Citation
Cossack fairy tales and folk-tales

Material Information

Title:
Cossack fairy tales and folk-tales
Creator:
Bain, R. Nisbet ( Robert Nisbet ), 1854-1909 ( Editor, Translator )
Lawrence & Bullen ( Publisher )
Richard Clay and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Lawrence and Bullen
Manufacturer:
Richard Clay and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xii, 290 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cossacks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Contes de fées ( rvm )
Contes -- Ukraine ( rvm )
Ukrainiens -- Folklore ( rvm )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Ukraine ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre:
Children's stories
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Bungay
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
selected, edited and translated by R. Nesbit Bain. Illustrated by E. W. Mitchell.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026654510 ( ALEPH )
ALG5043 ( NOTIS )
04475830 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








The Baldwin Library



COSSACK FAIRY TALES

AND.

FOLK-TALES.













FATRY TALES

AND

o &
ooggatt

\- ,

sy / FOLK-TALES.

SELECTED, EDITED, AND TRANSLATED
BY

R. NISBET BAIN.

ILLUSTRATED BY E. W. MITCHELL.



LONDON :
LAWRENCE AND BULLEN,
16 HENRIETTA 8T., COVENT GARDEN, W.C.
1894.

[All rights reserved.]



Ricwarp Ciay & Sons, Lrwirep,
Lonpox & Bunuay.





CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION ...

OH

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

STORY OF THE WIND

VOICES AT THE WINDOW

STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, THE

AND THE FAITHFUL BEASTS

VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL

STORY OF TREMSIN, THE BIRD ZHAR, AND

LOVELY MAID OF THE SEA
SERPENT-WIFE eer are
STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL
SPARROW AND THE BUSH
OLD DOG...

FOX AND THE CAT

STRAW OX

GOLDEN SLIPPER ... ogo
IRON WOLF

THREE BROTHERS

FALSE SISTER,

NASTASIA, THE

PAGE
ix

18
40

79

93
103
109
122
127
130
134
14]
158
161



viil CONTENTS.

THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL

THE STORY OF IVAN AND THE DAUGHTER OF THE SUN
THE CAT, THE COCK, AND THE FOX ...

THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS TWO WIVES

THE ORIGIN OF THE MOLE

THE TWO PRINCES

THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN AND THE OLD FATHER WHO
WENT TO SCHOOL AGAIN... pad Sete)

IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETER’S FIFE ea near

THE MAGIC EGG a

THE STORY OF THE FORTY-FIRST BROTHER

THE STORY OF THE UNLUCKY DAYS ... eae

THE WONDROUS STORY OF IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS

b po WM bw wo
ao co oF WW WY
TO WW WwW Ww

bo





INTRODUCTION.

THe favourable reception given to my volume of
Russian Fairy Tales has encouraged me to follow
it up with a sister volume of stories selected from
another Slavonic dialect extraordinarily rich in folk-
tales—I mean Ruthenian, the language of the
Cossacks.

Ruthenian is a language intermediate between
Russian and Polish, but quite independent of both.
Its territory embraces, roughly speaking, that vast
plain which hes between the Carpathians, the water-
shed of the Dnieper, and the Sea of Azov, with
Lemberg and Kiev for its chief intellectual centres :
though rigorously repressed by the Russian Gov-
ernment, it is still spoken by more than twenty
millions of people. It possesses a noble literature,
numerous folk-songs, not inferior even to those of
Servia, and, what chiefly concerns us now, a copious
collection of justly admired folk-tales, many of them
of great antiquity, which are regarded, both in Russia
and Poland, as quite unique of their kind. Mr.



x INTRODUCTION.

Ralston, I fancy, was the first to call the attention
of the West to these curious stories, though the want
at that time of a good Ruthenian dictionary (a want
since supplied by the excellent lexicon of Zhelekhovsky
and Nidilsky) prevented him from utilizing them.
Another Slavonic scholar, Mr. Morfill, has also fre-
quently alluded to them (most recently in his
interesting history of Poland) in terms of enthusiastic
but by no means extravagant praise.

The three chief collections of Ruthenian Folk-Lore
are those of Kulish, Rudchenko, and Dragomanov,
which represent, at least approximately, the three
dialects into which Ruthenian is generally divided.
It is from these three collections that the present
selection has been made. Kulish, who has the
merit of priority, was little more than a pioneer,
his contribution merely consisting of some dozen
hazki (mirchen) and kazochiki (miirchenlein), in-
corporated in the second volume of his: Zapishi o
yuzhnoi Rusi (Descriptions of South Russia), St.
Petersburg, 1856-7. Twelve years later Rudchenko
published at Kiev what is still, on the. whole, the
best collection of Ruthenian Folk-Tales, under the
title of Narodnuiya Yuzhnorusskiya Skazki (Popular
South Russian Mirchen). Like Linnrét among the
Finns, Rudchenko took down the greater part of
these tales direct from the lips of the people. Ina





INTRODUCTION. xi

second volume, published in the following year, he
added other stories gleaned from various minor MS.
collections of great rarity. In 1876 the Imperial
Russian Geographical Society published at Kiev,
under the title of Malorusskiya Narodnuiya Pre-
donyia t Razkazw (Little-Russian Popular Traditions
and Tales), an edition of as many MS. collections
of Ruthenian Folk-Lore (including poems, proverbs,
riddles, and rites) as it could lay its hands upon.
This collection, though far less rich in variants than
Rudechenko’s, contained many original tales which
had escaped him, and was ably edited by Michael
Dragomanov, by whose name indeed it is generally
known. -

The present attempt to popularize these Cossack
stories is, I believe, the first translation ever made from
Ruthenian into English. The selection, though natur-
ally restricted, is fairly representative; every variety
of folk-tale has a place in it, and it should never be
forgotten that the Ruthenian Kazka (miirchen), owing
to favourable circumstances, has managed to preserve
far more of the fresh spontaneity and naive simplicity
of the primitive folk-tale than her more sophisticated
sister, the Russian Skazka. It is maintained, more-
over, by Slavonic scholars that there are peculiar
and original elements in these stories not to be found
in the folk-lore of other European peoples; such data,



xl INTRODUCTION.

for instance, as the magic handkerchiefs (generally
beneficial, but sometimes, as in the story of Ivan Golik,
terribly baleful) ; the demon-expelling, hemp-and-tar
whips, and the magic cattle-teeming egg, so mis-
chievous a possession to the unwary. It may be so,
but, after all that Mr. Andrew Lang has taught us
on the subject, it would be rash for any mere philolo-
gist to assert positively that there can be anything
really new in folk-lore under the sun. On the other
hand, the comparative isolation and primitiveness of
the Cossacks, and their remoteness from the great
theatres of historical events, would seem to be
favourable conditions both for the safe preservation
of old myths and the easy development of new ones.
It is for professional students of folk-lore to study
the original documents for themselves.

R. Nispet Bary.

British Musewm,
August, 1894.





COSSACK FAIRY TALES.



OH.

HE olden times were not like the
times we live in. In the olden
times all manner of Evil Powers!
walked abroad. The world itself
was not then as it is now: now



there are no such Evil Powers
amongst us. I'll tell you a kazka? of Oh, the Tsar
of the Forest, that you may know what manner of
being he was.

Once upon a time, long long ago, beyond the times
that we can call to mind, ere yet our great-grand-
fathers or their grandfathers had been born into, the
world, there lived a poor man and his wife, and they
had one only son, who was not as an only son ought

* Div. This ancient, untranslatable word (comp. Latin Deus)
is probably of Lithuanian origin, and means any maletic power.
? A folk-tale. Russ., Skazka. Ger., Mirchen,
B



2 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

to be to his old father and mother. So idle and lazy
was that only son that Heaven help him! He would
do nothing, he would not even fetch water from the
well, but lay on the stove all day long and rolled
among the warm cinders. Although he was now
twenty years old, he would sit on the stove with-
out any trousers on, and nothing would make him
come down. If they gave him anything to eat, he
ate it; and if they didn’t give him anything to eat, he
did without. His father and mother fretted sorely
because of him, and said: “ What are we to do with
thee, O son? for thou art good for nothing. Other
people’s children are a stay and a support to their
parents, but thou art but a fool and dost consume our
bread for nought.” But it was of no use at all. He
would do nothing but sit on the stove and play with
the cinders. So his father and his mother grieved
over him for many a long day, and at last his mother
said to his father: “ What is to be done with our
son? Thou dost sce that he has grown up and yet is
of no use to us, and he is so foolish that we can do
nothing with him. Look now, if we can send him
away, let us send him away ; if we can hire him out,
let us hire him out; perchance other folks may be
able to do more with him than we can.” So his
father and mother laid their heads together, and sent
him to a tailor’s to learn tailoring. There he remained



OH. 3

three days, but then he ran away home, climbed up
on the stove, and again began playing with the cinders.
His father then gave him a sound drubbing and sent
him to a cobbler’s to learn eobbling, but again he ran
away home. His father gave him another drubbing
and sent him to a blacksmith to learn smith’s work.
But there, too, he did not remain long but ran away
home again, so what was that poor father to do?
“Tl tell thee what T’ll do with thee, thou son of a
dog!” said he; ‘I'll take thee, thou lazy lout, into
another kingdom. There, perchance, they will be
able to teach thee better than they can here, and it
will be too far to run away from.” So he took him
and set out on his journey,

They went on and on, they went a short way and
they went a long way, and at last they came to a
forest so dark that they could see neither earth
nor sky. They went through this forest, but in a
short time they grew very tired, and when they came
to a path leading to a clearing full of large tree-
stumps, the father said: “I am so tired out that I
will rest here a little,” and with that he sat down
on a tree-stump and eried: “Oh, how tired I am!”
He had no sooner said these words, than out of the
tree-stump, nobody could say how, sprang such a
little little old man all so wrinkled and puekered, and
his beard was quite green and reached night down to



4 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

his knee.—‘* What dost thou want of me, O man?”
he asked.—The man was amazed at the strangeness
of his coming to light, and said to him: “I did not
call thee; begone!”—‘* How canst thou say that
when thou didst call me?” asked the little old man.—
“Who art thou, then?” asked the father.—‘ I am Oh,
the Tsar of the Woods,” replied the old man; “why
didst thou call me, I say ?”—‘ Away with thee, I did
not call thee,” said the man.—‘‘ What! thou didst not
call me when thou saidst ‘Oh’ ?”—I was tired, and
therefore I said ‘Oh’!” replied the man.—‘* Whither
art thou going?” asked Oh—‘ The wide world lies
before me,” sighed the man. “ I am taking this scurvy
blockhead of mine to hire him out to somebody or
other. Perchance other people may be able to knock
more sense into him than we can at home; but send
him whither we will, he always comes running home
again !”—“Hire him out to me [I warrant Pll
teach him,” said Oh. ‘ Yet I'll only take him on one
condition. Thou shalt come back for him when a
year has run, and if thou dost know him again, thou
mayest take him; but if thou dost not kuow him
again, he shall serve another year with me.’”—
“Good!” cried the man. So they shook hands upon
it, had a right-down good drink to clinch the bargain,
and the man weut back to his own home, while Oh
took the son away with him.









} lofts A
Vie ae
STAT ie
. qs sieht Be

(ee = y erence __ jiwe
ie

E TaN Le Gs
Zs tu j
Lo nS ily ies
Fig fy [ b Mu Meee Ab Wr Wey ne

AN \\ Bad





6 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Oh took the son away with him, and they passed
into the other world, the world beneath the earth, and
came to a green hut woven out of rushes, and in this
hut everything was green; the walls were green and
the benches were green, and Oh’s wife was green and
his children were green—ain fact everything there was
green. And Oh had water-nixies for serving-maids,
and they were all as green as rue. “Sit down now!”





said Oh to Lis new labourer, ‘and have a bit of
something to eat.” The nixies then brought him
some food, and that was also green, and he ate of it.
‘And now,” said Oh, ‘‘take my labourer into the
courtyard that he may chop wood and draw water.”
So they took him into the courtyard, but instead of
chopping any wood he lay down and went to sleep.
Oh came out to see how he was getting on, and there



OH. if
he lay a-snoring. Then Oh seized him, and bade
them bring wood and tie his labourer fast to the wood,
and set the wood on fire till the labourer was burnt
to ashes. Then Oh took the ashes and scattered
them to the four winds, but a single piece of burnt
coal fell from out of the ashes, and this coal he sprinkled
with living water, whereupon the labourer immediately
stood there alive again and somewhat handsomer and
stronger than before. Oh again bade him chop wood,
but again he went to sleep. Then Oh again tied him
to the wood and burnt him and scattered the ashes to
the four winds and sprinkled the remnant of the coal
with living water, and instead of the loutish clown
there stood there such a handsome and_ stalwart
Cossack * that the like of him can neither be imagined
nor described but only told of in tales.

There, then, the lad remained for a year, and at the
end of the year the father came for his son. He
came to the self-same charred stumps in the self-same
forest, sat him down, and said: Oh!”—Oh imme-
diately came out of the charred stump and said ;
“ Hail! O man !”—“ Hail to thee, Oh !”—“ And what
dost thou want, O man ?” asked Oh.—‘* I have come,”
said he, ‘‘ for my son.”—“ Well, come then! If thou

1 Kozak, a Cossack, being the ideal human hero of the Ruthe-
nians, just as a bogatyr is a hero of the demi-god type, as the
name implies.



& COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

dost know him again, thou shalt take him away ; ‘but’
if thou dost not know him, he shall serve with me yet,
another year.” So the man went with Oh. They.
came to his hut, and Oh took whole handfuls of millet
and scattered it about, and myriads of cocks came
running up and pecking it. “ Well, dost thou know,
thy son again?” said Ob. The man stared and
stared. There was nothing but cocks, and one cock
was just like another. He could not pick out his son.
“Well,” said Oh, “as thou dost not know him, go
home again; this year thy son must remain in my
service.” So the man went home again.

The second year passed away, and the man again
went to Oh. He came to the charred stumps and
said: “Oh!” and Oh popped out of the tree-stump
again. ‘ Come!” said he, “and see if thou canst
recognize him now.” Then he took him to a sheep-
pen, and there were rows and rows of rams, and one
ram was just like another. The man stared and
stared, but he could not pick out his son, “Thou
mayest as well go home then,” said Oh, ‘ but thy son,
shall live with me yet another year.” So the man
went away sad at heart.

The third year also passed away, and the man came,
again to find Oh. He went on and on till there met
him an old man all as white as milk, and the raiment
of this old man was glistening white. “Hail to thee,





OH, ° 9

Oman!” said he.—“ Hail to thee also, my father !”
——“ Whither doth God lead thee 2’”—* JI am going to
free my son from Oh.”—* How go ?”’_Then the man
told the old white father how he had hired out his
son to Oh and under what conditions.
said the old white father, “’tis a vile pagan thou hast
to deal with; he will lead thee about by the nose for



“ Aye, aye!”

a long time.”—* Yes,” said the man, “‘I perceive that
he is 4 vile pagan ; but I know not what in the world
to do with him. Canst thou not tell me then,
dear father, how I may recover my son ?”—“ Yes, I
can,” gaid the old man.—* Then prythee tell me,
darling father, and I'll pray for thee to God all
my life, for though he has not been much of a son to
me, he is still my own flesh and -blood.”—*« Hearken;
then !” said the old man; “when thou dost go to Oh;
he will let loose a multitude of doves before thee, but
choose not one of these doves. The dove thou’ shalt
choose must be the one that comes not out, but
remains sitting beneath the pear-tree pruning its
feathers; that will be ‘thy son.”’ Then the ma
thanked the old white father and went on. 5

He came to the charred stumps. “Oh!” cried he,
and out came Oh and led him to his sylvan realm:
There Oh seattered about handfuls of wheat and
called his doves, and there flew down such a multitude
of them that. there was no counting them, and one



10 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

dove was just like another. ‘Dost thou recognize
thy son?” asked Oh. “An thou knowest him again,
he is thine; an thou knowest him not, he is mine.”
Now all the doves there were pecking at the wheat,
all but one that sat alone beneath the pear-tree,
sticking out its breast and pruning its feathers.
“That is my son,” said the man.—‘‘Since thou hast
guessed him, take him,” replied Oh. ‘Then the father
took the dove, and immediately it changed into a
handsome young man, and a handsomer was not to be
found in the wide world. The father rejoiced greatly
and embraced and kissed him. “ Let us go home, my
son!” said he. So they went.

As they went along the road together they fell a-
talking, and his father asked him how he had fared
at Oh’s. The son told him. Then the father told
the son what he had suffered, and it was the son’s
turn to listen. Furthermore the father said: “ What
shall we do now, my son? I am poor and thou art
poor: hast thou served these three years and earned
nothing ?”—‘‘Grieve not, dear dad, all will come
right in the end. Look! there are some young
nobles hunting after a fox. I will turn myself into a
greyhound and catch the fox, then the young noble-
men will want to buy me of thee, and thou must
sell me to them for three hundred rubles—only,
mind thou sell me without a chain; then we shall





Of. 11

have lots of money at home, and will live happily
together !”

They went on and on, and there, on the borders
of a forest, some hounds were chasing a fox. They
chased it and chased it, but the fox kept on escaping,
and the hounds could not run it down. Then the son
changed himself into a greyhound, and ran down the
fox and killed it. The noblemen thereupon came

galloping out of the forest. “Is that thy grey-
hound ?”—* It is.’ —“ Tis a good dog ; wilt sell it to
us ?”—* Bid for it !”—‘ What dost thou require ?””—

“Three hundred rubles without a chain.”—‘ What
do we want with thy chain, we would give him a
chain of gold. Say a hundred rubles !”—* Nay !”—
“Then take thy money and give us the dog.” They
counted down the money and took the dog and set
off hunting. They sent the dog after another fox.
Away he went after it and chased it right into the
forest, but then he turned into a youth again and
rejoined his father.

They went on and on, and his father said to him :
“What use is this money to us after all? It is
barely enough to begin housekeeping with and repair
our hut.”—‘ Grieve not, dear dad, we shall get
more still. Over yonder are some young noblemen
hunting quails with falcons. I will change myself
into a falcon, and thou must sell me to them; only



12 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

sell me for three hundred rubles, and without a
hood.”

They went into the plain, and there were some
young noblemen casting their falcon at a quail. The
falcon pursued but always fell short of the quail, and
the quail always eluded the falcon. The son then
changed himself into a falcon and immediately struck
down its prey. The young noblemen saw it and
were astonished. “Is. that thy faleon?’”—“ Tis
mine.”—“ Sell it to us, then!”—‘‘ Bid for it!”’—
‘What dost thou want for it?”—‘If ye give three
hundred rubles, ye may take it, but it must be
without the hood.”—“As if we want thy hood!
We'll make for-it a hood worthy of a Tsar.” So they
higeled and hageled, but at last they gave him the
three hundred rubles. Then the young nobles sent
the falcon after another quail, and it flew and flew
till it beat down its prey; but then he became a
youth again, and went on with his father.

“ How shall we manage to live with so little?” said
the father. “Wait a while, dad, and we shall have
still more,” said the son. ‘ When we pass through the
fair I'll change myself into a horse, and thou must
sell me. They will give’ thee'a thousand rubles for
me, only sell me without a halter.” So when they
got to the next. little town where they were holding
a fair, the son changed himself into a horse, a horse





Of. 13

as supple as a serpent, and so fiery that it was

dangerous to approach him. The father led the
horse along by the halter, it. pranced about and
struck sparks from the ground with its hoofs. Then
the horse-dealers came together and began to bargain
for it. “A thousand rubles down,” said he, “and you
may have it, but without the halter.” What do we
want with thy halter? we will make for it a silver.
gilt halter. Come, we'll give thee five hundred!
“No!” said he.—Then up there came a gipsy, blind
of one eye. “Oman! what dost thou want for that
horse?” said hé.—* A thousand rubles without the
halter.” —*“ N ay! but that is dear, little father! Wilt
thou not take five hundred with the halter 2?—<« No,
not a bit of it !”—“ Take six hundred, then!” Then
the gipsy began higgling and haggling, but the man
would not give way. “Come, sell it!” said he,
“with the halter.”—“ No, thou gipsy, I have a liking
for that halter.”— But, my good man, when didst
thou ever see them sell a horse without a halter ?
How then can one lead him off 4” —“ Nevertheless,
the halter must remain mine.”—* Look now, my
father, [ll give thee five rubles extra, only I must
have the halter.’—The old man fell a-thinking, “A
halter of this kind is worth but three grivnt,’ and

the gipsy offers me five rubles for it; let him have °

1 A grivna is the tenth part of a ruble, about 22d,

aN



14 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

it.” So they clinched the bargain with a good drink,’
and the old man went home with the money, and the
gipsy walked off with the horse. But it was not
really a gipsy, but Oh, who had taken the shape of a
eipsy.

Then Oh rode off on the horse, and the horse
carried him higher than the trees of the forest, but
lower than the clouds of the sky. At last they sank
down among the woods and came to Oh’s hut, and
Oh went into his hut and left his horse outside on
the steppe. “This son of a dog shall not escape
from my hands so quickly a second time,” said he
to his wife. And at dawn Oh took the horse by the
pridle and led it away to the river to water it. But
no sooner did the horse get to the river and bend
down its head to drink, than it turned into a perch
and began swimming away. Oh, without more ado,
turned himself into a pike and pursued the perch.
But just as the pike was almost up with it, the
perch gave a sudden twist and stuck out its
spiky fins and turned its tail towards the pike, so
that the pike could not lay hold of it. So when
the pike came up to it, it said: “Perch! perch !
turn thy head towards me, | want to have a chat
with thee!”——“I can hear thee very well as I am,
dear cousin, if thou art inclined to chat,” said the
perch. So off they set. again, and. again the pike







Of. 15

overtook the perch. “Perch! perch! turn thy
head round towards me, I want to have a chat with
thee!”—Then the perch stuck out its bristly fins
again and said: “If thou dost wish to have a chat,
dear cousin, I can hear thee just as well as I am.”
So the pike kept on pursuing the perch, but it
was of no use. At last the perch swam ashore, and
there was a Tsarivna whittling an ash twig. The
perch changed itself into a gold ring set with
garnets, and the Tsarivna saw it and fished up the
ring out of the water. Full of joy she took it
home, and said to her father: “Look, dear papa !
what a nice ring I have found!” The Tsar kissed
her, but the Tsarivna did not know which fluger it
would suit best, it was so lovely.

About the same time they told the Tsar that a
certain merchant had come to the palace. It was
Oh, who had changed himself into a merchant. The
Tsar went out to him and said: “What dost thou
want, old man ?”—*T was sailing on the sea in my
ship,” said Oh, “and carrying to the Tsar of my own
land a precious garnet ring, and this ring I dropped
into the water. Has any of thy servants perchance
found this precious ring ?”—“No, but my daughter
has,” said the Tsar. So they called the damsel, and
Oh began to beg her to give it back to him, “for I
may not live in this world if I bring not the ring,”



16 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

said he. But it was of no avail, she would not give
it up. Then the Tsar himself spoke to her. “ Nay,
but, darling daughter, give it up, lest misfortune befall
this man because of us; give it up, I say!” Then Oh
begged and prayed her yet more, and said: “Take
what thou wilt of me, only give me back the ring.”—
‘Nay, then!” said the Tsarivna, “it shall be neither
mine nor thine,” and with that she pitched the ring
upon the ground, and the ring turned into a heap of
millet-seed and scattered all about the floor. Then
Oh, without more ado, changed into a cock, and
began pecking up all the millet-seed. He pecked
aud pecked till he had pecked it all up. Yet there
was one single little grain of millet which rolled
right beneath the feet of the Tsarivna, and that he
did not see. When he had done pecking he got upon
the window-sill, opened his wings, and flew right
away.

But the one remaining grain of millet-seed turned
into a most beauteous youth, a youth so beauteous
that when the Tsarivna beheld him she fell in love
with him on the spot, and begged the Tsar and
Tsaritsa right piteously to let her have him as her
husband. ‘“ With no other shall I ever be happy,”
said she, “my happiness is in lim alone!” For a
long time the Tsar wrinkled his brows at the thought
of giving his daughter toa simple youth; but at last



O#. 17

he gave them his blessing, and they crowned them
with bridal wreaths, and all the world was bidden to
the wedding-feast. And I too was there, and drank
beer and mead, and what my mouth could not
hold ran down over my beard, and my heart rejoiced

within me,



THE STORY OF THE WIND.

NCE upon a time there dwelt two
brethren in one village, and one
brother was very, very rich, and
the other brother was very, very
poor. The rich man had wealth
of all sorts, but all that the poor
man had was a heap of children.
One day, at harvest-time, the poor man left his

wife and went to reap and thresh out his little plot
of wheat, when the Wind came and swept all his corn
away down to the very last grain. The poor man
was exceeding wrath thereat, and said: ‘Come what
will, Vl go seek the Wind, and I'll tell him with
what pains and trouble I had got my corn to grow
and ripen, and then he, forsooth! must needs come
and blow it all away.”



So the man went home and made ready to go,
and as he was making ready, his wife said to him:



THE STORY OF THE WIND. 19

“Whither away, husband ?”—«[ am going to seek
the Wind,” said he; “what dost thou say to that?”
—“T should say, do no such thing,” replied his wife.
“Thou knowest the saying, ‘If thou dost want to
find the Wind, seek him on the open steppe. He can
go ten different ways to thy one.’ Think of that, dear
husband, and go not at all.”—“T mean to go,” replied
the man, “though I never return home again.”
Then he took leave of hig wife and children, and went
straight out into the wide world to seek the Wind on
the open steppe.

He went on farther and farther til] he saw before
him a forest, and on the borders of that forest stood
a hut on hens’ legs. The man went into this hut and
was filled with astonishment, for there lay on the
floor a huge, huge, old man, as grey as milk. He
lay there stretched at full length, his head on the
seat of honour,’ with an arm and lee in each of the
four corners, and all his hair standing on end. I¢
was no other than the Wind himself. The man
stared at this awful Ancient with terror, for never
in his life had he seen anything like it. “God help
thee, old father!” eried he.—« Good health to thee,
good man!” said the ancient giant, as he lay on the
floor of the hut. Then he asked him in the most

* Pokute, the place of honour in a Ruthenian peasant’s hut, at
the right-hand side of the entrance.



20 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

friendly manner: “ Whence hath God brought thee
hither, good man ?”—*I am wandering through the
wide world in search of the Wind,” said the man.
“Tf I find him, I will turn back ; if I don’t find him,
-Ishall go on and on till I do.”—“ What dost thou
want with the Wind?” asked the old giant lying on
the floor. “Or what wrong hath he done thee, that
thou shouldst seek him out so doggedly ?”—“« What
wrong hath he done me?” replied the wayfarer.
‘“ Hearken now, O Ancient, and I will tell thee! I
went straight from my wife into the field and reaped
my little plot of corn; but when I began to thresh
it out, the Wind came and caught and scattered every
bit of it in a twinkling, so that there was not a single
little grain of it left. So now thou dost see, old man,
what I have to thank him for. Tell me, in God’s
name, why such things be? My little plot of corn
was my all-im-all, and in the sweat of my brow did
I reap and thresh it; but the Wind came and blew
it all away, so that not a trace of it is to be found in
the wide world. Then I thought to myself: ‘Why
should he do this?’ And I said to my wife: ‘Tl
go seek tue Wind, and say to him: “ Another time,
visit not the poor man who hath but a little corn,
and blow it not away, for bitterly doth he rue
it 1”’"—* Good, my son!” said the giant who lay on
the floor. “TJ shall know better in future ; in future









AG>
ZEEE

ii We















































\



























A,











22 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

I will not blow away the poor man’s corn. But, good
man, there is no need for thee to seek the Wind in
the open steppe, for I myself am the Wind.’—
“Then if thou art the Wind,” said the man, “ give
me back my corn.”—‘ Nay,” said the giant; “thou
canst not make the deal come back from the grave.
Yet, inasmuch as I have done thee a mischief, I will
now give thee this sack, good man, and do thou take
it home with thee. And whenever thou want’st a
meal say: ‘Sack, sack, give me to eat and drink !’
and immediately thou shalt have thy fill both of
meat and drink, so now thou wilt have wherewithal
to comfort thy wife and children.”

Then the man was full of gratitude. “I thank
thee, O Wind!” said he, ‘‘for thy courtesy in
giving me such a sack as will give me my fill of meat
and drink without the trouble of working for it.”—
“For a lazy loon, *twere a double boon,” said the
Wind. ‘Go home, then, but look now, enter no
tavern by the way; I shall know it if thou dost.”—
“No,” said the man, “I will not.” And then he
took leave of the Wind and went his way.

He had not gone very far, when he passed by a
tavern, and he felt a burning desire to find out
whether the Wind had spoken the truth in the matter
of the sack. “ How can a man pass a tavern without
going into it?” thought he; “Tl go in, come what



THE STORY OF THE WIND. 23

may. The Wind won’t know, because he can’t sec.”
So he went into the tavern and hung up his sack
upon a peg. ‘The Jew who kept the tavern immedi-
ately said to him: “What dost thou want, good
man ?”—“ What is that to thee, thou dog?” gaid the
man.—‘‘ You are all alike,” sneered the Jew, “take
what you can, and pay for nothing.”—“ Dost think
IT want to buy anything from thee?” shricked the
man; then, turning angrily to the sack, he cried:
“Sack, sack, give me to eat and drink!” Immedi-
ately the table was covered with all sorts of meats
and liquors. Then all the Jews in the tavern
crowded round full of amazement, and asked all
manner of questions. ‘ Why, what is this, good
man?” said they; “never have we seen anything
like this before !”—*“ Ask no questions, ye accursed
Jews!” cried the man, “but sit down to eat, for there
is enough for all.” So the Jews and the Jewesses set
to and ate until they were full up to the ears; and
they drank the man’s health in pitchers of wine of
every sort, and said: “ Drink, good man, and spare
not, and when thou hast drunk thy fill, thou shalt
lodge with us this night. We'll make ready a bed
for thee. None shall vex thee. Come now, eat
and drink whatever thy soul desires.” So the Jews
flattered him with devilish cunning, and almost forced
the wine-jars to his lips.



at COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

The simple fellow did not perceive their malice and
cunning, and he got so drunk that he could not move
from the place, but went to sleep where he was.
Then the Jews changed his sack for another, which
they hung up on a peg, and then they woke him.
“ Dost hear, fellow!” cried they; “get up, it is time
to go home. Dost thou not see the morning light ?”
The man sat up and scratched the back of his head,
for he was loth to go. But what was he to do? So
he shouldered the sack that was hanging on the peg,
and went off home.

When he got to his house, he cried: “Open the
door, wife!” Then his wife opened the door, and he
went in and hung his sack on the peg and said: “ Sit
down at the table, dear wife, and you children sit
down there too. Now, thank God! we shall have
enough to eat and drink, and to spare.” The wife
looked at her husband and smiled. She thought he
was mad, but down she sat, and her children sat down
all round her, and she waited to see what her husband
would do next. Then the man said: “Sack, sack,
‘give tous meat and drink!” But the suck was silent.
Then he said again: “Sack, sack, give my children
something to eat!” And still the sack was silent.
Then the man fell into a violent rage: ‘Thou didst
give me something at the tavern,” cried he; “and
now I may call in vain, Thou givest nothing, and





THE STORY OF THE WIND. 25

thou hearest nothing ”—and, leaping from his seat, he
took up a club and began beating the sack till he had
knocked a hole in the wall, and beaten the sack to
bits. Then he set off to seck the Wind again. But
his wife stayed at home and put everything to rights
again, railing and scolding at her husband as a madman.

But the man went to the Wind and said: “ Hail to
thee, O Wind !”—“Good health to thee, O man!”
replied the Wind. Then the Wind asked: ‘“ Wherefore
hast thou come hither, O man? Did I not give thee
a sack? What more dost thou want ?”—* A pretty
sack indeed!” replied the man; “that sack of thine
has been the cause of much mischief to me and mine.”
—“‘ What mischief has it done thee ?”—‘ Why, look
now, old father, I’ll tell thee what it has done. It
wouldn’t give me anything to eat and drink, so I
began beating it, and beat the wall in. Now what
shall I do to repair my crazy hut? Give me some-
thing, old father.”—But the Wind replied: “Nay,
O man, thou must do without. Fools are neither
sown nor reaped, but grow of their own accord—hast
thou not been into a tavern ?”—‘T have not,” said
the man.—* Thou hast not? Why wilt thou lie?”—
“Well, and suppose I did lie?” said the man ; “if thon
suffer harm through thine own fault, hold thy tongue
about it, that’s what I say. Yet it is all the fault of
‘thy sack that this evil has come upon me. If it had



26 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

only given me to eat and to drink, I should not have
come to thee again.” At this the Wind scratched his
head a bit, but then he said: “ Well then, thou man!
there’s a little ram for thee, and whenever thou dost
want money say to it: ‘ Little ram, little ram, scatter
money!’ and it will scatter money as much as thou
wilt. Only bear this in mind: go not into a tavern,
for if thou dost, I shall know all about it; and
if thou comest to me a third time, thou shalt have
cause to remember it for ever.”—‘‘ Good,” said the
man, ‘I won’t go.”—Then he took the little ram,
thanked the Wind, and went on his way.

So the man went along leading the little ram by a
string, and they came to a tavern, that very same
tavern where he had been before, and again a strong
desire came upon the man to go in. So he stood by
the door and began thinking whether he should go in
or not, and whether he had any need to find out the
truth about the little ram. ‘‘ Well, well,” said he at
last, “VIL go in, only this time I won’t get drunk.
Tl drink just a glass or so, and then I'll go home.”
So into the tavern he went, dragging the little ram
after him, for he was afraid to let it go.

Now, when the Jews who were inside there saw
the little ram, they began shrieking and said: ‘* What
art thou thinking of, O man! that thou bringest that
little ram into the room? Are there no barns outside





THE STORY OF THE WIND. Gir

where thou mayest put it up ?””"—“ Hold your tongues,
ye accursed wretches!” replied the man: “ what has
it got to do with you? It is not the sort of ram
that muck-worms like you deal in. And if you don’t
believe me, spread a cloth on the floor and you shall
se something, I warrant you.”—Then he said:
“Tittle ram, little ram, scatter money!” and the
little ram scattered so much money that it seemed to
grow, and the Jews sereeched like demons.—“ man, man!” eried they, “such a ram as that we
have never seen in all our days. Sell it tous! We
will give thee such a lot of money for it.”—< You
may pick up all that money, ye accursed ones,” cried
the man, “but I don’t mean to sell my ram.”

Then the Jews picked up the money, but they laid
before him a table covered with all the dishes that a
man’s heart may desire, and they begged him to sit
down and make merry, and said with true Jewish
cunning: “Though thou mayest get a little lively,
dou’t get drunk, for thou knowest how drink plays
the fool with a man’s wits.”—The man marvelled at
the straightforwardness of the Jews in warning him
against the drink, and, forgetting everything else, sat
down at table and began drinking pot after pot of
mead, and talking with the Jews, and his little ram
went clean out of his head. But the Jews made him
drunk, and laid him in the bed, and changed rams



28 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

with him; his they took away, and put in its place
one of their own exactly like it.

When the man had slept off his carouse, he arose
and went away, taking the ram with him, after bid-
ding the Jews farewell. When he got to his hut he
found his wife in the doorway, and the moment she
saw him coming, she went into the hut and cried to
her children: “Come, children! make haste, make
haste! for daddy is coming, and brings a little ram
along with him ; getup, and look sharp about it! An
evil year of waiting has been the lot of wretched me,
but he has come home at last.” ;

The husband arrived at the door and said: “ Open
the door, little wife; open, I say!’—The wife replied:
“Thou art not a great noblenian, so open the door
thyself. Why dost thou get so drunk that thou dost
not know how to open a door?” It’s an evil time that
I spend with thee. Here. we are with all these little
children, and yet thou dost go away and drink.”—
Then the wife opened the door, and the husband
walked into the hut and said: “Good health to thee,
dear wife!”—But the wife replied: “ Why dost thou
bring that ram inside the hut, can’t it stay outside
the walls ?”—‘ Wife, wife!” said the man, “speak,
but don’t screech. Now we shall have all manner of
good things, and the children will have a fine time of
it.’—* What!” said the wife, “what good can.we



THE STORY OF THE WIND. 29

get from that wretched ram? Where shall we get
the money to find food for it? Why, we’ve nothing
to eat ourselves, and thou dost saddle us with a ram
besides. Stuff and nonsense! I say.”—* Silence,
wife,” replied the husband; “that ram is not like
other rams, I tell thee.”—“ What sort is it, then?”
asked his wife.—‘‘Don’t ask questions, but spread
a cloth on the floor and keep thine eyes open.’—
“Why spread a cloth?” asked the wife.—‘ Why 2”
shrieked the man in a rage; “do what I tell thee, and
hold thy tongue.”—But the wife said: “Alas, alas!
I have an evil time of it. Thou dost nothing at all
but go away and drink, and then thou comest home
and dost talk nonsense, and bringest sacks and rams
with thee, and knockest down our little hut.’”—At
this the husband could control his rage no longer, but
shrieked at the ram: ‘Little ram, little ram, scatter
money !”—But the ram only stood there and stared
at him. Then he cried again: “Little ram, little
ram, scatter money!”—But the ram stood there
stock-still and did nothing. Then the man in his
anger caught up a piece of wood and struck the ram
on the head, but the poor ram only uttered a feeble
baa! and fell to the earth dead.

The man was now very much offended and said:
“Tl go to the Wind again, and I’ll tell him what a
fool he has made of me.” Then he took up his hat



30 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and went, leaving everything behind him. And the
poor wife put everything to rights, and reproached
and railed at her husband.

So the man came to the Wind for the third time
and said: “Wilt thou tell me, please, if thou art
really the Wind or no?”—‘ What's the matter with
thee?” asked the Wind.—‘“T'll tell thee what's the
matter,” said the man; “why hast thou laughed at
and mocked me and made such a fool of me?”—“ 1
laugh at thee!” thundered the old father as he lay
there on the floor and turned round on the other ear ;
“why didst thou not hold fast what I gave thee ?
Why didst thou not listen to me when I told thee
not to go into the tavern, eh? ”__«What tavern dost
thou mean?” asked the man proudly; “as for the
sack and the ram thou didst give me, they only did
me a mischief; give me something else.” —‘* What’s
the use of giving thee anything?” said the Wind;
“thou wilt only take it to the tavern. Out of the
drum, my twelve henchmen !” eried the Wind, “ and
just give this accursed drunkard a good lesson that
he may keep his throat dry and listen a little more
to old people !”—Immediately the twelve henchmen
leaped out of the drum and began giving the man
a sound thrashing. Then the man saw that it was
no joke and begged for mercy: “Dear old father
Wind,” cried he, “be merciful, and let me get off





THE STORY OF THE WIND. bl

alive. Tl not come to thee again though I should
have to wait till the Judgment Day, and T’ll do all
thy behests.”—“Into the drum, my henchmen!”
cried the Wind.—* And now, O man!” said the
Wind, “thou mayest have this drum with the twelve
henchmen, and go to those accursed Jews, and if
they will not give thee back thy sack and thy ram,
thou wilt know what to say.”

So the man thanked the Wind for his good advice,
and went on his way. He came to the inn, and when
the Jews saw that he brought nothing with him they
suid: “Hearken, O man! don’t come here, for we
have no brandy.”—* What do I want with your
brandy ?” cried the man in a rage.—“ Then for what
hast thou come hither?”—“I have come for my
own.”— Thy own,” said the Jews; “ what dost thou
mean ?”—“ What do I mean?” roared the man ;
“why, my sack and my ram, which you must give
up to me.”—* What ram? What sack?” said the
Jews; “why, thou didst take them away from here
thyself”—“ Yes, but you changed them,” said the
man.—“ What dost thou mean by changed?” whined
the Jews; “we will go before the magistrate, and
thou shalt hear from us about this.”— You will have
an evil time of it if you go before the magistrate,”
said the man; “but at any rate, give me back my
own.” And he sat down behind the table. Then the



32 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Jews caught him by the shoulders to cast him out
and cried: “ Be orf, thou rascal! Does any one know
where this man comes from? No doubt he is an evil-
doer.” The man could not stand this, so he cried:
“Out of the drum, my henchmen! and give the
accursed Jews a sound drubbing, that they may know
better than to take in honest folk!” and immediately
the twelve henchmen leaped out of the drum and
began thwacking the Jews finely.—“ Oh, oh!” roared
the Jews; “oh, dear, darling, good man, we'll give
thee whatever thou dost want, only leave off beating
us! Let us live a bit longer in the world, and we
will give thee back everything.” — Good!” said the
man, “and another time you'll know better than to
deceive people.” Then he cried: ‘Into the drum,
my henchmen!” and the henchmen disappeared,
leaving the Jews more dead than alive. Then they
eave the man his sack and his ram, and he went
home, but it was a long, long time before the Jews
forgot those henchmen.

So the man went home, and his wife and children
saw him coming from afar. ‘‘ Daddy is coming home
now with a sack and aram!” said she; “ what shall
we do? We shall have a bad time of it, we shall
have nothing left at all. God defend us poor
wretches! Go and hide everything, children.” So
the children hastened away, but the husband came to





THE STORY OF THE WIND. 33

the door and said: “Open the door !’—* Open the
door thyself,” replied the wife.—Again the husband
bade her open the door, but she paid no heed to him.



The man was astonished. This was carrylug a joke
too far, so he cried to his henchmen: “ Henchmen,
henchmen! out of the drum, and teach my wife to
respect her husband!” Then the henchmen leaped
out of the drum, laid the good wife by the heels, and
began to give her a sound drubbing. “Oh, my
dear, darling husband!” shrieked the wife, “never to
the end of my days will I be sulky with thee again.
I'll do whatever thou tellest me, only leave off beat-
ing me.”—“Then I have taught thee sense, eh?”
said the man.—“ Oh, yes, yes, good husband!” eried
she. Then the man said: “Henchmen, henchmen !
into the drum!” and the henchmen leaped into it
again, leaving the poor wife more dead than alive.

Then the husband said to her: “ Wife, spread a
cloth upon the floor.” The wife scudded about as
nimbly as a fly, and spread a cloth out on the floor
without a word. Then the husband said: “Little
ram, little ram, scatter money!” And the little ram
scattered money till there were piles and piles of it.
sp bicl i ceups my children,’ said the man, “and
thou too, wife, take what thou wilt!”—And they
didn’t wait to be asked twice. Then the man hung

up his sack on a peg and said: “Sack, sack, meat
D



34 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and drink!” Then he caught hold of it and shook
it, and immediately the table was as full as it could
hold with all manner of victuals and drink. “Sit
down, my children, and thou too, dear wife, and eat
thy fil. Thank God, we shall now have no lack of
food, and shall not have to work for it either.”

So the man and his wife were very happy together,
and were never tired of thanking the Wind. They
had not had the sack and the ram very long when
they grew very rich, and then the husband said to
the wife: “I tell thee what, wife !”—‘‘ What?” said
she.—“ Let us invite my brother to come and see
us.”—“ Very good,” she replied; “invite him, but
dost thou think he'll come ?”—‘ Why shouldn’t he?”
asked her husband. “Now, thank God, we have
everything we want. He wouldn't come to us when
we were poor and he was rich, because then he was
ashamed to say that I was his brother, but now even
he hasn’t got so much as we have.”

So they made ready, and the man went to invite
his brother. The poor man came to his rich brother
and said: “Hail to thee, brother; God help thee!”
—Now the rich brother was threshing wheat on his
threshing-floor, and, raising his head, was surprised to
see his brother there, and said to him haughtily: “I
thank thee. Hail to thee also! Sit down, my brother,
and tell us why thou hast come hither.” —‘“ Thanks,





THE STORY. OF THE WIND. 35

my brother, I do not want to sit down. I have come
hither to invite thee to us, thee and thy wife.’—
“Wherefore?” asked the rich brother.—The poor
man said: “My wife prays thee, and I pray thee
also, to come and dine with us of thy courtesy.”—
“Good!” replied the rich brother, smiling secretly.
“T will come whatever thy dinner may be.”

So the rich man went with his wife to the poor
man, and already from afar they perceived that the
poor man had grown rich. And the poor man
rejoiced greatly when he saw his rich brother in his
house. And his tongue was loosened, and he began
to show him everything whatsoever he possessed.
The rich man was amazed that things were going so
well with his brother, and asked him how he had
managed to get on so. But the poor man answered :
“Don’t ask me, brother. I have more to show thee
yet.” Then he took him to his copper money, and
said: “ There are my oats, brother!” Then he took
and showed him his silver money, and said: ‘ That's
the sort of barley I thresh on my threshing-floor !”
And, last of all, he took him to his gold money, and
said: “There, my dear brother, is the best wheat
I’ve got.”—Then the rich brother shook his head, not
once nor twice, and marveiled at the sight of so many
good things, and he said : “‘ Wherever didst thou pick
up all this, my brother?”—“Oh! I’ve more than



36 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

that to show thee yet. Just be so good as to sit down
on that chair, and I'll show and tell thee everything.”

Then they sat them down, and the poor man hung
up his sack upon a peg. * Sack, sack, meat and
drink!” he cried, and immediately the table was:
covered with all manner of dishes. So they ate and
ate, till they were full up to the ears. When they
had eaten and drunken their fill, the poor man called
to his son to bring the little ram into the hut. So
the lad brought in the ram, and the rich brother
wondered what they were going to do with it. Then
the poor man said: “ Little ram, scatter money !”
And the little ram scattered money, till there were
piles and piles of it on the floor. “ Pick it up!” said
the poor man to the rich man and his wife. So they
picked it up, and the rich brother and his wife
marvelled, and the brother said: “ Thou hast a very
nice piece of goods there, brother. If I had only
something like that I should lack nothing ;” then,
after thinking a long time, he said: ‘Sell 1t to me,
my brother.”—“ No,” said the poor man, © IT will not
sell it.’—After a little time, however, the rich brother
said again ; ‘Come now! I'll give thee for it six yoke
of oxen, and a plough, and a harrow, and a hay-fork,
and I'll give thee besides, lots of corn to sow, thus
thou wilt have plenty, but give me the ram and the
sack.” So at last they exchanged. The rich man



THE STORY OF THE WIND. 37

took the sack and the ram, and the poor man took
the oxen and went out to the plough.

Then the poor brother went out ploughing all day,
but he neither watered his oxen nor gave them any-
thing to eat. And next day the poor brother again
went out to his oxen, but found them rolling on their
sides on the ground. He began to pull and tug at
them, but they didn’t get up. Then he began to beat
them with a stick, but they uttered not a sound.
The man was surprised to find them fit for nothing,
and off he ran to his brother, not forgetting to take
with him his drum with the henchmen.

When the poor brother came to the rich brother’s,
he lost no time in crossing his threshold, and said:
“Hail, my brother !”—‘ Good health to thee also!”
replied the rich man, “ why hast thou come hither?
Has thy plough broken, or thy oxen failed thee?
Perchance thou hast watered them with foul water,
so that their blood is stagnant, and their flesh
inflamed ?”—* The murrain take ’em if I know thy
meaning!” cried the poor brother. “All that I
know is that I thwacked ’em till my arms ached, and
they wouldn’t stir, and not a single grunt did they
give; till I was go angry that I spat at them, and came
to tell thee. Give me back my sack and my ram, I
say, and take back thy oxen, for they won’t listen to
me !”—“ What! take them back!” roared the rich



38 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

brother. “Dost think I only made the exchange for
a single day? No, I gave them to thee once and
for all, and now thou wouldst rip the whole thing up
like a goat at the fair. I have no doubt thou hast
neither watered them nor fed them, and that is why
they won't stand up.’—‘I didn’t know,” said the
poor man, “that oxen needed water and food.”—
“ Didn’t know !” sereeched the rich man, in a mighty
rage, and taking the poor brother by the hand, he
led him away from the hut. ‘Go away,” said he,
“and never come back here again, or I'll have thee
hanged on a gallows !”—‘ Ah! what a big gentleman
we are!” said the poor brother; ‘just thou give me
back my own, and then I will go away.’—“ Thou
hadst better not stop here,” said the rich brother ;
“come, stir thy stumps, thou pagan! Go home ere
I beat thee !”—‘ Don’t say that,” replied the poor
man, “but give me back my ram and my sack, and
then I wll go.’—At this the rich brother quite lost
his temper, and cried to his wife and children:
“Why do you stand staring like that? Can't you
come and help me to pitch this insolent rogue out of
the house?” ‘This, however, was something beyond
a joke, so the poor brother called to his henchmen :
‘Henchmen, henchmen! out of the drum, and give
this accursed brother of mine and his wife a sound
drubbing, that they may think twice about it another



THE STORY OF THE WIND. 39

time before they pitch a poor brother out of their
hut!” Then the henchmen leaped out of the drum,
and laid hold of the rich brother and his wife, and
trounced them soundly, until the rich brother yelled
with all his might: “Oh, oh! my own true brother,
take what thou wilt, only let me off alive!” where-
upon the poor brother cried to his henchmen:
“Henchmen, henchmen! into the drum!” and the
henchmen disappeared immediately.

Then the poor brother took his ram and his sack,
and set off home with them. And they lived happily
ever after, and grew richer and richer. They sowed
neither wheat nor barley, and yet they had lots and
lots to eat. And I was there, and drank mead and
beer. What my mouth couldn’t hold ran down my
beard. For you, there’s a kazka, but there be fat
hearth-cakes for me the asker. And if I have aught
to eat, thou shalt share the treat.



THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW.

NOBLEMAN went hunting one
autumn, and with him went a
goodly train of huntsmen. All
day long they hunted and
hunted, and at the end of the



day they had caught nothing.
At last dark night overtook .
them. It had now grown bitterly cold, and the
rain began to fall heavily. The nobleman was wet
to the skin, and his teeth chattered. He rubbed his
hands together and cried: “Oh, had we but a warm
hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and sour kvas,!
we should have nought to complain of, but would tell
tales and feign fables till dawn of day!” Immedi-
ately there shone a light in the depths of the forest.
They hastened up to it, and lo! there was a but.
They entered, and on the table lay bread and a jug

1 A sourish drink.



THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW. 41

of kvas; and the hut was warm, and the bed therein
was white—everything just as the nobleman had
desired it. So they all entered after him, and said
grace, and had supper, and laid them down to sleep.
They all slept, all but one, but to him slumber
would not come. About midnight he heard a strange
nolse, and something came to the window and said:
“Oh, thou son of a dog! thou didst say: ‘If we had
but a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and
sour kvas, we should have nought to complain of, but
would tell tales and feion fables till dawn’; but now
thou hast forgotten thy fine promise! Wherefore
this shall befall thee on thy way home. Thou shalt
fall in with an apple-tree full of apples, and thou
shalt desire to taste of them, and when thou hast
tasted thereof thou shalt burst. And if any of these
thy huntsmen hear this thing and tell thee of it, that
man shall become stone to the knee!” All this that
huntsman heard, and he thought, “ Woe is me!”
And about the second cockcrow something else
came to the window and said: “Oh, thou son of a
dog! thou didst say: ‘If we had but a warm hut, and
a white bed, and soft bread and sour kvas, we should
have nought to complain of, but would tell tales and
feign fables till dawn’; but now thou hast forgotten
thy fine promises! Wherefore this shall befall thee
on thy way home. Thou shalt come upon a spring by



42 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the roadside, a spring of pure water, and thou shalt
desire to drink of it, and when thou hast drunk
thereof thou shalt burst. But if any of these thy
huntsmen hear and tell thee of this thing, he shall
become stone to the girdle.” All this that huntsman
heard, and he thought to himself: “Woe is me!”

Again, towards the third cockcrow, he heard some-
thing else coming to the window, and it said: “Oh,
thon son of a dog! thou didst say: ‘If only we had
a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and
sour kvas, we should have nought to complain of,
but would tell tales and feien fables till dawn’; but
now thou hast forgotten all thy fine promises !
Wherefore this shall befall thee on thy way home.
Thou shalt come upon a feather-bed in the highway ;
a longing for rest shall come over thee, and thou wilt
he down on it, and the moment thou lest down
thereon thou shalt burst. But if any of thy hunts-
men hear this thing and tell it thee, he shall become
stone up to the neck!” All this that huntsman
heard, and then he awoke his comrades and said:
“Tt is time to depart !”—“ Let us go then,” said the
nobleman.

So on they went, and they had not gone very far
when they saw an apple-tree growing by the wayside,
and on it were apples so beautiful that words cannot
describe them. The nobleman felt that he must taste



(Vv

to Fi) ihe
y ae =
yi = Vw “ir

While ile





44 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

of these apples or die; but the wakeful huntsman
rushed up and cut down the apple-tree, whereupon
apples and apple-tree turned to ashes. But the
huntsman galloped on before and hid himself.

They went on a little further till they came to a
spring, and the water of that spring was so pure and
clear that words cannot describe it. Then the noble-
man felt that he must drink of that water or die; but
the huntsman rushed up and splashed in the spring
with his sword, and immediately the water turned to
blood. The nobleman was wrath, and eried: “ Cut
me down that son of a dog!” But the huntsman
rode on in front and hid himself.

They went on still further till they came upon a
golden bed in the highway, full of white feathers so
soft and cosy that words cannot describe it. The
nobleman felt that he must rest in that bed or die.
Then the huntsman rushed up and struck the bed
with his sword, and it turned to coal. But the
nobleman was very wrath, and cried: “Shoot me

1?

down that son of a dog But the huntsman rode
on before and hid himself.

When they got home the nobleman commanded
them to bring the huntsman before him. “ What
hast thou done, thou son of Satan?” he cried. “I

22)

must needs slay thee But the huntsman said:

“My master, bid them bring hither into the courtyard



THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW. 45

an old mare fit for nought but the knacker,” They
brought the mare, and he mounted it and said: “ My
master, last midnight something came beneath the
window and said: ‘Oh, son of a dog! thou saidst if
only we had a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft
bread and sour kvas, we should grieve no more, but
tell tales and feign fables till dawn, and now thou
hast gone and forgotten thy promise. Wherefore this
shall befall thee on thy way home: thou shalt come
upon an apple-tree covered with apples by the way-
side, and straightway thou shalt long to eat of them,
and the moment thou tastest thereof thou shalt burst.
And if any of thy huntsmen hears this thing, and
tells thee of it, he shall become stone up to the knee.’ ”
When the huntsman had spoken so far, the horse on
which he sat became stone up to the knee. Then he
went on: “About the second cockcrow something
else came to the window and said the selfsame thing,
and prophesied: ‘He shall come upon a spring by
the roadside, a spring of pure water, and he shall long
to drink thereof, and the moment he tastes of it he
shall burst ; and whoever hears and tells him of this
thing shall become stone right up to the girdle.’ ”
And when the huntsman had spoken go far, the horse
on which he sat became stone right up to the breast.
And he continued, and said: “ About the third cock-
crow something else came to the window and said the



46 : COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

selfsame thing, and added: ‘This shall befall thy
lord on his way home. He shall come upon a white
bed on the road, and he shall desire to rest wpon it,
and the moment he rests upon ithe shall burst ; and
whoever hears and tells him of this thing shall become
stone right up to the neck!’” And with these words
he leaped from the horse, and the horse became stone
right up to its neck. “That therefore, my master,
was why I did what I did, and I pray thee pardon

)

me.



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, THE
FALSE SISTER, AND THE FAITHFUL BEASTS.

NCE upon a time, in a certain kinedom,
in a certain empire, there dwelt a
certain Tsar who had never had a
child. One day this Tsar went to
the bazaar (such a bazaar as we have
at Kherson) to buy food for his needs.

For though he was a Tsar, he had a mean and churlish

soul, and used always to do his own marketing, and so

now, too, he bought a little salt fish and went home
with it. On his way homeward, a great thirst suddenly
fell upon him, so he turned aside into a lonely mountain
where he knew, as his father had known before him,
there was a spring of crystal clear water. He was so
very thirsty that he flung himself down headlong by
this spring without first crossing himself, wherefore
that Accursed One, Satan, immediately had power over





48 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

him, and caught him by the beard. The Tsar sprang
back in terror, and cried: “ Let me go!” But the
Accursed One held him all the tighter. “Nay, I will
not let thee go
entreat him piteously: ‘‘ Ask what thou wilt of me,”

tiz2

cried he. Then the Tsar began to

said he, “ only let me go.”—‘ Give me, then,” said
the Accursed One, ‘something that thou hast in the
house, and then [ll let thee go!”—‘‘Let me see,
what have I got?” said the Tsar. ‘Oh, I know.
I’ve got eight horses at home, the like of which I
have seen nowhere else, and I'll immediately bid my
equerry bring them to thee to this spring—take
them.”—“I won't have them!” cried the Accursed
One, and he held him still more tightly by the beard.
“ Well, then, hearken now!” cried the Tsar. ‘‘I have
eight oxen. They have never yet gone a-ploughing
for me, or done a day’s work. I'll have them brought
hither. Tl feast my eyes on them once more, and
then I’ll have them driven into thy steppes—take
them.”—‘ No, that won’t do either!” said the Ac-
cursed One. The Tsar went over, one by one, all the
most precious things he had at home, but the Accursed



Cne said “No!” all along, and pulled him more and
more tightly by the beard. When the Tsar saw that
the Accursed One would take none of all these things,
he said to him at last: ‘Look now! I have a wife
so lovely that the lke of her is not to be found in



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, 49

the whole world, take her and let me go!"—*«No!”
replied the Accursed One, “I will not have her.”
The Tsar was in great straits. “What amI to do
now?” thought he. “I have offered him my lovely
wife, who is the very choicest of my chattels, and he
won't have her!”—Then said the Accursed One:
“Promise me what thou shalt find awaiting thee at
home, and I'll let thee go.”

The Tsar gladly promised this, for he could think
of nought else that he had, and then the Accursed
One let him go,

But while he had been away from home, there had
been born to him a Tsarevko + and a Tsarivna 37 and
they grew up not by the day, or even by the hour,
but by the minute: never were known such fine
children. And his wife saw him coming from afar,
and went out to meet him, with her two children,
with great joy. But he, the moment he saw them,
burst into tears. “Nay, my dear love,” cried she,
“wherefore dost thou burst into tears? Or art thou
so delighted that such children have been born unto
thee that thou canst not find thy voice for tears of
joy ?”—And he answered her: “My darling wife, on
my way back from the bazaar, I was athirst, and
turned towards a mountain known of old to my
father and me, and it seemed to me as though there

1 A little Tsar, * Rus., Tsavevna, é,e. a Tsar’s daughter.
E



50 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

were a spring of water there, though the water was
very near dried up. But looking closer, [ saw that
it was quite full; so I bethought me that I would
drink thereof, and I leaned over, when lo! that
Evil-Wanton (I mean the Devil) caught me by the
beard and would not let me go. I begged and
prayed, but still he held me tight. ‘Give me,’ said
he, ‘what thou hast at home, or I'll never let thee
go!’—And I said to him: ‘Lo! now, I have horses.’
—‘I don’t want thy horses!’ said he.—‘I have
oxen,’ I said—‘I don’t want thine oxen !’ said he.
——‘JT have,’ said I, ‘a wife so fair that the like of her
is not to be found in God’s fair world; take her, but
let me go.’—‘I don’t want thy fair wife!’ said he.
—tThen I promised him what I should find at home
when I got there, for I never thought that God had
blessed me so. Come now, my darling wife! and let
us bury them both lest he take them !”—“ Nay, nay!
my dear husband, we had _ better hide them some-
where. Let us dig a ditch by our hut—just under
the gables!” (For there were no lordly mansions in
those days, and the Tsars dwelt in peasants’ huts.)
So they due a ditch right under the gables, and put
their children inside it, and gave them provision of
bread and water. Then they covered it up and
smoothed it down, and turned into their own little
hut.



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 51

Presently the serpent (for the Accursed One had
changed himself into a serpent) came flying up in
search of the children. He raged up and down
outside the hut—but there wag nothing to be seen.
At last he cried out to the stove - “Stove, stove,
where has the Tsar hidden his children ?’””—The
stove replied: “The Tsar has been a good master to

; he has put lots of warm fuel inside me; I hold
to ee "So, finding he could get maybe out of
the stove, he cried to the hearth- broom: “ Hearth-
broom, hearth-broom, where has the Tsar hidden hig
children ?”—But the hearth- broom answered: “The
Tsar has always been a good master to me, for he
always cleans the warm grate with me; I hold to
him.” So the Accursed One could get Reouine out
of the hearth-broom.—Then he cried to the hatchet :
“Hatchet, hatchet, where has the Tsar hidden his
children ?”—The hatchet replied: “The Tsar has
always been a good master to me. He chops his
wood with me, and gives me a place to lie down in ;
so I'll not have him disturbed.’—Then the Der
cried to the chisel: “ Chisel, chisel, where has the
Tsar hidden his children ?”—But the chisel replied :
“The Tsar has always been a good master to me.
He drills little holes with me, and then lets me rest ;
so I'll let him rest too.”—Then the serpent said to
the chisel: “So the Tsar’s a good master to thee, eh!



52 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Well, I can only say that if he’s the good master
thou sayest he is, [ am rather surprised that he knocks
thee on the head so much with a hammer.”—*“‘ Well,
that’s true,” said the chisel, “I never thought of
that. Thou mayest take hold of me if thou wilt, and
draw me out of the top of the hut, near the front
gable; and wherever I fall into the marshy ground,
there set to work and dig with me!”

The Devil did so, and began digging at the spot
where the chisel fell out on the marshy ground till
he had dug out the children. Now, as they had been
growing all along, they were children no more, but
a stately youth and a fair damsel; and the serpent
took them up and carried them off. But they were
big and heavy, so he soon got tired and lay down
to rest, and presently fell asleep. Then the Tsarivna
sat down on his head, and the Tsarevko sat down
beside her till a horse came running up. The horse
ran right up to them and said: “Hail! little Tsar
Novishny ; art thou here by thy leave or against
thy leave ?”—And the little Tsar Novishny replied :
“Nay, little nag! we are here against our leave,
not by our leave.’— Then sit on my back!” said
the horse, “and [ll carry you off!” So they got
on his back, for the serpent was asleep all the
time. Then the horse galloped off with them ;
and he galloped far, far away. Presently the serpent






54 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

awoke, looked all round him, and could see nothing
till he had got up out of the reeds in which
he lay, when he saw them in the far distance, and
gave chase. He soon caught them up; and little
Tsar Novishny said to the horse: “Oh! little nag,
how hot it is. It is all up with thee and us!”
And, in truth, the horse’s tail was already singed
to a coal, for the serpent was hard behind them,
blazing like fire. The horse perceived that he could
do no more, so he gave one last wrigele and died ;
but they, poor things, were left alive. “ Whom
have you been listening to?” said the serpent as
he flew up to them. “Don’t you know that I only
am your father and tsar, and have the right to carry
you away ?”—* Oh, dear daddy! we'll never listen
to anybody else again !”— Well, 'll forgive you
this time,” said the serpent; “but mind you never
do it again.”

Again the serpent took them up and carried them
off. Presently he grew tired and again lay down
to rest, and nodded off. Then the Tsarivna sat
down on lis head, and the Tsarevko sat down be-
side her, till a humble-bee came flying up. ‘ Hail,
little Tsar Novishny!” cried the humble-bee.—
“ Hail, little humble-bee!” said the little Tsar.—
“Say, friends, are you here by your leave or against
your leave ?”—* Alas! little humble-bumble-bee, ’tis



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 55

not with my leave I have been brought hither, but
against my leave, as thou mayest see for thyself.”—
“Then sit on my back,” said the bee, “and I'll carry
you away.”—‘‘ But, dear little humble-bumble-bee,
if a horse couldn’t save us, how will you ?”—« J
cannot tell till I try,” said the humble-bee. “But if
I cannot save you, I'll let you fall.”—* Well, then,”
said the little Tsar, “well try. For we two must
perish in any case, but thou perhaps mayest get off
scot free.” So they embraced each other, sat on the
humble-bee, and off they went. When the serpent
awoke he missed them, and raising his head above
the reeds and rushes, saw them flying far away,
and set off after them at full speed. ‘Alas! little
humble-bumble-bee,” cried little Tsar Novishny,
“how burning hot ’tis getting. We shall all three
perish!” Then the humble-bee turned his wing and
shook them off. They fell to the earth, and he flew
away. Then the serpent came flying up and fell
upon them with open jaws. ‘“ Ah-ha!” eried he, with
a snort, “you've come to grief again, eh? Didn't I
tell you to listen to nobody but me!” Then they
fell to weeping and entreating: “ We'll listen to you
alone and to nobody else!” and they wept and
entreated so much, that at last he forgave them.
So he took them up and carried them off once
more, Again he sat down to rest and fell asleep,



56 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and again the Tsarivna sat upon his head and the
Tsarevko sat down by her side, till a bullock came
up, full tilt, and said to them: * Hail, little Tsar
Novishny! art thou here with thy leave or art
thou here against thy leave ?”— Alas! dear little
bullock, I came not hither by my leave; but may-
be I was brought here against my leave !”—*« Sit
on my back, then,” said the bullock, “and I'll
— But they said: “Nay, if a
horse and a bee could not manage it, how wilt

B)

carry you away.’

thou ?”—** Nonsense!” said the bullock. “Sit down,
and Pll carry you off!” So he persuaded them.—
“Well, we can only perish once!” they cried; and
the bullock carried them off. And every little while
they went a little mile, and jolted so that they very
nearly tumbled off. Presently the serpent awoke
and was very very wroth. He rose high above the
woods and flew after them—oh! how fast he did
fly! Then eried the little Tsar: “Alas! bullock,
how hot it turns. Thou wilt perish, and we shall
perish also!”—Then said the bullock: “Little
Tsar! look into my left ear and thou wilt see
a horse-comb. Pull it out and throw it behind
thee !”—The little Tsar took out the comb and threw
it behind him, and it became a huge wood, as thick
and jagged as the teeth of a horse-comb, But the
bullock went on at his old pace: every little while



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 57

they went a little mile, and jolted so that they nearly
tumbled off. The serpent however managed to gnaw
his way through the wood, and then flew after them
again. Then cried the little Tsar: “ Alas! bullock,
it begins to burn again. Thou wilt perish, and we
shall perish also!”—Then said the bullock: “Look
into my right ear, and pull out the brush thou dost
find there, and fling it behind thee!”—So he threw
it behind him, and it became a forest as thick as a
brush. Then the serpent came up to the wood and
began to gnaw at it; and at last he gnawed his way
right through it. But the bullock went on at his
old pace: every little while they went a little mile,
aud they jolted so that they nearly tumbled off.
But when the serpent had gnawed his way through
the forest, he again pursued them; and again they
felt a burning. And the little Tsar said: “ Alas!
bullock, look! look! how it burns. Look! look!
how we perish.” Now the bullock was already near-
ing the sea. “Look into my right ear,” said the
bullock, “draw out the little handkerchief thou
findest there, and throw it in front of me. He drew
it out and flung it, and before them stood a bridge.
Over this bridge they galloped, and by the time they
had done so, the serpent reached the sea. Then
said the bullock to the little Tsar: “Take up the
handkerchief again and wave it behind me.” Then



58 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

he took and waved it till the bridge doubled up
behind them, and went and spread out again right
in front of them. The serpent came up to the edge
of the sea; but there he had to stop, for he had
nothing to run upon.

So they crossed over that sea right to the other
side, and the serpent remained on his own side.
Then the bullock said to them: “T'll lead you to
a hut close to the sea, and in that hut you must
live, and you must take and slay me.” But they
fell a-weeping sore. “ How shall we slay thee!”
they cried; “thou art our own little dad, and hast
saved us from death !”—‘“Nay!” said the bullock ;
“but you must slay me, and one quarter of me you
must hang up on the stove, and the second quarter
you must place on the ground in a corner, and the
third quarter you must put in the corner at the
entrance of the hut, and the fourth quarter you
must put round the threshold, so that there will
be a quarter in all four corners.” So they took and
slew him in front of the threshold, and they hung
his four quarters in the four corners as he had bidden
them, and then they laid them down to sleep. Now
the Tsarevko awoke at midnight, and saw in the
right-hand corner a horse so gorgeously caparisoned
that he could not resist rising at once and mounting
it; and in the threshold corner there was a self-



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 59

slicing sword, and in the third corner stood the dog
Protius,, and in the stove corner stood the dog
Nedviga.’ ‘The little Tsar longed to be off. “ Rise,
little sister!” cried he. “God has been good to us!
Rise, dear little sister, and let us pray to God!”
So they arose and prayed to God, and while they
prayed the day dawned. Then he mounted his horse
and took the dogs with him, that he might live by
what they caught.

So they lived in their hut by the sea, and one day
the sister went down to the sea to wash her bed-
linen and her body-linen in the blue waters. And
the serpent came and said to her: “ How didst thou
manage to jump over the sea ?”—‘ Look, now!”
said she, “we crossed over in this way. My brother
has a handkerchief which becomes a bridge when
he waves it behind him.’—And the serpent said to
her: ‘I tell thee what, ask him for this handkerchief ;
say thou dost want to wash it, and take and wave it,
and [ll then be able to cross over to thee and live
with thee, and we'll poison thy brother.”—Then she
went home and said to her brother: ‘Give me that
handkerchief, dear little brother; it is dirty, so Pl
wash and give it back to thee.” And he believed
her and gave it to her, for she was dear to him,

1 The two fabulous hounds of Ruthenian legend.
2 Heavysides ?



60 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and he thought her good and true. Then she took
the handkerchief, went down to the sea, and waved
it—and behold. there was a bridge. Then the
serpent crossed over to her side, and they walked
to the hut together and consulted as to the best
way of destroying her brother and removing him
from God’s fair world. Now it was his custom to
rise at dawn, mount his horse, and go a-hunting,
for hunting he dearly loved. So the serpent said to
her: “Take to thy bed and pretend to be ill, and say
to him: I dreamed a dream, dear brother, and lo,
I saw thee go and fetch me wolf’s milk to make
me well. Then he'll go and fetch it, and the wolves
will tear his dogs to pieces, and then we can take
and do to him as we list, for his strength is in his
dogs.”

So when the brother came home from hunting the
serpent hid himself, but the sister said: “I have
dreamed a dream, dear brother. Methought thou
didst go and fetch me wolf’s milk, and I drank of
it, and my health came back to me, for I am so
weak that God erant I die not.”—*T’'ll fetch as
said her brother. So he mounted his horse and
set off. Presently he came to a little thicket, and
immediately a she-wolf came out. Then Protius
ran her down and Nedviga held her fast, and the
little Tsar milked her and let her go. And the



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NO VISHNY, 61

she-wolf looked round and said: “Well for thee,
little Tsar Novishny, that thou hast let me go.
Methought thou wouldst not let me go alive. For
that thou hast let me go, I'll give thee, little Tsar
Novishny, a w olf-whelp.”—Then she said to the
little wolf: “Thou shalt serve this dear little Tsar
as though he were thine own dear father.” Then
the little Tsar went back, and now there were with
him two dogs and a little wolf.w vhelp that trotted
behind them.

Now the serpent and the false sister saw him
coming from afar, and three dogs trotting behind
him. And the serpent said to her: « What a sly,
wily one it is! If he hasn’t added another watch-
dog to his train! Lie down, and make thyself
out worse than ever, and ask bear’s milk of him,
for the bears will tear him to pieces without doubt.”
Then the serpent turned himself into a needle,
and she took him up and stuck him in the wall.
Meanwhile the brother dismounted from his horse
and came with his dogs and the wolf to the hut,
and the dogs began snuffing at the needle in the
wall. And his sister said to him: “Tell me, why
dost thou keep these big dogs? They let me have
no rest.” Then he called to the dogs, and they sat
down. And his sister said to him: “I dreamed
a dream, my brother. I saw thee go and search



63 COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

and fetch me from somewhere bear’s milk, and I
drank of it, and my health came back to me.’—«I
will fetch it,” said her brother.

But first of all he laid him down to sleep. Nedviga
lay at his head, and Protius at his feet, and Vovchok!
by his side. So he slept through the night, and
at dawn he arose and mounted his good steed
and hied him thence. Again they came to a little
thicket, and this time a she-bear came out. Protius
ran her down, Nedviga held her fast, and the little
Tsar milked her and let her go. Then the she-bear
said: “Hail to thee, little Tsar Novishny ; because
thou hast let me go, I'll give thee a bear-cub.”
But to the little bear she said: “Obey him as
though he were thine own father.” So he set off
home, and the serpent and his sister saw that four
were now trotting behind him. ‘“ Look!” said the
serpent, “if there are not four running behind him!
Shall we never be able to destroy him? I tell thee
what. Ask him to get thee hare’s milk; perhaps
his beasts will gobble up the hare before he can
milk it.” So he turned himself into a needle again,
and she fastened him in the wall, only a little
higher up, so that the dogs should not get at him.
Then, when the little Tsar dismounted from hig
horse, he and his dogs came into the hut, and the

1 Little Wolf.



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NO VISHNY, 63

dogs began snuffing at the needle in the wall and
barked at it, but the brother knew not the cause
thereof. But his sister burst into tears and said:
“Why dost thou keep such monstrous dogs? Such
a kennel of them makes me sweat with anguish !”
Then he shouted to the dogs, and they sat down
quite still, Then she said to him: “J am so ill,
brother, that nothing will make me well but hare’s
milk, Go and get it for me.”—* [’I] get it,” said he,
But first he laid him down to sleep. Nedviga
lay at his head, Protius at his feet, and Wowdhale
aud Medvedik* each on one side. He slept through
the night, but at dawn he mounted his steed,
took his pack with him, and departed. Again he
came to a little thicket, and a she-hare popped out.
Protius ran her down, Nedviga held her fast, then
he milked her and let her go. ‘Then the hare said :
“Hail to thee, little Tsar Novishny ; because thou
hast let me go—I thought thou wouldst have torn
me to pieces with thy dogs—l’ll give thee a leveret
for it.” But to the leveret she said: « Obey him,
as though he were thine own father.” Then he
went home, and again they saw him from afar
“What a wily rogue it is!” said they. “All five
are following him, and he is as well ag ever !”’
—‘Ask him to get thee fox’s milk!” said the
1 Little Bear.



64 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

serpent; “perhaps when he goes for it his beasts
will leave him in the lurch!” Then he changed
himself into a needle, and she stuck him still
higher in the wall, so that the dogs could not
get at him. The Tsar again dismounted from his
horse, and his dogs rushed up to the hut and began
snuffing at the needle. But his sister fell a-Weeping,
and said: “Why dost thou keep such monstrous
dogs?” He shouted to them, and they sat down
quietly on their haunches. Then his sister said
again: “I am ailing, my brother; go and get me
fox’s milk, and I shall be well.”— I'll fetch it for
thee,” said her brother.

But first he lay down to sleep. Nedviga lay at
his head, Protius at his feet, and Vovchok, Medvedik,
and the leveret by his side. The little Tsar slept
through the night, and at dawn he arose, mounted
‘his horse, took his pack with him, and went off.
They came to a little thicket, and a vixen popped
out. Protius ran her down, Nedviga held her
fast, and the little Tsar milked her and let her go.
Then said the vixen to him: “Thanks to thee,
little Tsar Novishny, that thou hast let me go.
Methought thou wouldst tear me in pieces with
thy dogs. For thy kindness Ill give thee a little
fox.” But to the little fox she said: “ Obey him
as though he were thine own father.” So he went



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 65

home, and they saw him coming from afar, and lo!
now he had six guardians, and yet bad come by no
harm. “’Tis no good; we shall never do for him,”
said the serpent. ‘Look, now! Make thyself worse
than ever, and say to him: I am very ill, my brother,
because in another realm, far, far away, there is a
wild boar who ploughs with his nose, and sows with
and in that same



his ears, and harrows with his tail
empire there is a mill with twelve furnaces that
grinds its own grain and casts forth its own meal,
and if thou wilt bring me of the meal that is beneath
these twelve furnaces, so that I may make me a
cake of it and eat, my soul shall live.’—Then her
brother said to her: “Methinks thou art not my
sister, but my foe!”—But she replied: “How can
I be thy foe when we two live all alone together
in a strange land ?”—* Well, I will get it for thee,”
said he. For again he believed in his sister.

So he mounted his steed, took his pack with
him, and departed, and he came to the land where
were that boar and that mill she had told him of.
He came up to the mill, tied his horse to it, and
entered into it. And there were twelve furnaces
there and twelve doors, and these twelve doors
needed no man to open or shut them, for they
opened .and shut themselves. He took meal from

beneath the first furnace and went through the
F



OG COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

second door, but the dogs were shut in by the doors.
Through all twelve doors he went, and came out
again at the first door, and looked about him, and—
there were no dogs to be seen. He whistled, and
he heard his dogs whining where they could not
get out. Then he wept sore, mounted his horse,
and went home. He got home, and there was his
sister making merry with the serpent. And no
sooner did the brother enter the hut than the serpent
said: “Well, we wanted flesh, and now desh has
For they had just slain a bullock,

pv?

come to us
and on the ground where they had slain it there
sprang up a white-thorn tree, so lovely that it may
be told of in tales, but neither imagined nor divined.
When the little I'sar saw it, he said: “ Oh, my dear
brother-in-law !” (for without his dogs he must needs
be courteous to the serpent,) “ pray let me climb up
that white-thorn tree, and have a good look about
me!” But the sister said to the serpent: “Dear
friend, make him get ready boiling water for him-
self, and we will boil him, for it does not become
thee to dirty thy hands.”—‘ Very well,” said the
serpent; “he shall make the boiling water ready !”
So they ordered the little Tsar to go and chop wood
and get the hot water ready. Then he went and
chopped wood, but as he was doing so, a starling
flew out and said to him: “Not go fast, not so



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 67

fast, little Tsar Novishny. Be as slow as thou
canst, for thy dogs have gnawed their way through
two doors.”

Then the little Tsar poured water into the caldron,
and put fire under it. But the wood that he had
cut was rotten and very very dry, so that it burned
most fiercely, and he took and sprinkled it with
water, and sprinkled it again and again, so that it
might not burn too much. And when he went out
into the courtyard for more water, the starling said
LOMmMIMEN Se SNOcesso taste note so fast, little Tsar
Novishny, for thy dogs have gnawed their way
through four doors!” As he was returning to the hut
his sister said to him: “That water does not boil up
quick enough! Take the fire-shovel and poke the
fire!” So he did so, and the faggots blazed up, but
when she had gone away he sprinkled them with
water again, so that they might burn more slowly.
Then he went into the courtyard again, aud the
starling met him and said: “Not so fast, not so
fast, little Tsar; be as slow as thou canst, for thy
dogs have gnawed their way through six doors.”
Then he returned to the hut, and his sister again
took up the shovel and made him poke up the fire,
and when she went away he again flung water on
the burning coals. So he kept going in and out of
the courtyard. “’Tis weary work!” cried he; but



68 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the starling said to him : “ Not so fast, not so fast, little
Tsar Novishny, for thy dogs have already gnawed their
way through ten doors!” The little Tsar picked up
the rottenest wood he could find and flung it on the fire,
to make believe he was making haste, but sprinkled
it at the same time with water, so that it might not
burn up too quickly, and yet the kettle soon began
to boil. Again he went to the forest for more wood,
and the starling said to him: “ Not so fast, not so
fast, little Tsar, for thy dogs have already gnawed
their way through all the doors, and are now resting !”
But now the water was boiling, and his sister ran up
and said to him: ‘Come, boil thyself, be quick ;
how much longer art thou going to keep us waiting?”
Then he, poor thing, began ladling the boiling water
over himself, while she got the table ready and spread
the cloth, that the serpent might eat her brother on
that very table.

But he, poor thing, kept ladling himself, and ericd :
“Oh, my dear brother-in-law, pray let me climb up
to the top of that white-thorn tree; let me have a look
out from the top of it, for thence one can see afar!”
—‘Don’t let him, dear!” said the sister to the
serpent; “he will stay there too long and lose our
precious time.’—But the serpent replied : “It doesn’t
matter, it doesn’t matter; let him climb up if he
likes.” So the little Tsar went up to the tree, and



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 69

began to climb it; he did not miss a single branch,
and stopped a little at each one to gain time, and
so he climbed up to the very top, and then he took
out his flute and began to play upon it. But the
starling flew up to him and said: “Not so fast,
httle Tsar Novishny, for lo! thy dogs are running to
thee with all their might.” But his sister ran out
and said: “What art thou playing up there for?
Thou dost forget perhaps that we are waiting for
thee down here!” Then he began to descend the
tree, but he stopped at every branch on his way
down, while his sister kept on calling to him to
come down quicker. At last he came to the last
branch, and as he stood upon it and leaped down to
the ground, he thought to himself: “ Now I perish !”
At that same instant his dogs and his beasts,
growling loudly, came running up, and stood in a
circle around him. Then he crossed himself and
said: “Glory to Thee, O Lord! I have still, per-
chance, a little time to live in Thy fair world!”
Then he called aloud to the serpent and said: “ And
now, dear brother-in-law, come out, for I am ready
for thee!” Out came the serpent to eat him, but
he said to his dogs and his beasts: “ Vovchok!
Medvedik! Protius! Nedviga! Seize him!” Then
the dogs and the beasts rushed upon him and tore
him to bits.



70 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then the little Tsar collected the pieces and burnt
them to ashes, and the little fox. rolled his brush in
the ashes till it was covered with them, and then
went out into the open field and scattered them to
the four winds. But while they were tearing the
serpent to pieces the wicked sister knocked out his
tooth and hid it. After it was all over the little
Tsar said to her: ‘As thou hast been such a false
friend to me, sister, thou must remain here while I
go into another kingdom.” Then he made two
buckets and hung them up on the white-thorn tree,
and said to his sister: “Look now, sister! if thou
weepest for me, these buckets will fill with tears, but
if thou weepest for the serpent they will fill with
blood!” ‘Then she fell a-weeping and praying, and
said to him: “ Don’t leave me, brother, but take me
with thee.”—*“I won't,” said he, ‘‘such a false friend
as thou art Pll not have with me. Stay where thou

oP

art.” So he mounted his horse, called to him his
dogs and his beasts, and went his way into another
kingdom and into another empire.

He went on and on till he came to a certain city,
and in this city there was only one spring, and in
this spring sat a dragon with twelve heads. And it
was so that when any went to draw water from this
well the dragon rose up and ate them, and there

was no other place from whence that city could draw



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 71

its water. So the little Tsar came to that town and
put up at the stranger’sinn, and he asked his host:
“What is the meaning of all this running and crying
of the people in the streets ?”’—“ Why, dost thou not
know?” said he; “it is the turn of the Tsar to send










Ya

4
Po

|
4 liz %
fe
i ‘ # ys
vy. M
i" om Ll %
A sai
E ~ MQ EP 2
fey
Alsace ae the e

his daughter to the dragon !”—Then he went out and
listened, and heard the people say: ‘‘ The Tsar pro-
claims that whoever isable to slay the dragon, to him
will he give his daughter and one half of his tsar-
dom!” Then little Tsar Novishny stepped forth and
said: “I am able to slay this evil dragon!” So



72 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

all the people immediately sent and told the Tsar:
“A stranger has come hither who says he is ready
to meet and slay the dragon.” Then the ‘I'sar bade
them take him to the watch-house and put him among
the guards.

Then they led out the Tsarivna, and behind her
they led him, and behind him came his beasts and his
horse. And the Tsarivna was so lovely and so richly
attired that all who beheld her burst into tears. But
the moment the dragon appeared and opened his
mouth to devour the Tsarivna, the little Tsar cried
to his self-slicing sword: “ Fall upon him!” and to
his beasts he cried: “ Protius! Medvedik! Vov-’
chok! Nedviga! Seize him!” Then the self-slicing
sword and the beasts fell upon him, and tore him
into little bits. When they had finished tearing him,
the little Tsar took the remains of the body and
burnt it to ashes, and the little fox took up all the
ashes on her tail, and scattered them to the four
winds. Then he took the Tsarivna by the hand, and
led her to the Tsar, and the people rejoiced because
their water was free again. And the Tsarivna gave
him the nuptial ring.

Then they set off home again. They went on and
on, for it was a long way from the tsardom of that.
Tsar, and at last he grew weary and lay down in the
grass, and she sat at his head. Then his lackey



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 73

crept up to him, unfastened the self-slicing sword
from his side, went up to the little Tsar, and said:
“Self-slicing sword! slay him!” Then the self-
slicing sword cut him into little bits, and his beasts
knew nothing about it, for they were sleeping after
their labours. After that the lackey said to the
Tsarivna: “Thou must say now to all men that !
saved thee from death, or if not, I will do to thee
what I have done to him. Swear that thou wilt say
this thing!” Then she said: “I will swear that thou
didst save me from death,” for she was sore afraid of the
lackey. Then they returned to the city, and the Tsar
was very glad to see them, and clothed the lackey in
goodly apparel, and they all made merry together.

Now when Nedviga awoke he perceived that his
master was no longer there, and immediately awoke
all the rest, and they all began to think and consider
which of them was the swiftest. And when they
had thought it well over they judged that the hare
was the swiftest, and they resolved that the hare
should run and get living and healing water and the
apple of youth also. So the hare ran to fetch this
water and this apple, and he ran and ran till he came
to a certain land, and in this land the hare saw a
spring, and close to the spring grew an apple-tree
with the apples of youth, and this spring and this
apple-tree were guarded by a Muscovite, oh! so



74 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

strong, so strong, and he waved his sabre again and
again so that not even a mouse could make its way
up to that well. What was to be done? Then the
little hare had resort to subtilty, and made herself
crooked, and limped towards the spring as if she
were lame. When the Muscovite saw her he said:
“What sort of a little beast is this? I never saw
the like of it before!” So the hare passed him by,
and went further and further on till she came right
up to the well. The Muscovite stood there and
opened his eyes wide, but the hare had now got up
to the spring and took a little flask of the water and
nipped off a little apple, and was off in a trice.

She ran back to the little Tsar Novishny, and
Nedviga immediately took the water and sprinkled
therewith the fragments of the little Tsar, and the
fragments came together again. Then he poured
some of the living water into his mouth and he
became alive, and gave him a bite of the apple of
youth, and he instantly grew young again and
stronger than ever. Then the little Tsar rose upon
his feet, stretched himself, and yawned. “What a
long time I’ve been asleep!” cried he.—“’Tis a good
thing for thee that we got the living and healing
water!” said Protius.—“ But what shall we do
next?” said they all. Then they all took council
together, and agreed that the little Tsar should



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 75

disguise himself as an old man, and so go to the
Tsar’s palace,

So the little Tsar Novishny disguised himself as an
old man, and went to the palace of the Tsar. Aud
when he got there he begged them to let him in that
he might see the young married people. But the
lackeys would not let him in. Then the Tsarivna
herself heard the sound of his begeing and praying,
and commanded them to admit him. Now when he
entered the room and took off his cap and cloak, the
ring which the Tsarivna had given him when he slew
the serpent sparkled so that she knew him, but, not
believing her own eyes, she said to him: “Come
hither, thou godly old pugrim, that I may show thee
hospitality!” Phen the little Tsar drew near to the
table, and the Tsarivna poured him out a glass of
Wine and gave it to him, and he took it with his left
hand. She marked that he did not take it with the
hand on which was the ring, so she drank off that
glass herself, Then she filled another glass and gave
it him, and he took it with his right hand. Then
she immediately recognized her ring, and said to her
father: “This man is my husband who delivered me
from death, but that fellow ”—pointing to the lackey
—‘‘that rascally slavish soul killed my husband and
made me say that he was my husband.” When the
Tsar heard this he boiled over with rage. “So that



76 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

is what thou art!” said he to the lackey, and im-
mediately he bad them bind him and tie him to the
tail of a horse so savage that no man could ride it,
and then turn it loose into the endless steppe. But
the little Tsar Novishny sat down behind the table
and made merry.

So the Tsarevko and the Tsarivna lived a long
time together in happiness, but one day she asked
him: “What of thy kindred and thy father’s
house?” Then he told her all about his sister. She
immediately bade him saddle his horse, and taking
his beasts with him, go in search of her. They came
to the place where he had left her, and saw that the
bucket which was put up for the serpent was full of
blood, but that the little Tsar’s bucket was all dry
and falling to pieces. Then he perceived that she
was still lamenting for the serpent, and said to her:
“God be with thee, but I will know thee no more.
Stay here, and never will I look upon thy face
again!” But she began to entreat and caress and
implore him that he would take her with him. Then
the brother had compassion on his sister and took her
away with him.

Now when they got home she took out the
serpent’s tooth which she had hidden about her,
and put it beneath his pillow on the bed whereon
he slept. And at night-time the little Tsar went



THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 77

to le down and the tooth killed him. His wife
thought that he was sulky, and therefore did not
speak to her, so she begged him not to be angry;
and, getting no answer, took him by the hand, and
lo! his hand was cold, as cold as lead, and she
screamed out. But Protius came bounding through
the door and kissed his master. Then the little
‘Tsar became alive again, but Protius died. Then
Nedviga kissed Protius and Protius became alive, but
Nedviga died. Then the Tsarevko said to Medvedik :
“Kiss Nedviga!” He did so, and Nedviga became
alive again, but Medvedik died. And so they went
on kissing each other from the greatest to the
smallest, till the turn came to puss. Puss kissed
Vovehok and died, but Vovchok remained alive.
What was to be done? Now that puss had died
there was none to kiss her back into life again.
“JXiss puss,” said the little Tsar to the little fox.
But the little fox was artful, and taking puss on his
shoulder, he trotted off to the forest. He carried her
to a place where lay a felled oak, with two branches
one on the top of the other, and put the hare on the
lower branch; then he ran under the branch and kissed
the hare, but took good care that the branch should
be between them. Thereupon the serpent’s tooth
flew out of the hare and fastened itself in the upper
branch, and both the fox and puss scampered back out



78 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

of the forest alive and well. When the others saw
them both alive they rejoiced greatly that no harm
had come to any of them from the tooth. But they
seized the sister and tied her to the tail of a savage
horse and let her loose upon the endless steppe.

So they all lived the merry lives of 'sars who
feast continually. And I was there too, and drank
wine and mead till my mouth ran over and it
trickled all down my beard. So there’s the whole
hazka for you.



THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL,

NCE upon a time in a certain village
there lived two neighbours ; one
was rich, very rich, and the other
so poor that he had nothing in the
world but a little hut, and that was



tumbling about his ears. At length
things came to such a pass with the poor man
that he had nothing to eat, and could get work
nowhere. Full of grief, he bethought him what he
should do. He thought and thought, and at last he
said: “Look ye, wife! Ill go to my rich neighbour.
Perchance he will lend me a silver ruble; that, at
any rate, will be enough to buy bread with.” So he
went.

He came to the rich man. “Good health to my
lord!” cried he.—“ Good health !”—“I have come
on an errand to thee, dear little master ! ”—‘‘ What
may thine errand be?” inquired the rich man.—





80 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“Alas! would to God that I had no need to say it.
It has come to such a pass with us that there’s
not a crust of bread nor a farthing of money in the
house. So I have come to thee, dear little master ;
lend us but a silver ruble and we will be ever
thankful to thee, and [Il work myself old to pay it
back.” —“ But who will stand surety for thee?” asked
the rich man.—‘ I know not if any man will, I am
so poor. Yet, perchance, God and St. Michael will
be my sureties,” and he pointed at the ikon in the
corner. Then the ikon of St. Michael spoke to the
rich man from the niche and said: “Come now!
lend it him, and put it down to my account. God
will repay thee!”— “Well,” said the rich man,
“Tll lend it to thee.” So he lent it, and the
poor man thanked him and returned to his home
full of joy.

But the rich man was not content that God should
give him back his loan by blessing him in his flocks
and herds, and in his children, and in his health,
and in the blessed fruits of the earth. He waited
and waited for the poor man to come and pay him
back his ruble, and at last he went to seek him.
“Thou son of a dog,” he shouted, before the house,
“why hast thou not brought me back my money ?
Thou knowest how to borrow, but thou forgettest to
repay!” Then the wife of the poor man burst into



THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 81

tears: “He would repay thee indeed if he were in
this world,” said she, ‘‘but lo now! he died but a
little while ago!” The rich man snarled at her and
departed, but when he got home he said to the ikon:
“A pretty surety thow art!” Then he took St.
Michael down from the niche, dug out his eyes, and
began beating him.

He beat St. Michael again and again, and at last
he flung him into a puddle |
and trampled on him. “Tl
give it thee for standing me
surety so scurvily,” said he.
While he was thus abusing
St. Michael, a young fellow
about twenty years old came
along that way, and said to
him: “What art thou doing,
my father ?”—“T am beating
him because he stood surety
and has played me false. He
took upon himself the re-
payment of a silver ruble, which I lent to the son
of a swine, who has since gone away and died. That
is why Iam beating him now.”—* Beat him not, my
father! Tl give thee a silver ruble, but thou give
me this holy image !”—“Take him if thou wilt, but
see that thou bring me the silver ruble first.”





82 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then the young man ran home and said to his
father: “Dad, give me a silver ruble!”—* Where-
fore, my son?”—“T would buy a holy image,” said
he, and he told oe how he had seen that
heathen beating



“Nay, my son, whence
shall we who are poor find a silver ruble to
give to him who is so rich ?”— —“‘Nay, but give it
me, dad!” and he begved and prayed till he got it.
Then he ran back as quickly as he could, paid
the silver ruble to the rich man, and got the holy
image. He washed it clean and placed it in the
midst of sweet-smelling flowers. And so they lived
on as before.

Now this youth had three uncles, rich merchants,
who sold all manner of merchandise, and went in
ships to foreign lands where they sold their goods
and made their gains. One day, when his uncles
were again making ready to depart into SEs lands,
he said to them: “Take me with you !°—" Why
shouldst thou go?” said they: “we have wares to
sell, but what hast thou?”— Yet take me,” said
he—* But thou hast nothing.”—“TI will make me
laths and boards and take them with me,” said he.—
His uncles laughed at him for imagining such wares
as these, but he begged and De ed them till they
were wearied. “ Well, come,” they said, “though
there is nought for thee to do; only take not much



THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 83

of these wares of thine with thee, for our ships are
already full.” —Then he made him laths and boards,
put them on board the ship, took St. Michael with
him, and they departed.

They went onand on. They sailed a short distance
and they sailed a long distance, till at last they came
to another tsardom and another empire. And the Tsar
of this tsardom had an only daughter, so lovely that
the like of her is neither to be imagined nor divined
in God's fair world, neither may it be told in tales.
Now this Tsarivna one day went down to the river
to bathe, and plunged into the water without first
crossing herself, whereupon the unclean spirit took
possession of her. The Tsarivna got out of the water,
and straightway fell ill of so terrible a disease that it
may not be told of. Do what they would—and the
wise men and the wise women did their utmost—it
was of no avail. Ina few days she grew worse and
died. Then the Tsar, her father, made a proclama-
tion that people should come and read the prayers
for the dead over her dead body, and so exorcise the
evil spirit, and whosoever delivered her was to have
half his power and half his tsardom.

And the people came in crowds—but none of them
could read the prayers for the dead over her, it was
impossible. Every evening a man went into the
church, and every morning they swept out his bones,



Sf . COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

for there was nought else of him remaining, And
the ‘sar was very wroth. “All my people will be
devoured,” cried he. And he commanded that all
the foreign merchants passing through his realm
should be made to read prayers for the dead over
his daughter's body. “And if they will not
read,” said he, “they shall not depart from my
kingdom.”

So the foreign merchants went one by one. In
the evening a merchant was shut up in the church,
and in the early morning they came and found and
swept away his bones. At last it came to the turn
of the young man’s uncles to read the prayers for the
dead in the church. They wept and lamented and
cried: “We are lost! we are lost! Heaven help
us!” Then the eldest uncle said to the lad: « Listen,
good simpleton! It has now come to my turn to
read prayers over the Tsarivna. Do thou goin my
stead and pass the night in the church, and T’ll give
thee all my ship.”—“ Nay, but,” said the simpleton,
“what if she tear me to pieces too? I won’t cone
—But then St. Michael said to him: “Go and fear
not! Stand in the very middle of the church fenced
round about with thy laths and boards, and take with
thee a basket full of pears. When she rushes at thee,
take and scatter the pears, and it will take her till
cockcrow to pick them all up. But do thou go on



THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 85

reading thy prayers all the time, and look not up,
whatever she may do.”

When night came, he took up his laths and boards.
and a basket of pears, and went to the church. He
entrenched himself behind his boards, stood there
and began to read. At dead of night there was a
rustling and a rattling. O Lord! what was that ?
There was a shaking of the bier—bang! bang !—and
the Tsarivna arose from her coffin and came straight
towards him. She leaped upon the boards and made
a erab at him and fell back. Then she leaped at him
again, and again she fell back. Then he took his
basket and scattered the pears. All through the
church they rolled, she after them, and she tried to
pick them up till cockerow, and at the very first
“ Cock-a-doodle-doo!” she got into her bier again and
lay still.

When God’s bright day dawned, the people came
to clean out the church and sweep away his bones;
but there he was reading his prayers, and the rumour
of it went through the town and they were all filled
with joy.

Next night it was the turn of the second uncle,
and he began to beg and pray: ‘Go thou, simpleton,
in my stead! Look now, thou hast already passed
a night there, thou mayest very well pass another,
and I'll give thee all my ship.”—But he said: “I



86 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

won't go, [ am afraid.”—But then St. Michael said
to him again: “Fear not, but go! Fence thee
all about with thy boards, and take with thee a
basket of nuts. When she rushes at thee, scatter
thy nuts, and the nuts will go rolling all about the
church, and it will take her till cockerow to gather
them all up. But thou go on reading thy prayers,
nor look thou up, whatever may happen.” .

And he did so. He took his boards and the basket
of nuts, and went to the church at nightfall and read.
A little after midnight there was a rustling and an
uproar, and the whole church shook. Then came a
fumbling round about the coffin—* Bang, bang!” up
she started, and made straight for him. She leaped
and plunged, she very nearly got through the boards.
She hissed, like seething pitch, and her eyes glared
at him like coals of fire, but it was of no use. He
read on and on, and didn’t once look at her. Besides,
he scattered his nuts, and she went after them and
tried to pick them all up till cockerow. And at the
first “‘ Cock-a-doodle-doo !” she leaped into her coffin
again and pulled down the lid. In the morning the
people came to sweep away his bones, and lo! they
found him alive.

The next night he had to go again in the third
uncle’s stead. Then he sat down and cried and
wailed: “ Alas, alas! what shall I do? “Iwere better’



















ae
ee
os

t i}





















ee





\



Le ere — ) y)
Si pa : oy ‘ A = ; lj \

hee 7 NK (i
mk
: cs \ S \

















.

i

q nN :
Why “a
MY \
a
\\ \ te
\
ANN





8& COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

I had never been born!”—But St. Michael gaid to
him: “Weep not, ‘twill all end happily. Fence
thyself about with thy boards, sprinkle thyself all
about with holy water, incense thyself with holy
incense, and take me with thee. She shall not have
thee. And the moment she leaves her coffin, do
thou jump quickly into it. And whatever she may
say to thee, and however she may implore thee, let.
her not get into it again until she says to thee: ‘My
consort !’”

So he went. There he stood in the middle of the
church, fenced himself about with his boards, strewed
consecrated poppy-seed around him, incensed himself
with holy incense, and read and read. About the
middle of the night a tempest arose outside, and there
was a rustling and a roaring, a hissing and a wailing.
The church shook, the altar candelabra were thrown
down, the holy images fell on their faces. O Lord,
how awful! Then came a “Bang, bang!” from the
coffin, and again the Tsarivna started up. She left
her coffin and fluttered about the church. She
rushed at the boards and made a snatch at him, and
fell back ; she rushed at him again, and again she fell
back. She foamed at the mouth, and her fury every
instant grew worse and worse. She dashed herself
about, and darted madly from one corner of the
church to the other, seeking him everywhere. But



Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080927_AAAALZ' PACKAGE 'UF00082996_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-09-28T19:25:15-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-04T15:09:21-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297587; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2014-01-11T08:33:22-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '566852' DFID 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACETW' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 0a7b32a78757480240b4e89332203920
'SHA-1' 1759f94040e96fbed69408dce0535217dbfebf7e
EVENT '2011-11-17T18:40:11-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'801204' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACETX' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
185db193be982cd5f952915abb91c7f8
b47515551e8889e65f5e36105ea039b3056cdd51
'2011-11-17T18:48:30-05:00'
describe
'1137600' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACETY' 'sip-files00001.pro'
306bf30542b5b040a75e22c9d0a59447
a49e58eea6a5433e74d3f1e18407f96693e03908
'2011-11-17T18:37:52-05:00'
describe
'233362' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACETZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
0a4842e329abc67aaf5731d8a192c536
e6b310c1c3a3df2e82a820bc730f8c2a59f802e1
'2011-11-17T18:30:56-05:00'
describe
'13626444' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUA' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a8ca071d2331fff4f53da0fd498d374a
43892c50e855770fe488edba04c6cc2ff99afee2
'2011-11-17T18:32:10-05:00'
describe
'42750' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
192519d500a6ed244262188247e07b66
cc00eb5bb9f4403a5380636baa12c9f4a35cf38e
'2011-11-17T18:35:18-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'75719' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUC' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
8d4a310fa56474beb83d5b38fc15bb1b
d0dd92f9d41eacbe90d326a9638ac1f575be29f0
'2011-11-17T18:43:56-05:00'
describe
'587109' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUD' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
e86e522c779481cad18a40d943ab6dab
8947a315c4385ffadfd21fa970502fda708e8605
'2011-11-17T18:37:11-05:00'
describe
'516306' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUE' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
f9b20462108c742da44db7a31c1c7935
e8ca91f2b23b6ee7f261c8a9209dc6cc255ee918
'2011-11-17T18:48:39-05:00'
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
b60cb86ee593ed03a74a653bfa363d63
332e0d4f402e4c90e5ce5a4f10bf694809d19210
'2011-11-17T18:41:06-05:00'
describe
'148949' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
c7e5c867a67d436668d9a97093d61eb2
5f5787aa156ca8b2cf52d9edec9e063cff48ed7a
'2011-11-17T18:42:02-05:00'
describe
'14109548' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
69ffe3caeb5e8b8cdfd8e1a81b49faf7
302abae6a13bd2e359aaf5a8a795c4600f2d048f
'2011-11-17T18:31:32-05:00'
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
a25bb3b0718597feb235f4608d31597b
da052018d4b55fed757aad03ef4be0b3b7c58ce2
'2011-11-17T18:48:08-05:00'
describe
'51000' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
a3d1788ef208f3edcbeee5afa8260aa5
03391a035c3113149bfa17c4940f2a1d6b267d03
'2011-11-17T18:31:49-05:00'
describe
'495216' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
d1177ae2e18270ab92e3dfce5f5346f9
269cd72821017bf47bf6221f6256e4b8fff272f4
'2011-11-17T18:41:21-05:00'
describe
'267334' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
33cf194b15f6011a7799fefb5db5db1a
a33650f0a352ff80b13b8e3c655d1bc1634ed514
'2011-11-17T18:44:22-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUM' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ad58bad5c7dc0e5bdbb693c247a817ac
53984c7cb9b9b8f9173f9e3becc28c2509ca6f08
'2011-11-17T18:46:12-05:00'
describe
'82990' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a060c8bfa7b480d59db45894004f2668
d71cbdcde08eddcf5381dc9c4843a9e1ffd61798
'2011-11-17T18:42:34-05:00'
describe
'3978680' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUO' 'sip-files00005.tif'
11f6bf6e88d6c6e3563eea6d7f4fefe7
a12378681a5cdb52d572dffaac4a5df44ed42815
'2011-11-17T18:30:33-05:00'
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUP' 'sip-files00005.txt'
591dac6a6a87646df130a5e72c648d3b
7a8078bf8aec87b4ca234367557bf66be75f8bbf
'2011-11-17T18:37:26-05:00'
describe
'33640' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUQ' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
30df4356720d080455a00a872f38b65f
1ffe050cfeae592a6ec0f55beea187c4d8db0be0
'2011-11-17T18:32:17-05:00'
describe
'525966' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUR' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
92067edf37b9c1163a412c493a8468e3
f0c7e430bf030f040a3c82b042f21dd649651355
'2011-11-17T18:45:09-05:00'
describe
'566840' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUS' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
632770022e527261748789c7381d1e95
184ea42213b668c72c3b786f4e0e8261065388e9
'2011-11-17T18:31:12-05:00'
describe
'2076' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUT' 'sip-files00008.pro'
422e8072e0ddb313853be2f5b214928e
132d32d627ba59d00dd52ce0232f8da74bdc4569
'2011-11-17T18:31:39-05:00'
describe
'174234' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUU' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
499aa414ee92073c2e72226d90ca932c
545e73d912e06e7afe1fd90e98ec34f42fa1397a
'2011-11-17T18:47:09-05:00'
describe
'4224740' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
63942040abca52a02d8d8f1c944b1c21
ca89d36c42c77b2d6696313343f9d725acceb455
describe
'126' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ef77b76e0ee49c359fe363e8ff120c60
21609b4d9c59bac9485e6e52fe5f72864a46ab60
'2011-11-17T18:37:16-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'56912' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUX' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
533b73d9f023afdf2d62d2b73509ff83
b1c43035e70b36b92b0f1e117d2612459bc3920d
'2011-11-17T18:40:01-05:00'
describe
'505699' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ec78737faaf9e9b6432a1a5acae18b2d
c8931b2213e666b8f3c476e339213ca9a307f700
'2011-11-17T18:31:00-05:00'
describe
'303800' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEUZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
4165a6cb3bbd55ced7bcedaed696c29e
7500fa324ffc4eed04283aab0886c4144e5c0205
'2011-11-17T18:40:53-05:00'
describe
'6176' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b5f1e7f55c61102d80662a207f153018
2909feb703a30dd30dbacf60cdb2aface868f643
'2011-11-17T18:36:45-05:00'
describe
'98931' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2c36ffd262b8f47ff4056d38e45abb6d
ea61e00f120ff7ecae41e2925d08c21516e64b10
'2011-11-17T18:31:28-05:00'
describe
'4062200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
fd2a60a5d0b18c4d2afe78a3201e82b2
dd91856e206327d30ddeb10064ea5ea3768ca528
describe
'337' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
96722ec1f19190644261c526e21b7471
7ebada7a905c5e93904c739f4001e6bc3992314e
'2011-11-17T18:32:42-05:00'
describe
'39451' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
333c62b314da2cae178222ce27cc662b
ff88979af7d5fd81dcb4e0b89b91604d284f7b52
'2011-11-17T18:39:02-05:00'
describe
'495038' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
15144cf5ea986e99c8cec607df3a5a0e
b6bc6a1de718ad00ac0047ff3498998afb60a5d5
'2011-11-17T18:40:29-05:00'
describe
'231844' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
9fc87736ae9f6b5c02503c6a67ebc412
8ad13ff9359ccadcb1207c0b77f33a59630bd146
'2011-11-17T18:30:36-05:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5312ab4fd45a97b046b45c709f3de9d7
f2418ffcdc09d3a31c934100ab7ed6b2062c29e9
'2011-11-17T18:44:21-05:00'
describe
'72797' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
497822637d1c240880dd266258a733a0
1a88137c8593016f5810d864d6b9ed23816ff0f1
'2011-11-17T18:45:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
90b595542837d3cf611216e6a5f02811
7dbb4af28f3aa83b238e5d5567b4b2fff23ecced
'2011-11-17T18:39:59-05:00'
describe
'143' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
48d019d1a2b5ddc2fcdd5903b94c6309
aa2653888b0037b0efe2f27d9c2e01d649bb3273
'2011-11-17T18:36:12-05:00'
describe
'30682' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
7aea9f7dba31f7344fe85dbf38c73cd6
e2bee3578504d5b763e7d03bff9be8fb87235706
'2011-11-17T18:34:55-05:00'
describe
'495243' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7ea0ce64a59126043a68140b6c289af5
b1b82f875788c4429bfa4de1fee61d53aca4d3ef
'2011-11-17T18:35:04-05:00'
describe
'302724' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
aa5ffd1e1a0ada1e9052e7829870594a
213231352c3f770f4e7067485a3c01008e0c6479
'2011-11-17T18:39:43-05:00'
describe
'19960' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
331b2dd6e27a2374445c8464c957565c
7e879b64160744657028b89e7a4424cf8fec7381
'2011-11-17T18:48:14-05:00'
describe
'102066' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6dfbf0d09d37527f840caec0450ea36a
f9394d7cfc1b690cbeadeb6a2dc7d9d56abf005e
'2011-11-17T18:43:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
53793d14c2f3570eb3b1c99b3cd5614e
7838f0106a28d342abdea1095fe606c56c4b5bbd
'2011-11-17T18:32:27-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d5555453d4b5e1e5451066bb3810d153
71b6664be00c59cdd900ff7d47b0ec9606f14b2c
'2011-11-17T18:46:16-05:00'
describe
'39208' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7659b33d0ca55ac47042ef926b49c761
f13600e64bff8ca01b4a4ccf90746a47fa5c253c
'2011-11-17T18:43:54-05:00'
describe
'495240' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
10686fbee6d2633a2e0c3ea4f2429842
c33d291cd8c5a2ca784fa0877e7105eafeb6cf6a
'2011-11-17T18:32:06-05:00'
describe
'299333' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
cc5053a061cf48029a7f739da0dc08f8
28e1fdf77a5f26d56f088c9290b24d1f6f8d96ea
'2011-11-17T18:38:16-05:00'
describe
'15975' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVV' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ab0109a3b94eb223cfbd633dd75fdd4c
aa6bd66e374904f80ccbfed7fc611c71223d4522
'2011-11-17T18:32:31-05:00'
describe
'98678' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
a7c7b4da85a0c6f67c23387af60ad814
64c5204ac7a2975f246f8079287954d412313198
'2011-11-17T18:48:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVX' 'sip-files00014.tif'
cf21526ea87cf443f5b943ca566d2c8f
5750af970a232ac06df3f35f2e8bc89489d77b55
'2011-11-17T18:45:01-05:00'
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVY' 'sip-files00014.txt'
5beb97ad20e17bbdbd109699849cc434
a36b83c8b7efe29ace262057445d46807e7d2c7e
'2011-11-17T18:44:55-05:00'
describe
'38295' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEVZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
61bb175dc545937f25e651fea91de956
2fc821e876a3aab72b2caf0a7169f428f197d6a0
'2011-11-17T18:41:18-05:00'
describe
'495209' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
36a03b80f40f1231ee1fb407e67c0fed
78197b653ed9359f16a4add6c3a7c1386e265366
'2011-11-17T18:37:00-05:00'
describe
'385359' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
dd91cc534796b4bc850a09643241eb6e
32d7efd21f43105146eb6b560bffbbe401a6d15c
'2011-11-17T18:43:45-05:00'
describe
'26243' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
08c22d3b4c98002efea26849c9908b65
a7c94956486c77f35dc7c662e5b4522cb6d91d53
'2011-11-17T18:41:23-05:00'
describe
'128663' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWD' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f8a1a55858d90552c431cc6a870c63cf
798f9ca6966af89ac37e1bc9804a52e380e1aa9b
'2011-11-17T18:42:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
cf24c1b0a585cabf66fbaf4b96e61adc
4744c053ef7747da6b074865956762fe7544b2d2
'2011-11-17T18:45:46-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b93a1edc473f2685819a00176a491fe2
e9d84b391e60eadecc15e080aab83c2418d8f1ca
'2011-11-17T18:40:07-05:00'
describe
'44876' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWG' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b0db16dc03ef3fe6f9270aab3d0fb6f9
783ac56668b862685b69745c30b5684348180a3a
'2011-11-17T18:31:59-05:00'
describe
'495290' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
30604ed9c64bb4826842fdc2b4312695
3919c08976a967e45bc197b6bfcd7e40ff53a7bf
'2011-11-17T18:31:07-05:00'
describe
'448269' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
036918b074f7c79b0b535dd1d667cba2
bd9ba359df84a31576204cee5e06249daac6ae0c
'2011-11-17T18:37:02-05:00'
describe
'36751' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
e831ce3de3abfdadab59c41c280461e2
5bd0964343e4e46f52e33bb7791f39b799831cdf
describe
'150605' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
94b0bd19e5e3acd1025dacfaceac023c
4e030cf7842b8c7ce38dc4a85eb59f9ec4d452a6
'2011-11-17T18:42:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
30b55383d277ae6cdffa19c85641425b
ae30e0784e4c8838ac74d1dc163583fb90ddbcab
'2011-11-17T18:45:31-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b07d0cacc3305b3065e73e8a8152be7a
750b2ecc1a1d40d023926ab39baaaa8e5d89f6c4
'2011-11-17T18:41:31-05:00'
describe
'50673' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWN' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
73def933d64a77ea12232a1671a186d9
09c0eaa64f88334e9bb4d3fde77c13d1bcd6e316
describe
'495245' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
9bbbb77a931f0c63faa68a538b804bec
79fccd32091d2e0fae3373d483e5197bc422210b
'2011-11-17T18:32:29-05:00'
describe
'442879' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e85715624294ecce557a2d22651d3347
985aa0c3d048f74358efa64d27d44dda5b1e1132
'2011-11-17T18:35:05-05:00'
describe
'36888' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0ca3c7e0a29ee068d8e3af762625504b
07845563fc3e0cf864813b7916589a6e880bc917
'2011-11-17T18:48:31-05:00'
describe
'149490' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
9b7ce42edfba5abe9ae7b56abb9eb776
9c4901edf52bb0c487b0133ba9a46fc71c73d4fd
'2011-11-17T18:45:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
662233b1a565f36cedc28b9857177517
a6186a2d8eb9200b12cea60cbfc507cd7cb7d1b0
'2011-11-17T18:37:47-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWT' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1068644dcdaa6a8d97c7b9a440096538
263ca8a438581545f91080beb8c3fa4de0c45da6
'2011-11-17T18:45:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'50479' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e9538d2ce8f0bc8d84614cac7175e12a
4f8696656376d05be9716c9dbe67c006ca912584
'2011-11-17T18:32:34-05:00'
describe
'495271' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
dcd1925b815befb6636a99f802eafb0b
651a65240520d1b146bac4908935f7414cffbeab
'2011-11-17T18:41:33-05:00'
describe
'363005' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3ab8bdb504a37c48f084f8c3684ea243
2da9eb13cb23623a5a90ab74dd647547f131478a
'2011-11-17T18:31:21-05:00'
describe
'24046' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
aa752ba0eb96a3f3832c9160f7829638
2f1a9d527d2323273fc2012c5bdd7cd7a2cc549d
'2011-11-17T18:38:54-05:00'
describe
'118610' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
16732a59e3be2fe584988fa9a9ef9f3d
6470ccd0e760099faa0427bb5cc15827f4cd4030
'2011-11-17T18:32:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEWZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
19e371893563423c4c63c007b1005daf
f00350c2e39f44f1d802741430f38c7933e7f15b
'2011-11-17T18:45:52-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
f23a8b0707f18b67b5157278ef2c5fd4
e65107493a1cd87bb2dc68ed58b794d9ca37232d
'2011-11-17T18:32:20-05:00'
describe
'43112' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
c8deb309c14464ec093ddf5992b16e51
881c692cae4dbc11715fbb0307307e26353a7e64
'2011-11-17T18:32:00-05:00'
describe
'488955' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a556e4c0e41f4cf04cf13c1164880bfd
6dda6bbde320693c989a66dc5c4e4b5fe25b8151
'2011-11-17T18:40:31-05:00'
describe
'349168' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
8daa57b6e4e1a7ba29e4edf316528c74
5325bb3f28668fb21e5e8d0f93429abbdab444b0
'2011-11-17T18:45:00-05:00'
describe
'20296' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
17d59230b32800568a764e8098ef076b
06639c00d221c8d1db0468885d61451412176711
'2011-11-17T18:39:37-05:00'
describe
'116123' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1937faed1b8e15e0cef322fe6eca366a
c896b1c8e7cc48688a1ea3221545f5888159f72d
'2011-11-17T18:45:32-05:00'
describe
'3928280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
32c18b237d4c2c7a2eb9e764c2312556
b728c47b1f32e5fb65bd5b6ecc17dfe329ff6e2d
'2011-11-17T18:37:04-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
aa39ec507c845aaf5e9669e4dfac1fd0
bdd9ddab160cafd719b0c1864bb84519cb8718a9
'2011-11-17T18:37:07-05:00'
describe
'44264' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8745def1ad3d57fd7c456a61f9edfdd8
6f254d117d774822ee4ebc9a7e7ba0b719faf580
'2011-11-17T18:48:01-05:00'
describe
'495215' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b0cd0c2a823391f47456bec1b1f22af0
03d6b0771d15adcfcacfc8a37064d89ee5fc7fee
'2011-11-17T18:38:02-05:00'
describe
'444917' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9e4a87309813b39b59a4868ee5127c9f
765bd3712c1a3934d054e26fcff329b80f242359
'2011-11-17T18:32:22-05:00'
describe
'37156' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
591cd620efaad22a6e56bd1cff0b75b8
8410daa1e554dbc62d9b06d2a5558354334c5922
'2011-11-17T18:42:46-05:00'
describe
'149210' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
53edcce9d2f91760bc926584b4e2eed8
98007c83cf474c1326a319d663e3b64270070f75
'2011-11-17T18:40:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
748b6bd7b742eba3d88e180c19f83e45
7e05e7946cb91bd1ca501b381d636caa4217646c
'2011-11-17T18:42:35-05:00'
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
532103a93b84e4c8a24d5ead9ee0830e
de9c515f57bc624d869f9c7e8328d8ea2ce3d68b
'2011-11-17T18:32:11-05:00'
describe
'50615' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9e883c540633730e94c5d704b07b26b4
49fdd9313d6349589c2cb3601d1204b9256576c6
describe
'495258' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7a96e82e3e00e87f93dd241bc284639b
59037218640031a5cfb06b52ffb0691fa3ee86d2
'2011-11-17T18:31:57-05:00'
describe
'433905' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
2521b2073f53ebe14cb4ba2cffdfb3fb
c8d56cf252ae2c1d00746d53e2f3488d5c0355f8
'2011-11-17T18:31:40-05:00'
describe
'35872' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e52d950375d1c03a25b1d38e29476159
0da63a5e158b957601bafdde08fee6d6332e788f
describe
'146949' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c498f44bcfcb344a3037aef193fc0675
1497755db155f425757cf2942a96abd4129ee2b0
'2011-11-17T18:32:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
d9ec97e30cc224d490243383cf049f92
dca2efc691493525704d8e13644352db237ceaae
'2011-11-17T18:40:56-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b8c621b6e2ab1b3f3097dc0ec8e76d7f
4d06fb15b32f2a4f295baca83706a833e172b2bd
describe
'49637' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c4f79b0f9116214dee166d021fd1fe98
bf38a7da5293ba4ba7d787b4dafca0ac97ce2847
'2011-11-17T18:38:00-05:00'
describe
'495273' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
77bf9c33edd311c986b5ed63c5e21ac0
7ecffa19cc4f3319bbb4d67e9e86872e6751963d
'2011-11-17T18:48:25-05:00'
describe
'441875' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e7182e6dc7b8a7a834beff691d0c566d
cc7be28ab07221e26b21a99d170625e4fa373781
'2011-11-17T18:41:35-05:00'
describe
'36260' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEXZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
726217b7d7dd3517127190438314103b
5103b48f52026388e8f16a6b27751b1d2b9aaf59
'2011-11-17T18:37:15-05:00'
describe
'149947' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
09c9ac0ad73fb263185da32e58f7b2e4
674ee0b28bef0e6a46bf81debbf8113f9872cd11
'2011-11-17T18:37:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
06f76f83ab4ae55aed4f3e1bfec53a93
6368ca216b95ab57e309cc5865b7af24accccb13
'2011-11-17T18:31:44-05:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
4119d351f6ee1f549ee9efd51a9af500
218f96a6c0f53192dc3e6af9d3cc32b645806109
'2011-11-17T18:37:03-05:00'
describe
'50505' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
27deb17aa1fd1cd7864a49373d5227a1
a9a7bccc68b8f2f8cb70b2fcb20d96f95a19ff25
'2011-11-17T18:31:35-05:00'
describe
'495278' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
fe76bc5f568d6b94878dcd28b43ba484
9bb84341829d901149399c74bde30d2b5e5b08b3
'2011-11-17T18:31:37-05:00'
describe
'579142' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2abf5e34e4d9ffb708750f38ebc910dd
b4f457cacdf7c66f7a633984554c20c1e2fabfc9
describe
'173275' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYG' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
fbf978a8f154a9cfb2428b94fc231995
26de27431cc60076acb3e314159875ab94a32704
'2011-11-17T18:48:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
b3fcf76b6898ef6ab47ea47bf9e9e7b8
b847480e4e99f1369d6326c7a4cd33f4984add28
'2011-11-17T18:41:47-05:00'
describe
'56610' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYI' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
cc7607c826bd9ce64f79959c606add88
275149ce2950d96ee464bb3d6928ffd3016703b0
'2011-11-17T18:40:58-05:00'
describe
'495248' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYJ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
6163204520aa496e0bb4d6f56a57fd8e
8664c18a70764e070284f76673ad4aabadbda6b1
'2011-11-17T18:48:47-05:00'
describe
'400963' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYK' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d9e389df810d683e643c5e00285ce168
946fbda91d596998ab32bd3f810ea479496cda52
'2011-11-17T18:41:04-05:00'
describe
'22199' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
dc060cb8323f5a6bdb4c433683bef8b6
d1a832e8a6a5036c09fef759004d96b91a542bbe
'2011-11-17T18:31:58-05:00'
describe
'132052' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYM' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4765d3f7fccd88bc877d9eb95ae344a0
4a0b9d8f123efded10662f57ebbedb886aadcb9c
'2011-11-17T18:37:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYN' 'sip-files00024.tif'
0d67db9586dc2b1859e1dc6d2f4f20ba
43586bdde62cf5e2ce75b11897878b1ff4b791df
'2011-11-17T18:46:18-05:00'
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
08c6d2b1f4af89af55362b5490ff637b
0d7a3a29b1038479dd0ad038e7ce59ac905d428c
'2011-11-17T18:37:20-05:00'
describe
'46744' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYP' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cd357a95a5a8c29a3816a46ce73d773f
a2c6799c2db071fcffce57dbf35247be18fa855d
'2011-11-17T18:31:45-05:00'
describe
'495251' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYQ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
b713fa0640f12ff138a3237046afee3c
b9726842e817cc5ef44e7de67fee8543563946b6
'2011-11-17T18:38:22-05:00'
describe
'438406' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYR' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
414e72e93ef0b14b595225db467016dc
4b60ac8587f8c3ab2cc4ebcf337dd471dea121e2
'2011-11-17T18:41:34-05:00'
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b3723fa74c25a16d9cc7d43766a124e1
8a71f814688106b0823be5c106702438092a1757
'2011-11-17T18:45:45-05:00'
describe
'148331' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYT' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c52716520f5fc476935015d51c618631
55503f14f753ddc06d3afb40774c610699c8350f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
75690d290550ca7a37a92eaa0190d627
32427551b9e52e4de4f3a1c2fee85583c3b36e7e
'2011-11-17T18:31:05-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYV' 'sip-files00025.txt'
87ad4a8922017677412e3005b76e226e
2f6722efd2a5301e2b5650aa0a6552aa08a93ada
'2011-11-17T18:44:44-05:00'
describe
'49915' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYW' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fe7a13695d8017b1cbdd00efdf8708b6
089381addac933d8e9ff1ad89cf6ce8062a57fb6
'2011-11-17T18:42:38-05:00'
describe
'495291' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYX' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e619e80ec1880cfbd9e25ce0e523dfba
efc49972bdcea78deecaa7f7875b0720ba600442
'2011-11-17T18:43:06-05:00'
describe
'435970' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYY' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
eee628e5fb2146e7413573dd53787f8a
639a0afcccc9ead8b7bb32644f8216d0250ce846
'2011-11-17T18:39:50-05:00'
describe
'35710' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEYZ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
ef677f80152649ff4a7706ea1cb93a40
44fee5972d66567a2d08bfd52eeb0c4b600d4714
'2011-11-17T18:36:59-05:00'
describe
'146098' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZA' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
7a581bced5da00785cddb078d9e37986
0938a93110b19fb4d3db9c4143f2722ef75f876e
'2011-11-17T18:39:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4d6faab51b593bc324a5d05dfeb118c1
c4b452eaadff3d72250705c2294cafae6bbb4960
'2011-11-17T18:38:30-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZC' 'sip-files00026.txt'
b3600370e74e4e795c351e2aa8e05f4f
ed83d94d3973adbe743e5ec6899e05f1b0f00984
'2011-11-17T18:32:41-05:00'
describe
'50211' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZD' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
6061c08eb854a23f9bf6b522242dc8fa
a357a29cc729d319e6eb216defb40a15e850761e
'2011-11-17T18:43:14-05:00'
describe
'487705' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2b43cfd085995114e1e6fb90af7d8bc0
f47f5a7e5b812e850b876d5fd3009c25a7ba65cd
'2011-11-17T18:37:21-05:00'
describe
'434544' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
06544df6109ee53f9993c052ee26a0fa
a0a16fb793323e777bb9b353166819df5036c69f
'2011-11-17T18:45:57-05:00'
describe
'36012' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0c1ccb68a78ac843316d560ecc0b73f5
7834755500b99f959ba4a064d501a67f3e07dc31
'2011-11-17T18:40:46-05:00'
describe
'146936' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
40b61e15a5a24acb51135b456976b712
8e51acea00548d8943d8fa2c5356553029a4ca8b
'2011-11-17T18:43:12-05:00'
describe
'3918200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZI' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fd08fe74d8a3bdb6f5f812f662c83f52
c4cbb532eae1fc746972367d6a6e02d49ae9c94a
'2011-11-17T18:44:02-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZJ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
47b7e8f7e467e794bd1ccb0167c45a53
1ba1196e963e76fedb0d593856dcbfd7753ee1dc
'2011-11-17T18:30:43-05:00'
describe
'51194' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZK' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f6d512d48c16db6da72539c6510b2a0b
7bb260d6b7e63659fa98d97e7a4a60fef2106d26
'2011-11-17T18:45:34-05:00'
describe
'495281' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
c48978a27fd14f21d34e32e1e1d9b09b
e168966f3f0a064077b84f0369f5e2d6d2fc19d0
'2011-11-17T18:41:00-05:00'
describe
'443480' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
94b1629f5d0f6f2786e8ea3321a0a5f9
211dbd799f71580d6a7c92e36f89c43da5030154
'2011-11-17T18:45:11-05:00'
describe
'35846' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c87982b1401918db1c25d2dffb81d31e
50db9b7072a1c14027ba5e2b9914d5f425d967ce
'2011-11-17T18:42:09-05:00'
describe
'150315' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
80b32f8ea5626e3ee9f9a79323137196
efef2ccc22088599d3a2d67ea908e710ed0f376c
'2011-11-17T18:44:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
24afced6a70eb4a720f3fa8731021767
3f6ddf86dacdf0afe67763ecc0efcde7ff866aef
'2011-11-17T18:43:50-05:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7581ebd545a3a02242967d7aa68d12be
f232b90016f6d1da5991ebf0a4fc02da64335812
'2011-11-17T18:30:50-05:00'
describe
'50909' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZR' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e8e63b8cac553bdbb424d6edec8f0157
84a75d246d3168620e5fdffd5f6543e2b74bef55
'2011-11-17T18:45:58-05:00'
describe
'485822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
1bab43ed77ff7af735ecbb04d8dec748
afa00d7440c38fe7451907bc35fd5619f4caae07
'2011-11-17T18:41:41-05:00'
describe
'428393' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b664f8b45558eec22885d250115f143b
69c2a89c73abd6adccb82f6e7775d4fffe048f1b
'2011-11-17T18:37:39-05:00'
describe
'33703' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
501b9b601bab4c320f3ba17d892e96dd
eb8e5cfcaebb6edcf64b355f08602c2ff59da462
'2011-11-17T18:30:23-05:00'
describe
'145903' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
20b62708096b640dc7ad8c756d02479d
53cf592081ac23fde3ea3414bafba4ccae8de509
'2011-11-17T18:32:37-05:00'
describe
'3903080' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c002fcf27591f66aab42f050ec0bcced
55adc9a1e6556ecab02199369351601e5d4075a6
'2011-11-17T18:42:04-05:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
777431c2311b71cd2606d1d9352491fb
748b6b1e8a20c15c3322ead039fbfaba549276be
'2011-11-17T18:48:26-05:00'
describe
'50884' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d8e8a371ac09f0c25d00913d76f3911b
df6071c6771361ade446d3203c46519458f7a030
'2011-11-17T18:39:05-05:00'
describe
'495242' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACEZZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ee1cb3f2d2eee87e65e483a1daa8b769
86e96c60704094c452c6724480ea9049a22907ca
'2011-11-17T18:32:30-05:00'
describe
'433948' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
fd668b624c6531ce60e020657efb9902
8f751a7ee0c314660aea86c2f666bc592031d9d3
'2011-11-17T18:46:13-05:00'
describe
'35396' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
f6694edd4b61636b63879d4aec51f9a1
d2672e4586e6a684d3628ba6b881d72da661ed45
describe
'146013' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
e9ce03dc64b740ead02a3db4faf24d7c
0e4c272e75ccac290c23c7543db899ac5e30debe
'2011-11-17T18:30:46-05:00'
describe
'3978676' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
435464c30212fc8222fa144d4945777b
a40fe4eed0f359020fedd1c61be384e06ab8df74
'2011-11-17T18:36:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c7345c5e96919527051ec850a4117d67
da48cde656d76c9dba4441a8cfff94df1d004fe0
'2011-11-17T18:36:53-05:00'
describe
'49524' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
9f27a5628cc7636f8188eac6bacdf46c
7f6b6489e60c7346d9157cadc9264e1f808d4cf3
'2011-11-17T18:43:15-05:00'
describe
'485838' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
bf2540221ab414b07d5b0ca465ed1348
9737272c7415c0095dd730fc9d6d4562f5073bee
'2011-11-17T18:42:28-05:00'
describe
'433280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f3177d84ce590d906dede50cf4c45f89
94bcaaeebc10b0e625aaad07a4e0e0d6a12172be
'2011-11-17T18:43:01-05:00'
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
5071baee32f58a98189b9006fabd9e33
6ff2f54b4a6eafab1704d423a37837541b6e2b65
'2011-11-17T18:35:34-05:00'
describe
'146125' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
12b0099405bc86f2fcd62ec3fb36d9c2
ca3e87794c1476826348ab29dcbaf0497b94aea9
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0e16b8898cb4057b2a756889beb0a682
5209d323ff41542047def73920777d5c1fd89a6e
'2011-11-17T18:39:36-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
373f7786f5c93df14f4bb4c66cee8b7a
24f16f509cf1929f9b0133047bd8257a21e60c95
'2011-11-17T18:41:50-05:00'
describe
'51713' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAM' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
3d8cbda63d4954a8dc2ca383f5541e60
582d9d55efa77640ce62f8f795607c8f591063e3
'2011-11-17T18:42:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
758e043ba8ac8d050643417cdae299c1
ff55f9e9d07dbfc1dd9753cdcbf92236fafb9eb1
'2011-11-17T18:39:46-05:00'
describe
'432803' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAO' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0ca02be1de30c1714bb243ceff5d15e2
98ee1a8f0404697632bd4321b354dbdfecc5f11d
'2011-11-17T18:31:26-05:00'
describe
'35180' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAP' 'sip-files00032.pro'
d94ae64f13530d9b7236d647417b553c
97884a48fed525268d99e78f2e774b58f978c157
describe
'146628' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAQ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
42ca250d1e82aa9e0ff7d8cd265e32f5
cfb194e30c1c2c798daa8db89954973ac812f2a6
'2011-11-17T18:31:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAR' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c20b5c2b29e64f48ee76f4c5c7d09745
d9829e5994cd71bdf6f528406036e1815aa1fc52
'2011-11-17T18:31:08-05:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAS' 'sip-files00032.txt'
472a690441d4c210f1df77e2ce4f183d
a141218f0a13fc6d48f2cb348973c3e899f1764f
describe
'50210' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAT' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f067590da3b1a7682d32c561d2f53e5a
433a4508add2307e522a3c4855e713001e20ba0c
'2011-11-17T18:43:49-05:00'
describe
'485809' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAU' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9f63a65760bafa20cc9ecd40d9ba0f8e
e03bcecb3057cbfbc5767bba3dba37b90dd2a6e3
'2011-11-17T18:42:39-05:00'
describe
'429608' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2fb2facdd091bf99633a3224301c6c66
1d89c2cfe1e842c21c1b59d783f3c1ec4af93356
describe
'35083' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
31fa622998599681cb70d49cfc13920a
0098cdc3b7b2a540e4c39e2b8439ebf4e09b65d3
'2011-11-17T18:42:13-05:00'
describe
'145773' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
368716766eddda455b1313658ea12131
319cbaa8e2ce468423aac5e6091d4484b48de1a4
'2011-11-17T18:30:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
cefc4056a99d0ba0ab94ef1eb0f97779
954dc48ed160a8c71f98b15d9d1a96dc126cee7b
'2011-11-17T18:31:46-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFAZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0d1d11a882b7074f33f1dd0b6f2c362c
5c8affb5879591872dc4987679e466a91d540e97
'2011-11-17T18:45:21-05:00'
describe
'51138' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c86f0fa85382a4038b876e4b8104b8f7
85c3340c81c8a5cb8c3851000722dfee4047154b
'2011-11-17T18:36:32-05:00'
describe
'495287' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c33068957e35d8953c7c7ea9731402bf
cd0a27a074addf0bb2e54499f8f61ebe4e570df0
'2011-11-17T18:44:40-05:00'
describe
'434521' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6cfc7adb294752f91b30e534685c796b
27291fcf2914d3d18aae2ccc8bf1370bbbc90e16
'2011-11-17T18:39:31-05:00'
describe
'36159' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e163eb329ffdcf434528767452e4dc1f
6789d4e39b4156fc285c3ebe1e4855870d11a406
'2011-11-17T18:43:41-05:00'
describe
'146940' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ce4cae27d3c201a0f1fd97a6ce6c5abc
3a8d9160df79e51a72b2e589e90d0dba14ad157c
'2011-11-17T18:48:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
66e985fdd5f7dd44c630e3e3ccc70607
f8d50e68b9c9febb89d748da327b1aecd411fee7
'2011-11-17T18:38:24-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e155f70ec42409bf6cc4b08987c3ae81
12026408e7f43379c098d19d51b3aa35b7aef184
'2011-11-17T18:39:39-05:00'
describe
'49743' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
049b6c2fbe3882b0e5186acc0efc5111
2c68ca27edb7ef1db59ec2764e8f997adf70d8db
'2011-11-17T18:38:09-05:00'
describe
'485790' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9c03627a1f520c14348a9e34f0f7b87d
5d53fcd1a50d086f0e5223c9c3d4d51ba34a6705
'2011-11-17T18:32:05-05:00'
describe
'263924' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
91282b15bfd292a7f56bba10e9155b45
ccedebf6a041ebb558d878ff5990e511db815942
'2011-11-17T18:38:48-05:00'
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
4c7545c75857df8422337a9f36c7b756
8631f58598b67a1027b22566ae2fb83d60dafe6f
'2011-11-17T18:32:44-05:00'
describe
'85448' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
da5e2324de9a7352942354c7bbadbd6b
5bd7ffaf2498b5e3d6f81c0b23d50cf515eea2e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2846b2e7f38b9c145c8198e838df38fc
ad55baeffcb66847eb64f27ea3d47ddec858319b
'2011-11-17T18:35:46-05:00'
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBN' 'sip-files00035.txt'
8c90f168e27fc00551d2bfccee50931c
69804508a3e67ffd1526927ae57ac6259637c9d9
'2011-11-17T18:42:49-05:00'
describe
'34963' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
08d6099cd79e4031ceba2b9c1a21ce8d
22acfbb25a6dcf3efff31cf3c34f6358f57556fc
'2011-11-17T18:30:27-05:00'
describe
'476391' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBP' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c2eaff6bf0fd165e43dafa88c465d014
cc04681c999f30d5e954b3d2636ba617808d46ec
'2011-11-17T18:37:35-05:00'
describe
'356657' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBQ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
56aaa507a2c19d937850af036d91d463
3a459a4f9b6e624a9100dcc34330359197b7713e
describe
'20545' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBR' 'sip-files00036.pro'
355dcbb8ebbc7cdb2284b2df7b54a6ca
e86e44ac8f873106ca737ca7eacf14772a2cfcf5
'2011-11-17T18:30:41-05:00'
describe
'120293' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBS' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
fa590ffa528e5793e016c7a5f8321f2e
15a209d7bbb6dbf517a2344b3571102cb50aa55b
'2011-11-17T18:44:29-05:00'
describe
'3827480' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
6364ffb5d912d99ab7d9ce471eeb2b0e
3c48ce5fb688d1235ae87cb456d7cdb90be1414a
'2011-11-17T18:41:05-05:00'
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBU' 'sip-files00036.txt'
31789b5af73ff1d30c84df7c5237bfff
21e8863590ef740e2aaa4a8bee702ef71ae3bacc
'2011-11-17T18:39:38-05:00'
describe
'45890' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0d0aa85f3c377031b76006ddc45087e1
f5d8ac45a6e277a709c5de5a99f800b84cda3431
describe
'485834' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
02db1298e13d7bc8eea55479804eac8e
7b2f990c8bbf9780bb3dfcbae871630e7d543a34
'2011-11-17T18:44:16-05:00'
describe
'429636' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
132c20be8bfe9cb46623197a48eedfe8
b089ec95316a2d9b5047dac544b42c9d0ee9a4d1
'2011-11-17T18:31:06-05:00'
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1210dcead2892a5713da89f74e677373
5cef9fe74e2a3fa0f4cce0a362676fc4c04536e2
describe
'144618' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFBZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a0a7622acc1cb923343d4f8731f570bb
67c059b42cd2a763213c3f3befed4dde29b9d6fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
e792457ac6493af613373fc2db2f546f
a71de5309f1618562dd7f39f033a8649611fdd41
'2011-11-17T18:46:05-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0732156fd816c71f54d1858180e1a0bd
12e4b3ac2aba0f213a0786b2852d4457fa61f8ac
'2011-11-17T18:38:43-05:00'
describe
'50677' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
0f7af542c833c0fffd8df06aed7c3fbc
4a1b14b12d321ffd31d4c52cfc684da7c345f797
describe
'474478' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
eb75686d61283c6ec7e1cb32ae0db399
d82c21c8515b8f731cecd988573a52e941ebde70
'2011-11-17T18:31:25-05:00'
describe
'432638' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
aa814dfe14faac489e9f2b67827b88d8
45ab55cdef8b1ce071e82d33e95f2bf49062377b
'2011-11-17T18:43:43-05:00'
describe
'37196' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
77beeedab7fe63a836cfe35fd4b26406
d1be994fd20853e980be44327e6c4b87e39fbd7e
'2011-11-17T18:43:40-05:00'
describe
'147417' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
3bc994cb68d3c1cff47c2d369c833f96
979681bb618770c3b8acdd3f68fb43644c804e0a
'2011-11-17T18:39:57-05:00'
describe
'3812360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
fffdb98c02c8f2a638c08ee965096780
1e56a8905c730dc0feaf0dbf0606f46900bf40b1
'2011-11-17T18:30:39-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2e657744b7d77e95bbf0348831d340f4
d882027aa6163b41c4c77c1ff13ce05928fb5154
'2011-11-17T18:38:52-05:00'
describe
'52350' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
bc69ac625210cf4d46b6bb1da2c0ad36
3c8a09896cbe614d4ba09be31fd81aa5ba525743
describe
'485789' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ee72dc87f4cbfb7b357e3debedc635a2
9b56f636aa566cc028818f8df9e605fa1c84dfd9
describe
'484030' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
fdd59681cac423603a352e76af9e5ff1
cddf8fdf36c00953cff1da50b769203c6635a64a
'2011-11-17T18:42:12-05:00'
describe
'143546' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7242aefa466df392d2f3b7669c34b618
9981ed0bce626c8e8839e303405189bf61669565
'2011-11-17T18:40:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b8ef74045f3c4e03c78ffea154db10ba
f91c54d7754b6587918b2559a66cd1f38ffe2e38
'2011-11-17T18:43:28-05:00'
describe
'50579' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a871bce9b37fe363b853a79fc835769f
a1160bbf565e38f3f1cefe1ed472da37478f9f3d
'2011-11-17T18:38:10-05:00'
describe
'486117' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
cac0eb81fd5efff9a6d080eb84920099
b097b30c9da74b846188ad38f9cbc99c703899bf
describe
'441381' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4323a5612a413fb7700a4529094c1cd0
c8b896efac78570cee729540bccb1359ed02e819
describe
'35729' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e7091917ea279755a56c83ec08946c71
55417975862b7a356dce4adae175ac8f1b3f3b5a
'2011-11-17T18:42:01-05:00'
describe
'148062' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
e99df9fea879e6693d4743c7c9ce4ca6
a50300f7f1f23f0c842174fb8101858873ea7f7f
'2011-11-17T18:38:50-05:00'
describe
'3905600' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
6cdb7de8f2209642733e0747800e1f3c
6150a05811e0618ca3e5ffb68e89635fa9dfb1b3
'2011-11-17T18:44:58-05:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
05184d0aece018d4d8c0ff7a8bbc13e9
c25f5871a16d2a9279ae033a1eea17cb4cd5340e
'2011-11-17T18:44:50-05:00'
describe
'51266' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
9c68837ecabaac5f8044bcff69a78062
fa51388eeac585fa41a4a6439a377387b3dc7c4f
'2011-11-17T18:44:49-05:00'
describe
'495264' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
0254e114bb126c5ea7816715614f7b10
743f060588a55557c9fc050292e4fef7a830d188
'2011-11-17T18:43:35-05:00'
describe
'439640' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
16ae01ec6a4011239186afb12b1c27c1
07f46f7270e1462eaeceef3803bdfabbca1efd54
'2011-11-17T18:30:45-05:00'
describe
'35825' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
993e2fa6bc2f4f6192f4a35f152551be
b9ed75af9f787b4de1086a9d2ba7cc57979168f3
'2011-11-17T18:31:17-05:00'
describe
'147322' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFCZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e4c62020643da5f0461da16943746b91
0d1be33eb9dd742926ed0f6ab71ef9fc51a52928
'2011-11-17T18:43:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8e756b18012cfdd5502b7c0ad32d5277
c80f00a30ac25bbee4babe7564962142e9920758
'2011-11-17T18:48:21-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
8a61e2c79bce26904dc67a022c084b01
b3af4fb7b8af13f8f29b2bcf6a3455973b06a4a0
'2011-11-17T18:41:08-05:00'
describe
'49502' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
727911185d6559d7d206796cf72f2fef
b898c566fa75577f3a10d981de3a165a3246cdf8
'2011-11-17T18:43:13-05:00'
describe
'495282' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
e139e79e4fa8e2abee9506040ba1c126
9d106b0b8bff440b0d2a9afece23f271d669cce1
'2011-11-17T18:40:32-05:00'
describe
'444564' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
555c8f102bc8bfe082611677a033bc15
388a57d79423cd63094f72e729165f754533bef2
'2011-11-17T18:31:20-05:00'
describe
'35990' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
cdfb00f1d77a2c1c53fd48a6ece26083
756b4fe7b5c9b18367e9cf2c48beeaeba22a88a3
'2011-11-17T18:42:17-05:00'
describe
'149360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
3219e0bae63142a09dcf76c8602ed4d6
51e0a01e9189e7d1ca9455b91f854822183d971e
'2011-11-17T18:39:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7a76e2dabad21e12289361498d668967
d8058952a94b2d6cc1d70a8a2edb312b43268e3a
'2011-11-17T18:47:56-05:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a9d92a2ef67ae4d6c1702c7b2750c6e4
675d0d5215285dea1ed6e02c070f3d4a602a8092
describe
'50964' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ab8e6be0ce1492ab632bac32541ba455
1626f64ad831654b4311e3e091ddbf67818a76b1
'2011-11-17T18:42:06-05:00'
describe
'499254' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
243f7843eeddaee193f2f7fe3dccb4d9
746f902976aa775ce6a47b291955da7c7b62734b
'2011-11-17T18:36:37-05:00'
describe
'441322' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ee89d261d3066353058779bcfc02a886
f5ab3bac84ddd859f03e05f5f3494bb7da84de24
'2011-11-17T18:41:24-05:00'
describe
'37266' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
20d14009cc9d00965f271ea3d3a522eb
a2da35874d9077057159f3ed4e10ef1b6c4257e3
describe
'148908' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
eb11bbcbcc9cf4539a8f56c4921c801c
e482a6301244cdd08d987bf0366acf318c642a01
'2011-11-17T18:43:36-05:00'
describe
'4010540' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
5f1fc56ea4b4fe50c51adfe8e2f5e28d
655883a1b15477b63e5c25240d6cf98c8fd63a23
'2011-11-17T18:44:47-05:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
cf1bff925874e37c4bb9d0848ec1a9bc
5c289e46f6d4afaa779db64d77a3b3ee9672826f
describe
'51581' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b4ec9c5da68fc6e04dbf30905b55b365
a1590cf61e367d9d62ac38e4d2bb6c3af19ed0a0
describe
'483944' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
5b60ebcfefe7030e5613277911a502a0
aa55dbc5a424835f49de8e4ceddc0b3380ef69b8
'2011-11-17T18:32:33-05:00'
describe
'431756' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
932d3196a6ca7976c5d326749c29b037
3f8685d272f6c5ede14aebfed4d592aa27856c4a
'2011-11-17T18:45:54-05:00'
describe
'37238' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
8c2a91028c9395322fb9019b959282e2
53206226f0fc22d2b9f999dcfbdfffb55a54b3a4
'2011-11-17T18:35:41-05:00'
describe
'144238' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
eb60693ec27bdae221e32b432e663ca4
d4dfc2b66958eed71ed5c93047f75b9afc768beb
'2011-11-17T18:43:48-05:00'
describe
'3887960' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a41bd2af75d38c2d0696ae374876a86c
e5e4cb111e2224f84e7a6d73e55abebbc87f92c2
'2011-11-17T18:44:17-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
07a9e24f32ea8a9a242a10f5c50e0299
72bad1ff7fd5378c1d77e748241d4ba52d7ccba3
'2011-11-17T18:44:53-05:00'
describe
'50973' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
adc56bdf108d062076ad5b3c80340188
de21bb09bcf79ee7ffb1c4bd44cbc41a87917479
'2011-11-17T18:31:22-05:00'
describe
'508251' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d3f9306d0cf078c5f22a902028973aff
a10c8d80a10322db4858387828cf4bdcedeb3a29
describe
'425097' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFDZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2740d8366cf962faa904f50808ed9af7
88eb5ccdaf31725e3402d08e18ad87d106220826
'2011-11-17T18:48:23-05:00'
describe
'36781' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
d78fef6809b992fccf3659cc14fe63f4
502b3f3283b6a17ffeec5fd30da0b342a08c3a54
describe
'144643' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a85d7ff4807e08d65a5dc0e1707dd449
d61a127258ba75bb62edba1413da156ec81dfd30
describe
'4082432' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0bb82a05d74c3c1c7ab9f161f052c9d1
3e5b76e60a09fb95c556d603833e6d15744a4b81
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFED' 'sip-files00045.txt'
99653752421d15c64a1d9f8e7c6a851c
1dc40e05d84b5b9a1817da1ee1122732968b500f
'2011-11-17T18:36:28-05:00'
describe
'50624' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
4667e04d991fb336f6b99a69bcf1e099
b0d6fc53126bffe90113ecabd2b18f46c9ae083a
'2011-11-17T18:30:37-05:00'
describe
'495265' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
77acd22558efa7ebf600f64a8b6af22c
3e2195c499095d97422b75f118f887391e047221
'2011-11-17T18:47:58-05:00'
describe
'443558' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
491cb5a487b6ee0030a92baf52f02d81
d9dba0faa179f12166ddd5e69140fa1fd9e51201
'2011-11-17T18:43:30-05:00'
describe
'36482' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
55b2ad7aebc4b35eb28e9b56c5b0060b
e2d0ea0f369c75c7ffdaeaac28c5551b728630eb
describe
'149434' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2ff3058052e6d151f79197bb45d40185
51873e509199ebd4bf14db4636f5815cbae648e4
'2011-11-17T18:41:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5e7a1aed0154d283999774a4ddb3527f
4bae492d63cc417707dfd1e5355b148dfd678bd4
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e7cb61cf50f6ab5b58e8687d5278b2f5
da27cb1e9872ad3351caf517e4c319946f9e7426
'2011-11-17T18:42:24-05:00'
describe
'51650' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
98413fd8971937bc1870b86eb5b1b1d1
e374828f42d86df9bffdf69c06d088a8868b77e0
'2011-11-17T18:46:19-05:00'
describe
'495249' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8e624c0d60b23b40226a9aff3df8544e
4fbb7f8ce2bb866c72f49ef4d8e42bf14f1fed6c
'2011-11-17T18:32:19-05:00'
describe
'431254' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
221955679163e03fa86dd7a8541adf36
776687dea98eea48c2cef2baaf365feeb1ae62ae
'2011-11-17T18:31:52-05:00'
describe
'36222' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6af135d8d9477671ee186b50291ca16b
0a7aa04412b89a147ef70147c808accd01098931
'2011-11-17T18:44:04-05:00'
describe
'145410' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c30c69c03df16aa319ab08fe89d6d1bb
064c9a68254e1b6acaae07481414215c9011457e
'2011-11-17T18:39:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
6b43b89e5bd58f0def80b9d4983987b0
02710843137eaf758a7db29e7789e175af86798b
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFER' 'sip-files00047.txt'
c4e2e27512aa68c388b461ccee73cea6
b7808cdc47547fef34c5b3a9ee19bc53d87e4454
'2011-11-17T18:30:22-05:00'
describe
'50453' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFES' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
40f6f82e94dc399490f4fa7d1c1428d0
eb43ca436a3d23a9ed2417ab3528bc9eeb75452e
'2011-11-17T18:37:58-05:00'
describe
'495229' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFET' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
7413cfd142bca73b9f1a7538111d464f
221deb4082b60c9ceee692197c245754d0f79bbd
'2011-11-17T18:36:27-05:00'
describe
'436442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
872f19f5426117355a18069069de7abc
6659668942eba68bca1daa56fb378e9c58304366
'2011-11-17T18:41:10-05:00'
describe
'35773' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
818e9ae3b890a0ddc7162d44fbfa06b5
8c429d9c4af6c60dec52d9cb00c664cb5f44aab7
'2011-11-17T18:45:41-05:00'
describe
'147016' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7f6717ef7048ef79588556cd18050f66
7a6cdb6c6637f0f58363234459d57601f228d3f3
'2011-11-17T18:42:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
78ea6f26eb6e4e7fc13cbd4b5b227e26
e34a7abccf144362fae6402b0e0b46153d0f6f19
'2011-11-17T18:40:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7df7124f46f3e8d65e81fab730e02575
e3a8f7031e2bd52bbad091531726ec7aa120b085
'2011-11-17T18:30:34-05:00'
describe
'49873' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFEZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
97c2d8526ab07d0b3b91ec842323c60d
b08b0308a50f5108d66cc2442b7ef0baa271279a
'2011-11-17T18:42:19-05:00'
describe
'495250' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
7ea81c5152fa6e35aad0b1899d4d03cf
786dd6fbc6724f973ca9c5745e12a5fdb7bf56d8
'2011-11-17T18:37:22-05:00'
describe
'432862' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
68f5c730efb0b577aaa53125261b45c6
daeb846d8f731430c373d4fa3d2dfb292ae54aa1
'2011-11-17T18:30:49-05:00'
describe
'34654' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
935b1101b2ec25ac320a25cfad6200b7
fff1835cbdad156cf73b445d5e1609ceb1eb087d
describe
'145380' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8f1b1cfd129ee2ab5afdbd4353521dc7
4ee87a52882f122a7f20da5a037678aa26b7fd47
'2011-11-17T18:30:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4130e1798cfd1d186547fbb5e384395f
3a59d16e2d582e72ffe6b535a08dadb4bebd9de3
'2011-11-17T18:38:39-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ead801f94abdf9969fa050f07deea47e
18cfaf9a50587ec7593525cbd1df90f6ce0626be
'2011-11-17T18:30:17-05:00'
describe
'50033' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a19303c39f1b4f136ef870ada7af415b
a9fcaea2530792eabef39ca97df59eba46520200
'2011-11-17T18:41:01-05:00'
describe
'488046' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
a85d84b84145a15e5718953f13e15de6
dd8c45c102037931fa1ddeeee4a466673a38c2a9
'2011-11-17T18:32:40-05:00'
describe
'428782' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
875a087822c86e59bbc69fb292b85512
a24cb11269dbac4a0ebc75147a79970b67c7b44d
'2011-11-17T18:48:46-05:00'
describe
'35676' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
669b99255d1b03a4d040f4be4944810e
71181c5d255725a452fe2b944224643a099e7d7a
'2011-11-17T18:38:20-05:00'
describe
'146199' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
c6e730e8a5e53c10f6028e82cc8f0830
b3e5d9050b25220ca2bfa658024847dc4ebdebb6
describe
'3920720' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
c06c3e6a9d07a4d1c65c125f1671a6d8
555b2821a33108e12fd5c61e40baa9739125e5f5
'2011-11-17T18:41:11-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
55fe2268149cd2b794889f98d07c20ae
2f7f2e9f934d25019322e88d468a6632ff3fa7e8
'2011-11-17T18:38:42-05:00'
describe
'50849' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
3f8440aeb94ceab1887b09c177754cee
a426665d2073164039cd615e609179c0f697b15d
'2011-11-17T18:32:24-05:00'
describe
'495184' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cfb4fc8c3b1e5bdce08dad5d1fd55b04
62a6bd593f7981942848797ae5c0038cfa6f7f4a
'2011-11-17T18:38:56-05:00'
describe
'439543' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
eeebe3f29b5c3d5ba4a0e8dbc7f61f6c
a36ab4a105570e50988bae7da8452677126e0fb8
'2011-11-17T18:38:49-05:00'
describe
'36227' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d29031e8f664cc68260589dfed9629c6
75ac4e1160a3d667c027d2a276e1f97c04e2beb9
'2011-11-17T18:43:37-05:00'
describe
'149583' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
4461c43797df0bc542e388d711ae6108
8134af4325992c70faf3744203b18a25d7dec7cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
efa2d78cd83fc8a5a74791a3d58a3033
1f60554dc37e179790b34f8e1802807e058cb609
'2011-11-17T18:31:31-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
100dddabad56f409e462724215293b56
96da16d4b4a3e36895dce5be245b4cd0f8fb3fd3
describe
'50660' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
48703c5494ce7625e63038613e3dea08
7569d486a969a35704be19fc142d0a8342441d85
'2011-11-17T18:36:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ad19107dd0c05ba29b50252930ef5c6f
636485c42092489439f111bdd346b89c3f7ec457
describe
'431728' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
79d7f60a51dddd7d1c4242ef0fb00be8
b0961b4f4b482f21336f669cce88e5baeb3e9e4e
'2011-11-17T18:32:39-05:00'
describe
'36280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c21427233f22e0acd7c8de169b0a7e9b
0b0f0b03126a086716911459e174865a35dc05f2
describe
'146427' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a516bd88bf127539b7b50dd7909904d7
9778bf8839cdcc18d43ca6a522fa61d1ae9a9d93
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFFZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
468d5366378ad2d30ba9245e24eade3b
c91e51eafbd753daf333989da820faec58023303
'2011-11-17T18:39:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8710807e770f856d85841a6d20137713
7101d84b1fad047e74316d3e96685a85c3f3fff6
describe
'50971' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
56e39789678c2d9085b7f5ddd11f0c6d
84be0c9dcb78c473e5216950f9dde5823bab7817
'2011-11-17T18:36:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
3c59c2bed973b0e4394b42508cd14f27
456b9b74e3fc1295cf8efd776571d2629dfbabdc
'2011-11-17T18:39:41-05:00'
describe
'434245' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
6d6409d6760dbb3a40a719c5e1c7e661
6cd33ddd531dbd0b3babb5bafeb46303668995a6
'2011-11-17T18:42:27-05:00'
describe
'36184' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
46127b9b6b208ba79d4d45e338e7a9c2
340d497ce8262104f23dba132a25ec17fe9dfc45
'2011-11-17T18:42:03-05:00'
describe
'146165' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9100ec0dd50641093cba6d04359f5cdb
5b1b6f2aa0439c616213c0270d30b5e73162ca27
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a2571d2bd159dd155f65988d6fdaefa4
a7b779abda7add10883088ffd64ba1b4a2f032f4
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f86f4063a9156cca1a41884d9f8fa850
bc73817f5c44e5d3ebe04c8280d1906193084e4e
'2011-11-17T18:30:54-05:00'
describe
'49540' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
08b8a8226660b45be2fc64eb2c482f89
a11dbd0fc611b721bc2bfaf33e81cf470371777d
describe
'495279' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e00fe9772d7c91b9aba38bab73c9b0fd
be2bc8dc619d105cd0b6991bfef5e5eea857a23b
'2011-11-17T18:38:17-05:00'
describe
'438258' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
48d035b37feb844da6e6b61061778500
e12acf813cd7f404bf363623c12b91498ad20ccb
'2011-11-17T18:39:28-05:00'
describe
'37550' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8298c48332ca5da2e4d43147c0b5b2eb
59fb99b40388c19cd8d755fd4a76b4c750320054
'2011-11-17T18:31:24-05:00'
describe
'147913' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
64fe90767b015ed738cf8f5ca30b5bba
a0fea4cfd4e64bf0d93c4bf27da43f68e6ccf4f9
'2011-11-17T18:34:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
803a9a74bb251dde7718a48954945a03
347e6f10a2b19c4b91f51ad47b36977c2174fbec
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5d5b0d8b1394fa4f2ef90a7b353d2486
72663d59a1700d53eeb77dabe33db4881d0080d6
'2011-11-17T18:47:52-05:00'
describe
'50441' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
99116761e4f91b4a4bd21a2879f7bdd4
e08410ebd310c331626a84f488ad56c3bac8067d
'2011-11-17T18:41:59-05:00'
describe
'495212' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
d0d4aef16ce0858d319cdfb7792c4c8a
af1a38069b37042d5cd91be7084458b8d658b918
'2011-11-17T18:38:25-05:00'
describe
'438110' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
df161e96280be06519dc8d0f58cb424b
5a25e0c1e807244091f65c062792bf2f308ffe62
describe
'36196' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
2ba5efaefccde86dec2cb81d6949f874
342f3943a0560c47fc5512c1b5ed20d24eb84569
describe
'146943' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e8098a6dce9e94537ce7246dbd17e7b4
6e4e5b8f4d73900f9b644f9b546d61624cc7a4f2
'2011-11-17T18:45:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e651a5962e6be2e246e6d6dc7812661f
3f0b5d02c3210a4361cb81ac196d5c3256aabd98
'2011-11-17T18:38:31-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
04ce4c1512429db8576434efe0067bad
d4d70375eadbfcf2e271863cf3a5180a94ada76b
describe
'50061' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
21d57ea3861408a0ed64eb3ce393fe5a
80a8228e146240ecd10193f0371fb8a7bd234fb8
'2011-11-17T18:31:01-05:00'
describe
'495254' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6a54a85972fd79c06bb0601dc2c1c193
b32db9bb5e0f3403d9e20b113d15faff82c66dad
'2011-11-17T18:31:30-05:00'
describe
'436032' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
08e56834a435f2465b4fd56abfc95223
1cb888650a5cbfd6bb079267cf7e34bb7bf043cb
describe
'36601' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFGZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8571cd43c421e356457736ba7fdf2cf4
d18437a912eb0a4aae848537d8908f95ae1b61bd
'2011-11-17T18:45:22-05:00'
describe
'146993' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f24216ae8621c4610672f0c90ec6b5ee
eafcf593b8f083a1f32da2d40230ed05a20f2b82
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c8eb835fe6d1e2b36da438e360509770
b1cb6008ba8d57a779da028f6efb4e538c5d0e45
'2011-11-17T18:37:12-05:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
c32e46c13a963b0369fa3bd605fe2405
e4c1361035e6fbe9c645ff5f07b7a626e8c40c95
'2011-11-17T18:37:36-05:00'
describe
'49804' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
23d4e037e282ccb2bf7e8a5800f7fc21
65823ccf605da1201ac16f7c18253a6470670463
'2011-11-17T18:44:54-05:00'
describe
'495030' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
6e6e7c054f7ce86ff4a1c1e8e02efa4f
c1776f057bdd7072c5ca3abaaa002e669cf1a32f
'2011-11-17T18:40:57-05:00'
describe
'358713' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
4dc3e1eb73a6a5f9aa84cedd8632b5f7
600c6be7df77bcaf32dfefa84f8eb4d688287e28
'2011-11-17T18:42:20-05:00'
describe
'23829' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f3a6cac8a28b7c1d2b8d6abe529fad33
25cddf7bc47eba3600635a58e808d6b612c471d6
'2011-11-17T18:42:52-05:00'
describe
'118141' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b4f5f2d616be7b2115eeee58df32bead
bcd15bdd3de2527a1abba8f4d0ba7f5b8c2ccea4
'2011-11-17T18:48:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
d9e70e61314bd803eddb55682d571e17
432f68480cf0703f0ffa5b1ab299240c0bc2829b
'2011-11-17T18:32:38-05:00'
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
663f1b002ccabec4c67e60dfc34f6d82
8c24a9b00af2bd30d32769648441ada8d5ca6900
describe
'42993' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
35537060c60ad381d320c511fae64a86
bf729978e2a62b62acc7f4af870b058ac955039c
describe
'495137' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
4e8d10bc087e953db0082b757661ef93
18fe8bb59c54c414b9d7e36ede27e9955ca747f0
'2011-11-17T18:31:14-05:00'
describe
'356863' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
c605ab08bcd460d6e62422170134ad52
f0a0154680b6da2822522a573cb5af0b2b820cd1
'2011-11-17T18:31:13-05:00'
describe
'20267' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
4ddae1c303a4613f950551cd448f8a00
c45c50e0e4861e0ec93cffd896a7c8f980abe04d
'2011-11-17T18:35:02-05:00'
describe
'119042' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
141c71e88225808ad09f67a7a3d1b176
1547915efc3ba4c817090889241f59f31b399762
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8486e1f5a9ccff82168ca1e784af17d2
ed20b68a4f9d40d8510c961ca5ecc56be6ecbf74
'2011-11-17T18:38:23-05:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a565d56ff9326194c96398edd99f6fb9
a731e741e2339240c936a2cf534f2a116dff49f9
'2011-11-17T18:38:04-05:00'
describe
'43143' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
5dbc958fb68901752431fbac30e5dc1f
bca05c74b489809135c9997a1b2bdd3dc98c0663
'2011-11-17T18:44:45-05:00'
describe
'495286' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
035faf0baef6695640da2f612811cbca
77f815072ce8f10d63e2bfb44601736e206313cf
'2011-11-17T18:44:12-05:00'
describe
'445493' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a6eabaf92087f6a56be4a34372dc80d4
1f5c4a4bea3c08c925c6de692c2220ec3846ee6c
describe
'36923' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
de9dc9afd38301d5fb851f8e80b1806d
24c739642dd09678ca119b1304f736c0ec487f38
describe
'149640' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4b911fae5b88521814ae2787a51fb729
7215cb5dc4ba91183ae1b0ded7741a6f35fb8eb9
'2011-11-17T18:46:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a7b068aca4f5275a883458808d45d8f0
19ccc00db5037071ee2db8e5e6408f466e4c228f
'2011-11-17T18:47:53-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e8eaeb7d7d057cfb8963d43dab80ab02
138424f8b39d6575df96a55cce55d4bf87c29155
'2011-11-17T18:31:38-05:00'
describe
'50655' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
69a673d9ca0fbc7022cc720ab249b32f
47a3849364cc62f65a9dda224ace64a5ffed399d
describe
'495246' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFHZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
b22069a68359129739838df18bee7856
d7fd386b999cc039fe1523a6331ded7dc416244a
describe
'432426' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
57b6f8f648197f75c64060d8c13092e5
0c439612f8507462037ed5713596c375c4e2ee13
'2011-11-17T18:39:54-05:00'
describe
'35822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
ca9b9efe4bc56f6a039522b1912a1ebb
bef4102be2f3cb1b6f30a5762339e8e04a919428
'2011-11-17T18:32:28-05:00'
describe
'144851' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
3138b537d671036b878f2e93660e011c
f1c65f318e45fb2ae79314bb2fbad06862014ec5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFID' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3faf4ad78a60df879fc8fc87ed6f79d4
5eaef25bb0e6f67ed987a296b1df9925ca4953e6
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d21f0a381f8a596a79819798a046ac98
0378418b1f84f16c7def208803e4c25c4f57afe8
'2011-11-17T18:36:41-05:00'
describe
'49709' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
49feb32058e6a9ab1f1d488f56394ce8
c1818c39ea4ffdd4f91bddfa7dd2196c627830d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
557faad5f9c6fc98f13ac7e3ee029150
b5448dae0c665457991916184f7adce0120e3a12
'2011-11-17T18:43:52-05:00'
describe
'574894' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
16c597099e7eedcfa5eadb785206a515
d8a9a1479d9ad600b0b28c9f7cee451409d85e75
'2011-11-17T18:39:09-05:00'
describe
'175920' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFII' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
decb0fd895309d9588fd15ec33dac8a8
7920a37f3ebb2e9332decfa3b6a254aa3783226f
'2011-11-17T18:31:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIJ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e60cad190d7e6d5c64b3b89c190293f1
297c6acbc2ef71cbd6ff079713a725d308c36669
'2011-11-17T18:37:32-05:00'
describe
'57880' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
08a1410a5be81989874bc3a2fb4df75f
d07f97387fba8bec745fadedb1c6133cae75ea4f
describe
'495222' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a80ed3d3eb3722aa4d4087382109732c
57705f3f2b0d059fb4aa6e99588a63750cdc0a0f
'2011-11-17T18:41:26-05:00'
describe
'432161' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
5eca0f0fc6df699eb349198018c4b93c
79c1bb2da9a81cd6f6af506cffdfa280634dc4ff
describe
'34892' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8d5a27d27f50feb3dbb025ab1240038b
dec0fac491a14e8c3dab269817c73817c7a1a37b
'2011-11-17T18:38:03-05:00'
describe
'145328' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
ff3a428b330901f1ce34820b40043c6e
427026bccd30dae9641feea2bfcb6220e94cb94a
'2011-11-17T18:32:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
55899afa2c7f155d34870937d5901345
1998d4e52b0c42608b9b4f58ea085eaae6b0b835
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0a366a9c9c2b2a21cfcf171ea73e3e3b
2f41f308923b1df0e405ce11acb4ed5a88484920
'2011-11-17T18:42:43-05:00'
describe
'50032' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
7d2fba84cddca88249cae62e1bcb8aae
5285a2a8602bee0864ea978705ef3a86dc6d7a50
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
10ee9bc8e94a4af4fed6cb67587903aa
99e76c6b8356942d4d0d6e70b2b8658bb7e9e573
describe
'444215' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e015d8ba29eb728e367cbec2f723d9a4
0ae4d6031c80e5eeef8c059ff8a90921c40ed843
describe
'37440' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
f293db2b8047ecf27039950e66f8238e
4b3eefd58ee14266d41b8cea5863dee37d8418c5
'2011-11-17T18:30:59-05:00'
describe
'149281' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2f0708be0e306ee363993d90d314cd5b
807e799dc6132a201de607f538046b6491efc417
'2011-11-17T18:36:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cbb2cb02b1e22c235d9d7495467a9d0f
1b00f0cc739581bf42b2ad0fb2ddfc39e4d4810f
'2011-11-17T18:41:36-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
138663f5edc9d1e8ffa7b9aa9010ad92
19baddb5926d5e95cccf03046b41f2defd95dfe4
describe
'50343' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f964ed9b3f5f4315ebd4bd1e36f7249b
e7e01eafae22c0c1dca68c837599c46a48c114de
'2011-11-17T18:43:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFIZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e95527fc60981223cafb9f77e59f9cc8
9266b4e8f7bbf5bf27d12fd5582103a061096692
'2011-11-17T18:43:44-05:00'
describe
'303093' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
fa27bb1f1d9b9b69aed4c91263f06bf4
39f6d46629a8acb2da08758e92a640e20fb5cfe0
'2011-11-17T18:31:03-05:00'
describe
'13344' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
760df5efc43e874e98a6be4b628e4237
d9f0f02ba9e6baef174e86442c6cb9fd3ce98d9a
'2011-11-17T18:45:03-05:00'
describe
'98478' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
e9f64fbbb1724bfb56f47ab3ed032987
f9d9918fac1631a504f6a9e4fcd3f1bb27dffaec
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5f4942fb21eae1f694907a88e730f7fa
4d439d3b82050787aca019dc0e64a3fd6d20f1dc
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
6c4b957107131405e42fa9e72aea051a
d63394604de356224f3d371628ce73e333610853
describe
'37939' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
5ed75844c1509ef1b3aa48d472171d72
a4c22fc18c8b0767008c0c4f655411d622ab14fa
describe
'495244' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5765381ed549c747003e949a36c47261
0c8bc70e8a2ac1b39a85420d83085b6a1a6d8df8
describe
'365813' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
48366e68399588f645bcacb9f5035f39
8e1a5d81087a902a0dab2ea3ebe1b5cf51d85269
'2011-11-17T18:43:34-05:00'
describe
'21897' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ae77d684280ddcb2336786a1e55317f0
1848ece9ba7d6cc54204a419c38993e48d7ad26b
'2011-11-17T18:32:12-05:00'
describe
'121984' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
970798d01317278c8d14106ccabda7ee
566a6148e1726edc23c4b73dfb167a8a5ad294cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c9449c75c852fa7b24a6515065be8d81
00378c77b031a52f1f89f3cdf89810d388279d3d
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
ab6247b19f32ef22fa157b91763f7652
12e250a48dfc077838f924f2fa572bc1539af77e
'2011-11-17T18:32:03-05:00'
describe
'44111' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
63eca6f424877409ce09f5306dab5158
11d0d3ac536861eaa9bdcf94a629fc2ab43ad0f3
'2011-11-17T18:30:55-05:00'
describe
'495289' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
2fe8d6fbda84f98151f359f133b9d554
d8298af9e3c45121760e31e85604a43031f99710
describe
'439867' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
6165e556016f76ae2bc82d864a04503f
5e9ba1ac614322eeeec485d177b492b4c2d3025b
'2011-11-17T18:37:08-05:00'
describe
'37056' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
49aad6e2f68e4275b0906948468a6b78
9888e56205da6320000e2f9bc8014ab87cbb81f8
describe
'149003' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
173ec13c28806d9b20dfc7d7a870fcb3
b361440b2b33c91f2717833ced34df972b5b817a
'2011-11-17T18:35:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7995edd4284e8630c0790eca779f6757
e521f17675b10954135441ed7b6cab24cdf0562d
'2011-11-17T18:41:15-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
10afc011d667f27a551c52afec01bf05
cb9cd7d94535f7e010502af840ddb347d500aeb3
describe
'50463' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d83e821ceb0572a2123cbeca70487bfb
4c4cb04c4b53dff69b9bf1d466690a3cdda1b019
'2011-11-17T18:43:22-05:00'
describe
'495259' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
30e2a0ee442fa8248ddc22b0b763caee
e3a2777ee9bf4c1976d5293b4cd754209ea34446
describe
'429807' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8164e4f270adb9ab46f9d9be382dd98e
58af8a3345a42e7c7c48e9baceab278e6a11fb45
'2011-11-17T18:46:53-05:00'
describe
'35253' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3d974585a79ef278e1414467ea5a3c79
c1ac722a9796d3a6693d66f69943da3ec6d035b9
'2011-11-17T18:42:42-05:00'
describe
'145399' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
255feb086c92db44f5569cd60b23deeb
dd65e45be05c2693cc7e6112af60934fc6952496
'2011-11-17T18:40:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
fd0ca387093b6d2b750ce5c61df2e4a0
89033fe4ec4be10748c0b15c54dfbe512551de62
'2011-11-17T18:32:26-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFJZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
92c6a36cd02ba054b21f59992cedbfc2
5623fecccb7047b4d17eaf282caf9db9169215b7
'2011-11-17T18:36:56-05:00'
describe
'50184' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
eb30eacd6a8708fa97fac677d5d8b4ea
4ef1d18803877e12f374ce3e4418198c4d8b3f74
describe
'495257' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
3e8ddd26ef2e691ca66280a25deef9ff
e96ed4d97c038e39eb07b5ca8080f7a478211cb0
describe
'432577' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
23a9acebc542ce0e8b46e24191dab6d6
ebaab0131d6436cb74b39991374b1cb2bca443ef
describe
'35874' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
524cb8fb61930b8c2e7787bcf714e42e
211436167a8bbbfa431cc6161a3b9a4b6b0f36cb
'2011-11-17T18:44:48-05:00'
describe
'145434' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
fd5ef2547111ddc98f57dfef1135d24f
8fad143e8ee1b2d1a167087c8b451c53f8ca1818
'2011-11-17T18:41:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
020c6d46dec594aa3d48b4dab1c7662b
a04ae317f40e2b3af9f43d537a17ba879e4df241
'2011-11-17T18:30:42-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
2c24affe1f92527591418115d4940184
6e999132bf378fe51e768419b38faf6c127ea595
'2011-11-17T18:48:34-05:00'
describe
'49331' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
55dedc43bd018a0796e0b9d1fd9caa78
2f3ca2492e0e94dcad8859133f10aac0f3c390f8
'2011-11-17T18:44:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ebbc78798590236795790ae8e9672413
86c9256f9006ad3345c614253fc3aaf604e8fbaf
'2011-11-17T18:31:29-05:00'
describe
'443478' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a9b7ff510ebe40664fdc83ddec7d7175
ac6838b8292cbecfddfc5c58370c3dc279ee29a7
'2011-11-17T18:37:42-05:00'
describe
'36941' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
16e62f8b03a9942bab35dd8899410e49
f597826cb5bb5c51f8c96193ad2da7e9b4da8737
'2011-11-17T18:36:08-05:00'
describe
'149678' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
88e01a1598244d6b2c6e7deaadebb2d2
7a125916ed4069a31b9a0244f370e9919634573f
'2011-11-17T18:44:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2d9c195b07ecfb288124d49e71c5c818
f8faad42f6668392acc2143cc861a70a1dc39e64
'2011-11-17T18:31:09-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
75870aa88310aa73164357ae26290e43
3fd67b0e222cfc7fc828c11981a840a71f92043f
'2011-11-17T18:38:57-05:00'
describe
'50785' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b783001201b3c19a2cfd162356908b8b
ec1d6132740727044196e7d8936be1e155af3702
describe
'495283' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
2959b69dc97f954ce70eeb155db897a9
23311910bc70aa0ebcb7d18ba1190232ec992c76
describe
'441117' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
b5bd97ffe6e55623cfc46bffcfa83415
654d897dc2503ea98ba3e685a27eba532df3be27
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
4fc3be153e7764e8173a6f7dab6fabe2
9811ff02d21c21f83d57e7e210a8d6e393666a40
describe
'149402' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
8aaf45fb58ce738b1682faae0f2a1a05
9eee5b01bb608a6568813d08bcdf9e17df670991
'2011-11-17T18:48:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
7ab565dbe18f0c05f382a0f266e57334
3734e3f266b15ef71d9c054c94b671a264183761
'2011-11-17T18:40:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
64d67581b3bd66e6d55406a790873258
6e58a5628ef5c85d0e601206e4b27bd1bcffdd62
'2011-11-17T18:37:30-05:00'
describe
'50652' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7d9dabb4df0b629582d998793a0a7c72
20e7fa818086b0feebcb023c05329cdb0e248d09
'2011-11-17T18:45:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
748d224e093973c9dc43e8f2af775b84
f64b71e706985ee8ad03c907fb151df81bc8bc73
describe
'461451' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
9c830ae2ac554153acacea0eca41dee6
9ac60b0740ae8dbec7b99f39b43b1e4660db0d71
'2011-11-17T18:31:18-05:00'
describe
'144211' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5a635a9afcfb6559a0df71472954d384
6eec75179e89c1014d91c5150fc28450f9983fd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFKZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
d597682f7c12aea6b0a10d4bd8f158d5
6e348c12f3eb4a541c2f45ed0c6179dfc1458d13
'2011-11-17T18:32:01-05:00'
describe
'51541' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
fedbfc3c9ffcae9322ec5b560b34d286
314977d7087f9486d1b5c580d7490c187b745264
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
407d32c7ea280d4d69dab5aa548dad6e
4f8188214ee0161bb288300e4011eefd2ccf47cf
'2011-11-17T18:41:56-05:00'
describe
'429517' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
fa5d0c313aa6df7fce740be3f707d762
ac88cd496f80ca5c2d9231da4aa7407db388fe40
describe
'35370' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLD' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d25ed2bd3fd4970988debe40a7612286
983194f2bc2c64ceded79a79cf8cfc267230738b
'2011-11-17T18:40:49-05:00'
describe
'145346' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
3f7fbbf5c85d79804eb0a3be311bb637
573ed3dbcf835cb3e454d36b5ba851d13089ed72
'2011-11-17T18:40:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e6ed5065d979b44bb0001ef34a5d01bf
69636b330196cbbd48727d8cc853fb18c7b9147f
'2011-11-17T18:39:29-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
0982f2b54cc61b9e747ebd5285e045b2
af7a79f5c97ea045ef3729801bdc7257a48c255f
'2011-11-17T18:31:34-05:00'
describe
'49697' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ecbac9165da2ec19fd6c9ce71fc17edf
b37c4ba6341f0818562e7dbb2af22799c1c1b008
'2011-11-17T18:42:51-05:00'
describe
'495231' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
434705bee5530e1711f57f5912814097
e574a22d8897a7744fb24e71d6539beb70f05d41
'2011-11-17T18:30:40-05:00'
describe
'440752' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f5ae580f443f754ab98e62f5c12561c1
fc5bde191af606cd4eeb23b948fc7d3b891de8ac
'2011-11-17T18:44:33-05:00'
describe
'36893' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
5059a6c724a9913beec9a89aeb3c4eb4
61008ab41564503780f2a0d23067e8e53218ed19
describe
'149682' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
24c2b0c1745c90a244a76ec25409c1b0
8c1fef3415d9a60e9a5959c3254210b9546f5c7b
'2011-11-17T18:44:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLM' 'sip-files00073.tif'
6d2979542ebe72e63c8d7684fbd8308f
69a812cf318eaa221e11834961acc6fbe11b82d0
'2011-11-17T18:48:05-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLN' 'sip-files00073.txt'
0c7f470ddf1f32485e0f6865fcac1476
550f4de077af4eeeb40e5a3a867be3568c9cb9ee
describe
'50859' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLO' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
fe5048c40fe093961818bd2e6972b75b
d0317f916b91b6a0a4ea15f7cd8b7aa075c1e45c
describe
'495262' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLP' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fb28ecab298d0641f95a411460b6e88c
3dd5125637157a5064643919a1a36cfd2932a3dd
'2011-11-17T18:42:57-05:00'
describe
'438852' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLQ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
379c68310150a28cd97397b8b7fa127c
7113d4bc86633cb9275c3c84b30e50a2b4fb5b4d
describe
'36102' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLR' 'sip-files00074.pro'
c7537e8c89680ccf1f2677fe5f0f77f6
437280dd191285c22e88491dc081c5fc72049bb3
'2011-11-17T18:46:10-05:00'
describe
'149234' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLS' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f41cef18410f7489169049f84c63bedc
f53790f630beaa2563f2dcd5004d3e2090ae9742
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
7f0f9567724ec5bdac9930f8899e6d49
19f39310e18ad273b095f9923084dd96f8c78255
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLU' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2db7d7293f1567e85bd0fe60195b1045
bd124c8d35c467add12f90b49822fa87a464e3cc
describe
'50484' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLV' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4c05bf8aef08a863fec0bfc0d8972243
8bef4e5d70f05b0990d6d49780ffdf658607a440
'2011-11-17T18:43:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
b86c56db4231426470c177b1ead10105
0eb09b18192ae7fa8181bbb49a5294bd81dc1c1d
'2011-11-17T18:43:38-05:00'
describe
'447613' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
47c26fc3275797b1dbbb5818acb06a57
f69741734071a7c62b1269c7d3fdd70709d53779
'2011-11-17T18:42:16-05:00'
describe
'36961' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLY' 'sip-files00075.pro'
076c97a29d4811341d53d60ccaeccfc0
8092834b10c974d1dea1afe79f3f800d55ac9b56
describe
'151348' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFLZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fe9fff5f32e06fcc88adc49f00f02ceb
52bef0758dce8154c655c73617596582b3be5411
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a202a5e0cf40cdc3ed48fcad6ccf8588
da913a65b764c1b0266e2f764cdd5f31f5329471
'2011-11-17T18:32:02-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMB' 'sip-files00075.txt'
84993bffa0544641fb510a8b3e5dee27
80373114c4e395efeb56d85e88acedb5ea328651
'2011-11-17T18:48:35-05:00'
describe
'51036' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3898414be43cfe1e191278963d587ed4
11453bc62f7e5cbca8857e35ff98dd71d2c0c2e0
'2011-11-17T18:35:01-05:00'
describe
'495185' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMD' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
0c1cdad2639e0fb01b1f82d827b4275d
5b93091a2238fa8fd2adb79e9fa92aa9a6fceffa
'2011-11-17T18:36:52-05:00'
describe
'435431' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFME' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f7894b4ba35fb5ec5ae3ff21e9d762eb
b9c26e50f0e5a15e2980d5e758b0cf1c649f2891
'2011-11-17T18:43:23-05:00'
describe
'35420' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
da878d3b1b7e751d1360ba97e8ec2e5a
0985d4e67820b49605de2c26db50e7e10a2cdeb2
'2011-11-17T18:40:34-05:00'
describe
'149127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMG' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
bdc751e89bf59ee7fe459288ac31a81d
61c7106f40d55cd504a4bd5b5a32768f20fa08c7
'2011-11-17T18:42:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMH' 'sip-files00076.tif'
70663be51b92504bdcccfa28c0b6ca5b
98ee1b370a15202add20e3ff433c8f4eab019551
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMI' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e98b8e877778dbc0f9a5a0d4fa270c60
5d04634f26d1ce7924a8097d37829e3575ee9f53
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMJ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
53d24846c7a4bab62291f374163a279b
68a5dfde88ec95258c9e46fc6025e906b1f837ed
'2011-11-17T18:44:15-05:00'
describe
'495261' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMK' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b6c8e3afe82b5c858fc117e1faac8548
e6210190d9f2a5d5bc19219cf77c221bf49468ad
describe
'429635' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFML' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
cfb5819e88a34e0aedff988e992c72ae
a97fb688412a7f0c969422eba64e67fb7a8e731f
'2011-11-17T18:43:03-05:00'
describe
'35071' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b2a8d51d153c920182c1b01f8292e6ac
943d0c86595a6323ad3b2261c33779c65a8b5035
describe
'145672' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
3535bb742f1997392b6d55b10723996d
30aece869fa695c33fdf714ff5a59e955b8ed297
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
840d231c4f3faf2705c1cf75809f63a1
4d47f08df8cf3869f47f35984f84d62d7fa22d0a
'2011-11-17T18:39:00-05:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ecb79e9d3469fc1064b7a0c9557438da
db03dda033ea687775758c88e4f08d816c8105ce
'2011-11-17T18:45:28-05:00'
describe
'49627' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
87647015cc87c5ed332966f4d0d97ee0
3f7ceabb1146aa5c68de21c63dd533135e5abaa2
'2011-11-17T18:30:52-05:00'
describe
'495280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2b65efffc143c16af4df31290140d793
5e061a7b6fc95a19e42eeedef4f4b24becd4f398
'2011-11-17T18:39:47-05:00'
describe
'429464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
d577577c636a9ffbd13940c875df2473
b2e494feb190b029516a8c0b2c5da4cabccee664
describe
'34646' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
2e9827db5f15fee1820ae341c6719deb
2c384e2f22df48f19acafe9f24a4206784e7fbaf
'2011-11-17T18:45:13-05:00'
describe
'146800' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
5b4191e64562ed8fa553d5b00ad10af2
5a6f7f0a5c7e716c0f4f16143e85c66e6ad5b09c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
00abb8f4a2a4fa80ce3cd7834a50c6f6
37b0ed3c1c02298e88bf284ba307f45f31e60e28
'2011-11-17T18:37:33-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
745066f7356d9382c673d7c62373a271
ca50fdf33cdd7951b2cb992688cbea420186d66f
'2011-11-17T18:37:31-05:00'
describe
'50439' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c5bf0617116cc0bee375da9c75196df4
4cf1d4c8542fc11936cdb86ff0ebe9d39842155c
'2011-11-17T18:38:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
15abc8e1a73dcb4e7d863ea370bf5404
13af93ca3ecdf15718540080d02fbb8e35cfddab
describe
'429473' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFMZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e2a3407fd071eb8e18f63fd23b66b80f
5b49c4f7b8ba79b6890c32d6f6f736224b240dc5
'2011-11-17T18:39:45-05:00'
describe
'34787' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
2a52711384f15560970665ef806771cd
90794c9b1d6fd410c5243af036b13dec963ace58
describe
'146988' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
fb75e6f2a1f5f4b51d9a5b0c4967fe04
d419a364677af5c33eba94277f741d56c10d3672
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
86e4624559d33a6e311a156bfde301bc
399b427a032cfeb4c295a4a7e10d0f01e6a1f5ba
'2011-11-17T18:42:23-05:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFND' 'sip-files00079.txt'
c1670304a2f0ad722f61409e272a1361
665f07cf7f635d9b9933fefdeb439d8e63b4a0da
'2011-11-17T18:38:51-05:00'
describe
'50649' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e55a47aaaccf9cf00a403224cd8562b3
2031a349683178e0b134f0d19045cab4e53f4f27
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
784761abe354fa44929bc7b0617ec844
9761c2ebc20205e547b63fcbecbb5b791ca10726
'2011-11-17T18:39:20-05:00'
describe
'429973' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
be87f34a5c91c65971f0c6b41c3cb603
f58bdce181938e5f3e3d823fa281aa7cbdb06893
describe
'35116' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNH' 'sip-files00080.pro'
37c39faaa041bb823e095c77d52d21cd
05284982ecefe413653651dcf72dcbee18153bca
'2011-11-17T18:31:51-05:00'
describe
'148125' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
8516c83ea9f5dc432f410393099eed0a
f064cfa6be438670890b8bfabf5e977aaaf02ec8
'2011-11-17T18:43:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
ac451fd75fbbd914305ca87e4f288d41
de1e2b4a2baf479e80a6b81e15e6565238e2f8bf
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
6783c083b401468c3f7c8b08d1cbc0dc
5550193e5c8e94e77bc14b36c48759e75880b09a
'2011-11-17T18:44:46-05:00'
describe
'50085' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
95071538d6ae7847a7bd9a6065c89672
13eb5ea1193084d8a1e304b12736557b505c6d39
'2011-11-17T18:40:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ea3caa16939a6068d999d326657d26ec
e6fd8754152ffaa41f20b02643d9dce853f4b8b3
describe
'431626' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
eb925d0d503aa6fdb76018a780d945ac
aa86df37a530ded621639c366b1311fa7a9248fc
describe
'35026' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
caae558a874a816d874aecc073a3b45a
c4fc03a3e79b35ade2e65a903b637e1d724d4252
'2011-11-17T18:42:21-05:00'
describe
'146418' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9243779ca894a3b0403a67a51073c5ff
dabaf075e9b9b01e773ea9fb162287f44ea53ae4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNQ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
cefe5345f5ddc59da6b7efd13f39e092
3670030165da7ab73f02868c1b72ec138bc136df
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNR' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8ffcec0e14282d90079c4b3e122ebf78
34d97bb26323717ddf257d85de3f9c2a2ea4f21e
'2011-11-17T18:42:07-05:00'
describe
'50292' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
f903dbd2d55738a688c436be6c40536e
aeb31a72cd46ccbf9fd1c472a0105cb5a7d62157
'2011-11-17T18:44:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
192a9d8b1f117d01f8faa142528ab7b3
64fc122af6088683deccfc5de38dbb11c3cb22bd
describe
'435370' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
41a820d26c7501d7d81fd2bf19d35aa0
e37d37d611fee59da53797a7e5f909e8815b90f3
describe
'35454' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b29dee782f3082b99b144374dd5f10e2
af5c40396451cf3943281829509255b53e1a7d22
'2011-11-17T18:36:14-05:00'
describe
'147915' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b82acfe4648ffdc15f26bc7b99cb78b0
0d6c41ca52196220de29f31bb1683e1944ef9856
'2011-11-17T18:45:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3ad0faf1feff371337858ccd6fa9ed05
c689f728dd5831ddc0f2d56cb53be7a85a21bae4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
6e84749c7009fd82e6e973df91c3b9e2
8816d2a1b144a2fb9b0d1e2f91017d1916aae3e1
'2011-11-17T18:43:39-05:00'
describe
'50509' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFNZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
3bcdf72c97f4270b268b42d5cd261d0e
b3d231a0cd7a16a35f1671fca582fddd73ce7fed
describe
'495266' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d8a57213a0d2f162631977ca1341e9b8
803fc83f38cb115e7981e03ebc24464143c668f6
'2011-11-17T18:47:37-05:00'
describe
'439331' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
10ebe2a75e795269ca0ac73de6d0f345
753405ba5799c4ba3f145838e54a3b49db92cb26
describe
'36307' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
9c8c8097623079771ede2173df02daf6
85585431c30fcb9c99cf4fcdb2f44cc80e7a80bf
'2011-11-17T18:42:15-05:00'
describe
'149215' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
58d8681b92068cd1e197588fd6778833
3065b81deeec3e68dedbe29ebd19f038bbda534e
'2011-11-17T18:30:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f3f5333237dc3f84f9bbc7d6d129b648
2bd585cea90da893e46b755f77658158f3ca6a8a
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOF' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8e9c3f28e9bb25bca7ef38b78ec7eb60
aced2393db37e280b4f55c09bb905bea1ef30c1e
describe
'50923' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
3c907619900c6923c8d1d06c7f9b85a5
56836c115a42c77aa728a05abd341eae3472a6b6
'2011-11-17T18:42:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOH' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
57c1a910190790108190726e8a58371e
7223cca875292cd96c23c20163c131b0fc0ef833
'2011-11-17T18:37:23-05:00'
describe
'436042' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
328bf84a622702052b311e564b5f6812
adf71ab63cfb2f4c57e6584b41b985865380111d
'2011-11-17T18:39:01-05:00'
describe
'36358' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b1454cd0805357d301ba69f4bd64da4a
42f1959961a0215f549f6ee6e2299c4ee8e92dcb
describe
'147199' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
3a46d2e3dfacfcf19a922f24ed2ff6b9
90d7fdfecf481ff9cdabbaf388bd8cf2c22cb984
'2011-11-17T18:32:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
5c091ac1c668e7e5dc1c51dfa5a9555e
b334d7267f0809b10453f686a0e57c955f1c40d0
'2011-11-17T18:43:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
b49a803df1f69e9dd9f06a1965c7a52c
6ea1b3d3626755913a7ef1ec98760bf8f6152a55
'2011-11-17T18:30:48-05:00'
describe
'50089' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFON' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
607d77589fc9f2c85211efc74c835c22
3128818e3281303a186ca2f3ce226d5566b439d2
'2011-11-17T18:45:53-05:00'
describe
'495191' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
906896250d8b6e1e4a162000c0937125
f7cf28e241faad8352f5bca742afbc3cd2f238cf
'2011-11-17T18:36:20-05:00'
describe
'432366' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
571d58efa77412c61f6906f73f3e09a7
feed2e15e641013b71eb56070395ce653fc8364e
describe
'35355' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5e5f06a1407fc03ab62fa1031e0c7b4c
fa0a14b1e4d8f1baa412084b49c826ec899d4fc6
describe
'146847' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
79ed7347267e29fb54e37306efafeb94
61e533aaeefe4bc9c8d5ade7122ea802a4032f8d
'2011-11-17T18:48:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
face51c4ed6471f1b438efaea2966e0d
91234799fa26a51c1e13fd72c990116ea01724fd
'2011-11-17T18:30:24-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOT' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fa1d5f3581743b4842be89b9fb07db92
536c8da28e348f13e44646b43231bc9060547818
'2011-11-17T18:30:53-05:00'
describe
'50117' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
57a680a73331dca693b2bbb97f1d6f09
6f73e6a24636ecebf4270ad8da073459333f9a0a
'2011-11-17T18:38:47-05:00'
describe
'495268' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b413efd0bbfa8264395d431b401acedb
b111b4511845cd8a7a65a818775864641a7fc860
'2011-11-17T18:36:44-05:00'
describe
'440464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7a02acdb1c834c1f319e9aa520856686
7920851d201b540f5165ed633b591508ab40e34c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
3e1c20c7ec878f2976f7855b38e4492c
d6b528928e5319cdfcdd447c0d4c687a53e72fca
'2011-11-17T18:43:47-05:00'
describe
'146843' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3944b1564b6bb11afff62db5cdedf294
7221c6b7a203d5d7bfd2ae81362ebbc918113c02
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFOZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
49d28d5165cb41603a721fb6c2856a37
75c85986b66bc159749183b0bcdd9cf3f82f398c
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
f7bf1a936ba0dbbcda8dab5d862331b2
54e169b650c407da46c7af9cbd8bd19d01a02064
describe
'49725' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
1740e4f5ae08cd2d7e5cb819a8466a48
d598c69ce119a8e3f38d9405cea8c22923edfa55
'2011-11-17T18:30:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPC' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
64f0fae8cbadbc908ecf01fcc99366b0
66df86564d177bc6e658ea89707926a04f55531c
'2011-11-17T18:45:27-05:00'
describe
'432860' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d6b0feff04b09096ec819bb35ef1c175
8d058a9b95e7b203985a85586a2a4bd0530f80be
'2011-11-17T18:40:33-05:00'
describe
'35597' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
9e483961751ae7567b4db67d1d600858
bab2b82b517d83ba1c684e6e68e155d9c3f406fc
'2011-11-17T18:43:55-05:00'
describe
'149189' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b561de414ae32669184563f74b905406
940caacec76df8867512c2b428679f034377e97a
'2011-11-17T18:37:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b96618e78db7ef0f6a573bf8fcfa4a1e
685f6b4bf73982e3ac31b4b7953472a75bb37d7f
'2011-11-17T18:43:09-05:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9460d4c4f3181373f70f2ea07ba8e59b
e0d23382762d07b0a726d2a65f05b3bee4b65e3c
describe
'50363' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
38988a90b30191aac6574f18d3062dcc
067f2dc5f75b5f98d6df0fbf7558b2be22295e37
'2011-11-17T18:47:54-05:00'
describe
'495233' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3f15e3b82ce8163f0d72528be666aeff
a50be5ff32092687f7556c7534ecd57d25369d29
describe
'437791' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f49426bf72c925e55d13b9da7801f36c
5199edb7061b9f92c6c8b2ba94e1f10b3cee8b74
describe
'36691' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPL' 'sip-files00088.pro'
69ea47572565d616676ad59f27fc956a
18db9973b72617339e714ba6b66c53bf3699521b
describe
'146554' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPM' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
213fa73fb0e0ee191ab5917ecc570c5b
fdfad92b96fcd5c3f96d7064c85e4bb6f719f9df
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
55341dd272265cc8c4b419a3ad30b763
a1f55b9bf83fd536d90ed7419a431fc144e4f290
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPO' 'sip-files00088.txt'
f74419d502460fa4865df093d458c230
279a69aa9e7200c14215b717205efde719273613
'2011-11-17T18:45:14-05:00'
describe
'49586' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
cb515de8d0ac36415f5be2067f3ea2bf
3a3d8d148afb7be82d918c0f2739221238180f17
'2011-11-17T18:38:44-05:00'
describe
'495276' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPQ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b902bc367cb796d9fae43bd54f784151
b43eb409abde28412daa531364f762b757aff859
describe
'410845' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPR' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
46af8b47abf037454bdc183c0b9e4467
a8602ba85e70e95ed0dc37c75cc04e4b2a685c2a
describe
'16477' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPS' 'sip-files00089.pro'
879e9544b20551b3fc4e549731322f42
1aef1bff3832e4811e3f13ab48a5eb719d9856b3
'2011-11-17T18:37:57-05:00'
describe
'131492' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e529a7f76d9d8f512ccfec630fb95c7e
f0d1a5d580ee9afe44d20267927d2c77dcff79b5
'2011-11-17T18:37:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPU' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7a11645f8b2a9d2efa3a9dfefb7592c5
0b747f97a0d6a40c27c5a874fd675fab1d0867ed
'2011-11-17T18:45:47-05:00'
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPV' 'sip-files00089.txt'
81c48987f6eaf5934dc6d564b1803724
458e5df27b776fa7cc732a3af063187b5d090d06
'2011-11-17T18:41:12-05:00'
describe
'47198' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPW' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ddb30113d55f1afea2ab84cd743df35b
a8a7c500da2f6a5f1d56ee7109b7c9aeac42a496
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1226a87e70b6ef826d6e47464f44c3bb
1cba69ca8653c44b9005fa55281e7ffd84938e61
describe
'437766' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPY' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ff5a4e5e19219e3236948c3b5c46cca9
7b7eaaef2527f3f57d8b45bd6c59d08db90f3350
'2011-11-17T18:30:21-05:00'
describe
'35066' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFPZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
a0afd917ec31933ae0cb91f663690ea3
a406ba2b3585fba09a1d849e1515de4a1816aae2
'2011-11-17T18:41:29-05:00'
describe
'148291' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQA' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
89e206690c3c6d14d5461a492046bcaf
8b4c2b45ba3e34a5e4b993e1236ab2b5e964f5cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
407f7455161f740b77b80b14f8eb4c85
ade85619f54d8270c4badab3faa459bd625b28d5
'2011-11-17T18:47:59-05:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
0cbb6b24473180fca1bb1599a26b187f
0991a74d27577b670f019c879b5936e41040418c
describe
'50230' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQD' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5b6605b160ca78fd9788931efc7307fd
033d6310f2014689db99420ff341fc5ab853ae6c
'2011-11-17T18:46:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
dc011551e28b5a3333342c4c1eda54ab
ea26a26df6e8dadbd45b384e597c767b0d9e3645
describe
'449784' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
6c5e1f0c9e6e9f485c125ecf5a281168
b2f300cebb1921356b8857b742ab27d6e7bbca2b
'2011-11-17T18:44:03-05:00'
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQG' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7dca90e218453eafa5b3a3d4fca5c6ae
3d57ee93022786b9aa2a31f967ddef7f39deebe4
describe
'153051' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQH' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7e9de76e19a3b5f173b8a8592cb8f267
c9f69d7e5a6867d31b6b5e41b9549306bbf7ffed
'2011-11-17T18:31:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQI' 'sip-files00091.tif'
342e06e749b0500a2c5485339c75e821
e309a67dae332cd873ab67b0284c114e585a9f2c
'2011-11-17T18:45:18-05:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
2e5d70cf719af8ad0095588a7aa3f79d
31283dc20e22cc6233706e891e00ec9cb4be45bb
'2011-11-17T18:43:05-05:00'
describe
'51352' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQK' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ea4c7d28ca7b8dd34eb25c21f56a9233
95f13295242413db7633c6c7eefaea85adce23b4
'2011-11-17T18:36:34-05:00'
describe
'495237' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
be14a2720e7bcbb4afbfd43bbf644ca2
f35b581280881ef87ea9c7e9f4524815da153e57
'2011-11-17T18:41:09-05:00'
describe
'436157' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f9bbd1e6a6ff7d30f541f492a11a2ebe
357a3ed3154b13585b0d0a40c0af4c6597b5a4f4
'2011-11-17T18:31:10-05:00'
describe
'36496' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
ee5c5e6393690254a11ffa34325fdb46
d090652f868a6d7ff309db8d7fc941be72a54ef4
describe
'147826' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQO' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7fad77238f9a79aff553dcb647507344
eaa811927df6a2be32d042fa6eee28b4b481bdae
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
02d7601a865c26d92f095f3f6a9cfefa
5f621af9428c29d246831a4a849b253a6ae0732d
'2011-11-17T18:45:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
07d0077002b95b3b54424cc3b7a6502f
7bd2de93c65d2f45aff92b8a065eec971abcd19e
'2011-11-17T18:46:08-05:00'
describe
'50108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e0e916687be2cf4c362f0ce35e2b7e38
150efdb41c5958cd8cf3ecb5c5650cafb4e73415
'2011-11-17T18:44:06-05:00'
describe
'495241' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQS' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
7714abd87c3bdf805c1d374562880521
9055e0129e09fc9b073da35086dceaaada881abd
'2011-11-17T18:42:33-05:00'
describe
'438686' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ac7b19e95272cfd3905fa78773d224f7
2f19c20b4c3f76b0ecec09402a3c9baa452e9f2b
describe
'36255' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
822bbde132741decef18ed8519782f7b
43ab1156e143ba155d35fde56ebe67b8b156e426
describe
'147727' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
fddef4eff8c7a69b0d0ae8b5d48669fb
b87348911f40c62c68c0da39347e34a2f0a2be79
'2011-11-17T18:45:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
2417907c86b89432590fdc9a4fe7a165
fc4e5b1d66921a624c06a7bda0dd4cf4af672979
'2011-11-17T18:39:13-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQX' 'sip-files00093.txt'
9b28a1dea813bdd5de2e0b0b9e2d1e21
b9ff0a3454685521b5faf4d9e768cf44d1308542
'2011-11-17T18:48:48-05:00'
describe
'50501' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6ef9ef5b03d2744c67e6885bbb5dca97
979384c14fd195e269d0d6f16a5a6969524bd5ea
describe
'495252' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFQZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
0d1d33f274d8b8e7b05b455de62ce822
8c3db907d1ed81d74ed790f7206beb3e28c2eceb
describe
'430230' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
4b474e2c1aac0aa564ccc99cd753f043
b18ca79ef0d547db1880ab6a804d0948cdcaf62f
'2011-11-17T18:31:04-05:00'
describe
'34910' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
33edd3bb1be8258958c85505c9abd178
9e2e1a10e113f5b22bcae35b8472cdee1cf71389
'2011-11-17T18:32:36-05:00'
describe
'145333' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
cfc3388ba7304659b53dfdd190760710
6d6b3630595bcf5d1152eb7f242fd7fa559e72d8
'2011-11-17T18:44:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRD' 'sip-files00094.tif'
578f12a00015d20c81484fc4d98a9a6a
8059fddc52a9fa03843ba9072a619a0620879b72
'2011-11-17T18:37:55-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRE' 'sip-files00094.txt'
6fb170d19c81ff205e75a7cc2ccd5eab
778c324e887e4249cd07df07c94e7bbd31805e4d
'2011-11-17T18:39:56-05:00'
describe
'49309' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRF' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
5a0176cb3b58d7517f94c4cca36d63d6
02c771b9e736d369df1f166b21926715a89e9e80
'2011-11-17T18:42:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0b8c39718f5f9f1218a71585502b05c2
fcf9fef2c47d5fe4e1618af17b0370608d940171
describe
'438364' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRH' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
edcf25f0751b6752ef2b0a9408bd8415
b163932d9597a691a84cd285a45c3dee422c91c4
describe
'36939' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRI' 'sip-files00095.pro'
386ccbf23e76fcaf885e9203860c73a4
ce41ad71c4722e516d3b7195d04d9a893d22b91b
describe
'148077' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
a1def943238c00e0b3daf85d17f586c5
45faaeb8387106cb13f1fabecfe34ed89f515579
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
4112e8a7a723681af147adeec2dc5969
d11af0741c793bb8b9864be8dc234f632c9408cc
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRL' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6a2ec51434b8defc74b95cc1eefa9865
bf69731d082eb42cc6835066727873db81cc99c7
'2011-11-17T18:35:36-05:00'
describe
'50489' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRM' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
a0a1e52d9813249f8f34ef52172d89f4
efe0051f83dedd29f78ed0d01096a97b8a82d2bd
describe
'495226' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
63644b3e2c9cf894a0ccba60246ef8db
b80cc84650c2d1221da8f7212f772b4bf5a44189
describe
'302749' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
aaaadc05961f2def918e2cf414483424
be0bbc9f2dfd0ec338acb94efb275f4bf72b6333
describe
'13098' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
864df7066c62fb9fc221c9b9605f3585
d4f30d9de347826fbbb7c2b8fb4b9b4680ed7781
'2011-11-17T18:41:45-05:00'
describe
'98626' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f70861e1c5de27497803cb5ab6ab595a
14896431bb59677a8f6a436dbb9bc34a3387e544
'2011-11-17T18:44:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
fbfccd0e6d9ef119c03b344cea585d01
ab898e58f09e1f4f7371928b973ddbb947762f2d
describe
'522' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
6f674ad5aaca1505d658761e11245479
68846836cacc5f35a6c920454e7c84ceaf38b747
'2011-11-17T18:35:23-05:00'
describe
'37786' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8458350f9d42e9af9c8869cbf8923a4b
54bd084b3e69e1fd91d3fc19c5194d33e2010b14
'2011-11-17T18:43:20-05:00'
describe
'495128' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
fc98d1e90ec3c0bf20f2b2281c2abe39
3869baf980bd7bdff263d33d3078d2098bb6ddf8
describe
'364606' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
007a900a0b4bcec4e77be0c0627a197d
fc504fb033e6fbe14f46e26e9e975caf11be691d
'2011-11-17T18:41:37-05:00'
describe
'20856' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRW' 'sip-files00097.pro'
6d35d148bd07edf4a8386d2759e649c7
64ed4a487bda327963b2e76c3b01a2f61f905743
describe
'121189' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
137f76e3e9da5c19f6f36d18634d869e
fc0b228f2b3e5cd28ab4d93154f4b3912615acde
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
b57d3677a1c08d52dafa5b2627968d5b
bc4509d969c44e4dada721ccdd52257a7c049b1f
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFRZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
66a2f85dffcab91a1f852691c3f0ddd3
0dcfff7bf666c05cb593003ae13cc11c0386b036
'2011-11-17T18:40:50-05:00'
describe
'43857' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
423e8e501ecbf18bdfcc94f3cd3f86fa
a11e1c2fef39c12ae3baa2b12b65a965062534b0
'2011-11-17T18:48:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c9ffec674236e45b09db4f613bb7a416
73219c7a31e46a9e8d72ac00eeaa096477b50c45
'2011-11-17T18:44:56-05:00'
describe
'431078' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
e8550fc1b7ceabe05347395cd8b92ca7
3a4c3fea55e124ca8465db92f3d0cad06017008d
describe
'35260' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSD' 'sip-files00098.pro'
929528d505fe1383886b2e5bad2ecb71
13cd1d98120ccd624b746c223d8f4539a8ba1aa3
describe
'147344' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d3405db2ab29685ca1bba665f8a92892
0a1dac26121cc40657d76118e78415898991c5a2
'2011-11-17T18:31:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
c289edb05b4195aac4bf0285ac190da3
6a1f20e17f618f0d057d8ea70d4f607bbb2b59f6
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
bd4e2a62517baf8ea87e59bfebeeb677
6b91469beb1e8508901c58835d4e715fa92ea633
'2011-11-17T18:44:52-05:00'
describe
'50076' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
b3be7d686de152c1efdf82f4e5febb52
5d693aee939839e17e06042ec7114f52ebe36ece
'2011-11-17T18:35:35-05:00'
describe
'495238' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
31c172d97e1ccca79db34ca3b6ae33e7
b2fe425ade1856d53d703745b7e7f39ef2bba169
describe
'421128' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
a84f55382d9126b84240b1db672768d1
83e31947fe8b24c9b0bde4d1a6050791e1dcbdf5
describe
'28737' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7be574893c97f402977bab0e362db7a8
2f6cb8ce7c297d9da4f65576e1d78616082ab35d
describe
'141354' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b7ae417b514687eece4b0284b6352559
73a3f9c518ff4b900d9e947de5dbaacc1de72409
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c34117d67139137ec258e6b1e142255a
d056f72d9dd210373a77c781d5c574f5857976f1
'2011-11-17T18:39:08-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c58003c95035a54dcbd866279b36401c
38b572e6c11f99842287a5cd258cb98b48690573
describe
'48760' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
855adb00ba92e1c97d37b277f5b99847
e7b4c164b9aff1303d1004f9d15a5adf1367f075
'2011-11-17T18:45:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
46b7eaad28f7ca308e69abcf860a5f46
c14490fe67ee3ce8bc4bbe3e2d342fd5a91d0429
describe
'429267' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f8d7781fad00246a4c602b3b55ab2794
98cee5e7db51a964153ad46e9c61d23a6e91a385
'2011-11-17T18:39:58-05:00'
describe
'34918' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSR' 'sip-files00100.pro'
450bb5e374dd44b7d88219ee094a18d5
8a044377b1a531793ea29b1e2352c90ed9b21328
'2011-11-17T18:39:27-05:00'
describe
'146194' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSS' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
14aae02336308bf0bdb332cbe281c0b7
35253c845c075b0b4bcaf4f099006f9620379bc6
'2011-11-17T18:45:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFST' 'sip-files00100.tif'
4ce23ae281b3e7c7592ed6a1131060a7
e15ead27988e821926b72bf7e7706fd4e6cefa04
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f6a11611ef609a46a942c0e9a1d0053e
d92c0ebfaccdffbddd4465272c088e557cd247c3
describe
'49652' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
293775fbab944998c15e81bd74b8dbb9
b472a0de81b0ccdd1fb7ec6aa8dcfc862bf6eba7
'2011-11-17T18:41:27-05:00'
describe
'495223' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
0729ce3f8830e480927fa39e56154004
7089627c696d231d77770f165870e4bafd8670c0
'2011-11-17T18:41:30-05:00'
describe
'438899' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6433265cf082c0f25707b4497cb38e99
9465a41948a0dec3d7444a2d25cc340626452222
'2011-11-17T18:31:36-05:00'
describe
'36277' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
a247823e5f90ffd28d62a5345c5022a4
1bcc43e3dec1fc93e88d98eaf890e6f700d5f092
describe
'150814' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFSZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
1c79e3e2352e0f2f5360fe5ac679bf02
c18ac9953b483afcda345ac1c1bf31b121b74a06
'2011-11-17T18:48:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
40b21b75b17471e685afd3315a55971c
491839b7cb9bd2ac099d6a645face2f72c3e08e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
846c01b6ca39f70144f895cc266f3caf
74bce0216b8c8876b6575eed013914ff1a04f999
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
92778f0d97f98b89d30d28b38ba831fd
7e7770228158a96fadc8fbae1e3be2a0f2950a83
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
15e85b4672762a1459e26a5fd44a9bee
13b8f39f4f8f700f63551d8ba88585336da57bc2
describe
'431970' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
4258b2faedf6e79597eab91e098c3b20
aadf7c5ec334480cdc9fa178c4b59f20fbaa51d4
'2011-11-17T18:35:47-05:00'
describe
'35468' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
77ddd645f030c75a45c059e72132aa82
283910f2b4fe9a841fa91ac8dc9d2385208db242
describe
'146750' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
24960aaba6997e601821238edfbff4a7
7e3fe4986a4e7b4dce33fdbd67815ae6075de384
'2011-11-17T18:30:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
fac3a1152f7b5a875f558772f781ee81
8e63aba7b72895d1ef5e9d71ad9677935a39351a
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
30ff5c96a83562a932e6c25dfe01f35f
3f51ed142e07937bccd6ea405256c9f94cc72382
describe
'50127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
e223552f420bfd8b99e1989a90c6773f
60057322499aa356757f1f87e40dc4a075377063
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
8572890c92ce7334691fcbd462fd249a
9b485d65768a78b09cc60da98279c49f3350e042
describe
'428941' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
1ea2cf592f85c29ef32f24c1f1de64cb
5f3a2df92e54a7473afe3b138d140fb9794e9855
'2011-11-17T18:43:53-05:00'
describe
'33779' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e06c92d78950df57d7f41ea40c3aa0fc
9f7495544b75fed2955148b245aa661104ee58f2
describe
'144679' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
84729b49a45a1260f7a0753b395d7a08
23e817143f692033b2016d95cbfb387f35da403f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d3ebf88ebe4e2e785f2ae28d9c738b90
878c197902ae5ec2624d0340d089d8180c7e5f8e
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
ddbca8a38dff399f3a74ab5c4072142e
dfea4ae425668488ad851d7e30d9ebea5a75295f
describe
'48940' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
48ec21b29f18245d8ea2045b380c9c21
b741efdcea4782aa5539fc1bee7d025558474058
'2011-11-17T18:36:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e5913ad49fbae805fb45c3a8bbc9fe4b
ba08680d03ed8cf02037a5d02343cb759676c3f0
'2011-11-17T18:31:02-05:00'
describe
'441984' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0e2d1f8ce3f79885e6e0916e7c10df3a
0607e42411aa1a5cc7ae6cb0e82d6ef9c03085b2
describe
'35870' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
a013439c9166eb7626a52f17b53b3fd9
979f1b88a19beb8794e0395f05390c04424f29c5
describe
'148517' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
a7cafa376570c08e7bbe68ebd39c7a9f
9b789e0f505f57bf615dd4c2aa594406c9824b59
'2011-11-17T18:41:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
416866dc25a16d10ecb62fc9a0f739e9
f9ff9c61854a7dcd909b0df2a0145b26546f680a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
5381f69767001de94039a2b3c13e0866
2236cddd939032b8d943fbd458a54e572e60a03c
describe
'50970' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
42713d533e742dfd7827036aacdb56f3
e8267cc435c1a8c318dc31ee76eb7e5a62506373
describe
'495166' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
63ac4de9dbcaa7460210065bfc51981f
59c23c33c084190ef9502ebc2dd61897a2bff43d
describe
'634500' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFTZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f22943ad3f9de4ea4aad16773c474df1
c0d5d73bff712b7c67139c124fed6765c4beeca8
'2011-11-17T18:41:02-05:00'
describe
'184378' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUA' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
381baa102d140528c36e1539aada5a56
3c0db77ea388ac3cb00cdd4c6874594d60320c2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
3fd38b07e3375607546b70fa989430f0
ceaa754f9a28449c389c1e3ae70a211b763bd24c
'2011-11-17T18:43:08-05:00'
describe
'58074' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUC' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
30e0602865fc91690b61ca2e6e64c534
1ab3263b62c34b8cdee4ac30a68299e1dc47cce3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUD' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
7a6a6a683e44c460e915f8ca914fe5d1
53a95780232dd4526fc889f501613341557a5b25
'2011-11-17T18:37:37-05:00'
describe
'438425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUE' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c65cae91e8aeab3af85f072506fae5d5
250484e0000f26665864b0bbf94969602605d1e5
describe
'35794' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUF' 'sip-files00106.pro'
e25e303e0c207ca4b57ae4eb5fa2a2d9
d7acac6684aa8465b0ee08effd4085534247a4af
describe
'147484' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUG' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f70bf96b20d016922effcd87e5918a59
c8888058b832007e31600f8d7407abd6b572b4dc
'2011-11-17T18:38:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUH' 'sip-files00106.tif'
079374a72300cee96bac6ecac2e9e86b
ac7049ed1ac95f064b206e6ab192f026674c68df
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUI' 'sip-files00106.txt'
76cbd6cc9a4e55676914503a613a8032
cae1525b8938161e5d0f09f5a4345d2d786e74c1
'2011-11-17T18:40:37-05:00'
describe
'49573' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUJ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c5a5fe070d9a02748d73056eae5a870e
98ef1cb639e8d9470f91983bc16bde361e313167
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUK' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
1ec165cda7875d5a3e659b1dc02ab2e7
097086640ad7606e0b7843cd9c23462bc353afda
'2011-11-17T18:30:32-05:00'
describe
'436321' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUL' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
a48baf159b7dd7c83838dfd9a4d39e71
b31ac05ca4b71415dba125c67547fa31e2b7df2e
'2011-11-17T18:41:48-05:00'
describe
'35429' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUM' 'sip-files00107.pro'
eaa2b4dddc74d56e8e92dd43c599ac16
8e7d41c208f0a8c4c740f55153db080b09b6b28c
'2011-11-17T18:40:25-05:00'
describe
'149695' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUN' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5ca8c8009c5dde4a7571216422341bc7
205ed88c6de1189c76588fc1fe4550f3c987371d
'2011-11-17T18:41:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUO' 'sip-files00107.tif'
19dd98d0f32449afdb6a9d68424ba044
045eecbd8c5290f754f2533495bce4a2c9fb4e35
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUP' 'sip-files00107.txt'
3c911eb73f7d9c5ef716345cb19107c1
40d160430bc9a627c1c8027fedf8be189ada6dd7
describe
'50309' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUQ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
76aab182f90ce8cdd445708173664626
88e6be9d06873445da6f676bff13e897cdf8b13a
describe
'495288' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUR' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
87624c46ad7a71e5d0f228510807bde8
b0b6f84542b8b53bef85c4c350a564eb4faa1fd4
describe
'438029' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUS' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
953213c53f589b140deb8c2f2cd3917d
00c2df835257244dd2c984046f00b4df2df81c75
describe
'35056' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUT' 'sip-files00108.pro'
3792b243ec110e9e5826e878df31cd20
c467e1b119e44dbde4e905227daed1ca93eac00a
describe
'149501' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUU' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9c2185d25e227cc8d28f53ec820163c1
06a8b054fd4c530b2039ee65f4c94ce017b101ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUV' 'sip-files00108.tif'
ee4104ae740f1dfe5d93fb8327e830dd
bb6838b86b59c9b2311df1fbae2cc491e85b74b5
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUW' 'sip-files00108.txt'
de6660832e085e55095c158258a2f01d
a017c413499ad4c363385c600e2d7bbadaa58a19
'2011-11-17T18:44:13-05:00'
describe
'50122' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUX' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
04196f0ff7df73058bb1a3557a78ecf6
8347bdf7b2a0f417731d9e40a28bce63e71578ee
'2011-11-17T18:30:47-05:00'
describe
'495095' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUY' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
39389cf60b1a9709c9c2ecb8d2b74372
c277cbe40dc479de47f2ffdb2377456f0c9cf502
describe
'268797' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFUZ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e6de6cd254ed4ef122f3d91ed41c9db9
f219e70e3f11daad78d18cdc6032fc2fb31d5aa9
describe
'7527' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVA' 'sip-files00109.pro'
5f84ae6baf17e16d59fbb2be3b43b158
2fd1da38bcbf02dbbc6011e746c16998cc7d38b8
'2011-11-17T18:46:04-05:00'
describe
'87451' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVB' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ebd0bf9af64955dc37d3c417223082e0
b341434241a207db4bd3227fa1659149c5dcd56c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVC' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f7c3e2f6ca24ae8a65e88235cda37337
4bd7b473e77d72a69351b0d96fc2164c9b0eea43
'2011-11-17T18:36:51-05:00'
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVD' 'sip-files00109.txt'
ddad2b543ebf7a7be4e4e7bf9d74e859
bf521bcd6312307da2809788bf5aa125e17c4c49
'2011-11-17T18:39:11-05:00'
describe
'35240' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVE' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ce8f748381560a6ed3531eddeb9cc141
62d5011a7420a4dfb39a7491809ae526e2cc5a85
'2011-11-17T18:48:10-05:00'
describe
'495094' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVF' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
bc847dd81bfb5f99de55484cd712ffc1
de21dddd8838a5afbede540ae1f36adf98ab347a
'2011-11-17T18:44:18-05:00'
describe
'365145' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVG' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ad17e282dd789979ca9318353964176e
daf61795cc5e24cb00f60dd9976f3ec196a89cdb
'2011-11-17T18:30:20-05:00'
describe
'21004' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVH' 'sip-files00110.pro'
535dd8daf819ed16b0d838a5d65db413
688749b1af68cfec64278e0dea993eca840c76a2
describe
'121908' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVI' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
c5c8d29c5f954c003fce12fee9b20578
b8f2fbbc0c6a460d754976387b0e7dad276ac8cc
'2011-11-17T18:43:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVJ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
7c19226654d853d2ea9c9eb57843056f
b14507c1f303db8808ef451a19f87d6f8281ec9d
'2011-11-17T18:41:14-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVK' 'sip-files00110.txt'
11f4cf491d50dfb65e6f9d75b0fc3bb7
51ad04c69fbf7cb59dba259bfb5be4415a668c61
describe
'44150' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVL' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
4bd8dfd8dff986b111dc6d1c2244e3bd
205c93fc77bcba1969c46e72869a72c43b8fedc5
'2011-11-17T18:39:06-05:00'
describe
'495230' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVM' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
d25a5f8b7b07033993bfe0af682cc731
40d7f7cce1ea4ad77adfc359dd6cee87d37150c9
describe
'432271' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVN' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
170794495a9ba3b22993323c6d65e2b8
e6b0654341d13fc8ffec8db3b8325a4937f91347
describe
'36138' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVO' 'sip-files00111.pro'
f7d4fb4138ce66b1003efd0fc9bc45c1
6896fcb81731a35dfffb543f011ddfc0eacac767
'2011-11-17T18:41:42-05:00'
describe
'145927' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVP' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
93362f66268b78fdbeb95098acf06a42
1d4837ab9ec6e1fdee5dba9923f3c866108dd1d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVQ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e2521a8f792d90dacb64575be1b3336e
7efcab15448366e4010a875adde30a1f7b6522d0
'2011-11-17T18:39:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVR' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0a8435381a53958b774d4d712d804492
bc47882437879929acfc3af76465f7f68b0eeb61
describe
'49380' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVS' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e9cf95761520f6d757a6ce350c5e9296
75dceae85b11da8551475422034b7b04781a38b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVT' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ae79a98fb138890e2eaa4e5a4b36d907
6128fb63743e1ae332df5937c05773de2ed20a58
describe
'441727' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVU' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c9db55a67a356a36f8560b8ee600eb99
2a5bd8ffdbbb25d423f20d87e5ecc25197e051d7
'2011-11-17T18:44:34-05:00'
describe
'36590' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVV' 'sip-files00112.pro'
e099eb7f1af4ac2b622e2fe9c749beeb
d709b10d2a93f0e83f48c522df174f20548660cd
describe
'148405' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVW' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d431fb634641c58bc7a077e588705750
46ade9e348ce5753b734d830a2d2f34f4994e087
'2011-11-17T18:44:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVX' 'sip-files00112.tif'
9b5956807b717461fb15f0a64d7247fa
92346bcf68197cab9dd1c913097e762efdd7fd7a
'2011-11-17T18:31:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVY' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6915af3294b3073b28bef5470f6fde19
400d74450bd073af1fe366d6ddcc85b79759fcff
describe
'50275' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFVZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cd276418faabde7b997450a1b6facfd8
ea8b8d69ad708cd5cd61adb415d0c6be3e8850d1
describe
'495234' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9e409340c8ccac8843613af0602b83cf
5b4bd34f7da5b286e6f907607456f677791070af
'2011-11-17T18:37:06-05:00'
describe
'440749' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWB' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
346ee79e05fa28e6ce977360f4b452e8
6a71ebbe941be8b2926ae11c8c76ae298cb4b4f7
describe
'37085' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
172481faad6ed1344b88f7bcfc315e3d
b9a4bb3a3b6370934a0c6685157545109c633151
'2011-11-17T18:45:20-05:00'
describe
'150016' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
fa6c8b7ba1962cc37c301ef5d842dbd4
26a65159e11150d1d6cd4e3e151e21b221903b5f
'2011-11-17T18:32:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWE' 'sip-files00113.tif'
0db1162cafef9e3a29aab1245564e6f6
2a186f0841ba16bcab852d23fbc78e95b442dbc4
'2011-11-17T18:45:38-05:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
7bf86e2cab227bc29b89757c0639d300
6fbc6fc107c0a80a585aaf9be18abf9a89b04987
describe
'50226' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
b2d760bc533b5285f60ba693cdeb5f73
9f01839ffbe3030adc5c892f8092d7adb4e3a960
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWH' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
6ab0d782308372688bdb9a2940f3b857
41025859b6f372051d20cfefaca5c245c6157d4e
describe
'439425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
6d84a9fc627d81dadceeb2324ca7b3e9
4e58da02396b3aa1a2f7c2977e64f995b0649fff
describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWJ' 'sip-files00114.pro'
1df25cd3f9b116b54ca0ea89f16171a6
cb7460643dba720c8751a149e4b7729e9f7b63e9
'2011-11-17T18:31:27-05:00'
describe
'147941' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWK' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
fbf642f4cfa894838b92d38d3c5800b6
65203b21a07baeab983577c7d9b3fe1963a6998b
'2011-11-17T18:38:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWL' 'sip-files00114.tif'
1a46376fea47ba1c73e0aba3de76500c
1d9ee5f4939b2eef8855318ae2af57b55f256bb4
'2011-11-17T18:38:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWM' 'sip-files00114.txt'
aea0ff93e2e4fcc1f172043201c82004
9f13f1e867c6015faa8f6badf42409c21233050b
'2011-11-17T18:38:28-05:00'
describe
'50110' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWN' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
25a376088668f3786a791647f76aac9b
95f81a4dc5ec00181ca2b10e68b3b60177b8cc67
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWO' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
15f70be7837bdc8ff4b393b7c0b3e5f5
7a996691a99146dfa984137e6dbe503947cb001c
'2011-11-17T18:31:56-05:00'
describe
'443212' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWP' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0826e189327570ca5a5a054ac82ec919
c296b923ae7a6a0a5fb5a953b875ff8011970fdd
describe
'37847' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWQ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
2e8eb25be915622771d4179f469e737d
f0c226cc1ca856d6ef273faa306956395534688a
describe
'148824' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWR' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0ad393f818a505c791854f424149b1dc
a3d5425918dbc17c89a1968425d62e9c448f5e44
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWS' 'sip-files00115.tif'
64e42ed0911cb19b3087eb1daa4b6fb3
4c4e5c2be49257dd322a3b68b04cc73d179b1aa8
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWT' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4fcae83c78eacb823179cd7d118f39fb
a7f4ea16cdee8411a151e64cfa5aa7cf122cf5e2
describe
'50729' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWU' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
05e8f89948ac7a71ad65a329109b84c4
4b4edf7d684523e6117a17122a265fda51f47ff6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
9bfabf87df2554b0dcea866a6289da71
eebb5c8a28b9f94db675761b3a26e0db1bc30d0c
describe
'441237' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
27ec827fab7e14669e7c9057a1e45297
e51532a82d0bc4b98cfb77dde86701e89723350b
describe
'37102' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWX' 'sip-files00116.pro'
da41cb1b91ba81a088982d7d2c2a3177
1a9756dc67e26bd4c16a77518ce03a1abb60d5bd
describe
'147823' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWY' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
f011298bb87d9aed3cc5130dce27a5d3
001e7097ac49b926ff8c72015c5a94ba735d4952
'2011-11-17T18:37:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFWZ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
bf72bbaa54ac80b15aa22fbaded136ce
86c8f68956d39ff1878fcd24f9b7caf3e1dd785d
'2011-11-17T18:37:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXA' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b21beccb43aaded809fa935d8667c7ca
9643dabf9f06aae119e6609e2bf65dd68a632831
'2011-11-17T18:31:47-05:00'
describe
'50100' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXB' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
257ac84dfd3d3a10e43b77f299fa8c78
c23ca4d64931ed37cd12ce26f018898ffa532f65
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
8a93afeeabaf0e47ad1d104df916ba4a
27b619b64c4af31058817ea5cb3fa1e34f918a83
'2011-11-17T18:43:19-05:00'
describe
'444659' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXD' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
3444d2d6a303151d100e6eb3a54d54b9
abe7bf7d5651706d0f846a0c49a5f45b11cb9b20
'2011-11-17T18:38:32-05:00'
describe
'37504' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXE' 'sip-files00117.pro'
34ae402411a390edd10f6ea58515de70
030217a43cecf60583eea29af27bea844aec2946
'2011-11-17T18:47:49-05:00'
describe
'148763' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXF' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
895709bc06bdbdfe83dc204b9f792cbe
83f8915977c09b8f7f0bbdd00546550cddd55883
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXG' 'sip-files00117.tif'
3557ae1dc8c072973780d5c0b14e0f18
156377b63c8fbfe9a8857077f1f9ca944cf4d0ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0e0e658f35ba1811736eb1dbbe9e073c
1c7c7c14116af83038f3f647343667e12d5a70d8
describe
'50804' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXI' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
28087b38d29a2d755c98c6646caa840e
b8ab30a714dbedf18a300116b70d9ea252022b2f
describe
'495275' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXJ' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
20c140daf106865f223c031dbe0ce44a
1c5da1fec745b6d7fabcf02c8d5d72e5a98f8c39
describe
'430046' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXK' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
411b3d3a58a90be602a52a40565925cb
39cba675a1a1740db7cb03ddded49bf565c57611
describe
'21793' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
c25d697934e7ebdf665ac053f7e83487
db4ea5c45f6c054ecdd13215d72772113d5bf848
describe
'137122' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
0460d1d5ad210f8fe48acc41f957f2cc
03833abe8c03f2333a09c81c3b120517b337d7f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
d7d07b594d670631a3837757fdac89e7
ad1f134170d7f3b52bad649c32f9b504899e2c9e
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXO' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ac26166af761eaadc7c91a852842bf02
1b4b614f3bb93598225cb8b5ddc10b11ddd1fcc4
describe
Invalid character
'48131' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXP' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
eada5547353991e551dce9c7f31b6023
7094d3a380ee8087e75089297222c28bec7f05f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXQ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
096cb1c426065ca426573f0fdfda51a8
df78f70832ac00e2b5cfe1dad5217e13d85a6ca7
describe
'439969' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXR' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c29f1f5ce708644275b95840afc3b603
fa7e63ef74c42ba18c9b44c5e132953ca628c11f
describe
'37796' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXS' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d679f4af11e8434c5f0a9374f79ee334
1971b8c0ecd69baca3875e6714496e1da3a75cb2
describe
'149088' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXT' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
3185b02f1555163ae5a4c25db1768482
ee03016b51872eb490291f066ea261f5c5737fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
aea8622edb6cd1b26c5c1e68ca57f4cb
a30f2b4cabd5ab239b209aecb6a3cedaea5b26fb
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
26250289e583318e13ea350e0042cf43
d033151f4ed351d8a96f172e186a0d439da8491b
describe
'50695' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXW' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
1ce6b92b755aaff130d5c4304bdbba44
d99a23bef12a2184e5b87dfb752b50a08fc8f13e
'2011-11-17T18:43:58-05:00'
describe
'495062' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
9324c36028af85bb77a42495dea4e347
6e01c4c107014ffa3e475fe01dfdf58fae143bb6
describe
'354809' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
24d907bd51bf88ab48ff7e8c69746b35
7a00c1bdc309a2372b4425b533b7607f43ee6e58
describe
'22237' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFXZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ee35f132c20e8d70e78c9ecc38ff848d
5a566a1e68308e201a8b1406a56f11c46cb9822f
'2011-11-17T18:42:59-05:00'
describe
'117880' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
29682e42db9bda85f6102bdc2eb9e9ab
62fedd0cac5eb3e6af54e8395f2866fd58ac8776
'2011-11-17T18:42:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
edf837aa0efe845c081d4069e805be9d
ece55b55ab799e135fc82b54131fbe8a742e9efa
'2011-11-17T18:38:40-05:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
047c0d2879afed20709c301ab863261c
f3ef08ce2d97e26c8e4c23c32d38aad21a1931c8
describe
'42561' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYD' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3a1122009f7df8f4eac5a6aa00f79331
f8c6edd57c6d497353f4a2a5bcde4d33bd077037
describe
'494996' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYE' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c8e3506e35ba7458ddbfe3d527327a5e
26709429b3e4dbb34efb9aa423c34d147e26de52
'2011-11-17T18:30:18-05:00'
describe
'360701' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYF' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
593c26f6fa07abad05ab64d4c7b946d0
a64a4ada55825a8383eabf7b31a05c4f3b15ea94
'2011-11-17T18:37:13-05:00'
describe
'21569' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
11960d26d2a72222c630fd96ad16f51f
1ce33abdceaa25e2294680ce11bddd69d688bb23
'2011-11-17T18:40:30-05:00'
describe
'120787' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYH' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
5793f880e8553e472be19f5abae74547
526efbb90df5517fb90a54a7f6fd512a69c7ce68
'2011-11-17T18:44:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYI' 'sip-files00121.tif'
474f204d156d07434c90a9d9cae5efee
d579b39210041d3dcf39ef82e9b62b801b5c7895
'2011-11-17T18:41:43-05:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYJ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0c5a0efcea9b02d58876cf2f15a76373
6e4589705f8a69088d59dcd3e17e9902de3726b1
'2011-11-17T18:45:55-05:00'
describe
'43183' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYK' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
4b8dbbbf23eda28d05e3943adc724f8a
a0aa900398ad6b0aed5e68b3975c0368598efe3c
'2011-11-17T18:37:01-05:00'
describe
'495256' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYL' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
9f7d1cec7cb585042ff5b39b7cef66eb
bb778ba05a2e91359ddcd01a973a4fe29d01b0c1
describe
'442020' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYM' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
05d6c22c65fe7d8309b935ddfe6b4ac5
e5819720c148bfb539af070ec069ba51736d153c
'2011-11-17T18:42:10-05:00'
describe
'36918' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYN' 'sip-files00122.pro'
e2e65da76560f04885a7ca3cb530d1ab
678faeddde730580807d0c824030fbcdbdb65f1f
'2011-11-17T18:48:36-05:00'
describe
'149828' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYO' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
9f5da64514d0349966a4903b7aad209a
0e791bb9d87e537ffa465e15ca9e75663f68a209
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYP' 'sip-files00122.tif'
3439bbab87ce14330a213fc8d70b7e77
863dbdf6f7a055496127d3b264cf8aacda8875f4
'2011-11-17T18:39:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYQ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
dc16e6fe8d9112c230c575219f7f28cf
ec3272671f21ff1d4c037490435f609267cad4b4
describe
'50456' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYR' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
7909ae300ee59ec06be615c490ae2d42
4e3999bada631e5e5d74c1e5aaee15bb5db0a9ef
'2011-11-17T18:45:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYS' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
77bc7539004c1c02a6b650604f633fb5
e0657d1540b7a8c46c146dc917fa2485d436616c
describe
'428934' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYT' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
198051c5d57c83aa81f04a4544e90fce
b7b9e318421b6d1dcb3c5f98e91c1d007d4c0e36
'2011-11-17T18:35:12-05:00'
describe
'34922' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYU' 'sip-files00123.pro'
4bdf2431a2fc0802a34785b7551c588c
612b2542f1797668ad7d2be1f25fc62e9a45f58e
describe
'145785' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYV' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
d266c2503021d38a1c4ccbe47b67568e
6381e11ccb01aadb6c1630a98d94438f40bc7e03
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYW' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5448205906452f5de568e5f20f1f30e0
8768de081a0e030ee7caa5e3ca730a05bc84b041
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYX' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d1be9322bebcd9a6003a35af1d0338e5
8b49759bdbc2604abc4e4fe2f1265d5bd3f892dc
describe
'49371' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a90b4d5e7f84f310b0b32a445251242d
68e500128c984ccc7a67184d831e094efb7b1ef0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFYZ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
09732611ba6e42f9d6bcfb7578a6ae1c
96262e82a9ad5d93b87f43cb97829a8e821685cd
describe
'432089' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZA' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
010455f5e82200c002b6313b51701ef3
849158792aab8fb8a9546bfb7fd16b7368540fa4
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZB' 'sip-files00124.pro'
d67271c324fff6646ea63ff12e66113a
289c0a7b6f7c806566c2953a883479d6802fff06
'2011-11-17T18:34:52-05:00'
describe
'145665' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZC' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b2e79177d8827c5894865c4ded8789e1
4482fe14cc03e1b02482aba736464b09c8bf9861
'2011-11-17T18:45:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZD' 'sip-files00124.tif'
3acbe92b9e4943c0918e9977b4522577
006d189511da30766dfbe4b0887e948cae856d65
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZE' 'sip-files00124.txt'
e55784c3600664f4e2ad305264c1b0f7
8228e41e80340faa4903574b167491b11f1c4a8a
describe
'49899' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZF' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
efed928ec235f9165d69b6a21d5ca814
5e2e789a23e623771f49936194662f4aab3f85f2
'2011-11-17T18:36:07-05:00'
describe
'495227' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZG' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a7f497ebe50ae75a3dfc9e54faf95d40
a0c70cfc7fe525e7639fc759be79c60a5bc71a26
describe
'641924' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZH' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
c2caf7e6772842434ad0958c48b19cbd
4406485f7f2f6f1cbde5c2dcd5f64085925723cc
'2011-11-17T18:45:19-05:00'
describe
'187810' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
6896cb656118ef16a610489ec38083d8
e27256ee84a960ff02dca58a40f0193fbc8f685f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZJ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c6e4ea1517824813a1f67b1fc0fb62c7
5d0283499a7434a08f4c023db9993b5857de7d7b
describe
'59854' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
bec35c6e0c76508689e066db2fc070ed
56bcc6e16ca669d21ae1adb1add278e658e470e5
'2011-11-17T18:30:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7fc2db187c2db37d07f0e521c4089cd9
571dadbef8347f70835a27cf0ca4be80bc6689c5
describe
'419593' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
b36c19f210eed0cea3c7981774195ba4
c9d7aae8c2f66016404f080261f0ff77b6eb94ed
'2011-11-17T18:32:23-05:00'
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
5ecc539096dba00a3ea2607707a076ac
99b905ca6fd47e10e82fdfeb96d57954b1729da3
describe
'140202' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
efc747769f71f07b47d866d84afc1b5c
6c2e2895dfb7c96ebe25180481056ef3e3b8e2d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9c24279ccc55b06a16a465938282ad0d
7261619c472d39612873ea04ed461ac24e873b3f
'2011-11-17T18:41:55-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f7bd32d07813b485206e351a63fb794f
0e1cb17d7166bd9a9ec5e9badcf9bafa7909f3ee
'2011-11-17T18:45:36-05:00'
describe
'48230' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZR' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
624a9b7086cf7e601723861c0ff75022
ab771a9d9a664c18f9f9d44634677e77951ccca1
'2011-11-17T18:44:43-05:00'
describe
'495059' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
1d6949ebbbc5b3c454f59276ffcfe22a
d99a9b5e4ec8cb1e5635c0de9ac85c6a90abdd2d
'2011-11-17T18:45:35-05:00'
describe
'361760' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c3cfc2fcf769211b94520e75ff52ed36
3f1653c2057ea0f4fe6a85d8a19dcc92e921cdad
'2011-11-17T18:32:07-05:00'
describe
'21149' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
31640784156ef464066659180793f98a
3cbb3112d133c9c306ae82636b1f3b19e324d1bd
'2011-11-17T18:31:48-05:00'
describe
'121732' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
ec1436ca02f94c9971ee8797ff72261f
0bae5e7ff7acd1a4e1942eaf4a4ee42c6c77c3a2
'2011-11-17T18:37:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
56ef52705aa0131e7fdddfbe6c22d987
bfab0ac26e28202f03524bbf14af6395da303bed
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
06b833d320f3711cfd7eed431db213c2
556b2a487a5204017d0c1891dd66fbfc69ef5ddc
describe
'44749' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b7b5d549f796b4da428657228f59e44d
7bc4a02145157b12f80f759c6fba082debb75873
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACFZZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
10b9680b983e59e92779b2e6d6d0bdb3
faf97f2084a344703d58c2b608d5a7f47756ebaf
describe
'435033' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4c1c004e55711f352991ebe4669dba12
5cf1c4a03dfcacf89f44cc40c9329b82722dd64f
describe
'36651' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
a724920adf1e0a265d02fae3c7372d43
86feb96c26a91322f75671f676bebbb1c09afcc6
'2011-11-17T18:38:05-05:00'
describe
'147410' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
5cffa2ed02759e640144e050847b4200
89ea331683da41b7455cae075706aa759614ca81
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
177962d45c143d44a454ef9a4fb9f44a
0ae8b2c88b61bc61a36e2e15cd6cde6741008f16
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
04382df775f3f8412e1d83a5f57798d3
959666b3dfc1df8b2d7f404f16a5d334d04846c5
describe
'50213' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
013ff24eed4848cf0534ddb769f97566
883604111f7ca09ae88f0e3a8c1f500a3aa50e1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
d594b31b20185f5120dc19b96f4e3550
723f9da7f67938d44b5bed9fecccb613f2227e1e
'2011-11-17T18:42:58-05:00'
describe
'438376' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
7299b2e2771c47cad7af42526a23526e
df64e2314c7991a68035843418c44ab09c5400ce
describe
'37049' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
4e85473ab8fa2bb5b21938cd5c6ae0ed
01d02c53131e60a2702b6e07613299b1e648e700
describe
'147499' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
b3761580b7568cf8daedc26018ec9fab
09aea8c3299dc34a2dd078d319becc05776b94c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
ad52563bf5af5665c41b0c09817e6067
3c2e368bded7bbd6800b8a2dff539f432b58bad6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
6f86f8bd6cfa7f2f27777b28c67d9570
54b1d239271fc3a0a50b5c495d44425a6ce71d02
describe
'50491' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
ad04c314d1c11c1f253acc0ff86e34bc
cd3310d2eb842a2be85f6ef1d5f19403905cd641
describe
'495225' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
326de66da248461f0872e302299b5d43
52b6da4442e6fa18f1d02b5e194f25af9452f963
describe
'436197' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
6438832c44b03c4d5fd8bf559ccf258c
0fdaf4d857a5e71c1dc3d722ef9f0e929b19744b
describe
'36530' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
dae388ebd3e4a77401a740e4839730f4
3617cfe9f282ddc96bc4514872091c1bdad8fd5b
describe
'147921' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
0f46347ff237db4c308fe26b26b5cd1e
52489a8c7d437bac83f7782cbc9a0ac509dc7702
'2011-11-17T18:31:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
eea836c2c0c0650c274857ff52487d5e
f2132317b0e6bcaa087a398861cf6dc22cffd436
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
70797f581b1c7aa9146e20d4bd65b0ef
219893f66207a6e1df45840291465e15bf441247
'2011-11-17T18:36:48-05:00'
describe
'50171' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
f4043c5f02cd8ca860edf16c2d10f412
9a05dc4f061c6eb3757fb9e4684a1fb63e88a5a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
e80b7c6a5e101f46b9742f94ce04283b
70888229bdb74751e5e7b6614894f66b5bdd6a57
describe
'422673' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
2e0ca8a25f3aa0e47eab6e4d59e5d31f
4531063cb7ec7d6dbb8058f1e2bb5b38c968f81c
describe
'131720' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAW' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2ce4ec9403bc836bbae1c09babd70353
a52897d6e1ec57bcfc4d38b0a6d1f1fa681e1532
'2011-11-17T18:48:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAX' 'sip-files00131.tif'
6d9fbde06a27e5703a953e4f04c80bf9
aa9b5d764800bf788fb8fe296be9ad2d7088c79a
'2011-11-17T18:48:27-05:00'
describe
'46314' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAY' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
362b8ed617b0859967c689e7c717b076
3bc149d1966f5dba69686574a6d791593469d7c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGAZ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
c1e899f0c331a7b49f46412465fd56c7
631cc14d15f2bcbc0d760ac15011b9de14ed0666
describe
'439304' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
4c82b41f1b87db844b39e11b6cb19fdf
0a571f001f8ba379c10d8a15e38fcd6c3dbb9d7a
describe
'37115' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBB' 'sip-files00132.pro'
80a201568b8df1af861c085a711c960d
a94a390dfc309adf4b02c05d080db573024eb6e0
'2011-11-17T18:32:09-05:00'
describe
'149425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBC' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
93f57247700eb6d0d7cdd69fe9630880
675d3650d6b5c7c3dcd8b4c3ff6c0ccf947dd186
'2011-11-17T18:31:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBD' 'sip-files00132.tif'
fe349220b14b8d85d1f7236fc8bb82b3
f4e14dcf94d48e0ba846ad29730dca489d37eeb3
'2011-11-17T18:45:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBE' 'sip-files00132.txt'
8c6e0f09320b715a29047fa082228965
fbb25fa37f59ff948df6da50163c6aeb2a35e6c1
'2011-11-17T18:44:23-05:00'
describe
'51030' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBF' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
183c5020a2776930b031c10ae44ba8fa
7152833b54b2aa7a5b0514e4308a6abeafb920a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7cf57c23579f9d76782b645501400898
5344e05bb4a6829f5e85b07f8066fbb0f0f5cc08
'2011-11-17T18:38:58-05:00'
describe
'439448' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBH' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
2ed930a99505404463737fd7969064b0
2debabf4941f2c8041431e2c5baed25ee4dde1b8
describe
'36740' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBI' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4197f0b6b57beeddf5f73ff5333affc4
5b073bc091897a0a72189568ed02eec26c5559ad
'2011-11-17T18:44:07-05:00'
describe
'148287' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBJ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3ee9754450c9469a9ae55e2145a52393
7efeb20a50582edad5eb867219cec6f939828e54
'2011-11-17T18:39:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBK' 'sip-files00133.tif'
4c9820198dc1f5e304e81f11d97d0362
fac2384abbabf3b5ca3e330d4b059b3b87edbe30
'2011-11-17T18:48:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBL' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2ad13c1939cc8133164e0962fc03d4e7
20c23bc2f33c9640f8ddcdd706de12313370b47a
describe
'50914' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBM' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
82dc5a6aafd73dcf126ac9c6f8d3043a
03bd3c85a71215413fb4d620b6079ecf0e0178ba
'2011-11-17T18:39:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBN' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
da806d596b8fee068244aa0eb73fdb7c
65ffd6ba0913160c20fc2bba3de44f9ea03601d1
describe
'368843' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBO' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
7b0600df159e5ec1c222be44f0396f8d
777a87ffb4c9a806a72e6707b8e496263f67e2f1
describe
'19274' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBP' 'sip-files00134.pro'
a200de6bca815db64b5d420e0501f78e
064919e884f76c7929776384c84936535e7f383d
describe
'120290' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBQ' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
fa64930cab9203a423fc66bb825df251
d0ac3ebcc103891b4d634f69321b12c3f1d3f86b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBR' 'sip-files00134.tif'
2d4aa97bbaf1c6bcc20366fd5685689c
627ab1375500dd7e041f62d5ffd675e47f0d5af1
'2011-11-17T18:30:30-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBS' 'sip-files00134.txt'
30da79b667bd4086fea789158f93abe5
38d91730efd3223324f41eccbde367b18ff2341c
'2011-11-17T18:42:14-05:00'
describe
'44951' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBT' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
e814232b5c15420d97a697be2ed88613
b3ade41eff718e5399fe29cc359be57d0280213a
'2011-11-17T18:45:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBU' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
484ffb9d618d27aa0bfeff94cf747ee3
1413b022d97158478896bedc950a27353dfb79bc
'2011-11-17T18:35:19-05:00'
describe
'436146' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBV' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
e1a29392c3d19c761036627e76d33c9b
0ed4ed54fb60528282061f6d4e396e2fb84c3de1
'2011-11-17T18:43:16-05:00'
describe
'36849' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBW' 'sip-files00135.pro'
df6792c60aee8886e65be006a11ddf97
73e1f6b1f915d69812f46f5a6d3a73f2f440be0e
describe
'146922' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBX' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0b8268e3a930d15e3cae2842d7034798
6704b40f9bb18c8cfd9667b1be094e60f499b8e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
69dc50dd90942d91071b6ef73a7f8d69
5be656090e39e9e683117d95b583405f55c58c2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGBZ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
13307e9b318499c66bea5580a183539b
194e41895ebe430ec28b78fa0eeeb10ffdc88877
describe
'50473' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCA' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
3652ba96adbb880f79f309e99503f4fb
609062c9163b24c4b3f17af9aa8d7ca08e851994
'2011-11-17T18:40:26-05:00'
describe
'495214' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCB' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
463c82618fe7bd31f8ac34c5552ec4f8
05b2175fe929475f410c904717734d78e215ca1d
'2011-11-17T18:42:56-05:00'
describe
'444713' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCC' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
320dd77bbff9c57a0425ee4e1142bb54
3e47e255ad5e993eb01a776e2db6bd512bf5fd00
describe
'37344' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
9098df2cc7e92dacefc39e6066dc7cc7
6c9c2d932f0df04b553430d7cf9b27c1cf9be647
describe
'148759' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
f5d592cd82bd88fccd5393e09b10b7df
4d5f8f88b12530a4ca7bff1043e1bc3fa6951203
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCF' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0de99d3eecb238f13f0a4779dd5fe657
7bcdac7faa031a23668f9a2689be7cff1b2b5707
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCG' 'sip-files00136.txt'
6a4ddb444044725a31c21e9d4dba9000
33a340afdce6cdd6291205d4e5d48c4d7c107077
'2011-11-17T18:43:31-05:00'
describe
'51851' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCH' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e47e22c2bfcc6070ff6024cf49789f95
595d38b0a17b3500e964490f7687a89f30f1ae0b
describe
'495247' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCI' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f97206fd27e0bfca2ac8dfcc1058223f
3eebfad375062933d72edd84ebabcfb42f0b1ab5
describe
'441118' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCJ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b652998018d4339fe6074ea3e196c4a4
513e0bf829fe7528efffcd0e54b189464353fe4b
describe
'37648' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCK' 'sip-files00137.pro'
42dbd3d46b1ff09d78ee68e5284183b6
a831e71cfc3123ed87edaf7f481d6980e62375a3
'2011-11-17T18:44:57-05:00'
describe
'149810' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCL' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
79a04e316949f615639b509d736970a1
710e079bb9c1281b77c7e7cabbef0ae81a606400
'2011-11-17T18:46:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
8e58516c81b4de46ecb11fe412e3f92e
4960a279d7572e6b301f2de61a2ed544fbaac42a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCN' 'sip-files00137.txt'
e70301ea5f8e9edd3790405bc761c3b1
4577f5d85fbffae61e9e442eacf1e705f13ebcbb
'2011-11-17T18:45:59-05:00'
describe
'50557' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
4bdd75b28eef6dbd2d6b074a0993a72a
30e41c0130d3970b7aa904c21e79499f1b2038c3
describe
'495277' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCP' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
dfd699155b56645846c0c5cca6c4efa8
ec36b0c6e7f7bfaf52b4e17a2913e60f1f03bd44
describe
'442822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
54357edabbd1cde740528d55baa5e2c0
934b9548d505ea30e9b81b9d1eccbc2a14368cfe
describe
'37704' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCR' 'sip-files00138.pro'
db0137aa06c4ef6ce276dc0dea1c93f7
5062a8913922f8f4a14ee5165651dc5acbc88439
describe
'149227' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
eb68614b832d2848f341684e888832c2
7b5f9e3584e7c0f59c1f22d8528e82858a53c53b
'2011-11-17T18:39:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCT' 'sip-files00138.tif'
b6f94f35c3275eb1a1b8b2544175689f
058941c9823dc05958497fb9eb297998952ede16
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
f0a783cea84aa84bd6678681c2af0a90
68656feb101a734f25dd805f75538eb09d6ba33f
'2011-11-17T18:44:36-05:00'
describe
'50290' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
ac709059a090488342cbaa890e09f388
84e1107671f88875fe3578783c9f42954b90f02f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCW' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
c3a760df0a2e2a4538f3cc02b8eb1528
6a0619c50d352978ee707954da930ffc13f09411
'2011-11-17T18:44:30-05:00'
describe
'388037' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
e0ababb3332796321a0e268aa0fb7a09
997c21fc3d15964f2b98c6b5b0382db2c8decf44
describe
'28460' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
12373df47ccd55f56c4a26ab4bcf0cd0
e77eb0f7c34492de8f3a432e5e63cce2b9d9e90a
'2011-11-17T18:40:27-05:00'
describe
'130754' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGCZ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
5ff1df133245c1aecdc6f8c29a2350a6
112b160a167e496b2e7af3aa353bf36ede161150
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
7196f50c417cefab1208ffe3320c4e67
4d6f4d90e341f84f7d7fb3286307c32a7720e03d
'2011-11-17T18:36:58-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
b8142ddddab1ebf21c8245e5d77df17d
85714012c82b3389dc77fdc281a0aed5f5b47067
describe
'45592' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
3e85a549dde7941f7dc8b88197d2c6b9
d4e8daaea236e881cd5551ee48ad3b41e287ff0a
'2011-11-17T18:37:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
2b5f09a4a47cf5cef9102cdf1b51fd4d
7e2fbac5116deaf4cee7722f9c35ef4daf2b3742
'2011-11-17T18:37:09-05:00'
describe
'371688' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
4d657286fc071f31d89015c515a58917
627d80d5768cfdd1a50fb49883de09eee7334aec
describe
'22898' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
d690a9decfe9d0ca0ceb799562f29e01
484a2d9875c9f2ff534978a7f1fb355b332916c4
'2011-11-17T18:39:52-05:00'
describe
'125108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDG' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
1bfa5e070833eded0bad9dc63d989549
806af8dac4c3fee6efae68b0880e92493320b7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDH' 'sip-files00140.tif'
018ab1eaedfc59fc86b046e68d7fa046
5c3594e8d215a9f01ed46a9537d9890011afd9da
'2011-11-17T18:34:58-05:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDI' 'sip-files00140.txt'
0e492fc93281011ceeef31d1e869620a
263e617b1bc64904e73f7c8df4e9c40f774261ee
describe
'44748' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDJ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
2a2bef2d0c2f620c1fd540b07bec5670
56a1ec797c46818f7a841908c11df4b48be169a1
describe
'495263' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6dddd3158ae757b4793ec6093437d2af
df878c498cb388ba4950c9f9e9a669ad2d51f1f3
describe
'423830' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
053558e2f785bb9bcc10137176debaba
165bc11c526c697996523800d4a80bf1d1c3dcc0
describe
'132715' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDM' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8fe044b9685df513a7e24d80a47cc260
37f650fec2641eae9d2d5fa881a47ed5460ff230
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDN' 'sip-files00141.tif'
5f21a4af816baac9c8e56b1a7d0daa66
56bea23838140643aec1dfe094ee424679c4583d
'2011-11-17T18:36:46-05:00'
describe
'47257' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDO' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
1d400b12f0f93dee00c35303af655e2f
16ad2b05b2f12e02e2693b3d52d860eb00cf10a9
'2011-11-17T18:41:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDP' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
0eba5adaa5deba3e8df0397da5b474b9
e6490e5e649ad00138d1eecda35c2b28f9c32dc8
'2011-11-17T18:32:14-05:00'
describe
'432140' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDQ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
2e0e79b1be39276e5bc583493d56d1ea
0b741fccce4278d47204bdd7928d79292f16dbad
describe
'36144' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDR' 'sip-files00142.pro'
5750049bd6c439e2b83b73a06b5163e6
eecf456369a0be81b3bb5200f3de6e1688f6141d
'2011-11-17T18:45:17-05:00'
describe
'145965' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
0cc67b8652a106157d8b70160462befc
ee1ff720ff60eecb09f8c1f4bbc48be5d0299572
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDT' 'sip-files00142.tif'
4dde61291c0f6a29aff7bd91d99808af
345bc86f999081901034a803c241895bce9a4d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDU' 'sip-files00142.txt'
dae4c70dc5b621b1e8145ec67b8f046b
286b4271ff472d08aaf480dfd1b6b542878acf34
describe
'50163' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDV' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
00a6314eb339f2771ae7254c81a630c6
a3b0ca12d970d1e43631cd0eb3214514f3500f9f
describe
'495270' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDW' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
68d25a099f8532dc618173bd221848e3
b281729b488eff6abf40ab8879d1a56efa53f9f3
describe
'426564' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDX' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1842d90d706aa60a769c35d16ec9fc03
2b302dfa60a865836df5f833bb971dfc5ed94add
describe
'35923' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDY' 'sip-files00143.pro'
736e7525336fc45340935de538b00a15
3c80222a8bbd67316b9a11c581ed08e843ca723e
'2011-11-17T18:37:25-05:00'
describe
'144960' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGDZ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
911b5fe9e93208d733edb3860aff7485
ff5dcb4fc4a00a5c6e455b88193129afbd11f88b
'2011-11-17T18:45:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEA' 'sip-files00143.tif'
39c68c50ab20471b6aa9a4af93230ba0
1dad0be81569893e82f292bae49b4920ecd17a8e
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEB' 'sip-files00143.txt'
69c415712c65d376d97453ca79f9cd78
e171b480058b71d6690ca6042570e385aefd52a0
describe
'50007' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEC' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
9582acc5f028cb1051d1cc05eb94aadc
017a837c24b60eef637ce8957b113dbe65b8bfd8
describe
'495285' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGED' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
98b1fa47685d950981cf6a85b76b0d71
54158cd54a97dd60fea93e4b0c99aa0d323bf65a
describe
'307964' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEE' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
919d85ddb1c59281ac5d0a1ee6b69b0f
1b901c2ed8c20206809b221c8c6f3508fb7a269a
describe
'14336' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEF' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d35e05cea5b74444af6c13cf555d3a1d
598b7a86808429dd697b43a1f16bb3bb97c42538
describe
'100803' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEG' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
51f9045803beb2a08fa5e1f8d1bd66d6
4c2390bd501d38b7bc856124d0edbc530a333b86
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
55e1c8e877faf52d579ac30236c0cd43
a2d580d1d3fa5ca24f59642aad0305760bcbb291
'2011-11-17T18:30:58-05:00'
describe
'597' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEI' 'sip-files00144.txt'
cb6a31e366f35d073210dac428fd02f0
5830c26d04edbab8f199fa76914c70b5e5acc720
describe
'38664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEJ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
cf5586d35631044e7dbf31e3c2148cb8
e6332ead2fc3039c2e5292fa6a6e93f71cee1441
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEK' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
299a335333cee016eb0a16ab07576519
9121147466a2fb14d3b04190742d66e351aa8a7a
describe
'366810' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEL' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
3e4149f3858b1abe192ad0a7391e4bb8
86306c54af5979e423571cf593235ba2364208b4
describe
'22818' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2e19d53c257127c127c1a58fc3983d1e
3262a2f05f337d4f809dcae1d4ca2a818d9ea338
describe
'123970' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEN' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
004087623bb255ef428cc3d3fc4790a4
635f58f4a729579ecff8de1aca04f3e69c5ee608
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEO' 'sip-files00145.tif'
cf30603cf4c24f79a65c825d55e5a3cb
0837a6031298598d68af5542b2cda2b8613cee44
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEP' 'sip-files00145.txt'
c4c132d2460f88cdddae646b95007446
51c0e92ad245621d6bd6ae78b1baa90d45ae699f
'2011-11-17T18:38:33-05:00'
describe
'44833' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
e32a7dfd3beb8f79f1f46b74862544fe
ffcd94d2f7aa5cf9f582541597f397704b92395a
describe
'495127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGER' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
2ef96dbe5f552d0402d48f62a34f0e2d
0d250d4925c6ccbb5f3f64ad76c557159108a9b5
describe
'448631' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGES' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
89ed3193eb3e72a04e51fb8463191d78
70ba5e9ad825e7e768ac4da67914e3bd783c5501
describe
'134564' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGET' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e8454a4d828da597bd57e94e714eb703
1843920e698bfca9450ed7a519c419665809c07c
'2011-11-17T18:46:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEU' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e3412285f45f0b8c26a02050a87d66e6
243ede05e18914c7d0d40219e5bcf401397ad51f
describe
'47186' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEV' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
1d7c6e15502d2c6123fb2f74e7480768
c75316d5235efcaf827d91485c6ec775622f571c
describe
'495180' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEW' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
13a0cc1a6ad41a4a16aab96d34717738
e847c825ea5f13da9e1ae2351902d075044deb29
describe
'320890' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEX' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
798608765f58dfac55a9575d80cadfbe
e04d97b0f2c9b68043732f39a579eacceea7c4c6
'2011-11-17T18:31:55-05:00'
describe
'16268' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEY' 'sip-files00147.pro'
69ed43495de7b9f68990229557bf73c9
21b75124e0a50f9425642d98656674cae47cc825
describe
'106425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGEZ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
6bac25ba3136134c29ce0e4259cd5431
5803c4be891907f2bb5dfbaed2401a6b4d2024c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFA' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f5b618988f5f186cf0646d6cc70f8f30
9f1b0b8b199ae7a306118462c0f738d08520c122
'2011-11-17T18:44:10-05:00'
describe
'646' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFB' 'sip-files00147.txt'
3c2ac90b731d0055ef21129e0e09b16a
48abd59204c82ad9d3a4074fe7957b5cafe02edb
describe
'40036' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFC' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3b84765dc6d21eea7504a101462e0c06
0c9ebf6fd0cbb8db4910b026a11477012222a885
describe
'495179' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFD' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c9059223b03b28f94ec9f1fd46e172cc
db88d0ef75e32955a18ea88e69d2571d94c5173c
'2011-11-17T18:42:05-05:00'
describe
'378871' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFE' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a7aace95e799a0890026a235da9e082d
0aa880d774293e05a8d5ab8821d3706b755532b9
'2011-11-17T18:48:38-05:00'
describe
'24578' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFF' 'sip-files00148.pro'
3ca4b62e78fbd6fd4dfa6681ad54067c
c53a94691b15e0c04169afafe9527ffccecd64fc
describe
'123758' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFG' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
fd1aa619e4dc334788050c194594b402
d2e131f557640a25808a9c0d03a92b6b38f5db22
'2011-11-17T18:41:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFH' 'sip-files00148.tif'
d68aff30067cd4b478f18ea8860120f1
54a8b80330e363fcad6f72f35e4170c9b609e599
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFI' 'sip-files00148.txt'
1476f28c499ad1f8b673754677d59442
8463a81ba55f54e7adcc3944d5d83e81d932ef1d
describe
'44471' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFJ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
9f231d6cc3d8c4e3659914a96dc221a1
18dfe05bc6a57eee82b95d3cb1f90724cd20bae6
describe
'495140' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFK' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
c4806931fcc27ee6e3d222ef39c76081
8650d9b92c89069c7f332d6801be45830c70977d
'2011-11-17T18:30:29-05:00'
describe
'462424' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFL' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
00cdc431114f12637e8659a3a362b114
5211a5a1fa841205bb1cdcb2e104873b2bfb9ff0
'2011-11-17T18:42:54-05:00'
describe
'138042' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFM' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
4243f46993fa44b297569318eb3b669a
6c1753684d501cf8c76e28100bde0513f68e1839
'2011-11-17T18:35:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFN' 'sip-files00149.tif'
37aaef2f662db10c0e8add60f2a1f916
c558e35695157b65d94a64786934e9aad219c471
describe
'47936' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFO' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
4c86e101e7f3c88e9a27b8cf65feae9b
4321967fa590d3a2c61650a9f7a1cfdd041988e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFP' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
57f0ff46d2dbae7e9112054d8b02ac5b
b28642001965b2cba38b454062b82e7783f53ab3
describe
'429944' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFQ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
9987c589a14a0c5811a0e721dd20737f
34906d807fdb799b92eb5d63ae38339983368928
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
875f8cb41b1e586dd0f1d349c437ff37
50254a409e440041307de5a131ecf5a27d25c68c
describe
'145824' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFS' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7c3aaf5fc16dff7ccd6efae57c0e4924
6db97744eb1ccd2ccff7054804919d3c550c8171
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
85d6733d9f009c78a8c418937ed3724b
e8b2e2b295b5d151bd01c6f421d5aaa3373bd1e4
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFU' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4e142f6da38f44c89e092bd5bf29cff5
53f46260260fbbc7e560b4f0e47d088ec6434968
'2011-11-17T18:39:42-05:00'
describe
'49793' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFV' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
bd21b80810026ae0e7f7741e94914616
421d34bc44449eef55fb6cdc6b67119bceab301b
describe
'495073' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFW' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4930bbff8e8420bef90c479b78a1fa54
d3127d68171177cf13e3f24bb6c94604f28aecc7
describe
'400286' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFX' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
28f972c5e874708951c48f75f9afbe28
3ea3a4d3cd47ca3bd696e8632308783cb312d2c9
describe
'30637' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFY' 'sip-files00151.pro'
93bf47be7efe15cea76a7e50304f5165
1f6440c7a8f66fcddc40bd4b43269f95545235e8
describe
'135395' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGFZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
47150e73a530d3b7af94cdc8f4bbc241
e31955e8f761947936d7ac29e14facdd85ca1380
describe
'3977108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2d45b237d92efb1ed338e47c04362c07
e59725d42e3d91128212a529706c0ae39409fc0d
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGB' 'sip-files00151.txt'
5272ddd8529388de77149379eebd335f
730af031ad03e89919d5d224689e11a2110babf5
describe
'46670' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
96aeda0b53e227ee58428c1d34fb563e
6457dae00067639c0ae5a1f7182456dfa76e6d7c
describe
'495016' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGD' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
0ba4647a3f7ab1f0ece25a2e5462ae89
b1693aa6485dcd92abb0339c1b6add90ea6fa04a
describe
'355176' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
8e7fcc0fa9e881ec3c5c64dd16e81c1f
17fa75f505bf18fcfa61b0bde255e30ea1f9c77e
describe
'21079' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGF' 'sip-files00152.pro'
1d5256422472833fa011cfdde77572f4
d19b22810684b3f30e56873200d57f0ee9670876
describe
'118743' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGG' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
39a6c289f9396e79bf4a3d39c7b6589c
20971d87260d432b93dacf0181959a791326a005
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGH' 'sip-files00152.tif'
dff63a582d00d35aadad17f51ad173a0
aba32c4d86b36ba66b71066fcb134fb37208906b
'2011-11-17T18:41:28-05:00'
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGI' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a6334a0490584d43ae8d0afb1f11e189
acc97d2532db7b229f922f11be63a14186c48e8f
describe
'42987' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ed6e7d8350b7d863e50a1e2c90eff0ec
1d86422d9daedfb53c65df1f2fdbcf2d853e9bc8
'2011-11-17T18:40:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGK' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
adec2d4403f58da87adf791f6266db07
728ec92b49aef90b9f2549f4a3e2ed39b474d8d8
'2011-11-17T18:35:26-05:00'
describe
'438751' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGL' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2b6c09d10106341057e290130c03348b
5d395b2793c1c6cb60f4a6b641c94276d880b475
describe
'36471' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGM' 'sip-files00153.pro'
aa7f17187a6f158f05a7fc1dcff58676
ed52ba2dc6bf079df75e251099e18cbfebcecd32
describe
'149379' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGN' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
87789d3add6982d8ad7d2509e2cc58f0
b9ac0da774432a518a4f1f54459e51ffb1b565e4
'2011-11-17T18:40:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a856e15de367db321ac7f160a1056c22
9fa7a47602c5fe474b416b1b9a57aa54abaf3cca
'2011-11-17T18:46:02-05:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGP' 'sip-files00153.txt'
a919f643bdfe9e797c23dfda9fffc579
c5c1086c0df06e8699bd96cd915710fb2c825fe1
describe
'50727' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGQ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
6f6c1a2f517dbb839ca5cdbd80ed8d51
4d0d1493d73af591d851a2b2f4009337592a9c2c
'2011-11-17T18:46:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGR' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
f91d658905bc1c996469bfa4a92fcbc1
d2cf616ac426d9116b689f849e2da42687b52a35
describe
'436577' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8126c1ec940adb3bcc098087da79daeb
0e09677b1ccd85b1e2b4aa8bb8bf8df45eb0ecc1
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGT' 'sip-files00154.pro'
8ce7a10e067abbddf633966d28309ab2
89adf93b438462f97310918faf52a14485bd62f9
'2011-11-17T18:47:55-05:00'
describe
'148628' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGU' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
d91809c496e4bf342b5e47c17b5f8cad
4c9ca3d1afa59396664fc9803dd6dd40b67006d7
'2011-11-17T18:42:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGV' 'sip-files00154.tif'
ce84027892f7f804ca1fe6c2ac568e71
8a0b139cfd6a4ad013c58761e8f2a623212afdba
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGW' 'sip-files00154.txt'
161d084157915af44a3e9d5c706862ca
55132ce570ded2a2e8ad61200bcecd428a08f2ec
describe
'50510' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGX' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
fea8c1247f88b0a5d6c5296c2ea7d5a6
c031c2d8b6c7a70ad0ae3812c5936a734805a99d
'2011-11-17T18:36:55-05:00'
describe
'495188' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
86303612985b5f408b8a9f9ae2547bf5
b8fa352ef48d681700e8ee1888b1197fc50c92bc
'2011-11-17T18:30:44-05:00'
describe
'418487' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGGZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
02e47030fb5ce7ff847bea78ac305365
5e163ee4fde8a67bcdeae4948217f893389ff874
describe
'130973' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHA' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3e6fd1f33d405af9edcf35ac164471f8
c93eb79bb49e19ab4f5d817133365ebf9640b6a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHB' 'sip-files00155.tif'
a20b92ff1bcedbe56f9dee381bb48d81
8b4baf03b87f020d135348b092f4cec4b6e3e6ea
describe
'47384' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHC' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
1362228cb7cdf8bb5999900e923d0934
56f20a19f497f4523e8c96647d0968cd7916205c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHD' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
f20a6bcbe589f75d850940d508633f3f
54e10daf8b4a5d1c12fe5b2430379c0d5443999b
describe
'419033' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
67d5571aedbfc440d855a2ef62a8ec82
c4740f4be577a2b006272f2440fc8e2db8038a0a
describe
'33127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHF' 'sip-files00156.pro'
bf96f32eff6511a90cb9d60a959520b6
55352a4c6c7f9581d44d90d7c2d214845fac70f9
describe
'143367' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHG' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
46b8ebe9b9b90c13254f7b478a3d5d71
7363b4f0c30e734462f30eabbb6016fde5b054ec
'2011-11-17T18:32:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
949a6097fc2c6ee1f24677502c06e0ce
08698c415a47a7cec2248fe48e46bf560630c37f
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHI' 'sip-files00156.txt'
31e02e19468d8ff4ef328d4ef1218c7a
aa174d79e6e300a9d6dc920562e404e04b05067a
describe
'48677' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHJ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
48716e506e8ba837fa4215b7419b2126
4fe7a6f4e6fdc3097c43cff96e7b09720db84b43
describe
'495235' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHK' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9f8a509d786c247407f82220701b5ea9
988113e743cc626bb6a96050dce10d5784472a7f
'2011-11-17T18:43:27-05:00'
describe
'433763' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHL' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
ef9ed1e0d0d5c8a3cc46ce30446e9f86
4713c892a5a8df07259bd63dcef9065843a1e99a
describe
'36032' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
6b78030f3b4b093081d1997284df2798
19b354b2105d48ceb9efc8c2ab0a4dce344a2068
describe
'148134' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
3c5665d181b74ac4f488cf370e6f6831
05641b60c97ed577aee1b07e61e8d5604c8b7943
'2011-11-17T18:48:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHO' 'sip-files00157.tif'
74cb2beb1cb2ef98e2d9155d5300159e
86b14efc7ffe286d0a86d17440f3445472e54bf2
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHP' 'sip-files00157.txt'
fa149eb0060b0361e12c17bf688917bf
15f630a4fd0c677d8380391d0d293e9215dbd017
'2011-11-17T18:38:19-05:00'
describe
'50353' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHQ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
be22f233921e3bc9dcad97e6c6d60532
a7d64105d1f22a10a3c4c01b7905516249c9726d
describe
'495253' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
e3d84e8e52bf5473f7253c900b219d7d
cf0184ac87fe5166aef8327f1872a5b43094992f
describe
'405267' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
0b103d2dae4c0cc4e19529d9703ff3cf
839125373d5cbd8c3e4a56ec8c157fbd54f69137
describe
'18867' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1af19646f9c5edd93311ae0f71d759b5
72795e6a88403919e3286f6881c69e2f7dac122b
describe
'131540' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
709dc7a44504a787101b46ba75c99cdb
6026780983e6b1b56eff4d6839e25d8194f098bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4df7a061b3945ba069cef406e045e5c2
c03b5684b58f64d490d4f123e1f2777b37c31e0c
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHW' 'sip-files00158.txt'
c015d38de99d54b26695010336d9dafc
b396e03cabed2af04db2ff24f98040625c61be19
describe
'46900' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHX' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
d8dbf646c956ccbfb718c04bc64a6fa8
febf635f042952fb88b36c42f6014e8f805d300c
'2011-11-17T18:35:37-05:00'
describe
'483835' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHY' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
b1e83302f227ee7c4b2463b3895776d0
3a25f52d862d408cea2f324db076131824a68244
'2011-11-17T18:47:47-05:00'
describe
'364320' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGHZ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
0ddbad6b32d36b08ec99bf8f712b4b73
f656ddeef5a4e4bd93a0487c21639008ec6c2882
describe
'22108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
b01d5f95afc93444ff4521295a59a374
d3a6879acca18dc87b5d1e10004b601beb51f41b
describe
'121365' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
686ade374afd627eaea8a19022261ed3
8d04f4adbd0d3afd60b65d34da49c4cec411f0bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
0a6b5651929eae15b74c862273dfbf5c
af61fa0e8542711be69bbd66810c598a25c6f0eb
'2011-11-17T18:41:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGID' 'sip-files00159.txt'
488331d07084a471980c2efce6021a75
edac91d1a84cd10e8b0e8999eabd926c8a6e09e3
'2011-11-17T18:31:43-05:00'
describe
'45385' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIE' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
7957f9d92449286dd5dd00a0da351b63
706d7f2687e4071fce7d8ec784907278cbaf892f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
505e872a58a212f86e9da178c5f29b04
6ec10a52d90d2fd172782c5805cd0df17adcd79c
describe
'436812' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIG' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
a7ece9b22bfa93fecd0da8d2cb789a74
e1870c1db661ff5baf1ede441e00839f3831c36a
describe
'36616' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIH' 'sip-files00160.pro'
9753305b3ee89384def6e393cef1988b
af8d522a50fdb8eeeb5f74652210f5898d90c4e5
describe
'148051' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGII' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
2b0670a1cb0aca9d3847c942f67bf9bb
9f9b47c7967a1f69342df822efa5930c3c5adc33
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6f29c09c7f8b1ccadeb60e577723fbe4
c847660b7c7956627e2d751ccaec8b50c78f6a05
'2011-11-17T18:44:32-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIK' 'sip-files00160.txt'
eba652d0bab672cf47dabad687fbc5aa
3ba351f6c094fd4bbdd6939ae0688857c54f89b5
'2011-11-17T18:44:11-05:00'
describe
'50077' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIL' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
71badecc21bf7e1db089a66aaabc88ee
279514d1d96dd30f59ee26b0c313c82440a8c107
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a06cfe23d671d7e744c2da0056ff126a
6b48ec9b31f98923a8839a012f2416435d772286
describe
'400330' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIN' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e62e06a10c6512c8f6ddb71978748983
e8fc163340a29be2b22837b05180e923466bc9f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIO' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
11e279237b938d853b9c70982fe9f54c
fc9fcb1331806130a09e59e7b5e6d48d34a6fbab
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIP' 'sip-files00161.tif'
f373670645e69685f7ef7fb77798e4d9
bcf8b7501a05d4d805cc657910ac26964ac5a32e
describe
'43758' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIQ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
6413869c293593c4a8cfb2f43f562010
7aeed901e9bde1bcef257ddea0c60a15a9f655e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIR' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
c3fe132e3e5a8daa6bc2f9c0f6da031e
9bd466676f9a926150c9eff763e43a45e6fa6f38
describe
'440440' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIS' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
709fdeec2feaf888a13ab44f6af5952f
247ab8c2e88d7242a8a7cc5a70b7f724862bd6ad
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIT' 'sip-files00162.pro'
bb1d10bb96d3106ff4fbe8daee33d7c7
39bbcf476c160834b64d57d6234824a11035c968
describe
'149337' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIU' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
68816a690582f35755d0997b10523c1f
3de397af44136e1b48e1905c36d07664db76e0a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIV' 'sip-files00162.tif'
542ff4119f3ae4c2d5c7580d651ee923
73dfc023c412bc8031f3a8bebd0f24568bd614a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIW' 'sip-files00162.txt'
6fa213f5c6e0c291b15c4cde8ab07865
c4747ef08fed8d6480def08c6edc681424081ce7
describe
'50440' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIX' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
7c2bcb4e2e1450b191f78983631eddd2
252141bc1d9f775ad83203c522521f97496e3b30
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIY' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
1fae6fc663ffa73ddbacb16c2f6b62ce
54b2940d5d6faeaa37f6edcf442a914819c5264c
'2011-11-17T18:48:40-05:00'
describe
'439234' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGIZ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
86a1bda5fe451d332d92f6fd4ee0faf7
4607864d4b6545cf7e9c5153272af8603a905f7c
'2011-11-17T18:38:35-05:00'
describe
'37308' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJA' 'sip-files00163.pro'
24a29a6ae84fcbfcdcecf8e8cb1448e0
448511400db9777ba227e9a052381333a8c607fc
'2011-11-17T18:39:12-05:00'
describe
'147659' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJB' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
482fc9f84f4a45a992638d8d37fcecca
c0fdf650a9342ef14bf0711fcd784b4467f9be92
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJC' 'sip-files00163.tif'
00f7fc2eb78e21e0f8159f6a076446c6
3d04e1f1a0b361843ef4c82cf9738b7baba85030
'2011-11-17T18:36:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJD' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4caf8b8d173cef46bfc9753d56f46be2
c85955c0970a67e4e32966cad54bc72378a9fc07
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJE' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
b9c6a6c6672948d3e89ac48b26a5aefa
69b335824c89c590846266597d34ad54e75d1971
'2011-11-17T18:37:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJF' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3a03e58336a8cada05efbf8d6a3ae29e
a6d5934f300d17d088fd859d13ac71df8dc27f75
describe
'426984' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJG' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
6690c4c91b70a06bad65982340c1a6ae
3a2677c00ca22cf41966628e745973431c1f30f0
'2011-11-17T18:41:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJH' 'sip-files00164.pro'
b3cf5d97482d9ef287782b3deba9422f
03a1f0555bf555049a88124e22ae152d4598e3d5
describe
'144060' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJI' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
d945606d1bc8dafd39036ccce3625736
78f9dd0f285b2f6aa0c2c4145057c56bd1c97330
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJJ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
4630d9f7b8277f1887dd45d9a4acc9ee
ec5a82eb8923127c528383b8908484ed42604c30
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJK' 'sip-files00164.txt'
6006b8319d5744370dc817ac3116c034
349b1d2ba1cc33989311fcbdca7aacfdedab382b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJL' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
bc4cf82326231eca4f2376976a84f3bb
ac6299a4ae3ef7cd7a836e25d732209b195b21e2
describe
'495272' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJM' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
231230641e79f12f4ec81a728f118b13
c1598eed0d27df5362842483fb51b71e0f171c47
describe
'384324' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJN' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
1ec331f59ae12eb1f6cb7dd78f71430d
a1e3ecf82d41ba18375f923f0295006d1b297633
describe
'15836' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJO' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6782c676e7b2282cf78c0f3f0ee18a84
1a306fd138b574a692f7b459253474050c569335
describe
'126360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJP' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7a1dc5c3b87366cf45c5f367c3ea1e37
6503d054396d6d14b09e96448083983a7ba213c8
'2011-11-17T18:36:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJQ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
7c33265d88086f2e25e8ea9b429f4a55
ff81c5d0be1d2ca0732c3d457b2948988f56534a
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJR' 'sip-files00165.txt'
d7726d4871732f9aad89b5c8beea4fc1
a119e89b5e3d83607b3100f218cb746f8af8010c
describe
'45685' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJS' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
2d0b8120dc309aafdc688c3132e3fa21
6058ce1f295ae6ae2ac8d1d51fec4c6ba9f45390
'2011-11-17T18:39:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJT' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
dd516f227c0c91efca6a7bcf9ca3d18f
6b7623518b648c16b94b9727f8be41921b2d2183
describe
'427443' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJU' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
64925d4cb93b3a9aa471b6b3520bd25f
02d4c7014ee9cfc25d65096f4f25595aee63efed
describe
'35938' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJV' 'sip-files00166.pro'
e8e6764a847d653577d8f2e8c32217a3
7af12aa731948533b57a00202e3baa3395e85320
describe
'144425' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJW' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
78a801ffe323e17e4c94f0703bb2053e
f581c4efe703a280557ebfd48c71777f2146e326
'2011-11-17T18:47:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJX' 'sip-files00166.tif'
31ff2085f95dcfb360acad9cae14aa20
bf533edcb8bba77b55a936b7f075b583f177acb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJY' 'sip-files00166.txt'
209d6aa2c2e8da120aebbf9db52970d0
3f8a38d4cf92bacf9dfd5471847b360a10ab1790
describe
'49860' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGJZ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
c023766b83a9ececa25130380f9d6b47
3f9faf21f7c9a7e8daa5d73add32fde6e549cd3a
'2011-11-17T18:41:20-05:00'
describe
'482898' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKA' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
92053d99afc40db96fd87b1727b0d3e2
2d667ecd25afe66c959a4cff18f7ac92bc5e02cd
describe
'434307' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKB' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
f1325db13ba20801a61ec9dd3bad0bcd
187a6f85db26747575be9b912b7825649badb1c4
describe
'36728' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKC' 'sip-files00167.pro'
52a4bf09e3f6673f7433434c979df716
c1c005cb4498b15065518195be5d40063d4885dc
describe
'146596' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKD' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
08365a10c7b8378c4bddea39011dbd9f
8db537150a4e73c4597d4dc58fa8f20ab6f5a187
'2011-11-17T18:37:48-05:00'
describe
'3879724' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKE' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6e0af2adc957d4fc4fcfa2c36584fca1
ece1731717d6555c8c432331bebea3bd02272a99
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKF' 'sip-files00167.txt'
d3f33d827c9f1e8b28dacdfead7ff69d
bacbb2292e21c60a0dc5814913d8ee90a2da941a
'2011-11-17T18:43:24-05:00'
describe
'51490' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKG' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
47a8a1f9b67a32551e76b6bb29caf304
299f301cc6c4126c432ce638a32a1fb87ed9eb10
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKH' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4199a58219d8c1ebc86664bf5e05aff0
497c97c5e8538f5c30f8cd3a5f6131afb76c8b5e
describe
'422003' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKI' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
ac3e6c2e18c7169d4ffc21d1289cc887
74bf78939bcc7fd47e0d5ecfbf37df9f10ce3aa3
'2011-11-17T18:37:28-05:00'
describe
'33978' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKJ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
688639237003857b8e45820a70836f0c
b3814ae666b0496fceb0496d3a2ca9fe8d65696b
describe
'143461' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKK' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
23eb47ddc23d399f64c54e9cecbfc6d6
e8b534666c8d41053cf7022443fe23b4cd1b2566
'2011-11-17T18:48:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKL' 'sip-files00168.tif'
cfe1ec277815a71ba7000ccc0dabc3da
3c2a37654dcb8ba35aaca23ddb546528a759528b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKM' 'sip-files00168.txt'
8bf93b8a8ec6e06256ca6e7ef846e7de
3be968805f645958cdf7398cdfb00a4b7d403779
'2011-11-17T18:40:04-05:00'
describe
'50206' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKN' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
1f737a99934dda92d1963b71cbf14794
d1d1465801582cf2c8e5693e4cdf888a3685f208
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKO' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
8d0ce2ce01120f5755220fd3671ac980
be827f2944b1138e8641a4b30adf464675475be1
'2011-11-17T18:37:59-05:00'
describe
'445253' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKP' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
4ecbe6ab143a25dc9461164da8550c7d
0d6add49e7d1e9ede51ad1c8ce820b2c8e93fbac
describe
'37311' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKQ' 'sip-files00169.pro'
52370c43378eab757bb061ed6466b42a
531ce44262b32f696c6cf5214f48434e06d08b1a
describe
'149442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKR' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
6c5c05d8204376e39ed8985b44f48244
4524174e7102c8a295cf528c7aa0fce42bb8d207
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKS' 'sip-files00169.tif'
b5196ee6b9e365e51986ffd3be15c915
57487c78cd0c7a7587cb862d23163f3cda84909a
'2011-11-17T18:43:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKT' 'sip-files00169.txt'
49ee51af29bb9245c909de70a3882878
1461ebc5d3fea64ca96d6c505ebe54ec2f3ad93b
describe
'50191' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKU' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
4f30568d366be9e5c3e809f85691a8e4
61eefeeaedf9ea313cf2d7ff9d1606ca405a7141
'2011-11-17T18:37:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKV' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
6fbba913d95798d5539ab05c04c66208
422a346f18764e20316cd7d88986c9463f038c1e
'2011-11-17T18:48:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKW' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
9c3d8468cc2a69ecba97d5b232e50820
f088527dd3f2473e5eddc81a0f49c2f96055a6d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKX' 'sip-files00170.pro'
61523aa8fc317d670f0f7f1737d3074c
a087133c7f73cc6fdb3e1f981755bdea5818e5a4
describe
'145406' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKY' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
8765e26fa89dd4e2164e8decd6765818
a3ae8e5f722320d1b7d8626f7b878ba047028a70
'2011-11-17T18:45:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGKZ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
caf9ddadcf799f09eec153b197453d49
1223958f7a0709ffaeb0c52da63d3e75d315607f
'2011-11-17T18:32:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLA' 'sip-files00170.txt'
2986d428f7cd8bffedce02095038c85e
5882b1caa243cf28f6927dc0178f3c53a56206fe
describe
'49841' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLB' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
242ade88efee4e5035fad4eb81ce5d0e
3282c8b13d94c9fb10d50e25b9ea7462e055412b
describe
'495116' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLC' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
0fd0a3e7c65c0e74960709808e880495
e55a7a819aa914829409b466f0364352f2b46603
describe
'354217' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLD' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
07cf7780fc8cd1fd3aa7cf248c838ac6
ed01f830abe5e6a039fd3c3eadc1b0bed1e5fae7
describe
'21316' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLE' 'sip-files00171.pro'
a611b5f22aef325270ec0e1ee8b1cf15
3ed6951c16cc45f0d251c58990035ff662a51bcb
describe
'118588' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLF' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e28776f786d8751fec892fe08c6280ac
59f8b72908c96c0733e1af886a545b69a267a2f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLG' 'sip-files00171.tif'
fa5fcedbef230e5636046ef80de05c27
940593c7a739217051ad6d4eff3feaf30ae93bd2
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLH' 'sip-files00171.txt'
33fd6f966f4391d6853124d8f30a8a03
ba8795019342a59549eebd51d85a1a31a4815a0f
'2011-11-17T18:47:51-05:00'
describe
'42776' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLI' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
701db8ea39ec1a85dbc9afcde2e0a75d
308f8ec45176a7e77f9cda5f0d5d4fc64c617504
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLJ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b8fc93929aa84b3798bb452ea312680b
17b3486f3d5dd0eb66538b586eca82f9ce26e7fd
describe
'434312' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLK' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
e44cd6d48b2755825b683a929799de83
87e6fe97d43e5cf1c4fa1151be8623b41e3fb925
describe
'37214' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLL' 'sip-files00172.pro'
a81c8e655ffce5a93ef8bd512d3209fa
43c445828c0e9100c93a883837a51a12c7bea316
describe
'146591' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLM' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
c428380a955b3382f28e216f8c3ae64a
53339e5663cfad6c16fa7ff5e58f2a6a89e8f6fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLN' 'sip-files00172.tif'
5f781bb6b157a4df481242540553003d
cfcee59528413ed3bc97c507105b2eb0d5315cc3
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLO' 'sip-files00172.txt'
174b7c0ba9b6e70adc1fae8e7c830d98
0d025b5bdd4bbe9dc3eee6909b27f9c3dc6d44c6
'2011-11-17T18:35:38-05:00'
describe
'50407' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLP' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
8d25f6aa012e220dc923d1c0841f8bf3
62237aae3ab33482a1b32ec331344c10995d8176
describe
'495198' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLQ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
e862eb02d43f119d660f49fb052030bc
1b27e4dcd7eab2c12b6c4acf0929b903fa158805
describe
'423652' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLR' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
bf1f8b8d57481d6d58a505234c9f3f88
9ef7652f0f90129261f99e24131f27f181ce548e
'2011-11-17T18:38:15-05:00'
describe
'131224' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLS' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1146498656be446037d882fe3374be3d
5e802c4eda637e5da28d6ae1731628de4e843a89
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLT' 'sip-files00173.tif'
ad028433f097e0c4a40f94c776a207a5
b1ba48a1d493aecbd7d495511009ffe9a39860b8
'2011-11-17T18:42:25-05:00'
describe
'47536' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
ed7ceaefe17cc28f31053dec12d20510
fcd302745b06b156cf95ee79fb6c62bcc62f3f19
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLV' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
24607b19c17ea5cb3ed0f5def13f07a7
fa9943d71381b4d3125e90097d2c0f1c5dd8c45e
describe
'436680' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLW' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
6bb274db814a8af95cc828412c9eb8a3
e092f00174d417d4c5c5dd5d7d1ecd0c455a59dd
describe
'36796' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLX' 'sip-files00174.pro'
510fac2378d4d47864f06607edc362db
e531a8913227f58fd207c5cc15235a9e9f914fe5
describe
'148308' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLY' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
335649f1e8fac17534c1662a77c247db
c16a59d57dcda5672c59df9351dc7613ac69d14d
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGLZ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
da5f7c300555ed487daaf5aec398af1e
13377d155435d60cc44a5c5fd6e213360580300c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMA' 'sip-files00174.txt'
786f8c0d12aa900336ef9aed04f37a22
29ca78886cde9defb96861150da879e3776cecad
'2011-11-17T18:36:26-05:00'
describe
'49862' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMB' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
2f2ad669789d74a184876ebc96b805d5
370e9638cee8f3e52708ed9d3f37a910eaa08ed9
describe
'482090' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMC' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
434be68a119dc30e5a8903ba514c1d86
629562ac22b88e55af42046089864997c4b25510
describe
'422587' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMD' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
f2c5d5d7de6829f135309e35ca0e3ea0
15985f70ae5d0d453a3e1672d18b6039cb727d7a
'2011-11-17T18:42:44-05:00'
describe
'35045' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGME' 'sip-files00175.pro'
0017813cbaafa163ca19da5c69892468
4bb3cbea5266ad9e13327519bcc88322daeb6bef
describe
'141922' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMF' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
d92ff7e33f80a178dcd00df8f25488a0
4810b40ed134da55269698c3f47febb62b7afa43
describe
'3873832' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMG' 'sip-files00175.tif'
7eb5b34f28d112826e209592dd1c91b6
df42d21d81e15f27c778f6de1d53f9bdf52e1da2
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMH' 'sip-files00175.txt'
88a27057497289d1d8cb0ee0e223921f
8070744114a53630a69787aea9ca92874f0123da
describe
'50570' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMI' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
427b9cba780dcfb3001dd607681badf0
a918d6ee7b1e6dd8c4005a0324fe4db66f0f14dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMJ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b90b12ec69b18e1f8d2646e4e434a9a4
367dcc9b3182a34fa1bc21e21ce56d44116b18cf
describe
'415744' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMK' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
e63c4a8798ff813a280b8460609cd6b6
ba2567fb397e7060441959acfd6153a662042e7a
'2011-11-17T18:38:27-05:00'
describe
'13527' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGML' 'sip-files00176.pro'
3d2cabbad5b1e6f099541a0c2bf6d2a0
67baebb0cd61718601f417e2814ab1f95f6cf3fd
describe
'130693' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMM' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
8bd86ff17e15406112d5bb2c12ebe3e7
a7021be487585f053b7628b5b8e832da1c68ba7f
'2011-11-17T18:40:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMN' 'sip-files00176.tif'
ebbd7b2e1524c7441b9ce3d74d5ab851
a5c0c73d60711bf83a6c1d4a8a75a3646d423874
describe
'557' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMO' 'sip-files00176.txt'
062ee45ce858c198829b209b7b99e150
3ec0739ca2e9b9e0a389087e6d9813b504082c3b
describe
'47047' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMP' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
a042fa1d1bd6b17eef974104d5c32f58
2bfefb4892c3d02878c9e145a2db7ac37ac09a61
describe
'491732' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMQ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c45ca46c9785fc883b691ec8811856c2
a3a797a0da1fe7094101c8163264f65d9e91178b
describe
'420061' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMR' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
81238fdf87803adf840fc082d10f8712
8bf9df80297c34ea42d4e48c8351e9f57e646578
'2011-11-17T18:36:11-05:00'
describe
'34579' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
724e9365329b54809c473965df4d9598
57e186670777023638bb799599bdfc969232150d
describe
'141171' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMT' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
abf68b28d474607fba1ff3e43c3b13dd
1afa259a1fa3fcfd0c6f27f78a9efa9733ef1ee0
describe
'3950416' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMU' 'sip-files00177.tif'
8d1ae003f73c8aaf84bde09ee551990b
bd6bc97f953f775279799dea560ae07ffcc33a8c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMV' 'sip-files00177.txt'
560791c7102265470e1f8975d37167ef
245412eb7d37faa7c12107b89ed2038197ddaf35
'2011-11-17T18:39:24-05:00'
describe
'50154' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMW' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
7c8e62f72dfec4da3cc95a17b44382f7
82918834f04c107478db9d162088f0ee8fc2c215
'2011-11-17T18:37:51-05:00'
describe
'495200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMX' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e9b7f11806781960e821940a66f143c8
e1bf375d5a07fb1bb5333795db7e5255bb277c32
describe
'306935' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMY' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
079f1dee293e4af7e865a4775d8eed8c
bcad988c28dfdda04904e8f32917e24850fbc398
describe
'14133' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGMZ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
638006308f7de3ee76f8136e7e7aa68c
6808c03e20aa12ab00a472c1db135f26b5d6497d
describe
'101140' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNA' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
8d184ff01ff2e766d657176e9a049288
fc6c0224d69830bb6df6a392e80cca8d15226708
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNB' 'sip-files00178.tif'
d15cba36bbbec9d4083f917536e1ac76
a82cbb5e1855d641cb483dea063ec61cb029d38f
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNC' 'sip-files00178.txt'
dc3680898dff01dd4490ba056e801dc4
ed7a5cd70c0638f48443c652ad5315603b3475ba
describe
'38024' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGND' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c4ed2262b0180e52f91a18b2dc00dd78
cfa72bed43e304a97645127b3d222f223f1e2509
'2011-11-17T18:47:50-05:00'
describe
'495183' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNE' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
fb0a962a98e9d6d007e386423aba1dce
70b59bfdc1704bd9cc8c5397f89d1e7210db7c47
'2011-11-17T18:48:42-05:00'
describe
'359587' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNF' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
80a0ac71539bf089f5192119f2dea48a
b04315426a379f201faacc4c9e2ec9139f08b808
describe
'21211' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNG' 'sip-files00179.pro'
1b270b36bda03b23ff88fde1d0fd79fc
db9c00e1fb79ca5388145b845f3af8b650c06eb2
describe
'119312' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNH' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
16f515b70381e48a1105f3b12c1bd9cf
264f77c12d7a888ec798b1acce9312c03d14cbda
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNI' 'sip-files00179.tif'
d865f8d89a72018b1314394e86b4ff26
a35c80ec8e3d41075b02252e26791fbadf0a480e
'2011-11-17T18:35:14-05:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNJ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
eb63cd6a0ad7eceeadc99f2f8a603760
b3d6c68f2097e43612ad9e0084faa93dbd90455e
'2011-11-17T18:39:10-05:00'
describe
'43044' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNK' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
128c49101e6f80318dd77ce4f8d73e67
f2105a4cbce1590d9ac5e30c28630aac023792f2
describe
'480138' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNL' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
66c059a04154afcaeee7c83b6e71b058
580cb1ba106c5d0c0de89f9920d5879883e9acf5
'2011-11-17T18:46:01-05:00'
describe
'433564' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNM' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
7c50c5e2156bc686333ee568c2e6436b
fed49ef58a7166fcbf371054eac24d6a78dc433c
'2011-11-17T18:41:38-05:00'
describe
'35186' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNN' 'sip-files00180.pro'
3ba5189e05f156976bc22beccef31c45
b2fc9b2151ac8208dd1091fb2eebef893cb94188
'2011-11-17T18:43:26-05:00'
describe
'147463' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNO' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
831b36e191f40e133c5184d55d0e785d
b264787c93b51d7af2af23ee2ddc6a69fdb76d19
describe
'3857720' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNP' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a98e20d9c34123ccd8c981bb89e5be81
9e91d53a574bcae25885dcb462f598f16bc31f1f
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNQ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
4dc19f349339311fc009ae045ceaba6e
5735ace3e98cf0020de01ab0194590b8a16fd000
describe
'52875' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNR' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
bba2158d0720f4648b6acdd3a1145ed7
b6e997439bd20368f3472d309ad31defa84dbc8e
'2011-11-17T18:37:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNS' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
70c908b0fcf4e1b4c69bb21c0cdb3dae
fc24e9ed26cc6296642d5f78496043a7ebf491f2
describe
'457139' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNT' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
d380466c8efd611484f93d2ba7ce5fb4
e0a847e07bd89a347e8684e9324e5602c298f057
describe
'141293' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNU' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
e2379b791d9e0b8aa9823803740cd7c0
4574bb5b49eb7d11658904cd7475bfb0255b5532
'2011-11-17T18:41:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNV' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e584ddffdc76dfe3c2822dd42806cd7b
56f88b3124d04da157597ef11ba5c0fa5aee9b23
describe
'48540' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNW' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
356a3b0d788d10679f01c718c71cc836
322b3670ee844ae487e4183a5b290bca09d65aba
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNX' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
407175a55d1dbc74ca5ce0df0defa512
aa67fcac7892e2a13bd5e3f7cd1bf8c72aef48fe
'2011-11-17T18:39:17-05:00'
describe
'387305' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNY' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
11f2d2687105e82ff5cc5843806ecc38
d6eba9a4bc7ef95fb251e3a34e154cf4d64d1076
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGNZ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
f179e4bcf0deb83512f80c6059b93162
9084a29f6580b0c1866e8de9a6384ec21f93eebf
describe
'126920' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOA' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
042a37512d9d571da374c17d4739e665
9491166117187bc7bc96894607e31038face81e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOB' 'sip-files00182.tif'
f3d72032166d6e45e9500c2fef4014cf
7f2b1cfcaf6ceb118e5bd8199a406cbbd0b8b137
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOC' 'sip-files00182.txt'
6324b5b908db5342a9b19458728773d3
a286399a866401cf44741fc766c64f20b3d56b1b
describe
'45629' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOD' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
018d10c3696f67a2348d431b19ec1c2f
ebf8b135d6630c62614642a41d5c898aa19a12b1
'2011-11-17T18:36:43-05:00'
describe
'485833' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOE' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
6467caef7cfade40920d856db58250e4
ee0cf2cb7ce6c938604dbaeac44ade271b3b74bd
describe
'378862' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOF' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
b85dd3ff6cec261a1b145531aa0908c9
7f48c141effe29aff70ee87636433c24393e245f
describe
'27897' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOG' 'sip-files00183.pro'
03cd10fe23bc1112f6fad2bef54a189c
b7cf012ce85440c12ec3ee5686613963e8b39c37
describe
'124400' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOH' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5c66f4da041c0fd4f171eeb53ac6bb4a
85bc3aac0c55a0c31c16ef643546cd8dbe3b5982
'2011-11-17T18:30:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
62a8c083af4f34a2958b131fd2444eb7
c35244abe29f0649ad5899d5de6250a08ad66d3f
'2011-11-17T18:41:39-05:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOJ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
0ace5435ee836dbe46cd973fce76baf2
eeef96426b768fb8d810d7894488758f56c09b7a
describe
'46341' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOK' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
a707525854f384b3aecf361b2eadf628
444a978063b2ac97ddfa511410ae815e76023fcd
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOL' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
8f98b8bfd6310f871d35d74b02c95d2c
89335412cbba0510363dadfaecb742fd51445d54
describe
'371076' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOM' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
4f9670014a414485c4859cc6f999aac9
1a349168191470896081bcbca1735140dbdd8768
'2011-11-17T18:38:14-05:00'
describe
'21369' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGON' 'sip-files00184.pro'
fa547bd7001992babfbdd5f1c03fe13e
6373ee0423762d31a66421f0a878e26bffac43af
describe
'122798' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOO' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
332801400239615da7c657349d6fcf9a
5e676616c7934a2707c39d802471e514d3fb1a15
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOP' 'sip-files00184.tif'
b995a17b24b7c26f38fc4e29c3a712b3
67b1a04981a296573fa79779122cb16a57741445
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOQ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
e61adc692a5edb366fcc56d953f06a79
becacc7697bb4b2629b9f83fa57f961d8a922dfe
describe
'44201' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOR' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
2e60f11bab775d4bcdae8b3d136330e1
dc253dc13232900053a93f743c22d3b53860be5c
describe
'487660' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
9d6a668b40180e1310ce859f4effd01a
f11a51b93f69c6d1817661634ad9dcbdf8b1e802
describe
'441038' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
c41c40791d047ad0326e1230d6841507
b3d81a78321f0e09184c8f64d986744a408fde1f
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOU' 'sip-files00185.pro'
d35933cc982cf72708ca2ea0ae6c2753
903e716f6ec1c43c95b285a46188d2586e43db30
describe
'150564' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOV' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
61c36063bdeaa1fd51d79afecd88fa16
17196f336a0df921bcfb6b60b6242118fe24e51a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOW' 'sip-files00185.tif'
9fb1c46e222ff0de565eb0f9489b4bef
df09ca419296f8fb654097bac7b5f09253c52d24
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOX' 'sip-files00185.txt'
9d20026dd283d8784c99f210339d3eed
57295950d5c1cb34c4e7a848c3ceabefa420912f
describe
'51575' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOY' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
926f55f14bd03262c7f09154ea547257
60e87aec4ef05ca58f471e5591691e567dade4ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGOZ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
f7cbdcf27f9d64ee347fd82a6dc24006
ecea060968eb446ee3e558faffcdc236aaf3d556
describe
'439082' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
666c1f578e1276eeda04de450fa9b7bb
81f97cf9fd47a53bea24547e129354d555502f87
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
a1ee794a87eb52f13822d2ae70588f02
546082ded63d9f702cac39a41f753ef74def9255
describe
'148668' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
eec97f5e042b1c92b3f7cac222b519f3
0586e855530d170de7ead7dffe631a8847865e72
'2011-11-17T18:35:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPD' 'sip-files00186.tif'
6560a5732c9d1a4863247dc426e8c76b
cd51838987c780cf064597bd7c4bdaeadd1f13eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
6d8492b878b10898ac0014960a162f3a
e6f27a4eda8e60c7519b5c20deaa11d89c7bfaae
describe
'50684' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPF' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
a2151989b7643c5518d510e082c5c602
32889e2d7a2df9172a19b6c9158c5aa02ca70388
describe
'485755' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPG' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
a246a6883c33b5bbd8c2533e59367931
779122e6bcd8441d4ddb18ebd20315088fbc6b46
describe
'413047' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPH' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
2776160a4b356fe88aad1b0511f485af
5b5c7c8c9c95f43a44ef23966e1629f67c3eb01a
'2011-11-17T18:42:32-05:00'
describe
'128152' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPI' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
34741a7a817f4449094d686045e4826c
6a299641e6dab01dd2f188392e09c598a3cda4bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPJ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ecb1de67643ed6eea4b5174f3c6ab592
6eb43bd857c97e2c196b056a6db01487302e67a9
'2011-11-17T18:46:14-05:00'
describe
'47630' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPK' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
6fd746cb8b8c4ea0449efb713bf1e1a2
e30a8a947660897d811be061d28e5fc43bea8491
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPL' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
b3693b8d71930f6c20f02367dec2dcec
42be9deb0ad3ffcbf102a7540c83a2b69d3b9880
describe
'441085' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPM' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
c2e86ab36d77cf74c59a3f62c2c89cd1
066aae4e0007195c6d0e8b9d813b478c039cc23e
'2011-11-17T18:47:57-05:00'
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPN' 'sip-files00188.pro'
f0e8e40af49804e19695c105b98e4acf
5e71a7bd6233bc804ab839621890c69075ed8902
describe
'148163' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPO' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
d01ba3624d6d87c3f7e598d082f35176
3fe4cada4a6bda26187f75c403a0dd89f907db06
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPP' 'sip-files00188.tif'
07922db5d65cfcf8feea5ed5000ecc6b
89db24c368ab72cd053cc07bece7372d1760a57a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPQ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
422fd854c9120a81f4bf6dda64aab212
d12104e3b5f6ecf7852f4682d8b3b7a8f99e7432
'2011-11-17T18:35:27-05:00'
describe
'50202' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPR' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
fd37bbf7c04d26b643525379a2ea2e0e
e35b72b4581e250d49bfe7b74bac750089d4e4fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPS' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
09063b48c05a68c7d93ad3ba29540f68
96fe2dd7e5f95e2d886e178f6c05bd44a2d1c180
describe
'421174' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPT' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
43358a4b8e5114a3161a4e3c1737832a
7da28ba574b868d2666dcf95b93387cab01df1f7
describe
'27080' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPU' 'sip-files00189.pro'
3572f3bfb120b9d28cade74a55ec50e1
37b7a88c332a820ef730ca102e4d845775663a7e
describe
'140196' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPV' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
784dab0f08147ceb5c09a0f17f5a8514
baeecf48bd65063dd9341b7f8b2fa58f0539320c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPW' 'sip-files00189.tif'
62e37fd900ce7202faa760e2559506b9
0bc0daeb3c3c3a47493072c4c234bb3276a98a9c
'2011-11-17T18:41:58-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPX' 'sip-files00189.txt'
44e89641586a156a2737e6c34d00c062
b9d579c31a7008d5f40a34778e6047b878040870
describe
'48953' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPY' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
c2ec1678006d9daef7150a46f74aa22c
2c462948c5ec867b0c415e778e5632f9e3f59c4f
'2011-11-17T18:41:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGPZ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
d479caaec0aadb93d88e0f0fe8ae50bc
4b6681ad19faac29da2450e4a457082cfc013ed7
describe
'439274' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQA' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
451cb96ab60f4254a1d2516cd5566be0
757e35cc1a0e3a157a315197b450dea590a1dba5
describe
'36006' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQB' 'sip-files00190.pro'
3ab71b946d31a8dd94a963b9cca1bad6
8711104cb158c7777a9e771fbe4e4d717bf1ea90
describe
'148358' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQC' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
64b7a2d42043f0029cf62567cf99a063
29fe7a5e2e52aa4935fee2ff8daf96d4e5244e69
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQD' 'sip-files00190.tif'
f037bea87ed72aac37c455d7d85a0b90
e9107d9de5c8355950fdc1011f12c10764f48967
'2011-11-17T18:40:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQE' 'sip-files00190.txt'
8ff7b97956478ccc1b6716aec270f9ad
331c9c748b80de84b2a7b69555f595dd6fdd6b7c
'2011-11-17T18:38:07-05:00'
describe
'50086' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQF' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0cdbef7db58a390cb9039d8e35fca62b
04310d0074cf2cf703b8247359ddbf7be84390a5
describe
'482441' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQG' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
a269ecb1a4f2c7cffcd64ff985ec3591
427d9725fb97c9018aebb6ce8ed29cbbc399b5ce
'2011-11-17T18:39:51-05:00'
describe
'428547' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQH' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
19065cba5ccad4e6b565da92a4b6c03c
70cb209a1b5a0a2f5e090440d3707d22ec9e5052
'2011-11-17T18:35:25-05:00'
describe
'35104' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQI' 'sip-files00191.pro'
b674a3a6cc6c8ca8984499439d2b18ee
015ff1e95e2c44689ceb45fadd91f38d0d1764ad
'2011-11-17T18:41:40-05:00'
describe
'145931' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQJ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
3e57c02b63d6787cf4b025fb0a966bc9
4acefa5e77621a36ae622e7a658c5a428870245e
describe
'3876008' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQK' 'sip-files00191.tif'
f24346fbb9dec23546169f4bb0db8aee
6778baaf994fa9649133ec9af23d8406cf5d9edc
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQL' 'sip-files00191.txt'
69445164d07a4d55087697009d6f6985
92c07f7aa9242a1ad9c6241d71c88244f2f98d69
describe
'51739' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQM' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
7f763615c1e32e48c26539b486b19a04
4334d08928cf40e7ff5944a3f247e75efcf1b982
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQN' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
524acc671341655aaa0a843e69b5affd
f6336fdefc1deef4cbf4b047a58a3f8adf8b3832
describe
'441157' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQO' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
443d4f3f072db54384a307f399eb53e0
8baa9c2ccf4121e05be29de385da5880b3d19ca1
'2011-11-17T18:38:41-05:00'
describe
'35172' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQP' 'sip-files00192.pro'
fcd2b2874e8cea889eef0f13c7eb289a
911b28ae5583bab4488e617917b318cdd647b5a4
'2011-11-17T18:40:44-05:00'
describe
'147887' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQQ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
c0ebc5e066d1fb6fa920f660cd260344
cc8c8d57e720c66db6bc44cf978af63ab5e9f3dc
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQR' 'sip-files00192.tif'
939665a0c513efa98e80515d02e2a938
7435221a47ea72ac7b84da045847eec7274e8853
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQS' 'sip-files00192.txt'
8a849fedaa730ef7bcc4faad2e743e72
0c84d27e5520368a4aa2fc16d7d237b12b2f52e1
'2011-11-17T18:44:09-05:00'
describe
'50442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQT' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7067819c0733ba2ff5de739c9d303871
1ba7810776c37dc574e1ddd3abd65c35d8d74f9b
describe
'495197' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQU' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
08260fa461a36d54cf1a4580e6b59ed7
2af569e999b1ca55bc4cdd88c49737fd303886dc
describe
'430108' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQV' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
951ead7e2d965d727292a67a7b8338d8
95dd25f8671d717985118163fc249a423240eb2c
describe
'34509' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQW' 'sip-files00193.pro'
9e44909adf89b77d70804da3e1aad3fc
929069d0e5c9ae41904abbefeeac48c2eaf26305
describe
'147785' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQX' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
1b88b8b4038d7746269346d6a263fb3d
e6e529d59bd592a89fdaafd528cac02cfdcc7fd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQY' 'sip-files00193.tif'
7921541f0f43d2ae68d13f4bb98cdb86
1560761e0d73c31c1c6262faf5be35957f023627
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGQZ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
426856f2a0b0ad90d8dec35323706907
ccd112fb3951239569e4a9f1c860a09cf117b9ac
describe
'50011' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRA' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
81b725fe35e2495b58d5c734cb7fc8e6
429c8b480a5516c6e2782837de89a90f4fafbc5c
describe
'495092' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRB' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
157323bdeab2103577e5e06aabb3ae6a
0321dc196205ed613880230fb888633ed43822cb
describe
'452145' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRC' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
75ce188c6694cff4265cb2e6332d977a
791f15ac3248f43a25ebd8b6aec66ccf4424389c
describe
'35636' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRD' 'sip-files00194.pro'
eed83562c70ffedea536da66d5005540
8f93614087265ef707337c60ceade4918b0cd12d
describe
'151300' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRE' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
6a70a809881ccb7c24c113a71079d4e3
066b4086cce1903c2f9b0442ac64edf10cfdfe65
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRF' 'sip-files00194.tif'
967278679ff032f172c7b9a10c8bfc43
1ed0d93ae374be21ca3768839dc08a04cbb1f187
'2011-11-17T18:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRG' 'sip-files00194.txt'
50ca721dabc27fea882bcea8859872fe
18d4cd46070253eb8abe1297806e24c61246646e
describe
'51092' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRH' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
73ebad94415f0a0f7d9c11f7d0d10fe7
639a9f3be41b8c4c9076e5c9fa641f8672f92d81
describe
'494911' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRI' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
f6cf379a0b83dda7c001988ce93e10b6
f2410cb17a68e1d27d26c89b5364652114ecbc66
'2011-11-17T18:43:42-05:00'
describe
'282945' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRJ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
7ada8d5c614c39ca8b3b2edcd2d47b90
68031ec819eb2a57e5ca22537d48cc3569213dbd
describe
'8786' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRK' 'sip-files00195.pro'
03c2a9f28072192b8e8ff2cf29af47f4
3c309193494937871420e820773ef2220ffd37db
describe
'90936' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRL' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
9e0bfcdfa3aa8833d4b24eb326c5910d
d37bb7f138315875a3864398f13e597999ced486
'2011-11-17T18:37:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRM' 'sip-files00195.tif'
445018297fcaa2470c1dc6d18fc83d96
439b7dec9b005ae3487c5e018fc81d65cee20f8a
describe
'354' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRN' 'sip-files00195.txt'
7070a75b6365aa92ecd8b802b65b1dcf
cd5d955fe6de63cfa67a8a6bb71a50049e870753
'2011-11-17T18:31:41-05:00'
describe
'35899' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRO' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
9e191491af1859a93ae00bf44deca883
efeab69176881c8d826fd0e3f389d81b48fe46da
describe
'495228' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRP' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
bff6b3b1440fee05ee4329ff36551905
4fc8e4676d4b9405053b1c10d50b633f249bdce5
'2011-11-17T18:43:21-05:00'
describe
'370245' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRQ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
c095f4449e5ac7a3cbd5561a200e166d
59b47834cf30ee226c43c43ce3d064385d690945
'2011-11-17T18:37:40-05:00'
describe
'21830' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRR' 'sip-files00196.pro'
26038c0e50a56482465ecbcbb604184d
f553cf2e6963a2cf830b45ac75c90d1ff32101bc
describe
'120838' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRS' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
4dbe5d6da19e33228743086e47fae884
448b8a121b409ca9d51486352714e9e9be977270
'2011-11-17T18:32:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRT' 'sip-files00196.tif'
252fc73cf3bec93ab2e1eb4035ee4d11
ea191f49caaf5ec43eb13ae44a9a637c7bcf8b19
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRU' 'sip-files00196.txt'
8d8a164a80298471b0ec9c4b0e77aa5b
2be0131fb2714f0f5875096eeb7f5c4238975d6b
describe
'43576' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRV' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
27b1b3f1c872681e3f598963f3e23e14
b9bd13917425d9c80428dbcbcf3f96e69e7915a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRW' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
1f69cea68a7ed3e7cb126ba4855b368e
a2b25c39e9c7f8011b79271ceec925296742411c
describe
'443332' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRX' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
9eda3670767f2ef423b5311ddfeee826
71290e8da67dbb7eb632b86f1f2f161f24d89ac5
describe
'37050' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRY' 'sip-files00197.pro'
d63c6746adb1e0a7230fbf3a80f529ee
7be31869e1198183d6d8c744392ed9160f760482
describe
'148269' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGRZ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
94a337fdbd9add9d9442192129f79bc3
4a44c13478b5b182ba15c9da9d14a18c4618278b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSA' 'sip-files00197.tif'
ad99c4b2a1500ce7b962de094df7fa87
bc730797ccb2d94b0fc8ca74202eb1c3fd49f76c
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSB' 'sip-files00197.txt'
dd28a18322948a5dd4b8a49603d977b3
b0c3190ef964f45c3346ca54a9f2303f5df17166
describe
'50600' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSC' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
ed2f36803701a0beb5d1fc7ee9f5fda4
b5348f11049fa595d909552110a214797135add2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSD' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
0d960672237fda357247b5c6e9bdb2f9
d7916c1e0600eb5647c7c0be12495c29c424fe2f
'2011-11-17T18:32:43-05:00'
describe
'442729' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSE' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
5866bebbde5c6140b6d934d66dd2268d
380c4d9cb523480f0db0b160f4503bc6bc72a6d5
describe
'37596' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSF' 'sip-files00198.pro'
118d7f3ab490249fdc3bccf636d9abd8
8d6f8ab1f8293230e1748fb19fc8808ce48f3d7e
'2011-11-17T18:35:56-05:00'
describe
'149384' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSG' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
31c04fec16a1cf9fce61357c4e145932
ca3e0884726209e2aa33e4fc29085db5fb32e9c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSH' 'sip-files00198.tif'
08404af885b84a6358b1e246593f7844
7652f65e8e029be3e2bbe46540d8d6acd24a8500
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSI' 'sip-files00198.txt'
37471093dc116703549817ad49c03743
bd86489270c4eb156b4d7d5f647428d2c3de902b
describe
'50618' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSJ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
b95b046c712fc8aa31be4cff778fecc7
87a99e014e60d872a951d7286057f99519cfab49
'2011-11-17T18:41:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSK' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
e32a9dfd3f05f96817e4a3bb1d3c9357
b3567b8a54ad7e16b880a75d48a2ce432855a3b1
describe
'403399' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSL' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
6706d0f2c27f49c6a26e5f06500220be
66816890d3bb83bcc3b3cf0525f3630ee6405381
describe
'123740' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSM' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
6e49c23498373db6d55a0d27337b3789
1e70ff242e6ced9ee9bd99dc1d4996475ae88b08
'2011-11-17T18:41:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSN' 'sip-files00199.tif'
f91f3b0df829d11dd716dc24c477933d
fe27ae0e28e780404165a85713c9838a73a164ae
'2011-11-17T18:46:07-05:00'
describe
'44519' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSO' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
d69ab537aaf1e70de1b9271f5f7051fa
8b94d197848925693f012c8e2afb4ff7a6cb2cd1
'2011-11-17T18:40:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSP' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
272ba9861d2642ff82eeca584976dd14
fdb223d92e4e6653f345ebf866c6f086acb0ba77
'2011-11-17T18:36:15-05:00'
describe
'440417' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSQ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
4d94f7196b6cc511436428454c7dffa5
28855ce672ac761a015e57343f4fd8a5a83a5600
describe
'36256' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSR' 'sip-files00200.pro'
140bcbe0763ee18fdda736aed877b6b9
1305a1140ac699ec0ccfdb8f5b8ed5a3e045adb2
describe
'150502' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
51522d7219a7d466df66d876fc54db52
375d132876d444bdd0ef1b55ef1fdbad54fb7db2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGST' 'sip-files00200.tif'
5f2736ffe1af13c17b2e46338a2d3cb3
bb1ba660e4a34fb9604e85eaeaa604f4b5d6c56f
'2011-11-17T18:40:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
43cbb399a4b630f0c49b0df367b1492d
1730aca0599d24f0d19e64e25b8300d77b42a94b
describe
'50520' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSV' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
df5c2a25b4b8be7d9c61a7d4f050e8ed
7196ce0aa0537bb560fe222b0abf93b14348c42b
'2011-11-17T18:40:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSW' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
ee3391399b90ac7d2f1ba4a44a339424
6065e531f6b411760a38da9f1aae2d32fce06d1c
describe
'445091' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSX' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
48cd5c77262f35280300c259747cd9c3
25b47e5f61e420586cea70d7c2ac7e2e05720eb4
describe
'37884' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSY' 'sip-files00201.pro'
8d2ddbb616d7da04a95748026dfb3cad
e4b5c9da0b021313f697809c2d27b83cba64538d
describe
'148099' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGSZ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
35f8bd3c6c7953e95c8befcd40ca6a5f
f5f5dfdbb12b54a8ce3ed229d6308c2905d093e6
'2011-11-17T18:34:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
2b3320ec8cbd90dff288e468b741783a
bb2b710e6639458df9f61d97a6a6b92ed251c32c
'2011-11-17T18:41:22-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTB' 'sip-files00201.txt'
df9c6cb32d86fd4c3cd00f56cd76641f
12afb0e64af12bcd474da5482672be406a6907d2
'2011-11-17T18:42:40-05:00'
describe
'50485' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTC' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
466583ece87604b5273aa7b43de22410
b2d5633b2d6d95f994e1fdee69c64ae1aadce8fa
describe
'495097' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTD' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
486eea75cae1364320f4dbeee9f16976
54595e16498c1914be62582314497023c9c6d4db
describe
'338233' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTE' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
dcaac59ad1549d25de21544a2e041665
35287742390b2744389216edef434c405c92c07d
describe
'18216' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTF' 'sip-files00202.pro'
9cdb6d29a1875ab58d5589ecc38e7b87
cffa15c6fd81df7a96487522bd4bb4f30fab805e
describe
'111743' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
b964f51b3d874df3351cd6905e48c0d8
87f0a92d5fed4a5276a6ae6bc07430787ead9372
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTH' 'sip-files00202.tif'
f6e2972f0912e08eb7d6c76ef4d40b5a
079b70c10479299ecb17014305e7c480a2b0870a
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTI' 'sip-files00202.txt'
3b49720975d0617367d9d1e324c566e3
bf409b77f2dcd1a4c38e64a6cf5d88e0faea6638
'2011-11-17T18:40:21-05:00'
describe
'41746' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTJ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
1500211d9d7495c655887d5688e9d641
647d806f73d87ff6ab0e2bfa0131c14d6eaeb2bd
describe
'495001' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
01475cda445e9ee091e40415b6a3db9b
fa89550c9ce79e94177b431e6d46a8459160cda3
describe
'344410' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTL' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
1b6067d1d4d3bef46b5898a54a44f471
429f51a8ee9beb9b98097f700deaba2000c360b2
describe
'18448' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTM' 'sip-files00203.pro'
c30e80543ce619f7012773b13d48fa71
7fc174eb4e5414028306d2818b1fccbd3afeae26
describe
'113396' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTN' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
9fb7ed033e248363e3ec9fc51ff9a8f6
a8461f81052792722befc664e05936abaaa9ae70
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
c4b0f77996e9001cb204ab54e931b66f
17a06533682bb4b2b93cf2f3612b5ebb60d5fdc1
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTP' 'sip-files00203.txt'
f86b8cf5e477ecbd0b571e9bd69df82c
0a8184cd070d68e3c1319862a371ec4bdff52f56
describe
'41794' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTQ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
d1ab57d190ef56bd431fc239b055e266
f334c77c873b49d07beb67e201ca2d8bfde388b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
f725eb18b7a4bda9b7490eb094fd698c
a3a25cf83a00daf9850c253a4e9c03a159dd944e
describe
'393596' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTS' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
abd936331f41b41b6046d1b5f6900c9b
d62a9bcc97af0359cb40f4a5c90b0809f9bd77d7
describe
'28993' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTT' 'sip-files00204.pro'
6d594e76067606f3be9cdf6ba59eef66
f93afbbbee48a0521d92fb0cca2e629f67468e4f
describe
'130615' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTU' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
cd4e97037e8e896817334f4e3d5fa0cc
19d7e0212ff5d280bf8c17063ca14220c63352e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTV' 'sip-files00204.tif'
0bce3328845044436b60a43598430334
83f5b2c27c71259a0b02805f19aa0ff403cdc70c
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTW' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9d638179ed98ad159f916dfb64baab49
685672a42edc0b91ee4527df3dc6bb0279d5aab0
describe
'45388' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTX' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
02240f4e66f730c33fbd33b8ea3f3f8f
8a82f38bfeba3f06b95874d3f7045c787432813a
describe
'495074' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTY' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
2fccd183371d94ab81791f1f2eae60ef
4267106c2167e72cf5a747f0d1d8ae963a5105ba
describe
'477822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGTZ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
e01224f0be3fce120d863f85fd911f44
a5d43c8a03f48eccc30f4aaf633a411aca398c5e
describe
'147156' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUA' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
1e67b99d0968bf3aec40d72d2dc14fbe
fbacaca9c2ef428b11b99c97d9d410cbdaa33b36
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
ff6290af35044f5d92056b2ff36b9b8c
dc000faa8a6fe683e008c192562dc0c23b996b89
describe
'51496' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUC' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
ede01e5292d573549739652c7147d56e
148806bac3535516ebf6109530c5cbe17565fd15
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUD' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
ac0ee12b4c00b1ad36a01a0298c87e58
9a91a5638f25d8251b4b1fb6a6ff8b0e60776075
describe
'371364' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUE' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
f49381e6e4839c00b66a16296962331b
90b81b0f9790943f1aae017d95f41e3d64001e1b
describe
'26050' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
85f4d79e4527610016304a7f5e9b6ed8
0f0b37f0400783c648705dd372c28c551e9a2937
describe
'123192' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUG' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
93d395092ef53394e885e174086a50dd
aa7e28a3308d5fa8cb63cebee619e96897f10b64
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUH' 'sip-files00206.tif'
f8bc6f7ffc3f88151c3a075f52cc8ead
7883a806f96be5c304d7da028213cfe799b0f7f5
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
2fa539b07b7602a63629cb5155ab7a01
d1e09c35442dafb0e6f4e7370ca33789b5b8662c
describe
'44082' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUJ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
acb41ace47967c6db7a7d80777f160e4
6e56a70f0af98ae274e112abd5f360ab2ff21517
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
7a07e529f7db4a0a790638ea9939600c
e57d624a5f5209e9de34390d68fd9febb88ec4b4
describe
'395197' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUL' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8ac72144303d5493e35e789f1491282d
bb20058ce71f26e9b0ebaddc4d285c820946e541
describe
'30025' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUM' 'sip-files00207.pro'
03642c6fbc56a55f7227397211c7f043
24bd3a35af73111b960b2f7882e16841a3028fa6
describe
'132909' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUN' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
9f4e99ae2cee51c73a8793ba6be0f69c
f1484ef94b1f8b59cf0183e735d480cde672a1a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
6be13c842e40b8069a90e5c582064b81
4cbf5170c4730cd38725f5c44fa24b7b3260e2ae
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
2cf30ab665fbc69cc66550de78b49b68
464df565afbd6a991b48ccb8584627b701a8753a
describe
'46695' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUQ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
75f7f45f343eec8194a74549b5339158
eed22e5f3ca2d671e3fce11001e2458cd95c5f65
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUR' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
606592a99a90ba28c701e8ffda660ef3
9732715b36cad176cf8b2a26238ddc40b00d1cb2
describe
'273932' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUS' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
989c70e08e721081c3446cb5f4284e25
984c9f1db57ff887e50b65b8fa32120c06db32bc
describe
'6989' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUT' 'sip-files00208.pro'
6d871fab86e2afd696579a331e83d714
a46cb807fcccf2f70a8b7be8b4cbf3da1f7ea138
describe
'87749' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
6ba0ecc8fe914a3dd1c3537a98000518
54ef170daf2b0c681618fe6b63e97140621a7490
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
06bfe4b25a5682b3c1dac156479d6bb5
ec0c5a74ce376b73183ef1f10a45e1fbbd89936f
describe
'282' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
c659c3fff453cda1044656070a6e12d7
6ea6e3c642ac23b75a8b482e4efaf6ab124f57f3
describe
'35068' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUX' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
cde7d9a40ba3028b82057ede1cfcfbcd
ce098afc6cff16f15d4443c84963b5b1b15f0cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUY' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d98051583fc04326cb220c6df7061d84
6f27677bdacc5017f5ee240c321979eebd1e5129
describe
'371657' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGUZ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
b3311f3e6ea9b03c7d8bd1840f4a1b96
eb8626c1295b32a8eb3f50e582d7769f4d0d5cf7
describe
'21749' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVA' 'sip-files00209.pro'
2385c0c36f4f5cd4d79f3c3f03d74f62
75279ab40b38838270cbb49f4a50adb6c5fb8bdd
describe
'123293' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVB' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
38e60c90d1bb70bca14c1d17356321df
672ec40682dcf62bf4087c2ed52c254200ec890c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
28352cb1c9728b662e47f6e0476c4623
1e08c792bd8b8da769b5f1d9b839ad0be8d4bb71
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVD' 'sip-files00209.txt'
67aac33ded1fe2072d48cd14d9e9bb24
dc201c0b18ff1823f1c53f965f4e21ec1d9484a4
describe
'44238' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVE' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
ac593880019841e4fd0ec23dcf68c41d
8baa78cdf9e41aeab7c5b7e214a62983705919ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
824d290aa1995e7a0ad25de150b1c245
da4fc812cd31f03c885a75baa9f34bf2b32794da
describe
'394020' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
17e4ca84a5cd0047a2c24d9648070468
d633cae4e930a2a79153225def9ece8c5d0d8659
'2011-11-17T18:42:26-05:00'
describe
'15480' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVH' 'sip-files00210.pro'
6457ebdaaef26a328c57b1805bf6df92
9c9e10abd312e101c44f949a53073bf6ee4aea7a
describe
'126840' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVI' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
5a1720e1f75773121956d09469cb131b
b6fe7b28519810d62211d0f346df8dbc41a0a10d
'2011-11-17T18:42:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
679c9fe6388c1add7b7670dbf0e13f30
4de77ee12d0898650d42032f81fa1c901f525b42
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVK' 'sip-files00210.txt'
e87c49898b552c2cb213357c21f1cbf2
cdbba99d481d0818a6b1a18c523327e42fc19c6e
describe
'45356' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVL' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
442a78549610edfce10cb33ef94bd017
1b209fa5c3c1755f93a8e8bad59efa2c878429eb
'2011-11-17T18:39:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVM' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1f2140b4242d843d5f8ccf70618df6ee
dcc249c5778141e2d67e791a9b7ad8bfa388b675
describe
'441473' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVN' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
f02a33cde0420c4225a0241f023ba1c3
7de8bb231a5cf9527ecacc81fdb2292efb78ef1f
describe
'37367' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
ed7f9aad11dbdefb67080b3b576c3508
28fba2ba1dae20dd5447e1efa1d4897ba22836ff
describe
'148485' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
7a7700a6d227f8ffede2cf72c8e95b42
05f32763b41bbc7ec2c0d30a345ffee2bade3141
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
c5ade70042c901a7f50b3c6d9e96665b
3370fa0773f61f234285c4f2b934897ceab5e9cb
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
1138547ae7f7b41c91f0e5174d521780
54bb658319347ed1ce2d6d130386de6fd82f9421
describe
'50426' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
ff2ae55ce8f687a5cc55a62805a3cca9
c069008680bb0ceb4bf2a4ce4871f8004e5cfbbf
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
44d8e7b7306478861b5c2504988e415c
cffd5f1df3c69241a8d883bd2462cf29306b1901
describe
'443783' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
fdfa5001f6dd31433ebdbfda1c26e1e8
2c6c78467a24a71064123e8611f8054cf8f54368
describe
'36600' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
3956b131ffd0f573976d99368155543a
45252783a1c5116ac173b1a249f287460b87167f
describe
'148550' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
94c94e1fb99b4c584fc49afcfd8ca017
ede47de605d1d1b6a32a5e21249739cccda07a3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
c2e5690780f64c145affbf8c531aa7a5
7e4ba8dafe957d62ac8bffa1ccf91f16e8ff1c72
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
1ade5f9fb753d08ff8d399ed10e1c200
2c6268ecb53c8718790ed8f49012819c83760a6d
describe
'50636' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGVZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
5e6d08d7e59efa0d71a5c83ed2abfc21
a73edca742dd16d5f1d9cd5a427279a1282d7280
'2011-11-17T18:38:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
1bacd78f44c8a8f0a5e6717ce6fbe0bd
abeee42fcbfba4d32a542fa80c60a9064c1917f2
describe
'442695' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
a6c5fb38745ac18155613e5ff1dbf15f
b2fc3557d759a0b1c3444e3ce3dc18e844d8421e
describe
'35727' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
643f254d7ead5869c70b86f99958e3f9
2462c2f54db93d4479a1f3ac1bc8ac2d1d222221
describe
'148639' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
fe112bc44bde78de09b0847628a09665
2f0cf9da548bfc164a1f4052752f14e0ef85b654
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
8359dda260fec6c00cf61c72bef66a74
e8fa70a7f5e32d852133dd6fc15c6758a668ef91
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
c9170f54ad2160cac836e5ac126f1a1f
45df6eb89ebcd5ed1677ac4db06a076df2e16b81
describe
'50091' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
dc3aba18d382370f6bea8e194272da41
718886608cf387cf1fead66f9e86c52b20f4b985
describe
'495284' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
0f92d48d8a64fa5008ab57f7c89aebc2
9d164efe2018e40f02a709c4eafac40b2f4de901
describe
'442664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
f19c973a063a03954aa3c86287eb1788
cc3379f60017d0840c7ba165e3626fc2d43088a5
describe
'36710' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
25ef5c5a8b6be77695de3ab9fa57f7a6
8abdc3465fdff54f2b3513e1ab8d0dee343c7976
'2011-11-17T18:32:13-05:00'
describe
'146449' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
cffa448564f72bccda2c1fce9c70d8b8
9b82032ad2018056e63487e8d19bda78bd730dba
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
b885abadd93b91c0ea0dfe86229f0a46
9e4db740d3547c7d11c4cb0d209f73c5d496a009
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
9fa81026df5cf6c00e44c4fed9476180
ee2b7b78e4d86aead8df869e316b357e184474c6
describe
'50907' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
2a4a9a8ef57922c9c2f8fb9ecf30ad2c
c102aa79823e8b185b02641b7e3fe5b106fb3e4d
describe
'495090' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
c49c07fe0c74f2f53babd00e1a9f8ba5
cb4684fa05c27bc8b4f18292c5fdb069c18c886b
describe
'445407' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
2642b12ef7fc55878bddd010ee8da9c5
03f55ed79ce57a09869aba18b6644bed1bd0bbd2
describe
'37307' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
f193ebd908cd7b042dd001412a303d3e
7f6123574721434c58e8719fffa5c642baf21f95
describe
'150288' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
abb99c6f18df84154d301c81a509d1da
f2280e75f3305ec492e9eaa956a61d94d7b5285b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
facacdfd5f09bdc2a418d1fd73167b82
db658ac0e545652d5b3ebc8a27b7a2e969e9f198
'2011-11-17T18:32:32-05:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
09814e68536dcefa7cdacd4341ee4373
e90a4fe39dbd18dbc56039c5a0e25d698d2a8956
describe
'50885' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
e91bc4e4857409ba470f2c6bb39072f6
a3ef3ef04b1572b6bf9efa972b9e577647861953
'2011-11-17T18:36:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
4b38b9bfbf8b6e352a0b1d2d2b562bfa
71bf1c0cbd81e1876a99512f265545f8415be644
describe
'440051' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
d7605b6d42544f2b7d19a7d13a55ff2a
3cb5b47ab08287621a5954b658bc832ef66debbe
describe
'35442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
b440e3fb81dc234f8bcd629af92ab775
07a5182b9557c8ede887ee05d598e9748dba3d32
describe
'147933' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
78d8e8ca71f63916b3198c893c69127e
3d71e1829dd31d7640359291d2b9c4a448280610
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGWZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
7350d0b494704f0dea1a380dca027d50
d19dc2bebccfc73d05675b08bd489b69c98a279a
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
e1aa3dc4882d51ac10576ad5036e8123
17f41d7269be0d51415113c51de90087abceb697
'2011-11-17T18:42:47-05:00'
describe
'50319' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
91e657d2f522dd53756d3acfdc57a1ff
3a08eff17066925a991c0ca14edc8a2b2db40b76
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
6fc258cf2585ff267086a0bdef5ca21f
a36de58669042e83671982eabc9fbfe4802d94c7
describe
'438085' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
9511040c283fe2fd6eb4cdf2b4f28c59
8fc9ed053a9202893bef98d76f39c80d92252cc1
'2011-11-17T18:42:00-05:00'
describe
'34700' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
c2308b0c313a10cb2405ed73a96f4f86
aba2fa5fd747a7b6b0f638853446861ea4391fd9
describe
'146884' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
8ae34c7bd6722076af2f84950e98c5f7
0d63d2bcd4d8b1026f0149d74b0bb63648fd1be4
'2011-11-17T18:44:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
20cf116c6990238b93bbcd0f01995e4b
db3cc29a13c72e4d5879afcdcd4e6b0b19333393
'2011-11-17T18:35:07-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
49a1dfa1890bcd5bb592c4e50545c1bc
253f2b9c70abc209980f04511552f2d42d3f2e30
describe
'50249' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
1afe4c92e807d41f5a186e3638817366
e6f7884e5b3ccb66c1a9c9a889b449a26538527c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
2a920daff2f6d9e7de65eb7f05a53b90
201ca270760b231c35a659a16820563ba8efb118
describe
'331847' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
2eecbec6b7e37a6e92d32a331dd25488
094248634d854c85cc35555d1f776c8fc20067a9
'2011-11-17T18:44:14-05:00'
describe
'17019' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXL' 'sip-files00218.pro'
9c532c6660b66c69388125f67d645630
1b311f24291bdc2afcb83add17a9d1da705eeea3
describe
'108589' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
51959dfdc299cefbc512b0ee91d30fd7
7164e77f02b3f029755dac1890fa784c7b2a6973
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
95539599640937dfc5e09c9331287161
492dcf6ecbcb7fedd5488748f2ed14785d3ceeaf
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXO' 'sip-files00218.txt'
20bceea2f35dc68326e389ee3afca075
2dc70b300c9bd1ce5b859f6971bfacacd5c3c415
describe
'40379' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
66d87e70cadfe9222e480647d555ef23
ac5bb53bf41e18bb83f383cd449204252c0c2677
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXQ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
f1a3bccb142407263ba0eb38d9e06850
adadcfc07f031cb854525f8dfe4f2d7a58e9645a
describe
'366530' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXR' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
5ab234005076d6de1c2b48b4e7055883
a1a1f018f14b0be71fe231a3d687c9b24ca9e448
'2011-11-17T18:48:11-05:00'
describe
'21431' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
82794dfaeef1eb10d4d4edf6ffe4b833
f7c3ab9c171c0f1cfc90e47d6ee76e1dc13a2356
describe
'121930' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
8d1fd7b404d8c85edd01b0a0f979fc92
c80fa06a3864eb78074d1bd13df70adcb4ba4497
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXU' 'sip-files00219.tif'
64fbe912b57cc9d9fbc55f1ccd8de676
a2667722f9c3b82450a03e562c0fa75a10c9342b
'2011-11-17T18:42:22-05:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXV' 'sip-files00219.txt'
e16c225de5e934992b135990ee42b281
741d4cf03270287eadf031e5eb40800b71270ef7
describe
'44782' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXW' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
c23e33d235014150fd0fd4e5bc4871b1
0de6f1b72d3b1c7e2f71bec16a99e9d6d88a57dd
'2011-11-17T18:43:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
53e488c8c84fe96149b396ce50a11766
8039c1bb11ada5d6c092d299ccbb63c851643cbb
describe
'370294' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXY' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
002ef913bb38941c43c854eab5cb4963
9d9f50b0cee08d126de72a150ee168bef745f86d
describe
'24715' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGXZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
b946160c2be5102c170043e03bf2ab37
09c96297c5373d3ce50946afb91282e364928b3b
describe
'124485' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c375a337c6a52b05b7cd1f11b8ada49b
393fab31de5f59d9980a1e4da4a41c03a551cd5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
519893b792513ff4ba8e85c6f145dcf1
761e938b8ac99d53caba43f5002c3d29555b54a2
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c4143a41f40555e1ab32629d6a102f4c
086d9eeb0649d6cee3f275d8bcc6aa9103646124
describe
'44173' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYD' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
a9e26ecfd325fa0302b264dd020e3959
ce08c022632852dcc33ce5796d495a608b7b2fc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYE' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
8f775fd6c86fbf4d9ad78a4a69620120
bdfe924f12504f93dce6409703128c8e65c9e468
'2011-11-17T18:44:00-05:00'
describe
'363236' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYF' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
d1d240cfa06a39541d2234f34343a0d7
80af765103aca658b827b8e283da6cec8c19e8c1
describe
'21869' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
80371cd16cbd5ea2cb050861c561c673
77bec654391963592713c6610b57511c59c43409
describe
'119664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYH' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
6e1f701dfc31ce354dc92fbe1cbb0f82
f5dd026b56f18063effdf443a7a823453866e425
'2011-11-17T18:35:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b197256b9d5cfb13265b4be166d7a494
9f4190d2e83507799613db0897949d2f0767e2c4
'2011-11-17T18:38:45-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYJ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
a71627e738b9d20ec9b1532c4b36db2c
2e5140718fe072f84b67a5b522b8fbc374e40051
describe
'43547' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYK' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
934c9677183854200b554d760f18d18f
63b4844a42754f9f73a67913fc3db7166dcd2523
describe
'495217' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
9b486889139767132143470d8dffc5c8
c5ba8101654c5abb4f5f13b14064fb9a4941af43
describe
'441529' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
392cf5d47c68680b9a917cb78c9f5866
0f98045727c1ba4716ffe51bba7a350085017411
describe
'37262' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
9423498a6509beb3dc7859b9c9aaf276
6d3bbfb28dc2e0d2e1be3c74b70ee39e0803b316
describe
'147754' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
638b959ec9aad4875b090bbef1cff709
6b73015ce4d2350fbd43a958e710aed7237f031b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
c9a882f7029ff61ce89d281c6b1421ce
93b889863a9bc4bd00397ba3be7ad767f9fe8b17
'2011-11-17T18:30:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
7079e6687e1d2c4c0e6249005133b1d7
6b54b7358f877802c9c2098f5dacb026cff87c9d
describe
'50508' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYR' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
c6eb704843c025646da9c9d12e2843ce
7ef8ca37672ce81fb85b9cc94c22feeda24a73c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYS' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
a5c08e23a192858c47b4349b0cee2a86
4f4bad6badbc969ab136c8b2cc4f8b281ef513ef
describe
'437833' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYT' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
74874cf169336e012029fab9e07890d9
2a6c01c3cb31cdf4a390427bb65d6ff2c376a45e
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYU' 'sip-files00223.pro'
606da37fd4d91860834da5b68f02b899
89d61be7482fa9ce317fea448d0823c4215828b3
describe
'147135' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
a6f0c5a22d529e636b31588ad7c78b1b
c9f936507dbb8318d143689f153c05c16329949c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
cbc5fd57cb1e89017067ed3f56ab128d
acbc80a8def959f534c0d74386666d05c0d9f89b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYX' 'sip-files00223.txt'
9380afd51587bb601a0802b3f11b9fbf
d8442fd17e5d30f8f113fc3330a10dad06b87117
describe
'49881' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
8c02cf54ef837102c84f68fbeb7024c9
5ae614ca59ddcd1dce46ec7c902ef3b90a172770
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGYZ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
2165594e2c523b1ba26f8c2054e7c4f8
767fa8c0e816d2525bd5b39c1ee9d81fa8b41064
describe
'446609' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZA' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
715b826dc04f58e98793406359ddb635
678a8621a457edf70a22b275474ca1ec01c3125e
describe
'37538' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
95fac9709b3e96fc32302a19d5d9ea34
a3527c56ef2f384402d8f88c8e7e11ad92a77fd8
describe
'149318' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZC' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
7a8a672e87ce4821a1957226eeba8edc
8061cf4a27b93ac27c3366e811c87a12ea814951
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
a4840b6561ec0cd31fa372de811f41ba
acca250c654a817724c3a78694afaf1dc5010e03
'2011-11-17T18:37:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZE' 'sip-files00224.txt'
2d5c5c26b38799e273a6556bc8ffe900
21bb8d8ca79fb224fdcfb28ff2dcb2c785c0d947
describe
'51006' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZF' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
f7801b8fca869ba88d28262486952f18
594d2b641e82cf86622b93e57d8b3180b9f7dad3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
ceb31516a48b8881d4f24e7e8d5e771c
d3fc402fe796e4d01ddc6f745c3816f04a474d41
describe
'443176' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
21dcc56424f82ce1e75269f668cb0a8c
462d9f2ebad4a4d67629b522b302da2e05f7f32b
describe
'36569' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
d26b556077ea20e75905adcb055bd014
dcbf946b614eeb06edd202f2e0b7f7386e93c1f2
describe
'149605' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZJ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
251b9145d20ccb45793dd91bceeaa64f
78144cb849e7a9527f97e255bccac915d8a3a734
'2011-11-17T18:40:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZK' 'sip-files00225.tif'
9859da430c5eb57ab567aee676cf83c7
50a67edfe18b6223b1e434ab387986ecd8f3b536
'2011-11-17T18:40:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZL' 'sip-files00225.txt'
b50fbbe05a1ac75349d3ca4962545261
8e64f4d83f4ade0285546c00a77e8f393dcffd36
describe
'50175' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZM' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
4856941df79de0bc8c8c8ff33f82877e
1455c05ff6a3d87ddcc535b20fc5f64469414ae6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZN' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
23780201c3de23a21079f5aff4649325
461027fbb382207ab5bea64e1562562dc67eea86
describe
'446544' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZO' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
0acbfc0d18067ca04e2f4babd12e17e8
7f90c9a899ef0af0ec984ce0c31e72ef86f87bb7
describe
'37588' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZP' 'sip-files00226.pro'
c3ef844f04139f29cb059d6b1b99e5ce
1dd45a35f09b636063f8fa231d09ae0fa41a4803
describe
'148091' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZQ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
ee3fa28d2902eebb4190aeb8c75210d0
9dac726667018ade8d0a854556dbbad4435e2219
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZR' 'sip-files00226.tif'
e644fc386eba13d536903de5ac18aa89
e8b6dfa6c12c0086fb78e90b856280d47b9f4857
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZS' 'sip-files00226.txt'
649ea6d8ee2244fb57013a1aef53d123
4e04e6c08fab5fdd25b679cb96aa6fa5697bff51
describe
'50792' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZT' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
5a1f05abce0687473104a539f2649ac6
68dfd7766b9bdc54e3ac6495f176a147785950a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZU' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
4e9072fbdb954ed575d350dd9021c11e
81b5df24c19dc1cbc6349bb10316b6b71afde459
'2011-11-17T18:34:57-05:00'
describe
'426316' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZV' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
90c7edde9b0c2c2c6ac4c57ff53c7b70
e89bd9ab5bc19b18e5f9f03aadbfd5e976a504f1
describe
'131883' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZW' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
2dc14432f4b3cc80ba0d7e4a2ebd9f37
405df7c8201de292fa2845f2af226850fcaac221
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZX' 'sip-files00227.tif'
b5953e578b6a85564c332d1593010624
d71f15079ead4d4ba303ffc81eb99c6277505195
'2011-11-17T18:48:03-05:00'
describe
'47587' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
cf1c37486082f490f8e874b963717557
0645cecd334ce1a8f0c984ae69eda0324bc36b8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACGZZ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
494d2f7b5b93e93539f7d5923dd0f10a
c4f2547a142810b66c5a39d4057d82e6235281c5
describe
'440078' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAA' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
92a753908c6ebe0fa6ee9cb87d1d9d0a
63801cd0ac4c5077c70e23da0dc429d00f7dd6d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAB' 'sip-files00228.pro'
69f7179f2beb593e155fc00b167c9f37
ddb23c2b3a8f93f10464df6ad820a7a2f31235a8
describe
'146673' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAC' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
29d345350fe2412e3551ef9d4897eb2e
5813a887951fe08c9c6a6d5cba670d4467672843
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAD' 'sip-files00228.tif'
0d2b62909b2ef07a508e5aa1a290bcc7
1a38e83cd2283cbee4d86b8c7604ce297fb60945
'2011-11-17T18:42:11-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAE' 'sip-files00228.txt'
3350641da953865e8ae459ad3f3f1df0
9efdf265546d3e10d5ece1db9c77c6a3f5203a29
describe
'50847' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAF' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
c73d2a0882b13a09b4c2bbcc31fbda2a
bfeb479601fe02acd50d4e7caf89d8f4a0566c60
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAG' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
7bc39f67251b8c88dc9189d5fb446898
8e72706b7637f5f45a83798e12e60222692e3225
describe
'357344' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAH' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
f2b43ebf06ea4663da1de2abfb882ede
55bded3139b5cc5a7b660700f710b23bf3052a72
describe
'20794' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAI' 'sip-files00229.pro'
92b38692aa0adba9cac08ed2a899fefa
c9d3e18603ca7d92c7543f0a0aa46196a0f37ae1
describe
'117074' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAJ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
f53c1956686c8c8deec8c6317eec01af
c3beb6327a62cd673f4723129580c7a8f1eacf06
'2011-11-17T18:48:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAK' 'sip-files00229.tif'
ff3985e793d40c2a0fd48a08ec6f679c
11ebcf1778119f849bf669af1812d368bdd901d5
'2011-11-17T18:43:25-05:00'
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAL' 'sip-files00229.txt'
b224f7233bc3eebba699dea90539ac9b
f6b1cd42a572b142d8b24b4ffcbbc7b5efc119fc
describe
'42417' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAM' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
af8e1e811ec5ca01f955b1fd5ddd1b3f
80308953ee20910e48084fbda76177114630e9ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAN' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
844f848648ca72c225b8a009b0bf9dfa
a71b4aa558a016dd9caa838f3827afbfc789b2de
describe
'375278' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAO' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
d79339425ffb220f2ef80cf5abe86e72
683484fc80f5b6e6b03ebb7365c68450b68e1940
describe
'21772' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAP' 'sip-files00230.pro'
8c9f3ea62c1b43b917d0e5e2eb958dc6
39d72ffce97979d8028abdd56d6699c6fb51071f
describe
'124809' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAQ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
cb97314a584a8c834e2c4c6e6ef9de54
0f0e260bd2d96721e4adfd2eee83d2b6e276f45a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAR' 'sip-files00230.tif'
8e90924c0f752e9072c161dd41f29033
f51afc66baf3e894a06fc50291924a6080bf2f30
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAS' 'sip-files00230.txt'
d1844c1ecbbe5c364c43cb3654ab8786
247c7a7212f5fd331b81415638f7148208c9dd4b
describe
'45247' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAT' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
1190459adddf0cbb2edf6fee7967d176
564e128244c9d2530e62c28ce107b88a71df3b4d
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAU' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
78226f867462755077042e790ea30aed
b80cbbd9fc5e2f7d04f1d2f981d6a87abaf03192
'2011-11-17T18:30:31-05:00'
describe
'450648' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAV' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
47f2563eb3b7d8d897446c288bb993d9
b6527bb04bb05d85dbd5a1e74e67d24c7b9c7f45
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAW' 'sip-files00231.pro'
53d1e51992ce1706acfc4fe9425c4f56
280b66e1be5163ba1dfbd4459172b7df1b61b576
'2011-11-17T18:48:37-05:00'
describe
'152203' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAX' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
2e376db180837919a03e381d326ce574
0048cebee2bc126f7189cf2e389e69943d3ec2c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAY' 'sip-files00231.tif'
087fb912589103c39a59d98df3c71149
3fd6b67038af1b1742085aa4f2da2439112f6bae
'2011-11-17T18:41:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHAZ' 'sip-files00231.txt'
812b93ac9e6c0f49fcdbcff58ed8d293
b1ac50848752e06f33d485a76b728e8c95868804
describe
'50864' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBA' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
31182d010dd66bb9a30413593cb960cb
bac03ea03ce2d6c893f2421c2c8629e8edb372e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBB' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
6999aaa3548eb23599a31644ece497c6
bf641f1bb384fc43902d1bf2e3cafbe7697d107c
describe
'445104' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBC' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
d5312df8af92228f3a422d3afbbfc378
0941cb9be8f375f2596e3d87f2ba44fb4b524c3b
'2011-11-17T18:46:03-05:00'
describe
'37016' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBD' 'sip-files00232.pro'
4756e23be7b53c3aa0a37f3eb3e0094a
fc865a3fe39ceb3f1f9907f43a9eef5af8524528
describe
'148504' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBE' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
a8f6d8ca32785bacc2239020e8562960
82ee57af678462c26d01325b9698f0edb48a054d
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBF' 'sip-files00232.tif'
c610145ae7b06549adb6111e421f99bd
a18b0c4719b8a233dc52f391dcf4768583a4c11c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBG' 'sip-files00232.txt'
6a7810a01327b70397e27d7cc7d309ae
e18a9a7c88d270ad7b6955a53118ccb07f7c659e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBH' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
029bbde302a6bf0b987d557bd4b82e15
b920e0b40007904d5e732336a61202845db957d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBI' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
ba2641cbe4cf4295779f9a7c70826412
d4fa970a3309133e917d7c31ea5900895152accd
describe
'444469' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBJ' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
20470b8424fa973399f00d76fb16ca69
8fa6b442edd9214fb35f499e77ccfad4271595d8
describe
'37312' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBK' 'sip-files00233.pro'
9160510623ac99cbfc6a171d61e901bd
bb46eaa1889d5b00f54ab6bb8be99e2c3839ee66
describe
'149331' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBL' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
b7d341b3c71aaa7d326c9acc637e9113
663852131e28e8e3f7d6b299de8b4bb6dd001950
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBM' 'sip-files00233.tif'
763d7d11fb75f04dd0cd01549b3b3598
2b77f6999cf4d46dd11413cec42c964bd987a6e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBN' 'sip-files00233.txt'
e249ab3067076dc2a1b947bb91059730
f7742dd48bdbff7a29013444b11db3d522e9b1b1
describe
'50547' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBO' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
948ffd9b7a5a1b92897207a1bd72db76
584496ad9e26193e57310a295fd73431a4b12430
describe
'487712' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBP' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
d8a4062530faf5a83df8079bada221a2
1cb7d4cf65b5620d374727c39ed9332aff03cf98
describe
'445915' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBQ' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
d440f945e1b34ba9cb700defc8c40d1d
ca881ee7219084bda907161ce57a9f4489f6b8cd
describe
'37888' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBR' 'sip-files00234.pro'
2fb12f965f2d611418b0146274701e27
4b8dd8e0ea1b70f9777cb000ac8ad40344ebd18e
describe
'149332' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBS' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
88e77d0d35922ea3f0584b7584163160
6a5a1a2350612b3b085d77722b6daf481d0a4a69
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBT' 'sip-files00234.tif'
8460b46a5263aa10ec6fd6ece6b9c5d5
8c0458bf003850bf56811408c929d9186187f6ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBU' 'sip-files00234.txt'
f3a18bfb7f6b69f2ac122d710e57660b
f1d0c9447efec593b90b00a58e6b47f460700f46
describe
'52145' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBV' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
c67b2c77557a3d6d2fe4e36645916813
93919d4b95ea7627b103b4639f24c08479e83c27
describe
'482037' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBW' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
2f9d21ea59f7e4234898d27cd64a6218
9adb48424813959ce65bf272b7e783c2605bb026
describe
'431848' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBX' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
2adf6dfbdaadfac048c507b584712b03
f975ec92d79410ae19f096587185bed000dece9d
describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBY' 'sip-files00235.pro'
4c74265f1fce0f0288b89965e9210bec
878ab453b61c035d9333beff7cab9f59a298f52c
'2011-11-17T18:42:53-05:00'
describe
'146801' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHBZ' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
30f6903b2fc0da8ed675df73907f5382
7f163c01a15c50abdf7c9ab5f265dd3c3ce02717
'2011-11-17T18:36:19-05:00'
describe
'3872840' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCA' 'sip-files00235.tif'
8d7f1a1f15071cc5f3ae0833088b0fa8
b256f5da7bf96efb406dd5b95454cfc2d3b0af01
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCB' 'sip-files00235.txt'
4da33bc037e5b413d1eee74988951bf4
0bcbcd379a7db36c4dfb61426830e1f5ce872efb
describe
'51963' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCC' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
d12cdbc6d3f933dc304db8edaa0c8e2e
7212e93655997cb7f913e3cdcb8b8e5404f2bd5b
describe
'483949' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCD' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
6fc2df509bcde451a67f98a754049310
89fae86b40f3a7f3fc6c8eb1330bcc12ec85d666
describe
'438648' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCE' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
f8f13711206300005db96c716011222a
37e911609538404c02091e37ef6fb2d7251097d4
'2011-11-17T18:38:36-05:00'
describe
'36555' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCF' 'sip-files00236.pro'
83b8e7ba03604b04bd4a938d6f4818bd
47c3b895119ed2570a741b9bac531d34e4f3a217
'2011-11-17T18:34:53-05:00'
describe
'145867' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCG' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
0eaab83562a6ddc1d43be304ce6e94a3
c665c47569933d84f4e8c9d5a7cd73ab8aea6e52
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCH' 'sip-files00236.tif'
8ca2e57707d374060bc54b051f74cf65
15a8ad4eb4f1b5fb65874d37fc90cb837f57db07
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCI' 'sip-files00236.txt'
ebcb418eff64047fe8e5d515d7e35614
4371ad0314e2827bb69c2d295769fc7f4c84eb91
describe
'52593' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCJ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
adca884a9940460d205e6489968ec7ee
b07c8c16f67cdd26a3f2b549ecca9860f82e6497
describe
'494087' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCK' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
d69bf327b67495959675459f61316fd6
78f155777ff8e9afa2eae566baa278ee0319a768
describe
'213603' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCL' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
3fe3dfc9ce94508f6894a51011727751
4718af01d6b4543cb99ddc62231d0df6a4df38d1
describe
'71740' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCM' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
e78eadc0c8579b384a28005ac2299225
4d1693643ee041ebff1e4f4e1b7b84180a104d0f
describe
'3969064' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCN' 'sip-files00237.tif'
5fec5b06dc2095794258716060189dc0
4941cc3750a7afb28e186ff0922c40391bd24a6d
describe
'31534' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCO' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
d8f399de5d011412b61838b59f0787b2
9a1c7e9770541d38c9d2df75b71154546a003fb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCP' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
8d8dc2002ac49ee1ade533595ae2d045
a963f99a368c0a8ae1f27d72fca48f3e7280159b
'2011-11-17T18:35:28-05:00'
describe
'441291' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCQ' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
8eb27c72cb673c1f693d145b0961baa2
09cb0481f30371fee64fa2ec0f9967d1be3f57ba
describe
'36725' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCR' 'sip-files00238.pro'
e5848d1cf4edecf2d0ebce5421f8f42f
730f5662d0e4d215011f22f88183c071e192ac20
describe
'148834' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCS' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
55280ef3b0aeb24fb696e441d8c4e926
3aa54bf331d14dcb552d6cc87fd140df6a618f24
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCT' 'sip-files00238.tif'
591401c08b83db119a4d28afca2dfb94
4ceabb7fbfa3a3f208fb79a0d3578b498ee46645
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCU' 'sip-files00238.txt'
3fa407e72d5bc188afc289f839a17971
89c48c84eeb8ba6c8cd04bc13944091e342fde9d
describe
'50608' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCV' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
b93596ecb588e20ab5315f5a1e7cf5a6
ebd42c7bc9b4fcc07c22db64086945037d84c375
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCW' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
80dc05b3559e3628e7f16dda7cfbfb61
e0921f3cf897a5ba856391107516473241bfa1e4
describe
'357318' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCX' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
b2e0e300fbc22fd5d4d444664c99a846
990cd5a1942c7793117e036e28d56ac0bc5baae7
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCY' 'sip-files00239.pro'
1eb3862bcf58acc3d2793c2ef7f5d8da
fcbeeca73ccca8caf22cc1add31fb96f70b5099d
describe
'116551' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHCZ' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
850f538da019bee9997f6a78aef4ba13
17b89442aed1847b08b6db41438eb67ccddd68be
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDA' 'sip-files00239.tif'
a46f3754f05099a10d0dedd44a9d4b4a
a81fd953d0bd18c7fcb3cfe839b4d37b77f41281
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDB' 'sip-files00239.txt'
1f78a889d0b155779c4c1d4b33f216af
7d9852143dcb15c5987287918e1227d4b6b8a6e2
describe
'42797' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDC' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
edc2daa432f66e535ef9dfad48d71e1d
cc81ccb0bf44f5d0e0ff6012e678274071601603
describe
'495151' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDD' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
02413c72c364ca8d14d48caf35a869fe
b7915779e2a16354f907ee312ec2b01739ff47a2
describe
'367959' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDE' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
982db9383a5ca59eb8116526fcee853e
f0b8cff86c9287bf8622812eb7089ea1d571f434
describe
'21948' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDF' 'sip-files00240.pro'
4b7c72e87dc9ad6753911bcbf7d2c084
ec85b5a6568efd9e0d75739f44b970d2e870a1e7
describe
'121391' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDG' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
6d2259a48ad443c4335b4594c9003e17
0ac6951556a193dbd5ba63be3d55954f75cffd7d
'2011-11-17T18:39:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDH' 'sip-files00240.tif'
afb92afb5822ed82a7ac8a70a4beee7f
f65d9d511ee57094432d7e59d1715fd7242475bd
'2011-11-17T18:32:16-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDI' 'sip-files00240.txt'
22432d56f5fc958c5950fe8408d14686
e905ed693927f0679973dcd4f0af94dd4dbb87cd
describe
'43430' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDJ' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
1ee2a03de8a1bf9a3f85601f3b9ff8f8
0ec54326d47237f116eb35a015fe6f5334ae7797
describe
'485728' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDK' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
5d59e2edac9b57f12fc139190c689dbc
36594998f013b4ba9d17bbf41dd5011f1b074706
describe
'442506' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDL' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
b7b6c4095987a2b3cc77ca553b882e98
8c07c51d7f239f74e9554e3a1b030308c0a1851c
describe
'28863' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDM' 'sip-files00241.pro'
8dbb28cf470664f25f6b43310a996a12
fdc2c010d570956c680b58e6090b9cdf60c1d3f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDN' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
0f81aa4302743972ee63022f202731b1
34b9146e75feef118008c172ea8d860970e01db4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDO' 'sip-files00241.tif'
2dd7652f821cbd95b4403ee790872405
b37c28c5b6119c80e94a61729245bbf7275c7e2b
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDP' 'sip-files00241.txt'
0f4977f6332699cd66a56e1245e02cd0
90bd775e1d8561f030b8cc4e54c1de3feeeb94fd
describe
'52418' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDQ' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
4029a91a98bc337eb0bb02edfd543be6
303fd0125b5fc0ffa1e4924b59f0b133fe350232
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDR' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
53f3f5f51fd2d604d216a49dbb443e06
5c21a48599d011c073c69bed004d0fc981714458
describe
'439052' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDS' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
b731f1c7bb10de6f5607bd2d61896768
2e1a0aaef06d50fe69b91f0569562e4e00ebb0fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDT' 'sip-files00242.pro'
d1a433ff0402e29a01d6652a0f979dd2
d01d4442702435e0eea6d287d41e65a998da05b3
describe
'148489' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDU' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
2a532068c9061a7bd0292dd1c14cd7a0
7cb7f35b710133747784d81af2ab9b7d8acbb9ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDV' 'sip-files00242.tif'
06e6a4830a01131c19b60ece5aee4db0
9612b87e4591cce78846ee185c66b41a8e091bd8
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDW' 'sip-files00242.txt'
31c2328eb7de1541325da82378300c48
9b1d087ffb6182a83a4cd2082a128ec4b058b9c8
describe
'50144' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDX' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
8d52a288ee45d596f3f6cf3e1fbb1654
5a51142e7bc4a37b2c7797d5bf6ac5e27c94af2f
describe
'489822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDY' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
fe43180beaafcad6f3f07dd5bc27146f
a9e2a48e8e0506b1f06a9370054ad85c328ec7be
describe
'204821' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHDZ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
cf6643052eac0342f06831098cd8bf7a
38a3c41ef739588e2c8e6ea3e84c8649b5cb436b
describe
'70165' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEA' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
ab1650b5ee30fea428952d0402c18999
7548d510019b6be1ce76d3c299ac4bbcaeb82a56
describe
'3935068' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEB' 'sip-files00243.tif'
ab800bc6f011249b602fc07fe8fae046
b8a5a9ceffd54ccae2806206b7627aadcf3597ef
'2011-11-17T18:45:39-05:00'
describe
'31140' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEC' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
c3a3b169f9c3f4afc36f98e30e61e350
35afe5a6eee389f771e83204eb8cfea6649c3744
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHED' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
5516935ae673b3021f438b8298d1b643
eae5fbbfe5c884e63c8903687c2b40484bc6ad66
describe
'436200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEE' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
3a99d33cadb9bf33e7801de40185ca1a
7049fc65cfeed5aa27a89c10fa0f7b933b919d6b
describe
'36458' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEF' 'sip-files00244.pro'
e022acb85729b0d1b1a63949bee0d45f
5c784b59464dc2bdcaca3b2f85c4bf4c8f35e8be
describe
'147413' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEG' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
a5799b606e9773c630235378e6904d0e
fbf97b93731f66297e893be84a153578b31e0787
'2011-11-17T18:38:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEH' 'sip-files00244.tif'
8c4ebc5acda9f88d8d0936358e65f8a5
1c6c260c2f0c1d41604f435dca87432883efa5ab
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEI' 'sip-files00244.txt'
194bb072832711ec9978430bb87ca580
93939c9ce7e5c53fe94fee411111ce2d77753ca3
'2011-11-17T18:39:03-05:00'
describe
'51930' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEJ' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
9162652ee0bd5f17f8049d9301ddb2fb
ba7161f1413b13dd1e37a79084026682f024efbf
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEK' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
de9a4c5612c42f6afeff8a3d0a36839b
541a5320bb8054a5f8c961c58a9b97422a3aa935
describe
'431841' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEL' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
3827dcb580708396897c99747e7dbe20
a2e0ac0ddb7f6f88a772e9a5a33cf64972df3b9b
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEM' 'sip-files00245.pro'
712206da9fce013243ee371b5f4027d4
f4ac2fdad85b3bc7ee356e2579064d988e260cc3
describe
'148067' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEN' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
88ee6040301d33c2f51da32e199ebd64
1c7a613fb3f680e38fc7b7ddea1e9d11764e5c68
'2011-11-17T18:37:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEO' 'sip-files00245.tif'
4a0118994714e8ae7f5235235c9b9405
4a232158c4f96e8fb1d06b28836bac073a5ca639
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEP' 'sip-files00245.txt'
11350841b7a0d0fe8ad20dfab89672f7
264a4176116027132143e9695a80a93d7d246825
'2011-11-17T18:45:07-05:00'
describe
'50119' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEQ' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
d711bf9ad9522f17b33d0bac9b706a0b
94a9fbae84a4464f7c18019d7678e7ed7c8e6cba
describe
'487698' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHER' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
ac11d7cc5a1a7a1fec80891e371bfbfd
c7ced54088e4dc7448c3b8a264e3b10637873754
describe
'432972' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHES' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
0e9566d1aa4b41704fabcd22ef2d87bc
f428fddf226565ca3767f3f1b1917ae9daf0de8d
describe
'35886' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHET' 'sip-files00246.pro'
4aff83af91dc68cacc67b9bb3d5a59fb
2c16065ac996da255986b96952cce6c68154515e
'2011-11-17T18:35:33-05:00'
describe
'145916' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEU' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
288dd822bc691531730c61fc6b724034
dbc97624ddfb1cb0e883ed7d4a033dc6a079f179
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEV' 'sip-files00246.tif'
c557fd9d267b8e743e1f6fad66be9b45
3c47490ba93bcc084478178484bdb9ddba2a7ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEW' 'sip-files00246.txt'
326bb13fc464e31501a4ebfcf55f7d53
2f1d0b27cd69f673185c0e86677de1fa6941b058
describe
'51064' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEX' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
571a639a7766d772d403e70235f27711
95eb97b477937079b1f843d6e2afc107aeac8add
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEY' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
e0c772033a9d50738f1ec730d4783e0c
f6a4fab8cf86944e6b92bb4eab964a06a154c970
describe
'444242' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHEZ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
07d8fbecde0809ac64fddc68fa3ca98c
c568ff683fd3be9032344add5c57928ac470ae94
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFA' 'sip-files00247.pro'
679fed9e330943cf1b25c3d0957c2d7c
8ad7934f5047d6b0ee41a647d2509c147f33302a
describe
'149261' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFB' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
5cfa3373e9ab52eff1cb5b2974b39d52
25790bf0d99f421a7095551d495e0258af6695c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFC' 'sip-files00247.tif'
6a22fea0038f06c4209940e17997d1c3
4278c2632bcdac11ae4515d7f40c059f4e4611cf
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFD' 'sip-files00247.txt'
5210879126b182c0179162277d14b0f0
653da6582ec177afa26e0cba0441683ea2f02428
describe
'50264' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFE' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
a25a80fd2faeab4c212760bc26f58143
ac464599976a8c8d306e8421fc5def559ad3fd88
describe
'483950' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFF' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
c985ac9fdc56cefe418dc0a8060bff60
863f5d484a874610e7e486d685e967efb9d8264e
describe
'437958' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFG' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
7c21de82b1ab11b5583ca7f17b1bc13d
b7e7b4854841d42ae24a4a11f75866bf5e80d3d5
describe
'37002' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFH' 'sip-files00248.pro'
e95e542383b5a2a1f5885ad4553d7518
e794bf102d602ef8476464f347a77895c0a3f460
describe
'148939' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFI' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
0cd182a30f405be31a832dd613d62987
8fb57fc6f2ac679b31fe6b9b5271645c0477f52d
describe
'3887956' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFJ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
040fd8d1a48ebafa6ddbd9432081973b
bffc8607e6e896211faaef29a2506b3b43c3965e
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFK' 'sip-files00248.txt'
8082c9945a2f1689469ada85f78ffdf6
08da7b278fba1ff57fba5fe0cce21d08ce80d0f5
describe
'53340' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFL' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
cdee9e895167c93eda76abdc3ae5fdda
ff96e1be7641f91cf79356cc4180230f8ff03eea
describe
'485827' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFM' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
bb832df401cb04185f51a062b9b553d3
bea6b080c593911ca555541205ba041b7168e335
describe
'373000' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFN' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
85679a7a7aecb9f90a3c10bd0eeea407
06d55e32e23ad8461ed609e922a00b7f040f6179
describe
'26089' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFO' 'sip-files00249.pro'
e4fdd0a5608664dfcacd5774ecde472e
20a008a0ec24750e213cd682eb86ebf3075c35c3
describe
'124671' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFP' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
361cd3b2afab91000a92ca59e56cc320
e451a82af0f713dc853a322cdeed62274b88a7e7
'2011-11-17T18:39:18-05:00'
describe
'3903076' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFQ' 'sip-files00249.tif'
2f386864ec53ad9cc864784d113319bb
db565b6f63b0e40cb0042b377be7280f9e3048b8
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFR' 'sip-files00249.txt'
b2803e9a05ac92430a1599cca516e44f
936ec7230f57cd94cd728c7f303e6b5200314f16
describe
'46380' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFS' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
c601d338204f2c9ff6e4dc377048d5f2
d6a88c5714fd561159f8bfe1f52df494fbe2f0b6
describe
'485823' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFT' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
7631b6009066cad0c6fa5796ef54b4fb
05299b7ed7d0098d58c587b4acb09bfb3bab2c62
describe
'359392' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFU' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
325c5fed616df2b400b17af6de5ac67d
9e692296139971d39311ce6fc213d3bfac0ba7bd
describe
'22541' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFV' 'sip-files00250.pro'
7a42d25352e7720aa262037fef340b72
421b27b281c201a9edbf72e3c23b24a55f225e2e
describe
'119943' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFW' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
6d6047aa77bfb534602c71fcc8adc7ec
ef35ae485e18b4ea89370887fbf77a727244ebeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFX' 'sip-files00250.tif'
a8970925a42692c0e45f97efdb8858bf
82afe0ae96440ae451626e33f99e0dea2efc7c9a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFY' 'sip-files00250.txt'
c006ae499b5c313939455974710c06d0
84a9e39a1c9d261b3e517d08d6356c9724e198df
describe
'44360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHFZ' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
4ddbf70722145d761576639468a9f216
de4e5321cc242acaef29621d911b7c63e8f74eb4
describe
'495208' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGA' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
1c7b769d561c83b9f4da3b0b5d4d0ac7
b9334ea4873ba5c8b1493c638ccc6c322ef8e8f1
describe
'433821' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGB' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
1987434d7a626d5c57e901ae7b1565e2
69ee45562f234ac57e6eeb461edbc82a7f76b3bb
'2011-11-17T18:39:19-05:00'
describe
'35537' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGC' 'sip-files00251.pro'
f83000633b58101fb7f7c889616fed64
8c40698216f1e82b55e133755779bdc43ec9c3f6
describe
'146932' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGD' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
06b5a9ddcb49333a77d76806118c76f2
522a6c4d12f31a6cc242a9a15e07b44d85b2921e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGE' 'sip-files00251.tif'
019e120e173540f3c6177f5b2326fc54
6b582b05186993d93de37460b87cd48416b87a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGF' 'sip-files00251.txt'
a15436473c2132ffde5f7a311902d312
70fd3448a90e3e93cf1e78137e13ada4f50379fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGG' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
da540d157a5a68298a9eed1742e5cf13
0bfeb155dfeac0cc0e6322cd9f90513c7129e04f
describe
'478347' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGH' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
b44140bf7d08588e6a0c2988ff67357e
648939668dc97eb2410237a15ff11743cad9e6d8
'2011-11-17T18:46:20-05:00'
describe
'416472' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGI' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
fd06c52a76b034c7749c7da4f512ed82
17cb87f86b728f095beab35a02653ba981bb3cdf
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGJ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
0a4146635703be92fc79c5ed2f4345aa
aff5833e0797ab611a01075ac50eeeed3e3510b1
describe
'141700' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGK' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
5e81871b49fa58c9a1ef31cb8293c3d5
456ba2f9439f1bb471d3f98b51ea58f254461068
describe
'3843376' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGL' 'sip-files00252.tif'
55ed3784ea1ab72be902b825530422a3
7a2ea5a49ed7f2da6bbb32513a8e4264e5bbd3c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGM' 'sip-files00252.txt'
ee8b6358530852dacb0ce15ad29665eb
c44f6a673db1a57bb01969e4387770d5636e11aa
describe
'53603' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGN' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
e6260a903b54a42a76a0e5ea2e6be241
432a1ea94435d45b6826a527e3a44d1e224df421
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGO' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
e8446e54b661b5f023c69d839bc4b4eb
79adc46a8a0f9be050215f00493a86bef978c901
describe
'346028' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGP' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
94a3800119a301897a31f84e726f7efd
2fc624639b2e62d2b16eaeacaff2db6fde49aa34
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGQ' 'sip-files00253.pro'
c1bc28685cb370ffa8be2d6351b546b4
18a844c6c5605037f67b7635801e5a00f3c4a0ba
describe
'113558' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGR' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
05e340e5c65eae6e6e8ebf3fee2408ac
ff1a97ff0b4610e863484fbebe72cfbc733d3488
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGS' 'sip-files00253.tif'
25b7d7fcd26bbabc9d3799774179e6cc
27b2479f6b9d4b7fed190894e2a633153359638a
'2011-11-17T18:39:25-05:00'
describe
'384' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGT' 'sip-files00253.txt'
f1b62b6e92aeaf7910e4e467f35b7faa
ca549fd03e638196f111ce3e7e11a5c8e508f000
describe
'42395' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGU' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
a6a2eded88144b661cd371c5812386dc
f1a2181e7131e507538997a1bde60c4eae3a7d9d
describe
'470678' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGV' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
7c140ef319d08fb90f396b528306f081
842a929d3cf44e3ae45327b33ade1241955525a1
describe
'422863' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGW' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
296a11e379f1023cd954e4fb85a55625
0ec76571652848951be4a4783f2dadb711cdfa2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGX' 'sip-files00254.pro'
a663fb85e20f79bf13280b2c4f60b7af
3c9de4b36272f26e920f0daa78a6cf5c737257ba
describe
'145055' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGY' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
c20bed793ebdfa004e29f4e92c6473a9
d49800145657f49a407a813c9410e4c1afbcc436
describe
'3782120' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHGZ' 'sip-files00254.tif'
54dda37fcc26d06b1f3afc0f135a0266
7ea6fd96974dd0794b79c5a5d218f769d9457b8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHA' 'sip-files00254.txt'
e8a28a657ad50a0af3ebfd2c2fac9b2d
938bcf7d07fdd29ae353c723d6c1e804a9dd261c
describe
'53011' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHB' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
7272cfb990ada6cf9006cb6c5a6ef544
74d10af10b6be291bc996cf07b5e4f8d48d5bdb9
'2011-11-17T18:42:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHC' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
71283320f666d2a7fa7842c6251285f3
048098ba9999753789213859ea24665682b5dcce
describe
'436974' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHD' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
630d9df3326b329b7ef0ed522330166f
7446fa620522ab5eb0b23133f2d167f73a47e94c
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHE' 'sip-files00255.pro'
8de9d0636851d78c4fefaf95cb07e786
9f29ca6a5182a57ccfdd0471fe649e0164814d2c
describe
'147524' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHF' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
7a1908b39db2aa7328c5e0d656ec1b1e
b13ed3256cc08d273abdc5f6ba87cde523a0eceb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHG' 'sip-files00255.tif'
98a92641f8fafa690ae66c314e4eec7b
c590537be9a8a1e6a7a667c4daa63c56f9f1884e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHH' 'sip-files00255.txt'
0adf031bba909ae2a3120cf34fcf11eb
70656d33e744c760b2d01da1062245618103f761
'2011-11-17T18:47:46-05:00'
describe
'49927' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHI' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
206bbe3c5fcfe149217dbcb2b717e54b
541829a76473ce32636b62b8420429d3c55d26a6
describe
'478224' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHJ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
dbdf36f16eaae13eaca903e3a5de93d7
9ba72487eef0f88affce6b4ed9bbf4a11b3128d4
describe
'431058' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHK' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
18e2ac8f2d86be1908e0d440dda6139b
d08de28267377f0554deabf742f7f6e1ff4fae6d
describe
'36924' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHL' 'sip-files00256.pro'
197b5a8fa370ae0e9c1a7de932166d49
5a6adc869d81d7c355c28d608c28402e7897e3b9
describe
'146833' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHM' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
581156ebd39f2049661060b09103d311
b806a02c3b4817c79a634ffe74185c7500abbd4e
'2011-11-17T18:35:51-05:00'
describe
'3842600' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHN' 'sip-files00256.tif'
8cc8715542f7c4379f22749aba717ad2
ab781558a98eb1a494028de0c9cdeb2081e2a9f6
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHO' 'sip-files00256.txt'
4aeeb514afc5831850f5d64d01e30279
6a43387b3cadb68bd48032edc3679f1583d84e03
describe
'52464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHP' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
a7fe3548a6b07e1868a543f3b7590b1c
f11353e75d178253df0202817a0a6c97109321bf
describe
'495274' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHQ' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
e1d334e8efe71ee88e123b65d790075f
08c0e0cfae14685e8048ee6820eb39f23e07cbbc
describe
'432835' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHR' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
d9ff79bd045aefff611a6ae80963c1da
1d3c4fa7568e6f30c81ad77b4c97208117eb07b8
describe
'35085' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHS' 'sip-files00257.pro'
373557bd0e622337e609176cc76d947c
a734ab7c67dcd22e150b3e62406a4b43014dd20d
describe
'145342' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHT' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
89a393387b3468869663d4798fead296
fe725b7f7c88ab9b490062617f6c65919eafc4ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHU' 'sip-files00257.tif'
505491506c8d446061b78ae35b6fb137
d72c571eb547606606e1a2cca8b1a9a380ee720c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHV' 'sip-files00257.txt'
061437a7d1de7e08aaeb951bec7c8b0d
c6fe626333e0cf667e9249c06bdb023126714b42
describe
'49452' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHW' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
c4928ecc0300ada97302f87a10e02c7d
13ceea9ea6f1eb6d9260000a61ecd40e44335461
'2011-11-17T18:44:05-05:00'
describe
'485866' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHX' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
b5bbd2022a434b98e12129fe33556400
ded6d0718a8648a8a8ad31796ce2170e796fc856
describe
'374716' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHY' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
4c9462562cb3d3d69144db46cd26bc86
66c57585a056c09476b7a748953c0a359c4b9a13
describe
'18685' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHHZ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
557bb763fc7706579af245645caddd3f
e7a3391caeb9c466ab66115a6dc7b14d2d35af21
describe
'123297' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIA' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
261d1bd06fdd8b45002f4cef6684563b
f52dea68da5c4ac518885083f78e1cf82988a04d
describe
'3903440' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIB' 'sip-files00258.tif'
163ca98ce7e86fff01ed3f49112aead8
9d787a5abfb945d14dc466feb8ba058d458dd7bc
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIC' 'sip-files00258.txt'
2a9a2c16493d0a57b59608507b5b11a5
9bb38b19032482f477bf0fdba4c8280945ab9b65
describe
'47559' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHID' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
925972eaf8ab1d47926bd5852cff8ca2
377f99e28406660d3f1f81ef06eb41d5da8e2c4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIE' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
c853bc2aa614f2c1abd60069d0f1805f
5a296e40b2d7777d636a1f0d4d43b3a1b85710c0
describe
'432656' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIF' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
b8a3c671bc740b2f9f513fd49018cc41
b8a45a2f8c5322a3141517cc2855be7ec01c940e
describe
'34730' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIG' 'sip-files00259.pro'
90b6acdcca31b97ad50d2ebce464c7e0
c3acbd46b51ceea8e382e6a892dab06dd772ce5b
describe
'144253' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIH' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
9055c4b37c9b7e2708eb6f0da6bad4f3
de3813b59f52c3a274048f0fad3a6120b46a154a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHII' 'sip-files00259.tif'
03ab8648a22618aeaee4d691d7d66773
f491b2b6062f588dc78db67f38baf849002e3537
'2011-11-17T18:40:55-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIJ' 'sip-files00259.txt'
f1005b676577f2a503390f76d772a48b
653ff905fb99d93fc6b0d21094c38493669ac15f
describe
'48649' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIK' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
d9460fa990a4d7290b726a9db01a2c4b
6c40682d30d8d9f3faf542267de968cb9c58c1ff
'2011-11-17T18:44:27-05:00'
describe
'476356' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIL' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
87540986b3bab21a4740fbcdbb87cf67
01f116370dab2b982003f84328286880a35ccd3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIM' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
9482c805ceb3e4e9b6f8393e0c708e52
e109ffe18221e6cfd05c785494aafacd8c46c63f
describe
'35718' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIN' 'sip-files00260.pro'
5f6ef0537a0518812376a2faad00278b
08dcaf31b8e2a38a05b706e6cd8c4148116a7cf5
describe
'148505' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIO' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
f4a37d0bf81a9df7a7b687e0c5bf35fa
9d07a3c7445d792744b9a57f72a2ae15478fc030
'2011-11-17T18:44:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIP' 'sip-files00260.tif'
be7fa71ba36cd11186cf5256709e7849
a0ea7fefbc5a1aba74e7a2bf1d0e753d384d38e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIQ' 'sip-files00260.txt'
1d5b04d5d521a02a187c4ffa872bc2e7
d401c03a5bc39b1aec343da485c922b33b26945d
describe
'53642' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIR' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
9db0eed1344751d30ad92be99afc7408
56991d3c57931ee0484b57d6fe614f145b7ba100
describe
'495211' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIS' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
d802954db33e8a23a3d2e6e6ceb433ef
de363874e4a6e22b279e3d81beaeac868082154e
'2011-11-17T18:37:53-05:00'
describe
'438187' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIT' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
7f6c48757f54b30b3cb82607a8ef297d
a5a8eb9f9251baacae95724dd0594fddbfe9e4f7
describe
'36207' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIU' 'sip-files00261.pro'
d43071641145445cddef8d2a151875e9
f8a777c3339979a0d44af635380cd172c270dd70
describe
'147292' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIV' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
6c11ae856097f8f3249638f5674f0645
fec82e81e06469a8ed40a2fc0d53f5c8922757d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIW' 'sip-files00261.tif'
2696fcbe79fbb0a3bf5edc0e309423b1
3b0483af9647186d7ab36189ab30044f43abc183
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIX' 'sip-files00261.txt'
d9e85eaf8fdba276a382b0029c98cbf0
58942ae5dfa608a74be2477610e17004bf102be7
describe
'49905' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIY' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
6f28bc0771ed9a79d55aac616b896bcf
8d453d55af7a13dd581a61294bab306f054b5dbe
describe
'480171' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHIZ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
bc5e453372112c055936bfb09b4cecda
a1e60998f1b8194b87570ddd0f4470ce447ddb3a
describe
'432629' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJA' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
79ca80de61b9d49170f5e7c846ea7d92
4b3119cac5c5fb48f97d07b23b44934fa76faa67
'2011-11-17T18:44:39-05:00'
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJB' 'sip-files00262.pro'
e73a9756037e85d302fa03620bb62d06
d2307628449c6fcd70f8bc63f6f8e795ecaeefe9
describe
'146857' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJC' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
29d584ee697a08cf1a49324be8562657
40ef51a1d612468fa7d9adcbc672561507f97bd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJD' 'sip-files00262.tif'
797ba767d4e50fbad37768f5f06d0142
d69eaa242eebb4a2f7b3eab23393260901ec325e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJE' 'sip-files00262.txt'
d34b4106baac9ff63da7b30856b7085c
7763a8924082a0e9ca7031a2dcb4ae3daa9e2dfb
describe
'52293' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJF' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
017d908aa009263cca058aab48d09d52
8483b5f674453578fed1347558910b208aca7101
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJG' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
9241716755174ef95cd8f663290abe57
8bfc0fc49405037b3ea8d71def01cfcf6be8f26d
describe
'432231' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJH' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
8a32b3f26c3597c51871b95cc3186cb6
3085818f9c42ceac079498f45faeb6fd65a1df1b
describe
'34586' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJI' 'sip-files00263.pro'
9774f19844287b50f6f04636aa1d974e
5fafb02c90f0a46d98dd778fa55d148b814b4239
describe
'145559' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJJ' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
06c617206a0290242dbc2b087a01c313
c858cf8bd3f13ca54ad6ebb39dbad81e97309421
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJK' 'sip-files00263.tif'
39dd273e33a0109cb4efbd9c347e2f40
4b3c0fc10e32a9568469f3c9e44ddb6519410195
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJL' 'sip-files00263.txt'
6a3a2a89aa4e4c4bee2e23bebf2d1fcf
3c29781a7dcfe0978b4d8076b1ec090d9d508334
describe
'50021' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJM' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
a49f250a37c599ab25d0be91e5001487
a11d5fc183d12fbbe57d63f5d629091bc2fb5758
describe
'483875' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJN' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
738b90b2e8465269f1dd77dad25155f2
d9682f5aa0dc6850efc07aa0d794dd98a61a7bac
describe
'442253' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJO' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
c45037a70131df2e93076aa5ffead4f5
93836a772e3eeb7cdf161558199553dbd053ecda
describe
'37001' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJP' 'sip-files00264.pro'
40028655446d6764e30bea4f827c1259
b169e6904239439551797f6130196e0d12e1ecb9
describe
'147116' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJQ' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
3c3ff301b4931c2dde5775f926c58fc1
18e69dc9681d2246c733075d6133d81eff82d0f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJR' 'sip-files00264.tif'
a4646b0cb1bf4c27e25e8dfec39a9420
76b46b25c8ab6ac22241305ae9da16ec25125861
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJS' 'sip-files00264.txt'
5f41e2bb1edcea1e30c215fb7c0f34a5
0d41e4de84cb0873c8d7940ed24556ff9bbb02cf
describe
'51588' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJT' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
31599ffa7877010fecd72381e89769ed
e1d4a30c1965fcf9c6b8099daa3d4670a0f2ed0e
describe
'495269' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJU' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
b9adb8ac4b5d1c878be047cf5154541d
ff837d81f8898468d4fad1ce0f8fa14fd2f58b36
describe
'446059' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJV' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
14fe0b83a53e803f2d32d559a8079df9
7c409af331d2525f9c56746ea646cc1d0da92e00
describe
'36211' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJW' 'sip-files00265.pro'
b488e0d245dd3a7825c29abb14e2a324
21685ebecaf0863d7688eb73da7080947265969c
describe
'150495' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJX' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
6e8e7187433ee8d7b6cd26750dd16895
b10ff1fa266a4eab67ff444b132d3ec15c6f7ae4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJY' 'sip-files00265.tif'
379f37f0a91311267743656ef7c340e8
0e1886a34d38d7642cee85880906ba347cc211d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHJZ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
71e6dc3c310ca2b6e8fceb47193117b4
774921c26e9a324e6b31b9bd9cad5ced722fd8f8
describe
'50461' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKA' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
863acf95d1163415af83098025b0b43b
0d6135f4d2d8a1f5d41dad0e575f7c9405e6e2a8
describe
'472586' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKB' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
136112010a5632cf23db9255d2bbcce8
743cd4e58c5dc6b5014f01ed8cf77dc14d510f16
describe
'436113' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKC' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
caf336138c1f5fd6216a3208fe47572a
f495500b239d602bbba82bd315f42dad3a0d7328
describe
'35313' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKD' 'sip-files00266.pro'
49eb0294db19ba64ba0e39a62e7840c9
ebb818f86a4698cf51e2a3f4bdc5e57235f74e6e
'2011-11-17T18:48:17-05:00'
describe
'145435' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKE' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
2463f16b5bf2158b2d2ee56588b27bd4
febf2b4cdccc579d1ca93a875bbe6e02d50590cc
describe
'3797240' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKF' 'sip-files00266.tif'
e6ba73973c1f170335a24aec32374f9c
efd55aee2e6905f4583fb669ec8cebc4d69eb513
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKG' 'sip-files00266.txt'
b027ecd498c22514be7deb2ba05b8731
3f3dc3dc3def470001071df00116ffe255d5e833
describe
'53137' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKH' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
2dedf14bca5d8ffb1c49f927791f5da1
6501b6346b6df9ac7150f39a9b6dfc6f6a7f9e78
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKI' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
06c80d7d55f92e7c8d0c5556f69feda3
0fef34354fb6fb44c3345542ea01f6e44d30a7d3
describe
'294541' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKJ' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
927087c8094d07df165dcb4913759145
e0a2baea0b754b772fc56200c8bb1f6de43abb97
describe
'10720' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKK' 'sip-files00267.pro'
1211133fe354ac211b9b3e233fa3e976
cf6dc4379fe7cde1c29bbf4bb9560f97d79bebc7
describe
'94700' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKL' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
e6a788e4d6da56f7b7075d4dbd0141e2
f2bba262e3f44cfdfe9d197f8f27d465ca345412
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKM' 'sip-files00267.tif'
6b7d024bececcb7c2c146c10f318bf0f
759f3bdcdccddacd6244838b0d6f9f749bf72b6c
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKN' 'sip-files00267.txt'
bd211979e23e71b39eb2ef8719bae7a9
4e89f23966aad82dfe35fa8dc2450521f907a86f
describe
'37030' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKO' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
df3652010ec7d45ade9710715002ce39
37aa07ed720f9b6bdb77e96ba413d266d01544cc
describe
'478271' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKP' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
a798575eba05a5c825211ea72a7d1f6c
b1d07a59a459873cd029d97d7aebaa96aad1f1ae
describe
'365961' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKQ' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
e95b527c7b8d43686426ebd23db5b15b
c3411459d446f74333ce2a09e55de07d8c2e9a7b
describe
'22348' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKR' 'sip-files00268.pro'
41db756902d6092345b04db8636956db
0c1fce0752c860f48bb3c111621c96c572686a25
describe
'122492' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKS' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
1ae55abdfa0090a99d13bb1499eb6697
a50efcbd4bca3a970da2c12d8d210e1474e956ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKT' 'sip-files00268.tif'
52e154ffb369f6fb8addc1d929836309
a4d3069d2d2fcdaea3d771b06231a41fe850faf3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKU' 'sip-files00268.txt'
6994bd41673af4de9d75699f775fd609
a124c4b3ab15a695403641d7e18338e53931743b
describe
'45721' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKV' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
7468c724adf14f92caffc3966c515a55
40a4bf5d3e11a20e218e5ee9bf7d21793ff46bb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKW' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
9d9a5492bb72100d4f02df848aedae1c
18f37d54776b756e08b9018d33e9431cd307424e
describe
'450562' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKX' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
5a9c4073e96e7ad12ffd69c175b648f8
96b7b88398ae41b118f3fd1f4997796399209989
describe
'38138' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKY' 'sip-files00269.pro'
45b2e201c5e6a7a177040800cbb48281
c630752e4b8c697deabc7f468273dcb806eb5ad7
describe
'151195' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHKZ' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
52a227fe3d4640c2e90899a89d3ba6de
5a324e93dfda4a8060896fd193f38c6f09f56878
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLA' 'sip-files00269.tif'
76dbe6ebe36d10b5424384742d07c961
6ff0a796a61b1ec114ab1879c49f57deb8840786
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLB' 'sip-files00269.txt'
cbaca0a3857ba72b1c9670b04025d64c
339d24be93053f6f852b12b0f00e6a16170a9343
describe
'50539' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLC' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
a2623f77d3edd98ad139e8eaa22c72b2
19a04a7c449ca9306ccca47e229de8b7aaf387cc
describe
'478261' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLD' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
896c6ab332ccc83504f2f130c6833a58
75ec886e4053eb5e8d4417e37c8c756e3c6be9dd
describe
'405167' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLE' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
5644a15583bae4c833fb8bbcea9e3104
61fe9c4bb76e6981c2a2d41a7f3032fd17279e81
describe
'19746' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLF' 'sip-files00270.pro'
c2bd47008660ff7cf4d1d38971e495ed
743511a754a5bfa6558c8bf2a816794b69207e80
describe
'130297' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLG' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
5d990b0742f9dfa1dfb2c1b11d9b8592
1189701656775acb50b4567a86eb3b52e6eef50f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLH' 'sip-files00270.tif'
383d38159dc9c24db52b5f8390baff06
cdb4c94ef00c3e6d8c767303234bd1a4476f770b
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLI' 'sip-files00270.txt'
a3856f96aeb73cc1b64092794cc88e72
2547521d34b95060c01a8687a532c56855e76509
describe
'48130' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLJ' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
015bfbb1eff5f359bcfd50ff75333ce7
d77a0e260e9ac55f2fec866c1c185979781b10a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLK' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
f78eb2a8318bb0b90d24a0d6334c0d39
4bdcc828d369f66d3e672a57ebf8a86ff49f99ce
describe
'443048' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLL' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
282966160dc9615ed21e28d68fb392df
1d80e0bd7badfbef6dd26e53d37f7569917241d5
describe
'37323' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLM' 'sip-files00271.pro'
4e8d345c1c10b3611f52a930ef427799
08cb9b6965a592a8b2b75ae2cf910bc30c462942
describe
'148832' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLN' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
c61c8e62b7370085dea64943729d46ea
ccd000b714654e56b5bf2715b8a48dd21ff018e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLO' 'sip-files00271.tif'
db0f4c308398b4ab196439cbfa0d6705
ab622acaea4044d5b17fe72725e4d94c33f4c3af
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLP' 'sip-files00271.txt'
babb506f407f9425eea53d3eaf177d3b
35247235c985c9ba22eff43a966f3e3144111c3b
describe
'50369' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLQ' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
d5ce8d57b28682fa9c091a60d67d0df2
9f1d750e972bad1d0f5c1b2a9ad12d107f3df9f0
describe
'485759' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLR' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
16b12af1d9fc86bc5e00cfa051e15e02
83bd196b3a4abdb6c53210a0c1dfabdd1bac858d
describe
'439312' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLS' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
93a9560def3deeca7ff9714385daf142
b709fec360dbfce2e0acad5b042712af2076dbdd
describe
'36942' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLT' 'sip-files00272.pro'
eb47055375bf61dff43877947392a71a
bed9b79085925c0f20ca1b5bf473c9f8aa7893bf
'2011-11-17T18:42:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLU' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
68cb77db0fb9c05783c16861e6876bb9
4b2762549d406b5565dcc52da16838764f078711
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLV' 'sip-files00272.tif'
2e71acdf7afde32a3ac57133061c0767
bf852fc98a2cc2c553f031c6509f9d8fa59b2540
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLW' 'sip-files00272.txt'
d7069896841837391b5e91e20e79eddc
7ee2284fd18ad88a429f7764241d4e355e656867
describe
'50845' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLX' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
a7b1dfd2e79b6dc842ab78c56f9295b6
dedbeb480c38f9097b0c7e40bbe63f09dc12564d
describe
'495114' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLY' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
955503152baa337c0c5ace43945dcc9c
d1f3b6c1b9ec57bda11fb4e4ae69957798a31eb2
describe
'381315' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHLZ' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
20acec332a1cdfd02e5e7328641e7f80
1bf5b8d3633ae029b9cb0560022a2b6d9fae6194
describe
'121747' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMA' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
439fc7f6fd2db1b1e8a808d9da8ab98e
7ba193aa4790692c07376cd93a015d6f16b1368c
'2011-11-17T18:38:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMB' 'sip-files00273.tif'
be4dd3c58525315a2664c01fef8dfedb
a74b4c8b8577de453748a3c9373e33a78b6cee24
describe
'44554' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMC' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
155a7054ddddbe80c6f5dd7f70eec744
1ccc037dc2db12c4bc2d65b6cd45b0abf2531cfa
'2011-11-17T18:39:26-05:00'
describe
'476383' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMD' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
4f33140889e2bfa8880e5cff937f5a7c
16c01d7b33bcc90f3827ffc1d6937725152a921d
describe
'323789' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHME' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
cb92d4efa770690beff0e1309f8b46e0
66211c440459cdd7be0bd6f7374f9564f638becf
'2011-11-17T18:45:16-05:00'
describe
'15599' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMF' 'sip-files00274.pro'
21fe84e66551569807f78daa037af13d
6b373459bbd192c3bda5b5e38079146831f52add
describe
'105190' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMG' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
1204f1eacf4472a77e00ad260bde06f1
9522b7b6ae2464b2c99092d93c14406ac8aec8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMH' 'sip-files00274.tif'
2106c46031fb68213e9409de0c52bc1c
542942173467d122c51c7a48db1bae87787cd7ee
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMI' 'sip-files00274.txt'
6123078ad6790b7ef28ee6b14a80344d
5351d3f5f005984b9f2261deaff3c54a0edeb649
describe
'41364' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMJ' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
abd80f6c3d3c6ba14bc4044c116869e9
3a2dcb8e9a2cd6a403192b9309731b968ad9cdee
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMK' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
e0d856753967720eec3b847d27d2cd2d
b5b9363a4083acd25e00b07f94dfcd150516b673
describe
'376171' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHML' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
70c8f0dd74d4db14bd1acf659c7c86ce
a0bb9246abb41b18de877f4571cd570dcdb75f76
describe
'21766' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMM' 'sip-files00275.pro'
7b899d87c9596bdad18e2e339cf4c6da
a01efc1bfdfb658a47162028104f52444be8eaba
describe
'123394' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMN' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
65bf649549f6e970f23338da99ab4b14
79b57033e00d6d5c16e73be027334d24d9bff93c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMO' 'sip-files00275.tif'
005a4d48cd2076111d0e8d15c0ab0f72
5f68373d1558382e9b937fce5316b45d9b9f5e0b
'2011-11-17T18:43:51-05:00'
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMP' 'sip-files00275.txt'
6473c53a361f8b49f7445ce2b3875067
04fdf29dc8fcef7d4cbd88489b73f1ed14facd5b
'2011-11-17T18:36:57-05:00'
describe
'44325' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMQ' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
a72e869aa7502a48ea102989835074a2
5b29d5bc95da2dbd8ae918b29f19d519519ac334
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMR' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
8ab0c345c8a29310408ebecd1537692b
57b4542c44a09117a8b603a4fe34ff540963be77
describe
'406200' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMS' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
6da5cdb2fe645322a1e050b162d7985d
f54cce215fdc4b41a7bbe44e3a5e7dd883b26e84
describe
'18670' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMT' 'sip-files00276.pro'
212a6dfeb0db8305f9f831e30aaea3f2
7dcfeb56028a7a9d197dbc8f47176fa66590841b
describe
'131453' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMU' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
229cdfbf2abbfe7a6d0e98067a8be0e3
78189ca87725a262f8df014bccf6fb4ad07139da
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMV' 'sip-files00276.tif'
a06a25ab2ddd93be6bccb6e8c77981a0
db249d0f42d0af92af79963522c1f981075a854e
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMW' 'sip-files00276.txt'
f25937258c41ceac6a27f147a6974c53
47e5a73f1cccfa3a3ff93a3f13563a2dccd33d30
describe
'46526' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMX' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
1bea565310f4e877b071de76bd82602d
66832b4146a0b8c0122c2adc1ee2f6a7d31f4d5e
describe
'495154' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMY' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
1c99d5049d9419f069063b639f66d2a2
4eff2f31ad8bf6adedeb2592b0c104e3500ae24a
describe
'533894' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHMZ' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
61d048b4d77e9bab4f5f5cbdb8bf42f9
91ef5b883e988e8b84b2a165d8df1933148e4b36
describe
'157903' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNA' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
bf51ede6d9bc2d1bb3d676d2a77820e9
8b29b62b7927efacebc125a6b3abbdb618793c4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNB' 'sip-files00277.tif'
c8ec8cdb9a398efb1c1191bd839e646d
09eef0302f2cc259cab62db5ab6f4c983ebbc492
describe
'52121' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNC' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
7aadc4640fd054f37d39e6779ea8d1ae
f7a616df74f533f3eaee091f53d3c53d7b84401e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHND' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
65f96ecca36ea07f2a66dcc36ec0908d
bd35eb54be210b9f4c288e27478a10105556251c
describe
'454731' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNE' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
ffc124ffe007d18a39fc566239963cf2
9ec9f731448fc070c78cbdc0dc6cf50f4e072f62
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNF' 'sip-files00278.pro'
f6f927be47720e6616d0a25f06336bc8
2a83476a9f45f7e578056fc95d5abc7fb34d5390
describe
'151127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNG' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
91b52e8836a8822a1f264a4fbed4d35d
08d96797a79dc82016a45abdba00594dadd8788e
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNH' 'sip-files00278.tif'
463a8313a70a149a11cc7ae1c2d62dc4
3f16796039ff2005ff99ae243544d161d9d3dd52
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNI' 'sip-files00278.txt'
2bc48ed3b83ff93cfd8f4106d3a5f359
1f25f5c64f037a9b7ef79f6086ea1d51f3545941
describe
'51450' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNJ' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
5afab34e632996fe8eb1c71e92803058
741c132b42771041b3828ce5806e24ccd5207a14
'2011-11-17T18:38:59-05:00'
describe
'495099' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNK' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
fbba965d6aa68b05f792970377f596a1
da9cee44b4927ddc2a7fbaff253bab3564227859
'2011-11-17T18:45:43-05:00'
describe
'407703' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNL' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
fb766a057fd7fbc25417e36bd9e5fbd0
016899ab4ff2c6447fbd2a54504ba44be5f495d3
describe
'28720' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNM' 'sip-files00279.pro'
03811cf419e62d4cebb69eef57d776a4
89fd9f3849222c442d75016e6492c5d93186b8c3
describe
'133221' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNN' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
5cdc60fd8805bd59dbb4fda481679e66
025a9d61646e2a3429d72e43efcb4325f0884df3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNO' 'sip-files00279.tif'
114b1c55084ae19371ecf2ce0e5a8f02
fb3b29a975245e2616240fb6bd4853fe7b615f61
'2011-11-17T18:36:31-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNP' 'sip-files00279.txt'
05ba38412c5a97eed70be3260ad9506d
f5f65582249a185161fe79b4f0a948e5628c6f14
describe
'46662' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNQ' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
ef3d983f8b2fcf990b42df7e02ee2db5
8b61756692a83308caa0cb3b6c253fbb4e7994e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNR' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
df58c3b481ebfea9903d4134d37e9a0e
ecaa00c21f14cd16fae7952fc0928b07a7aa9fd1
'2011-11-17T18:37:44-05:00'
describe
'370708' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNS' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
ad080986dfcb3780e9002bd233918690
262724525031f589e46fe6022708d0777dd85f93
describe
'20384' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNT' 'sip-files00280.pro'
9ec60e8ccfc8696ac5bf8577397cafdc
bc47330c549bf18cd2e14a10fa2301f3ef38883e
describe
'121464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNU' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
155b5f0c2cee67dc8c699593acfb0d72
09a8ef2fc3e39e50dfde05e0b4971afd8eac259b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNV' 'sip-files00280.tif'
11859532bbc4a6ff2af25b69041c7bca
c402b48fe52481ed8f3aa22560757b9f79593842
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNW' 'sip-files00280.txt'
cdcb6bfb71c489220680e8203cede5d9
c56c972287135b7dc90a75dfc46e455b76dcfe82
describe
'43815' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNX' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
2ca9d72c59d9eb09d937218d0590c46b
e0046778a18abb5b2d16477a9d1298a810ced226
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNY' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
42104ab43a05f96d8d80ad1dfc900e39
4d781703d42e6dbcc163e57ddfe9dee60e5fd804
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHNZ' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
dc700c43b962d96f1fb7db6b562df2f0
8c99ae5d284987024ab5e8d7932eafa79003e040
describe
'33603' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOA' 'sip-files00281.pro'
b86375761d0eca044b6ac15425bc0271
80581e036458f29b29ca3e0175d4f4a4c99189e2
'2011-11-17T18:43:29-05:00'
describe
'146753' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOB' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
c57ce52534bb658e82dcbe7a024720fc
0a2f5ef85ff52146b4965f4409472027cc218307
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOC' 'sip-files00281.tif'
f84d26d89b204bd911464d87fd69b16e
f82240b0afb64afd9c37181a3235ce807f8bfbed
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOD' 'sip-files00281.txt'
077652a954cedc941076c09cbac8f6a3
a7e9f5953d48e29a8b2da758b8e81fd49a33b755
describe
'50084' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOE' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
c8f4fae2721313a67c577fa488c9dcb6
3fa9f71cb24486743850a8c54272fa4404133d10
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOF' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
fa521e01cfffcb9569e7a19a533f6024
1abb4b1e360888d8d6b0e6252e9890fbf253514f
describe
'438662' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOG' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
b90434aa6bd183b096cc34e305cddb1a
06632b27cd20bc7b132c547814aa67ed8758f57c
describe
'16240' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOH' 'sip-files00282.pro'
58d38fbbc08e8c91ae6b2b80e5150919
c5d649b8660bdf6444151b1a9e41ad3c25847f8e
describe
'136818' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOI' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
caea3ab2a5ff57de2fae5a7c42527d5e
3ea2647dc7edc401136ca888af58df673adcc5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOJ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
70276fb81eb686fd3c10530a22534215
b9ac1aabc647598d2373949bed393fa02fe81988
describe
'638' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOK' 'sip-files00282.txt'
45169508f90880cf1a83603bae94e25a
f6d49cfb2f6d65f03cae4415932c30a46edf9cee
describe
'47389' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOL' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
e0bb1bfc530bbb817e891b87bc2af148
8d7e239b272c9e2fe4346562cefdcd12dc88ef59
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOM' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
9379a857b4bbed80fff194e74a3565a4
f3dbd478497cab760d97ff2afbf8589b6d42d31b
describe
'441575' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHON' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
903306dc08d26d01d87cf3f1c043d273
550c79d23c1827e78519c66e676426d91e15c40c
describe
'35210' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOO' 'sip-files00283.pro'
069ed29bf2716de1047ebdd57eb0a44b
aa6dd25b7fd9b1de53b627eca5c9d92c7970d41e
describe
'145758' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOP' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
821afdd13b851fee9e197722716766b9
74f77b21f058b9005566a4d4a925e6ecbd5c07b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOQ' 'sip-files00283.tif'
3aee637e4865b0803b2a9b58930d4b81
8bfab3edff66ad44862858dc969ab3f4369c21d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOR' 'sip-files00283.txt'
36f91c013d0f1e2031809e086fe824fe
d0a449af6f59562153ca0ec946e213a31b5a9f97
describe
'50621' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOS' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
caa697d3bf53720be7c61ff7afb8171f
5a4793ac600fa07d9d8da2ee2a04ada0da9ba85a
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOT' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
1b7e37705e4a18087c81ae61b420634b
4aa2d42ea84392344c929e196f71c6153598e0b5
describe
'419119' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOU' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
556cf7d996d87d44b3671e0177fa421f
af9dc481247035a80ce7a762a931508b55de4051
describe
'32004' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOV' 'sip-files00284.pro'
0cf402549e69c78e0359c34078064241
74ff8d145fe12728a40a62e40b698e124b68d892
describe
'140442' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOW' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
3cafe8826f0b62ac9706eefbceb9a021
ab70c13db627f07f6a8c5a77269c61e95408eceb
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOX' 'sip-files00284.tif'
949917478466a68d5d3eeb679ff911f0
34d868af108f130565256983dfeba3414a86b6cb
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOY' 'sip-files00284.txt'
7169e5080634aeaa14a726d82a190118
f3aef9056bcdbf0bf899c934fd2f8c0324d7790a
describe
'48783' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHOZ' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
e15e3a12c379dada4e106b46654336ec
2181f06ea44e08177b3fbf63f0c8df7d2c48b719
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPA' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
a960035f755bdc303680e24b9e513ad4
d34f4b432b215b39c234ecf442b9d535bbef8dc6
describe
'432795' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPB' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
59702359dd730d6115d04cec295d5079
cfb3e075bd9a6f30b8943652ca3fe9402edc7a2b
describe
'33772' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPC' 'sip-files00285.pro'
d59c433255be22b60ac66567a312ea50
fcde0063860935bf9a47308e21e76ab0fdfe51fc
describe
'143251' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPD' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
3fab42bd8a58b5cb8e21af38a8af089b
e1f0ff35c1237f56cdf0d669babdec09f42226d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPE' 'sip-files00285.tif'
5f1e625e52b3da1c842e42d6264ab2c0
bf70206adcc7b6d8fa5802aa6c4cd2122e3993d6
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPF' 'sip-files00285.txt'
df88e8e3587d2cb54920f686fe479648
1dcaafdbd6d2fff789cdb277e1657c3ff1e5d40a
describe
'49887' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPG' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
722e8a47b5c7116c80abc1eaa899ea1a
a63bef66bd1a8c7180255f22e9ae9018d8bf0572
'2011-11-17T18:36:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPH' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
7db080b76a0149ef2d9372dd592483e5
cdd9125e5225d89a8c760921363c22bbb3cd2ef6
describe
'446242' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPI' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
15cbda171b343750b988b76741f2a7e9
44276b87ff4fd3d212593b8dd51e6b6da0368402
describe
'35812' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPJ' 'sip-files00286.pro'
d086980c4111a7cc9aa2377540c12d2e
092aee18676be655e49be59dd515c8d45ae5160c
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPK' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
a9ff825be768048cde61aacff972829c
babea56998b761674adae422b6716d85882a74c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPL' 'sip-files00286.tif'
649c233c03e9b8964417d2c1aa0adf8b
01808d5764e83ee6d9b34f475996398622dc1e06
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPM' 'sip-files00286.txt'
ad8bdd87ab3119e822771f472c7e0cb9
5e4c757b2faa7068b7318334ec1d6f6963acdd9e
'2011-11-17T18:45:25-05:00'
describe
'50378' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPN' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
fe225c497cde061cf40c276449f7f28d
1120e1e282d759362a777f755a329f915652d278
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPO' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
a2c76cf9880f09f458fa1353a02a12bb
e82fe3e74d2b305af8674a0d3418ec41122031e2
describe
'439634' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPP' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
660be8c15b6d05bdbcbbd8a696e1bbb5
4d9725f3691eed803a85b36dbfec659760ba5b27
describe
'34364' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPQ' 'sip-files00287.pro'
aec4b3ec6c2ac99bd8273d9bc06528f1
2dbe2228032076244a7b26fd0b665c16eb13716d
describe
'145437' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPR' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
878c997d4eaeaf5c95c166423e3da3ce
ffd7ca61819fb59ba1a9969558ae08cdc3b895a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPS' 'sip-files00287.tif'
214f76464b65d03ce7b9bc12b80a7833
1f04cfdfb5f612301b83e89083a23dddbace42f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPT' 'sip-files00287.txt'
538fcadd66796229fbbfba5787794f96
fead8f89177562dc54540c1303abe15bedc02381
describe
'50609' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPU' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
7ea672330b82ae348fd853bd89c234f0
572146af910f0518b98d2d486db92c71ae33c910
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPV' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
cab7497ae59e76f97747cda38e725745
ec6e0e67c0578a747a58c1f2318e5cab03acb10d
describe
'445434' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPW' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
6bccf6173ad75e826abe1583e373af54
a4c3b107c3e105a075168b5c72634c534486d736
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPX' 'sip-files00288.pro'
d3373613e5bbda2d861d572a81916a8c
00661d4abc4a624c141ffce595bfcb241cb6f685
describe
'148345' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPY' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
66df7076d9af066b9851898336a14886
ccef8475aad0ed44e8e607a3afbbf3f06d8112c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHPZ' 'sip-files00288.tif'
4cb027b32143d0255f68aaaf540cda94
f5a8cede62af9d23173b35c462e3835af6bac826
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQA' 'sip-files00288.txt'
86630ab8ed0a84c1355831b49e6c0caa
d2145fa7f85652a3d0f797ab5a325e7e0b518bd6
describe
'50722' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQB' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
fb7545e12ec192d3214e201d6cdbd931
de84c980baec9a6154fdb06f9f678e328b56f9d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQC' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
7f55d705a306b27725dbf413d2617916
7f7734ffb56d52f654afe3b8a81521eaac54adda
'2011-11-17T18:35:16-05:00'
describe
'434051' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQD' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
465eb94b8377e9ddd9df083d067647c1
86de9a94252aae7451eb550b824b12523fde7f89
describe
'34204' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQE' 'sip-files00289.pro'
0be5768e42d33b95d73eca9ce8cd9288
f9ebc1f25bc6310872e14621133fb5ee621f0541
describe
'144672' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQF' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
2e45e5fee3cc806e3815d0303a0a99d5
3e807cd7bbceb55f8633f12c328fcf93ca5458c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQG' 'sip-files00289.tif'
0619e79571e36c2c395de27b0903769f
82d7e8d7bdfe96156bc2265ee9c9bf14364e885d
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQH' 'sip-files00289.txt'
e13a6dc0fc6a0ab686e400adb2f78b39
d43d5219cef02d61c16812261ec2587398f56e2d
describe
'50337' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQI' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
6c667ff049affecba04c000a3040bea7
7859c7fbef85c8110953fbb48a8201464532e10a
describe
'495207' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQJ' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
800cd7335eeb3a2c7d7bf13970bc3cfa
d09b4ce75cc83e11289febbdf98d44b76cc19682
describe
'429202' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQK' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
8abc29beb91750c1add5626db5a4afb1
69c461b97f90489e411cef32ef4d5fde5689b3a1
describe
'33088' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQL' 'sip-files00290.pro'
882bce6d25081bc9d0b220fdc32440fd
250abf21792947da015f089187a56941a41581a4
describe
'143834' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQM' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
79e40b57b961e1b294415dc0952475d4
197f0cf298c466c35dacda3866ec8efc22ae2fd7
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQN' 'sip-files00290.tif'
d3f4f2810ff52f4fe32995f6c8b380a8
a2e090dfa7091b334fe09c46bdd7551896128690
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQO' 'sip-files00290.txt'
e57ca7d7a719b75da5212e77d4683cd3
60575304e0952645249727cc44170f8fbcc0dc99
describe
'49045' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQP' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
f573ab959e0d632f2ce7be4ad9181bd2
6d362b47a2a5f6e681776d05360c2f125d259f19
describe
'495122' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQQ' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
9796d5344fdace1549dcf6d52507b2b5
d28199cfeb89c62ed3ee1e245ad7460c5e527892
describe
'407138' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQR' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
0603966a070d99d324c11edf49ec517c
3c87c9825498451bb808e36e3c38525a5badaedf
describe
'30758' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQS' 'sip-files00291.pro'
9ce712933aba010b31bd0243b2a76cb8
9ba57c75f56fe433598811f9407f174fa4635e7b
describe
'135817' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQT' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
681e8f49eca438f72382ea57fb5353bf
cad0237942309e201459493afb31c937131f5cdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQU' 'sip-files00291.tif'
70342c7365105addea3f647a43600c0a
9a955598a222256d9129318e89d3fe4e24c8362d
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQV' 'sip-files00291.txt'
7accf718a325d85c72b51ce4fa7a16f3
5cb1cc04ebc2b27954256df02380d4de1d18d43c
describe
'48633' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQW' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
c0ee4f3eca0ec666eff4a89116ca071a
5102082524186f1b9cac5bff1144c9eae41b112d
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQX' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
57b2f22c730da2c157885b25af1b146f
a87a316ae92c9fdb80507f1aecdf6e48149922b7
describe
'423467' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQY' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
f83cd59349931ffdf18e74eadc807412
673f9829d42dd47b7eda64c02d4ac2ead7a25f9f
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHQZ' 'sip-files00292.pro'
21f5d2d198db09dbeb71fbf776adbab9
6e9194afe3a8398ad331ae7d07bdb9493afccc60
describe
'142420' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRA' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
48b1b4ec2242ed3e64d7198f9e9d54c4
e949d3c29894ea082348a2596552e6093b9d8730
describe
'3978672' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRB' 'sip-files00292.tif'
4cc2eb7796362537b92a2839565658d2
dae787804697ebd66f4a5c48a4d7c160387860f9
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRC' 'sip-files00292.txt'
3265835ad4a546da679e7528ee3c93e8
e0bb6a6abd8e5839102f7ef7d8068438bca72a6b
describe
'49717' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRD' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
1f35dd55fb6f0e69f9611757750c6abc
85c4c3675f5e941b44131f439a343955befb9f65
describe
'494792' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRE' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
be8257f03b31a4a294f19bfe70b5af7b
9f14126fc750841a714362b2a7328eb31c57cb12
describe
'443368' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRF' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
2420758ced64a5bf7a6503b4843ad6b2
6f6b3a22bfae8ed6611a2b772baf32ed79917f3f
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRG' 'sip-files00293.pro'
18ce5194dfcc168797d146c39b3b3be7
debf7f6a7ae5b428e066f2196c2ed50edb56cc0f
describe
'149357' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRH' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
b508b06c1ab14c28505b96f597be77b1
d07c71d07a11770b33d97e34241b00c1daaa8299
describe
'3974756' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRI' 'sip-files00293.tif'
5f96c5c5f17b49550b0e2b3a8ea39832
dff8e4e794ec42b1c661bf202b04caef8f7fe1a6
'2011-11-17T18:35:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRJ' 'sip-files00293.txt'
f93c919c03591871a2147e14137c6255
108ea7e78a5774c704ea21c142ab030e7ce191dc
describe
'51126' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRK' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
710cfcfd1bd7c123c41efd9c7b463570
90f208efe227c71f3d554174706cdb48bf883d54
describe
'514312' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRL' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
26cd4e0a11f9f5581a229cd89a0af1e4
646809662d8e48e163caddefd842c5d77bf50e5f
describe
'440785' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRM' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
d21a59e6ad686217d0800e2591632c4e
91f76312c253d50c05dca6ced79fefbfd8f8587e
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRN' 'sip-files00294.pro'
79e1dc0054d01484d94be1a28064d531
3d22ddf11d237242394a13fd676b886a66383ef4
describe
'146127' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRO' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
cf76832f7851f5a9c25aca0eecf4e368
107ba2b2e9c977f070722f8b69789988dfd4ca35
describe
'4131176' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRP' 'sip-files00294.tif'
902f8f6bf44a031a7ccbdfdbc8cd8f6e
c759a099a102cbfc7eef48b20ab9a196731c2648
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRQ' 'sip-files00294.txt'
f8781513ba31ca1405052f34bd5a90c1
90bb038cb896056e1a07f0a840b7984f7553abd7
describe
'49617' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRR' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
26f76826576c08019d4eff3071ebdfca
8b56a1ab54c089d9b77ee7e7ee7082e50cfbe353
describe
'504436' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRS' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
07f10fcef332d8ac96c3e74c3bcee373
7d01b928bda499e491f362b4a99a8b065a616832
describe
'392457' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRT' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
516e66219dfec1c289ec11cad0ea308a
af089f3d53419b637f58a7d46edc372136af47c4
describe
'121269' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRU' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
6f48d75e1f9f74bfb270b6b6f784a8c1
913a43155edfdb833db419a4235bfe866c4d8c05
describe
'4052392' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRV' 'sip-files00295.tif'
a07b0cfdba24a55318454b91519bbe6d
7a04dbfde41454e9b5d08a2c55ed0144745d5209
'2011-11-17T18:41:44-05:00'
describe
'45048' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRW' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
301ccf6a4434dddf0b671551154ba11b
264da51a7509e5baefa0534594cc2ae3d89b7142
describe
'514346' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRX' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
f3a505b3804e07e377b608d2e370fca5
d881b3ac56ddb3ba95960a660beed233f2b8e2a8
'2011-11-17T18:43:02-05:00'
describe
'426242' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRY' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
b70dcb469ec9c091756b73a4ff9229e1
6c83b1f8e4c175720f006242e5bd815635e63fbb
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHRZ' 'sip-files00296.pro'
eb37c685dc4f2741861fea724d1c45d6
30bb55ad3fff030ee77b72bbff886ff93d74d9f3
describe
'140408' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSA' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
5fa59105b9b63e1764bf0d0725168c09
01b249b64fc9267519df16af596184f14afd47c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSB' 'sip-files00296.tif'
21607a5cb9c462ee482dd470f359621e
d08a9392e57a6b82f6572385285bb2de8e4af888
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSC' 'sip-files00296.txt'
ea616885b345bd6962f8e0b61aa14864
1dbfcb36431927a599b74c143dfe91029f705a0f
describe
'49185' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSD' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
531864769616137352c8fdd49009d661
75f18a4ee4ef41d8089009eb39bd43e2d89c6109
describe
'514299' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSE' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
69426808fa1ed3da80fe76d1d2151290
c445371467843c1e4fc516fa397447cf4bae54fd
describe
'438434' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSF' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
0ea693f10f9ce7d66eb6662be1e15f6a
fcd7df5d2e70006540c46f49f91ccbc6d334a67a
describe
'36441' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSG' 'sip-files00297.pro'
9c6c0497ae60dcd720ede71e78a4e7d1
f7a54f471ea3c8c04114e2a74d4d11115abf914d
describe
'147014' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSH' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
e2a4dbb42ceb66db5fff62e65132f364
1fd0a2f9887afc5d79c7fac21f291370e19b560b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSI' 'sip-files00297.tif'
e3c14809bdf14276af7b537d1ea94813
8867f6a1a32b4e76ea881f112e675be71ff60b21
'2011-11-17T18:44:31-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSJ' 'sip-files00297.txt'
d4563656262d3f96c2e0f130201276a1
414448bf7065357b84dc553bea71e2944a7990a6
describe
'49883' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSK' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
ca86c03b08412d1fad083a1c313fb6a1
8466b8794cc05b30f2874dce622d9bfb27d56143
describe
'514322' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSL' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
4fe53fb94523fb40aea7fbc4041e36b4
843e6f1f98154b82e57b9f00b8e41ed500d40fbc
describe
'418877' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSM' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
0043143d5a3b1e0e13935391e916ac96
f74675a7a63ac082dd5ed6d8d6cb289fdd1ca925
describe
'32880' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSN' 'sip-files00298.pro'
18c35fef0f94114ccdd02a033f01d2b8
46a4e7045d1ce97d6b6ce3dd8d3f590773a43396
describe
'140039' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSO' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
4030734203b324770ed889eefa83cc3e
490f731c2864ad066bb239e58a733bbc3b06cfd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSP' 'sip-files00298.tif'
b2f161a47168a18a68bc5ad5616ba944
867fd2f76e6c9e5999b7740edf07307f8a1bc26e
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSQ' 'sip-files00298.txt'
adfaa60f275ea6e45509877d7d39ea7d
bcebeac9e3bcdcbff3e8e96f2c14f701c6008df5
'2011-11-17T18:36:29-05:00'
describe
'49099' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSR' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
e5863371c96bf9b745ef0f2d422819dd
364fdc770a7a347cbc8f8dff3c76760d85f5ae48
describe
'509013' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSS' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
f403e7fc91f69d1beb6cd2e7f71cb4c7
bec542abeee60c03a75971c44eaa68449c11c6da
describe
'432537' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHST' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
0b34ba6b0aa8205ce83b9ebd4e33e961
6970ed8cde4bd7f890671887820f030e84383a70
describe
'14876' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSU' 'sip-files00299.pro'
c750861a88e84d307aebb592364ed41d
4bb04310ae099ad6a010111febcef25423fe48cd
describe
'136360' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSV' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
46ce88c24166e6cc8ca013957dd98aad
84b50b9e448d0e50a0f0f86a322a30bb0d3b3fd6
describe
'4089524' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSW' 'sip-files00299.tif'
c122c919a20069f586a4dc68017debc5
0271d2875da8de54a2a6024512ee8b37e51081c9
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSX' 'sip-files00299.txt'
3c2a75eaa103ac773116999d33e7aa93
57537afdb6fd56f7485ee4fd5c44c3b3eb1d288c
describe
'48125' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSY' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
2dd988b109001f85c979001ba2e806fb
b86609a717fb2b83077bf84e1a6bb9a2e4f9e6b3
describe
'514324' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHSZ' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
cba33daa620956d9edefa40b1eaf0cf5
45a1a1104a598fa869f0f335348adcefafdc1c5b
describe
'438333' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTA' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
48fc64001d618d72f41d2374391c99e8
76a5fac28a129d7c36f18a74a9be324d0f3167c7
describe
'35610' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTB' 'sip-files00300.pro'
819ba25669b98ea0ffc2c534d26d77cd
754f6c71d3bc727dc777b3e96e3673edad6d1a7b
describe
'146059' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTC' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
160f69292176e27522bfca9e8d28c478
a8c1421d4e744b8368989bc35e460d3031821fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTD' 'sip-files00300.tif'
3272f8f69e9651e26c6448cfec30166d
73dbc84e71fa8866d951b8130f1abc2c87b84f38
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTE' 'sip-files00300.txt'
0d5ca51b17a7f26bac7833f2e224cf7e
17e1c09c14711f8616827659de3b6199a5a7942a
describe
'49082' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTF' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
cf37c81772931481a8334c0072a015a4
b88e512cbd4a2fada7b9f37212c56dfc589f258e
describe
'507105' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTG' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
14ac8be68467337c5b2e4f487453cb92
5be7809469973855d8fc6b5be9dea4a8158dbdc3
describe
'431603' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTH' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
15af0423f8fb50ce35d018d1ef7a537d
98b133ade094f94246c2b497a8f16ba7de90c1eb
'2011-11-17T18:35:17-05:00'
describe
'33833' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTI' 'sip-files00301.pro'
7541e2d8c9071b348fae4953b8f7ce75
e325580b4a714acd9fcad14bc43dec3071bdde57
describe
'143963' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTJ' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
7ece6374e3ed263a276da5fe43c95f6a
a3ce65fc0f660495a6921cf4f66c44de4f1c9737
describe
'4073504' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTK' 'sip-files00301.tif'
8b03bd7fe436be376ba40114300461a7
ea167b1d155bc3245d45f799760df596911418a5
'2011-11-17T18:44:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTL' 'sip-files00301.txt'
531182b8560a927f916605e2986efdf1
cd7faacf8a3b059334ff494d0d298adda58842a8
describe
'49760' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTM' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
99fea6b85df54b916fc4479bfad360fb
f215715d2d4f082dfd72993e73f1fda68d145ef9
describe
'514341' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTN' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
d487db7611b992b451083d3a46db2a6a
12778b9007913b92a4d48fbcb2f85a1abd57cac2
describe
'400863' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTO' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
8deeafa704ccb8fd1dac0a183f7eebd8
b01b3b7a4a1eaf4049805bd30b58d1a8739e9443
describe
'28504' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTP' 'sip-files00302.pro'
d008c9567b56bbf07edbb017cedfcf8e
f33ae9220f8268f40716d2294341fa6b2e378fc4
describe
'133596' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTQ' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
ed5233d69be1b14edf8e1d8cb6ead6ea
312a53f032457a0f84e5cdd132192849f2410260
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTR' 'sip-files00302.tif'
9ca41c9bf6bf2a47c60f11f210b5d293
fa676093c153a7b78f572ffa7efa3f878bf97830
'2011-11-17T18:39:07-05:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTS' 'sip-files00302.txt'
06f7ee3c153d4ea29856cbd8f5aeb269
f76d5d8983859806bb46a44cab5560b6cf689a4d
describe
'46939' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTT' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
ed64d719510c31b67da88ede10e7a573
0e2538a0e8ddaeadeb42782023caad27935c2589
describe
'505873' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTU' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
b6f71530a42bcf800750a39d27302c42
6eaaea21087d0722e05a91eb4f64614fefd2de9e
'2011-11-17T18:35:03-05:00'
describe
'432971' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTV' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
3d3ffb58152e6487d17427caade4b72d
1cb50bedd3f8c9cae74580d41c588cb6d1771419
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTW' 'sip-files00303.pro'
a7e2bf317da495940447d16ad783ce67
79120feee5aa01f14e7008018de3a9a2d8758e6d
describe
'145175' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTX' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
02fd08adae759726477fa3df3f2c657b
b872b629a4af91c76ce3ab84d7956a8c4ae3d2b9
describe
'4063892' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTY' 'sip-files00303.tif'
99930a70fa362918f175255bc7dcda57
ca61a67c6e6230127dc9b3e416ec12672d519c8c
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHTZ' 'sip-files00303.txt'
0dfdf437bbf399b4ce8fb9c29e194054
8002017cd58a3957df1eba8674244b928e354ee4
describe
'48843' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUA' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
ccefd5d28aa8f3f5bf4d926867fe7480
42fa50cd7dbe438099f0853292d5dc09378141a1
'2011-11-17T18:35:40-05:00'
describe
'514337' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUB' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
b5ffa5a3e5765644b8b5f55fc5ead02a
fc6fd8c4f08ab3d7b526836fee24bcafd964c667
describe
'431610' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUC' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
a9e0b85b5433676386abd9e2dc991975
8b63fca3f21177c3ded5f6be46288748fc4b466b
describe
'34102' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUD' 'sip-files00304.pro'
16c9f696c577b69c0aebd2ad6e739bfa
da420ac0cce3e8bcac5959d3719150e0da3f5bad
'2011-11-17T18:46:15-05:00'
describe
'144352' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUE' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
f63dabb99a6581322300e95ced869b3d
01fb1a3b3ee8a759cd0dc7825676214328daf280
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUF' 'sip-files00304.tif'
1f3c808edf530ec15e26e78b40aa4439
5b2fe331b642e5e679e40da040cb8bb2fa80da04
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUG' 'sip-files00304.txt'
cb8834963d8c06f506c981bc50ecc461
806e30cefd760f6c9ef285b1cb7f4f989c373830
describe
'50225' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUH' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
2b115759c6b4703b950d90037e98e0a5
e5a45faa02ad986608155678b02c9521fab12a00
describe
'505922' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUI' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
15d5beeff38402d0c5fc9e5251357797
f7b67342ac23b7b6c747f931c84149f3baeaf2e5
describe
'418378' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUJ' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
7c57ea6b13549351203a25e2594ecb34
eae849f5c161908758da46cebdb6694cd2558adb
describe
'31961' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUK' 'sip-files00305.pro'
f8ef0470532e16414dfe3a0a26a6a53b
bee4349db90e9431c7979bb0e7ae39e674722db5
'2011-11-17T18:36:10-05:00'
describe
'141661' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUL' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
4711d07c41d8cb6668c39093da66fefc
06e06d898e2830de5a9c7c2cc687bf6eecae84c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUM' 'sip-files00305.tif'
a81ac8cb56c4a17a221e41f8e263f933
ef3f19e9f2abac8be697e833dd6b9a6fc3df5b03
'2011-11-17T18:39:04-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUN' 'sip-files00305.txt'
341ac4c97136ab00b236d3c994b110c2
fbbfd42dd604de0de8f95aa824fc41dbbd0e1126
describe
'48328' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUO' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
3c2fda52f262c9d416bfa6e4a43e4c14
17579d3b9f8ded5c01c9ea195713645e08989312
describe
'514294' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUP' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
c374d9af81ab63e315e0a90910fa2c97
a749f0553278a358518affe9587e3fc25c6034f8
describe
'421822' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUQ' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
3a8017840d21cc8daf047de429640ab8
105c1711ca6a8f7055ebcc0b9c713fa895311847
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUR' 'sip-files00306.pro'
8dbb6694301b3bf96e5d4d56cc9ceeb4
649283c55ce9b1085071c19c6f7b5d9849463e51
describe
'140827' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUS' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
b61e56ad3ee8eb6eac4c7deed2e323f7
f1acd5a926560683b7a4e1605e375c737d55c23b
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUT' 'sip-files00306.tif'
efa3a9a295479431fe5c71fd4ff1beaf
12da478f7cc0bd65a90a58af315efbc6144b7d7c
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUU' 'sip-files00306.txt'
969d38e88a83bc0f3e29b087c5060085
722f9e897c487c6beb48b03951b5fc6c580febc3
describe
'48081' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUV' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
f4895fa6a845b49d8d3026e8d81c9866
98d57a68a22920017eb77f58ecbb0c7d77567df1
describe
'506969' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUW' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
8f7df515a5b5a7772a40625260b23753
65d00a0899617176ce311d299db0c8f08027f1eb
describe
'416565' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUX' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
aab959a4f1d73bd6ee345fbf474ca01e
b0b0c8b6d797f0752671bcf253d1b2cc52fdbaf8
'2011-11-17T18:43:11-05:00'
describe
'31820' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUY' 'sip-files00307.pro'
07149e9bd3a7843f43b5426d4da30b07
b951a9ba62e6121ee52a17b768ae69214eca5259
describe
'140509' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHUZ' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
a104158b98fd9c6a3d22c83e9afcf48f
f03c3a0491134e1e77513f11ca5765cbebf0edb7
describe
'4072644' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVA' 'sip-files00307.tif'
0d961a3e38521656d0b6975c9e59f5a7
24db3d09ac110d437f8d7de2dbc64e6f53fd3ee0
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVB' 'sip-files00307.txt'
6d5349e32ccfa6217fadd7b3caebfee5
028150d195778a0660b0e0979d4fa167a0e5bbbf
describe
'50524' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVC' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
8d59b0aceaf1e0cab9c530fb4bc41905
a406b4fc51b47eba715625b5da55b0194c8dc23f
describe
'514222' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVD' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
18c817d7187765f6ba41fa8269ddd3fd
a514c2e242a1df8a680cc4c13871d07ea4be6daf
describe
'339311' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVE' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
94db4b9c745658b991e43a2533b2f6fe
017f39ec34e3759dc6480fb2aa6057c79dd3a478
describe
'18320' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVF' 'sip-files00308.pro'
65c843d05a22c58c71694f3a3c342ce1
d1e74c7ad0f0a13ad9fa0241fa1c1ee2ea30346a
describe
'111578' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVG' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
dfc98412d8e07a4c1bc6587baf67bbe8
01c6710691a44acef95e49bd637f719391276a43
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVH' 'sip-files00308.tif'
7b18c927dd842537ddd9d3a7ae32f2ac
6d1e51c9bfc6b7d302963e4e75299896bc50c8b8
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVI' 'sip-files00308.txt'
30b561d7689c46e5033108fe5e584d98
1806f1e045500fac8219180ee60bf5ad50eb2197
describe
'41373' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVJ' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
a881e8f86f8a60864f0967da1480c5ec
ab595631b412babf64889c377f95e1a52bd78086
describe
'514331' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVK' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
628d7e2789d3b876f902d0bd982f4e3e
d16a274c0927e5bf1289cfa1c9f4784b218a90c8
describe
'250329' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVL' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
444904677e6b96a9c92f3ffbc61b31d4
6d1ebde696b25d127fcf2f9ad84a9736dd762635
'2011-11-17T18:31:42-05:00'
describe
'79063' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVM' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
8db2f1b54b9750fb5bd984dd42e41cfc
40b064a7e440732c522051124dbf02d5d5e45e73
describe
'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVN' 'sip-files00311.tif'
3dde89da6d2023216cbc172945479ef3
ee00e9bc3fbb387b7f27699b378abd7f8c54e241
describe
'32304' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVO' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
9992977f06516160328bede773c105bf
5ca655f875a366e0d3be026a5a41a11733e64621
describe
'567549' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVP' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
19bcb7e8a405a006cfddac13b1152e23
d8ae0da19b4513fed770f65bbd7972eacf916af1
describe
'500553' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVQ' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
0fc33a2da03e633b0616e5a6295dbb55
b283e30c7cc330b20cd21ba0e2ba66027e261a0b
describe
'144388' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVR' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
5a3d8a9bd2bb2168b33920ced60c2244
65513ad7d0d798351e99b04bbe260ef012eb4d07
describe
'13639280' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVS' 'sip-files00313.tif'
21ac3144bc4b74d39210b93fe446bc23
79a06c09c521e3955e8fd55965bf1c7d3f5b170c
describe
'49666' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVT' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
52236937f607501b12be6a8307a1b6c5
3f0631079a813845c390ca81d8955f3a71c65c3a
describe
'570869' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVU' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
e25406dfd1e6c265284f89aa8b3173b1
f8b2653813a3d6fea036d860fa97abf51ffe725d
describe
'733420' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVV' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
7b9809f15d9b1a662ebb0b0e71e53c48
e8b1b48b147a0eff050d608f54119680798747dc
describe
'204061' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVW' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
7589f19d7c4c19850b4ac2c916f5b0c0
88c1f7de9ac5a82a76ebdafb08769e2eaec9a26e
describe
'13719800' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVX' 'sip-files00314.tif'
7d92ce9663a1835ab74121966e77471c
dea6df59c6de8db3601c6f43cdcacd5b8539a3a4
describe
'63973' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVY' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
17396334f4b7e827fca83e1e48036c80
e48555c565a4920ecd13b68821d932d6760b5ab5
describe
'122343' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHVZ' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
81f156de9f281bdf9a222f87ff0ed882
e82b6950d0daecc4aa927dee855255dad511482d
describe
'151465' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWA' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
5d543746e860b2e148cb0b4bd7157394
e5d07b5535b276adfcac316681e513107849fb40
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWB' 'sip-files00315.pro'
1182d5bbe9c73f15ab5ba20fd09800e0
f0149947a3cd5c0806bf2618f0c4abf1f6d87be0
'2011-11-17T18:39:23-05:00'
describe
'45029' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWC' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
370cd0a41c415ec9df13d3e49cea4110
1e75239ef07acbed78f07360b7f25aa7a355d5f1
describe
'2941476' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWD' 'sip-files00315.tif'
dd5fdcd6a3973d32108201ab13dd4b20
b2f1e9f95ad7a39c1958a525e0a44872c7c48688
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWE' 'sip-files00315.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'23325' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWF' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
052e020033f69d3bed972cc2a901dc5f
88041a4f4d85f21c73a7480eb630e69c4b73e959
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWG' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
39ce00a0a91775a41adcfd447a5397d5
3308d79fc160f4df857a15e77ea4a3dcbad7ffc9
describe
'493499' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWH' 'sip-filesUF00082996_00001.mets'
ef64c452410078421b7a307eac94db9c
3db8da84a32e2da71f35bd17f84f625b4638ae78
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2014-01-11T08:17:15-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'643863' 'info:fdaE20080927_AAAALZfileF20080928_AACHWK' 'sip-filesUF00082996_00001.xml'
911af79e0390a3c12fcdbd34d34adc2b
6a67018d4d14ef8ef4c5ad18539796d92965e22b
describe
'2014-01-11T08:17:10-05:00'
xml resolution







The Baldwin Library
COSSACK FAIRY TALES

AND.

FOLK-TALES.







FATRY TALES

AND

o &
ooggatt

\- ,

sy / FOLK-TALES.

SELECTED, EDITED, AND TRANSLATED
BY

R. NISBET BAIN.

ILLUSTRATED BY E. W. MITCHELL.



LONDON :
LAWRENCE AND BULLEN,
16 HENRIETTA 8T., COVENT GARDEN, W.C.
1894.

[All rights reserved.]
Ricwarp Ciay & Sons, Lrwirep,
Lonpox & Bunuay.


CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION ...

OH

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

THE

STORY OF THE WIND

VOICES AT THE WINDOW

STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, THE

AND THE FAITHFUL BEASTS

VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL

STORY OF TREMSIN, THE BIRD ZHAR, AND

LOVELY MAID OF THE SEA
SERPENT-WIFE eer are
STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL
SPARROW AND THE BUSH
OLD DOG...

FOX AND THE CAT

STRAW OX

GOLDEN SLIPPER ... ogo
IRON WOLF

THREE BROTHERS

FALSE SISTER,

NASTASIA, THE

PAGE
ix

18
40

79

93
103
109
122
127
130
134
14]
158
161
viil CONTENTS.

THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL

THE STORY OF IVAN AND THE DAUGHTER OF THE SUN
THE CAT, THE COCK, AND THE FOX ...

THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS TWO WIVES

THE ORIGIN OF THE MOLE

THE TWO PRINCES

THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN AND THE OLD FATHER WHO
WENT TO SCHOOL AGAIN... pad Sete)

IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETER’S FIFE ea near

THE MAGIC EGG a

THE STORY OF THE FORTY-FIRST BROTHER

THE STORY OF THE UNLUCKY DAYS ... eae

THE WONDROUS STORY OF IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS

b po WM bw wo
ao co oF WW WY
TO WW WwW Ww

bo


INTRODUCTION.

THe favourable reception given to my volume of
Russian Fairy Tales has encouraged me to follow
it up with a sister volume of stories selected from
another Slavonic dialect extraordinarily rich in folk-
tales—I mean Ruthenian, the language of the
Cossacks.

Ruthenian is a language intermediate between
Russian and Polish, but quite independent of both.
Its territory embraces, roughly speaking, that vast
plain which hes between the Carpathians, the water-
shed of the Dnieper, and the Sea of Azov, with
Lemberg and Kiev for its chief intellectual centres :
though rigorously repressed by the Russian Gov-
ernment, it is still spoken by more than twenty
millions of people. It possesses a noble literature,
numerous folk-songs, not inferior even to those of
Servia, and, what chiefly concerns us now, a copious
collection of justly admired folk-tales, many of them
of great antiquity, which are regarded, both in Russia
and Poland, as quite unique of their kind. Mr.
x INTRODUCTION.

Ralston, I fancy, was the first to call the attention
of the West to these curious stories, though the want
at that time of a good Ruthenian dictionary (a want
since supplied by the excellent lexicon of Zhelekhovsky
and Nidilsky) prevented him from utilizing them.
Another Slavonic scholar, Mr. Morfill, has also fre-
quently alluded to them (most recently in his
interesting history of Poland) in terms of enthusiastic
but by no means extravagant praise.

The three chief collections of Ruthenian Folk-Lore
are those of Kulish, Rudchenko, and Dragomanov,
which represent, at least approximately, the three
dialects into which Ruthenian is generally divided.
It is from these three collections that the present
selection has been made. Kulish, who has the
merit of priority, was little more than a pioneer,
his contribution merely consisting of some dozen
hazki (mirchen) and kazochiki (miirchenlein), in-
corporated in the second volume of his: Zapishi o
yuzhnoi Rusi (Descriptions of South Russia), St.
Petersburg, 1856-7. Twelve years later Rudchenko
published at Kiev what is still, on the. whole, the
best collection of Ruthenian Folk-Tales, under the
title of Narodnuiya Yuzhnorusskiya Skazki (Popular
South Russian Mirchen). Like Linnrét among the
Finns, Rudchenko took down the greater part of
these tales direct from the lips of the people. Ina


INTRODUCTION. xi

second volume, published in the following year, he
added other stories gleaned from various minor MS.
collections of great rarity. In 1876 the Imperial
Russian Geographical Society published at Kiev,
under the title of Malorusskiya Narodnuiya Pre-
donyia t Razkazw (Little-Russian Popular Traditions
and Tales), an edition of as many MS. collections
of Ruthenian Folk-Lore (including poems, proverbs,
riddles, and rites) as it could lay its hands upon.
This collection, though far less rich in variants than
Rudechenko’s, contained many original tales which
had escaped him, and was ably edited by Michael
Dragomanov, by whose name indeed it is generally
known. -

The present attempt to popularize these Cossack
stories is, I believe, the first translation ever made from
Ruthenian into English. The selection, though natur-
ally restricted, is fairly representative; every variety
of folk-tale has a place in it, and it should never be
forgotten that the Ruthenian Kazka (miirchen), owing
to favourable circumstances, has managed to preserve
far more of the fresh spontaneity and naive simplicity
of the primitive folk-tale than her more sophisticated
sister, the Russian Skazka. It is maintained, more-
over, by Slavonic scholars that there are peculiar
and original elements in these stories not to be found
in the folk-lore of other European peoples; such data,
xl INTRODUCTION.

for instance, as the magic handkerchiefs (generally
beneficial, but sometimes, as in the story of Ivan Golik,
terribly baleful) ; the demon-expelling, hemp-and-tar
whips, and the magic cattle-teeming egg, so mis-
chievous a possession to the unwary. It may be so,
but, after all that Mr. Andrew Lang has taught us
on the subject, it would be rash for any mere philolo-
gist to assert positively that there can be anything
really new in folk-lore under the sun. On the other
hand, the comparative isolation and primitiveness of
the Cossacks, and their remoteness from the great
theatres of historical events, would seem to be
favourable conditions both for the safe preservation
of old myths and the easy development of new ones.
It is for professional students of folk-lore to study
the original documents for themselves.

R. Nispet Bary.

British Musewm,
August, 1894.


COSSACK FAIRY TALES.



OH.

HE olden times were not like the
times we live in. In the olden
times all manner of Evil Powers!
walked abroad. The world itself
was not then as it is now: now



there are no such Evil Powers
amongst us. I'll tell you a kazka? of Oh, the Tsar
of the Forest, that you may know what manner of
being he was.

Once upon a time, long long ago, beyond the times
that we can call to mind, ere yet our great-grand-
fathers or their grandfathers had been born into, the
world, there lived a poor man and his wife, and they
had one only son, who was not as an only son ought

* Div. This ancient, untranslatable word (comp. Latin Deus)
is probably of Lithuanian origin, and means any maletic power.
? A folk-tale. Russ., Skazka. Ger., Mirchen,
B
2 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

to be to his old father and mother. So idle and lazy
was that only son that Heaven help him! He would
do nothing, he would not even fetch water from the
well, but lay on the stove all day long and rolled
among the warm cinders. Although he was now
twenty years old, he would sit on the stove with-
out any trousers on, and nothing would make him
come down. If they gave him anything to eat, he
ate it; and if they didn’t give him anything to eat, he
did without. His father and mother fretted sorely
because of him, and said: “ What are we to do with
thee, O son? for thou art good for nothing. Other
people’s children are a stay and a support to their
parents, but thou art but a fool and dost consume our
bread for nought.” But it was of no use at all. He
would do nothing but sit on the stove and play with
the cinders. So his father and his mother grieved
over him for many a long day, and at last his mother
said to his father: “ What is to be done with our
son? Thou dost sce that he has grown up and yet is
of no use to us, and he is so foolish that we can do
nothing with him. Look now, if we can send him
away, let us send him away ; if we can hire him out,
let us hire him out; perchance other folks may be
able to do more with him than we can.” So his
father and mother laid their heads together, and sent
him to a tailor’s to learn tailoring. There he remained
OH. 3

three days, but then he ran away home, climbed up
on the stove, and again began playing with the cinders.
His father then gave him a sound drubbing and sent
him to a cobbler’s to learn eobbling, but again he ran
away home. His father gave him another drubbing
and sent him to a blacksmith to learn smith’s work.
But there, too, he did not remain long but ran away
home again, so what was that poor father to do?
“Tl tell thee what T’ll do with thee, thou son of a
dog!” said he; ‘I'll take thee, thou lazy lout, into
another kingdom. There, perchance, they will be
able to teach thee better than they can here, and it
will be too far to run away from.” So he took him
and set out on his journey,

They went on and on, they went a short way and
they went a long way, and at last they came to a
forest so dark that they could see neither earth
nor sky. They went through this forest, but in a
short time they grew very tired, and when they came
to a path leading to a clearing full of large tree-
stumps, the father said: “I am so tired out that I
will rest here a little,” and with that he sat down
on a tree-stump and eried: “Oh, how tired I am!”
He had no sooner said these words, than out of the
tree-stump, nobody could say how, sprang such a
little little old man all so wrinkled and puekered, and
his beard was quite green and reached night down to
4 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

his knee.—‘* What dost thou want of me, O man?”
he asked.—The man was amazed at the strangeness
of his coming to light, and said to him: “I did not
call thee; begone!”—‘* How canst thou say that
when thou didst call me?” asked the little old man.—
“Who art thou, then?” asked the father.—‘ I am Oh,
the Tsar of the Woods,” replied the old man; “why
didst thou call me, I say ?”—‘ Away with thee, I did
not call thee,” said the man.—‘‘ What! thou didst not
call me when thou saidst ‘Oh’ ?”—I was tired, and
therefore I said ‘Oh’!” replied the man.—‘* Whither
art thou going?” asked Oh—‘ The wide world lies
before me,” sighed the man. “ I am taking this scurvy
blockhead of mine to hire him out to somebody or
other. Perchance other people may be able to knock
more sense into him than we can at home; but send
him whither we will, he always comes running home
again !”—“Hire him out to me [I warrant Pll
teach him,” said Oh. ‘ Yet I'll only take him on one
condition. Thou shalt come back for him when a
year has run, and if thou dost know him again, thou
mayest take him; but if thou dost not kuow him
again, he shall serve another year with me.’”—
“Good!” cried the man. So they shook hands upon
it, had a right-down good drink to clinch the bargain,
and the man weut back to his own home, while Oh
took the son away with him.






} lofts A
Vie ae
STAT ie
. qs sieht Be

(ee = y erence __ jiwe
ie

E TaN Le Gs
Zs tu j
Lo nS ily ies
Fig fy [ b Mu Meee Ab Wr Wey ne

AN \\ Bad


6 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Oh took the son away with him, and they passed
into the other world, the world beneath the earth, and
came to a green hut woven out of rushes, and in this
hut everything was green; the walls were green and
the benches were green, and Oh’s wife was green and
his children were green—ain fact everything there was
green. And Oh had water-nixies for serving-maids,
and they were all as green as rue. “Sit down now!”





said Oh to Lis new labourer, ‘and have a bit of
something to eat.” The nixies then brought him
some food, and that was also green, and he ate of it.
‘And now,” said Oh, ‘‘take my labourer into the
courtyard that he may chop wood and draw water.”
So they took him into the courtyard, but instead of
chopping any wood he lay down and went to sleep.
Oh came out to see how he was getting on, and there
OH. if
he lay a-snoring. Then Oh seized him, and bade
them bring wood and tie his labourer fast to the wood,
and set the wood on fire till the labourer was burnt
to ashes. Then Oh took the ashes and scattered
them to the four winds, but a single piece of burnt
coal fell from out of the ashes, and this coal he sprinkled
with living water, whereupon the labourer immediately
stood there alive again and somewhat handsomer and
stronger than before. Oh again bade him chop wood,
but again he went to sleep. Then Oh again tied him
to the wood and burnt him and scattered the ashes to
the four winds and sprinkled the remnant of the coal
with living water, and instead of the loutish clown
there stood there such a handsome and_ stalwart
Cossack * that the like of him can neither be imagined
nor described but only told of in tales.

There, then, the lad remained for a year, and at the
end of the year the father came for his son. He
came to the self-same charred stumps in the self-same
forest, sat him down, and said: Oh!”—Oh imme-
diately came out of the charred stump and said ;
“ Hail! O man !”—“ Hail to thee, Oh !”—“ And what
dost thou want, O man ?” asked Oh.—‘* I have come,”
said he, ‘‘ for my son.”—“ Well, come then! If thou

1 Kozak, a Cossack, being the ideal human hero of the Ruthe-
nians, just as a bogatyr is a hero of the demi-god type, as the
name implies.
& COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

dost know him again, thou shalt take him away ; ‘but’
if thou dost not know him, he shall serve with me yet,
another year.” So the man went with Oh. They.
came to his hut, and Oh took whole handfuls of millet
and scattered it about, and myriads of cocks came
running up and pecking it. “ Well, dost thou know,
thy son again?” said Ob. The man stared and
stared. There was nothing but cocks, and one cock
was just like another. He could not pick out his son.
“Well,” said Oh, “as thou dost not know him, go
home again; this year thy son must remain in my
service.” So the man went home again.

The second year passed away, and the man again
went to Oh. He came to the charred stumps and
said: “Oh!” and Oh popped out of the tree-stump
again. ‘ Come!” said he, “and see if thou canst
recognize him now.” Then he took him to a sheep-
pen, and there were rows and rows of rams, and one
ram was just like another. The man stared and
stared, but he could not pick out his son, “Thou
mayest as well go home then,” said Oh, ‘ but thy son,
shall live with me yet another year.” So the man
went away sad at heart.

The third year also passed away, and the man came,
again to find Oh. He went on and on till there met
him an old man all as white as milk, and the raiment
of this old man was glistening white. “Hail to thee,


OH, ° 9

Oman!” said he.—“ Hail to thee also, my father !”
——“ Whither doth God lead thee 2’”—* JI am going to
free my son from Oh.”—* How go ?”’_Then the man
told the old white father how he had hired out his
son to Oh and under what conditions.
said the old white father, “’tis a vile pagan thou hast
to deal with; he will lead thee about by the nose for



“ Aye, aye!”

a long time.”—* Yes,” said the man, “‘I perceive that
he is 4 vile pagan ; but I know not what in the world
to do with him. Canst thou not tell me then,
dear father, how I may recover my son ?”—“ Yes, I
can,” gaid the old man.—* Then prythee tell me,
darling father, and I'll pray for thee to God all
my life, for though he has not been much of a son to
me, he is still my own flesh and -blood.”—*« Hearken;
then !” said the old man; “when thou dost go to Oh;
he will let loose a multitude of doves before thee, but
choose not one of these doves. The dove thou’ shalt
choose must be the one that comes not out, but
remains sitting beneath the pear-tree pruning its
feathers; that will be ‘thy son.”’ Then the ma
thanked the old white father and went on. 5

He came to the charred stumps. “Oh!” cried he,
and out came Oh and led him to his sylvan realm:
There Oh seattered about handfuls of wheat and
called his doves, and there flew down such a multitude
of them that. there was no counting them, and one
10 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

dove was just like another. ‘Dost thou recognize
thy son?” asked Oh. “An thou knowest him again,
he is thine; an thou knowest him not, he is mine.”
Now all the doves there were pecking at the wheat,
all but one that sat alone beneath the pear-tree,
sticking out its breast and pruning its feathers.
“That is my son,” said the man.—‘‘Since thou hast
guessed him, take him,” replied Oh. ‘Then the father
took the dove, and immediately it changed into a
handsome young man, and a handsomer was not to be
found in the wide world. The father rejoiced greatly
and embraced and kissed him. “ Let us go home, my
son!” said he. So they went.

As they went along the road together they fell a-
talking, and his father asked him how he had fared
at Oh’s. The son told him. Then the father told
the son what he had suffered, and it was the son’s
turn to listen. Furthermore the father said: “ What
shall we do now, my son? I am poor and thou art
poor: hast thou served these three years and earned
nothing ?”—‘‘Grieve not, dear dad, all will come
right in the end. Look! there are some young
nobles hunting after a fox. I will turn myself into a
greyhound and catch the fox, then the young noble-
men will want to buy me of thee, and thou must
sell me to them for three hundred rubles—only,
mind thou sell me without a chain; then we shall


Of. 11

have lots of money at home, and will live happily
together !”

They went on and on, and there, on the borders
of a forest, some hounds were chasing a fox. They
chased it and chased it, but the fox kept on escaping,
and the hounds could not run it down. Then the son
changed himself into a greyhound, and ran down the
fox and killed it. The noblemen thereupon came

galloping out of the forest. “Is that thy grey-
hound ?”—* It is.’ —“ Tis a good dog ; wilt sell it to
us ?”—* Bid for it !”—‘ What dost thou require ?””—

“Three hundred rubles without a chain.”—‘ What
do we want with thy chain, we would give him a
chain of gold. Say a hundred rubles !”—* Nay !”—
“Then take thy money and give us the dog.” They
counted down the money and took the dog and set
off hunting. They sent the dog after another fox.
Away he went after it and chased it right into the
forest, but then he turned into a youth again and
rejoined his father.

They went on and on, and his father said to him :
“What use is this money to us after all? It is
barely enough to begin housekeeping with and repair
our hut.”—‘ Grieve not, dear dad, we shall get
more still. Over yonder are some young noblemen
hunting quails with falcons. I will change myself
into a falcon, and thou must sell me to them; only
12 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

sell me for three hundred rubles, and without a
hood.”

They went into the plain, and there were some
young noblemen casting their falcon at a quail. The
falcon pursued but always fell short of the quail, and
the quail always eluded the falcon. The son then
changed himself into a falcon and immediately struck
down its prey. The young noblemen saw it and
were astonished. “Is. that thy faleon?’”—“ Tis
mine.”—“ Sell it to us, then!”—‘‘ Bid for it!”’—
‘What dost thou want for it?”—‘If ye give three
hundred rubles, ye may take it, but it must be
without the hood.”—“As if we want thy hood!
We'll make for-it a hood worthy of a Tsar.” So they
higeled and hageled, but at last they gave him the
three hundred rubles. Then the young nobles sent
the falcon after another quail, and it flew and flew
till it beat down its prey; but then he became a
youth again, and went on with his father.

“ How shall we manage to live with so little?” said
the father. “Wait a while, dad, and we shall have
still more,” said the son. ‘ When we pass through the
fair I'll change myself into a horse, and thou must
sell me. They will give’ thee'a thousand rubles for
me, only sell me without a halter.” So when they
got to the next. little town where they were holding
a fair, the son changed himself into a horse, a horse


Of. 13

as supple as a serpent, and so fiery that it was

dangerous to approach him. The father led the
horse along by the halter, it. pranced about and
struck sparks from the ground with its hoofs. Then
the horse-dealers came together and began to bargain
for it. “A thousand rubles down,” said he, “and you
may have it, but without the halter.” What do we
want with thy halter? we will make for it a silver.
gilt halter. Come, we'll give thee five hundred!
“No!” said he.—Then up there came a gipsy, blind
of one eye. “Oman! what dost thou want for that
horse?” said hé.—* A thousand rubles without the
halter.” —*“ N ay! but that is dear, little father! Wilt
thou not take five hundred with the halter 2?—<« No,
not a bit of it !”—“ Take six hundred, then!” Then
the gipsy began higgling and haggling, but the man
would not give way. “Come, sell it!” said he,
“with the halter.”—“ No, thou gipsy, I have a liking
for that halter.”— But, my good man, when didst
thou ever see them sell a horse without a halter ?
How then can one lead him off 4” —“ Nevertheless,
the halter must remain mine.”—* Look now, my
father, [ll give thee five rubles extra, only I must
have the halter.’—The old man fell a-thinking, “A
halter of this kind is worth but three grivnt,’ and

the gipsy offers me five rubles for it; let him have °

1 A grivna is the tenth part of a ruble, about 22d,

aN
14 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

it.” So they clinched the bargain with a good drink,’
and the old man went home with the money, and the
gipsy walked off with the horse. But it was not
really a gipsy, but Oh, who had taken the shape of a
eipsy.

Then Oh rode off on the horse, and the horse
carried him higher than the trees of the forest, but
lower than the clouds of the sky. At last they sank
down among the woods and came to Oh’s hut, and
Oh went into his hut and left his horse outside on
the steppe. “This son of a dog shall not escape
from my hands so quickly a second time,” said he
to his wife. And at dawn Oh took the horse by the
pridle and led it away to the river to water it. But
no sooner did the horse get to the river and bend
down its head to drink, than it turned into a perch
and began swimming away. Oh, without more ado,
turned himself into a pike and pursued the perch.
But just as the pike was almost up with it, the
perch gave a sudden twist and stuck out its
spiky fins and turned its tail towards the pike, so
that the pike could not lay hold of it. So when
the pike came up to it, it said: “Perch! perch !
turn thy head towards me, | want to have a chat
with thee!”——“I can hear thee very well as I am,
dear cousin, if thou art inclined to chat,” said the
perch. So off they set. again, and. again the pike




Of. 15

overtook the perch. “Perch! perch! turn thy
head round towards me, I want to have a chat with
thee!”—Then the perch stuck out its bristly fins
again and said: “If thou dost wish to have a chat,
dear cousin, I can hear thee just as well as I am.”
So the pike kept on pursuing the perch, but it
was of no use. At last the perch swam ashore, and
there was a Tsarivna whittling an ash twig. The
perch changed itself into a gold ring set with
garnets, and the Tsarivna saw it and fished up the
ring out of the water. Full of joy she took it
home, and said to her father: “Look, dear papa !
what a nice ring I have found!” The Tsar kissed
her, but the Tsarivna did not know which fluger it
would suit best, it was so lovely.

About the same time they told the Tsar that a
certain merchant had come to the palace. It was
Oh, who had changed himself into a merchant. The
Tsar went out to him and said: “What dost thou
want, old man ?”—*T was sailing on the sea in my
ship,” said Oh, “and carrying to the Tsar of my own
land a precious garnet ring, and this ring I dropped
into the water. Has any of thy servants perchance
found this precious ring ?”—“No, but my daughter
has,” said the Tsar. So they called the damsel, and
Oh began to beg her to give it back to him, “for I
may not live in this world if I bring not the ring,”
16 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

said he. But it was of no avail, she would not give
it up. Then the Tsar himself spoke to her. “ Nay,
but, darling daughter, give it up, lest misfortune befall
this man because of us; give it up, I say!” Then Oh
begged and prayed her yet more, and said: “Take
what thou wilt of me, only give me back the ring.”—
‘Nay, then!” said the Tsarivna, “it shall be neither
mine nor thine,” and with that she pitched the ring
upon the ground, and the ring turned into a heap of
millet-seed and scattered all about the floor. Then
Oh, without more ado, changed into a cock, and
began pecking up all the millet-seed. He pecked
aud pecked till he had pecked it all up. Yet there
was one single little grain of millet which rolled
right beneath the feet of the Tsarivna, and that he
did not see. When he had done pecking he got upon
the window-sill, opened his wings, and flew right
away.

But the one remaining grain of millet-seed turned
into a most beauteous youth, a youth so beauteous
that when the Tsarivna beheld him she fell in love
with him on the spot, and begged the Tsar and
Tsaritsa right piteously to let her have him as her
husband. ‘“ With no other shall I ever be happy,”
said she, “my happiness is in lim alone!” For a
long time the Tsar wrinkled his brows at the thought
of giving his daughter toa simple youth; but at last
O#. 17

he gave them his blessing, and they crowned them
with bridal wreaths, and all the world was bidden to
the wedding-feast. And I too was there, and drank
beer and mead, and what my mouth could not
hold ran down over my beard, and my heart rejoiced

within me,
THE STORY OF THE WIND.

NCE upon a time there dwelt two
brethren in one village, and one
brother was very, very rich, and
the other brother was very, very
poor. The rich man had wealth
of all sorts, but all that the poor
man had was a heap of children.
One day, at harvest-time, the poor man left his

wife and went to reap and thresh out his little plot
of wheat, when the Wind came and swept all his corn
away down to the very last grain. The poor man
was exceeding wrath thereat, and said: ‘Come what
will, Vl go seek the Wind, and I'll tell him with
what pains and trouble I had got my corn to grow
and ripen, and then he, forsooth! must needs come
and blow it all away.”



So the man went home and made ready to go,
and as he was making ready, his wife said to him:
THE STORY OF THE WIND. 19

“Whither away, husband ?”—«[ am going to seek
the Wind,” said he; “what dost thou say to that?”
—“T should say, do no such thing,” replied his wife.
“Thou knowest the saying, ‘If thou dost want to
find the Wind, seek him on the open steppe. He can
go ten different ways to thy one.’ Think of that, dear
husband, and go not at all.”—“T mean to go,” replied
the man, “though I never return home again.”
Then he took leave of hig wife and children, and went
straight out into the wide world to seek the Wind on
the open steppe.

He went on farther and farther til] he saw before
him a forest, and on the borders of that forest stood
a hut on hens’ legs. The man went into this hut and
was filled with astonishment, for there lay on the
floor a huge, huge, old man, as grey as milk. He
lay there stretched at full length, his head on the
seat of honour,’ with an arm and lee in each of the
four corners, and all his hair standing on end. I¢
was no other than the Wind himself. The man
stared at this awful Ancient with terror, for never
in his life had he seen anything like it. “God help
thee, old father!” eried he.—« Good health to thee,
good man!” said the ancient giant, as he lay on the
floor of the hut. Then he asked him in the most

* Pokute, the place of honour in a Ruthenian peasant’s hut, at
the right-hand side of the entrance.
20 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

friendly manner: “ Whence hath God brought thee
hither, good man ?”—*I am wandering through the
wide world in search of the Wind,” said the man.
“Tf I find him, I will turn back ; if I don’t find him,
-Ishall go on and on till I do.”—“ What dost thou
want with the Wind?” asked the old giant lying on
the floor. “Or what wrong hath he done thee, that
thou shouldst seek him out so doggedly ?”—“« What
wrong hath he done me?” replied the wayfarer.
‘“ Hearken now, O Ancient, and I will tell thee! I
went straight from my wife into the field and reaped
my little plot of corn; but when I began to thresh
it out, the Wind came and caught and scattered every
bit of it in a twinkling, so that there was not a single
little grain of it left. So now thou dost see, old man,
what I have to thank him for. Tell me, in God’s
name, why such things be? My little plot of corn
was my all-im-all, and in the sweat of my brow did
I reap and thresh it; but the Wind came and blew
it all away, so that not a trace of it is to be found in
the wide world. Then I thought to myself: ‘Why
should he do this?’ And I said to my wife: ‘Tl
go seek tue Wind, and say to him: “ Another time,
visit not the poor man who hath but a little corn,
and blow it not away, for bitterly doth he rue
it 1”’"—* Good, my son!” said the giant who lay on
the floor. “TJ shall know better in future ; in future






AG>
ZEEE

ii We















































\



























A,








22 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

I will not blow away the poor man’s corn. But, good
man, there is no need for thee to seek the Wind in
the open steppe, for I myself am the Wind.’—
“Then if thou art the Wind,” said the man, “ give
me back my corn.”—‘ Nay,” said the giant; “thou
canst not make the deal come back from the grave.
Yet, inasmuch as I have done thee a mischief, I will
now give thee this sack, good man, and do thou take
it home with thee. And whenever thou want’st a
meal say: ‘Sack, sack, give me to eat and drink !’
and immediately thou shalt have thy fill both of
meat and drink, so now thou wilt have wherewithal
to comfort thy wife and children.”

Then the man was full of gratitude. “I thank
thee, O Wind!” said he, ‘‘for thy courtesy in
giving me such a sack as will give me my fill of meat
and drink without the trouble of working for it.”—
“For a lazy loon, *twere a double boon,” said the
Wind. ‘Go home, then, but look now, enter no
tavern by the way; I shall know it if thou dost.”—
“No,” said the man, “I will not.” And then he
took leave of the Wind and went his way.

He had not gone very far, when he passed by a
tavern, and he felt a burning desire to find out
whether the Wind had spoken the truth in the matter
of the sack. “ How can a man pass a tavern without
going into it?” thought he; “Tl go in, come what
THE STORY OF THE WIND. 23

may. The Wind won’t know, because he can’t sec.”
So he went into the tavern and hung up his sack
upon a peg. ‘The Jew who kept the tavern immedi-
ately said to him: “What dost thou want, good
man ?”—“ What is that to thee, thou dog?” gaid the
man.—‘‘ You are all alike,” sneered the Jew, “take
what you can, and pay for nothing.”—“ Dost think
IT want to buy anything from thee?” shricked the
man; then, turning angrily to the sack, he cried:
“Sack, sack, give me to eat and drink!” Immedi-
ately the table was covered with all sorts of meats
and liquors. Then all the Jews in the tavern
crowded round full of amazement, and asked all
manner of questions. ‘ Why, what is this, good
man?” said they; “never have we seen anything
like this before !”—*“ Ask no questions, ye accursed
Jews!” cried the man, “but sit down to eat, for there
is enough for all.” So the Jews and the Jewesses set
to and ate until they were full up to the ears; and
they drank the man’s health in pitchers of wine of
every sort, and said: “ Drink, good man, and spare
not, and when thou hast drunk thy fill, thou shalt
lodge with us this night. We'll make ready a bed
for thee. None shall vex thee. Come now, eat
and drink whatever thy soul desires.” So the Jews
flattered him with devilish cunning, and almost forced
the wine-jars to his lips.
at COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

The simple fellow did not perceive their malice and
cunning, and he got so drunk that he could not move
from the place, but went to sleep where he was.
Then the Jews changed his sack for another, which
they hung up on a peg, and then they woke him.
“ Dost hear, fellow!” cried they; “get up, it is time
to go home. Dost thou not see the morning light ?”
The man sat up and scratched the back of his head,
for he was loth to go. But what was he to do? So
he shouldered the sack that was hanging on the peg,
and went off home.

When he got to his house, he cried: “Open the
door, wife!” Then his wife opened the door, and he
went in and hung his sack on the peg and said: “ Sit
down at the table, dear wife, and you children sit
down there too. Now, thank God! we shall have
enough to eat and drink, and to spare.” The wife
looked at her husband and smiled. She thought he
was mad, but down she sat, and her children sat down
all round her, and she waited to see what her husband
would do next. Then the man said: “Sack, sack,
‘give tous meat and drink!” But the suck was silent.
Then he said again: “Sack, sack, give my children
something to eat!” And still the sack was silent.
Then the man fell into a violent rage: ‘Thou didst
give me something at the tavern,” cried he; “and
now I may call in vain, Thou givest nothing, and


THE STORY OF THE WIND. 25

thou hearest nothing ”—and, leaping from his seat, he
took up a club and began beating the sack till he had
knocked a hole in the wall, and beaten the sack to
bits. Then he set off to seck the Wind again. But
his wife stayed at home and put everything to rights
again, railing and scolding at her husband as a madman.

But the man went to the Wind and said: “ Hail to
thee, O Wind !”—“Good health to thee, O man!”
replied the Wind. Then the Wind asked: ‘“ Wherefore
hast thou come hither, O man? Did I not give thee
a sack? What more dost thou want ?”—* A pretty
sack indeed!” replied the man; “that sack of thine
has been the cause of much mischief to me and mine.”
—“‘ What mischief has it done thee ?”—‘ Why, look
now, old father, I’ll tell thee what it has done. It
wouldn’t give me anything to eat and drink, so I
began beating it, and beat the wall in. Now what
shall I do to repair my crazy hut? Give me some-
thing, old father.”—But the Wind replied: “Nay,
O man, thou must do without. Fools are neither
sown nor reaped, but grow of their own accord—hast
thou not been into a tavern ?”—‘T have not,” said
the man.—* Thou hast not? Why wilt thou lie?”—
“Well, and suppose I did lie?” said the man ; “if thon
suffer harm through thine own fault, hold thy tongue
about it, that’s what I say. Yet it is all the fault of
‘thy sack that this evil has come upon me. If it had
26 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

only given me to eat and to drink, I should not have
come to thee again.” At this the Wind scratched his
head a bit, but then he said: “ Well then, thou man!
there’s a little ram for thee, and whenever thou dost
want money say to it: ‘ Little ram, little ram, scatter
money!’ and it will scatter money as much as thou
wilt. Only bear this in mind: go not into a tavern,
for if thou dost, I shall know all about it; and
if thou comest to me a third time, thou shalt have
cause to remember it for ever.”—‘‘ Good,” said the
man, ‘I won’t go.”—Then he took the little ram,
thanked the Wind, and went on his way.

So the man went along leading the little ram by a
string, and they came to a tavern, that very same
tavern where he had been before, and again a strong
desire came upon the man to go in. So he stood by
the door and began thinking whether he should go in
or not, and whether he had any need to find out the
truth about the little ram. ‘‘ Well, well,” said he at
last, “VIL go in, only this time I won’t get drunk.
Tl drink just a glass or so, and then I'll go home.”
So into the tavern he went, dragging the little ram
after him, for he was afraid to let it go.

Now, when the Jews who were inside there saw
the little ram, they began shrieking and said: ‘* What
art thou thinking of, O man! that thou bringest that
little ram into the room? Are there no barns outside


THE STORY OF THE WIND. Gir

where thou mayest put it up ?””"—“ Hold your tongues,
ye accursed wretches!” replied the man: “ what has
it got to do with you? It is not the sort of ram
that muck-worms like you deal in. And if you don’t
believe me, spread a cloth on the floor and you shall
se something, I warrant you.”—Then he said:
“Tittle ram, little ram, scatter money!” and the
little ram scattered so much money that it seemed to
grow, and the Jews sereeched like demons.—“ man, man!” eried they, “such a ram as that we
have never seen in all our days. Sell it tous! We
will give thee such a lot of money for it.”—< You
may pick up all that money, ye accursed ones,” cried
the man, “but I don’t mean to sell my ram.”

Then the Jews picked up the money, but they laid
before him a table covered with all the dishes that a
man’s heart may desire, and they begged him to sit
down and make merry, and said with true Jewish
cunning: “Though thou mayest get a little lively,
dou’t get drunk, for thou knowest how drink plays
the fool with a man’s wits.”—The man marvelled at
the straightforwardness of the Jews in warning him
against the drink, and, forgetting everything else, sat
down at table and began drinking pot after pot of
mead, and talking with the Jews, and his little ram
went clean out of his head. But the Jews made him
drunk, and laid him in the bed, and changed rams
28 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

with him; his they took away, and put in its place
one of their own exactly like it.

When the man had slept off his carouse, he arose
and went away, taking the ram with him, after bid-
ding the Jews farewell. When he got to his hut he
found his wife in the doorway, and the moment she
saw him coming, she went into the hut and cried to
her children: “Come, children! make haste, make
haste! for daddy is coming, and brings a little ram
along with him ; getup, and look sharp about it! An
evil year of waiting has been the lot of wretched me,
but he has come home at last.” ;

The husband arrived at the door and said: “ Open
the door, little wife; open, I say!’—The wife replied:
“Thou art not a great noblenian, so open the door
thyself. Why dost thou get so drunk that thou dost
not know how to open a door?” It’s an evil time that
I spend with thee. Here. we are with all these little
children, and yet thou dost go away and drink.”—
Then the wife opened the door, and the husband
walked into the hut and said: “Good health to thee,
dear wife!”—But the wife replied: “ Why dost thou
bring that ram inside the hut, can’t it stay outside
the walls ?”—‘ Wife, wife!” said the man, “speak,
but don’t screech. Now we shall have all manner of
good things, and the children will have a fine time of
it.’—* What!” said the wife, “what good can.we
THE STORY OF THE WIND. 29

get from that wretched ram? Where shall we get
the money to find food for it? Why, we’ve nothing
to eat ourselves, and thou dost saddle us with a ram
besides. Stuff and nonsense! I say.”—* Silence,
wife,” replied the husband; “that ram is not like
other rams, I tell thee.”—“ What sort is it, then?”
asked his wife.—‘‘Don’t ask questions, but spread
a cloth on the floor and keep thine eyes open.’—
“Why spread a cloth?” asked the wife.—‘ Why 2”
shrieked the man in a rage; “do what I tell thee, and
hold thy tongue.”—But the wife said: “Alas, alas!
I have an evil time of it. Thou dost nothing at all
but go away and drink, and then thou comest home
and dost talk nonsense, and bringest sacks and rams
with thee, and knockest down our little hut.’”—At
this the husband could control his rage no longer, but
shrieked at the ram: ‘Little ram, little ram, scatter
money !”—But the ram only stood there and stared
at him. Then he cried again: “Little ram, little
ram, scatter money!”—But the ram stood there
stock-still and did nothing. Then the man in his
anger caught up a piece of wood and struck the ram
on the head, but the poor ram only uttered a feeble
baa! and fell to the earth dead.

The man was now very much offended and said:
“Tl go to the Wind again, and I’ll tell him what a
fool he has made of me.” Then he took up his hat
30 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and went, leaving everything behind him. And the
poor wife put everything to rights, and reproached
and railed at her husband.

So the man came to the Wind for the third time
and said: “Wilt thou tell me, please, if thou art
really the Wind or no?”—‘ What's the matter with
thee?” asked the Wind.—‘“T'll tell thee what's the
matter,” said the man; “why hast thou laughed at
and mocked me and made such a fool of me?”—“ 1
laugh at thee!” thundered the old father as he lay
there on the floor and turned round on the other ear ;
“why didst thou not hold fast what I gave thee ?
Why didst thou not listen to me when I told thee
not to go into the tavern, eh? ”__«What tavern dost
thou mean?” asked the man proudly; “as for the
sack and the ram thou didst give me, they only did
me a mischief; give me something else.” —‘* What’s
the use of giving thee anything?” said the Wind;
“thou wilt only take it to the tavern. Out of the
drum, my twelve henchmen !” eried the Wind, “ and
just give this accursed drunkard a good lesson that
he may keep his throat dry and listen a little more
to old people !”—Immediately the twelve henchmen
leaped out of the drum and began giving the man
a sound thrashing. Then the man saw that it was
no joke and begged for mercy: “Dear old father
Wind,” cried he, “be merciful, and let me get off


THE STORY OF THE WIND. bl

alive. Tl not come to thee again though I should
have to wait till the Judgment Day, and T’ll do all
thy behests.”—“Into the drum, my henchmen!”
cried the Wind.—* And now, O man!” said the
Wind, “thou mayest have this drum with the twelve
henchmen, and go to those accursed Jews, and if
they will not give thee back thy sack and thy ram,
thou wilt know what to say.”

So the man thanked the Wind for his good advice,
and went on his way. He came to the inn, and when
the Jews saw that he brought nothing with him they
suid: “Hearken, O man! don’t come here, for we
have no brandy.”—* What do I want with your
brandy ?” cried the man in a rage.—“ Then for what
hast thou come hither?”—“I have come for my
own.”— Thy own,” said the Jews; “ what dost thou
mean ?”—“ What do I mean?” roared the man ;
“why, my sack and my ram, which you must give
up to me.”—* What ram? What sack?” said the
Jews; “why, thou didst take them away from here
thyself”—“ Yes, but you changed them,” said the
man.—“ What dost thou mean by changed?” whined
the Jews; “we will go before the magistrate, and
thou shalt hear from us about this.”— You will have
an evil time of it if you go before the magistrate,”
said the man; “but at any rate, give me back my
own.” And he sat down behind the table. Then the
32 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Jews caught him by the shoulders to cast him out
and cried: “ Be orf, thou rascal! Does any one know
where this man comes from? No doubt he is an evil-
doer.” The man could not stand this, so he cried:
“Out of the drum, my henchmen! and give the
accursed Jews a sound drubbing, that they may know
better than to take in honest folk!” and immediately
the twelve henchmen leaped out of the drum and
began thwacking the Jews finely.—“ Oh, oh!” roared
the Jews; “oh, dear, darling, good man, we'll give
thee whatever thou dost want, only leave off beating
us! Let us live a bit longer in the world, and we
will give thee back everything.” — Good!” said the
man, “and another time you'll know better than to
deceive people.” Then he cried: ‘Into the drum,
my henchmen!” and the henchmen disappeared,
leaving the Jews more dead than alive. Then they
eave the man his sack and his ram, and he went
home, but it was a long, long time before the Jews
forgot those henchmen.

So the man went home, and his wife and children
saw him coming from afar. ‘‘ Daddy is coming home
now with a sack and aram!” said she; “ what shall
we do? We shall have a bad time of it, we shall
have nothing left at all. God defend us poor
wretches! Go and hide everything, children.” So
the children hastened away, but the husband came to


THE STORY OF THE WIND. 33

the door and said: “Open the door !’—* Open the
door thyself,” replied the wife.—Again the husband
bade her open the door, but she paid no heed to him.



The man was astonished. This was carrylug a joke
too far, so he cried to his henchmen: “ Henchmen,
henchmen! out of the drum, and teach my wife to
respect her husband!” Then the henchmen leaped
out of the drum, laid the good wife by the heels, and
began to give her a sound drubbing. “Oh, my
dear, darling husband!” shrieked the wife, “never to
the end of my days will I be sulky with thee again.
I'll do whatever thou tellest me, only leave off beat-
ing me.”—“Then I have taught thee sense, eh?”
said the man.—“ Oh, yes, yes, good husband!” eried
she. Then the man said: “Henchmen, henchmen !
into the drum!” and the henchmen leaped into it
again, leaving the poor wife more dead than alive.

Then the husband said to her: “ Wife, spread a
cloth upon the floor.” The wife scudded about as
nimbly as a fly, and spread a cloth out on the floor
without a word. Then the husband said: “Little
ram, little ram, scatter money!” And the little ram
scattered money till there were piles and piles of it.
sp bicl i ceups my children,’ said the man, “and
thou too, wife, take what thou wilt!”—And they
didn’t wait to be asked twice. Then the man hung

up his sack on a peg and said: “Sack, sack, meat
D
34 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and drink!” Then he caught hold of it and shook
it, and immediately the table was as full as it could
hold with all manner of victuals and drink. “Sit
down, my children, and thou too, dear wife, and eat
thy fil. Thank God, we shall now have no lack of
food, and shall not have to work for it either.”

So the man and his wife were very happy together,
and were never tired of thanking the Wind. They
had not had the sack and the ram very long when
they grew very rich, and then the husband said to
the wife: “I tell thee what, wife !”—‘‘ What?” said
she.—“ Let us invite my brother to come and see
us.”—“ Very good,” she replied; “invite him, but
dost thou think he'll come ?”—‘ Why shouldn’t he?”
asked her husband. “Now, thank God, we have
everything we want. He wouldn't come to us when
we were poor and he was rich, because then he was
ashamed to say that I was his brother, but now even
he hasn’t got so much as we have.”

So they made ready, and the man went to invite
his brother. The poor man came to his rich brother
and said: “Hail to thee, brother; God help thee!”
—Now the rich brother was threshing wheat on his
threshing-floor, and, raising his head, was surprised to
see his brother there, and said to him haughtily: “I
thank thee. Hail to thee also! Sit down, my brother,
and tell us why thou hast come hither.” —‘“ Thanks,


THE STORY. OF THE WIND. 35

my brother, I do not want to sit down. I have come
hither to invite thee to us, thee and thy wife.’—
“Wherefore?” asked the rich brother.—The poor
man said: “My wife prays thee, and I pray thee
also, to come and dine with us of thy courtesy.”—
“Good!” replied the rich brother, smiling secretly.
“T will come whatever thy dinner may be.”

So the rich man went with his wife to the poor
man, and already from afar they perceived that the
poor man had grown rich. And the poor man
rejoiced greatly when he saw his rich brother in his
house. And his tongue was loosened, and he began
to show him everything whatsoever he possessed.
The rich man was amazed that things were going so
well with his brother, and asked him how he had
managed to get on so. But the poor man answered :
“Don’t ask me, brother. I have more to show thee
yet.” Then he took him to his copper money, and
said: “ There are my oats, brother!” Then he took
and showed him his silver money, and said: ‘ That's
the sort of barley I thresh on my threshing-floor !”
And, last of all, he took him to his gold money, and
said: “There, my dear brother, is the best wheat
I’ve got.”—Then the rich brother shook his head, not
once nor twice, and marveiled at the sight of so many
good things, and he said : “‘ Wherever didst thou pick
up all this, my brother?”—“Oh! I’ve more than
36 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

that to show thee yet. Just be so good as to sit down
on that chair, and I'll show and tell thee everything.”

Then they sat them down, and the poor man hung
up his sack upon a peg. * Sack, sack, meat and
drink!” he cried, and immediately the table was:
covered with all manner of dishes. So they ate and
ate, till they were full up to the ears. When they
had eaten and drunken their fill, the poor man called
to his son to bring the little ram into the hut. So
the lad brought in the ram, and the rich brother
wondered what they were going to do with it. Then
the poor man said: “ Little ram, scatter money !”
And the little ram scattered money, till there were
piles and piles of it on the floor. “ Pick it up!” said
the poor man to the rich man and his wife. So they
picked it up, and the rich brother and his wife
marvelled, and the brother said: “ Thou hast a very
nice piece of goods there, brother. If I had only
something like that I should lack nothing ;” then,
after thinking a long time, he said: ‘Sell 1t to me,
my brother.”—“ No,” said the poor man, © IT will not
sell it.’—After a little time, however, the rich brother
said again ; ‘Come now! I'll give thee for it six yoke
of oxen, and a plough, and a harrow, and a hay-fork,
and I'll give thee besides, lots of corn to sow, thus
thou wilt have plenty, but give me the ram and the
sack.” So at last they exchanged. The rich man
THE STORY OF THE WIND. 37

took the sack and the ram, and the poor man took
the oxen and went out to the plough.

Then the poor brother went out ploughing all day,
but he neither watered his oxen nor gave them any-
thing to eat. And next day the poor brother again
went out to his oxen, but found them rolling on their
sides on the ground. He began to pull and tug at
them, but they didn’t get up. Then he began to beat
them with a stick, but they uttered not a sound.
The man was surprised to find them fit for nothing,
and off he ran to his brother, not forgetting to take
with him his drum with the henchmen.

When the poor brother came to the rich brother’s,
he lost no time in crossing his threshold, and said:
“Hail, my brother !”—‘ Good health to thee also!”
replied the rich man, “ why hast thou come hither?
Has thy plough broken, or thy oxen failed thee?
Perchance thou hast watered them with foul water,
so that their blood is stagnant, and their flesh
inflamed ?”—* The murrain take ’em if I know thy
meaning!” cried the poor brother. “All that I
know is that I thwacked ’em till my arms ached, and
they wouldn’t stir, and not a single grunt did they
give; till I was go angry that I spat at them, and came
to tell thee. Give me back my sack and my ram, I
say, and take back thy oxen, for they won’t listen to
me !”—“ What! take them back!” roared the rich
38 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

brother. “Dost think I only made the exchange for
a single day? No, I gave them to thee once and
for all, and now thou wouldst rip the whole thing up
like a goat at the fair. I have no doubt thou hast
neither watered them nor fed them, and that is why
they won't stand up.’—‘I didn’t know,” said the
poor man, “that oxen needed water and food.”—
“ Didn’t know !” sereeched the rich man, in a mighty
rage, and taking the poor brother by the hand, he
led him away from the hut. ‘Go away,” said he,
“and never come back here again, or I'll have thee
hanged on a gallows !”—‘ Ah! what a big gentleman
we are!” said the poor brother; ‘just thou give me
back my own, and then I will go away.’—“ Thou
hadst better not stop here,” said the rich brother ;
“come, stir thy stumps, thou pagan! Go home ere
I beat thee !”—‘ Don’t say that,” replied the poor
man, “but give me back my ram and my sack, and
then I wll go.’—At this the rich brother quite lost
his temper, and cried to his wife and children:
“Why do you stand staring like that? Can't you
come and help me to pitch this insolent rogue out of
the house?” ‘This, however, was something beyond
a joke, so the poor brother called to his henchmen :
‘Henchmen, henchmen! out of the drum, and give
this accursed brother of mine and his wife a sound
drubbing, that they may think twice about it another
THE STORY OF THE WIND. 39

time before they pitch a poor brother out of their
hut!” Then the henchmen leaped out of the drum,
and laid hold of the rich brother and his wife, and
trounced them soundly, until the rich brother yelled
with all his might: “Oh, oh! my own true brother,
take what thou wilt, only let me off alive!” where-
upon the poor brother cried to his henchmen:
“Henchmen, henchmen! into the drum!” and the
henchmen disappeared immediately.

Then the poor brother took his ram and his sack,
and set off home with them. And they lived happily
ever after, and grew richer and richer. They sowed
neither wheat nor barley, and yet they had lots and
lots to eat. And I was there, and drank mead and
beer. What my mouth couldn’t hold ran down my
beard. For you, there’s a kazka, but there be fat
hearth-cakes for me the asker. And if I have aught
to eat, thou shalt share the treat.
THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW.

NOBLEMAN went hunting one
autumn, and with him went a
goodly train of huntsmen. All
day long they hunted and
hunted, and at the end of the



day they had caught nothing.
At last dark night overtook .
them. It had now grown bitterly cold, and the
rain began to fall heavily. The nobleman was wet
to the skin, and his teeth chattered. He rubbed his
hands together and cried: “Oh, had we but a warm
hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and sour kvas,!
we should have nought to complain of, but would tell
tales and feign fables till dawn of day!” Immedi-
ately there shone a light in the depths of the forest.
They hastened up to it, and lo! there was a but.
They entered, and on the table lay bread and a jug

1 A sourish drink.
THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW. 41

of kvas; and the hut was warm, and the bed therein
was white—everything just as the nobleman had
desired it. So they all entered after him, and said
grace, and had supper, and laid them down to sleep.
They all slept, all but one, but to him slumber
would not come. About midnight he heard a strange
nolse, and something came to the window and said:
“Oh, thou son of a dog! thou didst say: ‘If we had
but a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and
sour kvas, we should have nought to complain of, but
would tell tales and feion fables till dawn’; but now
thou hast forgotten thy fine promise! Wherefore
this shall befall thee on thy way home. Thou shalt
fall in with an apple-tree full of apples, and thou
shalt desire to taste of them, and when thou hast
tasted thereof thou shalt burst. And if any of these
thy huntsmen hear this thing and tell thee of it, that
man shall become stone to the knee!” All this that
huntsman heard, and he thought, “ Woe is me!”
And about the second cockcrow something else
came to the window and said: “Oh, thou son of a
dog! thou didst say: ‘If we had but a warm hut, and
a white bed, and soft bread and sour kvas, we should
have nought to complain of, but would tell tales and
feign fables till dawn’; but now thou hast forgotten
thy fine promises! Wherefore this shall befall thee
on thy way home. Thou shalt come upon a spring by
42 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the roadside, a spring of pure water, and thou shalt
desire to drink of it, and when thou hast drunk
thereof thou shalt burst. But if any of these thy
huntsmen hear and tell thee of this thing, he shall
become stone to the girdle.” All this that huntsman
heard, and he thought to himself: “Woe is me!”

Again, towards the third cockcrow, he heard some-
thing else coming to the window, and it said: “Oh,
thon son of a dog! thou didst say: ‘If only we had
a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft bread and
sour kvas, we should have nought to complain of,
but would tell tales and feien fables till dawn’; but
now thou hast forgotten all thy fine promises !
Wherefore this shall befall thee on thy way home.
Thou shalt come upon a feather-bed in the highway ;
a longing for rest shall come over thee, and thou wilt
he down on it, and the moment thou lest down
thereon thou shalt burst. But if any of thy hunts-
men hear this thing and tell it thee, he shall become
stone up to the neck!” All this that huntsman
heard, and then he awoke his comrades and said:
“Tt is time to depart !”—“ Let us go then,” said the
nobleman.

So on they went, and they had not gone very far
when they saw an apple-tree growing by the wayside,
and on it were apples so beautiful that words cannot
describe them. The nobleman felt that he must taste
(Vv

to Fi) ihe
y ae =
yi = Vw “ir

While ile


44 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

of these apples or die; but the wakeful huntsman
rushed up and cut down the apple-tree, whereupon
apples and apple-tree turned to ashes. But the
huntsman galloped on before and hid himself.

They went on a little further till they came to a
spring, and the water of that spring was so pure and
clear that words cannot describe it. Then the noble-
man felt that he must drink of that water or die; but
the huntsman rushed up and splashed in the spring
with his sword, and immediately the water turned to
blood. The nobleman was wrath, and eried: “ Cut
me down that son of a dog!” But the huntsman
rode on in front and hid himself.

They went on still further till they came upon a
golden bed in the highway, full of white feathers so
soft and cosy that words cannot describe it. The
nobleman felt that he must rest in that bed or die.
Then the huntsman rushed up and struck the bed
with his sword, and it turned to coal. But the
nobleman was very wrath, and cried: “Shoot me

1?

down that son of a dog But the huntsman rode
on before and hid himself.

When they got home the nobleman commanded
them to bring the huntsman before him. “ What
hast thou done, thou son of Satan?” he cried. “I

22)

must needs slay thee But the huntsman said:

“My master, bid them bring hither into the courtyard
THE VOICES AT THE WINDOW. 45

an old mare fit for nought but the knacker,” They
brought the mare, and he mounted it and said: “ My
master, last midnight something came beneath the
window and said: ‘Oh, son of a dog! thou saidst if
only we had a warm hut, and a white bed, and soft
bread and sour kvas, we should grieve no more, but
tell tales and feign fables till dawn, and now thou
hast gone and forgotten thy promise. Wherefore this
shall befall thee on thy way home: thou shalt come
upon an apple-tree covered with apples by the way-
side, and straightway thou shalt long to eat of them,
and the moment thou tastest thereof thou shalt burst.
And if any of thy huntsmen hears this thing, and
tells thee of it, he shall become stone up to the knee.’ ”
When the huntsman had spoken so far, the horse on
which he sat became stone up to the knee. Then he
went on: “About the second cockcrow something
else came to the window and said the selfsame thing,
and prophesied: ‘He shall come upon a spring by
the roadside, a spring of pure water, and he shall long
to drink thereof, and the moment he tastes of it he
shall burst ; and whoever hears and tells him of this
thing shall become stone right up to the girdle.’ ”
And when the huntsman had spoken go far, the horse
on which he sat became stone right up to the breast.
And he continued, and said: “ About the third cock-
crow something else came to the window and said the
46 : COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

selfsame thing, and added: ‘This shall befall thy
lord on his way home. He shall come upon a white
bed on the road, and he shall desire to rest wpon it,
and the moment he rests upon ithe shall burst ; and
whoever hears and tells him of this thing shall become
stone right up to the neck!’” And with these words
he leaped from the horse, and the horse became stone
right up to its neck. “That therefore, my master,
was why I did what I did, and I pray thee pardon

)

me.
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, THE
FALSE SISTER, AND THE FAITHFUL BEASTS.

NCE upon a time, in a certain kinedom,
in a certain empire, there dwelt a
certain Tsar who had never had a
child. One day this Tsar went to
the bazaar (such a bazaar as we have
at Kherson) to buy food for his needs.

For though he was a Tsar, he had a mean and churlish

soul, and used always to do his own marketing, and so

now, too, he bought a little salt fish and went home
with it. On his way homeward, a great thirst suddenly
fell upon him, so he turned aside into a lonely mountain
where he knew, as his father had known before him,
there was a spring of crystal clear water. He was so
very thirsty that he flung himself down headlong by
this spring without first crossing himself, wherefore
that Accursed One, Satan, immediately had power over


48 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

him, and caught him by the beard. The Tsar sprang
back in terror, and cried: “ Let me go!” But the
Accursed One held him all the tighter. “Nay, I will
not let thee go
entreat him piteously: ‘‘ Ask what thou wilt of me,”

tiz2

cried he. Then the Tsar began to

said he, “ only let me go.”—‘ Give me, then,” said
the Accursed One, ‘something that thou hast in the
house, and then [ll let thee go!”—‘‘Let me see,
what have I got?” said the Tsar. ‘Oh, I know.
I’ve got eight horses at home, the like of which I
have seen nowhere else, and I'll immediately bid my
equerry bring them to thee to this spring—take
them.”—“I won't have them!” cried the Accursed
One, and he held him still more tightly by the beard.
“ Well, then, hearken now!” cried the Tsar. ‘‘I have
eight oxen. They have never yet gone a-ploughing
for me, or done a day’s work. I'll have them brought
hither. Tl feast my eyes on them once more, and
then I’ll have them driven into thy steppes—take
them.”—‘ No, that won’t do either!” said the Ac-
cursed One. The Tsar went over, one by one, all the
most precious things he had at home, but the Accursed



Cne said “No!” all along, and pulled him more and
more tightly by the beard. When the Tsar saw that
the Accursed One would take none of all these things,
he said to him at last: ‘Look now! I have a wife
so lovely that the lke of her is not to be found in
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY, 49

the whole world, take her and let me go!"—*«No!”
replied the Accursed One, “I will not have her.”
The Tsar was in great straits. “What amI to do
now?” thought he. “I have offered him my lovely
wife, who is the very choicest of my chattels, and he
won't have her!”—Then said the Accursed One:
“Promise me what thou shalt find awaiting thee at
home, and I'll let thee go.”

The Tsar gladly promised this, for he could think
of nought else that he had, and then the Accursed
One let him go,

But while he had been away from home, there had
been born to him a Tsarevko + and a Tsarivna 37 and
they grew up not by the day, or even by the hour,
but by the minute: never were known such fine
children. And his wife saw him coming from afar,
and went out to meet him, with her two children,
with great joy. But he, the moment he saw them,
burst into tears. “Nay, my dear love,” cried she,
“wherefore dost thou burst into tears? Or art thou
so delighted that such children have been born unto
thee that thou canst not find thy voice for tears of
joy ?”—And he answered her: “My darling wife, on
my way back from the bazaar, I was athirst, and
turned towards a mountain known of old to my
father and me, and it seemed to me as though there

1 A little Tsar, * Rus., Tsavevna, é,e. a Tsar’s daughter.
E
50 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

were a spring of water there, though the water was
very near dried up. But looking closer, [ saw that
it was quite full; so I bethought me that I would
drink thereof, and I leaned over, when lo! that
Evil-Wanton (I mean the Devil) caught me by the
beard and would not let me go. I begged and
prayed, but still he held me tight. ‘Give me,’ said
he, ‘what thou hast at home, or I'll never let thee
go!’—And I said to him: ‘Lo! now, I have horses.’
—‘I don’t want thy horses!’ said he.—‘I have
oxen,’ I said—‘I don’t want thine oxen !’ said he.
——‘JT have,’ said I, ‘a wife so fair that the like of her
is not to be found in God’s fair world; take her, but
let me go.’—‘I don’t want thy fair wife!’ said he.
—tThen I promised him what I should find at home
when I got there, for I never thought that God had
blessed me so. Come now, my darling wife! and let
us bury them both lest he take them !”—“ Nay, nay!
my dear husband, we had _ better hide them some-
where. Let us dig a ditch by our hut—just under
the gables!” (For there were no lordly mansions in
those days, and the Tsars dwelt in peasants’ huts.)
So they due a ditch right under the gables, and put
their children inside it, and gave them provision of
bread and water. Then they covered it up and
smoothed it down, and turned into their own little
hut.
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 51

Presently the serpent (for the Accursed One had
changed himself into a serpent) came flying up in
search of the children. He raged up and down
outside the hut—but there wag nothing to be seen.
At last he cried out to the stove - “Stove, stove,
where has the Tsar hidden his children ?’””—The
stove replied: “The Tsar has been a good master to

; he has put lots of warm fuel inside me; I hold
to ee "So, finding he could get maybe out of
the stove, he cried to the hearth- broom: “ Hearth-
broom, hearth-broom, where has the Tsar hidden hig
children ?”—But the hearth- broom answered: “The
Tsar has always been a good master to me, for he
always cleans the warm grate with me; I hold to
him.” So the Accursed One could get Reouine out
of the hearth-broom.—Then he cried to the hatchet :
“Hatchet, hatchet, where has the Tsar hidden his
children ?”—The hatchet replied: “The Tsar has
always been a good master to me. He chops his
wood with me, and gives me a place to lie down in ;
so I'll not have him disturbed.’—Then the Der
cried to the chisel: “ Chisel, chisel, where has the
Tsar hidden his children ?”—But the chisel replied :
“The Tsar has always been a good master to me.
He drills little holes with me, and then lets me rest ;
so I'll let him rest too.”—Then the serpent said to
the chisel: “So the Tsar’s a good master to thee, eh!
52 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Well, I can only say that if he’s the good master
thou sayest he is, [ am rather surprised that he knocks
thee on the head so much with a hammer.”—*“‘ Well,
that’s true,” said the chisel, “I never thought of
that. Thou mayest take hold of me if thou wilt, and
draw me out of the top of the hut, near the front
gable; and wherever I fall into the marshy ground,
there set to work and dig with me!”

The Devil did so, and began digging at the spot
where the chisel fell out on the marshy ground till
he had dug out the children. Now, as they had been
growing all along, they were children no more, but
a stately youth and a fair damsel; and the serpent
took them up and carried them off. But they were
big and heavy, so he soon got tired and lay down
to rest, and presently fell asleep. Then the Tsarivna
sat down on his head, and the Tsarevko sat down
beside her till a horse came running up. The horse
ran right up to them and said: “Hail! little Tsar
Novishny ; art thou here by thy leave or against
thy leave ?”—And the little Tsar Novishny replied :
“Nay, little nag! we are here against our leave,
not by our leave.’— Then sit on my back!” said
the horse, “and [ll carry you off!” So they got
on his back, for the serpent was asleep all the
time. Then the horse galloped off with them ;
and he galloped far, far away. Presently the serpent
54 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

awoke, looked all round him, and could see nothing
till he had got up out of the reeds in which
he lay, when he saw them in the far distance, and
gave chase. He soon caught them up; and little
Tsar Novishny said to the horse: “Oh! little nag,
how hot it is. It is all up with thee and us!”
And, in truth, the horse’s tail was already singed
to a coal, for the serpent was hard behind them,
blazing like fire. The horse perceived that he could
do no more, so he gave one last wrigele and died ;
but they, poor things, were left alive. “ Whom
have you been listening to?” said the serpent as
he flew up to them. “Don’t you know that I only
am your father and tsar, and have the right to carry
you away ?”—* Oh, dear daddy! we'll never listen
to anybody else again !”— Well, 'll forgive you
this time,” said the serpent; “but mind you never
do it again.”

Again the serpent took them up and carried them
off. Presently he grew tired and again lay down
to rest, and nodded off. Then the Tsarivna sat
down on lis head, and the Tsarevko sat down be-
side her, till a humble-bee came flying up. ‘ Hail,
little Tsar Novishny!” cried the humble-bee.—
“ Hail, little humble-bee!” said the little Tsar.—
“Say, friends, are you here by your leave or against
your leave ?”—* Alas! little humble-bumble-bee, ’tis
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 55

not with my leave I have been brought hither, but
against my leave, as thou mayest see for thyself.”—
“Then sit on my back,” said the bee, “and I'll carry
you away.”—‘‘ But, dear little humble-bumble-bee,
if a horse couldn’t save us, how will you ?”—« J
cannot tell till I try,” said the humble-bee. “But if
I cannot save you, I'll let you fall.”—* Well, then,”
said the little Tsar, “well try. For we two must
perish in any case, but thou perhaps mayest get off
scot free.” So they embraced each other, sat on the
humble-bee, and off they went. When the serpent
awoke he missed them, and raising his head above
the reeds and rushes, saw them flying far away,
and set off after them at full speed. ‘Alas! little
humble-bumble-bee,” cried little Tsar Novishny,
“how burning hot ’tis getting. We shall all three
perish!” Then the humble-bee turned his wing and
shook them off. They fell to the earth, and he flew
away. Then the serpent came flying up and fell
upon them with open jaws. ‘“ Ah-ha!” eried he, with
a snort, “you've come to grief again, eh? Didn't I
tell you to listen to nobody but me!” Then they
fell to weeping and entreating: “ We'll listen to you
alone and to nobody else!” and they wept and
entreated so much, that at last he forgave them.
So he took them up and carried them off once
more, Again he sat down to rest and fell asleep,
56 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and again the Tsarivna sat upon his head and the
Tsarevko sat down by her side, till a bullock came
up, full tilt, and said to them: * Hail, little Tsar
Novishny! art thou here with thy leave or art
thou here against thy leave ?”— Alas! dear little
bullock, I came not hither by my leave; but may-
be I was brought here against my leave !”—*« Sit
on my back, then,” said the bullock, “and I'll
— But they said: “Nay, if a
horse and a bee could not manage it, how wilt

B)

carry you away.’

thou ?”—** Nonsense!” said the bullock. “Sit down,
and Pll carry you off!” So he persuaded them.—
“Well, we can only perish once!” they cried; and
the bullock carried them off. And every little while
they went a little mile, and jolted so that they very
nearly tumbled off. Presently the serpent awoke
and was very very wroth. He rose high above the
woods and flew after them—oh! how fast he did
fly! Then eried the little Tsar: “Alas! bullock,
how hot it turns. Thou wilt perish, and we shall
perish also!”—Then said the bullock: “Little
Tsar! look into my left ear and thou wilt see
a horse-comb. Pull it out and throw it behind
thee !”—The little Tsar took out the comb and threw
it behind him, and it became a huge wood, as thick
and jagged as the teeth of a horse-comb, But the
bullock went on at his old pace: every little while
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 57

they went a little mile, and jolted so that they nearly
tumbled off. The serpent however managed to gnaw
his way through the wood, and then flew after them
again. Then cried the little Tsar: “ Alas! bullock,
it begins to burn again. Thou wilt perish, and we
shall perish also!”—Then said the bullock: “Look
into my right ear, and pull out the brush thou dost
find there, and fling it behind thee!”—So he threw
it behind him, and it became a forest as thick as a
brush. Then the serpent came up to the wood and
began to gnaw at it; and at last he gnawed his way
right through it. But the bullock went on at his
old pace: every little while they went a little mile,
aud they jolted so that they nearly tumbled off.
But when the serpent had gnawed his way through
the forest, he again pursued them; and again they
felt a burning. And the little Tsar said: “ Alas!
bullock, look! look! how it burns. Look! look!
how we perish.” Now the bullock was already near-
ing the sea. “Look into my right ear,” said the
bullock, “draw out the little handkerchief thou
findest there, and throw it in front of me. He drew
it out and flung it, and before them stood a bridge.
Over this bridge they galloped, and by the time they
had done so, the serpent reached the sea. Then
said the bullock to the little Tsar: “Take up the
handkerchief again and wave it behind me.” Then
58 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

he took and waved it till the bridge doubled up
behind them, and went and spread out again right
in front of them. The serpent came up to the edge
of the sea; but there he had to stop, for he had
nothing to run upon.

So they crossed over that sea right to the other
side, and the serpent remained on his own side.
Then the bullock said to them: “T'll lead you to
a hut close to the sea, and in that hut you must
live, and you must take and slay me.” But they
fell a-weeping sore. “ How shall we slay thee!”
they cried; “thou art our own little dad, and hast
saved us from death !”—‘“Nay!” said the bullock ;
“but you must slay me, and one quarter of me you
must hang up on the stove, and the second quarter
you must place on the ground in a corner, and the
third quarter you must put in the corner at the
entrance of the hut, and the fourth quarter you
must put round the threshold, so that there will
be a quarter in all four corners.” So they took and
slew him in front of the threshold, and they hung
his four quarters in the four corners as he had bidden
them, and then they laid them down to sleep. Now
the Tsarevko awoke at midnight, and saw in the
right-hand corner a horse so gorgeously caparisoned
that he could not resist rising at once and mounting
it; and in the threshold corner there was a self-
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 59

slicing sword, and in the third corner stood the dog
Protius,, and in the stove corner stood the dog
Nedviga.’ ‘The little Tsar longed to be off. “ Rise,
little sister!” cried he. “God has been good to us!
Rise, dear little sister, and let us pray to God!”
So they arose and prayed to God, and while they
prayed the day dawned. Then he mounted his horse
and took the dogs with him, that he might live by
what they caught.

So they lived in their hut by the sea, and one day
the sister went down to the sea to wash her bed-
linen and her body-linen in the blue waters. And
the serpent came and said to her: “ How didst thou
manage to jump over the sea ?”—‘ Look, now!”
said she, “we crossed over in this way. My brother
has a handkerchief which becomes a bridge when
he waves it behind him.’—And the serpent said to
her: ‘I tell thee what, ask him for this handkerchief ;
say thou dost want to wash it, and take and wave it,
and [ll then be able to cross over to thee and live
with thee, and we'll poison thy brother.”—Then she
went home and said to her brother: ‘Give me that
handkerchief, dear little brother; it is dirty, so Pl
wash and give it back to thee.” And he believed
her and gave it to her, for she was dear to him,

1 The two fabulous hounds of Ruthenian legend.
2 Heavysides ?
60 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and he thought her good and true. Then she took
the handkerchief, went down to the sea, and waved
it—and behold. there was a bridge. Then the
serpent crossed over to her side, and they walked
to the hut together and consulted as to the best
way of destroying her brother and removing him
from God’s fair world. Now it was his custom to
rise at dawn, mount his horse, and go a-hunting,
for hunting he dearly loved. So the serpent said to
her: “Take to thy bed and pretend to be ill, and say
to him: I dreamed a dream, dear brother, and lo,
I saw thee go and fetch me wolf’s milk to make
me well. Then he'll go and fetch it, and the wolves
will tear his dogs to pieces, and then we can take
and do to him as we list, for his strength is in his
dogs.”

So when the brother came home from hunting the
serpent hid himself, but the sister said: “I have
dreamed a dream, dear brother. Methought thou
didst go and fetch me wolf’s milk, and I drank of
it, and my health came back to me, for I am so
weak that God erant I die not.”—*T’'ll fetch as
said her brother. So he mounted his horse and
set off. Presently he came to a little thicket, and
immediately a she-wolf came out. Then Protius
ran her down and Nedviga held her fast, and the
little Tsar milked her and let her go. And the
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NO VISHNY, 61

she-wolf looked round and said: “Well for thee,
little Tsar Novishny, that thou hast let me go.
Methought thou wouldst not let me go alive. For
that thou hast let me go, I'll give thee, little Tsar
Novishny, a w olf-whelp.”—Then she said to the
little wolf: “Thou shalt serve this dear little Tsar
as though he were thine own dear father.” Then
the little Tsar went back, and now there were with
him two dogs and a little wolf.w vhelp that trotted
behind them.

Now the serpent and the false sister saw him
coming from afar, and three dogs trotting behind
him. And the serpent said to her: « What a sly,
wily one it is! If he hasn’t added another watch-
dog to his train! Lie down, and make thyself
out worse than ever, and ask bear’s milk of him,
for the bears will tear him to pieces without doubt.”
Then the serpent turned himself into a needle,
and she took him up and stuck him in the wall.
Meanwhile the brother dismounted from his horse
and came with his dogs and the wolf to the hut,
and the dogs began snuffing at the needle in the
wall. And his sister said to him: “Tell me, why
dost thou keep these big dogs? They let me have
no rest.” Then he called to the dogs, and they sat
down. And his sister said to him: “I dreamed
a dream, my brother. I saw thee go and search
63 COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

and fetch me from somewhere bear’s milk, and I
drank of it, and my health came back to me.’—«I
will fetch it,” said her brother.

But first of all he laid him down to sleep. Nedviga
lay at his head, and Protius at his feet, and Vovchok!
by his side. So he slept through the night, and
at dawn he arose and mounted his good steed
and hied him thence. Again they came to a little
thicket, and this time a she-bear came out. Protius
ran her down, Nedviga held her fast, and the little
Tsar milked her and let her go. Then the she-bear
said: “Hail to thee, little Tsar Novishny ; because
thou hast let me go, I'll give thee a bear-cub.”
But to the little bear she said: “Obey him as
though he were thine own father.” So he set off
home, and the serpent and his sister saw that four
were now trotting behind him. ‘“ Look!” said the
serpent, “if there are not four running behind him!
Shall we never be able to destroy him? I tell thee
what. Ask him to get thee hare’s milk; perhaps
his beasts will gobble up the hare before he can
milk it.” So he turned himself into a needle again,
and she fastened him in the wall, only a little
higher up, so that the dogs should not get at him.
Then, when the little Tsar dismounted from hig
horse, he and his dogs came into the hut, and the

1 Little Wolf.
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NO VISHNY, 63

dogs began snuffing at the needle in the wall and
barked at it, but the brother knew not the cause
thereof. But his sister burst into tears and said:
“Why dost thou keep such monstrous dogs? Such
a kennel of them makes me sweat with anguish !”
Then he shouted to the dogs, and they sat down
quite still, Then she said to him: “J am so ill,
brother, that nothing will make me well but hare’s
milk, Go and get it for me.”—* [’I] get it,” said he,
But first he laid him down to sleep. Nedviga
lay at his head, Protius at his feet, and Wowdhale
aud Medvedik* each on one side. He slept through
the night, but at dawn he mounted his steed,
took his pack with him, and departed. Again he
came to a little thicket, and a she-hare popped out.
Protius ran her down, Nedviga held her fast, then
he milked her and let her go. ‘Then the hare said :
“Hail to thee, little Tsar Novishny ; because thou
hast let me go—I thought thou wouldst have torn
me to pieces with thy dogs—l’ll give thee a leveret
for it.” But to the leveret she said: « Obey him,
as though he were thine own father.” Then he
went home, and again they saw him from afar
“What a wily rogue it is!” said they. “All five
are following him, and he is as well ag ever !”’
—‘Ask him to get thee fox’s milk!” said the
1 Little Bear.
64 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

serpent; “perhaps when he goes for it his beasts
will leave him in the lurch!” Then he changed
himself into a needle, and she stuck him still
higher in the wall, so that the dogs could not
get at him. The Tsar again dismounted from his
horse, and his dogs rushed up to the hut and began
snuffing at the needle. But his sister fell a-Weeping,
and said: “Why dost thou keep such monstrous
dogs?” He shouted to them, and they sat down
quietly on their haunches. Then his sister said
again: “I am ailing, my brother; go and get me
fox’s milk, and I shall be well.”— I'll fetch it for
thee,” said her brother.

But first he lay down to sleep. Nedviga lay at
his head, Protius at his feet, and Vovchok, Medvedik,
and the leveret by his side. The little Tsar slept
through the night, and at dawn he arose, mounted
‘his horse, took his pack with him, and went off.
They came to a little thicket, and a vixen popped
out. Protius ran her down, Nedviga held her
fast, and the little Tsar milked her and let her go.
Then said the vixen to him: “Thanks to thee,
little Tsar Novishny, that thou hast let me go.
Methought thou wouldst tear me in pieces with
thy dogs. For thy kindness Ill give thee a little
fox.” But to the little fox she said: “ Obey him
as though he were thine own father.” So he went
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 65

home, and they saw him coming from afar, and lo!
now he had six guardians, and yet bad come by no
harm. “’Tis no good; we shall never do for him,”
said the serpent. ‘Look, now! Make thyself worse
than ever, and say to him: I am very ill, my brother,
because in another realm, far, far away, there is a
wild boar who ploughs with his nose, and sows with
and in that same



his ears, and harrows with his tail
empire there is a mill with twelve furnaces that
grinds its own grain and casts forth its own meal,
and if thou wilt bring me of the meal that is beneath
these twelve furnaces, so that I may make me a
cake of it and eat, my soul shall live.’—Then her
brother said to her: “Methinks thou art not my
sister, but my foe!”—But she replied: “How can
I be thy foe when we two live all alone together
in a strange land ?”—* Well, I will get it for thee,”
said he. For again he believed in his sister.

So he mounted his steed, took his pack with
him, and departed, and he came to the land where
were that boar and that mill she had told him of.
He came up to the mill, tied his horse to it, and
entered into it. And there were twelve furnaces
there and twelve doors, and these twelve doors
needed no man to open or shut them, for they
opened .and shut themselves. He took meal from

beneath the first furnace and went through the
F
OG COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

second door, but the dogs were shut in by the doors.
Through all twelve doors he went, and came out
again at the first door, and looked about him, and—
there were no dogs to be seen. He whistled, and
he heard his dogs whining where they could not
get out. Then he wept sore, mounted his horse,
and went home. He got home, and there was his
sister making merry with the serpent. And no
sooner did the brother enter the hut than the serpent
said: “Well, we wanted flesh, and now desh has
For they had just slain a bullock,

pv?

come to us
and on the ground where they had slain it there
sprang up a white-thorn tree, so lovely that it may
be told of in tales, but neither imagined nor divined.
When the little I'sar saw it, he said: “ Oh, my dear
brother-in-law !” (for without his dogs he must needs
be courteous to the serpent,) “ pray let me climb up
that white-thorn tree, and have a good look about
me!” But the sister said to the serpent: “Dear
friend, make him get ready boiling water for him-
self, and we will boil him, for it does not become
thee to dirty thy hands.”—‘ Very well,” said the
serpent; “he shall make the boiling water ready !”
So they ordered the little Tsar to go and chop wood
and get the hot water ready. Then he went and
chopped wood, but as he was doing so, a starling
flew out and said to him: “Not go fast, not so
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 67

fast, little Tsar Novishny. Be as slow as thou
canst, for thy dogs have gnawed their way through
two doors.”

Then the little Tsar poured water into the caldron,
and put fire under it. But the wood that he had
cut was rotten and very very dry, so that it burned
most fiercely, and he took and sprinkled it with
water, and sprinkled it again and again, so that it
might not burn too much. And when he went out
into the courtyard for more water, the starling said
LOMmMIMEN Se SNOcesso taste note so fast, little Tsar
Novishny, for thy dogs have gnawed their way
through four doors!” As he was returning to the hut
his sister said to him: “That water does not boil up
quick enough! Take the fire-shovel and poke the
fire!” So he did so, and the faggots blazed up, but
when she had gone away he sprinkled them with
water again, so that they might burn more slowly.
Then he went into the courtyard again, aud the
starling met him and said: “Not so fast, not so
fast, little Tsar; be as slow as thou canst, for thy
dogs have gnawed their way through six doors.”
Then he returned to the hut, and his sister again
took up the shovel and made him poke up the fire,
and when she went away he again flung water on
the burning coals. So he kept going in and out of
the courtyard. “’Tis weary work!” cried he; but
68 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the starling said to him : “ Not so fast, not so fast, little
Tsar Novishny, for thy dogs have already gnawed their
way through ten doors!” The little Tsar picked up
the rottenest wood he could find and flung it on the fire,
to make believe he was making haste, but sprinkled
it at the same time with water, so that it might not
burn up too quickly, and yet the kettle soon began
to boil. Again he went to the forest for more wood,
and the starling said to him: “ Not so fast, not so
fast, little Tsar, for thy dogs have already gnawed
their way through all the doors, and are now resting !”
But now the water was boiling, and his sister ran up
and said to him: ‘Come, boil thyself, be quick ;
how much longer art thou going to keep us waiting?”
Then he, poor thing, began ladling the boiling water
over himself, while she got the table ready and spread
the cloth, that the serpent might eat her brother on
that very table.

But he, poor thing, kept ladling himself, and ericd :
“Oh, my dear brother-in-law, pray let me climb up
to the top of that white-thorn tree; let me have a look
out from the top of it, for thence one can see afar!”
—‘Don’t let him, dear!” said the sister to the
serpent; “he will stay there too long and lose our
precious time.’—But the serpent replied : “It doesn’t
matter, it doesn’t matter; let him climb up if he
likes.” So the little Tsar went up to the tree, and
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 69

began to climb it; he did not miss a single branch,
and stopped a little at each one to gain time, and
so he climbed up to the very top, and then he took
out his flute and began to play upon it. But the
starling flew up to him and said: “Not so fast,
httle Tsar Novishny, for lo! thy dogs are running to
thee with all their might.” But his sister ran out
and said: “What art thou playing up there for?
Thou dost forget perhaps that we are waiting for
thee down here!” Then he began to descend the
tree, but he stopped at every branch on his way
down, while his sister kept on calling to him to
come down quicker. At last he came to the last
branch, and as he stood upon it and leaped down to
the ground, he thought to himself: “ Now I perish !”
At that same instant his dogs and his beasts,
growling loudly, came running up, and stood in a
circle around him. Then he crossed himself and
said: “Glory to Thee, O Lord! I have still, per-
chance, a little time to live in Thy fair world!”
Then he called aloud to the serpent and said: “ And
now, dear brother-in-law, come out, for I am ready
for thee!” Out came the serpent to eat him, but
he said to his dogs and his beasts: “ Vovchok!
Medvedik! Protius! Nedviga! Seize him!” Then
the dogs and the beasts rushed upon him and tore
him to bits.
70 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then the little Tsar collected the pieces and burnt
them to ashes, and the little fox. rolled his brush in
the ashes till it was covered with them, and then
went out into the open field and scattered them to
the four winds. But while they were tearing the
serpent to pieces the wicked sister knocked out his
tooth and hid it. After it was all over the little
Tsar said to her: ‘As thou hast been such a false
friend to me, sister, thou must remain here while I
go into another kingdom.” Then he made two
buckets and hung them up on the white-thorn tree,
and said to his sister: “Look now, sister! if thou
weepest for me, these buckets will fill with tears, but
if thou weepest for the serpent they will fill with
blood!” ‘Then she fell a-weeping and praying, and
said to him: “ Don’t leave me, brother, but take me
with thee.”—*“I won't,” said he, ‘‘such a false friend
as thou art Pll not have with me. Stay where thou

oP

art.” So he mounted his horse, called to him his
dogs and his beasts, and went his way into another
kingdom and into another empire.

He went on and on till he came to a certain city,
and in this city there was only one spring, and in
this spring sat a dragon with twelve heads. And it
was so that when any went to draw water from this
well the dragon rose up and ate them, and there

was no other place from whence that city could draw
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 71

its water. So the little Tsar came to that town and
put up at the stranger’sinn, and he asked his host:
“What is the meaning of all this running and crying
of the people in the streets ?”’—“ Why, dost thou not
know?” said he; “it is the turn of the Tsar to send










Ya

4
Po

|
4 liz %
fe
i ‘ # ys
vy. M
i" om Ll %
A sai
E ~ MQ EP 2
fey
Alsace ae the e

his daughter to the dragon !”—Then he went out and
listened, and heard the people say: ‘‘ The Tsar pro-
claims that whoever isable to slay the dragon, to him
will he give his daughter and one half of his tsar-
dom!” Then little Tsar Novishny stepped forth and
said: “I am able to slay this evil dragon!” So
72 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

all the people immediately sent and told the Tsar:
“A stranger has come hither who says he is ready
to meet and slay the dragon.” Then the ‘I'sar bade
them take him to the watch-house and put him among
the guards.

Then they led out the Tsarivna, and behind her
they led him, and behind him came his beasts and his
horse. And the Tsarivna was so lovely and so richly
attired that all who beheld her burst into tears. But
the moment the dragon appeared and opened his
mouth to devour the Tsarivna, the little Tsar cried
to his self-slicing sword: “ Fall upon him!” and to
his beasts he cried: “ Protius! Medvedik! Vov-’
chok! Nedviga! Seize him!” Then the self-slicing
sword and the beasts fell upon him, and tore him
into little bits. When they had finished tearing him,
the little Tsar took the remains of the body and
burnt it to ashes, and the little fox took up all the
ashes on her tail, and scattered them to the four
winds. Then he took the Tsarivna by the hand, and
led her to the Tsar, and the people rejoiced because
their water was free again. And the Tsarivna gave
him the nuptial ring.

Then they set off home again. They went on and
on, for it was a long way from the tsardom of that.
Tsar, and at last he grew weary and lay down in the
grass, and she sat at his head. Then his lackey
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 73

crept up to him, unfastened the self-slicing sword
from his side, went up to the little Tsar, and said:
“Self-slicing sword! slay him!” Then the self-
slicing sword cut him into little bits, and his beasts
knew nothing about it, for they were sleeping after
their labours. After that the lackey said to the
Tsarivna: “Thou must say now to all men that !
saved thee from death, or if not, I will do to thee
what I have done to him. Swear that thou wilt say
this thing!” Then she said: “I will swear that thou
didst save me from death,” for she was sore afraid of the
lackey. Then they returned to the city, and the Tsar
was very glad to see them, and clothed the lackey in
goodly apparel, and they all made merry together.

Now when Nedviga awoke he perceived that his
master was no longer there, and immediately awoke
all the rest, and they all began to think and consider
which of them was the swiftest. And when they
had thought it well over they judged that the hare
was the swiftest, and they resolved that the hare
should run and get living and healing water and the
apple of youth also. So the hare ran to fetch this
water and this apple, and he ran and ran till he came
to a certain land, and in this land the hare saw a
spring, and close to the spring grew an apple-tree
with the apples of youth, and this spring and this
apple-tree were guarded by a Muscovite, oh! so
74 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

strong, so strong, and he waved his sabre again and
again so that not even a mouse could make its way
up to that well. What was to be done? Then the
little hare had resort to subtilty, and made herself
crooked, and limped towards the spring as if she
were lame. When the Muscovite saw her he said:
“What sort of a little beast is this? I never saw
the like of it before!” So the hare passed him by,
and went further and further on till she came right
up to the well. The Muscovite stood there and
opened his eyes wide, but the hare had now got up
to the spring and took a little flask of the water and
nipped off a little apple, and was off in a trice.

She ran back to the little Tsar Novishny, and
Nedviga immediately took the water and sprinkled
therewith the fragments of the little Tsar, and the
fragments came together again. Then he poured
some of the living water into his mouth and he
became alive, and gave him a bite of the apple of
youth, and he instantly grew young again and
stronger than ever. Then the little Tsar rose upon
his feet, stretched himself, and yawned. “What a
long time I’ve been asleep!” cried he.—“’Tis a good
thing for thee that we got the living and healing
water!” said Protius.—“ But what shall we do
next?” said they all. Then they all took council
together, and agreed that the little Tsar should
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 75

disguise himself as an old man, and so go to the
Tsar’s palace,

So the little Tsar Novishny disguised himself as an
old man, and went to the palace of the Tsar. Aud
when he got there he begged them to let him in that
he might see the young married people. But the
lackeys would not let him in. Then the Tsarivna
herself heard the sound of his begeing and praying,
and commanded them to admit him. Now when he
entered the room and took off his cap and cloak, the
ring which the Tsarivna had given him when he slew
the serpent sparkled so that she knew him, but, not
believing her own eyes, she said to him: “Come
hither, thou godly old pugrim, that I may show thee
hospitality!” Phen the little Tsar drew near to the
table, and the Tsarivna poured him out a glass of
Wine and gave it to him, and he took it with his left
hand. She marked that he did not take it with the
hand on which was the ring, so she drank off that
glass herself, Then she filled another glass and gave
it him, and he took it with his right hand. Then
she immediately recognized her ring, and said to her
father: “This man is my husband who delivered me
from death, but that fellow ”—pointing to the lackey
—‘‘that rascally slavish soul killed my husband and
made me say that he was my husband.” When the
Tsar heard this he boiled over with rage. “So that
76 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

is what thou art!” said he to the lackey, and im-
mediately he bad them bind him and tie him to the
tail of a horse so savage that no man could ride it,
and then turn it loose into the endless steppe. But
the little Tsar Novishny sat down behind the table
and made merry.

So the Tsarevko and the Tsarivna lived a long
time together in happiness, but one day she asked
him: “What of thy kindred and thy father’s
house?” Then he told her all about his sister. She
immediately bade him saddle his horse, and taking
his beasts with him, go in search of her. They came
to the place where he had left her, and saw that the
bucket which was put up for the serpent was full of
blood, but that the little Tsar’s bucket was all dry
and falling to pieces. Then he perceived that she
was still lamenting for the serpent, and said to her:
“God be with thee, but I will know thee no more.
Stay here, and never will I look upon thy face
again!” But she began to entreat and caress and
implore him that he would take her with him. Then
the brother had compassion on his sister and took her
away with him.

Now when they got home she took out the
serpent’s tooth which she had hidden about her,
and put it beneath his pillow on the bed whereon
he slept. And at night-time the little Tsar went
THE STORY OF LITTLE TSAR NOVISHNY. 77

to le down and the tooth killed him. His wife
thought that he was sulky, and therefore did not
speak to her, so she begged him not to be angry;
and, getting no answer, took him by the hand, and
lo! his hand was cold, as cold as lead, and she
screamed out. But Protius came bounding through
the door and kissed his master. Then the little
‘Tsar became alive again, but Protius died. Then
Nedviga kissed Protius and Protius became alive, but
Nedviga died. Then the Tsarevko said to Medvedik :
“Kiss Nedviga!” He did so, and Nedviga became
alive again, but Medvedik died. And so they went
on kissing each other from the greatest to the
smallest, till the turn came to puss. Puss kissed
Vovehok and died, but Vovchok remained alive.
What was to be done? Now that puss had died
there was none to kiss her back into life again.
“JXiss puss,” said the little Tsar to the little fox.
But the little fox was artful, and taking puss on his
shoulder, he trotted off to the forest. He carried her
to a place where lay a felled oak, with two branches
one on the top of the other, and put the hare on the
lower branch; then he ran under the branch and kissed
the hare, but took good care that the branch should
be between them. Thereupon the serpent’s tooth
flew out of the hare and fastened itself in the upper
branch, and both the fox and puss scampered back out
78 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

of the forest alive and well. When the others saw
them both alive they rejoiced greatly that no harm
had come to any of them from the tooth. But they
seized the sister and tied her to the tail of a savage
horse and let her loose upon the endless steppe.

So they all lived the merry lives of 'sars who
feast continually. And I was there too, and drank
wine and mead till my mouth ran over and it
trickled all down my beard. So there’s the whole
hazka for you.
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL,

NCE upon a time in a certain village
there lived two neighbours ; one
was rich, very rich, and the other
so poor that he had nothing in the
world but a little hut, and that was



tumbling about his ears. At length
things came to such a pass with the poor man
that he had nothing to eat, and could get work
nowhere. Full of grief, he bethought him what he
should do. He thought and thought, and at last he
said: “Look ye, wife! Ill go to my rich neighbour.
Perchance he will lend me a silver ruble; that, at
any rate, will be enough to buy bread with.” So he
went.

He came to the rich man. “Good health to my
lord!” cried he.—“ Good health !”—“I have come
on an errand to thee, dear little master ! ”—‘‘ What
may thine errand be?” inquired the rich man.—


80 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“Alas! would to God that I had no need to say it.
It has come to such a pass with us that there’s
not a crust of bread nor a farthing of money in the
house. So I have come to thee, dear little master ;
lend us but a silver ruble and we will be ever
thankful to thee, and [Il work myself old to pay it
back.” —“ But who will stand surety for thee?” asked
the rich man.—‘ I know not if any man will, I am
so poor. Yet, perchance, God and St. Michael will
be my sureties,” and he pointed at the ikon in the
corner. Then the ikon of St. Michael spoke to the
rich man from the niche and said: “Come now!
lend it him, and put it down to my account. God
will repay thee!”— “Well,” said the rich man,
“Tll lend it to thee.” So he lent it, and the
poor man thanked him and returned to his home
full of joy.

But the rich man was not content that God should
give him back his loan by blessing him in his flocks
and herds, and in his children, and in his health,
and in the blessed fruits of the earth. He waited
and waited for the poor man to come and pay him
back his ruble, and at last he went to seek him.
“Thou son of a dog,” he shouted, before the house,
“why hast thou not brought me back my money ?
Thou knowest how to borrow, but thou forgettest to
repay!” Then the wife of the poor man burst into
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 81

tears: “He would repay thee indeed if he were in
this world,” said she, ‘‘but lo now! he died but a
little while ago!” The rich man snarled at her and
departed, but when he got home he said to the ikon:
“A pretty surety thow art!” Then he took St.
Michael down from the niche, dug out his eyes, and
began beating him.

He beat St. Michael again and again, and at last
he flung him into a puddle |
and trampled on him. “Tl
give it thee for standing me
surety so scurvily,” said he.
While he was thus abusing
St. Michael, a young fellow
about twenty years old came
along that way, and said to
him: “What art thou doing,
my father ?”—“T am beating
him because he stood surety
and has played me false. He
took upon himself the re-
payment of a silver ruble, which I lent to the son
of a swine, who has since gone away and died. That
is why Iam beating him now.”—* Beat him not, my
father! Tl give thee a silver ruble, but thou give
me this holy image !”—“Take him if thou wilt, but
see that thou bring me the silver ruble first.”


82 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then the young man ran home and said to his
father: “Dad, give me a silver ruble!”—* Where-
fore, my son?”—“T would buy a holy image,” said
he, and he told oe how he had seen that
heathen beating



“Nay, my son, whence
shall we who are poor find a silver ruble to
give to him who is so rich ?”— —“‘Nay, but give it
me, dad!” and he begved and prayed till he got it.
Then he ran back as quickly as he could, paid
the silver ruble to the rich man, and got the holy
image. He washed it clean and placed it in the
midst of sweet-smelling flowers. And so they lived
on as before.

Now this youth had three uncles, rich merchants,
who sold all manner of merchandise, and went in
ships to foreign lands where they sold their goods
and made their gains. One day, when his uncles
were again making ready to depart into SEs lands,
he said to them: “Take me with you !°—" Why
shouldst thou go?” said they: “we have wares to
sell, but what hast thou?”— Yet take me,” said
he—* But thou hast nothing.”—“TI will make me
laths and boards and take them with me,” said he.—
His uncles laughed at him for imagining such wares
as these, but he begged and De ed them till they
were wearied. “ Well, come,” they said, “though
there is nought for thee to do; only take not much
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 83

of these wares of thine with thee, for our ships are
already full.” —Then he made him laths and boards,
put them on board the ship, took St. Michael with
him, and they departed.

They went onand on. They sailed a short distance
and they sailed a long distance, till at last they came
to another tsardom and another empire. And the Tsar
of this tsardom had an only daughter, so lovely that
the like of her is neither to be imagined nor divined
in God's fair world, neither may it be told in tales.
Now this Tsarivna one day went down to the river
to bathe, and plunged into the water without first
crossing herself, whereupon the unclean spirit took
possession of her. The Tsarivna got out of the water,
and straightway fell ill of so terrible a disease that it
may not be told of. Do what they would—and the
wise men and the wise women did their utmost—it
was of no avail. Ina few days she grew worse and
died. Then the Tsar, her father, made a proclama-
tion that people should come and read the prayers
for the dead over her dead body, and so exorcise the
evil spirit, and whosoever delivered her was to have
half his power and half his tsardom.

And the people came in crowds—but none of them
could read the prayers for the dead over her, it was
impossible. Every evening a man went into the
church, and every morning they swept out his bones,
Sf . COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

for there was nought else of him remaining, And
the ‘sar was very wroth. “All my people will be
devoured,” cried he. And he commanded that all
the foreign merchants passing through his realm
should be made to read prayers for the dead over
his daughter's body. “And if they will not
read,” said he, “they shall not depart from my
kingdom.”

So the foreign merchants went one by one. In
the evening a merchant was shut up in the church,
and in the early morning they came and found and
swept away his bones. At last it came to the turn
of the young man’s uncles to read the prayers for the
dead in the church. They wept and lamented and
cried: “We are lost! we are lost! Heaven help
us!” Then the eldest uncle said to the lad: « Listen,
good simpleton! It has now come to my turn to
read prayers over the Tsarivna. Do thou goin my
stead and pass the night in the church, and T’ll give
thee all my ship.”—“ Nay, but,” said the simpleton,
“what if she tear me to pieces too? I won’t cone
—But then St. Michael said to him: “Go and fear
not! Stand in the very middle of the church fenced
round about with thy laths and boards, and take with
thee a basket full of pears. When she rushes at thee,
take and scatter the pears, and it will take her till
cockcrow to pick them all up. But do thou go on
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 85

reading thy prayers all the time, and look not up,
whatever she may do.”

When night came, he took up his laths and boards.
and a basket of pears, and went to the church. He
entrenched himself behind his boards, stood there
and began to read. At dead of night there was a
rustling and a rattling. O Lord! what was that ?
There was a shaking of the bier—bang! bang !—and
the Tsarivna arose from her coffin and came straight
towards him. She leaped upon the boards and made
a erab at him and fell back. Then she leaped at him
again, and again she fell back. Then he took his
basket and scattered the pears. All through the
church they rolled, she after them, and she tried to
pick them up till cockerow, and at the very first
“ Cock-a-doodle-doo!” she got into her bier again and
lay still.

When God’s bright day dawned, the people came
to clean out the church and sweep away his bones;
but there he was reading his prayers, and the rumour
of it went through the town and they were all filled
with joy.

Next night it was the turn of the second uncle,
and he began to beg and pray: ‘Go thou, simpleton,
in my stead! Look now, thou hast already passed
a night there, thou mayest very well pass another,
and I'll give thee all my ship.”—But he said: “I
86 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

won't go, [ am afraid.”—But then St. Michael said
to him again: “Fear not, but go! Fence thee
all about with thy boards, and take with thee a
basket of nuts. When she rushes at thee, scatter
thy nuts, and the nuts will go rolling all about the
church, and it will take her till cockerow to gather
them all up. But thou go on reading thy prayers,
nor look thou up, whatever may happen.” .

And he did so. He took his boards and the basket
of nuts, and went to the church at nightfall and read.
A little after midnight there was a rustling and an
uproar, and the whole church shook. Then came a
fumbling round about the coffin—* Bang, bang!” up
she started, and made straight for him. She leaped
and plunged, she very nearly got through the boards.
She hissed, like seething pitch, and her eyes glared
at him like coals of fire, but it was of no use. He
read on and on, and didn’t once look at her. Besides,
he scattered his nuts, and she went after them and
tried to pick them all up till cockerow. And at the
first “‘ Cock-a-doodle-doo !” she leaped into her coffin
again and pulled down the lid. In the morning the
people came to sweep away his bones, and lo! they
found him alive.

The next night he had to go again in the third
uncle’s stead. Then he sat down and cried and
wailed: “ Alas, alas! what shall I do? “Iwere better’
















ae
ee
os

t i}





















ee





\



Le ere — ) y)
Si pa : oy ‘ A = ; lj \

hee 7 NK (i
mk
: cs \ S \

















.

i

q nN :
Why “a
MY \
a
\\ \ te
\
ANN


8& COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

I had never been born!”—But St. Michael gaid to
him: “Weep not, ‘twill all end happily. Fence
thyself about with thy boards, sprinkle thyself all
about with holy water, incense thyself with holy
incense, and take me with thee. She shall not have
thee. And the moment she leaves her coffin, do
thou jump quickly into it. And whatever she may
say to thee, and however she may implore thee, let.
her not get into it again until she says to thee: ‘My
consort !’”

So he went. There he stood in the middle of the
church, fenced himself about with his boards, strewed
consecrated poppy-seed around him, incensed himself
with holy incense, and read and read. About the
middle of the night a tempest arose outside, and there
was a rustling and a roaring, a hissing and a wailing.
The church shook, the altar candelabra were thrown
down, the holy images fell on their faces. O Lord,
how awful! Then came a “Bang, bang!” from the
coffin, and again the Tsarivna started up. She left
her coffin and fluttered about the church. She
rushed at the boards and made a snatch at him, and
fell back ; she rushed at him again, and again she fell
back. She foamed at the mouth, and her fury every
instant grew worse and worse. She dashed herself
about, and darted madly from one corner of the
church to the other, seeking him everywhere. But
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 89

he skipped into the coffin, with the image of St.
Michael by his side. She ran all over the church



secking him. ‘‘He was here—and now he is not
here!” cried she. Then she ran further on, felt all
about her, and cried again: “He was here—and now
he’s not here!” At last she sprang up to the coftin,
and there he was. Then she began to beg and pray
him: ‘Come down, come down! T’ll try and catch
thee no more, only come down, come down!” But
he only prayed to God, and answered her never a
word. Then the cock crew once: “ Cock-a-doodle-
doo !”—* Alas! come down, come down, my con-
sort!” cried she. Then he came down, and they
both fell on their knees and begau praying to God,
and wept sore and gave thanks to God because He
had had mercy on them both.

And at dawn of day crowds of people, with the
Tsar at the head of them, came to the church. ‘ Shall
we find him reading prayers, or shall we only find his
bones?” said they. And lo! there they both were
on their knees praying fervently to God. Then the
Tsar rejoiced greatly, and embraced both him and
her. After that they had a grand service in the
church, and sprinkled her with holy water, and
baptized her again, and the unclean spirit departed
from her. Then the Tsar gave the young man half
his power and half his kingdom, but the merchants
90 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

departed in their ships, with their nephew on
board,

They lived together, and time went on and the
young man still remained a bachelor, and was so
handsome that words cannot describe it. But the
Tsar lived alone with his daughter. She, however,
grew sadder and sadder, and was no longer like her
former self, so sorrowful was she. And the Tsar asked
her, saying: “ Wherefore art thou so sorrowful ?”—
“Tam not sorrowful, father,” said she. But the Tsar
watched her, and saw that she was sorrowful, and
there was no help for it. Then he asked her again:
“Art thou ill?”—‘ Nay, dear dad,’ said she. “I
myself know not what is the matter with me.”

And so it went on, till the Tsar dreamt a dream,
and in this dream it was said to him: “Thy daughter
grieves because she loves so much the youth who
drove the unclean spirit out of her.” Then the Tsar
asked her: ‘ Dost thou love this youth ?”—And she
answered: ‘1 do, dear father.”—‘‘Then why didst
thou not tell me before, my daughter?” said he.
Then he sent for his heydukes and commanded them,
saying: “Go this instant to such and such a king-
dom, and there ye will find the youth who cured my
daughter; bring him to me.” Then they went on
and on until they found him, and he took just the
same laths and boards that he had had before, and
THE VAMPIRE AND ST. MICHAEL. 91

went with them. The Tsar met him, and bought all
his boards, and when they split them in pieces, lo!
they were full of precious stones. Then the Tsar
took him to his own house and gave him his daughter.
And they lived right merrily together.
THE STORY OF TREMSIN, THE BIRD ZHAR,
AND NASTASIA, THE LOVELY MAID OF
THE SEA.

Mae HERE was once upon a time a man



: and a woman, and they had one

ss little boy. In the summer-time
rates they used to go out and mow corn
in the fields, and one summer when
they had laid their little lad by
the side of a sheaf, an eagle swooped down, caught
up the child, carried him into a forest, and laid him
in its nest. Now in this forest three bandits chanced
to be wandering at the same time. They heard the
child crying in the eagle’s nest: “Oo-00! 00-00!

199

00-00!" so they went up to the oak on which was
the nest and-said one to another: “Let us hew down
the tree and kill the child !”—* No,” replied one of
them : “it were better to climb up the tree and bring

him down alive.” So he climbed up the tree and
THK STORY OF TREMSIN. 93

brought down the lad, and they nurtured him and
gave him the name of Tremsin. They brought up
Tremsin until he became a youth, and then they
gave him a horse, set him upon it, and said to him:
‘Now go out into the wide world and search for thy
father and thy mother!” So Tremsin went out into
the wide world and pastured his steed on the vast
steppes, and his steed spoke to him and said: ‘* When
we have gone a little further, thou wilt see before
thee a plume of the Bird Zhar;+ pick it not up, or

ta

sore trouble will be thine Then they went on
again. They went on and on, through ten tsardoms
they went, till they came to another empire in the
land of Thrice Ten where lay the feather. And the
youth said to himself: “ Why should I not pick up
the feather when it shines so brightly even from
afar?” And he went near to the feather, and it shone
so that the like of it cannot be expressed or con-
ceived or imagined or even told of in tales. Then
Tremsin picked up the feather and went into the town
over against him, and in that town there lived a rich
nobleman. And Tremsin entered the house of this
nobleman and said: ‘Sir, may I not take service with
thee as a labourer ?”—~The nobleman locked at him,
and seeing that he was comely and stalwart: “ Why
not? Of course thou mayest,” said he. So he took

a We IM Oeloe
4.é@. Burning-bright.
9+ COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

him into his service. Now this nobleman had many
servants, and they curried his horses for him, and
made them smart and glossy against the day he
should go a-hunting. And Tremsin began to curry
his horse likewise, and the servants of the nobleman
could not make the horses of their master so shining
bright as Tremsin made his own horse. So they
looked more closely, and they perceived that when
Tremsin cleaned his horse he stroked it with the
feather of the Bird Zhar, and the coat of the good
steed straightway shone like burnished silver. Then
those servants were filled with envy, and said among
themselves: ‘‘ How can we remove this fellow from
the world? We'll saddle him with a task he is
unable to do, and then our master will drive him
away.”’—So they went to their master and said:
“Tremsin has a feather of the Bird Zhar, and he
says that if he likes he can get the Bird Zhar itself.”
Then the nobleman sent for Tremsin and said to him :
“QO Tremsin! my henchmen say that thou canst
eet the Bird Zhar if thou dost choose.”—“ Nay, but
I cannot,” replied Tremsin.—“ Answer me not,” said
the nobleman, ‘for so sure as Ive a sword, Ill slice
thy head off lke a gourd.’—Then Tremsin fell a-
weeping and went away to his horse. ‘‘ My master,”
said he, ‘ hath given me a task to do that will clean
undo me.’’—‘‘ What task is that ?” asked the horse.—
THE STORY OF TREMSIN. 95

“Why, to fetch him the Bird Zhar.”—“ Why that’s
not a task, but a trifle,” replied the horse. “Let us
go to the steppes,” it continued, “and let me go a-
browsing ; but thou strip thyself stark naked and lie
down in the grass, and the Bird Zhar will straightway
swoop down to feed. So long as she only claws
about thy body, touch her not; but as soon as she
begins to claw at thy eyes, seize her by the legs.”

So when they got to the wild steppes, Tremsin
stripped himself naked and flung himself in the grass,
and, immediately, the Bird Zhar swooped down and
began pecking all about him, and at last she pecked
at his eyes. Then Tremsin seized her by both legs,
and mounted his horse and took the Bird Zhar to the
nobleman. Then his fellow-servants were more envious
than ever, and they said among themselves: “ How
shall we devise for him a task to do that cannot be
done, and so rid the world of him altogether?” So
they bethought them, and then they went to the
nobleman and said: “Tremsin says that to get the
Bird Zhar was nothing, and that he is also able to
get the thrice-lovely Nastasia of the sea.” Then the
nobleman again sent for Tremsin and said to him:
“Look now! thou didst get for me the Bird Zhar, see
that thou now also gettest for me the thrice-lovely
Nastasia of the sea.”—‘ But I cannot, sir!” said
Tremsin.— Answer me not so!” replied the noble-
96 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

man, “for so sure as I’ve a sword, I'll slice thy head
off like a gourd an thou bring her not.”—Then
Tremsin went out to his horse and fell a-weeping.—
“Wherefore dost thou weep 2” asked the faithful steed,
—‘“‘ Wherefore should I not weep?” he replied. “ My
master has given me a task that cannot be done.?—
“What task is that ?”—« Why, to fetch him the
thrice-lovely Nastasia of the sea!”—Oh-ho!”
laughed the horse, “that is not a task, but a trifle.
Go to thy master and say: Cause white tents to be
raised by the sea-shore, and buy wares of sundry kinds,
and wine and spirits in bottles and flasks, and the
thrice-lovely Nastasia will come and: purchase thy
wares, and then thou mayest take her,”

And the nobleman did so. He caused white tents
to be pitched by the sea-shore, and bought kerchiefs
and scarves and spread them out gaily, and made
great store of wine and brandy in bottles and flasks,
Then Tremsin rode towards the tents, and while he
was on the way, his horse said to him: “Now when
I g0 to graze, do thou lie down and feign to sleep.
Then the thrice-lovely Nastasia will appear and say :
‘What for thy wares?’ but do thou keep silence. But
when she begins to taste of the wine and the brandy,
then she will go to sleep in the tent, and thou canst
catch her easily and hold her fast!” Then Tremsin
lay down and feigned to sleep, and forth from the
THE STORY OF TREMSIN. 97°

sea came the thrice-lovely Nastasia, and went up to
the tents and asked: “Merchant, merchant, what for
thy wares?” But he lay there, and moved never a
limb. She asked the same thing over and over again,
but, getting no answer, went into the tents where
stood the flasks and the bottles. She tasted of the
wine. How good it was! She tasted of the brandy.
That was still better. So from tasting she fell to
drinking. Firstshe drank a little, and then she drank
a little more, and at last she went asleep in the tent.
Then Tremsin seized the thrice-lovely Nastasia and
put her behind him on horseback, and carried her off
to the nobleman. The nobleman praised Tremsin
exceedingly, but the thrice-lovely Nastasia said :
“Look now ! since thou hast found the feather of the
Bird Zhar, and the Bird Zhar herself, since also thou
hast found me, thou must now fetch me also my little
coral necklace from the sea!” Then Tremsin went
out to his faithful steed and wept sorely, and told
him all about it. And the horse said to him: “ Did
I not tell thee that grievous woe would come upon
thee if thou didst pick up that feather?” But the
horse added: “Come! weep not! after all ’tis not a
task, but a trifle.” Then they went along by the
sea, and the horse said to him: “ Let me out to graze,
and then keep watch till thou see a crab come forth

99

from the sea, and then say to him: ‘I’ll catch thee.
H
98 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

—So Tremsin let his horse out to graze, and he himself
stood by the sea-shore, and watched and watched till
he saw a crab come swimming along. Then he said
to the crab: “T’ll catch thee.”— not!” said the crab, “but let me get back into the
sea, and I'll be of great service to thee.” —* Very
well,” said Tremsin, “but thou must get me from the
sea the coral necklace of the thrice-lovely Nastasia,”
and with that he let the crab go back into the sea
again. Then the crab called together all her young
crabs, and they collected all the coral and brought it
ashore, and gave it to Tremsin. Then the faithful
steed came running up, and Tremsin mounted it, and
took the coral to the thrive-lovely Nastasia. ‘ Well,”
said Nastasia, “thou hast got the feather of the Bird
Zhar, thou hast got the Bird Zhar itself, thou hast got
me my coral, get me now from the sea my herd of
wild horses!”—Then Tremsin wag gore distressed,
and went to his faithful steed and wept bitterly, and
told him all about it. “Well,” said the horse, “this
time ’tis no trifle, but a real hard task. Go now to
thy master, and bid him buy twenty hides and twenty
poods? of pitch, and twenty poods of flax, and twenty
poods of hair.”—So Tremsin went to bis master and
told him, and his master bought it all. Then Tremsin
loaded his horse with all this, and to the sea they
1 A pood = 40 Ibs.
THE STORY OF TREMSIN. 99

went together, And when they came to the sea the
horse said ; ‘ Now lay upon me the hides and the tar
and the flax, and lay them in this order : first a hide,
and then a pood of tar, and then a pood of flax, and
so on, laying them thus till they. are all laid.”
Tremsin did so. ‘And now,” said the horse, |
shall plunge into the sea, and when thou seest a large
red wave driving towards the shore, run away till
the red wave has passed, and thou dost see a white
wave coming, and then sit down on the shore and
keep watch. I shall then come out of the sea, and
after me the whole herd; then thou must strike
with the horse-hair the horse which gallops imme-
diately after me, and he will not be too strong for
thee.”—So the faithful steed plunged into the sea, and
Tremsin sat down on the shore and watched. The
horse swam to a bosquet that rose out of the sea, and
there the herd of sea-horses was grazing. When the
strong charger of Nastasia saw him and the hides he
carried on his back, it set off after him at full tilt, and
the whole herd followed the strong charger of Nastasia.
‘They drove the horse with the hides into the sea, and
pursued him. Then the strong charger of Nastasia
caught up the steed of Tremsin and tore off one of his
hides, and began to worry it with his teeth and tear it
to fragments as he ran. Then he caught him up a
second time, and tore off another hide, and began to
100 COSSACK FAIRY TALES. -

worry that in like manner till he had torn it also.
to shreds; and thus he ran after T'remsin’s steed for
seventy miles, till he had torn off all the hides, and
worried them to bits. But Tremsin sat upon the gea-
shore till he saw the large white billow bounding in,
and behind the billow came his own horse, and behind








\







Uf fen

REE ly Ez =
LE, jj, as i

be, LM iit soe E* 2 is WEE. 45



his own horse came the thrice-terrible charger of the
thrice-lovely Nastasia, with the whole herd at his
heels. Tremsin struck him full on the forehead with
the twenty poods of hair, and immediately he stood
stock still. Then Tremsin threw a halter over him,
mounted, and drove the whole herd to the thrice-
lovely Nastasia. Nastasia praised Tremsin for his


THE STORY OF TREMSIN. 101

prowess, and said to him: “ Well, thou hast got the
feather of the Bird Zhar, thou hast got the Bird Zhar
itself, thou hast got me my coral and my herd of
horses, now milk my mare and put the milk into
three vats, so that there may be milk hot as boiling
water in the first vat, lukewarm milk in the second
vat, and icy cold milk in the third vat.” Then
Tremsin went to his faithful steed and wept bitterly,
and the horse said to him: “ Wherefore dost thou
weep ?”—“ Why should I not weep ?” cried he ; “ the
thrice-lovely Nastasia has given me a task to do that
cannot be done. I am to fill three vats with the milk
from her mare, and the milk must be boiling hot in
the first vat, and lukewarm in the second, and icy
cold in the third vat.”—“ Oh-ho!” eried the horse,
“that is not a task, but a trifle. Ill caress the mare,
and then go on nibbling till thou hast milked all
three vats full.” So Tremsin did so. He milked the
three vats full, and the milk in the first vat was
boiling hot, and in the second vat warm, and in the
third vat freezing cold. When all was ready the
thrice-lovely Nastasia said to Tremsin : “‘ Now, leap
first of all into the cold vat, and then into the warm
vat, and then into the boiling hot vat!”—Tremsin
leaped into the first vat, and leaped out again an old
man; he leaped into the second vat, and leaped out
again a youth; he leaped into the third vat, but when
102 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

he leaped out again, he was so young and handsome
that no pen can describe it, and no tale can tell of
it. Then the thrice-lovely Nastasia herself leaped
into the vats. She leaped into the first vat, and
came out an old woman; she leaped into the second
vat, and came out a young maid; but when she leaped
out of the third vat, she was so handsome and goodly
that no pen can describe it, and no tale can tell of it.
Then the thrice-lovely Nastasia made the nobleman
leap into the vats. He leaped into the first vat, and
heeame quite old; he leaped into the second vat, and
became quite young; he leaped into the third vat,
and burst to pieces. Then Tremsin took unto himself
the thrice-lovely Nastasia to wife, and they lived
happily together on the nobleman’s estate, and the
evil robbers they drove right away.
THE SERPENT-WIFE.

ELERE was once a gentleman who
had a labourer who never went
about in company. His fellow-
servants did all they could to
make him come with them, and



now and then enticed him into
the tavern, but they could never get him to stay there
long, and he always wandered away by himself through
the woods. One day he went strolling about in the
forest as usual, far from any village and the haunts
of men, when he came upon a huge Serpent, which
wrigeled straight up to him and said: “Iam going
to cat thee on the spot!” But the labourer, who was
used to the loneliness of the forest, replied: “ Very
well, eat me if thou hast a mind to!’”—Then the
Serpent said: “Nay! [ will not eat thee; only do
what I tell thee!” And the Serpent began to tell
the man what he had to do. “Turn back home,” it
104 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

said, “and thou wilt find thy master angry because
thou hast tarried go long, and there was none to work
for him, so that his corn has to remain standing im
the field. Then he will send thee to bring in his
sheaves, and I’ll help thee. Load the wagon well,
but don’t take quite all the sheaves from the field.
Leave one little sheaf behind; more than that thou
needst not leave, but that thou must leave. Then
beg thy master to let thee have this little sheaf by
way of wages. Take no money from him, but that
one little sheaf only. Then, when thy master has
given thee this sheaf, burn it, and a fair lady will
leap out of it; take her to wife!”

The labourer obeyed, and went and worked for his
master as the Serpent had told him. He went out
into the field to bring home his master’s corn, and
marvellously he managed it. He did all the carrying
himself, and loaded the wagon so heavily that it
creaked beneath its burden. Then when he had
brought home all his master’s corn, he begged that
he might have the remaining little sheaf for himself.
He refused to be rewarded for his smart labour, he
would take no money; he wanted nothing for himself,
he said, but the little sheaf he had left in the field.
So his master let him have the sheaf. Then he went
out by himself into the field, burnt the sheaf, just as
the Serpent had told him, and immediately a lovely
_ THE SERPENT-WIFE, 105

lady leapt out of it. The labourer forthwith took
and married her; and now he began to look out for
a place to build him a hut upon. His master gave
him a place where he might build his hut, and his
wife helped him so much with the building of it that
it seemed to him as if he himself never laid a hand
to it. His hut grew up as quick as thought, and
it contained everything that they wanted. ‘The
man could not understand it; he could only walk
about and wonder at it. Wherever he looked there
was everything quite spick and span and ready for
use: none in the whole village had a better house
than «he:

And so he might have lived in all peace and
prosperity to the end of his days had not his desires
outstripped his deserts.) He had three fields of
standing corn, and when he came home one day his
labourers said to him: “Thy corn is not gathered
in yet, though it is standing all ripe on its stalks.”
Now the season was getting on, and for all the care
and labour of his wife, the corn was still standing in
“the field. “Why, what’s the meaning of this ?”
thought he. Then in his anger he cried: “T see
how it is. Once a serpent, always a serpent!” He
was quite beside himself all the way home, and was
very wroth with his wife because of the corn.

When he got home he went straight to his chamber
106 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

to lie down on his pillow. There was no sign of
his wife, but a huge serpent was just coiling itself
round and round and settling down in the middle of
the pillow. Then he called to mind how, once, his
wife had said to him: ‘ Beware, for Heaven’s sake, of
ever calling me a serpent. I will not suffer thee to
call me by that name, and if thou dost thou shalt
lose thy wife.” He called this to mind now, but it
was already too late; what he had said could not be
unsaid. Then he reflected what a yvood wife he had
had, and how she herself had sought him out, and
how she had waited upon him continually and done
him boundless good, and yet he had not been able to
refrain his tongue, so that now, maybe, be would be
without a wife for the rest of his days. His heart
grew heavy within him as he thought of all this,
and he wept bitterly at the harm he had done
to himself. Then the Serpent said to him: ‘ Weep
no more. What is to be, must be. Is it thy
standing corn thou art grieved about? Go up
to thy barn, and there thou wilt find all thy corn
lying, to the very last little grain. Have I not
brought it all home and threshed it for thee, and set
everything in order? And now I must depart to the
place where thou didst first find me.” Then she
crept off, and the man followed her, weeping and
mourning all the time as for one already dead.















































108 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

When they reached the forest she stopped and coiled
herself round and round beneath a hazel-nut bush.
Then she said to the man: “Now kiss me once, but
see to 1t that I do not bite thee!”—Then he kissed
her once, and she wound herself round a branch of a
tree and asked him: “What dost thou feel within
thee ?”—He answered: “At the moment when [
kissed thee it seemed to me as if I knew everything
that was going on in the world!”—Then she said to
him again: “ Kiss me a second time!”—* And what
dost thou feel now?” she asked when he had kissed
her again.—‘‘ Now,” said he, “I understand all
languages which are spoken amongst men.”—Then
she said to him: *‘ And now kiss me a third time, but
this will be for the last time.” Then he kissed the
Serpent for the last time, and she said to him:
“What dost thou feel now ?”——‘‘ Now,” said he, ‘I
know all that is going on under the earth.”—*« now,” said she, “to the Tsar, and he will give thee
his daughter for the knowledge thou hast. But pray
to God for poor me, for now I must be and remain a
serpent again.” And with that the Serpent uncoiled
herself and disappeared among the bushes, but the
man went away and wedded the Tsar’s daughter.




eee



THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL.

HERE was once upon a time a
youth called Unlucky Dan.
Wherever he went, and what-
ever he did, and with whomso-
ever he served, nothing came of
it: all his labour was like spilt
water, he got no good from it. One day he took
service with a new master. “Tl serve thee a
whole year,” said he, “for a piece of sown wheat-
land.” His master agreed, and he entered into
his service, and at the same time he sowed his
piece of wheat-land. His wheat shot up rapidly.
When his master’s wheat was in the stalk, his was
already in the ear, and when his master’s wheat
was in the ear, his own wheat was already ripe.
“Tl reap it to-morrow,” thought he. The same
night a cloud arose, the hail poured down, and
destroyed his wheat altogether. Daniel fell a-weep-
110 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

ing. “Vl go serve another master,” he cried,
“perhaps God will then prosper me!” So he went
to another master. ‘I'll serve thee for a whole
year,” said he, “if thou wilt give me that wild colt.”
So he stopped and served him, and by the end of the
year he trained the wild colt so well that he made a
carriage-horse out of it. ‘ Oh-ho!” thought he, “I
shall take away something with me this time!” The
same night the wolves made an inroad. upon the
stables and tore the horse to pieces. Daniel fell
a-weeping. “I'll go to another master,” said he,
‘perhaps I shall be luckier there.” So he went to
a third master, and on this master’s tomb lay a large
stone. Whence it came none knew, and it was so
heavy that none could move it, though they tried for
ages. “Tl serve thee a year,” said he, “for that
stone.” The master agreed, and he entered his
service. Then a change came over the stone, and
divers flowers began to grow upon it. On one side’
they were red, on the second side silver, and on the
third side golden. ‘Oh-ho,” thought Daniel, “that
stone, at any rate, will soon be mine. Nobody can
move it.” But the next morning a thunder-bolt
descended and struck the stone, and shivered it to
atoms. Then Daniel fell a-weeping, and lamented
that God had given him nothing, though he had
served for so many years. But the people said to
THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL, lil

him: “Listen now! thou that art so unlucky, why
dost thou not go to the Tsar? He is the father of us
all, and will therefore certainly care for thee!” So
he listened to them and went, and the Tsar gave him
a place at his court. One day the Tsar said to him:
“T marvel that thou art so unlucky, for do whatso-
ever thou wilt, thou art none the better for it. I
would fain requite thee for all thy labours.” Then
he took and filled three barrels, the first with gold,

and the second with coal, and the third with sand,

and said to Daniel: “Look now! if thou dost pitch
upon that which is filled with gold, thou shalt be a
Tsar; if thou dost choose the one that is filled with
coal, thou shalt be a blacksmith ; but if thou dost
pick out the one that is full of sand, why then thou

att indeed hopelessly unlucky, and out of my tsardom
thou must go straightway, yet I will give thee a
horse and armour to take along with thee.” So.
Daniel was brought to the place where were the three

barrels, and went about them and felt and felt them

one after the other. “This one is full of gold!” said

he. They broke it open and it was full of sand.

“Well,” said the Tsar, “I see that thou art hope-

lessly unlucky. Depart from my tsardom, for I have

no need at all of such as thou.” Then he gave him

a charger and armour, and the full equipment of a

Cossack, and sent him away.
112 COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

He went on and on for a whole day, he went on
and on for a second day, and there was nothing to
eat, either for his horse or himself. He went for a
third day, and in the distance he saw a hay-cock.
“That will do for my horse, at any rate,” thought he,
“even if it is of no good to me.” So he went up
to it, and immediately it burst into flames. Daniel
began to weep, when he heard a_ voice crying
piteously: “Save me, save me! I am burning !”—
‘““How can I save thee,” he cried, “when I myself
cannot draw near ?”—‘ Oh! give me thy weapon!”
cried the voice, “and Tl seize hold of it, and then
thou canst pull me out.” So he stretched forth his
weapon, and drew forth a goodly serpent, such as is
only known of in old folk songs. And she said to
him: ‘Since thou hast drawn me out, thou must also
take me home.’”—“ How shall I carry thee?” asked
he.—* Carry me on thy horse, and in whatsoever
direction I turn my head and his, thither go.” —So
he took her upon his horse, and they went on and on
till they came to a court so splendid that it was a
delight to look at it. Then she glided down from his
charger and said: “ Wait here, and V’ll soon be with
thee again,” and with that she wriggled under the
gate. He stood there and stood and waited and
waited till he wept from’ sheer weariness; but, at
last, she came out again in the shape of a lovely











114 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

damsel in gorgeous raiment, and opened the gate for
him. “Lead in thy horse,” said she, “and eat and
rest awhile.” So they went into the courtyard, and
in the midst of it stood two springs. The lady drew
out of one of these springs a little glass of water,
and strewing a handful of oats beside it, said;

a?

“Fasten up thy horse here!”—‘ What!” thought
he, “for these three days we have had nought to eat
or drink, and now she mocks us with a handful of
oats!”—Then they went together to the guest-
chamber, and she gave him there a little glass of
water and a small piece of wheaten bread.—“ Why,
what is this for a hungry man like me?” thought he.
But when he chanced to glance through the window,
he saw that the whole courtyard was full of oats
and water, and that his horse had already eaten its
fill. Then he nibbled his little piece of wheaten cake
and sipped his water, and his hunger was immediately
satisfied. ‘ Well,” said the lady, ‘hast thou eaten
thy fill?”—“ That I have,” he replied.‘ Then lie
down and rest awhile,” said she. And the next
morning, when he rose up, she said to him: “Give
me thy horse, thy armour, and thy raiment, and [ll
give thee mine in exchange.”—Then she gave him
her shift and her weapon, and said: “This sword is
of such a sort that, if thou do but wave it, all men
will fall down before thee; and as for this shift, when
THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL. 115

once thou hast it on, none will be able to seize thee.
And now go on thy way till thou come to an inn, and
there they will tell thee that the Tsar of that land is
seeking warriors. Go and offer thyself to him, and
thou shalt marry his daughter, but tell her not the
truth for seven years!” Then they took leave of
each other, and he departed. He came to the inn,
and there they asked him whence he came. And
when they knew that he came from a strange land,
they said to him: “A strange land has attacked our
Tsar, and he cannot defend himself, for a mighty
warrior has conquered his tsardom and carried off his
daughter, and worries him to death.—‘‘ Show me the
way to your Tsar,” said Daniel. Then they showed
him, and he went. When he came to the ‘Tsar, he
said to him: “1 will subdue this strange land for
thee. All the army I want is a couple of Cossacks,
but they must be picked men.” ‘Then the heralds
went through the tsardom till they had found these
two Cossacks, and Daniel went forth with them into
the endless steppes, and there he bade them lie down
and sleep while he kept watch. And while they
slept the army of the strange country came upon
them, and cried to Daniel to turn back if he would
escape destruction. And then they began to fire
with their guns and cannons, and they fired so many
balls that the bodies of the two Cossacks were quite
116 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

covered by them. Then Daniel waved his sword and
smote, and only those whom his blows did not reach
escaped alive. So he vanquished them all, and con-
quered that strange land, and came back and married
the Tsar’s daughter, and they lived happily together.

But counsellors from the strange land whispered
dark sayings in the ears of the Tsarivna, “‘ What is



this fellow that thou hast taken to thyself? Who is
he, and whence? Find out for us wherein lies his
strength, that we may destroy him and take thee
away.”—Then she began asking him, and he said
to her: “Look now! all my strength is in these
gloves.” Then she waited till he was asleep, and
drew them off him, and gave them to the people
THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL. 117

from the strange land. And the next day he went
hunting, and the evil counsellors surrounded and shot
at him with their darts, and beat him with the
gloves; but it was all in vain. Then he waved his
sword, and whomsoever he struck fell to the ground,
and he clapped them all in prison. But his wife
caressed and wheedled him again, and said: “ Nay,
but tell me, wherein doth thy strength le ?’—“ My
strength, darling,” said he, “lies in my boots.” Then
she drew off his boots while he slept, and gave them
to his enemies. And they fell upon him again as
he went out, but again he waved his sword, and as
many as he struck fell to the ground, and he put
them all in prison. Then his wife wheedled and
caressed him the third time. “Nay, but tell me,
darling,” quoth sbe, “wherein doth thy strength
lie?” Then he was wearied with her beseeching, and
said to her: “ My strength les in this sword of mine,
and in my shirt, aud so long as I have this shirt
on, nobody can touch me.” Then she caressed and
fondled him, and said: ‘Thou shouldst take a bath,
my darling, and well wash thyself. My father
always did so.” So he let himself be persuaded, and
no sooner had he undressed, than she changed all his
clothes for others, and gave his sword and his shirt
to his enemies. Then he came out of his bath, and
immediately they fell wpon him, cut him to pieces,
118 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

put him in a sack, placed him on a horse, and let the
horse go where it would. So the horse went on and
on, and wandered farther and farther, till it came to
the old place where he had stayed with the Serpent
Lady. And when his benefactress saw him, she said :
“Why, if poor unlucky Daniel hasn’t fallen into a
scrape again.” And immediately she took him out
of the sack, and fitted his pieces together, and washed
them clean, and took healing water from one of
the springs, and living water from the other, and
sprinkled him all over, and he stood there sound and
strong again. ‘Now, did I not bid thee tell not
thy wife the truth for seven years?” said she, “and
thou wouldst not take heed.” And he stood there,
and spoke never a word. ‘‘ Well, now, rest awhile,”
she continued, ‘‘for thou dost need it, and then [ll
eive thee something else.” So the next day she gave
him a chain, and said to him: “ Listen! Go to that
inn where thou didst go before, and early next
morning, whilst thou art bathing, bid the innkeeper
beat thee with all his might on the back with this
chain, and so thou wilt get back to thy wife, but tell
her not a word of what has happened.” So he went
to this same inn and passed the night there, and, on
the morrow, he called the innkeeper, and said to
him: “Look now! the first time I dip my head in
the water, beat me about the back with this chain
THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL. 119

as hard as thou canst.” So the innkeeper waited till
he had ducked his head under the water, and then he
thrashed him with the chain, whereupon he turned
into a horse so beautiful that it was a delight to look
upon it. The innkeeper was so glad, so glad. “ So
I've got rid of one guest only to get another one,”
thought he. He lost no time in taking the horse to
the fair, and offered it for sale, and among those who
saw it was the Tsar himself. ‘“ What dost thou ask
for it?” said the Tsar—‘*I ask five thousand rubles.”
Then the Tsar counted down the money and took the
horse away. When he got to his court, he made a
great to-do about his beautiful horse, and cried to his
daughter: “Come and see, dear little heart! what a
fine horse I have bought.” Then she came forth to
look at it; but the moment she saw it, she cried :
“That horse will be my ruin. Thou must kill it on
the spot.”—* Nay, dear little heart! how can I do
such a thing?” said the ‘'sar.— Slay it thou must,
and slay it thou shalt!” cried the Tsarivna, So they
sent for a knife, and began sharpening it, when one
of the maidens of the court took pity on the horse,
and cried: “Oh, my good, my darling horse, so
lovely as thou art, and yet to kill thee!” But the
horse neighed and went to her, and said: “ Look
now! take the first drop of blood which flows from
me, and bury it in the garden.” Then they slew the
120 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

horse, but the maiden did as she was told, and took
the drop of blood and buried it in the garden. And
from this drop of blood there sprung up a cherry-
tree; and its first leaf was golden, and its second leaf
was of richer colour still, and its third leaf was yet
another colour, and every leaf upon it was different to
the others. One day the Tsar went out walking in
his garden, and when he saw this cherry-tree he fell in
love with it, and praised it to his daughter. “ Look!”
said he, ‘what a beauteous cherry-tree we have in
our garden! Who can tell from whence it sprung ?”
—But the moment the Tsarivna saw it, she cried:
“That tree will be my ruin! thou must cut it down.”
—“‘Nay!” said he, ‘how can I cut down the fairest
ornament of my garden?”—‘ Down it must come,
and down it shall come!” replied the Tsarivna. Then
they sent for an axe and made ready to cut it down,
but the damsel came running up, and said: “Oh,
darling little cherry-tree, darling little cherry-tree,
so fair thou art! From a horse hast thou sprung,
and now they will fell thee down before thou hast
lived a day !”— Never mind,” said the cherry-tree ;
“take the first chip that falls from me, and throw it
into the water.’—Then they cut down the cherry-
tree; but the girl did as she was bidden, and threw
the first chip from the cherry-tree into the water,
and out of it swam a drake so beautiful that it was
THE STORY OF UNLUCKY DANIEL. 121

a delight to look upon it. Then the Tsar went
a-hunting, and saw it swimming in the water, and it
was so close that he could touch it with his hand.
The Tsar took off his clothes and plunged into the
water after it, and it enticed him farther and farther
away from the shore. Then the drake swam towards
the spot where the Tsar had left his clothes, and
when it came up to them it changed into a man
and put them on, and behold! the man was Daniel.
Then he called to the Tsar: “Swim hither, swim
hither!” The Tsar swam up, but when he swam
ashore Daniel met and killed him, and after that he
went back to court in the Tsar’s clothes. Then all
the courtiers hailed him as the Tsar, but he said:
“Where is that damsel who was here just now ?”—
They brought her instantly before him. “ Well,” said
he to her, “thou hast been a second mother to me,
and now thou shalt be my second wife!” So he
lived with her and was happy, but he caused his first
wife to be tied to the tails of wild horses and torn to

picces in the endless steppes.
THE SPARROW AND THE BUSH.

SPARROW once flew down upon
a bush and said: “Little bush,
give good little spalrow a
swing.”—*[ won't!” said the
little bush. Then the sparrow



was angry, and went to the goat
and said: ‘‘Goat, goat, nibble bush, bush won't
give good little sparrow a swing.”—“I won’t!” said
the goat.—Then the sparrow went to the wolf and
said: “ Wolf, wolf, eat goat, goat won't nibble bush,
bush won't give good little sparrow a swing.”—
“I won't!” said the wolf—Then the sparrow went
to the people and said: “Good people, kill wolf,
wolf won’t eat goat, goat won’t nibble bush, bush
won't give good little sparrow a swing.”—< We
won't!” said the people.-—Then the sparrow went to
the Tartars: “Tartars, Tartars, slay people, people
won't kill wolf, wolf won’t eat goat, goat won't
nibble bush, bush won't give good little sparrow a
| 1. &

pwn a < me
Pi, Wie i
agg


124 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

swing.”—But the Tartars said: “We won’t slay the
people!” and the people said: “ We won’t kill the
wolf!” and the wolf said: “I won’t eat the goat!”
aud the goat said: “I won't nibble the bush!”
and the bush said: “I won’t give the good little
Sparrow a swing.”—“Go!” said the bush, “to the
fire, for the Tartars won’t slay the people, and the
people won’t kill the wolf, and the wolf won’t eat
the goat, and the goat won’t nibble the bush, and
the bush won’t give the dear little sparrow a
swing.”—But the fire also said: “I won’t!” (they
were all alike)—“ eo to the water,” said he,—So
the sparrow went to the water and said: “Come
water, quench fire, fire won’t burn Tartars, Tartars
won't slay people, people won’t kill wolf, wolf won’t
eat goat, goat won’t nibble bush, bush won’t give
good little sparrow a swing.”—But the water also
said: “I won’t!” So the sparrow went to the
ox and said: “Ox, ox, drink water, water won’t
quench fire, fire won’t burn Tartars, Tartars won’t
slay people, people won’t kill wolf, wolf won't
eat goat, goat won’t nibble bush, bush won’t give
little sparrow a swing.”—“I won't!” said the ox.
—Then the sparrow went to the pole-axe and said :
“ Pole-axe, pole-axe, strike Ox, ox won't drink
water, water won’t quench fire, fire won’t burn
Tartars, Tartars won’t slay people, people won’t kill
THE SPARROW AND THE BUSH. 125

wolf, wolf won't eat goat, goat won’t nibble bush,
bush won’t give little sparrow a swing.’—‘‘I
won't!” said the pole-axe.——So the sparrow went
to the worms and said: ‘‘ Worms, worms, gnaw
pole-axe, pole-axe won’t strike ox, ox won't drink
water, water won’t quench fire, fire won’t burn
Tartars, Tartars won’t slay people, people won't kill
wolf, wolf won't eat goat, goat won’t nibble bush,
bush won’t give little sparrow a swing.” —“ We
won't!” said the worms.—Then the sparrow went
to the hen and said: “Hen, hen, peck worms,
worms won’t gnaw pole-axe, pole-axe won't strike ox,
ox won't drink water, water won’t quench fire, fire
won't burn Tartars, Tartars won’t slay people, people
won't kill wolf, wolf won’t eat goat, goat won’t nibble
bush, bush won’t give little sparrow a swing.”—
“T won't!” said the hen, “but go to the sparrow-
hawk, he ought to give the first push, or why is
he: called the Pusher!!”—So the sparrow went to
the sparrow-hawk and said: “Come, pusher, seize
hen, hen won’t peck worms, worms won't gnaw pole-
axe, pole-axe won't strike ox, ox won't drink water,
water won’t quench fire, fire won't burn Tartars,
Tartars won’t slay people, people won’t kill wolf, wolf
won't eat goat, goat won't nibble bush, bush won't
give little sparrow a swing.”

1 Shulyak means both sparrow-hawk and push.
126 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then the sparrow-hawk began to seize the hen, the
hen began to peck the worms, the worms began to
gnaw the pole-axe, the pole-axe began to hit the ox,
the ox began to drink the water, the water began to
quench the fire, the fire began to burn the Tartars,
the Tartars began to slay the people, the people began
to kill the wolf, the wolf began to eat the goat, the
goat began to nibble the bush, and the bush cried
out—

Little daddy sparrow, have your fli-i-i-ing !”
THE OLD DOG.




} HERE was once a man who had a dog.
While the dog was young he was
made much of, but when he grew old
he was driven out of doors. So he
went.and lay outside the fence, and

a wolf came up to him and said: “ Doggy, why
so down in the mouth ?’—‘ While I was young,”
said the dog, “they made much of me; but now
that I am old they beat me.” The wolf said: “I
see thy master in the field; go after him, and
perchance he'll give thee something.”—‘ Nay,” said
the dog, “they won’t even let me walk about the
fields now, they only beat me.”—“ Look now,” said
the wolf, “I’m sorry, and will make things better
for thee. Thy mistress, I see, has put her child
down beneath that wagon. I'll seize it, and make
off with it. Run thou after me and bark, and
though thou hast no teeth left, touzle me as much as
thou canst, so that thy mistress may see it.”
i WP









ae
cu
en Mae
Mh He He

indi LOOM aN

U
Wyld 9 |
Wyn ye ee
Me i i ln 5













THE OLD DOG. 129

So the wolf seized the child, and ran away with it,
and the dog ran after him, and began to touzle him.
His mistress saw it, and made after them with a
harrow, crying at the same time: “ Husband, hus-
band! the wolf has got the child! Gabriel, Gabriel !
don’t you see? ‘The wolf has got the child!” Then
the man chased the wolf, and got back the child.
“ Brave old dog!” said he ; “you are old and toothless,
and yet you can give help in time of need, and will
not let your master’s child be stolen.” And hence-
forth the woman and her husband gave the old dog a
large lump of bread every day.
THE FOX AND THE CAT.

N a certain forest there once lived a
fox, and near to the fox lived a man
who had a cat that had been a good
niouser in its youth, but was now old
and half blind. The man didn’t want
puss any longer, but not liking to
kill it, took it out into the forest and

lost it there. Then the fox came up and said: “ Why,

Mr. Shaggy Matthew! How d’ye do! What brings

you here ¢”—* Alas!” said Pussy, “my master loved

me as long as I could bite, but now that I can bite no
longer and have left off catching mice



and I used
to catch them finely once—he doesn’t like to kill



me, but he has left me in the wood where I must
perish miserably.” —* No, dear Pussy!” said the fox ;
“you leave it to me, and [ll help you to get your
daily bread.” —* You are very good, dear little sister
foxey!” said the cat, and the fox built him a little
shed with a garden round it to walk about in.
4

Mie". SWS
owt a

4

i

in
iY
KOS f
ee,
ia at




132 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Now one day the hare came to steal the man’s
cabbage. ‘‘ Kreem-kreem-kreem!” he squeaked. But
the cat popped his head out of the window, and when
he saw the hare, he put up his back and stuck up
his tail and said: “ Ft-t-t-t-t-Frrrrrrr!” The hare
was frightened and ran away and told the bear, the
wolf, and the wild boar all about it. “ Never mind,”
said the bear, “I tell you what, we'll all four give a
banquet, and invite the fox and the cat, and do for
the pair of them. Now, look here! T'll steal the
man’s mead ; and you, Mr. Wolf, steal his fat-pot ; and
you, Mr. Wildboar, root up his fruit-trees ; and you,
Mr. Bunny, go and invite the fox and the cat to
dinner.”

So they made everything ready as the bear had
said, and the hare ran off to invite the guests. He
came beneath the window and said: ‘“ We invite your
little ladyship Foxey-Woxey, together with Mr. Shagg
Matthew, to dinner ”—and back he ran again.—‘‘ But
you should have told them to bring their spocns with
them,” said the bear.—‘* Oh, what a head I’ve got! if
I didn’t quite forget!” cried the hare, and back he
went again, ran beneath the window and cried :
Mind you bring your spoons !”—“ Very well,” said
the fox.

So the cat and the fox went to the banquet, and
when the cat saw the bacon, he put up his back and


THE FOX AND THE CAT. 133

"0

stuck out his tail, and cried: ‘‘ Mee-oo, mee-oo!
with all his might. But they thought he said:
“* Ma-lo, ma-lo!”1—“ What!” said the bear, who
was hiding behind the beeches with the other beasts,
“here have all we four been getting together all we
could, and this pig-faced cat calls it too little! What
a monstrous cat he must be to have such an appe-
tite!” So they were all four very frightened, and
the bear ran up a tree, and the others hid where they
could. But when the cat saw the boar’s bristles
sticking out from behind the bushes he thought it
was a mouse, and put up his back again and cried:
Stel inp el espyase | AUnein ney Wes mere
frightened than ever. And the boar went into a bush
still further off, and the wolf went behind an oak, and
the bear got down from the tree, and climbed up into
a bigger one, and the hare ran right away.

But the cat remained in the midst of all the good
things and ate away at the bacon, and the little fox
gobbled up the honey, and they ate and ate till they
couldn’t eat any more, and then they both went home
licking their paws.

1 What a little! what a little !
THE STRAW OX.

HERE was once upon a time an old
man and an old woman. The old
man worked in the fields as a
pitch-burner, while the old woman
sat at home and spun flax. They
were so poor that they could save



nothing at all; all their earnings
went in bare food, and when that was gone there was
nothing left. At last the old woman had a good
idea: “ Look now, husband,” cried she, “make me a
straw ox, and smear it all over with tar.’—‘‘ Why,
you foolish woman !” said he, “ what’s the good of an
ox of that sort ?”—‘‘ Never mind,” said she, “you
just make it. [ know what I am about.’—What was
the poor man todo? He set to work and made the
ox of straw, and smeared it all over with tar.
The night passed away, and at early dawn the old
woman took her distaff, and drove the straw ox out


THE STRAW OX. 135

into the steppe to graze, and she herself sat down
behind a hillock, and began spinning her flax, and
cried: “Graze away, little ox, while I spin my flax ;
graze away, little ox, while I spin my flax!” And
while she spun, her head drooped down and she began
to doze, and while she was dozing, from behind the
dark wood and from the back of the huge pines a
bear came rushing out upon the ox and said: “ Who
are you? Speak and tell me!”—And the ox said:
“A three-year-old heifer am I, made of straw and
smeared with tar.’—‘‘ Oh!” said the bear, “ stuffed
with straw and trimmed with tar, are you? Then
give me of your straw and tar, that I may patch up my
ragged fur again !”—‘Take some,” said the ox, and
the bear fell upon him and began to tear away at the
tar. He tore and tore, and buried his teeth in it till
he found he couldn’t let go again. He tugged and
he tugged, but it was no good, and the ox dragged
him gradually off goodness knows where. Then the
old woman awoke, and there was no ox to be seen.
“Alas! old fool that Tam!” cried she, ‘ perchance it
has gone home.” Then she quickly caught up her
distaff and spinning-board, threw them over her
shoulders, and hastened off home, and she saw that
the ox had dragged the bear up to the fence, and in
she went to her old man. “Dad, dad!” she cried,
“look, look! the ox has brought us a bear. Come
136 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

out and kill it!” Then the old man jumped up, tore
off the bear, tied him up, and threw him in the
cellar.

Next morning, between dark and dawn, the old
woman took her distaff and drove the ox into the
steppe to graze. She herself sat down by a mound,
began spinning, and said: “ Graze, graze away, little
ox, while I spin my flax! Graze, graze away, little
ox, while I spin my flax!” And while she spun, her
head drooped down and she dozed. And, lo! from
behind the dark wood, from the back of the huge
pines, a grey wolf came rushing out upon the ox and
said: “Who are you? come, tell me!”—*“I am a
three-year-old heifer, stuffed with straw and trimmed
with tar,” said the ox.—* you? Then give me of your tar to tar my sides, that
the dogs and the sons of dogs tear me not !”—*“Take
some,” said the ox. And with that the wolf fell
upon him and tried to tear the tar of. He tugged
and tugged, and tore with his teeth, but could get
none off. Then he tried to let go, and couldn’t;
tug and worry as he might, it was no good. When
the old woman woke, there was no heifer in sight.
“Maybe my heifer has gone home!” she cried; “I'll
go home and see.” When she got there she was
astonished, for by the palings stood the ox with the
wolf still tugging at it. She ran and told her old


“Thin 1, A
f fr “Wine i

Mere | Dates
kel yes

ie ty
cle

’
}
!










138 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

man, and her old man came and threw the wolf into
the cellar also,

On the third day the old woman again drove her
ox into the pastures to graze, and sat down by a
mound and dozed off. Then a fox came running
up. ‘“‘Who are you?” it asked the ox.— three-year-old heifer, stuffed with straw and daubed
with tar."—*Then give me some of your tar to
smear my sides with, when those clogs and sons
of dogs tear my hide!’—‘Take some,” said the
ox. hen the fox fastened her teeth in him and
couldn’t draw them out again. The old woman told
her old man, and he took and cast the fox into the
cellar in the same way. And after that they caught
Pussy Swift-foot! likewise.

So when he had got them all safely, the old man
sat down on a bench before the cellar and began
sharpening a knife. And the bear said to him:
“Tell me, daddy, what are you sharpening your
knife for?”—“To flay your skin off, that I may
make a leather jacket for myself and a pelisse for
my old woman.’—“ Oh! don’t flay me, daddy dear!
Rather let me go, and I'll bring you a lot of honey.”
—‘“ Very well, see you do it,” and he unbound and
let the bear go. Then he sat down on the bench
and again began sharpening his knife. And the wolf

1 The hare.
THE STRAW OX. 139

asked him: “Daddy, what are you sharpening your
knife for?”—‘To flay off your skin, that I may
make me a warm cap against the winter.”—“ Oh !
don’t flay me, daddy dear, and I'll bring you a whole
herd of little sheep.”—‘ Well, see that you do ta
and he let the wolf go. Then he sat down and
began sharpening his knife again, The fox put out
her little snout and asked him: “Be so kind, dear
daddy, and tell me why you are sharpening your
knife!”—‘ Little foxes,” said the old man, “ have
nice skins that do capitally for collars and trimmings,
and I want to skin you!”—‘“Oh! don’t take my
skin away, daddy dear, and I will bring you hens and
geese.”—* Very well, see that you do it!” and he
let the fox go. The hare now alone remained, and
the old man began sharpening his knife on the hare’s
account. “Why do you do that?” asked puss, and
he replied: “Little hares have nice little soft warm
skins, which will make me nice gloves and mittens
against the winter !”—‘‘Oh! daddy dear! don’t flay
me, and I'll bring you kale and good cauliflower, if
only you let me go!” Then he let the hare go also.
Then they went to bed, but very early in the
morning, when it was neither dusk nor dawn, there
was a noise in the doorway like “Durrrrm!”—
“Daddy!” cried the old woman, “ there’s some one
scratching at the door, go and see who it is!” The
140 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

old man went out, and there was the bear carrying
a whole hive full of honey. The old man took the
honey from the bear, but no sooner did he lie down
than again there was another “Durrrrr!” at the
door. The old man looked out and saw the wolf
driving a whole flock of sheep into the courtyard.
Close on his heels came the fox, driving before him

7s



geese and hens and all manner of fowls; and last of
all came the hare, bringing cabbage and kale and all
manner of good food. And the old man was glad,
and the old woman was glad. And the old man sold
the sheep and oxen, and got so rich that he needed
nothing more. As for the straw-stuffed ox, it stood
in the sun till it fell to pieces.


THE GOLDEN SLIPPER.

HERE was once upon a time an old
man and an old woman, and the
old man had a daughter, and the
old woman had a daughter. And
the old woman said to the old



man: “Go and buy a heifer, that
thy daughter may have something to look after!” So
the old man went to the fair and bought a heifer.
Now the old woman spoiled her own daughter, but
was always snapping at the old man’s daughter. Yet
the old man’s daughter was a good, hard-working girl,
while as for the old woman’s daughter, she was but
an idle slut. She did nothing but sit down all day
with her hands in her lap. One day the old woman
said to the old man’s daughter: “Look now, thou
daughter of a dog, go and drive out the heifer to
graze! Here thou hast two bundles of flax. See
that thou unravel it, and reel it, and bleach it, and
142 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

bring it home all ready in the evening!” Then the
girl took the flax and drove the heifer out to eraze.

So the heifer began to graze, but the girl sat down
and began to weep. And the heifer said to her:
“Tell me, dear little maiden, wherefore dost thou
weep ?”—* Alas! why should I not weep ? My step-
mother has given me this flax and bidden me unravel
it, and reel it, and bleach it, and bring it back as
cloth in the evening.”—“‘ Grieve not, maiden!” gaid
elvewshentent a ont wall eval lercunesonits well alicia crn
to sleep!”—So she lay down to sleep, and when she
awoke the flax was all unravelled and reeled and
spun into fine cloth, and bleached. ‘Then she drove
the heifer home and gave the cloth to her mother-
in-law. The old woman took it and hid it away,
that nobody might know that the old man’s daughter
had brought it to her.

The next day she said to her own daughter : “ Dear
little daughter, drive the heifer out to graze, and here
is a little piece of flax for thee, unravel it and reel ites
or unravel it not and reel it not as thou likest best,
but bring it home with thee.” Then she drove the
heifer out to graze, and threw herself down in the
grass, and slept the whole day, and did not even take
the trouble to go and moisten the flax in the cooling
stream. And in the evening she drove the heifer
back from the ficld and gave her mother the flax.









JAE, - 7 h i
aan
Gis qi
Ph, Megat’ aly,
nh gst 4s, Y
LZ









SEB ee -
(Kaen Aa

ciadee sy Oe es
Yi a

= Cig! ' Nee

| SL:

Witte 7
A

See ee aS



‘egy
as





af ~
PH As 7!
144 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“Oh, mammy!” she said, “my head ached so the
whole day, and the sun scorched so, that I couldn’t
go down to the stream to moisten the flax.” —“ Never
mind,” said her mother, “lie down and sleep; it will
do for another day.”

And the next day she called the old man’s daughter
again: “Get up, thou daughter of a dog, and take
the heifer out to graze. And here thou hast a bundle
of raw flax; unravel it, heckle it, wind it on to thy
spindles, bleach it, weave with it, and make it into
fine cloth for me by the evening!’”—Then the girl
drove out the heifer to graze. The heifer began
grazing, but she sat down beneath a willow-tree, and
threw her flax down beside her, and began weeping
with all her might. But the heifer came up to her
and said: “Tell me, little maiden, wherefore dost
thou weep ?”—“ Why should I not weep?” said she,
and she told the heifer all about it—‘ Grieve not!”
said the heifer, ‘it will all come right, but lie down
to sleep.’—So she lay down and immediately fell
asleep. And by evening the bundle of raw flax was
heckled and spun and reeled, and the cloth was
woven and bleached, so that one could have made
shirts of it straight off. Then she drove the heifer
home, and gave the cloth to her step-mother.

Then the old woman said to herself: “ How comes
it that this daughter of the son of a dog has done all


THE GOLDEN SLIPPER. 145

her task so easily? The heifer must have got it done
for her, I know. But I'll put a stop to ail this, thou
daughter of the son of a dog,” said she. Then she
went to the old man and said: “ Father, kill and cut
to pieces this heifer of thine, for because of it thy
daughter does not a stroke of work. She drives the
heifer out to graze, and goes to sleep the whole day
and does nothing.”—“ Then [ll kill it!” said he—
But the old man’s daughter heard what he said, and
went into the garden and began to weep bitterly.
The heifer came to her and said: “Tell me, dear
httle maiden, wherefore dost thou weep ?”—“< Why
should I not weep,” she said, ‘when they want to
kill thee ?”—* Don’t grieve,” said the heifer, “it will
all come right. When they have killed me, ask thy
step-mother to give thee my entrails to wash, and in
them thou wilt find a grain of corn. Plant this grain
of corn, and out of it will grow up a willow-tree, and
whatever thou dost want, go to this willow-tree and
ask, and thou shalt have thy heart’s desire.”

Then her father slew the ox, and she went to her
step-mother and said: “ Prythee, let me have the
entrails of the heifer to wash !”—And her step-mother
answered: “As if I would let anybody else do such
work but thee!”—Then she went and washed them,
and sure enough she found the ovain of corn, planted

it by the porch, trod down the earth, and watered it
L
146 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

alittle. And the next morning, when she awoke, she
saw that a willow-tree had sprang out of this grain
of corn, aud beneath the willow-tree was a spring of
water, and no better water was to be found anywhere
in the whole village. It was as cold and ag clear
as ice.

When Sunday came round, the old woman tricked
her pet Gaughter out finely, and took her to church,
but to the old man’s daughter she said: “Look to
the fire, thou slut! Keep a good fire burning and get
ready the dinner, and make everything in the house
neat and tidy, and have thy best frock on, and all the
shirts washed against I come back from church. And
if thou hast not all these things done, thou shalt say
good-bye to dear life.”

So the old woman and her daughter went to church,
and the smart little step-daughter made the fire burn
up, and got the dinner ready, and then went to the
willow-tree and said: ‘ Willow-tree, willow-tree, come
out of thy bark! Lady Anna, come when I call
thee!” Then the willow-tree did its duty, and shook
all its leaves, and a noble lady came forth from it.
“Dear little lady, sweet little lady, what are thy
commands?” said she.— ‘Give me,” said she, “a
grand dress and let me have a carriage and horses,
for I would go to God’s House!”-—And immediately
she was dressed in silk and satin, with golden slippers


THE GOLDEN SLIPPER. : 147

on her feet, and the carriage came up and she went to
church.

When she entered the church there was a great to-
cdo, and every one said: “Oh! oh! oh! Who is it?
Is it perchance some princess or some queen? for the
like of it we have never seen before.” Now the

ma

cy




es,









young Tsarevich chanced to be in church at that
time. When he saw her, his heart began to beat.
He stood there, and could not take his eyes off her.
And all the great captains and courtiers marvelled
at and fell in love with her straightway. But who
she was, they knew not. When service was over, she
148 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

got up and drove away. When she got home, she
took off all her fine things, and put on all her rags
again, and sat in the window-corner and watched the
folks coming from church.

Then her step-mother came back too. “Is the
dinner ready?” said she.—“ Yes, it is ready.”—
“ Hast thou sewn the shirts ?”—* Yes, the shirts are
sewn too.—Then they sat down to meat, and began
to tell how they had seen such a beautiful young lady
at church.—* The Tsarevich,” said the old woman,
“instead of saying his prayers, was looking at her
al the while, so goodly was she.” ‘Then she said to
the oid man’s daughter: “As for thee, thou slut!
though thou hast sewn the shirts and bleached them,
thou art but a dirty under-wench !”

On the following Sunday the step-mother again
dressed up her daughter, and took her to church.
But, before she went, she said to the old man’s
daughter: “See that thou keep the fire in, thou
slut!” and she gave her a lot of work to do. The
old man’s daughter very soon did it all, and then she
went to the willow-tree and said: “Bright spring
willow, bright spring willow, change thee, transform
thee:” Then still statelier dames stepped forth from
the willow-tree: “Dear little lady, sweet little lady,
what commands hast thou to give?” She told them
what she wanted, and they gave her a gorgeous dress,
THE GOLDEN SLIPPER. 149

and put golden shoes on her feet, and she went to
church in a grand carriage. The ‘I'sarevich was again
there, and at the sight of her he stcod as if rooted to
the ground, and couldn’t take his eyes from her.
Then the people began to whisper: “Is there none
here who knows her? Is there none who knows who
such a handsome lady may be!” And they began to
ask each other: “Dost thow know her? Dost thou
know her?”—But the Tsarevich said: “ Whoever
will tell me who this great lady is, to him will I give
a sack-load of gold ducats!”—Then they inquired
and inquired, and laid all their heads together, but
nothing came of it. But the Tsarevich had a jester
who was always with him, and used always to jest
and cut capers whenever this child of the Tsar was
sad. So now, too, he began to laugh at the young
Tsarevich and say to him: “I know how to find out
who this fine lady is.”—* How?” asked the young
Tsarevich.—* T’ll tell thee,” said the jester; “smear
with pitch the place in church where she is won’t to
stand. Then her slipper will stick to it, and she, in
her hurry to get away, will never notice that she has
left it behind her in church.”—So the Tsarevich
ordered his courtiers to smear the spot with pitch
straightway. Next time, when the service was over,
she got up as usual and hastened away, but left her
golden slippers behind her. When she got home she
150 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

took off her costly raiment and put on her rags, and
waited in the window-corner till they came from
church.

When they came from church they had all sorts of
things to talk about, and how the young Tsarevich
had fallen in love with the grand young lady, and
how they were unable to tell him from whence she
came, or who she was, and the step-mother hated the
old man’s daughter all the more because she had done
her work so nicely.

But the Tsarevich did nothing but pine away.
And they proclaimed throughout the kingdom:
‘Who has lost a pair of golden slippers?” But none
could tell. Then the Tsar sent his wise councillors
throughout the kingdom to find her. “If ye do not
find her,” said he, ‘it will be the death of my child,
and then ye also are dead men.”

Se the Tsar’s councillors went through all the
towns and villages, and measured the feet of all the
maidens with the golden slippers, and she was to be
the bride of the Tsarevich whom the golden shppers
fitted. They went to the houses of all the princes,
and all the nobles, and all the rich merchants, but it
was of no avail. The feet of all the maidens were
either too little or too laree. Then they hied them
to the huts of the peasants.

They went on and on, they measured and measured,


THE GOLDEN SLIPPER. 151

and at last they were so tired that they could scarce
draw one foot after the other. Then they looked
about them and saw a beautiful willow-tree standing
by a hut, and beneath the willow-tree was a spring of
water. ‘Let us go and rest in the cool shade,” said
they. So they went and rested, and the old woman
came out of the hut to them.— ‘Hast thou a
daughter, little mother?” said they.—‘ Yes, that I
have,” said she—‘One or two?” they asked.—
“Well, there is another,” said she, “ but she isnot my
daughter, she is a mere kitchen slut, the very look

?

of her is nasty.” —“ Very well,” said they, “ we will
measure them with the golden slippers.”—‘ Good !”
cried the old woman. ‘Then she said to her own
daughter: “Go, my dear little daughter, tidy thyself
up a bit, and wash thy little feet !”—But the old man’s
daughter she drove behind the stove, and the poor
thing was neither washed nor dressed: “Sit there,
thou daughter of a dog!” said she.—Then the Tsar’s
councillors came into the hut to measure, and the
old woman said to her daughter: “ Put out thy little
foot, darling !”—The councillors then measured with
the slippers, but they wouldn’t fit her at all. Then
they said: ‘ Tell us, little mother, where is thy other
daughter ?”—* Oh, as for her, she is a mere slut, and
besides she isn’t dressed.”—‘‘ No matter,” said they;
“where is she?”—Then she came out from behind
152 COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

the stove, and her step-mother hustled her and said:
“Get along, thou sluttish hussy!”—Then they
measured her with the slippers, and they fitted like
gloves, whereupon the courtiers rejoiced exceedingly
and praised the Lord.

“Well, little mother,” said they, “we will take
this daughter away with us.”—“ What! take a
slattern like that? Why, all the people will laugh
at you!”—‘ Maybe they will,” said they.—Then the
old woman scolded, and wouldn’t let her go. “ How
can such a slut become the consort of the Tsar’s
son?” sereeched she—‘ Nay, but she must come!”
sad they; “go, dress thyself, maiden !”—“ Wait but
a moment,” said she, “and [ll tire myself as is
meet !”—Then she went to the spring beneath the
willow-tree, and washed and dressed herself, and she
came back so lovely and splendid that the like of it
can neither be thought of nor guessed at, but only told
of in tales. As she entered the hut she shone like the
sun, and her step-mother had not another word to say.

So they put her in a carriage and drove off, and
when the Tsarevich saw her, he could not contain him-
self. ‘Make haste, O my father!” cried he, “and give
us thy blessing.” So the Tsar blessed them, and they
were wedded. Then they made a great feast and
invited all the world to it. And they lived happily
together, and ate wheat-bread to their hearts’ content:


THE IRON WOLF.

HERE was once upon a time a
parson who had a servant, and
when this servant had served him
faithfully for twelve years and
upwards, he came to the parson
and said: “Let us now settle our
accounts, master, and pay me what thou owest me. I
have now served long enough, and would fain have a
little place in the wide world all to myself.” —“ Good !”
said the parson. “I'll tell thee now what wage Til
give thee for thy faithful service. Tll give thee this
ego. Take it home, and when thou gettest there,
make to thyself a cattle-pen, and make it strong;
then break the egg in the middle of thy cattle-pen,
and thou shalt see something. But whatever thou
doest, don’t break it on thy way home, or all thy luck
will leave thee.”

So the servant departed on his homeward way.
154 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

He went on and on, and at last he thought to
himself: ‘Come now, I'll see what is inside this ege
of mine!” So he broke it, and out of it came all
sorts of cattle in such numbers that the open steppe
became like a fair. The servant stood there in amaze-
ment, and he thought to himself: “ However in God’s
world shall I be able to drive all these cattle back
again?” He had scarcely uttered the words when
the Iron Wolf came running wp, and said to him:
‘“T’ll collect and drive back all these cattle into the
egg again, and I'll patch the eee up so that it will
become quite whole. But in return for that,” con-
tinued the Iron Wolf, “ whenever thou dost sit down
on the bridal bench,’ I'll come and eat thee.” —*“ Well,”
thought the servant to himself, “a lot of things may
happen before I sit down on the bridal bench and he
comes to eat me, and in the meantime I shall get all
these cattle. Agreed, then,” said he. So the [ron
Wolf immediately collected all the cattle, and drove
them back into the egg, and patched up the ege
and made it whole just as it was before.

The servant went home to the village where he
lived, made him a cattle-pen stronger than strong,
went inside it and broke the egg, and immediately
that cattle-pen was as full of cattle as it could hold.

1 Posad, or posag, a bench covered with white cloth on which
the bride and bridegroom sat down together.


en aor i . h s | :
4D ae eM Wy 2 a mS
ny it a D = 156 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then he took to farming and cattle-breeding, and he
became so rich that in the whole wide world there
was none richer than he. He kept to himself, and
his goods increased and multiplied exceedingly ; the
only thing wanting to his happiness was a wife, but
a wife he was afraid to take. Now near to where he
lived was a General who had a lovely daughter, and
this daughter fell in love with the rich man. So the
General went and said to him: “Come, why don’t
you marry? Tl give you my daughter and lots of
money with her.’—‘* How is it possible for me to
marry?” replied the man; ‘‘as soon as ever [ sit
down on the bridal bench, the Iron Wolf will come
and eat me up.” And he told the General all that
had happened.—‘‘ Oh, nonsense!” said the General,
“don’t be afraid. I have a mighty host, and when
the time comes for you to sit down on the bridal
bench, we'll surround your house with three strong
rows of soldiers, and they won't let the Iron Wolf get
at you, I can tell you.” So they talked the matter
over till he let himself be persuaded, and then they
began to make great preparations for the bridal
banquet. Everything went off excellently well, and
they made merry till the time came when bride and
bridegroom were to sit down together on the bridal
bench. Then the General placed his men in three
strong rows all round the house so as not to let the
THE IRON WOLF. 157

Iron Wolf get in; and no sooner had the young people
sat down upon the bridal bench, than, sure enough,
the Iron Wolf came running up. He saw the host
standing round the house in three strong rows, but
through all three rows he leaped and made straight
for the house. But the man, as soon as he saw the
Iron Wolf, leaped out of the window, mounted his
horse, and calloped off with the wolf after him.

Away and away he galloped, and after him came
the wolf, but try as it would, it could not catch him
up anyhow. At last, towards evening, the man
stopped and looked about him, and saw that he was
in a lone forest, and before him stood a hut. He
went up to this hut, and saw an old man and an old
woman sitting in front of it, and said to them:
“ Would you let me rest a ttle while with you, good
people ?”—* By all means!” said they.—“ There is
one thing, however, good people!” said he, “ don’t
let the Iron Wolf catch me while I am resting with
you.” —“ Have no fear of that!” replied the old
couple. We have a doe called Chutko* who can hear
a wolf coming a mile off, and he'll be sure to let us
know.” So he laid him down to sleep, and was just
dropping off when Chutko began to bark. Then the
old people awoke him, and said: “Be off! be off!
for the Iron Wolf is coming.” And they gave him

1 Hearkener.
158 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the dog, and a wheaten hearth-cake as provision hy
the way.

So he went on and on, and the dog followed after
him till it began to grow dark, and then he perceived
another hut in another forest. He went up to that



hut, and in front of it were sitting an old man and
an old woman. He asked them for a night’s lodging.
“Only,” said he, “take care that the Iron Wolf
doesn’t catch me!”—‘ Have no fear of that,’ said
they. “We have a dog here called Vazhko,’ who can

1 Heavysides.
THE IRON WOLF. 159

hear a wolf nine miles off.” So he laid him down
and slept. Just before dawn Vazhko began to bark.
Immediately they awoke him. “Run!” cried they,
“the Jron Wolf is coming!” And they gave him
the dog, and a barley hearth-cake as provision by the
way. So he took the hearth-cake, sat him on his
horse, and off he went, and his two dogs followed
after him.

He went on and on. On and on he went till
evening, when again he stopped and looked about
him, and he saw that he was in another forest, and
another little hut stood before him. He went into
the hut, and there were sitting an old man and an
old woman. ‘ Will you let me pass the night here,
good people?” said he; “only take care that the
Tron Wolf does not get hold of me!”—‘ Have no
fear!” said they,.““we have a dog called Bary, who
can hear a wolf coming twelve miles off. He'll let
us know.” So he lay down to sleep, and early in the
morning Bary let them know that the Iron Wolf
was drawing nigh. Immediately they awoke him.
“Tis high time for you to be off!” said they. Then
they gave him the dog, and a buckwheat hearth-cake
as provision by the way. He took the hearth-cake,
sat lim on his horse, and off he went. So now he had
three dogs, and they all three followed him.

He went on and on, and towards evening he found
160 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

himself in front of another hut. He went into it,
and there was nobody there. He went and lay down,
and his dogs lay down also, Chutko on the threshold
of the room door, Vazhko at the threshold of the
house door, and Bary at the threshold of the outer
gate. Presently the Iron Wolf came trotting up.
Immediately Chutko gave the alarm, Vazhko nailed
him to the earth, and Bary tore him to pieces.

Then the man gathered his faithful dogs around
him, mounted his horse, and went back to his own
home.
THE THREE BROTHERS.

PUERE were, once upon. a time,
three brothers, and the third was
a fool. And in their little garden
erew golden apple-trees with
golden apples, and not far off
lived a hog that had taken a fancy
to these apples. So the father
sent his sons into the garden to
guard the trees. The eldest went first, and sat and sat
and watched and watched till he was tired of watch-
ing, and fell asleep. Then the hog crept in, and
dug and dug till he had digged up an apple-tree,
which he ate up, and then went his way. The father
got up next morning and counted his apple-trees,
and one of them was gone. The next night the father
sent the second son to watch. He waited and watched
till he also fell asleep, and the hog came again and

dug up and ate another golden apple-tree and made
AL


162 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

off. The next morning the father got up again and
counted his trees, and another was gone. Then the
fool said: ‘Dad, let me go too!” But the father
said: “Oh, fool, fool, wherefore shouldst thou go?
Thy wise brethren have watched to no purpose, what
canst thou do?”—‘Hoity-toity!” said the fool;
“ oive me a oun, and Tl go all the same.” His father
wouldn’t give him a gun, so he took it, and went to
watch. He placed his gun across his knees and sat
down. He sat and sat, but nothing came, nothing
came; he got drowsy, was nodding off, when his gun
fell off his knees, and he awoke with a start and
watched more warily. At last he heard something
—and there stood the hog. It began to dig up
another tree, when he pulled the trigger and—bang!
His brothers heard the sound, came running up, were
quite amazed to see a dead boar lying there, and
said: “ What will become of us now ?’”—“ Let us.
kill him,” said the eldest brother, “and bury him
in that ditch, and say that we killed the hog.” So
they took and slew him, and buried him in’ the ditch,
and took the hog to their father, and said: “ While
we were watching, this hog came up and began

digging, so we killed him and have brought him



to you.”
One day a nobleman came by that way, and was
2
surprised to see a beautiful elder-bush growing out






tH
rt

Se
NN.
CSA

SSeS oe
SEs
WEN
ROSS
SS
,


164 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

of the ditch; so he went up to it, cut off a branch,
made him a flute out of it, and began playing upon
it. But the flute played of its own accord, and made
this moan :
« Play, good master, play,

But steal not my heart away !

Me my brothers took and slew,

In the ditch my body threw,

For that hog shot down by me,

That rooted up the tree.”

The nobleman then went on to the inn, and there
he found the fool’s father. ‘Such a funny thing has
happened to me,” said the nobleman. “1 went and
cut me out a flute from an elder-bush, and lo! it
plays of its own accord!” Then the father took
and tried his hand at it, and it sang :

“ Play, good daddy, play,
But don’t steal my heart away !
Me my brothers took and slew,
In the ditch my body threw,
For that hog shot down by me,
That rooted up the tree!”

The father was so astonished that he bought it,
Â¥ : :
and took it home, and gave it to the mother for her
to play upon it, and it sang:
‘Play, good mammy, play,
But don’t steal my heart away !
Me my brothers took and slew,
In the ditch my body threw,

For that hog shot down by me,
That rooted up the tree!”
THE THREE BROTHERS. 165

Then the father gave the flute to his brothers to
play upon, but they wouldn't. “ Nay, but you
must!” said their father. Then the younger brother
took and played upon it :

“Play, my brother, play,
But don’t steal my heart away !
Me my brothers took and slew,
Tn the ditch my body threw,
For the hog shot down by me,
That rooted up the tree!”

Then the father gave the flute to the elder brother
who had slain him, but he wouldn’t take it. “Take
it and play upon it!” roared his father at him. Then
he took it and played :

“Play, my brother, play,
But don’t steal my heart away !
Twas thou who didst me slay,
And stowed my corpse away,
For the hog shot down by me,
That rooted up the tree!”

“Then it was thou who didst slay him?” cried
the father. What could the elder brother do but
confess it! Then they dug the dead man up, and
buried him in the cemetery; but they tied the elder
brother to a wild horse, which scattered his bones
about the endless steppe.

But I was there, and drank wine and mead till my
beard was wet.
THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL.

OMEWHERE, nowhere, in a certain
kingdom, in a certain empire, time
out of mind, and in no land of
ours, dwelt a Tsar who was so
proud, so very proud, that he feared
neither God nor man. He listened

to no good counsel from whithersoever it might come,
but did only that which was good in his own eyes, and
nobody durst put him right. And all his ministers
and nobles grieved exceedingly, and all the people
grieved likewise.

One day this Tsar went to church; the priest was
reading from Holy Scripture, and so he needs must
listen. Now there were certain words there which
pleased him not. “''o say such words to me!”
thought he, “words that I can never forget, though
I grow grey-headed.” After service the Tsar went
home, and bade them send the priest to him. The




THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL. 167

priest came. “How durst thou read such and
such passages to me?” said the ‘T'sar.— They
were written to be read,” replied the priest.—
“Written, indeed! And wouldst thou then read
everything that is written? Smear those places over
with grease, and never dare to read them again, |
say !”—“’Tis not I who have written those words,
your Majesty,” said the priest; ‘nor is it for such as
I to smear them over.’—‘“‘ What! thou dost presume
to teach me? I am the Tsar, and it is thy duty to
obey me.”—‘In all things will I obey thee, O Tsar,
save only in sacred things. God is over them, men
cannot alter them.”—‘ Not alter them!” roared the
Tsar; “if I wish them altered, altered they must be.
Strike me out those words instantly, I say, and never
dare read them in church again. Dost hear ?”—“I
dare not,” said the priest, ‘I have no will in the
matter.” —“I command thee, fellow !”—‘‘I dare not,
O Tsar !”—“ Well,” said the Tsar, “Tll give thee
three days to think about it, and on the evening of
the fourth day appear before me, and [’ll strike thy
head from thy shoulders if thou dost not obey me!”
Then the priest bowed low and went home.

The third day was already drawing to a close, and
the priest knew not what to do. It was no great
terror to him to die for the faith, but what would
become of his wife and children? He walked about,
168 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and wept, and wrung his hands: “Oh, woe is me!
woe is me!” At last he lay down on his bed, but
sleep he could not. Only towards dawn did he doze
off, then he saw in a dream an angel standing at his
head. ‘Fear nothing!” said the angel. “God hath
sent me down on earth to protect thee!” So early
in the morning the priest rose up full of joy and
prayed gratefully to God.

The Tsar also awoke early in the morning, and
bawled to his huntsmen to gather together and go
a-hunting with him in the forest.

So away they went hunting in the forest, and it
was not long before a stag leaped out of the thicket
beneath the very eyes of the Tsar. Off after it went
the Tsar; every moment the stag seemed to be falter-
ing, and yet the Tsar could never quite come up
with it. Hot with excitement, the Tsar spurred his
horse on yet faster. “Gee up! gee up!” he cried;
“now we've got him!” But here a stream crossed
the road, and the stag plunged into the water. The
Tsar was a good: swimmer. “I’ve got him now, at
any rate,” thought he. ‘A little longer, and I shall
hold him by the horns.” So the Tsar took off his
clothes, and into the water he plunged after the stag.
But the stag swam across to the opposite bank, and
the Tsar was extending his hand to seize him by the
horns—when there was no longer any stag to be






















we
ie yy
eT YU , Ven y A is
Z aa Mey
Mt S,. Wp My ay,


170 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

seen. It was the angel who had taken the form of a
stag. The Tsar was amazed. He looked about him
on every side, and wondered where the stag had
gone. Then he saw some one on the other side of
the river putting on his clothes, and presently the
man mounted his horse and galloped away. The
Tsar thought it was some evil-doer, but it was the
selfsame angel that had now put on the Tsar’s
clothes and gone away to collect the huntsmen and
take them home. As for the Tsar, he remained all
naked and solitary in the forest.

At last he looked about him and saw, far, far
away, smoke rising above the forest, and something
like a dark cloud standing in the clear sky. “ May-
be,” thought he, “that is my hunting-pavilion.” So
he went in the direction of the smoke, and came at
last to a brick-kiln. The brick-burners came forth
to meet him, and were amazed to see a naked man.
“What is he doing here?” they thought. And they
saw that his feet were lame and bruised, and_ his
body covered with scratches. ‘Give me to drink,”
said he, ‘and I would fain eat something also.” The
brick-burners had pity on him; they gave him an
old tattered garment to wear and a piece of black
bread and a gherkin to eat. Never from the day of
his birth had the Tsar had such a tasty meal. “ And
now speak, O man!” said they; ‘who art thou ?’”—
THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL. 171

“T’]] tell you who I am,” said he, when he had eaten
his fill, “I am your Tsar. Lead me to my capital,
and there I will reward you!”—‘ What, thou
wretched rogue!” they cried, “thou dost presume
to mock us, thou old ragamuffin, and magnify thyself
into a Tsar! Thou reward us,
indeed!” And they looked at
him in amazement and scorn.—
“Dare to laugh at me again,”
said he, “and Ill have your
heads chopped off!” For he
forgot himself, and thought he
was at home.—‘ What! thou!”
Then they fell upon him and
beat him. They beat him and
hauled him about most unmer-
cifully, and then they drove him
away, and off he went bellowing
through the forest.

He went on and on till at
last he saw once more a smoke
rising up out of the wood. Again he thought:
“That is surely my hunting-pavilion,” and so he
went up to it. And towards evening he came to
another brick-kiln. There, too, they had pity upon
and kindly entreated him. They gave him to eat
and to drink. They also gave him ragged hose


172 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and a tattered shirt, for they were very poor people.
They took him to be a runaway soldier, or some
other poor man, but when he had eaten his fill and
clothed himself, he said to them: “I am your Tsar!”
They laughed at him, and again he began to talk
roughly to the people. Then they fell upon him and
thrashed him soundly, and drove him right away.
And he wandered all by himself through the forest
till it was night. Then he laid him down beneath
a tree, and so he passed the night, and rising up very
early, fared on his way straight before him.

At last he came to a third brick-kiln, but he did
not tell the brick-burners there that he was the Tsar.
All he thought of now was how he might reach his
capital. The people here, too, entreated him kindly,
and seeing that his feet were lame and bruised, they
had compassion upon him, and gave him a pair of
very, very old boots. And he asked them: “Do ye
know by which way I can get to the capital?”
They told him, but it was a long, long journey that
would take the whole day.

So he went the way they had told him, and he
went on and on till he came to a little town, and
there the roadside sentries stopped him. “Halt!”
they cried. He halted. ‘Your passport!” +—“I

1 This is a good instance of the modern intrusions in these
ancient kazki. An angel and a passport in the same tale!
THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL. -173

have none.”—‘ What! no passport? Then thou art
a vagabond. Seize him!” they cried. So they
seized him and put him in a dungeon. Shortly after
they came to examine him, and asked him: “ Whence
art thou ?”—“ From such and such a capital,” said
he, Then they ordered him to be put in irons and
taken thither.

So they took him back to that capital and put
him in another dungeon. Then the custodians came
round to examine the prisoners, and one said one
thing and one said another, till at last it came to the
turn of the T'sar.—‘ Who art thou, old man?” they
asked. Then he told them the whole truth. “Once
I was the Tsar,” said he, and he related all that had
befallen him. Then they were much amazed, for he
was not at all like a Tsar. For indeed he had been
growing thin and haggard for a long time, and his
beard was all long and tangled. And yet, for all
that, he stood them out that he was the Tsar. So
they made up their minds that he was crazy, and
drove him away. “Why should we keep this fool
for ever,” said they, “and waste the Tsar’s bread
upon him?” So they let him go, and never did any
man feel so wretched on God’s earth as did that
wretched Tsar. Willingly would he have done any
sort of work if he had only known how, but he had
never been used to work, so he had to go. along
174 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

begging his bread, and could scarce beg enough to
keep body and soul together. He lay at night at the
first place that came to hand, sometimes in the tall
grass of the steppes, sometimes beneath a fence.
“That it should ever have come to this!” he
sighed.

But the angel who had made himself Tsar went
home with the huntsmen. And no man knew that
he was not a Tsar, but an angel. The same evening
that priest came to him and said: ‘Do thy will, O
Tsar, and strike off my head, for I cannot blot out
one word of Holy Scripture.”—And the Tsar said to
him: “Glory be to God, for now I know that there
is at least one priest in my tsardom who stands firm
for God’s Word. Tl make thee the highest bishop in
this realm.” The priest thanked him, bowed down
to the earth, and departed marvelling. “What is
this wonder?” thought he, “that the haughty Tsar
should have become so just and gentle.’—But all
men marvelled at the change that had come over the
Tsar. He was now so mild and gracious, nor did he
spend all his days in the forest, but went about
inquiring of his people if any were wronged or
injured by their neighbours, and if justice were done.
He took count of all, and rebuked the unjust judges,
and saw that every man had his rights. And the
people now rejoiced as much as they had grieved


THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL. 175

heretofore, and justice was done in all the tribunals,
and no bribes were taken.

But the Tsar, the real Tsar, grew more and more
wretched. Then, after three years, a ukase went forth
that on such and such a day all the people were to
come together to a great banquet given by the Tsar,
all were to be there, both rich and poor, both high
and lowly. And all the people came, and the un-
happy Tsar came too. And so many long tables were
set out in the Tsar’s courtyard that all the people
praised God when they saw the glad sight. And
they all sat down at table and ate and drank, and the
Tsar himself and his courtiers distributed the meat
and drink to the guests as much as they would, but
to the unfortunate Tsar they gave a double portion of
everything. And they all ate and drank their fill,
and then the Tsar began to inquire of the people
whether any had suffered wrong or had not had
justice done him. And when the people began to
disperse, the Tsar stood at the gate with a bag of
money, and gave to every one a grind,’ but to the
unhappy Tsar he gave three.

And after three years the Tsar gave another
banquet, and again entertained all the people. And
when he had given them both to eat and to drink
as much as they would, he inquired of them what

1 About twopence.
176 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

was being done in his tsardom, and again gave a
grwne to each one of them; but to the unlucky Tsar
he gave a double portion a meat and drink and
three grivnt.

And again, after three years, he made yet another
banquet, and proclaimed that all should come, both
rich and poor, both earls and churls. And all the
people came and ate and drank and bowed low before
the Tsar and thanked him, and made ready to depart.
The unlucky Tsar was also on the point of going,
when the angel Tsar stopped him, and took him aside
into the palace, and said to him: “Lo! God hath
tried thee and chastised thy pride these ten years.
But me He sent to teach thee that a Tsar must have
regard to the complaints of his people. So thou wast
made poor and a vagabond on the face of the earth
that thou mightest pick up wisdom, if but a. little.
Look now, that thou doest good to thy people, and
judgest righteous judoment, as from henceforth thou
shalt be Tsar again, but I must fly back to God in
heaven.”—And when he had said this he bade them
wash and shave him (for hig beard had grown right
down to his girdle), and put upon him the raiment of
a Tsar. And the angel said further: “Go now into
the inner apartments. There the courtiers of the
Tsar are sitting and making merry, and none will
recognize in thee the vagabond old man. May God
THE TSAR AND THE ANGEL, 177

help thee always to do good!” And when the angel
had said this he was no more to be seen, and only his
clothes remained on the floor.

Then the Tsar prayed gratefully to God, and went
to the merry-making of his courtiers, and from
henceforth he ruled his people justly, as the angel
had bidden him.
THE STORY OF IVAN AND THE DAUGHTER
OF THE SUN.



game LIERE were once upon a time four
~ brethren, and three of them
remained at home, while the fourth
went out to seek for work. This
youngest brother came to a
strange land, and hired himself
out toa husbandman for three gold pieces a year. For
three years he served his master faithfully, so, at the
end of his time, he departed with nine gold pieces in
his pocket. The first thing he now did was to go to a
spring, and into this spring he threw three of his gold
pieces. “Let us see now,” said he, “if I have been
honest, they will come swimming back to me.” Then
he lay down by the side of the spring and went fast
asleep. How long heslept there, who can tell? but at
any rate he woke up at last and went to the spring,
but there was no sign of his money to be seen.
IVAN AND THE DAUGHTER OF THE SUN. 179

Then he threw three more of the gold pieces into the
spring, and again he lay down by the side of it and
slept. Then he got up and went and looked into the
spring, and still there was no sign of the money.
So he threw in his three remaining gold pieces, and
again lay down and slept. The third time he arose
and looked into the spring, and there, sure enough,
was his money: all nine of the gold pieces were
floating on the surface of the water!

And now his heart felt lighter, and he gathered up
the nine gold pieces and went on his way. On the
road he fell in with three katswpi' with a laden
wagon. He asked them concerning their wares, and
they said they were carrying a load of incense. He
begged them straightway to sell him this incense.
Then they sold it to him for the gold pieces, and
when be had bought it and they had departed, he
kindled fire and burnt the incense, and offered it up
to God as a sweet-smelling sacrifice. Then an angel
flev down to him, and said: “Oh, thou that hast
offered this sweet-smelling sacrifice to God, what dost
thou want for thine own self? Dost thou want a
tsardom, or great riches? Or, perchance, the desire of
thy heart is a good wife? Speak, for God will give
thee whatsoever thou desirest.” When the man had

1 Lit. Big billy-goats, the name given by the clean-shaved
Ruthenians to their hairy neighbours the Russiaas.
180 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

listened to the angel, he said to him: “Tarry a while!
I will go and ask those people who are ploughing
yonder hard by.” Now those people who were
ploughing there were his own brethren, but he did
not know that they were his brethren. So he went
up and said to the elder brother: “Tell me, uncle,
what shall I ask of God? A tsardom, or great riches,
or a good wife ? Tell me, which of the three is the
best gift to ask for ?”—And his eldest brother said to
him: “I know not, and who does know? Go and
ask some one else.” So he went to the second
brother, who was ploughing a little further on. He
asked him the same question, but the man only
shrugged his shoulders and said that he didn’t know
either. ‘Then he went to the third brother, who was
the youngest of the three, and also ploughing’ there.
And he asked him, saying: “Tell me, now, which is
the best gift to ask of God: a tsardom, or great
riches, or a good wife 4 ”__And the third brother said:
«What a question! Thou art too young for a tsar-
dom, and great riches last but for a little while; ask
God for a good wife, for if it please God to give thee
a good wife, tis a gift that will bless thee all thy life
long.” So he went back to the angel and asked for a
good wife. Then he went on his way till he came to
a certain wood, and, looking about him, he perceived
that in this wood was a lake. And while he was
<3 SS
Pe
er OE KR OS
4 Ae as
‘i CDNA ae
Renee a =e
z \— = Fy SAS bd

Yee

= a

ati

LY,
Madi ee
Tiles

a

S
a

C
¢ \
s

seme
.


182 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

looking at it, three wild doves came flying along and
lit down upon this lake. They threw off their
plumage and plunged into the water, and then he
saw that they were not wild doves, but three fair
ladies. They bathed in the lake, and in the mean-
time the youth crept up and took the raiment of one
of them and hid it behind the bushes. When they
came out of the water the third lady missed her
clothes. Then the youth said to her: “I know where
thy clothes are, but I will not give them to thee
unless thou wilt be my wife.”’—‘‘ Good!” cried she,
“thy wife will I be.” Then she dressed herself, and
they went together to the nearest village. When
they got there, she said to him: “Now go to the
nobleman who owns the land here, and beg him for
a place where we may build us a hut.” So he went
right up to the nobleman’s castle and entered his
reception-room, and said: “Glory be to God!”—
“For ever and ever!” replied the nobleman. “ What
dost thou want here, Ivan ?”—“‘I have come, sir, to
beg of thee a place where I may build me a hut.”—
“A place for a hut, eh? Good, very good. Go
home, and I'll speak to my overseer, and he shall
appoint thee a place.”—So he returned from the
nobleman’s castle, and his wife said to him: “Go
now into the forest and cut down an oak, a young
oak, that thou canst span round with both arms.”
IVAN AND THE DAUGHTER OF THE SUN. 183

So he cut down such an oak as his wife had told him
of, and she built a hut of the oak, for the overseer
had come and showed them a place where they might
build their hut. But when the overseer returned
home he praised loudly to his master the wife of this
Ivan. “She is such and such,” said he. ‘“ Fair she
may be,” replied the nobleman, “but she is another’s.”
—‘She need not be another's for long,” replied the
overseer. “Tbis Ivan is in our hands; let us send
him to see why it is the sun grows so red when he
sets.” —“ That's just the same as if you sent him to a
place from whence he can never return.”—‘* All the
better.”—Then they sent for Ivan, and gave him this
errand, and he returned home to his wife, weeping
bitterly. Then his wife asked him all about it, and
said: “ Well, I can tell thee all about the ways of the
sun, for I am the sun’s own daughter. So now [il
tell thee the whole matter. Go back to this noble-
man and say to him that the reason why the sun turns
so red as he sets is this: Just as the sun is going
down into the sea, three fair ladies rise out of it, and
it is the sight of them which makes him turn so red
all over!” So he went back and told them. “ Oh-
ho!” cried they, “if you can go as far as that, you
may now go a little further ;” so they told him to go
to bell and see how it was there. “Yes,” said his
wife, “I know the road that leads to hell also very
184 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

well; but the nobleman must let his overseer go with
thee, or else he never will believe that thou really
didst go to hell.”—So the nobleman told his overseer
that he must go to hell too, so they went together ;
and when they got there the rulers of hell laid hands
upon the overseer straightway. ‘Thou dog!” roared
they, “we've been looking out for thee for some
tine!” So Ivan returned without the overseer, and
the nobleman said to him: “ Where’s my overseer?”
—“‘T left him in hell,” said Ivan, “and they said
there that they were waiting for you, sir, too.”—
When the nobleman heard this he hanged himself,
but Ivan lived happily with his wife.
THE CAT, THE COCK, AND THE FOX.

HERE was once upon a time a
" cat and a cock, who agreed to
live together, so they built them
a hut on a dunghill, and the cock
kept house while the cat went



foraging for sausages.

One day the fox came running up: “Open the
door, little cock!” eried she-—‘ Pussy told me not
to, little fox!” said the cock.—‘‘Open the door,
little cock!” repeated the fox.—‘‘I tell you, pussy
told me not to, little fox!”—At last, however, the
cock grew tired of always saying “No!” so he
opened the door, and in the fox rushed, seized him
in her jaws, and ran off with him. Then the cock
eriedl—

“ Help! pussy-pussy !
That foxy hussy

Has got me tight
With all her might.
186 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Across her tail
My legs do trail
Along the bridge so stony!”

The cat heard it, gave chase to the fox, rescued the
cock, brought him home, scolded him well, and said :
“ Now keep out of her jaws in the future, if you don’t
want to be killed altogether !”

Then the cat went out foraging for wheat, so that
the cock might have something to eat. He had
scarcely gone when the sly she-fox again came
creeping up. “‘ Dear little cock!” said she, “ pray
open the door!”—“Nay, little fox! Pussy said
I wasn’t to.” But the fox went on asking and
asking till at last the cock let him in. Then the
fox rushed at him, seized him by the neck, and ran
off with him. Then the cock cried out—

“Help! pussy-pussy !
That foxy hussy
Has got me tight
With all her might.
Across her tail
My legs do trail
Along the bridge so stony!”

The cat heard it, and again he ran after the fox
and rescued the cock, and gave the fox a sound drub-
bing. Then he said to the cock: ‘Now, mind you
never let her come in again, or she'll eat you.”

But the next time the cat went out, the she-fox
188 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

came again, and said: “Dear little cock, open the
door!” —No, little fox! Pussy said I wasn’t
to.” But the fox begged and begged so piteously
that, at last, the cock was quite touched, and
opened the door. Then the fox caught him by
the throat again, and ran away with him, and the
cock cried —
“ Help! pussy-pussy !

That foxy hussy

Has got me tight

With all her might.

Across her tail

My legs do trail

Along the bridge so stony !”

The cat heard it, and gave chase again. He ran
and ran, but this time he couldn’t catch the fox up ;
so he returned home and wept bitterly, because he
was now all alone. At last, however, he dried his
tears and got him a little fiddle, a little fiddle-bow,
and a big sack, and went to the fox’s hole and began
to play—

« Fiddle-de-dee !
The foxy so wee
Had daughters twice two,

. And a little son too,
Called Phil.—Fiddle-dee !
Come, foxy, and see
My sweet minstrelsy

1?

Then the fox’s daughter said: ‘“‘Mammy, Pll go
THE CAT, THE COCK, AND THE FOX. 189

out and see who it is that is playing so nicely!” So
out she skipped, but no sooner did pussy see her
than he caught hold of her and. popped her into his
sack. Then he played again—

« Fiddle-de-dee !
The foxy so wee
Had daughters twice two,
And a little son too,
Called Phil.—Fiddle-dee !
Come, foxy, and see
My sweet minstrelsy |”

Then the second daughter skipped out, and pussy
caught her by the forehead, and popped her into his
sack, and went on playing and singing till he had
got all four daughters into his sack, and the little son
also,

Then the old fox was left all alone, and she waited
and waited, but not one of them came back. At last
she said to herself: “ Pll go out and call them home,
for the cock is roasting, and the milk pottage is
simmering, and ’tis high time we had something to
eat.” So out she popped, and the cat pounced upon
her, and killed her too. Then he went and drank
up all the soup, and gobbled up all the pottage, and
then he saw the cock lying on a plate. “Come,
shake yourself, cock!” said puss. So the cock
shook himself, and got up, and the cat took the cock
190 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

home, and the dead foxes too. And when they got
home they skinned them to make nice beds to lie
upon, and lived happily together in peace and plenty.
And as they laughed over the joke as a good joke, we
may laugh over it too!
THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS TWO
WIVES.



Oye WERE was once a Tsaritsa who had
S no child, and greatly desired one,
so the soothsayers said to her:
“Bid them catch thee a pike, bid
them boil its head and nothing
but its head, eat it, and thou shalt
see what will happen.’ So she did so. She ate the
pike’s head and went about as usual for a whole year,
and when the year was out she gave birth to a son
who was a serpent.

And no sooner was he born than he looked about
him, and said: “Mammy and daddy! Bid them
make me a stone hut, and let there be a little bed
there, and a little stove and a fire to warm me, and
let me be married in a fortnight!”—So they did as
he desired. ‘They shut him up in a stone hut, with
a little bed and a little stove and fire to warm him,
and in a fortnight he erew quite big, indeed he grew
192 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

too big for his little bed. ‘“ And now,” said he, “I
want to be married!” So they brought to him all
the fair young damsels of the land that he might
choose one to be his own true bride. Exceeding fair
were all the damsels they brought him, and yet he









would choose none of them. Now there was an old
woman there, who had twelve danghters, and eleven
of these daughters they brought to the Serpent-
Tsarevich, but not the twelfth. ‘She is too young!”
sud they.—Then the youngest daughter said: “Ye
fools, not to take me too! Why, if I were brought to
THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS WIVES. 193

the Serpent-Tsarevich, he would make me his bride
at once.”

Now this came to the Tsar’s ears, and he com-
manded them to bring her to him straightway. And
the Tsar said to her: ‘* Wilt thou be my son’s bride or
not ?”—And she said: “I will; but before I go to thy
son, give me at once a score of chemises, and a score
of linen kirtles, and a score of woollen kirtles, and
twenty pairs of shoes—twenty of each, I say.”—So the
Tsar gave them to her, and she put on the twenty
chemises, and the twenty linen kirtles, and the twenty
woollen kirtles, and the twenty shoes, one after the
other, and went to see the Serpent-Tsarevich. When
she came to the threshold of his hut, she stopped
and said: ‘Hail, O Serpent-Tsarevich !”—“ Hail,
maiden!” cried he. ‘ Wilt thou be my bride ?”—
““T will!”—* Then take off one of thy skins!” cried
he.



“ Yes,” she said, “ but thou must do the same.”
—So he cast off one of his skins, and she cast off one
of her twenty suits of clothes. Then he cried out
again: “Cast off another of thy skins, maiden.’—
“Yes,” she replied, ‘ but thou must cast off one too !”
—So he did so. Nineteen times did he cast off one
of his serpent’s skins, and nineteen times did she cast
off one of her suits of clothes, till at last she had only
her every-day suit left, and he had only his human

skin left. Then he threw off hig last skin also, and
0
194 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

it flew about in the air like a gossamer, whereupon
she seized hold of it and threw it into the fire that
was burning on the hearth till it was all consumed,
and he stood before her no longer a serpent, but a
simple Tsarevich, Then they married and lived
happily together, but the husband never would go to
visit his old father the Tsar, nor would he allow his
bride to go near the palace.

The old Tsar sent for him again and again, but his
son would never go. At last the wife was ashamed,
and said to her husband one day: “ Dear heart!
let me go to thy father! I will only go for my own
pastime, lest he get angry. Why should I not go?”
Then he let her go, and she went to the court of the
old Tsar, and took her pastime there. She amused
herself finely, and ate and drank her fill of all good
things. Now her husband had laid this command
upon her: “Go and divert thyself if thou wilt, but if
thou tell my father and my mother what has hap-
pened to me, and how I have lost my twenty serpent
skins, thou shalt never see me more.” For they did
not know that he was now no longer a serpent, but a
simple T'sarevich. She vowed she would never tell;
but for all her promises, she nevertheless told them
at last how her husband had lost his twenty serpent
skins. Then she enjoyed herself to her heart’s con-
tent, but when she returned home she found no trace
THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS WIVES. 195

of her husband—he had departed to another kingdom
in the uttermost parts of the world.

Then the poor bride sat her down and wept and
wept, and when she had no more tears to weep, she
went forth into the wide world to seek her husband.
She went on till she came to a lonely little house,
and she went and begged a night’s lodging from the
old woman who dwelt there, who was the Mother
of the Winds. But the Mother of the Winds would
not let her in. “God preserve thee, child!” gaid she.
“My son is already winging his way hither. In
another moment thou wilt hear the rustling of his
bones, in another moment he will slay thee, and
scatter thy bones to the four winds.” But the bride
besought the old woman till she had her desire, and
the old woman hid her behind a huge chest. A
moment afterwards the son of the Mother of the
Winds came flyine up, and he smelt out the bride,
and said: “ What’s this, mother? there is an evil
smell of Cossack bones about the house !”—‘ No, it
is not that,” said his mother, “ but a young woman
has taken shelter here, who says that she is going in
search of her husband.”—“ Then, mother, give her
the little silver apple, and let her go, for her husband
is in another kingdom.” So they sent her away with
the little silver apple.

She went on and on till night descended upon her,
196 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and she came to the lonely abode of another old
woman, and begged a night’s lodging of her also. But
the old woman would not let herin. “ My son will
be here presently,” said she, “and he will slay thee.”
— Nay, but, granny,” said the bride, “ I’ve already
stayed the night with such as thou, for I have lodged
at the house of the Mother of the Winds.”—Then the
old woman took her in, and hid her, for she was
the Mother of the Moon. And immediately after-
wards the Moon came flying up. ‘“ What is this,
little mother?” cried he. ‘I smell an evil smell of
Cossack bones!”—But she said to him: “Nay,
my dear little son, but a young woman has come
hither who is obliged to search for her husband
because she told his father and mother the truth.”
Then the Moon said: “’Twould be as well to let her
go on further. Give her the little golden apple, and
let her be off ag quickly as possible, for her husband
is about to marry another wife.” So she passed the
night there, and in the morning they sent her away
with the little golden apple.

She went on and on. Night again descended upon
her, and she came to the house of the Mother of the
Sun, and begged her for a night’s lodging. But the
old woman said to her: “I cannot let thee in. My
son is Hying about the world, but he will fly hither
presently, and if he find thee here he will slay thee !”
THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS WIVES. 197

—Then the bride said: “Nay, but, granny dear, I have
already lodged with the like of thee. I have lodged
with the Mother of the Winds, and the Mother of the
Moon, and they each gave me a little apple.” Then
the Mother of the Sun also let her in. Immediately
afterwards her son, the Sun, came flying up, and he
said: “Why, what is this, little mother? I smell
an evil smell of Cossack bones!’”—But his mother
answered : “ A young woman came hither who begged
for a night’s lodging.” ‘She did not tell -her son the
whole truth, that the bride was in search of her
husband, but he knew it already, and said: “ Her
husband is about to marry another wife. Let her go
to the land where now he is, and give her the diamond
apple, which is the best and most precoius apple in
the whole world, and tell her to hasten on to the
house where her husband abides. They won’t let her
in there, but she must diseuise herself as an old
woman, and sit down outside in the courtyard, and
spread out a cloth and lay upon it her little silver
apple, and all the people will come flocking around to
see the old woman who is selling apples of silver.”
So the bride did as the Sun bade her, and went to
that distant empire, and the Empress of that empire,
whom her husband had married, came to see what
she was selling, and said to her: “ What dost thou
want for thy silver apple?” And she answered :
198 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“No money do I want for it. Oh, sovereign lady,
all that I require in exchange therefor is that I
may pass the night near my husband.”—Then the
Empress took the apple, and allowed her to come
into the bedchamber of the Tsarevich to pass the
night there; but first of all she made the Tsarevich so
tipsy that he knew nothing, and could speak not a
word to her, nor could he even recognize what manner
of person his true wife was. Then only did the
Empress let her come into the room where her
husband lay drunk. And she watched over him, she
watched over him the live-long night, and with the
dawn she departed.

The next morning he awoke out of his drunken
sleep, and said to himself: “ Why, what is this? It
is just as if my first wife has been weeping over me
here, and wetted me with her tears!” But he told
nobody what he thought, nor did he say a word
about it to his second wife. “Wait a bit!” thought
he, “ to-morrow night I'll not go to sleep. I'll watch
and watch till I watch the thing out.”

The next day the faithful wife spread out her little
cloth again, and laid upon it her golden apple. The
Empress again came that way, went up to her, and
said: “Sell me that apple of thine, and I’ll give thee
for it as many pence as thou canst hold in thy
lap!"—But she replied: “ Nay, my sovereign lady!
THE SERPENT-TSAREVICH AND HIS WIVES. 199

money for it I will not take, but let me pass one
more night in my own husband’s room!”—And the
Empress took the apple, and let her sleep there. But
first the Empress caressed and kissed her husband
into a good humour, and then she made him drunk.
And the faithful wife came again, and watched and
wept over him and wetted him with her tears, and
with the dawn she departed.

And now she had only one apple left, but that
was the diamond apple, the most precious apple in
the world. And she said to the Empress: ‘‘ Let me
watch by him for this apple but one night more,
and Pll never ask again!” And she let her. Now
this night also her husband was asleep. And his
first wife came and immediately began to kiss him
on the head, but he said nothing. Then she kissed
him again, and at last he awoke and started up, and
said: “ Who's that?”—‘It is I, thy first wife.”
—‘ How hast thou found thy way hither ?”—“ Oh,
T have been here and there and everywhere. I have
lodged with the Mother of the Winds, and the
Mother of the Moon, and the Mother of the Sun,
and they gave me three apples, and I gave these
apples to thy Empress-wife, and she let me watch
over thee, and this is the third night that I have
watched by thy side.”

Then he came to his right mind, and cried aloud
200 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

that they should bring in lights, and he saw that
his faithful wife was quite an old woman. Then he
bethought him, and said: “ Was ever the like of this
known? My first and faithful wife goes a-seeking
her husband throughout the wide world, while my
accursed second wife, Empress though she be, sells
her husband for three apples!”

Then he bade them give his faithful wife rich
garments as much as she would, and she stripped
off her disguise, and washed her face and erew
young again. But the faithless wife was tied to the
tails of four wild horses, and they tore her to picces
in the endless steppes.
THE ORIGIN OF THE MOLE,

NCE upon a time a rich man and a
poor man had a field in common,
and they sowed it with the same
seed at the same time. But God
prospered the poor man’s labour
and made his seed to grow, but
the rich man’s seed did not grow.
Then the rich man claimed that part of the field
where the grain had sprung up, and said to the
poor man: “Look now! ‘tis my seed that has
prospered, and not thine!” The poor man protested,
but the rich man would not listen, but said to
him: * If thou wilt not believe me, then, poor man,
come into the field quite early to-morrow morning,
before dawn, and God shall judge betwixt us.”

Then the poor man went home. But the rich man
dug a deep trench in the poor man’s part of the field
and placed his son in it, and said to him: ‘“ Look now,


202 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

my son ; when I come hither to-morrow morning and
ask whose field this is, say that it is not the poor
man’s, but the rich man’s.”

Then he well covered up his son with straw, and
departed to his own house.

In the morning all the people assembled together
and went to the field, and the rich man cried: “ Speak,
O God! whose field is this, the rich man’s or the poor
man’s?”

“The rich man’s, the rich man’s,” cried a voice from
the midst of the field.

But the Lord Himself was amongst the people
gathered together there, and He said: “ Listen not to
that voice, for the field is verily the poor man’s.”

Then the Lord told all the people how the matter
went, and then He said to the son of the rich man:

“ Stay where thou art, and sit beneath the earth all
thy days, so long as the sun is in the sky.”

So the rich man’s son became a mole on the spot,
and that is why the mole always flies the light of day.
THE TWO PRINCES.

HERE was once upon a time a Tsar
who had two sons, and these sons
went a-hunting in the forest and
there lost themselves. They wan-
dered on and on for twelve



weeks, and at the end of the
twelve weeks they came to a place
where three roads met, and the elder brother
said to the younger: “My brother, here our roads
part. Thou take the road on that side, and I'll take
the road on this.” Then the elder brother took a
knife and stuck it into the trunk of a maple-tree by
the roadside, and said: ‘“ Look now, brother, should
any blood drip from the blade of this knife it will be a
sign that I am perishing, and thou must go and seek me;
but if any blood flow from the handle, it will be asign
that thou art perishing, and J will then go and seek
thee.” Then the brothers embraced each other and
204 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

parted, and one went in one direction and the other
went in the other.

The elder brother went on and on and on till he came
to a mountain so high that there cannot be a higher,
and he began climbing it with his dog and his stick. He
went on till he came to an apple-tree, and beneath the
apple-tree a fire was burning, and he stopped to warm
himself, when an old woman came up and said to him:
“Dear little gentleman ! dear little gentleman ! tie wp
that dog lest he bite me.” So he took the dog and tied
it up, and immediately he was turned to stone, and
the dog too, for the old woman was a pagan witch.

Time passed, and the younger brother came back to
the maple-tree by the cross-roads and saw that blood was
dripping from the blade of the knife. Then he knew
that his brother was perishing, and he went in search
of him, and came at last to the high mountain that
was higher than all others, and on the top of this
mountain there was a little courtyard, and in the
courtyard an old weman, who. said to him: “ Little
Prince, what brings thee hither, and what dost thou
seek 1”—TI seek my brother,” said he; “a whole
year has passed since I heard of him, and I know not
whether he be alive or dead.

3

—Then she said to him:
“T can tell thee that he is dead, and it is of no use
secking for him, though thou goest the wide world over.
But go up that mountain, and thou wilt come to two
THE TWO PRINCES. 205

other mountains opposite to each other, and there
thou wilt find an old man, who will put thee on thy
’ So he went up the high mountain till he came
to two other mountains that were opposite each

way.

other, and there he saw two old men sitting, and
they asked him straightway : “Little Prince! little
Prince! whither dost thou go, and what dost thou
seek ?”—“T am going in search of my brother,” said
he, “my dear elder brother who is perishing, and I
can find him nowhere.”—Then one of the old men
said to him: “If thou canst scale those two moun-
tains yonder without falling, I'll give thee all that thou
dost want.” Then he scaled the two mountains as
nimbly as a goat, and the old man gave him a bast
rope, three fathoms long, and bade him return to the
mountain where was the fire and the old woman who
had asked him to stay and warm himself, and bind
this old woman with the cord and beat her till she
promised to bring his brother back to life again, and
not only his brother but a Tsar and a Tsaritsa! and a
Tsarivna,’? who were also turned to stone there. “ Beat
her till she has brought them all to life again,” said
they. So be took the cord and went back to
where the fire was burning. An apple-tree was
there, and beneath the apple-tree was the fire, and
the old witch came out to him and said: “ Little

1 The wife of a Tsar, 2 The daughter of a Tsar.
5S
206 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

master ! little master! let me come and warm myself.”
“Come along, little mother!” cried he; “come and
warm thyself and make thyself comfortable.” Then
she came out, but no sooner had she done so, than he
threw the cord around her and began flogging her.
“Say,” eried he, “what hast thou done with my
brother ?” “ Oh, dear little master ! dear little master !
let me go, let me go! I'll tell thee this instant where
thy brother is.” But he wouldn’t listen, but beat
her and beat her, and held her naked feet over the
fire, and toasted and roasted her till she shrivelled
right up. Then he let her go, and she went with him
to a cave that was on that mountain, and drew from
the depths of it some healing and life-civing water,
and brought his brother back to life again, but it was
as much as she could do, for she was half-dead herself.
Then his brother said to him: “ Oh, my dear brother,
how heavily I must have been sleeping! But thou
must revive my faithful dog too!” Then she revived
the faithful dog, and she also revived the Tsar and
the T'saritsa and the Tsarivna, who had been turned
to stone there. Then they left that place, for they
longed to be far away from the mountain where they
had all but perished. When they had gone a little
distance, the elder brother bowed to the ground
before them, and went on his way alone.

He went on and on till he came to a city where all
THE TWO PRINCES. 207

the people were weeping and all the houses were
hung with black cloth. And he said to them:
“Why do ye weep, and why are all your houses hung
with black ?”—And they answered: “ Because there’s
a Dragon here who eats the people, and it has come to
such a pass with us that to-morrow we must give him
our Princess for dinner.”—“ Nay, but ye shall not do
this thing,” said he, and, with that, he set out for the
cavern where the Dragon lived, and tethered his horse
there and slept by the side of the cavern all night.
And the next day, sure enough, the Princess was
brought to the mouth of the cavern. She came driv-
ing thither in a carriage and four and with a heyduke
in attendance. But when the Prince saw her, he
came forth to meet her and led her aside and gave
her a prayer-book in her hand, and said to her:
“Stay here, Princess, and pray to God for me.” Then
she fell down on her knees and began to pray, and
the Dragon popped one of his heads out of the cavern
and said: “It is time I had my dinner now, and
there’s not so much as a breakfast here!” But the
Prince also fell down on his knees and read out of his
prayer-book and prayed to God, and gaid to the
Dragon: “Come forth! come forth! and Tl give
thee breakfast and dinner at the same time!” Then
the Dragon darted back again, but when he had
waited till midday and still there was neither break-
208 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

fast nor dinner for him, he popped two of his heads
out and cried: “Jt is high time I had my dinner,
and still there is neither breakfast nor dinner for
me !”—‘ Come forth, and I'll give thee both at once !”
cried the Prince. Then the Dragon wouldn’t wait any
longer, but stuck out all his six heads and began to
wriggle out of the cavern; but the Prince attacked
him with his huge broadsword, a full fathom long,
which the Lord had given him, and chopped off all.
the Dragon’s six heads, and the rock fell upon the
Dragon’s body and crushed it to pieces. Then the
Prince gathered up the six dragon-heads and laid
them on one side, and cut out the six lolling tongues
and tied them in his handkerchief, and told the
Princess to go back to her palace, for they could not
be married for a year and twelve weeks, and if, by
that time, he did not appear, she was to marry
another, and with that he departed. Then the ecoach-
man of the Princess came up to the place and saw the
six heads of the Dragon, and took them up and said
to the Princess : “I will slay thee on the spot if thou
dost not swear to me twelve times that thou wilt say
I slew the Dragon, and wilt take me for thy hus-
band!” Then she swore to it twelve times, for else
he would have slain her. So they returned together
to the town, and immediately all the black cloth was
taken off the houses and the bells fell a-ringing, and


Cs on S


210 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

all the people rejoiced because the coachman had
killed the Dragon. ‘ Let them be married at once!”
cried they. .

Meanwhile the King’s son went on and on till he
came to that town where he had left his brother, and
there he found that the Tsar and the Tsaritsa had
given his brother the whole tsardom and the Tsarivna
to wife as well, and there he tarried for a time; but
towards the end of a year and twelve weeks he went
back to the other city where he had left the Princess,
and there he found them making ready for a grand
wedding. ‘ What is the meaning of all this?” asked
he. And they answered: “The Tsar's coachman
has slain the Dragon with six heads and saved the
Princess, and now he is to be married to her.’—* Good
Lord!” eried he, “and I never saw this Dragon !
What manner of beast was it ?”—Then they took him
and showed him the heads of the Dragon, and he
cried : “Good Lord! every other beast hath a tongue,
but this Dragon hath none!” Then they told this to
the coachman who had been made a Prince, and the
coachman was very angry and said: ‘ Whoever
maintains that a Dragon has tongues, him will I
order to be tied to four wild horses, and they shall
tear him to pieces on the open steppe!” The Prin-
cess, however, recognized the King’s son, but she held
her peace. Then the King’s son took out his hand-
THE TWO PRINCES. 211

kerchief, unrolled it, showed them the six tongues, and
put each one into one of the six mouths of the
Dragon’s six heads, and each of the tongues began to
speak and bid the Princess say how the matter went.
Then the Princess told how she had knelt down and
prayed out of the prayer-book while the King’s son
slew the Dragon, and how the wicked coachman had
made her swear twelve times to that which was false.
When the Tsar heard this, he immediately gave the
Princess his daughter to the King’s son, and they
asked him what death the wicked coachman should
die. And he answered: “Let him be tied to the
tails of four wild horses, and drive them into the
endless steppes that they may tear him to pieces
there, and the ravens and crows may come and pick

his bones.”
THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN AND THE OLD
FATHER WHO WENT TO SCHOOL AGAIN,

NCE upon a time there was an old
man, He lived to a great age,
and God gave him children whom
he brought up to man’s estate,
and he divided all his goods



amongst them. “I will pass my
remaining days among my children,” thought he.

So the old man went to live with his eldest son,
and at first the eldest son treated him properly, and
did reverence to his old father. “’Tis but meet and
right that we should give our father to eat and drink,
and see that he has wherewithal to clothe him, and
take care to patch up his things from time to time,
and let him have clean new shirts on festivals,”
said the eldest son. So they did so, and at fes-
tivals also the old father had his own glass beside
him. Thus the eldest son was a good son to his old
THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN. 213

father. But when the eldest son had been keeping
his father for some time he began to regret his hos-
pitality, and was rough to his father, and sometimes
even shouted at him. The old man no longer had
his own set place in the house as heretofore, and there
was none to cut up his food for him. So the eldest
son repented him that he had said he would keep his
father, and he began to grudge him every morsel of
bread that he put in his mouth. ‘The old man had
nothing for it but to go to his second gon. It might
be better for him there or worse, but stay with his
eldest son any longer he could not. So the father
went to his second son. But here the old man soon
discovered that he had only exchanged wheat for
straw. Whenever he began to eat, his second son
and his daughter-in-law looked sour and murmured
something between their teeth. The woman scolded
the old man. “We had as much as we could do
before to make both ends meet,” cried she, “and now
we have old men to keep into the bargain.” The old
man. soon had enough of it there also, and went on to
his next son. o one after another all four sons took
their father to live with them, and he was glad to
leave them all. Each of the four sons, one after the
other, cast the burden of supporting him on one of
the other brothers. “It is for him to keep thee,
daddy!” said they; and then the other would say :
214 : COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“ Nay, dad, but it is as much as we can do to keep
ourselves.” Thus between his four sons he knew not
what to do. There was quite a battle among them as
to which of them should not keep their old father.
One had one good excuse and another had another,
and so none of them would keep him. This one had
a lot of little children, and that one had a scold for a
wife, and this house was too small, and that house was
too poor. ‘Go where thou wilt, old man,” said they,
“only don’t come to us.” And the old man, grey,
grey, grey as a dove was he, wept before his sons, and
knew not whither to turn. What could he do? En-
treaty was in vain. Not one of the sons would take
the old man in, and yet he had to be put somewhere.
Then the old man strove with them no more, but let
them do with him even as they would.

So all four sons met and took counsel. Time after
time they laid their heads together, and at last they
agreed among themselves that the best thing the old
man could do was to go to school. ‘ There will be a
bench for him to sit upon there,” said they; “and he
can take something to eat in his knapsack.” Then
they told the old man about it; but the old man did
not want to go to school. He begged his children
not to send him there, and wept before them. ‘Now
that I cannot see the white world,” said he, “ how can
I see a black book? Moreover, from my youth up-
tT

THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN. 21

wards I have never learnt my letters; how shall I
begin to do so now? A clerk cannot be fashioned
out of an old man ou the point of death!” But there
was no use talking, his children said he must go to
school, and the voices of his children prevailed against
his feeble old voice. So to school he had to go. Now
there was no church in that village, so he had to go
to the village beyond it to school. A forest lay
along the road, and in this forest the old man met a
nobleman driving along. When the old man came
near to the nobleman’s carriage, he stepped out of the
road to let it pass, took off his hat respectfully, and
then would have gone on further. But he heard
some one calling, and, looking back, saw the nobleman
beckoning to him; he wanted to ask him something,
The nobleman then got out of his carriage and asked
the old man whither he was going. The old man took
off his hat to the nobleman and told him all his
misery, and the tears ran down the old man’s cheeks.
“ Woe is me, gracious sir! If the Lord had left me
without kith and kin, I should not complain ; but
strange indeed is the woe that has befallen me! I
have four sons, thank God, and all four have houses
of their own, and yet they send their poor old father
to school to learn! Was ever the like of it known
before?” So the old man told the nobleman his
whole story, and the nobleman was full of compassion
216 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

for the old man.—*‘ Well, old man,” said he, “’tis no
use for thee to go to school, that’s plain, Return
home. Ill tell thee what to do so that thy children
shall never send thee to school again. Fear not, old
man, weep no more, and let not thy soul be troubled !
God shall bless thee, and all will be well. I know
well what ought to be done here.” So the nobleman
comforted the old man, and the old man began to be
merry. Then the nobleman took out his purse, it was
a real nobleman’s purse, with a little sack in the
middle of it to hold small change. Lord! what a
lovely thing it was! The more he looked at it, the
more the old man marvelled at it. The nobleman took
this purse and began filling it full with something.
When he had well filled it, he gave it to the old man.
“Take this and go home to thy children,” said he, ‘and
when thou hast got home, call together all thy four
sons and say to them: My dear children, long long ago,
when Iwas younger than I am now, and knocked about
in the world a bit, I made a little money. ‘I won't
spend it,’ I said to myself, ‘for one never knows what
may happen.’ So I went into a forest, my children,
and dug a hole beneath an oak, and there I hid my
little store of money. I did not bother much about
the money afterwards, because I had such good
children ; but when you sent me to school I came to
this self-same oak, and I said to myself: ‘I wonder
THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN. 217

if these few silver pieces have been waiting for their
master all this time! Let us dig and see.’ So I dug
and found them, and have brought them home to you,
my children, I shall keep them till I die; but after
my death consult together, and whosoever shall be
found to have cherished me most and taken care of
me and not grudged me a clean shirt now and then,
or a crust of bread when I’m hungry, to him shall be
given the greater part of my money. So now, my
dear children, receive me back again, and my thanks
shall be yours. You can manage it amongst you, and
surely ’tis not right that I should seek a home
among strangers! Which of you will be kind to
your old father—for money?”

So the old man returned to his children with the
purse in a casket, and when he came to the village
with the casket under his arm, one could see at once
that he had been in a good forest! When one comes
home with a heavy casket under one’s arm, depend
upon it there’s something in it! So, no sooner did
the old man appear than his eldest daughter-in-law
came running out to meet him, and bade him welcome
in God’s name. “ Things don’t seem to get on at all
without thee, dad!” cried she, “and the house is
quite dreary. Come in and rest, dad,” she went on:
“thou hast gone a long way and must be weary.”

1 I. e. a forest where treasure is hidden.
218 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

Then all the brothers came together, and the old man
told them what God had done for him. All their
faces brightened as they looked at the casket, and they
thought to themselves: “If we keep him we shall
Then the four brothers could not
make too much of their dear old father. They took

Pd

have the money.

care of him and the old man was happy, but he took
heed to the counsel of the nobleman, and never let the
casket out of his hand. “ After my death you shall
have everything, but I won't give it you now, for who
knows what may happen? I have seen already how
you treated your old father when he had nothing. It
shall all be yours, I say, only wait; and when I die,
take it and divide it as I have said.” So the brothers
tended their father, and the old man lived in clover,
and was somebody. He had his own way and did
nothing.

So the old man was no longer ill-treated by his
children, but lived among them like an emperor in his
own empire, but no sooner did he die than his children
made what haste they could to lay hands upon the
casket. All the people were called together and bore
witness that they had treated their father well since
he came back to them, so it was adjudged that they
should divide the treasure amongst them. But first
they took the old man’s body to church and the casket
along with it. They buried him as God commands.


TS Pan
Pe Oak a
g

an
pi we 2 Vigne w

ae

el Ie, i, H f
AWM /

fs is
Gq >
Ee “AWE

cl br a, %

ae f a Hs

ULOy ~ fit Ke ‘
er Cag sa wees sli Ae a
220 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

They made a rich banquet of funeral meats that all
might know how much they mourned the old man 3 1b
was a splendid funeral. When the priest got up from
the table, the people all began to thank their hosts,
and the eldest son begeed the priest to say the
sorokoust* in the church for the repose of the dead
man’s soul. “Such a dear old fellow as he was!”
said he; “was there ever any one like him? ‘Take
this money for the sorokoust, reverend father!” so
horribly grieved was that eldest son. So the eldest
son gave the priest money, and the second son gave
him the like. Nay, each one gave him money for
an extra half sorokoust, all four gave him requiem
money. ‘‘ We'll have prayers in church for our father
though we sell our last sheep to pay for them,” cried
they. Then, when all was over, they hastened as fast
as they could to the money. ‘The coffer was brought
forth, They shook it. There was a fine rattling in-
side it. Every one of them felt and handled the
coffer. That was something like a treasure! Then
they unsealed it and opened it and scattered the
contents—and it was full of nothing but glass! They
wouldn’t believe their eyes. They rummaged among
the glass, but there was no money. It was horrible!
Surely it could not be that their father had dug up a
coffer from beneath an oak of the forest and it was

’ Prayers lasting forty days.
THE UNGRATEFUL CHILDREN, 22]

full of nothing but glass! « Why!” cried the
brothers, “ our father has left us nothing but glass !”
But for the crowds of people there, the brothers would
have fallen upon and beaten each other in their wrath.
So the children of the old man saw that their father
had made fools of them. Then all the people mocked
them: “You see what you have gained by sending
your father to school! You see he learned something
at school after all! He was a long time before he
began learning, but better late than never. It
appears to us ‘twas aright good school you sent him to.
No doubt they whipped him into learning so much.
Never mind, you can keep the money and the casket!”
Then the brothers were full of lamentation and rage,
But what could they do? their father was already
dead and buried.
IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETER’S FIFE.

HERE was once upon a time a man
who had three sons, and two were
clever, but the third, called Ivan,
was a fool. Their father divided
all his goods amongst them and
died, and the three brothers went

out into the world to seek their fortunes. Now the

two wise brothers left all their goods at home, but Ivan
the fool, who had only inherited a large millstone, took
it along with him. They went on and on and on till it
began to grow dark, when they came to a large forest.

Then the wise brothers said: “ Let us climb up to

the top of this oak and pass the night there, and then

robbers will not fall upon us.’—“ But what will this
silly donkey do with his millstone?” asked one of

them.—‘ You look to yourselves,” said Ivan, “for I

mean to pass the night in this tree also.” Then the




IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETERS FIFE. 223

wise brothers climbed to the very tip-top of the tree
and there sat down, and then Ivan dragged himself
up too, and the millstone after him. He tried to get
up as high as his brothers, but the thin boughs broke
. beneath him, so he had to be content with staying
in the lower part of the tree on the thicker boughs ;
so there he sat, hugging
the millstone in his arms.
Presently some robbers
came along that way, red-
handed from their work,
and they too prepared to
pass the night under the
tree. So they cut them
down firewood, and made
them a roaring fire beneath
a huge cauldron, and in this
cauldron they began to boil



their supper. They boiled
and boiled till their mess
of pottage was ready, and then they all sat down
round the cauldron and took out their large ladles,
and were just about to fall to—in fact they were
blowing their food because it was so boiling hot
—when Ivan let his big millstone plump down into
the middle of the cauldron, so that the pottage flew
right into their eyes. The robbers were so terrified
234 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

that they all sprang to their feet straightway and
scampered off through the forest, forgetting all the
booty which they had robbed the merchantmen of.
Then Ivan came down from the oak and cried to his
brothers: ‘You come down here and divide the
spoil!” So the wise brothers came down, put all the
merchandise on the backs of the robbers’ horses, and
went home with it; but the only thing that Ivan
was able to secure for himself was a bag of incense.
This he immediately took to the nearest churchyard,
placed it on the top of a tomb, and began to pound
away at it with his millstone. Suddenly St. Peter
appeared to him and said: “ What art thou doing,
good man?”—“T am pounding up this incense to
make bread of it.’—‘ Nay, good man, I will advise
thee better: give me the incense and take from me
whatever thou wilt.”—* Very well, Saint Peter,” said
the fool; “thou must give me a little fife, but a fife
of such a sort that whenever I play upon it, every one
will be obliged to dance.”—“ But dost thou know
how to play upon a fife ?”—*No, but I can soon
learn.” Then St. Peter drew forth a little fife from
his bosom and gave it to him, and took away the
incense, and who can say where he went with it!
But Ivan stood up and gazed at the sky and said:
“Look now! if St. Peter hath not already burnt my
incense, and made of it that large white cloud that
; a fis \ ETA
sell GY Mie \ Wie '-
Ls Frat ERIS

Nee al hs


226 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

is sailing above my head!” Then he took up his
fife and began to play, and the moment he began to
play, everything around him began to dance; the
wolves, and the hares, and the foxes, and the bears,
nay, the very birds lit down upon the ground and
began to dance, and Ivan went on laughing and
playing all the time. Even the savage, surly bears
danced and danced till their legs tottered beneath
them. ‘Then they clutched tight hold of the trees
to stop themselves from dancing; but it was of no
use, dance they must. At last Ivan himself was
tired, and lay down to rest, and when he had rested
a little, he got up again and went on into the
town. There all the people were in the bazaars,
buying and selling. Some were buying pancakes,
others baskets of bright-coloured eges, others again
pitchers of kvas. Ivan began playing on his fife,
and forthwith they all fell a-dancing. One man who
had a whole basket of egos on his head danced them
into bits, and danced and danced till he looked like
the yolk of an egg himself. Those who were asleep
got up and gave themselves up to dancing straight-
way ; there were some who danced without trousers,
and some who danced without smocks or shirts, and
there were some who danced with nothing on at all,
for dance they must when Ivan began a-playing. The
whole town was turned upside down: the dogs, the
IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETERS FIFE. 227

swine, the cocks and hens, everything that had life
came out and danced. At last Ivan was tired, so
he left off playing and went into the town to seek
service. The parson there took a fancy to him, and
said to him: “Good man! wilt enter my service ?”
— wages dost thou want by the year then ?”—“ It won’t
come dear; five karbovantsya* are all I ask.”—
“Good, I agree,” said the parson. So he engaged
Ivan as his servant, and the next day he sent him out
into the fields to tend his cattle. Ivan drove the
cattle into the pastures, but he himself perched on
the top of a haystack while the cattle grazed. He
sat there, and sat and sat till he grew quite dull, and
then he said to himself: “Tl play a bit on my fife,
I haven't played for along time.” So he began to
play, and immediately all the cattle fell a-dancing ;
and not only the cattle, but all the foxes, and the
hares, and the wolves, and everything in the hedges
and ditches fell a-dancinge too. They danced and
danced till the poor cattle were clean worn out
and at the last gasp. In the evening Ivan drove
them home, but they were so famished that they
tugged at the dirty straw-roofs of the huts they
passed, and so got a chance mouthful or two. But
Ivan went in and had supper and a comfortable

1 A karbovanets is about four shillings.
228 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

night's rest afterwards. The next day he again
drove the cattle mto the pastures. They began
grazing till he took out his fife again, when they all
fell a-dancing like mad. He played on and on till
evening, when he drove the cattle home again, and
they were all as hungry as could be, and wearied to
death from dancing.

Now the parson was not a little astonished when
he saw his cattle. ‘“ Where on earth has he been
feeding them?” thought he; “they are quite tired
out and almost famished! Tl take care to go myself
to-morrow, and see exactly whither he takes them,
and what he does with them.” On the third day
the neatherd again drove the cattle into the pastures,
but this time the parson followed after them, and
went and hid himself behind the hedge near to which
Ivan was watching the cattle graze. There he sat
then, and watched to see what the man would do.
Presently Ivan mounted on to the haystack and
began to play. And immediately all the cattle fell
a-dancing, and everything in the hedge, and the
parson behind the hedge danced too. Now the
hedge was a quickset hedge, and as the parson began
capering about in it, he tore to shreds his cassock and
his breeches, and his under-coat, and his shirt, and
scratched his skin and wrenched out his beard ag if
he had been very badly shaved, and still the poor
IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETERS FIFE. 229

parson had to go on dancing in the midst of the
prickly hedge till there were great weals and wounds
all over his body, and the red blood began to flow.
Then the parson saw he was in evil case, and shrieked
to his herdsman to leave off playing; but the herds-
man was so wrapped up in his music that he did not
hear him; but at last he looked in the direction of
the hedge, and when he saw the poor parson skipping
about like a lunatic, he stopped. The parson darted
away as fast as his legs could carry him towards the
village, and oh! what a sight he looked as he dashed
through the streets! The people didn’t know him,
and—scandalized that anybody should run about
in rags and tatters so that his whole body could
be seen—began to hoot him. Then the poor man
turned aside from the public road, crawled off
through the woods, and dashed off through the tall
reeds of the gardens, with the dogs after him. For
wherever he went they took him for. a robber, and
hounded on the dogs. At last the parson got home,
all rags and tatters, so that when his wife saw him
she did not know him, but called to the labourers :
“Help, help! here’s a robber, turn him out!” They
came rushing up with sticks and cudgels, but he
began talking to them, and at last they recognized
him, led him home, and he told his wife all about
Ivan. The parson’s wife was. so amazed she could
230 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

scarce believe it. In the evening Ivan drove home
the oxen, put them into their stalls, gave them straw
to eat, and then came into the house himself to have
supper. He came into the house, and the parson said
to him: “Come now, Ivan, when thou hast rested
a bit, play my wife a little sone!” But as for the
parson, he took good care to tie himself first of all to
the pillar which held up the roof of the house. Ivan
sat down on the ground near to the threshold and
began to play. The parson’s wife sat down on the
bench to listen to him while he played; but immedi-
ately she leaped up from the bench and began to
dance, and she danced with such hearty good-will
that the place became too small for her. Then the
Devil seemed to take possession of the cat too, for
pussy leaped from under the stove and began to
spring and bound about also. The parson held on
and held on to the pillar with all his might, but it
was of no use. Hehad no power to resist; he let
go with his hands, and tugged and tugged till the
rope that held him grew slacker and slacker, and then
he went dancing round and round the pillar at a
furious rate, with the rope chafing his hands and feet
all the time. At last he could endure it no longer,
and bawled to Ivan to stop. “The deuce is in thee!”
eried he. Then Ivan stopped playing, put his fife
into his breast-pocket, and went and lay down to
IVAN THE FOOL AND ST. PETERS FIFE. 231

sleep. But the parson said to his wife: “ We must
turn away this Ivan to-morrow, for he will be the
death of ourselves and our cattle!” Ivan, however,
overheard what the parson said to his wife, and
getting up early in the morning, he went straight to
the parson, and said to him: “Give me one hundred
harbovantsya, and Dll be off; but if you won't give
them to me, I'll play and play till you and your wife
have danced yourselves to death, and then I'll take
your place and live at mine ease.” The parson
scratched himself behind the ears and hesitated; but
at last he thought he had better give the money and
be quit of him. So he took the hundred karbovantsya
out of his satchel and gave them to Ivan. Then Ivan
played them a parting song, till the parson and his
wife fell down to the ground, dead beat, with their
tongues lolling out of their mouths; and then he put
his fife into his breast-pocket, and wandered forth
into the wide world.
THE MAGIC EGG.



HERE was once upon a time a lark
who was the Tsar among the birds,
and he took unto himself as his
Tsaritsa a little shrew mouse. They
had a field all to themselves, which

they sowed with wheat, and when the wheat grew

up they divided it between them, when they
found that there was one grain over! The mouse
said: “Let me have it!” But the lark said:

“No, let me have it!”—‘* What’s to be done?”

thought they. They would have liked to take counsel

of some one, but they had no parents or kinsmen,
nobody at all to whom they could go and ask
advice in the matter. At last the mouse said: “ At
any rate, let me have the first nibble!” The lark

Tsar agreed to this; but the little mouse fastened

her teeth in it and ran off into her hole with it, and

there ate it all up. At this the Tsar lark was wroth,
THE MAGIC EGG. 233

and collected all the birds of the air to make war
upon the mouse Tsaritsa; but the Tsaritsa called
together all the beasts to defend her, and so the war
began. Whenever the beasts came rushing out of
the wood to tear the birds to pieces, the birds flew
up into the trees; but the birds kept in the air, and
hacked and pecked the beasts wherever they could.
Thus they fought the whole day, and in the evening
they lay down to rest. Now when the Tsaritsa
looked around upon her forces, she saw that the ant
was taking no part in the war. She immediately
went and commanded the ant to be there by evening,
and when the ant came, the Tsaritsa ordered her to
climb up the trees with her kinsmen and bite off the
feathers round the birds’ wines.

Next day, when there was licht enough to see by,
the mouse Tsaritsa cried: “Up, up, my warriors!”
Thereupon the birds also rose up, and immediately
fell to the ground, where the beasts tore them to bits.
So the Tsaritsa overcame the Tsar. But there was
one eagle who saw there was something wrong, so
he did not try to fly, but remained sitting on the
tree. And lo! there came an archer along that
way, and seeing the eagle on the tree, he took
aim at it; but the eagle besought him and said :
“Do not kill me, and I'll be of great service to
thee!” The archer aimed a second time, but the
234 COSSACK FAIRY TALES,

eagle besought him still more and said: “Take me
down rather and keep me, and thou shalt see that it
will be to thy advantage.” The archer, however,
took aim a third time, but the eagle began to beg of
him most piteously: “Nay, kill me not, but take
me home with thee, and thou shalt see what great
advantage it will be to thee!” The archer believed
the bird. He climbed up the tree, took the eagle
down, and carried it home. Then the eagle said to
him: ‘Put mein a hut, and feed me with flesh till
my wings have grown again.”

Now this archer had two cows and a steer, and
he at once killed and cut up one of the cows for the
eagle. The eagle fed upon this cow for a full year,
and then he said to the archer: “ Let me go, that I
may fly. I see that my wings have already grown
again!” Then the archer let him loose from the
hut. ‘The eagle flew round and round, he flew about
for half a day, and then he returned to the archer
and said: “T feel I have but little strength in me,
slay me another cow!” And the archer obeyed him,
and slew the second cow, and the eagle lived upon
that for yet another year. Again the eagle flew
round and round in the air. He flew round and
about the whole day till evening, when he returned
to the archer and said: ‘‘I am stronger than I was,
but I have still but little strength in me, slay me
THE MAGIC EGG. 235

the steer also!” Then the man thought to himself:
“What shall I do? Shall I slay it, or shall I not
slay it?” At last he said: “ Well! I’ve sacrificed



more than this before, so let this go too!” and he
took the steer and slaughtered it for the eagle. Then
the eagle lived upon this for another whole year
236 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

longer, and after that he took to flight, and flew high
up right to the very clouds. Then he flew down
again to the man and said to him: “I thank thee,
brother, for that thou hast been the saving of me!
come now and sit upon me!”—* Nay, but,” said the
man, “what if some evil befall me ?”—*« Sit on me,
I say!” cried the eagle. So the archer sat down
upon the bird.

Then the eagle bore him nearly as high as the big
clouds, and then let him fall. Down plumped the
man; but the eagle did not let him fall to the earth,
but ay flew beneath him and upheld him, and
said to him: “ How dost thou feel now ?’”—T feel,”
said the man, “as if I had no life in me.”—Then the
eagle replied: “ That was just how I felt when thou
didst aim at me the first time.” Then he said to
him: “Sit on my back again!” The man did not
want to sit on him, but what could he do2 Sit he
must. Then the eagle few with him quite as hich
as the big clouds, and shook him off, and down he
fell fears till he was about two fathoms from the
ground, when the bird again flew beneath him and
held him up. Again the eagle asked him: “ How
dost thou feel?” And the man replied: “TI feel
just as if all my bones were already broken to bits!”

—“That is just how I felt when thou didst take aim
at me the second time,” replied the eagle. “ But
THE MAGIC EGG. 237

now sit on my back once more.” The man did SO,
and the eagle flew with him as high as the small
fleecy clouds, and then he shook him off, and down
he fell headlong; but when he was but a hand’s-
breadth from the earth, the eagle again flew beneath
him and held him up, and said to him: “How dost
thou feel now?” And he replied: “I feel as if I
no longer belonged to this world!”—“That is just
how I felt when thou didst aim at me the third time,”
replied the cagle. “ But now,” continued the bird,
“thou art guilty no more. We are quits. I owe
thee nought, and thou owest nought to me; so sit
on my back again, and I'll take thee to my master.”
They flew on and on, they dew till they came to
the eagle’s uncle. And the eagle said to the archer:
“Go to my house, and when they ask thee: ‘ Hast
thou not seen our poor child?’ reply, ‘Give me the
magic egg, and V’ll bring him before your eyes!’”
So he went to the house, and there they said to
him: “Hast thou heard of our poor child with thine
ears, or seen him with thine eyes, and hast thou
come hither willingly or unwillingly ?”—And he
answered: “I have come hither willingly !”’—Then
they asked: “Hast thou smelt out anything of our
poor youngster ? for it is three years now since he
went to the wars, and there’s neither sight nor sound
of him more!”—And he answered: “Give me the
238 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

magic egg, and I'll bring him straightway before your
eyes !”—Then they replied: “ ’Twere better we never
saw him than that we should give thee the magic
egg!”—Then he went back to the eagle and said to
him: “They said: ‘’TI'were better we never saw him
than that we should give thee the magic egg,’”—
Then the eagle answered: “‘ Let us fly on further !”
They flew on and on till they came to the eagle’s
brother, and the archer said just the same to him as
he had said to the eagle’s uncle, and still he didn’t
get the egg. Then they flew to the eagle’s father, and
the eagle said to him: “Go up to the hut, and if
they ask for me, say that thou hast seen me and will
bring me before their eyes.”—So he went up to the
hut, and they said to him: ‘‘O Tsarevich, we hear
thee with our ears and see thee with our eyes, but
hast thou come hither of thine own free will or by
the will of another ?”—-And the archer answered :
“T have come hither of my own free will!’—Theu
they asked him: “Hast thou seen our son? Lo,
these four years we have not had news of him. He
went off to the wars, and perchance he has been
slain there.’—And he answered them: “I have seen
him, and if thou wilt give me the magic egg, I will
bring him before your eyes.”—And the eagle’s father
said to him: “ What good will such a thing do thee ?
We had better give thee the lucky penny !”—But he
a

THE MAGIC EGG. 239

answered : “I don’t want the lucky penny, give me
the magic egg!”— Come hither, then!” said he,
“and thou shalt have it.” So he went into the hut.
Then the eagle’s father rejoiced and gave him the
egg, and said to him: “Take heed thou dost not
break it anywhere on the road, and when thou gettest
home, hedge it round and build a strong fence about
it, and it will do thee good.”

So he went homewards. He went on and on till
a great thirst came upon him. So he stopped at the
first spring he came to, and as he stooped to drink he
stumbled and the magic egg was broken. Then he
perceived that an ox had come out of the egg and
was rolling away. He gave chase to the ox, but
whenever he was getting close to one side of it, the
other side of it got further away from him. Then
the poor fellow cried: “I shall do nothing with it
myself, I see.”—At that moment an old she-dragon
came up to him and said: “ What wilt thou give me,
O man, if I chase this ox back again into the ege
for thee?”—And the archer replied: “What can I
give?”—The dragon said to him: “Give me what
thou hast at home without thy will and wit !”?—
“Done!” said the archer. Then the dragon chased
the ox nicely into the egg again, patched it up
prettily and gave it into the man’s hand. Then the
archer went home, and when he got home he found
240 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

a son had been born to him there, and his son said
to him: “Why didst thou give me to the old she-
dragon, dad? But never mind, I’ll manage to live
in spite of her.” Then the father was very grieved
for a time, but what could he do? Now the name of
this son was Ivan.

So Ivan lost no time in going to the dragon, and



the dragon said to him: “Go to my house and do
me three tasks, and if thou dost them not, I’ll devour
thee.” Now round the dragon’s house was a large
meadow as far as the eye could reach. And the
dragon said to him: “Thou must in a single night
weed out this field and sow wheat in it, and reap the
wheat and store it, all in this very night ; and thou
THE MAGIC EGG. © 241

must bake me a roll out of this self-same wheat, and
the roll must be lying ready for me on my table in
the morning.”

Then Ivan went and leaned over the fence, and his
heart within him was sore troubled. Now near to
him there was a post, and in this post was the
dragon’s starveling daughter. So when he came
thither and fell a-weeping, she asked him: ‘“ Where-
fore dost thou weep?”—And he said: “How can
I help weeping? The dragon has bidden me do
something I can never, never do; and what is more,
she has bidden me do it in a single night.”—‘ What
is it, pray?” asked the dragon’s daughter. Then he
told her. “ Not every bush bears a berry!” cried
she. ‘Promise to take me to wife, and I’ll do all she
has bidden thee do.” He promised, and then she said
to him again: “Now go and lie down, but see that
thou art up early in the morning to bring her her
roll.” Then she went to the field, and before one
could whistle she had cleaned it of weeds and
harrowed it and sown it with wheat, and by dawn
she had reaped the wheat and cooked the roll and
brought it to him, and said: ‘Now, take it to her
hut and put it on her table.”

Then the old she-dragon awoke and came to the
door, and was amazed at the sight of the field, which

was now all stubble, for the corn had been cut. Then
R
242 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

she said to Ivan: “Yes, thou hast done the work
well. But now, see that thou doest my second task.”
Then she gave him her second command. “Dig up
that mountain yonder and let the Dnieper flow past
the site of it, and there build a store-house, and in
the store-house stack the wheat that thou hast reaped,
and sell this wheat to the merchant barques that sail
by, and everything must be done by the time I get
up early next morning!” ‘Then he again went to
the fence and wept, and the maiden said to him:
“Why dost thou weep?” and he told her all that
the she-dragon had bidden him do. “There are lots
ot bushes, but where are the berries? Go and lie
down, and I’ll do it all for thee.” Then she whistled,
and the mountain was levelled and the Dnieper
flowed over the site of it, and round about the
Dnieper store-houses rose up, and then she came and
woke him that he might go and sell the wheat to the
merchant barques that sailed by that way, and when
the she-dragon rose up early in the morning she was
amazed to see that everything had been done which
she had commanded him.

Then she gave him her third command: “This
night thou must catch the golden hare, and bring it
to me by the morning light.” Again he went to the
fence and fell a-weeping. And the gul asked him:
“Why art thou weeping ?”—He said to her: “She
THE MAGIC EGG. 243

has ordered me to catch her the golden hare.”—* Qh,
oh!” cried the she-dragon’s daughter, “the berries
ave ripening now; only her father, the Devil, knows
how to catch such a hare ag that. Nevertheless, ll
go to a rocky place I know of, and there perchance
we shall be able to catch it.” So they went to this
rocky place together, and she said to him: “Stand
over that hole. I'll go in and chase him out of the
hole, and thou catch him as he comes out ; but mind,
whatever comes out of the hole, seize it, for it will be
the golden hare.”

So she went and began beating up, and all at once
out came a snake and hissed, and he let it go. Then
she came out of the hole and said to him: “What!
has nothing come out ?”—* Well,” said he, “only a
snake, and I was afraid it would bite me, so I let it
go.” —“ What hast thou done?” said she; “that was
the very hare itself. Look now!” said she, “I'll go
in again, and if any one comes out and tells you that
the golden hare is not here, don’t believe it, but hold
him fast.” So she crept into the hole again and
began to beat for game, and out came an old woman,
who said to the youth: ‘What art thou poking
about there for?”—And he said to her: “For the
golden hare.”—She said to him: “It is not here, for
this is a snake’s hole,” and when she had said this
she went away. Presently the girl also came out
244 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and said to him: “What! hast thou not got the
hare? Did nothing come out, then ?”—‘ No,” said
he, “nothing but an old woman who asked me what
I was seeking, and I told her the golden hare, and
she said: ‘It is not here,’ so I let her go.”—Then the
eitl rephed: “ Why didst thou not lay hold of her?
for she was the very golden hare itself, and now thou
never wilt catch it unless I turn myself into a hare
and thou take and lay me on the table, and give me
imto my mother’s, the she-dragon’s hands, and go
away, for if she find out all about it she will tear the
pair of us to pieces.”

So she changed herself into a hare, and he took
and laid her on the table, and said to the she-dragon :
“There’s thy hare for thee, and now let me go
away!” She said to him: “ Very well—be off!”
Then he set off running, and he ran and ran as hard
as he could. Soon after, the old she-dragon dis-
covered that it was not the golden hare, but her own
daughter, so she set about chasing after them and
destroying them both, for the daughter had made
haste in the meantime to join Ivan. But as the she-
dragon couldn’t run herself, she sent her husband,
and he began chasing them, and they knew he was
coming, for they felt the earth trembling beneath his
tread. Then the she-dragon’s daughter said to Ivan :
“I hear him running after us. I'll turn myself into
THE MAGIC EGG. 245

standing wheat and thee into an old man guarding
me, and if he ask thee: ‘Hast thou seen a lad and
a lass pass by this way?’ say to him: ‘Yes, they
passed by this way while I was sowing this
wheat !’”

A little while afterwards the she-dragon’s husband
came flying up. ‘‘ Have a lad and a lass passed by
this way?” said he “Yes,” replied the old man,
“they have.”—“* Was it long ago?” asked the she-
dragon’s husband.—“‘It was while this wheat was
being sown,” replied the old man.—‘ Oh!” thought
the serpent, ‘this wheat is ready for the sickle, they
couldn’t have been this way yesterday,” so he turned
back. Then the she-dragon’s daughter turned her-
self back into a maiden and the old man into a
youth, and off they set again. But the dragon
returned home, and the she-dragon asked him:
“What! hast thou not caught them or met them
on the road?”—* Met them, no!” said he “I
did, indeed, pass on the road some standing wheat
and an old man watching it, and I asked the old
man if he had seen a lad and a lass pass by that
way, and he said: ‘Yes, while this wheat was being
sown, but the wheat was quite ripe for the sickle,
so I knew it was a long while ago and turned
back.”—“ Why didst thou not tear that old man and
the wheat to pieces?” cried the she-dragon; “it was
246 COSSACK FAIRY. TALES.

they! Be off after them again, and mind, this time
tear them to pieces without fail.”

So the dragon set off after them again, and they
heard him coming from afar, for the earth trembled
beneath him, so the damsel said to Ivan: “He’s
coming again, I hear him; now Ill change myself
into amonastery, so old that it will be almost falling to
pieces, and I’ll change thee into an old black monk at
the gate, and when he comes up and asks: ‘Hast thou
seen a lad and a lass pass this way?’ say to him: ‘Yes,
they passed by this way when this monastery was
being built.’” Soon afterwards the dragon came flying
past, and asked the monk: ‘Hast thou seen a lad
and a lass pass by this way ?”—“ Yes,” he replied,
“I saw them what time the holy fathers began to
build this monastery.” The dragon thought to him-
self: “That was not yesterday! This monastery has
stood a hundred years if it has stood a day, and won't
stand much longer either,” and with that he turned
him back. When he got home, he said to the she-
dragon, his wife: “I met a black monk who serves in
a monastery, and I asked him about them, and he
told me that a lad and a lass had run past that way
when the monastery was being built, but that was not
yesterday, for the monastery is a hundred years old
at the very least.’—‘* Why didst thou not tear the
black monk to pieces and pull down the monastery ?
THE MAGIC EGG. 247

a

for “twas they. But I see I must go after them
myself, thou art no good at all.”

So off she set and ran and ran, and they knew she
was coming, for the earth quaked and yawned beneath
her. Then the damsel said to Ivan: “I fear me ’tis
all over, for she is coming herself! Look now! T’l
change thee into a stream and myself into a fish—a
perch.” Immediately after the she-dragon came up
and said to the perch: “Oh, oh! so thou wouldst run
away from me,eh!” Then she turned herself into a
pike and began chasing the perch, but every time she
drew near to it, the perch turned its prickly fins
towards her, so that she could not catch hold of it.
So she kept on chasing it and chasing it, but finding
she could not catch it, she tried to drink up the
stream, till she drank so much of it that she burst.

Then the maiden who had become a fish said to
the youth who had become a river: “Now that we
are alive and not dead, go back to thy lord-father
and thy father’s house and see them, and kiss them
all except the daughter of thy uncle, for if thou kiss
that damsel thou wilt forget me, and I shall go to the
land of Nowhere.” So he went home and greeted
them all, and as he did so he thought to himself:
“Why should I not greet my uncle’s daughter like
the rest of them? Why, they'll think me a mere
pagan if I don’t!” So he kissed her, and the moment
248 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

he did so he forgot all about the girl who had saved
him.

So he remained there half-a-year, and then be-
thought him of taking to himself a wife. So they
betrothed him to a very pretty girl, and he accepted
her and forgot all about the other girl who had saved
him from the dragon, though she herself was the
she-dragon’s daughter. Now the evening before the
wedding they heard a young damsel cryin g@ Shishki?
in the streets. They called to the young damsel to
go away, or say who she was, for nobody knew her.
But the damsel answered never a word, but began to
knead more cakes, and made a cock-dove and a hen-
dove out of the dough and put them down on the
ground, and they became alive. And the hen-dove
said to the cock-dove: “ Hast thou forgotten how I
cleared the field for thee, and sowed it with wheat,
and thou mad’st a roll from the corn which thou
gavest to the she-dragon?”—But the cock-dove
answered : “ Forgotten! forgotten!”—Then she said
to him again: “And hast thou forgotten how I dug
away the mountain for thee, and let the Dnieper flow
by it that the merchant barques might come to thy
store-houses, and that thou might’st sell thy wheat to
the merchant barques?” But the cock-dove replied :
“Forgotten ! forgotten !”—Then the hen-dove said to

1 ‘Wedding-cakes of the shape of pine-cones.
THE MAGIC EGG. 249

him again: “And hast thou forgotten how we two
went together in search of the golden hare? Hast
thou forgotten me then altogether?”—-And the cock-
dove answered again: “Forgotten ! forgotten !”
Then the good youth Ivan bethought him who this
damsel was that had made the doves, and he took
her to his arms and made her his wife, and they lived
happily ever afterwards.
THE STORY OF THE FORTY-FIRST BROTHER.

S HERE was once upon a time an old
man who had forty-one sons. Now
when this old man was at the point
of death, he divided all he had
amongst his sons, and gave to each



of the forty a horse; but when he came to the
forty-first he found he had no more horses left,
so the forty-first brother had to be content with a
foal. When their father was dead, the brothers
said to each other: “Let us go to Friday and
get married !”—But the eldest brother said: “No,
Friday has only forty daughters, so one of us
would be left without a bride.”—Then the second
brother said: “Let us go then to Wednesday—
Wednesday has forty-one daughters, and so the whole
lot of us can pair off with the whole lot of them.”
So they went and chose their brides. The eldest
brother took the eldest sister, and the youngest the
THE STORY OF THE FORTY-FIRST BROTHER. 251

youngest, till they were all suited. And the youngest
brother of all said: “Tl take that little damsel who
is sitting on the stove in the corner and has the nice
kerchief in her hand.” ‘Then they all drank a
bumper together to seal the bargain, and after that
the forty-one bridegrooms and the forty-one brides
laid them down to sleep side by side. But the
youngest brother of all said to himself: “I will
bring my foal into the room.” So he brought in the
foal, and then went to his bed-chamber and laid him
down to sleep also. Now his bride lay down with
her kerchief in her hand, and he took a great fancy
to it, and he begged and prayed her for it again and
again, until at last she gave it to him. Now, when
Wednesday thought that all the people were asleep,
he went out into the courtyard to sharpen his sabre.
Then the foal said: ‘Oh, my dear little master, come
here, come here!” He came, and the foal said to
him: “Take off the night-dresses of the forty sleeping
bridegrooms and put them on the forty sleeping brides,
and put the night-dresses of the brides on the bride-
grooms, fora great woe is nigh!” And he did so.
When Wednesday had sharpened his sabre he came into
the room and began feeling for the stiff collars of the
bridegrooms’ night-dresses, and straightway cut off
the forty heads above the collars. Then he carried
off the heads of his forty.daughters in a bunch (for
252 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

the brides now had on the night-dresses of their
bridegrooms), and went and lay down to sleep. Then
the foal said : “* My dear little father! awake the bride-
grooms, and we'll set off.” So he awoke the bride-
erooms and sent them on before, while he followed after
on his own little nag. They trotted on and on, and
at last the foal said to him: ‘ Look behind, and see

iY

ae
eae
5



whether Wednesday is not pursuing.” He looked
round: “Yes, little brother,” said he, ‘‘ Wednesday
ts pursuing!”—“Shake thy kerchief then!” said
the foal. He shook his kerchief, and immediately a
vast sea was between him and the pursuer. Then
they went on and on till the foal said to him again :
“Took behind, and see if Wednesday is still pur-
THE STORY OF THE FORTY-FIRST BROTHER. 253

suing !”—He looked round : “ Yes, little brother, he
as pursuing !”—‘* Wave thy handkerchief on the left
side!” said the foal. He waved it on the left side,
and immediately between them and the pursuer stood
a forest so thick that not even a little mouse could
have squeezed through it. Then they went on still
further, till the foal said again: “Look behind, and
see whether Wednesday is still pursuing !”—He
looked behind, and there, sure enough, was Wednesday
running after them, and he was not very far off
either.—‘‘ Wave thy kerchief!” said the foal. He
waved his kerchief, and immediately a steep mountain
—oh, so steep!—lay betwixt them. They went on
and on, until the foal said again: “Look behind,
is Wednesday still pursuing ?”—So he looked behind
him and said: “No, now he is not there.” Then
they went on and on again, and soon they were
not very far from home. Then the youngest brother
said: “You go home now, but I am going to seek a
bride!” So he went on and on till he came to a
place where lay a feather of the bird Zhar. ‘Look !”
cried he, what Pve found!”—Bué the foal said to
him: “ Pick not up that feather, for it will bring thee
evil as well as good !”—But his master said: “Why,
1 should be a fool not to pick up a feather like that !”
So he turned back and picked up the feather. Then
he went on further and further, until he came toa clay
254 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

hut. He went into this clay hut, and there sat an
old woman. “Give me a night’s lodging, granny!”
said he.—“I have neither bed nor light to offer thee,”
said she. Nevertheless he entered the hut and put
the feather on the window-corner, and it lit up the
whole hut. So he went to sleep. But the old
woman ran off to the Tsar, and said to him: ‘A
certain man has come to me and laid a certain feather
on the window-sill, and it shines like fire!” Then
the Tsar guessed that it was a feather of the bird
Zhar, and said to his soldiers: “Go and fetch that
man hither!” And the Tsar said to him: “ Wilt
thou enter my service ?”—‘ Yes,” he replied, “but
you must give me all your keys.” So the Tsar gave
him all the keys and a hut of his own to live in
besides. But one day the Tsar said to his servants:
“Boil me now a vat of milk!” So they boiled it.
Then he took off his gold ring, and said to the man:
“Thou didst get the feather of the bird Zhar, get
me also this golden ring of mine out of the vat of
boiling milk!”—‘“Bring hither, then, my faithful
horse,” said he, “that he may see his master plunge
into the vat of boiling milk and die!” So they
brought his horse, and, taking off his clothes, he
plunged into the vat, but as he did so the horse
snorted so violently that all the boiling milk leaped
up in the air, and the man seized the ring and gave
REA
SAH

~
eS

Ye pa ft
a ; oe)
TA pe

in “fy (a , as ' ke Ly me
= 7 Ss ta 7, 7M
eee. Sahl ys


256 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

it back to the Tsar. Now when the Tsar saw that
the man had come out of the vat younger and hand-
somer than ever, he said: “Tl try and fish up the
ving in like manner.” So he flung his ring into the
vat of boiling milk and plunged after it to get it.
The people waited and waited and wondered and
wondered that he was so long about it, and at last
they drained off the milk and found the Tsar at the
bottom of the vat boiled quite red. Then the man
said: “ Now, Tsaritsa, thou art mine and I am thine.”
And they lived together happily ever afterwards.
THE STORY OF THE UNLUCKY DAYS.

T the end of a village on the
verge of the steppe dwelt two
brothers, one rich and the other
poor. One day the poor brother
came to the rich brother’s house



and sat down at his table; but
the rich brother drove him away
and said: “How durst thou sit at my table? Be
off! Thy proper place is in the fields to scare

!” §o the poor brother went into

away the crows
the fields to scare away the crows. The crows all
flew away when they saw him, but amongst them
was a raven that flew back again and said to him:
“Oman! in this village thou wilt never be able to
live, for here there is neither luck nor happiness for
thee, but go into another village and thou shalt do
well!” Then the man went home, called together

his wife and children, put up the few old clothes that
8
258 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

still remained in his wardrobe, and went on to the next
village, carrying his water-skin on his shoulders. On
and on they tramped along the road, but the Unlucky
Days clung on to the man behind, and said: “ Why
dost thou not take us with thee? we wil! never leave
thee, for thou art ours!” So they went on with him



f+ 4G
Ae Aw Ine b

till they came to a river, and the man, who was thirsty,
went down to the water’s edge fora drink. He un-
did his water-skin, persuaded the Unlucky Days to
get into it, tied it fast again and buried it on the
bank close by the river. Then he and his family
went on further. They went on and on till they
came to another village, and at the very end of it












































































































































































: | ==
WHC
AAT SE

AN ee SS
> i, i ves
Z- il] i Wg
———



= SSS










260 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

was an empty hut—the people who had lived there
had died of hunger. There the whole family
settled down. One day they were all sitting down
there when they heard something in the mountain
erying: “Catch ‘hold! catch hold, catch hold!”
The man went at once into his stable, took down
the bit and reins that remained to him, and climbed up
into the mountain. He looked all about him as he
went, and at last he saw, sitting down, an old goat
with two large horns—it was the Devil himself, but
of course he didn’t know that. So he made a lasso
of the reins, threw them round the old goat, and
began to drag it gently down the mountain side. He
dragged it all the way up the ladder of his barn,
when the goat disappeared, but showers and showers
of money came tumbling through the ceiling. He
collected them all together, and they filled two large
coffers. Then the poor man made the most of his
money, and in no very long time he was well-to-do.
Then he sent some of his people to his rich brother,
and invited him to come and live with him. The
rich brother pondered the matter over. ‘Maybe he
has nothing to eat,” thought he, “and that is why he
sends for me.” So he bade them bake him a good
store of fat pancakes, and set out accordingly. On
the way he heard that his brother had grown rich,
and the further he went the more he heard of his
THE STORY OF THE UNLUCKY DAYS. 261

brother’s wealth. Then he regretted that he had
brought all the pancakes with him, so he threw them
away into the ditch. At last he came to his brother’s
house, and his brother showed him first one of the
coffers full of money and then the other. Then envy
seized upon the rich brother, and he grew quite green
in the face. But his brother said to him: “ Look
now! I have buried a lot more money in a water-skin,
hard by the river; you may dig it up and keep it if
you like, for I have lots of my own here!” The rich
brother did not wait to be told twice. Off he went to
the river,and began digging up the water-skin straight-
way. He unfastened it with greedy, trembling hands ;
but he had no sooner opened it than the Unlucky
Days all popped out and clung on to him : “ Thou art
ours!” said they. He went home, and when he got
there he found that all his wealth was consumed, and
a heap of ashes stood where his house had been. So
he went and lived in the same place that his brother
had lived, and the Unlucky Days lived with him ever
afterwards.
THE WONDROUS STORY OF IVAN GOLIK!
.AND THE SERPENTS.

OMEWHERE, nowhere, in another
kingdom, in the empire of Thrice-ten,
lived—whether *twas a Tsar and a
Tsaritza, or only a Prince and a
Princess, I know not, but anyhow
they had two sons. One day this

prince said to his sons: “Let us go down to the

sea-shore and listen to the songs of the sea-folk!”

So they went. Now the prince wanted to test the

wits of his two sons; he wanted to see which of the

twain was fit for ruling his empire, and which should
stand aside and make way for better men. So they
went on together till they came to where three oaks



stood all ina row. The prince looked at the trees,
and said to his eldest son: “My dear gon, what
wouldst thou make of those trees ?”

1 Naked.
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 263

“What would I make of them, dear father? I
would make me good barns and store-houses out of
them. I would cut them down and plane the timber
well, and goodly should be the planks I should make
of them.”

“Good, my son!” replicd the prince, “thou wilt
make a careful householder.”

Then he asked his younger son: ‘ And what wouldst
thou make out of these oaks, my son ?”

“Well, dear father,” said he, “ had I only as much
power as will, I would cut down the middle oak, lay
it across the other two, and hang up every prince
and every noble in the wide world.”

Then the prince shook his head and was silent.

Presently they came to the sea, and all three stood
still and looked at it, and watched the fishes play.
Then, suddenly, the prince caught hold of his younger
son, and pitched him right imto the sea. ‘‘ Perish!”
eried he, “for ’tis but just that such a wretch as thou
shouldst perish !”

Now, just as the father pitched his younger son
into the sea, a great whale-fish was coming along and
swallowed him, and into its maw he went. There
he found wagons with horses and oxen harnessed. to
them, all of which the fish had also gobbled. So he
went rummaging about these wagons to see what was
in them, and he found that one of the wagons was
264 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

full of tobacco-pipes and tobacco, and flints and steels.
So he took up a pipe, filled it with tobacco, lit it, and
began to smoke. He smoked out one pipe, filled
another, and smoked that too; then he filled a third,
and began smoking that. At last the smoke inside



the whale made it feel so uncomfortable that it opened
its mouth, swam ashore, and went asleep on the beach.
Now some huntsmen happened to be going along the
beach at that time, and one of them saw the whale,
and said : “ Look, my brethren ! we have been hunting
jays and crows and shot nothing, and lo! what a
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 265

monstrous fish les all about the shore! Let us shoot
Titan

So they shot at it and shot at it, and then they fell
upon it with their axes and began to cut it to pieces.
They cut and hacked at it till suddenly they heard
something calling to them from the middle of the
fish: “Ho! my brothers! hack fish if you like, but
hack not that fiesh which is full of Christian blood !”

They fell down to the ground for fright, and were
like dead men, but the prince’s younger son crept out
of the hole in the fish that the huntsmen had made,
went out upon the shore, and sat down. He sat down
there quite naked, for all his clothes had rotted and
dropped off inside the fish. Maybe he had been a
whole year in the whale without knowing it, and he
thought to himself: “ How shall I now manage to
live in the wide wide world ?”

Meanwhile the elder brother had become a great
nobleman. His father had died, and he was lord
over his whole inheritance. Then, as is the wont
of princes, he called together his senators and his
servants, and they counselled their young prince to
marry; so out he went to scek a bride, and a great
retinue followed after him. They went on and on till
they came to where a naked man was sitting. Then
the prince said to one of his servants: “Go and sec
what manner of man that is!”
266 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

So the servant went up to the man, and said: “Hail!”

‘Hail to thee!”

‘Who art thou, prythee ?”

“Tam Ivan Golik. Who art thou?”

“We are from such and such a land, and we are
going with our prince to seek him a bride.”

“Go, tell thy prince that he must take me with
him, for he'll make no good match without me.”

So the messenger returned to the prince and told
him. Then the prince bade his servants open his
trunk and take out a shirt and pantaloons and all
manner of raiment, whereupon the naked man
went into the water and washed, and after that he
dressed himself. Then they brought him to the prince,
and he said to him: “If you take me with you, you
must all obey me. If you listen to me, you shall
remain in the land of Russia; but if not, you shall
all perish.”

“Be it so!” said the prince, and he bade all his
suite obey him.

They went on and on till they overtook the hosts
of the mice. The prince wanted to go hunting after
the mice, but Ivan Golik said: “ Nay, step aside and
give place to the mice, so that not a single one of
them lose a single hair! ”

So they turned aside, and the mice swept by in
their hosts, but the hindmost mouse turned round and
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 267

said: “ Thanks to thee, Ivan Golik, thou hast saved
my host from perishing ; I will save thine also.”

Then they went on further, and lo! the gnat was
marching with his host, and so vast was it that no eye
could take it all in. Then the lieutenant-general of
the gnats came flying up and said : “Oh, Ivan Golik!
let my host drink of thy blood. If thou dost consent,
‘twill be to thy profit; but if thou dost not consent,
thou shalt not remain in the land of Russia.”

Then he stripped off his shirt and bade them tie
him up so that he could not beat off a single gnat,
and the gnats drank their fill of him and flew off
again.

After that they went along by the seashore till
they came to a man who had caught two pike. Then
Ivan Golik said to the prince: ‘ Buy those two pike
of the man, and let them go into the sea again.”

‘But wherefore ?”

“ Ask not wherefore, but buy them !”

So they bought the pike, and let them go into the
sea again. But as they swam away, the pike turned
round and said: ‘‘ We thank thee, Ivan Golik, that
thou hast not let us perish, and it shall be to thy weal
and welfare ! ”

Swiftly they moved on their way, but the story
that tells thereof moves still swifter. They went on
and on, for more than a month maybe, till they came
268 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

to another land and to another tsardom, to the
empire of Thrice-ten. And the serpent was the Tsar _
of that tsardom. Vast were his palaces, iron railings
surrounded his courtyards, and the railings were
covered with the heads of various warriors; only on
the twenty huge pillars in front of the gate were there
no heads. As they drew nigh, deadly fear oppressed
the heart of the prince, and he said to Ivan: “ Mark me,
Ivan! those pillars yonder are meant for owr heads!”
—“ That remains to be seen,” replied Ivan Golik.

When they arrived there, the serpent at first
treated them hospitably as welcome guests. They
were all to come in and make merry, he said, but the
prince he took to his own house. So they ate and
drank together, and the thoughts of their hearts were
joyous. Now the serpent had twenty-one daughters,
and he brought them to the prince, and told him
which was the eldest, and which the next eldest, down
to the very last one. But it was the youngest
daughter of all that the prince’s fancy fed upon more
than on any of the others. Thus they diverted them-
selves till evening, and in the evening they made
ready to go to sleep. But the serpent said to the
prince: “ Well, which of my daughters dost thou
think the loveliest ?”

“The youngest is the most beautiful,” said the
prince, “and her will I wed.”
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 269

“Good!” said the serpent, “but I will not let
thee have my daughter till thou hast done all my
tasks. If thou doest my tasks, thou shalt have my
daughter ; but if thou doest them not, thou shalt lose
thy head, and all thy suite shall perish with thee.”

Then he gave him his first task: “In my barn are
three hundred ricks of corn ; by the morning light thou
shalt have threshed and sifted them so that stalk lies
by stalk, chaff by chaff, and grain by grain.”

Then the prince went to his own place to pass the
night there, and bitterly he wept. But Ivan Golik
saw that he was weeping, and said to him: “ Why
dost thou weep, O prince ?”

“Why should I not weep, seeing the task that the
serpent has given me is impossible ?”

“Nay, weep not, my prince, but lie down to sleep,
and by the morning light it will all be done!”

No sooner had Ivan Golik left the prince than he
went outside and whistled for the mice. Then the
mice assembled round them in their hosts: “ Why
dost thou whistle, and what dost thou want of us, O
Ivan Golik ?” said they.

“Why should I not whistle, seeing that the serpent
has bidden us thresh out his barn by the morning
light, so that straw lies by straw, chaff by chaff, and
grain by grain?”

No sooner did the mice hear this than they began
270 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

scampering all about the barn! There were so many
of them that there was not room to move. They set
to work with a will, and long before dawn it was quite
finished. Then they went and awoke Ivan Golik. He
went and looked, and lo ! all the chaff was by itself, and
all the grain was by itself, and all the straw by itself!
Then Ivan bade them be quite sure that there was
not a single grain remaining in a single ear of corn.
So they scampered all about, and there was not a
mouse which did not look under every stalk of straw.
Then they ran up to him, and said: “Fear not!
there is not a single loose grain anywhere. And
now we have requited thee thy service, Ivan Golik,
farewell !”

Next morning the prince came to seek Ivan, and
marvelled to find that everything had been done as
the serpent had commanded. So he thanked Ivan
Golik, and went off to the serpent. Then they both
went together, and the serpent himself was amazed.
He called to his twenty-one daughters to search the
ears of corn well to see whether one single grain
might not be found therein, and his daughters
searched and searched, but there was not a single
loose grain to be found. Then said the serpent:
«'Tig well, let us go! We will eat and drink and
make merry till evening, and in the evening I will
give thee thy to-morrow’s task.” So they made merry
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 271

till evening, and then the serpent said: “ Early this
morning, my youngest daughter went bathing in the
sea and lost her ring in the water. She searched
and: searched for it, but could find it nowhere.
If thou canst find it to-morrow, and bring it hither
while we are sitting down to meat, thou shalt remain
alive ; if not, ’tis all over with thee !”

The prince returned to his own people and fell a-
weeping. Ivan Golik perceived it, and said to him :
“Wherefore dost thou weep ?”

‘For such and such a reason,” said he; “dost thou
not see that I am ruined ?”

Then said Ivan Golik: “The serpent lies. He
himself it was who took his daughter's ring and flew
over the sea early this morning, and dropped in the
water. But le down and sleep! I myself will go to
the sea to-morrow, haply I may find the ring.”

So, very early next morning, Ivan Golik went
down to the sea. He shouted with a heroic voice,
and whistled with a heroic whistle, till the whole sea
was troubled as by a storm. Then the two pike he
had thrown back into the sea came swimming to the
shore. ‘‘ Why dost thou call us, O Ivan Golik?”
said they.

“Why should I not call you? The serpent flew
over the sea early yesterday morning and dropped in
his daughter’s ring. Search for it everywhere. If
272 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

you find it, I shall remain alive, but if you find it
not, know that the serpent will remove me from the
face of the earth !”

Then they swam offand searched, nor was there a
single corner of the sea where they searched not.
Yet they found nothing. At last they swam off to
their mother, and told her what a great woe was
about to befall. Their mother said to them: “ The
ring is with me. Jam sorry for him, and still more
sorry for you, so you may have it.” And with that
she drew off the ring, and they swam with it to Ivan
Golik, and said: ‘‘ Now we have requited thy service.
We have found it, but ’twas a hard task.”

Then Ivan Golik thanked the two pike and went on
his way. He found the prince weeping, for the serpent
had already sent for him twice, and there was no ring.
The moment he saw Ivan Golik he sprang to his feet,
and said: ‘‘ Hast thou the ring?”

“Yes, here itis! But look! the serpent himself is
coming !”

“Let him come!”

The serpent was already on the threshold as the
prince was going out. They ran against each other
with their foreheads, and the serpent was very angry.
“ Where's the ring ?” cried he.

“There itis! But I will not give it to thee, but
to her from whom thou didst take it.”
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS, 273

The serpent laughed. “Very good!” said he,
“but now let us go to dinner, for my guests are
ye and we have been waiting for thee this long
time.”

So they went. The DEnee arrived at the house,
where eleven serpents were sitting down to dinner.
He saluted them, and then went on to the daughters,
and said, as he drew off the ring, “To which of you
does this belong ?”

Then the youngest daughter blushed and said :
i To me!”

“Tf it be thine, take it, for I sounded all the depths
of the sea in searching for it.”

All the others laughed, but the youngest daughter
thanked him. |

Then they all went to dine. After dinner the
serpent said to him, in the presence of all the guests:
“ Well, prince, now that thou hast dined and rested,
to thy tasks again! I have a bow of one hundred
poods? in weight. If thou canst bend this bow in
the presence of these my guests, thou shalt have m y
daughter !”

When. dinner was over they all lay down to rest,
but the prince hastened off as quickly as he could to
Ivan Golik, and said : “‘ Now indeed it is all over with
us, for he has given me such and such a task.”

1 A pood = forty pounds.
274 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

“ Simpleton !” cried Ivan Golik, “‘ when they bring
forth this bow, look at it, and say to the serpent: I
should be ashamed to bend a bow that the least of
my servants can bend! Then call me, and Pll bend
the bow so that none other will be able to bend it
again.”

With that the prince went straight off to the
serpent again, and the serpent commanded and they
brought the bow, together with an arrow weighing
fifty poods. When the prince saw it, he was like to
have died of fright; but they put the bow down in
the middle of the courtyard, and all the guests came
out to look at it. The prince walked all round the
bow and looked at it. “ Why,” said he, “I would not
deign to touch a bow like that. I'll call one of my
servants, for any one of them can bend such a bow as
that !”

Then the serpent looked at the prince’s servants one
after the other, and said : “‘ Well, let them try !”

“Come forward thou, Ivan Golik!” cried the
prince.

And the prince said to him: “Take me up that
bow and bend it!”

Ivan Golik took up the bow, placed the arrow
across it, and drew the bow so that the arrow split mto
twelve pieces and the bow burst. Then the prince
said: “Did I not tell you? and was I to put myself
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 275

to shame by touching a bow that one of my servants
can draw ?”

After that Ivan Golik returned to his fellow
servants, and put the pieces of the broken bow behind
his shin bone; but the prince returned with the
serpents into the guest-chamber, and they all rejoiced
because he had done his appointed task. But the
serpent whispered something in the ear of his
youngest daughter, and she went out, and he after
her. They remained outside a long time, and then
the serpent came in again, and said to the prince :
“There is no time for anything more to-day, but we'll
begin again early to-morrow morning. I havea horse
behind twelve doors; if thou canst mount it, thou
shalt have my daughter.”

Then they made merry again till evening and lay
down to sleep, but the prince went and told Golil.
Golik listened to the prince, and said: “Now thou
knowest, I suppose, why I took up those pieces of the
broken bow, for I could see what was coming. When
they lead forth this horse, look at it and say: I will
not mount that horse lest I put myself to shame. "Tig
with the horse as with the bow, any one of my
servants can mount it! But that horse is no horse at
all, but the serpent’s youngest daughter! Thou must
not sit upon her back, but I will trounce her finely.”

Early in the morning they all arose, and the prince
276 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

went to the serpent’s house to greet them all, and
there he saw twenty of the serpent’s daughters, but
where was the twenty-first? Then the serpent. got
up and said: “ Well, prince, now let us come down
into the courtyard ; they'll soon bring out the horse,
and we'll see what thou dost make of it.”

So they all went out and saw two serpents bringing
out the horse, and it was as much as the pair of them
could do to hold its head, so fierce and strong it was.
They led it out in front of the gallery, and the prince
walked round it and looked at it. Then said he:
“What! did you not say you would bring out a
horse? Why, this isno horse, but a mare. I will not
sit on this mare, for ’twould be to my shame. I will
call one of my servants, and he shall mount her.”

“Good!” said the serpent, ‘let him try!”

The prince called forth Ivan Golik: “Sit on that
mare,” said he, “and trot her about!”

Ivan mounted the mare, and the two serpents let
go. She earried him right up among the clouds, and
then down again upon the ground she came, with a
ringing of hoofs that made the earth tremble. But
Ivan Golik took out a fragment of the broken bow,
fifty pounds in weight, and trounced her fincly. She
reared and bucked and carried him hither and thither,
but he flogged her between the ears without ceasing.
So when she saw that all her prancing and curveting







278 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

was in vain, she fell to piteously beseeching him, and
erled: ‘‘Ivan Golik! Ivan Golik! beat me not, and
Pll do all thy behests !”

- “JT have nothing to do with thee at all,” said he,
‘but when thou dost come up to the prince, fall
down before him, and stretch out thy legs towards
him !”

At this she bethought her for along time. ‘“ Well,”
erled she at last, “it must be so, there is no doing
anything with thee!” So she carried him all over the
courtyard, fell down before the prince, and stretched
out her legs towards him.

Then said the prince: “ Thou seest what a sorry
jade it is! And ye would have had me mount such
a mare!”

At this the serpent was full of shame, but there
was nothing to be said or done. So they went into the
garden and sat them down to dinner. The youngest
daughter met them there, and they greeted her. The
prince could not refrain from looking at her, so fair
was she, and now she seemed fairer than ever. Then
they sat down and ate, and when the meal was over
the serpent said: ‘“ Well, prince, after dinner I'll
bring all my daughters into the courtyard, and if
you can find out the youngest, you may be happy
together.”

So after dinner the serpent bade his daughters go
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 279

and dress themselves, but the prince took counsel of
Ivan Golik. Ivan whistled, and immediately the gnat
came flying up. He told the gnat all about it, and
the gnat said: “Thou didst help me, so now I will
help thee. When the serpent brings out his daughters,
let the prince keep his eyes open, for I will fly on her
head. Let him walk round them once, and I will fly
round them too. Let him walk round them a second
time, and I will fly round them twice also. Let him
walk round them a third time, and then I’ll settle
on her nose, and she will not be able to endure my
bite, but will strike at me with her right hand.”
And with these words the gnat flew off into the
house.

Soon afterwards the serpent sent for the prince.
He went, and there in the courtyard stood the twenty-
one daughters. They were as like as peas, their
faces, their hair, and their raiment were exactly the
same. He looked and looked, but could not tell one
from the other. He walked round them the first
time, but there was no sign of the gnat. He walked
round them the second time, and the gnat came and
lit upon her ‘head. Henceforth he never took his
eyes off the gnat, and when he had begun to walk
round the twenty-one daughters for the third time,
the gnat sat on the nose of the youngest, and began
to bite her. She brushed it off with her right hand,
280 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

whereupon the prince said: “She is mine!” and led
her to the serpent.

The serpent was amazed, but said: “Since thou
hast found out thy bride, we'll wed thee to-day, and
all be merry together.”

So they made them merry, and that very evening
the young couple got their bridal crowns. And they
feasted and fired guns, and what else did they not
do? But as they were going to bed, Ivan Golik took
the prince aside, and said to him: “ Now, prince, see
that we go home to-morrow, for they mean us no good
here. And now, listen tome! I beg thee tell not
thy wife the truth of the matter for seven years.
However caressing she may be, thou shalt not let her
ears know the truth, for if thou dost tell her the truth,
both thou and [ shall perish !” :

“Good!” said he. “T will not tell my wife the
truth.”

Next morning the young men arose and went to
the serpent, and the prince took leave of his father-in-
law, and said he must be going home.

“But why off so soon ?” said the serpent.

“Nay, but I must go,” said he.

Then the serpent gave the youth a banquet, and
they sat down and ate and made merry, and after
that he departed to his own tsardom. And the prince
thanked Ivan Golik for all that he had done for him,
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 281

and made him the first of his counsellors. Whatever
Ivan Golik said was performed throughout the realm,
while the Tsar had only to sit on his throne and do
nothing.

So the young prince dwelt with his wife for a year





TN







‘

i





sors Bir

Ds

or two, and in the third year a son was added to
them, and the heart of the prince was glad. Now
one day he took his little son in his arms, and said:
“Is there anything in the wide world that I like
better than this child?” When the princess saw that
the heart of her spouse was tender, she fell a-kissing


282 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

and caressing him, and began asking him all about
the time when they were first married, and how he
had been able to do her father’s commands. And
the prince said to her: “My head would long ago
have been mouldering on the posts of thy father’s
palace had it not been for Ivan Golik. “Twas he who
did it all and not I.”

Then she was very wroth. But she never changed
countenance, and shortly afterwards she went out.

Ivan Golik was sitting in his own house at his ease,
when the princess came flying in to him. And imme-
diately she drew out of the ground a handkerchief
with gold borders, and no sooner had she waved this
serpentine handkerchief, than Ivan fell asunder into
two pieces. His lees remained where they were, but
his trunk with his head disappeared through the roof,
and fell seven miles away from the house. And as
he fell he cried: “Oh, accursed one! did I not charge
thee not to confess! Did I not implore thee not to
tell thy wife the truth for seven years! And now I
perish and thou also!”

He raised his head and found himself sitting in a
wood, and there he saw an armless man pursuing a
hare. He pursued and pursued it, but though he
caught it up, he couldn’t catch it, for he had no arms.
Then Ivan Golik caught it and they fell out about it.
The armless one said: “The hare is mine !’—‘‘ No,”
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 283

said Ivan Golik, “itis mine!” So they quarrelled
over it, but as one had no legs and the other had no
arms, they couldn’t hurt one another. At Jast the
armless one said : “ What is the use of our quarrelling ?
Let us pull up that oak, and whichever of us pitches it
farthest shall have the hare.”

“Good!” said Legless.

Then Armless kicked Legless up to the oak, and
Legless pulled it up and gave it to Armless. Then
Armless lay down on the ground and kicked the oak
with his feet three miles off. But Legless threw it
seven miles. Then Armless said: “Take the hare
and be my elder brother! ”

So they became brothers, and niade a wagon
between them, and fastened ropes to it, and while
Armless dragged it along Legless drove it. On
they went till they came to a town where a Tsar
lived. There they went up to the church, and
planted themselves with their wagon in the place
of beggars, and waited till the Tsarivna came up.
And the Tsarivna said to her court lady: “ Take
this money, and give it to those poor cripples.”

The lady was about to go with it when Legless
said: “Nay, but let the Tsarivna give it to us with
her own hands.”

Then the Tsarivna took the money from her court
lady and gave it to Legless. But he said to her:
284 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

‘Be not anery, but tell me, now, wherefore art thou
so yellow ?”

“God made me so,” answered she, and then she
sighed.

“No,” replied Legless. “I know why thou art
so yellow. But I can make thee once more just
as God made thee.”

Now the Tsar bad heard them speaking, and the
words of the cripples moved him strangely. So
he had the armless man and the legless man in the
wagon brought to him, and said to them: “Do as
you are able.”

But Legless said: “O Tsar! let the Tsarivna
speak the truth, and confess openly how she became
so vile!”

Then the father turned to his daughter, and she
confessed and said: “The serpent flew to me, and
drew my blood out of my breast.”

“When did he fly to thee?” they asked.

“Just before dawn, when the guards were sleep-
ing, he came flying down my chimney. In he came ~
flying, and lay down beneath the cushions of my
couch.”

“Stop!” cried Legless; “we'll hide in the straw
in thy room, and when the serpent comes flying in
again, thou must cough and wake us.”

So they hid them in the straw, and just as the
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 285

guards had ceased knocking at the doors as they went
their rounds, sparks began to flash beneath the straw
roof, and the sarivna coughed. They rushed up
to her, and saw the serpent already nestling beneath
the cushions. Then the Tsarivna leaped out of bed ;
but Armless lay down on the floor and kicked ae!
less on to the cushions, and Legless took the serpent
in his arms and began to throttle it. “Let me
go! let me go!” begged the serpent, “and I'll
never fly here again, but will renounce my tithes.”

But Legless said: “That is but a small thing.
Thou must carry us to the place of healing- Gate:
that I ay get back my legs and ny brother here
his arms.’ 3

“Catch hold of me,” said the ee “and Tl

take you, only torture me no more.’ eeu

So Legless clung on to him with his arms and
Armless with his feet, and the serpent flew away
with them till he came to a spring. “ There’s your
healing-water !” cried he.

Armless wanted to plunge in’ straightway, but
Legless shrieked: “ Wait, brother! Hold the serpent
tight with your legs while I shove a dry stick into
the spring, and then we shall see whether it nally
is healine-water.”

So he shoved a stick in, and no sooner had it
touched the water than it was consumed as though
286 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

by fire. Then the pair of them, in their rage, fell
upon that false serpent and almost killed him.
They beat him and beat him till he cried for mercy.
“Beat me no more!” cried he; “the spring of
healing-water is not very far off!” Then he took
them to another spring. Into this they also dipped
a dry stick, and immediately it burst into flower.
Then Armless leaped into the spring and leaped
out again with arms, whereupon he pitched in
Legless, who immediately leaped out again with
legs of his own. So they let the serpent go, first
making him promise never to fly to the Tsarivna
again, and then each thanked the other for his
friendship, and so they parted.

But Ivan Golik went again to his brother, the
prince, to see what had become of him. “I wonder
what the princess has done to him?” thought he.
So he went towards that tsardom, and presently he
saw, not very far from the roadside, a swineherd
tending swine; he was tending swine, but he him-
self sat upon a tomb. ‘“Tll go and ask that
swineherd what he’s doing there,” thought Ivan
Golik.

So he went up to the swineherd, and, looking
straight into his eyes, recognized his own brother.
And the swineherd looked at him, and recognized
Ivan Golik. There they stood for a long time look-
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 287

ing into each other’s eyes, but neither of them
spoke a word. At last Ivan Golik found his voice:
“What!” cried he. “Is it thou, O prince, who
art feeding swine? Thou art rightly served! Did
I not bid thee, ‘Tell not thy wife the truth for
seven years’ ?”

At this the prince flung himself down at the
other’s feet, and cried: “Oh, Ivan Golik! forgive
me, and have mercy !”

Then Ivan Golik raised him up by the shoulders
and said: “’Tis well for thee that thou art still
in God’s fair world! Yet wait a little while, and
thou shalt be Tsar again !”

The prince thereupon asked Ivan Golik how he
had got his legs back again, for the princess had
told him how she had cut Ivan Golik in two. Then
Ivan Golik confessed to him that he was his younger
brother, and told him the whole story of his life.
So they embraced and kissed each other, and then
the prince said: “’Tis high time I drove these
swine home, for the princess doesn’t like being
kept waiting for her tea.”

“Well,” said Ivan Golik, “we'll drive them back
together.”

“The worst of it, brother, is this,” said the prince,
“Dost thou see that accursed pig that leads the
others? Well, he will go only up to the gate of
288 COSSACK FAIRY TALES. .

the stye, and there he stands fast as if rooted to
the ground, and until I kiss his bristles he will not
move from the spot. And all the time the princess
and the serpents are sitting in the gallery at tea, and
they look on and laugh !”

But Ivan Golik said: ‘It needs must be so!
Kiss it again to-day, and to-morrow thou shalt
kiss it no more!”

Then they drove the swine up to the gates, and
Ivan Golik looked to see what would happen. He
saw the princess sitting in the gallery with six
serpents drinking tea, and the accursed pig stuck
fast in the gate, and stretched out its legs and
wouldn’t go in. The princess looked on and said :
“Look at my fool driving the swine, and now he
is going to kiss the big boar!” ,

So the poor fellow stooped down and kissed its
bristles, and the pig ran grunting into the court-
yard. Then the princess -said: ‘Look! he has
picked up from somewhere an under-herdsman to
help him !”

The prince and Ivan Golik drove the pigs into
thei stye, and then Ivan Golik said: “ Brother,
get me twenty poods of hemp and twenty poods of
pitch, and bring them to me in the garden.” And
he did so. Then Ivan Golik made him a huge whip
of the twenty poods of hemp and the twenty poods
IVAN GOLIK AND THE SERPENTS. 289

of tar. First he twined tightly a pood of hemp,
and tarred it well with a pood of pitch; round
this he plaited another pood of hemp, and tarred
that also with another pood of pitch, till he had
used up the whole forty. By midnight his task
was done, and then he laid him down to sleep.
But the prince had gone to sleep long before in
the pig-sty.

Early in the morning they rose up again, and
Ivan Golik said to him: ‘Up till to-day thou hast
been a swineherd, and after to-day thou shalt be a
prince again; but first let us drive the swine into
the field.”

“Nay, but,” said the prince, “the princess has
not yet come out upon the balcony to drink tea
with the serpents, and see me kiss the pig before
it goes out, as is her wont.” Ivan Golik said to
him: “ We will drive the swine out this time, too,
but it will not be thou but I who shall kiss the big
boar.”

“Good !” said the prince.

And now the time came for the swine to be
driven away, and the princess came out on the
balcony to drink tea. They took the swine out
of the sty, and the pair of them drove the beasts
before them. When they reached the gate the

leading pig stuck fast in the gateway, and wouldn't
U
290 COSSACK FAIRY TALES.

budge an inch. The princess and the serpents grinned
and looked on, but Ivan Golik flicked his heroic
whip, and struck the pig one blow that made it
fly to pieces. Then all the serpents wriggled off
as fast as they could. But she, the accursed one,
was in no way frightened, but caught Ivan by the
hair of his head. He, however, caught her also
by her long locks, and flicked her with his whip
till he had flicked all the serpent-blood out of
her, and she walked the earth in human guise. So
she cast off her serpent nature, and lived happily
with her husband. And that’s the end of the
kazka.

THE END.

HKichara Clay & Sons, Limited, London § Bungay.
Ish CD56"


































































eee
Se etic as
ETE BSB fesiitae eva ah ee? = ees





ip ysis





















































































































































































































ie PSST
SHEL Hie epssticattey acid