Citation
The favourite book of beasts, birds, and fishes

Material Information

Title:
The favourite book of beasts, birds, and fishes
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
126 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Insects -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Fishes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Reptiles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1895 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
with numerous illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026687841 ( ALEPH )
ALG6379 ( NOTIS )
228823911 ( OCLC )

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UNINVITED GUESTS



THE PAVOURITE BOOK

OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES



I. NELSON AND SONS

London, Edinburgh, and New York







THE FAVOURITE BOOK

OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND
PISHES

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York



1895



THE FAVOURITE BOOK OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



ADDER, or Viper. A reptile
of the Snake kind common in
many parts of Great Britain.
Adders are harmless, and very
timid, and will glide swiftly °
from any fancied foe. There
is one kind, however, whose
bite or sting is poisonous.
This one may be known by
the dark spots on its back.



AcouTi. This creature is
what is called a rodent, or
gnawing animal, like the
beaver, the mouse, and the rat.
The agouti is a native of South
America, and is fond of nearly
every kind of plant as food,



including roots, nuts, and fruit. :
It is a swift runner.’ It feeds AGOUTI.
only at night.



6 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

sen, AN, SOE Mili AI, or Three-toed Sloth, is
Ya a native of South America.
: Ciew\\“ 8% Like all the Sloth family, the
ais pass most of their lives
hanging, with their backs
downwards, from the boughs
of trees. They are said. to








take their name, ai, from the
a low, sorrowful ery which they
ae "utter being like the sound of
that little word.




ALBATROSS. A large sea-
bird found in the South Seas,
where it makes its home on
the high rocks. It is power-
ful on the wing, and its long
and strong beak is a terrible
weapon when it attacks any
person who may have fallen
overboard from a ship. The
flesh of the albatross has a
strong oily flavour.

ALLIGATOR, the crocodile of
_ North America, can live both
on the land and in the water.
He is a terrible reptile to meet,
with his powerful jaws. The
female alligator lays her eggs
(50 to 60) in the sand to be
eee hatched by the heat of the sun. .





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 7

Aupaca. “A native of Peru,
in South America; sometimes
called the Peruvian sheep.
There are several kinds of the
same family, and all are valued
for their long, silk-like wool,
or hair, which is woven into
cloth for dresses. In their
native country they become
very tame, and are used for
carrying burdens. They can
travel from fifteen to twenty
miles daily, through the rugged
passes of the Andes, each carry-
ing over a hundredweight.

Ancuovy. A fish belonging
to the Herring family, in length
from five to seven inches. It
is taken in large quantities
on the southern shores of
France, and is made into an-
chovy sauce, a famed dinner-
table relish.

Anouts. A reptile of the
Lizard kind. This one is
called the crested anolis. It
inhabits the warmer parts of
America. It can swell its
throat when angry, and it can
also change its colour.

























































ALPACAS,





8 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Ants. Busy little insects
that live together in great
numbers. They are divided
into classes, the perfect, which
have wings, and the imperfect,



which have none, as you see

in the picture. The perfect

females lay the eggs, the hatch-

ing of which is watched by

the imperfect females called

workers, who nurse and feed
the baby ants.

ANT-EATER. An animal
‘ that feeds upon ants and other
insects. It has no teeth, but






“.\ a very long tongue, with which
it catches its food. The ant-
eater is a native of South
America.

ANTELOPE. A large family
of animals, including many
ee ~ kinds under different names.
It comes between the goat and

. the deer, but it is easily known

from those animals by its



; slender and elegant shape, and
== ee Sia” by the form of its horns, some
being straight, and some bent
ee backward, while others are
ANTELOPE. twisted. -



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 9

APE. An animal of the
Monkey tribe, but known from
the monkey by having no tail
and no cheek-pouches. Each
hand has four fingers and a
thumb. The orang-outang
and the gorilla are large apes.
A few Barbary apes live on
.the Rock of Gibraltar. They
are so called because they
came originally from the Bar-
bary States, in the north of
Africa. These are the only
apes in Europe.

ARAB HORSE is, in many

respects, entitled to take the i
first place among all kinds of fff

horses. It has long been
esteemed for its swift limbs,
its fine form, and its kindly
qualities of temper.

ARMADILLO is a_ strange-
looking animal. It has many
names. The Spanish name
armadillo, which is used in
Great Britain, means “ clad in
armour.” Tatow is the name
given to these animals by the
natives of South America, where
only they are found. ©





APE.



ARMADILLO.



10 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Asp, or Aspic. A small rep-
tile of the Snake kind, common
in Egypt and Libya, and
much dreaded for its deadly
bite or sting. Persons bitten
by it die of a sleep from
which they cannot be awak-
ened. The asp mentioned in
the Bible is supposed to have
been the snake used by Egyp-
tian jugglers, or the Egyptian
cobra, both of which are very
venomous.

Ass. , mal—the poor man’s beast of
burden—but, in this country
at least, not a well-used one:
the meek, patient, docile
donkey. It differs from the
horse in having its tail smooth
at the root, with a tuft at the
end.

Aux. A large bird of the
Northern Seas, as the penguin
is of the Southern. The great,
auk is now very rare, if it
does at all exist. The last
one seen was on the shores of
the Western Isles of Scotland
many years ago.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. li

Bazpoon. A large four-
handed animal of the Monkey
kind, whose head and jaws so
much resemble those of the
dog that it is sometimes
called the dog-headed monkey.
The baboon is an inhabitant
of Africa; it is a powerful
and ugly animal—ugly in its == igs
looks and in its habits. sa Al







































Bapcer.
mal belonging to the Weasel
tribe. It is a miner—that is,
it burrows in the ground, that
it may have a safe and warm

the day. Its food consists of
fruits, roots, grass, snails,
worms, small lizards, and frogs.



The badger is so cruelly treated BADGER.
by man that to “badger” a
person means to pester him.

Bat. This is what is called
a “wing-handed animal,” and
“flying mouse,” because it has
a body like a mouse, and wings
like a bird, not with feathers,
but with a thin skin. It
brings forth its young as mice
do, and suckles them.





12 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BEAGLE. One of the great
Dog family, and the smallest of
the Hound tribe. These dogs
are chiefly employed in hunt-
ing the hare and the rabbit,
s@ It is not so fleet of foot as
other kinds of hounds, but it
has a much _ better nose, so
that it can follow on the scent
in places where others would
be thrown out.

Brar. A rough, savage
animal that lives chiefly in
natural dens and holes of the
earth, and sometimes in hollow
trees. There are many kinds
of bears. The one in the pic-
ture is called the grizzly bear,
a name that sounds terrible. to
the Indians of North America,
but which simply means of a
gray colour.



Braver. This clever ani-
mal builds its dwelling with
so much art, that one would
think it was the work of man.
It uses its tail as a mason does
his trowel. Beavers build their
houses and make their dams
Senet by the banks of pools and lakes.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Bee. - The winged insect
that makes the honey. In
each hive there is a female
bee called the queen; as head
of the house, she rules the
others. You may remember
Watts’s hymn :—

‘* How doth the little busy bee

Improve each shining hour,

And gather honey all the day
From ev’ry opening flower !

‘‘How skilfully she builds her cell !

How neat she spreads the wax !

And labours hard to store it well

With the sweet food she makes.”

BeetLe.
insects, known by having hard
cases or sheaths of shining
metal, like coats of mail, under
which the wings are folded.
They act as scavengers in eat-

ing up refuse.

Bison. The one in the
picture is what is called the
North American bison. This
creature gathers together in
large herds of many thousands

in number. The bison is very
swift and sure-footed; and is’

rated highly by the hunter,
as its body affords him nearly
everything he needs.

BEETLE.

BISON,

13







14 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Birrery. A bird belonging
toa great family called Waders.
The haunts of the bittern are
in marshy places, where it
finds its food in snails, insects,
and the like. With their long
legs, long necks, and long
beaks, how nicely this class of
birds is adapted to their habits
and mode of living!



Biacksirp. This bird is
classed among our song-birds.
It’ is a favourite cage-bird ;
and its notes do not appear
to be less mellow because it
is a prisoner. The blackbird
can even be trained to whistle
tunes. In its native groves
ib is very shy, popping out and



in among the hedgerows, and
giving a shrill scream as it
disappears.

Buackcock. Sometimes
called Black Grouse, or Heath-
cock—names which apply only
to the male bird, as the female
is of a lighter colour. These



} Mace. * birds of the moors have many
eS. an foes, the worst being man

Be RGROOGE: with his fowling-piece.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 15



BuroopyounD. This large
and powerful animal of the
Dog kind is now very scarce «



—that is to say, the pure /
breed. It has a very quick
sense of smell, and it eagerly
follows up a bleeding animal,
and from this it gets its name.
Long ago it used to be em- =z



ployed in the capture of crimi-
nals, whom it tracked to their Borer
haunts when put upon the

scent.

Boar. The male of the
hog. There are many dif-
ferent breeds of hogs scattered
over Britain. The hog is
believed to be the first animal
of any size which formed a
portion of the food of the
human race in a state of nature.
Hogs are said to be stubborn
creatures; so much so, that
sometimes the best way to
make them go forward is to
pull them backward.

Bream. A spiny - finned .
fish of rather handsome make,
not unlike perch; not very
plentiful in British waters. ERUAM.



wo



16





)



















































wr



BULL (BRAHMIN).

~ all over the world.

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BurraLo.
of the Ox kind; but it cannot
be attached to man as the ox
can. The one in the picture
is known as the Indian buffa-
lo, which inhabits the marshy
places on the lower rivers of
India, on which account it is
sometimes called the water
buffalo.
as the Cape buffalo, is found
in South Africa. The Ameri-
can buffalo is better called the
bison.

Another kind, known

Butt. This is the male of
the Ox kind, of which the cow.
is the female. Oxen are spread
Britain
has many kinds, known by
the name of Short Horns,
Long Horns, and Polled—that
is, those that have no horns,
the Suffolk bull and some

others. Then comes the sacred

BuLuL of India. In cities
crowded with the wealthy and
devout, these animals throng
the streets and the temples, |
and are so well fed that they

become fat and lazy.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

savage of the Dog tribe. As |i}
some one has observed, “ His jj
very look’s a bite.” He is|
called the fighting dog, and
takes his name from the cruel !
sport of bull-baiting. We see S
this brute chained to his
kennel ; in this way he spends
most of his time.

Buiirincuy. This is one
of our song-birds, and is best
known to us as a cage- bird.
He can be taught to whistle
tunes. His native haunts are
the rich orchard and shady
erove, where he lives upon
buds and fruits.

Burrerrty. All boys and
girls know this beautiful in-
sect,socommon on our meadows
and in our gardens in summer
days. But boys seem to think
that they are made for them
to chase.

‘Cunning insect, well you know
Fruit is pleasant to the taste ;
But your wings make such a show—
See, to catch you, boys make haste.
Leave your tempting dinner, pray,
While they stop to gain new breath;
Hasten, butterfly, away,
Lest your beauty prove your death.” BUTTERFLY.

17







18 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BuzzarpD. This large bird
of prey belongs to the Falcon
tribe, It is said to be an idle,
lazy bird, that does not pur-
sue its prey like the falcon
or the hawk, but sits upon a
branch and watches what crea-
ture may pass below, when
-down it will suddenly pounce
and carry off its prey.

CaLF is the young of the
cow. This one looks very
weakly on its legs, partly
because it is of tender age,
and partly from a cruel prac-
tice the butcher has of bleed-
ing it with a lancet every
now and then, that the flesh,
which we call veal, may



a appear white.

CaMEL. This one is the
camel of Arabia, or dromedary.
There is another kind with -
two humps, but the one in
the picture.is the more useful
to man. In travelling the
hot, sandy desert, it carries
a quantity of water in the
<§ water-pouches of its stomach,
CAMEL, that it may quench its thirst.







BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 19

Canary. This bird belongs
to the Finch family; and we
all know what a grand singer
the cock bird is. Canaries
were first brought to Europe,
about three hundred years
ago, from the Canary Islands,
off the west coast of Africa.
They are also found in Madeira
and in the Cape Verd Islands.



CANARY.

Carp is a fresh-water fish
found in rivers, lakes, and
ponds. It was brought to
this country from the south
of Europe in the fifteenth
century. Some carps are said
to attain to a hundred years
of age. No other fish can
live so long a time out of the
water.

CART-HORSE is the largest
horse found in this country,
and is sometimes called the
dray or draught horse, because
used by brewers in drawing
their heavy carts or lorries.
Another well-known kind of
cart-horse is called the Clydes-
dale, one of the best breeds



in Scotiand. CART-HORSE,



20

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



CENTIPEDE,

Cassowary. A large bird
classed among the Running
Birds, as the ostrich, ete.
Swiftfoot is another name for
the class. They are for the
most part birds of the desert,
shy and retired in their man-
ners, This bird has a_hair-
like plumage, and is next to
the ostrich in size. It is found
only in tropical countries—
that is, in the hottest parts of
the globe.

Car (domestic). To say
that a cat is an animal that
catches mice, would only be
to tell you what you already
know. Did you ever see a
young cat at a looking-glass ?
How droll it is to see it paw
at the image, and, not being
able to touch it, peep: slyly
round the edge of the glass
as if to catch its companion
on the other side,

CENTIPEDE, or “ Hundred-
feet.” Loathsome - looking,
creeping thing. In warm.
countries it grows to a large
size—a, foot long.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 21

EEE ey aN ee a tel oe

CHAD is the young of the
common sea-bream, or gilt
head, as it is sometimes called.
These fishes appear in vast
numbers on the southern
coasts of England, where great
quantities are devoured by the



larger fishes.

CHAFFINCH. This is a gay
and sprightly bird, in great
plenty in most parts of the
British Islands. It is one of
our earliest songsters, and has
a simple, pleasing run of notes
for its sone, which it repeats
over and over again. Strange
that in England, and in Scot-
land too, there are very few
indeed who think this favour-
ite worth keeping in a cage; CHAFFINCH.
but that is so much the better
for the bird.



CHAMELEON is a member of
the Lizard family of reptiles,
and is said to live upon air.
That is a mistake, for this one
is about to catch an insect
with its long tongue, on the
end of which there is a sticky
substance. CHAMELEON.





D9: BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Cuamois belongs to the
Antelope family, and the Alps
may be said to be its home,
As the ostrich is called a run-
§ ner among birds,so the chamois
is a leaper among animals,
It is a very sure-footed animal.
It appears as if made of elastic
springs, and to be as much
made for the mountains as
the mountains are for it.

Cuar.
of the Salmon kind. It may
be called a lake fish. It never



? descends to the sea, and never
enters a river unless to de-
posit its spawn.

CHARGER, or War-horse;
CHAR. for it is only on the battle-
field that this noble animal
appears in the full greatness
of his character. “The glory
of his nostrils is terrible. He











paweth in the valley, and re-
joiceth in his strength: he
7 goeth out to meet the armed
= men. He mocketh at fear,
\y and is not affrighted; neither
â„¢ turneth he back from: the
CHARGER. sword.” .





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

CHINCHILLA.
little animal feeds entirely
It is a bur-

This cleanly

upon vegetables.
rowing and gnawing animal,
found in South America; and
it is particularly active in
The
animals it most resembles are

climbing among rocks.

the mouse and the squirrel.
It has broad ears and a bushy
tail, and its hind legs are
Tis
pretty, soft fur is much prized

longer than its fore legs.

by ladies, who use it in their
dress.

Cuus.
fish, and, like the dace, closely
allied to the roach.

CIVET is a native of North-
ern Africa, and is hunted
chiefly for its perfume, or
scent-bag, It is not entirely
a flesh-eater. It feeds some-
times on sweet fruits and
juicy roots.
to be a sleepy animal in the

daytime; yet it is quick at 2

catching birds and small ani-
mals, upon which it springs
like a cat.



The civet is said,

23






YS?
5k
FSS)



24 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Coach Doc.
known on our streets, from its
running alongside or in front
of the horses that draw its
owner’s coach. The dog has
also a long foreion name,
showing the breed to have
come from a province in Hun-
gary.

Cock. The male of the
common or domestic poultry.
In spite of his beautiful plu-
mage, his slow and firm step,
his head always erect, his
stately march in proud and
commanding gait, he is styled
the “dunghill cock.” His
loud and cheerful crowing has



gained him the name of
“ chanticleer.”

CockAToo belongs to the
Parrot family. The one in
the picture is the most hand-
some as well as the rarest; it
\ is called “three-colour crested
\ a cockatoo.” The erest consists
» -pointed, and standing apart
from one another when they
Cockatoo, are erected.





—-"

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 25

Cop. The Great Bank of
Newfoundland may be said to
be the headquarters of the
cod, from which the fish
spread themselves out across
the Atlantic. The cod is found
in great quantities in the seas
around the British Islands, and
also on the north-west coast
of Norway. As a useful and
nutritious article of food, it
ranks among fishes next to
the herring.

Cott is the name applied
to the young of the horse,
whether male or female, until
they reach the age of four
years.

ConstricToR (Boa). One
of the largest kinds of serpent,
a native of America within
the tropics. When full grown,
it measures over thirty feet
in length, It is without
venom, but it possesses great
bodily strength, which enables
it to bind or crush large ani-
mals in its folds, so that they
die; hence the name “con- CONSTELEEOH 202):
strictor.”





26 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Coor. This is what is
called a lobe- footed water-
bird. The lobe-foot differs
from the web-foot. The coot
is a grand swimmer, swift and
strong. Jt remains in the
British Isles all the year
round. The young, soon after
quitting the shell, take to the
water; and they often become
the prey of the pike or of the
hawk.

Cormorant. This is a sea-
bird much larger than the
coot. Cormorants are also
called sea-ravens, owing to
the greedy way in which they
prey upon fishes. They catch
the fish by the middle with
their bill; but as they can-
not swallow the fish in this
fashion, it is tossed in the air
and caught with the head
down.

Cow. Properly the: female
of the ox and mother of the
calf. The small cows of the
islands of Jersey and .Alder-
at ney are famed for the milk
cows. which they yield.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 27

Crane. A bird with a
straight, long bill, long neck,
and long legs, showing it to
be one of the Waders. The
cranes fly in flocks at a great
height. When they alight on
the bank of a river or on the
gea-shore, it is for the purpose
of feeding.

Cricket.
sect that chiefly frequents
bake-houses. The one in the
picture is known as the field-
cricket. The chirping sound
is not produced by the mouth,
but by brisk rubbing of the
wings.. The field-cricket is of
a black colour, the house one
is of a yellowish buff.

CrocopILe. The largest
of the Lizard family, and
powerful even on land, but
its chief place of action is in
the water. The crocodile of
the Nile has been known to
attain the length of thirty
feet. The body of the cro- *
codile is covered with hard



seales, and it has wide and ===
; powerful jaws. CROCODILE.



28




BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



CUCKOO.

CURLEW

Crow. This bird is smaller
than the raven. The carrion
or common black crow is a
filthy feeder. No garbage,
however rank it may be, comes
amiss to the crow. For this
reason it: is called the dung-
hill crow, in Scotland the
“midden” crow. The crow
takes its name from the croak-
ing sound of its voice.

Cuckoo. This bird differs

# from other birds in not build-

ing a nest. It never hatches
its own eggs, but places them
in the nest of some other bird.
The following rhyme on the
cuckoo used to be common in
England :—
‘In April’, come he will.
In May, he sings all day.
In June, he alters his tune.

In July’, he prepares to fly.
In August’, go he must.”

CuRLEW, the Scottish Whaup,

is a bird of the moors in sum-

mer, frequenting the sea-shore
in winter. It is one of the
birds called Waders, and it has
long legs and a very long and
slender bill.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 29

CyGNeT. A name given to
the young of the swan, which
in some places are unable to
take to flight the first year ;
in other places they do not get
their full plumage until the
second year. It is then that
these helpless cygnets are
hunted down for the table,
their flesh being much esteemed. SN



The cygnet differs from the
full-grown swan in having
plumage of a bluish-gray col-
our and a lead-coloured bill.

Das.
abundant on the sandy coasts
of Britain. It has a brown,
rough surface, and is nearly of
the same size and shape as the
fluke or flounder, though its
flesh is not so good, It is
thought to be best for the
table in February, March, and
April.

Dac. A small river fish,
closely allied to the roach. It =
is known in England under
the names of dav, dare, and
dart. This fish, it is said, has
never been seen in Scotland.





30 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Daw. More properly Jack-
daw, as if Daw was the sur-
_name. You may see by the pic-
‘ture that Jacky is a funny
- fellow, up to all kinds of droll
“tricks. He is the smallest of







the Rook family, very attach-
able and teachable, and has
much wit and humour; yet,
DAW withal, he is a great thief.
But we must not tell him so,
for he does not like to be
called by such names.

Day-FLly. A name given to
an insect which, after arriving
at the winged state, lives only
for a day. It is sometimes
called the May-fly, because it
is most common in the month
of May.



DAY-FLY.

Deer. There are many
kinds of deer. There is the
stag, Which is the male of red
deer, also called the hart, the
female the hind, the young
the calf; of the fallow-deer,
buck the male, doe the female,
and fawn the young. The
females and the young have
no horns, or antlers.







,

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 31

Diver. A large, web-footed
bird, chiefly of the more
northerly seas. They assemble :
in great numbers on jutting
-headlands where the sea runs :









strong, and the surf and spray
beat with great force. But
amid the storm and the foam-
ing water the diver feels quite
at home.

Dopo. A large bird said
to be now extinct; which
means that it is not now
found living in any part of
the world. It used to inhabit
the island of Mauritius, in the
Indian Ocean; but the Dutch
settlers in the island found it
good for food, and it by-and-
by died out.

Doe (St. Bernard’s), The
convent of St. Bernard is at
the top of the mountain of
that name. The good monks,
though they have little to live
upon, open their doors to all
seeking shelter. They have
trained dogs that go out to
rescue travellers who may be

lost in the snows of the Alps. DOG (ST, BERNARD'S).
3





32 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Doe-FisH.
Shark kind. It feeds greedily,
following the shoals of other

DOG-FISH. fish ; hence its name of “ dog-
fish.”

DoLPpHIN belongs to the
Whale family, and is remark-
able for the great number of



sharp teeth its jaws are armed
with; also for its leaping
entirely out of the water.
The dolphin follows ships,
and feeds upon any garbage
thrown overboard. It is of
a greenish-black colour above
and white below. The flesh
is sometimes eaten by sailors.



Dore. A fish commonly
called John Dory. The flesh
of the dory is good, and suit-
able for those who may live
far inland, as it is greatly
improved by being kept for
two days.

Dormouss. A curious
little animal that keeps its
nest during the day, and sleeps
all the winter after laying by



= food, such as acorns, nuts,
DORMOUSE. and corn, for the spring.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 33

DotrerREL. This neat and
_ pretty bird is of the Plover
kind. The habits of the dot- &
terel are very little known.




~, xl") i



It has the name of being a a
foolish bird. “ As stupid as a
dotterel” is a common phrase »
applied to a person who may
show little wisdom.

Dove. There are a great
many kinds of doves; they
all belong to the Pigeon
family. We have only room
for the names of some, as the
stock-dove, so called from its
habit of building its nest in
the stumps of trees; the rang-
dove, known also as wwood-
pigeon and cushat; the rock-
dove, and the turtle-dove.

DraGon-FLy. There are
many kinds of this insect.
They haunt the banks of
streams and ditches. They
are very strong on the wing,
and possess the strange power
of flying backwards and for-
wards without turning. The
object of this is to capture
small flies for food. DRAGON-FLY.



34 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

DrRoMEDARY. This animal
stands much in the same
relation to the Arabian camel
as the racing or hunting horse

horse. The dromedary, being
more slenderly built, is not
used as a beast of burden like
the camel; but men ride on
it, and it travels very quickly.

Drone. This is the male
of the honey-bee. It makes
no honey, and is therefore
driven from the hive and
killed by the workers. It
has no sting.



DRONE.

Drum-FisH are found in
American waters. The name
is given to this fish on account
of the strange sound it makes,
which resembles the beat of a
Decors drum.



Duck. There are many
kinds of wild duck; one
called the mallard is that from
which our domestic duck has
sprung. The male, which is
called the “drake,” is known
by the little curled feathers
of the tail.



does to the dray or draught



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 35

Duck-BitL. This curious
little creature belongs to Aus-
tralia, where it feeds upon
worms and insects. Indeed it
is formed to live in the water

or under the earth. It is”

named, as you will see, from

having a beak like that of a
duck.

Ducking. A young duck;
properly, a little duck. Some-
times duck-eges are set under
a hen that she may hatch
them; and it is curious to
witness the dismay of the poor
mother hen on beholding her
brood take to the water, where
she herself cannot follow them.

Eacite. This bird ranks
among the largest birds of
prey. On account of its keen
eyesight, its great strength,
the height and swiftness of
its flight, and its long life, the
eacle is regarded as the king
among birds, like the lion
among beasts. It is a royal
bird, whose figure was shown
on the army standard of the
old Romans.











DUCE-BILL.



DUCKLING.





36 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

HacLer.
properly a little eagle. The
eagle’s nest is usually built on

a rocky ledge, far up a lofty
3 mountain, in a lonely spot
which man cannot reach.

‘* On high the eagle builds his nest,

And hides his young from sight ;

While he, a bold and cruel guest,
Goes robbing in the night.

Our lambs and kids, our poultry too,
His little eaglets share ;

What have the greedy things to do
With such nice wholesome fare?”



Earwic. A very common
insect, the pest of the florist.
The food of the earwig is
vegetable. It does much
damage to gardens by eating
the petals of flowers. Ear-
wigs live in shoals in holes
and crevices, and under the
bark of decaying trees.

Het. A fish having a snake-
like body. It lives much in
the muddy bottom of lakes
and rivers. Linlithgow Loch,
in Scotland, has long been
|famed for its eels. Eels live
in salt water as well as in
_ fresh, and are considered
wholesome food, though some
do not like it.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 37

ELEPHANT. The largest of
living quadrupeds, notable for
its flexible snout, called its
“trunk,” and for its projecting
tusks of solid ivory. The
nostrils are at the tip of the
snout, where there is also a
finger-like contrivance for seiz-



ing even very small articles
like a pin or a blade of grass.
There are two kinds of ele-
phants—the African, with flat ,
forehead and large ears; and
the Indian, with rounded fore-
head and smaller ears,

ELEPHANT.

ELK. A large animal be-
longing to the Deer kind, and
called the moose deer in Amer-
ica, where it is still abundant.
Ié is not so plentiful in Europe
as it once was. The horns
are said to weigh fifty pounds.

ERMINE, or Stoat. A small
animal of the Polecat kind,
but much larger than the
weasel. It is valued for its f
fur, which is used for the |
lining of state robes of sover-
eigns and nobles, as well as for



their crowns and coronets. ERMINE.



38 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Ewe is the female sheep.
The sheep is as useful to us





as the ox. Its body gives us
food, while its wool gives us




>warm clothing, and its skin
has many uses. Ewe’s milk
is sometimes made into cheese.
ee Useful creature, when we look
EWE, in thy quiet, gentle face, it
seems a pity to take a life so
harmless !

Fatcon. One of the Hawk
tribe of birds of prey Falcons
are light and graceful in their
forms. Flying the falcon at
game, called faleonry or hawk-
ing, was a royal sport in the
Middle Ages, holding the same
place that partridge-shooting
does now. The smallest kind
of falcon is the merlin, and the
largest the jerfalcon

FALLOW-DEER. Only the
male of this animal has horns ;
the female, or doe, has none.
You see that its sides are
= covered with white spots, but
" thisis only its summer clothing
The fallow-deer is not so large



FALLOW-DEER. as the stag, but it is tamer.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 39

Fawn. Now we come to
‘ the young of the fallow-deer.
The male fawn has no sign of
horns during the first year of
its life. In the second year
they begin to show, but they
are not fully formed till the
sixth year.

Ferrer.
creature of the Weasel kind.
It is remarkable for its long,
slender body and short legs.
The ferret is never quite tame,
but it is used by sportsmen
who pursue rabbits. One is
put into a rabbit-hole to drive
out the rabbits, while the men
are ready to trap them with
nets or to shoot them with
guns. To prevent them from
killing the rabbits in the hole,
the ferrets are generally
muzzled.

FIELDFARE. This bird be-
longs to the Thrush tribe, and
only visits this country about
the beginning of winter.
When these birds are seen
coming in flocks, it is a sign



of a severe winter. FIELDFARE.



40 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

FIELD-MOUSE, or Wood-
mouse, is a pretty little crea-





j- ture, but a great pest to the
A ON, farmer and the gardener. Be-
#ix\ sides man it has many foes,
= such as the owl, the kite, the
ey ae weasel, and the wild cat, where

= these abound.





FLAMINGO belongs to the
Waders, or stilt-birds. It is
remarkable for the great
length of its legs and its neck.
The food of the flamingo is
shell-fish, insects, and fishes’
egos. The plumage of the
male bird is a bright scarlet
or rose-red ; that of the female







is less bright. Flamingoes
are strong on the wing, and
fly like geese in strings, or in
flocks of a wedge shape.

FLOUNDER. A flat fish,
commonly found at the mouth
of large rivers that bring
down much mud. There the

PS tom. It is the least seaward
of the flat fishes, and is often
found some distance up the
FLOUNDER; rivers referred to.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 41

Fiy is a name given to
most winged insects. To us
the name means the common
house-fly.

FLYING-FISH. To say that
a fish flies may not be quite
correct. The long fins of the
flying-fish, so called, enable it
to leap out of the water for a
short space when pursued by
foes below. These fishes can-
not flap their fins as a bird

















does its wings; besides, they
cannot turn, but they dash
against any object, such as a
ship, that may be in front of
them.

Fox. An animal of the
Dog kind. We all know sly
Reynard by his sharp nose and
mouth, called the muzzle, and
his bushy tail. He is never in
favour with anybody, owing,
perhaps, to his cunning ways
in prowling about at night,
robbing hen-roosts, to which he
slips forward with great cau-
tion. In England fox-hunting
on horseback with packs of
hounds is a favourite sport.





42 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



Fox-Hounp. The _ best-
known, and said to be the
favourite, hound in Britain,
As the name implies, it is used,
in chasing the fox, for which
it is carefully trained. These

a oh ~
Wh “ “ff
A ANNA tz auf



dogs are famed for their keen
scent, their swiftness of foot,
their strength and spirit.

Frog. A small four-footed
reptile that lives in water as
well as on land. There are
many kinds of frogs, with
curious names. The one in
the picture is the common
frog, the most plentiful in
Britain. It has short arms
with four fingers on each, and
long legs with five webbed
toes. The young are pro-
duced from spawn, or eggs.

GameE-cock. Formerly
these birds were reared for
the cruel practice of cock-
fighting, now happily. put a
stop to by law. The one in
the picture has been in many
a battle, for its comb is cut off;
this was done to prevent the
GAME-COCR, enemy from tearing it.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 43

GANNET, or Solan Goose. ih
A large sea-bird. The Bass \
Rock in the Firth of Forth,
Ailsa Craig in the Firth of
Clyde, and other rocks and
headlands on the coasts of
Scotland, are thronged with
these birds. They live in
flocks or crowds, and have



their nests close together on i yi
the tops of cliffs. They feed
on fishes, on which they some-
times drop from a great height
like a bolt.

GAZELLE. A sprightly little
animal of the Antelope kind,
found in the north of Africa,
where it keeps to the open
plains. The females have
horns as well as the males,
but smaller.

- GIRAFFE, or Camelopard.
Like the ostrich among birds,
the giraffe is the tallest among
beasts. Its height when full
grown is from eighteen to
twenty feet. This mild and
timid animal belongs to various
parts of Africa, where it feeds :
chiefly on leaves. GIRAFFE.



4A BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

GLow-worm. An _ insect
that shines in the dark. It
is the female, which has no
wings, that gives out the light.
The male is more of the Beetle
order;. it has wing - covers,
} under which it folds its wings
when at rest. In Europe,
Asia, Africa, and America,
sixteen kinds of glow-worm
are known.

Gat. A small, winged,
blood-thirsty insect. Some
say it is only the female that
is to be feared. It is also
said that vinegar applied to
the wound caused by the sting
will allay the pain. There
are several kinds of gnats; the
mosquito is one.





Gnu.
Africa. Who would ever
think that this fierce-looking
beast would be classed among
the timid antelopes? Yet so
it is, with the head of the
bison, and the body of the
swift, strong horse. The gnu-
is called Wildebeest by the
Dutch in South Africa.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 45






Goat. The common, tame ,
goat, found in almost every i
quarter of the world. There (iS\
are a great number of differ- W/W
ent kinds of the domestic "|
goat, all of them useful to ft
man. They are easily kept. 3
Give them a rock with but
scanty herbage upon it, and
they will keep themselves.

GoaTsucKkER. A large fam-
ily of curious birds not very 2
common with us. They prey x
upon the wing—that is, hav-*
ing a wide gape like the
swallow, they feed, while fly-
ing, upon their favourite food.
The night-jar is another name,
and whip-poor-will is the
American kind.

GoutpFiIncH. This beautiful
favourite songster feeds upon
the seeds in thistle-down,
dandelion, ete. It also feeds
upon chickweed, groundsel, and
the unopened yellow blos-
soms of furze. You may see
it holding its food with its
foot while pecking at it with -
its bill. i ' GOLDFINCH.



46 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Goose.
web-footed bird of the flat-
billed or Duck family. While
swimming, it feeds on the seeds
and leaves of water-plants,
but does not do so below the
surface of the water. The
male of the goose is called
the “ gander.”

GOsHAWK. This is said to
be the finest of all the hawks.
In days when “ hawking” was
a royal sport, this hawk was
much used for ground game,
such as hares, rabbits, wild
ducks, and the like, upon
which the bird steals and
IN , seizes with a sudden pounce.
The name means goose-hawk.

Gostinc. A young goose ;
properly a little goose. In
some parts of England these



S
NIRS
MOL) SS
GOSHAWE.

birds are bred in great numbers
for the sake of the feathers,
which are plucked from the
living birds several times a
year. The old birds submit
quietly to the process, but the



= 3 goslings are often very noisy

GOSLING. and unruly.



BEASTS, BIRDS,

Grampus.
fish of prey classed with the
whale, the dolphin, and the
porpoise. It attains a length
of from twenty to twenty-five
feet. The Firth of Forth is
said to be a favourite haunt of
the grampus. English sailors
call grampuses “ killers.”

GRASSHOPPER. An insect
with hind legs fitted for leap-
ing, in which it is assisted by
These
insects are very destructive to
herbage. They make their
by their
chirping like crickets, to which
class they belong.

a pair of gauzy wings.

presence known

GREEN-FINCH, or Grosbeak,
or Green Linnet.
common bird in Europe, and
abundant in the British Islands.
It frequents hedges and the
outskirts of woods, feeding
upon all kinds of seeds, and
much upon grain; also, on
green leaves of groundsel and
other plants. It is not of
much account as a singing-

bird.



47

AND FISHES.



GRAMPUS.

GREEN-FINCH.



48 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

GREYHOUND. A tall, slender
dog, famed alike for its keen-
ness of sight and its swift-
ness in running. In former
times none beneath the rank
of gentleman was allowed to
keep a greyhound. In the

were held in high repute.

Grouse. The common
name for a large family of
birds, of which the one in the



picture is a type or pattern.
They are known by their
short, arched bills, legs feath-
ered down to the feet, and a









- bare, red skin over each eye.
These birds are found nearly

j~ all over the world. Grouse-

== shooting is a favourite sport

——

=~ on the Highland moors.

GROUSE, GupeGron. A small fresh-
water fish belonging to the
Carp family. These fishes are
found in clear, slow-running
streams in the south of En-
gland, and are considered
wholesome, delicate food for



@uDGEON. invalids. They are seldom
over eight inches in length.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 49

GUINEA-FOWL. This is the
common euinea-fowl. It has
a.grayish-blue body, sprin-
kled with round white spots.
These birds are not so pro-



fitable to keep as common
poultry. The guinea-fowl is a
wandering bird, going long dis- 5
tances from home in search of
grasshoppers, worms, beetles,
and ants. It destroys tender
buds and flowers.



GUINEA-PIG. This home semis = ee ea

pet must be wrongly named. “yl ra. { Ly |
It is not a pig, but a rodent
or gnawing animal like the
beaver. It does not come
from Guinea in Africa, but
from Brazil in South America.
Tt feeds on vegetables, and is
easily tamed.








GULL. A web-footed, long-
winged sea-bird, the “wild @
sea-mew” of the Britis!
shores. The gull is not alto
gether a fisher, but scoops u
any garbage that may be>

































0

floating about. Tame ones = (0 i8
° Ses

are very useful in gardens, WSR

which they clear of vermin. GULL,



50 _ BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Happock. This belongs

to the same family as the cod,
ZE= yt is a more handsome fish.
22 The finest haddocks are found
in the clear and deep waters
of the rocky shores of the
north-east of Scotland. Those
of Dublin Bay are remarkable




for their large size.

Hatisut, or Holibut. The
largest of the flat fishes. One
has been known to measure
from five to seven feet in
length, and to weigh from
two hundred to over three
hundred pounds. Though a
valuable food, the halibut is
not so good as the turbot.



Hare.
of the Rabbit kind; but it
does not burrow like the rabbit,
unless it be in winter, when
it forms for itself a cave in
the snow. . The young of the
hare is the “leveret.”

Harrier. A small hound
for hunting the hare. It is
smaller than the foxhound,
which it resembles in all its
HARRIER. . points, but it is not so swift.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 51

HawFincn. One of the
Grosbeak family. It is the
largest, and one of the most
beautiful of the finches. It is
a shy bird, inhabiting thick
woods, where it lives on seeds
and: berries of different kinds.
The bird is not common in
Britain.

Hawk. There are several
kinds of this bird of prey,



such as goshawk, sparrow-
hawk, ete. There is a curious
sparrow-hawk belonging to
Africa, said to be the only
bird of prey which can give a
musical song. Some of the
hawks are named falcons, such







as the American sparrow-hawk
(called the little falcon), the
St. Domingo falcon, the New
York merlin, etc.



HAWKE.

Hepcenoc. This little
harmless creature is seen some-
times running as you see in
the picture. It is oftener seen
rolled up as a round ball of
spines. It has the power to
assume this form on the ap-



proach of danger. HEDGEHOG.



52 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

HEIFER. May be said to
be a calf of a larger growth;
a young cow, somewhat older
than a calf. “As an heifer of
three years old” (Jer. xlviii.).
The heifer is otherwise re-
ferred to in the Bible—Num.

xix.; Jer. xlvi.; Hosea iv., x.,
Heb. ix.

Hen. The female of what
we call the barn-door fowl—
the cock being the male. It is
sometimes asked, as a kind of
puzzle, Which is the mother
of the chicken—the hen that
laid the egg, or the hen that
hatched the chick ?

Heron, that lives by the banks of
lakes and rivers,and in swampy
or marshy places, feeding on
fish, The heron is a patient
fisher, and with its long, sharp,
pointed bill, it is also a ter-
ribly keen fisher. Besides
fish, it feeds on frogs, snails,
worms, and insects. When
flying, the heron stretches its



long legs out behind it like a



HERON. ° tail .



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 53

HERRING. One of the most
valuable of the many inhabit-
ants of the waters. With us

























ib is called “the poor man’s

























fish ;” equally cheap, good, and
tasty whether eaten fresh or
salted, smoked or potted.



Hippopotamus. This is a HERRING.
long name, but the animal
that owns it is great and
bulky, with a very large head
and very short legs. It in-
habits the larger rivers of
Africa and their margins,
where it feeds on the strong,
coarse water-plants. Its usual
motion in the water is walking,
with its nose now and then
above the surface that it may
breathe ; which gives it its
name “river-horse.” The name Sagas meena
behemoth in the Book of Job
is supposed to refer to the
hippopotamus.



Horner. The largest in-
sect in Britain belonging to
the Wasp family. From the
size of the insect its sting is
very powerful, and much to
be dreaded. HORNET.





54 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Horn-owt,
plied to several kinds of these
night birds of prey, which
have tufts of feathers on the
head that look like horns.

Hunter, or Hunting-horse.
It is employed in what is
called the chase, to which it
has to be trained. The hunter,
in England, ranks next to the
race-horse, although the racer
has qualities that would be
injurious to the hunting-horse.
The latter has many fine points,
\ having more bone and more
power than the other. Al-
" though it cannot run so fast,

J




it can run longer.

HYENA or Hyzena. A species
of wild, untamable animals of
the Dog family. They are -
found in Asia and Africa, and
they live upon raw flesh and all
kinds of offal. The one in the
picture is the largest known.
It is called the striped hyena,
and has a very shaggy look,
with a coarse bristly mane
running along the back. The
tail is short and bushy.



BEASTS, BIRDS,

Isex.
with large horns sloping back-
ward. It inhabits the tops
of the highest mountains of
Europe, Asia, and Africa, but
is not found in America. The
Alpine ibex is the best known.

Isis. This bird belongs to
the family of Waders, or stilt-
birds. The one in the picture
is the black or glossy ibis.
_ There is a kind that used to
be held sacred by the ancient
Egyptians. More of them than
of any other bird are found
preserved in their mummy
tombs. From the hooked form
of their long bills, they receive
from the natives of Lower
Egypt a name which means
Father Sickle Bill.

Icuneumon.
mal inhabiting Egypt, India,
and Java. Like the ibis, it
was held sacred by the ancient
Egyptians, on account of its
keeping down the race of
crocodiles by destroying their
egos. It is sometimes kept as
a domestic animal, like the cat.

AND FISHES.

IBIS.

ICHNEUMON.

55







56 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

JAcKAL. A kind of wild
dog that hunts in packs. The
jackal inhabits the same coun-
tries as the hyena, and, like
the hyena, lives in holes and
caves. At night he goes howl-
ing and prowling about in
search of prey ; for the jackal
is a grasping, greedy fellow,
and if the dead be not properly
buried, he will scratch away
the earth and tear the body
out of its tomb.

JACKSNIPE. One of the
game-birds of the fens and
marshes, as the woodcock, the
; great snipe, and the common
snipe. Jacksnipe is much
the smallest and prettiest of
all our marsh-birds.



JaGuaR. One of the largest
of the Cat tribe. It isa spotted
animal like the leopard. Being
‘a native of the New World,
it is sometimes called the
American panther. Monkeys
are the favourite food of the
jaguar when it can catch them.
It is the fiercest of the Ameri-
JAGUAR. .. can beasts of prey.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 57

Jay. A chattering bird
with pretty plumage. When
the jay is taken young it can
be easily tamed and taught
many kinds of tricks; it can
also be taught to repeat words
and to imitate voices. Although
subsisting mostly on vegetables,
the jay is a great robber of the
nests of smaller birds; it kills
also mice and the larger in-
sects.



JERBOA. A small rodent,
or gnawing animal, with a
very long tail, and very long
hind legs, useful for leaping. =
You may see what very short
fore legs it has. The jerboa is
a burrowing animal, and feeds
only by night. a JERBOA.



KanGaroo. Another curi-
ous leaping animal, whichis
confined to the wilds of Aus-—
tralia, where it is. cruelly”
hunted by man and dog. The,
female kangaroo is furnished
by nature with a curious
pouch, in which she carries
her young, and where they
take refuge when in dangev. KANGAROO.





58 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.





























KestreL. belonging to the large family
~of Falcons. It is a swift-
- winged bird, and yet, when it
_ chooses, it can remain motion-
less in the air with outstretched
~ Wings, its keen eyes watching
ZE the ground for field-mice and
other creeping things.

Kip. A young goat. Famed
for the fine, soft, and: smooth
quality of its skin. When
tanned, it is used for gloves,
upper leathers of boots and
shoes, and other things. The
flesh is said to be more deli-
cate than that of the lamb.

KINGFISHER. Among the
many varieties of this bird,
what is called the common
gg kingfisher is not uncommon in
this country. It is known by
its long, straight bill, its short
body and tail, and above all by
its beautiful plumage of bright





































blue, green, and orange. Seated
on a bough overhanging a





























































































“stream, it patiently waits to
pounce with its long, sharp
KINGFISHER. .. bill on passing. fish below.































BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 59

Krire. Like the kestrel,
this is a large bird of prey of
the Falcon kind. This one
seen in the sky is also known
in Scotland as the “gled.” It
is on the young of the most
timid animals that the kite













chiefly feeds, such as the young +43
of hares and rabbits. It feeds ob
also on mice, insects, worms, \!Ne
and snails. | — &

Kitten, or Kitling (Scotch).
Names given to the young of
the cat. “ Playful as a kitten ”
is a common saying. Well,
kittens are made to be happy,
they like fun so much. We
should be kind to them, for
they have their sorrows too.

Lapy-BirD. A small, pretty,
round insect, famed for its
showy colours, commonly a
bright red with black spots.
Tt creeps slowly, but can fly
well. It is of great use in
gardens by feeding on the
plant-lice that destroy fine
plants. The name lady-bird
has been changed from lady-
bug. - LADY-BIRD.



60 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Lamp. Meek, innocent crea-
ture, you little think that we



let you crop the green meadow
but to fatten your flesh for
our eating, and-to grow wool
for our soft, warm clothing!
‘Boys and girls do not need to
be told that a lamb is a:young
sheep.



ae a
LAMB, LAMPREY, otherwise called
Stone-sucker, from the power
it has to fasten itself to stones

by means of its mouth, is a
" snake-like fish resembling the
eel, and lives both in the sea

and in fresh water. It ascends



rivers that it may lay its eggs.
The lamprey has seven open=*
ings, or breathing-holes, on
each side of the neck, on which
account it is sometimes called
the “nine-eyed eel.” In some
countries lampreys are used as
food.






l

fs LANDRAIL. Called also Corn-

[5 crake from its shrill, grating

j{~ ery in the corn-field. It is a

; Coe. stilt-bird, that

SEES ORR “SSN never takes to the wing if it
LANDRAIL, ; can avoid it.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 61

Lap-poc. A little dog
fondled in the lap; a pet dog;
a toy dog. The most common
is the poodle, with his snow-
white coat of corkscrew curls,
or ringlets. There is a very
small kind of poodle called
the barbet, that used to be
much thought of as a lady’s
dog.



LAPWING, or Peewit, is of
the Plover family of wading-
birds. When disturbed in the
nest, she makes her escape
and pretends lameness, and _
tumbles about as if her wings §
or her legs were broken. This
ig done in order to lead the
supposed enemy away from
the nest.



Lark. There is the sky-
lark, also the pencilled lark,
the woodlark, and the shore-
lark, all of them remarkable
for the great length of the
claw of the hind toe. The
bird in the picture is best
known to us as the skylark :
known in Scotland by the
name of the laverock.





62 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Launce, Wriggle, or Sand-
eel. A long, slender fish com-
mon on our sandy sea-coasts.
Sand-eels bury themselves in
the wet sand when the tide



LAUNCE. is back. With spades and .
rakes they are caught in great
numbers, and are said to be
fine eating. Fisher-folk em-
ploy them for bait.

Lerecu. This is the com-
mon leech of the doctors, so ;
well known for its useful,
blood-sucking, healing service
to the sick. It is said that
the leech is a good weather-
glass, as it foretells a change



















in the weather by its lively
motions in the water.

Lemur. This is called a
handed animal, like the mon-
keys; indeed, it is said to
form a link between the apes
and the monkeys. It is a
native of the island of Mada-
: gascar, and is found nowhere
* else. The name “lemur,” mean-
“ing “night-wandering ghosts,”



is given them because they
LEMUR. wander abroad at night.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 63

LeoparD.
prey of the Cat kind found in
Africa and Asia; a nimble
tree-climber, and a swimmer.
The form of the leopard is
elegant, and its movements are
graceful. Its skin, which is
very beautiful, is pale yellow,
covered with roundish black
spots. leopards attack and



LEOPARD.

eat small antelopes and mon-
keys, and if near settlements
they creep slyly upon sheep
and pigs. The jaguar of
America resembles the leopard.

Line.
the Cod kind; indeed, it in- »
_ habits nearly the same parts
of the sea; and, like the cod,
it is salted’ in large quantities
and sold as dried fish.

Linnet.
ful little singing-birds fre-.
quenting open heaths and
commons, and breeding among |
the furze, whin, and other |
bushes. They feed upon the =
seeds of many wild plants, <<
such as the dandelion, the
thistle, ete.





64 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Lion, sometimes called the
“king of beasts,” belongs to
the Cat family, of which he is
the largest. He inhabits South
Africa and the warmer parts
of Asia. ~Lions are nearly
always found in pairs. The
male is as long as an ox, but
does not stand so high. “He



has a long, shaggy mane cov-
ering his large head and neck.
He is of great strength, and
can carry off the body of a
man nearly as easily as a cat
can a mouse. The female has
no mane. The young ones
are called cubs.

Lizarp. ‘There are a great
many different kinds of this



reptile. The one in the pic-
ture looks like what is called
the scaly lizard, so plentiful








upon the heaths and commons
of England. Lizards feed on
flies and other small insects.

Liama. A wool - bearing
animal of South America. It’
resembles the camel in form,
but is much less in size. (See
LEAMA. . ALPACA.)



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 65

Losster. A kind of shell-
fish of a dull, pale, reddish
yellow, ‘spotted with bluish &
.black. When boiled it be-
comes red. As an article of
food, the lobster is - perhaps
the most important of the ~
shell-fish. Ne

Locust. It may well be;
said, that of all the insect
pests, the migratory locust
is the most terrible. They







sometimes appear in vast
numbers in Central Europe,
Egypt, Syria, and the south
of Asia, darkening the air as
they fly, and soon destroying
all vegetation where they
alight. They have hind legs



ae




formed for leaping. ae
Lynx. A wild animal of Bo \\\ \\
; Z LIS :
the Cat kind, more or less S



spotted, remarkable for speed
and sharp sight. It is a for-
est animal, and a great climber
of trees. It finds its prey in
’ weasels, ermines, and squirrels,
and in hares and other beasts,
on which it drops from the
branches,



66 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Macaw. There are several
kinds of this bird, all belong-
ing to the Parrot family.

’ They are mostly inhabitants
of South America. They are
remarkable for their very long
tails and the rich colours of
their plumage.

MAckEREL. A well-formed,
. beautifully-coloured fish, some-
CW times caught with baited hook,
but oftener with the net, in
the same way as the herring
is taken. The flesh of the
gimackerel is very good, but
Pmust be eaten fresh, as it
soon becomes tainted after





being taken from the water

2

MACKEREL, and is unfit for human food.

Macpiz.
Crow tribe; it ig smaller than
the rook. The chattering,
* prying, pilfering, and nest:

ke

robbing magpie is found in
many parts of the world. It
is seldom at rest, but hops
and skips about, shaking its
long tail. It chatters more



Za > When tamed, and may be
MAGPIE. taught to utter words.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 67

MANATEE, or Sea-cow, is
classed among animals that
suckle their young. It is
found at the mouths of the
great rivers of South America
and Africa that flow into the
Atlantic Ocean. Those of
America are much larger than
those of Africa. They have
been known to reach twenty
feet, and to weigh four tons.

Manpritu. The largest of
the baboons, the most savage,
and the most fierce-looking,
with its short, upright tail, its
bright-tinted cheeks and nose
giving the animal the appear-
ance of being painted for
show. The mandrill is a
native of Guinea.



MARMosET. One of the
smallest of the monkeys. It
inhabits the forests of the
hotter parts of America, and
takes ill with the cold of our
country. You see the one in
the picture perched on a man’s
thumb. The food of the mar-
moset consists of flies and
other insects, and fruits. MARMOSET.

MANDRILU,





68



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,



MASTIFF.

Marmot, or “ Bear-rat,” is
a burrowing, gnawing animal,
so clever at the digging! It
begins its dwelling by forming
a tunnel six feet long, only
wide enough to admit itself.
Then it forms a room or cham-
ber large enough to hold a
number of marmots, Next it
forms a smaller apartment as
a store-house, that they may
have food when they awake
from their six month’s sleep.

Marten. An animal that
may be classed among the
blood-sucking vermin of pole-
cats, weasels, and ermines,
which are so destructive about
farm-yards and hen-houses.

Mastirr. This faithful
watch-dog is the largest and
most powerful of English dogs.
Long ago in England, all
watch-dogs that were not of
the true mastiff kind were
called ban-dogs, supposed to
mean “baying dogs.”
in Shakespeare says,—

“ ban-dogs howl.”



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 69

Meruin. The smallest of
the British falcons, and one of
the swiftest on the wing; a
very bold bird of prey, easily \v

tamed. When the amusement *





of hawking was common, the
merlin was valued as a lady’s~*
bird. ; {

Mote. A small reptile--<
eating animal that burrows in G
the ground, where it gets its $
food, such as earth-worms. It
was long believed that the
‘mole had no eyes, so that “as
blind as a mole” was a by-
word; but it has eyes, only
they are very small, and sunk
deep in the fur. The mole’s
sense of smell and of hearing
is very keen.

Moon-FISH, sometimes called
Sun-fish. This curious fish,
which looks as if the whole
body was only the head part
of a large fish, is caught in
British waters. The food of
the moon-fish is said to consist
of seaweed and shell-fish. The
flesh resembles that of skate,
and is relished by sailors. MOON-FISH.



79 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Moor-HEN, or Water-hen.
Though very like the coot,
the moor-hen differs from that
bird in its habits. The haunt
of the moor-hen is by the















margins of streams or lakes,
-where there is much vegeta-
tion, and where it can dash
along swiftly on the surface
of the water and under it.

Mosquiro, or Musquito.
The name of one of the most
tormenting of insect pests.
The bite of the mosquito, in
the sultry countries which it
inhabits, is venomous, causing
great itching for several days.
It is thought by some that
flies of this kind were one of
the plagues of Egypt.

Movs. A destroying little
timid pest of our homes is the
common brown mouse, which
follows man wherever he goes.
It does much damage in farm-’
yards and grain-lofts. As the
young mice come into the
world blind and naked, the
mother mouse prepares a nice
warm nest for them.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 71

Mute. A beast of burden
which ranks between the ass
and the horse. It is not so
showy, so fleet, or so dashing
as the horse, but it is hardy,
patient, cautious, and sure-
footed ; and for these reasons
it is chosen to bear loads
along paths where hardly any
other animal could hold its
footing securely.

Mutter. This is the gray
mullet, so plentiful in British
waters and in other seas.
Mullets live in large shoals,
and are often seen near the «
mouths of rivers. They are °



caught in nets. Their flesh is eee
very tender and delicate. They

feed upon small crabs and
shell-fish. ‘

Musk Deer. The animal
from which is obtained the
perfume called musk. It in-
habits the high mountains of
Central Asia. The animal in
the picture is called the pigmy
musk ; it has no horns. It is
a native of Java and the ad- MUSK DEER.
jacent islands.





72

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Musk Ox. This animal
lives far away in the cold
parts of North America, where
it feeds upon the grasses and
lichens which grow there.
The flesh of the animal smells
strongly of musk—hence its
name. The musk ox is not a
large animal; the great mass
of long brown silky hair



makes it look larger.

Musser. A well-known
shell-fish, plentiful on almost
every coast; and when the
tide is low, great numbers may
be seen in the mud-banks, in
the crevices of the rocks, and
in the pools of sea-water left
upon the beaches. All the









sea-mussels spin short, horny
threads, by which they attach
themselves to the rocks.



MUSSEL.

NarwHau. ‘This large ani-
mal, which inhabits the north-
ern seas, belongs to the Whale
family, and is remarkable for
its long, straight tusk or horn
of finest ivory, giving to the



animal the name of the sea-

NARWHAL. unicorn.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 73

Navtitus, Argonaut, or
Paper Sailor, has its home far
away in the Pacific and Indian







Oceans. It has a white, deli-
cate, and beautiful shell, two
large eyes, and eight long
arms covered with suckers by
which it can cling tightly to 7
anything it takes hold of.









NEwFrouNDLAND Doc. This
noble animal is named after
its native island, where it is
employed as a beast of bur-
den. From three to five are
tackled to a sledge or cart
loaded with three hundred-
weight of wood, which they ,
_ will draw for miles. | With iy
us he is the companion of _
man, and many persons he
has saved from drowning.

Newt. A reptile of the Sa-
lamander kind, hatched from
eges. It passes through the
tadpole state, a fish-like form,
having no legs: that is the
first stage from the egg. The
one in the picture is called the ~
crested newt, from the deeply-
toothed edge on the back.





74: BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

NIGHTINGALE. A summer
visitor to the warmer parts of
Britain; a bird that sings
later in the night and earlier
in the morning than any other
bird, unless it be the redstart,
and said to be the sweetest
of song-birds.

NortHern DIver, or“Loon.”
A large sea-bird common on
the northern coasts of the
British Islands, the Western
Islands, and the Orkneys.
The eggs are somewhat like
those of the goose, but slightly
spotted with black. Its webbed
feet are set so far back that
it cannot walk well, but makes

as

a water, its proper element,





a tumbling scramble for the

Nut-watcu.
less, tree-climbing bird that
belongs to Europe; yet, as a
British bird, the nut-hatch is
confined to the south of En-
ggland. It feeds on_ insects,
berries, and nuts; it cracks
‘ the nuts by fixing them in a
‘ 4 Chink and striking them with
cone: ak its bill.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 75

Nyuieuav. This large ani-
mal, which belongs to the
Antelope family, is an inhabit-
ant of the forests of India and
Persia. It is a fierce, horned
animal, and it is of little use
to the hunter,

OceLor. A member of the
Cat family, and a native of
Central America. In size, it
stands between the tiger and
the domestic cat. It paces
along with the same long step
and noble tread as the tiger.
The one in the picture is called
the linked ocelot, because the
markings on its fur are chain-
like.

Opossum. There are many
kinds of this animal. This
one is a native of North Amer-
ica. It is about the size of a
cat, and, as with the kangaroo,
the female has a pouch in which
she carries her young. It has
been said that the opossum
has a gape like a pike, and
has the ears of a bat, the feet
of an ape, and the tail of a



serp ent. OPossuUM.



76

BEASTS. BIRDS, AND FISHES.



ae
ORIOLE.



SER

ORTOLAN,



ORANG-OUTANG. An _ ani-
mal of the Ape kind found in
the Sunda Isles, and some-
times called “the wild man of
the woods.” It feeds on vege-
tables, spending much of its
life among the branches of
trees; for it cannot walk well
on the ground, but goes on
from tree to tree with much
ease and quickness.

ORIOLE. This is the golden
oriole, very rare in Britain,


Europe. It feeds on insects,
worms, and caterpillars; but
it also likes berries, cherries,
and other sweet fruits. The
nest is hung from the end of
a slender twig or branch.

ORTOLAN. This bird be-
longs to the family of Bunt-
ings. The ortolan is rare in
Britain, but in many parts of
Europe, as Italy, France, Ger-
many, and Sweden, it is plenti-
ful. Great numbers are caught
and fattened for the market,
for they are a luxury of the
table.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. aaa

Oryx. An animal of the
Antelope kind. The one in
the picture has another name
—the gemsbok. You see that
its horns, sloping backward,
are nearly straight. There is
another variety—the true oryx
—which has the horns curved
backward. Both are animals
of the African plains.

OsPREY, or Fish Eagle. A
large bird of prey, living chiefly
upon fishes, which it takes by
darting upon them, sometimes *
plunging two feet under the
surface of the water. It makes
its nest in the crevices of rocks
or on the tops of tall trees,
laying from two to four eggs.

OstricH. Belongs to a
class called Running Birds,
which move by running instead
of flying. It is the swiftest-
footed of known animals. This
bird of the desert is a native
of Africa, and measures from
seven to eight feet in height ;
its wings, of long, soft plumes,
much esteemed for ornament,



are useless for flight. OSTRICH.





78 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Orrer. This animal in-
habits different parts of the
world. It is truly a water
animal. Though the otter
cannot walk well on land, it
‘ passes the daytime among the
rocks, and only at night goes
=~ forth to catch fish. It is fond
of salmon and trout, and is











































therefore the angler’s enemy.

OuncE. At one time thought
j to be a variety of the leopard,
g= Which it equals in size; but
it is easy to know it from
the other by the roughness of
its fur, as well as by the mark-
ings upon it; also by the tail
being more bushy. The ounce
is an inhabitant of India and
other parts of Asia.



oN
Rist oh

OvuzEL. Commonly called
the ring ouzel or ring thrush,
on account of the broad white
patch on the upper part of the
breast. This bird is not plen-
tiful in Britain, being but a
summer visitor. It feeds
chiefly on insects, grubs, and
caterpillars. Its haunts are



ouzEn. secluded glens and ravines.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

OwL. The common name
of a large family of night-
preying birds. The one in
the picture is called the barn-
owl, the screech-owl, or the
white owl, well known over
Britain by any of these names.
It is also spread over Europe,
Asia, and America. It is said
to be the most useful, and in
its plumage the most beautiful,
of British owls.

Ox. The domestic ox is
spread nearly over the world
in one or other of its kinds.
When we say oxen, we mean
more than one. In many
parts of the country these do -—
the work of horses in tilling
the land with the plough.
The male ox is called a bull,
the female a cow, and the
young a calf.

PanTHer. An animal a
little larger in size, and more
Savage in its ways, than the
leopard. The panther looks
very much like the leopard in
the markings of its fur, and is *
found in the same countries. PANTHER.



79



80

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



PARTRIDGE,



Paroquer. The plumage
of this bird is pale green, with
a black collar round the neck,
which gives it the name of
ring parrakeet, as the name is
sometimes written. The two
middle feathers of the tail are
always much longer than the
others.

Parrot. The bird in the
picture is the common gray
parrot, a native of Western
Africa, brought to this coun-
try by sailors; it is easily
tamed and taught to speak.
With us it is a very long-
lived bird; some have been
known to reach a hundred
years. The plumage is a
sober gray, excepting the tail
feathers, which are red.

PARTRIDGE. There are sev-
eral kinds of this bird. The
one in the picture is called the
common or gray partridge of
the copse and corn-field. There
is a curious thing about this
bird: in many cases the young
run about before quite getting
rid of the shell.



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 81

Peacock. This beautiful
and hardy bird is a native of
‘India.
feathers adorns the head of
male and female; but the great
beauty of the male bird is in
his tail or train, which he can
erect or spread at pleasure,
and which shows a beautiful
display of colours. In this



country the peacock is kept
to adorn the park, the lawn, PEACOCK,

and the farm-yard.

Petican. A large, heavy
web-footed bird with very
short legs. It is found in
Africa, Asia, South America,
and Southern Europe, where
it haunts the rivers, the lakes,
and the sea-coasts; for it is a
keen fisher, and is provided



with a pouch in which it car-
ries the fish to the shore. The
plumage is white.

PELICAN.

Prercu. One of the most
beautiful of our fresh-water ,
fishes, found in the lakes and
large ponds of nearly all Europe
and Asia, and much esteemed
as an article of food. PERCH.





82 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Petrer, A long-winged
web-footed ocean bird, which
comprises a large family, of
various sizes and of different
habits, that consume the sur-
face refuse of the sea. The
plumage of this bird, commonly
called the stormy petrel, or
“Mother Carey’s chicken,” is
sooty black.

PHEASANT. There are many
birds known by this name.
The one in the picture is called
the golden pheasant, a native
of China. From the head rise
some long rich golden-yellow
feathers, which hang becom-
ingly over the hind part.
Pheasants feed on rice, hemp-
seed, wheat or barley, and
herbs, fruits, and insects.

Piczon. There are a great
many kinds of dove-cot pigeons,
of which this is one, such as
pouters, fantails, carriers, tum-
blers, nuns, jacobins, ete. They
all come from the rock-pigeon
in the wild state, so named



from its natural dwelling being
PICTON: in rocks rather than in trees,



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 838

PILCHARD, or Gipsy Herring,
is like the herring in size and
form, but is thicker. When a
pilchard is held by the tip of
the dorsal or back fin, th
head rises and the tail droop































down, which is the very revers
of what happens with the her- '







ring. Many millions of pil-
chards are caught every year.

Prtor-FisH. This little fish
is very nimble and swift in
its movements. It is silvery
gray, with five dark-blue bands
round its body, It is often
seen swimming before a ship
or in front of sharks following
a ship—hence itsname. The
usual length of the pilot-fish
is twelve inches.

PILOT-FISH.

Pirge-FisH. There are many
kinds of this fish in British
waters. This one is also called
the bill-fish and the sea-needle.
A curious thing about these
fishes is that the male is fur-



nished with a pouch or bag,



into which the female drops
the egos, or roe, there to be -
hatched by the male. PIPE-FISH. in





84 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Puaice. A flat fish common
in most seas. Its colour above
is olive, or light brown, spotted
with dots of red on the body
and on the fins; the under
side is white. It is caught
chiefly with the trawl-net.
Plaice is in season a great part
of the year, but it soon be- |
comes tainted after being
taken from the water.

Piover. There are many
kinds of plovers under differ-
ent names. They are all stilt-
birds, and they may be said
- to be spread ali over the world.
They breed on the margins of
= marshes and streams, mostly
in wild places. They resemble
the lapwings in their haunts
and habits.

PoIntEeR.
» Ssporting-dog trained to stop

and point with his nose to the
3 place where the game is lying.

tae There are several kinds of




INEGTISSSS is said to be the best. He
ial ees mlb ny : :
wey Bean > is more sure and steady, obedi-

POINTER. : ent and teachable.



BEASTS, BIRDS,

PotarR BEAR.
heavy, stout- bodied, fierce
white animal inhabiting, as

A great

its name shows, the polar
regions of the far North. It
is a land animal, or
properly

animal ;

more
ice - and - snow
and yet the prey
which it pursues is not land

an.

animals, but those of the frozen
sea, such as seals and the like.

Potecat.

animal of the Weasel kind, |

with a long body and short
legs,
and climbs walls with ease to
destroy the poultry wholesale.
In the rabbit-warren it will
kill a great number of rabbits
in one day.

Pony. A smart little ani-
mal of the Horse kind. The
best are said to come from
Wales, Dartmoor, Exmoor, and
The favourite is the
Shetland pony (sheltie), from
the northern islands of Scot-
land, where they used to run
wild, but are now tended and
folded like sheep or cattle.

Iceland.

It is nimble and bold, -



85

AND FISHES.








Hs
HAY

PONY.



86 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Poopte. A small dog with
long; fine, white curly hair.
It is sometimes called the les-
ser water-spaniel. It is very
playful, and swims well. It
is a much-petted dog, and be-
comes very fond of its master
or mistress. (See Lap-poc.)



POODLE. PoRCUPINE An animal
found in Africa, India, and
Southern Europe. It is a
gnawing animal that sleeps in
its burrow through the day
and quits it at night in search
of its food, which is vegetable,
as roots, buds, and fruits.
When angry it can erect its
spines ; and, like the hedgehog,
it can coil itself into a ball.



PORPOISE, or Sea-Hog, A
BOS ING: shoaling fish belonging to the
. Whale family. It is plentiful
in all European seas, and on
the coasts of North America,
It is generally about six or
seven feet long. Its blubber
yields about a hogshead of oil.
Breer The upper part of the porpoise
is bluish black and the under
part whitish,





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 87

PouTEr. There are about
twelve different kinds of do-
mestic pigeons, of which the
pouter (sometimes written
“powter”) is one. The bird
in the picture has the power
to puff up or swell the crop.

Prawn. A shell-fish which
is highly esteemed as a delicacy.
It is generally about three



iches in length, and of a

POUTER.
pale-red colour. Prawns gen-
erally inhabit sandy bottoms
near coasts. It is interesting

to watch the habits of the















prawn in an aquarium—that
is, a tank with glass sides, for
holding and showing water
plants and animals, and their
modes of living.



PTARMIGAN (pronounce, tar-
migan). Ptarmigans, the
smallest of the British grouse,
haunt the lofty heights of
Kurope, Asia, and North Amer-
ica, descending to feed on the
buds of trees, wild berries,
young shoots of heath, and on
insects. The feet of these “qlee = aN
birds are covered with feathers. PTARMIGAN

PRAWN.





88 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

PoFFIN, or Coulter-neb (so
called from the droll shape of
its beak), is a web-footed, short-
winged sea-bird, very common
in Britain. At the Needles in
the Isle of Wight and in other
places it is plentiful. Its food
consists of fishes and insects.

Puma, called also the Amer-
ican Lion. It is of a tawny
colour without spots or stripes
when full grown, and is found
. In both South and North
‘America. It often climbs
trees; and lies upon a branch,
ready to spring upon its prey
as it passes below. The puma
>gis easily tamed, and shows
7 much affection to those who
are kind’ to it, purring like
the domestic cat when stroked.



PUMA.

Quacca. An African ani-
mal of the Horse kind, very
plentiful on the plains of Cape
Colony, where it is found in
large herds. The quagea is
a spirited little animal, easily
tamed, and a willing servant.
The face, neck, and shoulders
quacca. are striped like the zebra.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 89









Quam. A bird of the ,
same family as the pheasant











and partridge. It has a round,
plump body and short legs ;
and is more of a running bird =

than a flying one. Quails are S



found in some parts of Europe,

Rassrr. A gnawing little 5 uA

animal of the Hare kind;
but the wild rabbit burrows
in the ground. Here is a
curious summing up:—“A
female rabbit will bring forth
about eight young rabbits
seven times in the year, so
that in four years her off
spring would amount to one
million two hundred and sev-
enty-four thousand eight hun-
dred and forty individuals.”

RacE-HoORSE. A horse
trained to run for a prize. It
is related of “ Eclipse,” a well-
known racer in his day, that
he had won for his owner
more than twenty-five thou-



sand pounds within seventeen

months. . RACE-HORSE.



90 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Racoon. An inhabitant of
the warmer parts of America.
It has a curious habit of
plunging its food in water
and rolling it between its paws
before eating it. The racoon
sleeps during the day with its
head sunk between its hind



legs; at night it goes forth to
eee search for food.

Ram. The male sheep ; the
owner of a very bad temper.
We are accustomed to look
upon the female as a mild,
timid creature. Not so the
ram: he is a bold and power-
ful one to contend against
when he hurls himself forward,
butting with head and horns.

Rat. A gnawing animal,
and one of the greatest animal
pests in dwellings, store-houses,
farm-yards, and mills—indeed,
everywhere. The one in the
picture looks like what is
known as the sewer-rat, the
only kind useful to man by
devouring the animal and vege-
table offal that might otherwise
RAT, breed a plague.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 91

Rarer. An animal about
the size of the badger, and
nearly allied to the glutton.
The ratel inhabits South Africa,
and ‘lives by plundering the
wild bees of their honey, which,
owing to the thickness of its
skin, it does without fear of
the stings of swarms of angry
bees,

RATTLESNAKE. This terrible
reptile, with its deadly fangs,
is a native of North America.



As the name implies, this
large serpent has a number of
horny joints on the end of the
tail, which rattle against one
another when the animal puts
its tail in motion.



Ravey. This bird belongs
to the Crow family, of which
it is the largest and most
powerful member. It lives in
the wilds rather than in the
woods, although it sometimes |
builds its nest there; but it?
prefers the ledges and clefts of ¥
high rocks for that purpose. &



Worms, grubs, and caterpillars
form the food of the raven.



92 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

RAZOR - BILL. Sometimes
called the common auk, which,
unlike the great auk in this



respect, can fly well. The
razor-bill finds its food in the
sea, and yet builds on the



ledges of lofty rocks many
hundred feet above the water.









The eges and flesh of the razor-
. bill are rank and fishy, yet
they are used as food by the
northern islanders.

Rep Derr. The male, the
only one that has horns, is a
hart or stag, the female a
hind, and the young a calf.
The stag is by much the larg-
est of European deer. The
7 number of red deer is now
greatly reduced in Britain. In
some parts of Scotland great
numbers are still found.

Repstart. This handsome
bird is classed among the Brit-
.ish warblers. As a summer
visitor, it is common in the
south of England. Like the
nightingale, it begins its song
at early dawn, and also con-
tinues it into the night.





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 93

ReEpDwine. A European bird
classed among the Thrushes,
and sometimes called the red-
sided thrush, the wind-thrush,
the swine-pipe, and, from the
melody of its song, the night-
ingale of Norway. The red-
wing is a northern bird in the
breeding season. Its food con-



sists of wild berries, insects,
and worms.

REINDEER. The Carabou ‘
in North America. These
useful animals differ from _
others of the Deer tribe in \f
the female having horns as |
well as the male. There is
no other animal so much af

ECT.
PN AES



servant to man in any country



as the reindeer is to the Lap- REINDEER.
lander; its body serves him ._ WR
ANA











with everything needful to life. .\

Ruinoceros. A thick-
skinned animal that stands
next to the elephant in;
strength, and inhabits the
hotter parts of Asia and}
Africa. Those of Asia have i
but one horn on the nose,
those of Africa have two. RHINOCEROS,



94 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Roacu. A fresh-water fish
of the Carp family, and allied
to the dace. It is a pretty
fish that swims in shoals,
usually in lakes.



fatvats Rosin. A European bird
classed among the warblers, a
family of great service to the
gardener in destroying earth-
worms, insects, and caterpillars.
Our winter weleome visitant,
the robin, is also called robin
redbreast, robin redstart,
robinet, and ruddock, owing
to the breast being of a red-
dish-orange colour. The robin
; builds its nest on the ground,
or near it—in a hole near the
root of a tree, or in a wall.
It lines the nest with dry grass,
withered leaves, and feathers.
The eggs are from four to seven
in number, and are spotted a
rusty red.

Roesuck. The most hand-
some of the Deer kind, smaller
than the fallow-deer. Some
think it should be classed
among the antelopes. Its



ROEBUCK, horns are sharp and pointed.



.BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 95

Rook. It is interesting to
watch the habits of these well-
known birds in their commu-
nity, called a rookery. They
have laws to regulate their
conduct. One of their laws
at the building time is, that
all the sticks must be fetched ,
from a distance. Lazy rooks,
when discovered breaking this
law by taking sticks from a
tree whereon other nests are
-building, are set upon and
banished by the others. :
Rurr. A bird which belongs ce nae
to what are called the stilt or
running birds. It is not so
plentiful in Britain as formerly.
It takes its name from the
ruff of feathers that surrounds
the neck of the male bird in













the breeding season. Like
. RUFF.
our game-cock, the ruff is a
fighting bird at the pairing
time, when the “wars of the
ruffs” begin.

SasLteE.
of the Weasel family, much ~
sought after in Siberia for the
sake of its valuable fur.



“



96 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. ~

SALAMANDER. A reptile of
the Lizard kind. This is the
common salamander. - It is
black, marked with large bright |
yellow spots. It inhabits some
parts of Europe, where it lives
Sin damp, gloomy holes of the
earth, under stones, or in
ruined walls. It is slow and
heavy in its motions, feeding
upon flies, worms, slugs, and
the like. In former times the



SALAMANDER. wildest fables were invented
about this timid, harmless
creature—that its bite was in-
stant death; that it lived and
crawled about in red-hot,
glowing furnaces.

SALmMon. This is the most
handsome fish that ever
adorned the fishmonger’s stall,



SALMON.

and is highly esteemed as an
article of food. Salmon pass
the summer in the sea; but in
autumn they push up rivers,







leaping the falls, in order to



find a gravel bed on which to



= deposit their eggs to be hatched.











Saw-risu.
BSAW-FISH. the Shark: kind.



-. BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 97

Scorpion. It is curious to
think that this lobster-looking
creature should be classed
among the spiders. It has
eight legs, and from eight to
twelve eyes; the tail is formed
of six joints, ending in a
venomous sting; it has two
arms with large claws. The
breathing-pores are four on
each side along the belly.
These dreaded. creatures in-
habit most warm countries,
crawling into houses, to the
great terror of the inmates.

SEAL. This is the common
seal, the colour of whose fur
is a grayish yellow, sprinkled
with spots of brown. It is
five or six feet in length, is
found on the shores of all the
colder places of Europe, and is
valued for the oil and the
skin.

SETTER. A sporting dog.
trained to sit or crouch to the
game he finds, in much the
same way as the pointer; in-
deed, the setter and the pointer







WZ LJ a
Mp.

are nearly alike in their habits. SETTER.



98 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

SHap. A fish much like
the herring, only larger; in-
deed, in some places it is called
the king of the herrings. And
yet the shad differs in its
habits from the herring and
the pilchard, which never leave
the sea, whereas shads ascend



the larger rivers into the fresh
waters to deposit their spawn.
The shad is very good food.

SHARK. This one is called
= the white shark, the largest
~ and most fierce of the tribe.
When about to seize its prey










z it has to turn on one side or
ere on its back. There are other
kinds of sharks, as the hammer
shark, the thresher shark, and
the saw-fish.









SHEPHERD'S Doc. This is

“a most useful kind of dog.
Ge Twenty shepherds without a
dog could not do the work of
one shepherd with a dog. At




* for miles. It does this quickly,
and gets its master’s flock to-
SHEPHERD'S DOG. gether by themselves.



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'5498' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGEW' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
9d35ea2a4a221f45675ed147ae01e3ed
ae404edc7bb2b81820cb5e4b4e83c86421e8fea8
'2011-09-20T05:04:59-04:00'
describe
'370044' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGEX' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
b26be4ad504554e9c3db506133631161
accb1b91e8988c0d94bbef2571f6a340db763c4c
'2011-09-20T05:06:00-04:00'
describe
'35160' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGEY' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
83d13f7e8e26df5f21778e1277059352
72253fe3c7e8b5dcd0689165b7524ff979c01e06
'2011-09-20T05:03:19-04:00'
describe
'443' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGEZ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
cc58f8bba175bad81503946ebe414a80
ec7df051a342e89d7206d0c7e4d1c9fbbad807aa
'2011-09-20T05:03:48-04:00'
describe
'6320' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFA' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
cdcaaeee4d9c1132a26fc60dbaa31c00
b163ea5756337dd91d446e3d5d16ec4da2909db6
'2011-09-20T05:04:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFB' 'sip-files00009.tif'
60cbba9f6e046ba5a8f288b23ffd311a
ee129d2314aa0f6181d2610f8d09356dd7b10d57
'2011-09-20T05:03:30-04:00'
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFC' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e1940ccf634f6938075f105bddf2b280
756f683cf4e6833b211effe3698244a5878446fc
'2011-09-20T05:06:09-04:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFD' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
81ac1a6b916a954ee39614a669b67432
4386786364ccebb3efc3b95177067c4cf354bf3d
'2011-09-20T05:05:18-04:00'
describe
'369842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b3e8b3e29d30beac28c2bfe32ba905cf
fde5f5b5a370d25c495e80f74e765638d4dfdcc2
'2011-09-20T05:03:35-04:00'
describe
'47830' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFF' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
593f662e3d4be4ffa7061c4261f941d2
b69eb8db88884b19113b36883a7a3f4a16d6c1fe
'2011-09-20T05:04:40-04:00'
describe
'3970' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
5f47623bb4c8188c4eff022ef6d3f6f0
2190ca6ffabee6e7eec699a3146bb14ad67948f7
'2011-09-20T05:06:04-04:00'
describe
'11607' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a568fa43576d8ab7b4919e6aec001a72
2f8a3c8bed5b68cc2163689771e53ad660f43dec
'2011-09-20T05:05:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFI' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8d72c5323189654fcb9a7f0b3ee60e29
b876cec6c1165e028255bd4719438522ddd512fc
'2011-09-20T05:03:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFJ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
3bb11a5935a62770f5797ed1ff516959
848fae55d85011a420243e92ada69d474dc755ba
'2011-09-20T05:05:47-04:00'
describe
'3588' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFK' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
684e080912d7e904dcbf1d52d3601c4c
e295a823728576c3371d4858a370b992c57006bd
'2011-09-20T05:02:49-04:00'
describe
'370022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFL' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2d9b2aa9fe1c972a2dc03a873e83bc15
8aa66fa564a5701be027edf6e0c244571f15417d
'2011-09-20T05:04:45-04:00'
describe
'117639' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFM' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
5b78bbd62657e3e9f617dddf7cab8097
b59c866ee9eb6cb13fc60f8396e57f726ee61cec
'2011-09-20T05:05:17-04:00'
describe
'17461' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFN' 'sip-files00012.pro'
80240bcc506155cbac9dec3e5dc3ca55
7a4f51f04b49e580d1ff78727af8a48cb19eb3bb
'2011-09-20T05:04:43-04:00'
describe
'31472' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
787750409aaa8bf5796c1135f32d1bff
3bd615bb217e71260aa653f15a2c7a2c72dbf444
'2011-09-20T05:04:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
1bb136070a326badcc5554b221f2ed90
75b4ed48adac8aa3f7a1914055c1f0872ec14c2b
'2011-09-20T05:06:15-04:00'
describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFQ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
16dce27c50116316bd59c0c16da8ce76
8337122f6a8c70147d0afeeaf68b73dbdf7ec3e8
'2011-09-20T05:05:11-04:00'
describe
'7764' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFR' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
0ff54be81ffeaba31f129cf839e89342
2c0d80050b4229a74b270d5bea6c352159f0964b
describe
'369922' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFS' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7771679b440fdd3f3c3ba31cb254de9f
d26bd1ed962ff9c5bb6c92499cb45d163339d40b
'2011-09-20T05:03:16-04:00'
describe
'160974' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFT' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e2a3cbdfebc73e0787d1a3671b86589c
ff39c6508f60349d8afad6516d73980fc35c510b
describe
'25693' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4cf47cd7a85af6f7c92a84e33ea3b8b9
fd1e7045da653f5cde1bca8570017b8837418897
describe
'43062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFV' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
d597ac973e5cd9a79b672dacdb2cc4cb
ac2b53e19d5eb64e0a3730816263d5b6775addc5
'2011-09-20T05:03:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFW' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bc838501947a37cfaa240b01065b5c0a
79393f16f8fd17f64fb23a839f17f27802cebc03
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFX' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5fbf3969d839f0579a809c16a9b87c4d
755df36f363e6757f98035fdb5881e287e316be0
'2011-09-20T05:03:08-04:00'
describe
'10379' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
aa07118bc2fed48382c0e8959afc81a8
712b0d15dfffdf0e02dfc1b68d662c95d9771976
'2011-09-20T05:04:58-04:00'
describe
'370059' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGFZ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
603a68d51f9890cec59061a992bd0a25
23bf66e1b5b702074f63d8a6ba4cae8f3951b848
'2011-09-20T05:03:34-04:00'
describe
'144720' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7603c03c4c988802a7a7035803110cac
62c4d4a368cbff4da6ef40e8cbd5853dd4591b92
'2011-09-20T05:02:54-04:00'
describe
'24330' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
57ff6370ca5cefa3200adaa7c8a6fe57
66d3c56f7173e9edbcb30c0b0d53a28479b484f8
describe
'39722' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGC' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
26ff10a13e56c079e25a79125f704583
051fd6c5e8aa87111a95bd262c0f8bf0e9e95a51
'2011-09-20T05:03:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGD' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8b500513c07442362c4488404f6cc3e3
43b087d40e5e0996ed6d099d523a929124382b58
'2011-09-20T05:02:53-04:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGE' 'sip-files00014.txt'
153be53980529ff4e3300f195f0a5c86
a609b92d80b4f4d3a8c555928685717c9a303ec0
describe
'9709' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2a439722f8bd604c8b502139d12e5dee
3acdaf86f81f2b9c3a4b03a993d207ec78a04911
'2011-09-20T05:04:38-04:00'
describe
'369975' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
104a662401aca24458e08006ff4e611b
c72c68714c2feb682193934358ca8a776436b6ee
'2011-09-20T05:05:26-04:00'
describe
'135850' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGH' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
6a91fa47bd7a1074e3974e7415af76de
53ceb9840c99aafee3ebf571e369d4763789203a
'2011-09-20T05:06:14-04:00'
describe
'23577' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGI' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d577fda0b5f323b4aab0e2a897f4c86f
76d2bd0d66b72e219a7da6a226e0392339395733
'2011-09-20T05:05:15-04:00'
describe
'38009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGJ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
fcb4e0fe75654b69837b3cbb956e0110
725f55f30c4263c79f28e4936751ef4ff4ab48f7
'2011-09-20T05:05:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7083a39e8129cd7056886eb7d4deedad
ddc83c730b42365e962a884b9b14000e03a79c74
'2011-09-20T05:05:05-04:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
295f48acd52a919f6c94e761a1458c2c
83e12b7e5086a9d1b38b9923236576f1d6071248
'2011-09-20T05:05:20-04:00'
describe
'9334' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGM' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4142ba85f291c2927b5646d566c1b35c
34154855d69eda9364251f94463d32f1efcd3ef5
'2011-09-20T05:05:22-04:00'
describe
'370032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
91ba42f6c5b119155c36fbf09bfe61e7
a02bf0e02f8cd63375d2912fd95f471c8c9ab178
'2011-09-20T05:03:25-04:00'
describe
'141381' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGO' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a799647fc8eef01d82fa8af8a2db9189
baa0051ad3ecce5ab148725127c4ab62d62d147d
'2011-09-20T05:03:18-04:00'
describe
'23358' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGP' 'sip-files00016.pro'
38cc42f7d0d39d5a8c6822f732552600
f8d780749218f952103468be96e5d80d32a40eb5
'2011-09-20T05:05:21-04:00'
describe
'38841' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGQ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0e474cd887af57efb5bb26ecd4f47f60
98c5130a3cdb80bc3005f07995c145d6d3183726
'2011-09-20T05:04:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGR' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2697094d67e4b029cef2a5ba78e38fa6
ee9e3852513e646afd6cc5ec1425724e1ed8152b
'2011-09-20T05:03:44-04:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGS' 'sip-files00016.txt'
18f2785950d3b87f82d1e81466d1adda
236135ac75bcf2021e1c8222aded4db8dcb2f964
'2011-09-20T05:04:48-04:00'
describe
'9543' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGT' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e3d7707aefe1ad6cb9dfd0db3d1eaafc
a07f19fe563bed824b2693d86679bbe6a5ac0ad8
'2011-09-20T05:03:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGU' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
dd44c2a02879f6a2fd4636bfd8374c92
c0630d3d5d492002ddc4dac89ee7df0224245180
'2011-09-20T05:04:18-04:00'
describe
'147081' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
234c965589d7e7bd43b2c6f4f5fcdea0
c294374dc644582a9bbe65fe4a74808e97fe284e
'2011-09-20T05:04:25-04:00'
describe
'23201' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGW' 'sip-files00017.pro'
3de64f2deefa43b2e1805c1b4e076677
acf78ad7e85be0f08ef3a84b81d1652981e51ec3
describe
'40073' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGX' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
5d3bdcbafb6424c7b246e0876856f594
1bbc2e3ea7760b0734db694c4e752946642c9ca2
'2011-09-20T05:04:41-04:00'
describe
'2976828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGY' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d01046b1f3f117244167e03d9ae76c72
c3d89a68bc97e265ac59ce0afe4bc98c861a14f2
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGGZ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d5c89d45142f5e7d54033935cf15b62b
269b155fd17722886f581ee5d4a96db0f0e61411
'2011-09-20T05:05:03-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'9695' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHA' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
51de52518c4b27f5ff5e67e8949bdab8
a28fea97b7936a58e5a95e587988a00716512eb2
describe
'370061' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHB' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
31eb9417718b570d163080872b37c853
728853f37f45c73c8e53ade2d86a73c8901eebea
describe
'146936' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHC' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b999126fa9c28e42ee01d943d24cac63
203a5b441a42ffa7d4419421ec877f2f5f9cd732
'2011-09-20T05:05:34-04:00'
describe
'24196' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHD' 'sip-files00018.pro'
adb3cc899a53a27d6059c2b135373330
1a3fdfa401cf02b2d5bcdb34b68433d205920f0d
'2011-09-20T05:03:43-04:00'
describe
'40454' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c04825bd07df9458e51987bb5f5e6cf1
5ce32eb37045a118daef3061467b084306878844
'2011-09-20T05:03:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
88f149b43e369f96c01cf16b734d7b06
36fd3e879e6d070c78e5e9a7fc96ec165948299a
'2011-09-20T05:04:00-04:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ca06b21e3385cf4cd1ae1a4b53c30e3a
94d6fe9bf568fd38728c81d5e14ddb8e05ca19ec
'2011-09-20T05:05:35-04:00'
describe
'9699' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
cce077833cd5f557ee2cdbbe3a015c68
64b94118563ca9c389b35d91e4145845445a2edb
describe
'370055' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ae74df5e5cf381ee529606f5570fd1f0
1fe0357e9bac51df142e4bfb2a967e3dee074c1c
'2011-09-20T05:04:14-04:00'
describe
'147793' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d82b0cf5dbeed24dcabed7cfe4c920e9
98b8b59cc85545bf4bfe140dd2a5fee4b7c952d9
'2011-09-20T05:03:56-04:00'
describe
'24407' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHK' 'sip-files00019.pro'
406e2a5dc275d4d0bd23f9b67b2aa1ff
5d0ee78c60dddb4622b6f8fc80f038fa08269840
'2011-09-20T05:05:27-04:00'
describe
'41409' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2c21c926c000ee502b6862b98a6e6052
3e92a0dd972e38993dc404c71c9e85a0190bf42f
'2011-09-20T05:03:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHM' 'sip-files00019.tif'
73f50d06c53cd562849873ddec8bfe01
8048a1499441d8853fab92a3650672531799b1f9
'2011-09-20T05:03:38-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHN' 'sip-files00019.txt'
6e94555d209d58203822d0a1741e1289
3688c544d28508f2a42620c1f1be15fce05c4962
describe
'9971' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHO' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
aa57bb71303ad84f562bd24ff7b15292
12db7344f7734f023b431075fa1a5b4ca1878d5c
describe
'370016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
ed65a50e0eccdc491202f54332584284
2d1f9371c258085323936f74ed927a818f6eb5f5
'2011-09-20T05:04:30-04:00'
describe
'125601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHQ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
a6c61f2adef7dc2b5b46e79e50163959
1b700768cce7baa5f707af7a3acee19f282fc23f
describe
'25611' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8d8f44bed9af5bcad83a63524b45d39d
ce86c5893e49473dea26f4b87a0e25330e7aa397
'2011-09-20T05:04:44-04:00'
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
d1f3288bc7490107dc44ee8d93c0c1c9
039723c813489acb3302ce587ce0cdc23edf5f9b
'2011-09-20T05:03:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHT' 'sip-files00020.tif'
247a443d6d2fea7e06672205a374614c
c0fbef5e27d6e7afe8e222347c39604663b0a758
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHU' 'sip-files00020.txt'
421ef289aa1871c7e627437a2a822dc0
3cb0465f47e718109b0cca1db44dfee1fa92bdd8
'2011-09-20T05:03:31-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8610' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
1a660a01e84eb06aff7306e00fece5ac
0f4ea3f441f7db7ae59efde2cb1057cc39b0e141
'2011-09-20T05:04:04-04:00'
describe
'370056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHW' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
2efec4a4ec013c1d7bcb9b35c0cb2719
344ae8c04003ec10b99defb002b2e67a0ed7bfeb
describe
'138236' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
cbdfa323593c8b5832d3b8e645f892d4
f6812b90f537e3ea0d9dfd7b1c7c0cd29eeff617
'2011-09-20T05:05:12-04:00'
describe
'24244' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHY' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0fb82d997540000303b7c837b1b41655
40d9719699f88351c3119f3476ec2002e9962d8b
'2011-09-20T05:03:03-04:00'
describe
'38459' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGHZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6a3942265708c5200510e59b716f013e
31e8c0b4f80c091cb061c3d37cd8375279f9a809
'2011-09-20T05:06:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8c47d37ef419d47518c720721a930ce7
2eb8a697a0b7dcdf32dcac9015788f5855716c65
'2011-09-20T05:04:19-04:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
9a5012932be157fbaa9b36dc8490bbdf
4da5e41969672ab0ecbebd4c74967a9c6871be05
'2011-09-20T05:03:22-04:00'
describe
'9722' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
42f4d3f9b34dccbbe409c81d568a8026
6c801df9f861268d97dbd34de8be070d6fff3373
'2011-09-20T05:04:56-04:00'
describe
'370043' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGID' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
af4c6f5058e718c23eca086c80a51dc7
ea0b8933e313a1d132bd208f98ad6a0b8e90a670
describe
'142336' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIE' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
06bd96be565bd285a919d8dd1854f82c
c0854d837bf3c764fe1af4c4f247541315d94801
describe
'22945' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIF' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ba6a919d2fb54a671a981d183576eab1
e50afac4c44aa9a970a284c88f506e544a32a888
'2011-09-20T05:04:55-04:00'
describe
'39135' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIG' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
254e63ffd4673417b0a9fd1c323c5e28
62222655c4e0c78ab861510b5e5c38cce122d80a
'2011-09-20T05:02:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIH' 'sip-files00022.tif'
9dfdd57b0fe93eb568d8c376da4d7c3c
98f1686945739f23f6b81054bbb384a068b9b053
'2011-09-20T05:05:42-04:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGII' 'sip-files00022.txt'
06911c6f92b70d41eabc796718d5e5ca
f41f11996726f2da66465c40268b7fd489489088
'2011-09-20T05:04:12-04:00'
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIJ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
8bfbafab4af77b8d47a2a4cccf0f4e2b
0605192c2fe669327044997b737ad30399a4adc4
'2011-09-20T05:04:51-04:00'
describe
'370033' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIK' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
da7a4c4df8b38e9276050770b2825f20
18cd4d740d7dadd997a9b54519bc99cef1f30750
'2011-09-20T05:02:58-04:00'
describe
'147733' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
9f2a6d2efc3161a5f8796e3046155862
671f044d8c96f01add0a2ec14d07ff6e3eeb4b7e
'2011-09-20T05:02:51-04:00'
describe
'26230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIM' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7e3583361f4f1929a0fb92cfd504ddd0
198d2fe1b1a38e165df671ced7d3b8f9fecee094
'2011-09-20T05:05:13-04:00'
describe
'41736' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIN' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d00f233d706ea5a1614e62d0bfe4699c
a68fa44cfb471c711836c4ebf8bf4ebdac133902
'2011-09-20T05:04:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIO' 'sip-files00023.tif'
e1af8e1d2daed7b97d82f0bf3ede3dca
783576b2f68edf8a1fd6350b4ec62b591f8570b4
'2011-09-20T05:06:01-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIP' 'sip-files00023.txt'
43a51cffb9923fbd7841b07ffa8a8fda
0f7188b609e52002824f3ef15a4c0823c424e6c9
'2011-09-20T05:05:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10084' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIQ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
40b0569397493503807bf2ef21edf734
488d4f9edf1761a00992d3bd86d8e9eda340c247
'2011-09-20T05:03:37-04:00'
describe
'369993' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
3711dedcde8e255bc3212ea11446e68f
9f617db583fd3fc799fe327c57514fba20d5f0a7
describe
'136801' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIS' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
23c06d2006f9b64536b1cf8a480a7900
ae423a990737e47f86d6a5771d7acd5481ac6f58
describe
'26150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
9866c1893e691403f3e2cfcfda3a6db9
5507f07908074d4aa319f90111258a156a5b41fa
'2011-09-20T05:04:54-04:00'
describe
'38410' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c8aee64c63408d56f9e6bc511adff4d2
da1b45d29ed3dcbd7556ddb2e35bedc4b38be56f
'2011-09-20T05:05:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIV' 'sip-files00024.tif'
7712378eaaa995b2ce41c249ae29caf4
a56bfc88dceba3d1af526992f8b609a3f8b289f4
'2011-09-20T05:03:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIW' 'sip-files00024.txt'
bf3e53fdde6572cbc4ac6492fcdda364
1b6bb46cf2d9f58f03ee4a463d38b53989e9e3bb
describe
'9626' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
5aeedfb01541fe40acc1d52d64bfa4a1
f8097a3aa75c0e41d86c3ffcb719b8ec03550b04
'2011-09-20T05:04:33-04:00'
describe
'369971' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
0b682aad08d7d8fe859c59ddc18d5d94
f0cd5d914d52330fd9e9a421e7b627749ada2a01
describe
'125022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGIZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
2e47a17532ccf3aa2ed9d7b57ff65f27
00fb4feee5bcd154311582a97d502e47ddf6c6d7
describe
'23992' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJA' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d2c117d594b29cb7b09850adb20345c1
919b7243e8b566fcac8040c58725161281c68537
describe
'36116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJB' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
bd19b8d213f62a13f9232fab8556d1d4
85a3f164470bde979daf96c98c04f9ea17ef9faf
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f804750058ce86a669b3cd0e57081ba1
aa94e80624ffe40590d8055a5842e93fcc3266d4
'2011-09-20T05:05:00-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJD' 'sip-files00025.txt'
955b214902c8b8ee9fd734221fbf2ab8
9359685ebdbf7fe0f603e28ccfa6e3fda57172b8
describe
'9196' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJE' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
8dbeb52202afbd2a2f46bc728d1a7e34
180c6f74938a4033cf4d527a89925df4c0579d2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJF' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c436a537775d8f1b5c5126fb2eedd84e
18e633e030e2af8395f2f0c654ad1a0d6928f51e
'2011-09-20T05:03:41-04:00'
describe
'138091' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJG' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c5fa97e462b44b1d3e14f5501d7dca10
167e37cc921f4f79d9473a7d293a337c17442e91
describe
'23200' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJH' 'sip-files00026.pro'
4bf811ea70e74728f3fe3b1cd759cb27
427dac70129bb9e5fb6a8ca36af9d57707e744cf
'2011-09-20T05:03:12-04:00'
describe
'38371' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d76898c220abe6197d10e50aea4be607
2c3cb0f1bc2e74514f3108ef1afdb4ac4b565ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2ab5ecb16712420779185db20111d5b2
68f40c83a8fee371f50f449e3fda0920149b1419
'2011-09-20T05:03:28-04:00'
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
afcf6d5d028b82880d78d12333714c4b
7e1a10704fc0139d04d88720aa8c0b22aa64f96d
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e244413392a6344d8e35fa99e5d2f397
203fb3e71f173d3892298b20f75228815e191c42
describe
'369905' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJM' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
248dc05f24164cb71e14f8c83a4abfcc
4291a90c92369f6f19173692171e86bc928f1712
describe
'126439' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6a15707b0cb40b0fa7d1b08f003ac49c
72286b7e12f5d239b55ba8539029ee3908fcaefa
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJO' 'sip-files00027.pro'
56f6dbf1e70b560dcb0067396410933c
0eff693a57d2105600ae5456d93848e08195e7ef
'2011-09-20T05:05:38-04:00'
describe
'37134' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJP' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
41b9580ac3d8a2dc0dbc84ad8811ab9c
87ee596273b9b862ad1e5589aaa48dcf05348aea
'2011-09-20T05:05:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJQ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f0843c99c6e67c3be497ec283dbbfd49
af9cbf69c6aaabe217059953bc00c36f554d943b
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJR' 'sip-files00027.txt'
248a32b9eaae715b7d121bbdcd35e3a4
6a575eea13e157db0212e1f8b28f1fe237784a12
describe
'9580' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJS' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
db08b68bd9be1a7bab10b1c6c9ea15c5
0d8e7b043c550ead6dfb09898c0bb488d0f523b5
'2011-09-20T05:02:57-04:00'
describe
'370052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJT' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
436caceb48d65bd52bd5c137238c49da
d7287b32fdc492f9861f20425bd543b697cb2dee
'2011-09-20T05:03:49-04:00'
describe
'132878' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJU' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e91e3d05266d0b4817f1a96cf9e7d450
ced39e18ac8a9f6fcb49ac6cc85bae0e8906bfc3
describe
'23834' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
584e93a9cf4a3f2543dc08d7ab935177
d5bfd2ff7af89c8be9682c22c14229f1e7278657
'2011-09-20T05:04:49-04:00'
describe
'38473' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJW' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6103f4b2c12ac1de10ad89db000c6af4
e9a30b30a70cd3cdd017e35f552e0ad793fc0f92
'2011-09-20T05:05:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJX' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8ecb4d4040031fd30fd0305fe53a7bc0
d730b07cbb8332e2f598dc364af6bedd808bc250
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJY' 'sip-files00028.txt'
e9922f399a0e7861f37e98ed282dde7a
195bfeee5b30a2b692f02c04ddfb28c50489aa2d
'2011-09-20T05:05:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9558' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGJZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
24e9ff2da90521eb58124a54ed816e28
c973e5721d9e37d96eedc8e03c5fca4895474a69
describe
'370046' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKA' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
4a60c15256ae5221c0127e76d5974f64
7d73893a9aedacb5f9a9f04b504efa9a3a5f3f99
'2011-09-20T05:05:45-04:00'
describe
'142434' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKB' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1fafd14d743abd356bb8fdeca574e481
30883183f069dfc0825b326aa1dd27caa141091a
describe
'27281' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
cba309090dd4354fa933928c312a9a79
68810b31d9c462cc970209118543636e0e94e37c
describe
'39499' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKD' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ba980050592a774cb668140b0177bf18
b553a3fc3c5cc9658f749daff79a7d6ffcd4fae2
'2011-09-20T05:04:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKE' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9b6dffea046bb51e96ea819cdebc0fcb
afba482004aa4810e096178a3c33825d74a52859
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKF' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3a998b27945b4794b98dd0c3be352d4b
92d90997e7c8818dec85e16a6dcc2dd0f2508ccc
describe
'9782' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKG' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1962c94bcdf76addeace082b6f08ac46
ea07120fe4afccdf7db0ec944530afd9a4c1e55a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ccc8e966252a1f5336d9dfbb765fc35a
7973d81a549dccdb175c8fbfa2271d8fc56d9279
describe
'140049' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
c232cb71cd2fb68d8a95f57510ea31c6
6e9a68d2e485aba7ef7f3caf7f237107fc4bae3a
'2011-09-20T05:05:51-04:00'
describe
'24476' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKJ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
43c4fb189b688cc6c8efe2dd2d3d3dce
7b586688247faad5faf963efc4d657ae7d1cab9d
describe
'39335' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKK' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0b72bd4822e83dd563f57ae5c9ab67a1
5a4dcedad9f531d14308e832ac43dafda6332803
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKL' 'sip-files00030.tif'
dc42aec245a8f7ff298e671a5b6e53dd
235d9ee87902f722d700602b3949a9a4b60d08e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c75071da25717a9ccd245d00ad99016a
53d7401a235314e56e4caf2e0297c77d8d72170a
describe
'9719' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKN' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
019e3c5d4c7e0ab40993523c171e499d
e1ab20e28ae8773f8ae600a4c4ea41f8962c89d8
describe
'369927' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5215e0f8d46a5b610fbdc23829de1527
f78636d2f90ff5f10af796377ccb837b8032a65a
'2011-09-20T05:03:45-04:00'
describe
'135383' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKP' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b60021f9d3a5af2a9194967c0986cd6c
153cc117bf30e829aa0dd5079fcee76faa873f52
describe
'23013' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKQ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
850194d73a770930ed9f2e5a9e7f9c6a
20f7cb7eec3c4b9654d415d0e068b7a3ec11a1da
'2011-09-20T05:04:16-04:00'
describe
'38329' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKR' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3075feb4a67678b599a3c62ad13a3b0f
3e718d89f03d7b45c3fd998b31334974d79176f2
'2011-09-20T05:05:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
be6d5027028f19a596fc69aa0f18752d
76e9eea9cae7222d99ea8ca08f8c8e23475bc732
'2011-09-20T05:04:10-04:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
32e67016d5e93bf02446f2e590e8728e
bc048fceedd61e5faffaa03f4e84586a16c737eb
'2011-09-20T05:04:36-04:00'
describe
'9585' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6aad71bca3c419a8f00f0ab2ede22cde
f2fa5bfdb3f9f7a4c001143dc1e7b3699de84a91
describe
'369898' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
723e02cb498b575e6659ae1b4907d958
eba8a78e1a29059b813cba573f38703dea83e4f6
describe
'129440' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKW' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
efb57aad672df3dbab8f08524941e98a
d44d16221bc282ddeb8f4aab76476ad31d15d452
'2011-09-20T05:03:53-04:00'
describe
'22843' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKX' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3b7dbc42a328d2c43f17c2d19d33d7fe
dadf3fed6872d23b7d57572a962e602200c7f7a6
describe
'35910' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
4f99e689a50b1c8dd8bfa9464bdb46d3
90f52d7fdea116f46487cbf4cc961836af8e9c0d
'2011-09-20T05:05:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGKZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
5232aa33856f704369e4be02fec75b54
8747d89a754c9ba5a71bdec3271eb7e891f840fa
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLA' 'sip-files00032.txt'
603c4ff07107810302c49a5be4f45d9b
efda4b5109226ff055936d2ccbdf021cbf49c51f
'2011-09-20T05:05:52-04:00'
describe
'9009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLB' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
41b40c557f1bce520e30600ad74327ad
fbf6303f01ab0eae92586ab3b391332c165d595e
describe
'370057' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9ec15bce74b464335a945e63bdc89800
3398feed3ceae8b5285b77037acc54fd140d9e74
describe
'139730' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLD' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
347d8ee8a11309d7397315dd95de1be8
1240d9f30aebef09ce94f932e24468f00bb01dc5
describe
'24102' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
4f46e4f80eae74d896cdd19f42c66fff
f372b0e61224e48665a2380f39321326e77b9e97
describe
'39083' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
872123b68019852a47187e8c9f57512d
48ce4f0fb8188c7cc3c0f1d87f629a1b0673c1db
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLG' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ee373d059810719c5becf807b665e7c9
8688eca848ceb90497bdbe22e7e05ec4e100f65c
'2011-09-20T05:03:13-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLH' 'sip-files00033.txt'
463e279891dc48c52e0aed2bb4874dd9
66551f9b08204733bd9c414b00bcc4acd64c352b
'2011-09-20T05:04:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9874' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
e487bde55e49dbaf689029042f05bc32
c8ab4897be15f86d4b87c1f670559da1fb281c8e
describe
'370024' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLJ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
bf3070864ebde24bd6060af55f524ce6
acaea1fd765e7a5d81e3d643d8425bc3dcfe24e0
describe
'136419' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLK' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
1f493a305993a62d845fd54b42e41189
15a80e5f0969f7cbe7ccd5c225faf78ccb47d91b
describe
'23551' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLL' 'sip-files00034.pro'
9900eb26448645c4ad5789b411cf7ba6
1868c61b8ce9019c25429f976cea28ee7a9bc0c9
describe
'38045' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLM' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
c6362a1c4680390f692850eaa95d09da
f28914ab3b5c2416a838aa08c1e8b0eeb50aac6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f61f8c944695cd29be3565b8640376bb
9360de7919739c5732a7a192fb3132926f2fd455
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLO' 'sip-files00034.txt'
93e5385c05db1cc5d74c8b2cd49f0f78
5a4c6eec9621040ce209274d9dc87eb59f8ce1a4
describe
'9289' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLP' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
943bf4f397901b4a17be855d3bf7f9cc
f707635e197eb668fc3b07aef8186446e55d0108
describe
'370021' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLQ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
60f2f99025fc2e334d7aef9f10f91d96
7638d6db728c11c64551b5c3c37bfab6c2d86956
describe
'124150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLR' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e91831dd4d680716015db9f9bd2fea0c
f0a3672e1358394f8636863c79849284ad14d2f4
describe
'27063' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLS' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0b1ee5087f55b08eb04bd3a2e535e3a4
d92fccfbaa60262c1f2f1547a2d814ad68cfb529
describe
'36361' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLT' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fc2089a4115b95f865bf580c36495af6
47721e217890557ec30a8e3309360561c2ac40f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLU' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d9eecb183dd6cdf9121a1fdb03d6ab22
76fb1becd45e4902234c9f580137d25f52cbc6bc
'2011-09-20T05:04:46-04:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLV' 'sip-files00035.txt'
78166baca33521ab566631d3fd95db53
b390731e1b9893f197821c88ddf50ff0e2afe525
'2011-09-20T05:04:35-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9269' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLW' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
68b55e44d2dbb6fa162daad475e92ce7
392190d3ad51aef0417db74433d4767c0ff88bcf
describe
'370018' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLX' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
91bbbdfbf72c60d366255f62d035a345
7ecd2e602d9f6abe7206785c59f53275bed7d782
describe
'125629' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
29db64fd89fbb3cd18bbe201512bff2c
cfd182b947cd68f2e60ed179fa9f11fdd65076c1
describe
'23679' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGLZ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
db89c029334138f4da3fe436e8b711f3
7a200594433cf027b116e09eb983daffa99ac5df
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMA' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d61b5e01c0fee67a96b1fff04e8c6503
8beb26db3c4ff1e24e8c1dad47708306ceae2247
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMB' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2158c6f3e16bb60ecdbd3cc3af82858c
937dcc8ce0e3aa09b611ff40b2d61a4e4ce3da55
'2011-09-20T05:03:55-04:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMC' 'sip-files00036.txt'
adbe52b2bfb59a9885deae6db433f21f
ee523a92347f4be7e4a9e0cd722c693ec7118339
'2011-09-20T05:05:39-04:00'
describe
'8803' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMD' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
638103c4d233525d039117c1c101003e
e0a164140ebdd771ccfee1164ffb71f5bba68e48
describe
'370054' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGME' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
08f93f3194e7baae6ecfd7bf7559324c
1512861b35098e54dd692a4e5da6ff08c053efd2
describe
'136654' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMF' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5dfa93f050e67301e0690aa8e59aa32d
38dc7d7a35417848db33aa69fc7a0900cb0dad98
describe
'23633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMG' 'sip-files00037.pro'
8a316458171b8b88c1a8d8e0b0974ac6
713678e017df7788153ed1784af935b1dab83b2a
'2011-09-20T05:03:59-04:00'
describe
'37575' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e0d9d0bc44a221bb933f01b217a0e880
8e654ac9798fabbe7a9fb65af9299c154868a967
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMI' 'sip-files00037.tif'
feb63c74e94673bcebf633aae058e6aa
ebbb049590f622507dd3f3768feb752dffa20c95
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMJ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
25dbdc969df3c364326b1f3300052226
1c1d48b8eca6298043a7ffc6dcb45f215a9f083c
'2011-09-20T05:02:50-04:00'
describe
'9150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMK' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1ef4f363c07180569c970a67e93ea52c
fcf15c4b3b8137b1e5335871b60d8de02c3b0fb7
describe
'370035' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGML' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ca5f99004d36e84c813aa0a2d921ff76
b61685c1f86ab46e7521d3ca1b721ef502552354
describe
'145083' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMM' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
ae7da3b3fca7367d437faf30cf935c86
0040521806b65e7c3c311a80f5c59aa4133d6dd2
'2011-09-20T05:03:10-04:00'
describe
'23898' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMN' 'sip-files00038.pro'
b2f6ba18c9904382335b9c50371e1a0d
d2d5d48bf17d4897e3b098f3da85506467b57eb1
describe
'40532' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMO' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
36ec104031685f55d8c032a4ad736d31
016b580a068dc1f1954888d3b14ec22044285ba2
'2011-09-20T05:03:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMP' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f2c0ff0dcbc57606830dda7234cf913b
a0f00178f5f7b1dd3a9c94dd285ee058bacf8cb5
'2011-09-20T05:05:57-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMQ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1b7b4360e4ecfd51b15857e282b364d8
f758c8e9fa70af3518c5becc654980c4b4e2951c
describe
'10012' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMR' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
70495fd4f6e9d571cd8c25942710aa40
87d65daf88747c5a280c335818eba1b1e8318947
describe
'369979' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
78031bc65b83ae44759c94873811748c
ce09d976cc2d78bd601cfbe9fa86937d4ab920ef
'2011-09-20T05:03:57-04:00'
describe
'132746' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMT' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0fab15218903dfb0e44771ae67ec1fc1
b4b9e34c7e1de8cab65d6a9a49d95ff06c290839
describe
'27563' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
39f4c7ecd3d4367f6af7b04643febe6c
05fb3c2ed4dce4044e1121c6271751a86a2dd54a
describe
'37108' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f723fba452d0f5ba9724b163435a2574
40fe273ba7270c3f3f3e13666aa53731729947a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9d4e5dda1f151dde7073c1f219449a34
81257740c00cb33537385c2bfcf96229f0290061
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMX' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f2edc051e1a42f2567359ccde376532a
fa0b967ec2c629dc34200cd2917358535038d3f3
'2011-09-20T05:03:36-04:00'
describe
'9202' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMY' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
ac413813ab68abf578a1139c9a1a5d23
539b44f6ad25175193541b492a7d550120a8a5f1
describe
'370051' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGMZ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d61b6caf5bc702e1e9445fdf907ff821
d7ccd9e341ac945577df4b4d04ddd70de014c1f6
describe
'138062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNA' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3a6ec5ec44c167105c4659d56bdf00d6
35f7922f0733c0738cbc84a65e11ad09c4bfb0b8
'2011-09-20T05:05:58-04:00'
describe
'23503' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNB' 'sip-files00040.pro'
906953f751fc2c69f3e67f18636c15a0
eeaa8a19d87beea078bdf12d788730f5e5edde2a
'2011-09-20T05:06:08-04:00'
describe
'39602' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNC' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d7edeaa8e622c069895ea99554e9ae59
87c6fdaee8cc7d0ca5feae7d2ea9fce7a4537026
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGND' 'sip-files00040.tif'
cd1b567c2d96d8fbfec64b576381b7d5
123cad14eb4cc9a6f23e251aa0b4ccb0031eee74
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNE' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1e70fc92b6c8e5294ed77118c34e1256
2cdb0e8c8f79ac0d1d88e26b7b7d64e4511da822
describe
'9741' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNF' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
7b07771fc8f516aa9e4a2862b71a021a
9d71526658392947dda5693063fa60a8718ef127
describe
'370020' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNG' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
3f40a6801f2416c0e8cc04279f65b35a
7a21c770c063990b77521d573ed03465a9df13ef
describe
'131531' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNH' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1d1535ae2c6f7f5ea0f40eae5236a3e3
6118dc8b79088eb3d5b0fdff608146fc99808da9
describe
'23169' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
83ff56820e1e59e44d96d68adffc6434
49f25e89c089e7fdf55957905a4fb1e54a4d2fda
'2011-09-20T05:04:06-04:00'
describe
'38186' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNJ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1f6da3eab17edd77a7297ee8d5451a51
56718be8b806a6b06e747b90bfd178d64864165c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNK' 'sip-files00041.tif'
943c07495391852d11d206a964547b04
41e2651fa12d9f393909db43a537b62cf5db4c24
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNL' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a7e216a746eff75f03a6b6a9ecdd0933
67de0020ac303e8cfa1e81a3d2a864b9c24c343b
'2011-09-20T05:06:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNM' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
bab2ca3b9985200c8a7eefcf3d59ab40
eed0f60cf6d8a290eff1603baa13bbe5142eff7a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNN' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
71ee6e78686c79cb743cd8db82bf124e
da29fb29d33e860850a6dff2ea0a499b8fa6e9fc
describe
'139086' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNO' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
444dc0fdd37676e101dc23e341f4c697
6fcdca731b0aaf9869f227a774ff1ea554b2e3d3
'2011-09-20T05:04:02-04:00'
describe
'24998' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
ae719c993a1d3c0b2186e71fea534591
3093db2be610b0649c4a7fd69dc08aa2a7f98d25
describe
'39179' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNQ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
7c8252981b6e5743d7d16bc18199bd3f
6a2938b342750eb79097734bd71850c22586bb34
'2011-09-20T05:03:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNR' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9ae1586118e762ab8e5e7a8be569e1de
efcfdcc2ae11c6f598fe15e7cb06086940b6940d
'2011-09-20T05:04:34-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNS' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2bb828297aa6db6ad1a0ea28bf6267d7
a565b050c8c3314f3cd931904582e5ba2810b237
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNT' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
9673b79aa955b68152139692f32929ff
ff590f4ab73277091530db48b3f12d13c2c22567
'2011-09-20T05:05:40-04:00'
describe
'370041' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNU' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
bd7b6d0faa9a87431e0a97e4a5f7001c
a5ea319e7be692338c779d4c76ae3be8e2cdce32
describe
'135181' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNV' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
18fdb0bea8f895a5dc55dcefa22ebb8e
85500a7228505777c1efb1fd5ef0edc20a8e2d49
'2011-09-20T05:04:24-04:00'
describe
'26754' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNW' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9d8e65ee6769ddd4f7ba4d19ba41e181
7246d94ee9c5cd46de9162d5cb2521ab90db7ab1
'2011-09-20T05:04:53-04:00'
describe
'37689' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNX' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
9b95a560f1c2ef464ecfc3edca99c8ee
68931133496690168fd41a846dd57bec645822d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNY' 'sip-files00043.tif'
dc108b5230cea60ec38e14a3562e7f5e
41912c59c5bc28c5572c15b739b23bfc7f2f8808
'2011-09-20T05:05:33-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGNZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
01240eda83bc993fc63d631c54a36355
4f363908a8040d620bd82955477c3488e7f41b67
'2011-09-20T05:03:39-04:00'
describe
'9514' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
84ac760a8cda2ba81af580ed8ce34166
ad6a71fb6427d28109ea90ea7e251da03ebcc9e6
describe
'370002' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1fcce99dfeddd2e39f75ed2be5790b0b
7276a878b30dac1035269dd3bb12ba28b459c727
describe
'146165' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOC' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
47b8a55498b34220faa87239ef10f886
049fa4f61f4f33eed32c67a61f51e987afc6a03b
'2011-09-20T05:05:28-04:00'
describe
'24559' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOD' 'sip-files00044.pro'
a8ef8776c4072f4b3849cb6d33d8ea75
42fefb43e95f710364416e6d512bb510c066bc7d
describe
'40919' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
91dcd86f6642955639c85562b06a5c0b
065d18cc7f185f794a0b6cb5e8edc7c092ae7922
'2011-09-20T05:05:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ecff38f47e96fb6b5d586e263488c16d
abcc09b386d887cb57ff6b7e55828fbc54f848c2
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
db7254a6804d83998c4a58f183cce7bb
dad48ea275a42c6b512ef38b3b131d6e118c640f
'2011-09-20T05:03:42-04:00'
describe
'9847' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2a57ddf03cb938088576ac4ba3922c5d
e2339c53b79bc58d88234a21c036d4c2d9e4212b
describe
'370019' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6a6892389d5bd0cdc821bbad5f82024d
f7376191a017f947458d67190a4f066aec9e6bc2
'2011-09-20T05:05:41-04:00'
describe
'156262' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a3837649a78ecfd022fb20171b86ab01
7152dd1cfc11cacfbb97b1404a376050ad13e326
describe
'25995' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOK' 'sip-files00045.pro'
b360cc58e0fe1fa258652f5fc2df64d4
57921dbe874b2ac801950c952b1b2a6ded4591f5
describe
'42342' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e84bc715647b2df0960ae8e4b7b1a321
ef6d7864a62bd3be8e071cb13ba72ad961c7941f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOM' 'sip-files00045.tif'
51f7048ef06e542f7d9532c14d9b080b
5a51c96c3a5adfbe632bdb65e492960a28e99ff9
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGON' 'sip-files00045.txt'
2e56fffc854fda09bbd8dcd274e792fa
e2051da2a7437e2ca62ec6c212cbd10611680053
describe
'10396' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b945b089d1a9dcd5164a7acc25b11f32
1f290c7ea672432e828e0e9d66207e15b896d8d6
describe
'369909' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9e8c447588e039c55f91b5c500d80e23
090dde9c69e06c54590f4d376c3f881cc9f04db8
describe
'149305' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ebcf38380bde42633ff96bb65b615f98
82b5d750de9f5f09b0a811a02f8eb26b96bbd640
describe
'23074' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
da848cc09215ceadbc260912f00ba71c
7b80b2c36b92bebad3faae65567ec1443245c544
describe
'40165' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
ea24d92734fa65f3674dac31ed748718
fcfc9c62dee48ec1b53a3a94df7b5ba9e423796d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
736ffd708a373dbaf0bd9cc72092466c
d641bc3b3d3078cbdb7664fd10201060ad0cb9e8
'2011-09-20T05:05:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f172d8295811a8d3bb894cdad402d575
48f003ea9c957dd45d367a2c5f28ad46d09da5bf
describe
'9744' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7835efec4acade347db1777246875023
d6e5fa0ff3904ca8691ac3fd6ec16b943705eaa2
describe
'370053' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
a675edaed5a46b526dec5da413259e32
eddcdf851d65cd3e12d17a3189fa313a40bfb24a
'2011-09-20T05:03:09-04:00'
describe
'150492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
21afa6eed7203ee80dc6540707183953
28a0ca96ebdbddd3a11205bae53e3e9016b4d937
'2011-09-20T05:04:15-04:00'
describe
'24404' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d2e414ac21e1e0fb803a65d023d5a86d
3c309fd0c8cff2d573994f4e8393449eb76a5a88
'2011-09-20T05:03:52-04:00'
describe
'41860' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGOZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8f596798146d2eea45dfe67b4578ddc6
5f578e6219232b6b7cbdf450e0bd0c8e1a3f9653
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c9b20ba91982511210083a61fbefc2b4
7ab1c9c798a5808965cb3003a37ee78551d45653
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
8308e28c1926aad99feb09f0810e863a
14946f7f8056712ba90f3f9716bfbb6f09634364
describe
'10155' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0d877c725b40f50bc8a59dc89730532a
ee55c3e68b6d2002629e7f5ffb5b632727174f66
'2011-09-20T05:06:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
53ee7b50a4d4bb816897dcfc2e777321
e371f5b68f05ed3a39a7d90c86eed5b1aca09465
'2011-09-20T05:03:51-04:00'
describe
'136795' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a68fc6fc51d0f81ece5af9e97dcb5890
88fa1559ef257191db0e5acab6b332b692f3c29f
describe
'23027' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
f2a6abf25b29e00c91b0f3f562ccb5e4
8ae879d412fd2edb18bdcd91b9f5c14ef3160458
describe
'38281' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0018dbb1e015c9a9a73f5d1fdcbfa3cb
d9627424ee0543e89f76e54aed990ce8118e7eb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ebbbbcc7738620d8115d70e6ec5b5074
a7cacd1847a3a699cc15f09e1b4e4b80cd2fffdd
'2011-09-20T05:05:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
9a5d0260df7198fc608c7cfcc7ec5bf9
95559d034f0adb98039e212c49c79956d70f8d3d
'2011-09-20T05:05:59-04:00'
describe
'9539' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
3359af6e843e0350ca8b3667a3f22dd9
a2eb7a64cee7e350c1e36c703126f731d3090f3a
'2011-09-20T05:04:26-04:00'
describe
'370050' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
5e982116008dbb100366bfe9560a007c
b4846a71c1e8b13fedf4db7ef440cdbb97e49b65
describe
'144749' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
84509000c88019eb74634cdf1e297cfd
d6d3fbf46fcfff2db17f69f64bbd92915b9b7c78
describe
'24911' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
a489b1e4acbd47d94eadb4ab9f99f2c7
9365e50933bbd6a98f7bd64d6e752b0dbd23951e
describe
'40524' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
d482d886124bc34ad7e7bcdca3d05a61
76f1ef800a8fc0f263b115df703b26c182279dc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
0f1b157e6f24b13351e2247c0912ff6a
db52aa6b2ac1844eaaaa6d5229860e9daa924871
'2011-09-20T05:03:24-04:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
4f75921f47d0cc3d944a146a9f3f6c20
9f9a50ac7021c5d8b51c89234c491bc65c6485d1
'2011-09-20T05:05:04-04:00'
describe
'9906' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e65fea7761810522b80556f4dbf6c6a9
6b355684a4b84b74a4ccbffa0765b271dc58f666
describe
'370010' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
88a676db4ef85a4fff9aa100ecd723dd
09f99b981855c1cc6a32cf35abd1f26c5d0232f7
describe
'151640' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
643d279adaed455a8c6e3b34d0c7bad0
3780edc540e50121d5addb471ddadaf9835414ba
describe
'27283' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
75149188f3b8569fa3f703311aa348df
f470641aaa38e0a24edc3060f42a702ab3179d2a
describe
'42080' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d1095024de25f0498a5595f362968714
5d7aa60716c424c5d23ee7a51ecae6a001fd18df
'2011-09-20T05:06:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
c73383c686199ba29a701d964e6f5369
0c556931fb07a65d91283c2a9d1d84535ef729ed
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
533befb242d3e02168bc809c4ce985a0
ec70bfed3e5ae760a145a0a9a86edc9be132810b
describe
Invalid character
'10075' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d028f9e59915f517a8dc6728de4d3104
01a080dd1da7b6c331c1f768d0b60e921c563fa4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a82b5378829410ebda4478621473bdf4
d199e660f716798bec32f9f34b8488928158bac1
describe
'136865' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGPZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e96844e0953626a919c31f8a60080323
e2aa9ccd60473912373095e5aa8e3d3913f33a5c
describe
'23671' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
149978b3a0c5821ba29ebdcbceb7091b
bbaec4ec72fe39a717a502ce22d0c6b9d1eda77a
describe
'37921' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a22d6ea235740d87980332f413cda412
cef2e738d204334dd155acd71e3ab95552202884
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
8039268bae4323754a29e6fe58218951
b86f6796992a797a7c6bc59bba95423c68f5288b
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f9fb3c2505ee107998335ad278a4bf0a
a11c866c75a75f652384121aa0d64c7d3a9a2a07
describe
'9674' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
01355c73c5074268cbd534612eeae1e0
401ff5b235c5776dec70f0c797db085699a4d15c
'2011-09-20T05:05:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1c5d1fd9df1e2897196230feabd84643
951a2799beb78e06b8059c8161b95693f2ff2a70
describe
'158967' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
13960b0cb229f01fd868de31b3008c17
bb432501c847dc9fa200575de721437954378c39
describe
'23467' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c97667a4847a980ded04380c63f0ff80
3344401d6266a4c541963ea9b10885a5b277465d
describe
'43645' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
eb757e73e4555c552ad05eaf93072270
698bfa79f4ae5ca2af48ff69e9e031c711075260
'2011-09-20T05:04:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
91c91cc400f9f710a90c4ceab6b98d95
20ebf7061066b9d6b6e3f29799949ed6f44c7419
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
501be023e6f1bf43dbf6f62f6b924c2c
ae1470779c7d81b2382a392cd42355947aa13f41
'2011-09-20T05:03:21-04:00'
describe
'10731' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e500200c088625fc1ac56b51c0b5f3c8
f0dceb1c6bb9b75efcf7a3a1a7aadb20884c7dc2
describe
'370048' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e6f6f2c7f392b382249d195f80240619
c9f2dfa96e01456111f48a59653f85f193a461a2
describe
'152473' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f55e7722374b42c5aacd2d1ff39dcf59
3e24269b6c7366f868d8a744b9d2174796df97d3
describe
'23712' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
74401ad0d3be88aa179dc9b4e9e79048
2a3951b0cf64b72940edd29d817a79cb4effcef9
describe
'41293' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
19b9a5a8fc2df45d80e0c3c336e96669
cce4db9a0621c27a60eaa857ddc7e93da7f78682
'2011-09-20T05:05:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
6ad90fd2c881da32c6e3123529616280
1edfb75456e3d5a248a15e91e92be6b09317a9d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
a48d526b11a00f95b42841704a90adaf
fe357f6a9708ce62d7f1de84a54dfbb19474684d
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
12979277d01f83bae20e9b45fdc94587
ca8c059314cb0e16820eabb3c13e3853eee0d61e
describe
'370006' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
fee65ba35392a408f497efc4db64b0bb
2375b66da0a0565835c3264d8b0dd0a5dc57cbbf
describe
'141331' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
072f27724d35231a1cead3a2e993de66
8dc8c8f1fde43183a1cd56c0c12832f82c35ce59
'2011-09-20T05:04:27-04:00'
describe
'23631' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
9ae0d923af7f7957118fd8a8727864b2
9a695aba664dd1a039a83013299ee0f803d31cfd
describe
'38358' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
51b807ce2e48ca0a8b5f4fc83dab3b5f
6af4985a46b49e8fede8b8182513804792fe3876
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b31af9e19814289647265b1fc57e8023
5aa46ce8db56a100914ab8743421b67f324df999
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d83f161e3b04c2ea482a4ca72c020aea
2ab4fbbe0382bb03ede10925613d487455c147e4
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGQZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
836c4e16056a5a478e3e263e914db81d
1149c7d3bea8c9d5cbd8c57476ffcd10cf17fcc9
'2011-09-20T05:04:08-04:00'
describe
'369995' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
926db48af9a59cda027db7644a26a081
d8c96aa4f02f9a85e70113956a156b67db3a2e9b
describe
'141567' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
63ccfd257062cb1474785fbe3047a072
5fba063892201be57c95f8e8b7525c8c69fea7c1
describe
'24341' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
aadec3d2027c5e0e30dd4ce770a1ef06
60b8b5695a77c3dd4062b5d56745799f135a5517
'2011-09-20T05:04:39-04:00'
describe
'39114' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d46bde74ba7dc8fca2c2d801a6b6e076
c15836bdc68405969e013a3ebf265ad550dac8a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
130949730e0866fb3bb3c20273eda278
5eb73a036a5dabb6e2a174ff0ad23a00155faeb2
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
95c9f105c288146515f05549828bbe5e
54646adbb600747dfb89123c9262621cf01c78c9
describe
'9429' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b6af50bcd58bc079249bd031071dc1aa
0ce951276de6fb81e9ddd92812c30ace32001500
'2011-09-20T05:03:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
0feee71244e18af5ace737cb041c445d
208ef67265caeb60167e67cf89c8bc2de6d08058
describe
'144866' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
59d8b428dad3fbfdb17b48578290c43c
a5df3e3d0a8194b1500b9b991948e1628f6d6fad
describe
'26682' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
66e39184abc590ed67a141b9e4e64d5a
4720d65e03b6b2f5273e6f50779c06af18d7645b
describe
'40026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4ba682608914a1560b3a46fa084641c1
16e4e158057fc25197249d5a8cf96cfbd0d133ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
19d213a2be993e319cfaa6734b1960e7
5474d22f5026eac0923a5b22a155fa09029d80a1
'2011-09-20T05:03:00-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
fef7ed757f55cae1bc27b14354e4b66d
bc8fb4a77dff9ee4b0eb52c1e4b5e6c7844f7be8
describe
'9762' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5517ee23bec753ab0f61c49da1ba2e30
28729a2310092843ac41c680bb663ae51678ca96
'2011-09-20T05:05:46-04:00'
describe
'370063' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b8ebd21b3bcf3554ed934f4281a8fac1
275c3426fa38b24b11b847471a10f78ddbb57dd6
describe
'153500' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
f91f839e535ddb95c9615d81ed23049b
d69714549040256949519c9856a09272ba1bfcc1
describe
'25560' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8f9147e713e2063dd4d2bb9a422c1c8e
309ceafaf1399c988f47318fd36bd6b59fd982ab
'2011-09-20T05:04:29-04:00'
describe
'42095' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
41a29b8a2b0b86000e0a980760a82f94
5e2d51edc309c5cab68a6d4410a0031010708ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6fd8d741356371a6866eec739f59b533
d9efed71b692eb09e9ded218da25f22eb5d33cbd
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
41ef9b3538651df39b5afde23b9d3336
b9f8b7ebab6d16b96a1fbbf0904366ff8897eff0
describe
'10314' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
afac96864f2067ceb028b6253ae4597f
001fe85756d1aa7eb33cb6b136300c4a2adb3108
describe
'370000' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
60ea7b634b881abce73cd22fef7d2f55
21ac45d02944c87f0ba17041dcaf0ecd73f9e3e5
'2011-09-20T05:03:58-04:00'
describe
'145898' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
93081da020671fb1ff28cf18c91b67cd
4b1f3b401a7f22312290635d0f23c0e4e5d65733
describe
'23275' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
9ce660928b1c7413c9f0ddd7fac619e7
c7883aac572aef01a3a09c9822c2311f38c3673c
describe
'39883' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
c5baecc819c26d631b51d8dadee313ef
1d1ff21348b180e0dae2a2c80161f05e553dc9c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGRZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5e15e5c523dacfea5535383029c8dbc1
6f341f705311e9dc7b9b84b3747817a0cc585dbc
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
90a89c9c189812799b0142aae091c3c5
46334aec1d4c9414e1fdf2c9efaea390262c2314
describe
'9566' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
d145432bc80d84cb82ef3f1eac0e71ef
311b9283ef1e888c9aaa644d91534828a688d764
'2011-09-20T05:05:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3c0039dbdf21936c1e1bd3ac26e68813
2c03b5f86df8948946f06e4b5f9b0e156c46dbf3
describe
'155171' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
9071c0cfa09faa4f2c89ef4599c956f7
2c6ed1b1399f553e3bb522b05652df2fb8cd968f
describe
'23504' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
acd00245f53913723879208f78d8d05b
34a79bb153edc4bb4c8d592ae2fc6c848658dfa0
describe
'41811' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c7c4cb4dfee1bea6609b717b2ff8f648
65edad439cd60680b8efa3e12a5226e6b3ef115e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0210e1b62839e86016ea12d7bfbad7c1
09b18270ec5f099fae026e1517efe9c9b31624ad
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ec32a163dc6ee456ea138040935816cf
c07c230af6dac2baa6a4020f6692c34e525d8956
describe
'10161' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4c5c2211f3cfc1936ba5f835024937bf
31b1f3b4cb2b191db46913cacaa50b24ff99670e
describe
'370034' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
461669d95efc564a48d81539c9ef8d03
b473a2de5510c3a392e2e34a4fce270c657afd47
describe
'136615' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a3bb6574e589a5a167152ae0f5d24fa1
4b946e17fd2a5b049f1a633ccd6939475873ba2f
describe
'25276' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
6fa82bf79d4f34d9a240b63de73c967f
caaed096101b835dd9563a2eeaafccfaa930b5e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
17f7a4bddd9af5993dabcfdb405f6bd2
a50aabd909ee70fbef6c566f2eb77aa82930a75e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
2b599c3cba2c05abdc91830757b3293c
2ee4d2ac9233837eec6622c4374479d25b58961d
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
4d3b330d9d8812855d35460bfc47f4e4
7f1e26f85af22ac6823b15861a47478a5dbad464
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
fc8d3b8403a03a6b88136003a2a8eaef
0a5715e5e9147e0d6637abf413a82d98a8c11b1e
'2011-09-20T05:05:19-04:00'
describe
'369977' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0513e4fbf61e1cd68410129222557ce1
67447d855db8231feb150eb6f3fc1c433fb82266
describe
'153576' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
646ec48b244b2d67c34c61b7039bfdf7
2eca73f708212e7f53b8afbe3b2fa5b5e7f9fb58
describe
'24921' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
a7245a9d2e6a2179d4744a3f31e7d51c
e7a6633570a32832b6deb95278e7444f47fab0ed
describe
'42746' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGST' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9697a86a6998d6060af39cdf691d1db9
dc275a3c07d59b274d07ddb1411fdfdb7a4f73e7
'2011-09-20T05:05:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
39187031b90921388d4c91e3b2a2c842
b303cb99b5d9e740bb601edb66220163e7c6d585
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
569d4a011789b6c056c6ffdd3c4a9c02
dfa341f0875ea444ee88b0590e8acbaa3ff55230
describe
'10328' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f552647fa0ad90b9106b6cdac444f00c
c0ed8b79b4c9a1f020aae5aad9e915c585a8a033
describe
'370040' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
10221dd5e9da22178290de30e3ac042c
7b0211d9373d292220ecf87214eac1cdc2d0a087
describe
'144133' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c82613b77c1fb2a9a87b29e438b3ecf1
4ddb039d3d36395b643cdec61c592f3d74067fc9
describe
'24006' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGSZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
a3a32ee92b9b6dcbc8fa8a3184df8324
d08fd74ebe305e37c83e051930f30e53176f7d48
describe
'39387' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b8b90f00d856b2082665b01fb41fdcc9
eee56744c3217382c0106f6c971e9eb37ada3dbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
df1af2a503a5b5e396f5472bd70745fd
ebeaa5dfd123c565b28a2cc6ab2fc488d21bc779
'2011-09-20T05:06:05-04:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5bca0ef84d78018753813018a93d9bfc
4013e66cb8e60f758a488d058bab9a992808b1e9
describe
'9581' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9e543136291e9fa684b6b31296959404
51ec0adb9bed5240419d4b0fde11b7eb99659321
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
d74503174703144582e1d026dac5302b
0faf1dc8f121242dbbaf137584f13ad432723a2a
describe
'140926' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
c9794e38cdc4fc116b132c87ac842cd0
75906b010b0ef8b6f8c0f4b63f80713105dcb3be
describe
'24098' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
a205d9ff6a84f540db387374f488c159
05250f2f2baf34894378f2e86e80aac6a3c7717a
describe
'39183' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4fc226fd6209aef5415502eaa7a20f3a
bd57ba961cea744339b637ffdd7726dd38fab4b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
4e8d18b367ea5b68bf3b32226a6b34da
e952936e957b8a1aaa4aee1f7a4ee70f876dbfaa
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
acda33571067dc2e2a2193021676b0e4
957c384763373ef0fb7d0dbeaa9259e8d19290fc
describe
'9574' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
57f89d65fb7ed3f6f7b2a6fa3070cf22
ec94531acc7d58848dfb526171c3337ba01fa87d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
65a00207479817d7d84bc6f5a120df86
d31c7fd5e1573dd55a80ced9d4c727dae98e928a
describe
'143623' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c0806ae6b6344e4cad4f19d1f0d1dffa
24fe6cad1c009445febc5dbb137cef516a38ff37
'2011-09-20T05:02:56-04:00'
describe
'23384' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
77176e02c1121f5dc7135ef3888cb393
d1afac48df43ef70e04b6576bda7f95ad5b4042f
describe
'40219' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
802356a2d8a74f1a0a5b25f1d3ac1394
c7577101a5c98a4898fc459c343cad9862171a72
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
276aae16b33c7c1da305dc81f7baf0e4
bed71542c6cb8e48235d1963593246baae5b1e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
6f21a90a6bf7873841fd2f8228e72e67
e0bfb985c6bad8d429b8a6ca82230cdc7caacabe
describe
'9661' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
375ea9d9f233260163aa9185ec8d6f7d
ae6c93628ae108ab285bc8bbe6d323beef201169
describe
'369854' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1ed31130670362ed7b189401bd65edf5
1ee4f2feb228b6f9a0a0a5cac353642d4f6c1fb7
'2011-09-20T05:06:12-04:00'
describe
'169889' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
77e45221b2f9d7708557534e829f1c58
35dee8bfd34cf9474673dffe96675db2ee34bbae
describe
'29309' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
e6838479f52a3edfabf406598eca31ce
12a8157a0ddefa2e84bade3692d1842c4454b3c6
describe
'44988' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
57bae69f37cb46cecdf5d78d5eb44894
d492651c9cafb29a681a34f4f195372d181250a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
6d9aba8bcd8058f63d06c3de658548b9
23f992af298f0b5452c16350c737fb1407ae8856
'2011-09-20T05:05:48-04:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
13a9022d637fc6a7ebecaa293c6ea908
c4a8529a59ecca483931a4533e01ea11321e596d
describe
'10581' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
f4e9fd039f1e61210bc19670c9f760bf
46cae0fe104d2cd23447499adf9670418e206c83
describe
'370028' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGTZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
81ad8dcd530d16a2c07412015b54c2a8
7b118f04a1af16a79a1b6b79004cca36f9cf0dc9
describe
'150083' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2780c1814a033284a6cecc8fe3da3f80
89f06f245d70da0a4f173a955ea24e193ca8dc8d
describe
'23117' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f567496f3361357cf469b34d366431a3
d7c7e2d902680d530011e744f0e862aa877012ce
describe
'40639' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c2aae5c0bfbed2c29a7803e946575ed4
144cd7d3a34867707d6b700eacae22abd3eb5322
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
d18f9fb4dd4d4c8da40219c58bc655cd
283536d8c234be8b614b97bb0b96d8db3d2463a8
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
5ba1ebbe5be7dffbfa7090255debf482
a16c3b871f6c6f929ba3d689eb820f2455021ffa
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6c8a7cfc71591d35be7577ee45274496
3f3cbd44e5d1ceadc86546dee95b7323abb2b355
describe
'370025' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
e5082ae88aa0ecb996f74d22c86beb67
5c9bf1d481d22c80ed576aea2bf726734c1d285a
'2011-09-20T05:03:46-04:00'
describe
'156691' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
eba74c0f680048040d3c2c97bdea6c12
e645421ae815c99643336c4f150f49c5377e33bd
'2011-09-20T05:05:49-04:00'
describe
'26169' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2d884b7275edd691c2bee3e9d49883eb
02876069ab77524e9392ccb6fe909ed65cdada0d
describe
'43090' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6c6f5263dcc177c78b0c4e84d6533fee
3f77ccf5e08c37887e571aa6cc358ea420e96e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
28931987984f33dd9ed87e68ccf740aa
aad735b8dce94e324326e2817d6ec0562399f9f6
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
0dd573ac8bc8be094efe4db2568f24a0
9a8b5e7ff73b3aef4d0e052f9204da601dd3c4f5
describe
'10274' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
14fc274b3ac05883960b9552565d90a9
d81fee574b65911d0e26c664d7cf0931436d0ae0
describe
'370015' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
56804b5cdcde70110a11d747917eaaa5
c8aa542e904a2652affb453b12c5175c668e064f
describe
'143441' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
6e8c2b314c7f11133c606eb30b7f7679
fd8dc91a7cdaad5277ba580467274400440a8962
describe
'28373' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
4b26363e05a1217801d724e9f4f535b8
214701e080f8420be85b8241bb7ca158459a0283
'2011-09-20T05:04:50-04:00'
describe
'39914' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dde77a4f70dc23878b5cf3712a17f8a9
b36265ff80ca781a1c8b14f6539578227e836adc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7808609726744779a487fcc38bfee058
b1351cc7234870b88cbd1f3e192eb627d7bedbea
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUS' 'sip-files00068.txt'
698bfa3d831db81329c8db914e0e95c0
6db39202cd187d8953c37bf0440c6ae538c82699
'2011-09-20T05:04:42-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9841' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUT' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d155b982a191ca07d92887f06419c10a
e4fbfdb9d11f170618d462459bc92a4d70b3c18a
describe
'370007' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ade92fb159c1e04ea60b2307def0ab6b
89f14eaa885c235f1b11a63c2d6da0ecd36571d3
describe
'145746' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUV' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
cd22ced1968c1c259e3c6f9097e06071
a04dc74040622da5a69188c8ad67564b2e954352
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUW' 'sip-files00069.pro'
92c9545b09aac22500a1c096e31f6c3e
c9d3fc1b774348232c0fa59e6b34894834a37c77
describe
'38891' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUX' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
41b5053e213baf647dc7f6874a487e87
5cb23bb806ddee9068cdc1845893c47fcc99b9a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUY' 'sip-files00069.tif'
75a1def3918f43d041c744ec5176e418
de4f8ddee98200a496685e36ddbf08dccdc49826
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGUZ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
00cae909916aea3acb2c9d952cbba636
6b158ee273a3ceb02514a78b0d631314855f0018
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVA' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2e19fcae976b5aef918dbf72c994a1f5
3c2245668272cddc00dc4e65c3838296fef44e09
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e4f9b9d6e563037faa17f3941b28e408
ae607b90678a4466188775a6937713913ba4eae4
describe
'141862' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVC' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e31e31a4bf9cd29d584a7b5695eebd2c
36c461574b4f1b0b370b1624abd0ccca589d6792
describe
'23565' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVD' 'sip-files00070.pro'
35d3b649d48ea4be9a52c7f52c0c1da1
9fddf0c3bfc091c7ca1182442b28f4fcb62ca085
describe
'38526' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVE' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
e2100edeb2dac535c4695855f54abf47
e5783200fbabc69c4e34ff0f1c0a3128d597686d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
22a7f34da205deeb39f9ca61e5f3eced
f14f960768e0057f6ee775d669250f64d3e492c0
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVG' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d08b7033b7ea62e0bc291a8d4be3d510
c234503e1e0eb6597f9e31ce2e6a6717720ce93e
describe
'9231' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVH' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1ef865656c151766c899edd966572772
cd4772b7c9abdbd500e5034e240e746ab3b69d08
'2011-09-20T05:06:03-04:00'
describe
'370062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVI' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
14d3ff480ca41bd5a1faab3abf3f7ca2
a1b938b26785db017de2427a15c715ff5b113e8a
describe
'149021' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVJ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
b0e266b9cbdd182067c69a2d1b6feee1
9bfb60e6a40463244f623bf8749a14d9adf3fc66
describe
'24164' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVK' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0b6ee59f8710b9e4e55312681cd34cf1
768a3b5a3d7e3bccd1825b458708155f23c8737b
describe
'40295' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVL' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
0eecfbd5637fbfbc50fcf65904b54456
141121436cc9ebb918e85de27812ebcd543557be
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
3ec62b28af61c44915429269895938d7
899833ea8e84e32b610be2831c6b19c5879866fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVN' 'sip-files00071.txt'
e5ccb6223537e81c3ece5ba3ede98319
00b8ce85bbc9dc05e2b02b26f387374e388a7d59
describe
'9756' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVO' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
5f5fe1806c7683d4c73f5a17d3757a3c
9e9e6c166859f1091bcfa2d5c5bfb25efe5ca6ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVP' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
2d56e9cf80b00894afdc20f5f8be07d7
683f9428ab609c6366b1e22dd9f39bea89a243f2
describe
'149317' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVQ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
ffa2c517f3a1ef2fbe56e3063eb1a927
dd0bbe68594cef618fd70ec24f3331bb824f784c
describe
'23007' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d7dde96df06a4e9a7918254c1f26e3a7
f5f4f73d8581356a24ed0c0815e70d18819241eb
describe
'41138' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5141a654144879e2acdce2131513af18
51f8d5997d87849845a121740b08060402768449
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVT' 'sip-files00072.tif'
dd45204e933067e8b5139d6333888145
a49cfa9768c601777bf9d069b5b3aca2af444788
'2011-09-20T05:02:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVU' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b25b5615fc094ed889247ee0c6f971f1
566cf313bcd34bd8f5f0d7547fc272cec476b402
describe
'9917' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVV' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
020a5089e92c9e603e711d268affa6e2
d5924247c73e66a919e6aa9195d2e7d04fa65646
describe
'369861' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVW' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
574bcbdc7288d2b858fe20a437a7bc2a
d1c7fc5e9c448ba20c1c87decf7db25af842c2a9
describe
'127414' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVX' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
58e5bf5086f9340c04d22920d66a8865
0060fda09e324de274a329a317f0b9566014823a
describe
'24727' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVY' 'sip-files00073.pro'
22dc677dcb5d0c49147c70509095b276
0c4fb8f0e2c95a02a0fe71a1db47d58cdaa320aa
describe
'35115' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGVZ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
b38049c9fc7d56fbb700fd2926fb804a
0de44aae923136f56c74917a4181977c76fee4a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
40bdf8d3de4a7d430f0118cbc9d68ab6
8377186adae49b902fd63a8ff31d4fe6d3aa8b01
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWB' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e6370cc233680ec15f54f8a6a7ccfdaf
400cdd041ee43b7645704dbfe4cb4515db1661cd
describe
'8954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
92fd955fd1cd97d951b9b30fd5179989
7b26dfd2a6f6d4ef6dfb4e319c61029d55913f99
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWD' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
f68b915d87638362295c613c989c2fc1
0e81a802dcab8f2a1e340bc0f9bc72b05ea4a243
describe
'147883' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1ac7ecabb7fd11437389e2cf7eb0454c
8ce3b7e8e9065d179ad581bc9ae2f98761a4da63
describe
'24033' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWF' 'sip-files00074.pro'
6948de69cc9a3637de7197012af732e4
16f3b7cc1adc7af405e6949782c8041ecd5d4763
describe
'40690' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWG' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3fac7148dc74443569eaa3e1dd240d18
e0e52fe672545648630cd213936b8dec5fa0c09a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f45ef4c193955b6b762ea6fa4570244d
faf54d89b5b7ad8197527e5e3cfc47903b1c0321
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWI' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6dc440d63e912539faa6383c0ff1010e
fcc08b6c3c22c0dcf458f37deaa39b2154815987
describe
'9921' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ad5d429296bc3d1fa6ff13230dc3727f
e211a374dfb2702627b43e53495d581cc610d2a2
describe
'370036' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWK' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1976b5deea2bb6beda9c2f7c35bb0d0c
cd5fcd6eecb9eb5e4b57759b214c1d35f1bb89dc
describe
'141226' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWL' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
5ec0901e11530a55589e5e78c1479b57
dada44ccd493eb3a1e1fb3c8bbb5f8d39b5c17b0
describe
'23936' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWM' 'sip-files00075.pro'
9cc17b78b0a3477a19812cc690cbc8fc
e3c866adff67e1a2df835d7a849118b90a86cb9d
describe
'38893' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
bcd1ff57a776ce1a46a9debf20869238
ef913f8da73f3c7064d120732132ad7df52a66b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWO' 'sip-files00075.tif'
23e4b75e8ad91198c3206eac1c9ee06f
2a8aea545e39f0f5ba1280833a2794a55011752f
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWP' 'sip-files00075.txt'
3ffa7604c6775bc6c067edeb7a738c71
4facb60227704171ecbc57700abf06f48d74ba6d
describe
'9423' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWQ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
11c965951c78388bea35694898974426
3eba4e7fd33cabc74a15abc7b2b407f65b24e4fd
describe
'369869' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWR' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
81fb0142f5d9aa3cb76787c17ebb69d6
8074a34ee838bdd01a446208762a5f5ce0a3adf6
describe
'144214' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWS' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
2217f6be432d09273dbd1155df83f2f7
1873bbd0593b96a912fa44cef40b3e2bacdfbc95
describe
'23782' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
da2d63d8bc6eedcfcf4122ae7965c30b
0729dfa729303c1bc91893f3bd735d71a936a95e
'2011-09-20T05:06:13-04:00'
describe
'39855' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWU' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
dcfe8a3143cbb79809145cf2d00b9484
0780118a3abfda317ad6a9051f5d1c4251748626
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWV' 'sip-files00076.tif'
148e2acbc42fc2aaf6d142f0b03975dc
28b8174a08f028835bd38b896dffaed503d09c96
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWW' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d3865ac0bb0d8ca034b046444e06c77e
e3b55e75dc4b17b5224b2cf802a59e9a9803e5b7
describe
'9776' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWX' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d6509580d537fbd6138f24b6d0a247b0
9bb4c4a63b226721bc7811bbbacedcf4f537f190
describe
'370030' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
0faf47b97c0bf00da715293d32bef537
29bfbd7237e1a1532a9787741b3d3b6b80d0d398
describe
'133781' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGWZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
705f84ebdb154a39afa2790fd7862a84
40a52bf1475738bc1e5b8f0db59e767d898f1b92
describe
'25504' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXA' 'sip-files00077.pro'
8fda827f8854a9044a5c2fa92ce0f5ea
26c922711fa61ce41549e3dfa576b9b1759a5c0e
describe
'37957' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXB' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
37d614d5eb4f19e4972dbf83b959edbf
4dc654d51c8f01bf0e32bb15ac1be7e036d733de
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
3c30eb3832c1014185a326fb4011c387
431f04c22c0cf715ef4a3a3d2dae8b8d84033210
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXD' 'sip-files00077.txt'
57854dc64e59e12c3c0856cb80f5fa7c
f5b99424bc1026b599e159b47902a8d2adb42ca0
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXE' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
87c79f75cf0a65067d02f5de9cd3eef8
01c972dc6f23e84d1715ea6d439ec67b3dd6bf52
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXF' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c514a2a24883efd5fd3299e6ef593ba1
0da0d78596cb4a1af6bb369fbcad68e69cdc0143
describe
'128352' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXG' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f3b87d31617096cb517f7e28e35741ed
de004275644ce1d59df48203d5c581d888cac4af
describe
'23052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXH' 'sip-files00078.pro'
dc034b0a1ae2d4280e1133234485ee16
7106ed0fe6e01eb5f5873b3752694f75b9910a03
describe
'35831' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
519ce0d8e85c322a29cc33b47c71b767
5d3444cdf12a43e26691a6a6ef1f19baa084bfd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0f70c313956aa2ac6c6c834b7d69895d
dc9b95079d0c2801f4c2346a4f9b9683d8e1f887
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
330d5c20cc2f998afdece68b483f6ce0
2f53d199252d516a981e568c6e0239ec0ca19949
describe
'8622' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
d51605e649e151db9e936f3305181766
d9c4577aed774fae73feda49ccc1f1583e5311b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
f1da59a397956876a73df260cdccc91e
6a9abcace64f0cbca6fd54f963bd1eea94c79e79
describe
'139113' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6dc12cd81880a03d610adf4a4e646ba2
54f11f1cd13aec824fdd8c69172166a3a73484fd
describe
'24047' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
736792d892020b006381994e6723349d
f1a3664b1f62016008da53d89005edc2acedf6ae
describe
'37980' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
4e9b54709084cb93a4af1ce62441fd63
448657eab8a2280f8a5087564b575f3033c7f273
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2051f2d10c4058f3c2547a02ffe0a04d
76e9cadab583dad2f9c08d83a853d80febe925bc
'2011-09-20T05:06:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
5d8668350a758270987042946f56657a
69189acbfc3b01c9037ee762d6c087a999a56be6
describe
'9236' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
8a0d2ba720f632bc9ff97e488d6106ae
b29ef1e18ec5c4f0b5de02f4d9aaf49ab5c684a6
describe
'370049' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXT' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8c9aeedc723c4f5b9b228b5806688b9d
122bdfcb47d9c685f847cade277c22ca81d793fd
describe
'142026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ffb64db5dde4f46861f002f454c531da
43b4e7bf3a215c84e2c47a1d64b00939f106d3f5
describe
'24703' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
01eaa2536282de4b6145f6a40f9b330e
e92f2271e28aa332e8d843fdd3a5208ba9b75d99
describe
'40007' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
e9e76bfd83433b6d19d7a5a74bbe0b37
62adb256ac6dc4b4123c3a805852b57ec9d4b396
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
cdbfaff63bd21a3dc7aea79aa973e932
262014401afdec59ceebbc823b7df4ffbb2cab17
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
64d322e691c0c6f4c4f9ddbe6231f665
47c38c37e76cf2c940650d611c97b92a3a6fc4f2
describe
'9644' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGXZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
0e9ad07363f5ca6ab38e3468dd7a4a9b
fb770c2a45ac58c520ac8248b89203a834fa44e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYA' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d0b40572a828ca86c3b098e9293e33ac
a7a5d673b71a38009f0f4a2f85e1337ce4db268e
describe
'146097' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
54154bfef266bf5d57b49b8f27945cfd
5f242e7b145aca9821b8b3a6c48ae2ec0de4607d
'2011-09-20T05:02:59-04:00'
describe
'27114' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
47eb8ac9cbcdcdb84c011ce409db99a9
7095627569b8628bc0d494fcb471814ab93f09d6
describe
'39495' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYD' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e6879f26a7c14d93674e9a294d49b9fe
2d6b46c6b6258cf67503e49195c09dd8d70999b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
290028e00f9c3f9314780c0980bd499a
ba9b4842435e8ca3a61a937e3909a3b35d3a251e
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYF' 'sip-files00081.txt'
0a77ef070514de82526bc284ca6a67ee
42c6b34b2861b9eb3e2f2202269f05b7f2c54ff9
describe
Invalid character
'9793' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
2297c4b0b89e9df2a323ebfbe3c631c2
ae59757e9b37a59439c253affde2328fb8f2e156
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYH' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
8c3535b5b2c098c056009846f3f7417a
bc5c3bcf937c2cf012d80f6f63b320ae4e4b8191
describe
'139966' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYI' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c87b2844226eb75532d20fbe091fa9ee
ad469400f90461d6b55a687b1f96f12fa7edcd05
describe
'26618' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYJ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d00848e57c49a80e0821a454d537b550
1aa46a30e5f13f90bfc6f36fab78db53dda7bc9b
'2011-09-20T05:04:32-04:00'
describe
'38510' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
218ad11c60991f032ae8f1183faaaa4d
691df6d8bddf565f36b0e8f0df67150620967647
'2011-09-20T05:04:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2e0ca05e78bce9a2611e2a34bfe15b10
b206eede6f515fcd87fefcd83eab9eec92709235
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
49b217d2699ddcf92f744bcd56f3a621
3f877f569fc799b85ae20adfc94ead851190cd4e
describe
Invalid character
'9339' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
57d0acc777fe18b10ebc47e1819d3c91
0fb989af3df533899a233fe0a69739b7378ec626
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
fa9789366ed909a970c12e67402ac2df
170c344285af0373f49184595c2b3227329efa0b
describe
'141330' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d8595127154b852d7b01967cf5908442
52da96dd8d63936b7549c46ed367de12215610a8
describe
'24089' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
705e347465ccea7b3cba14cc151e8f98
2d3c85287a9a8830c9f5ccb3177891f9e7029347
describe
'39133' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYR' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
9d1725bb6940e994e197b318f19bf867
f0e07fa109f36b2ce37e916496573cba4eecf4e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYS' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6458f1e05f46b6ed4119e5bbd935ce14
44f179b9db53599230bdec6aba04695749174a4c
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYT' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d2d9bd8f7f6c2142bd6cbe3f4d9120b0
bb60ffad09d41a8055bbcc1c7bb34e4ce482db06
describe
Invalid character
'9635' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
a5206339950ff361c8d619dfd98c967d
c92a2206d68f2cf5471f0e8485821827ff6e60c7
describe
'369958' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a9267c0ae9af4c5f1794d6ad697af26b
05ba10636e61a742a8d0c0e1c3a7e8afb562ab88
describe
'153387' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
429b8512dc3ab6b62863f40db772be57
c612bfe30247e8502a69568d933316c0e6df942f
describe
'24192' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYX' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e0b0a661b07192a5ad715a0d9fd8683b
547128117f3d30f403a4894484e4561f79b0b59f
describe
'42399' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
8ddc16d58b69e037145e42f6a0e5e81f
e5272a81ab2169e3e905722d81c3241a7372b982
'2011-09-20T05:02:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGYZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7796f510a1f0dc3552d77263885fba02
9a53caa3c45be6678cae08b1bbf12b4b1f7d687e
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
1c0cb1fc99a321a2fac91e15cb3e70c2
fb3714b6cc3db1446c48d77060ec839e5f70ce56
describe
'10056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
1a2c42aec404bfda27849f4362636ef7
6943d10c7fe5c386ae03d68b1294411fa6a07ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e7a8087171fddfeeb4b7f816a7d86afc
74129e2d6a13dd4f28af233a2abcd5fb10a2c71c
describe
'161635' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ee749c850331623aea353991ecc119b6
bb0cfea8453beefaf6083ef6ab1cc0ea63f96486
describe
'24732' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZE' 'sip-files00085.pro'
3e75d21cbe6bc383f68ebd3c3f9dd7c6
86027452d5d1483cc85fc76a302ce69d9284c0a3
describe
'43370' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
df16fc95f558ce505489d1e6fc73eb38
18df1d4c10e25d8f9f4da846a3c9845329ed5b33
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZG' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5156c63fa2e4b965652730143eb964d8
be688c59e4d33d52ad090852a9893544f6c78d48
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZH' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b02811f069f5611a44147255dc0caf21
4ac7afd57e2ba3dd8ecc0f1ffd67cd4d414718af
describe
'10243' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZI' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a365d564f56b2ccdfa961a3edb86a669
ab828a84652f1c3fe32072bea79c35f921e73b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZJ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e31f6a0f7d3c7bc0eeb2966e50f18012
7d7378573047edb584fb5c6807c49d7ef134397d
describe
'150395' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZK' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
c88de617b91eaa01f4a89f853a7056bf
d5816971f28f47adc3ffaea6604788adc64c8a48
describe
'22963' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZL' 'sip-files00086.pro'
92f5e0c23a8506e9aae4c01db53ed9a0
6ab36b17bf8d33007f5ae5e141d2cfe54e89e1d6
describe
'40470' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZM' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
749a0d27063236bcc34d01dfa4eb1fb6
40c3fd9ea8bf65d5a0b4db791b2356b52fc92ba9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
40f24a06862db8cdc126305bd11000b5
998d0ea529e088071bf3dea1e03dab60e000e832
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZO' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ba336642026c11c791dff23a9d33e750
ee5ccc1b608a98eb81151da985e5d645c329779d
describe
'9794' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
f4c93443089d39675204124ffff6e9a8
42663bbfe713f252c35e70531c8d4e3807568b7b
'2011-09-20T05:04:37-04:00'
describe
'369890' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1098f28b312ac73d73dc4eb4d07cde12
fd8caacba0907b082053174dee300a112b198922
describe
'135087' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
475b8df6f79eebf5dab47ab3939c73c9
9a75f5f2e1b7c530ed55d2806f40106d8ace488e
describe
'24022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0a8dff7c9fad376840ac174d2ca4ae76
a3bcc7fb1fba07f5a241d40d94ce1df0dfca2b69
describe
'38077' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
aae9f068073384b529bc28fe8a049c55
ddffd1e6749fb2e5972fd4a6c0f0a27ae23b5e09
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a6619e2d970e9e27d3bdac08a3d9d9c2
c661838a80b440d5e1ae25c2a59dc8d748cb78bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
31bca82d78ed8767442496dd68027b3e
aab10f86cc4429ac7e136b675415e5eec70e6ba7
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZW' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
72d3f11a511048391132282b1a5066d7
dd5e489fa9152b217dd41e33bb808fba87a7918b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZX' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
afaea1aeb38482735594637d0805f603
6c3d81e05330a2313bd1e858e5f3c5491ebb3cf1
describe
'132337' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
deaae3672d694a6e6802218214e639d0
350d75efc078ace19a4ac07a312de5c98b0d95b5
describe
'27027' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAGZZ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0234cdfad80590b984a691b593a7f999
cf89a9dd3300d8d2a7541387e807637612fe97b2
describe
'37276' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
c63a758f64103bda2dbbb8adfb0b4002
dcc46d188549ff790661b874609ab63bff4c637a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
33690370a29b5410654c88092d97d8fa
ef8734a628d7f924a3e41e7d01c392c0c5db1882
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAC' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b21ddb944f031b0999c85e1964d47ee4
95fe91b94fec09e33638483eb8ecfcf6a9676ff1
describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAD' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
f1453c908b1c9fb7874d3a20e0b7da0f
876bf9f48d5342776d870aaa94d510d07c48c470
describe
'369982' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAE' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e14eebec92cee431dd44ef80f6d4a6a2
037530e30b5e3cf47d61a2a1a479dda5f3858d9b
describe
'153447' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAF' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
128a1ed163dc7a008d01d85e61804fd3
bd29ed2eb166bff083585352a266d5cf845f7883
describe
'25048' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAG' 'sip-files00089.pro'
3b89f39035bd6f8c28f42a573338c5d7
5a321a9376dc0aca78f05f192e022325237869f7
describe
'40964' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAH' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
88583423a48b0e1c6db6bf6eb7f5029c
856248ff79c57c457eebcdf2bed7edd2b42f649f
'2011-09-20T05:05:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAI' 'sip-files00089.tif'
17a9bb64b1eb8c1ccedb783cb8b33758
e87a6a23f163e628ad5e2d00dde490ba1efe7dce
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAJ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
ead028d2ec37123ef6528be03f5850eb
f1045028a93a183128221d4bd32da55b98cfced3
describe
'9896' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAK' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b19a8bb2c232c5db0ccbdbaad6f6fb04
3febcd7c1f7a57d98c4ca2f43a6ac6f6fc8ae914
describe
'369942' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAL' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
850a40f9db4d2d474476cb77791e4707
095feb33a3572b0aecca91aedcb6785861759e9b
describe
'132847' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAM' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ec5a7454e81758894bc1c77f2d1b69c5
7f3870b2a25997612692bf58044e6ab92ea35519
describe
'26627' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAN' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2f2acdfb8874e7be61154f22da563cae
92a6b4a69deadb88daf0dbe114d1d82d3a715d7e
describe
'35854' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAO' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
88cd3ebe9e25d0f3554764612985478f
acb5e4c999d56aa4cb82236df3eb0f7103853b09
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAP' 'sip-files00090.tif'
546103f7e2815417ffe2f12fe5c68811
3dace72f63eb057f8d839795f1add9e1ea17d0b5
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAQ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
3ae0ebeeea4e89a78a2d4ea6a5dfac39
c943b4e959a4de83d36ed53ac890344987686ecb
describe
Invalid character
'8626' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAR' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
a39b32b04b935cae210b45628fdcaa67
b6f647fbd70f4cab7b2bc064b315c830c44b0271
describe
'370009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAS' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
20986a872f555ea2a85b8a1f6b4cc218
7cae3a3b0117dbf30b25673e72c6601b8581270c
describe
'142343' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAT' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
844c2818f153968348f9f619454bb2e3
fa417fea02114880da4002ddc4e4f679acf2ec96
describe
'23313' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAU' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3d30d27c88d5cd0d22e7bb506e647f04
ea7ad3c774d1e28195f9b39af3a65d21abb90e70
describe
'39087' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAV' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
601a62cd131867dcf817734c7022e566
d1e8d23371dafe9235770af5ba5f850d659c5c7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAW' 'sip-files00091.tif'
bedbad300a2a21e0d318ede4a05a975b
1d1904f6b6e34d1a045428fce623c0a5f7823f85
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAX' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c26a3e7893bdfc95725bf45a863c1a19
b9b1d2537c7c4a123c648d7026a3a92c93dfc635
describe
'9740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAY' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
98e16081c7432b93f26b5731e1685046
1a3ffb7923f5bb0f977000433ac802758b57bb86
describe
'369985' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHAZ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
ee61b4543fa6e2f81624003e3bc5e301
c984ed015ec8c6429f21d91c0a39197eeb8867ee
describe
'148806' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBA' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
51b10c47b5fe326c2d831f55da45376b
85b69d09401c745adec5df40ef39fb7dbe6249df
describe
'23651' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBB' 'sip-files00092.pro'
927c72a48c28e78f4f6bc548c2f6bbac
62582998150f9e891eff36a169e8972e06ade24c
describe
'40332' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBC' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
69ecdcfe62cfe72a673c403e094ed6a2
b6345680c05a1a038179bd5d611b9eb84859096b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBD' 'sip-files00092.tif'
73dae8cb09f201cc315821432020e207
542c66e308284945cc2a7a337b8e01522a216d12
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
84c5a7b6e834b1671cb04730e96a940b
a5540a9359a5317a73c082d4d5acb0750364e106
describe
'10015' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBF' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
94823b104c5b8cebdf219788d2c220d5
c6679c6ef3919155546d78a99a01f1983bb3e706
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBG' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
a9646dcb9cdb2a5427d842f6bc2fba64
88221ae0c61bc9358c6a9e79e806c8d610484d0e
describe
'124758' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3e579a2a77620e01d71cdb97cbc7080a
7e4fbc937167fab0497e0da516abe92693166200
describe
'25451' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBI' 'sip-files00093.pro'
5029c48e097ecfb649b26071db2e7d01
4f3a9e4d7d51ee96f61c0b2c3fd1bab779ae110a
describe
'34450' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBJ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
b587ae2ef675defab2a960ba06522cd7
eee247b99702a9c41efaea6a79b9d8063b6e4e18
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBK' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2f1742c56d63e691c70387e44756c2da
7388544b5edb9a9a64d717c78dd6390d00347273
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBL' 'sip-files00093.txt'
0e68af50feb816393f3843eda75ffb7b
cf7ce8321f245a9173e42bd8a703caeada0a1f00
describe
Invalid character
'8615' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBM' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8f077f0b2ee54a26f432c7468634981c
125f0e2a359c9b8823fdd82fc2fcde8f0b2a4309
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBN' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
bdb264519f986d268ecd781c4d885206
beb08339ad4123adff0aa0f02506f55930cbbc19
describe
'149808' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBO' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
1f731648474e4bf66fbf4f2d95b6b275
cd42ac81ec189d3b67299e37e640f8a52916b50f
describe
'23928' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBP' 'sip-files00094.pro'
28deb7ff199630a2456ee962e0ee512f
f9ba35fb344742383beff625bd3d28b1ea5ed61e
describe
'41123' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBQ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
0c76cb362b39c198aa01f9e595339645
e82dde62f2c7ad9b14200f96cd7104a1fdb17f92
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBR' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b3edeff570ad31c979db8e053cabf4c1
db43d9187f97c6a270509e1ea0b6aef1315f5998
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBS' 'sip-files00094.txt'
376e751df3c8d6b899ca49f2976bf803
d4eea90fd4bcad0848b9c120db6bbf8d949a7e57
describe
'9871' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBT' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
69b33083bd0d05742c63ff696d582ad8
529043ca1d0331d8afdf4fed2dba5339bd18a86a
describe
'370037' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBU' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9416cee7d064a6274fdfeac89446b45f
d8e2a059c918b4a29536ce7adb72d9675358dd95
'2011-09-20T05:04:52-04:00'
describe
'153841' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBV' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
daef2259a55255820b61648d3a56fd87
fc75016b33a5646adb45850154a5775ac2e3f5e8
'2011-09-20T05:03:54-04:00'
describe
'26642' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBW' 'sip-files00095.pro'
403bd2a7f0825cea86683024226b8ce4
5e753052071d719a3d57e30c79c9713b44e3f511
describe
'42623' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBX' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
7a0577d8d423549bbbf6d91b30fea6cb
84459a46c3d4815b1f950f73b472bd275d9f35f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBY' 'sip-files00095.tif'
cac10238b34d35fe330324eb132da8ce
90ec698ad900eedf69e0be6c6b9691f2e6fb40c0
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHBZ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
975263f04bbcab000bedad3faf1b1b72
73af22ffbfeb6044a6890cab28a83f7540abd671
describe
'10071' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCA' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
c00c783580e9a4e15a2d4f7f34b6f3c0
30aa547b149baa003246b431d48200d1feeb95a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCB' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e9254341adc8f290ca302872c2fd67de
5d1781291a4735aebebdf05ec58c8f3d863c99e4
describe
'140337' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCC' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
928201e87c7e6c459d44ce6048f69d4a
12fb5caed90475821cc09923435eb994cafee419
describe
'24427' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCD' 'sip-files00096.pro'
67c4dd45fd9fe76572907ba0c7035e6c
01f0ae6c90c452a37fae793b29a963857ea1190d
describe
'39728' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCE' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f627e660b03827a0e76bbdbe728304b4
d1635964ec8d947283578e44beb743edb39a2399
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCF' 'sip-files00096.tif'
393b1615c68213d319c151aec99d742a
66d4045d035d94b05ef1cff03ed1c5835cc8389b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCG' 'sip-files00096.txt'
a8c1ce2bae432775a5f069a0d3696f5a
158c58cd83d1e1646204a9f1df919d62b3c4e55c
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCH' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0394c08c45be58bfef7f82b47b7925d1
24478acee5904fa9d5e27b2f4ae18d5cd901ec14
describe
'369951' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCI' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9936f065ffd6a132ccec0d66449005f0
9d3cae6465f320109c56c7be816318c5d6f156ed
describe
'155815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCJ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
d0f6dcc50e92e625f2d75c56e6a6e416
bc6a944d0fc9297aa7006538f33fa702eff57e9c
describe
'23884' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCK' 'sip-files00097.pro'
711582cf53b4e814dbb4c02695c19243
b3160287bfd36378838bc0d0137cc3d8930fa9ce
describe
'41959' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCL' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
9c3493d5b7655dc08b541863fdd30345
3956dffcda0f775c9aee10671a98965b34ea61c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCM' 'sip-files00097.tif'
52a01bc0a71477d097894eb75efae6d8
872fc6824c63eded9388873fe1c4f1812b5b33f6
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCN' 'sip-files00097.txt'
954e99eb0784e4c9c8fd2f367e7b9043
4f600e4e0b92c009727bb261d8aef1e03b6bf553
describe
'9943' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCO' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
6b3169ec4aa392a860e03ebaf4e1a429
8377f518dd225d17c31067b0c8a0a6a690cd96f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCP' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
787122a41895dc4c2b15a9705f0ddad6
b2a41782a68f2bacca8ea1ec6d54c64ccf135c5c
describe
'154810' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCQ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4afd029f84bd1d011dd30b6a96eef00e
23d31e400b028bc0a69bb1c256aeda01925e891e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5ad68d7bf0e4c838bc3a5b1157bd107f
dcc0339a24aaec91bb87f242e55e6188ae30fd08
describe
'42499' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCS' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
66c534dc6f440dd60ad14ae78421564c
a087c96376693a43bc8ba350f4fa4af2263326ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
34ba6a8a042848742c3c98d9f6f9e389
a11fe4f46e6b99140f920fcb8cf6214fb4aeb3de
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCU' 'sip-files00098.txt'
257c81eb751643cb641529aaacc006f9
e399f982c0f836664aadf6095972d4e9d9de2cf6
describe
'10201' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCV' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
5d90c960f7015ae98c59f635d37f931f
1dd5a621109201e0c99744a12a3a30dc85064c95
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCW' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
af3cea29eb3e8cbe4e31ecffbb1f23f8
3b65b7140be9c9e8d886b63b402442b73524b654
describe
'146420' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCX' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e1582a9e1dcb325299c34b2215e58e38
c6b396c1981d7489210e95c67ac3f84cf50b5a72
describe
'24270' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCY' 'sip-files00099.pro'
ed7e01515004a60930861bc75409d7d7
8e166b80bf8351fa8e18c56eb281a96597e5c900
describe
'40397' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHCZ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
21fc488bdf1a43c81860ee5fede9480e
90c4c1850fb4a2753ea9739ccbf5c100437d20c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
245ab169acf3c62d5948a666bd07ac93
d134724d20419af7fa8845b3a70f3a6620c62b34
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDB' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d145b70bdfee256c6cf64b4940880a2a
2e15d3f10acc3740ffa199ba261e591c13846135
describe
'9879' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
d85a0a8b1bb8c4e552499681fc62118a
6b5a4a660194e241ac8b81d81eb32e6aafadcc9b
describe
'369900' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDD' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e92473a30f804d545c3b2015eeced7f6
355847648e0756b5b76e33454d20407843935f72
describe
'154315' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDE' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7001eacbf6f58d0a6b02e319925a7e6b
9ba214edd0f665eac56c1c199e0fd63697236d32
describe
'26283' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDF' 'sip-files00100.pro'
43f5152de0fa224f8fe1acac8d0308a6
23e5ad13f2376e6a50dfaeb5f0d7ffc90e3967fc
describe
'42135' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDG' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
0d8c63bf04164c4ebc74ff152705b2c8
e93ba348fac7c5d871c930e30492da7e66b840c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDH' 'sip-files00100.tif'
694988ecaa8bd42f54bd97999630046e
6bb6cb8459c950de5a4d585d48c81c638fbed7e1
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDI' 'sip-files00100.txt'
38bc06f085daff8865610a50589d309a
c287e4a8f74e8eabbcd4d73e28b1b98f5090f9ea
describe
'10180' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
070dccf6dcfc27847669b2dfdbdde150
a8134bb88c4f6692828438d896e40c96dc896f68
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDK' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bc572c993beb273874f7df19f298b13f
cb97de1875b8e109712a03afbd29d700a9a3b100
describe
'133744' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDL' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8c99356f133cd387df395dca2e7bbc20
d67102d16b2d1cebc56fc5d3e608f451cce4ee42
describe
'24626' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDM' 'sip-files00101.pro'
b5d7379df15e1a45ba1b04735b0042d6
f7d376c4f74fc7679f3f2c96ce14ae62c33b846a
describe
'36923' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDN' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d86388eabc8342f3e1c5db0ba5da5f4d
37ee578b04abb60d83a5b6ed4979a3448df04bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDO' 'sip-files00101.tif'
cd5e85bbe23145d85f1955042f3da8cd
cd715fb7e3f5675491a478e907076dbb3430c63f
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDP' 'sip-files00101.txt'
4377ca0f6540158fdb154efbe4f022f6
2ce5aab0572e2c623505f91118de4845d6de85ec
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDQ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
565a670626bdcd6645807d4d6a00d78a
2b62ee6c53538af4cfa73a2b5f58036ddf3cf8db
describe
'370060' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDR' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
5500e8be4e960367e25b6a46646b9588
6792de4be16a37d64dc6a82d8a60976761d6f9de
describe
'147038' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDS' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
fd98fc32aad99be000d7c6b37ea5fa1c
eca10337dd6c258f4ce9885e5de81e8a41748aff
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDT' 'sip-files00102.pro'
b085d9af51d340c28d68125b5a791f34
622ec3d40ab6e13aeb5754aade765294dbf5be98
describe
'40826' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDU' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d5420739c7588f83bfd9f7d3f2fb9d07
0f0f724973d7c6102712ed5c509d8acad82a57f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDV' 'sip-files00102.tif'
06bdba09e35bb439540e0816c75205b2
c6ec7241bf378dc86ef0bdca144fc484b082f7c3
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDW' 'sip-files00102.txt'
7d42e45c09c0d26a92e70b5022233c04
645800a641888dabcecdf98a05660cdb6590e711
describe
'9586' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDX' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
cf7e4c9c576a9017b8570ea5251a86d0
93c519854671b0693be4112aece01f975719c2e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDY' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
1711a13f527303478a809a2da425df55
70a7314905e7199c729f4ce9ec2b3d09bf3e4305
describe
'128826' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHDZ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8ee302766e0a326575c21366c2bb3533
1d0cc46c2721ffebd1306caed40b3f46624f754e
describe
'27596' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEA' 'sip-files00103.pro'
baa97d52d1c092459123546b05f79173
230382b5143d95c38ae8fe6bee4d7d52f0c77602
describe
'36434' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEB' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
b2363bf506ddcb9310f2cda4569870a7
6d989c34e1e0e7bf47972fbecca75474b72eb450
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEC' 'sip-files00103.tif'
ca8e69c2cf5fc304a7424c6e8395353e
808bc24648222f8dea9a652bf50c9e0bb4a22d19
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHED' 'sip-files00103.txt'
3664067db6e2788d51277486b44684ae
c8bdfb428678a4b62153ccb66a9b39d466776e69
describe
'8891' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEE' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
1ca47583b4dfe59770b74eba78adb540
3a47d41ce07c11bf25ffcbcaa9fc61acb9cd6dc0
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEF' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d90cfff74fcc359c9904e8ead916ac87
4bb379755bcb5d89f165ccdeb344d8a478b5f7c0
describe
'150671' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEG' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
3197d3df9ce44633b51f9bd984db1d7a
9b37f91a3f7a2766752433d84b0a4c69d221d6ec
describe
'24348' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEH' 'sip-files00104.pro'
244cb74d5defd8f874d0ac92b96ff701
a0f3af113ebd1dc5b56e360dc5bf6b3625f918ec
describe
'41106' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEI' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a89be7a8cd8bf9a3ee88f8b27198df49
8bbafd8f6aa8683360896ac5609a9d3c7555a53c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEJ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
14686e95d6e98a0d749d0eeb3b284dfa
b4874010ccb001add095ec80a021ce8d312ce504
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEK' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b3b197578f34dbcca59ca383557ce163
01e9b71a609c8ef6385d3b278b7b1632c886fbf5
describe
'10126' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEL' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
73f997529af0976ebcb196a6ee73e8a5
97f0e3a8a4991fec9c0cefda5a4aa25bafc83d0f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEM' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c538c183e7ae6c228807527c48744b8c
6a39d09e5ee0db044a3d5767c8deda726991804f
describe
'138813' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEN' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
82bbe00a311d18b486d95afc7cfc05a5
58e1a26c4c63c2917e038f1499bc511e1ea59fab
describe
'27874' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEO' 'sip-files00105.pro'
eb36aee400f516d005887853f361cdbd
2350487ba1219def150e1cf7db409645a3b8dd1d
describe
'37885' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEP' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d65feffc51cf43efb2a422ceac92c4b2
17e38a63448a3d3f768b925f0935531eea7207e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEQ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
3e126740bbb4630e983608e8e546c0b3
7b2dac12cac9570770cbfc4a9742ea40a0f4bfb5
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHER' 'sip-files00105.txt'
78a568be0f1f242c5ec772eefd36689b
451b2c884f767298e142e0b9508c6f5cd699e5f5
describe
'9251' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHES' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
28cb02e73d74701b0045e076a920ff41
7e09292c4a306e752844b71d5afc8862728fd660
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHET' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b64b03e8eed37f499c1bf562c3fd5d62
667a6ff15b5eadc1a5a41d0e570097835bc5565b
describe
'151286' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d6067075346394fbd92b20b28b15363d
bb6d337d7baab8f040987978a399c84c87deb56a
describe
'24353' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEV' 'sip-files00106.pro'
58d5ec036d2c805ce1beb646fbfb6bde
c150092b534b6199dde997c2df919d03b79d125a
describe
'41307' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEW' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2d243c0e2adaa63c3da064420b716877
05adb3a5e91f97a78869d2eeb97510391ca57609
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEX' 'sip-files00106.tif'
f49b4898b29818ddb304ecd4ca2272cc
c44bcd84452c6ac4fe3c6ccfd4e76bd13d1698a9
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b473feca7130932f901c6f2f84523768
14e852c6af52232488db68b4f5b134dc2702b185
describe
'9973' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHEZ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ec3b5566527e826609d0b0d622f311b8
9b09c3877eb723fc75b338a408073f595a8ca81f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFA' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
8aa745984e52b60fbbf0c3b2084be512
7fcd0cd9bd503455255f5d3c9397d890c742c3f3
describe
'138000' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFB' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
8c7a1145fc57a63943a6cd55d74e4b0e
31604062226bff523d34ea0983b020eaaa088065
describe
'25747' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFC' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8dca5bea01e42e6644d3480ae46274f4
fef6d3677b358749b95c78a5376ed3382af73cbe
describe
'38597' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFD' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1a1829f2f7a9558c259b6c3f2d4ba4b5
102b3cb23ac47822f9edb84c7723fc4d77171ef5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFE' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4ccea1397e29073fca1afd1710e1cca7
63349379a541da8c9030bbc41070075e0946d9db
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFF' 'sip-files00107.txt'
658ad150e2fbb9c6ac483fe880b09435
b7f2b2beb08a6c39fe5d1c3a1d47d797fc105b66
describe
Invalid character
'9256' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFG' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
f42a4781ef4ad89638c0234c9e05ad65
54349b017c4df5ac257ffa4473b743fa49e8c74b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFH' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
98406fc0886c0b23a19b83ff73fd3b9d
13c117eeab13d5a115528867e56a4540504819a5
describe
'128053' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFI' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
ea3fdcd77f7c34d60c5f3c3c43c48d64
e9ca99371e87597929d952534825ff02c13ad0d2
describe
'24465' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFJ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d3fe5969fc98b06821ce186b35379c9a
5da6fd98c1e1327d7f349bb81d2c9f279485a6d8
describe
'36003' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFK' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c2806b4f23d792c89c3a777b52b12f7b
998e8a9e90044964062ba8e2a5d68077ec26e983
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFL' 'sip-files00108.tif'
2221dadedbb6503f4447888344e3df9b
2ef72471da179e6ea714b38de94a14d590f72c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFM' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8c3c0d4b034bbaacd8f2a9353ef90735
83e00f4594e0b40ccccbb6094cc98cad4f0dfdcc
describe
Invalid character
'8911' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFN' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
d5f746b6cde376c7b8f10e6a73f9f673
640a2a56cdff2b66b37256114fd96a1eb7509195
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFO' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
54bc9ebb525d6aab094d0b2097305e36
475a1d96cc3c418192b081a4b62f04bd5f8558ee
describe
'144639' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFP' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
b5d759a0ed99e817278c48a6837d9a98
0bb47826f3ac7eb3fa9ab41f176b7a193e2caaa8
'2011-09-20T05:04:17-04:00'
describe
'24965' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFQ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
7122e7b358a11f7536057abb1d26650b
c50c5bac9fa6456d5eab6b492579cb1c8285c924
describe
'39683' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFR' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
641e9cbd33e31e90508057cdd6fcda28
53e26aea46d65cd07b7e37c3e751a82b46c05163
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFS' 'sip-files00109.tif'
df9f884a0ea3454344f1672c3cab6763
b0964a3fb4fe74d48957345feb12921ff78ba136
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFT' 'sip-files00109.txt'
4fd349bc54f2530a00fa39efbb7a2d49
5e97c26c5f8012f2ef73491aae9e7dbd340fb1e2
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFU' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1810d16b14bbc0381bec2e2b90bc9676
89de4983869da1fa95b32bcda663dc4c5d02207b
describe
'369820' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
cf4b6601d06186e5b50e4c962cd704c2
91f371b2e0447bc1addcca1b80c399e337499b31
describe
'146611' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFW' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6ddf17084efa89ada351b0876456ad34
205a1dd983d8c4f4f4b1ab600bae048b3dd5dd1e
describe
'27532' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFX' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1d713462209deaac9142d5aceaa8b52c
355975b416e8495a81eb15c84b548a29493ede93
describe
'40476' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
1140339a1cc57815eb1c1a22c7c21a88
6ecfdc58c7a40950700a27474ada146b69223607
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHFZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
5c373842110c564e485c932d86483888
8205999b5c40ae23a9e6402e13b0bd1c48d4fb5a
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b8e00881a0bd9d7cfb2b6c0676a8e5fd
69d653a0064945376b9964e023d366f1077cf3c1
describe
'9596' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
2c5bd61d600f1bb76ad9cd29fc5c054c
c48af3894e0899e3af41c6a80ca72fc867c34f5d
describe
'369968' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
989ce188057d753d0f3ca42b9a0e418f
32339a8e5c7fd33ff39c315b0777bcca442a8833
describe
'144570' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGD' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
0f3c480f62125c368fb00503dfad7209
1e292dbf33a4001f6635a44f0295098a12e660b1
describe
'29519' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
566c448da7972fed12d4e25a23d68d09
a9f81b47769730a2aef6a262c02ab9f9fe69a880
describe
'39360' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
1fff4a4d3074093223c712bf54395901
8c51928c4c82ee4011e0d8342f9c21b79620f31b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGG' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0f3452300111d791d96a81be0483434b
eb93106466b969cb5dd76eb132be2b7db9549ff2
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGH' 'sip-files00111.txt'
d8576ad856e3d2276655950bcbfa1777
3675a6928778c966450eb1416b2e5da510194f77
describe
Invalid character
'9697' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGI' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
c368cd8d3cfa232db0a5307e85389a98
2fc04fa549bff6d43a5a5a33cd36fa452084ea1c
describe
'369992' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGJ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f670ea5743f87bef25e111abd8f1f613
bd18768e916573774b221d49ca2f7ee1a71a8c09
describe
'156624' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGK' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
da82412573bebb1d829e7272a65ffd9e
4446b0a45c0886e7b1d49f3a196db97893585d4c
describe
'26356' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGL' 'sip-files00112.pro'
248e3e3a51f4ab21f549551af6964d69
cae390f7d025dad1fef1fb539cb4a781dcd8cb7b
describe
'42887' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGM' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f017dd168bbe01c490a6b80f70f39d8a
fb418eac48b6118f86cbdfbe30ae5326c6732fe1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGN' 'sip-files00112.tif'
c9a7ef313439481c14a0f8a2eed468e2
abcbbcb51ea86276a9c6306659f0f1dd6b476ff1
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGO' 'sip-files00112.txt'
961c2d22a101630f22acf9c6e29b8968
51e221e0d96e5a12bb089a12d0dd1f0b0d436848
describe
'10204' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGP' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
dbb2a3d6c4a9524f2fee34b732666c3f
f6b6c34d74032d682645a421dddc8d566355be21
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGQ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9819bdc5caec35ae736917929b200769
5cda51990440d2ea791179ef64cb546ffb3fd534
describe
'153045' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3e9ef263b684a93a5fc5a372e511f3af
3fe7f25012031f34b6f4805879f638a9d81d9d54
describe
'24750' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGS' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c329c494eed47312c29ea28d0b1bd21e
b25b3159bf1a7a3b289dafbea1224a2ca0d5f487
describe
'42176' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGT' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
27a09cc71f63ae2b106cd84b30600e13
3c6209386a4fe7543612b2c27e93fba6d712c327
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGU' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d311f7376fbdd407ba81ec01295a38f9
c11d6ad3ef46e077c1cfce16a1a89c86c0ea58a5
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGV' 'sip-files00113.txt'
00dc67c1fc1f2827559a9003b9b757a7
1eb7259c990ee4645884be2d797544b7c6be4d7e
describe
'10153' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGW' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3d5f8b5ead5e8ab27393b383ae13d8be
b46ad360ff71413fa535496af5ca91eabccf8fb9
describe
'369960' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGX' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a973c37a907f42c2ccb72b64c1a03de2
1ef620e4ad9e40bc4b45e2f7a462e75e4fbb99af
describe
'146588' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGY' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
45775a8cac1942ba0e0b1028f3eefd00
0012077f5bad5142234be5e3af2776c617770fa4
describe
'24145' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHGZ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
755d21805e4a7f890d55a2542f14eb50
bb9e867ac20076795a40582f84bfe41e591a2f89
describe
'40538' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHA' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c28b6bde750970ee74df753b75f1cd0d
67964fdcd24fb97f6e87c7343219bdc58e739dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHB' 'sip-files00114.tif'
640776b2ab77e42e14843a05a534063d
ca5fdfcc91ed627b178ddad96f8935c933b7835b
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHC' 'sip-files00114.txt'
214f5012141794dd6e24471165a6604c
389328431a4fb19cd147cb69ce9e939ed7f47119
describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHD' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
bf1d095fea15013cba1af40912a010f5
e904e3a55cfd4e1292dcc1b3d15c67d23c3a44db
describe
'370058' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHE' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d2f967e412624d62c3ccd5b4881e6096
a56a50bc3263bbaea3a30ea67efeaa80d7460180
describe
'151140' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHF' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
927551b58af5c34e439c50419c5e0199
d963880b74b5912041ed41d7c64e22ed4e914bcf
describe
'24032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHG' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a6aa72d79d1c18a5473d017e78e7f856
991215baf6d73bc072822c6eea9f8182464aed86
describe
'42093' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c990804a89443ce41a0da30d3720d4c5
ce2d5136d6b198686412a3b237e9ee930d6b7c16
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHI' 'sip-files00115.tif'
1d4751e3e756df47bc811716354f08c2
a4e2936d7a6fd3ff0171f7c27798e5255d42b352
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHJ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9caa04fb159c5ab7546b24286a9e9ea2
411f501a5dabe628f404b07d37145da633f89099
describe
'10169' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHK' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
9250fb50cf65646ad2771b57e2ee58fb
8a3da66a4214ed2ad2169d768bf1fd87e68368e8
describe
'370023' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHL' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
92d4010adcf15b96debf260d109cf539
b2d67ecc73434b168841ce59175b4551a42806d3
describe
'127528' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHM' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b08d3c251a1a55d11c9d30f9149cee62
42cae5d315c0f1b3e2f1b0d37487b93265f5d388
describe
'24715' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHN' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a164339585c1cb2388c4ecf9fd036f63
07066b58238056794563d01a8f7c38087f99b38c
describe
'36198' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHO' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
e73181f5824ade73c5a804f8fc745a6c
d3e7a23903bd5b52eb6e4bee7930569872e8b203
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHP' 'sip-files00116.tif'
4ee85f017d1cfbb978993adbb8581cfc
ddb1e00042a5161483e2f92cc4d76d96caf6b148
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHQ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c1b8073c7525f6e5aeedbeda7703203b
9e54315773cb1db073be07ca44ed7a278bd297f4
'2011-09-20T05:03:04-04:00'
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHR' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
7afe2707ba8bbc963f79a2281609685b
976d8a42cc80d3150ba1782cdd2e09b48b8ef1fe
describe
'369918' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHS' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f2a1c10cf8fc40e0afe734b2030524a8
e93c7bb5f0f48063ab8afb2ed3375b8daf8dea40
describe
'142954' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHT' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
9b291eb4b8fce2c323226e1246881c1b
f49fd1a3a00715c6470b79988d3cc5f5ffebdd45
describe
'27993' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHU' 'sip-files00117.pro'
1a4787c68cc71ce375fd15ab520dd609
90db46268cc456e666fdaeae32b36e5286752ab1
describe
'39516' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHV' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d40986d38eab0351b3f12e93448dffd6
08c8f8c3b3882d31f559dd7e27f84cda3ea62036
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHW' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6a35e8fad29e2ccb83202097dcc9728c
27e365f8d70060342f03610f56ff63df595e42a8
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHX' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0abff83c155809f190ca2020887ffc27
2a0b9024b8fdc515c59fbffb0751a7df877d52b6
describe
Invalid character
'9614' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHY' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
04c55306892586f89844eb74ea644767
558fe8b9b4f15a7d9faf942ac97223d87e9dd809
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHHZ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
c6800302930673af4957e46e24947763
ba59ac6bd99235630b3548af72c8f2573ce1d6c8
describe
'121344' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIA' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
5f3fe8dd13a33bc6dd757fa15392a5f1
e52d236660335b54a612974a91c1bdcca5a378a0
describe
'24683' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIB' 'sip-files00118.pro'
8fde68f2a967bbd704e1dbff7c5f3bc0
e098a5c17b6e2214da42e5823e080e9816193a13
describe
'34674' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIC' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
57e9be94453c8ec0224fe96d5fe141d7
2f25b5ecea7fdffd9ac8c5a4a770cdbb026b1098
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHID' 'sip-files00118.tif'
01b031bdd892d8338fe665ec0a930730
cc09f5f4689219b8c2cc3b964fd43d7261486f55
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIE' 'sip-files00118.txt'
8e13a185e54cb76fb9d321a768a575a9
10ce8939b037c22589cc4c1ff99b7bb79860daa0
describe
'8633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIF' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5a4f40460ab08e9b7e58624ca436bc46
807b27a530fb95c5d56bb3b3bc61ea93410288cf
describe
'369961' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b11e4171f56f0cf0cbebae338d973288
c33e3d2692e3096fa5c573ed25393f3d2ec17cfa
describe
'159153' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIH' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
49e29ccbe58d85bb89ff9adb5ea1b850
dd9806be0bfc1ee75d40c0aca3744d8b747da0e6
describe
'24856' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHII' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d3704a0ea2a6d6515799925631f140b1
eac8f243ae7fb1ab3cd709a87b2189908eba1575
describe
'43601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIJ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
4233765940a0c7dcf053c713efe49b88
94d95e933586122a574b564e8bbe9d45b77c264a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ea2e8a8805194d77157f1618ed38dfca
af84c8b55d103d581eeb21ee7227a156a94dbe82
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
51239ab1e62f82844780a750a10e6d4e
f400f40249ade36ee4e9814b5f5a63e8b8bc750d
describe
Invalid character
'10459' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIM' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
dc66a14503dab629bdc240858cc8b43d
2e9af4cea276622696ac041c4ffc50282a2dfb0e
describe
'369989' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
1764509fc02849fe226f873ab746c665
5f60491e7fe5a56f4478c8d78b1eea5a25060693
describe
'149533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
7602b69d0cb59932c51458997a30860e
9823d11b7a69a149eb971cffca82a66f7cc5fe63
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIP' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a4298e497c47f3f49245ca02e20ac056
5f45b0c0367302742728955736d6e161d6de74e9
describe
'41315' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4fc05c93a95dd3978f70d8c23fdbfca6
2acdab34b19a039cd27e4ebc4d2ecf9cd3061433
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIR' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ef7c93f0202e58e8d5c902d177a3852f
520b4a62d71c1668e2b7990d0b9951014c38d1cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIS' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1a1b6f706cd18126d57ab9d2a4fabf3c
b0b7ba73c7f465ac1302f077c5071f5738087ce6
describe
'10046' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIT' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a8a973b23c71a98f70f43060ce0cc1ac
ce14483f2709766a89ae2914a6aec678f28be233
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIU' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6fa24a1bb3d5383ab6f920b985f77370
56b2ba8759a8b2fd60445c91c56cb5d49918caf5
describe
'145022' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIV' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d7d105d8077f9389d272ab25036fbc9e
f7b3d723df021db67113805927eb0293422049af
describe
'27926' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIW' 'sip-files00121.pro'
651843eeac6d5776a50b6cc84b3bb766
77867c32a0d50e51a00b377bd25f9c6f8a63b029
describe
'39731' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
853deea4eeff63739211bcedcafab6d8
d2a7cbaf19e920b67966d90f80b170d116b0012e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIY' 'sip-files00121.tif'
1af843c72b74b941c3c44928c2fdfc53
203124af24d9aad3aecd5ed56e0fb92f3eb3c2f8
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHIZ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
2fa9eac48c928c3235a335e1749fd94a
35909ed8eecbb04c08eb5226498eb8008f02242d
describe
Invalid character
'9439' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJA' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c9e2508cd6caee277a4398df9dc6ecfa
461adc95b01487f02da6e9dc8d7132845d42f1f3
describe
'369984' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJB' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
b8597aacd52a93f14a4849b9ce375853
e4a9e925f5fc3d3e4e9d63d1141a5cad9bf419b1
describe
'148545' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJC' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6e42d1bceba8a3b85509ac5a52936544
8355d5616c84d92113426e3752b53cd2449aa661
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJD' 'sip-files00122.pro'
404dd35960a2d97ca2eb25e88c5322cc
9296c0c0dea3f2a3c22df9bba3d4ebf4cde23691
describe
'40790' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c0965b99647a247f689f15f97c113d82
a151af595f23134dd4efedfd1c3d54629935c9e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
26806f3dd1e5f6ed098776b95229e60e
8d0a0bb2cfd8656debec2fd7e4be9fcbb07e949b
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJG' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2623f4eb5fd480b22791cd6333007f4d
657633ab413afb95861597457cfb8d180ae249cc
describe
'9775' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJH' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
a7b2465d4127a3c6728acfd38cb6c4e8
d921095933de49d5b85e9b5eaeafbf488a1e5958
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJI' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
3611a5b3b0c2a9c89b8c0c164e9b6b8d
04b85904b339558679175fc54ed924408fe78347
describe
'150207' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJJ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
b6a470f378b77d598910a67ec07aad55
3ef7ef8cc13d9a8150d2ccb77918f055638bd595
describe
'25542' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJK' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e46283162c259f8f6494094165a26777
df7af87ff1c2b6f90b791a53a8a7e7ab98e46530
describe
'40534' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJL' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
19c28b4c18f81aa9ed577f2d1586bcc7
404c48f497949bb4850146f25ed4db8bc8822eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJM' 'sip-files00123.tif'
3393ef34afb163dced71450dde944cb2
d506844cb5bea40929f09a7716e501e5ee3f19be
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJN' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b27c3e1e4c58683e0b953edea7e04518
920aff443dfe78ea0d5898dee26917d4eb6ae3f2
describe
'9804' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJO' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e079dac190d1995051543c4ea3c17b55
b11479021bc2d390fa0e1e7c927928cf3f53db39
describe
'370014' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJP' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f8b3c5147d495571934e877d975c188a
83b7aa3e573171758b29da4ef8b812398a439cbb
describe
'157921' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJQ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
1bd8b0a4bfcfd1481cc95176aa982482
dee2ec7b456dbcaedae9fd2a954c18ae83175bdf
describe
'23594' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
1fab201e0cab5122357b03636ea8fc21
8a6d6f46348dc9341626751a29711452f2c5c0ea
describe
'42769' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
02017151301220af6a00a2b847f8f9c5
bf957ce42c805daeaa888f9981e915e0fab134c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJT' 'sip-files00124.tif'
a13f9d358866166fdbee2780e107622b
7e357481d53c2bba94de0d688a09c483d9e8143c
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJU' 'sip-files00124.txt'
14f663058007621d210fb01e0051244d
7770b9f1017633d4b4646e227bd37ec0f3d6b2b5
describe
'10230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJV' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
c3dfca65647faabaf273116c77b36b67
cd6f5dc38f207c2a5d62ac489f93968d54a8879f
describe
'369745' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJW' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
26f8813051c7b75bac8f4ea95ce152da
4acb90cb21363297af3ed8c2236f40c670984943
describe
'160276' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJX' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
e63c7c2c39b2280fe2a955cb6128fe56
3a05d61f1b50ef1236a0a4da43faf768eee2449a
describe
'24326' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJY' 'sip-files00125.pro'
1ad8fd3bc54a62177e9cd1a3e6503584
6bd89f41290a90ee9796295a07cfe859925fe140
describe
'43829' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHJZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1f5907915e477820c5af046b6924c3af
83324b2970ea2aa340b05f069db3168f9f90796b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9c16db510aa1bc7040bc048c1a505b84
52b033ae9215ac08201b1af4a83504cce07af78f
'2011-09-20T05:04:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b0e154750bfed8ff0a3dd332d91cd1e0
a4abf93edaad097c7b53159535309243fda743c0
describe
Invalid character
'10366' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
8a2db2def74d48b0234feec8bb7153e2
eb3ca8a78ced1fd891179d8406d749578891deea
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
856826fb28ea97a0752e8821a89dcf86
12931ed4a243a46b06ecffaf02f3eb6bb2ca52e5
describe
'145089' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
096d3b0282ef1eb0ab1239e2c16bfef5
9d99d62b34817ecca58166e4b4c2e218b3e4910a
describe
'24349' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKF' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0a3ed026c8d5ffa7cdb8470c3e31d625
ae6996f32825389648b31d7b7e4af05dcfb733eb
describe
'39078' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKG' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
49774ac8f41e3bb9c1ec2a5efc8d81c1
aeedac88d4ac54ec82d573b4e9e892185947a67d
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKH' 'sip-files00126.tif'
35ff7f1e4f6546be8653a3d314c92f26
42958da21f4dd8090f4d8ab59bffc64f1523900b
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKI' 'sip-files00126.txt'
01d6cdface0120ceabfd198c2e2eb394
678aaa0581290fa75005785a00b394f957006ddb
describe
'9438' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
ccd7afe3943b75031052e477ae4a6953
6f528e83f49babc78527212f64db6f58214d2ba2
describe
'370031' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1340567da20b8d3ad5a359c11c4b3759
7ce583bad4b98c07859ca36b25d873d80615ea9d
describe
'128659' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKL' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d746eb216b5271d889b6057d715da654
45a48185986f5f60f386be2bad9c7edd03b214b0
describe
'26606' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
74f73f24f8c0e1d2ee4080a613172cdd
7241f8d7dafe33a8acd635d9e763bad91eb398a7
describe
'36498' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
72a3b7483a217fb2f368344a9ffa34d3
1c47c4d4d0af356c77217bc8064266d2fc969a6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
edb6e9c0904416f1001f544e0959153f
d433a2c3b2ec5e024c1f727744dc87a9d059079e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
5881c26079c6878bb4dcde72970d3530
74adfe087a767655eb854ece887884628f5ef6a7
describe
'8937' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
533f796210bd17bbfb6c6bf87c1120ad
cd2610c7befff86a40e538df086f89c9f35f37d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
03ab68e35165e1faca0bcc8404f3a4ab
eddfd6fc9e26533da926c033558e551933ae7bfb
describe
'151139' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
30b2f027333497e908c4728a3e61f482
e29559b948bcf306aedd21e2c557e0e6dac64d86
describe
'25757' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
2383579bc21b77bcec69eca00da3ee09
e7cc90f66ca27fe22f463786e4d1e168dcf45f13
describe
'42037' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKU' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
11d9564ca590d5012d8154bdbd2d0378
cc247e62461178c2e3e808550f64fe5a1d8a1090
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
8f1e19487000273bae250580ad9d9db7
b656b9736e2010c24fe19df63de4e1e99b66b755
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
3f828927a11d173b752defdd9962e244
46288f9dd4b86a40bb2e307c66f193b6233a29ce
describe
'10038' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
b755ad639b62a736f8be22590f32f4ef
5b3edbfb098a646861c87c09c387f99dbb4554d4
describe
'369994' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
e0036364ffc15eba8d3c3d5d6d92ef5e
8bccbdbca57c7a2029cd2b8958a10a3e23a8713b
describe
'137757' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHKZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
310c98c6dbabfa82066c47fef10e9eae
50d485bbca25165af293eb94a51af71a5dc53aba
describe
'24837' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLA' 'sip-files00129.pro'
d743b315fa2c90f4d84494324be3b6bb
f608126e2c61561b05d236b3e0454bdd85608107
describe
'37523' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
cdae3753d87c4fa11e18cf36423f412e
7d5f1ad43dbe9e83429f63c6429d0cb73bf30955
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
a11eef9ed5be11c91aa4491d3253b2ed
e5874d39a17d5250122a80627de26e5dd868fcfb
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLD' 'sip-files00129.txt'
200af9d997a02b2d05f6552c029b4cb1
d16a08d661a1e1df16774b9dd5d36e03fc9d82a4
describe
'9141' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLE' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
e18d91240ca14f6c34428c5d848ca5c2
57bb0d92d7724cd4329e00451f71a80147618fde
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d6e02b2d751fd6913af2afacd6e766cf
cd8e669b2965a12d0e47fe8368c5056e0790b89d
describe
'156150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
42ca3181998825cd8e71b1b7d1f3e26b
06f27d7a4631d9d2ccad136de66cd743c00be366
describe
'24398' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4bba4f5d86022a6b52e3a6e7313eb763
921fcf7deba26479ddc494e7f833a1ce87e0405b
describe
'41590' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
b82c7a9aef7f9134c8d6fddc2f5c1772
9b85ff541a1ed08b7e2955960a12ba55a86ce042
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
d0e9a8c5716130f2a18ca0e453ebd6ca
7d89b08c54a267d072d41053758184b55acb73e7
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e2b6f4b697dbf5571cb4586dfd7688b9
73d8d389cf4d1931c0339982a76c8392126baacd
describe
'10026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
789bc162aa98a9b997c8c7c90563406d
d3c488850f9a91c2f623d0709b243830289f4c3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0792e7b9ffebc565ba30960ea575ee1a
3e1db3a48b335f3f771abe00cb1866125165a1e8
describe
'149485' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d0cb120221c080f3928649b5795cb705
810d78651dc5e814b50754f77134203d6611788e
describe
'24125' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
1a04a3401cd4f1c52fcca68cd0a07353
7ef50f9053e08149dc97f882970ec58b3e7ad026
describe
'40264' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a821487672c17c48888e29c5f716089a
fa07fb768c9dfe80afb5b232261670d11ac08f0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
cde9bb4aeae69258dc37897cf9ee0718
efa7cd081accb487754266be78664449bf47bf4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
f8d03ee356d499112c34b724d5cfbf1a
14eb923e285e56e1d6b1f7f42e590bfd91eab766
describe
Invalid character
'9677' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
8e7f00dadad49584b28c8402072f1bc0
de0b78414dcd547da19562e28e1783eba93634f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
819b9aa5741d9ec0330253c34a0284da
df1a9c1ad1b3ac64c4334ab4184c6bd519a17733
describe
'147687' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
039bf1c7b5d0cf0362036f5541afa115
e3b143dc4c386cd24d4dedd9277dd76d4b89eb38
describe
'24446' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
0a64614b447d152e09fbae043a5d243f
becafbb54164b741459a28d486e92d9c2e39a52d
describe
'40782' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
4e8ec73d790d289359d7e5c03090a03f
8578f15f6a3547933fa9be0ef2eddce1d43faca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
16f3803daf82aee93c8f872105199f49
751d39279c159b06ab3d503fea010716d89b8d51
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
f82618b73895e57b115f3d67b15164ae
321e6f0d73583059be7f729721f28b59f518a4e3
describe
Invalid character
'9728' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHLZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
0626a55e2baba52696f14dd80f4283d7
2a8242f99f3d18e6a9e71f2114f2db8067b63a57
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHMA' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
ef093b35340b49f9d5c045a1dd29995c
0204b7f41250863bc592dba8c9c0f796f2aec9f6
describe
'119016' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHMB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1705ece91e27dacd08dbf84073eeff83
0963fe64e405806594a624fe8302d54e6549ea68
describe
'20640' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHMC' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e3801a8906159f80374b227ae86f8bc6
14072dfc5f15d3723b00147de559d7fdeb4d7856
describe
'32804' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHMD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
c9d6555b5b2d266fe8ec8719bdf01842
052fd9552711394b2bcb7c83924228b22fcedec2
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHME' 'sip-files00133.tif'
f83ee2cd3c0b0970ade87d240aa089f6
d3badfd704648252f208f55cb692f9e6fefd2b0c
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'907' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDUfileF20080730_AAAHMF' 'sip-files00133.txt'
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UNINVITED GUESTS
THE PAVOURITE BOOK

OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES



I. NELSON AND SONS

London, Edinburgh, and New York

THE FAVOURITE BOOK

OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND
PISHES

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New York



1895
THE FAVOURITE BOOK OF

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



ADDER, or Viper. A reptile
of the Snake kind common in
many parts of Great Britain.
Adders are harmless, and very
timid, and will glide swiftly °
from any fancied foe. There
is one kind, however, whose
bite or sting is poisonous.
This one may be known by
the dark spots on its back.



AcouTi. This creature is
what is called a rodent, or
gnawing animal, like the
beaver, the mouse, and the rat.
The agouti is a native of South
America, and is fond of nearly
every kind of plant as food,



including roots, nuts, and fruit. :
It is a swift runner.’ It feeds AGOUTI.
only at night.
6 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

sen, AN, SOE Mili AI, or Three-toed Sloth, is
Ya a native of South America.
: Ciew\\“ 8% Like all the Sloth family, the
ais pass most of their lives
hanging, with their backs
downwards, from the boughs
of trees. They are said. to








take their name, ai, from the
a low, sorrowful ery which they
ae "utter being like the sound of
that little word.




ALBATROSS. A large sea-
bird found in the South Seas,
where it makes its home on
the high rocks. It is power-
ful on the wing, and its long
and strong beak is a terrible
weapon when it attacks any
person who may have fallen
overboard from a ship. The
flesh of the albatross has a
strong oily flavour.

ALLIGATOR, the crocodile of
_ North America, can live both
on the land and in the water.
He is a terrible reptile to meet,
with his powerful jaws. The
female alligator lays her eggs
(50 to 60) in the sand to be
eee hatched by the heat of the sun. .


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 7

Aupaca. “A native of Peru,
in South America; sometimes
called the Peruvian sheep.
There are several kinds of the
same family, and all are valued
for their long, silk-like wool,
or hair, which is woven into
cloth for dresses. In their
native country they become
very tame, and are used for
carrying burdens. They can
travel from fifteen to twenty
miles daily, through the rugged
passes of the Andes, each carry-
ing over a hundredweight.

Ancuovy. A fish belonging
to the Herring family, in length
from five to seven inches. It
is taken in large quantities
on the southern shores of
France, and is made into an-
chovy sauce, a famed dinner-
table relish.

Anouts. A reptile of the
Lizard kind. This one is
called the crested anolis. It
inhabits the warmer parts of
America. It can swell its
throat when angry, and it can
also change its colour.

























































ALPACAS,


8 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Ants. Busy little insects
that live together in great
numbers. They are divided
into classes, the perfect, which
have wings, and the imperfect,



which have none, as you see

in the picture. The perfect

females lay the eggs, the hatch-

ing of which is watched by

the imperfect females called

workers, who nurse and feed
the baby ants.

ANT-EATER. An animal
‘ that feeds upon ants and other
insects. It has no teeth, but






“.\ a very long tongue, with which
it catches its food. The ant-
eater is a native of South
America.

ANTELOPE. A large family
of animals, including many
ee ~ kinds under different names.
It comes between the goat and

. the deer, but it is easily known

from those animals by its



; slender and elegant shape, and
== ee Sia” by the form of its horns, some
being straight, and some bent
ee backward, while others are
ANTELOPE. twisted. -
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 9

APE. An animal of the
Monkey tribe, but known from
the monkey by having no tail
and no cheek-pouches. Each
hand has four fingers and a
thumb. The orang-outang
and the gorilla are large apes.
A few Barbary apes live on
.the Rock of Gibraltar. They
are so called because they
came originally from the Bar-
bary States, in the north of
Africa. These are the only
apes in Europe.

ARAB HORSE is, in many

respects, entitled to take the i
first place among all kinds of fff

horses. It has long been
esteemed for its swift limbs,
its fine form, and its kindly
qualities of temper.

ARMADILLO is a_ strange-
looking animal. It has many
names. The Spanish name
armadillo, which is used in
Great Britain, means “ clad in
armour.” Tatow is the name
given to these animals by the
natives of South America, where
only they are found. ©





APE.



ARMADILLO.
10 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Asp, or Aspic. A small rep-
tile of the Snake kind, common
in Egypt and Libya, and
much dreaded for its deadly
bite or sting. Persons bitten
by it die of a sleep from
which they cannot be awak-
ened. The asp mentioned in
the Bible is supposed to have
been the snake used by Egyp-
tian jugglers, or the Egyptian
cobra, both of which are very
venomous.

Ass. , mal—the poor man’s beast of
burden—but, in this country
at least, not a well-used one:
the meek, patient, docile
donkey. It differs from the
horse in having its tail smooth
at the root, with a tuft at the
end.

Aux. A large bird of the
Northern Seas, as the penguin
is of the Southern. The great,
auk is now very rare, if it
does at all exist. The last
one seen was on the shores of
the Western Isles of Scotland
many years ago.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. li

Bazpoon. A large four-
handed animal of the Monkey
kind, whose head and jaws so
much resemble those of the
dog that it is sometimes
called the dog-headed monkey.
The baboon is an inhabitant
of Africa; it is a powerful
and ugly animal—ugly in its == igs
looks and in its habits. sa Al







































Bapcer.
mal belonging to the Weasel
tribe. It is a miner—that is,
it burrows in the ground, that
it may have a safe and warm

the day. Its food consists of
fruits, roots, grass, snails,
worms, small lizards, and frogs.



The badger is so cruelly treated BADGER.
by man that to “badger” a
person means to pester him.

Bat. This is what is called
a “wing-handed animal,” and
“flying mouse,” because it has
a body like a mouse, and wings
like a bird, not with feathers,
but with a thin skin. It
brings forth its young as mice
do, and suckles them.


12 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BEAGLE. One of the great
Dog family, and the smallest of
the Hound tribe. These dogs
are chiefly employed in hunt-
ing the hare and the rabbit,
s@ It is not so fleet of foot as
other kinds of hounds, but it
has a much _ better nose, so
that it can follow on the scent
in places where others would
be thrown out.

Brar. A rough, savage
animal that lives chiefly in
natural dens and holes of the
earth, and sometimes in hollow
trees. There are many kinds
of bears. The one in the pic-
ture is called the grizzly bear,
a name that sounds terrible. to
the Indians of North America,
but which simply means of a
gray colour.



Braver. This clever ani-
mal builds its dwelling with
so much art, that one would
think it was the work of man.
It uses its tail as a mason does
his trowel. Beavers build their
houses and make their dams
Senet by the banks of pools and lakes.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Bee. - The winged insect
that makes the honey. In
each hive there is a female
bee called the queen; as head
of the house, she rules the
others. You may remember
Watts’s hymn :—

‘* How doth the little busy bee

Improve each shining hour,

And gather honey all the day
From ev’ry opening flower !

‘‘How skilfully she builds her cell !

How neat she spreads the wax !

And labours hard to store it well

With the sweet food she makes.”

BeetLe.
insects, known by having hard
cases or sheaths of shining
metal, like coats of mail, under
which the wings are folded.
They act as scavengers in eat-

ing up refuse.

Bison. The one in the
picture is what is called the
North American bison. This
creature gathers together in
large herds of many thousands

in number. The bison is very
swift and sure-footed; and is’

rated highly by the hunter,
as its body affords him nearly
everything he needs.

BEETLE.

BISON,

13




14 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Birrery. A bird belonging
toa great family called Waders.
The haunts of the bittern are
in marshy places, where it
finds its food in snails, insects,
and the like. With their long
legs, long necks, and long
beaks, how nicely this class of
birds is adapted to their habits
and mode of living!



Biacksirp. This bird is
classed among our song-birds.
It’ is a favourite cage-bird ;
and its notes do not appear
to be less mellow because it
is a prisoner. The blackbird
can even be trained to whistle
tunes. In its native groves
ib is very shy, popping out and



in among the hedgerows, and
giving a shrill scream as it
disappears.

Buackcock. Sometimes
called Black Grouse, or Heath-
cock—names which apply only
to the male bird, as the female
is of a lighter colour. These



} Mace. * birds of the moors have many
eS. an foes, the worst being man

Be RGROOGE: with his fowling-piece.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 15



BuroopyounD. This large
and powerful animal of the
Dog kind is now very scarce «



—that is to say, the pure /
breed. It has a very quick
sense of smell, and it eagerly
follows up a bleeding animal,
and from this it gets its name.
Long ago it used to be em- =z



ployed in the capture of crimi-
nals, whom it tracked to their Borer
haunts when put upon the

scent.

Boar. The male of the
hog. There are many dif-
ferent breeds of hogs scattered
over Britain. The hog is
believed to be the first animal
of any size which formed a
portion of the food of the
human race in a state of nature.
Hogs are said to be stubborn
creatures; so much so, that
sometimes the best way to
make them go forward is to
pull them backward.

Bream. A spiny - finned .
fish of rather handsome make,
not unlike perch; not very
plentiful in British waters. ERUAM.



wo
16





)



















































wr



BULL (BRAHMIN).

~ all over the world.

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BurraLo.
of the Ox kind; but it cannot
be attached to man as the ox
can. The one in the picture
is known as the Indian buffa-
lo, which inhabits the marshy
places on the lower rivers of
India, on which account it is
sometimes called the water
buffalo.
as the Cape buffalo, is found
in South Africa. The Ameri-
can buffalo is better called the
bison.

Another kind, known

Butt. This is the male of
the Ox kind, of which the cow.
is the female. Oxen are spread
Britain
has many kinds, known by
the name of Short Horns,
Long Horns, and Polled—that
is, those that have no horns,
the Suffolk bull and some

others. Then comes the sacred

BuLuL of India. In cities
crowded with the wealthy and
devout, these animals throng
the streets and the temples, |
and are so well fed that they

become fat and lazy.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

savage of the Dog tribe. As |i}
some one has observed, “ His jj
very look’s a bite.” He is|
called the fighting dog, and
takes his name from the cruel !
sport of bull-baiting. We see S
this brute chained to his
kennel ; in this way he spends
most of his time.

Buiirincuy. This is one
of our song-birds, and is best
known to us as a cage- bird.
He can be taught to whistle
tunes. His native haunts are
the rich orchard and shady
erove, where he lives upon
buds and fruits.

Burrerrty. All boys and
girls know this beautiful in-
sect,socommon on our meadows
and in our gardens in summer
days. But boys seem to think
that they are made for them
to chase.

‘Cunning insect, well you know
Fruit is pleasant to the taste ;
But your wings make such a show—
See, to catch you, boys make haste.
Leave your tempting dinner, pray,
While they stop to gain new breath;
Hasten, butterfly, away,
Lest your beauty prove your death.” BUTTERFLY.

17




18 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

BuzzarpD. This large bird
of prey belongs to the Falcon
tribe, It is said to be an idle,
lazy bird, that does not pur-
sue its prey like the falcon
or the hawk, but sits upon a
branch and watches what crea-
ture may pass below, when
-down it will suddenly pounce
and carry off its prey.

CaLF is the young of the
cow. This one looks very
weakly on its legs, partly
because it is of tender age,
and partly from a cruel prac-
tice the butcher has of bleed-
ing it with a lancet every
now and then, that the flesh,
which we call veal, may



a appear white.

CaMEL. This one is the
camel of Arabia, or dromedary.
There is another kind with -
two humps, but the one in
the picture.is the more useful
to man. In travelling the
hot, sandy desert, it carries
a quantity of water in the
<§ water-pouches of its stomach,
CAMEL, that it may quench its thirst.




BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 19

Canary. This bird belongs
to the Finch family; and we
all know what a grand singer
the cock bird is. Canaries
were first brought to Europe,
about three hundred years
ago, from the Canary Islands,
off the west coast of Africa.
They are also found in Madeira
and in the Cape Verd Islands.



CANARY.

Carp is a fresh-water fish
found in rivers, lakes, and
ponds. It was brought to
this country from the south
of Europe in the fifteenth
century. Some carps are said
to attain to a hundred years
of age. No other fish can
live so long a time out of the
water.

CART-HORSE is the largest
horse found in this country,
and is sometimes called the
dray or draught horse, because
used by brewers in drawing
their heavy carts or lorries.
Another well-known kind of
cart-horse is called the Clydes-
dale, one of the best breeds



in Scotiand. CART-HORSE,
20

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



CENTIPEDE,

Cassowary. A large bird
classed among the Running
Birds, as the ostrich, ete.
Swiftfoot is another name for
the class. They are for the
most part birds of the desert,
shy and retired in their man-
ners, This bird has a_hair-
like plumage, and is next to
the ostrich in size. It is found
only in tropical countries—
that is, in the hottest parts of
the globe.

Car (domestic). To say
that a cat is an animal that
catches mice, would only be
to tell you what you already
know. Did you ever see a
young cat at a looking-glass ?
How droll it is to see it paw
at the image, and, not being
able to touch it, peep: slyly
round the edge of the glass
as if to catch its companion
on the other side,

CENTIPEDE, or “ Hundred-
feet.” Loathsome - looking,
creeping thing. In warm.
countries it grows to a large
size—a, foot long.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 21

EEE ey aN ee a tel oe

CHAD is the young of the
common sea-bream, or gilt
head, as it is sometimes called.
These fishes appear in vast
numbers on the southern
coasts of England, where great
quantities are devoured by the



larger fishes.

CHAFFINCH. This is a gay
and sprightly bird, in great
plenty in most parts of the
British Islands. It is one of
our earliest songsters, and has
a simple, pleasing run of notes
for its sone, which it repeats
over and over again. Strange
that in England, and in Scot-
land too, there are very few
indeed who think this favour-
ite worth keeping in a cage; CHAFFINCH.
but that is so much the better
for the bird.



CHAMELEON is a member of
the Lizard family of reptiles,
and is said to live upon air.
That is a mistake, for this one
is about to catch an insect
with its long tongue, on the
end of which there is a sticky
substance. CHAMELEON.


D9: BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Cuamois belongs to the
Antelope family, and the Alps
may be said to be its home,
As the ostrich is called a run-
§ ner among birds,so the chamois
is a leaper among animals,
It is a very sure-footed animal.
It appears as if made of elastic
springs, and to be as much
made for the mountains as
the mountains are for it.

Cuar.
of the Salmon kind. It may
be called a lake fish. It never



? descends to the sea, and never
enters a river unless to de-
posit its spawn.

CHARGER, or War-horse;
CHAR. for it is only on the battle-
field that this noble animal
appears in the full greatness
of his character. “The glory
of his nostrils is terrible. He











paweth in the valley, and re-
joiceth in his strength: he
7 goeth out to meet the armed
= men. He mocketh at fear,
\y and is not affrighted; neither
â„¢ turneth he back from: the
CHARGER. sword.” .


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

CHINCHILLA.
little animal feeds entirely
It is a bur-

This cleanly

upon vegetables.
rowing and gnawing animal,
found in South America; and
it is particularly active in
The
animals it most resembles are

climbing among rocks.

the mouse and the squirrel.
It has broad ears and a bushy
tail, and its hind legs are
Tis
pretty, soft fur is much prized

longer than its fore legs.

by ladies, who use it in their
dress.

Cuus.
fish, and, like the dace, closely
allied to the roach.

CIVET is a native of North-
ern Africa, and is hunted
chiefly for its perfume, or
scent-bag, It is not entirely
a flesh-eater. It feeds some-
times on sweet fruits and
juicy roots.
to be a sleepy animal in the

daytime; yet it is quick at 2

catching birds and small ani-
mals, upon which it springs
like a cat.



The civet is said,

23






YS?
5k
FSS)
24 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Coach Doc.
known on our streets, from its
running alongside or in front
of the horses that draw its
owner’s coach. The dog has
also a long foreion name,
showing the breed to have
come from a province in Hun-
gary.

Cock. The male of the
common or domestic poultry.
In spite of his beautiful plu-
mage, his slow and firm step,
his head always erect, his
stately march in proud and
commanding gait, he is styled
the “dunghill cock.” His
loud and cheerful crowing has



gained him the name of
“ chanticleer.”

CockAToo belongs to the
Parrot family. The one in
the picture is the most hand-
some as well as the rarest; it
\ is called “three-colour crested
\ a cockatoo.” The erest consists
» -pointed, and standing apart
from one another when they
Cockatoo, are erected.


—-"

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 25

Cop. The Great Bank of
Newfoundland may be said to
be the headquarters of the
cod, from which the fish
spread themselves out across
the Atlantic. The cod is found
in great quantities in the seas
around the British Islands, and
also on the north-west coast
of Norway. As a useful and
nutritious article of food, it
ranks among fishes next to
the herring.

Cott is the name applied
to the young of the horse,
whether male or female, until
they reach the age of four
years.

ConstricToR (Boa). One
of the largest kinds of serpent,
a native of America within
the tropics. When full grown,
it measures over thirty feet
in length, It is without
venom, but it possesses great
bodily strength, which enables
it to bind or crush large ani-
mals in its folds, so that they
die; hence the name “con- CONSTELEEOH 202):
strictor.”


26 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Coor. This is what is
called a lobe- footed water-
bird. The lobe-foot differs
from the web-foot. The coot
is a grand swimmer, swift and
strong. Jt remains in the
British Isles all the year
round. The young, soon after
quitting the shell, take to the
water; and they often become
the prey of the pike or of the
hawk.

Cormorant. This is a sea-
bird much larger than the
coot. Cormorants are also
called sea-ravens, owing to
the greedy way in which they
prey upon fishes. They catch
the fish by the middle with
their bill; but as they can-
not swallow the fish in this
fashion, it is tossed in the air
and caught with the head
down.

Cow. Properly the: female
of the ox and mother of the
calf. The small cows of the
islands of Jersey and .Alder-
at ney are famed for the milk
cows. which they yield.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 27

Crane. A bird with a
straight, long bill, long neck,
and long legs, showing it to
be one of the Waders. The
cranes fly in flocks at a great
height. When they alight on
the bank of a river or on the
gea-shore, it is for the purpose
of feeding.

Cricket.
sect that chiefly frequents
bake-houses. The one in the
picture is known as the field-
cricket. The chirping sound
is not produced by the mouth,
but by brisk rubbing of the
wings.. The field-cricket is of
a black colour, the house one
is of a yellowish buff.

CrocopILe. The largest
of the Lizard family, and
powerful even on land, but
its chief place of action is in
the water. The crocodile of
the Nile has been known to
attain the length of thirty
feet. The body of the cro- *
codile is covered with hard



seales, and it has wide and ===
; powerful jaws. CROCODILE.
28




BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



CUCKOO.

CURLEW

Crow. This bird is smaller
than the raven. The carrion
or common black crow is a
filthy feeder. No garbage,
however rank it may be, comes
amiss to the crow. For this
reason it: is called the dung-
hill crow, in Scotland the
“midden” crow. The crow
takes its name from the croak-
ing sound of its voice.

Cuckoo. This bird differs

# from other birds in not build-

ing a nest. It never hatches
its own eggs, but places them
in the nest of some other bird.
The following rhyme on the
cuckoo used to be common in
England :—
‘In April’, come he will.
In May, he sings all day.
In June, he alters his tune.

In July’, he prepares to fly.
In August’, go he must.”

CuRLEW, the Scottish Whaup,

is a bird of the moors in sum-

mer, frequenting the sea-shore
in winter. It is one of the
birds called Waders, and it has
long legs and a very long and
slender bill.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 29

CyGNeT. A name given to
the young of the swan, which
in some places are unable to
take to flight the first year ;
in other places they do not get
their full plumage until the
second year. It is then that
these helpless cygnets are
hunted down for the table,
their flesh being much esteemed. SN



The cygnet differs from the
full-grown swan in having
plumage of a bluish-gray col-
our and a lead-coloured bill.

Das.
abundant on the sandy coasts
of Britain. It has a brown,
rough surface, and is nearly of
the same size and shape as the
fluke or flounder, though its
flesh is not so good, It is
thought to be best for the
table in February, March, and
April.

Dac. A small river fish,
closely allied to the roach. It =
is known in England under
the names of dav, dare, and
dart. This fish, it is said, has
never been seen in Scotland.


30 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Daw. More properly Jack-
daw, as if Daw was the sur-
_name. You may see by the pic-
‘ture that Jacky is a funny
- fellow, up to all kinds of droll
“tricks. He is the smallest of







the Rook family, very attach-
able and teachable, and has
much wit and humour; yet,
DAW withal, he is a great thief.
But we must not tell him so,
for he does not like to be
called by such names.

Day-FLly. A name given to
an insect which, after arriving
at the winged state, lives only
for a day. It is sometimes
called the May-fly, because it
is most common in the month
of May.



DAY-FLY.

Deer. There are many
kinds of deer. There is the
stag, Which is the male of red
deer, also called the hart, the
female the hind, the young
the calf; of the fallow-deer,
buck the male, doe the female,
and fawn the young. The
females and the young have
no horns, or antlers.




,

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 31

Diver. A large, web-footed
bird, chiefly of the more
northerly seas. They assemble :
in great numbers on jutting
-headlands where the sea runs :









strong, and the surf and spray
beat with great force. But
amid the storm and the foam-
ing water the diver feels quite
at home.

Dopo. A large bird said
to be now extinct; which
means that it is not now
found living in any part of
the world. It used to inhabit
the island of Mauritius, in the
Indian Ocean; but the Dutch
settlers in the island found it
good for food, and it by-and-
by died out.

Doe (St. Bernard’s), The
convent of St. Bernard is at
the top of the mountain of
that name. The good monks,
though they have little to live
upon, open their doors to all
seeking shelter. They have
trained dogs that go out to
rescue travellers who may be

lost in the snows of the Alps. DOG (ST, BERNARD'S).
3


32 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Doe-FisH.
Shark kind. It feeds greedily,
following the shoals of other

DOG-FISH. fish ; hence its name of “ dog-
fish.”

DoLPpHIN belongs to the
Whale family, and is remark-
able for the great number of



sharp teeth its jaws are armed
with; also for its leaping
entirely out of the water.
The dolphin follows ships,
and feeds upon any garbage
thrown overboard. It is of
a greenish-black colour above
and white below. The flesh
is sometimes eaten by sailors.



Dore. A fish commonly
called John Dory. The flesh
of the dory is good, and suit-
able for those who may live
far inland, as it is greatly
improved by being kept for
two days.

Dormouss. A curious
little animal that keeps its
nest during the day, and sleeps
all the winter after laying by



= food, such as acorns, nuts,
DORMOUSE. and corn, for the spring.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 33

DotrerREL. This neat and
_ pretty bird is of the Plover
kind. The habits of the dot- &
terel are very little known.




~, xl") i



It has the name of being a a
foolish bird. “ As stupid as a
dotterel” is a common phrase »
applied to a person who may
show little wisdom.

Dove. There are a great
many kinds of doves; they
all belong to the Pigeon
family. We have only room
for the names of some, as the
stock-dove, so called from its
habit of building its nest in
the stumps of trees; the rang-
dove, known also as wwood-
pigeon and cushat; the rock-
dove, and the turtle-dove.

DraGon-FLy. There are
many kinds of this insect.
They haunt the banks of
streams and ditches. They
are very strong on the wing,
and possess the strange power
of flying backwards and for-
wards without turning. The
object of this is to capture
small flies for food. DRAGON-FLY.
34 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

DrRoMEDARY. This animal
stands much in the same
relation to the Arabian camel
as the racing or hunting horse

horse. The dromedary, being
more slenderly built, is not
used as a beast of burden like
the camel; but men ride on
it, and it travels very quickly.

Drone. This is the male
of the honey-bee. It makes
no honey, and is therefore
driven from the hive and
killed by the workers. It
has no sting.



DRONE.

Drum-FisH are found in
American waters. The name
is given to this fish on account
of the strange sound it makes,
which resembles the beat of a
Decors drum.



Duck. There are many
kinds of wild duck; one
called the mallard is that from
which our domestic duck has
sprung. The male, which is
called the “drake,” is known
by the little curled feathers
of the tail.



does to the dray or draught
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 35

Duck-BitL. This curious
little creature belongs to Aus-
tralia, where it feeds upon
worms and insects. Indeed it
is formed to live in the water

or under the earth. It is”

named, as you will see, from

having a beak like that of a
duck.

Ducking. A young duck;
properly, a little duck. Some-
times duck-eges are set under
a hen that she may hatch
them; and it is curious to
witness the dismay of the poor
mother hen on beholding her
brood take to the water, where
she herself cannot follow them.

Eacite. This bird ranks
among the largest birds of
prey. On account of its keen
eyesight, its great strength,
the height and swiftness of
its flight, and its long life, the
eacle is regarded as the king
among birds, like the lion
among beasts. It is a royal
bird, whose figure was shown
on the army standard of the
old Romans.











DUCE-BILL.



DUCKLING.


36 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

HacLer.
properly a little eagle. The
eagle’s nest is usually built on

a rocky ledge, far up a lofty
3 mountain, in a lonely spot
which man cannot reach.

‘* On high the eagle builds his nest,

And hides his young from sight ;

While he, a bold and cruel guest,
Goes robbing in the night.

Our lambs and kids, our poultry too,
His little eaglets share ;

What have the greedy things to do
With such nice wholesome fare?”



Earwic. A very common
insect, the pest of the florist.
The food of the earwig is
vegetable. It does much
damage to gardens by eating
the petals of flowers. Ear-
wigs live in shoals in holes
and crevices, and under the
bark of decaying trees.

Het. A fish having a snake-
like body. It lives much in
the muddy bottom of lakes
and rivers. Linlithgow Loch,
in Scotland, has long been
|famed for its eels. Eels live
in salt water as well as in
_ fresh, and are considered
wholesome food, though some
do not like it.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 37

ELEPHANT. The largest of
living quadrupeds, notable for
its flexible snout, called its
“trunk,” and for its projecting
tusks of solid ivory. The
nostrils are at the tip of the
snout, where there is also a
finger-like contrivance for seiz-



ing even very small articles
like a pin or a blade of grass.
There are two kinds of ele-
phants—the African, with flat ,
forehead and large ears; and
the Indian, with rounded fore-
head and smaller ears,

ELEPHANT.

ELK. A large animal be-
longing to the Deer kind, and
called the moose deer in Amer-
ica, where it is still abundant.
Ié is not so plentiful in Europe
as it once was. The horns
are said to weigh fifty pounds.

ERMINE, or Stoat. A small
animal of the Polecat kind,
but much larger than the
weasel. It is valued for its f
fur, which is used for the |
lining of state robes of sover-
eigns and nobles, as well as for



their crowns and coronets. ERMINE.
38 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Ewe is the female sheep.
The sheep is as useful to us





as the ox. Its body gives us
food, while its wool gives us




>warm clothing, and its skin
has many uses. Ewe’s milk
is sometimes made into cheese.
ee Useful creature, when we look
EWE, in thy quiet, gentle face, it
seems a pity to take a life so
harmless !

Fatcon. One of the Hawk
tribe of birds of prey Falcons
are light and graceful in their
forms. Flying the falcon at
game, called faleonry or hawk-
ing, was a royal sport in the
Middle Ages, holding the same
place that partridge-shooting
does now. The smallest kind
of falcon is the merlin, and the
largest the jerfalcon

FALLOW-DEER. Only the
male of this animal has horns ;
the female, or doe, has none.
You see that its sides are
= covered with white spots, but
" thisis only its summer clothing
The fallow-deer is not so large



FALLOW-DEER. as the stag, but it is tamer.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 39

Fawn. Now we come to
‘ the young of the fallow-deer.
The male fawn has no sign of
horns during the first year of
its life. In the second year
they begin to show, but they
are not fully formed till the
sixth year.

Ferrer.
creature of the Weasel kind.
It is remarkable for its long,
slender body and short legs.
The ferret is never quite tame,
but it is used by sportsmen
who pursue rabbits. One is
put into a rabbit-hole to drive
out the rabbits, while the men
are ready to trap them with
nets or to shoot them with
guns. To prevent them from
killing the rabbits in the hole,
the ferrets are generally
muzzled.

FIELDFARE. This bird be-
longs to the Thrush tribe, and
only visits this country about
the beginning of winter.
When these birds are seen
coming in flocks, it is a sign



of a severe winter. FIELDFARE.
40 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

FIELD-MOUSE, or Wood-
mouse, is a pretty little crea-





j- ture, but a great pest to the
A ON, farmer and the gardener. Be-
#ix\ sides man it has many foes,
= such as the owl, the kite, the
ey ae weasel, and the wild cat, where

= these abound.





FLAMINGO belongs to the
Waders, or stilt-birds. It is
remarkable for the great
length of its legs and its neck.
The food of the flamingo is
shell-fish, insects, and fishes’
egos. The plumage of the
male bird is a bright scarlet
or rose-red ; that of the female







is less bright. Flamingoes
are strong on the wing, and
fly like geese in strings, or in
flocks of a wedge shape.

FLOUNDER. A flat fish,
commonly found at the mouth
of large rivers that bring
down much mud. There the

PS tom. It is the least seaward
of the flat fishes, and is often
found some distance up the
FLOUNDER; rivers referred to.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 41

Fiy is a name given to
most winged insects. To us
the name means the common
house-fly.

FLYING-FISH. To say that
a fish flies may not be quite
correct. The long fins of the
flying-fish, so called, enable it
to leap out of the water for a
short space when pursued by
foes below. These fishes can-
not flap their fins as a bird

















does its wings; besides, they
cannot turn, but they dash
against any object, such as a
ship, that may be in front of
them.

Fox. An animal of the
Dog kind. We all know sly
Reynard by his sharp nose and
mouth, called the muzzle, and
his bushy tail. He is never in
favour with anybody, owing,
perhaps, to his cunning ways
in prowling about at night,
robbing hen-roosts, to which he
slips forward with great cau-
tion. In England fox-hunting
on horseback with packs of
hounds is a favourite sport.


42 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



Fox-Hounp. The _ best-
known, and said to be the
favourite, hound in Britain,
As the name implies, it is used,
in chasing the fox, for which
it is carefully trained. These

a oh ~
Wh “ “ff
A ANNA tz auf



dogs are famed for their keen
scent, their swiftness of foot,
their strength and spirit.

Frog. A small four-footed
reptile that lives in water as
well as on land. There are
many kinds of frogs, with
curious names. The one in
the picture is the common
frog, the most plentiful in
Britain. It has short arms
with four fingers on each, and
long legs with five webbed
toes. The young are pro-
duced from spawn, or eggs.

GameE-cock. Formerly
these birds were reared for
the cruel practice of cock-
fighting, now happily. put a
stop to by law. The one in
the picture has been in many
a battle, for its comb is cut off;
this was done to prevent the
GAME-COCR, enemy from tearing it.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 43

GANNET, or Solan Goose. ih
A large sea-bird. The Bass \
Rock in the Firth of Forth,
Ailsa Craig in the Firth of
Clyde, and other rocks and
headlands on the coasts of
Scotland, are thronged with
these birds. They live in
flocks or crowds, and have



their nests close together on i yi
the tops of cliffs. They feed
on fishes, on which they some-
times drop from a great height
like a bolt.

GAZELLE. A sprightly little
animal of the Antelope kind,
found in the north of Africa,
where it keeps to the open
plains. The females have
horns as well as the males,
but smaller.

- GIRAFFE, or Camelopard.
Like the ostrich among birds,
the giraffe is the tallest among
beasts. Its height when full
grown is from eighteen to
twenty feet. This mild and
timid animal belongs to various
parts of Africa, where it feeds :
chiefly on leaves. GIRAFFE.
4A BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

GLow-worm. An _ insect
that shines in the dark. It
is the female, which has no
wings, that gives out the light.
The male is more of the Beetle
order;. it has wing - covers,
} under which it folds its wings
when at rest. In Europe,
Asia, Africa, and America,
sixteen kinds of glow-worm
are known.

Gat. A small, winged,
blood-thirsty insect. Some
say it is only the female that
is to be feared. It is also
said that vinegar applied to
the wound caused by the sting
will allay the pain. There
are several kinds of gnats; the
mosquito is one.





Gnu.
Africa. Who would ever
think that this fierce-looking
beast would be classed among
the timid antelopes? Yet so
it is, with the head of the
bison, and the body of the
swift, strong horse. The gnu-
is called Wildebeest by the
Dutch in South Africa.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 45






Goat. The common, tame ,
goat, found in almost every i
quarter of the world. There (iS\
are a great number of differ- W/W
ent kinds of the domestic "|
goat, all of them useful to ft
man. They are easily kept. 3
Give them a rock with but
scanty herbage upon it, and
they will keep themselves.

GoaTsucKkER. A large fam-
ily of curious birds not very 2
common with us. They prey x
upon the wing—that is, hav-*
ing a wide gape like the
swallow, they feed, while fly-
ing, upon their favourite food.
The night-jar is another name,
and whip-poor-will is the
American kind.

GoutpFiIncH. This beautiful
favourite songster feeds upon
the seeds in thistle-down,
dandelion, ete. It also feeds
upon chickweed, groundsel, and
the unopened yellow blos-
soms of furze. You may see
it holding its food with its
foot while pecking at it with -
its bill. i ' GOLDFINCH.
46 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Goose.
web-footed bird of the flat-
billed or Duck family. While
swimming, it feeds on the seeds
and leaves of water-plants,
but does not do so below the
surface of the water. The
male of the goose is called
the “ gander.”

GOsHAWK. This is said to
be the finest of all the hawks.
In days when “ hawking” was
a royal sport, this hawk was
much used for ground game,
such as hares, rabbits, wild
ducks, and the like, upon
which the bird steals and
IN , seizes with a sudden pounce.
The name means goose-hawk.

Gostinc. A young goose ;
properly a little goose. In
some parts of England these



S
NIRS
MOL) SS
GOSHAWE.

birds are bred in great numbers
for the sake of the feathers,
which are plucked from the
living birds several times a
year. The old birds submit
quietly to the process, but the



= 3 goslings are often very noisy

GOSLING. and unruly.
BEASTS, BIRDS,

Grampus.
fish of prey classed with the
whale, the dolphin, and the
porpoise. It attains a length
of from twenty to twenty-five
feet. The Firth of Forth is
said to be a favourite haunt of
the grampus. English sailors
call grampuses “ killers.”

GRASSHOPPER. An insect
with hind legs fitted for leap-
ing, in which it is assisted by
These
insects are very destructive to
herbage. They make their
by their
chirping like crickets, to which
class they belong.

a pair of gauzy wings.

presence known

GREEN-FINCH, or Grosbeak,
or Green Linnet.
common bird in Europe, and
abundant in the British Islands.
It frequents hedges and the
outskirts of woods, feeding
upon all kinds of seeds, and
much upon grain; also, on
green leaves of groundsel and
other plants. It is not of
much account as a singing-

bird.



47

AND FISHES.



GRAMPUS.

GREEN-FINCH.
48 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

GREYHOUND. A tall, slender
dog, famed alike for its keen-
ness of sight and its swift-
ness in running. In former
times none beneath the rank
of gentleman was allowed to
keep a greyhound. In the

were held in high repute.

Grouse. The common
name for a large family of
birds, of which the one in the



picture is a type or pattern.
They are known by their
short, arched bills, legs feath-
ered down to the feet, and a









- bare, red skin over each eye.
These birds are found nearly

j~ all over the world. Grouse-

== shooting is a favourite sport

——

=~ on the Highland moors.

GROUSE, GupeGron. A small fresh-
water fish belonging to the
Carp family. These fishes are
found in clear, slow-running
streams in the south of En-
gland, and are considered
wholesome, delicate food for



@uDGEON. invalids. They are seldom
over eight inches in length.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 49

GUINEA-FOWL. This is the
common euinea-fowl. It has
a.grayish-blue body, sprin-
kled with round white spots.
These birds are not so pro-



fitable to keep as common
poultry. The guinea-fowl is a
wandering bird, going long dis- 5
tances from home in search of
grasshoppers, worms, beetles,
and ants. It destroys tender
buds and flowers.



GUINEA-PIG. This home semis = ee ea

pet must be wrongly named. “yl ra. { Ly |
It is not a pig, but a rodent
or gnawing animal like the
beaver. It does not come
from Guinea in Africa, but
from Brazil in South America.
Tt feeds on vegetables, and is
easily tamed.








GULL. A web-footed, long-
winged sea-bird, the “wild @
sea-mew” of the Britis!
shores. The gull is not alto
gether a fisher, but scoops u
any garbage that may be>

































0

floating about. Tame ones = (0 i8
° Ses

are very useful in gardens, WSR

which they clear of vermin. GULL,
50 _ BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Happock. This belongs

to the same family as the cod,
ZE= yt is a more handsome fish.
22 The finest haddocks are found
in the clear and deep waters
of the rocky shores of the
north-east of Scotland. Those
of Dublin Bay are remarkable




for their large size.

Hatisut, or Holibut. The
largest of the flat fishes. One
has been known to measure
from five to seven feet in
length, and to weigh from
two hundred to over three
hundred pounds. Though a
valuable food, the halibut is
not so good as the turbot.



Hare.
of the Rabbit kind; but it
does not burrow like the rabbit,
unless it be in winter, when
it forms for itself a cave in
the snow. . The young of the
hare is the “leveret.”

Harrier. A small hound
for hunting the hare. It is
smaller than the foxhound,
which it resembles in all its
HARRIER. . points, but it is not so swift.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 51

HawFincn. One of the
Grosbeak family. It is the
largest, and one of the most
beautiful of the finches. It is
a shy bird, inhabiting thick
woods, where it lives on seeds
and: berries of different kinds.
The bird is not common in
Britain.

Hawk. There are several
kinds of this bird of prey,



such as goshawk, sparrow-
hawk, ete. There is a curious
sparrow-hawk belonging to
Africa, said to be the only
bird of prey which can give a
musical song. Some of the
hawks are named falcons, such







as the American sparrow-hawk
(called the little falcon), the
St. Domingo falcon, the New
York merlin, etc.



HAWKE.

Hepcenoc. This little
harmless creature is seen some-
times running as you see in
the picture. It is oftener seen
rolled up as a round ball of
spines. It has the power to
assume this form on the ap-



proach of danger. HEDGEHOG.
52 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

HEIFER. May be said to
be a calf of a larger growth;
a young cow, somewhat older
than a calf. “As an heifer of
three years old” (Jer. xlviii.).
The heifer is otherwise re-
ferred to in the Bible—Num.

xix.; Jer. xlvi.; Hosea iv., x.,
Heb. ix.

Hen. The female of what
we call the barn-door fowl—
the cock being the male. It is
sometimes asked, as a kind of
puzzle, Which is the mother
of the chicken—the hen that
laid the egg, or the hen that
hatched the chick ?

Heron, that lives by the banks of
lakes and rivers,and in swampy
or marshy places, feeding on
fish, The heron is a patient
fisher, and with its long, sharp,
pointed bill, it is also a ter-
ribly keen fisher. Besides
fish, it feeds on frogs, snails,
worms, and insects. When
flying, the heron stretches its



long legs out behind it like a



HERON. ° tail .
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 53

HERRING. One of the most
valuable of the many inhabit-
ants of the waters. With us

























ib is called “the poor man’s

























fish ;” equally cheap, good, and
tasty whether eaten fresh or
salted, smoked or potted.



Hippopotamus. This is a HERRING.
long name, but the animal
that owns it is great and
bulky, with a very large head
and very short legs. It in-
habits the larger rivers of
Africa and their margins,
where it feeds on the strong,
coarse water-plants. Its usual
motion in the water is walking,
with its nose now and then
above the surface that it may
breathe ; which gives it its
name “river-horse.” The name Sagas meena
behemoth in the Book of Job
is supposed to refer to the
hippopotamus.



Horner. The largest in-
sect in Britain belonging to
the Wasp family. From the
size of the insect its sting is
very powerful, and much to
be dreaded. HORNET.


54 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Horn-owt,
plied to several kinds of these
night birds of prey, which
have tufts of feathers on the
head that look like horns.

Hunter, or Hunting-horse.
It is employed in what is
called the chase, to which it
has to be trained. The hunter,
in England, ranks next to the
race-horse, although the racer
has qualities that would be
injurious to the hunting-horse.
The latter has many fine points,
\ having more bone and more
power than the other. Al-
" though it cannot run so fast,

J




it can run longer.

HYENA or Hyzena. A species
of wild, untamable animals of
the Dog family. They are -
found in Asia and Africa, and
they live upon raw flesh and all
kinds of offal. The one in the
picture is the largest known.
It is called the striped hyena,
and has a very shaggy look,
with a coarse bristly mane
running along the back. The
tail is short and bushy.
BEASTS, BIRDS,

Isex.
with large horns sloping back-
ward. It inhabits the tops
of the highest mountains of
Europe, Asia, and Africa, but
is not found in America. The
Alpine ibex is the best known.

Isis. This bird belongs to
the family of Waders, or stilt-
birds. The one in the picture
is the black or glossy ibis.
_ There is a kind that used to
be held sacred by the ancient
Egyptians. More of them than
of any other bird are found
preserved in their mummy
tombs. From the hooked form
of their long bills, they receive
from the natives of Lower
Egypt a name which means
Father Sickle Bill.

Icuneumon.
mal inhabiting Egypt, India,
and Java. Like the ibis, it
was held sacred by the ancient
Egyptians, on account of its
keeping down the race of
crocodiles by destroying their
egos. It is sometimes kept as
a domestic animal, like the cat.

AND FISHES.

IBIS.

ICHNEUMON.

55




56 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

JAcKAL. A kind of wild
dog that hunts in packs. The
jackal inhabits the same coun-
tries as the hyena, and, like
the hyena, lives in holes and
caves. At night he goes howl-
ing and prowling about in
search of prey ; for the jackal
is a grasping, greedy fellow,
and if the dead be not properly
buried, he will scratch away
the earth and tear the body
out of its tomb.

JACKSNIPE. One of the
game-birds of the fens and
marshes, as the woodcock, the
; great snipe, and the common
snipe. Jacksnipe is much
the smallest and prettiest of
all our marsh-birds.



JaGuaR. One of the largest
of the Cat tribe. It isa spotted
animal like the leopard. Being
‘a native of the New World,
it is sometimes called the
American panther. Monkeys
are the favourite food of the
jaguar when it can catch them.
It is the fiercest of the Ameri-
JAGUAR. .. can beasts of prey.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 57

Jay. A chattering bird
with pretty plumage. When
the jay is taken young it can
be easily tamed and taught
many kinds of tricks; it can
also be taught to repeat words
and to imitate voices. Although
subsisting mostly on vegetables,
the jay is a great robber of the
nests of smaller birds; it kills
also mice and the larger in-
sects.



JERBOA. A small rodent,
or gnawing animal, with a
very long tail, and very long
hind legs, useful for leaping. =
You may see what very short
fore legs it has. The jerboa is
a burrowing animal, and feeds
only by night. a JERBOA.



KanGaroo. Another curi-
ous leaping animal, whichis
confined to the wilds of Aus-—
tralia, where it is. cruelly”
hunted by man and dog. The,
female kangaroo is furnished
by nature with a curious
pouch, in which she carries
her young, and where they
take refuge when in dangev. KANGAROO.


58 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.





























KestreL. belonging to the large family
~of Falcons. It is a swift-
- winged bird, and yet, when it
_ chooses, it can remain motion-
less in the air with outstretched
~ Wings, its keen eyes watching
ZE the ground for field-mice and
other creeping things.

Kip. A young goat. Famed
for the fine, soft, and: smooth
quality of its skin. When
tanned, it is used for gloves,
upper leathers of boots and
shoes, and other things. The
flesh is said to be more deli-
cate than that of the lamb.

KINGFISHER. Among the
many varieties of this bird,
what is called the common
gg kingfisher is not uncommon in
this country. It is known by
its long, straight bill, its short
body and tail, and above all by
its beautiful plumage of bright





































blue, green, and orange. Seated
on a bough overhanging a





























































































“stream, it patiently waits to
pounce with its long, sharp
KINGFISHER. .. bill on passing. fish below.




























BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 59

Krire. Like the kestrel,
this is a large bird of prey of
the Falcon kind. This one
seen in the sky is also known
in Scotland as the “gled.” It
is on the young of the most
timid animals that the kite













chiefly feeds, such as the young +43
of hares and rabbits. It feeds ob
also on mice, insects, worms, \!Ne
and snails. | — &

Kitten, or Kitling (Scotch).
Names given to the young of
the cat. “ Playful as a kitten ”
is a common saying. Well,
kittens are made to be happy,
they like fun so much. We
should be kind to them, for
they have their sorrows too.

Lapy-BirD. A small, pretty,
round insect, famed for its
showy colours, commonly a
bright red with black spots.
Tt creeps slowly, but can fly
well. It is of great use in
gardens by feeding on the
plant-lice that destroy fine
plants. The name lady-bird
has been changed from lady-
bug. - LADY-BIRD.
60 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Lamp. Meek, innocent crea-
ture, you little think that we



let you crop the green meadow
but to fatten your flesh for
our eating, and-to grow wool
for our soft, warm clothing!
‘Boys and girls do not need to
be told that a lamb is a:young
sheep.



ae a
LAMB, LAMPREY, otherwise called
Stone-sucker, from the power
it has to fasten itself to stones

by means of its mouth, is a
" snake-like fish resembling the
eel, and lives both in the sea

and in fresh water. It ascends



rivers that it may lay its eggs.
The lamprey has seven open=*
ings, or breathing-holes, on
each side of the neck, on which
account it is sometimes called
the “nine-eyed eel.” In some
countries lampreys are used as
food.






l

fs LANDRAIL. Called also Corn-

[5 crake from its shrill, grating

j{~ ery in the corn-field. It is a

; Coe. stilt-bird, that

SEES ORR “SSN never takes to the wing if it
LANDRAIL, ; can avoid it.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 61

Lap-poc. A little dog
fondled in the lap; a pet dog;
a toy dog. The most common
is the poodle, with his snow-
white coat of corkscrew curls,
or ringlets. There is a very
small kind of poodle called
the barbet, that used to be
much thought of as a lady’s
dog.



LAPWING, or Peewit, is of
the Plover family of wading-
birds. When disturbed in the
nest, she makes her escape
and pretends lameness, and _
tumbles about as if her wings §
or her legs were broken. This
ig done in order to lead the
supposed enemy away from
the nest.



Lark. There is the sky-
lark, also the pencilled lark,
the woodlark, and the shore-
lark, all of them remarkable
for the great length of the
claw of the hind toe. The
bird in the picture is best
known to us as the skylark :
known in Scotland by the
name of the laverock.


62 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Launce, Wriggle, or Sand-
eel. A long, slender fish com-
mon on our sandy sea-coasts.
Sand-eels bury themselves in
the wet sand when the tide



LAUNCE. is back. With spades and .
rakes they are caught in great
numbers, and are said to be
fine eating. Fisher-folk em-
ploy them for bait.

Lerecu. This is the com-
mon leech of the doctors, so ;
well known for its useful,
blood-sucking, healing service
to the sick. It is said that
the leech is a good weather-
glass, as it foretells a change



















in the weather by its lively
motions in the water.

Lemur. This is called a
handed animal, like the mon-
keys; indeed, it is said to
form a link between the apes
and the monkeys. It is a
native of the island of Mada-
: gascar, and is found nowhere
* else. The name “lemur,” mean-
“ing “night-wandering ghosts,”



is given them because they
LEMUR. wander abroad at night.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 63

LeoparD.
prey of the Cat kind found in
Africa and Asia; a nimble
tree-climber, and a swimmer.
The form of the leopard is
elegant, and its movements are
graceful. Its skin, which is
very beautiful, is pale yellow,
covered with roundish black
spots. leopards attack and



LEOPARD.

eat small antelopes and mon-
keys, and if near settlements
they creep slyly upon sheep
and pigs. The jaguar of
America resembles the leopard.

Line.
the Cod kind; indeed, it in- »
_ habits nearly the same parts
of the sea; and, like the cod,
it is salted’ in large quantities
and sold as dried fish.

Linnet.
ful little singing-birds fre-.
quenting open heaths and
commons, and breeding among |
the furze, whin, and other |
bushes. They feed upon the =
seeds of many wild plants, <<
such as the dandelion, the
thistle, ete.


64 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Lion, sometimes called the
“king of beasts,” belongs to
the Cat family, of which he is
the largest. He inhabits South
Africa and the warmer parts
of Asia. ~Lions are nearly
always found in pairs. The
male is as long as an ox, but
does not stand so high. “He



has a long, shaggy mane cov-
ering his large head and neck.
He is of great strength, and
can carry off the body of a
man nearly as easily as a cat
can a mouse. The female has
no mane. The young ones
are called cubs.

Lizarp. ‘There are a great
many different kinds of this



reptile. The one in the pic-
ture looks like what is called
the scaly lizard, so plentiful








upon the heaths and commons
of England. Lizards feed on
flies and other small insects.

Liama. A wool - bearing
animal of South America. It’
resembles the camel in form,
but is much less in size. (See
LEAMA. . ALPACA.)
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 65

Losster. A kind of shell-
fish of a dull, pale, reddish
yellow, ‘spotted with bluish &
.black. When boiled it be-
comes red. As an article of
food, the lobster is - perhaps
the most important of the ~
shell-fish. Ne

Locust. It may well be;
said, that of all the insect
pests, the migratory locust
is the most terrible. They







sometimes appear in vast
numbers in Central Europe,
Egypt, Syria, and the south
of Asia, darkening the air as
they fly, and soon destroying
all vegetation where they
alight. They have hind legs



ae




formed for leaping. ae
Lynx. A wild animal of Bo \\\ \\
; Z LIS :
the Cat kind, more or less S



spotted, remarkable for speed
and sharp sight. It is a for-
est animal, and a great climber
of trees. It finds its prey in
’ weasels, ermines, and squirrels,
and in hares and other beasts,
on which it drops from the
branches,
66 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Macaw. There are several
kinds of this bird, all belong-
ing to the Parrot family.

’ They are mostly inhabitants
of South America. They are
remarkable for their very long
tails and the rich colours of
their plumage.

MAckEREL. A well-formed,
. beautifully-coloured fish, some-
CW times caught with baited hook,
but oftener with the net, in
the same way as the herring
is taken. The flesh of the
gimackerel is very good, but
Pmust be eaten fresh, as it
soon becomes tainted after





being taken from the water

2

MACKEREL, and is unfit for human food.

Macpiz.
Crow tribe; it ig smaller than
the rook. The chattering,
* prying, pilfering, and nest:

ke

robbing magpie is found in
many parts of the world. It
is seldom at rest, but hops
and skips about, shaking its
long tail. It chatters more



Za > When tamed, and may be
MAGPIE. taught to utter words.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 67

MANATEE, or Sea-cow, is
classed among animals that
suckle their young. It is
found at the mouths of the
great rivers of South America
and Africa that flow into the
Atlantic Ocean. Those of
America are much larger than
those of Africa. They have
been known to reach twenty
feet, and to weigh four tons.

Manpritu. The largest of
the baboons, the most savage,
and the most fierce-looking,
with its short, upright tail, its
bright-tinted cheeks and nose
giving the animal the appear-
ance of being painted for
show. The mandrill is a
native of Guinea.



MARMosET. One of the
smallest of the monkeys. It
inhabits the forests of the
hotter parts of America, and
takes ill with the cold of our
country. You see the one in
the picture perched on a man’s
thumb. The food of the mar-
moset consists of flies and
other insects, and fruits. MARMOSET.

MANDRILU,


68



BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,



MASTIFF.

Marmot, or “ Bear-rat,” is
a burrowing, gnawing animal,
so clever at the digging! It
begins its dwelling by forming
a tunnel six feet long, only
wide enough to admit itself.
Then it forms a room or cham-
ber large enough to hold a
number of marmots, Next it
forms a smaller apartment as
a store-house, that they may
have food when they awake
from their six month’s sleep.

Marten. An animal that
may be classed among the
blood-sucking vermin of pole-
cats, weasels, and ermines,
which are so destructive about
farm-yards and hen-houses.

Mastirr. This faithful
watch-dog is the largest and
most powerful of English dogs.
Long ago in England, all
watch-dogs that were not of
the true mastiff kind were
called ban-dogs, supposed to
mean “baying dogs.”
in Shakespeare says,—

“ ban-dogs howl.”
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 69

Meruin. The smallest of
the British falcons, and one of
the swiftest on the wing; a
very bold bird of prey, easily \v

tamed. When the amusement *





of hawking was common, the
merlin was valued as a lady’s~*
bird. ; {

Mote. A small reptile--<
eating animal that burrows in G
the ground, where it gets its $
food, such as earth-worms. It
was long believed that the
‘mole had no eyes, so that “as
blind as a mole” was a by-
word; but it has eyes, only
they are very small, and sunk
deep in the fur. The mole’s
sense of smell and of hearing
is very keen.

Moon-FISH, sometimes called
Sun-fish. This curious fish,
which looks as if the whole
body was only the head part
of a large fish, is caught in
British waters. The food of
the moon-fish is said to consist
of seaweed and shell-fish. The
flesh resembles that of skate,
and is relished by sailors. MOON-FISH.
79 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Moor-HEN, or Water-hen.
Though very like the coot,
the moor-hen differs from that
bird in its habits. The haunt
of the moor-hen is by the















margins of streams or lakes,
-where there is much vegeta-
tion, and where it can dash
along swiftly on the surface
of the water and under it.

Mosquiro, or Musquito.
The name of one of the most
tormenting of insect pests.
The bite of the mosquito, in
the sultry countries which it
inhabits, is venomous, causing
great itching for several days.
It is thought by some that
flies of this kind were one of
the plagues of Egypt.

Movs. A destroying little
timid pest of our homes is the
common brown mouse, which
follows man wherever he goes.
It does much damage in farm-’
yards and grain-lofts. As the
young mice come into the
world blind and naked, the
mother mouse prepares a nice
warm nest for them.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 71

Mute. A beast of burden
which ranks between the ass
and the horse. It is not so
showy, so fleet, or so dashing
as the horse, but it is hardy,
patient, cautious, and sure-
footed ; and for these reasons
it is chosen to bear loads
along paths where hardly any
other animal could hold its
footing securely.

Mutter. This is the gray
mullet, so plentiful in British
waters and in other seas.
Mullets live in large shoals,
and are often seen near the «
mouths of rivers. They are °



caught in nets. Their flesh is eee
very tender and delicate. They

feed upon small crabs and
shell-fish. ‘

Musk Deer. The animal
from which is obtained the
perfume called musk. It in-
habits the high mountains of
Central Asia. The animal in
the picture is called the pigmy
musk ; it has no horns. It is
a native of Java and the ad- MUSK DEER.
jacent islands.


72

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Musk Ox. This animal
lives far away in the cold
parts of North America, where
it feeds upon the grasses and
lichens which grow there.
The flesh of the animal smells
strongly of musk—hence its
name. The musk ox is not a
large animal; the great mass
of long brown silky hair



makes it look larger.

Musser. A well-known
shell-fish, plentiful on almost
every coast; and when the
tide is low, great numbers may
be seen in the mud-banks, in
the crevices of the rocks, and
in the pools of sea-water left
upon the beaches. All the









sea-mussels spin short, horny
threads, by which they attach
themselves to the rocks.



MUSSEL.

NarwHau. ‘This large ani-
mal, which inhabits the north-
ern seas, belongs to the Whale
family, and is remarkable for
its long, straight tusk or horn
of finest ivory, giving to the



animal the name of the sea-

NARWHAL. unicorn.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 73

Navtitus, Argonaut, or
Paper Sailor, has its home far
away in the Pacific and Indian







Oceans. It has a white, deli-
cate, and beautiful shell, two
large eyes, and eight long
arms covered with suckers by
which it can cling tightly to 7
anything it takes hold of.









NEwFrouNDLAND Doc. This
noble animal is named after
its native island, where it is
employed as a beast of bur-
den. From three to five are
tackled to a sledge or cart
loaded with three hundred-
weight of wood, which they ,
_ will draw for miles. | With iy
us he is the companion of _
man, and many persons he
has saved from drowning.

Newt. A reptile of the Sa-
lamander kind, hatched from
eges. It passes through the
tadpole state, a fish-like form,
having no legs: that is the
first stage from the egg. The
one in the picture is called the ~
crested newt, from the deeply-
toothed edge on the back.


74: BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

NIGHTINGALE. A summer
visitor to the warmer parts of
Britain; a bird that sings
later in the night and earlier
in the morning than any other
bird, unless it be the redstart,
and said to be the sweetest
of song-birds.

NortHern DIver, or“Loon.”
A large sea-bird common on
the northern coasts of the
British Islands, the Western
Islands, and the Orkneys.
The eggs are somewhat like
those of the goose, but slightly
spotted with black. Its webbed
feet are set so far back that
it cannot walk well, but makes

as

a water, its proper element,





a tumbling scramble for the

Nut-watcu.
less, tree-climbing bird that
belongs to Europe; yet, as a
British bird, the nut-hatch is
confined to the south of En-
ggland. It feeds on_ insects,
berries, and nuts; it cracks
‘ the nuts by fixing them in a
‘ 4 Chink and striking them with
cone: ak its bill.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 75

Nyuieuav. This large ani-
mal, which belongs to the
Antelope family, is an inhabit-
ant of the forests of India and
Persia. It is a fierce, horned
animal, and it is of little use
to the hunter,

OceLor. A member of the
Cat family, and a native of
Central America. In size, it
stands between the tiger and
the domestic cat. It paces
along with the same long step
and noble tread as the tiger.
The one in the picture is called
the linked ocelot, because the
markings on its fur are chain-
like.

Opossum. There are many
kinds of this animal. This
one is a native of North Amer-
ica. It is about the size of a
cat, and, as with the kangaroo,
the female has a pouch in which
she carries her young. It has
been said that the opossum
has a gape like a pike, and
has the ears of a bat, the feet
of an ape, and the tail of a



serp ent. OPossuUM.
76

BEASTS. BIRDS, AND FISHES.



ae
ORIOLE.



SER

ORTOLAN,



ORANG-OUTANG. An _ ani-
mal of the Ape kind found in
the Sunda Isles, and some-
times called “the wild man of
the woods.” It feeds on vege-
tables, spending much of its
life among the branches of
trees; for it cannot walk well
on the ground, but goes on
from tree to tree with much
ease and quickness.

ORIOLE. This is the golden
oriole, very rare in Britain,


Europe. It feeds on insects,
worms, and caterpillars; but
it also likes berries, cherries,
and other sweet fruits. The
nest is hung from the end of
a slender twig or branch.

ORTOLAN. This bird be-
longs to the family of Bunt-
ings. The ortolan is rare in
Britain, but in many parts of
Europe, as Italy, France, Ger-
many, and Sweden, it is plenti-
ful. Great numbers are caught
and fattened for the market,
for they are a luxury of the
table.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. aaa

Oryx. An animal of the
Antelope kind. The one in
the picture has another name
—the gemsbok. You see that
its horns, sloping backward,
are nearly straight. There is
another variety—the true oryx
—which has the horns curved
backward. Both are animals
of the African plains.

OsPREY, or Fish Eagle. A
large bird of prey, living chiefly
upon fishes, which it takes by
darting upon them, sometimes *
plunging two feet under the
surface of the water. It makes
its nest in the crevices of rocks
or on the tops of tall trees,
laying from two to four eggs.

OstricH. Belongs to a
class called Running Birds,
which move by running instead
of flying. It is the swiftest-
footed of known animals. This
bird of the desert is a native
of Africa, and measures from
seven to eight feet in height ;
its wings, of long, soft plumes,
much esteemed for ornament,



are useless for flight. OSTRICH.


78 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Orrer. This animal in-
habits different parts of the
world. It is truly a water
animal. Though the otter
cannot walk well on land, it
‘ passes the daytime among the
rocks, and only at night goes
=~ forth to catch fish. It is fond
of salmon and trout, and is











































therefore the angler’s enemy.

OuncE. At one time thought
j to be a variety of the leopard,
g= Which it equals in size; but
it is easy to know it from
the other by the roughness of
its fur, as well as by the mark-
ings upon it; also by the tail
being more bushy. The ounce
is an inhabitant of India and
other parts of Asia.



oN
Rist oh

OvuzEL. Commonly called
the ring ouzel or ring thrush,
on account of the broad white
patch on the upper part of the
breast. This bird is not plen-
tiful in Britain, being but a
summer visitor. It feeds
chiefly on insects, grubs, and
caterpillars. Its haunts are



ouzEn. secluded glens and ravines.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

OwL. The common name
of a large family of night-
preying birds. The one in
the picture is called the barn-
owl, the screech-owl, or the
white owl, well known over
Britain by any of these names.
It is also spread over Europe,
Asia, and America. It is said
to be the most useful, and in
its plumage the most beautiful,
of British owls.

Ox. The domestic ox is
spread nearly over the world
in one or other of its kinds.
When we say oxen, we mean
more than one. In many
parts of the country these do -—
the work of horses in tilling
the land with the plough.
The male ox is called a bull,
the female a cow, and the
young a calf.

PanTHer. An animal a
little larger in size, and more
Savage in its ways, than the
leopard. The panther looks
very much like the leopard in
the markings of its fur, and is *
found in the same countries. PANTHER.



79
80

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



PARTRIDGE,



Paroquer. The plumage
of this bird is pale green, with
a black collar round the neck,
which gives it the name of
ring parrakeet, as the name is
sometimes written. The two
middle feathers of the tail are
always much longer than the
others.

Parrot. The bird in the
picture is the common gray
parrot, a native of Western
Africa, brought to this coun-
try by sailors; it is easily
tamed and taught to speak.
With us it is a very long-
lived bird; some have been
known to reach a hundred
years. The plumage is a
sober gray, excepting the tail
feathers, which are red.

PARTRIDGE. There are sev-
eral kinds of this bird. The
one in the picture is called the
common or gray partridge of
the copse and corn-field. There
is a curious thing about this
bird: in many cases the young
run about before quite getting
rid of the shell.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 81

Peacock. This beautiful
and hardy bird is a native of
‘India.
feathers adorns the head of
male and female; but the great
beauty of the male bird is in
his tail or train, which he can
erect or spread at pleasure,
and which shows a beautiful
display of colours. In this



country the peacock is kept
to adorn the park, the lawn, PEACOCK,

and the farm-yard.

Petican. A large, heavy
web-footed bird with very
short legs. It is found in
Africa, Asia, South America,
and Southern Europe, where
it haunts the rivers, the lakes,
and the sea-coasts; for it is a
keen fisher, and is provided



with a pouch in which it car-
ries the fish to the shore. The
plumage is white.

PELICAN.

Prercu. One of the most
beautiful of our fresh-water ,
fishes, found in the lakes and
large ponds of nearly all Europe
and Asia, and much esteemed
as an article of food. PERCH.


82 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Petrer, A long-winged
web-footed ocean bird, which
comprises a large family, of
various sizes and of different
habits, that consume the sur-
face refuse of the sea. The
plumage of this bird, commonly
called the stormy petrel, or
“Mother Carey’s chicken,” is
sooty black.

PHEASANT. There are many
birds known by this name.
The one in the picture is called
the golden pheasant, a native
of China. From the head rise
some long rich golden-yellow
feathers, which hang becom-
ingly over the hind part.
Pheasants feed on rice, hemp-
seed, wheat or barley, and
herbs, fruits, and insects.

Piczon. There are a great
many kinds of dove-cot pigeons,
of which this is one, such as
pouters, fantails, carriers, tum-
blers, nuns, jacobins, ete. They
all come from the rock-pigeon
in the wild state, so named



from its natural dwelling being
PICTON: in rocks rather than in trees,
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 838

PILCHARD, or Gipsy Herring,
is like the herring in size and
form, but is thicker. When a
pilchard is held by the tip of
the dorsal or back fin, th
head rises and the tail droop































down, which is the very revers
of what happens with the her- '







ring. Many millions of pil-
chards are caught every year.

Prtor-FisH. This little fish
is very nimble and swift in
its movements. It is silvery
gray, with five dark-blue bands
round its body, It is often
seen swimming before a ship
or in front of sharks following
a ship—hence itsname. The
usual length of the pilot-fish
is twelve inches.

PILOT-FISH.

Pirge-FisH. There are many
kinds of this fish in British
waters. This one is also called
the bill-fish and the sea-needle.
A curious thing about these
fishes is that the male is fur-



nished with a pouch or bag,



into which the female drops
the egos, or roe, there to be -
hatched by the male. PIPE-FISH. in


84 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Puaice. A flat fish common
in most seas. Its colour above
is olive, or light brown, spotted
with dots of red on the body
and on the fins; the under
side is white. It is caught
chiefly with the trawl-net.
Plaice is in season a great part
of the year, but it soon be- |
comes tainted after being
taken from the water.

Piover. There are many
kinds of plovers under differ-
ent names. They are all stilt-
birds, and they may be said
- to be spread ali over the world.
They breed on the margins of
= marshes and streams, mostly
in wild places. They resemble
the lapwings in their haunts
and habits.

PoIntEeR.
» Ssporting-dog trained to stop

and point with his nose to the
3 place where the game is lying.

tae There are several kinds of




INEGTISSSS is said to be the best. He
ial ees mlb ny : :
wey Bean > is more sure and steady, obedi-

POINTER. : ent and teachable.
BEASTS, BIRDS,

PotarR BEAR.
heavy, stout- bodied, fierce
white animal inhabiting, as

A great

its name shows, the polar
regions of the far North. It
is a land animal, or
properly

animal ;

more
ice - and - snow
and yet the prey
which it pursues is not land

an.

animals, but those of the frozen
sea, such as seals and the like.

Potecat.

animal of the Weasel kind, |

with a long body and short
legs,
and climbs walls with ease to
destroy the poultry wholesale.
In the rabbit-warren it will
kill a great number of rabbits
in one day.

Pony. A smart little ani-
mal of the Horse kind. The
best are said to come from
Wales, Dartmoor, Exmoor, and
The favourite is the
Shetland pony (sheltie), from
the northern islands of Scot-
land, where they used to run
wild, but are now tended and
folded like sheep or cattle.

Iceland.

It is nimble and bold, -



85

AND FISHES.








Hs
HAY

PONY.
86 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Poopte. A small dog with
long; fine, white curly hair.
It is sometimes called the les-
ser water-spaniel. It is very
playful, and swims well. It
is a much-petted dog, and be-
comes very fond of its master
or mistress. (See Lap-poc.)



POODLE. PoRCUPINE An animal
found in Africa, India, and
Southern Europe. It is a
gnawing animal that sleeps in
its burrow through the day
and quits it at night in search
of its food, which is vegetable,
as roots, buds, and fruits.
When angry it can erect its
spines ; and, like the hedgehog,
it can coil itself into a ball.



PORPOISE, or Sea-Hog, A
BOS ING: shoaling fish belonging to the
. Whale family. It is plentiful
in all European seas, and on
the coasts of North America,
It is generally about six or
seven feet long. Its blubber
yields about a hogshead of oil.
Breer The upper part of the porpoise
is bluish black and the under
part whitish,


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 87

PouTEr. There are about
twelve different kinds of do-
mestic pigeons, of which the
pouter (sometimes written
“powter”) is one. The bird
in the picture has the power
to puff up or swell the crop.

Prawn. A shell-fish which
is highly esteemed as a delicacy.
It is generally about three



iches in length, and of a

POUTER.
pale-red colour. Prawns gen-
erally inhabit sandy bottoms
near coasts. It is interesting

to watch the habits of the















prawn in an aquarium—that
is, a tank with glass sides, for
holding and showing water
plants and animals, and their
modes of living.



PTARMIGAN (pronounce, tar-
migan). Ptarmigans, the
smallest of the British grouse,
haunt the lofty heights of
Kurope, Asia, and North Amer-
ica, descending to feed on the
buds of trees, wild berries,
young shoots of heath, and on
insects. The feet of these “qlee = aN
birds are covered with feathers. PTARMIGAN

PRAWN.


88 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

PoFFIN, or Coulter-neb (so
called from the droll shape of
its beak), is a web-footed, short-
winged sea-bird, very common
in Britain. At the Needles in
the Isle of Wight and in other
places it is plentiful. Its food
consists of fishes and insects.

Puma, called also the Amer-
ican Lion. It is of a tawny
colour without spots or stripes
when full grown, and is found
. In both South and North
‘America. It often climbs
trees; and lies upon a branch,
ready to spring upon its prey
as it passes below. The puma
>gis easily tamed, and shows
7 much affection to those who
are kind’ to it, purring like
the domestic cat when stroked.



PUMA.

Quacca. An African ani-
mal of the Horse kind, very
plentiful on the plains of Cape
Colony, where it is found in
large herds. The quagea is
a spirited little animal, easily
tamed, and a willing servant.
The face, neck, and shoulders
quacca. are striped like the zebra.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 89









Quam. A bird of the ,
same family as the pheasant











and partridge. It has a round,
plump body and short legs ;
and is more of a running bird =

than a flying one. Quails are S



found in some parts of Europe,

Rassrr. A gnawing little 5 uA

animal of the Hare kind;
but the wild rabbit burrows
in the ground. Here is a
curious summing up:—“A
female rabbit will bring forth
about eight young rabbits
seven times in the year, so
that in four years her off
spring would amount to one
million two hundred and sev-
enty-four thousand eight hun-
dred and forty individuals.”

RacE-HoORSE. A horse
trained to run for a prize. It
is related of “ Eclipse,” a well-
known racer in his day, that
he had won for his owner
more than twenty-five thou-



sand pounds within seventeen

months. . RACE-HORSE.
90 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Racoon. An inhabitant of
the warmer parts of America.
It has a curious habit of
plunging its food in water
and rolling it between its paws
before eating it. The racoon
sleeps during the day with its
head sunk between its hind



legs; at night it goes forth to
eee search for food.

Ram. The male sheep ; the
owner of a very bad temper.
We are accustomed to look
upon the female as a mild,
timid creature. Not so the
ram: he is a bold and power-
ful one to contend against
when he hurls himself forward,
butting with head and horns.

Rat. A gnawing animal,
and one of the greatest animal
pests in dwellings, store-houses,
farm-yards, and mills—indeed,
everywhere. The one in the
picture looks like what is
known as the sewer-rat, the
only kind useful to man by
devouring the animal and vege-
table offal that might otherwise
RAT, breed a plague.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 91

Rarer. An animal about
the size of the badger, and
nearly allied to the glutton.
The ratel inhabits South Africa,
and ‘lives by plundering the
wild bees of their honey, which,
owing to the thickness of its
skin, it does without fear of
the stings of swarms of angry
bees,

RATTLESNAKE. This terrible
reptile, with its deadly fangs,
is a native of North America.



As the name implies, this
large serpent has a number of
horny joints on the end of the
tail, which rattle against one
another when the animal puts
its tail in motion.



Ravey. This bird belongs
to the Crow family, of which
it is the largest and most
powerful member. It lives in
the wilds rather than in the
woods, although it sometimes |
builds its nest there; but it?
prefers the ledges and clefts of ¥
high rocks for that purpose. &



Worms, grubs, and caterpillars
form the food of the raven.
92 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

RAZOR - BILL. Sometimes
called the common auk, which,
unlike the great auk in this



respect, can fly well. The
razor-bill finds its food in the
sea, and yet builds on the



ledges of lofty rocks many
hundred feet above the water.









The eges and flesh of the razor-
. bill are rank and fishy, yet
they are used as food by the
northern islanders.

Rep Derr. The male, the
only one that has horns, is a
hart or stag, the female a
hind, and the young a calf.
The stag is by much the larg-
est of European deer. The
7 number of red deer is now
greatly reduced in Britain. In
some parts of Scotland great
numbers are still found.

Repstart. This handsome
bird is classed among the Brit-
.ish warblers. As a summer
visitor, it is common in the
south of England. Like the
nightingale, it begins its song
at early dawn, and also con-
tinues it into the night.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 93

ReEpDwine. A European bird
classed among the Thrushes,
and sometimes called the red-
sided thrush, the wind-thrush,
the swine-pipe, and, from the
melody of its song, the night-
ingale of Norway. The red-
wing is a northern bird in the
breeding season. Its food con-



sists of wild berries, insects,
and worms.

REINDEER. The Carabou ‘
in North America. These
useful animals differ from _
others of the Deer tribe in \f
the female having horns as |
well as the male. There is
no other animal so much af

ECT.
PN AES



servant to man in any country



as the reindeer is to the Lap- REINDEER.
lander; its body serves him ._ WR
ANA











with everything needful to life. .\

Ruinoceros. A thick-
skinned animal that stands
next to the elephant in;
strength, and inhabits the
hotter parts of Asia and}
Africa. Those of Asia have i
but one horn on the nose,
those of Africa have two. RHINOCEROS,
94 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Roacu. A fresh-water fish
of the Carp family, and allied
to the dace. It is a pretty
fish that swims in shoals,
usually in lakes.



fatvats Rosin. A European bird
classed among the warblers, a
family of great service to the
gardener in destroying earth-
worms, insects, and caterpillars.
Our winter weleome visitant,
the robin, is also called robin
redbreast, robin redstart,
robinet, and ruddock, owing
to the breast being of a red-
dish-orange colour. The robin
; builds its nest on the ground,
or near it—in a hole near the
root of a tree, or in a wall.
It lines the nest with dry grass,
withered leaves, and feathers.
The eggs are from four to seven
in number, and are spotted a
rusty red.

Roesuck. The most hand-
some of the Deer kind, smaller
than the fallow-deer. Some
think it should be classed
among the antelopes. Its



ROEBUCK, horns are sharp and pointed.
.BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 95

Rook. It is interesting to
watch the habits of these well-
known birds in their commu-
nity, called a rookery. They
have laws to regulate their
conduct. One of their laws
at the building time is, that
all the sticks must be fetched ,
from a distance. Lazy rooks,
when discovered breaking this
law by taking sticks from a
tree whereon other nests are
-building, are set upon and
banished by the others. :
Rurr. A bird which belongs ce nae
to what are called the stilt or
running birds. It is not so
plentiful in Britain as formerly.
It takes its name from the
ruff of feathers that surrounds
the neck of the male bird in













the breeding season. Like
. RUFF.
our game-cock, the ruff is a
fighting bird at the pairing
time, when the “wars of the
ruffs” begin.

SasLteE.
of the Weasel family, much ~
sought after in Siberia for the
sake of its valuable fur.



“
96 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. ~

SALAMANDER. A reptile of
the Lizard kind. This is the
common salamander. - It is
black, marked with large bright |
yellow spots. It inhabits some
parts of Europe, where it lives
Sin damp, gloomy holes of the
earth, under stones, or in
ruined walls. It is slow and
heavy in its motions, feeding
upon flies, worms, slugs, and
the like. In former times the



SALAMANDER. wildest fables were invented
about this timid, harmless
creature—that its bite was in-
stant death; that it lived and
crawled about in red-hot,
glowing furnaces.

SALmMon. This is the most
handsome fish that ever
adorned the fishmonger’s stall,



SALMON.

and is highly esteemed as an
article of food. Salmon pass
the summer in the sea; but in
autumn they push up rivers,







leaping the falls, in order to



find a gravel bed on which to



= deposit their eggs to be hatched.











Saw-risu.
BSAW-FISH. the Shark: kind.
-. BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 97

Scorpion. It is curious to
think that this lobster-looking
creature should be classed
among the spiders. It has
eight legs, and from eight to
twelve eyes; the tail is formed
of six joints, ending in a
venomous sting; it has two
arms with large claws. The
breathing-pores are four on
each side along the belly.
These dreaded. creatures in-
habit most warm countries,
crawling into houses, to the
great terror of the inmates.

SEAL. This is the common
seal, the colour of whose fur
is a grayish yellow, sprinkled
with spots of brown. It is
five or six feet in length, is
found on the shores of all the
colder places of Europe, and is
valued for the oil and the
skin.

SETTER. A sporting dog.
trained to sit or crouch to the
game he finds, in much the
same way as the pointer; in-
deed, the setter and the pointer







WZ LJ a
Mp.

are nearly alike in their habits. SETTER.
98 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

SHap. A fish much like
the herring, only larger; in-
deed, in some places it is called
the king of the herrings. And
yet the shad differs in its
habits from the herring and
the pilchard, which never leave
the sea, whereas shads ascend



the larger rivers into the fresh
waters to deposit their spawn.
The shad is very good food.

SHARK. This one is called
= the white shark, the largest
~ and most fierce of the tribe.
When about to seize its prey










z it has to turn on one side or
ere on its back. There are other
kinds of sharks, as the hammer
shark, the thresher shark, and
the saw-fish.









SHEPHERD'S Doc. This is

“a most useful kind of dog.
Ge Twenty shepherds without a
dog could not do the work of
one shepherd with a dog. At




* for miles. It does this quickly,
and gets its master’s flock to-
SHEPHERD'S DOG. gether by themselves.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 99













SHOVELLER. This very
handsome bird is of the Duck
family. It forms its rude -
nest of withered grass in the ,
tallest and thickest tufts of
rushes near water, the eggs
average eight or nine, and the
young are led to the water as

















































soon as hatched, for it is there =
they have to find their food.
The flesh of the shoveller is SHOVELLER.
said to be good.



















SHrew, or Shrew Mouse,
called in some parts of Scotland
the “ Ranny,” is a small animal
common in most parts of
Europe. The shrew is very
like the common mouse in
shape and colour, only it has



a long snout and a square tail.
The shrew, like the mole,
tunnels in the ground, where
it finds its food.

SHRIKE. Sometimes called
the butcher-bird. Although
living upon insects, this bird
ought to be classed among the
birds of prey, for it kills
smaller birds. Shrikes live in



families and build on trees. SHRIKE.
100

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



SHRIMP.



SKATE.

Surimp. There are many
kinds of this shell-fish, They
are caught in large numbers
on our shores with long nets
pushed along the sandy bottom
of the sea. They dart along
by leaps through the water.
The shrimp is very like the
prawn, but not so large.

SILK-WoRM is the caterpillar
from which comes nearly all
the silk used in the world.
This worm is hatched from a
very small eg, and during its
caterpillar life it eats many
thousand times its own weight
of the leaves of the mulberry-
tree. Many thousands of
people are employed in tak-
ing care of the caterpillars,
in winding the silk from the
cocoons, and in making it
ready to be woven into webs.

SKATE, or Ray. A well-
known flat fish, of which there
are many kinds. As they
move through the water they
flap their broad flat sides as
a great bird moves its wings
when flying.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 101

SLow-worm.
reptile. Those common in
Britain are from twelve to
eighteen inches in length.
They feed upon slugs, worms,

and insects. This reptile moves
slowly, as its name implies ;
but why it is called also the
blind-worm it is not easy to
understand, as the harmless



creature has two bright eyes. SLOW-WORM.

Stuc. A molluse (a word
which means having a soft
body without any bones) very
destructive to gardens, where
they are always plentiful.
Like the snail, it has two pairs
of horns, with what are sup-
posed to be eyes on the tips
of the longer pair.



SMELT. A small fish of the
Salmon family. Smelts are
found at the mouths of certain
rivers. Their food consists
chiefly of small shell-fish.
There is another small fish,
the sand-smelt, which resem-
bles the smelt in flavour and









in. the singular odour of its Sane.
flesh as of cucumber.
102 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

SoLE. A flat, oblong fish
plentiful on the British coast.
Soles are fishes of the milder
rather than of the cold seas.
Being what are called ground-
SOLS. fish, they are caught with the
dredge or trawl net. They
vary in length from about one
foot to nearly two, and weigh
as much as twenty ounces.



Sow, otherwise called the
‘1, domestic hog; but, as shown
i in the picture, the sow is the
i in female hog, the male being the
| boar. They are profitable ani-
gj mals to the cottager who has




» @ garden. Not only are the
hides made into leather, and
the bristles into brushes, but
the flesh is used for food as
pork, and, when cured, as ham
and bacon.

Sow.







SPANIEL. This is another
Mi of the sporting dogs. It is
fl sl } not so large as the setter, and
=< there is this other difference
: between them—the spaniel





game; which raises the birds
SPANIEL, for the sportsman to shoot.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 103

Sparrow. The bold, pert,
chirping, house-top sparrow is
seen in our streets in all
weathers, and follows man
wherever he may choose to
reside. The sparrow is accused
of being troublesome to the
farmer, but the number of
grubs and insects he devours
is immense.

SPARROW-HAWK. We are
apt to suppose from the name
of this bird of prey that it
kills and eats sparrows only.
It is not so, for the sparrow-
hawk, a cruel and daring bird,
does great mischief among
pigeons, poultry, rabbits, and
hares. It has been seen in



pursuit of birds much larger
than itself SPARROW-HAWK,

Sperm WHALE, of which
there are several kinds found
both in the cold and in the
warm seas. It differs from























the Greenland whale in having
no whalebone, but it has a
very large head which con-
tains the valuable substance



SS SS

called spermaceti. SPERM WHALE.
104 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

SPIDER. This one is called
the garden or cross spider.
The web is the most beautiful









Se and most common in this
\ \\ country, being found in every
a bush, between hedges and
sibs during the autumn
‘months. These spiders have
ft a system of organs for pro-
ae ducing long silken threads
with which they spin their
dens and webs for catching
flies, on which they feed.

SPOONBILL belongs to the
arge family of stilt or wading
irds—birds of the marshes.
It is spread over the gréater
_ part of Europe and Asia, and
a portion of Africa.









Sprat. A small fish be-







































































































~ Like the herring, sprats swim
in great shoals, and are caught
in nets. In many places the
sprat is believed to be the
young, or fry, of the herring,
which is not the case. The
favourite feeding-places of
the sprat are the mouths of
SPRAT. rivers.

SPOONBILL.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 105

SPRINGBOK belongs to the
great family of Antelopes, and
is a native of South Africa.
Its colouring is very fine in
gloss and.in tint.

SQUIRREL.
animal having long toes armed *
with sharp claws, and a long
bushy tail. Squirrels are swift
in their motions and quick in
the eyesight. In the woods
and fields they eat nuts,
berries, and other fruits and
seeds. The squirrel sleeps.
during the winter. '

STAG-BEETLE, or Horn-bug,
So called from the very large
and powerful jaws of the male,
which gives a very painful bite.
The stag-beetle is seldom seen,
for it stays in its hiding-
place during the day. It is
seldom we see the picture of

%y
at

it with the wing case or sheath

Se
ot
=
S
~

SEN
=)

Iw}

open, showing the wings be- *

ee,
gr 4
A>
Ss
ay!

t

neath. It feeds upon the sap ,”



of trees, and kills caterpillars
that it may suck their juices. ¢

It lays its eggs in cracks in&

the bark of trees.

rn
106 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.




Fe SraGHounpD. A dog form-

BR ac erly used in chasing the stag
Van





(gre te, WOR or deer. The staghound is
Lh ‘asi Bee
ie now very rare; it is a large,
Peto
it

~... handsome dog, nearly allied to

dy






Ss

Srartinc. A bird far from
being rare in most parts of
Europe, and said to be most
abundant in the south of
England. The starling is
called a noisy chatterer, but
_When taken very young it
. can be taught to talk and to
whistle tunes. It takes its
name from the star-like mot-
tlings of its plumage. It is
chiefly an insect-eater.



STEED.

STARLING. mettle for state or for war.
bes SS Many anecdotes are told of
RAAB the soldier’s gallant steed—of

vf vv

: Fie faa
R¢- the strong liking and warm
as






gratitude shown to certain
riders for kind usage, for the
, horse is very sensitive to kind
\ ‘ treatment ; and of the evident
fondness which horses that
, have been accustomed to it
sree. have for the army.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

STICKLEBACK. Here is a
picture of a little fish that
builds a nest for its eggs and
its young. This fish has three
sharp spines upon its back,
and from these it gets the
name of stickleback, or prickle-
fish. It is a greedy fellow.

STONE-cHAT. A bird classed
among the Warblers, which
remains in Britain all the year
round. The furze, gorse, or
whin is the favourite haunt of
the lively stone-chat. There
he trills his sweet song, and
finds his food in worms and
insects. In winter this hand-
some bird is safe within the
snow-covered prickly furze.

Stork. Long ago there
were storks in England, but
there are none there now. In
Holland they are cherished and
protected. Boxes are placed
on the house-tops for them to
form their rude nests in. They
live on fish and vegetable ref-
use, so that they are most
useful in clearing the streets
of towns.



107
108 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. -

Sturceoy. A large fish
having rows of bony plates
over the body. Sturgeons are
caught in great numbers in
, large rivers, chiefly in the
Volga, and in the Caspian Sea,
to be used as food. Isinglass
is made from the air-bag, and
an article of food is prepared
from the roe. The common
sturgeon is from six to eight
feet in length.

SwaLLow. “The joyous
prophet of the year ”—*de-
lightful messenger of spring.”
These sayings refer to the
chimney-swallow, the one in
‘the picture, known by the very
great length of the feathers
that edge the tail. This is
the only kind which with us
is called a swallow, the others
being martins and swifts.

Swan. This is the tame
or mute swan, to us the best
known. These birds adorn by
their presence the surface of
Pour lakes, lochs, and rivers,
where they live to a great age,
some to a hundred years.


















BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 109

Swirt. The largest of the
swallow tribe, the others being
the chimney-swallow (on the
opposite page) and the sand
and house martin. Of all the
kinds, the swift is the most
constantly on the wing. When
it alights on the ground, its

short legs and long wings

make it difficult for it to uise ;
but it can stick with ease to
an upright wall of rock, in a
crevice of which, or in a high
steeple, it makes its nest.

SworpD-FisH.
being ten or fifteen feet in
length. It gets its name from



SWIFT.











the hard bony upper jaw
long and sharp like the blade
of a sword—with which it
attacks larger fishes.

Syrian Fox. This animal
lives in burrows, and has the
general habits of our common
British fox, to which it is
nearly related; the colour being
more red on the back and
lighter on the under parts.
The vineyards are well pro-
‘tected to keep out the foxes.



SYRIAN FOX.
110 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

SYRIAN Goat. Remarkable
for the great length of its
hanging ears and fine long
hair, useful for making a kind
of cloth. The females of this

breed give excellent milk in
large quantity. The Syrian
goat is also called the wild
goat, and is believed to be the
parent of all the tame kinds.

Syrian SHEEP. These sheep
differ very little from ours,
except in the large broad tail.
In order to prevent injury to
the fat tail, the shepherds often
support it on a board with
wheels. The tail is reckoned
a dainty dish.

Tapir. Two kinds of this
animal are known: the one



inhabits the warmer parts of
South America, and the other
the East India Islands. The
latter is the one in the picture,
for it has no mane like the
American one, and its trunk
is a little longer. Tapirs live
in the thick forests, and feed
on vegetables of all kinds, and
TAPTR, are fond of the water.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 111

TARANTULA.
of spider, named from the
town of Taranto in Southern
Ttaly, where it is found in
great numbers. Its bite was
supposed to cause a curious
dancing madness, which could
only be cured by lively music.



The tarantula belongs to the
TARANTULA.

class called “ wolf-spiders.”

’ Test. This is the smallest
of the Duck family, and a
beautiful bird it is. Its flesh
is much prized as a delicacy,
and sells at a high price. The >
haunts of the teal are found
about lakes and marshy places.
The nest is concealed among
the tall reeds, and composed





















































of a great quantity of leaves,
erass, and stalks, lined with
feathers. The eggs are nu-—
merous. i

Tencu.
habitant of British rivers. It
is found in slow, muddy rivers,
ponds, and lakes, where it is
caught with the net. The tench
is said to bury itself in the



mud during the winter.
112 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

TERN, called also the Sea-
swallow from the length of









the wings and the forked tail.
Terns are found in plenty upon
nearly all parts of the British
shores. The common tern de-
pends chiefly on the waters
=== for its food, which it takes
when on the wine.

Terrier. A favourite dog
2 that seems to understand what
is said to it, and learns easily
to perform curious feats.
These dogs get the name of
terrier from the word terra,
which means earth, because
they are sent into holes to
drive out such animals as
foxes and rabbits. They are
also good at killing rats.



TERRIER,

TuBet Doc. This gloomy-
looking dog is a noble, useful
animal in spite of his looks.
He guards his master’s home
and watches over his flocks;
everything is intrusted to the
protecting care of this dog.
It is said that in former times
- he was employed in hunting
THIBET DOG. the lion.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 113

TurusH. There are several
kinds of this bird; they be-
long to the same family as the /Â¥
blackbird. One of the group
called the missel thrush is the
largest and most handsome.
The song-thrush is smaller,
and is famed for its clear and
powerful note. In Scotland
it is called the mavis,

Tiger. The most terrible
animal of the Cat kind, more
fierce and cruel than the lion.
The length of the Bengal tiger



sometimes exceeds nine feet,
not including the tail. In
colour it is a tawny yellow
beautifully marked with black 4
stripes, except on the breast,
throat, and belly, and also °
parts of the face, which are
almost pure white.

TitLaRrk, Titling, or Tree sed SS
Pipit. From any one of these . a AP









names we may understand, Si)
this bird to be the smallest of; Fy
the Larks. It gives a song, “YJ
but in weaker strains than its
larger relatives; neither does

it fly 50 high. i TITLARK.
114

BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



‘ORPEDO.

Tirmouse. This is the blue
tit, often called tomtit, the
smallest of a group of little
birds of great service to the
gardener as insect-destroyers.
This little bird is no stranger
to us. He may often be seen in
woods and orchards searching
for his favourite food in insects
and grubs that would other-
wise destroy the buds and
blossoms of fruit-trees.

Toap. An animal that
looks very much like a frog,
only the toad has not such
bright colours, and has a rough,
warty skin. Toads can live
a long time without eating,
and even with a small amount
of air. They are useful in
the garden, for they destroy
many insects and grubs.

TorPepo. A curious fish
belonging to the Rays or
Skates. This kind gives elec-
tric shocks to persons in the
water near them. Thisstran ge
property gives the fish the

name of the cramp or numb
fish.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 115

ToRTOISE. A curious rep-
tile of which there are many
kinds, and which some people
confound with the turtles.
This one is called the common
land-tortoise, the only kind
found in Europe. The shell
upon its back, known as tor-
toise-shell, is made into combs
and other useful articles.

Toucan.
perching bird found in the
warmer parts of America,
where it nestles in the holes
of trees. Toucans for the
most part feed on vegetables,
but when necessity requires, ©
they feed on birds’ eggs, and \
on small birds themselves. The
great feature in the toucan is
its large bill.



Trout. The brook trout,
or speckled trout, belongs to
the same family as the salmon;
it is of much the same shape
as that fish, but smaller. - This
beautifully-marked fish inhab-
its clear running streams, feed- “E
ing on all kinds of insects that





fall upon the water.
116 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Tunny. A handsome and
important fish belonging to the
same family as the Mackerel,









but much larger. It is found
-In great shoals on the north
shores of the Mediterranean

























Sea, where the tunny-fisheries









=== are carried on widely.



TUNNY.

Turzor, called in Scotland
the Bannock Fleuk, is one of
the largest of the Flat-fishes,
and is common on the British
shores, where it is fished for
with the trawl-net in shallow,
and with the hook and line
in deep water. The turbot is
= sometimes more than two feet
in length, and is in great re-
pute as an article of food.

Turkey. This bird is a
native of North America,
where it is seen wild in large
flocks. This is the male of
the common domestic turkey.
You see him with his tail
‘spread like a fan, proudly
strutting about, with the
fleshy comb dangling over his



sae
SS

e =e. beak. We seem even to hear
TURKEY. his “gobble, gobble, gobble !”


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 117

TurTLE. This sea-reptile
is found in great abundance
both in the East and in the
West Indies. Turtles seldom
leave the sea unless to deposit
their eggs in the sand. At
such times the hunters come
upon them and turn them on
their backs, where they remain
helpless. These are the green
turtles so much prized as ar-
ticles of food.

TURTLE-DOVE, smaller. than
the domestic pigeon or the




wood-pigeon, is a bird of pas-
sage—that is, coming as a
summer visitor, and spending
the winter somewhere else.
They always go in pairs, keep- Se ae
ing closely together through
life. If the pair be caught,
their attachment to each other
continues, and thus they often

become home pets. “

Vampire. The name of af
large kind of bat found in
South America, where it is
accused of sucking the blood §
of every kind of animal, and
of man while he sleeps. VAMPIRE.

i
118 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

VIPER. The name given to
all kinds of poisonous snakes
found in Africa and Asia.
Three kinds are found in
Europe. The only kind found
in Great Britain is about two
feet in length. (See ADDER.)

VoLE—that is, the field-
vole. A short-tailed, burrow-



ing animal, most injurious to
the farmer. He destroys not
, only the newly-sown seed, but
also the growing crops and
the pasture-lands. Sometimes
~ voles appear in overwhelming
,) numbers, as if rained from
“4 the clouds. They also attack
eee FG" young plantations and nursery
a grounds.



VULTURE. There are many
kinds under different names of
these winged scavengers of the
land. They all feed on ear-
rion—that is, the decayed
parts of animals. Some of
the vultures soar to a great
height, and sight or scent their
putrid food from afar. A
feature in some kinds is that
vuLTURE. the head is nearly naked.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 119

Wactalt. What is called
the pied wagtail is the best
known to us, with its long tail
continually wagging up and
‘ down. It is found mostly near
pools and streams. It lives
on insects and their grubs, for
which, in the spring, they may
be seen following the plough ;
which makes the poet sing of



one,——
WAGTAIL.
“You ought a good ploughman to be,
For long you have followed the trade;
But it’s all for the insects, I see,
And not to give Hector thine aid.”

Watrus. The largest ani-
mal of its group; called also
the Morse, the Sea-cow, and the
Sea-horse. The walrus lives
on the land as well as in the



sea among the ice of the far
North. Walruses are very like
the seals in their character and
in their habits. They are
highly valued for their ivory
tusks.

Wapiti, or Carolina Stag,
is allowed to be the largest of
the Deer kind. It feeds on
grass, lichens, and the branches



of certain trees.
120 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES,

Wasp. This stinging winged
insect is allied to the hornet
' (which see). Some wasps live
alone, but most kinds live to-
gether in large numbers. They
build their nests for their
young in holes in the ground,
or on trees and bushes. The
nests are made of something



like paper; which gives the in-

sects the name of “the first

paper-makers.” They do not
?make honey as bees do. They
eat other insects.








WATER-RAIL. This is classed
< es among the stilt-birds. It is
~ not plentiful in Britain, and is
=== = == therefore seldom seen. It is a
shy bird, inhabiting the banks
of streams and lakes where
there is plenty of tall reeds.
It is rapid in its motions. It
feeds mostly on insects and
worms.





WATER-RAT, Water-Vole, or
Shear-mouse. A common and
well-known burrowing animal
found on the banks of streams.
Tt feeds on vegetables. It is



WATER-RAT. nearly allied to the beaver.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 121

WEASEL. This belongs to—
the same family as the pole-
eat, and is the smallest of its
tribe. It lives in old walls
and stone heaps, and under the
roots of old trees. The fur is
brown in summer and white in
winter. Weasels are bold, and
often kill animals much larger



than themselves.

WHALE. This is the right
or Greenland whale. Inside

WEASEL,

the roof of its large mouth,
arranged in rows, is the sub-
stance wecallwhalebone. Under
the whale’s skin lies the fat, or
blubber, which contains the oil.
Although the whale lives in
the sea, ib is not exactly a fish.



Like the cow, it brings forth its
young one alive and suckles it. PR

WHEATEAR. A pretty little iz
warbler found in all parts of
Europe. In England it is S$
much esteemed as food, and is a ‘\ My
in great favour for the table. AN

The wheatear feeds chiefly on 2g








numbers by shepherds. a WHBATEAR.
122 BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

Wuitreparr. A delicious,
pretty little fish belonging to
the Herring family, and sup-

~~ posed to feed on the little crea-

ag, vares that float in countless

numbers in the sea. Whitebait

I ee dinners are famed over London
and Greenwich.



WuittInc belongs to the
Cod family, and is very com-
mon on most parts of the Brit-
s ish shores. Its flesh is held
” in little esteem as food, being
soft and tasteless ; but as it is
understood to be light and
easily dissolved in the stomach,
it may be well adapted for
Re invalids.



WHITING.


















WIDGEON (sometimes writ-
ten Wigeon) belongs to the
\\ Ducks, and is nearly allied to

=, the teal. In England it is but

a winter visitant, coming about
- the beginning of October and
- leaving in March; so that little
is known of its summer habits,
although it is spread over
Kurope and Asia. It feeds
’ chiefly upon various kinds of
WIDGEON. grasses.


BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 123

Wotr. An animal that
looks very much like a large
dog, but which lives in the
woods of wild, unsettled coun-
tries. Wolves are very strong,
fierce, and greedy. They hunt
in large packs, and killanimals ,
much larger than themselves.
They often attack travellers



passing through lonely places.












There are no wolves in Brit-
ain now. In many parts of |
Europe they are still very /
troublesome.

Wotr-poc. Don’t you think *
this sulky-looking dog is more
fierce than the wolf it is trained
to hunt? Yet it belongs to
the family of Collies, or sheep-
dogs, with pointed nose and
bushy tail. Wherever there
are wolves in any part of the
world, these dogs may also be
found.

Wombat, or Australian Bad-
ger, is a rodent and burrow-
ing animal, and lives entirely
upon vegetables. The peace-
able wombat is said to be fast~

dying out. c WOMBAT.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.



WOOD-PIGEON.

Woopcock.
longing to the Snipe family,
but larger. It remains hid in
the woods most of the day.
Woodeocks are. birds of the
wild, marshy copses, where they
find their food. Theyare mostly
birds of passage, and winter
with us; but if their favour-
ite haunts continue moist and
damp during summer, they
will remain and breed.

WoopPEcKER. Of all the
kinds of this bird, the one in
the picture is the most common.
It is called the green wood-
pecker. It obtains its food,
consisting of insects and grubs,
under the bark of decaying
trees; it feeds also on the
ground about ant-bills.

WooD - PIGEON, otherwise
called Ring-dove and Cushat,
is the most plentiful of our
wild pigeons, living, as they
do, in groves and thickets. It
is not very clever at nest-
building, its nest being merely
a few sticks laid across each
other.
BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES. 125

Worm. The common earth-
worm is a jointed animal liv-
ing underground. Its long
body is divided by furrows
into a great number of rings,
which enable it to extend and

_contract its boneless body in

crawling. Though to us its
form be not inviting, it is a
timid, harmless creature.

Wren. Here is the picture
.of a lively and active little
songster. The nest is curi-
ously made of moss lined with
feathers, and having a small
entrance to it. There the fe-
male deposits her eggs. The
wren, like the robin, is always
‘a, favourite bird.

Yak, or Grunting Ox, is a
native of the mountains of
Thibet and the higher parts
of Central Asia. When wild, it |

is said to be savage, but it is -



easily tamed. The white tails :
of these animals are in much





request in India and Turkey,
where they. are mounted on %
ivory or silver handles, and ~~

are used as a badge of rank. YAK,
1 *





BEASTS, BIRDS, AND FISHES.

YELLOWHAMMER, Yellow
Bunting, or Yellow Yowley.
One of the most common of
British birds, and one of the
most beautiful. The head and
breast are of a fine lemon yel-
low, and the back of a rich
chestnut brown. These birds
frequent hedges and copses.
This is another bird. that is
hunted to the death, but being
a watchful bird it generally
manages to keep out of reach
SPREE ENB of stone-casting. In some

places the yellowhammer is
fattened for the table.

Africa, is a beautiful animal.
The ground colour is cream
white, and the stripes are
blackish brown. The zebra
“cannot be tamed and managed
like the horse or the ass, so ib
is of little use except for its
ZEBRA, flesh and its skin.

THE END.

ZEBRA, a native of South °


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