Citation
Aquaphyte

Material Information

Title:
Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title:
Aquaphyte
Creator:
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Place of Publication:
Gainesville FL
Publisher:
The Program
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiannual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aquatic plants -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Genre:
newsletters ( aat )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent) ( marcgt )
periodical ( marcgt )
serial ( sobekcm )
Newsletters ( lcsh )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body:
Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body:
Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
06513906 ( OCLC )
sc 84007615 ( LCCN )
0893-7702 ( ISSN )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online


A Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants

Volume 23 Number 1 Summer 2003
Gainesville, Florida
ISSN 0893-7702


Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants

Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from:

The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

The St. Johns River Water Management District


Contents

About AQUAPHYTE

APIRS Database Update New Interface Makes It Easy!

Where is Pistia From?
Closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes resolved with combined chloroplast
and mitochondrial DNA sequences
by S. Renner and L.-B. Zhang

APIRS Picks: Particularly Interesting New Items in the Database

Large Photo-Murals for K-12 Teachers and Agency Trainers




Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Mural
Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural

Journals For Sale

BE THERE, DO THAT

BOOKS/REPORTS

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRSdatabase



Aquaphyte page Home

CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





About Aquaphyte



This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic,
Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS:
Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries.
Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic
plant research are solicited.

Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion
represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the
University of Florida.



Aquaphyte Contents I Aguaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





APIRS Database Update

After 22 years of assiduous work, the APIRS database contains more than 60,000 annotated
citations for scientific articles and reports about uncounted species of aquatic, wetland and
invasive plants. Beginning as a mainframe, punch-card database with a few hundred references
about water hyacinths, the APIRS database has grown to be the largest free database of its kind in
the world. After a recent period in which the database was unavailable due to computer crashes, it
is now up and running and better than ever. It has retained the quick searching speed which is
now combined with an easy-to-use web interface. The database has been used many thousands of
times by researchers, government agencies, companies, teachers, students and private groups and
individuals.

The History of APIRS

APIRS originally was meant to be a source of information for "aquatic weed" workers in
developing countries, and was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID) for that purpose. It quickly became a source of information for workers in Florida as
well, gaining the support of the then Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management of the Florida
Department of Natural Resources (now the Bureau of Invasive Plant Management of the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)). USAID ceased sponsorship of the database in
the early 1980s. The DEP Bureau continues to be a primary sponsor of the APIRS program. The
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Aquatic Plant Control Research Program supports national and
international APIRS services. The program also is supported by the St. Johns River Water
Management District, with occasional special-project support coming from other agencies and
companies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Cerexagri.

APIRS was developed by Mr. Victor Ramey, who continues to manage the overall program. Ms.
Karen Brown now manages the database itself, while Ramey works to develop other
informational and educational products about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants. Ms. Mary
Langeland is the cataloger of all materials placed in the database.

The Value of APIRS (It's FREE!)

Essentially, APIRS is a bibliographic database devoted to the research of aquatic, wetland and
invasive plants. Databases abound, but none of them are entirely devoted to these specific plants,
and few, if any, are free. A researcher or an institution can subscribe to journals, but these are
very expensive, ranging in price from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars each per year. In
addition, journals are focused on a specific subject, and this is clear by the journal titles: Aquatic
Botany, Plant Physiology, Journal of Ecology, etc. But subjects in aquatic and invasive plant




research often cross disciplinary boundaries. Invasive and aquatic plant information can be
published in ecology journals, weed science journals, or journals covering crop science, natural
areas, wildlife management, ecological restoration, biogeography, and more. In the book, Life
Out of Bounds Bioinvasion in a Borderless World, Chris Bright comments that "Information on
exotics is badly fragmented it is scattered about in hundreds of technical newsletters and
publications. ." Peter Pysek, in a chapter titled "Recent trends in studies on plant invasions"
from Plant Invasions General Aspects and Special Problems, states that "the available
information on plant invasions is scattered in at least 189 journals," and that journal literature
comprises 80% of the total published information. Pysek names the top 13 journals and goes on
to explain that in his sample, which covered the literature on any aspect of the ecology of non-
native species, nine journals covered 28% of the published studies, and 20 journals covered
almost 50% of the published studies. That is a lot of expensive journals to sub-scribe to. Pysek
went on to say that approximately 15% of the literature on invasive plants was published in books
or proceedings, and 4% was published in internal reports or theses. These types of items have
been cataloged and entered into the APIRS database since its inception.

Many of the scientific journals are indexed, and sometimes abstracted, in commercial databases
such as Biological Abstracts, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, Current Contents and others.
However, unless you subscribe to these databases, or belong to an institution that does, you do
not have access to them. These databases often are even more expensive than individual journals.

APIRS collects and catalogs journal articles, books, book chapters, theses, conference
proceedings, agency reports and other published scientific literature. To build the APIRS
collection, we write to authors for reprints, reports and books to be cataloged and entered into the
database. Authors usually are happy to contribute their published research to the database, thus
making it widely known to others in their field. Many regional research centers around the world
also contribute relevant publications. We rely on these contributions to maintain a comprehensive
collection. In exchange, researchers have access to a free bibliographic database of references
specific to their field. To contribute publications to APIRS, please send reprints, photocopies or
PDF's.

Searching APIRS

To search APIRS, go to http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu and click on APIRS Online Database. From
this page, you can select Helpful Hints and Specific Examples for better searching of the
database; Some Keywords in the Database for a simple list of keywords commonly used in the
database; Category and Keyword Use for a list of definitions of the categories and keywords
that we use when cataloging references; or Search to search for references in the database.
Actually the database is straightforward enough even for first-time users to search without any
instructions being necessary. However, to obtain the best results, it is best to consult the help
pages. If difficulty or confusion is encountered when using the database, please contact Karen




Brown. She will assist you with any problems or help you create a search strategy that will
optimize your search results.

Finding Full Text

The APIRS database contains fully annotated citations for each reference, but not full text. We
would like to be able to provide copies of publications to users of the database, but we are not
permitted to do so under copyright law.

For those with access to an academic library, many books and journals may be available there.
Also, most academic libraries participate in "interlibrary loan" (ILL) agreements, enabling them
to borrow items from other libraries for their patrons. ILL requests can cost approximately $10
per item for non-members of the university and can be free for members, but this will vary
between libraries.

Some articles may be downloaded directly from a journal's web site, but many require a fee.

To purchase the full text of cited articles, visit the document delivery services listed below.
These services comply with copyright law. They can provide documents for fees ranging from
$15 to $45 per article, with payment via online transaction or invoicing. These sources are not
guaranteed to have references cited in APIRS, but they are the most likely document delivery
services for science related journal articles. Although most of these sources have databases in
their own right, none of them has the comprehensive coverage of the literature on aquatic,
wetland and invasive plants found in APIRS.

ISI Document Solution Institute for Scientific Information, 800/523-1850. Scanned articles are
provided and various methods of delivery are available, including fax, Federal Express and
standard mail delivery.

Ingenta (formerly CARL UnCover) 800/787-7979. Full text articles are available by fax, Ariel
(a digitized format used between libraries), or 24 hour electronic display/download. Payment by
credit card.

ScienceDirect a pay-per-view ordering process which allows 24 hour access to full text articles
in PDF format, payable by credit card.

CAB International (UK) Mail or fax delivery available.

British Library Document Supply Centre ". a rapid and comprehensive document supply
and interlibrary loan service from our extensive collections to researchers and scholars in all
kinds of libraries and organizations." Self-described as the leading document provider in the




world.


Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) One of the largest
scientific and technical libraries in North America. Copyright-cleared document delivery services
provided.

National Library of Australia Australia's largest document supply center.

DocDel.net. A directory for document delivery services and users hundreds of resources and
providers.

For items that cannot be found using these document delivery services, contact Karen Brown for
assistance at 352.392.1799 or kpb(kmail.ifas.ufl.edu




Aquaphvte Contents I Aquaphyte page Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





Closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes resolved

with combined chloroplast and mitochondrial

DNA sequences

about the work of Dr. Susanne Renner, Menzinger Strasse 67, D-80638 Munich,
Germany, renner@lrz.uni-muenchen.de, and Dr. Li-Bing Zhang, Department of Biology,
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, Libing.Zhang@ColoState.edu


At long last, the closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes (water lettuce) have been
identified. Previous hypotheses about the plant relationships of Pistia had to be based on
morphology alone, which in its case is difficult because of the plant's much-condensed
flower and other reproductive structures. The great morphological distinctness of Pistia is
reflected in classifications of Araceae, which place this single species in a subfamily or
tribe by itself. This work was conducted by S. Renner and L.-B. Zhang, systematists at the
Missouri Botanical Garden and the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

The scientists used sequences from three sections of chloroplast DNA, called intronss' and
'spacers' because they are inserted between and inside genes, and one intron in a
mitochondrial gene. (A manuscript on their discovery has been submitted and the
sequences have been made public in the genetic sequence database GenBank, an
annotated collection of all publicly available DNA sequences which also contains the
human sequence.)

The figure is a phylogenetic
'tree' (drawn as a circle) based on all
combined sequences. The tree
represents the most likely -
relationships between Pistia and its
closest relatives in the Araceae ---
family, given the data and a model of -
sequence evolution based on the .
specific sequences in the analysis. d.
The numbers on the branches -
represent statistical confidence (100
is the highest possible level). -- _.




Pistia stratiotes appears in the lower "'
right, and it is the sister group to the .\.
entire circle of genera 'above it' in
the tree. In other words, Pistia is not -
closely related to any single living
species. Rather, its ancestor diverged
from the ancestor of all the genera in
the tree before those other genera had diversified.

Most of the genera in the 'tree' have but a few species, but a few, such as jack-in-the-
pulpit (Arisaema, with 150 species), are species rich. The distribution maps next to the
genera show that the species related to Pistia all occur in the Old World tropics. The only
exceptions are three species of jack-in-the-pulpit that entered North America across the
Bering land bridge, sometime in the Miocene as indicated by 16-18 million year old
fossils from Spokane. The oldest fossils of Pistia are seeds from the Late Oligocene/Early
Miocene (24 million years) of Europe and Russia. These fossils, however, 'underestimate'
the true age of Pistia because some of the genera in the Pistia sister group have 45 million
year old fossils. Also, the group at the very bottom of the tree, Peltandra (in Florida) and
Typhonodorum, are known from 60 million year old leaves from the Late Paleocene/
Eocene of eastern Europe, Kazakhstan, North Dakota, and Tennessee (Wilde et al., in
press).

The combined molecular and fossil evidence led the researchers to infer that the early
evolution of Pistia took place between 60 and 45 million years ago somewhere around the
Tethys sea, that is the proto-Mediterranean sea which opened into the Indian Ocean, and
that Pistia in geologic terms may be a relative newcomer to the New World tropics. More
detailed comparisons of gene sequences from different populations of Pistia are needed to
test whether New World Pistia populations on average are younger than Old World Pistia
populations. It is tricky, however, because Pistia is so mobile, and there is likely to have
been much local extinction, followed by re-invasion.

References cited:

Renner, S.S., L-B. Zhang. Submitted. Phylogeny and evolution of the pantropical aquatic
weed Pistia stratiotes (Araceae).

Wilde, V., Z. Kvacek, and J. Bogner. In press. Fossil leaves of the Araceae from the
European Eocene and notes on other aroid fossils. Int. J. Plant Sciences.


Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home






APIRS Picks

Particularly interesting new items in the APIRS database.

Selections by reader/cataloger, Mary Langeland; elaborated by Karen Brown.



The population of Myriophyllum quitense (Haloragaceae) at Laguna Toro in the high
Andes of Bolivia was noteworthy for possessing some unusual characteristics. Numerous
individuals (ca. 5-10% of the population) were noted with leaves arrayed in 5-merous
whorls. By contrast, M. quitense typically possesses leaves in 4-merous (occasionally 3-
merous) whorls (Orchard 1981). Leaves in 5-merous whorls have only been reported for
the species from a single herbarium specimen from North America (Orchard 1981), and,
more recently, from Cochabamba's Laguna Alalay (Ritter and Crow 1998).
Ritter, N.P. 2000. Biodiversity and Phytogeography of Bolivia's Wetland Flora. Ph.D.
Thesis, University of New Hampshire, 399 pp.



Where the species [Nelumbo lutea] occurs in pure stand the rhizomes form a complex
underground network which totals a length of 45 miles per acre. The rate of
colonization is phenomenal since a small patch was observed to extend itself radially an
average of 45 feet in one growing season. This represents a growth rate of 0.23 feet per
day for the entire summer. On this basis six properly spaced patches of lotus (10 feet
across) would produce an acre of lotus during one growing period.
Hall, T.F., and Penfound, W.T. 1944. The Biology of the American Lotus, Nelumbo lutea
(Wild.) Pers. American Midland Naturalist 31(3):744-758.



Management of nonindigenous species is a crucial aspect of maintaining native
biodiversity and normal ecosystem functions. We attempt to guide researchers in
developing projects that will be of use to conservation practitioners, tangibly improving
applied conservation measures. We advocate a directed approach for conservation
research to aid in prioritizing nonindigenous species for intervention by resource
managers. This approach includes outlining what needs to be known to make such relative




judgments about the impacts of nonindigenous species and the most promising methods
by which to obtain such information. We also address active measures that should be
taken once priorities have been set, highlighting the roles of risk assessment and research
in improving control efforts. Ultimately, a better match between research and practical
conservation needs should result in more effective reduction of the effects of
nonindigenous species on native species.
Byers, J.E., Reichard, S., Randall, J.M., et al. 2002. Directing Research to Reduce the
Impacts of Nonindigenous Species. Conservation Biology 16(3):630-640.




We present the results of a 14-year common garden experiment with the Chinese
Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum) from its native range (Asia), place of introduction to
North America (Georgia) and areas colonized a century later (Louisiana and Texas).
Invasive genotypes, especially those from recently colonized areas, were larger than
native genotypes and more likely to produce seeds but had lower quality, poorly defended
leaves. Our results demonstrate significant post-invasion genetic differences in an invasive
plant species. Post-introduction adaptation by introduced plants may contribute to their
invasive success and make it difficult to predict problem species.
Siemann, E., Rogers, W.E. 2001. Genetic Differences in Growth of an Invasive Tree
Species. Ecology Letters 4:514-518.




In an effort to help modernize neo-tropical plant studies and to make GIS more
accessible to botanists, The New York Botanical Garden has developed a digital base
map of the Americas with multiple registered map layers that can be superimposed in any
combination and may be used to create digital distribution maps from collection lists for
dissemination and analysis. The Americas Base Map may be utilized by any botanist
affiliated with a nonprofit institution and with access to ArcView, and it is available on
CD or in electronic form by request.
Bletter, N., Janovec, J., Brosi, B., et al. 2003. A Digital Basemapfor Studying the
Neotropical Flora, The New York Botanical Garden.




We report that an eelgrass bed Zostera marina L. at the Aland Islands, northern
Baltic Sea, is dominated by a single genotype which extends over an area of
approximately 160x40 m.. To our knowledge, it represents the largest marine plant
identified thus far. Based on estimates of horizontal rhizome growth rates, this clone may
be more than 1000 years old. The remarkable phenotypic plasticity of a single genotype
which dominates this site illustrates that there is no simple one-to-one relationship




between genetic diversity and population persistence in changing and stressful
environments.
Reusch, T.B.H., Bostrom, C., et al. 1999. An Ancient Eelgrass Clone in the Baltic. Marine
Ecology Progress Ser. 183:301-304.







Aquaphyte Contents I Auaphyte page Home



CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





NEW!
Two PHOTO-MURALS
INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANTS

A Collaborative Effort:
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
and
Cerexagri

Classroom size, Free to Requesting Teachers (K-12)
Send your non-virtual letter for immediate delivery.


Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the plants
depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50%
are also found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and
17% are also found in most of the rest of the U.S.

All plants are depicted in large, strikingly attractive color photographs. Here is the list of plants.

At the request of teachers and enviro-trainers, these photo-murals were produced to be
attention-grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for




homeowners' forums, ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others concerned about
the onslaught of non-native plants in the United States. It was produced by the University of
Florida and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, with printing support from
Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea Grant, the national Aquatic Plant
Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and from the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office.

The photo-murals are available:

-- free-to-teachers:

fully laminated copies of the murals are free to teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who request them in writing, on letterhead, to
the non-virtual APIRSaddress below. there is a limited number of free
copies available -

Please do not telephone or e-mail us about the free photo-mural s offer;
we are happy to accept letters on letterhead from teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who want their free copies. Send your request
letters to: APIRS Photo-Mural, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants,
7922 NW 71 ST, Gainesville, FL 32653.

-- All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764:

They may be purchased singly or as a complete set.

1) SP-293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in.
X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

2) SP-329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated
27 in. X 39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.

3) SP-292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

4) SP-328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X
39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.


OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR!





SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50
plus S/H

Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-1764.
(Credit cards accepted.)

Remember that WHEN YOU PURCHASE A COPY, you also are buying a copy
for a K-12 teacher!




Home |
CAIP-WEBSITEaufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





FOUR CLASSROOM-SIZE, LAMINATED
PHOTO-MURALS FOR YOU!



Two NATIVE FRESHWATER PLANTS

and

Two INVASIVE PLANTS, AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL

A Collaborative Effort:
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Cerexagri



All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764; or by visiting the
IFASBOOKS website:

They may be purchased individually or as a complete set.
1) SP 293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H.
2) SP 329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H.
3) SP 292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H.
4) SP 328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H.

OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR! SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS
DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50 plus S/H Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-
1764; or visit the IFASBOOKS website (Credit cards accepted.)

These photo-murals were produced at the request of teachers and enviro-trainers to be attention-
grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for homeowners' forums,
ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others interested in marshes, swamps and other wetlands
of the United States. The murals were produced by the University of Florida and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, with printing support from Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea
Grant, the national Aquatic Plant Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and
from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office.


NATIVE AQUATIC PLANTS


























Lest we forget, with so much current emphasis on invasive non-natives, most plants in the U.S. are
native; beneficial to animals, humans, and the environment; and often beautiful. So, here are two photo-
murals of 76 native freshwater plants of the U.S.. Of the plants depicted, 100% are in Florida; 97% are also
found in the rest of the Southeast U.S.; 50% are found in the Eastern U.S.; 22% are found in the West; and 22%
are found throughout most of the U.S.

Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "native" murals.



NON-NATIVE INVASIVE PLANTS,
AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL




INVA"[I"I
NON-NATIVB PLANTS
FIl


I


ME

N I


I,
NE


"Em


I
4 ~


Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the
plants depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50% are also
found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and 17% are also found in
most of the rest of the U.S. As in the other photo-murals of this series, all plants are depicted in large, strikingly
attractive color photographs.
Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "invasive" murals.


UNIVERSITY of
UrFLORIDA
TFAS Extension
C(r7 fn, r Adr ,..jfi
rfr /ni tw i'/..ujt.


, 1 ,l .


Home
CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
Copyright 2006 University of Florida


.0I





Journals for Sale


The Aquatic Plant Management Society, Inc. (APMS)has complete sets of back issues of the
Journal of Aquatic Plant Managementfor sale (four issues are available as photocopies only.)
The set of journals represents forty years of research into the management of aquatic plants. The
semi-annual Journal was first published in August 1962, with the most recent issue being Volume
41, January 2003.

Sets are priced at $250.00, plus postage. The average cost of shipping to a U.S. address is $25.00
(parcel post rate), and to an international address $35-$40 (economy rate). The APMS treasurer
can accept credit cards or checks as payment.

Contact Dr. Linda Nelson, USAERDC-WES, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180-
6199, 601.634.2656. E-mail: Linda.S.Nelson@erdc.usace.army.mil



Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Meetings


May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org
28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference
Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage



May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org
10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference



June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis.
edu/5intlweedcong.htm
International Weed Science Society

Aquatic Weed Management

Contacts:

Mike Netherland, USA I mdnether(@ufl .edu

Kevin Murphy, UK |I k.murphy@vbio.qla.ac.uk



June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/
wetland082/site.htm
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course



August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www.
sce.Isu.edu/conference
Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice






September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri 2008.
htm
2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute



September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



October 21-23, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB symposium.
htm
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton
Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University



November 18-20 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
11th International Paleolimnology Symposium



August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@(sun.ac.za
The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant
Invasions (EMAPI)
Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University







V UNIVERSITY of
W FLORIDA
IFAS Extension
CcnfcrT fr Api4mt
AVUS ~ ii 1r 'i~iiif


%M r V


' -.ld ^


Home I Aquaphyte page
Contact Us: CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
@2007 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Books, Manuals, and Online Resources


New Books and Reports
8 Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks
Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book
8 Online Articles and Extension Publications
Extension Publications & Articles
8 Online Books


. 5 rPt PAnr

A'*I h ^ "


UNIVERSITY of
FLORIDA
IFAS Extension
I.'r',t ,i- r r l i,', i',


Home
CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
Copyright 2007 University of Florida





FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic, wetland and invasive plant database since Winter 2003. The database has
more than 60,000 citations. To use the free APIRS database online, go to http://plants.ifas.
ufl.edu/search80/NetAns2/.

To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library, or a document delivery
service.



Agwunobi, L.N., Angwukam, P.O., Cora, 0.0., Isika, M.A.
Studies on the use of Colocasia esculenta (taro cocoyam) in the diets of weaned
pigs.
TROP. ANIMAL HEALTH PROD. 34(3):241-247. 2002.

Anderson, L.W.J.
U.S. eradication program for Caulerpa taxifolia, an exotic and invasive marine alga.
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE,
CO, P. 31-32 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Baskin, Y.
The greening of horticulture: new codes of conduct aim to curb plant invasions.
BIOSCIENCE 52(6):464-471. 2002.

Boedeltje, G., ter Heerdt, G.N.J., Bakker, J.P.
Applying the seedling-emergence method under waterlogged conditions to detect
the seed bank of aquatic plants in submerged sediments.
AQUATIC BOTANY 72(2):121-128. 2002.

Bootsma, M.C., van den Broek, T., Barendregt, A., Beltman, B.
Rehabilitation of acidified floating fens by addition of buffered surface water.
RESTORATION ECOLOGY 10(1): 112-121. 2002.




Champion, P.D., Clayton, J.S.
Border control for potential aquatic weeds: Stage 1. Weed Risk Model. Stage 2.
Weed Risk Assessment.
SCIENCE FOR CONSERVATION 141 AND 185, DEPT. CONSERVATION, WELLINGTON, NEW
ZEALAND, 48 PP. & 30 PP. 2000, 2001.

Chandramohan, S., Charudattan, R., DeValerio, J.T., Hanlon, C.
Use of a multiple-pathogen bioherbicide system for integrated management of
torpedograss.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 58 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Colares, I.G., Colares, E.P.
Food plants eaten by Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis, Mammalia:
Sirenia).
BRAZ. ARCH. BIOL. TECHNOL. 45(1):67-72. 2002.

Dale, P.E.R., Chapman, H., Brown, M.D., Ritchie, S.A., et al
Does habitat modification affect oviposition by the salt marsh mosquito,
Ochlerotatus vigilax (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae)?
AUSTRALIAN J. ENTOMOL. 41(1):49-54. 2002.

Daniel, H., Bernez, I., Haury, J.
Relationships between macrophytes morphology and physical features of river
habitats.
PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS.
A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 115-118. 2002. (IN FRENCH; ENG. SUMMARY)

Darby, C., McKercher, L.R.
Bones wrapped in Lygodium microphyllum rachis suggest a potential problem for
wildlife.
WILDLAND WEEDS 5(4): 14. 2002.

Davis, O.K., Minckley, T., Moutoux, T., Jull, T., et al
The transformation of Sonoran desert wetlands following the historic decrease of
burning.
J. ARID ENVIRON. 50(3):393-412. 2002.


Doering, P.H., Chamberlain, R.H., McMunigal, J.M.




Effects of simulated saltwater intrusions on the growth and survival of wild celery,
Vallisneria americana, from the Caloosahatchee Estuary (south Florida).
ESTUARIES 24(6A):894-903. 2001.

Dorken, M.E., Friedman, J., Barrett, S.C.H.
The evolution and maintenance of monoecy and dioecy in Sagittaria latifolia
(Alismataceae).
EVOLUTION 56(1):31-41. 2002.

Doyle, R.
Cryptocoryne beckettii: a "pretty" aquarium plant threatens endangered aquatic plant
species in the San Marcos River, TX.
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MGMT. SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 20
(ABSTRACT). 2002.

Elger, A., Barrat-Segretain, M.-H., Amoros, C.
Plant palatability and disturbance level in aquatic habitats: an experimental
approach using the snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)
FRESHWATER BIOL. 47(5):931-940. 2002.

Fagan, W.F., Lewis, M.A., Neubert, M.G., van den Driessche, P.
Invasion theory and biological control.
ECOLOGY LETTERS 5(1): 148-157. 2002.

Fairchild, J.F., Allert, A.L., Riddle, J.S., Gladwin, D.R.
Efficacy of glyphosate and five surfactants for controlling giant salvinia.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:53-58. 2003.

Filizadeh, Y., Esfahani, M.
Management of water fern in Iran.
PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS.
A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 349-350. 2002.

Fox, A.M., Gordon, D.R., Stocker, R.K.
Challenges of reaching consensus on assessing which non-native plants are invasive
in natural areas.
HORTSCIENCE 38(1):11-13. 2003.


Fox, A.M., Haller, W.T., Cuda, J.P.




Impacts of carbohydrate depletion by repeated clipping on the production of
subterranean turions by dioecious hydrilla.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:99-104. 2002.

Gajalakshmi, S., Ramasamy, E.V., Abbasi, S.A.
Vermicomposting of different forms of water hyacinth by the earthworm Eudrilus
eugeniae, Kinberg.
BIORESOURCE TECHNOL. 82(2):165-169. 2002.

Gettys, L.A., Sutton, D.L.
Cut-stump glyphosate treatment results in torpedograss (Panicum repens L.) control
and pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata L.) survival.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 14 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Goes, B.J.M.
Effects of river regulation on aquatic macrophyte growth and floods in the Hadejia-
Nguru wetlands and flow in the Yobe River, northern Nigeria; implications for
future water management.
RIVER RES. APPLIC. 18(1):81-95. 2002.

Green, E.K., Galatowitsch, S.M.
Effects of Phalaris arundinacea and nitrate-N addition on the establishment of
wetland plant communities.
J. APPL. ECOL. 39(1):134-144. 2002.

Grimshaw, H.J.
Nutrient release and detritus production by herbicide-treated freely floating aquatic
vegetation in a large, shallow subtropical lake and river.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 153(3):469-490. 2002.

Harada, A., Okazaki, Y., Takagi, S.
Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I.
Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.
PLANTA 214(6):863-869. 2002.

Hardej, M., Ozimek, T.
The effect of sewage sludge flooding on growth and morphometric parameters of
Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel.




ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 19(3):343-350. 2002.


Harms, S.
Predator-prey intractions between carnivorous plants (Utricularia) and littoral
microcrustaceans.
PH.D. DISS., UMEA UNIV., UMEA, SWEDEN, 99 PP. 2001.

Hattink, J., Wolterbeek, H.T.
Accumulation of technetium in floating aquatic plants.
RADIOPROTECTION COLLOQUES 37(C1):633-638. 2002.

Haury, J., Peltre, M.-C., Tremolieres, M., Barbe, J., et al
A method involving macrophytes to assess water trophy and organic pollution: the
Macrophyte Biological Index for Rivers (IBMR) application to different types of
rivers and pollutions.
PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS.
A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 247-250. 2002.

Hefty, R.
Floating vegetated platforms close an open-water ditch in peat wetland (Wisconsin).
ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION. 20(4):284-285. 2002.

Hegazy, A.K., Amer, W.M., Khedr, A.A.
Allelopathic effect of Nymphaea lotus L. on growth and yield of cultivated rice
around Lake Manzala (Nile Delta).
HYDROBIOL. 464(1-3):133-142. 2001.

Heilman, M.A., Smith, C.S., Netherland, M.D., Tarver, D.P.
Use of GPS, GIS, and variable rate application technologies for maximum
application precision of Sonar herbicide.
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY,
KEYSTONE, CO, P. 18 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Henderson, D., McClure, R., Sabol, B.
Commercialization of submersed vegetation mapping system technology.
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY,
KEYSTONE, CO, PP. 17-18 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Holub, P.
The expansion of Calamagrostis epigejos into alluvial meadows: comparison of




aboveground biomass in relation to water regimes.
EKOLOGIA (BRATISLAVA) 21(1):27-37. 2002.

Hood, S.C.
Report of the camphor experiments conducted at Huntington, Florida, during the
spring of 1907.
CAMPHOR REPORTS, 1907-1908 YEARBOOK. 1907.

Hovel, K.A., Lipcius, R.N.
Effects of seagrass habitat fragmentation on juvenile blue crab survival and
abundance.
J. EXP. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 271(1):75-98. 2002.

Hu, M., Skibsted, L.H.
Antioxidative capacity of rhizome extract and rhizome knot extract of edible lotus
(Nelumbo nucifera).
FOOD CHEM. 76(3):327-333. 2002.

Kasselmann, C.
Echinodorus decumbens: new discoveries into its ecology and culture.
AQUATIC GARDENER 15(2):3-10. 2002.

Kenney, W.F., Waters, M.N., Schelske, C.L., Brenner, M.
Sediment records of phosphorus-driven shifts to phytoplankton dominance in
shallow Florida lakes.
J. PALEOLIMNOL. 27:367-377. 2002.

Kirsch, K.D., Valentine, J.F., Heck, K.L.
Parrotfish grazing on turtlegrass Thalassia testudinum: evidence for the importance
of seagrass consumption in food web dynamics of the Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 227:71-85. 2002.

Klesius, M.
The big bloom: how flowering plants changed the world.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, JULY, PP. 102-121. 2002.

Koschnick, T.J., Haller, W.T.
Effects of endothall in irrigation water on selected turf and ornamental species.




WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 72 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Kurata, K., Minami, H., Kikuchi, E.
Stable isotope analysis of food sources for salt marsh snails.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 223:167-177. 2001.

Lake, M.D., Hicks, B.J., Wells, R.D.S., Dugdale, T.M.
Consumption of submerged aquatic macrophytes by rudd (Scardinius
erythrophthalmus L.) in New Zealand.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 470(1-3): 13-22. 2002.

Langeland, K.A., Hill, O.N., Koschnick, T.J., Haller, W.T.
Evaluation of a new formulation of Reward landscape and aquatic herbicide for
control of duckweed, waterhyacinth, waterlettuce, and hydrilla.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:51-53. 2002.

Lass, L.W., Prather, T.S.
Improving the detection of Brazilian pepper with geospatial enhancement of
hyperspectral remote sensing imagery.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 13 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Leon, C.T., Webster, E.P., Zhang, W.
Post-flood cyhalofop tank-mixtures for rice weed control.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 2 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Les, D.H., Crawford, D.J., Landolt, E., Gabel, J.D., et al
Phylogeny and systematics of Lemnaceae, the duckweed family.
SYSTEMATIC BOT. 27(2):221-240. 2002.

Lienert, J., Diemer, M., Schmid, B.
Effects of habitat fragmentation on population structure and fitness components of
the wetland specialist Swertia perennis L. (Gentianaceae).
BASIC APPL. ECOL. 3(2):101-114. 2002.

Lopez, R.D., Fennessy, M.S.
Testing the floristic quality assessment index as an indicator of wetland condition.
ECOL. APPLICATIONS 12(2):487-497. 2002.





Maberly, S.C., Madsen, T.V.
Freshwater angiosperm carbon concentrating mechanisms: processes and patterns.
FUNCT. PLANT BIOL. 29(2-3):393-405. 2002.

Mahujchariyawong, J.
Modelling sustainable water quality improvement using water hyacinth and its
application in Thailand.
INT. J. SUSTAIN. DEV. WORLD ECOL. 8(3):221-231. 2001.

Mailly, D., Margolis, H.A.
Accretion of carbon and nutrients in the forest floor and mineral soil of Casuarina
equisetifolia plantations on the coastal sand dunes of Senegal.
MANAGEMENT OF TROPICAL PLANTATION-FORESTS AND THEIR SOIL LITTER SYSTEM:
LITTER, BIOTA AND SOIL-NUTRIENT DYNAMICS, ED. M.V. REDDY, SCIENCE PUBL.,
ENFIELD, NH, PP. 379-393. 2002.

McAvoy, T.J., Kok, L.T., Mays, W.T.
Establishment of Hylobius transversovittatus Goeze (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a
tropical biological control agent of purple loosestrife, in Virginia.
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 24(3):245-250. 2002.

Masuyama, S., Yatabe, Y., Murakami, N., Watano, Y.
Cryptic species in the fern Ceratopteris thalictroides (L.) Brongn. (Parkeriaceae). I.
Molecular analyses and crossing tests.
J. PLANT RES. 115(1118):87-97. 2002.

Medal, J.C., Sudbrink, D., Gandolfo, D., Ohashi, D., et al
Gratiana boliviana, a potential biocontrol agent of Solanum viarum: quarantine host-
specificity testing in Florida and field surveys in South America.
BIOCONTROL 47:445-461. 2002.

Meiners, S.J., Pickett, S.T.A., Cadenasso, M.L.
Effects of plant invasions on species richness of abandoned agricultural land.
ECOGRAPHY 24(6):633-644. 2001.

Muller, S.D., Guiot, J., Richard, P.J.H., de Beaulieu, J.-L., et al
Postglacial climate dynamics in the St. Lawrence lowlands, southern Quebec: pollen
and lake-level evidence.
CONDITIONS OF CARBON ACCUMULATION IN A SOUTHERN QUEBEC PEAT BOG: THE




INFLUENCE OF AUTOGENIC FACTORS AND ALLOGENIC CONTROLS, S.D. MULLER, PH.D.
THESIS, UNIVERSITY DE DROIT, D'ECONOMIE ET DES SCIENCES D'AIX MARSEILLE, PP. 61-
89. 2001.

Nelson, L.S., Stewart, A.B., Getsinger, K.D.
Fluridone effects on fanwort and water marigold.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:58-63. 2002.

Netherland, M.D., Dayan, F., Scheffler, B., Cockreham, S.
Three and a half years of laboratory and field monitoring of fluridone-tolerant
hydrilla: what have we learned?
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE,
CO, P. 26 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Noble, C.V., Evans, R., McGuire, M., Trott, K., et al
A regional guidebook for applying the hydrogeomorphic approach to assessing
wetland functions of flats wetlands in the Everglades.
TECH. REPT. ERDC/EL TR-02-19, US ARMY ENGINEER RES. DEV. CTR., VICKSBURG, MS, 198
PP. 2002.

Ozbay, H., Yildirimli, S.
Systematics, biology, relationships with other organisms and uses of Lemnaceae.
HERB J. SYST. BOT. 7(2):149-166 (IN TURKISH; ENGLISH SUMMARY). 2000.

Ozimek, T.
Possibilities of reconstruction of submerged macrophyte communities from the seed
bank in eutrophic Lake Mikolajskie (northern Poland).
PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS.
A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 47-50. 2002.

Penny, D.
The developing mechanical shredder technology.
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE,
CO, P. 30 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Perfetta, J., Demierre, A.
Aquatic vegetation of Lake Geneva: comparison between 1973 and 1998 in relation
with the trophic level.
PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS.
A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 193-196. 2002.




Piazzi, L., Ceccherelli, G.
Effects of competition between two introduced Caulerpa.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 225:189-195. 2002.

Rimando, A.M., Duke, S.O.
Studies on rice allelochemicals.
IN: RICE: ORIGIN, HISTORY, TECHNOLOGY, AND PRODUCTION, EDS. C.W. SMITH & R.H.
DILDAY, JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., HOBOKEN, NJ, PP. 221-244. 2003.

Pitelli, R.A., Reis, R.A., Pitelli, R.L.C.M.
Brachiaria decumbens, a major exotic invasive plant in Brazil.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL,
ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 23 (ABSTRACT). 2003.

Povilitis, T.
What is a natural area?
NATURAL AREAS J. 22(1):70-74. 2002.

Pratt, P.D., Rayachhetry, M.C., Van, T.K., Center, T.D.
Field-based rates of population increase for Oxyops vitiosa (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae), a biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca
quinquenervia.
FLORIDA ENTOMOL. 85(1):286-287. 2002.

Reichard, S.
Horticulture as a pathway of invasive plant introductions in North America.
LINKING ECOLOGY AND HORTICULTURE TO PREVENT PLANT INVASIONS, PROC.
WORKSHOP, MISSOURI BOT. GDN., ED. K. FAY, ST. LOUIS, PP. 13-14 (ABSTRACT). 2001.

Reinartz, J.A.
Winter season offers many advantages for treating invasive buckthorns and
honeysuckles (Wisconsin).
ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 20(4):286-287. 2002.

Riddle, S.G., Tran, H.H., DeWitt, J.G., Andrews, J.C.
Field, laboratory, and x-ray adsorption spectroscopic studies of mercury
accumulation by water hyacinths.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 36(9):1965-1970. 2002.




Rutishauser, R., Isler, B.
Developmental genetics and morphological evolution of flowering plants, especially
bladderworts (Utricularia): fuzzy Arberian morphology complements classical
morphology.
ANN. BOT. 88(6):1173-1202. 2001.

Saadi, A., Guerbet, M., Gamier, J.
Influence of diethyldithiocarbamate on cadmium and copper toxicity to freshwater
macrophyte Spirodela polyrhiza.
WATER SA 28(1):107-110. 2002.

Santamaria, L., Rodriguez-Girones, M.A.
Hiding from swans: optimal burial depth of sago pondweed tubers foraged by
Bewick's swans.
J. ECOL. 90(2):303-315. 2002.

Schaffelke, B., Murphy, N., Uthicke, S.
Using genetic techniques to investigate the sources of the invasive alga Caulerpa
taxifolia in three new locations in Australia.
MAR. POLL. BULL. 44(3):204-210. 2002.

Schols, P., Furness, C.A., Wilkin, P., Huysmans, S., et al
Morphology of pollen and orbicules in some Dioscorea species and its systematic
implications.
BOT. J. LINNEAN SOC. 136(3):295-311. 2001.

Shearer, J.F.
The potential role of an endophytic fungus in the decline of stressed Eurasian
watermilfoil.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:76-78. 2002.

Shelton, D., Leach, D., Baverstock, P., Henry, R.
Isolation of genes involved in secondary metabolism from Melaleuca alternifolia
(Cheel) using expressed sequence tags (ESTS).
PLANT SCI. 162(1):9-15. 2002.

Sorrell, B.K., Downes, M.T., Stanger, C.L.
Methanotrophic bacteria and their activity on submerged aquatic macrophytes.
AQUATIC BOTANY 72(2):107-119. 2002.





Sprecher, S.L., Getsinger, K.D., Sharp, J.
Review of USACE-generated efficacy and dissipation data for the aquatic herbicide
formulations aquathol and hydrothol.
ERDC/EL TECH. REPT. TR-02-11, U.S. ARMY ENGINEER RES. & DEV. CTR., VICKSBURG, MS,
50 PP. 2002.

Stewart, S.L., Zettler, L.W.
Symbiotic germination of three semi-aquatic rein orchids (Habenaria repens, H.
quinquiseta, H. macroceratitis) from Florida.
AQUATIC BOTANY 72(1):25-35. 2002.

Stocker, R.K., Haller, W.T.
Toxicity of 19 adjuvants to Lepomis macrochirus (bluegill sunfish).
PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE,
CO, P. 21 (ABSTRACT). 2002.

Tanaka, M., Yamawaki, K., Nakasuji, F.
Dynamic interaction between a leaf beetle, Galerucella nipponensis (Coleoptera:
Chrysomelidae) and an aquatic plant, Trapajaponica (Trapaceae) I. Life history
traits of G. nipponensis.
ENTOMOL. SCI. 5(2):187-192. 2002.

Thomas, B., Brandt, L.A.
Monitoring ground treatments of Old World climbing fern (Lygodium
microphyllum) on the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee NWR.
WILDLAND WEEDS 6(2):9-11. 2003.

Torres, R.
Getting private landowners involved in invasive species management: A Nature
Conservancy pilot project. WILDLAND WEEDS 6(1):14-17. 2002.

Travis, S.E., Proffitt, C.E., Lowenfeld, R.C., Mitchell, T.W.
A comparative assessment of genetic diversity among differently-aged populations
of Spartina alterniflora on restored versus natural wetlands.
RESTORATION ECOL. 10(1):37-42. 2002.

Triest, L., Mannaert, A.
Genotyping of Callitriche L. is useful to estimate relationships of clones with




environmental variables.
IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE,
EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 201-204. 2002.

Valley, R.D., Bremigan, M.T.
Effects of selective removal of Eurasian watermilfoil on age-0 largemouth bass
piscivory and growth in southern Michigan lakes.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:79-87. 2002.

Veys, P., Lejeune, A., Van Hove, C.
The pore of the leaf cavity of Azolla species: teat cell differentiation and cell wall
projections.
PROTOPLASMA 219(1-2): 31-42. 2002.

Vitalis, R., DuBois, M.-P., Olivieri, I.
Characterization of microsatellite loci in the endangered species of fern Marsilea
strigosa Willd. (Marsileaceae, Pteridophyta).
MOLEC. ECOL. NOTES 1(1-2):64-66. 2001.

Wirsel, S.G.R., Runge-Frobose, C., Ahren, D.G., Kemen, E., et al
Four or more species of Cladosporium sympatrically colonize Phragmites australis.
FUNGAL GENETICS AND BIOL. 35(2):99-113. 2002.

Wolterbeek, H.Th., van der Meer, A.J.G.M.
Transport rate of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc in Potamogeton pectinatus L.:
radiotracer experiments with 76As, 109, 115Cd, 64Cu and 65, 69mZn.
SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 287(1-2):13-30. 2002.

Wright, J.F., Gunn, R.J.M., Winder, J.M., Wiggers, R., et al
A comparison of the macrophyte cover and macro invertebrate fauna at three sites on
the River Kennet in the mid-1970s and late 1990s.
SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 282-283:121-142. 2002.

Wu, L., Guo, X.
Selenium accumulation in submerged aquatic macrophytes Potamogetonpectinatus
L. and Ruppia maritima L. from water with elevated chloride and sulfate salinity.
ECOTOXICOL. ENVIRON. SAFETY 51(1):22-27. 2002.


Ye, Z.H., Whiting, S.N., Qian, J.H., Lytle, C.M., et al




Trace element removal from coal ash leachate by a 10-year-old constructed wetland.
J. ENVIRON. QUAL. 30(5):1710-1719. 2001.

Zetter, R., Ferguson, D.K.
Trapaceae pollen in the Cenozoic.
ACTA PALAEOBOT. 41(2):321-339. 2001.

Zimba, P.V., Tucker, C.S., Mischke, C.C., Grimm, C.C.
Short-term effect of diuron on catfish pond ecology.
N. AMER. J. AQUACULTURE 64:16-23. 2002.



Aquaphyte Contents I Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu




Aquaphyte Newsletter


JWf9 UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA
IFAS Extension


Home
CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
Copyright 2007 University of Florida


http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aquaph.html (2 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]




Full Text

PAGE 1

Aquaphyte Volume 23 Number 1 Summer 2003 AQUAPHYTE OnlineA Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive PlantsVolume 23 Number 1 Summer 2003 Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702 Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences University of Florida 7922 N.W. 71st Street Gainesville, Florida 32653 352-392-1799 with support from: The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Invasive Plant Management The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Waterways Experiment Station, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program The St. Johns River Water Management District Contents About AQUAPHYTE APIRS Database Update New Interface Makes It Easy! Where is Pistia From? Closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes resolved with combined chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequences by S. Renner and L.-B. Zhang APIRS Picks: Particularly Interesting New Items in the Database Large Photo-Murals for K-12 Teachers and Agency Trainers http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-1.html (1 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:55:56 PM]

PAGE 2

Aquaphyte Volume 23 Number 1 Summer 2003 Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Mural Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural Journals For Sale BE THERE, DO THAT BOOKS/REPORTS FROM THE DATABASE a sampling of new additions to the APIRSdatabase Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-1.html (2 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:55:56 PM]

PAGE 3

23(1) About Aquaphyte AQUAPHYTE ONLINE Summer 2003 About Aquaphyte This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water Management District and UF/IFAS. EDITORS: Victor Ramey Karen Brown AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries. Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic plant research are solicited. Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the University of Florida. Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-9.html [6/6/2008 1:55:57 PM]

PAGE 4

23(1) AQUAPHYTE AQUAPHYTE ONLINE SUMMER 2003 APIRS Database UpdateAfter 22 years of assiduous work, the APIRS database contains more than 60,000 annotated citations for scientific articles and reports about uncounted species of aquatic, wetland and invasive plants. Beginning as a mainframe, punch-card database with a few hundred references about water hyacinths, the APIRS database has grown to be the largest free database of its kind in the world. After a recent period in which the database was unavailable due to computer crashes, it is now up and running and better than ever. It has retained the quick searching speed which is now combined with an easy-to-use web interface. The database has been used many thousands of times by researchers, government agencies, companies, teachers, students and private groups and individuals. The History of APIRS APIRS originally was meant to be a source of information for "aquatic weed" workers in developing countries, and was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) for that purpose. It quickly became a source of information for workers in Florida as well, gaining the support of the then Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management of the Florida Department of Natural Resources (now the Bureau of Invasive Plant Management of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)). USAID ceased sponsorship of the database in the early 1980s. The DEP Bureau continues to be a primary sponsor of the APIRS program. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Aquatic Plant Control Research Program supports national and international APIRS services. The program also is supported by the St. Johns River Water Management District, with occasional special-project support coming from other agencies and companies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Cerexagri. APIRS was developed by Mr. Victor Ramey, who continues to manage the overall program. Ms. Karen Brown now manages the database itself, while Ramey works to develop other informational and educational products about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants. Ms. Mary Langeland is the cataloger of all materials placed in the database. The Value of APIRS (It's FREE!) Essentially, APIRS is a bibliographic database devoted to the research of aquatic, wetland and invasive plants. Databases abound, but none of them are entirely devoted to these specific plants, and few, if any, are free. A researcher or an institution can subscribe to journals, but these are very expensive, ranging in price from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars each per year. In addition, journals are focused on a specific subject, and this is clear by the journal titles: Aquatic Botany, Plant Physiology, Journal of Ecology, etc. But subjects in aquatic and invasive plant http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-3.html (1 of 4) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 5

23(1) AQUAPHYTE research often cross disciplinary boundaries. Invasive and aquatic plant information can be published in ecology journals, weed science journals, or journals covering crop science, natural areas, wildlife management, ecological restoration, biogeography, and more. In the book, Life Out of Bounds Bioinvasion in a Borderless World, Chris Bright comments that "Information on exotics is badly fragmented it is scattered about in hundreds of technical newsletters and publications. . . ." Peter Pysek, in a chapter titled "Recent trends in studies on plant invasions" from Plant Invasions General Aspects and Special Problems, states that "the available information on plant invasions is scattered . . . in at least 189 journals," and that journal literature comprises 80% of the total published information. Pysek names the top 13 journals and goes on to explain that in his sample, which covered the literature on any aspect of the ecology of nonnative species, nine journals covered 28% of the published studies, and 20 journals covered almost 50% of the published studies. That is a lot of expensive journals to sub-scribe to. Pysek went on to say that approximately 15% of the literature on invasive plants was published in books or proceedings, and 4% was published in internal reports or theses. These types of items have been cataloged and entered into the APIRS database since its inception. Many of the scientific journals are indexed, and sometimes abstracted, in commercial databases such as Biological Abstracts, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, Current Contents and others. However, unless you subscribe to these databases, or belong to an institution that does, you do not have access to them. These databases often are even more expensive than individual journals. APIRS collects and catalogs journal articles, books, book chapters, theses, conference proceedings, agency reports and other published scientific literature. To build the APIRS collection, we write to authors for reprints, reports and books to be cataloged and entered into the database. Authors usually are happy to contribute their published research to the database, thus making it widely known to others in their field. Many regional research centers around the world also contribute relevant publications. We rely on these contributions to maintain a comprehensive collection. In exchange, researchers have access to a free bibliographic database of references specific to their field. To contribute publications to APIRS, please send reprints, photocopies or PDF's. Searching APIRS To search APIRS, go to http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu and click on APIRS Online Database. From this page, you can select Helpful Hints and Specific Examples for better searching of the database; Some Keywords in the Database for a simple list of keywords commonly used in the database; Category and Keyword Use for a list of definitions of the categories and keywords that we use when cataloging references; or Search to search for references in the database. Actually the database is straightforward enough even for first-time users to search without any instructions being necessary. However, to obtain the best results, it is best to consult the help pages. If difficulty or confusion is encountered when using the database, please contact Karen http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-3.html (2 of 4) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 6

23(1) AQUAPHYTE Brown. She will assist you with any problems or help you create a search strategy that will optimize your search results. Finding Full Text The APIRS database contains fully annotated citations for each reference, but not full text. We would like to be able to provide copies of publications to users of the database, but we are not permitted to do so under copyright law. For those with access to an academic library, many books and journals may be available there. Also, most academic libraries participate in ''interlibrary loan'' (ILL) agreements, enabling them to borrow items from other libraries for their patrons. ILL requests can cost approximately $10 per item for non-members of the university and can be free for members, but this will vary between libraries. Some articles may be downloaded directly from a journal's web site, but many require a fee. To purchase the full text of cited articles, visit the document delivery services listed below. These services comply with copyright law. They can provide documents for fees ranging from $15 to $45 per article, with payment via online transaction or invoicing. These sources are not guaranteed to have references cited in APIRS, but they are the most likely document delivery services for science related journal articles. Although most of these sources have databases in their own right, none of them has the comprehensive coverage of the literature on aquatic, wetland and invasive plants found in APIRS. ISI Document Solution Institute for Scientific Information, 800/523-1850. Scanned articles are provided and various methods of delivery are available, including fax, Federal Express and standard mail delivery. Ingenta (formerly CARL UnCover) 800/787-7979. Full text articles are available by fax, Ariel (a digitized format used between libraries), or 24 hour electronic display/download. Payment by credit card. ScienceDirect a pay-per-view ordering process which allows 24 hour access to full text articles in PDF format, payable by credit card. CAB International (UK) Mail or fax delivery available. British Library Document Supply Centre ". . . a rapid and comprehensive document supply and interlibrary loan service from our extensive collections to researchers and scholars in all kinds of libraries and organisations." Self-described as the leading document provider in the http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-3.html (3 of 4) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 7

23(1) AQUAPHYTE world. Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) One of the largest scientific and technical libraries in North America. Copyright-cleared document delivery services provided. National Library of Australia Australia's largest document supply center. DocDel.net. A directory for document delivery services and users hundreds of resources and providers. For items that cannot be found using these document delivery services, contact Karen Brown for assistance at 352.392.1799 or kpb@mail.ifas.ufl.edu Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-3.html (4 of 4) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 8

23(1) AQUAPHYTE AQUAPHYTE ONLINE SUMMER 2003 Closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes resolved with combined chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequencesabout the work of Dr. Susanne Renner, Menzinger Strasse 67, D-80638 Munich, Germany, renner@lrz.uni-muenchen.de, and Dr. Li-Bing Zhang, Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, Libing.Zhang@ColoState.edu At long last, the closest relatives of Pistia stratiotes (water lettuce) have been identified. Previous hypotheses about the plant relationships of Pistia had to be based on morphology alone, which in its case is difficult because of the plant's much-condensed flower and other reproductive structures. The great morphological distinctness of Pistia is reflected in classifications of Araceae, which place this single species in a subfamily or tribe by itself. This work was conducted by S. Renner and L.-B. Zhang, systematists at the Missouri Botanical Garden and the University of Missouri-St. Louis. The scientists used sequences from three sections of chloroplast DNA, called introns' and spacers' because they are inserted between and inside genes, and one intron in a mitochondrial gene. (A manuscript on their discovery has been submitted and the sequences have been made public in the genetic sequence database GenBank, an annotated collection of all publicly available DNA sequences which also contains the human sequence.) The figure is a phylogenetic tree' (drawn as a circle) based on all combined sequences. The tree represents the most likely relationships between Pistia and its closest relatives in the Araceae family, given the data and a model of sequence evolution based on the specific sequences in the analysis. The numbers on the branches represent statistical confidence (100 is the highest possible level). http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-30.html (1 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 9

23(1) AQUAPHYTE Pistia stratiotes appears in the lower right, and it is the sister group to the entire circle of genera above it' in the tree. In other words, Pistia is not closely related to any single living species. Rather, its ancestor diverged from the ancestor of all the genera in the tree before those other genera had diversified. Most of the genera in the tree' have but a few species, but a few, such as jack-in-thepulpit (Arisaema, with 150 species), are species rich. The distribution maps next to the genera show that the species related to Pistia all occur in the Old World tropics. The only exceptions are three species of jack-in-the-pulpit that entered North America across the Bering land bridge, sometime in the Miocene as indicated by 16-18 million year old fossils from Spokane. The oldest fossils of Pistia are seeds from the Late Oligocene/Early Miocene (24 million years) of Europe and Russia. These fossils, however, underestimate' the true age of Pistia because some of the genera in the Pistia sister group have 45 million year old fossils. Also, the group at the very bottom of the tree, Peltandra (in Florida) and Typhonodorum, are known from 60 million year old leaves from the Late Paleocene/ Eocene of eastern Europe, Kazakhstan, North Dakota, and Tennessee (Wilde et al., in press). The combined molecular and fossil evidence led the researchers to infer that the early evolution of Pistia took place between 60 and 45 million years ago somewhere around the Tethys sea, that is the proto-Mediterranean sea which opened into the Indian Ocean, and that Pistia in geologic terms may be a relative newcomer to the New World tropics. More detailed comparisons of gene sequences from different populations of Pistia are needed to test whether New World Pistia populations on average are younger than Old World Pistia populations. It is tricky, however, because Pistia is so mobile, and there is likely to have been much local extinction, followed by re-invasion. References cited: Renner, S.S., L-B. Zhang. Submitted. Phylogeny and evolution of the pantropical aquatic weed Pistia stratiotes (Araceae). Wilde, V., Z. Kvacek, and J. Bogner. In press. Fossil leaves of the Araceae from the European Eocene and notes on other aroid fossils. Int. J. Plant Sciences. Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-30.html (2 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 10

23(1) AQUAPHYTE CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-30.html (3 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:58 PM]

PAGE 11

23(1) AQUAPHYTE AQUAPHYTE ONLINE SUMMER 2003 APIRS Picks Particularly interesting new items in the APIRS database. Selections by reader/cataloger, Mary Langeland; elaborated by Karen Brown. The population of Myriophyllum quitense (Haloragaceae) at Laguna Toro in the high Andes of Bolivia was noteworthy for possessing some unusual characteristics. Numerous individuals (ca. 5-10% of the population) were noted with leaves arrayed in 5-merous whorls. By contrast, M. quitense typically possesses leaves in 4-merous (occasionally 3merous) whorls (Orchard 1981). Leaves in 5-merous whorls have only been reported for the species from a single herbarium specimen from North America (Orchard 1981), and, more recently, from Cochabamba's Laguna Alalay (Ritter and Crow 1998). Ritter, N.P. 2000. Biodiversity and Phytogeography of Bolivia's Wetland Flora. Ph.D. Thesis, University of New Hampshire, 399 pp. Where the species [Nelumbo lutea] occurs in pure stand the rhizomes form a complex underground network which totals a length of 45 miles per acre. The rate of colonization is phenomenal since a small patch was observed to extend itself radially an average of 45 feet in one growing season. This represents a growth rate of 0.23 feet per day for the entire summer. On this basis six properly spaced patches of lotus (10 feet across) would produce an acre of lotus during one growing period. Hall, T.F., and Penfound, W.T. 1944. The Biology of the American Lotus, Nelumbo lutea (Wild.) Pers. American Midland Naturalist 31(3):744-758. Management of nonindigenous species is a crucial aspect of maintaining native biodiversity and normal ecosystem functions. We attempt to guide researchers in developing projects that will be of use to conservation practitioners, tangibly improving applied conservation measures. We advocate a directed approach for conservation research to aid in prioritizing nonindigenous species for intervention by resource managers. This approach includes outlining what needs to be known to make such relative http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-25.html (1 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:59 PM]

PAGE 12

23(1) AQUAPHYTE judgments about the impacts of nonindigenous species and the most promising methods by which to obtain such information. We also address active measures that should be taken once priorities have been set, highlighting the roles of risk assessment and research in improving control efforts. Ultimately, a better match between research and practical conservation needs should result in more effective reduction of the effects of nonindigenous species on native species. Byers, J.E., Reichard, S., Randall, J.M., et al. 2002. Directing Research to Reduce the Impacts of Nonindigenous Species. Conservation Biology 16(3):630-640. We present the results of a 14-year common garden experiment with the Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum) from its native range (Asia), place of introduction to North America (Georgia) and areas colonized a century later (Louisiana and Texas). Invasive genotypes, especially those from recently colonized areas, were larger than native genotypes and more likely to produce seeds but had lower quality, poorly defended leaves. Our results demonstrate significant post-invasion genetic differences in an invasive plant species. Post-introduction adaptation by introduced plants may contribute to their invasive success and make it difficult to predict problem species. Siemann, E., Rogers, W.E. 2001. Genetic Differences in Growth of an Invasive Tree Species. Ecology Letters 4:514-518. In an effort to help modernize neo-tropical plant studies and to make GIS more accessible to botanists, The New York Botanical Garden has developed a digital base map of the Americas with multiple registered map layers that can be superimposed in any combination and may be used to create digital distribution maps from collection lists for dissemination and analysis. The Americas Base Map may be utilized by any botanist affiliated with a nonprofit institution and with access to ArcView, and it is available on CD or in electronic form by request. Bletter, N., Janovec, J., Brosi, B., et al. 2003. A Digital Basemap for Studying the Neotropical Flora, The New York Botanical Garden. We report that an eelgrass bed Zostera marina L. at the Aland Islands, northern Baltic Sea, is dominated by a single genotype which extends over an area of approximately 160x40 m. . . To our knowledge, it represents the largest marine plant identified thus far. Based on estimates of horizontal rhizome growth rates, this clone may be more than 1000 years old. The remarkable phenotypic plasticity of a single genotype which dominates this site illustrates that there is no simple one-to-one relationship http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-25.html (2 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:59 PM]

PAGE 13

23(1) AQUAPHYTE between genetic diversity and population persistence in changing and stressful environments. Reusch, T.B.H., Bostrom, C., et al. 1999. An Ancient Eelgrass Clone in the Baltic. Marine Ecology Progress Ser. 183:301-304. Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-25.html (3 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:55:59 PM]

PAGE 14

Two Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Murals NEW! Two PHOTO-MURALS INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANTS A Collaborative Effort: Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection and Cerexagri Classroom size, Free to Requesting Teachers (K-12) Send your non-virtual letter for immediate delivery. Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the plants depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50% are also found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and 17% are also found in most of the rest of the U.S. All plants are depicted in large, strikingly attractive color photographs. Here is the list of plants. At the request of teachers and enviro-trainers, these photo-murals were produced to be attention-grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural.html (1 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:00 PM]

PAGE 15

Two Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Murals homeowners' forums, ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others concerned about the onslaught of non-native plants in the United States. It was produced by the University of Florida and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, with printing support from Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea Grant, the national Aquatic Plant Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office. The photo-murals are available: -free-to-teachers: fully laminated copies of the murals are free to teachers (U.S., K-12) and public agency trainers (U.S.) who request them in writing, on letterhead, to the non-virtual APIRSaddress below. there is a limited number of free copies available Please do not telephone or e-mail us about the free photo-mural s offer; we are happy to accept letters on letterhead from teachers (U.S., K-12) and public agency trainers (U.S.) who want their free copies. Send your request letters to: APIRS Photo-Mural, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW 71 ST, Gainesville, FL 32653. -All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764: They may be purchased singly or as a complete set. 1) SP-293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H. 2) SP-329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H. 3) SP-292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H. 4) SP-328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H. OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR! http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural.html (2 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:00 PM]

PAGE 16

Two Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Murals SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50 plus S/H Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-1764. (Credit cards accepted.) Remember that WHEN YOU PURCHASE A COPY, you also are buying a copy for a K-12 teacher! Home | CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural.html (3 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:00 PM]

PAGE 17

Four Photo-Murals Native Freshwater, and Non-Native Invasive APIRS FOUR CLASSROOM-SIZE, LAMINATED PHOTO-MURALS FOR YOU! Two NATIVE FRESHWATER PLANTS and Two INVASIVE PLANTS, AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL A Collaborative Effort: Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection Cerexagri All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764; or by visiting the IFASBOOKS website: They may be purchased individually or as a complete set. 1) SP 293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H. 2) SP 329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H. 3) SP 292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H. 4) SP 328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H. OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR! SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50 plus S/H Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-2261764; or visit the IFASBOOKS website (Credit cards accepted.) These photo-murals were produced at the request of teachers and enviro-trainers to be attentiongrabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for homeowners' forums, ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others interested in marshes, swamps and other wetlands of the United States. The murals were produced by the University of Florida and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, with printing support from Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea Grant, the national Aquatic Plant Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office. NATIVE AQUATIC PLANTS http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural2.html (1 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:01 PM]

PAGE 18

Four Photo-Murals Native Freshwater, and Non-Native Invasive APIRS Lest we forget, with so much current emphasis on invasive non-natives, most plants in the U.S. are native; beneficial to animals, humans, and the environment; and often beautiful. So, here are two photomurals of 76 native freshwater plants of the U.S.. Of the plants depicted, 100% are in Florida; 97% are also found in the rest of the Southeast U.S.; 50% are found in the Eastern U.S.; 22% are found in the West; and 22% are found throughout most of the U.S. Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "native" murals. NON-NATIVE INVASIVE PLANTS, AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural2.html (2 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:01 PM]

PAGE 19

Four Photo-Murals Native Freshwater, and Non-Native Invasive APIRS Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the plants depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50% are also found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and 17% are also found in most of the rest of the U.S. As in the other photo-murals of this series, all plants are depicted in large, strikingly attractive color photographs. Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "invasive" murals. Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2006 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/mural2.html (3 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:01 PM]

PAGE 20

23(1) AQUAPHYTE AQUAPHYTE ONLINE SUMMER 2003 Journals for Sale The Aquatic Plant Management Society, Inc. (APMS)has complete sets of back issues of the Journal of Aquatic Plant Managementfor sale (four issues are available as photocopies only.) The set of journals represents forty years of research into the management of aquatic plants. The semi-annual Journal was first published in August 1962, with the most recent issue being Volume 41, January 2003. Sets are priced at $250.00, plus postage. The average cost of shipping to a U.S. address is $25.00 (parcel post rate), and to an international address $35-$40 (economy rate). The APMS treasurer can accept credit cards or checks as payment. Contact Dr. Linda Nelson, USAERDC-WES, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 391806199, 601.634.2656. E-mail: Linda.S.Nelson@erdc.usace.army.mil Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2003 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-50.html [6/6/2008 1:56:01 PM]

PAGE 21

Meetings Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants Meetings May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org 28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org 10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis. edu/5intlweedcong.htm International Weed Science Society Aquatic Weed Management Contacts: Mike Netherland, USA | mdnether@ufl .edu Kevin Murphy, UK | k.murphy@bio.gla.ac.uk June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/ wetland082/site.htm Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www. sce.lsu.edu/conference Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/meetings.html (1 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:02 PM]

PAGE 22

Meetings September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri_2008. htm 2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl. edu Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists UF/IFAS October 21-23 , 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists UF/IFAS November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton_CIB_symposium. htm Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University November 18-20 , 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl. edu Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists UF/IFAS June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/ 11th International Paleolimnology Symposium August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@sun.ac.za The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions (EMAPI) Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/meetings.html (2 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:02 PM]

PAGE 23

Meetings Home | Aquaphyte page Contact Us: CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/meetings.html (3 of 3) [6/6/2008 1:56:02 PM]

PAGE 24

Books -Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants Books, Manuals, and Online Resources New Books and Reports Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book Online Articles and Extension Publications Extension Publications & Articles Online Books Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2007 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/books.html [6/6/2008 1:56:02 PM]

PAGE 25

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database AQUAPHYTE ONLINE Summer 2003 FROM THE DATABASE Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into the aquatic, wetland and invasive plant database since Winter 2003. The database has more than 60,000 citations. To use the free APIRS database online, go to http://plants.ifas. ufl.edu/search80/NetAns2/. To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library, or a document delivery service. Agwunobi, L.N., Angwukam, P.O., Cora, O.O., Isika, M.A. Studies on the use of Colocasia esculenta (taro cocoyam) in the diets of weaned pigs. TROP. ANIMAL HEALTH PROD. 34(3):241-247. 2002. Anderson, L.W.J. U.S. eradication program for Caulerpa taxifolia, an exotic and invasive marine alga. PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 31-32 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Baskin, Y. The greening of horticulture: new codes of conduct aim to curb plant invasions. BIOSCIENCE 52(6):464-471. 2002. Boedeltje, G., ter Heerdt, G.N.J., Bakker, J.P. Applying the seedling-emergence method under waterlogged conditions to detect the seed bank of aquatic plants in submerged sediments. AQUATIC BOTANY 72(2):121-128. 2002. Bootsma, M.C., van den Broek, T., Barendregt, A., Beltman, B. Rehabilitation of acidified floating fens by addition of buffered surface water. RESTORATION ECOLOGY 10(1):112-121. 2002. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (1 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 26

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Champion, P.D., Clayton, J.S. Border control for potential aquatic weeds: Stage 1. Weed Risk Model. Stage 2. Weed Risk Assessment. SCIENCE FOR CONSERVATION 141 AND 185, DEPT. CONSERVATION, WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND, 48 PP. & 30 PP. 2000, 2001. Chandramohan, S., Charudattan, R., DeValerio, J.T., Hanlon, C. Use of a multiple-pathogen bioherbicide system for integrated management of torpedograss. WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 58 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Colares, I.G., Colares, E.P. Food plants eaten by Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis, Mammalia: Sirenia). BRAZ. ARCH. BIOL. TECHNOL. 45(1):67-72. 2002. Dale, P.E.R., Chapman, H., Brown, M.D., Ritchie, S.A., et al Does habitat modification affect oviposition by the salt marsh mosquito, Ochlerotatus vigilax (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae)? AUSTRALIAN J. ENTOMOL. 41(1):49-54. 2002. Daniel, H., Bernez, I., Haury, J. Relationships between macrophytes morphology and physical features of river habitats. PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 115-118. 2002. (IN FRENCH; ENG. SUMMARY) Darby, C., McKercher, L.R. Bones wrapped in Lygodium microphyllum rachis suggest a potential problem for wildlife. WILDLAND WEEDS 5(4):14. 2002. Davis, O.K., Minckley, T., Moutoux, T., Jull, T., et al The transformation of Sonoran desert wetlands following the historic decrease of burning. J. ARID ENVIRON. 50(3):393-412. 2002. Doering, P.H., Chamberlain, R.H., McMunigal, J.M. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (2 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 27

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Effects of simulated saltwater intrusions on the growth and survival of wild celery, Vallisneria americana, from the Caloosahatchee Estuary (south Florida). ESTUARIES 24(6A):894-903. 2001. Dorken, M.E., Friedman, J., Barrett, S.C.H. The evolution and maintenance of monoecy and dioecy in Sagittaria latifolia (Alismataceae). EVOLUTION 56(1):31-41. 2002. Doyle, R. Cryptocoryne beckettii: a "pretty" aquarium plant threatens endangered aquatic plant species in the San Marcos River, TX. PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MGMT. SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 20 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Elger, A., Barrat-Segretain, M.-H., Amoros, C. Plant palatability and disturbance level in aquatic habitats: an experimental approach using the snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L.) FRESHWATER BIOL. 47(5):931-940. 2002. Fagan, W.F., Lewis, M.A., Neubert, M.G., van den Driessche, P. Invasion theory and biological control. ECOLOGY LETTERS 5(1):148-157. 2002. Fairchild, J.F., Allert, A.L., Riddle, J.S., Gladwin, D.R. Efficacy of glyphosate and five surfactants for controlling giant salvinia. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:53-58. 2003. Filizadeh, Y., Esfahani, M. Management of water fern in Iran. PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 349-350. 2002. Fox, A.M., Gordon, D.R., Stocker, R.K. Challenges of reaching consensus on assessing which non-native plants are invasive in natural areas. HORTSCIENCE 38(1):11-13. 2003. Fox, A.M., Haller, W.T., Cuda, J.P. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (3 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 28

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Impacts of carbohydrate depletion by repeated clipping on the production of subterranean turions by dioecious hydrilla. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:99-104. 2002. Gajalakshmi, S., Ramasamy, E.V., Abbasi, S.A. Vermicomposting of different forms of water hyacinth by the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae, Kinberg. BIORESOURCE TECHNOL. 82(2):165-169. 2002. Gettys, L.A., Sutton, D.L. Cut-stump glyphosate treatment results in torpedograss (Panicum repens L.) control and pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata L.) survival. WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 14 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Goes, B.J.M. Effects of river regulation on aquatic macrophyte growth and floods in the HadejiaNguru wetlands and flow in the Yobe River, northern Nigeria; implications for future water management. RIVER RES. APPLIC. 18(1):81-95. 2002. Green, E.K., Galatowitsch, S.M. Effects of Phalaris arundinacea and nitrate-N addition on the establishment of wetland plant communities. J. APPL. ECOL. 39(1):134-144. 2002. Grimshaw, H.J. Nutrient release and detritus production by herbicide-treated freely floating aquatic vegetation in a large, shallow subtropical lake and river. ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 153(3):469-490. 2002. Harada, A., Okazaki, Y., Takagi, S. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I. Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. PLANTA 214(6):863-869. 2002. Hardej, M., Ozimek, T. The effect of sewage sludge flooding on growth and morphometric parameters of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (4 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 29

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 19(3):343-350. 2002. Harms, S. Predator-prey intractions between carnivorous plants (Utricularia) and littoral microcrustaceans. PH.D. DISS., UMEA UNIV., UMEA, SWEDEN, 99 PP. 2001. Hattink, J., Wolterbeek, H.T. Accumulation of technetium in floating aquatic plants. RADIOPROTECTION COLLOQUES 37(C1):633-638. 2002. Haury, J., Peltre, M.-C., Tremolieres, M., Barbe, J., et al A method involving macrophytes to assess water trophy and organic pollution: the Macrophyte Biological Index for Rivers (IBMR) application to different types of rivers and pollutions. PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 247-250. 2002. Hefty, R. Floating vegetated platforms close an open-water ditch in peat wetland (Wisconsin). ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION. 20(4):284-285. 2002. Hegazy, A.K., Amer, W.M., Khedr, A.A. Allelopathic effect of Nymphaea lotus L. on growth and yield of cultivated rice around Lake Manzala (Nile Delta). HYDROBIOL. 464(1-3):133-142. 2001. Heilman, M.A., Smith, C.S., Netherland, M.D., Tarver, D.P. Use of GPS, GIS, and variable rate application technologies for maximum application precision of Sonar herbicide. PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY, KEYSTONE, CO, P. 18 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Henderson, D., McClure, R., Sabol, B. Commercialization of submersed vegetation mapping system technology. PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY, KEYSTONE, CO, PP. 17-18 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Holub, P. The expansion of Calamagrostis epigejos into alluvial meadows: comparison of http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (5 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 30

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database aboveground biomass in relation to water regimes. EKOLOGIA (BRATISLAVA) 21(1):27-37. 2002. Hood, S.C. Report of the camphor experiments conducted at Huntington, Florida, during the spring of 1907. CAMPHOR REPORTS, 1907-1908 YEARBOOK. 1907. Hovel, K.A., Lipcius, R.N. Effects of seagrass habitat fragmentation on juvenile blue crab survival and abundance. J. EXP. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 271(1):75-98. 2002. Hu, M., Skibsted, L.H. Antioxidative capacity of rhizome extract and rhizome knot extract of edible lotus (Nelumbo nucifera). FOOD CHEM. 76(3):327-333. 2002. Kasselmann, C. Echinodorus decumbens: new discoveries into its ecology and culture. AQUATIC GARDENER 15(2):3-10. 2002. Kenney, W.F., Waters, M.N., Schelske, C.L., Brenner, M. Sediment records of phosphorus-driven shifts to phytoplankton dominance in shallow Florida lakes. J. PALEOLIMNOL. 27:367-377. 2002. Kirsch, K.D., Valentine, J.F., Heck, K.L. Parrotfish grazing on turtlegrass Thalassia testudinum: evidence for the importance of seagrass consumption in food web dynamics of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 227:71-85. 2002. Klesius, M. The big bloom: how flowering plants changed the world. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, JULY, PP. 102-121. 2002. Koschnick, T.J., Haller, W.T. Effects of endothall in irrigation water on selected turf and ornamental species. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (6 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 31

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 72 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Kurata, K., Minami, H., Kikuchi, E. Stable isotope analysis of food sources for salt marsh snails. MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 223:167-177. 2001. Lake, M.D., Hicks, B.J., Wells, R.D.S., Dugdale, T.M. Consumption of submerged aquatic macrophytes by rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus L.) in New Zealand. HYDROBIOLOGIA 470(1-3):13-22. 2002. Langeland, K.A., Hill, O.N., Koschnick, T.J., Haller, W.T. Evaluation of a new formulation of Reward landscape and aquatic herbicide for control of duckweed, waterhyacinth, waterlettuce, and hydrilla. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:51-53. 2002. Lass, L.W., Prather, T.S. Improving the detection of Brazilian pepper with geospatial enhancement of hyperspectral remote sensing imagery. WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 13 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Leon, C.T., Webster, E.P., Zhang, W. Post-flood cyhalofop tank-mixtures for rice weed control. WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 2 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Les, D.H., Crawford, D.J., Landolt, E., Gabel, J.D., et al Phylogeny and systematics of Lemnaceae, the duckweed family. SYSTEMATIC BOT. 27(2):221-240. 2002. Lienert, J., Diemer, M., Schmid, B. Effects of habitat fragmentation on population structure and fitness components of the wetland specialist Swertia perennis L. (Gentianaceae). BASIC APPL. ECOL. 3(2):101-114. 2002. Lopez, R.D., Fennessy, M.S. Testing the floristic quality assessment index as an indicator of wetland condition. ECOL. APPLICATIONS 12(2):487-497. 2002. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (7 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 32

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Maberly, S.C., Madsen, T.V. Freshwater angiosperm carbon concentrating mechanisms: processes and patterns. FUNCT. PLANT BIOL. 29(2-3):393-405. 2002. Mahujchariyawong, J. Modelling sustainable water quality improvement using water hyacinth and its application in Thailand. INT. J. SUSTAIN. DEV. WORLD ECOL. 8(3):221-231. 2001. Mailly, D., Margolis, H.A. Accretion of carbon and nutrients in the forest floor and mineral soil of Casuarina equisetifolia plantations on the coastal sand dunes of Senegal. MANAGEMENT OF TROPICAL PLANTATION-FORESTS AND THEIR SOIL LITTER SYSTEM: LITTER, BIOTA AND SOIL-NUTRIENT DYNAMICS, ED. M.V. REDDY, SCIENCE PUBL., ENFIELD, NH, PP. 379-393. 2002. McAvoy, T.J., Kok, L.T., Mays, W.T. Establishment of Hylobius transversovittatus Goeze (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a tropical biological control agent of purple loosestrife, in Virginia. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 24(3):245-250. 2002. Masuyama, S., Yatabe, Y., Murakami, N., Watano, Y. Cryptic species in the fern Ceratopteris thalictroides (L.) Brongn. (Parkeriaceae). I. Molecular analyses and crossing tests. J. PLANT RES. 115(1118):87-97. 2002. Medal, J.C., Sudbrink, D., Gandolfo, D., Ohashi, D., et al Gratiana boliviana, a potential biocontrol agent of Solanum viarum: quarantine hostspecificity testing in Florida and field surveys in South America. BIOCONTROL 47:445-461. 2002. Meiners, S.J., Pickett, S.T.A., Cadenasso, M.L. Effects of plant invasions on species richness of abandoned agricultural land. ECOGRAPHY 24(6):633-644. 2001. Muller, S.D., Guiot, J., Richard, P.J.H., de Beaulieu, J.-L., et al Postglacial climate dynamics in the St. Lawrence lowlands, southern Quebec: pollen and lake-level evidence. CONDITIONS OF CARBON ACCUMULATION IN A SOUTHERN QUEBEC PEAT BOG: THE http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (8 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 33

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database INFLUENCE OF AUTOGENIC FACTORS AND ALLOGENIC CONTROLS, S.D. MULLER, PH.D. THESIS, UNIVERSITE DE DROIT, D'ECONOMIE ET DES SCIENCES D'AIX MARSEILLE, PP. 6189. 2001. Nelson, L.S., Stewart, A.B., Getsinger, K.D. Fluridone effects on fanwort and water marigold. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:58-63. 2002. Netherland, M.D., Dayan, F., Scheffler, B., Cockreham, S. Three and a half years of laboratory and field monitoring of fluridone-tolerant hydrilla: what have we learned? PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 26 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Noble, C.V., Evans, R., McGuire, M., Trott, K., et al A regional guidebook for applying the hydrogeomorphic approach to assessing wetland functions of flats wetlands in the Everglades. TECH. REPT. ERDC/EL TR-02-19, US ARMY ENGINEER RES. DEV. CTR., VICKSBURG, MS, 198 PP. 2002. Ozbay, H., Yildirimli, S. Systematics, biology, relationships with other organisms and uses of Lemnaceae. HERB J. SYST. BOT. 7(2):149-166 (IN TURKISH; ENGLISH SUMMARY). 2000. Ozimek, T. Possibilities of reconstruction of submerged macrophyte communities from the seed bank in eutrophic Lake Mikolajskie (northern Poland). PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 47-50. 2002. Penny, D. The developing mechanical shredder technology. PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 30 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Perfetta, J., Demierre, A. Aquatic vegetation of Lake Geneva: comparison between 1973 and 1998 in relation with the trophic level. PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 193-196. 2002. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (9 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 34

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Piazzi, L., Ceccherelli, G. Effects of competition between two introduced Caulerpa. MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 225:189-195. 2002. Rimando, A.M., Duke, S.O. Studies on rice allelochemicals. IN: RICE: ORIGIN, HISTORY, TECHNOLOGY, AND PRODUCTION, EDS. C.W. SMITH & R.H. DILDAY, JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., HOBOKEN, NJ, PP. 221-244. 2003. Pitelli, R.A., Reis, R.A., Pitelli, R.L.C.M. Brachiaria decumbens, a major exotic invasive plant in Brazil. WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2003 MEETING, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA, V. 43, JACKSONVILLE, FL, ED. R.J. KREMER, P. 23 (ABSTRACT). 2003. Povilitis, T. What is a natural area? NATURAL AREAS J. 22(1):70-74. 2002. Pratt, P.D., Rayachhetry, M.C., Van, T.K., Center, T.D. Field-based rates of population increase for Oxyops vitiosa (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquenervia. FLORIDA ENTOMOL. 85(1):286-287. 2002. Reichard, S. Horticulture as a pathway of invasive plant introductions in North America. LINKING ECOLOGY AND HORTICULTURE TO PREVENT PLANT INVASIONS, PROC. WORKSHOP, MISSOURI BOT. GDN., ED. K. FAY, ST. LOUIS, PP. 13-14 (ABSTRACT). 2001. Reinartz, J.A. Winter season offers many advantages for treating invasive buckthorns and honeysuckles (Wisconsin). ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 20(4):286-287. 2002. Riddle, S.G., Tran, H.H., DeWitt, J.G., Andrews, J.C. Field, laboratory, and x-ray adsorption spectroscopic studies of mercury accumulation by water hyacinths. ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 36(9):1965-1970. 2002. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (10 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 35

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Rutishauser, R., Isler, B. Developmental genetics and morphological evolution of flowering plants, especially bladderworts (Utricularia): fuzzy Arberian morphology complements classical morphology. ANN. BOT. 88(6):1173-1202. 2001. Saadi, A., Guerbet, M., Garnier, J. Influence of diethyldithiocarbamate on cadmium and copper toxicity to freshwater macrophyte Spirodela polyrhiza. WATER SA 28(1):107-110. 2002. Santamaria, L., Rodriguez-Girones, M.A. Hiding from swans: optimal burial depth of sago pondweed tubers foraged by Bewick's swans. J. ECOL. 90(2):303-315. 2002. Schaffelke, B., Murphy, N., Uthicke, S. Using genetic techniques to investigate the sources of the invasive alga Caulerpa taxifolia in three new locations in Australia. MAR. POLL. BULL. 44(3):204-210. 2002. Schols, P., Furness, C.A., Wilkin, P., Huysmans, S., et al Morphology of pollen and orbicules in some Dioscorea species and its systematic implications. BOT. J. LINNEAN SOC. 136(3):295-311. 2001. Shearer, J.F. The potential role of an endophytic fungus in the decline of stressed Eurasian watermilfoil. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:76-78. 2002. Shelton, D., Leach, D., Baverstock, P., Henry, R. Isolation of genes involved in secondary metabolism from Melaleuca alternifolia (Cheel) using expressed sequence tags (ESTS). PLANT SCI. 162(1):9-15. 2002. Sorrell, B.K., Downes, M.T., Stanger, C.L. Methanotrophic bacteria and their activity on submerged aquatic macrophytes. AQUATIC BOTANY 72(2):107-119. 2002. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (11 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 36

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Sprecher, S.L., Getsinger, K.D., Sharp, J. Review of USACE-generated efficacy and dissipation data for the aquatic herbicide formulations aquathol and hydrothol. ERDC/EL TECH. REPT. TR-02-11, U.S. ARMY ENGINEER RES. & DEV. CTR., VICKSBURG, MS, 50 PP. 2002. Stewart, S.L., Zettler, L.W. Symbiotic germination of three semi-aquatic rein orchids (Habenaria repens, H. quinquiseta, H. macroceratitis) from Florida. AQUATIC BOTANY 72(1):25-35. 2002. Stocker, R.K., Haller, W.T. Toxicity of 19 adjuvants to Lepomis macrochirus (bluegill sunfish). PROGRAM, 42ND ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOC., KEYSTONE, CO, P. 21 (ABSTRACT). 2002. Tanaka, M., Yamawaki, K., Nakasuji, F. Dynamic interaction between a leaf beetle, Galerucella nipponensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and an aquatic plant, Trapa japonica (Trapaceae) I. Life history traits of G. nipponensis. ENTOMOL. SCI. 5(2):187-192. 2002. Thomas, B., Brandt, L.A. Monitoring ground treatments of Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum) on the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee NWR. WILDLAND WEEDS 6(2):9-11. 2003. Torres, R. Getting private landowners involved in invasive species management: A Nature Conservancy pilot project. WILDLAND WEEDS 6(1):14-17. 2002. Travis, S.E., Proffitt, C.E., Lowenfeld, R.C., Mitchell, T.W. A comparative assessment of genetic diversity among differently-aged populations of Spartina alterniflora on restored versus natural wetlands. RESTORATION ECOL. 10(1):37-42. 2002. Triest, L., Mannaert, A. Genotyping of Callitriche L. is useful to estimate relationships of clones with http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (12 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 37

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database environmental variables. IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS INTERNAT'L. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, PP. 201-204. 2002. Valley, R.D., Bremigan, M.T. Effects of selective removal of Eurasian watermilfoil on age-0 largemouth bass piscivory and growth in southern Michigan lakes. J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:79-87. 2002. Veys, P., Lejeune, A., Van Hove, C. The pore of the leaf cavity of Azolla species: teat cell differentiation and cell wall projections. PROTOPLASMA 219(1-2): 31-42. 2002. Vitalis, R., DuBois, M.-P., Olivieri, I. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the endangered species of fern Marsilea strigosa Willd. (Marsileaceae, Pteridophyta). MOLEC. ECOL. NOTES 1(1-2):64-66. 2001. Wirsel, S.G.R., Runge-Frobose, C., Ahren, D.G., Kemen, E., et al Four or more species of Cladosporium sympatrically colonize Phragmites australis. FUNGAL GENETICS AND BIOL. 35(2):99-113. 2002. Wolterbeek, H.Th., van der Meer, A.J.G.M. Transport rate of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc in Potamogeton pectinatus L.: radiotracer experiments with 76As, 109, 115Cd, 64Cu and 65, 69mZn. SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 287(1-2):13-30. 2002. Wright, J.F., Gunn, R.J.M., Winder, J.M., Wiggers, R., et al A comparison of the macrophyte cover and macroinvertebrate fauna at three sites on the River Kennet in the mid-1970s and late 1990s. SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 282-283:121-142. 2002. Wu, L., Guo, X. Selenium accumulation in submerged aquatic macrophytes Potamogeton pectinatus L. and Ruppia maritima L. from water with elevated chloride and sulfate salinity. ECOTOXICOL. ENVIRON. SAFETY 51(1):22-27. 2002. Ye, Z.H., Whiting, S.N., Qian, J.H., Lytle, C.M., et al http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (13 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 38

Aquaphyte 23 (1) Summer 2003 From The Database Trace element removal from coal ash leachate by a 10-year-old constructed wetland. J. ENVIRON. QUAL. 30(5):1710-1719. 2001. Zetter, R., Ferguson, D.K. Trapaceae pollen in the Cenozoic. ACTA PALAEOBOT. 41(2):321-339. 2001. Zimba, P.V., Tucker, C.S., Mischke, C.C., Grimm, C.C. Short-term effect of diuron on catfish pond ecology. N. AMER. J. AQUACULTURE 64:16-23. 2002. Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page | Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aq-s03-13.html (14 of 14) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 39

Aquaphyte Newsletter Aquaphyte NewsletterUniversity of Florida Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval SystemThe newsletter, Aquaphyte, covers news of interest to aquatic, wetland and invasive plant researchers, regulators, managers, students and others. Aquaphyte is published twice yearly and is free of charge. It reaches subscribers worldwide. You may subscribe to the printed edition by sending your postal address to us through e-mail. To order by mail, contact APIRS, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 N. W. 71 Street, Gainesville, FL, 32653. Aquaphyte Online Current Issue -Volume 27 Number 1 Fall 2007 Volume 26 Number 1 Fall 2006 Volume 25 Number 2 Winter 2005 Volume 25 Number 1 Spring 2005 Volume 24 Number 1 Summer 2004 Volume 23 Number 2 Winter 2003 Volume 23 Number 1 Summer 2003 Volume 22 Number 2 Winter 2002 Volume 22 Number 1 Summer 2002 Volume 21 Number 2 Winter 2001 Volume 21 Number 1 Summer 2001 Volume 20 Number 2 Winter 2000 Volume 20 Number 1 Summer 2000 Volume 19 Number 2 Fall 99 Volume 19 Number 1 Spring 99 Volume 18 Number 1 Summer 98 Volume 17 Number 1 Winter 97 Volume 16 Number 2 Winter 96 Volume 16 Number 1 Spring 96 http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aquaph.html (1 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 40

Aquaphyte Newsletter Home CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu Copyright 2007 University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/aquaph.html (2 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:56:04 PM]

PAGE 41

Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida IFAS Search the APIRS Online Database | Plant Images & Information | What's New WelcomeThe UF/IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants is a multidisciplinary research, teaching and extension unit directed to develop environmentally sound techniques for the management of aquatic and natural area weed species and to coordinate aquatic plant research activities within the State of Florida. The Center was established in 1978 by the Florida legislature. Directed by Dr. William Haller, the Center utilizes expertise from many departments with UF/IFAS and its Agricultural Research and Education Centers throughout Florida. The mission of the CAIP Information Office is to inform and educate all stakeholders about the impacts and management of invasive plants. Image Request Form AQUAPHYTE Newsletter -Fall 2007, Vol. 27 No.1 Products & Educational Tools Plant Management in Florida Waters Meetings IFAS Assessment Osceola County Hydrilla & Hygrophila Demonstration Project Faculty & Staff Helpful Links Tribute to Victor Alan Ramey http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ie6/index.html (1 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:56:06 PM]

PAGE 42

Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida IFAS This web site is best viewed in Firefox Browser Center for Aquatic & Invasive Plants | 7922 NW 71st St. | Gainesville, Fl. 32653 | 352-392-1799 Contact Us | University of Florida http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ie6/index.html (2 of 2) [6/6/2008 1:56:06 PM]