Citation
Child's book of trades

Material Information

Title:
Child's book of trades
Series Title:
Slovenly Peter series
Creator:
Donohue, Henneberry & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Publisher:
Donohue, Henneberry & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[16] p. : ill. ; 31 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Occupations -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Stiff paper covers.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023064940 ( ALEPH )
23076671 ( OCLC )
AHK0360 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Sens



&





-Donoh



ve

+ CHICAGO +.
ue-Henneberry &@-

*







The ehilds Book of Jrades.

THE BAKER.



| ‘THE Baker mixes meal
He kneads the flour too
To make white bread and brown,
And also cake, for you. —



Into his oven hot

He pokes the loaves to bake.
But think of what is done,

Before they're bread and cake!





The farmer first must sow his
seed ,

Upon his well-ploughed farm

‘The mowers, too, must swing
) their scythes

So strong and stout of | Perhaps you think it fine

He buys the flour too

And stirs and kneads and
rolls it out 3

For boys and girls like you.



arm. To be a busy baker
Then, binding up the And what nice things you'd
yellow grain _ taste

| They load it on the cart, Were you a cookie-maker!
i, Off to the mill it goes But tasting this and that
" and there, Would spoil your teeth so —
The miller does his part. — white ae |
At last the baker gets | The baker, too,
the meal | works hard =

| The Baldwin Library | |

| University

|RMNB vile |
: | Florida |











For you, the livelong night For children who eat well-
For they must mix and bake baked bread |
So that you may be able | Have sturdy
To have your rolls and bread frames and
Upon your breakfast table, | cheeks so red.




THE FARMER.
Be the sun is Or up the hillside gg) fer

high - Ploughs out his

Upon ee summer furrows deep,

sky He scatters —
The busy. oun, every seed .

goes To raise the Se
With spades and things we need be

ploughs and hoes : And watches well each crop
To make the loamy field That it may never stop

Its store of good things yield, But grow and grow and yield

His sheep and lambs and cows’ The fruits of farm and field,

He drives a-field to Then praise the farmer good
browse 2 ‘Who helps us all to food.







THE PHARMACIST (DRUGGIST).

[® many a herb and many a plant
Lie juices full of health;

_ They bring to sick and weary
g folks









For strength and healing, Mortar and pestle, powder,

balm and cure paste,
And life to weakened blood, And liquids strong in smell,
Came from the juice the All these in pharmacies are
druggist’s skill _ used

Can press from leaf and bud, To make the sick ones well.

THE FIREMAN.

Tire! fire! hear the cry = Ze
See the red flame in » -
the sky
Hear the skrieks of
frightened folk—
For a fire is no joke.
Hark, what is it, dong,
dong, dong!
Tis the fire engines gong.
“Clear the track,” the firemen Up and down the engines



shout, play,
“We will put the fire out! Out bursts water, stream
Quick, against the burning. and spray

wall, Down the fire falls, now

Now they place the ladder tall its out ©
Round and round the fireman Hurrah! all the people oa
goes _ Who else could our houses |
With his line of well-knit Save 3
hose, — | Like the fireman so brave.





THE BUTCHER.

EE the jolly butcher-man
=~, In his well-filled shop

seg ee Beef and lamb and pork are



ad ps! there,
= SS Fowl, and roast, and ae :
Tongues so red and sausage All the things he has
round, for sale



Meat for That give strength



Savory to you.
stew
THE COOK.
N his kitchen, hard at work, So that he may mix them
See the white-robed cook. fine
See what nice things there he For the dish on which ce ‘Il
makes; dine. as

Wp

Fw GAAS NS
WS

x
es By \\) pee
ib A ye DBs
N a ao . - y
Â¥ yee MB) Ge IAS Ks



It will pay to look!

Soups and stews and roasts and
cakes,

All of these the big cook makes,

While the maid, near by, is seen,

With the vegetables green,

Scraping, cutting, slicing, paring,

All the things for which he’s
caring,








(i Aon bl
wn ts aa NN
eA NaY cit!
i. it RW ERAN LH AN \
ho NN
a cl ; ms

Sen Hoa USS TS

















THE SHIP BUILDER.

\AJuHERE forest trees grow straight and

high | ,
With tops that seem to reach the sky,
- The straightest, tallest trunks are sought,
To river-bank and sea-shore brought,
And there, in ship yards, fashioned fast
In hull and stanchion, rail and mast,











Until from keel to top-mast And day by day, with patient
neat zeal :
The graceful ship is all com- The builder works, straight
plete. from the keel,
BuO! the Work theme ee As: _ ship, all trim and taut
do UVown slippery ways, to sea
B ie hi is brought,
ce - z ip-builder - Where floating free, with sail
ae and sheet,
For he must cut and shave She couras
and saw, P
the waves
And fit and trim and smoothe beneath
and draw,

a her feet,
With caution great must lay And with. <6



—— Sis f
the keel, a her colors a ee < ar
And set the ribs like bars of high un- | -alle "op a
steel, furled eee ||
Must make the seams all She leads | j=) sae |
water-tight the race “* iz eae 3
And finish off, all trim and around se FD

hight. the world. oe







THE GARDENER.

MONG the flowers the gardener works
Nor over weeds his labor shirks.
Roses and tulips, fine and rare
Lilies and pinks and pansies fair,
Fruit, rich and ripe, on vine and tree
Plants brought from countries o’er the
sea, - ,
\ He tends and rears with wondrous
care |
To make boquets and garlands fair,
Or serve at feasts and banquets where
Both fruits and flowers the tables bear.

















THE SIOREKEEPER.

(COME, dear children, let’s go down
To the Merchant's in the town,
See the things’ he has to sell
For I know they'll please you well.

Here are sugar, coffee, spice,
Oil and salt and raisins, nice;
Nuts and lemons, butter, too,
Oranges so liked by you.
* Dishes, pitchers, cups and _ plates,
SS a> _Knives and forks and books and >
wa yp _ slates; }



Dollies, drums, and jumping jacks,
Wheelbarrows and carpet-tacks;
Garden rakes and jumping ropes;
Essences and scents and soaps.



































Cloth and silk and dainty laces,

Things to set off pretty faces,

Hats and shoes, umbrellas, too,

Useful things for me and you.

Medicines for those whore sick,

Soda water, candy-stick;

All things needful, all things rare,

Will the merchant sell
you there,

If you have the cash to
buy

And the price is not

if c
4
WL "@ 2
ZENG, fie et
Z & 4 v
4 o fe j
ee Eva of
UN sd
Y VaR NG °
y,
ae aT
Epp

MS eagel





too high. il



You would poorly fare, I fear, If no storekeepers were here.

THE SADDLER.

HERES nothing like leather! On his saddle he'll ride over

For, no matter whether valleys and hills,
Its in saddles or satchels or In his shoes he can travel
shoes, all day,
If they're well made and strong In his satchel he brings
They will last a man long, To the children rare things

And he'll find them delightful That he bought for them far,
to use. far away.









RR af eas ss

me

Then ho! for the saddler’s needle and thread:

And ho! for his stitches so strong.

He makes us good things for the home and the stall,
That to children or horses belong.

THE SHOEMAKER.

~ROM stones so sharp, and snow so cold
And rainy roads so wet

The busy shoemaker, I’m told

» Makes things that you can get.

“, With awl and hammer, wax and thread

\- He works with zeal for you

And soon from leather, black or red

Turns out a dainty shoe.



THE TAILOR.

uT of wool and flax and silk Clothes, however fine are they
Soft as down and smooth Do not make the man, I say.

as milk | Worth and truth make
Does the busy weaver make people good,
Cloth of all sorts for our sake, But ‘tis always understood
To the tailor all this goes That the poorest may be neat
Who with flashing needle sews, Clean and bright — head
Into clothes he cuts and fits to feet,
As he at his table sits. If he watchful is and takes

Trousers, vests and jackets too Care for what the tailor makes.
Coats he makes for me and you .
That we all may look so neat
Dressed in style from head to feet.





THE HUNTER,

ot dog and gun the hunter hastes,
To seek the forest shades,

Where stag and hare and slyboots fox,

| Roam through the verdant glades.

Oe fast they flee when through the trees,
= The gleaming gun they spy,

he (08 For well they know the

: a ee hunters’ skill,

ian < “They know how true his eye.

ae 9 We praise his quick, unerring aim,

a y ,, And hail him as of old they cheered,

*”“ The hunter, Nimrod’s name.












ee
ee










Ve Uf Gre ©









yrs hook and line,
With net and na!

In salt sea brine,
And rivers small;

In boat and punt,
From shore and ship,
The fishers hunt,
From trip to trip,
For what you call

A tempting dish;—
But hard they toil
To catch your fish.



THE CARPENTER.

How many things the carpenter makes!
What should we do without him?

| See where he whistles and works at his bench,
While the shavings tumble about him.

First from the forests, thick and high,
Comes the fragrant wood,

Which for timber first is cut,
Dragged from where it stood.
Then ‘tis sawn for joists and planks,

And as lumber goes,
Fitted for most useful things,
As the Carpenter shows.





How he measures, planes and saws,
Smoothes and fits and glues
Into windows, sashes, doors,
All the things we use,
For our houses snug and warm
Where we live secure from storm.























THE MASON.
[» brick and stone the mason Piers that uphold the bridge

works | : so wide,
To build walls stout and strong, And forts where ace live,
And towers high The mason makes. |
That toward the sky Much pains he takes,

Are lifted straight and long. — Both form and strength to
With patient toil he lays each give.

stone He lays the bricks on, one by
And fastens Shem re. one, |
With honest mortar And thus great buildings are
Mixed in water, : begun,

That outlasts wear and weather. And noble edifices done.

THE PAINTER.

When the carpenter has made Outside, inside, roof and door,
All his building right, : Blinds and stairways, wall
Then, with colors rich and fast and floor

Comes the painter man at last Into brilliance rush.

Juste make Wee But be careful children dear

How he lays the colors on To his work go not so near
With his skilful brush; | Or you'll hear his voice, not
faint, :




Calling, “Hey!
~ look out for
paint!”









THE WATCHMAKER.
Tae Watchmaker sits at his He mends broken springs,

bench, | wheels and hands,
And mends all our watches Or puts a new glass in the
and clocks, face,
He looks a his powerful And when all his labors are
glass, through,
At the delicate works in the Then our timepieces seem
case, good as new.

THE BLACKSMITH.
His hammer clinks, his anvil What does he make? A



rings, horse's shoe,
The sparks fly round about, A sword so sharp, a bolt
The iron shapes to useful complete,
things, A wagon tire,a standard true,
The fire glows, and climbs and Things stout and strong he
springs, makes for you,
As fast the belore pout. . In forge and anvil heat.

THE HORSESHOER.
WAJHILE the blacksmith fashions neat,
~ Iron shoes for horse’s feet.
On the hoof he works to fit,
In the form he fashions it,
Well-curved shoes which pound

and pound,

As the swift horse aan the
ground.
And, atlast,;when Dobbin’s shod,
Off we gallop o’er the sod.





























Full Text


Sens



&





-Donoh



ve

+ CHICAGO +.
ue-Henneberry &@-

*




The ehilds Book of Jrades.

THE BAKER.



| ‘THE Baker mixes meal
He kneads the flour too
To make white bread and brown,
And also cake, for you. —



Into his oven hot

He pokes the loaves to bake.
But think of what is done,

Before they're bread and cake!





The farmer first must sow his
seed ,

Upon his well-ploughed farm

‘The mowers, too, must swing
) their scythes

So strong and stout of | Perhaps you think it fine

He buys the flour too

And stirs and kneads and
rolls it out 3

For boys and girls like you.



arm. To be a busy baker
Then, binding up the And what nice things you'd
yellow grain _ taste

| They load it on the cart, Were you a cookie-maker!
i, Off to the mill it goes But tasting this and that
" and there, Would spoil your teeth so —
The miller does his part. — white ae |
At last the baker gets | The baker, too,
the meal | works hard =

| The Baldwin Library | |

| University

|RMNB vile |
: | Florida |





For you, the livelong night For children who eat well-
For they must mix and bake baked bread |
So that you may be able | Have sturdy
To have your rolls and bread frames and
Upon your breakfast table, | cheeks so red.




THE FARMER.
Be the sun is Or up the hillside gg) fer

high - Ploughs out his

Upon ee summer furrows deep,

sky He scatters —
The busy. oun, every seed .

goes To raise the Se
With spades and things we need be

ploughs and hoes : And watches well each crop
To make the loamy field That it may never stop

Its store of good things yield, But grow and grow and yield

His sheep and lambs and cows’ The fruits of farm and field,

He drives a-field to Then praise the farmer good
browse 2 ‘Who helps us all to food.







THE PHARMACIST (DRUGGIST).

[® many a herb and many a plant
Lie juices full of health;

_ They bring to sick and weary
g folks



For strength and healing, Mortar and pestle, powder,

balm and cure paste,
And life to weakened blood, And liquids strong in smell,
Came from the juice the All these in pharmacies are
druggist’s skill _ used

Can press from leaf and bud, To make the sick ones well.

THE FIREMAN.

Tire! fire! hear the cry = Ze
See the red flame in » -
the sky
Hear the skrieks of
frightened folk—
For a fire is no joke.
Hark, what is it, dong,
dong, dong!
Tis the fire engines gong.
“Clear the track,” the firemen Up and down the engines



shout, play,
“We will put the fire out! Out bursts water, stream
Quick, against the burning. and spray

wall, Down the fire falls, now

Now they place the ladder tall its out ©
Round and round the fireman Hurrah! all the people oa
goes _ Who else could our houses |
With his line of well-knit Save 3
hose, — | Like the fireman so brave.


THE BUTCHER.

EE the jolly butcher-man
=~, In his well-filled shop

seg ee Beef and lamb and pork are



ad ps! there,
= SS Fowl, and roast, and ae :
Tongues so red and sausage All the things he has
round, for sale



Meat for That give strength



Savory to you.
stew
THE COOK.
N his kitchen, hard at work, So that he may mix them
See the white-robed cook. fine
See what nice things there he For the dish on which ce ‘Il
makes; dine. as

Wp

Fw GAAS NS
WS

x
es By \\) pee
ib A ye DBs
N a ao . - y
Â¥ yee MB) Ge IAS Ks



It will pay to look!

Soups and stews and roasts and
cakes,

All of these the big cook makes,

While the maid, near by, is seen,

With the vegetables green,

Scraping, cutting, slicing, paring,

All the things for which he’s
caring,








(i Aon bl
wn ts aa NN
eA NaY cit!
i. it RW ERAN LH AN \
ho NN
a cl ; ms

Sen Hoa USS TS














THE SHIP BUILDER.

\AJuHERE forest trees grow straight and

high | ,
With tops that seem to reach the sky,
- The straightest, tallest trunks are sought,
To river-bank and sea-shore brought,
And there, in ship yards, fashioned fast
In hull and stanchion, rail and mast,











Until from keel to top-mast And day by day, with patient
neat zeal :
The graceful ship is all com- The builder works, straight
plete. from the keel,
BuO! the Work theme ee As: _ ship, all trim and taut
do UVown slippery ways, to sea
B ie hi is brought,
ce - z ip-builder - Where floating free, with sail
ae and sheet,
For he must cut and shave She couras
and saw, P
the waves
And fit and trim and smoothe beneath
and draw,

a her feet,
With caution great must lay And with. <6



—— Sis f
the keel, a her colors a ee < ar
And set the ribs like bars of high un- | -alle "op a
steel, furled eee ||
Must make the seams all She leads | j=) sae |
water-tight the race “* iz eae 3
And finish off, all trim and around se FD

hight. the world. oe

THE GARDENER.

MONG the flowers the gardener works
Nor over weeds his labor shirks.
Roses and tulips, fine and rare
Lilies and pinks and pansies fair,
Fruit, rich and ripe, on vine and tree
Plants brought from countries o’er the
sea, - ,
\ He tends and rears with wondrous
care |
To make boquets and garlands fair,
Or serve at feasts and banquets where
Both fruits and flowers the tables bear.

















THE SIOREKEEPER.

(COME, dear children, let’s go down
To the Merchant's in the town,
See the things’ he has to sell
For I know they'll please you well.

Here are sugar, coffee, spice,
Oil and salt and raisins, nice;
Nuts and lemons, butter, too,
Oranges so liked by you.
* Dishes, pitchers, cups and _ plates,
SS a> _Knives and forks and books and >
wa yp _ slates; }
Dollies, drums, and jumping jacks,
Wheelbarrows and carpet-tacks;
Garden rakes and jumping ropes;
Essences and scents and soaps.



































Cloth and silk and dainty laces,

Things to set off pretty faces,

Hats and shoes, umbrellas, too,

Useful things for me and you.

Medicines for those whore sick,

Soda water, candy-stick;

All things needful, all things rare,

Will the merchant sell
you there,

If you have the cash to
buy

And the price is not

if c
4
WL "@ 2
ZENG, fie et
Z & 4 v
4 o fe j
ee Eva of
UN sd
Y VaR NG °
y,
ae aT
Epp

MS eagel





too high. il



You would poorly fare, I fear, If no storekeepers were here.

THE SADDLER.

HERES nothing like leather! On his saddle he'll ride over

For, no matter whether valleys and hills,
Its in saddles or satchels or In his shoes he can travel
shoes, all day,
If they're well made and strong In his satchel he brings
They will last a man long, To the children rare things

And he'll find them delightful That he bought for them far,
to use. far away.



RR af eas ss

me

Then ho! for the saddler’s needle and thread:

And ho! for his stitches so strong.

He makes us good things for the home and the stall,
That to children or horses belong.

THE SHOEMAKER.

~ROM stones so sharp, and snow so cold
And rainy roads so wet

The busy shoemaker, I’m told

» Makes things that you can get.

“, With awl and hammer, wax and thread

\- He works with zeal for you

And soon from leather, black or red

Turns out a dainty shoe.



THE TAILOR.

uT of wool and flax and silk Clothes, however fine are they
Soft as down and smooth Do not make the man, I say.

as milk | Worth and truth make
Does the busy weaver make people good,
Cloth of all sorts for our sake, But ‘tis always understood
To the tailor all this goes That the poorest may be neat
Who with flashing needle sews, Clean and bright — head
Into clothes he cuts and fits to feet,
As he at his table sits. If he watchful is and takes

Trousers, vests and jackets too Care for what the tailor makes.
Coats he makes for me and you .
That we all may look so neat
Dressed in style from head to feet.


THE HUNTER,

ot dog and gun the hunter hastes,
To seek the forest shades,

Where stag and hare and slyboots fox,

| Roam through the verdant glades.

Oe fast they flee when through the trees,
= The gleaming gun they spy,

he (08 For well they know the

: a ee hunters’ skill,

ian < “They know how true his eye.

ae 9 We praise his quick, unerring aim,

a y ,, And hail him as of old they cheered,

*”“ The hunter, Nimrod’s name.












ee
ee










Ve Uf Gre ©









yrs hook and line,
With net and na!

In salt sea brine,
And rivers small;

In boat and punt,
From shore and ship,
The fishers hunt,
From trip to trip,
For what you call

A tempting dish;—
But hard they toil
To catch your fish.
THE CARPENTER.

How many things the carpenter makes!
What should we do without him?

| See where he whistles and works at his bench,
While the shavings tumble about him.

First from the forests, thick and high,
Comes the fragrant wood,

Which for timber first is cut,
Dragged from where it stood.
Then ‘tis sawn for joists and planks,

And as lumber goes,
Fitted for most useful things,
As the Carpenter shows.





How he measures, planes and saws,
Smoothes and fits and glues
Into windows, sashes, doors,
All the things we use,
For our houses snug and warm
Where we live secure from storm.

















THE MASON.
[» brick and stone the mason Piers that uphold the bridge

works | : so wide,
To build walls stout and strong, And forts where ace live,
And towers high The mason makes. |
That toward the sky Much pains he takes,

Are lifted straight and long. — Both form and strength to
With patient toil he lays each give.

stone He lays the bricks on, one by
And fastens Shem re. one, |
With honest mortar And thus great buildings are
Mixed in water, : begun,

That outlasts wear and weather. And noble edifices done.

THE PAINTER.

When the carpenter has made Outside, inside, roof and door,
All his building right, : Blinds and stairways, wall
Then, with colors rich and fast and floor

Comes the painter man at last Into brilliance rush.

Juste make Wee But be careful children dear

How he lays the colors on To his work go not so near
With his skilful brush; | Or you'll hear his voice, not
faint, :




Calling, “Hey!
~ look out for
paint!”



THE WATCHMAKER.
Tae Watchmaker sits at his He mends broken springs,

bench, | wheels and hands,
And mends all our watches Or puts a new glass in the
and clocks, face,
He looks a his powerful And when all his labors are
glass, through,
At the delicate works in the Then our timepieces seem
case, good as new.

THE BLACKSMITH.
His hammer clinks, his anvil What does he make? A



rings, horse's shoe,
The sparks fly round about, A sword so sharp, a bolt
The iron shapes to useful complete,
things, A wagon tire,a standard true,
The fire glows, and climbs and Things stout and strong he
springs, makes for you,
As fast the belore pout. . In forge and anvil heat.

THE HORSESHOER.
WAJHILE the blacksmith fashions neat,
~ Iron shoes for horse’s feet.
On the hoof he works to fit,
In the form he fashions it,
Well-curved shoes which pound

and pound,

As the swift horse aan the
ground.
And, atlast,;when Dobbin’s shod,
Off we gallop o’er the sod.