Citation
Favorite stories

Material Information

Title:
Favorite stories happy hours for little people
Creator:
Barnes, Hiram Putnam, b. 1857 ( Illustrator )
Bonsall, E. F ( Illustrator )
Bridgeman, E ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop Publishing Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[156] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's poetry
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations by Hiram P. Barnes, E. F. Bonsall, E. Bridgeman and others.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023199913 ( ALEPH )
23068276 ( OCLC )
AHK4365 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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~ TWO PET PARROTS.

- OWN in the Southern States of
“America pet parrots are very
common. Sailing vessels are
constantly bringing them from
South and Central America and
from the West Indies.

I recall one now that I was
the happy owner of when a
child in New Orleans. She
was a dark green parrot, with
a black bill and feet; she was
from Nicaragua. She was very
bright and a great favorite
with all the children. She
spoke very plainly, and could
laugh and cry quite like a



human being; it was very amusing to hear her.

She was full of mischief. If a servant was called, she would
answer (herself unseen), sharply “What!” and when the servant
was reproved for his lack of respect she would shout with
laughter. a . re

She learned from the newsboys on the street, very naughty
‘words, which was finally the cause of our having to part with
her. From her hanging cage on one of the front verandas, she
would cry out to a passer-by, “Oh, you rat!” and when the
passer-by would stop to see who it was that made the remark,
and discover the parrot, the naughty bird would only laugh. —



TWO PHT PARROTS.

Another serious fault was a habit of opening her cage with
her bill. She could do this quite cleverly when it was not
securely tied. Then she would come out and walk into pools of
water and mud in the yard. When the careful laundress had
hanged the clothes-lines full of freshly washed linen, she would
walk up and down the lines soiling the clothes with her muddy
feet, and cutting off all the buttons with her bill. With all her
faults, however, we loved her dearly, and many tears: were shed
when she was finally sent away on account
of her bad language. Another parrot which
lived in a Southern city, was a great favorite
in the family of some friends of mine.




She was quite old—
though her exact age I ~
cannot now tell. She had
lived in the State of Texas,
while it was a Republic
belonging to Mexico, and
seemed equally. happy in
her home after it became
one of the United States.

She formed a great at-
tachment for a horse which
the children drove, and the
two became great friends.
She would climb up on a
fence, the horse would come
along beside it, allow her
to get on his back, and then walk slowly around while the parrot
held a piece of his mane with her bill. After she had ridden as
long as she wished she would climb into the pantry window, and

‘“‘OH, YOU RAT!”



TWO PET PARROTS.

hand out with her bill, rolls or cookies or anything she could

find to the horse, as a return for her ride. | .

; In the early morning she would go upstairs, visit the sleeping
_ rooms of the children, and call out “Get up, Charlie!” “ Get

up, Frank!” until she had
aroused them all.

When they set off for
school, she would sit aloft
on the cross beam of the.
high front gate, and call
out as long as they were
in sight, “Good-by, Char-
lie!” “Good-by, Frank!”

And here on her favorite
perch she finally met her
sad fate. ;

There were two tame
eagles in the city; they
had been caught when
young, tamed and often al-
lowed to fly about where
they liked.

One morning as Polly sat
on the gate bidding her



ean set young friends good-by, one
: re of these great birds swooped
suddenly down upon her, and carried her off in his claws, fol.
- lowed by the frantic but fruitless shrieks of the children.
So long as she could be. seen a mere speck in his claws, as
he soared | toward the sky, she was sending back the most piteous
eries of “Poor Polly” “Poor Polly!” wae MRS.



A DREAM-CAMEL.

A DREAM-CAMEL.

“T had a sweet dream last night,” said Kitty Clover. “Uncle _
John says it was because I ate so much turkey at Christmas dinner-
Eating too much makes dreams, he says. But it was a sweet dream.

“TI dreamed I was riding on a camel. And he stept so softly
and gently, ’twas like riding in a hammock. Uncle John says
real camels do not step softly and gently. But dream-camels do.

“And we—for dear mamma was with me —we had an awning
over our heads to keep the hot sunshine off. The awning was
blue and pink shiny silk, and it had we silk tassels that waved
and streamed in the wind.

“And the sands of the desert were all bright like gold. And
the sky was a sweet blue like baby’s eyes.
~“ And we rode and rode. :

“By and by, we came to a place where there was a spring of
water. It was clear like glass, and bubbled and sparkled and sang
a tinkling song. The grass was green all around it, and a tall
palm-tree grew high above it. On the palm-tree hung clusters of
great purple dates. I.reached up from the camel’s back and picked
the dates, and gave some to mamma, and we ate them. O, how
sweet and juicy they were! .

“Then I looked ahead, and the golden sais were turning into
gray, and the blue sky-was growing dark. And I said, “O, let
us stay here, mamma, it is so lovely!”

“But mamma said, ‘No, my child, we must go on through the
desert till we come home, though the sands are gray and the
skies are dark.’ And then I waked up. It was a sweet dream, but
T was glad I waked up.” :













































































THE PRETTY WOODPECKER,



‘ CAPTAIN.

CAPTAIN.

Captain is a large, handsome Newfoundland dog. He lives in
Malden. We call him Cap most of the time. When he is
called Captain he understands that something is wrong. Some-
times he gets into mischief and has to be scolded or punished
for it. Then he is called Captain, and that in a very stern voice.

Cap knows that he is to stay about the house. That is his
duty. But one day (this really happened in the spring of
1889) Cap was not to be seen when his mistress called him to
breakfast. This was something strange,, she thought. So she
waited a little while and again called his name. “Cap, Cap,’
she called. But no dog appeared. Captain’s mistress thought he
surely must have run away this time, and so he had. For
two days nothing more was heard from him. We thought he
had been stolen by some bad boys.

But the third morning, on opening the door, what did we see
sitting on the steps but poor old Captain. He looked very meek
and sorrowful. He wagged his tail slowly, and hobbled around
on three legs, holding up the fourth paw as if it were hurt.

Of course no one had the heart to punish the poor fellow
then, so he was caressed and called “poor doggie.” The paw
was looked at, but we could not find anything the matter. We
thought we would take him to a dog doctor if the paw troubled
him much. Cap was given a good warm breakfast, and seemed very
grateful for it. He now thought his troubles were over.

Going into the room @ little later, his mistress was astonished to
fnd Cap trotting: around as well as ever. The rogue had been











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THE THOUGHTS OF KITTY GRAY.

~ making believe all the time. He was afraid of a whipping, and
thought we would forget it after a while. Captain didn’t get the

whipping, but he did get a good scolding for running away.
Frank FE. Saville.



THE THOUGHTS OF KITTY GRAY.

I am thinking. I’ve seen
my mistress do it and talk
all the time. But I can’t.
If Spotty does not keep her
whiskers out of my ears Pll
bite her.

I don’t think folks try to
please kittens. Now, if the
gardener saw us playing with
his flower pots he would drive
us away. Tony broke two
last week; but the gardener
needn’t have sprinkled water
on us; we could go and leave
the. pieces without having
water sprinkled on us; that’s
why I lie in the sprinkler.
And I don’t like to be scatted
“scat! scat!” all the time.



KITTY GRAY IN THE SPRINKLER.

There are sparrows in the garden, but they are spry. [ve
put my paw: on a great many, but every time I do it the
sparrow is gone. Louis Hall.



THE SPARROWS SONG.

THE SPARROW’S SONG.





Twhit! T’whit! O, throw out a crumb
To a poor little bird of the air;
Twhit! T’whit! O, throw out a crumb —

You surely have plenty to spare!
M. A. 8.



*

A PORCUPINE’S THOUGHTS.

Said the Porcupine, “Really, I think,
I could write if I only had ink;
- ‘TI have quills and to spare,
— I have thoughts very rare,
~But I fear to oblivion theyll -sink,
For want of a bottle of ink.” Mess He





NURSE’ S BIRTHDAY FLOWERS. it}

NURSE'S BIRTHDAY FLOWERS.

Tt was old nurse’s birthday, and so soon as little Thérdse had
eaten her breakfast of a white roll and milk, she trotted off to
carry the flowers that she always Books nurse each year when
her birthday came round.

The little cottage where nurse lived was not far from the big
house and it was quite safe for Thérése to go alone. Her
mamma, who was standing on the terrace, could see her from
the time she left the house until she went into the door of
nurse’s cottage.

She took Minette with her, of course. Minette was her. dear
little dog, and went almost everywhere that Thérése went. Min-
ette’s cord was fastened to her belt. She carried the basket of
flowers in one hand, and her sunshade in the other. And as
she walked along, she felt like a very important little woman.

Mamma had objected a little to having Minette’s cord fastened
to Therése’s belt. “He is so gay this morning, he may go too
fast for you,” she said. But Thérése would have it so. “He’s
so little, mamma, he can’t pull,” she said. 3

But he did pull. He saw a pigeon in the grass and started
to run, and almost upset Therese and. the flowers.

“Naughty Minette!” said Therese; and then he walked on
quite soberly for a few steps, when he saw a cat. Up went
kitty’s back, and off started Minette. The cat ran, and Minette
ran, and there was nothing for Therese to do but to- run also.
The cat was nurse’s cat, and she rushed into the cottage door
with Minette and Therése at her heels, and nurse thought a
hurricane had arrived. But it was only her birthday flowers.





NURSE, THERESE, MINETTE AND THE BIRTHDAY FLOWERS,





THURSDAY'S CHILD.































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THURSDAY’S CHILD.

O, why, little girl, will you never be still,
But rove from one spot to another?

Thy dear little feet will be weary, my sweet,
Come here and sit down with thy mother.



MUNGO; A SCOTCH DOGGIE.

Nay, nay, pretty mother, I cannot be still,
But must always be roving just so!
Now, would you know why! Thursday’s child am I,
And “Thursday’s child has far to go.”
A, G. Plympton.

MUNGO ; A SCOTCH DOGGIE.

Every morning his master gave Mungo a penny, and he took
it to the butcher’s to buy himself a piece of meat. The butcher
expected him as much as he did any of his customers, and he would
say, “Oh! here’s Mungo. Come, Mungo, here’s your meat all ready
for you.” bie

Now the family never fed Mungo at the table, or in the dining-
room. He had his meals in the kitchen. He never was trouble-
some asking for food, although he often sat in the room while
the family were at the table.

But one day they had a visitor who did not know this. As
soon as she had done her breakfast, she called, “Come here,
Mungo,” and sat down her plate, full of. nice things for him.

-Mungo did not stop to ask any questions —he went right to
work, and ate all there was in the plate.

He had had nothing to eat that morning and that was the
time he usually went to get his meat. ©

As soon as he had cleaned the plate he looked round for his
master. _He went up to him, stood up on his hind legs and patted
_with his paw on the breast-pocket of his master’s coat where he
knew he kept his wallet,



A GAY LITTLE TEAM.

At first his master did not understand. Then he said, “0,
Mungo! are you asking for your penny?”

So he gave him the penny. Mungo carried it to his new
iriend, and gave it to her. Then he looked up in her face, and
wagged his tail as if he were very much pleased.

I suppose he meant, “See what an honest dog I am! I’ve
paid for the nice breakfast you gave me!”

Pamela McArthur Cole.



Tf children and folks would be happy as kings,
The only true way is to do the right things.



A GAY LITTLE TEAM.





Wagaie and. t tagether play



D, Tee hehest of Friends the livelong datp,
Z Ban Girst fam Master andthen he, @
ZZ bi | Ag it is right that it shauld be. |
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Za wEwe si
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Moy ten-pins for the warders qreat
eg hall quard without the mullicned gate.





Jy atlas makes a drawhridge here,
ome books a tented army near,

find f must now his vassal he

nd serve }King Day ou herded kiae.



YF. Bonsall

Blanche Dillage.



THE CUNNING WEASELS.

THE CUNNING WEASELS.

In a hollow of a tree, cuddled among the leaves and moss, are
five baby-weasels. Mother Weasel has gone to find her break-
fast, for she heard a hen cackling and knew she should find an
egg in her nest. With a hop, skip and jump the weasel finds
the egg, and making a tiny hole in the shell, sucks it out. But
it was not one egg only that she found; she found one, two,
three eggs; how sweet and good they were!

Although the weasel is smaller than a rat, still she is very
brave and hunts the rats and mice for her dinner. She sples a
rat. The rat runs for his hole; with a jump the weasel is after
him. Into the rat-hole they go, and race down its halls and
through its rooms, until the weasel catches him and_ takes poor
rat to her nest.

The baby-weasels grow and grow until they are as large as
their mother-weasel ; they, too, soon learn to climb trees for birds’
eggs to suck.

- All summer the back. of the weasel’s fur coat is brown, and
the front white; but when the winter “comes, mother-weasel
awakes some morning to find the cold has changed the fur on
her back white. When summer comes, her coat is brown once more.

One day mother-weasel and her five weasel children went hunt
ing together. They met a man, and they stopped running, set
up on their hind legs with their paws over their noses, looked
. at the man, then with a squeak, pop went the six weasels under
some bushes!

The man was so surprised that he quite forgot to fire off
his gun at them. Nina Shaw Stevens.







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TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
TROTTINO STUDIES WITH MR. GRISONNET.
Gettins older. After a while, Mr. Grisonnet stopped,

ay with a grave air, to gaze at a little ©
aT 2
plant. Trottino, who was very curi-



ous, asked him what he was looking at.

“Tt is a lesser centaury,” replied
Mr. Grisonnet. “T-ve never seen it
about here before.”

“A lesser centaury! What a funny
name!” said Trottino. “Is the lesser
centaury good to eat?”

“No, it has not a good taste; but
it cures fever.’ Trottino opened his
eyes wide. .

What! A plant which cured fever! —After all, why not?
There were dangerous plants, like the hemlock; Trottino knew
that, very well. And was it true that there were also plants
which could cure?

Trottino kept close beside Mr. Grisonnet, and did not fail to
notice everything that Mr. Grisonnet looked at; and what Mr.
Grisonnet looked at was always plants. He observed that this
one was well-grown, that that one bloomed early, that another
was slender and had hard work to grow.

Trottino asked: “What is the name of that, Mr. Grisonnet ?
What is it good for? Is it poisonous? Does it cure fever?

Mr. Grisonnet was as good as he was wise. He answered



TROTTINO.

Trottino’s questions so carefully, and told him so much besides,
that at the end of the walk Trottino had learned the names
and properties of a dozen plants.

Rabbits grow more quickly than children. At the end of some
weeks Lapino and Trottino were trusted to go about by them:
selves. :

Good: Mother Rabbit was getting older now, and became easily
fatigued. She liked to stay at home, seated in her easy chair



M





and comfortably knitting or sewing, while -Lapino and Trottino.
went to run and play in the fields.

Often they met companions there and made a parties. But
Trottino, although he liked very much to frolic, always left his
younger friends if he saw Mr. Grisonnet pass slowly by, examin-
ing plants.

In three leaps he would be with him, and Mr. Grisonnet was
delighted to have him as companion. Mr. Grisonnet loved to teach
and Trottino to be taught.

Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.



TROTTINO. —



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zig :



TROTTINO.

TROTTINO USES HIS KNOWLEDGE.

One day Lapino and Trottino were returning home after a long
walk. They were always careful to get back at the hour their
mother expected them, so that she should not be anxious, and they
generally found her sitting in the doorway watching for them.
This time, however, there was no Mother Rabbit in sight; and
as they drew nearer they heard cries which came from the back
of the house. Seized with fear, they ran forward; and entering
their home, found Mother Rabbit lying on the bed moaning with pain.

When she saw Lapino and Trottino she tried to rise, saying, “Ah!
my dear little ones, here you are at last. I feared I should not

see you again.”

_ The two little ones began to cry and then they asked what had
happened. They saw blood on several parts of her body. The
poor rabbit told them that a wicked dog had bitten her. How
she ever got away from him she could not tell. She had been so
frightened !



TROTTINO.

Lapino was in great grief. He loved his mother with all his
little rabbit heart. He threw his paws around her neck, begging
her not to die-and leave them; and then he began to lick her
wounds to ease her pain a little.

But where is Trottino now? Does he not love his mother? Will
he not try to help her, too?

Trottino had indeed gone out and left his mother, but it was
with a wise and loving purpose. He now came toiling in, carrying
a great bundle of herbs which he had gathered.

“Have no fear, mother,” said he; “you shall not die. I have
something to cure you with. Lapino, wash the parts which bleed,
quickly. Oh! you have already licked |
them? That is good. Then break that Me d:
herb up fine.” And Trottino, taking oe. in



some of the same herb, mashed it up so
that he could make it into a plaster.
This he placed upon the wounds. O,
joy! The dear Mother Rabbit was soon
in a gentle sleep. _

When she awoke, she was better;
and in a few days the tender care of
her children cured her. When the neigh-
bors came to inquire after their wounded
friend Lapino loved to tell them that
it was Trottino — little Trottino— who had known what to do for
his mother, and had brought the healing plants.

“How did the idea come to you,’ asked an old rabbit one day
curiously, “to learn about plants which are not good to eat?”

“Tt is because I once poisoned myself with hemlock,’ replied
Trottino. “That made me notice plants; so I was glad to learn
about them, and dear, good Mr. Grisonnet was willing to teach me.”



TWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

“And it is very plain that he has profited by other lessons as
well as mine,” said Mr. Grisonnet, coming up at that moment. “For
instead of the once disobedient, greedy and thoughtless Trottino,
we have here a good and wise little rabbit, who is a joy to his family
and a credit to the rabbit race.”

Adapted from the French, by Laura EH. Poulsson.

TWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

So tired! and hungry, too! They had gone to see the soldiers
start off for the Centennial, and when they tried to get home, they
got lost and did not know which way to go. They walked and
walked and walked till they could not walk any more, and they
just stopped to think.

They were in some white people’s back yard, and they concluded
they could crawl under the house and sleep when night-time came;
but they did want some “corn beade” so badly. They liked corn
bread and molasses better than anything else, and their mother,
who was a washerwoman and worked hard to give them food to
eat and clothes to wear, let them have it three times a oe they
did not have much _ besides.

I think I must tell you how this same mamma told them about
the five little pigs, and how she used to tell it to the little white
children she nursed long before they were born. She would spread
out the little feet and pinch the little toes as she said,

“Dis little pig say he want some corn;
Dis little pig say ‘Whar yer gwine git some ?’
Dis little pig say ‘Out ob Marser’s barn;’



LPWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

.

Dis little pig say ‘I tell Marser;°
Dis little pig say ‘ Squeak, squeak, squeak!
Can’t git ober de barn sill.’”

While the two lost little pickaninnies were wondering where they
could get some corn bread, they saw a big man come out of the
house, and they were so afraid he was a policeman come to arrest
them for being there, that one of them began to cry and the other
started to crawl under the wheelbarrow, when they saw something
that made them run through the yard as fast as they could.

There in the street was Jumpy, the milkman’s dog, driving the



THEY SEE JUMPY DRIVE THE COWS HOME.

cows home. The milkman lived on the same street they did, so
they just forgot how tired they were and followed the cows till
they got home, when their mother gave them some corn bread

and molasses and put them to bed before the sun went down.
Annie Weston Whitney.



A DEER YARD.

A DEER YARD.

When the cold comes on, and the snow begins to get deep,
the deer commence making their yard to live in during winter.

They make great paths through the snow for a large circuit,
and by traveling over it in all directions, it gets trodden down
hard and makes a very good yard for them.

They browse on the bark of the moose-wood—red maple —and
beech-trees. They first commence gnawing the bark at the bottom
of the tree, and work upward as the winter comes on, as far as
they can reach. They do not gnaw the bark off entirely around
the tree, if they did the tree would die; and it is said they
seem to understand this and leave enough of the bark to save
the life of the tree. They also eat grass, shrubs, buds and moss
in the season when they can get them.

There are three species of the deer-kind of animals; the moose,
deer and caribou. The largest is the moose. Sometimes they are
as large as the largest horses.

They have heavy, lofty horns, or antlers; these spread out in
shape like the open fingers of the hand. They shed these horns
once a year, usually in February. They add one new prong every
year, beginning when two years old, so by counting the horns you
can tell how old a moose is. The horns are not shed all at one
time, but come off one by one as the moose rubs against trees.

The moose is called the most noble animal of the forests. In
the State of Maine, the white pine is called the finest and most
noble of forest trees. So the moose and the pine-tree is on the
shield in the coat of arms, as the great seal of the State of Maine.

Sadie L. Pickard.





A DEER.



SIX LITTLE MAIDS OF LYNN.



SIX LITTLE MAIDS OF LYNN.

Six little maids on the beach at Lynn
Holding a walking match—who will win?
Six rods out and six rods in,
This is the length of the race at Lynn.
Lilian Crawford True.



“SAYING GRACE.”

“SAYING GRACE.”

“Come, come, mamma, to the window!”
Cried Freddie, with eager face,

“Just look at my little biddies —
They are drinking and saying grace.” .







THE SIX THANKFUL CHICKENS.

I quickly came at his bidding,
And saw a pretty sight:

Six downy little chickens |
Drinking with all their might.

And as they sipped the water
They craned their necks on high,
As if their thanks were lifted
To the beautiful blue sky.



PETER THE GOAT-HERD.

And so I could not wonder,
So rapt was his eager face,
That to him the little chickens
Were “drinking and saying grace.”
W. @. Richardson.

PETER THE GOAT-HERD.

Peter the goat-herd lives up among the hills. He has a small
house of his own to live in, and a small house for his goats to live
in. The two houses are. side by side. There are great stones upon
the roofs to keep them from blowing off and away. For the
winds blow very hard where Peter lives.

Every morning he takes his goats still farther up on the hills.
Up there are green pastures, where they feed. Peter sits down, and
his goats feed all about him. They feed right on the edge of the
steep precipices, for goats are very sure-footed.

Many flowers, blue forget-me-nots, and pretty pink and yellow
and white flowers, bloom on the hills; they make the prettiest car-
pet in the world.

Peter does not drive his goats; he goes before and leads the
way, and they follow him.

He has a name for each one. There is Silver-white and Sweet-
heart, Velvet-eyes, and Sunbeam. Hach goat knows its name and
comes when Peter calls it.

These pretty pastures where Silver-white and Velvet-eyes feed are
shut in by high mountains. All the year round the tops of the
mountains are white with snow. But at sunrise and sunset they
are pink.



me



‘AKING HIS FLOCK TO PASTURE.

PETER T.



THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

HE Dolliver children imvited the Cheney
children to their Christmas-tree.

The Cheney family lived on Water Street
near the wharves. The Dolliver family lived up
on the Hill. ee
The Cheneys lived in a house with four —





other families. They had only three rooms.
The Dollivers had their beautiful great house
all to themselves, and had, O, ever so many rooms!

The street before the Cheney children’s house was narrow and
black with coal dust, and noisy with drays and carts. The
Dolliver house sat back from the street, and had beautiful lawns
about it, and flower beds in summer.

The father of the Cheney children was ill. He had been ill a
long time, and the doctor said he would never get well. So
Mrs. Cheney took in washing, and scrubbed floors to support the
family. .

There were six Cheney children. George was the eldest, and was
eleven. The youngest, Susy, was one. George carried bundles for
the corner grocer. Mary, who was nine, helped do the housework;
Sarah, who was seven, picked up bits of coal and wood about
the wharves for the fire, and tended upon Baby Susy; Johnnie,
aged five, waited upon the sick father; Dicky was only three,
and could do nothing but be “dood,” and not cry. He was a
sweet little fellow. .

They were all good children, and did their best to help their
mother, and take care of their sick father. :







JENNY RILEY AND GEORGE,











THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

There were also six of the Dolliver children, and, taken together,
the families made six pairs. They were exactly the same ages,
too, beginning with Tom Dolliver who was eleven, and ending
with Baby Rose who was one.

The Christmas-tree was very pretty. In fact, I do not think
anybody ever saw a Christmas-tree that was not pretty. ' This
one was hung with shining balls—red, yellow, blue, pink. A white
dove perched on the very tip-top of it. Tom hung upon it a
pair of shoes, a ball and bat, and a suit of nice clothes for
George. Bessie added one of her picture books, a letter game, and
two housemaid’s aprons for Mary. Then Amy came up and hung
her prettiest doll, a pink hood and brown mittens, and a bright
half-dollar for Sarah. Ned, reaching up as high as he could,
fastened to its branches a new jack-knife, a box of paints, and
a book of outline pictures to color, for John. Then Mrs. Dolliver
hung, on the very lowest branches, a box of building blocks for
Dicky, and a rubber ring for Baby
Susy who was just teething. These
were from Theo and Baby Rose, who
were not big enough to hang anything
themselves. There was a lace bag full
of chocolate creams for each of the
twelve children, and Mrs. Dolliver put
a little gift on the tree for each of
her brood. She had never given them



costly presents at Christmas. For
Cliristmasy she aids wasethe=binciday. =f ee 2 ee eas
of the Holy Babe of Bethlehem, and gifts on that day must be
made to Him. Tom, when he was a very little boy, had asked
her how we can make gifts to Him, seeing He is not here. And
she had said that our Lord: himself had told us how when He said:



THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

I was an hungered and ye gave me meat. TI was thirsty and ye
gave me drink. And then added: Inasmuch as ye did it unto
one of the least of these, my brethren, ye did it unto me.

“And so, my dear boy,” she said, “when you give to those
who are in want, in body
or in mind, you give to Him.
Some people are in want of
bread, dear, and some of a
kind word.” .

‘She had also taught her
children, that a gift to be
of value, must be one’s own. ;
To buy gifts with papa’s or
mamma's money could not
be a real gift of their own.
And so they had bought or
made the gifts for the Cheney

children.
Tom had a good many



“tips” from good-natured

SARAH PICKED UP WOOD AT THE WHARYES,

uncles and aunts, and so he
had been able to buy the nice clothes for George, whose one
suit he had noticed was covered with patches.

Bessie had made Mary’s aprons herself. They each had two
pockets, and buttoned up close around the neck. The sewing was
well done, and. Mary was very pleased with them. “They will
keep my gown clean, when I’m washing the dishes and cleaning
the stove,” she said.

When five-year-old Ned saw how pleased pore was with the
paints and outline pictures, he hugged him and said, “I thought
you'd like ’em, and I bought ’em all with my own, Own money,



. A GAME WITH MAMMA’S BOA.

Johnnie,” and Johnnie kissed him on each cheek three times over.
Amy had knitted the pink hood, and hooked the brown mittens
for Sarah. It had taken her a long time, and she often dropped
a stitch, or made a mistake, and had to pick her work out, ‘and
do it over again. And, of course, they were not made quite so
nicely as a grown woman, like her: mother, would have made them.

But Sarah thought that never was there such a pretty hood,
or such nice warm mittens. How warm ‘they would keep her
hands, when the bits of wood and coal were frosty!

«And did you do ’em you own self?” she asked. “O, I
should love to do such pretty things.” And then Mrs. Dolliver
said she must come some day and Amy would show her how.

Of course, there’ was a little supper after the Christmas-tree,
with some pink ice-cream. And then they all went home, and the
Dollivers’ nurse took Baby Susy herself, wrapped in a very nice
warm cloak, which Mrs. Dolliver had given her, and George and
Tom trundled Dicky in the Dolliver baby carriage.

Frances A. Humphrey.



A GAME WITH MAMMA’S BOA.





aww

\ wy Wy fe
XC ey iy
RS

GA





THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.





THE OLD HOUSE.

THE OLD HOUSE.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

OOK! look!” George called out.
“OQ, what lots ‘of sticks! what
fun, Say! ” for that was what the
family all called little Sarah —
Sanya

George had come out to help
her pick up sticks. He carried
his basket turned over his head.
Just as they met Jenny Kelly,
who was carrying her little baby-
brother, they saw that the old

EF house just by the corner was be-



ing pulled down.’ The workman
‘were at work busy as so many bees all over the house.

They had taken off the doors, and taken out the windows.
There wasn’t much glass left in the windows, but they leaned
them up carefully against a post. Then they began to tear down
the wood-work and throw that out in great long strips.

“O, I’m so sorry!” said little Say.

“T ain't,” replied George. George did not always speak properly,
and said “ain’t” instead of “am not.” “I’m glad,” he said,
“there'll be capital sticks. You won’t have to hunt round all
day for a few sticks, Say.”

“©, but it was such a lovely old house!” said Say. “And they
said a great man lived in it once. Don’t you know, Jenny, the
nice big closets? O, we’ve had such good times in those closets



THE OLD HOUSE.

playin’ go-a-visitin’, and make-h’lieve
parties.” And the tears really stood
in little Say’s eyes.

Jenny Riley looked grave too. This
old house had been a play-ground for
the children in rainy days. The man
who owned it was a good-natured man,
and liked children, and so he had often
let the little girls on Water street
play there. He kept the boys out
though; he said boys would smash
things up too much, So there was
good reason why George did not feel
so badly as little Sarah, that the old
house was coming down.

“ And such big fireplaces,” said lit-
tle Say. “One day when it rained

y
x

ever so hard, Mr. Small built a great
fire im one of ’em. I never saw
such a nice big warm fire, and he
told us about the great man. He
said there were real parties then in
it, not make-b’lieves, and he had little
girls —the great man did.”

Whiz-z-z! how the sticks and strips
of wood did come flying out of the
doors and windows! big sticks, thick
sticks, long, thin strips!

“OQ, there you be, little Say!”
called out Mr. Small in a kind, hearty
tone. “Come right along and fill Se ee







FAR OUT AT SEA.

your basket, George; plenty o’ sticks now! plenty. Take all you
want. And how's the father to-day? Coughin’ bad? O, I’m
sorry !”

Never did little Say have such a harvest of nice dry sticks to
kindle fire with before; never since she began to pick up
sticks for a living. Generally, she only got the smallest handful,
though that helped, her mother always said.

And Mr. Small, too, tossed her out a few bits of prettily carved
wood. “Those will dress up the baby-house, little Say,” he said.
He knew about that small, very small baby-house of hers, in the
corner by the old chest of drawers.

And he had seen the Christmas doll, too, that Amy gave her;
he said it beat all the dolls he’d ever seen. « It’s a beauty,” he

said.
Mr. Small never said, “Git out o’ here!” to the children, as

some of the men about the wharves did; and he often took
them to ride in his cart. In winter, when there was snow on
the ground, and he came with his sled, what fine times they
did have! That sled would hold twenty children. Mrs. Cheney
often said she “h’lieved it was’ made of india-rubber! ”

Frances A. Humphrey.





FAR OUT AT SEA,





LITTLE GRETCHEN.






THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

(The Dolliver Stories.)

IRS. DOLLIVER did not forget what she had said
to little Sarah on Christmas Eve. “You must



come sometime and let Amy teach you how to
crochet and hook mittens,” she said. :

So one day she sent down word for little Say
to come up the next Saturday, in the forenoon,
at ten o’clock, if her mother could spare her.

Little Say was ready at the time set. She had used plenty of
water, and was as sweet and clean as it is possible for a little
girl to be, and that is very sweet, as we all know.

To be sure, the little hands looked somewhat rough and red
with hard work. But she drew on over them the nice brown
mittens. And the pink hood made the loveliest of settings for
the round brown face, with its black eyes, that had a soft sparkle
in them.

“Be a good girl, little Say,” said the dear mother, as she
held the door open for her to go out.

“T’ll try, mother,’ was Say’s cheerful answer. And I am sure
that is all any of us can do—try to be good. For if we really
try we shall succeed.

It was a bright frosty morning, and Say tripped along, singing
to herself, and stopping just a second, now and then, to look at
the sparrows, who were busy picking up their food in the streets
and chattering and scolding.

She met Mr. Small, who smiled and said “Good-morning, lit-





THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

tle Say. You aren’t running away, I hope; we can’t spare you,
you know;” which made little Say laugh right out. The idea
of her running away! Mr. Small was such a nice funny man,
to be sure! ;

Mrs. Dolliver herself met little Say before she had a chance
to ring; before she had
got fairly up the steps,
even; and led her in, and
took off her coat and
mittens, and untied the
pink hood, and gave her
a motherly kiss.

“You are fresh as a
little rose this morning,”
she said. “ And now come
right in to my morning-
room, and I think we
shall fnd Amy there.” ~

What a warm, sun-
shiny, cosey place that
morning-room was! Say
skipped and said “Oh!”
very softly, as the door



opened. - There were pots MISS MORRIS, THE LADY WHO CALLED

of palms standing about,

and some violets in bloom filled the room with a sweet fragrance.
In a large easy chair sat Amy. She had been reading Hans

Andersen’s stories almost all the morning. She had stopped to

play with a kitten which was scrambling over the chair-back.

The door had opened so noiselessly she had not heard her mother

and Say come in.





THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

“Amy,” said her mother, as they came up and stood quite near.

Amy turned and jumped up when she saw Say, and dropped
Hans Andersen, and the kitten, taken by surprise, spit, and that
made them all laugh.

They were quickly seated on a sofa, with worsted and crochet

needles, and the lessons began.
Mrs. Dolliver sat in another part
of the room, and a sweet-faced
lady came in whom she called Miss
Morris. They talked together in
low tones.

The little girls chatted and
‘worked, and Mrs. Dolliver said
Say was to stay to lunch, for her
mother had said she might. By
lunch time, she had got so she
could manage the crochet needle
quite well, though Mrs. Dolliver
said there would have to be a
good many more lessons before
she could crochet well enough to
begin the mittens.

And Amy and Say said to
each other that they did not care
how many lessons there were; the more the better.

After lunch, Mrs. Dolliver. tied on the pink hood again and



AT THE DOLLIVER HOUSE.

gave little Say a small basket of white grapes for the sick
father, and a bunch of sweet violets for her own self, and she
skipped along home as merrily as the sparrows.

“OQ, mamma, I have had such a lovely time!” she exclaimed as
the dear mother opened the door for her. Frances A. Humphrey.





ee

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ON THE BEACH.

* —,





“THE AWFUL BLOT”

«THE AWFUL BLOT.”

(The Dolliver Stories.)

4g OME, little Say, it is time to get
sa ready for’ bed,” was what her
mother said to Sarah every



























night at exactly quarter to seven.

For that getting to bed took a
long time. First of all, Queenie
5 had to be undressed. (Queenie
oe was the doll which Amy had
given to Sarah at Christmas.)
Then Sarah herself was to be

















































Bee











SS





















1A Ee undressed. Sometimes she un-
ej fereda dressed first.
ee While she was undressing
ey ; iW ee Queenie, she always told her all
S a we about what had taken place that
UK eR a day; where she ‘had been, what she had

done, and what strange things she had seen.

It was on an evening in April that

she told her the story of “The Awful

Blot.” Baby Susy had been fast asleep in

her cradle for a full half-hour. Say herself was undressed and was
sitting on a stool by the side of the cradle, so as to gently
rock the cradle, if baby should show signs of waking up. For —
the mother was in the other room fanning the poor father, who

was now very sick indeed.





“THE AWFUL BLOT.”

“Queenie,” said Say, “you have been such a good child
to-day I shall tell you everything. I got a nice lot of sticks
to-day and we girls played hop-scotch. I don’t suppose you
ever played hop-scotch ’cause
you can’t hop; and George
and Jimmy Riley played
marbles. But Billy Smith
kept plaguing them and
knocking their marbles
about. He’s a bad, naughty
boy, Billy Smith is, and is
always teasing.

“But he .was punished
to-day, and we did not feel
a bit sorry. Do you ’mem-
ber, Queenie, Mary’s nice
writing-book? Of course
you do. . She keeps it as
nice and clean, and she Nain

HT ta
: we Meni i
never gets her fingers all HANEY



over ink as Jenny Riley does.
And she *spected to get MARY SHOWS THE AWFUL BLOT.
a merit for it.

“Well, to-day she was writing, and teacher called out Billy’s
class in spelling. And he was walking along down.to the spell-
ing place, and just when he come to Mary’s desk, he knocked
it and the ink-bottle tipped over, and such an awful blot!

“ And Mary she cried, and teacher said, ‘Billy Smith, did you do that
a-purpose or was it an ac’dent?’ And Billy said ‘Twas an ac’dent.’

“But Johnny Hall said he saw Billy kick the desk with his
- foot. And then Billy said p’raps "twas done a-purpose, but he



«THE AWFUL BLOT”

didn’t mean to, And teacher said if ’twas done a-purpose, of
course he meant to. And she made him stand up in the floor.
And he was ’shamed. And teacher kept him after school.
«And she said, ‘Mary Cheney, you shall have a merit just
the same; it isnt your fault. And, said she, ‘just hold it up
and let us all see that awful blot! And she made Billy look
at it and he was just as ’shamed.’ ”

This was the story that Say told to Queenie, and the teacher
did. keep Billy after school, and talked to him very seriously
about his fault. For Billy’s great fault is liking to tease.

She told him that liking to tease leads to many bad things;
it makes a boy careless about the feelings of others; he doesn’t
mind if he makes them feel badly. “It leads to falsehood, often,
just as it did to-day, Billy,” she said. “ You wanted to tease
Mary, and when you found you would have to be punished you
told a lie. Teasing makes a boy cowardly.” FL A.



GEORGE AND JIMMY RILEY PLAYING MARBLES.





















































































































































































































































































































































































































OUT ON THE HIGH SEAS WITH THE SEA GULLS.



A NEW HOME.

A NEW HOME.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

OW that May had come all the
Dollivers had gone out in the
country to their farm, which they
had named Beechcroft.

And all the Cheney family were
going, too. Their poor father had
died late in April, and Mrs. Dol-
liver had said to Mrs. Cheney,
“Now you must give up your
tenement in this black dusty Water
Street, and come out to Beechcroft.
We have a small red house on the
farm which will be just the place
for you. And it will be such a

good thing for the children to have the fresh country air and

play out of doors all day long.”

Mrs. Cheney said she would gladly go if she could find work
to do out there. She should not want to be dependent.

And Mrs. Dolliver said there would be plenty of work for
her at the farmhouse. Anything that she would like to do;
housework, or washing at home, or sewing. George could help
on the farm. And they should have a garden of their own,
and raise their own vegetables.

Perhaps they could raise some vegetables to sell. Only about
a mile away was the beach, where a great many visitors came





A NEW HOME.

in summer; they could sell vegetables to these summer visitors,
and berries. The fields were full of blackberries and huckleberries,
and the children could pick them.

“And it will be so much nicer than picking up sticks at the
wharf,” said Say.

A busy time the Cheneys had packing up. It did not take
them many hours, however; in the first place they did not
have so very much to pack; and then, as we all know, many
hands make quick work, and they all helped.

It was a lovely blue and pink May morning when they
started; for they got off on the
earliest train, and just as they
steamed out of town, the sun
came up and the blue sky in
the east was full of little pink
clouds. It was like gomg a-May-
ing, only as none of them, poor
things! had ever been a-Maying,
they did not think of 1. Mr=
Small came down to see them off,



and brought Say a paper of choco- | I
late creams. . ) il

It was a long ride, but before 08, Neen. sana oF y
they had time to think of being TOM’S DONKEY.

tired, the train stopped, and the conductor shouted “Beechcroft.”
They made quite a bustle leaving the cars; for not only was
Baby Susy fast asleep, but so was Dicky, and they both had to
be carried; and then there were all the bags and _ packages.
But the conductor was very kind, and carried Dicky himself.
“He’s a sweet little fellow,” he said. “I shouldn’t mind own-
ing him myself. Can’t you spare him?” :



A NEW HOME.

“O, no, no! we couldn't!” they all shouted at once.

The man Silas was at the station with an open carriage, and
Bessie was there with her little goat team, and Tom came down
on his donkey. _

Bessie took Say and Amy, and drove the goats herself. Tom
offered his donkey to George; but when George tried to mount
him, the donkey kept standing on his fore feet and kicking up
his hind feet. So George said he would walk.

Their goods had come: down the day. before, and Silas had
unpacked them and set them up. Mrs. Dolliver had had the
table set out and a dinner sent down from the farmhouse.



































BESSIE’S GOAT TEAM.

The windows were wide open, and the sweet air came in,
and the smell of apple blossoms; and the birds were twittering.
“Oh!” said Say, drawing a long breath. “Isn’t this lovely?”
Frances A, Humphrey.





TAKING A PORTRAIT.



THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.

THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

ONG before the Cheney chil-
dren arrived at Beechcroft,
the swallows had come and
were busy building their
nests in the old barn.

I suppose that these swal-
lows, and their fathers and



mothers, and their grand-
fathers and grandmothers,
and. great-grandfather Swallow and his wife, and great-great-grand-
father Swallow and his wife had all had nests in this barn for
ever and ever so many summers. 7

The old beams were quite thick with nests. Some of them
were so old they were tumbling in pieces. Others were broken
in places, but were still strong, and the swallows were repairing
these — putting in fresh bits of mud.

One pair were building a new nest. This was their first nest,
and they took great pride in it and shaped it carefully. Some-
times an old swallow came over and looked at the nest, and
gave them some advice about it. ‘He sat on the beam and
chirped away to them while they worked.

Say and George and Mary and Dicky were never tired of
watching the swallows. They watched them at twilight, as- they
darted through the air on swift wings, catching the insects
which are their food. How swift their flight was! It is said



THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.

a swallow can fly ninety miles in an _ hour.
Sometimes they passed so near the children as
almost to brush their cheeks with their wings.
They never seemed afraid of the children.
They would go on building their nests, with a



. whole row of eager watching eyes looking up
from the mow just below them.

But let Flossie or Sam, especially Sam, put so much as his
nose into the barn door and there was an outcry, indeed!
Every swallow came swooping down and scolding, and Sam was
glad to flatten his ears back, and escape as best he could.

In due time the nests
and then each
seen carefully

were finished, the eggs were laid,







little swallow was
brooding over
her nest from morning till
night, and of
brooded all

could not be

course _ they
Patient little creatures! It
very “intresting,” as little Say remarked.






night also.

But when
all mouth. ,

the eggs turned into bare little birds, almost
then it was interesting. And after this
the swallows fairly persecuted poor Sam. They not only
drove him out or the barn, but if they found him lying on
the green turf. in the yard, they would swoop down upon him
as though they would like to pick out his great bright eyes.

And how his great eyes would shine! The swallows knew
very well that if he could only get up to the nests he would
make but a mouthful apiece of their
little baby-birds. ;

But Sam never did get at the swallows.
They all grew and thrived, and in due



time tried their wings and were seen



THE LITTLE DAYS.

darting about in the twilight with the old birds, catching insects.
There were other birds at Beechcroft besides the swallows,
though these were the most interesting, because their nests were
built where they could be plainly seen.
An oriole had a nest in a great elm. It was like a little
bag, and was stoutly fastened to the branch by threads, so that



FLOSSIE. SAM.

it rocked with every breeze. The oriole himself was of so bright
a color he looked like a bit of flame among the green leaves.
And there were red linnets that sung sweetly, and merry bob-
olinks in the green meadows, and a brown thrush that perched
every noon on the tall maple by the gate and sung till he
could sing no more. -Franees A, Humphrey.

———
THE LITTLE DAYS.

Tf the Sun had a sled for sliding down the Sky,
How very much faster he could coe

And the funny little Days, how quickly they would fly
In order to keep up with him, you know. M. J. A.



ii



IN JAPANESE DRESS.





THE FOURTH OF JULY.

THE FOURTH OF JULY.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

ERY often during the night before
the Fourth, Say kept waking up
and asking Mary if it wasn’t morn-
ing and time to get up, and George
was hopping out of his bed every
other hour almost, to see if the
sun was not yet up. The sun
always rises very late, I have ob-
served, on Fourth of July morning.

They had made a plan the night



before to be up so as to send
off a whole bunch of fire-crackers
just as the sun should show his red face. Their mother had said
they might do so, if they would go off in the field away from
the house so as not to wake baby Susy. If she were wakened
so early, she would be cross, and in no mood to enjoy her Fourth
of July.

Then, too, Mrs. Cheney was afraid they might set something
on fire, if they sent off the crackers too near the house. For
her part, she said, she should be glad when it was over with,
and one bunch was all she permitted them to have.

They went off beautifully—snap! snap! crack! crack! and
then the children—or a part of them— had their procession,
and marched around the yard, so that at last they had a good
appetite for breakfast. The Dollivers had come down, and part



THE FOURTH OF JULY.

marched, while the rest sung Sherman’s “March through Georgia.”

They were to have a picnic on the beach that day; not the
great beach where the visitors were, but a smaller beach not
far from Beechcroft. The children were all going under the care
of Mrs. Cheney, and Mrs. Dolliver was coming down with the
baskets of goodies at one o'clock.

The children never tired of this beach; it wasn’t one bit like
the dirty wharfs in Bayside, where they had lived. It was
clean, and they could dig in the sand for hours without getting
their frocks dirty. It was shallow, and they could take off their
shoes and stockings and wade in ever so far without any danger
of being drowned.

They found lovely things that day— pretty round shells, pur-
ple, and with little green spines
all over the outside; these are
called “urchins.” Ned found
a big crab, walking along on
the sand backward as crabs
do, and tried to catch it and
did catch it but it almost
pinched his finger off.



In one deep place were eae
starfish, pink and gray, looking like the loveliest of sea flowers.

In another place, a great crimson jelly-fish had come on shore
—a _ curious-looking creature that you never would think was
ever alive.

In the damp sand were little holes, and if you dug down
you would find a clam. And there were little black snails all
over the rocks, and once in a while a seal would stick his round
black head out of the water, and blow and bark seal-fashion.

How hungry they were when lunch time came. Mrs. Dolliver



THE FOURTH OF JULY.

had arrived, with Silas bringing the baskets, and a table-cloth
was spread on the sand under the shade of a high rock. A
tiny flag—the Stars and Stripes of course —was stuck in the sand
at each of the four corners of the cloth, and Mrs. Dolliver gave to
each child a small cluster of red and white and blue ribbons to
pin on frock and jacket. Z
Then they all sang .“ My Country, ’tis of Thee, Sweet Land of
“Liberty,” after which they sat down and ate. Never, I believe,
were there such good
things to eat on a Fourth
of July picnic.

“Oh! it’s lovely,” sighed
Say, “just as lovely as it
can be. The very bestest

time I ever had in my
life.” And as Say’s “ good
times ” were generally very
good indeed, this must,
as you see, have been won-
derfully fine.

In the evening they all
went to the Dolliver
house, where Chinese lan-



ONE OF THE CHINESE LANTERNS.

terns were hung all about

on the trees, making it look like fairy-land. Then came the fireworks,

There were rockets that flew up among the stars, and burst,

sending down a shower of bright sparks. .

There were Roman.candles blue, and red, and yellow, and won-

derful fiery serpents; and a Catherine wheel that whizzed and
whizzed, until Babies Susy and Rose shouted with glee to see it.
Frances A. Humphrey.



~

weaving. Carpets are also made

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

The world is very large, and it takes a long time and a
great deal of money to travel around it. Those who make the
journey must travel thousands of miles. by steamship, and by
railroad, and by stage-coach and sometimes on horseback and on
camel-back. :

But you and I shall make a little tour around the world,
without the aid of steamship, or railroad, or horse, or camel, or
money. We shall merely walk
hand in hand around this sit-
ting-room in which I am writ-
ing, where we shall see things



from many countries; and that
will be almost. as good as visit-
ing those countries themselves.

And first, what do we step
on, as we enter the room? A
carpet. Where did it come
from? From England, where
there are many cities which
have become famous for carpet-



A CORNER OF THE WORLD.

in. this and other countries.

Those of Persia are thought to be among the finest of all.
The lace window-curtains also came from England; the linen

of the window-shades was grown, spun and woven in Scotland.
The next thing we notice is an upright piano. It is made of

rosewood. Rosewood is the wood of a large tree that grows in



CAREFUL WALKERS.

South America. It is very scarce and expensive. The keys of
the piano are made of ivory. That comes from Africa, and some
parts of Asia. It is the tusks of elephants, great numbers of
which roam wild in those parts of the world, and are hunted
and killed for the sake of their tusks.

If we look inside the piano, we see beautiful wires of brass
and steel, called the “strings,’ which are brought from Eng-
land. The little pegs round which the strings are wound, are
made of the best Swedish iron; none other is found strong
enough to bear the tension. The little hammers that, by strik-
ing the strings, produce the sounds, are covered with chamois —
the skin of the chamois, or wild goat, which is found among
the Alpine valleys and snow-covered mountains of Switzerland.

The piano itself was made in the city of New York.

Some of the other furniture of the room is of mahogany. That
wood is also found in South America, as well as in Guatemala,
where the trees grow to a great size. Other articles are made
of black walnut, a native wood, found in great abundance in
the forests of Wisconsin and Michigan. Isabella McFarlane.





CAREFUL WALKERS.





AN ENGLISH GIRL PLAYING THE VIOLIN.



A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

Here is a little ornament of lacquer-work ; it represents a
company of Japanese ladies and gentlemen drinking tea. It was
made in Japan, where the people excel in that kind of work.

Against it rests a fanciful Turkish pipe, made ‘in Constanti-
nople. Its mouth-piece is of amber—a substance found on the
seashore, in Bermuda and other places; its bowl is of some
polished red material, and its stem of purple velvet, hung with
little gilt chains and crescents. (It is kept solely for decoration,
and not for smoking vile tobacco.) _Near by hangs a pair of
bracelets, of carved sandal-wood beads, made in India.

Here is an embroidered scarf of China silk. The embroidery
is home-made, but the silk was made in China, and none but
the Chinese can make it so fine and so beautiful. It was the
Chinese who first thought of weaving silk cloth from the fine
filaments spun by the silk-worm.

Yonder is a little basket, curiously woven of dried sea-weed.
It was made by a blind man, in Scotland. It is filled with
some dried leaves and flowers, which remind me pleasantly of a
late visit I made to that country—an ivy-leaf from Melrose
Abbey, a bunch of grasses and a big Scotch thistle from Edin-
burgh Castle, and a sprig of fragrant birch from Balmoral, one
of the homes of Queen Victoria.

On the mantel we see a little cup and saucer, in blue and
gold, which came from Paris. Above them, spread out like a
great fan, is a natural palmetto leaf, which a friend brought me ©
from Florida; while near by hangs, on the corner of a picture-
‘frame, a long, drooping spray of eray Southern moss.



A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

On a corner bracket, framed in glass, is a South Carolina six
dollar bank bill, issued at Charleston in 1776—a centennial relic.

On the lamp which stands on the center-table, there is a
fancy lamp-shade of satin ribbon and lace. The ribbon came
from Lyons, in France, where the best ribbons. are made; the
lace was made by some poor peasant girl in Ireland; and the
silk with which the lamp-shade is frmged was spun and twisted
in a neighboring town of Massachusetts.

The gold with which some of the picture-frames are gilded,





ANOTHER CORNER OF THE WORLD.

came from California; the quicksilver on the back of the mir-
ror, from Spain; and the mirror itself may have come from
Venice, a city of Italy, which has long been famous for the
manufacture of mirrors.

There is a stove in the room, and the sheet-iron of which
the stove-pipes are made came from Russia.

There is a little tray containing some curiosities—a stone
picked up in Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal; a few shells
brought from the South Seas by a sea captain; a piece of gold-
bearing quartz from California, with the little specks of gold



THREAD THE NEEDLE.

glittering in it; a scrap of iron-ore from Northern New York;
some Indian arrow-heads, used by the Indians who once inhab-
ited this part of the country, before the white men ‘came to
it; and a rusty bullet, ploughed up in a field, where a great
battle was fought, in the time of the Revolution, more than a
hundred years ago. .

Now let us sum up the countries we have visited — South
America, Guatemala, Africa, India, Japan, China, the South Sea
Islands, England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Sweden, Russia,
Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Turkey, Bermuda, Canada, and many
parts of the United States! Quite a journey, indeed!

And now I think it is time to stop and take a rest.
. Isabella McFarlane.



THREAD THE NEEDLE,



A LITTLE FLOWER GIRL.

A LITTLE FLOWER GIRL.

Many little children have to
work in order to earn their living.
IT remember as I was coming up
School Street, in Boston, one cold
winter’s day, at twilight, I heard
a little piping voice at my elbow
say “Buy a Record”?

I looked down; what a little
mite of a fellow he was, to be
sure! Of course I bought a
Record. Who could say “No” to



A FLOWER GIRL SELLING HER FLOWEKS.

such a little wage-earner ?
While he was folding the paper, I asked how old he was.
“Seven,” was ue reply; and away he went cheerily calling

his papers.

I could not help thinking of one or two little
boys of seven whom I know, and wondering
how they would like to sell papers for a living.

In many cities, little girls sell flowers. It
would seem to be a pleasant business to sell
flowers; and so it is. But still it is very hard
for a little girl to be so poor and ragged as
- to have to sell them in order to get bread to
eat. But this many little girls have to do.

To pick and arrange flowers for the home
—to be mamma’s little flower girl, is quite
another thing.



MAMMA’S FLOWER GIRL



MARIA THERHSA AND HER LITTLE SON.

MARIA THERESA AND HER LITTLE SON.

On the next page you will see, pictured out, a most inter-
esting and charming story. This scene took place a great many
years ago, September 12, 1741.

The father of Maria Theresa had died, fee her Empress
of Austria.

But Frederick, King of Prussia, who is called in history,
Frederick the Great, wanted to seize her kingdom and add it to
his own. So he went into Austria with his army.

Then Maria Theresa fled to the country of the Hungarians,
which was also a part of her kingdom. She came before the
Hungarians bringing her little son Joseph, then only six months
old, and stood, as you see her in the picture, a tall, handsome
woman, clad in velvet and ermine, the pretty boy smiling on her
shoulder. For he was pleased. with the sight of the beautiful
dress and shining swords of these men.

In a speech full of courage, Maria Theresa called upon her
Hungarians to come to her help, and drive out the Prussians.
“T have no friends but you in all the world,” she said.

And these brave and gallant men answered by drawing their
swords, and waving them on high, while they shouted:

“ We will die for our King, Maria Theresa!”

They called her their king, you see, and she had as high a
courage as any king that ever lived. .

And they were as good as their word. They drove out the
Germans, and many of them did die for her, and she reigned
as Empress of Austria many years. The little child in her arms
became afterwards Joseph II., Emperor of Austria. ees





1»

ESA

MARIA THER

ING,

E WILL DIE FOR OUR K

bow



WHO KNEW BEST?

WHO KNEW BEST?

ABOUT some things Flor-
ence was sure she knew bet-
ter than her mother, although
she was but ten years old.
One was about her new spring
coat and hat. Florence wanted
to wear them at once, but her
mother said she must wait for
some time yet. This made
her quite cross, but her
mother did not allow her to
wear her new clothes any the
sooner for that.

One bright, sunny morning
-her mother was in bed with a
headache, and Florence had

FLORENCE AND THE NEW HAT, to get ready for school by

herself. She went to the

closet for her old coat and winter hood, and there on the nail was
the new coat, and on the shelf lay the hat all ready to put on.

“TI do believe I will wear it to-day,” she said to herself.
“T am most sure mamma would let me, it is so bright and



warm!” But she was really not at all sure. She would not
have put on the new coat and hat, and gone so quietly down-
stairs for fear Mary, the nurse, would see her, if she had been.

When she arrived at school all the little girls came about
her to admire her new clothes, and she felt very proud.



WHO KNEW BEST?

At recess the children were playing in the yard. The ground
was damp and muddy, for it had rained all the day before.
Florence was having a fine game of tag, quite forgetting her
new coat. Suddenly as she was running her foot caught and
down she fell in the very muddiest part of the yard! The |
others ran to help her and laughed merrily when they saw the
plight she was in. But Florence did not laugh; she was much
nearer crying! The front of her pretty light coat was black
with mud, and her hat was bent out of shape! While the
older ones were brushing off the mud and trying to console her
the bell rang and they had to go in to school. Florence was
able to pay very little attention to her lessons, and received a
number of bad marks, the first she had had that week. To
make matters worse, when she came out of school the rain was
pouring down and she had no umbrella. With her old coat and
hood on she would have liked the fun of running home in the
rain. Now it was anything but funny, particularly as her mother
opened the door when she got home.

“You may go upstairs,’ said her mother, “and wait till I
come.”

The waiting was dreadful. Mary came and took her coat and
hat away, but did not speak to her. At last her mother came,
and Florence would have preferred any punishment to her
mother’s way of talking; it made her feel so small and so
ashamed.

She cried a great deal, and said she was very sorry. But
that did not take the stain off the coat. She was obliged to -
wear it, however, stain and all, until it was outgrown, to
teach her that wrong doing had lasting effects.

I am glad to say that it did teach her.

Anna M. Talcott.



BRAVE TOMMY.

=

BRAVE TOMMY.

Tommy was always say-
ing, “I’m not atraid!”
His big brother John said
he was a “little brag,” al-
ways telling what he would
do if a great bear- should
come out of the woods,
or a great giant should
threaten to eat him up.

“T shouldn’t be afraid!
I should just hit ‘em with
a big stick, and say ‘go
*way, and I should chase
’em, and make ’em run.”

He had never seen a
bear, or a tiger, or a



giant. But one day he
went in wading among
some tall water plants. A
great insect with a long
tail came buzzing about
his face. Its eyes were
large and fierce. And what
did this brave Tommy do?
He stood and shrieked “O,
O, O!” till brother John
came and drove the big
_ harmless thing away.





A FROLIC SONG.



My papa made this little song,
We dance it on the grass,
Whenever he is home with me,
For Tm “his little lass.”




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S & = cP Y) aaa Gn ae
ee Za! =< - SS SE a

=~ fi $e .
Be x Sn S QZ =f OD et SCY
se SSeS Ly Ye ee a
Z 5 SS = Be 3S

“The little sheep are scampering,
About the soft, green hill,
I feel so full of frolic, too,
Somehow I can’t keep still.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi, -
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.

. —



“The little leaves are capering,
The brook is on a run,












ae ~. The birdies singing so, I think
re y Y } They must be having fun.
AGS oe Ae : a ey | ify : c
\ NU //- Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
NOS YEG LA ; :

8 o Cie “id Ho-a-diddle-hi,

For everything a-dancing is,
So merrily dance I.



A FROLIC SONG.



“The little clouds are hurrying
Across the big blue sky,
I guess the sun is calling them,
And that is why they fly.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.

“The little stars come out at night,
They twinkle while they play,
And get so tired then, I s’pose,
They have to sleep all day.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
For everything a-dancing is,
So merrily dance I.

“T am ‘his little midget, too,
A-dancing in the air,
With dimpled hands and busy feet,
And lots of curly hair.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.”

Good-by, for I must run away,
I saw my papa pass,
And soon Ill hear him calling me,
“Where ts my little lass?”
. Hannah Coddington.



A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.



GETTING READY TO GO SOUTH FOR THE WINTER.



A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.

A monkey was chattering among the trees of a lawn near
Central Park, in New York. He had escaped from an organ-
grinder. He had a collar around his neck, and wore a red cap
trimmed with gold cord and covered with little bells which kept
up a merry jingling as he swung himself from limb to limb,
using his tail, and his paws which were so much like a child’s
hands.

The gardener climbed a tree after him, but before he reached
him the monkey was in another tree a dozen yards away. Then
the gardener climbed that tree, but the monkey had already gone
on to another; then he tried a third tree and failed, and gave
up the chase.

Mr. Anson, the owner of the place, was very much amused,
and his little girl and boy clapped their hands with delight.
The organ-grinder, however, did not seem to be in a good humor,



A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.

He scolded, shook his stick, and kept calling, ,““Jocko! Jocko !”
The monkey scolded angrily in return, waved his red cap, and
flung leaves and twigs at his old master. In a little while a
Chinaman entered the yard. There was a twinkle in his almond-
shaped eyes.

“Chmaman catchlee monkley,” he said.

“Catch him, then,” said Mr. Anson.

“ Whatll gim me?” asked the Chinaman.

_ J will give you three dollars if you catch that monkey,” said
the organ-grinder.

“ Allee rightee!” cried the Chinaman.

He disappeared in a flash, and when he returned he was car-
rying a water-melon.

“Watchee Chinaman catchlee monkley,” he said. “No makee
muchee noise. Allee glo way.”

They all walked back to the porches. They watched the China-
man, and wondered what he was about to do. He went right
to work.

He made a small hole in the water-melon, and then placed it
in one of the wide walks, after which he hid himself behind the
bushes, ready to pounce upon the monkey.

The latter saw the melon and approached it with a good deal
_ of caution. He chattered softly and looked cunningly around him.
Monkeys are very fond of water-melon seeds, and so Jocko forced
his paw into the hole and grabbed a handful of them.

The Chinaman sprang ‘toward him. The monkey could not
draw his paw from the melon because he would not open it and
let go of the seeds. He tried to drag the melon with him but
it was too heavy, and he was easily caught. The Chinaman was
a sailor and had seen monkeys caught that way in India.

Frank H. Stauffer.



Re D>

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Sl ay Vs iG a
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L (ZZ,





ROLLIN ADATR.

ROBIN ADAIR.

That is his name, but we call him Bobby. Johnny found him
when he was hardly fledged out. He was cuddled close to a
big rock in the wheat field and crying as if his little heart
would break. Just as you would cry if some great giant should
burn your home and kill your dear brothers and sisters. That .
was what had happened to this dear little robin. Some cruel
boy had destroyed the home nest, and killed all the baby-robins
but this one. He had slipped away among the wheat.

He was alone, and cold, and hungry, so Johnny brought him -
home. He soon grew to be very tame, and ate the bread and
egg which Johnny gave him, readily. It was easy to teach him
tricks. And now, while the winter wind blows cold, and the
snow whirls against the windows, we have great fun with Bobby.

He will kiss us very prettily, but if a stranger offers his
mouth for a kiss he will nip his lips with his long, sharp bill.
He will sit on mamma’s shoulder for an hour at a time, softly
singing a pretty song, but if she begins to eat an apple, and
does not offer him a bite, he will tweak her ear sharply.

Sometimes he will not let her sew, but will fly towards her,
‘seize the thread, and pull it out of the needle before she can
take a stitch, No matter how many times she threads it, he
will not let her sew until he is tired of the fun. He will climb
a tiny ladder, then fall down and make believe he iy dead. He
will “sing for his supper” when we hold up any dainty and tell
him to sing for it.

He will play “hide-and-seek.” But we generally let him hide,
because he pulls our hair when he finds us, Ee eens



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RUBIN ADAIR. ‘' SING FOR YOUR SUPPER, ROBIN!”’



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| ys we

TAKING TOLL.



KITTY’S FIVE O'CLOCK THA.

Kitty had her own little table set for tea with her dolls, and
never thought of such a thing as having a real live visitor. But
she went upstairs to find one of her doll-children that had been
left when the others were brought, and when she came back there
was Aunt Jane, sitting by the fire, warming her feet. It was a
long walk from her house, and the day was cold.



GITTY’S FIVE O'CLOCK TEA.

“Good afternoon, Aunt Jane,” said Kitty. “You are just in
time. Come and take tea with me.”

“Dear me! I can’t!” said Aunt. Jane. “I am- very cold. I
must sit by the fire.”

Now Aunt Jane was not very obliging. She did not like to
trouble herself to please other people. She had a good many
nieces and nephews (I think there were seventeen in all), and
nobody had ever seen her go across the room to play with any
one of them. —

“QO, Aunt Jane!” said Kitty. “Of
course I shall bring it to you. Mother’s
away, and I am so glad to have a
~ real visitor!” .

“Oh! [Pm sorry your mother’s out,”
said Aunt Jane. “ Well, there, I think
it would rest me to have some tea.
Yes, Pll have some. Now, be careful!
Don’t spill it!” Kitty pours carefully.



It seems to be hot. I see the steam. te een ee ta
But this tea was made for Kitty and
the dolls. It is not such tea as Aunt Jane drinks. It is what
people call “cambric tea,” made of milk and hot water and a
great deal of sugar in it. I am afraid Aunt Jane will feel
disappointed, and think it will not “rest” her much.
Pamela McArthur Cole.

Sunshine is the truest gold: ;
Take as much as you can hold! M. J. H.



THE LITTLE PRINCE. — ELSAS DOLLY.









THE LITTLE PRINCE.

THE LITTLE PRINCE.

This pretty little prince you see
Lived where the red rose grows;
But what he did and what he said
— Why, eoodness only knows.
He wrote his life all in one book
For his own private shelf;
And read, and read, and read that book,
And wore it out himself.

ELSA’S DOLLY.

“What is it, my darling? Why do you cry? JI thought you
were playing tag so happily with Nero,” called little Elsa’s mother,
putting her head out of the window.







ELSA’S DOLLY.

On the lawn stood a little girl with her apron up to her eyes,
erying as if her heart would break. From one hand hung the
limp body of a doll, while a big romping dog stood by, wagging
his tail and looking as if eager to have the fun begin again.

But Nero’s fun had caused great grief to Elsa, and when she
heard her mother’s voice she sobbed out, “ Nero has bitten Julie!
bitten her head dreadfully!”

“Julie’s head, my precious? O, Nero, Nero, for shame! But,
dearie, he didn’t mean to do any harm. Dogs don’t understand
about dollies. Bring Julie in and let me see her.”

So Elsa went into the house, while Nero strayed off to the
‘kitchen door and laid himself down in the sun.

Ah! what a beauty poor Julie had been, with her beautiful
wax: head crowned with golden curls! And her eyes, that could
open and shut! Elsa used to put her to sleep and wake her
again many times a day, just for the pleasure of seeing the
sweet blue eyes close and then open again. Could it be that all
this happiness was at an end? But what a delightful being a
mother is! Elsa’s mother first washed Julie nicely; then her lips
and cheeks and eyebrows had a touch of paint, so that the face
looked as smiling and rosy as before; and next, the yellow hair
was brushed and curled; last of all, the head was fastened on;
and there was Julie as fresh and sweet as ever!

When Elsa took her, Julie’s eyes turned upward with a soft
glance and Elsa cried —

' “OQ, mamma! She is well again! She has opened her eyes!
Now I must put her to sleep. What a good mamma you are!

“But I will never let Nero play with you again, poor little
Julie! He is a fine old fellow to play with little girls; but he
is too rough for dollies, isn’t he?”

From the Danish, by Emilie Poulsson.



i MILITARY CAPS.—MY SAND HOUSE.



MILITARY CAPS.



MY SAND HOUSE.

They had been digging a well at my aunt’s, and so right by
the side of the house was a large pile of white sand. :
I took a piece of shingle for my spade, and by patting the
sand down hard and smooth I made the floor of my house. Then
with the fingers of my left hand resting on the floor, as a wall
against which to make the end of the house, and the back of
my hand as a support for the roof and sides, I took my spade
and packed the moist sand carefully over my hand until I had

a round, smooth house which was like a mound in shape.

When the outside of the house was arranged to suit me, I very
carefully drew out my hand, and there was the inside just as it
should be.

The next thing in order after finishing a house, is the garden,
or lawn; and so I made the garden around my house with
flower-beds and walks, and inclosed it with a fence which was
also made of the sand. I picked flowers and leaves and planted
them in the flower-beds, and set out little stems and twigs along
the walks.

I wanted a fountain, or fish-pond in my front lawn to make

\



MY SAND HOUSE.

it look prettier. I could not make the fountain, but I did the
fish-pond. z

I ran into the house and took one of auntie’s patty-tins, filled
it with water and sunk it in the sand. Then I put daisies
around the edge.

Now all was finished, and how pretty it looked! It was ready
for some one to live in. But where could I find anybody small
enough who would want to rent my little house?














“yt
YY









Gy

lee Dm UF OV Ze yy

% Shey oy Ni 5g
ay “agit WP

= ee NL wy

volt “They

ee Wy

aaah KW

gin x
a CYA >
iF












THE SAND HOUSE AND ITS TENANT,

At that moment there came hopping that way just the right
person. A dear little toad went to the gateway, walked into
the garden, looked at the lake and trees and flowers and then
went straight to the door of the house and took possession. Oh!
how happy I was to have such a cunning little tenant for my
little sand house!



















































































AMY AND THE KITTEN.



EDITH THOMAS.

EDITH THOMAS.

Edith is a pretty little kin-
dergarten scholar, as some of
you may be who read _ this
book; but her school is quite
different from yours. She is
blind and lives in a pleasant
home with other blind children.
They learn to read with their
fingers in books with raised
letters. They march, play games
and sing like merry birds; but
Edith does not sing. She is
deaf and has never heard any



TALKING WITH THE FINGERS.

one talk, so she has not learned to speak and sing. —

She is like a poor prisoner, shut away from all you learn so
easily. She puts up her hand and spells on her fingers a ques-
tion, or asks for what she would like.

Her teacher answers in the same way, touching the poor lit-
tle hand so the child can feel which letter she is making.

She can read stories and write printed letters to her mother
that you could read as well as a book.

She models clay images and does other work very nicely; but
think how long it would take you to learn without eyes, ears
or voice.

Perhaps your mother will take you some day to the Kinder-
garten for the Blind at Jamaica Plain, where you can see Kdith
and her little playmates. Louis Hat.



TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
THE DOG—DANDIES OF PARIS.

“Where is little Flo going?”
asked Trinket’s big staring eyes
as plainly as a doll’s eyes could.

“ Off to Europe!” said Nurse.

“Let’s go too!” barked saucy dog
Tramp, picking up poor Trinkets
in his mouth, and dashing after
the carriage.

When Flo reached the steam-
er’s wharf there were her Tramp
and Trinkets waiting for her.

Papa



was go-

TRINKETS WAS STIFF AND SMILED SCORNFULLY.

ing to
send them home, but the child cried as if
her heart would break, for she wanted to
take them along.

That is how Tramp and Trinkets went
to Paris. And many funny things they
saw there. .

Did any little boy, or girl, or doll, or
puppy, ever meet, on a rainy day, a dog
with a water-proof cloak on, and a hood



drawn over its head to keep the dear from

THE TERRIER WITH HIS LADY’S
getting wet? PORTRAIT. :



TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

Tramp and Trinkets did—zin Paris.

In that city there are nearly

four thousand persons who earn their living by making dog’s-

clothes, and the sum paid for
their work amounts to a million
dollars a year.

Tramp and Trinkets went
one day with Flo and her
mamma to a large shop where
nothing is sold but dog cos-



A SPANIEL TRIED ON A DUST-CLOAK.

tumes and dog jewelry. Here ever so many dogs were being rigged
out with what their mistresses thought they needed. Some were



FITTED TO A PAIR OF FINE DOE-SKIN BOOTS.

having suits for the house ; others
for the street. .
One was being fitted to a new
pair of fine doe-skin boots, to pro-
tect his dainty feet from the dust
and mud. Another was having
fastened to his left forefoot a
plain’ gold bracelet with
owner's
Beside rough-
coated terrier that wore a col-

his
monogram upon it.

him was: a

lar with his lady’s picture set in it.

At another counter a_ pretty
spaniel was having tried on a
dust cloak for traveling. It was
very stylish and had a_ pocket
at the side the
ticket. There were

dressing cases for the dog-dandies,

for wearer's

handsome

and sleeping baskets with cur-





MES. ALPHABET’S NEW YEARS PARTY.

tains, just like a doll’s cradle— “lovely enough for Trinkets!”
Flo said, which proves that they were nice indeed.

Tramp thought it all very odd. Flo asked him if he would
like to be dressed up in that way, but he
shook his head and growled at the little dog
fops, as if to tell them he thought they were
very silly.

Flo bought a pretty red blanket for him.
This he was pleased with, because it would



oo

een Seep: Tm warm om cold. days. “lrimicets | did

aes not seem a bit interested in anything . they
saw in the shop. She was as stiff as could be all the time and
smiled in a scornful way as though to say,

“«What is the use of making such pretty things for ugly dogs
- like Tramp! How much better it would be to give them to a
beautiful doll like me!”

. Mary Oatherine Crowley.



TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
THE DOLL-DOCTOR OF LEIPSIC.
OH! oh!” cried Flo, one day, “my doll’s leg is

‘broken, what shall I do? oh! oh!”
Frau Gretchen, who kept the boarding-house



in Leipsic where the family were staying, found
the little girl crying over poor Trinkets.

“ Ah! too bad, too bad!” said the good woman.
“Why don’t you take her to the great doll-doctor?”

So that afternoon they took Trinkets to the doctor’s office.
Of course dog Tramp went too. He thought it would be useful to
know how legs were mended, in case he should meet with an accident.

The name of Frau Emma Friederike Schneider, the doll-doctor
_of Leipsic, is known all over the world. For more than fifty years
this busy, cheery woman has given her time and skill to the mend-
ing of dolls.

When Floand ~
her mamma
knocked at her
door it was
opened by a lit-
tle creature





scarcely taller
than. Flo. She
had pretty blue
eyes, and soft flaxen curls, and her quaint German head-dress and cos-
tume made her look, Flo thought, like a fairy godmother, who had



TRINKETS’ BROKEN LEG.



TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

stepped out of a picture-book. This
was, in fact, the famous doll-doctor
herself. With a smile of welcome she
showed her visitors into a large room.

“Oh!” cried Flo in surprise, as
she looked around in vain for a
place to sit down. The chairs, tables,
floor, wall, all were crowded with
dolls; dolls dressed, “some in rags,
and some in tags, and some in



velvet gowns.” Such funny-looking

THE DOLL-DOCTOR.

dolls as they
were, too. Many seemed hopeless cripples,
lacking one or both arms, or legs, or feet.
Others were without an eye, a nose or a
wig, and some had lost half or the whole
of their heads. Several, however, had just
been made over as good as new by this
wonderful doctor, and sat up straight upon
a shelf, looking fresh
WANTING A NOSE. and rosy and happy.
The doll-doctor “took Trinkets in her
soft hands, and looked at the break. ee
Then she nodded her head.
“This is very simple,”
said she. “The lit-
tle lady will not eS
have to go to the —==s=45
hospital, I will cure

her at once.” oe LEZ

She took some AS GOOD AS NEW.








GOING TO SCHOOL.

elastic, and with one or two tiny instruments went to work.
Soon Trinkets was as strong and beautiful as ever. Flo danced
about with delight, and Fran Emma
laughed, and her little curls bobbed about
in the queerest way.

Flo’s mamma laid a silver piece upon
a small salver held by a black doll.

The sweet little doll-doctor patted Flo’s
cheek, kissed her lightly on the forehead,
and presently the party were again in
the narrow, crooked street. All the way
home Trinkets looked very proud of hav-
ing been to such a celebrated surgeon,
while Tramp yelped and frisked about as



if laughing with Flo at all the funny
THE BLACK Dot witH Tae satver. things they had seen. Mary ©. Crowley.

The regiment upon the lot
In ranks is growing thinner —

For lo! Papa comes out and calls
Three veterans to dinner! M. J. oF.



































































































































A HAPPY LITTLE HELPER.



TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

SOLDIER—DOGS.

—

fy - -

“ALO,” asked papa one morning, “ would

you like to see some soldier-dogs? ”

“Soldier-dogs, papa! how funny!”
laughed the little girl.

“Yes; in some of the regiments
of the German army an attempt is
being made to train dogs for use in
time of war,’ said her father. “In
the garrison at Schwerin, which I am



GZ going to visit to-day, there are several
Zee SE SE oreo: dogs which are drilled for military duty
as strictly as any of the other soldiers. You may go with me to
see them if you wish.”
Flo danced about in glee, Tramp wagged his tail and begged to

Wy:



go too.

“Yes, you shall, old fellow!”
said his little mistress. “ You
must learn all you can while you
are abroad. That’s what mamma
is always saying to me.”

Flo fancied that her doll
Trinkets looked lonely when they
planned to go off and leave her. TRAMP WAS JEALUUS AND SULKY.

“Well, Trinkets,” she said, “you can’t learn anything, because
your head is made of wood, but I suppose we’ll have to take you.”



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describe
'10107' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKS' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
1555448dd1b526fad60adff3dd9d0935
87e5b8a203d08e3ba36ab128f380b74dc3931585
'2011-09-20T16:59:36-04:00'
describe
'5812248' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKT' 'sip-files00008.tif'
1da5352a46bbbdb365a7259048551279
41568e897b16443cc0984dee29fc65457ee01153
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
5432bcbcb1daf5abed97681076fa095e
913e8927d921dc00f623bd85467a73939ea59bcb
'2011-09-20T16:59:31-04:00'
describe
'2210' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKV' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f865f47b188c52f72bb93605b3895c2e
c8165026281431539d22c20b6767419d5c509892
'2011-09-20T16:59:16-04:00'
describe
'724447' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2e23c5f8b39df5a80bb49a84f522f307
e5eb1fdda8c0ce3854873bc0f121f1822c38f454
'2011-09-20T17:00:05-04:00'
describe
'125016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a9794d9e1bafe2956c3a46fa5146e0b3
7dd92d44f41ea7c2c42ee35bd0d016c53bb5618d
'2011-09-20T16:57:49-04:00'
describe
'28827' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
546ea40e8bd9596180a8d7d25b3df3d6
7c00aed3d5e73bba6259f9be373fe3a80bb89b31
'2011-09-20T16:59:25-04:00'
describe
'32190' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1c0cb0aef42aec85eeed5a04529cc59f
43c2e1e7475a3a02e53c911bc81ec30784424064
'2011-09-20T16:59:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
18b44a764cfdbf60499878abc8c69b47
1274fcb7bacf09b8dd153c8afcd0a24a20fec8d8
'2011-09-20T16:58:59-04:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
53ddb4115abc6e280ebbc0055d2af55a
8baf3ba40494bf5a62e12c0da09a1794f8a1116f
'2011-09-20T16:57:46-04:00'
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2d2345c26e0e38c9f838a8f281590699
375a3848c3266c124b6902e4de9196b9f2b67d93
'2011-09-20T16:56:51-04:00'
describe
'724460' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLD' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
eca3fdbd88914f8b67963072a54ae30b
cbbefbf3f8bcd2e133ec9590fbbfcbe5bce95d9f
'2011-09-20T17:00:37-04:00'
describe
'109637' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
5a339812beb43a020adc83b5f6e53dd0
92991b2b399fb0464788892a6fb5bd3c09a4d2b0
'2011-09-20T16:59:51-04:00'
describe
'35739' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLF' 'sip-files00010.pro'
5ff7a1144921cd85ade63b636e5a9c27
655c01ab69dbceaa2acbd2cfda4ea67374b5eb44
'2011-09-20T16:54:51-04:00'
describe
'30603' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLG' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1952eb1fc20bd1c78e683e549229c814
c0d5d4f807945a43944badf20fcdb3fa80669b8e
'2011-09-20T16:54:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
41edee26081014e6a507c7931a606635
bd6d30fba7601010d287b63aa206c63d059734e6
'2011-09-20T16:56:06-04:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLI' 'sip-files00010.txt'
b65bbf2722d7605698be2894766e8894
142d173203f9b4c5c2470f6df5e6601f0403348f
describe
'7221' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
deec8a5bb2190ff457bb4a6a55eb163a
f6d40cef23d1d80a1c076dacbdd9b7741c98d3b9
describe
'724469' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
031f33bf5eb3a13e968ef8ac334da223
6ed892545caa75ec4e52afe3c578333c4d67069b
'2011-09-20T16:56:32-04:00'
describe
'110783' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
82ec9340e59727da17bd6f4047e187e4
366498b2cbb15862d2f3ee8ddbf6be0d06155238
'2011-09-20T16:57:15-04:00'
describe
'30604' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLM' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b253cce6e08f71083d26d0d394b1d162
14f3768136d712f2a0cc7306c446dc557f251cc6
'2011-09-20T16:57:12-04:00'
describe
'29726' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
64da57ae208efc72207559a06c82fa74
053c07dd16b940c69c6b60c553136a70d8629692
'2011-09-20T16:59:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fdea664adf5305aa259a7838133fdaa3
b542aa3c66210bf414f83a29af56e45a59b525ad
'2011-09-20T16:58:36-04:00'
describe
'2045' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a2c5c489c751816aafb340969a3e03e5
23241f3958add43eb1a5468c04a82a51587b56ca
'2011-09-20T16:57:57-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7013' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
0c450a03937db421220c8103600828c4
a455d376b57bc62496904302e295f1bdf4b8bcf9
'2011-09-20T16:57:32-04:00'
describe
'724752' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLR' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2e3c35ce897f9a86994240959672d56c
476eea93dffabf8e16cb27a63a59a4142aa5e204
'2011-09-20T16:57:53-04:00'
describe
'107037' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLS' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6787e8513bcf2b088a1de7e961a610d3
df547e6d10604c17681785198a4b77852860bfd6
'2011-09-20T16:56:35-04:00'
describe
'40191' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLT' 'sip-files00012.pro'
85a3e69f1aaa81d12d41f61cf6f94caa
b499a0dfb0a2c6e63085b5d40f1d1886546b7480
'2011-09-20T16:55:29-04:00'
describe
'29150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a9dffdf1b8d0f1ae1e3c9b24021a9542
29641258cc67235f34c7dfda90fd2fa563654995
'2011-09-20T16:56:57-04:00'
describe
'5815000' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b9ac81c387eedba412c4316ecd83c450
e25e009cb6f6a909ae6438c557111195574f61ad
'2011-09-20T16:57:14-04:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
04bc5bbc38dad6155287368fd0261236
283c4c183d2230d6a8902dbb94e88a509872f78e
'2011-09-20T16:58:38-04:00'
describe
'6724' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLX' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5b2312b98a6578c2d2d1a463e86af47d
fdaf43091ec94b7a68b9f220e17a8fc9dcc39d1b
'2011-09-20T17:00:07-04:00'
describe
'724736' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7efa10fc515eb019f874d74d498354e5
f267784dd3ecf6dcaf4306acffea32b39898c2c3
'2011-09-20T16:58:49-04:00'
describe
'138238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
31e4ff02a631a867c7dc5a834d37273f
744b958c2a0664f7034438dbde65d74d3c127c09
'2011-09-20T16:55:44-04:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
34ddc832a76fe9ccd3d39cb0a7ab4a1e
73544972024276932dfe933b4b073bca800d15ed
'2011-09-20T16:58:27-04:00'
describe
'31812' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMB' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
51fd053a2b74e13a90c6c7cc938ab59f
58f285d2da06a807073f5f5eaebbf3ce9db9ac08
'2011-09-20T17:00:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
fda10ae85c5eb8de6b830e8fdd883fb8
57c6e7fe876b0c53fe5df369dfe1be9f70a78840
'2011-09-20T16:58:09-04:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5c693a0e87a182f169350003a27570c8
068f03fab8fc5f10b0d53e0fb707184616f95d6a
'2011-09-20T17:00:39-04:00'
describe
'7216' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRME' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a3dd7959c3729d4e8ad6cb8132710ac2
0ffe71f85342598349c4a567075722aa7f5cf4da
'2011-09-20T16:57:25-04:00'
describe
'724762' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
03ca01e19dffff3d15bef99be80c74e8
5979b137329b2c76d89087946d809acc897898ba
'2011-09-20T17:00:16-04:00'
describe
'103217' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a4c226597a6a119e8ae934feca6c88a3
60452c232a883869271ea9f5699db83ad1628d3f
'2011-09-20T16:58:26-04:00'
describe
'41925' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
c66e0faaacab3103f7192dea669f7d8d
452bfd7c8dc200bce490dd4eb16b7b9fd8612395
'2011-09-20T16:59:44-04:00'
describe
'29004' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
920c03f96058f5d8ed6a4f9bcdbfa36a
0da06da1352a63219d726e781bc01f8bb21f8563
'2011-09-20T16:56:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
58f885822b8b9ea1d90a2a77ef888d97
f350f9658ecc315518597c1ecd4185a4534459a6
'2011-09-20T16:59:19-04:00'
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
a1afb9efe5386caebfdd92f1dec40ee5
1cc5fbc54b55690ad5853e42afc9c1151a0d865a
describe
'6627' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRML' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
96d647899c9ad522afba3d557913130d
784e8dc0687598a75282752133a57dccb03bee01
'2011-09-20T16:57:04-04:00'
describe
'693511' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d5f67a29a185f05adf4f75e4d80f970e
6f7c3a40bdc4bfa5e722168ce19e9d6d8dc8cda1
'2011-09-20T16:56:34-04:00'
describe
'139796' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9259152924731cc4436cf5e754d06a89
df144a7ff2955865993a2be546fda3b4d8f32af6
'2011-09-20T16:58:57-04:00'
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
18a1dd917067010893ecb541c5e25e72
d891f12ef3980dd7adbe0c9932d2f891bbe208ab
'2011-09-20T16:55:14-04:00'
describe
'32709' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
01a9705e70d1f274d348f68036958a64
97e6efadc67275059b4f89312c9ea96535b0669d
'2011-09-20T16:54:34-04:00'
describe
'5564476' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
1e88bcc91069a7c50a7ef712717af182
e728289652e13f5dcb4a74b0e48b36f4f16a4715
'2011-09-20T16:56:46-04:00'
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
40f43b7e5413b8871dfd171c12708650
07625f83d2ef74e55c8a45a3166c3b8d81506e6c
'2011-09-20T16:55:06-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7659' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
06e724c0c80d4a96dd67aa8af4a9437f
047920c15eed99854495565ba940c8a70df6e28d
describe
'724721' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
ad80a9bcd121d041d187abf1920d739f
6670f11ffef5232e4e88e5f5f9645ce2916072f4
'2011-09-20T17:00:02-04:00'
describe
'112466' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ac78c0983cda34ea5e9064a60e674177
2ecf64b8965e600c94b2429895fd72abdaeaff1e
'2011-09-20T16:58:00-04:00'
describe
'25715' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7464c963b989cd1681ab349e5bd97ab3
8f81a452ddaf24fef73d0ac9baa054ce75dd0035
describe
'28732' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
da18db901c743817dac10792d5f77a2b
8da32ae17a20f70b9939ad0248400b3231c89379
'2011-09-20T16:58:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2c267fabfaab90400a5a14ff31c37758
139f534a56df308ae2f238cf00ab38b8d6c385df
'2011-09-20T16:56:47-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6d711598aab6cf580d4047fdbfa5b9d9
94c263a4b622c6bf9048f1debbe84bdd6d4a2302
'2011-09-20T16:58:51-04:00'
describe
'6739' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
1d8cdb1341ed7b9b9e2e447a45547877
50bb65373797e24bb6935f2f95e3256eeba6e61c
'2011-09-20T17:00:17-04:00'
describe
'724775' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
dd35a06569d1a9661673ac75050442d9
14834c21975c8c21f9b1c64df8000075b263913e
'2011-09-20T16:55:26-04:00'
describe
'90115' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
1dc50a6f805ea7c57328e4f8c11a1223
88e0fb100ac65e542f15a0b5a6532605cd753cdf
'2011-09-20T16:56:43-04:00'
describe
'11663' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
881dc6e9dc449e61e4132bb6e4c923a4
1b4d1d7047370836386313e24a4ffaeebabf9dbf
'2011-09-20T16:56:02-04:00'
describe
'22272' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRND' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
3d95ccc3cf643dd7f8197cb539837292
03473e1560d1c58e0c96b1c969cf4d960640a42e
'2011-09-20T16:59:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
11e6eedbfde9ef702c77af66f673bf56
70f943000375836c2f5cc3e580fa2897e6ec45e2
'2011-09-20T16:59:24-04:00'
describe
'680' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9c79196addca72798f3539717955b924
86c7b8ca311d33753c9b85dc2f0cc8d43862aa8b
describe
'5509' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
c04e703ec8ad3ace682154356621094c
99a068671900bdaf4206ed1a97ca9f6a6e1ae904
'2011-09-20T16:55:40-04:00'
describe
'724482' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNH' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
550ad8d0be6320d6ed3ba3fff0952d49
af6461e621709e9ff879f5da7b141145d93727cd
'2011-09-20T16:59:09-04:00'
describe
'102775' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNI' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b5ec24867aa58c2bfeeea69a7a991487
d097b847e78b61de3151c9c8e7be40187e7f1f6a
'2011-09-20T16:59:29-04:00'
describe
'42840' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d61dd36140f7a291eeb08a23d2f81c60
d04371abc2f93fa794fd03c31256480eb2c3a657
'2011-09-20T16:59:48-04:00'
describe
'29117' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c703a92e0cb28cb3d8414c12b396dae0
750344c61c865441ec5ae04c48747b27394b48b5
'2011-09-20T16:58:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNL' 'sip-files00018.tif'
b3f9d434e7aad5cbc7bcebd791d20a43
c79af671e52846aba943596641add62aaecb654a
'2011-09-20T16:59:14-04:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNM' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e54c59da7acdea1d265049a05a619306
1270c9c977601c034866fc546be644643503b0e5
'2011-09-20T16:56:33-04:00'
describe
'6858' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNN' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ca6b5941ea28492f4ff33437cf5a847b
e3948a6e0794198f55333a00adf2af1ba190fe5a
describe
'724481' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
39492fe22ec4f6d4a4b08b69c270da46
65fa6dc40720afc715f1c59c08275e0465882253
'2011-09-20T16:57:41-04:00'
describe
'134478' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNP' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
926d2348e066c3499ad0c28d06d7bdbf
a6089d4e604338bb25893d519e21926f6525e186
'2011-09-20T16:58:18-04:00'
describe
'3858' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
320c442b518395845597dea178b0899b
6e8079abde73f935cb675ad499b5511eadfddef7
describe
'29501' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
de0577ae9b4f1b03126ab576527a2e2f
fb9d71ab88b45d853595c439a95e4ba83d98ec50
'2011-09-20T16:59:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNS' 'sip-files00019.tif'
8f395c7607b3469ca146801bb7371671
ef4593c783d90ff965fa539a8be4faf9d81f9b9c
describe
'361' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNT' 'sip-files00019.txt'
f5514ade5a07bac6b14aeb1760aaa0dd
16a240c4d16d65e948b152fd0c1b5a9ce72a67f6
'2011-09-20T16:55:52-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6859' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNU' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
131d1716ad9cb594765dc1d0e5802acf
494a40d5e97c9b7161062456f89514e96cdb3f1a
'2011-09-20T16:55:23-04:00'
describe
'724398' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNV' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d35aad24df8504aabb9f16521eab792f
e1a6aaffba92d6288310879ad67ba2374c5fe19b
describe
'115022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2a223e22a1767aecd997a195c21ecd8b
c0449320112a912317a1b9845a71d331e1c01112
describe
'7842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f20c12ff4c10795ac914f70326dc9ac1
e72a7f57ad21cb22f016791c44eacfe7e55afe8b
'2011-09-20T16:56:16-04:00'
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0df182837e13601d27e2a320d3734b1f
ccbca70f20067830e7aa427b5f85c80006ecb02e
'2011-09-20T16:54:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7e6842f30c680a2d78dfc6eeb2fc5040
1109d257952c2afb3c8912d0d30056108751b1d9
describe
'448' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
726ef3087b96e5f1bb03ff7bf137eef0
e765f37e7e908219838667b0d6687b21103a3b8b
'2011-09-20T16:59:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6291' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6115359a64fe8f6b05fff8ff219a5db4
598d8df161ba54e6bef9caf0148a3f200ca9336d
'2011-09-20T16:54:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
fc9f82ae56a66a57ffe081cc805d643d
b4191fb73b54987906f26ede9257d8afde53ec7b
'2011-09-20T16:57:16-04:00'
describe
'97786' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
097dcb826258386798d60e4c1591446a
e9c76aeb8e0ecfd6e5473f79fd0f6e048112fa4d
'2011-09-20T16:58:02-04:00'
describe
'34308' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROE' 'sip-files00021.pro'
525377dbc0b61374be99a4625ad21bda
458e03387b7f593ba90a08ac5b0fc52059244409
'2011-09-20T16:57:05-04:00'
describe
'27221' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROF' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7bd47da1554b20987e48db0cde522f82
fde5698034cb8355ca99a9c9277f64ae6b7bcdef
'2011-09-20T16:56:22-04:00'
describe
'5812240' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROG' 'sip-files00021.tif'
f0bf77237c437dc7ab2da11dae994fac
9dcba1c6705634d04e805742d8f2de5fe58347dd
'2011-09-20T17:00:21-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROH' 'sip-files00021.txt'
dea29dd186670997cd0a874f7f237c0b
7fc09e1c62270aa6dd3aafeb7dc36c11d4c0ea51
'2011-09-20T16:57:08-04:00'
describe
'6297' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROI' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
bb54892de934c4840bb91d9c29f1fc71
aef2333f611fdace82073920cbfa1ac3351cc542
'2011-09-20T16:55:54-04:00'
describe
'724797' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d421cba23f04cd3c785c3d6839dda962
695e28f273fb922d26005abf717eee280ec8002a
describe
'71762' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7f0b18e37062743251b3beeba0443dca
aede5bbe108fba1d1af45114f6b82cdd1b8a9650
'2011-09-20T16:55:56-04:00'
describe
'14147' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROL' 'sip-files00022.pro'
40ffd253aed87bfb8f58b695a1d76a8f
407322dac0be4c09a2ca6c46d08e6adcef28cb29
'2011-09-20T16:54:49-04:00'
describe
'19608' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROM' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
38c5cb0a063b29dab6e11df9d1f41c78
b3bec8dfd436dbcd0c20c52831ee0d61ca5f0fb9
'2011-09-20T16:59:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRON' 'sip-files00022.tif'
5f3b01c8d1eefd172c74d81d4a3b6172
e7d14b40026b30443b48bc7e099a0cf9fdb75253
'2011-09-20T16:55:24-04:00'
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROO' 'sip-files00022.txt'
3df1143bfcc432cf491f4926830b04fb
2bfac18c7af231ab53e8d4393e719a477a8f8f1d
'2011-09-20T16:56:21-04:00'
describe
'5262' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROP' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
9636dcea7f59ac4a031529434643950b
3accb31a4fdefe6b4a4497ada758e690c057086b
'2011-09-20T17:00:28-04:00'
describe
'692313' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
67b90b32ba2952908422bdd8583dd1b4
9edf36ad1330be728bcd97aba93615c948eb1db8
'2011-09-20T16:55:48-04:00'
describe
'101089' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROR' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
bd5f1db276bd00f2db09ac5945b396a6
6353fba08405aef41028f3ad60eb39914824b8c2
'2011-09-20T17:00:45-04:00'
describe
'13217' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d2442da7954bf69aebee2cf3f41b7b37
4869b147031bb527667bccad76a984d7395956f1
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
93b17895eaad81034c43a2efffca79ef
f5dfb0e3800f0ddfe2d8f9509aba2405d4736030
'2011-09-20T16:57:36-04:00'
describe
'5554880' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROU' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2d3d7567d3799612874f78a86b3d8fbb
bcc28ff3e6da585c028eac044ee19bdb8a30a685
'2011-09-20T16:56:25-04:00'
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROV' 'sip-files00023.txt'
dd84696be56b57872cd027b33b330126
e71f25d2b760abdb0ca06b9f988141b51ffc21b6
'2011-09-20T16:58:25-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6310' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROW' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
238f7df0de861c9f880e832225fb6cdf
442dd3ed83b2ea4e42a41e77e0984bf8bfe05738
'2011-09-20T16:54:44-04:00'
describe
'724812' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a28047684d9e68f9cf911e0d85d8b173
f358668715e92470387a0b3d85b386a3fe892648
'2011-09-20T16:58:54-04:00'
describe
'87607' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
626cc091ff6dee269bf5de6e5409be96
b6c62a73d8ab06bcde6996412564243971e87a86
'2011-09-20T16:55:49-04:00'
describe
'41018' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABROZ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
bde2b26cf838504e4d9d902b16ae4522
c79db4ee3b3e38ac1e9f094358f0a5e10b8cf5c9
describe
'25913' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
1f762aaa03bf6f1c009e5f9cc1a6c58f
71682ce71892d4d123d037b251148153961f6f2d
'2011-09-20T16:59:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
d7b0a88722e288dedb457298c0fe5a8d
d79153ff600f4ed1ae5969e5f62f5cb2cd73b46d
'2011-09-20T16:58:11-04:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
da38561db6afe8006fe48beb24f9e3fe
a5193d08f095b61089be5cbf74eba7c16217f53e
describe
'6206' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
947ec86d24eb034a230baa59a2ccc895
46b235beee5080899a6def795345c4350c0cafbd
describe
'710336' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1b447d1f69683659b28865bf3fe255d5
9c76d121e7107a8459c37a5fda18490072b2bb15
describe
'131394' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
dfd991d9cf1fcf770716e3f04162d028
5135cc6cf074e985ff4180bc0ecf84ac453018a0
'2011-09-20T16:57:40-04:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPG' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f04516de31e82280e355eb33db2f1336
8dba16feb0bb479e1f998b5fa9436abe5b05b387
'2011-09-20T16:57:34-04:00'
describe
'30954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d13bdc308fd2e3821be6ce86548065c6
c0c4cffd516545a38362d42a1b427288b229747f
'2011-09-20T16:56:56-04:00'
describe
'5699372' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPI' 'sip-files00025.tif'
3254f83a3e2d37f469358ff71a812b16
3eadf6df35a043b67e6bf831673efbaae811b06d
'2011-09-20T16:55:32-04:00'
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
844ccd5f466baff118a4ee80e19ec530
152f03dab1704ca566490736d22c12aed59aa407
'2011-09-20T16:57:22-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7170' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
75c04d0d9ec67d9dd98b72253ba22b75
664e7fd4bab838d219dae90f9fecd71a4bfaf195
'2011-09-20T16:57:17-04:00'
describe
'724813' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPL' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2ff852d0104e3bea8a3701a5b6ff6e90
3c21b0f7899f95a494d26294cc387590c6e6a51a
'2011-09-20T16:59:21-04:00'
describe
'89941' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPM' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f2235b95536c6bab658e974b358fbafe
c0fbce93157fac4a179295ae4612669c05770c10
describe
'31216' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
03219b67d438d50f33acd388ecd5a3e5
b9ccedce95333049f61274bea64536c0688aa54d
'2011-09-20T16:56:45-04:00'
describe
'24947' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6e01f9176ae541e6c55b59078f917e30
9074b972839fbc99ad7745c4eb9b7c24576a537f
'2011-09-20T16:55:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
d479fc5ccf1a7d875700f818a1143523
c26e0ca8f72b3c6385c583d55001a6a10d9a33a4
'2011-09-20T16:57:58-04:00'
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
bdb05fdfdcdb9b6c3a2da8dafce1b120
c559cbe6141637800f04fa7ea8168fbf773b2fbc
'2011-09-20T16:57:52-04:00'
describe
'6374' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6d93e27edfbb4b3d0e027bf8970643d6
aeefa7f16dd731c80e4645af8bf23ed6eba7928c
'2011-09-20T16:58:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
921a65e1d55a0420eae3bb5d39513f36
d3e3d1626eae246a29cc9b2c8b69da9f116cb460
'2011-09-20T16:55:19-04:00'
describe
'90120' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
10d9131eae96e91230e7a95835b96e58
7aed529b37800d9f0b8fcd60efd20fc2b5c153bf
'2011-09-20T16:57:03-04:00'
describe
'25750' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d5f05290a9e64002311806a589b28ca2
cb52c538d0c289fcc525643f0b1bbc3e6b7febfc
'2011-09-20T16:57:11-04:00'
describe
'24797' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPV' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
cacb987ee72b3896fafac9af995fa5e4
9fab345d0051e30c491764bc9b54f4b36faa7dde
'2011-09-20T16:57:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a2f39eccf8a12df2ad33c636d64268dd
b8e628b0805305331325fb2f60a45d33c9d25c6f
'2011-09-20T16:56:20-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
140643d1c2eb9bc1dc64028f8b688a55
df6bf684d92193378588451a877c15cd7e151d36
describe
'6345' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
e1318a1391ecad585822b22cb8f669f1
33829371e951a04fd864e8e4cf8a2782b089dbd6
'2011-09-20T16:55:04-04:00'
describe
'724806' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
10f263c937c08357fd2a95bd0862622c
7b661aa1f1ca3490abd91d1fa98cabac25f0e0c1
describe
'84498' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQA' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8d5779c3fe38e5f90f7c6a95f8aed5c6
f838b8f37339f73ba24736e1e6919e0352186724
'2011-09-20T16:59:22-04:00'
describe
'25578' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
103eb292919812b47cdbd7534fea30de
23e3eb7973d82fb5091a3a284f8f9564ff4a67d2
'2011-09-20T16:58:22-04:00'
describe
'22647' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQC' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
8d21c8768e057cad46b15e0581abac67
0f815f44b6353f6b2e0f292e409f405e47b23f7b
'2011-09-20T16:58:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a89cfbe29c32f4b1a478ee5ed21c4ded
da54a0f1e64ac12bafc84d776e7c8e36fd48d052
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQE' 'sip-files00028.txt'
203140033ccd404e0136e8bbca51c71a
948f373d9451427569933fda22311a0204a7533f
'2011-09-20T16:56:28-04:00'
describe
'5757' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5f7766fed5564294a423eab524a8977d
17da3e0883514c343dedf9d19e8070fadbc1ebcc
'2011-09-20T17:00:31-04:00'
describe
'701546' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQG' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1d9d00400fd3955d89669fee3ee70a01
8b855327a56671e574367c55b5dcedf2b1101d8c
'2011-09-20T17:00:09-04:00'
describe
'100986' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQH' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
9d089feea11c9e9483090591f7b60177
3bec653daee53b5dc102185d2e0ae190883c0404
describe
'41039' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQI' 'sip-files00029.pro'
efad507f892c8cfff1d0d3c21a2b8802
a7b86d6ccca9e5f63724c560124080c03c7f51e4
'2011-09-20T16:55:01-04:00'
describe
'29212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9db8fcb2f083ba66c56d430c394f0e94
aa37b16bf0f0618a00cbeb737ea6952f726255d6
'2011-09-20T16:58:31-04:00'
describe
'5628952' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQK' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ac371b45e707c234ad1deeeef1b988eb
d2925fe77a0034083ab9208412171f6065c23662
'2011-09-20T16:59:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQL' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b01226b8e836c82abb8971ea6c2a6594
0abdab0c5048d8eb79e4b770a337522e39e383bf
'2011-09-20T16:57:28-04:00'
describe
'6872' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
eb284b445c849d1a55f4241883c4c23a
1d967983dc4e74f8329b038377773c7a271a5f50
describe
'724836' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
78f7916d9e0d08650c4a5d83c4ba7f28
6586c68d15897c8bd63982889830adf8f2294129
describe
'91030' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7a3c04a52f7d723aade6e9df0024a7b4
ffe8f6a3f10b2ef7ccbb0f53dbdb9245def504c0
'2011-09-20T17:00:11-04:00'
describe
'38605' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
19d3511373c079c2698777ce73484d2d
4a5f604f32802701d052a37e57bbc5207c5919cd
describe
'25897' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0d4903c0fa11f3ec05aca36fefac69e4
607a15660c97820156b4b19ae9fdef205f958047
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
945fc6dc080af272aba041dbb8f74486
5b9c9463f2ac9c8ff61b5a6423430aa85fe855c2
'2011-09-20T16:59:46-04:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
0eb7f0c4dc34262a7532250d518acfdf
c57570c1244859d49e38f3b26e2669dc4ee1214e
'2011-09-20T16:58:06-04:00'
describe
'6143' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQT' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
5858b05a2c46871bf437d2af0720b8e0
8ec1ffdf8c5bb7f266763a69d745bb95063428d9
describe
'724494' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
fded0b173f9dcd9f2d4262ab9d9b1cf6
d7a72662a16143280affabffcfb7b9f1339a31dd
'2011-09-20T16:55:33-04:00'
describe
'104382' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
35a8f1d5939b2cd239a2bca7c0730df5
9a2801ad1da4a43444949057ced629af5ba1cda1
'2011-09-20T16:57:43-04:00'
describe
'32228' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
753fb3a7131690fd24bb133e621708fa
2cfd859796f9290b2dca360f1f219cb76505a147
'2011-09-20T16:54:40-04:00'
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
5e4144f953030cb31df2492974ae86fe
d9cc66fe70a62768fbdb8f8197d5ab952ea71a1c
'2011-09-20T16:58:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b01c3602c49e36578a030a97ed56e33a
4842b7dfe78ebe6f0e4e082c30c00c9633e17a46
'2011-09-20T16:56:10-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d364e6a41b920e06008304f32ef2b076
0ac72f140a376df55b13033f48bcfacb2ec3c400
describe
'6440' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
27b7922eb0f32c22686417fdfdf419c2
ad8fde9dbc56ff18cd4235f23ae62aff1bd98778
describe
'724826' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ed898c9f5c3f19f2f36804c735da2414
a3443d805e6bd94ac43291dba625b546fe712fe4
'2011-09-20T16:56:54-04:00'
describe
'88815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRC' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
4a99b3b5a2ad2dd2cc84bd6b3760817f
93bd636b6afca5fd7c69d7804613a112641a9b52
'2011-09-20T16:55:21-04:00'
describe
'42449' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
aa385f56a471ce73e0e82bc7dc543ab7
885aeeccc8c3d549381eab2fed80281adf5ed3aa
describe
'25980' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
87aa7c5a505ff0fb5f85cd64ab0de180
23afc7fdf5a5e931cd100ad1365f3d80082a155c
'2011-09-20T17:00:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRF' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0d6a62f3bffad68ebfad96dfbd5d9171
a1139ac8ff0e3bcfe4967c2c9bfc09687fb01b6d
'2011-09-20T17:00:36-04:00'
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRG' 'sip-files00032.txt'
509f22d9e8b080680ebced9e63ad5845
23b491eaf1ddff6d5ee1efdf47f2ae1b1331267e
'2011-09-20T16:57:24-04:00'
describe
'6119' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRH' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
3948bfb1bd4bc25fae36d938a726ef5e
15aa6e6c3c25ce358025007ec81d66f73ab5e377
'2011-09-20T17:00:25-04:00'
describe
'724450' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
356d5de8de7df6182d3147c828486a74
1bd99cf360e3fdb7ad53bdd71659ea1175aeddb7
'2011-09-20T16:56:41-04:00'
describe
'106630' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
fc221e1610b467020d81b68811423d16
650e2728eaf6494c583cf18bd3e9172b5d7df5bf
describe
'443' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
eaac61e3baa5522ecd850c45617ad821
b8fe0d70dfd1297e3f1788dc19e2442414909484
describe
'23217' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7a3e2a6f745adb9e3232e217435add2b
9d2594e1b54736f52ccc4e36af1f53b34f29b5c2
'2011-09-20T16:55:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
02c5b9ef86ab90bbea2760dbe087e10b
f644897e4b827117af4423e23eed38fc4a3b0d90
describe
'206' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7b1e40912c617ad789344b324ae7dc2f
26ec95beeba254be128d463f1f4d9107605a3a70
'2011-09-20T16:57:35-04:00'
describe
'5330' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
ef85aa3f91e73e46f1b26ebbb3789a7a
50eda73adcad605f1406f0ce7da840dd0e80a6ef
'2011-09-20T16:57:02-04:00'
describe
'724484' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
86f01d2c8cdd8f9f8c681a3dfaf60737
d1ed262aab4057fc9ad2843f18fb8750c3a92f6b
describe
'63825' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
950bde061f1f578ee13d2cc645af1c95
4012b97b7194765e42cfeb26cae11dc324096bff
'2011-09-20T16:57:07-04:00'
describe
'8062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRR' 'sip-files00034.pro'
2e4c33543e995603f37e254672272009
3a700e34d3d173e38385c654c77b15631be702c5
'2011-09-20T16:55:13-04:00'
describe
'16528' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRS' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a519d6cbb29db4761cc553533ce0b8d1
52c944b7460e76409007447ef2a0ce50a1125dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRT' 'sip-files00034.tif'
72449ef385639efb10fc72e811081ddb
3910de4959dcb41cc61814a010e5eba79a677cf9
'2011-09-20T16:55:27-04:00'
describe
'419' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRU' 'sip-files00034.txt'
136f5567eb04b4be85e50c741f3aafa0
ded01566197f468c5fec52eca2def19beeb8cfe4
'2011-09-20T17:00:40-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4564' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRV' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
711e4a95059ff611bdfa3a4dfb638ce9
cce921aec97029418d3d7ce8c1e3231d26fda222
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRW' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
8ce2db4fefae65f2e96df0a898ffa780
74320156367c70b9db300b06003e20277e518d6d
'2011-09-20T16:56:38-04:00'
describe
'69365' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a7968e8581175e49070297465c6445a2
4724dc61cae09d49044fc6bca5c3a2f124cdb009
describe
'12121' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRY' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3fa347844ca544f9249a6adc57a754ae
5cb39412164e2b235c8d8a06fef2f2c10c8095bb
'2011-09-20T16:55:42-04:00'
describe
'17527' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
08affdaca170bb5bae78a1e284c50cc9
6c8b2b43785504311290abb7e964b7c7abbf7d52
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSA' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a00afaf065dc10aeec8b037dab30ffc1
df3b5eaae30e01556b2ea6f77263af8f123f4d31
'2011-09-20T16:56:24-04:00'
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSB' 'sip-files00035.txt'
59bd8bbdcc328dd7e9282d69b0e75e3d
580cb3eb889d471a89e7afce6906d7d0d4490a78
describe
'4414' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
377b2129bc826ae660f0e01324743e03
b0a9c910f68bf2d49a07d36f0d13fa575f11a70b
describe
'724834' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSD' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
52dbfe11e4e87644e029eb96e03b0127
3475c6af0bb91a35471079333793c51cb86ccf85
'2011-09-20T16:57:18-04:00'
describe
'78199' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSE' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
2190487b8375ff35f71a62c294fdefe2
66fbe1a56b393ef0fdf2e86e69280855839d5af0
'2011-09-20T16:59:01-04:00'
describe
'34708' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f7a53fac5a679e41f02aaf417ff366bc
19b2bc5396b002a8b5a4cd7010888eb5ae49ca2f
describe
'22106' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
62c62395ec44866cbb0180e7948d70a9
8205427f20e78d3d4a9247b5dc18d762e77aa63b
'2011-09-20T16:55:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSH' 'sip-files00036.tif'
462fc1d307487d5067ad14085b0d3737
ab271955a27b34368ce7b5ac1c5a659154e28044
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSI' 'sip-files00036.txt'
2d3d0925f0cdf9511687dab22738bed1
e0dfb85f317bee86b67c8387d509492351bf320a
'2011-09-20T16:57:51-04:00'
describe
'5477' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
8dc0872917afa0c32192a64563d1ced5
7da1f452c9787e29824153f6ca8f976bf2ba8e93
'2011-09-20T16:56:49-04:00'
describe
'724486' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c9d244b86b028399197e59881edc5066
f48a9b39e2ddd516aab196fec8dace19b36c3e13
'2011-09-20T16:54:52-04:00'
describe
'137988' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ec5471a1d9021f3bc7990fdeb721c71f
72d11f054ce6f1f7a6f0425461212a092a241f23
describe
'14273' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSM' 'sip-files00037.pro'
93ed597df430dd415749bb817c9bbf3e
cdfa774731b8975495993a8cffd0746cc2132104
describe
'29698' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSN' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
c60b9f0d4b18498ac37f5a286799b83c
d7f84398644953f66dec7ea3ef3c8dda13ec2a32
'2011-09-20T16:58:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3f1fd9e924d11d3c45ea4c06d8f246bc
d867eb1f2e729a9d7b8fdcf90b94b19568fde67a
'2011-09-20T16:58:29-04:00'
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
94098feb62ffe5e63cf790564e97b77e
da70795f06c7e83c727f96943e9ee9075c95cf4f
describe
Invalid character
'6700' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ffbaf20ce28d2a12c2768b4765903416
a030eac77fd47b7f5e291cf520d3972b21383cb6
'2011-09-20T16:57:42-04:00'
describe
'724264' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
0e925356894869288af5c8ae895fe986
a48593ae936e3200b1231650a751ff9d923f4c4c
'2011-09-20T17:00:42-04:00'
describe
'89895' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
012128c6650477d41c03a8cef602e822
8066ec543c5d0bf8a819f07fc8790ed38a2108e1
'2011-09-20T16:54:50-04:00'
describe
'36524' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRST' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6fb876484603e84f01eb87be9eba1254
75bdf2e840cbffe1b6dfb13a6ed6a8a6cb5adadb
'2011-09-20T16:58:55-04:00'
describe
'25867' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8de345b2dc106be73407a051bc5d338d
41145281d6b37fff74ba28a8ee5a71c4ff5c3224
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
47629c3b814c398685aba5da527233cb
fc2bd074aad023a5a859877e98f41e5273d3d226
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
9da9f065aff0e40d782e7a2804b8665a
b2f534d7cd6704527030f631857d5cbbb0f51251
'2011-09-20T16:55:36-04:00'
describe
'6361' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
3908bb145f36882222291d0669d095f4
14e3ea2524699654dcc352ceefd81664b202bee7
'2011-09-20T17:00:00-04:00'
describe
'724492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
9ed356d40120b238096732d018c0fdaf
6d96e3a40a31bccc56c23698717470093669ab82
'2011-09-20T16:57:29-04:00'
describe
'96505' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
a08cb75d37df10e20b5a3e16eebe5991
78ff47fce95cd0c2da220a7f999f34963062d92d
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
534e73ae7083b58dd6de6485f8b6491c
41310c77e09edc88f706bee3d737cd3341ae1ade
'2011-09-20T16:54:57-04:00'
describe
'23741' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7111a305253e88cad818cf1b43cb90c1
2edc14ae5a1b0c2fb07b5c9e6faaacb7f88c69a8
'2011-09-20T17:00:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f2db07cdc9361d9b55aab788cad592eb
cbd4ca128c7b4ab94057c8d9201cfa0abc726879
'2011-09-20T17:00:23-04:00'
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
75d090185c86ae53415121254f8f428b
be8a257913a5c4789a3be0bb3568a40aec65de25
describe
'6052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTE' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
685745914e8e51d6bfd5fb33e2dbfc19
8f025adbff31db79392b1de569c72080715a8b34
describe
'724489' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4975cddafa88a952808b459a70506461
db71485c2d02efca5dfe0d38543400203f8d0c59
'2011-09-20T16:55:38-04:00'
describe
'108244' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
686036d9d8b6c848850f6cdbcc768231
6b783c2f96555a07b73c1c39702a862fa1694524
describe
'46564' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
386ca714ce987b479c8ceb716b3a3ea7
ec422f077589aba52851d0fd3349368421e44942
'2011-09-20T16:59:45-04:00'
describe
'31499' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
b6e13c3eccd3a3ee6f7fd6dd50985943
aacf57a0dcb385b4c82a0f3d2cf2322c800adb13
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
abfe637af3d5cee5128b77a86de9fcc0
80dd0c9a70d64092d7d6166933b8343f9d67840b
describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
3115c34784e01b3a9c1f90ef3b6d1dc2
e391b8da95d9f2c252a5ac2df1cf1c3c49c32e1d
'2011-09-20T17:00:27-04:00'
describe
'7235' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
76540f4affc02bfb0d46bd1c0c107898
3b4ef93d1b64be2a2d4bbbc5239d0fbdfb20ae99
describe
'724473' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b96935d7f09b8ce80de8fca56ad265af
3157d6b473670d99b7a66d51a608f167eb4b12bc
'2011-09-20T17:00:18-04:00'
describe
'102850' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0ab17d434e6956c289f4c2b09746bd0e
e063052d74c11c928a10d503b52aacf633b52902
'2011-09-20T16:56:44-04:00'
describe
'36260' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5981c93c38e66523cb6901596de79bd5
4da7e1cf35c02ff3e114824d4e4801d113280083
'2011-09-20T16:58:03-04:00'
describe
'29261' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
dc7677e07f98794088a6ca5e9b0fe852
8947a05c60cde995211d0b59ad1a853b56114367
'2011-09-20T16:54:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b300292cfc115e32bca1d2c00f8d15dd
a3290190ccd8474b61c30ecd2f1dd81f4ea462bd
describe
'1933' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
6b5177afecad91999073b6789a79c1b7
f5deeef1927aaa1b9f52fcfca97ed260d1598cad
describe
Invalid character
'7106' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
c6adfef3938fc419b328863c930cd019
4c91148bf34ee0670ee189646e6a034a693c16e8
describe
'724485' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
ea92e06238b9cd3227bca087baa16c94
199127208f02d45c24d311f9dcbac04636bb0bbd
describe
'85514' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f9763d975ed9030e501abc281e63bafc
89fadd4d64065c3b233905225a343938928e14a9
'2011-09-20T16:55:53-04:00'
describe
'29133' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c1b63d75bdfe14e0e80a543c35454300
c10f1b0714259173607a0fb1fc47d6dfa1976347
describe
'24359' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
14ee4752bc70eaf06593abc70af2b234
1b3362a7b4e77bf74d775f78b7aa42a4e31e15b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
17dc36554d3257a12ac745340c27621c
5f4f45d49d26771a1c6ca47749a95b060d7d2b3f
'2011-09-20T16:58:58-04:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
cdc8fb0b9865a336907dab02bf18da8f
a3e6b40672661656831ed3ea4e82d733edeb5949
'2011-09-20T17:00:43-04:00'
describe
'6026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRTZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
442167ac27095de485ace58f4a2ee4a1
652b4a44745caf827a9c7cb1c0635f3de2b752b9
'2011-09-20T16:59:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9c8b17db40ced35fbcdf4c159289a804
eac9da697c8a486c92d1b1d021470f934e6a1c0d
describe
'106016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ef5fd3b15a66674097cc93f6a510d915
3888542edfe7e82b5d2a5ad3a681ee83d9f031c8
'2011-09-20T16:55:47-04:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
ce8533da3538e56d7152ae18f494c443
226bbb828c8b245d6f9fd5cd829d6cb85dcd43be
'2011-09-20T16:55:18-04:00'
describe
'25212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUD' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
848f7a034c39e7e7a0e1161dffe6a6eb
da0216362b0e8b1c036242e8ed1cfe59ed943148
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
2712a792eb04a7fa473f97f2905004a1
d2b3bc8bd3f45a464b8bcdb4c2b4416e55501b5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e1a489a0445aab3c867a7c0861188996
43644f4195a2b77a89110e4b8d22ca11e476072d
'2011-09-20T16:59:59-04:00'
describe
'6038' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUG' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
86d480122fc17d0b042b561dbb84ac29
949e30d334bfaeeb572b09c56b7b6eb1b911147c
'2011-09-20T17:00:15-04:00'
describe
'724468' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUH' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
f8e0f8b673547f630243fe6d26c953b7
a03b60791a31a9ce1964038f32e43bc624f8eccc
'2011-09-20T16:55:08-04:00'
describe
'86933' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUI' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d78f1c7d1f50c564312d2fe07543193b
b2829717f7444d0e14c85c630675da42575ae07b
'2011-09-20T16:58:56-04:00'
describe
'33560' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUJ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
30158b4c967cd4e202389307925a006a
90c2163cdfa99bbe0c8e7b0baa8068884dd66bd2
describe
'25029' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ba2d90a56f4201bc45336a431d806657
9fb650b98c84e4613b1b43221a0c4eb581d5c36c
'2011-09-20T16:56:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUL' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7f6b7144a18b36436488f3aeb1efbe93
770a4560a7b6a7689a441c906eecb287faa12394
'2011-09-20T16:54:41-04:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUM' 'sip-files00044.txt'
fac7abc0739dfe1a88b1d03782edc513
bd9e0021b0d878a52f4deafb2c2423d56483b5aa
'2011-09-20T16:57:13-04:00'
describe
'6091' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUN' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
fb206d8e5efda2afefe6663cd44248fd
ca868877744a368bee03aa5388a228b4b2b30561
'2011-09-20T16:59:18-04:00'
describe
'724414' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUO' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5f92880e1cfdde8e111f520b3a55109d
dda287ccbe69e776bdfd3fec54e8adf813836ba1
describe
'127049' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUP' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f8b9166174e75f13d2a557c9e8681b5c
6b40428d601cb362ce9adc80c74c358cacca816c
describe
'29563' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
fd9032a13a31c3eedade8076e3221c64
9d84cd80cbca6e92183f464d28c5901a8fb44569
describe
'33433' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
02be3dae1a8750a9a07e5d1b42c4e7e8
2bfc10b4438e5a588b7b431563c59fd6e8d3bda0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
206d08ba91a52f3d5de032f67067830d
5d5b06244c4c0c558337a22326c88a4597cd6606
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
98a43db4e62c9e77323e54fdabc1ba29
884164d52919c9895a1596282f1b427d39931d20
describe
'7552' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c85ac959a74303ea4a6692ae26d7b9de
c3a67bd869b3822033d0177ea9ad714c8c12e0d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d42ebc7e5516a5c24ec8eb7df0054326
e93f9b64e68d473b2a23fbb519f285844c5f7186
'2011-09-20T17:00:19-04:00'
describe
'97717' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
719225a8468791dd2132996faf26a47b
243edf048aeb04119380292614ef51e9ebc8c956
'2011-09-20T16:54:39-04:00'
describe
'30425' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUX' 'sip-files00046.pro'
44feb2c25693acd27eab0fc92ff410d5
e8a438a16064c8a3c39ba43b21ec5fcbd1c404e9
'2011-09-20T16:55:15-04:00'
describe
'27234' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUY' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
28eb36b75f422f2774156a82be5c0f43
053deaa05eb83d1b8a202d487b5781b5a5fd5bd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRUZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
76cc90080a07ab51c66e76015b39c7ce
436f8f780e474f1b3d591de1b7e3f03d355c1146
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVA' 'sip-files00046.txt'
c00bd8783f9763c38d1270c96b280944
b816996869130ef999fcbb950270b4d0cde3932d
describe
'6694' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVB' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
129cce27a89b604e13f3d064cbd0cdd6
cf0642746664761e69500cfeafef5f1a9bcd6881
describe
'724347' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
46faa0ef4dfbc36f45e4677ca9711f17
2db98c4672dce47d84d01809805acded83763df0
describe
'91816' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
132aa29ce9b17ff8bf23e5ce513d80bd
3403141506846fa9eb4afa1f12a275a11e75909f
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVE' 'sip-files00047.pro'
e2fd83c93aaa1ad51a977548291e9f4e
44d7471d029b0dac20d0949e2a290874dd44482f
'2011-09-20T16:55:43-04:00'
describe
'21744' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVF' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e1fa38ab761e22193d21778c73e7686b
3b1604b0172516a18d58680986ff348e30f3070c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVG' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9cc95e463b8b88ef1b94f25c8f025c13
aa06cb9990e970fc9879a31ac7784598cadfe828
'2011-09-20T16:58:28-04:00'
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVH' 'sip-files00047.txt'
d0546aa7d125fc72bbb71962632b3332
6b0ceb001339503e5f24c33d5d7443d002ae6dc3
'2011-09-20T16:56:03-04:00'
describe
'5296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2e0adce4171f7e456e2283580bb672e1
59081b29ccd5a1f288ab905fd00f341fcbc830ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVJ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
13281ac4f22ca7c50cdd4919bc89414b
d9f05c3f771a56e8092a85253abffa25d27e6b7a
'2011-09-20T17:00:26-04:00'
describe
'89501' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a123cc763379cfc6a481a3cf5dcd2a8e
5b5fc75b1b79bc8dfce7fa52f1f9f6bc6ece4cd8
describe
'35817' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVL' 'sip-files00048.pro'
29f8ec0d0131f7e663b8a4d82cc566ed
f8b6f7b6d0a980424edddb4ca9738d9888ebe764
describe
'26096' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVM' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
b5a905896baf2927860d1e8a1e01c58f
407df240de66dfde3f9dc99275da218da4df8489
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
0dc3db9d4e7c317eb2ecbe02361a46c1
bd09e46a4d787cb60012d384402c9f9933beb4d6
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVO' 'sip-files00048.txt'
2d7840c64b671368886eac528e811b15
feba17c5c334fed1a678cce5935f800045c90188
describe
'6334' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVP' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b91801c5f18d783a0de857e0d605900d
5b36111bfd76d05874b3737941d0b79e29b93c9b
'2011-09-20T16:58:47-04:00'
describe
'724446' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVQ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
bc715bfd2666a4c77c5f2e4180d9d5c6
473431f568525b885dac4aeaabc441527bc069f4
describe
'112248' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b25f07227e6efb3717889ba5fc0bf211
bfae4342b00d06746f3f65ce4481327f4da37b6d
describe
'29837' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVS' 'sip-files00049.pro'
8ac2826ac9f3eb621e99eca16e0e2153
638fb18c914b02f16bfd165d2a6a636dda8857d0
describe
'29799' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVT' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ba0763c8bb352fcaca3be200b259b293
00edaa2da4218b2d44ca7aab14f118255d351376
'2011-09-20T16:58:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVU' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e1479d2bd519f061ea5bcd1c8f097e59
458bbb614f72ca684a12a16c01e8a0a4911cfa48
'2011-09-20T16:59:35-04:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVV' 'sip-files00049.txt'
c07db4e5b826dc26e2350c108c55caf2
5c066622da54804ccf5a1c40ab75eef9088676d4
'2011-09-20T17:00:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVW' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
dd2078a3d4fc54f6fd2d4d31a273ca41
e28fe955a8e251a58070117e47f05c80bf5bd163
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
c60dd50ae0340cc3025df2eb669e5b6b
b75c319354b12ac0d6e7c137743609ee6f7e417f
describe
'117844' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
2daf5b2e8dac7337cf6c56effc0086db
8325bc9117a87a9798a0642ee0d4fdff7e45139f
describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRVZ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b30745bfee4c4fdbafa7498219a053ba
86db8213515aefab3e697d6973c1a8fb6438a585
describe
'31979' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b48feef086361ab5927cea661a95796b
fbcee018d32574ad13b4532aac98c9461a07779f
'2011-09-20T16:55:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2b177f685fb4883fa2a4a92a1c83ff6d
c82a35bc16c275f295051b95c5615c18966228c1
describe
'2006' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
7d8a9bc89a94abba335bfcbdb5c184a7
2e2971133dcf42717a24db7de69682af92b89e5f
describe
'7503' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
4d18203b6e11c472a678531382bcead1
766e48b9f27706b3e9a850d3c576cea74417b207
describe
'724802' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1a28f2e780c6c051476aa8054c201453
194603938825f1a51fb20aa03ecd1c1a02511a0d
describe
'132848' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
f01f7206d355839c3ed1ebb048b471db
2385e0c4a6c582e28a2c4bd225b78244441a9779
'2011-09-20T16:58:30-04:00'
describe
'2954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWG' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c3fd885e6d9a43daabf101f201b2775f
e43a055331b376ac675542149e6dd957b10afb7c
describe
'30931' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8ea30577366f5a66062045c1d30e1b2f
418dbb84006926668a7c89cd232c921f263fbe88
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWI' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4c7eaaff51e4c716f5789098b90bd240
33b95586534cbade1f2dc2e437b128a1947ba14a
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWJ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
e0325ea0323ab69e150f61d9d85690d6
f4a94c1e108506229ff221dbae3cd5c1796fb2ee
'2011-09-20T16:58:44-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7244' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cab3099ebaee08a978e7d32f94aa67fe
16bc490cafee0ebd786d9a92e9f5ad25b1f13311
'2011-09-20T16:55:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWL' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2cadd705a127cdf0eb74998aadb8e837
05fc4674758d1f2a353d05570e8f48244b7746fc
'2011-09-20T17:00:32-04:00'
describe
'94103' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWM' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1a6937aa5a17876aab6772812b15c671
18c51bf2dc3f578468cadccd03ce0bf548fa723c
'2011-09-20T16:59:10-04:00'
describe
'26485' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9ea2afa19c434ab6444962c4e01291c6
091beae85f9ae96f0702ed6b6b8588c8d737260f
describe
'26092' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
0251dab9cdb028e9ae75677705f86ca1
8fd644f54d9e432d4b9af28e72aca59232bb6fdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ce1a63efd6bb342a97eb8eb6d91a493f
c878b5445b01cd8474a12d39a8abb7d862677022
'2011-09-20T17:00:10-04:00'
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
91ab0fea0948cfcfb465eb194d17f475
454bc5c93765895b1651944be474ab313eaf222b
'2011-09-20T16:56:13-04:00'
describe
'6450' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
8fc61faa3640ac3373fc6e7fcab0337e
80881430e4e608a58b1053153f0491968e7ce99d
describe
'724781' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
c985c20dd7ffcc4a6e63dd9d2da54cd4
5258a4d13cec12a9c20a3f6938bf7c08d68a9ded
describe
'117866' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c00b14bbe04a951760fcd150b0fb90e2
5c8ca45943a3ff2ef4a3f409fd591ea5fed0d8c7
'2011-09-20T17:00:06-04:00'
describe
'33062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
c743c549451817b05a5e431d6d3aec03
1c060e32e65e05f4da5544c5882697d2a5ff097f
'2011-09-20T16:55:45-04:00'
describe
'31926' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWV' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
82bbad8451a7b0be7c567cf82e611a00
2a57c908dc32291733d721a17a6264c54003a49e
'2011-09-20T16:58:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWW' 'sip-files00053.tif'
555ca54a89207d2726bfa342f11f55c5
7526ba08c07b460d0f6391f651a205d16a30ec41
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWX' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e7d0d34750a7817f5141af9c3b9aa7d5
02c7691ed4b399073fe496656c04d0c43bfb9ff8
'2011-09-20T16:56:48-04:00'
describe
'7428' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWY' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
d4e9b2c1508d8ce61c157af4cbf83880
c6223264f44183e9225dfe721f853eb945c9da5d
describe
'724445' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRWZ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
77072a38295f6e9d3b3844cced9fe364
28b852eebc910e1db9615b00a396cab9dd7f52b2
describe
'99173' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXA' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a2968e81a4c26ac26c80347043e76d56
78332ab287c336f4ef2085bf02f7e472926a7e71
describe
'27270' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
bae8d668e3e75950d2f94200dc095798
f996b66e9e96d3236a393911f22c3953ea981837
'2011-09-20T16:57:44-04:00'
describe
'27186' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXC' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3ef5261538d36b50c850e0149d842ec2
8548628ee123d2fbc8ed262b3cc4dba343c8fb92
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
98c3a7b4864568b9e5ad4ce88932f801
dc6ac1d2485c056e9f694211e5eb99a95a0ba355
'2011-09-20T16:58:40-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXE' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f787bc009c7872daae1ea206b97ee9b5
09e3e3d3bc99c2c4c1aee3b475be82141cc681ac
'2011-09-20T16:54:30-04:00'
describe
'6620' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXF' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
323dc3a51bdcb140d71a85be55f5f718
57590edb21c345b03f81a2991296ad893a25a0ae
describe
'724609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXG' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
5d33e30d3c86e795ee95f55cd43f6c01
8bbc70dab3d6fd37b3a3521719c7c306a7275131
describe
'132540' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXH' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
a01b9af6eb6093abfda380a27b9348cd
978540f9b300f98bed3f0fa400985e2d808bf522
'2011-09-20T16:59:07-04:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXI' 'sip-files00055.pro'
19e8533bf7572932fe87391e8dcc1a38
4c32a0ab470660daea7fbbf711efc285c5dbcf4d
describe
'31166' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXJ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6a41c7ccaa89136a64c134c3a33e8de1
5c8e18b893ed8b10a784d7466ff3db6f0de939aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXK' 'sip-files00055.tif'
c57c837e1756d025cef4e814f4a531c6
df0bc506e04accf559740ae7e198e538988c4edc
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
2dd51b494df01cf959f66453092ca558
b5a0372dfe0e4869dc5667f9730729170e7fad6d
'2011-09-20T16:55:28-04:00'
describe
'7480' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
8f095774a2a591b682a1eaa53e9781ec
9216064a49527fa163dd28f6f4469c4ce88af54c
describe
'724768' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a68d80f4f95e9cba77be17fbdd8a9e95
84dd8953839b90768285faa30de219ce7cf05262
describe
'80791' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXO' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
70b91ced619bb66630f2f99f4565b8e1
09b62b06c8ddbe6da8c5934c23234ff089fbc4c1
describe
'29220' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXP' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2ca22e74053f4b6396c18611cb3d65ce
305ecaf9dbd78bd7a13bf77d09856f354bce6bb3
'2011-09-20T16:56:07-04:00'
describe
'23846' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXQ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e02490b794c54165868684c0aedb277e
94fb8d0543549b80f554924654902424e3981e7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXR' 'sip-files00056.tif'
47ea96f9f8c3bee2b4e684f2b5d5efbe
c9cd2edeb578d02a69c7bac6893f7311ecb88d86
'2011-09-20T16:56:58-04:00'
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXS' 'sip-files00056.txt'
33d38d9100f98d5afab86194b19318c7
f609f491a08434c2b4f0d897c70e586f68c01f40
'2011-09-20T17:00:13-04:00'
describe
'5816' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXT' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
796902156dd356add0cf42fbd3e3e9b3
647ac84b247ff25e6cc4279f10f0cdec7293d721
'2011-09-20T16:57:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXU' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b2934c2601b881eb7199a9186047ce8b
ffe634aefb724fc813ef7cc4f1f43646e9b2dcce
describe
'93582' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXV' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
fcb4e6a5e2400fb78c58c4cbcf256757
45c40f039f20d18670252329ff5f18e2df44919f
'2011-09-20T16:54:32-04:00'
describe
'37437' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXW' 'sip-files00057.pro'
9e4f38343e48ca5b0c83cd96af4e3609
87abfe4d638bef479c8a704f2b26815895b44ade
describe
'27282' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4f8b8df1fc29d7696ef298297973fd05
a6618a1500891d34826dfa0d63a1b1e97353e30d
'2011-09-20T16:59:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXY' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d56517383bf45f774404364453f8b02f
36d0f835e9640051f0fed225ff0dd75bf3f0b02a
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRXZ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1ac24b48aa02cccff7ccf4a79ed3d733
f0e2d5962b4f4a51de201853b8bb8e972b829ce3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a5c7b918529bf625c1c56e20113a2944
3444a153ed036e7f483d5c87361f4f96b88b88b4
'2011-09-20T16:54:56-04:00'
describe
'724483' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYB' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
9ad456d2ceb2a5ec774220a3f7a86e11
6bfead66784d2e31498392467e90fa73b5e57e4f
'2011-09-20T16:59:58-04:00'
describe
'114255' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYC' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a613b9831e18466efad873452f851677
ca32feb858badb952d6a736163141e3667710367
'2011-09-20T16:59:49-04:00'
describe
'23255' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
d592485fd297b20468bcd03c58a44125
3c249e88f8ef490fea8bb156d18a600b49df121d
'2011-09-20T16:56:31-04:00'
describe
'29011' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
348c46f4e43c6c0800febe7fd1366e66
264e40a5b84d8eb0568e68746567cce117267afc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYF' 'sip-files00058.tif'
422f7fdcbfc0fd7d6c81af2e125a548c
7280917098270cdfa05c8fed0fb2f1f092d251cf
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
994debf55abff5d06c65f3a3ab345f14
5f12f36c8522c20e969e191c6a7b0bee76606381
describe
'6802' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
97348dd557548dfb2a93923e7dae8f04
1b8f8ff3c6cc49f4afd9a0d3972c70981454337a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fbfcab1c8ee43b5cd5f77300d9ed6737
e1235b99c123c0459ace0f6b15fefc1a9382e0de
'2011-09-20T16:54:35-04:00'
describe
'139416' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f990c23f7a99dc5a043fef38deef07c4
65b5bc26c21bf2518cef9e6c9a05909efa487a76
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b039589d7f6baaa5edf47f596418ff5d
d04602b9705fd9490cbc051104736c63a630f3bb
describe
'31721' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
6f9d6889ede94462eaab3267d28e7ecc
451dd9f81c6631868b620b0c5a7e3bfc49f1f614
'2011-09-20T16:56:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3931d25b8b7f8c73d073009cb2568f10
e31b847d33f1d8acc3863a8f36f66cca568ac1d7
'2011-09-20T16:56:52-04:00'
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
6580949b3d2b1eb607a127bcfcf38c13
f84b17a174baa3b695761e5e277f9cf1293e7653
describe
'7227' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
fc76ab0823fc5f243390f8a1f51e47a3
f0eabc7a50a91305fcbe8b96cb69b63ff1b2e01d
describe
'724488' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYP' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8a7d3ba6e7814274cf4fd3063953fabd
94b1cdd2fd572cf12e47325452284abff32f6ed6
'2011-09-20T16:57:56-04:00'
describe
'82492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
d993d92797a71785f13a8d2bbb669f30
a875a18434e0b91a54c3f2cf6af1362beeddfddc
'2011-09-20T16:58:13-04:00'
describe
'33406' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYR' 'sip-files00060.pro'
ac8782adc204d6006f9645d6ebc2226c
3bde0f1a453780bb0fc2e61e8f9fe2b4f1ed86b6
describe
'24645' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
145f0ca8907ef690774a678578f52dc6
0435c250e9d3451758a54d2df0b6e987529f93c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
c8e8b6b898361e20b8c90889e26c1594
1f95bd27e003d268bb6a3d386e253771011e76a6
'2011-09-20T16:55:07-04:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYU' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7df4ce9ef6b4709168673f2597bdf6b2
894c2865782fa33a56b019eef561b93f02118402
describe
'6003' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYV' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
3c6116b04353bf2315be322506b21307
d91591285da966dcc3809b868e2cda76473cde62
describe
'724478' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYW' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
92500ffa1934d6a7e1f92a73a760b491
b9f67e1c067e7084ff6f0e75d56f5c285a64db9a
describe
'97072' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a16bdf0db7cfcaa1857127849bdde164
cd5b1ebc8c7b2427c9651d79d3a1957825e2ee3d
'2011-09-20T16:56:30-04:00'
describe
'42639' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4966e247179c0a0509574169f262806b
1104615817d7e0abea89ada2ea3df10616e7e7ac
'2011-09-20T16:54:42-04:00'
describe
'28692' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRYZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2c511d1d2bccb876240f21a26c79afb5
a65f3c2e66bb610b7aa198562b200e4c1b6d42f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f7f14c2e02a030d2c0fa46ba206f51af
e9cea78397bd45d0e0b67397c0ee5e97f8639e21
describe
'1878' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
bd02380bd97654c65f0efe890319efeb
43a375d6150ee336001ba29bf3ee3d1a9ebf9de7
'2011-09-20T16:58:41-04:00'
describe
'6920' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
e04e4eb98ea5f789798de99e0834ef88
5b1259a1dd599e612617dd6d8317ef4c7a6aa0a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
65eb1025d51760a2d1718e5b91040fd9
313d0ce60ae43464cff8c43e10bd08a89097445c
'2011-09-20T16:55:34-04:00'
describe
'82778' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b243ba748e81c12e31c8874cd5f09664
664ce4c2531f845e5501f8a11f2c3f74a322d96a
describe
'26071' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3fa458191d17e790f5a75c441415573e
a7ed465cfb3de6844223f58841dac0c1f7cb07da
'2011-09-20T17:00:46-04:00'
describe
'24274' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ad138b675d47ae33e991e13457817205
ebba786171413f5fdb11e61944cbdd9d04dffc26
'2011-09-20T16:55:22-04:00'
describe
'5812244' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
0b9b79b5871a6e380549707588f2e69a
7ef047a6ed6c5e242b6f3c8371858eb873400b62
'2011-09-20T16:54:38-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cd41da087ce722d73c398a4469f3c40e
19cce1147bf36d896afccfc3e31c8aaf111c0628
'2011-09-20T16:55:37-04:00'
describe
'6274' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c9b549ca4f11878efd9b049f08157312
e004234de7a7d0874e4fa641c2330638bd3d7be1
'2011-09-20T16:58:42-04:00'
describe
'724425' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2e9e40ac0d5573ed6064725788584c5f
385ff2497d4d3ab1a2578155b5032bf06c694a46
'2011-09-20T16:57:20-04:00'
describe
'149901' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c5bc068464681b5e5251a0349d364c5c
38d70d85ca0970c29601083d9afd51398ae77733
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
3d8891a414f065efa12736e91e42f3f1
c58bb245cfdb5cfe5374c1a58a39b6c8dd0ff6af
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
715f5a22315922a03f71cbbe8f3c1a77
933318ce9ddaba3294fc1ce4fad47b75bec1f470
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ba918eae49b421a01ad26d5c531ed894
e5ad75560625fccafa65598a22874566be4ba963
'2011-09-20T16:57:01-04:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
93ba06e601018da1a4486d54ea8f0913
5a95ed3207c261acbdcb8a12611fee0806e96639
describe
'7505' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8dfaba7c6ce8ea94f22e9361a661ded4
ca85d7cd737aaa37b717493750f75e73fe4b372a
'2011-09-20T17:00:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
43bdaa4c03ae19b6fa413c1d4516cfa2
7a88b6e82287dd995c9fdc0c6f963a63b09f4dcb
describe
'79059' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
11c380440e6561315bcd2a81291c62a4
31c53a610aadf8e4d21fed86e02e9e292757fa90
'2011-09-20T16:54:45-04:00'
describe
'31896' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZT' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e24789fb0d300e07e4adc0a879929ad1
e069561d89de864585df9cd2b294266ea9332045
describe
'23131' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZU' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1e953c47ef7e72c5ab3873b856f9ab2f
0fa87cc190af2090dbb756864f3a111a87b83de9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZV' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b1441ee2d6948cb9b52ed4a1584eb056
3961a38358ab34d274d868acee613025059c58e7
'2011-09-20T16:55:10-04:00'
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZW' 'sip-files00064.txt'
648d2125d370c8520b2ff91e5ef84ecb
f4e5773e3a35975b81136bf81ff893d201fa33be
'2011-09-20T16:57:19-04:00'
describe
'5650' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZX' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
9aa6b43b14d76c34afeb7429470c1a42
e8815c20424977e51c3a89e960c26199e587b938
'2011-09-20T16:57:21-04:00'
describe
'724348' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZY' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
f1897be817b0200c03f8e154cdab002a
8a7ea94ff2bce84ebcbb6b262a9abfbcc5cef6b6
'2011-09-20T16:59:42-04:00'
describe
'97547' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABRZZ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
069459dbb711c1d8bd18debc8ccd60fd
8cfddd94dabf3214a0919659cd4725a66c2d8d17
describe
'41211' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4f3817d36554cc90e4aff133cba3147a
57a8b76976e10d32e17f4b6e6c44169cc5916223
'2011-09-20T16:59:54-04:00'
describe
'28799' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
09991ede48f3d4fb520b1c0040a00863
e567c7d44639982122ea0f853c5f21d6bcf2a381
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAC' 'sip-files00065.tif'
4e31d53b5b0c8a74c70cb04bfa6b1384
ab09e7b4157a0c8e4f0ce3b9ccdee71307c27da4
'2011-09-20T16:56:29-04:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAD' 'sip-files00065.txt'
e659503e9168fea79f1ae06c0d08a69b
dfd83023375a62570b796e5d0af2d4d4710fd97c
describe
'6998' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8c42cf97960cd1429885dc60117310c6
a4bf4472753d2fa7955c1253404e04a64fd65d3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAF' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fff961b69cbf920da0b107d733b6cf60
44f2efdc3a5eca7c16d6b726cc49cf81378c564b
describe
'101011' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fa22d61ebc0a3d242d6e565d287b3fac
3282a0b6feb911c227d303a4d98c7af7f1d7a7b7
describe
'34297' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f7f737bcf0e27503db07d5d340097578
9b3c1908766a4ee581be603efc0b2d88257a9416
describe
'27814' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAI' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
889374ce68a6924515dc2ec9962adecb
91606b80d512f52d0af2e9c751fb283917e5178f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
f5c2b9358c0e64a1c320e27fcad83fbf
f234763e12a06056ea854d235fef768c6e8a6201
describe
'2004' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAK' 'sip-files00066.txt'
fb4c73b5db7266cc83ec6144c6d7de3a
37557e472d5037c1ddf7684870992b1e8396e645
'2011-09-20T16:57:59-04:00'
describe
'6812' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0a48f80212340f3d1ea57f7277fde174
6312331120d968b0c884119c7024d3d143debd5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c38ad3f83c49275af4a8c45e40fc279a
ce9bc517459da5361ba90a6deceb99d171e6b183
'2011-09-20T16:55:57-04:00'
describe
'95462' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAN' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
e9e3b3ae1980ac479e65915d86dbaf93
0a53c320a92f3fee4da09880cf5a07822ac56160
describe
'32605' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6db910ce8671af3349426d56157a61bd
c9a79af84bde017c3fabee5758211b7fb5b278b4
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6d1e4a04cbbcf66a620e7b71b2a780e4
63cce7a81c9aa57663dd35b3e0c6a4685480adaa
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9a9e05a901e79e96dc16e76019c86f08
c46839ce3dbcb082786f624aea05018f146faaeb
'2011-09-20T16:58:52-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
104fd643fd929c3065c0b3799a77a723
a579d66181179b747e73ea4343071426c6e4fdac
describe
'6671' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
2e04216901158e63ccd59598388abe1e
57a664e17b8631671b9dd3599f376248921fdc4e
describe
'724464' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAT' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
4f9d1b38b2904223a795c791ec1a27f1
3491c7e3e96bde9498c0d909dee2114c43993d40
'2011-09-20T16:57:37-04:00'
describe
'96044' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAU' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
811efadc84bfede20be6d9b191d19a74
2b1572857a6483c991659d2ea943e14c071c0a5e
'2011-09-20T16:55:58-04:00'
describe
'31513' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAV' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3bb56b7f7a7f7b0342b48eef0a536b48
81bab2cc9e9a3fbc74a1fb6b8eccbddf207f21ec
describe
'26633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAW' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b5e129dee139e2709635e7fd095d6ac0
4dcd2726550d2abf082f6c6c4d2194cdf813abe8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAX' 'sip-files00068.tif'
88d979d0c2e254198b7159391838b40c
908c67fd1f080c3b20bc4db7a52be0d2f69facd2
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAY' 'sip-files00068.txt'
deb064c40309dc31da197827b54988e9
ffe2cd1551915d29006892adbb6bb8e636c79d39
'2011-09-20T16:58:07-04:00'
describe
'6385' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2680e887997170ad8a7a70c7965a65ae
466d7a43142ba6df1ef7fdc177e8b77e507a847c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
02ed70d3ef2bfba61216b6971f08ab83
3ebf1048648e2b5226a327e42cbe7fd73db71e0d
'2011-09-20T16:58:20-04:00'
describe
'87968' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBB' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
7fc0b9667d0f28c68919a5d94b1effb8
06bbcd12b30698c20a386d0e28abe46b5d850096
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7464b36f54218ad96cc6673d57d4eee1
1b749c3937683db3fa131ba59eb7c2aa0f39d384
'2011-09-20T16:55:03-04:00'
describe
'19973' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBD' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
86067001e4fc418b20d8c55498e85bd5
7a7ccd40d956f8079a89a58696fc11fd493a9007
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
eb2d41dc3f7b012c55f0899b462088ee
70673468719d4f2ecfc0bdafef7e76698a892d85
describe
'222' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBF' 'sip-files00069.txt'
61b47a5b071b09221c36ea662c995766
39d2dafa8faae25fc81603d47d12c661684713fc
describe
'4882' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBG' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
99192d21422660389362df33630147e4
52923b6122236c3ecc3dd213005c7bfa3b1ea755
describe
'724828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBH' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
79042bcc4a7f0bb5f96939c171626013
2349093e02a030db48a691b857656419837d89ba
'2011-09-20T16:59:26-04:00'
describe
'100098' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBI' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
2a6807877ecd22a9bc1f2c22f42abdb6
fa7ede0d3addf8dc45fbe99bbe0bae4dfffa124f
'2011-09-20T16:58:48-04:00'
describe
'44408' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
cd7722048711929f60023bb6e4eab4c7
5e6d633d1732c04e304502567a4d44aa7415f3d8
describe
'28504' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
df2c04e3411906adbc3b10b74ead5224
9fff662375cff37bf9412d281c71a2d6624bfcf8
'2011-09-20T16:54:36-04:00'
describe
'5814992' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
07a7d74c6ba6a455f8c5f8eb6194df45
468e18ac431e95c7801cf63c573c0067b704f18c
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e48d53e57ccf5a5a71842bc3e58c431b
10cf958a3d01c4492ec38bdbfd205975a8ef0ab7
describe
'6883' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBN' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
3f2d545586c1443ed99061d6b1fb4ed8
0e6d74518565c23c2f675008fcaa9213b6fb1c8a
describe
'724823' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBO' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
0f747cfc66591fc8510b98169f5a6818
5f85dd3bfa0a41127e07a70ecf097f68c0a8cd03
describe
'101620' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBP' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1df4c2e57e7e5e984abfdf66559b2f07
47f999b5f9290181b0ccc6a6666648675c0cedbf
describe
'31214' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
650f27f612c9a2a9c14165bb37309e76
afb09e7f14f1ad3f68a336da13d6abe23410dc0a
describe
'28170' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
87b07efde5dd8935eb8f12d1a37efdd5
449267f8125b3fc14d42b6f4b67c79318687b6fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBS' 'sip-files00071.tif'
f8fa17bb66d7dfb43d3dc300ee87b794
163e243755b7cacf4b755db6cc4628629e925618
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBT' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b6fac9fcd4e7e66f4eca33787152ef61
097b0afdff901e07c687a7b8bbfaba29220b2c49
describe
'6954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBU' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
4932b99abef51981b124cf8fb0696f45
e9fbbcb1c435c21dfc2d5e93ade16ae13293a109
describe
'724833' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBV' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
2b72198f02d1fc3ae4025a86f139ce40
d0b1d719cc920ecb9f6d3861ffcff854092dc7f3
describe
'83876' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBW' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
1beb9a045d81e93f2171abbd09a0ab8d
d9e883347d0eb1db2239f798f074e00367a9ec61
describe
'19796' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBX' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7b3ccabbe463d6428d589f330cdfa0a6
1efb4fc02d08e9bc9949483e0885e84517074169
'2011-09-20T16:55:12-04:00'
describe
'23759' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBY' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
dffd02b7be52ba2a48948b35bc440dfe
608b745c007fe1f0b9fb986368c1e52b155dd69a
'2011-09-20T16:59:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
1125547e0e87e9de45aacb79b6d3252c
21b3a8b3da65b6870fa5e55f9d45a6e7bd0dd178
'2011-09-20T16:54:58-04:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCA' 'sip-files00072.txt'
97f6bb9085d9f9fdfac03df86ee6ce77
dec2d0cd7e9ae9e1aaf679e1da2a900a250cd65a
describe
'5913' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCB' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a91a177b4099c3a6aef960999cb3ce9d
f16ea9d073ff6c156ebe4f137207cc333e8f8a7e
'2011-09-20T16:58:10-04:00'
describe
'715354' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
95f8678b20fd31900c74b418351d0f42
a0747f0ee9675c02e5981a71a935307bb9f1b424
'2011-09-20T16:55:39-04:00'
describe
'84110' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
544e158c7757464217bc8dfcf736d42e
32174f5b79e8bb76aaeb587b034e9912631ecebc
describe
'31054' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCE' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c6eada193693db696e11edbf24678547
d88a7b85804ddad517084e228df555a351721bdc
describe
'24786' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCF' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
da7bf97baec99732255d08861bdb4afd
83d8cdeae6358947cd1f518897d5a40686322cbd
describe
'5739184' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
5e4c8189db32ff8d5e8a5d6c6bfbb9bd
e6df31d8438c965d034cd531d9ec34a00f9f113e
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCH' 'sip-files00073.txt'
6b447a3dadea20f0cc4e8df127b9de99
3e4c29908afcbabbf903cc1358f7b507e3cbd40c
describe
'6111' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6f06c141775ff85e79a6fee453a1ce47
21a7873ba1f7fb7dcfd46e4a856224697fb790b3
describe
'724349' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCJ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
50a30d725a96e18257e6b3cc8eea18c8
65e6dfbd4549753dc00a4438061aee6a1b717b62
describe
'91448' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
4778fde54b27832f4e82fc3d8788fb34
24dbcaa0403f39b800a2ec8631e81b81dff2b976
'2011-09-20T16:59:53-04:00'
describe
'40631' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCL' 'sip-files00074.pro'
16e28cf65067af08ddd7400f3ad9589a
d10ef66c0b82ad0a7b9900c6fffe5f4263f45383
describe
'27438' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3af87eb2a2f23af7b3f033e0ee08fa6c
99e6d2c98fdececb33c4f8439b348a2a1d0ff80d
'2011-09-20T17:00:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b3dee110c15b358a62dcbf73488a60e4
9ae9fbfe285ef9717eeec60c5e107a6420c028dd
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCO' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e93d99fa7ba70f8153bd0d95f781c421
64cac24f570fae7a1764969bcbc4c08997ec8272
'2011-09-20T16:56:55-04:00'
describe
'6693' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCP' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
03bcfc323dde45721a13cb9394c2447a
ff194dfece8c2a01d5539ec441c32cc49ebcf6a1
'2011-09-20T17:00:03-04:00'
describe
'724436' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a6d601548b90b0c202515d5c4dc8a1f5
6ba2953f8938e5bc5bf58a2a3e15f15a184bb7e3
describe
'137181' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCR' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
32925728944fee47652b2a67cf18985d
d950db72b57363f2ca9f2e1585a095a481e27983
describe
'2100' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0c0fedf69851792ddb17dc7fba0739b1
e17eedf4d6ce54b23ee83c0311011ffc99c66c5a
describe
'30737' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCT' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7cdcdab1e808693b8eed4a4c870cb794
222fd5361cb6b6c5c504184fa41cbe291d7ea4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCU' 'sip-files00075.tif'
fd051e2ce35115212871b911775a79d7
a1f2f74d45c18dddab62f37dcda2270ed163903c
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCV' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1f3ee4cc046ee10c2625e869ffabbb35
20565873d2ddefed4e321cf8ec5e09d50c6b329e
describe
'7079' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCW' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
e3cbfcb625de5f265c3d6772acd43493
0675d170d64b5dc438800108bc46cd2848be4016
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
36aba8e054495e4f6c02b034fb4c1c9f
98998260cc2c950de2c4df1ffcd0dbae81315891
describe
'95578' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
51b706a05c970852de9f7692887e3a11
740f0c7942953393063b6fe1c7514ba6e6e1b303
describe
'29774' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSCZ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
c3ed2d69db2e787510a226e4b3d02643
c693827c62cac2c1f5b9c80e409f0caf02782a4f
describe
'26171' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8516d01f9714391be3ac952adbff0074
621af50e05ddc53e461c7007b3a642e9fb5cb54d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
369e21b9136329b3443f493d935e73ee
56a97d433ff29204a0eeb75d7d221c1216d9ff35
'2011-09-20T16:54:53-04:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
8f7fe7283a19bc3b7877a56e951eb9b6
567c7f6fc0c24141379489a8ba8230350a50af45
'2011-09-20T16:58:17-04:00'
describe
'6269' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
7f3b94d104bdcd81a47855ad4ec7b5ab
10de97865481d33b46f51904a4fd94f23cf2bcc9
'2011-09-20T16:59:39-04:00'
describe
'724480' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e9ed0c9737ed6133911ee76b67dc96e3
d187f420b30138a567516b6ce664f63bb8ce72b5
describe
'97728' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
2ea725371362944e5d7ddb630af7dae8
0502904608db69756275f524c4a146f2c535c4a3
describe
'44383' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDG' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2c0f5308804876d587806ed8d6585f33
15678055b0bd70a8d0e0b98a82d2dcc43fa99bd4
'2011-09-20T16:54:46-04:00'
describe
'29141' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b1bc3a2fbe4b1c3431959a5d69795adf
6187ff35b2401e97994f97a8faa591d7d736c395
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDI' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e10bbc863f5984fc90eab532bd82d1a8
1ae3d0d64bbbfbe5b6252c42ce64ce2dae8e17bd
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDJ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
9521569b2ed6c74ede40ee03738552c3
3521f0b2e747cc91b3cf9b339ee30e9ebb52894b
describe
'6768' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
ca1b47625ec03ff047037255e0fe4e51
ba369b1ed7fe6b6f5be5554dee10f9b540022268
'2011-09-20T16:56:12-04:00'
describe
'724788' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDL' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
48d0017bc99edd34b34b60ecf8fc3e4c
e53f866d2235cb14a70f881207402684c1b859b3
describe
'115422' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDM' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
0a29a76c7f3c4f26af34c41c52e2a5ef
84f946ac5ff1ba75d4fdf02a1ce9f3b1d37ffc01
describe
'19377' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
4bfcf7c3ab6e7ea369d2f737e0da6435
fc6aa97b56bb072c8488db15357bb1fb847152c5
describe
'28688' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8217b83dbd8d68eb6f4602311a53a24d
2af36e7db15a1654c3fb699ca5f4087b2efb5cc8
'2011-09-20T16:56:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d7afee2a0604b8126593b43f29688f9c
fa49733213112af41c34c97998b0f6abdf7d3fbe
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f7332e6fe8855f5ade45c365d6710cb6
a93b215fb89818ff81b81cf2770780bdfbd64b46
'2011-09-20T16:59:06-04:00'
describe
'6895' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1b45455410eed5465cc2483385a9310e
d43e49be8d945cc52d4fc60e016a2512960d26e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b7aad2cda815e16545c1db47aed5c683
d6ebb3ebb1e049f9f49c3583c545cc7c3d74c08d
describe
'107831' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
67e380226be0b9f54caaa8f0d43bdc87
addf1ae47915236cfacc4ce9677b5a4f852201f1
'2011-09-20T16:55:25-04:00'
describe
'14933' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
5cfa85aad42dde9050487f09979eaa37
3b2cca11539dd5ec7c9f17359f747d89de11be97
describe
'28025' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c63608c394adac10d737c181438c7d73
63f9073f63adf8dfa5b08eb2c51ae2876a51b83d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
92e4a4204e843620a435786c49cc54d1
eb5483127b4076b863cbdb2653601f613ab19d89
'2011-09-20T16:56:18-04:00'
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1cb6908b23d433d2ac5757d934984d16
a99ff46fc06141cbb112abd6c596439ac583f011
describe
'6753' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
45d11e70ea792ab2112c26c9826b726a
89bad13fbe19bca3ea1dd168b336a228b93435ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSDZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
468fe100e15716ebde61483ffc26b218
890601c6e9a192373192c12ce813dee289588482
'2011-09-20T16:59:52-04:00'
describe
'98819' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
e538a01236e1e7333b21340bb5624304
2e48da18a17b375eed702aca6edf2e687db8589d
describe
'21555' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
2c472948dd61ca377fac45a94a3c8b76
e609efc2cfc4446f0bfb3268427d2352a88091c4
'2011-09-20T16:58:05-04:00'
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
35123dcc409c1f30aca36b9021d26274
69eaace1821c79534ee54d69967f97cb1b17fc87
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSED' 'sip-files00080.tif'
3b2a9edc688bd778d9dca460f793b641
f361901c6f111918990671d82c1cd6109d91b231
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
77b23f84cb1b53130ea0931e63604887
962dbc907df2c7fd8907c668c7ff77dac10f04f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
15dc325e53ef9f3ccf064fb3d88aa4ab
40c63abaac07c516030982a0015463124b8571e5
describe
'724741' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
1178e17ef2cb581dc49af79d5d249f31
1d88ec0059dcb44f6c7de7d31939e36bcbc0e8ee
'2011-09-20T16:58:23-04:00'
describe
'94706' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a5077c1fd17ca6c1e8b9713128da9ba7
ff9da2087e82d634282b5e1fb5712d8c5abad719
describe
'23956' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a1b51b80a9cdbe66e02d0253e9d29db7
352c7d7a0190637a8dd190d92511b2b36b8f1bb7
describe
'25451' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
5700dba4adf5fb4879e42aa51133cc09
fa3eae7ae23a42d53b3d26925a1b6db741a78e00
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6c7ac9ae1428979e27af4527494b8f59
7e76f7946e0a6a46a4faff7e49375a8dd3ca448e
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
5ff8b633259502401edde3d088740214
3294440b2e0ccd42dd1b944d78debc757ded6086
describe
'6433' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
384b525435a1b560723b1a3d049dd23f
54cdbf1e6a549ad072466f2be33329ec693aa9eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
b188f9544f6b7cae2999fe1cdf78c876
474c0ee71dcb2a7c403a991ff13f6c91f796963f
describe
'89791' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
3314c4a1c670c05f0a5afae9430b3494
3ae2988d928826d94e897d4204ae8fee34f8a67d
describe
'40633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
03b71cb433534d4e9ceeddb067c67622
c1351560dd2e5cb03be23ec6564045e1c9c7ba9b
describe
'26941' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
4abf8a27c83649518a5a261d4c09bfc8
bf345ad9e5cdcab6366ad04da7ba080b58bd6cd6
'2011-09-20T16:55:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSER' 'sip-files00082.tif'
68a02cc9f34d7576ec3057d27b25d598
c74bdc69ff7ead7fb30841277e1559e8818e4725
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSES' 'sip-files00082.txt'
7e95b395c38be1c71a1c49fb2387edcc
05775fd1a175eaa01cc28278d16deda58c5d9574
'2011-09-20T16:57:09-04:00'
describe
'6147' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSET' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8b475151c7d3e1be9ddf3bea8a6953f8
61385447d0ad17c1c1ac4775b54f2b59d91f3408
'2011-09-20T17:00:20-04:00'
describe
'724379' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
27b371262b7966f7b09c345c2f6a79cc
c94532fd159f597e3196b49161658688a3afae4f
describe
'96489' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c8809eb26fde31426a8f77d2612d1550
a8c3f999abcd5a87511f148a4be113c0503cfecd
'2011-09-20T16:57:23-04:00'
describe
'2593' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
7d427ae88c055a527cf34a753c61195e
95391e42b82f59267ec162bd14d8320d0b1acaeb
describe
'23376' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
6985989541068725a37e253419a03d18
113cbf13c1b30c60b35d06dbd618c7837717ab52
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
827717c0977425a4b868d8cdc7cdf421
c5681e45de9df870e6bde8015502ec111e895865
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSEZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c000aedecef7cd01d0ff4a714281c434
feba5237b0b4e8b6db5d74b7b883af44a7e9b7f5
describe
'5797' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
52a72de0cd33986e9c0fd300140c4d06
1133505246fc5d7ea7e90b0564fff40617fbe022
describe
'724456' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f941136d752a5b4102e22c08871fa145
3582a9bf5ea9c9064c85fb764972c17bce91ed41
describe
'92667' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
71d7cdd25041c0abcb696f31c6941e39
cc8997fb0e5f9cf4b84f2f637b72cf3ebabb2b46
'2011-09-20T16:58:32-04:00'
describe
'43150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a7c2097d72b5ef60fd9e44875e0a53e2
38c6c664cd01772c42c29aa633d16a1726ac3b7a
describe
'28376' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
9b87b7455d0db6584040c8b081e7b08c
983cc3789e5a90b72a293123ed807fdfb2eef3fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
6564cd9dbad1631bfd6a53e3d79438de
9aa9d0927d7efd984d2cf6fa9c0b9a0ce2c13786
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
78bc45d7894e5aac73ffe4fda50502c5
8453eca482fef6e04673f9a6a208a84764adb259
describe
'6621' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c0f5c12b78ca750879589fe5c92eecbc
4a87bf5ebb30b96f7d6e57582c3a4fc1386cd26d
describe
'724360' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
3301139f476f97e91e844028eae090be
510c9044b1c6572801fbe1476e3ad3760601e9d1
describe
'120797' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e82aeb5cea633fc760727f8b34712e2c
68c7a7281bc9a3be93b321af9991eb5392d8e356
describe
'3107' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
13073141ae1a6cbec94c7c2ff4b59b64
5287c26f97e1186eed57ca4b9a61070b59f8c62f
describe
'29064' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
a7dbe4442055efb25aa03d7f7527ab55
f604ef5158fbdafc349b9ae0743d59fa3880ae18
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
e467f5e5e13a2bbe7c98a7526880a141
888c904f3a1a9d39c8d5794882a8b6e8973d51d6
describe
'157' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
161b3f45ade40c673ecaeda01fe1b944
9443173e9268fcf668df231249fee0a088b3d565
describe
'7029' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
057f307318c197b0f4c1994022d6498a
3ca03b3ce21d377effd99cffdc881cb07d194814
describe
'724837' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
07dd50e633c74424975e9e6d2a677776
4bd98e7033c375e66727ef9ed3a000f74829d3cd
describe
'89334' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
b00b9237c8a285300c5d72f6e0a6f401
f26b2e90df3c041e4e0b79e70e920410f23e3331
'2011-09-20T16:54:55-04:00'
describe
'11976' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
631aaea6aa3514332b170d579a26c15c
ce9295fce34d9cd9be38ea58792498c2a6dee8fe
describe
'23372' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
8e362952f765be094c85bd6a5a5b9937
c976d45fb5f8ac97a9017c28d197c58013b82779
'2011-09-20T16:56:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
d1a5030680573490689167776602e259
24d7730626402368c02bd53fca25bc66b27f3849
'2011-09-20T16:59:28-04:00'
describe
'501' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e7e3f74a8df2e205bf21f52ad52df85e
060936e2e576aa46e131d53ea365d364dd69ca1d
describe
'6102' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
0fc9e73f03700392af9353e8b389a99f
869f402840d985962d440773580f60a613dd749b
describe
'724477' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0198e1de65986e19e1056904da788354
3b12a07226dd043fbf9560ebc937592f75eb8dfa
'2011-09-20T16:59:15-04:00'
describe
'78042' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9b8210ff418e1414aa6b157e84b0b5e0
f4c5c484235b143eb66a9741e2dd916337d345b5
describe
'32373' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
8c4ce2aace1eddb96bae6dfac38fb951
0764a252d09eaabaae59bd08bb601ce966ebbd89
describe
'23859' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSFZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
f506ec927638b668a5263b14fca92868
e64982d749016558583f4c8fbc482fbda8bb82a0
'2011-09-20T16:59:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
919c9d4df5345e99cc8244bbfb7a7f5e
3541a6be47e87fb15c5ed406d095c25ef8332da2
'2011-09-20T16:55:46-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
aff6e5744844d2aaa9337a4c6055700b
e6a9ebd8b1658ce11854bea288c6835171f7a19c
describe
'5990' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8d2e32cb3b3e80585e6bf4a3a96fbc5d
a83f54f341f4edbfad7d161b991f17a880ff2672
describe
'724640' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
896cba46d26259865c4ef74286325061
1c4bfc29d761dda0ad7251e4e6a1ccbb42240bef
describe
'72374' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0d66e34a338417a13043a91fd2bd2d03
d7557b9c18e7086a28392617512c44de6075b2d9
describe
'13788' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
b1a85e783096cbcb946de9df24f80c3d
587fee4b3828e593b9683edf2a426a8c0f768375
'2011-09-20T16:58:12-04:00'
describe
'18717' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4a44b14f6cd8a39f5418fca3b05b03dc
4426c666dcdb04b3df8f1154d48a49532487aabc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5cb377d09f83c0fa03607c19434f600c
dfdff90f51803cc9eb25523da74448fded990fe7
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a579b143f4bb13362140dc32081255fa
d6750b18bc0ef0243466e0fde8dea2aab724f74d
describe
'4698' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
d736f6cc021ca44a44630a0424664a54
60cba9d151b5cdfd22b72bbb2da70465fdfe2f1f
describe
'724213' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
4f66f9654314407c65e390604d482fc3
606abcd692ee9478b4ff2c0e71647b508df6acce
describe
'113354' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
bae928cf49a3da0173ca5d9c7d7e8f52
bbce51d4eedb527844c7e68d67a239c986e98212
describe
'24654' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
a8dad9a8830b21c7f06b2d038ac347f0
1c7d93b0bceb8269cd60a08147caf01485c23ab1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
2d91d092d0dccfdc46e085427519807f
d25402e997260786d7906703aa5f82c739734d00
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGO' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
c83d3e43d251e743c6d7282a5ea4c7ae
b31c0a625a1ac30c3154a53d95630f5395da978d
describe
'724735' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGP' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
15c38a501efa9927ca732522cbf45035
45decf80cf392b93ac792acedc0c0c0886d02e00
describe
'98537' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
400d14555219bc079f1b5fc8784aa965
3c88937b16c080639d582bb6b5a8ae960ad41396
describe
'46740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGR' 'sip-files00090.pro'
28efae70695d00fe8826ab2cc9538bf8
c83d61ded917548da895fdfab68f4760294e9ccf
describe
'29183' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGS' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
55158cf9edd9130ee7929c2769f51ac4
a2703c0aa637a70df1a5e44b9a134c4b402854dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
174bfabb2c680fd4f4c4f5529e1dbd1c
991c4abd243ffaefc072771cdaa50810135df17f
'2011-09-20T16:56:53-04:00'
describe
'1885' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGU' 'sip-files00090.txt'
52ec382d13e058a34f19e17ca1ef2e96
4a25b6708711d00ef66d4bd57319b09a42d62052
describe
'6790' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0b6e465fc5774aff52475f7c4d9eee75
1cbbab1de9aba257ac23256d7c025ca7a5614606
describe
'724487' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5f48f70fd684f40a0d54370dfbb66d0c
5a780626efa09304dd3f5dc638c0ed9e2d796656
describe
'80710' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGX' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
4f339e615bb8bfd45bcf3915195f1509
1c74c426da6691d45833a249da12e878dbb8a62b
describe
'29609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGY' 'sip-files00091.pro'
1af63d202ae042ddcf6baa92f0296bc6
edcd78c998735558a4949d10b35a25ee6c22dbd4
describe
'24057' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSGZ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e08470cd2f2c912066a750527be9686a
749c30e35758fa2e4537825d99143b798b28a0d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHA' 'sip-files00091.tif'
7a4cf28914e32cab0c25697c95b76e17
30805a59d4272de2ca63ea57a07f32ddfac08573
'2011-09-20T16:56:11-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
bf2a09ad161c43a9aa8a2555787e8ac8
4b932f4609e3d7479b62f8ea30b519b92e22eba4
describe
'6045' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHC' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
4c744f998c501a364b82f8b3fbea5dd0
d8b7d689d752998ebcc69e8f277b5c95799a20c9
describe
'724798' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHD' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
a5bc5d38dc6fa5c6159bc7de5170f835
710176b82e242442062c3bb96209cc54b31840e1
describe
'97964' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHE' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
436dfd4785ccaf59f1a6bf75af6fa37c
08da14bc9f200694d771d811cdc937598c18eef8
'2011-09-20T16:59:11-04:00'
describe
'24352' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
12b29ecc729a180a21161dbb0dff518c
672a43d72e52c2ab26963d111912ed0b8cda7257
describe
'26601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
699479e42be165ad3e37c2651415e398
30a34b8d5346ae9ed70c2bd7495daaab18340821
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
12e0286aaf0ecca3f4a1eff27e84ee84
66eef58f3bfc6929ce96a96944a0a1b4a4b2cfbc
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
11b634b0f87eb8f636cc758501c13229
a4e66e4c0d31d8c8f40d3503b6a3c5ab3ba77857
describe
Invalid character
'6466' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
ca4c304e03e5f3ddb328d79779ca33c9
8c38a1a68a7cc1bd96e4bdb561aae4d72aa16c35
describe
'724444' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
3dcb39af686c800cdafddaa4e9e6bb78
7e84b5d310eeb853c20de16631e3b7d196d78e7b
'2011-09-20T17:00:49-04:00'
describe
'129190' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHL' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f46ec6ba982e6066e4a341ccc3c42d53
89ec3ea54b42f1fe3c30285c085fe353ed2ec638
describe
'2110' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
2abe23b42e9efa30a118c539ce2470fe
2de8c2a46825e3fea2846456cd00627a3acd8b10
'2011-09-20T16:57:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
33ee839e334d0434c6970fdb93598032
755e0523153ca9ab1e4ba5a142a556f058463076
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
b33a6b7c957267b9901cd63a0e685e19
01f3ac77438254e3da27c74305d7c6702fd36add
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
2e93525890c4180c38f610dc5d90d817
b587c8206322d1d5067830ee9c1b99619b472c4e
'2011-09-20T17:00:22-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6798' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
759d66345cb7bf24126b875c00999245
b64ed332f5b34f3c692c353bbe7b11b887c06b35
describe
'715080' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
3e2dcb3aa5e8cec813c206a02a08374d
77f187d9ac814239a5ef4174a4e78b0c0781217b
describe
'90237' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
9b696627b68ccbf655e16267a03e43dc
40ce12b926e32e9482c66bb23e0c5deb0954dc8b
describe
'31652' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f3c2bfbd013b0078547d0933ea674da2
4bf47c7ad8599014a7451813fd6f95dbe5290b89
describe
'25683' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHU' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c6ded3db9a405a51ea96992e7e9f52ba
3fe866c3e6b2caa388e9a525c22ee2d903c32932
'2011-09-20T16:58:24-04:00'
describe
'5737076' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
7af9a7e52c85670bda691a52d5b34d19
f3b5e34ab654d3c66738d48b4fcf4a5b4058f1ff
'2011-09-20T16:57:10-04:00'
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHW' 'sip-files00094.txt'
cae73adddcc6eafaa83bc400a566f052
89bbe327217ca8fe52cdde347496deaae356f40c
describe
'6496' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
76f1fe3664965e8663c7186b63011d98
ba1330916019136a3bbf979d2f93325f1b60777d
describe
'724440' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHY' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
f67a11b0294d4d0014b21753254bc3a8
4c083bca6b3422d0910dbc7fa8355d1f0b8e45ef
describe
'89358' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSHZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
9452856b06159db72d86c34a1a755980
d0e553695aec24f9267509e1a22bae9d04643933
describe
'23789' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
2f366cc5b3d57e2a4a5eb366d6f47cda
c482b42ec9a951873179655345c848a25e73fbcf
describe
'24925' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
686665fd73ef532f5ae6c5ac837af1fd
381c6c1b5cf066a68bf87b1ab1435a20e1464736
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
6f9444b2713f6ae701e11b2397bf4cc4
6ece2aa1ed7ca34193c51bfc68b52b4342f68a98
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSID' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f40b6b70ea09d1a5a93716dea30fa246
84c7872e2682815f5754b3420b6c5cf8e1d5be3c
describe
'6217' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIE' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
04735f1fa1d0c87f6d749f08296d22c0
df50e2cd59e3422eb9c8dd3bc34d3bfa04e050c6
'2011-09-20T17:00:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIF' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
7a63d571a7881497a6f128b9ae9b692f
10c2429fa7aa3d7851c0c443a86c015708795931
describe
'104001' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
6db4b9fd18b40d04f3d3cc01dd3f7f2f
32759372e34fbbb6cbcf33a3b0c320f72fbc3715
describe
'37658' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIH' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e8ba12536cb09b7208b43959b868bedb
45ac69045e595571c660547178e30b660359ba3f
describe
'28061' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSII' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
bafcf879901d45bc11acc778f1c707b7
2da344619d8f617e63d274baff3da0bb47b2aad5
'2011-09-20T16:58:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7e255d6921d26a4ea08e74bf69c171d3
50c5b9ed5e2fa187549b36e7d068a4bda135639c
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIK' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fcfb2fe0184f01c2dfaf43aebdeb46e1
0f81954e5a356e7ce68ca94643b6a9a59f529397
describe
'6815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIL' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
518d30b8a03bccfa20503395a457e159
a2fd58d5a573b6f909bf113689706f642b748ad4
describe
'724405' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIM' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ffc6ac11245223e2b3962a1ebdfc8557
1982e044176712dc248e4e38e0622c5cc057c6fa
'2011-09-20T16:58:14-04:00'
describe
'58238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIN' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
bd8f986cf5d7c91363902791e1c545aa
e8d4492b03b77ae678a7acc9146f073ba2a560e6
describe
'22442' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIO' 'sip-files00097.pro'
359dc26d834c525b1dee233a61236073
787592cbacac5afd728a6cb55827dac3bd8bc49f
describe
'16686' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIP' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
eb339812d2bc7e11b33b22be12ad24bc
ca02c78163ae1624ff6dba4937a09f53d146fb3d
'2011-09-20T16:56:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIQ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
6c06fc45e85ca13479ba8ae1688ccea5
88ae76c63b6ec131d68398917462d6014740d6f4
'2011-09-20T16:59:32-04:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
3f9564f84f1f7cb2ff88397c5ba7c94e
f4f9b5b3bb42012e7da27b4bde84938499ad06ae
describe
'4219' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIS' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
4ab294f2c9f0be95a0e3937d35f4ae35
f0245c1a96ca0b641ef1be510ca262cee1e992bc
describe
'724817' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIT' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6f1b498e8e02071b7f19bc81242a8c7d
82a3a852734bcab37a95ec0e9f11e6bbe29f98b3
describe
'89209' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
8b42e9540dcbe1fc56cb4ccd2c4e70be
1e1abcff6f1043b14a9aec3bb5527d385cccd753
describe
'29014' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIV' 'sip-files00098.pro'
e0ec6753638e403c8cd2858de9457e01
137046e65d15e794f938b4d5d9fd68da15903312
describe
'25501' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIW' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9c9385eb0a0f2763e937499876ea0501
2a8b7e1b2e9f1bdc002ed55e4926d49a0b411a2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIX' 'sip-files00098.tif'
048c5d29252d001e12ae7362b0c0078d
2313580da51b94b8dab408c6e4bc1f70161e5afa
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
0140df4ec870324b304236a63a6627e6
8e4609c6321d29c9975d327e26a132486ae300c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSIZ' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
acea0e7e231eac22ddb5c6f86526404c
b6bb3cac0fb23e3a5bbed57b3719693efd4b67fd
describe
'724435' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJA' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
483c61f8ce727a7c41f48f291ce5bf44
b6ab0baed9e8acf6023410362c2dd5ddc0f31d85
'2011-09-20T16:58:35-04:00'
describe
'107842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJB' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
4ede70bee55c3125e3a309c79c945c0a
7ad51dfb1ab9d59d5771b9a568269da312d98561
'2011-09-20T16:57:30-04:00'
describe
'30700' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJC' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8898357287a404b19aeb2b1c42af5e68
f111cb49e10b7ba6081ff1ff7faf052ea91703a0
describe
'28890' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJD' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
669e0444ed46d28573459a897c5c3968
4178ed2021b9e08c5a717da8c24fac40c8160f29
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJE' 'sip-files00099.tif'
fa07343fc8e7176d3c170c6634ae9efd
d76f44846a25a7566c0fdaf49ca0a4a8516cb723
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJF' 'sip-files00099.txt'
bb1cc44ec3112c73cd8f8dff4087cc15
43d2cc20e12d84cc4e59c9f568440899b9f6bdc6
describe
'6834' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJG' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
004fe0fada9af0532efb5093ae42236f
04373327324ad95b0d7812e463d8724056ff509a
'2011-09-20T16:55:02-04:00'
describe
'724463' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJH' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
0c86b6e4d24f1ed47702974f40f2680b
114abaa12a0db4572f0b57a288c21530616c0917
describe
'68844' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJI' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
58f46796980ef873f0f3c7e55669159e
97806958c40eefc6618cf4b8966cef07415a4dc5
'2011-09-20T17:00:47-04:00'
describe
'22358' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
7252162c56d6e0f9ed4ec7c30496e8ac
3c444bf7c44230a38070f37359a6191bd4017f74
describe
'19464' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJK' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
84a373538ac1d94be208df1858804818
9e47448fe4e559e70becf60a9157a7d00205c286
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJL' 'sip-files00100.tif'
6061aefae425edea6d781326aaa75d36
e055b8c0ec9d0dfb05a1d6eeed793c026cf31a1a
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5fc52e73a2d95af44615a55806e9a249
bc0c585c405447f9d7240787fc03727c2c9d0d9f
describe
'4746' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
21498d7d06b0500031af04ee4eb3e4df
c05ab964d8ded456f5195ed1a492909f6ef1296f
describe
'724467' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJO' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8c13c91983cef3f3e18a33f04a437e3e
71d1a7416dab6a5828e99e7dbd9bb875e519aa3d
describe
'128224' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
664c267d4d7890206d913a9f7595cd23
06ef3354aa8e2831e22addf83e4d12b58ff3c16e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJQ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
1fa7febc4c0c1c87c089604e5c0951dd
3246a03da9fec3784906e850e4bc9a754114b7bb
describe
'27894' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJR' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
b62a743d173efd3608cf76b1905776c3
60fe26c129d64161fb6287c72dbe8aab00469d50
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJS' 'sip-files00101.tif'
984ce2e0172b834ced2462a3ce77970b
89b9da06ea3ab9453ce5b02273a7229aaa8ab0e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJT' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2cbf5b4ece43460a4ce76e5eaf6e9653
96f6d684181ca1abc2ee72e8fe29ea8dbaac4319
describe
'6280' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJU' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
5c0cd9e94097a3581c30d0413901089e
c02d02283a51665d8e7c54ed48113bb87e0ca65f
describe
'724452' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJV' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
013e2d33a4a26b681279fef0fef6f567
24ae2219ef332020a94f71520af2dd1dec42fa50
'2011-09-20T16:55:00-04:00'
describe
'87447' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJW' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
daf9f18ec98bcb5753d149c5b26fba4d
d4b10e5831ab9a65d5c787ee03e7daa684746104
describe
'27756' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJX' 'sip-files00102.pro'
178552736f0aaa1b5ea1ca3d1c0447ee
dd4bc1e4689b055ad8b332ce53cc0eec12f9ac81
describe
'24150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJY' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7a291f9e738f06e51117128302e7f949
22451d6bfc9e71cbc24be83911d3dbd077744a88
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSJZ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
795f8ac68a29e27be40f1c4caa9a2276
726a47ad5b9b2a3210cba67e104c6e6b3b89c98c
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKA' 'sip-files00102.txt'
83fc86145f94bf3a462af952c987bdd0
a410d38c247b75dea4f84f83ad1328693284387f
describe
'6114' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKB' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
83b0126d8e2aa1197c8433580325fb82
57fb376b71e0a9f60a557887b6878ce730b795a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKC' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
fcd89c76c8a6d2dde9dd61ff1f826181
e7c67dc05486dad0d65c9fd9ab543df7447d72e5
describe
'104025' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKD' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c1e590bdc0edf5c966fe1653f9702029
07a03cc717114adfd4e29a2e6ab6cfa81f21743d
describe
'37647' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKE' 'sip-files00103.pro'
2e95391d31b3ab2b436208595bd0c62f
7ca4b5633eb08ff33b8bfcdbd060631606ae7332
'2011-09-20T16:59:12-04:00'
describe
'29138' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKF' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
274a7bb8e171cbd45b622e0cfe08cb51
68e4cef1e0deae3798e6d5436a90c30c467638b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKG' 'sip-files00103.tif'
dd2158831c5b8560cd00ee04f6b2cfcb
1d2a5acd7ebc0d8a1f2b2b209d64d63b65524aa5
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKH' 'sip-files00103.txt'
9708f81c4ee9ec29c861a3b582cf71c7
640d90d5324e04d53bad8fff865f37566cdb7c80
describe
'7031' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKI' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
4f61d405a22c92f5c0477089b16979a4
d33b14444da35949f10542e7543b259519dda6b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e8b496d5854091e03302a06ed2188653
3edc62ac118aa71dc4711af781e30cc1c49d9f65
describe
'86073' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKK' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
f8e8ed69785673eec719bbce452b246e
a0a388c9d3cd7ed32007039307214a6a4e06dd22
describe
'23380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKL' 'sip-files00104.pro'
05efc8ed61a11698da4c5207a01a4c97
ef8c8cfe2a30cbd6dcddf0228a383ce6a026d7cc
'2011-09-20T17:00:24-04:00'
describe
'24056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKM' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
ca6f9f7fea2e2c660f6bd40d5e1bd5e6
eaa7bb9a264325c330fc346557259241a7524963
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKN' 'sip-files00104.tif'
cc1ba0e5fc781e4f16b629b2d09a9a60
f3cab1614a87b0a7e396e13cd3c2a88f06b48567
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKO' 'sip-files00104.txt'
4801854c30218d8dfa1ca29a765ae001
c10de7a37a23c8b714acdc917ab752e324b14cd5
describe
'6010' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKP' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
815be43dae92c2db3b545868956e91c7
b0601738933b066c412127f4bda301d2114d61f0
describe
'724438' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKQ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
3911c597f746516a9b2331a7cc3a0a9b
1431cce3bb92fb624882aacc790a86e048233708
describe
'140329' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKR' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1b40254277cbb2d4eec1e02b7de73ac7
500ba68840187920e24c5c49dcdc3529189b24e5
describe
'2448' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKS' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0d9267221c7acc52a729571ba00a9191
5a2ccabd14e301c0577cffbf84cc403a59e3596d
describe
'31443' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKT' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
19ef2cc85575e6b615f1f5b932864028
42c019b63ddf1a7925d4bd308a7dc29eb63fe864
'2011-09-20T16:57:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKU' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e0cbb3635bafac5871eaaecffd0c1df8
ace9452854b656b1be1f5793ff63997ba8807b1b
'2011-09-20T16:55:35-04:00'
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKV' 'sip-files00105.txt'
1c4dd197717cb89f7e68e75a8cb77a38
3a1adf4958c13bdecedfbf243b760ae8bf227ff0
describe
Invalid character
'7197' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKW' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2f2fa907e2d86542adf500afcfd44d1f
f0541014868bc69087931b41595d55c208a4ef33
describe
'724800' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKX' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
19d6fd7ee9a615ff466673e628bf926c
f2596f7d41a964e2759685772c349e89cd44e6d9
describe
'87332' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKY' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
de29a15df40c73c4cef2065c20cb96ec
e75599b9f36baf1df08cb34d68d6ffb3f86e2cb9
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSKZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
92b208b5834fc8ad480c82ac2c8fc5df
b8a4584ae0c839bbdaf5c3841d43fc1c3ef8b040
describe
'24218' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
79b416d4edbaf71db4e42fb57fda7548
bfec38c9011c782aa05bcfcce8d645a03f180615
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
bdaa8eb5841787c2690eb89ff56e13de
7ba13391615d923165482e70c1e56d55a4caf9c4
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
39ebde3b81f192249c5ca0eff6c5206b
e9a47ae150625d55943b4607d6fb7fb83c0ccad1
describe
'5901' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
25117df5736cc644a39d6b3425894805
b1687a7427bdec9ed451eddb73a35cfc14ac59ca
describe
'724433' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
7e8ab150e1c350d02a3cf8662194eed6
4d7a66cc147a609be5b2c0ab696e66fb16d698b4
describe
'101367' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
149d9c137c3300c5b944fd9765f1f64e
6ae08292817b070d9c3315776bff06f03861f102
describe
'40839' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLG' 'sip-files00107.pro'
ff8b389355d3b10fcc40db6444838a1d
b8d91154c06f846a02cfe0e28251a268cdf80e75
describe
'28764' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLH' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f33cff248a94e9eb090e0ab5b87a8886
98d9e5b85ce382608a2a9f3d6c9eced9079b26d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
847ba3c3fb002f58e2b7ad33e5b456b8
83a2e0b7cc95ffcb08f0a6fe243454a22a5d9b65
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
dc8479962a38da9e5903d0f7bc7d481c
c2a8cf1659f834097e00433ff2cde32f07286192
describe
'6860' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
3d09849cb1c8629e259c3adca4386ca2
00ee3c606b8cfeaf72e5917d623a744fb5dbcde4
describe
'724645' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
55d84e824ba33a6980c226e726849868
3194029feafd923c5cd59f15f719a77e7e44c0f6
describe
'80050' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
4b5d7c852d452a54bcee2e126ec8ffb9
22ab9deb622de294de1db4261ccb8f67e85b7eab
describe
'21929' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLN' 'sip-files00108.pro'
fc9fa756a79624191891b9df0661de8a
e8125aa529f74bba0cae3bb92ea7396ae6a0903c
'2011-09-20T16:57:00-04:00'
describe
'23004' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLO' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
703f378fe4e2578a16026c2ae2446a86
85abea57c145c491a1b85f1f539e1c5807029ee5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLP' 'sip-files00108.tif'
e0cc04d78a55e49ab95aed08c612827f
2b152318bee2779886a1195aff3b747887d18b4c
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
a394797c3efe218efe711e7c4690735b
bd38a71c7944eb18260f916249f70e379c0e367a
describe
'5524' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
20a08388718f20e498cf937c5aea26a4
2b2c5fd5858cf94fea204403508c89f3679d21c8
describe
'724764' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0da37d52787a9f3be0d1cf50ce8a7bac
2af8a624c19661fea76a2b8b54942aa3d6209f3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e33ebcd3d01b43dbd5c6083691170f42
5db9437d394e6ed364aa25c3e33a89a040b23cff
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f965af2ede4c09ea40b5307d914555d9
65c2741ce900bcdcb62b6cabd58f2b5fbaa96dba
describe
'26065' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c54da6043a9df4ba73842c7b2535ca4c
4ba24b1e055fbff3b3c73267aa1dc4295114df2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f23176107bce8e7310094fc4a9239476
dba7ae595f5f59551f09632f610d0c762739cf47
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
522285ac5db9a61b9eef20ae395c1ec9
6fd776a4ec630f5cb85480928966e2b3243b80bf
describe
'6235' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
819db9049b6709b053ac3f77eb7f9437
a31590cf4288a0bc821ca443308f0aaa9715109f
describe
'724814' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSLZ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
eca9dbdb242b789274e3d1baebb5b345
422a6a0e510f089365121e700d49fc0052416a82
describe
'97936' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
3bf9e5c53ae3c1d8838de42ade8b20b5
8fc6bc546d2293777285a55e52b22fc18f8492fb
describe
'29197' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMB' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e164d1767555eae19746a2294be7a539
90eda4351e9e735f2536cac661bea1247f9ca792
describe
'26302' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cb0de4606186b1587e0bb186493647c9
b2745b6d70fae51ef59e07ca55a915e88c3dd70d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMD' 'sip-files00110.tif'
ea08518e03215fa6e0b6917ff0e57271
bf19bb831d46743530d860730afd13ac9b16f99a
'2011-09-20T17:00:35-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSME' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8dd1f0d4c5c2f3250edc9bd68ef2ebd3
41e9b471400ce5bf0baf822b4eaa53e685706f11
describe
'6659' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMF' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8c43337e8e8a913e051cbc7723dbe006
c36afa56dd1493ea7985e1c2dc9c11c0f3ea77bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMG' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
7b75c5dada5c2854229ebdabbee9e098
33969751a99e9fe3abcfef57ca9a7e416b918101
describe
'99349' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
9878120cc6fb261c930a6779315808ea
539c798a6fa20a9278502ab91aa11c32bbc38efb
describe
'37922' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMI' 'sip-files00111.pro'
b892f260475c780efaa7478f2d7a6964
fd6c2afbdf982a7833a647d8813524b7d9dbe6d0
describe
'28424' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMJ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
2ffe0e3917243b95cf5c5defa192b9f9
14a08fe2da283b9d126dbfb63a4abcbe0cbe9933
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMK' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1f10883c7c0afff10622a2f339056152
9f18750a860037db5a75427d816f5ebe33cd0d3e
describe
'1907' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSML' 'sip-files00111.txt'
1b792785f484fb1627919ce5967b58b9
9e6f287886323c86442545ea8a2f005eb7cf8888
describe
'6851' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMM' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
56ccfff5399964da41d8b28f190e5497
d155c84e8a26db131e3b2ac173ed39df300c80d1
describe
'724453' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMN' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
d2a7d8606f3c22c060b4e7e813bbac83
c98e96f461a4d569670bda9c75305913617ac5c2
describe
'94356' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMO' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b93d8ad6460213d1e831527bec573aa7
73fbf6fdf4cb06ad2399271784c8bf0b199c752a
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
fb4699255035b851e8769a13fc1206c3
b1d46a040859e9b6dd629fd25ba9fc1c28fb49aa
describe
'26680' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMQ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
3b88a254c028b8dd0bac830071dd1a29
3b1ccf0715f7d7d641f23b52f632f4a153cfebb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMR' 'sip-files00112.tif'
22ddd130ab6c840352de7720424f9f5a
8a42f09eab3988da4c5a0d8de21f699bc79d636f
'2011-09-20T16:54:47-04:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMS' 'sip-files00112.txt'
5e3bbb8426c35c52072ff2816a1c1bcb
85e6ef5429a2e4fb7764249e7a4e5731ac1c4b4c
describe
'6618' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMT' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cd7ccb8e426768de38085925512e6b60
44aa588a068bdf6268002d53fcaf86a2a9a8a85d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMU' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b7a7b437753073a5d194f20fd2466e05
33dbb842454cf8f164e8daa665c840503c93d362
describe
'106140' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMV' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
6b9315303cb124581c0f1f589283dd16
54dfa0f5c82cdfe8998961aeac8555f7ead395e0
describe
'31299' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMW' 'sip-files00113.pro'
bb07468e22cf66957d10a022cea8b51d
006e6e30b84b784da377fc0b73d75c900bb8239d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMX' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
e3f22472f3c0e8a12a197c1fce9eeabe
53f150165c7c54e0659f48c6d7452d93561b54ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
91e0da4321f17e2522a95b744ed7a5fc
f2917373dba9b262d4377601737f69b5561041dd
describe
'1954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSMZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e7157ebe672776379253ef51ffa86114
c64387653e7e3ec99e1f9486faf34b879c162a89
describe
'6968' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNA' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
7646056621ec11184ebbf86008f2d35d
70fcf25f451471e32a63a099883055298b5eacf0
describe
'724734' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
1d3da23c1b1a863b350928135ce039d1
30278b0a7a159392d149554a17cc22a7c0338025
describe
'95334' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
f58cf745b98c7653962e51808ffb7f52
47c3953786842850afaecc30093002e9fb1468da
'2011-09-20T16:57:38-04:00'
describe
'40318' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSND' 'sip-files00114.pro'
41b337402bc58d1ae494153ceb507ee5
8ba0408f3cdda5a0d4411c3d2b25a544dc877274
describe
'28026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b4c1c538cfe55195b33475e30ab1a8ea
447256e14655a7796d91f6c46baba900a37c56ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
197bc404e2f56dbaa1abaf9e548788ce
1227f28bad7bff6976d11e70bd8b6179d1d948ca
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
56ce205385d44625a1450c22bc3b9a62
1a10c72a10ce40501ebf1f59e081013565226e0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNH' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
f034bd103884b6734bd7cabc3da8dc4d
abdb9129a2e38e07e9a0c71f2ed04878028676d7
'2011-09-20T16:55:17-04:00'
describe
'724261' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
c3266a800014ca8f8dff05a5085d517d
f751195f313abb342216578fc37fe466be8ca2f0
describe
'142847' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
017591ec7f4b6ce462c2dbd7179ea0c4
0913ebea428a3d338ec0ba93401a0665f66361f0
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNK' 'sip-files00115.pro'
78d9898f0c1150aa071a4492f2d26536
eed4eeb6337af7139932a79c8643a4d41db79c84
describe
'32504' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNL' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
3dd8077f3940adaef1ce7b23c4edd780
58855ddbe5acad960653372f39810b6cfea3d34d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
82fd759df3db828572b6b7987c4071c5
4e9c554d039d38e860c4816f3a454d6867346e16
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNN' 'sip-files00115.txt'
50fdd25bf507b2ccf745dbc021358069
8431fa7c75c7d8d9e6875857ffca8cf7814b5063
describe
Invalid character
'7713' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNO' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
266996889f864e4439a898d3ec67b2c5
ba757cd0d0caffdcf95af86e4312ba66ce6ab293
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
3e5a22a66b6bbe5141497016abb21278
5ef749226685153b610b54982c81812ccb6e0507
describe
'89097' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
c6b7b94c377d9b74f1899f8531fb5e6d
f5436a4f9a8e5bee3e3be775bcaa756aac74cb7a
describe
'32988' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNR' 'sip-files00116.pro'
660ad0dee95a601569c4d83f12b21cf5
9b8c8e069761957125357eaacb1831496887145f
describe
'25869' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
16bba1173cff8a10fe4f05238982d68a
ad3442df74d54b5f0ac7a3e64bf88bb13364d3c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
6e58008c5a8d3ad4e926d21a685c245f
7c0b2206b5ee1e702ca9a6a28f24d790d9222bf5
'2011-09-20T17:00:30-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNU' 'sip-files00116.txt'
bb330c77cbb8f9f6f3a01d7104e59c44
7ec5d77e3d4c32be0f479cc90ced6290e24685fb
describe
'6635' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNV' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
33b151fc847ca044ac7ffd25d7012fbe
56bbc33b0b534c9c4459f80c3bd9c75bbb543d9d
describe
'724476' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
da961f61a7876da7bc6889fd6b0a437a
b6e8f8dd0bbe4003d461c6a43a5dc17ce162b77a
describe
'74865' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
dab072dbca799f9148a2515531d603d6
ed570815124ecd0908bd8775a1bcfad0f002a784
describe
'30402' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNY' 'sip-files00117.pro'
39b3476f6b1335097477395c377d70d3
a878bbb25fd193f3d20900df182db7d111e95053
describe
'22379' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSNZ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d4e08def277461c747275d720e57bd2c
18f8829067755cf5495c7bea6ff081cec5a46311
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOA' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2bee8da29d8e811407d7ce777a71193a
79a7c9fc0b450338b7a9dc2eeda3611a12b8ace3
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOB' 'sip-files00117.txt'
59c50a58aba9dd58ea650d0ecc97981d
0c3758e5d71c0bd43194a6cb86b2ae3c08f406ba
describe
'5712' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOC' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
72529d0fa340dda91c538df482ab185e
e60047422567f9ad669bb37eb5c2232e39e343df
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
74d154ac2b49222ae9257cd0275940c1
bb789803a1693021375ae577a99529f1ed14aae8
'2011-09-20T16:59:05-04:00'
describe
'96175' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
f2a138c1551ced037034aec49cec712b
d3c8c192b7e4f3bcf35b3e8a5644caf18c90b675
describe
'39007' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
53ef21458e4be5bf8d9353ff8c3c9ee5
a601b9c30cda9aba6460f00dd34e0142025bb1ab
describe
'27779' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
4557b0a9b132df3154b91da1a87c2f0d
c8b65ff6a11319eca0a61aba446d782a7e531de6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
a09649a6f4163bb16f5ad04845db31f5
af38f2171340b0aa92e267f11be75cb7a75cecd7
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
baf3733f6b969e88b0daac43f5f5f8fa
adad4445b15db66b98846e6b2c2acb61fe02bd9b
describe
'6549' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
2de4f7478ec46fa3cd31d7d85ec731ef
dd595cb2b9f694b2d2fe035180ccc61ef38f419c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
08f61db5793335f7ced241992aa02a80
df3b18e217b71dec45c043d5f069218bda3d0e07
describe
'122474' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
24317887a480f32c8b9492b87c49d9ef
cd15c8694eceb4b7bc9852a447df8d3658471451
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
bc301cfeb3741f2b61a892dda5354354
a7cfbcd83cba1ae80041b15de8ece3714ae2d928
describe
'28115' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSON' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1e6214a13dce0762bf075d900d56fe6e
c0c576fd7d29c6745439e0cbaab282bd12cce26d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d33f96d0441c0aed93312cd82594d283
2e34aaf94901d07705881a8709268819dfc65d3d
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
fbf1c2a47127f22e2a8a1376eae840a8
fc71841a739bf9f1f852591203327155c3f13200
describe
'6688' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
ffd5ce22a173957ddd080b0231a148b3
f6d7630d701f0f77917f454320deab4422922289
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOR' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
04af9a0a0d69ffaf0e65a5381a5c95d3
c7e184666fea3587e458dbd6f07cd1f011a5b867
describe
'102934' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
e04e77b5d643dd6f2e14cc22ecf76f0c
51f2a482677ae91285470d83c713e600b42fa66c
'2011-09-20T16:57:48-04:00'
describe
'19916' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOT' 'sip-files00120.pro'
226b514f9302d09c5b77fcb0fdaec803
58c0629bd4249b89c6f3036152c6360bbea31e8d
describe
'26811' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOU' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e9c24f57a1f680c20a291db2ba69e3c3
9b7a905a372954b07fdaf956855f176a5ff60be3
'2011-09-20T16:59:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d9b20c9f6c01ef29766148d4221605a8
68c9b6518285be398284781e94ec5622184a1225
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
3c16f7d9ec97a27c8a8b19b2db17d79e
1e4228076e987e09a3404e7e698c408227d4fcdb
describe
'6573' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
6140ecbdd57a800a6d725e69f2a70d2a
f7c9a1434f5d81e197c82ff9ec37cd6aa3ad9c6b
describe
'724380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
edf00875631c1bc1e5d047a48145a1f1
0eb61a8b797313be9ca49d9bc2df681cf68f8609
describe
'95484' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSOZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6cb413aed65305ccf6f0a79ca91558ba
7fe6ad6390f39ef6f361a2a8d66e8204c1b83298
describe
'45452' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1fca3ea167fa63dd2fa673a0d1f1ecfe
8227d930eb067375c8ef37aa7166b3617e5ce9c7
describe
'29576' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPB' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
68bccbc36e6d309427dc14b65427c9fd
cd4c61791aa9a0c0f2d8e3eabc6c26f91228a376
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPC' 'sip-files00121.tif'
d952c71a11b7c55c1e1c44a307d21b1e
904b0960bd0228e7aaac3c227172c10203dca7e8
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
bb78ef27cc64bb3a5aecf05a4a653bcc
02637acf259fb6adc3d61879a4c49ff9f4487ff2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
e848806ae8917abb5a4396b0065b9c1c
26b15b561222cdaca1fb6f8339c983e1fe72b337
describe
'724796' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPF' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a840e8937e348754d231df2e1a762c4e
88313a14dc58970c8790b5ba326ffce8a8ff5a4d
describe
'98283' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPG' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
474285d646f691b7ce3e2e96efb76416
51e94760ec40a310dc7cc203ba126d9d614422eb
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
69576f882cc748c04fb4cfb251dcf1c6
9d9638829f7a015db8b88404c2f141f784a7e9a1
describe
'23056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPI' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
fd13087fbc75b2aaba96596be61a89f6
2830e2599051f08a365b2f2472fbe92273225ab8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPJ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ff830bace5c40aba6ecdbeab4c34d269
fc8a3bffa420705326fdc3b93a03081d6e05b32b
'2011-09-20T16:59:20-04:00'
describe
'259' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPK' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b339d343694c9af490cb077ee082cb2e
5087f74f89e79cbde91d71e0d44426ed1f76f00c
describe
Invalid character
'5740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPL' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
eba514b2be7bf889ea28dfad8a03c735
3fb7ae7ea639cbd22e2dd416fec61a6c7c2d5602
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPM' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
1b2b74a32c1268b95ccd12aa8d7a352e
09d39849c1e4ebff075ef91729ea53fe42241a0b
describe
'85798' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
e5f2c9baff81084f6b38bafcd41ea474
789c59914fe0d3e324a125cb6bcd9f0c5d051a74
describe
'20828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPO' 'sip-files00123.pro'
c650e024ae920ff229b8a351ca2db236
704fd01cbf3aec0e77c2e627cd8090ab62f988a6
describe
'23744' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPP' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1062d92641873cdac42e6691390dc48b
22a4e2d4690ac6441ba84cde3f55759564af1464
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
08c11f80a391d8bf6f3b8ec9ed077bf1
7b61fa98858c04662465446daa31685b3bb6ed9f
describe
'879' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPR' 'sip-files00123.txt'
472f62d882d276327b9a3b0e42b5a501
77ea24d46eac557115aa7055d9b250af715a2c65
'2011-09-20T16:57:47-04:00'
describe
'6086' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPS' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
787dc89baaf9c1fc9ac2fe1624c05c79
28a496fdb184cd6b83f945abbd6e57cad75c475c
describe
'724755' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPT' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
66a5f0e958cbc3282f11040c1e261ec0
02332bee25874b186981ff96c25ea647cc9be4ad
describe
'94344' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
43b4e349e4c0cf42c9dbf6f69a90325b
70b5a4f2142d777fcadb5e3017ebbfa383ba745d
describe
'25587' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPV' 'sip-files00124.pro'
98634632c82d6571633f81c76e5de23b
8414b68593c010a5097c39be553e52025b7a8124
describe
'25941' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPW' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
0eb36420b109a630e619cd881c1ff1b0
4745c3b12de12349bac2952dc2daa3fa8d2f075a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPX' 'sip-files00124.tif'
6562113032a82083ab1abcfb44f85f43
333be6c1e2491f04aee40cb4ce2f6605bf59a7eb
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPY' 'sip-files00124.txt'
0e7c9dc90a78909739b556499eb0d97f
f6f72dc1b291ccf027f3464770c9fbed5119fbea
describe
'6340' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSPZ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
61d83355af5b2bf0504313eb4cd07fff
2089bdcc30a32035fe8f2e28f9d9487f91d20f43
describe
'724479' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQA' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a68c3cb00a3c7416d6b0cda7ff05b3e9
19c86257352f9ca8377a5f6160d1d7ccea215d4e
describe
'78730' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
d0db8a306fdb9b9113e746070170af6a
e7d10f994dad92b0af66f0ac34ce4e1ba91f6cd2
describe
'30599' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQC' 'sip-files00125.pro'
0e352663163d52a1fbd9ff209a2ca836
7364754208b00c69b44aff865d8560a242391aea
describe
'22669' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
9bf79d50c5d89df2385e6d500d6704c9
565d75a4c8a69a22d7cf453e2b442d401046dab7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0e5735c0cd13f48d638d6221ee865fff
f312482204b5c573ff789a9ee1bad73ce6050656
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQF' 'sip-files00125.txt'
e7a5f53bfbafe12bb8a2aafb9f1f3b0e
a3e1ec8e5c9c233b179da4f23c9cc759e331e600
describe
'5643' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQG' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
e3cc32d598afdcb87470f5b5ee04d766
87db044c986b45f3176235bb58cb584e6417a9b0
describe
'724774' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQH' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
8d693d6a3db21deed0f93d88982152cc
bd5de74b7f6cdbefd889d672a4337156ec61497a
describe
'77057' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
b68e22c8713020072cde94ddf0e3376b
7f2747dd40b50c8f5e6650d24a6b6b4bdbf8e3ee
describe
'22716' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
96cd0f600fe11f6c9fc42093e30ff43c
06aa8e7d71c845a5743a2fe5ed1b970385d4ca96
describe
'22157' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
37680c5bbc8073a1403e607d2312e5a3
5fb42a35eacb994fe319174086f33812a68572ec
'2011-09-20T16:58:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQL' 'sip-files00126.tif'
53d354a341cad7e3817f66e500b6c6ba
5a5b0d2391bc27ef26ad1b25314037aff2240001
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
6d5ca47cc906140700e50326fb512581
68776093839dc8e578028d3509e96805f818c4dd
describe
'5795' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQN' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
f05a2e1124a01c2026fdf7812b4335f9
b126cf3d03ab048948f43f95a319c41965627b49
'2011-09-20T17:00:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9b5ba943099b27a5608cad4e2c99283f
a9a7ddc88f78c12e4b162e593f1d70f0ab29c6b6
describe
'79169' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d727df7c38a15ff0e6061d8ad00e0983
24209fabf4943aa889eb4cffd5408854c6810416
'2011-09-20T16:57:33-04:00'
describe
'30217' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
56af5473809b45019cdf372b3c5f32aa
442b087cba179fda5bfe1761684590525917039f
describe
'23302' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQR' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
05521682bfe9dcfc312650aa4ea4718b
4b1c6a925a802809099e9238dbd988737e60790b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQS' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c1f5333516162de504151066513b0f52
55a80c5b8b50bf6e16cf172e55bd49b7762b786d
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQT' 'sip-files00127.txt'
6f1ab14409f847755411abdc544dfce2
e139df3afa1c657140046882be16d3cce2729e99
describe
'5748' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQU' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5f24e129298baaea8784c5ac95d18778
f5072a917c3958b200a2c399517e2c01a6b48f49
describe
'724831' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQV' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
ab90e9ad1ff495cc7d6b8b4a9957b277
c9f0efc056ede10f6a2a4df1507a67ee19d16914
describe
'79360' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4d0aad05263b8eb892e1b66d8b0a4bea
fb8ef187157cc9450ab889e825cae045286360f3
describe
'28636' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQX' 'sip-files00128.pro'
3ae190188746bf07224ef21e313bd39f
0a59cf0ed7934196d0c383f02dc7902e1692489c
describe
'23048' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQY' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
bad5cb783934cdfec2389031f82ad8d3
b8286ea33120ddc1da7b743cf532b9bc7a145d4e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSQZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c34f3c8906555445bf8cd794ed43ef51
78400704aba94f98b9c640838e66e2a56e8bd95d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRA' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2f1adbca1b886b9973d0fa7c7f056faa
a1696f848e6cbdee7bee7f80483fc2371654dd08
describe
'5876' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRB' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
be7fff67df6536adbb798ffbbea21a98
d0458369e2d2e59476d922d0cd87aa0222862553
'2011-09-20T16:55:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRC' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
65d613b8b43e819198c6c7b05d22635b
542f69d12a402e21803d468ee04a7a52493c178f
describe
'92581' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
b6cc9beb1766ddcaa17f079843091ca4
0dbe25c8c90e6412356e8910453aa8d49c871dcd
describe
'40795' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRE' 'sip-files00129.pro'
58f8c9cb0f91abb87e843dccbaa49aed
8430872ad2f1313908a7dae08279cf70323e5f9a
describe
'26952' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRF' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c1c778c603cacdc856a7ea76c6024e18
b18039c792130b779cf16a9f2638bde823ef0b3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRG' 'sip-files00129.tif'
526d4af1b4ed8bee1b24dd5b699e89ac
fca56e5dc663c2111491636aeeac6b4efed14e3b
describe
'1904' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRH' 'sip-files00129.txt'
acbcc838a23a31d7bf19effe941053ca
f63b114fea1ba3b25298c3e5bd9ce08b712691f2
describe
'6555' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRI' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
3cca7eaf2f2127bde4c78ec23d2cd59c
05b74d439bc857e648b8849a7f26dfe01509d47c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRJ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
512458408eff263d686909828af3a93d
4759f5246029bd3bf750ec28f1ce6e83962be34a
describe
'73072' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRK' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4619278761cecc76b7c6defcdb584604
b3e6ed39d8080382544078c1c09fb7590c593f72
describe
'22439' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRL' 'sip-files00130.pro'
94955c1e0fa31fffca582b3577bf2406
904d69562e37ad4c5f07844a367365817998199c
describe
'20569' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRM' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
bdcc5b8d5cc259235b85d2ad916bb1d9
5b9591f2a6958d8f3290f0bab4e5c65bd946eab5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRN' 'sip-files00130.tif'
0330dc6f56338210108249ba81916f58
886313e2864cc25940d376dbf3449c6a3f74e96e
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRO' 'sip-files00130.txt'
cb54fe6713c9b1d4d5394988f04f199f
dc57a7274b37fda7604a077c64cbec8226cecf28
describe
'5484' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRP' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
5b24df10e193af63bc9e2e3c3d6a3a99
dc49216e9c0416e92fee49ffe3e0639859940c42
describe
'724376' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRQ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
904af319cc1010e97dc8675e04073f2c
3cd45e2662b1bf7111cc7dfa9b36770f1ba2abee
'2011-09-20T16:59:37-04:00'
describe
'134570' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRR' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
8947345cc1e10eb18c454646af2c6eaf
fba25b6be77ab9b2a94e628e919c872f64bc9773
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRS' 'sip-files00131.pro'
95cfa7291ad2dc421b3e672854b462a9
dbbd3692fdc3a7578728242da907b1d908476443
describe
'29679' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRT' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2c30fed442cf5dfd0777eb0c6459a74e
587c49a1d762f709865646b0dd95af2d9c5cf304
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRU' 'sip-files00131.tif'
bd8833a00e30e332e8aff3f7597d7056
68364a8506b4cdc9c1e8478104f928b4e21ae65a
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRV' 'sip-files00131.txt'
6614ba657f2b0ab897feb1dfe6bf6db2
3763c63bac8175a08a0d64ea1a172b97f8e8d341
describe
'6884' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRW' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
78028b5f409e7d838545bbda6e692fee
7c41a89b408eb4a810624cfd0cfc86bac99b88ee
describe
'724696' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRX' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
879627b20191d89dac24c1a5694f69f3
43a2f7f25866991e2844acf5e47b4dc07c39c16d
describe
'75079' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRY' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
2cd67def36452d42c872651dbe20b8d1
7c1d5545d3f73ade450cc9021b86c6888759d37b
describe
'21195' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSRZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
37dc077393cd429177c083e8301d1019
6ea61de3cfed27ea337e1011e797eba7f2cb66e2
describe
'21561' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
3684b8b599e190d6d75cde39c69967ef
293231792bc42b7c109d5112a246e570b7daac0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSB' 'sip-files00132.tif'
dd21ebcfe359d7939ef789580cc8f1e7
4120bc9f44838cbbfe01011a7f7313fb38a001c6
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
44f21b86f2c8f64f8bfe1e2e5badf20a
e90ef5101b77b54499567e9c6e78f9871d568f83
describe
'5618' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSD' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f17405f57acab644824631f10b94a59c
0b245f32a1fd3c66ea2773a43810e87a5cd23010
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSE' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
2acddd4533c429fb10cd8930e4b2fa7d
e0a925cdce2109cccdf7d3bb2a8954092bba89e5
describe
'96049' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSF' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
2184eaa7be33c85c5e4827672b19c1dd
c4e48532313515ad980352f354192986d8f24052
describe
'36755' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSG' 'sip-files00133.pro'
0be7a94891ac32f8497a69b660270af7
cda42df601529a4f34468a5ae1d759ff8b29eb5b
describe
'27382' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSH' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9502e832ff8f829f76aaae722bcb5a35
60e8f3fc3fce549f1c3303a5921c46de0fa9ea48
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSI' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fcbfbde4bf8b9dad6768397f5796096d
d3bda511209511cbf85b3589ad2ae81aa07eb8be
'2011-09-20T16:57:50-04:00'
describe
'1900' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSJ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2bc2e805e7f4df01d7a3310b9e55d84b
c0eb2ee3345c7aa63b4927148a8e70ecbb7bb106
describe
'6699' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSK' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
fd013ee37aad32f01f98b2c898dfeb53
8a06558158c76562f08ce84776fccc4828e133ba
describe
'724811' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSL' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
e8c622a197892e31fbf2db98b882ce82
5732620f47f7b7257091cf4e5bcc61813c52693a
describe
'58937' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSM' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
f21c11b7df4196d44c9371d81587092e
a23cde20db5a8c1ee1fc779ae15545ec2c91af75
'2011-09-20T16:56:50-04:00'
describe
'23452' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSN' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2c7385fd8fa284a23edf1e2ed09abf6e
b5f0a16ad4db2f102d1319999be51b39bc55fd63
describe
'17188' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSO' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6f0b6a7db132aed1c32d95cab06a9b6d
3f26fd1e21bf7d0c5b0a7764cd15a6d7414eeaf0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSP' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b4dce76da886cb8122479b2282720b02
2b36dc5e0be6eff6f5f115376fe548c1e4b68cc0
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSQ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
05db3385a834ecbed39006266f956a60
e7c3dbe6410a35dfe85fafc80caa631dc8ca5359
describe
'4580' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSR' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
c548d6e091df7a1807f7574dca89b5f6
f6556ab32fa5bc0d0edff5279d78f8a05bb8b05b
describe
'724417' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSS' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
b978b2fcca5fff363e3de43fcb69e0b4
38fc496ba3ecf95a6a3e7cbe180477b3fd0a8d3c
describe
'64377' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSST' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
8a1887cd759dac9e95b363a86643bf25
1a31ee61b69827fb25198476fdf6a5ff2d024954
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSU' 'sip-files00135.pro'
3c0a5b9f95d280eca77694524759a2da
517baf31dcb689693cb18479a0829d8390f827b1
describe
'16681' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
c3af70ec6d50f382c166b126fc8332f2
03cca057b3615c7596b9611e39bb9586485d91da
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSW' 'sip-files00135.tif'
25685d66a0f60a6044ef8850f4ec6c27
35f3a036a63bcbd62806361328c6182454fdb503
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSX' 'sip-files00135.txt'
26b2fa3d8b0c42b103bad1f4ea8450f1
1065292996c1232cc0926be482ad6f07549b053c
describe
'4491' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSY' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
440331fe9ee0bbf60d6ab80320718a39
8f7366441329c4ab124af98dc36cbbdadb5db83d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSSZ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
770d951042a84d6488f69364342ed6ba
cc629bef363e84a2a0cc66c535c13ee08be7b952
describe
'87317' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTA' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
394b0411c8b8662b9a474c1a090340f1
32356c081dce52a2fe4b1e93ff0d67cfc870138d
describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTB' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5fe8302bda8f10dc10a6fcdadb782d0f
ae7deff63aaeeb952d6c8d049c72146a7829e945
describe
'23512' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTC' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
e0efcedcffefda26ed59b43dd2e917fc
4c5526267bb57016d77e76f4f245bcc01c47c3f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTD' 'sip-files00136.tif'
9cef2b7fafad7a8eb9cb084d04d20f0e
cbef84ba08cd27c968ab9f9c9daadcebf5f277cf
'2011-09-20T16:56:19-04:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTE' 'sip-files00136.txt'
32bea843453b7bcad3beb689759a856e
afc092ac9f50aff8f90576475fef44a61c2e88ab
describe
Invalid character
'6041' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTF' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
b6904be5fa0fa4a2c7326c1ef065ba2c
c331a22326ae1b4aeb19766cf65750a2b47f531c
describe
'724729' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTG' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
49cbff7cc7841edd84c7dcc96f889487
5bd6d434a0d5a7ddba379434de71b2bc109a4786
describe
'96987' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTH' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d1c7e6fde6ced167b64ba8942684afed
2270d815a20e01d42549e23203aad3c7c6104968
describe
'33237' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTI' 'sip-files00137.pro'
2a711b15015a1c4b88941db20062b9a1
00c0dee807fca1973d66f3881a229d0a0e348b08
describe
'27030' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTJ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
5d3a46c28557900e79c0520da8bb3fc0
3e5d3ab0eff0b5135c1fc7eee62644c5f1b0e8c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1cc936d940a68e6b8bfba677f20e1aaf
8d9340d4971014680094478c9fbdf4e9c4303f41
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTL' 'sip-files00137.txt'
528e5bb256c29c926792fc3d6d090102
c7793301189317ec1c0fc7bf42487b44ffbf7137
describe
'6632' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTM' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
9610304bedb2daf1ee6854662a17fbdf
d68e33a8398c403372fb9755d8b94748b977095b
describe
'724816' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTN' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7ff6124a26ff518c6c376abfce172648
fa1cb32cd928d0a42505e0b7393ac21842120bd9
describe
'61800' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTO' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
d83c33a152d83838ebc179f2adc3b0d9
d17da1c3da5f9fc703e88f0357b6828da06d0d29
describe
'20226' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTP' 'sip-files00138.pro'
771ec1a7356ccf49d5786e91fa4128fe
689e3afc11e0153be430056346b544f804bc1b6e
'2011-09-20T16:59:00-04:00'
describe
'18212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTQ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
3af658ac616b5bfc8e11c6ba6f21b9b0
4054dfc8fb051d33e89fde60bb5c6fb80c536426
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTR' 'sip-files00138.tif'
58ee8b79c616d7ee1c32b7a50a77585f
bcc348ef3d4c26b32a4667d9493c9bb23f88de52
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTS' 'sip-files00138.txt'
fc8f9fb5077256cff2ebb9c0ed48e9a3
8ce250bdb1824e0a757b0b77cc43ba906e0036f6
describe
'4890' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTT' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
223430ecfcccff1b5f6a87b6440e1363
7000ab29e2c8ae88959c855f87eb9e979bb0c394
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTU' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
5135d6e124319c3549238ce923a71194
58e8f94ddcaf6f0dd0fa3d11f3ae53e5f3407124
describe
'74662' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTV' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
bf814c23283bb2f3964641e8027024f1
7e1173488f1ec3c270c998e749b2a0445f12fbe4
describe
'18588' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTW' 'sip-files00139.pro'
c6906f934582464a7d723df4678abf4b
1bd0f4eb0ce149b9d8678868dca3aa7bfbf86ad2
describe
'20925' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTX' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
b19175c72fa909059b2b495c73737407
2b645efd0ce0b9b976bf72bf2a98e32e252587a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTY' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f7d5da90e8bbcf3af26db8fe46c7763b
44da24812a378dbcae11d2404288d5481e862a0c
describe
'772' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
9233c159e67742d1d915ef2a575ea820
fc9f05ec07284069d1a1d27805cd37af66fa5ed7
describe
'5769' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUA' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
073fcb12daf3a591727f09a86a197c0b
f5d2ee9550abc490d1b4f052ac4d105590029463
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUB' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
3664533cf69e63134a9496b4392db634
47647fe46e1a83e36bd06aaee6e3a1c1e332ca28
describe
'87358' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUC' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
0118377304c28dd08fdd6635133cc47a
0d4632181c35e9cab58dfffac1784fe0a1818df3
describe
'24929' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUD' 'sip-files00140.pro'
8addd28fe9fa77c93c622c4c951a12f0
1d329eedb1c845681a952a435b8b004afbf2472e
describe
'24859' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUE' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
9caf6c8022810ea5747c718d27d1a490
57f004e91218700fcb52fa92845a2391b7b80ffc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUF' 'sip-files00140.tif'
26d8196e8a944d4a54ab8db6e5a58fd8
46ca0a417063c12adc98de96577b4b97ef24f0a8
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUG' 'sip-files00140.txt'
bd2d6066cf06c77df8a15bc675eee961
c27a384452253a49ff7b8af55e73697367d64b04
describe
'6502' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUH' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
549f76d720b9c72f7d3bcd2db5e96236
8b7be08bf28ff233e81749c27fb7cf8b6a3cd71a
describe
'724251' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUI' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f586834f942811d1d721c99e1ca398f3
52ead99421c6f7fdd90b97d32f98212e841b4309
describe
'140541' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
cb6642052d5ff7dc42fc754d72bae53a
66843bd17a4dab8611bf131cdc1c5d82733b4df3
'2011-09-20T16:56:01-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUK' 'sip-files00141.pro'
eb73f431401938dbba4e584884694a5e
e82cf14ac97008925c0f5247d8ee362e90fc244c
describe
'31065' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUL' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
ab13315eadd053b39e13571653588479
3a2f92650d905031c6ea3457dceef04fe9d2a4d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
e1352a0406a7d2ac7d074c4e4817127a
187c53ce763a7a01dcca29119890c8f1ce411406
describe
'177' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUN' 'sip-files00141.txt'
464d3486165c607f559fdd8ae90debee
63a53aca86813d6dcd65da73e0e4a20121392bd1
describe
Invalid character
'7016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUO' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
b557607c02247d116290247e842cbea2
b49c63ba757a957bc4e64d209d8deb6b0d8d660b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUP' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1b69fab9e78fba180c3e668512ff88a9
c2be0abeaa5301f09d3b82ef5e46074940429491
describe
'83969' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
d820cb0df991bb97f4a227a066dc1100
ef75f99728ec75149fd1c3f8f57771f0571aec34
describe
'28511' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUR' 'sip-files00142.pro'
35fc56e68e553ef6595c00149c30070b
79f196355cf8c185e2f45ec583ca8da40f9fb40b
describe
'23431' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
7e9447ee505f3076b65e5c5b33907b55
a472585af0f6ac9361dfc2aab8be4fcaf0dc615c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUT' 'sip-files00142.tif'
5c1a2d2a0a878e6297d46db90ad994f0
d80439dced7fc0612274cf46a4011087ff721cf5
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUU' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4ace751ac73951fc25d467fc0be20115
f355455f64d1ef2cf3c1b0866f29f4d30c7c0e9b
describe
'5859' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUV' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
d07f425d8a2a98116dae83b48f08ceb1
37c17d77a8da16f25debde93dabee5f17b6c0860
describe
'724429' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUW' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
838115a6be20ff65884cda92b0544071
951b14929836236335c437dda5a7c484d8567930
describe
'76675' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUX' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
940b5f3479b62b89b06892118b965112
04864ac5c2486955afa91f9d0a512e6a9f9d17b0
describe
'20029' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUY' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0c143cd333203857d1f8e05c8c86a8c8
c367834bafa4db00f428123ec82afbbd9f3439f8
describe
'21409' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
657a58d92bbc2c498da82bdefe624a37
10bf993a3bfbd7f79eabb7c1a22a14443bb446dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVA' 'sip-files00143.tif'
4e10838e204be7e5727920449ae03797
5418dc514510d657776f42d54de3f816c916c636
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVB' 'sip-files00143.txt'
9cd682b4245f3b4ba9e658210c4b267d
132eba0c8692b22659e32cae87a416dddbe6957d
describe
'5514' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVC' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
dae3449399df3b5f454c0572019d214b
dffb06395637972fd680be4c62bc6e612b75204c
describe
'724792' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVD' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
9b7401056ac12f3f1fbfc9124994e412
7253f7513c181fa34e4b5ed092d25797de5dfc8d
describe
'89146' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVE' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
6fe2ec931f4d440d399a7e01723de8cd
d9121b38fce9f7e4f197bfe540ef2f11164551f4
describe
'24414' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVF' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2ec6998378a9e98e12db7df388ce214e
60643ee53b660c8ea703049d81dd7685e63a0514
describe
'24602' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVG' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
1acaf01141a84e9b60f20741f220032c
50cb7ca06ba4b4dcbe615a7347821f6edefabbc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
2940b8eddaf3aa2a2fc10be5f8c4e796
e2f3a42242d2a0cf6b540b0a6378c50ca52ab083
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVI' 'sip-files00144.txt'
00ba0c294a7305faf730b6b2bccf89b4
75443c5b51ce5d91e762abf1fd8c8b1cd8556852
describe
'6405' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
cdb3f966bce3cccb62eeffcfc3608126
3086d9f8920432da95308b4af1874c5571a79167
describe
'724790' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVK' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6b830bc091d4fd55b78e5f64362e657d
347673d01307728575d75cf300b2543ba47f1711
describe
'77535' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVL' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
a3393bb79435c788c0bbff40917a4e2e
e5b34a53455f9c49fb3f93cf0fe5a7692ffc5d42
describe
'23205' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
fff97e1dd910046b534d0446ac30d3ea
b883a00a3d3b1822cae66f6f26fadc1792d0f80f
describe
'21753' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVN' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
fd250cf61077336e691ec6a2f3f43df8
f1d18d46cc90f9187192a1ccb02b7f32a3a3d38a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVO' 'sip-files00145.tif'
e156e3ec5a594ff5e12fc5fb7d3dda1b
8cd5e5700cc32100c2b17f405eaf3a49ee033ced
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVP' 'sip-files00145.txt'
cb7f611aff7c11ce31e3999ba58bb6a6
27319907154b4fc5eff1abb18fc45170c7e49424
describe
'5556' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
66549a6d6e4ddd7c1a9c6b47a1825f2b
806de6ec224a5a07a69dfc7e23e551e10e209a63
describe
'724832' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVR' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
44b1c9464efc3864a67182c64c9f6609
6d1aced765fbf83e2500a6f16485ecbe2421b727
describe
'75572' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVS' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
7be0baa1dc67ddcce431f4cadc024268
4e57e30cd1a61ba5c15fed94c304c8c893185ef7
describe
'31379' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVT' 'sip-files00146.pro'
e81ba0e04db30f8634139671dd730b71
b7a1dac2f230dcfff4e77e0b7e663152e4878745
describe
'22502' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVU' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
ab93de68075634357ae21951936d15ff
6a0aa2d9489b5fa1b46d8d14163275f255be7a81
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVV' 'sip-files00146.tif'
98781a53f33b281f639db91f09779651
331b487393330a6307f34302ec2f3eda8eb9b990
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVW' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b270f1d607b5d190fa44aef9f736b501
bbb055ea919277008ac0135eb0866342e70f7dea
describe
'5718' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVX' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
b340551cbda7fe2ad427283b7876c51f
7a5023ef4d4f91805a7d9e15f9042a6b86c91353
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVY' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
67115abfafd53f303ec07572b8532d2c
bf17dbd278b8b71f2861597ba10b1640bd9bd8a9
describe
'65971' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
7fcbf7f63637e586f3ab630990ccc4bf
562ff714b76d581b52d0e9a81e228c925ed6e46d
describe
'18220' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWA' 'sip-files00147.pro'
38589ce900e1fb4be5716c9d21ef2f3c
f516eee8205df0fc0e3101d67a73ff8f77a6f204
describe
'17823' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWB' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
251c6bf6d8a810d00425797f4bc9b0fa
3a2d84e1fe36eb0d6a8369180d56ec91548b8ec8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWC' 'sip-files00147.tif'
eb463755134e0c0441b9332bb4418a32
78146b25198f45f72dce46f8751dbe2c891a9cfb
describe
'796' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWD' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3223ea58cab4d9bfd4296594e55ce8be
aebd13afd9573eef7b7938de615a938054ae7017
describe
'4629' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWE' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
d4ebfa883b6809c922968f7d780d62b4
0bde17ff2f6b69d41cfe532ad828a4fc6d4f3862
describe
'724689' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWF' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0d16d71729ad71aa928497b834f72747
2cfcbee53f4ffceb1e515a5dbeadb77d7dfabe69
describe
'86694' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWG' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
464bef570fe5156ee3bc741088096c3b
3aff069fcdd245ed60788e0330678e4d7df7ef61
describe
'21766' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWH' 'sip-files00148.pro'
b19ace5d3b83f1a5a1cbf287db17966c
1111b578b472d0f024cb3652c77ff7c7eecdc5ae
describe
'23181' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWI' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
7b7cbb0e5e4cf1699091b2e9605f087d
0cecc2d084a4c73331bf94a6386c472ca2869427
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
7ffc35ed4408ddf40fb2a7d4e4f3c203
6842c69650fdbb385af4f4414d50d2d267a0b865
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWK' 'sip-files00148.txt'
9fc7c171de5d3bb45bca1b5f57c56bdf
61bc83a3184a9563cc9a32af3c21a277a603ed65
describe
'6130' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWL' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
d5590abd51ab3fa27b41c6170183dc36
fcf95bd00dcdc56444076387b8fefbb8d054cba0
describe
'724809' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWM' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
b745d657d87aa7bbf921baab8c91dfa0
febc803b0e9cd43711666864f752490fcf54e3cb
describe
'91953' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWN' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
152c73f9216041f7054a25366be79333
9625b6493642ac844a3511262b654676953a8a3b
describe
'24437' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWO' 'sip-files00149.pro'
1a57a1f3cdecbb18bdae0d04055d6d95
75552e2488692ef0d7eba81a7815ccedfe10d4d8
describe
'24343' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWP' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
1120ff9465ef1285bcd7d8b9c5513c98
1f9106981b32b422c58bb7f9a4ae83c75b1d184b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
782625c66564b98ab57831c9dbd01594
b242ac8e2314073d60b665235c0bd99b0b2ac021
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWR' 'sip-files00149.txt'
bcae55ffe44ab0e37963161098e7ed15
16b7a89e85783bad7aae0e2f01846b2729bddb9d
describe
'5961' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWS' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
4ca7ce05f325fc52d08dce7901327325
269bf5d88ab517e73dd0b1aa2543fbe764ad9c2a
describe
'724808' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWT' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
0110a026dbbe0a24e5c8d9b2f44b7c98
d31017219f017cd4258a11d9026bc7d4c8a5abcd
describe
'88572' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b250ae3599893b499f58964f5244f667
14e70770eb80b0f91682655d1cd2af29a28aaa41
'2011-09-20T17:00:12-04:00'
describe
'40109' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWV' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b8d304b18feda8124dd13853e45e6018
aa67661fab62a3c7cb1299aadcfa0443523cddb8
describe
'26256' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWW' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
f9da0c07c17f8e3578f7e49176ace85d
23b5fa50b5953fb49991f8c21acbe0f2d38cde70
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWX' 'sip-files00150.tif'
5894d7225b7b795b4464daae83c401ab
b3cdff03fb657425487f44b28c41af2467bf7fa7
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWY' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4ad6bde5fc918b500568c2eb5324c6b1
0fd660f018045985c5ad3239aa42e189a37d095c
describe
'6273' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
edd2bbff45825b5c67ec763215c3d8a2
d9318337148abb3595d3a1535d732071a706f2e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXA' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
30007c39f9e2688f623fe727949ad75d
bfc9566b47c9bfa1f4727b1eae7538c39e59eed9
describe
'99864' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXB' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
8d64b6185944d654463d596d4bd09e65
0c63dfc483714534a625e994e7a900e2f4dbba1f
describe
'42316' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
84876c47ba657322424aaf978d4101c2
fa789ca0cd5c0b4ef40706dc3ae6c9bf320fb8af
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXD' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
7ea8987321dc0337066d09dc6dea6b84
4a80c20094e718a952905b934bbbf58f0ac4892d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXE' 'sip-files00151.tif'
5537acf10c7a02c04f64defc13cc75db
bdef5750cc2361a2c6eed9423fa658a26105ee83
describe
'1881' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXF' 'sip-files00151.txt'
5cea0a115c577c70ab44fe238eb09ba3
1799596aeee16eae27ea89ba579e53dadd39c5f9
describe
'6909' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXG' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5d27126e2ceedb004e3af13efe18ec33
dd6fc8d6fc5bec5d26a609f5ef12802c55e47e2b
describe
'724457' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXH' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
43a7b16105fdf5b2a3937cb376725420
98e215e327907c265e7eeabd8b318c13f51d8607
'2011-09-20T16:56:36-04:00'
describe
'83494' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXI' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
d9becbaaa148315c928e7336f36ad50e
cd60dedb9fa0c13a1d5960d408791928b1e3d823
describe
'11006' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
f9bc0ab575010265ef1232bd6508c3ad
db7fd34dd582be738ee82ddb5f8988e670d00de7
describe
'21133' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXK' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
3472ba8cc60854dbd39d87b12472c30a
538d461128ea8eb4f9e843451bf145f48517262a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXL' 'sip-files00152.tif'
7f70a3cd65e2bf1db671c4f67fef61c4
56a658aef4aad231bdf1d0afec464b6787d96920
describe
'537' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
67528ddf9e7dd5e87ac61e23fc3f6684
e2ef7abfe7031da6eccaf5bb42aaeee421343d88
describe
'5351' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXN' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
155b0c9f2119d846820797bf04dedc2f
99fd536656699e2354c96e2a081341cffcde503e
describe
'724763' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
1a719a3fa9d86317cbc68379e928a334
e57aa862de59b01316196626dfb2453596020173
describe
'131821' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXP' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
3d591c0f3536393989388c08f920ba59
1ec214b3eea65842ede8ef0ee0afbc9a19d0e177
describe
'1880' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
2bb7bdb2f789748971027c1ddc0fb46f
814afe4ac09148ed88bb16ade2adc77d93ebf064
describe
'30601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXR' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
abec269843278548a3d53d61449f0d1a
e1d7349e886d7f56ed095a6e2e15b5471696d01e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXS' 'sip-files00153.tif'
4127399bc4d83187c4da484edca7d875
1dba256a70a0b42ccfad43d820ee6a49fbf25c99
'2011-09-20T16:56:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXT' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ba83cbfa2cbb8e33ce911a66335e3e8e
86a2036dc7dc2346f0a5f1f834377b88ca3af8df
describe
Invalid character
'7155' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXU' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
025007f93298e404ddb73612dcf3ee38
50f21410345dbfc7a2497a92848b8b27e18b56ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXV' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
7259faa93820a552a0215776c855892c
522bb7fc58f19b304303386a66f7950fb312300c
describe
'88009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXW' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
71f0e6d4fed6a13c67069e03eead7bbb
ac529a51d324f31fda8c5fd2ce836182ad2ccf8d
describe
'39014' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXX' 'sip-files00154.pro'
fafe93468d4f75dc8ce49427fc3b260f
10d641a1b98fc3e890b29a572b0b3ca24fa32113
describe
'25239' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXY' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
77dc6ca38919285d9ac3ea9bea202495
c9f14b3e4af1eb8c334d65c147142bfff8e8caab
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
b8caa4c37967bcc871203ad4153dc2d8
aa3bde9d708b3bb3e7ddfa9279288da430333f4a
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYA' 'sip-files00154.txt'
d2c015a6c205b187a4c645130280e316
f63a6959b1a9424f86aba5e817f591b39165c50f
describe
'6188' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYB' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
658da05880948d9a42d315348680de2a
f9941bdf96a94bfa7d0449707c61fb9de8e5935b
describe
'724838' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYC' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
aec45b3535968ac14296e300363ba177
ee96526f9c88fc440db6e654158935b8977221b1
describe
'117247' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYD' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
f78d8bb1b4fa54936b9885a37180badf
7e5190a1ece34036c9c3b8e3b8a2db47510a0522
describe
'2091' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYE' 'sip-files00155.pro'
40548370f179c97e05469d419150a075
8177a6a089e56f6453ba6d3ad77a49bb342a7fa2
describe
'27995' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYF' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
23a7203a6c65a40c045c50ebc1d230d1
39ccd3cd5f16a1ccf9f27072d98cc56ab15ea3a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYG' 'sip-files00155.tif'
f731044e0b9d4596271393d578206721
db777f1cb00d0ead4a3918fee93e7455f9dcc4b8
describe
'131' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYH' 'sip-files00155.txt'
3cc5626aadfd774a7736e2f0b58bef74
aa516f0615a9459570414efa6a8ab33e5b97b1f0
describe
Invalid character
'6760' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYI' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
524e8989f279bb9b7cdcb0dbc4c945f5
4441667858e5ae06ced029a77c267a81ee6a9b04
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
2daa23749ce4f2da0ebdf7f641d45e10
08df09db6631f70f6be835d9d205c9e46417b584
describe
'96243' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYK' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
5f152b715a9adcd57b839065ac10b809
ef62a10e221fa2e46a8205b4d86a4f7983df37ea
describe
'40977' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYL' 'sip-files00156.pro'
29883200445723b78eef14db22696b8d
044426c4533586002986ad040a14167946745328
describe
'27859' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYM' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ad52c86f5e56c2d9163f527ff0ec140b
ace24135d0be77f0f2337a9a8d9a4ebbfde3696d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYN' 'sip-files00156.tif'
0c938f0dd84eb29df325d13058897790
82daf2224567ad373b710393893aba7bc973f090
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYO' 'sip-files00156.txt'
65a6acd490729a3186f23713737c2a90
431c8456c8258ebc04e091a74b0e7e9bca79b0f1
describe
Invalid character
'6603' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYP' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
99a2793589861d2e1928c00a0516d2ff
052608e447223f56178e470970eaa4b32f83a592
describe
'724815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3de10598abb714ac7c4ead52a6e0d921
fb39024c8bda49df9c3b8a9cb10ab2e91fea2f0d
describe
'114828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYR' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
d7d09c957db5f1541d356736571ac1b9
f8286706356dbcd82196de760cc57f454bbde507
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYS' 'sip-files00157.pro'
d1449e993da980956292d2c1341be6d4
4abf0d787ed529b50354a2d1f048fef4b0d10310
describe
'27569' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYT' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
20e063c60e599201e83acf7a6dba0a43
19786ef4a29b9947619ca342a350792ab4cae85f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYU' 'sip-files00157.tif'
840b6cbe660156383ac47b7590f99aeb
4eafdbc0e091d67231b4aa48aaf91d74bd3a5cbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYV' 'sip-files00157.txt'
7b95ca844b6d053cec4cd8538c72fe5a
36f8d3e9786bcdfc4b45165003b6aea773e8bcc8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYW' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
d8ee79d29e0f3ae3b691cf34a49262b9
6bfe7169aeb7591528d92b72be3957ee0f1e1098
describe
'724728' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYX' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
3da55581327e6ee2367b54d472fbf9b3
90479100475553240e4d09164c6e590ca2dbf2ad
describe
'92025' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYY' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
76d787605f5a56418e43f53a24984a64
311ed7af860514e7f2ac5cd75fe65ca42a5a3a15
describe
'40860' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
feba4ddd5ed0d4ef4203199cfe1ec414
bf90edb4f3eba0f109c92591ea56d6ec1b17bfae
describe
'26817' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZA' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
8991b26c5e89810ca9e7118780c02d44
717bd6d51ffb58aec852b2713dd21aa984df1cb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZB' 'sip-files00158.tif'
92182875cd5c50ede0210c405b4d59dc
93c5ca27f2d6ffb1f58465609184a41911500868
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZC' 'sip-files00158.txt'
efffa4b1119eb31843a915ba40f03aed
7db9eecc5724926aebae85fe918fb955fae33f0d
describe
'6512' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZD' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
34df2c932299fb6bca48648ae9f233cd
2bab961d4f66a2d54579c61109f82e0fbc729ae9
describe
'724740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZE' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
0ac3d7dd996471fe64bf6406cff89221
ccd7d1d2cff3fa52194528fc688689ee7cdf3e85
describe
'90776' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZF' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
49c9a3dedfcb7e345c4ca07ae4adb328
f88947b8368917b1e68464def6972f37b048732c
describe
'34633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZG' 'sip-files00159.pro'
09dd742878634df992bfcf981bfdfc38
4271f0742a6eb39bf474e7e7537e2b3e0bd97862
describe
'26205' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZH' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
6d7b1d4fdde460c859589e5759b9a071
c553bf63a776fbc6c599067724a1b6ea58891708
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZI' 'sip-files00159.tif'
1b43195c9a1eee6d9dd534fe1620fa1b
5ab3762c3af793d24d9f1f9d20dbc5c4e47e9cb1
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
96be1958efd6f660e14821d10f45f4dc
29144f552c878f77f0527d28fdca4d1655dcd878
describe
'6308' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZK' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
7dbb3ea11547d1a9dfda4c4f838be5aa
27adcff8226563e9b918fea71fa5b907826b610e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZL' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
d64134899ff66fbd8904d3515aae6a16
ab5f75b5520be3c5e386d5ab60f46c56fd0e43a2
describe
'100835' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZM' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f1afb953f5cb095a4ffda4dde0c691d8
64e0e2f77561765f562fbee3fb7de16722b57f8d
describe
'42108' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZN' 'sip-files00160.pro'
39a1e86c5c7ffab8dff5c02a1b617a82
4b5b65f0d23be53c7cac4b465997d26dd8840fb9
describe
'28253' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZO' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
f20de47126c4d7d94a4886cf23c1c032
f924e232f0573531c1a20a0ee2f2e86241a2355f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZP' 'sip-files00160.tif'
5d3fa53c95dd8934bc3e91bece3e2815
bf723e56ef408da302ed47c2492864f705f6c0f7
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
999e0b3981a2d157194903327aaf4432
c10daedd18990d2747eb58b3290a94700faa3533
describe
'6929' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZR' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
f800c470cad4a17789029105f61954fc
af49dfa0a1a45a9a5ff77a3a2e60d1caa7a3e87c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZS' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
ce7e7120ee7aa04a7d6dd314c97be48a
bb3ad469e94e7c252880ce37401d6cffb3c0e24a
describe
'107134' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZT' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4541669142c0b68f4346aedc4736ec68
34402e9df048f7936db5e16900b3f1836fbd30ac
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZU' 'sip-files00161.pro'
b0b0585c658671fc63788bed4dfb7dfc
cdc7136fe3f8efe94af55c3389ed29fe752212ad
describe
'25380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
77f82bb4f813f67f5b2b94d930461d95
8595b29aa1c5670b3399f7e6a123dca578260fcf
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZW' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a8397ac75a432979fb9f3a6ecb55511e
e58afaf3620f4304f8b7923768c2a647cfdc8277
describe
'36' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZX' 'sip-files00161.txt'
8d5c78d79c7f33c6be6bb65dd7b46cb0
b77d4e8c49e765d4b7f9b942e40ec486d60cf57a
describe
'5905' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZY' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4b72d24c18205e485cb4d4ad29d8afb2
b80c1bb58076030c64a63cc36b2c42e1025dad1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
9f1ad8de521d7444292cd43baf84d142
156b2a576bd2a135a49ed17e2ec8bdff4275e22d
describe
'66566' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAA' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0813e0509cb76ef6925ab1b4d54751d6
ccdedef2aa1913ad5cfc95049a6583daf678a2d2
describe
'10445' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAB' 'sip-files00162.pro'
c7b9b9c49ab16a42ee5758f846e5f73d
e57d3981580c820ddc2261300ccb64c28ad0450c
describe
'17116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAC' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
8b1533865fcfd99134476bdebd9137a8
7a3ba5ebf17c7de77dbf0a951cc15306b628fbb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAD' 'sip-files00162.tif'
636c45852a22e45d715cd6a121b7d7b6
925cd0c0f2e12009ef573e2cf5c306daa43e3071
'2011-09-20T17:00:04-04:00'
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAE' 'sip-files00162.txt'
8a5a842c6814a95c8c51e47163051cab
661f9e3701787ec7d74bb6c9f2a0ad666be7ba59
describe
'4374' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAF' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
eda7cbdb8ef87526b982571721bad7dc
df0cfbc4314c41c80b88b79ccc756eb6e63eeb59
describe
'724791' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAG' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
d66561547205ba55952fc092567a65bf
aa86c2921887c09cf2cf1a26096438ef82bed9c6
describe
'55609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAH' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
a339e99fcaf0a11a89580f53fb35a1f5
7b034b9b059bec61ab173db0598adb58e3f757d8
describe
'11453' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAI' 'sip-files00163.pro'
9238e6fa8e4f478c3799c9aa670f6fdd
a1bdfd1f9972a69b21f0bea17dcc84219e49d97e
describe
'14486' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
1acaa09ed393397d95322e8009851ecf
c65e4eb73e4485a9513291fe0bbd6090a0bbfc86
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAK' 'sip-files00163.tif'
b5c6b5f22711dbc45d4e7fa5141cbb62
bea533150047917a29861571a2ad7de66287100f
describe
'506' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAL' 'sip-files00163.txt'
7cc9937122fffc941c409a51e6a9b785
4efd12942fa004de7066af3ee30f539cf7ae56db
describe
'3768' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAM' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
902af62f81e53395f9cab0d994cb372a
c3b899d355fc444ecd3d5c28314f21b039582596
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAN' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
d654e64cde06c15c2880e8059e10bedf
b803132c41b37794f038b571bd22c991ab824cc0
describe
'106422' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAO' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
cd234fc586678e770878a3eee5c1fb15
9408f2cba8105bca057a58872184ff741dfbe4b8
describe
'31240' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAP' 'sip-files00164.pro'
0871111738b9ba8f5d4c101db5759ee6
d1c5d8f4cb19d70d83f5f897ef5e46407affeda6
describe
'28788' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d4c15895eda2736c6183cd0d6ed40d2c
612dd6fd6d769f88e69cd005af8448b494500e00
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAR' 'sip-files00164.tif'
c5fcfb21bc66a8e6b1e2df646d94d463
f066a167d0d1809d3318bcb00d0f9deffa4f7759
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAS' 'sip-files00164.txt'
223f274361e8ce7c490206250d0f734c
63e8a1e90760a1da3415ed39f1e0b069a8daceb5
describe
'6970' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAT' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
227b42f44d71b8d9a1c1b4558c70d47f
92cfd02c4f1a2fdd1068ce7ffa37f792a878772d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAU' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
60aa90d51c69ef326cda8130e783ff92
3efa8cf0f0b820948ac168129a5448e17b9a28ba
describe
'78150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAV' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
7be9e8f8f7fd5f9769fe1885182acbda
9af2f9f3e2cbebda7974bb2ef30183d34427a1c6
describe
'10703' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAW' 'sip-files00165.pro'
2112c7610bfc8e703296838af52c46a3
9661f55a4d09f8b2b40d90bfefc6214507b5947a
describe
'18418' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAX' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
a0d17a3dc46078bc7894b40d5747d124
3fb4921775a7a072a232c3a8ab6b4eb1ca5d8ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAY' 'sip-files00165.tif'
5b8f2f190f5df319aeb10cedfe143da5
674e5af0d8f60f573b4bb2b1eb08be6203ddd6f3
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a7387d21ad67d995c19a186c15d9a039
7ae9d1b6953edf511c94ff360ac2e8f477351306
describe
'4438' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBA' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
ce3454e221c6ffa71b568d777ad3c3c1
c0d600103208510502b20231893270265a78acd8
describe
'724835' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBB' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
f6294cb655cbcf6e3649361bf832f071
848da855c57145026033d08722357f74dd3581f2
describe
'83419' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBC' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
dbe8c345fb07750b5adbf8ac3dc71e4f
aab40e89901609412535fa4174996a00db8099ed
describe
'37461' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBD' 'sip-files00166.pro'
bd02674201d21f2517f1be6436544ad3
dcc156acf2c44e97f8692bea1da830001d8e7eff
describe
'24230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBE' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
cf4a640bf34c6d53f1c6a53e941751e4
78364777e21745fbf33eeb29d1f7dd32958cd1fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBF' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2b5c2ef0e28e0bc40bcca85852fc301f
f4fb693049f59d01ad42647fa8e45ca1cb49d564
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABETfileF20080730_AABTBG' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8de46b5061664d6606bfb8e6fb1133d0
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describe
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PUBLISHING COMPANY _



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Copyright, 1896, =
eat BY2 6; f
LorHRoP PUBLISHING COMPANY. Sai
All rights reserved. :
a : ae




~ TWO PET PARROTS.

- OWN in the Southern States of
“America pet parrots are very
common. Sailing vessels are
constantly bringing them from
South and Central America and
from the West Indies.

I recall one now that I was
the happy owner of when a
child in New Orleans. She
was a dark green parrot, with
a black bill and feet; she was
from Nicaragua. She was very
bright and a great favorite
with all the children. She
spoke very plainly, and could
laugh and cry quite like a



human being; it was very amusing to hear her.

She was full of mischief. If a servant was called, she would
answer (herself unseen), sharply “What!” and when the servant
was reproved for his lack of respect she would shout with
laughter. a . re

She learned from the newsboys on the street, very naughty
‘words, which was finally the cause of our having to part with
her. From her hanging cage on one of the front verandas, she
would cry out to a passer-by, “Oh, you rat!” and when the
passer-by would stop to see who it was that made the remark,
and discover the parrot, the naughty bird would only laugh. —
TWO PHT PARROTS.

Another serious fault was a habit of opening her cage with
her bill. She could do this quite cleverly when it was not
securely tied. Then she would come out and walk into pools of
water and mud in the yard. When the careful laundress had
hanged the clothes-lines full of freshly washed linen, she would
walk up and down the lines soiling the clothes with her muddy
feet, and cutting off all the buttons with her bill. With all her
faults, however, we loved her dearly, and many tears: were shed
when she was finally sent away on account
of her bad language. Another parrot which
lived in a Southern city, was a great favorite
in the family of some friends of mine.




She was quite old—
though her exact age I ~
cannot now tell. She had
lived in the State of Texas,
while it was a Republic
belonging to Mexico, and
seemed equally. happy in
her home after it became
one of the United States.

She formed a great at-
tachment for a horse which
the children drove, and the
two became great friends.
She would climb up on a
fence, the horse would come
along beside it, allow her
to get on his back, and then walk slowly around while the parrot
held a piece of his mane with her bill. After she had ridden as
long as she wished she would climb into the pantry window, and

‘“‘OH, YOU RAT!”
TWO PET PARROTS.

hand out with her bill, rolls or cookies or anything she could

find to the horse, as a return for her ride. | .

; In the early morning she would go upstairs, visit the sleeping
_ rooms of the children, and call out “Get up, Charlie!” “ Get

up, Frank!” until she had
aroused them all.

When they set off for
school, she would sit aloft
on the cross beam of the.
high front gate, and call
out as long as they were
in sight, “Good-by, Char-
lie!” “Good-by, Frank!”

And here on her favorite
perch she finally met her
sad fate. ;

There were two tame
eagles in the city; they
had been caught when
young, tamed and often al-
lowed to fly about where
they liked.

One morning as Polly sat
on the gate bidding her



ean set young friends good-by, one
: re of these great birds swooped
suddenly down upon her, and carried her off in his claws, fol.
- lowed by the frantic but fruitless shrieks of the children.
So long as she could be. seen a mere speck in his claws, as
he soared | toward the sky, she was sending back the most piteous
eries of “Poor Polly” “Poor Polly!” wae MRS.
A DREAM-CAMEL.

A DREAM-CAMEL.

“T had a sweet dream last night,” said Kitty Clover. “Uncle _
John says it was because I ate so much turkey at Christmas dinner-
Eating too much makes dreams, he says. But it was a sweet dream.

“TI dreamed I was riding on a camel. And he stept so softly
and gently, ’twas like riding in a hammock. Uncle John says
real camels do not step softly and gently. But dream-camels do.

“And we—for dear mamma was with me —we had an awning
over our heads to keep the hot sunshine off. The awning was
blue and pink shiny silk, and it had we silk tassels that waved
and streamed in the wind.

“And the sands of the desert were all bright like gold. And
the sky was a sweet blue like baby’s eyes.
~“ And we rode and rode. :

“By and by, we came to a place where there was a spring of
water. It was clear like glass, and bubbled and sparkled and sang
a tinkling song. The grass was green all around it, and a tall
palm-tree grew high above it. On the palm-tree hung clusters of
great purple dates. I.reached up from the camel’s back and picked
the dates, and gave some to mamma, and we ate them. O, how
sweet and juicy they were! .

“Then I looked ahead, and the golden sais were turning into
gray, and the blue sky-was growing dark. And I said, “O, let
us stay here, mamma, it is so lovely!”

“But mamma said, ‘No, my child, we must go on through the
desert till we come home, though the sands are gray and the
skies are dark.’ And then I waked up. It was a sweet dream, but
T was glad I waked up.” :










































































THE PRETTY WOODPECKER,
‘ CAPTAIN.

CAPTAIN.

Captain is a large, handsome Newfoundland dog. He lives in
Malden. We call him Cap most of the time. When he is
called Captain he understands that something is wrong. Some-
times he gets into mischief and has to be scolded or punished
for it. Then he is called Captain, and that in a very stern voice.

Cap knows that he is to stay about the house. That is his
duty. But one day (this really happened in the spring of
1889) Cap was not to be seen when his mistress called him to
breakfast. This was something strange,, she thought. So she
waited a little while and again called his name. “Cap, Cap,’
she called. But no dog appeared. Captain’s mistress thought he
surely must have run away this time, and so he had. For
two days nothing more was heard from him. We thought he
had been stolen by some bad boys.

But the third morning, on opening the door, what did we see
sitting on the steps but poor old Captain. He looked very meek
and sorrowful. He wagged his tail slowly, and hobbled around
on three legs, holding up the fourth paw as if it were hurt.

Of course no one had the heart to punish the poor fellow
then, so he was caressed and called “poor doggie.” The paw
was looked at, but we could not find anything the matter. We
thought we would take him to a dog doctor if the paw troubled
him much. Cap was given a good warm breakfast, and seemed very
grateful for it. He now thought his troubles were over.

Going into the room @ little later, his mistress was astonished to
fnd Cap trotting: around as well as ever. The rogue had been








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THE THOUGHTS OF KITTY GRAY.

~ making believe all the time. He was afraid of a whipping, and
thought we would forget it after a while. Captain didn’t get the

whipping, but he did get a good scolding for running away.
Frank FE. Saville.



THE THOUGHTS OF KITTY GRAY.

I am thinking. I’ve seen
my mistress do it and talk
all the time. But I can’t.
If Spotty does not keep her
whiskers out of my ears Pll
bite her.

I don’t think folks try to
please kittens. Now, if the
gardener saw us playing with
his flower pots he would drive
us away. Tony broke two
last week; but the gardener
needn’t have sprinkled water
on us; we could go and leave
the. pieces without having
water sprinkled on us; that’s
why I lie in the sprinkler.
And I don’t like to be scatted
“scat! scat!” all the time.



KITTY GRAY IN THE SPRINKLER.

There are sparrows in the garden, but they are spry. [ve
put my paw: on a great many, but every time I do it the
sparrow is gone. Louis Hall.
THE SPARROWS SONG.

THE SPARROW’S SONG.





Twhit! T’whit! O, throw out a crumb
To a poor little bird of the air;
Twhit! T’whit! O, throw out a crumb —

You surely have plenty to spare!
M. A. 8.



*

A PORCUPINE’S THOUGHTS.

Said the Porcupine, “Really, I think,
I could write if I only had ink;
- ‘TI have quills and to spare,
— I have thoughts very rare,
~But I fear to oblivion theyll -sink,
For want of a bottle of ink.” Mess He


NURSE’ S BIRTHDAY FLOWERS. it}

NURSE'S BIRTHDAY FLOWERS.

Tt was old nurse’s birthday, and so soon as little Thérdse had
eaten her breakfast of a white roll and milk, she trotted off to
carry the flowers that she always Books nurse each year when
her birthday came round.

The little cottage where nurse lived was not far from the big
house and it was quite safe for Thérése to go alone. Her
mamma, who was standing on the terrace, could see her from
the time she left the house until she went into the door of
nurse’s cottage.

She took Minette with her, of course. Minette was her. dear
little dog, and went almost everywhere that Thérése went. Min-
ette’s cord was fastened to her belt. She carried the basket of
flowers in one hand, and her sunshade in the other. And as
she walked along, she felt like a very important little woman.

Mamma had objected a little to having Minette’s cord fastened
to Therése’s belt. “He is so gay this morning, he may go too
fast for you,” she said. But Thérése would have it so. “He’s
so little, mamma, he can’t pull,” she said. 3

But he did pull. He saw a pigeon in the grass and started
to run, and almost upset Therese and. the flowers.

“Naughty Minette!” said Therese; and then he walked on
quite soberly for a few steps, when he saw a cat. Up went
kitty’s back, and off started Minette. The cat ran, and Minette
ran, and there was nothing for Therese to do but to- run also.
The cat was nurse’s cat, and she rushed into the cottage door
with Minette and Therése at her heels, and nurse thought a
hurricane had arrived. But it was only her birthday flowers.


NURSE, THERESE, MINETTE AND THE BIRTHDAY FLOWERS,


THURSDAY'S CHILD.































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THURSDAY’S CHILD.

O, why, little girl, will you never be still,
But rove from one spot to another?

Thy dear little feet will be weary, my sweet,
Come here and sit down with thy mother.
MUNGO; A SCOTCH DOGGIE.

Nay, nay, pretty mother, I cannot be still,
But must always be roving just so!
Now, would you know why! Thursday’s child am I,
And “Thursday’s child has far to go.”
A, G. Plympton.

MUNGO ; A SCOTCH DOGGIE.

Every morning his master gave Mungo a penny, and he took
it to the butcher’s to buy himself a piece of meat. The butcher
expected him as much as he did any of his customers, and he would
say, “Oh! here’s Mungo. Come, Mungo, here’s your meat all ready
for you.” bie

Now the family never fed Mungo at the table, or in the dining-
room. He had his meals in the kitchen. He never was trouble-
some asking for food, although he often sat in the room while
the family were at the table.

But one day they had a visitor who did not know this. As
soon as she had done her breakfast, she called, “Come here,
Mungo,” and sat down her plate, full of. nice things for him.

-Mungo did not stop to ask any questions —he went right to
work, and ate all there was in the plate.

He had had nothing to eat that morning and that was the
time he usually went to get his meat. ©

As soon as he had cleaned the plate he looked round for his
master. _He went up to him, stood up on his hind legs and patted
_with his paw on the breast-pocket of his master’s coat where he
knew he kept his wallet,
A GAY LITTLE TEAM.

At first his master did not understand. Then he said, “0,
Mungo! are you asking for your penny?”

So he gave him the penny. Mungo carried it to his new
iriend, and gave it to her. Then he looked up in her face, and
wagged his tail as if he were very much pleased.

I suppose he meant, “See what an honest dog I am! I’ve
paid for the nice breakfast you gave me!”

Pamela McArthur Cole.



Tf children and folks would be happy as kings,
The only true way is to do the right things.



A GAY LITTLE TEAM.


Wagaie and. t tagether play



D, Tee hehest of Friends the livelong datp,
Z Ban Girst fam Master andthen he, @
ZZ bi | Ag it is right that it shauld be. |
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Za wEwe si
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_ =e iV quid sits upon his Royal throne,

= ql = “Pitkin apewler lankard fall
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=e Che lid on fop’s the crown he wears,
Moy ten-pins for the warders qreat
eg hall quard without the mullicned gate.





Jy atlas makes a drawhridge here,
ome books a tented army near,

find f must now his vassal he

nd serve }King Day ou herded kiae.



YF. Bonsall

Blanche Dillage.
THE CUNNING WEASELS.

THE CUNNING WEASELS.

In a hollow of a tree, cuddled among the leaves and moss, are
five baby-weasels. Mother Weasel has gone to find her break-
fast, for she heard a hen cackling and knew she should find an
egg in her nest. With a hop, skip and jump the weasel finds
the egg, and making a tiny hole in the shell, sucks it out. But
it was not one egg only that she found; she found one, two,
three eggs; how sweet and good they were!

Although the weasel is smaller than a rat, still she is very
brave and hunts the rats and mice for her dinner. She sples a
rat. The rat runs for his hole; with a jump the weasel is after
him. Into the rat-hole they go, and race down its halls and
through its rooms, until the weasel catches him and_ takes poor
rat to her nest.

The baby-weasels grow and grow until they are as large as
their mother-weasel ; they, too, soon learn to climb trees for birds’
eggs to suck.

- All summer the back. of the weasel’s fur coat is brown, and
the front white; but when the winter “comes, mother-weasel
awakes some morning to find the cold has changed the fur on
her back white. When summer comes, her coat is brown once more.

One day mother-weasel and her five weasel children went hunt
ing together. They met a man, and they stopped running, set
up on their hind legs with their paws over their noses, looked
. at the man, then with a squeak, pop went the six weasels under
some bushes!

The man was so surprised that he quite forgot to fire off
his gun at them. Nina Shaw Stevens.




i) YY
BEE
nl WI affe 5
q t Ora
Ge
Ss


TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
TROTTINO STUDIES WITH MR. GRISONNET.
Gettins older. After a while, Mr. Grisonnet stopped,

ay with a grave air, to gaze at a little ©
aT 2
plant. Trottino, who was very curi-



ous, asked him what he was looking at.

“Tt is a lesser centaury,” replied
Mr. Grisonnet. “T-ve never seen it
about here before.”

“A lesser centaury! What a funny
name!” said Trottino. “Is the lesser
centaury good to eat?”

“No, it has not a good taste; but
it cures fever.’ Trottino opened his
eyes wide. .

What! A plant which cured fever! —After all, why not?
There were dangerous plants, like the hemlock; Trottino knew
that, very well. And was it true that there were also plants
which could cure?

Trottino kept close beside Mr. Grisonnet, and did not fail to
notice everything that Mr. Grisonnet looked at; and what Mr.
Grisonnet looked at was always plants. He observed that this
one was well-grown, that that one bloomed early, that another
was slender and had hard work to grow.

Trottino asked: “What is the name of that, Mr. Grisonnet ?
What is it good for? Is it poisonous? Does it cure fever?

Mr. Grisonnet was as good as he was wise. He answered
TROTTINO.

Trottino’s questions so carefully, and told him so much besides,
that at the end of the walk Trottino had learned the names
and properties of a dozen plants.

Rabbits grow more quickly than children. At the end of some
weeks Lapino and Trottino were trusted to go about by them:
selves. :

Good: Mother Rabbit was getting older now, and became easily
fatigued. She liked to stay at home, seated in her easy chair



M





and comfortably knitting or sewing, while -Lapino and Trottino.
went to run and play in the fields.

Often they met companions there and made a parties. But
Trottino, although he liked very much to frolic, always left his
younger friends if he saw Mr. Grisonnet pass slowly by, examin-
ing plants.

In three leaps he would be with him, and Mr. Grisonnet was
delighted to have him as companion. Mr. Grisonnet loved to teach
and Trottino to be taught.

Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.
TROTTINO. —



ee
Ys
zig :



TROTTINO.

TROTTINO USES HIS KNOWLEDGE.

One day Lapino and Trottino were returning home after a long
walk. They were always careful to get back at the hour their
mother expected them, so that she should not be anxious, and they
generally found her sitting in the doorway watching for them.
This time, however, there was no Mother Rabbit in sight; and
as they drew nearer they heard cries which came from the back
of the house. Seized with fear, they ran forward; and entering
their home, found Mother Rabbit lying on the bed moaning with pain.

When she saw Lapino and Trottino she tried to rise, saying, “Ah!
my dear little ones, here you are at last. I feared I should not

see you again.”

_ The two little ones began to cry and then they asked what had
happened. They saw blood on several parts of her body. The
poor rabbit told them that a wicked dog had bitten her. How
she ever got away from him she could not tell. She had been so
frightened !
TROTTINO.

Lapino was in great grief. He loved his mother with all his
little rabbit heart. He threw his paws around her neck, begging
her not to die-and leave them; and then he began to lick her
wounds to ease her pain a little.

But where is Trottino now? Does he not love his mother? Will
he not try to help her, too?

Trottino had indeed gone out and left his mother, but it was
with a wise and loving purpose. He now came toiling in, carrying
a great bundle of herbs which he had gathered.

“Have no fear, mother,” said he; “you shall not die. I have
something to cure you with. Lapino, wash the parts which bleed,
quickly. Oh! you have already licked |
them? That is good. Then break that Me d:
herb up fine.” And Trottino, taking oe. in



some of the same herb, mashed it up so
that he could make it into a plaster.
This he placed upon the wounds. O,
joy! The dear Mother Rabbit was soon
in a gentle sleep. _

When she awoke, she was better;
and in a few days the tender care of
her children cured her. When the neigh-
bors came to inquire after their wounded
friend Lapino loved to tell them that
it was Trottino — little Trottino— who had known what to do for
his mother, and had brought the healing plants.

“How did the idea come to you,’ asked an old rabbit one day
curiously, “to learn about plants which are not good to eat?”

“Tt is because I once poisoned myself with hemlock,’ replied
Trottino. “That made me notice plants; so I was glad to learn
about them, and dear, good Mr. Grisonnet was willing to teach me.”
TWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

“And it is very plain that he has profited by other lessons as
well as mine,” said Mr. Grisonnet, coming up at that moment. “For
instead of the once disobedient, greedy and thoughtless Trottino,
we have here a good and wise little rabbit, who is a joy to his family
and a credit to the rabbit race.”

Adapted from the French, by Laura EH. Poulsson.

TWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

So tired! and hungry, too! They had gone to see the soldiers
start off for the Centennial, and when they tried to get home, they
got lost and did not know which way to go. They walked and
walked and walked till they could not walk any more, and they
just stopped to think.

They were in some white people’s back yard, and they concluded
they could crawl under the house and sleep when night-time came;
but they did want some “corn beade” so badly. They liked corn
bread and molasses better than anything else, and their mother,
who was a washerwoman and worked hard to give them food to
eat and clothes to wear, let them have it three times a oe they
did not have much _ besides.

I think I must tell you how this same mamma told them about
the five little pigs, and how she used to tell it to the little white
children she nursed long before they were born. She would spread
out the little feet and pinch the little toes as she said,

“Dis little pig say he want some corn;
Dis little pig say ‘Whar yer gwine git some ?’
Dis little pig say ‘Out ob Marser’s barn;’
LPWO LITTLE PICKANINNIES.

.

Dis little pig say ‘I tell Marser;°
Dis little pig say ‘ Squeak, squeak, squeak!
Can’t git ober de barn sill.’”

While the two lost little pickaninnies were wondering where they
could get some corn bread, they saw a big man come out of the
house, and they were so afraid he was a policeman come to arrest
them for being there, that one of them began to cry and the other
started to crawl under the wheelbarrow, when they saw something
that made them run through the yard as fast as they could.

There in the street was Jumpy, the milkman’s dog, driving the



THEY SEE JUMPY DRIVE THE COWS HOME.

cows home. The milkman lived on the same street they did, so
they just forgot how tired they were and followed the cows till
they got home, when their mother gave them some corn bread

and molasses and put them to bed before the sun went down.
Annie Weston Whitney.
A DEER YARD.

A DEER YARD.

When the cold comes on, and the snow begins to get deep,
the deer commence making their yard to live in during winter.

They make great paths through the snow for a large circuit,
and by traveling over it in all directions, it gets trodden down
hard and makes a very good yard for them.

They browse on the bark of the moose-wood—red maple —and
beech-trees. They first commence gnawing the bark at the bottom
of the tree, and work upward as the winter comes on, as far as
they can reach. They do not gnaw the bark off entirely around
the tree, if they did the tree would die; and it is said they
seem to understand this and leave enough of the bark to save
the life of the tree. They also eat grass, shrubs, buds and moss
in the season when they can get them.

There are three species of the deer-kind of animals; the moose,
deer and caribou. The largest is the moose. Sometimes they are
as large as the largest horses.

They have heavy, lofty horns, or antlers; these spread out in
shape like the open fingers of the hand. They shed these horns
once a year, usually in February. They add one new prong every
year, beginning when two years old, so by counting the horns you
can tell how old a moose is. The horns are not shed all at one
time, but come off one by one as the moose rubs against trees.

The moose is called the most noble animal of the forests. In
the State of Maine, the white pine is called the finest and most
noble of forest trees. So the moose and the pine-tree is on the
shield in the coat of arms, as the great seal of the State of Maine.

Sadie L. Pickard.


A DEER.
SIX LITTLE MAIDS OF LYNN.



SIX LITTLE MAIDS OF LYNN.

Six little maids on the beach at Lynn
Holding a walking match—who will win?
Six rods out and six rods in,
This is the length of the race at Lynn.
Lilian Crawford True.
“SAYING GRACE.”

“SAYING GRACE.”

“Come, come, mamma, to the window!”
Cried Freddie, with eager face,

“Just look at my little biddies —
They are drinking and saying grace.” .







THE SIX THANKFUL CHICKENS.

I quickly came at his bidding,
And saw a pretty sight:

Six downy little chickens |
Drinking with all their might.

And as they sipped the water
They craned their necks on high,
As if their thanks were lifted
To the beautiful blue sky.
PETER THE GOAT-HERD.

And so I could not wonder,
So rapt was his eager face,
That to him the little chickens
Were “drinking and saying grace.”
W. @. Richardson.

PETER THE GOAT-HERD.

Peter the goat-herd lives up among the hills. He has a small
house of his own to live in, and a small house for his goats to live
in. The two houses are. side by side. There are great stones upon
the roofs to keep them from blowing off and away. For the
winds blow very hard where Peter lives.

Every morning he takes his goats still farther up on the hills.
Up there are green pastures, where they feed. Peter sits down, and
his goats feed all about him. They feed right on the edge of the
steep precipices, for goats are very sure-footed.

Many flowers, blue forget-me-nots, and pretty pink and yellow
and white flowers, bloom on the hills; they make the prettiest car-
pet in the world.

Peter does not drive his goats; he goes before and leads the
way, and they follow him.

He has a name for each one. There is Silver-white and Sweet-
heart, Velvet-eyes, and Sunbeam. Hach goat knows its name and
comes when Peter calls it.

These pretty pastures where Silver-white and Velvet-eyes feed are
shut in by high mountains. All the year round the tops of the
mountains are white with snow. But at sunrise and sunset they
are pink.
me



‘AKING HIS FLOCK TO PASTURE.

PETER T.
THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

HE Dolliver children imvited the Cheney
children to their Christmas-tree.

The Cheney family lived on Water Street
near the wharves. The Dolliver family lived up
on the Hill. ee
The Cheneys lived in a house with four —





other families. They had only three rooms.
The Dollivers had their beautiful great house
all to themselves, and had, O, ever so many rooms!

The street before the Cheney children’s house was narrow and
black with coal dust, and noisy with drays and carts. The
Dolliver house sat back from the street, and had beautiful lawns
about it, and flower beds in summer.

The father of the Cheney children was ill. He had been ill a
long time, and the doctor said he would never get well. So
Mrs. Cheney took in washing, and scrubbed floors to support the
family. .

There were six Cheney children. George was the eldest, and was
eleven. The youngest, Susy, was one. George carried bundles for
the corner grocer. Mary, who was nine, helped do the housework;
Sarah, who was seven, picked up bits of coal and wood about
the wharves for the fire, and tended upon Baby Susy; Johnnie,
aged five, waited upon the sick father; Dicky was only three,
and could do nothing but be “dood,” and not cry. He was a
sweet little fellow. .

They were all good children, and did their best to help their
mother, and take care of their sick father. :




JENNY RILEY AND GEORGE,








THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

There were also six of the Dolliver children, and, taken together,
the families made six pairs. They were exactly the same ages,
too, beginning with Tom Dolliver who was eleven, and ending
with Baby Rose who was one.

The Christmas-tree was very pretty. In fact, I do not think
anybody ever saw a Christmas-tree that was not pretty. ' This
one was hung with shining balls—red, yellow, blue, pink. A white
dove perched on the very tip-top of it. Tom hung upon it a
pair of shoes, a ball and bat, and a suit of nice clothes for
George. Bessie added one of her picture books, a letter game, and
two housemaid’s aprons for Mary. Then Amy came up and hung
her prettiest doll, a pink hood and brown mittens, and a bright
half-dollar for Sarah. Ned, reaching up as high as he could,
fastened to its branches a new jack-knife, a box of paints, and
a book of outline pictures to color, for John. Then Mrs. Dolliver
hung, on the very lowest branches, a box of building blocks for
Dicky, and a rubber ring for Baby
Susy who was just teething. These
were from Theo and Baby Rose, who
were not big enough to hang anything
themselves. There was a lace bag full
of chocolate creams for each of the
twelve children, and Mrs. Dolliver put
a little gift on the tree for each of
her brood. She had never given them



costly presents at Christmas. For
Cliristmasy she aids wasethe=binciday. =f ee 2 ee eas
of the Holy Babe of Bethlehem, and gifts on that day must be
made to Him. Tom, when he was a very little boy, had asked
her how we can make gifts to Him, seeing He is not here. And
she had said that our Lord: himself had told us how when He said:
THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.

I was an hungered and ye gave me meat. TI was thirsty and ye
gave me drink. And then added: Inasmuch as ye did it unto
one of the least of these, my brethren, ye did it unto me.

“And so, my dear boy,” she said, “when you give to those
who are in want, in body
or in mind, you give to Him.
Some people are in want of
bread, dear, and some of a
kind word.” .

‘She had also taught her
children, that a gift to be
of value, must be one’s own. ;
To buy gifts with papa’s or
mamma's money could not
be a real gift of their own.
And so they had bought or
made the gifts for the Cheney

children.
Tom had a good many



“tips” from good-natured

SARAH PICKED UP WOOD AT THE WHARYES,

uncles and aunts, and so he
had been able to buy the nice clothes for George, whose one
suit he had noticed was covered with patches.

Bessie had made Mary’s aprons herself. They each had two
pockets, and buttoned up close around the neck. The sewing was
well done, and. Mary was very pleased with them. “They will
keep my gown clean, when I’m washing the dishes and cleaning
the stove,” she said.

When five-year-old Ned saw how pleased pore was with the
paints and outline pictures, he hugged him and said, “I thought
you'd like ’em, and I bought ’em all with my own, Own money,
. A GAME WITH MAMMA’S BOA.

Johnnie,” and Johnnie kissed him on each cheek three times over.
Amy had knitted the pink hood, and hooked the brown mittens
for Sarah. It had taken her a long time, and she often dropped
a stitch, or made a mistake, and had to pick her work out, ‘and
do it over again. And, of course, they were not made quite so
nicely as a grown woman, like her: mother, would have made them.

But Sarah thought that never was there such a pretty hood,
or such nice warm mittens. How warm ‘they would keep her
hands, when the bits of wood and coal were frosty!

«And did you do ’em you own self?” she asked. “O, I
should love to do such pretty things.” And then Mrs. Dolliver
said she must come some day and Amy would show her how.

Of course, there’ was a little supper after the Christmas-tree,
with some pink ice-cream. And then they all went home, and the
Dollivers’ nurse took Baby Susy herself, wrapped in a very nice
warm cloak, which Mrs. Dolliver had given her, and George and
Tom trundled Dicky in the Dolliver baby carriage.

Frances A. Humphrey.



A GAME WITH MAMMA’S BOA.


aww

\ wy Wy fe
XC ey iy
RS

GA





THE DOLLIVERS’ CHRISTMAS-TREE.


THE OLD HOUSE.

THE OLD HOUSE.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

OOK! look!” George called out.
“OQ, what lots ‘of sticks! what
fun, Say! ” for that was what the
family all called little Sarah —
Sanya

George had come out to help
her pick up sticks. He carried
his basket turned over his head.
Just as they met Jenny Kelly,
who was carrying her little baby-
brother, they saw that the old

EF house just by the corner was be-



ing pulled down.’ The workman
‘were at work busy as so many bees all over the house.

They had taken off the doors, and taken out the windows.
There wasn’t much glass left in the windows, but they leaned
them up carefully against a post. Then they began to tear down
the wood-work and throw that out in great long strips.

“O, I’m so sorry!” said little Say.

“T ain't,” replied George. George did not always speak properly,
and said “ain’t” instead of “am not.” “I’m glad,” he said,
“there'll be capital sticks. You won’t have to hunt round all
day for a few sticks, Say.”

“©, but it was such a lovely old house!” said Say. “And they
said a great man lived in it once. Don’t you know, Jenny, the
nice big closets? O, we’ve had such good times in those closets
THE OLD HOUSE.

playin’ go-a-visitin’, and make-h’lieve
parties.” And the tears really stood
in little Say’s eyes.

Jenny Riley looked grave too. This
old house had been a play-ground for
the children in rainy days. The man
who owned it was a good-natured man,
and liked children, and so he had often
let the little girls on Water street
play there. He kept the boys out
though; he said boys would smash
things up too much, So there was
good reason why George did not feel
so badly as little Sarah, that the old
house was coming down.

“ And such big fireplaces,” said lit-
tle Say. “One day when it rained

y
x

ever so hard, Mr. Small built a great
fire im one of ’em. I never saw
such a nice big warm fire, and he
told us about the great man. He
said there were real parties then in
it, not make-b’lieves, and he had little
girls —the great man did.”

Whiz-z-z! how the sticks and strips
of wood did come flying out of the
doors and windows! big sticks, thick
sticks, long, thin strips!

“OQ, there you be, little Say!”
called out Mr. Small in a kind, hearty
tone. “Come right along and fill Se ee




FAR OUT AT SEA.

your basket, George; plenty o’ sticks now! plenty. Take all you
want. And how's the father to-day? Coughin’ bad? O, I’m
sorry !”

Never did little Say have such a harvest of nice dry sticks to
kindle fire with before; never since she began to pick up
sticks for a living. Generally, she only got the smallest handful,
though that helped, her mother always said.

And Mr. Small, too, tossed her out a few bits of prettily carved
wood. “Those will dress up the baby-house, little Say,” he said.
He knew about that small, very small baby-house of hers, in the
corner by the old chest of drawers.

And he had seen the Christmas doll, too, that Amy gave her;
he said it beat all the dolls he’d ever seen. « It’s a beauty,” he

said.
Mr. Small never said, “Git out o’ here!” to the children, as

some of the men about the wharves did; and he often took
them to ride in his cart. In winter, when there was snow on
the ground, and he came with his sled, what fine times they
did have! That sled would hold twenty children. Mrs. Cheney
often said she “h’lieved it was’ made of india-rubber! ”

Frances A. Humphrey.





FAR OUT AT SEA,


LITTLE GRETCHEN.



THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

(The Dolliver Stories.)

IRS. DOLLIVER did not forget what she had said
to little Sarah on Christmas Eve. “You must



come sometime and let Amy teach you how to
crochet and hook mittens,” she said. :

So one day she sent down word for little Say
to come up the next Saturday, in the forenoon,
at ten o’clock, if her mother could spare her.

Little Say was ready at the time set. She had used plenty of
water, and was as sweet and clean as it is possible for a little
girl to be, and that is very sweet, as we all know.

To be sure, the little hands looked somewhat rough and red
with hard work. But she drew on over them the nice brown
mittens. And the pink hood made the loveliest of settings for
the round brown face, with its black eyes, that had a soft sparkle
in them.

“Be a good girl, little Say,” said the dear mother, as she
held the door open for her to go out.

“T’ll try, mother,’ was Say’s cheerful answer. And I am sure
that is all any of us can do—try to be good. For if we really
try we shall succeed.

It was a bright frosty morning, and Say tripped along, singing
to herself, and stopping just a second, now and then, to look at
the sparrows, who were busy picking up their food in the streets
and chattering and scolding.

She met Mr. Small, who smiled and said “Good-morning, lit-


THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

tle Say. You aren’t running away, I hope; we can’t spare you,
you know;” which made little Say laugh right out. The idea
of her running away! Mr. Small was such a nice funny man,
to be sure! ;

Mrs. Dolliver herself met little Say before she had a chance
to ring; before she had
got fairly up the steps,
even; and led her in, and
took off her coat and
mittens, and untied the
pink hood, and gave her
a motherly kiss.

“You are fresh as a
little rose this morning,”
she said. “ And now come
right in to my morning-
room, and I think we
shall fnd Amy there.” ~

What a warm, sun-
shiny, cosey place that
morning-room was! Say
skipped and said “Oh!”
very softly, as the door



opened. - There were pots MISS MORRIS, THE LADY WHO CALLED

of palms standing about,

and some violets in bloom filled the room with a sweet fragrance.
In a large easy chair sat Amy. She had been reading Hans

Andersen’s stories almost all the morning. She had stopped to

play with a kitten which was scrambling over the chair-back.

The door had opened so noiselessly she had not heard her mother

and Say come in.


THE FIRST CROCHET LESSON.

“Amy,” said her mother, as they came up and stood quite near.

Amy turned and jumped up when she saw Say, and dropped
Hans Andersen, and the kitten, taken by surprise, spit, and that
made them all laugh.

They were quickly seated on a sofa, with worsted and crochet

needles, and the lessons began.
Mrs. Dolliver sat in another part
of the room, and a sweet-faced
lady came in whom she called Miss
Morris. They talked together in
low tones.

The little girls chatted and
‘worked, and Mrs. Dolliver said
Say was to stay to lunch, for her
mother had said she might. By
lunch time, she had got so she
could manage the crochet needle
quite well, though Mrs. Dolliver
said there would have to be a
good many more lessons before
she could crochet well enough to
begin the mittens.

And Amy and Say said to
each other that they did not care
how many lessons there were; the more the better.

After lunch, Mrs. Dolliver. tied on the pink hood again and



AT THE DOLLIVER HOUSE.

gave little Say a small basket of white grapes for the sick
father, and a bunch of sweet violets for her own self, and she
skipped along home as merrily as the sparrows.

“OQ, mamma, I have had such a lovely time!” she exclaimed as
the dear mother opened the door for her. Frances A. Humphrey.


ee

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































ON THE BEACH.

* —,


“THE AWFUL BLOT”

«THE AWFUL BLOT.”

(The Dolliver Stories.)

4g OME, little Say, it is time to get
sa ready for’ bed,” was what her
mother said to Sarah every



























night at exactly quarter to seven.

For that getting to bed took a
long time. First of all, Queenie
5 had to be undressed. (Queenie
oe was the doll which Amy had
given to Sarah at Christmas.)
Then Sarah herself was to be

















































Bee











SS





















1A Ee undressed. Sometimes she un-
ej fereda dressed first.
ee While she was undressing
ey ; iW ee Queenie, she always told her all
S a we about what had taken place that
UK eR a day; where she ‘had been, what she had

done, and what strange things she had seen.

It was on an evening in April that

she told her the story of “The Awful

Blot.” Baby Susy had been fast asleep in

her cradle for a full half-hour. Say herself was undressed and was
sitting on a stool by the side of the cradle, so as to gently
rock the cradle, if baby should show signs of waking up. For —
the mother was in the other room fanning the poor father, who

was now very sick indeed.


“THE AWFUL BLOT.”

“Queenie,” said Say, “you have been such a good child
to-day I shall tell you everything. I got a nice lot of sticks
to-day and we girls played hop-scotch. I don’t suppose you
ever played hop-scotch ’cause
you can’t hop; and George
and Jimmy Riley played
marbles. But Billy Smith
kept plaguing them and
knocking their marbles
about. He’s a bad, naughty
boy, Billy Smith is, and is
always teasing.

“But he .was punished
to-day, and we did not feel
a bit sorry. Do you ’mem-
ber, Queenie, Mary’s nice
writing-book? Of course
you do. . She keeps it as
nice and clean, and she Nain

HT ta
: we Meni i
never gets her fingers all HANEY



over ink as Jenny Riley does.
And she *spected to get MARY SHOWS THE AWFUL BLOT.
a merit for it.

“Well, to-day she was writing, and teacher called out Billy’s
class in spelling. And he was walking along down.to the spell-
ing place, and just when he come to Mary’s desk, he knocked
it and the ink-bottle tipped over, and such an awful blot!

“ And Mary she cried, and teacher said, ‘Billy Smith, did you do that
a-purpose or was it an ac’dent?’ And Billy said ‘Twas an ac’dent.’

“But Johnny Hall said he saw Billy kick the desk with his
- foot. And then Billy said p’raps "twas done a-purpose, but he
«THE AWFUL BLOT”

didn’t mean to, And teacher said if ’twas done a-purpose, of
course he meant to. And she made him stand up in the floor.
And he was ’shamed. And teacher kept him after school.
«And she said, ‘Mary Cheney, you shall have a merit just
the same; it isnt your fault. And, said she, ‘just hold it up
and let us all see that awful blot! And she made Billy look
at it and he was just as ’shamed.’ ”

This was the story that Say told to Queenie, and the teacher
did. keep Billy after school, and talked to him very seriously
about his fault. For Billy’s great fault is liking to tease.

She told him that liking to tease leads to many bad things;
it makes a boy careless about the feelings of others; he doesn’t
mind if he makes them feel badly. “It leads to falsehood, often,
just as it did to-day, Billy,” she said. “ You wanted to tease
Mary, and when you found you would have to be punished you
told a lie. Teasing makes a boy cowardly.” FL A.



GEORGE AND JIMMY RILEY PLAYING MARBLES.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































OUT ON THE HIGH SEAS WITH THE SEA GULLS.
A NEW HOME.

A NEW HOME.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

OW that May had come all the
Dollivers had gone out in the
country to their farm, which they
had named Beechcroft.

And all the Cheney family were
going, too. Their poor father had
died late in April, and Mrs. Dol-
liver had said to Mrs. Cheney,
“Now you must give up your
tenement in this black dusty Water
Street, and come out to Beechcroft.
We have a small red house on the
farm which will be just the place
for you. And it will be such a

good thing for the children to have the fresh country air and

play out of doors all day long.”

Mrs. Cheney said she would gladly go if she could find work
to do out there. She should not want to be dependent.

And Mrs. Dolliver said there would be plenty of work for
her at the farmhouse. Anything that she would like to do;
housework, or washing at home, or sewing. George could help
on the farm. And they should have a garden of their own,
and raise their own vegetables.

Perhaps they could raise some vegetables to sell. Only about
a mile away was the beach, where a great many visitors came


A NEW HOME.

in summer; they could sell vegetables to these summer visitors,
and berries. The fields were full of blackberries and huckleberries,
and the children could pick them.

“And it will be so much nicer than picking up sticks at the
wharf,” said Say.

A busy time the Cheneys had packing up. It did not take
them many hours, however; in the first place they did not
have so very much to pack; and then, as we all know, many
hands make quick work, and they all helped.

It was a lovely blue and pink May morning when they
started; for they got off on the
earliest train, and just as they
steamed out of town, the sun
came up and the blue sky in
the east was full of little pink
clouds. It was like gomg a-May-
ing, only as none of them, poor
things! had ever been a-Maying,
they did not think of 1. Mr=
Small came down to see them off,



and brought Say a paper of choco- | I
late creams. . ) il

It was a long ride, but before 08, Neen. sana oF y
they had time to think of being TOM’S DONKEY.

tired, the train stopped, and the conductor shouted “Beechcroft.”
They made quite a bustle leaving the cars; for not only was
Baby Susy fast asleep, but so was Dicky, and they both had to
be carried; and then there were all the bags and _ packages.
But the conductor was very kind, and carried Dicky himself.
“He’s a sweet little fellow,” he said. “I shouldn’t mind own-
ing him myself. Can’t you spare him?” :
A NEW HOME.

“O, no, no! we couldn't!” they all shouted at once.

The man Silas was at the station with an open carriage, and
Bessie was there with her little goat team, and Tom came down
on his donkey. _

Bessie took Say and Amy, and drove the goats herself. Tom
offered his donkey to George; but when George tried to mount
him, the donkey kept standing on his fore feet and kicking up
his hind feet. So George said he would walk.

Their goods had come: down the day. before, and Silas had
unpacked them and set them up. Mrs. Dolliver had had the
table set out and a dinner sent down from the farmhouse.



































BESSIE’S GOAT TEAM.

The windows were wide open, and the sweet air came in,
and the smell of apple blossoms; and the birds were twittering.
“Oh!” said Say, drawing a long breath. “Isn’t this lovely?”
Frances A, Humphrey.


TAKING A PORTRAIT.
THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.

THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

ONG before the Cheney chil-
dren arrived at Beechcroft,
the swallows had come and
were busy building their
nests in the old barn.

I suppose that these swal-
lows, and their fathers and



mothers, and their grand-
fathers and grandmothers,
and. great-grandfather Swallow and his wife, and great-great-grand-
father Swallow and his wife had all had nests in this barn for
ever and ever so many summers. 7

The old beams were quite thick with nests. Some of them
were so old they were tumbling in pieces. Others were broken
in places, but were still strong, and the swallows were repairing
these — putting in fresh bits of mud.

One pair were building a new nest. This was their first nest,
and they took great pride in it and shaped it carefully. Some-
times an old swallow came over and looked at the nest, and
gave them some advice about it. ‘He sat on the beam and
chirped away to them while they worked.

Say and George and Mary and Dicky were never tired of
watching the swallows. They watched them at twilight, as- they
darted through the air on swift wings, catching the insects
which are their food. How swift their flight was! It is said
THE SWALLOWS AT BEECHCROFT.

a swallow can fly ninety miles in an _ hour.
Sometimes they passed so near the children as
almost to brush their cheeks with their wings.
They never seemed afraid of the children.
They would go on building their nests, with a



. whole row of eager watching eyes looking up
from the mow just below them.

But let Flossie or Sam, especially Sam, put so much as his
nose into the barn door and there was an outcry, indeed!
Every swallow came swooping down and scolding, and Sam was
glad to flatten his ears back, and escape as best he could.

In due time the nests
and then each
seen carefully

were finished, the eggs were laid,







little swallow was
brooding over
her nest from morning till
night, and of
brooded all

could not be

course _ they
Patient little creatures! It
very “intresting,” as little Say remarked.






night also.

But when
all mouth. ,

the eggs turned into bare little birds, almost
then it was interesting. And after this
the swallows fairly persecuted poor Sam. They not only
drove him out or the barn, but if they found him lying on
the green turf. in the yard, they would swoop down upon him
as though they would like to pick out his great bright eyes.

And how his great eyes would shine! The swallows knew
very well that if he could only get up to the nests he would
make but a mouthful apiece of their
little baby-birds. ;

But Sam never did get at the swallows.
They all grew and thrived, and in due



time tried their wings and were seen
THE LITTLE DAYS.

darting about in the twilight with the old birds, catching insects.
There were other birds at Beechcroft besides the swallows,
though these were the most interesting, because their nests were
built where they could be plainly seen.
An oriole had a nest in a great elm. It was like a little
bag, and was stoutly fastened to the branch by threads, so that



FLOSSIE. SAM.

it rocked with every breeze. The oriole himself was of so bright
a color he looked like a bit of flame among the green leaves.
And there were red linnets that sung sweetly, and merry bob-
olinks in the green meadows, and a brown thrush that perched
every noon on the tall maple by the gate and sung till he
could sing no more. -Franees A, Humphrey.

———
THE LITTLE DAYS.

Tf the Sun had a sled for sliding down the Sky,
How very much faster he could coe

And the funny little Days, how quickly they would fly
In order to keep up with him, you know. M. J. A.
ii



IN JAPANESE DRESS.


THE FOURTH OF JULY.

THE FOURTH OF JULY.
(The Dolliver Stories.)

ERY often during the night before
the Fourth, Say kept waking up
and asking Mary if it wasn’t morn-
ing and time to get up, and George
was hopping out of his bed every
other hour almost, to see if the
sun was not yet up. The sun
always rises very late, I have ob-
served, on Fourth of July morning.

They had made a plan the night



before to be up so as to send
off a whole bunch of fire-crackers
just as the sun should show his red face. Their mother had said
they might do so, if they would go off in the field away from
the house so as not to wake baby Susy. If she were wakened
so early, she would be cross, and in no mood to enjoy her Fourth
of July.

Then, too, Mrs. Cheney was afraid they might set something
on fire, if they sent off the crackers too near the house. For
her part, she said, she should be glad when it was over with,
and one bunch was all she permitted them to have.

They went off beautifully—snap! snap! crack! crack! and
then the children—or a part of them— had their procession,
and marched around the yard, so that at last they had a good
appetite for breakfast. The Dollivers had come down, and part
THE FOURTH OF JULY.

marched, while the rest sung Sherman’s “March through Georgia.”

They were to have a picnic on the beach that day; not the
great beach where the visitors were, but a smaller beach not
far from Beechcroft. The children were all going under the care
of Mrs. Cheney, and Mrs. Dolliver was coming down with the
baskets of goodies at one o'clock.

The children never tired of this beach; it wasn’t one bit like
the dirty wharfs in Bayside, where they had lived. It was
clean, and they could dig in the sand for hours without getting
their frocks dirty. It was shallow, and they could take off their
shoes and stockings and wade in ever so far without any danger
of being drowned.

They found lovely things that day— pretty round shells, pur-
ple, and with little green spines
all over the outside; these are
called “urchins.” Ned found
a big crab, walking along on
the sand backward as crabs
do, and tried to catch it and
did catch it but it almost
pinched his finger off.



In one deep place were eae
starfish, pink and gray, looking like the loveliest of sea flowers.

In another place, a great crimson jelly-fish had come on shore
—a _ curious-looking creature that you never would think was
ever alive.

In the damp sand were little holes, and if you dug down
you would find a clam. And there were little black snails all
over the rocks, and once in a while a seal would stick his round
black head out of the water, and blow and bark seal-fashion.

How hungry they were when lunch time came. Mrs. Dolliver
THE FOURTH OF JULY.

had arrived, with Silas bringing the baskets, and a table-cloth
was spread on the sand under the shade of a high rock. A
tiny flag—the Stars and Stripes of course —was stuck in the sand
at each of the four corners of the cloth, and Mrs. Dolliver gave to
each child a small cluster of red and white and blue ribbons to
pin on frock and jacket. Z
Then they all sang .“ My Country, ’tis of Thee, Sweet Land of
“Liberty,” after which they sat down and ate. Never, I believe,
were there such good
things to eat on a Fourth
of July picnic.

“Oh! it’s lovely,” sighed
Say, “just as lovely as it
can be. The very bestest

time I ever had in my
life.” And as Say’s “ good
times ” were generally very
good indeed, this must,
as you see, have been won-
derfully fine.

In the evening they all
went to the Dolliver
house, where Chinese lan-



ONE OF THE CHINESE LANTERNS.

terns were hung all about

on the trees, making it look like fairy-land. Then came the fireworks,

There were rockets that flew up among the stars, and burst,

sending down a shower of bright sparks. .

There were Roman.candles blue, and red, and yellow, and won-

derful fiery serpents; and a Catherine wheel that whizzed and
whizzed, until Babies Susy and Rose shouted with glee to see it.
Frances A. Humphrey.
~

weaving. Carpets are also made

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

The world is very large, and it takes a long time and a
great deal of money to travel around it. Those who make the
journey must travel thousands of miles. by steamship, and by
railroad, and by stage-coach and sometimes on horseback and on
camel-back. :

But you and I shall make a little tour around the world,
without the aid of steamship, or railroad, or horse, or camel, or
money. We shall merely walk
hand in hand around this sit-
ting-room in which I am writ-
ing, where we shall see things



from many countries; and that
will be almost. as good as visit-
ing those countries themselves.

And first, what do we step
on, as we enter the room? A
carpet. Where did it come
from? From England, where
there are many cities which
have become famous for carpet-



A CORNER OF THE WORLD.

in. this and other countries.

Those of Persia are thought to be among the finest of all.
The lace window-curtains also came from England; the linen

of the window-shades was grown, spun and woven in Scotland.
The next thing we notice is an upright piano. It is made of

rosewood. Rosewood is the wood of a large tree that grows in
CAREFUL WALKERS.

South America. It is very scarce and expensive. The keys of
the piano are made of ivory. That comes from Africa, and some
parts of Asia. It is the tusks of elephants, great numbers of
which roam wild in those parts of the world, and are hunted
and killed for the sake of their tusks.

If we look inside the piano, we see beautiful wires of brass
and steel, called the “strings,’ which are brought from Eng-
land. The little pegs round which the strings are wound, are
made of the best Swedish iron; none other is found strong
enough to bear the tension. The little hammers that, by strik-
ing the strings, produce the sounds, are covered with chamois —
the skin of the chamois, or wild goat, which is found among
the Alpine valleys and snow-covered mountains of Switzerland.

The piano itself was made in the city of New York.

Some of the other furniture of the room is of mahogany. That
wood is also found in South America, as well as in Guatemala,
where the trees grow to a great size. Other articles are made
of black walnut, a native wood, found in great abundance in
the forests of Wisconsin and Michigan. Isabella McFarlane.





CAREFUL WALKERS.


AN ENGLISH GIRL PLAYING THE VIOLIN.
A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

Here is a little ornament of lacquer-work ; it represents a
company of Japanese ladies and gentlemen drinking tea. It was
made in Japan, where the people excel in that kind of work.

Against it rests a fanciful Turkish pipe, made ‘in Constanti-
nople. Its mouth-piece is of amber—a substance found on the
seashore, in Bermuda and other places; its bowl is of some
polished red material, and its stem of purple velvet, hung with
little gilt chains and crescents. (It is kept solely for decoration,
and not for smoking vile tobacco.) _Near by hangs a pair of
bracelets, of carved sandal-wood beads, made in India.

Here is an embroidered scarf of China silk. The embroidery
is home-made, but the silk was made in China, and none but
the Chinese can make it so fine and so beautiful. It was the
Chinese who first thought of weaving silk cloth from the fine
filaments spun by the silk-worm.

Yonder is a little basket, curiously woven of dried sea-weed.
It was made by a blind man, in Scotland. It is filled with
some dried leaves and flowers, which remind me pleasantly of a
late visit I made to that country—an ivy-leaf from Melrose
Abbey, a bunch of grasses and a big Scotch thistle from Edin-
burgh Castle, and a sprig of fragrant birch from Balmoral, one
of the homes of Queen Victoria.

On the mantel we see a little cup and saucer, in blue and
gold, which came from Paris. Above them, spread out like a
great fan, is a natural palmetto leaf, which a friend brought me ©
from Florida; while near by hangs, on the corner of a picture-
‘frame, a long, drooping spray of eray Southern moss.
A LITTLE JOURNEY ROUND THE WORLD.

On a corner bracket, framed in glass, is a South Carolina six
dollar bank bill, issued at Charleston in 1776—a centennial relic.

On the lamp which stands on the center-table, there is a
fancy lamp-shade of satin ribbon and lace. The ribbon came
from Lyons, in France, where the best ribbons. are made; the
lace was made by some poor peasant girl in Ireland; and the
silk with which the lamp-shade is frmged was spun and twisted
in a neighboring town of Massachusetts.

The gold with which some of the picture-frames are gilded,





ANOTHER CORNER OF THE WORLD.

came from California; the quicksilver on the back of the mir-
ror, from Spain; and the mirror itself may have come from
Venice, a city of Italy, which has long been famous for the
manufacture of mirrors.

There is a stove in the room, and the sheet-iron of which
the stove-pipes are made came from Russia.

There is a little tray containing some curiosities—a stone
picked up in Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal; a few shells
brought from the South Seas by a sea captain; a piece of gold-
bearing quartz from California, with the little specks of gold
THREAD THE NEEDLE.

glittering in it; a scrap of iron-ore from Northern New York;
some Indian arrow-heads, used by the Indians who once inhab-
ited this part of the country, before the white men ‘came to
it; and a rusty bullet, ploughed up in a field, where a great
battle was fought, in the time of the Revolution, more than a
hundred years ago. .

Now let us sum up the countries we have visited — South
America, Guatemala, Africa, India, Japan, China, the South Sea
Islands, England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Sweden, Russia,
Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Turkey, Bermuda, Canada, and many
parts of the United States! Quite a journey, indeed!

And now I think it is time to stop and take a rest.
. Isabella McFarlane.



THREAD THE NEEDLE,
A LITTLE FLOWER GIRL.

A LITTLE FLOWER GIRL.

Many little children have to
work in order to earn their living.
IT remember as I was coming up
School Street, in Boston, one cold
winter’s day, at twilight, I heard
a little piping voice at my elbow
say “Buy a Record”?

I looked down; what a little
mite of a fellow he was, to be
sure! Of course I bought a
Record. Who could say “No” to



A FLOWER GIRL SELLING HER FLOWEKS.

such a little wage-earner ?
While he was folding the paper, I asked how old he was.
“Seven,” was ue reply; and away he went cheerily calling

his papers.

I could not help thinking of one or two little
boys of seven whom I know, and wondering
how they would like to sell papers for a living.

In many cities, little girls sell flowers. It
would seem to be a pleasant business to sell
flowers; and so it is. But still it is very hard
for a little girl to be so poor and ragged as
- to have to sell them in order to get bread to
eat. But this many little girls have to do.

To pick and arrange flowers for the home
—to be mamma’s little flower girl, is quite
another thing.



MAMMA’S FLOWER GIRL
MARIA THERHSA AND HER LITTLE SON.

MARIA THERESA AND HER LITTLE SON.

On the next page you will see, pictured out, a most inter-
esting and charming story. This scene took place a great many
years ago, September 12, 1741.

The father of Maria Theresa had died, fee her Empress
of Austria.

But Frederick, King of Prussia, who is called in history,
Frederick the Great, wanted to seize her kingdom and add it to
his own. So he went into Austria with his army.

Then Maria Theresa fled to the country of the Hungarians,
which was also a part of her kingdom. She came before the
Hungarians bringing her little son Joseph, then only six months
old, and stood, as you see her in the picture, a tall, handsome
woman, clad in velvet and ermine, the pretty boy smiling on her
shoulder. For he was pleased. with the sight of the beautiful
dress and shining swords of these men.

In a speech full of courage, Maria Theresa called upon her
Hungarians to come to her help, and drive out the Prussians.
“T have no friends but you in all the world,” she said.

And these brave and gallant men answered by drawing their
swords, and waving them on high, while they shouted:

“ We will die for our King, Maria Theresa!”

They called her their king, you see, and she had as high a
courage as any king that ever lived. .

And they were as good as their word. They drove out the
Germans, and many of them did die for her, and she reigned
as Empress of Austria many years. The little child in her arms
became afterwards Joseph II., Emperor of Austria. ees


1»

ESA

MARIA THER

ING,

E WILL DIE FOR OUR K

bow
WHO KNEW BEST?

WHO KNEW BEST?

ABOUT some things Flor-
ence was sure she knew bet-
ter than her mother, although
she was but ten years old.
One was about her new spring
coat and hat. Florence wanted
to wear them at once, but her
mother said she must wait for
some time yet. This made
her quite cross, but her
mother did not allow her to
wear her new clothes any the
sooner for that.

One bright, sunny morning
-her mother was in bed with a
headache, and Florence had

FLORENCE AND THE NEW HAT, to get ready for school by

herself. She went to the

closet for her old coat and winter hood, and there on the nail was
the new coat, and on the shelf lay the hat all ready to put on.

“TI do believe I will wear it to-day,” she said to herself.
“T am most sure mamma would let me, it is so bright and



warm!” But she was really not at all sure. She would not
have put on the new coat and hat, and gone so quietly down-
stairs for fear Mary, the nurse, would see her, if she had been.

When she arrived at school all the little girls came about
her to admire her new clothes, and she felt very proud.
WHO KNEW BEST?

At recess the children were playing in the yard. The ground
was damp and muddy, for it had rained all the day before.
Florence was having a fine game of tag, quite forgetting her
new coat. Suddenly as she was running her foot caught and
down she fell in the very muddiest part of the yard! The |
others ran to help her and laughed merrily when they saw the
plight she was in. But Florence did not laugh; she was much
nearer crying! The front of her pretty light coat was black
with mud, and her hat was bent out of shape! While the
older ones were brushing off the mud and trying to console her
the bell rang and they had to go in to school. Florence was
able to pay very little attention to her lessons, and received a
number of bad marks, the first she had had that week. To
make matters worse, when she came out of school the rain was
pouring down and she had no umbrella. With her old coat and
hood on she would have liked the fun of running home in the
rain. Now it was anything but funny, particularly as her mother
opened the door when she got home.

“You may go upstairs,’ said her mother, “and wait till I
come.”

The waiting was dreadful. Mary came and took her coat and
hat away, but did not speak to her. At last her mother came,
and Florence would have preferred any punishment to her
mother’s way of talking; it made her feel so small and so
ashamed.

She cried a great deal, and said she was very sorry. But
that did not take the stain off the coat. She was obliged to -
wear it, however, stain and all, until it was outgrown, to
teach her that wrong doing had lasting effects.

I am glad to say that it did teach her.

Anna M. Talcott.
BRAVE TOMMY.

=

BRAVE TOMMY.

Tommy was always say-
ing, “I’m not atraid!”
His big brother John said
he was a “little brag,” al-
ways telling what he would
do if a great bear- should
come out of the woods,
or a great giant should
threaten to eat him up.

“T shouldn’t be afraid!
I should just hit ‘em with
a big stick, and say ‘go
*way, and I should chase
’em, and make ’em run.”

He had never seen a
bear, or a tiger, or a



giant. But one day he
went in wading among
some tall water plants. A
great insect with a long
tail came buzzing about
his face. Its eyes were
large and fierce. And what
did this brave Tommy do?
He stood and shrieked “O,
O, O!” till brother John
came and drove the big
_ harmless thing away.


A FROLIC SONG.



My papa made this little song,
We dance it on the grass,
Whenever he is home with me,
For Tm “his little lass.”




ne == : Z : ar 4 SES «.
= Ss . EV op EN RS
S 2 ae Fee ~~ : se
S & = cP Y) aaa Gn ae
ee Za! =< - SS SE a

=~ fi $e .
Be x Sn S QZ =f OD et SCY
se SSeS Ly Ye ee a
Z 5 SS = Be 3S

“The little sheep are scampering,
About the soft, green hill,
I feel so full of frolic, too,
Somehow I can’t keep still.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi, -
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.

. —



“The little leaves are capering,
The brook is on a run,












ae ~. The birdies singing so, I think
re y Y } They must be having fun.
AGS oe Ae : a ey | ify : c
\ NU //- Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
NOS YEG LA ; :

8 o Cie “id Ho-a-diddle-hi,

For everything a-dancing is,
So merrily dance I.
A FROLIC SONG.



“The little clouds are hurrying
Across the big blue sky,
I guess the sun is calling them,
And that is why they fly.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.

“The little stars come out at night,
They twinkle while they play,
And get so tired then, I s’pose,
They have to sleep all day.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
For everything a-dancing is,
So merrily dance I.

“T am ‘his little midget, too,
A-dancing in the air,
With dimpled hands and busy feet,
And lots of curly hair.
Hey-a-diddle, hi-a-diddle,
Ho-a-diddle-hi,
When everything a-dancing is,
Then merrily dance I.”

Good-by, for I must run away,
I saw my papa pass,
And soon Ill hear him calling me,
“Where ts my little lass?”
. Hannah Coddington.
A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.



GETTING READY TO GO SOUTH FOR THE WINTER.



A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.

A monkey was chattering among the trees of a lawn near
Central Park, in New York. He had escaped from an organ-
grinder. He had a collar around his neck, and wore a red cap
trimmed with gold cord and covered with little bells which kept
up a merry jingling as he swung himself from limb to limb,
using his tail, and his paws which were so much like a child’s
hands.

The gardener climbed a tree after him, but before he reached
him the monkey was in another tree a dozen yards away. Then
the gardener climbed that tree, but the monkey had already gone
on to another; then he tried a third tree and failed, and gave
up the chase.

Mr. Anson, the owner of the place, was very much amused,
and his little girl and boy clapped their hands with delight.
The organ-grinder, however, did not seem to be in a good humor,
A FUNNY MONKEY TRAP.

He scolded, shook his stick, and kept calling, ,““Jocko! Jocko !”
The monkey scolded angrily in return, waved his red cap, and
flung leaves and twigs at his old master. In a little while a
Chinaman entered the yard. There was a twinkle in his almond-
shaped eyes.

“Chmaman catchlee monkley,” he said.

“Catch him, then,” said Mr. Anson.

“ Whatll gim me?” asked the Chinaman.

_ J will give you three dollars if you catch that monkey,” said
the organ-grinder.

“ Allee rightee!” cried the Chinaman.

He disappeared in a flash, and when he returned he was car-
rying a water-melon.

“Watchee Chinaman catchlee monkley,” he said. “No makee
muchee noise. Allee glo way.”

They all walked back to the porches. They watched the China-
man, and wondered what he was about to do. He went right
to work.

He made a small hole in the water-melon, and then placed it
in one of the wide walks, after which he hid himself behind the
bushes, ready to pounce upon the monkey.

The latter saw the melon and approached it with a good deal
_ of caution. He chattered softly and looked cunningly around him.
Monkeys are very fond of water-melon seeds, and so Jocko forced
his paw into the hole and grabbed a handful of them.

The Chinaman sprang ‘toward him. The monkey could not
draw his paw from the melon because he would not open it and
let go of the seeds. He tried to drag the melon with him but
it was too heavy, and he was easily caught. The Chinaman was
a sailor and had seen monkeys caught that way in India.

Frank H. Stauffer.
Re D>

LE oreo RG mn
Sl ay Vs iG a
Se Sethe UROL Neg de?





























Uy
Ki?




AV) lif |
AM i VN |

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L (ZZ,


ROLLIN ADATR.

ROBIN ADAIR.

That is his name, but we call him Bobby. Johnny found him
when he was hardly fledged out. He was cuddled close to a
big rock in the wheat field and crying as if his little heart
would break. Just as you would cry if some great giant should
burn your home and kill your dear brothers and sisters. That .
was what had happened to this dear little robin. Some cruel
boy had destroyed the home nest, and killed all the baby-robins
but this one. He had slipped away among the wheat.

He was alone, and cold, and hungry, so Johnny brought him -
home. He soon grew to be very tame, and ate the bread and
egg which Johnny gave him, readily. It was easy to teach him
tricks. And now, while the winter wind blows cold, and the
snow whirls against the windows, we have great fun with Bobby.

He will kiss us very prettily, but if a stranger offers his
mouth for a kiss he will nip his lips with his long, sharp bill.
He will sit on mamma’s shoulder for an hour at a time, softly
singing a pretty song, but if she begins to eat an apple, and
does not offer him a bite, he will tweak her ear sharply.

Sometimes he will not let her sew, but will fly towards her,
‘seize the thread, and pull it out of the needle before she can
take a stitch, No matter how many times she threads it, he
will not let her sew until he is tired of the fun. He will climb
a tiny ladder, then fall down and make believe he iy dead. He
will “sing for his supper” when we hold up any dainty and tell
him to sing for it.

He will play “hide-and-seek.” But we generally let him hide,
because he pulls our hair when he finds us, Ee eens
GL,
if

HA
“





































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iC eS ( th (i ee
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RUBIN ADAIR. ‘' SING FOR YOUR SUPPER, ROBIN!”’
LEGIUINV CIS! TTI AOI ONCE ES EIB ak








amas y

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| ys we

TAKING TOLL.



KITTY’S FIVE O'CLOCK THA.

Kitty had her own little table set for tea with her dolls, and
never thought of such a thing as having a real live visitor. But
she went upstairs to find one of her doll-children that had been
left when the others were brought, and when she came back there
was Aunt Jane, sitting by the fire, warming her feet. It was a
long walk from her house, and the day was cold.
GITTY’S FIVE O'CLOCK TEA.

“Good afternoon, Aunt Jane,” said Kitty. “You are just in
time. Come and take tea with me.”

“Dear me! I can’t!” said Aunt. Jane. “I am- very cold. I
must sit by the fire.”

Now Aunt Jane was not very obliging. She did not like to
trouble herself to please other people. She had a good many
nieces and nephews (I think there were seventeen in all), and
nobody had ever seen her go across the room to play with any
one of them. —

“QO, Aunt Jane!” said Kitty. “Of
course I shall bring it to you. Mother’s
away, and I am so glad to have a
~ real visitor!” .

“Oh! [Pm sorry your mother’s out,”
said Aunt Jane. “ Well, there, I think
it would rest me to have some tea.
Yes, Pll have some. Now, be careful!
Don’t spill it!” Kitty pours carefully.



It seems to be hot. I see the steam. te een ee ta
But this tea was made for Kitty and
the dolls. It is not such tea as Aunt Jane drinks. It is what
people call “cambric tea,” made of milk and hot water and a
great deal of sugar in it. I am afraid Aunt Jane will feel
disappointed, and think it will not “rest” her much.
Pamela McArthur Cole.

Sunshine is the truest gold: ;
Take as much as you can hold! M. J. H.
THE LITTLE PRINCE. — ELSAS DOLLY.









THE LITTLE PRINCE.

THE LITTLE PRINCE.

This pretty little prince you see
Lived where the red rose grows;
But what he did and what he said
— Why, eoodness only knows.
He wrote his life all in one book
For his own private shelf;
And read, and read, and read that book,
And wore it out himself.

ELSA’S DOLLY.

“What is it, my darling? Why do you cry? JI thought you
were playing tag so happily with Nero,” called little Elsa’s mother,
putting her head out of the window.

ELSA’S DOLLY.

On the lawn stood a little girl with her apron up to her eyes,
erying as if her heart would break. From one hand hung the
limp body of a doll, while a big romping dog stood by, wagging
his tail and looking as if eager to have the fun begin again.

But Nero’s fun had caused great grief to Elsa, and when she
heard her mother’s voice she sobbed out, “ Nero has bitten Julie!
bitten her head dreadfully!”

“Julie’s head, my precious? O, Nero, Nero, for shame! But,
dearie, he didn’t mean to do any harm. Dogs don’t understand
about dollies. Bring Julie in and let me see her.”

So Elsa went into the house, while Nero strayed off to the
‘kitchen door and laid himself down in the sun.

Ah! what a beauty poor Julie had been, with her beautiful
wax: head crowned with golden curls! And her eyes, that could
open and shut! Elsa used to put her to sleep and wake her
again many times a day, just for the pleasure of seeing the
sweet blue eyes close and then open again. Could it be that all
this happiness was at an end? But what a delightful being a
mother is! Elsa’s mother first washed Julie nicely; then her lips
and cheeks and eyebrows had a touch of paint, so that the face
looked as smiling and rosy as before; and next, the yellow hair
was brushed and curled; last of all, the head was fastened on;
and there was Julie as fresh and sweet as ever!

When Elsa took her, Julie’s eyes turned upward with a soft
glance and Elsa cried —

' “OQ, mamma! She is well again! She has opened her eyes!
Now I must put her to sleep. What a good mamma you are!

“But I will never let Nero play with you again, poor little
Julie! He is a fine old fellow to play with little girls; but he
is too rough for dollies, isn’t he?”

From the Danish, by Emilie Poulsson.
i MILITARY CAPS.—MY SAND HOUSE.



MILITARY CAPS.



MY SAND HOUSE.

They had been digging a well at my aunt’s, and so right by
the side of the house was a large pile of white sand. :
I took a piece of shingle for my spade, and by patting the
sand down hard and smooth I made the floor of my house. Then
with the fingers of my left hand resting on the floor, as a wall
against which to make the end of the house, and the back of
my hand as a support for the roof and sides, I took my spade
and packed the moist sand carefully over my hand until I had

a round, smooth house which was like a mound in shape.

When the outside of the house was arranged to suit me, I very
carefully drew out my hand, and there was the inside just as it
should be.

The next thing in order after finishing a house, is the garden,
or lawn; and so I made the garden around my house with
flower-beds and walks, and inclosed it with a fence which was
also made of the sand. I picked flowers and leaves and planted
them in the flower-beds, and set out little stems and twigs along
the walks.

I wanted a fountain, or fish-pond in my front lawn to make

\
MY SAND HOUSE.

it look prettier. I could not make the fountain, but I did the
fish-pond. z

I ran into the house and took one of auntie’s patty-tins, filled
it with water and sunk it in the sand. Then I put daisies
around the edge.

Now all was finished, and how pretty it looked! It was ready
for some one to live in. But where could I find anybody small
enough who would want to rent my little house?














“yt
YY









Gy

lee Dm UF OV Ze yy

% Shey oy Ni 5g
ay “agit WP

= ee NL wy

volt “They

ee Wy

aaah KW

gin x
a CYA >
iF












THE SAND HOUSE AND ITS TENANT,

At that moment there came hopping that way just the right
person. A dear little toad went to the gateway, walked into
the garden, looked at the lake and trees and flowers and then
went straight to the door of the house and took possession. Oh!
how happy I was to have such a cunning little tenant for my
little sand house!
















































































AMY AND THE KITTEN.
EDITH THOMAS.

EDITH THOMAS.

Edith is a pretty little kin-
dergarten scholar, as some of
you may be who read _ this
book; but her school is quite
different from yours. She is
blind and lives in a pleasant
home with other blind children.
They learn to read with their
fingers in books with raised
letters. They march, play games
and sing like merry birds; but
Edith does not sing. She is
deaf and has never heard any



TALKING WITH THE FINGERS.

one talk, so she has not learned to speak and sing. —

She is like a poor prisoner, shut away from all you learn so
easily. She puts up her hand and spells on her fingers a ques-
tion, or asks for what she would like.

Her teacher answers in the same way, touching the poor lit-
tle hand so the child can feel which letter she is making.

She can read stories and write printed letters to her mother
that you could read as well as a book.

She models clay images and does other work very nicely; but
think how long it would take you to learn without eyes, ears
or voice.

Perhaps your mother will take you some day to the Kinder-
garten for the Blind at Jamaica Plain, where you can see Kdith
and her little playmates. Louis Hat.
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
THE DOG—DANDIES OF PARIS.

“Where is little Flo going?”
asked Trinket’s big staring eyes
as plainly as a doll’s eyes could.

“ Off to Europe!” said Nurse.

“Let’s go too!” barked saucy dog
Tramp, picking up poor Trinkets
in his mouth, and dashing after
the carriage.

When Flo reached the steam-
er’s wharf there were her Tramp
and Trinkets waiting for her.

Papa



was go-

TRINKETS WAS STIFF AND SMILED SCORNFULLY.

ing to
send them home, but the child cried as if
her heart would break, for she wanted to
take them along.

That is how Tramp and Trinkets went
to Paris. And many funny things they
saw there. .

Did any little boy, or girl, or doll, or
puppy, ever meet, on a rainy day, a dog
with a water-proof cloak on, and a hood



drawn over its head to keep the dear from

THE TERRIER WITH HIS LADY’S
getting wet? PORTRAIT. :
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

Tramp and Trinkets did—zin Paris.

In that city there are nearly

four thousand persons who earn their living by making dog’s-

clothes, and the sum paid for
their work amounts to a million
dollars a year.

Tramp and Trinkets went
one day with Flo and her
mamma to a large shop where
nothing is sold but dog cos-



A SPANIEL TRIED ON A DUST-CLOAK.

tumes and dog jewelry. Here ever so many dogs were being rigged
out with what their mistresses thought they needed. Some were



FITTED TO A PAIR OF FINE DOE-SKIN BOOTS.

having suits for the house ; others
for the street. .
One was being fitted to a new
pair of fine doe-skin boots, to pro-
tect his dainty feet from the dust
and mud. Another was having
fastened to his left forefoot a
plain’ gold bracelet with
owner's
Beside rough-
coated terrier that wore a col-

his
monogram upon it.

him was: a

lar with his lady’s picture set in it.

At another counter a_ pretty
spaniel was having tried on a
dust cloak for traveling. It was
very stylish and had a_ pocket
at the side the
ticket. There were

dressing cases for the dog-dandies,

for wearer's

handsome

and sleeping baskets with cur-


MES. ALPHABET’S NEW YEARS PARTY.

tains, just like a doll’s cradle— “lovely enough for Trinkets!”
Flo said, which proves that they were nice indeed.

Tramp thought it all very odd. Flo asked him if he would
like to be dressed up in that way, but he
shook his head and growled at the little dog
fops, as if to tell them he thought they were
very silly.

Flo bought a pretty red blanket for him.
This he was pleased with, because it would



oo

een Seep: Tm warm om cold. days. “lrimicets | did

aes not seem a bit interested in anything . they
saw in the shop. She was as stiff as could be all the time and
smiled in a scornful way as though to say,

“«What is the use of making such pretty things for ugly dogs
- like Tramp! How much better it would be to give them to a
beautiful doll like me!”

. Mary Oatherine Crowley.
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
THE DOLL-DOCTOR OF LEIPSIC.
OH! oh!” cried Flo, one day, “my doll’s leg is

‘broken, what shall I do? oh! oh!”
Frau Gretchen, who kept the boarding-house



in Leipsic where the family were staying, found
the little girl crying over poor Trinkets.

“ Ah! too bad, too bad!” said the good woman.
“Why don’t you take her to the great doll-doctor?”

So that afternoon they took Trinkets to the doctor’s office.
Of course dog Tramp went too. He thought it would be useful to
know how legs were mended, in case he should meet with an accident.

The name of Frau Emma Friederike Schneider, the doll-doctor
_of Leipsic, is known all over the world. For more than fifty years
this busy, cheery woman has given her time and skill to the mend-
ing of dolls.

When Floand ~
her mamma
knocked at her
door it was
opened by a lit-
tle creature





scarcely taller
than. Flo. She
had pretty blue
eyes, and soft flaxen curls, and her quaint German head-dress and cos-
tume made her look, Flo thought, like a fairy godmother, who had



TRINKETS’ BROKEN LEG.
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

stepped out of a picture-book. This
was, in fact, the famous doll-doctor
herself. With a smile of welcome she
showed her visitors into a large room.

“Oh!” cried Flo in surprise, as
she looked around in vain for a
place to sit down. The chairs, tables,
floor, wall, all were crowded with
dolls; dolls dressed, “some in rags,
and some in tags, and some in



velvet gowns.” Such funny-looking

THE DOLL-DOCTOR.

dolls as they
were, too. Many seemed hopeless cripples,
lacking one or both arms, or legs, or feet.
Others were without an eye, a nose or a
wig, and some had lost half or the whole
of their heads. Several, however, had just
been made over as good as new by this
wonderful doctor, and sat up straight upon
a shelf, looking fresh
WANTING A NOSE. and rosy and happy.
The doll-doctor “took Trinkets in her
soft hands, and looked at the break. ee
Then she nodded her head.
“This is very simple,”
said she. “The lit-
tle lady will not eS
have to go to the —==s=45
hospital, I will cure

her at once.” oe LEZ

She took some AS GOOD AS NEW.





GOING TO SCHOOL.

elastic, and with one or two tiny instruments went to work.
Soon Trinkets was as strong and beautiful as ever. Flo danced
about with delight, and Fran Emma
laughed, and her little curls bobbed about
in the queerest way.

Flo’s mamma laid a silver piece upon
a small salver held by a black doll.

The sweet little doll-doctor patted Flo’s
cheek, kissed her lightly on the forehead,
and presently the party were again in
the narrow, crooked street. All the way
home Trinkets looked very proud of hav-
ing been to such a celebrated surgeon,
while Tramp yelped and frisked about as



if laughing with Flo at all the funny
THE BLACK Dot witH Tae satver. things they had seen. Mary ©. Crowley.

The regiment upon the lot
In ranks is growing thinner —

For lo! Papa comes out and calls
Three veterans to dinner! M. J. oF.
































































































































A HAPPY LITTLE HELPER.
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

SOLDIER—DOGS.

—

fy - -

“ALO,” asked papa one morning, “ would

you like to see some soldier-dogs? ”

“Soldier-dogs, papa! how funny!”
laughed the little girl.

“Yes; in some of the regiments
of the German army an attempt is
being made to train dogs for use in
time of war,’ said her father. “In
the garrison at Schwerin, which I am



GZ going to visit to-day, there are several
Zee SE SE oreo: dogs which are drilled for military duty
as strictly as any of the other soldiers. You may go with me to
see them if you wish.”
Flo danced about in glee, Tramp wagged his tail and begged to

Wy:



go too.

“Yes, you shall, old fellow!”
said his little mistress. “ You
must learn all you can while you
are abroad. That’s what mamma
is always saying to me.”

Flo fancied that her doll
Trinkets looked lonely when they
planned to go off and leave her. TRAMP WAS JEALUUS AND SULKY.

“Well, Trinkets,” she said, “you can’t learn anything, because
your head is made of wood, but I suppose we’ll have to take you.”
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

When they reached the fortress they were received by a number
of officers in gay uniforms; they chatted with papa, petted Flo,
and made her talk to them in her
queer German, about Tramp and Trink-
ets. The visitors were shown all over
the fort and afterwards witnessed the
drill. But Flo was more pleased with
the soldier-dogs than anything else;
Trinkets, too, seemed to look upon
them with favor, but Tramp was jealous
of the attention bestowed upon them
by his friends, so

LZ he just sulked
TRINKETS WENT ALONG. . and wished he

had staid at home, and Trinkets wished so too.









The dogs were strong, handsome animals.
They leaped up on Flo and greeted her with
delight, but, at an order from the guard they
fell back and stood so still that one might
have supposed they were made of stone, or
of wood, like Trinkets; so Tramp thought
with a sniff. The guard said they had been
placed upon picket duty, and were faithful
sentries, giving notice by their barking of



the coming of strangers. "ONE ov THE OFFICERS.
At the drill it was splendid to see them, they were so clever
and eager and in such high spirits. Each dog in turn was taken
to the head of the troops. Then an officer tied a note to his
collar and he dashed off with it one way or another, as told by
the word of command.
Flo clapped her hands with joy when the Colonel sent her a
THE TUG OF WAR.

tiny letter in this way. She put her arms round the neck of
the beautiful hound that brought it, and thanked him, and his
soft, loving eyes told her he was glad to
have been sent on such a pleasant errand.
Tramp snarled at him, but Flo scolded her pet -
for being so foolish. One of the officers said
the dogs were being taught in this way, so
_ that if a war should come
they could carry messages
from one part of the bat-
tle to another. Flo hoped
they would never have a
chance to do that, but she felt sure that if they
did, there would be many a hero found among
the soldier-dogs.



Flo was sorry to go away and leave the beauti-



ful creatures. As to Tramp, he was glad to me veavrirur noun.
get away. But Trinkets had very few thoughts about it, any way.
Mary Catherine Crowley. °





THE TUG OF WAR.


























































BY THE BROOK-SIDE.
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
THE DOLL’S SHOEMAKER.

\ KY dear, I am going to take you to the
4 doll-shoemaker’s!” said Flo as she
dressed Trinkets in a stylish hat and
gown. “You must be measured for a
new pair of shoes, since naughty Tramp
chewed up your old ones.”

“TY think,” added the little girl, as
she set out to walk with her mamma,
“T think Trinkets must be very happy here, for this seems to
be dolly-land, and real people are like strangers traveling through
it. Dolls are looking out of all the windows. In the tiny gar-
dens dolls are hanging up to dry.



THE SHOES } LIFE SIZE.

We see them everywhere. I didn’t
know there were so many in the
whole world.”

“ Yes,” replied mamma, “ Saxony
is the home and paradise of dolls.
More are made here than in any
other country. In that attic room
Opposite is a lame girl who earns
her living by painting dolls’ faces.”

“ Oh, what fun!” cried Flo. “It . 5
must be just like playing all the a Sr ee
time.” “TI am afraid that she finds it rather hard work,” said
mamma, “and that she is but poorly paid.”


TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

“Over there at the corner is a factory for making doll’s wigs,”
she continued, as she led Flo through the narrow streets, while
dog Tramp trotted along in front.

At last they came to the shoemaker’s. It
was a queer little room, like some Brownie’s
workshop, Flo thought. The inmates were as
busy as bees, and did not seem to think
there was much sport in their task. All the
members of a family were working at the
trade. The father was blind, but it was
surprising to see how neatly he cut out and



TRAMP AT THE SHOBMAKER’S, formed the wee boots and slippers, from the
sheets of red, blue, and bronze leather.
The mother and older girls were stitching
the small. pieces together. The younger
children pasted the soles, or sewed on the
mites of buttons. Even the baby, a chubby
little chap, helped. He toddled to and fro,
and carried the bright bits of kid to one,
or a thread of gay silk to another.

They were all glad to see Flo, made
friends with Tramp at once, and were as
interested about making the shoes for Trink-
ets as if she had been a great lady, instead
of a doll.

It was droll to see the blind shoemaker
gravely take her measure, ask if she wore



her shoes tight or loose, and what color
would best suit her dress and complexion. HANGING UP TO DRY.

As Trinkets could not decide, Flo chose for. her a lovely gilt
morocco. In a trice they were cut out and looked like the
RACERS.

shining prints of Trinket’s wee feet. Then the making of them began.

The mother stitched, the children pasted and sewed on. the
buttons, the baby chattered. Thus, while Flo and her mamma
were talking to the workers, the pretty
shoes were finished.

Mamma slipped a coin into the baby’s
hand. “Oh, that is too much!” cried
the mother. “That would buy half a
dozen pairs.”

“It is what we
should have to pay
in New York, and
I do not think it

THE BLIND FATHER. any too much for



such pretty shoes,” said Flo’s mamma.
Presently, she and the little girl bade the —
family good-by. After a merry leave-taking



between Tramp and the children, Flo went THE BABY HELPED.
nome as happy as if she had herself been fitted to a pair of
golden shoes. Mary Catherine Crowley.



Sty,

= e
3 -aatule Ran cys ROMD NAHI a AaTT ROE verees s
SCADA UREA NE MNT satay ee

RACERS.



Qs
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.
A BREAD-WINNER DOG.

HAT is it to ‘work like a dog’?” asked Flo.
“That is what I heard a man in the street
say he had to do!”

“He meant that he had to toil hard,”
answered the little girls mamma. “But if
you want to see how a dog actually works,



I will, take you with me upon an errand this
TRINKETS AT THE COTTAGE. morning.”

Flo was delighted. Tramp pricked up his ears and wagged
his tail for, though he thought he knew all about it, he
worked hard himself, trotting round after
Flo all day, of course he wanted to go too.

Trinkets seemed to open her eyes wider

scornful air, as if to say:
“Can a dog really be useful?”

reply. -But Flo stopped the quarrel by giv-

ing Tramp a sharp tap on the nose, and
shaking Trinkets severely.

Presently they all started. They were in

Glasgow, Scotland, and the place where they

WEES MEO ONNG enya Sie ay el lone Olam (yOu @ Ut mobi gee Dama Ms Eaas Ons tte COT ACE



the country. Before long they came to it, a small cottage,
where a widow with four children lived. The woman was glad
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD. "

to see her visitors, and wiped
off a neatly scrubbed wooden
chair, which could not have had
a speck of dust on it, for Flo’s
mamma, and another for Flo.
She stood looking at them with
a smile upon her round, rosy

face.

“J want to buy some fresh



butter,” said the lady. THE LITTLE COTTAGE.



TRAMP AT THE COTTAGE.

“Very well, ma'am!” she replied. “Corrie
churned yesterday.”

Tramp did not hear; he was sniffing round a
queer-looking machine that filled the whole
side of the room. ‘Trinkets stared at it, too,
while Flo wondered what it could be, and who
Corrie was!

She did not have to wonder long. There
was a scamper outside, a din of voices and
short barks. Then the door burst open and

in bounded a large colly dog, followed by four barefooted children.
Tramp showed fight, but

the big dog took no notice.
The children shyly shrank
into a corner, and, with
their fingers in their mouths,
watched the strangers.
‘ “Come, Corrie,’ said the
dairy-woman. “ The ladies
want to see how you make

a living for us!



I have CORRIE BOUNDS INTO THE ROOM.
TRAMP’ AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

put some cream in the churn, now you must get the butter!”

The dog shook himself, and walked to the odd machine.
Flo saw it was a wooden wheel about two feet wide—in fact,
it looked like a narrow plank walk that went round and round,
and set in motion the machinery con-
nected with a barrel churn, that is,
a churn worked by a crank, like a
hand-organ.

The dog jumped upon -the wheel,
which was fenced in at the sides to
keep him from falling off. Now he
began to turn it, like a _ tread-mill.
Tramp thought this very foolish work,
for every ‘time the ‘dog took a step
forward, he only slipped round with
the wheel, and never seemed to get
ahead at all. Trinkets looked at Tramp,
as much as to say, “I told you so!
Dogs can’t do anything right!”

Silly Tramp and Trinkets! They did not know that some-
times, when we seem to be slipping back, we are really getting
on. But when, in a few minutes, they peeped into the churn
and saw the butter in the buttermilk, like bits of yellow gold,
then they knew.

“Yes, indeed!” said his mistress, “Corrie can do a great many
things. In the same way he saws wood and pumps water for
us. He once worked at broom-making, and I’m sure he could
wash clothes if he had a washing machine such as they tell
me are used in America. Oh! I do not know what we should
do without Corrie. He helps to support the family!”

Mary Catherine Crowley.



CORRIE CHURNING. -
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

THE DOLL FESTIVAL OF JAPAN.

RAMP and Trinkets went next to Japan, and,
at last, came home by way of San Francisco.




FI
; FO me)
fee ei
Br
wa coche fey J

Thus, as one can see from the geography,
they traveled all round the world! Flo’s papa
says he'll wager they are the only dog and
doll that ever did.

They got to Yokohama a short time before the great Doll
Festival. This is a pleasant custom observed by the people from
ancient times. Each year, on the third of March, almost every
family in Japan gives a grand feast in honor of all the charm-
ing race of dolls, and especially
of the dolls of the household.

For days before little Flo
noticed that the shop-keepers
seemed to forget their regular



Py eal Aya

w Wy
\ Se By




business, and everybody in the
whole town took to selling or
buying dolls, and toys and knick-
knacks for the festival. In
every house there was a sound
of hammering, and of getting
ready for the holiday. THE DOLLS IN SPLENDID COSTUME,

At length it came. The special feast to which Flo and nau
and Trinkets were invited was a very elegant party.

In one corner of the parlor were a set of shelves. covered




TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABROAD.

with red silk. On the top
shelf were displayed a royal
company of dolls dressed in
splendid costumes, with a
pretty screen behind them
for a background. The next
shelves were crowded with





plainer dolls, and all kinds



of odds and ends; the low-
SMALL GOLD-LACQUERED BOXES. est held many small, gold-
lacquered boxes filled with candies and cakes. Arranged on this
shelf, also, were a number of ‘scarlet and black-lacquered tables,
about five inches square, painted in
gold and ornamented with ivy vines
and grapes. Set out upon each of
these was a tiny dinner service. That
they were only mites of things may
be known from the number on each
table. On the first, for instance, at :
the left-hand corner, was a rice cup; DHE sen STEROL:





then a soup tureen; at the other end a covered dish, containing
her deep dish. At the
right were two wee
fishes baked whole, and
between the corners
sliced vegetables laid
on bamboo leaves, the
latter cut in the shape
of a plum flower. Upon
the next table the course











= ==

HE NAUGHTY THING TRAMP DID, following was served,
TRAMP AND TRINKETS ABR OAD.

and so on till the last was reached. An almost endless number.

Flo and Tramp and Trinkets, with a bright little Japanese
girl, sat at these dainty tables, and enjoyed the feast of the
dolls. Trinkets, to be sure, was too excited to eat much, or to
take tea from the tiny cup, but Tramp had his own share and
hers too. And then, what did the dreadful fellow do, but tip
over one of the beautiful tables! Trinkets
was so ashamed of him!

But the prettiest part of it all was
when Yona, the little Japanese hostess,
went out to the street and asked all
the stranger children, rich and poor, who
happened to be passing to come in to
the feast, as the custom is. Of course
they came, and what a merry time they
all had, for the children of Japan know
how to play as well as Flo does.

Flo’s papa and mamma sat at a large
table with the other grown folks, but
-the dinner served to them was just like that prepared for the



dolls. Trinkets thought everything was lovely, and as it should
be. Too much could not be done for dolls! But Tramp growled:
“Tt’s all nonsense! —all but the cakes and candies! ”

Not quite, Tramp. It is not nonsense to make people happy!

They drove back to the hotel at twilight, past the orchards
of plum-trees, covered with fragrant pink and white and red
blossoms. —

The next day our friends sailed for home, and in a few
weeks Tramp and Trinkets and their little mistress were all °
back in Flo’s nursery again. .

Mary Catherine Crowley.










































































































































































































































IN EARLY MARCH,
IN LITTLE MARIE’S COUNTRY.

IN LITTLE MARIE'S COUNTRY. |

Little Marie’s country is in France. She
is the daughter of a peasant; what we
should call a farmer, perhaps ; her father
owns his little bit of land; he works hard.

Marie wears a nice large pinafore over
her gown, and a close little cap that quite
covers her brown hair.

Here is a loaf of the bread of Marie’s coun-
try. It is. almost
as big as she is,
and if the inside
crust only left she
ite. that. Joat of
ily a good while, un-



LITTLE MARIE.

were dug out and the
could almost crawl into
bread will last the fam-
less there is a boy or two belonging to it,
who can eat six slices 8

at a time. We have

seen boys that could



do that very easily; nay, could eat nine slices.

Marie’s sister is a milkmaid. She carries
milk to sell in the town; the town is not a
great way from Marie’s home.

Marie herself has. been to town once or
twice. But she likes home best, after all. She
loves the pigeons, and feeds them every day.

They fly all about her, and light on her
shoulders and on her little cap.



ris



THE MILKMAID.
AFTER A VOYAGE.

She likes very much to see the women wash their clothes in

the river.



A MOURNER,

The river is not far from the town, and the women

bring their clothes, and wash them in the river.
They wade in and plash about, and Marie thinks
it is great fun.

Marie sees some queer sights; that is, we should
call them queer. But she is so used to them,
they do not seem queer to her. Here is one of
the queer sights. It is a woman dressed in
what is called mourning. If it were not for
her feet, we should not know it was a woman.

In Marie’s country the women work in the fields.
They help plant; they tend the grape vines;

they help get in the harvest. Marie helps; she likes it; she
likes to work in the fresh pure air. Frances A. Humphrey.

AFTER A VOYAGE.

Come, little Chatterbox, here to my knee;

I’m just in a mood for your last new notion;

They tell me you've been on a voyage at sea,

Now what did you think of the great big ocean?

“O, yes, I can tell you about the sea,”
Wisely responded the youthful rover;
“Tt looked like a caterpillar to me,
When it moved at one end it moved all over.”

Anna R. Henderson.
: THE LITTLE SWEDISH PRINCES.

THE LITTLE SWEDISH PRINCES.

RINCE Oscar and Prince Karl of Sweden are
very loving brothers.

Royal children have generally long names,
and the elder of the.two is really Oscar
Frederick William Olaf Gustavus Adolphus.

There have been some famous kings of
Sweden named Gustavus, so the Swedish
people love the name; and if this little
prince ever becomes king, he will be known
as Gustavus Adolphus VI.

He is to be a soldier; he will not be a
play-soldier, but he will have the hard work



that real soldiers have to do. He was born
November 11, 1882, so he is but eight years old.

~The younger Prince is Karl William Ludwig; he is to be a sailor.
The two boys live much of the time near the seaside in the Castle
of Tullgarn. There they go bathing and fishing, and the elder has
learned to swim. Little princes and princesses have a great many
things to learn, and they must begin their work early. Prince
Oscar has for some time been able to read and write well.

Like all other children, they like to “go to Grandfather’s ” visiting.
Their Grandfather is King Oscar of Sweden. He is very fond of the
children, and when they go to see him, he takes great pleasure in
giving them the military drill. They go through their exercises on
the lawn, where the people of the neighborhood can stand outside
and watch them. When they are through, he tells them to “ present
arms” to the people. . Pamela McArthur Cole.
rm



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































PRINCE OSCAR AND PRINCE KARL OF SWEDEN.
BINNY, THE BEAVER.

BINNY, THE BEAVER.

Beavers always build a good many houses near together, so
that they live in little villages, and they build beside a stream.
They make a dam across the stream, with stones and trees
neatly piled up, and they plaster their houses and the dam







































































































BEAVERS MAKING A DAM.

with clay. They lay the clay on, and smooth it with their tails,
which are broad and flat like a mason’s trowel. The trees they
cut down with their sharp teeth.

An English gentleman who was very fond of animals once |
had a present of a baby-beaver. He named him Binny. Binny
grew very tame and would come when he heard his name called,
and jump upon his master’s knee. He loved to be talked to,
and have his head patted. |
BINNY, THE BEAVER.

‘Binny had been caught when he was young and he had never
- geen any beavers building, but he seemed to know just how to
go to work, and when he grew large and strong he built a
dam in his master’s parlor.

_He chose a place where there was a tall desk, not fe from
ie corner of the room, and he built from there across the
corner. He could not find a tree to cut; he took books, and
boxes, and anything else he could move. Most of these things
he pushed before him on the floor; one thing he seemed to like
most was a long-handled brush for sweeping up the hearth; he
always carried that in his paws.

He would build up a pile of things neatly; then he would
sit up in front of his dam, holding his head one side, and look at
it to see if it was all right. Sometimes he would seem pleased and
let it stay; sometimes he would take it apart and do it over.
- Binny had a little soft bed: to sleep on, and when he had
_the dam all made to suit him, he would go in behind it, pat
up his bed, and go to sleep. Of course his master and the
other people in the house wanted to use the books, and the
boxes, and the long-handled brush; so every morning Binny’s
dam was taken down, and every day he built it again. So he
was kept pretty busy.

After a while, Binny’s master went away out of the country ;
and it was then thought best to send Binny to live at the Zodlog-
ical Gardens in London, where he would have the company of
other animals, and perhaps find some beavers to play and build
dams with.

Here he had something else beside boxes and books to build
with. Though at first he was rather lonely and wanted his mas-
ter, he grew quite content and happy after a while.

eames McArthur Hie


























































































































CLEAR THE TRACK!
TROTTINO.



TROTTING AND CASINO ies





ey
Zz A Ss
‘QE
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|

i
v1 Ma

i)

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,

iy

TROTTINO.
HIS FAULTS.

There was once a mother-rabbit who had two little rabbit chil-
dren. The older one was called Lapino and the other Trottino.

Lapino was a most lovable little rabbit. He was not only
pretty, but he was good. Sweet, obedient, always in a good humor, .
willing to give up to his little brother, and always ready to help
his mother, Lapino was a model for all little rabbits.

His mamma would. have been the happiest of rabbit-mothers if
Trottino had been like his brother. But Trottino, though he was
a pretty good little rabbit in many ways, had great faults.

He was disobedient, Trottino was; not from naughtiness, but
because he did not try to think. When he wanted to do some-
thing which he thought would be “good fun,” he forgot all about
TROTTINO.

his mother’s wishes. If he
had been more thoughtful
he would have heard a voice,
the voice of his little rabbit-
conscience, saying to him,
“Don’t do that, Trottino!
It is naughty!” But alas! he
did not think of these things.

Another fault of Trottino’s
was greediness. He had a



kind heart and would some- ;
times go without a beautiful carrot, or a very tender cabbage
leaf, in order that he might
give it to some poor little
rabbit who had nothing to”
~ eat. But he was too fond of
dainty food, and his mamma
often tried to make him
ashamed of it and sorry for it.
Atsuch times he would throw
himself on her neck and ask
her pardon, and say to her,
“I won’t do so any more!”
And he would do the same
thing the very next time.
He did not seem to know
that a rabbit of honor ought
to think well before giving



Oy : ae word, but when it was oe
ASKING PARDON, . lez given he ought to hold to it.
Adapted from the French, by Lawra E. Poulsson.
iS ; TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
MOTHER RABBIT GOES TO MARKET.

Lapino and Trottino began to
be large enough to eat alone,
but they did not yet know much
about plants, and their mother
had told them not to eat any-
thing which she had not given
to them.

When the weather was fine
she took her children out for



a walk in a beautiful field where

CONS ees there were all sorts of plants,
and she pointed out to them which were good; but they were
forbidden to go there alone.

One morning Mother Rabbit saw that her cupboard was empty.
She said to Lapino, “My little Lapino, I must go to the town.
Hurry, my child! Get up, and make your bed and your little
brother’s, and have the room all clean and tidy when I get
home. I will come back as soon as I can, and take you out
for a nice walk in the sun. You, Trottino, be good, and mind
your brother.”

“ Yes, mamma,” replied the two children; and the mother rabbit,
taking her big basket, hurried away.

Lapino arose. With his little paws he shook up the straw on
which he”had slept, and arranged it so that it had quite the air
of a well-made bed. Afterwards he carefully put the room in order.
TROTTINO.

Trottino usually did not trouble himself about such work, so
Lapino was astonished to see him give all the help he could; and
he praised him for being kind and working well.

But if Trottino helped about the house it was not for the
sake of gaining compliments ; he had another idea. When all the
work was done he sat down in the open doorway of the house.

“Oh! do come and see, Lapino, how fine the weather is!”
eried he to his brother. .

“Very finé,’ answered Lapino; “when mamma comes home,

= = | % 2







and after she has taken a little rest, I shall be glad to go out
of doors.”

“Poor mamma! It is true that she will be very tired. She
will have to rest a long while, and we shall have scarcely any
time for our walk! What if it should rain?”

“That would be very provoking; but why do you think it
will rain?”
THE PUSSIES’ PROMENADE

“Because — because —I have heard Mr. Grisonnet, who is ‘a
very wise rabbit, say that when it is clear in the morning it
often rains before night. It seems to me that there are clouds
already! Come and see!”

Trottino slipped outside and went
several. steps away. Lapino followed
him, but only as far as the door.

“JT do not see any clouds,” said he.
“But where are you going, Trottino ?
Come back quickly! You know very
well that we are not large enough to
go out alone!”

“Oh! not last week, perhaps; but
we have grown since then! - My legs



are stiff from staying in the house so long. I need to run.”
“Oh, well! Run a little before the door, but do not go far.”
“I do not know how to play all alone! I get tired of it!
Dear Lapino, come; play with me. I will be good. I will not
run away at all. If you knew how I long to play leap-frog!”
Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.

é



The pussies have a splendid promenade;
Of a dozen back yard fences is it made;
And here in single file
Back and forth for many a mile
Go the pussies in the sunshine and the shade!
el AH.
TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
LAPINO AND TROTTINO STRAY AWAY.

“Well, Ill come, then; but
we must. stay near home,”
said Lapino.

He went and played leap-
frog; and he was thinking so
much of taking care of his
little brother and keeping close
to him, that he did not see
how ‘Trottino was gradually
leading him farther and farther
from the house.

He stopped. the game sud-
denly, because he found himself
near a flight of steps which



looked strange to him.

“Where have you brought me, Trottino?” said he, in an
anxious tone. “We must go back home. What will mamma
say if she does not find us there when she returns?”

“Bah! She won’t say anything, because we will be. there.
Don’t you see where our door is? It isn’t far. We have still
time to play; it isn’t long since mamma went away. Oh!
What beautiful lettuce! Surely that must be tender!”

There was, indeed, at the foot of the flight of steps, a bas-
ket full of lettuce. The woman who owned it had gone into
the house to sell vegetables to the cook, and she had left her
TROTTINO.

largest basket at the door because it was in her way. Trottino,
greedy rascal, was nibbling as fast as he could at the best head
of lettuce in her basket.

“Fie, Trottino! What are you doing there?” cried his brother.
“Tf mamma should see you she would say that was stealing, and
that thieves deserved to go to prison between two policemen!”

“ What crisp lettuce!”’ replied Trottino. ‘Mamma never brings us
anything but the outside leaves; and the heart is the best part!”

As Trottino said this he received a kick which sent him roll-
ing over toward his brother, while an angry voice called him:

“Wicked rabbit! A thief of a rabbit! Good only to be
made into a stew!”

The woman who owned the vegetables had come out of the
house and had seen him eating her lettuce. Of course she did
not like that at all; and, as she had wooden shoes on, her
kick hurt Trottino very much, so that he ran away, groaning.

Lapino had not been hurt, but he had been frightened. The
two poor children had only one idea—to flee from the woman
with the wooden shoes; and
so they ran farther still from
home and out of their way.

The poor little things ran
so fast they were quite out
of breath; but they did not
dare stop an instant to rest.



For whenever they looked
back, as they did now and
then, they saw the old woman, with the dreadful wooden shoe
still thrust out.
They could hear her shouting, again and again, “ Wicked rabbit!
A thief of a rabbit! Good only to be made into a stew!” How
THE GOOD-NATURED GIRL. |

angry she was! How gladly would she have given Trottino
another kick 1 =
By and by her cry grew faint; then it ceased altogether.
They turned a corner in the lane, and came to a wide green

Ce ee
FLEEING FROM THE WOMAN WITH WOODEN SOle S:
> ee:



meadow. Their legs ached with running so fast and so far;
and they had scarcely one bit of breath left.
Adapted from the French, by Laura #. Poulsson.



THE GOOD-NATURED GIRL.

No matter what happened they found her the same,
No fuss and no fury, and no word of blame.
= Her friends and relations were quite at a loss.
To think how it was that she never was cross !

They said to her, “How on earth is it— pray tell—
That you always are keeping your temper so well?”
“Only this,” she replied, “ she had made up her mind,
No matter what happened that she would be kind!”

| M. J. A










BRUNO, YOU OR ME?”

‘WHICH DOES IT FIT BEST,
TROTTINO.

2



w



, ae do not know them: but | know them very well.?

,



TROTTINO.

TROTTINO EATS THE POISONOUS HEMLOCK.

Lapino stopped first. “Where is our house now?” cried he,
trembling.

“JT don’t know. Oh! how she hurt me! that ugly woman!”

“See, Trottino; let us try to find our house again. Mamma
will be so anxious! I believe it is on this side. You remem-
ber that big tree, don’t you?”

“Yes! yes! Our house is right near the tree. We will be
there very quickly; let me rest a little. Mamma has never
brought us here.” ~ :

“It is not prettier than our meadow, and there are plants
growing here that we do not know.” ;

“You—you do not know them; but I know them very well.
Look! There is some wild thyme! That’s something very
delicious ! ”

“Yes, I believe it really is wild thyme; but mamma has for-
TROTTINO.

bidden us to eat plants which she has not given us herself.
You have had a good breakfast, Trottino. You do not need that
wild thyme.”

“TI have breakfasted; but I have taken exercise since, so that
I am hungry again. Aren’t you hungry, too?”

“Yes, I am hungry; but we must not disobey mamma. Let us
go home quickly.
Perhaps she has
come back again,
and then she will
give us some-
thing to eat.”

“Pretty soon.
My paws are
trembling. I
have been s0
frightened ! I
shall have to eat a morsel to gain a little strength;” and Trottino,
going into the grass still wet with dew, began to nibble the wild thyme.

Lapino shook his long ears with a troubled air. He would
have liked to go back home and leave Trottino alone; but he
stayed, thinking he could perhaps keep the giddy little fellow
from doing more foolish and naughty things. He called to his
brother every now and then, but Trottino was eating as fast as
he could and would not stop.

Suddenly, however, he cried out: “Oh! Lapino! What beau- .
tiful- parsley! I never saw any so large!”

“Are you quite sure that it is parsley? Parsley is not so tall.”

“Tt is because this is unusually fine and good! Taste a lit





Ol

tle and you will see.”
“T don’t want to. It is wrong for you to eat it. Come, let’s go.”
THE SMALL BOY AND HIS STRING. |

“When I have had enough parsley. It is delicious!”
“Oh! Trottino! If mamma knew!”
“OQ, well! She won’t know. At least, unless you are going
to tell her, you horrid old tell-tale!”
“You know very well that I am not a tell-tale. But it is
naughty to disobey. Do come, little brother.”
Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.



‘THE SMALL BOY AND HIS STRING.

What can a small boy do with a string?
Well, I should guess, about everything:

Make a cat’s cradle; tie up a knot
In every place he oughtn’t and ought;

Send his kite flying up in the air;
Sail his boat on the pond over there;

Make a stone-sling; and a red top spin;
Catch a small fish with the aid of a pin—

These are a few things, not nearly all;
So, under his knife, marbles, pop-gun and _ ball,

In a boy’s pocket the bottom-most thing
Is always a piece of good stout string.
S. Hail.
|

al
Ae

Bo
AALS —
ef (3 bX i l)
Ze Yoel (Md
( ANY ftptst:
\

‘ SES
: \



CROWNING COUSIN KATE.
TROTTINO.

- {pout To EAT |

ROTTINO 15 wh




TROTTINO.

THE RETURN HOME.

Lapino looked so sad that Trottino was touched. “All right,”
said he, “let’s go home. Besides, I can’t eat any more. What -
a pity! It was so good—that wild thyme—and that parsley!”

Lapino thought to himself that it was a very naughty thing
to be greedy. Happily, Trottino was small; there was hope that
he might improve. .

They had scarcely reached home’ when Mother Rabbit arrived.
Lapino, who stood at the doorway, saw her coming.

“There is mamma!” he cried. “There is mamma, Trottino!
Are you going to meet her?”

“T am tired. I am resting,’ replied Trottino in a weak voice.

“Oh! how you look! Are you sick, poor little fellow?”

“Why, no, indeed! A person can be tired without being
sick, can’t he? Don’t tell mamma that I am sick, above all!”
TROTTINO.

- Lapino said nothing, but went to meet Mother Rabbit, who
kissed him and asked if he had been good.

“Very good, mamma,” replied Lapino.

The mother rabbit also asked Trottino; who answered, but
without looking at her, that he had been very good. Then he
rolled himself up in a corner while Lapino helped Mother Rabbit
take the provisions out of her basket.

Soon Mother Rabbit had a
nice dinner ready. Lapino
ate with a fine appetite. Trot-
tino tried to eat, too, but
he could not manage it. He
felt sick. His stomach ached
and his head was dizzy. At
length he could bear the pain
no longer. He threw himself
on the ground and rolled
about, uttering pitiful cries.

“What is the matter, my
dear little Trottino? What
is the matter, my dear child ?”
cried the good rabbit mother,






*) ANYTHING IN Ji
THE MEADOW 2 I

running to him.

“Qh! dear, dear!” groaned
Trottino. ‘TI havea pain here
—and here! It is like some



fierce animal biting me! Oh! oh! oh!”

“What has happened to you? What have you done while I
was gone? Have you eaten something poisonous? Lapino, tell
“me what is the matter?”

- Lapino turned away his face. He remembered that his brother
DANCING DROPS.

had called him a “horrid tell-tale,’ and he did not want to say
anything. :

“But there isn’t anything poisonous around here;” continued
Mother Rabbit. “Did you go
ome dt distinctly forbade
that!”

Both the rabbits lowered
their ears with a confused air.

“You did go out? What
else did you do? Did you
eat anything in the meadow ?”

Lapino still hesitated to
speak. And as to Trottino he was fast becoming quite insensible
from the tervible pain and distress.

Adapted from the French by Laura EH. Poulsson.



DANCING DROPS.

The little drops of water
Are dancing in the pool;
What fun they must be having
And all the while so cool!
Dancing are they really ?—
However that may be
They’re making circles gaily,
As any one may see!
M. J. i.
TROTTINO.

So CAT fae aaa aT oe NER SR SEMIS CNG TET NS,
“NRE QU, SURE IT WAS PARSLEY 2”













TROTTINO.
TROTTINO CONFESSES.

“Not Lapino, mamma! He did not!” said Trottino, driven
by remorse and trying to be brave. :

“You only, then? What have you eaten? Tell me quickly,
my poor little one. I must know in order to take care of you
and cure you.”

When she said this Trottino redoubled his groans. It was
hard to confess, but he gasped out in broken sentences while
the tears dropped from his eyes:

“We went—in a meadow. I ate—some wild thyme. Lapino
didn’t want me to. Oh! what a pain I have! Mamma, do
help me! Do!”

“My poor little fellow! Didn’t you eat anything but the wild
thyme ?” zi zs

“Yes—some splendid parsley. I never saw any so fine. It
tasted so very good!”
. TROTTINO.

«Some splendid parsley! Lapino, did you see it? Are you
sure it was parsley?” ae

“TI don’t think it was, mamma. I told Trottino that it was.
too large for parsley; and it seems to me the smell was not
just the same, either.” :

“Unhappy child! You have mistaken hemlock for parsley,
and it is poison! Lapino, run to the doctor and tell him that
your little brother has poisoned himself. I will do the best I
can for him while you are gone. But hasten, dear child, there
is not a moment to be lost.”

Trottino sank down “in one corner quite senseless. Now and then
he moaned, and moved a foot or an ear. Otherwise he seemed to
be dead.

His poor mother stood over him, smoothing his head and rub-
bing his little paws, now one and now another, and longing for
the doctor to come.

Once Trottino aroused sufficiently to say again: “O, what a
pain I have. Mamma, do help me! Do!”

Adapted from the French, by Laura H. Poulsson.

—- ey
oOon.

Nido 52 lt = é
“Th




A JUNE DAY.
TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
THE DOCTOR'S VISIT.

Lapino ran as’ fast as he

~ HOCTOR
~ és , house of the rabbit-doctor,

= who was just finishing his
dinner.



The doctor wanted to give
some of his dessert to
Lapino, whom he knew to
be a good little rabbit —
very polite and well-bred ;
but when he was told that Trottino had poisoned himself, he
quickly caught up his hat and cane, and started out with Lapino,
taking care to carry some medicine with him, so that they should
not have to lose time in going to the druggist’s.

They found Trottino a little better. His mother had put him
to bed and given him a hot drink, then rubbed him well and
covered him up warmly. But he ;
._ was quite weak and ached all
over, and he felt very sick indeed.

He held out his little paw to the
doctor, who felt his pulse and-said
that he must swallow at once the
medicine which he had _ brought.
Trottino drank a mouthful, but then pushed the cup away with
disgust, saying, “It is nasty!” :


TROTTINO.

“What! ‘It. is nasty!’” mimicked the doctor, in his eruffest
tones. “You deserve to have it ten times as nasty, naughty,
greedy child! You must drink it right down. The sickness and
the medicine are your punishment for being disobedient. Come!
hurry up! you must drink it to get cured.
And,” he added, in a softer tone, “you
must drink it to please your poor mamma,
to whom you have brought so much trouble.
See! she is crying.”

That decided Trottino. He took the cup
and drained it to the bottom, without
making a face.

When he had finished he threw his two paws around his
mother’s neck, and said to her, weeping, — —



“Forgive me, mamma; I will never do so any more!”
Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.





op




SUNRISE.
TROTTINO.



TROTTINO.

TROTTINO WELL AGAIN.

Trottino got well; and, what is better still, he was also cured
of his disobedience and his greediness.

Mother Rabbit had always said to him, “Don’t eat this.”
“Don’t eat that.” “It will make you sick!” but he had never
really believed it. Now he knew that what she had told him was
true, and he obeyed much more quickly and cheerfully than he
had done before. _

After his experience with the hemlock new ideas arose in
Trottino’s little rabbit-brain. :

“There were, then,” he thought, “plants which were good to
eat, and others which were dangerous, which made little rabbits
sick and even made them die sometimes.

“ How ought one to set about learning these things? By tasting
each plant a little and so finding out which were good and which
not? But in this way one would be made sick each time he tasted:
of a poisonous plant. That would be terrible, that would!”
THE RACE.

Trottino consulted his brother. Trottino often consulted Lapino. »
Lapino did not know much more than Trottino, and he
_ advised his. brother not to trouble his head about such things.

But Trottino was eager to learn, so he questioned his mamma,
who told him that her own mother had taught her all she
knew about plants. ;

“And Grandmamma,—” asked Trottino, “who showed her
which were the good plants?” : :

“Her mother, my child. As long as there have been plants and
rabbits, the rabbit-mothers have instructed their children; then
when these children were grown up and had little rabbits of their
own, they in turn taught what they had learned.”

Adapted from the French, by Laura EH. Poulsson.



THE RACE.

A daisy field and a sunny sky,

A little lad and a butterfly,

A frantic chase, and a tearful face,

For the butterfly has won the race.
. Harriot Brewer,
TROTTINO.

TROTTINO.
TROTTINO LEARNS MUCH FROM HIS MOTHER.

“And will you teach me all you know, mamma ?”

“Certainly, my little one.” | ,

Trottino was delighted, and capered about with joy. Then he
began to help his mother about the house so that they could
all go to walk sooner, and he worked just as well as Lapino.

When all was in order, they set out for a pleasant walk. As
soon as they had reached the meadow, Trottino began to search
out different plants and to ask questions.

‘What is the name of this plant, mamma? What is the name
of that? Is this good to
eat? Do you think that
one is poisonous?”

Mother Rabbit replied to
him very patiently and
told him interesting things
about many of the plants
which they saw; but Trot-
tino was a little surprised

ered





ct
He “cap



to hear her sometimes answer, “I do not know.” ‘Trottino had
thought that his mother knew everything. However, as he paid
great attention to what she did tell him, he soon knew a great ~
deal, for she was a well-instructed rabbit who had lived in dif-
ferent places where there were all sorts of plants.
Trottino had sharp eyes and a fine sense of smell. He spied
THE MOUSE TRAP.

the good plants long before his mother and brother, and it was
his delight to call them to share in what he found. Indeed, it
was now to be seen that Trottino was very intelligent. ine ae
fortnight he had become more learned than his mother.

Human. children have to spend a great deal more time than that
in order to know as much as their mothers; but then, men and
women need to learn so many more things than rabbits do.

Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.





THE MOUSE TRAP.

Four little mice, a little trap,
Some toasted cheese — snap!
Snap! snap! snap!
That little trap has caught in a trice
Those four little hungry, tempted mice.
Harriot Brewer.
TROTTINO.

50 off they all started tosether= ——s!



TROTTINO.

MR. GRISONNET.

Mr. Grisonnet was a wise rabbit: He was not handsome, with
his gray and somewhat rough rabbit-wool, but he had a kind
face and friendly ways. He was on very good terms with Lapino
and Trottino, and always stopped to chat with them and _ their
mother when he met the family in the fields.

One day as he was-leaping leisurely along a hedge with his
‘thoughts upon a rare plant which he had just been examining,
he heard a voice calling out to him—“Hey! Mr. Grisonnet!”

Turning about he saw Mother Rabbit at a little distance, with
Lapino and Trottino at her side. :

“Can you point out to us a place where there is some nice
tender thyme?” said she to him. “What we find here is too
old.”

“Yes, come with me, neighbor; I will lead you to an excellent
place,” replied the old rabbit.
BY THE SEA.

So off they all started together, Mr. Grisonnet and Mother-
Rabbit leaping gently along at a steady pace across the field,
and the little onés frisking around them. Sometimes Lapino and

Trottino- would play a game of leapfrog and get far ahead;

then off they would go, chasing each other, sidewise and back .

and all around; and if you had tried to count them, you would

have said at last, “There
are two large rabbits, but
I don’t know how many
little ones!”

At last Mr. Grisonnet
stopped before a beautiful
bank where thyme and other

« C hasins



each «

other >



herbs were thickly growing. “Ah! what a feast,” said Mother
Rabbit. “Let us all enjoy it.”
So each one began to nibble, taking care to thank their kind

old friend for the treat he had given them.
, Adapted from the French, by Laura E. Poulsson.





BY THE SEA.
PHILIPPA’S PARTY.

PHILIPPA’S PARTY.

It was not a large party, but it looked quite large to Philippa,
for it was the first one she ever had.

Three little girls were invited — Philippa herself was the oars
and they sat down to tea at a little square table, one girl on
each side.

The oldest of the guests was Octavia. They all looked up to
her with great respect, she was so old—eleven years. She was
a nice, well-behaved little girl.

She had lived mostly with grown-up people and read their
books, and she had a grown-up way of talking which all the
company thought was something very fine.

Mary was the same age with Philippa —not quite ten. Mary
was not always well-behaved; she was rough and noisy. I can
not -say that Philippa liked her very well. Indeed Philippa her-
self could not tell whether she liked her or not. But they had
played together ever since they were able to walk, and their
mothers were dear friends. So when the party was talked of,
Mary was the first guest invited. I am glad to say that she
behaved well— perfectly well, indeed.

The last was Delia. She was not quite six, and very small

for her age. Philippa had felt afraid that Octavia might not
like to be invited with such a little girl, but Octavia did not
seem to object at all. She petted Delia and seemed quite glad
to be acquainted with her.

Delia had never been invited to a party before, and O, how
pleased she was! In the morning her mother sent her to a
milliner’s shop near by, to buy some ribbon.
PHILIPPA’S PARTY.

Delia went into the store and said, “If you please, I should
like a piece of blue ribbon like this pattern. It ig for my hair.
I am invited to eat my tea out to-night.” 4

She was the first one to arrive, her hair in two braids, tied
with new ribbon. They hung down her back.

Little girls then wore shoes; not boots. And they wore “pan-
talettes”” too, coming down to their ankles. The pantalettes they
wore at school or out to play were like
the dresses they wore, but with their nice
dresses they wore white ones.

You may be sure all the party wore
nice white pantalettes, trimmed with edg-
ing or ruffles.

The company had a delightful afternoon. .
It was a lovely June day and they had a
fine grassy yard to play in. They had a swing in the wood-
shed; they swung there, they played hide-and-seek, they sang,
they played school, and keeping house with their dolls; each one
had brought her doll.

They were all of them pleasant and obliging and they were ex-
tremely polite in “taking turns” with Delia. She was so little that
they all wanted her for their “little girl” when they kept house.

The afternoon flew by as though it had wings; there did not
begin to be time for all they wanted to play.

They had an early tea and all went home before dark. Philippa
poured the tea and waited on the company, but her mother
looked in, to see that she did not forget anything.



QP
AUT ie y

OF THE PARTY.

People have different ways of speaking, as you all know, but
these four, guests and hostess, all said the same thing — “T
never had such a beautiful time in my life! ” et :

Pamela McArthur Cole.





*e CHERRY
Ce BLOSSOMS.

‘There grew beside our garden
gate
A spreading -cherry-tree, oe é
Where baby-buds with. smooth white '
heads =a
Were close as close could be.







Now who went shopping, or who sewed,
While we took nightly naps—

One .morn those babies all came out
In little snow-white caps!

Be

a Fancy a thousand baby-caps
"4 -_ All fashioned in one night!
The little heads all bobbed with glee—
It was a pretty sight.
: Christine Chaplin Brush.
<




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































BENNIE’S PARTRIDGES.

BENNIE’S PARTRIDGES.

Bennie had always heard it said that partridges could never
be tamed; but he did not believe this; he was going to try,
any way.

He knew where there was a partridge nest under a _ thick
bush down by the pond—such a pretty nest of dry brown
leaves and grass, and eleven smooth eggs. He crept down to
the pond and took three eggs from .the nest, and put them
under his own hen, Old Speckle, who was setting in the barn.

The days passed slowly, but at last he heard a faint “peep”
under Old Speckle’s wing. He lifted her; the eggs, both chicken
and partridge eggs, were cracked! He waited an hour and lifted
her again. There were three downy young partridges among the
chickens.

Then he called papa and mamma to see.

“There! didn’t I tell you?” he cried in triumph.

But where were they? Only eight downy chickens were cuddled
under old Speckle’s wings.

“They're gone!” sobbed Bennie. “How could they?”

“Here is one,” laughed papa, pointing to the legs of a baby
_ partridge, sticking from a hole in the deep box. This was the
plumpest one of the three, and he couldn’t get through.

«And the others?” wailed Bennie, but the others could not
be found. Bennie put that one into the table drawer, but in

the morning that, too, was gone —nobody knew where nor how.
' Bennie never tried to tame partridges again, but he never could
answer the question—can any of you?— Where did those little
things go? . Be H.S..








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PARTRIDGES : BENNIE CREPT DOWN.
i THE MEADOW HEN.

A MEADOW HEN.

That is what I have always heard it called, and I cannot
tell you the name it has in natural history. |

We found him by the brook one cold, rainy night, shiver-
ing with wet and hunger, and we brought him home. Such a
_ queer bird as he was! He had a small body perched upon
long, slender legs, and looked as a small boy does on high
stilts. He had a tiny, flat head, a long stout bill, great awkward
feet and fierce eyes, and we named him Captain Kidd.

I don’t know why we called him that, unless it was because
he was such a greedy bird-pirate. We soon found that we could
not pet him much, for he could pinch hard with his long, sharp
pill, and his temper was not one of the best. So we took him
down in the meadow and let him go. . |
But he was like a great many people that you have seen.
Tf he was not loving, or even grateful, he knew where he
could get food the easiest; and the “next morning we found
_ him among our hens; he was_ snapping right and left, as he
ate their breakfast up, while the poor, ee chickens had to
stand back and watch him eat.

We carried him further away the next time, and it was more
than a week before we saw him again. We were thinking that
we were rid of him when there he was, crosser than ever.
His fierce eyes twinkled and his great mouth swallowed every-
thing he could find that was eatable.

_ Well, when a traveling showman eed us twenty-five cents for
him we were happy. Poor Captain Kidd! Wherever he went, I
‘hope he found enough to eat. EHS.













































































































































CAPTAIN KIDD.
BOBBITT’S FIRST LESSON.

BOBBITT’S FIRST LESSON.

“Qh, oh, oh!” sobbed a little bird that had hopped too far
away from the nest when he was just learning to fly.

“What is the matter?” asked the mother-bird anxiously.

“Why, I just hopped on that little balcony over there, and a
lady opened the window and threw things at me.”

“Dear! dear! that will never do. Don’t any of you stir from
the nest again till I come back. I must see what the trouble is.”

So away flew the anxious mother, but in a very few minutes
she came flying back, and said with a cheerful little chirp, —

“Why, Bobbitt, I don’t believe you stopped to see what it was
that the lady was throwing at you; did you?”

“No, indeed,” answered Bobbitt. “I didn’t stop for anything;
I just flew away as fast as I could.”

“But, Bobbitt, it was bread the lady was throwing; nice soft

little crumbs of bread for your breakfast. I know that lady very

well; she always opens the window and scatters crumbs for me
when she sees me flying about. You mustn’t be so easily scared,
my birdie; when you think anything is coming to you that is
going to be dreadful, just wait a minute and see if it doesn’t
turn out to be something nice, after all.

“You see it would really be quite disagreeable to hop down

-into the muddy road this wet morning to pick up something to

+

eat; and this good kind lady has saved us the trouble. Never
run away before you have looked a misfortune sca in the

‘face, and are quite sure it is a misfortune.”

“TI never will again,” said the timid little Bobbitt. “The next
BOBBITT’S FIRST LESSON.

time I see a window open, I will just fly right in and get my
breakfast comfortably inside, if the lady is so kind.”

“0, no! O, no! no indeed!” screamed his mother. « That
would. he going to the other extreme; that would be trusting
too much. You must never turn away and run before you are
sure that you are hurt; but you mustn’t run right into a trap
either. You must be wise, Bobbitt, wise; not too much afraid,
or too bold. You must never
fly in at an open window,
because you cannot possibly
know what may be inside
the room; it might be break-
fast, but then again it might
be boys. Always stay safely
on the outside, but look
about you before you run
away entirely, and be sure
it is bullets and not bread- a
crumbs that you are running



HOME OF BOBBITT AND HIS RELATIONS.

away from.”
“JT will,” ‘answered Bobbitt meekly. “I will always be wise.”
“He didn’t know how hard he would find it to be always wise;

but he had learned one lesson, in trying not to be foolish.
Alice Wellington Rollins.

The dear little children are making mud Pies;
Are they ever so good? Are they sweet?
0, dear little children, we think you are wise;
You make the Pies no one can eat! MSH.
WHAT ALICE SAW FROM THE WINDOW.

WHAT ALICE SAW FROM THE WINDOW.

Alice stood at the window, watching the falling snow. “What's
that?” she said, as she caught sight of something coming up
the street. :

“It’s a dog; a woolly dog,’
dog, it’s a little bear!”

It was a little bear cub. It stopped directly in front of the
window, and, sitting up, nodded to Alice in the most friendly

’

she cried out. “QO, no! it’s not a

manner. “Oh! you amusing thing,” she cried. “I’m going to
feed you!” and opening the window, she tossed out a sweet cracker,
which Master Bear snapped up in a moment; then, sitting up, he
made another bow, and held out his paw for more. So she gave
him another, but just as he was stooping to snap it up, he suddenly
fell at full length on the snow; and with his forepaws over his
eyes, lay perfectly still. “Why, you poor little fellow, what can
be the matter?” said Allie. At the same moment, she saw a man,
coming very fast; he had a whip. He stopped, when he saw
the cub, and snapped the whip. In a moment, Master Bear was
_ sitting up, bowing, and offering his paw.

Alice was afraid that he would be punished for running away,
so she opened the window, and said, in a coaxing little voice:
“Oh! please don’t whip him; he’s so cunning!”

“Well, I won't, Miss, if. you don’t want me to,” said the man.
“Come, Ned!” Ned understood by the tone of his master’s voice,
that he was not to be punished; he immediately got up and
clasped his paws around his master’s leg and pee him tight.
“ That’s the way he always. does when we make up,” said the man.

Annie L. Hannah.
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THAT’S BECAUSE.

mi



aaa ca h

A FAIRY MUSICIAN,

The rabbits and owls and wood creatures all
Come swift and come fast at my bugle call.



THAT’S BECAUSE.

A little girl at the mail-box
Said to’ me,

“T am posting a letter
For mamma— see!”

And then she slyly added
After a pause,

“T am five years old —

That’s because!”

Oh! how nice for your mamma
It must be

That you can reach the mail-box
Easily,
MARY’S LITTLE LAMB.

I know she must love you dearly
As never was,
For you're five years old and help her,
That’s because.
Clara Doty Bates,



MARY’S LITTLE LAMB.

All the children know that Mary had a little lamb, and perhaps
some of them think it is still running about, and that Mary is
_ still a pretty little girl with rosy cheeks and curly hair. But it
is-a long time since the lamb followed her to school.
MARY’S LITTLE LAMB.

Little Mary became a young lady, and after a great many
years, she was a lovely old lady with beautiful white hair and
a sweet smile. = vee :

When she was a little girl her mother knit some stockings for -
her, from the lamb’s wool, which - were kept after she had
outgrown them.

A few years ago when the 4 ladies were trying to save —
money enough to buy the Old South Meeting-House and
Washington was alive, she
this fair.
ings, and sold the yarn

quite a large sum of money









keep it just as it was when
sent the stockings to be sold at

They ravelled out the stock-
in little balls. The yarn brought
and helped to pay for the Old
South Meeting-House. The
pretty old lady who was once
the pretty little Mary
was much pleased to
have her lamb’s wool
used in this way. Her
name was Mary Sawyer —
Tyler. ase

She was more than
eighty years: old when
she died, last winter,
(1889-90) in Somerville,
Mass.

Though many did not.

THE OLD SOUTH MEETING—HOUSE, BOSTON.

know her real name, all é

the children of ‘to-day, and all the children of days to come, will

remember Mrs. Tyler and the charming story of her little lamb.
2 | Louis Hail.
BIRTHDAY RHYME.

BIRTHDAY RHYME.

How many birthdays have you tried?
How many boys take a base-ball side?
How many days does. a wonder last?
How many Muses throve in the ‘past?
How many tails has a navy “cat?”
How many lives the foe of the rat?
How many syllables has this line?
How many lines has this poem fine?

What can the answer be but %
Emma H. Kalbfleisch.















































































































































‘TOUCH IT IF YOU DARE!”
OUR MINER. ies

OUR MINER.

How pretty he was, with his black and white wings and jaunty
red cap, and what a cheerful little fellow he was too.

Grandmother said that woodpecker was good company enough
to drive away the blues. He was always tap, tap, tapping at
something and so we called him our miner.

But he did not dig for gold and silver; he dug holes in the
wood in search of food.

It was quite- another thing when he began digging into the
legs of the piano and parlor table. So mother sent him to an
unfinished room in the attic, where the bare, brown rafters would
give him plenty of work, and perhaps a few nice, fat boring worms
for his supper.

While the fruit was ripe we gave him a generous supply every
day, and kept a dish of nuts where he could find them.

He did not sleep upon a perch as other birds do, but hung
downwards from it, with his head upon his wing instead of tucked
snugly under it.

We kept him until cold weather, and then let him go. We
could not keep him alone in the cold garret through the long,
dreary winter.

When we opened the window another woodpecker answered his
call, and we were almost sure that it was his pretty mate. Perhaps
she had been mourning for him, so we were not sorry to see him
fly away with her.

Afterwards, in cold days, when the snow was on the ground
we would see him tap, tap, tapping at the old apple-trees in the
orchard. ileeisia Ss