gave
it up, and left us alone for the night.

“Then we played them a Yankee trick. We
built big fires to make them think we were lying
there all snug, waitin’ for them to come on in the
morning, turned off by a roundabout way, and
marched away for Princeton. Ugh, but it was
cold!







THE OLD SERGEANTS STORY 71

“Our two hundred volunteers were with the
advance. We were ina sorry plight for a forced
march, but there were no stragglers. Our artil-
lery horses were without shoes; and when we
came to a spot that was frozen over, they would
slip and slide about so that the soldiers would
have to drag and push them along, by main
strength. The men were hardly better off than
the horses for shoes, many having nothing on but
some old rags or a piece of carpet to keep their
feet from the frozen ground.”

“You don’t mean to say that the men were
actually barefooted?” we cried out in a chorus of
horror.

“Boys, you could have tracked those men by
the blood oozing out at every step, where the
sharp ice had cut through into the flesh.”

“T should have thought their feet would have
frozen stiff,’ was the sympathetic rejoinder of the
youngest of us.

“Qh, your feet won't freeze as long as the
blood runs. You wanted me to tell you about
the good old times of ‘seventy-six,’ didn’t you?”
And the old sergeant went on with his story.

“Tt was, I think, about sun-up on the morning
of January 3, ‘seventy-seven,’ when, upon reach-
ing the top of a hill near Princeton, we saw a
. light-horseman watching us at a distance. Gin’ral
Mercer, he gave orders to some of the riflemen to
pick him off ; but before they could draw a trigger,



72 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

the vedette turned his horse and galloped off, out
of our reach.

“«That rascal will give the alarm,’ said the
gin’ral to my captain.

“There was a farmhouse a few rods from where
we halted, to spell the men a little. Presently a
countryman came out of the house, and stood on
the doorstep staring at us, as if we were so many
ghosts. The gin’ral beckoned to him.

“Are you a friend to your country?’ he asked.

“*T am.’

“There ought to be some by-way by which
we can approach coe village without pelle seen.’

“ «There is one.’

“Very good, Captain,’ continued the gin’ral,
turning to us, ‘here is the man you want. If he
prove faithful, reward him; should he betray us,
shoot him.’

“The countryman’s eyes roved from one to the
other, but. he said never a word. You see, boys,
the man who didn’t carry a musket on one side or
the other, in those days, couldn’t be trusted out
of sight.

“*You hear?’ said our captain to the man.

“*Yes,’ was the sullen reply.

“«Then take care how you lead us into an
ambuscade. If you do, I'll blow out your brains,
March !’

“The man led us off through a farm-road, that

ran nearly parallel with the one on which we had ~



THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY Te

seen the vedette disappear. For some: distance
our march was concealed by a piece of pine woods,
but at the end of about fifteen minutes, as I
should judge, we came out of this wood into open
‘ground again, on the top of a small hill, which we
began descending. Before us we saw a high
bank and hedgerow, stretching across our path,
and glittering with icicles in the morning sun,
which-shone full in our faces. It blinded us. All
seemed quiet around us.

“Turning to my captain, who marched at my
side, I pointed to this innocent looking hedgerow, .
without speaking. He nodded, as much as to say,
‘I see it as well as you do,’ and kept right on.
If it hadn’t been for those plaguy icicles, I could
have sworn I saw bayonets sticking up behind
that hedge.

“Tn a couple of minutes more, we were within
twenty paces of the ditch, under the bank. All
of a sudden a perfect swarm of British rose up,
and poured a tremendous fire into us.

“« Aha! Captain,’ said our guide, ‘it seems that
two can play at this game.”

“He had hardly got the words out of his mouth,
when the captain brought down the breech of his
musket on the fellow’s head with all his might.
It was enough to have felled an ox.

“*« Fire, men! why don’t you fire?’ shouted the
gin’ral, reining back his horse. I then saw that
he was bare-headed and bleeding too.



74 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“Luckily for us, their first volley mostly went
over our heads. They were in too big a hurry to
do execution. We were ordered to wheel out.
As my platoon was obeying this order, the cor-
poral at my left let go his gun, gave a spring in
the air, and pitched headforemost into the ditch.
We rallied, moved on, shoved our muskets
through the hedge, and gave it to the beggars
hot and heavy. If ever I smelled powder, it was
then and there.”

The old sergeant stopped to mop his forehead,
and get his breath. ¥

“Where was I? Oh! we were a-fightin’ away
across the bank. Well, pretty soon they fell back
about eight rod, to where their packs were laid-on
the ground, in a line. We kept on rattling the
buckshot into ’em, like all possessed; for we saw
we had ’em beaten, fair and square. But just
then, what should we see but another passel on
“em come a-runnin’ up double-quick.

“Some one sung out to us, ‘Stan’ your ground,
brave boys! The beggars are comin’ to town!’

“It was no use. They were three to our one,
and all fresh men. Pretty soon I heard some one
give the order to retreat, in a dying sort of voice.
It was the general. I looked around to see if I
could discover anything of our main body; for we
were all fought out, and the enemy were drivin’
their bayonets into our wounded men, right and
left. Our folks were nowhere to be seen. After





aaa aac



THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY 75

giving the enemy what I had in my gun, I ran for
the woods I told you of before.

“ Before I could get there, Gin’ral Washington
came ridin’ up. at full gallop. Far behind him I
could see the head of our advancing columns.
‘Parade with us, my brave fellows,’ he shouted,
‘there are only a handful of the enemy, and we'll
have them directly.’

“Tf there was one of ’em, there was a million;
and he was almost alone.

“Well, the minute they saw us trying to rally,
the enemy gave us a whole volley. How the bul-
lets did hum! Some of us grabbed the gin’ral’s
bridle, and tried to turn his horse’s head. We
all felt that it was no place for him. But he
wouldn’t budge an inch. ‘Leave me alone!’ he
cried, ‘the enemy is there,’ pointing his sword
toward the rascals who were popping away at us
out of the smoke. It was the bravest thing I
ever saw. I vow and declare to you nobody would
have thought he was the commander-in-chief. It
was the Virginia colonel, stemming the tide of
defeat at Braddock’s field over again. My heart
was in my mouth, for I expected to see him fall
from his horse every instant. But bless you, they
couldn’t hit him. That man bore a charmed life.”

“Well, go on, go on; how did it come out?”
we breathlessly exclaimed.

“ Just like this. Up came our folks, puffin’ and
blowin’, cheerin’ and shoutin’, ‘have at the blood-



76 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

hounds!’ ‘Trenton! Trenton!’ I tell you it was
beautiful. Did you ever see dead leaves go whirl-
ing away before a gust of wind in autumn? At
*em we went, tooth and nail. They retreated
back to the college, where they thought them-
selves safe. Our army was there in an instant.
Our cannon unlimbered right before the door;
and, after two or three shots, we saw a white
handkerchief hung out of the window on the point
of asword. The enemy had surrendered.”



| GERMANTOWN Tei

GERMANTOWN

‘THERE was Germantown. We had them whipped
there as clean as a whistle. I'll tell you how I
know it. After the British marched out of Phil-
adelphia for good, some of us were rummaging
around their quarters at Germantown, when we
ran across a lot of papers that had been torn up
and thrown into a fireplace among the ashes.
One of the men, I forget now who it was, picked
up a piece to pene his pipe with.

“Hold on,” says he, “ there’ s writing on it.”

We pulled a rickety table out of a corner, spread
the torn pieces out on it, and went to work trying
to put them together. It took us a good while;
but we got as much interested in it as boys will
over a puzzle, and at last we had them all com-
plete, like a book.

One paper-was a return of the killed and
wounded ; another was a letter telling about the
battle, aie the writer evidently hadn’t had time
to finish before he was ordered off somewhere in
a hurry. So he tore it up. This was the way it
read. I know it by heart. You can see by the
way it is worded that an educated man and an



78 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

officer wrote it, —none of your ignorant rank and
file, Squire — ahem !

**While the greater part of our army were employed at
Mud Island, General Washington, availing himself of that
circumstance, attacked our battalion at Biggerstown with
his whole army.

«The first General Howe knew of Washington’s march-
ing against us was by his attacking us at daybreak. General
Wayne commanded the advance, and fully expected to be
revenged for the surprise we had given him a short time
before.

‘* When the first shots were fired at our pickets, so much
had we all Wayne's affair in remembrance, that the battalion
was out and under arms in a minute. The day had just
broke; but it was a very foggy morning, and so dark we
could not see a hundred yards before us.

‘Just as the battalion had formed, the pickets came in
and said the enemy were advancing in force. They had
hardly joined the battalion when we heard a loud cry of
. ‘Have at the bloodhounds! revenge Wayne’s affair!’ and
the enemy immediately fired a volley at us.

“We gave them one in return, cheered, and charged.

“As it was near the end of the campaign, our battalion
was very weak; it did not consist of more than three hun-
dred men, and we had no support nearer than Germantown,
a mile-in our rear.

‘“‘On our charging they gave way on all sides, but again
and again renewed ine attack, with fresh troops and greater
force.

‘*We charged them twice, till the battalion was so re-
duced by killed and wounded that the bugle sounded a
retreat; indeed, had we not retreated at the very time we
did, we should all have been taken or killed, as two columns
of the enemy had nearly got round our flank. But this was



CERMANTOWN 79

- the first time we had ever retreated from the Americans, and it
was with great difficulty we could get the men to obey orders.
“‘The enemy were kept so long in check that the two
brigades had advanced to the entrance of Biggerstown when
they met our battalion retreating. By this time General
Howe had come up; and seeing the battalion retreating all
broken, he flew into a passion and exclaimed, ‘ For shame,
Light Infantry! I never saw you retreat before; form! form!
it’s only a scouting-party !”

“ However, he was quickly convinced it was more than
a scouting-party, as the heads of the enemy’s columns soon
appeared. One coming through Biggerstown, with three
pieces of cannon in their front, immediately fired, with
grape, at the crowd that was standing with General Howe
under a large chestnut-tree. I think I never saw people
enjoy a discharge of grape before; but we really all felt
pleased to see the enemy make such an appearance, and to
hear the grape rattle about the commander-in-chief’s ears,
after he had accused, the battalion of having run away from
a scouting-party. :

‘‘ He rode off immediately at full speed, and we joined the
two brigades that were formed a little way in our rear; but it
was not possible for them to make any stand against Wash-
ington’s whole army, and they all retreated to Germantown,
except Colonel Musgrave, who, with the Fortieth Regiment,
nobly defended Chew’s house till we were re-enforced from
Philadelphia.”

There the letter ended abruptly.

It may be supposed that we were far from sat-
isfied with the way the story broke off. Just as
we had worked ourselves up into a fine state of
excitement, to be left dangling in a state of
uncertainty was cruel.



80 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“What did he mean by ‘Wayne’s affair’?”
one asked. ;
“What had Chew’s house to do with the battle?
and why couldn’t they have marched past it?”

asked another.

“That’s another story,” the veteran replied,
shaking his gray head regretfully. ‘Ah, boys,
fortune o’ war, fortune o’ war.”





Full Text








BY THE SAME AUTHOR

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“FIGHTING THEIR BATTLES OvER AGAIN”
THE WATCH FIRES
Cl 76

BY

SAMUEL ADAMS DRAKE



“ The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay,
Sat by the fire and talked the night away”

Ellustrated

BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET

1895
CopyYRIGHT, 1895, BY SAMUEL ADAMS DRAKE
All Rights Reserved

Tue WatcH Fires or ’76

TYPOGRAPHY BY C. J. PETERS & SON, BOSTON.

PRESSWORK BY ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL.


CONTENTS

THE PENSION AGENT. .

THe First TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION. *.

THE FLIGHT oF HANCOCK AND ADAMS.

THE OLD CocKED Hat

THE READING MINTUE-MEN
THE Kinc’s OWN REGULARS

THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA

ETHAN ALLEN

THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY .

GERMANTOWN...
CuHew’s House . .

HUBBARDTON ....

THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER. .

A ForRTUNATE DISCOVERY

A Moruer’s Love. ....

GENERAL GATES .

THE CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH

THE KIDNAPPING OF GENERAL PRESCOTT.

AT VALLEY FORGE. .

THE FIRE IN THE REAR:
CHRISTOPHER LUDWICK

Stony Point JAcKson .
EIGE-HIRING 9,5 =.
OLp Pur’s GALLows . .
THE SECRET SERVICE.

Davip Gray, THE DouBLeE Spy .

103
110
113
117
121
127
137
140

144

172

181
v1 CONTENTS

THE SPY AND THE INNKEEPER .
CHARLEY MORGAN. . .
WavswortnH’s ESCAPE

FEMALE HEROISM ..

Tue INTREPIDITY OF Miss Ross
THE Story oF A Tory. .
THE YOUNG SENTINEL

A TEMPERANCE SERMON

Our FRENCH ALLIES .

A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS

THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN

CARMEN BELLICOSUM. ....




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



vii

PAGE
“FIGHTING THEIR BATTLES OVER AGAIN” . Frontispiece
PORTRAIT OF WASHINGTON : Se gee eee ACL /C.
THE HEAD OF A PATRIOT . . E aan aNe 2)
BUNKER-HILL MONUMENT : SUSI Eas 7
THE First TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION . coe: 8
ComMBAT AT THE CONCORD BriDGE eels
Province House .. . ; e 15
Boston Boys GuyinG a BRITISH OFFICER ee 22)
Percy MARCHING Out, APRIL 19TH : 25
Russet, House, ARLINGTON, Mass P 30
Hosmer House, Concorp, Mass . 38
A BRITISH GRENADIER . er eat
“T Fert BACK DEPRIVED OF SENSE OR MotION” . , . 44
Tue Heap oF aA TRAITOR. . . , 55
WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE Go 69
CoLoniaL Frac . . . . 5 reer G20 5 : 80
Tue CHew Housr, GERMANTOWN Be ete 81
GENERAL BURGOYNE . . . 3 ae fewer CO,
AN AMERICAN RIFLEMAN . : eae. 97
AN AMERICAN SOLDIER . eae log
THE SILVER BULLET . ae ; 108
GENERAL Horatio Gares . eae : Poe 114
EQurEsTRIAN PoRTRAIT OF WASHINGTON 136
AVES TuRP ODN Ts NG Verena yates ine fae p 6 + 141
Ruins oF Fort Putnam, West Point. . . ae S 147
“STORMING oF Stony Point ... eee Sere 153
vill LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
InmMAN House, CAMBRIDGE, Mass'. . . . .... + 162
WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS, TAPPAN, N.Y... . . 2. 1970
WEAVOR: JORIN ANID 56 6 o 0 6 6 50 0.6 0-0-0 : 173
WASHINGTON’S TREASURE CHEST -. . ....., - 178
Gis IGANG, 5 5G 6 6 0 0° 0:0 6 6 6 6 , 153
SHR ISVS COOTON 5 5 oo 2 5 96 5.0 0 © 0 6 0 0 BOR
WASHINGTON’S SERVICE SWORD, AND STAFF. . . . . . . 207
IBIRICISH 2S OL DINE Race tea ie tet ee oer en emery ee NOT
WWASIETINIGMON) IBEW 5° 5-5 ceo 0 B96 bo 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 Bei
DNV AGT ETT RANT re oe ee ee ee 0)
HIS<@) GEC SVE AC er i sees ee ee mn 2
Doe! Nari Op 178 6 6 o 6 50 6 6 » 6 6 6 0 YO
WORESHONTN, Who a 6 co 0 0 0 0 0 00.0 a 6 6 0 9 0 0 Ae
CORBWWAGHS 9 5 oo 0 0 0 6 0 o oo 6 9 6 0 8 oo BBY
WHERE THE SURRENDER Took PLACE . . ..... . . 259
SVU. © IV VE NIT pe ea ees en et ee O

SHOWIN oo oo 0 6 0 6 6 6 6b 6 6 9 0 06 6 626 AM






WATCH FIRES OF ’76

THE PENSION AGENT

SOME years ago, in the course of my rambles
among the battlefields of old Middlesex, I chanced
to fall in with a hale old gentleman of seventy, or .
thereabouts, in whose company I spent very many
happy hours. He knew the history of all the older
families of the neighborhood by heart. He had
the open sesame to all the old houses, and in not
a few cases also held the key which unlocked
closed chambers and long unused closets, in which
the family skeleton was shut out from the knowl-
edge of a gossiping world.

He told me that he had formerly been a Revolu-
tionary pension agent. Though his clients were
all dead, his occupation gone, his interest in them
had suffered no abatement, and was easily aroused.
His: gray eye would light up whenever we ap-
proached some century-old cottage, as if the bare
sight of it had made him feel twenty years younger,

or had awakened some slumbering recollection.
I
2 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

When we knocked at the door, he seemed to
expect to see one of his former clients standing,
with extended hand, on the threshold. There
was a hesitation in his manner, in his speech,
which showed all too plainly how hard it was
to realize the passing of his own generation.
Together we gleaned the country round of its
secrets. Like another Old
Mortality, he would scrape
away the clinging mosses
from some weather-beaten
headstone with loving
hand, and fall into silent
communion with himself
over the fading inscription
of “A soldier of the Rev-
olution, mustered out.”

Then, as we loitered

homeward, he would tell .
: me some little anecdote,
Tur Heap or a Parrior OF some scrap of history,

which the incident had
called up, to all of which, it is certain, I eagerly
listened.

What a pity, thought I, that all the knowledge
this man has gathered, as it fell from the lips of
those veterans, should perish with him! Upon
this thought I spoke.

“You must have accumulated a vast fund of
information, first and last,’ I suggested,




THE PENSION AGENT 3

By way of reply he threw open a closet door,
and taking down from a shelf one of half a dozen
thick folios, he let it fall on the table before me.

A cloud of light dust rose and floated around
the room, as if we had wantonly disturbed the
ashes of the dead.

I turned over the leaves with a certain feeling
of respect. Muster-rolls, enlistment papers, sworn
affidavits, letters of identification, furloughs and
the like, followed each other in rapid succession.
It was like a disbanded army again collected with-
out order or organization. It was like the head-
stones in the old graveyard across the way.

Impressed with my.idea, I put my finger, at
hazard, on a name against which, in the margin,
there was only a cross. ‘“ Who was this man,
who thus makes his mark?” asked. “Was that
common?”

“Oh,” replied the pension agent, glancing over
my shoulder, “that was my first case. Queer old
chap, that. You should have seen him come hob-
bling in here one day on his crutch. I asked him
the usual questions, made out the application in
proper form, and told him where to sign his
name. He couldn’t do it because he had lost his
right arm, and could only make his mark with
his left. :

“J then asked him for his discharge papers or
other proofs of service.

“* Proofs, proofs,’ the old fellow repeated after
4 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

me, in high dudgeon, ‘here’s one,’ touching his
empty sleeve; ‘here’s another,’ pushing back his
long, scanty white hairs, so as to uncover a deep
scar on his seamy forehead ; ‘and here’s another,
somewhere hereabouts,’ he added, fumbling with
unsteady hand at the buttons of his waistcoat.
‘What more do you want ?’

“Of course I stopped him. ‘Nothing,’ said I
mildly, ‘you need nothing more to convince me ;
but the rules of the pension office are strict, you
see, and must be complied with.’ .

_ «<«T’yve got my gun and ca’tridge-box to home,’
he said doubtfully. ;

“T told him to go home and make search for
the necessary papers. ‘ By-the-by, how did you
lose your arm?’ J asked him as he was going.

“Me? lose my arm? Oh, I lost it at the
storming of Fort Montgomery by the British.
Youve heard tell of that?’ I nodded. ‘Ah,-
that was rough and tumble! We had a cannon
trained on them, loaded chock up to the muzzle
with every kind of thing we could rake and scrape
up, even to old spikes and horseshoes. I was
cannoneer. I was chuckling to myself a thinkin’

_ what kind of a grist we would give them, when up
they come a-hoorarin like time. Says I to my-
self, now’s your time, Jake; give it to ’em. Just
as I was touchin’ her off, a musket-ball from the
‘enemy broke this arm, thug! Like a fool I let
the match drop to the ground. “Steady,” says I
THE PENSION AGENT 5

to myself; “that cannon’s got to be fired.” I
snatched up the match with my left hand, saw it
was lighted, gave it a switch to make sure, and
touched off the piece at the very instant the
enemy were rushing into the fort, shouting, ‘‘ Give
the rebel rascals no quarter!’’ When the smoke
blew off, not a living soul was to be seen nowhere
near. You can tell them that’s why I have to
make my mark. I never learned how to write
with my left hand.’”

“Bravo! I hope he got his pension,” I cried.

“Oh, yes, he got it; but I had a deal of trouble
to establish his claim, all the same. Red tape is
no respecter of persons.”

“The hand that wrote this signature must have
shaken terribly,” I remarked, seeing that my host
had finished. ‘“ What do you make of it?” I
asked. :

“No wonder you're puzzled. That’s Starbuck
Ramsdell. The boys used to call him Old Buck-
ram, for short. ‘Joe,’ he used to say to me, ‘I’ve
settled down in three States. I left one leg in
the Jarseys, an arm in Virginny, and the rest of
me is here in old Massachusetts.’ He used to ask
the parson if he thought a man like him would -
find himself all together on resurrection day.

“Well, when Ramsdell applied to me for his
papers, I asked-him where he had served. Some-
how that question always nettled those old sol-
diers. They seemed to think you were playing
6 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

with them. Poor old Buckram! He was over
eighty, nearly blind, and hardly able to help
himself. He flew up in a moment.

“«Why, first,’ said he, ‘in the old French War. ,
Put that down.’

«««Qh,’ said I, ‘you can’t get a pension for that.
You must have served in the Revolutionary
army.’

« I was at Bunker Hill, afterwards at Long Island,
and the taking of the Hessians at Trenton. Have
you got that down?’

“¢Ves, in black and white.’

««That’s right. Then I was at the attack on
Germantown, in the battle of Monmouth, and
finally at the siege of Yorktown, in Virginia;
and,’ added the old man, his eyes rekindling with
the fire of 76, ‘I was the first American sentinel
placed at the quarters of Lord Cornwallis when
he became an American prisoner.’ ”

Before leaving him, I made my friend promise
to tell me as many more of these stories as he
could remember, and it was accordingly agreed
that we should meet every Thursday evening for

. the purpose; he meanwhile refreshing his memory
by a reperusal of his old documents; while I,
fully alive to the conviction that individual valor
and heroism had never had half the recognition
they deserved, made up my mind that love of
country could have no nobler inspiration than in




THE PENSION AGENT 7

these homely tales of the Continental rank and
file. Brave veterans! those of us who, in our
own generation, have striven to uphold the totter-
ing fabric that your devotion had reared, salute
you!


8 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION



On my part, I took good care that the pension
agent should not forget his promise. -

«Since you were here,” said he at our next
meeting, “I have been ransacking my memory as
well as my old documents ; and, as luck would have
it, I have found some minutes of several informal
meetings, held at the old village tavern, years and
years ago. In fact, I had forgotten all about
them. The tavern was a place of much resort
for my clients, the veterans; but at first it was
like pulling teeth to get them to talk at all; nor
would they until I had broken the ice myself.
Now imagine yourself in that tavern, and fancy
that you hear them talking through my lips,
if you can.” With this preamble he thus pro-
ceeded : —

“Among other relics of the old Revolutionary
times, sacredly preserved in the State House at
Boston, is an old king’s arm with a history. No
soldier would ever dream of carrying such a
clumsy affair nowadays; indeed, visitors are often
THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE “REVOLUTION 9

heard to remark that the gun looks as if it would
do greater hurt to the one who should fire it than
the'one fired at ; yet it was with just such weapons
as this that the battle was won and independence
achieved. I will give you the story of this mus-
ket as well as I can; because from seeing it ex-
hibited in so public a place, visitors are naturally
curious about it. :

“Now, this old rusty king’s arm is something
more than a musket. To be sure, I cannot well
explain the curious association that exists between
a thing made of wood, iron, and brass, and the
event in which it may have borne a part. But so
it is. I should call it a sort of conductor between
mind and matter. For instance, at the Springfield
arsenal you will probably see thousands of mus-
kets. Yet who cares for them? Now, with this
one it is different. It is a sort of talisman to the
memory. Give it but a rub, and, like the magi-
cian’s lamp in the tale, it whisks you away in an
instant across the gulf of time. The past lives
again, and you live in it.”

Thus spoke the pension agent, whose business
had often taken him to the State House, there to
delve among the musty archives of that past of
which he had become almost a part himself.

It is an episode of the Nineteenth of April,
1775 — the beginning of the war for independence,
10 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

the ending of British dominion over her American
colonies. If, now, it should appear that this very
musket had fired the first shot, people would look
upon it with almost superstitious awe. But of
that we are not quite certain. It may or may not
be so.

Everybody knows that Hancock and Adams
were staying at the Rev. Jonas Clark’s house on
the night of the 18th. Hancock’s sweetheart was
staying there too. You can put this and that
together as well as I.

During that afternoon several British officers
were seen riding up the main road in the town.
This aroused the suspicions of some of our people,
who knew them to be British officers, although
they were so disguised as to look like honest
men.

Very early in the morning word was brought
to Hancock and Adams that a British force was
on the way to Lexington, designed, it was sup-
posed, to get possession of their persons, and also
to destroy the military stores at Concord. In
fact, it could mean nothing else. First one mes-
senger rode up in hot haste, then another, both
with the same startling story —“The regulars
are coming!” “The regulars are coming!”

They had been seen getting under arms, had
been watched while crossing the bay, and were
now, no doubt, well on their march, which they
hoped and expected would be as complete a sur-
THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 11

prise as General Gage had meant it should be.
On their way up to Concord they could easily lay
hands on those two arch-rebels, Hancock and
Adams, clap a pair of handcuffs on each one of
them, destroy the stores, overawe the people by
this display of force, and presto, the infant rebel-
lion would be strangled in its cradle. That was
General Gage’s logic.

“Man proposes and God disposes.” The mes-
sengers had only succeeded in passing the pickets
by the skin of their teeth, and by hard riding had
got far ahead of the marching column, setting
the church bells ringing, rousing people in a fright
from their beds, and spreading the alarm as they
went, from village to village, and from door to
door. And still on they went.

All that, every schoolboy knows so well that
it is hardly worth while to repeat it here.

About that musket. John Parker, yeoman, was
captain of the Lexington company of minute-
men. There never was a better name given, as
every man was pledged to turn out at a minute’s
notice. Well, the alarm was soon spreading on
every side; and, as the enemy’s force was reported
to be very large, besides warning the minute-men,
messengers were sent off through the town, call-
ing out the regular militiamen as well. The church
bell on the green also struck up, sounding ten
times louder and more startling than it ever did in
the daytime. Lights were soon flashing in the
12 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

windows, windows went up, doors flew open, and
voices were heard timidly asking what was the
matter. No more sleep that night.

Captain Parker lived about two and a half
miles from the meeting-house on the Common,
which was the place of rendezvous agreed upon
in case of an alarm. He had been there late in
the evening to see Hancock and Adams about
calling out his men, in case it should be neces-
sary. Parker went to bed late, feeling quite ill.
About two o’clock he was called up by the mes-
sengers referred to, and went in haste to the meet-
ing-house. There he formed his company on the
Common, a little after daybreak, and ordered the
roll called. About a hundred and twenty men
-answered to their names, armed and equipped ;
but as some doubted the truth of the reports
brought in, Parker dismissed them, with the order
to be within call, ready to fall in at the tap of the
drum. Not long after, one of his own scouts re-
turned, bringing the startling news that the British
were close at hand.

Parker then ordered the drum beat in front of
the tavern, near by the Common. It is there
now. Seventy men fell in, were formed in four
platoons, and marched into the Common to the
music of a fife and drum. Parker’s nephew, Jona-
than Harrington, then a lad of sixteen, played the
fife that morning.

After forming his men in line, Parker ordered




THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 13

them to load with powder and ball. There was a
famous rattling of ramrods. When this was done,
he said, “ Men, don’t fire unless fired upon; but if
they want war, let it begin now and here.” He
then took his station at a little in front of the
company’s right wing, and waited.



CoMBAT aT THE CONCORD BRIDGE

Soon the British came marching up, in full view,
with Pitcairn on his horse at their head. Some
of Parker’s men were so terrified that they began
to slink off out of harm’s way. Seeing this, the
captain drew his sword, and calling on them by
name to come back, said he would order the first
man shot who should show the white feather.

You know what followed —the fire of the Brit-
14 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

ish, the return of the fire, the killing of eight of
Parker’s company, his order to them to disperse
and to take care of themselves.

After they were gone, the British soldiers gave
three loud cheers, and halted for half an hour or
so to eat their breakfasts, after which they marched
off at a quick step for Concord. But they came
back quicker.

Upon their leaving the ground, Captain Parker
and his men came back, took up the dead, looked
after the wounded, and tried to realize what had
happened. Bloodshed had happened ; death had
stricken down the flower of the little village ; war
had begun. Where would it all end?

Then it was that fear left the breast of every
‘true man, and thirst for revenge steeled every
true heart. The minute-men grasped their mus-
kets, and followed on after the royal troops. Cap-
tain Parker saw a British soldier, who had loitered
behind, sitting by the roadside. The man was too
far gone in drink to keep up with the marching
column. Parker instantly seized and disarmed
him. Besides his musket, he carried a knapsack,
blankets, haversack, and cartridge-box, with sixty
rounds of ammunition in it. Captain Parker kept
them as the spoils of war, as did also his son, and
so likewise his grandson, before they finally passed
into the keeping of the State of Massachusetts.
This is that very same musket.

“A great affair, truly,’ said I, when I saw he




THE FIRST TROPHY OF THE REVOLUTION 15

had finished his story, “to take away a helpless
man’s gun!”

“Never mind,’ he returned, with a quiet
chuckle, “it was the first trophy of the Revolu-
tion — the very first.”


16 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS

My father was town clerk, justice of the peace,
and general factotum for all the country round;
the man, in short, to whom everybody goes for
advice. He knew every family in the county —
knew all about them away back as far’as the first
settler of the name. After the battle of Lexing-
ton he took down the depositions of a number of
his townspeople whose houses had either been
burned or plundered, or both; for at that time it
was the very general expectation that these losses
would be made good to them.

Sometimes, of an evening, mother would glance
up from her knitting-work at father’s face, and if
she thought he was in the right mood, would say
to him, ‘‘ Father, why can’t you tell the children
about -those folks who used to live down by the
Hollow, on the Woburn road ?”’

“What folks ?”

“Oh, you know who I mean— those women
down there, who helped Hancock and Adams to
get away so cleverly on the night after the battle
was fought.”

We all knew that father was only making
believe, for he dearly loved to tell a story, and, for


THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS 17

that matter, few could tell one better. So we all
teased him to begin.

“Oh, that’s an old story,’ he would say
evasively.

“What if itis? I want these children to know
that the men-folks were not the only ones who
faced dangers, and went through hardships, for
their country’s sake,’ mother would very earnestly
reply.

As near as I can recollect, the tale ran about as
follows : —

It was late on that night of the Nineteenth of
April, 1775. Mrs. Vallette and her friend Mrs.
Reed were sitting over a few dying embers, in
their home at Lexington, with their infants in
their arms. The clock had struck eleven — guns”
had been heard throughout the day —the firing
had ceased ; and they sat talking over the perils
of the times, when Mrs. Reed said, “Hark! I
hear footsteps.”

“Tt is only the rustling of the trees, and we will
not be needlessly alarmed,” said Mrs. Vallette,
pressing at the same time her infant closer to her
heart, as if fearful it might be wrested from her,
and trying to assume a courage which she did
not feel.

At that moment a gentle rap at the door was
heard.

“ Who is there ?”’ asked Mrs. Reed, in a tremu-
lous tone, hardly above a whisper.
18 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

“Friends,” replied a low voice, speaking through
the small hole where the cord had been drawn in
to prevent the lifting of the latch outside, for few
doors had locks and keys in those simple times.

They immediately opened the door; and three
men, each muffled in a long cloak, entered in pro-
found silence.

“Do not be alarmed, ladies,” said one, in the
same low tone of voice; “we are friends to our
country, and are pursued by the enemy; we have
hid in the woods through the day, and have come
now to seek your bounty, and a shelter for the
night.”

« And these you should have with all my heart,”
said Mrs. Reed, whose countenance brightened
up when she found that instead of the dreaded
enemy, her guests were those distinguished pa-
triots, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and Paul
Revere. ‘But,’ she continued, ‘you would not
be safe here a moment. Why, the redcoats are
prowling around us in every direction ; they were
here only yesterday, eating up all my pies, and
bread and cheese, and because they could not find
enough at my neighbors’ to satisfy their hunger,
they must needs rip open their beds, and leave
their cider running out. Oh, sir, these are dread-
ful times !”’

“They are, indeed, madam,” said Mr. Hancock.
“But, gentlemen,” he said, turning to his com-
panions, “what shall we do, for it is certain we
are not safe here ?”


THE FLIGHT OF HANCOCK AND ADAMS 19

They looked at each other, but did not speak.

“ Flave you any neighbors,” asked Mr. Hancock,
“where we might find safety for the night?”

“None except my father,” replied Mrs. Reed,
“who lives five miles off, on the main road. It
would be dangerous for you to go by the road, and
you could not find your way through the woods ;
and we have neither man nor boy to guide you ;
they have all gone to fight the redcoats.”

“Will you stay alone and nurse my baby,”
asked Mrs. Vallette of her friend, “while I go
and show these gentlemen the way?”

She answered, “I will do so, though it is sad to
be alone in such dangerous times. But you must
not go; you are not able, you are lame, and never
walked a mile at once in your life; you must not
think of going on this wet night.” Mrs. Vallette
had had the misfortune to fall and break her back,
and was ever afterward an invalid and a cripple.

Mrs. Vallette made no reply ; she knew there
was not a moment to be lost ; so laying her infant
in the arms of her friend, she wrapped her riding-
hood ‘around her, and desired the gentlemen to
~ follow her.

When they saw this deformed little woman, not
more than four feet high, prepared to walk a dis-
tance of over three miles, they looked at each
other in astonishment; but not a word was spoken,
for the case was desperate.

Mrs. Vallette, taking the proffered arm of Mr.
20 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

Hancock, they went forward, the other two gen-
tlemen bringing up the rear. The rain which had
fallen for some days previous, had so swelled the
brooks, that the gentlemen were obliged at times
to lift Mrs. Vallette overthem. Thus wading and
walking, they reached the farm-house at about
three o'clock in the morning.

No sooner had they aroused the family, and
made known who they were and what they
wanted, than every one was up and in motion ;
and even the dog tried to show them by his gam-
bols that they should find protection. A blazing
fire soon shone forth on the hearth, and a plenti-
ful repast was provided; and notwithstanding the
gloominess of the times, a degree of cheerfulness,
and even humor, pervaded the little company.

At early dawn a carriage was prepared to con-
vey Mrs. Vallette home to her infant. Mr. Han-
cock politely lifted her into the carriage, and said,
“Madam, our first meeting has been in trouble-
some times. God only knows when these scenes
will end; but should we both survive the struggle,
and you should ever need a friend, think of me.”

“There, children,” said mother triumphantly.
“Tt was a woman who saved King Charles from
his enraged pursuers ; and it was a woman who
led the proscribed American patriots to a place
of safety.”

“Do tell!” said father dryly.
THE OLD COCKED HAT 21

THE OLD COCKED HAT

HeERE’s another story of Concord Fight, as told
by one of my pensioners.

A Boston boy, I was born in an old house on
Copp’s Hill, near the burying-ground, which, I can
promise you, I gave a wide berth after dark. I
lived with my grandparents, my own father hav-
ing been lost at sea. The old folks used to give
me the run of the house; and many is the romp.
I’ve had, playing hide-and-seek around the huge
chimney-stack in the garret, knocking my head
against the big, cobwebbed rafters, from which
all sorts of old cast-off clothes were hanging limp
and forlorn. How they did scare me!

Being a boy, what most charmed me in this
museum of antiquities was an old sword, with the
blade peeping out at the end of the scabbard, just
like Jim Bolles the tinker’s toes out of his boots.
It went beyond my small strength to draw it, so
firmly was the weapon rusted in the sheath; but
with it loosely belted round me, and dragging on
the floor behind me, and an old cocked hat —
which to my surprise fitted me exactly — stuck on
my head, I doubt if any veteran just returned
from victorious fields ever felt prouder than I.
22 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

But we know it is not the sword alone that
makes the soldier, any more than it is the dress
that makes the man.

One day, equipped as I have described, I ven-
tured down-stairs to where grandfather was sitting
by the fireside smoking his pipe, with one eye
shut, and with the other meditatively watching
the smoke slowly curling upward along the low
ceiling. At the clatter on the stairs, and the
queer figure I cut, the old man took his pipe from
his mouth, straightened himself up, and when I
had made him a mock salute, said with a quiet
chuckle, —

. Well,. lad, ready for action, I see. Do you
mean to attack our old four-post bedstead, or will
you try a bout with the pump, out in the back-
yard?”

“ But, grandpa,” said I, “where in the wide
world did you get this rusty old sword, and this
funny old hat?”

“Come here, boy,” said the old man; and tak-
ing from my head the thing which appeared so
ridiculous to me, he put his finger through a hole
I had not before noticed, and said very gravely,
“two inches lower, and the bullet would have
gone through my head.”

“Where? when?” I breathlessly exclaimed,
quite overcome by the thought of grandfather’s
narrow escape, as well as by the impressive way
in which he spoke of it.

d












Boston Boys GuyinG A BRITISH OFFICER




THE OLD COCKED HAT 23

“ At Concord Fight, in the year °75. You've
read of that,.my boy, in your Be book, I'll be
bound.”

“To be sure I have; and about General Gage
and Pitcairn, and the minute-men. It is also
called the Battle of Lexington. Oh, do, grandpa,
tell me all about it. You don’t know how I love
to hear you talk about war and battles.”

“Well, tis an old story. But sit down, my boy,
and.listen. You shall hear my first experience of
strife and bloodshed.

Grandfather gave the backlog a stir, refilled his
pipe, settled himself comfortably back in the old
rush-bottomed chair, and thus began : —

“T was just fourteen in April, ’75, and lived in
this same house, built by my grandfather a hun-
dred years before. On my way to and from
school, I passed every day the barracks of the
king’s soldiers, for at that time Boston was a gar-
risoned town. Some of them were always loiter-
ing about, and I grew quite accustomed to hear
myself called a young rebel by the redcoat gen-
try. But my cheeks would burn for many a long
hour after. I must not forget to mention that I
had got acquainted with a boy of about my own
age, called Tony Apthorp, drummer-boy of the
Welsh Fusileers, who now and then invited me
into the barracks, and had even taught me how to
beat the drum a little.

“One fine morning I started off for school, as
24 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

usual. When I got to the barracks, the redcoats
were forming out in the street as if for parade;
but even I, boy that I was, knew by their faces
that something unusual was going on. The ser-
geants were serving out ammunition, while the
goat of the corps, a prime favorite with us boys,
was loudly bleating in the barrack-yard. Such a
look as Tony gave me! not a bit like his usual
mocking expression. Even the surly old drum-
major let me pass without a word. I was lost in
wonder.

“While I stood looking at the men,— some of
whom were buttoning their gaiters, others trying
‘ the locks of their muskets, —an aid came down
the street at full gallop.

“«Ffalloo, there, Royals!’ said he; ‘where is
your officer ?’

« A sergeant stepped out of the ranks, and made
a salute. The officer then ordered the detachment
to march; but the men did not stir a step.

«Does he take us for raw recruits, like him-
self?’ growled some of those grizzled veterans.

“Tt is his excellency’s command,’ said the aid
angrily, starting off as fast as his horse could
carry him.

“«Vou should have said so at first, young
greenhorn,’ muttered the old sergeant, fixing his ~°
bayonet. ‘Come along, lads, come along; the
general must not be kept waiting.’

“The soldiers shouldered their firelocks, and








APRIL 19TH

?

ARCHING OUT

Percy M


THE OLD COCKED HAT 25

took their way towards the Common. I soon lost
sight of them in a turn of the street.

“ When I reached the schoolhouse door, I found
it shut fast. A group of wondering urchins were
loitering there, each asking the other the mean-
ing of these strange proceedings. But we were
true schoolboys, and, provided our holiday did not
disappoint us, cared not a button where it came
from. Just then an upper window. was thrown
open, and the schoolmaster called out to us : —

“ «Boys, war has begun ; school is dismissed!’

«« Some one proposed that we should follow the
‘rig’lars ;’ a proposal no sooner made than agreed
to. Away we scampered, in the route the troops
‘had just taken. By this time every one we met
seemed strangely excited ; and I scarcely remem-
bered that I would not have ventured above the
mill-bridge the day before, for fear of a sound
drubbing from the South End boys.

“When we came near the Common, a long line
of soldiers extended to the head of the mall in
Long-Acre, and in their midst were two brass
cannon I had so often gazed at with admiration
and awe. At command of Lord Percy, the rig’lars
shouldered their muskets, and moved off towards
the Neck. We boys followed on in the rear, tak-
ing care to keep a good distance behind the
marching column. I well remember that the fifes
struck up ‘ Yankee Doodle,’ as they often did, just
to plague our people,
26 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

“By this time the whole town knew that the
tig’lars had gone out the night before to destroy
the stores at Concord, and that Lord Percy had
been sent to re-enforce them. It was just as we
came to the George Tavern that I noticed a small
boy seated astride a fence, laughing so immoder-
ately I felt sure he must be a born idiot, for I
assure you I saw nothing to laugh at.

« «What are you laughing at, sirrah?’ demanded
his lordship sternly.

«To think how you'll dance to another tune
by and by,’ replied the young scape-grace, scam-
pering off, out of harm’s way.

“Lord Percy gave his horse the spur, and gal-
loped off to the front, as if these idle words had
called up something in his mind he would rather
have forgotten at that moment. If you should
ever read the old ballad of ‘Chevy Chase,’ you
will understand what I mean.

“We had got quite through Little Cambridge,
now Brighton, when an express from General
Gage overtook the troops. The courier rode
straight up to the earl, and, lifting his hat, deliv-
ered his errand in a few hurried words. His lord-
ship turned in his saddle, and exclaimed, —

“On! press on! God’s life, gentlemen! we
shall be too late!’

“Urged on by their officers, the soldiers marched
silently and with a quickened pace. The road
was deserted. Every house was shut up. Nota


THE OLD COCKED HAT 27

living soul was to be seen as we passed by. Now
and then our ears caught the sound of some dis-
tant alarm bell. Once in a while we even thought
we could catch the report of distant gunshots. At
hearing these ill-omened noises in the air, some of
our comrades began to lag behind, but a few of us
kept on, more because we wouldn’t give ourselves
the time to think, than from superior courage.
Boys will be boys, you know. We soon reached
the bridge leading to the colleges, and I heard
the word passed to halt, prime, and load. The
cannoneers lighted their matches. These orders
being executed, the troops impatiently awaited
the word to march; but it did not come. The
officers impatiently slashed the bushes by the
roadside with their swords, and demanded of each
other what was up.

“
“ «Then the rebels mean to make a stand here,’
said another.

“Tis what I most wish for, next to my din-
ner,’ ejaculated a third.

““My throat is full of this infernal Yankee
dust,’ observed a fourth, carrying his well-filled
canteen to his lips. ‘Here’s confusion to the
whole rebel crew!’

“The bridge was soon made passable, and the
troops crossed. Before we followed, I picked up
a handful of musket-balls where. they had stood.
At the colleges, an officer sternly forbade our fol-
28 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

lowing the column farther; and as we were thor-
oughly tired out, after quenching our thirst at a
neighboring well, we threw ourselves down upon
the grass to rest.

“The rig’lars were hardly out of sight, when the
roads in every direction seemed swarming with
men, some in little squads of two’s and three’s,
some with the semblance of military order, but all
armed with muskets or fowling-pieces, and every
one looking eager and determined. They halted,
by common consent, on the college green. An
angry murmur of many voices, every instant
growing more and more threatening, came out of
the throng, as their numbers increased. They
seemed undecided what to do next.

“«« The bridge is where we ought to have stopped
them,’ I heard one strapping fellow call out.

«So we might, if the planks hadn’t been piled
up on the wrong side; too bad, too bad!’

“A roar of rage and disappointment went up
from two hundred lusty throats. It subsided ina
moment, and I heard a voice, very calm, but clear
asa bell, speaking rapidly. Every word cut like
a whip-lash.

“ the two detachments from forming a junction, as
I hoped we might; but so long as we’re between
them and their quarters, shall we let them march.
back unscathed? Hark!’ The distant booming
of a cannon broke the stillness. The speaker, who
THE OLD COCKED HAT 29

had been standing quietly in the middle of the
minute-men, now pushed _ his way out of the
throng. Oh, he was a beautiful looking young
man, armed with a fusee and hanger.

“< Why do we stand here idle, when our
brethren are being slaughtered by the king’s
cut-throats? We have them between two fires.
Let all who are willing to strike one good blow
for liberty, follow me!’

“ How brave he looked as he said this, his eye
sparkling, his fine form drawn up to its full
height! I thought I had never beheld such an
heroic countenance.

“Ay, avenge them! Down with the bloody-
backs!’ shouted the multitude.

“Lead us on, Doctor!’ cried several voices ;
and I then knew it was Warren who had first
spoken,

“Waving his fusee toward the enemy, Warren
put himself at the head of our people, who started
off at a brisk pace up the road. As excited as the
rest, without a moment’s reflection, I joined them.
We soon heard firing at no great distance. By
our leader’s advice, we now made a circuit across
the fields so as to reach the road again unperceived
at a point where it descends from a great pile of
granite ledges into the plain. It is what military
men call a defile. Here we concealed ourselves
among the bushes and trees, on both sides of the
road, Indian fashion. The place where we lay
30 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

hid is known as the Foot of the Rocks, to this
day.

“Cannon firing now grew rapid and clearer.
At every peal my heart
gave a great thump;
but I tell you, boy, I
had little idea of what
was coming.

“«There they are!’
“Sure enough, there











RusseLL Housz, ARLINGTON, Mass.

With cellar-way showing bullet-holes. (Eleven Americans were killed at
this house.)

they were, coming down the narrow road in a
cloud of dust, and that cloud spitting out fire
right and left. Every house they came to was
THE OLD COCKED HAT 31

saluted with a volley; and we were maddened to
desperation by the sight of feeble womén, with
babes in their arms, flying shrieking across the
' fields, while these miscreants fired and hooted at
them, like so many demons let loose. Then up
would leap the red flames from the dwellings that
those poor, terrified creatures had just quitted.”

The old man had kept his pipe lighted, giving
now and then an angry whiff between whiles ; but
he had now got so worked up over his recollec-
tions, that he bit the stem of his pipe short off.

“Don’t stop, grandpa! How did it end?” J
exclaimed.

“Waal, boy, we just let the rig’lars clear our
hiding-place, and then, with a yell of rage, our
men fell on their rear. I forgot I had no earthly
weapon but a stout hickory stick, and shouted,
and rushed into the thickest of the mé/ée with the
rest. The first thing I knew, the soldiers faced
about, and gave us a volley slap in our faces. I
thought the day of judgment had come, sartin’
sure. How like fiends they looked, panting with
rage and heat, and with faces: begrimed with
powder and dirt! Well, I guess we looked as
wicked to them as they did to us.

“ An officer on horseback waved the rig’lars on,
his sword in one hand, his hat in the other.

“*Upon them, my gallant Fusileers! Give
them the cold steel! Drive the rebel pack to
their kennels !’
32 LHE WATCH FIRES OF "76

“*Down with the murderers! Kill the assas-
sins !’ we yelled back at them. I jest tell you,
bullets and curses flew thick and fast that day.
Oh, we peppered them good, and they know it!

“The soldiers were actually pushed along by
our onset, some falling every instant under the
deadly fire. Presently, a shot knocked the officer
from his horse, at which a cheer went up from
our side. Then we made another rush, and forced
the enemy toarun. A poor devil of a drummer-
boy was just in front of me. I sprang upon him,
and brought him to the ground. Lo and behold!
it was Tony, my chum of the Royals. It was the
work of an instant to take away his drum, put it
on, and then to follow the throng, beating the
charge like a drummer gone mad. My prisoner
kept close at my heels. Our people saw my
capture, and heard my drum. As for me, I
hurrahed myself hoarse, and got this hole in my
hat.”

Here the old man paused, quite breathless,

“Plague on’t!’’ he at length exclaimed; “here’s
my pipe gone out, and the fire too. What’ll
granny say?”


THE READING MINUTE-MEN 33

THE READING MINUTE-MEN

Tue pension agent now invited me to consider
myself as listening to the pensioners themselves.

Deacon Adoniram Short, who, by the way,
stood some six feet two in his blue yarn stock-
ings, having pleaded conscientious scruples against
drawing lots to see who should tell the next story,
was finally persuaded into telling one of his own
free choice. Like some other people whom I
have known, he only needed a little coaxing.
After leaning back in his chair as far as safety to
his long person would permit, and dovetailing his
hands together as a support to the back of his
very bald head, he delivered himself as follows :—

“TI s’pose, friends, you’ve all heard how Colo-
nel Barrett’s house, up in Concord town, was one
of the places where our ammunition was stored
agin’ the time when we should give it to the
British. If they'd only waited a little longer
they might have had it for nuthin’!

“Well, tew days before they come out, I
hauled an even ton of bullets, with my tew old
hosses, over from Reading. I lived in Reading
then, and done teaming when I could get it.
34 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

When I got to Colonel Barrett’s, they told me to
drive over yon into the rye-field, where some
men in their shirt-sleeves were hard at work dig-
ging a big hole in the ground. They told me to
dump the bullets into the hole, and I done it.

*« Vou don’t expect ’em to sprout without pow-
der, do ye?’ said I to one of the diggers, who
was shovelling the dirt back into the hole, and
stamping it down with his feet.

“« Dunno, mebbe so; some say they come up
first rate if you don’t plant too deep,’ he replied
with a sort o’ knowing wink at me. ‘At any rate,
they won't spile.’

“Waal, says I, winking back at him, ‘if that’s
so, I'll jest take a handful home for seed.’ So off
I drove.

“T b’longed to our minute-company. I was
corporal. Captain Brooks was our captain, Dave
Butters orderly sergeant. There was seventy-five
of us, all big, strong fellows, who didn’t take no
dare from nobody, either drillin’ or shootin’ at a
mark. Our captain was clear grit through and
through, if he was a doctor; and we all sot as
much by him as anybody could. And I guess he
did by us.

“After ['d put up my team, I went over to
have a little talk with the captain.

«Hello, Shorty, is that you?’ he sung out,
when I poked my head into his office. ‘Come

in.’
THE READING MINUTE-MEN 35

“*It’s me, Cap,’ says I, ‘and I’m goin’ to put a
flea in your ear.’ I then up and told him where
I had been, and what goings-on I had seen.

“His tone changed in a minute. ‘Corporal
Short, notify your platoon to report for duty at
the meeting-house after dark to-night. You know
where the key is kept?’ I nodded so; he went
on: ‘You keep watch by reliefs till sun-up. If
nothing happens by that time you can go home.
Take care I don’t catch one of you napping; if I
do, I'll break him. Now go warn your men. Off
with you!’

“There was mischief brewing. I see it in his eye.

“Nothing happened that night. The captain
didn’t come round, though, ’cause as soon’s ’twas
dark he’d saddled his old bay mare and rode off
to Boston full tilt. Next day he was back again,
lookin’ sober as a— as a—

“«Say deacon,’ some one suggested, seeing
Adoniram halting for a word.

“Well, deacon, then,’ Adoniram continued,
chuckling a little to himself. ‘Well, the cap’ he
came back chock full of something he’d picked up
in Boston. He rode round town as usual, making
calls on his patients, but somehow or other most
all his patients that day were minute-men. At
each house, it was noticed, he left the same pre-
scription: ‘To-night; Weston’s corner; sixty
rounds.’ At each house visited he received the
same response, ‘We shall be there.’
36 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“On his way home the captain stopped before
the minister’s gate. The parson came out lookin’
as stiff as a drum-major, and the two men held a
whispered talk together.

“The parson stood with his hand on the horse’s
mane, looking up into the young captain’s face till
he had done speaking.

“« These are fine words you have just spoken ;
but will you have the courage to repeat them to
others besides an old man like me?’

*««Tn the face
of all the world,
and even of my
Maker.’

“<«Well said.
I have waited
long for this
visit and for just
such areply. But —pardon me— if worst comes
to worst, do you think you can be cool on the
ground?’



PITCAIRN’S PISTOLS

“*T do not know. But you may depend upon
it, that if I do lose my head, it will always be at
the front.’

“*God be with you, then. Good-night.’

“¢ Good-night.’

“The men began stealing off for the rendez-
vous as soon as it grew dark, As I’d been on
duty all night before, the captain said he’d excuse
me, on my promise to be at the rendezvous bright
and early in the morning.
THE READING MINUTE-MEN 37

“T was just putting. the bridle on Old Calico,
when I heard the clatter of a horse going by the
house at a great rate, as if he’d run away. While
I was listenin’, somebody shouted out at the top
of his voice, ‘Turn out! turn out! the rig’lars are
comin’ !?

“Tn five minutes the meetin’-house bell struck
up at a lively rate. In ten, the whole village was
turned topsy-turvy. When I got outdoors every-
body was a-streakin’ it for the green, where the
courier sat on his steamin’ horse with a crowd
around him, all talkin’ and gesticulatin’ at once.
The parson he stood on the top step of the porch
with a gun in his hand.

“Just as I turned my horse’s head down the
road, my wife, Marthy, ran out to the gate. She
had one corner of her apron in her mouth, and
looked as if she was goin’ to bust right out cryin’.

“«Come back you, Adoniram,’ sez she. ‘You
ain’t goin’ off lookin’ so. How ’shamed I should
be to have you taken up dead with that old waist-
coat on.’

“TI got to the rendezvous: Nobody there, so
I pushed on quicker ; and a mile or two further
on, where the road crosses the Widow Peters’s
medder (she had money fell to her), I overtook our
boys. I put up my horse in her barn, and j’ined
the company.

“Whenever we halted for a minute or two’s
rest, we could hear the sound of distant bells or
38 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

blowin’ of horns, and now and then a gun-shot
would crack away. That made us move on all
the faster. We were 'fraid the fightin’ would
be. all over before we could take a hand in it.

“When we got to where our road and the
one from Chelmsford come together, we fell in
with Colonel Bridge, to whose regiment we be-
longed. -

“We were glad enough to see them, and they
us. .‘There come the man-eaters!’ we hollered
out to them.

“«What do you know about war? You never
fired a gun!’ they hollered back.

“The regiment, or as much of it as Bridge had
been able to get together, was also on the march
to Concord. Captain Brooks saluted, and reported
for orders. Colonel Bridge said to him, ‘I’m glad
you’ve come up, Captain: we will halt here, give
our men some refreshment, and then push on
for Concord.’ To this Brooks replied, ‘My men
have just refreshed themselves; and as I think
there is no time to be lost, with your leave,
Colonel, I will push ahead; and, as neither of -us
knows just what is going on over there, if I
should get into trouble, I shall know that you
are following me, and shall have you to fall back
upon.’ ‘You may go,’ the colonel replied, ‘ but
be careful not to get too far ahead.’

’“QOur captain then ordered us forward again.

“We had gone astrong mile, I should say, when


Hosmer House, Concorp, Mass.
THE READING MINUTE-~MEN 39

we met a courier, looking for us. In afew hurried
words he told the captain how matters stood, how
the enemy (for as such they had now shown them-
selves) had fired upon our men, how the fire had
been returned, and how, if we expected. to do any
good, now was our time. Nota man of us could
stand still. The news made us as skittish as a lot
of two-year-old colts.

“ As luck would have it, we had arrived in time
to intercept the villains.

“* Ride back, as hard as you can, till you meet
Colonel Bridge. Tell him what you've told me.
Don’t spare the spur. Away with you!’

“We halted only long enough to load. Every
man looked well to his priming. Every face was
set for what was coming. As I was feelin’ pretty
fresh, I was sent on ahead, with a file of men, to
see what we could scare up.

“When we had come quite near to the main road
from Concord to Lexington, we saw some seventy
or eighty men, making their way across a hillside,
which rose between us and the village. They
seemed to be watching us. ‘They were redcoats
retreating.

“Captain Brooks at first took these men for some
scattered party of ourown. The fact Is, they were
the enemy’s flankers. He therefore halted us,
until he discovered his mistake, which he soon
did upon seeing this flank-guard fall in with the
main body, to cross a bridge down the road, below
40 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

the hill which had hid them from us. The enemy
was in full retreat.

“Finding his position could not be outflanked,
Brooks then ordered us to advance to Merriam’s
Corner, where we were covered by a barn and
some stone walls (for all I know the old barn’s
there now).; and as soon as we were securely
posted, he gave the order to fire straight at the
crowded bridge, not more than twenty or thirty
rods off. We let ’em hev.

“ As the enemy were in a great hurry, they fired
only one volley at us in return. They shot wild.
Our men took deliberate aim, and every shot told.
After they had all crossed the bridge we followed
them up, loading and firing, and either on or near
it, nine dead bodies were lying where they had
fallen, unde: the unerring aim of the Reading
minute-men.” i

«That just about squared the account for those
of our men killed on Lexington Green, without
provocation, in the morning,” observed one of
the deacon’s most interested listeners.

“How great a matter a little fire kindleth,”
added another.






A BRITISH GRENADIER, 1775




THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 4l

‘THE KING'S OWN REGULARS

“One story’s good till another’s told,” said

Jotham Beard, contemplatively punching the fire
with his iron-shod staff. “Now, for my part, I
always like to hear both sides, then you can put
this and that together, and perhaps get the rights
of it.”
“Don’t you b’leeve what your own folks say?
I do,” remarked Reddy, rather testily. “Id
b’leeve the deacon, here, ten times over, before I
would a Britisher,” he added.

“That reminds me of the Dutch judge, out in
York State, who was trying a case of assault and
battery. He refused to hear the defendant’s
counsel, because he said he could decide the case
so much better by hearing only one side.”

There was a ripple of laughter at Reddy’s
expense. But he took it all in good part, though
vigorously maintaining his own opinion.

“Go on, Jotham, with your other side,” said
several voices. ‘“Court’s open, and the jury’s all
good men and true.”

“So be it, then. You know, I was second
officer of a Marblehead privateer. We cruised
out in the bay, looking for what we could pick up
42 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

in an honest way, and one day we gave chase to a
transport ship bound out. She gave us a long
chase; but at last we came up with her off the
Salvages, fired a shot across her bows, and ordered
her to heave-to. She hove to.

“When we boarded her the captain tried to
throw his mail-bag overboard ; but I fished it out
of the water with a boat-hook before it could
sink, and after we had taken our prize into port,
we went through the contents.

‘They were mostly letters from officers of the
British army to their friends at home. After
reading them through, we sent the whole batch to
General Ward, to do what he pleased with them.
Some, I believe, were eventually returned to the
writers, who probably chose a safer mode of de-
livery next time. I hope so. They had wives
and sweethearts over the water, those Britishers.
Though enemies, they were men. Why, some of
the letters had little keepsakes in them.”

“Yes, and I've got one of their little keepsakes
in my left leg now,’ growled the irreconcilable
Reddy.

“Come, no more interruptions; open your
budget, Jotham,” commanded the deacon author-
itatively.

« Sartain; here it is,’ Jotham returned, pro-
ducing a bundle of papers from his side pocket,
putting on his spec’s, and unfolding a sheet of
yellow foolscap. “Listen, all.”
THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 43

‘Boston, May 5, 1775.

«« Won't my dear Bess be more pleased with hearing I am
well and hearty, than with the account of all the world
besides? That I am so, God alone can, in his goodness,
account for... . The tale would last a winter's night, so
some Christmas, when we have exhausted all our gambols,
you shall have a history of our late frolic. At present, it
would seem we have the worst of the fight, for, however we
block up their port, the rebels certainly block up our town,
and have cut off our good beef and mutton, much to the dis-
comfiture of our mess.

‘** But while I get sufficient to sustain life, though of the
coarsest food, with two nights out of three in bed, I shall not
repine, but rejoice that fortune has given me a constitution
to endure fatigue, and prove that it is accident, not inclina-
tion, that has made me hitherto eat the bread of idleness.

“You will perceive that I write in a great hurry; probably
this will be finished by the side of my fortification — mine I
may safely call it, as ] am not only planner and director, but
partly executor — as often taking the spade as telling others
where toemploy it; which is attended with these good effects
— exercise to myself and encouragement to the men, who,
you will be pleased to hear, fly to execute that for me, which
for others would be done with a very bad grace, because I
set them a good example in not being afraid to work.

‘*T had three approving generals (Gage, Pigot, and Howe)
in favor of my work, with one of whom I dine to-morrow.

«I have now before me one of the finest prospects a warm
imagination can picture. My tent-door, about twenty yards
from a piece of water, nearly a mile broad, with the country
most beautifully tumbled about in hills and valleys, rocks
and woods, interspersed with straggling villages, with here
and there a spire peeping over the trees, and the country of
the most charming green that delighted eye ever gazed on.
Pity these infatuated people cannot be content to enjoy such
44 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

a country in peace! But alas! this moment their advanced
sentinels are in sight, and tell me they have struck the fatal
blow. Where it will end, but in their destruction, I cannot
see. Thank you for the pocket-pistol (the bottle and cup):
would that I had had it on the rgth of April for the sake of
my friends and self.

‘‘When Lord Percy’s brigade joined us there were very
few men had any ammunition left, and we were so fatigued
that we could no longer keep our flanking parties out; so
that we must soon have laid down our arms, or been picked
off by the rebels at their pleasure.”

“Well, I don’t see any bragging there,” re-
marked one of the listeners, when the reading was
completed. ‘“ We certainly had ’em on the run,”
he added triumphantly. ‘Let’s hear another

”

one.

“This one,” continued Jotham, “was written
after the Battle of Bunker Hill, and shows how
perilously near the writer came to leaving his
bones to moulder with the dust of so many of his
companions-in-arms. JI will read it.”

“© We had made a breach in their fortifications, which J’
had twice mounted, encouraging the men to follow me, and
was ascending a third time, when a ball grazed the top of
my head, and I fell back deprived of sense and motion.

“My lieutenant, Lord Rawdon, caught me in his arms,
and, believing me dead, endeavored to remove me from the
spot, to save my body from being trampled on. The motion,
while it hurt me, restored me to my senses, and I feebly
articulated, ‘ For God’s sake, let me die in peace.’










“YT Fett Back DEPRIVED OF SENSE OR MOTION”
THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 45

*‘ The hope of preserving my life induced Lord Rawdon
to order four soldiers to take me up and carry me to a place
of safety. Three of them were wounded while performing”
this office (one afterwards died of his wounds) ; but they suc-
ceeded in placing me under some trees, out of reach of the
rebel balls. A retreat having been sounded, poor Holmes
(my body servant), was running about like a madman, in
‘search of me, and luckily came to the place where J was lying,
just in time to prevent my being left behind; for when they
brought me to the water’s edge, the last boat was put off, the
men calling out that they would take no more! On Holmes’
hallooing out, ‘It is Captain Harris,’ they put back and took
me in.

«‘T was very weak and faint and seized with a severe shiv-
ering; our blankets had been flung away during the engage-
ment; luckily there was one belonging to a man in the boat,
in which, after wrapping me up, and laying me on the bot-
tom, they conveyed me safely to my quarters.

«The surgeons did not at first apprehend danger from the
contusion, notwithstanding the extreme pain I felt, which
increased very much if I attempted to lie down. A worthy
woman, seeing this, lent me an easy chair, but this being full
of bugs, only added to my sufferings. My agonies increas-
ing, and the surgeons, observing symptoms of matter form-

‘ing (which, had it fallen on the brain, must have produced
instant death, or at least distraction), performed the opera-
tion of trepanning, from which time the pain abated, and I
began to recover. But before the callous was formed they
indulged me with the gratification of a singular curiosity —
fixing looking-glasses so as to give me a sight of my own
brains. The heat of the weather, and the scarcity of fresh
provisions, added greatly to the sufferings of the wounded.
As patience was the only remedy for the former, I trusted to
it for relief; and for the latter, the attention of the surgeon,
and a truly benevolent family in Boston who supplied me
with mutton-broth, when no money could purchase it, was
a blessing for which I can never be sufficiently thankful.”
46 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“That seems a good sort of fellow,” the deacon
remarked.

“ You'll see a white blackbird, when you see
one,” interjected the incorrigible Reddy.

“Here’s another, written by an officer of the
52d, a right jolly fellow, ’ll be bound; for he
seems to have enjoyed a joke cracked even at the
expense of his own comrades.”

“During the winter of 1775-76, plays were acted at Bos-
ton twice a week, by the officers, and some of the ladies of
the town. A farce called ‘ The Blockade of Boston, written
by General Burgoyne, was on the stage. The enemy knew
the night it was to be performed, and made an attack on the
mill, at Charlestown, at the very hour that the farce began.
They fired some shots, and surprised and carried off a ser-
geant’s guard. We immediately turned out and manned the
works, and a shot being fired by one of our advanced sen-
tries, a firing commenced at the redoubt, and could not be
stopped for some time.

“An orderly sergeant, standing outside the playhouse
door, who heard the firing, immediately ran into the play-
house, got upon the stage, and bawled out at the top of his
lungs, ‘ Turn out! turn out! they’re hard at it, hammer and
tongs.’

“* The whole audience, supposing the sergeant was acting
a part in the farce, loudly applauded, and there was such a
noise, he could not, for some time, make himself heard.
When the applause was over he again cried out, ‘What the
dickens are ye all about? If ye won’t b’lave me, be gorra
you need only go to the door, an’ there ye’ll hear and see
both.’

‘If the enemy intended to stop the farce, they certainly
THE KING’S OWN REGULARS 47

succeeded, as the officers immediately left the playhouse to
join their regiments.”

“Where was the playhouse?” it was asked.

“Tn old Faneuil Hall.”

“Who wrote the letters?”

“The first two were written by Captain Harris,
afterward Lord Harris, the conqueror of Mysore,
in India. The last was from the pen of Lieu-
tenant Hunter, afterward a lieutenant-general.
Both fought their way up, through the interme-
diate grades, to high distinction. Both are dead.
. Peace to their ashes!”
48 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA

Wuen Thursday evening came round again,
there was quite a full turn-out of veterans, as the
word had been passed from house to house that
these talks were likely to prove much more inter-
esting than at first had been supposed. Some of
the old fellows were naturally talkative, some
grown garrulous with age, and some, who were
really the best informed of all, needed to be
drawn out. But that old feeling of brotherhood
in arms! Once aroused, it proved a talisman to
loosen all tongues. -

In order to overcome the feeling of awkward-
ness, or rather, perhaps, I should say of backward-
ness, which invariably showed itself at our first
coming together, I resolved to take upon myself
the part of spokesman. Fortunately I knew
_ where all the men had served, so that I was at no .
loss for a subject.

“Peleg,” said I, by way of an opening, “you
were with Allen at Ticonderoga. Come, we
would like to hear your account of that affair.
Are you ready?”

“Cocked and primed,” was the prompt reply.
“I can’t tell it as some of the rest could; but any-
THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 49

how, I. can give you the real Simon-pure facts
about the taking of ‘Ty,’ and if that will sarve, .
here goes.”

‘There were two men consarned in that affair
who were born leaders of men. You all know
who I mean. ‘Ethan Allen was one, Benedict
Arnold another.”

An ominous, though suppressed, growl ran
round the circle at the mention of the traitor’s
hated name.

“That’s right; give it to him,” resumed Peleg,
with an angry toss of the head, ‘“‘he’s no more a
friend of mine than of yours, though now that
he’s dead and gone, give the devil his due, say I,
for one.”

“Amen! he’s got it, or I’m a sinner,’ spoke
up Thody Rhodes testily.

“Ay, along with Judas Hiscarrot,” interposed
Remember Bowen, whose recollection of Scrip-
ture names was none of the clearest.

“How you do take me up. Let him go. He
was dog in the manger at ‘Ty’; but when it
came to fighting, Benedict Arnold would rather
fight than eat any time. Neither Allen nor Ar-
nold made the first move toward taking ‘Ty.’
That was done by some quiet, long-headed folks,
down ‘in Connecticut, who planned the whole
affair beforehand. They sent up spies to see how
the land lay ; saw how the thing might be done
’ by a bold dash, invited Allen to take hold with
50 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

his Green Mountain Boys, let the Massachusetts
folks know what they were up to, and Arnold got
a commission to raise men and go up and help
them. But all the men that Arnold raised, be-
sides himself, was his own servant. That, how-
ever made no difference with him. He was
bound to be there, men or no men.

‘“‘Now then, the leaders were on tenter-hooks
for fear the secret would get out before they were
good and ready. They knew it must be a sur-
prise or nothing ; so they took precious good care
not to beat any drums or blow any trumpets, but
just quietly mounted their horses and rode off to
Pittsfield, where they let some good men and true
into their plans, who in turn passed the word
round among their neighbors so quietly that,
presently, they rode out of Pittsfield with forty
men, for Bennington, — and there’s where I come
into the story.

““At Bennington they met Allen, who entered
into the spirit of the thing with all imaginable
ardor. Allen instantly set about raising his men.
Castleton was appointed as the place of rendez-
vous; for which place the party pushed on in
great spirits, now that the famous leader of the
Green Mountain Boys was so thoroughly enlisted
in the good cause. :

_“When we were all mustered at Castleton,
there were just two hundred and seventy of us.
Two hundred and thirty were Allen’s boys, who
THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA SI

*minded me of Robin Hood’s outlaws, such a
tough looking lot they were, all keen as briers
and wild as so many catamounts. It took Allen
to handle ’em. It was there that Arnold joined
us, with his re-enforcement of one, though to hear
him talk you’d have thought he had got up the |

-whole thing. With his accustomed impudence he

immediately laid claim to the command, by virtue
of his commission. Allen swore he never should
have it. Arnold vowed he would; and for a while
the sparks flew, because one was flint and the
other steel, and neither would give an inch.
Pretty way to begin by fightin’ among yourselves,
wasn’t it? But that was Arnold all over.
“Flowever, it was finally settled that Allen
should be first in command and Arnold second.
One party was sent off to Skenesborough, now

Whitehall, at the head of the lake, to secure

Major Skene with his negroes and tenants, who
might have given us trouble, as they belonged to
the other side of the dispute. You see, the thing
had so grown upon us that we had pretty much
made up our minds to make a clean sweep of
everything on. Lake Champlain.

“Allen had set the next morning to march for
‘Ty’ with his hardy band. It so happened, how-
ever, that something caused that plan to be
changed. That something was a man who came.
ridin’ up to our rendezvous with his horse all ina
lather.
52 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

“We.all crowded up round him. ‘ Where's
Ethan?’ says he.

«“ «Here I am,’ called back Allen, pushing his
way through the crowd. ‘Stand back there, you
fellows,’ he commanded in that big voice of his;
‘Noah Phelps and I must have a little talk to-
gether.’

“As the men didn’t move along quite so quick
as he thought they should, Allen gave one or two
of them a smart shove, by way of emphasizing his
words. But they took it all from him. He was
over six foot, long-limbed, and muscular ; and I’d
as soon have let a bear hug me as get into Allen’s
clutches, especially when he was a little riled.

«So you're back, Noah?’ Ethan said, when-his
men were out of earshot. ‘What’s the word?’

“«Good for us. The best. I’ve been in the fort.’

«« You have ?’

“Ves; I disguised myself as a countryman,
went boldly up to the sentinel, and told him I
wanted to be shaved by the fort barber. He
let me pass. I vowed and vum’d I never did
‘see such tarnal big guns before in all my born
days. “Take care you don’t care any of ’em
off with you,” says he, alaughin’ fit to kill him-
self. -“I couldn't,” says I, “onless I had father’s
ox-team and some of the boys to help me. How
many of ’em might there be, now?” I asked him.
‘Oh, about a hundred or so,” he replied, then
turned sharply on me with the question, ‘ What’s
THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 53

that to you ?”” — “Oh, nothin’,” I replied indiffer-
ently. “I was only wonderin’ what an all-fired
noise they would make if they was all touched
off at once.’

“«Come to the point,’ said Allen, rather im-
patiently.

“¢ All in good time, friend Ethan. The first
thing was to disarm suspicion. In the character
I assumed, of a simple, inquisitive, country lout,
they let me look about as long as I liked. Our
information was correct. They have not the
least suspicion of our plans. There are only
forty odd privates, besides half a dozen officers ;
but, in his talk while shaving me, the barber,
who, like his tribe the world ovet, is given to
babbling, let fall something about a re-enforcement
being expected from below. Ethan, we must be
beforehand with them.’

“By the tall pines of these hills, you say well,
Noah! It shall be this very night! Here’s for
Ticonderoga or a turf jacket!’ exclaimed Ethan,
turning away to give the necessary. orders.

“We were soon ready for the march. Every
man’s horn, bullet-pouch, and flints were care-
fully looked to. By the light of the stars we ,
stole noiselessly out of the little village, picked
up our picket, posted outside on the road we
were travelling, settled down into our leader’s long,
swinging stride, and were presently swallowed up
in the pitch-darkness of the surrounding woods.
54 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“ After a long, hard march we got to the lake
opposite the fortress the next evening. Here we
expected that the detachment sent to Skenesbor-
ough would join us, with what boats they had
been able to pick up at that place. But the night
wore away without news of them. This was the
ninth day of May. I remember it so well because
the next was my birthday, which I had promised
myself to celebrate (providing our expedition did
not fail), by making an assault on the larder and
cellars of Ticonderoga.

“With what few boats our scouts had ferreted
out along shore, eighty-three men of us crossed
the lake, and landed under the fortress just as
the east was brightening up a little. Allen first
formed us in three ranks, and then sent the boats
back for the rest. I confess that I felt a little
nervous when I saw them push off, leaving us
to take what the enemy might choose to give
us, either in cold lead or stiff hemp; for from
where we stood, screened by the cliffs above our
heads, the fortress loomed up dark and threaten.
ing, like some ancient castle, silent now, but ready
to spit out fire and flames as soon as we should
show ourselves. I know I was all of a shiver.

“But my teeth actually chattered in my head
when, instead of pushing on, as any man in his
sober senses would, Allen stepped out in front and
began making us a speech. A speech! and we
standing there at the imminent risk of discovery !


THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 58

I’ve heard that Allen first studied for a minister,
so he may have felt that morning like one of the
prophets of old, before leading his men forth to —
battle. But this was no time to preach. Men
fought then with darts and javelins, not powder
and ball. Pooh!



THE HEAD oF A TRAITOR

“All I can now recollect of what Allen said was
this : ‘You men that are not afraid to undertake
this adventure, poise your firelocks!’

“Every musket was instantly brought to a
poise,

“We were now faced to the right, and Allen,
with his drawn sword, put himself at our head.
Arnold did the same thing. He declared by all
56 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

that was good and great that he would go into the
fort first. Allen swore he should not. Here was
a pretty pickle. Two commanders quarrelling for
precedence within gunshot, ay, almost within ear-
shot, of the sentinels on the ramparts. For my
part, at that moment, I heartily wished both of
them at the bottom of the Jake.

“The dispute was finally compromised by let-
ting them march side by side. It is my firm
belief that Arnold would rather have seen the
expedition fail, than not to have carried his point.

“This war of words being over, we advanced
briskly up to the water-gate, where a sentry was
posted. This man snapped his musket at Allen,
looked as though he had seen a ghost, and then
took to his heels, we pushing on after him through
the covered way right into the fort, before he had
time to give more than one yell of wild alarm.
Once there, we formed in line on the parade, the
front rank facing one row of barracks on one side,
the rear rank those on the other, ready to fire at
any one who showed himself at a window. So
far, so good.

“The garrison being sound asleep, we gave
three rousing huzzas, that would have waked the
dead. If they heard us, they took good care to
keep quiet. If they saw us, they saw our guns
held at a ready. Ticonderoga, the gate of the
North, was ours without the loss of a man.

“The next thing was to secure the garrison.
THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 57

We had no trouble at all. One only of the sen-
tinels made a lunge at one of our officers with his
bayonet, giving him a slight wound. Allen in-
stantly gave the fellow a neat sword-cut over the
head, which made him drop his gun, and howl for
quarter. On being ordered to lead the way to the
commandant’s quarters, the fellow showed Allen
a pair of stairs leading up to the second story of
the barracks, which Allen immediately mounted,
two steps at a time, finding himself before a door
at the top. The door being locked on the inside,
Allen dealt it two or three furious blows with the
hilt of his sword, at the same time calling out to
the terrified commandant that if he did not in-
stantly come forth, the garrison should all be
put to the sword.

“ The bewildered commander did not hesitate to
open the door at this threat; although he stood
only in his shirt, with his breeches in his hand,
not having had time to pull them on. Without
more words Allen demanded the surrender of the
fort. sus

“«By what authority?’ asked the perplexed
Delaplace.

“¢In the name of the Great Jehovah and the
Continental Congress!’ was the bombastic reply.

-“ Still more astounded, for supposing he had
heard of the first, it was unlikely that he ever
had of the second, the commandant began to
stammer out some objections, which Allen, how-
58 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

ever, cut short by brandishing his naked sword
over the officer’s head, repeating his demand in
a still more peremptory voice. To this display
of force, the unlucky commandant incontinently
-yiélded. Orders were given for the garrison to
parade, as prisoners of war to the Great Jehovah
and the Continental Congress.

“While Allen was thus occupied, the rest of us
had not been idle. By command of our officers,
we had beaten down several of the barrack doors
without opposition, taking the soldiers within be-
fore they could muster in any force. We were
‘too overjoyed by our success to jeer at them, in
spite of the black looks they gave us. A more
mortified lot of men you never saw in your life
than the forty-six officers and soldiers we took
there on the ever glorious. 10th of May, 1775.”

“But what became of the other detachments ?”
it was asked when Peleg had finished.

“Oh, I forgot to say that Seth Warner crossed
over with the rearguard as soon as the boats had
got back, though not in time to take part in the
capture of the fort. Immediately upon his join-
ing us, he was sent off down the lake to Crown
Point, another strong fortress, built at a narrow
part of the Jake during the Old French War.
Warner got possession of it very easily. There
were only a sergeant and twelve men there. Glory
enough for one day !

“This was not all. There was an armed sloop
THE SURPRISE AT TICONDEROGA 59

at St. Johns, at the foot of the lake, with which
the enemy could, of course, keep control of the
water, if let alone. It was determined to take
her too. For this purpose a schooner was fitted
out, and put under the command of Arnold, who
had been a sailor, I believe. At any rate, he got
the chance he had been waiting for, to do some-
thing on his own hook. To make sure of their
prey, Allen sailed with some bateaux, along with
Arnold; but the wind came out fair and fresh, the
schooner outsailed the boats, and Arnold took the
sloop alone. That puffed him up like a peacock.”
60 THE WATCH PIRES OF ’76

ETHAN ALLEN

“Wasn't Allen a little cracked in the upper
story?’ asked Uncle Billy, without addressing
any one in particular.

“Well, if he was, I only wish for my part we'd
had a few more like him, that’s all. I call him
an original, I do,” said. Reddy, with his usual.
decision. ‘ What's your opinion?” he added,
turning to me.

Thus appealed to, I could only say that, in
my judgment, Allen was a singular compound
of courage and rashness, of shrewdness and self-
conceit, and of misdirected abilities. He was one
of those men who believe they are born to great
things; and such men are always a power, if per-
sonally brave, because courage and decision are
qualities all men admire, more especially in the
soldier. But then Arnold was thoroughly unprin-
cipled. Allen has always made me think of one
of Cromwell’s Ironsides. His talk was a strange
mixture of “local barbarisms, scriptural phrases,
and Oriental wildness, though often highly ani-
mated and forcible. So much, at least, I have
gathered from his own narrative, I finished, by
way of apology, for I saw the frowns gathering »
ETHAN ALLEN 61

upon the brows of my venerable hearers, who,
however, heard me through silently, if I may ex-
cept an occasional angry snort or grunt coming
from the right or left of my chair. -

Reddy tilted his chair back to the verge of
oversetting it, passed his big freckled hand over
his glistening bald head, gazed up at the ceiling,
as if I was beneath his notice, and blurted out the
question : —

“What was Greene ?”’

* The son of an anchor-smith.”

“ Knox?”

“ A bookseller.”

“Putnam ?”

“ A farmer and tavern-keeper.”

“Turned out pretty well, didn’t they?”

“None better.”

“Well, Squire, when you lay down the law at
education, don’t forget what our generals were
made of. Weren’t they all sons of the soil, like
Allen?”

“ Mostly so, I admit.”

“And had to get their growth by the hardest
kind of knocks ?”

“Tf you mean that experience was their teacher, .

”

yes.
“I think you said something about Cromwell's

Ironsides. - You never said a better thing. They
were the hard-handed yeomanry of England. We
fought their fight over here. They won theirs; so |
62 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

did we ours. As for Allen, I wouldn’t give a pis-
tareen for a man who hadn’t a little gunpowder
in him, eh, boys?”

There was a general murmur of assent, so I
held my peace. Reddy went on :—

“In a single night Allen, with his handful of
homespun soldiers, did what whole armies had
failed to do in the French War. It was a great
conception.”

“Yes; but not his,’ objected some one else,
who now took up the cudgels on the other side.
“Peleg told us how that was. To tell the truth,
I’ve about come to the conclusion that Allen’s
success at ‘Ty,’ turned his head. What could
have been more foolish than his attack on Mon-
treal, with only a hundred and ten men, and a
river a mile wide behind him?”

“He made a good fight, anyhow,” Reddy in-
sisted, apparently determined not to desert his
hero.

“And was taken prisoner for his pains,” was
the reply.

“Like some other folks I know of.”

“You mean me. I don’t mind your twitting
on facts, Reddy. Fortune of war. When I was
a prisoner in New York, Allen was there too,
so I saw him. often. To speak out plainly, the
British had treated him more like a wild beast
than a human being. I think it was because
they were afraid of him. But he was the same -


ETHAN ALLEN ; 63

old Allen still. They had kept him in irons, like

any criminal; but his spirit was just as untamed
as if he had been walking the wild woods of his
native hills.”

“ That’s the boy for me!” Reddy exclaimed in
triumph. “Never say die!”

“ How did he look after his long confinement?”
T asked.

“As you would naturally expect, very bad.
He had been brought from Halifax a short time
after that wretchedly managed business at Long
Island, where I was taken, and was paroled when
we were. Allen at that time looked like a once
robust man, worn down by hard usage and worse
fare, but he was then recovering his health and °
spirits. He wore a suit of blue, with a gold-laced
hat, presented to him by some gentlemen of Cork,
when Allen was there, in which he cut a very
passable figuré—for a rebel colonel. He used
to show us a tooth that had been broken by his
twisting off with it, in a fit of anger, the nail
which fastened the bar of his handcuffs; an act
which drew, from one of the astonished spectators,
the exclamation of ‘Hang the man; can he eat
iron?’ I soon became well acquainted with Allen,
and have more than once heard him relate his
adventures while a prisoner, exactly correspond-
ing, both in substance and language, with the
narrative he gave to the public in the year 1779.
I have seldom met with a man possessing in my
64 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

opinion a stronger mind, or whose mode of ex-
pression was more vehement and oratorical.”

_ “There!” exclaimed Reddy, turning to me
with every mark of triumph on his honest face;
“seein’s believin’, Squire, the world over.”

“ Anyhow, the taking of Ticonderoga was a most
costly victory for us,” I returned, “because it drew
our people on to attempt the conquest of Canada,
instead of confining their efforts to holding that
strong place alone. What happened? We lost
two. armies, three generals, and were kicked out
of Canada in the bargain.”

“Nothing venture, nothing have,” observed
Pelee. . “I. notice,’ he continued, “that none
of you have found out that Boston was taken at
Ticonderoga.”

Seeing that his remark was a puzzle, he pro-
ceeded to make it clear to us in this wise :—

“ At that time, as you all know, our New Eng-
land yeomanry had General Gage penned up in
Boston hard and fast; but their intrenchments
were without cannon, and their men without
powder. It could not be a siege; it was more
of a blockade. ‘Ty’ was taken in May. Things
lingered along until winter. Washington wanted
those cannon and mortars badly, but getting them
down to camp before there was snow on the
ground was not to be thought of. Even then
it was a task to make a man think twice. Just
you think of it yourselves,
ne TN eS ee Le ee eee TT a a ee

ETHAN ALLEN 65

“But where there’s a will there’s a way. Wash-
ington sent for Knox, who declared himself ready _
for anything. Dear me, I was just like him at
his age! Washington gave him his instructions,
some letters to friends at Albany, handed him
a wad of money, wished him success, and watched
the young colonel of artillery mount his horse and
ride off, with something of the feeling of having
asked him to perform a miracle.

“Tt is only miracles, after all, that can save
us, murmured the commander-in-chief to himself,
as he turned to his writing-table, loaded down
with piles of official correspondence, and set him-
self resolutely at work again.

“That was a proud day for Knox, a glorious one
for us, when the long train of ox-teams came
toiling down into Cambridge from across the
mountains. The whole army turned out to cheer
them as they passed by —twenty-fours, eighteens,
heavy mortars, shot, shell, and what not — with
Knox at their head, brown and ragged, but happy.
When they had come up abreast of the com-
mander-in-chief’s quarters, he with his staff stood
on the doorstep, clapping their hands. Knox
dismounted, threw the bridle over the hitching-
post, and walked up the flagged-walk to where
they stood.

“<«Flere are the guns from “Ty,” your Excel-
lency,’ was all he said, making his salute.

“ 66 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

in bluff old Putnam, who was standing my with
a face wreathed in smiles.

‘“Washington grasped Knox’s hand, and piece
it warmly, ‘God has decreed that we should
succeed,’ he said, ‘since He has permitted a
miracle in our favor. This is more than I dared
to hope for. Colonel, you dine with us to-day.’

“«By your Excellency’s leave, there is a little
woman not far off who is expecting me.’

“The general smiled benignantly. ‘Ah! very
true. I forgot. Go and embrace her, and report
here to-morrow. General,’ turning to Putnam,
‘we will send the enemy the latest news from
Ticonderoga from the muzzles of their own

r99

guns.




THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY - 67

THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY

Ir was Christmas night. Four of us were sit-
ting round a blazing wood fire in the old tavern at
X. A wrinkled, white-haired man crouched over
the fire, rubbing his hard, bony hands together, in
the seat that by general consent was always left
vacant for him in the chimney corner.

There is always something about very old men
that inspires us with a feeling of awe. So we sat
silent now, although our tongues had been running
fast enough before this taciturn old fellow had
‘dropped in upon us. He said never a word.

After giving a meaning glance at the rest of us,
one of the boys spoke up: “ What makes you look
so glum, Uncle Billy? Brighten up, old man, and
tell us a story about the good old times of ‘sev-
enty-six.’.” ie i

“The good old times of ‘seventy-six,’” the old
man slowly repeated, “the good old times of ‘sev-
enty-six?’ You don’t know what you're talking
about.”’

Having said this, the old sergeant fell into a
brown study again. Our defeated companion ~
-nudged me.

“My grandfather was in the retreat from Long
Island,” I said, rather grandly I suppose.
68 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

“Was he?” retorted Uncle Billy: “I hope he
retreated in good order,” he added, with a grin of
disdain. ,

“Which would you rather do, fight the British
or Hessians?’’ my next neighbor asked, half iron-
ically, half in earnest.

At this question the old man fired up.
“Neither,” he replied, with decision. “Id rather
be a-settin’ here, by a warm fire, hearin’ other
folks tell about their explites. Ah, boys, boys,”
he continued, in a more gentle tone, “this is
the time o’ year when peace on airth and good
will toward men is the universal gospel, and
right it should be; but I’ve seen the time when
things were different, I can tell ye.”

We sat as still as mice, afraid to interrupt

. him.

“You want to hear about it? You shall. I
remember it as if it was yesterday, and yet it
was nigh on sixty year ago. How time does fly !

“Jt was at Trenton, the very last of December
‘seventy-six. The time for which most,of us had
enlisted was out — yes, and more too. Now, just
as we'd made up our mouths to go home, what
does Gin’ral Washington do but order our regi-
ment paraded. ‘God bless the man! he’s goin’ to.
give us all our discharge,’ was what we thought,
at first. Instead of that he made us a speech,
begging and entreating us to stay a month
longer.
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WASHINGTON CROSSING THE DELAWARE


THE OLD SERGEANTS STORY 69

“The drums beat up for volunteers. Not a
man stirred. What do you think? We were all
worn out. We were in rags. I know I was
nothin’ but skin and bone; for sence we licked
the Hessians and before, we'd been kept dancin’
back and forth, to and fro, up hill and down dale,
until we looked more like a pack of scarecrows
than good flesh and. blood. The only thing we
ever got a full meal of was fightin’; and most of
us wern’t hankerin’ for any more of that, you can
take your Bible oath on. Why, many’s the time
I’ve eat raw potato peelin’s, and glad to get ’em.
Now just look at it. For the last month we'd
been countin’ the days, one by one, when we
should go home —home! why it was like heaven!
And now to be asked to stop another month. It
was enough to turn a man to stone. ;

“J said not a man stirred in his tracks, didn’t
I? I know my backbone was stiff as a ramrod.
We stood there like graven images, deaf and
dumb, and never winked. |

“The gin’ral wheeled his horse, and rode along
in front of the regiment, very slow. Says he —
I give you his very words — ‘ My brave lads, your
country is at stake ; wives, homes, little ones, and
all you hold dear. I know you have worn your-
selves out with fatigues and hardship, and now
want to go home; but we know not how to spare
you. If you will only stay one month more, you
will render that service to the cause of liberty, and


70 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

to your country, which probably you can never do
under any circumstances. The present is em-
phatically the cvzszs, which is to decide our des-
tiny.” Oh, he was grand!

“The drums then beat for the second time.

“ The soldiers felt the force of the appeal and
showed it. One said to another, ‘I’ll stay if you
will.’ Others said, ‘We can’t go home under
such circumstances, can we?’ A few stepped
forward. Their example was quickly followed
by nearly all who were fit for duty, in the regi-
ment, amounting in all.to about two hundred
volunteers.

«¢ Shall these men be enrolled, sir?’ our colonel
asked.
“«No,’ said the gin’ral; ‘men who will act as |
they have don’t need any enrolment.’

“ Now, you must know that we were in a pretty
tight fix. There was Lord Cornwallis planted
squarely in our front, with men enough to eat us
all up. We stood lookin’ at each other across the
Assanpink. Three times the Hessians tried to
force their way across the bridge, and three times
our cannon drove them back. At last they gave
it up, and left us alone for the night.

“Then we played them a Yankee trick. We
built big fires to make them think we were lying
there all snug, waitin’ for them to come on in the
morning, turned off by a roundabout way, and
marched away for Princeton. Ugh, but it was
cold!




THE OLD SERGEANTS STORY 71

“Our two hundred volunteers were with the
advance. We were ina sorry plight for a forced
march, but there were no stragglers. Our artil-
lery horses were without shoes; and when we
came to a spot that was frozen over, they would
slip and slide about so that the soldiers would
have to drag and push them along, by main
strength. The men were hardly better off than
the horses for shoes, many having nothing on but
some old rags or a piece of carpet to keep their
feet from the frozen ground.”

“You don’t mean to say that the men were
actually barefooted?” we cried out in a chorus of
horror.

“Boys, you could have tracked those men by
the blood oozing out at every step, where the
sharp ice had cut through into the flesh.”

“T should have thought their feet would have
frozen stiff,’ was the sympathetic rejoinder of the
youngest of us.

“Qh, your feet won't freeze as long as the
blood runs. You wanted me to tell you about
the good old times of ‘seventy-six,’ didn’t you?”
And the old sergeant went on with his story.

“Tt was, I think, about sun-up on the morning
of January 3, ‘seventy-seven,’ when, upon reach-
ing the top of a hill near Princeton, we saw a
. light-horseman watching us at a distance. Gin’ral
Mercer, he gave orders to some of the riflemen to
pick him off ; but before they could draw a trigger,
72 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

the vedette turned his horse and galloped off, out
of our reach.

“«That rascal will give the alarm,’ said the
gin’ral to my captain.

“There was a farmhouse a few rods from where
we halted, to spell the men a little. Presently a
countryman came out of the house, and stood on
the doorstep staring at us, as if we were so many
ghosts. The gin’ral beckoned to him.

“Are you a friend to your country?’ he asked.

“*T am.’

“There ought to be some by-way by which
we can approach coe village without pelle seen.’

“ «There is one.’

“Very good, Captain,’ continued the gin’ral,
turning to us, ‘here is the man you want. If he
prove faithful, reward him; should he betray us,
shoot him.’

“The countryman’s eyes roved from one to the
other, but. he said never a word. You see, boys,
the man who didn’t carry a musket on one side or
the other, in those days, couldn’t be trusted out
of sight.

“*You hear?’ said our captain to the man.

“*Yes,’ was the sullen reply.

“«Then take care how you lead us into an
ambuscade. If you do, I'll blow out your brains,
March !’

“The man led us off through a farm-road, that

ran nearly parallel with the one on which we had ~
THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY Te

seen the vedette disappear. For some: distance
our march was concealed by a piece of pine woods,
but at the end of about fifteen minutes, as I
should judge, we came out of this wood into open
‘ground again, on the top of a small hill, which we
began descending. Before us we saw a high
bank and hedgerow, stretching across our path,
and glittering with icicles in the morning sun,
which-shone full in our faces. It blinded us. All
seemed quiet around us.

“Turning to my captain, who marched at my
side, I pointed to this innocent looking hedgerow, .
without speaking. He nodded, as much as to say,
‘I see it as well as you do,’ and kept right on.
If it hadn’t been for those plaguy icicles, I could
have sworn I saw bayonets sticking up behind
that hedge.

“Tn a couple of minutes more, we were within
twenty paces of the ditch, under the bank. All
of a sudden a perfect swarm of British rose up,
and poured a tremendous fire into us.

“« Aha! Captain,’ said our guide, ‘it seems that
two can play at this game.”

“He had hardly got the words out of his mouth,
when the captain brought down the breech of his
musket on the fellow’s head with all his might.
It was enough to have felled an ox.

“*« Fire, men! why don’t you fire?’ shouted the
gin’ral, reining back his horse. I then saw that
he was bare-headed and bleeding too.
74 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“Luckily for us, their first volley mostly went
over our heads. They were in too big a hurry to
do execution. We were ordered to wheel out.
As my platoon was obeying this order, the cor-
poral at my left let go his gun, gave a spring in
the air, and pitched headforemost into the ditch.
We rallied, moved on, shoved our muskets
through the hedge, and gave it to the beggars
hot and heavy. If ever I smelled powder, it was
then and there.”

The old sergeant stopped to mop his forehead,
and get his breath. ¥

“Where was I? Oh! we were a-fightin’ away
across the bank. Well, pretty soon they fell back
about eight rod, to where their packs were laid-on
the ground, in a line. We kept on rattling the
buckshot into ’em, like all possessed; for we saw
we had ’em beaten, fair and square. But just
then, what should we see but another passel on
“em come a-runnin’ up double-quick.

“Some one sung out to us, ‘Stan’ your ground,
brave boys! The beggars are comin’ to town!’

“It was no use. They were three to our one,
and all fresh men. Pretty soon I heard some one
give the order to retreat, in a dying sort of voice.
It was the general. I looked around to see if I
could discover anything of our main body; for we
were all fought out, and the enemy were drivin’
their bayonets into our wounded men, right and
left. Our folks were nowhere to be seen. After





aaa aac
THE OLD SERGEANT’S STORY 75

giving the enemy what I had in my gun, I ran for
the woods I told you of before.

“ Before I could get there, Gin’ral Washington
came ridin’ up. at full gallop. Far behind him I
could see the head of our advancing columns.
‘Parade with us, my brave fellows,’ he shouted,
‘there are only a handful of the enemy, and we'll
have them directly.’

“Tf there was one of ’em, there was a million;
and he was almost alone.

“Well, the minute they saw us trying to rally,
the enemy gave us a whole volley. How the bul-
lets did hum! Some of us grabbed the gin’ral’s
bridle, and tried to turn his horse’s head. We
all felt that it was no place for him. But he
wouldn’t budge an inch. ‘Leave me alone!’ he
cried, ‘the enemy is there,’ pointing his sword
toward the rascals who were popping away at us
out of the smoke. It was the bravest thing I
ever saw. I vow and declare to you nobody would
have thought he was the commander-in-chief. It
was the Virginia colonel, stemming the tide of
defeat at Braddock’s field over again. My heart
was in my mouth, for I expected to see him fall
from his horse every instant. But bless you, they
couldn’t hit him. That man bore a charmed life.”

“Well, go on, go on; how did it come out?”
we breathlessly exclaimed.

“ Just like this. Up came our folks, puffin’ and
blowin’, cheerin’ and shoutin’, ‘have at the blood-
76 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

hounds!’ ‘Trenton! Trenton!’ I tell you it was
beautiful. Did you ever see dead leaves go whirl-
ing away before a gust of wind in autumn? At
*em we went, tooth and nail. They retreated
back to the college, where they thought them-
selves safe. Our army was there in an instant.
Our cannon unlimbered right before the door;
and, after two or three shots, we saw a white
handkerchief hung out of the window on the point
of asword. The enemy had surrendered.”
| GERMANTOWN Tei

GERMANTOWN

‘THERE was Germantown. We had them whipped
there as clean as a whistle. I'll tell you how I
know it. After the British marched out of Phil-
adelphia for good, some of us were rummaging
around their quarters at Germantown, when we
ran across a lot of papers that had been torn up
and thrown into a fireplace among the ashes.
One of the men, I forget now who it was, picked
up a piece to pene his pipe with.

“Hold on,” says he, “ there’ s writing on it.”

We pulled a rickety table out of a corner, spread
the torn pieces out on it, and went to work trying
to put them together. It took us a good while;
but we got as much interested in it as boys will
over a puzzle, and at last we had them all com-
plete, like a book.

One paper-was a return of the killed and
wounded ; another was a letter telling about the
battle, aie the writer evidently hadn’t had time
to finish before he was ordered off somewhere in
a hurry. So he tore it up. This was the way it
read. I know it by heart. You can see by the
way it is worded that an educated man and an
78 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

officer wrote it, —none of your ignorant rank and
file, Squire — ahem !

**While the greater part of our army were employed at
Mud Island, General Washington, availing himself of that
circumstance, attacked our battalion at Biggerstown with
his whole army.

«The first General Howe knew of Washington’s march-
ing against us was by his attacking us at daybreak. General
Wayne commanded the advance, and fully expected to be
revenged for the surprise we had given him a short time
before.

‘* When the first shots were fired at our pickets, so much
had we all Wayne's affair in remembrance, that the battalion
was out and under arms in a minute. The day had just
broke; but it was a very foggy morning, and so dark we
could not see a hundred yards before us.

‘Just as the battalion had formed, the pickets came in
and said the enemy were advancing in force. They had
hardly joined the battalion when we heard a loud cry of
. ‘Have at the bloodhounds! revenge Wayne’s affair!’ and
the enemy immediately fired a volley at us.

“We gave them one in return, cheered, and charged.

“As it was near the end of the campaign, our battalion
was very weak; it did not consist of more than three hun-
dred men, and we had no support nearer than Germantown,
a mile-in our rear.

‘“‘On our charging they gave way on all sides, but again
and again renewed ine attack, with fresh troops and greater
force.

‘*We charged them twice, till the battalion was so re-
duced by killed and wounded that the bugle sounded a
retreat; indeed, had we not retreated at the very time we
did, we should all have been taken or killed, as two columns
of the enemy had nearly got round our flank. But this was
CERMANTOWN 79

- the first time we had ever retreated from the Americans, and it
was with great difficulty we could get the men to obey orders.
“‘The enemy were kept so long in check that the two
brigades had advanced to the entrance of Biggerstown when
they met our battalion retreating. By this time General
Howe had come up; and seeing the battalion retreating all
broken, he flew into a passion and exclaimed, ‘ For shame,
Light Infantry! I never saw you retreat before; form! form!
it’s only a scouting-party !”

“ However, he was quickly convinced it was more than
a scouting-party, as the heads of the enemy’s columns soon
appeared. One coming through Biggerstown, with three
pieces of cannon in their front, immediately fired, with
grape, at the crowd that was standing with General Howe
under a large chestnut-tree. I think I never saw people
enjoy a discharge of grape before; but we really all felt
pleased to see the enemy make such an appearance, and to
hear the grape rattle about the commander-in-chief’s ears,
after he had accused, the battalion of having run away from
a scouting-party. :

‘‘ He rode off immediately at full speed, and we joined the
two brigades that were formed a little way in our rear; but it
was not possible for them to make any stand against Wash-
ington’s whole army, and they all retreated to Germantown,
except Colonel Musgrave, who, with the Fortieth Regiment,
nobly defended Chew’s house till we were re-enforced from
Philadelphia.”

There the letter ended abruptly.

It may be supposed that we were far from sat-
isfied with the way the story broke off. Just as
we had worked ourselves up into a fine state of
excitement, to be left dangling in a state of
uncertainty was cruel.
80 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“What did he mean by ‘Wayne’s affair’?”
one asked. ;
“What had Chew’s house to do with the battle?
and why couldn’t they have marched past it?”

asked another.

“That’s another story,” the veteran replied,
shaking his gray head regretfully. ‘Ah, boys,
fortune o’ war, fortune o’ war.”




N (PHILADELPHIA)

GERMANTOW

7

THE CHEW House,






CHEWS HOUSE 81

CHEW’S HOUSE

Axsour Chew’s house. Well, I’ll try to tell
you how that unlucky house was the cause of our
losing the day, after we had so nearly won it in
a. fair. stand-up fight. As far as he goes, that
British officer tells the truth. So I’ll just fill up —
what he has left out.

After the battle of Brandywine the British
thought Washington was so badly beaten that he
would be only too glad to keep quiet for some
time to come. But they had reckoned without
_ their host. Washington saw his opportunity and
seized it promptly.

Part of the British army lay in PRViadel pita
part was posted at Germantown, with its light
troops pushed out beyond that place to watch the
Americans. Now, if that part holding German-
town could be overwhelmed by a sudden assault,
Philadelphia would fall into our hands again.
That was precisely what General Washington
aimed at.

For this attack he had formed his army in four
columns. He, himself, was with the column that






82 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

was driving the enemy before them through Ger-
mantown, helter-skelter.

While everything was going on thus success-
fully with him, a brisk musketry fire, coming from .
a large house situated at a pistol-shot back from
the street, stopped the head of his troops at that
spot, and, of course, brought those in the rear to
a sudden halt.

The general officers instantly gathered round
Washington in a little knot, all talking excitedly.

Knox insisted that it was against all rule to
leave a fort in their rear.

“Do you call that a fort?”’ another exclaimed
in apet. ‘We waste our time here.”

Washington was undecided. In this case, how-
ever, he seems to have yielded to Knox’s advice.
The worst that could have happened was the loss
of a few men in marching on, while every minute
we stayed there put our chances of success at
hazard, as you will presently see.

“T think Knox was right,” interposed one at-
tentive listener.

“And I think he was all wrong,” asserted an-
other with equal decision.

“There was a difference of opinion then, more’s
the pity; but there doesn’t seem much room for
it at this late day,” returned the narrator of the
story. “If we'd got Philadelphia, where would
Chew’s house have been?”
CHEW'S HOUSE 83

As this question was unanswerable, he was
allowed to proceed without further interruption.

Unluckily it was determined to make an attack.
on this Chew’s house. This could only be done
successfully by cannonading it, as the house was
strongly built of stone, and of course could not
be set on fire. As luck would-have it, again, there
was nothing but some light six-pounders at hand.

The Chevalier Mauduit Duplessis brought up two

to within two hundred yards of the house, with
‘which he opened fire. Bless you! they did no
more good than snowballs. The balls just im-_
bedded themselves in the solid walls, and that was
all.

But Mauduit would not give it up so. He now
proposed carrying the house by an assault. His
plan was quickly matured. Colonel Laurens was
to take a few determined men, each of whom
should carry a bundle of straw with him to the
house, throw it down in a heap against the front
door, and set it on fire. If this plan succeeded,
the enemy would have to choose between being
smoked out or surrendering at discretion.

These two young dare-devils immediately set
about the execution of their most desperate pro-
ject.

Supposing that the men with the straw were
following him, Mauduit himself made straight
for a window of the first floor, broke it in, and
84 THE WATCH FIRES. OF °76

climbed up on the sill ina moment. He had no
sooner gained this dangerous perch than a pistol
was thrust in his face with a gruff command to
surrender. At the same instant a shot was fired
from inside the room, which brought down, ‘not
Mauduit, but the officer who wanted to take him
alive.

It was now become a question of how to escape
from this dangerous situation with a whole skin,
since either to go or stay would expose the gallant
young Frenchman to about equal risk. He real-
ized that he must not only run the gantlet of a
murderous fire, which the defenders of the man-
sion kept up from the upper stories, but also in
the full sight of a large part of the American
army who stood looking on to see how he would
get out of the scrape he was in.

Rather than to risk being laughed at, should he
make a bold dash for his friends, or have it said
that he had run away from his enemies, Mauduit
coolly marched back to the American column, |
under a shower of balls. Laurens did the same
thing. To the astonishment of all the lookers-on,
both returned safe and sound, except that Laurens -
received a slight wound in the shoulder.

An officer, with a flag, was then sent to sum-
mon the house to surrender. He was shot down
before he could deliver his message,

It was this unforeseen delay, caused by the
obstinate resistance of Colonel Musgrave, that
CHEWS HOUSE 85

turned the fortunes of the day against-us; for the
other columns, being thus left without support,
were compelled to fall back, fighting in retreat,
because Howe had gained time to bring his whole
‘army into action.

General Washington candidly admitted that the
fault was his own. After the battle was over
somebody asked him whether he blamed any of
his subordinate officers for the disasters of the
day. ‘No; not at all,” he replied; “ the fault lay
with ourselves,” referring, of course, to that wind-
mill attack on Chew’s house. If you’ve ever read
“Don Quixote,” you'll know what that means.

A good plan spoiled by a.bad decision, was the

general verdict upon this affair. Soldiers, you
know, can only obey orders.
86 - THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

HUBBARDTON

As some of you may happen to know, I was
one of the guards who were detailed to escort
General Burgoyne’s army to Cambridge after the



GENERAL BURGOYNE

surrender. While we were on the march, I got
acquainted with a good many of the officers, both
high and low. Some were young cubs, hardly
out of their teens; some grizzled veterans, who
looked as savage as a meat-axe when you passed.
HUBBARDTON . 87

the time o’ day to ’em. I didn’t blame them a
mite, Vou and I would have done the same thing,
if we had taken a dose of the same medicine.

There was one young fellow among them who
showed more sense than a good many did. Hewas
a captain in the Twenty-fourth, I think it was, well-
educated, good-looking, gentlemanly, never snarl-
ing at the weather, the rations, or the lodgings, .
but taking things as they came, like the good
soldier he was. The way we got acquainted was
this. (I wonder where he is now.) You see,
he’d lost some of his baggage, and was telling
me in a joking sort of way, though I could see
he felt as ashamed as could be to think he didn’t
look quite as slick as some, that he hadn’t a shirt
to his back, except the one he had on. I got him
one of mine. “Take it,’ says 1; “I’ve got plenty
more at home.’ That broke the ice between us.
I got to like that young chap like a brother. I
wonder where he is now.

Speaking of brothers, my next oldest one,
Joshua, was in the battle of Hubbardton. We'd
heard all kinds of stories about that affair, so
one day I made bold to ask my captain if he had
been in it too. ;

“It was my first engagement,” he replied;
“and before it was half over, I little thought
that I should ever live to tell of it,” he added,
with a very expressive shake of the head. “Those
Green Mountain Boys of yours are dead shots,”
88 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

I then told him about my having had a brother
in the fight ; and said I would like to hear his side
of the story.

“ First tell me your own version,” he suggested.
“That’s Yankee, isn’t it?”

“Well, Joshua is no hand to write letters, so
it’s not much I know about it ; but anyhow, this ©
_is the way we heard it : —

“When our army retreated from Ticonderég’ on
the morning of July 6, 1777, they took the road
leading to Hubbardton, Vt. Colonel Francis, of
Newton, Mass., was in command of ‘the rear-
guard with his own regiment. When Francis
came up with our main body, which had halted
at Hubbardton, the rear-guard was re-enforced
with the regiments of Warner and Hale, and
Warner, as senior officer, then ‘took command of
it. The main body then moved on six miles
farther to Castleton. Warner’s orders were to
keep within supporting distance; but, as his men
were tired, he decided to go into camp where
he was, and the battle of Hubbardton was the
result.”

“Are you quite sure those three regiments
were all the force you had on the ground?” asked
my officer in some surprise.

“ As sure as you live.”

The captain then gave me his side. Ycu can
put this and that together.

Said he, “I belonged to Frazer’s corps, com-
_HUBBARDTON 89

posed of the light infantry and grenadiers, with
_some Canadian bushrangers acting as scouts. We
were the advanced guard of the army.

“ As soon as it was known that the Americans
had abandoned their works, we marched into
them. When we got down to the bridge thrown
across the lake, over which the garrison had
passed, some hours earlier, to the eastern shore,
we had to halt until the bridge could be made
passable again, which took up some time, as it
had been partly destroyed on purpose to stop
us. More than this, four men had been left in
a battery, which raked the bridge from end to
- end, who, on the approach of our army, were to
have fired off the cannon that defended it, and get
away in the confusion. .

‘No doubt this was their intention, as they left
their lighted matches close to the cannon.

“Situated as our brigade was, had these men
obeyed orders, they would have done us great
mischief ; but, instead of doing so, we found them
lying dead drunk by a cask-of wine, which had
been left behind in the retreat.

“However, this same battery came very near
being the destruction of the Ninth regiment,
through the curiosity of an Indian, who took up a
lighted match that was lying on the ground, and,
whether by accident or not, let a spark fall on the
priming just as that regiment was marching over
the bridge. The cannon was loaded with all man-


90 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

ner of destructive missiles, great and small, which
must have swept the bridge of every living thing ;
but, as it fortunately turned out, was so elevated
that it did no damage whatever when it went off.

“Some little time after this, we were ordered
to march in pursuit of the enemy, and to catch up
with them if we could. Riedesel’s Germans were
ordered to fall in behind us as a support; but as
we took a sort of pleasure in making them chase
us, we saw nothing more of them until the next
day.

“On our march we picked up several strag-
glers, from whom it was learned that the enemy’s
rear-guard was composed of picked men, com-
manded by a Colonel Francis, one of their best
officers.

“Upon learning that this force was not far off,
we marched on, three miles nearer, and slept on
our arms where night overtook us. Few harder
“marches have ever fallen to my lot. The general
was initiating us into the mysteries of soldiering
with a vengeance.

“At three in the morning we were on the road
again ; and at about five we came up with the en-
emy, whom we found thrown entirely off their
guard, and busily employed in cooking their
breakfasts around the camp-fires. The celerity
of our march had prevented their getting any
notice of it.

“Major Grant, of our regiment, at once at-
HUBBARDTON gl

tacked their pickets with our advanced guard.
After firing a few scattering shots, the pickets —
ran in to their main body, with our men following
close at their heels. Upon coming up with them,
the major got upon the stump of a tree to recon-_
noitre, and had hardly given the order ‘to fire
when a rifle ball knocked him off the stump,
stone dead. He was the first man I saw killed
on that day, though not the last by a good many.

“At the commencement of the action, the
Americans were everywhere thrown into the
greatest confusion; but being rallied by that brave
officer, Colonel Francis, whose death, though an
enemy’s, will ever be regretted by all those who
can feel for the loss of a brave and gallant man,
the fight was renewed with the greatest fierceness
and obstinacy. Indeed, the fate of the day was
undecided until the arrival of the Germans, who,
though late, came in. for a share of the glory, in
dispersing the enemy in all quarters.

“Upon their arrival we were apprehensive, by
the noise we heard, that a re-enforcement had been
sent back from the main body of the American
army for the support of their rear-guard ; for they
began singing psalms on their advance,: and at
the same time kept up an incessant firing, which
totally. decided the fate of the day.

“ After the action was over, and all firing had
ceased, a number of our officers met at a quiet
spot to read the papers taken out of the pocket-
92 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

book of Colonel Francis. While thus engaged,
Captain Shrimpton of the Sixty-second, who had
the papers in his hand, jumped up, staggered and
fell, exclaiming that he was severely wounded.
We all heard the ball whiz by us, and upon turn-
ing toward the place whence the shot came, saw
the smoke drift away from it, but the person who
had fired could not be found.”

I told the captain, who had now finished his
narrative, that I was glad to hear our men had be-
haved so well, as I was tired of hearing them con-
tinually spoken of as cowards, who would run
away at the first fire.

“T admit,” he replied apologetically enough,
“that such was the general belief in our army
at one time. But that was before we had met the
_ Americans in the open field on the 19th of Sep-
tember. The courage and obstinacy with which
the Americans fought on that day were the as-
tonishment of every one of us; and we then be-
came fully convinced that .they were far from
being the contemptible enemy we had once im-
agined them, or were, as some of us had thought,
incapable of fighting except behind strong and
well-manned works.

“And since I have mentioned the 19th of Sep-
tember, I will tell you of another thing that set
me to thinking. Being one day detailed as officer
of the guard, I was requested to reconnoitre over
HUBBARDTON 93

across two wide ravines that lay in our front. In
doing this I had to make a circuit over a part of
the late battle-ground, meeting in my way with
several dead bodies belonging to the enemy, still
lying unburied where they fell. Among them,
lay a woman quite dead, with arms extended and
both hands full of cartridges. Evidently she had
heard the men calling out, for more ammunition,
had run up into the hottest of the fire, and was in
the act of distributing her cartridges among them,
when one of our bullets struck her. down.

“Not brave, eh? I will give you another in-
stance of personal heroism that I never knew
excelled.

“While we were halting at Fort Edward, on
our march down to Albany, there were almost
daily skirmishes between our Indian contingent
and the American scouting-parties, who were thus
trying to delay us. In one of these skirmishes
the Indians had taken some prisoners, who were.
brought into camp.

“One of them, who was-so badly wounded as
to be unable to walk, the Indians had brought in
on their backs for nearly three miles, with as
much care and attention as if he had been one of
their own people. Even they know how to honor
bravery in an enemy.

“As they approached the camp we were all ap-
prised of their having some prisoners with them,
by their setting up the war-whoops ; but every one
94 = THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

was as much astonished as pleased with their hu-
manity in bringing the chief of the party in on
their backs.

“He was taken before General Frazer, but
would give no answer to any question whatever,
and }ehaved in the most undaunted manner
throughout.

“The general, imagining that by showing him
some attention he might gain some information
from him, ordered him some refreshment; and
when the surgeon, who had examined his wound,
told him he must immediately undergo an ampu-
tation, which was submitted to without a murmur,
the man was warned to keep himself still and
quiet, or lock-jaw would inevitably set in.

“To this he replied with great firmness, ‘ Then
I shall have the pleasure of dying in a good cause;
that of gaining independence to the American col-
onies.’

“Such was the man’s restless disposition that
he actually died the next morning.”
THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER 95

THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER

By his evident desire to be fair and straight-
forward in all he said, I had come to put a good
deal more confidence in my English captain than
in some of our own boasters, and I hinted as
much to him. oa

His reply was what I should have expected
from him.

“Why,” said he good-humoredly, “I could
never see how disparaging your enemy was
going to increase your own importance. The
more contemptible your adversary, the less glory
in overcoming him. Look at it in this way. Of
course, I would: not be willing to admit that we
were your inferiors, yet here we are prisoners
of war.” ;

“What do your officers say about our riflemen?
Don’t you think them more than a match for any
troops in your service?”

“As skirmishers, especially in a wooded coun-
try like yours, no troops in the world can equal
them. At first we thought highly of our own
Indians and Canadians as marksmen, but your
riflemen actually drove them out of our camp.
It was to that fatal skill of theirs at long-range
96 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

firing, that we owed the loss of our gallant com-
mander, General Frazer.”

“Were you near him that day?”

“No; I was on duty in the lines. I saw him
soon after he was shot, however.”

“Would it be painful for you to give me some
account of his last moments?”

“By no means. He met a soldier’s death on
the field of honor, fighting for the cause he be-
lieved in. What more can be said? You may
recall my speaking about heading a reconnoi-
tring party out beyond the ravines. I knew that
our troops had gone out, though ignorant with
what object. Before I got back to my post, how-
ever, the battle of the 7th of October was raging
off at my right in a way to put us all on the
alert. ay

“This was all the more provoking because the
thick woods hid everything from our sight.

“Soon after my return to the guard, the firing
appeared to become general on both sides, and
very heavy indeed. Much about this time the
bat-men of the army, who went out with the
troops for forage, came galloping back into camp,
having thrown off their forage to save their own
horses and themselves by rapid flight.

“You must allow this defeat of the bat-men,
besides a steady stream of wounded men coming
into camp, was no very favorable omen of suc-
cess; nor can you conceive the sorrow visible
THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER 07

on every face at General Frazer’s beirig brought
in wounded, supported by two officers, one on

each side of his
horse.

“ T cannot describe
the scene to you. It
was such that the im-
agination must help
to paint, — the offi-

cers all anxious and.

eagerly inquiring as
to his wound, the
downcast look and
melancholy that were
visible to every one
as to his situation.
And all the answer

he could make to the

many inquiries was a
shake of the head, ex-
pressive that it was

all over with him. So

much was he beloved,
that not only officers
and soldiers, but all
the women, flocked



AN AMERICAN RIFLEMAN

(From a print of 1780)

round him, so solicitous were they for his fate.

“When the general had reached his tent, and
was a little recovered from the faintness occa-
sioned by loss of blood, he told those around him
98 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

that he saw the man who shot him. He was a
rifleman perched up in the forks of a tree. The
ball had entered a little below the breast, and
come out just below the backbone. It had gone
entirely through him.

“ After the surgeon had dressed his wound, the
general said to him very composedly, ‘Tell me,
Sone, to the best of your skill and judgment, if
you think my wound is mortal.’ -The surgeon re-
plied, ‘I am sorry, sir, to inform you that it is,.
and that you cannot possibly live four-and-twenty
hours.’

“ The general then called for pen and ink, and,
after making his will and distributing a few little
tokens of regard to the officers of his suite, de-
sired that he might be removed to the general
hospital. Ah, that was a bad day for us, very bad!

“The next morning we heard that the general
was dead. We could as well have lost another
battle. At his own request he was buried in the
great redoubt we had thrown up on the high
ground above the hospitals. The body was borne
up the hillside to, the grave upon the shoulders of
four stout grenadiers of his own corps. The rest
of the corps marched in procession. _

“T greatly doubt if just such a military funeral
was ever seen before — certainly not to my knowl-
edge. Upon seeing such a collection of troops
massed in one spot, your artillery opened fire
upon us; and amid the roar of this cannonade the
THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER 99

funeral service began, with the balls ploughing
and throwing up the earth all around us. Even
while the chaplain was reading the service for the
dead, a cannon-ball, better aimed. than the rest,
fell exactly in the middle of the group around
him, covering him and them with dirt. It was
barbarous — barbarous |”

The captain’s face showed far more clearly than
words his deep horror of the act.

“T’ve heard about it,’ said I, “from our own
men who were there. As you say, they saw your
troops massing on the hill, but without knowing
the object, and so opened fire. No flag was sent
in to let them know what was going on. It was
supposed that you were getting ready either to
attack or retreat; but, in any case, your troops
were a fair mark for our guns, I’ve been told,
and believe it too, that somehow word was passed
between the sentries that a general officer was
being buried, and that not a shotted gun was
fired by us afterward, but minute guns instead.”

“That, indeed, puts a new face upon the mat-
ter,” said the captain, visibly brightening up. “I
hope it may be true,’ he added, with a shake
of the head.

“Oh, we Americans are not quite lost to all
feeling, you may depend, sir. Ask your wounded,
ask your prisoners who have fallen into our hands,
if we have behaved to them like savages.”

I suppose I had spoken out rather impulsively,
100 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

for the captain’s face grew flushed. Instead of
showing temper, however, he simply answered,
“ Nothing was farther from my thoughts. Am I
not a living evidence to the truth of your state-
ment?” The subject was then dropped. :

We rode along together in silence for the next
half-hour, each probably casting about in his own
mind for something more agreeable to talk about.
He was the first to break the silence.

“By-the-by,” he remarked, “it’s an ill wind
blows nobody good. We took some of your men
prisoners who are now enjoying their liberty, I
dare say, through our misfortunes.”

I informed. him that all those who were taken
at Hubbardton had been retaken at “Ty” by our
own troops, before the surrender, a fact of which
he seemed thoroughly ignorant.

“Our retreat, then, was really cut off,’ he
observed thoughtfully. “It was not of them that
I was thinking, though,” he continued, “ but of
some we took at the beginning of that roth of
September affair.

“Tn this skirmish, one of General Frazer’s bat-
men rescued an officer of the Virginia riflemen
from the Indians, who had already plundered him
of his valuables, and were on the point of strip-
ping him when Frazer’s man interfered. He
made them give up the officer’s pocket-book, con-
taining all his valuable papers, as well as his com-_
mission, in return for which the grateful officer
THE DEATH OF GENERAL FRAZER 1o!t

offered his rescuer all the paper dollars he had,
and said he was only sorry he had no ae ones to —
reward him with. a

“The bat-man brought his prisoner up to Gen-
eral Frazer, who closely questioned him concern-
. Ing the enemy’s position and force, but could get
no other answer than that their army was com-
manded by Generals Gates and Arnold.

“Exceedingly provoked that he could gain no
intelligence, General Frazer told the prisoner
that if he did not immediately inform him as
to the exact situation of the enemy, he would
hang him up directly. The officer, with the
most undaunted firmness, replied, ‘You may,
if you please.’

“ The general, perceiving he could make noth-
ing of him, rode off, leaving him in the custody of
Lieutenant Dunbar, of the artillery.

“Just at this time my servant arrived with my
canteen, which was very fortunate, as we stood in
need of some refreshment after our march through
the woods, and this little skirmish. I requested
Dunbar, with his prisoner, to partake of it; so
seating ourselves upon a fallen tree, we asked the
captain a variety of questions, to which he gave
very evasive answers. We both observed that he
was in great spirits.

“At last I said to him, ‘Captain, do you think
we shall have any more work upon our hands
to-day ?? To which he replied, ‘ Yes, yes; you'll
102 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

have business enough, for there are many hun-
dreds all round you now.’

“He had hardly spoken the words, when from
out of the woods, a little way in our front, there
came an excessively heavy fire. Dunbar ran off.
to his guns, saying, ‘Anburey, you must’ take
charge of the captain.’ There being only one
officer, besides myself, with my company, I com-
mitted the captain: to the care of a sergeant, with

particular orders that he should not be ill-treated:
And that was the last I saw of him,”
A FORTUNATE DISCOVERY 103

A FORTUNATE DISCOVERY

You must know that my confidential talks.with
the British captain not only helped to shorten the
road, which was as bad as possible, coming over
the mountains, so late in the season, but also was
the means of correcting a good many mistakes
into which each of us had fallen with respect to
the operations of the campaign just closed. He
had been so free and frank with me that I felt
myself bound to be equally so with him.

On the day that we crossed over the Connecti-
cut River there was, of course, considerable delay ;
and General Glover, who commanded the escort,
grew impatient and SEeDE ED I pointed him out
to my captain.

“That’s the man who saved our army at Long
Island,” said I.

The captain looked at him long and attentively.

“And who crossed Washington’s little army
over the Delaware, when he beat up your sua
at Trenton,” I continued.

“ Really?”

“Yes; his men are mostly fishermen and
sailors, whe handle an oar or a musket equally
well. Some are ship-carpenters. If they want
104 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

boats they build them; if a bridge, they build
that ; or, if in a hurry, a raft. They take to the

water like ducks.”

AN AMERICAN SOLDIER

(From an old print)



“ Jacks at all trades?”
observed the captain,
laughing.

“Why, yes; but let
me tell you we’ve no bet-
ter regiment in our army
than Glover’s. Instead
of having to wait for a
corps of artificers, as you
call ’em, when Glover
comes to a river too deep
to be forded, he simply
sings out, ‘Boatmen, to
the front!’ or ‘ Bridge-
builders, fall out, there!’
as the case may be; and
at it they go, and you are
across before you know
it.”

“? Tisn’t soldier-like.
A soldier should be noth-
ing else ; a sailor nothing
else. I can’t imagine a

half-and-half creature like that being the best of

either.”

“Vou seem a little out of sorts this morning,

Captain.”
A FORTUNATE DISCOVERY 105

“T confess it. This river reminds me of the
Hudson at Saratoga, only it’s broader. Oh, if we
could only have got across that river in season !”

“Glover would have taken you over,” I hastened
to say. :

“ Flum,” returned the captain musingly, “I
think you: have the best of it.”

“You might have got away, as it was, if it a
not been for one trifling accident.”

“What was that?” the captain hastily asked.

“A deserter.” a

The captain looked at me blankly. I saw that
he was as ignorant as a child of my meaning.

“Tl tell you about it,” I explained. “We
knew that. if you stayed where you were, you
would have to surrender. So we all expected
your army would try to get away. That’s clear.”
The captain smiled and nodded assent.

“Early on the morning of October 11, General
Gates heard that your army (that is, the main
body) had marched off for Fort Edward, leaving
only a rear-guard behind to fool us. _

“The general officers were called together in a
hurry. They were told how matters stood. The
news fell like a bomb-shell among them, for all
thought you were as safe as so many herrings
in a pound. It was decided to advance to the at-
tack of your camp in half an hour. So the offi-
cers were ordered forthwith to their respective
commands,
106 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

“ The first brigade crossed the Fishkill. Glov-
er’s was behind, in support. The banks were
rough, steep and broken—in short, it was just
such a place as one would like to see his
enemies floundering about in. And that is
just the reason why we had not attacked it
before.”

“ Our artillery was in position there, masked by ©
the brushwood,” interposed the captain, with
marked interest.

“Precisely. And would have blown our troops
into the middle of next week. Well, then, just as
Glover was spurring his horse into the creek,
he saw a British soldier making for our side of
it. Glover called the soldier to him and ques-
tioned him.

“ The soldier said that he had belonged to the
cattle-guard, but had watched his chance to desert,
and was going over to the Americans. The gen-
eral then asked him about your army. The reply
was, ‘It is encamped the same as it has been for
some days past.’

“Said the general, ‘If you attempt to deceive
me, you shall be hung in half an hour ; if you tell
the truth, you shall be protected, and have good
usage.’ He then asked the deserter, ‘ Have not
large bodies of your troops been sent off to Fort
Edward ?’

« two ago, sir, but it returned on finding the road
A FORTUNATE DISCOVERY 107

occupied by ee Americans; and the whole army
is now in camp.’

“Glover sent word to the first brigade to re-
cross the creek on the instant. The deserter
was mounted behind an aid, and hurried off post-
haste to headquarters. Upon hearing his story,
the order to attack was countermanded in all
haste.

“General Nixon, who led the first brigade, had
begun to fall back as soon as he received Glover's
message ; for he, too, realized the danger he was
in as soon as he should be discovered.

“JT ought to explain that at this season of the
year the mornings are always very foggy, and this
one was no exception. So far the fog had favored
the advance of our troops; but, as luck would
have it, the sun came out bright, clearing off the
fog before Nixon could get back across the creek.
Your artillery blazed away at him, killing and
wounding a number of his men; but he thought
this loss trifling compared with what it must have
been if Glover’s message had failed to reach him
in season. Nobody doubted that if he had kept
on, his brigade, and perhaps Glover’s too, would
have been cut to pieces. And if that had hap-
pened the situation of the two armies might have
been reversed. Ours would have found itself
weakened and dispirited, yours elated, and with
confidence restored. At least, that is the way I
look at it.”
108 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

“TJ doubt it much,” said the captain gloomily.
“True, it might have bettered the situation some-
what; indeed, it must; but we should probably
have been cut off in detail, and forced to sur-
render at Jast. Our provisions were about gone ;
so was our ammunition. Our horses were dying
of starvation; our bateaux were mostly taken or
destroyed. The fate of the campaign was really
settled at Bennington. Some of us then saw the



THE SILVER BULLET

handwriting on the wall. I tell you it was not so
to be.” ee

“ Who was to blame for your pushing on as you
did?”

« A British officer, sir, never criticises the acts
of his superiors,” replied the captain with some
asperity. In another moment he went on to
say that the expected assistance. from below
was doubtless a controlling reason with General
Burgoyne, but that no news of Clinton’s prog-
A FORTUNATE DISCOVERY 109

ress up the Hudson reached him until too late.
“Strange,” he said, halt to himself and half aloud.

“J think I can explain that part of it,’ I sug-
gested. “One of Clinton’s spies was captured
while on the way to your camp. When taken
before our Clinton, he was seen hastily to swallow
something. An emetic as quickly brought to
light a silver bullet, in which was found a de-
spatch meant for you. The spy pleaded hard for |
mercy, but grim old Clinton told him he was con-
demned out of his own mouth.”
110 THE WATCH FIRES OF °*76

A MOTHER'S LOVE

I know of nothing so likely to take all the con-
ceit for fighting out of a man as a little thing that
_ happened after we were settled down in quarters
for the winter. A prisoners’ camp had been
formed on Prospect and Winter Hill, in what
is now Somerville. The officers, however, were
allowed to take up their quarters in the neighbor-
ing towns if they wished, though not to go out-
side of certain limits. They relieved the dulness
of their captivity by strolling about the country,
as men in their situation naturally would. One
day when I was passing by his quarters, the
English captain I told you of came to the door
and called me in.

“Well met,” said he. ‘‘Do you remember our
talk about Hubbardton ?”

“ Every word of it, Captain.”

« That’s good. Then I would mee to know
what you think of this adventure. It has made
me heartily sick of the very name of war. Listen.

“A few days since, while walking out with
some brother officers, we stopped at a house to
see if we could purchase vegetables there. While
the others were bargaining with the woman of
A MOTHER’S LOVE 111

the house, I observed an elderly woman sitting
by the fire, who was continually eying us, and
every now and then shedding a silent. tear.

“Just as we were quitting the house she got up,
turned her eager looks toward us, and bursting
into tears, said, ‘Gentlemen, will you let a poor,
distracted woman speak a word to you before
you go?’

“We, as you must naturally imagine, were
much astonished; and, upon inquiring what she
wanted, with the most poignant grief, and sobbing
as if her very heart would break, she asked if any
of us knew her son, who was killed at the battle oe
Hubbardton, —a Colonel Francis.

“Several of us informed her that we had seen
him after he was dead.

“ She then inquired about his pocket-book, and
if any of his papers were safe, as some of them
related to his estate ; or if any of the soldiers had
got his watch. Oh if she could but obtain that in
remembrance of her dear, dear son, she should be
almost happy.

“Captain Ferguson of our regiment, who was
of the party, told her that, as to the colonel’s
papers and pocket: -book, he was fearful they were
either lost or destroyed ; but, pulling out a watch
from his fob, he added, ‘There, my good woman,
if that can make you happy, take it, and God
bless you.’

“We were all as much surprised as ignorant
112 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

at his having the watch in his possession, which
it seems he had purchased from a drummer-boy.

“On seeing it, it is impossible to describe the
joy and grief that were depicted in her counte-
nance. I never, in all my life, beheld such a
strength of passion. She kissed it, looked un-
utterable gratitude at Captain Ferguson, then-
kissed it again. Her feelings were inexpressible ;
she knew not how to express or show them. She |
would repay his kindness by kindness, but could
only sob out her thanks. Our feelings were lifted
up to an inexpressible height. We promised to
search after the papers; and, I believe, at that
moment could have hazarded life itself to pro-
cure them.”
GENERAL GATES 113

GENERAL GATES

“Wuar did you think of Gates, anyway?” I
asked of one of the Saratoga veterans, as a feeler.
“ Was he, or was he not, a good general?”

“ Private soldiers, Squire, are not always the
best judges, I admit ; but we had our opinions, just
the same, and if you want to know mine, there’s
no law agin’ my giving it to you. At the begin-
ning of the war, those officers who had seen ser-
vice in the British army were looked up to as the
ones who were going to make reputations. We
all thought so. But before the end of the war
came, nearly all of those officers had gone to the
rear, as so many failures. There was Lee. Some
think he was-a traitor. St. Clair was always get-
ting whipped. Conway was a snake in the grass.
Montgomery began well, but nobody knows how
he would have ended. However, he failed.”

“But what about Gates?”

“Gates ? oh, Gates was-just the man for the
-place they first put him in. As adjutant-general
he did great work in getting our raw levies into
shape ; no man could have done better ; but when
it came to commanding an army in the field, why,
Gates had to depend mostly on his subordinates.
I14 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

Mind, I don’t say that Gates was no general, but I
do say he was not a great captain. After Camden,
there was nothing left of him. His head could
hold only just about so much.”

“You surprise me, for I always have thought
Gates a skilful tactician.”



GENERAL HORATIO. GATES

(In British Uniform)

“T will say this for Gates. As a man, every-
body spoke well of him. There was not a kinder-
hearted man in the army. Let me give you an
instance, as told me by a British officer taken
prisoner at Saratoga.”

There was an old soldier of the royal regiment
of artillery, who had served in the French war, at
GENERAL GATES TI5

Fort Pitt and the Illinois. On his return from
that country to Philadelphia, in 1772, he came to
me with a happy smile on his face, and told me
that he had had the honor to receive a letter from
Major Gates, which he begged me to read for
him.

I asked him how he came to correspond wit
Major Gates.

“Please your honor,” said the old man, “ Major
Gates was dangerously wounded at Braddock’s
defeat, and was left on the field among the slain.
I was wounded also, but made a shift to carry the
worthy Captain Gates (he was then a captain) off
the field. He has often told me since that he
owed his life to me, and charged me at parting
that whenever I thought he could, in any way,
serve me, not to forget to write to him without
reserve ; so, please your honor (this is the way
soldiers address all officers), I am now grown old,
and worn out in the service, and expect to be
invalided and sent home; but have been long in
America, and I like America, please your honor.
I accordingly took the liberty to write to Major _
Gates for his advice, and this is his answer. He
has also written to Major Hay, to give me every
indulgence the service will admit of. I hope your
honor will give me your opinion what is best to
be done.”

I read the letter, but had not read far before I
was sensibly touched with the generous senti-
116 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

ments of the writer. After going over the service
the veteran had rendered him at Braddock’s field,
he went on to say,—

“Do as you please respecting your small pittance of
pension. Thou hast served long, but thy service has not
brought thee rest for thy wounds and infirmities. I find by
your letter that you wish to continue in America; therefore,
make yourself easy. When you receive your discharge, re-
.pair to my plantation on the Potomac River. I have gota
fine tract of land there, which not only furnishes me with
all the necessaries, but all the comforts of life. Come and
rest your firelock in my chimney corner, and partake with
me. While I have, my savior Penfold shall not want; and
it is my wish, as well as Mrs. Gates’s, to see you spend the
evening of your days comfortably. Mrs. Gates desires to be
' affectionately remembered to you.”

“Tf Gates hadn’t let himself be made a tool of
to throw down Washington, I should vote him a
_trump. That I can never forgive him,” Uncle
Billy very seriously insisted.

“You may go still farther, and say that he
even descended to snub the commander-in-chief,” .
snarled Reddy. “Tl never forgive him for that,”
he added, bringing his clenched fist down on his
knee as if to clinch the assertion.
THE CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH T17

“THE CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH

«Wer want something to stir the old sluggish
blood. a little to-night, boys. I don't know just
what it should be myself; but you all know what I
mean— something, for instance, that will prove
we had those among us as able to plan, and as
prompt to execute, a risky piece of business as
our enemies ; and they were not slow either, at
that sort of thing. I have it! Let the parole
be ‘Newport,’ and the countersign ‘Barton’ to-
night. Come, Jerry, my boy, you must take the
laboring oar now, as you did that night in the
whaleboat. Stiffen up, man, and let a listening
world hear your version of that exploit.”

“I suppose,” Jerry very deliberately began,
“you've all seen a semaphore working? But did
any of you ever hear of a clothes-line telegraph ?”

This unexpected question elicited considerable
merriment from the old boys. After the laugh
had subsided, Jerry -quietly remarked, “ Oh, you
may laugh as much as you please, but he laughs
best who laughs last; and if Ben Franklin could
make the lightning pass over the string of a boy’s
kite, why not over a clothes-line ? Hasn’t a
clothes-line got poles too? Wait and see.
118 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

“The British held Rhode Island strongly, with
an army and a fleet. That was a thorn in the
flesh that our people couldn’t pluck out. Twice
_ they tried it, and twice they failed. When the
British got ready to go they left, and not before. |
All that our folks could do, in the meantime,
was to look over the water at the beggars, who -
every now and then would sally out of -their
stronghold, and burn a town or two, just to keep
their hand in, as it were.

“At length General Gates was sent down to
Providence. to see what could be done. It was
important to know what this nest’ of redcoated
salamanders would try to do next. I call them
salamanders because they were all so fond of
warming themselves by the blaze of our burning
towns and villages —the wretches! So. the gen-
eral sent for one Lieutenant Seth Chapin, told
him what he wanted, studied Chapin’s face a bit,
and finally asked him if he didn’t know some way
of getting at the root of the matter. Chapin said
he would try. :

“Chapin knew every nook and corner of New-
port like a book. The thing was, first, to find a
trustworthy agent; and next, to hit upon such a
plan of communication as should. excite no sus-
picion in the minds of the British garrison. They
were a suspicious folk, and watched everybody
sharply, as you may imagine.

“Finally, in some way, Chapin found out a poor
THE CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH 119

washerwoman on the island, who was in the nabit
of taking in washing for the British officers ; and
as she had to go back and forth often, to fetch
away the soiled clothes or carry the clean ones
home to her customers, she became a sort of
privileged character; and by keeping both eyes
and ears open, she managed to hear and see a
good deal of what was going on

“Chapin sounded her, found her willing to
undertake the business for a consideration, and
so, after a little talk, the matter was settled
between them.

“Tt was agreed that she should write down all
the intelligence she could get. A woman has ten
times more wit than a man in such matters, any-
way, besides a natural love for havin’ a hand in
probing a mystery, or being made the confidant
of one, and all that. Some folks pretend that she
can’t keep a secret, but that’s all stuff. I know
better.

“Well, these two conspirators, Chapin and the
washerwoman, settled. it between them that the
writing should be put in the crevice of a certain
rock near the shore, where Chapin could come
over the water and get it. But how should he
know when there was a letter in the post-office
for him? ‘Leave that to me,’ says the woman.

“With the ready wit of her sex, the washer-
woman contrived a code of signals, to be made
when she had anything of consequence to send
120 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

out, by putting up a certain number of clothes-
poles, as if drying her clothes, on which the Brit-
ish linen was hung out in such a way as to give
Chapin his cue to.come or not to come. For
instance, three shirts hung in a row meant ‘im-
portant ;’ two with a gap between them, ‘nothing
to-day ;’ a pair of drawers, hung upside down,
‘come quickly ;’ and so on. .

“ After dark the lieutenant would paddle across
from Little Compton in his skiff, secure the com-
munication, and return the way he came, with
nobody the wiser; and the very next day it would
be put in the hands of General Gates at Prov-
idence.

“ After the British had evacuated the island,
the general gave Chapin fifteen hundred dollars,
in Continental paper money, for himself and his
trusty agent. The whole of it was worth just
seventy-five silver dollars — not a cent more.
- Think of it!” And for this paltry recompense
two persons had risked the gallows. But Chapin
never told even General Gates who his partner
was. So some men can keep a secret too.”
KIDNAPPING OF GENERAL PRESCOTT 121

THE KIDNAPPING OF GENERAL ‘PRESCOTT

Ir was the general impression that Jerry, like
every good story-teller, had merely given us this
incident as an appetizer, leaving the best part for
the finish. He now resumed his relation.

“ All of you recollect what a tremendous blow
to us the capture of General Lee was in the ©
Jerseys, in the winter of ’76; for with all his
eccentricities — and they would fill a volume —
Lee was looked up to as the best military man we
- had. It made no difference that he was taken
through his own utter disregard —to use the
mildest term — of Washington’s. repeated orders,
or even that he may have thought he was a
greater man than Washington himself. Taken
he was, the army was going to pieces, the enemy
swarming about us, and it really looked as though
the end of the Revolution was in sight. I, for
one, thought so, at any rate.

“ Lee was taken to New York; we had no gen-
eral officer in our hands to exchange for him;
everybody was now praising Lee to the skies;
and there the matter stood, blue for us, rosy for
the enemy, black for Lee.

“It was this state of things that first put it
ee _. THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76,

into Major William Barton’s head to attempt the
capture of the British General Prescott. ‘Prescott
was just such a captain as you like to have op-
posed to you in war. He was no warrior, but
then he would be just as valuable for the purpose
of an exchange as a better man would. Besides,
che had once before-been taken in this war, and
Barton probably argued that what had been done ©
before could be done again.’

“Having thus settled the matter in his own
mind, Barton next applied to his colonel for the
necessary permission. After hearing his plan,
he was told, in substance, to go ahead. He then
proceeded’ to choose such officers as he knew
would not fail him in a pinch. “As for the men
who were to go with him, he purposely put off
calling for them until the very last moment; for .
the very excellent reason that, if they knew noth-
ing about the proposed expedition, they would say *
nothing

“When all was in readiness the battalion was
paraded. In a few words Barton told the men
he wanted forty volunteers, and finished by ask-
ing those who were willing to go with him on
a very hazardous expedition to step out two paces
to the front. The whole regiment stepped out.

“ Barton was thus enabled to take his pick from
the whole regiment.

“But I’m getting a little ahead of my story.
Before this, while Barton was turning the matter
KIDNAPPING OF | GENERAL PRESCOTT 123.

over in his mind, a man by the name of, cone
who had made his escape from. the island, was
brought to Major Barton’s quarters. This man
described minutely the situation of the house
in which General Prescott lived.. This was a
good-sized farm-house, standing near the direct
road from Newport to Bristol .Ferry, and about
‘half-way between the two places. So General
Prescott, it seemed, was doing precisely the same.
thing that had so easily brought about General:
Lee’s CBee —mamisly) sleeping away from. his.
troops.

“Barton’s quarters were at Tiverton. The.
time for action having come, he crossed over the
bay to Warwick Neck, where he was detained two
days more by a violent storm. With him were
his forty volunteers, picked men every one, wha
manned five whaleboats. The enemy were then.
in possession of both Canonicut- and Prudence
Islands, with some guard-ships of theirs lying at:
anchor under the little Hope Island, which is be-
‘tween Prudence and the west shore of the bay.

“On the night of the 9th of July, 1777, every-
thing being favorable, Barton informed his. men
for the first time where they were going, and. for
what purpose. His party then embarked in their
boats,“ rowing swiftly and silently, with muffled
oars, between Patience and Prudence Islands, in
order to keep clear of the enemy’s guard-boats.
Of these they saw no sign; but from the enemy’s.
124 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

shipping, whose position was indicated by the
lights sparkling on the water, there came to their
ears the thrice-welcome cry of ‘ All’s well!’ ‘All’s
well!’ passed from ship to ship and from watch
to watch.

““So they reached the island shore undiscov-
ered, at a point about a mile distant from the
Overing house, where they knew that General
Prescott was to be found. Near it were two
guard-houses, one on each. side of the road.
These also were passed without discovery. They
now saw the house itself, standing a little back
from the road, looming up in the darkness. Two
parties instantly filed off to the right and left to
surround it. Leaving a third in the road, Barton
- advanced with a fourth toward the house by the
usual entrance. As he opened the gate of the
front yard, the sentinel posted at the door of
the house sharply challenged. No reply being
made, he again challenged, ‘Who comes es

“¢ Friends, Barton answered.

««¢ Advance one, with the countersign !’

“ Before he could have the time to recover his
wits, the poor man found himself in the grasp
of seven or eight determined men. Wresting the |
musket from his trembling hands, Barton threat-
ened the. sentinel with instant death if he made
the least noise or offered the least resistance.
He was then asked if the general was in the
house. Upon receiving an affirmative reply, the
KIDNAPPING OF GENERAL PRESCOTT 125

door was burst open, and the party, with Barton
at their head, rushed in.

“The first room entered was that of Overing,
Senior, who positively denied that General Pres-
cott was in the house. They then darted into
that of the son, who gave the same answer as his
father had done. Other rooms were then searched,
with the like ill-success.

“Fully persuaded that the general was con-
cealed somewhere in the house, Barton, as a last ©
resort, called out to his men to set it on fire.
The stratagem succeeded. In a moment more a
voice was heard asking what was the matter.
Barton instantly ran to the place, pushed open a
door, and, by the dim light of a candle, saw the
person of whom he was in search, just getting out
of bed. The colloquy was brief and to the point.

“«Are you General Prescott?’ Barton de-
manded.

te Teamasile

««Then you are my. prisoner.’

“ Time was given to the crestfallen British gen-
eral to partly dress himself before being marched
off to the boats. Meantime his aid, Major Bar-
rington, had also been taken. On arriving at the
shore, the general was allowed to finish dressing
himself in the open air. The boats then pushed
off. Soon after Barton’s party had left the island,
the alarm was given in the British camp. Cannon
were fired, and rockets sent up in every direction.
126 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

It was more than fortunate that those on board
the enemy’s shipping were unable to guess the
cause of the uproar, as they might easily have cut
off Barton’s retreat. As it was, however, the
“audacious Americans carried off their prize with-
out interference or accident. As they stepped on
shore at. Warwick Neck, the prisoner, who. had
been cautioned not to speak aloud, said to his”
captor, ‘Sir, you have made-a very bold push to-
night” The whole affair was planned and exe-
cuted with consummate skill and’ boldness, and
was all over in just six and a half hours from the
time.the party had shoved off from the Neck.”
AT VALLEY FORGE ee

AT VALLEY FORGE

WE met, as usual, at the tavern; though one or
two of the more infirm were absent at roll-call, as
the veterans now facetiously styled these gather-
ings, on account of the severity of the weather.

It was a bitter cold night in January, following
a heavy fall of snow, so that travelling could hardly
have been worse; but nothing could keep the old
fellows away, now that their tongues had become
loosened by the magical. power of old recollec-
tions. One by one they came straggling in,
stamping their feet, threshing their arms about,
or blowing upon their benumbed fingers with
frosty breath, in the effort to restore warmth to
the different members, or aid the feeble circula-
tion of their bodies. But their hearts were still
warm. ae

“Whew!” exclaimed Uncle Zeb Turner, delib-
erately unwinding several thick coils of woollen
muffler from his throat. “Do you know, this
’minds me of the nights I stood guard down there
at Valley Forge, in ’77?”

“You have the floor, Uncle Zeb,” a by- stander
facetiously remarked, making way for the veteran
to reach the fire.
128 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“Yes, Uncle Zeb, you have the floor,” the
others hastened to join in; “now speak your
piece, and never mind the weather outside.”

“Let me get my breath first, won’t you?” the
old man returned. ‘Fact is, I ha’n’t got thawed
out yit. Seems as if I could spit snowballs, an’
sneeze icicles.”

An armful of dry wood was thrown on the fire,
from which the red and yellow flames presently
leaped up in great style, setting fire to the thick:
crust of soot at the chimney back, and making it
glow like a furnace. Uncle Zeb gave a sigh of
deep content, put one hand on each knee, stared
steadily at the fire, and said absently, —

“?Tain’t no long story. I’m like the dreenings
toa jug. You have to tip me clean upside down
before anything’ll run out. Hows’ever, [ll try to
keep the ball a-rolling.

“ After making that bad mess of it at one
town, there was consider’ble marching and coun-
termarching, but very little fighting, until, at last,
as the season for that sort of business was about
over, our army went. into ‘winter quarters at Val-
ley Forge, seventeen miles up the Schuylkill.
The long and short of it all was, that the British
took Philadelphia, and we took to the woods.

“Now, that warn’t quite the original cal lation.
We had planned to spend the winter in Philadel-
phia ourselves. We had even dreamed of tight
houses, warm clothing, full rations, light duty,
AT VALLEY FORGE 129

and sich like; but General Howe he’d gone and
shut the door in our faces, and there we were,
turned out in the cold, with the bare ground for
our beds, the naked sky for a covering to pull over |
us, and as for the feathers for our beds, they came
down presently, thick and fast, in the form of
snowflakes. Who wouldn’t be a soldier?

“ We were set to work at. our old trade of dig-
ging, and building huts. We said our clothes
were dropping off of us. They said work would ~
keep us warm.

“From day to day the snow fell, sometimes
more, sometimes less, but often to the depth of a

foot or more. Until our log huts were roofed in,
we had to sleep on the frozen ground, never tak-
ing off our clothes wet or dry, which, by the way,
were often frozen so stiff that a man would rattle
about in them as he walked, like a dried-up crab
in his shell. The way we did was this. Half a
dozen of us would form a mess together, spread
our straw out on the ground — they gave us the
same kind of litter as the horses — we had an old
tattered blanket apiece. to pull over us, and by
building big fires, and snuggling up so close
together you couldn’t tell tother from which, we .
managed to get through the nights pretty well. I
mean things might have been worse. Those who
came in off duty would keep the fires going, turn-
ing into the warm nests of those who were turned
out, growling, for the reliefs.
130 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“T shall remember one night to the longest
day I live — that won’t be very long, will it? but
no matter. My knapsack’s packed ; and when the
Great Commander of us all gives the order to fall
in, Uncle Zeb’s ready to march.

‘Well, the weather for several days had been
remarkably cold and stormy. On that particular

-day we had one of the most tremendous snow-
storms in the memory of man. No man could
stand out in it many minutes without danger to
his life. It blew great guns. The snow did not
fall straight down, so as to lie on a level, but came
swooping down on the camp in whirlwinds, that
nothing could stand up against. It stung like
bird-shot; it blinded you; it took your breath
away. The sentinels had to be relieved every fif-
-teen minutes ; and even in that short time some
_ of them narrowly escaped being frozen to death.
Bur-r-r! it makes the cold shivers run down. my
-back when I think of it. Am I here, or am I not?

“You know how short December days are.
“Well, it grew dark early, with the storm still ra-
ging about us, while we crouched and shivered,
- dozed off and woke again, under our blankets.
Suddenly my comrades and myself were roused
from sleep by loud cries for help, coming from
close-at hand. We.turned out in a hurry. Sev-
eral officers of our battalion stood there, sort of
bewildered like, as if they didn’t know which way
to turn, though only-a few yards from the door.
AT VALLEY FORGE 130

Their old matquee had been ripped up by the
wind like rotten paper, and blown down over their
heads, flat. They had managed to crawl out,
somehow, into the darkness and the storm, in
which they were almost smothered before they
could reach our hut, not ten rods off. When day-
light came at last, it was found that.some of the
soldiers who slept in tents were actually covered
up, and buried, under a foot or more of snow, like
» sheep caught out in a storm. y

“But that was not the worst of it, either.
These storms so blocked up the roads, that fora
week at a time not a wheel could turn; or a hoof
travel to camp ; so that when what we had on hand
was gone, rations were cut down, and cut down,
until we had exactly enough dealt out to us to
keep us from dying of hunger, not a crumb
‘more. Would you .believe it, for seven days
together the army was without a speck of meat,
and for several days without a morsel of bread.
What was the consequence? Why, that we grew
leaner’ than Lent. We were’ so weak from
hunger and cold as to be unfit for duty of any
kind, let alone digging out roads, hauling wood on
hand:sleds, or building huts: When I think of it,
our situation seems more like that of some casta-
ways in the Arctic regions, you read about.' Why,
friends, a thousand well-fed countrymen, armed
with old-fashioned flails, could have thrashed the
whole of us easy.
132 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“Do you wonder that we thot'ght ourselves —
abandoned by our country? When it was no
longer to be borne, the soldiers got together, and
sent upacommittee to the general officers. Their
sufferings were told as respectfully as could be,
but between you and me their looks spoke the
loudest. O Liberty, Liberty, what did not the
American soldiers of that day endure for thy
sake !

“When the wretched story was all told, the °
men said right out plain that it was no longer
possible to keep body and soul together without -
food. It was bread,‘or every man for himself.

“Bless you, we all knew perfectly well that the
officers were hardly better off than we were our-
selves, yet pride kept them from complaining.
All the same we knew it. We knew of their
borrowing hats, coats, belts, yes, and even boots
from each other, in order that they might appear
decently before their commands on parade. And
when this resource failed they would feign sick-
ness, and all that. Ah, many a sore heart beat
’ under-those threadbare uniforms, if the wearers
did keep a stiff upper lip before us. Eternal
honor to the officers of the Continental army of
"77 say I.

“General Greene, who had a heart as big as an
ox’s, promised to lay the appeal before the com-
mander-in-chief. He declared that the men’s pa-
tience and forbearance thus far were beyond all
AT VALLEY FORGE mee

praise; but Re begged and entreated them not to
act too hastily in a matter of such vital importance
to themselves and their country. But that sort of
talk had little effect on starving men. There’s no
nourishment in it. We told him so up and down.
He then promised to see what could be done by —
making a personal appeal to the farmers of the
Dutch country above us, who were mostly well
off, but snugger’n the batk of a tree; and he
was as good as his word. When General Greene
promised this, the men quietly went back to their
duty. These little collections, doled out with the
. utmost care, were all that kept the army from
disbanding then and there. But for some time
longer.we literally lived from hand to mouth,
never knowing where the next meal was coming
from.

“Meantime. General Washington was doing
everything in his power to alleviate our -dis-
tresses. The light in that man’s quarters was
often seen burning all night long. I’ve seen it.
We've all seen it. He was writing letters, hun-
dreds of them, to governors, to Congress, to men
of influence everywhere, begging and imploring
their assistance. Precious little he got of it.
And the time, too, was coming right along when
the army (if such a lot of ragamuffins can be
called one) ought to take the field again. And
we were expected to win battles! I’ve no pa-
tience when I think -of it, No man alive, but
134 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

Washington, could have held that hurfgry, ragged,
and dispirited crowd together. God-bless him!”

‘The old pensioners, to a man, reverently lifted
their beavers, while the moisture stood in more
eyes than one at the mention of that thrice-ven-
erated name. :

“Ah, yes,’ resumed Uncle Zeb, with a depre-
catory shake of the head; “if dumb beasts could
only speak, my tale would be more complete.
Hundreds of our horses died of starvation; hun-
dreds of other people’s horses too. Most of them
had been impressed from the country round to
haul our supplies to camp. Often the poor crea-
tures would. drop from sheer exhaustion. One
man, I remember, came to beg to have his two
horses returned, to him, as he must otherwise
starve. He was told to look for them himself.
Both were found lying dead, a little outside the
camp. The man came back heartbroken. To all
his complaints the officer in charge: retorted,
stroking his long beard, a you have ‘the
_ hides, haven’t you?’

“T can only tell you one ae more, for my
throat’s as dry as a powder-horn, with talking. It
probably did as much to quiet the grumblers in
the time of our distresses as anything that could
have happened. General Washington had a house-
keeper, a very worthy Irish woman by the name
of Thomson. Some folks imagine that all this
time, while we soldiers were perusing: the gen-.
AT VALLEY FORGE |: 135

eral himself was living on the fat of the land.
You'll see. Tom Bixby, brother to Bill Bixby,
who lives over on the back road, as you go .to
the pine meeting-house, told me this himself.
Tom was one of the general’s body-guard. . Noth-.
ing went into headquarters that those chaps didn’t
scent out, you may depend.

««Sir,’ said the’ good woman to him one day,
‘we have nothing in the Ee to cook but the
rations.’

“Well, then, Mrs. Theor, you must cook
the rations, for I have not a farthing to give
you.’ ; i < '

“ give me an order for six bushels of salt.’

«« Six bushels of salt! For what, pray?’

““*To preserve the fresh beef, Sir,”

“One of the aids gave the order, and the next
day his Excellency’s table was amply provided
with fresh meat. Mrs. Thomson was sent for.
The general put on a severe look, and said that
she had done very wrong to spend her own.

money, in the way she had,’as it was not known
when she could be repaid.

“<«T owe you,’ said his Excellency frankly, ‘too
much already to permit the debt being increased,
and our situation at this moment is not such as
to induce very sanguine hopes.’

«Dear sir, said the good old lady, ‘it is
always darkest just before day, so I hope your
136 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

Excellency will forgive me for bartering the salt
for other necessaries which are now on the table.’

«Salt was then worth eight dollars a bushel,
and could always be exchanged with the country
people for anything they had to sell. There was
a woman for you!”


THE FIRE IN THE REAR 137

THE FIRE IN THE REAR -

UncLe Zzp here has told you something of
what soldiers had to endure while in the field,
from such enemies as cold, hunger, disease, and
bullets. I put bullets last because they didn’t
kill as many of us by half as the others did. Be-
sides, they came from our enemies.

But of all we had to contend with, the ne in
the rear was the worst. Outside of New York
and Philadelphia, where the enemy had things all
their own way, the Tories kept pretty quiet. I
don’t mean them at all. I do mean the general
apathy prevailing among our friends at home,
after the first year of the war had come and gone
without our having driven the enemy back on
board their ships. That was, indeed, hard to bear.

I will just read you two letters that were passed
around the camp while the army was getting
ready to make one more effort against the numer-
ous, well-fed, well-clothed, and splendidly equipped
forces of Sir William Howe. Judge ye whether
I have stated the case too strongly.

You must know that when any of us received
letters containing matters of general interest to
the army, they would be handed round among the


138 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

soldiers to be read, as newspapers are to-day. It
was few enough we had of them. Here is one
letter I took a copy of. It is written from Boston,
you see:—

‘“We were greatly alarmed here a few days ago by an
express from Cape Ann, to the effect that one hundred and
fifty sail of large ships were seen in the bay, steering directly
for this port. They were supposed to be the enemy’s fleet
from New York.

“‘You cannot begin to imagine the confusion we were
thrown in at this unwelcome news. Some were driving up
street, and some down, buying up all the old hogsheads,
barrels, and boxes they could discover to pack up their goods
in. Others were galloping as madly about, hunting after
teams to take their goods away out of town.

‘‘The Council was then sitting, but they did not know
what to do. Express after express was sent off in a hurry
to call the members of the General Court together, to ask
their advice about fortifying one place or evacuating another.
Colonel Crafts, with eighteen or twenty orderlies, attended
on the Board of War to wait their orders.

‘« Before this alarm came, there was not a barrel of rum,
a pound of sugar, or a pound of cotton-wool to be bought in
the town; and in three hours there was not less than a hun-
dred loads of these articles carted out of it! .

‘* Although the alarm came very direct, every one was for
one’s own dear self. From my little observation of this
affair, I really think that if the enemy were to come here,
not one quarter part of the town would turn out to oppose
them. I tremble at the thought. Harry, it is too true.
Tell it not in high places; publish it not in poor America!”

The second letter is more spicy. It is from a
lady to her husband, and most vividly does it set
THE FIRE IN THE REAR 139

forth the straits to which the poor were put by
the niggardly conduct of their own more wealthy
neighbors.

‘‘T have nothing new to entertain you with, unless it is
an account of a new set of nobility which has lately taken
the lead in Boston. You must know that there is a great
scarcity of sugar and coffee, articles which the female part
of the State is very loath to give up, especially whilst they
consider the scarcity occasioned by the merchants having
secreted a large quantity. There had been much rout and
noise in the town for several weeks. Some stores had been
opened by a number of people, and the coffee and sugar
carried into the market and dealt out by pounds. It. was
rumored that an eminent, wealthy, stingy merchant (who is.
a bachelor) had a hogshead of coffee in his store, which he
refused to sell to the committee under six shillings per pound.
A number of females, some say a hundred, some say more,
assembled with a cart and trucks, marched down to the ware-
house, and demanded the keys, which he refused to deliver.
Thereupon one of them seized him by the neck, and tossed
him into the cart. Upon his finding no quarter, he delivered
the keys; when they tipped up the cart, discharged him,
then opened the warehouse, hoisted out the coffee them-
selves, put it into the truck, and drove off.

“It was reported that he had personal chastisement
among them; but this, I believe, was not true. A large
concourse of men stood amazed, silent spectators of the
whole transaction.”
140 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

CHRISTOPHER LUDWICK

‘REALLY and truly,” observed the pension agent,
shaking his head, “the more I think of it, the
more I am led to wonder how we ever succeeded.
It was not so much the fighting, as the thousand
and one perplexities arising from our own inex-
perience, apathy, or neglect that came so near
to making shipwreck of the righteous cause.”

“That is true,’ assented the deacon, rubbing
his chin musingly, “I’ve often ehoughe of that
mpself,’ he added. “ But as

‘Truth crushed to earth will rise again,” .

so in every dark hour some true patriot would
lift the falling standard out of the mire; and by
his own abiding faith and noble example give
new courage to the faltering or disheartened ones
among us. One such I will now give you. And
as long as the story shall be told, my friends,
never let the name of Christopher Ludwick be
‘forgotten.

“This Christopher Ludwick was a German.
In early life he had had a small sum left him by
a-relation. This money he had squandered away
in London, in the pursuit of pleasure, thinking


VY

N

WeEsT POINT,
CHRISTOPHER LUDWICK I4!i

perhaps, like many another spendthrift, that it
would last forever. After parting with his last.
shilling’at the places of public resort in the neigh-
borhood of London, he went to sea, and passed
the years between 1745 and 1752 in successive
voyages from London to Holland, Ireland, and
the West Indies, as a common sailor. In these
voyages he saved twenty-five pounds sterling ;
with which he bought a quantity of ready-made
clothes, and sailed for Philadelphia, where he
arrived in 1753. He sold these clothes for a
profit of three hundred per cent, and with the
proceeds returned to London. Here he spent
nine months in learning the confectionery busi-
ness, and the making of gingerbread. In the
year 1754 he returned to Philadelphia with a
number of gingerbread prints, and immediately
set up his business of a family and gingerbread
baker.

“Tn the year 1774 he felt, with the great ma-
jority of the people of America, the impulse of
that spirit of liberty which led them to oppose,
first by petitions and afterwards by arms, the at-
tempts of Great Britain to subjugate the Amer-

. ican colonies. He then owned nine houses in

Philadelphia, a farm near Germantown, and three
thousand five hundred pounds, Pennsylvania cur-
rency, at interest, all of which he staked, with his
life, in the cause of his country.

“Ludwick was elected successively a member
142 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

of all the committees and conventions which con-
ducted the affairs of the Revolution in Pennsyl-
vania, in 1774, 1775, and 1780. His principles
and conduct were alike firm, under the most
difficult and alarming events of those memorable
years.

“In one of the conventions of which he was
a member, it was proposed by General Mifflin to
open a private subscription for purchasing fire-
arms. To this motion some persons objected the
difficulty of obtaining, by such means, the sum
that was required. Upon this, Mr. Ludwick rose
and addressed the chair in the following laconic
speech, which he delivered in broken English, but
in a clear and firm voice: ‘Mr. President, I am
but a poor gingerbread baker, but put down my
name for two hundred pounds.’ The debate was
closed with this speech, and the motion was
carried unanimously in the affirmative.

“Tn the spring of 1777 he was appointed super- .
intendent of bakers in the army of the United
States. When his commission was delivered to
him by a committee of Congress, they proposed
that for every pound of flour he should furnish
the army with a pound of bread. ‘No, gentle-
men,’ said he, ‘I will not accept of your commis-
sion upon any such terms; Christopher Ludwick
does not want to get rich by the war ; he has money
enough. I will furnish one hundred and thirty-
five pounds of bread for every hundred weight
CHRISTOPHER LUDWICK 143

of flour you put into my hands.’ The committee
were strangers to the increase of weight which
flour acquires by making it into bread. From
this time there was no complaint of the bad
quality of bread from the army, nor was there a
moment in which the movements of the army,
or of any part of it, were delayed from the want
of that necessary article of food. After the ca-
pitulation of Lord Cornwallis, he baked six thou-
sand pounds of bread for his army by order of
General Washington.

« At the close of the war Ludwick returned, and
settled on his farm near Germantown. His house
had been plundered of every article of furniture,
plate, and wearing apparel he possessed, by the
British army. As he had no more cash than was
sufficient to satisfy his daily wants, he lived in
the most economical manner, rather than to run
in debt. He even slept between blankets until
such a time as he could replace the sheets by pay-
ing for them honestly. Borrowing was his aver-
sion. True to his undeviating principle of living
strictly within his means, this man, who had been
able to lend to others, now steadfastly refused to
become a debtor himself. Thanks to his own fru-
gality and thrift, he again saw himself possessed
of a moderate competence before his death, in
June, 1800.”
144 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

STONY POINT JACKSON

As I have said, the old tavern, down here at the
Four Corners, was a favorite resort of my old pen-
sioners, who so often met there of winter even-
ings, to talk over their campaigns together. It
would have done your heart good, I know, to see
the cordial way in which they would greet each
other, calling each other by their Christian names,
or by such nicknames as they had been given in
the army so long ago. For instance, “ Reddy”
Brown’s hair was as white as snow, though it may
once have been as red as fire; “Silent” Wilde
was the most talkative, and “Solomon” Sharp
the stupidest of the lot. When those old fellows
fell to chaffing each other, the sparks flew as thick
and fast, I guess, as they used to do from their
old flint-locks when they pulled the trigger.

Speaking of nicknames, there was a cousin of
one of my clients who went by the name of Stony
Point Jackson, although his right name was
George. I never heard him called anything else.
Strange how a nickname will stick to a man.
This, alone, was quite enough to arouse my curi-
osity to the boiling-point ; and so one evening,
hearing that Jackson was to be at the tavern, I
went over bright and early myself.
STONY POINT JACKSON TAS

When I walked into the public room, some six
or seven grizzled pensioners were sitting around
‘the fire, all blowing great puffs of tobacco-smoke
into the open chimney-place, like a breaching bat-
tery in full play. I drew up my chair within the
charmed circle, nodded in turn to the smokers,
and settled myself down to listen to the conversa-
tion which had been broken off at my entrance,
but was now resumed.

It seemed that they had been talking about
General Hull, whose death had occurred within
the week. ;

An old man of seventy or thereabouts, who sat
on a settle at my left, took up the word.

“They may say what they like; but I saw him
at Trenton, and I saw him at Stony Point, and
I say—— George Jackson’s my name—that no
braver man ever stepped than that same Wil-
liam Hull, and I don’t care who the next man
is, either.”

Having said this, like a man who has weighed
well his words, Jackson glanced defiantly round
the group as if challenging a denial, but meet-
ing none, very coolly drained his mug to the last
drop. The smokers smoked silently on.

I adroitly turned the conversation upon Stony
Point ; and as the outburst had loosened Jackson's
tongue, he readily consented to tell us what he
knew of that most brilliant exploit.

“You know how it was,” he began, by way of
146: THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

preface, “the British were always sneering at us,
because we wouldn’t fight except behind breast-
works. That’s what ¢hey said.”

A derisive laugh greeted this statement, in
which Jackson himself heartily joined.

“Wait and see. They had piled up a nice big
fort at a place called Stony Point on the Hudson,
armed it with heavy guns, and garrisoned it ac-
cording to. Their old blood-red rag waved defi-
ance in our very faces. Said Washington to
Wayne, ‘This will never do; we’ve got to take
that fort, and you’re the man to do it.’

“Then Washington, he up and took a pinch of
snuff, and Wayne he took another. ‘I’m ready,’
said he, ‘if you be. Where do you buy your snuff ?’

“«Capital!’ continued his Excellency. ‘I de-
pended upon you. How many men do you
require for this affair?’

“ Wayne took another look at the fort.

“«Fm! twelve hundred; fifteen hundred.’

“«You shall have them. Now to arrange the
plan of attack. But first, we want an intelligent
man, who will contrive some way to get into the
fort, and let us know how matters stand there. I
charge myself with that. Go and settle your plan
of attack.’

“But I’m getting ahead of my story. Perhaps
some of you would like to know the whys and the
wherefores of the matter first. It was little
enough I knew about it, at the time, because


STONY POINT JACKSON — 147

somehow or other the general officers never asked
our opinions or advice; but for all that I think the
men in the ranks could have made a better fist at
it than some of ’em did. Eh, Reddy?”

Reddy simply gave a low grunt of assent.

“Our folks had begun to build some strong



Ruins or Fort Putnam, West PoInr

works at Stony Point, and Verplanck’s Point, op-
posite (you all know how the land lays there),
designed to keep open the lower route between
the Eastern and Southern States. The farther the
enemy crowded us up river, the longer marches we
had to make to get around them. Well, the Brit-
ish came and took both forts away from us before
they were half completed. So we lost that trick.
148 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

“Now you see what I’m coming at, don’t you?
By the loss of these two posts the Jersey people
had to make a circuit of about ninety miles round,
through the mountains, to reach the States east of
the Hudson River, and vice versé. When they
fell, the enemy pushed on farther up the river.
Our army then lay at Middlebrook. We had to
pull up stakes quicker, and fall back on West
Point, where a new fort had only just been com-
menced. And there we were, actually kicked out
of our kennels.

“<*T'll shorten that line,’ said General Washing-
ton.

“That brings me back to where I started from.
It was found out from a deserter just what the
enemy had been doing in the way of strengthen-
ing Stony Point since they took it away from us.
Of course we knew all about its strong natural
defences, having chosen it for that very reason;
but these were now turned against us, and more
too. Then it was that Wayne was ordered to go
and take it.

_ “Wayne was given his pick from the army.
He took his men from several different States. It
was a shrewd move on his part ; because the Mary-
landers and Pennsylvanians pretended to look
down on our Yankee regiments, as if they were
no better than negroes, and Wayne well knew we
would rather die to the last man than let. those
Quakers and Southerners crow over us, We'd


STONY POINT JACKSON - 149

often wished for the day to come when Washing-
ton would put us outside the enemy’s works to-
gether, so we might see who'd back down first.
My grief, but they were saucy!

« All the Massachusetts light infantry marched
from West Point on the morning of the 15th.
And who do you think commanded.us? Who
but Major Hull, the man they wanted to shoot,
like a dog, in the last war, because they said he
was a coward. Billy Hull a coward! Scapegoat’s
nigher, I guess.

“Tt was in July, as hot as Tophet. Pretty soon
some more troops came dustin’ down the road
where we were halted — Southern fellows. How
they did grin as they passed us! Our boys worked
at the shanks of their bayonets when they saw
that, but said nothing.

“Wayne paraded us, fourteen miles from the
fort, at dark, and ordered any man who was
afraid to take his life in his hand to step right
out in front. The way he spoke it sounded more
like a threat than anything else. Unless my ears
deceived me it meant, ‘I should like to see the
first man who would dare to do it.’ _I verily believe
Mad Anthony would have shot him on the spot.
So not a man stirred in his tracks.

“Up to that moment not one of us had even a
suspicion of where we were going. Now it was
all out.

“¢ George,’ whispered my rear-rank man over
150 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

my shoulder, ‘I’m afraid it’s going to be a toss up
who of us gets out of this with a whole skin.
What do you think ?’

“*Tooks like it,’ I answered as shortly as
possible, for I’ve always noticed that when men
get nervous they want to talk tosomebody. Now,
I’m different. When I scent danger ahead, my
mouth. shuts up like a steel trap, my thoughts
buzz around in my head like a swarm of angry
bees that won’t light nowhere. So I didn’t want
to think at all—what was the use of it?—I
wanted to know why it was that they kept us
dawdling there in the road, leaning idly on our
muskets. Queer, isn’t it?

“*George, whispered my right-hand man,
‘hold my musket, will you, till I tighten my belt a
bit?’ I did so. ‘All right,’ said he, when he
had taken up another hole in the leather. ‘Now
feel in the side pocket of my coat.’ Idid as he
requested. ‘All right,’ said he again; ‘if I should
get my billet in this scrimmage, promise me to
send that to the old folks at home. I'll do as
much for you, George.’

“«Vou needn’t,’ I answered him. ‘I’m not think-
ing about getting killed. I’m thinking about my
breakfast.’

“The order was given to march on in perfect
silence — not a word was to be spoken in the
ranks. In midnight darkness we were marched
up in sight of the fort. There we were halted.




STONY POINT JACKSON I51

Wayne then walked through the ranks, and ex-
plained just what was to be done. He promised
the first man who should enter the fort $500;
the second, $400; the third, $300; and the
fourth, $200— also to divide among the officers
and men the value of all the property found in
the fort. More than this, he promised that any
officer or man who should perform any particular
act of bravery should have his name mentioned
to the commander-in-chief.

“The men all knew Wayne like a book. Ah!
but he was a cool one. :

“The fort was reached at ten o’clock at night,
after a most severe march through bad roads, over
high mountains, and through narrow defiles, where
we had to go in single file. This delayed us.
Half-past eleven was the time fixed for the as-
sault ; but when we finally got into position, the
tide wouldn’t let us cross a wet marsh in our front
till after midnight.

“ Our force was formed in two columns, each
headed by a forlorn hope of twenty men, who
were told off to remove obstructions. These were
followed by a hundred more with unloaded mus-
kets, and these again by the main body.

“The night was so dark that each one of us
was ordered to put a piece of white paper in his
hat, to distinguish him from an enemy. We were
to move forward without firing a shot until the
order was given, on pain of death. Any man who
152 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

attempted to retreat in presence of the enemy
was to be served the same way. _When the works
should be forced, and not before, the victorious
troops were to shout aloud the watchword, —
‘The fort’s our own!’

“Wayne put himself at the head of the right
column. The word was passed down the line in
whispers; and like two dusky serpents crawling
stealthily up to some rocky den, the two columns
began winding their way up the steep ascent
leading to the fort.

“In a minute or two I heard our pioneers
thundering away at the abatis with their axes.
Then first one gunshot, and then another, flashed
out in the darkness. Then I saw bright sparks
moving swiftly to and fro above the black bulk of
the fortress, like fireflies in August. Bur-r-r!
went the drums. Ta-ra-ra! went the trumpets.
Bang! went the big guns. The enemy was wide
awake.

“In less time than it takes to tell of it, the
fort was blazing like a volcano. The flashes of
the guns showed us our road. A terrible fire of
cannon and musketry was poured into us, which
made our column reel and lurch like a ship in
a heavy seaway. Yet every lurch was forward.
How the grape and canister did rattle about our
ears! It was hard not to return this bitter fire,
but such were the orders. One reckless chap, in-
deed, stopped to load in spite of orders, and on


STONY POINT JACKSON 183

refusing to desist, was run through the body by
- his officer. J didn’t see it, but others did.
« All at once we tumbled, one after another,



STORMING OF STONY POINT

into the ditch, without seeing it. It brought us
up all standing. I was just thinking to myself,
‘We're here first, anyhow,’ when we heard a loud
cheering off at our left. For just one second we


154 THE WATCH FIRES OF °*76

stood there stock-still, listening. Then some one
in the crowd cried out, ‘Thunder and Mars, boys,
the Quakers are in ahead of us!’

“That did it. The men went downright crazy.
There were the pickets, a good deal higher than a
tall man could reach up to. We began mounting
over each other’s shoulders, one by one; and when
one man got to the top, another would hand him
up his musket. Others, more impatient, would
give a spring, catch hold of the pickets with his
hands, while another gave him a heave by the leg,
and so on.

‘There was that little Captain Miller. What a
bantam! Over and over again, did he try to
reach the tops of the pickets, only to miss his
hold each time, and fall backward into the ditch
again. After making several unsuccessful leaps,
he turned to his men, and yelled out, almost be-
side himself, ‘Throw me into the fort on your
bayonets!’ His men crossed their bayonets, and
actually tossed him over the pickets in this man-
ner. I tell you I saw it done.

‘By this time some axes were brought to the
spot. Our men couldn’t wait for the pickets to be
cut through, but tore them away with their hands,
like madmen ; squeezed themselves through the
openings, and swarmed upon the parapet, over-
turning everything they met, silencing the guns,
and raising their battle-cry of ‘The fort’s our own!
The fort's our own!’ And so it was. You ought










STONY POINT JACKSON 155

to have heard those Britishers cry out for quar-
ter! Colonel Fleury, our leader, had eleven swords
thrust into his hands by officers of the garrison,
in their haste to surrender before the Americans
should take a bloody revenge for the cowardly
murders perpetrated at Paoli and elsewhere. We
took five hundred prisoners. That wasn’t a bad
night’s work, was it? And we beat the Quakers
in the bargain.”

“T couldn’t have told it better myself,” declared
Solomon; “and I was there too,” he added very
composedly.


156 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

FILE-FIRING

BEFORE separating for the night, it was agreed
that at our next meeting, instead of listening to
one or two long stories, we would have only short
anecdotes of personal experience from each pen-
sioner in turn. The idea seemed to please the
old fellows hugely, as, indeed, it was the only
way of getting some of them to talk at all.

“ File-firing to-night, boys,’ was the word
passed round the circle, as we took our accus-
tomed seats before mine host’s hospitable fire-
place.

“Come, Buckram, I don’t see but what you'll
have to lead off,” said the deacon, after we were
all comfortably seated.

The ever ready Buckram gave a preliminary yawn
or two, and thus began: “‘ When the British over-
ran the Jerseys, they used our people worse than
barbarians. It didn’t help them any though, for
just as soon as we got the upper hand again every
man’s hand was against the varmints! Even the
Tories riz up in arms.

“They weren't satisfied with killing a man, but
must hew and hack him in pieces, so’s his own
mother wouldn’t know him. The butchers!






FILE-FIRING 157

“There was a young man, belonging to our
army, who had been recently killed by the Brit-
ish cavalry while out on a scout, and his poor,
lifeless body so shockingly hacked and mangled
by their sabres, that General Washington thought
proper to send it in to Brunswick for their in-
spection, to see if it wouldn’t shame them into
better things. for the future. The officer com-
-manding the post, to which the poor lad’s body
was brought, refused even to look at it, and sent
it back with the answer that he was no coroner.”

“The clever rascal! But that reminds me of a
little circumstance to which I ask your attention,”
observed the next chair in order. ‘“ When we
were manceuvring below New York in 1776, it
so chanced that a widow woman’s garden, which
lay between the two camps, was frequently robbed
at night.

“Fler son, a mere boy, and small of his age,
asked his mother’s leave to find out, and if pos-
sible to take, the thief, in case he should return
to renew his depredations. His mother, as any
mother would in her place, refused point-blank.

“The son persisted: the mother flatly forbade
his stirring from the house.

“ As soon as it was dark, however, the fearless
boy, watching his opportunity, slipped out at the
back door with his gun, and hid himself among
the bushes growing at the edges of the garden.
Arrived here, he cautiously peered around to see
158 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

that nobody was spying him, rested himself on
one elbow, and waited patiently for the thief to
show himself, confident that the darkness would
prevent his own presence being discovered.

“Pretty soon he saw a figure approaching with
slow and stealthy steps. Upon coming nearer, it
proved to be a strapping Highlander, belonging to
the British grenadiers, who carried a large bag in
one hand. It was the thief.

“After satisfying himself that the garden was
completely deserted, the burly grenadier pro-
ceeded to fill his bag, which, being soon com-
pleted, he lifted to his shoulder, gave it a toss
to ease its weight, and turned to make his retreat
by the way he came.

“Seeing him thus encumbered with his load,
the boy left his hiding-place, stole softly up
behind the thief, cocked his gun, and called out,
‘You are my prisoner; if you attempt to put
down your bag or turn round, I will shoot you on
the spot; now go forward in that road. March!’

“The grenadier promptly did as he was bid,
fully believing that his captor would be as good
as his word. The boy kept close at his prisoner’s
heels, constantly threatening him with the con-
tents of his gun if he slackened his gait for an
instant.

“Tn this manner they arrived at the American
camp, where the crestfallen soldier was at once
secured. When he found himself at liberty to
FILE-FIRING 159

throw down his bag, and first saw by whom he
had been so cleverly taken, his mortification
knew no bounds; and he exclaimed in bitterness
of spirit, ‘What! a British grenadier made pris-
oner by such a miserable brat! by such a miser-
able brat!’ He was led away to the guard-house
‘muttering curses on his ill-luck.

‘““The American officers were so delighted with
the boy’s ready wit and spirit that a ¢éollection
was made up for him on the spot, amounting to
quite a little sum, with which he returned home.
fully satisfied for the losses his mother’s garden-
patch had sustained. The soldier had his side-
arms, but of course they were of no use so long
as he dared not lay down his bag.”

The general verdict was that it served the
soldier exactly right for committing so mean an act.

“ Ahem! well, perhaps so,” spoke up old Amos
Corbin ; “but I’m thinking if every soldiér who
robbed a garden-patch had been served the same
sauce, a good many of us would have spent our
days and nights in the guard-house, hey?”

This sally provoked a general laugh, old Amos
shaking his sides silently, as if the memory of
some nocturnal foraging scrape, in which he had
been an actor, was now vividly recalled.

“Yes,” he continued, “it used to be forbidden
up and down; but you know forbidden fruit’s the
sweetest. It used to be set out in orders, written
by men with full stomachs, what a burning shame
160 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

it was to plunder the poor, suffering inhabitants of

.a few ’taters, or a few knurly apples, and all that
stuff and nonsense, just as if hanging was too
good for such depraved villains. Bless ye, ’twa’n’t
no use. Finally the sentinels had orders to shoot
down any man caught trying to steal out without
the countersign. But we fixed their flints for
them.”

“What! you didn’t take their gun-flints out,
Amos, did you?” asked Jonas Parsons, in a tone
of strong disapproval.

“Oh, no; we just went halves with ’em,” was
the quiet reply.

“You see, boys,’ Amos went on presently,
“starving men’s got no consciences, anyway.
I'd ha’ resked an ounce of lead for a pound of
meat any time. And so would you.”

“Well,” Jonas struck in, “foraging on the
enemy’s all right enough, but on your friends,
you know — come now, call a halt.”

“Friends!” laughed Amos scornfully ; “friends,”
he repeated, with a still more contemptuous shrug,
“‘why, man, down in the Jarseys we used to beg
for food from door to door —actually begged for
it. What did they tell us? ‘All’s gone; been
stripped of everything; not a mossel in the
house.’ Same old tune everywhere. Hungry!
Why, my glory! if we’d ha’ seen a funeral goin’
by, I verily b’leeve the boys would have et the
corpse and chased the mourners.”

?
FILE-FIRING 161

“ Speaking of guns,” Jonas chimed in, “there
was a curus thing happened to my wife’s oldest
brother, Bill, at the battle of Bunker Hill.”

“ How was that ?”’ we inquired.

«“ Bill was a-standing inside the redoubt loading
up, as the enemy was comin’ up for the second
time. Just as he’d rammed home two nice new
bullets good and solid, a cannon-ball came and
struck the outside of the parapet, pretty high up,
filling the barrel of Bill’s gun with dirt, plumb up
to the muzzle. Bill was a-lookin’ at it, rather silly-
like, when his captain sung out, ‘What are ye
lookin’ at? Give it to ‘em dirt and all, man.
It'll brush off.” And Bill said, when he pulled
the trigger the dirt flew so he couldn’t see
whether he aimed true or not.”

“ That’s nothing,” observed Reddy. ‘During
the heat of the battle of Germantown, while
bullets were flying as thick as hailstones, one
Barkalew was just taking aim, when a ball came
and carried away the lock of his musket. Looking
around him, he caught up the gun belonging to a
dead comrade, fetched it up to his shoulder, and
was just going to pull trigger, when another ball
from the enemy entered the muzzle, fair and
square, twisting the barrel round like a corkscrew.
There was twice he had tried to get a shot and
couldn't. ;

“ But Barkalew wouldn’t give it up; so dropping
down on his knees, he unscrewed. the whole lock
162 THE WATCH FIRES OF 776

from the twisted barrel, found it fitted his own
gun to a T, screwed it on in a hurry, and, jumping
to his feet, blazed away at the enemy as if he had
meant to make up for lost time.”

“He was a good one, and that’s a fact,” ob-
served Ezra Valentine a little cautiously. “He
showed presence of mind.”

“Absence of body’s better than presence of
mind, in my opinion, where bullets were flying as
thick as Reddy tells for. For my part, I’d much
rather put my own bullets in my own gun. It’s
safer.” This was Jotham’s quiet comment.

Reddy looked hard at the speaker to see if there
was any hidden meaning in his words, but as
Jotham kept a straight face the incident passed
off unquestioned.

“Ah, yes; strange things happen on the battle-
field,” said old Ebenezer Stimpson, as if talking
to himself; “but were any of you ever smoked
alive?” he asked.

The question was greeted with ironical laughter.

“Oh, you may laugh. I mean what I say.
Listen. In the summer of ’76, I was at my old
home in Boston, on a furlough. The smaill-pox
was raging in town, and the authorities were very
strict about letting any one go out of it who had
not had the disease in the natural way, or been
inoculated for it, for fear of spreading it. I knew
that if I didn’t report back at camp before my fur-
lough was out, I would be posted as a deserter.


ERS

'S HEADQUART

)

M

E Mass. PUTNA

CAMBRIDG

N STREET),

NMA

n House (I

INMA
FILE-FIRING 163

So they took me, and put me into their smoke-
house, where I was nearly choked to death by the
fumes of burning sulphur, tar, and such rubbish.
Fumigating they call it now. Here is what they
gave me. I brought it here on purpose,” he con-
tinued, taking a much crumpled piece of paper
out of his waistcoat pocket. ‘Here, Deacon, you
read it.”
The deacon read aloud as follows : —

Boston, August ye 13, 1776.
These certify that Ebenezer Stimpson has been so
smoaked and cleansed, as that in our opinion, he may be
permitted to pass into the country without danger of commu-
nicating the small-pox to any one.

JOHN SCOLLAY

ms ( Selectiien.
NAtTH’L APPLETON
164 | THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

OLD PUT’S GALLOWS

PuncruaL to the hour the veterans filed into
their seats. After the usual amount of small talk
had been indulged in, a call was made for reminis-
cences of General Putnam. At the mention of
that familiar name there was a general call for
Abel Small, who until now had lurked in the
background, like some bashful schoolboy who is
afraid of being called upon to speak his piece.

“Come, Abel, say something and be some-
body,” urged the deacon by way of encourage-
ment.

Thus urged, Abel stroked his chin thoughtfully
a moment, turned his eyes up to the ceiling,
cleared his throat, and thus began.

Near Peekskill, not far from the main road
there stands a clump of forest trees, among which
an aged hickory is conspicuous. It bore for a long
time, and still bears I believe, the name of “ Old
Put’s Gallows,” from the fact that it was the place
of military execution when Putnam commanded
on that line.

In the early part of August, 1777, General


OLD PUT’S GALLOWS 165

Tryon was in command at the British outposts,
near King’s Bridge. It will be remembered that
he was royal Governor of New York at the com-
mencement of the Revolution, and a full colonel of
British regulars. After the war broke out, he was
placed on active service, and raised to a general's
rank, with power to recruit and equip a Tory corps
or brigade from the Americans who yet remained
loyal to the crown and government of Great
Britain.

For a long time it had been a favorite project
with Putnam that an attempt should be made to
recapture the city of New York. From all ac-
counts it appears that Washington did not dislike
the plan, but, with proper caution, did not wish to
run at that time the risk of a defeat. Putnam,
however, made several feints and false movements
at his outposts to alarm Sir Henry Clinton, in
which he succeeded so well that he kept the Brit-
ish troops within the city for its protection, that
otherwise, aided by the fleet, would have been rav-
aging the adjacent shores of other States.

Clinton decided that he must know the position
and strength of Putnam’s troops more accurately,
and also endeavor, if possible, to ascertain who it

_was in the city that gave Putnam such a correct
knowledge of all his, Clinton’s, plans.

Tryon was busy raising his “new levies,” and
for him Sir Henry sent.

“General Tryon,” he said, “I must know the
166 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

position of Putnam’s troops, and their number,
including his fresh battalions of militia. You
ought to be able to find some one— say a native
—who has enlisted in your corps, that will go
into the Highlands and get what I want. The
reward shall be liberal, and, if successful, the per-
son shall be advanced in grade.”

“T think I have such a man, Sir Henry; heisa
sergeant in De Lancey’s regiment. He enlisted
only about a week ago; is intelligent and ambi-
tious. He has friends on the other side who do
not yet know he has joined us.”

“The very man! Go and send him!”

General Tryon was absent about two hours, for
he had to send to Harlem, where the sergeant
was posted, undergoing a drill with others of the
‘‘ new levies,” and their officers.

“T have seen the man, and had a long conversa-
tion with him,” said Tryon, when he re-entered.
“He is willing to undertake the service on one
condition, and that only a condition of pride.”

“What is it?” i

“That he shall receive a lieutenant’s commis-
sion at once. He will then depart the instant you
require, and is confident of success.”

“Do you know him to be worthy of reliance?”

“From all that I can learn, as well as from my
own judgment, I should not doubt it in the
least.”

“Then let his commission be made out, and


OLD PUT’S GALLOWS 167

send him with it to me. If I have the same
opinion of him then I will sign it.”

The young sergeant soon made his appear-
ance. He was not more than three and twenty
years of age, of good personal appearance, and
there was a cunning twinkle about his black eye
denoting no want of confidence in his own good
opinion of himself. Sir Henry was so well
pleased with him that his instructions were soon
completed; and after receiving his commission,
the new lieutenant bade the British commander
farewell, promising to return with the desired
information. On reaching his quarters, he changed
his military suit, ripped up the lining of his cocked
hat, under which he placed his commission, which
he carefully re-sewed, saying to himself, —

“T think when Miss Rosa Milford sees my com-
mission as an officer in his Majesty’s service, she
will no longer refuse to listen to Nathan Palmer.”

The next morning he left the farther British
outposts at King’s Bridge on horseback, where
General Tryon had accompanied him to pursue
his expedition. It was a beautiful morning; and
he looked forward with all the anticipations of
gratified pride, and hope rose high in his breast.
He passed the “ Neutral Grounds” without moles-
tation, and advanced into what was considered the
American district without being troubled by any
of the occasional travellers on the road, although
almost every one was armed and carried a musket.
168 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

Now and then he met an American yeoman or
farmer with whom he was acquainted who did not
know as yet of his defection; for he was born in
that section of the country, and residents within a
wide circle were considered as neighbors.

Late in the afternoon he came within sight of
the regular American outposts, when he turned
off of the main road by a narrower one that led to
a mill and dwelling on the banks of a small but
rapid stream. Let us, fora moment, look into the
dwelling and notice its inmates. One was a girl
of about eighteen, a fine rustic beauty, engaged in
some trifling housework, but mainly listening to
the conversation of a lively-looking, brown-com-
plexioned young man in a half military garb. It
was evident that what he said did not displease
her, for she looked up at him from time to time
with an arch smile. These two were Rosa Mil-
ford, the miller’s daughter, and William Townley,
a neighboring farmer’s son, and an ensign in the
American army lying near.

“Who is that, William, coming towards the
mill on horseback ?”

“As I live,” said the young man, “ it is that sly
rascal, Nathan Palmer, the dominie’s nephew, who
despises him and has cast him off. The rogue, I
heard it in private this morning, has enlisted in
the refugee corps. If I knew for certain, he
should swing for it. Depend upon it, Rosa, he is
here for no good purpose.”
OLD PUT’S GALLOWS 169

“Do not be seen, William. Leave me to man-
age him.”

The young man retired by a back door, but not
out of hearing, as the Tory lieutenant and spy
entered by the front. He advanced with a bold
step.

‘Miss Rosa, I have but little time to spare, and
want your answer at once. Read that.” He took
the commission from the lining of his hat, and,
with a self-satisfied air, placed it before her.

“Some difference between holding a commis-
sion in King George’s service and in being a
ragged Continental!”

“Nathan Palmer,” said Rosa sternly, “I always
disliked you ; now I hate you!” And she handed
him back his commission.

“Do you refuse me now?”

“Refuse you! Leave this house, or I shall be
tempted to loose the dog upon you.”

“Good-by, Miss Rosa,” he said, grinding his
teeth in anger. ‘Look to your father’s mill your-
self. I will be avenged.” And he mounted his
horse and rode swiftly away.

Rosa hastened to the back door to look for
Townley. He was just entering the woods lead-
ing to the camp, and a wave of his hand indicated
to Rosa that he knew Palmer’s errand. He has-
tened to the camp, had an interview with Putnam,
and the latter issued his private orders. Palmer
came into the lines that night with the freedom
170 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

of an. old comrade, and having, as he supposed,
accomplished his errand, was about taking his
departure, when he was arrested, and the fatal
commission was full proof of his guilt as a spy.
After.a brief trial he was ordered to be hung on
“ Put’s gallows” the next afternoon.

Before the hour for execution came, Tryon, who
heard of the arrest, had sent in a flag, declaring it
murder to hang a mere civilian, who happened to
be a loyalist, and. threatening retaliation. He
_ was not aware that Palmer’s commission had been
found upon his person. Putnam wrote back this
brief and memorable note : —

HEAD QUARTERS, Aug. 7, 1777.
Sir: —Nathan Palmer, a Lieutenant in your King’s ser-
vice, was takén in my camp as a spy. — He was tried as a
spy — he was condemned as a spy — and you may rest as-
sured, sir, he.shall be hanged as a spy.
I have the honor to be, &c.,
ISRAEL PUTNAM.

His Excellency, General Tryon.
P.S. Afternoon. He is hanged.

Such was “ Old Put,” prompt to execute as to
decide. The hickory-tree still remains standing
near Peekskill.

«Speaking of memorable trees,” said Buckram,
“did you ever know that the great tulip-tree at
Tarrytown, under which Major André’s captors
were playing. cards when he rode up, and was








WASHINGTON’s HEADQUARTERS, TAPPAN, N.Y.
OLD PUT’S GALLOWS I7I

taken, was struck by lightning some twenty years
after? Singularly enough, the destroying bolt
rived the tree from top to bottom, splitting it ex-
actly in two. One-half only was left standing,
but that part overhung the road so dangerously
that it had to be cut down. It was impossible to
save it, much to the regret of everybody, far or
near; for besides the great interest attached to it
historically, the tree was a noble specimen of its
sort. It stood over a hundred feet high, measured
twenty-six feet around the base, and spread out
its branches for a hundred feet more.

“And do you know,” continued the speaker,
lowering his voice almost to a whisper, “ it has
always seemed to me that, even in death, there
was some mysterious connection between Arnold
and André, the betrayer and the betrayed; for if
youll believe me, on the very day this tree was
struck down news was received there of Benedict
Arnold’s death.”

“The greatest of all mysteries,” solemnly re-
plied the deacon, raising his old eyes reverently
as he spoke, ‘is the overruling providence of
God.”

The room was hushed in silence as, with bowed
heads, the. veterans, one by one, filed out into the
darkness of the starlit night.
172 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

THE SECRET SERVICE

“ ANYTHING but a spy!”

The curl of Andy Tompkins’s lip, as he aid
this, showed that he fully shared in the feeling
of hatred with which this class of go-betweens
in war is universally regarded.

“ All’s fair in war, they say,” the phlegmatic
Reddy retorted. “ Besides, there were sples and
spies,” he added, in his knowing way.

“How so? Do you call it fair to creep into your
camp like a snake, count your men while asleep,
bring your enemy on your back, and butcher every
mother’s son of you before you can have a chance
to cry for quarter? That’s Injun fashion.”

“No, I make a distinction. For instance, there
were spies who put their necks into a halter for
pay only. They simply sold themselves. But
there were some who did it out of as pure a love
of country as ever you and I fought for, Andy, or
just for the glory of the thing, like that amiable
spy, Major André.”

“T saw him hanged.”

“Vou did?” :

“Yes ; I was one of the guards at the place of
execution. I stood as close to him as I do to you
now. He died game,”




THE SECRET SERVICE 173

“So I’ve heard. They moved heaven and earth
to save him. And wasn’t there a Captain Hale
on our side? They gave him hardly time to say
his prayers. It makes a difference whose ox is
gored, you know. Neither of those men would
have played the part of a spy for a room-full of
gold.”



Major JoHN ANDRE

‘“They were spies just the same.”

“Yes, of course; but nobody thinks any the
less of them now on that account, do they? If
either of them had been a professional spy, he
wouldn’t have been caught. No, it’s your profes-
sional spy that everybody despises so. We'd as
soon have hung one of ’em up as killed a snake —
sooner. Yet there were men, let me tell you, who
174 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

risked the noose from motives as excusable —I
won't say honorable, because the word sticks in
my throat —as ever André or Hale did, who lived
and died forgotten, while André has a monument
in Westminster Abbey.”

“Oh, he was an officer high in rank, with lots
of influential friends. That makes all the differ-
ence in the world.”

“Not in principle. But to cut short the dis-
cussion, did any of you ever hear tell of David
Gray?”

Two or three of the veterans answered in the
affirmative. All listened expectantly.

“We had a man of that name in our regiment,
He was with Ethan Allen at ‘Ty,’ besides having
seen considerable service before he joined us.
They say Allen set a good deal by him. That man
Gray had an eye like a hawk, a step like a cat,
seldom spoke unless spoken to, and it was then
plump yes or no with him. Not a word more.

‘““Whenever there was a nest of Tories to be
smoked out, or information was wanted of the
enemy’s doings, Gray was always the first man
detailed. He would get into a smock frock, cut
himself a stout stick, and make himself look so
much like a country bumpkin, that his best
friends wouldn’t have known him. But whoever
took David Gray for a fool was mightily deceived
in the man. He was as keen as a brier, and as
close as the bark of a tree.


THE SECRET SERVICE 175,

« All of a sudden Gray disappeared. I had my
suspicions ; so did others; but, poor fellow, we
wronged him. He was as true a man as ever
drew breath.

“The war came to an end. All of us came
home —all who were left. Imagine my surprise
at hearing that Gray had got back before us, and
was then living quietly on his farm. But not a
word could any of us get out of him about his
reasons for leaving camp at Fishkill as he did.
So we set him down as a deserter.

“Tt was full forty years afterward before that
man Gray would lisp a syllable about himself.
Then the truth came out.

“Tt seems that Washington was in want of a
man who could be trusted to go‘inside the en-
emy’s lines, at New York. Upon making inquiry
for such a man, Gray was recommended to him
by our colonel. And there, the colonel never
said a word either. It only leaked out when Gray

became too poor and infirm to keep body and soul

together.”

“But I know he was a pensioner,’ I hastened
to put in, “because I made out his papers my-
self.”

«A mere drop in the bucket. Were eight dol-
lars a month, for a man who had half a dozen
dependent upon him, and was as poor as poverty,
a sufficient means of livelihood, or a mere gra-
tuity ?
176 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

«Well, General Washington sent for our colo-
nel, and, says he, ‘I have urgent need of a man,
daring, quick-witted, intelligent, active, and all
that, who at need will let himself be cut in pieces
before betraying his employers. You under-
stand?’

« Excellency, he is in my regiment.’

“*Excellent. Send him hither immediately.
I must know what is going on below. But take
care, sir, not to let. the man know what he is
wanted for; I must take his measure first.’

“Gray was to report after dark, so that no one
might recognize him when going in or coming out
of headquarters. At the appointed hour he was
conducted into the presence of the commander-
in-chief, who eyed Gray long and closely before
speaking. At length he said, —

«¢T am in want of a trustworthy person, who
will go within the enemy's lines, get all the infor-
mation he can of their intended movements and
force, and return with it. to headquarters as soon
as possible. You have been strongly recom-
mended to me by your colonel. Reflect well
before you decide. It is true the risk is great,
but the reward will be ample.’

“David stood irresolute before the questioning
eye and majestic figure of the commander-in-chief.
‘A spy, thought he. ‘To be tucked up to the
nearest tree if taken? To be followed through




THE SECRET SERVICE — 177

life by the scorn of honest men? To lie, cheat,
and dissemble? A thing for every man’s hand to
be raised against? My God, what shall I do?’
And David turned and twisted his battered old
hat in his trembling hands, like a thief taken in
the fact.

« At last his face cleared up. ‘I will do it, your
Excellency,’ he said firmly, ‘on one condition.’

“*Name it.’

“« That if I succeed, I shall fix my own reward.’

“Tt was now Washington’s turn to hesitate.
But he saw something so frank and noble in the
humble soldier’s looks, that after taking a quick
turn up and down the room, he said, ‘I agree to
your terms; only take care they do not exceed
my abilities.’

“«QOh, your Excellency, they will not tax them
overmuch,’

“«So much the better, since the army chest is
not overstocked. So again, I say, let your de-
mands be moderate.’

“Oh, it will not be money I shall ask for.’

“* Not money ; what then, sir?’

“For what does your Excellency serve?’

“Washington gave David one of those looks
which read a man’s soul. ‘To set my oppressed
country free, young man, God willing! For a
principle dearer than life itself, he replied im-
pressively.

“* And without pay?’
178 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

«“ Washington gave a shrug of disdain. There
was a suppressed excitement visible under. his
usual impassive manner. He seemed to catch
dimly at David’s meaning. :

“*T am ready, sir; give me your instructions,’
said David simply.

“For a moment the two men stood looking at
each other without speaking. Then the general



WASHINGTON’sS TREASURE CHEST

sat down at his table, and wrote a few lines on
a piece of paper, which he handed to David.
‘This,’ he said, ‘will pass you through all our
lines and outposts. Guard it well. Destroy it if
you are taken. Once within the enemy’s lines
you must rely on your own resources. I am
much mistaken if they do not prove equal to
every emergency.’ ,

“ David took off his neckcloth, carefully folded


THE SECRET SERVICE 179

the pass up in it, and tied it around his neck
again.

“While he was doing this the general unlocked
an iron-bound chest, took from it a small but
heavy bag, and handed it to David, with the re-
mark, ‘Here are fifty guineas. Guard these well
too,’

“David weighed the bag for an instant in his
hand, like a man bewildered at the possession of
so much money, then dropped it into his capacious
pocket.

““* One thing more,’ resumed the general; ‘ by
no word or sign must it be suspected that you
have any dealings with me. For your own safety
this must be so.’:

“David assented to this hard condition by a
nod of the head. ‘An outcast,’ he murmured.
‘Be it so.’ ae

“* And now,’ the general finished in a whisper,
inaudible to any prying eavesdropper, ‘I give you
the countersign for the night ; for you must leave
camp immediately: and, mark me, that pass is
only to be shown should you fail to elude the
vigilance of our guards. You understand?’

“Again David nodded. ‘A deserter,’ he inwardly
groaned. ‘What will they say of me at home?’

“David saluted, half turned to go, then hesi-
tated. ‘You have something to ask of me,’ said
the commander-in-chief.

*“ David’s, voice for the first time, was unsteady,
180 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

as he replied, ‘ Your Excellency, I have a wife and
four children at home, whose sole support I am.
Should I?—should I?’ — here David expres-
sively put his hand between his neckcloth and
throat, for words failed him.

“« Fave no fears on that account, my friend. I
charge myself with their care, should anything
happen to you,’ was the firm reply. ‘Do you
rely on me?’

“¢Next to my Maker,’ David declared, feeling
his heart lightened of its load.

“At roll-call the next morning, David Gray
failed to answer to his name. When the colonel
looked over the morning report, his gray eyes
sparkled. ‘Private David Gray absent without
leave, is he?’ was all he said. ‘Guess he’ll turn
up again.”






DAVID GRAY, THE DOUBLE SPY 181

DAVID GRAY, THE DOUBLE SPY

Davip Gray had visibly risen in the estimation
of all the veterans during the recital of his inter-
view with the commander-in-chief. One and all
teased Reddy to continue.

“So far I’ve told you Gray’s story as I heard it,
after he’d put in his claim for assistance to the
legislature. Gray was not the man to brag about
his familiarity with great men. He was too mod-
est for that. But now comes his own account of
his doings.

“The night on which he ‘ook French leave of
camp, with his pack on his back, and his life in
his hand, instead of steering straight for New
York, he struck off through the woods, and over
the hills, by unfrequented paths, or no paths at
all, until he knew he had got clear of all our out-
guards. By daybreak he cal’lated on having put
a good fifteen miles between him and camp. He
darsen’t be seen skulking about that part of the
country in the daytime, for the very good reason
that our light-horse were continually scouting the
roads in that direction, and might pick him up.
But perhaps he most feared falling in with some
marauding party of Skinners or Cowboys, either
182 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

of whom would quickly have gobbled him up as
lawful prey. So David hid in the woods till it
was safe to travel.

“Once out of the dangerous ‘ Neutral Ground,’
David breathed more freely, and travelled more
at his ease. His idea was to strike for the Sound,
find means to cross over to the Long Island shore,
and get thence to New York: whereas, if he had
taken the short cut, the Cowboys would have
robbed him first and hung him afterwards; while
the Skinners would have hung him first, and
read his pass later on.”

_“ Out of the frying-pan into the fire,” Peleg re-
marked, kicking some stray coals back from the
hearth into the fireplace.

“Just so. A greater set of scoundrels never
disgraced the name of soldiers. We reckoned
them all as one — Cowboys or Skinners, Skin-
ners or Cowboys.”

“Right you are. David would have stood a
mighty poor chance once in their clutches —the
sarpents!”

“Once safe in Connecticut, David was among
friends. The only risk he run was that of falling
in with small squads of militia, who were on the
lookout for deserters from the army. So the first
time David could get hold of pen and ink he
forged himself a furlough. ‘In for a penny, in
for a pound,’ he remarked to himself, while imi-
tating the cramped scrawl of his commanding of-
DAVID GRAY, THE DOUBLE SPV 183

ficer. ‘I may as well add forgery to my other
accomplishments, he added, as he inserted the
name of Jonathan Brown, instead of that of
David Gray. And wherefore, indeed, should
not Jonathan befriend David in time- of need,
I should like to know?

“ As sharp-witted a chap as we know David to
be was not long in finding a man who, for some
hard dollars counted out on the spot, would risk
making the run across the Sound. The man was
as good as his word, the Sound as smooth as a
smelt; so by daylight next morning David was
landed on Long Island. In the cool of the morn-
ing he set out across the sands, at a brisk pace
for the nearest village, in which the boatman had
warned him he would find De Lancey’s dragoons
quartered. i

“David marched straight into the village tavern,
sat himself down, and called for something to eat,
with the air of a man who-feels himself quite at
home. ‘Two or three loungers dropped in to take
their morning dram, who stared at the new-comer
with no very friendly looks, and, after whisper-
ing with the landlord, went out, shortly returning
with a soldier who wore a sergeant’s stripes.
This was precisely what David had foreseen
would happen.

“The sergeant did his best to pump David; but
all he could get out of him was, ‘I will tell your
commanding officer. The sergeant blustered,
184 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

threatened to no purpose. David wouldn’t budge
a hair. So off he was marched, between a file of
soldiers, to headquarters.

«“ While the sergeant was making his report,
David managed to catch the colonel’s eye. To
arrest his attention by making a quick motion
toward the breast of his coat, giving him at the
same time a look of peculiar meaning, was the
work of a moment. The act was not lost on
the colonel, who immediately ordered the sergeant
out of the room. ‘Remain within call,’ he cau-
tiously added, glancing at the table where his
pistols were lying, as if to make sure that they
were within reach of his hand.

“When they were alone, David ripped open the
lining of his coat, took from it a letter, and
handed it to the colonel, who broke the seal, read.
it through from beginning to end, and at once
threw off all reserve.

“«This letter vouches for you as a true friend
to your king and country. The writer is a stanch
friend to our cause. How would you like to join
my American Legion? That would give you the
opportunity you desire, of paying off some old
scores, I fancy.’

“David replied that he preferred to enter the
secret service, in which he might hope to pay off
all the abuse and ill-treatment to which he had
been subjected, by one good stroke.

““« Well,’ said the colonel warily, ‘although you
DAVID GRAY, THE DOUBLE SPY 185

come well recommended, such further proof of
your fidelity will be required as will put it beyond
a question. Besides,’ he added, turning the letter
over in his hand, and holding it up to the light,
“how do I know this paper is not a forgery ?’

“¢Vou shall judge. All our cavalry moved
down into Westchester the day I left camp.
Four brigades of Heath’s division, mine was one,
drew ammunition the day before, and we had
orders to cook six days’ rations. Besides this, all
the blacksmiths in the army were at work night
and day shoeing the artillery horses. Even the
headquarters’ guard were packing up. Old sol-
diers needn’t be told what that means.’

“The colonel drummed on the table with his
fingers. Presently he started to his feet, threw
open the door, and shouted to his orderly to bring
his horse round from the stables. ‘Sir Henry
must know of this instantly. You must go with
me. And, Orderly! a horse for our friend here. —
Come on, sir, we have not a moment to lose.’

“And off they galloped toward the city, at a
rate that promised to take them there inside of
two hours.”

“The villain! The double-faced villain!”
shouted the indignant Peleg, half rising from
his chair; “and did he really mean to betray
us?”

“Oh, no; not he. Washington told him just
enough to keep his credit good with the enemy.
186 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

It was only a big foraging party, or a reconnois-
sance, or something like that; but it served
David’s turn to a T, for they found it all as
straight as a gun-barrel.”

“The upshot of it was that Sir Henry took
David into his special service. He was employed
in this sort of work for a year, carrying letters
to Tories inside our lines, and even to Canada;
all of which he first faithfully delivered into
Washington’s own hand, and afterward to the
persons for whom they were intended. Many
were the disguises he assumed, and many the
expedients to which he was driven to conceal his
American pass, which would have betrayed him
to the British, or the despatches they trusted him
with, which would have betrayed him to the
Americans. For a long time things went on
swimmingly. David played his part to perfection ;
fortune favored him wonderfully. But the pitcher
that goes too often to the well is broken at last.

“Tt happened in this wise. David knew that
the British, under the traitor Arnold, were collect-
ing a force on Long Island with which to make
a descent on New London. He promptly con-
veyed the news to headquarters. When the
matter was fully ripe, David was sent to inform
Colonel Ledyard, who commanded at New Lon-
don, that if the wind was fair, Arnold would
probably attempt to land the next morning. It
so turned out. Arnold was on hand. He knew
DAVID GRAY, THE DOUBLE SPY — 187

the place only too well, having been born right
there, in the neighborhood—the renegade. It
so happened that the fort in which David found
himself was so closely invested that he barely had
time to make his escape, leaving his despatches
in the hands of the commanding officer, who, as
you all know, was most wickedly run through the
body with his own sword, at the moment of sur-
rendering it. As everything fell into the hands
of the British, David’s papers with the rest, that,
of course, put an end to his career as a spy.

«All that goes to prove that what one man
whispers in another man’s ear may easily decide
the fate of war. To know just what your ad-
versary intends doing is half the battle, at
least.”

“There’s not one man in a thousand who could
have done what David Gray did, and have come
off with a whole skin. He must have had nerves
of steel and a constitution of iron,” spoke up one.

“Of course his claim was allowed?” inquired
the next man.

“No; there you are wrong. The legislative
Solons, in a spirit of economy perhaps, gave him
leave to withdraw. You see, the war was an old
story. The debt was considered as outlawed.”

«A debt of honor never is outlawed!” ex-
claimed old Buckram in a voice of deep emotion.
188 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

THE SPY AND THE INNKEEPER

“THERE was another story current in camp,”
said Big Reuben, “the truth of which I do not
vouch for myself, mind you, but which was gen-
erally believed by all of us. I give it to you for
what it is worth.”

In the year 76 the keeper of a country tavern
at White Plains, by the name of Albertson, struck
a bargain with a British spy, who bribed him
for a large sum to favor the British cause. As
Albertson’s house was the resort of our officers,
who frequently dropped in to take a little refresh-
ment, it was thought that he might pick up from
their conversation some useful information now
and then. |

Among other things, this Albertson was to
receive a snug reward if, in any way, he could
succeed in entrapping a certain sergeant of ours,
named Josephs, who had made himself partic-
ularly odious to the refugees and Tories by his
activity in thwarting their well-laid plans to rob
and plunder our people. Really he was a born
detective, that Josephs.

The cunning innkeeper promised to do his best
THE SPY AND THE INNKEEPER 189

— which I take to mean his worst ; and it so hap.
pened that chance soon afterward put the sergeant
in his power. One evening the sergeant stopped
at Albertson’s, intending to pass the night there,
as he had often done before, not suspecting that
his treacherous host was meditating, all the time,
how he should earn the promised reward without
arousing the sergeant’s suspicions.

The sergeant was a strongly built, athletic fel-
low ; the innkeeper middle-aged, and a coward to
boot. So the idea of taking the sergeant by
throwing himself upon him unawares was not to
the innkeeper’s liking. Instead of trying that,
he conceived the cowardly notion of poisoning
Josephs, which would be, he thought, on the
whole, the safer way.

After exchanging a few words with his host,
Josephs ordered something to keep the cold out.
The temptation was too strong to be resisted.
Albertson accordingly drugged the liquor, brought
it’ in, and handed it to his unsuspecting victim.
As he did so their eyes met. Josephs noticed
that the innkeeper’s hand trembled. It suddenly
flashed upon him that all was not as it should be.

“What’s the matter, Albertson? And why
does your hand shake so?”

“Oh, nothing, nothing,” the startled wretch
replied, forcing a sickly smile, but turning very
pale at the question.

The sergeant set the cup down on the table
1g0 | THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

untasted, and his look grew more and more
threatening. “Well, now,” said he, jumping to
his feet, and speaking like a man struck with a
sudden light, “you look as if some deed of dark-
ness was in the wind, if ever a man did; and for
some time I’ve half suspected you were in the
pay of the other side. If so, you had better
hang yourself up to your own sign-post, and save
us the trouble.”

Albertson had now grown so agitated that he
shook all over.

“J believe you are a cowardly traitor to your
country,” the sergeant went on; “for no honest
man could look as white-livered as you do. Why
do you eye my cup of grog so closely? Ah! I
have it. Speak out! Ain’t the liquor right?”

«“ Ye-e-s,” stammered the now thoroughly
frightened innkeeper.

“Well, then, if it’s good, let’s see you drink it.
Come, down with it, and I'll have another cup,”
said Josephs, pushing the deadly draught into
Albertson’s reluctant hand.

Albertson looked first at the mug, then at
Josephs, but made no movement to raise the
liguor to his lips.

“Why don’t you swallow it, if it is good?”
again demanded the sergeant, still more peremp-
torily.

“T beg that you'll excuse me; in fact, I don’t
feel well; I don’t, indeed,’’ Albertson pleaded.
THE SPY AND THE INNKEEPER 1gt

Big drops of perspiration stood out on his fore-
head as he said this.

Josephs was now fully convinced of the truth
of his suspicions. ‘“ Swallow it you shall!” he
cried out, drawing his sword to enforce the com-
mand. ‘Choose quickly between this and that.”

Death by poison or the sword was too much
for Albertson. He fell on his knees, confessed
that the cup of liquor was poisoned, made a clean
breast of his treacherous compact with the enemy,
and begged for mercy so humbly that Josephs’s
anger was turned to contempt. Two weeks after-
ward the would-be murderer was tried by a court-
martial and hanged.”


192 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

CHARLEY MORGAN

It was voted to hear one more spy story as
a complement to what had gone before, as all
agreed that the subject had never been given
the importance it deserved. Nearly every one
was busy with his own recollections when Buck-
ram struck.in with, —

You all remember when Cornwallis marched up
across the Carolinas into Virginia in 1781, —the
march that brought his victorious career to a halt
at Yorktown the next year. He wasa driver, that
Cornwallis. So much for that. Well, at the time
I speak of, Washington had sent Lafayette, with a
small force, to watch his lordship’s motions.

This was easier said than done. His lordship’s
motions were so decidedly energetic, his force so
decidedly superior, especially in cavalry, that the
poor marquis was kept continually on the jump to
keep out of harm’s way. Still, as often as he was
obliged to fall back before one of the enemy’s
sudden dashes, he would be found advancing
again just so soom as Cornwallis had faced about.

Angry at being so dogged about by a force he
could never bring to bay, Cornwallis laid his plans
CHARLEY MORGAN 193

to surprise the marquis, and so make an end of
him. He felt so confident of succeeding, that he
declared that “the boy” could not escape him.
But that same “boy” had a man’s head on his
shoulders, as it turned out.

Both armies were then on the same side of
James River. Being very desirous, on his part,



wy

Cy



GENERAL LAFAYETTE

of finding out what move his lordship was plan-.
ning, the marquis concluded to send a spy into
his camp for that purpose. His eye fell upon one
Charles Morgan, a Jerseyman, of whom he had
formed a favorable opinion as being the right man
for just such a bold and hazardous undertaking.
So Charley was sent for. The marquis unfolded
194. THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

his project, and Charley agreed to undertake it;
stipulating, however, that in case he should be
discovered and hanged, which was one and the
same thing, the marquis should cause the facts
to be published in the Jersey papers, in order
that justice might be done to his reputation.

Charley deserted to the enemy. When he
reached the royal army he was taken before Lord
Cornwallis, who asked him his reasons for de-
serting.

To this question Charley replied : “ My Lord, I
have been with the American army from the
beginning, and while serving under General
Washington I was satisfied ; but since they have
put a Frenchman over us, I, for one, do not like
it, and have left the service.”

His lordship commended his conduct, arid or-
dered him to be suitably rewarded.

Charley was very diligent in performing all his
military duties, so as to ward off suspicion; but
at the same time he kept both eyes wide open to
all that was passing about him.

One day his lordship sent for the new recruit.

“ How long a time will it take the marquis to
cross James River?” he asked.

Charley thought a moment, as if making a
mental calculation, and then answered, —

“Three hours, my Lord.”

“Three hours! Why, it will take three days!”
his lordship exclaimed.
CHARLEY MORGAN 195

“No, my Lord,” said Charley; “the marquis
has so many boats, each of which will carry so
many men. If your Lordship will take the trouble
to reckon that up, you will find that he can cross
in three hours.”

Turning to the officers with him, Cornwallis
remarked, in Charley’s hearing, “ The scheme
will not do.”

Charley now concluded that this was the proper
moment for making his escape to his friends. He
determined, however, upon not returning alone.
Getting together some of his comrades whom he
thought he could best work upon, he first plied
them well with grog until they were well warmed
up, and then very artfully opened his masked
battery. He complained of the poor fare fur-
nished in the British camp as compared with the
plenty that prevailed in the American, more than
hinting at his own inclination to return to the
Continental colors. Finding he was listened to,
he bluntly asked, “What say you, lads, will you
go with me?”

They agreed, leaving it to him to manage te
sentries.

Charley went boldly up to the first sentinel, and
offered him a drink out of his canteen. .While the
fellow was drinking, Charley secured his musket.
He then proposed to the sentry to go along with
them. Finding himself thus caught, the sentinel
joined the deserters, willing or unwilling. The
second was served in the same way.
196 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

In this way Charley Morgan managed to carry
off seven deserters with him to the American
camp. When he was brought to headquarters,
upon seeing him, the marquis cried out, ‘ Aha,
Charley, are you got back?”

“Yes; and, please your Excellency, I have
brought seven more with me.”

After Charley had told his reasons for return-
ing, then and there the marquis offered him
money, which was firmly refused. Charley said
he only wanted his gun again. The marquis
then offered to make him a sergeant. To this
Morgan replied: “I will not have any promotion.
I have abilities for doing my duty as a common
soldier, and a good character. Should I accept
promotion, my abilities might not answer, and I
would then lose my character besides.”


WADSWORTH’S ESCAPE 197

WADSWORTH’S ESCAPE

“We have now had stories of all sorts, relating
to almost every kind of experience in a soldier's
life, with one exception. I now propose to fill
that gap to the best of my ability,” said the pen-
sion agent, crossing one leg over the other, while
each of his listeners assumed the attitude best
suited to his comfortable hearing.

« Ahem! my voice is a trifle husky this even-
ing; but the story, fortunately, will not be long.
Attention! ;

“General Peleg Wadsworth was the second in
command when the New England militia tried to
take Castine, but were repulsed.

« After that the general held a nominal com-
mand in that quarter, without troops. He made
his headquarters at Thomaston, on the other side
of the bay, where he lived with his wife in ap-
parent security. A young lady by the name of
Fenno, with a guard of six militiamen, comprised
his whole means of defence.”

“Why do you put her in?” asked one veteran,
who was making an ear-trumpet of his right hand.
“Women don’t count in a scrimmage.”

“Have patience and you shall see, General
198 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

Campbell, commanding at Castine, was well in-
formed of Wadsworth’s defenceless condition, and
resolved to send him an invitation to come over
and take up his quarters in the fortress, at the
king’s expense. A leutenant and twenty-five
rank and file were detailed to carry the message.
They arrived at Wadsworth’s house at dead of
night. The sentinel challenged and fled into the
house. General Wadsworth, hearing the commo-
tion, jumped out of bed in his shirt, only to find
himself face to face with his assailants, who made
a rush to take him; the lieutenant calling out at
the top of his lungs, ‘Surrender, or you are a
dead man!’

“The general defended himself with Spartan
bravery. “Armed with a brace of pistols, a fusee,
anda blunderbuss, he fought his assailants away
from his windows, then turned upon those who
had followed the retreating sentinel through the
door, and fought them off until he had not a shot
left. Then he kept them back with his bayonet,
until a shot disabled his left arm. Then, with
five or six wounded men lying on the floor around
him, the windows shattered and the house on fire,
Peleg Wadsworth was able to say, ‘I surrender.’

“ They took him, exhausted by his efforts, and
benumbed with cold, to the fort, where he was
kept a close prisoner.

“Some time after this, a Major Burton, who
had served with the general, was also brought a










WADSWORTH'S ESCAPE 199

prisoner to the fort, and put in the same room with
him. Wadsworth applied to be paroled. It was
refused. Governor Hancock sent a cartel, with
an offer to exchange an officer of equal rank for
the general. That, too, was denied. One day
Miss Fenno, who had come to the fort to see
him, managed to let him know that the enemy
had resolved to hold him a captive until the end
of the war. Then Peleg Wadsworth resolved that
they should do no such thing.

“The prisoners were confined in a room of the
officers’ quarters, the window of which was grated,
and the door fitted with a sash, through which the
sentinel, on duty in the passage, could look into
the room as he paced up and down on his beat.
At either end of this passage there was a door
opening out upon the parade-ground of the fort,
at which other sentinels were posted. At gun-fire
the gates were shut, the number of sentries in-
creased, and the countersign given out for the
night. -

“ These were not all the difficulties in the way
of an escape. Even supposing the prisoners
should have passed the sentinels posted in the
passage, and at the outer door of their quarters,
they would have to cross the parade and ascend
the ramparts in full view of the guards on duty
there. Admitting the top of the rampart gained,
the outer wall was strongly fraised with pickets
driven obliquely into the earth, of which it was
200 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

built. From this point there was a sheer descent
of twenty-five feet to the ditch. Once in the ditch,
the fugitives must ascend the counterscarp, and
contrive in some way to work through the che-
vaux-de-frise beyond it. They were then out of
the fortress, with no possible means of gaining
their liberty except by water, as Castine is a pe-
ninsula, joined only to the mainland by a narrow
neck, where there was a picket posted. To elude
this picket was not to be thought of.
“Nevertheless, the prisoners made up their
minds that it was worth the trial. The room in
which they were confined was ceiled with pine
boards. Upon one or another pretext they pro-
cured a gimlet of a servant, with which they bored
a circle of holes in the ceiling, thus making an
aperture sufficiently large to pass the body of a
man through. The interstices were cut through
with a penknife, except at the corners, which
were left in place until the moment for action
should arrive. The holes were then closed with
bread, and the dust carefully removed from the
floor beneath. All this work had to be carried on
while the sentinel in the passage was pacing off a
distance equal to twice the depth of the room.
“The way they took to prevent being surprised
at their work was quite ingenious. Arm in arm,
the prisoners would walk the floor, taking care to
keep exact time with the sentinel, whose steps
'they counted. At the moment he had passed the








WADSWORTH’S ESCAPE 201

door, Burton, who was the taller of the two, and
could reach the ceiling by standing on tiptoe,
would begin the boring, while Wadsworth walked
on, At the soldier's returning, Burton quickly
rejoined his companion. In this manner the work
went on without exciting suspicion, though it took
three weeks to complete it. Meantime each man
had provided himself with a blanket, and a strong
staff sharpened at the end. For food they se-
creted their crusts, and dried scraps of their meat.

“They waited until one night when a violent
thunderstorm was raging out of doors. It grew
intensely dark. The rain fell in torrents upon
the roof of the barracks ; now and then a blinding
flash lit up the darkness, followed by the loud
bellowing of the thunder, as if the fortress was
beleaguered by all the powers of the air. It was
just such a night as the daring captives had
longed for. The moment for action had come.

“The prisoners undressed themselves as usual
and went to bed, in order to throw the watchful
sentinel off his guard. They then put out their
candle, arose, and hurried on their clothes. Their
plan was to first get into the vacant loft overhead,
and then to gain the passage-way next beyond
them, which they knew to be unguarded, by creep-
ing along the joists on their hands and knees.
Thence they had agreed to make the best of their
way to the north bastion, acting afterward as cir-
cumstances might determine,


202 | THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

“Burton was the first to pass through the open-
ing. He had made but little progress before the
cackling of some fowls notified him of his having
invaded a henroost. Wadsworth, meantime, lis-
tened breathlessly to the familiar noises that ap-
prised him, for the first time, of this new danger.
At length they ceased, without having attracted
the attention of the guards; and the general, not
without difficulty, ascended in his turn. He
passed over the space between him and the gal-
lery unnoticed, then quickly gained the outside by
the door which Burton had left open. The storm
was still fiercely raging; but what was that to a
man who, for the first time in many long, weary
months, now drew in the free air of liberty?

“Feeling his way, in the dark, along the west-
ern wall of the barracks, Wadsworth made a bold
dash for the embankment, thence mounting the
rampart by an oblique path. At the very moment
when he stopped to take breath, and was striv-
ing to peer into the blackness about him, the door
of the guard-house was flung open, a bright light
streamed forth upon the parade-ground, and a voice
was heard giving the order, ‘ Relief, turn out !’

“Wadsworth gave himself up for lost. In
another moment the relief would be upon him..
Fortunately the guard passed without seeing him.
He reached the bastion agreed upon as a rendez-
vous; but, lo and behold, Burton was not there!
No time was to be lost. Fastening his blanket to






WADSWORTH’S ESCAPE 203

a picket, he lowered himself as far as its length
would permit, and then, like a spider dangling at
the end of his thread, let himself drop into the
muddy ditch, now ankle deep with water.

“From here the fugitive crawled stealthily out
by the water-course unobserved, and at length
stood a free man outside the fort. It being low
tide, the general waded the cove to the mainland,
plunged into the thickets, and made rapid strides
in a direction that would take him farthest from
the fort before his daring escape should be dis-
covered, In the morning, to his great joy, he
was rejoined by Burton, when both pushed on
again together with renewed resolution; and after
a terrible march, they finally succeeded in reach-
ing the opposite shores of the Penobscot.”

“T would have given something to have seen
that commander’s face when news of the escape
was brought to him,” observed Jonas. “It must
have been a study.”




204. THE WATCH FIRES OF "76

FEMALE HEROISM

“T suppose that all of you recollect what was
said here about the gallantry of the woman who
was shot dead, and left on the field, while in the
act of distributing cartridges to the men, at the
battle of Freeman’s Farm. I wish I knew her
name, But I could never learn it. Though a
woman, she had the heart of a true soldier.”

“That is by no means a solitary instance,” said
Reuben Philpot, casting his dim eyes up and
down the line, until they rested on. a sleepy-look-
ing individual, whose head was half hid by his
enormous coat-collar. ‘Here you, Jere!” he
called out; “wake up, and tell that old story
about Captain Molly.”

“Tell it yourself. You know it as well as I
do,’ was the drowsy rejoinder.

“T don’t know about that. But I thought it
was a thing understood that no man should shirk
when called upon. Shall we let him off, boys?”
finished Reuben, glancing-to the right and left.

The notion was highly resented. So after
thrusting his frowzy head up out of his coat-
collar, like a mud-turtle from her shell, and seeing
that the looks of all were turned expectantly








FEMALE HEROISM 205

toward him, Jere very reluctantly began his rela-
tion in this manner :—

“’Twas, let me see? yes; I] remember now,
it was at Germantown. No; I’m wrong. Lord
help my poor head! ’twas at Monmouth. Yes;



Sir Henry CLINTON

Monmouth. Warm work! warm work! I was
all het up.”

Here poor old Jere relapsed into a brooding
silence, which. continued so long that one of the
party suggested touching him off with the logger-
head that lay thrust among the glowing embers
of the fireplace.. The idea met with instant ap-


206 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

proval, for the reason that Jere had served in the
artillery, in which the use of a loggerhead was
by no means unknown.

“Tut, tut, you boys, keep the loggerhead to
warm your flip,’ remonstrated Jere. “I’m only
a little slow in going off, like one of our old field-
“pieces. Give me time, and I’ll give you the yarn,
and done with it.

“Well, then, as I said, ’twas at Monmouth.
Clinton had evacuated Philadelphia. The British
were in full retreat across the Jerseys; we after
them. Washington thought he had them. So did
we. One part of our army was advanced so as
to hang on their rear, and worry them, until the
main body could come up. So easy, wasn’t it ?
We thought their rear-guard would be easily
handled; because their whole line, wagons, artil-
lery, and all, don’t you see, stretched out for
twelve miles along the road. Then we would
scoop in the wagons. There’s where we made
a big mistake. Instead of doing as we thought,
John Bull was marching wrong end foremost, with
horns to the rear. So in place of worrying him,
as they thought, he tossed and gored our ad-
vanced guard until they were tired, and gave up
the fight.

“Our people were trying to rally on some high
ground, to which the enemy had driven them,
when Washington rode up. He was the maddest
man I ever laid eyes on. There was our vanguard
.. FEMALE HEROISM .. 207

all fought out and in disorder. There were the
British lining up beyond us, for a fresh attack.
Boys, if I was to live as long as
old Methuselah himself, I shall
never forget that moment. I saw
Washington straighten himself up
in his saddle like a man of bronze.
I heard him give Lee such a tre-
mendous scolding that the poor
man turned as white as a sheet.
Out flew the orders. Aids were
soon skurrying over the field in
every direction. Our men plucked
up heart again. Our artillery
came up at a gallop. Up came
the old Continentals, with steady
tramp, bayonets fixed, all on edge
to retrieve the fortunes of the
day. It was glorious, glorious !

«“¢ Where shall I put in, Gen-
eral?’ asked the bluff old briga-
dier, who had rode on ahead,
busily mopping his forehead with
his red bandanna as he spoke.

eer : WASHINGTON’S SER-

Halt your men here, General. yicx Sworn, AND
The enemy are going to advance STAFF
directly. Our guns are getting
into position to check them until we can have
time to make a stand. You must support the
guns, sir.” He then rode off to the rear.


208 THE WATCH FIRES OF *76

“General Knox posted us; our orders were to
silence that battery, firing over against us, and
at it we went, hammer and tongs. After a few
discharges the smoke grew so thick that we fired
at the flashes of the other battery’s guns. They
were not slow at giving us as good as we sent
them; and what with the terrible heat, the suffo-
cating smoke, and the blinding dust and dirt that
the enemy’s balls threw over us every minute or
so, it was the hottest place I ever got into, by
all odds. But we made it hot for them on the
other hill too, or I miss my guess.

“T remember that about this time Colonel
Wesson of the Old Ninth rode up to our battery
to see what was going on. He was another old
salamander. His regiment lay on the slope of the
hill just behind us, taking it easy.

““* Blame this smoke,’ he roared out; ‘how do
we know the enemy’s infantry ain’t stealing a
march on us?’

“* Because their guns haven’t slackened their
fire yet, Colonel,’ my captain answered him.

“The cannon-smoke hung down over us as high,
perhaps, as a man’s head from the ground.. There
wasn’t a breath of air. The colonel leaned down
over his horse’s neck to see if he couldn’t peek out
under it, when biff! there came a round shot from
the enemy’s battery, tearing the coat from his
back, and the flesh from his body. Had he sat
upright an instant longer, he must have been
FEMALE HEROISM 209

killed outright. As it was, he became a cripple
for life.

“Excuse me. That little incident darted up in
my mind, to turn it away from my story.

“J was working away like a blacksmith at my
piece, black in the face, with not a dry rag on me,
when who should I see but Molly, the wife of our
gunner, fetching water from a neighboring spring.
She never scooched a mite. Just how many times
she trotted back and forth on this errand I don't
know, and therefore can’t say ; but at any rate, she
was coming up again, with her canteen full, when
a shot struck the gunner fairly, and down he went
like a log.

“ Molly was at his side, and down on her knees,
in a moment. One look was enough. The man
was done for. He never spoke again.

“While the woman sat crouching over the
dead man, in speechless grief, a mounted officer
came up, and ordered the piece to the rear, be-
cause there were not now: men enough left to
serve it. What there were prepared to obey the
order, when Molly sprang to her feet, laid her
hand on the breech of the gun, and with flashing
eyes, cried out, ‘Stop!’

“The men all thought she had gone crazy.

«Stop, I say!’ she again exclaimed; ‘that
cannon shall never leave the field for want of
somé one to serve it. Come, lads,’ turning to the
amazed artillerymen, who stood staring at her in
210. THE WATCH FIRES OF.*76

astonishment, ‘since they have killed my poor
husband, J will try my best to take his place, and
avenge his death.’ She then wrenched the ram-
mer from the dead man’s grasp, sprang forward
to the muzzle of the piece, rammed home the car-
tridge with all the strength and fury of an Ama-
zon, and in another moment the gun was again
dealing death and dismay in the enemy’s ranks.
That gun didn’t go to the rear. And so Molly
stood to her post, as well as the best of them,
throughout the action, to the wonder and admira-
tion of all who saw her, never flinching or making
even a whimper until the order came to cease firing.
Then she sat herself down on the ground, by the
side of her poor dead husband, threw her apron
over her head, and gave way to her pent-up grief.

“ Among the rest, Washington saw her at work
at her gun. After the battle he gave her an
officer’s commission, of which she was very proud.
After that she wore an epaulet, and was called by
everybody, ‘ Captain Molly.’ ”

“There was a woman for you!” exclaimed
Reddy, rubbing his hands gleefully.

“Not for me,” remarked Jotham, scratching his
ear. “I don’t know now as I should pick out just
such a woman as that for my wife. I think I’d
rather be excused.”

“The fact is, observed Buckram sagely, that
most of the women who have been held up as
FEMALE HEROISM 211

examples of personal bravery on the field of battle
were camp-followers. Camp’s no place for women,
anyhow. They get to be so much like the men,
and often so much worse than the men, that men
come to have no respect for them. However,
there’s one woman who has been a good deal
talked about, who, by all that’s unaccountable,
went into the army just for the love of the thing.
Just fancy it!”

“Who was she ?”

“Deborah Sampson, better known as Deborah
Gannett, that being her husband’s name, though
she was a Sampson before she married him. [ve
studied a good deal overt that woman, and can’t
make her out yet. You've all heard of her?
Everybody has.”

Not a few broad grins broke out on the faces of
the amused veterans. Buckram went on: “There
have been women in history who have enlisted in
the room of some husband, brother, or sweetheart,
who for some reason or other, good -or bad,
couldn’t go himself. That’s quite another thing.
But this case was not of that kind. Debby just
took it into her foolish little wrong head to go
a-soldiering for no better reason, as far as I can
make out, than because she was dead tired of the
humdrum life of a country village. So she put on
men’s clothes, hunted up a recruiting-officer, took
the bounty, and became a Continental soldier, as
true as you live.”
212 THE WATCH FIRES OF "76

“Women folks scream when they see a mouse,”
laughed Jotham, “let alone the bang of a gun.
That sets ’em off into hysterics.”

“I know it. But Debby was not one of the
screaming kind.”

“T should have thought they would have de-
tected her on the spot.”

“Qh, no; she passed muster all right. She had
made herself a suit of men’s clothes, in which she
carried herself so well that nobody seems to have
seen through the cheat.”

“She must have been a bold, brazen-faced huzzy
then, to have carried it off so bravely,” insisted
Jotham.

‘Have your own opinion. At any rate, she en-
listed, though not until the war was about over,
in the spring of 1782, so that she really saw but
little hard marching or fighting in comparison
with old soldiers, though there’s little doubt that
she got all she wanted of both. She went in
the army by the name of Robert Shurtleff. Of
her having served without detection for eighteen
months or so, there is no manner of doubt; but
the stories told about her in the book called the
‘Female Review’ — some of you may have read
it—are all gammon. Instead of fighting all so
gallantly in the campaign of Yorktown, that affair
was all over six months before she enlisted. Peo-
ple swallowed the story, though, as if it was gos-
pel. It made her out a second Joan of Arc.
FEMALE HEROISM 213

«She must have been awful cute, though, to
have concealed her-sex as long as she did, among
so many prying eyes. It makes me think that
she must have been a very masculine looking sort
of woman. Being beardless, and having probably
little color, they called her the ‘smock-faced boy’
and other nicknames; but she was never found
out until she was taken down with a fever, and
had to go into the hospital, when the sharp-eyed
surgeon made the discovery that the youthful
soldier was a woman.

“She was true blue. She was out in several

' skirmishes our folks had with the refugees, in one
of which she got a musket-ball in her hip, which
she carried to her grave. She got a pension ; and,
but for the conflicting stories she told about her-
self, her name would be more highly honored than
it is. Some folks have a weakness that way, you
know ; and from often telling a story they seem to
get to believing it themselves.”
214 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

THE INTREPIDITY OF MISS ROSS

“You will not find any chapter of the Revolu-
tionary struggle from which there does not shine
forth some bright example of female heroism, like
this which I am about to relate to you,” said
Obed Grimes, the color-bearer of the Old Sixth.

During the British General Tryon’s descent
upon Connecticut in 1779,—a most dastardly
affair for men calling themselves soldiers to be
engaged in, by the way, —he met with some of
the true Yankee spirit among the brave girls
and dames of Norwalk and Fairfield, both of
which places he burned to the ground, thus
turning the poor inhabitants out of house and
home. —

Most of them had fled at the enemy's approach,
having had timely warning of it, leaving their little
all to the invader’s mercy; but among those who
stayed behind to protect their property, was a
wealthy family by the name of Ross, or rather,
I should say, the women of the family, for Squire
Ross, the head of it, was then absent from home
on some business of his own,
THE INTREPIDITY OF MISS ROSS 215

Squire Ross was a lawyer of some note in that
part of the country, who had taken little or no
part in the struggle for freedom. Perhaps it was
on this account that Mrs. Ross and her daughter
Lavinia had decided not to leave their house, but
to await the arrival of the British troops, as if
nothing had happened. Indeed, they were very
far from foreseeing that the total destruction of
this flourishing village was the one object which
had brought Tryon’s soldiery there — congenial
employment for which they were well fitted.

However, for fear of being troubled by these
marauders, the women armed themselves and
their domestics, locked their doors, and awaited
the result as calmly as they could.

They did not have long to wait. The soldiers
came, divided themselves into squads, spread them-
selves out through the village, and set about their
cruel work. Their orders were to spare not, and
soon smoke and flames were rising in every part of
the village. Not even the mecting-houses were
spared. One squad surrounded the Ross house,
while another set fire to the out-houses belong-
ing to it. Upon being refused admittance, they
began an assault upon the dwelling itself, whose
only garrison was a few weak women, trembling
with fear at every shot that came crashing through
the windows.

One of these messengers of death struck down
Mrs. Ross. Instead of shrieking and fainting
216 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

dead away, the daughter was nerved to despera-
tion at the sight. She had a musket in her
hand. Taking deliberate aim, she fired at one of
the nearest of the assailants. The man dropped.
Lavinia kept on loading and firing until several
more had fallen under her unerring aim.

This unlooked-for resistance served only to ex-
asperate the infuriated marauders all the more;
and they finally forced their way into the house,
rushed upon and disarmed the plucky Lavinia,
and would, in their rage, undoubtedly have put
her to death on the spot, but for the timely inter-
ference of a lieutenant, who had fortunately come
up at the moment when the soldiers had effected
their entrance into the house.

Miss Ross was put under guard, and taken away
as a prisoner to the enemy’s camp. From here
she made her escape through the aid of the very
lieutenant who had saved her life. Gratitude had
prompted her to acknowledge to him, that to him
alone she owed her rescue from death, and out of
the fulness of her heart she spoke. Her remark-
able beauty and intelligence, no less than her dis-
tress of mind at being separated from her friends,
won his consent to assist her in making her es-
cape. Horses, a trusty guide, and a_ suitable
disguise for himself, were procured. At the ap-
pointed time the generous lieutenant conducted
the homeless and friendless girl to a place of
safety before he left her to return to his duty.
THE INTREPIDITY OF MISS ROSS 217,

“ And did she never see him afterward?” it

was asked.
“No; I believe not. The Englishman was killed
in a skirmish some months later. She never saw

him more.”




218 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

THE STORY OR A. TORY.

“I wave about as much love for a Tory as
for a rattlesnake,” remarked Timothy Toothaker,
making a very wry face; “but something that
happened up our way once made me confess to
myself that after all a Tory might not be quite as
black as he was painted.

“During the war the New oa country
became too hot for Tories. Most of them had run
away aS soon as fighting began. Those who re-
mained had to keep very quiet, and they were
generally men who thought a good deal more of
saving their property than of serving their king.
Still, there were exceptions.”

The veterans shifted uneasily about on their
chairs, in evident disapproval.

“By your leave, friends,” Timothy briskly went
on, “if you will hear me out, I think you will be
very apt to agree with me. But, be that as it may,
here is the story.”

“A plain farmer, Richard Jackson by name,
was taken up during the war under such cir-
cumstances as proved beyond all doubt his inten-
tion of joining the king’s forces. In fact, when
charged with it, he was too honest to deny it. So
THE STORY OF A TORY 219

Jackson was delivered over to the high sheriff of
the county, who, without more words, clapped the
prisoner in the county jail.

“ The old prison was in such a state that Jack-
son might easily have got out of it if he had
wanted to; but the fellow considered himself as
being in the hands of the constituted authorities,
and the same principle of duty which led him to
take up arms made him equally ready to abide
the consequences. That was queer logic, wasn’t
it ? but it shows you the man, all the same.

“However, the jail was dirty, the air foul, and
the idleness oppressive. So, after lying there for
a few days, Jackson asked the sheriff to let him
go out and work by day, promising to return regu-
larly at night. .

“His character for simple, straightforward in-
tegrity was so well known, that permission was
given without hesitation; and for eight months
Jackson went out every day to labor, and as regu-
larly came back at night.

“In the month of May the sheriff told Jackson
that he must go with him to Springfield, to stand
his trial for high treason. The court sat at
Springfield. Jackson said that this would be a
needless trouble and expense, as he could go just
as well by himself. His word was once more
taken; and he accordingly set out alone, to pre-
gent himself for trial, and, in short, for certain
condemnation, as the evidence against him was
clear and positive.
220 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“On the way to Springfield, Jackson was over-
taken in the woods by a Mr. Edwards, a member
of the council of Massachusetts, which at that
time was the supreme executive body of the State.
This gentleman asked Jackson where he was
going. ‘To Springfield, sir, to be tried for my
life,’ was his answer.

“To this casual interview Jackson owed his
escape from a felon’s doom; for after having been
found guilty and condemned to death, application
was made on his behalf to the council for mercy.
The evidence and the sentence were stated, after
which the president put the question whether a
pardon should be granted or not.

“Tt was strongly opposed by the first speaker.
The case, he said, was perfectly clear; the act un-
questionably high treason, the proof complete.
If mercy was shown in this case, he saw no reason
why it should not be granted in every other.

“This hard-hearted opinion tallied quite with
the temper of the times, and was acquiesced in
by one member after another, until it came Mr.
Edwards’s turn to speak.

“Instead of giving his opinion, he merely re-
lated the whole story of Jackson’s strange con-
duct while a prisoner, and also told what had
passed between them at their meeting in the
woods. For the honor of old Massachusetts and
of human nature, not a man was found willing to
weaken its effect by one of those dry legal re-
THE STORY OF A TORY 221

marks, which, like a blast from the desert, wither
the hearts they reach. The council began to
hesitate; and when at last another member ven-
tured to say that such a man certainly ought not
to be sent to the gallows, a natural feeling of
justice and humanity prevailed, and a pardon
was immediately made out.”


222 THE WATCH FIRES OF "76

THE YOUNG SENTINEL

AT our coming together again, some one
promptly suggested that no attention had yet
been paid to that particularly arduous, exacting,
and often perilous part of a soldier’s duty, namely,
standing guard. The suggestion seemed to touch
a mysterious fibre in about every veteran’s experi-
ence, judging from the way in which all the hands
went up when the question was put.

With one accord all eyes were turned toward
Abel Hewett, who thus far had kept himself

_well in the background, but who was now called
out by the deacon in spite of his protests, which
nobody listened to. We all knew that this old
fellow, nearly ninety, blind of one eye, minus an
arm, and hobbling painfully on his wooden leg,
could tell us, if he would, of some things worth
hearing. His tale, begun in a quavering voice,
gradually growing stronger as he went on, ran
about as follows :—

Jonathan Riley had been a sergeant in the
French War, where he served under General
Amherst. Before that he had been with the
-Provincial levies at the taking of Havana.. So
THE VYOUNG SENTINEL 223

he was pretty well seasoned when the Revolution-
ary War broke out, as you may judge.

After doing duty for a spell as a non-com’, he
was at length detailed on recruiting-service, in
which he had very good success, as he was the
very man to take the fancy of the young fellows
who hung about the taverns, by his well-told tales
of the attractions of a soldier’s life. And what
he didn’t know about that wasn’t worth knowing,
In a very short time Riley had succeeded in ’list-
ing a large number of men.

Among his recruits was a weak and puny lad,
“not over sixteen, called Frank Lilly, who would
not, perhaps, have passed muster, if we had not
been so greatly in want of men.

The soldiers made this boy a butt for their ridi-
cule, as soldiers are apt to resent comradeship
with all such food for powder as he seemed to be;
and many a sorry joke was cracked at poor Frank’s
expense. They told him to swear his legs, or in
other words get them insured; for his spindling
shanks did not look as if they could stand even
one good, hard march, without giving out. Poor
Frank bore it all silently. To have shown anger
would only have made it all the worse for him.

For some unknown cause, —look into it you
who have seen the like comradeship spring up be-
tween the weak and the strong, —I say, for some
unknown cause, the stout soldier Riley became
greatly attached to this friendless boy Frank, and
224 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

seemed to pity him from the bottom of his heart.
Often, on our long, fatiguing marches, when we
were almost dying of hunger, or being incessantly
harassed by the enemy, I have known Riley to
carry the boy’s knapsack for miles together, shar-
ing with him many acrust that he had, with an
old soldier’s foresight, put by from his own scanty
allowance.

But for His own wise purposes, no doubt, the
Great Commander of us all often puts a great
soul into a weak body. Many a big bully have I
seen turn coward at the first fire, and so have
you, cs
You all know how it was when the British held
Staten Island, and we the Jersey shore to give
notice if they should try to land there in any
force. We had what were called flying-camps —
a good name, by-the-by, for the soldiers were con-
tinually deserting them— but the heaviest part
of our army in that quarter was encamped at
Elizabethtown.

We had a picket-guard posted about four miles
in advance of the main body, near the Kill as they
called it, separating our shore from Staten Island.
If that island wasn’t a hornet’s nest, then your
humble servant is no judge of hornets. As they
had full and entire command of the water, the
British could land on our shore under cover of
the night, and attack our outposts when and
where they pleased. Once they did succeed in
THE YOUNG SENTINEL 225

surprising and carrying off an officer and twenty
men in this manner, without the loss of a man on
their part. So you see, you old Continentals, that
our advanced picket was no place to curl yourself
up to take a quiet nap in.

This particular post I’m telling you about had
been held by a Southern regiment. Their men
were continually going off. Washington made up
his mind to put a Yankee regiment in its place,
and ours was ordered up there. The arrangement
of our guards, as near as I can now recollect, was
like this: The main body, consisting of two hun-
dred and fifty men, was encamped at a short dis-
tance inland. In advance of this were several
pickets, consisting of an officer and thirty men
each, spread out like a fan. Our sentinels were
so near each other as to meet in going their
rounds, and were relieved once in every two
hours. And so, there you have it.

It chanced, on one dark and windy night, that
Frank Lilly and myself were sentinels on adjoin-
ing posts. All of us had orders to fire on the
least alarm, and then retreat to the guard I told
you of, where we were to make the best defence
we could, until supported by the battalion in our
rear. Now, I’m almost there.

There was a thin strip of woods in front of me,
and the bay was so near that I could plainly hear
the wash of the waves as they struck the shore.
Lonesome is no name for it. If ever a man is in
226 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

just the right mood for overhauling all the acts of
his past life, it is when he is walking on a lonely
beat, with nothing but the sound of the winds and
waves to keep him company. Ugh!

It was near midnight. All was as still as death.
Now and then, as I shifted my musket over to
right or left, and glanced upward, a star could be
seen shining out through the flying clouds. Then
it would turn as thick as mud. The hours passed
cheerlessly and slowly away. Now and then I
would stop to listen, as a gust of wind went tear-
ing its way through the strip of woods before me.
And then, as it subsided, I would walk on again.
This happened many times, until I tried to stiffen
up my nerves a bit by saying to myself, ‘“‘ Don’t be
afool; don’t you know the sound of the wind
when you hear it? Hello, what’s that?”

In a lull of the storm, as the wind suddenly died
away, and was only heard moaning in the dis-
tance, I-was startled by an unusual noise in the
woods opposite tome. Again I listened intently,
until I felt sure I heard the heavy tread of a body
of men, and the rattling of their cartridge-boxes.
As soon as Lilly and I met again, I told him of
my suspicions. He had heard nothing himself,
but promised to keep a sharper lookout, and to
fire at once if he saw anything coming toward his
post. We then separated.

I had passed on only a few rods, when a sharp
challenge, coming from behind me, brought me
THE YOUNG SENTINEL 227

to a sudden halt. It was the sentinel’s startling
cry of “Stand!”

The answer came from some one, rapidly ap-
proaching, who spoke in a low, constrained voice,
as if afraid of being overheard, “Stand yourself,
and you shall not be injured! Fire, and you are
a dead man! Remain where you are, and you
shall not be harmed! Stir a step, and I'll run
you through !”

These words could scarcely have been uttered,
when I saw the flash, and heard the report of
Lilly’s musket. J now saw a moving black mass,
rapidly advancing out of the woods, at which I
fired, faced about, and, with the rest of the senti-
nels, retreated back upon the guard of thirty men.

They had barely time to turn out of the barn
which served as a guard-house, and to form in the
road in front, before the British, who had pushed
on after us, were within six rods of them. Fortu-
nately they were stopped by a rail-fence, over
which the redcoats were climbing—TI should
think there were at least seventy or eighty — when
we gave them one fire, and then fell back on our
main body. This was all in the dark, remember.

The enemy pushed us hard, but we were soon
re-enforced; and they, in their turn, were com-
pelled to retreat back to their boats, we following
close at their heels.

The next morning we found that poor Frank
Lilly, after discharging his musket, had been so
228 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

closely pursued by his assailants that, while in
the act of getting over a fence, the enemy had
overtaken him and run him through with their
bayonets, though not without a fierce struggle.
But on going back to his post, there lay in front
of it a British non-commissioned officer, one of
the best formed men I ever saw, shot directly
through the body. It was evident that he had
died in great agony; for the ground around him
was torn up with his hands, and he had literally
bitten the dust. It was Frank’s shot that had
given the alarm, and saved the detachment in the
face of almost certain death. And so this de-
spised stripling had died the death of a hero.

My story is nearly ended. Poor old Riley
took Frank’s death so much to heart, that he
never afterwards was the same man he had been
before. He became indifferent, neglected his
duty, moped around the camp, and was finally
guilty of some act for which he was tried and
sentenced to be shot. Through it all he showed
no sort of feeling whatever. On the day of exe-
cution, he was taken to the appointed spot, the
fatal cap drawn over his eyes; he was commanded
to kneel, and the firing party of twelve men faced
the condemned man in readiness to carry out the
stern sentence of the court-martial.

Unknown to Riley, a pardon had been granted
him, in consideration of his previous long and
meritorious services. The firing party had only
THE YOUNG SENTINEL 229

blank cartridges. As the word ‘ Ready!” was
given, the cocking of the guns could be distinctly
heard. At the command “Fire!” Riley fell for-
ward flat on his face before a gun had been dis-
charged. We turned him over. He was quite
dead.


230 THE WATCH FIRES OF "76

A TEMPERANCE SERMON

“How public sentiment does change, to be sure.
Common rum was a regular ration in the Revolu-
tionary army and navy, as much as bread or meat ;
and many a soldier and sailor would as soon have
thought of going without the one as the other.
If you will read General Washington’s letters,
you will find him more than once earnestly com-
plaining to Congress because the army had been
without rum for weeks together. Now look at
Abs

Thus spoke Old Sam Butterfield, whose long,
straight nose, thin lips, and massive chin be-
tokened no little decision of character,

“Yes,” he went on reflectively, “I took my
morning nip with the rest of them, year in, year
out, and never thought it hurt me a mite. But
Pm going to tell you how I was cured.”

The veterans craned their necks toward the
speaker, in expectation of hearing one of those
humorous yarns for which Old Sam was famous,

“There was a retired veteran officer’ up in Old
Berkshire, where good men come from, — I’m from
Berkshire, — whose army service had been full
as brilliant as his private character was above re-
A TEMPERANCE SERMON 231

proach. Like everybody else, he kept his decanter
on his sideboard.

“The first thing that anybody knew, there was
a great stir being made in the papers, in the
pulpit, in the prayer-meetings, about the vice of
intemperance. You've no idee how rabid our
folks got about it. Why, I’d no sooner get hold
of the old brown jug in the buttery, arter a hot
day in the ‘hayfield, than my oldest darter would
beseech and beset me to set it down. ‘Father,’
sez she, ‘you put that right straight down !”

“¢Tn a minnit,’ sez I, uncorking it.

““¢ Don’t, father, dear, there’s death in it!’ she
pleaded, putting one corner of her apron up to her
eye,
««Who put it in?’ sez I.

“ sollum like. |

«© Hooroar, boys! Betsy be you crazy?’

“«No, father; I’ve just come to my senses.
I’ve joined the teetotal society. Already we've
rescued many erring souls. Squire So and So is
one.’

“«Sho!’ sez I, -settin’ the jug right down.
‘You don’t mean it.’

“Ves, I do mean it,’ sez she, clapping her
hands on the jug, and whisking it away out of
my reach.

«“¢Tell me about it,’ sez I.

“<«Well, soon after our Temperance Society
232 THE WATCH FIRES OF "76

was formed, we all felt the need of having the
leading people in town with us. So our commit-
tee waited on the squire, you see, and respect-
fully invited him to unite with us in the good
work. He fidgeted a little when he heard what
they wanted of him, but said very kindly, “I beg
that you will excuse me, gentlemen. I honor
your motives, and approve of your efforts, and
hope you may have great success. But old peo-
ple don’t change easily, you know. I learned
to drink when I was in the army, and have always
been in the habit of taking a little now and then,
with moderation, as you know, gentlemen; and
now, in my old age, it seems like a necessary com-
fort, so much so that I can hardly think of giving
_itup. I hope that you may succeed, with all my
heart, and that the next generation may be wiser
than their fathers ; but as for myself, why, really,
gentlemen, I think the old soldier must be ex-
cused. I do indeed.’

“«My sentiments to a dot. And a good deal
better than I could have said them. Betsy, you
just pass that jug up here. I’m as dry as a
powder-horn.’ That’s the way I broke in on her,
when she stopped to take breath.

“ «Wait a minute, father, I ain’t through quite
yet. Hear me out, and if you want it then, you
shall have it.’

“«The committee left, feeling not a little sorry
at their failure in obtaining the name of so worthy
A TEMPERANCE SERMON 233

a fellow-citizen as the squire, but certainly with
no loss of respect or affection for one whom they
all venerated as a father.’

«¢\ mean trick, a downright mean trick, to
want to take away the sole comfort of his declin-
ing years! Is that all?’ sez I, reaching for the jug.

“¢No; have patience, can’t you? A short
time afterwards they visited the old man again.
As before, he received them politely, though there
might have been a little more stiffness than at
first. “Squire,” said the spokesman of the com-
mittee, “we've made bold to come to see you
again, on account of a little difficulty we find our-
selves in,” ,

“¢And pray what may that be, gentlemen ?’
asked the squire pleasantly.’

“Tt is this. We go to our neighbors who
are drinking men, and who are in danger of drink-
ing too much, and we try to persuade them to give
it up. But they all say, ‘Squire So and So drinks ;
and if he thinks it is right, why should not we
drink too?’”

“<«The squire thought a moment. There was
a brief struggle, soon ended. The old fire of ’76
blazed up again. “Give me the paper, gentle-
men,” said he. “It shall never be said that an
old soldier of the Revolution was found standing
in the way of a measure so necessary to the public
good as temperance reform. There,’ putting his
name to the pledge just handed him, “I have
234 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

helped to conquer the enemies of my country, and
it will be a sin and shame if I cannot conquer
myself. If my name or example can do you any
good, they are yours for the good work.”’

“«Betsy,’ sez I, ‘you can jest pour what’s in
that ar’ jug down the sink-spout.’ By hoky,
boys, she dreened the jug! Then she hugged me
half to death.”
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 25

OUR FRENCH ALLIES

Wits one accord this evening was devoted to
reminiscences of the French auxiliary army,
which the King of France—the amiable, but
‘unfortunate, Louis XVI.— had sent over to help
us achieve our independence. The old boys ap-
proached the subject with peculiar diffidence,
however, because, owing to their ignorance of the
French language, communication with the soldiers
of that army had, as a matter of course, been
much restricted, to say the least.

However, one among the rest volunteered to
break the ice.

“When the French army was encamped at
Newport,” he began, “I was one day detailed by
General Heath to act as a guide to the Count
Rochambeau, who was going to meet General
Washington at Hartford on public business of
importance. I joined the army from Connecticut,
you know ; that’s why they sent me, I suppose.

«The air was full of rumors of great doings, so
you may be sure I kept my ears wide open ; but as
all the conversation between the count and his
suite was carried on in French, precious little
news came my way, I can tell you.
236 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“The count rode in a carriage with the admiral
of the French fleet. The staff-officers rode their
horses behind; and I believe there was a small
escort, sent more for form’s sake than anything
else, as the country we were travelling through
was considered safe enough for our parties.

‘But you ought to have seen the gold and silver
lace, the orders, medals, crosses, and what not,
those big fellows wore. Why, I give you my word,
there was enough to have gone round the whole
American army, with something to boot.

“We were just coming into the village, where
we had planned to stop for the night, when the
count’s carriage broke down, ker-smash. In a
moment his countship and his admiralship were
tumbled out into the road without ceremony,
greatly astonished, no doubt, to find themselves
safe and sound on solid ground.

“Well, we all gathered round the trap to ex-
amine into the damage. It was an old dried-up
affair, the carriage was, which had been left
standing so long without use that it was as shaky
in every joint and crevice as— well, as an old
soldier out of service. The off hind-wheel had
got twisted in a rut, skewed itself inside out, and
let the spokes drop out of the rim, as slick as
could be. And there we were.

“Such a jabbering! Such a shrugging of
shoulders! Such a looking this way and that way!
Finally the count took out his gold snuff-box,
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 237

helped himself to a huge pinch, said something
quite sharp to his aid, gave another shrug, and
very resignedly started off on foot toward the
tavern, which was in sight of the place where we
had broken down. It seemed to me that the
count had given his aid a scolding for hiring such
a ramshackle old vehicle as he did.

“The aid turned to me in despair. ‘I say,
lami, ma foi, dites-donc,
you savez sometime one
maréchal, one blacksmeet,
par exemple, by here,
close to, hein?’

“My ear caught the
word blacksmith out of
this jumble of words, so
I nodded, grinned, and
pointed: to the village,
where I knew we should
find one.

“We drew the broken
vehicle to one side, left the horses in charge of
the grooms, and started off in search of a wheel-
wright. It was then growing dark. We found
our man crouched over his kitchen fire, shivering
with: the ague they have in that section. It was
the day his fit had come on, and he was as cross
as a bear. He scarcely looked up at us when
we entered the room.

“In a few words, I told him of the accident, the





ROCHAMBEAU
238 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

urgent need of our not being delayed, and to clinch
the matter, dropped a hint that he would be well
paid for his trouble.

“ He heard me through, pulled his blanket still
closer round him, and promptly replied that a hat
full of guineas would not tempt him to work in
the night. And not a word more could we get
out of him. ;

“We went back to the tavern with this answer.
The count and the admiral exchanged a few words
together, then put on their hats and went back
with us, to try if their joint entreaties would have
any better result than ours.

“ The man was sitting in exactly the same spot
where we had left him, and in the same listless
attitude. Anybody could see that he was really
suffering from the quartan fever.

“When he saw his room filled with strangers,
he peevishly demanded to know why oo thus
disturbed him.

“The count talked fast; the aid translated as
well as he could; I helped; and the sick man lis-
tened without proffering a word or asyllable. He
was told that General Washington would arrive
that very evening at Hartford for the express
purpose of conferring with these officers on the
next day; and that he would be much put out
should the whole object of this very impor-
tant meeting be defeated because a broken car-
riage could not be mended so that we might
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 239

continue our journey at an early hour. Having
said so much, the count cast his eyes upward,
as if he might have said a good deal more if a
sense of official propriety had not forbade his
doing so.

“The moment that Washington’s name was
mentioned, the sick man brightened up. ‘I be-
lieve you,’ he said, ‘for I have read in the news-
paper about this meeting. I see that this is really
a matter of public necessity. Make yourselves
easy. Your carriage shall be ready at six in the
morning.’ And so it was.

“T tell. you Washington’s was a name to con-
jure with.

«That was not the end of it. We went on to
Hartford. JI was not admitted to the conference,
so came away as wise as I went. But I saw
Washington. On our return, would you believe
it, another wheel gave out, nearly at the same
spot, and at the same hour too, as had happened
to us before. Queer, wasn’t it ?

‘We were obliged to look up our old friend, the
wheelwright, once more. ‘What,’ said he, ‘you
want me again to workin the night?’ — ‘Alas!
yes, the count replied. ‘Admiral Rodney has
arrived, and has tripled the enemy’s naval force ;
so.we must get back to Rhode Island with all
speed, so as to be ready for him when he comes
to attack us.’

“You know they pretend to say that we Con-
necticut folks are just a little bit inquisitive. .
240 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

«But, sir,’ objected the wheelwright, ‘what
are you going to do with your six ships against
twenty?’

“* Ah, my friend, it will be a fine day for us
if they should try to sink us at our anchors,’ re-
plied the admiral, twisting his gray mustache de-
fiantly. Then they all twisted.

««Come, come,’ said the wheelwright, ‘I see
that you are clever fellows; you shall have your
carriage at five o’clock in the morning. But be-
fore I set to work, tell me, if there’s no harm in
asking, are you pleased with Washington, and is
he with you?’

“He was assured that this was the case. His
patriotic feelings were gratified, and again he was
as good as his word.”

We were all much pleased with this evidence of
public spirit in a poor mechanic. It aroused a
new interest in the subject.

“ They tell me,” said Jotham Beers, “that our
folks wasn’t over and above pleased to have the
French layin’ there at Newport, dancin’ and fid-
dlin’, so many months doin’ nothin’, while our
poor boys were stretchin’ their necks till they
ached, lookin’ for ’em to come and help us.”

“T know it,” the deacon assented sarcastically.
“We were all gin’rals, and that’s a fact. Don’t
you see, Jotham, that so long as the British could
blockade their fleet with a supe’ror force, the
French army couldn’t march off without leaving
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 241

their ships at the mercy of the enemy? I should
think any fool might see that,” he concluded.

“You say you seen it,” was the tart rejoinder.

““Stiddy on the left! no back fire! no hittin’
your friends!” cried Ansel Robinson sharply.

“Well, let him stop crackin’ me over the
knuckles, then,’ muttered the irate Jotham.
“Who took Canada?”

“Who took Cornwallis?” Shorty retorted.

“Tfold on there! Scolding is not answering,”
I ventured to interpose, in behalf of harmony.
“JT think I can clear that matter up for you,
Jotham. The French knew, Washington knew,
that a second army and fleet were on the way
to join them. You understand? very well. Now,
that would give them the upper hand, wouldn’t it ?
Of course it would. You see that as well as I do.
Wouldn't it have been a silly thing, then, to put in
half your strength when the other half was on
the ocean? Washington knew better than to do
that.”

Jotham was silenced, but not convinced.

“Yes; and didn’t their staying at Newport
cover New England? Didn’t it keep the British
from sending off re-enforcemrents to Cornwallis?
Do you call that nothing?” Buckram put in.

After this outburst of patriotic feeling, called
forth by Jotham’s slurring remark, had subsided,
French stock had visibly risen among the veter-
ans.
242 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

“Tl say this for them,” interposed Uncle Billy
Bean ; “they were the best behaved, best dressed,
and best disciplined soldiers I ever saw. Not so
much as a rail was teched or a hen-roost robbed,



FRENCH ARTILLERISTS OF 1780

so I’ve heerd say, while they were at Newport.
Everything they took was paid for on the nail,
fair and square.”

“Yes; and more too. That reminds me of what
we heard down at Providence, when I was in Bar-
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 243

ton’s regiment; why, I was ashamed to look a
Frenchman in the face after that,’ spoke up
Johnny Merriwether. “ Hear this :—

“On their way back from Yorktown to Boston,
where they were to embark for the West Indies,
the French army made a halt at Cranston, State
of Rhode Island. Count Rochambeau got quar-
ters with a militia captain. The troops camped
on the place. It was in the dead of winter, wood
was plenty and cheap, so they helped themselves.
Just as they were under marching orders, what
does this here militia captain do, but come to the
count with a bill of two thousand dollars in pay-
ment for firewood, burnt on his property by the
Soissonais brigade. Think of that.

“ The count looked at the bill, raised his white
eyebrows in mild surprise, and told the captain to
go and present it to the commissary, as he was
- the proper officer to settle all accounts chargeable
to the army. The man took his bill and left.

“Next day, just as the long roll had been
beaten, and the troops were ready to march off,
aman walked up to the count with a very queer
look on his face, such as one is apt to put on
when conscious of doing a mean thing; and after
telling him, with many hems and haws, how much
everybody thought of him, and all that, wound up
by saying that he was obliged, nevertheless, to do
his duty.

“Such a roundabout preamble seemed to pre-
244 THE WATCH FIRES OF °7

sage a disagreeable conclusion. In fact, when he
had spoken his piece, the man pulled out a paper,
and after handing it to the count, timidly laid his
hand on the nobleman’s shoulder, with the remark
that he was his prisoner.”

“What! he, all alone, take the Count Rocham-
beau prisoner, at the head of his army?” was the
indignant exclamation on all sides.

“Just as I’m telling you.” '

««* Well, sir,’ said the count, laughing good-
naturedly, ‘take me away if you can.’

“Not so, your Excellency,’ answered the sher-
iff, looking round him in some alarm at seeing
several of the count’s suite lay their hands on
their swords ; ‘but now that I have done my duty,
I beg of you to let me depart unmolested.’

“«Have no fear, my good man,’ the count re-
plied; ‘I will look into this affair immediately.’
He then called for his commissary, and told him
to settle with this importunate creditor.

“By this time the affair had got wind, so that
when the commissary reached the captain’s house,
he found that worthy beset by a crowd of thor-
oughly angry. people, citizens or soldiers, who
were all firing hot shot into him, first for his ex-
tortionate charges, and then for his appeal to
the law, which, it was felt, would be highly re-
sented and condemned. It was finally agreed to
submit the matter to arbitration, with the result
that the avaricious captain had to pay the costs
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 245

and take four hundred instead of the two thousand
dollars he had hoped to squeeze out of the count.”

“The old skinflint! Well, that was sharp prac-
tice, and no mistake. But why didn’t they give
the fellow a coat of tar and feathers ?” Sd
‘the wrathful Reddy.

“T thought you said, a little while ago, that
those Frenchmen never touched a thing that
didn’t belong to’em.?” interjected Jotham, cock-
ing his eye triumphantly at the speaker.

“Oh, then, it was agreed, in the first place,
that they should cut what firewood they might
want, and settle for it afterward.”

“Decidedly I think now, before we go, we
should have one more story to take away the
bad taste of that last,’ observed the deacon,
cracking his knuckles violently — an. operation
which with him was an unfailing sign of some-
thing weighty on his mind.

One of the French generals, and a marquis at
that, was going over this same road that the
Count de Rochambeau had travelled before him,
only somewhat farther on. He was within two
miles of the tavern where he meant to pass the
night, and like all the rest of us, I suppose, in a
like case, was pushing his nag along, in order to
get there ahead of another traveller, whom he saw
coming up behind him. He knew the American
custom of first come, first served, it seems.
246 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

He soon had the satisfaction of seeing the
other wayfarer fall behind; but this feeling was
changed to sorrow at finding the little inn already
occupied by thirteen drovers, and two hundred
and fifty head of beeves, which were being driven
to the American camp.

The cattle were, however, the least annoying of
the whole company, because they had been turned
out to graze on a piece of level ground, at some
distance off, where they were left to shift for
themselves, without any sort of guard, not even a
dog. But the drovers, with their horses and dogs,
were in full possession of the house.

While the marquis was engaged in inquiring
into the reason of this assemblage, his own ser-
vants were vainly looking up a lodging for him.
None was to be had. Every bed was taken by the
drovers; and the poor foreigner, marquis though
he was, and accustomed to be treated with the
greatest deference wherever he went, was in dan-
ger of being left to shift for himself, like the two
hundred and fifty beeves.

With many apologies, the landlord told the
marquis he had so much company that he really
did not know where to put him. He had evén
been obliged to give up his own bed, he said, and
expected to sleep in the barn himself. He also
timidly tried to prove to his sceptical guest that
the smell of hay was very healthy, indeed, and
that actually he would be better off sleeping with
him on the straw than in a good warm bed,
OUR FRENCH ALLIES 247

This sort of reasoning failed to have much
effect upon a traveller who had just made a dozen
leagues or so on horseback. In fact, the hay-mow
was only accepted as a last resort.

In short, the poor marquis was in a very unhappy
frame of mind at the prospect before him, when a
big, tall fellow, who seemed to be the head drover,
having just found out who this new guest was,
came up to him, and, without any ifs or buts, said
that neither he nor his fellows would ever let
a French general officer want for a bed while
they had one themselves; and that rather than he
should go without, they would all sleep on the floor.
They were used to it, he added, and therefore
such a lodging would not put them out in the least.

To this friendly offer the marquis replied that
he was a soldier, and that, as such, not unused to
having no other bed than the bare ground.

Then a great war of politeness ensued. The
drovers all insisted. The marquis did not like to
be outdone, but yielded at last to these rude but
thoroughly kind-hearted tavern companions. He
had a chamber with two beds, one for himself and
one for his two aides-de-camp. In the morning
the company separated, but not until they had
shaken hands all round with the French general,
after the American fashion, in testimony of their
good-will toward one who had crossed the ocean

to fight their battles for them,
248 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS

“Oxtp comrades, we had a little gossip about
the French at our last meeting; what say you to
making this a Cornwallis night?” said the deacon,
after crossing his legs comfortably before the fire.

As this proposal met with no objection, the
deacon told Uncle Zeb to consider himself out on
the skirmish-line, and to blaze away.

“Not me. I haven’t a ca’tridge left,’ Uncle
Zeb objected. “Try Buckram: there. He was
at Yorktown; I wasn’t.”

“Very well, then, Buckram; do you open the
ball.”

“Where shall I begin ?”’

“Can’t you tell us something about how the
French army looked, as compared with ours?”

“They looked like tame peacocks among a
flock of wild geese.”

“Give us the pertic’lers.”

“T’ll begin at the beginning. The French
army, marching from Newport, formed a junction
with ours on the banks of the Hudson, on the 6th
of July, 1781—-we having marched down from
our winter quarters above to meet them. Our
advanced posts were not more than ten miles from
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 249

the enemy’s, at King’s Bridge. It’s going to be
New York, we thought, for sartin.

“ Some of us got leave to go over to the French
camp to take a look at the men. Up to that time,
the British were about our idee of what was what ;
but these fellows were soldiers from the ground
up. They made a business of it.

“They got around us, and seemed desirous of
cultivating our acquaintance; but being as igno-
rant.of our language as we were of theirs, of
course the conversation was mostly carried on by
signs. They took us to their quarters, gave us
some first-rate soup, as good as I ever tasted,
treated us to a good stout glass of rum apiece, no
water in it, and then passed the pipes around.
We understood that part of it at any rate.

“JT wish you could have seen them. The offi-
cers carried themselves like gentlemen toward the
men, and the men seemed to look up to their
officers. ‘Turn out, you lazy dogs!’ was what we
were used to. Some of the officers spoke to us
real pleasant. Their uniforms and side-arms were
just elegant. The soldiers were kept under the
strictest discipline, and, on duty or off, carried
themselves like soldiers. Their arms and equip-
ments were kept in the neatest kind of order.
Then their uniforms were made to fit them, not
somebody else, like ours. They wore coats made
of white broadcloth, trimmed with green, and a
white under-dress, with black gaiters coming up
250 THE WATCH FIRES OF '76

to the knees. And, although they had just come
off a long and hard march, every man of them
looked as if he had just hopped out of a band-
box.”

“Dressed to kill, eh?” Jotham suggested.

“Say, rather, they were made to feel some
pride in their looks, as soldiers ought to. Put a
good coat on a man’s back, don’t he feel himself a
better man than in a ragged one?”

“Feelin’s nothin’. Won’t a bullet go through
a handsome coat as easy as through homespun?”

“What makes boys follow and hoot at a beggar
— yes, and dogs bark too?”

“* Cause they don’t know any better, I s’pose.
Go ahead with your tailor-made soldiers, Buckram.
You're all right. They fou’t well enough; but I
wouldn’t ha’ gin the Old Tenth for the hull bilin’
on ’em.”

“The Tenth, indeed!” sneered Ansel. “Where
was you a-goin’ so fast that day at Brandywine,
Jotham ?”

“ Tryin’ to ketch up with you, Ansel.”

“ Silence all!” the deacon sternly commanded.
“Give Buckram a chance, won’t you ?”

“But the hats they wore! Instead of the old
three-cornered, like ours, theirs had only two
corners, like a canoe. Then they had a band of
music to ‘liven things up for them, which beat
anything I ever heard tell of. They rolled the
music out just as slick as molasses. Some of our
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 251

boys thought our drummers could outdrum theirs,
but I don’t know about that either.

“Well, the smoking made us sociable like.
They talked and talked, one steady stream, but
never a word could I understand of it all. But
bimeby the one who sat next to me pointed his
finger at this scar on my cheek-bone here, turned
to his comrades, and said all of a sudden, —

«¢V'la un coup de baionette!’?

“Then the other fellows took their pipes out of
their mouths, and all looked at me so hard that I
felt myself grow red in the face. All that I could
make out was the one word bayonet. But I could
put this and that together.

“T shook my head, then touched the soldier's
short sword (they all wore them), and nodded my
head, so.

““« Tiens :’ he said again, ‘un coup de sabre; et
un mauvais.’? Then they all nodded.

“Just then, one of our French-American offi-
cers came strolling along (you know we had a
whole lot of ’em in our army) who spoke French
and English too. We all jumped up and made
our salute, standing.

“The officer said a few words to the French-
men, with which they seemed vastly pleased, and
then told us what they had been saying to us.
‘And now,’ he continued, ‘I think you fellows

1 Look! a bayonet thrust. 2 Stay ! a sabre cut, and a bad one.
252 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

had better be getting back to camp, at once, for
from what I hear, the army will soon be on the
move.’

“Tl die if those Frenchmen didn’t hug and
kiss us all round! I never was so mortified in all
my life. We made them promise to come over
to see us next day, rain or shine; but they
couldn’t, for marching orders were out; nor did
we’ meet them again till we were in front of
Yorktown.

“«Colonel Fleury,’ I asked of our officer, who
walked back to camp with us, ‘what did you tell
those fellows about me? I knew it was some--
thing by the way they acted.’

“JT told them how you got your cheek laid
open at Stony Point, while climbing the parapet
with me; and how you shot the man who did it,
for his trouble.’

“ «What did they say to that?’

“«Say? Why, that a sabre cut was worth a
gunshot, the world over.’ S

“We heard the long roll beating down the line,
rub-a-dub-dub, and made tracks back to camp as
fast as our legs could carry us.”

“Well, that will do for a beginning; but I, for
one, would like to hear something that would
wake us up a bit. Come, Jonas, it’s your turn to
give us a lift.” So said our file-leader, the deacon.

“Tl do my best,’ Jonas answered, knitting his
brows, as if ransacking his memory.
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 253

“Tt was at the siege of Yorktown, where we
Burgoyne’d ‘em. We began with the spade.

«Well out in front of our right, the British had
thrown up two strong earthworks, from which
they galled our men who were digging the first
parallel, like time. Did any of you ever try dig-

















YORKTOWN, VA...

ging under fire? I saw one man’s shovel knocked
out of his hands by a cannon-ball — dirt and all.
He was as mad as a March hare.

«Tt was determined at headquarters to take
those two redoubts by a night assault. You see,
if this succeeded, it would be possible to bring
the siege to a speedy close, as our heavy guns
254 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

could then knock the town into a cocked-hat. If
it didn’t, we might have to burrow for a month
longer; and time was precious, because we were
expecting the enemy’s fleet from New MoS at
any moment.

“One of these redoubts lay out in front of =
and the other in front of the French right
trenches; so as soon as it was known that an -
assault was coming off, one fell to them, and one
to us.

“The attacking columns were picked men of
both armies, led by the most dashing officers that
the generals on both sides could pick out. Several
officers volunteered just for the glory of the thing,
and got it. There was Colonel Hamilton, the
same man who was afterward killed in a duel by
Aaron Burr, more shame to him. Lafayette had
given command of the American storming-party
to another officer, but Hamilton went straight to.
Washington and had the order changed.”

Uncle Zeb here broke in on the narrator with,
“Colonel Hamilton was Washington’s secretary
and aide-de-camp when the army marched.”

“Was; yes. But he and Washington fell out
at Yorktown; so Hamilton left him, in a huff ;
and to smooth him down a bit, I suppose, Wash-
ington gave him a regiment in Lafayette’s divis-
ion. Those officers were stiff in standing up for
their rights, I can tell you.”

“Why didn’t Washington take him back?”
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 255

“ There, you know as much about it asI do. I
suppose Washington wouldn’t own up that. he was
wrong, or perhaps he wouldn’t let it be thought
that he had pertick’ler need of anybody. He was
that kind of a man. But, say, how do you s’pose
I’m goin’ to take those two batteries, with you
interruptin’ me so?”

“Go ahead,” said the deacon soothingly. “ You
left us cooling our heels in the trenches.”

“This was to be another cold-iron party. The
men’s guns were all unloaded. The two detach-
ments, each four hundred strong, moved out of
the trenches after dark, in perfect silence, to as
near the enemy as. they could without danger of
being discovered, and there waited for the signal.
It was like waitin’ to be hung.

“ Presently up went a shell from our batteries.
Up went our four hundred heads. We watched
it go sailing away through the darkness, like a
comet with a fiery tail, till it dropped, a mere red
speck, where it would do the most good — in the
enemy’s camp. Then up rose another, and an- |
other, in quick succession, until we counted six of
them — all ticketed for Cornwallis and his friends.
It was our signal. We were like hounds held in
the leash, quivering and whining to be let loose,
and now we were off.

“The forlorn hope, twenty good men, under
Lieutenant John Mansfield, led the way. The
rest of us pushed on after them, except one small
256 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

party under Colonel Laurens, which filed off to
the rear of the redoubt, in order to cut off the
enemy’s retreat in that quarter.

“As soon as we came up close under the re
doubt, we made a rush forit. There was a strong
abatis of brushwood and timber thrown up out-
side of it, but that didn’t stop us. We were too
old for that. Instead of waiting for it to be cut
away, our men pulled it to pieces with their hands,
making a road through it in that way, do you see,
So we made short work of that. By this time the
British were firing into our faces. ‘Wait a min-
ute,’ says I to myself, ‘and we'll be with you, my
lads.’ Then we came to the ditch and stockade.
This was knocked to pieces in no time; and with
a yell and a cheer in we tumbled, head over heels,
one atop of ’tother, scaled the parapet in short
order, and went at them with the bayonet.

“In ten minutes it was all over. We were in
full possession. You ought to have heard us
cheer! Again we set up our shout of victory,
when we found that the French had not yet taken
their redoubt. Our fellows slapped each other on
the back, wrung each other’s hands, and some, I
believe, almost cried with joy. ;

“Well, it seemed as if our whole camp was up
watching us; for when they knew by our cheers
that the redoubt was ours, such a roar as went up
you never heard, no never! It rolled over us in
big waves, like the big gusts you sometimes hear
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 257

just before a storm ; it travelled on to Cornwallis’s
camp, extinguishing the last ray of hope they may
have hung onto, up to that time; for they knew
it was all day with them as soon as we should
turn our new batteries loose.

“Our working parties came up, fell to with
pick and shovel—the dirt flew some, —and by
morning both redoubts were connected with our.
second parallel. Mr.
Cornwallis was bagged.

“This was the four-
teenth. The whole army
was anxious to make an
end of it. Our heavy
guns and mortars had
knocked their works into
dust-heaps. The town
itself was as full of holes
as asieve. Atthree hun-
dred yards we could send Conners
a ricochet-shot, that would
go skipping through Yorktown just as neat as a
boy’s skipping-stone on a mill-pond.

“ Cornwallis was as game as a woodchuck in his
hole. He was their best general, and we knew it.
We knew if we got him, — Great King! if we got
him —the war was as good as over.

“T said Cornwallis was game. When he found
himself trapped, he tried to get across the river
in the night. He reckoned upon whipping our


258 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

troops who were posted on that side on purpose,
brush them away like a passel of flies, shoulder
arms, right face, and make a bold dash for the
upper country.

“That was his little game. You see the man;
don’t you? When he got half his soldiers over,
it came on to blow so hard that the rest couldn’t
go. And there he was, half on one leg, half on
t'other. So that plan didn’t work. Then he
called his men back to Yorktown, sat himself
down, and began to think about makin’ his will.”

“His will?” we exclaimed. x

“What I mean is this. He began to think
about leavin’ his army and things to Washington,
while he had any to leave.

“At ten in the morning, seventeenth October
(do you mind that date, you Saratoga boys ?), we
saw a drummer come up on top of their parapet,
and go through the motions of beating his drum.
But not a sound could you hear for the roaring of
the cannon. With the drummer there came an
officer, waving a white handkerchief to and fro.
That, at least, was plain English. We could
hardly speak, our hearts were so full, Then up in
the air went our hats. To us that little piece of
white cloth spoke volumes.

“The officer was met by one of ours, blind-
folded, and marched off to headquarters. At
last Cornwallis, the victorious Cornwallis, had
made up his mind to surrender, and then again
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 259

he hadn’t. He knew the end was near; but he
wanted a loophole left to crawl out of, in case
Clinton came to his assistance. So he asked for
twenty-four hours. Washington gave him two.

“ Several flags went back and forth before the
terms were finally settled. But it was now our



WHERE THE SURRENDER TOOK PLACE

turn to dictate. Moore’s house was the place
where the papers were drawn up. The capitula-
tion was announced to the army ; the roar of artil-
lery ceased.

“When he heard of it, General Greene said
that he had been beating the bush for Washing-
ton to catch the bird.”

“Well and good. But how about the French
260 THE WATCH FIRES OF 76

attack? Most assuredly we ought not to monop-
olize all the credit of that affair. You said they
carried their redoubt.”’

“I did; and right gallantly too. Let one of
their own officers tell how it was done.”

You must know that, at that time, the French
regiments were not numbered like ours, but went
by the name of the particular province in which
they were raised —such as Bourbonnais, Soisso-
nais, Gatinais, and the like.

The Gatinais grenadiers were assigned to lead
the assault. This regiment had been formerly
called Auvergne; but its name had been changed
for one reason or another, much to the disgust of
the soldiers, who had served long under the old
name. Old soldiers always do hate to be drafted
into a different regiment, or in any way to lose
the designation under which they may have
gained honor and fame. That’s natural.

As the assault was expected to be bloody,
Rochambeau himself made a little speech of
encouragement to his storming-party. “My
friends,” said he, “if I should need you this
night, I hope you have not forgotten that we
have served together in that brave regiment of
Auvergne, ‘Sans Tache.”’

“Promise, General, to give us back our old
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 261

name again, and we will suffer ourselves to be
killed to the last man.”

The promise was given. Now for the way in
which the gallant Frenchmen did their part.

The six shells were fired at last, and we ad-
vanced to the attack in profound silence. When
we had come within a hundred and twenty paces
of the redoubt, a Hessian sentinel, posted on the
rampart, called out
“Wer da?” Gwho comes
there ?) to which we made
no reply, but only pushed
on all the faster. On the
instant after the chal-
lenge, the enemy opened
fire.

We lost not a moment
in reaching the abatis, .
which being strong and Zs
well kept up, at about ViGWeNTT
twenty-five paces from
the redoubt, cost us many men, and stopped us
for some minutes, but was finally cleared away
with brave determination. We threw ourselves
into the ditch at once, and each one sought for
himself to break through the fraises, and to mount
the parapet.

That was not an easy thing todo. I could not
have succeeded without help. After a first at-
tempt I had fallen backward into the ditch, A
















262 THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

young officer of the Gatinais chasseurs, who was
ahead of me, saw my difficulty, and gave me his
_ arm to assist me in getting up. At nearly the
same moment he received a musket-shot in the
thigh.

We reached the parapet at first in small num-
bers, and I gave the order to fire. The enemy,
too, kept up a sharp fire on their side, and even
tried to drive us off with the bayonet ; but no one
was driven back. Our pioneers, who had worked
hard on their part, had made some breaches in
the palisades, which soon helped the main body
of the troops in mounting. With great joy I saw
the number constantly gaining.

Our fire was increasing, and making terrible
havoc among the enemy, who had placed them.
selves behind a sort of barricade, made of casks,
where they were well massed, and where all our
shots told. The time had now come when I was
willing to order my men to spring down into the
redoubt and charge the enemy with the bayonet,
when, before we could do so, they laid down their
arms, and we then made the leap more deliberately,
and with less risk to ourselves. _

I shouted immediately the cry of “Long live
the King!” which was repeated by all the grena-
diers and chasseurs who were unhurt, by all the
troops in the trenches, and to which the enemy
replied by a general discharge of musketry.

King Louis confirmed the pledge given by
A NIGHT WITH CORNWALLIS 263

Rochambeau. The name of Auvergne was re-
stored; and in token of its peerless valor, Wash-
ington caused one of the captured cannon to be
presented to the regiment.

“ Bravely done!” cried the deacon. ‘I remem-
ber well how the French called the Yorktown
campaign a little promenade of seventeen days!”
264 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN

“THaT seems to be a fitting ending to our
evening’s confab,” observed Buckram; “but I do
so dearly love to talk about that Yorktown bus-
iness, where Cornwallis
met his Waterloo: and
besides, Jonas has just
reminded me of some-
thing I saw there, which
seems to fall in so well
with his story, that I
must really trespass on
your patience a little.”

There being no voice
of dissent raised, Buck-
ram went on.

“ Speaking of the stub-
bornness with which our officers clung to their
rights, reminds me of what Baron Steuben did at
Yorktown. I’ve known duels to be fought on
account of some such disputes about precedence
in getting a chance to be shot.

“Old Baron Steuben, our drill-master, com-
manded in the trenches at the moment when
Lord Cornwallis made his first overtures for a



STEUBEN
THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN 265

surrender. The proposals were immediately sent
to the commander-in-chief, and the negotiations
began.

‘The Marquis de Lafayette, whose turn it was
“next to mount guard in the trenches, marched
to relieve. the baron, who, to Lafayette’s great
astonishment, declined to march out of them, on
the ground that the custom of war was in favor
of his holding his position till the surrender, and
that being the case, it was a point of honor he
could neither give up for himself nor his troops.
In vain the marquis argued the orders.. The
stout old Prussian declared that the offer to sur-
render had been made during his turn of duty
in the trenches, and that in the trenches he would
stay until the capitulation was either signed or
hostilities were renewed.

“The puzzled marquis immediately galloped
to headquarters to lay the matter before the-com-
mander-in-chief. Washington decided it in the
baron’s favor, to his great joy; and he proudly
stuck to his post of honor until the preliminaries
of a surrender were fully agreed upon.

“On Oct. 19, 1781, the army of Lord Cornwallis
marched out of their works and laid down their
arms, thus bringing to a successful close the long
and arduous struggle for independence.

“ Just before this took place, and while the
baron was waiting in the trenches for the British
flag to be hauled down, he saw a shell coming
266 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

from the enemy’s batteries, which his experienced
eye told him would fall dangerously near the spot
where he stood. Obeying his first impulse, he
immediately threw himself flat on his face. Gen-
eral Wayne, who was at this moment standing
by him, and who also saw the shell coming,
followed the baron in such a hurry that he fell
upon him, On turning his head the baron saw
that it was Wayne. ‘Ah, General,’ said he pleas-
antly, ‘I always knew that you were brave, ‘but
I did not give you credit for such perfect attention
to duty. You cover your general’s retreat in the
best possible manner.’

“His was a noble soul. After the taking of
Yorktown, the superior officers of both the
American and French armies tried who could
show the most civility and attention to the cap-
tive Britons. Entertainments were given by all
the major-generals except Baron Steuben. He
was above all prejudice or meanness ; but poverty
prevented him from showing that liberality on
this occasion which others, more fortunate than
himself, had hastened to proffer.

“Such was the baron’s predicament, when he
called on Colonel Stewart to ask if that officer
would advance him a certain sum of money, as
the price of his favorite charger. He wanted the
money, he said, to enable him to entertain Lord
Cornwallis, in his turn, as his brother officers had
been doing. ‘’Tis a good beast,’ said the baron,
THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN 267

‘and has proved a faithful servant through all the
dangers of the war; but though painful to my
heart, we must part. It shall not be said that the
Baron de Steuben ever failed in the duties of his
station. I must have the money.’

“Colonel Stewart immediately offered the use
of his purse, recommending the sale or pledge of
the baron’s watch, should the sum it contained
prove insufficient.

“«My dear friend, the baron replied, ‘’tis
already sold. Poor North was sick, and in want
of necessaries. He is a brave fellow, with the
best of hearts. The trifle my watch brought is
set apart for his use. My horse must go; so say
no more, I entreat, to turn me from my purpose.
I am a major-general in the service of the United
States ; and my personal convenience must not be
put in the scale with any duty which my rank
imposes on me.’

“That was just like him. Before he joined us
we were indeed an awkward squad, much as that
epithet would have been resented. The officers
_ were little better than the men, as a general thing.
Even the oldest regiments could go through no
_ more than two or three of the most simple battal-
ion evolutions, because so few of our officers could
teach us more. The baron came, saw, and con-
quered. How disgusted he must have been when
he first saw us on parade, poor man! How could
he have helped it! But however that may be, he






268 THE WATCH FIRES OF °76

kept it to himself, went to work on the officers
first, and pretty soon we saw a difference. It re-
quired the patience of Job, but he had it.”

“Yes,” spoke up Elnathan Doolittle, the old
fifer ; “yet for all that he was a tiger when roused,
I can tell-ye.”

“It’s no such a thing,” Buckram angrily re-
torted. ‘What do you know about war anyway,
Elnathan? You never fired a gun.”

“ Oh, didn’t I? Well, ef I didn’t, it wasn’t be-
cause I put five loads in my gun, as you did at
Garmantown, and thought you was a-doin’ terrible
execution all the time.”

“T tell ye the baron was as rough as the ocean
in a storm when great faults were committed; but
if, in some sudden gust of passion, he had wronged
any one, the redress was ample. J remember
that once at a review, near Morristown, a Lieu-
tenant Gibbons, a brave and good officer, was put
in arrest on the spot, and ordered to the rear, for
a fault which, as it afterwards appeared, was not
his at all.

“At the proper moment, when the officers
marched up to the front, the colonel of the regi-
ment came forward and told the baron just whose
fault it was, what an excellent officer Lieutenant ~
Gibbons was, and how deeply he had been morti-
fied by this public reprimand before the whole
brigade.

“Colonel, said the grand old soldier, ‘ desire
Lieutenant Gibbons to come to the front,’
THE BRAVE OLD BARON STEUBEN 269

“The lieutenant soon presented himself, not
knowing what was coming.

“«¢ Sir,’ said the baron to him, ‘the mistake
which was made during review might have proved
serious, had it occurred in presence of the enemy.
I took you to be the delinquent, and so put you in
arrest. I have since learned that I was mistaken,
and that in this case you were not to blame. I
ask your pardon. Return to your command, sir.’

“All this passed with the baron’s hat off, and
with the rain pouring down on his venerable head.
Do you think there was an officer or soldier who
saw it unmoved?”

CARMEN BELLICOSUM.

In their ragged regimentals,
Stood the old Continentals,
Yielding not.
When the grenadiers were lunging,
And like hail fell the plunging
Cannon shot.
When the files
Of the isles,
From the smoky night encampment, bore the banner of the rampant
Unicorn;
And grummer, grummer, grummer rolled the roll of the drummer
Through the morn.

Then with eyes to the front all,
And with guns horizontal,
Stood our sires,
oO THE WATCH FIRES OF ’76

And the balls whistled deadly,
And in streams flashing redly,
Blazed the fires;
As the roar
On the shore
Swept the strong battle breakers o’er the green sodden acres
Of the plain.
And louder, louder, louder cracked the black gunpowder,
Cracking amain !

Now like smiths at their forges
Worked the red St. George’s
Cannoniers.
And the ‘‘ villainous saltpetre ”’
Rang a fierce, discordant metre
Round their ears.
As the swift
Storm-drift,
With hot sweeping anger, came the Horse Guards’ clangor
On our flanks.
Then higher, higher, higher burned the old-fashioned fire
Through the ranks.

Then the old-fashioned colonel
Galloped through the white infernal
Powder cloud;
And his broadsword was swinging,
And his brazen throat was ringing
Trumpet loud.
Then the blue
Bullets flew,
And the trooper-jackets redden at the touch of the leaden
Rifle breath.
And rounder, rounder, rounder roared the iron six-pounder
Hurling death.







Bs

See sees






xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080808_AAAAFK' PACKAGE 'UF00083202_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-08-09T16:55:38-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-04T15:05:28-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297503; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2014-01-11T04:32:10-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00317.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-11-14T19:12:50-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-11-14T19:05:51-05:00'
redup
'415112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWAW' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
e8b8b40213ffa45ce1218aa70d1d1b16
a1609f39899beb8abf1f4db4b3b9de7094046412
'2011-11-14T19:06:45-05:00'
describe
'202405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWAX' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f0e8aaa315e62762d5351f7b94620a21
55cdcb49fd1594a5360bde33a0c77c8c7fa671b0
'2011-11-14T19:13:04-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWAY' 'sip-files00001.pro'
7d5d7d87bed355389aaac22cce9fe14c
f08055ac38da718a046936deb4f1729b12d64f16
'2011-11-14T19:14:37-05:00'
describe
'47570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWAZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
a6860def8e0f141e0d4adf41dc9b868c
8e9f44170a7ad48ae5ac3678f7a7a3699cdc1e37
'2011-11-14T19:08:29-05:00'
describe
'9969548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBA' 'sip-files00001.tif'
fec29ad58117660a1a14e34fffe6c2df
83087ba6c15d10f54f3613e6a8821030c7852b03
'2011-11-14T19:08:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-14T19:06:47-05:00'
describe
'9431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBC' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
a9dfd916133890e3d1fdca2c75050859
277843dfe0d73cbbcbf28d149f3d820aaa6cbf68
'2011-11-14T19:08:37-05:00'
describe
'399086' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBD' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
3669b494527e531c8ef4d63a25baae88
b8d98a67492f833801e5ad95a2f1b1fce5f74b4b
'2011-11-14T19:07:17-05:00'
describe
'215254' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBE' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
c39615426c238e3e3864fde60bbd8c31
cb214dca1f9dd8e4f131910930f2e50616899f91
'2011-11-14T19:13:40-05:00'
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
e8caa61f83e8b448d0f592ca47a00679
0cc0f8dcb83c3e7449a19773a0e594591e45c6e4
'2011-11-14T19:06:44-05:00'
describe
'50947' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
0bd432c4fb5d478b294974c6020c72e1
bd83c3ca4eda0db0880017f397bc9771af4191a7
'2011-11-14T19:10:58-05:00'
describe
'9598696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
bc16ff4f4fb4c53b2682019a1f68f783
c9787561e5d97b8e7fccf3aedba28495494cdd58
'2011-11-14T19:06:25-05:00'
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
11e28f66da01a970bcfb19560abae859
c26c4a288fc8bb3b9338b6e192d5e704ee80d3f9
'2011-11-14T19:10:01-05:00'
describe
'10526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c8c9d9f204b29a55a84f2158c3edaa52
b521b72a54d8137d0319c63ad5dc58adfe31f963
'2011-11-14T19:12:18-05:00'
describe
'359753' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBK' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
9e9b733980724cd9a8eb94c80ca457a0
2298c6f516404b8b78b721e216f4a65a29bbb678
'2011-11-14T19:08:58-05:00'
describe
'207810' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
d74c1557427df80caac6d671adfff8ee
61d7744daf622ef4dcabfa6db0b6f58400d22265
'2011-11-14T19:14:11-05:00'
describe
'48534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBM' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
8ee0661502f84e39973e6d5d5dd12369
5f9461f531891191b1386d2e0e7346995a0e612b
'2011-11-14T19:11:29-05:00'
describe
'8655008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBN' 'sip-files00003.tif'
9e06392b26aa5e12e8d8a922b9713429
882dd629c95997c7acdb9775faa7b6fe57191cb7
'2011-11-14T19:08:48-05:00'
describe
'10405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBO' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
9417f4fa633a2507ded2b1162810a33f
7dee266d0e50fb200cf0f1d2a83805c1b98b927c
'2011-11-14T19:10:48-05:00'
describe
'357768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBP' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
e7e22e90e106d7271194d5b6a74e2850
073b115e5f418a05136a63729e2e3579a23a7dcb
'2011-11-14T19:06:34-05:00'
describe
'114323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBQ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
c1163cb0eecef1b4d1630a97802391c1
0a3736732d4a0e1bf13303ac4bab2daf7a244580
'2011-11-14T19:06:57-05:00'
describe
'24494' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBR' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
9ce626796cec08e2bda8ed7d816a5e99
02762206ecf355875dd4130faba41c001f6b64d4
'2011-11-14T19:11:57-05:00'
describe
'2878936' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBS' 'sip-files00005.tif'
2ce888c9d633069f643a46306f7487b8
a0b7afb800e806f4e5106bcfdbfd0966d8d8bed6
'2011-11-14T19:06:11-05:00'
describe
'5036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBT' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
cf8648d7ffef262f3ed3e0a5d88bf067
c681b82d5e13c964b55da3f30ef89b023dd52ba6
'2011-11-14T19:13:17-05:00'
describe
'357770' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
36c67b77185d4515a9e2bf249784c178
3b1a6c2e3fde01bb4a608b3887423acff8c85e7d
'2011-11-14T19:11:42-05:00'
describe
'65409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
307ddcf24c32972c1255ead72e20179a
3b6e5ad7a3759c5de17993b78ba3bd50ad1948b3
'2011-11-14T19:07:11-05:00'
describe
'24326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBW' 'sip-files00008.pro'
f8ad1e2b82807b218b69d9fe869552f0
03a736358188d6685bf014663e8bb6924a113afc
'2011-11-14T19:13:38-05:00'
describe
'19787' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c2c8d6883487a951cc0adcb02099930b
1c65b1c539142053732d55e4836d43a501434d62
'2011-11-14T19:06:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
dba33d7be46af64e1a6dd88a44784656
2de3dd1df8cc2f2f9a1a71a65e345aabac3b2a75
'2011-11-14T19:07:53-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWBZ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
59fb5daed8f91017fa895e58ee2e56b5
f645ec5ed1d92949e9d3bc41f0da98025c69b35f
'2011-11-14T19:06:53-05:00'
describe
'5319' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1a78df488ff82f22cf8a57a438cc4ac2
d11b9c418a79108f2e6e370620391124f3e8c86a
'2011-11-14T19:13:47-05:00'
describe
'346451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
df4b458760375a21c2a18064fe68f0fa
8789fde7a78276dfa6fb1177f94b3358f3d1b297
'2011-11-14T19:07:43-05:00'
describe
'78290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e04c52625c4e609f85fd16f41c140a9f
5f3df391183e65cc5d22f9681dd2180bc261accf
'2011-11-14T19:10:22-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
1f052f4143b0a110f724e8de80301393
d6067a5fd5ecf274b4f381dec6706da4a08ddca5
'2011-11-14T19:11:27-05:00'
describe
'19565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCE' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8576e1c9765c4a22393afc630d5ab92c
6b14202f1fde02dcacf43c9f13c16025d8b7c73c
describe
'2788184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
81f0727f0275f488d16bae96289c84e6
0f040d8036147d258769f3af94ac030f26c59b13
'2011-11-14T19:14:34-05:00'
describe
'154' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1b780c994b4ac0abd2dbec2ed707b6d8
86ab0469f2c1356a644ffad8b6fb245135491f60
'2011-11-14T19:06:17-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
19cc942860ab953b1cc4b134f44febef
5081b207bf15d4541bf1d4c1ef6517d22bac975e
'2011-11-14T19:11:40-05:00'
describe
'357686' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9ccb63c8baac93e0773f4ecba33997b0
07af929be0495f043d43b63083aeb72f05552b9c
'2011-11-14T19:06:14-05:00'
describe
'49732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
cbb30ecf88e4e79c9329d8b0eaff2596
0e42d3c120a104d5eba05ad5fc384a9a1f5b5fec
'2011-11-14T19:06:03-05:00'
describe
'5528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
917f5886f3c486660b367de61ca5242d
ca1d94e6dee1906b6e6b375d76716f500231b2d3
'2011-11-14T19:14:14-05:00'
describe
'14346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8a5b1fb081e70a3c1a5bd25c7e8d8cc7
24afef61597938d43a586b0e29cd7e4a6ddbc3e8
'2011-11-14T19:10:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
087ff2b31907f8666c18ccf804284f7e
9592904997194562985f07562186528aa7429034
'2011-11-14T19:10:37-05:00'
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
dd73341bc2d4de6a624fe1d4b07fc77f
87b460fc8c1c33d27a36eda5d34118fa44e25a40
'2011-11-14T19:14:47-05:00'
describe
'4078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1fff03266b9927f5b7a89bd937a89def
eac8e366db09eaf33907487bbfcc93beb624a29e
'2011-11-14T19:12:34-05:00'
describe
'357790' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b4de3f092afaafe27be997e63c79cee4
d4479dc3b8856261d51f3f423add56b1a78adedf
'2011-11-14T19:12:57-05:00'
describe
'19417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6dbc0de692dd261a39f3daa282c78454
ffb6ee0d624d384730cfdf1954c2e30599523a4e
'2011-11-14T19:07:20-05:00'
describe
'4277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
1df90eca1eff5883eb1ae02923252030
89a95005d07630f5375da167d139ac1a83c01018
'2011-11-14T19:06:52-05:00'
describe
'5399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b94ee1c06017c35a9b8837730d965927
de2c66ae4b92e63932a9ec6e6e2bd80bebbb3f4f
'2011-11-14T19:08:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1100b9cb5a5c147022cbcc8e424b3e32
ad30e32c0203797048b72149cc0a659f14bb1a3b
'2011-11-14T19:08:33-05:00'
describe
'322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6381b9d181d1085b983be964b434f126
eb43f996f574e4dc00c703d0f3f338b83d63a520
'2011-11-14T19:11:43-05:00'
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
7ee9aa7f80bbebb452b959253690771a
0209de9b31fed6486f69caed0e72e083abf3f8a3
'2011-11-14T19:11:39-05:00'
describe
'357733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
42210969202df25a70aa8bc05d5cf148
dbbb43cbb4d9ebf46f555a712b8aecaf57bb85bb
'2011-11-14T19:13:58-05:00'
describe
'67396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
84a50d8de97bc3212e5c300caad7558f
12e8a7bf2369c84fbb0cee23ba119e4ffe0df694
'2011-11-14T19:06:18-05:00'
describe
'34729' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
04cca30a461ed11f7d6608b6b7fe7d3f
3e533b508fe310391df4a5e592ffeb070d60b8e7
'2011-11-14T19:13:12-05:00'
describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWCZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
10fe204ae2000d0b4fb35a0a0e410e9f
aeb29fb7660dcfeb7c94096673f4a9df896bc694
'2011-11-14T19:12:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b0cd4fcf1981799277157b55bbb5b06c
79e1a33387bf209854f8c8ea1bc67b42f2bd2440
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
cb22ff4152ac6abaa36a8a848131a6ad
46deb1970dd545656be689b2a0644d30ce86e242
'2011-11-14T19:10:51-05:00'
describe
'5463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9b21d44498881d6551dcd846b8c77a4d
f83cf5cc1061816a6af3f1cca54c59f7aecdb1da
'2011-11-14T19:10:44-05:00'
describe
'357506' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
20adc5eebd36c7a1a63468c8446d1d58
26c7f0ad613915b1d9c265bc95b866ed2c21ce59
'2011-11-14T19:10:49-05:00'
describe
'35590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
64e7d2b0dbebb20159e6fd578aa45500
3f659b9385d4e01a932bdbccd067757807715792
'2011-11-14T19:07:10-05:00'
describe
'20198' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
83d8b179157b528f335cf1eee1e7364d
a513e71a63d94c3d3994d071603958456d0f93c2
'2011-11-14T19:14:04-05:00'
describe
'12041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
88138bf079cf8ab591c499434ae4a41e
ccd4ebb2addba01771efcbd12891c19db928f100
'2011-11-14T19:07:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
e85be68acc56ba01f2d5dd9491095605
b3e2dbaf7e525b3d85877039caac80b609265aa0
'2011-11-14T19:07:48-05:00'
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
cd1a52190a3733509661bbb8ff59a571
c1c885d96a40048d2a39c7f8680ee2c26f4c4f1a
'2011-11-14T19:08:32-05:00'
describe
'2853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
554eae5b3da597bf7bd3e83e719e76ca
19decc73682a1c31c5e0b2f15d48565118d44b34
'2011-11-14T19:13:18-05:00'
describe
'357741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ceff7857e007e7f579c7f8806b3dae12
4b2a5659044e92d66773034bc99675b3eff312d8
'2011-11-14T19:12:49-05:00'
describe
'72613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
688eb52f21cbbe616e9843d63ce10efc
f3eddd42bdf6c96cec3a1c01ec68bfe672cc197d
'2011-11-14T19:14:16-05:00'
describe
'34263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
40795059bd934b699895ce9f4414fca9
a3b2c44113f6677deb7a51c636f6ab5b7620dbba
'2011-11-14T19:08:18-05:00'
describe
'23899' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4e6a10bd417b15345de41fa88c443348
2ee8a711ceeb7b962733b0c3a832867a17c640f0
'2011-11-14T19:06:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
915646bd8a84bb37362ee7c642eb9118
99be2223e493ca16a119eab059341a4253db2e45
'2011-11-14T19:10:41-05:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d848f6870278f21a7c632b9d49cc4b2a
550ce5be84550d2d635a4ce214866a0c99cdb07a
'2011-11-14T19:07:12-05:00'
describe
'5426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
b4328a10ea0cacb4a06ba674a556d464
fa8477afb3c8a61760677d97fb6321505dfce8e1
'2011-11-14T19:07:29-05:00'
describe
'357819' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8eaf080834ab42d9ed11661fb5f9350e
204b5b4a012829fd97731829871740fc2df2e415
'2011-11-14T19:07:36-05:00'
describe
'46238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
afca87cd1ec7b4ee80542e5c96bc2b07
d0c6959138b88df97ec7cba65fdfe5b63cda7ed7
describe
'19523' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ea0d38b350bfc9ad91421ee3e15a2d6e
f495922ec7cc261c3c378ae0d286cec829718beb
'2011-11-14T19:06:54-05:00'
describe
'16065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d9e0ed9d5331d45272db948568624531
85d77ca1187a20a9fbfcc64540e22c416fc26932
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b9e1ef120e2884e97ee6eeb791ff82ba
a004a11113a5058c7a449f1c5f178435fb730a1b
'2011-11-14T19:07:07-05:00'
describe
'789' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
235237db0c2b356a179ececabd3623b5
b5806ea27c692217abd48e0ae528f9a5a9dfbe67
'2011-11-14T19:09:01-05:00'
describe
'3978' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
8687a9f7363635c8ee42d78447db024a
04015ffa0576bb0730981511f14dad45560e00d3
'2011-11-14T19:11:08-05:00'
describe
'357763' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
1ff5a17029311ebf6e06d7a149e470a2
ec7afe31d8e422902ae5b6cf8cb5fb76433a0d42
'2011-11-14T19:13:29-05:00'
describe
'46233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWDZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
13289386078831140f5b1eadda70f49f
ddd50280d1fa3e3a904d2bb04256104cdefb48fa
'2011-11-14T19:08:49-05:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9dcfe3a2d8ae52d1c79fea10501e7e9c
b17dde85b1b107126f655c9e68b3938fec89734d
'2011-11-14T19:14:08-05:00'
describe
'10603' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5302d551e565f43bb966031250256261
54d9c2fe19a20e8481bc181b109aae685f62bfdf
'2011-11-14T19:07:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
79499180676f53dce9245340b1aa0a26
c67f522d6c371f26ba002fe162f94c733d53925e
'2011-11-14T19:12:41-05:00'
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWED' 'sip-files00019.txt'
e39dcbedc32592f2dfacb84d4f38ed95
ebae084449d2bab6f1f0a21d3db9df74d76e3d54
'2011-11-14T19:10:06-05:00'
describe
'2943' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
3e7ea543a27a7169674b9c2bd85b54f1
5c5dfb557a493ab5bc40c97429e72d197213eb54
'2011-11-14T19:07:25-05:00'
describe
'346029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
681fdd10be7dad8e8de079684c43efd1
3381e97a1b7316aa1eea7c9d85fdc385f0e21921
'2011-11-14T19:09:46-05:00'
describe
'19452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
53911b4b34c5b1cc82b5289cdf901807
c267f984ff2ecca1dbdb1e83851cbb0288dffea1
'2011-11-14T19:07:33-05:00'
describe
'3623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
626f78b10b3e78a84275e8e760a2585f
a0a6b54c7165371be983549dba0e27e4609bf633
'2011-11-14T19:08:20-05:00'
describe
'2785040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEI' 'sip-files00020.tif'
5629f054adf24db33f0c3df2c7159536
faefac18d408d45d89bc8fe3a2c76e2fc7967bd2
'2011-11-14T19:13:03-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
119bbfeb67f4beb889c5180b99eaceaa
892ffbc1a2e7ef1a40b15232eb7a9b0d39ffc785
'2011-11-14T19:07:19-05:00'
describe
'357691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
95c7636ab54a4f10713cc355f51e4098
9a8254700a31dd07d1234c6eef9874fe7dfc49f9
'2011-11-14T19:09:13-05:00'
describe
'93677' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
327cf65e7dc69d116c9f85d17fa1b1f9
2b26f710fb79212fdfd2e1c0dc58bab35e0a8d19
describe
'24922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
073a913e224f3f873a98f1e3ea22ed03
87bb771c106702c711304e8fc779458815bed72d
'2011-11-14T19:07:18-05:00'
describe
'27990' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
2dfcf74b759ddb7c424e92ad425abe4f
d5d0f1b65fad5bae1d224c6ec7ebaad3f762af1e
'2011-11-14T19:13:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
631a080d37565ba0a2fb7bf8b9a84265
3e29d5098f34b6227d088f0cdaa0a71470680486
'2011-11-14T19:10:07-05:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
37a6a7cb26d8c90653a84751e329c8a7
28357f6dc8d34e5a47681642e3e11c13f04713d7
'2011-11-14T19:12:00-05:00'
describe
'6871' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2646813c95fba0f1b14d4fc44b8f8a43
97f228dd2e17bbf33121685617eb59e1625ebd52
describe
'357791' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWER' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
df068022276de0cf4a385cb63b8c1f00
8eb913f32c17d40ea745cc95a864ab73ef6f3b7c
'2011-11-14T19:09:37-05:00'
describe
'120753' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWES' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c51d88035c329bb32e2eb28b36f652d4
a25e731966c345e0b4290d7c4a5410b5d48840ff
'2011-11-14T19:10:00-05:00'
describe
'27996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWET' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3d3d5db49c9badc5b34177f729a4d5aa
9fa2b52d09be38e1b52845a6098af784b88cdba5
describe
'34327' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
8c1a93ad2be58f19a873263ad28474a7
606589d6b6af647940612b7cecfb8d85c937434f
'2011-11-14T19:09:12-05:00'
describe
'2878932' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c442bab2c9f45cead8fa227ef3351fa9
f7f49922bbc285baeb9538266af8fd99207086a0
'2011-11-14T19:14:27-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
de5f490eccfb767435dd3a3421d07175
98a415990da9051e22acd1f2aac854785030e799
describe
'8339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
419c0108412546ede1a3cb36c465df01
3bbf0158be1bb905da354a5225fb93efa74dfabe
'2011-11-14T19:07:52-05:00'
describe
'357802' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7eaf308d592a2db112513defc1abe408
e7262b966b6c329e3cd1dd725428599b8bd57f8d
'2011-11-14T19:07:58-05:00'
describe
'116427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWEZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
6852e98b3dd57a852019c894520b87ed
2c811f96eca80f3d022fe592db2bc805a14e3d04
'2011-11-14T19:08:04-05:00'
describe
'34904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
39596de1fad5717ef0d1fb2cfe7d2518
9bb29d18e54f6a02410c1a1ab405e9ddf8cb9fab
'2011-11-14T19:10:35-05:00'
describe
'36700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
22bad3b6bf51a634f0c56f543b59fd36
9abc4bdf52be8afd9f0a5575884f9ca0a9f81975
'2011-11-14T19:06:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
0d7db5a204b750eaedf50b008add4d2f
df635d5de6f419310d7fb4b049ca433aa367a1ee
'2011-11-14T19:14:29-05:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
3ab55b3d80f701277873bbc56e464c49
2e852524d0f045b5a1b8b71d64711df25fd2e9e6
'2011-11-14T19:10:09-05:00'
describe
'8443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
a5690f06257f00b9fdb2fd5cfeb96fa4
2313432e7eab033194c9a6382101005fef70581f
'2011-11-14T19:09:52-05:00'
describe
'357765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
67b2c5adbfc54b1db72d241d64bd157a
d75beafccc4cbd8259c7408df6abcee9cbd46b8b
'2011-11-14T19:07:38-05:00'
describe
'118307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2b2ae6d6cb20da4dc587a43b888ad004
12add00e38ae2ab524a79de2df070faf876e22f6
describe
'36230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c75f17e636db64b7c0858d2ed87d509e
6aade8454901188ad52e060f3a4d284aef95ca01
describe
'36898' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFI' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
73e4864b16c7645553e0cbc720acf8c0
1cb49e1f5d888dbcc90c8d01d684399a0144f8c6
'2011-11-14T19:08:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c606a69dce582c2a9a97c8c2cba791d2
5b67b037d20ef9348acdcfdbcb05b085d19383d8
'2011-11-14T19:07:31-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
80f0946ba686bc8c46e019ceee1b1b1f
9e2eb9e467b402879c1f50ece43a6945fab3f80d
'2011-11-14T19:08:01-05:00'
describe
'9023' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFL' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
22c2aa549c461948f2c365e4c17195d3
b4aac245eebf69c0dd6b1af0f7fe3b117837f825
'2011-11-14T19:06:22-05:00'
describe
'349038' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d3e1fb7850f9dd67e2ee15354d41af83
117cf0975a19ca5ba5e787f6dcae8b2989da98ba
'2011-11-14T19:12:38-05:00'
describe
'118461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
556309cf967744064f0a53aea60e7396
69768f659f9c11679705c47763e13dfeb8ae1def
'2011-11-14T19:11:09-05:00'
describe
'35281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b49d499ca09435d076ba6f82732f1df9
c7ceb2eaf1da7563cee0e22c04aa573fc9a8f4b6
'2011-11-14T19:10:20-05:00'
describe
'37760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0b07d38420b6cf5cae935c78b640ae85
ace90bbaaf814b8d594e8a4a250d3fa97b0ab3de
'2011-11-14T19:11:49-05:00'
describe
'2808680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f56adbd6f99835bbe828989a354185cc
dab8fa22cf8fdcee274fb1a405a0f405d53a6fcb
'2011-11-14T19:13:39-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
27786f5a41bce1a1306b9145114a03fe
9047c04e32fa9a8e2ae889b8075d947084099f24
'2011-11-14T19:08:25-05:00'
describe
'9361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b5f2945af514c995a6ef778a78a4709d
1643ee0c5961d02470cb9c65ec7a68a8f3a7dd06
'2011-11-14T19:11:03-05:00'
describe
'339586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
726094ff77e78ff007f7fa56e2fb59a8
02119e7230daec954790d4bc9cb9fdc1a60c9d3d
describe
'114105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8d85604a472e4b761da5dd33f159a1ad
4669324d8f5a8699462cdae62437c179db0294f5
'2011-11-14T19:08:13-05:00'
describe
'34104' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
f8131b74093ee1bf9000d16877940c3d
ab53fffe6f9a2ea7ef0bf5fa649c7bf4d783cf44
'2011-11-14T19:07:49-05:00'
describe
'35392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b77586c4158dc1a50fe7be1a428fe148
4de997c40b384b6de6b5afb3981e41aabec97bac
'2011-11-14T19:07:00-05:00'
describe
'2733160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b4c4006def86534d6e192ede25698507
1ad9a2066ec01c2bd794ecd271ceea7e66230aad
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
1189f538d70db32d700e9b66dc032beb
815c7aa39ade1e23e2c234479de61a084f08081b
'2011-11-14T19:10:47-05:00'
describe
'9335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWFZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
ab1901b366dc6dc9fbf6c06b464574ea
d98a48864184e84bc326e7432479da26ef120948
describe
'346083' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d919732f5e69085fcf95515dda103119
399eaf78089cd8ea2f410859d12c1728316542c2
describe
'58377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4a786991e4168b74ba7f45aeb2b7ab8f
670c79c48b0c763076b4b0ac50f20268d1e578d8
'2011-11-14T19:11:50-05:00'
describe
'6083' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
4e54a8853a4f902cbbe07f764e53b39c
7ca21a0047f342df660a68dcc6b87bae741a1861
describe
'15572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f563c7d68c4d25dc06422469216a2c18
76d04e4967fd5057e07849f0942691e985b8600e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c7c42a3fa4802f6e8931bbbd7be26955
b9768b2065f402928ca85fcd9bba38f83d6ab9b6
describe
'268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
1a4ce52a10d82fdb38d8aee92a0bcbf4
d8da942eb0a33c6cf021e2136b0a518d66759f5c
describe
'4110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
b19960a7a1ace37bc54290ac4830482d
43aac7da5a19fab5a9e70c36ae05e0030d918eb8
describe
'350292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
18c9789dcd15a01f7f7e09a945ead004
f9954265292766abe30448ccd6be0ac838449954
'2011-11-14T19:14:05-05:00'
describe
'100179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9d9fc2a7d511cf49a1cbfc0e0f9ebae7
6ef140944bf282e8f2cf609983a5926646104aef
describe
'26695' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a9608ef17085933418124c291553f250
b115dd67e6928e03cad23961c5a2062d90744bd1
'2011-11-14T19:06:33-05:00'
describe
'31298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
56b9192c9de4c9afa1f0285c48e92461
22188f437f774b782972f5878a251b3fe3d7a81d
'2011-11-14T19:06:19-05:00'
describe
'2819184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
04f3d265b12863ffc17d32b803d9e086
186bfc0808d7fecbb090f3dfd158a078dc82c51f
'2011-11-14T19:09:32-05:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f4ebd07182ba4b0fa6034e628b4c764d
269ba9568163fb01d586e7efb85800e6fabcc872
'2011-11-14T19:09:35-05:00'
describe
'8553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
60af37862568df1f26846dcba58e18cb
0f678f5dbe94f0f38cb480f6872350d23aa3abd2
'2011-11-14T19:13:15-05:00'
describe
'329690' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
11e44d2e71b1295cf821defb93cd8551
dd4f78b92ae5bf1109547f02da636cd1194338c1
'2011-11-14T19:10:11-05:00'
describe
'115904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ac3176f87b850ae285bbd129710e45f0
1ae5776a54a848d5e34eb10a7bdd3909d6c08937
'2011-11-14T19:11:41-05:00'
describe
'35149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a17889a919c1bf8a0d201216eb393b14
c30f16d6efe9fd1773503c609cb1dc82752187e3
'2011-11-14T19:07:32-05:00'
describe
'36708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8f93fc74d7170651963b3b27d2ecfe22
d52b3a03bfa74b60c8af7420b74decaa6cc8bc8c
describe
'2654152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
5e3e0c775ccb83fc83efc8fc09f1f3ac
e304a5a52f6d0394478bec42764025a572ab204a
'2011-11-14T19:14:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
5fa991e8dc008909aa9ece5386205799
35b50813608f7ec397b636e2671658338befcc75
'2011-11-14T19:08:19-05:00'
describe
'9688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
5efb7ed9817dcdc01b54dffbb5582033
78fd84205f63fb66b0373baf6525e776e3fc1bc4
'2011-11-14T19:09:26-05:00'
describe
'339662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
d1741f1427289cdf0b3efc35f937939b
504db30ac1b186d18f5e6766bcc916d2bd76f536
describe
'113623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
19f84a4b1a1d459aab143ad310c41fda
83e42801bc02a68482a10e7254e32557bed39773
'2011-11-14T19:10:30-05:00'
describe
'35096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1df12656a8166720cde5eb0583885457
b90bf7f3e6447c1fddce2bb40b129eb1e7ea08ce
'2011-11-14T19:11:52-05:00'
describe
'35634' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9560de56fa460d382408e08a093512b4
911d86b5d27effda2805fdc7802dfff7a46dbe66
'2011-11-14T19:06:31-05:00'
describe
'2733824' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWGZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c4913e02d91132366ea1f3f1de74eb5e
31ba4f52bf757c4e1615d03d20f7af693779b2dc
'2011-11-14T19:13:01-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
0a5c3c15cb031b05140f123f7fb51229
46b79d23fa5f0bd76037a9c3df079af2a1d3c48d
'2011-11-14T19:11:58-05:00'
describe
'9205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
6875d2587fa2f6e1326e8f63190de3eb
4eac1b9203d55f920beddd73efed9dd9d00c9b34
'2011-11-14T19:09:34-05:00'
describe
'342791' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e5a0f0982fdb7436ba56e20ad185d1c7
6d5599a7787992c54dd2dff3a2fb90e36b675362
describe
'129057' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
77770b274b6f125749a3caec7e238dae
5dd933da8694be7a5de8ac3b3105de519ee76570
'2011-11-14T19:09:29-05:00'
describe
'37331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
69ec9c4874a14d3bbbc6c22e1d1e9a2c
8923c5078daf7bed33746f21db02b5c8989e6bd5
'2011-11-14T19:09:57-05:00'
describe
'40717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6059b7e101c89435cb9439172a73911c
6fb54ce5f31456b2ac9249f03d1a1b6a97f6b84e
'2011-11-14T19:12:30-05:00'
describe
'2759100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
729f2cc6caa843af13de8679c8935a09
726b024b81d7bf73cc94ba771e899003c1685fc3
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
6aa2389fefaff52f79da4df66a05b9ea
80273a5909cd3a2cefe5e67cdca59a14ff50dfa3
'2011-11-14T19:06:39-05:00'
describe
'10020' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
f726b23da095435e2bd0eb26321af404
159802701f53e66c3209f2489d8ed86baf95d7a6
'2011-11-14T19:08:38-05:00'
describe
'350296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
529890f96c41201daf5f262017c13318
2c794b8f4decbc658dc2dbe16a2454bf7b42bda5
describe
'119728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
28c1f1e7d8486b28156edd0dab93bf34
e6e6d81c9f35406f70bf09176e6cfa69ca28f973
'2011-11-14T19:07:23-05:00'
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
242524b62b67e9f26c95875ccf4c5b9c
e42f1bf2aafed16f1a8bf481b140199d1ad8461a
'2011-11-14T19:11:44-05:00'
describe
'37874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3b1fd67b204be4b5b24252e1c671fabe
f05e81aa14535e50000d10a77d5582b90a452f93
'2011-11-14T19:09:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
086945994d8d6a1ce0503dcfb4630caa
cfd586a5efcd86a6dec55c7e163c6731aa18f6ab
'2011-11-14T19:09:17-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
35ed249734533c4ca5689e62eca55ad5
fa134bd815769e6739449508217ce9fa7c971b29
'2011-11-14T19:06:13-05:00'
describe
'9436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
0173a33d0aebb6150d528e26d5724932
7b96cbc6359c4deb7811f2a4291a9e9a7873cfee
'2011-11-14T19:08:07-05:00'
describe
'353760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
fec055c15a4a7d3fb36538bdafdce986
4a1ad381a73bcddea9feca62ec5c301d0103ce35
'2011-11-14T19:14:12-05:00'
describe
'138430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1990b1ac6666a31644b077d89d43b109
73e77b78af499a9a03fea277e2b2ead98fb931df
describe
'19351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a3eacca007d2289e41bc85675067de79
d27afbd278c36af685ce21e4d2e4e0bca4735cee
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
e1353f2f090e90474e47d3f5715d0022
e65f0b8eb99bcb291d5be33053e8b63c789b938b
describe
'2846752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
d0e299ba6c8a79c44b875dd66d6feec6
8b5348a0560d7ec8ed5a1908b8ef2e201467b942
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d384fc14771ac809bfef6b7c6ed028b7
328c9c4f915c39ca3e48ca9760aa65a22f55caa1
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
d2ce1a841be297da6a3dbebf61f00be3
e58f605428ea407ba3f768930e026f373372a636
describe
'339135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
150d042fdf0af79ab96e3dc19bd6d7e0
c8bb5a6a6347d85b15a6e9334f1b790f5bb328c5
'2011-11-14T19:12:47-05:00'
describe
'124132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b97c00af4eeb731d38600543dfa0355b
e60a517e214c130006f1b0ab68700c579d93019c
'2011-11-14T19:05:57-05:00'
describe
'35888' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWHZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
2e26c4ba91ca2128f843824efb7ca0eb
38eb1bb7e4a09f658bda7f278758b4af45d420aa
'2011-11-14T19:12:25-05:00'
describe
'38027' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9cd3bbb835ed665c3376aa7213b08848
a67be2ff9cb309e1b39dd09dd956e5aa71925017
'2011-11-14T19:10:57-05:00'
describe
'2729956' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
43fa7d95d46217c6af6b989b94cde1d6
d286ce6941da511ab870e59bc92c01c781a23836
'2011-11-14T19:08:42-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6641cb3e2b338a5f1ba38008dc3ce90c
7cdcf29190a8162b8d8242db7652fa04de3a86c2
'2011-11-14T19:09:59-05:00'
describe
'9645' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWID' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a1bde71290b6522cdfb1f8ae3c9a1c3d
4e67f2a3f7a0b3b0cbec9538a429d18a3f592306
describe
'357660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8207b16859df6606d45b89d782652727
a38518a79b1d37aad58c7ac6821c4639be0e59cb
'2011-11-14T19:09:53-05:00'
describe
'64403' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e72bac3901f035eaf28de643814bc14c
ef61e578cf12563a85e133cb95abf68a993cbd28
'2011-11-14T19:11:02-05:00'
describe
'5593' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5f59d60edcc830bb17b5cf938afbc777
160325e3cae850a21b9d4c91a39298c4a89e1bae
describe
'16280' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fb1e21aae487bdffe2d1a90beec2fa1b
cd19366006b68b7d4f3bc6239ce34549fccfe0cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWII' 'sip-files00035.tif'
96adbbbe007ad5cbc9f7d8226fbe0c1d
16e22b795a027be93d5e6c52b143e96d22150806
'2011-11-14T19:08:06-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4b8b30067008f7935f4d5d000a0db2a7
daf074ea4ba03537295d0d7e3ff18da3e5af879c
'2011-11-14T19:07:37-05:00'
describe
'4279' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
9366e80682d2ac1cbb0acf8935a92336
fc53ff0d30b039f53972795dc1aac3404ed314f9
'2011-11-14T19:10:27-05:00'
describe
'352464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
69eb62e3f8b4ec471221e7f8dee421c9
03f728fdb8f7aecc983f8dd469bd8626bdb4c2e3
'2011-11-14T19:12:51-05:00'
describe
'99621' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
6b86228aaa20091b956bd1cb600d3bc4
3cc33fc8bc419d3b399aaec86f12d0d18bfabe3b
describe
'29108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
c41a967cb666aebb7a20c5d6edbf2f24
11faae6e0bbb3836856e2f8e03980f69606038ca
'2011-11-14T19:10:31-05:00'
describe
'30889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
771fde2698e57e3d24d10124c69e5171
a36c8c89e555daa8f76fc217716b0f1735665099
describe
'2836256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
be526c863113a2dee7202b695c470617
79e1ed055aaea541f43bc84edc107a756e6aea5e
'2011-11-14T19:07:05-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
9ef2f675eb186ffce8ada03f810f24b6
bb1b36a9e65616a534e701c33812dddf7202792a
'2011-11-14T19:07:22-05:00'
describe
'7870' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
043055e964a7987570ed2ebb6b3fc063
e6c11dfde29bcccb9fafbdafc3a155ea0ad828a5
describe
'351405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
197aba2329b1e65660d488d27366d46e
3bab911495b2d14004b25074fc10a26c5c2d3493
describe
'106058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
fa9370f354d313a3c5dcee4ce7678344
a98df679b9d971db1f6bdcb2e05294e279d53898
'2011-11-14T19:07:28-05:00'
describe
'31355' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d9bedbb81a52789178771c0166c69f9c
9084572b90e28f41d530933e4611c28d474a6337
'2011-11-14T19:13:35-05:00'
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
63f7da49bd14fd493b74be82d4c8ce64
75f42325da400ec39493027dc14860529c7261a8
describe
'2827720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0838cc7fcb8c419c34f18a998d0d903f
c2ff12cdc88223c9aa83156bd19409be8da4d553
'2011-11-14T19:14:18-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
86c41aea8c31f2f41696c117868db27b
f85d0b9f22fbbb7218b4d93d07822701709d95a7
'2011-11-14T19:08:16-05:00'
describe
'8551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
fe575d66659311155203f59de44f65de
7140b7773a6669e80b2768f10c512f65f130d877
'2011-11-14T19:08:35-05:00'
describe
'357812' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWIZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
04cfd0265837d3eede15423b8897ec46
9384face5c212bd007d6ead863426696b30e7ce3
'2011-11-14T19:12:39-05:00'
describe
'117289' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
107df5c606f28dc939565b697c128707
991559337251bba1f047099cc933cf666a650491
'2011-11-14T19:08:56-05:00'
describe
'36244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
18db04c4cd383c6078ab9ebbca394ee2
1061cd75e07ff6a88c5bdbe895c470fa3c5055d1
describe
'36217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6359be4abe61c747564f7af872278a9c
9871f3d46741ac1edc3126802c9dd28f7089395f
'2011-11-14T19:06:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
79c978342f7314dab651b0c92ad0bf45
20915fb8033d52ff3afdc6b79cfd52d1c5015804
'2011-11-14T19:11:48-05:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
16f5553020aaa59c418afe4370b52ebd
1346f732e255a422f41f23ec84118653f5eb99f6
'2011-11-14T19:11:11-05:00'
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ec1a071682cd8f28443be00d54e7cddf
4e8b4a4bf801fa05f2e68d5d56b53157e45dbc61
'2011-11-14T19:07:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a2ff25576e0be772eb5e5a961d28ef30
7ffb7c1ece338d6dcae79aeda75235ab22ea7709
describe
'122249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
67fd48918572ba8ea787c5533fa36b05
0d77be96e117b63de77e95bc3a7a624d96bf068c
describe
'36685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f05a20e549b9717e8a237e9287427e9d
97bd698f767077b598bf37c03b1a087d7b8dbdf3
'2011-11-14T19:11:30-05:00'
describe
'38071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
bb5f53ef087e3fba2adee36489544060
062c18c65b8e5a2f178e018a0e576b22f0afcbd1
'2011-11-14T19:14:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d983814a7ca44917e02dd8d6e1561df5
0f63e8cf17b4da40e48514216e255333e79afe08
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b198344d57c9feaa05cb5f00ae875c5a
acdf60fd4381e2377775f9def2737d62f7d142cb
'2011-11-14T19:11:17-05:00'
describe
'8840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a0dbc509bae79180564fc0a849d94ff6
40a8cf4ad5b20f9745b822117a87b026ce9f68a8
'2011-11-14T19:08:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
0bbbf06797b602bc2f5084e9f79432f0
cd78751cdaf13bcaed49494bad28786068934265
'2011-11-14T19:13:36-05:00'
describe
'116766' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
aefc98c9853f1d29c26c22523ae8ef56
8a3f2323534e2d9bb54c598399751bcfd72e1250
describe
'35177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2e41bdce4126a2a36a2b77b00b19f1a3
62870bc342ead2e456563a686c568f29b82ed2d6
describe
'36002' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ca52dab56240c3283b5f4ef797db9aec
560b1d7da324a5c9ae485e5c6966854c646720e4
'2011-11-14T19:06:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
50199bff93339c758aba811ea08ce953
a2e414a9d9e31eecf4b9709ec6fd27a90d74260f
'2011-11-14T19:10:54-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
bbc7e8940c5a7db95d200308220af488
60fae70a20b52ce006fc25c5c4599820e8937441
describe
'8514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
373ff93bb3fc7addfe88c83f8c566207
4e22b495f69b76041154a8f04397870cdfced4d9
'2011-11-14T19:09:02-05:00'
describe
'344263' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c7ba8b5258725b98539f5cce6ae31064
6c71a5382a912b98d0fbec73562b47fc0bb94165
'2011-11-14T19:11:19-05:00'
describe
'106558' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c2002ff7b52137c090ed97df434815a3
297ba0669232443eb8d4dedcd1ecf00e35a3678f
'2011-11-14T19:06:28-05:00'
describe
'30330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ea33748e655fc82103b9d7e2b3f9648a
7cc00015b4bc87355ccf0a1e6dcf476fb9777122
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c54250cc66377d47cd1da23046a613a9
6678ee5282590bc66c95fa319f1b31b4e5d1a1a5
describe
'2770792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5b5e1a5c3bdea037d3f6ec0ef0159eb9
db0dd28a0eb323b2168ed43dc1d7af59980bcfce
'2011-11-14T19:09:15-05:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWJZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4c497f2715d089ba3f7fde6a8c0855c6
7b6632528b21ea50f7c64deeba4fcb7fdd0e2c3f
describe
'8036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
5f826c9dc076708ef8eee3dcbe40ea70
c9ea94519055266f48a398215afdf0a0ec06c5b9
'2011-11-14T19:09:48-05:00'
describe
'349259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
cb7618660fb8964f13497e2f3002f743
a70a4fe49316bf29972b0bebf0e435b764af6b93
'2011-11-14T19:13:46-05:00'
describe
'110043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
857d106e982afdb6c15ba5d4d5a07034
55a1048d1eb1de2b514e3914d757221e9c90df62
'2011-11-14T19:11:36-05:00'
describe
'33409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
1d318728491faf9668af768ca115a973
be20beed1a5f3716936f044c82326fd1c2b078c6
'2011-11-14T19:08:34-05:00'
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ef428170a052b422b8d14d241b63e505
1cedc866f544e93b28dbe339597885c3960e2715
'2011-11-14T19:10:46-05:00'
describe
'2810644' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
4a9f2076556c565728160127624a9533
9f91179e46aa47e2bd966d0515f0fc64cf4f6a44
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
06065be3c294d12586e9cfe85866b776
3a70abb29ee89743948eccead22c69f1cea348cf
'2011-11-14T19:08:44-05:00'
describe
'8882' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
51f83baedfc7c366cf2acfc4c3d3498c
0dc1be94e4fa9ebb02b2eadfb3037b12e3f6e938
describe
'343267' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
664efeadb6b1b0ef8530f78bcfa5dbcf
617f2ce0150db72f78e750cb4d816acaf3f7afc1
describe
'157698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
b805f4442877dd09ebe009f3751fb484
bbac6403d3487cf63b113c06b0c84d7ef2199ccf
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
da814358c99cd139d57a013897deb928
b562bb6ca150ced003ac1f3961911a3fe33d432a
describe
'36934' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
28ecc232f0096e6dd12011c3c1241167
b2668b71d7a471a85736dcf117ee7536ff697a76
'2011-11-14T19:11:38-05:00'
describe
'2764284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1386c079a6e0df10f57669b946917cad
d459191d7317a1158313db7fc321936d910a9fce
describe
'151' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
9e7529d0ddb6bbcfe90795fc79f88d05
4e3938b81784e89f55f75e5ab64ee97563e2be07
'2011-11-14T19:09:18-05:00'
describe
'8916' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
95c7711831d23ba142b53a600c4876a1
e404c0fdb11928c051ab5739082e07eb8303d6fc
'2011-11-14T19:08:24-05:00'
describe
'349845' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d30c51c839e650d0b386af30119b2402
d2cf8d39c8dc98f98712ea09bb05a6f621562ec9
describe
'121626' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
1181e7f7c0a61984b55e14cc25e6948a
b952448040fe66fcc901f635ed528ae0f5313f17
'2011-11-14T19:06:15-05:00'
describe
'35196' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKR' 'sip-files00045.pro'
1b36cd2c944432644c41eed4496bb3db
6d5a8eedec99e53ccd243ca777b815cc0879f452
'2011-11-14T19:13:02-05:00'
describe
'37888' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKS' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ab2ad5b7fc258b59a00bf14da53416d2
9725bfee73923709641968e5c7b01726561a26b0
describe
'2815120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
72d9175bf8e5a84ff306f0937567047f
e7b67d5f36704a23dac59c5d81ae9e58b930943d
'2011-11-14T19:13:19-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
992ddd7afa332f03bc6d8a636eb6e60e
23d454d281210156c9d42d7c3fb00373182c7bdb
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKV' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
051d67b37e372dcc0f3c0137ada5b6ef
bd4a5c02b54b1902e533c0c61b37dbb8eaa8976a
'2011-11-14T19:06:12-05:00'
describe
'349249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKW' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
dbb08e6e7ab2b9548dae3dbc688081ae
92879b9810a4cb1053b4df92d24c156d69ac8e35
describe
'112546' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKX' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
90e152de2097f131427ceabf29945c5f
db1ed068e54c74649fa3d80f83cb4ea8c20093a3
describe
'33143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKY' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e4f0253eccdd1081f34e12981085a285
06611b22a0947499c2470e03810785aeb81f4ce3
'2011-11-14T19:08:57-05:00'
describe
'36150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
874cbc21b4b5306d19ead3b1cb78d2bb
65c5e608cfd826866cb613b331e5772134ccfd10
'2011-11-14T19:12:03-05:00'
describe
'2810648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLA' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e539da09f12ff3977e53db16d5808dae
4941539438b0447c6158b3c10d77a82ab28b8b12
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f47faf52816b076d20488a5ab22956c1
eaa66d16ce726902dacd16d51c30bc7bcdb59242
'2011-11-14T19:09:10-05:00'
describe
'9250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
73db10475dd78dc9dd66ee834fafe8ea
e13d57d0fdd420930d4617a1bbd94fa888035f9a
'2011-11-14T19:10:45-05:00'
describe
'354867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLD' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
00d42152236f91ae9b3bf80ddce1e269
d064cb9866e14c292c658aee152a04db2575736b
'2011-11-14T19:07:46-05:00'
describe
'171519' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLE' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e1ef5cf9b20e2d809df086affadefa78
d2e2f526680c25e2b1a57c896d573da12268fe45
'2011-11-14T19:09:28-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLF' 'sip-files00047.pro'
fcc3ddfb32c0805ad3c62288dee7c0ff
7cc2c5c38eba0cbe8fcfbf35b2b2111b88ca204d
describe
'39240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLG' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c6ff7263972a4f5c013ffdabcfd62b99
d4624a8a79e3b2eee57d0598105fe401f3606990
'2011-11-14T19:09:41-05:00'
describe
'2857480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLH' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a83cf0c086f0626815fcfb31909c36ca
09250fa5e4e03640cfeca65caded25cf93316f90
'2011-11-14T19:10:15-05:00'
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
d2b773a0d6d3060a2c4a11343e772c95
80b74dd4c80de1a04b4fd35569db45d381b9c941
describe
'8715' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e44a0d923a18e60b099fe96558aaa4f7
0f23edb42bd86ca9414f30befe52cd703046962e
'2011-11-14T19:07:57-05:00'
describe
'353710' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f492a5a2abe82cd439b4b3389d1a137e
0f6659a2ccfc3956b3ef887eb3245895727040b8
'2011-11-14T19:07:27-05:00'
describe
'125728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
61656e9c36c5acced643761c595782a9
e7fce669668943033f9070149c6e7763d7fea1ea
'2011-11-14T19:08:03-05:00'
describe
'36610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
947f518f5199ea2f939ca437e1d1b687
5d873cf1c124cb963217d2576babc2bb41bf54e8
'2011-11-14T19:12:05-05:00'
describe
'39723' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
637db970d8241dac83f89d212ebdd6bb
7f4c9a0a394158e65963369543b9dbce7f9eb4e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
42f66b28d7746db27d293082c61f8585
02c32224c832b61bee98100c7036c22f72539a1d
'2011-11-14T19:13:50-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
8e6b715a114b9fad19eb2b6f244c70ce
9643c30837b4e083a325c0949956b61b62805a9d
describe
'9118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6c82b5be8d4f3a671b7e5d01439fdc06
901326e61268ee899b932ac4eca8b62e26bb4128
describe
'357816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
7bcc8c9ac253e8dec210d9be2b2c08de
74373004304c02f2bd15422a0ece50d15398379a
'2011-11-14T19:09:50-05:00'
describe
'117158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
fbe2028edd911cbd58272543d3a3d7de
effaaa3c92bae138c974f287582022ae14b7e1b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
bfe5be351c1813b8cd8cd6bee6d8bc6b
74b6744b3622cf7feebc531a0485c120416e082c
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4ec40bc9f3c6a23ba36525bf9c154801
00f44e221360d14a663082c63fccdc4f4f88b468
'2011-11-14T19:11:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ba27e3b4fb6d051400833143b38f66e0
070adf2ab948b9e85de42fdefb03c2d488ff5838
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a94235722498bc55fc975e2d3757bb95
d3b3ee4a564aa254f6f7d25f3659817278273f34
describe
'9019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
146afbe5db1eb66519eeee32bf86901b
7d1196fcbb9c3b0380a629ca99782b4805879fd1
describe
'357760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7ff8a71e663334a8baa94ca37ae18f0e
77b73d3173293e373691e49b979bb42e9e28b15d
'2011-11-14T19:14:25-05:00'
describe
'118631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
861c791bc83ea59a7c00c373b25eef0c
ba93bdf62fa6a57030b3005617f8ef96c70b1dc2
describe
'34844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
70c2214e4d161427bb96e34f942a2e00
19654f79e2a3820995310c738b433a44630970be
describe
'36406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d0b5f34d8551358d5c56f756fd01f788
bf26a5d780959a453da0cefd847d4fd60b370683
'2011-11-14T19:14:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e1bae426de290f858f6359d7eb1cf84e
a35b0e9ba5d2e06054aa68cdd9006a3b31f74a34
'2011-11-14T19:12:02-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
7e1f3761d3a56e7514705c6d7c21a2f3
cf4e9adc00a1bd3a35c61cc465d4cc49d7751e4b
describe
'8642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWME' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ee7caf421ab11a2a79822db1dbcf6060
d3568af68ff5b901a51a00889ec75948d7062f1d
describe
'357780' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1d005a2a09c10967030adb2e09be11d6
91eb954a5fbbea96dbc6245ab90e777221bcf966
'2011-11-14T19:08:22-05:00'
describe
'121036' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
049776792cd4d2961a7248279062cb68
91dad815e77f9edc3321914b00bb7d95097549a8
'2011-11-14T19:11:35-05:00'
describe
'36061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
73074e73928f775c0c505c3d9d01e0c3
a95f26a389ad6fdd34b4f716aecbb92e315d7f36
'2011-11-14T19:12:46-05:00'
describe
'37761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
c3a7a4f33e76e61594234c3d8c164826
6ee0de222f393e40d62cba8db752662f309e1e53
'2011-11-14T19:14:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
3ef158144fc674ef3b66d58b5bc11b7d
113a8ddc4b3e2202c8b44e0db6bb0b9f50acc718
'2011-11-14T19:07:50-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2c0074ee4c1d9151e61e4df3b7f39834
fd03aa8f3737338f548c5ca9caedfba1852580fd
describe
'8653' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWML' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
08206106910f472ae6aa23ea84a1e1d9
14562efd17d6782b1873cfb55e48cbd87385200e
'2011-11-14T19:14:00-05:00'
describe
'357761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e202a3cc49a5c181d86f63433a6926e8
d4f09899730d7c643dfc274247269aeac26fb143
'2011-11-14T19:11:26-05:00'
describe
'112886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
dcbd2d1311e3f2036262de158a14d7d1
60529ae3f6fce590f61c473ec8d523059e23ee6b
describe
'34340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
c1725e68886bc57f0e2a63a7608c21f1
67863ce1a72c246c63762419ea94ea091dec1728
'2011-11-14T19:14:43-05:00'
describe
'35397' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9fd23650873c5fa9f42371fb95bff743
40ef1e7a157c028b4f5d4072a891f122249b86d6
'2011-11-14T19:06:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
53f748a7671266712d2041ad2b26bc96
44d4a8cb2febfd58835ebda56c48c4a069fb7ed3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b31dc100e92b9b475f84e2d8b4f2f88a
54a564314f8eecc301ec3d41623919fbada81a97
'2011-11-14T19:07:59-05:00'
describe
'8599' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c472a58fc438765d725e813c234af1c1
898c28c09a1958328ca683310e8637a0a05a8d8e
'2011-11-14T19:09:56-05:00'
describe
'357800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a5d3f447648ed47f9703d6dd702fb33a
40217f29e0ff001ba332cf4d11fd2cc51a97f73b
describe
'142586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
da01f7574663628a1a048fcfb0435c18
593886277e3ec02926f6f2ad7c6e1341796ad6da
'2011-11-14T19:10:25-05:00'
describe
'16759' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5b66b1c7f2805c7678447140659b0377
407c445ef4065875e84f4c815eb582dfbefc0fcb
'2011-11-14T19:11:21-05:00'
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8c111d13923a1282d7277b500e6c9ed7
72d278bcf19b2f5e84a35304c17467f8f1cd2197
'2011-11-14T19:10:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
56d24396837adf32a3bc23d9729c859c
22d17a91f4e6089528bfe9bd52d98ea2f2d681aa
'2011-11-14T19:14:32-05:00'
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2c69ce937f1897d0d3da948fbca6be79
7cf6ef6b14b6b66e402611a9a04263628c51c31e
'2011-11-14T19:08:45-05:00'
describe
'8414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
4395298094b063bef911f083a4006406
0197896d784baac68f77e2f2531b0a8c633af889
describe
'357776' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
624daacc7fbfe948fa159fe46ad06a51
1225dd5557db0152e65895d86bea5cfe476bf10e
'2011-11-14T19:08:23-05:00'
describe
'117148' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e3b6692aa6206006ecbdc4beb969e7e4
5951899820d38a80ee4ce854db2e6fb3f267bf35
describe
'35724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
04e5401b000c6d98462571d26a5d74a3
fd316b7aadf3b6e07801e323e644a9249421a02e
describe
'36093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWND' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
08f481cd6590278f11ddcde951158352
002ae03a8f387125386cc25704ac0a54284a4682
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
f4df5744efe72af918567c07e1f064b2
de1a00af28196df94e559c13ce469b20555165a6
'2011-11-14T19:09:09-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
eb578b0276e21a256dcbd72cb62e9d71
9ce8e5b936b2860e022055ababd136a2a1879927
'2011-11-14T19:06:37-05:00'
describe
'8458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
28aa086616b15541a0a415a9a087e936
106f97b3bb458b841f0362ba346af72611323720
describe
'357466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
d67ce1eec60085aeea73a75a69989471
fe8eaeb20f2b81b0dd58fda5af94277c6ac3d539
'2011-11-14T19:07:47-05:00'
describe
'95483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
2d998af971e8ed82cef27a6e7f12089d
313d419fdf94a72d3186c0e9ca430526f9b48e2a
'2011-11-14T19:11:22-05:00'
describe
'28100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
db30ad22fb726dbba48adeae3a0f5b3a
e2cd17188f72abf6b88456d45ef6a5fa608fd907
describe
'29268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
cbf3b73671370e25cfa81326e0fd956c
32b487b9d8c3a263f1031edf209887a3335de2cd
describe
'2876800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c9a0f9174fc2467344322c9f8bd5f7a9
e8b93fdf5c7bd3c90a97307b9e93a3ef8f27ae3e
'2011-11-14T19:07:01-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1a755437cf529ea655126f00b6e1227c
bbd47575e334ae4fb48531371be95c20c5383915
describe
'6980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
0d3eaae29f2f12d415a5dacd14f0c997
f7c51783444f641c8ef0ca64ce2799ddc5c21f29
describe
'357737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
edec590e8ae870d86a597d8b81679025
08a1a6793fb5ff7cccffe6fd0c1070b82bbaabce
describe
'101490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e63aaba5d77765909c13960b78293fb1
827152ccd3b02b5c261e250bdefbedd6d9d01008
'2011-11-14T19:12:29-05:00'
describe
'29351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a22b919214170a44e72ffebab0fddd51
40dc2402d334277529b3a2ce2e7873041bf1f34a
describe
'30805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
61aa9f07acd3596d62b73f4320bff843
3678ed090f7966e261e890eaee2ef7133039b57f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
e8d3ecfdfcc44e38bf1d209473a1c012
19c38fda9ae87d92fe805394121b0acc370087ca
'2011-11-14T19:13:28-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
516dd8fb6d666aad08a206163e787085
a63fbadd43aecfd974926b1e8d0adae34a3f8f11
'2011-11-14T19:11:07-05:00'
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ad38071ae5c3c43b1f69edcbb3fb79b8
5f8b1f0292592375b2710a3a122aaf36e03a437b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c8604d1d48f2dcb451a1d1eae7de4be5
32d78951c8abec7052b9ef2b3b9a22a2f1864703
'2011-11-14T19:13:06-05:00'
describe
'108606' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a1b07db9cddc62218038bf2d77c0d51f
3e412e17bd8897d9f1cf62b6d4248d3a1fcd25ca
describe
'33522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a95d297e760b4dc564ba9b1e3a6f7c90
213c2fcc8d013f3e8b148b81b77098c7f7af33df
describe
'33319' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f29ea7e2e467e42b67392cb0e66faa5e
0f18acd5323fe24a13ca1f51200f1d183c47e0e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c59a16fd72601763b2732ccb8ecbd70d
5fa43e3d563b4d4ad8c852d965372ac376d0bb26
'2011-11-14T19:09:23-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a850e2f19a7b80032330fd3875b8deba
df9d3527c707fbf8ea2f91c3fb8e979a3a05ad2f
'2011-11-14T19:14:44-05:00'
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
6bd6448df34c4aace2cd8bc887334349
3a675d87477472772606e840ba27bdfa7d331417
'2011-11-14T19:10:33-05:00'
describe
'357813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
371d5fd73d82749bd2211e9a5b07eef2
0a1c005460e9969843a9427d40297157da3ad20e
'2011-11-14T19:11:16-05:00'
describe
'116072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
21bdeb430120db0e67368d24710a9edf
9081290e40d66d2d1db27f5f67c0e07153700e42
'2011-11-14T19:11:15-05:00'
describe
'35472' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2866d0b54118ea9bd6469a32a1b2376f
62cf44d274bdb2c9e74d66e95cb5db393c611f26
'2011-11-14T19:10:34-05:00'
describe
'36049' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
5bbd0564528dc8a6751eeb9a74f82721
6654cca437a0a029c7d88a7e430f61c55e7de6d0
'2011-11-14T19:10:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e86a5dea26f577376d85b8f91960fa21
ad70e654a4bdce0be5eb705ef064ef628ecc13e8
'2011-11-14T19:13:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ef33edf2913abc3bf6cf4e897e45a113
14fa482bd82506cfd99a17fdbecac65a2ea5dfd6
'2011-11-14T19:06:49-05:00'
describe
'8531' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
31c6ae9097e0f83a1f4e4d454e67ff06
a44ead62d0013e5dd8a77a46a5e478aa1de339b7
'2011-11-14T19:09:22-05:00'
describe
'357727' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
bca6c754064649fc302086efa3302422
9957d267ca619882479384d1d55b84699d7aa572
describe
'110556' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
00b081126f26b3fa554a5435a1cf7a07
fba5fdf0c237eb6a3a9bb1ac4ac9e676d74030cc
describe
'27868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
60eacf566a6f61c7bfa25e02a3d2ff31
148a4a0dc9ffdacc6bd78145f79614bc188b481c
'2011-11-14T19:12:12-05:00'
describe
'33673' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7af2029cb53913303fdce64271ed9ea7
256050de58a63d0cb1b17aa15a35289745f6826b
'2011-11-14T19:06:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWON' 'sip-files00060.tif'
248f75f7425cb6c6be2068dd7e708a1b
e43406ea4222eeb5596b67aa22537a260753c644
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
56ebb1c171f3d23fcc6432468bd697ad
533eab5243a3e52f7d9cee4da8c9f6b0c36f32b3
'2011-11-14T19:13:31-05:00'
describe
'8244' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
715aaf71ced6be457c70180472f323f5
d92ddf7b3fca65ff06eec0fb96d90623f6078549
'2011-11-14T19:11:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
093b55b8b7c5a661923716f4e5aae947
5c1216ed9823e9802496a1652a6e7ac1b4bd1dab
'2011-11-14T19:07:09-05:00'
describe
'112402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
15b4be5482bf65ece299ffc9fea07d98
46f575a69bdfbd48106a2dbea295c1d47c442f5d
describe
'34660' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a511706c04858d652030ede0bde8f42a
b5799a22a27509ea3c1079af4a65ca3722136d80
describe
'34662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
31a02dc2bdef53e2f3978d3525ca243e
1f88edfb0c953449e62c088ce40332e06da2ec60
'2011-11-14T19:09:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
591cef5ca4b25f03de418da9a98511f7
1ac3e1b07d925e81aea7bba311224f965f808ec5
'2011-11-14T19:05:58-05:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2502209f190de6f55304db0a4ff49462
856eecca466c8021125e3dbb73a4c4498403bc2c
'2011-11-14T19:12:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4d3bd28a7fa52c80b1b5810b3625326d
acfc89ba48b97aa81e99ab45d1d3e1ed0d6c6771
'2011-11-14T19:13:34-05:00'
describe
'357773' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
eb756ae2430cfe02f2e95ff090d30b8a
10d829e57423213192960b71e3d9b3c9dd0291be
describe
'115347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
a99f4c240b03a661fbb1f275c799c559
44c3ab4dd1b11f58c67c2a2d9b5738fea4348fbd
describe
'34889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
1bfbd8812b3017c0dd0ac1a1f6e46390
831794386b038957b36f756d3359733b0f9980a0
describe
'36840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
cf92e9c567b41acf51f7215f6c994de6
6c4dc57ccfa2ca31eb13871fcda1c04532cdc2d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4931a7a97b82095ee267ce5bc702e6c4
2b4f4c88dee288ae373c061d4996b053fb85a6e7
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
b2c54523098d02ec29147a99afe5baf5
16385732ee8bb4c95c2d2b159a5591e33bcf1165
'2011-11-14T19:13:11-05:00'
describe
'8718' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
a76063f7df4dff7fc020634b6de8785a
38f2a9b74254c79cb45a5d13add763266474b4d1
'2011-11-14T19:07:14-05:00'
describe
'360326' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a22fe4beaf5e921bfd18f5aaec298036
60c46a99afbb83db94c891265d898faa63201bbb
'2011-11-14T19:11:05-05:00'
describe
'74798' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
1f13bc6d57f0110f6b3cacbadc1a66f9
7cf8825d0344475ef26a7fe5d2449a09675d2f71
'2011-11-14T19:05:59-05:00'
describe
'2216' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
43c37478be16d128a31c5bbc5aac8fa8
f4ccb7ec44cc570607931057b52e695f8c98aaa2
describe
'18287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6ca5b569391b1baa7923ea054c4219a8
f91dcea064ae060852ccdeb0ec25cdece19e58e4
'2011-11-14T19:13:43-05:00'
describe
'2899856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
3f23a6649279b5e1eea9bbf4221301de
7db82abe28454acd28ff759adc91c8282cbb4346
'2011-11-14T19:08:51-05:00'
describe
'262' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
41ef9002a242be35ae621f5913bf0e0b
ada60f69de6170015c830a85139425a069e6cf00
describe
'4421' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
390f5b8609cfb7adc61814253771787e
faf62065d4b9a328044de1ddfa9f0d057d6b0f77
'2011-11-14T19:06:20-05:00'
describe
'357807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
9a1b7f7f17a299f0833db83a36aeba4e
db313f0adf91042294dcdb9ed4eb564affa33070
describe
'116045' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
10785a48e727fee83422c57188486c9e
f980eb2f8fe04290fa91376045741d7b65d7a34a
'2011-11-14T19:09:45-05:00'
describe
'35640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
1e8e89d79c16cd844968e9122f47f027
cc2155d7d1d1845b9d80b0a493eb59bea4662345
describe
'36018' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
dd762b2af62080bcbcaff5d4941edd5b
cf0a47ec912c5db6921e5e7b5febb3a226a74f55
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6cb3b22d04fd58d1c2775859674f3093
ff1d347a100c5e187ac6a5ea1ae9483ff02b937a
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
2b1295134c05307ceb9f7a7da11ae97a
e25a923f23580ed3d0aa324fed8ff4f917ece92f
'2011-11-14T19:08:43-05:00'
describe
'8677' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
97c1905d97211473b37f8f1e21e84f01
fe9302e59fd0412b8de016bdcadebc7ba9c8cfdc
describe
'357767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
39dfd3ae9e4fb373655afedecba574a4
c0233ef771c9ed636de817d361b4765b7d7d4073
'2011-11-14T19:06:55-05:00'
describe
'91359' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1ddedec50478991cb56182f178245662
3a7830fdf398064d300e959af1588283de2c374c
describe
'26609' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
b7924650c4e4e8bfd01d856c91a735db
8e842bbdb00d80362e130d776568dba355feba53
describe
'28226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a35592d39d1bb05c68143b97329258b0
4acab532c109f41c5c05ae691b60f17349c24553
describe
'2878928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
ba6c27139ddd0c96c8333a18e89157f1
d933929aac30649108894f22fff26b3c1f90b901
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
3cfc4cfa5574d474b77f6cddff356e42
69fc26688fbe5f46b954cdd956cec6ad413bee83
describe
'7102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
cd42433d344781ff564a98219a11299a
cc55ce8b166b9a37c23a05a90c9d043c845d3762
'2011-11-14T19:10:04-05:00'
describe
'357608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
754d06decc135d8e3cda3c8ded051d8b
63e74d2deb1da3fd2cfebfa903ef9c155bd144db
'2011-11-14T19:12:26-05:00'
describe
'89951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
21ade67fb31ed63fcb340da455fe5126
a5934a92c44b1fd0a096013d3fdf947492c10c5f
describe
'2633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
50578658410d9cfc97a26bc9ddb6ebca
42bfdee9570848b925d921c930537103dd8b349b
'2011-11-14T19:11:23-05:00'
describe
'19529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3ee4064ff3293011a86ba175c75de99f
b7755bdd0c1281bb6dcc241db76ebf7a12e62162
'2011-11-14T19:08:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4541dde98fa17c7ed3dd34ec5a362dbb
b5ad375a4fe028382ba7dfcc500108199333e043
'2011-11-14T19:11:18-05:00'
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8e46bd9d9779f7442a620bb3a14896e8
eaf8f48f0f14c7ffbcc729df833a0681afd43ab6
describe
Invalid character
'5038' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
f7172d8bf6dc927cfb9ac89dd085b9ab
a30302f7e9d74b710606d41e8b9596447ba89ec3
'2011-11-14T19:10:28-05:00'
describe
'357238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQG' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b3ba8a3bea29fe1503eabbdd708c65a3
794c09d8b2457cc1c240b29525098086e2f79f72
describe
'93156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQH' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
17cfeb6076ba9a6cc44c37a2f20a3ff4
56231b6d78a73332defd24800b5f443ac09b46ab
describe
'28401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c4bff2dd7e27ddeee96ff41f98a01681
da0596a0b8eca114ecce32daaa1936debb6ae5d1
'2011-11-14T19:08:12-05:00'
describe
'30293' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9ad145b67d6611b4773eb936d19ce69f
c5b5cff336f55fa479f61d293e162db85ec7df38
'2011-11-14T19:10:52-05:00'
describe
'2874424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
e97b3bdbb95a628420296fb386e7a48e
a1bdf0452e24c32875cdd1fe36c421d648d93730
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2c9c76fb17227d2b5192c5877879f554
409dcab2ab11955dd56bf90dc9e0a642fe80b3e7
describe
'7231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQM' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b38761de289ae9e2ba4c546f75a4310d
778b1f9adf0a865ca390126b82f16623105571fb
describe
'374864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
aca95d3ba9b5387528d662202cbba9da
782b10eb123af9ae7030a44e7121cd9c5c7ef48d
'2011-11-14T19:08:36-05:00'
describe
'104976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQO' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
3a1f17016a6799b6f167e3fbed0ac323
aa105c0068937f40abf66cd0798a59f7e358625f
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b99f1386a2b1b286b90cc3fb085a648b
88482243c020c5dddda7dad0d7f821285ced2a74
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
bdd89fcfb3d4af0b0df4739f71ab6b20
792f770d9f6842b23319a40676e8bbe2b99aa8d1
describe
'3015552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b3ee0ec40c8d4553849322fc88297940
e04473ddb641ee4c0441d11e7ed745366bc85193
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQS' 'sip-files00070.txt'
30984ab2270c8f9622ab5ebddcb994ce
2ca3643ad21ea8d9a4f065c23170f2b9313571ee
describe
'7767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
51fb8f44a1f230bb87bda5077995892d
12c657ac99e9d64cdbe9b2350c5a2fea3c5941c7
'2011-11-14T19:13:33-05:00'
describe
'354165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3a4daf39144120a90a494faed824806e
ff09c12ea4b2b65aedd7dbc68d62f7f3501fd46d
'2011-11-14T19:06:01-05:00'
describe
'130526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a43bff0227fbf3282ebabb9e24ecc996
8a183b1789c3ca4c6759f60e7b0f6bab5fe1a4ed
describe
'51284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
4f4d36a01f9d01c44ab0c961b828049d
6bb5862e87536cca9435b8130fda9eed9d78b8ee
describe
'36696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
cea15251204d7f504f333c2acd64d511
012735fa450d6fde951107a41a67e88707baac3c
'2011-11-14T19:08:10-05:00'
describe
'2850424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
fe5737eea15079f82967e345ab2fcd45
6bb6f17fb982deead619bd69a40aab09b34a9ff4
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d018d6fecf53d057996adfc4c59a7c39
30442b18d8e4cc2da4f977c3463929709c03e11d
describe
'8225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
42aa9c6e975c488c6817f7a0f5999fd6
c2656e25fb569befa43ba133d866cb059a049444
'2011-11-14T19:08:39-05:00'
describe
'357794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
e77037078628a1e3f935ccdeeb6d58ad
2f73e135b907cfd9ec30091ccee6367e88ffc2ed
'2011-11-14T19:08:53-05:00'
describe
'110586' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
64d9defd122d7e37094fb46685819f4a
d5931552f99665f2e7ff01577c98006c703914f3
describe
'39295' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRD' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c9652b01485cac73440b4178f9c3f526
424d69cc2951d1af645312a45d1861f0f39cafa6
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f92f59eb1d2b979c91ee8f5d5f2e248b
727cfa8aafe2fb9e02deab230353ca31eddaec26
'2011-11-14T19:13:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e5ff36a48202534bdf1857b67a61727a
1d7c41751883443157b8edb4c6b96e4d58a02a02
'2011-11-14T19:09:24-05:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
8c6e30a4cd280a3301e40f6e264878f6
a8f0aa54de4df69182088262095aca1e8a60715f
describe
'7997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e9dd47dfe75f56d50193d95a3d46afb5
38e7feb5297ab1d766f8febfdac52d16fe7a7fec
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
9ab1dbfb0c53d96f01a5baf3a3cd0377
bbb690dcddd4f8fb467d625500198aeeecbf9b73
describe
'157748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c0a21f3598e76ceae08f10ffe0bf9284
9a564714038d03c562d7c4b3dc5f6649c5f6276d
'2011-11-14T19:08:00-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
4b182ec2c7c08d1f0676ff6b2a09a06d
328626ac6a0c268f12e4e113afcf949052c7be3d
'2011-11-14T19:10:12-05:00'
describe
'36064' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
45b212774d1bc06292526eb10ad429fc
5bc5f6afdb9f7c7f2ae7ffdc043ce93a5a9ec277
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRM' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6393ada3838a2a71d437acee4d0c2d78
3ce4db4f8d0ef792b3f54220819b8622fd8b43a1
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRN' 'sip-files00073.txt'
cebe8c969f567800ef0de4b5171fcc51
26ee38095b427cad9787d73d3e7cd2023d43bc35
'2011-11-14T19:07:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8054' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRO' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
4b006d292260720db435015762cfe18e
c95fc901881f7d71bf73789ee03aca550dde354f
'2011-11-14T19:10:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
8a32753c2612e6f0e006db08d0d44533
640fa18209ce22b02c66d03cc5411fc5886f6356
describe
'147922' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
08b8abd8c5073bde060b8198a179352d
f1590bdad743f7b0c82ba2b183f90fb835540dee
describe
'54253' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e31a72fa76fff8d72584d7922600107a
921b16d1f97bfb2be0ceb98c35be6c1ba7614c9e
'2011-11-14T19:10:29-05:00'
describe
'42526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
369b4f099155849212d4846793926390
a6925c3b10563adbf45b3f66c79db09538c9237d
'2011-11-14T19:11:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
712c5929961f385a31b305d66294855e
05049525bb15e982eb4e1857aa17e0372a0e71cf
'2011-11-14T19:14:23-05:00'
describe
'2209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c40e7339009aaf37fb8295602fb72719
b8e3ded3f4af1d33fe767aa6817b96d9c73aa7d7
'2011-11-14T19:13:14-05:00'
describe
'9828' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
309336bd82071a82584d81e154911c1f
3d851ad5fe7ac461f151f952af0c4fe4ae27d9dc
describe
'372757' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
6a8dcc9cee2b681b1d6da7e40a6868d3
d59233805181de1388fbe0015cc457b6ee6fdab9
describe
'111268' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6324abb7347b35b27e4cbf1062713da3
705a275440df793779ea04eb57f4df5bbdc5f580
describe
'40680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
70228f319bfa32b671642585d0d81b9c
70aa23179476aade208aef5fa091b083f0ee24ff
'2011-11-14T19:08:40-05:00'
describe
'32257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
94672ee5cbc1e6ba6125b7ee7f6d3a57
6d4d71ca897a2571c91e7bf112a40863286309c7
'2011-11-14T19:12:55-05:00'
describe
'2998440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
a56d0f3a555c5d4ab683c8ce2557b06b
346b0c0250e078b0af7ae1afd80165b5bb15414d
'2011-11-14T19:13:42-05:00'
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
55c11c8b6d91f06175bea4bca1d5fea3
cdd21b2cf39d06be1d1751f8bd91fc516f1d72d6
describe
'7983' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b84fa2505c99c55d3601ba0c722f1c3f
50e291e07d33bcf962433b0de2c3da9bcfb371c9
'2011-11-14T19:08:55-05:00'
describe
'372529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
5ae61402068f62ed354586e338ff5bc0
25c20af0369bb4de3c4ebaf49a6d91f90949dd20
'2011-11-14T19:07:35-05:00'
describe
'55559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
2844e2319779a0ee52e7adb341ca621c
b0a7a81df3945a97dd4c255199c4e60dd2d6dafb
describe
'13643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSF' 'sip-files00077.pro'
3a9e34f43482a631ea090b9114690b32
ce8bf306e6dcb069af6f62b23ba4274b4cc23f8e
'2011-11-14T19:13:22-05:00'
describe
'16050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c4a3ea42fea816a29afcc651188ac013
c6160ebe83d7fd17907e1548727d71c3860b26f6
'2011-11-14T19:13:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
04b5157e8492c51d0fd10f475f89d511
3004ade20e53047d4d197d462611ad2c434ca164
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
fe4d16160962b9a9d439e7fb7aa37fd2
bd08db86f6a743b81a686503eeaa8f9b77182bf2
describe
'4046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
37981358e1348d581287298e6ee67b39
e0c641ca4c77bc20bce23eba18934c92987a5623
'2011-11-14T19:12:59-05:00'
describe
'372685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f8699ee40fe38e577a8e3539c8e913ff
d831df5c5cf7d7f6dfe23a28c15a34bb32928f0d
'2011-11-14T19:09:36-05:00'
describe
'96298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
2259c7098460f794b275fd3fabdb5418
768911b4cf103e2cae77fc8c65a04744fa2cfe39
'2011-11-14T19:06:23-05:00'
describe
'29022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
5b1f490b1a7141679d1cb385bdf9df2e
0a46880f3df74ce1bc6deffa65a18ebc251ee38e
'2011-11-14T19:14:01-05:00'
describe
'30009' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSN' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
c78b2b66173d6535a7c1449b2b544f3b
dfb49d31d7ac42755776771c278f883c1824721d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSO' 'sip-files00078.tif'
766042f080539f7b170c3406f7d800c4
cffdcff32519b99048e67b7a10c5a622e9df4879
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8e81c67b6fce4da7cea55edd3fdf3af0
36d4359cd535da5f020d8b2648c846ab41276a00
'2011-11-14T19:08:46-05:00'
describe
'6851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
45f5d1eff0b3a27c07d85e63def7d1b9
dd7ee6cfdf8b97a628d3715865a3c5c777de596f
'2011-11-14T19:06:26-05:00'
describe
'366345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
4a857eacefcb18ba25cfdd27d27c63ff
c9acc3dccd642007a7f9d50f8cc850063d0a6a19
describe
'110503' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
298d61c9f7d4d6a0d6af0a1ed4574ec2
d42457524b0ba560e973840e75001be5e3b2a4dd
'2011-11-14T19:10:21-05:00'
describe
'32711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWST' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9a0e6fd230b03175a5ccc227f512eead
473f86c86ce4ee4849465da07cbc299c6809095c
describe
'35552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
74f0234d93f69d428dadda8e5e8955aa
0a56f266b5f121a64fd371c91f68ed05c837ed47
'2011-11-14T19:13:44-05:00'
describe
'2947224' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
f782b1ef919d670c449d7ab3663c7526
c1e6d7e205a1db4ba5c8e51da59fcb033844bb26
'2011-11-14T19:14:20-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6585c9e6bdd369cd06e6839330e66862
ad1cda3ff9aa9eafd5e64d6ee0c3bc63ef01e703
'2011-11-14T19:11:55-05:00'
describe
'8640' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
de0a9dd66e18910341d85295c18fe2a3
649e479cc97e86692710354475762b8b63f7bba1
'2011-11-14T19:14:26-05:00'
describe
'369248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
50d830c1c8060b3af0eb2057e56a265a
320811603ed6f54ed6f0b544999e93da6d4ee13c
describe
'113437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
da526189c39b2267a9a96130a231faec
434320d0bab4b6ff8dbf23cce50d3b4f9320bf72
describe
'35574' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ceba7690103b5391cb00aefb93f7a6a1
c7acdb586357968bbc8f179bf398865d8e52b98c
describe
'34859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
c2ab8022f4203d6f7a43cbe46539ff1c
f9737cbdde812a0ee33d2660fcb25f9c75b858bd
'2011-11-14T19:06:35-05:00'
describe
'2970500' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4e81e4743029db1ee24db62c700908f4
a31d868710c208abd4b422b354462783d0690c4e
'2011-11-14T19:06:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b72164c80c211cbc192124545992769f
748b10c51338d0a0d1ba71d61732e6db87181196
'2011-11-14T19:06:16-05:00'
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTE' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
015a2936bc78441b39411dd69986589f
7668613c4d5e5cf7b3549462d9ea45b85eafc65a
'2011-11-14T19:06:43-05:00'
describe
'372733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
f53a10c1e208b1856c7a773640069a61
808a800ffb0df0787d5860641c1c58e3d18530aa
describe
'116667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7168d810eda5fb51eecb7965c8b0ba52
4d2e7d9c8e2cc3efda4f9687b1c96e126e904d15
'2011-11-14T19:06:08-05:00'
describe
'35955' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4bc393070f6f6d9e62943e04b1dd18c4
440bb3bb3531b094304a47a6e97f3b1ac8155129
'2011-11-14T19:07:40-05:00'
describe
'36415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
d3df9fe168a192c3767324514d4d0cce
941efcf571e007eb695282f80f504b3551171abf
'2011-11-14T19:08:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
5a0a51fe3bc964f13551801c864090ec
44635ebd23b48f14d3e03354885a265f21e002fb
'2011-11-14T19:06:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
27ac8c5072c0a68798f5135de7376790
1d83112c4fd70c2a5336dbb917491a6b69be1935
describe
'8332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTL' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
255784b04e103b86091d347c77092b91
4d4e8be2b420d267d10112aa9ad9a83015354135
'2011-11-14T19:12:36-05:00'
describe
'372760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c289ada61834436e99796893c43c5392
ea40ae12550dcdb615cb596b36e728fc28d6af78
describe
'112696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTN' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
b637605f540c472062a35cc686d46d5e
88c205c8c66c5ca91d43d615150af3b2eeac5f75
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6a5c183e2b92e82c8170c5a61b8f4551
3ab2d7a07581bc80e9d10b56a3846c01abd8e5bc
describe
'34623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
42401e62d78be657583f993de189f470
5cfa94def4d14c7d8dc3e145b205a9a2e88ede94
'2011-11-14T19:09:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
87e3e1b4b1776d7bd019da265d961927
c76b8cb3c8117dd0e677cce9dc312e4c92229ca3
'2011-11-14T19:09:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
1ec04c2bafb802ef3ffa84982eb810d1
2bb9864fcd8587083f8b02eee8a137d763ae0de1
describe
'8369' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ef212b00ebaf0e49930d42c4e4ea2246
75656212639c36f8ab4d675f4c69c30320ab4ecd
'2011-11-14T19:07:56-05:00'
describe
'372711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTT' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
e65dd32d442da284b95a2f9ec65d810f
8fa64ecb1367e70cc7c28db3d50ff15fc1a632c5
'2011-11-14T19:06:27-05:00'
describe
'116438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTU' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a741fd20cd98c885dbf446d98104b4ba
daab0d2a9da12de22cff796e8548946c58a10393
describe
'34524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4d0d78d8af5f695caf26be38c9bcd2e2
5bf87106573ef7848363fa4113df4a92c8721959
describe
'35191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTW' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
3e90325873db3de831111c3d3173141e
670b034759f100feef614260d8a2d7f79bf99635
'2011-11-14T19:10:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTX' 'sip-files00083.tif'
00ead1e3dc38a2626c463bf78aeb745d
fa6fc79cf0f4d3eb1a0036c97f62ef3ddc71d99b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
02703b8422b92c93554aaa38b7cbd6de
389a432b30a1769d11a62cda21b7e2ce13213e46
describe
'8135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
abff67e80f3bef8fb70cd59531615b72
bb83afe0accb881c9f0d05b2db88ca6e84fd0e7d
'2011-11-14T19:07:04-05:00'
describe
'372731' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a6717368050f2faff14f03c6aa32e02e
b86b5072d7c2fd7da000033faf007f886e4acd58
describe
'120944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a867fcdc5fd48d4d84b9e8a13774e840
d474b8d6f759046f5c03f91e489a7581de8737ab
describe
'37681' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUC' 'sip-files00084.pro'
29b72383e20da5f29c62fdcc072ff2ac
2067056ff67f2bb2f9621cf1763ae559ca45c1d1
describe
'37277' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
61ec97fe075c9aae8c9a9b6b631ce0c1
4203c418e7e91da74860de52baf69506410fbe31
'2011-11-14T19:11:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUE' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e02e97e77e4f94680e251163eafab573
1260862a2f5a5cfcbdd0df18c997287ee6c9c55a
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
b11eea404c27b9edcfd18898fafb639b
f7d308eeab416597a4b26e3eea4bda94008b37a7
describe
'8630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
cce31409a79ab519ad8b7bef1d788eb8
76773b8c5827fa262fddeb3a1e01f3549f066284
describe
'372748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
02b5ddb9c0d2cb34df317182177fd02d
bd4d0180e1d39879eff45ea851fcfea562d72580
describe
'92874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUI' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
b2076d2471156c252b8f220ffa7bde99
77ff7765fdb3334f7bb27a895a00c4a65fe727ec
describe
'17593' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0f1ab72fec6116ab8ac4b0c5d218cde8
03f02343cb610761fddf1a7bba9427e019c01a68
describe
'26272' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
25e8574156505d8ed04636348fed3f93
02491e3f0fa868617ff63918b40b2c4012a85bea
'2011-11-14T19:11:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f4596eb6ffe159b2c505f2a2befe9a47
e90c9742d1007ca71f76b1abf6f5ac0afee480c1
describe
'709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b7d55d53d94a843ca63c5715fad366ab
23aa8810b7b94a115a23ed0fa2aa2dd74d8bbfe1
'2011-11-14T19:08:41-05:00'
describe
'6883' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
4c3b45fb0a33efc6e794b6f0c22e8896
b16209430f02511c8f8805d34b064a7bde9271f9
describe
'372713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
3c86e04f0c5ad0ba247dcdaa189ab2aa
e50599c724b840beb093df988155571dc10ac353
describe
'117324' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
70bd6c54a401406ede12fba193186f5d
ea36b6e4261b40aaeef44f7fe11522561a56c376
'2011-11-14T19:09:16-05:00'
describe
'36878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUQ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
9c590bafc374ebc674de39ac13c2538a
fabec5b23fafe7f2f935b866e665c6c1687218fc
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
6f78d3c09a160296e89c1dde3bc22bb0
61e173bb8a4e246801c4e70a94585a3ce6b7c6ba
'2011-11-14T19:09:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8882acfede2f1a2be53b3c8249786d50
1a031d03cd2cdacb778ec00c245054a494489976
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
521b6fad6557daca029acab23015e90d
0c4a3e57d1140ee633d8e6459714c937fcd70f0b
describe
'8670' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
cec526b76c07346b40640c642de1c029
7430dbcec6cbfd9662ac499eb6c3bd6b10bd5b87
'2011-11-14T19:08:08-05:00'
describe
'372718' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
415484478acd84b71502a90738f94f71
206569193cb52373a3d5042f4a648e9e66e6415a
describe
'116607' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9ca075e5b4062e19006b1658ed433e47
d993d0334edbd133db9295cff0d700e63a5bae48
'2011-11-14T19:14:36-05:00'
describe
'35459' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
d899a591061ced41d4649efebac77200
78820f89c7a0c7c2865885a55e8c98b35028efd9
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
341c93928b0fd56d04756984a2a93d77
8ba55cf8a09cdae9713c8abb9938046b2530c78e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
ae1665b28d8ca4349c8f4a3bea767e85
84bdee6352df6bd2578f7c995b9ed7b5abbd7d40
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
91773d972109f0cc0a9b5d4ef29d99b0
aa1e5a087efcbc259081cd265e0f8694292b0665
describe
'8722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVB' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
708070d7fcb39480170314d684d307be
abd4b68e7c6d3b168dd6fcd86f29daa252694144
describe
'372755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
169402aebb301c7f3e9058e6ff8f2fa9
8ab3f0327009862851118455ab785554d77a7f80
describe
'119559' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVD' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
e37829795e70e60e82b7c889bc8de976
c8f59efeab1f1049571c2d4b2fda020cdd15e3e8
'2011-11-14T19:14:10-05:00'
describe
'37007' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVE' 'sip-files00088.pro'
3e1cad2d19fde1d07592d9172fcd8f0e
308cea2b845d8f971d018af915df121ce354eae2
'2011-11-14T19:14:40-05:00'
describe
'36633' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
b6c4bf8d2f16e9056e24fe324817ad12
7d1f0ba9255f184c75be028ccac48ed41761f447
'2011-11-14T19:10:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
60e5dc49ddddba9dcf02b132fed70674
a014af12985e4abb48a1bd4aa5ef7aae94582151
'2011-11-14T19:10:19-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
7499c655a97d99174f2b5cb69d5a85e7
5aef57dcd3be4f441feef194e5463f2f0b7c9ed3
describe
'8849' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
6b72bbfdb05dde237470d63e354dccfc
17f00e5e9b6b1af0979bb8821605ffd369d76e62
describe
'372738' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
dc26c103b5ac327d483776d498fba657
04a9138ea7281bbec00125b6619c36d2b154f84d
'2011-11-14T19:11:53-05:00'
describe
'61306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1d77083f317e31a0c8556a0b9470f857
0c108fc44239dfa2d46ba10cefdcd1205cca7cd2
describe
'16197' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
2056ddd53b179de8fc05e9dde6ddc6ef
543771661adf0d2924b06f2a4cfb1affec19394e
describe
'19377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ea243e8cc54ee9ef5133f3c8b2e2be49
9d9144b6819b55310cf0c093af60ac14a17347d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2f1ff21b0f1cf1815da4aa0b81bec945
5548e24cb4bd1711cd1305a596e3076603a8d042
describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
65bbb952e42fd8a0559413ef0d5cbfbf
30ec30010d8795e438d339e5dc3f58b4a0544efa
describe
'4532' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
6baf6b036ad4cc212bb82362ed56b630
d18fe2cfbbeeeb33e925e7055bb2238c317edbd3
describe
'372756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
152e01659e4ae8161acd8f4a71147b0f
61075c51347a42636a6b9a375aeb96a180f507df
'2011-11-14T19:09:43-05:00'
describe
'98233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
164f76bbfe051598a5e62286b2a17f45
5f79b82b6630acef97a0c2d6a72a3258ebde62d6
describe
'29427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
4d5b16f5eae77920c1b181d16cfbe430
3b1c2c0bbfa6e37b65678917d56a8f72999ce9f8
describe
'30701' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
203fa98c3113aa3f1f9e35b205126bbc
a65f5dca44baec1ee3920ba81aa1df3cf753009d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
7ac1dfde7d13243f10cdf460428f1b17
04a1d552dfb8aad2664c49d45c43a8031bd5c51f
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
2c278acce1971d4811f4a4b9118a40c1
718182b4ac955e0740f2107934bd016587b6a4c9
describe
'7406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
80d5a06b7eb49ffcfc75bf27667e5339
d51ce55d76f27cb51fb5bbf8fee9074455ba8046
describe
'372749' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
f36ddd61af7ccb91bda23190193705dc
fbfa277b9aaee3ccb7ab6cac1071a08280102120
'2011-11-14T19:09:44-05:00'
describe
'94164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8550ca2b796014b522e2cb4654517f82
3dea6733822eaef1eb79a7fb3f03ee3435689c51
'2011-11-14T19:11:24-05:00'
describe
'26937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
8a8ddf584c57d80863fccd3e81743383
c449c7558057e168d1f3077e66d16afe80bd9549
describe
'28736' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
2e8c8121710f4c64485b778a03cbe5a8
d5b87e4e314474e3c16cb913c5ce86276599d943
'2011-11-14T19:11:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1ccc66ee537ebd26679a54722ec153e5
d4d63622601f4513ae80933e9044ee299e598372
'2011-11-14T19:12:19-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
8bdd18997724ba1bd9a677fdcb3a0b5b
095df6f3d47d92aaef587c4f2e3a5d29d109e051
'2011-11-14T19:11:32-05:00'
describe
'7107' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
988ac2ecfe92ef39dd1bae72fe344637
306d06c1f0ff819484914217d32419ca03e2e03f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
0fbc9afacf6504c44b3108dc655fadf3
7698023b16f6cabf395dc2e9e505f6a2a7a05ad8
'2011-11-14T19:13:52-05:00'
describe
'103620' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
16c3121165c4a5456d3b340bd0712d45
b346de0ccb8706ae2848de174cdeb5718df9ed28
'2011-11-14T19:07:06-05:00'
describe
'32434' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
88adbc880a8994c6e1d42d683e2a0ee3
bf71520601d08580cd2d698ab0d3c89ba2c1e345
describe
'32777' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
6ba1c0a9f5ea288e4a6582db54cd8b52
e6d57beedfa7fa392f22101a14c4e9a6d5c43154
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
0764940d620bf2c780f6f1db2fdbc7f0
34400d2f7d758e384f3034460fcff09eba2b7ba6
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
694309f11b9017df5334476fd7aacf89
c574fb258bbbb3963bd9adfb3464eaaf9d92cef6
'2011-11-14T19:13:27-05:00'
describe
'8072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
f44c2c518cb71f7089ced857bcaf591b
2a24872db23a1369a9129bf35d2e40ed8697c5d9
describe
'372746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
4e73cbc3ba1e65861e9c7f75482893d2
3a54be101c1cd632b8fedc5dcc3da1842ad8f63f
'2011-11-14T19:12:13-05:00'
describe
'117737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
22c4cb5c9889f757ce588d2b215991d4
272f7e9e894289f19227c8bea852f8b4b350fd6c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
aea53a2071aa82625ba313f59d359999
4440590c5f4bb5fd85ba9dbc46ee43d2c6e9ff6f
describe
'36514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
544a57e061b1b5ac9339f0f21f627329
2bb9029979c9c9bbef8b60c9ff618b591573e16f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1016cffa84651061c41dfe6cf18b8a45
f25ce732b97151646f50a142765ca98cb3b4d850
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
024540ffd0da4fea3a6a9c4559b15b53
b986b9707c4d07f5eadca06993088f91bcf6da66
'2011-11-14T19:07:15-05:00'
describe
'8455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
45b1fd0fa4ead1e6ec66243c623adc8c
87d6ff4ee4b2f5170a45a112f1fcf8a5e54bafde
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
32d08e245d0cf0e1dc52439ef64797fd
d905a44b9068bc30d59a0b5e57ba3c245b1cc6d8
describe
'116762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
974bc75ad85e40288f3febe7b99928ee
c62427b784c177b855b31e21111e08f458b5f4d0
'2011-11-14T19:06:41-05:00'
describe
'35136' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
4df780608a454973893359d04cc7ee82
89e0980f2597efc3cdb4075c86e8a0bd1bd27b2a
describe
'35994' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
19bf6fd3201f8728460db043512ecb8b
c982e38a269f50453e0a2aa35fc7a17ca6a8c13c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
e6d1e74206548b7aa7c956b3c22623a6
ca8cea9c06b7431eebf3630f5686f6dd596ecf8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
250e647845be621f72ee177a5f8e8f98
e8704975b648b2f90fb35f33469749889ba62bed
describe
'8702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
bb693bca6b32af469014c3c5cc2931b9
322faaef9ecf4e050adb630a0f102c036b7f3688
'2011-11-14T19:14:28-05:00'
describe
'367414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
633968fc55362c7850afd68e381b5557
701166cd39fa571e2787859b2b3a045c804d91b3
describe
'123416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2caff00ed9f3263a54facc517ba1b389
a94d92d8fe7afea9f98172018a267a483aab29c4
'2011-11-14T19:08:17-05:00'
describe
'35933' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
fc0972b8c5d886affa074b0fc0e88bac
e5607d49b8cb992d32edd11392e4310d050635e9
describe
'37137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
65dc6791d880cf41b50ca4c1f3d96532
82f6756bd88b8b58e5a27246fe2dbf543298c9e1
'2011-11-14T19:10:39-05:00'
describe
'2955752' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
3d77a8b39569915fa755cd80531ef3cb
35e430d511e9ea8d3856d89bbd71570134e94899
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
2bf5e48611430f7b4f5cdf03ef6c993d
6186930d0236a75801fd54a374136051e06f03f3
describe
'8762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
e43d10c6673dd5b1a2995e7ccd9a8067
14ea160091e3f8bb7d61c4bcf42519596cbd1838
describe
'372726' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
60fcdb63e70b787986746fe6fe155393
3dfde2e7420cd88f003f22bc9bfbc8e433c48d67
describe
'64298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
46682bcc94e18aa5625ebd8a79018978
454c052647e7da8f4c9ddaa99c8044a7354be7c6
'2011-11-14T19:10:43-05:00'
describe
'17330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e1cfa87615db1da541ce38e885f2dba2
8bfa4348859d413a1890c142098fbd12267553f8
'2011-11-14T19:12:11-05:00'
describe
'19838' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
c78cabf8e683ba75e0f9630427ee4171
d9d383546e41136f33f1911f4c068fa07b4f6b45
'2011-11-14T19:09:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
68c2381247f698bbd90a00d9ed8a1d84
3674b58b4276c6f37456c0be5a468dab0f0e9169
describe
'694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4abd648bb7cec5748cd3f4414db943f3
6fdc44ce4fc2849c5c726086b6e03a6db8ad51d8
'2011-11-14T19:11:01-05:00'
describe
'4887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
feeca35435274074f039d59451c26988
efbbe10653e51bcddee7b2ddf37222082a81dd24
'2011-11-14T19:09:33-05:00'
describe
'372750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
e109312bb8983c4505aba6d4a66d7738
8e1c0c2190eefa3622e7ec38a963bdd79c59b291
describe
'100966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
070ef14e7d66ee326c68954fbc385e8c
2e4062577b870056adcdade1c3fd851203579935
describe
'29658' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
d2391e8333be1cd6849093296cb4cbd3
8829b0623cc21653d0da7b24600a82479c36cb01
describe
'30967' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
f4e2b904b52aa1ca6db397b5f1b67235
99348334b137a924e9ef13a44174ae2113fef3eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
2eb19495f90cf8e8d49d6450bef27626
969eb082090f537c3e3b3d33cb1a2505dd79e26c
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
bea0339dcd48154114cc2e8322039dbd
806ff01726e5eef44eb412214af26a8ce17293fe
describe
'7868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e56fd7c95a7fd28a667228729a8e05ed
1d579a186a81476ab414a158af44242efffa298b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
9867efac60e7d243151140afe33c9b7c
75e64d5bdf07f9b9f35da1b8df9a6d22c7c8cc01
'2011-11-14T19:06:42-05:00'
describe
'112139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4405ad83e2cd61c914b420ddcf13d23e
44625d3337c16799c8babfe2b04394edbfe0985f
describe
'34123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
c992fe5e59bb23a9770372d455d40704
24e4ad7abdcb76f7beeb7748e8115601aec245db
describe
'35339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
bc9134a6eadb3e38e78a1295446354e7
0e14a888112db7f205ff73584ebaf525a46db624
'2011-11-14T19:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
89a5b16674da5c08d17ea842e707f585
a98665f8ebc2b8e2d3e93d3fd2e4b9e422b2e0a8
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWXZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
a63031d92e2a928f9caa6cfc52d437f5
80c76ac8bd90c8d329c7f94f3322f80589cbf024
describe
'8529' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
01c131a6fb694c733fa5d0cea9bf81c5
809ac1550e53db96ef83cbf7f029b4ade62f8d78
'2011-11-14T19:09:40-05:00'
describe
'376129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
0deb519fd306e0a5b79c5ab74c511d4d
767737c2b73a830a10a08cd40558ba36a08967ff
'2011-11-14T19:06:56-05:00'
describe
'89761' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
8041084e412e74d188539ae532b692d0
4892dc9b035d978aa8a992fae4ab16176b8ea302
describe
'3242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
dea5ebb6db338209fa048d4cb824517b
d7dc6f94f459212837479a06b1a8c68cf82fc6ec
describe
'21011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
3ade415906cd572c8a7a246874640e23
4adb3b445a77aa2b11d585939fe31eba841a51cc
'2011-11-14T19:13:20-05:00'
describe
'3025840' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
db748487383aa5f7e287466dc8820047
5e196a91fcb75d053d6f0ed79f28701b421ed358
'2011-11-14T19:12:32-05:00'
describe
'226' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
de5bb0334a5b61672ec1b2b625f40f72
6a8d935721cf938921067902e5aac22f3115de09
'2011-11-14T19:06:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5019' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
d5bb3fef40cbf290e57539cbb405ee32
b93e8fcb6b6654e3ec1513691e2697a2b5cbcf63
describe
'372720' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
da4fa729541ca81ab4aad54dd6d7ed79
eba794770f310a4758260a1d57d0d3fc0a3566b0
describe
'123281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
1264c35789f68938acf29b00cb20be1c
e26334d90833f5b2611b749dfa03dae555fabe0b
describe
'37125' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
75e4bcd658ea14080a3b7566d2345468
0755fd91ac94fd9d244727e0be6e73fab2e85343
describe
'38362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c013d90196d96ae78b71ad4b7e412b27
a5186f143e24bc43d076b9e40364fb799b18199e
'2011-11-14T19:09:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
0c75411ee8247c9b82d4027be11902a4
8055091ebb7fbc2b1230bd3708441952e996c8e6
'2011-11-14T19:14:02-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
e845c5cb23b0b857455fb0c32faa50c5
d89f094ece87745f59b9967a71755cbc945b2bd8
describe
'9048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
01e324e4f4ee4bda4428996b9ac5b557
132a691b18b6b5fd4b3a776e802ae39a867f416e
'2011-11-14T19:11:47-05:00'
describe
'372703' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
3af8116e206b875591e9c36f4a64b808
d5c6b67150224e2197f17f8d93535bde5b22f265
describe
'113373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
6093fc9f40687d19346b2e61acd02016
d378d6152936bdf7b0196a7361fb5cab42d8fb71
'2011-11-14T19:07:45-05:00'
describe
'34089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
5bdbb6157970b224a43729388677a7b2
471422be91dd89b1b87bf0f897eaff2135159221
describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
e96b3d962d7b74339662d5ebcddd3567
62c1af6bff8a6996b73def66b2b32044d49b054b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
26285768c485e98d7f2a5728c5661d24
bd2e45b338f481ab421e433d72c1c70bc2428d83
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
0ac024dc2f30629d06433dddbe8b5612
cbbab74f064fcaf705848794ab5951b9a9fb02e3
describe
'8380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1dd2c3b2a65357eb528383c3a26389b6
83a3769ff349857c58f4d916a9f731220e68881b
describe
'372722' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cec86c4f4f28d1a3a55f01fa80a5e872
7d09f7ddc8c7ce4d7607d8cf68e9a56b5c269bc2
describe
'118097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6381e6d5a41cf5553743fe0eb11806b3
3866396f86b9ec0ed97a7a7668c0ab508798ad28
describe
'35424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ea0c505c1cf360a5d4572f78c92f24ca
223b5d74687a6dabeb7d4601b8660e95ef1c18a6
'2011-11-14T19:10:16-05:00'
describe
'36237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWYZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d99f7c5e2169dc478244c228276f0e80
2a311de38dfed280d4a6d2fd20d63bddf520475a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d42701df829bbb16b82144702a078031
a0d2df6f8a90f867862de7d1304a8718cc99e2c2
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1b372cf6045a1b6c57d3eb484e59f8f0
cc4fc7006631dc72e6570f622aa70d865d7a0e69
'2011-11-14T19:06:30-05:00'
describe
'8428' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2986db8c48ba280814f3c76c7d2d1018
73ec4efe862aafa39e5e03ef0b17575d55f72e98
'2011-11-14T19:12:43-05:00'
describe
'372723' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
7a40b934bbae778194c169aa36a783ed
0e2e0af76b6b7ddd2d57df660395b2b4dfefe931
describe
'102284' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
9a89a878f7cbd7985b8e91105812cb75
0270559a824371cabd698d8957ab4a9b63386b6e
'2011-11-14T19:11:31-05:00'
describe
'31418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
3b3a50e80e61e6e78d51e971eb918bd3
6feecf0dde0e116126b396e093f4ae2fd416402c
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
6857976f713564cc01e9a9c249737e98
bb8c8dc7bdb14a133e43cbdf9fc110a4e29bee82
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b9dff96adc275f2deb8ad62f943867b3
bb8f268d69cd8337e4c25a58f9a6d4ff58cfd486
'2011-11-14T19:13:56-05:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5ad393c4c1339fd3806247702f181611
f75b5487d37807ac366756c19d84851f86f08253
describe
'8450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
90622b83ff1e36a285ba6e0b74579b7d
4410f7491c7340a4dfd203a3b7059990393b7e91
'2011-11-14T19:13:07-05:00'
describe
'372716' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
24e92daf7da41b252a58678f95a3c0c0
a72f33f4905d0f8043108bbcec5c7eed424a8af3
'2011-11-14T19:13:00-05:00'
describe
'118187' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
002e4419691ee4546edbb1d0c79b93e5
97645a8ef6d0e62daf7f77375b3c4b070856c1ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
a46e2ea362c456d54b5df626904e5302
be045bc067c5f6a900b38e66afd387d5533a6e5e
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
194c39d58623ebb4c28a4afc2cd9d5d9
9546b703370e5dc8e32c305dc419de1d4ad2c8fa
'2011-11-14T19:08:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c4e1f838e70bb81dcf7c46531ece18ee
a839bb10208b4c53922e6d3031214ae6e6c4488a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
00d8ec3e3a775990b0c10cbe62bb3e62
8afbd190ebd2c0b4bbeb4d6e7f9a5ebad60d01fb
describe
'8507' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
3686ef83d90b9289719fc057dbd51702
b5271be36edc79a7887fb4dd408905c5813939a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1719afb3b08c2e9e5ec0ed9d2592aa64
d17ba964bd94610d90a665372f516b91a39c65cd
describe
'118310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
b0de3715279a16843d878154b6201c15
f6f35c6b071d1d5f9928eac250ccc1b16251b022
describe
'36149' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
adf68f7568162166cadc0f0b7b91c8d2
807e48b53af76b5d295f4c14290c4dde14dafaf8
'2011-11-14T19:10:38-05:00'
describe
'36031' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
53c3c9e2de438cd34c0968ff5a0bf6cd
22c35e71b46877e9fb897e3237ebf540ce2cccfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b35962ce9c4018a4c4341e95c566dd95
3b8862ed11fb23012c2a5a7d14002a571c08cf8c
'2011-11-14T19:09:39-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5f19653d87ed02f56f545d41d376e46e
c2733f57c42c2174a2f76f3ffe74d30701512224
describe
'8709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
a873d13151e543de1f430bda1cb6e8e9
d9eab1fda34a95f4ca4ff5b7de7b085f4fed4a46
describe
'372742' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
fd7e1051ddf945791bb740d90ebb6116
bb57b51f9f1cc46e4679d44865cccb9bd9248375
describe
'116874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABWZZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
6a0dfd1c271358037032f72ef7623a18
601736f1b14707f096dacfbe362d028ca7c07e2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
33d58217769adb30d6928cf5672b8b42
a484ab4d49f44c41299e43e162846353d824684a
describe
'35305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
00eaa02c52e308819c458a2b63df81ad
9f9f7064cfa81023171715d2746cf4bfb7d829c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
dc4e3ff3a3fc8b002581d424b4882639
74f19f11e562c6dd86cdaf3586c76df55331cbc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
82a78e34e377f9483655a11f194a211d
b78a7d66b25f4e2af5b629be03d905ce1f0f7be8
describe
'8741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
6ae23372422f8e092740d92d24d168b8
0c6571476565dcadcf514e30dd3a0bafa50fe7b3
'2011-11-14T19:09:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4ca9f1770dd1dc7529b8469821c9fe9c
c53f0d1433e750bcfb5cdf872f3fa995a833467e
describe
'54882' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9521fc2c44158aa931c97668e234c00b
1b613435eb98e10a326a4923a2a0835db0e968cc
describe
'13087' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
293c7d3598b93e5e83086e60d3999b8c
cdbec6aedf6c7d8620655b47dd214491cc6e2700
describe
'16446' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
fa7351850a96aab054bcb52be6f0d070
459ec473fcaef7c0e66abccd0db4df4f3fc6f307
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
8ac9256e6e62fd6fab6187a6a98b0392
97fe462c303b9e34656326fa875718c1c284b808
describe
'522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3e741c12a4ff6d60199b45ce6642e3be
cbb9ad03e8e743fe492e153a201a0ddd06512d4c
describe
'4091' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
50d97af1fd105ff5f7c374fb77647b20
5186038bb157330de08edbb85fbde52083d52d2b
describe
'372758' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
e0fd807de3bafcdb075706b86a8ecce2
73285dd21005741c3096bd98747376293a2fff31
'2011-11-14T19:08:54-05:00'
describe
'96888' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
bc561636a0ecc7be9eabdd1b611c7ef3
c47d313635840dbfcaf335101ec45f230ff592ad
describe
'28209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
2c78fdbb7af267db1a7e99a0ffcb0d84
34fda404b8226b90664df8075f113db7b239e999
describe
'29629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
f08566868aecfaccca842cf71708f0eb
495b0e9adaed9162229ef5b8c7b1d05622f3bec2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c26ac1f0ddea94a3dc3f455bdf6d3837
072b214bd8dfbd04d71082c950532d36d409e8b4
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
e924398640effe88fdac335d182e63b4
109c539498e1f585ff551f718e8df94af652fc3b
describe
'6974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b83745109b824e030146674f25ed56e8
7fe71c6ad336b9542348cd8afbcd36f4a6d739ed
describe
'365281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
da05251b67e96170b256db9bfe2ba542
92689d26dd73a2c5ae392e1f666c0117cc599dae
describe
'117331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
74d9248450bb6f8c0b48f2873d369294
6f5b99d5c0c7131d941712f62d8899843966960a
describe
'43017' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
286565564fa8fafedc3be1043beca453
df0f6870039f75de37e6d7cd0bc47851b63fdbcc
describe
'34984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8112c5079b5fde7cdf637c8ab2b0692f
364c20431f6c064b779ef605ed0438e8dc8160a0
describe
'2938688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
43919b4405b0080dd4642bc9f5ed5549
eea07610c5b8e173fde43bd357e1d3be3a5d6c97
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
7a8c6923bb608c45370d3b8dc6adda90
3e52d5f8f48302bc8522fba9a1d4d4b72b8f5737
describe
'8040' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXAZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
967667819b9b60f1708b2dadcb7252d7
f90e4e0fd8f326e65c4355e7f4c60607bc04a2e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2f7c6caa907113ed47522552dca04546
a206395318948aeed5adf88d5c7c4dc9ccc810d8
describe
'120964' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
efc869acea9043ef3adb73a72301775c
d437dc2858423d00abee46c1568acb8b9da7d6f0
describe
'43287' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
58b43b97f93480eff11db71905fedc46
ed155b2ff14559f44d69ebf8e32037de5d3efb44
describe
'35016' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBD' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
bf47de9a4ae134c41ceb18bffeef88b3
45f4862e538b0e6babb89139907f8434707f460b
'2011-11-14T19:07:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
d045bd415f048315e8e497ba7a497b9a
bc16f1e0ffc0c51114e707b7d73a1fac85a315c1
'2011-11-14T19:08:59-05:00'
describe
'1785' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
f4792bbe9933e262489a09118206d5d3
b9e47171e329f5bb1ac531f0462e824a4a65de2e
describe
'8187' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
52dbd429ec38107db1deb04ef39da1ce
a41a9da1e4c438e93241559cba817b1a57338060
'2011-11-14T19:06:59-05:00'
describe
'367231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
077b380b37bf5650a98512a479b238d0
4c00c713f750365d18c7af149d9c36242a21470d
describe
'54564' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
6ea1d344cffc95ebc31fb04c27fedbae
e1c3ef80bc9900a5b604a985a81544254a4686af
'2011-11-14T19:07:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
b3b5d4309f78ef933cf900c079a25f61
7a31925110b97a9a62461fe9a8ec540d411b0f12
describe
'15445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
780efb22eec9efef3acfcb661ed7e8bc
b84b52ed3a7dca299c1253c4a5dc585a907e23cc
describe
'2955760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
215583e235c6a04916ef5a6c8a4c04ab
9a98738260ba27521e6474f3df0dafdf1ca477ea
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
44061650d8db7e22c677a58caa37abcb
46f67aae6305c4ffd8447369d438fc41265e114e
describe
'4076' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
461ba8b04b9573f889eb1bbc7f642635
18870316c5458cbf551997b72243e05a608b4875
'2011-11-14T19:11:25-05:00'
describe
'368046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b491de28c2b5ea19503a12809fd8f2bd
72d574d39c07789dbe099d489edefee84a9e1695
'2011-11-14T19:12:58-05:00'
describe
'74346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
dba1ec3d463e83d3029a8cba17807eca
2468388f4a4b41ef421baf2039845d1be3bdc883
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
018730dbab8d9459d87bbfdb3633a49b
5df513b970a78a85af9649a26254e61cee1ef638
describe
'18259' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
dd10aaae1cd6a6e830a45711a81823b6
79085d5df7990524fd24f9c983ee90da5ecada8d
describe
'2963128' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
aaf6ae689f937bfed834bac617f7da62
020c1b06eea678a0bb422ca7cb9105e807a50d3a
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4652585709ad4587d19ece7bb9f48235
b2f3d1e3d259d14353d8d774e7ec3e0e01c0688a
describe
'4517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
98f6d83812067243622cc0cb2e7a4422
31c5d5764a6542543543c3911e4c665eb135787d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBV' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
7c4403214012419337ba9cf2a0d05811
f56031b689f55cbe7e9358bc09e4df417539fea6
describe
'93102' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBW' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
cc187c3a8b4a9e15b37722d3da2f2329
950955c230615840d6e53e953f9a2206ffbbbf37
describe
'25415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBX' 'sip-files00115.pro'
cccaf96e6980fbbe76e6ddf64ec0852e
958cb83d18cc0f3c70701ffb0b9cbba6d9b9e26f
describe
'28429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBY' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
eb0401dae6cf5709ad8a90d4a732e438
39a9263ce8295687979da10682a16b327fff5729
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXBZ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
0b1b8825527b89101289f456ec296bd5
c05c955aa37e181d954cd0a2fcf4d3b4cde4dbd8
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCA' 'sip-files00115.txt'
b3d1e2a501e35be55fbc5bb7adcf6402
0fa6a1a4a91ac7beef46a72a1dfc1578e6cc4b9e
describe
'7039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCB' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c0d92ccfc38c68ebb9e988d49e22f781
2c9ee970ee380d5032edf37b2af9d70e4c90782f
describe
'365997' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCC' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c008fa44cb5e7ec45316ed8e8cd87c02
29dfa00b2f6e05191f427a2efb8fa89fd01745ac
describe
'109011' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCD' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
0d060b322a7ef5682f14b7b2306e07ae
e2ba2dad274f279d0a166b3382418c6b5903433d
describe
'32835' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCE' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f344be567cbdfb5c439ecdaea73b0071
59942f85adfec3e7af517baebf34419ca7d1daaf
describe
'33163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCF' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
ca76751b6b6bb53e8d6f5ad022e47caa
76791688d4c7bbfc5f857b4bb8999923192a6701
describe
'2945132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCG' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0b867768b0214cb557f57761024c8a52
4fe18f3ad8508a176a2c45418283e3134056c8cd
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCH' 'sip-files00116.txt'
7dff5f6a414cd2056b14931774a3ef78
c7b41db56e0a086b712d5d0a29146a70399dc9ab
'2011-11-14T19:13:08-05:00'
describe
'8089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCI' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2017d87b7af1fa190dd86c42f46d8172
046d766bd4a08e63d0fad0b6e278e49586522c4d
'2011-11-14T19:14:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCJ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
6d9971a5057107e0ba753c40a3849fa8
ece2ada9991c1f469903455c10cb4374eb0fd762
describe
'109982' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCK' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d69f5478bd6a68de7249f0b8033387ba
56d0e8fbd8b5ead279e7386bf316750f3cb59bea
'2011-11-14T19:07:13-05:00'
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCL' 'sip-files00117.pro'
6f523b6b856bb997ebfbb776d06cb0c8
3972e9b4613075b1bf6ae83b74ce2ff1be20fe8e
describe
'34570' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCM' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
5a009eefc0679e3346f06499d94c5235
eaf924f5331ecaf8b5a3f0be507f01de2242da3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCN' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c3340dec5b3d668c854bafbf7e908172
6c1ba624c62e790665c36ad84e6f3040b3f47d7b
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCO' 'sip-files00117.txt'
c3568fcf10cdada4dc5b8324edb22284
219f134a06b13f4cf566183862c1ad6e6844a1e4
'2011-11-14T19:10:17-05:00'
describe
'8071' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCP' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
4129e6ab09fd874b8888832ffb10007c
fa994aec7dd052713b57a40aecb53d12429892ab
'2011-11-14T19:06:29-05:00'
describe
'366315' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCQ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7be16a742d11827ad21b864bc7f22b7b
0707e27c0afe7735a7e2ba18cedb206032c675c5
describe
'119211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCR' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9b4249137304508d07db69d31bf9e155
1ea3ac45ff55c568b2cb54577524311e9847a0c4
describe
'36435' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCS' 'sip-files00118.pro'
eaf511341bd99751e67a1fec5486b161
8377ad1be10e8284682df7cd59dea8195be085ab
describe
'36733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCT' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
ecddd15fd6c5fdab2015a5138e56320e
8911c9d778cfe7760c854629391cd5524e1b3eb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCU' 'sip-files00118.tif'
1b6f9a9f897fa78c864cb9a4f39cf056
8bac3556cccaf4981128dc49841b52d4c029ab04
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCV' 'sip-files00118.txt'
7b91b72400aef79a2530b29d6ea1e91e
5f08195077c0e7ee596b300b501231cb00ffe830
'2011-11-14T19:06:36-05:00'
describe
'8940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCW' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e7ac39cbebdca5c37227aae7b67f9901
999219fb10ef5c9916c9b31bdf6f0ee42fd82f76
'2011-11-14T19:08:31-05:00'
describe
'366245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCX' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
74a853a0708d67c52fec2a4ef55e94fb
cd100c398f5913c5ae1d87de59d74ad411fd6397
describe
'73418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCY' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
75d99c7ba51c5222232b45d0f2f4cb63
5ce9837984b7b5b4b6b1acab599ed52e4dc88895
describe
'19643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXCZ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
2780971da5bb5402520f220211cbfa07
1d58c3ddf6b6cc0a34b99e025bc4533f376e9032
'2011-11-14T19:12:35-05:00'
describe
'21891' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDA' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
21f03307accd6d9eb8126ecba784ad5d
656c4f204702952dc9bc0e67d0242d12d217e551
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDB' 'sip-files00119.tif'
6859c5eaed2782feb4ec24f64e4d51e3
8d3d07a488f616f74ef6d46d58f34bbc41aa1b02
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDC' 'sip-files00119.txt'
73d927c259a4d22ef6da434cd6bc7832
f98b45429dd9bedbd5ae4d6b31c2ef2ef9d1320c
describe
'5188' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDD' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
e0eabbc14741076b1c609e8613aae4ad
10bec5da98e63d07e4a886cfe890c23e83574a78
describe
'372747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDE' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b95c58edab9f534095cca54391ab546b
85a7ee29ff7bdeeee2a81a8c7d054d40f226669d
describe
'72120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDF' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
06f968f013014bbf9f222f1461c26981
5ab4f79657074d8623cab44032c349e2a2456e7e
describe
'11361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDG' 'sip-files00120.pro'
4980a0b4ee5570ddbc97ff9e3a5ef4c1
abdd004c73607bde95dfbbf9327bcc5995c9027b
'2011-11-14T19:12:06-05:00'
describe
'20191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDH' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e7a7c2efc04a53a0fd9c8024ffff9924
fb701b1723bd566298b3b5eef79cdd6e31cf09f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDI' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c077ea97053233b9ae59e4ebf2353d4e
483b4fd4c65fe4b8fc06d8e6ec274fa350d3281a
'2011-11-14T19:10:53-05:00'
describe
'473' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDJ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
5f6576a96c656b57414fdfde682f5ebb
3a841c150b2390a7738b73830ac5c778858b662c
'2011-11-14T19:08:05-05:00'
describe
'5107' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDK' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
d31a96f19c375e835cc7ae7323e47260
dadb5503480c6fb4f27a3887bf071c707fe7bc04
describe
'372717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDL' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
904406c4dd03dd15cceab3abd3d17f38
81c111191ac3b110a7b4fbf3386081d19c4c1f7f
'2011-11-14T19:07:55-05:00'
describe
'116537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDM' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
92ea715795278cab3e793432dda6a082
476c6f98e7e611eec1cfa0feff7edc2443a2cb31
describe
'35989' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDN' 'sip-files00121.pro'
4960be3bf3a1b81eb31f6daa1e344ca1
1b8c17de4454bb15e6c7e5dbd6e012ca322b7951
describe
'36396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDO' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b72760f4bdb66164eb87f4db773b5f7e
d846b328f1f6e799aa3d90aea64ca89d087f2ecb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDP' 'sip-files00121.tif'
99a68ed929885b1d69fb23cb6cc55fc2
9529717f2c12c4d6750e2267baddd09bb667bc4b
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDQ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
2615c9375cb23925cd05235dcc4ad068
d3ddb11ca626a0d042171e76a2926185e72cae05
'2011-11-14T19:12:40-05:00'
describe
'8418' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDR' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
503fdcaf49a1ebb733fdce30d850f224
2653749d6c2a3fa2d7a12bb4391862a05027adb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDS' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
b883abcdb2e2248c3867569db9145549
a5b0b37d30786a71a4c8e4474c9b685cd40368ac
'2011-11-14T19:12:14-05:00'
describe
'109807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDT' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
94b6689db273cbd9e92144c646d898b8
b426c5a1d0dd1d3a52833c45dedf3685ac64f6e9
describe
'32952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDU' 'sip-files00122.pro'
552cb499715845ffe9310e527c9e2b2c
43e9aa23748a8042d8e651c1ba5766c31f80b3ce
describe
'34138' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDV' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
78831f2fd71f279b09d4c99509c23cee
2ec7f343e7c5cd37f86972806784c2944253958e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDW' 'sip-files00122.tif'
3e2e64e13f490945f0299cfb77ea0874
70053d528ae938db4dd6193907448c8c398b3276
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDX' 'sip-files00122.txt'
01df58f7fd185764edf26e48521f2192
1bacb5aa4f2725b402ef233fa99635c030437b53
describe
'8427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDY' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
18c3199301a56fe55cbb8f980e4e130d
ce72455d4a8c5c2235c871102bb7dbd371fea5dc
'2011-11-14T19:13:23-05:00'
describe
'372729' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXDZ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
aaa0c4f8d9798ee5645ac52accf3a1c8
6512d98da9746feabb41b62a795e89f474d831ca
describe
'120759' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEA' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
33a5a453487d6ac76c5e5af6b5d968c0
3f9a0123973f2d74959dd794d8b21e89d2c9acb4
describe
'36066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEB' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bfdc2a0b13c7665309e418be1112971f
26b27138884b1c3bdaf85b41b4341a762ab35be5
describe
'37365' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEC' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
fa6d3c765933d76f61ad7025635141fe
642cc044a9bd4cc39415107fa05dfd11fcaa8d88
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXED' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1efbe2526d81eed08125156282943459
5e5eafffa6aefbedd021f0d12543b0a92f3efa58
'2011-11-14T19:12:01-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEE' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2b7e4251301006449d02a3c1f720124d
08422393f07953372d07c033ba39333369fd9dcd
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEF' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
edd8a15d0f62d745e86e52eb04cb3ce4
ce9388a6d35d8ab7acabb676cc112376e388243a
'2011-11-14T19:09:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEG' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b8ee62a897ba9510f7b570e454a798d8
5bf3cd3a916b1f2bbd922b5f47e34acf64e6a98b
describe
'113461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEH' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
608b7ac90560a1b0925b2a637515c184
1e4aeac5f5552532ca6e4612f9367656eec72cec
describe
'34537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEI' 'sip-files00124.pro'
87488cf281df5c060e90f88cad2bfaea
9dcae73c7039a3dfa42a2d8508c94629b3f788b6
'2011-11-14T19:12:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEJ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
406974f83a0c13925b8b368e93b8a17b
d4cb72bac15e46fce1f26bf071288e9a9851feed
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEK' 'sip-files00124.tif'
bdd7a98a35298df549f6b6b1549714be
5e2aff42322b1a29565a6cc70b86deec2ed964bb
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEL' 'sip-files00124.txt'
138e3f4a2ba4e1ec354c85ba3af2d115
76911eace1a41ede0f43aa44c6b39e605464d35d
'2011-11-14T19:11:34-05:00'
describe
'8533' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEM' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
7001f715b360cc3a1cefb40b21fba954
c9d63409833c475f9c917db5a65e73a4605e4727
'2011-11-14T19:12:31-05:00'
describe
'372696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEN' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b40dd6e92343e36a762cca5e489c87ef
0eaf04801a5e4fc02575cab77c92a1a016d5332c
describe
'120894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEO' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f004861823b13c6d3f2dd06c7b20c3b0
09bdfe2dbdd28cda7d10660662819a3ad1fae1d2
describe
'37638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEP' 'sip-files00125.pro'
04f5beca9cedf48aa7691d0f2669a3c3
18eb9ecaf347b0d0a2bae1eec85c7ea2b8b1f4f9
describe
'37587' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEQ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
fe47db3e882c483e73bcd8b7f112e0a5
924934d1ff6ac8cd6f8f794dbdef5aac2b3df75c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXER' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5ee3c2e3d102ebd5baa83f35cbb771ca
c9c71ef56aff5e6823ec9abb34c7b37c21c82a81
'2011-11-14T19:10:03-05:00'
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXES' 'sip-files00125.txt'
0a2993b99b103ffc58aaedf613976e70
afeba4bf03009a4ba55f211d76d11a6f768d1470
describe
'8610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXET' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
f711a1cb83be67518d3812b5dd545bcf
80cdd5b702ada893e2641e3aaeb6fc652ea4636d
describe
'372751' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEU' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
32fe95cf378a519f07f3b816833e0896
a12cd2e50d571e768c3120c444ea9716b1d6602c
describe
'113568' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEV' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
89be1bc947c4c138fcddadb589b9f87c
9f82bf4036b04ea6c26e8d4a0507830345ed67d3
describe
'35150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEW' 'sip-files00126.pro'
38f6c2cf619a20da4aaf1749dce38779
9e17f64f58e1a0cda429b0fa7900fe981e7aa722
describe
'34565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEX' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9fc0d3584fe065a475480ce1d73874e5
dd4141e1ff54ca7d5ce7415b3963405af928b50a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEY' 'sip-files00126.tif'
978b1ba2fd4b00f9e2869aeadeeea874
0d4fec60719abb68c3d5d6997d3882082bbfe751
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXEZ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
19c280050b626f2d1e0165c6aa5a75c1
140691e8c4aa3f008a4c10a23e74062012c7da20
'2011-11-14T19:13:53-05:00'
describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFA' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
083fcb8d35af334e0aa2a89c3e9f07b1
6154776c5c9f1b64934394bb087ba1cc4b9f7322
'2011-11-14T19:11:12-05:00'
describe
'372699' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFB' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
477ec1196c4a9280ad11998b6a11cf7f
a8260da336f4959387281dc707450a8be56a49b1
describe
'114048' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFC' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5fe6f9199e861b277705bbed07fe5893
4a484efd47daf53c0b51d391318bcc74f7a29f13
describe
'35247' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFD' 'sip-files00127.pro'
033d27c591756b78532ec5d57d619e64
8c0d47077c4e4f1b54b259d0cf24925908491434
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFE' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e525af82d1d81ba92a7e768524f2498d
f90868dd57d4eed291a4bdeb8734e84d6bc07bb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFF' 'sip-files00127.tif'
3193c20ce127b20494979c3bd5750fda
a54c59a889d6046ff7ab3ed0c06295acc2d783ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFG' 'sip-files00127.txt'
51d2167516d74be2a9487425164560fb
ab74c9395d6ecbc2fe580c7a1b8d7ab2288bf029
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFH' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
cb6484e14b94bbeace32dd1b081f7aa0
8592d70c1d0d7f9b650e3504cff12612c1c499a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFI' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
368a09f0042c361c8936ac3112a6b652
6eb872c37472c180928775b031cad6d5ab5d5080
'2011-11-14T19:10:36-05:00'
describe
'82341' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFJ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e09a08f62f03680b6733b16c54d1d0a4
13cd00274a1b4df5b238c43b176b959deb730e43
describe
'22762' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFK' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d00a2ba662c5b30c3fd66fa034b247e7
9aac5230e35049e4f7ab08b407666f6fa0b59996
describe
'24939' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFL' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
51f88240e573f5d9a0124b371f76b26f
9b529daca34fe4e5396921c3fd1807e38e417902
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFM' 'sip-files00128.tif'
59186d420dfa6e21ff5edec8d9aa11bd
cc0950f106aadbccdc5367ba4843d1e300071a18
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFN' 'sip-files00128.txt'
248c58c92885110c9cd899bc45396246
a3450fdfd6f65ef4358d5f4983bc7a517fccaf50
describe
'6147' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFO' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
094c307046c53f489dce98587306ca61
7c1a06a291b690b21cd110e4b0e7a378c1616b4e
describe
'372709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFP' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
1ac9d579d983d4dea32c3ab4557f06c7
358a42329726fe41e014137dcbfbdd73c01f0f72
describe
'92837' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFQ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
ae600ea371401bf7c09a4ba7a7ef1525
d273561d6a759bda4895fc75b84258dc3655d458
'2011-11-14T19:14:31-05:00'
describe
'27493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFR' 'sip-files00129.pro'
06fff8f89e5fb5d56209e1fec20021f4
4ae39f96f8d269a43a28f805dd337cae88e40966
'2011-11-14T19:14:19-05:00'
describe
'28694' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFS' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
5ff1e36b8e7606fbdbd437130a7fb630
e6d0ec4e6b766fea80bf908416089b2aa2c3da23
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFT' 'sip-files00129.tif'
353c680e30271ffbe837cac378793357
381f8d43e754ae97c334bfa928211be4506f5e50
'2011-11-14T19:10:26-05:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFU' 'sip-files00129.txt'
8a8a65c578bc582d8371744e91c51d8b
5def4947ce0a0eaff0fc8cb306df9aec432a9606
describe
'7024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFV' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d2452cabe301bd3ab4c547ce6d1e6cd2
c507f798ddf62f6988c13297b3c0b8f94ee21e45
'2011-11-14T19:07:26-05:00'
describe
'372743' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFW' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
457099de764024c46c9597f1e9a55daa
1c16c84304f87427a6588fe73e0708e38f6b8d3a
describe
'111708' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFX' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
a5b6be300c651b49b4276e798119f2d9
b4d040bab361b7d9bdf451d7b7167716d5432849
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFY' 'sip-files00130.pro'
9148d40fda9d2071bdea3a76d36a8181
f25b6830f03af015233ade48cfb4c4d20f3c4b76
describe
'34581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXFZ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
f51162d8cdef0343d7ed3a55b2ae90ad
983984b2a5bd0e924f5559fee6feb243a483665b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGA' 'sip-files00130.tif'
04fdbb6e55f04fabe33ce576248821bf
f4b39f5ccfd065b83ddc3050fee654ff0e392b34
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGB' 'sip-files00130.txt'
1e19a235b9d7007618e752f79b56a990
5821f0a7a66e70c9ce8a8f7d64505aa4d189b60f
describe
'7817' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGC' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
c304da2d9bc5bc943489fef51ad2ceda
c7676aa634a52e7f4307a6593152d8a95cbbf4e0
describe
'372754' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGD' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
8bf0e935b09a14313f84c0bf04de85bf
1fc84706da19c240a34e4c5854f08ab9514e48d0
describe
'114312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGE' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d6c73d6bef9c8c462a85cc59b20872df
ab8d01d99baeb5521e1e877ac98f3419c61288b3
'2011-11-14T19:12:37-05:00'
describe
'22795' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGF' 'sip-files00131.pro'
09d8d03181ec56a6caf7826f3acc3d31
1b95a75248e4f5a60507a3dc5e4697d8e77ecc56
describe
'31958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGG' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
989970a28321008c47471cef19f96b38
6930cd53493f6b15de4ada25494fdc5d177ecf51
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGH' 'sip-files00131.tif'
5a5f71c7ccd0e2e0c2b74222328554e7
6c5c636db8415209e000fec530db73c3f57b63ef
'2011-11-14T19:10:05-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGI' 'sip-files00131.txt'
962acea78c368cb58cd7ec7382f4073d
36a6648a94dcb49a90fbf620e0d1f50e7f9e1b2c
describe
'8021' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGJ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
a9b5c51a5e8a9e0f914cb1094fd2a38f
8cb9256ad7147179ed9a219f681f9e0e1c27fb5e
'2011-11-14T19:13:25-05:00'
describe
'369952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGK' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
eedcd411dec85968292ec1276345f1a0
1d7e8ab924bb793868a9040a70ff6fed537c7774
describe
'113793' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGL' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
670b891f79075bb789afb362ac8a82a8
ed1e42eda9b824fbc8de31a24462f87a4b481c7f
describe
'36589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGM' 'sip-files00132.pro'
9e022fd687ba9c9b35a90317f415cf90
b03a8d315f18274560a96aadeee2380186251379
describe
'35158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGN' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f101a16d6f679e5cdb9cd82c9c544531
85ad105b96f4a185f81940cee54b33a83eb523bc
describe
'2976172' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGO' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8f6dc4f8e32019f3acf5791bcc59e3cf
1d14cd88be0fcf14bdca5f45e7f725f7d01bc86e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGP' 'sip-files00132.txt'
0eabc9b4d8e2eeba32a1aa04e701077e
1aa78522350069ec67a2ab7e37298efb62d29881
'2011-11-14T19:14:22-05:00'
describe
'8139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f9bd166f7271111284615a4c173e421a
e3d705ad89a95a0f1ab02d3fc68d222475e7a0fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGR' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9d78c846991d613e8ea05f8a845032d2
770e18eddc55bacf0297578e99aec3b3851fcade
describe
'114954' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGS' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
36f0440678c39703215ceb1c1907dd2d
8341353579c38a0604b7f1b06843ce7ed9f2877c
describe
'36231' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGT' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b428af8e900b3cf673c3fdf5ccdb9609
380d7953fdfdc27ddd30bffbc8a2dc0dc17f1367
describe
'35565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGU' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
031a09ae275d28f55624574ce0984c98
c79b3de49203b2416e3010a31b49c69221f7b3b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGV' 'sip-files00133.tif'
342966396d02c0bafc708ef2d6cb1a95
315b57d757dabb617bcaf12dcbd5f887060441c0
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGW' 'sip-files00133.txt'
9f3ca19df2a14a916f8315a58c5b9de6
5f83dde1068f14b615efe00695070f5991091389
'2011-11-14T19:10:13-05:00'
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGX' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
e5e875a38011a875cd4501c8b79a7f2a
d50bff5fc7e1eca6d41238b0e8e7889f154ddc29
describe
'369954' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGY' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
fa65cc3ecee5bf48f973a3b07047e851
5bddb8e1e02f93c4e64825d8a0dd7d78a1e901b0
describe
'115785' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXGZ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
fdd3d502196c5d962cf5fb104f74dc7d
903b507ca9b81eb6ba0f677d4ac41372fd36aa38
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHA' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2e8385a65d4dc96170ff48d7be3dd9a6
8b77692a4569378bc34187f5871123056ec93940
describe
'35265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHB' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2a0080b007d5bc0d265d58d701c36f66
bdab42e42b54159b5c9b31fbe90bf8ee5d5ad039
describe
'2976088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHC' 'sip-files00134.tif'
d85411a86263ec9cc18f08591b9fb0c4
1ce7ebda047bfbc741d5bd8c2d7672abcf171992
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHD' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c731de3ee1c45c80d2e92c026b616e04
faa1cf5d45deda8ef735563b94899b9c45728d51
describe
'8251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
ca065c4edfb1baf2772284756228aafa
3a3e8153b74b7451ab48fab941811a1948e1d706
'2011-11-14T19:06:48-05:00'
describe
'372744' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHF' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
1f82262d4569500b40896146031d575a
805fedc3e7ea86c522d8c04382e80cc90ec8da70
describe
'112469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
62d1165b9e2c90d9c4fe02b4e5b36c37
1727c044e6bb666d57ea1895d8019f7554e81498
describe
'35575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHH' 'sip-files00135.pro'
85e7ba32373f2a359bb08ba34c0d9833
b573a0543ccfcaa0e836823c958bd3a47381d974
describe
'34276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHI' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
3e7d06de4a6d3044f4ba44294cc57f0e
daa16b29dcdd55b58bc85b5afe71a4a47bdfe21a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHJ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c2daf2d25aaf495bdfe14e7e63bdb8e3
1160761a6a0b9cf8e3e04839cecfe92f1a939d7b
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHK' 'sip-files00135.txt'
a4797948a70768e0ee0270ce9a7fbe77
5c357cf9884b7e4be88636cabae08c973145ca43
describe
'8668' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHL' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
645dc8d077969a854a44fd926e013495
a608e97b609bd09f4ba3c0b696a7ebe0ab0bc33e
'2011-11-14T19:13:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHM' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c145ef43d2572cd9521731ce52721652
e51bbc36e8d1451f27fd3a785ec13ec0864406f2
describe
'53814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHN' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
35fe93308f87761874f2d8ef7aea5ac9
58059e3190c98aca2dc6e7d6939cc11865da441e
describe
'13996' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHO' 'sip-files00136.pro'
99a186a252b48822a18cf335a1f61227
72689b648cf412654274dd96155e6439ad090190
describe
'16078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHP' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
401e033415ba76f3dbb373357dbaf945
9db4dfee94573cdf2d14451313800ce1a5d2de09
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHQ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
c498c868fdff01908adb8659bbcbd074
65bbe12e13d12672f665513c7b380f2e693f4730
'2011-11-14T19:10:14-05:00'
describe
'557' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHR' 'sip-files00136.txt'
9dc3b49dde1d2db119801b064c1fe2e8
2dd20b41a17a51726c4150235ad3924deee1348d
describe
'4135' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHS' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
d280e18b58e34f54ee3602c777c586fd
209a962edff13a052ddcc1d98e2066e63a22887a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHT' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
d039505d56b36eb930506624a867b9f0
2d74fd1c4215384e3dd319722c3e86d28c84777a
describe
'93330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHU' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
901ea2f4d283b09f74ea7fc0bd0f9659
06cf2f2351513cb4f67ea1f6a5627d58a0245067
describe
'27572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHV' 'sip-files00137.pro'
eb55563ca8c86a27c44ac406e7a3ab8c
d5f110c0e52aa73662a68ec6b5aad211849b3a98
describe
'28420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHW' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
81cd6c21611a7e6f06674a9c64cfe917
c433186a7c19f7a4d7b45af992ab3b92e5c33ee9
'2011-11-14T19:10:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHX' 'sip-files00137.tif'
37020e7256b6af399f9d74857457a8c8
ac9a13869db2a920ff79785051b153d9ada63f85
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHY' 'sip-files00137.txt'
22d8cc2408563ad9628f32447ce014ae
9568af8c346095b8a05a0ecb49119ccaff380a72
describe
'7306' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXHZ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
b96e29efa1868b5bcc7021723428ec94
0518be4325cec9961e9cf9b9421e94011e772094
'2011-11-14T19:07:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIA' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
1383d38205b2e477e01bfde85f117ce1
e12d346f678a7334cc57c1538f3badd17af1ce88
'2011-11-14T19:07:51-05:00'
describe
'102906' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIB' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
b500d8f2e34d6c124d94a0a2210b7bde
f9ccf45ba80f8e7d8fdcd9c45d003672db42c6c0
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIC' 'sip-files00138.pro'
bc0c1878699360a0fef49349e7436734
1324c133f62d1d34af1b662a56b3f25afc7c98d6
'2011-11-14T19:07:16-05:00'
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXID' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
6838f5af25bb18d374e8bba1c5dbb421
f9726b64ad3ad2e2ebc11d4918298ba4b72cc5c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIE' 'sip-files00138.tif'
59085a56bf54fcce967aabb382d795f9
5137c359882446365a76cbdd39b09bf3da85165f
'2011-11-14T19:08:09-05:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIF' 'sip-files00138.txt'
810a62d7b658bead8a9f8cd853b9c5b8
b2fb886d6310df66212447cdec672f663e1aef87
describe
'7480' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIG' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
540cfa306dd3f1b63124f0570b74c434
ed8dbec285ab79af9dcf5d0e656aeb12c2f54626
'2011-11-14T19:06:09-05:00'
describe
'372745' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIH' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
136513a6075138dd58dcc6a37d176c8f
c95fd441a9749783fb8534e71f636079c3b2a784
describe
'110237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXII' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
3ab77eeb1403342f1da1d6c82737846a
5d534c9e8b3b7f92f157ec9dd9f4f6e81a6c4693
'2011-11-14T19:11:59-05:00'
describe
'32382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIJ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
640db7d2a1ba0c4a84db3d03f74e869d
3e3be47e14bd983171bd738e656880cad7ab715e
'2011-11-14T19:07:02-05:00'
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIK' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1598b84fea33e7d0acb226105530529b
951cc5b48bc94f79004512870052ad98dd6355da
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
5c3c78f896baf9f5cae709dae0b2edcb
290d9fe1b0353170ee006add8b3424cd80fe26e2
'2011-11-14T19:12:15-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIM' 'sip-files00139.txt'
281b1541a8ef20c3ee8223a2a9fd879f
027b3db722b946a8fbc0401fd2c75eb7196ef6be
describe
'8245' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIN' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
158f14a0be54220dc4fc1aa62fafdcbf
0485b728e4a6d553f962c03ae59cd8c5cc499e94
'2011-11-14T19:08:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIO' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
85f0bb1633ee2810c725f326ca12d65c
3cbc9b715093c0d2d312fd24c13b69a68117f4bb
describe
'107957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIP' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
5691fca28ae41f7a30041c61a6ddf06c
aec47d678357c5d7d9e520c4405bd93f4148329e
describe
'33558' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIQ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
50719afebef8a06f7bf950f29bfcfa3b
b02dc89afe093188224ce57201c9068d4d864f6d
describe
'34445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIR' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
886ccb88f6e104ad1bec38ba8597bc13
195992e3b59c58a97c5c790f1c06c2e17d92168f
'2011-11-14T19:11:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIS' 'sip-files00140.tif'
168f8a3375c889a915e7cf6373e26ceb
e15e86d3bac04b2828bb41ac8a8af38112a97ab9
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIT' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f6a622d676ec4eb8d24545494f92d845
02e956315ec34dd0145a2237cdfe781cbd4b8c34
describe
'8639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIU' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
08d943720215342adef53282e5427c00
a93c77dbd49a29c962214807601773e41f161cde
describe
'372759' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIV' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
87565e469b05239b7aea9adf08b6de2c
362847be8bb14a117e1d52344b650517e225ffa5
'2011-11-14T19:12:42-05:00'
describe
'114672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIW' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e5e101cba305ac0db26b2fd2476022b2
9f8c65f9899ba5d79dff41f33daa50d25c88bdd5
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIX' 'sip-files00141.pro'
cf3d4fbf90f099ade22b5f089402e70a
bb9a54316340a38822cd89dacd308ecbb0a7ada2
describe
'36261' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIY' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1ac56774f8b22f2a78cc8a0629de6a45
3efde4da4a8c361f549bbde9d2262f78ac77e594
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXIZ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
f4fc9086a3080a8e7adb8c7196fb6407
2bbcf2b7c5217dbfc71cda81ea879b76d5c3b5f3
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJA' 'sip-files00141.txt'
657d73475ada0e8358e33a3f46ad3dd5
26b828107d5aaa44e50e871d10d10e6ab724c1d1
describe
'8395' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJB' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
9324b3ae966cb94345af223c937e5628
5b7ba1d461fb9f3c99f3ea2be3c2136946417667
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJC' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
3bc36ce5bf716e0b942cf08d5b02f4a8
85a5e1f6898908c9c54e48aafebddd974a3e9240
describe
'86951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJD' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
d1cf1f174c4668c0b54e2280079c929f
321382e3ed1a734eab63c561c84ae24f2e5a5a4f
describe
'23111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJE' 'sip-files00142.pro'
b99767094106f7bbe0eb8ab8d50a2d51
e3fcd6caefda0877f405af866ee3be3e0b01ce5f
describe
'26129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJF' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
4b6f1bff8c5f41a5ca75c8d162686298
2c88b1be94f3e7d7ef446fd1390b2f5a601746ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJG' 'sip-files00142.tif'
b210633e6b5054364b1c4d80a39c512e
a64f049df9aaab43ba81294ff7e806ade64dfbda
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJH' 'sip-files00142.txt'
79e5d8eb82bd61c6da205b1d597752bc
87ed9633caa2b27e91544b1292df856a572baeb3
describe
'6662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJI' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
2fc1399e8d3df0b333cea24280120418
b0d495ab7b494c8db310b0c01df84bc770a831c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJJ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
7c62c17df6d2929bdf2aa460eefb81d9
ad61976c51c58005d1c5738087a0788858ef99a3
'2011-11-14T19:14:21-05:00'
describe
'55706' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJK' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
0f1ead54e9bec9bcbade06043b499dfc
720067c8c469ae34047fe1f3feb1a372136251c4
describe
'14166' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJL' 'sip-files00143.pro'
95b3ee9b592813d4df48e511a1f3e57f
6ed9049a8d74fa4645e4f011f7d32453c22d5f0b
describe
'17030' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJM' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4bb8d3f9fe1413a11beb5efc6ac4e383
424e3246d36492fa7a76b76d81aa1eb817e515ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJN' 'sip-files00143.tif'
39ec4a82f5ced60e719a6893a44c7e2c
e6806b8c9e01fa1a4833dafeb0fd1ed2ac0ab51a
'2011-11-14T19:13:09-05:00'
describe
'580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJO' 'sip-files00143.txt'
344bf3721130afac73b027d801d5a038
982c554ce49b6997bca4360d1c1b4a0761084227
describe
'4133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJP' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
ee15507be841b45669e883f7ac84f711
e37a88c3ae21f2c17b83f6e14fc0d25f885374b9
describe
'372680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJQ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
0636aba51a9786bec22fc3957436cff4
09c516fa3ae73d9ddb2da63b0cdc518c7bc14536
describe
'98049' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJR' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
305fdc7403fc55c81441fdb0135f4f50
25caa8895cc60537621ddac421270c118f9b2b88
describe
'29291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJS' 'sip-files00144.pro'
46ba60c919616a53e7fc288374177fa4
bf139b5f7c5f2375b96422ca89d9ba3198c63c0b
describe
'30230' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJT' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
94e0af90f737ba7c346bfeff7a85d317
4183dafad229e572867efb8e28b15ec4c79ab4df
'2011-11-14T19:13:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJU' 'sip-files00144.tif'
2f6ad4a74cea532ecaa291e4f287c506
f6be37d4d3cb255b226c8a0c7ecc5c2ca19af996
'2011-11-14T19:08:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJV' 'sip-files00144.txt'
67907fb54bd0c28b9652904352ba6706
aef02a96b6a9f140db2ed183143e73ad1bfb8f82
describe
'7297' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJW' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
6e0a06c49305dd6a0ac6a37c030e49d3
c62bde66086e67926870fbebeddb6f9745241ee3
'2011-11-14T19:13:10-05:00'
describe
'372732' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJX' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
19f1befdd9586f377d8b66f62ac92cc2
213065964ae9d1cd7f92e53bd91738bcbb76d8b2
describe
'111538' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJY' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
def1fb3c689dd472795bff9e30a5c3cc
03c237c53c2b730b0c263325a4cbfe9226592977
describe
'34251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXJZ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
00a73012415d5f16f0ef8d0237f055d8
c1ff33ec2b8806fa3dbe99f1f25fa25f2531cc8f
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKA' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4ab85381f55feaef27f11b5882b43cb5
ce982b59084869228f881677388be88432da4f8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKB' 'sip-files00145.tif'
cf05c154805a88a761a126d712043edb
3761f5dd617b56334d0dc1afc52287f419d12f1c
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKC' 'sip-files00145.txt'
05e58a5747bf43a49d07152098b35884
2cb4f8abae8d3e5826ccc9cb5af87a77ae3d716f
describe
'8425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKD' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d8c95024cb28abf4e0a74359ca716361
24dd2551403ea3149765eceba68924e7beae3d44
'2011-11-14T19:09:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKE' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ea0004752ec54d45880a39c1799e83cd
fe1801bb469a2e085d81ba8256e43a3cdb026ba1
describe
'68990' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKF' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
16267fbb63a78f76af970d4bae390fb2
114a444b1db192aa6f7feace0bdd06b112be13f6
describe
'18891' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKG' 'sip-files00146.pro'
b84ca752de5f9c95e85ad8414ecf19eb
75ef8cd98f7e265e46eca2689d26dc28520e3c3e
describe
'20958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKH' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
48029873efe89bec7643cd2a585390e3
3b28ebc9d4a41fc405cc669f02a05ecb51a7b372
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKI' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e6f2d9bfcceec7cfcc367ffec95fdd9e
8bfda57548afe0d776d7b5f904724ba62f372bc6
'2011-11-14T19:07:03-05:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKJ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9ff842fb415b68b6a0ea995eb6c98d38
3fa0a489cc6498a637791fbae24df1241fb033f4
describe
'5164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKK' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
606a0543ea015a615e3152767811324a
073c131e8d3d6275eeb1e26915d9789aa415a72d
describe
'372702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKL' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
365e634198729a676f1e1098d0be1cf3
bc50e21f7a6b5103d6eb0ac5c0554bc5c8bc174d
describe
'99599' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKM' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
25b6e32dba1e3258a31448ad59a9d939
84ec394e6cba4745764595070c843b6966b9d78a
describe
'30177' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKN' 'sip-files00147.pro'
e338d4b768df13f1fb1159c45e430c7c
9822699ddca7e4845872674a03239af705f25b55
describe
'30565' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKO' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
2ec12950a2cf2afd94f668b3c32693f7
9760d7a1da2b065d536ebdead56a5dd3c1426349
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKP' 'sip-files00147.tif'
6421640dc70cb7cb52aef001f0c92948
96cb24f2957e0c3cd4de6cb21b7796a80a6744cd
'2011-11-14T19:14:42-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKQ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
29f42250bca554b38305277d16ef38b4
6a344d21ccf2fc3bf9066679370347b0f15b86f8
describe
'7310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKR' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
c169d88adb855bb75c5659e697184b74
06a125ca7035a7ae9725542884c4d05e95564399
'2011-11-14T19:11:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKS' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0dcd855e4dbe7dce6a7f5c58816e1295
822fa844613f3ec8ecee4741f3fbbbe785b24e88
describe
'87942' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKT' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5ae6314c8c74c2ac0642f64eba20dae6
2d8e1b1437ca5ac593069e291f373b4ae128dad4
describe
'16728' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKU' 'sip-files00148.pro'
9a533f72bfd90e81e3ebab82e8d213be
0574e03bb52dc8969ad8d25d5116ecd74d3377b5
describe
'25323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
413e22d2a853906bcba03fad9549779a
5679c14757bd972622681c9ce6b8af82545755db
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKW' 'sip-files00148.tif'
dafaa5dbd17e96dd03388158cf347cf1
7e981730bae8539f68ea19046d801c21da3a8127
describe
'675' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKX' 'sip-files00148.txt'
47c0289cd86e10f564d14e1487302464
c7dd923f5993decad1717075d80781461161e134
'2011-11-14T19:14:24-05:00'
describe
'6551' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKY' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
e095b3b2cc845794fc3caf619c268ddb
618e8c102de906c2462b50a7e00ed353b83948d3
describe
'372664' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXKZ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
34e1dc46353ed2b37a7776a02a0cd779
dc0dab90fefa36bd654bdd965b738853d32defe8
describe
'112992' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLA' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
1d5a8779f28f255e84f7704970ba1260
d0e47494c0e030910f4f8cd4a3ce3d950a2d3c1b
'2011-11-14T19:06:46-05:00'
describe
'33995' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLB' 'sip-files00149.pro'
16ca393295517c3a6d714b1873747062
c6a49b4d94618bd35bfe8042815c6641c2d1e273
'2011-11-14T19:09:19-05:00'
describe
'35356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLC' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
05e4e3ea453eb6c8e26c74a96c7ab1c4
0d5214dda2f4d3154d729899372b88cb5c386877
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLD' 'sip-files00149.tif'
aa3002c02a41babe561489a2d5edb03d
5ec9519f620a58501022754c238aa7f4c02d2d7e
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLE' 'sip-files00149.txt'
7672b403c1a9d5a67f0e817456b59fee
69275924f49b23ef865e2e6480bfb7c80642fc86
describe
'8217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLF' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d25236f3549d2893b1b3cf1fb4dec334
4b508f118344c7622ca445f4c31b6565094ca8c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLG' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6871f7a3fa4e7a9714acbb949d8c279e
7c05c019a9738b22f8dc8b7a2740b1558a7d09f6
describe
'94765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLH' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
373ef1b03cf181341a3c27177c230449
0fbc71fa0ff0409f859ff436ae6216caae1818d7
describe
'32853' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLI' 'sip-files00150.pro'
539ed746747baac4a8f7837a281e52cf
4f49b446fa00ad14f5a1f5a3672ff20a76ddcea7
describe
'27940' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLJ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9c13eb48e966239452ec2607b8b78f3e
926cf0ffb248c36f0048cbdab96be3b69e9c33da
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLK' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a9105ef35afde6be70c2f83579125871
e4b83c268e82ccdb33dcb76d13ac112ca08b6004
'2011-11-14T19:14:13-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLL' 'sip-files00150.txt'
d0d5f08fc370705e1e04784ce249de37
70aab8af2d7d4f6ab02c5cc4c295b446a26cfacd
describe
'6683' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLM' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
e8050afcd0c990be7291b7e966d90b10
7c22e5ada944ad02ff03b8661183f823e394e6c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLN' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
2462d0f14047ff309e25b3b909a53a3c
f1f58b518be590ebb3bf94b31c03a04a1240cbd6
'2011-11-14T19:07:41-05:00'
describe
'104298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLO' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
09a1ad82c867a090e8e654e73c01c7fd
4c91ad3c9228708f89ce730fceb5ca1e80aff3dd
describe
'31266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLP' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f871a773e410c7d9f8ce475c36819608
317d03448094becde014e79426ab6e00e9f72eb2
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLQ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
80d2826d28c0f431c3f873dc0923ed42
095e1d9a7f16318a816eadfbfb8a67e9d657c94a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLR' 'sip-files00151.tif'
e767124cc6e6a0531d136e5b126357d5
51a433e043f20d6291998b2d534ef59c527f24a8
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLS' 'sip-files00151.txt'
f84057ed61374bfa83e101411c47569b
c18108a8733f012622e91f59517129162cde48cb
describe
'7419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLT' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
8220c60b133ea03f39645c677ed436d4
7b7f982e56d2d5f37898d7575d673b597af60562
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLU' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a9abec3c5703663cf1abd9c0532ef375
1ab5948262033d301fa483ee08598da9195f12d6
describe
'115800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLV' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
64ecd51cb49eab9f410d043e5c24b653
eb60df5338ba8dfbe5196e4545553c341cc4598f
describe
'35963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLW' 'sip-files00152.pro'
f032fbf8e1b98f058cc86ebfe9cd5dde
c03c91bd545af8810b0b3ff325594a65533dbd4e
describe
'36309' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLX' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
02ed55ee7c72de528f7db2495315fc2c
ffe6e2152ea58cdd8304a35d4d2cafca7cae6c4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLY' 'sip-files00152.tif'
cf6516c937a6a5a9f3f150f0519407fb
4a25d53ffae0d87cec9c149c39f57623040412e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXLZ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c495f4987260736cb4153ecc2dd5dd7c
a0fe383d240a9cba4dc3171ec7e2fca8f405d460
describe
'8581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMA' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ebf1f8b5e0f3ee17b00bc535b634d4bc
7daeefd55d98ad8da97f956d9db1c0601034f5f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMB' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5ffe7d5725a4248eb21a294df4544d40
f32f8ac86de64e92997de9d0f419542f442bb72c
'2011-11-14T19:12:04-05:00'
describe
'114721' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMC' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
b390c3c70bef5d8e2d151a750cf3e9de
4c7bd5988b876040a97d64e2b1f8ae9f6a664705
describe
'34702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMD' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ff8378ff93cc2d12a882c06de0406ae3
5139b0c2062dee31b80561246746fbcd64f62bbf
describe
'36072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXME' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
8410aec36ea32a1d32edd37cad5bbc04
d99865af9bc3f755e2ad6ceb8eb03d042d9e06fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMF' 'sip-files00153.tif'
1b69cdf819b08ef15632b9383eeaac49
6ea27cc54641b3f5c69320f230959504b6d0afab
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMG' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e0cb51b1ab8c30dbb298c840cd248ae0
c447663be9749e3b96014433f4116c636edd61ca
describe
'8679' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMH' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
78e9d23fa6b57d7219fdd3339fcd4172
d0f737675ba352107af950334e44e51e6f03c854
describe
'369505' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMI' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
0c21dce05dc5211140e8262a62c6ed87
3c9f82371bc4efd1d2f6603784f278dcc49d7fb3
describe
'95679' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMJ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
44cd7676dcc907e1ddaed88c4950ef00
42dcb5df598b68769ebb9970378814d89bf69fdb
describe
'27739' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMK' 'sip-files00154.pro'
fc3bb74f473d1328273d385ca5a19626
b94df4837b5ca6079b32bd92aa86628802250cc1
describe
'28799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXML' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
97eb7f15fc606ccde0f7c0c439275111
bbeab0dee12098202c8141acffc7c77e6e4a18f1
describe
'2972832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMM' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1e3528311afa536b2b8973e133e81388
67d16fba86555bb30b09a11c7408f1e32d003ced
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMN' 'sip-files00154.txt'
3a1c43a9c44398f68261394c18227d0b
99881ecc105d1d61fc776d648b0b4cef2b204cb5
describe
'6850' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMO' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
772ef461398b9f8168c1fe011d373abf
55e1ee203a7c20f11432dbc7f33f141f12cff99a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMP' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
43afb444b127a6630bcd3135a12ee881
055553fde5e22a65388bb55b277d5cd64f0ef1ec
describe
'106599' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMQ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
65a0a33646d41ea9a78bc2b9e7236b91
184db37283591db6c33041b02d9c3e322252061e
describe
'30340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMR' 'sip-files00155.pro'
7f8b3390d016c866125f0073855b1a71
a3c09f99b2ca07373c0c8b5cd12d97c327e5083a
describe
'34794' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMS' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
5dc559ae9b38f30373df75be369e9bbd
0e4246a6a990b67a9125435f4ca7d7a763c4f5da
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMT' 'sip-files00155.tif'
3c3921570c3fc4c3d386b997b230f3f0
0e260d807c4a43101327758006f46e499cd0568f
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMU' 'sip-files00155.txt'
37f26a98caab550fffd7bad0e73fa6b0
c0477a0e9476986dc9ac81df7db4fa29729e2d95
describe
'8266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMV' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
d77f92b5d5ad68d5369bfe21743101cd
15238d985ba4631707fb6eb70e22a799da18d008
describe
'357805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMW' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c8f083ecb9d8b4e2db715d087ef1de5f
956169fde86e9e21a31dbc6ce5e53a4112a4fc21
describe
'124634' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMX' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f5323f8bef5400178d1e3921d1615b8b
9942d796bede1d6e655196596127940bda9dd5f7
'2011-11-14T19:08:52-05:00'
describe
'35945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMY' 'sip-files00156.pro'
a857581af7632137077bc41e12093784
dd9fc9811cbd22602e0fa21b308422ff15d0ef4c
describe
'38511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXMZ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
7b0582f547b6d0140e54338a0370c295
bca4370155041696441b8c49440c6b3feef949ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNA' 'sip-files00156.tif'
13aab4adbaf9eb3616c291922d3d429d
888c3850af9dfe6404ac9161603243e8986309a4
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNB' 'sip-files00156.txt'
c492cab0fd2fca459f1a23031a42e74b
0314eca478578595e8c564e779160e1aceaa81e2
describe
'9225' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNC' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
d5a56abfbfaf16c4a5b1548057766fd2
906b4399fa11cb4ecb942514544ec01aff885879
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXND' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
a4bf3efcd7dd597b142ecc3a3d1190b6
3aeac5e08cf0d77da8057a37683ff0209190a776
describe
'130300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNE' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
3296036399b6cb1363ece4b1ab0f270c
5fe766dab91c27ad6c27ccba9e9d0f2e43273b9e
describe
'37084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNF' 'sip-files00157.pro'
4b7256328f7800e9f9a39ddc093c625b
0744f9057ab38e322f8245b2c810cd916d832175
describe
'40430' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNG' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
bb6b5ca41a1b0cb5a9a4c1f6eb10fd61
bd69fce433935e5852f50dc1d16a8d43629e9a6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNH' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a524b84bce1eb209f71eedf59181adef
89ceaf4d7e91fe4689dbdc04816f5024d2eede27
'2011-11-14T19:12:24-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNI' 'sip-files00157.txt'
291d0a6a240d20c8cbe75cfa3bed3c0f
f2e2c55db4c693a7aa0f7e59d1bba7450b27b811
describe
'9369' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNJ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
634a403f0526bb1725e579998707846d
c0e68ca3537f36a882e9e171b14783756242f29d
describe
'357797' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNK' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
eb746b970a4b9fe1c9230920b0744a77
82d40517f1ea0eec4fb2acd43c482d2e1fb738df
'2011-11-14T19:12:56-05:00'
describe
'124235' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNL' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
f643c80848899f69d2e6acd408459ae9
fd50eeb7aa9c0ed935efb750bbcd573eabaf2b7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNM' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1d8bcf9c26ea7944f187587efacab332
5e8c841b38513c662b153c6197f718cfb891189c
describe
'39238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNN' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
0703e6eec56971573c5ce28f4883c2eb
70006c6cc0c98a09519ed3e73c2b4b4282f48f33
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNO' 'sip-files00158.tif'
cb9875a478f800b2e14cb7bfd264eec2
57f56236961da97982b828833ba56c81380dbbba
'2011-11-14T19:14:45-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNP' 'sip-files00158.txt'
8b5c62e3932bea22c9d0302199c56675
fc4a122caa9122c5a11365573d65f25518ea9db9
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
8a940ae2661c3287271bb45a25e3fff0
e69ccc061fb5a4640e61d9a42f7172799869eb56
describe
'357815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNR' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
92b910951db91a674e83a22a456f0b6b
a526c5ffa6d1d4ea040f35f180602dc566ff3ec4
describe
'118583' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNS' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
ace71402f0fcd9dceb8b6d93a4fcb6af
b72e936984d4bef9c8856021d055ce99bace67b5
describe
'35258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNT' 'sip-files00159.pro'
fe703c277d87339c121345a11ff9e4c9
42d35ca6bca1a82c4a154e91c625d12f30256fab
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNU' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
24933ea4f4600410f48851a3f01d07e0
e8b17499e4dccb972ae742cde2611bceba2b566d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNV' 'sip-files00159.tif'
d758ffb8c8ee945e7c62f3e0d6e3c8ac
396347c199cb7fbfda6b36a17bd78557ae70fad6
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNW' 'sip-files00159.txt'
aeb15edc68412f0d7c68297b278741b2
809c968a1e375a916277a1b6cf7d6921e3417fe2
describe
'8873' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNX' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e88a4e88cd320f678f56b7a5a0e661f1
1ff0bb38bf29c9cde8891bdf9204e5612128157a
describe
'357769' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNY' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
aa093c2ff449cd7d9e2bfb3974957ebe
ca1ad69b5ed40fcd4ab41dc0012ab10f63c60133
describe
'72043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXNZ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f3db0d84398e375983002ff51e082302
396eac003d206ff725b7969b19dbe8708320e21e
describe
'17252' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOA' 'sip-files00160.pro'
b85b5b0275cd335ac0c014fb90c9bab4
65711c00c5521f3ae268e619bd8c872d5e34ab66
describe
'21624' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOB' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
5ee75d7c1ef53be2462e515714d6cef2
e04fee6c691e2e44429d1dc7317041fdb8a6cb9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOC' 'sip-files00160.tif'
9c7bfc0bb505b2ef256c91555136e797
31b4b5cf97c6ef70051c0fe7e79143aba65122d7
describe
'683' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOD' 'sip-files00160.txt'
388a5dadd5158d43411e376739f6a9a0
806d2cc54f0a1763d38aa355e20c3357568ac652
describe
'5073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOE' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
9b13b6942c7058a29a347ddaa83c63dc
e58b56d2953ade673f47acbfd92376ca688b89eb
describe
'357702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOF' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
68c70307a3736689772d35cac8bf8208
0cbcf2dcc0f768382dd52cccbbe2722223462f9e
'2011-11-14T19:09:21-05:00'
describe
'101642' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOG' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e56fea93584bec46b75d30dcba348aed
f6a3ed700688f7a0f15347e8383719a38455580b
describe
'27962' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOH' 'sip-files00161.pro'
6371b2c708436a5f90eb9df6fe989f59
0a9e0b09dfdc1f889ed76cc08cd9262c1291087d
describe
'31689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOI' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
4825a5e556d3beed0aeeab8297f664e5
3679030748a4e7803806e65f9f23c48657444b60
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOJ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
5f0fca25f3d6a1bebca3b87b7a166da9
e5674e2d50fad941e745f6c4b48846856bb0388d
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOK' 'sip-files00161.txt'
5bc1e705b7b5aa5893ea6e300c688e9e
a09647db117f7ae589b8bee3c15a996d6c3eb75b
describe
'7543' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOL' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
303ccc5b65108c9bb8fa01a6ccaf2924
a30bf09527e076713a242e13bc72f07564334a39
'2011-11-14T19:14:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOM' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
38a02fde09db564bfd1cea0be03776a0
a91d23378a13346bcc80f97fcb0b7302a2769519
describe
'121616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXON' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
9da566e2721c3883ad320843f922ec6c
ea2ad85afebd8a35fba72d9c8b37cf0fb6c1d43f
describe
'36894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOO' 'sip-files00162.pro'
915ddceccee015c73355705ebda42b23
dfefe9b0dd8c7f93600e172c0c0eab5723c25742
'2011-11-14T19:09:08-05:00'
describe
'37816' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOP' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
8132d6fca153ae74d7bf936193c32dbc
6064f8d5f4e74e85d6f88f9268449c7972e08669
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOQ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
51197ba8811ace0dc31e86e91e1632ea
01f2f6e40295e5b6845f3d0284e05aed5a2932ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOR' 'sip-files00162.txt'
2740b4310742f9375d7586581e7c3c0e
1a49332bdd9d5f4b6147ad2777fd63d7a58689f5
describe
'9121' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOS' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
06223a8ffaef5d124bf639a769ce8362
b9445bf2b3fa86c4214b060ed4c15a4da211aab2
describe
'357810' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOT' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4b75657e70514559edb6e88d46054657
125213091442809eb3f69b71a06e605f5e650f48
describe
'125061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOU' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
6486631ae30d89e77e8110e18be363b5
d20bf8c8ab9a4d790d46699c5967ea310bf2b40a
describe
'36858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOV' 'sip-files00163.pro'
937b714b717b82a9c3d1f9d7c3690a8e
6f0553585c09ab239ace79d65184528a1e4bf5fc
describe
'38952' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOW' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
17fd633649945ade42f508717e272e5f
bc80becc318c5cd48aaf02a0c1c4e10056cc5dbf
'2011-11-14T19:13:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
834d6c08ee3a324071abb413e8dbb012
1325a049cc1dd3b5cb34101ce6b34dbefabce3ad
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOY' 'sip-files00163.txt'
8a0f59908200dc2d42551854ace2d1e4
3979b93191ab9d5f8cde646d54e1a871f20c7e5c
describe
'8982' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXOZ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
f471913ccecb434aaf9927575a62ad0d
260ed76bc602aad1b3a48e724372dc3fa14f8521
describe
'357808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPA' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
4256591bdf4088c4127162f53169cfce
ca52c2fc4dfb5a85fa93ac97798e958925aeee25
describe
'127548' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPB' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
4b7c43da5719b5b67b80a41af941ec0b
9410bcf7f789e000067c65deaafb2373d99a7659
describe
'37657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPC' 'sip-files00164.pro'
6062edfe9d2731e6a8f04da422e45540
b79f9ee9c18425267e32066aff4b1f7fe0608d45
describe
'39654' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPD' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
073fa62aa49b91d215cce5cc7ffdf14f
9d8d24c55f48485fa67caf4c83bb9647138c36db
'2011-11-14T19:12:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPE' 'sip-files00164.tif'
8baaa8e650b82e3b0ac7362ec40ffb7a
4a0d3a8c0188d1c115de95bd4c1a8cda2be30f72
'2011-11-14T19:11:00-05:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPF' 'sip-files00164.txt'
bfa20d65f440e223ff6feac29a68bc2b
ae9b4b1cb0927ddc00e02e00ef3cb97a3433ce2b
describe
'9164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPG' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
4d050a29b5487a021f8570daa42c2e13
13b655a6e81dbb2a4aa12a2b1aafa631ade9a592
describe
'357821' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPH' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
42250adaa4b09de7b0256e09ab734766
934f14b8d2aa4a681694a1cadeaa26bd762b5a30
describe
'124868' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPI' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1972b243679551b8b6645a9850b2edf6
0f30f79f65e16dbe2530d79962047024e1dc4737
describe
'36553' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPJ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
4fb6b6b5f2b74d6b617b274f40d5682f
d268ce1923640cc4e7dcc07c9a882005f893e6a5
describe
'38601' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPK' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
6d62762af1e072a9930c6fcb89de297e
7634608ffd4bd7be9c8d08aeda36afe2bb477543
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPL' 'sip-files00165.tif'
4be2a020ebe24b4490222ba9f098fd86
2f048af84a7a3f951fd34398f48fa04578e2cdeb
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPM' 'sip-files00165.txt'
113f3de64544f60aa8c1af1af58a119c
72125a35a9a2190f02fa71e5972c051a9a3f932a
describe
'8893' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPN' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
3424f481435d6cf53081ec05ce67ba47
80a33adaf645fdb3fed3df0ca1d5c339fa6d55f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPO' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
2f3663473f3fb260d0f70130a0b39d74
3c6ca6ff58b8c46a56211aa5dea6a7e63e957472
describe
'123055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPP' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
398f7733434d7645c27368cd98ddaade
ff8dd92bc8c08adca5bde99b1ee26b04e30c4356
describe
'36088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPQ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
70fb8b5742ea9aaaf20adc1fcaa48aea
1f57515a9f07e8a007dec435f0c97db88e0673f7
'2011-11-14T19:08:14-05:00'
describe
'38385' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPR' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
99777b29a515d74336cbfb1747abff6f
46db601d23aa2b5ba7ac2083af4062cdd5e11204
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPS' 'sip-files00166.tif'
766a053f162e438455302ddbecfefb27
2f2f7acc52c9a376542b2d1c9849bf77e1552948
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPT' 'sip-files00166.txt'
aa710e7f093d48d08c735a249210de55
b1c0d4e891df8f829dfe88c537a23b53a348d615
describe
'9233' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPU' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3479ab8cbfc3b65df3cf7f3809ebfee5
a0129368921df9def468d65e34b81234d91e38ba
describe
'357817' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPV' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
6f9a6844892e94a3e3adbc0516c17a20
c4528fcbbf86ccb11ff2b3d11489dc4987574916
describe
'124944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPW' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
f019992ea579b6f3c3ef2ba00793b2a6
3a95814431a0d00e1a5c3341dcdbd51c43c7c5a7
'2011-11-14T19:07:24-05:00'
describe
'36413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPX' 'sip-files00167.pro'
2cf2543a03c2c03ea7a1496f2915f1c8
2b2f4cc73308dbbfc83f0214525f470262e84a0d
describe
'38844' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPY' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
65146eadf2cb874be389b1442481246e
162bd5e64c330e906c5443fa1a51783a402ea59a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXPZ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6ff289dfea1d94b846b129c074126c78
3a08f4d1b7986045d374b61f8fce485905c6c55c
'2011-11-14T19:08:50-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQA' 'sip-files00167.txt'
e200f37e8c4a32c840cf3902e114b6d1
e0c62d11c4e602ec5e3ab2dbe6397b1ac32948c2
describe
'9419' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQB' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
5140e05b860ed5729714905037280d93
3460f1f219b5b1a4eb3c9c45ce533f29b54ba1c5
describe
'357746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQC' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
623ba38b5649e2ea883de785b8934c10
0f38a4465be26548d99bdd5ad324931250a3e321
describe
'125305' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQD' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
8118ba519bdef860641d0290bb259d99
22be78656d75b47926fac834acae22c907a29b70
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQE' 'sip-files00168.pro'
6c62ff5c176802df6702b53fbc30fe5a
d1f52cc5729a7ca9a79774f9d1a64b5b2f02df52
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQF' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
282ddb8a635ec6a30fea0e16858e6ca6
c1938bb4346951b873ff34743236e3c750ccba8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQG' 'sip-files00168.tif'
703c93f8201b2cc10b999aaa21dfd842
6856a0503cda15064f5b81b8d9fe2261938e4827
'2011-11-14T19:13:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQH' 'sip-files00168.txt'
8e9a25833b56b6039631b4dbbafc1ebc
856ad317ef8f8a2dc1f0c944c6093c679aa5320e
describe
'9013' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQI' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b4f0ca51b2897ace561b53921cd0cd6a
8aaf2264019ed69c58a6eb62320524fc03f3061a
describe
'357742' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQJ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
bb8d48ea704f4b9c6a6a62705fae57ad
16372f663dbfef0a2034a7245be52d34a3f3221d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQK' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
64d6fa0f3edb2605f1d02d55504413ec
e4c920f2b1113e5db2321b0bd15a29c0b4800f15
describe
'33173' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQL' 'sip-files00169.pro'
b5fc06b081123b5dc01a9f0158d89d6e
6b226c99757d18ffbe07c4fb7861e9991db5b935
describe
'35670' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQM' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
f6fbd25033d4886ac095d203c763b1c4
84c37e4abd3a905ac00129143f50f79a2ec14d6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQN' 'sip-files00169.tif'
b8e417509c02faa3e62162b2b825f35d
bafa46374058326a12ae00cddd056596d8b6ed7d
'2011-11-14T19:11:10-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQO' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1c99f42918aedc2a0116043ab12f8539
dde4d1d8b72fc66edd7e102944ff2cc9ff7e5b13
describe
'8711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQP' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
d8a408271dc49120eba8c023ebdc1839
a6c2e162ebbf855e623bd5b0671118cb60f377ad
'2011-11-14T19:07:30-05:00'
describe
'357822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQQ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
4a5489b6541c53e61033cd0922398810
2042db4585f5434bf26054cf387f0456ee4d1852
describe
'87260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQR' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
b833af5ac6e1dc6d36f1a1629d0cb9d0
0e24e130e3038ffc7c0892b00929dd2991bf784e
describe
'7710' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQS' 'sip-files00170.pro'
4edb01d5ae20802bf0b021dba548fe66
165c1e2c174920e72be34af2138a901230a9a149
describe
'21969' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQT' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
239b3cf4fe6a6d40702c1a8f4321db31
266d36c60d20c3c592cf989126967270df692662
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQU' 'sip-files00170.tif'
3d4a173dcf84ae29d74afb47b3c5cb70
95ef92d03a16eef1a0fe26c47d7bf099672ffd33
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQV' 'sip-files00170.txt'
efaa4b5649b294157f5a5e438e20abeb
8b24e5397302b966957bfdd27160a322bf9e8c99
'2011-11-14T19:11:54-05:00'
describe
'5497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQW' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
7126bf05c19ebd72ab4d017994a0917c
b8cc3e2848964959e9200b60fa2bf124d331b3c1
describe
'357803' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQX' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
737755611c5c055165833bf930c8267c
ab9a6fca89eccde41a1c7a7f0b2f97864381f9b8
describe
'106689' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQY' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
d3f61e11ec9587655bff273f8129b914
468c837a16a2c04c43b1733be9d6511bf6493540
describe
'30276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXQZ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
91ca07f09df511c971f9c919881d8696
9a1aa68f36874059c904e359c07266deb9441751
describe
'32602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRA' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e5f5eedfba73950b94422cb36145e2ed
8852936e73dc5929c963da20fc16a026d1afcb31
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRB' 'sip-files00171.tif'
23485228ab7a4a101b3461c80b11a54d
6c85016e787d646199a6fe48985ea613958b6796
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRC' 'sip-files00171.txt'
c02bcdedb272987841f6952a17f6ec9b
c9c7859fae6342c4e6900bfd59d0cc12dd7d4296
describe
'7929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRD' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d795256587e2868cf74c8dfc6e04e1f8
c24fe1fec9b4c327ca2ac33ca419066074fdaf92
'2011-11-14T19:13:05-05:00'
describe
'357804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
367977c124d92245ad3d3a1f468b6c08
ec6b5a2ab0a5911fa68db9d45a5481eb750fbf42
'2011-11-14T19:10:10-05:00'
describe
'124509' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRF' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
35d4cf5934d7d319f4355f4021b628bf
75204f047198d2af265cb30f7fc46b838597cde7
describe
'44825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRG' 'sip-files00172.pro'
169d669f37f953ff36f663488da154af
fac2d81d05db80a9ca4e6da740cc4908404f2ae1
describe
'37806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRH' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
a9c091a2cc164e7dc4f2d3abd57335b4
11527b1760375a13f33df332516bab34cade3e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRI' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c24eb461e7666ea0ddd500f9db49983a
a4402b0389e898a1ab2bfc33ce84bd77ff9870d7
describe
'1834' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
149950a38978fcaffc8b79669e32ef9f
fc802213cfce8f558d5f948bf45d7b2b2d60a5ff
describe
'8854' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRK' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
b7ca525d8a45ce706575a2850db138bc
d036ca4dfb8d4b3b90196646749594d1e208c357
describe
'357806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRL' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
2dc55ab28d94453d14ec731f9b72dbce
36e8a956bb55e120590ede2de92b912abf0996ca
describe
'110755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRM' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
de8047473c4af09e291c22122f05bda4
22ba5db231e754bfa3078b1411c46ad997e2ad01
describe
'38340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRN' 'sip-files00173.pro'
ba130ba6eb3bda9cca42d952440bca8b
d845759952d4bea0376d27cd5da1d366a59ed131
describe
'32292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRO' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
be480afa7e1ccc0df1b597cddd95311d
06e463dca222f2eb84b5ba609ea37901217891e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
5531134103957ae39dd724739938c835
e80fd4d6d7db825038f688ff14d61357fd9815d3
'2011-11-14T19:12:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRQ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
1d085187942ab1a9717c1fa449bf49fc
8f929d44073f58c3907690facd04d0d662d7f2a6
describe
'7765' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRR' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
fc7a1038d5f31c33f20aa463ac949587
e0138cac65d3318e3bac1eeca4532567a30624c1
describe
'357731' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRS' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
3c55f724615888ddd57c221cb99fb872
584b611784fd995a9a06d208521764d07e408f9f
describe
'94813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRT' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
0ed86ed4d4920b7ffe1233a3783f066f
6fcae8d9c5cfd47e509e326f3ed619b5ec21d7e0
describe
'28164' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRU' 'sip-files00174.pro'
705f887f877ddba3d7959490493870c7
b22e5f9d9b695a97edbf984d8a5e6c39a6b5da97
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
c097624847e765c4a77d0c0a64f04178
f5a0494d12ec018718a6bbb5153f95bb95da99ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRW' 'sip-files00174.tif'
931f21ca95be6fb7e21509b4856b620d
2fcf9fd811ac595108a084aeea454afd88c8e386
'2011-11-14T19:09:51-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
e27793cae272168040e2958b8a67509a
5870d6e5a0b1046c929d5568dcd4e2b920bb7797
describe
'7368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRY' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
53a1a73af140f1cb3a4417247fefd23f
b4ac149944c0c5155b8717d8d035238061e3534c
describe
'357799' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXRZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
7d784430fafbdab168f42ba6bfdb33d9
c7aa12db1aef5cfb48033a423ff074456bad0a75
describe
'116581' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
dbbe4af3bbb2df7b9d38e29f40ad070e
b7785d95979e08e8ec6221be8959f042360bb547
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSB' 'sip-files00175.pro'
73df89b52daad45d6307837c1a915f14
8521cc3975c7597af968a5b7005dedab2af158ef
describe
'26215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
8366c137837cdfd8c64ef705c6f7ee5a
a9309e8a02b214035bd109b71fe9d5c58bf49e6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSD' 'sip-files00175.tif'
50c54a461c5da8136d203aeaf0bb68c2
3167329e3c6b0e3e0d6f57244a9c683aa6ebb53c
describe
'86' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSE' 'sip-files00175.txt'
883c7e18852651058e5fe2a686078fb6
2202a8b62f5e93e8b6b89d4f2c73fe7fd24bc5fd
describe
Invalid character
'6110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSF' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
9a1cc3c49321e9ded1b728cebcaaf62c
9f1c7cfc16b80a1671385f732cd7fbb01c10aa7e
'2011-11-14T19:11:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSG' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
b0be9f368a82ceb075e6165497493128
9c6e268ea22fd14943833b26e3b97af9c3f8cea5
describe
'119094' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSH' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
684716fb3639a3008954f9671e536714
11d2906a73a5d812f71c1252ec2deda88a3440be
describe
'36191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSI' 'sip-files00177.pro'
5ffbebc72cd2da85d1aab82bb098c8d0
bc15190cf63ab90f567b0b464aa5469898608507
describe
'37499' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSJ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
6160572da0ccc13bdd4ca932960d093b
f67c3d5a7f457ad665463cc8ffb171fe17988bee
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
f428ac2c67b8786eb2ff5af77380a3f3
aa4baa73d2a15baa4cf71e7aa778b3ec97493224
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSL' 'sip-files00177.txt'
e3ca41b38650e5e0745a2685793c1c7d
2d2806613bc3c995f4100471f9adfbaa3a4c3d25
'2011-11-14T19:09:47-05:00'
describe
'8815' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSM' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
1d33f3f7c5c49728a8de29c908ce14c2
a8c165bc4034f6cac40039613b15fbf2cbfbd829
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSN' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
149055ecc43b65c3e0a293a7cfb74139
46939a9529e0d8692988762cf84d96c5aa8971a1
describe
'122639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSO' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
b54573f680ce24ff316bbe7a40312cc1
817c68a45d8bdf11dd6342d891392710190d64c1
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSP' 'sip-files00178.pro'
d48e49ac40453f9c30b74e5aa4fad7b4
7b0dc2863a8c1085253625df958cb473a95511da
describe
'38282' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSQ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
33fbb5b401a69162a911f1e682748216
528a294261b1832ad43b08e8839e75b3cedbdfcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSR' 'sip-files00178.tif'
40e800792ff2b673af88b56a5c32da86
88496b002221057d2da3de80be3659f896bd59cb
'2011-11-14T19:14:07-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSS' 'sip-files00178.txt'
1a0b441f144692f8140c656541ee64b7
73e3381d0f37c1a0c625f5c9c250c231deb6fa38
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXST' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
57ba478b308a5d759681236c4a2fafc5
85c1442308ef3e4d5547d9965e2bd39f8800ecb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSU' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
0f9d40a86933dba81e29799dab269b6f
5bcc0b9ae631423ba1781d5274fa2d3c0603f359
describe
'110822' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSV' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
cf727b58c395943f84dbaa28d94c9004
f57a258229c9a2a3ee1db41ba0e974cd9670e8f7
describe
'34075' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSW' 'sip-files00179.pro'
beec8d482a4d3c330ad57e1d97fa3705
bfa037a7968c03910342727ed5518162b67e3017
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSX' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
0f878c8443cb98387eac14e8c7bf36f4
124e4a654349e70224964aefc6777fc3507a5074
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSY' 'sip-files00179.tif'
070038038521cbec560ee953001e6426
0a957532ed7689fca41a462eac1c9ade3e00a4b9
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXSZ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
10b5787d2a364a37eec33bec9bcb5f4c
4b02c36290de39d74c85c27acd349fae91a01f24
describe
'7943' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTA' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
7afd01a93955de2dd911c0147247e706
6d64695966ee15e1c9e0158f8a2be3556c221c1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTB' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
ad1cc02b61c7c2efec06ea30f0b95dd2
763f3dc6ba3ba6a2e2781f994ec461c7ca69809e
describe
'105451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTC' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
4296626e390e061c2050486fb34cfbaa
48402fa0caea71ef4622eed4d55c9cea3512c9e2
describe
'32452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTD' 'sip-files00180.pro'
51bf6e8720eb14bc96152a350dfbb19b
74babbbba7979a56abd4918f8fd531bee2d9c622
describe
'32332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTE' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
8b5d41804e7e2b87d39b10f9c5385130
41e88a22dcb6582fc4f5ad22d4aa52b2208cdf09
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTF' 'sip-files00180.tif'
0434e23f4c3c3f72dbf940ffccb1f0b8
defa06cdf0abcd3b140b1c71821c531f97c13eae
'2011-11-14T19:10:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTG' 'sip-files00180.txt'
f9c5229a383a4a945dd0ad010ea38c06
f52c65441580c0b62d60b785b93f6c7663728f48
describe
'7643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTH' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
830cd02738d5dc0e482258ab88814fa6
c2c3b56aa0cd4b2fa642f9c4a324dac974ea3ef4
describe
'368443' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTI' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
724b1a628ce72fa2a1c263c8a2fc4394
b52fcb4eee6ef51103813b0ac0568d9c0670068b
'2011-11-14T19:09:05-05:00'
describe
'109393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTJ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
d7db6e2878f254b58bfec31a7dc5dae2
6925671412dc1923383abc76bbb604bfe2e71f3e
describe
'34366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTK' 'sip-files00181.pro'
fe1f62d82f2b0b81008cc6d83a4ea6e4
e3c1675404942d8748b0a319a7de8fba71d6c254
describe
'33357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTL' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
198f6086c7dd2e1646dc2c0f1a658dee
e5a790feac89c3810ade50df44814ece1f99e8f8
describe
'2964296' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTM' 'sip-files00181.tif'
db9fdf51506a75a66a4b46f7aa17232b
ca945da4c0c4040315914c36ce9ff6552dfbe513
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTN' 'sip-files00181.txt'
1babe41e586b61ee5d7c9b421c00ae80
28dde94ee078727c3e694b13b084d85741cdc42a
describe
'7778' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTO' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
d67a9e28ac2313fee9a3e99ef26a6338
6fa34bfca1d1572d8561ceb55e75d83651c7c135
describe
'368488' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ebfba7e7217c4692aae76410be978e97
d4abe50dd55d43357ffc74e01dd2764eb25f2cce
describe
'110904' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
c49d9c791a6637b61071724130715e08
f1e05de32b36fb8a4c3cebadd6cbc2e401f15c07
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTR' 'sip-files00182.pro'
1695a6963a025036dacd927ee6b97f4a
2b41cdac5b95e1e76b47c785956e753c0a88a21b
'2011-11-14T19:09:06-05:00'
describe
'34163' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTS' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
bc77db9363f411023d1d1a0e089046f1
4276c2b48b5a372d6227edb4b66b81cf6506adbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTT' 'sip-files00182.tif'
8b1dd1907af2cb44a62a75e6353ec528
134bbc2099c32c1c913989be8ea052d9d78d6d51
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTU' 'sip-files00182.txt'
a3552a76c313642ec4df0b399e16032a
9059a31a3b8262addfbbd3f68c3cce866ffa4689
describe
'8115' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTV' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
bc62b6aead8da69a3c0882011bd3d4d5
5ffc0a3efb3a0a4ac4c3c09d294d585f07a346a9
describe
'368453' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTW' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
efc1be34375f2288c2dc9414b666a868
0f91d71022d337c612ddc071c5c9558729a8a8bc
describe
'136958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTX' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
2219ce11cef7df06993c11b8eb8d283b
a44c508101f3f499546e0a7e2df51552990379c2
describe
'19807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
c259de6312fda77998e3a97f58622f5d
b803e0ae9bd9603c532d6e1fcaa3950aacca2406
describe
'36032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXTZ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
cce6168400cc6e19908ee88dc1093992
6e524a5021f9a1899381b918a004dec536a93323
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUA' 'sip-files00183.tif'
3cc3d88f78bff730d7aafbe181a25f5e
ed06388e85e236dde7233522c77406a06c57881b
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUB' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ce88dac680c94afb9fb16d910519f17e
e89f2fafeff41372728c114b56697a20b1e219b2
describe
'8456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUC' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
28fe487720f513167603cd2a9988e1ba
d0bfa7027dc5a4655a27c25c007b69dd8a0af2a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUD' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
48502c9aad3a9b419fe8c2af0414ec73
16626a43c56f9db67582c9f8546e3d4dd411b10f
describe
'116764' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUE' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
de04e4bee8ebdca7fe771bc77e115d6f
fabe7949ec957683d4486eba6a543d7466c7328a
describe
'35237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUF' 'sip-files00184.pro'
c1d4b459e4989126fffa4599082235bb
e837001e0cd46f54ee5a344b895d59f53a538424
describe
'35918' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUG' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
e41604d13ba3adfea6b73d3b90cbb88e
04d513825ecb91982f60039554888e6ddc3ee8ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUH' 'sip-files00184.tif'
942c22dff6cbca4bec6f847824d27660
6cc456876884209a216e2a2efe11749e5e7c142f
'2011-11-14T19:10:02-05:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUI' 'sip-files00184.txt'
9a73e05fdbf75ba85b7a46b5c8170e8c
55c4bd6a1349f984263b09848361fac2b5e305a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUJ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
7ea02a91ec59c5a363ca73c874732193
d1b4bd24fa1fec9d0713ddd2581deca09bd3d3e3
describe
'368475' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUK' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
2d921e7b6f8563d0c82a63612c0142de
02d796dc48db520273e7f785f3b8df8f7c06262a
describe
'108972' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUL' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
51711df4575e13a140e423e2b24c6900
6ea1f878c77d213488da971463662809b0c58249
describe
'34339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUM' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9f8cce2b519b3f7e3f9f38d381b2f136
8b58658eb6e5cc7bcef0e8e92187b81c50011b05
'2011-11-14T19:12:33-05:00'
describe
'34228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUN' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
86fe6f6c7cba3e309890e21514355478
9080f8afcd73a5e2dae4bc0e80251fe62b0b8c11
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUO' 'sip-files00185.tif'
4cf196d06f599a4a6741a0d91e7a064e
c7000720e8d6e7c138b065126c4f444fa2eb9486
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUP' 'sip-files00185.txt'
5f2bc87752bb72ac776a2b62e70a6ec0
66f002fd677d6e54415f9c10044d0a9efc974e53
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUQ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
85ae992287dc1c284b64d2d2b9745d04
f7192c0d636f878b3003395eec3aa3ff07707f3a
describe
'361740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUR' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
b41f68d2979bb4dd07528dfb9828df40
ecdc2e0b326e30b890f4730cda4dcd29f4145b4f
describe
'114097' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUS' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
5fd1ccef9a67eaf981e14296e685cbdc
0cc2c86be45b38b08edee31fb669cd7272bb1493
describe
'35073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUT' 'sip-files00186.pro'
ffd6a11d30b67806d3139807adaf0e9c
f41049da18826fac9d3ab3cd1dc1d3474bdf50d7
describe
'34881' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUU' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
4f68e68073366e73bd2967ecab13a0ac
c66a3a22355747d459b6431528cb24b6e15ae7e5
'2011-11-14T19:09:31-05:00'
describe
'2910944' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUV' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f2c30cf964da7aec9b3ca96383f20f64
5d5be978bffcb59dc7e370462a368ff629a14729
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUW' 'sip-files00186.txt'
4d46518cdc653e4c222b97713d8d3c99
68ded4449a1c50c690dd062342ef13ec36978111
describe
'8638' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUX' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
01e69252d4b688a9e26c6ea5e8b0f327
ddcbe580e35107b78dc1e234ac1580f7d2690dda
describe
'368465' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUY' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
673181047970ec7a9950d70b1e872623
bfb5fa9eee4ff288eba0b6131d5f9591a57d8ad2
'2011-11-14T19:12:27-05:00'
describe
'117250' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXUZ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
17fed2d4fe558f73310e01d2ce840f04
d3a058ea5b922a84ad8dcc13fedd71ac16ba2aff
describe
'34312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVA' 'sip-files00187.pro'
8be859a3c9ca5a8f687c0d34a3c63682
a063a6fd024e81e9d481fe2a0e9db5916c4c92e1
describe
'35273' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
720e2ea10ad26ba949d26070f12cfd4e
a3b8e7f7d22d81aa88278f7b47e041f6af4c248f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e672c08851dee2c20490e11a647515d4
c15dbb02351e317f5b36c6433c827c8326202533
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
61b2525c9ba893d8cf701c40a8f67cb2
4a0b9748e4c970b22e8ab1012302c988c54e12f4
describe
'8246' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVE' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
0b052411d5d56367d9ef901763baea2e
1bb0edd98b9c0eaee291208b685c55b4e6b43dc6
describe
'356716' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
0711cc4c92a6ca589f27fef6c5bd3ef5
a419b5d413954d0388ee731457e840ee4f477df8
describe
'116700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
eb64fa206c6e8dff785700fbd7fb501c
6a664cbc0788cdf97f231e8c1b5d08d3d5439a74
describe
'34631' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVH' 'sip-files00188.pro'
2493b39b3b537f36870ab6fd9e1fb070
57d548880746b12f754471ed5b450e71553c72d6
describe
'35584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVI' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
c8afc66bc1a860b60cca6d1da3a93e1e
9b89c921807d482ed358a3ce6ea6c745a16aa63e
describe
'2870400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
de4e2bfdf0b45c48f0d9b2f41b1b0dd2
72b90c0c66efbb50af1c6561e93cc782c6db032c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
5631f4dee5cc049dae5f610643519805
3c83ccaf7987d4020a6436f56096ec3bbb905d90
describe
'8993' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVL' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
4a900a7610240d8a40d9e7e407ec0f57
bc469d757e17388be7680d4c5d185d3a9fd2ed84
describe
'363986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVM' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
18ae28c3d418f0e5396761ecaf1282a6
d13d64626c029053635bbbe7bd628adf2ee87a17
describe
'116711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVN' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
4d3c0e8e3045a36a78a77eeaa83acc00
f2a3dc0cef47e48f4c6c19e7f80690f803365721
describe
'10192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVO' 'sip-files00189.pro'
a887b8191c6fc14d8e249bb346a85ffd
27d93fbe2b81a828aa4a20d89eb2b1d3fc4ed287
describe
'29150' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVP' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
a90891ea4b97457b664898291a5d727d
4f0a1fc8361ff67e9eccc7cd9ff9cbe5092d727a
describe
'2930152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVQ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
b6391a58617219c65370994215ff39af
4d1adc895ded7f5b9ca82842480febbea78635dc
'2011-11-14T19:11:28-05:00'
describe
'413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVR' 'sip-files00189.txt'
675a0721476d324be08a8620dc3945b4
f60fa0baf0429a47ab40496190433435203bc6cb
describe
'7264' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVS' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
b06a0ee6e99e1bd5990be721be3b41b1
4734a17725f99a5f31b355a2d157a283aadf5622
describe
'363127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVT' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
41d2ab96a84f00739b7fe29ab4f8430e
656cb928d9568c6ad3ffe99ef6ed79c4f5e60fd3
describe
'120345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVU' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
f5075a315c7d673804998933ecb51310
b473572f7601f324c3f0775efd64d1e0b9e967af
describe
'36949' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVV' 'sip-files00190.pro'
254ec0582f06a3bd3b87906b287c7090
8e3dcdb6beeba64e2c063605cdeef1404dede4d9
describe
'36865' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVW' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
8ae2db9f74cb9912a669c418b761c3f1
19e1f09bc71429aad3b11fbc9308bc12cc808abc
describe
'2921616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
90fcd78df3447cbcf75db810bcfc8c0c
f3c91af3376c31d1c5db03d9a8ed2ac32d0dd181
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVY' 'sip-files00190.txt'
5f2912982970ed1e5c018500423b45a0
ac68b3cd73b8291204c089b84402ebd082d79ecd
describe
'8635' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXVZ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
f6049548fa3f726ce79df05410f1b2e5
593a07e0d9e8ad5fd4399bcd150dc1c4d2c77b7a
describe
'368339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWA' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
73a6eb26c94552c9a7e311cd4b963150
b78efb41093b6bb294770cb6ebd58199e7230ecb
describe
'55698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWB' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
400079c3fd5e3f52430ec7a10808c063
6513a9b709832d2eb52a190f463a664daccb562c
'2011-11-14T19:11:20-05:00'
describe
'13864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWC' 'sip-files00191.pro'
fd7058c24c4cd3a500e6a1ac10992e83
2b6d24c55dbdff9b29dc0a54a07ed099bee31394
'2011-11-14T19:10:59-05:00'
describe
'16372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
16578c9f033f7626f5144d056ebc4386
437cb1f85548b06532c123fccf5bd9551c987361
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWE' 'sip-files00191.tif'
08c6286e8c1bf0304a6c37d88e983525
84f1b9d29641006ec4d538fa7f4ceee13596cbe9
'2011-11-14T19:06:06-05:00'
describe
'591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
eef1058788fcdad825652b739fdeaf44
c7d1a0499203ffb2b85af3d94fac54c275aaef0d
describe
'4217' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWG' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
6bc57d28b87379499ca0775be5aeca61
8dc5a7743fa5a07eb993848ac05ca645e6f616ea
describe
'364112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWH' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
8df66d687c2c419ad70559c52002f93f
7a589dd67309735d93b7c4d176711360f9c9da66
describe
'97827' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWI' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
eed9caac509e2d98de9a993ec9f142b4
e205ed1d9fb6e53e96e8becf5dcdbf389d60a12d
describe
'28701' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWJ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
326e2d6bf8963eefc0eb82a7f2379885
8ec39314a9a3f68466ad810f4f4a41cd9c6f8199
describe
'31052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWK' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
2bb3124d77218fd14959bb57f8f3aab6
1e42fe437a59c83b2456216e7aeac39f48a7ed1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWL' 'sip-files00192.tif'
985e2b1d20923e049841514d3e7f5a36
bdb6d8c98e383582caf98c8d2cf51b0010d2e009
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWM' 'sip-files00192.txt'
291fe9e29fb597557956b7eac64101e0
94fe260bc921a0d01feadf457acadce5b1194cc4
describe
'7711' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWN' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
bb8cc978bbc2a570c254eb8d7d17d5d7
b9aa45f877d037abce6681545e9d966f75adc89f
describe
'368427' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWO' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
19de877de49110379b9a71cae9d43d0a
4bfe6e831040cae02b14ee04cf62e2d58483641d
'2011-11-14T19:14:46-05:00'
describe
'119749' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWP' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
00354767fe20584a087692d0e49cb67b
4de19ca023af10f0c788f45193a3ef88dae22e36
describe
'36213' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWQ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
f46127d310170dfdf5bd3cf47347c894
9190f56428b3c517dab6d866e9e619a9da072fe8
describe
'36648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWR' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
37b587b396853917030786346a0ecab5
75ce1ab31b0d81d9242573a6547ac26c16571669
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWS' 'sip-files00193.tif'
46b9c1956c8eb84514b0db1b310f349e
1fa53a921d2368fc4b4ca636522ed480424b7467
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWT' 'sip-files00193.txt'
c4f227c2dc7105fcfc364f52f14545df
d8468ee7c9b20d3aaf43ac0328d9bf0dd2344082
describe
'8165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWU' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
38f93f36532a10eb40de1bdec254c53a
fda1239fa2c07bcd4053ebdc7237c68724afba42
describe
'368391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWV' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
a2bc8f958cc0e0f57e1f455f2a5bcc97
caa9d3ba23597bfc8e2703c31720390769c5a4af
describe
'111066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWW' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
404748c2121e1f3e3007f46cc5ef54b4
69c42a0319e0da56f257313c17a9ab72e8d5b2aa
describe
'36047' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWX' 'sip-files00194.pro'
f75a09c7ccc85ca4ac1c136f5be7552b
3f37ba83286f0daa837932842474507ea3786438
describe
'34210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWY' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8cbffe2826dba660b8e3e8e8bd3fa002
6ea8ff73e9913babb6a47221a0376e2e18fb85dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXWZ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
e56aac3c180ce2717eb4038d2eed2744
3f841fed14a1d32e8ad5b072e637d5b22aec808e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXA' 'sip-files00194.txt'
50471ac7ab9799909b48639839d5796f
c84e0f6fec55f1b70a5bb8dd379b6d0e0e49ec11
describe
'8383' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXB' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
806811c225e2caf7bfbae2adc7d0b83a
1cc96e8382e7b99306edb070b6fc6a0b7aa55135
'2011-11-14T19:09:04-05:00'
describe
'361463' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXC' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
9c3ccaa140f9d29338e0d9ca53398d81
e094d5ad2402a2d31680b75a03e721de2fd6d60d
describe
'116582' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
c20bed3ea4cb6d9489b4e0b8a3c21e2f
8e4708a2a107360b026cb4f7b88b05c6f9a6936b
'2011-11-14T19:13:30-05:00'
describe
'36953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXE' 'sip-files00195.pro'
020c94d6ae960e78f44110326540f592
635ac06668c66a0900b8d3bf13fc25f56cb184fb
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXF' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
a86200527bc0a47e69433fbba27e2604
94d0ec40685bb288c342aa854aace6c185b3885d
describe
'2908312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXG' 'sip-files00195.tif'
4decbd7eafd3b8f42746e516f817b45e
a80abffcb1c700d88214d9ef40704e5c70a2a9e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXH' 'sip-files00195.txt'
ffd8127e041a3a5bccfa840d1659d6a9
6df96b89ddb47a6178c74f813b9829c7ba26beaf
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXI' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
d72db17dab87e90b282d913648c7ac73
badcd4b8ef00ffb7d7b2c31cabd3bd45e880c546
describe
'356747' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
9722a884724d353b0db40b252deb4e17
5f0eae5f1725aae11d29ffed8a32159b05a7333f
describe
'115963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
08c176c635bf8c221ef0ea388e1775a0
c48ae1830294dbab7fdfff881c5656d1fa712734
'2011-11-14T19:11:04-05:00'
describe
'34450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
6593c0ccb8f01e4cf9cb185ea1d0da3e
ae88297eeecdbc8e2c6e51f19c742b2f7008b729
describe
'35081' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXM' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
15c0e7baa19f1d1e44e2db85f4371ca2
9858ce5a01c54e9d1736ce8ebc3957a84c94e0af
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXN' 'sip-files00196.tif'
a329c5d621aec28d67e1d04b54002c9a
df272a01dd0b61fd34efc2b363f870c5fd08d6bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXO' 'sip-files00196.txt'
d846e29cd0e0e70150e0a0e7bfba3742
87470a82914e9fb01a3b7aacf189083ebc8c08a5
describe
'8518' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXP' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
89ce8821c7445ec260b15d151760b47c
fffe2c897d2a860de30960a633a0ba2ec047ee54
describe
'368459' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c78ad83e0e801390a7c02dfd753a76e9
ee45ad620dbebff66bb44c6a4f2b4003a1463b12
describe
'117537' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXR' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
71893a1245b288840093ac1c88399e0a
4b284e513d36efb4a8ee912a12949d86fca032fd
describe
'36124' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXS' 'sip-files00197.pro'
969a72f4fed02e6e9da4170fb2beef84
a6dc980de3e785389f90857363526cd31e09add7
describe
'35290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXT' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
f1ad61a9e4bdc0b03ef8a5b25eb918d1
2cd51ce741d264b44c92136f5739e8788a5dac35
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXU' 'sip-files00197.tif'
f813904e07cfaea010accf331b01985a
ec1ae422685acc429826ff4f569c5d0af33e62b5
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
c025c943400f4c526a6908a4a4eae161
0d7542b14d54179c20f11f0429a2a2f00f60c9ea
describe
'8400' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXW' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
4ac3712973f04e006c85a86bebb40e82
00fa7ea11f41156bbcfdf9813720931f077f3edf
describe
'362066' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b459f36e059ac00c9280c435cb78de0e
8fac7ce3be5255c8949dcc27efe8d65542982c57
describe
'113602' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXY' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
f4fbc28c492f19f2845df2856cc3c884
495ef878132d01c4866d72e8571a898af5290055
describe
'34712' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXXZ' 'sip-files00198.pro'
5e219f8176093b443f8f04becc49b810
691fced36501491053d2a761bf89213539b3f56a
describe
'35900' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYA' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
97804d70a1dcbca94327700247d9cd28
0cd6cc8dc429ae4cf05fa330e442a604d526489b
describe
'2913080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYB' 'sip-files00198.tif'
11cd7199901cef1f836b6557a8e7a0a1
b28ae86a05d0cf3e9951dbf4dc49ce0d3c8fed67
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYC' 'sip-files00198.txt'
a1aa53ab09a60c53570c01d1cf53071e
caa8dfb37d6906983b9653b305f05bc934f233c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYD' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
b49c24e3d3bc1bd1e087d743f13dc771
8f60fa67c012b9edf3f81ed3c9dc7e7e51799ca6
describe
'363774' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYE' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
ecf0d18c114e8ddb6abc7d35da8b0078
82da45a3aa50dc486b6d66aa878d8b94f410e34a
describe
'90680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYF' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
fa141dce4157464387ec686a3d8bd57a
fc609bca75201ac19f6fe8a8fefebf7d99fe2b95
describe
'1892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYG' 'sip-files00199.pro'
22e788561777d711fc7f1822fd3cff85
7371a184ba284a643b19eecb1bd04e1feb700d66
describe
'21120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYH' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
780fb88cd8cad65c56abbcaeb79a0857
ebb8ba2fa2fc6b0cf173d3d2b5366807044a8efa
describe
'2926820' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYI' 'sip-files00199.tif'
4f31ceb40ea15298f68b8b7802980882
92608181eccddbc206c0c965b74cfe76e49e38c3
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYJ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
19686aa087b42d107a97c29fb74eab2d
3c6e3bd793d2a322172e56bf35038a445a7bec87
describe
'4855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYK' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
cc31530e043d51f553dc56b3b1c44957
154ed032efa4953e7e06bfc4adcbec1783171e33
describe
'365001' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYL' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
6698b0268cc5a7b526c93a21c1b49938
fb732bd6e9c69ef69c6477bfee03c0e0c4938cb5
describe
'59079' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYM' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
dcb1376737ee987feb3dc20d5dfd6532
b0a755b03ade2c570f34b0d1afa82c2c93e1d367
describe
'17622' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYN' 'sip-files00201.pro'
7da4dde7cf449171000f6feaa4fd5605
1ec79e0a88691a85ba246f03cd9839d26f25923b
describe
'17248' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYO' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
2288abb6476f5a5a0e0b0531f2395f6a
6a73a982fe47eff7f8372141179eab3a66a636cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYP' 'sip-files00201.tif'
8fb0bfb75e55c423ffb46c06cdef29d5
96f755b053d507c5be5421ed08cbb3567d49cf54
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYQ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
2ea979cd9e15ff93f946313e9c3a48ba
c1528ea4cfca7792d1fd9b4be282af1a190e4a45
describe
'4469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYR' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
0ceb7b082e170e137e472a7a4f098bb9
3a8975e326621f2d05ef4991161a821af6435f50
describe
'362061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYS' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
67257dd675d3ede8c21e8a4de57467c0
d620978d33b44dbb8379d9f382baee83581164cf
describe
'90608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYT' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e7a2e03380cd959c7c7eb6e5c67bfca7
09469c0dade89c480a9a33951cb7ebf89c783a7e
describe
'26116' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYU' 'sip-files00202.pro'
b1ceaa01abc3abb03c08f941ddec8aa1
f6aa56a7ff214a4254833c2fd1f685a67e5a937b
describe
'26667' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYV' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
99dfc1cec676c26594c894e2c754bb31
c36a48c5d9998a8a7d5374467760f743841a6093
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYW' 'sip-files00202.tif'
fd2e9d43e0f206bb802030ae63ee1d67
b9475cc6354435c0d6bd2dd80f3c01e4020f0f6e
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYX' 'sip-files00202.txt'
b5c39438f2d9d7d96d875318cd0905e6
8027889c7a73a0fcb8282fdb70d6b054af45234b
describe
'6823' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYY' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a5627ea375dc73303d5f5c2aafeb223c
9738871e8460483a62b3e9ca6a3ce541b09dc216
describe
'368487' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXYZ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
e680e4a62e7134baf616c51536808dbd
ed94798659218ab56206b389517ec78fbec36681
describe
'115700' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZA' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
1d66b778948f669821ba699b20eae209
e60d0fc24b53b58ca3369fa278735f0d14e11140
describe
'36639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZB' 'sip-files00203.pro'
53871c6112282400768592b5e3efcfa7
83278eeff9a58aaa405330788df1fbfc81e8323d
'2011-11-14T19:09:54-05:00'
describe
'35792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZC' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
8c91d3a15fb4b0a286ad27267a8a005b
7f5a0ef7c44ebfcccf3f4a3d909c1536f92163b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZD' 'sip-files00203.tif'
8935ec21ea5e74ab3245c87f3b64f02a
3bdc81a2f4cbccdd4dc199fc55b8763eafe232cf
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZE' 'sip-files00203.txt'
63c137daff8cd8b356b86c5f235da0fc
395f1951ea37d73c32c3b027ec5a9a7ca6eedfb9
describe
'8649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZF' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
f136469f7230c3cab217d2350a369367
c88c3155aad42285811b7296414a7404d9230875
describe
'363090' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZG' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
bfb3b1948903544984712874b8b13bc2
e6723e8c379b0cc5520eb526e1e1ee8a7f3f3102
describe
'112013' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZH' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
3fc6435ab061a3ea5fda5182f7b1bb5a
4bbbb7d8d3ba056d752aac197c6aa94da1c5fc69
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZI' 'sip-files00204.pro'
950843f43d740991c395c16aa75b374a
04af0aed658245746709ba7331e3338f6ccb91db
describe
'33964' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZJ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
915195f8e8f91198181f1fdf0bc6cc47
2b28c9e8fa4ea4a50eee6a2f310b5a6a0e42cf54
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZK' 'sip-files00204.tif'
7ad8591a6daf94d36e44fd0f8086c78b
92d03fdad493663e55dee32132a32ab029b5842b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZL' 'sip-files00204.txt'
222c8574388731cdb1480fe21d9b56c3
6c858a3dbc6914d61e4e05e4a76a0836730f417a
describe
'8391' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZM' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
8849d1e424198ce05ec17890d335f98f
a96ed8d94ccb09ab99b95c4e5a965da264f594e3
describe
'368451' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZN' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
062327325b9afc92e80e4f6d285420eb
66e27d59041f479f047bd9470d330f38eb9c86e0
describe
'121210' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZO' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
84dd208c531ca70cf969dd85e06c25b7
616391bc465853a05620ebe10bbd8663462b9c3b
describe
'37680' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZP' 'sip-files00205.pro'
a1f3def989af59318a4386a3b6bf06c9
fdb4d9c5f232b20f77b36e91d092d36ecdc9e4ae
describe
'36643' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZQ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
cc996eb4bdb3930c0d13adc386d518ae
6d867e09570378f194998fae93d3b43370887150
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZR' 'sip-files00205.tif'
a40d59fa6c6980f5cc4c0852ee42512e
1481bebbb8296f0a412369c305d789e1ccde6a1d
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZS' 'sip-files00205.txt'
e8eced15cd9580e50006fa6379a92cd6
9b0e7c0edd5806cb19d026031be653df9208c9bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZT' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
50477c768df86e0588599eb2116b8f39
d011568569ba300126235d5ef345d689576808ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZU' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
14da240fc30c797d901cc2026a20e0f9
2ffc79748bee453da8650f0864d7a171889e200d
describe
'120951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZV' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
ac33ff8e7cb0acd99deba16ee97aabdf
db884e8cb900cad724e32dc7f4e848d15d0d775e
describe
'36825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZW' 'sip-files00206.pro'
658c618ac4abd799e9eb17ddc745c792
71aa75e7436d23004ad033d5a8a7e9102bfff307
describe
'37275' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZX' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
3addd4eeb6b65eb054f19bfac6763b04
1a1db11cd4e90d06a2d1ddb16900a888a257daec
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZY' 'sip-files00206.tif'
cae218c282eb20c9991d62565ca01ae0
45775c8e3d9289e164a50b06359145bb5c1ffc42
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABXZZ' 'sip-files00206.txt'
adbc0432ade8984c34fb3fdd5851f245
cefe2087d4cd96a2e116e64c3e08a53b1716cb09
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAA' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
c8807ec2ce901c2fa93d228a691d61c1
a7660bb1a718f7b9b832aeff35fb10cbf8be25ed
describe
'359902' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAB' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
942a6151ba7a940b7960c6889d03508a
3d4be5833bf26c81a0b5a54d64a59e93a3499850
'2011-11-14T19:14:17-05:00'
describe
'111258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAC' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8313e25c733b6a206ac8369abd7f5fb9
7ad9765a71544a17c65e5a00767b1220dfd3e7f2
describe
'32841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAD' 'sip-files00207.pro'
8bc76b1227b29cde6cb5748e834f638e
08912a9dee664019296c3050734c1984d4913d0a
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAE' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
f64d4505f1a436dd1d5cdbda62a7f0d4
8d0a12591245071dce751e3cfad0d408b0be68ce
describe
'2896004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAF' 'sip-files00207.tif'
d2b8f06e55688ccc732cc41b98469e39
03a754240387bfe64dbae0f81d460c884069299f
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAG' 'sip-files00207.txt'
961a7fef6bc713545056646b9945cc1f
9e4c0a5b14aa8c639a6e071f8628c60fe642630d
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAH' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
9c1df1a5e0b6aadc6093f6ff8642e24f
0a5178e17f3ce6df76f7d5e86ab4038d5f7c40f9
describe
'354584' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAI' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
79007a35eb4944455a9dd3a586f8f6ce
ff4b4cfaaed0d437578c4fbcd5b1d3264ba0a5a8
describe
'102986' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAJ' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
0671bfbe5a81ad29bc316590214855d7
df5b8c8698d2ae9f222ea2eae07d80781f74a443
'2011-11-14T19:13:57-05:00'
describe
'32896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAK' 'sip-files00208.pro'
7245e80af3e89e83ad168205832f94be
0c51eea57e4e9c09dafd647ed68300d437eca5a9
describe
'31835' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAL' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
e3affe793dad4f4bb3180079e9926207
fa8e126d7ff3b3ddb689a147b6cbafbaa7b52d51
describe
'2853328' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAM' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e803e828737b9e028fa09d3e65f32ca0
f710def146c82d7eb28be05525a6163f82bd8c28
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAN' 'sip-files00208.txt'
f2c333cd261d6a25ec96ce9e70c66d02
b0a20d4048e500ff0fbee8c8170cbb9ce301c7d1
describe
'8192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAO' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
93eca5229d48d248bd0b1161dc3a307e
c0d18b6526cf732822c273991778007fe30b41b2
describe
'370511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAP' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
279457a7e9240100d6d6f4debf8130fc
3f7b5aeb501284805e1053d444e51589b2e58bf3
describe
'68988' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAQ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
3d75f72d41f70bb706f4a1b251e90651
b481b6698d18fdf0303169d875cbb5283077e808
describe
'3201' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAR' 'sip-files00209.pro'
efd5fc22925fe6949a8ac0e5dbced518
8bcf3847e82f7fda9832271cc968f378d26f1e74
describe
'15240' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAS' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
a2189cc1a6f5da46a5e262503e610196
62465592c7b93f22f946f10e5d6dee0a61e0ef02
describe
'2982112' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAT' 'sip-files00209.tif'
ebdf118a382233a77880a6f3e13d6993
ba322d306b6346005e9ad711966aba92d4308929
'2011-11-14T19:13:32-05:00'
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAU' 'sip-files00209.txt'
ca9f1becff041717b99a4f1a552fc1ed
abdf839c0a50d966eaa1aafd4f39c27556085e20
describe
Invalid character
'3554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAV' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
31014f99df52754d8db0eaf10c4b68f8
bf7285c05a509d9b6a73b5f91a1bcf1be081c15e
describe
'362037' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAW' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
4ff2908483531e1382b80fd55d2af10e
42ffe80ca27a654b9a2acbefae5baef561c5819c
describe
'105312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAX' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
729a35af86a16d7ba4950a44fe26a1cf
675cd5078b6e8b78f2cd99c5e36c2f5c44975759
describe
'32239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAY' 'sip-files00211.pro'
f9674984885aaae0718e046d56ef30c4
5d63e74f3c3f55a7d10c2488130fdb96b22e9f2f
describe
'32693' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYAZ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
9d151c52fc99f2e4889fffab54eed3b0
2fa72e878d58592045c176c3ab1aa3ef92b764cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBA' 'sip-files00211.tif'
6d79437a9e3f0571afdb8a2efd195fe0
1921e0aba1f512e0818bafeaa1db86df42acd717
'2011-11-14T19:10:23-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBB' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b9aa62fc10d923dffbcd4609cafd7bb1
55ad18172ba877119210a28c3b56ce4205dd26d5
describe
'7998' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBC' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
8466d7427451a26608f87d504be0c1c2
0a23ee6dfad15ce8c121070e679ab2646a5366d2
describe
'352323' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBD' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
64acf7ab325fdad963e043012c1dc6e6
4930e4d01e8305ed33213d041753726fa7c39195
describe
'97052' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBE' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
997d574e270a28995f775fd1fdaf0d1c
66df6ae05b2a12811b13ee67db3c4157b3ade217
describe
'28249' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBF' 'sip-files00212.pro'
94dc47b89938c9e6d8104ecfa5a0c04f
9926e6f6fd28052c9d8f50cf4205505fe5b8d54d
describe
'29382' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBG' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
5799b3f23e75a8c9a0146c0929190a47
a436695d2efd6c23869183f9a6ed36954f78018d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBH' 'sip-files00212.tif'
b2a020e7ca598a8febb2836dc500ca45
a53c2f9e9ccf5cbc49956e1b78d06a269c245089
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBI' 'sip-files00212.txt'
22f5dd59cd0f6ed31df2e9980dcc6d61
bf1960b03769abcc49d0138efcc16c893225ffa3
describe
'7346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBJ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
e5a2d928d53b15b47d7f04cb9d1dfd13
1f1fa5aa13dfd9c3b9f0be391af7b5ca34247a0c
describe
'359901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBK' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
3acaf183b001d60b8afc5bc838c26f69
b88ea752a4488c366d1320443fe75da047c8ca58
describe
'100515' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBL' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
0d695f3a44b7de412f531cc403ca3119
01c8c4a6bdcf36fb6fc2534947002c0516975f08
describe
'17659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBM' 'sip-files00213.pro'
bae4b529890cb440aa8941c86afaed5f
0c7d263f0be8683a2095fabcb9b698bfac17db8a
describe
'28291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBN' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
6a06113d8b07f4ef7bc5bdac24989231
f72d1b70379f2c626bcf14d66894ce684eb9c425
describe
'2896008' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBO' 'sip-files00213.tif'
3236428b75e54efbcc00f185fed035b7
33c751812e4770876225e9a2a292dd5fc7bf6988
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBP' 'sip-files00213.txt'
b002abc658c4311178f1a8a68d48e2e6
a7134aca08b7eb690b6564582c1c86a13b70b9a7
describe
'7012' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBQ' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
c7c7df7962e02e24b3b09fa5239bccde
41214529081d7a8f48d6083090ec80a9578b7d8d
describe
'350084' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBR' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
5710807022a6088d26aef1e2dd1f5911
141ec9c9059bd80b5e248a3a8cfa02b2b5be1d20
describe
'116852' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBS' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
06d12280a56c843182a660dfa960682f
77e6156d387993437c6eb689c6aca7b59246f041
describe
'34601' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBT' 'sip-files00214.pro'
716783e8c9595b3d5bc8661f364fc595
e2541132c91cf057a772615eaafd887c31f9311f
describe
'36180' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBU' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
abb0c50560a23fb8a6bd0eefb4adf9ef
84f1b7a59eaa3788faae47f95b0b6beb2bfc87ca
describe
'2817184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBV' 'sip-files00214.tif'
ef3f49fc0735f4bd86d7014893212d27
01fd04b8b4330f75dd2b47129e338f56cefb6041
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBW' 'sip-files00214.txt'
bac203337aecc5cfc5d1358e03403602
31d6edb11ae8c7a59519736fa6d94cf627ed9f73
describe
'8810' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBX' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
4b75f7ef56f40c1ce1e6bbe35bd8588d
53edfb33c7dea3ee7b4821ac48d9bdf4a58ac089
describe
'363098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBY' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
83226f887290070214cb3104c7f3e18a
e284eca8e28bc038ec91d69858c9ff6403421250
describe
'108170' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYBZ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
8e734d2e6851c7a33cb05fdf21b8f5de
9bdb5b67da9520200e6905489f0195615e1a8814
describe
'32267' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCA' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b36b1fb3a97d813ca9d3dde7837b377d
47bf93382278d8320cecc5a614168973b0875936
describe
'33223' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCB' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
aaba33ee194a5f2d9682cfbef2c5315c
a257b345bb5135d745b1164e3fe278c1e5024acd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCC' 'sip-files00215.tif'
7396dabfbfe9232f150dfffa2118602b
1615cae7959c2725dc0168adf22a7fe3d0317a96
'2011-11-14T19:06:38-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCD' 'sip-files00215.txt'
f84444ba2572e14d0c10870b1fba9753
ffed63ed92658c381ca92871e3a8df707f1b6dcf
describe
'7830' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCE' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
ea735c10fe04f5d48001f20fcdb35716
2b56153521c47a2ef6f5f72bbe57fa442ddadd66
describe
'341814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCF' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
64e1c5c5d1e315fd3df71399c51e4dc5
b14e93734e0c4a9db9ec78e6866a26bfb89282c0
describe
'117768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCG' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
e80f179087d407d1bd3858648414de57
da4647c36b2f21c97143deecf718447b3c979df4
describe
'35756' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCH' 'sip-files00216.pro'
b1934ed1f93fdfc592121b166cc93ebb
cfc1c3bf8a61260054339cb9cf20469f25a8f503
describe
'36409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCI' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
33cc0a1f2f9b07d6062b0d1cb1df8884
2b9314c52e522f706ea09082c0353e640a6f165d
describe
'2750896' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCJ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
5ed73e024ab47e867f415ff88d9c33ff
692c6cc6e5a11b8001ed01ba5bdd9e65ea40b1bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCK' 'sip-files00216.txt'
f31ba743b95650e8ac53efeaab10aa0a
615ba240dea8c3ecb33c5d28ecc429de08759a09
describe
'8953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCL' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
8acbbb4d87c3bb046bfead5ed7075619
0c2073278f42d5da6d0035b50d76c53b6052e543
describe
'360857' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCM' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
a68037bf8f9c2843714e5bfdbbdd68ba
e3b2576807bc52bd21164974a78ce74ed7b23fa7
describe
'106737' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCN' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
bdad9501da6917725bb3ca9971c47626
cee21951612d39da03a9725e828cd3facd2cdef1
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCO' 'sip-files00217.pro'
b4d45d1b1a8bc31a61181f1aa57c68c6
833e9a67bc53e0f66b9d8c59041ee1e42962f251
describe
'33580' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCP' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
302455fcf38d93b7896f4352c2f959a8
ba4603fc7d94931b79b8d6dcf085f3985edbc421
describe
'2904544' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCQ' 'sip-files00217.tif'
44a54006f99fb69d799529bf6306e811
68cf25f5102ec912087f9d21d81c4277ce0f601d
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCR' 'sip-files00217.txt'
a5d89feaaf94ef40c0bc06e00378de40
d038bbaf4cab29c9f3e771aa10b3f0c0f0ecbd18
describe
'8206' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCS' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
278acd96f76125f8f86a5cb9ac4fb06e
3fdc1b7ae6bbb162768f8d61be64b49a911d8e97
describe
'350232' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCT' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
721ba95a1983ec6ec366c5c323152b96
46162ef6d494eb73d33ad0daa2480d9f8e0bd159
describe
'115022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCU' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
4b60e92345193528ea64d82c551d34e1
3c0a58482f986a8b3d5e9ff15277e3cd32d9115d
describe
'19593' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCV' 'sip-files00218.pro'
f495755b54db3028ed87c90c92a9fbc2
18ead38b0aeed6c9f0d99066e1b05bd76f2ff803
describe
'31749' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCW' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
11ab0b78a75e7c4820b573e8f2618962
da996cbff894a84185e37368bac46c8a48eaf381
describe
'2818292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCX' 'sip-files00218.tif'
b141e6d630f16b9619f406d0e602e0b0
454e9fb4f977182ac3ba19df099612b2d5719a2b
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCY' 'sip-files00218.txt'
300eb5b22cc2debb881b53f6efe9b13c
a8607ec9d29471bc90f1b3ad765d1fa5af3f87b0
describe
'7782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYCZ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
d5e0465523979e2b12e360f7db5a1af5
1f477bc3fbb1d60ca49208bc11f0b39df96e031a
describe
'356709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDA' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
2eaa01d216a0791b039d560f9ca11e2f
6550fecfa13a5b216195ea45ce24e8ae1eb752cc
describe
'109626' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDB' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
13dfdf7ac0bbb71fa02557390e0b5e42
a2d4d6f3265752dc06cba8ad84c1953b891043a6
'2011-11-14T19:14:09-05:00'
describe
'32059' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDC' 'sip-files00219.pro'
3b5cd4e5b8228c8668a087459099c13b
53dfc436299fd7e1264cdaa99d93bdf598fd0869
describe
'35024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDD' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
58c86920c0a25f7496df9a44438868d7
a06bcb4b9d281c37114b4898cedee2e580fd1e5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDE' 'sip-files00219.tif'
73085f2a9df13d3737a87ee6ddb4239b
f41877afe8f24adfb360b1da383f316497d2e5e4
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDF' 'sip-files00219.txt'
188ec995c97c66894a36b4574218e8fd
e86b19d39b3aac5153bcb05b4494110816a4daac
describe
'8596' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDG' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9f7a26e028557473c04032171ac2798d
462d45fc6db17e712bcb0c482c74e8f2a6547bfb
describe
'340237' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDH' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
06b5065ac9ffc1727de8b98441dcda2b
6c76e13679319f001c8e8f5118620e231414e1ab
'2011-11-14T19:06:40-05:00'
describe
'72167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDI' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
cd0bc5595bda3ce356a4ecedfba8173d
93eadc27dff0eb2feaac95c0b000929834a3c68e
describe
'19375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDJ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
054aefa303f9b585e2a907c8165c28f7
54161cf03dc51a31eb555638ba3f50fa1d6da836
describe
'22388' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDK' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
7dc86129e33067742158e2f8fdfefe97
6e27deb4dbccad8ef584d969ebe3182c8802fcc6
describe
'2738348' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDL' 'sip-files00220.tif'
29ee7e2f265ea912bc5727b7f0649255
d62aff6c74246e71058f444ca3cfa8fd9d72380a
describe
'772' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDM' 'sip-files00220.txt'
8d3e0de190c8f3d955583e1872ccaea7
7afa298cd229642e7953257a99cbad352058353c
describe
'5928' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDN' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
98adcf4b7422ede66ba40dc00897e382
d17611c36381d4c35ab2aa09e6ba7aa798175fcd
describe
'361005' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDO' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
eef4839cc6c55df26fa4349c1d5a4476
f26a6b8567eb6e72ad4c0b47023b5a5ee37500c8
describe
'107340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDP' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
351ae4c619f15cd7b067db44d7bafd9f
e85fd36f6f8fcbe3be00eb3a4ad5be074af543ff
'2011-11-14T19:09:38-05:00'
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDQ' 'sip-files00221.pro'
66e0efb157b1b25eda8e7738c215d836
ecff42f162105b2d3a5ba7a5bb5b5d0ebc5d3242
describe
'32415' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDR' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
5e5f5379e9916296b01977a825afe086
e6359708e503c1dee3855d8b31fe3f988301a66f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDS' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b522e350a143605234d306b661863ac3
0cf3b1d1eee97796a2c1cca2e3e71533f3760fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDT' 'sip-files00221.txt'
950030cd60166adf8799a61caea7d76a
3fa4706b4a95aaedc95e31a9d9f72aa0f8d1bdc2
describe
'8207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDU' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
3f6aafa6df5612508734ff271cfdbe6a
e04badb7399d9a4929fdbdfa4dfcc7c98779cc0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDV' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
03c8fbd77bf3256a421fe8220d29003b
21dcb5a014cd7f9adf268119bf8123bf1d44bd7f
describe
'106029' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDW' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
b4bc5d360c3083895f3272e56d22efd5
c4f92df6068515145a9a40dafd013fe7dc0a8e4f
describe
'34335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDX' 'sip-files00222.pro'
520fa85c542ea58128f0bd2f7ea1c95a
90e01b5aece0c1febe94ff5284350216d24edbd7
describe
'33152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDY' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
4420c5fb63af70bab3b793e2666ff08a
81cc8133ff5fe16713ab267099219ca628944349
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYDZ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
a8ca2af6e990cb5dad03ccb72b7ac79f
f94a28b311b146b05d7c932bcebd6f109fb0f14d
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEA' 'sip-files00222.txt'
c23a656b1ae5bf453df8ae79bd1e5f41
0f71be804e9b925c854a1cd1d2c5dda4f0e9b761
describe
'7848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEB' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
e6a23736577f4adefc29dcbc339147f2
270e6ff9e74b0a8b3c611499aa7a61d07a0c6dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEC' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
6698a7adaf9d605f889467e9e5c38d8c
27e299049d3a2f2be1a54dea53aacfa6920636bb
describe
'116271' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYED' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
f79a41f066fdb9b353cc7ff103b44f08
c392eb88b2fde10a3fa50cdf2af7f5d27f44c991
describe
'34161' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEE' 'sip-files00223.pro'
b26e704d33300bad29aa1b2f7b0b7897
18f0082cdc95f8e5bda079839d1784a26196199e
describe
'35193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEF' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
53f8333e7f53bc7161e24e4062cb9a9e
b5141527b5786a575098927c9d0ce876809c158c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEG' 'sip-files00223.tif'
5209d47747623d84b5668d86e1f1bc1d
9ede2ec177c61c6b99c1562ed7ae8371e46beb93
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEH' 'sip-files00223.txt'
031d0318f378d2f109b9b55ea0ca6b4c
912795a6657bacebb4039e049393094854696d9f
describe
'7768' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEI' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
202a5cce5e1e8ee9e1b8c8f901c72c29
c4223ca8875f2027eaf9f7efb62f69f38f07f399
describe
'368492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEJ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
e6098930f69e186ee618928beb4296f5
68e577259cbe40c3245dab6ace1f5c0459460dc8
describe
'117653' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEK' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
1ca0d4508b910050dc126f272e12357d
9cd4a15838025c4d751c5702de6f7943be1cffdd
describe
'35528' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEL' 'sip-files00224.pro'
793bd9fba555ef5570ff560266877845
47c69edbf31f26cf186d24f63428aca0e1384835
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEM' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
7157f658fed9ddd19e39879b1f56fb6d
84c6c16cf7c9d61fd8e34aad31c45bad5185f45f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEN' 'sip-files00224.tif'
5de885ced106693a0490e788dd816220
56502fbb57e216dfde1806185790d07a1c4688a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEO' 'sip-files00224.txt'
2629375d5f617279a0be6a54f6a6cb0f
60b5ccbbccd38dbf56f7f9bf774eb9de126a20a6
describe
'8161' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEP' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
4be3e542e21e83af6e12eadfcb442bbd
8d8eb1b69f47fa649e5db0f0769835f98ae77c5c
describe
'368455' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEQ' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
47a622cad53d87726ce793a93e1e77ed
e2d19b747b3185e66aa3188526b5383c4395f8e0
describe
'111618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYER' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
157bcfef84c112046d5194b66066a7b0
29774d4dbea6ac7d33780933b65b6e36e56bc091
describe
'35314' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYES' 'sip-files00225.pro'
9151ed282e1f5fb22a9928e2fb7d7a44
aa609e6c12595c1fee9eaeb316e03cd8b71c80eb
describe
'35162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYET' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
53dcab765bb662d6210bf45c89fa3710
99114db2a59d61d28960da0fc2f18a66f7d468b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEU' 'sip-files00225.tif'
e7d88d8dc1fb3870104b11bfaac3929e
469ba67a18fd5f56429e1fd31da95146d68dc988
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEV' 'sip-files00225.txt'
d0a10c7088ffd4a3960efe75879d80cd
dec7f4381b55ce4dbf1ba1292b0f8c16ef205bf5
describe
'8239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEW' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
62e67ff26fd63b574f70e2376efed6d4
e1fb6a78ef1fa847e10aad6194732016b5be88a3
describe
'368489' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEX' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
e4096c3043223738baa0182490ec9cff
a4c8d23ee5192049467b630492c41f3d7eea25db
describe
'118285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEY' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
5844b1059ba76ac50d1c198c7973a29b
152ad353d6416acc40622601c4f5c9d474e811a7
describe
'36832' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYEZ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
174727089068a29108a9b1e7e147b467
a85c9cbde6522891fae6f075755d1c47aaa39cc5
describe
'37462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFA' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
6e7f62ccba8a32fd333c56da404e91d2
1d2e8b44e3e530c6c053ebc910968503e8a0aa95
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFB' 'sip-files00226.tif'
a053b4fab60dce2fe7f0368417170b11
8ac42433c11145e5b1ca4d2fed7bf95f4de8e1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFC' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9b4566c7b9cd195db857e45594feed47
baab274b25131d8f3197f6718bd378a1ccbe6051
describe
'8692' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFD' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
56bd69f5894958437f46ab800b212a50
862ae9312385d8c9c0f43160c337d504a2ce3b03
describe
'362035' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFE' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
24dac604ddaf26c20fe46f2a1715174c
5e1e630216b35435eb709c301dc7944d8d04380c
describe
'110730' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFF' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
604c5265aebb05562cfeed3a7e05da12
64b609063c7d330e78b0fd482a6e46dd599e3cdc
describe
'33256' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFG' 'sip-files00227.pro'
533a3772fa6ac0e4da9f1748a9e4963b
4b2a44c4a4e7be0452a15399f9ea7ca65401ecb4
describe
'33378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFH' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
288bfefd59be6aa2fe490bba2e7a2cee
5c7753b3a2e87732424b0faf11115ec31af3485f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFI' 'sip-files00227.tif'
bfc88604fc08e243bb922ba7dd3163a1
3065e67f5237be3e6cf5ba9d8d4abae5eb924e84
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFJ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
ad33b32bd7d32cce3f8a3aa5cdfd60d6
f2e2ebbae7564fb5aa1b3effb9c35f4c147070f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFK' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
cbc5898b3102c30d2559cc1800eb6a7a
10a06d43208ad6de52f7ad4e58f7fc120e342fb4
describe
'360843' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFL' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
c17b10aed2ec1b17ce9aa4ff4fdff24c
623674f7331be6939c3f54e57412b7fa112854df
describe
'96827' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFM' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
18e22bde4c3d2e85247590463c857520
c19cb99d2322a30b22115ef8f4ccaac202df4269
describe
'27889' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFN' 'sip-files00228.pro'
ff813c0d4c71ce1b4bbc9ea76397c3ac
462ff5ab9255059998eb56b46f5ceed534a47216
describe
'30366' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFO' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
af00c8bfdf4d735eb69ad75a8ffad39e
4138d4b33f72f1b00a35da420b68d75b0418128f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFP' 'sip-files00228.tif'
b4a57a54c1a7539d41ca7cf0b50e9d59
90b931853c1c6abee44fb7d54d58ee134b33140e
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFQ' 'sip-files00228.txt'
835f57bd31005dbb10f5c13da29b1714
29a7f8f736fab49674988ce510ca9bf5bc79a9fa
describe
'7202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFR' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
b6b04edd7559307982cd3774231fa494
0dcfabd6f8c8319b3cc05531e67396e4f4ea1e97
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFS' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
fd38defefd8650f22087ff678231f411
8fca343cb99002a3661c6b5ed0e7da37b93f415f
describe
'117095' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFT' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
086df28ce6a3d47cc137a637f2a3a3ad
4d48e41b6c45a4d378dca02e1ecec68df9136520
describe
'35878' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFU' 'sip-files00229.pro'
835e344558fe89bc9ab7da5fb38153e8
1de83304d0eeb31f32ca0062c62aea1552b810f3
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFV' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
769a6688111be28fdc30bec13ea47f86
a179493138ccd45e7e83b86085dda2257cc5f5fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFW' 'sip-files00229.tif'
6b5f94f4a3da206f623f965f7fe03e2a
d79070b4fdf9fdf4f9017d774220ee7b50b13595
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFX' 'sip-files00229.txt'
661b8a3b5406fc207e446531c00cf0a2
2020c0fe43f697fede0aa9a46b73006d177ecafe
describe
'8404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFY' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
5e9a8dcadab2e35e8a77f373fa5e0ddb
1213bb8851f79cca864f8fca2316dd06526361ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYFZ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
0095fe053d036e79256d9f975ba5994c
18a4f8b630842be88d9d83bfce21597bab9cd38a
describe
'110113' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGA' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
b031b70fc6ec9816336cccf990a84b0c
3dd8772e23859d8a1066794865d1ca79cb036c31
describe
'32999' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGB' 'sip-files00230.pro'
6896b0d9d77ef593a01787e19c73d8e1
0e4b91977b1b9bb7b860deabf6d70637e3b7c814
describe
'34356' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGC' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
64e2af5326ae0de8864a529aa75d63a8
fefcad9b6bf985c635110ed4ade7837075ee5ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGD' 'sip-files00230.tif'
0924797448cc4ad240050938e15eef12
e63e98725bc604136605ee6bf05ba8bdfd0fc0a3
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGE' 'sip-files00230.txt'
06e0285e9013dfa2601dafad05325feb
284bc7062fc79ff2b9bfc32237f647d3e0c55607
describe
'8420' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGF' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
fdf4c287a15153abbda6ae3f818c1ee8
6154e6a4508ceb89b3d20947f2d120878856d67d
describe
'361782' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGG' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
bc72cf5992115e84190a32facf3dff84
3dd9074828e79a39273a14074143e3e3d86150b2
describe
'62165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGH' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
cea498c0e2065c100f9fda0167679d15
0f67404d1ba5a8588a6361e39c5b7bdb4779be17
describe
'16860' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGI' 'sip-files00231.pro'
38fb9f890383e6aa60b91695002a2c70
5bc0d4a7f55d20b18ea861ca2557980d894e4025
describe
'18867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGJ' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
6de1814e6d9652e9f5dd6eb891690926
d40c0bea91b99ce662928facaff21ba09624a016
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGK' 'sip-files00231.tif'
2df0e0622f96398436f421459efd3edd
f71f0b9dbe1b3d7dab4d33b0c8027286f1ade064
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGL' 'sip-files00231.txt'
8a983a7ecc4d5148e06f42ad7bfdf80f
bc38cf6bde26795f46ab18fd5d37f458f5c4d031
'2011-11-14T19:13:48-05:00'
describe
'4841' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGM' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
f1df3f5edf47bdb0cc503e7a4588039e
ef2b38afb7b7a879ec6f341ca52c5d675d577a20
describe
'368375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGN' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
8eaf1c31447214f028d1a5a6c36af5fd
9467796e4c73814e7e51eea850de9c1f8bd0a0da
describe
'102610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGO' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
f31a1591a913639b1261b659dac51a52
aa4f80799e4fc7cbfdf7a666be4010e470e468d4
describe
'29453' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGP' 'sip-files00232.pro'
0e7e60acd84ec4120e08fb084d7a87ed
70734b17e8ecd9e44e95ae1eeff5523390a6a848
describe
'30378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGQ' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
9c432c8863862ea1da1a9b830bc0d04a
08b84491b285ca36d31f4a1fd25e595aa3dcb12a
'2011-11-14T19:13:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGR' 'sip-files00232.tif'
db35b827b0ac286ef83085f6495c2952
14c6e18d4e25a0a0728e6ea89b0c7f6585ccc7cc
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGS' 'sip-files00232.txt'
de2d9c497c0d573965f4253ecd8d2ec9
c75ab93a7c2840b879eda1f28709d5731aa5062f
describe
'7322' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGT' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
6f79c597db3bea1b6c4b52db24c331f1
659daebd24e493e18e22cbecae0821e8c4280b99
describe
'362022' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGU' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
deee24292366c99cdfad33ef727c9ec2
cb9c99d9221baf787da9f8be4afccd970ff695e4
describe
'96425' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGV' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5363a683e508d5ddac5fa0b5e33fa383
4488a0dd03b06bf33e07473dc05524ca9ae4ab77
describe
'18448' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGW' 'sip-files00233.pro'
ac9048ab9fa9224d2429439a819d5323
2f6aa279ac5f2d431a19dd2f933d014e80830f11
describe
'26209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGX' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
c62e9f5689b68e98134ef64cd45d6829
2f7736174418d2a77d7f55a918c729165275802c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGY' 'sip-files00233.tif'
ea6cb0abdb0e2e36d5972a8e17d93fd4
72404454f136e7becf270e0356326398ea21c10b
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYGZ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
a7e179aba9b519b89625b56a8b4933e8
19c12c042c90e78e17a6476725a128dbd793c77e
describe
Invalid character
'6552' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHA' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
a559cd38596483bb0516d9c6835944df
cb899e783eaf3245d7593e518dad73a9dc5ecc85
describe
'362058' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHB' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
26f07870f5c66119aaa4e215ba628d5e
e23831bee557bfa4a8b345fef0a03228ca972390
describe
'111490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHC' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
9b971ffbed5a54bf02d2cee34547abd5
ff77ec3b4767b5ac297dc15814bcac3f444142d1
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHD' 'sip-files00234.pro'
3fd319688e84fc9de06dd1b920b270bc
8adb61dee1da3549223ec399a52eee0cb0f85056
describe
'33392' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHE' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
b14c564770dc232bf6fc4c25c8fc4cfc
5348e1991417d768b6def6ae23f4ca4ae5bd5b41
describe
'2913072' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHF' 'sip-files00234.tif'
a8cb18518d2224e0474eabea69b91f31
0680a0e9221f131fd346333d96bf03918615e21a
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHG' 'sip-files00234.txt'
63dd648b72913097cbfb0a19383e63fb
9152fc5a84e8cb8839c39bc2f3a140409c4abcba
describe
'8202' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHH' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
1960357206d74d0221d22c1d9b2c0556
4ed8203fc31e0f23eb1e69f1bfda1fca49951b09
describe
'368450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHI' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
0d777cfe1b972beb8204e51e53c63ea5
3a1d8a0e7ea0d4fddd3c34d369cb80efcfa9b570
describe
'113554' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHJ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
1c0bf265d03b62744819027f696cf4c2
f12d052453bcc2195d4a944e5949ff73db228a01
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHK' 'sip-files00235.pro'
c74ac7a087a50720a77ecb65c816a995
9cb41d55c4fb6c088efa5780f19a4d8173a43875
describe
'35200' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHL' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
2752afba23fe750a9b7c45b047a4df75
b4f4cd290da8c30d5c662c6c91099eb2fd3380c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHM' 'sip-files00235.tif'
5090bff3b3aaff7411cfd4e6172ccf16
73f2bc2be62f33a2aef1c1990b8e7478ced67144
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHN' 'sip-files00235.txt'
36068f7cc99e9564c4ad593892141434
c1c0a92b758d599661e8905ca32a5f79623c0680
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHO' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
7445770e1666a20cda18ad3ac90a5e48
c52ebd8b4fd17bddfa8702425b0d1f9c83731d44
describe
'356748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHP' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
de15311d127e18de2257a4f51b10ef97
7778ff92970391917e2179f4ac2024ad0a24bea8
describe
'75310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHQ' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
532525f56d246650db9e5d0244f22300
3e2e1dae9cd5425a4ed0d395c577e7d9bd22034d
describe
'20301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHR' 'sip-files00236.pro'
2c8074c1d2fde708ed90f730e31be4dd
d0ec0a9b3542efd2d5bb7f1479685033803fc616
describe
'22541' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHS' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
f84c6c58d730b81535a2e2cf1fd449aa
eb482184e1b1b2d153dab6142cd302560312fcbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHT' 'sip-files00236.tif'
f717a9679534d9df78ffb7a939cca4be
3baa10e5dff8d0670d8e822feae59f1d618555e4
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHU' 'sip-files00236.txt'
011572ccfad3eac1dccdecdb290420b6
a51dc9389d1ac005ae5b89672305f08b526f1016
describe
'5886' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHV' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
b5af5549188e7e523d3459effdf2bcdf
6e4354618c238258dae9e8cae70225438cd99280
describe
'363143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHW' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
289a518854f9acb2d9f78806d338fe38
0f4c86da8a45be00451fc83203fdea78482ae963
describe
'101291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHX' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
426593107391be89e7d7dacecdeb235b
051267ad31da9df93d15d788f88b1f57e1019187
describe
'28612' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHY' 'sip-files00237.pro'
897489257596b8204c6f2a69d733e7bc
7b2e524c8e2a5b4be41c3c7feb095e2047eb6226
describe
'31123' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYHZ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
ae7703fa435b2921a16bbf30db131c43
4fabb7448885c0dcc104fc0e40fc462308bb4432
'2011-11-14T19:12:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIA' 'sip-files00237.tif'
2d86bb4aabe6bf1c469bb05ee7f88332
731faa5a2126ad3ed84c43d6776a4e572d98ed9d
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIB' 'sip-files00237.txt'
df9e1673a19da52301d872fb65844529
1e70d7b5eb24601dc4b7f36b76ed064c557f1791
describe
'7447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIC' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
8ef1a4b50164af6706b18cb2603cb080
20f3f7aeaf2c53ee225906970a2aa724248f9261
describe
'355676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYID' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
e8d4a3380a2d1f398ba37949d498970c
1d40715427c234d03399a9cbd4965456b0bc3871
describe
'122699' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIE' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
5ff3e58fa46781fdb27c5cfe28f26604
122a614bba6f35c70724c8668702e1e19cb47071
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIF' 'sip-files00238.pro'
1a45ee3ec1a6452921b243c8aad3d3e9
3a162031ac12c0232116778f519edf84835d33af
describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIG' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
8b2e9ed0f6b980d8db8d24e2dc5e9eb8
e23cd98951ded5610a467d698393616f953416b4
describe
'2861864' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIH' 'sip-files00238.tif'
186010d0cd6ef5314ccac422ec3d4448
8b28837efc8ede92e38281410220ad2dae3e8cb2
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYII' 'sip-files00238.txt'
1e141a3cce1cbaef7662828a32081813
859c4fd09dbca5b477605413db58399320634857
describe
'9063' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIJ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
6cf1788e963a856a9ff596c55a2474eb
3e856181f795e5811a41be31d829a1ab2f59f380
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIK' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
f90374fc1bd62f768712e5d3220ab6f9
ea872bbfb63fb82fae5f2d7625a30718f263b4b7
describe
'124920' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIL' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
ffcc036d5db3656bb330bd2bec843fc4
713094a75e2deb3d1cf0256e4647eb6c32db4524
'2011-11-14T19:14:41-05:00'
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIM' 'sip-files00239.pro'
3335193f41cfc24e9164fcafb5bf53ef
4dda0a2c4a2e30900e25d9720b0f18a91bee39b7
describe
'38484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIN' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
303292fa2162d1041f3ed29bdf46d302
c2c05fd2d03f85d058e3a88cebf636c9d7fcba66
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIO' 'sip-files00239.tif'
d1071b6254d08aba46e260b6523109f7
29dcc418ca2c6995a5bda03cc9396493ff46e421
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIP' 'sip-files00239.txt'
86347b0f15fc93b82d89fe8e9b09a739
f1ed04588db6409ad3863e4a48a1589ada0d95a2
describe
'8496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIQ' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
fce883aae2ecde14c8722b57977a3ada
f8e23797c98be53024a2aa7bb9f658b6907bc206
describe
'351132' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIR' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
ad9f624ded3f6ff1254cca4ec8b30cdb
b6a829d56ad390f0c92acbab271a598ae75c694d
describe
'124399' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIS' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
c77d87d1d32d1191fc690d948ecf89d4
8f3a6a7f9e30ed7b7b508901ff10d8f2fc290c84
describe
'37925' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIT' 'sip-files00240.pro'
79064d27da7791bb604cdf7b06ce8045
14b948f353b2229cad3318c042f6c2b908bbcd7e
describe
'37603' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIU' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
b0bd52ea9eaf6ca1287e9ecc55227880
1a3b816629cadfb809fc39ef433e6b424238c707
describe
'2825688' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIV' 'sip-files00240.tif'
7a41b32c3743c3bd0a6a2f344ea9084c
ea1a61beb964c176b4ced1aaafd96172d4bbde9c
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIW' 'sip-files00240.txt'
90e0c26a2458866b5b67cc1341514a51
11d862344036f97720e5b832cbb1e462a6f9eccf
describe
'9364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIX' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
035f3d82bfaab4a55fb138b40bf32d40
25ba7f646befa4f4119027b295757846e0767bdb
describe
'361004' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIY' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
71048989fb1021ee41aa3dfec29f0377
94b9e3883a40c2fa9c3d5da9eca9eb9789569fe8
describe
'128184' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYIZ' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
43bc427c52238275c2c7433dd0d1ee0c
80db0f5e707db30d6e4b0af27d87e06515cd2ab8
describe
'37800' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJA' 'sip-files00241.pro'
8c3036bf27f8d34144e94eb0c75e3df1
d5885e3e852824e5f404dfbecda481c6f598e19a
describe
'38806' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJB' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
1fbbe9c988a5081fc8f40237391eda29
a959a77d07bca6be3ba81be1204daaf6e40dc145
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJC' 'sip-files00241.tif'
7dc3bc8f6f873df352091a0fe5aa28bb
746cd7463d2064051d96140eabdeec10d434c03d
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJD' 'sip-files00241.txt'
80d45d279980085d0412a39298077967
08f574086e3820fb53869e913c114ba95e51a252
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJE' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
06f7ce629b14c7a4ddc56495882e98bb
508bf65c8d3efce4f29a2b43c78b205231a80387
describe
'344535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJF' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
d131cdabe95fdf096d71958fc1492b38
7758421c30c9b3ed7615edef4494eae34d24092a
describe
'127606' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJG' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
fe3fc5f26d126dfa4f9d487275d6dade
2ed69719028f3bbf97e53bbafb6e50b8b9a55831
describe
'38966' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJH' 'sip-files00242.pro'
22eca67e5d3d3302184467eb940eb6ae
e30de4da19d4a785163d1ee14971a6d45254f481
describe
'39044' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJI' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
9b2499aa746398ff3d32a49aec220ce2
89e100792930d0ffd3ed44013b6e615f83fda1c4
describe
'2772760' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJJ' 'sip-files00242.tif'
339a646d64a247da4a2c63f906667931
30498b72b842b8c199216fc3ef67ee9303c96b59
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJK' 'sip-files00242.txt'
51e7d763853b72ab2c9bd4d36c0831de
3cc32e7e1746fa56bab52c6a3f098ada12751dc2
describe
'9304' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJL' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
54ec0cf5e90468a687110a9e4a65a713
bb064b0685c31c7067079151e3a4dfc219e1a433
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJM' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
59087bc63c00c2743f094dc25c240d1f
229f9160e15b637f5aeb13f60e01980691808eaf
describe
'90526' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJN' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
7f5dbe5e513265987d0c6489041ee08a
f606565b5e644b6c6d1984d521cd0588680cfbab
'2011-11-14T19:12:53-05:00'
describe
'23733' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJO' 'sip-files00243.pro'
c9d631e1ca55fea35f06fbdc8af57f15
987287146b67beeea30efbf7241c8c6d6a780a59
describe
'26659' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJP' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
f1d3a83637bfb9250366ba13878909b0
9897c44bc4769d65ba9d882cbd4306bcdda0b05b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJQ' 'sip-files00243.tif'
33bf7489c1f5b0b68d30201dc7cd71e8
386f935f7bc4c11033c013142554dd9b9a019e33
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJR' 'sip-files00243.txt'
9b8752041b83bfdfefe5c2636cfe191d
4a1fefc04bfbaac6c6b026680b72f53517627ece
describe
'6290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJS' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
9194f2bf099ec3212e654e9eb483b863
f87eec23ff3b629dbb368ac98a38d37be3ac5060
describe
'350349' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJT' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
a89c40ea59d00b6e9480f870354ce8b0
caeb5f98f79d1f6cbd91299db579ccaacfaa6bc7
'2011-11-14T19:14:48-05:00'
describe
'100373' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJU' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
a65b68da81f8a422451376c522ac2d1d
bbe6eb34dcf23688b282d02ea11912f66d7969ac
describe
'28662' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJV' 'sip-files00244.pro'
07d4a09d849d59a729a650465e1084ff
cad6167f847d7cac1169381f02dfbc88db25a4a7
describe
'31639' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJW' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
66330d61a78218a7f4ea31543abdbe7f
6eb7d1d15b0ca7e54a4339f118c5d0461091e684
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJX' 'sip-files00244.tif'
dda26131acfbef5e5f81c70ed819a210
c0ef792f20d387d151da8df78db51e7d7d0705fd
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJY' 'sip-files00244.txt'
1f9e2b7479a20cdabc31c27990d6b524
5b26e9981d8884608e32b3fc95d84cfbccd42cec
describe
'7890' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYJZ' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
3a9b948954ea6ce929d2997b1b607d1c
acc9c99e43db1af3fc8aa7d610d75c864ef68f88
describe
'362027' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKA' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
5dc7427099df52922e58bf972ca7f89c
5f9548df24100a058e4ed1d893001e9c9ecdcf34
describe
'94338' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKB' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
547bd8f86591cd04596ea620be0bf58a
dd00bc8854fb67b3567662ae04a89d3c9f0cf4b4
describe
'13623' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKC' 'sip-files00245.pro'
63fa54036ce72097cccf0f0ccc21382f
ab40fd58728491ad3bd8eb7408e5cec3889d14b0
describe
'26144' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKD' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
51923d34a306c0be1ee3ab31adc51b2f
6cde8e0bf9098813337a1041db8d5164948632e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKE' 'sip-files00245.tif'
49b8a0fc5e0483e3a8ae8348f14a16c1
72618ba3be04f9202782dd92f6320d6c7fe1b217
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKF' 'sip-files00245.txt'
433190d2e804e5382814b560635fbd56
4c38cc21d09057a2fc8ad2a52f6eb66fc72fabe8
describe
'6885' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKG' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
e1176a718d6a51d44b0da382340ee36f
b37f2b84ef6dd0b0c4d59f5ba90f93f66acf66ac
describe
'368410' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKH' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
3400e1c29f02bd8b331b1f0a677cf81a
b0e9c8b85af2d0db7ec5d6c57dd3e7bc72c1428e
describe
'118487' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKI' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
8eb78766b62fc591b128b292eb8fde56
336524c5278d6a8fa7fad2494281ebba7ae6c8de
describe
'35513' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKJ' 'sip-files00246.pro'
685a1f8f42596e1554345c223be8a46f
f110398b01ea9586bee9bd60339051fc25c8b151
describe
'36065' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKK' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
651214ecfef8ae783a67be31adfe8ce0
d6e8f215eeeac5c8911eb485e71e46caaaee2647
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKL' 'sip-files00246.tif'
2d28b6e3a4bc52525650f04980a1e08f
67662d7ff341074166a19f8fee45a439097c9f5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKM' 'sip-files00246.txt'
6091642bf7586422f2f1ff15d296eddc
c32a975bcef969cb2042012f3e244fde9b81b26d
describe
'8608' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKN' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
2e19988196199a910fb61114f2303d8c
134365eb9273f5e3f60aa671b5504c9547158a9b
describe
'368438' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKO' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
dc90238ea3539da56cc0793e08cae38d
40a89abff788ff89ba8413ed472f133124246b21
describe
'109165' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKP' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
5b8a54217c65e0d7f47714a955992a36
50dd129d595e0aa0514f1d9d648bb390167eb6be
describe
'30143' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKQ' 'sip-files00247.pro'
ac79d8af39ecb67cfd55563e1c8aacaf
61245200096677628e7487ac6a1bef3ac3d333fd
describe
'33167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKR' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
050f554c1ff5cd3b61f12f08518872a0
7bc64b82a47d0c7a7d603a4f23e7aa94b6372676
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKS' 'sip-files00247.tif'
9969e4d0aefb9a585d101c9f41d8a629
dbfcc62099f4755f48b1470afdc9381bd12cb002
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKT' 'sip-files00247.txt'
e54d109425fb14c97f10b5b1139b5d73
f16de197303b39a30ca1be15c0f041a527be728a
describe
'7945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKU' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
c3f0dc5ee3e014e063f355826ddeb232
df8f1bf293bff3d36d0ef44bb2208b8f79d071a0
'2011-11-14T19:09:42-05:00'
describe
'368462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKV' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
63ac5cdd00b02bdbc26516abc8d3ccb0
b442f2a9bc24c854a843e044702da08a241ebb18
describe
'119290' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKW' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
adcc74b8f75d1a081136388d4f82877d
2959a34c234e1dc8ebc346a3c2f589126a8f13d8
describe
'35298' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKX' 'sip-files00248.pro'
dcc8f96a1955ee13819f59738038c09d
e5affe9f1e1a3f1ebbeb06d0b450801501984db0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKY' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
8bc21443327e02ac7eda054830de7c23
0ae6916779e6fecf8a27577fbac63b88b2a94b55
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYKZ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
25af619ffd52adba7bad407c59aa8446
cb167129ad81e84a5e29cb46bea6e95d5cb5aac6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLA' 'sip-files00248.txt'
3ffd21b3caf21c5b2073d377e71a1f34
60e580b1c1b594babe151540adc090e0eab0f868
describe
'8573' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLB' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
3e86d0156fc6fab99adea91db2ae7886
3f238654b818eb2edef26849d74881ab1fe32599
describe
'368362' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLC' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
18fc9c5d12fe33706642b88ceb85755f
e2aef57c6dc640acd861e9738d25ea7cc8a68eec
describe
'112903' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLD' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
6f7eccfb3dca7a3b08556d3079c376a8
11b5e973e72e7332d320e3356a7558c71d08ecae
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLE' 'sip-files00249.pro'
11a3ebbcabdff35185f71fe7f1f54fc4
a9fdc84fbf74483d476c8621b98ea1c9e38c6538
describe
'34703' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLF' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
b4875801dacd32e967d015604286be3a
2bf3045e6424806b304d3342af1917a59762c3f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLG' 'sip-files00249.tif'
04f45913b091656d44540fb11eba0d8e
01acfc1560cf7e62ba556c468bdda996e463901b
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLH' 'sip-files00249.txt'
31e3b5e5c446489f51293ee3d2851526
3dff5babea35bccbf9ea1cce39854a1d2fcf9fe7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLI' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
07abe545997c2dbc77ba343b42d658b3
620cd14a697928703ea419e8cd41b1b5f614f112
describe
'368484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLJ' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
03e23dbb6b2ffbb4b00249d1723474b9
a649bcb657cca84e58925953a9491e58bd3890d6
describe
'117524' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLK' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
b3c085c7bd45742b45346aa5da3f70bb
8f401eab5734eb006fabfbdd781a1751dcae751a
describe
'35566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLL' 'sip-files00250.pro'
dcb9cf159f2ca472d97bae84a04f0697
52740e5acf85cbf083ae7122dc63f20c24b73a09
describe
'34823' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLM' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
1f8cec7aafee7755e962917f9dc585f5
f7ff7e4b993e5c5f2b0f7f1ac40fe5e68733c48e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLN' 'sip-files00250.tif'
354706cfe5057f68ed06a25f8e675bfb
4623e350d754d16f0e070a716b93555678928a4a
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLO' 'sip-files00250.txt'
eb49cb24633db08c725292771e07bc92
02414e7eb8861f365339b372c0a201509be30a55
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLP' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
4d8ff7507022394566d92d591e1f692b
31a54bc86db22d5725a53b29b7340b28b62e4046
describe
'368490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLQ' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
2f532f28c47b52cc04fd583a0b0ff297
9b4fbd6c8553d2b380429c1927fa3942aa391b3e
describe
'114215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLR' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
dfe6e76b7c41fc2289d035142e9e9ae7
e247f8b990c9dadd327ceffda096be619e6886fc
describe
'34955' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLS' 'sip-files00251.pro'
f97c4b1d2349373fa463a1a09d16e798
7a9609b668e39bd069d8c9796bb2235f85f9dbeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLT' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
e0a404f1b787e6cf8a87bfe7cd2fb20b
88f178dfd9d7a0840e4b63f53a75d20c87a571d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLU' 'sip-files00251.tif'
85226cfa841bef5f1dc3d1baa3655ddc
f7c7862ef54bca0577584954d872c31cc6cd0d43
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLV' 'sip-files00251.txt'
40e94e53ab199eb93186ccb1c2ccaf89
2a7b6cff8e534e239fab16acf0a4e079f396dc9d
describe
'7977' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLW' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
92c6bc1e13cebef35a8d626812e716be
5a4b85079dcaa76c8292bf0a712b1a7b01ec5b5c
describe
'368470' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLX' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
801dc55d2fb91eb01ca7b202710bfbf3
bc198243fcc3008f705f07cc8a5fed3c5065d67d
describe
'111127' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLY' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
7acf3b92b2badc43fcecea64b1606061
def90d242a72f67cadd0d14f2dd8b7a4b19c4f7c
describe
'34957' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYLZ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
92aa600ab5bc85e01a440249e1e602cb
284fa9800e8388b4084ed5f1c8fb74b84b4aa91e
describe
'33663' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMA' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
dca2cda6b3420f18ccf7f29710168899
3728393808f533058c7be6685c9354d785eecab7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMB' 'sip-files00252.tif'
cc1560b1f1c2245b0db1aeff301eb956
49697bbf8699905535f054aaabaf07e7812341f8
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMC' 'sip-files00252.txt'
27b9d9b6a1c5a0a4399e7dc3fca8ea5b
6ae8f4daa49e8c40c4d65b2c337da93912983f15
describe
'7858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMD' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
e7dda030dac886c61533f77690fb0838
10a6b834d6dec5e9b334e142a6de537d51f9e921
describe
'368441' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYME' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
a0723ac0ed0a2a6cd72652066d5e7438
e23abefa4a4b20f1d255a3e2f7f1ffdd4e805804
describe
'83069' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMF' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
34f83e1392cf293248503c9414c64114
8085542c5c1f3fa8b5746605ed0b0bc93a3e0774
describe
'23814' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMG' 'sip-files00253.pro'
ee585c9c9bc9b4bb3803fcb534812b53
59a6759888143f882cb04191a241434d20a55fa6
describe
'25271' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMH' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
1108364b92f75fdd0a459992f318ff96
1ad352aee1e5de53e7fa6f009bbeebc392981daa
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMI' 'sip-files00253.tif'
03393610003c996ebcacdff8cc06807f
83648f0ce586fba2ea306f50de491a73bd5f70e1
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMJ' 'sip-files00253.txt'
94de3d2d8b29c9779eeb359b233340bb
f3d11405cda772d21277e833e4f5df85bfe6c0dc
describe
'5851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMK' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
5359667fd028f8dc7ebd8ca375bf902e
ec6cbf59124458f723747ef5d96a7798b26654c7
describe
'368416' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYML' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
b68fc3b2c38f89940c104a7e7ef90412
55fb47729f906fb0091b07f93cc3240b519a1b70
describe
'92119' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMM' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
43a3b61ef0709b680b6530fe4afd3aa0
243887fb09d18edbb54808b9bc4011281826da4f
describe
'27363' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMN' 'sip-files00254.pro'
cce5665160490c68a31fc0aaf489316c
f9a00f5bb49ae77c885db7725905d75b8203632b
describe
'28281' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMO' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
de3a5edc0351a8e15b15485f8b038b52
0330ba1948f7dba8df06099f02ec50830f4cf9b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMP' 'sip-files00254.tif'
119e4810290d72db909823af883cca54
be40facaca61e745d8fd919752e9704811297e07
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMQ' 'sip-files00254.txt'
8f4a1eae2055a47f0d80be2a22b9c208
f8f412c0b631824fa537590ae336999274246a27
describe
'6741' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMR' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
2ebe1d93d969cd8141b75e5ce4f22a8d
029a97ff1a10038cfd849c878a6baf3100537ac5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMS' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
2a16f7a88d4c83518056b2bf9966b370
39c3e514be20f2a48071e7d1f921963bb23d8e94
describe
'123301' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMT' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
0bd84cd411432cca88c708b7ac50a66e
76eed80b682b55b2ddecd0d445a446dde6219849
describe
'37073' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMU' 'sip-files00255.pro'
b5cb7b0669bc32fe8667a4973622f6c9
9304156340325c60339667903ccdc72d20ac1c25
describe
'36450' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMV' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
544f61482732325759ec24475e12e381
2100e0aa0a0a36fbe98cdd79680391760a1015dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMW' 'sip-files00255.tif'
31f841d787c59dadeadb5e87ba34a15c
441ae503421b5cd1a99f54179321bbc15d029df3
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMX' 'sip-files00255.txt'
d764a1001f241b29ffc761b5ce967647
bb9c637c80f8c926f8cb147867721079e6186d1e
describe
'8387' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMY' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
4451bfb146feab1186f95551e12e4edc
a95230038badfbd20411197e0b086fec86f44b9c
describe
'368468' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYMZ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
4d045c36fb012400e3f0f5098f875857
b07683c929d42684d68e341f131dc83accd665b6
describe
'123098' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNA' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
11637d8318766abe410a840f515b7bc6
8669dcb8bfd9edfff4ccda143682ec2187c8f56e
describe
'38051' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNB' 'sip-files00256.pro'
aa72c8bc80b061c2c7874bbf24484679
c0348a548313d996474c6a4ddf1e89348e9c2741
describe
'37461' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNC' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
8aaafe407e7ee2ddd16d975f0e521786
a4f801772b90c504f1dc79c246838c30b97b5174
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYND' 'sip-files00256.tif'
ad494d98595971c29ebf04aa8a82828a
9931d03fbed2dc539f2b14a57ae2cd53e97c047a
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNE' 'sip-files00256.txt'
6e7a95f176b780ee272d953b5f2b6d08
df0d4e680628a51ec0b8e550316796310576e01b
describe
'8490' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNF' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
401b76dc064c7c3ee6881cafd4ec1c9b
a9c889a46dc3e827374ee47a49089179c503a8a7
describe
'368308' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNG' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
abd747232776396ee3c90635ad41abd2
3b878f05c4689a9120da0db1948d9655ff265027
describe
'57698' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNH' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
6ee1d746c726414e85602da0af24e30e
521b148d45605b8574b841b214a29686f88bef36
describe
'5171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNI' 'sip-files00257.pro'
471c302c1e83bee94d43ae744019bf4f
4a5d8a162a66676536019fcd835d2766da8133d9
describe
'14804' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNJ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
810f3d11476d57104b236ef96350b0bb
a70f716f6279f8dbb22bdfb9aa718f20180a97ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNK' 'sip-files00257.tif'
dd221d171628b931dd4663c7648552f9
332da262679c737b9d52ccf9123a959d71482650
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNL' 'sip-files00257.txt'
57ee940fbc31f64bb068a4490edb6539
05928f1211a9302f07d3bdfdf5aaaf40deb7a0a5
describe
'4157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNM' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
d37db0037ff3430fb8ad695371eed90f
8ba1640cef794d9dc499d6c4dee826db8f4c14e0
describe
'368481' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNN' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
fc43de3b68e7136cfa9c4eb85aa31389
d46e7fc5314aead031fdee5c10c7a1b43340fc85
describe
'95462' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNO' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
f62636e67138fa12e16e280d577048aa
83249a478462d530fef03f04ec3b77467f7fff99
describe
'28792' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNP' 'sip-files00258.pro'
c061db6d680ae85cf320aadf267daefc
79fe1ba295d89c7865f9bbdf43888277af5e0280
describe
'28422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNQ' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
2029a77102f2279e2ddd2ac625a1cb22
2529fefe4f1ee4fe7298e428028bfa4fb5e6402c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNR' 'sip-files00258.tif'
0235e17ec26a87a16d8fb3ae8caba89b
9c9dd596d96f06fd20b0aa37d2a7c6c6aa0c6be1
'2011-11-14T19:10:40-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNS' 'sip-files00258.txt'
4b72065c7f8755032c48dabc3e9c5ca4
fb4681d08c233e44243f33d77adcdbe7862f2725
describe
'7061' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNT' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
d2d0fb753e532a78fe8868423bc3dbf5
2a662a9b59ae6765ada3070cf6fd70add1963f35
describe
'368479' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNU' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
3f56881bc4cb9ec4db1a242465e9b343
bdcd5f152f49b44dc64a6797d2f6e761718802e1
describe
'119851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNV' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
64898d1cfe0b437cb4051a599943454e
5205b4e4e7cc067d68f8941b16eb216cf5ea977b
describe
'37139' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNW' 'sip-files00259.pro'
bec5e7843f110919e3501cb67720740a
765a6f82195c348736a8e48da5f28f0ffe5ec07e
describe
'36006' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNX' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
927eb48747aff3a0e68a1ea244ea5581
e77a26f91b8f276c1d6c5a35d626991eb56f2de4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNY' 'sip-files00259.tif'
4e0bd12f23e6ed06e444e2400100bbb6
97880afc13a8217b9383040d4cb6ffce7dc882c6
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYNZ' 'sip-files00259.txt'
fbfe541b6914f5e8db64a8c6929e0a39
1b2bc336e80289af4247a408179b8eaec3d81b75
describe
'8426' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOA' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
70606876d12f7721fb9fb98f8cdaf7ac
01698537b78cf98d57f2cf8f5174b0800ce67e33
describe
'364145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOB' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
ecabbccea2422bd3c8a193c23669035a
bcba768a74fb523e6e8065d074af287e3f708e03
describe
'119617' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOC' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
77f53a912dde65250cafab93e85fccc9
c2dfff6410f8dd2a0976aedc864d16f2b6dbc057
describe
'36487' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOD' 'sip-files00260.pro'
fead8099565319a00af1fea1c8fcd1af
14bac4467dca3a8be1902ba6f2cc16ac50869c3d
describe
'36569' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOE' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
9f3fc96c3794853721ae830a08d5e15d
bdeb46bd39ea4acdbd8f8fca9ad17e75bd521c9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOF' 'sip-files00260.tif'
8535523d31436ea2f1e27194627dec33
4ce1769060d296c7074f56afcd1359aa8a1d83e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOG' 'sip-files00260.txt'
1996d82f739bb93129199741034eae23
c3ec2b60449ade045baa886f806939dba82ab240
describe
'8650' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOH' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
32406e46753ae400593490cefc0b42db
438016f3aa77f9850b25c85d980ebdf3d5a5dc26
describe
'368291' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOI' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
70e988068543aa4853eaaece0b1adfb3
8819d4dab86194673b0e5c37846575854e2afd75
describe
'62212' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOJ' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
d3b6fe910881d0ce6a24dcd6859ea969
a7466073f52ca35751a88de3e15605c251ed6e28
describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOK' 'sip-files00261.pro'
40442fcf0ddd74a6885440b20774a284
05b5eea847cdd95afb03351c3490374d27e82399
describe
'16803' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOL' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
9ee1140899eafc3019235886ea16d6fd
fb72d33ab2f46b144e060d3bf23ce1585e11db98
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOM' 'sip-files00261.tif'
dee36e23d64bf9ca51e75f58d3ee7ccb
820df1581175c4216e4bcd9a3b3a09545dfdea67
describe
'381' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYON' 'sip-files00261.txt'
fbc50e1ca3191538252561b4facfcfc2
f832c142c2d5372254927877d9c6e2f9f5e32d9c
describe
'4167' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOO' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
139d6c5ba4e8b8192e64b9480ead05c0
ca5fc3345a0f1b7c1b12b639dd0840a702a84b6e
describe
'368378' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOP' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
2d0cad16c4e594bae6ce48f087d2b790
b514d86dc3df2ba6fdfbce8f8b141564f7f43125
describe
'96826' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOQ' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
9776a7f9a889bf0ad11e4e64f009de8c
3bd226f8a3cbb6b364bcb4f4b526e870a34e4b58
describe
'28539' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOR' 'sip-files00262.pro'
96aaf50bd9906a959f2a01efd4722338
47f4a4ddd5b08ec5dd80d40806b4d423ef824f1a
describe
'28905' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOS' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
b6bf62f15702ba47c18ad1e25fc764e9
3e2e313b55e1e42c51289cc4d3abd1b33b59fc35
describe
'2964288' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOT' 'sip-files00262.tif'
b190d9d487f952684fcbeba41241855a
98c8dc0f6b6911608744fa8c863b13a2bae2a4cf
'2011-11-14T19:14:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOU' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5994b9fbba622b75affd7bd89c2cf06d
4040a7d964e6c137db339f1a61a57985e59c8e8d
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOV' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
55db6d7acf8b78b79f94efff63d18710
6d4dde57ecd8e6ce89dcc2468c8a9281133b780f
describe
'362088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOW' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
884f73c62a15486069cc4d9f235177e0
a57f5e6097a383a84737c5ad5925bac7be7bf776
describe
'118848' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOX' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
4a7c0ff775304b1c6a3d7b14d801cc0e
2b906ffa9beb1a5bf61d77e1c8911f85b2b3e152
describe
'35885' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOY' 'sip-files00263.pro'
8507a26a18cd80d2087a842205dda303
9be57438bf8ad6ba0c41b5fa0f77669765df0d89
describe
'36122' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYOZ' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
fb5e3c85e8689811e6df9d347c7ef6cf
a9987f719483b4d810c1d68e2df737d9886f24c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPA' 'sip-files00263.tif'
057af0d61411dffd10ecbce76f8fbf15
d4dfec69bd412dca9366aa271181fe1617329180
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPB' 'sip-files00263.txt'
3170e87bd3c2f5d1f76c3a2ecbd8ee8d
c01462cfdf8a60ed5d6ce2cdd86a14c736e62730
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPC' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
2eb9bd35b0284974ac420b4a5127d2c1
058fcfbdf95468ffbb4455567606d524932a2792
describe
'368436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPD' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
d502b7488b6e79d7cd3b48d3a547f5e8
9f0c848d59fce31bb921f1deadfb90e0d81be0fd
describe
'115498' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPE' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
6132560f8e1fa14696f172bef1e88346
45e084eb48722f8b2f143f9b56e58b267e374427
describe
'34209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPF' 'sip-files00264.pro'
719b2d622d835f038a0b1a2bd4136719
164391e04117cb48643f84d054099f702705ba01
describe
'35869' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPG' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
cb2192bd0251d00c74ed6d3f92b3b61b
a8a7b1052b5071b24fab4694e8fecf9626e01f47
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPH' 'sip-files00264.tif'
46fa14a444ff4fbc42e7920da298b1e0
a1e33a854769940d108b6e0eb78551c4a61682ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPI' 'sip-files00264.txt'
2a95fec1087f843a8c38aaa8b30378af
4ee4caff5dc113ab45e7b92cec1fc9dfff69d298
describe
'8294' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPJ' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
10e91734ea8ec44f886132994da15d77
55300fd582b5492792e7253abc024dccfbaa7076
'2011-11-14T19:09:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPK' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
b9150f599104e7718c5da8167faad4be
ae54d1bf48652d540b8ad5f3fad612804a2f3ca7
describe
'111851' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPL' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
f747251fe2cb9b560f5b46c4345a06e7
52b39648ef27c4c2140ba3b9e4ecb981d736796a
describe
'37026' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPM' 'sip-files00265.pro'
fa26b1949a850b6c4f3580c654e40269
df74d9cf5193cc2d9190b6417e1f4a51adce3f81
describe
'34685' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPN' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
850871e321b66910d1df52db81b4fc6a
7bf53a0a381a7b2a368755086d31cfa7ddb69d4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPO' 'sip-files00265.tif'
d688eea68bcad57088e7a0f45dd3e07f
07a747a4f6e801795fb2c71c65befb634e82979d
'2011-11-14T19:12:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPP' 'sip-files00265.txt'
c1b6f5909f8d5e5c6ce8c22aac6b40ca
f1fa7b5197faf33e6bc52e6c73f96423b40d9362
describe
'8364' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPQ' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
2f68e07ff0b55ade0d7c18a9d49366bd
53d6a4eb268492e643171388f6356bf4998ba723
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPR' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
2708fcf363aedbf977ce61cd887506b0
870708444c75fa0be869c217232c309640796249
describe
'119858' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPS' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
38c688d96e663882579e06edfd138e05
2bde4360d0f2443d2b0cc38e9b84d9fd8816f289
describe
'38109' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPT' 'sip-files00266.pro'
4ce1b7c638b53a06801479468f47ae3a
8191e56b87610149c7dc64f76dd0fdbd6df4d340
describe
'35950' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPU' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
a05fb0f1e3fad1b9729d78054ec0f915
69831699b9dfac6ad15c0b02fbe8798cef0e3b98
describe
'2964292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPV' 'sip-files00266.tif'
6e60a7b3de188bea64a7205af1a5d270
29aa8303159e1eaaaf8ceb76217359560d09ba39
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPW' 'sip-files00266.txt'
61f2c93d7c56802ab4ca9a055dbe6849
9c7ea3489696ae3f442a15ce219ac094d9349501
describe
'8454' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPX' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
d1f838158f5690d6184a98304f644554
f99b539e8254714a061ac689015fc0708eaa01c5
describe
'368442' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPY' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
78cb176fe8ed193712c79b7902639cb4
b120c8c5323421be8762d617d661f0184404a256
describe
'114535' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYPZ' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
195a827c237f4e076588eca6360baf75
41812a22e82b15bd2aa8fda0c97509d67d6adbcf
describe
'35713' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQA' 'sip-files00267.pro'
880056bd5fe5862157fa81ebe0ae3e38
f07c8d1fbd304cf39171b3bafeb2e66397922c27
describe
'35254' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQB' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
99df2811ff846b20352005c6a0f2051a
ede652b6c8f0eed630700110dd11d349a921feb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQC' 'sip-files00267.tif'
0ddd41056f63239f80605a35ed3928f4
0d4d38bc1f92a31755c001f8c92166c4e924d138
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQD' 'sip-files00267.txt'
e783405b87d730fc7f4c6c39f1d4187d
b98d64cfae05da2b7fd7e7ba00eb5f65c1884750
describe
'8121' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQE' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
b3da3249648b6583937dc836454ddf07
a9eca674b5ebdb377c552289526c382fb90ff8f3
describe
'359339' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQF' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
2cc3acc8e3db1d1f6687bb5fcc78803b
da1299a33518b333c12d69602a32b07227c1ca5b
describe
'122266' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQG' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
7c5f5108497e0328d89632bd78dd0eca
d3594c86c35bbf65dd6bd4094e1e79463dc74b32
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQH' 'sip-files00268.pro'
f9b494e11ab2eb525238c600cae6013f
fad477bdae9f5c345c3251fbdaf65c55ad6fcd18
describe
'38805' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQI' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
a11eb59e4333c94ef644766a4195023e
7e3fe29882097a9fbaff80098cbdbfc63b85345e
describe
'2891368' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQJ' 'sip-files00268.tif'
2968b3ee17f21055649e16cb0989e8e7
486d365c2de4ed713664f709fe96bd2968097413
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQK' 'sip-files00268.txt'
2a1fea75c4220963a3f4adcc32ba295c
7c1e2369463822ba176da79d1312467dc4a4b906
describe
'9082' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQL' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
9b53a03f0f1c317a0934fe54150f86a1
4e12f2ceb647d2c321b39ef96b3e86fe13e048fa
describe
'368478' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQM' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
1806c7fa22c38cd3ae770738dd89ddfe
7d583804cb68c06bf765c0690e9478f00e5498d7
describe
'48228' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQN' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
6f3f47e2761ec199c00149ac4b76a9f6
cab80f09d16fbfb7512e4f14f8dcce9ea368749c
describe
'6937' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQO' 'sip-files00269.pro'
739ed0c02fd5c5166417269f81e73058
d49963c4f6592fe0e86f1c6b4b39422ba4dc29af
describe
'13745' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQP' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
fc952a7b8d32df0e636286225ac0a4f4
b0b843b3035a1494d71fbcf91f8a9a439f6d5f90
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQQ' 'sip-files00269.tif'
a287ce4abed5705fb9c50e367d743c23
25704e3028b71203d4bb4f79702e18c38d738d46
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQR' 'sip-files00269.txt'
44228d9bcf2f21a877baf6ee0a8fc909
f782373640fb927435360f0f18876c61917c269f
describe
'3867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQS' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
f2dbcfc2aec167229c8dca8de868b0ba
7a88e7789afa8807e2a0e28e73e0d6016e7a9b09
describe
'364215' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQT' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
223960cc3cdf860a6bf99d0e00b1b1e6
be97cf597099f2d6fad7122b96a884637a9a4aac
describe
'99212' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQU' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
8fb6e9ba467b99241f6bd6734509a06e
6904b79e4b605ab5e43a61d5e470ea6372ec3878
describe
'28618' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQV' 'sip-files00270.pro'
2274ae8cd8664aba96b46144a3a9dd58
948dd9870dbc57bfa3772002dfb57281fa79345d
describe
'30310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQW' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
18fdb9b3bf8c26aadc110f275a4f2977
85bf2b5598a7f5e778a42631e8c9323e02acd88e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQX' 'sip-files00270.tif'
bdb4ca3fe7bc98f0c5bd9af87c5244f5
6194e6b3f94a6b7e84649f6a3e58d7073732a6bf
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQY' 'sip-files00270.txt'
4d886ae4d2b10538e882e60c39e40ee6
e61fc2640670c9958182becb20d4ab843218d3e2
describe
'7511' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYQZ' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
8d71fa4f43e240ffd7e5f2f39a8d81aa
97b90e846712db62e5192b9181a91c66a33f51dd
describe
'368421' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRA' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
bf8a315568cb0e3f8bee0bd2c705632b
3c5ae3a914445a9a65531593b92076d0e6fe6ba4
describe
'97110' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRB' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
d8a3715e4484f1d45ca4b38ae916b735
85897c45b8f6e458f665c88119ba7d52dc2d223c
describe
'30821' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRC' 'sip-files00271.pro'
4b305baf749411012faed95d675ecd97
fda8a0d6a4a3e5fb40be26f17dd5556bd1931b15
describe
'30095' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRD' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
14e887cae28ba69d0fff8f336bc8e86e
60e651a8e23e72de2e1153e46a5afc9c73cc02eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRE' 'sip-files00271.tif'
b47bfe96563f1c8bf78f90e645937b4e
b18129374b915967e1e2b079813738403fc1dc4d
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRF' 'sip-files00271.txt'
630f18049a79071bad303cfba90b178a
1058de793eadefacdac4ddf535f241d2fd638fa0
describe
'7646' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRG' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
1c9023a3e1cfebd62a8987494f8a133b
3eef7f986573660a9601c2c27a95abd1b5863b03
describe
'359754' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRH' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
66341020586da87ca377dcb1850f0c3d
f16e53f105e73db925e78953968c05b3a216b542
describe
'117015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRI' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
97ac563c2fdec4b6822c816587540975
51ea17a9204dacb4b7ae935b12802d957a7656da
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRJ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
4e54cd22d74dac7652589d0413553531
05641fcaffaef21f4fd1fe43355edbcfb83ed16f
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRK' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
e03779f05820d3c9a19fe8b01703fae2
f40949a84ab2d97561ecc40d04c93361021369f7
describe
'2894396' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRL' 'sip-files00272.tif'
e0475f1c6b91b67382947b8138cf0f9a
e4334eef2e1dfa4756a1365595c3ccb6901a3e3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRM' 'sip-files00272.txt'
63b411891e4a7a440f110df5a3d0600c
5bf88a0c50bb7934db90008a1b915fbf89d241a7
describe
'8477' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRN' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
ba829c216ca8de5c0b1d8ab53ba044f5
ee3f00c3979df0e03a306697e7eba957b37be9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRO' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
c5aba8ba18cdd00656b1fae60142d13c
20e26ecac651a2247642f0781d5610cf98d750bb
describe
'110999' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRP' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
73f6e23946e7b847eeaf0dc02f3156ef
23d16b3a7939e4673154ee0755e54c4e82866f81
describe
'35497' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRQ' 'sip-files00273.pro'
42f3ebc15a4be4d40e8b0d118deb9141
504d35305cf63896d71163a1ffc339dbe10a83a1
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRR' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
aa2cdec8965a3b0b3ed6dd9b7be34658
2233b22f2a0ad483b716a4a11ae797f96bd1bb98
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRS' 'sip-files00273.tif'
5b8d0a6d843adb9cbc10207e0e6ec4bd
fba0474a3d8395f3602f981e5222bfb566e01591
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRT' 'sip-files00273.txt'
c80defd7e768f89807add720899a9526
ccd3bf811b860a2f8011143919983891f89b50f6
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRU' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
5761d2bcf6074ce364e5e61a2eb85b1c
28bffcbea8ed2d493954ce2724f0ecd2a7525a74
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRV' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
3750aa79145d48cc190d43d50c00ce8f
3dfa471cdcbd7b6336c0380f1fdb73ec359cfc63
describe
'43456' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRW' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
632e255bfa5bb26c562ba4331ad216f4
eb8810e03ee0ba70224b44ba240767f5f32a5116
describe
'9892' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRX' 'sip-files00274.pro'
251ee54d08c493d659fd04f71d35c0b7
ee220edb91ada60d66d9b13088dc92b97765e9e7
describe
'12239' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRY' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
db3de53dbcef13d36a1233854e8f142c
f83269070e80664fa5ab7422763b16fa292a45af
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYRZ' 'sip-files00274.tif'
becdd765928b426b15203ce7a1302b2e
328023f69b87c2f56b1db6d43dd43edc643ed5ce
describe
'398' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSA' 'sip-files00274.txt'
a3313391487498c59f1da43dfe6e7ba3
46dbce0b2d40a64741313a8ba241155f54fc4962
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSB' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
1c8348942fa790902f5b5195070e285e
2800d29bfef962e92c3fffa50f85593804335089
describe
'368422' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSC' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
c9be6bbe8f66d88b3e92024859ff91f2
33224425d540749f7b4a6d2119f0a8781d95c909
describe
'94118' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSD' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
da453d7eb7637e4868ece046c842e15c
cb3d470cbbaffe5251471cc0448867cf60b9cdde
describe
'27704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSE' 'sip-files00275.pro'
e083382bbe5c6ac19bec5f6fd92dbdf7
a37dbbe52f2457eb23ea880871ce38b3f66c9812
describe
'29178' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSF' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
f7feab355b20c2566939cbb7056f45e2
45d85c165872170b17cd5b443632d6e309019bbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSG' 'sip-files00275.tif'
7a70eba7511dfc06297226151c05462a
3eef22e0fc3ab172787bc270acf339d7661d5434
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSH' 'sip-files00275.txt'
6fcd9f695f2b64c82993e62b023cc9ba
ec8651bce0884324f4b7534235d8a7d67522cd6f
describe
'7156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSI' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
81f82fc3e10f4dcf8db6d2ec2b337960
97b87b587c985f27fd369bb6869b557a995aba14
describe
'368467' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSJ' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
cac483c909bd3ae2d9f59341e8ee1702
89899f5ca78087d4b39092fbfdd79a642ad6a5a5
describe
'113572' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSK' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
601afb58ae818021f514ea22c0cc74e8
7afd359f574cd50031ea192d530351b1b736cc55
describe
'36974' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSL' 'sip-files00276.pro'
622609e43840fed2d04872f18ebe0b88
efafd3548345d20d367ac1776665a805cccdb6cb
describe
'35577' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSM' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
d5a4793a62a3ae032202be13174415c1
4c037de68d5eeb8f4427ca480af1804e2f73d87d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSN' 'sip-files00276.tif'
3516f7d46a3cd4aaba79085bee9269a6
6c5f62c048b7631e87327fa52ad3cc03738f6fb0
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSO' 'sip-files00276.txt'
398338e12c6afc2b2b272dc9a3236cec
9e6e85c74b7642a0d6b1d9471a5b6eee8dfe92dc
describe
'8345' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSP' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
cbfc0b84bcc3a0453aa1ba29de62912e
bd251aff5590b95d0ab839f63d4728d18de4df1c
describe
'368482' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSQ' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
d5de883290867314cd925b3f0807c22d
cca11f3aad1e4481f30370c25d97c4e36b3918f1
describe
'112251' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSR' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
a3377e167a5d49d2eba761f5b16aa58e
0f6127ebb26f92e4ac491337255bd79dcdd3b54a
describe
'29604' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSS' 'sip-files00277.pro'
52239b16de33de2b51f0bf4d937ee984
723342f2aa1238325660cd76a6d18385638aa67f
describe
'33872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYST' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
9f8a93188293a3ff8f5e56895ef15710
a2a7c4e5c2b058362a5a967159278084a517fefe
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSU' 'sip-files00277.tif'
38be5b72c63a744a404eaf74d2164031
c74625f8ff9d2ddea4b702b0acfb61476641b978
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSV' 'sip-files00277.txt'
cc6d08207669de7825c5e20cf23e9644
171d7eba5efad4425aefc9cbcb38db2beb50516b
describe
'8050' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSW' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
a2ebff5d8c91fd93f388e38ea92272a7
0f7391aa9560f69190e8fd79f616b5cacdf8d7ed
describe
'368486' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSX' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
4ed6b561def7697e1f00eecb0ba968d9
a94767b5ed4715d32596186314363020e0e07123
describe
'113573' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSY' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
b0bcf92c285fe526ae76aa81b1f24972
363f51e546c0576fbd1bd6580304123fb03f3283
describe
'34901' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYSZ' 'sip-files00278.pro'
5eed4353dbe0dd1619aefef7c4fc18e2
e9b8d4453df80d7119100750dea9db276b0372c9
describe
'35242' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTA' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
79c02bed76fe8874694c37ba6c160f8d
2be43f55cb3993db2887d6e8521bbee60a2c3b0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTB' 'sip-files00278.tif'
bb6ce656d6ce6961f1c988d39ded89f9
d0520bc665ea032a9f7c2ec3b926dd1b760e1339
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTC' 'sip-files00278.txt'
a0f76b6290254ab4f8a03f48518b557b
21c77e1fe42184492a4bba808d5763d310908027
describe
'8189' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTD' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
a8d0da11f420bb4e2d6915a7478cb7da
ff3de22d56407d6c1a0a0b1423478ae57c0c41ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTE' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
e0ee3d72956c28b450a9f242bf78ef77
629db80d9710c92f0b18d2738ec67974a1a779e1
describe
'110145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTF' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
8342a4e626b44203eab491a4221f619a
d4d99565db92a3473c0a85e36f8a6126c15d69b0
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTG' 'sip-files00279.pro'
5cf802bc8970e9c676da58555fe37c1e
6180c8b17adc4761d8e176ac77dca02c0f534f55
describe
'33835' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTH' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
e3bf57b814fc078de4031b2aa1893199
f4d823934014dcfd8b0288f528a038b16766b431
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTI' 'sip-files00279.tif'
c3a6ed9774694a4e9a135ac72a210584
a99f11e11092ce0dec93cc0bf3a63c39277e9388
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTJ' 'sip-files00279.txt'
6650e956554857d196b09df4390093c2
de2ce2cefd94d4382f64d56d2c7c612a672334c0
describe
'8257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTK' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
5236cb1fee4209f1c3628389dea60295
4f6cee15d7893639967566fd52c35cad6ef7e299
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTL' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
a433b5f6d4148769e3c33fbdc14c51fe
88ffa10a6c2e13717e3865669f1a12099055db78
describe
'114300' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTM' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
3d2e18bf72d104d3d0aac6f1732a6ebc
8fe5d50ea9789ee869126c9ef82745c4e1c9ef94
describe
'35219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTN' 'sip-files00280.pro'
660f0b35f53115a56614fb2dffb10580
bfd5cfc3bc6791a99e8935c7a742fc999a4ec1d8
describe
'33657' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTO' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
9544d16b14bea70a097df296d3af3903
62a980ffb4472b8c479e877721516c1f3c2146bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTP' 'sip-files00280.tif'
22cd61bf6b642d4e81052509c14a2ffe
2e162234a0406fa21b6cdb338420b85b5e12b190
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTQ' 'sip-files00280.txt'
0b02861144cecb4c68adb8eaf19b23c0
0fbfac225b0cdbe4a59a098fbd3046db4be37bd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTR' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
3144e094d9f597bcdb9e09ecb9dc93b5
7bb2d4c97bd2963a45480dce8725e1a9e82c0f82
describe
'368447' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTS' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
88d49f1091616c280bfa6ca28cde56af
cbee8fc69b4481ff7f4c5e8c8a5256fa4ab59687
describe
'103145' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTT' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
0dec5718a4bd1e7415758d7c2af99ccc
01059b2f9b591c1c0a0825075dc452e3954f5f34
describe
'32962' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTU' 'sip-files00281.pro'
2073b8d21b71a643cdfc89276cc33981
72b06a3cc7963cd767fd8e3047c1ebf8ac282f2e
describe
'32745' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTV' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
ac11cdba8ebc97dd03f23ec984d90463
da71ef010c1734b0a2a4cd6b4c0a80418ec1fde5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTW' 'sip-files00281.tif'
d6a16dd66bc7402eb9b5084669ba33df
beb63baf8609304daa2df0a5f6a16e5eaf8085f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTX' 'sip-files00281.txt'
fae4b6458dc7d6ba1a85d1bb2e782d74
1a52df48471cfbe774293dd3e57b0ba40234899e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTY' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
1f5a1d392bb8e7fcac3a8d3c90745bfb
75af83a79418510ab391255f47d0f4cfc69527c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYTZ' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
e882831fa74d46a13d6614bf17f62dae
627773c0da7d534fd9ecfb95739ce417fb8d39e7
describe
'99015' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUA' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
eca982983131395cf32137ac7a3be03e
d5bf05e189a6d12ca1a41b6e533ad332088ab7b7
describe
'12953' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUB' 'sip-files00282.pro'
5058181b61b9cb24d671bb485e4ba0ad
2c7650daf25875cee85798a0894e73b478118e24
describe
'28130' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUC' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
711816d455be176a52908f2f38137a50
2f542cadfc5ee29bd6bbf92fa4a348aaef2c47e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUD' 'sip-files00282.tif'
baefd177c3e2e55a0ee822a530fc51d3
0d04313b17da767593596bace8ca7e6d03c1d33e
describe
'566' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUE' 'sip-files00282.txt'
e49f622053a273a6240f5baf9dfe3eb3
cb4f101d495516d7c1c0403353ee28068f0c654e
describe
'7292' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUF' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
a623871bd31ca69012ac9b10b8c3ee54
bbb97b4d0881cb82e0ca15841879ffdfb4c67032
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUG' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
f10078ee1684f40db3a507d3d8ad8fbf
115a75532ccbba21bfc6abd1df4403bf3a044834
describe
'115960' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUH' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
241b99daf01b168f60fcea0048fc8b75
8f15351ae1d444387b43d4e5c37cf29e75e4b111
describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUI' 'sip-files00283.pro'
dc7b6bd795698c28f07bc6435a4e8df6
2ac40604dc18038a1ea96c7d1f6d29bee30bfb75
describe
'36517' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUJ' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
e93587f6b98c394a4563382ef8dc0415
00ceba2f945186dc0da88362d2c3eed54c90edfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUK' 'sip-files00283.tif'
bb9fc087082cee23a7eca002b49f80be
55647ba978ba6abb328da425828bd7c146ee0c0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUL' 'sip-files00283.txt'
936a2d7801303838af00181a91a1c2ab
d735f50e510f6653645e16cd3e694b16ed05c9ce
describe
'8043' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUM' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
c121a160e7c9f8e6f41aa6ed94ac953e
525f67a1a4cd43048e39304baa4f3854f8f9e0dc
describe
'359855' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUN' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
e0fcf30ef6e54aab7f38e2e2bd533af6
d6311a25f95cdfba6cb48254366602928415b069
describe
'117522' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUO' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
08a4dc737c86075c3dab783eaaab0590
2441c98c5f6ec54a7cdf54f16b12fe8a097f9d40
describe
'36965' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUP' 'sip-files00284.pro'
ba5256de571f628bd61b389f3156677e
d9c059bce498949d42c9551e9778675c4f69268d
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUQ' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
854d4eefaf0f441e46a3fe5c544413a8
1f999a7666919f8762b04646dff4d0155295110b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUR' 'sip-files00284.tif'
9ec84abddca3f99d2649157614501d81
753268630ae0d63b8465eb97e8d5a645f00a4d3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUS' 'sip-files00284.txt'
23aa8285918489b1bf458adf1d9de1ce
ceda2dde53990b667597a3fcbb89193206235578
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUT' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
dbbc4f19d9a72e56bbe0e47b0b912845
f69c4a7cf3f476199551de20422bc733ac93fc4e
describe
'364207' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUU' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
1459ca97868dd524a9d9c6c9ea304db2
dd24d74d726c32cae890a5b557d41bfe92d9da8a
describe
'109951' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUV' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
182fc05aa32c32f27e486ec004035661
ae40fee0648336ac865e0741aaab098e77dc93d7
describe
'34534' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUW' 'sip-files00285.pro'
2cb4a18a00ec9cfce6f6e4cc9ed9c351
63dd223a9bd5bac71aa0fea131af3a697fefba68
describe
'33695' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUX' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
7d8bd6b8587b5c60ae671f694708085f
41a0a9c36359f0e694df672af81ab9d0cd27a542
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUY' 'sip-files00285.tif'
1d1c6b337cd759b04273c3582055999e
8aa48ace28f29d443c826119f6700432a87f269d
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYUZ' 'sip-files00285.txt'
384dcf7bb723710bc883109f4efd6515
87662f0ecf2e1ade47e49061174dee320359f953
describe
'8309' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVA' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
ad4b5d2dfb71b60ee6c73df949ed9757
2379faf0fb617d6873e5b1e0ba6848493cf167b4
describe
'363106' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVB' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
eb71f6530a7edc1c68f64c3cc71a612d
5ba80557589bf28a1a6c63904c9ef7a82b564b26
describe
'119882' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVC' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
4eb47bb11c5c39ca35cf84b39eaf2b5c
97c81dc0892af3e1bbe1cab0de4d35cb348a0afb
describe
'38285' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVD' 'sip-files00286.pro'
dbdd9317442f6c7d726bbae249214e49
5bf952c5d07bbe64ab3ca732747f1cb6d531f26b
describe
'36963' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVE' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
4105ac86484117643ae3d1d30008857b
38df123c99590c6f5b5c3d42b21582ec9a0a1f47
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVF' 'sip-files00286.tif'
da0799c30ffa4f2b800464c4df81c072
e6474d56b464fe43899a0a0e892f28499d10e5cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVG' 'sip-files00286.txt'
1a457968bb6b5c8e743df51f04fe11f7
2857c229665df02811099916e5ee4ade172f0208
describe
'8597' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVH' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
c2a87f07a5240b2c47054ad6f3699edf
420d2c33b1eabdcfb23154195995ffacf7c71909
describe
'368449' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVI' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
c2a18e4cb8c546e9b1d3a3661196f919
c9214e6c77d4ade488ea67a2d88a01cd5ad5ded0
describe
'111813' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVJ' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
81e1d1a0878c1257254f2f483ea9edb5
05b4836077199d394b052c8847069d4a606bfc6e
describe
'35171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVK' 'sip-files00287.pro'
6244accacbac10d44d0883411e32c6b8
8bf5088feae8c4c17aaaa62d11b6e2781c48beed
describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVL' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
8b3b01223d2aef5be4fa8336459f5bd2
17d173bb8960ae41f939d4522c1ded6c8ffc6b6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVM' 'sip-files00287.tif'
692fd364ad020f121f6a6da0326782c7
a9d06a1f13fe11cbfe74719b4576e19d8e391c80
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVN' 'sip-files00287.txt'
4d6b01a36bd8de56c0d91773c5e0ade0
e6cedb8948dac22a58aff79619cc7cd4e98ac791
describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVO' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
35d540bc9e2b8a61f75429c9837664b7
c4faefad9efe6b1d7fd8d987858555161a5cba9d
describe
'356869' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVP' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
a183030dee2958b8ca79e113beaf7538
8260e92f0a58008d647a48f5b26a00d6693d80bf
describe
'92024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVQ' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
7bc6dd39890d984efd97d34d4471ee97
0ca2af201544332833cf5ac07a1661adeeed4fbe
describe
'26885' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVR' 'sip-files00288.pro'
d1b636649509c8ea96ad7b0b4ef5745f
d381d08a433148c31010f18ac6ed8422f2d645dd
describe
'28495' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVS' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
bf5c5bd812cfd8f2bd81f885702fe89a
906d0758e634e69e954b7c7ab5b1469286c5a2d3
describe
'2871332' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVT' 'sip-files00288.tif'
fb84fab4c3534b553b842a43d2ff793f
407c958781c91bd3a1b8863c173796b794c556c9
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVU' 'sip-files00288.txt'
2292ab0b9bd67b7ee227de5f3c2883e8
1eded19e761982682868935ffe14537a2f5d2e2a
describe
'7161' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVV' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
42d0fb5533636dd383f0375b0b74702f
9cde8f12e5ff0ff83495199091a6efbf1687b53d
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVW' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
37a804829711e72ee161294be2cdd6b6
85b6beaa65d5fd9a5a8eccc7f47b81b875bc3ab0
describe
'116674' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVX' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
c57e6bb9754935270c1be9503cd423fa
3048a3d9e1e826ce2b346ba22ca18f6df4aef02f
describe
'37375' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVY' 'sip-files00289.pro'
a3539534e7fa2a2e89cf982138b80e07
a7d0ae4ef738d85cae66d499fb4e81c9d6d06da3
describe
'37312' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYVZ' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
c613960cc5588b08c144926b404b3d51
21fb0b483a548272da8b91a7330923471d6d6cd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWA' 'sip-files00289.tif'
cbe7b8ede130dbbbfada06b11367b029
b130ea648b603778a7fddbc5291808a6e0824666
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWB' 'sip-files00289.txt'
344478c52f832848ec8033899cc6b79e
569d93236b73387a013ceb0ff9c2cf90b4c27ed1
describe
'8408' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWC' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
f0cf54bc404fc20d43e6c215ae8086ba
d10784f2e793595417406801884481cd99acd747
describe
'368452' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWD' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
a220a20ec1c93bfc49b8dd11edb2aa53
9b0d3ee5f57f0f2184ad04532a3c8d75264e69aa
describe
'108331' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWE' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
dd79f30d27b1e168cc469f80029c8ef7
e3008a880853dfa9b2cc736fa05d05f18ba179d0
describe
'33613' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWF' 'sip-files00290.pro'
ff694889a1904ca1292afac693ef3928
5ed314402e3aa4c6b6aa7c6d8b3907ba1d59024b
describe
'32492' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWG' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
87b0a6b8583f2c2195a227eb0f13705b
d3e649901da174d09911dda3f026d611a0f2a146
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWH' 'sip-files00290.tif'
cefca25ecc3333b830882207d1369618
ac7e821aff0a8c3e6696d9058ccad37a68b7974a
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWI' 'sip-files00290.txt'
1414d1f7ad453fa718ed8a35957bff67
4adc1de74232b5f9ce1de7086ac1c841319056ad
describe
'8067' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWJ' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
21e739fcb70c4f7cf4200b16d0358714
45ae0e88ee6375858b70a2d070e5ffcb1aafa9b0
describe
'368445' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWK' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
a0390aad6cd4f9dc548b4a84768de683
38b4da3de35e43e7d3e07b734595bc5d3f3d913b
describe
'107459' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWL' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
ecca9040154d7ef81272c909e0ef4d40
0734918fe771992282ab16ae981d998c74bc866f
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWM' 'sip-files00291.pro'
1dd97952d21ee1ade5b2f718dfb1ea1f
fb3dceece787118e1e5c0c0feccd5037e1c8cdcf
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWN' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
bb9fdcee8d4ca1f0f14c010a341b111d
d931ef17e3c09181e4cbb94be1dc8334d98e150b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWO' 'sip-files00291.tif'
1a687c22ec9e805f89c88c9f413d3b58
bf9e414233ee2ad6f309cacd1c6bcfe660eeec29
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWP' 'sip-files00291.txt'
0fc6e6dcfa426f1ca01430eaec56839d
e978830f85c2660bce6d38d9683d26f651aa745a
describe
'7976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWQ' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
fa07c682bd163a852c122f255695ce45
5ca08f9d2ce5a65a0f907c4d535ce037052c2fc7
describe
'368491' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWR' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
707475b66d4d34b0cfc78d7e881d0483
8b06a2e4f303e90fcc20df876b5f790707c9e601
describe
'99807' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWS' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
f8135628a9aad52e69fe76b9f953315c
af93fed58d551d73ed1baadf6ce55712a0e3857b
describe
'33003' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWT' 'sip-files00292.pro'
9e5249b0e8402dd4420fdf345826abc9
77984b3dab9a506fc2589a3212c1bcfb5430ed85
describe
'32053' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWU' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
d00c902347e1c049ec6e21ba349eee25
520af9ebe89694bd04cc35b4e626033af567dfb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWV' 'sip-files00292.tif'
b79b05c09adfab5b8b3d5e42eae9a3d3
ac80438557a8f1a4f7f55a9bf41e6eb3b580ace6
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWW' 'sip-files00292.txt'
be8105eb37628fc790eef7e3c6a8e058
f5e29166defe2f4f7b36149faae747cdfa443e83
describe
'7958' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWX' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
57a8b1864a0d0f09e5f23396065928b9
8d9012040b87b1ed79a9009e8eff51b4f0680182
'2011-11-14T19:12:48-05:00'
describe
'368371' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWY' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
ab412d4f53a4ba75473ca9b93cfac6ab
1c2973affd61b0e01d0c36b89d17ee5bd0c53ed1
describe
'140182' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYWZ' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
7b61f6263853b518c53f31e34b1fb5bb
764c704112615e999173d73bf2d86ed77fc8f068
describe
'17927' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXA' 'sip-files00293.pro'
97bf3e045bd32dae89aa779c1c5b1634
1670126c955d65317eb134ab2efa165c3530f27a
describe
'36340' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXB' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
51d47c56ad36e0b60c5206c3fbaf1db4
ed0b1d94c545810a579d8fe8b58f827e2a625b1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXC' 'sip-files00293.tif'
0dfe1b7c00d5195e21ff3dfdb72abb20
e8dab39d9d3d1fca0d70f40185c8436e3b811f20
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXD' 'sip-files00293.txt'
25a97f89447c1e6f3ced15787aa87b19
bd12aa283014984e98d41e86cb7671d35bf4b1cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXE' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
2ab06dcf61702a14c76d1ab784c9b284
ffb486353ace07fb8c3736d7a664cd78c08664b6
describe
'368413' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXF' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
c82f283c04d5b1e8a0d41f8eb2e034d1
f6686824b2fd239b5cc9c568bfabdbe794d5cc00
describe
'110219' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXG' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
b3f5b3360d13816b1e94041753f97a8d
eb219be1aa79023339ab9df9c90667dc11bd99cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXH' 'sip-files00294.pro'
f23e6622c966d36361f103fd76175a5e
05ae42c82e49ecc60327781d03884c7736c86f57
describe
'33879' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXI' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
9599b5aad4fc8828635930e50501e252
403fa9f89040ad0320d90da3134dc2881be92995
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXJ' 'sip-files00294.tif'
a86dd28d2a1edde011e63de39c6a6ab4
aaf7e5ca352202ae274b0188b9646e3e792022b1
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXK' 'sip-files00294.txt'
3e1dd1943466502a8994250009b92d45
c9c8ea2f7f1b11ecd9fff49dc8d71dce2da80a9a
describe
'8265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXL' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
229b936a7a93d9479c4a66c3be1aa7dd
fa92067a5f5bded9e04bb61a016ae1cd2c438aab
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXM' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
685a974db9daf82d15cff3bcf8c8f3ef
1dd8f72291351e4b03f86a48244d5ec78547b7d2
describe
'114696' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXN' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
22ad760f3fbc1aba0a8cf7b3dd357a55
b480dd7d9ba49398e322a2299baf4c2aaa488db4
describe
'36436' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXO' 'sip-files00295.pro'
31b194ed0e094ff30557120fc0ffc926
e5f14743d7c49e7f858722c2e3cfaf2d93bd0a30
describe
'34946' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXP' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
e5ab8838c9d2f5cbefc6859bfdc6a6e2
767350aef470b1c7c809e1daa4a846070867e478
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXQ' 'sip-files00295.tif'
34491025f95ec8334ea6f82a2665f3a0
c6254092a7acb09e573f99afbf92271bd656f334
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXR' 'sip-files00295.txt'
2cae5fdb4471462fdee15f8bf7260226
cad4c7b69f4816b8d676a560013609cb6d7d2b73
describe
'8092' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXS' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
c762d9fc04d1c487f26987fe559b3882
b241669737873782eedb510c70a65b1ad3e55bf2
describe
'368466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXT' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
45e00c6bc6bd617333629db3eecf9aed
028cec9f577ba14d4d24dde3cd088a15c9d2e088
describe
'117350' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXU' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
1709b22540444752faa75b850b9a2d6a
5834c51740a5d994de6164db7751dd7d3c54436d
describe
'37790' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXV' 'sip-files00296.pro'
68c50462fcddd7b3117e818f99de5c66
f33efc5c3882ba81fd1ae290929b44a4a8f41f1b
describe
'36591' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXW' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
101d936ceee479853f48957d7bfaa2a6
5c4020f9c908376109a205d3c64109a5697c7266
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXX' 'sip-files00296.tif'
95895aa279b2d25159e2b3698d102470
fc3bdabb310acf71d7fce97142feba793387062d
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXY' 'sip-files00296.txt'
43d57a6160a2450be962d2b936dfaff7
489803e927752dab190edc1d3cd9cfa1dc052749
describe
'8516' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYXZ' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
ca8fe09b5667a3622c6732967967d882
29e74243550f5571a72bc786eef90e15c1532b4c
describe
'379156' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYA' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
ff9f007ebf65327b15a494d04353aa4c
14267b16e2a8aa583630131b17bd3f364964ac5c
describe
'110032' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYB' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
f7e2e1a3e106e1361686311a6d225dbb
8250aa951854a0edf6831e21c3722bde87631f9c
describe
'30176' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYC' 'sip-files00297.pro'
fc7267a3460d87ea0684f95eebf8720c
9c6045e6cb5deaec76b7ce9b7469344e416412d3
describe
'32393' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYD' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
9457b734a876bac75c897b82e515703c
be521b8470679ef11bd9dfd374e1b46fd6ffad3a
describe
'3049656' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYE' 'sip-files00297.tif'
1a16382b6f233222174e86323c2489c5
935c7291ceb9b6e9f61ae4a6de7f837cccd44571
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYF' 'sip-files00297.txt'
4b54e880269ee42ce948781f448dd8e5
1987c77f95c07474fb78c7c64319676bcdb5e080
describe
'8024' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYG' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
279b9502498d4da205015976f20e296b
b187ce9ba1e5676c2da652ea39e30ed7400f010f
describe
'373825' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYH' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
6bf7920e549d29075b3ad51da871807f
b7e56531c504d9a8ecdb282912e9257c36550804
describe
'108222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYI' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
c8bc4b7440d9c5d97e79e64a401675a0
6c406d3791da03645edbbecc6142248ebbdd0755
describe
'35514' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYJ' 'sip-files00298.pro'
b8bfd4cdcce23f82eec6b692a767ba6d
088837c2a22cace7718d6e742fba4f0e68267c3c
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYK' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
274826caac9b7efbaada049a08141c18
9514e9e208c09631b75ae1a57f6996a378499486
describe
'3006976' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYL' 'sip-files00298.tif'
941a6c6353dbcd2e01f9f817b50b2758
ff7e8982559380a13fea38926e4c0fd0306e40f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYM' 'sip-files00298.txt'
0bcb4896f3ca06ffbf0bda2e886353a1
186fa3a1db76d2ecee66717acfe9f51a0c42aa1f
describe
'7938' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYN' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
9046048531640469f3ec4c9dccd19742
c729f2554060daa1c0eb339680c96872ca2217df
describe
'379142' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYO' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
524fdd409ab299e77f1d63550f94dec5
084c23968602c0aebab66395391f14e657782b7e
describe
'119962' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYP' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
20ea4c219bbbc89c8792bb9d7b125ffe
ee1f2285762c0f1ef9e18cca9ad822d5bb712cbd
describe
'17257' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYQ' 'sip-files00299.pro'
387d9dc14d2d0617f3a9ec637419e779
cbf0a88bfa6ec5c95c12259bea964a771b1b00a1
describe
'31669' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYR' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
40ca650c2eb3e3ce6d51f0bdfcc77850
b693f34c11df0692216776630a87cec3d534b096
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYS' 'sip-files00299.tif'
0e1010bdf82d745bfd6e30305c7995fc
27153924c0f1857e836f1d2b1dc715f869b1ccc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYT' 'sip-files00299.txt'
f1ba13ae9947ea822e3feaaa11c23975
444500dc0489817684f9d4aa5e99c29aa3e0912b
describe
'7313' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYU' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
2d4a1785e8342c20620d4c6849fbb14f
93f4b8c8b7b050ea4cceecbd3656e6109a9b6ee1
describe
'379157' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYV' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
03dc7c257861eda9e5509dbadc539f67
d885f9d99aedfcff06db1352508e21c98a917e5f
describe
'98887' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYW' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
a88cd5829bbea67f1f819b2d1fcdb7af
f6707963d8203cca402cf0fb55d4a6e23ce2d073
describe
'31746' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYX' 'sip-files00300.pro'
1d0075f1e20eb3c8cf05d799de7539d5
222214140f66776743a48fcc52095135fc0d3451
describe
'30222' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYY' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
73042606bcec619b768f30e52dd94d89
79a9aa56de523d221974b958b78215339e047aa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYYZ' 'sip-files00300.tif'
d1123f535d356f3e443b41b819b7c881
9140e19dabab6b8bf69bfb4aef0f3c6d96ce7ab5
'2011-11-14T19:13:41-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZA' 'sip-files00300.txt'
96b1b81c5fe005d5189eed508277e4cb
944f5183c4b92a0750e6b46cf755c521dc5215fa
describe
'7530' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZB' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
2d75a872722c0f5aa0dda898d8af3353
4f86705bb9180e1a885e4bc29625fc9201f20268
describe
'379129' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZC' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
136781dffa95849b8e82531bc5f63d14
7e3c2fc5e6d6c96a4d184221248557d113028cc9
describe
'108466' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZD' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
cca7d358616b618e9ec2ad8342b3b153
a9e1f96519a5b2964ad7d27315d3d84dbcc2fa4a
describe
'28540' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZE' 'sip-files00301.pro'
6e19d1eac67f2063fadfacf7184984ff
3c18a1d895b2c9c94e899d1304c3b789e1661995
describe
'31648' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZF' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
9efedbeb03562299a59596e2cc0bdb2d
04fa875c388f47e51e81b74a708ba26c22e88e70
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZG' 'sip-files00301.tif'
9eb31fa4cc5aa17633a67b433b9a55a7
ea1dd37b5d208310dd8d52e00570a15715e17feb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZH' 'sip-files00301.txt'
6ac9c0145996033968f1326f00f0360d
987867b82442c6dca43d660aa8daf6bbd4ec8aa5
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZI' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
6b30f2a4f56b5fc95857a2661706fc78
f37bdbb53c5248d9669313180aeb6cab9b4251c8
describe
'379160' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZJ' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
06120688fcc6eb046a8f0792a87aa77d
e5d9860b661b23c613f43b5e2eb642f5b9d8f721
describe
'112409' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZK' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
f702905accdd6302ec8f01b1254bc718
9089acef7e78c57001add63c0a5d41f1262df62d
describe
'34839' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZL' 'sip-files00302.pro'
a4ee505830c46d231f0707f151fe87ee
05e0cd27926898d6d7600956da907fae698a2c84
describe
'34211' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZM' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
e68b0c9c53cf523f8d8eb115dc94aac5
5d09b04addc25f07a7ae1f8b61d9ccb977d76e9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZN' 'sip-files00302.tif'
8f974afa6839aca392c9c92bd8666181
b8b9dd5aaf0f6dce4cda06e4b56298a86e0d2732
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZO' 'sip-files00302.txt'
4f7368339a43556f7f9df1cf557ed2a2
7c7cf77ff1be510c049ae37c1b1292813d5a7ac1
describe
'8267' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZP' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
f3a3bc5cfa21434c54b0fb9c8baaec19
956366e7b21a4cf41cf4a5aec16cea9cec4bfb3f
describe
'378750' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZQ' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
2de4d91157479b8badd7a1650bbbd9a0
d7bc339851785b68ca4db8a71e19d91608ba84b9
describe
'36171' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZR' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
e7feb5c054e20c232863ab271f5fb1da
eb4285691a2d3799fa1b362e486b68d317b31422
describe
'8704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZS' 'sip-files00303.pro'
97c4fbf116f44c65f0fb4ccf0d1b8983
afbe0a63b50fe884555b72cb83178be02e75f0cb
describe
'10681' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZT' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
48901bca9f91aade70c2ad9632575791
215c996c88d94fa42c7b06dd56daccc0200d30bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZU' 'sip-files00303.tif'
27615238043a9087a371158fc1af536b
db1555bece13844672469d79713a636b349a6ff4
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZV' 'sip-files00303.txt'
42ebebd15d9f240bfaeba06a3bbf8307
c35e134f34a8edc0c2126eba38f2bd7daff83e81
describe
'3002' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZW' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
3114e99e1fb25967e07b338bd882feab
2b916a3cee58864ab19dd2578dde06265fdcdb9b
describe
'362034' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZX' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
6515ebbf0ebab5980134566547e8a7e4
a8fef2a024afbf646a6e8cd57b6efe1c81a17dcf
describe
'98361' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZY' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
ce50afcf84a0857d093cd0d8875a1f3e
8ccffc6279376f2f97094fbf4df763745a5246d0
describe
'22100' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABYZZ' 'sip-files00304.pro'
058b0e66c6e2541c914e597db40af83f
68e3857e3ac9e8a65a255695be22534ca9461483
describe
'28943' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAA' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
9babfc0a5de94838aa728fe390961d6a
845eca7cbaca89d0e6525f4173d128df1697dce7
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAB' 'sip-files00304.tif'
088c5a4ce0fe35dd5a62838c0ddbae5d
ce0bdc5210fce3aae1168ff9e6b83068b8333531
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAC' 'sip-files00304.txt'
8ba9f84ef143d316b3ad4cbc23cf70eb
88dd3aa447ec7b3146d1ba6d977d8ca57e0b8065
describe
'7421' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAD' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
89b49da7545e05f81ef2596464cc0300
50fabc574c6b3684c2fc2ce4c10e6ec829d7cd00
describe
'363088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAE' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
52bf2568ab763227918e6bfd433269d2
634a610cbf6a510b618ab78fea4974027413b767
describe
'116484' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAF' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
8383690656ad0df54fb4629659dedd77
3015ac146cfc7f90722ba9c9aed7df576698eb78
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAG' 'sip-files00305.pro'
c44596a237e9c7aaa84fbe1de88318cc
4689635e1de45cf6f918b47b8a247d748e2408f0
describe
'36914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAH' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
c1cb33d0cdfad5955dc57b6c4f9dd1d6
751ff6d232e9b7a6b2f407a171a1c2fa64a478b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAI' 'sip-files00305.tif'
517e7b061fefafdb2a65d80212e3f8d7
41f45ca2ae49511942bbb2d9bba1f5e47f8767dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAJ' 'sip-files00305.txt'
2a0a0c647057e25805d9001e7bab063a
c02630069999edc54d6a298ff32827af8f3b0b73
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAK' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
82d087888bb6e9dcb2b8469888cb65b3
66a7ba576bf6170a366822cf52712c0fb8fcf95a
describe
'379162' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAL' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
a8a36b849bd670685c8a54b177e04d4c
409da201127c04bf77b9c4f5ada78adadc448903
'2011-11-14T19:06:24-05:00'
describe
'112429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAM' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
d9565a91e21d00927f8dda8d45ea4e96
2c11cba88b8a881dee0a7d9d87dad1bc287c955c
describe
'37193' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAN' 'sip-files00306.pro'
22171198463b619d94879ef73685b89f
01bd8e18098ddafe83f2e6610efdfc90db011b60
describe
'34629' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAO' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
c2f3d18a9da1753be035425fdf511285
5f9d14183892473ca31f9cf2371d51a93816a785
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAP' 'sip-files00306.tif'
71c789efd50b152989a9929d05507acf
ac58c052c1216b289e4c829409ffe8d507b6b341
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAQ' 'sip-files00306.txt'
5995357ef99c55d322c77f2a4f1bc3b4
35faf0db500ae844e532928ea02760f3096cd7f8
describe
'7894' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAR' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
e6c7028a39f3b854d15e686227468fb6
ddd273ec52e8b289eb5421e35496ac7e63df1cb5
describe
'379137' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAS' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
a95f0ee60990b1b0a53ee2b09aafa0fe
dac71017790f51eb8879b6cfa0d3c25d87dbac89
describe
'112704' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAT' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
47480d5490712f6e533768ae7362c17e
ed347ab0677591fb22efa859e8059eb0e4cb0285
describe
'36702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAU' 'sip-files00307.pro'
1eacfffff8b8f4d3d0434647f8026970
7d2943a02107f122f8d09af3e322c97f32276e9d
describe
'34846' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAV' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
2a1b2a2f190920e017ce6acfeaa1ea8a
ff5bdd48993133b0ae965b5f06de82bfc0f16f38
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAW' 'sip-files00307.tif'
ddeea571dcb963c7850625c9e2007dab
8e8f42154ce4c601ad7a88e1a829b4403a1b26fe
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAX' 'sip-files00307.txt'
9303b41426e2f644b5f28a333de996ae
118915ec7b07e4190691c4653a298eb87a5d1a50
describe
'8357' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAY' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
e33115cb8c0cc00dd06f8683de9534f9
4593c705670b669039760389644bff2669381247
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZAZ' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
b685ac119e855fda43f47e602ce7d9fd
7d8dfe8af664b29a6f209eac942c6441fd6e9b29
'2011-11-14T19:14:33-05:00'
describe
'107788' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBA' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
2bc248593f1bb643a77ef6c35eb36fc0
a7720e5bfe7057bad45ecc7fbbcb9436a71b6552
describe
'34967' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBB' 'sip-files00308.pro'
30d3cdfed1b3970ed4584e7fd45fecbb
659d24dde867a83a3cd04e249d42a5a5e94ebc77
describe
'32917' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBC' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
0fb1a2b59ed0e442549364963d39daf0
87044d7e2966ad7b35fbaf291f97789f2390bb84
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBD' 'sip-files00308.tif'
50e784b64f61542c803bd57f14400342
d2057bf86f05203662fb71910ecfe00a86db0d2b
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBE' 'sip-files00308.txt'
d23bc6a6604f022b0106d6ef7078a2ef
49789ce21cacfc523e17df146649e6089aa12f5e
describe
'7649' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBF' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
8cc78f87f105045b60488b7523ae5dee
52d4427abde63a41a9759b4404a724961770b151
describe
'379111' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBG' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
9eb66947436951642a5dea6a989dcd94
3536473a2d50dbc67c92c4837b9041e293914dfa
describe
'76740' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBH' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
1fecad8822d5362b8bda0b481e8f4252
e4ae82dfbfa19704cbb204be0ae1ede040521450
describe
'27049' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBI' 'sip-files00309.pro'
932ba60b4c995043ed14067b1828be70
2b40c1799b06be57e403a14df4859167a83b8f25
describe
'22859' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBJ' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
ca61f6ec8a59022d0f1b5e72eb60a7c4
bba6172d49b931851ce4774396e8011310574c80
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBK' 'sip-files00309.tif'
14427f442649f1d3316ae1c6446c8353
fdfd292784f609017f03be2b328c4c035990800b
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBL' 'sip-files00309.txt'
67ba7eae7f808f4737b7a6fe75ca7b95
3b48f687426d81fd4de3a61fefb36e5d55ffc403
describe
'5702' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBM' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
24e992ea9a72c6cb7200ce5b75e76b69
786569c1632ecdea35819b5de30e2748efc09e1f
describe
'378945' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBN' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
74de52337cba6fdcc10b370c1dde0276
ac8dcc2609ed41302eccaf1dcf4be84e4a105a2f
describe
'60299' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBO' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
d50a745897f308dfd628747ce4e1d650
b29a453dc1e5382b2b49bbbcee67adc3215116d5
describe
'24258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBP' 'sip-files00310.pro'
a92ddbcb667c9a990a7e44aa9a3c930e
e6e0e468344093e0a3d3126b256d94f7b32752c6
describe
'16991' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBQ' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
b6814a542c2333fd76d49325825bc3b4
bae42eb6639988d20cf6f0a4792b9b05522d9e45
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBR' 'sip-files00310.tif'
88c35cff99c21ac33ccffd6abf688cb7
2d28a9dc946cb134166d7e01e47d5962ca244bbf
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBS' 'sip-files00310.txt'
3cd4107fdb58e0737e65da026205eab6
1de241286e6654c7d0945aac92971d6271c43b7e
describe
'4610' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBT' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
7ac59cb8026355101db4eda34de8d529
d2ca940bffb1f5dc04383d77faa76a8e1b2b2865
describe
'390030' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBU' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
c6b721e50c4be474dfbb64ccd82b0221
6d2ea73699f54782676678d4f0c8504c0f3fac5d
describe
'13310' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBV' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
340bfb7d8d9914ac1ef2c368758933a8
dacd3914704e7a4037864e8c36ed3eec2a71fbbb
describe
'3717' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBW' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
d53bbe45df5c7879116bf112aa05c4b4
b90903a06a0dcecb7e7807b779468107a2dd762b
describe
'3136748' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBX' 'sip-files00311.tif'
775a95500f5fbd33a1f4cd126e26857a
3b548f489c8d07a7c8c09b7dc9c35a601be05807
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBY' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
056c1430c2249a3d2b56144194f5982a
f99401873f30ed9b4944cde17018f0c8b4285bc9
describe
'363041' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZBZ' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
7c2827451660635269d20b35f664b762
5a296116315ab3daa3cbf5e2e40ae9512ae7d2e3
describe
'208709' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCA' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
7f60478f81f5857c8a9c18420c1c4b75
27fecf1fabf936ac83bda9035b0643ea29c40f0b
describe
'48929' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCB' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
98c91306806daa035d0c024dd6a56412
0238add077acabcad6c010f2a404f458fb9c9070
describe
'8732912' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCC' 'sip-files00314.tif'
148189f6315f91e8db04cadad63ef7d9
ce5fa64609cf1f0b87f5f1665990ec93ac2898d8
describe
'10258' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCD' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
8a0badff92144ae849649e4628011eb0
dfd79eecbebecb4f90b623f1a5bff2cbe662cee0
describe
'399055' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCE' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
e4ad2eef0613b71eb72f9f54f6a7cde4
2d2ba581077d4b09ced4c2bb50a8f72735da5550
describe
'225575' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCF' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
a574c809ec1b487ee5f2a32ec32b77d6
8ac9dd0e4731a8ace463634bfe95aba401e92e37
describe
'53473' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCG' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
fc0ef429a540af4a9ea6ddcb0ecfa789
7af6b3f23304dfa8adef25dd05a0c97046f778ae
describe
'9599872' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCH' 'sip-files00315.tif'
df0b654e673de6a7477c48d17eaf1c1e
35cf1cd548e2f9920c1f1207ac7f7b4af6a3a307
describe
'11120' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCI' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
1fbc91c7d5e763f27f4ec8f7af360b6d
6bbb2f0ae35f19b8923081b4c6c24ac7e2f47dfa
describe
'430402' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCJ' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
f645edc1bad0a794b60085e111868c15
668b3514f7f662377dc88ab90d12549f5690c96d
describe
'183429' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCK' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
5d2e74854341f429e4b47b758d8d6dce
a3469017a3bda2bf80aeb72f4492f762c64a7c83
describe
'40458' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCL' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
5e289646afcadf3dce40949ca103a81d
ab9b143a6120d31c70245a7fb7cf397741463733
describe
'10338616' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCM' 'sip-files00316.tif'
e8e94cd52dfb86ae96335dff8a6760f9
eb95a5b8b88757dbff7bd9fd0d31c862efe726ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCN' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
5fbb76c9d4fabe11dafeef19e1a7f64b
b9d8e37ca8381c5e18d0e5d600498da3a555d79b
describe
'119209' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCO' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
e64171c448518b26583c7bf82a5327ce
774c4bb382b2fc8315564a1d2cf3763ba6b65311
describe
'65370' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCP' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
7e67563fed2aa333a22554c3a896e6b7
1513e28cc9f9655a9730dc44e28eefd2fa348b67
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCQ' 'sip-files00317.pro'
26ec8b9a918b2792afdaca336802d415
56f6bd60c6daec9df399b51919b2870742be0958
describe
'15867' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCR' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
4dbb783173200c028e341b526cbf78f1
b6fe73263a6420ce9c542ebfe9b1c211762b9300
describe
'2868088' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCS' 'sip-files00317.tif'
312bf7f57591d16b04a4d07b68bc09da
c56452e5e57d982fa206cbf2dcda12286752908f
describe
'5279' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCT' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
87d1a86b228d398f9149ffe684824b9c
9deee6a63ad8bd7cf67d2acd18a26f5302d7c0f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
a3dcea790b1a93bde2c922f7000b9b3f
736e48fc15d589bb531c757e498206e5d8257fd9
describe
'494914' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCV' 'sip-filesUF00083202_00001.mets'
2c189232898bbedf4d76a0600a7e0bd6
87965698ea312088b1f6f82c8a35dfb436867592
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2014-01-11T04:16:55-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'641218' 'info:fdaE20080808_AAAAFKfileF20080809_AABZCY' 'sip-filesUF00083202_00001.xml'
e9f936861fbc0a382baaac9cb2f769f5
17933d7cda4bf0d96353cf8552136c23f58d03f7
describe
'2014-01-11T04:16:59-05:00'
xml resolution