Citation
The whispering winds and the tales that they told

Material Information

Title:
The whispering winds and the tales that they told
Added title page title:
Baby Benedetta
Added title page title:
Green bridal
Added title page title:
Mist king
Added title page title:
Hilda Brave-heart
Creator:
Debenham, Mary H
Hardy, Paul, b. 1862 ( Illustrator )
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Glasgow ;
Dublin
Publisher:
Blackie & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
198, 32 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895 ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1895 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1895 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's stories
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Ireland -- Dublin
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertising at end: p. [1]-32.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary H. Debenham ; with twenty-five illustrations by Paul Hardy.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026668541 ( ALEPH )
ALG5612 ( NOTIS )
39061922 ( OCLC )

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Full Text












Trial, Kewirflle
Ves, ISS G i -



THE WHISPERING WINDS

ae





““THEY WERE A HAPPY-HEARTED FAMILY.”



THE WHISPERING WINDS

AND THE TALES THAT THEY TOLD

BY

MARY H. DEBENHAM

Author of ‘‘ Three Little Maids from School”, &c.

WITH TWENTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS
BY PAUL HARDY





LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Limirep, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN
1895



CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION, .

BABY BENEDETTA,

THE GREEN BRIDAL,

THE MIST KING,

HILDA BRAVE-HEART, .

Page

17

61

. 109

» 153



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
Page
‘“©THEY WERE A HAPPY-HEARTED FAMILY,” . . . . + . 20
Tur EL?F-KNIGHTS HOLD REVEL ON THE HILLS, . . . - 93
“‘GOODY HOBBLED AFTER THEM WITH A BUNCH OF MARIGOLDS,” 131

““PuT THIS ON YOUR HEAD AND YOU WILL BE INVISIBLE,” . 182

ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE TEXT.

‘© There, then, Maddalena, they are all against you,” . . . . 25
The little Agoni bring the News to the Water-sprite. . . . . 36
‘Nita addressed herself to the Nightingale,” . . . . . . + 43
“ He threw the necklace with all his might”. . . . . . . 49
“ He knew what it was to sit at old Dugall’s feet,” . . . . . 67

Eva vows to become a Bride when the Heather isin Bloom, . . 78
“Death to her! She has slain ourchief!” . . . . . «. « 100
‘Ronald stood with Eyg’s face upon his breasts?) 2 sme. 5s) i LOG:
“ There’s a bottle of stuff to go to old Goody Gabble,”. . . . 125
“The Mist King was galloping across the moor,” . . « . « 132

“They're like a lantern! Look how they show the path Ieee 130)

“Oh, do let’s be quick and wake them!” . 2. . . . «+ I4!
‘A welcome home was a beautiful thing in those days,” . . . 165
“‘T am not the bride fora hero,” . . 2. . . 1 6 6 + + © T74

“Tt seemed to him that there was a figure always by his side,” . 193

“ He liked to walk with her through the solemn fir-woods,” . . 195









STHEWH RoI ie

7 AND-THE- PALES THAD THEL 1)" SS





And he wandered away and away,
With Nature, the dear old Nurse,

Who sang to him night and day,
The rhymes of the Universe.

And whenever the way seemed long,
Or his heart began to fail,
She would sing a more wonderful song,
Or tell a more marvellous tale.
—LONGFELLow.

I wonder if all children are as greedy for stories
as those of my acquaintance. To keep them satis-
fied you must have a perfect memory for all the
tales you ever read or heard, or else you must

engage a story-spinning spider to live in your



10 The Whispering Winds.

we













AA

brain and be ready to work at a moment’s notice.
They pounce upon you at all sorts of times.
They expect you to talk against the rattle of a
train; they seize on you the moment after dinner,
“because we don’t want to have to go to bed in
the middle”; they drag you away from the break-
fast-table before other people have finished till you
blush for your own rudeness, ‘‘ because we sha’n't
get done before lessons”.

When you protest, “My good children, I
haven't got a story ready”, they respond cheer-
fully, “Oh, you can soon think one up”; and they
assist your brain by sitting on the top of you,
resting heads on your shoulders and elbows on
your knees, and asking about every two minutes,
« Haven't you almost thought?”

“What am I to tell them next?” I said the
other day to some friends of mine; ESteChemis
nothing new left to invent. Can't you provide me
with some stories?”

I should like to introduce you to these four

friends—old friends they are now, for they began



Introduction. 1I

RRRRRARARRRRRR RRR PnPn~P—P——O~—oe—w”

years ago to talk to me and tell me tales. Travel-
lers’ tales they were, for these friends of mine
journey from the ends of the earth, and bring me
messages from the lands and seas over which they
pass—and men call them the Four Winds. Some-
times they come to me salt and fresh like tumbling
waves, or they sweep down with a rush and a roar
from rocky heights, or they whisper in my ear
such lullabies as mothers in sunny far-away lands
croon over their dark-eyed babies. They bring
the song of birds and the roar of mighty rivers,
echoes of weeping and sounds of laughter, fierce
war-cries and the clash of arms, and the musical
peal of church bells.

If you will only listen with earnest willing ears
they will tell you such tales as you never dreamt
of. But first you must make friends with them,
and learn to love them and welcome them each in
turn. You mustn’t call them “horrid” when they
don’t blow just as you wish, as if your convenience
were the only thing in the world worth considera-

tion. You mustn’t turn sulky and hide your head



12 The Whispering Winds.

hmmm



when they get a little boisterous and want a game
with you, when they take your hat for a football
and bring the rustling leaves about your ears, or
when they sweep fiercely down with an armful of
snow-flakes, of which the earth’s winter counter-
pane is made. No, you must go out fearlessly
and bid them welcome, and they will teach you
their meaning and tell you their tales of far away,
and sing you to sleep with songs which they only
know.

Well, when I asked these four friends to help
me in the matter of stories they were quite ready
to do their best.

“ Stories!” they said, “oh yes, we know plenty.
What sort do the children like best?”

“Well,” I said, “the sort they always ask for
are fairy tales, wonderful things about wood-
sprites and water-sprites; and they are very fond,
too, of knights and ladies, and as many dragons
and giants and enchanted castles as you can
put in.”

“Well,” exclaimed my friends in chorus, “you



Lnutroduction. 13

~



do surprise us! We thought that, since the
passing of the Education Act, the children were
all grown too wise to wonder at anything. Don’t
they call a fairy an optical delusion, and declare
that a knight-errant was a useless member ot
society, and that he and the dragons could not
exist under the same atmospheric conditions?”

“Oh,” I said rather severely, “you travel so fast
that it is no wonder your information is inaccurate.
The children of my acquaintance have every
educational advantage, but their knowledge teaches
them that there are hundreds of good, beautiful
things in this world—and out of it—which they
cannot understand, and that the love and courage
which armed the knights are the grandest and
most powerful things in history.”

That was true, was it not, dear children?

“If that’s the case,” said one of the Winds,
whose voice had a merry roll and rumble like the
tossing of Atlantic waves; “if that’s the case, you
may come to me for stories. Why, Jack the
Giant-Killer himself, and King Arthur and all his



14 The Whispering Winds.



knights, came to live with me when the Saxons

~ drove them out.”

‘““The Saxons brought plenty of good stories
with them,” said the angry voice of a second
Wind. ‘But that’s always the way, nobody ever
has a good word for me. I do all the dirty work
—dry up the winter’s mud, send the fogs and the
fevers about their business, get the ground ready
for sowing, and who thanks me except a few
farmers and sanitary inspectors, who have the sense
to be grateful?”

‘“There were some verses written about you
once,” I said soothingly, for I felt that there was
some truth in the Wind’s complaint.

“Very true,” he replied, somewhat mollified;
“very fine verses they are, so I have heard.
Well, if your children would like something in
the way of a Norse Saga, I shall be glad to
oblige.”

‘“Come to me for tales about fighting,” said a
strong fresh voice like the rush of a mountain river.

“T will give you the gathering tune which called



Introduction. 15

~



the northern clans together, aye, and the coronach
which the women cry over a chief fallen in
battle.”

“You all talk so loud I can’t make myself heard,”
said a soft voice with a caress in every gentle tone;
“but I should like to know who brought the Greek
myths, which were famous before anyone began to
talk about your heroes.”

‘‘ My dear friends,” I pleaded, “ would you mind
telling me your stories in turn? My brain will not
really take in more than one voice at a time.”

“You know we are never let out all together
now,’ said the West Wind regretfully. “ Once upon
a time, when we lived in a mountain, a lady who
had her own reasons for wanting a hullabaloo
begged the old gentleman who had charge of us to
give us all a holiday on the same day. Oh what a
time we had!” and he laughed a free, merry laugh
like wind rattling in the shrouds.

“We got into mischief, I’m afraid,” said the
South Wind demurely. “I was sorry at the time
for the poor ship that we used so roughly, and we



16 The Whispering Winds.



AA



got a dreadful scolding all round when it was over.
I should not like it to happen again.”

“You know we sha’n’t have the chance,” laughed
the merry West Wind.

‘Might we not begin the stories?” I suggested.

The Winds professed themselves quite ready,
the only question was whose story should come
first.

“Well,” I said, “we ought to be polite, and we
are a Northern nation, suppose we hear what the
South Wind has to say.”

So the South Wind stole to my side, all fragrant
with the scent of flowers, and, in a voice like music

on a summer night, he whispered to me this story.

(991 )





‘* Soft, soft wind from out the sweet South sliding,
Waft thy silver cloud-webs athwart the summer sea;
Thin, thin threads of mist on dewy fingers twining,
Weave a web of dappled gauze to shield my babe and me.”
—Kingsley.

This is going to be a fairy-tale about a baby.
If babies could speak they would be themselves
the most wonderful story-tellers. They and the
fairies love each other dearly. What do you sup-
pose they see when they lie blinking and crowing
and catching at sunbeams? Why the elves of
course, sliding down the yellow rays, as their elder
brothers and sisters slide down the balusters.
There is a body-guard of fairies always stationed

round a baby; and though we don’t see them,—
\ (991) B



18 The Whispering Winds.

RAR RAR RRR eer ere”



we're so blind we elder people,—we feel their
presence plainly enough.

““ Behave yourselves when you come here,” they
say to us; “leave your naughty tempers and your
wrinkled foreheads and your worries and troubles
outside this circle, if you please.” They keep a
custom-house, and have a strict examination of
everything that goes into the baby’s country, and
they don’t allow any smuggling.

“Mind your manners,” they say, severely; “if
you want to come into Babydom you must do as
the babies do. Learn to laugh if you please, and
sing too if you can, and turn your back on stocks
and shares and politics, and Paris fashions, and
the price of mutton.”

That’s what the babies’ fairy guardians say.
Just ask the grown-up people if they haven't
heard them, aye, and obeyed them too, as quickly
as possible.

When this particular baby opened her eyes
first, she opened them on a square of the bluest
sky you ever saw, looking through the window
over her bed like the big blue eye of a great, kind,
smiling giant, and being a nice responsive baby



Baby Benedetta. 19



she smiled back at him at once. By and by she
noticed what might have been a green eyebrow to
the great blue eye, a little trailing bit of a vine,
with green cool pointed leaves and tiny twisting
tendrils, running all along the top of the window,
and breaking the sunshine into little patches on
the floor. And better than either the sky or the
vine, she had her mother’s eyes to look at—deep,
deep dark eyes, all overflowing with the beautiful
love, which the angel who brings babies brings
straight out of heaven to mothers’ hearts.

That was enough to occupy the most active-
minded baby for the first few days. Very soon
the baby’s field of observation widened. First
it began to include the round brown faces and
big black eyes of her brother and her two sisters,
faces screwed up into quite a remarkable expression
of wonder and delight; for it was full seven years
since they had had a baby in the house, and at
that time Battista was only six and Maso a year
younger, and Chiara, having been the baby her-
self, was not qualified to express an opinion.

And after a little while she made acquaintance
with a wide blue lake watched over by rocky



20 The Whispering Winds.

Pe

mountain peaks, and with green woods and floods
of hot bright sunshine, and little boats with red
striped awnings. Why, if she had been a poet or
an artist there would have been enough there for
her to think about, and being only a very happy-
hearted baby, she smiled, and cooed, and sang
little songs to herself about all the beauty, and
grew sweeter and plumper every long summer's
day.

She was a very smiling baby; the neighbours
all noticed it when they came to see her.

“Only see how the little one smiles,” they said
to her mother. “It is a blessed child; you are
happy in your babies, my Maddalena.”

And the young mother, thinking so too, called
her baby Benedetta.

Baby Benedetta came when the grapes were
just turning purple, and all through the winter
months there was sunshine enough in that little
house to have ripened any number of grapes, if
there had been any left ungathered. They were
a happy-hearted family, who smiled more than
they frowned; but even if they had been grave by
nature, the fairies who guarded Baby Benedetta



Baby Benedetta. 2

~





would have taken care that nothing but smiles
came where she was. And when the spring came,
then it would have been hard indeed to he'p being
happy. For the nightingales sang all day and all
night, the woods put on a court dress of the
daintiest, brightest green, the meadows were
white-robed and fragrant with narcissus, and on
the banks under the trees grew lilies like a peal of
little white bells, and gentian like big church bells
made out of a piece of the deep blue sky. And in
the little cottage by the lake the young hearts
sang as joyfully as the nightingales.

Well, one day a little boat came across the blue
water of Lake Maggiore, with a beautiful clear
reflection like a coloured picture dancing along by
its side. And when the keel grated on the pebbly
shore, there stepped out of it a man with a kind
brown face and white hair, whom the children ran
to meet and called Grandfather. And when he
had kissed them all round and hugged Mother
twice over, and tossed Baby Benedetta until she
crowed again, he told them why he had come
across from Pallanza to see them to-day. For
there was to be a wedding at Mother’s old home,



22 The Whispering Winds.

De

directly, the very next week. It was that naughty
Tonino who wanted to carry off pretty Aunt Rosa
at once, who said he would not wait any longer
—did they desire to have a wedding when Rosa
was wrinkled and his hair was white like Grand-
father’s? So here was Grandfather come to bring
all the love and the embraces of Grandmother and
Rosa, and to say that nothing in all the world must
keep Maddalena from coming to the wedding—yes
—and staying till late, quite late, when all the guests
were gone, that she might help Grandmother to
put things straight. Rosa had said she would
not be married unless her sister Maddalena came,
and Tonino said that if Rosa would not marry
him he would jump into the lake, and if Tonino
jumped into the lake, Tonino’s aunt, who had
brought him up, would have no one to support
her. So there, Maddalena, little stay-at-home
that she was, might see what depended on her.

«But, my father, the children!” said Maddalena
doubtfully.

“Bring them, bring them,” said Grandfather
heartily; “the festa is for all the family, and
Grandmother will welcome them, the little angels!”



Baby Benedetta. 22

w





But even the children’s father, who leaned
laughing against the door, knew better than that.

“Grandmother will have enough to do without —
four little angels under her feet,” he said; “and if
it is to be a festa for the Madre, and she goes
to help Grandmother, they will be better at home.
I will stay and be Madre for the day.”

But Maddalena would not hear of that. Go
without her husband! No indeed! Who could
make such fun at the wedding, or sing so good
a song as her Beppo? And Beppo had been
Tonino’s friend; if Rosa would not be married
without her, assuredly Tonino would never be
married without Beppo.

And then Battista spoke, with her rosy cheeks
rosier than ever with indignation. Was she a
little tiny baby? Did not Mother say she made
as good soup as herself? Did she not dress and
undress Baby Benedetta for a whole week after
Mother cut her hand? Did the Madre really,
really think that she could not be trusted to mind
the house for one single day? Battista’s black
eyes were quite full of tears, and Father, whose
pet she was, took her part.



24. The Whispering Winds.

RoE I ENO Ae IU IA BETO OE
“ The little one is right,” he said, “she grows

quite a woman; what should go wrong if she





SINS




=
Wy we Ne ‘
Wha SS

SHES

keeps house for a day? You were no older,
Maddalena, when I saw you first, so good a little



Baby Benedetta. 25



housewife, and the mother and father away for
days together at the vintage.”

Maddalena shook her head.

“Yes, but there were neighbours always in and
out, and here it is so lonely.”

“Well, and if there were neighbours,” cried
Battista, “what good would they be? Does not
Mother Assunta, when she does come, make the
little one almost cry, she holds her so badly? Did
you not say I was twice as good a nurse, did you
not, did you not? Ah, Mother, you know you did.”

“T will take care of Baby Benedetta,” cried
Maso; “what should hurt her while I am here?
I will not look away from her, not so much as for
a single‘moment, all day long.”

“And I will play with her,” whispered little
Chiara, with her chin on Mother’s knee as she
knelt beside her. “I will get flowers for her, and
sing and tell stories all the time that Battista
makes the soup.”

“There then, Maddalena, they are all against
you,” said Grandfather; “and the little one would
say the same if she could. Come, say yes, they
all wait for you.”



26 The Whispering Winds.

“Come, Madre, we say yes, do we not?” said
Father.

“Say yes, say yes, Mother,” clamoured the
three voices.

So the Madre said yes, hesitating at first, then
laughing at herself for hesitating, for after all what
could happen to hurt the little family between
sunrise and sunset on one bright May day? So
Grandfather said good-bye, and kissed them all
round and went away, and Maddalena got out her
féte-day dress, and sighed and smiled to think of
her own wedding and of Aunt Rosa, a little,
laughing, roguish maiden then younger than
Battista, and now a bride herself. To think
how time flies; why, Tista will be the next to
go!

And so the wedding-day arrived, and in the
pure, sunny morning she dressed herself, and put
great silver pins in her dark coils of hair, and
kissed the children all round, with two kisses for
Baby. Then she gave them all ever so many
charges to be good, and started, looking back to
wave her hand, and running back to say good-bye
again, until Father dragged her away, saying they



Baby Benedetta. 27,





would be late for the market boat which would
take them from Baveno to Pallanza.

“ remarked Nita the goat to herself, as she chewed
the fresh spring grass meditatively at the cottage
door. She was a motherly old person, with little
ones of her own. “ Battista is a good child, but
young—very young—and thoughtless. Why not?
Who looks for a beard on the chin of a kid? But
that blessed baby weighs on my mind.”

There were two lizards, an emerald green and
a peacock blue one, sunning themselves among
the ferns on a bit of old wall close by, and what
Nita thought, they said out loud.

“T think Maddalena is to be blamed, very
much to be blamed,” the emerald lizard said, mak-
ing a little nervous dart up the wall. ‘It gives
me the creepy shivers to the tip of my tail to
think of what might happen to Baby Benedetta
while she is at Pallanza.”

“So it does me,” said the peacock blue lizard;
“ suppose a thunder-storm came, or a thief stole
her. Why, bless my heart, why couldn’t they
take her with them?”



28 The Whispering Winds.

Re

“You just show your utter ignorance of the
subject,” said Nita crossly. She was anxious her-
self, but she possessed the fine virtue of self-con-
trol and didn’t bother other people with her fears;
and the lizards, she declared, kept her always on
the fidget with their perpetual dartings and shoot-
ings. “A baby ata wedding! Who ever heard
such stuff? And, pray, who ought to know most
about the dear children, their mother, or you two?
If people would but hold their tongues until they
have something worth saying.”

Which remarks so crushed the lizards, that
they darted into the nearest crevices between the
stones like two flashes of light from a blue and
green firework.

Meanwhile the children watched the father and
mother as far as they could see them along the
dusty road, with the blue lake on one side and the
green woods on the other, and then they came
back to the little pebbly beach before the cottage.
They made a sort of little throne for Baby Bene-
detta, and while Battista tidied the room and
chopped vegetables for the soup, the other two
played with her and told her stories. They



Baby Benedetta. 29

RRR RRR nnOOOPPOPOPOWOVOVOWIOOWIOWVOVOYVPO—V—IOIO™”_

watched for the boat on its way from Baveno to
Pallanza, and they counted the little boats and
wondered who was in them. They looked at the
mountains opposite, with the two peaks which
kissed the stars at night, and wondered whether,
if one ever got up so high, one could see what the
angels were doing.

While they talked a nightingale sang ing the
tree behind the cottage. He was a genius—the
nightingale was. That means that he had some-
thing beautiful to tell the world, and that he was
bound day and night to sing till he had told it.
It means that people heard him, and new thoughts
came into their tired hearts, or their own old
thoughts, which had been dim and hazy and un-
formed, stood out clear and beautiful before their
eyes, as if someone broke a place in a big black
cloud and showed the sun, which had been shin-
ing away all the time out of sight. Sometimes
he was sad because he could not tell his mes-
sage well enough; sometimes he got a horrid
idea, quite a mistaken one, that he was singing
out of tune; but then one must pay, by some little
drawbacks, for knowing more than other people.



30 The Whispering Winds.

The children didn’t half understand him; but
they knew that they were the happier for his song,
which, indeed, was all he wanted with them at
present.

While the sun shone and the nightingale sang
and the children chattered, Nita nibbled the grass
close by, and Chiara made a wreath of flowers and
_ put it round her neck; and Nita bleated with plea-
sure, and rubbed up against her and said to herself:

“Good, good; they are wise children, every-
thing will be right.”

The lizards, who had short memories, had got
over their snubbing, and come out into the sun
again. They watched the children, and raved to
each other about Baby Benedetta; for they were
enthusiastic creatures, and never could help talk--
ing about their feelings.

There was someone else, too, watching the
group of children; someone who looked up at
them through the clear blue depths of the lake;
someone who had a wonderful home just where.
the pebbly shore shelved down into deep water.
She was water-sprite, and a very beautiful one.
She had a face like a picture, or a lovely doll.



Baby Benedetta. Zit

aa



She was hundreds of years old, but there was not
a gray thread in her long dark tresses, not a
wrinkle on her white brow, no lines of sorrow or
weariness or tender anxiety on her smooth, fair
face. Some people think a face is improved by
them, but that is a matter of taste.

The water-sprite, who was a great lady among
the lake fairies, had a lovely palace under the
water, lots of inferior sprites for servants, and
fishes to go errands for her. Anyone would have
said that she must be perfectly contented. But it
is always the way in this dissatisfied world, that
the one thing we haven’t got is the one thing
we set our hearts on. And the water-sprite was
quite cross and ill with wanting Baby Benedetta,

There is nothing in the world that makes one
feel so green and horrid as wanting what belongs
to other people; only if one is a respectable, and at
the same time a sensible person, one just looks
the other way and thinks about something else.
But the water-sprite, being neither respectable nor
sensible, went on looking and wanting until she
felt as if it were hardly worth while going on
living at all, unless, by hook or by crook, she



32 The Whispering Winds.



could get hold of the baby. But then how was it
possible for her to steal Baby Benedetta when she
was being so well taken care of? For Tista had
come out of the cottage and was sitting on one
side of her, and Maso on the other, and Chiara
kneeling in front of her, and what chance was
there for a greedy water-fairy to get past those
loving little guardians?

So the fairy went into a dreadful passion, and
shook all her hair into a tangle—which hurt her-
self more than anyone else,—and scolded and
fumed, until the agoni, the little brown fish who
lived in the lake and ran—no, swam—errands for
the water-sprites, simply turned tail and scuttled
away in terror. And then she rolled her eyes and
said, “A time will come”, which always seems to
comfort the bad people in stories, and threw her-
self down on a couch of silvery sand to wait till
the time arrived.

And meanwhile the sun beat down hot on the
blue lake and the green woods, and Baby Bene-
detta’s eyelids began to droop, and Battista said,
‘There then, she is sleepy, the little angel. Sleep
then, my treasure, and Tista will sing to her.”



Baby Benedetta . 33



And she laid the baby on the grass in the shade,
and sang to her about someone who went away in
a most beautiful uniform to fight his country’s
enemies, and someone else who was obliged to
stay behind and would dearly like to have been
a soldier and gone too. It was strange to hear
about soldiers and fighting in the hot bright sum-
mer noontide beside the still lake, but it did quite
well for Baby Benedetta, who fell fast asleep with
a little half smile flickering on her lips.

After she had sung the song twice Battista sat
silent, leaning back against the mossy wall, where
the lizards darted in and out of the crevices. She
was thinking about her mother and the wedding
and Aunt Rosa. Ah, how pretty she would look
dressed for her bridal! What fun it would be to
have everyone looking at you and admiring you
and wishing you good fortune! ‘“ Tista will be
the next,” the Madre had said, and Battista smiled
to herself and wished she could grow up quicker.
She had heard Grandmother say that she was Aunt
Rosa over again, and she wondered if she would
really ever be as pretty. Maso and Chiara had

moved away, and were having a game by the
(991) c



34 The Whispering Winds.
ne
water's edge, and Tista went down to the lake
and tried to see herself in the still water. Yes,
her eyes were like Aunt Rosa’s, and her face was
the same shape only rather fatter; she would look
much more like her if she had on her féte-day
dress, and her necklace, the beautiful necklace that
Grandfather gave her. Oh! what a pity it was
Mother would not let her wear it oftener. And
then she would have to do her hair differently;
if she twisted it up on the top of her head like
Aunt Rosa’s and put a great pin into it, she would
certainly look much taller and more important.
Suppose she were to go into the cottage and try.
She quite longed to see how she would look. She
cast a glance at Baby Benedetta. She was fast
asleep, and would sleep for an hour or more, most
likely.

“Maso! Chiara!” she called, “take care of
the dambina till I come back, I'll only be a few
minutes,” and she went into the house. Maso
and Chiara heard her, and stopped their game for
a minute to look at Baby. But she was so
happily asleep that it seemed a pity to disturb her
by moving her to where they were playing, and



Baby Benedetta. 35

nn ~~



they couldn’t possibly have the same game any-
where else. For just in that place a fallen tree-
trunk ran out into the water, and they were -
pretending that it was a boat, and that Maso was
a boatman who took people for trips on the lake,
and Chiara was a grand English signora in velvet
and diamonds (which we know English ladies
always wear when they travel), and wanted to be
rowed to Santa Catarina. And, after all, what
could happen to Baby Benedetta, even though
some trees just hid her from their sight?

What could happen? Oh, my dear children, if
you could but have known about the greedy eyes
gazing up through the clear water, if you could
but have seen the figure in the green floating
robes with the greedy arms outstretched, who was
parting the blue lake as she rose up noiselessly to
the surface, how you would have forgotten in a
moment all about your play and your finery, and
flown to make a body-guard around that precious
baby.

It was the agoni who noticed first that Baby
Benedetta was left alone.

They were horrid little sycophants, always try-



36 The Whispering Winds.

eth he a Un SANA Ut RR
ing to curry favour with somebody, and they
thought if they told the water-sprite she might



reward them for it. So they swam to her in a
great hurry, and told her that if she really wanted
the little mortal baby she had better make haste



Baby Benedetta. a7







before its relations came back. The water-sprite
wouldn’t believe them at first, but the agoni
vowed they wouldn’t tell her a story to save them-
selves from being fried with bread crumbs. They
said that sort of thing every day, and it meant
nothing; but the water-sprite went to look, and
found that, for once in a way, the agoni had
spoken the truth.

So up she rose through the clear sparkling
water until her bare white feet rested on the shingly
beach. AQ little white cloud came across the sun
as she stepped on shore; the nightingale stopped
singing, and no wonder, it was enough to make
any respectable nightingale feel bad to have any-
one near him so greedy and horrid as the water-
sprite looked at that moment, with the naughty
selfish gleam in her cold eyes. The lizards saw
her and went nearly mad; they darted up and
down like blue and green lightning and tried to
shriek for help; and Nita the goat bleated with all
her might, and tore at the cord by which she was
fastened to a peg in the ground. But, poor things,
what could they do? All their efforts could not
tell the children what was happening. And, in



38 The Whispering Winds.

the cottage, Tista was standing on a stool before
a cracked looking-glass, with her necklace of
coloured beads round her bare brown throat, and
her thick black hair in a heavy coil on the top of
her head. ‘I am like Aunt Rosa,” she was
thinking. ‘“ Ah, now, if I had Mother's silver
pins, should I not be quite beautiful!”

And, outside, Maso was telling the English
signora how a great rock fell through the roof of
Santa Catarina’s little church, and how the good
saint preserved everyone from harm. And Chiara
held up her hands and exclaimed: .

“Oh, wonderful! Miraculous! But you, my
friend, tell the story so beautifully that I must
give you a piece of English gold, and I shall
never row in any boat but yours.”

How should any of them have eyes or ears
for the wicked water-sprite, as she bent over
Baby Benedetta and lifted her, still fast asleep,
in her arms, and stepped back into the lake,
and sank down out of sight through the calm blue
water?

The green and blue lizards rushed almost to the
water's edge in their despair.



Baby Benedetta. 39

I OG CGA

“Qh, the baby, the baby!” they screamed.
“Oh, the darling daméina| Oh, thieves! murder!
police! Why doesn’t somebody come?”

But nobody came till after the parted waters
had closed again over the fairy and her burden,
and the sun was shining down, as if in mockery,
on the place where Baby Benedetta had sunk out
of sight.

Then Battista came out of the cottage with
her necklace on, and a posy of fragrant white
narcissus at her breast, and holding her head
rather carefully, because her hair didn’t feel very
firm. She saw that Baby Benedetta was not
lying where she left her, and supposed that she
was awake and the others had taken her to play
with them. So she went to look for them, hoping
they would be impressed by the difference in her
appearance. After a minute she met Maso and
Chiara. Their game had not ended quite happily,
because Maso wanted to play that he came home
and had a little house and a vineyard of his own,
and Chiara was his wife and made the soup, and
Chiara much preferred to be the English signora
and give little pebbles for gold pieces. So they



40 The Whispering Winds.
ee
couldn’t agree, and left off playing and came back
to find Battista.

“Where have you left Baby Benedetta?” asked
Battista, forgetting to wonder if they noticed her
hair when she missed the baby.

“Under the tree by the house,” said Maso.
“ She was fast asleep, so we didn’t move her.”

All the red went out of Battista’s cheeks.

“She's gone!” she cried, and ran back to make
sure, and the others rushed after her.

There was the tree, and the red handkerchief
which had been tied over Tista’s hair, and the
grass pressed down where they had all been
sitting—but no baby!

“She must have woken up and crawled away,”
said Chiara, with a dreadful frightened look in her
eyes.

And then they all ran hither and thither, and
shouted and called, first trying to speak merrily,
then getting more and more anxious and terrified,
‘until at last Battista threw herself down on the
grass under the tree and burst out into passionate
crying.

« She’s lost, she’s gone!” she sobbed. ‘Oh,



Baby Benedetta. 41

~~

what shall I do, what shall I do? Oh, wicked

122



ones, I told you to take care of her

“Why did you leave her?” cried Maso. “You
promised Mother to take care of her, you know
you did.”

“Oh, don’t, don’t!” sobbed Chiara. “Oh, we're
all wicked and miserable, don’t let us quar-
rel! Oh, Baby, Baby! Oh, what will Mother
do?”

“Oh, I wish I was dead!” wailed Tista, rocking
herself backwards and forwards. ‘Oh, I can’t
meet Mother, I shall jump into the lake and
drown myself!”

“No, don’t,” said Chiara again, ‘it’s enough to
lose Baby; if you were gone too Mother would
die.” And then they threw themselves down
on the grass and cried till they could cry no
more.

All this -was very sad to see. Kind-hearted
old Nita turned her head away, and the sympa-
thetic lizards wept abundantly.

“Oh, dear, it’s too dreadful!” sobbed the pea-
cack-blue one; “it’s perfectly heart-breaking, |
can’t stand it any longer.”



42 The Whispering Winds.
Oo RN

“Nor can J,” whimpered his emerald-green
brother; “do let’s do something. If only we
could tell them where she is.”

“But we can’t; they can’t hear us,” said the.
first lizard. ‘Oh, dear, why can’t we talk human
language? Couldn’t we get an interpreter? When
Maddalena comes home and finds the Jamézna
gone her heart will break, 1 know it will, and
Beppo will die of grief.”

“Oh, yes, so he will, and the dear children will
starve,” sobbed the other. ‘Oh, I can’t stand by
and see them starve! Oh, let’s do something this
minute?”

And then they cried for ten minutes over
Maddalena’s broken heart, and then spent ten
more minutes in saying how sweet Baby Bene-
detta was; which was true, but beside the subject;
but the lizards never could go straight to any
point, and always tried the temper of the chairman
when they sat on a committee. But while the
lizards raved Nita was using her brains, and she
started from the point at which they had branched
off to weep.

“Couldn't we get an interpreter? Was there no



Baby Benedetta. 43

AAR RA RAR RAR Renee eee

one who could tell the children where Baby Bene-
detta was?”

And as Nita wasted no time in weeping or
speculation, she soon came to a conclusion. There
was only one person she could think of who could
understand her, and to whose voice she knew
human beings would listen, and that was the
nightingale. So she determined to ask the night-
ingale’s advice. I can’t say she liked doing it, for,
if the truth must be told, Nita was not fond of
asking advice from anybody, and had always con-
sidered that the nightingale wasted a good deal
of time in singing songs which did not help him
in building his nest or providing himself with daily
bread. However, she felt that the way to help
the children was beyond her understanding, and,
like a wise creature, she came to the conclusion
that there might be powers beyond her under-
standing too, and that she had better go else-
where for help. So she addressed herself to the
nightingale, who was sitting on a bough just behind
the cottage.

“Signor,” she said, “can you spare me five
minutes; if you please? It isn’t often I trouble



44 Lhe Whispering Winds.







you with my affairs, but things have gone wrong,
and I own it’s past my power to mend them.”

She had got so far when the lizards understood
what she was doing, and chimed in both together
as usual.

“Oh yes, dear signor, gracious signor, you will














ie Y
(Ye '"%
M,N
WN EY
Ne

if





aR
y Ny j f yy oN f
rs Vi) Z

NEL, | dei d SW 7) oy fig
eZ hee Kanes ; AX
WN AE SOG LZ

Bir Nie OOF
eB aun Vix TE ee

Lifgae) @ w,.
i= s2 ae ap ST La fre wy
CE ne e WU bt % Ui ae

help us, won’t you? You're so kind and so clever,






and all our hearts will break if you don’t help
lise

Nita went on as if the lizards had not spoken.
“That wretch of a water-sprite has got Baby

Benedetta, and I can’t even tell the children



Baby Benedetta. 45

PRAIA RRR RAR RRR

where she is. Now, I know these two-legged
human creatures listen to you, though they can’t
understand a good bleat.”

« And so you'll tell them, won’t you, dear, beau-
tiful, kind signor?” cried the lizards; “or they'll
die of grief, and so shall we.”

“And a jolly good thing if you did,” cried the
exasperated Nita. Of course she said it in Italian,
which sounded prettier, but meant something quite
as forcible.

“Poor things, don't scold them,” said the
nightingale kindly; ‘they're very unhappy.”

“So are we all,” said Nita; “but it won't make
us happier to behave like idiots.”

“We all want to do our best to help,” said the
nightingale, “and I am going to do my part.
Only, you know, my friends, I have not anything
of my own to say. I speak the message that is
given to me, and sometimes I’m afraid I cannot
speak it clearly. But I think there will be a word
for the children here, and I will tell it them as well
as ever I can.” |

“Oh, thank you, thank you!” gasped the
lizards; “we knew you'd manage everything.”



46 The Whispering Winds.
Sa

“Do hold your tongues,” said Nita; “ the signor
can’t hear himself sing for your jabber.”

So the lizards kept as quiet as they could, and
the nightingale flew to the tree under which the
children lay, and began to sing. At first none of
them took any notice. Then Maso stuffed his
fingers into his ears, for it made him think of
Baby Benedetta and feel more miserable than
ever. Tista was almost too unhappy to notice
anything, but Chiara sat up and listened, with a
sudden look of interest in her face. Then she
seized her sister by the shoulder.

“Listen, listen!” she cried. “Hark what the
nightingale says!”

“What do you mean?” asked the other two.
But Chiara only replied, “Listen! do listen!”
And certainly it seemed to them all that the
nightingale’s clear song had words to it, and this
is how they ran:

“ The lake holds a treasure worth its weight im

gold, but that which rs more precious than gold may
yet buy it back again.”

That was all, and he sang it three times, and
after the third time Chiara started up and cried:



Baby Benedetta. 47

RRR RAR RR RRR



‘He means Baby Benedetta, I know he does!
She’s worth her weight in gold, and she’s in the
lake—the water-sprites have got her! Mother
Assunta talks about them, and we must buy her
back. Oh, dear nightingale, thank you, thank
you!”

“But oh, how can we?” cried Battista, while
they all three ran to the edge of the lake as if to
look for Baby Benedetta in its depths. “We
haven't anything more precious than gold to buy
her back with. What must we do? Shall we sell
everything we've got?”

“ Your necklace, Tista,” cried Maso.

“Oh yes, yes,” said Battista eagerly, beginning
to unclasp it with fingers that trembled so that she
could hardly use them.

Now we know, of course, that poor Tista’s bead
necklace wasn’t precious at all. Of course not?
Everybody has them nowadays, your grown-up
sisters wouldn’t wear them to a dance. But, you
see, when Grandfather brought them for Tista from
the fair, and chose the colours he knew she liked
best, and made her put her hand into his pocket
to find what there was there for her, she was so



48 The Whispering Winds.

DO
delighted and felt so fine, that sapphires and
emeralds couldn’t have seemed more valuable. It
was Tista’s greatest treasure. But, oh dear, what
was it by the side of Baby Benedetta? And yet
she could not but give it just one little loving look
as she unfastened it and held it up high in her hand.

“] will throw it into the deep water where the
water-sprites live,” she said.

Nita and the lizards watched her, Nita quite
quiet, though she was really trembling with
anxiety, and the lizards quivering to the tips of
their tails. She never stopped to look at herself
in the water this time. If she had she would have
seen a pale face and eyes red with crying, and
the thick dark hair all tumbling loose about her
shoulders; and yet there had come a new beauty
into her face, a something which can’t be put into
words, because it doesn’t belong to this world at
all.

Just as she lifted the necklace to throw it, Maso
caught her arm.

«Let me run out where it is deeper,” he cried,
and he ran out, knee-deep, waist-deep, into the
water. Once he stopped a moment and bit his lip



Baby Benedetta. 49



Eee



hard, for he had stepped on a sharp pebble, and
his foot was cut and bleeding.

“ Are your hurt, Maso?” asked Chiara.

‘No, no, it is nothing,” he said; and then he



threw the necklace with all his might, and it struck
the still water and sank out of sight. Then
Chiara stretched out her arms, and her tears fell
into the lake.

‘Oh, water-fairies, give her back to us!” she
cried. “You shall have all we have got, only

give us back Baby Benedetta!”
(991) D



50 The Whispering Winds.

~



But nobody answered, and the three children
stood with hands held out and eager eyes fixed on
the water.

Now down at the bottom of the lake the Queen
of the water-sprites was making a royal progress.
She rode along in her state chariot, and took
order with any of her subjects who were not
behaving themselves. You may be quite sure
that the tuft-hunting agoni were on the look-out
to curry favour with her Majesty, and had no
compunction at all about telling tales of their
mistress, the water-sprite. They stood in the
way, bowing and scraping, as she came along,
and all began with their most subservient manner.

“Long live the Queen! Welcome, your Ma-
jesty, to this end of the lake. Permit us the
happiness of directing your Majesty to some
objects worthy of your attention. Here you
may behold some jewels, fitted for no one but
royalty.”

Now the Queen, in spite of her exalted station,
had a real woman’s love for ornaments, so, when
the agoni said that, she stopped to listen, and
asked where the jewels were to be seen.



Baby Benedetta. 51

PRAIA PIP LIDIA ALL LEIS

“This way, your Majesty,” said the agoni, feel-
ing sure of posts about the royal household, and
they swam, tails first so as not to turn their backs
on the Queen, into the apartment where the water-
sprite was lying on her couch, with the most
glorious jewels you ever saw spread out before
her. There was a necklace of sapphires and
emeralds as big as marbles, and a clasp set with
three wonderful rubies, and a coronet of the most
perfect pearls, and, as the sunshine streamed on
them through the clear water, they were almost
too dazzling to look at.

But where did they come from, you ask, when
all that the children sent down was a bead neck-
lace? Yes, and something else besides. Do you
remember those drops of blood on Maso’s cut foot
which no one knew anything about, and those
longing, loving tears which Chiara’s black eyes
dropped into the lake? Well, once upon a time,
men were always looking for the Philosopher's
Stone, which turned everything to gold, and I
think that some such charm had touched the
common blue and green beads and the brave
drops of blood and the tender tears, something



52 The Whispering Winds.



called Love and Sacrifice, which make what they
touch more rare and precious than all the sap-
phires and emeralds, all the rubies and pearls, in
the whole world.

“Dear me!” exclaimed the Queen, “however
did you come by those? Why, I never saw such
jewels in my life!’

The water-sprite had not heard her coming,
and she jumped up and made her court curtsy in
a great hurry, clutching the jewels at the same time.

‘“Where did you get them?” asked the Queen
severely.

“They were sent down by some human beings,”
stammered the fairy.

“Indeed! Very unusual, I think,” said the
Queen dryly; and just then she caught of Baby
Benedetta, fast asleep on a heap of silky green
water-weed.

“My word,” exclaimed the Queen, “what a
beautiful human baby! Where did you get it, I
‘should like to know? Sent down, I suppose, like
the jewels. You stole it, you know you did,
getting us into bad odour with the mortals.
Come, tell the truth, for I mean to know.”



Baby Benedetta. 53

RnR eee re ey



If the water-sprite had been a dog she would
certainly have put her tail between her legs. She
looked thoroughly driven into a corner.

“They did send the jewels down,” she said
sulkily.

“To buy back the baby,” whispered the tell-
tale agoni.

“Well, I call it perfectly abominable,” said
the Queen, “I never heard of such goings-on.
For you to presume to keep the baby when you
were paid a fair price for it. The fact is, you
fairies of good family think you can have it all
your own way, but you'll find yourselves mistaken,
I can tell you. Take the baby home this minute,
and put it where you found it. And as for the
ornaments,” and her fingers closed over them,
“they'll go among the crown jewels. You take
them to my palace,” she said to the agoni.

The horrid little things swam off with alacrity,
thinking they would certainly be made keepers of
the regalia. But they had reckoned without
their host; for the sun, who had been playing
about the jewels all the time, had no intention of
letting them stay among the water-fairies. Soa



54 Lhe Whispering Winds.
Ne ECS:
sunbeam was despatched to take them straight up
to the highest of those two mountain peaks, and
there you may see them glowing sometimes, when
you think it is the setting sun kissing the snow.

The agoni got a tremendous scolding for not
taking better care of the treasures, and were out
of favour with everybody, which generally happens
to those sort of people, and nobody was sorry for
them.

But, meanwhile, the water-sprite, who dared
not disobey the Queen, had taken up Baby Bene-
detta and carried her back to the shore, and laid
her down under the tree, all so noiselessly that the
children, who were looking the wrong way, knew
nothing about it. And then she went back to her
lake palace and sulked and scolded, and gave her
maids a dreadful time of it for the next week.

But Battista and Maso and Chiara, after waiting
for what seemed to them like hours, began to de-
spair of ever getting their little sister back.

_ “The necklace was not good enough,” sobbed
Tista, as they turned back towards the cottage;
“not good enough to buy back Baby Benedetta.
Oh, I would give everything I’ve got, I’d go down



Baby Benedetta. 55

OOO







and live at the bottom of the lake myself, if I
could only see her lying under the tree where we
left her!”

«Why!—why!—” burst out Maso.

“ She’s there!” screamed Chiara.

And then—what then? Did you ever hear of
eating people up with kisses? I can tell you
Baby Benedetta ran some risk of it from her
brother and sisters that day. She woke up
directly and laughed and cooed, and talked a
great deal in baby language, telling them,—if they
could have understood her,—all about the bottom
of the lake and the water-sprites and the agoni,
and that she was very glad indeed to be back
again, for the water-fairy was not half as pretty as
Tista, and there were no flowers there to make
garlands of. But they didn’t understand; they
only knew that they were the happiest children,
and their baby the most beautiful baby in the
world, and that she should never, never, never,
never go away from them any more.

The moon was up that night when Maddalena
and her husband came home. There was a path
of silver right across the lake, and in at the win-



56 The Whispering Winds.



dow and along the floor of the room where the
children were asleep, though they were so sure
they would have been awake when Mother got
back. On a tree behind the cottage the nightin-
gale was singing with all his heart. He knew he
was singing his best to-night, and he sang and
rejoiced and told a beautiful story, which is as old
as the world and yet is always new.

“ What sebf-love has lost, self-sacrifice may win
again,” he sang; and the stars above shone back
in answer, “ Yes, yes, that is true.”

The lizards were asleep in a hole in the wall.

“ Such another day would be the death of us,”
they had said to each other; “but all’s well that
ends well.”

Nita stayed awake till she heard the father and

mother coming along the shady road.
. “That's a good thing,” she said as they drew
near. ‘Now I can sleep in peace, and if they
don’t all take good care of that precious damédina
in future, they’re not worthy to be trusted with
her, that’s all.

Maddalena felt very happy as she drew near
home.



Baby Benedetta. 57

~_—_——e—rrrrre



“It has been a beautiful, happy day,” she said,
“and the best part of all is the coming home to
the little ones. Do you hear, Beppo, how the
nightingale is singing? It is a beautiful world,
my dear, and I am the happiest woman in it.”

And then she stepped noiselessly across the
threshold, and kissed the four sleeping faces, and
the children never woke, only Baby Benedetta
smiled in her sleep.

And, overhead, the nightingale sang to the

stars.

“Ts that all?” I asked, as the South Wind’s
soft tones died away into silence.

“Certainly,” he replied, just a little bit ruffled
by the question. “What else do you want?
Would you like me to say that Baby Benedetta
grew up to be a blessing and a comfort to all
who knew her? No thank you; I’m like the
great Sir Walter Scott, I don’t tell people what
their own common sense ought to find out for
them.”

“Oh, indeed, I didn’t mean that at all,” I said,
hastily. “I only wanted to know if that was



58 The Whispering Winds.

aa





really all, and to say how very much I’ve enjoyed
the story, and I am sure it will suit the children
exactly.”

“Well,” said the North Wind, coming down
upon me with a rush and a sweep; “well, my
taste is for something a trifle more stirring. That
last story was like a lullaby all through; I wonder
you could keep your eyes open.”

‘And pray, what else would you have where a
baby is concerned?” I said severely.

“Not a bit of it,” laughed the North Wind.
‘Babies like what they are accustomed to; if
" you're for ever purring over them, of course they
can't stand anything stronger. Why, dear me,
didn’t you ever hear the song,

‘Rock-a-bye Baby,
On the tree top?’

The wind wasn’t too particular when he broke the
bough, and you may trust me that that baby came
up smiling. Many a bairn has fallen asleep with
my voice in his ears, and lived to grow into a
stout warrior.”

“Well, don’t find fault with other people’s style,



Baby Benedetta. 59

WS.





even if you have stories of your own to tell,” I
said.

I spoke with all the severity I could muster,
just because I was afraid of being unfair; for, do
you know, the voice of that Northern wind went
straight to my heart. As | listened there came
to me the sound of rushing waters and the wild
music of the pipes, and it made my blood run
quicker.

“Stories!” laughed the North Wind! “only let
me try. Do you think there are no fairies any-
where except in your sleepy blue ponds down
South? Did you never hear of the kelpie who
lives in the Northern rivers? There's something
to make your hair stand on end if you like. Have
your Southern families got a spirit of their very
own to warn them when trouble is coming? Do
you think I make those shouts myself that come
borne on my wings, when the nights are wild and
the snow comes driving up the glen? I'll tell you
stories by the score, and I'll warrant you'll not go
to sleep over them.”

And I turned to the North Wind and held out
my hands to him as to an old friend.



60 Lhe Whispering Winds.



ns

“Tell me a story from the Scottish Highlands,’
I cried, “I don’t mind what it is, so that it comes
from the North.”

And, as I shut my eyes to listen, the hills rose
round me, heaving up their purple shoulders
against the pale sky, and the heather was under
my feet and the voice of the river in my ears.

And then the North Wind began—





Backwards, backwards let me wander,

To the noble northern land,

Let me feel the breezes blowing

Fresh along the mountain side ;

Let me see the purple heather,

Let me hear the thundering tide-—Ay/our.

Who may dare on wold to wear
The fairy’s fatal green.— Scott.

I know a northern glen where the winds and
the mists have their home. The mountains draw
together there and leave only a narrow gorge
between them, where the river rushes over the
stones or lies in dark silent pools under the rocks.
On one side the tall bracken and the graceful
birches clothe the hill, and on the other the steep
mountain rises up bare and dark, with only a



62 The Whispering. Winds.

LOO OOOOOrOrOrwrrwrmrrreraem=â„¢>-.



narrow path, where but one man can walk at a
time, running along the face of the precipice.
And just at the head of the glen, where the
river bends a little, there is a piece of grass as
green as an emerald, lying there girdled round by
rock and purple heather, and high on the opposite
bank, looking up the gorge and down upon the
river like a stern watchman, there stood, once upon
a time, a gray old castle. Oh no! you won't find
it there now. People have grown so quiet and so
orderly we don’t want stone walls now to keep us
safe. The laws do that, of course; that’s to say,
they do their best. But though they have tamed
the people who lived there they can’t tame the
glen, not they, and the rocks rise up dark and
grand still, and the river hasn’t learnt to flow like
a canal, and the storm howls there as fiercely as in
the days when the chieftain I am going to tell you
about “kept his castle in the north”, and kept his
neighbours in order into the bargain.
- Ah! I wish you could have seen him coming
down the hillside, with his long easy stride and his
fluttering tartans, and the eagle’s feather in his
bonnet to mark him out from the rest of his clan.



The Green Bridal. 63

PPE FROOOAewowe—™™>



I don’t fancy we make men like that nowadays;
they don’t get fresh air enough. Fresh air and
plenty of room to move are the things that go to
the making of people like this chief. And didn’t
his people love him, his wild, sturdy, simple
people, who lived in their little heather-thatched
huts all up the glen. It never filled them with
envy that he lived in a castle, and it never
occurred to them to want his eagle’s feather or his
big brooch for themselves. His family had been
their chiefs long, long before any of them could
remember, and had a right, they thought, to their
services.

Moreover, being a chief was not all fun, and
meant a certain amount of work on the other side
too. For instance, if one of their clan got his
house burnt or his cattle carried off by an amiable
neighbour, he knew he had only to present him-
self and his grievance at the castle by the river,
and the chief’s sword, or his purse (which hadn't
generally much in it), nay, his last cow or his last
loaf, would be at his clansman’s service that
minute. And at the same time they knew that
they had to mind their own manners, after two



64 The Whispering Winds.

a





~~

or three rather rough-and-ready rules which their
lord and master laid down for them. They knew
that if they practised their light-fingered tricks on
each other’s cattle, or were greedy over the spoil
they took in lawful warfare with people they had
a quarrel against, he was pretty sure to hear of it,
and the offender wouldn’t care to face the look
which kindled his frank blue eyes when he was
angry.

“ Does eagle prey upon eagle and brother upon
brother?” he would say, with a roar in his voice
like the waves practising for a storm. ‘ You
know me, Ronald vich Alastair nan Cath.” (Rather
a mouthful of a name to call anyone by, but it
runs off Highland tongues like water over the
rocks. )

To which the clan would reply submissively
that they did know, and would be very careful
for a good long time afterwards. For they were
like a big family, you see, with a father whom
everybody looked up to and obeyed, and a lot
of unruly children who looked to him for help
and counsel in return. And while they each stuck
to their own part of the bargain, it worked very



The Green Bridal. 65

~~





well, as things do when everybody pulls evenly
and takes his own share of the work.

The chieftain’s wife was dead. They had
buried her among those who had borne his name
for generations past, on a little island in the
middle of a dark steely lake, with sombre fir-trees
climbing the banks around it. All up the glen
the people wept for her, the pipers played mourn-
ful music and the women cried the coronach, till
the hills echoed with their mourning voices. The
castle seemed quite desolate when shé was gone,
though she was only one gentle woman, with a
soft kind tongue and a very loving heart. She
left them all something, though, to keep them
from forgetting her, and the something was a
stout-limbed, yellow-haired baby boy, who was to
be a chief like his father some day, and to have
the eagle’s feather and the castle, and what was
much better, all the love and loyalty of his father’s
clan.

He was a bonnie boy, that little chief, young
Ronald as they called him, so as to distinguish
him from his father until he earned some grand

nickname of his own. He would be like his
(991) z



66 The Whispering Winds.

Oe A
father some day, erect and stately like a young
northern pine, with the light firm tread and the
keen clear sight of the mountaineer, and the grace
which twenty dancing-masters couldn't have
taught him so well as his free active open-air
life. And his mother had given him something
too, though she only held him in her arms once,
poor lady. For, while she clasped her little boy
and looked into his eyes and kissed his lips, she
gave him a heart as tender as her own, full of the
strong deep love which Northern hearts know
well, and a spirit as pure and sweet as the springs
that rise up cold and clear among the heather.

He knew almost before he could walk that he
was going to grow up into a great warrior.
Hadn't he been sung to sleep with stories of
bygone battles, nay, hadn’t he a minstrel all to
himself, a white-haired old harper, whose business
it was to make songs on purpose for him, and tell
him all that his ancestors had done ever since the
castle was built above the river? He had no
history books, you see; that worthy lady, Mrs.
Markham, was not writing in those days, so that
Ronald had not the advantage of knowing what



The Green Bridal. 67

Oe Cain Se RA OA EOE AEDT
Master Richard thought about the feudal system,
or of hearing Master George reproved for allow-

ing his dazzled imagination to run away with



his judgment. But he knew what it was to sit at
old Dugall’s feet on a winter night, when the
peats and the pine logs glowed the brighter
because of the snow and darkness without, and



68 The Whispering Winds.

ARR ARAAeeeeeeeeeaeeereeerw OOOO e_PP|>P>Perr rrr

made the ruddy light dance on the old man’s
white hair and beard and the eager listening face
of the young chief, to hear long rambling songs
about Ronalds and Lauchlans and Eachauns who
had gone forth to war, and come home triumphant
with honour and spoil, or been borne back in
mournful procession, with a blood-stained plaid
for a winding-sheet. And young Ronald would
spring up and try to wield his father’s claymore,
and wish that ten thousand enemies would come
that he might show that the spirit of his ancestors
was not dead. And the sturdy clansmen would
look on well pleased, and vow that their young
chief would be a gallant warrior.

Well, you will think that there were plenty of
people to encourage my hero in his taste for
fighting, but not many to call out the love and
tenderness which I told you his mother left him
when she died. Wait a minute and you shall
hear, for I haven’t yet come to the person who
had the most to do with this story.

One stormy night, when young Ronald was
quite a little boy, there was knocking heard at
the castle door and voices piteously begging for



The Green Bridal. 69

RR ITIL LLL AA SLL SSID RR

shelter. Now if the very worst enemy of the
family had come there with such a request as
that; he would have been let in directly, and
would have found welcome and the best food the
house contained, and been set on his way next
day when the storm was over. But that night
when the door was thrown back, there were only
two people, a tall man and a woman with a
bundle in her arms, with a young stag-hound at
their heels. They were blinded by the snow and
numbed by the cold, but when they heard where
they were they forgot everything in their joy, for
it was to the castle they had been trying in the
darkness to find their way.

The woman undid her bundle, and showed,
wrapped up in a plaid, the most beautiful little
baby girl, fast asleep and quite warm and _ safe.
All the household gathered round to wonder and
admire, and young Ronald, who had never seen
anything like her in his little life before, cried out
to know whether it were a fairy or an angel.
Then the man and woman, who had begun to get
back their wits and their breath with the warmth
and kindness, told that the child was the daughter



70 The Whispering Winds.

a
of a neighbouring chief—that their home had
been burnt by a hostile clan, who had come down
upon them with fire and sword and killed every one
except this child, who had been carried out of the
general slaughter by her nurse and her father’s
harper. They hid with their little lady among the
mountains, and the stag-hound, who had been
their chieftain’s favourite, came with them and
would not leave them. They had been trying all
that day to find our chieftain’s castle, knowing he
had been a friend and ally of their murdered
master and would give shelter to his orphan child.

Of course they were not mistaken. Ronald the
chief wept, as brave men then were not ashamed
to do, over his comrade’s sad death, and vowed
that when the spring came the hostile clan should
learn that he had friends to avenge him. And
indeed they did, for he exterminated them alto-
gether, which sounds rather shocking, but was
quite correct, according to his ideas of justice and
friendship. As for the little girl, he declared
she should be like his own, and should grow up
with his young Ronald like a daughter of the
house. Finella the nurse had a warm seat by the



The. Green Bridal. 71

Re RIS IL

fireside, and Diarmaid the bard sat on the same
bench as Dugall, and quarrelled with him all day
long as to which family had been the most dis-
tinguished, and was descended in the longest
unbroken line from the kings of Scotland. And
Luath the hound lay before the great fire, and no
doubt argued with Ronald's hounds about whose
master had killed the most deer.

And in young Ronald’s wooden cradle the fair-
faced baby lay, like a lily blooming among last
year’s brown leaves. Dugall made a song about a
violet that came to grow under a great black rock
for shelter from the storm, and young Ronald
understood what it meant directly.

“Yes, yes,” he cried, “little Eva is the violet,
and I will be the rock and never let the wind
come near her.”

From which you may perceive that our young
chief knew something of poetry, even though he
couldn’t repeat the rules of prosody and pick out
the obsolete words in a play of Shakespeare, as
you clever young people can.

And little Eva lived and throve in the castle by
the river, and grew into the fairest maiden you



72 The Whispering Winds.

PLD LLL LAL OL Lt



ever dreamed of. I can’t draw a bit, children.
If I could I would show her to you, only the
prettiest picture wouldn't be half pretty enough.
I couldn't find a colour pure enough for her fair
skin, or bright enough for the golden locks which
fell like a shining cloud almost to her knees. And
I couldn’t show you her springing step, or paint
her merry laugh or the light that danced in her
roguish eyes, or the little toss of her proud head
that sent the golden hair shining over her shoulders.
I don’t think she was vain exactly; she had known
how beautiful she was ever since she began to
know anything, and it came to her as a matter of
course. The flowers talked to each other about
her as she came down the hillside.

“Bend your heads,” cried one harebell to the
others, “here comes Eva. Bow to her all of you,
see how beautiful she is.”

“Eva, beautiful Eva,” cried the river, ‘‘come
and look into me. I have a mirror where you can
see your fair self, come and make a picture in my
waters.”

“Look,” said an old cock grouse to his family
as he sat on a gray rock by the narrow sheep



The Green Bridal. 73

ee

track through the heather, ‘‘there is Eva, the
violet flower who came to grow under the rock.
That’s what Dugall sang about her when first she
came, I’ve heard my great-grandfather talk about
it scores of times. Isn't she the bonniest flower
in all the glen?”

“T daresay she is,” said the lady grouse, a trifle
doubtfully (she was of a more critical nature than
her husband), “but with all respect to Dugall |
think he might have found a better simile. To
my mind Eva is not the least bit in the world like
a violet.”

And indeed, children, the lady grouse was per-
fectly right, that is to say if the violet is really the
modest quiet retiring flower we learnt about in
our nursery poetry books. For never in all the
world was there a maiden more wilful and more
wayward than the golden-haired maiden of the
glen. You see she had had her own way ever
since she could remember, she didn’t know what
it was to want anything and be refused it. At the
castle, nay, all up the glen, every man, woman,
and child did her bidding. The old chieftain, the

head of his clan, the terror of his enemies, was



74. The Whispering Winds.
te eee SENN ee
Eva’s humble servant; she could have twisted
him round her finger, led him with a thread of her
golden hair. And what about young Ronald?
Why from that very first evening when the orphan
baby was carried into the castle hall, that strong
tender heart of young Ronald’s was Eva’s to do
what she liked with, and between you and me,
she didn’t half know what a treasure she’d got.
It was just like her bonnie face and her yellow
locks, she had been used to having Ronald at her
beck and call ever since she could remember, and
so she never thought about him. That’s the way
with us all, ’m afraid. We don’t go down on our
knees with thankfulness when roses bloom in the
summer, or cry out how happy we are because
the autumn makes all the woods into fairyland;
more’s the pity, I say, we lose a great deal by
getting used to beautiful things.

And ever since Eva learnt to walk she had
looked upon it as a sort of right that Ronald
should leave whatever he was doing to give her
the help of his strong young arm. If she wanted a
flower, Ronald must get it, even if he ran the risk
of breaking his neck, or getting swept away by



The Green Bridal. as

ee
the river, or drowned in a bog; it was all in his
day’s work, it was part of his business, and she
needn't bother if she forgot to thank him for it.

Once when they were children on the hill together
they lighted on a wild cat with young ones, who
flew at them savagely, and looked as if she were
disposed to spoil Eva’s beauty for good and all.
But Ronald caught the fierce creature and held
her tight in his strong hands, and never made a
sound, though she bit and tore his arm, till he had
strangled the life out of her. And then he just
threw the plaid over his arm, so that Eva mightn’t
see it bleeding. But Eva never thought about it,
she was so anxious to have the cat’s skin for her-
self. So Ronald set his teeth and walked on after
her, carrying the dead cat, and afterwards Finella
tied his arm up for him, and said nothing about it
as he asked her not to.

Well, all this time young Ronald was growing
into a warrior like his father, only he was a finer
fellow even than his father had ever been, and all
over the country they spoke his name with pride,
and minstrels made songs about him and vowed
his fame would reach through the length and



76 The Whispering Winds.

~





ae nw



~

breadth of Scotland one day. And as they sang
of his strength and prowess they sang too of the
_ wondrous beauty of bonnie Eva, his promised
bride. For no one had ever had any doubt that
Ronald and Eva were made for one another.
Ronald’s father had settled that long ago; and of
course the young chief was ready enough, and
Eva never troubled her head one way or the
other. But now Ronald the elder was getting on
in years and wanted to see his son married, and
young Ronald felt as if he should like to make
sure of the happiness of having Eva for his own,
- because it was something so altogether delightful
that he simply couldn’t feel sure of it till it came
true. But Eva was inno hurry. The first time
Ronald asked her if she were not ready to bea
bride it was a winter evening, when she sat in the
red fire-glow spinning, with the young chief on a
wooden stool at her feet and Luath on the other
side, and she took much more notice of Luath.
“Tt is my father’s will, Eva,” he said. He
didn’t say “it is mine”, Ronald never did.
But Eva pouted her red lips.
“Tt is surely not his will to have a wedding in



The Green Bridal. aa
ee Nan

“Tt is ungallant
of all my

the depth of winter,” she said.
of you, Ronald; would you rob me



finery? You men think only of your own pleasure.

Would you have me a bride in furs?”



78 The Whispering Winds.

RAR ARR RAR RRR RRR



“You would be bonnie in sackcloth, my Eva,”
said he. “But you are right, we will wait for the
flowers and the spring-time.”

But when the snow melted and the first flowers
showed themselves still Eva was for waiting.

“A bridal procession with bare boughs!” she
cried. “Fie on you, Ronald! Time enough
when the birch-wood is in leaf.”

But when the birch-wood lay like a green mantle
on the hillside Eva vowed they should never make
a bride of her till the heather was in bloom. She
laughed at the disappointed faces of the two
Ronalds.

“There, I pledge you my word I'll wed when
the hills are purple,” she cried.“ Do you think I
shall take wings and fly away, or vanish in a night
like the fairy castles?”

“Have a care, have a care, my child!” cried
Finella. “Guide your tongue, my dear, when
you speak of the Good Neighbours, bless them.”

“Now you poor people who don’t know any
northern fairy tales won’t understand this, I dare-
say, so] must stop and explain. When you talk
about fairies you think of a certain dream that



The Green Bridal. 79

I eG

somebody dreamt one twenty-third of June, and of
moonlight, and people who swing on harebells, and
only play such pranks as a lot of good-natured
little beings just overflowing with fun and frolic
might indulge in now and again. Well, Northern
fairies aren't like that. They're a gloomy, ill-
tempered lot of beings, who've made a muddle of
their own lives and want to spoil other people's.
They have their dances and their processions and
their feasts, but the glories of them are all a sham;
the gold-laced gowns are made of tinsel and the
jewels made of glass, and, what’s worse, the ban-
quets are nothing but brown paper and sawdust.
Now, pretending is all very well for a bit if every-
body enters into the joke, but if one of the party
keeps on saying that the roast-beef on the doll’s
plate is really an Albert biscuit, and can’t make
the elephant out of the Noah’s Ark do duty for
venison, why, the fun’s all over, isn’t it? And the
fairies had got tired of pretending ages ago, and
were always grumbling and growling and scolding
each other, and envying human beings who were
real and substantial.

And there was nothing they liked so much as



80 The Whispering Winds.

Ee pO
to carry off something belonging to a mortal man,
something that wouldn’t go off into nothing like a
soap-bubble, or, better still, a mortal man himself.
And so they were not altogether pleasant people
to have about. And though our friends in the
glen were not a bit afraid of anything made of
flesh and blood, they didn’t care for facing shadowy,
unsatisfactory creatures, who wouldn’t be a bit the
worse if you ran a sword right through them.
So they always spoke very politely of the fairies in
case any of them should be eavesdropping, which
was a nasty way they had, and called them the
Peaceful Folk or the Good Neighbours, which
were horrid fibs, and didn’t deceive the fairies
a bit.

Now I think I said that just opposite the castle
on the river bank there was a bit of bright green
turf, the most brilliant green you ever saw, like an
emerald in a dark setting, and there, so said the
old people, who were wise about such things, the
Good Neighbours had their wild dances on moon-
light nights, and everybody who didn’t want to be
spirited off to their dreary, dreamy world had better
keep out of the way. Finella knew all sorts of



The Green Bridal. 81
Py RE We NG OE OEE
stories about them, which she would tell in the long
winter evenings; how they sometimes carried off
babies when their mothers’ backs were turned and
put their own ugly little children in their places,
and how they had power sometimes even to bewitch
the souls out of people’s bodies and take them to
live with them clad in forms that were not their
own, and weary and wear out their sad lives among
the shadows and the tinsel of the fairy-land.
Finella always spoke under her breath and very
cautiously, lest any of the Peaceful Folk should be
listening, and was dreadfully worried because Eva
would laugh out loud, and speak in most disre-
spectful terms of the Good Neighbours, and would
even linger on the fairy dancing-ground in the
gloaming, just to see if she could get a sight of
their green gowns as they tripped to and fro.

And now, when everything was settled about
the wedding, and all the glen folks were bidden to
the feast, what must the bride do but vow that she
would be married in green. Finella cried out in
horror at the bare idea. Wear green at the bridal!
the colour that belonged to the fairies—she begged

their pardon, the Good Neighbours—the colour
(991) F



82 The Whispering Winds.

~ RII PD PLL III PORES



which no mortal should dare to wear within twenty
miles of their haunts! Mercy on us all, was their
bonnie lady gone demented? Even Ronald
remonstrated gently; Eva would never want to
have an ill omen on their bridal-day, and she
looked so fair in anything, she was not bound to
wear any particular colour.

But Eva pouted. No colour suited her so well
as the bonnie green. It was the hunting colour,
the proper dress for a mountain maid; and,
besides, it was her choice, and she was not used
to ask anyone’s leave when she chose her gowns.
And then she turned round upon her bridegroom
and asked was he afraid? Did he really fear what
the spiteful fairies might do to him? She always
thought the lords of the glen were afraid of nothing,
but it seemed she was mistaken.

Then Ronald’s sunburnt face flushed dark red,
and he bit his lip as if Eva’s little hand had struck
him a blow, and then said quite gently:

“No, my Eva, I am not afraid. Dress yourself
for your bridal as you will.”

And so Eva had her way, though Finella
trembled and wept and fastened some leaves of



The Green Bridal. 83

DER ees



the rowan-tree into the young lady’s dress, which,
as everyone knows, are a wonderful safeguard
against magic.

You never saw a more glorious day than that
upon which the wedding was held. The hills
wore the imperial purple of their heather robe,
with a fringe of gold where the bracken was
withering. The sky was the clear pale blue of a
northern sky, with great white clouds crossing it
like stately ships in full sail, and laying broad
shadows across the mountain sides. And such a
gallant procession it was that came winding up
the valley towards the castle, when the wedding
was over and nothing remained but to dance and
sing and feast all the rest of the day and night.
The pipers played merry music, and the maidens
wore their gayest gowns, and everyone vowed
that so bonnie a bride and bridegroom never trod
the heather. Eva had been right when she said
that her green gown became her well. Ronald
looked at her as if he had no thoughts for any-
thing else in the world, and the old chief never
took his eyes off the pair.

And so they walked together through the sun-



84 The Whispering Winds.

Ww



shine until they reached the castle, and Ronald
stepped first over the threshold and held Eva's
hand to lead her in, when something made them
pause, for just at that moment a strange scornful
mocking laugh sounded as if from the air above
them, making them start and look up, though
there was nothing to be seen. Three times it
sounded, making the gay bridal party shiver and
tremble, only Eva, in her pride and her beauty,
laughed back again as if in scorn. But the laugh
died away on her lips as she felt her bridegroom’s
warm strong hand grow cold in her own, and saw
a strange gray shadow creep over his face, and
then without a word or a cry he fell forward on
the threshold, and lay there still at her feet.

Old Finella shrieked :

“The fairies, I knew it, ’tis their vengeance!
Oh, woe worth the day!”

And those around, as they pressed up in terror
to where the young chief lay, whispered to each
other:

“The green gown! Alack, alack! ill ever
comes of daring the Good Neighbours!”

The old chief knelt down by the side of his son,



The Green Bridal.











86 The Whispering Winds.

~~.



and lifted his head and gazed into the white face;
but Eva stood still on the threshold with the
colour dying out of her cheeks and her rosy lips,
like a beautiful figure of stone.

But the clansmen, as you know, were not even-
tempered people, and as they saw their gallant
young chief, the hope and pride of them all, lying
there as if he were dead, their wild loyal hearts
rose up in fury against her who done the mischief,
and they turned upon Eva with such looks as she
had never met before.

“Go!” they cried fiercely. “Go out from
among us! Curse of our chief and our clan, go
hence lest we slay you!” And even the old chief
who had made her his daughter, raised not a hand
to stop them.

But Eva needed no second bidding. Even
before they spoke, before the fierce claymores and
shining dirks were bared in the sunshine by the
very men who for years had been her loving
_ servants, she threw up her hands with one little
cry of horror, and fled, fled from among them
all, while the men frowned and the women
shrank back from her touch, fled down the hill-



The Green Bridal. 87

NN





side away from those whom she had made so
miserable.

I don’t think she knew where she was going.
She felt as if she were running away from a
dreadful dream. She felt still the cold touch of
Ronald’s fingers as they loosed their clasp, and
saw the look on his face which was not even a
reproach, when he fell at her feet. It was that, and
not the bare dirks and broadswords, which urged
her flying feet away, away, as if she could fly from
the remembrance. She did not even stop when
she reached the river. It was not deep there, but
I don’t think Eva would have minded if it had
been. She plunged straight in, and in the strength
of her horror and remorse she struggled through
the stream to the other side, across the fairy
dancing-ground, and so up the steep hillside on
and on, never looking where she was going, till
her strength failed her at last, and in the gray of
the evening she sank down exhausted among the
heather and lay still, with her face buried in her
hands and her glorious hair shining like a stray
sunbeam in the gathering darkness.

She did not care that night was coming on, that



88 The Whispering Winds.

n~—n

the wind was moaning and the clouds gathering,
and that she had nothing to eat; she only knew
that her wilful folly had killed Ronald, her noble
bridegroom, and that she knew—now that she
had lost him—what that treasure had been which
she had held so lightly. And so she lay there
and sobbed and wailed in the rising storm, until
by and by she felt something cold against her
hand, and then a gentle touch on her neck, push-
ing aside the heavy waves of hair. And as
she looked up drearily she saw Luath, her old
faithful hound, standing over her, and behind him,
weeping and clinging together, stood Diarmaid
the bard and Finella, who had brought her when
she was a baby to the castle by the river. She
sprang up and would have pushed them away
from her, but they seized her hands and held her
tight and would not let her go, while they cried
over her and kissed her cold fingers and called
her their own lady, their dear lady. Then a
dreadful thought struck Eva.

‘Have they turned you out because you are
my friends?” she cried. ‘Oh! wretched that I
am, have I ruined you too?”



The Green Bridal. 89

~

But the faithful old servants said no, it was not
so, the chief was good and just and would never
have let them go, but that they were bound to
follow Eva, and they would follow her, their own
lady, to the world’s end.

Then the maiden wept afresh, such tears as her
bright eyes had never shed before.

“But this must not be, my friends,” she said.
“Though you are so good, so much too good to
me, you cannot help me now. I must dree my
weary, weary weird alone.”

‘But where will you go, my poor Eva, my dear
lady?” sobbed old Finella.

“7 will wander over the world till I die,” said
Eva, ‘with no rest and no home, bearing the

’

badge of my wicked wilfulness;” and she pointed
to the green dress, all torn and draggled by her
passage through the river. ‘You are old, my
friends, and your limbs would fail you, but I am
young and strong and so my penance will last the
longer.”

And then, as they still vowed they would never
leave her, she knelt humbly down before them, as

she had never knelt to any one in her life.



go The Whispering Winds.

ne RAR







“Go back, if indeed you love me,” she prayed
them; ‘go to the chief and say that Eva prays
him, for the love he once bore her, to give you
shelter. Say that Eva will do penance for her
sins till flesh and blood shall fail, and then she will
crawl to where Ronald lies, and pray them of their
charity to lay her beside him.’

So the two old servants turned away weeping,
but when she would have bidden Luath follow
them, he refused to leave her, and pressed close to
her side and would not be sent away. And so
Eva, in her tattered green dress with the faithful
old dog beside her, went away over the wide lonely
moor into the darkness and the storm. For the
clouds had gathered thick and dark, and the wind
came howling down the corries, and the rain
poured down in torrents on the girl’s bare head.

Once in her life before Eva had come through
such a wild storm, borne asleep and happy in the
arms of her good friends to a warm welcome and
-a safe shelter; but now she had no shelter to go
to, she had ruined the happy home which had
taken her in so readily, and there was no home
for her now any more. The air seemed full of



The Green Bridal. gI

wild voices, fierce shouts, mocking laughter, but
she did not feel afraid of them even though she
wore the green gown; she felt as if the evil
powers had done their worst with her, and she
was too miserable now for them to hurt her any
more.

All that night the storm lasted and all the
next day, and still Eva wandered on, struggling
through the deep heather and breasting the hills
in the teeth of the fierce gale. She hardly felt
the wet and cold, except to remember how often
Ronald’s plaid had sheltered her from the rain
and wind, and Ronald’s arm had guided her over
rough places, and helped her up the mountains.
And she had never thanked him, never thought
about his goodness at all until now, when it was
over for ever. And so she wandered on and on,
hardly knowing that she was tired, and cold, and
hungry, though Luath, who had no dreadful
remorseful thoughts troubling his clear conscience,
rubbed up against her and tried to suggest that
there was such a thing as dinner. But Eva
hardly noticed him, and so, like the well-bred dog
he was, he didn’t press the subject. And, indeed,



92 The Whispering Winds.
he hardly knew his young mistress with her
piteous white face and the wild look in her bonnie
eyes. But Eva, though she was as strong and
enduring as a mountain maiden ought to be,
couldn’t go walking on for ever, and so at last,
when the day of storm and rain was drawing
towards evening, she sank down on the wet
heather and wondered if the time had not come
for her to die. But she didn’t die, she just fell
fast asleep and slept for hours, forgetting all about
everything, while Luath watched over her.

When she woke the storm was over. The
wind wailed still, but softly, like far away crying,
and the moon was struggling out between the
rain clouds and shedding a pale eerie light upon
the wide dark moor and gleaming water-courses.
Eva lay still, because she dreaded to wake up
thoroughly and remember the dreadful thing that
had happened, and just then Luath gave a low
growl and she saw the hair bristle all along his
back. Then she sat up, and put her wet locks
from before her eyes and threw her arm round the
old dog’s neck to keep him still. But Luath, who
never feared the fiercest wolf, and would have





THE ELF-KNIGHTS HOLD REVEL ON THE HILLS.



The Green Bridal. 93

RAN ARRRRRR Renn enero spss sr Om OOS

faced an army to defend his mistress, cowered
down under her hand, and whined as if he were
afraid: And Eva, as she lay half hidden among
the bracken and the juniper bushes, saw two
figures like knights on horseback coming over the
hillside into the pale moonlight. Gallant gentle-
men they looked, tricked out in all manner of
bravery, and with green mantles hanging from
their shoulders and bells on their horses’ bridles.
And all in a moment Eva knew that they were
the fairies, holding a moonlight revel on the hills.
But she did not feel afraid, even though she knew
that the Peaceful Folk would be furious if they
found they had been spied upon, for, as she said,
what more could they do to hurt her now. So
she lay still where she was, and the elf-knights
passed so close that she could almost have
touched them, and could hear every word of their
conversation.

“A fair moonlight night for our riding,” said one,
in a voice hollow and echoing like a dying wind.

“We want but one thing to our Queen’s train,”
said the other discontentedly, ‘our bonnie captive
may not ride with us to-night.”



94 The Whispering Winds.

awe eeeeeaeeaeaeee>m>m>O>r0—OOO*OOOOO™O™E”™Orn”” ~





“Not he,” said the other, “’tis too pure and
brave a soul to be slave to fairy folk; we would
have done better to take the maiden.”

‘Not so,” said the first speaker, “we struck a
harder blow when we carried off the young chief's
bonnie form, and, if the soul be too fair a thing for
us to meddle with, the flesh that clothed it is ours
for ever.”

“Aye,” said the other with a shrill eerie laugh,
“so they harm not the form we have left them in
its place.”

“Not they,” said the first mockingly, “not
they, poor souls. No, no; our pasteboard chief
will have a stately burying, and they will never
guess but that they cry their coronach and sing
their psalms over the real Ronald. Ah! if they
had but a little of our eye-salve, ’twould be ‘into
the fire’ with the gallant form we lent them, and
we should have to give them their own chief back
again.”

“No fear of that,” laughed the other. “ Hist!
—the Queen!”

And sure enough there was the Elfin Queen
in her robe of grass-green silk, and the silver bells



The Green Bridal. 95

anne





eee”



an

on her horse’s mane, as the old ballad tells us, and
after her came all the fairy train, knights and
ladies wondrous fine to be seen, unless one had
the fairy eye-salve, which spoilt the whole pro-
cession. The two knights who had been talking
took their places among the rest, and on they
went with bridles jingling and plumes waving and
jewels gleaming in the pale moonlight. And as
they passed, Eva threw both her arms round
Luath’s neck to keep him from moving, and held
her own breath for fear they should notice her.
Why did she do that when a few minutes ago
she had not cared what the fairies did to her?
Why, just because in those few minutes all the
world had changed to her, because a wild hope
had come unto her heart, and a light into her eyes
that were so dim with tears. And she was think-
ing of some old tales that she used to laugh at,
about people whose bodies had been exchanged
for sham ones by the fairies, and who had seemed
to be pining and dying, till they were saved by
their friends destroying the false form they wore,
when the fairies were forced to bring back the

true one.





96 The Whispering Winds.

Oe



Ns

That was why her own safety grew suddenly
to be such a precious thing, because perhaps it
might mean Ronald’s too. So she waited till
the fairy procession had all passed by, and then
she rose up with a new look on her white face.
Old Luath looked up at her as if he didn’t quite
understand, and was asking what she wanted, and
Eva looked down into his soft truthful eyes.

“ Luath,” she said, “I want to go- home as fast
as may be.”

Luath understood directly; there wasn’t much
he didn’t understand, I believe. He gave a little
sniff, as you or I would have given a nod, and
off he went over the hill towards home at a good
round pace, and yet not too fast for Eva to follow.
She had not come so very far after all; you see,
she had never noticed where she was going, and
so she went back over the same ground and
wandered round and round, not looking to see
whether the country were strange or familiar.
But Luath’s eyes had been open all the time, and
he must have thought his mistress’ behaviour
strange, though he was too much of a gentleman
to remark upon it. But now that she said she



The Green Bridal. 97

mn



wanted to go home Luath knew what he was
about, and thought it a capital idea, and straight
home he led her; so that, just at the dark still
hour before the dawn, they stood on the river
bank opposite the castle in the glen. The river
ran deep and strong, swollen by the rain, but Eva
never waited and neither did Luath. He plunged
straight into the water and the maiden clung to
his neck, and together they got through the
yellow stream with its white foam crests, and
reached the bank gasping and dripping. Up to
the castle door they sped, Eva with the wild hope
in her eyes, and old Luath close at her heels, not
understanding a bit but knowing that he had to
take care of her.

The door was not fastened, I’m sure I don’t
know why; perhaps everybody was too unhappy
to think about it, or perhaps they felt, as Eva
had done, that nothing worse could happen to
them now. At any rate the girl pushed the
door open and went noiselessly into the hall.
It was all quite still The fire had died out,
and the ashes on the hearth looked cold and

gray and cheerless. But there were two great
(991) G



98 The Whispering Winds.
pine-wood torches held in iron sockets on the
wall, and they shed a strange wild light on the
bier in the middle of the hall on which the body
of the young chief lay. There had been some
watchers beside it, young Ronald’s favourite piper
and Dugall the harper, and there were others
stretched upon the floor round the cold hearth;
but in that dark hour before the dawn there falls
such a weight of slumber upon the world that the
tired eyes of the watchers came under its spell.
They were all asleep in the great silence, and
no one heard Eva as she stepped softly across the
floor to the side of Ronald’s bier. And as she
looked by the torchlight upon the form of her
bridegroom, she forgot what she had come for and
dropped on her knees and hid her face. For it
seemed to her that her chief's very self lay there,
so still and grand, with his tartans falling in stately
wise around him. His claymore lay beside him,
and his head was bare, so that the light gleamed
_on his yellow hair. His face was calm and
noble, and seemed to Eva to reproach her all the
more because there was no look of anger upon it.
And poor Eva, who had no fairy eye-salve to



The Green Bridal. 99

_—s

show her the truth, felt as if she had no power to
do violence to the form that seemed so noble and
so fair.

And so she knelt with her head bowed, and
longed to die for her wilfulness by Ronald’s side.
It was Luath who made her look up, giving a low
growl beside her. Luath loved Ronald dearly,
he always went hunting with the young chief, and
would bound even from his mistress’ side to meet
him; but now Luath was looking at Ronald’s form,
with his white teeth showing, and his hair brist-
ling as if in fury. And then Eva noticed that
none of the other dogs, who always lay round the
fire, were in the hall. Had they been turned out
because they were wiser than their betters, and
wanted no fairy eye-salve to tell them that he who
lay there was not their master? The thought
gave Eva courage. She rose to her feet, and
took one of the blazing pine torches in her hand.

“Oh, Ronald,” she said, “if.this is yourself,
forgive me once again.”

And then she turned her head lest the sight
of the grand calm face should take away her
courage, and with the torch in her hand she set



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03cc9db1f9a52d2f349095d4e1042291bad71053
'2011-08-19T04:15:16-04:00'
describe
'22336' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d04d879c8a173220002438a250f7ee07
3f374bc7fa6490a6a07b3e999fa9db5714be7762
'2011-08-19T04:10:15-04:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00005.pro'
9ac3a3417a600903713941d4486ade9d
d8a1e6273f75206211091e1121bbba885f8fd60c
'2011-08-19T04:12:40-04:00'
describe
'7697' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
28e6de4bb17a5a0e34427c5b650f6c06
f6f3cd065fddb0353ca4a467673719e7e79cc4f8
'2011-08-19T04:11:40-04:00'
describe
'2838656' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00005.tif'
ba2e7dcc75cb91b7291a52d2ae4d832a
10564bc445f672eb8820448a5aa401efb9f8eebe
'2011-08-19T04:11:15-04:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00005.txt'
32ba5b4ec137315476e561898f135898
f609f15fd1db7b97fb7676b7b2d8f46102b7b1a6
'2011-08-19T04:13:05-04:00'
describe
'2544' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
e6c004514193efd7c5072a1f95b5f951
5a1c00efaace689560d45afcb8726947cca92fb3
'2011-08-19T04:16:02-04:00'
describe
'342634' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5d8847a54a275fe27446de6de0119600
9ff4a15e162c91da6559a6970803e65da72c6a10
'2011-08-19T04:17:11-04:00'
describe
'168803' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b55b666db6a2ccd094776aaff6fa1b55
e11dcbfa41301c0016b580cbd1d86ad42e43cb87
'2011-08-19T04:08:23-04:00'
describe
'3299' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c383f33f701c608d480dc5e8a538f086
5da82925cca73a874e880674303c32e19de9b5b2
'2011-08-19T04:06:49-04:00'
describe
'41335' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
03797dd45e7d37181f262c0abe2f07c6
90f37a46aaed679e6668294d13b5974b90925648
'2011-08-19T04:12:24-04:00'
describe
'2758476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1c505346ae86cd856192945d0b3f8a55
e6e6b887e82aed338c93068760f65c7b3cd70b4d
'2011-08-19T04:10:26-04:00'
describe
'186' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00008.txt'
841d50929cc3281507bf8da477314830
bae0e63aad020af3afe3308511284c76b0e372bf
'2011-08-19T04:16:59-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10058' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
30652c3983525412127435da1c6c844c
28d7229837fccc6cfe8a84d542880899cdc1ac17
describe
'386402' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
d0c31e4dcc6da75635436dbf5965e237
527a839168b4d28d927275fb84df8b98c35de7d1
'2011-08-19T04:19:00-04:00'
describe
'53282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
b331527e6df47df576d372f83fae5a57
c6bc451e4de6fa953c49e0a888b42a918f4a04a2
'2011-08-19T04:15:28-04:00'
describe
'6583' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00009.pro'
a62c1573f064f6b747a9fc359c609aca
4381043187b6e7a88d367bd1bdf6cc0c3225893a
'2011-08-19T04:07:03-04:00'
describe
'15764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
fa720b90cb38204e6bb119c72a3ca4d9
ffce6262c16787deb8638311d3cfe6990515e6c1
'2011-08-19T04:16:26-04:00'
describe
'3107560' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a4995f1ca68e5499727b8c9b62f37713
f2b94be573d48d78605aa23e338c3723a9583bae
'2011-08-19T04:08:19-04:00'
describe
'388' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00009.txt'
ce5d53c42cfee135d7bfc07f2e32c125
db676896c90c6fddf9e5d0ede5a7d4ef16b8c44c
'2011-08-19T04:13:23-04:00'
describe
'4665' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
a44177d7d5d9068eab1653b02657e436
0931a181b562028b0c08698a66e1fb04df607776
'2011-08-19T04:15:31-04:00'
describe
'365018' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
e22a4d613683490285eccedcb5756276
2972901e157d868b1b0dd8bbcde048c5f7658184
'2011-08-19T04:20:48-04:00'
describe
'20930' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6c24db52009c2e0c226f5566b54463ec
cad2278e38f67e2a681a06fafb47ee52acd01f4f
describe
'5903' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9c7dab251f96c6b83e195ce2bd9cc3c6
f01899599c25fb8287b6706d5757d389cece0679
'2011-08-19T04:11:17-04:00'
describe
'7214' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c946dbeaf27c2215d6ec650956f705c9
c57f2677c990fd33acda3b60efb5dc8024ed7e62
'2011-08-19T04:13:56-04:00'
describe
'2936524' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
222766b57539a62e5037de88ba66885c
06b09eb66cfd7f0591c21552133589763cf859c6
'2011-08-19T04:14:55-04:00'
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f3cda566aadeb7ded10a5a8fdadcf749
904740eee253687c99701547757d005f6d1fdbc1
'2011-08-19T04:07:59-04:00'
describe
'2565' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
ceb31098718f39a057056ce0f94d0b3f
ebb19fc3ca02568158a07894f2be70e2c3f18235
'2011-08-19T04:11:20-04:00'
describe
'364955' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e0db972354ff2ff7dffaf0be593bd6a5
a1b56ef3a65464d80b5d00961d17c4ceb27166bc
'2011-08-19T04:11:14-04:00'
describe
'71883' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
2e870bd9c239fe7b4b1b9adb8da385db
e2c775fda3815fd7c19efcc91ab838e23e963ef8
'2011-08-19T04:20:00-04:00'
describe
'33015' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
397024666081bce095b4fb723967760b
aead49ab679bbfa1f276ccba33b4caafb69bdf91
'2011-08-19T04:19:10-04:00'
describe
'25640' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
00c2849bb9b04489fa644956093ef32b
4d64b56ebc8f89d8bf5015a817fbb9560b6873d8
'2011-08-19T04:19:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
caf7cbccda07746a24fd5d0bb498fdf7
b1685aa680d19388216383eb7fa3929a3e19bd2e
'2011-08-19T04:16:04-04:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ebc7df9eb4c021b32335977c4f803c81
d47f5f278f78b6771ac42e3efb6253ce33219557
'2011-08-19T04:11:36-04:00'
describe
'6249' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
5f814459e0ea3643a39559a0f4d28bc6
97473e57f8e01bda38e1079b1c2df70729ffc8e3
'2011-08-19T04:15:08-04:00'
describe
'365028' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
269ec755704067019e0d524ac17c354f
b527b2ca454f446f10320881e7b680608d56fa34
'2011-08-19T04:09:45-04:00'
describe
'77163' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
5202c85f597cf861835e516b61da06ab
de956aac94140d3a4fa3bd4345f0b594fd36c560
'2011-08-19T04:13:16-04:00'
describe
'13367' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
9f51dc287fe290d464a7d04ce3be3f68
ccf67b7515554408c6b2061ef4e6763fc7b85f40
'2011-08-19T04:15:24-04:00'
describe
'24748' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c13e20d8956021084e86c34815c6a0b3
f8346ede0f8e8f1b17b8879785d166f857d3ee28
'2011-08-19T04:10:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
92c24125d36c35df20d503d45b9a6e81
361e0cb35ad9c4543fbc6e25f2e9976d5ab7a894
'2011-08-19T04:12:31-04:00'
describe
'736' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
9bcef83546975d0d19fc9585909ece4b
1717d8400e7d75f5670ca63273fb27c6da6e0621
'2011-08-19T04:11:24-04:00'
describe
'6351' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
a4ce0c462998f0b14bf9b1cd80df3b75
d7893a99d37c785c31b6f0f735bbd6a6c69e569b
'2011-08-19T04:11:50-04:00'
describe
'364997' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
34e0a5eead3f16e18ac04f0f558e09ab
adad47286b8b069e38a836526adf03c0d7068416
'2011-08-19T04:07:12-04:00'
describe
'96128' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
6e632c11ff32d974b05255c27f219cb5
1680e849ea0c64e7f52c0aca2f77e0801718b86f
'2011-08-19T04:16:40-04:00'
describe
'26457' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
91a2ba21f92390801967d5628d52263a
b20fa5e75c3e52b277cfbff4372ef81573ff21c8
'2011-08-19T04:15:23-04:00'
describe
'33263' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
d9910767617544e080dbd2e208f89a06
df9902cc8aeef10ac5f6953f5a7e128a6f1e6a5f
'2011-08-19T04:14:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8b3e883138dd6ff93a4c6024d00a823f
32852ce25de83692afb89811333a32ba55dd872a
'2011-08-19T04:20:09-04:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7e9998f5911d3b4d6793e22709937007
d9beed92cedd85e77086089c76622e48a3da4fc0
'2011-08-19T04:10:34-04:00'
describe
'8786' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
114b9fdd3efa17b53dbb162acaba7942
2e9458cd3a286f3a006a9cbe0e92baee301c6b5c
'2011-08-19T04:13:41-04:00'
describe
'365024' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
9bed1d74f7557d030d98a46d762d7be0
26762dcc018ccf0a91d82924a3fce9078733b686
'2011-08-19T04:16:14-04:00'
describe
'100916' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
a32a556f352e87637ada1c83cf690e48
993d28e974bd34dec02bafa2dfd0a4b3d7fbc5b6
'2011-08-19T04:06:37-04:00'
describe
'28090' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0266307034cee1ffabb58796a1b52ade
4e5abd1d16068477802bd7a225f2a2aab5074901
'2011-08-19T04:15:27-04:00'
describe
'34256' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d636c95c35c6dcc2ac5e923d27d5c909
db2f805747da8c69d323ad9e90e72d5942ca7a10
'2011-08-19T04:08:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ee8700536306666dadd118f929ef98d4
570b2f5d9264d67b1f3f9901ad0f3fa62ce0cfd9
'2011-08-19T04:11:52-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
73473be2c2a5c51f74f5b89f959f4645
d005dbf6cb262eb37342c53a3439a685c453b012
'2011-08-19T04:12:06-04:00'
describe
'9084' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
fbd5cf80629f0d034303751f92f02196
27f73211802a2cb2208afafcf3addd2157098e15
'2011-08-19T04:10:23-04:00'
describe
'365012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e0994ed3c7397cd896ccbb832f00523a
318e7f55a6be89d6a6a095f11cfd1caeccad9eb8
'2011-08-19T04:16:39-04:00'
describe
'89979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
85e443a51b925736a3c440afff28cbcb
8ea3cf40ee21a5336d37f7d7d2fa41f88f0e388f
'2011-08-19T04:20:13-04:00'
describe
'25348' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
a0229f2c3d75d3865c6d6e21545e9762
2db8af54e8bd94672d17263dd6ddd252a088f5fb
'2011-08-19T04:14:44-04:00'
describe
'29473' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
b9cf6ad745a7803176c6841b0eba5362
983285e0f409d08e6dd24f8f32be547c9ac91f58
'2011-08-19T04:11:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
aeb03b60d127deb0e90cca470b17d6fd
17779429a36c0d4259fce3ce3a41f2df51cae20e
'2011-08-19T04:13:00-04:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
87fad302459f6b787f7b6fec8a3a3068
728aa57a691226c52b184674c3e4953aa84e55cf
'2011-08-19T04:11:32-04:00'
describe
'8301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2ef85afcd1581851cdbb06b458ea4f51
7aa06270e42eec7fdf1cbdfcd95def3ccf425d2b
'2011-08-19T04:13:25-04:00'
describe
'364999' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f1d62e740f0bb9c4b78ca24df100f124
06b658d69b3b4bcc0e944ada977afb113f46efbe
'2011-08-19T04:16:13-04:00'
describe
'98268' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d6f8dc2efdd11aa3edba2dd55d4d9b2a
e42880e28f40e7a905a92025b5023ef9e40dde74
'2011-08-19T04:08:37-04:00'
describe
'27701' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e81a905cbed9a172fd3ccd8abb427566
003da2068f5d20a231e7139f162d8080c49a0847
'2011-08-19T04:08:25-04:00'
describe
'34201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
136ac69c76598fb442cae045b893072b
23b012e5b04fa7455d3bcd5d62f781ac0ca354fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
691ef311045425ab73549d3be0d36800
96f5049ceb465baae469dcb93bf7857f51061364
'2011-08-19T04:11:19-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
7e6f5489e42c39dd7fe4547d0ffd469c
09c1d43c00f1a37affe02c8de8e75042fce215c2
'2011-08-19T04:09:18-04:00'
describe
'8810' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
1a955c601b7c2052c952aea44fe47aa7
f755b7a4a8adbb87969eeddee8eafa8ac00b8c84
'2011-08-19T04:21:16-04:00'
describe
'384864' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
3e01aaa15ec7b866e88aaae0fdce5e2f
2e0ab58cf51257b2b1662cb1bd47d69bd232f378
'2011-08-19T04:12:07-04:00'
describe
'88972' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
fac007fdc5217605aa444e41a3931f97
2961c12064c4d7013459c3c1421b96158b1bb842
'2011-08-19T04:11:09-04:00'
describe
'25187' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
375a03d82050b6ffcde09ebcb92f398c
6b3860fa1d597a869ad9c2c1de6b4a6d10554d03
'2011-08-19T04:13:37-04:00'
describe
'30641' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
78a125ec93efc8d752844b8c708a1f60
95efe81fc453122c4352391835610c4191b05e40
describe
'3095304' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d9fd743f7fb98df92227e9cfb6add52a
abd5df6ca3baf941603a2b1e71c182bb0d0eef1b
'2011-08-19T04:09:57-04:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
d85018a4e52070e3ad0239e8a9b13a19
cbd86651bc03aac88c5b0b6b52d61806059d664a
'2011-08-19T04:20:40-04:00'
describe
'8138' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c8a32a0aeeda4be8b4d2aee97d326a8e
f27ff9f1af965214670efb7d012ff14b997357c1
'2011-08-19T04:11:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
dd94d3866d7fb862a46fe99715d4c3c5
b182bb7512c2928522ffceb2af7a48cdcdcb2bf5
'2011-08-19T04:07:00-04:00'
describe
'94907' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
befa27d8094a1e4b4f5f38827ea91e5b
52a30f2a7ca937d281ba774d49215513a29558da
'2011-08-19T04:18:55-04:00'
describe
'26495' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKME' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f441a28aff92a552a240ae2489f74bd6
f8b84f378560d9f1cdee0e218729a871eb7c0629
'2011-08-19T04:13:01-04:00'
describe
'32759' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
fd212f800d1a1e4fce56ad2ab7e02055
3d151527d9280a1fe637b41d28600886ae30281e
'2011-08-19T04:09:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
046c9a045d20f5f9050f038131168a1a
bcb3e9bd39cb96002a9258c9d53bd3c502ec8c22
'2011-08-19T04:06:30-04:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
bf7814321b0ff01a8e28788a58ffa945
5ca47f746eabe9a90366f90c2af77cc4e63820b4
'2011-08-19T04:12:03-04:00'
describe
'8635' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
312780c3e789474a6a7d96bc22f429bd
5340a72554f6c8189f19aee041c1e908c4acc169
'2011-08-19T04:07:23-04:00'
describe
'365009' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c9288ee97949cce62d571befb95f592b
e7936eccf16d3821a669b8bdec24d8d0728753e0
'2011-08-19T04:17:10-04:00'
describe
'64637' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8f64c562beabb50c68ce3de79e2d0807
45baa6bbc6640c0e3973b774e07ff94239d33cf9
'2011-08-19T04:12:41-04:00'
describe
'16003' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKML' 'sip-files00022.pro'
0e149b770ac6cda19e2f97dc18a3de32
583058ff48734d55ec5c455244a2a21755c8c656
'2011-08-19T04:10:12-04:00'
describe
'21397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
5c0a357ea6ea50b61976e894285cb06d
746208930f3b111a42984e2b604358ecbf2eaa22
'2011-08-19T04:13:31-04:00'
describe
'2936564' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4a329069208b316208d889845fbfef9f
6ce25dcea7c1958fac9d59ed3e6fe9e395bf742e
'2011-08-19T04:15:13-04:00'
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00022.txt'
36293d79026198fcc052c2c6f00141a6
2330fa1b4111041a5a6e4ea6a9418841c18ce9e6
'2011-08-19T04:10:27-04:00'
describe
'5862' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
37874ad18e795b249d220baca55de477
f48b8a86639d4ffcab1c4b83c2084bb313eede16
'2011-08-19T04:07:41-04:00'
describe
'364957' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a45ff25d6aba3fb8be95b768ecfb65aa
8a3ac92a2ff9411af825965ae3b20a16d4c4c8f0
'2011-08-19T04:09:58-04:00'
describe
'83907' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f549b11272033b87350187e174e4fe7e
21b0c5beeb4b6e7a183786edda7243df135eabb5
'2011-08-19T04:19:32-04:00'
describe
'18921' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
ad09ce7ee0fc10ad515d77a2f88f0dbb
693ffda34967bde8836c6b2ebbdd6f2ba93f9bbf
'2011-08-19T04:08:52-04:00'
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
55b4e54effef34f8da1cf48554c20486
e808e81eff89643accaf860b8183b91300dee22b
'2011-08-19T04:11:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6402678e77af6f85753026fcf73ec20d
560b33b5ba6304ae296dae4259b1b795bb555972
'2011-08-19T04:20:33-04:00'
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f4a27a60b76f2f7cfcda655a42b0cfc5
392ac2e5b76f205da9aeb94c0c3642279d432b18
'2011-08-19T04:10:58-04:00'
describe
'6929' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
083c2be5978a8628d7a1d97e9bd9cbea
9cfabf8f5fad4c7ba5d9741ddd7941574549106d
'2011-08-19T04:16:23-04:00'
describe
'364959' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
45914882cbe4efcbcda7922f0423966b
faba2e5a22ac94c8b97a6e161eb0c10fc085e898
'2011-08-19T04:15:44-04:00'
describe
'104038' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a0413538753a2bdda7c9d551ef6fbce8
2fc48af89535a882a3f2800a56f9a370f25d0181
'2011-08-19T04:14:40-04:00'
describe
'28190' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
817136cbe5bed5da762abe17dfee9933
27e0f02bed65cd5ff9682e868678f6600fa59cbc
'2011-08-19T04:10:38-04:00'
describe
'35584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
b7555cd98bb8ae07155101ee0035ed07
2a5cbc2dd75c25b86160a4f1f1feef6b18a26cb6
'2011-08-19T04:08:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6b21fffda731612def6b84a504cda621
f4f0d56f03e4b8b81341e7611e65ceb91d9a39d8
'2011-08-19T04:15:53-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
45859ed6e44c05e7a69f1c2c719069f7
280267c203a82a6dfe8c0a90927b9f6b9fd48e7a
'2011-08-19T04:19:36-04:00'
describe
'9298' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKND' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
18d43945602e7dda5347d02caf1aa2ca
20bb3e7104ca45653efde618b6a67f28430d1fc9
'2011-08-19T04:13:22-04:00'
describe
'365000' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
43fe6bd6a7e11e3c81b8d7a3e1460628
794f7d074d87f52cb47b73371b942ef6b4937798
'2011-08-19T04:08:13-04:00'
describe
'110895' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
afdf44d0d7fc1bd10bfe5ccb7312e152
5c966ab6153bb44fd014c4af8a2c7943d7065d95
'2011-08-19T04:10:39-04:00'
describe
'30850' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
6c8bfa74c995c84fd6280d282765f03a
0bc52edc2dc0175bff98f51584366d09f982de02
'2011-08-19T04:13:24-04:00'
describe
'38022' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0496bd5e2021f58aabfaae70365cb0c0
9b0d8b87ed7ac053f9a859f790980faea964755d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1f2baa6e06425d08857bbfd6bfa7d993
e525a8e8671eaba514b5e44619e322b52301299b
'2011-08-19T04:10:01-04:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b93527e278e7b7403212819b1489b06f
8be19e27916a40f4530fa640f48df3d85b2a77ed
'2011-08-19T04:07:06-04:00'
describe
'9593' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
5bb0932c5ea6d7d606742cd981022771
32700bef520620a13102cfa385f07bd65af2151f
'2011-08-19T04:09:44-04:00'
describe
'364971' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
7a9ae3af8cd598934d11e386cfe640c7
62a9f74277668ceb1df9eebab05959aace832250
'2011-08-19T04:21:10-04:00'
describe
'105336' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fe696bff7b1bbaf7ad4c90825bc25403
5e17d30890457e22357d80034ecf8ea14551351e
'2011-08-19T04:11:38-04:00'
describe
'28371' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9cf91d0bee30169eb322f5b71f7760ab
871c5d54c2c55b781d2f69a691c5a1b5f5796c2a
'2011-08-19T04:09:00-04:00'
describe
'35624' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c0b60c0eaae39d8c2a6121e18a015b2c
0c9bdd2cd2d57f04754e9c1196705cc9b4b668e0
'2011-08-19T04:19:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
93e40fdcb7036a1d367701e60feb92e0
024c8e1f117ceb645f0a2d327aa5388535653a83
'2011-08-19T04:08:34-04:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
74278641371bac7c082a3f394fc71dce
860a19ac5fbfc14db564a2497630c98b6106566a
'2011-08-19T04:15:26-04:00'
describe
'9264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
94b3d8d944620c3aaae0ae9c54535764
006d0f5cc1b3b5e886763cabddf394b87e2c7d8c
'2011-08-19T04:16:01-04:00'
describe
'365013' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
ed5fd4f1ab70b93fc7a35908f26b420c
b7b90fe5a7b43867c575079cf9a8eb6cb54652e4
'2011-08-19T04:14:26-04:00'
describe
'111642' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
11892a77ad04ff1cd93a9676d76fcd3d
6e6428f139961a0819728473fdee4d5ad48bea6a
'2011-08-19T04:17:28-04:00'
describe
'30521' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e10ad1b70e00eb4a7676a2f132273a27
03c8b85d3cacd030e24a0ac517d99124dea41697
'2011-08-19T04:08:30-04:00'
describe
'38192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c4435bbab305b28b8c8f8ab597592399
92d756a9886b45ac6652bcc919e4665bdbe56b43
'2011-08-19T04:09:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
2536aeee6d93e3df486eb75dca827bfa
1022692d23f60981de819eacaf2dfae93871a785
'2011-08-19T04:10:46-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9b036319f823b22f6e86b4f666185e5c
1d82f579306340a1c50e8f8dd4b36ecc0646e6d3
'2011-08-19T04:18:04-04:00'
describe
'9740' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cced2b143d1798897143766d12651213
7998f3c3e404bd0ed652bc37c2d48710ccc814f5
'2011-08-19T04:11:45-04:00'
describe
'364986' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
633f28b5833dd9170e17e4438e7aa58b
8f7d99221de3415bcbcb5fc15f688853ee5796a9
describe
'110388' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
cd2d6c0629e54af6c84ab43be14ea7d4
a24793b49aed53ad156c69ebb7211fe1eef0fdd0
'2011-08-19T04:12:22-04:00'
describe
'29890' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
9f2eef783a82c66f6c2698ea38e32d38
f65c5b8d16f3a843823ef3864f16d704d5efcee1
'2011-08-19T04:19:08-04:00'
describe
'37647' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5cab9ee9d1949bb55b73413de6654070
2c17b3ffc6f28a7864cd3671be21d458f32eb713
'2011-08-19T04:14:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
92c3592c0c5eed7cdb32efcf898724e4
1923fd04eee60fe6904debde18df04ca3c2c2032
'2011-08-19T04:16:00-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
692c5b5ec28eea5dbdaa10280e98e305
57b0297bb53050e9ea643954a858f59412d0640e
describe
'9733' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
551576d30136845cf8aa50537f53dd7b
0de32d068264471d88bfa0104b7c608240525f88
'2011-08-19T04:08:01-04:00'
describe
'364987' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f10340ea6517c0a0d61dee9fb9de475f
ad6bbe80cbe232554366415a4345871d62963556
'2011-08-19T04:12:32-04:00'
describe
'106367' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
548aecb2ab179cdeb218d5fc2ffb5088
1c96f70af8a6a1c6cfba57edb3c09f94630ace31
describe
'28537' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0a09cc0f66e3fcf47120d67173cf44e3
56223af6d84e0e3098ad83a3382ef74b7737f208
'2011-08-19T04:17:44-04:00'
describe
'36668' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
5da5da52ece6be69a3af5b861817ce67
14d994e961f515d205bed211433e2e5f77e3a97f
'2011-08-19T04:09:22-04:00'
describe
'2936520' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
8d44a72813c8146077dac39b0b322352
9362749ae16e8394d0123d129b9e676d6785edf5
'2011-08-19T04:09:42-04:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
f6a0b44df26bce737252d7688bb7e975
0f47b815bef64f66e143716ca42226df9fda3e9a
'2011-08-19T04:09:36-04:00'
describe
'9373' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
f270588937601290f7727acf7d0e827e
116bbc9d541a12df1edb3b3d5588185ba05cb529
'2011-08-19T04:13:45-04:00'
describe
'364798' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKON' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
4902635c933aae09282412af50f085cb
c933f0f6b7e1e153e0b6ecd470cd6648f5a3e8fd
'2011-08-19T04:15:14-04:00'
describe
'121638' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
4e4f370d764ea3dff7fdc263bbb35e68
8fd8390b2a4f434293e53e45cfabe60f56379f54
'2011-08-19T04:07:31-04:00'
describe
'5953' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9364d18636d799b11908a6d7ced8fdc6
b6fe4401b6159b96ffd0499034ba660c7bd2c1e0
'2011-08-19T04:16:45-04:00'
describe
'33376' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
cdd607ca0c84b73afb72c8fd676bacaf
1ee316d3e894f4e913cd9e34f41db2b9610a16fe
'2011-08-19T04:09:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c2e5e77c45c75e219b9e888f58c90f04
ba4fb70f780810fd82f40f73cfd5488482905528
describe
'243' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
d5f22b0361626278ea668525d6cf34fb
3c68a6c4edd6118a027bfe688d7312593bf857cf
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
dc0199623a03b0d7aede469aaf56f8cf
aff6ce262dc0e74736c48fcd293e547aca40ba12
'2011-08-19T04:12:29-04:00'
describe
'364932' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
fd1851d450725793444fa36dd6872fb2
de32337c3cc794bc0b0c1522f2e4b52804ffd1d0
'2011-08-19T04:14:27-04:00'
describe
'99218' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
3f87345699295a50dc6e208a242293e5
1f24bdd1d2827a7f214c9fc6235815eeaf26082e
describe
'27219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9bacb778d469b5c2e5d1bf77256e4683
8cd2bc1551562d2bcef6e0e96165e23d65629235
'2011-08-19T04:14:57-04:00'
describe
'34083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
aa2368f8aad68ab055388141cbf20adb
02363139e436a38ba177de4df8f29f9740cd6577
'2011-08-19T04:13:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
703687b1235b49da0b7834a668e3da5a
2624a886799202c40a80d0a96a152362f3b1bb59
'2011-08-19T04:14:30-04:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5d5601bd891da2601e3e628ca1b2c35c
af2c6310987b0b7be9ca068dc8c5ce63590eac9b
'2011-08-19T04:10:04-04:00'
describe
'9095' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1199745a337df78d7da6d21a2792ccda
4dfd01e10c5cd73261f3fdc911c470bdcbeebf15
'2011-08-19T04:09:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a6d8cae066d9f774629585ad19fbfac2
a1eef68f875cf4d8f88bdc92dd79a8c39f1255db
'2011-08-19T04:09:34-04:00'
describe
'101770' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
714fc8887c7d621d38fb9b165db70a3e
78f2eaece72c392e1353c5f01b8d22fad16dcfc7
describe
'27469' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
bc7fc3096611d7a3701a604409ff3071
fd2f34627356d06271de898b56eb04ea405193be
'2011-08-19T04:20:32-04:00'
describe
'34739' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
2bb43f0fff474e45408920cd951ce67a
1ee0018879aa13beb59fa497304f783a68094160
'2011-08-19T04:07:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
a204022326d2af1c584645e1a6d90bb5
5a5ed64c70cb8477cb6e97f218070db941c95f04
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
899134b7f9099fdfa292772b4eca23f8
1b31989145d5f11f1747a06be79c03cf1371c240
'2011-08-19T04:13:35-04:00'
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1d9621b7ed3d2025cd0144da66d64ab3
37190c132b0d6d8ccf95474b5125099c89625243
'2011-08-19T04:08:20-04:00'
describe
'364993' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
3af4740000608c19c3be43459d84f919
0c953c226511da89ae242af010adbcc99af39e7d
'2011-08-19T04:13:46-04:00'
describe
'103327' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
210b5319ecadc3b91375a5d7256e73f9
04324db5de24b14d405dc39ef6d13a9d835d3834
'2011-08-19T04:09:55-04:00'
describe
'28348' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
825282e305193b7f97439613d803bae8
59691c7abbfa60b068b7d1edbc28f52572f59c81
describe
'34677' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
56e7ae1715279028b90ca36359abf1ee
5752c7f1addc4b31d0ff30d90fd07c8b591c3ed5
'2011-08-19T04:06:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
cd40d23d8f86d345cf0df28929ef2e51
c9b426052a2b10387baf4a14ac0c9aee81007a4b
'2011-08-19T04:16:28-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
6cbcf5c3b1d53b8ca81b535cd86c2b68
ee2ed4d345a373b0e3fd84b91ef3479b80c07067
'2011-08-19T04:16:19-04:00'
describe
'9309' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e7f89b6e52e9fe89a0b9fe8c4d6f747a
7c2ebcb6aaa7db90dedc1bcd5d44d47b40effcc2
'2011-08-19T04:12:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
e621813d43477a3a42cde13d195e9d1b
2a0c905a1aa8121c00fcc046ae7cd384712b393e
'2011-08-19T04:20:59-04:00'
describe
'109562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a93e6aa9c92aefc2362f1a7e2a3512c7
a1b029646208c02309d1aa211a0ce68a7ec37daf
'2011-08-19T04:14:47-04:00'
describe
'29866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4527facf066afa97b6647895b03faf4b
84e150334e3bba955f818818d5720f2697d3c49f
'2011-08-19T04:19:30-04:00'
describe
'37448' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
e27a41f517268ddd9aed9856902617e2
9e264c7b18d029248a429aa387dab88ad10633ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
71febd0e90620f3ecd24658095ea8a09
36fcb5f19d77b619345aa70e45eade221859e735
'2011-08-19T04:07:22-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
2dd7cd17b0b3247c028bd02e79d5a500
236ed31cef77a15e6cdbbc87ed08a8a82b489f0f
'2011-08-19T04:11:03-04:00'
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
39db87c04115fd6b5007dbd78af664a3
4b97eb7690f1be413e8a9959902c9c4228050abc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
370d2d3d91b5053e3c8b34144b89fa9f
b1f5608b4d36dff7906fa33dd98d1693800ac24b
'2011-08-19T04:14:56-04:00'
describe
'110156' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6ed6dfe8b05e9a184e2cc11c21b4dbbe
ed46c915f76ffbff88a8f1bd9b25193fdce92249
'2011-08-19T04:14:32-04:00'
describe
'29872' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0f152263a59781232dc17b1bd5bc3adf
5a981609fac53e6e85cc7379c8ee5748f1c8f743
describe
'37381' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6e452f5dd615c2ce608472c3a4e70a0e
7f096e080b12fa7353cb16c9053ef9f9b2a71c20
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
36795edf20d8b4958e18b9fb187f33e4
c4612e810a7de275d813e2b6dd8d38c2553eaaec
'2011-08-19T04:15:02-04:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
58384a11ca52956945d24908f6865180
93a82e952f4b0f93e0694b00343c5806627d4b7f
'2011-08-19T04:09:56-04:00'
describe
'9884' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
82ea45eba61a4d89d41af70009f08766
e75c8db64ea25611fb1aee0f07678d972a094664
'2011-08-19T04:11:58-04:00'
describe
'355177' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e5b0ad3343aba91d49d394adba040c88
826f3b273181ab20539e8eb3cd7bc1127b75b438
'2011-08-19T04:07:07-04:00'
describe
'104977' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1b2fb272f006ed10b730de0fcc5d81c9
c41420c07d39eb144231c4ae6e6a21e0d56b4342
'2011-08-19T04:19:59-04:00'
describe
'28430' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
06e9f55c0fdcf6edba9220f9507de139
dea92b415a5831dbed3a61e5ebe282864eafeb3c
describe
'35902' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
2108f0b45772750cdd8a79e17d9c2b63
09bdc2e80ecc4abcacd05d27c80fb59237d256d1
'2011-08-19T04:12:56-04:00'
describe
'2857960' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
b7dc3257de388c28b8ab880b760bdf55
449e285d2c99a8e6b7577b733b296777170bf3ed
'2011-08-19T04:18:23-04:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
af7b231694f60f5b072643fd3b27ba57
67df22224a94d12ae46f60a08a42419325e5ccfa
'2011-08-19T04:12:13-04:00'
describe
'9315' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
33efc44aa1f25d48361cecc0dc866c19
e2ffb116063bbd1cc22f39104db44f8457aa1e4a
'2011-08-19T04:06:39-04:00'
describe
'364994' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
568fb9b12d6106dcb6be1d294ce9eb08
ad9ead855bb1fde368622e25bc4151b12b199e03
'2011-08-19T04:06:32-04:00'
describe
'109461' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
73406c372145f0d672608a95aa3a14d0
f81988ce9f48c379ef1710ed5ccff260b43cb1c0
'2011-08-19T04:09:53-04:00'
describe
'30795' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a699e66de1dbb5d839e5c02e4b81aa6e
aeca09fcf15c0cd689ceb7ec9ab1ab3e460e503a
'2011-08-19T04:09:21-04:00'
describe
'37626' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
ccdc9f96708ea259cd3fdd1f8bfe7388
c9230fd839ddc68729ca3758a6834c41dde9c95f
'2011-08-19T04:15:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a1ed716181ec4f2922529fed6e105b09
01da031ee7f442d4575382a4b38405f25264362c
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
3f2c77b7ff5aa7404fd2e7ddaf02e90c
50c41e49c5e47f31575579cae7d8b582e9640b37
describe
'9535' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5d9bedc5b37f658855f16279cefdaf39
db6b2d351a76868c2de23acf7e92bfdf97f686ce
'2011-08-19T04:08:05-04:00'
describe
'372427' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
701f7c010adda9137334457edcef61be
826cd17ea939d580a4b85f689429697ebed88905
describe
'105818' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b8690650a9da42dd644d4000ca0d3341
18e0649e3eb55878eca7512a6d1638f794b2eec7
describe
'29747' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
53256652fe563dfeb1cb4b61ad457534
7588aeabb0cb5df26e4ec44115a1f646c7923b1f
'2011-08-19T04:08:49-04:00'
describe
'36269' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
04a286483877a79fcb8897e685aad247
f2a1a758cfeb6b3c136a0fa0029ccff6853041e4
'2011-08-19T04:14:04-04:00'
describe
'2995860' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
99ec82dbab58dd8ec4a6378657337dfb
9af4013e6bf3b04d5da26c5c487fd8b0da1c19ed
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2b6d5a17249580ac83c272889f854a88
273edbb2027259589955d0601e59dbb86f29f592
'2011-08-19T04:07:30-04:00'
describe
'9702' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
417b8469430a5acb76cf14cf08716439
c251fc3273f488e7274b085c6662cd24c7eb6f12
describe
'365023' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
abfe241ba60f26bc9f086fde7e1ce32a
cac51ace73dedd5a314078e7ad9f189d8d148c5d
'2011-08-19T04:16:10-04:00'
describe
'112040' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
29535f88f3b30048d7e0aa1a4a34491f
e8a50e6889f48ce6343ae497829397f7bbdc2593
'2011-08-19T04:12:59-04:00'
describe
'31276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f4eefeb36883ca5470721cbcf040fb6d
d56715ae9cb22985aa3dda4d6048e2aa2442d194
'2011-08-19T04:07:54-04:00'
describe
'37334' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9d00301eefca913db91e4f1c17198816
c2116ac607147cd8fb613e4dde844fbce02c7c9d
'2011-08-19T04:10:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3349c1ad4f3af47eee696c91f00696fc
66a3b70b2046f37272d7210cfff198a6674a4e7c
'2011-08-19T04:21:19-04:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0777b20faf24165699ecba3dc2fe9a7f
04354e13873eb36e7941428b66b67e29368577b5
'2011-08-19T04:08:16-04:00'
describe
'9915' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2989c102ab9af32e406f101d9d41cd68
98797688563e0c9a25f122b9b1e6f3ca3756c128
'2011-08-19T04:06:46-04:00'
describe
'364983' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
475db1eba825da53c6ef27615987959a
6b6e0e28eca7e839398c571b60154a570e9d15f2
'2011-08-19T04:09:43-04:00'
describe
'107562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
974b6d4765ae7aca8d2c3a7f9525c6bf
7ee3c9a06c3dcefe403d79c4bcacc4ea5cd25c19
'2011-08-19T04:10:18-04:00'
describe
'29848' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
faad1c4b759f9cd63fa80db0f9400719
793ed132c60f029bce10a06de74cc2c421a83506
describe
'36933' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
63cfbc050be4e7aca8dbbcab888323db
410cca9c5213170ad3ad3e1d80e79dad5f5e06c0
'2011-08-19T04:13:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
304afff123c7f00f91147545dabcbef2
75b767bca0848f1e82cc969d87e57963c05ef7bf
'2011-08-19T04:16:50-04:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
6ccab83fe76975745ac47749cd11f545
3d299b0d59253d98b4f2d670124c3297c5fa760e
'2011-08-19T04:17:27-04:00'
describe
'9560' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
4a540e5e114e82cc462d5e8af037a487
bf240aecbdf1cbaa770792e11a6e5f21aa4fdae6
'2011-08-19T04:15:36-04:00'
describe
'364972' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4ae232f424d8768e1f80e1b455e34d34
be5a7928bcc6296fe2b788c73a15d9ed15a3ae3b
describe
'103859' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4677bbb7b4c19efdf0a96fa0339dec34
9cd091b3a08eb85c4ad9a8ad221db500d3952871
describe
'28677' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e47336163da10b96f6f6b48adc808782
1a2fee668e3a1fa59f8cacbe5d992a2473d6238e
'2011-08-19T04:19:33-04:00'
describe
'34861' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
f91b56cd8880694622b3db82e4bd2f27
2733604e5e64a61610215d645a5b5a10c3b40430
'2011-08-19T04:16:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
3de26874a591896c401edbd353ed1a88
ac10857bd8e625992d9b39d35a97d6b907398341
'2011-08-19T04:09:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a02bad501b7b96d529eeabba4af9b084
d634fa1fdb92a284b2a02b87ddd15fafc4bc044f
'2011-08-19T04:11:01-04:00'
describe
'9662' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
11f7f733a958faf057d0df837356793b
6df40e586f7a91cc60ce41d0fd871a9548b55942
describe
'365027' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
2258e030a2dd50203e7a4d3a361b3a9d
d52e9ba97992d0e248ad44d13bf64bf5e0dc0dd7
'2011-08-19T04:19:40-04:00'
describe
'113291' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
d277f5f183db23a5453ded1a618ebc64
c8cd37628ddd3ec6475cf53130696d1a51d22d00
describe
'7919' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
de832e516adb4684b3969f87bd8d9801
6b29582cb68a4b1c78296ec79cb8b0224725a754
'2011-08-19T04:16:32-04:00'
describe
'30745' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
41d10a38f1f5a8d6f65f12d491081ca9
9cba08232c89a4d324c9b6f4ef3496e85dbcf06f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
94247c659bae05e7d21323a7b6650ba2
8731e492c8eda797ea6c68a95598deaea52e93e8
describe
'327' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
408f74502c7b6d60fa4e5e8083d61813
766aa22075ddcffdfdb1839a235e1e94346a59cb
'2011-08-19T04:19:31-04:00'
describe
'7731' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
10b53edb3094d8d13ab20f42b7dae8e2
6af680a0bc3f2db929b1188685d1b50521b91b3c
'2011-08-19T04:13:32-04:00'
describe
'365017' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a38ceaa240508bd789dfae350ccb302b
64d6075afedc599493f2f0a003a5da148c0de0f0
'2011-08-19T04:11:43-04:00'
describe
'109915' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f9e4e39331ab3737a93ec56c823503cd
0ac517b01456470b10661cc73163cc749cd62fb5
describe
'30160' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
21fc051c0679b2a4d15db9fd4b098709
e3805cc5deb98acf56b2ec5b5a7e3e0481d575c8
'2011-08-19T04:09:40-04:00'
describe
'37536' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
85fcfa394669fc2fdf340101a3006221
307b23803efe6d0f150f89ccb1546a1615c5c9ed
'2011-08-19T04:19:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d6dd94cefbb86faa8596e97d1f421139
810a63f55a49ec81359d82386d08f0189ec5976c
'2011-08-19T04:18:48-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
493f042dcd35cc6dfab88ed792c1628c
55880035424cd16708dc46350b68871ce9bbab40
'2011-08-19T04:14:20-04:00'
describe
'9951' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
863a99c50ff0b3dace6753d475ce917e
46c89522ac42abe50712e109cc1db5949a7ddbbb
'2011-08-19T04:15:07-04:00'
describe
'389066' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
07a2005748dc54aaf0e0abd7c791c539
9d1fd93225502755d555cf81dc1fd0405ecec3e7
'2011-08-19T04:19:41-04:00'
describe
'96269' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c06df10f8ec1e3b30710a7d42207befc
85159199e0def7bbb48c5750e5da1ae913d40487
describe
'27936' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c8277536cc317a79194a2c96f9fbe34a
8dd24fb6ca1f7532df6a10c49c7ada8fc4590c40
'2011-08-19T04:15:52-04:00'
describe
'32430' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
bce5083aa54f26c461f36b79250373a6
de8d2bae18a27a552df41c78682e13361fcb1f10
describe
'3129056' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
dab69bc59dccb66dca947c70d5db1318
1fb2e6ca518c832bd1e277a008f3adf672458367
'2011-08-19T04:09:49-04:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
6a9b6e2026481124ecaf24bcdafb3985
a6371ff599830baa3cdf04e88bf2f842b2c6e001
'2011-08-19T04:08:04-04:00'
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
738c12cacece8d31df89a95c94ab0c5d
990b9e87c24a7b7c894e4cbe6be500ac1a243ebb
'2011-08-19T04:13:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
3f6292e7100fc1a384ca4d7e1bee2796
61ae6a89272e217c52b9709b9221dfede5c20ff3
describe
'106611' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0e855e200ada5655f8844f78cf48f1dd
85ea68e42f2f017fffd4c1a46f5cfe90a49226b0
describe
'28864' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
37ba5bf554f23a8bad97945a8800a324
926c4e09362b57d05524bc03a5c80d03f09ff78e
'2011-08-19T04:19:49-04:00'
describe
'36837' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
fb6317aa4d51dac4fd7da0f72363ed1a
ae920c36a8190971cb011182308f48f3e31ed6ca
'2011-08-19T04:14:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
072c072fd984f0b1acd51483efcb35d8
88440072287e1730fec06d690c77dda38c8c2be1
'2011-08-19T04:17:50-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKST' 'sip-files00045.txt'
5fbb4ccc57046271dd80a3e5602352de
a1a7d253525e5efd89f4fc79ff64afbd5d355b40
'2011-08-19T04:14:09-04:00'
describe
'9460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
33422c45fe23085289951c939af3fd10
8b5c1cdfb0b62c138e344399d28a0c980767cfdf
'2011-08-19T04:09:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f5b0593d9690f72725cd6a8391c240ab
7512323607067dade09ec3f5aad367027000ed4f
'2011-08-19T04:11:35-04:00'
describe
'96443' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
7e037a55090bf449ff22fe2693f14f0e
1752cb0331a0cda596cba7de3339924f4d224581
describe
'26335' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
79c80dadaf7e6c8e1779e3424c9612cd
c7873d64fb5a683d749b89950af346e46e2fa93a
'2011-08-19T04:10:43-04:00'
describe
'32997' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8f9819a4280ed7ce78a9da0cc0bcfe47
266aa66194dd541d1220e1c51f93515681d179b8
'2011-08-19T04:14:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
17a9c6fdec00d7675230015b5e09833a
b0145de559cadbcc79b697e5bd8a698079825990
'2011-08-19T04:13:17-04:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d6157c062c9a7011c9f2f124cf0d7d79
ed2e1f0507bbeb15a7fbd6f9bd7eb7bb1c9578e7
'2011-08-19T04:11:05-04:00'
describe
'8390' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
475d2a7d8f358243dab854e785e77451
11f92ba844eafa94ea7e804ae7741ce889429e5d
'2011-08-19T04:15:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
67e1140b985e1b5f4cc78eaa6cd72bb1
1fec5f845fba7034b5c3e765802f0d31afb0af3e
'2011-08-19T04:15:32-04:00'
describe
'90546' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6c657c06d4f77770002609ab93d95cc9
05f124fb061194a2eeaacbbe38af3f735126dbe5
'2011-08-19T04:20:42-04:00'
describe
'24602' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
13273ca802d224063fc7c1836f1454c2
7930819c1a51fbd603e6a57bcddab447f0f817f6
'2011-08-19T04:12:15-04:00'
describe
'31041' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9e8a9e41b784e7294ce2fc4d41ddb333
94cd57e4a05353af63ee893bc5fd2aee0845a2ae
'2011-08-19T04:08:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c34591340a8e4b93011203dca0359216
7ec5d85deb1aaab40e1f4a5d8bb116b2e81784e4
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1c302d9d7b1bba27e87833dd20173880
17aef8dd9eddbb8a3013f67ec8828d9c1e220109
describe
'8722' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
29d4298a8cdf3d233f08749a907ba6a7
d64865652cc77e06f3a2042f0475b65ced90264d
'2011-08-19T04:19:39-04:00'
describe
'364975' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
82f243aea4cb2f69caf5aea3c64fbd22
032f9eb5f8bd55fd709653f8f7fb275c1ca555e0
'2011-08-19T04:09:30-04:00'
describe
'101782' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
cf584c99ad223bcb5e524832fe8331a5
0f8bb6b4c6747cc77a4c74022de0ad0bbc95b4c3
'2011-08-19T04:08:48-04:00'
describe
'27580' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b58727f715e4d1b95720de34f28945f9
7eaa504c3bd964da37a9b905e59f50ce9d400f58
'2011-08-19T04:07:33-04:00'
describe
'34909' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
26cf3ac3208650f6ced69cbad9420e30
992f0e1c8f5de53e8e7cf79564cd79fa2f6673bc
'2011-08-19T04:16:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
bf76dbc90a7dbe094911534ef273abdc
d07582736430eb792b6a3f50105683f0dbe31001
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
8d9c7357d876383f8c886c21412a5702
db0a6067c919fc7aa950126789f7d128741ef794
'2011-08-19T04:15:37-04:00'
describe
'9330' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4698ce8e7023360e6f941df10b09b06b
10daa233119a8635836d882f88ff3e872f270695
describe
'365015' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4f502a6a085897ddd514a77c108153b7
fe5963344dd22e4ba8d5bf2fddab26275d1c6eca
'2011-08-19T04:17:04-04:00'
describe
'106313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
dc195f3ac580b86a939e4dea32ed3527
30e8973c4e976f426dda6ff7a44ddcceca24e494
'2011-08-19T04:09:20-04:00'
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
dffda589cf8339af500f0f04644bacf8
dc88e80630c85f6534a14481e40c7d80bb600cd2
describe
'36107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
d74c593753538a980e9804e4f6e44322
a6d8461984bae489a891e2c9183d42bed17de48d
'2011-08-19T04:19:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
30307da86cca7d690936867a3f5b3ac0
27dd26988d2abe96c040a25e68531acfccc5b5bf
'2011-08-19T04:16:33-04:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
110b667311a13b0ad92f85e16eb7d88d
ece1ce49f778ba244928a6a319a9ffb3b80650f5
describe
'9431' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
23125be3d062821d303840e1242cd996
f0a137d89405f57ae64f46bf45086272bc762040
'2011-08-19T04:07:58-04:00'
describe
'364962' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
98c388e6521867cab334ba03671c0d80
9c245641d243ee474ea04b63adb54eb5e99ee1dc
'2011-08-19T04:16:37-04:00'
describe
'103806' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9135f2bd5c2768820e5977664a698cf9
7b705fe9e77fef2b186d09b807fc766e3443646a
'2011-08-19T04:11:49-04:00'
describe
'13819' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
67bd08941c673026228e54a61e7af1ef
f06c8f8817d03f3d97b9424b12dae17d090cf11d
describe
'31216' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b7ed2840a03c115c0e7f6f73fa8b1a15
e58e4e28e34469aa6376dc7a4cb14790503df49d
'2011-08-19T04:14:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
c5e35dec901403150e7f501b703bae10
5791c001ab83a4706a239232d8c09bdefee58f0f
'2011-08-19T04:12:26-04:00'
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
07b7872c9cc30ebc9b0462bf180b9313
75f9373113ba10531ad573f29ff4a7536bd09857
describe
'8051' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
2c0b27347561892c9c6e8d19efb5a1f3
30e04dffbfdf65f2898d1e898dea04e94705c7e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
f3425e9b742b6ba8bf762440fb3aa1a5
fda943fff26efe89ce289fa98524b03e1c5a31dc
'2011-08-19T04:20:07-04:00'
describe
'100201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
adb8b3927f586c68ec9a469a9e717cb4
9d8557a29cfa0be849552b9f0863ca3c3b0c9929
'2011-08-19T04:15:22-04:00'
describe
'27343' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
687751f8127e61705e3665c75f7bc4a9
d372d1c14ef6678b471d9fcf3a5a0e04abc206ad
describe
'34615' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1dd180f0b5ef5e63c4725db11f6c847b
33840a7a86a36293c82535a88edcdc0b2cf56df1
'2011-08-19T04:10:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
07824a2a9d66da6902ad14ed49adc9e0
eacde79d2122164d52e9d79c86b2a6577051f99c
'2011-08-19T04:20:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
0ac0863b044b84ccd364edb6d1a55caf
8fe32c11515ac232b1356e25b6c7dbb1d2352624
describe
'9319' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1c4efd8833794db5a52b733f3e9b23d6
de37c298f5802eb8e6c1138cd092262990039c79
'2011-08-19T04:19:42-04:00'
describe
'365014' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
9219574377558fb72aa51b8e296a1b28
6ed81d9bfaf214c74bae44af85e74f4057ba0912
'2011-08-19T04:09:38-04:00'
describe
'101843' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1ffe4a1199e372ce2c23a998c44d8244
1d0ce208738e2432f2c9fac30ce7c10298af5241
describe
'28123' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
b1b1bfa6ab070e6205ba7c1810eb9cce
ff985addf68c5547ad717784a0cf2689307191dc
'2011-08-19T04:07:42-04:00'
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
7724dd769b5959e7e02d2e9cc0615c1f
1f15f61077a000dfa0bca7b49e1b167c3d2acd18
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
06cfb2397bbef43d41a61d2dbf7a377e
9e47eb3f9ed5342751b2136fcfeb4ea3d479b8eb
'2011-08-19T04:10:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
fd7f2c427224b372cba4f56102012805
e1e04058cdefc1833e7cd514903c70bd1381d37a
'2011-08-19T04:15:34-04:00'
describe
'9126' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
0629d7fbf2d1681ccda44b4d0fca3752
acff71d5fbef6aa6938756f2c2e28f8381a3b361
'2011-08-19T04:17:35-04:00'
describe
'365025' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
682498c3169354b62c427550c79ce964
bc110015803134ec6c72d70eb6946a83d98d95f7
'2011-08-19T04:19:56-04:00'
describe
'101851' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7e29bf5e7d5bd9c56444c82b2dfb65d1
b5488fc821069a03c7be7ef6797877fe2037482a
'2011-08-19T04:13:19-04:00'
describe
'27826' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d0f092722122c3c185e433cd2a28d603
f76a9f7c05bdc041e2687518b3013c525b1fec04
'2011-08-19T04:14:00-04:00'
describe
'34942' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2c5a77a6671284a092c0dc08a043b75e
8d5d47f628977b00cb641830f4caa3ad0d532ed1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
31882bf60df02168455235a52821f688
bd1ed9820dae07b3c432c877463283296cb6947b
'2011-08-19T04:12:20-04:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
697a8c4b5535116b9f0f72979050dff1
5d1876c0fc11cad951104d86e68d6788c6c90a44
'2011-08-19T04:12:47-04:00'
describe
'9213' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
d638937bd02602e827def2de8bef4654
04d9e182e404c64041ea196ed40cf8c08bf5f74d
'2011-08-19T04:12:05-04:00'
describe
'364992' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3d5f606e90b93587773321f114370762
8bb6c479acf74f466e2ae45684b268c56b0bfd92
describe
'104377' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9b9cff3034fa5a0751c44b0fcb92001f
ba7354848b81e06fba2ca7ac2df7640aa6622e8d
'2011-08-19T04:08:03-04:00'
describe
'29111' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c51dd9f11d1b23e3e7a02eab3a722484
242c9c72fb4b7c834f7a87b46637f961589c2859
'2011-08-19T04:11:56-04:00'
describe
'35477' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
340e49c408b979dc6e1b5577d15f7b93
259f262b1a18128f1bf4fd7bcf2a21e561044c7a
'2011-08-19T04:10:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
fb1d8ff63f16f96681b8751485e7c890
da79c9a4bdaca516d2587fc4eb6ad021ccbb7bd2
'2011-08-19T04:13:21-04:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
b6bb6c6a24354f94035aae97d3c88b4a
2d2d4a0d39198e7effdd2954bee57a0b33d7c306
'2011-08-19T04:09:15-04:00'
describe
'9606' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a3d391871eae7dc8c46a223a6312e09b
9e1fcf2c2f78f412fbf49b595a9649b0349d1ce6
'2011-08-19T04:12:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
fab17c8bf6526145da411d73f1affdb3
bd7515ad4f4fe20ca5798320376ad8aa256bdf2d
'2011-08-19T04:12:01-04:00'
describe
'86237' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ecd598665be75b7ad5365a82248d15d7
8c693a49db4c873a4dc247e2c255af805de2470b
'2011-08-19T04:09:09-04:00'
describe
'13146' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
b736aa7ea94020b27b1ac61be0816270
10f1cea52f005a932da3a663c1d0d49da83e05dd
'2011-08-19T04:11:18-04:00'
describe
'26603' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a6c9f977f6646fb6d220a313f5750197
57870fa8bbde694d9f11d913e309e1a1eac0edbc
'2011-08-19T04:08:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6860b83e9357119d614c53c61631a242
4c328b12946ed9325a8e18dd09a44250c45d10b6
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
10ad13fa859afec8633423468635a76f
b6914e7b2a673bd05144ec8e23eca0133968fc23
'2011-08-19T04:10:20-04:00'
describe
'7363' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
62ee023997dacdfd608e23343973390a
057304cb513860da25f1106a9bf0f0a0b4700cbb
'2011-08-19T04:16:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
747e1d92ccf943225c0569f186f5d32b
da0af436e39ea396b5da32459413c3cb454b4b3d
'2011-08-19T04:17:15-04:00'
describe
'104107' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
fc2d6d4e61b979f81ec7f21d4a505cb9
0cd8a30b8e6da6c331fe2332165247426c89de09
'2011-08-19T04:13:07-04:00'
describe
'28047' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
9d816bb86ef2380af914bd0d56c67dd6
213a73b705ad1fed829094aad6f9de8d1464ea91
'2011-08-19T04:12:51-04:00'
describe
'35696' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
8a784b089ddb3902b5830aefbc9625d4
89da98ca9bde2dc2e49e2e20ef516a56833d6c96
'2011-08-19T04:07:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
9ff3c8257b88a0dcd52938a0342829cc
b54f2d7bc3d2fd88d84e749c8b85bf5069190a1e
'2011-08-19T04:08:31-04:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
bd2e1dae878d87f9114ac0ea74109929
a4462732e1c188a17af12fcc2be0c614ca81bb7b
'2011-08-19T04:15:49-04:00'
describe
'9267' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
1b4391e359cdce1b35e2fa5b0a6fe036
ae731349f8c60f8d7357b97aa6d244db92a71e80
'2011-08-19T04:15:09-04:00'
describe
'365005' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
1c0a62df6e35429a054c69fa02c83f9d
8b91c5695e0c381d4b3392fb94f712b5840aeef6
'2011-08-19T04:08:51-04:00'
describe
'108575' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
f038322608cd1c1941bef33fd3cdd60f
f7815a48de868a994e71d6b50cf7fa51059fe8a8
'2011-08-19T04:12:28-04:00'
describe
'29716' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
918ac2b68846323849b637e401c85fe0
4f7d09f7fd5edb397313be1044c4dadfb7788353
'2011-08-19T04:14:37-04:00'
describe
'37307' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
d46af2f1d0fe09e904c6c64f40a11786
2264f10e57406043e9355adc5cf240441c950a17
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
8f426ca98178d94169a5c6dc054204ad
6ceb37fbdec2f15309b38fac0b9d781305269440
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
21453af78aaafce147a2c96b0cd5a649
f752cc2b99ab2079933e2d9b87b862e3d5e0eab7
describe
'9438' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
dbfa0ae40594531ec98e7835ac3763c3
6c48dc8db15f6f575b0f39c995cba91fb787d6fb
'2011-08-19T04:06:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
ddb841ab7bca6d81c1a708cf0903e208
b4f32e573dc5d2f2290f652e1a60d1560150c8f2
'2011-08-19T04:15:05-04:00'
describe
'94121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
832c3cde25416ae624bb83b23b3cd796
14bb3fbc189f066db796542082a449d61b9f0ec0
'2011-08-19T04:12:43-04:00'
describe
'25820' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
995db41eabf34b108d4298f679336393
bcdf69a3087900a0491e885c3fde673fdaa60470
'2011-08-19T04:13:44-04:00'
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ec133cbb76311eb3f3834cea1f804e1b
5b91ceb608a3e808ad32d4cf897b74c099defa99
'2011-08-19T04:13:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9d4d8ad06781a3504a7010d273ec39b1
57986e715c095a7e38a71fad2417e43a1f5fe9b5
'2011-08-19T04:14:15-04:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
9373f8e9611a2e24a49bd2f2767f6330
2362fd9c96333df7bc61b90e29c92ac1eb3165da
describe
'8580' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
20560a5f30e4a7ecef9a00cc84f72cbc
775ec37020f66106ead42454ad5de27dc9b69b03
describe
'364974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4389d39cd9f2940580226b60a5b8db68
faba6be9c585ed4e42ffe10fa22e1958e8c844f1
'2011-08-19T04:14:48-04:00'
describe
'99426' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
19e0e77e4b28a3e839c6e87ae87d42e1
8757085f85164b219792bc3f3c72156e1fe71e65
'2011-08-19T04:14:43-04:00'
describe
'28018' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6f8fc1caaf2eb263a1a68fbe0d291f01
16a05bc75b0090388d33627fe93352bd86be774a
describe
'34576' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
2b9b085f8ed6e5eeab6b7ccf6ea90cab
71603ef910d257b0c2414af708acc82c31ff9f45
'2011-08-19T04:15:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5ebe347490178e38cc2d3eb0e620de39
d026f7a5b7cd898922573e60affe2ca3a571af1c
'2011-08-19T04:14:31-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
168c13eb020f7f5d7b91cf1d6c071cbb
e003cab4b58571f1c183992e9e3a30bd45ca18d6
'2011-08-19T04:16:35-04:00'
describe
'9246' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
58ca8ac798436c7d225964cef742d248
cf6f8aa51acdbcff760fd8217d0a62057ac60b73
'2011-08-19T04:10:17-04:00'
describe
'364991' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
eef17a6ed7275a53386d7110fc361a9e
0b85a93d964e31251fb7f487f25948bd6a8f1543
'2011-08-19T04:15:29-04:00'
describe
'109342' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
6b1fc4afd4386d22b8c7ed53ab1f0553
cf487a1c2a8eba1ce2d686d4467b268a223b2072
describe
'30121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
570f096fd3dc3e13e6182ef373cbe518
1cc8447b79084d68d2cdd8964746e471888e3fa8
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
235c14f570bf0467416245d412986606
7112a35f6485adfbf6a4bcd6b0daa7a3030d5b49
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8cd581166a11350e00a3edbbceedddf9
916643a1bf0fee2605d70f331df33bdc71218894
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6a92ca0110ff5564425e75080c6ba5a0
c13460083c96aa725acc0c7c8e73d4cc77e30dbe
'2011-08-19T04:15:19-04:00'
describe
'9457' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5ff126a8147b662b19b8854d4c912a63
798df103704d147b57fb09ff1afa7a4042ad3692
'2011-08-19T04:11:21-04:00'
describe
'365006' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0172d0030314e95fc23dc5e24cbbfc14
86ee3afb1bca1ed859a1b2fd0b481ce3e0476918
'2011-08-19T04:12:08-04:00'
describe
'101542' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
cd5b709dbe8ca06a36b36a0dad1f6734
b75a0206eab87310ece866e31c5241f86aef8419
'2011-08-19T04:15:46-04:00'
describe
'28026' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
fdeaedd2820bca398db3c1616445c2ac
982da56ca6506e2c74536729228bb87605f8d329
'2011-08-19T04:18:31-04:00'
describe
'34386' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
961b0609a99ac9fd3f70458503552aca
d4e3888a86a6a7567caeb37bc77510584c04e951
'2011-08-19T04:16:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
30ca74c1cc0ffd9c3a1a5688bd2ab6c3
48a6b47f0f61dd3db08296fc018ef7ca595eee0c
'2011-08-19T04:15:06-04:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
e79a859c610878383f79096c9a0c0062
2bfa7c6f891c9aacb1b73c4dadc7b5883910829a
'2011-08-19T04:16:05-04:00'
describe
'9005' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3f59d3de5cbf4591f8545b6de0648023
8c639abf1777078dfb3cb8b932c1c5ad96bd3002
'2011-08-19T04:16:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
495d4ac421f948405603dbb688b43032
4c6bb3d5014e0c4b5030af7f34e9c7ee83f8eba1
'2011-08-19T04:19:09-04:00'
describe
'97448' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c4c882225a46574d481b6016770102dc
afdc5af12eb064ccc56dafdfcc2d181e6ccddfef
'2011-08-19T04:10:50-04:00'
describe
'27172' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
833de6f266ce2f44329cff181be443f9
5b5012c80a3c4b07c13f6c0c69a22d93b5fef33d
'2011-08-19T04:07:35-04:00'
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
6f26ec4d1dd15fb1e0b1744eebeb6c4a
7624720b3f96ed2fac803e3aadf908cdf69a7025
'2011-08-19T04:16:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
16f01e63fd5be9a11502c0f852aeed64
06fc0ffb13664c2184379e63f35dd82834501080
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
a99d75507dceeac3bdab4af4bdaa626e
e6a2dc50d25a605f897aab7d3e2f1834fd0edfbd
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ce2fe12086a408827811636debf8a037
7a5288f463b60c46a9be4f97f4bc56c2d3dca61f
'2011-08-19T04:09:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
f516aec5066fe6914ed8a1c2970eaa9b
bfa9926d42b6c9a2b2d422b058175f40a8c0a052
'2011-08-19T04:16:49-04:00'
describe
'92508' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
4b4a9849bfff8a740dae17e6822fbbb0
f3ce51757b94462762c17aecf1d413d161e0aa97
'2011-08-19T04:07:36-04:00'
describe
'25555' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5c6cce1ef274c436223d4661a418c7bf
916bfc070d96228f638206c2d35064797c12eb15
describe
'32912' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
57242c24cf56050aa3dd801014ac8081
f881db58a80689edbd1eef9b160e411f116c14e3
'2011-08-19T04:16:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
90fef7dca6151d002dfcecbfe6ada78a
ddf6c3b448890539c9bdd42be65d649d9d5c2104
'2011-08-19T04:10:16-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
276fb4abb03274a44782f724f8bc99b1
6c510bee2c605efadf2731b64f1c607e69553854
'2011-08-19T04:08:40-04:00'
describe
'8819' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
12ee6a1de578cf355607fc1c20aff031
b345012dcc5d8f7d699627d536ecdf464afc4aa0
'2011-08-19T04:18:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1f7c415041547138805c8cbfd0763d43
8c32ef59960386308575028d66777bea83b2b536
'2011-08-19T04:16:54-04:00'
describe
'89914' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a895eefca61596568de96d0cc16477da
dae8709306b8460d924a7cb63ec66ffb5f5a4a93
describe
'25221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
c0cec5221f446bd9f1252de0ae894341
e1e4c1f707b1d157224bf25045ca9c234d52c3fc
'2011-08-19T04:13:26-04:00'
describe
'31343' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ffcfaa329cceca13db70abc286b96cec
39b28466230d01418f17c4f9de7a142e1ea275b5
'2011-08-19T04:11:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
018c01ffea324aa1a2ed6b2c564140af
95437efffbc407f8234013807248d223d1de0fd8
'2011-08-19T04:19:07-04:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
4c314e86ded0178ef8b34bf6d3d38f98
2f004e3ba0aa028a691018e0455bd24bf0a7e566
'2011-08-19T04:20:57-04:00'
describe
'8139' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ef51a250ebc8506ff3e246f786a2cc11
28115ad9ed0e2a2685f48ff4bfe16c485f620be2
'2011-08-19T04:12:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
6154407f977e693266d589e5b41eebb8
6ed29356cdc3f2ef9ae2d65a527ffc88296700d7
'2011-08-19T04:18:06-04:00'
describe
'99209' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6878143672290a2b3557954dc515e5a4
3acb50b2d6ce5c9b2bac7ae877586624a0c07c60
describe
'27406' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
118e397d4d586334b57670b62014e153
abb3789770324719e06e803f586e740d12b2aef4
'2011-08-19T04:18:39-04:00'
describe
'34418' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e8f6a7c3183f661e1d548fe2653559e3
4bc18aaa1a09138c778b4b5c4cbdc19fade1a77a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e7a1ebfb9f8081898c75e0220a55ea1b
c8c8cff9551d4ab22a4c842a087b753f172cb90b
'2011-08-19T04:07:52-04:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c1c4514becc5870ab62fd5e3c4984cb7
cf80d72374b505cf95a9211bdfde67032de9b542
'2011-08-19T04:17:03-04:00'
describe
'9261' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ac25dc75abfb81a69bfe89f5b03feb5b
31caa4106c077b3c4680e6e392b3bc50982a4170
describe
'365026' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a442f2f6022354cd185b2edc98fa6fad
4b51b7f1d62b420320d2092820744a62a27324a0
describe
'42691' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
bd0151f135a92deba419a6faf409f5e7
0c671b4e7cfe1acc9514481d244d3f19dea82411
describe
'9786' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
30e9c2144f377a212e0bcc299a79a462
d91931b19a6e8b250eca8b7fd8bf7afba7099985
'2011-08-19T04:12:39-04:00'
describe
'13799' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
f0cb848a1c006db5928522a19686ac64
221db2458b78ea398ad9d158bf7774ec482524d0
'2011-08-19T04:20:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
8828dae0d5cf30ff0dd0e0886a5faf2f
64db706146b839121157733db3ec918713e97359
'2011-08-19T04:12:36-04:00'
describe
'397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
dc7147863fce26696e81c080466b25f4
e4115c24647082983f20fc258cc0fa4c88feb1a8
'2011-08-19T04:14:28-04:00'
describe
'4055' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
f5835ba0a42d80d2fa14dd663f946435
e151eb97836e9b54ba38f88f7d6d2d0a2d44ee4c
'2011-08-19T04:10:41-04:00'
describe
'364965' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bf04ff2297458983b5b28834bf663f07
ecf85fe837b1489a6307e676bdd6441095368728
'2011-08-19T04:07:51-04:00'
describe
'73928' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
4936a1cf35520e8fc13a446c213a403b
675a16e9bc8da99e306c4f27037f78894fa40674
describe
'16742' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
ede43d8181f0b0d4149899d9d3e56111
678a15b1a6c8d00e73ee4f70ff84979816ef61e3
describe
'22866' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
251ea9d850fb09b471e51ae1697697f9
d443dea820df6ebadb36edf4107205e32363e153
'2011-08-19T04:14:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
0aaf0770874f11a892a9bf67d0ebb2f5
f68bd9f87e44c02f3babf261780619b7895e1b25
'2011-08-19T04:15:58-04:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
a625b615601e7360375c016431e4c2f4
37e0f986974443d3b6de2f61c73490a343aa5329
'2011-08-19T04:10:55-04:00'
describe
'6193' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
fcd2f7ab3c05acbbed9a7357721a8194
b13ee8c3c5faafd41e50a548fa1097e7415971f5
'2011-08-19T04:18:19-04:00'
describe
'365020' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
187e3abbc1236fa66aab31e3577fe186
f814c893a10a9d16f4cd7f59ee5129c33d6885e9
'2011-08-19T04:17:21-04:00'
describe
'111187' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3b55715c75fac3e3e18a38e4da06df47
b7e72ec3275039e7b79ba4c63ca6f26138c54ee7
describe
'31542' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
aff2f6c3252d6191fecb13fd369d93fb
dba852c3d02870a6e48157ad16e81d2b71c08ed0
'2011-08-19T04:09:35-04:00'
describe
'38186' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1d5c6f2b2ba6a2e6bdafde14e20a5738
a6bcbf1c1912237cf5e6b98a923bbedb75380a84
'2011-08-19T04:15:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
acc486b5f22db578f83ec5c401b0cba7
15cb1d926259cb899322abb0e7f9be626e4d4424
'2011-08-19T04:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d3e78c3333b5d61ab18bfccc20e96168
ffba6561c3e1ca5cce032b225b05e8183a15d0cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
05d79ac52ba3db563f992e9b41f7839a
a9ae6e986ef23f0cb6824a9f0ccabeae560907ed
'2011-08-19T04:12:58-04:00'
describe
'364996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d5cc4a082afebc63c3149fc698dac062
790196ee1a6b9b3c6f14e9d26542b81e58dc924a
'2011-08-19T04:12:27-04:00'
describe
'107807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
2855c45fea7373f787ff9324c3d0202e
2e9f206a6e4b92f6fe2481ecf64b91f359a4405b
describe
'30117' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
f8b7ad7fb392fc8b9af5a39f87e54025
637883b29ca7da47be5f8b5ce2aa442a2970580b
'2011-08-19T04:20:41-04:00'
describe
'36478' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d0ec41d2c9a24133610f8f1687cf8fd6
3a6eda217a924ecdab2153df0c15496c0cd08737
'2011-08-19T04:19:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
1336dc4b91653a9d400d6cccdd15d8c2
2209645545c311507d56c566e7df750020f8bdf6
'2011-08-19T04:12:14-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b7bc87aad9cc4661c620385e06be24a9
f0b94effb82e8fca596cf00c3296efc6b100dc70
'2011-08-19T04:15:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ddadf1c95f8f80c23bab5b486fa17fd1
97eba20d8365450525c53682819ecf3c27f3b7fd
'2011-08-19T04:19:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
8c70939bec548ae4b116083485bf2453
c4fb66d0bba962ebd80f35294fd3981f3641b6f1
describe
'104755' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
804b8809376445036e48d620308663e4
51afab8d03745abbab1354bbc81bde6d10a74f51
'2011-08-19T04:11:22-04:00'
describe
'28951' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d92314c1b2f95e1acd32a5f58e65a99c
491616960277fae52763b01ae28535bea77fb25e
'2011-08-19T04:07:40-04:00'
describe
'36585' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f21f8d19559f6b9e4145ae4fe304ade0
3d3bd3ce8c5c350eae1786a57f42e38a7d086699
'2011-08-19T04:14:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a2899eae7ded9e3c9de893b045a5bd86
a1858d1d19c8b8d0ef68add2151249cd7d55ffd7
'2011-08-19T04:08:24-04:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
6c3d0ffcf4b91659a65da7eaa4b7867f
ff32eb08c0a7001ba0c66d89b9b4dee2a30876db
describe
'9430' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9febba7f51d2e4d0e50e10d6366e69fc
ab0702c6427106af0f96272ca3a3980e3895a856
'2011-08-19T04:12:30-04:00'
describe
'365016' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
44083cc971d02f07de2698bacd9bdfdc
65b0fb025262554052335d6b0391884cb6b8105a
'2011-08-19T04:13:54-04:00'
describe
'106080' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c1f99f0b2f8f55b2c6d45e6ee2a69be6
f3870f456fd200ad5e6cb57a768a90b131a90158
'2011-08-19T04:13:12-04:00'
describe
'29765' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3919523a1f2a3eb237e6ad99750e8ea5
405e20a9400d3912d3a3705d32a2903e2c8e4f1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
6a1853d4a7670d788bd74a137d04d9ca
72e9a851d6b8a6ccc12ee9a0836014f862c5925f
'2011-08-19T04:19:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b872b7d100167c64ad518fe789030494
2f310e6c63b1e6b7a086011a90b397325834067f
'2011-08-19T04:09:05-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
426d1a5b9bb666830ce3b63d03b92daa
16a823cbe151a7d6b611ee5b082798b779f67290
'2011-08-19T04:09:52-04:00'
describe
'9588' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1f0aaa63623f46ff7388836dfcd28065
e2c85d4257f9d4a3f775188651859e9f1bdb6596
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
fa764091c0776e3ea809267ed9093a7d
71219d8b0fde8d545d26667646fbcf4257b8089c
'2011-08-19T04:13:59-04:00'
describe
'110202' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
823f581f0361abdf1463686431d56d27
c6e071f0139e49aa033d7191f249e1c3b641cb9e
'2011-08-19T04:07:04-04:00'
describe
'30950' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
a5bb13cca9ec1ed2c2410970440c5038
f40cfebf507f772cef09a5c997f68c736f9db271
describe
'37219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
530e754b3d0166e2ae8e1aa167e12f69
add769bc23fdfc50d203449d095802b9d874fab2
'2011-08-19T04:19:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
aeb4ec04cfee81388f8fe1b2b14aae86
f0500619e4b4da2f9ddee732aa1f0216afc0e1aa
'2011-08-19T04:10:29-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1fcb5e152ffcfa04fea91cc4553bdb08
c2bca4c3ca30f6f14e28e079223fa37e6ea304fd
describe
'9612' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d766cae9b29d2a6548ace6f40df610d8
030edae7e2c2956653b7405cc37f23e51a5ad4cc
'2011-08-19T04:10:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
160748ec9f77149063e46e321f326679
6b0998d7ae2afdf4ab65faf5e2d43d154a7bda6e
'2011-08-19T04:15:57-04:00'
describe
'106845' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0287ca9b8599c5e57319745c089f3b48
f59e34fc2f97bd0c157cce5d92137ade77d16dfe
describe
'9568' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
927d1380e38c8feda42d4908e1f9b583
9b1cf4504ab9c7592d63e400e63f28d65678277d
describe
'30445' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
8b3b43c5c71d0f7f4ac42464a55513f6
31741980b433a3466ddb88af756c9fec9b55dcfc
'2011-08-19T04:08:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
61360f09c28870e4be7a986b45e2a901
e5014152bda4d3f83e9395f2e28106fc9873b3ef
'2011-08-19T04:18:07-04:00'
describe
'425' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1fa3eda8760e2d73f5454384c00c854f
c3de9d668608a7459cf8b5d57ab04829bbc29862
'2011-08-19T04:11:13-04:00'
describe
'7618' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
95243ed4326b15690b02fdba4ee117e1
e3470ab6f9922afb7206fd2200901dcb7b8e6a7c
'2011-08-19T04:19:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6199a5092b660a445db63799f1e073f4
242747c33034ad7de6f7c6bec43be6d66ade80d4
'2011-08-19T04:07:02-04:00'
describe
'107331' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f082aa2904568f542e6308f31a4ec608
7407de4dd06ed8f972cc7bbd7121c9b75e33bd3e
'2011-08-19T04:07:28-04:00'
describe
'29695' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
fc0d7d4aba129d6c01a300ec59414b53
e633d876db6926a383bf2e6ecce8f4bf2d4cbe9e
'2011-08-19T04:09:03-04:00'
describe
'36122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a42dfe648f60d7d3c516db0dde217d7c
03bb34a592014e331c92b44bbf02d3ed4c8268e3
'2011-08-19T04:06:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f484b02e1c8d27b794e367af656d87de
df3059348f508deb7d3acbebc627357d1b942ed5
'2011-08-19T04:15:48-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
5360e70e4dfd7675f6da2dc92c7e4fc5
b2920abcf75af521197d56d2ae5e7cba7ab8adb7
'2011-08-19T04:13:06-04:00'
describe
'9470' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
c4590059ef3d546b1b2956cbd65983bd
099031bd4bfba847cd1a9ab771a03037d4d8973f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
778dea28e00c253b55a5469b1f05e07d
3f79d1cbf41662e4ac8875fdd41c468347464157
'2011-08-19T04:12:48-04:00'
describe
'107228' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d58fde8b8b02954d37903197538fde42
054e101eb67a0349d05ea8170f21f35e4c464001
'2011-08-19T04:07:55-04:00'
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
10a0b0d00cdbe25e3b790078faca4915
7c6d4712a071578254b359aeb8978ac666c599c7
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
cc9779ab1872b5caf7a7dd2929f9bbcb
8c5f80f7c206d1cc74b77479084ddd2356c010df
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d83e0644ef4740625befd12f3dfb3ffd
46b56fa15421b457571dc7ade14c6599fa32451d
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
47c6ce9931147418870429e75f4b9156
1084654cc2fa714d05d067b2b9d388b26619d4a6
'2011-08-19T04:15:43-04:00'
describe
'9404' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
bad32b735073be453288060c0062bfe7
0366b2a19564e4310141c874801ef01cf9775738
describe
'365021' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9633776b00471ad2f1d08a11cce32c9a
9be2f521ab62de8eaee308de847ebbe3b6d6e102
'2011-08-19T04:17:52-04:00'
describe
'111649' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
15f469c8590ba993d013fe65b088d683
7bb07dedb868c802de4227c12dc56db1d28c479d
describe
'31028' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0852febd335c8b8221d695444f7741db
cb6b784475b1979b10b6209849848e225b0fe112
'2011-08-19T04:17:23-04:00'
describe
'37664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
9bb1f838c0011446bae01441319d9cf7
55cd26fc72a019a9780a8418a0364ffd84f3d34a
'2011-08-19T04:14:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2e2b1e37cb31080b3e814ed8a3454525
219953063ce8a20815ce6e48b71d8fc8312e2569
'2011-08-19T04:13:18-04:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
bfa93464454cf98cb71459ed5d99c485
e204c9866aa45a164ff47836246acae4e832ee59
describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
de888037360f3065529c5ffa567ce1fd
87b83011ce8919019315bf35d28f656628e3162a
'2011-08-19T04:12:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
082c5a29813d187d66f6cfdeb00e5a05
303b66932a5f8e935bd3e54c2e6112989cc2f6b5
'2011-08-19T04:10:49-04:00'
describe
'105558' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
992aec5fab1d9cac4a878d9ae4576616
3eac70d5007288788ffddc2ae34a9f101d4eb46a
'2011-08-19T04:11:44-04:00'
describe
'28599' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
520d2cad68e6dd25f315fd3b98cf703b
0803ed499c4bc4c724092af5d00cb9c6320bb3cf
'2011-08-19T04:07:05-04:00'
describe
'36217' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f28e2d5d23b60f86ea02d1d539739ed9
3c1cb6597735764b029bcd9e7743f2f72c81b34b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7ef6a1c874a0cecb11572ee7ebc62b21
9518c5cf91f3f4aba10da5926af346b3a3f37602
'2011-08-19T04:13:10-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
fb21d837b7a874f94eb37f51c4249997
c3c2a146a4832a1dc6cf2337c14b03192f806e47
'2011-08-19T04:19:53-04:00'
describe
'9468' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
92529e7070ee4c247d2f98b94da0b8d1
2b76ee1f41b39bdc92479cf9ef3df8b87f21be44
'2011-08-19T04:10:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6119de9a4b4139875e38bd1e8cfe7602
38381f4d752f51d0269da4b3a742227cb7f5b6e9
describe
'104402' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6efe84e3982ecc9e40595969802c33de
e720869011b81bb74c7e7d3c54a773a992eecf66
describe
'29556' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4a8748edeb6d6f2c3a128a5c5d93094a
3338e14e0d79c03f77b082dd3c72050c024bc7ba
'2011-08-19T04:09:17-04:00'
describe
'35714' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8bb2467f4ac76dd3adf2bef068996f9e
9e222d37ad3fcc135ba16c2ba08a60ac31bccf18
'2011-08-19T04:14:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
abb346f49bd9131769bc9d92a7646413
9d4749d96d6f6e395b0c3f2bf365dc016ddafc91
'2011-08-19T04:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
c098e900be0719fdbb55d4fb459d672b
b76045a803d2855db0bf4212ee4c7298929a1c59
describe
'9282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c38afadb3f9395a99d6e5852a2a80a89
cb4c1e22200d1f1143c6f420087031a915129492
describe
'365004' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5d5415262180588ad80542febce326d2
1c33d65ac77164aef74f084de32c2f70364e0257
describe
'105209' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d3d1221e71fc9fc1a146223bcb271537
ac972edf29448927187de7e55163bb878879dcdc
describe
'29396' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
936f2cdc885722aaf5085fe02efdfd2b
f9e7c1bc98a69e2c6370f0ebe0cf89d22efdd7b2
'2011-08-19T04:10:45-04:00'
describe
'36350' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
bc81daa59e31d5fb9becf41a62a5c787
7e5ea098bbe545a3d69147354e04077a151af375
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
0e6363e055ce951bdabeb3d650c2d91d
4458b3cd17ca0bd666ae38b97b01e7d1524abecf
'2011-08-19T04:11:33-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
de2fc15156110bc8e35aa00502f89715
f665922c13e01889813f583b3a5cd1b4bbde1fd7
'2011-08-19T04:17:46-04:00'
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
2df49ab7411a5b9d8ec860b1f29441d5
af92c43cd5e675a0c57a146c421c3203c0b9a4fa
'2011-08-19T04:16:42-04:00'
describe
'364989' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
edd133e198ef2ac6b8a830540f598d1e
f455570b47b783b6d1a77ed55d26dcdf24d9246c
'2011-08-19T04:16:20-04:00'
describe
'110073' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
8d16f355c208a782083f763c7e1b3117
a036d4d90173f85e3daebb0f67c7779ff11793a7
'2011-08-19T04:19:13-04:00'
describe
'30517' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
486307c99cc4a9d6ed0525c26632c32d
93cd885477f76ef797ae9f2ba34f556e287f9a23
'2011-08-19T04:15:35-04:00'
describe
'37385' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
8b7bacf6b176d8fb208dca73b7838db7
58acfe342a504d300918c9d42c702bbfa841e18e
'2011-08-19T04:14:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
9d73b403b3e267791efdcf7f9e36b3de
3145dc32ba5e9e0788fe3f8c9ca3822e668162df
'2011-08-19T04:09:25-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
608711eed58fe9ca8c863f9268346423
46715b5c247da9ce0362013c657e1d1bcf0cd903
'2011-08-19T04:17:05-04:00'
describe
'9569' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
3bbf446f5529616d3355ac1e1a690a3d
3a34d9370a3ae38174210f6f6136dda35fc0e931
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c548d12f89ff30a16d73f40a4fa1f85a
35c0172a62802ed9e38c9c0818d9fbe8f3273e14
'2011-08-19T04:11:47-04:00'
describe
'110136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
5b104a58a2e0299a02051dc1fe22acb5
cc07892679b319b9e5be77effbff9b3eb9dfed8c
'2011-08-19T04:11:34-04:00'
describe
'30865' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e79ddd3d526c78ae43a4a94f309dde94
b90abc8b77d791a3847ddc379a9ae5f5bd8b66f9
describe
'37047' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
5f043ad9b6224275bf34d1220f60f8e8
4d8fa0a390a96e2a06b12d7317fa9e0ed16fab64
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
b8177a1c2cdb436c68477f012eaabc2b
5005941d9f8b9721a9cdea833945576925d41b95
'2011-08-19T04:15:20-04:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
823bea50b2dea72607bffb7eadd5985c
4c6e6e74514a19c044d56e5df4b31cf011897766
describe
'9499' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
57d854da6c357a561ac2e83d484d7dc9
6212f9d59975fbaa800ffea7139090612e8d9927
'2011-08-19T04:14:13-04:00'
describe
'365008' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2ffdee520628825f269361aea135b32d
cf3723d008b5cdb2f0f077f11ba98e0d6f201e73
'2011-08-19T04:15:25-04:00'
describe
'107733' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
093a39beffca2dbacfc08a777cfef27b
0fd0eb9b29b0f6cfa864b315ee8afb4f4f889fc0
'2011-08-19T04:09:16-04:00'
describe
'30180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
41c472fcf7b82d050c6b28d6b1f55483
24488c8446d2b5d6bf5812746260a6c8e93d240d
describe
'37227' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
4be49e5f55d459e2958c46e8d5970161
06a027e5a38b038b3dfb0fcbe26d295e49e60b07
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
fae3915f435dd0408ef72767a9f67323
d0799ef94d94edf124752c5938af42cf1ae61c8a
'2011-08-19T04:14:23-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
b03e7615f448dbfc7ffbc79c227e0bb7
6422ad68d1729caeb576515df15038caa63a097b
'2011-08-19T04:09:31-04:00'
describe
'9485' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ba4826cac58009999916e145d765ceba
21581af6da0be84a9eadcbc9b3992f6b0703a2f0
describe
'364979' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6d689e0e71b262cb2a587e629fa758c1
462824807c76bcbba92c46116ae4e99cc52cb1c0
describe
'102681' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a3229bb072b330332f0249cb007ef127
0d0328170ec78b1c2ea7c7c3e1ed389764adb62d
describe
'6231' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2434c61e9ac37c879dcc282d8b42b49a
c63088c8121c81318d069763c6aaf7eefd9d0e7e
'2011-08-19T04:19:50-04:00'
describe
'29668' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b6261c84c12183fb16a94359bd4244e5
6abf7063869092fa23fd4db58cf1bebab154739c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
4fb166ac63807dc30434bead772ad6f6
2131d0faa51081083cc7e845f96c3384e617f781
describe
'367' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
054bb748b86b378025ca91335dd13c39
b489db2977e5ecbb528ca5c000c0d22ad6f85e9a
describe
'7557' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
5b791778befdb4050c8134f9b0506c1f
5034d5f9e493b5e4a916e6722cf471071117c22f
'2011-08-19T04:14:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
d16647c07e1c82be5cb4a0d0266bc01e
ba875df9b065f0f31fd6d060ae56dfcbfcd51150
describe
'101183' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6eafbccfff5d329743042c6f7f0ad0f4
2dd7cae55e0d5c4e4d81b133fa79171080424998
'2011-08-19T04:16:57-04:00'
describe
'28041' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3e1f7969b8d9c22959856a9b7d6d7ede
bab93fd7bda55732688d07a18a8bea802a7b93cf
'2011-08-19T04:12:52-04:00'
describe
'34142' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e9f4163f86c5a9280d6929160fe5710b
4ce3eabb0eeef042063f5551eee30a177f91e7ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d37f9d0fd276b6feca1471c66e645e75
f088f7463ea67ad11551a686ed78d8798c83eeae
'2011-08-19T04:09:06-04:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
b94e835259ba152de2605cf17ed1c305
95997076e975f01e43a2d719448a4002256ca6ce
'2011-08-19T04:19:38-04:00'
describe
'8882' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
2b0b2afc522c7c05bcd00bab205ad133
e6403b5bcd496a6db83177306148e488af1ad635
'2011-08-19T04:11:04-04:00'
describe
'364977' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4a0c833ad18bca2ac04eda43addb5f59
eb9b7dc28cb500c0de0e45508a41e6e9f3607af0
'2011-08-19T04:19:54-04:00'
describe
'111265' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
153c9976bd7844b4d1232cc8d6ac2f37
ba650b76967f65012c5403136dd1f47013c906c7
'2011-08-19T04:11:12-04:00'
describe
'30791' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
7187a2ce5693a923de78a9d3e399e8c2
16cd9d0c2c375b12fe7acc3694d9e92ea9e5ba69
describe
'37761' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
b6f4aff7835155010b3529bcdc7315c2
55beeec61d1818b95a545e55cae69c4d5987dcfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
0494040cb2222e2bcf97a97de594249c
cb1739dbfda44fd21033daf15452ef9b5dc1fb40
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
82a042aa97f4e31cfd295ad2a1057cca
e5ca363afda5ec28ab5eb37cbed39948dfc8bc6d
'2011-08-19T04:14:38-04:00'
describe
'9522' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
383c3c18e67346ecb8609de8b5e96f7f
e29d0a1b68733339a429e2fb18fc8bfe812a3d94
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b177912c2b21ef586f1598544925304c
b8b0e17d99e2e3305784baad4dfd5fc32ceb1a05
describe
'109784' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b99e52b6083bd60aa056b845f055ae4c
687165407568ef650ab3c214d2fbfff22d0d89f1
describe
'30915' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
47ea7ca81ae1499556a07dec886a6d39
313728949e19a324058f570229d856912083b825
describe
'37033' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
246f9cbdccccfa3e365dace1efba3e97
46164750b2038a6a2d8fb2eb83521e02a9ab9daa
'2011-08-19T04:08:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e5ccf9df99fdb2a4236c242572f57ce0
b7eca368d1da900731a3b509488f49b5c8aea614
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2e940407fa63686e836d88b97b6112a9
749650c529abe6ff23975172b2569ca247d1703e
'2011-08-19T04:16:55-04:00'
describe
'9369' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9cd082b71633d9f7467f0aa1785598ff
2c92c3c49b10646a05e7d3edb8ae0e587bca24b0
'2011-08-19T04:08:53-04:00'
describe
'364995' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
370b97fdc123440835939976f8fb47aa
4cdb50a50899b64c583b99685f37278c96f580c3
'2011-08-19T04:14:46-04:00'
describe
'114928' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3b44194b84ae12701ef236726959f013
3678b37ed791b9a4e984896bc69228ec247d015e
describe
'32139' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
4767a03398f9f668678df8e858088d36
deb91e955922fdafec56da85a43242a400dcac37
describe
'38723' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
18be73e4137e12f9799af9fd2b3129e6
781b81043e038378f71a0bbe22be0bed30c1fcf2
'2011-08-19T04:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
262a74603045c0f28263683ff1477712
b681868edb625bb9753ac2878c3801a1df59d0cc
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
732febd432284211e1ae38313ddf2ade
6a0b3736169c80a085bef6fed2d36bfba3685099
'2011-08-19T04:08:02-04:00'
describe
'9812' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
085fcf0c7937ab19e644d06cf310a54b
06d6b1f07fbc8aff7079ea6188f7354ca805f751
'2011-08-19T04:12:16-04:00'
describe
'364998' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALED' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e71aa40f76baa699aad86b49fa29f406
a608df6cc564d420e3972c49354a6800ee506c4a
'2011-08-19T04:15:12-04:00'
describe
'104241' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
6433a9762ac387c6f15bd80b46f9d0cb
8e2d6ab2a07100e198e3260780e39adb8fdcebbf
describe
'29276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
d021ef33a320f21424fe8ca616f62438
1603ae654f500961c7ddc5664917337b2c5d16ad
describe
'35401' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4755eaad708dce10c6c8e085fd4fec24
b92dfbf7d051f6aa41296b394c8ce285b02f33ef
'2011-08-19T04:13:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
4e25fd2280eb1be968d6cbf3d10cb287
cfcaca885a56d82923589f61253c1abff2a270ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
bfc63bef8f51bba3655e2f28b14a1b0a
170f83ba79f10341a571d2d0f1553ab979c43399
'2011-08-19T04:08:36-04:00'
describe
'9271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
67e86307dcf9da3cd3bbf81821f1eb59
7fafe9603f63737ac5c7ea314a406cc8395a8784
'2011-08-19T04:06:42-04:00'
describe
'364985' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1cce5e0989c1b2580f856e921545de38
c539586f7ac6982f497b94861eee4952f44f102e
describe
'102251' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
6dc1e7a12896b8614f36c91d31d1248e
ced54d4e6883c356707fed25df433b78cd01b06d
describe
'29003' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
cdf6ddadd5c0c3123c06f6e67afb0f4f
1437c5f35b0b38622d4c5a966cbddcc2317d295a
describe
'34906' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
232d024588b812d5f97a97888b66b7f0
1b5d937e7b4859deb43ddbfb500cb94f437716a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
29076ee97d46805a4b75cdc05e283ae7
1ba88c4abbbfab1906c27255eb857b4f77f97f10
'2011-08-19T04:08:56-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
af40b30e635896a6612f39a38d56a06b
52ea65ca2f3f422110a6ec0801875ac1720f4b52
'2011-08-19T04:19:45-04:00'
describe
'8967' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
06642f9a57311fc1b793abbe2d57db38
4b3334c691f1647a9ebf217ea5d59c52c1f8195c
describe
'361046' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALER' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
bdc518d3f6a20408b28333b63d8a35eb
29a32ec0e97055a39df234f43edca8a2a5b3b161
describe
'100934' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALES' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
e11d42314fb28635a8148af602af1967
2a323eebc16ccfe7f383da29c1e619a3bdcaf24b
describe
'28106' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALET' 'sip-files00090.pro'
868e0a2acfee8dc5d67717116759b5ac
0cef6bef7e4d37b3bbd61e08c895373a889e557c
describe
'33405' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d3402e7a28f236caa462a17603b1b77c
2d7d9d392c5ab10a512379b8626d22c2dce5ebed
'2011-08-19T04:06:52-04:00'
describe
'2904808' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
2b9da64cc860dd1b9929d4b3b455b7ea
aa4ad5245b36c290a8f2f44b24bc4dba3693011e
'2011-08-19T04:20:01-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
34fd5356d3332b1cdbbbbcddbdea64ae
a3ae81a19cc30ae468a4040f397f03684251dcf0
'2011-08-19T04:16:15-04:00'
describe
'9030' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3d3e7b16a22da6017f1f9f0b991bbfa5
891dcf1f86b2f6b3eb7a1c4a388482073aba8411
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5b354139bbacd88c6ddf2d4464fd04a3
f1c34e42a4d2ae4e1bdcce9f7d80467bf1bd62be
'2011-08-19T04:12:17-04:00'
describe
'138664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b62a1fba996c590e550eae17cf43f884
5789e498d89089772bebd27ea1d72e3b42b41841
'2011-08-19T04:11:08-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
85ec21ab641a04c692aabb65795d2bd2
a50708dbb52e20b20da0c86af2f0436609e653ca
'2011-08-19T04:14:29-04:00'
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
d3f4b26269f06ef8dba410c0e84141d6
a0adfea50f64a4b541f45bf6f5985ee5c0d97a63
'2011-08-19T04:16:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d293c8c9a4ed2c88c0710ef53026d23e
4afd9beecb3d9c30f63a1427358b88e98e0ae050
describe
'49' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
f26a5fd35aec97f2b6b7f464e812faab
8ae1bc55ff560e96fe60d6a6da762eee44c68171
describe
'8858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
b67b45da118fdd4174ffbfd43b742891
974e6a993cc862bbd5dd658709d5cb9b8f9ad234
'2011-08-19T04:21:12-04:00'
describe
'353624' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4cd73ae349dc90a0f62cf4b0b2e0aa35
01ac6ae55059e178980042caa1ac9e9971e5e1d3
describe
'107249' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
af6af557f02ec40cc6e2a1b5e103bd2e
fb97ad0f2c75d82f8b5f697faa1f79987db6c5e9
describe
'28627' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
29136d52ff32f834dace12befe61d963
9fb2f2cfeee3099a77613df18ad8f38e746eb94e
'2011-08-19T04:20:29-04:00'
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
979a2d9181d49a2ed322892aa8189d37
e2fbe0d66e9fe9b9a94c400b8494bd79707743f4
'2011-08-19T04:20:55-04:00'
describe
'2845532' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3fa578957fbab868a4718f43a34b5f88
57ebe76d1d9d3bbc081d065817eb54f46f454bfd
'2011-08-19T04:20:51-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
18763fce244a1c93eb6e386b09bdb711
76aed1cf5d9e3394e47d3d8ed8c8776c7b3136f1
'2011-08-19T04:20:05-04:00'
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
2c7eccd1c0b85713d424c80beee59400
73fd8e8d453550bf1accaa6199567f7840e9e4b5
'2011-08-19T04:07:16-04:00'
describe
'365010' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8e8d5a8d75debda8d08d67724a202b69
68770b9826ff5332fd7a6398b6060f090b9102a3
describe
'107180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
03b38fa71a7e9f517908b6d26c77b489
53f738ba40f6553b499efe00c13513063a6a7eb6
'2011-08-19T04:10:54-04:00'
describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
018b2fbe9d97031dad0eb5f20dbacdcd
d4628897f69f37db847d247e758033bd5e7f2790
describe
'36707' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
58280bded01ab9ab4ba5b04070aea3eb
77f685da0bb898edfedf3f2f79ec5e2a919a5261
'2011-08-19T04:14:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f85b5470d076193f2a83cdc333317213
7e0fe4d6c077505aaf45c647b8eb96f93b5a6dd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFR' 'sip-files00093.txt'
be5ceff3b27ec0ffc8a16d33e4646ba1
d649e12ddf44cf24701ec8ddeded49d64c0363f3
'2011-08-19T04:17:33-04:00'
describe
'9176' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
e0a5f1e6514870e7a1230499daf0f464
be8fefdc5e4093ef2bf6ba268e2098be447e5456
describe
'344109' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFT' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
1a9b0d29ec153306a1bdfb350b92c6ba
2e2d7f0359423d2af1c96133d43ea2840a02a2da
describe
'111875' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5609168f43d39f1561c9da4edaf5732a
824a436865f6ca7b8d2d01756dc6a6e9f3c46bed
describe
'29118' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
d808226ff942b71c6ef5619b1ec8fa37
bc4283a74f69fafc7e3a8b4bed934e9721018dd0
describe
'36071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
484d9b939d87ba2007e056620992db8f
c351252c315705ea07f3c65bcedb90bb539a248b
describe
'2769320' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
6ca8d31bb514af00aa763c3d3b2106bd
a9c9bd7ff7671d69001bbe5180cafa46c17c73ac
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
ada7bc21635420807e875339fb1f9ebe
4e719973c2f9d55a6f8055a4a67ba933cb18483e
describe
'10578' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d907a58532e693a6ad2b73b4ad6fc586
04c08c84c9604ce3c21bc16174419a4dec6fa127
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
e830b9f2135e1fd703cda89c079fb11b
a8e7f44877b67cac66ca24812dbb9703d14fd32a
describe
'97594' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
eaaf61d958b3bbfa6479e5c5e96da317
fcabcd140fcc34efd0a3c4222a7bf9b5fa319d99
'2011-08-19T04:11:10-04:00'
describe
'27554' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a7d3b22a00e945ee36da830d4c65109a
349df8ac548573a93e37ea1c4509ab5616fa00b3
'2011-08-19T04:17:45-04:00'
describe
'33315' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
dfe96f369876f4ddd6dd0af5436392fd
0986ab68531082a6ae0c49b611170231d95e27fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
d854947de42078bd31329fd6a7c71f9e
8ce3ddbb1854808270a65f2531c47dae4929c26f
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
144c6e7d750905f0e7dbfc470ca516ee
33c6a7f5b6c5929b328e09fcc0a861c484520ace
'2011-08-19T04:18:05-04:00'
describe
'8754' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f09471b97dcf48057cf79611f81685fc
f40e214267179a4badde799938547166ff72a138
'2011-08-19T04:13:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e302f25153ae6a566a08567c72ee0d81
7d6d444306caa9d8c9ce665b0fe06c014411d3ab
describe
'109996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
9067511fa0cf55963ca8ed57cebd8756
ac9112a86809f53681b6222cede5c8203ccdd435
describe
'30576' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
cc57b5de999ecdbd6ebb64d0f7fa50b9
aa942223aadf222c9dd4737ef787edadda0ae243
describe
'37275' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d3f113e347c70b1a9f7fda3246f89f3a
f363728bd157ead7e7844005ba0825fb734d2cac
'2011-08-19T04:08:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
db7fd7d4d8b8b8d51a43a062b2b922f7
2ffbac33954e5ea05ce03090711ab9f22a302fd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ce43b1824248e12f0231b2e442b29a01
a6d1f7d6117bf06534791e605b613b7b9387d001
describe
'9688' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
1c04d283a1d8b85058977ea6368401e0
98597d15aa914701b6ea3839050bbca65593ac1a
'2011-08-19T04:16:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
480d483c47c0ecfead04bcbf3b3e9360
a0774ba9df683efab8681db1a8cda048f4448b70
'2011-08-19T04:20:03-04:00'
describe
'104833' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
bc8b23a0a1860d1cfcc8c19555a438b9
6d54e6d6b24572a5386f49ed0fbc11866f934b25
'2011-08-19T04:09:19-04:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2e3399087bb189eaf300b114a27b05a6
d10d2adf1ce1456e97bf8902380a0b80aa43b750
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a23bffacb484e8334a3b413c335371ba
b7ff7a9d3de4a8fe7ccc5906c39cb7430afacc3a
'2011-08-19T04:06:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
6795a877494f890953c59978bd272347
1f082541ccf672a825a1b977c44be572f945bae2
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
eb755dc84d14a900827e2e365129b481
44d36388e647d05e081d81e58edf63d69b266308
describe
'9276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
2a217fad96e42d5b90955b32215fec3c
0125f2026294afd881a3f08de6048efec73ce588
'2011-08-19T04:20:28-04:00'
describe
'336637' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
423c4232a19b39ffe50a5a458dd7bdd9
d2a9567ef07a8e2de8b2c60989901838457c76dd
'2011-08-19T04:16:16-04:00'
describe
'113830' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
ce99f5b23df000ee4e7da7f3ca1604fc
51ca3e0a72df724ecfcb23576f36736e34caac5d
'2011-08-19T04:09:29-04:00'
describe
'30035' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
61899d153be6320d410b1fdb658839f5
f69620c13b0e5b59be6e5fa70f6d9464fb53417b
describe
'41927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
c2ae666edecc308d15c3b9dc40d24005
20cff0b268ac36dbf6f3ac6cf8815bfcc626ff59
'2011-08-19T04:09:39-04:00'
describe
'2710044' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
63c85126dd7536b89a84070074a11da8
8b8e5133177145adbb0cfaa62080c745e242811b
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
9fc6f4f05abd1970c4ef27b484a317ce
b8af96ced7db7b67bad27c12c869705182021b06
describe
'11040' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c0f0b6090a959c06c015bb69b71aed54
2d323b53e09f0b3d4b058f589e80daae0ee4b2bc
describe
'372523' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
372ff8c6016aa0a599575fde20673d95
2be23c6e0f7f5874002f71e7cf3e6c7bfeca5d2f
'2011-08-19T04:11:27-04:00'
describe
'155446' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
fe16b34fe2af90bf8c3eb4e7baee1b63
fc3027626c99ff3cc5161b775919e17f78805c06
describe
'4575' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
e9537853096a2e85f985a17194568a41
5be91bcf0e5404615d54e979339504ef401e1310
'2011-08-19T04:06:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
266831a981352ba86181c43242658058
0724493c7b8837a1816d32797d7577ec42dff0fe
describe
'2998620' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
73d27ab4fdb10e860e2ccaafa99f8e97
66361920787abbb3076854266fa36cd8dfd92af6
describe
'416' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c4e5b6fc12409cfdbd42722123352675
172174c6e477243069832887b33bb20c6bcb28ae
describe
Invalid character
'8129' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4f7411c24f44b2f67f21631334dcc13b
9e49aa0da57a1770529df5ed849aa62330f2886c
'2011-08-19T04:12:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
f4433922e6fc8956d2dbb18a7251b3ea
967faf6649460d99f696b32a99fbbb43683c1d84
'2011-08-19T04:21:13-04:00'
describe
'106086' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHK' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b28c2d9d4f24e8f56582ead1aa12b208
782b346d0b972f1bf73acbca03b6e3f348b437dd
'2011-08-19T04:13:34-04:00'
describe
'29429' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHL' 'sip-files00101.pro'
28054c959d090a9ad062696a73605a94
575bdb4eca1af17dd3fd5a3de5df08381e9bdffa
'2011-08-19T04:09:32-04:00'
describe
'35770' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHM' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
986e5fb24cb0632a62ba78a0c455418f
3ced420bd377818ef569ca8037e965b3254c3d1a
'2011-08-19T04:12:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
879a0c67bd2be6eb000c6d35d308a32c
57f781c758b9215727cbce8ec7404b68f98c8dfc
'2011-08-19T04:20:49-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHO' 'sip-files00101.txt'
39217859cb95058b4bf1ee8098128e84
8746513aeae22baf0c326d586be7c7b64e15821c
'2011-08-19T04:12:10-04:00'
describe
'9367' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
bcacb775adec38e7f320a8193922b185
6f2bda4fa7442c1b3d5e7e4df5542fb7892e098f
describe
'349390' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2760d1d0886330e63dbaad6a01c3ef86
601859cc44a13e9ad05706f94a76679d60fb3d2e
'2011-08-19T04:07:57-04:00'
describe
'98190' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
03291552ae46ab7d383017ebeb188306
dd9851f29a6ff65216a443743bda380707fbe1e0
'2011-08-19T04:18:27-04:00'
describe
'27208' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHS' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d22271a5b1e9d8875196d50df0a00ae2
ebc73d78d14acd3d5199dd518a10d0ee23080b9b
describe
'34267' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHT' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8ad4c925bfe83865f1be0c6fd81660f5
bba87709e74633a5e606a899e7ce551d4d092546
'2011-08-19T04:18:42-04:00'
describe
'2812272' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHU' 'sip-files00102.tif'
0a0253bba310b5ca911d357613633230
25990b2e3ebfe4dbed8cc16ef60a2a30e9670ea5
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHV' 'sip-files00102.txt'
5c294c9e04206c6cda4f8ffafa6af039
aacb49c2dfa4064fab69d8034d00c713e55967e2
describe
'9437' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHW' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0cd2eccefa6d0a50cc466eff340e4357
eb7548afbbb1c77908f7df9996557738485e2ea8
'2011-08-19T04:16:41-04:00'
describe
'365007' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHX' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
14783796561d921d8f0a77b38ca58384
22e02c9c4a3b9939147674e35da3dccb1d623601
describe
'105543' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHY' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
f7c583472ea7d940e5d9f158e45d1107
7493562a20060f4597749dd0563cce3a05234b6c
'2011-08-19T04:17:06-04:00'
describe
'29648' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
54623ab9d2b60460053aac96bca1ac40
fc08379cfea9dbe98ba1b1ab2947251c3ea81203
'2011-08-19T04:10:48-04:00'
describe
'36055' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIA' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a42cfb4cadb4dbf5521386967e106eda
494228afa83d471ffe815eed4c7c241153aad13a
'2011-08-19T04:07:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIB' 'sip-files00103.tif'
c053512e1f898b272be4e83b354c3c7e
231f9f5685ab190a0bbb965c675fba096ffac713
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
00b8d025af64f9ce85f1ed9a3606957c
cd769158a465ffbd99aea402350294ee556170ca
'2011-08-19T04:14:02-04:00'
describe
'9059' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALID' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
2cca1fc1b4b8ee54ec3696188e7791e6
4e88524271f977f10b0f0055aa39095baaa4f171
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIE' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2e1c8062fb9dda4376f25913fa72c544
30be894d3173fc8eb788c485924dbb675f1a0b8e
'2011-08-19T04:16:48-04:00'
describe
'106224' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c8cf0c8cbce34b36608034d0899d7229
307e8f0e8fec44da3c11b0fe7ea3bc84234f76b9
describe
'29698' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIG' 'sip-files00104.pro'
55ddfee712c531262071d9bd6c7af59a
8e9a8d647d29d572ad015c893f326c31c2108e93
describe
'36965' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
7f1f398575a62b02e8721b83e88a605f
89f69cabf5c9e9325affc8d489fda22e452bf4ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALII' 'sip-files00104.tif'
4eff7e5a454a7187a3d594f591590ad0
f6c6969836a9378f527d5f87afdaf190518408d9
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
399bff40dbc577d9ff70f58e79a9e402
b1e00becb0ed7ee7eec5ed473a202ab81643f1e5
describe
'9372' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
a7278f1b53d31862db9c1f1b2836d2e7
b92544a2aefee708c131a4727fe5d8de38ca1162
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
1e12a30b8542bafca64f7d44d6b92cbc
1918243e4d92d37b3a733397c6a745fbac570c27
'2011-08-19T04:10:56-04:00'
describe
'104746' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
141b8f6497c59b4fa072c16bc91f2e9c
58b4a6376ed6176e57427b68da955775923edf4f
'2011-08-19T04:20:52-04:00'
describe
'29755' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
c249afc84af17d9440f57acc009120ad
8822001dc530e993a038535db97c28458d26ede4
'2011-08-19T04:17:02-04:00'
describe
'36301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIO' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
cfd196a76aa462a54fbc248ea7cec773
e5f3b81039ebec04172bde1f125bfe6e984e9cff
'2011-08-19T04:18:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f459fb6495310586471f8f6393b8b539
2bf7c8f96c68a2fc7160829aa5b695476cb32ae4
'2011-08-19T04:19:21-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e8f8d9075a2e8f0659a3c16806fa87ec
608800bb7cd958badcd0c45f5ca31f83cdbf7d86
describe
'9362' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIR' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
977b2726009cb9b1225ac2e2f899fb47
5ddc72099904352406c0ed4fed07d5ed8c35aaa4
describe
'356777' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIS' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
dd8a6f9b7f298324d1106ac0623dcfba
8c77a3245a1da34d10153855b7cdac7fd41e0f39
describe
'112225' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
f580ec8e3d0698d6813e72e169bec389
2845c55ec8895cd0c3e5fddd3c39f79e8ce89d8a
'2011-08-19T04:21:25-04:00'
describe
'31091' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIU' 'sip-files00106.pro'
ba1027dd2d42fdf0bb5ce9b7b3d5e6e9
d9aec69a46efdc13ba00f997f65b122dc62014a5
describe
'39215' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
fc791d41c381630ff8e09c13910c7005
4bc996c815031f4ac1b872056972fd6779808243
'2011-08-19T04:13:30-04:00'
describe
'2870936' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b44f9e0b59c730e49c8cb84997d3bfd4
1fc01bdf5d6de4551186ac11680e783424ea5567
'2011-08-19T04:10:47-04:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
af9a59c14312bad09cb32e09d8b5338f
c9c7a301374ebf0b9901480b33fb421f9bd9139d
describe
'10166' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2cec4f2a3b8a1978ecc73f74023424ec
55cc932594716cf3ed1e98032938003f9a8244d9
'2011-08-19T04:13:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
29df431b872a83f7c76718320ac608ad
da2de01516a0ad7f345c42fc8a53abd931aebb15
'2011-08-19T04:12:57-04:00'
describe
'103975' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f607dbd728006600dd65933c4640ac59
f59cba4415ccc35331ee7b721ee3b4b5012bc6ca
describe
'29043' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
daa8959ad3f9775cf0d04fcb814bf1bf
ae55246d729a35cd173402cfe1d98c3c0bbdb45b
'2011-08-19T04:21:20-04:00'
describe
'35640' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ee70f16355a9e5313dd53e220bc675a2
96c89775f137629c593ecae9d004a5bef4ffa4d7
'2011-08-19T04:20:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
0082805205eedea5e111ecd8a9c994db
4b16bb2a9f0d31d391ff017595066f2e91425a55
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJE' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ab736438ca9d5c0326145c981ff559c0
6d9b122f727bf3f0a06b7027f2aaf183c026435b
'2011-08-19T04:20:50-04:00'
describe
'9009' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c0c21e63cf5927103582d494a477c6db
a44b5bb0b93dc90b73574861bbba0d46af6255ef
'2011-08-19T04:14:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d3efc2e45268773c9790b1b7f0cb7387
b108de5b02f0d8701d77261696bfde0a380338a1
'2011-08-19T04:07:37-04:00'
describe
'106810' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
1321537085de4227720f93ba15f03d65
7fa865d547cb5be86fc2dbbe74d7178bf3601f60
'2011-08-19T04:10:59-04:00'
describe
'29311' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJI' 'sip-files00108.pro'
8190712a1db86bae5f765786601bddec
3ad2fdab82b4e2d250a8a092a776a6ed713c76bf
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e492c0d03ff207fe4c9ccb91b2b0b5ee
1ef6fc2604863c6ea47208929567b2861975b408
'2011-08-19T04:11:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
fa41e6b3f9bb8af614b232932d9cfce6
762dbe9aabc2bb118f52bd9d3052eae83b6be6b7
'2011-08-19T04:20:27-04:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJL' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8149365db1142d2fd9f7102fb32d2ba3
a40852c45049a6ba3db1b7b21471680932a239d9
'2011-08-19T04:15:40-04:00'
describe
'9383' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
db87ec59bd07149ea2658a20efe4d0db
52c7ecbdbec97b18cea521a84a1425e543561dc6
'2011-08-19T04:13:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJN' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
da03239c2f1eaab97a6daa3e152c0336
257418281765e40d7ecc7494fcfa3376937db6ea
describe
'96034' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
d506d63502d4f29d8f2c12489e9cf9cb
86600d994cae18a6597ea732f3e86a0dcfe8599d
describe
'26911' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
dc698ee08078f75e78e3eaedfba9b8b4
b26cc9af2cc55dec5d6c1ab290bed5f08ccea3d1
'2011-08-19T04:11:26-04:00'
describe
'33245' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b17f33a3b6c33010e30fd8213e97b5b7
f0007e693baa17fefd8e5fed27c14186ef405335
'2011-08-19T04:16:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJR' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f600aee21496ba35adc2a336111b8a06
27dc6e93d48a45c1acccc3cad2c05babb502a8d6
'2011-08-19T04:14:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
2386490d674ec43439edd72938820295
20f691fee11914f0348d248d6345d9c67ec3a2ec
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJT' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1378d2856b0e5a9b078acd65f469cce2
c1a5959be4949cee03c8133569d1a2fef3f35c33
'2011-08-19T04:12:42-04:00'
describe
'353609' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJU' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
cb1ee5075d772296ed8c78ca9ccfe089
96a89de412b8ebd65aa7092875a11510cec87c9a
'2011-08-19T04:14:21-04:00'
describe
'109224' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJV' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
10a4739845075184123944c83e0f2214
39a827ab8152f0b216e019b044b8c8369c4f48fb
describe
'28932' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
44b956ad7e04a92f0eb64011e6720ef9
e1a15b0144c33b2c66f615624ab74947526cdb1a
describe
'39844' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
0eb796543618f178b821f41487840553
4a71f02c6c62e4465041d4f73b069056fa446789
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJY' 'sip-files00110.tif'
b5e65d131894fbb106723449b9421aa4
a3ec0e72817c5e2fcb6154602c55e247a775cb82
'2011-08-19T04:18:18-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
9657e6ec37c6b8093cfd443029d88790
ee1fd873f3f8d0f83004007fe77926d878485f89
describe
'9648' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKA' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
785d55d20e2cafade69f74cc71f577e5
8b74e025fdaadad4c38981e75fd3367036524244
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
455b286b60b7206006fa9440b78b0879
eaa286717023cfef7d70674e4325bc6c218a4285
'2011-08-19T04:08:15-04:00'
describe
'99836' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
d993f9c074d63c14f47dc6a9a50467db
c1642468e7374d16afc5be5b483585ff4485ea36
'2011-08-19T04:17:53-04:00'
describe
'27982' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKD' 'sip-files00111.pro'
0130db1aab4a64f689548b55d5c53471
aefa82746306969344e2eaf442d4aecf84dc711d
'2011-08-19T04:08:57-04:00'
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
87e7d9a2acb221e911de327546eab800
2c61eddb07677abd9bcd3f295c3b6e5c9465b1ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1cc150a0a9bbfb125ba97cfc682c240e
cbfc905b0b74fec60eb6baef2f389e87826ca708
'2011-08-19T04:10:14-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
f6b70c15a2de6dafda66c2669fabbb29
31083088b92ef74f7ad252b0681f397570b52917
describe
'8909' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f06714eaf8ccea351549108b4dbe1558
2f6f14d2cc19a67a1b050e58ff54cca645788470
'2011-08-19T04:09:46-04:00'
describe
'348293' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a54c3a4399ccaf6b4be64fc7a0ef1663
0001340748f4bbc6f5affffc9392e6991ce445a9
'2011-08-19T04:20:38-04:00'
describe
'110063' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3308650f1b88489bc8fc2e527ab3d406
86f2cb030ad769491dda13539709b1bc8c216d9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
4518271166076207f3dc5489984ecd84
0994ba1cb313f8df72a81adf340d1983f4ae0a12
describe
'31729' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKL' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
8450b0432608ccc10c5e6e16857ffe8f
64d02e1991803a0c11b7891692c7971a9c1ca95c
'2011-08-19T04:10:52-04:00'
describe
'2803192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
38784853864169d9e925771e81d0d657
00abc0d7ea9bf337a6228d65359df2f90e267e05
'2011-08-19T04:19:02-04:00'
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
5af5be90885c3cd4e60c93c43ab6d6fe
6833a6d4a7db31c146c3e5c39f0d0e6e2d4c6f0d
describe
'8320' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
988577615b76bcc66a0cc7100c9030a7
b8b2f50d8e34b3edb6db83c1ce4151d67c7091df
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
aef08080f9565464323db450509579dc
49a0ca02541c6418c254c29cf55ce4170c722c5b
describe
'101719' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
4811965e51798ccbedd92b43f9cb5cd6
f92b7773aa5c0a3930a7f49158aece58b79defc2
describe
'27980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKR' 'sip-files00113.pro'
7bed033be5141520ce82a0819622ad77
1bf3436e7a0281f7ff56cfe819cc1bd7a36d1b06
describe
'35462' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKS' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
cebc2d2d213068c87ceefaa3472ad7a9
b63e82d15d164b2abf155ea2d55840da1322eec9
'2011-08-19T04:10:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8ccd5ba0d40dbec186f599322cea688e
30b0f0308ceca4efbab252669f291d9a3ec01e3e
'2011-08-19T04:09:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4446aee1fc462b3fa5ba1004bd49ae5d
a6c592c63276644667edf420d51117d05e06fa49
'2011-08-19T04:19:44-04:00'
describe
'9074' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKV' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
c149d8ce6f5641369e4d3f7a4b979b67
43e595a125d53a64471893eea874f5d18c4edc62
'2011-08-19T04:07:27-04:00'
describe
'358902' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKW' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ddbf937cc9c6d0730c34581e2b9331c3
9f1b6aae7ca1514d86c493b6082b4ca621b24985
'2011-08-19T04:11:16-04:00'
describe
'104705' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKX' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
3a733595796d80b918d50765e472301b
61002e8c637452aa643d4b5b10cfc18effa862bf
'2011-08-19T04:10:31-04:00'
describe
'28770' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
058495bcb906d44a6e268eda454288b7
0336511b46ca1fabca01edbb034fba7791919f84
describe
'36278' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f60eeaf2bc497c2a35ece163dfffb784
adb9192d717a909c58ba3b0999efd27ab5238a83
describe
'2887872' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
944f44bbc45fc8fc595f4f23caf29e0b
98761bfa4b1eefe4d7cb16fa7e0b4740ae138b31
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
120c81f97bc216471b37e75d0488cad2
2bb0cd0faeccabb48d2a5fbec2eb3371f8efb13e
'2011-08-19T04:09:41-04:00'
describe
'9237' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
be892601de7e6b540f3b3f7fdaa3476b
226e2c46b64dff04e695332710ea9ec39ef24399
'2011-08-19T04:17:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLD' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ebfb19305097e188fbfe1e75eea89888
862b8860c848d37bd6ebb709347487bed1dc94bb
'2011-08-19T04:08:06-04:00'
describe
'104150' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
e03643f5cb4a392f164fc6c3f15ca321
1dfe94b90c8481ed20a92a29f438cd5c27893ee4
describe
'29301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
2c73765425c9589b35a86df7660e9b01
ee46a6487ef0a400ace7dc2e416e6b4b96f207b2
'2011-08-19T04:10:11-04:00'
describe
'35424' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
fc7b3b3496e3cadebc92ac7c940a8a75
fc49bf4d90bff90f1b5c12b87cdb98c6b23340ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
7f68a1e26afbe223c1475229140d4383
beb5e977d5a2e28c043fdd1ffa8e336362822904
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
81925149b6f0d365494475c4633c3013
586eb9b38fede542fbfc6d2e5a342478eaa06890
'2011-08-19T04:11:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5d0f0069299b20d82a0ed0261a46e746
da329325e0ee30f924d3933b575679ddc2104e49
'2011-08-19T04:15:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
844f7a9ddc0cf3d17e6d32b650b84c5e
1f93ed5412b408b25ab5ee0fabb2960117e50218
'2011-08-19T04:13:09-04:00'
describe
'68967' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4af280efc9e0d2f058b4ecdd6eaabb36
3ba4e9af6921f9ff008c20224017ec5acee76854
describe
'17325' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
5efa6dd55825c475b31788c7360ea43a
a4f8572cef83f8ede7df9386b000e421ff09d8b6
describe
'24288' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLN' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
21f8227ceba59071fb70831bc7c7d4eb
7b4080ab7170843b0a6473323e03f7b233529514
'2011-08-19T04:21:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
113b515805f61753bbefd357e5f7fd19
ff2a7942bc38c782827be411d59f8b2d35795d95
'2011-08-19T04:16:44-04:00'
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
80b360c71f4f302952d636639b087b03
99c863ed62b263992c30ab775274b9b397ac6e32
'2011-08-19T04:18:00-04:00'
describe
'6840' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
e3c67f8511eb548c761d37df526577c3
3e26ce67cc35987a81571a1f411948509c0e4be7
'2011-08-19T04:21:15-04:00'
describe
'365019' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c58fe9328c9799cf2fd75982be9899be
96c811de11991f76d9da91b03830bd88591e0327
'2011-08-19T04:20:11-04:00'
describe
'80009' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
2af176e9d42c76102858a857951fe318
e504101770b2e5c6c82ad52f923d596b3e72afbc
'2011-08-19T04:06:41-04:00'
describe
'15274' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
610ccd9b4044536873712a34e0433ea3
13b2b036b29153c0f09eba62d286d94e5026dca2
describe
'25058' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c4d6db9408553711232fc2968d90b32b
4b1fe8334383d8d57fa6b8c4a4f773721a820f50
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
de3b6be2065862ca2364c74dfcd65e27
de6b659d3837ff723bab2106f5a9ea06809a0c1e
'2011-08-19T04:08:32-04:00'
describe
'649' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
627a594abb9dfadd4eb20860e56d8067
96f065b382bb75412be4eb15958bbb5d237c4508
'2011-08-19T04:06:59-04:00'
describe
'6390' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
121566e2ffa5371429275c18eb71f907
165fd40ceceee026d4d681dbc34c11dca6ec1ff3
'2011-08-19T04:17:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
640a265b3d0e1d5ae6426ca3400391dc
ea7b018b4d7da23faf40141026f70bd49b8b4d39
'2011-08-19T04:10:21-04:00'
describe
'114059' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
fdc3f4e1e783559081d0461f7801932e
ecea3aabd59ac9fec880030b8f71c78635d79c23
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
5a716477384777eebe810fcea04d6e41
99417d2c87b73b15f264ebb658422e64304cb455
describe
'38365' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
31c972489370a9012bf08f3e71809702
6bcd5e5340e181ba92f7ea4dfd423093c343ad49
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0580e057c6e25f99de412be5cb505cf7
0e43e0a8e1fcc198a60f5b3ef8ff847cc781f60a
'2011-08-19T04:07:14-04:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
db96d5eb25ba6bd12bf0b9dbe3472a3f
fa06297f8ae20d37c8dcd90e94cf22782a8a0094
'2011-08-19T04:11:46-04:00'
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALME' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
42df9ff3ef24a72fa90be1d79687683c
f248a9a5189535870febe166a61c09d881a5f250
describe
'365022' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8e693ea9eb655da9b5910bc7a0c18771
638047b0455cec886308924125b5f0be74932a1e
describe
'103400' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
589a09edb2f97b279041dea0b5d66fa5
2e8ae8e9af00168f3f58be7ebf1406c9ac799829
'2011-08-19T04:13:40-04:00'
describe
'29018' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
2153ebf736897722969b3b863daaf45f
978d8d1f6b9ceab4a2eb9fc26a1051793c3e852b
'2011-08-19T04:16:36-04:00'
describe
'34858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
454b9463bdadced21dbaff3dd5639531
2283182f6672605928171bceb19b188c2895bebe
'2011-08-19T04:13:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
0f42d27c1ce2681d4e73b2895b468085
0cf99d0db4fa6145b0199766f9b763fd631b7360
'2011-08-19T04:10:30-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a3a88677d71865c05f23129272e82376
d37b5f1535399d3914bf350c6a0c52894c2d9afe
describe
'9064' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALML' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
5288ad7c3670287136b265242d7627d7
cdd50e6e786c492b6916492ce4b9095eb879984d
'2011-08-19T04:06:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
db5f88f391f1677344af12262af5c632
3256278906a81818b48ef8f369ff305a0fd35546
describe
'108174' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMN' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2641084fb9fccc913efe3a165cb389c1
c6341a3b6aa474a6c916e8a2b1d13b9c18c26d39
'2011-08-19T04:15:01-04:00'
describe
'29927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a790df2fad44971f2db511f3d1434dbe
f16e00052ee489739770c631161574fa87d5508b
describe
'36433' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
d60077eb1cb30794fbf1079f03fe3205
88be2c0a9f497e923527858339ac8fd60bf63f18
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c1910f05f2410df94472c562956b7a48
c7fa0c5589f9faf5597f2873c9ac7d7d141457bf
'2011-08-19T04:08:21-04:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
c944cbf5f234f5258c6b1c0d7756c3c4
7921b3c61e92bb6c4ee59e62dfb125c5e9cbb874
describe
'9814' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
7e8ad474ce44b570236b32183367444d
843a89183d494c8ff3fb579a80c0ed9fea8c4d4d
describe
'362284' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
20cb3ef5f10764c2ca64eeabe38161c1
d1b69ae133eb5eb1e2ce25cba5f6daac43849fc4
describe
'108782' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d12274ab1e678ed0a3ceb072ac9159c9
e6fbccd2e968abd8d3c7b4897daa43c66338edbd
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
c829cf92337aa9826ddf6657cf04e9bc
f132a224e644f0632e6e4a647572efc774d97470
'2011-08-19T04:09:08-04:00'
describe
'35459' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
f6b37bfcb7678d138a9d9b40b41515cb
41f6aa8ed68907e663c04c1e7a66f0bf329038ce
'2011-08-19T04:08:38-04:00'
describe
'2914636' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
defb00b147e767f4bfc66b900a5dd4a6
19140934079086e76f09785ba19c9d54bcacd3ef
'2011-08-19T04:10:19-04:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
846632d830176c03aaa57bdaff861cbd
c9fd00bfe642b5c107a73a7c610cbb6f2b6d6e50
describe
'9129' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
7dc88f2ebcfd4c6156e062a677f4a009
e86a7045d58e77e9cae0dd86459600b6024c59f2
describe
'364978' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
9c62675e6d425fe99100888451b4230c
0fe38a28c77a49fbc6df35facce277a74a127067
describe
'108929' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
a169a6dba138e25d912435a80121408a
c877634cf80abcd5fe5e8730abd364c17af383ed
describe
'30376' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
e7a6b66ef4cba763ffb41ab87edc93a9
cec31a277e70ae03c56ab152df2d575ef27b1633
'2011-08-19T04:15:11-04:00'
describe
'37394' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALND' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
dcfa6b05041597fdd8c954237be12e2e
89b1897cabb69188969824e654ac665630586168
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
90fd7f099b2f5e1c5b4ccaff110783c6
d817b5acc47132a95e4d25c7fbe7914cb2cdb056
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
000dc5a32977d5cc56b797610fd9a443
106ce4ba94b42c2464a331e716685eeae6978013
'2011-08-19T04:07:56-04:00'
describe
'9412' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
c77d07a090a0c10d48e4da88ebbfb4e7
663b2e7409391e0e16372fb20449e400aea44758
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
d440780e82c7f2b208d60f05c28a8662
e304222af42f41a663cf69aefffc943c3cbc20bf
describe
'95514' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
57123544d3a4ac6c0c9e320d22518bc9
b16c33386213f906448114c1b971ff26d4f50999
'2011-08-19T04:08:10-04:00'
describe
'26240' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
280e6dfac7b2465bec3cde4a45aeeee5
6dd367bc33a3702cbd36d4d05a53178ec390e9be
'2011-08-19T04:15:39-04:00'
describe
'32773' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3a6bfb8361554c998ba78d025069d1c2
be7c18f89c23bdc42504db2de0677ffaee4ce2ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
4800382a6075b6b39f21482b01555b93
b7b8e26c2672fdd8243ac0e4f09c57e11a01147c
'2011-08-19T04:14:05-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
55581c28a371cc8045a69a2c926cb23f
7b4602e01c642a09ce4a4af4ccaab9b8545d78b1
describe
'8599' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
2161320a437170dfadda0cb0c6849a81
a47236bb0185e5ba9fc6cc82db62639374dd2c9f
describe
'333426' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
8a29d03247f49c1ec190b5fd4dc8c09d
ac6477a44cc96c6d0c4aa2b1baab7d6adfe0d18c
describe
'85113' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
32e4cd6788abaca465255d172966f95c
a70423424b2b224b8f3e5173af86ed1d13d264f5
describe
'22537' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
3198f02c357003d48ad885e2ed31dbe2
5ededdb15fb610ca4838ad3a468f19d0b7bc34c4
describe
'28837' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
02313a50f95712f20d3df4ee4efd3198
b5511481e1324a69493c6c9427b079a000b3b2e3
describe
'2683980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
562323a7a8945dd023bcede62d87e294
6e2563bf6a8fd7ae6f68785dd5a57e214f144e5e
'2011-08-19T04:12:35-04:00'
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
7661cec3c4f4907966d988fed1ea4eeb
fab4428036701753cb9ad1f6015498ee50ce376d
describe
'10425' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
77beaf7a0aafbe460af2f2a8d4cc0034
d115dfd80b02a1eaad47877678f2c70d71649e05
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
5497200387d865a3f0fa1f1d56143baf
1418dcd4d55f9efac1b95ce547a581d60c28d89a
describe
'102642' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
52b299ce8cd9e506b5378d878e565926
217a76b4fbcfbe8a82e36a616b2aeec0ffef65e5
describe
'28612' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
d1d19650994a3f795d0b917846e6f1ce
85c02e6c9b42e40f45578a98e9d3f4e682eefc61
'2011-08-19T04:14:08-04:00'
describe
'34850' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
a1aea21b30f19c676cc93a5ceb91cd65
385700a82d830f6c35769482ad5edfc1148c425a
'2011-08-19T04:21:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9159a3fc0fea9ca98ada70c6d9c583c6
53a30b8c019b040cbc8fb35ee0de34f223c5e961
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1cdbd89f8879e564c992c894d475ad55
7405dcbc69e617bf9280fcd4faaad0bc6ddb01ed
'2011-08-19T04:15:56-04:00'
describe
'9072' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
3375e26e858b040ade89bb22fb0f2989
d511becea26a813019f2f22a8ccbd2460be91d61
describe
'361807' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
d00804375fef98658df4866f465139c9
9222eed6ffba7b278a6f03317558ca305d10eba1
describe
'111888' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
c2a3a854decd8d437cd79db6cee6a9d8
294a3f06b7b1a13352b78de1dd3d7bfb63bb9534
'2011-08-19T04:20:47-04:00'
describe
'30529' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b55eb7fa2e6053ef39312fafe21333f6
7b15006a1919d052db3833bd08ed438da618ecac
'2011-08-19T04:13:38-04:00'
describe
'37692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
8e1ca52be8c76a28122464f9f6cb0eb9
15e2390d2c57bfcc3201abbcf254770a6ef3114c
'2011-08-19T04:13:58-04:00'
describe
'2910852' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
4cbe9069a1b25018a16a8733cd6212ac
b9c67b762b1c1913b774d08db526212202a24f83
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
6e3acd0675a64393927a6b38f25d83fd
2a61985b68c8667afd9f5ce81104adac041d3a52
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
7e4a775c54ed86b49486760e1b6e11d7
a3c6f77f207c36cab36d7f46329b5cbe2c08f528
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
bce7ca85a0463fc2837bdd1330e89ca8
cec00f970ce891d4e9975c507385ff6b53476eb7
describe
'98271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1fbc338f153efde990b695bc40d6d830
f6987fb8ab254e61e9be40d7e8fb6a778af8ee00
describe
'26995' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
eb052a69ac08f3dd97798178c5265b8b
f2ef216fab3bcd6cbf7e922c3f02a0a3620f1ab4
describe
'33225' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
6cfa4b03653763ae18f0c5cf8dfbe330
21069ceaea6fdfa25e4c0478dc43937522efd699
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALON' 'sip-files00127.tif'
00b3e7d01e0325083fb2b82de86a16bc
ec3b61447da27d2aca0eeb5fe9e581fd9721e185
'2011-08-19T04:16:38-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
cba21269677fa44cef17d281e5640f3d
0dba05dad7b01f82719500f77fe0996bff2e6903
describe
'9070' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
f4d07b70a807e98e513269758a7b0bcd
ddd7ac27afc3dd99ee1217492d40d4bf983125e7
'2011-08-19T04:11:48-04:00'
describe
'330984' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
82f14f94cc7b1e4c84ef65c90865b7f8
6e4bef951b38515ac52a0f54762b7bd8fe60a1f9
'2011-08-19T04:13:57-04:00'
describe
'113821' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
ebf2cc4eb47008dd9f4210ddcac2a98e
ea222382e0c6350fee130c0c9c22b0fcdb2834a5
describe
'29664' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
78a887fd2d83065542b314e486ade7a0
ed2d5134bacb7b659c07b96bf0c5b8d2b0decfb0
'2011-08-19T04:20:36-04:00'
describe
'42308' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
9ba8114998f74252867ff04b7507202e
30ddb3b5e51638d6b81752dc1e74fbe718dcea76
'2011-08-19T04:13:36-04:00'
describe
'2664252' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b3971ab9eaaf7b3d4b779c16d7580c22
a5a016832ed04086e0d0ba854987b90783e4abfd
'2011-08-19T04:07:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
10593eb5d5f14b392fe55fdc75f92059
d00703e693ef4e42ad120bb163913ed497d477e4
describe
'10747' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b3adc3a0c8fe9fe7c86a6dfd67952147
1c4c4473e1bec7abea9923348884d5568c20f958
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
78e297375e34b174182a7af5a1b19e86
48c1d6baece9f3ad02bdda858ed7e52465cbdef5
describe
'111229' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4d8f2b1a0f1bc8d6bab6104491fa7713
4396cc6f9364c36634ebeceb349c251ebeee81d3
'2011-08-19T04:21:24-04:00'
describe
'30755' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
dbb91fef3a777d3ac45d97e0b42eb297
f3443368c3831487b304e67285f4315caa759094
'2011-08-19T04:08:43-04:00'
describe
'38416' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
b2e287d80fafa6879bb0f1765258b04d
f3abd0dbd5197c3dd6184eb268d7d0b1b50b2b0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
7160d9ba3ea00a2b2aee856d049af5ab
77ffdbc72841a9c12f8a94955613759f0d1665fd
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
fa1aa08512351339c8b9398a8c8d076f
a6e322d617777f9de864e371dab1dc8bde4d3207
describe
'9652' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
552a296bc546354ceb25d493fcff5497
c9cb1e72378f5ac8c8dbcf70954c27b47924d51e
describe
'345116' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
5e61793b511c6c954e56aec6e0ec525e
270b879f3c03a871867f6aa102982fecef0b65bc
describe
'112298' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ebc9942525c620aaa12afbb80c4663b8
66904493bcbdcc5002665a238c324eda1224d864
describe
'29298' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
16a34c737cc14537d5be9fcb7b3c00f0
fc1a53af7856ceded098d55c8199473177b3c68b
describe
'33957' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
798107ebb1a730fe8667b40d7fcc98e1
f46293b2f0e3c382825fc1acac8903c8c7b9dc4e
'2011-08-19T04:17:43-04:00'
describe
'2777556' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
67603ab7b1a9bdb8e6870568fd4c0614
9ec8a03a449eff18831a2e4811fafa2a47f15c28
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
5c714a8e9aac0e35e048bf46bb28d407
98b187d3d62602c267bac557895a9b381bf52bf0
describe
'10264' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
6da154244dcca4bc781a73fdf12f6d28
c84c08a8d4d393a39bbecd51891ca10b5c0f56d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPL' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6fdec66090a83a47d0115e8b2c201f3a
807e7eacdb44c29ca439ff8a4d0ab5e19da43527
'2011-08-19T04:06:47-04:00'
describe
'106426' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPM' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3340bc43d7398d0b0f92e0b86e821be2
3983a629dd6d6e67c78efa3e1e7ef03ecdb16216
'2011-08-19T04:14:17-04:00'
describe
'28895' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPN' 'sip-files00131.pro'
8ea27604ec2e97fe0bec94aef0447bd8
3814d30870881f3e4c956ae50aff22e80d741d0f
describe
'36082' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPO' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
94ea309f59a380734b819fbb97fd51e5
549520451b130a571c0ce39885f7bc4166e29b0c
'2011-08-19T04:13:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPP' 'sip-files00131.tif'
cdcb57cc8b2444ee2cadd9819e7c0740
46b589502b6c1ca78f37b85124e7eb7fff03035f
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2feae7372fa70927d212edbe0e6ba5c2
66828b8e4842823a9eda82d3a37e26222c954efc
describe
'9127' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPR' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
6a3bbe7f6e8141e9149e7c0906b9be55
d9b67552ad22ebd30ebf1d2b1849f6da348a26ea
'2011-08-19T04:20:08-04:00'
describe
'363342' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPS' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2029ce5e2b62d3eb795f3e34d2f55d15
b50f1528f6af849ac69ebfd2984111da93f21e72
describe
'108691' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPT' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
9a38bb4745b5fa1f51bcf9a4170c6c4e
0af3672b6d8bf99997f4fceaba1ed556074efd8d
describe
'31152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPU' 'sip-files00132.pro'
61b8e0d52329de956782e5ba8d1bcaab
94c60e7d0a3b3ed26c20052029016a16e490678d
'2011-08-19T04:14:50-04:00'
describe
'35603' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
975a53edbb99547db3f49218b2bb9210
982f976bbb6518e9a2651131fa9d01ebe7609b96
'2011-08-19T04:20:53-04:00'
describe
'2923232' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
cbf3e0d2ad7ff72637be2922061888a6
2c8f420be138ebb799baca8e2c7f51f70f19034b
'2011-08-19T04:14:58-04:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPX' 'sip-files00132.txt'
c4c7c7956253364ae58367a4715e0ce8
0032978e5736def2c9baf3296198e055fc49ce82
'2011-08-19T04:11:42-04:00'
describe
'8731' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
6b28312dc3433e584f00c2bbe4577195
efa96351bc6f9c68163484d265c4d679f2e42ade
describe
'365001' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a1a0c895817642a06190afd8fb930e24
d2b2811d5686fca3baf514ec191367abbcabb31e
'2011-08-19T04:16:12-04:00'
describe
'111861' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
76aa8877cc7c8a0b9af5840424ac8f35
311ebf0ba9eb2e64457da423a88364e7ff8feff6
'2011-08-19T04:17:42-04:00'
describe
'10813' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
94efe000ad139516fef998d284aa008c
e44941a6b26a8a2ccaa5085aab46b1cbae29a83e
'2011-08-19T04:16:58-04:00'
describe
'31905' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQC' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
e4f21ddb18648876bfef7cca65e5be81
37e15269769e4aa19263aefebc4800a9c6de1a8c
'2011-08-19T04:16:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQD' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e9905b629384b712155cf6498f8de6a9
8c4f4040c56cb23bbc4f9ed15e0c160fdeb7b3e9
'2011-08-19T04:08:45-04:00'
describe
'478' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQE' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3340cf7239e24b54aea916bbf31ca56f
32ba1c5200e09295e0ba8d082be9ddd4c213d155
describe
'8176' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQF' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
191d86a757b8eec3a8d69e98181aaa92
19b1b58768eb2c46df96e755f88c38a2bd66fdda
'2011-08-19T04:11:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQG' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
e4c449fc1d38a8aaa4fadbc635485dae
a8beaa3a2840844de64ce074960fd7c5bdb9ef41
describe
'99538' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQH' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
c784934d13e1510e251445c9841c08e9
583b331f5cb938fa572170b3f7daae72e35fca5f
'2011-08-19T04:10:32-04:00'
describe
'27757' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQI' 'sip-files00134.pro'
b7785567acb7d6a0728ed4d961453797
cc888825793873548bea8a173459a31c97af95dd
'2011-08-19T04:14:36-04:00'
describe
'32793' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
9070c6df8b22026ef0e0e298f7ff2313
2a552323af5b152175435ddd802e53d7e0ea9133
'2011-08-19T04:06:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQK' 'sip-files00134.tif'
fbf65fb9eaceea81f5888fcb14d0fb18
10c673b9ea3eb1c3c950ab45da8588d99ecbbae8
'2011-08-19T04:11:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
71699cac4cc2440fdacc69d078516315
4a6ebe5031a374bfcfcb37424da2e5b7bd1871fb
describe
'8941' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQM' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
b36e22b744a875b5de7dc81ccd03323e
eefeacec563ce15bb36a59dc0f86029118cdaf26
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQN' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8242cf3d5023f81072c1c60bc146a1ca
ed598fd354b86be6e09682fff08555d6650a9f99
describe
'105689' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQO' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
43e4d49d64f16a527b0bd1d6951b5f49
56ee4b24064bf9c72f32a7e6a5ceeb5e3f16d33a
'2011-08-19T04:10:10-04:00'
describe
'29767' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
0c2e0f7b299ca98c21cc8c75cf612f99
24f533db9d6a1ab0818ed1cf500b62860a9255cc
describe
'36132' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
8790b0fa89a956babd6b226e733b347c
e43a7ea9a6a02a390faeb1a544145a462880c4e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQR' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a71a5873eb4db5ae1ce66cc4c56de616
38bc375069d03dbf9b1ef0b9b74ee6471376039e
'2011-08-19T04:12:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQS' 'sip-files00135.txt'
e97d5201f61abe7ade5ba91412b2ef58
53b4cbc340b017563e07c5b32c4b050fe91f9983
describe
'9292' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQT' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
f39aba2101a908782191b0f131a5978d
5a90f93ea96984d68dec38e0fe3bcce0fbe26b11
'2011-08-19T04:16:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQU' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
94362de53c6b3c47a8e27d97db421a10
57349d4799b2ee406f551d123eff1835d844fa8f
describe
'104258' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQV' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
6de683e106c1380f0b1ac92f8bf7c6a1
8829a7f8eb18e1b75224cfdd2d3adeed187260be
'2011-08-19T04:10:02-04:00'
describe
'28838' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQW' 'sip-files00136.pro'
119826c836b4b069c4cb22bfb123dc64
3ad41cf533fcfff65f5e16debc2a512517a10bbd
'2011-08-19T04:10:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7458bdd133897e5e7e62fbe18d3d44fd
ed34a8e5381cabeff8b8b443441dbc48ae9238e8
'2011-08-19T04:13:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQY' 'sip-files00136.tif'
f5536ab63a6fc212c40f39e8c5fb70d4
0dc7b40cd9b4ca3c9c3f8d4fa31bd87c9acfeca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
79755c0c4f422d919ae7725e8af476e9
9f95f57b070808f959806f5f3acf30cc4d00ecaf
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRA' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4c26c72213c6e95eb2755cd2d73c7666
4c1145a7e34ea9e8932de31f2efa55e57392ba78
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
95c490546328b3c20b238d99285eee47
12dd89e8c8a5abf17232db88056d9155d648967f
describe
'96878' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRC' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
497cd23d7da3815b1f838a0cdf9fed9b
b2530c57b5108355207cbab0b3e5c6d3b910cc70
describe
'26840' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRD' 'sip-files00137.pro'
3bc24ff0c46143787ce8a659788bfa9e
f87f35d0cee9444d3abceb096221c5f90666c8fb
'2011-08-19T04:11:29-04:00'
describe
'33084' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
46d05272308eb1cefd6d73bd50582026
97a530f2c68a421a018b900f27d589b59393864e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
137d36685693c5f55714962a010af478
b1230463913a466c7b975033a4cf8e913e822881
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
99f6a596910564c3f6b1cec2fddd4a0d
25689a0d132e0f888e298c8ab60b66c158f4ee28
'2011-08-19T04:12:44-04:00'
describe
'8855' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
beef3af61ec197246d53573cb92c6747
6810d7ba6ebe8313b7b202e227e06d8d30bb61f6
'2011-08-19T04:11:37-04:00'
describe
'350474' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
01775a86bc5e810c9493a2618db96476
70fa74249f58f941558c26d525cc70849e7326b4
describe
'103825' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
88453dfa6295b163fe87a388450c0911
c2b813700db613b7cd5bc45f830b8d326b1adb36
'2011-08-19T04:10:03-04:00'
describe
'27517' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRK' 'sip-files00138.pro'
8e34817bc78ccb4f15e2393de2cbff5f
264cdc4be375d1a9cca557fab35057ff9b310bb1
'2011-08-19T04:09:14-04:00'
describe
'37279' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRL' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
aac9996aa229ab69c5b256e2f7797e76
00b52f0820921a5b3994141a243f916cd1231ca3
describe
'2820124' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRM' 'sip-files00138.tif'
674fa38fa1b69667348feffb870d02ff
3c516ccff2949365752af058d1afe663e87d5f35
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRN' 'sip-files00138.txt'
86ce78b9937725b9b9620319d8bf05ef
9a10e0e86381093aaac5b729abff1aefff28a1fc
'2011-08-19T04:18:20-04:00'
describe
'9553' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRO' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
b47ccaddf638349f4621104597797685
68332fcc4edb0727ed217dbcf20a95d288fae32d
describe
'364925' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
c811f9733ea883d147de2ea1c36a9e07
141ce4fa71cba227dd6f434a688ece944c083f7f
describe
'159735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
061d394785be7ea2b81bdf7ebaabed14
1e40f7b48ec7c32dcc529a871af10b555e87f7f4
describe
'2570' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRR' 'sip-files00139.pro'
b774de28197202b56a50b6b33498f1ad
48e18a5d221636db979f9c1df1a69351d742ed71
describe
'36617' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRS' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
20967eff8515daea1bbc496b8f39d4ba
9a67c83e9b26d404c695fb916a9a7e721cc527c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRT' 'sip-files00139.tif'
023270b09275d99cb362937510127207
39965983328b826f58e0a121b7aed697d9be673f
'2011-08-19T04:09:11-04:00'
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRU' 'sip-files00139.txt'
1195e202408a6fa74b0694500061502d
6f5c741a8d7a8649e396b24bd88269b94490191f
'2011-08-19T04:06:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9078' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRV' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
8647a17c85821fc1a5cd07d8a4eb155b
226d310a0f46e4065c13b2a08b768c5873106a76
describe
'344402' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRW' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
14897a00d63a959760b34611786cf7d1
992ebfe9bbff9adb6cd0fd7ade6e8ba6d7fc6ee3
describe
'97783' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRX' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
dc722b2d666e1342d9ef816703223540
0862cf298f63507688d770a4c15bdd48c5e7fa66
describe
'27425' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRY' 'sip-files00141.pro'
b3c55be06b62cf9be37c835a0824cf8a
11067f7eb5aa956d0c19c344eb3ef095e1afbdd9
describe
'32932' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
26bafbdfd764c72eb926c1fd2536d3dc
1320ff0e52f8b8e4e1b58f32233653ba222cc231
'2011-08-19T04:15:54-04:00'
describe
'2771844' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSA' 'sip-files00141.tif'
64c590a1f84ffe07f4bfeba079874b9b
d71d5108e1b6d440065b6e1e8c55bc2021dd91be
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSB' 'sip-files00141.txt'
f8e146dc7260863cd8549817575077f6
333659834fb5c1e1b70774bb3ff0e1ac02ad6665
describe
'8775' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSC' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
ab9a2ae2a96b3b56e91fe24f8f82253d
1efe315f304c71d097454237e08826622a9db2be
'2011-08-19T04:08:47-04:00'
describe
'364969' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
38caafc1c537ce7b45217ec8a2bfcb6b
1a7ce058058c1c36b1aea8d249cdd6a4f4ca6d88
describe
'104697' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSE' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
c7d7ecb842f4fc0c80f4431162dd2d02
555b159d16868d33c9016dd0b023cc156fc58306
describe
'29313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSF' 'sip-files00142.pro'
6b4c2b750c8bcd6cc5409120ae7c81cc
6ad76a0d64a8d594f88c4270ea5070de616f2718
describe
'36332' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSG' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
ae5f4078d911222828613b582ac26566
0954e9bf3915eacf15103d36a76e2c6933d2b52d
'2011-08-19T04:09:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSH' 'sip-files00142.tif'
926fe096b8c2a47f730112b71b9cd0e9
d6219358e31f7ed7c6654daed5a1b08dfc10d6c3
'2011-08-19T04:21:23-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSI' 'sip-files00142.txt'
2600f842793943d45b6389e631c0df57
3a6ea4566c32c1961cf44a13b00199b316a35b3a
describe
'9248' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ac70d37359be4eee6a62affebf88a7c3
2c1ac2b602128de222c84dcc2f86fdccad06bb95
describe
'364904' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSK' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
cb49192a9ba3cb371cb577a7eaf2a26b
b995b745dc127ebc84d25e3e7f48d14711d6d33b
describe
'108288' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSL' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9a3d055c497c22a220de0bc0925ce5c6
e009df9a477f298c5abffbe8f3bf338ed7d556d6
describe
'18151' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSM' 'sip-files00143.pro'
f7ee32e8e69119d258512e8187835800
b6cb04b2e9d0fc1252de19bdfdc9d91e6eb7656e
describe
'33311' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSN' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
1f49e5a4ea89ec793ac000f20ceeb463
e57aa4c53a281d95c9f7c65e39f9e49952b2c190
'2011-08-19T04:17:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSO' 'sip-files00143.tif'
8529bb697a4ef905ccf8588f843059eb
7c8cf7794eeb4e0f73bd5aaf392bcf1c036d8bc3
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSP' 'sip-files00143.txt'
35e08515a0d2387cdb91c2e0ddce3fba
413d275f9ef0515e0e8ec217ddeb8e452ab84b6e
'2011-08-19T04:21:14-04:00'
describe
'8877' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
1bf586706dbf1c30f45a0dccd8399e67
2d4f09bfc082730b0d61398e94e512b4ef3c7731
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSR' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
d29181e66f99ddba3a3980085ca1bd51
febf99f14c49796a61ca958a6894d2ba75b8c33e
'2011-08-19T04:11:30-04:00'
describe
'93756' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSS' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
390e3ff1504bace86659a847d613e956
e0248941ddfc71a9be0084aa14c8ddfb855fe3d3
describe
'25329' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALST' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0bfdf7263e9bf37383dfd2ea13956c84
4944cdce3a1da3fb67986658fb27bb33f8c9a14c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
94c8cab97e184081d1ac9e1a5968b45a
35d2cfe21359a9b2e6761ff1b7c617ebe1e69907
'2011-08-19T04:07:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSV' 'sip-files00144.tif'
9fad66db5acb3e484cffc1bf3cf45c2d
c865cbd012305629efb886c1d0a0b8308b944c35
'2011-08-19T04:08:14-04:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSW' 'sip-files00144.txt'
d43262e88fd797f0b714d427c181d4e4
06d7aaca27758c38c4fe5598c267c3d21373ebbf
describe
'8181' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
72180bac73a55d9091dffcad407c04ac
c3cfa7048d87c1c8a01efbacef5b03e9ab540369
describe
'352591' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSY' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
04883fc3c0f0601aecba60ae66ac6b2b
d282f0033aeb91b545f2b8ea4861f577b1897da3
'2011-08-19T04:15:10-04:00'
describe
'108746' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
cbc397ea2bb7f92edac8b92c1cda32ea
07e7b914670b8e55d0a28a868559be1247c1dea1
describe
'30522' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTA' 'sip-files00145.pro'
09e0f67728247a2b10843860388970b7
6a5e0ad2548fec30433a391cf7f70a39760daea4
describe
'36987' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTB' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
8be308c112e83946521e75f4c1ab857c
6ca7db97e4334f3196e2caf1a39608171a661fd7
'2011-08-19T04:20:45-04:00'
describe
'2837276' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTC' 'sip-files00145.tif'
313cbdaa18142288cdc13fcd65a52a5c
9860e25031175d16925cf0843400951872b67899
'2011-08-19T04:16:21-04:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTD' 'sip-files00145.txt'
cfe264802686066650a1117b46379832
e44fca6d676003d5b1602594b4d85b34482dfd6c
describe
'9364' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTE' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
b9a8654c77833944d639d0f216f633d3
e3dd61478ce36a66e395d68ef6a2a4a35e36ba15
describe
'364939' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTF' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
a9d4060ff5ab6673fa0cb6c1b51bdc57
8d99bba1ef8b74fac5427d27585499a79ddecc07
'2011-08-19T04:09:01-04:00'
describe
'105794' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTG' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
33485997f6e34f96771f67aec78efc8e
e9165c3bca958478f80ac7456b9ba4ad1a821df3
'2011-08-19T04:17:32-04:00'
describe
'28650' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTH' 'sip-files00146.pro'
15cb95056dbdac14796c9610d27bfdf7
8eb863b721cd233666277b9f43451cd7439ec2e5
describe
'36216' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTI' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
f163b539ab34e0168870e24ddc20c34f
1ade9f16334bc7470cd466688496329ff9a22871
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
ba642ca011a6ae8ff6a8b33df5fcaebc
124793f949c1bd6814aedde633c64664ca534553
'2011-08-19T04:21:03-04:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTK' 'sip-files00146.txt'
cb96bbbe5b82b09bbff69863b54ab614
c1f945452ff0e1223b2ad90dad43ab0ee007b4dc
describe
'9250' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTL' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
c083b12978761012f049b88b14fd8c20
aac5905366b51b3fb3c111ca521f91d3b68c9c3b
describe
'323624' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTM' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
170090516569607c54b2386ef1f6f593
7a25e8488470c2c99902430a3f536a6a04685c34
describe
'115271' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTN' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
c150a535b0ff7979a28411fa7bf84137
c0da088ae7ba8ee8af43efe08a2ab34292f302ec
'2011-08-19T04:11:11-04:00'
describe
'30284' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
c81b67d99a668c2f69e211ae189b6d36
9e70fb1ecfe864f58cbe08f8cbfafb742e582d22
describe
'40987' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
1c0cb6e78d999c1a84ca771e56550da1
e1c8eaa5d60bc6622fb2fe16fcc81d5f2e6f1e42
describe
'2605892' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
7b9d79f4928e8aab3f358ca87e3d2d74
f2b8726e5f566c871c6003163958a8a657150f9e
'2011-08-19T04:12:00-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTR' 'sip-files00147.txt'
8bd51f1cf3a7f8d9bddadc93a5795cce
4c735e9574e65579ec2a76ac8116e2176e02c9bc
'2011-08-19T04:15:41-04:00'
describe
'10800' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTS' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
c6d6c360dff20b926871bae36ffae2f7
06e4e4cdbc905ad6aca9ef6e4796801707b9e5dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTT' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9dc08f8d4d8ab893a23e93ad43d349c7
1d18d6f58d1fea4bdf654e4b72390e4ef2165012
describe
'110779' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTU' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d87bae47243ed5a53712435c4ded4cb4
b1d530dd61ef41947e2f5c96b8e0bc732ef4e93e
describe
'30969' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTV' 'sip-files00148.pro'
7393837098eaf82f4ae80a83b9d64392
cbb5d72b3adf3468be9e9b97cee14175baa91980
'2011-08-19T04:10:33-04:00'
describe
'37857' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTW' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d7a7810dd05f58c2edad11294000bde5
757886de91e7bbd78578c3db4ac3390d7e44fa85
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTX' 'sip-files00148.tif'
5c2d27f93690acd937fbf57334266aca
666a015a8e2373869e812a55a4bf63c8a3de41f3
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTY' 'sip-files00148.txt'
7f8c8f140f400b2f8ade45ca5f6ea9a7
67c48436e9a0df962231e62f15849231630168de
describe
'9384' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
763c204e44959f398a421a48dd605833
cdead64e80963de3a61fcc85a0dacdb63f704c2d
'2011-08-19T04:16:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUA' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
6aada57c536a67a28e0b0d7b1cfdd49e
9d1576c951ba33c7831db5cd80852012388738d6
'2011-08-19T04:17:55-04:00'
describe
'98966' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUB' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
992b06ae1168b8b2f605935bc02ada35
b5cc6ab863f41586e0f4b7b2c4491f41b99f327f
describe
'27447' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUC' 'sip-files00149.pro'
5216517a5e241b0d2dda9892d697c520
f966c69040ec34c0a3dc2503926eab34d8c0f593
describe
'32996' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUD' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
03f09e3016d2e172c31c11d104c2bbdb
569f367878e6014fd62aa86faff60db2b820f416
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUE' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b01cbec87e2fa2266eacc22c00f96990
a6ea461e4bfb42c3e9152c8f8dc2eff70facdfaf
'2011-08-19T04:19:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUF' 'sip-files00149.txt'
8a5cd1a982c9903fca0670a174ebc768
fca87a58aef3d3462f652752429a41cd868d2c70
'2011-08-19T04:10:53-04:00'
describe
'8796' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUG' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
97e930d7a1d60e0c8230e750be4fd261
9ecb507a20887d89cefc205ea2cf1776b4f335c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUH' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
63c66827a666822bece41237002c5ef5
cc270ed05a829716bfc77d21d0446a4887941ddc
'2011-08-19T04:13:43-04:00'
describe
'99646' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUI' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
68c164c3bb93f58fac3835e77eb747e2
c7bd00ce9107be9c24221b826d8686ff64e83ab0
describe
'14473' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
352dbf6b36b4fca8595ee5cfc4ff0b77
f563bff9d4931654ca75f9005cc611c154355006
describe
'29914' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUK' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
ace8ec98b52147503916469b70261168
b88dfbc190c0cf904a6a5e719ab5378d9098cf7e
'2011-08-19T04:14:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUL' 'sip-files00150.tif'
e0de7e01d1930a297f896b18d1cbb1c4
e95e54083b711910a12a34d97aa40304c57ca14e
describe
'641' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUM' 'sip-files00150.txt'
8848e6ec654a7a19fa1170a04f64ad46
bae3be344fb98b0c5b33e1dcb272c0b0670eb888
'2011-08-19T04:14:01-04:00'
describe
'7718' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUN' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
eaafb2de491f4cdfa9a4cbfed573d84e
399bd44ba9f2298e06434f45d02074624688223d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUO' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
82e59d9d14fd0a402f2e1cb4d32599e2
36abd05c97820f5b6fa2651ff020d1acd27c7b4c
describe
'107928' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUP' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d0cae3a3d57a7c1a0f213495d5d5e761
4240a3de92a991026038655cbd84407f0eb04c94
describe
'30217' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
a315b039f1c2a94dc37358324ab6e6b8
4c1c96c6c6cdbbefd0eac504807a4d4d65cd0717
'2011-08-19T04:21:11-04:00'
describe
'35974' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUR' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
798385c6d3725ca915cced9ee6e36630
45d5e7f8c9d2264878311904c390ea30cfcd4038
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUS' 'sip-files00151.tif'
90fc0904ddea565f430aa3265f4331e4
caaa9d5f72f29c7517c5c76f924ceea27985be0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUT' 'sip-files00151.txt'
94c29a3d9c608d4e5a3fda544344e7a4
0d6bebf65c93897b64314f480a0d048609911e4e
'2011-08-19T04:08:33-04:00'
describe
'9186' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUU' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
b5f1eae52adc13db0a26d2637473edd8
1a5bb60e2fe7a3cdc89b172ea55f1c354257a552
'2011-08-19T04:09:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUV' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
9e6b759864638a63983d20d11f7f275e
46aa83b45d59ee8678e0d2eba10deafb0365f201
describe
'108624' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUW' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2e46ab57e5e93cb31f6ae863ec722b88
897e707bb1f316b372e5f4245c7e1a0db8f47122
describe
'30676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUX' 'sip-files00152.pro'
ed790bb6cce2a338d1d7c176c8fbca2e
b48d9c8fb010c6c53ae15e76ee83d1bd92b5a909
'2011-08-19T04:16:47-04:00'
describe
'36956' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUY' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
b2806317fa89e06709a7c442b4584832
11027487470b989b1128115851ce476ccf908891
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
478fc2165e07b350143b02a7c8c5ce20
19de3911b450d10605651307ae1d2ce8392ee4bd
'2011-08-19T04:12:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVA' 'sip-files00152.txt'
21f66fc03addfd12b4c43ba8bef7e42b
eeb5536a946748e8f9ff92e67564e1450e61459d
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVB' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
705ad753ea7053f77358ade21bcb8d7c
ec0cfeb08f3c13a58bcb277d781ad78713bd77fd
'2011-08-19T04:08:09-04:00'
describe
'364984' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVC' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b52e18483ecf6ac5ccafef064c92c3e6
969dec2e2bb865d2251ce6749a09fb99af3b9715
describe
'98927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVD' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
f7d28a27b127a400be915bb9b71e5ec0
690ef2efff30d200c4c1ab36acfa996782fa3c93
'2011-08-19T04:09:50-04:00'
describe
'27277' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVE' 'sip-files00153.pro'
aafb5cc52676c820de493a01182cea1a
aea0274de7c2bb8bb788b1adb3f24dbba008101f
'2011-08-19T04:08:41-04:00'
describe
'33436' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
3c22cf71579667dc28ff040ceb50c5b6
8d3d67ec4571d5c98dfd79c2ee8ce9ec193bec76
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVG' 'sip-files00153.tif'
eb109a140e601a602fcb53dbb1cbf82b
b9c3b62fab4969e99b2c77ab0252c257aa8a4221
'2011-08-19T04:09:51-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVH' 'sip-files00153.txt'
0ccb5e626c87315c4ea0e8ed125a6aae
e08f86619704ec61b9b33762ec5dcb58becf97e3
'2011-08-19T04:13:53-04:00'
describe
'9073' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVI' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
141ed391761aedbcb47eec6237c4d789
42fd8f6c8f52664923426aab3e800cea471ba6bb
describe
'326380' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
79f9d70118ec0358cbcee8ee8f3525e3
2f6fdcf69111c5dc688722fff26ef9070d225027
describe
'126522' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVK' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7568a83a43364a99d270c6b68ddd9c30
22c135c7c6426043769320b9ba656c0582a42f4d
'2011-08-19T04:18:53-04:00'
describe
'9173' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVL' 'sip-files00154.pro'
c4c6803f4678d7339d8e05fac4a8f042
fdf20ca3366a566a5276638af765774af3bd63b1
describe
'36110' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVM' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
94085b9246da6e94d52b6884c6fbea50
a5010841df03886d6eb45bb150448abbee46e93d
'2011-08-19T04:18:51-04:00'
describe
'2627424' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVN' 'sip-files00154.tif'
60df30e05adea5ac9d45a30f21db0846
cbd00f08cacba7b77638a5eda46135a83c3c7b5a
describe
'375' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVO' 'sip-files00154.txt'
9b7268cf48ba18f863bbd52e681cbe94
972af447a114bb315116fad57e092948440d5100
'2011-08-19T04:09:10-04:00'
describe
'9142' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVP' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
2e88916d0fecd5febb0ebb6550725c9b
141bdfbd2c8a758c052ef0401960ad2236e0bb2b
'2011-08-19T04:10:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
e679bb02b6fc770f4259e198051d6b92
56b46b80e58809a04ece7f11580527d81c2a4d1a
'2011-08-19T04:15:03-04:00'
describe
'109097' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVR' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
09020234b212702995e6b1dea869ad7b
76b6327e7f238153e4c6ca33afbfa21b26adcb36
'2011-08-19T04:13:39-04:00'
describe
'30282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVS' 'sip-files00155.pro'
a5ffe7db159e3d5ecf4190c14ea3c584
a03dc149a9f0138bf7a3c187dd1aa649d9dc8259
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVT' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
60615065c5c882aa8bd87c571e9f3221
a1ef2064ce24b66bf22c7595204c62de63ab320e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVU' 'sip-files00155.tif'
e24156540ff1dcf00ef5aa85b112dc53
70ff632a95853be60f5ece404a292a866078200f
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVV' 'sip-files00155.txt'
4ba8345add5fd7ebda2d4cce1ea7d877
5730dd3db449ddeab7c2f6c14c89e56909f0426e
describe
'9210' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVW' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
64505ffec33cce5c09c248c732d3d1ab
1fdbd92df875b2b3eb0a2b90433241eb12bd7e43
'2011-08-19T04:17:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVX' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e1b3d9046692c59a02c95c5eb93ae651
bb93741c5c425a0a09484df3f0b6c3f45538ffc4
describe
'96571' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVY' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
8f73f69eeff1d76e6a1062e9174d3602
4d7d1cc79e53a7cb9988989618a711656a65648a
'2011-08-19T04:13:48-04:00'
describe
'27073' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
9d95db2f6ff89ac29e7da1b58a21f3e9
b029f48f7da1e47e5779e20f4d61ac08bf4955fd
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWA' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2e36d1c8fc8234f6b1d6836be089010b
2f7530b294176aea69a5f65da68f560abb11cca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWB' 'sip-files00156.tif'
49f2eac5594a070833cd02a0d067a78e
5121726a083dba9ea89e0f3ce6f83a751e366d22
'2011-08-19T04:08:11-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWC' 'sip-files00156.txt'
e295c9fa4e0ecc1f52eaac1a0e2d8e94
6edcddf96c85aa3df6206c9ee970f3c549a501a0
describe
'8997' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWD' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
454dc29dfbeb376f4d53c75d7372cef0
2d4c7b596118d9a1ebf6fa2dd5ad6efe3c31805d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWE' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3026c4ca9c32b625eb0fd34ca216a84e
84236952d7b597b4c1f9362727b19fa33a705c45
'2011-08-19T04:07:50-04:00'
describe
'107578' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWF' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
89b086352b86683b97044fe7c24c07fa
6db544604efd53eb15d9196da1a1c81329ad0c9f
describe
'30750' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWG' 'sip-files00157.pro'
0ae1c30bb8fb2d740e59a5906dac224d
59892848d82c90c0e252373ac2d540142976337a
describe
'36539' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWH' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
c63f65d157425949e6634e6ec9783dff
baeaae362c4ff81196b5c05b95c7534d8266165c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWI' 'sip-files00157.tif'
1169dbcce97a3f1d4746b3c9c80123d5
d3006fd18971bd7d68a059acc3ff2d154c6a50a6
'2011-08-19T04:21:22-04:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f8f5ea54e8fd91ca97561182197f1a76
985012e09f34d4071f3b983bcf0d9595ab4a9eeb
'2011-08-19T04:16:34-04:00'
describe
'9390' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWK' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
8cf696d3f8af41c662b36538e47081c4
94e3b72f837f6ae4281e38fa3f8147fe5f1ae00f
'2011-08-19T04:08:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWL' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
be31954bed7fe133ac744e21ea4aed9a
0c7f282a313e81adf66dd892fa3af84fbe321efe
'2011-08-19T04:12:25-04:00'
describe
'107061' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWM' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
b254e8ba103d366a49bcf1f858b4e5ff
526ac6c6225b6ead6c45f910a0271e410867f7d7
'2011-08-19T04:15:17-04:00'
describe
'30030' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWN' 'sip-files00158.pro'
db4eb1eec8395b4cfaea58876a7700f5
9fe1eb0a80a20696651ded87acc74d2b14c1de53
describe
'35745' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWO' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
68abea8ff18e931c3726705e639e1b06
e5d171f4eecce295403b90a29de86515a2e78972
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWP' 'sip-files00158.tif'
39a50a4b4ff7af6327cafad3cc001d85
0d012db0334657e51579de7bfb4f2ba0e97b9c47
'2011-08-19T04:07:29-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
17fe3b746f10c82a743c4ba1f2c1ff29
31a7f858d5d252f5cc42ccab9daa7ed372537fd7
describe
'9357' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWR' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
be48b80955be999b82e86dc668edc15d
7ab6fe30c15e300783c06507c30293a11b9ac335
'2011-08-19T04:14:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWS' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
c52d46fd2846d4985d3aa74376061f54
1f22b4cb2f3a203e678a950dd2ecbdf07fdca9db
describe
'98736' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
9c781afc8f477dbbb407ac01462e1d3b
c9c5556109dbb1a4fb44d016803d67098429bc4a
'2011-08-19T04:21:07-04:00'
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWU' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ac3d29b4e3370e115dbf8734b7b70c5c
a55dde808ec0c02a80a3570d9f93c3160b09d1eb
describe
'32991' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWV' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
ede549143f769f9184c5940b30c46f1c
d1fe108166517c9c84fcb4b832672407329ec05b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
ac356429b9b641a3408c89a9cb88d3f2
305f2c357e108049c48ed59d32da9ebef8e8c9b5
'2011-08-19T04:10:24-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
b5ea3e6f4e4c9551d70f3ac0931a982d
7340ed05dbef5534a67481843b4c8d4319d727b3
describe
'8533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e22da7afad9b713aedada8f6da6ea704
4f7fa16f3d74f590653391af83f1f77c8ad6cccc
'2011-08-19T04:07:45-04:00'
describe
'364960' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
c18eac4c07c87fd0c394be0332b6e5ed
dc55b0be651a1602c2c5f757b30f9d0f67295589
'2011-08-19T04:18:44-04:00'
describe
'102012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
29278a172b9cf5708a4cfb83d65d1079
a488189e1c81faeaea21c34f68463416e469dfa6
describe
'28291' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
d1720399804dc50862675b8e3d082ddc
991ca7eb54e9e685869be848eaa51e7d029d8a00
describe
'35402' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
275cd8a1eeb177be45c3f1dc772f3c3b
a994917f433e4f0dba35e91fc5ba3d56f7245c8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
45db8b97eb861a6e4366838674eecc1e
89bfa2eee7fc7a8ff299a5ae0390a9382fc8bd53
'2011-08-19T04:13:11-04:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXE' 'sip-files00160.txt'
bcf705e00bdd21f2759ea087c6835eff
87539f082650b52567a2c605ad5dc94fab016140
describe
'9147' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXF' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
6f77e2385e170ffb19bf914611a1682f
4a4845beaee030ec4b96ab57fa5bb21b395c5b25
'2011-08-19T04:06:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8ef251982b9cc4690ae5a00f3d14212e
4862761c2cb2543592a8a151b3f04ef2e7f1bf67
describe
'103047' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
64e4fe1bd57edb56469ac62ca02ffb7d
0099e7b9a283991cf1c8d75858b94c42c921eb78
describe
'29506' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXI' 'sip-files00161.pro'
ada05af58938ffa1a90a85f144278dd9
874069fddcf0ac1bff8c3d668ac14c752197ca90
'2011-08-19T04:18:11-04:00'
describe
'35342' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
90ca38deda78eda46630220cdb19f049
21a58e8d65a65e1aee67306469d0df56514db772
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
0df59fb815a4a7117c7a6c72fbc5683f
a8065926a28d8a0fa235605740d4ee7df1fa02e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXL' 'sip-files00161.txt'
578e7b6c49cd4a83363eed9ba3ca8481
d76083c20595cb23836da7ff18a4976ca906e24b
describe
'9205' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXM' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d8582d1db163a4161c5e3604f54b2213
3ebb86f2bad041a4094aa6d03b237e7b395e52d3
'2011-08-19T04:20:31-04:00'
describe
'365011' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
3bc0253394205d8f4e8af4c7fceebb50
7d1384e919f5dcc3320afe8bab885f99a341e8e5
describe
'43273' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
f335d069f0d550140329f55990ce67df
0c070da4eed34435f50e0a9f2eb5b6aad90bcdb1
'2011-08-19T04:20:46-04:00'
describe
'9927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
8e73d15d037bbad70e8a9bc49844effc
5e287004a01fc2f9b9df965081dd6de381a6c949
'2011-08-19T04:13:14-04:00'
describe
'14089' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
974bd33b859aeace58ff7c9e9b53cd18
63b6496419486850ea8580a7d7e0307e10dc06c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXR' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5c4c8510e50537c8d106e92768eef8fa
33ee3b4e94a6c5de4e38cd0f92ed9cfd4467943a
'2011-08-19T04:16:08-04:00'
describe
'399' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXS' 'sip-files00162.txt'
603187c5fa3577f4803c64235f4de5a4
409fe300338c3ddae10be0c3b77b8460dbbfaa58
'2011-08-19T04:11:28-04:00'
describe
'4024' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
443961e6cde5ba1f149d584bd79ed302
b0faa65e52f790e801dadd9c4c7b45b4a1d05c70
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXU' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
12e4bf4beca8895d0c44be924c72328f
66da0bb332c8e8e9c39e1f9328fd9b331ecb9e05
describe
'73161' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9acf392cef33f14c92ca024763165547
2123a0bbf0f21b232a4faf81092108940c2bdcb8
'2011-08-19T04:10:44-04:00'
describe
'14728' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXW' 'sip-files00163.pro'
154cd31e60c007735bda5432ab19c5d6
bf850afa642b67824b6326daeb1cdd6b2f4b5358
describe
'22313' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8efa9bf7e8946638d5a228bfe2a2a668
e1cd3d2560cf44201da63c040d4db1cbb3960ecf
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXY' 'sip-files00163.tif'
465e29348e7fa3759491cda073295c6b
c09b62ec69ed0f8c435ebbb7954be7be4c6994d2
'2011-08-19T04:19:26-04:00'
describe
'637' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
532a297db9dcb6de8187fe2f66caf66c
a5d075c32475ef6ad14b6fd142596261b529c497
describe
'6025' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
75ceac95167414389fb91cb6c6168fea
1fbf329701bbce61c44d2d90ef4f4e894fada573
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
78d86d3e229ab740be241b0807f0947e
34bc127ef4594276ac7428a0765de4dcf274f163
describe
'109346' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
6fa36b833556236b22f1e160e65fc45b
97424489b24d13b88fb74c4eb250bef20d88eb6d
describe
'31434' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
a052869c40648d7eb63c0dbba3617959
5ca4802b833a3d08ce6b5028980c4616d60e82ec
describe
'37298' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYE' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
06f6da638330cbf31935beaa9e77815a
187e8491209a65592933e22a72dac4efa42f41c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
6d98a1e281f571fa3853d42492874165
46dc878873e7abe9fdb99c3bd216f29aae8e0235
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
11f6f68455b0dc6f8c9a154b36f354aa
5b923109bff37cd613bf7787c7c50c10ea946f47
'2011-08-19T04:06:43-04:00'
describe
'9620' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
23257d4348e585affee564c2637a0b01
fb378ebd3a2b00867b8cf4cc7b4f9e66b1dd5f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYI' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
0ff2c0f6279c4249135ff44f01c02a53
28eace5a5c27956adf455d55cdd3c103d874d04d
describe
'106198' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
a1261886ebb79513b3dafc32c6f29368
55b439abca7d29e785db79b208d54b34c25d9d51
describe
'29480' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYK' 'sip-files00165.pro'
90e548323c62122ca2069ffc2dae8f9d
1a5942a67f847b7876ec492b7273f923b9c63fa2
describe
'36014' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYL' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
2077900b605bed1a86603e81a64b7a15
46b291241d8263ca417294b4b0677b1e3d170221
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYM' 'sip-files00165.tif'
0a977c3e82631f0a48f849e7c72d0cdf
3256d49e3618f67d948924c5f3235c16014b6f3d
'2011-08-19T04:16:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYN' 'sip-files00165.txt'
1c51214c60aad5379c320ff11b9b0c44
4a92d048df76aff196407762af0ce67ee9a9e2c9
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYO' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
cf1c8e12821c0a0a7af9e2eb2e36924c
f9804e099f4aeb9d8b2b08ed975d14222e30bc34
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYP' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
37fa352341f7d16bc34481d7a611540f
56511f3f220f57ff0ca56578a4d5232a9480b035
describe
'107917' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
f234d94051a2dd49365a92468b3a7547
4a102ebbe9fcb4e612f342cf666484a9970dbd53
describe
'30797' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
eb42c607802fc87f9aa8c71d41ffb7ce
b9803636e01ce9b17f0602adc96dce64f2b9af8f
describe
'37355' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYS' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
44ab409a5fdaab69e2b9156430d9be9d
e286e1ccc962d628aabccfb498bd2ae862bd73fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYT' 'sip-files00166.tif'
e45f46429d8ed0bb08870710e9e5b916
d1a305ed90c7c7dcb2263de42477b0c85d1b7301
'2011-08-19T04:08:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYU' 'sip-files00166.txt'
fe169093d8d01fa304d4ee913449726e
0aa496f8c44715cc276b31e93f39e77f29dd4e3d
'2011-08-19T04:20:15-04:00'
describe
'9409' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYV' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
2cea5147bf2bb04a3b870634bc15b2f6
b341c4a82b5dc9f14fe518b5bdc8515e79cbfcc5
'2011-08-19T04:11:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
85a344f1b65fce05a26ef8ae41ee4880
bf96c0a76e6a9496f2cfabe97ba00ca99e29a6af
describe
'103525' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYX' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
aff8287d91c83b966d2f4bf0d5220f69
119d2b66c62987d1937e31c468aceace6470e656
describe
'28632' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYY' 'sip-files00167.pro'
e16ddba325c3498f96151ff31d46f9f4
7622272f5ada2983f7bb8cabaf6ea49c91aa4576
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
707af13d3238a64a8fd5e33c7a3d0f64
9ae75d05c6ab5458af4fcf8762f64053b54826c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
1281288b288dbeba451438298a44422d
39028d6da443e1e426154d6136617b2e7271eddf
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
96712be979ed955b0b24b7e7cb49c3e9
5c4dbc3dcf7ba5ebd3e2075b7aa9f38fc4331910
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZC' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
45b2f4f648cb6fee52ecf45387d45557
e86d36a214eed796bfb761e611e2df94a33c7abe
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZD' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
87f12f76c85fe25fda39fcc5a4908337
478e081b774589d79890c403f86fdacda05e6921
describe
'106980' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZE' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
d47042b7fbcc96dce11b116a5762a0e5
63f3f1af0b9606791caff520c47d5c3242772131
'2011-08-19T04:12:11-04:00'
describe
'29964' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZF' 'sip-files00168.pro'
a699bbc6e72fb2c3b9be4e45055d6356
920351533f6efdedd17fe6c4bb53694db31c4b83
'2011-08-19T04:15:59-04:00'
describe
'36564' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZG' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
62d00f8aea3f52e47c6715cefb982520
a2f4053c85f8eed5c6a76c21e39c26a6b057a8d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
9c195cf6e2726fc466abc9668c9ccbd0
47ae07d41ab0f8fa4b9c436211c43c49a694baba
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZI' 'sip-files00168.txt'
9c6d813cd5954e9bf2253fcc3a6d9c30
9a4df18e2eae944667a79e0c3e39c2a348c10a34
describe
'9322' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
85aee177a0530cf37201d9ce4ff64bfd
95b394b854c653e281ab2b1766afa923b5e2ad6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZK' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
b766532d02ebbc66ae65d1750b2deb57
bf769d8e8bdb36c6474be0b91e882cea05af2856
describe
'110137' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZL' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
68a4e6b67b3b96d2d7d98b8b4fb380dd
790acbc2c9756f1188ca8dd084d1929254015c51
describe
'30854' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZM' 'sip-files00169.pro'
c3ab8d7db883e93bf719bb932773893f
2653b79ecc6187ec34da2ffe160c2a3f785305b8
describe
'37255' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZN' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
a8f1628efb7d050d5727c4b68684f5f2
2cf16d0ec62ba127af03c97f096c9267c2dd4c96
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZO' 'sip-files00169.tif'
07a16087ad20aabb6f8555481e604ccf
143f9142b1f37afd35e393709eef8c66b031682d
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZP' 'sip-files00169.txt'
675001743e2c22c7686641bde1d1b907
f3eb67432226ee13b41b49c00c56ffe9946ac898
'2011-08-19T04:16:24-04:00'
describe
'9482' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
b3c191dbade26fd54ab24439fcf267f6
b01a7208391e31f54de917c18c5477d9bac85201
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZR' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
c775b11e31152792d086da7234d54c6d
70f223a57cf6fe5b64d12d6525f292a149d3886d
describe
'111714' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZS' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ee9804d4cb5f12954b347b6a97462ab7
e6bd35e9b32f86c0c6729b7c74e8c7bcfddbf750
'2011-08-19T04:18:43-04:00'
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZT' 'sip-files00170.pro'
50971ca31b6802fcee08dae07ecbe098
7b43b03799723b1adba4570d7bd8a49e644e327e
describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
0015e530eb75b04b009e74a89897335d
8922ac736ab6db66baa10577e6d7146fd3bd954a
'2011-08-19T04:15:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
fc74227c326c9d8b22a625afea8bacf5
f79db406e9b6cd31a2752f214a9281ee87b08904
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZW' 'sip-files00170.txt'
7c0c8daac3e3141796bdf35d5393810f
040f9efac8e71c8fe08ed33868eb1c390c66177e
describe
'9670' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
416e467622d2c33c50fb41a8f839cde7
beb755636b52191571f1d09abfa50353f16e4cc4
'2011-08-19T04:08:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZY' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
2f36ffff6ad769f50f2393b360642912
f7badef565b6aacb773f23cb13beb70acd9869e1
describe
'110842' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
3bc11aa24ea5bffe2a7ef2f4c3147aa2
81307b3e273de3b69381628201eea78ef85fedaf
describe
'30636' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00171.pro'
c570ebfdb6459585bb0b8c049386dcde
0698ca736e732754604580e4eee5a32dc7502ede
describe
'38841' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
957c7209dace3e013e19da8c731e31ad
9722d2cb6e8b6d90e992871c8916459872b9eaa7
'2011-08-19T04:12:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00171.tif'
b740f62170f7771080a5e28f42949168
51830c2c92984481f4eb0d62307f650c458d5708
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00171.txt'
e4ae8b3d0006ae588fe4b92d36fcc0e7
efab35b9cafcd7c9085ead5b98df09ea5ce84519
describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
05fb39446c663601d226f1d4f3b6fe4e
ca083b530339a702d6b9fc338b62dafb78ef0a9c
'2011-08-19T04:11:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
7c24021054bd31580820933330100686
26ac3f6b6932b1e8179d3e31d284ba253d8604b1
'2011-08-19T04:14:24-04:00'
describe
'103846' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b48cb80c01485d2d839f7f4c19aff069
e3b8488fd5e02e903f83e507b1054793e4ca8c29
'2011-08-19T04:20:06-04:00'
describe
'29476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00172.pro'
0659633819aa6179982133536e5676de
a9dffe07f75d2ea5ccf02e751872ea2e03561ff7
describe
'35358' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e6fd57e7eb49d925da236c00a0769e0b
b9ca0b52614362def03c455a52310ddeaa513284
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1d6cc1bdeaed4249c75908eb55f02d78
2c76a4e4ddf74ca24bf28373db883304457f755d
'2011-08-19T04:14:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00172.txt'
916f4bfeb56f29cfd71c58c467f3feea
fd6fc5a0e60fe7e25383ccfe74d625b084b8e044
'2011-08-19T04:19:35-04:00'
describe
'9062' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
fe0f769f2796c3f5ef5b4cc5d4bd64da
d6ebb316f0cb9cf9f70ae2622e3db39d9792d587
'2011-08-19T04:06:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
1b8f9973b92250cfa07e69df038448aa
77e842f207bb8ab34aeea6f2e22a289bba429077
describe
'108467' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
c771d62361a88ffec57eeceb8aed6949
7494948a46f29b463b056812a8f2b37d5a38f748
describe
'29399' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
5ac94c0289c8052afa5a10fa66fe4305
566b3c4f6ca42be5d63fed20d64398beddf2461a
describe
'36911' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
b5cda9893d1a188d665d87c0ed75b69a
35b0efe6a1ea278dc78bc3a90f35c36565295194
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
5d1279703705530c6b805f2fc06f4f9c
fdda4631546bcf3dd57b6446047799a50278e75f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
8293b70c719f147d83ab0df4c6572cd6
48351a19241787d8adcb83065e4a828dd3f337a1
describe
'9493' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
abfb0bad91a0bfc0d29cd750413aef90
7614f4f5b9d73e19609121ebfada3abd5231286c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
c117da34e23ff322fb3f1db5ae793af4
26c545c973285a27873d0e6c9f539df60e3df8d0
describe
'101073' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
d945cb1d06f01cb131a9e2a16251c1e0
f724e8ef6788bdade6590e0f1e283aec82b5fb77
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00174.pro'
e841a5de0539eeb7caefd578adcd95ab
98e3aa407765ae80f71987493fc9fba92db932b4
describe
'34359' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
6ac013bfe17cc98a75388b6352055c6a
a16595b4214144c8d973428e3127bb4e8418961e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00174.tif'
a5209b7a7f415a6cd4c38ba5c8e41397
5717031e8a72daf0148a476f90c26e60b696aade
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00174.txt'
600a3a42e385bbe09b2acfe0a3ff3829
85b3802aa118938403526461f7fbe290569fd2aa
describe
'9086' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
5df37116b5a5bdb6e1ee303f7f0e2aa1
4e96cd9d22c46200edc89ff6b09ed7d6ae940c0f
describe
'358889' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
9f763564b2b068776f0345d73600e918
b8b9341ca17d00227211ab33ed979cd7a83dcee4
'2011-08-19T04:11:53-04:00'
describe
'105696' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
c349b3c82131877383bfbaeced3cbc9b
b1f3754e7f2aa6de0f30af20bd2eaa826035d33d
describe
'11385' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00175.pro'
27c459690d2c26df820e852963b35b4e
90d1880b110103ccd4696fb74cb03f70ec57e886
describe
'29941' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
34b029eed231a0183032b1ec6d837fca
9c7c2f0bad4283e043e686d586d54fc082a85809
describe
'2888272' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00175.tif'
ab099f6b16567992793e885c0dc493c0
06a2d94cf7b158cac295da70857e27d3b0528733
'2011-08-19T04:08:54-04:00'
describe
'470' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00175.txt'
bc3e63e394690787b6803b39b0293729
b5990e9685d97b89aa8996a852b3e0077d545a1d
describe
'7844' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
ef545bcc79a90a519ce813ba2acdf013
6b1686a479aba2b171f57453e8f0dbb15e2a96b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
2d472b94c900c390c60d866783f223c0
6ddd1b32fad60119262b6e400719839d1aea6275
describe
'110185' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
33135343d9a57b6060cef164745daf25
2d763fd0acdebce34d61d9698483a5f6bae84cf7
'2011-08-19T04:10:42-04:00'
describe
'30911' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
bac01e3b0642a372f262bcbccb66fbce
f958fae0bcbd72b5f8ab0524edfdf9c73f5174fd
'2011-08-19T04:12:12-04:00'
describe
'37386' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
5a24b82052757b495178a87ac5cafd89
57b6e03cfb78aa3fcadf72d5dbc4c8af69aedf28
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00176.tif'
917edf4a11b496e4d426b8c98675d9f9
59723ae7a5b947ef54df69eb85032006c65c5ab2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00176.txt'
88279fbd46e65d2d89a8f6ff4dd29113
19077321128e9c98fd3ce327da60525a3d577afa
describe
'9631' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
81b64ea07e422996482cb9f0264a747f
40ccca7826d0ab4b3b0fdd3ee2b2d178d18bd45f
'2011-08-19T04:07:44-04:00'
describe
'344856' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
f16d92e513c583bb6410f9021195a8e8
db608678bd241f376f1b8234584b29de8be7d0de
describe
'109968' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
bad01dd2d720ee7e049885b101d7c60a
456adb94a4e97f8532b0d5d7f38529c03839a308
describe
'30993' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00177.pro'
bbee0917f26117c1d68e7090c5cb46c7
66207c02c18e34f83ef6002526a23adcde10aaa8
'2011-08-19T04:10:08-04:00'
describe
'37403' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
be9d37ce85432ee76e6db6b7134d09da
94c2d34281c1cf5835541f0352eca1254d05e6cb
describe
'2775220' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00177.tif'
d01098419fca58c2f7f07ddbeee8656b
b67a31c0dd41380976ffe24f9611581bc8b24a70
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00177.txt'
2cfefad868d95aa1d81fa71d8d0ade16
6773fe598bac4206556f3243292acee090acace8
describe
'9327' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
53578862c289147f975ce750bdfc8fed
81f1f62b1ccf2df034041a5bb06124723952789e
'2011-08-19T04:20:58-04:00'
describe
'364982' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
1a593a1817d5e246892d7ae20bca53b1
0e73e14784e54cfad0cd238cb28cc1ce8d6d3e4f
describe
'108759' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
01b6ca4ba861ffc4324940401f6f9ec5
1df4b0eb28474129e3f4fcade66443ebfb2cf55d
describe
'29919' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00178.pro'
9eaf301af817b6a4dfa8402f4b3551db
1e99974af2ad76f0475d327a81dee6451d1f5aad
'2011-08-19T04:07:49-04:00'
describe
'36845' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
b5302cdac1d4b3478675344a0352cf38
7bd835b7bd150bd7a0757658994cfc7000f1bdf4
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b1499dd605be4f0f26d1326595ce9695
52b1385fc4125d19d8072d24a11c54c70b435f22
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00178.txt'
d7713d3c0a761f1d11c483a281ccb99e
03914954724606ca23a2b4b876eeaf608f06c0cf
describe
'9279' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
482ccaf02cd4accf41abbacba441d429
58d48a4a6c860d50fc0cb7d54d12abc33740e6f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
fcd75089f9799e4454bef154d0f3d659
92fca6f727cd61fd9c402830fb773f4b836f4755
describe
'113582' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
2b9f1d76c7d971f27fbe825ab1a80342
4e68bc0215a12d0b7c04302f903708a18f68ccd5
describe
'31484' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00179.pro'
363e018bc81481fe1933dfb55f94e4f4
679d72ca7b038f76efef4f752b68ec1b8cd6bd30
describe
'38414' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
74e4194f2e22738d88ca1d53589fa178
2130fb7c46263079a2ef2134e5d5909392819ebf
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00179.tif'
b902f0cd810ff274ce7aa37e6a76bc74
fa6d604e31ff6f88665baaf31c06b9033e3ae863
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00179.txt'
67a063df0359eacfbdfa2ad7dcfad49d
812f227bc366018baac49956cfdadc6fac836848
'2011-08-19T04:17:47-04:00'
describe
'9742' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
e6b272cc75ee685b8a693a2c6b9226b5
3063d160cd4e9bb784c21b14ca3a18c74546b93f
'2011-08-19T04:18:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
fe7ce35a15a3194c37f19165b11fd18f
0840d63868504b0942eff8f069eae1935e1af1e1
describe
'111539' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
4cc15c1c518668a02be548d85e531bb5
e14901559aba384e271bc32758942175f7a5cf83
describe
'8025' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00180.pro'
9f785303b4b59e68365567a97046a4ee
afaa15f340bac8ce89c05fe022d56ec5deb07419
'2011-08-19T04:20:43-04:00'
describe
'31476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c981830cdda486994c137e755f3dea66
145ff6e6c45f9be9b21455c098c8bb19a2700124
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00180.tif'
c8deffc5bc9a4c2e8cdd2c59cf1e234b
cc315048d1da5e754db6e388180b8b1d9efd9540
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00180.txt'
b23b709f32ac3d9682841b51566aaa9a
a3e562175c214b90596566e970f7ad3fa271b960
'2011-08-19T04:15:47-04:00'
describe
'7873' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
6e32e7d205c34b1f2a50a3316861558a
91a2f71f53e1ae2678ef83287ee3c19d03f395e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
cc290856704b08e778dae35d9f056db4
d027d7d15a6456ba3aec78d4550308eb2015d1be
'2011-08-19T04:17:00-04:00'
describe
'110486' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
fa43fc0fbc27a5514a2f086245b4ad72
902d9fe4745ca97db5cf6ad0d7b02cc4c0e2f521
describe
'30735' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00181.pro'
0cbb9561ed0bb6994724ca8e66f6b93a
b5357f45d416a559eff647251eb117b67929c96c
'2011-08-19T04:07:15-04:00'
describe
'37672' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
ae460ed8c807b9ef195ee70cb33146e1
1dc8572967aa5ae326aa1c44dfd29ad1f0aa4778
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00181.tif'
1c22dd5e5fd906c129bba5dc232de4eb
a2392133811839fc44ff25ad3ba6c45b160dd6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00181.txt'
1f1729a2709226cbf2c0f54b6f40240d
11859d51cdf344654899a8e84c0f21142aca9c88
'2011-08-19T04:18:14-04:00'
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
857b76fe93d1ec640ea43ca4734356cc
8d638701a9f489faf3fa2b30e856c74adfa2638f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
205bd6b4319ae122c559e52493ed2eaa
ec299dbb029a8535ab367650216b78ab71e9beb4
'2011-08-19T04:17:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
8d9f9122d9246902a5e6fa772c6ad042
6b21d79bce9b6c353603cd249b7d138ec2aa5ad1
describe
'30766' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
ecb1c89bf30a24ddfc3f53604f903cd8
5c24e140ce8b2b06d4b437312d628af62dc61145
describe
'37605' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
172a3968e0f34a205b39fe55403e67e8
44ac4640e197f8e789a11aa453488f1dff805164
'2011-08-19T04:12:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00182.tif'
99cd6eb1b762f7608a4b54d28f882591
0560fd38d5a696f9739c81aca7fb1ee23c8376de
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00182.txt'
026d16c1e94320c7f144d8a2c381caa7
ffcd9b20b12e081f8980ee2ffba92b66ad0521a3
'2011-08-19T04:19:04-04:00'
describe
'9714' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
76d367d8750bffa9c5f5c2e18a58f875
8196a10c7eac65f3da355e6d183813686ff865fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
c256b27868011c47ca0bb9c14c898305
c3f78331f50cbb3840fe762f797b227a97809df9
'2011-08-19T04:18:54-04:00'
describe
'113876' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
2a1801148b3b1e1c0cc0081691b2eb8d
45bc1a36f06dc0b830b2ffea2892c8d5d1a058ad
describe
'31634' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00183.pro'
25d3211a5614a8c5ecec38ae7fda9d9e
abf52d491a915707e5fdd284356fef8e2705421e
describe
'38440' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
93d2498e7a194ddf1eb42f7888b5881c
fe37bb14688986a78a615392f7c948a48090ce3a
'2011-08-19T04:11:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
2e41661114090e3f8b0e6977189b9050
e561bab77f04826f6b52839299ca85e56e1ceed2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
df550caaec515e5851e9d55b3fe0e042
8ceae35f433e90e78fba7ae30ef84714b2ccecf9
'2011-08-19T04:09:07-04:00'
describe
'9849' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
3a6f9a8e859603be4747e847d260575d
0c4d996627376b3e03ab8e972147c7325effce45
'2011-08-19T04:08:26-04:00'
describe
'365003' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
59b055beef5ca97bc9ad824e6cd5ff0f
73f771da64dced3b3ac70037f3dca05448ddf6b9
describe
'98522' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
c6fc96885600e0dc9d40a8e171a92046
d712fc79fd47881b2c0297f5011a922ad0397ae4
describe
'26903' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00184.pro'
5c8ceb9463571de6b1dac5823662f37b
df2f9edcdf734692a1a503be3c1a9c7ff45a2b0e
'2011-08-19T04:09:26-04:00'
describe
'33819' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
c4f753a534865a4846d9f1defc507733
beb7ea163c134233df4c2a2f0a5b7493c1c00976
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00184.tif'
c8c31a04ab9e73ba7c0f02ec40a8c16a
2c592b8f14a15933c4209c2c1072fb2b1dcd6381
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
ac4033174fb41e6692890121af1426ce
287c042d26c90158654673aace1212f1127b63ae
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
a614d3dc875f507e47d95aaed1b4f22a
036b47c54a8bbc413eebdee94945020a327e21fa
describe
'364990' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
9d99807c8fa4d256149f14f526d92ab9
b532b42a6ac22c41021d4905f3cf857a5ecf1608
describe
'100630' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
870ecb6b7f8c58b062c82ddbfaf3e368
8e256a0308fe378f0fab7f1ded628642fe56a36b
describe
'27888' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00185.pro'
01f84122c53765df15c17a0e252ff5f8
8ca9ff4b51cb7179f96f15d89d8ad9c7f08a0ee5
describe
'34556' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
ea4e2adf2212a3fedbe5ff5cca69f432
a781a6899b95b8a4ae9ae71a14e34266f93d5893
'2011-08-19T04:07:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00185.tif'
6da97ad577e529d67132854220e1768a
b23a0bcbff7ffc186f0d5dbe2ec2941cfc77dffa
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00185.txt'
33a79ae9a491d40af351042cfc529d5e
0e951c4bdcca1bd4bd55a8f449001b1e9ecb182c
describe
'8817' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
65a301d3de90f939f5e26b45ced57f7b
3232b2dfe884fac4b8025d19249916aa1fcf7cd6
'2011-08-19T04:14:25-04:00'
describe
'364988' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
5285cb20be15a43f65fb5eb140dd490c
8ea5a62b888524bfdfe35abd1b6ae8fe4c8b5c5b
describe
'107908' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
ef9a31d2c46491e8ba98a47811aa9d6f
1e115fa66faabeb6c2dc5501bb0302e3d5a332df
'2011-08-19T04:15:33-04:00'
describe
'29835' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
8a69a88f254f4c7e57d7e3ec695685b9
63ee2de5a433a1e840f541138db71aaa79724e3f
describe
'37287' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
16d47fffc8340843023eb5cfce8d98ee
382fd9e3a7c7fc0e6669c93b2b1511a5673de4a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMED' 'sip-files00186.tif'
fc8b9716c8e848e6c1825cdca6ada707
58ae32e7a21edd8f92c1e45a336acd29c57d0438
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
48622ed6bdaebf97d10b1f71cefdd101
933308631e41fbe6105fbac3f7f3ffa0f02ce905
describe
'9475' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
07d33f6462f075c4836dca8af431b034
459a017f3565505c277df8b5cb63a496009adf83
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
829d93d469faa675ae97eef7478c2c33
6f3ebb1e9f2e2472b7a07a2540f00b1d7fe03c9c
describe
'106483' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
445764d7895c8e0fdd4fec6fe32f95ba
f44d43353be665d9420cb53cb4af61122da3e067
'2011-08-19T04:20:44-04:00'
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00187.pro'
bd738eeda1d49a96e216a23e3156566e
1b0314afc662103eeea3d2baa434d01518e8b9f6
describe
'36400' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
24bc6f35e1bc58b04bf44c3aa2d7c6f8
0ef1e98f5b640fed608bab6a54c9e44811eff6a6
'2011-08-19T04:11:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00187.tif'
537d77ab219611f35e7d7a7a8ff2a055
de63711e4470d530cbf5094fa95e2f8dd3bd8d00
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00187.txt'
fd7299a57052ad035c59ac006b5e5dbb
7055f912eb9797b122a813dfbbf5a60b181a33c2
describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
d0cda7e25d3d573d14d91f44a0053766
fdae54885657e5c70ea39cc1bbd4ec360d1c0369
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
225139e77f591972cdad53c76329cdf8
c3c82f30107d420b5b2497cad3777feea8c3b12b
describe
'112615' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a62bfc48adfc70b9fe63c28f96ac4bbc
2d3cef94e7b211b7c5f90f409613686e79ef259c
describe
'30927' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00188.pro'
3ed42c23db84e8baa009eb74ff37003c
8ae9b4838953dedebfbc485eec9b5fe31efb36e1
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d5399a8f6b10ae36f0f18536bf8733f1
8fec311fe5a82c1ee205d340c59e4e5cd9e9a966
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMER' 'sip-files00188.tif'
003fc27bf3d590f87b1d7e929eeab166
62b7268e1ecec034139249f2663a9b8db1da4eee
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMES' 'sip-files00188.txt'
446f0c4baab7cd34360f1953a71355cb
a5e720f86bb2a06691b45752322414084f1f7d59
describe
'9881' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMET' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
5385ffcb88bc347487544922e8c455a4
76ec8af20ae06be0e99216a32fbc4cff8d0509b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d93dc35c575e54843ec1b5728d9ba78c
37c1dccb783169be3e5117669397cc708cf686b8
describe
'98303' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
803e8d25599ee2dc7bd55421cca73a21
a1942fa6fb16be1b98b710fde8201e54465e7670
describe
'27770' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00189.pro'
c0e0d778b3e240fd5f153975e33e4870
ba6773880be7fdfc61616ec7cfd12c970759359e
'2011-08-19T04:15:42-04:00'
describe
'33524' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
6cfbe53d74a07f0cbb0717b26a58b9d2
014a15d79699878f3f63d1f544a4f3765baf8430
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00189.tif'
723f58ae5426d6a74f0e4bb220514cd0
6ab499e9576421d4bfb0056ce33144bbb243e3a8
'2011-08-19T04:10:35-04:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
9cbd02bb822fa13fe1391634223ec435
e927adaa939bfdf1d0346ec0201c912fad52f14b
'2011-08-19T04:10:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
8e934037b245e824606672336acd306c
384c5049341f4605230076dd3993962233a5b43e
describe
'364942' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
c01ce42e93d2ecaccf099b2f112660f1
7155964e093824ee2c7d82b35d0314fedecdef35
describe
'109582' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
1ac2d3d6093422489eab6d1a77b3d73f
55863ba45280548ddd28d289671549efd0a669e5
describe
'31790' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00190.pro'
5d011172fb98f6bc6e56ba3037c5e52d
843c4340e92e8b10bd2a9c6e1c07858f34becb1d
describe
'37489' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
26bf68df3bc3f19d2741890de7672a66
96aa3124d1bcadef1e4f5ad52efe29d925fae388
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
a48a4926060e91ec3e0825e6c2f7bd40
874c80f59bd33de473b7e8e9460db11864fbac74
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
b5f3ca328ba6db5f21833ed9148d06e3
4d9266dadb8f8d2f30071da9a0ae143c4f74bd98
describe
'9895' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
2deb58c1a69a1bc4d6231e5940d9cf49
ca3c0fb6e86a6839b494c2c9922ebc6a3de8267b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
9646e2d703dc7a426facea5503780f10
df852f6a9391e9444098dedabbb814078d45f3c0
'2011-08-19T04:07:34-04:00'
describe
'96221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
72af0b754b33941a6f3a0241dd05ccc3
3b4358e52a72f1d9c96544c11e3790c32a714056
describe
'26674' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00191.pro'
d6c89321f4b577bf8ac87baa15337ff0
07aec0358c27c2f4f7f527e22930ee3673d905c8
describe
'33501' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
4504e0cfadb72a8eb31c55a3c03dce16
609885981be829491119ae7fe771d0255ae510c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00191.tif'
19971b67c040c44198496f33bdb27ef7
1db33627f4a08b7f06c9e63fe5df87062785157d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00191.txt'
f9d0572a266e5d5012b4224968f7d6cf
94d9f393a11256b48e0eeec27989749d8ebec792
describe
'8851' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
379e0f1816c4b8da2141395ca3734e06
a993ca5e54b3181db5820f515988adc212b30c56
describe
'321130' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b5601c3f4d84e7f10fa9aae127ad6e98
a8b461b41c9aca49ff9ef3f38b4a0c4898a8a427
describe
'109011' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
8f6720792ec6f31851d3173a61669de5
dba5e56c5efc526f75aaab806afa1186956484c3
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00192.pro'
03479a7ef137addee261b4ef61bdd27f
e360fdf7e0254c387bfec14c6c0a6586da6d6b2c
describe
'40071' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
9b45dd7ac0c1fa616d225474dab5f923
558143f193dc931fd24cc044d430ff9d508aea2a
describe
'2585460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00192.tif'
5cc55ce1021740fe94ffc09641f05bf5
cf5c669a00f8181343f4b9ad2d500b15ec325282
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00192.txt'
71e793a58f87b576a6e7457e5eba530e
a1f617031716fefa765e48ec7c19f9239c7ea843
describe
'10177' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
2a3970105ff9bdd4a3bb3d4bba10b0bc
bc1c59b838a04753f0fae14b6e217f5d6625b7c2
'2011-08-19T04:07:13-04:00'
describe
'364733' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
967b2cadb9bee16c7dc34859ca4d05e5
5d7a4064859856fb087349108a898819cfa74892
describe
'164731' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
a4392ad84d69da406279de0418177ab7
62513caa0baf3f76866b88602d1257f361fcec53
'2011-08-19T04:21:02-04:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00193.pro'
fd19ff7af915f5bf9915cc02c6d0a765
c7918791b4426f1f0586c50f56a4de7b7a3d7cfd
'2011-08-19T04:20:34-04:00'
describe
'39287' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
c5451e3ebb559b2125f023649ff2e69a
c3db0be2672f45a79512802ae7df4a9f10014584
'2011-08-19T04:09:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00193.tif'
9fe73ac8e8b19a23b5a8ff572c4b0b7d
332b1152fed3ebf4e01e95fe8490a1ffe553f627
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00193.txt'
71ad9d8d91ccd0277cb42fbac701ed54
8a840c40580eab6c57d25dc3d3a13bf6a3ca486d
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
723e8337e39c0c66467664770312f84c
41a74b24f28a747b01714cae619f0963750b4ff6
describe
'343649' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
4fd0eb6e8005bc6eb6ad333ce777e728
da6d5d13fe4e1c6b3d08637e93df948ca8c60b3a
describe
'105676' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
1f17bcbfd37a09512197c9a6f4e0fb34
3320071dcaccbd589e0888940049affc148d5776
describe
'29706' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b673dab9de2b02bc1d8ea59a5ebeb77c
17feb782a6d888a09a50c60ae0a9d13f5d86b34a
'2011-08-19T04:19:55-04:00'
describe
'36738' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
a6d6999f0be4981871b9778b232eb46d
b8aa3e31ff893981a5b642d598be6073157d356a
'2011-08-19T04:12:23-04:00'
describe
'2765712' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00195.tif'
a28b1b97e4ad8f1ed4f7c84d25f19838
f3942d962b01c2626a7e845adddc2fd053811725
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00195.txt'
2fc6280a3c63cf56a1be10d872d77890
7e54d9b1f36494850c5bf2407830d7007aee6321
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
1ccb971f8359892f530775431a6eabf3
d5abb91ad3eb7493d09d60d062b11244361814ef
describe
'336944' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
6dd254bd0c453fbb6494280b2988750c
00f65f436393843c3dc0d328f9289a63dc9e336c
describe
'99845' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
8e4956bd6f03d2da9a6f659f4fec7341
12e74d909145dd15b39887eeb29c76d3a1a11624
describe
'27803' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
4f2a285596bb9bef762df8c8ce4b486e
c660e143492227aef557e76b2daa93cfc94910e1
describe
'34179' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
1fabebd10368d0eb69e38440ac850b41
6458fa7e1f0f9b4275c04bb7bd49ee8dd814d31a
describe
'2712012' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00196.tif'
fed87f644802c627b3efa97c70a65b01
0e89a933a313f97a3786d26a4d97577534c037fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00196.txt'
c172e2f2fb180b64eaf71885c84f5450
6b8c46296dc147bca835d5b8637c792a2c256354
describe
'8794' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
f73b783d65087f2320289e881fc752cb
13d2e718f629017de977090bf659cce83cdbf38d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
2e91f4edf42d3e26a90ff860873073da
19a0b796dc488ab1d513d95539a907f3c423c5b4
describe
'99315' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
064146d94aeb3adbf43bdbb45b37553d
f253f54cf0696ad630f4ca21040f33470a20bce7
'2011-08-19T04:20:12-04:00'
describe
'27754' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00197.pro'
6cfec0e8e34938fb64dd78f17b3f7def
e1864a4bbd4025e0f568e47864634e78bf303410
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
75d36621f8c89dbac5584987fc7455b9
39a205b114208bd092b1eee73a96b68e0b593387
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00197.tif'
ad94502826b3df62bef97d956525340b
1f28c23138945a8be031da8c8720ff41668303b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
225a04ed21d5bc4d964647ece9097b03
5e8ff4ab88b2a0ca21f75dc2043dc9cb194c790d
describe
'8686' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
b28a6712629098565b9c9604d1177812
5604b574e5e9f84b894bd852251d288e79744430
describe
'332928' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
c6f74e4eec549365fd1637342a39e29a
856519a07265b1860306dd99af406e100fdf6503
'2011-08-19T04:14:35-04:00'
describe
'113397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
d3cd85c3904f9a65d01d1febd828ca05
75b6d55b65506eea8b5e8179f7581af03e605108
describe
'29692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00198.pro'
cfc863d294a05b8fa0deaedb64cf769c
b0d3d87ca064c3fc13b2090037e1c1c0e495bba4
describe
'39156' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
7aeec564aea97ea1169056c49dc39ac8
4bcd89ab7cb271f4d1cbefbebe9ec68ea9198549
describe
'2679780' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00198.tif'
ed0c1bf26ed506a84d3bcb4e76e24962
fd5e055089a227fae5929fcecb0b7f4d08886db4
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00198.txt'
b3b78826eb6c6e290bfe8ea5fbafb673
18f43f3425ef64ed275f53c07a463597bf822469
describe
'10557' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
3013c2d494301849ef0b1893fcc55195
70542163fde1486ed56b7130c3e75f3ff1c45069
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
8707e1eb2afc030869c933fddfdaad6a
1544f5c5da3ead7c305873191c9d193e042ea29c
describe
'103435' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
4dd663ac101dc9a79264984d888ec401
756cda70559115641f7057fb271335b0fe87d1cc
'2011-08-19T04:20:37-04:00'
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00199.pro'
704ec568a19d6aeaa40248d3af7e723d
9800bd2a4400a690ae84d9b335b3911bd6fbf5a2
describe
'35727' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ccb28b576114a926d2371e30fc2b31fa
902f946f96beb7c459768237e4fed32f92597271
'2011-08-19T04:19:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
c5b270395160d79ba84a799b95da5d1b
69d3b942c43eba11d1547e05ef0129cc8ca7fd8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00199.txt'
764a0de07f6191a6bc3c5031fcd3024d
77ae84e47dc7ea86d1fa839158177112e7dbd705
'2011-08-19T04:08:29-04:00'
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
c9ab0fad53982918fff0521c3c64be4f
cce977eebf32b33d9d741b78f6750ec8b6009be8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
f7fc712baa994c44baf32d3533a50c01
d347fe6ad77ea76adb73bcf9827fbea8a9f1245f
describe
'91661' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
0ede4145a2f8f8e0ac7257fb73a38cb9
e0ff14a37dca17205bb3c6ebd9d4c8e4cc29110e
describe
'25869' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00200.pro'
256a959050c6d1250aba8c75eba09157
fa2074289c9e6302cebd604455b1d12aab63dbff
describe
'31477' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
84163675e665b5baeb36fc7357920d37
b88f8f70e570f0dd33ab261e0c1b0f5f37dae6af
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
36b83dbe5f13b530691530d290980408
043495dc6647904d9a23c0071a5f4b5d70746c98
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a0d45dec0188f6e91d498e23593b8f1b
c9cf51d4a1310eba761ea5381aa97aa6df60d67e
describe
'8369' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
2d6ad79f9b42c57bec69c46d1c439480
9693ebf2f210ff2c1c2a0eed698a94b1c9838ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
4657e0b8ab815f55301d790b868c4287
6cfd666739440ed4b496c357b4338ae9fc7bd442
'2011-08-19T04:18:52-04:00'
describe
'112386' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
f89ecaf773b3828fd4e66137e1087ca9
920fe06e6e472d735b905435e0bdd63c1e035847
'2011-08-19T04:14:41-04:00'
describe
'31003' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00201.pro'
37f931f1c3cf4fa96bcd804e38769e1e
5719a69da52936a6f8e0f87d91dd8d933c01f96c
describe
'38298' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
179bd2b96a14ab576e801149e8953172
2134e9192eee667c1b7e399779a2ab419984d5ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00201.tif'
6b9f4b79a94195b6b2e6ec19c65854a3
8971f314a79b5697a11211c0a50340b3df75e91a
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00201.txt'
334ebe2110cd60eebc84ba3147085de1
0d6a6d3333a7cc424bd57e40ed9ec2fa27fbefd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
e52b53033b06174e20e35a6352274328
7fb7c2ace6d1e5159264fc82578983960337f244
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
2a232bcd0162aa80b2de414d831a91fb
2d8fee0d582bad192b12ce72575ee960059f6719
describe
'101523' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
0cf6468fd429a1334c8dca553970f757
9254579816389842f8f6deda2b41ccec085d4d6f
describe
'28633' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00202.pro'
7886292cea07fa63a89a92d476e2b1ed
c7804fbd5be8c9479db54333b2acd4298deaef8d
describe
'35150' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMID' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
369ee1705b602cc495a9fca7f740093a
9f44c269a4b5cee7a42cd30f1f116f6f6599328f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00202.tif'
1d9f33d7d2c5a579b9f75860028d814d
94f62b91ec61baf754b78a2596fc1c429a95e111
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00202.txt'
4422f49012e82e393541fc95ae18140e
b529276d728243cd840e8c22477704cb8263df3e
'2011-08-19T04:07:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a2a3a04f514d98e5ba661ffa1b1230ca
1091581cc1bdc0785f26208ee962d35b4e9cad86
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
2055b4fae5fdfbc97a7414fde02fe906
8c5b016de8fe8897db8adced9e48db73ec31b3ce
describe
'85848' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMII' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
61be970cba68fda0549ccb043bfc0ff1
2891ebd820b75ddcdd208919a140b44cdf60e668
describe
'23447' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
e6f8a1113e7c2fcd1c7de86177f3e3a0
3833eca314a3fa180f15b9d1cb72cee201d22f6f
describe
'29083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
bb2dcfb8d013abdee70e5ad39de9f6a6
a6154886734576a4518501ff8efe8553cb4a387e
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00203.tif'
9d53e4f32ce729bf9a5ca1276a867154
a3cc7e137171a5aa8621aea7186770d1eba3473b
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00203.txt'
40b11647ae70e38c54398225279cee28
ad209acdbbcc74de48ce2d92c14656fa2db30c04
'2011-08-19T04:14:12-04:00'
describe
'8133' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
000aee16f10fcc94cf50cf70124654c8
8177e0b1af2061f31ba977a26d704cfa59892548
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
87c1f7a3064a462755ead6ead486c001
a69fc5961fc96047fb7cb9861f6f958eeb881de7
describe
'108714' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
b3ad7a4cdef11c9d8c90e48f5e244fb7
69c5e835dc2b20ac9ebb0ee70252066c616bb1d3
describe
'29449' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
f1687deeb12c43497d4b46bf5b82e324
013c7c4c47642c9cdc068cfac1063fc8f3bd6963
describe
'36692' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
69261412474df5ef1098a7a74dca5b57
e62f8a95355628a99c3852eda2f0f72ff50402d4
'2011-08-19T04:20:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00204.tif'
b46a5931e7ff3168b8c0b275ad1b877d
93cd90a0bd5fea9b7a9bede693be46ec7a2d87bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00204.txt'
694e39c0c1e66495f33b1eb3d3f7da58
33a2abe8a223d8ed3c587fcd8591a30b46c35f05
'2011-08-19T04:10:06-04:00'
describe
'9478' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
dac50d1e39233a3e61e722f3e481aa5c
debeb44e27715ad9012159eb3f1263e56cebb9d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
bc98bff14e2201dbba36b9bad7401241
9c90ed02b0ae248ffee0fa3f2f54084468b7d5a6
describe
'119104' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
764af098564e63b45e206f4186c9c4b9
086c8ed5dc7e95430fbbc884418c7f0b175246ea
describe
'10897' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00205.pro'
9db0254831307f4e45f7512dd8b32dc4
c3f07198e41d37e311437fde60fc7b7dbf69f5d5
describe
'33032' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
257926be5a1aec8775d5841341d0e3a2
03c347d2348362b9e4ae97b65a6522041591284a
'2011-08-19T04:15:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
54584a02ee3b7cec2650702b850b6441
9671a8b27d79fca975fe9df7539171b7c736d7b0
describe
'538' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00205.txt'
2001813f26b8c94c2de8a3690a548102
2960e9c46fbc5c9984d426468ed5be396aaec425
describe
'8229' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
cd93adf3b7bb11e47cb74d339173af39
106d2d855fdb8c4d9fa13cff160b90fbc9f4342d
describe
'419355' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
6e13642541c2121d935efcc951d330f4
41299108774c93a6fb13657b8c618cab1941fb2f
'2011-08-19T04:09:47-04:00'
describe
'93899' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
b0ef65b61d2cb35b7e9a9ab7b6c49019
adaa3631c1294ad9b6a76af4dd3b052c102edbf5
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00206.pro'
45cd6a6ffba997e24f91b55489388c07
5e912bcf43f0d28f9ceaa109ff1d08cd962c6641
describe
'32034' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
b33ffaef59f61b454bb9521b7421bd87
b6e8ba5bfe608b5b705094de008c5760841470d0
describe
'3371644' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00206.tif'
3d845cca4e401c34bcec1f7044f31bc1
fc70045537c936e47630c914e817e295962b337f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00206.txt'
64d93f2621d50e5155dabc24ac42f183
8ed70ce33c4e466d249714003d504247d2b14ab5
describe
'7460' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
8512e598059e1a979013c31b5c5cf8f7
352622ac411fe7e4d1a7471c2018257df1456aae
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
73b437f66977bed797f46a4bea05da38
a9a8f1e8ee8c44860871378260c0d9039cb8bdde
describe
'142819' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
bd288466688f1631df2edc0b7466fd96
dfec5cc1f0456af88cc925237a0362847016b55b
describe
'7783' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00207.pro'
75d1c0bdc2bd4903fcce0760d46039fb
1b66f02909c515570202f0569f3085b297a23380
describe
'38108' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
3e5bb927b5320d75998c15991294c56a
c4ec4cc1263f53d67bd099176c1fe15f0282d060
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00207.tif'
c8806bc9fefa5d6852d2405fa2fe6598
0773795ef2a1028f9c11fc3598b4f555716c0773
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00207.txt'
c2dce110df2706078a6108cee0643971
a661d7ac354d88dc14492670f09c8637f15019f4
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
ee68c4a819c5fa308906077c51885ed3
56a8e7cdcf79e23ce035da66eea4e8c09f4a37f0
'2011-08-19T04:13:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
649c606ae863812eda3c675f4ccd78c2
a4938a01bed71f9fcb34e35498d51f7f787cd315
'2011-08-19T04:11:06-04:00'
describe
'99241' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
1df39b8e290308d07085758a2e50a8de
208be3dd950069037f8e150b358ae83c663e6789
describe
'26679' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00208.pro'
22e7f16b62baccca939acd91bce5ea2b
6be509cea3e175931a7b9e80c67aecfacf0e7fd1
describe
'33926' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
c602326d624689c38823a844fc038c6b
04859f20bee964544546323bac786f82781937e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00208.tif'
7ddc1851cf932fe0958b65688f03c95d
33ba37f267f3e126af502f3de0c558e1b605c3e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00208.txt'
de96e899b3ed53f2084b3d5bcf8b3f23
bde1fe45f47d2e0273e8d30dbdde658b4de847fb
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
6c7c8c9bb02963cf199a15b0b27dc7fe
3702bb56de54211658b6a11da6f76c60789975d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
b1fb9763b0909868acb852ef20040855
350f8c0096ab1944a61f9199e4ed6a8c0c9b9ab1
describe
'102392' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
435bc8eb6d3c778266d913f32748e6ec
a4f6689ebcc55000a47b2359c4b6755888b2dfe7
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
fb37971d8e02fdaac00de65e1b9e4264
45d4d785a929746136568d017a26396ccad13b23
describe
'35072' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
f8f0966060f3b575eec2e6d85288496f
204d319ebf22945688fdf095a4fdc2573d9d827c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d85e4d8c55cf53c178075b3bda11ba18
7de012ff54eed00ef59003045f3286f8d29aba91
'2011-08-19T04:12:21-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00209.txt'
5ce24cad146b16d2ae0f51beb9b96ff0
08311eedf14ac1de61c50417c2ee9876ebeadf89
describe
'9397' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
fe52cf929c57efe4d892d7f3785c1c87
ac5312b17376d926a78075648fe1f53095d83c06
describe
'356398' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
afa6133871ba130eca7cb6ded68bfed5
00d098ea9b7c7e26dcda0ab55b4e0ae4bfc5ff7c
describe
'88988' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
1d7b0b36b4b799f4f7b8cf3894defd56
74597614caf30994e010d89cb81ba12b23e427a4
describe
'24641' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00210.pro'
83d47c45208a3c29fd425f69b2e3fecf
65df23180e1a25c9914dd4e407fad9cac0abce09
describe
'29541' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
9cec64cc579ac5f0bd11a456fca69ccc
fa548b3a0a4ca9c08d7ac4d31a1680e5244cc9f1
describe
'2867532' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00210.tif'
871f1a2571b2bb268999f00ec53acc91
94c09d92c915f88eec314c126e7f9f9d2a69fc65
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
f0bb8ecb6222916ad01249be8235743e
0a579c26206e790de2f93d3b51b2ec64f735d671
describe
'7828' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
0e830e3bb14afd0ea30d6b7149a0dfb9
c12ec8a3cfad8fc9d1962d816298ab47721f1b44
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
f8da69cee33b7257d09e6e969417a4c5
1b627b708725fa8c2d0f002de257703223738f0e
describe
'135845' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
6a601fd39e52c5e97f34e7f36ba1e283
42a889e020386274198067d1752bf9c3df839829
describe
'53787' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00213.pro'
ae0c5beafee339cec6a04c6cf4489d0d
b1c998e9d240ecc81f933bed90690b030a9086eb
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
cedea0649ad0c5c1aad8a21ddfd81f06
8bd2d8836830bdbbeb206661ac649fcf7b0f167f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00213.tif'
ef06bccc4e9a3d2d5caf01d0d58fbc34
83bb8c2dbc89eb7c128ead1b93a5e5e43fbfa9b8
describe
'2349' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00213.txt'
b481ec2c8593f3aeb7e1c8c347243f5b
b8dd506061f2da17e7b4f5deb8dc49bd2403d000
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
c0fa7635284b30b3887030cc4ad2f452
9f03ce8ea0645c1fb34916268c8e30b16c682614
describe
'325352' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
7c7f5fbb9796360d1074f77f5b9337c3
2d0be4589db439dace48e909037ef94194fa5ea0
describe
'155471' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
a32f1584adf89beba91f2ce17359af2a
1024513a303b46f35b6436156ba2124f183c232d
describe
'75801' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00214.pro'
7281465a84338ecd96cf9ffc0be13ccd
3765747557ca846facb246cdb3f486ddc3f40f7a
describe
'42865' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
04c2ebe6d0b38faae7f4400ec17c147a
115caa36c4982ec9a6217dab75c17fab56dcc675
'2011-08-19T04:08:00-04:00'
describe
'2619368' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00214.tif'
861cbd1753d712f54ab23584859e95f7
d660084cc7422037a49b87e4f999856922ed037b
'2011-08-19T04:17:22-04:00'
describe
'3221' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00214.txt'
3b0289c1ba3468733e516185ddbb5e5b
e4957667556c8e40513e4122d6c0a9646aae2b64
describe
'11675' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
b20f6b931a33983e5ad4491e4d5bea85
bf060f1623980e550a2c21d735639fa98ad47123
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
38ce7f8da887beeedcd7bb4053af2444
d97b126913f2dd5d89f2ada5015cb4b82dfda9bb
describe
'124183' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
3f6446a1c6cb7a647938f6534ed2148b
c53edd904c2b40d6968d38e96bb8863a9876b5f8
describe
'24667' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b1d953a420cce7ce074b349beff7ed7e
a793e14f51b5cffa53e7eb3b34716e3b8aaf46d0
describe
'32208' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
9a74fd31170c7e96af979ba4bc3b42d7
b06f33f6bf83cec67cc3eb145b7eb30d82161840
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00215.tif'
3a9e568ea2f6f538a0a51da52e748a1f
d95f2f1bf45c8ec287f53681ee1fac6306a4ee1d
'2011-08-19T04:06:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00215.txt'
f483de9a891615a16febabad0786c3b5
dd8d7ac93f9cedd4d22fef9e6d6a093784238e95
describe
'7954' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
eb5d4f3c25fa52aac783edc4c1dd6d66
6a98cab32cc40f78ff1ec5cac7caf1df7c1a8c32
describe
'314417' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
244a06c1a2bf994f6ecf31bd372b075e
16f51a4f795f186dd4e0bca44f6ae907f8cea180
describe
'142598' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
acac128aee569d67ba8fb46790c00f78
fb983b20f6630807ad896321f6219edb6ac759e2
describe
'70392' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00216.pro'
429edbaf5162ba373aec8e85a8956d92
0d8318d3955858e9d55cb6952236ce9c2a582a64
describe
'42409' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
ddbe5b5fbc4064fef4253d56c69bf838
193faf1f590fb071d6cdb8fe7401326272c22357
describe
'2532096' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00216.tif'
fd058ae2eee8e0fbce5ceffd399b6c9a
71d336a1d211610446e7e0f9b85502d77a8b5d70
describe
'2970' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00216.txt'
7f0ae1af7dd9f64592b1914d5efd29de
fa68d850df965dc32bf35031756f542ff9980673
describe
'11032' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
3bc3d8c68df72df2bf3731b9586fb1bc
8347cb4e5c13b74530dea4a456ebc0e3e6a44f2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
4e3297b84d4e2c342b47110081c44718
0f20648db2c340ec93c923184d424b6e3ee2fb2d
describe
'123566' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
f45c64204dec63457beb487437566f86
5665c9621bac7d3354330e87d00e58b359851373
'2011-08-19T04:15:15-04:00'
describe
'24753' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00217.pro'
2e2100bbaef677c5811bd5e7991383a4
047f3448306d61728b52c7ef73c42a8521c889d0
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
bd1b4d095d0fe7147bf3dc5a43c310a6
ccaa53f606e7d63a4d49a6d397d73b49d5eff1bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00217.tif'
640fe62ae2dcb9b9c371ec0f67972e3d
93f98365aac4cab921f0e9c74a1d26799d837a00
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00217.txt'
b319a41a6b5ec366e0f2a90001306103
bbc7a206c398c8ab32a91c360da4efa09ceb827d
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
874ddc5c216bc94fbd819c91dff8f048
6786c0db7ae94a7f3faa89f4605b268178392391
describe
'322917' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
629f5bcc499479b7debba512f3d475fd
4b640559823b67c72aa5f775d933a34081b655af
'2011-08-19T04:15:45-04:00'
describe
'158433' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
41be7b37ee480d74301583c20a3a7eaf
7d92a967edd531863d47772b314b406461320a0a
describe
'75864' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00218.pro'
d4758946d14c1b3bcd15cd5bc58109b1
fa2290cc1a0054d8e495b1f6322da9cb45136e2a
describe
'46352' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
fd815bc3dde472b34b715ddd52892a6e
111371d44ad0a6e814e293dc46abb5e1ee118ca1
'2011-08-19T04:14:53-04:00'
describe
'2600372' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d606e9d3da0b532de89289260505db10
2f3403dc085820999ba20e873f0680d69f6a1327
describe
'3196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
aede4a482bed62d10a05d087662fe9c2
ebe0c3b4c88cb149e0f2068f7caa858a1caa3217
describe
'11008' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
c9a331b1c100b5b2f319c502e3a458f8
6968f8105594c5926581317cf39fd046ad92adc9
'2011-08-19T04:07:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
b412826ec5a7caecea0abe117949e219
cbe6f74808e556df19f13f876d6e0b87d897c49e
describe
'131848' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
6e0af31834912f64f5f1cdd8bcf5b1e3
f899513053876eeb0767968e07db51466280f88c
'2011-08-19T04:16:43-04:00'
describe
'70035' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00219.pro'
4700aed07fbcb3847197702b47bcb06b
511853c49d846e8b44b4b3b43fcaff8c2f155db8
describe
'38098' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMME' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
e8665dba3ec66b33c425045e2c6431bf
6bab39746a86be73790fc8c147f1833982fc2df2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00219.tif'
fd9f2725f0ddc9e5110dcdcdac5df76c
998298b0ec578a960d9dd2254d6f609c6f6685ec
describe
'3056' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
a519969db564ddf7129bfe0022e59ef6
4fd2674c76c28fd9d0b15b238ace171a1b7786d5
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
3bfa59e8a08b259f35a9974ffa2e20f4
e739fe9dfe300e83485931f3d0287edd34276f36
'2011-08-19T04:19:03-04:00'
describe
'329854' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
841e07c64ceede9e463227470b40d9fc
f7a4772b7aa899b8ad8c05d5bf0258837fea2824
describe
'150673' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
a893a2b1ad711c071beca38e821c31d7
f932141c76dea706dc31bdf4a502a08f7de46944
describe
'74571' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00220.pro'
f34b7b2ab7bc7c04a303cb36ce327d20
8253d72af27c9f8eb676970aac10050212999202
describe
'43745' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMML' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
b6aac7fcba08e6c4e1295fb08721aab5
0f7ca866cc0ae6e4b062a2ee17b87a077b42fffa
describe
'2655456' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00220.tif'
a0e8113b4db1be44cad05d58cbb8448b
59974cb91bf39ea7cdfc1c18eb17c8fd9a5d358f
describe
'3152' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00220.txt'
fb10b09a0c1b50be8f824f480f02c4fa
f23c18e8e8886b9373c49f3e4b493fc3bdbdabc3
describe
'10566' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
86b866a524fc1b0dbc2a61cd9635765f
2f0bd2eeda5604b56d40bcf787cc411f45f7b6d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
bd7013c77a84b7b2ef5859f4b38dc466
dd72ecf472344a743a7913010fcbde19b8c71f7b
describe
'137093' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
8be9a2b2f7e219972e981a276d1ee1f6
12527792ba9ae49f35eb41c6ac3fc555f66da3b1
describe
'42426' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00221.pro'
49d3fc783b8627f5c155e9a640780195
fa81174871cf19a21711181a8302f28b0d369d7c
describe
'38241' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
c36cdb1147e77f833d3036b0e6787e34
b3a2dbab3b1fad6f976a18cd9bc52e7e78543bfa
'2011-08-19T04:10:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00221.tif'
37eab52570ae497fae1bfa3763f5cb63
1f33281b10bf39799a1e8feabef2ba6244a11283
describe
'1956' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00221.txt'
dabfacc7aa6f34fd3cae03978c9f3747
fc5b031b9c7aad67ea46978fe0e189b19ea469a5
describe
'9121' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
08464398b9b7b059d2e7305935b7f84e
4c51238c351039439c5de53f22bb7d5377b63492
describe
'320440' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ec25b53d40bd7ee17b8eb346a18229cb
5d34053ba1ca5dff43a26f8f45e4160acbb713fd
describe
'136624' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
e7099b74e5b40c862ecb228de6b2c480
784d2ce7922981868b6aa468f95f351042af5148
describe
'62104' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00222.pro'
f30d1164f16f3131717e35eedd8e296f
84ff94bfba2478d778c7ec68a389b8ef97b140c6
describe
'41057' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
8451c52cf0120ef083a9e12e862fe25a
12c12369505ceec696f8b7d851db9c7508c89d9a
describe
'2580452' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00222.tif'
f7d3f4fe30131da3562aef48416c83d8
7536172b14247e7afa1570d177ad6ba46de69d9a
describe
'2640' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00222.txt'
46da027f5fac839ff57f3bc9d4a7e566
dbd163c8a74268c77606f482efd4af8b2f31b3de
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
3f6631b9daca3f9ea8f6873841597c12
5d3a37337f244d6c50e9145a7856c6c148306bfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMND' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
5b1e0db2ae15960b514cd4b392d18c1d
9d6278d2a09ee0986167c2a9942b041aa7610846
describe
'150744' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
d61f68f52878334c312d471d1150e344
3ce52399923afa9569cedffdefd041e325601d51
describe
'47437' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00223.pro'
38cd28df80e7a604cfeb6c53aeb83759
42fd1d254b663e429b96c4c1dc2b7496b0760714
describe
'39550' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
f390d917ad9532e4a706128c933f5e42
d38620432cd7918f4631ad7224278bbd248fc9a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00223.tif'
9ee892f02910c3e5d959eeec5ab52137
9b438400f41de504dc0c9db40c452374ac4b25d1
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00223.txt'
f8e1879ae8c231ea267638229b5139aa
bd4c9dcb24dbdf4aaf3f1673a4be0741f6f7a845
describe
'9532' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
a7b9de548f47c94fb85558f04bfddc7c
b91a83ba72518b562aa1271a4b4a45b955e36e49
describe
'342219' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
eb6972477cca4fc821ca94d1d8bb52ea
7a352824747d9c1968e0999a279d104717bac69f
'2011-08-19T04:20:56-04:00'
describe
'137104' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
09974b7d4d1e448cbb2c90ba83ee78b4
4c9b323b70c68db6201ee5e2a9fe958ee3a38bcc
describe
'65451' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00224.pro'
d42c4599dd53de32679ee8c9a12c8df0
647efbe2af94f9851ecbf4c37c9de8fe7bac368b
describe
'38985' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
07a89df3ee8358d57d614cc2917145af
8de1768414e6778f3dea66d01be33fcb100c460e
'2011-08-19T04:17:59-04:00'
describe
'2754340' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00224.tif'
d549a1452b519fb5ba53ab27b375d8e9
a1b38479e816f7cdfb41a3b2f0c54f627aa276c5
describe
'2767' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00224.txt'
acfa040e161b1f992daf939562a5c42c
0efd1318ffc3903c42a30387cfd0752e5e4bf052
describe
'9813' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
4d97fb63b86798bcc51c44b166bdb125
341c2670c881f7389a967b5b9907c08551b8ec7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
658c8e8106d1448e118770bab4ea9ec7
ce411097dcfb107a40cbd7d2405612a022a13fdd
describe
'139225' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
b89074d7a020eb2802e953a3534e7a5d
4b0e35909495fd96dc1d3a667ab242bc19b7328a
describe
'66648' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00225.pro'
73a0c59be2880303637256d201ea19b0
1d898249a6f72c4afeca1c5824e05c71edcc2b8b
'2011-08-19T04:07:11-04:00'
describe
'40197' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
b873f5bc37702baba102eb219c1d4c4f
bdd47f53993793c5878fe261bde06f3c863cb5b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00225.tif'
68209bcb5930c9b003e605b3a616dd8d
58cc700144ceb1957a85b86b1d211b3ba8706224
describe
'2839' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00225.txt'
977f9e08c76e0fa4da566f185c9bd64d
414f81a2a9f5006a5fe42541093e7ed3abf3ae2f
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
8c41ff37bf9827ace92ebfa8d4cb9ba0
6780a3e5e18da0e7fa0692e09d8c3540d77e80f3
describe
'308662' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
cd7f7b95078c24c81190f286f350497b
569ff45939d84a4972099e7ad21857c52d48788b
describe
'151651' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
bf10a35c54f0317589d0400768fa7799
33b0bf2ad42f06d5e3f854dd24108351b68aa2d0
describe
'68476' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00226.pro'
6e621634b95bb77463f1814fe6cd7fb9
5525e4dad6981bf7f29a7846474fc112f48ed6d9
describe
'44382' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
7e1c62bc5fd2c8c654e5cdc5593501b4
df5f0a3aac1c3df18533e44d1bcea44fb99dcb11
describe
'2485764' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00226.tif'
2efef05bee900e2287ccfda337894839
ddfc60f7da11e3eafe6c6a18f71f995793154438
'2011-08-19T04:09:33-04:00'
describe
'2952' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00226.txt'
16253746a96fe43b72db6b6281655785
71657bf6479922af7f375d90adf09061e4330da9
describe
'10840' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
aad7c621230d82e41c35119b13ba8c1a
6ba60756e2db8247575965a0d69cf7ebc8e266b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
62eccf8ec08b8397de0a36c952f1f663
06f2a8a0930a838edad69a236aa1d1df7d6ff66d
describe
'140195' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
0a9a6ea59245db2155dd2adad74d4bda
2b650d4571c67794b8013060357593a86837e112
describe
'40930' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00227.pro'
68902ecbae9fa89e36bd088a98a55e82
49230baf3553e1c4bf4cfc6a674ca687b88f6831
describe
'37731' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
719848bb538ef2fd9bc15653d38fc522
391151733097a297e2d510987bd0b9b62136be4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
2a8bceeb6b6d9197e18bbc6f35bd470b
41c394b157bfecb253a5bc150bd91b13084779ef
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00227.txt'
9739d84d6ecc03fcc049c83d6ec460b1
3ffcac62c6eace60a32b6bc77ead0e08bde0c449
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
a1a91700f81321798bdc938069734075
8073c7cc6d0e5313f48538024fcbc10ec16a08e1
describe
'341218' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
6776bab39099aa54073d4f7658c07188
c507d33afd2ffaadbeb572a548103e2b293987ad
describe
'142978' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMON' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
156f69bea20938e79e122758be18ef54
ab49f712e47d02348a46819b53a34a0d2b6457b2
describe
'70584' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00228.pro'
cdddf09ab2c85bfdee639dd7cd616304
c64c79fd9d4dcc5cdbb5ea03c3d026140607aba7
describe
'40858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
d69082354de64d5a6ccfc1039bc08ae1
e9deb663ba51fc2217651ca32503517731cf91b0
describe
'2746196' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
f7b92811f35708b2b8ec2c38d2ebc542
fa80a36d6dcaa0b5540a58d02172529ab11eb45e
describe
'2957' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00228.txt'
8e9f4fbc27d2b0618fa1c067216d29c4
28b61e4d91c608544eca17e4174877b4b07a2b9e
describe
'9617' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
55675df708fa4cd388f792796dd7ef3d
87a6cd68178600e0962528ee3ca7feff7898245c
describe
'364964' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
6ebcab304a17429894bb35b5149ed4da
bfdd6ae0f723738b0cc15a29114a137f2597c57e
'2011-08-19T04:07:20-04:00'
describe
'134314' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
539681f3edbe1157b09b930b879bb3f1
90a724c4a198b775374ddf3e31437d966f0c003a
describe
'68360' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00229.pro'
fb450ed2a96b9419eabc2276b6af500c
4f59ddba5f1b6e86cecbae43f72979bf32b1f903
describe
'39437' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
d9ffbc8df7836f5340ba3e293efeec99
2f28ea2ab0cce04b334133e64011fe98aec7501d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00229.tif'
0547dfe6afaeb7879f30d4cc0c2d5e8f
aa4dc739173200c9fdc13e7af6a3b532eecb4372
describe
'2916' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00229.txt'
d56f65fea1b6ac470dfa1447e48f0df6
985c6f18f66cd63852b891bc8a92faf2b617b166
describe
'9156' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
bb6c6b1a8e270acc28292835a7bad8e6
6d7379bf5cc38f50f9f07770e40396ebbbb3d5b9
'2011-08-19T04:21:18-04:00'
describe
'330793' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
9e5c019a58c2ae57a6eb3320a5912f40
ffbfab31886ceeadd98af5c558d6ae4fc2a70154
describe
'148789' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
fb61fca3c50599b1a6e88e7bd37552c0
a429d82dce64af35e5b52c16fb4d880582dc6ed0
describe
'73900' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00230.pro'
fb4f739013d3827723eba29c86252d32
11c27e4915aaeb5e1d85b92f086fbf9ff8d00b30
describe
'42751' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
af796bc69cd7333b09021810179ea824
3cd4f880b5545a755b475fb13f52162169c518b8
describe
'2663248' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00230.tif'
402bf79cbef95bfc0ff56e68115b8682
92bbb94caeca582659815e1afdfaed333a818b63
describe
'3127' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00230.txt'
122f4fabedb863a8a75d1e177c1cd195
50ad1b993d53b3eee4c8fa777e8417e16023eb21
describe
'10005' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
f7fd2dcb733f89fa71b70a276ceb4d64
6190885531bfb3988f337117008f451346e51615
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
09946228b49590268cf2f974d45340f0
a8bfd0ac19f563c3e3eff67a4945c8c51bf5513d
describe
'118049' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
abd2c8d748e7de45a46daeddca61559d
bba7d3e3d52e4a1b6db648cc73344ffdfdd502e4
describe
'56509' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
7224ccee0a7d0009948e057ad639bb6c
d51c11cef16ed5967b6c49048d1e516933e1ef60
describe
'35411' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
66346d6202e137f78ce288aa1c8e51f6
5276c55c85d3c469996b621fe09e64c5aab4ad8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00231.tif'
7af609cf36d0012fa451910e5a3647f2
2c9da9c658084047fb6df54cf00ce3bb3899d60d
describe
'2461' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00231.txt'
359ec9399b0e22a5bd03775ddb62dcc0
dfd7e2c1799221871effb660cb2fc50c71cfae1a
describe
'9002' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
a4164ebad905aa72478e472020f32f26
8749b4c98bd38ff89c301efc4c356aef6c762d1c
describe
'347080' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
5902a0fa48339ee4c3b0bec066ed42a7
b34555082ed20225c324191199a523349f88507b
describe
'130878' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
519534df1bdae7b5e77f0580c42a57eb
a95090b51303ba029286530fbf9a2952b509ffa9
describe
'65556' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00232.pro'
62552e65d4ff61336c0de9ab76af6b20
1790cab9f436fe440b7f48645930fc3419a85f94
describe
'37746' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
a3918502afeaf50cbef718957a023316
919698db832cca794d4cf067157930cbdaf19bd9
describe
'2793252' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00232.tif'
7644b59809cbd2f664911786406a7273
58093b00cb45d25b800fdbaef507101592045fc0
describe
'2775' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00232.txt'
b8bff4a83a46a01a4d923ccf7b987250
222702d7dec9c90cfed006154ae863a67e0203c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
3f8a6c982aa1b1cc6f43b1cbc638aa38
65189b3d0a7db31fae47884efe3ae488b881de67
'2011-08-19T04:07:26-04:00'
describe
'364952' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
8f77b2a2d4eb420f31b954fb738f2ebf
e2811356e16d396fd881b2796e5bfb7b272bbcf5
describe
'121461' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
cd93d8b0c2f6bd9199c9597d6fb0751f
7cebf146b3cb2ebe3160c9d5c2c2be7439c2f83e
describe
'56958' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00233.pro'
d5a2d9797e4192be2553b66bc3231767
a4c1c936fc95573fd93c8faad39c639bc47a0066
describe
'37898' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
a0f3e712fd5229c8b29b1956499af134
409fd82facac949b9b34b60a4dc03ce9eab9400b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00233.tif'
f24db427fe75046cd056125ecdc34da5
2d588fe10352cd0f9bf6c8ff495ada6888581ed9
describe
'2485' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00233.txt'
9d1d7c7e0ff429c8d06301cd1a88a567
3cba7c739679d231c8438b46df0b9b4d8df1ddee
describe
'9170' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
26b4aa45d4e39b3fd4b333a8c437a49d
337232057d3ebec0f99027ab05b8ac42e735ec33
describe
'319228' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
c7fdabc8ea51d059f0e71eb63b0b72d9
1926990e41706513f64275da710053c042e38e5d
describe
'134769' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
89ae1749c6cfc4fabf5c7876f7fa6bd2
77ba2fcf1d5ae44b98e19c0f2361d9815a8b7541
describe
'64372' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00234.pro'
74c41b981725c554a03633f965fbe997
43181fea2b8f07c1d039d9d995a1697b37942c87
describe
'42404' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
0d5b387450f3f317234ceda2df724cab
39b4cde8017eddaa2b937fbfd09a06b9e19fca76
'2011-08-19T04:12:38-04:00'
describe
'2570256' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00234.tif'
221fbc8387740949001c48027dbd357d
67c49feb30604eed453c2cf27dbd79bdc6978601
describe
'2754' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00234.txt'
ef387fb7581a2b95788fad524fad8a6b
844c89416d4e73870235297442d4302eefbdc281
describe
'10455' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
65baba745d16903d67860166d4383998
11da6c2695aaf0ec04ed6e14134d625b221d7ba5
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
427ea1486181601f0f58994f17408bb0
6017a4a8bc57960cf9a0af50f6ab92baa965af73
describe
'138299' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
bb5c4964038d0b03b6411803531ad3de
72557b4cab26eb65bb2f9f729bdcf04645523b7f
'2011-08-19T04:19:25-04:00'
describe
'67670' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00235.pro'
b0c4a7395a774a150a5c986b111421e8
72b1e478722d65cf9b2bd60b7a6be03da091d691
describe
'38961' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
e1bcbff207f90c9cd3a03d7c2c4ea0f0
75a720f9d41c87bf5840ec95b2ebdcbe7785e60b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00235.tif'
52aaaa564f035f8607f78506718bfa30
1e17314d2d50aa10d7ce9e212b4b35d47f4b0663
describe
'2904' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00235.txt'
2ed677603f3aa5f3b85e0e9f9f87a38a
126a7b6e3c3162ab8b5e3bd071802e0269aabe4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
6bc87ee276c753dc37b2b08d343145e7
71555b83b5b7f58a5cf54b118aa03223f936708c
describe
'321277' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
105528652fa0a74504c10b70886fe4c5
8192b638adf33b11fbf766a074f0b4e77702578e
describe
'129093' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
94e9ffb524180c269628b189ac9200ce
3b5391b4913a2701e364dc2a18e643015d75d34e
describe
'52991' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00236.pro'
85aa835e071d874b4986b58761b6377f
0dfa721c06b051766c219323c946cd9a33baa243
describe
'41537' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
fe9f50a0876ece829d36195aa8c1e6f9
4ff22b6a3ea881286d1b144dec005c97e1bb08da
describe
'2586908' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00236.tif'
3abc9bf9f205d56858cc9dc043bf0508
9c6e2d4bfc7c36d1ef05a1a0be1edcfd2cab8a3d
describe
'2207' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00236.txt'
2676eaf227f8b89ff090c6dfb95342ab
dd7fcb820174a57fd9510c682442218e1619f863
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
7316372cfff00cd643ca23939bcbd779
7ba4afb9b41b1b2aa12d442e588a77ceac4dcfc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
4ab879c84c1d481b939939aa0869fa68
4e0b1560bcaead88df8b588b3c1e12d419c97cf7
describe
'124690' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
bc9430cc5bb12ab6fd14dce4f40b0386
32610ad678e7dd9af90fc6b025a0ec772fe8f4f0
describe
'56606' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
4665c39c27503e8f6ace321476de70d4
99a34e225cb8b5db1627f6902f25a1c8fcc60cf8
describe
'38079' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
541e9a79d1d424a5dee1df9b7dcc60e6
0b8fba2b6b0da9caa453098649ec582e565afb68
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00237.tif'
258aaa5284c3de2527a92240057bf543
3e5d9c9f2c72ae2fffe2310c0a2008fdccf5b775
describe
'2414' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00237.txt'
0b32bae0378e050d6b263c92db6368ac
c6ed63f4204f01cb7bf952d69e6cdbf8e7c71e67
describe
'9089' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
fea38f6ad6635e9441aee88e7672baf3
d36f1c5e5d27c7a15eead447e7e3137a88f5179c
describe
'327699' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
b27cc27f1ca13e8b78016fb61863feaa
aac1e4e672e0e0eccfa1642c5b302b83a10a1525
describe
'123513' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
cb9b894e855558424f0ab5dda2d50b90
0039f0eb0e0ce3671b570d311afd1dff42e1c38b
describe
'42177' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00238.pro'
d3ec55575aef54dce98a3facb1456463
a54863a26f42c1e629c85bb0531d94edcdcba714
describe
'40365' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
5b480485ebdadfdc28638184bd529f08
51df7a45027cd7a11b4b78743a15c9e28776cbf8
'2011-08-19T04:16:51-04:00'
describe
'2638132' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00238.tif'
0dd6aebe21af7a1e61bbe9005c8b3b1a
ce765fd86ea2351ab737c44d8b322b2c6e66f95d
describe
'1795' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
e9cd7768c676f810729d7856730d6320
2ccc027deec663114a074c44969d65dfe764b8bf
describe
'10339' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
420b0d0824bcaa05f61ebd6e7129ec30
e614b42b56c2e91b528f52d4fd38bf04a7cf17c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
6028a934b24a94bc57924e75b8bfd1fd
a01e5fdd89619840b9b17de8dbdb117114614aee
describe
'126041' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
2053b4ba2920140ed965e46be0f0a611
f4f89f65c286d0e66e1d1375a199393756467503
describe
'15430' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00239.pro'
0554eb72f8feb22e1cce2f58fe379ef2
01263c15a67a78bd33dfeeb2ea02b0bae592bcf0
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
2942dff957894a4226551c7a8d3172dd
862083a7d29d812f5097eae02c13770f563c1260
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00239.tif'
521d7cf96deabb8ed8ff91b514088e6e
0a73d720d7e0530208fb561a8be76df14cc6be95
'2011-08-19T04:20:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
c278dab6b290f7234b4757a1858d1f11
907a87467d61f2935da672140102e143c7fb8ad8
describe
'7858' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
e2a4269ade59e1e5db8b7e415adbd745
d2f11932eb2dc63803a7e498d2b1e36f9809c342
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
d01f44feb03ea40f06ad86f34a92e20d
73d8e01f232a8a47082dcdbad33ddb177d5c1bba
describe
'119122' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
02b9ff6d92b53432c28fc24d87dfedf2
681fa74022d83180b46e3025f6c313ae1955bd5c
describe
'40314' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00240.pro'
a5925973d9fe706da1d862153d3fd1fa
67516b3caf14a98c2c0739ce6f5b8a70b89b7e60
describe
'38511' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
53d515466e6880d6281a27b9f41a8a05
76a56fab3897ddf799d3ff96a55b3ccf7d6d264c
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00240.tif'
cb8cb0aabaa01335a5674cc94f973d60
7ced20463f3d10b16c0359920e9a9da077213296
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00240.txt'
a9b0f7092ee8a551f566239447972e65
26fae4fcc3e4a0fe916eef10f15194b36e2a3e74
describe
'9585' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
293c2bb471412780233d95f0cfbadff4
1c8fabad4315cab3aa79d09feb058b2912fc929a
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
c42dfc395035023d65d54587e4edebd9
1b90f80c101230752bd90cdd30c4d0a229bbcec5
describe
'151917' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
f5c17b6cd86e16164dc30b4b9348129f
65db2abacb68136c0de5fc3d848eee2e7cb975bc
describe
'49850' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00241.pro'
8b505c1b6188244cda0cd2fdce7ba1ad
1b6d6ae7ec54d2cdf96a58b4e0c7812259f70885
describe
'41116' 'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
024f3d96f8b3ca4592fc338c1a7d1262
f779fce2d544bd40b05bd78ef9c74c4da7da910b
describe
'info:fdaE20080801_AAAAIXfileF20080804_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00241.tif'
036a2abd923793042d9a348e06e09eba
bbc071b468553eb24922834bb2a12df4a736c660
describe
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Trial, Kewirflle
Ves, ISS G i -



THE WHISPERING WINDS

ae


““THEY WERE A HAPPY-HEARTED FAMILY.”
THE WHISPERING WINDS

AND THE TALES THAT THEY TOLD

BY

MARY H. DEBENHAM

Author of ‘‘ Three Little Maids from School”, &c.

WITH TWENTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS
BY PAUL HARDY





LONDON
BLACKIE & SON, Limirep, 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.
GLASGOW AND DUBLIN
1895
CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION, .

BABY BENEDETTA,

THE GREEN BRIDAL,

THE MIST KING,

HILDA BRAVE-HEART, .

Page

17

61

. 109

» 153
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.
Page
‘“©THEY WERE A HAPPY-HEARTED FAMILY,” . . . . + . 20
Tur EL?F-KNIGHTS HOLD REVEL ON THE HILLS, . . . - 93
“‘GOODY HOBBLED AFTER THEM WITH A BUNCH OF MARIGOLDS,” 131

““PuT THIS ON YOUR HEAD AND YOU WILL BE INVISIBLE,” . 182

ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE TEXT.

‘© There, then, Maddalena, they are all against you,” . . . . 25
The little Agoni bring the News to the Water-sprite. . . . . 36
‘Nita addressed herself to the Nightingale,” . . . . . . + 43
“ He threw the necklace with all his might”. . . . . . . 49
“ He knew what it was to sit at old Dugall’s feet,” . . . . . 67

Eva vows to become a Bride when the Heather isin Bloom, . . 78
“Death to her! She has slain ourchief!” . . . . . «. « 100
‘Ronald stood with Eyg’s face upon his breasts?) 2 sme. 5s) i LOG:
“ There’s a bottle of stuff to go to old Goody Gabble,”. . . . 125
“The Mist King was galloping across the moor,” . . « . « 132

“They're like a lantern! Look how they show the path Ieee 130)

“Oh, do let’s be quick and wake them!” . 2. . . . «+ I4!
‘A welcome home was a beautiful thing in those days,” . . . 165
“‘T am not the bride fora hero,” . . 2. . . 1 6 6 + + © T74

“Tt seemed to him that there was a figure always by his side,” . 193

“ He liked to walk with her through the solemn fir-woods,” . . 195






STHEWH RoI ie

7 AND-THE- PALES THAD THEL 1)" SS





And he wandered away and away,
With Nature, the dear old Nurse,

Who sang to him night and day,
The rhymes of the Universe.

And whenever the way seemed long,
Or his heart began to fail,
She would sing a more wonderful song,
Or tell a more marvellous tale.
—LONGFELLow.

I wonder if all children are as greedy for stories
as those of my acquaintance. To keep them satis-
fied you must have a perfect memory for all the
tales you ever read or heard, or else you must

engage a story-spinning spider to live in your
10 The Whispering Winds.

we













AA

brain and be ready to work at a moment’s notice.
They pounce upon you at all sorts of times.
They expect you to talk against the rattle of a
train; they seize on you the moment after dinner,
“because we don’t want to have to go to bed in
the middle”; they drag you away from the break-
fast-table before other people have finished till you
blush for your own rudeness, ‘‘ because we sha’n't
get done before lessons”.

When you protest, “My good children, I
haven't got a story ready”, they respond cheer-
fully, “Oh, you can soon think one up”; and they
assist your brain by sitting on the top of you,
resting heads on your shoulders and elbows on
your knees, and asking about every two minutes,
« Haven't you almost thought?”

“What am I to tell them next?” I said the
other day to some friends of mine; ESteChemis
nothing new left to invent. Can't you provide me
with some stories?”

I should like to introduce you to these four

friends—old friends they are now, for they began
Introduction. 1I

RRRRRARARRRRRR RRR PnPn~P—P——O~—oe—w”

years ago to talk to me and tell me tales. Travel-
lers’ tales they were, for these friends of mine
journey from the ends of the earth, and bring me
messages from the lands and seas over which they
pass—and men call them the Four Winds. Some-
times they come to me salt and fresh like tumbling
waves, or they sweep down with a rush and a roar
from rocky heights, or they whisper in my ear
such lullabies as mothers in sunny far-away lands
croon over their dark-eyed babies. They bring
the song of birds and the roar of mighty rivers,
echoes of weeping and sounds of laughter, fierce
war-cries and the clash of arms, and the musical
peal of church bells.

If you will only listen with earnest willing ears
they will tell you such tales as you never dreamt
of. But first you must make friends with them,
and learn to love them and welcome them each in
turn. You mustn’t call them “horrid” when they
don’t blow just as you wish, as if your convenience
were the only thing in the world worth considera-

tion. You mustn’t turn sulky and hide your head
12 The Whispering Winds.

hmmm



when they get a little boisterous and want a game
with you, when they take your hat for a football
and bring the rustling leaves about your ears, or
when they sweep fiercely down with an armful of
snow-flakes, of which the earth’s winter counter-
pane is made. No, you must go out fearlessly
and bid them welcome, and they will teach you
their meaning and tell you their tales of far away,
and sing you to sleep with songs which they only
know.

Well, when I asked these four friends to help
me in the matter of stories they were quite ready
to do their best.

“ Stories!” they said, “oh yes, we know plenty.
What sort do the children like best?”

“Well,” I said, “the sort they always ask for
are fairy tales, wonderful things about wood-
sprites and water-sprites; and they are very fond,
too, of knights and ladies, and as many dragons
and giants and enchanted castles as you can
put in.”

“Well,” exclaimed my friends in chorus, “you
Lnutroduction. 13

~



do surprise us! We thought that, since the
passing of the Education Act, the children were
all grown too wise to wonder at anything. Don’t
they call a fairy an optical delusion, and declare
that a knight-errant was a useless member ot
society, and that he and the dragons could not
exist under the same atmospheric conditions?”

“Oh,” I said rather severely, “you travel so fast
that it is no wonder your information is inaccurate.
The children of my acquaintance have every
educational advantage, but their knowledge teaches
them that there are hundreds of good, beautiful
things in this world—and out of it—which they
cannot understand, and that the love and courage
which armed the knights are the grandest and
most powerful things in history.”

That was true, was it not, dear children?

“If that’s the case,” said one of the Winds,
whose voice had a merry roll and rumble like the
tossing of Atlantic waves; “if that’s the case, you
may come to me for stories. Why, Jack the
Giant-Killer himself, and King Arthur and all his
14 The Whispering Winds.



knights, came to live with me when the Saxons

~ drove them out.”

‘““The Saxons brought plenty of good stories
with them,” said the angry voice of a second
Wind. ‘But that’s always the way, nobody ever
has a good word for me. I do all the dirty work
—dry up the winter’s mud, send the fogs and the
fevers about their business, get the ground ready
for sowing, and who thanks me except a few
farmers and sanitary inspectors, who have the sense
to be grateful?”

‘“There were some verses written about you
once,” I said soothingly, for I felt that there was
some truth in the Wind’s complaint.

“Very true,” he replied, somewhat mollified;
“very fine verses they are, so I have heard.
Well, if your children would like something in
the way of a Norse Saga, I shall be glad to
oblige.”

‘“Come to me for tales about fighting,” said a
strong fresh voice like the rush of a mountain river.

“T will give you the gathering tune which called
Introduction. 15

~



the northern clans together, aye, and the coronach
which the women cry over a chief fallen in
battle.”

“You all talk so loud I can’t make myself heard,”
said a soft voice with a caress in every gentle tone;
“but I should like to know who brought the Greek
myths, which were famous before anyone began to
talk about your heroes.”

‘‘ My dear friends,” I pleaded, “ would you mind
telling me your stories in turn? My brain will not
really take in more than one voice at a time.”

“You know we are never let out all together
now,’ said the West Wind regretfully. “ Once upon
a time, when we lived in a mountain, a lady who
had her own reasons for wanting a hullabaloo
begged the old gentleman who had charge of us to
give us all a holiday on the same day. Oh what a
time we had!” and he laughed a free, merry laugh
like wind rattling in the shrouds.

“We got into mischief, I’m afraid,” said the
South Wind demurely. “I was sorry at the time
for the poor ship that we used so roughly, and we
16 The Whispering Winds.



AA



got a dreadful scolding all round when it was over.
I should not like it to happen again.”

“You know we sha’n’t have the chance,” laughed
the merry West Wind.

‘Might we not begin the stories?” I suggested.

The Winds professed themselves quite ready,
the only question was whose story should come
first.

“Well,” I said, “we ought to be polite, and we
are a Northern nation, suppose we hear what the
South Wind has to say.”

So the South Wind stole to my side, all fragrant
with the scent of flowers, and, in a voice like music

on a summer night, he whispered to me this story.

(991 )


‘* Soft, soft wind from out the sweet South sliding,
Waft thy silver cloud-webs athwart the summer sea;
Thin, thin threads of mist on dewy fingers twining,
Weave a web of dappled gauze to shield my babe and me.”
—Kingsley.

This is going to be a fairy-tale about a baby.
If babies could speak they would be themselves
the most wonderful story-tellers. They and the
fairies love each other dearly. What do you sup-
pose they see when they lie blinking and crowing
and catching at sunbeams? Why the elves of
course, sliding down the yellow rays, as their elder
brothers and sisters slide down the balusters.
There is a body-guard of fairies always stationed

round a baby; and though we don’t see them,—
\ (991) B
18 The Whispering Winds.

RAR RAR RRR eer ere”



we're so blind we elder people,—we feel their
presence plainly enough.

““ Behave yourselves when you come here,” they
say to us; “leave your naughty tempers and your
wrinkled foreheads and your worries and troubles
outside this circle, if you please.” They keep a
custom-house, and have a strict examination of
everything that goes into the baby’s country, and
they don’t allow any smuggling.

“Mind your manners,” they say, severely; “if
you want to come into Babydom you must do as
the babies do. Learn to laugh if you please, and
sing too if you can, and turn your back on stocks
and shares and politics, and Paris fashions, and
the price of mutton.”

That’s what the babies’ fairy guardians say.
Just ask the grown-up people if they haven't
heard them, aye, and obeyed them too, as quickly
as possible.

When this particular baby opened her eyes
first, she opened them on a square of the bluest
sky you ever saw, looking through the window
over her bed like the big blue eye of a great, kind,
smiling giant, and being a nice responsive baby
Baby Benedetta. 19



she smiled back at him at once. By and by she
noticed what might have been a green eyebrow to
the great blue eye, a little trailing bit of a vine,
with green cool pointed leaves and tiny twisting
tendrils, running all along the top of the window,
and breaking the sunshine into little patches on
the floor. And better than either the sky or the
vine, she had her mother’s eyes to look at—deep,
deep dark eyes, all overflowing with the beautiful
love, which the angel who brings babies brings
straight out of heaven to mothers’ hearts.

That was enough to occupy the most active-
minded baby for the first few days. Very soon
the baby’s field of observation widened. First
it began to include the round brown faces and
big black eyes of her brother and her two sisters,
faces screwed up into quite a remarkable expression
of wonder and delight; for it was full seven years
since they had had a baby in the house, and at
that time Battista was only six and Maso a year
younger, and Chiara, having been the baby her-
self, was not qualified to express an opinion.

And after a little while she made acquaintance
with a wide blue lake watched over by rocky
20 The Whispering Winds.

Pe

mountain peaks, and with green woods and floods
of hot bright sunshine, and little boats with red
striped awnings. Why, if she had been a poet or
an artist there would have been enough there for
her to think about, and being only a very happy-
hearted baby, she smiled, and cooed, and sang
little songs to herself about all the beauty, and
grew sweeter and plumper every long summer's
day.

She was a very smiling baby; the neighbours
all noticed it when they came to see her.

“Only see how the little one smiles,” they said
to her mother. “It is a blessed child; you are
happy in your babies, my Maddalena.”

And the young mother, thinking so too, called
her baby Benedetta.

Baby Benedetta came when the grapes were
just turning purple, and all through the winter
months there was sunshine enough in that little
house to have ripened any number of grapes, if
there had been any left ungathered. They were
a happy-hearted family, who smiled more than
they frowned; but even if they had been grave by
nature, the fairies who guarded Baby Benedetta
Baby Benedetta. 2

~





would have taken care that nothing but smiles
came where she was. And when the spring came,
then it would have been hard indeed to he'p being
happy. For the nightingales sang all day and all
night, the woods put on a court dress of the
daintiest, brightest green, the meadows were
white-robed and fragrant with narcissus, and on
the banks under the trees grew lilies like a peal of
little white bells, and gentian like big church bells
made out of a piece of the deep blue sky. And in
the little cottage by the lake the young hearts
sang as joyfully as the nightingales.

Well, one day a little boat came across the blue
water of Lake Maggiore, with a beautiful clear
reflection like a coloured picture dancing along by
its side. And when the keel grated on the pebbly
shore, there stepped out of it a man with a kind
brown face and white hair, whom the children ran
to meet and called Grandfather. And when he
had kissed them all round and hugged Mother
twice over, and tossed Baby Benedetta until she
crowed again, he told them why he had come
across from Pallanza to see them to-day. For
there was to be a wedding at Mother’s old home,
22 The Whispering Winds.

De

directly, the very next week. It was that naughty
Tonino who wanted to carry off pretty Aunt Rosa
at once, who said he would not wait any longer
—did they desire to have a wedding when Rosa
was wrinkled and his hair was white like Grand-
father’s? So here was Grandfather come to bring
all the love and the embraces of Grandmother and
Rosa, and to say that nothing in all the world must
keep Maddalena from coming to the wedding—yes
—and staying till late, quite late, when all the guests
were gone, that she might help Grandmother to
put things straight. Rosa had said she would
not be married unless her sister Maddalena came,
and Tonino said that if Rosa would not marry
him he would jump into the lake, and if Tonino
jumped into the lake, Tonino’s aunt, who had
brought him up, would have no one to support
her. So there, Maddalena, little stay-at-home
that she was, might see what depended on her.

«But, my father, the children!” said Maddalena
doubtfully.

“Bring them, bring them,” said Grandfather
heartily; “the festa is for all the family, and
Grandmother will welcome them, the little angels!”
Baby Benedetta. 22

w





But even the children’s father, who leaned
laughing against the door, knew better than that.

“Grandmother will have enough to do without —
four little angels under her feet,” he said; “and if
it is to be a festa for the Madre, and she goes
to help Grandmother, they will be better at home.
I will stay and be Madre for the day.”

But Maddalena would not hear of that. Go
without her husband! No indeed! Who could
make such fun at the wedding, or sing so good
a song as her Beppo? And Beppo had been
Tonino’s friend; if Rosa would not be married
without her, assuredly Tonino would never be
married without Beppo.

And then Battista spoke, with her rosy cheeks
rosier than ever with indignation. Was she a
little tiny baby? Did not Mother say she made
as good soup as herself? Did she not dress and
undress Baby Benedetta for a whole week after
Mother cut her hand? Did the Madre really,
really think that she could not be trusted to mind
the house for one single day? Battista’s black
eyes were quite full of tears, and Father, whose
pet she was, took her part.
24. The Whispering Winds.

RoE I ENO Ae IU IA BETO OE
“ The little one is right,” he said, “she grows

quite a woman; what should go wrong if she





SINS




=
Wy we Ne ‘
Wha SS

SHES

keeps house for a day? You were no older,
Maddalena, when I saw you first, so good a little
Baby Benedetta. 25



housewife, and the mother and father away for
days together at the vintage.”

Maddalena shook her head.

“Yes, but there were neighbours always in and
out, and here it is so lonely.”

“Well, and if there were neighbours,” cried
Battista, “what good would they be? Does not
Mother Assunta, when she does come, make the
little one almost cry, she holds her so badly? Did
you not say I was twice as good a nurse, did you
not, did you not? Ah, Mother, you know you did.”

“T will take care of Baby Benedetta,” cried
Maso; “what should hurt her while I am here?
I will not look away from her, not so much as for
a single‘moment, all day long.”

“And I will play with her,” whispered little
Chiara, with her chin on Mother’s knee as she
knelt beside her. “I will get flowers for her, and
sing and tell stories all the time that Battista
makes the soup.”

“There then, Maddalena, they are all against
you,” said Grandfather; “and the little one would
say the same if she could. Come, say yes, they
all wait for you.”
26 The Whispering Winds.

“Come, Madre, we say yes, do we not?” said
Father.

“Say yes, say yes, Mother,” clamoured the
three voices.

So the Madre said yes, hesitating at first, then
laughing at herself for hesitating, for after all what
could happen to hurt the little family between
sunrise and sunset on one bright May day? So
Grandfather said good-bye, and kissed them all
round and went away, and Maddalena got out her
féte-day dress, and sighed and smiled to think of
her own wedding and of Aunt Rosa, a little,
laughing, roguish maiden then younger than
Battista, and now a bride herself. To think
how time flies; why, Tista will be the next to
go!

And so the wedding-day arrived, and in the
pure, sunny morning she dressed herself, and put
great silver pins in her dark coils of hair, and
kissed the children all round, with two kisses for
Baby. Then she gave them all ever so many
charges to be good, and started, looking back to
wave her hand, and running back to say good-bye
again, until Father dragged her away, saying they
Baby Benedetta. 27,





would be late for the market boat which would
take them from Baveno to Pallanza.

“ remarked Nita the goat to herself, as she chewed
the fresh spring grass meditatively at the cottage
door. She was a motherly old person, with little
ones of her own. “ Battista is a good child, but
young—very young—and thoughtless. Why not?
Who looks for a beard on the chin of a kid? But
that blessed baby weighs on my mind.”

There were two lizards, an emerald green and
a peacock blue one, sunning themselves among
the ferns on a bit of old wall close by, and what
Nita thought, they said out loud.

“T think Maddalena is to be blamed, very
much to be blamed,” the emerald lizard said, mak-
ing a little nervous dart up the wall. ‘It gives
me the creepy shivers to the tip of my tail to
think of what might happen to Baby Benedetta
while she is at Pallanza.”

“So it does me,” said the peacock blue lizard;
“ suppose a thunder-storm came, or a thief stole
her. Why, bless my heart, why couldn’t they
take her with them?”
28 The Whispering Winds.

Re

“You just show your utter ignorance of the
subject,” said Nita crossly. She was anxious her-
self, but she possessed the fine virtue of self-con-
trol and didn’t bother other people with her fears;
and the lizards, she declared, kept her always on
the fidget with their perpetual dartings and shoot-
ings. “A baby ata wedding! Who ever heard
such stuff? And, pray, who ought to know most
about the dear children, their mother, or you two?
If people would but hold their tongues until they
have something worth saying.”

Which remarks so crushed the lizards, that
they darted into the nearest crevices between the
stones like two flashes of light from a blue and
green firework.

Meanwhile the children watched the father and
mother as far as they could see them along the
dusty road, with the blue lake on one side and the
green woods on the other, and then they came
back to the little pebbly beach before the cottage.
They made a sort of little throne for Baby Bene-
detta, and while Battista tidied the room and
chopped vegetables for the soup, the other two
played with her and told her stories. They
Baby Benedetta. 29

RRR RRR nnOOOPPOPOPOWOVOVOWIOOWIOWVOVOYVPO—V—IOIO™”_

watched for the boat on its way from Baveno to
Pallanza, and they counted the little boats and
wondered who was in them. They looked at the
mountains opposite, with the two peaks which
kissed the stars at night, and wondered whether,
if one ever got up so high, one could see what the
angels were doing.

While they talked a nightingale sang ing the
tree behind the cottage. He was a genius—the
nightingale was. That means that he had some-
thing beautiful to tell the world, and that he was
bound day and night to sing till he had told it.
It means that people heard him, and new thoughts
came into their tired hearts, or their own old
thoughts, which had been dim and hazy and un-
formed, stood out clear and beautiful before their
eyes, as if someone broke a place in a big black
cloud and showed the sun, which had been shin-
ing away all the time out of sight. Sometimes
he was sad because he could not tell his mes-
sage well enough; sometimes he got a horrid
idea, quite a mistaken one, that he was singing
out of tune; but then one must pay, by some little
drawbacks, for knowing more than other people.
30 The Whispering Winds.

The children didn’t half understand him; but
they knew that they were the happier for his song,
which, indeed, was all he wanted with them at
present.

While the sun shone and the nightingale sang
and the children chattered, Nita nibbled the grass
close by, and Chiara made a wreath of flowers and
_ put it round her neck; and Nita bleated with plea-
sure, and rubbed up against her and said to herself:

“Good, good; they are wise children, every-
thing will be right.”

The lizards, who had short memories, had got
over their snubbing, and come out into the sun
again. They watched the children, and raved to
each other about Baby Benedetta; for they were
enthusiastic creatures, and never could help talk--
ing about their feelings.

There was someone else, too, watching the
group of children; someone who looked up at
them through the clear blue depths of the lake;
someone who had a wonderful home just where.
the pebbly shore shelved down into deep water.
She was water-sprite, and a very beautiful one.
She had a face like a picture, or a lovely doll.
Baby Benedetta. Zit

aa



She was hundreds of years old, but there was not
a gray thread in her long dark tresses, not a
wrinkle on her white brow, no lines of sorrow or
weariness or tender anxiety on her smooth, fair
face. Some people think a face is improved by
them, but that is a matter of taste.

The water-sprite, who was a great lady among
the lake fairies, had a lovely palace under the
water, lots of inferior sprites for servants, and
fishes to go errands for her. Anyone would have
said that she must be perfectly contented. But it
is always the way in this dissatisfied world, that
the one thing we haven’t got is the one thing
we set our hearts on. And the water-sprite was
quite cross and ill with wanting Baby Benedetta,

There is nothing in the world that makes one
feel so green and horrid as wanting what belongs
to other people; only if one is a respectable, and at
the same time a sensible person, one just looks
the other way and thinks about something else.
But the water-sprite, being neither respectable nor
sensible, went on looking and wanting until she
felt as if it were hardly worth while going on
living at all, unless, by hook or by crook, she
32 The Whispering Winds.



could get hold of the baby. But then how was it
possible for her to steal Baby Benedetta when she
was being so well taken care of? For Tista had
come out of the cottage and was sitting on one
side of her, and Maso on the other, and Chiara
kneeling in front of her, and what chance was
there for a greedy water-fairy to get past those
loving little guardians?

So the fairy went into a dreadful passion, and
shook all her hair into a tangle—which hurt her-
self more than anyone else,—and scolded and
fumed, until the agoni, the little brown fish who
lived in the lake and ran—no, swam—errands for
the water-sprites, simply turned tail and scuttled
away in terror. And then she rolled her eyes and
said, “A time will come”, which always seems to
comfort the bad people in stories, and threw her-
self down on a couch of silvery sand to wait till
the time arrived.

And meanwhile the sun beat down hot on the
blue lake and the green woods, and Baby Bene-
detta’s eyelids began to droop, and Battista said,
‘There then, she is sleepy, the little angel. Sleep
then, my treasure, and Tista will sing to her.”
Baby Benedetta . 33



And she laid the baby on the grass in the shade,
and sang to her about someone who went away in
a most beautiful uniform to fight his country’s
enemies, and someone else who was obliged to
stay behind and would dearly like to have been
a soldier and gone too. It was strange to hear
about soldiers and fighting in the hot bright sum-
mer noontide beside the still lake, but it did quite
well for Baby Benedetta, who fell fast asleep with
a little half smile flickering on her lips.

After she had sung the song twice Battista sat
silent, leaning back against the mossy wall, where
the lizards darted in and out of the crevices. She
was thinking about her mother and the wedding
and Aunt Rosa. Ah, how pretty she would look
dressed for her bridal! What fun it would be to
have everyone looking at you and admiring you
and wishing you good fortune! ‘“ Tista will be
the next,” the Madre had said, and Battista smiled
to herself and wished she could grow up quicker.
She had heard Grandmother say that she was Aunt
Rosa over again, and she wondered if she would
really ever be as pretty. Maso and Chiara had

moved away, and were having a game by the
(991) c
34 The Whispering Winds.
ne
water's edge, and Tista went down to the lake
and tried to see herself in the still water. Yes,
her eyes were like Aunt Rosa’s, and her face was
the same shape only rather fatter; she would look
much more like her if she had on her féte-day
dress, and her necklace, the beautiful necklace that
Grandfather gave her. Oh! what a pity it was
Mother would not let her wear it oftener. And
then she would have to do her hair differently;
if she twisted it up on the top of her head like
Aunt Rosa’s and put a great pin into it, she would
certainly look much taller and more important.
Suppose she were to go into the cottage and try.
She quite longed to see how she would look. She
cast a glance at Baby Benedetta. She was fast
asleep, and would sleep for an hour or more, most
likely.

“Maso! Chiara!” she called, “take care of
the dambina till I come back, I'll only be a few
minutes,” and she went into the house. Maso
and Chiara heard her, and stopped their game for
a minute to look at Baby. But she was so
happily asleep that it seemed a pity to disturb her
by moving her to where they were playing, and
Baby Benedetta. 35

nn ~~



they couldn’t possibly have the same game any-
where else. For just in that place a fallen tree-
trunk ran out into the water, and they were -
pretending that it was a boat, and that Maso was
a boatman who took people for trips on the lake,
and Chiara was a grand English signora in velvet
and diamonds (which we know English ladies
always wear when they travel), and wanted to be
rowed to Santa Catarina. And, after all, what
could happen to Baby Benedetta, even though
some trees just hid her from their sight?

What could happen? Oh, my dear children, if
you could but have known about the greedy eyes
gazing up through the clear water, if you could
but have seen the figure in the green floating
robes with the greedy arms outstretched, who was
parting the blue lake as she rose up noiselessly to
the surface, how you would have forgotten in a
moment all about your play and your finery, and
flown to make a body-guard around that precious
baby.

It was the agoni who noticed first that Baby
Benedetta was left alone.

They were horrid little sycophants, always try-
36 The Whispering Winds.

eth he a Un SANA Ut RR
ing to curry favour with somebody, and they
thought if they told the water-sprite she might



reward them for it. So they swam to her in a
great hurry, and told her that if she really wanted
the little mortal baby she had better make haste
Baby Benedetta. a7







before its relations came back. The water-sprite
wouldn’t believe them at first, but the agoni
vowed they wouldn’t tell her a story to save them-
selves from being fried with bread crumbs. They
said that sort of thing every day, and it meant
nothing; but the water-sprite went to look, and
found that, for once in a way, the agoni had
spoken the truth.

So up she rose through the clear sparkling
water until her bare white feet rested on the shingly
beach. AQ little white cloud came across the sun
as she stepped on shore; the nightingale stopped
singing, and no wonder, it was enough to make
any respectable nightingale feel bad to have any-
one near him so greedy and horrid as the water-
sprite looked at that moment, with the naughty
selfish gleam in her cold eyes. The lizards saw
her and went nearly mad; they darted up and
down like blue and green lightning and tried to
shriek for help; and Nita the goat bleated with all
her might, and tore at the cord by which she was
fastened to a peg in the ground. But, poor things,
what could they do? All their efforts could not
tell the children what was happening. And, in
38 The Whispering Winds.

the cottage, Tista was standing on a stool before
a cracked looking-glass, with her necklace of
coloured beads round her bare brown throat, and
her thick black hair in a heavy coil on the top of
her head. ‘I am like Aunt Rosa,” she was
thinking. ‘“ Ah, now, if I had Mother's silver
pins, should I not be quite beautiful!”

And, outside, Maso was telling the English
signora how a great rock fell through the roof of
Santa Catarina’s little church, and how the good
saint preserved everyone from harm. And Chiara
held up her hands and exclaimed: .

“Oh, wonderful! Miraculous! But you, my
friend, tell the story so beautifully that I must
give you a piece of English gold, and I shall
never row in any boat but yours.”

How should any of them have eyes or ears
for the wicked water-sprite, as she bent over
Baby Benedetta and lifted her, still fast asleep,
in her arms, and stepped back into the lake,
and sank down out of sight through the calm blue
water?

The green and blue lizards rushed almost to the
water's edge in their despair.
Baby Benedetta. 39

I OG CGA

“Qh, the baby, the baby!” they screamed.
“Oh, the darling daméina| Oh, thieves! murder!
police! Why doesn’t somebody come?”

But nobody came till after the parted waters
had closed again over the fairy and her burden,
and the sun was shining down, as if in mockery,
on the place where Baby Benedetta had sunk out
of sight.

Then Battista came out of the cottage with
her necklace on, and a posy of fragrant white
narcissus at her breast, and holding her head
rather carefully, because her hair didn’t feel very
firm. She saw that Baby Benedetta was not
lying where she left her, and supposed that she
was awake and the others had taken her to play
with them. So she went to look for them, hoping
they would be impressed by the difference in her
appearance. After a minute she met Maso and
Chiara. Their game had not ended quite happily,
because Maso wanted to play that he came home
and had a little house and a vineyard of his own,
and Chiara was his wife and made the soup, and
Chiara much preferred to be the English signora
and give little pebbles for gold pieces. So they
40 The Whispering Winds.
ee
couldn’t agree, and left off playing and came back
to find Battista.

“Where have you left Baby Benedetta?” asked
Battista, forgetting to wonder if they noticed her
hair when she missed the baby.

“Under the tree by the house,” said Maso.
“ She was fast asleep, so we didn’t move her.”

All the red went out of Battista’s cheeks.

“She's gone!” she cried, and ran back to make
sure, and the others rushed after her.

There was the tree, and the red handkerchief
which had been tied over Tista’s hair, and the
grass pressed down where they had all been
sitting—but no baby!

“She must have woken up and crawled away,”
said Chiara, with a dreadful frightened look in her
eyes.

And then they all ran hither and thither, and
shouted and called, first trying to speak merrily,
then getting more and more anxious and terrified,
‘until at last Battista threw herself down on the
grass under the tree and burst out into passionate
crying.

« She’s lost, she’s gone!” she sobbed. ‘Oh,
Baby Benedetta. 41

~~

what shall I do, what shall I do? Oh, wicked

122



ones, I told you to take care of her

“Why did you leave her?” cried Maso. “You
promised Mother to take care of her, you know
you did.”

“Oh, don’t, don’t!” sobbed Chiara. “Oh, we're
all wicked and miserable, don’t let us quar-
rel! Oh, Baby, Baby! Oh, what will Mother
do?”

“Oh, I wish I was dead!” wailed Tista, rocking
herself backwards and forwards. ‘Oh, I can’t
meet Mother, I shall jump into the lake and
drown myself!”

“No, don’t,” said Chiara again, ‘it’s enough to
lose Baby; if you were gone too Mother would
die.” And then they threw themselves down
on the grass and cried till they could cry no
more.

All this -was very sad to see. Kind-hearted
old Nita turned her head away, and the sympa-
thetic lizards wept abundantly.

“Oh, dear, it’s too dreadful!” sobbed the pea-
cack-blue one; “it’s perfectly heart-breaking, |
can’t stand it any longer.”
42 The Whispering Winds.
Oo RN

“Nor can J,” whimpered his emerald-green
brother; “do let’s do something. If only we
could tell them where she is.”

“But we can’t; they can’t hear us,” said the.
first lizard. ‘Oh, dear, why can’t we talk human
language? Couldn’t we get an interpreter? When
Maddalena comes home and finds the Jamézna
gone her heart will break, 1 know it will, and
Beppo will die of grief.”

“Oh, yes, so he will, and the dear children will
starve,” sobbed the other. ‘Oh, I can’t stand by
and see them starve! Oh, let’s do something this
minute?”

And then they cried for ten minutes over
Maddalena’s broken heart, and then spent ten
more minutes in saying how sweet Baby Bene-
detta was; which was true, but beside the subject;
but the lizards never could go straight to any
point, and always tried the temper of the chairman
when they sat on a committee. But while the
lizards raved Nita was using her brains, and she
started from the point at which they had branched
off to weep.

“Couldn't we get an interpreter? Was there no
Baby Benedetta. 43

AAR RA RAR RAR Renee eee

one who could tell the children where Baby Bene-
detta was?”

And as Nita wasted no time in weeping or
speculation, she soon came to a conclusion. There
was only one person she could think of who could
understand her, and to whose voice she knew
human beings would listen, and that was the
nightingale. So she determined to ask the night-
ingale’s advice. I can’t say she liked doing it, for,
if the truth must be told, Nita was not fond of
asking advice from anybody, and had always con-
sidered that the nightingale wasted a good deal
of time in singing songs which did not help him
in building his nest or providing himself with daily
bread. However, she felt that the way to help
the children was beyond her understanding, and,
like a wise creature, she came to the conclusion
that there might be powers beyond her under-
standing too, and that she had better go else-
where for help. So she addressed herself to the
nightingale, who was sitting on a bough just behind
the cottage.

“Signor,” she said, “can you spare me five
minutes; if you please? It isn’t often I trouble
44 Lhe Whispering Winds.







you with my affairs, but things have gone wrong,
and I own it’s past my power to mend them.”

She had got so far when the lizards understood
what she was doing, and chimed in both together
as usual.

“Oh yes, dear signor, gracious signor, you will














ie Y
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M,N
WN EY
Ne

if





aR
y Ny j f yy oN f
rs Vi) Z

NEL, | dei d SW 7) oy fig
eZ hee Kanes ; AX
WN AE SOG LZ

Bir Nie OOF
eB aun Vix TE ee

Lifgae) @ w,.
i= s2 ae ap ST La fre wy
CE ne e WU bt % Ui ae

help us, won’t you? You're so kind and so clever,






and all our hearts will break if you don’t help
lise

Nita went on as if the lizards had not spoken.
“That wretch of a water-sprite has got Baby

Benedetta, and I can’t even tell the children
Baby Benedetta. 45

PRAIA RRR RAR RRR

where she is. Now, I know these two-legged
human creatures listen to you, though they can’t
understand a good bleat.”

« And so you'll tell them, won’t you, dear, beau-
tiful, kind signor?” cried the lizards; “or they'll
die of grief, and so shall we.”

“And a jolly good thing if you did,” cried the
exasperated Nita. Of course she said it in Italian,
which sounded prettier, but meant something quite
as forcible.

“Poor things, don't scold them,” said the
nightingale kindly; ‘they're very unhappy.”

“So are we all,” said Nita; “but it won't make
us happier to behave like idiots.”

“We all want to do our best to help,” said the
nightingale, “and I am going to do my part.
Only, you know, my friends, I have not anything
of my own to say. I speak the message that is
given to me, and sometimes I’m afraid I cannot
speak it clearly. But I think there will be a word
for the children here, and I will tell it them as well
as ever I can.” |

“Oh, thank you, thank you!” gasped the
lizards; “we knew you'd manage everything.”
46 The Whispering Winds.
Sa

“Do hold your tongues,” said Nita; “ the signor
can’t hear himself sing for your jabber.”

So the lizards kept as quiet as they could, and
the nightingale flew to the tree under which the
children lay, and began to sing. At first none of
them took any notice. Then Maso stuffed his
fingers into his ears, for it made him think of
Baby Benedetta and feel more miserable than
ever. Tista was almost too unhappy to notice
anything, but Chiara sat up and listened, with a
sudden look of interest in her face. Then she
seized her sister by the shoulder.

“Listen, listen!” she cried. “Hark what the
nightingale says!”

“What do you mean?” asked the other two.
But Chiara only replied, “Listen! do listen!”
And certainly it seemed to them all that the
nightingale’s clear song had words to it, and this
is how they ran:

“ The lake holds a treasure worth its weight im

gold, but that which rs more precious than gold may
yet buy it back again.”

That was all, and he sang it three times, and
after the third time Chiara started up and cried:
Baby Benedetta. 47

RRR RAR RR RRR



‘He means Baby Benedetta, I know he does!
She’s worth her weight in gold, and she’s in the
lake—the water-sprites have got her! Mother
Assunta talks about them, and we must buy her
back. Oh, dear nightingale, thank you, thank
you!”

“But oh, how can we?” cried Battista, while
they all three ran to the edge of the lake as if to
look for Baby Benedetta in its depths. “We
haven't anything more precious than gold to buy
her back with. What must we do? Shall we sell
everything we've got?”

“ Your necklace, Tista,” cried Maso.

“Oh yes, yes,” said Battista eagerly, beginning
to unclasp it with fingers that trembled so that she
could hardly use them.

Now we know, of course, that poor Tista’s bead
necklace wasn’t precious at all. Of course not?
Everybody has them nowadays, your grown-up
sisters wouldn’t wear them to a dance. But, you
see, when Grandfather brought them for Tista from
the fair, and chose the colours he knew she liked
best, and made her put her hand into his pocket
to find what there was there for her, she was so
48 The Whispering Winds.

DO
delighted and felt so fine, that sapphires and
emeralds couldn’t have seemed more valuable. It
was Tista’s greatest treasure. But, oh dear, what
was it by the side of Baby Benedetta? And yet
she could not but give it just one little loving look
as she unfastened it and held it up high in her hand.

“] will throw it into the deep water where the
water-sprites live,” she said.

Nita and the lizards watched her, Nita quite
quiet, though she was really trembling with
anxiety, and the lizards quivering to the tips of
their tails. She never stopped to look at herself
in the water this time. If she had she would have
seen a pale face and eyes red with crying, and
the thick dark hair all tumbling loose about her
shoulders; and yet there had come a new beauty
into her face, a something which can’t be put into
words, because it doesn’t belong to this world at
all.

Just as she lifted the necklace to throw it, Maso
caught her arm.

«Let me run out where it is deeper,” he cried,
and he ran out, knee-deep, waist-deep, into the
water. Once he stopped a moment and bit his lip
Baby Benedetta. 49



Eee



hard, for he had stepped on a sharp pebble, and
his foot was cut and bleeding.

“ Are your hurt, Maso?” asked Chiara.

‘No, no, it is nothing,” he said; and then he



threw the necklace with all his might, and it struck
the still water and sank out of sight. Then
Chiara stretched out her arms, and her tears fell
into the lake.

‘Oh, water-fairies, give her back to us!” she
cried. “You shall have all we have got, only

give us back Baby Benedetta!”
(991) D
50 The Whispering Winds.

~



But nobody answered, and the three children
stood with hands held out and eager eyes fixed on
the water.

Now down at the bottom of the lake the Queen
of the water-sprites was making a royal progress.
She rode along in her state chariot, and took
order with any of her subjects who were not
behaving themselves. You may be quite sure
that the tuft-hunting agoni were on the look-out
to curry favour with her Majesty, and had no
compunction at all about telling tales of their
mistress, the water-sprite. They stood in the
way, bowing and scraping, as she came along,
and all began with their most subservient manner.

“Long live the Queen! Welcome, your Ma-
jesty, to this end of the lake. Permit us the
happiness of directing your Majesty to some
objects worthy of your attention. Here you
may behold some jewels, fitted for no one but
royalty.”

Now the Queen, in spite of her exalted station,
had a real woman’s love for ornaments, so, when
the agoni said that, she stopped to listen, and
asked where the jewels were to be seen.
Baby Benedetta. 51

PRAIA PIP LIDIA ALL LEIS

“This way, your Majesty,” said the agoni, feel-
ing sure of posts about the royal household, and
they swam, tails first so as not to turn their backs
on the Queen, into the apartment where the water-
sprite was lying on her couch, with the most
glorious jewels you ever saw spread out before
her. There was a necklace of sapphires and
emeralds as big as marbles, and a clasp set with
three wonderful rubies, and a coronet of the most
perfect pearls, and, as the sunshine streamed on
them through the clear water, they were almost
too dazzling to look at.

But where did they come from, you ask, when
all that the children sent down was a bead neck-
lace? Yes, and something else besides. Do you
remember those drops of blood on Maso’s cut foot
which no one knew anything about, and those
longing, loving tears which Chiara’s black eyes
dropped into the lake? Well, once upon a time,
men were always looking for the Philosopher's
Stone, which turned everything to gold, and I
think that some such charm had touched the
common blue and green beads and the brave
drops of blood and the tender tears, something
52 The Whispering Winds.



called Love and Sacrifice, which make what they
touch more rare and precious than all the sap-
phires and emeralds, all the rubies and pearls, in
the whole world.

“Dear me!” exclaimed the Queen, “however
did you come by those? Why, I never saw such
jewels in my life!’

The water-sprite had not heard her coming,
and she jumped up and made her court curtsy in
a great hurry, clutching the jewels at the same time.

‘“Where did you get them?” asked the Queen
severely.

“They were sent down by some human beings,”
stammered the fairy.

“Indeed! Very unusual, I think,” said the
Queen dryly; and just then she caught of Baby
Benedetta, fast asleep on a heap of silky green
water-weed.

“My word,” exclaimed the Queen, “what a
beautiful human baby! Where did you get it, I
‘should like to know? Sent down, I suppose, like
the jewels. You stole it, you know you did,
getting us into bad odour with the mortals.
Come, tell the truth, for I mean to know.”
Baby Benedetta. 53

RnR eee re ey



If the water-sprite had been a dog she would
certainly have put her tail between her legs. She
looked thoroughly driven into a corner.

“They did send the jewels down,” she said
sulkily.

“To buy back the baby,” whispered the tell-
tale agoni.

“Well, I call it perfectly abominable,” said
the Queen, “I never heard of such goings-on.
For you to presume to keep the baby when you
were paid a fair price for it. The fact is, you
fairies of good family think you can have it all
your own way, but you'll find yourselves mistaken,
I can tell you. Take the baby home this minute,
and put it where you found it. And as for the
ornaments,” and her fingers closed over them,
“they'll go among the crown jewels. You take
them to my palace,” she said to the agoni.

The horrid little things swam off with alacrity,
thinking they would certainly be made keepers of
the regalia. But they had reckoned without
their host; for the sun, who had been playing
about the jewels all the time, had no intention of
letting them stay among the water-fairies. Soa
54 Lhe Whispering Winds.
Ne ECS:
sunbeam was despatched to take them straight up
to the highest of those two mountain peaks, and
there you may see them glowing sometimes, when
you think it is the setting sun kissing the snow.

The agoni got a tremendous scolding for not
taking better care of the treasures, and were out
of favour with everybody, which generally happens
to those sort of people, and nobody was sorry for
them.

But, meanwhile, the water-sprite, who dared
not disobey the Queen, had taken up Baby Bene-
detta and carried her back to the shore, and laid
her down under the tree, all so noiselessly that the
children, who were looking the wrong way, knew
nothing about it. And then she went back to her
lake palace and sulked and scolded, and gave her
maids a dreadful time of it for the next week.

But Battista and Maso and Chiara, after waiting
for what seemed to them like hours, began to de-
spair of ever getting their little sister back.

_ “The necklace was not good enough,” sobbed
Tista, as they turned back towards the cottage;
“not good enough to buy back Baby Benedetta.
Oh, I would give everything I’ve got, I’d go down
Baby Benedetta. 55

OOO







and live at the bottom of the lake myself, if I
could only see her lying under the tree where we
left her!”

«Why!—why!—” burst out Maso.

“ She’s there!” screamed Chiara.

And then—what then? Did you ever hear of
eating people up with kisses? I can tell you
Baby Benedetta ran some risk of it from her
brother and sisters that day. She woke up
directly and laughed and cooed, and talked a
great deal in baby language, telling them,—if they
could have understood her,—all about the bottom
of the lake and the water-sprites and the agoni,
and that she was very glad indeed to be back
again, for the water-fairy was not half as pretty as
Tista, and there were no flowers there to make
garlands of. But they didn’t understand; they
only knew that they were the happiest children,
and their baby the most beautiful baby in the
world, and that she should never, never, never,
never go away from them any more.

The moon was up that night when Maddalena
and her husband came home. There was a path
of silver right across the lake, and in at the win-
56 The Whispering Winds.



dow and along the floor of the room where the
children were asleep, though they were so sure
they would have been awake when Mother got
back. On a tree behind the cottage the nightin-
gale was singing with all his heart. He knew he
was singing his best to-night, and he sang and
rejoiced and told a beautiful story, which is as old
as the world and yet is always new.

“ What sebf-love has lost, self-sacrifice may win
again,” he sang; and the stars above shone back
in answer, “ Yes, yes, that is true.”

The lizards were asleep in a hole in the wall.

“ Such another day would be the death of us,”
they had said to each other; “but all’s well that
ends well.”

Nita stayed awake till she heard the father and

mother coming along the shady road.
. “That's a good thing,” she said as they drew
near. ‘Now I can sleep in peace, and if they
don’t all take good care of that precious damédina
in future, they’re not worthy to be trusted with
her, that’s all.

Maddalena felt very happy as she drew near
home.
Baby Benedetta. 57

~_—_——e—rrrrre



“It has been a beautiful, happy day,” she said,
“and the best part of all is the coming home to
the little ones. Do you hear, Beppo, how the
nightingale is singing? It is a beautiful world,
my dear, and I am the happiest woman in it.”

And then she stepped noiselessly across the
threshold, and kissed the four sleeping faces, and
the children never woke, only Baby Benedetta
smiled in her sleep.

And, overhead, the nightingale sang to the

stars.

“Ts that all?” I asked, as the South Wind’s
soft tones died away into silence.

“Certainly,” he replied, just a little bit ruffled
by the question. “What else do you want?
Would you like me to say that Baby Benedetta
grew up to be a blessing and a comfort to all
who knew her? No thank you; I’m like the
great Sir Walter Scott, I don’t tell people what
their own common sense ought to find out for
them.”

“Oh, indeed, I didn’t mean that at all,” I said,
hastily. “I only wanted to know if that was
58 The Whispering Winds.

aa





really all, and to say how very much I’ve enjoyed
the story, and I am sure it will suit the children
exactly.”

“Well,” said the North Wind, coming down
upon me with a rush and a sweep; “well, my
taste is for something a trifle more stirring. That
last story was like a lullaby all through; I wonder
you could keep your eyes open.”

‘And pray, what else would you have where a
baby is concerned?” I said severely.

“Not a bit of it,” laughed the North Wind.
‘Babies like what they are accustomed to; if
" you're for ever purring over them, of course they
can't stand anything stronger. Why, dear me,
didn’t you ever hear the song,

‘Rock-a-bye Baby,
On the tree top?’

The wind wasn’t too particular when he broke the
bough, and you may trust me that that baby came
up smiling. Many a bairn has fallen asleep with
my voice in his ears, and lived to grow into a
stout warrior.”

“Well, don’t find fault with other people’s style,
Baby Benedetta. 59

WS.





even if you have stories of your own to tell,” I
said.

I spoke with all the severity I could muster,
just because I was afraid of being unfair; for, do
you know, the voice of that Northern wind went
straight to my heart. As | listened there came
to me the sound of rushing waters and the wild
music of the pipes, and it made my blood run
quicker.

“Stories!” laughed the North Wind! “only let
me try. Do you think there are no fairies any-
where except in your sleepy blue ponds down
South? Did you never hear of the kelpie who
lives in the Northern rivers? There's something
to make your hair stand on end if you like. Have
your Southern families got a spirit of their very
own to warn them when trouble is coming? Do
you think I make those shouts myself that come
borne on my wings, when the nights are wild and
the snow comes driving up the glen? I'll tell you
stories by the score, and I'll warrant you'll not go
to sleep over them.”

And I turned to the North Wind and held out
my hands to him as to an old friend.
60 Lhe Whispering Winds.



ns

“Tell me a story from the Scottish Highlands,’
I cried, “I don’t mind what it is, so that it comes
from the North.”

And, as I shut my eyes to listen, the hills rose
round me, heaving up their purple shoulders
against the pale sky, and the heather was under
my feet and the voice of the river in my ears.

And then the North Wind began—


Backwards, backwards let me wander,

To the noble northern land,

Let me feel the breezes blowing

Fresh along the mountain side ;

Let me see the purple heather,

Let me hear the thundering tide-—Ay/our.

Who may dare on wold to wear
The fairy’s fatal green.— Scott.

I know a northern glen where the winds and
the mists have their home. The mountains draw
together there and leave only a narrow gorge
between them, where the river rushes over the
stones or lies in dark silent pools under the rocks.
On one side the tall bracken and the graceful
birches clothe the hill, and on the other the steep
mountain rises up bare and dark, with only a
62 The Whispering. Winds.

LOO OOOOOrOrOrwrrwrmrrreraem=â„¢>-.



narrow path, where but one man can walk at a
time, running along the face of the precipice.
And just at the head of the glen, where the
river bends a little, there is a piece of grass as
green as an emerald, lying there girdled round by
rock and purple heather, and high on the opposite
bank, looking up the gorge and down upon the
river like a stern watchman, there stood, once upon
a time, a gray old castle. Oh no! you won't find
it there now. People have grown so quiet and so
orderly we don’t want stone walls now to keep us
safe. The laws do that, of course; that’s to say,
they do their best. But though they have tamed
the people who lived there they can’t tame the
glen, not they, and the rocks rise up dark and
grand still, and the river hasn’t learnt to flow like
a canal, and the storm howls there as fiercely as in
the days when the chieftain I am going to tell you
about “kept his castle in the north”, and kept his
neighbours in order into the bargain.
- Ah! I wish you could have seen him coming
down the hillside, with his long easy stride and his
fluttering tartans, and the eagle’s feather in his
bonnet to mark him out from the rest of his clan.
The Green Bridal. 63

PPE FROOOAewowe—™™>



I don’t fancy we make men like that nowadays;
they don’t get fresh air enough. Fresh air and
plenty of room to move are the things that go to
the making of people like this chief. And didn’t
his people love him, his wild, sturdy, simple
people, who lived in their little heather-thatched
huts all up the glen. It never filled them with
envy that he lived in a castle, and it never
occurred to them to want his eagle’s feather or his
big brooch for themselves. His family had been
their chiefs long, long before any of them could
remember, and had a right, they thought, to their
services.

Moreover, being a chief was not all fun, and
meant a certain amount of work on the other side
too. For instance, if one of their clan got his
house burnt or his cattle carried off by an amiable
neighbour, he knew he had only to present him-
self and his grievance at the castle by the river,
and the chief’s sword, or his purse (which hadn't
generally much in it), nay, his last cow or his last
loaf, would be at his clansman’s service that
minute. And at the same time they knew that
they had to mind their own manners, after two
64 The Whispering Winds.

a





~~

or three rather rough-and-ready rules which their
lord and master laid down for them. They knew
that if they practised their light-fingered tricks on
each other’s cattle, or were greedy over the spoil
they took in lawful warfare with people they had
a quarrel against, he was pretty sure to hear of it,
and the offender wouldn’t care to face the look
which kindled his frank blue eyes when he was
angry.

“ Does eagle prey upon eagle and brother upon
brother?” he would say, with a roar in his voice
like the waves practising for a storm. ‘ You
know me, Ronald vich Alastair nan Cath.” (Rather
a mouthful of a name to call anyone by, but it
runs off Highland tongues like water over the
rocks. )

To which the clan would reply submissively
that they did know, and would be very careful
for a good long time afterwards. For they were
like a big family, you see, with a father whom
everybody looked up to and obeyed, and a lot
of unruly children who looked to him for help
and counsel in return. And while they each stuck
to their own part of the bargain, it worked very
The Green Bridal. 65

~~





well, as things do when everybody pulls evenly
and takes his own share of the work.

The chieftain’s wife was dead. They had
buried her among those who had borne his name
for generations past, on a little island in the
middle of a dark steely lake, with sombre fir-trees
climbing the banks around it. All up the glen
the people wept for her, the pipers played mourn-
ful music and the women cried the coronach, till
the hills echoed with their mourning voices. The
castle seemed quite desolate when shé was gone,
though she was only one gentle woman, with a
soft kind tongue and a very loving heart. She
left them all something, though, to keep them
from forgetting her, and the something was a
stout-limbed, yellow-haired baby boy, who was to
be a chief like his father some day, and to have
the eagle’s feather and the castle, and what was
much better, all the love and loyalty of his father’s
clan.

He was a bonnie boy, that little chief, young
Ronald as they called him, so as to distinguish
him from his father until he earned some grand

nickname of his own. He would be like his
(991) z
66 The Whispering Winds.

Oe A
father some day, erect and stately like a young
northern pine, with the light firm tread and the
keen clear sight of the mountaineer, and the grace
which twenty dancing-masters couldn't have
taught him so well as his free active open-air
life. And his mother had given him something
too, though she only held him in her arms once,
poor lady. For, while she clasped her little boy
and looked into his eyes and kissed his lips, she
gave him a heart as tender as her own, full of the
strong deep love which Northern hearts know
well, and a spirit as pure and sweet as the springs
that rise up cold and clear among the heather.

He knew almost before he could walk that he
was going to grow up into a great warrior.
Hadn't he been sung to sleep with stories of
bygone battles, nay, hadn’t he a minstrel all to
himself, a white-haired old harper, whose business
it was to make songs on purpose for him, and tell
him all that his ancestors had done ever since the
castle was built above the river? He had no
history books, you see; that worthy lady, Mrs.
Markham, was not writing in those days, so that
Ronald had not the advantage of knowing what
The Green Bridal. 67

Oe Cain Se RA OA EOE AEDT
Master Richard thought about the feudal system,
or of hearing Master George reproved for allow-

ing his dazzled imagination to run away with



his judgment. But he knew what it was to sit at
old Dugall’s feet on a winter night, when the
peats and the pine logs glowed the brighter
because of the snow and darkness without, and
68 The Whispering Winds.

ARR ARAAeeeeeeeeeaeeereeerw OOOO e_PP|>P>Perr rrr

made the ruddy light dance on the old man’s
white hair and beard and the eager listening face
of the young chief, to hear long rambling songs
about Ronalds and Lauchlans and Eachauns who
had gone forth to war, and come home triumphant
with honour and spoil, or been borne back in
mournful procession, with a blood-stained plaid
for a winding-sheet. And young Ronald would
spring up and try to wield his father’s claymore,
and wish that ten thousand enemies would come
that he might show that the spirit of his ancestors
was not dead. And the sturdy clansmen would
look on well pleased, and vow that their young
chief would be a gallant warrior.

Well, you will think that there were plenty of
people to encourage my hero in his taste for
fighting, but not many to call out the love and
tenderness which I told you his mother left him
when she died. Wait a minute and you shall
hear, for I haven’t yet come to the person who
had the most to do with this story.

One stormy night, when young Ronald was
quite a little boy, there was knocking heard at
the castle door and voices piteously begging for
The Green Bridal. 69

RR ITIL LLL AA SLL SSID RR

shelter. Now if the very worst enemy of the
family had come there with such a request as
that; he would have been let in directly, and
would have found welcome and the best food the
house contained, and been set on his way next
day when the storm was over. But that night
when the door was thrown back, there were only
two people, a tall man and a woman with a
bundle in her arms, with a young stag-hound at
their heels. They were blinded by the snow and
numbed by the cold, but when they heard where
they were they forgot everything in their joy, for
it was to the castle they had been trying in the
darkness to find their way.

The woman undid her bundle, and showed,
wrapped up in a plaid, the most beautiful little
baby girl, fast asleep and quite warm and _ safe.
All the household gathered round to wonder and
admire, and young Ronald, who had never seen
anything like her in his little life before, cried out
to know whether it were a fairy or an angel.
Then the man and woman, who had begun to get
back their wits and their breath with the warmth
and kindness, told that the child was the daughter
70 The Whispering Winds.

a
of a neighbouring chief—that their home had
been burnt by a hostile clan, who had come down
upon them with fire and sword and killed every one
except this child, who had been carried out of the
general slaughter by her nurse and her father’s
harper. They hid with their little lady among the
mountains, and the stag-hound, who had been
their chieftain’s favourite, came with them and
would not leave them. They had been trying all
that day to find our chieftain’s castle, knowing he
had been a friend and ally of their murdered
master and would give shelter to his orphan child.

Of course they were not mistaken. Ronald the
chief wept, as brave men then were not ashamed
to do, over his comrade’s sad death, and vowed
that when the spring came the hostile clan should
learn that he had friends to avenge him. And
indeed they did, for he exterminated them alto-
gether, which sounds rather shocking, but was
quite correct, according to his ideas of justice and
friendship. As for the little girl, he declared
she should be like his own, and should grow up
with his young Ronald like a daughter of the
house. Finella the nurse had a warm seat by the
The. Green Bridal. 71

Re RIS IL

fireside, and Diarmaid the bard sat on the same
bench as Dugall, and quarrelled with him all day
long as to which family had been the most dis-
tinguished, and was descended in the longest
unbroken line from the kings of Scotland. And
Luath the hound lay before the great fire, and no
doubt argued with Ronald's hounds about whose
master had killed the most deer.

And in young Ronald’s wooden cradle the fair-
faced baby lay, like a lily blooming among last
year’s brown leaves. Dugall made a song about a
violet that came to grow under a great black rock
for shelter from the storm, and young Ronald
understood what it meant directly.

“Yes, yes,” he cried, “little Eva is the violet,
and I will be the rock and never let the wind
come near her.”

From which you may perceive that our young
chief knew something of poetry, even though he
couldn’t repeat the rules of prosody and pick out
the obsolete words in a play of Shakespeare, as
you clever young people can.

And little Eva lived and throve in the castle by
the river, and grew into the fairest maiden you
72 The Whispering Winds.

PLD LLL LAL OL Lt



ever dreamed of. I can’t draw a bit, children.
If I could I would show her to you, only the
prettiest picture wouldn't be half pretty enough.
I couldn't find a colour pure enough for her fair
skin, or bright enough for the golden locks which
fell like a shining cloud almost to her knees. And
I couldn’t show you her springing step, or paint
her merry laugh or the light that danced in her
roguish eyes, or the little toss of her proud head
that sent the golden hair shining over her shoulders.
I don’t think she was vain exactly; she had known
how beautiful she was ever since she began to
know anything, and it came to her as a matter of
course. The flowers talked to each other about
her as she came down the hillside.

“Bend your heads,” cried one harebell to the
others, “here comes Eva. Bow to her all of you,
see how beautiful she is.”

“Eva, beautiful Eva,” cried the river, ‘‘come
and look into me. I have a mirror where you can
see your fair self, come and make a picture in my
waters.”

“Look,” said an old cock grouse to his family
as he sat on a gray rock by the narrow sheep
The Green Bridal. 73

ee

track through the heather, ‘‘there is Eva, the
violet flower who came to grow under the rock.
That’s what Dugall sang about her when first she
came, I’ve heard my great-grandfather talk about
it scores of times. Isn't she the bonniest flower
in all the glen?”

“T daresay she is,” said the lady grouse, a trifle
doubtfully (she was of a more critical nature than
her husband), “but with all respect to Dugall |
think he might have found a better simile. To
my mind Eva is not the least bit in the world like
a violet.”

And indeed, children, the lady grouse was per-
fectly right, that is to say if the violet is really the
modest quiet retiring flower we learnt about in
our nursery poetry books. For never in all the
world was there a maiden more wilful and more
wayward than the golden-haired maiden of the
glen. You see she had had her own way ever
since she could remember, she didn’t know what
it was to want anything and be refused it. At the
castle, nay, all up the glen, every man, woman,
and child did her bidding. The old chieftain, the

head of his clan, the terror of his enemies, was
74. The Whispering Winds.
te eee SENN ee
Eva’s humble servant; she could have twisted
him round her finger, led him with a thread of her
golden hair. And what about young Ronald?
Why from that very first evening when the orphan
baby was carried into the castle hall, that strong
tender heart of young Ronald’s was Eva’s to do
what she liked with, and between you and me,
she didn’t half know what a treasure she’d got.
It was just like her bonnie face and her yellow
locks, she had been used to having Ronald at her
beck and call ever since she could remember, and
so she never thought about him. That’s the way
with us all, ’m afraid. We don’t go down on our
knees with thankfulness when roses bloom in the
summer, or cry out how happy we are because
the autumn makes all the woods into fairyland;
more’s the pity, I say, we lose a great deal by
getting used to beautiful things.

And ever since Eva learnt to walk she had
looked upon it as a sort of right that Ronald
should leave whatever he was doing to give her
the help of his strong young arm. If she wanted a
flower, Ronald must get it, even if he ran the risk
of breaking his neck, or getting swept away by
The Green Bridal. as

ee
the river, or drowned in a bog; it was all in his
day’s work, it was part of his business, and she
needn't bother if she forgot to thank him for it.

Once when they were children on the hill together
they lighted on a wild cat with young ones, who
flew at them savagely, and looked as if she were
disposed to spoil Eva’s beauty for good and all.
But Ronald caught the fierce creature and held
her tight in his strong hands, and never made a
sound, though she bit and tore his arm, till he had
strangled the life out of her. And then he just
threw the plaid over his arm, so that Eva mightn’t
see it bleeding. But Eva never thought about it,
she was so anxious to have the cat’s skin for her-
self. So Ronald set his teeth and walked on after
her, carrying the dead cat, and afterwards Finella
tied his arm up for him, and said nothing about it
as he asked her not to.

Well, all this time young Ronald was growing
into a warrior like his father, only he was a finer
fellow even than his father had ever been, and all
over the country they spoke his name with pride,
and minstrels made songs about him and vowed
his fame would reach through the length and
76 The Whispering Winds.

~





ae nw



~

breadth of Scotland one day. And as they sang
of his strength and prowess they sang too of the
_ wondrous beauty of bonnie Eva, his promised
bride. For no one had ever had any doubt that
Ronald and Eva were made for one another.
Ronald’s father had settled that long ago; and of
course the young chief was ready enough, and
Eva never troubled her head one way or the
other. But now Ronald the elder was getting on
in years and wanted to see his son married, and
young Ronald felt as if he should like to make
sure of the happiness of having Eva for his own,
- because it was something so altogether delightful
that he simply couldn’t feel sure of it till it came
true. But Eva was inno hurry. The first time
Ronald asked her if she were not ready to bea
bride it was a winter evening, when she sat in the
red fire-glow spinning, with the young chief on a
wooden stool at her feet and Luath on the other
side, and she took much more notice of Luath.
“Tt is my father’s will, Eva,” he said. He
didn’t say “it is mine”, Ronald never did.
But Eva pouted her red lips.
“Tt is surely not his will to have a wedding in
The Green Bridal. aa
ee Nan

“Tt is ungallant
of all my

the depth of winter,” she said.
of you, Ronald; would you rob me



finery? You men think only of your own pleasure.

Would you have me a bride in furs?”
78 The Whispering Winds.

RAR ARR RAR RRR RRR



“You would be bonnie in sackcloth, my Eva,”
said he. “But you are right, we will wait for the
flowers and the spring-time.”

But when the snow melted and the first flowers
showed themselves still Eva was for waiting.

“A bridal procession with bare boughs!” she
cried. “Fie on you, Ronald! Time enough
when the birch-wood is in leaf.”

But when the birch-wood lay like a green mantle
on the hillside Eva vowed they should never make
a bride of her till the heather was in bloom. She
laughed at the disappointed faces of the two
Ronalds.

“There, I pledge you my word I'll wed when
the hills are purple,” she cried.“ Do you think I
shall take wings and fly away, or vanish in a night
like the fairy castles?”

“Have a care, have a care, my child!” cried
Finella. “Guide your tongue, my dear, when
you speak of the Good Neighbours, bless them.”

“Now you poor people who don’t know any
northern fairy tales won’t understand this, I dare-
say, so] must stop and explain. When you talk
about fairies you think of a certain dream that
The Green Bridal. 79

I eG

somebody dreamt one twenty-third of June, and of
moonlight, and people who swing on harebells, and
only play such pranks as a lot of good-natured
little beings just overflowing with fun and frolic
might indulge in now and again. Well, Northern
fairies aren't like that. They're a gloomy, ill-
tempered lot of beings, who've made a muddle of
their own lives and want to spoil other people's.
They have their dances and their processions and
their feasts, but the glories of them are all a sham;
the gold-laced gowns are made of tinsel and the
jewels made of glass, and, what’s worse, the ban-
quets are nothing but brown paper and sawdust.
Now, pretending is all very well for a bit if every-
body enters into the joke, but if one of the party
keeps on saying that the roast-beef on the doll’s
plate is really an Albert biscuit, and can’t make
the elephant out of the Noah’s Ark do duty for
venison, why, the fun’s all over, isn’t it? And the
fairies had got tired of pretending ages ago, and
were always grumbling and growling and scolding
each other, and envying human beings who were
real and substantial.

And there was nothing they liked so much as
80 The Whispering Winds.

Ee pO
to carry off something belonging to a mortal man,
something that wouldn’t go off into nothing like a
soap-bubble, or, better still, a mortal man himself.
And so they were not altogether pleasant people
to have about. And though our friends in the
glen were not a bit afraid of anything made of
flesh and blood, they didn’t care for facing shadowy,
unsatisfactory creatures, who wouldn’t be a bit the
worse if you ran a sword right through them.
So they always spoke very politely of the fairies in
case any of them should be eavesdropping, which
was a nasty way they had, and called them the
Peaceful Folk or the Good Neighbours, which
were horrid fibs, and didn’t deceive the fairies
a bit.

Now I think I said that just opposite the castle
on the river bank there was a bit of bright green
turf, the most brilliant green you ever saw, like an
emerald in a dark setting, and there, so said the
old people, who were wise about such things, the
Good Neighbours had their wild dances on moon-
light nights, and everybody who didn’t want to be
spirited off to their dreary, dreamy world had better
keep out of the way. Finella knew all sorts of
The Green Bridal. 81
Py RE We NG OE OEE
stories about them, which she would tell in the long
winter evenings; how they sometimes carried off
babies when their mothers’ backs were turned and
put their own ugly little children in their places,
and how they had power sometimes even to bewitch
the souls out of people’s bodies and take them to
live with them clad in forms that were not their
own, and weary and wear out their sad lives among
the shadows and the tinsel of the fairy-land.
Finella always spoke under her breath and very
cautiously, lest any of the Peaceful Folk should be
listening, and was dreadfully worried because Eva
would laugh out loud, and speak in most disre-
spectful terms of the Good Neighbours, and would
even linger on the fairy dancing-ground in the
gloaming, just to see if she could get a sight of
their green gowns as they tripped to and fro.

And now, when everything was settled about
the wedding, and all the glen folks were bidden to
the feast, what must the bride do but vow that she
would be married in green. Finella cried out in
horror at the bare idea. Wear green at the bridal!
the colour that belonged to the fairies—she begged

their pardon, the Good Neighbours—the colour
(991) F
82 The Whispering Winds.

~ RII PD PLL III PORES



which no mortal should dare to wear within twenty
miles of their haunts! Mercy on us all, was their
bonnie lady gone demented? Even Ronald
remonstrated gently; Eva would never want to
have an ill omen on their bridal-day, and she
looked so fair in anything, she was not bound to
wear any particular colour.

But Eva pouted. No colour suited her so well
as the bonnie green. It was the hunting colour,
the proper dress for a mountain maid; and,
besides, it was her choice, and she was not used
to ask anyone’s leave when she chose her gowns.
And then she turned round upon her bridegroom
and asked was he afraid? Did he really fear what
the spiteful fairies might do to him? She always
thought the lords of the glen were afraid of nothing,
but it seemed she was mistaken.

Then Ronald’s sunburnt face flushed dark red,
and he bit his lip as if Eva’s little hand had struck
him a blow, and then said quite gently:

“No, my Eva, I am not afraid. Dress yourself
for your bridal as you will.”

And so Eva had her way, though Finella
trembled and wept and fastened some leaves of
The Green Bridal. 83

DER ees



the rowan-tree into the young lady’s dress, which,
as everyone knows, are a wonderful safeguard
against magic.

You never saw a more glorious day than that
upon which the wedding was held. The hills
wore the imperial purple of their heather robe,
with a fringe of gold where the bracken was
withering. The sky was the clear pale blue of a
northern sky, with great white clouds crossing it
like stately ships in full sail, and laying broad
shadows across the mountain sides. And such a
gallant procession it was that came winding up
the valley towards the castle, when the wedding
was over and nothing remained but to dance and
sing and feast all the rest of the day and night.
The pipers played merry music, and the maidens
wore their gayest gowns, and everyone vowed
that so bonnie a bride and bridegroom never trod
the heather. Eva had been right when she said
that her green gown became her well. Ronald
looked at her as if he had no thoughts for any-
thing else in the world, and the old chief never
took his eyes off the pair.

And so they walked together through the sun-
84 The Whispering Winds.

Ww



shine until they reached the castle, and Ronald
stepped first over the threshold and held Eva's
hand to lead her in, when something made them
pause, for just at that moment a strange scornful
mocking laugh sounded as if from the air above
them, making them start and look up, though
there was nothing to be seen. Three times it
sounded, making the gay bridal party shiver and
tremble, only Eva, in her pride and her beauty,
laughed back again as if in scorn. But the laugh
died away on her lips as she felt her bridegroom’s
warm strong hand grow cold in her own, and saw
a strange gray shadow creep over his face, and
then without a word or a cry he fell forward on
the threshold, and lay there still at her feet.

Old Finella shrieked :

“The fairies, I knew it, ’tis their vengeance!
Oh, woe worth the day!”

And those around, as they pressed up in terror
to where the young chief lay, whispered to each
other:

“The green gown! Alack, alack! ill ever
comes of daring the Good Neighbours!”

The old chief knelt down by the side of his son,
The Green Bridal.








86 The Whispering Winds.

~~.



and lifted his head and gazed into the white face;
but Eva stood still on the threshold with the
colour dying out of her cheeks and her rosy lips,
like a beautiful figure of stone.

But the clansmen, as you know, were not even-
tempered people, and as they saw their gallant
young chief, the hope and pride of them all, lying
there as if he were dead, their wild loyal hearts
rose up in fury against her who done the mischief,
and they turned upon Eva with such looks as she
had never met before.

“Go!” they cried fiercely. “Go out from
among us! Curse of our chief and our clan, go
hence lest we slay you!” And even the old chief
who had made her his daughter, raised not a hand
to stop them.

But Eva needed no second bidding. Even
before they spoke, before the fierce claymores and
shining dirks were bared in the sunshine by the
very men who for years had been her loving
_ servants, she threw up her hands with one little
cry of horror, and fled, fled from among them
all, while the men frowned and the women
shrank back from her touch, fled down the hill-
The Green Bridal. 87

NN





side away from those whom she had made so
miserable.

I don’t think she knew where she was going.
She felt as if she were running away from a
dreadful dream. She felt still the cold touch of
Ronald’s fingers as they loosed their clasp, and
saw the look on his face which was not even a
reproach, when he fell at her feet. It was that, and
not the bare dirks and broadswords, which urged
her flying feet away, away, as if she could fly from
the remembrance. She did not even stop when
she reached the river. It was not deep there, but
I don’t think Eva would have minded if it had
been. She plunged straight in, and in the strength
of her horror and remorse she struggled through
the stream to the other side, across the fairy
dancing-ground, and so up the steep hillside on
and on, never looking where she was going, till
her strength failed her at last, and in the gray of
the evening she sank down exhausted among the
heather and lay still, with her face buried in her
hands and her glorious hair shining like a stray
sunbeam in the gathering darkness.

She did not care that night was coming on, that
88 The Whispering Winds.

n~—n

the wind was moaning and the clouds gathering,
and that she had nothing to eat; she only knew
that her wilful folly had killed Ronald, her noble
bridegroom, and that she knew—now that she
had lost him—what that treasure had been which
she had held so lightly. And so she lay there
and sobbed and wailed in the rising storm, until
by and by she felt something cold against her
hand, and then a gentle touch on her neck, push-
ing aside the heavy waves of hair. And as
she looked up drearily she saw Luath, her old
faithful hound, standing over her, and behind him,
weeping and clinging together, stood Diarmaid
the bard and Finella, who had brought her when
she was a baby to the castle by the river. She
sprang up and would have pushed them away
from her, but they seized her hands and held her
tight and would not let her go, while they cried
over her and kissed her cold fingers and called
her their own lady, their dear lady. Then a
dreadful thought struck Eva.

‘Have they turned you out because you are
my friends?” she cried. ‘Oh! wretched that I
am, have I ruined you too?”
The Green Bridal. 89

~

But the faithful old servants said no, it was not
so, the chief was good and just and would never
have let them go, but that they were bound to
follow Eva, and they would follow her, their own
lady, to the world’s end.

Then the maiden wept afresh, such tears as her
bright eyes had never shed before.

“But this must not be, my friends,” she said.
“Though you are so good, so much too good to
me, you cannot help me now. I must dree my
weary, weary weird alone.”

‘But where will you go, my poor Eva, my dear
lady?” sobbed old Finella.

“7 will wander over the world till I die,” said
Eva, ‘with no rest and no home, bearing the

’

badge of my wicked wilfulness;” and she pointed
to the green dress, all torn and draggled by her
passage through the river. ‘You are old, my
friends, and your limbs would fail you, but I am
young and strong and so my penance will last the
longer.”

And then, as they still vowed they would never
leave her, she knelt humbly down before them, as

she had never knelt to any one in her life.
go The Whispering Winds.

ne RAR







“Go back, if indeed you love me,” she prayed
them; ‘go to the chief and say that Eva prays
him, for the love he once bore her, to give you
shelter. Say that Eva will do penance for her
sins till flesh and blood shall fail, and then she will
crawl to where Ronald lies, and pray them of their
charity to lay her beside him.’

So the two old servants turned away weeping,
but when she would have bidden Luath follow
them, he refused to leave her, and pressed close to
her side and would not be sent away. And so
Eva, in her tattered green dress with the faithful
old dog beside her, went away over the wide lonely
moor into the darkness and the storm. For the
clouds had gathered thick and dark, and the wind
came howling down the corries, and the rain
poured down in torrents on the girl’s bare head.

Once in her life before Eva had come through
such a wild storm, borne asleep and happy in the
arms of her good friends to a warm welcome and
-a safe shelter; but now she had no shelter to go
to, she had ruined the happy home which had
taken her in so readily, and there was no home
for her now any more. The air seemed full of
The Green Bridal. gI

wild voices, fierce shouts, mocking laughter, but
she did not feel afraid of them even though she
wore the green gown; she felt as if the evil
powers had done their worst with her, and she
was too miserable now for them to hurt her any
more.

All that night the storm lasted and all the
next day, and still Eva wandered on, struggling
through the deep heather and breasting the hills
in the teeth of the fierce gale. She hardly felt
the wet and cold, except to remember how often
Ronald’s plaid had sheltered her from the rain
and wind, and Ronald’s arm had guided her over
rough places, and helped her up the mountains.
And she had never thanked him, never thought
about his goodness at all until now, when it was
over for ever. And so she wandered on and on,
hardly knowing that she was tired, and cold, and
hungry, though Luath, who had no dreadful
remorseful thoughts troubling his clear conscience,
rubbed up against her and tried to suggest that
there was such a thing as dinner. But Eva
hardly noticed him, and so, like the well-bred dog
he was, he didn’t press the subject. And, indeed,
92 The Whispering Winds.
he hardly knew his young mistress with her
piteous white face and the wild look in her bonnie
eyes. But Eva, though she was as strong and
enduring as a mountain maiden ought to be,
couldn’t go walking on for ever, and so at last,
when the day of storm and rain was drawing
towards evening, she sank down on the wet
heather and wondered if the time had not come
for her to die. But she didn’t die, she just fell
fast asleep and slept for hours, forgetting all about
everything, while Luath watched over her.

When she woke the storm was over. The
wind wailed still, but softly, like far away crying,
and the moon was struggling out between the
rain clouds and shedding a pale eerie light upon
the wide dark moor and gleaming water-courses.
Eva lay still, because she dreaded to wake up
thoroughly and remember the dreadful thing that
had happened, and just then Luath gave a low
growl and she saw the hair bristle all along his
back. Then she sat up, and put her wet locks
from before her eyes and threw her arm round the
old dog’s neck to keep him still. But Luath, who
never feared the fiercest wolf, and would have


THE ELF-KNIGHTS HOLD REVEL ON THE HILLS.
The Green Bridal. 93

RAN ARRRRRR Renn enero spss sr Om OOS

faced an army to defend his mistress, cowered
down under her hand, and whined as if he were
afraid: And Eva, as she lay half hidden among
the bracken and the juniper bushes, saw two
figures like knights on horseback coming over the
hillside into the pale moonlight. Gallant gentle-
men they looked, tricked out in all manner of
bravery, and with green mantles hanging from
their shoulders and bells on their horses’ bridles.
And all in a moment Eva knew that they were
the fairies, holding a moonlight revel on the hills.
But she did not feel afraid, even though she knew
that the Peaceful Folk would be furious if they
found they had been spied upon, for, as she said,
what more could they do to hurt her now. So
she lay still where she was, and the elf-knights
passed so close that she could almost have
touched them, and could hear every word of their
conversation.

“A fair moonlight night for our riding,” said one,
in a voice hollow and echoing like a dying wind.

“We want but one thing to our Queen’s train,”
said the other discontentedly, ‘our bonnie captive
may not ride with us to-night.”
94 The Whispering Winds.

awe eeeeeaeeaeaeee>m>m>O>r0—OOO*OOOOO™O™E”™Orn”” ~





“Not he,” said the other, “’tis too pure and
brave a soul to be slave to fairy folk; we would
have done better to take the maiden.”

‘Not so,” said the first speaker, “we struck a
harder blow when we carried off the young chief's
bonnie form, and, if the soul be too fair a thing for
us to meddle with, the flesh that clothed it is ours
for ever.”

“Aye,” said the other with a shrill eerie laugh,
“so they harm not the form we have left them in
its place.”

“Not they,” said the first mockingly, “not
they, poor souls. No, no; our pasteboard chief
will have a stately burying, and they will never
guess but that they cry their coronach and sing
their psalms over the real Ronald. Ah! if they
had but a little of our eye-salve, ’twould be ‘into
the fire’ with the gallant form we lent them, and
we should have to give them their own chief back
again.”

“No fear of that,” laughed the other. “ Hist!
—the Queen!”

And sure enough there was the Elfin Queen
in her robe of grass-green silk, and the silver bells
The Green Bridal. 95

anne





eee”



an

on her horse’s mane, as the old ballad tells us, and
after her came all the fairy train, knights and
ladies wondrous fine to be seen, unless one had
the fairy eye-salve, which spoilt the whole pro-
cession. The two knights who had been talking
took their places among the rest, and on they
went with bridles jingling and plumes waving and
jewels gleaming in the pale moonlight. And as
they passed, Eva threw both her arms round
Luath’s neck to keep him from moving, and held
her own breath for fear they should notice her.
Why did she do that when a few minutes ago
she had not cared what the fairies did to her?
Why, just because in those few minutes all the
world had changed to her, because a wild hope
had come unto her heart, and a light into her eyes
that were so dim with tears. And she was think-
ing of some old tales that she used to laugh at,
about people whose bodies had been exchanged
for sham ones by the fairies, and who had seemed
to be pining and dying, till they were saved by
their friends destroying the false form they wore,
when the fairies were forced to bring back the

true one.


96 The Whispering Winds.

Oe



Ns

That was why her own safety grew suddenly
to be such a precious thing, because perhaps it
might mean Ronald’s too. So she waited till
the fairy procession had all passed by, and then
she rose up with a new look on her white face.
Old Luath looked up at her as if he didn’t quite
understand, and was asking what she wanted, and
Eva looked down into his soft truthful eyes.

“ Luath,” she said, “I want to go- home as fast
as may be.”

Luath understood directly; there wasn’t much
he didn’t understand, I believe. He gave a little
sniff, as you or I would have given a nod, and
off he went over the hill towards home at a good
round pace, and yet not too fast for Eva to follow.
She had not come so very far after all; you see,
she had never noticed where she was going, and
so she went back over the same ground and
wandered round and round, not looking to see
whether the country were strange or familiar.
But Luath’s eyes had been open all the time, and
he must have thought his mistress’ behaviour
strange, though he was too much of a gentleman
to remark upon it. But now that she said she
The Green Bridal. 97

mn



wanted to go home Luath knew what he was
about, and thought it a capital idea, and straight
home he led her; so that, just at the dark still
hour before the dawn, they stood on the river
bank opposite the castle in the glen. The river
ran deep and strong, swollen by the rain, but Eva
never waited and neither did Luath. He plunged
straight into the water and the maiden clung to
his neck, and together they got through the
yellow stream with its white foam crests, and
reached the bank gasping and dripping. Up to
the castle door they sped, Eva with the wild hope
in her eyes, and old Luath close at her heels, not
understanding a bit but knowing that he had to
take care of her.

The door was not fastened, I’m sure I don’t
know why; perhaps everybody was too unhappy
to think about it, or perhaps they felt, as Eva
had done, that nothing worse could happen to
them now. At any rate the girl pushed the
door open and went noiselessly into the hall.
It was all quite still The fire had died out,
and the ashes on the hearth looked cold and

gray and cheerless. But there were two great
(991) G
98 The Whispering Winds.
pine-wood torches held in iron sockets on the
wall, and they shed a strange wild light on the
bier in the middle of the hall on which the body
of the young chief lay. There had been some
watchers beside it, young Ronald’s favourite piper
and Dugall the harper, and there were others
stretched upon the floor round the cold hearth;
but in that dark hour before the dawn there falls
such a weight of slumber upon the world that the
tired eyes of the watchers came under its spell.
They were all asleep in the great silence, and
no one heard Eva as she stepped softly across the
floor to the side of Ronald’s bier. And as she
looked by the torchlight upon the form of her
bridegroom, she forgot what she had come for and
dropped on her knees and hid her face. For it
seemed to her that her chief's very self lay there,
so still and grand, with his tartans falling in stately
wise around him. His claymore lay beside him,
and his head was bare, so that the light gleamed
_on his yellow hair. His face was calm and
noble, and seemed to Eva to reproach her all the
more because there was no look of anger upon it.
And poor Eva, who had no fairy eye-salve to
The Green Bridal. 99

_—s

show her the truth, felt as if she had no power to
do violence to the form that seemed so noble and
so fair.

And so she knelt with her head bowed, and
longed to die for her wilfulness by Ronald’s side.
It was Luath who made her look up, giving a low
growl beside her. Luath loved Ronald dearly,
he always went hunting with the young chief, and
would bound even from his mistress’ side to meet
him; but now Luath was looking at Ronald’s form,
with his white teeth showing, and his hair brist-
ling as if in fury. And then Eva noticed that
none of the other dogs, who always lay round the
fire, were in the hall. Had they been turned out
because they were wiser than their betters, and
wanted no fairy eye-salve to tell them that he who
lay there was not their master? The thought
gave Eva courage. She rose to her feet, and
took one of the blazing pine torches in her hand.

“Oh, Ronald,” she said, “if.this is yourself,
forgive me once again.”

And then she turned her head lest the sight
of the grand calm face should take away her
courage, and with the torch in her hand she set
100 The Whispering Winds.

a

light to the bier on which the form of her bride-
- groom lay. She was desperate now, poor Eva,
and she did her work with no faltering hand. A
few minutes more and the flame was streaming up
in flickering spires towards the roof of the dark
hall, and rousing the weary sleepers with its fierce
light. One after another raised his head and
looked around him in wonder. What they saw
was the maiden whom they had driven from
among them, standing with her white face and
wild eyes, and the golden hair falling over the
green gown which had done all the mischief, hold-
ing a flaming torch in her hand, while the body of
their chief was hidden by a dense cloud of smoke,
through which the red tongues of flame were
flashing. Can you wonder that they sprang up
in fury and seized Eva in their strong grasp and
dragged the torch from her hands.
“Out on her! Death to her!” they cried.
“She has slain our chief, and she would rob him
of his grave. Witch! Sorceress! Into the fire
with her!”

Luath growled fiercely and would have flown
at them, but two of them held him back by force.
The Green Bridal. IOI

eo

As for Eva, she said not a word. She felt as if
she had nothing to say. How could she prove to
them what she hardly felt sure of herself, how
could she look for them, in their bitter grief and
anger, to believe her. Then she heard old
Diarmaid’s voice pleading for her.

‘Have pity,” he was saying, “she does not
know what she is doing, grief has driven her
mad. Cast her out if you will, but do not slay
her.” -

But they would not listen, they threw the old
man back and dragged the maiden towards the
fire.

“Jt is an evil spirit in her form,’
“To the flames with her!”

Eva never tried to free herself. She felt too

z

they cried.

bewildered to explain anything. Was it true
what Diarmaid had said? Was she mad? Had
the sight she had seen, the words she had heard,
been only a dream and a delusion? If so, then
what better could happen to her than to die here
at Ronald’s side by the hands of his friends.

The smoke swept across her face and choked
her, she felt the hot breath of the fire scorching
102 The Whispering Winds.

the green dress, singeing her yellow locks, and
she shut her eyes and thought she should never
open them again. And then through the heat
and the darkness she heard a voice which thrilled
her like a trumpet note, a voice which she thought
she had heard for the last time, and what it said
was:

“Eva, where is my Eva?”

And then she felt that she was free, for those
who had been holding her had fallen back, and
were standing gazing before them and holding
their breath as if they saw a ghost. But it was
no ghost who burst in among them, the stately
figure in the flying tartans and the fair face lighted
by the red fire glow. It was their own living,
breathing chieftain, strong and beautiful and un-
harmed; and they had no words to greet him,
they could only gaze at him and ask each other
was it true? The door was open behind him,
and over the hills the gray dawn was breaking
-and putting out the stars, and the breeze that
comes before the sun blew the red flame back and
showed Eva where she stood with the fire all
about her. Only for a moment though, for, the
The Green Bridal. 103

RI RPRARARARRARRRR eee

next, those arms that had always been strong to
guard her were dragging her from the blazing
bier, the ready hands were crushing out the fire,
tearing off the fatal green gown and flinging it
into the flames. And somehow, all at once, every-
one understood and remembered, as they ought
to have done before, what they had heard of the
Good Neighbours’ little tricks, and a shout went
up which shook the very castle towers:

“Our young chief! we have our young chief
again!”

And Luath shook himself free, and made one
great bound to where his master and mistress
stood, and looked as if he would have said:

“Yes, and no thanks to any of you.”

And the old chief rushed in at the sound of the
shout and gazed as if he could not believe his
eyes for very gladness, and Finella rushed after
him and burst into tears of joy, and talked about
the rowan leaves she had sewn into Eva’s gown.
And the fire died down with a shiver, like an evil
power defeated, while the dawn came creeping up
the glen.

And in the pale light Ronald stood with Eva’s
104 The Whispering Winds.

a

fair face hidden humbly against him, and her
yellow locks like a star upon his breast.





It was a wild story, that Highland fairy tale



that the North Wind told. After his voice had
died away, I seemed still to hear the echo of all
he had been telling me—the far-away music of
the minstrel’s harp, and the hollow mocking
The Green Bridal, 105

nN







laughter of the spiteful fairies, and the pipes wail-
ing over the dead chieftain. I felt as if I had
wandered ever so far from Nowadays and brick
walls, and were out on the wild hillside with the
rushing waters in my ears and the wild gale in my
face, and back in the old fighting days when the
fiery cross went round and the clansmen mustered
in the glen. Then I gave a little sigh, for that
breath of the Highlands had been very pleasant,
and thanked the North Wind for his story.

“Did the Peaceful Folk ever bother Ronald
and Eva again?” I asked him.

“Never, I believe,” said the North Wind;
“they had a spell more powerful than the fairies
had. Finella said it was rowan leaves, but I
fancy it was something even stronger. I have
an impression that Ronald got it from his
mother, and that Eva won it that night on the
hillside.”

“Then, if you will allow the expression,” I
said, “the Good Neighbours were, so to speak,
completely sold?”

“Completely,” said the North Wind; “if they
got anything at all out of the bargain it was the
106 The Whispering Winds.

et





wilful freakish part of Eva’s heart, for that never
came back.”

“Excuse me,” said a laughing voice at my side,
“you'll pardon my interrupting, but are all the
stories going to be as serious as this one? Be-
cause I find it rather depressing.”

“Depressing!” I said severely. ‘Dear me, |
think it would take a good deal to depress you.”
And then I laughed, for the West Wind’s voice
was so full of laughter that it was utterly impos-
sible to help joining him.

“Salt, my dear lady, salt from the Atlantic
breakers,” said the West Wind briskly; ‘nothing
like it for keeping you alive. Many a stout heart
I’ve freshened up before those twenty thousand
Cornishmen meant to ‘know the reason why’. The
history books don’t mention me, just like their
unfairness, but I taught those men their lessons;
I rocked Drake’s cradle and made Raleigh dream
of the Spanish Main, and hurried post-haste to
tell them that the Armada was in sight.”

«Ah! you had to be serious that day,” I said.

“Not I,” said the jovial West Wind with a
great gust of laughter, “a stout heart and a
The Green Bridal. 107

DAR AR RRR RR ee





smiling face go best together. Laugh, my dear
lady, laugh, and teach the children the same.
Spirits and goblins and those limp nasty things
can’t stand it; it sends them to the right-about
faster than anything. I'll tell you a story about
that if you like.”

“Well, I shall be very pleased to hear it,” I
said politely, ‘and a merry story comes well after
a grave one.”

“Oh! there’s plenty of grave part in mine,” said
the West Wind, trying to speak pompously; “a
creepy-crawly part like cold water running down
your back. Dreadfully frightening, I can tell
you,” and he burst out laughing again at the idea.

“JT can understand that,” I said, “if it is a story
of the west coast; for you see I had heard of the
false lights luring good ships into the deadly arms
of those smooth, shining Cornish rocks, and I had
seen the little line of laughing foam on the violet
water where many a cruel stab has been dealt in
the dark to a homeward-bound boat.”

“What a hurry you are in to know all about
everything!” said the Wind, trying to be huffy,
and not succeeding a bit. “I have land stories as
108 The Whispering Winds.

aeons WO



well as sea stories to tell. There’s room to fancy
things on those plains of the West where the
hunters and the trappers ask nobody for a game
license.”

“ Ah! then, it is an Indian story,” I said, “with
war-paint, and tomahawks, and birch-bark canoes,
I know.”

‘No, you don’t,” laughed my friend, ‘you're
quite wrong again. It’s an English story, as
English—as English—as the Union Jack at a
British mast-head.”

“Well, go on and tell me, and don't spoil the
end,” I said.

So the West Wind had his laugh out, running
up and down the scale as one plays chop-sticks
on the school-room piano in holiday time, and
then began.


Jog on, jog on the footpath way,

And merrily hent the stile-a;

A merry heart goes all the day,

Your sad tires in a mile-a.— Shakespeare.

Farmer Rowe was a Devon man, born and bred,
and proud to own it. The house he lived in had
belonged to his family for more years than anyone
could count; and it was a place to be proud of, I
can tell you. Do you like cider, and Devonshire
junket, and saffron cake, and clotted cream? And
do you like such a fresh breeze as blew in the faces
of the Devon lads in the days of good Queen Bess,
and stirred their stout hearts till they put to sea
IIo The Whispering Winds.

A



Rn



and sailed “Westward Ho!” for the honour of old
England? Then you had better make friends with
the farmer, and get an invitation to visit him and
see what a hearty welcome he will give you. And
when you see the farmhouse garden, with the big
sweet pink roses and great bushes of lavender, and
the barns full of hay, and the fat cart-horses and
the sleepy good-tempered cows, and the acres of
golden wheat, you will say that the farmer may
well be proud of his inheritance. And when you
see the farmer's family | think you will say that he
can afford to be proud of them too. For Mrs.
Rowe will come out of the dairy to meet you,
with her happy face shining like the sun when he
comes up in the morning fresh from his sea-bath.
Then there is Dick, the eldest son, a head taller
than any lad about, who gets through twice as much
work as any man on the farm, with the help of his
honest hearty laugh and cheery whistle. And
then there is smiling Tamzine, the very image of
her mother at eighteen, and golden-haired Dolly
promising to be her sister over again, and then the
twins, Humfrey and Hilary. And really I am not
sure but that these last are the bonniest of all,
The Mist King. 111

RRR RRR eee





RAAB

for their cheeks are firm and rosy like their father’s
finest apples, and their brown eyes as sparkling as
the golden trout stream that runs down from the
moors to fill the cattle-trough, and they themselves
as merry and kindly a pair of little lads as ever
went bird’s-nesting or played cricket on a village
green. Wherever you see one you may be sure
the other is not far off; where one fails the other
will be on the spot to help him.

Thus, if Humfrey’s sum came wrong and the
figures wouldn’t make anything different, though
he had counted his fingers twenty times and
rubbed the slate till it was greasy, and pressed on
the pencil till it squeaked, Hilary’s curly head
would be pushed over his shoulder and his cheery
voice would say:

“Why, Humf, you duffer, 12 times 9 is 108,
8 to put down and to to carry!”

Or if Hilary went out fishing on a warm half-
holiday without a juicy apple Humfrey was certain
to have such a big one that he couldn’t anyhow
eat it all, and it would be wasteful to throw it away.
So, as Hilary once said:

“You see, Humfrey and I get twice as many
112 The Whispering Winds.

RRR aes



good things as anyone else, because we have each
others’ as well as our own, and only half as many
bad things, because we always go shares.”

Which was an Irish way of putting it, wasn’t it?
But a very true one, all the same, for sympathy
has an odd way of doubling joys and halving
sorrows, as those who have tried it know full
well.

Now I shouldn’t wonder if you are thinking that
it was very easy for the Rowes to be such nice
people, in their beautiful home among such pleasant
surroundings. It’s easy enough to be good-tem-
pered and smiling on a summer holiday, when the
sun shines and the strawberries are ripe; but it
isn’t quite the same thing when the rain comes
down to spoil your cricket match, or on the first
day of term, when the frost breaks up and your
chilblains are sore, and your long-division sum
won't prove. And that is why I say that the
farmer was such a fine fellow, because, when ill
luck came, he still managed to be cheery and
brave and to hope for better times. For, you see,
there came a bad year when it rained all hay-
time and harvest-time, and the cows caught some-
The Mist King. 13

~~





thing dreadful (in four or five syllables), and died
one after the other, and a tramp must needs smoke
his after-dinner pipe under the hay-ricks and burn
two of them. And then there came a fever to the
village, and Dolly caught it, and lost her rosy
cheeks, and got so thin that Tamzine had to take
her dresses in two or three inches. The twins
looked very sad over the wet hay-fields and the
black patch where the hay-ricks had been, and
cried over the favourite cows, but they were sadder
still over Dolly, for, you see, she was nearest them
in age, and came bird’s-nesting and blackberrying
with them, and sat up late to mend their coats
when they tore them ona Saturday afternoon, and
begged them off a whipping when they left the
garden gate open and the pigs got in.

And they wished more than anything to be
useful to their father in his trouble, and stayed at
home on half-holidays to help Dick or read to
Dolly, and laid their curly heads together to think
how they could earn some money. And by and
by there came a way. It was Dr. Curem who
thought of it one day when he was visiting Dolly.

He was the village doctor, and so clever that the
(991) H
TSI The Whispering Winds.

eee







country people were always afraid that the folks in
Plymouth or even in London might hear of him
and want him for themselves. He was a good
man, and I think a happy man, for surely there is
nothing happier than to be able to lift a little the
great sad burden of this world’s suffering. His
patients felt better even for his kindly presence in
their rooms, and as for the children, I do believe
he must have put sugar into their powders, for
they all loved him, and would almost have con-
sented to have a tooth out for the pleasure of
going to see him.

Well, when the doctor had paid his call on
Dolly, and had coaxed her into smiling at him,
and even brought -a little shade of colour into
her white cheeks when he told her she would
be well and hearty in time for the Michaelmas
goose; he lingered a minute to talk to Tamzine in
the garden, for he often made time for a kindly
word about some other matter than the case that
brought him. Tamzine was gathering a posy to
send to the village inn, where they bought her
flowers to deck the parlour with on market-day,
and the doctor said the roses were far finer than
Lhe Mist King. 15

NARA aera









‘his own, and he wished he knew Tamzine’s gar-
dening secrets.

“Tis the little lads are the gardeners, sir,” said
Tamzine, nodding towards Humfrey and Hilary,
who were holding the doctor’s horse.

“Are they, though?” said Dr. Curem kindly.
And then he went on: “ You don’t know of a man
in the village, I suppose, who would come up and
put my garden to rights for the autumn? I’m my
own gardener generally, but this year the fever has
taken the time from the flowers, and the whole
place wants weeding and digging over.”

As the doctor said this Humfrey looked at
Hilary and Hilary at Humfrey, and then Humfrey
burst out in such a hurry that his words tumbled
over each other.

“Oh, please, sir, wouldn’t you take us? We're
ten-and-a-half come Martinmas, and twice ten-and-
a-half’s—” .

“Twenty-one, please, sir,” cried Hilary while
his brother was counting it on his fingers, “and
that’s as old as Dick.”

“And we can dig,” said Humfrey eagerly.

‘And weed,” cried Hilary.
116 The Whispering Winds.

“And take cuttings too, we always do,” gasped
Humfrey.

‘And roll the gravel-path,” spluttered Hilary.

“Oh, sir, only try us,” begged the two to-
gether.

‘ Lads, lads,” said Tamzine, when she could get
a word in, ‘you talk too fast.”

But good Dr. Curem looked down on the two
eager faces and said kindly:

‘But, my dear lads, this isn’t work for you. |
meant to get a lad from the village.”

“They don’t know anything about gardening,”
said Hilary scornfully.

“But your father wouldn’t like you to do this,”
objected the doctor.

“Father wouldn’t mind our doing any honest

)

work,” said Humfrey; “he says so often, please

sir,

‘““And we want so much to earn some money,”
pleaded Hilary.

The doctor looked at them very kindly. ‘You
“want to earn some money, eh?” he said.

“Yes, sir,—yes, please sir, for father,” said the

twins.
Lhe Mist King. 1309)
Be I OE CO

“And you're content, the two of you, to work
for the wages of a bigger lad?”

‘““Oh yes, sir, please.”

“Then if you can get leave from your father
and mother, you shall come and try your hand on
my garden,” said the doctor; and Humfrey and
Hilary looked as pleased as if some one had given
them a hundred pounds.

They got leave from their parents, for I don’t
think the farmer could have found it in his heart
to refuse, when his two little boys begged in such
an earnest manly way to do their share in helping
the family. And so we see them turned into able-
bodied workmen, or rather perhaps, I should say,
an able-bodied workman, since it is only their two
ages together which makes a man in the eye of
the law. And I know this, that no money was
ever so beautiful in their eyes as the wages which
they carried. home and put into their mother’s lap
on the first Saturday night.

Now Dr. Curem’s round, like that of many a
country doctor, was a very wide one, and it was
not only along the high-road that his stout black
pony had to carry him. You could see them
118 The Whispering Winds.







sometimes standing out sharp against the sky on
the summit of a hill, or splashing through the
mud in the deep narrow lanes, or crossing the
wide moors like a moving speck a few shades
darker than the heather. It was very pleasant
on the moor on bright spring mornings, or on
sunshiny August days when the bees were hum-
ming over their heather honey; but then it was
not only in spring and summer that people chose
to be ill, and want Dr. Curem to come to them.
There were winter nights, when the snow lay
drifted like cold soft feather-beds in the hollows,
and there were days when the mists came steal-
ing up, quiet and still like noiseless ghosts, and
put cold arms round you and laid a veil over your
eyes and shut you off from all the world. And
then there were horrid stories of the wicked
malicious little pixies, who led you round and
round, always in a circle, and landed you at last
on what looked like a beautiful patch of green
moss fit for a fairy carpet. But underneath lived
a wicked kelpie, who stretched out greedy arms
and drew you down and down and down into cold
wet darkness where no light or help ever came.
The Mist King. 119



People from the village where our twins lived
had been lost on the moor and never came home
again. There was Tommy Titmouse, the rosiest,
idlest, most mischievous little lad in the Dame
school. It wasn’t that he was stupid; I should
like you to have seen him make a hemlock whistle,
or tie a trout-fly, or play the most puzzling bowl-
ing; but when he had his slate or spelling-book
before him, you would have said he was a born
idiot. It was just because he didn’t choose to
give his mind to it, and he said as much when the
Dame scolded him.

“T hate lessons,” he said; “when I’m a man
Pll never do any.”

“You'll never be a man worth the name if you
shirk what you don’t like, my dear,” said the good
Dame. “I don’t like caning you, but it’s for
your good, and I’m going to do it. Hold out
your hand—now the other—now fetch the fool’s
cap—now stand on that stool and say the multi-
plication table.”

But even the good advice and the caning
couldn’t cure Tommy.

There was one September day when the
120 The Whispering Winds.





heather was in bloom, and the trout stream
danced and sparkled so that he felt as if the fish
were begging him to come and catch them. And
I suppose he thought they would be disappointed
if he didn’t come, or else the rippling water
drowned the ringing of the school-bell, for he took
the turn which led to the moor and not to the
village. And before ever the afternoon closed in,
came the misty curtain down upon the moor and
hid Tommy away from all his friends and kinsfolk,
The boys missed him on the green, his mother
cried over the pillow where his curly head used to
lie, the Dame wiped her spectacles when she saw
his empty place and wondered, good old woman
that she was, whether she had been hard on the
naughty little scapegrace, but he never came
back.

And then there was Mollie Goldilocks, pretty
tidy Mollie, who kept house for her father and
looked after all the little motherless brothers and
sisters; and hard work it was, I can tell you,
sometimes, when there were so many stockings to
darn and the children quarrelled and the baby was
heavy and wouldn't sleep unless she hushed him.
i ae
ig
we

Lhe Mist King. E21
EEO NONE IIe
So that once when she got a day’s holiday and
‘went to the fair on the other side of the moor, and
all the lads wanted to dance with her because she
had the lightest foot on the green, can you wonder
that she was loth to come home? And when
Roger, the blacksmith’s son and the very best
dancer, vowed she must give him one more turn,
she said yes, and told herself that Nan was old
enough to put the children to bed, though she
knew that Nan always burnt the bread-and-milk
and made.the baby scream by sticking pins into
him. It wasn’t right, I know; but I also know
some young ladies who find it dreadfully hard to
cut short the last polka, though the carriage is
waiting and mamma is sleepy—young ladies, too,
who get many more dances than my poor Mollie.
Well, at last she set off home, just when the
first soft mist wreaths came creeping up the valley.
She set off, I say, and that was all anyone knew
about her. The children waited and waited, poor
Nan burnt the milk and made a pin-cushion of the
baby, but Mollie never came. Father grew daily
more gray and careworn, the children went about
with rough hair and torn clothes, the baby cried
122 The Whispering Winds.



itself pale and thin, but busy neat-handed Mollie
never came back to them.

And then, what made even more talk, there
was the good squire’s only son, the bright open-
handed free-spoken young gentleman whom every-
body loved. How bonnie he looked when he
rode away that bright autumn morning, and
laughed at the old coachman who warned him
the weather would not last! How the old man
blamed himself afterwards that he let him go!
but young Master Lionel was hard to hold, and
thought he knew best. They searched for him
far and wide, that dark dreary misty night, but
the day dawned, and many another day after that,
and he never rode home up the old avenue.
The Hall was silent for want of his merry voice,
his little sisters went about the house with soft
steps and sad eyes. Don’t you know, little girls,
what it is when the boys go back to school? And
for these little girls there were no holidays to
look forward to. And the old squire grew bent
and feeble, and cared no more for the hunting or
shooting without Lionel to go with him, and
sighed to think of the old house with a new
The Mist King. 1233



master, instead of the family who had held the
place for King Charles and fought against the
Spanish Armada. For if the Spaniards were to
come again, he thought, who was to hinder them,
now that the loyal stout defenders would be there
no more?

So that you see Dr. Curem’s rounds were not
always pleasant expeditions, which, no doubt, was
much better in the end for the good doctor him-
self, because, as the Dame tried to teach Tommy,
it is just facing the hard work and doing the
things they don’t like which makes such fine
fellows of our Englishmen.

Well, one evening in late September, Humfrey
and Hilary were just writing a few labels for the
doctor’s bulbs and putting up their tools before
going home for the night, when Joe, the physic-
boy, came up and sat down on a turned-up basket
and began to talk to them. Joe was a fat boy with
a dismal face, and when Hilary once asked him
why he was always sighing he replied that if the
doctor scolded Hilary as often as he did him,
Hilary would find it harder to be always on the
erin. He did get a good many scoldings cer-
124 The Whispering Winds.





tainly, chiefly for dawdling when he was sent on
errands; but that, as he had carefully explained
to the twins, was a failing that ran in his family.
None of them ever could go straight to anywhere;
his father’s great-uncle was imprisoned for sheep-
stealing, because he stopped every day, on his way
to work at the gate of a certain field, until an old
ram got so attached to him that he followed him
home. It just showed how unjust the doctor was
to scold poor Joe because of a thing that he was
no more responsible for than another boy is for a
Scotch accent or the want of a musical ear. Only
the doctor never could see it in that light, and no
more could Mrs. Motherly when her baby nearly
died for want of its medicine while Joe stood
looking at the tarts in Dame Halfpenny’s window.
Well, this evening Joe looked even more dismal
than usual, and began the conversation by a sigh
that seemed to come out of his boots.
‘Just putting up for the night, I suppose?” he
said; ‘‘now you're free, you lucky little beggars.”
Aren't you?” asked Humfrey, writing “ Var-
cossus odoriferus” in big round hand on one of
the nice white-painted wooden labels.
The Mist King. 125



ww



“Tl—-no such luck. There’s a bottle of stuff to
go to old Goody Gabble, right across the moor.
A nice walk for this time of night! Horrid old



thing! There’s nothing earthly the matter with
here

“Doctor says those sort of folk are the hardest
to cure,” said Hilary, giving a gentle poke to a
heap of burning weeds which filled the air with a

pleasant healthy autumn smell.
126 The Whispering Winds.



‘Oh, it’s all very well for him to talk,” growled
Joe. ‘He hasn't got to carry her precious stuff
across the moor for her.”

The twins looked up quite red and indignant.

“ Doctor never shirks,” said Humfrey hotly.

‘No, never,” echoed Hilary.

“Well, don’t bite my head off,” said Joe.
‘“ Nobody ever said he did.”

And then he said nothing for a minute until the
twins had stuck in the last label.

‘‘T don’t wonder the doctor’s fond of you two
chaps,” he said then, in his very nicest voice;
“how jolly neat you have made the garden look!
You're just as handy as your brother Dick, and
just as plucky too, I believe. Now I shouldn't
wonder if you'd go across the moor to Goody
Gabble’s to-night and never think twice about it.”

“We shouldn’t mind, should we, Humf?” said
Hilary.

‘No, of course you wouldn't,” said Joe. ‘See
what it is to come of a plucky family. Now, none
of my relations ever could stand the dark; my
mother’s great-aunt couldn’t so much as go into
the cellar for a pint of beer. That’s what it is
The Mist King. 127)

RRR RRR RRR ———PLP—POOOOOOO

makes me hate this job so. I can’t help what's in
the family, can I now? But the doctor never will
see it. Besides,’ he went on, after a minute,
“there’s two of you. I shouldn't mind a bit if
there was two of me.”

Now, I ask you what could our twins do?
How could they refuse to help poor woebegone
Joe, seeing that, as he said, there were two of
them, and they had not the misfortune to come of
a family who were afraid of the dark? So they
said directly that they would take the stuff to
Goody, it was only a matter of a couple of miles.
Joe thanked them a good deal as he handed over
the bottle. He said they were the kindest chaps
he ever knew, and he would do as much for them
any day, and he hoped they wouldn’t mind his
saying good-night now, as his mother didn’t like
him to be late for supper. The twins’ supper
would be waiting too, and they were as hungry as
a pair of healthy boys ought to be after a day's
work; but it was no good bothering about that,
and they knew their mother would understand.
So they set off when the hills were purple with
the sunset, and went whistling across the moors,
128 The Whispering Winds.



only pausing now and then to pick a flower or a
dainty fern, or a bit of golden bracken to make a
posy for Dolly.

Goody Gabble lived in a little low thatched
cottage ever so far from everywhere. There was
a bit of a garden fenced in before the door, and on
this September evening it was gay with yellow
marigolds, looking like a patch of sunshine with
the brown heath all round. The old dame came .
out to meet the twins, and called down ever so
many blessings on the head of the good doctor,
who never forgot her and her drop of stuff, the
only thing that did her rheumatics any good.
She was a hospitable old woman, and would not
hear of the boys going away without a bite or a
sup. And she made them come in and eat a slice
of bread-and-honey — delicious heather honey,
which her own bees had made for her when the
moor was all purple and sweet in the sunshiny
August weather.

““T won't keep you late, my dears,” she said as
she spread the honey on thicker; “I wouldn't
have your dear mother worrying for you. Not
that you'll come to harm. The Mist King won't
The Mist King. 129

ee
hurt them who cross his path on a kind er-
rand.” .

“Who is the Mist King, Goody?” asked Hum-
frey,—with his mouth full, ’m afraid. But he was
in a hurry, you see.

“Hush! hush! my dear, don’t talk about him.
The poor folks know whom he takes away with
him.”

“T thought ’twas the pixies led them folks into
the bogs,” said Hilary.

“That's all people know about it,” said Goody
Gabble. “They work for the Mist King, my
dears; the pixies do. When folks are after no
good, or pleasing themselves when they should be
at work, the pixies take them in hand and lead
them to where the Mist King comes riding on his
gray horse; and once he puts his cloak over them
and lifts them up in front of him, why, ’tis a long
good-night to them, poor souls.”

“ Does he kill them?” asked Humfrey.

“No, no, my dear; not he. He just wraps his
cloak about them and gallops away with them, and
jumps over the Owl’s Rock into his own country,

and there he sings them to sleep. The sun never
(991) Ts
130 The Whispering Winds.

one rae







PPO eee

comes there, you see, and the birds sing in a
whisper; the wind dares not blow and the streams
run without a ripple, and the flowers are all white
and droop their heads. And there the Mist King’s
subjects sleep a charmed sleep. Sometimes the
sounds out of their old life come stealing to them,
and they stir and moan in their sleep and try to
rise, but the spell is on them and they cannot
wake.”

“How awful!” said Humfrey, with the bread-
and-honey half-way to his mouth. ‘“ Fancy hearing
the bacon frizzling for breakfast and not being able
to get up.”

“Can't they ever wake?” asked Hilary solemnly.

“ Not until someone comes of his own will, and
in the way of duty, to the Mist Kingdom and brings
the sunshine with him. And now, my little lads,
you must be off, for the night will be dark, and |
couldn’t rest and think you ranarisk forme. But
there’s no fear, the good spirits take care of all good

souls.”
So the twins said good-night and went off,
thoughtful over the strange weird things they had
heard. .


*©GOODY HOBBLED AFTER THEM WITH A BUNCH OF MARIGOLDS.”
The Mist King. Ii

0







n_



They had gone but a few yards when they heard
oody calling after them, and she hobbled down
ie path with a bunch of flaming marigolds in her
and.

“Just give these to the little sister that’s bad,
ty dears,” she said. ‘ They’re cheerful things—
octor always says they’re like a bit o’ sunshine;
ad I'll warrant squire hasn’t better in his garden.”

The marigolds smelt very strong, and were
ither sticky, but the twins did not object to them
n that account, but thanked Goody warmly and
et off homewards.

It was getting dark and chilly now, and the
rhite fog wreaths lay along the stream as if the
‘airy Queen had left her veils there. However,
s the twins did not come of a family who couldn’t
tand the dark, they thought very little about it,
nd trudged along merrily enough.

“What a horrid place that Mist Kingdom must
ve!” said Humfrey thoughtfully.

“ Awful!” said Hilary. “Isay, Humf, I wonder
f Tommy’s there.”

“| wonder if he is. And Mollie Goldilocks, and
Waster Lionel. Wouldn’t it be fine if we could
132 The Whispering Winds.

ew



ww ree



get them out. I say, how thick it’s getting.
Hilary, do you suppose he'll be out to-night?”

“J don’t care if he is,” said Hilary stoutly.
“He can’t hurt us—Goody said so.”

So on they went, and on the mist went too,
growing and spreading all over the moor, wrap-
ping acold wet blanket over the hills, and lying in
heavy drops on the fustian jackets of the twins.

Joe would have been out of his mind with
fright, and even Humfrey and Hilary left off
whistling, and strained their eyes to see the rocks
and bushes which served as landmarks. Humfrey
was turning round and looking back where the
mist seemed to have built up a thick wall across
their path, when suddenly he felt Hilary clutch his
arm, and heard him say, in a voice that would
tremble a very little:

“Humfrey, look!—it’s him!”

It wasn’t grammar. No, I know it wasn’t;
and I should like to know what sort of grammar
you'd have talked if you had seen what Hilary saw
at that moment. For the Mist King was galloping
across the moor on his gray horse. His hair was
long and flew out all round him, and mingled with
The Mist King. ie

RIOR RR IIT III IIL SOILD LLL

his flowing beard and his horse’s mane; and his
long gray mantle hung in folds about him, and
spread out behind him and left trailing mist over
everything as he passed along. His face was wan

and gray, and his eyes like the cold depths of a



—

winter sea. He seemed to shout to his horse
and to clap his shadowy hands, but he made
no sound, yet the horse sped on like the wind
though no noise of hoofs broke the chill dead
silence.

The twins held each other’s hands tight and
felt as if someone were tickling them with cold
fingers, and at the same moment a great pity
came into their warm little hearts for those who
were in the power of that dread chilly monarch.
naa The Whispering Winds.

DARA RRR eeeeeeeeeeeereermrmrrrOOOe——*—o———™——_-—"—_—"__—-—_—



And into both their heads came the memory of
Goody Gabble’s words:

“No one can wake them but he who comes of
his own will and in the way of duty to the Mist
Kingdom’.

And I don’t know which said it first, for the
words seemed to come out together:

«] say, Humi—”

“T say, Hilary—”

“ Suppose we try.”

“ Hilary, do you think we could catch hold of his
cloak and jump on behind him?”

“T’m sure we could, Humfrey; shall we?”

“ Right you are.”

And the next moment the Mist King’s gray
horse, as he was sweeping by, was pulled up
suddenly by a vigorous tug at his master’s flowing
mantle, and found himself burdened by the addi-
tional weight of two sturdy little brothers, who sat
astride, one behind the other, holding on for dear
_life to his Majesty’s robe. No horse of spirit
would have stood such a shock calmly, least of all
that wild unearthly steed. Perhaps you may have
heard of a buck-jumper, which I believe is about
The Mist King. 135



the most awkward quadruped to stick on to, but I
can tell you that the very worst buck-jumper that
ever jumped was a rocking-horse to the Mist
King’s charger. He stood on his hind legs and
he stood on his fore legs, and bent himself up in
the middle like the Greek letter 2, but Humfrey
and Hilary stuck to him like leeches. As for the
Mist King, he trembled from head to foot. I
don’t know what he felt, but I fancy that the very
touch of anyone so warm and cheery and hearty
as our twins made that cold monarch quake all
down his shadowy spine. He wriggled and shook
himself and tried to drag his robe from the strong
little fists, and finding it was no use he bent his
head and spoke .mysterious soundless words to
his horse, and the horse bent his head and flew
over the heath at a pace that it makes one giddy
even to think of. And the twins went too, holding
on tight to the misty robe.

It was like a dream almost, that wild noiseless
ride through the cold white mist—a strange eerie
dream, without beginning or end, only a continual
going on and on and on. I doubt if even our
twins could have kept their stout little hearts from
136 The Whispering Winds.

ee NO
failing had there not been two of them to encourage
each other, for when Hilary whispered doubtfully:

“You don’t think he can send us to sleep, do
you, Humf?” Humfrey answered stoutly:

“Not he. Goody said he couldn't do us any
harm. Just fancy, Hilary, if we brought Master
Lionel home. Father says squire would grow ten
years younger.”

And a few minutes later Hilary would whisper:

“Fancy bringing Mollie back! Wouldn't the
children be pleased! And I say, Humf, fancy
having Tommy for cricket! He was the best
field we had.”

But I can tell you they wanted every bit of
courage they had when the Mist King’s horse
stopped short for a moment on the edge of the
Owl’s Rock. The white vapour lifted for a minute,
just enough to show them the sharp edge of the
jagged rock going sheer down, down, down into
darkness, as if they had got to the end of the world
_and were looking over into that dreadful thing
called Space. I’m not going to pretend that my
little heroes were not frightened, and I for one
think the better of them because they were. Don’t
The Mist King. 137

you know how you feel when you are learning to
swim, and you go off the diving-board for: the first
time into the deep end of the bath—how you stiffen
your knees and straighten your arms, and put your
head down, as if you were a professional swimmer,
while your heart feels about as stout as a jelly-fish?
Only, having got up on the board you can’t go down
again, except head first, if you die in the attempt.
All the more honour to you, I say. If it were all
easy and natural where would be the need for that
grand English quality called “pluck”? And so I
call my twins a pair of little heroes, because, scared
as they were, they said not a word, but set their
teeth and clenched their hands, and went headlong
over into the Mist Kingdom.

And what did it feel like? Well, it felt a good
deal like the dive off the spring-board. The cold
damp mist closed all round about them and seemed
to stop their breath. They could not even see
each other in the thick white darkness (which
sounds rather contradictory, but I daresay you
understand), only they held on tight to each other
and supposed they would get to the bottom some-
time.
138 The Whispering Winds.

eae



_—_eoemn



After going down and down for what seemed
about a week, to the bottom they did get; but first
of all, the shadowy horse and the shadowy King
melted away into the mist round them, and the
shadowy robe turned into a gray cloud-wreath and
sailed away through their fingers, and there lay
our twins side by side, on a bank by the side of a
still stream, which flowed along without a splash
or a ripple through the Mist Kingdom.

They sat up then and looked at each other, and
then all round them.

It was a strange place they had come to, a wide,
wide land, with hills and woods and rivers, all still
and pale and gray, like shadows that would vanish
if you touched them. It was like being in a thick,
thick white fog, only the fog itself, instead of being
like a dense wall, had taken the form of trees and
bushes and rocks. But the most terrible thing was
the dead silence. The river made no sound as it
flowed along; the trees bent to a breeze which
swept through them, but not a leaf rustled as it
passed. On a bough above the water a bird sat
and tried to sing, but the notes were swallowed up
in the great stillness. And as Humfrey and Hilary
The Mist King. 139

~Y





walked along their feet fell without a sound upon
the river bank.

“ What a horrid place!” said Humfrey shivering,
and his voice sounded hollow and strange, as when
one speaks in a great echoing empty hall. “ Hilary,
just pinch me, will you, I feel as if I was turning
into mist.”

“Oh no, you're all right,” said Hilary cheerfully.
“Tt’s very funny, Humf, but you look as if the sun
was shining on your face; there’s a little spot of
light just where you are walking. Why, I do
believe it’s Goody’s marigolds!”

Humfrey had the big bunch of cheerful yellow
flowers still in his hand, and certainly a warm ruddy
glow seemed to come from them, as different as
possible to the cold colourless gloom of the Mist
Kingdom.

« They’re like a lantern!” cried Humfrey. “ Look
how they show the path.”

“Come, Hilary, let's be quick and call all the
sleepy people and get out of this. It’s horrid—it’s
like a washing-day, only cold.”

So they began to run, following the river, for
they had a feeling somehow that it was the right
140 The Whispering Winds.

ROO





thing to do, and the bunch of marigolds that Hum-
frey carried shone like a little sun and threw a
broad beam across the cold silent stream. And so

I

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MS HDA 4
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they came at last to the Mist King’s garden. He
had a private pleasure-ground like other distin-
guished monarchs, and a very eerie, dreary plea-
sure-ground it was. As Goody Gabble had said,
the flowers were all white; not nice white, like our
earthly roses and lilies, but pale, like blossoms
grown in the dark, and they drooped as flowers
The Mist King. I41

eee





droop when the first frosty night comes and they
hang down their heads and sigh their sweet lives
away. And on a grass plot, round the fountain
where the water fell without a sound into a basin,
lay the Mist King’s captives. Pale and cold they
looked in the pale cold light, but not lifeless, for
their sleep seemed uneasy and restless; they stirred
now and then, and would have moaned if they
could in that silent land, and stretched their yearn-
ing arms as if to clasp something they could never
reach. It was a sad, sad sight, and it made the
hearts of the twins ache.

“Oh, do let’s be quick and wake them!” Hum-
frey said. “Oh, poor things, it’s horrid! Let’s
find Tommy first,”

“Here he is!” cried Hilary; and sure enough
there lay Tommy, with his rosy face grown wan,
and his roguish eyes closed in that terrible charmed
sleep. He stirred and turned, and seemed to try
to rise; and no wonder, for he heard far away the
school-bell ringing up the lane from the village,
and he would have given the best thing he had
now to answer it and be first in his place in class.
And close beside him lay pretty Mollie Goldilocks.
142 The Whispering Winds.

“~~







And she too stretched out her hands so that it was
piteous to look at her, and her long lashes were
wet with tears, for through her sleep the baby’s
wailing came to her, and when she would have
clasped and kissed and comforted him only the
chill mist filled her arms and lay cold on her lips.
And at her feet, stretched out all his bonnie length
on the soft grass plot, was the young squire, Master
Lionel, tossing and turning as if the sound of his
father’s horn and the cheery voices of the hounds
in cry were telling him that it was a glorious
hunting morning, and the cruel spell was holding
him back from following them with the rest.

The twins couldn’t stand it another minute.
Down on their knees they went, and shouted and
called with all the strength of their healthy lungs.
“Wake up, Tommy, wake up! It’s us, it’s Hum-
frey and Hilary! Wake up, Mollie, the baby wants
you! Master Lionel, wake up, sir; we're come to
fetch you home!”

As the twins shouted the sleepers tossed and
turned more and more, as if they were struggling
against the charm, but their eyes did not open and
no sound came from between their parted lips.
The Mist King. 143

~~ Yee”



Humfrey and Hilary shouted till their faces were
red and their throats sore. They were almost in
despair. Was it in vain after all, the terrible ride
and the plunge into the Mist Kingdom? Humfrey
leant over Tommy Titmouse and shouted once
more, his voice getting shaky in his distress.

“Tommy, Tommy, do wake up! Oh, do wake
up—there’s a good fellow!”

And as he leant over him the yellow light from
the bunch of marigolds fell full on Tommy’s
face. ‘

And then—then something happened.

For the next moment the dead stillness of the
Misty Land was rent by a cry—a cry so wild and
ghostly that it could come from no one but the
baffled Mist King—a cry of anger and helpless-
ness and disappointment. And as it died away
Tommy sat up and rubbed his eyes.

“ All right, Mother,” he said sleepily; “I'll be
in time for school yet.”

But the twins jumped up and laughed out loud
for joy, such a glad ringing laugh as had never
sounded in that silent land before. They knew
what to do now. Right and left they flashed the
144 Lhe Whispering Winds.

OOOO



YO



~

marigold sunshine upon the pale faces of the
sleepers. And first Mollie started up and cried °









































































\
M ‘Y

‘YM \ BET WEE
AAR EN







vy Pee! | : 5
/ SNI RNY mrt! af LUMA ws We Are :
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out, “Come to me, baby, my beauty — here’s
Mollie, dear!”

And the young master sprang to his feet with
one bound and cried, “ Hark, for’ard!” And one

after another all the spell-bound prisoners of the
The Mist King. 145

aww



Mist King lifted their heads and gazed at each
other as if they had been roused suddenly from a
strange dream.

But meanwhile the marigold sunshine went on
merrily with its work, for the yellow rays grew and
strengthened and pierced the mist like shining
arrows, and right and left the gray clouds rolled
away before them. The mist veil cleared away,
and the sky grew pure pale blue, flecked with pink
clouds of sunrise. The woods took the colouring
of autumn, dark green and brilliant red and gold.
The flowers lifted their drooping heads, and, as if
they were ashamed of being caught napping,
blushed all sorts of lovely tints. And the terrible
silence was broken too, for a fresh breeze rustled
through the woods, and the trees curtseyed before
it, and whispered the happy news to each other.
The streams broke out into joyous laughter as
they hurried over the stones, the fountain splashed
gaily into the basin, and on every tree the birds
began a perfect clamour of rejoicing. And there
stood Humfrey and Hilary in the midst of a beau-
tiful world, to which life and hope and sunshine

had come back.
(991) K
146 The Whispering Winds.







As for the awakened prisoners, they looked
about them and stared at each other and began to
‘understand.

Well, do you know what it is to wake out of a
terrible dream, and find it has been nothing but
fancy? If you do you will understand how they
danced and shouted and shook each other by the
hand, and how they crowded round the twins and
kissed their hands and their clothes, yes, even their
hob-nailed boots, till Humfrey and Hilary, who
had not been under a spell, felt quite hot and
uncomfortable.

“ Please don’t,” they said. “ Please don’t; there
isn’t any need, really. Don’t you think we'd
better go home?”

And at those words a joyful shout rose all
around them.

“Home, home! yes, let us go home!”

There was no need of a lantern now to show the
path above the river by which the twins had come,
and straight before them, leading right up the
’ Owl’s Rock, was a flight of steps. Up the rock
went Humfrey and Hilary with the joyful crowd
behind them, and above lay the moor, all bright
Lhe Mist King. 147

SRERLRAAARADR ARRAN OO



rns’





with sunshine, and beneath in the valley the gray
church tower and the thatched roofs and the village
green showed fair in the morning light as they
went towards home.

Do you want us to tell you about the home-
coming? Ah! but there are things in this world
so pure and tender and beautiful that we cannot
write of them with pen and ink, only talk of them
under our breath, with smiles which are not far
from tears. And such was the gladness on the
face of Tommy’s mother when her darling naughty
troublesome boy rushed into her arms, and brought
with him ever so much bother and anxiety—stock-
ings to darn, and clothes to patch, and a hungry
mouth to feed. Such was the sight of Mollie,
catching up the heavy baby in her arms, while the
children clung to her and tore her gown, and half
strangled her with their hugs, and poor little Nan
cried, “Oh, Mollie, I’ve managed so badly, but it’s
all right now you’ve come.” And such was the pic-
ture of the Squire, with the tears running down his
furrowed cheeks, and his trembling hands held out
to welcome his son, while the little girls held their
brother tight and vowed he should never go away
148 Lhe Whispering Winds.

again, and the young master frankly told the old
coachman that he should know who was wisest
next time.

And such was the scene at the farm, when the
village lads carried Humfrey and Hilary home
shoulder high, and when twenty people told their
father and mother the story, and Tamzine almost
cried over them when she heard of the dreadful
night ride, and Dick slapped his little brothers on
the back till he nearly knocked them down, and
Dolly looked like the old rosy Dolly as she hugged
and kissed them. All these are not things to write
about; think about them as much as you please,
and grow better and happier for the thought.

And what happened afterwards?

Oh, you always want to know so much; I’ve
told you the fairy part of the story, and that’s all
I have any concern with. But did Dolly get well?
Of course she did. And the farmer get rich again?
Certainly; the latest news is that he is more pros-
perous than ever. And did the twins go on work-
ing for Dr. Curem? I’ve no doubt they did, grew
gray in his service probably; and if the villagers’
fears were ever realized, and the doctor went to
The Mist King. 149

PRA



PWN





PAA

London and became a consulting physician, I dare -
say they answered the bell in powder and livery
and showed the patients in, though I own I can’t
fancy them away from their woods and moors.

And the Mist King? Is his power destroyed
for good and all, or does he still gallop across the
moor on dark nights in search of someone to kid-
nap? Well, it has never been clearly proved, but
if you take my advice you will not cross the
shadowy monarch’s path, unless you go, like my
twins, in the way of duty, and take with you a
good supply of the sunshine of a brave, cheery,
loving heart, before which all such chilly unpleasant
people as Mist Kings hurry away into the darkness
where they belong.

The West Wind ended as he began with a ring-
ing peal of laughter.

“Will that do?” he asked when he could speak
soberly again.

“First rate,” I said, as well as I could, for the
West Wind’s merriment was most infectious; “ we
shall have all the children wanting to be off to the
West Country moors to look for the Mist King.”
150 The Whispering Winds.

Oe»



~r



“Bless their hearts!” said the West Wind warmly.
“A hearty welcome for all of them, and lots of
clotted cream with it.”

And now, leaving my friend to go rollicking on
his way, I turned to the last of the four Winds and
asked what he had to say to me. I felt that I
owed him some attention, for he gets so very little
politeness from English people generally, and has
such very ugly adjectives put before his name
sometimes, that I wanted to make him some little
amends. So I said in my sweetest tones, and
you've no notion how bewitching I can be when
I choose:

“T am sure you have a story to give me for the
children. Why, the very name of the East sounds
like a fairy-tale, and sets us thinking beautiful
romances of Crusaders and Saracen maidens. And,
dear me, why of course it was you who brought
dear Aladdin and Ali Baba, and all the Arabian
Nights!”

_ “IT brought them to Europe,” said the East

Wind, “not to England; my brother, the South ©
Wind, undertook the last part of their journey,
just as the train meets the Dover and Calais
The Mist King. 151

POR een



RADA



steamer when people go abroad. No, the stories
I bring to England are not like that. I don’t
bring you Turkish delight and attar of roses and
Khalifs and Sultanas. I sweep across the cold
Northern Ocean, as once the keels of the Norse
long-ships cut the steel-gray water; I drive the
fogs and the mists before me and harden the earth
and clear the air, and I have a song to sing to
those who will listen.”

“What sort of a song?” I asked respectfully.

“T call them to look me in the face,” said the
East Wind; “I tell them to be true and to be
brave, to hold up their heads and remember that
they come of a race of fighters, to face danger and
see what it is made of, not look the other way, and
cower down when the storm sweeps by.”

“T think I understand you,” I said. “ You filled
the sails of the sea-kings of old, and you come,
ringing with one of their wild sagas, to tell us a
tale of courage which will help us to be brave when
our turn comes.”

“Well, I don’t know,” said the East Wind.
“T have plenty of tales like that, all battles and
war-cries and the fall of burning houses, but once
152 The Whispering Winds.

RRARAR RRNA RR ens RPP



I heard a story which had a soft note in it, like
the lap of waters leaving the shore and the low
sough of the wind among Northern pines, and it is
in my mind to tell you that story to-day. And
whether it is a tale of courage or not I have not
made up my mind.”

“We'll talk it over when you've finished,” I said.

And so the East Wind began.


Come, as came our fathers,
Heralded by thee,
Conquering from the eastward,
Lords o’er Jand and sea.
Come! and strong within us,
Stir the viking’s blood ;
Cracing brain and sinew;
Blow thou wind of God.— Kingsley,

That was what they called her when they told
her story, sitting round the winter fire in the old
timbered farmhouse in the long-ago days. They
all knew the story, every fair-haired maiden who
sat spinning her yarn around the glowing hearth
could tell and sing of Hilda, the Brave-Heart, but
they never seemed to tire of it, though it was an
154 The Whispering Winds.

ee





old, old tale. Ann old, old tale even in the long-ago
days! How long must it be, then, since Hilda sat
herself by her father’s hearth and spun the house-
hold yarn, since she climbed the hill with the cows
and made butter and cheese, and baked and brewed,
and sang about her work, as maidens learn to do
who lead busy healthy lives and live much in the
open air, where the free winds and the happy
birds are the best of music-masters ?

Hilda’s father was a sea-king. I don’t know
whether that made Hilda and her sisters princesses.
If so, they were a very merry and a very busy’
royal family. I don’t mean that royal families are
not usually busy people; indeed I’m sure they
work harder than many of their subjects, and often
don’t get half such a good time of it. Fancy hav-
ing to smile away by the hour together when
you've got the toothache, or to keep the carriage
open and go on bowing first one way and then
the other, with a wind fit to cut you in two and the
sleet coming down on your best bonnet. Oh, my
dear children, it wants a lot of pluck and patience
to be a “regular, right-down” good princess, and
for my own part I would sooner climb with the
Hilda Brave-Heart. 155

AARAARARY







cows to the high green meadows, and bake and
churn and spin as Hilda and her sisters did, aye
and were proud to do.

Hilda’s home was a long low wooden house,
with a big hall where they all gathered in the
winter round the blazing fire and told stories, or
sat at the long wooden tables and ate fresh salmon
and venison with appetites which would astonish
London folks. Close to the house the cold blue
sea-lake (they called it a fiord) ran up into the land,
while the mountains rose up dark on each side,
and the birch-trees clustered on the rocks and
peeped over to see themselves in the water. Up
above were the green pastures, where the cows
went for their summer outing, and had a merry
time of it among the long rich grass and the hill-
side flowers.

People made a great fuss about the summer
there; and no wonder, for it was such a summer!
The sun was so in love with the place that he
never went to bed at all, but sat up above smiling
away as cheerfully at midnight as he did at noon.
Of course, as might have been expected, he wanted
a tremendous sleep after it, and, as soon as the
156 The Whispering Winds.

ann









summer was over, had to retire into private life
and recruit, like a dissipated young lady at the
end of a hard season. He knew well enough that,
as the old song says, “absence makes the heart

,

grow fonder”, and so he let the people get tired to
death of being in the dark, and then came back
with his broad face beaming and smiling, and say-
ing “ All right, here I am, aren’t you pleased I’ve
come?” On which everybody went wild with
delight, and made fuss enough to satisfy the most
exacting sun that ever shone.

But to the women there was one drawback to
all the merriment of spring-time. For when the
bright days came the hearts of their husbands
and sons and brothers began to beat quicker, and
their eyes to turn seaward, and their hands to feel
after sword and battle-axe. And then the stately
long-ships, the water horses, as their masters called
them fondly, were manned, and sailed proudly
down the fiord and out to the open sea, to find
_ fresh countries in the fair far-away south, and come
‘back in the autumn laden with gold and silver,
gems and treasure, won by the swords of the
Norse warriors. And the women would watch
flilda Brave-Heart. 157

news aon eee



them out of sight, and turn back with a sigh and
wonder what stories the men would have to tell
when they came back. For there was no hope of
getting any news before. There was no penny
post, you see, in those days; no chance of sending
a sixpenny telegram such as:

“Sacked town. Heavy booty. Wire news from
home. Flavald Keen-Eye. Reply prepaid.”

No, the women had nothing but their own
fancies to go upon until the long-ships sailed
once more up the fiord, and a joyous beacon was
lighted on the hill, and they hurried to the shore
to welcome their men home. I don’t fancy they
worried much about the chances of their being
slain. You see, fighting was every man’s busi-
ness in those days, and it was as natural to go
to war as it is now to go to the city. And, in the
end, every man expected to get killed, after killing
a good many other people first; a man who didn’t
die in battle was looked upon as rather a failure,
and not much talked about. And so the women
had to make up their minds to it from the begin-
ning, and having grown up, as it were, among
158 The Whispering Winds.

nN Waren









blows and bloodshed, they didn’t as a rule think
of them as anything so very alarming.

As a rule, I say; but then the wise people tell
us that every rule is proved by an exception, and
the exception that proved this rule was my heroine
—Hilda. I say “my heroine”, but I’m sure Hilda’s
friends and relations would have laughed at me
for giving her such a name; for it is a fact that
Hilda hated to hear of fighting, never wished -to
be a man and a warrior, nay, even shivered at the
sight of a naked sword or gleaming axe. How it
came about nobody ever could think, certainly she
didn’t get it from any of her relations, for her
grandfather and great-grandfather, oh and ever
so many greats before that, spent their lives in
fighting and died valiantly with their faces to the
foe.

And her grandmother, not to be behindhand,
had a little fight on her own account when all the
men were away. For an enemy’s ship sailed up
the fiord and the enemies prepared to sack the
‘homestead, but Hilda’s grandmother and her
‘ great-aunts at once manned the walls—no, that
can't be right, would it do to say “womanned”,
flilda Brave-Heart. 159

aes





DOr ~~

I wonder? Well, at any rate they got up on the
roof, and received their visitors with such streams
of boiling water, and such showers of stones and
iron bars and great logs of wood and such little
trifles, that the strangers suddenly found they had
an important engagement at home, and sailed
away down the fiord, vowing that the maidens
had got men’s souls put into them by mistake.
And so you see Hilda's relations naturally felt
injured by her timidity, as a great composer might
do if his daughter couldn’t distinguish “ Rule
Britannia” from “Pop goes the Weasel”, or a
Royal Academician whose son couldn’t draw a
straight line. Hilda’s mother was dead, and her
father didn’t take much notice of her, because, as
I said, he felt rather injured, and preferred to
forget his unnatural daughter by not looking at
her. She had several sisters, none of them a bit
like her, and I’m afraid they didn’t make things
very easy for her. They were gay fearless
maidens, and in this crooked world courage and
tenderness don’t always go, as they were meant
to go, together, and they rather liked to see the
rosy colour die out of Hilda’s cheeks while they
160 Lhe Whispering Winds.

eee



WANN





told their worst battle stories, and to make her
start and shiver by false alarms of wolves on
winter nights and enemies in the fiord. But
in company they tried to hush up her deficiencies
for the honour of the family, sent her out of the
way when the men were wrestling or trying the
unbroken horses, and got in front of her when it
thundered, lest people should see how scared she
was. And poor Hilda thought it very kind of
them, and felt that it was rather a pity she had
not been thrown into the fiord when she was a
baby, instead of living to grow up and disgrace all
her brave kindred.

Well, one autumn evening, Hilda and her sisters
“were standing about the house-door, spinning or
chatting or doing nothing, which was allowable
after such a good day’s work as those young ladies
generally got through. One of the idle ones was
the youngest, Astrid, the baby of the family, who
sat on the door-step with her chin on her hands
looking down the fiord. She was a wild, strange
' little maiden, that baby Astrid, happiest on the
mountain or in the pine-woods, or tossing on the
wild waters when the wind was high. Her sisters
Hilda Brave-Heart. 161





~

thought a good deal of her, and listened to what
she said in a quite extraordinary way, for they had
a notion that she knew more than other people.
And I am not altogether sure that they were
wrong, for people who know and love the voices
of the woods and hills and waters are quick to
understand those things which our eyes and ears
can’t tell us, but which are very real all the same.
So when Astrid said suddenly:

“J had a dream last night,” Thora, the eldest
sister, who managed the house and saw to the
larder, and would no doubt have kept the keys
and cast up the accounts if a Norse household
had store-rooms and butcher’s bills, didn’t snub
her, but said with quite an interested face:

“Well, my child, what was it about?”

“T thought it was evening like this,” said Astrid,
with a sort of look in her eyes as if she saw hun-
dreds of miles away. “The sunset was on the
fiord and made it golden, and there came a long-
ship slowly up to the landing-place. And among
the red clouds up in the sky there were forms
moving in the air and voices calling each other.

And something said to me that they were the
(991) i
162 - ‘The Whispering Winds.

Oe









Valkyrier, the battle-maids who choose the brave
hearts and take them to Valhalla to live with gods
and heroes. And I knew that a brave warrior was
dead, and I waited to see him go. And then there
rose up one from the long-ship in the fiord and
passed to where those voices were calling, but the
air was full of golden clouds and I could not see
who the hero was. Only once there came a hand
out of the floating clouds, waving as if to say fare-
well to those on earth—and oh, Thora, it was
small and slender like a maiden’s hand. And then
there was a great shout of praise and welcome as
if all the heroes rose up to greet the stranger, and
I woke and saw no more.”

“That is strange,” said Thora thoughtfully, join-
ing her thread. “Did you not see the face?”

“ Nay, nothing but the one hand, and I vow it
was not the hand of warrior or sea-king.”

“ Astrid,” broke in the eager voice of Gudruna,
one of the sisters, “tell me, child, was the hand
like mine?” and she thrust her brown fingers into
her little sister’s lap.

“No, it was smaller than yours,” said Astrid
decidedly.
fitlda Brave-Heart. ~ " 163
Gudruna sighed. She had listened .to Astrid’s
dream with the colour coming and going in her
cheeks. She wanted so dreadfully to be a heroine.
She did feel it so hard to have been born a maiden
when she felt quite certain that her heart was the
heart of a warrior. She never heard a fighting
story without feeling that she could have done that
if only she had had the chance, and her one long-
ing was for an enemy’s ship to sail up the fiord
when the men were away, that she herself might
do as her grandmother had done and rescue the
house by her valour. Had she not tried on her
father’s helmet and slipped his shield upon her
arm, and did not the old folks say that she
looked for all the world like one of the Valkyrier?
And so, when Astrid told her dream, Gudruna’s
eager young heart gave a great jump as if her
fancies were coming true. And then, as if it
were not bad enough, Astrid must needs go on to
say:
“The hand was more like Hilda’s.”
Like Hilda’s indeed! Even Hilda laughed with
a sad little sigh at the same time, and Gudruna
might have said something not altogether polite,
164 The Whispering Winds.
for her temper was just a little ruffled, you see,
when Astrid sprang up crying:

“ Look, look what is coming!”

And up the narrow fiord between the rocks came
a stately ship, like some fair sea-bird upon the
water, and a warrior in gleaming armour stood at
the prow.

“An enemy!” cried Gudruna, not a bit afraid.

Oh, let us tly!’ cried: Hilda,

But Thora burst out laughing.

“ Fie, for shame, Gudruna, and ten times more
for shame, Hilda. Know you not the Raven? Our
father is coming home.”

Then Gudruna laughed out loud at her own
folly, and Hilda blushed rosy red, and they all
ran together to the strand to be there when their
father, Snorro the Mighty, the great captain and
sea-king, should step ashore.

He was a fine man that Norse warrior, standing
there on the poop of his ocean steed, and it was
good to see him spring to land and take one
daughter after another into his arms and hug her
much as fathers do now, lifting Astrid up as if she
had been a kitten, and laughing again a hearty
Hilda Brave-Heart. 165

~~ On



~



peal which woke the mountain echoes to laugh
back. For a welcome home was a beautiful thing
in those days, and is a beautiful thing still, and will



be a beautiful thing while yet our hearts are good
and true and loving, and turn back to those we
leave behind even as the compass keeps turning
to the North.

But after a minute or two Thora slipped away
and hurried back to the house. You know what
166 The Whispering Winds.
she was about, don’t you? for didn’t I tell you she
was the housekeeper, and she had to hurry supper
and to see that there was salmon enough for every-
body, and mead and ale enough for all the healths
which must be drunk to celebrate the home-coming.
And so it happened that Thora was gone and Hilda
was clinging to her father’s arm, for on such a
joyful occasion he forgot what a disappointment
she was, when there came up the strand from the
ship a young warrior whom the sisters had never
seen before. The golden sunset glinted on his
shirt of mail and on his winged helmet and on his
thick fair hair till he shone like a sun himself, and
Hilda felt as if he were too beautiful and dazzling
for her to look at. Surely, she thought, almost
holding her breath, this must be one of the Aasir,
the noble powerful gods, come down to visit the
earth and glorify it with his presence. And I
believe she would have fallen on her knees before
him, had not her father cried out in his hearty
_ friendly voice:

“Maidens, here comes Olaf, whom they call
truly the Valiant. Thank him, daughters mine,
that you see me here to-day, for he came stoutly
Hilda Brave-Heart. 167

~~ ~



to my rescue in the. Southern Sea when I was
like to have fought my last battle. Ship and spoil
and many a comrade did he lose in my service, so
must he find friends in my folk and home in my
home while he bides on shore.”

On this Snorro’s daughters welcomed the stately
stranger readily, and as they went homewards he
told them how he had no father of his own, but
had sailed with a distant kinsman who had been
slain in the south, and that he had no kindred
now in the world and must carve his fortune with
sword and axe. And so they reached the hall
and soon thereafter sat down at the long tables to
supper. And oh, my dear children, it was a supper!
Salmon (not salmon cutlets or salmon croquettes,
mind you, but big silver fish, speared in the river
close by) and haunches of venison and joints that
made the table groan, and great horns and tankards
of mead and ale. And they wanted it all, I can
tell you, for sea-air sharpens the appetite, and no
eleven cricketers, no eight rowing men, yes, and
I think I may say,—though I feel it’s a bold word,
- —no Highland house full of sportsmen, could have
competed with those Norse vikings. While they
168 The Whispering Winds.

~





~~





WO

took the edge off their appetites the maidens waited
on them, and proud and happy enough they were
to do it, for nothing pleases cooks and housekeepers
like seeing their good things enjoyed. Astrid took
her place by her father’s side and filled his plate
and his tankard as he emptied them, and the good
old sea-king hardly knew which was the best, the
sight of his little maid or the taste of the home-
brewed ale, which was all part and parcel of home
and friends and welcome.

“Why, friend Olaf, your horn is empty,” he
cried as he drained his own. “Astrid, Astrid,
my little maid, how’s this? Fill up our guest’s
cup, my child, and let him drink to a good cruise
next year.”

“T will fill none but yours to-night, my father,” said
little wilful Astrid; “let Hilda fill for the guest.”

Astrid was spoilt, you see, being the baby of the
family. In those days the youngest did now and
then get spoilt; we know better now, we never do
such things, do we, babies? But in those early
days they made such mistakes. So Hilda filled
" Olaf’s cup, and he emptied it to “old Norway, the
land of fair maidens”,
fiilda Brave-Heart. 169



“Aye, that’s true enough,” cried Snorro, “I’ve
seen no faces in the south to please me as these do.
But wait till we've supped, my children, and you
shall see I did not forget you where I have been.”

And indeed they did see, for his men brought
in such rich and beautiful things, such broidered
stuffs and gold collars and ear-rings and bracelets
as would make any young maiden’s eyes sparkle.
He had got them—well, perhaps we had better
not say how he had got them. He didn’t pay for
them in money, I know, but I rather fancy that in
those days swinging blows were counted as current
coin, and there were plenty of those given and
taken before all those presents for his daughters
got on board Snorro’s ship the Raven, and so
perhaps from his point of view they were honestly
come by. Olaf hadn’t much to show, since his
ship and all the pretty things on board had been
lost in the fight, but by and by he took a chain
from his neck and told Hilda that it came from a
land where the skies were always blue, and where,
close to the blue sea, there grew trees laden with
wonderful golden fruit, while under-foot bloomed
flowers of strange fashions and colour unknown in
170 The Whispering Winds.



the north. And then he begged her to keep it to
remind her of his first coming and the welcome he

had met.













Hilda blushed quite rosy with pleasure, for she
so seldom had nice pretty things said to her, and
such pleasant little speeches do warm and brighten
flilda Brave-Heart. 17d





us up sometimes, as the sun makes the flowers
lift their heads and smile at him. After supper
they had music—wild songs about fighting, in
which you could almost hear the war-ships cutting
through the water and the crashing blows and the
shouts of triumph. And then old Snorro bade
Olaf sing, which he did directly, for in those days
nobody waited to be pressed, or said they were too
hoarse or too shy, which saved a good deal of time.
And as to having no music with him, Olaf couldn’t
have made that excuse, seeing he knew his songs
by heart, and, moreover, made up most of them as
he went along; for he was a poet, or, as he would
have called it, a scald, as well as a soldier, proving
what has been proved dozens of times over, that a
man’s muscles needn’t suffer because he uses his
brains and his fancy too, and loves verse and music
as well as sailing and fighting.

Hilda didn’t generally much like those war-
songs, which always made her dream about
having the house burnt and her own head cut
off; but she couldn’t help listening while Olaf
sang, and besides, he did not sing a war-song
that night. He sang the Saga of Odin, the
ee The Whispering Winds.





All-father, and of how he hung for nine nights,
foodless and comfortless, upon the tree Yeedrasil,
and then plunged down into the depths of the
dark Nether World, and came back bringing a
wondrous song, such as no man ever heard before,
and so reigned in the hero’s city of Asgard over
gods and men. And Hilda’s heart thrilled as she
listened, and it seemed to her for a moment as if
she too could suffer and dare if it were for the sake
of those she loved.

All that winter Olaf the Valiant stayed at the
homestead by the fiord, and every day that he
stayed they all got fonder of him. There seemed
to be nothing that he couldn’t do, he was what our
brothers call “a good all-round man”.

When the frost came and they all went skating
no one in all the dale was so graceful and so swift
as Olaf, no one was so skilful in following the track
of a wolf or a bear, no one told such stories or sang
such songs by the winter fire. And before the
spring came he was very busy about something
else, for he was building himself a new war-ship to
fill the place of the one which went down in the
blue Southern Sea! And what a beautiful thing
Hilda Brave-Heart. 173

PR PTI REI LI LLL EAD SDS LAP SIAL AA LLIN



that war-ship was! No, I don’t think I ought to
say “thing”, for she looked like some wonderful
sea creature, with her stately figure-head rising
out of the water, and the bright-coloured shields
hanging like a girdle all about her. I believe
Olaf knew every nail in that ship, and for that
matter so did the girls, who had watched the
building with the greatest interest, and advised
about the figure-head and the colour of the shields.
They all suggested names for her—all, that is to
say except Hilda, who rarely made any suggestion
until she was asked. But Olaf did ask her, after
all the others had spoken, and then, colouring very
much, she said that if she chose the name of a ship
she would call it Sea-mew, because the sea-mew
had its nest and its little ones on shore, and always
loved them and came back to them. And in spite
of all the remonstrances of Gudruna, who thought
that the “Water-Snake” or the “Destroyer” would
have been a nice cheerful name, Olaf’s war-ship
was called the Sza-mew. And on the day when
the work was finished, and they all went on board
and vowed she was the fairest ship that ever sailed
on northern waters, Olaf went to old Snorro and
174 Lhe Whispering Winds.
EEE OU
told him that, with his good-will, he had chosen a
bride from his household, and asked his leave to
woo his daughter Hilda.



Then Snorro opened his eyes in wonder.

‘Why, man,” he said, “what makes you choose
Hilda? Thora is a wonderful housewife, and no
maiden in Norway can make better cheeses.”

“But I want a wife just now, not a cheese,” said
Olaf.

“Then there is Gudruna,” said Snorro. “That
maiden should have been a warrior. She would
gird on sword and dagger and go to battle with
you to-morrow.”

“But I can fight my own battles still,” said Olaf,

“And little Astrid is wondrous wise,” said
Snorro. “Men say she can read the future, and
I well believe it. Wait a while, my friend, and
let her grow into a woman.”

“But I don’t want to read the future and |
don’t want to wait, and I want Hilda for my wife
now,” said Olaf.

And then it occurred to Snorro, that, though the
other sisters would be certain to marry, there might
be some difficulty in getting a husband for Hilda,
Hilda Brave-Heart. , 175







and if Olaf liked her, why, tastes differed, and it
was his own affair. So he gave his consent, and
left Olaf to woo his daughter. And what do you
think Hilda said? Well, I believe that if Baldur
the beautiful, the Norse sun-god, had come him-
self to ask her to be his bride, she couldn’t have
been more surprised. At first she thought, like
Snorro, that he must mean one of her sisters, and
then when he persisted that it was she herself,
Hilda, whom he wanted, she began to blush and
tremble, and fear that he would be disappointed
when he knew her better.

“You do not know, Olaf,” she faltered with the
tears coming into her eyes. ‘I am not the bride
for a hero. I am no strong brave-hearted maid
like my sisters. I ama coward, Olaf, and I shall
make you blush for me and grieve to think you
chose me.”

But Olaf smiled into her eyes.

“Tf a man had said that of you, Hilda,” he
answered, “I had slain him where he stood.
Nay, my love, I know you better than you know
yourself. No coward soul looks at me through
those eyes.”
176 Lhe Whispering Winds.
RE
And so Hilda, feeling she had said all she could,
put her hand into that of her brave lover and let
him have his will. But she trembled a little still,
for she felt sure that she knew best, and she
feared lest he should find it out and not love her
any more.
And then Olaf set to work to build a house near
Snorro’s, only just a little further up the dale, and



to furnish it for his bride (which was not a very
long business, since they neither of them under-
stood anything about wall-papers or Liberty hang-
ings or artistic furniture), and then he and his
thralls, who were mostly prisoners taken in war
and allowed to work out their freedom, fenced in
some land, and sowed some corn, for he meant to
be a farmer in a small way, though he was more
given, as the songs say, to ploughing the main.
And then, on a sunshiny spring day, he and Hilda
were married, and there were good wishes and
feasting and songs and dancing, and all sorts of
festivities.

And suddenly, in the middle of the wedding
feast, as the first clap of thunder crashes into the
silence of a summer night, there burst into the
ffilda Brave-Heart. ‘177
De PE I SEO OO ECOG
hall a breathless man, hurrying and gasping out
his words as he ran.

“Busk ye, busk ye briskly, men all! Danish
viking ships are on the coast, they will be in the
fiord with sunrise!”

And then if you had seen the men break off in
the middle of draught or song and rise up brisk
and ready on the instant, you would have known
you were in a land of warriors. The young men
looked joyful and the elder men prompt and
cheerful, but in no face was there any sign of
fear. In no face, did I say? Ah, but you know
how one person felt; you know how, while Thora
went to fetch her father his war-gear, and Gudruna
sighed again for the hundredth time because of
the unkind fate that had made her a woman, and
Astrid ran out to try and sight the enemy’s ships,
you know how Hilda shrank and trembled and
looked fearfully at her father and her bridegroom
and cast terrified glances towards the door, dread-
ing to see Danish helmets flashing in the sunset
light. In the first moment Olaf did not notice
her, for Snorro called him to counsel about what

should be done, and when he turned to speak to
(991) M
178 The Whispering Winds.

ww



nN







Z



her again she was gone. He thought she had
run to his own house to take down sword and
helmet for him, or to look to putting provisions on
board the Sea-mew, and he strode off to get ready,
shouting to his men to go on board without delay.

But Hilda had not gone to the new house; no
indeed, poor little trembling bride, her only thought
now was to keep out of her bridegroom’s sight.
For worse than for him to be going away to war,
worse even than the fear lest he should never come
back, was the thought that now he would know
that he had been mistaken in her—he would
see the terror in her face and would never love
her any more. And so, while all the cheery
bustle of preparation was going forward, she ran
away into the fir-wood behind the house and
cowered down in the black shadow against a
rough red trunk, and hid her eyes and wished
twenty times that she had stuck to her first
thought and not let Olaf marry her at all. And
so taken up was she with wishing, and listening to
the clashing of arms, the hurrying of footsteps and
the eager voices, and straining her ears to hear
whether Olaf called her, that she never felt some-
flilda Brave-Heart. 179

mw Anne





one pull her dress, with such a vigorous pull as
must have torn out all her gathers, if Norse
maidens had any.

And then a decidedly cross voice said:

“Hold your head up, maiden, can’t you, and
answer when you're spoken to, if you’ve a tongue
to do it with.”

She looked up then, of course, and saw a little
ugly man with a tangle of red hair and beard, and

‘pigs’ eyes, and a voice like walking on a marble
floor with a stone sticking to the sole of your
boot—and you know how that sets your teeth on
edge. Hilda knew who he was, one of the dwarfs,
the underground workmen who carried on a brisk
blacksmith’s business somewhere inside the moun-
tains, and sometimes forged armour and weapons
even for the gods themselves.

‘Can I do anything for you?” she said gently;
for Hilda had such a sweet temper that she didn’t
even think it necessary to punish her neighbours
because she was unhappy, and that’s saying a
good deal, isn’t it?

“Of course you can,” said the red-haired old
gentleman snappishly, “or I shouldn’t cultivate
180 The Whispering Winds,



the acquaintance of such a milk-and-watery crea-
ture as you seem to be. I’m in trouble too, but I
set about mending it, I don’t sit and whine. I’ve
dropped my hammer into a hole in this rock while
I was breaking off a crystal, and a skinny wisp of
an arm like yours, that couldn’t do a day’s work
to save your life, will just do to pull it out for me.”

Nine people out of ten would have said: “If
you can’t ask civilly, my friend, you can whistle
for your hammer;” but, as I said, Hilda had a
kind heart and a sweet temper, so she pushed up
her sleeve, which was sensibly loose, and thrust
her slender bare arm down into the fissure in the
rock, and pulled out the dwarfs hammer and gave
it to him, not minding whether he said “thank

?

you” or not. But the dwarf was not really bad,
though his parents had certainly never paid two-
pence extra to have him taught manners. His
friends called his rude behaviour “his way”, and
meant it for an excuse, though I shouldn’t consider
it an excuse, I think, to have such a very dis-
agreeable way described as mine. Personally, |
think that such a jewel as a good heart deserves

the beautiful setting of good manners, but the
Hilda Brave-Heart. 181

oe SAA





dwarf and his relations thought it didn’t matter.
However, he did stop with the hammer in his
hand and asked sharply:

“Well now, and what’s the matter with you?
No more than a crystal necklace or a purse of
gold will cure, I’ll be bound. Which will you
have? Make haste.”

“T want neither money nor ornaments,” sighed
Hilda. ‘My husband is going to war, and my
heart will break with fear for him.”

“Well, go with him,” said the dwarf, “then
you'll know the worst that happens, at all events.”

But Hilda looked sadder than ever.

“That would be worse than all,” she sighed;
“for I am a coward, and he would know it, and
hate me, and I would sooner die.”

“ Hoity-toity, here’s a state of things!” laughed
the dwarf. “You want to go and you don't want
to go, and you're afraid of being killed and more
afraid of being afraid. What a mixture and a
muddle a woman’s head must be, to be sure!
However, I don’t mind if I do something for
you.”

So saying he stepped into a narrow opening in
182 The Whispering Winds.

Loa eee eeeeaeeeeeeeeeaeaa0@§Ewnnm@am>aOEOOES’



— ae

the rock like the mouth of a cave, and came back
after a minute with a shining helmet in his hand.

“ Put this on your head,” he said, “and you may
go scatheless through the fiercest battle that ever
raged. You will be invisible, and your voice and
movements will be unheard by human ears, and
no weapon can harm you. In this helmet you
may stand upon the deck of your husband’s war-
ship as safely as on your own hearth. You may
be by his side without fear, and none will know
but that you are spinning at home. What say
you?”

But Hilda hesitated. She had heard stories of
the dwarfs’ presents which had brought little good
to their possessors. Every Norse maiden had
heard of the terrible dwarf sword which would
never sheath itself unless it were fed witha human
life, and brought misery to all who owned it.

But the little man laughed.

“Never fear, maiden,” he said, “it is only for
those who harm and oppress us that we put a
curse with our gifts. We do no ill to those who
deal with us truly and fairly.”

And so Hilda, with a new resolve coming into


991
“pur THIS ON YOUR HEAD AND YOU WILL BE INVISIBLE.”
fitlda Brave-Heart. 183

a



ww



her heart, thanked the dwarf and put the helmet
on her flaxen locks, and went down through the
woods and past all the busy group in front of the
house unseen and unheard. And so she sped away
to Olaf’s house, and, with the thought of what was
before her, her heart seemed to grow strong, so
that when she took off the dwarf’s helmet and hid
it among the rocks close by and stepped across the
threshold, her tread was firm and her eyes were
bright as if she had borrowed some of Gudruna’s
spirit. And when Olaf came out, looking stately
and beautiful as when Hilda saw him first, in his
shining mail, with the pointed shield on his arm,
and sword and axe by his side, he saw her, and
caught her in his arms and then held her from
him and laughed into her eyes.

“ Farewell, Hilda, my brave little heart,” he said.
“ He slandered you foully, my love, who called you
a trembler. Why, the sound of war brings the
colour to your cheeks. Who would not fight with
such a face to fight for!”

And Hilda, whispering to herself, “He is not
leaving me, I am going with him,” let Olaf go
without shedding a tear.
184 The Whispering Winds.

NR hae



i SIN



And then the stately war-ships glided out upon
the fiord, which lay all still and glassy in the hush
of the evening, and the golden sunset glowed upon
the warriors’ mail and the bright shields hung
round the sides of the ships, and the stalwart
rowers bent to their oars, and the women on the
shore stood waving and watching until the ships
were out of sight.

“The sun is crowning the victors,” said Astrid
gravely.

‘Oh, to be one of them!” sighed Gudruna.

“Poor Hilda!” said Thora. “ Never even to bid
Olaf good speed.”

And none of them dreamt of the slender figure
in the shining helmet who stepped on board among
the sturdy warriors, and stood now, trembling a
little, close to Olaf’s side.

The red and gold died out of the sky, and the
night came down upon the fiord. In the home-
stead the women watched and waited; Gudruna
carried a few stones up on to the roof, for she had
a faint hope that the Danish ships might somehow
slip up the fiord and give her a chance of dis-
tinguishing herself. Thora got ready such a meal
flilda Brave-Heart. 185

tw



as people would want after winning a great victory,
and Astrid sat at the door and looked over the
ford with the strange light in her eyes. Every-
one had too much to do and to think of to miss
Hilda.

And at the mouth of the fiord, where the open
sea stretched out towards the sun-setting, the two
long-ships lay and waited in the still, keen star-
light. The water lapped softly against their sides,
and now and then a breeze like a whisper stirred
the sea and went sighing away into silence. And
all night long, while the warriors watched and
rested by turns, that one figure stood voiceless
and invisible at the prow and looked up at the
stars and down at the dark water, and thought
one moment fearfully:

“What if the foe should come!” and then hope-
fully :

“Still I am by Olaf’s side, and it is better than
being at home.”

And when the sun rose up in uuolaen glory over
the hills and the pine-woods, there came into sight
four high-prowed stately ships bearing down upon
the mouth of the fiord, and at sight of them there
186 The Whispering Winds.

oan eeeeeern



a wweeenmmreoerrrooameeeaeses



~~

went up a great shout from the Ravex and the Sea-
mew, and the oars dipped as if the rowers had but
one heart among them, and the still shimmering
water cleft apart as the ships shot forward like war-
horses when the trumpet sounds the charge. And,
all unseen by the eager warriors, a figure stole close
to Olaf’s side and two trembling hands stretched
out towards him, while he cried to his men:

“ Now strike for home, men of Norway, lay on
for wives and children!” |

And so the battle began.

I do not doubt but that the scalds of Norway
have sung the story of that sea-fight, and have
told how the ocean steeds spurned the foaming
water, and how the lightning lagged behind
the swift sword of Olaf the Valiant, and the
thunder hadn’t a chance against the blows of
stout old Snorro’s war-axe. But I will leave you
to listen for such songs yourself, when the night
wind crashes through the bare wood and flings
the hail against your windows on a winter even-
ing. For my tale is about Hilda, and I am sure
that Hilda, though she stood all that day by the
mast of the Sea-mew, could tell you very little
flilda Brave-fHeart. 187

PRIA OIE

of that battle. For like many a one before and
since, whose heart might else have failed before
the horror and the suffering which the battle-songs
leave out, she kept her eyes and her thoughts
all that day on her own part of the battle, and that
part was Olaf. And, as she watched him, her
thoughts were so full of him and of how grand he
looked and of how all went down before him, that
there wasn’t any time to think about being afraid.
And whether the watchful eyes which he couldn't
see, and the loving heart beating so close to him,
made Olaf’s foot more swift and his arm more
strong, is a question that wiser heads than mine

must answer.

All that day Hilda’s three sisters sat on the hill-
side and watched and listened. Thora had brought
her distaff and her hands moved all the time, but
her face was just a little grave, for, after all, the
unexpected sometimes happens, and her father and
his stout friends. might get the worst of it and the
Danish ships sail up the fiord. And Gudruna
walked restlessly up and down, and felt the edge

of a dagger which she had put in her girdle.
188 The Whispering Winds.

eee



me



And little Astrid sat on the ground with a listen-
ing look in her eyes, and never stirred all day.

“Astrid,” Thora said once, “what are you listen-
ing to?”

“The wind is talking to the fir-trees,” said Astrid.

“What does it say?” asked Thora wonderingly.

“Only one thing over and over,” said the little
sister. ‘Jt says that loving heart ts brave heart,
Jor love ts mightier than fear, and longer than life,
and stronger than death,”

And then they were silent for a long time, until
the sunset lighted a crimson beacon over the sea.
Then Thora laid down her spinning and asked
again:

“ Little one, do you hear anything?”

And Astrid nodded and held up her finger.

“ Hush!” she whispered. “There is a shout of
victory in the air.”

“Then is all the fighting over?” asked Gudruna,
with almost a disappointed sound in her voice.

But Astrid shook her head.

And, meanwhile, the battle at the mouth of the
fiord was over and the victory was won. For
Hilda Brave-Heart. 189

m~





though the Danes, who had all to win, fought
stoutly, the Norsemen, who had _ their homes to
fight for, fought more stoutly still. And so, when
the sky began to glow with sunset, three of the
four ships sped away, broken and battered, to seek
shelter in the coming darkness, while one sank
down with a rush and gurgle of water above her,
and half her brave crew dead on her deck. And
on the fore-deck of the Sea-mew Olaf stood, with
the dazzling light on his winged helmet and the
pride of victory in his eyes. And it was just then,
when his men were shouting for their captain, that
a wounded Dane, who had lain on the deck as if
he were dead, lifted his head and crawled towards
the young sea-king. There was a dagger lying
near him, and he gripped it in his hand as he drew
near to Olaf, with a fierce fire glowing in his eyes
under a tangle of matted hair. Not one of the
crew of the Sea-mew saw him, and their leader
stood looking homewards, and thinking perhaps
sweet thoughts that were not war thoughts at all.
But those watchful eyes which had followed Olaf
all day noticed the moving figure and the gleaming
dagger, and a quick warning voice cried:
190 The Whispering Winds.



“Olan Olaf, beware!”

But Olaf did not turn. Why should he, seeing
that that voice passed by him without so much as
stirring the still evening air? His eyes looked
homewards up the fiord and he had laid down his
pointed shield, while ever nearer came the dark
avenging form of the fierce Dane.

And then Hilda remembered that, with the
dwarf’s gift upon her head, she was powerless to
make herself seen by mortal eyes, or speak one
word of warning to mortal ears. And just then
the Dane rose to his feet, and stood up tall and
wild in his broken blood-stained armour, and
gathered up all his strength to spring like a wild-
cat at Olaf. At that moment there came the ring
of a helmet flung upon the deck, and a girl’s voice
chied::

“Olaf! Oh my love, beware!”

And Olaf started in wonderment, and, dazzled
by the sunset light, felt for his sword. But he was
too late, the gleaming dagger was lifted even as
he turned, and he had no shield to parry the blow.
But, swift as a ray of light there passed a form
between Olaf and his foe, an arm was thrown
flilda Brave-Heart. IQI

rownn





RA



about him and a face upraised to his with a tremu-
lous joy wonderful to see. The dagger swept
down, and Hilda’s head, with the smile still in her
eyes, fell back against the sea-king’s shoulder, and
the Dane staggered and fell dead among his dead
kindred.

On the hillside Astrid sat with wide eyes and
her hand uplifted.

“ Little one,” said Thora again, “what do you
hear?”

“ There is a brave heart passing over the rain-
bow arch into the halls of the gods,” said Astrid,
“the song of welcome is in the air.”

Then Thora grew just a little paler and laid her
hand on her sister’s shoulder.

“ Astrid,’ she whispered, “is it my father or
Olaf?”

But Astrid shook her head.

“Tt is my dream coming true,” she said, and she
would say no more.

Lower and lower sank the sun until the level
rays made a path of gold along the fiord. And
Astrid pointed to it and stood up.
ho? The Whispering Winds.



ae



mney (IPE eee





“Look!” she said. “It is coming, the ship I
saw!”

And along the path of light came Olaf’s war-
ship with slow and stately motion, and a strange
awe fell on the sisters, and hand in hand they went
down to the shore to meet it. Like statues of
steel stood the warriors on the deck, but their
young captain knelt with his winged helm bowed
low and his face hidden. And on the deck lay
Hilda, with her fair locks loose about her, her
face turned upward to the sunset sky, and the
strange smile lingering on her lips.

They made out, bit by bit, the story she could
never tell them. They found the glittering helmet
on the deck where she had thrown it, and the old
men, who were learned in such things, knew it for
dwarf workmanship and guessed that she had been
among them, unseen and unheard, all through that
stubborn sea-fight. And they gave her the burial
of a hero, and laid the magic helmet beside her,
and made sagas about her, and told their children
the story of Hilda, the Brave-Heart.

Olaf never brought another bride to the house
he had built for Hilda. People told him some
flilda Brave- Heart. 193

An nw





times, that he who was so young and brave, might
well make choice among the fairest maidens; but
he shook his head, and when they asked if he were

































not lonely he said, “ No, never.” For by the fire,
and in the silence of the snowy hills in winter, in
the heat of battle, and in the solemn night watches

on the starlit sea, it seemed to him that there was
(991 ) N
194 The Whispering Winds.
a figure always by his side, a pair of loving eye:
following all he did; that figure which, all unseen
had stood beside him in the battle, those eye:
which smiled up into his when Hilda took for her
self the blow that was meant for him. Some peopl
called him fanciful, but if he were, all I can say i:
that such fancies are good things to be full of, fo
they made Olaf braver, more steadfast, more gentle
every year he lived, so gentle and merciful some
times that his friends would have been almos
afraid of people doubting his bravery, had that no
been proved a thousand times already.

Hilda’s sisters missed her more than they coul«
have believed, and were very proud of her.

“T must say,” Gudruna would confide to Thora
“that I think I would have struck a blow at thi
Dane myself if I had been Hilda. But no on
can say a word against our sister’s courage now
She has shown herself one of the family.”

“Ves,” said Thora, “and to think how we mis
understood her; or was it the magic helmet, .
wonder, that changed her so?”

But I think Astrid understood things bette
than they did. She was growing up into a grave
Hilda Brave-Heart. 195

aA errr PERRO Oe”



beautiful maiden, with eyes that seemed to look
into the heart of things, and when Olaf came home

AX

iN

%
)



from his long cruises he liked to walk with her on
the hills and through the solemn fir-woods and to
talk to her of Hilda.

“ Astrid,” he would say, “what was it that the
196 The Whispering Winds.

AAW



wind whispered to the trees that day of the sea-
fight?”

And Astrid answered:

“Tt was a secret, Olaf, a beautiful true secret.
The wind said this: Loueng heart 1s brave heart,
for love is mightier than fear, and longer than life,
and stronger than death.”

“ Stronger than death, Astrid. Are you sure the
wind said that?”

“Quite, quite sure, Olaf. Norway does not
know the secret yet, but we know it, and Norway
and all the world will know some day.”

And with that knowledge in their hearts, Olaf
and Astrid might well be content and wait.

That is all the East Wind’s story. I do hope,
children, you are not disappointed, that you won't
say it isn’t a proper fairy tale because there’s no
“lived happy ever after” at the end. Even where
we have to do with magic and dwarfs and fairy
things there must be sad endings sometimes. Only
I don’t think this is a sad ending; do you? At
least, not sad for Hilda, for you know she wasn’t
brave as the Norse women counted bravery, and,
Hilda Brave- Heart. 197

RRR







very likely, if she had looked at that dagger in the
fierce Dane’s hand she might have turned coward
and run away, and disgraced herself for ever instead
of gaining an undying name. Only, you see, she
didn’t see it, because she saw nothing but Olaf all
the time, and so she lived to her friends as Hilda
Brave-Heart, and never had the chance of dis-
appointing them again.

And is the East Wind’s story a story of cour-
age?

I think it is—a story of the best and purest sort
of courage, for that message which the wind whis-
pered to the fir-trees is the truest of all true
secrets, and the hearts that are strong to love are
strong also to bear and hope and do and dare, with
a power longer indeed than life and stronger far
than death.

And so the Wind stories are done, but I think
that their voices are still in my ears. I fancy I
hear the song that lulls Baby Benedetta to sleep
beside the calm blue lake, and the wild music of
pipes shrilling up the glen, and the laugh of the
joyous wind that scatters the mists out of the
hollows, and the shout of victory on the fiord
198 The Whispering Winds.

mnne



AW



mingling with the song that tells the triumph of
the brave heart.

And I want you, my children friends, for whom
I have written these stories, to take the heroes and
heroines of old days for your comrades, and so add
many a brave name to your list of friends. I want
you to open your hearts wide, and let in the voices
of wind and sky, and the sunshine of spring morn-
ings and the hush of autumn woods, the rush of
waters and the calm strength of the hills. And so
you and I will go on walking together through a
wonderful world, whose diameter and circumference
are not given in any geography book. And the
friendship between us will not die when you are
grown up and wiser than I am and can tell me
tales in your turn, but will be still fresh and
bright like this beautiful earth, which is a sort of
great-great-great-grandmother to us all, and yet
is always green and beautiful and young.

THE END.




BLACKIE & SON’S
BOOKS FOR YOUNG PHOPLE.

BY G. A. HENTY.

Wulf the Saxon: A Story of the Norman Conquest. By
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2 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



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BY G. A. HENTY.

“Surely Mr. Henty should understand boys’ tastes better than any man living.”
—The Times.























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Reduced Illustration from “St. Bartholomew's Eve’.

St. Bartholomew’s Eve: A Tale of the Huguenot Wars.
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4 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



‘BY G. A. HENTY.

“ Among writers of stories of adventure for boys Mr. Henty stands in the +
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Under Drake’s Flag: A Tale of the Spanish Main.
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“There is not a dull chapter, nor, indeed, a dull page in the book; but
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For the Temple: A Tale of the Fall of Jerusalem. 1]
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BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 5



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Reduced Illustration from Henty’s ‘ Redskin and Cow-boy”.

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Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“Tt has a good plot; it abounds in action; the scenes are equally spirited and
realistic, and we can only say we have read it with much pleasure from first to
last. ‘The pictures of life on a cattle ranche are most graphically painted, as are
the manners of the reckless but jovial cow-boys.”—Z'imes.

In Freedom’s Cause: A Story of Wallace and Bruce. By
G. A. Henty. With 12 page Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“Mr. Henty has broken new ground as an historical novelist. His tale of the

days of Wallace and Bruce is full of stirring action, and will commend itself to
boys. ”"—A thenwuim.
6 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY G. A. HENTY.

“Mr. Henty is one of our most successful writers of historical tales.”—Scotsman.

By Right of Conquest: Or, With Cortez in Mexico. By
G. A. Heyry. With 10 page Illustrations by W. 5. Sracry, and
2 Maps. Crown 8yo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“By Right of Conquest is the nearest approach to a perfectly successful histori-
cal tale that Mr. Henty has yet published.”—
In Greek Waters: A Story of the Grecian War of Inde-
pendence (1821-1827). By G. A. Henry. With 12 page Illus-
trations by W. 8. Sracry, and a Map. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant,
olivine edges, 6s.

‘There are adventures of all kinds for the hero and his friends, whose pluck
aid ingenuity in extricating themselves from awkward fixes are always equal to
the occasion. It is an excellent story, and if the proportion of history is smaller
than usual, the whole result leaves nothing to be desired.”—Journal of Education.

Through the Fray: A Story of the Luddite Riots. By
G. A. Henty. With 12 page Illustrations by H. M. Pacer. Crown
vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“Mr. Henty inspires a love and admiration for straightforwardness, truth, and
courage. ‘This is one of the best of the many good books Mr. Henty has produced,
and deserves to be classed with his Facing Death.” —Standard.

Captain Bayley’s Heir: A Tale of the Gold Fields of Cali-
fornia. By G. A. Henry. With 12 page Illustrations by H. M.
Paget. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

‘©\ Westminster boy who makes his way in the world by hard work, good
temper, and unfailing courage. ‘The descriptions given of life are just what a
healthy intelligent lad should delight in.”—Sé. James's Gazette.

In the Heart of the Rockies: A Story of Adventure in
Colorado. By G. A. Henry. With 8 page Illustrations by G. C.
Hinpiey. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

From first to last this is a story of splendid hazard. The hero, Tom
Wade, goes out to his uncle in Colorado, who is a hunter and gold-digger.
Going in quest of a gold mine the little band is spied by Indians, chased
across the Bad Lands, and overwhelmed by a snow-storm in the mountains,
where they camp all winter. They build two canoes and paddle down the
terrible gorges of the Rocky Mountains, with many an upset on the way
and the instant danger of bloodthirsty Indians shooting from the banks.
After many perils they reach Fort Mojarve and safety, and the reader
finds that the record of this most daring journey has closed all too soon.

One of the 28th: A Tale of Waterloo. By G. A. Heyry.
With 8 page Illustrations by W. H. Ovrrenp, and 2 Maps. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Written with Homeric vigour and heroic inspiration. It is graphic, pictur-
esque, and dramatically effective . . . shows us Mr. Henty at his best and
brightest. ‘'he adventures will hold a boy of a winter’s night enthralled as he
rushes through them with breathless interest ‘from cover to cover’.”—Observer.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 7



BY G. A. HENTY.

**No more interesting boys’ books are written than Mr. Henty’s stories.”—
Daily Chronicle.

The Cat of Bubastes: A Story of Ancient Egypt. B
G. A. Henty. With 8 page Illustrations by J. R. WEGUuELIN.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“The story, from the critical moment of the killing of the sacred cat to the
perilous exodus into Asia with which it closes, is very skilfully constructed and
full of exciting adventures. It is admirably illustrated.”—Saturday Review.

Maori and Settler: A Story of the New Zealand War. By
G. A. Henry. With 8 page Illustrations by ALFRED PEARSE, and
a Map. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Tt is a book which all young people, but especially boys, will read with
avidity.” —Atheneum.

“A first-rate book for boys, brimful of adventure, of humorous and interesting
conversation, and of vivid pictures of colonial life.”—Schoolimaster.

St. George for England: A Tale of Cressy and Poitiers.
By G. A. Henry. With 8 full-page Illustrations by Gorpon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“A story of very great interest for boys. In his own forcible style the author
has endeavoured to show that determination and enthusiasm can accomplish mar-
vellous results; and that courage is generally accompanied by magnanimity and
gentleness.” —Pall Mall Gazette.

The Bravest of the Brave: With Peterborough in Spain.
By G. A. Henty. With 8 full-page Pictures by H. M. Pacer.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Mr. Henty never loses sight of the moral purpose of his work—to enforce the
doctrine of courage and truth, mercy and lovingkindness, as indispensable to the
making of an English gentleman. British lads will read The Bravest of the
Brave with pleasure and profit; of that we are quite sure.” —Daily Telegraph.

For Name and Fame: Or, Through Afghan Passes. By
G. A. Henry. With 8 full-page Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Not only a rousing story, replete with all the varied forms of excitement of a
campaign, but, what is still more useful, an account of a territory and its inhabi-
tants which must for a long time possess a supreme interest for Englishmen, as
being the key to our Indian Empire.”—Glasgow Herald.

A Jacobite Exile: Being the Adventures of a Young English-
man in the Service of Charles XII. of Sweden. By G. A. Henry.
With 8 page Illustrations by Paut Harpy, and a Map. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Incident succeeds incident, and adventure is piled upon adventure, and at the
end the reader, be he boy or man, will have experienced breathless enjoyment
in a romantic story that must have taught him much at its close.’”—Army and
Navy Gazette.
8 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY G. A. HENTY.
“ Ask for Henty, and see that you get him.”—Punch.

Condemned as a Nihilist: A Story of Escape from Siberia.
By G. A. Henry. ‘ With 8 page’ Illustrations by Wanrrer Pacer.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“The best of this year’s Henty. His narrative is more interesting than many
of the tales with which the public is familiar, of escape from Siberia. Despite
their superior claim to authenticity these tales are without doubt no less fic
titious than Mr. Henty’s, and he beats them hollow in the matter of sensations.”
—National Observer.

Orange and Green: A Tale of the Boyne and Limerick.
By G. A. Heyy. With 8 full-page Illustrations by Gorpon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“‘The narrative is free from the vice of prejudice, | and ripples with life as
vivacious as if what is being described were really passing before the eye. :
Should be in the hands of every young student of Ivish history.”—Belfast News. |

Held Fast for England: A Tale of the Siege of Gibraltar.
By G. A. Henry. With 8 page Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Among them we would place first in interest and wholesome educational
value the ‘story of the siege of Gibraltar. . . . There is no cessation of exciting
incident throughout the story.’—Athenewm.

In the Reign of Terror: The Adventures of a Westminster
Boy. By G. A. Heyy. With 8 full-page Illustrations by J.
ScuéyBerc. Crown 8yo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Warry Sandwith, the Westminster boy, may fairly be said to beat Mr. Henty’s
record. His adventures will delight boys by the audacity and peril they depict.
The story is one of Mr. Henty’s best.” —Satur day Review.

By Sheer Pluck: A Tale of the Ashanti War. By G. A
Henty. With 8 full-page Pictures by Gorpon Browne. Crowr
8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“‘Morally, the book is everything that could be desired, setting before the boy:
a bright and bracing ideal of the English gentleman.”-—Christian Leader.

The Dragon and the Raven: Or, The Days of Kin;
Alfred. By G. A. Henry. With 8 page Illustrations by C. J
STANILAND, R.I. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“A story that may justly be styled remarkable. Boys, in reading it, will bi
surprised to find how Alfred persevered, through years of bloodshed and time
of peace, to rescue his people from the thraldom of the Danes. We hope th:
book will soon be widely known in all our schools.”—Schoolmaster.

A Final Reckoning: A Tale of Bush Life in Australia
By G. A. Heyty. With 8 page Illustrations by W. B. WoLLEN
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“ All boys will read this story with eager and unflagging interest. The episode
are in Mr. Henty’s very best vein—graphic, exciting, realistic; and, as in all Mr
Henty’s books, the tendency is to the formation of av honourable, manly, ant
even heroic character.”— Birmingham Post,
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PLOPLE. 9



BY G. A. HENTY.

«Mr. Henty’s books are always alive with moving incident.”—Review of Reviews.

Facing Death: Or, The Hero of the Vaughan Pit. A Tale of
the Coal Mines. By ;
G. A. Henry. With
8 page Pictures by
GorDon Browne.
Crown 8vo, cloth
elegant, olivine edges,
5s.

“Tf any father, godfather,
clergyman, or schoolmaster is
on the look-out for a good
book to give as a present to a
poy who is worth his salt, this
is the book we would recom-
mend.” —Standard.

A Chapter of Ad-

ventures: Or,
Through the Bom-
bardment of Alex-
andria. By G A.
Henry. With 6 page
Illustrations by W.
H. Ovgerenp, Crown
8yvo, cloth elegant,
3s. 6d.

“Jack Robson and his two
companions have their fill of



excitement, and their chapter } Na
of adventures is so brisk and
entertaining we could have Reduced Illustration from “ The Clever

wished it longer than it is.”— iss Follett”
Saturday Re view. ares

Two Thousand Years Ag: Or, The Adventures of a Roman
Boy. By Professor A. J. Cuurcu. With 12 page Illustrations by
Aprien Maris. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

«Adventures well worth the telling. The book is extremely entertaining as
well as useful, and there is a wonderful freshness in the Roman scenes and
characters.”—he Times.



The Clever Miss Follett. By J. K. H. Deyyy. With
12 page Illustrations by Gerrrupe D. Hammonp. Crown 8vo,
cloth elegant, olivine’ edges, 6s.

“Just the book to give to girls, who will delight both in the letterpress and
the illustrations — Miss Hammond has never done better work.”—Leview of
Reviews,
10 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY ROSA MULHOLLAND.

Banshee Castle. By Rosa Mutuouzanp. With 12 page
Illustrations by Joun H. Bacoy. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant,
olivine edges, 6s.

This story deals with the adventures of three girls who, with an old
governess, migrate from Kensington to the West of Ireland. Belonging
as they do to ‘‘the ould family” at the castle, the three girls are made
heartily welcome in the cabins of the peasantry, where they learn many
weird and curious tales from the folk-lore of the district. There is also
an interesting plot running through the narrative, but it is by reason of
its happy mingling of Irish humour and pathos that this story holds the
reader charmed to the end.

Giannetta: A Girl’s Story of Herself. By Rosa Munuoniayp.
With 8 page Tlustrations by LockHarr Bocis. Crown 8vo, cloth
elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Giannetta is a true heroine—warm-hearted, self-sacrificing, and, as all good
women nowadays are, largely touched with the enthusiasm of humanity. One
of the most attractive gift-books of the season.”—The Academy.





A Fair Claimant: Being a Story for Girls. By Frances
Armsrronc. With 8 page Illustrations by GertrupE D. Hammonn.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“Asa gift-book for hig girls it is among the best new books of the kind. The
story is interesting and natural, from first to last.”— Westminster Gazette.



The Heiress of Courtleroy. By Ayyz Beatz. With 8
“page Illustrations by ‘I. C. H. Casriz. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant,
olivine edges, 5s.

“We can speak highly of the grace with which Miss Beale relates how the
young ‘ Heiress of Courtleroy’ had such good influence over her uncle as to win
him from his intensely selfish ways.” —Guardian.

The White Conquerors of Mexico: A Tale of Toltec and
Aztec. By Kirk Munror. With 8 page Illustrations by W. S.
Stacey. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“My, Munroe gives most vivid pictures of the religious and civil polity of the
Aztecs, and of everyday life, as he imagines it, in the streets and market-places
of the magnificent capital of Montezuma.”—Z'he Times.



Highways and High Seas: Cyril Harley’s Adventures on
both. By I. Franxrorr Moore. With 8 page Illustrations by
ALFRED Pearse. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“This is one of the best stories Mr. Moore has written, perhaps the very best.
The exciting adventures are sure to attract boys.” —Spectator.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. i



BY GEORGE MAC DONALD.
A Rough Shaking. By Grorer MacDonatp. With

12 page Illustrations by W. Parkinson. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant,
olivine edges, 6s.

"One of the very best
books for boys that has been
written. It is full of mate-
rial peculiarly well adapted
for the young, containing
in a marked degree the
elements of all that is neces-
sary to make up a perfect
boys’ book.” —TZ'eachers’ Aid.

At the Back of
the North
Wind. By Gro.
Mac Donatp. With
75 Illustrations by
ARTHUR HUGHES.
Crown 8vo, cloth ele-
gant, olivine edges,
5s.



“The story is thoroughly
original, full of fancy and
pathos. . . . We stand
with one foot in fairyland
and one on common earth.”
—The Times.



Ranald Banner-
man’s Boy-
hood. By Geo. =
Mac Donatp. With Reduced Illustration from “ A Rough Shaking”.
36 Illustrations by :

Artuur Hucurs. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“The sympathy with boy-nature in Ranald Bannerman’s Boyhood is perfect.
It is a beautiful picture of childhood, teaching by its impressions and suggestions
all noble things.” —British Quarterly Review.

The Princess and the Goblin. By Grorez Mac Donaxp.

With 32 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“Little of what is written for children has the lightness of touch and play of
fancy which are characteristic of George Mac Donald’s fairy tales. Mr. Arthur
Hughes’s illustrations are all that illustrations should be. ”__ Manchester Guardian.



The Princess and Curdie. By Grorek Mac Dona,p.
With 8 page Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“There is the finest and rarest genius in this brilliant story. Upgrown people
would do wisely occasionally to lay aside their newspapers and magazines to
spend an hour with Curdie and the Princess.” —Shegield Independent.
12 BLACKIE & SONS BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY HARRY COLLINGWOOD.

The Pirate Island: A Story of the South Pacific. By
Harry CoLtinewoop. With 8 page Pictures by C. J. Sranrnanp
and J: R. WELLS. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

‘‘A capital story of the sea; indeed in our opinion the author is superior in some
respects as a marine novelist to the better known Mr. Clark Russell.”—The Times.

The Log of the ‘‘Flying Fish”: A Story of Aerial and
Submarine Adventure. By Harry CoLiinewoop. With 6 page
Illustrations by Gorpon Brownz. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“The Flying Fish actually surpasses all Jules Verne’s creations; with incred-
ible speed she flies through the air, skims over the surface of the water, and darts
along the ocean bed. We strongly recommend our school-boy friends to possess
themselves of her log.”— Atheneum.

For other Books by Harry Collingwood, see pages 21 and 22:

BY GEORGE MANVILLLE FENN.

a Mr. Fenn stands in the foremost rank of writers in this department.”—Daily
ews.

Quicksilver: Or, A Boy with no Skid to his Wheel. By
3
Grorcr Manvitie Fenn. With 10 page Illustrations by Frank
Dapp. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“ Quicksilver is little short of an inspiration. In it that prince of story-writers
for boys—George Manville Fenn—has surpassed himself. It is an ideal book for
a boy’s library.”"—Practical Teacher.

‘

Dick o’ the Fens: A Romance of the Great East Swamp. By
G. ManviLie Fenn. With 12 page Illustrations by Frank Dapp.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“We conscientiously believe that boys will find it capital reading. It is full
of incident and mystery, and the mystery is kept up to the last moment. It is
rich in effective local colouring; and it has a historical interest.”—Times.

Devon Boys: A Tale of the North Shore. By G. Mayvitie
Fenn. With 12 page Illustrations by Gorpon Brownz. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“An admirable story, as remarkable for the individuality of its young heroes
as for the excellent descriptions of coast scenery and life in North Devon. It is
one of the best books we have seen this season.” —Athenceum.

The Golden Magnet: A Tale of the Land of the Incas. By
G. ManvitLe Fenn. Illustrated by 12 page Pictures by GorDon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s,

“There could be no more welcome present for a boy. ‘There is not a dull page
in the book, and many will be read with breathless interest. ‘The Golden Mag-
net’ is, of course, the same one that attracted Raleigh and the heroes of West-
ward Ho!”—Journal of Education.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 13

BY GEORGE MANVILLE FENN.

“No one can find his way to the hearts of lads more readily than Mr. Fenn.”—
Nottingham Guardian.

In the King’s Name: Or, The Cruise of the Kestrel. By
G. Manvitir Fenn. Illustrated by 12 page Pictures by Gorpon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 6s.

“The best of all Mr. Fenn’s productions in this field. It has the great quality
of always ‘moving on’, adventure following adventure in constant succession. ”—
Daily News. f
Nat the Naturalist: A Boy’s Adventures in the Eastern

Seas. By G. Manvitte Fenn. With 8 page Pictures. Crown 8vo,
cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“This sort of book encourages independence of character, develops resource,
and teaches a boy to keep his eyes open.”—Saturday Review.

Bunyip Land: The Story of a Wild Journey in New Guinea.
By G. Manvittr Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations by Gorpon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 4s.

“Mr. Fenn deserves the thanks of everybody for Bunyip Land, and we may ven-
ture to promise that a quiet week may be reckoned on whilst the youngsters have
such fascinating literature provided for their evenings’ amusement.”— Spectator.
Brownsmith’s Boy. By G. Mayvitie Ferny. With 6 page

Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“Mr. Fenn’s books are among the best, if not altogether the best, of the stories
for boys. Mr. Fenn is at his best in Brownsmith’s Boy.”—Pictorial World.

*,* For other Books by G. Manvitte Fenn, see pages 21 and 22.



BY ASCOTT R. HOPE.

Young Travellers’ Tales. By Ascorr R. Horz. With
6 Illustrations by H. J. Draper. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.
These lively records of haphazard experience are drawn from various
parts of the world. There is a thrilling adventure in the Austrian Tirol,
a mischance in Norway, an exciting escapade in Africa, a tale of shooting
in India, a cyclist’s laughable exploit in France, a runaway experience in
Switzerland, an encounter with a Corsican bandit, and other stories of a
like entertaining character. All are presented in a crisp and engaging
style.

The Seven Wise Scholars. By Ascorr R. Horz. With
nearly 100 Illustrations by Gorpon Brownz. Cloth elegant, 5s.
“As full of fun as a volume of Punch; with illustrations, more laughter-
provoking than most we have seen since Leech died.”—Sheficld Independent.
Stories of Old Renown: Tales of Knights and Heroes.
By Ascorr R. Horr. With 100 Illustrations by Gorpon Browne.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“A really fascinating book worthy of its telling title. There is, we venture to
say, not a dull page in the book, not a story which will not bear a second read-
ing.”—Guardian,
14 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



The Universe: OrThe Infinitely Great and the Infinitely Littl
A Sketch of Contrasts in Creation, and Marvels revealed a
explained by Natural Science. By F. A. Poucuer, mp. Wi
272, Engravings on wood, of which 55 are full-page size, and
Coloured Frontispiece. Eleventh Edition, medium 8vo, cloth el
gant, gilt edges, 7s. 6d.; also morocco antique, 16s.

“ We can honestly commend Professor Pouchet’s book, which is admirably,
it is copiously illustrated.” —The Times.

“Scarcely any book in French or in English is so likely to stimulate in t
young an interest in the physical phenomena.”—J’ortnightly Review.



BY ROBERT LEIGHTON.

Olaf the Glerious. By Roserr Leicuron. With 8 pa,
Illustrations by Rap Peacock, and a Map. Crown 8vo, clo
elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

This story of Olaf the Glorious, King of Norway, opens with the incide
of his being found by his uncle living as a bond-slave in Esthonia, and
follows him through his romantic youth in the court of King Valdemar
Russia. Then come his adventures as a Viking and his raids upon t
coasts of Scotland and England, his victorious battle against the Engli
at Maldon in Essex, and his conversion to Christianity. He then ret
to pagan Norway, is accepted as king, and converts his people to t
Christian faith. The story closes with the great battle of Svold, wh
Olaf, defeated, jumps overboard, and is last seen with the sunlight shini
on the glittering cross upon his shield.

The Wreck of ‘‘The Golden Fleece”: The Story of
North Sea Fisher-boy. By Roserr Lereurox. With 8 pa
Illustrations by Frank Brangwyn. Crown 8vo, cloth elegai
olivine edges, 5s.

“This story should add considerably to Mr. Leighton’s high reputation. 1
cellent in every respect, it contains every variety of incident. The plot is vv
cleverly devised, and the types of the North Sea sailors are capital.”—Zhe Tim

The Pilots of Pomona: A Story of the Orkney Islan
By Rozerr Letcuron. With 8 page Illustrations by Joun Lute
ron, and a Map. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“A story which is quite as good in its way as Treasure Island, and is ful:
adventure of a stirring yet most natural kind. Although it is primarily a be
book, it is a real godsend to the elderly reader.” —Glasgow Evening Limes.

The Thirsty Sword: A Story of the Norse Invasion
Scotland (1262-63). By Rozerr Lerenroy. With 8 page I
trations by ALrrepD Parser, and a Map. Crown 8vo, cloth €
gant, olivine edges, 5s. :

“This is one of the most fascinating stories for boys that it has ever been:
pleasure to read. From first to last the interest never flags. Boys will wors
Kenric, who is a hero in every sense of the word.”—Schoolmaster.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 15



BY DR. GORDON STABLES.

To Greenland and the Pole. By Gorpon Srazuus, up.
With 8 page Illustrations by G. C. Hinpigy, anda Map. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, oli-
vine edges, 5s.

The unfailing fascination
of Arctic venturing is pre-
sented in this story with
new vividness. The author
is himself an old Arctic
voyager, and he is thus
enabled to make excellent
use of the recent exploits of
Nansen in Greenland, and
the splendid daring of that
explorer’s present expedi-
tion. The story deals with
skilébning in the north of
Scotland, deer-hunting in
Norway, sealing in the Arc-
tic Seas, bear-stalking on
the ice-floes, the hardships
of a journey across Green-
land, and a_ successful
voyage to the back of the
North Pole. This is, in-
deed, a real sea-yarn by a
real sailor, and the tone
is as bright and whole-
some as the adventures are
numerous.









Reduced Illustration from “Grettir the Outlaw”.

Westward with Columbus. By Gorpon Srasuzs, m.p.,
com. With 8 page Illustrations by AnrreD PEARSE. Crown 8vo,
cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“We must place Westward with Colwmbus among those hooks that all boys
ought to read.”—T'he Spectator.

’Twixt School and College: A Tale of Self-reliance. By
Gorpon STABLES, 6.M., M.D., RN. With 8 page Illustrations by

W. Parkinson. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.
“One of the best of a prolific writer’s books for boys, being full of practical

instructions as to keeping pets, and inculcates in a way which a little recalls Miss
Edgeworth’s ‘Frank’ the virtue of self-reliance.” — 16 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY G. NORWAY.

A Prisoner of War: A. Story of the Time of Napoleon
Bonaparte. By G. Norway. With 6 page Illustrations by Rost.
BaRNES, A.R.W.S. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

When Napoleon Bonaparte suddenly broke the treaty of Amiens and
declared war against England, many peaceful Englishmen who had ven-
tured to reside upon the Continent were made prisoners. Among these
was Captain Wynter, who was arrested at Helvoetsluys in Holland, and
from thence carried into France. His family escaped across the Channel,
but his son, a young lad, determined to return, trace out his father, and
assist him to escape. Disguised as a packman he searched France from
fortress to fortress. After many a mischance and many a hair-breadth
escape he finds his father, contrives his escape, and brings him safely to
England. It is a romantic narrative, with the additional merit of being
true.

A True Cornish Maid. By G. Norway. With 6 page
Illustrations by J. Finnemore. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“There is some excellent reading. . . . Mrs. Norway brings before the eyes
of her readers the good Cornish folk, their speech, their manners, and their ways.
A True Cornish Maid deserves to be popular.”—A thenewm.

“Among girls’ books the success of the year has fallen, we think, to Mrs. Norway,
whose True Cornish Maid is really an admirable piece of work. . . . The book
is full of vivid and accurate local colour; it contains, too, some very clever
character studies.” —Review of Reviews.

Hussein the Hostage: Or, A Boy’s Adventures in Persia.
By G. Norway. With 8 page Illustrations by JoHn ScHonBERG.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“* Hussein the Hostage is full of originality and vigour. The characters are life-
like, there is plenty of stirring incident, the interest is sustained throughout, and
every boy will enjoy following the fortunes of the hero.”—Journal of Hducation.

The Loss of John Humble: What Led to It, and What
Came of It. By G. Norway. With 8 page Illustrations by Jonny
Scuénpere. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 5s.

“This story will place the author at once in the front rank. It is full of life
and adventure. He is equally at home in his descriptions of life in Sweden and
in the more stirring passages of wreck and disaster, and the interest of the story
is sustained without a break from first to last.”—Standard.



Under False Colours: A Story from Two Girls’ Lives.
By Saran Doupney. With 6 page Illustrations by G. G. Kin-
BURNE. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 4s.

“Sarah Doudney has no superior as a writer of high-toned stories—pure in
style, original in conception, and with skilfully wrought-ont plots; but we have
seen nothing from her pen equal in dramatic energy to this book.”—Christian
Leader, 2
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 17



With the Sea Kings: A Story of the Days of Lord Nelson.
By F. H. Winper. With 6 page Illustrations by W. 8. Sracry.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 4s.

“Just the book to put into a boy’s hands, Every chapter contains boardings,
cuttings out, fighting pirates, escapes of thrilling audacity, and captures by corsairs,
sufficient to turn the quietest boy’s head. The story culminates in a vigorous
account of the battle of Trafalgar. Happy boys !"—Z'he Academy.

Grettir the Outlaw: A Story of Iceland. By 8S. Barine-
GouLp. With 6 page Illustrations by M. Zeno Diemer, and a
Coloured Map.. New Edition. Crown 8ve, cloth elegant, 4s.

“Ts the boys’ book of its year. That is, of course, as much as to say that it
will do for men grown as well as juniors. It is told in simple, straightforward
English, as all stories should be, and it has a freshness, a freedom, a sense of sun
and wind and the open air, which make it irresistible.”—National Observer.



Gold, Gold, in Cariboo: A Story of Adventure in British
Columbia. By Crive Puitiiprs-Wouizy. With 6 page Illustra-
tions by G. C. HinpLEY. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“It would be difficult to say too much in favour of Gold, Gold, in Cariboo. We
have seldom read a more exciting tale of wild mining adventure in a singularly
inaccessible country. There isa capital plot, and the interest is sustained to the
last page.” —The Times.



A Champion of the Faith: A Tale of Prince Hal and the
Lollards. By J. M. Cannwett. With 6 page Illustrations by
Hersert J. Draper. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 4s.

“Will not be less enjoyed than Mr. Henty’s books. Sir John Oldcastle’s pathetic
story, and the history of his brave young squire, will make every boy enjoy this
lively story.” —London Quarterly.



BY ALICE CORKRAN.

Meg’s Friend. By Auice Corkray. With 6 page Illustra-
tions by Rosert Fowier. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“‘One of Miss Corkran’s charming books for’ girls, narrated in that simple
and picturesque style which marks the authoress as one of the first amongst
writers for young people.”—The Spectator.

Margery Merton’s Girlhood. By Aurcr Corkray. With
6 page Pictures by Gorpon Browne. Cr. 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“Another book for girls we can warmly commend. ‘There is a delightful
piquancy in the experiences and trials of a young English girl who studies
paifiting in Paris.”—Saturday Review.

Down the Snow Stairs: Or, From Good-night to Good-
morning. By Axice Corxran. With 60 Ilustrations by Gorpon
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, olivine edges, 3s. 6d.

. “A gem of the first water, bearing upon every page the mark of genius. It is
indeed a Little Pilgrim’s Progress.”—Christian Leader. B
18 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



Sou’wester and Sword. By Huan Sv. Lecur. With 6
page Illustrations by Hat Hurst. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 4s.

This is the book for a lad who loves a sea-yarn. The fun no less than the
dangers of a sailor's life are faithfully depicted. Shark fishing, mast-
heading, galley-ranging, mutiny, tropical gales, death at sea, and the
final shipwreck, are incidents in a tale which is one continuous adventure.
The hero and several of the crew are saved from the wreck, and with the
harum-scarum recklessness of seamen they join the English expedition
against the Mahdi, taking part in the terrible fighting around Suakim,



BY EDGAR PICKERING.

In Press-Gang Days. By Epcar Picxerine. With 6
Illustrations by W. 8S. Stacey. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

In this story Harry Waring is caught by the Press-gang and carried on
board His Majesty’s ship Suxdwich. He takes part in the mutiny of the
Nore, and shares in some hard fighting on board the frigate Phenix. He
is with Nelson, also, at the storming of Santa Cruz, and the battle of the
Nile. His career is like to end in a French prison, but he, with some
companions, manage to escape, seize a French schooner, fight their way
out of the harbour, and so return home with a prize.

An Old-Time Yarn: Wherein is set forth divers desperate
mischances which befell Anthony Ingram and his shipmates in the
West Indies and Mexico with Hawkins and Drake. By Epear
PickErinc. Illustrated with 6 page Pictures drawn by ALFRED
Pearse. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“And a very good yarn it is, with not a dull page from first to last. There is
a flavour of Westward Ho! in this attractive book.”—Educational Review.

Silas Verney: A Tale of the Time of Charles I]. By Epvear
PickERING. With 6 page Illustrations by ALYRED Prarsn., Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“ very naturally worked out and very plausibly presented. Altogether this is an
excellent story for boys.”—Saturday Review.

BY ANNIE E. ARMSTRONG.

Three Bright Girls: A Story of Chance and Mischance.
By Annie E. Armsrrone. With 6 page Illustrations by W. Par-
KINSON. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

«Among many good stories for girls this is undoubtedly one of the very best.
The three girls whose portraits are so admirably painted are girls of earnest,
practical, and business-like mood. Ever bright and cheerful, they influence other
lives, and at last they come out of their trials and difficulties with honour to
themselves and benefits to all about them.”—Zeachers’ Aid.

A Very Odd Girl: or, Life at the Gabled Farm. By Anyiz
E. Armstrone. With 6 page Illustrations by 8. T. Dapp. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“The book is one we can heartily recommend, for it is not only bright and
interesting, but also pure and healthy in tone and teaching.” —T'he Lady.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 19



BY C. J. HYNE.

The Captured Cruiser: or, Two Years from Land. By
C. J. Hyne. With 6 page Illustrations by Frank Branewyn.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“The two lads and the two skippers are admirably drawn. Mr. Hyne has
now secured a position in the first rank of writers of fiction for boys.” — Spectator.



Afloat at Last: A Sailor Boy’s Log of his Life at Sea. By
Joun C. Hurcuxsoy. With 6 page Illustrations by W. H.
OveREND. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“As healthy and breezy a book as one could wish to put into the hands of

a boy.” —Academy.

Picked up at Sea: Or, The Gold Miners of Minturne Creek.
By J. C. Hurcuzson. With 6 page Pictures. Cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“The author’s success with this book is so marked that it may well encourage him
to further efforts. The description of mining life in the Far West is true and accu-
rate.” —Standard.



Cousin Geoffrey and I. By Caroriys Avstiy. With 6
page Illustrations by W. Parxiyson. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.
“Miss Austin’s story is bright, clever, and well developed.” —Saturday Review.



Brother and Sister: Or, The Trials of the Moore Family.
By Exmwazetu J. Lysacur. With 6 page Illustrations. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“A pretty story, and well told. The plot is cleverly constructed, and the moral
is excellent.” —


The Search for the Talisman: A Story of Labrador.
By Henry Frira. With 6 page Illustrations by J. SCHONBERG.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s, 6d.

“My. Frith’s volume will be among those most read and highest valued. The
adventures among seals, whales, and icebergs in Labrador will delight many a
young reader.”—Pall Maul Gazette.



Reefer and Rifleman: A Tale of the Two Services. By
Lieut.-Col. Percy-Groves. With 6 page Illustrations by Jonn
Scuénserc. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“A good, old-fashioned, amphibious story of our fighting with the Frenchmen in
the beginning of our century, with a fair sprinkling of fun and frolic.”—T'iimes.



Dora: Or, A Girl without a Home. By Mrs. R. H. Reap. With
6 page Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

‘<1t is no slight thing, in an age of rubbish, to get a story so pure and healthy
as this."—The Academy.
20 BLACKIE & SONS BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



Life’s Daily Ministry: A Story of Everyday Service for
Others. By Mrs. E. R. Pirman. With 4 page Illustrations. Crown
8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“Shows exquisite touches of a master hand. She depicts in graphic outline
the characteristics of the beautiful and the good in life.”—Christian Union.

Storied Holidays: A Cycle of Red-letter Days. By E. S.
Brooxs. With 12 page Illustrations by Howarp Pyrite. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“It is a downright good book for a senior boy, and is eminently readable from
first to last.” —Schoolmaster.

Chivalric Days: Stories of Courtesy and Courage in the
Olden Times. By EH. 8S. Brooxs. With 20 Illustrations by
Gorpon Browne and other Artists. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 8s. 6d.

_ “We have seldom come across a prettier collection of tales. These charming
stories of boys and girls of olden days are no mere fictitious or imaginary sketches,
but are real and actual records of their sayings and doings.”—Literary World.

Historic Boys: Their Endeavours, their Achievements, and
their Times. By E. 8. Brooxs. With 12 page Illustrations by
R. B. Brack and JoHN ScuénBerc. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“‘A wholesome book, manly in tone, its character sketches enlivened by brisk
dialogue and high-class illustrations; altogether one that should incite boys to
further acquaintance with those rulers of men whose careers are narrated. We
advise teachers to put it on their list of prizes.” —Knowledge.

Dr. Jolliffe’s Boys: A Tale of Weston School. By Lewis
Hovex. With 6 page Pictures. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“Young people who appreciate Joi Brown's School-days will find this story a
worthy companion to that fascinating book. There is the same manliness of tone,
truthfulness of outline, avoidance of exaggeration and caricature, and healthy
morality as characterized the masterpiece of Mr. Hughes.’’— Newcastle Jounal,



The Bubbling Teapot. A Wonder Story. By Mrs. L. W.
Cuampngy. With 12 page Pictures by WALTER SATYERLEE.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

_, {Very literally a ‘wonder story’, and a wild and fanciful one. Nevertheless
it is made realistic enough, and there is a good deal of information to be gained
from it.”"—The Times.

BY JENNETT HUMPHREYS. .

Laugh and Learn: The Easiest Book of Nursery Lessons
and Nursery Games. By Jennerr Humpureys. Profusely Ilus-
trated. Square 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d.

“One of the best books of the kind imaginable, full of practical teaching in
word and picture, and helping the little ones pleasantly along a right royal road
to learning.” —Graphic,
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. at



Thorndyke Manor: A Tale of Jacobite Times. By Mary
C. RowseLt. With 6 page Illustrations by L. Lustre BRooxe.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

«Miss Rowsell has never. written a more attractive book than Thorndyke
Manor.”—Belfast News-Letter.

Traitor or Patriot? A Tale of the Rye-House Plot. By
Mary C. Rowsett. With 6 page Pictures by C. O. Murray and

C. J. StaNILAND, R.I. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s. 6d.

“Here the Rye-House Plot serves as the groundwork for a romantic love epi-
sode, whose true characters are lifelike beings.” —Graphic.



BLACKIE’S NEW THREE-SHILLING SERIES.
Beautifully Illustrated and Handsomely Bound.



NEW VOLUMES.

Under Hatches: or, Ned Woodthorpe’s Adventures. By F.
Frankrort Moors. With 6 page Illustrations by A. FoRESsTIER.
New Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s.

“The story as a story is one that will just suit boys all the world over. The
characters are well drawn and consistent; Patsy, the Irish steward, will be found
especially amusing.” —Schoolimaster.

The Congo Rovers: A Story of the Slave Squadron. By
Harry Cottincwoop. With 6 page Illustrations by J. SCHONBERG.
New Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s.

“No better sea story has lately been written than the Congo Rovers. It is as
original as any boy could desire.”—Morning Post.

Menhardoc: A Story of Cornish Nets and Mines. By G.
Manvitir Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations by C. J. SraNILAND,
R.I. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

“They are veal living boys, with their virtues and faults. The Cornish fisher-
men are drawn from life, and stand out from the pages in their jerseys and
sea-boots all sprinkled with silvery pilchard scales.”—Spectator.

Yussuf the Guide: or, The Mountain Bandits. A Story of

Strange Adventure in Asia Minor. By G. ManviLiE Fenn. With

6 page Illustrations by J. Scuénpurc. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

“old with such real freshness and vigour that the reader feels he is actually

one of the party, sharing in the fun and facing the dangers.”—Pall Mall Gazette.

Robinson Crusoe. With 100 Illustrations by Gorpoy
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

“One of the best issues, if not absolutely the best, of Defoe’s work which has
ever appeared.”—The Standard.
22 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



THREE SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Gulliver’s Travels. With 100 Illustrations by Gorpoy
Browne. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

“Myr, Gordon Browne is, to my thinking, incomparably the most artistic,
spirited, and brilliant of our illustrators of books for boys, and one of the most
humorous also, as his illustrations of ‘Gulliver’ amply testify.” —Truth.

Patience Wins: or, War in the Works. By Grorcs May-
VILLE Fenn. With 6 page Illustrations. Cr. 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

“Mr. Fenn has never hit upon a happier plan than in writing this story of
Yorkshire factory life. The whole book is all aglow with life.” —Pall Mall Gazette.
Mother Carey’s Chicken: Her Voyage to the Unknown

Isle. By G. Manvinie Fens. With 6 page Tlustrations by A.
Forestier. Crown 8yo, cloth extra, 3s.

“Undoubtedly one of the best Mr. Fenn has written. ‘The incidents are of
thrilling interest, while the characters are drawn with a care and completeness
rarely found in a boys’ book.”—Literary World.

The Missing Merchantman. By Harry Coriiewoop.
With 6 page Illustrations by W. H. Overenp. Cloth extra, 3s.

“One of the author's best sea stories. The hero is as heroic as any boy could
desire, and the ending is extremely happy.’—British Weekly.

The Rover’s Secret: A Tale of the Pirate Cays and Lagoons
of Cuba. By Harry Conrincwoop. With 6 page Illustrations by
W. G. Symons. Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 5s.

“The Rover's Secret is by far the best sea story we have read for years, and is
certain to give unalloyed pleasure to boys.” —Saturday Review,

The Wigwam and the War-path: Stories of the Red
Indians. By Ascorr R. Horr. With 6 page Mlustrations. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 3s.

“Ts notably good. It gives a very vivid picture of life among the Indians,
which will delight the heart of many a schoolboy.” —Spectator.

Perseverance Island: or, The Robinson Crusoe of the 19th
Century. By Dovcras Frazar. With 6 page Illustrations.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s.

«This is an interesting story, written with studied simplicity of style, much in
Defoe’s vein of apparent sincerity and scrupulous veracity; while for practical
instruction it is even better than Robinson Crusoe.”—Illustrated London News.

Girl Neighbours: or, The Old Fashion and the New. By

Saran Tyrrer. With 6 page Illustrations by C. TI. Garnann.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 3s.

“One of the most effective and quietly humorous of Miss Sarah Tytler’s stories.
It is very healthy, very agreeable, and very well written.” —The Spectator.
no
os

BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



BY BEATRICE HARRADEN.

Things Will Take a Turn. By Buarrice HARRADEN.
A New Edition, with 34 Illustrations by Joun H. Bacon. Crown
8vo, cloth elegant, 2s. 6d.

A happy creation this by the author of “Ships that Pass in the Night”.
One cannot help loving the sunny-hearted child who assists her grand-dad
in his dusty second-hand book-shop, she is so gay, So engaging, so natural.
‘And to love Rosebud is to love all her friends, and enter sympathetically
into the good fortune she brought them. The charm of this tale, as of all
Miss Harraden’s work, is a delicate, wistful sympathy.



The Whispering Winds, and the Tales that they Told. By
Marr H. Desennam. With 25 Mlustrations by Paut Harpy.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 2s. 6d.

Every wind whispered a story. ‘he South Wind came from Italy and
told a bright little fairy tale about Baby Benedetta. ‘The North Wind
brought a weird story of the spiteful fairy-folk from a Scottish glen; the
laughing West Wind from Devonshire told of the King of the Mist, and the
delights of clotted cream ; and the East Wind spoke of the brave sea-king’s
daughter in Norway over the sea. ‘And all the tales were passing good.

2 ee SE

BLACKIE’S HALF-CROWN SERIES.

Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.



Hammond’s Hard Lines. By Sxenron Kurrorp. Illus:
trated by HaroLp Corrine.

‘Tom Hammond was a pupil at a public school, and, boy-like, was much
given to grumbling and discontent with the ‘powers that be”. He wished
oh! so many things. At length ina most curious and unexpected way he
received the offer of Three Wishes, which he joyfully accepted. The rela-
tion of the adventures that ensue forms a graphically diverting narrative
of the freshest interest.

Duleie King: A Story for Girls. By M. Corser-Seymour.
Tllustrated by Gerrrupe D. Hammonp.

A bright, happy-going story in which the heroine is taken from
her modest home and adopted by a rich relative. Dulcie King is not
dazzled, however, by her new and sumptuous surroundings, and the native
goodness of her heart helps her to resist all temptations to dispossess the
rightful heir. Dulcie King is a girl whom one cannot help loving.
Hugh Herbert’s Inheritance. By Caro.ine AUSTIN.

With 4 page Illustrations by C. T. GARDAND. New Edition.
Crown 8vo, cloth elegant, 2s. 6d.

“Will please by its simplicity, its tenderness, and its healthy interesting
motive. It is admirably written.”—Scotsman.

Nicola: The Career of a Girl Musician. By M. Corset-Ser-
Mour. Illustrated by GerrrupE D. Hammonp.

“There is a great deal of quiet force and strength about the story. I can thor-
oughly and heartily yecommend Nicola as a present for girls.”—Winter's Weekly.
24 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLs.



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.



A Little Handful. By Harrimr J. Scripps.

“A very charming picture of a bright, lovable, mischievous boy, who hails from
the New World.”—School Guardian.

A Golden Age: A Story of Four Merry Children. By Ismay
Torn. Illustrated by Gorpon Browne.
“Ought to have a place of honour on the nursery shelf.’—The Atheneum.

A Rough Road: or, How the Boy Made a Man of Himself.
By Mrs. G. Linnazus Banks.

“Told with much simple force and that charm which belongs to one who has
known herself what a rough road is, and how to traverse it.”—- Winter's Weekly.

The Two Dorothys. By Mrs. Herserr Marri.

“A book that will interest and please all girls."—The Lady.

Penelope and the Others. By Amy Wazroy.

“This is a charming book for children. Miss Walton proves herself a perfect
adept in understanding of school-room joys and sorrows.”—Christian Leader.

A Cruise in Cloudland. By Heyry Farrn.

“A thoroughly interesting story.”—St. James’s Gazette.

Marian and Dorothy. By Anyim E. Armsrroye

“This is distinctively a book for girls. A bright wholesome story.” —Academy.

Stimson’s Reef: A Tale of Adventure. By C. J. Hyyz.

“Tt may almost vie with Mr. R. L. Stevenson’s 7veasure Island.’—QGuardian.

Gladys Anstruther. By Louisa Tuompsoy.

“Jt is a clever book: novel and striking in the highest degree. ”—Schoolimistress.

The Secret of the Old House. By E. Evzrerr-Green.

“Tim, the little Jacobite, is a charming creation.” —Academy.

Hal Hungerford. By J. R. Hurcurnsoy, B.a.

“ Altogether, Hal Hungerford is a distinct literary success.” —Spectator.

The Golden Weathercock. By Jui1a Gopparp.

“ A cleverly conceived quaint story, ingeniously written.”—Saturday Review.

White Lilac: or, The Queen of the May. By Amy Watton.

“ Every rural parish ought to add White Lilac to its library.”—Academy.
Miriam’s Ambition. By Everyn Evererr-Greey.

“Miss Green’s children are real British boys and girls.”—Liverpool Mercury.

The Brig ‘‘Audacious”. By Auay Coun.

“Fresh and wholesome as a breath of sea air.”—Court Journal.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 25



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.



The Saucy May. By Heyry Frira.

“My. Frith gives a new picture of life on the ocean wave.” —Shepield Independent.

Jasper’s Conquest. By Exizasera J. Lysacur.

“ One of the best boys’ books of the season.” —Schoolmaster.
Little Lady Clare. By Evetyy Evererr-GReen.

“ Reminds us in its quaintness of Mrs. Ewing's delightful tales.”—Liter. World.
The Eversley Secrets. By Eve.yn Everert-GREEN.

“ Roy Eversley is a very touching picture of high principle.” —Guardian.
The Hermit Hunter of the Wilds. By G. Srasuzs, B.y.

“Will gladden the heart of many a bright boy.”-—Methodist Recorder.

Sturdy and Strong. ByG. A. Heyry.

“ A hero who stands asa good instance of chivalry in domestic life.” —The Empire.

Gutta Percha Willie.. By Gzorez Mac Donan.

“ Get it for your boys and girls to read for themselves.”—Practical Teacher.

The War of the Axe: Or, Adventures in South Africa. By
J. Percy-GROVES.
“The story is well and brilliantly told.”—Literary World.

The Lads of Little Clayton. By R. Sreap.
“<4 capital book for boys.” —Schoolmaster.

Ten Boys who lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now.
By Jane Anprews. With 20 Illustrations.
“The idea is a very happy one, and admirably carried out.”—Practical Teacher.

A Waif of the Sea: Or, The Lost Found. By Kare Woop.

“Written with tenderness and grace.“—Morning Advertiser.

Winnie’s Secret. By Kare Woop.

“Qne of the best story-books we have read .”—Schoolmaster.

Miss Willowburn’s Offer. By Saran Dovupyzy.

“Patience Willowburn is one of Miss Doudney’s best creations.” —Spectator.

A Garland for Girls. By Louisa M. Atcort.

“These little tales are the beau ideal of girls’ stories.” —Christian World.

Hetty Gray: Or, Nobody’s Bairn, By Rosa MuLHornanp.

“Hetty is a delightful creature—piquant, tender, and true.” —World.

Brothers in Arms:
vorD Harrison.
“Sure to prove interesting to young people of both sexes.” —Guardian.

Miss Fenwick’s Failures. By Esmé Sruarr.

“ A girl true to real life, who will put no nonsense into young heads.” —Graphic.

Gytha’s Message. By Euma Lustin.

“This is the sort of book that all girls like.’—Journal of Education.
26 BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



HALF-CROWN SERIES—Continued.
Jack o’ Lanthorn: A Tale of Adventure. By Henry Friru.

“The narrative is crushed full of stirring incident.”— Christian Leader.

The Family Failing. By Daruey Dats.

“4 capital lesson on the value of contentedness.”—A berdeen Journal.

My Mistress the Queen. By M. A. Pavit.

© The style is pure and graceful, and the story full of interest.”—Scotsman.
The Stories of Wasa and Menzikoff.
Stories of the Sea in Former Days.
Tales of Captivity and Exile.
Famous Discoveries by Sea and Land.
Stirring Events of History.
Adventures in Field, Flood, and Forest.

“It would be difficult to place in the hands of young people hooks which
combine interest and instruction in a higher degree.” —Manchester Courier.



BLACKIE’S TWO-SHILLING SERIES.

Illustrated by eminent Artists. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.

NEW VOLUMES.
The Organist’s Baby: A Story for Boys and Girls. By
KatHLern Knox. Illustrated by Jonn H. Bacon.

School-Days in France. By Ay Otp Girt. Illustrated
by W. PARKINSON.

The Ravensworth Scholarship: A High School Story
for Girls. By Mrs. Henry Cuarke, M.A. Illustrated by Jonn H.
Bacon.

Queen of the Daffodils: A Story of High School Life. By

Lesuie Larne.

Raff’s Ranche: A Story of Adventure among Cow-boys and
Indians. By F. M. Houmes.

An Unexpected Hero. By Enz. J. Lysacur.

The Bushranger’s Secret. By Mrs. Heyry Chiarks, M.A.
The White Squall. By Jouy C. Hurcuusoy.

The Wreck of the ‘‘Nancy Bell”. By J. C. Hurcurson
The Lonely Pyramid. By J. H. Yoxaut.

Bab: or, The Triumph of Unselfishness. By Ismay Tyory.
Climbing the Hill, and other Stories. By Anni 8. Swan.
BLACKIE & SONS BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 27



TWO-SHILLING SERIES—Continued.



Brave and True, and other Stories. By Grueson Gow.
The Light Princess. By Grorex Mac Doyatp.
Nutbrown Roger and I. By J. H. Yoxatr.



HI Be iit

Reduced Illustration from ** Phe Queen of the Daffodils”.

Sam Silvan’s Sacrifice. By Jxssr CoLMAN.

Insect Ways on Summer Days in Garden, Forest, Field,
and Stream. By Jenner? HuMPHREYS. With 70 Illustrations.

Susan. By Amy WALTON.

A Pair of Clogs. By Auy Watroy.

The Hawthorns. By Amy Watton.
Dorothy’s Dilemma. By Caronxe Avstis.
28 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



TWO-SHILLING SERIES—Continued.



Marie’s Home. By Carorine AvsTIN.

A Warrior King. By J. Evetyy.

Aboard the ‘“‘Atalanta”. By Huyry Frits.

The Penang Pirate. By Joun C. Hurcunsoy.

Teddy: The Story of a“‘Little Pickle”. By Joun C. Hurensson.
A Rash Promise. By Cectrta Sersy Lownpss.

Linda and the Boys. By Cxcizia Serpy Lownpss.

Swiss Stories for Children. From the German of Mapam
JouaNNA SpyRi. By Lucy WHEELOCK.

The Squire’s Grandson. By J. M. Cannwent.
Magna Charta Stories. Edited by Arraur GILMAN, A.M.

The Wings of Courage; anp Tue Coup - SPINNER.
‘Translated from the French of GEorcE Sanb, by Mrs. CorkRran.

Chirp and Chatter: Or, Lessons From Fistp aNnD TREE.
By Aticp Banks. With 54 Illustrations by Gorpon BrowNE.

Four Little Mischiefs. By Rosa MuLHouianp.

New Light through Old Windows. By Grecson Gow.
Little Tottie, and Two Other Stories. By Tomas ARCHER.
Naughty Miss Bunny. By Cuara MULHOLLAND.
Adventures of Mrs. Wishing-to-be. By Atice Corkray,
The Joyous Story of Toto. By Laura E. Ricuarps.
Our Dolly: Her Words and Ways. By Mrs. R.H. Reap. 2s.
Fairy Fancy: What she Heard and Saw. By Mrs. Reap. 2s.



BLACKIE’S EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES.

With Illustrations. In crown 8vo, cloth elegant.



NEW VOLUMES.

Olive and Robin: or, A Journey to Nowhere. By the Author of
“Two Dorothys ”.
Mona’s Trust: A Story for Girls. By Pungnore LESLIE.

Little Jimmy: A Story of Adventure. By Rev. D. Ricu-JonEs, M.A.
Pleasures and Pranks. By IsapeLta PEARSON.

In a Stranger’s Garden: A Story for Boys and Girls. By
CoNSTANCE CUMING.
BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE. 29



EIGHTEENPENNY SERIES—Continued.



A Soldier’s Son: The Story of a Boy
who Succeeded. By ANNETTE Lys-
TER.

Mischief and Merry-making. By
ISABELLA PEARSON.
Littlebourne Lock. By

F. BAYFORD HARRISON.
Wild. Meg and Wee
Dickie. By Mary E.
ROPES.
Grannie. By ELIZABETH
J. LYSAGHT.
The Seed She Sowed.
By EMMA LESLIE.
Unlucky: A Fragment of a
Girl’s Life. By CARo-
LINE AUSTIN.

Everybody’s Business:
or a Friend in Need.
By IsMAY THORN.

Tales of Daring and
Danger. By G. A.
HENTY.

The Seven Golden Keys.
By JAMES BE. ARNOLD.

The Story of a Queen.
By Mary C. ROWSELL.

Edwy: Or, Was he a
Coward? By ANNETTE
LYSTER.

The Battlefield Trea-
sure. By F. BAYFoRD
HARRISON.

Joan’s Adventures at
the North Pole. By
ALICE CORKRAN.

Filled with Gold. By J.
PERRETT.

Our General: A Story for
Girls. By ELIZABETH
J. LYSAGHT.

Aunt Hesba’s Charge
By EvizaBeTH J. Ly-
SAGHT.

By Order of Queen Maude: 4 Story
of Home Life. By LouIsa Crow.

The Late Miss Hollingford. By
Rosa MULHOLLAND.

Our Frank. By Amy WALTON.

A Terrible Coward. By G. MAN-
VILLE FENN.



Yarns on the Beach. By G. A.
Hany.

Tom Finch’s Monkey. By J. C.
HUTCHESON.

Miss Grantley’s Girls, and theStories
she told them. By ‘Tos. ARCHER.

The Pedlar and his Dog. By MAry
C. ROWSELL.

Town Mice in the Country. By
M. EL. FRANCIS.

Phil and his Father.
THORN.

Prim’s Story. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.

By IsMAY



Reduced Specimen of the Illustrations.

Down and Up Again. By GREGSON
Gow.

Madge’s Mistake.
ARMSTRONG.

The Troubles and Triumphs of
Little Tim. By GREGSON Gow.

The Happy Lad: A Story of Peasant
Life in Norway. By B. BJORNSON,

Into the Haven. By ANNIE S. SWAN.

A Box of Stories. Packed for Young
Folk by HorAcE HAPPYMAN.

The Patriot Martyr, aud other Nar-
ratives of Female Heroism,

By ANNIE EK.
30

BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.



LIBRARY OF FAMOUS BOOKS FOR
BOYS AND GIRLS.

In Crown 8vo. Illustrated.
Waterton’s Wanderings in S.
America.
Anson’s Voyage Round the World.
Autobiography of Benjamin
Franklin.

Lamb’s Tales from Shakspeare.
Southey’s Life of Nelson.

Cloth extra, 1s. 6d. each.

Miss Mitford’s Our Village.

Dana’s Two Years before the
Mast. »

Marryat’s Children of the New
Forest.

Scott’s The Talisman.
The Basket of Flowers.
(Others in preparation.

THE SHILLING SERIES OF JUVENILES.

Square 16mo, Illustrated, and neatly bound in cloth extra.

NEW VOLUMES.
Only a Shilling. By M. CorBrer
SEYMOUR.
Sparkles. By HARRIET J. SCRIPPS.
Just Like a Girl. By PENELOPE
LESLIE.

Daisy and her Friends.
‘TIDDEMAN.

Brave Dorette. By JULIA GODDARD.

Pieerust Promises. IBY Was
ROOPER.

Summer Fun and Frolic.
BELLA PEARSON.

Little Aunt Dorothy. By JENNIE
CHAPPELL.

The Lost Dog. By Ascorr R. Hover.

The Rambles of Three Children.
By GERALDINE MOCKLER.

By L. E.

By Isa-

A Council of Courtiers. By Cora
LANGTON.

A Parliament of Pickles. By Cora
LANGTON.

Sharp Tommy. By EL. J. Lysacur.

Adventures of Nell, Eddie, and
Toby. By GERALDINE MOCKLER.

Freda’s Folly. By M. 8. Haycrary.

Philip Danford: A Story of School
Life. By JULIA GODDARD.



The Youngest Princess. By JENNIE
CHAPPELL.

Arthur’s Temptation. By Emma
LESLIE,

A Change for the Worse.
HARRIEY M. CapEs.

Our Two Starlings. By C. Reprorp.
Mr. Lipscombe’s Apples. By JULIA

By M.

GODDARD.

Gladys. By E. O'BYRNE.

A Gypsy against Her Will. By
EMMA LESLIE.

How the Strike Began. Do.

The Castle on the Shore. By Isa-
BEL HORNIBROOK.

An Emigrant Boy’s Story. By

Ascorr R. Hor.

Jock and his Friend. By Cora
LANGTON. :

John a’ Dale. By Mary C. ROWSELL.

In the Summer Holidays. By JEN-
NET" HUMPHREYS.

Tales from the Russian of Madame
Kabalensky. By G. JENNER.
Cinderella’s Cousin. By PENELOPE.
Their New Home. By A. S. I'aNN.

Janie’s Holiday. By C. REDForRD.

A Boy Musician: or, The Young Days
of Mozart.

Hatto’s Tower. By M. C. RowsELL.
Fairy Lovebairn’s Favourites.
Alf Jetsam. By Mrs. Guo, CupPLES.
The Redfords. By Mrs. G. CupPLEs.
Missy. By I’. BAyrord HARRISON.
Hidden Seed. By EMMA LESLIE.
Tom Watkin’s Mistake. Do.
BLACKIE & SON'S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN,

31



SHILLING SERIES—Continued.

Ursula’s Aunt. By ANNIE S. FENN.

Jack’s Two Sovereigns. By ANNIE
S. PENN.

A Little Adventurer. By G. Gow.
Olive Mount. By ANNIE S. FENN.
The Children of Haycombe. Do.
Three Little Ones. By C. LANGTON.

Two Little Brothers. By M. Har-
RIET M. CAPES.

The New Boy at Merriton. By
JULIA GODDARD.
The Cruise of the ‘‘Petrel”. By

I. M. HOLMEs.



The Wise Princess. By M. HARRIET
M. CapEs.

The Blind Boy of Dresden.

Jon of Iceland.

Stories from Shakespeare.
Every Man in his Place.
Fireside Fairies and Fancies.

To the Sea in Ships.

Jack’s Victory: Stories about Dogs.
Story of a King.

Prince Alexis: or, Old Russia.
Little Daniel: A Story of the Rhine.
Sasha the Serf: Stories of Russia.
True Stories of Foreign History.

THE NINEPENNY SERIES. FOR CHILDREN.

neatly bound in cloth extra.

F’cap 8vo, Illustrated, and

NEW VOLUMES.

Toby. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.

He, She, It. By A. DE V. Dawson.

The Carved Box. By NorLry
CHESTER.

Darby and Joan. By ETHEL PEN-
ROSE.

A Little English Gentleman. By
JANE DEAKIN.

The Doctor’s Lass. By L. E. Tip-

DEMAN.
Spark and I. By ANNIE ARMSTRONG.

What Hilda Saw. By PENELOPE
LESLIE.

Little Miss Masterful.
‘TIDDEMAN,

A Sprig of Honeysuckle.
GEORGINA M. SQUIRE.

An Australian Childhood. By ELLEN
CAMPBELL.

Kitty Carroll.

A Joke for a Picnic.
ROOPER.

Cross Purposes, and The Shadows.
By GEORGE Mac DONALD.

Patty’s Ideas. By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
Daphne. By E. O'BYRNE.

Lily and Rose in One. By CECILIA
S. LOWNDES.

Crowded Out.
Tom in a Tangle.

By L. E

By

By L. E. TIDDEMAN.
By W. L.

By M. B. MANWELL.
By 'T. Sparrow.

i Max or Baby.
' The Lost Thimble.

Things will Take a Turn. By

BEATRICE HARRADEN.

By IsMAY THORN.

By Mrs. Mus-
GRAVE.

Jack-a-Dandy. By E. J. Lysacur.

A Day of Adventures. By CHAR-
LOTTE WYATT.

The Golden Plums.

The Queen of Squats.
HORNIBROOK.

Little Troublesome. Do.
Shucks. By EMMA LESLIE.
Sylvia Brooke. By M. H. M. CapEs.
The Little Cousin. By A. S. FENN.
In Cloudland. By Mrs. Musgrave.

By F. CLARE.
By ISABEL

Jack and the Gypsies. By Karr
‘Woop.

Hans the Painter. By Mary C.
ROWSELL.

Sepper] the Drummer Boy. Do.

Fisherman Grim. Do.

My Lady May: and One Other Story.
By HARRIET BOULTWOOD.

A Little Hero. By Mrs. MUSGRAVE.

Prince Jon’s Pilgrimage.

Harold’s Ambition: or, A Dream of
Fame. By JENNIE PERRE?T.

Aboard the Mersey. By Mrs.
GEORGE CUPPLES.

A Blind Pupil. By ANNIE S. Fenn.

Lost and Found. By Mrs. Caru
ROTHER.
32 BLACKIE & SON’S BOOKS FOR CHILDREN.

SOMETHING FOR THE VERY LITTLE ONES.

Illustrated. 64 pp., cloth. 6d. each. Little Tales for Little Folk.
By Miss W. L. Rooprmr. 2d. each.

Tales Easy and Small. FRED'S RUN.

Old Dick Grey and Aunt Kate’s Way. NORA’S DARK LOOK.
Maud’s Doll and Her Walk. ELLA’S FALL.

s PATTY’S WALK.

n Holiday Time. HONEST DOLLY.
Whisk and Buzz. LITTLE QUEEN PET.

THE SIXPENNY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.
Neatly bound in cloth extra. Each contains 64 pages and an Illustration.
, NEW VOLUMES. ; . Fairy Stories: told by PENELOPE.
Nobody’s Pet. By A. DEV. DAWSON. | 4 New Year's Tale. By M. A. Currin.

Daisy’s Visit to Uncle Jack. | Littl By Mis. CE ae ‘
: : e Mop. By Mrs. CHARLES BRAY.
Lady Patience. By F. 8. Houiines. | The Tree Cake, and other Stories.

Vera and Teunet ten bya eo HORE. Nurse Peggy, and Little Dog Trip.
Fanny’s King. By DARLEY DALE.
Wild Marsh Marigolds, By D. DALE.
Kitty’s Cousin.

Cleared at Last.

Little Dolly Forbes.

A Year with Nellie. By A. S. FENN.
The Little Brown Bird.

The Maid of Domremy.

Little Eric: a Story of Honesty.
Uncle Ben the Whaler.

The Palace of Luxury.

The Charcoal Burner.

Willy Black: A Story of Doing Right.
The Horse and his Ways.

Mrs. Holland’s Peaches.
Marjory’s White Rat.
Grandmother’s Forget-me-nots.
From over the Sea,

The Kitchen Cat. By AMy WALTON.
The Royal Eagle. By L. ''Hompson.
Two Little Mice. By Mrs. GARLICK.
A Little Man of War.

Lady Daisy. By CAROLINE STEWART.
Dew. By H. Mary WILSON.

Chris’s Old Violin. By J. Lockwart.
Mischievous Jack. By A. CorKRAN.
The Twins. By L. E. TIDDEMAN,
Pet’s Project. By Cora LANGTON.
The Chosen Treat. By C. Wyarv. The Shoemaker’s Present.

Little Neighbours. By A. 8. FENN. Lights to Walk by.

Jim: A Story of Child Life. The Little Merchant.

Little Curiosity. ByJ.M.CALLWELL. Nicholina: A Story about an Iceberg.
Sara the Wool-gatherer.

A SERIES OF FOURPENNY REWARD BOOKS.
Each 64 pages, 18mo, Illustrated, in Picture Boards.

A Start in Life. By J. LockHart. Papa’s Birthday. By W. L. Roopkr.
Happy Childhood. The Charm Fairy. By PENELOPE.
Dorothy’s Clock. Little Tales for Little Children.
Toddy. By L. E. TIDDEMAN. Brave and True. By Griason Gow.
Stories about my Dolls. Johnnie Tupper’s Temptation. Do.
Stories about my Cat Timothy. Maudie and Bertie.
Delia’s Boots. By W. L. Roopmr. The Children and the Water-Lily.
Climbing the Hill. By ANNIE 8. By JULIA GopparD.

SWAN. Poor Tom Olliver. Do.
A Year at Covérley. By Do. Fritz’s Experiment.
Phil Foster. By J. LockHart. Luey’s Christmas-Box.

BLACKIE & SON, Limiren., Lonpon, Guascoiv, anp Dusiin.>

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