Citation
Aunt Louisa's first book for children

Material Information

Title:
Aunt Louisa's first book for children
Portion of title:
First book for children
Creator:
Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Emrik & Binger ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
93, [1] p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894 ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books) -- 1894 ( rbgenr )
Alphabet books -- 1894 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Textbooks ( fast )
Alphabet books ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Netherlands
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Attributed to Laura Valentine by the Bodleian Library.
General Note:
"Lith in Holland by Emrik & Binger, 337 Strand, London"--back cover
Statement of Responsibility:
with numerous illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002222566 ( ALEPH )
ALG2812 ( NOTIS )
226307845 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


LONDON

FREDERICK WARNE & C°

AND NEW YORK









AUNT LOUVISA’S
FIRST BOOK

FOR CHILDREN.





Copyris, ht.
/ DREAMLAND, By permission of Messrs, HENRY GRAVES & Co,





AUNT LOUISA’S

FIRST BOOK

FOR CHILDREN.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.



LONDON:

FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,,

AND NEW YORK.
1894.







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INSECTS.









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A BIG DOG AND A. LITTLE. DOG;






























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SMALL WRITING LETTERS.

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OLD ENGLISH ALPHABET.

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WXYZ





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- NOTE.—W and Y are Vowels when they do not begin
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syllable,

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QUAIL.»

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KINGFISHER.





WOLF.



THE. ALPHABET. OUT OF ORDER.





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PEACOCK.



THE ALPHABET OUT OF ORDER.



OSTRICH.

NIGHTINGALE.



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SPELLING LESSONS IN WORDS OF TWO LETTERS.



by he
do if

Le ee

THE LITTLE SWEEPER.



JOHN AND IIIS DOG.

to up us we_ ye





. FIRST READING LESSON.
Do go up. It is my ox. AS ye go.
No. He is | If my ox is to go.| We go up.
to go to it. | I am at it. Itis I.| He. is at it.
We go on. | So it isi’



‘LESSON .
We go up to it. Is it by me?
Ye go:up to us.) VWedo it.
Igo up toit. He is up it.
Oh! go up by me, do. No.





LESSON. 3.

Do it so. He is to do it.
We or ye go. We do So.
it is it. Is it’so, or no?

Itisso. As heis. Itis to be.
Onanox. On! No. Of it.

=
——eoaeaeaeaNaeaewoanawawsasSeeeeooawswasoaoa=s*=~=~qaomoeooDonOwjlqqmnon0n0=$”$*qQM eee ————

LESSON 4.

It is he. DolIdoso? No!

Go in to it. If it be so.

He is at it. So itis by me.
Do as we do. My ox is to go.



LESSON 5.
Do we go up to it?
We dogo up. So dol.
He is to do so. If he be in.
Is it he? Is it I?
lt am to go on to it.
AS we go; aS 1 go. Do So.

LESSON 6.

Be 1t so. Do as we do.

It is my Ox. Go up to it..
An oX is it? As it is So.
It ison an ox. If itis he,
No itis I. Do go to it.

To me itis so. Is it so?

~_———-.



LESSON 7.
Is it to be so? No, it is he.
He is to do it if he is up.
As it is in it, go to it.
Heisto goto us as he is.
Oh! no. By me—to me.
If we go. I am to do it.
So is he. OF it; to it; by it.



FIGURES AND OBJECTS.



~, act

4,--FOUR®








yEGGS.



re OIG Eg Ok LE en tail 2a
"14 Geren MeN es






@—SIX ODDITIES.





FIGURES AND OBJECTS.

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ees

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ih
a

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8.—EIGHT GIRLS.

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\ i ' mS
Z Ayr . f i At
| % wT mee es
. Me

amy



9—NINE KITTENS. 10.—TEN BALLS.











34








SS a

PAPA’S HORSE AND DOG.
35



SPELLING LESSONS IN



FLY.
are
boy
can
pan



Do you
see the fly?
ee OO:
No, I do
not, but I

ant
bee
cup



FLY AND ANT
36

too
her
put
cub
inn





see an ant;
do you?

Oh, yes, I
do.



LESSON. 1,
cat eat and fat ham pet
rat pit ram hat = jam let

My cat can eat a rat. She is
my pet. Do you see her? He
has a dog and it is his pet; as
the cat is my pet. Has she a
cat? No, she has not one, but
he has.





LESSON 2. 7

It is a ram you see. A fat
ram, but it is no one’s pet.
It can run, and the dog can
run too... He has a hat, so has
she. Get me a bit of ham for
the cat to eat. Oh! no, do.
not let her eat it.



LESSON 3. -
My cat can run and get the rat and eat it.
The rat was in my cot.
How did it get in? No
*. one saw it. Oh! yes, he
- saw it go in. No, he did



——

RAT. nN ot.

a7



| LESSON 4.
who may out mow _ hot

The boy is hot, he is- in
the sun. Let us go to the
new-cut hay, and we can see
the men who mow. May I
go out? No, it is too hot for
you to go. |



LESSON 5.
axe ash oak log sit old

The man. has an
axe. See, he can
cut the ash. No, it
is not an ash; it is
an oak. Sit on a log
out of the sun. _ Are
youhot? =x}
No, Iam not. Go in the hay. Do
go. No, let me sit by you. It is an
old oak. The man can cut it, can
he not? He can. Goto her. I am
by you. The boy, too, has an axe.






LESSON 6.





He has He has a
a cow. It ‘cap... Put
is a fat it:-on. “It
cow. Men 1S is .net,
mow hay. B® .too; ~ ‘and
for the : ee his) ink
cow to eat. mrs | arid pen.

_ She has a fat pig. My pen is bad, and so is
the ink. Get emer-=mpgg@s my cap for me.
{tis on my bed. , YZ» I am to go out
now to see the cow and the

pig. Are you ~a sere togo? Yes.

39.





LESSON 8.



Did you see the eft? Yes, I saw it. It
is his top, and her tub. Did you see the
fox run? No, I did not. An eel is in
my net. Can you eat an eel? We do not
eat it. How the fox can run! Has Ann a
jug? Yes, she has. My cap is on. She
has a mop. He has atop. She has not
a top.

40 .



LESSON 9.
bad did Tom cot wet ice
box day big fed mud" fit:



hit pie beg
saw tie bat
gay win Ann

DOG.
Tom has a big dog; and he has a bat
too, aS you see.
The sky is red to-day, we can see it in
our cot. |
The dog is fed by Ann. She can let |
him eat a bit of pie if he can eat it, or
we you may cut it, Ann. No, I do
S——=7 not eat pie. You can go and
om mop up the wet mud now. The
men are on the ice. Do you
see the men on the ice? Yes, I
do. Get me a bit of ice to
eat. Do not eat it, Ann. It is
not fit to eat. I beg. you not
to eat it.









‘41





Os) DP EA Ss





SPELLING LESSONS OF THREE AND FOUR LETTERS:

rose kite

Sai =
lark
dark
park
bark
farm

harm

4,
fish
dish
last

past
cast

fast |

e 7.
Jay
pay
nay
ray
_ sly
pry







JAY. .











DOVE.

pink — cock

2.
bird... dove. milk. silk gate: late.

5

rest

best
west
mill
fll
bill

6.
wing
sing
morn

born

song
long

8,
kit

pin

lip
Sip
dip

‘TIp



The child ts to find the first eight words

on the pictures when they are learnt.



. LESSON = 10:





good _ | here
kind 7 have
slow — \e hive.
mine Mfj, wood
kept ,, must
draw well
lost == \ me pond
Seen “TWO. ASSES, anaes frog

The ass is good and _ kind, but slow.
One of these asses is mine. ‘They are kept
at the farm to draw the cart. .Our farm is a
nice one: we have six cows and an ox: and |
a hive for our bees. We must be kind to
the ass and to the cows. In the wood
we find bees as well as in the hive; and
by the pond in the wood
we have seen a frog jump
Up: “Here 1s. a “a frog. Do you
like it? No, I : “eee donot. I have
a hen of my own, and she lays eggs for
me; one a. day. Have you seen my hen?
No, I have not. I will give you an egg?





LESSON 11.

vat. port
gnat fort
hold = air
sold fair
told drum

wine hum
pine plum
line wasp

A vat is made to hold
wine. This vat is for port
wine. We hear by our ears,
When a drum is beat, our
ears can hear it.



A wasp has a sting. It will sting you if you
put your hand on it, so pray do not do so. A
fly will eat jam. Here
are some by a jar of
plum jam. They do
AN not sting to hurt, but a
— enat does; its sting
will hurt, but not as much as that
of a wasp.



DANCE OF FLIES,




The gnats are hy to be seen 1 by the
pond. Here are QW ok eq, Some of them.
When the sun Sa ty oR F sets, they fly up

seem glad.



LESSON. 12.



kid this
owl © ~ know
web | - nice
S near make
Ze tree take
oe like wake

WEB.

Do you see the web up in the tree? Yes,
I do. Can you make a web like it? Oh, no,
| a cannot. Here is an inn, you see; and
f@".an owl is on a tree near it. An owl
fesigecan fly. Has Tom a kid? I do not
wy. know if he has one or not. A kid is
a nice pet for a boy. Who is Tom? He isa
boy who has an ass. Did you see the owl?
Yes, I did see it; it was near the inn, and so
was the kid. ~The kid is the pet of the men
of the inn as well as of Tom. Do you know
Tom? He is a kind boy, ym

and is good to his ass and ~
to his kid and to his dog. Yaa
He made me a kite, one @EVe








re

5

ne
Yr

ay

13

MARY AND THE

47



TINY DUCKS.



LESSONS IN WORDS OF TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX











LETTERS.
i 2. 3. 4,
these might cream | bleat
those night dream cheat
could chair gleam treat.
would stair steam | wheat
ay 6. 7. s
arms nurse .
knee child field | boat
head aunt yield = float
face plant | boast fruit
place aase | coast | suit
hair Lease | earn | mute
pair seas | learn | cute
fey 16; if; te 12,
chase stain foam | earth
race main roam | mirth
brain vain moan | birth
chain heart | groan | beach
drain part | oar peach
grain start | boar | teach
train mart | | roar reach
, 14. | 15;

sail slice hymn fling sand grand

fail price swim strong pull |

ship dwell |spring prong full

slip shell string wrong fern
spell Am stern
swell broom Me
fell room jae
fall thank Me
eall prank Ze
small |mark stars |sent 2am

lhark cars BROOM.





48





went



LESSON “4;





















quite oS walk
proud town
tail rent
rail street
mane threw
please stone
friend James
spend throw
end faces
lend loud
right ground
sight caught
fight pony

JAMES AND HIS PONY.

James loves his wee po-ny. He gives it
sweets and bits of bread, and pats it; its
name is Fun. James can ride quite well,
and Fun goes fast when he has James on
his back, and James is proud of Fun’s nice
tail and mane. Fun is fond of the boy,
and will try to please him; and James is
kind to Fun; they are good friends, that
po-ny and boy. James has a kind, good
heart.

49 4



LESSON? 2:
grows bread mouse look _ stalk

rich sheaf flour shall house
enough flies means stile —_ drive

Wheat grows in the rich earth
to make us bread. Men cut it
down, and tie it up like this, in
what is said to be a sheaf. The
grain is ground at the mill, and
it is then the flour, that we make
into bread. Cook makes it, not I.
A small mouse has put her nest
in the wheat. Look at her. Here
she is on the stalk of the wheat.
Hers is a small house, but it is big
enough for her. Do you see the
bee that flies over the sheaf ?



This boy does not live in the
town. He has a whip, and he
means to get over the stile, and go
to the wheat field, to drive the cart
home. He is a good boy. |





LESSON 3.



pick seed
much plough
ere goes
climb spoon
a-gain floor
uses John
tools thin
gave © stout
things short
Bonne HOME Win THE FLOWERS. toys poor

Rose has been out in the fields to pick the
spring buds. She has her lap full of them. She
will give them to her sick Aunt to make her
room smell sweet and look bright.

John is a good boy; he would not
take a nest or hurt a_ , eo. Jae
poor bird. When he has ¥ = \\ Ss
time to play, he uses the q
tools his Aunt gave him, :

\ 2 a





and makes nice things ‘iM
with them. He has just |
made a box to hold his








tools. Does it not look %%@ aa
nice ? TN ae or





51



EVIL ARTUR S DAY.















WAKING UP. © GOING DOWN STAIRS.

Little Arthur wakes at the He is dressed, and goes down
peep of day ; the stairs to play.

\i er NO



DIGGING IN THE GARDEN. DRIVING THE COW,

To dig his garden he eagerly And then in the field the
strives ; old cow he drives.



LITTLE ARTHURS DAY.






At. YS he .

SO hts
YS, ea
oN



PLAYING AT BEING A CARPENTER. RIDING THE ROCKING HORSE,
As a carpenter next, a box he Then a ride on his rocking-
makes ; horse he takes,



OF ~ | xe 9
SEN a, (Ce ee es
ASKING FOR A STORY. SAYING “GOOD NIGHT.”

For astory he begs in the failing In bed the boy murmurs a sweet

light ; “Good night.”
53



NELL..AND: THE. BUDS,

sweet twists
buds large

creep-er thinks
fold horns

leaves queen

Nell loves the
sweet buds of the
bind-weed_ that
grows in the field.
It twists round a
small tree. She
thinks the buds
look like horns, so
she calls down one
to the queen of the
buds to ask where
she lives, and if
she will come out
of one and havea
game of play with
her. But there is
no queen of the
buds or the leaves.
Who made them?
You can tell
Freddie, can you
not? Yes, the good God made them grow.

54







HAUL ed Y
a Ty WU; f; |
C AZSBL YY 4 Med
LU GE

[Le



A SMALL MAID.

Jane will only hard dust moves
clean maid sweeps
raises round soon

next would these does













Jane thinks she can
clean the house as well as
the maid can, so she takes
the broom and sweeps and
sweeps quite hard, and
raises a great dust; but she
goes round and round, and
so the dust moves only
from one place to the next,
but it is still there. We
must learn how to do all
things, or we cannot do
them. If Ann would teach
Jane how to sweep,
she would soon do it
very well. Jane has
put on Ann's cap,
and’ thinks she is
like Ann now; but
she cannot sweep
as Ann does.





ee \ EE)

17 s
Nd





eas

WCE

NY
\



GOING TO WAR.

a \ ——
SAN
7% : .,
fo wvis.
4 Fe" NNN
I~ oS





war march wall die

flag along laugh brave

sword horse first sure

The boys play at go-ing to war. Here
they are! They have a gun, a horse, a

drum, a flag, a horn, a sword, and they march
along; they mean to fight and win the day.
Old Tom and Ann are on the wall; they
look at the boys and laugh. Tom says,
“On you go, boys! Fight and win; do not
let any one take our flag” “No, we will
die first,” cry the boys. They are brave lads,
and will fight well, we feel sure.

56



THE FIVE LIT-TLE PIGS.








“
This lit-tle pig stayed
at home;

This lit-tle pig went
to mar-ket,

This lit-tle pig ate
roast beef a :
This lit-tle pig
had none.

This lit-tle pig said, “Wee! wee! wee!
T can’t find my way home! |
57



THE FOUR SEASONS.

SAGES
ioe
Lee





SUMMER.
58



Layik

‘



EIOERY





ANS i
SFT ITIT pare \
A tags



WINTER.
59



BY “FHE- SEA.
| LESSON 1.

Do you like to go on the sands? Oh, yes! I
am so glad when pa-pa says that it is time to go
to the sea. I love the sands and the shells and
sea-weeds. Donotyou? Yes,I do; I love themall.



























































































































































































don-key EF __ 7 ic StCer
kick ae beam
hoofs seen
shoes tide
seat ride
thrown wide
scream ebb
trot flow
orew storm
drew spade
weeds ee : rake
erie a — build

LESSON <2.

John one day went on a don-key to the sands
to have a ride; but the ass was a bad one. It
gave a kick and threw up its hoofs, and John was
thrown off on the sand, but I am glad to say he

Was: not hurt
60



LESSON 3.




leave deep
heap white
flow-ers green
home plume
black grey
cheeks wih ESS pee cloak

ROSE’S WALK.

Rose has had leave to walk in the wood
near the house. It is Spring, and she has
got a great heap of flow-ers to take home.
Rose is a good girl, and minds all that is said
to her; so ~ her Ma-ma-is fond of her, and is
glad to do any thing to please her. She
gave Rose a doll to-day. It has black eyes
and hair, and red cheeks, and its dress is of
white silk, with green stripes on it. It has a
white hat, with a plume in it, and a grey
cloak. It is a nice doll, and Rose loves it,
but she did not bring it out to-day, as she
meant to go to the woods.

61








her

CAT KITTENS.

and

some

PUPPIES:

DOG

and

MARE

and

Some

OE EP



COW

and

Two
GOATS



A COCK
and
A HEN




with their
“CHICKENS.









her
DUCKLINGS.

















THE SWALLOW. THE SONG THRUSH.

The Swal-low comes to us The Thrush can sing, and
in May. It flies very fast; | its song is very sweet. It
but it does not sing, sings in March.























THE CUCKOO.

THE SKYLARK.

When we hear the Cuc-koo
in the tree,we know that Spring
iscome. We like to hear him
cry “ Cuc-koo, Cuc-koo!”

This bird gets up when
the sun rises, and sings a
sweet song as it flies up to
the sky.

64













MAUR oN Pony

. e =o
a Ww, why (e a





THE STARLING.

E BLACKBIRD :
Rae eR The Starl-ing can be taught

to speak, and will say any

This bird sings a sweet
word we teach it.

song. It is ve-ry kind to
its young birds.



































































































THE HOUSE SPARROW. THE WREN.
The spar-row lives in a The wren is a small bird,
nest in the wall and on the | but singsa sweet song to us all
house-top. It does not sing. | the win-ter, even in the snow.

65 5



SPELLING LESSONS OF FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX LETTERS,
LESSON 1.

shines gone
warm ripe
knock stick
boughs bush
down work
shade throws



IN THE WOOD.



into the woods to play. The
nuts are ripe, and Tom wants to
knock some down with his stick.
Nell and Ann pick some from a
low bush; Rose is on her knees
to look at the ants at work, and
Ned throws stones into the pond at the leaves.
The sun shines, but they are in the shade, and
do not feel too warm under the fine old trees.
By-and-by, Nurse will bring out some cups and
the teapot, and they will have tea; the boughs of
the oak-tree will shade them. Ann will drink
milk, she does not like tea; but all six of them

will eat the nice cake Nurse gives them.
66



LESSON 2.

cold thus wind wool
snow |. poke thaw sheep
fire coals time frost
flames poles world smoke |
storm clothes each road
freeze cloth — cloud roof
hard rain ~ block skate
bard hail clock prate

‘It is cold; snow is on the earth and on
the trees, and the road is quite hard from the
frost. The snow is on the roof of the house
and on the ground, and all the world looks white.
Last night the rain and hail fell; to-day there
Is no wind, no rain, no hail, but it freezes
, hard. Let us make
a good fire; put
on coals, but first
poke it. Thus we
shall make the

WINTER, _ room warm.
67





LESSON 3.



































bells porch
chimes church
heat o-ver
stands hedge
lane three
leads miles



It is warm in the sun, though there are
clouds in the sky; so the girls and boys go out
of the house and lie on the grass, in the shade
of the trees. Their house stands in the lane that
leads to the town, but it is quite three miles
from it. They do not lke the town. They love
the green fields, the grass, and the trees. Do

you see the sheep in the field over the stile and
the church which is far off? Yes, I do.

68 ae



LESSON 4,

Will nought
Jane brought
tale sought
light tells
though tongs
when prongs



Jane and Will like to sit by the fire when it
is cold and dark. Some-times Jane tells Will a
tale; some-times they look in the fire and think
they see faces in the red-hot coals. Did you see
some when you sat by the fire? No, I did
not, and I do not think they did.



LESSON. 5.

BRAVE HUGH.

ce OO OVUM

Hugh was out for a
walk one day in the
town, and as he went
downone of the streets,
a boy threw a stone
at him, and hurt him.

Hugh told him not to |

throw stones; but the

bad boy only made §
faces at him. Hugh}
went on, but by-and-

by he heard a loud
cry. He cast a look
back, and saw the bad











boy on the ground, and some horses just about
to go over him. Hugh tan and’ caught the
horses’ heads, and held them whilé:the bad boy
got up. So, though the boy had hurt him with
a stone, he saved the lad’s life at the risk of his
own, for the horses might have gone over him.
Was not Hugh a good, kind boy?



NURSERY RHYMES AND NURSERY DITTIES.
The King of







Tue Queen of Tee ree
Hearts she
' called for
a sae the tarts,
He
, And beat the
All on a Knave fuil
: ummers oe
ay ; Ti K
The Knave of of Hearts
Hearts, he brought
the back the
arts, tarts,

And took | [Sire lef 4 And * rowed
them clean [iy/e- he'd | steal
away. eos

_THE QUEEN OF HEARTS. aie
SEE a pin and pick it up, :
All Mie eiyrsou ll teve-ooed | Tue north wind doth blow,

loc: | And we shall have snow,
See a pin and let it lay, And what will poor Robin de
Bad luck you'll have all the day. | then? .
Poor thing !

Tom, Tom, the piper’s son, He'll sit in a barn,

Stole a pig and away he run. | ~— And to keep himself warm,

Tepe was eat, and, | Omywas) reese head ander his
beat, wae
: >?
And Tom went -roaring down Poor thing!
the street.

a
—



NURSERY RHYMES AND NURSERY DITTIES.

Jacx and Jill went up the . Litrre Jack Horner sat in a
hill, corner,

To fetch a pail of water; Eating his Christmas pie;
Jack fell down and broke his He put in his thumb, and
crown, took out a plum,

And Jill came tumbling And said, “What a good

after, |



Here am I, little jumping Joan;
When nobody’s with me,
1 am always alone.

Turrty days hath September,

April, June, and November ;

a February has twenty-eight alone,

| All the rest have thirty-one,

Excepting Leap-year, that’s the time

When February’s days are twenty-nine.
72



THE TEN. LITTLE KITTENS. Gg

TEN TLE KIT TENS
wm ALL NALINE |

LONE: RARE: spo: ThE ae WEREN INI } Ni E. .

af ay i 4 i
es

A

* di
sor LITTLE: IT TENS TO: FISHING: WERE:GIVEN;



73



THE TEN LITTLE KITTENS.




e mio hé
au

eS
na =



Five Lae 1 TTENS:-WENT: TO:

ROBASTORES
ONE-GOT-LOCKED-UP»KND‘THEN:

“Wary SRERE ERE FOO:





THE TEN LITTLE KITTENS.

FOUR: aL ae saat
TAKING: TREIR-DEGREE

\ TS WOLINTLE: MITTENS
\ PLAYING WITH:

BY ‘TAKIN GTO! 4IMSELF:
ASWEET LITTLE WIFE* 2
KAISHA D-ALITTLE> FPeRMILY
EN
OF-TEN KITTEN S+MORE#\ 35
VYWHO-PLAY: AND*ROMP-ABGUT>
| AS THE: OTHERS:-DID-BE FORE





PAB LES.

——_e—__

THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

Once upon a time a small
mouse found a lion asleep and
ran up on his back. The lon
woke, and was first going to kill
the mouse by a blow from his
great paw, when she begged him
to forgive her and let her go. The
lion was kind and said that he
would not hurt her, and the mouse
thanked him and told him that if ever she could help him she
would. The lion laughed to himself at the promise. How could
a little mouse help such a great lion? But one day the lion was
caught in a net, and could not get out. The mouse heard him
roar, and came to see what was the matter. When she saw the
net she set to work, and gnawed the ropes through, and set her
friend the lion free. Weare never |
too small to help one another.



Wie DOG AND “TELE
MANGER.

A voc once made his bed
on some hay in a manger.
By-and-by an ox came and
wished to eat the hay, but the dog growled and would not let
him. “How can you be so silly and unkind?” said the ox;

“you can't eat hay yourself, and you will not let me eat it!”
76





THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.

at ~






A poe, going across a plank
over a little stream, with ‘a piece
of meat in his mouth, saw his
own shadow in the clear water,
and believing it to be another
dog who had a larger piece of
meat, he greedily snapped at it, ==
and in doing so, of course, he
dropped his own piece into the water and lost it. So his greedi-
ness was punished by the loss of his dinner. In grasping at a

\ “hy

shadow we may lose the substance.

“THE POX AND THE CROW.

A crow having taken a large piece of cheese out of a cottage
window, flew up in a tree to eat it. A fox, who wished to get it,
came under the tree, and began
to flatter the crow on her fine

































voice. Now you know a crow’s.



























voice is very hoarse; but the.
silly bird was so pleased at his.
praise that when he begged her
to sing she tried to do so, and,.
of course, dropped the cheese.
The cunning fox caught it up
and ran off with it: he did not care for the crow’s song. Do not.
believe people when they praise you unjustly.
77





THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

OnE hot day a wolf and a lamb
came to drink at the brook at the same
time. Now, the wolf wanted an excuse
for eating up the lamb, so he said,

“Why do you make the water so
muddy that I cannot drink it?” The
lamb answered very gently, “I cannot
make it muddy for you, since you drink
it before it runs down to me.” ‘ Well,”
said the wolf, “that is true, but I hear

that you spoke ill of me about half a year ago.” “But,” replied the lamb,

“I was not born then.” ‘ Then,” said the wolf, “if it was not you it was

your father, and that is all the same!” So he seized the poor little lamb
and ate it up.

Any excuse will do to make a quarrel, but only wicked people make them.



THE CAT AND: THE MICE.

THERE was once a house very full of mice, so the people who lived in it
bought a cat who every day ate some of them. The mice talked together
about it and resolved to keep out of Pussy’s nays so they hid, cunningly, on
an upper shelf. The cat finding that
they did not come out, thought that
she would try to deceive them. So
she hung by her hinder-legs on a peg
in the wall, and pretended to be quite
dead. She thought that then they
would not be afraid of her; but the
mice were not to be imposed upon.
A clever old mouse peeped at the
cat and said, “So you are there! I
would not trust you, though your skin were stuffed with straw. It is best

always to keep away from wicked creatures.”
78









THE COUNTRY CHURCH.

79



THE DAYS OF THE WEEK.

1.—Sunpbay is the First Day ........
2.—Monpay is the Second Day...... IT. |
3.—Tuespay is the Third Day ...... HI.
4.—WEDNESDAY is the Fourth Day .. IV.
5.—Tuurspay is the Fifth Day...... V.
6.—Fripay is the Sixth Day ........ VI.

7.—SATURDAY is the Seventh Day.... VII.

The Year is divided into 365 Days.

There are 52 Weeks in a Year, which

is divided into Twelve Months.

80



THE YEAR.

























THE MONTHS OF THE YEAR.


























Pie CLOCK

CAN you tell what time it is by the Clock? No. Then I will teach you.

You see that there are Twelve Figures on the Face, and Two hands that
move round and point to them.

The long hand tells the Minutes and the short aa tells the hours.

When the long hand and the short hand are both at XII (twelve), it is
Twelve o'clock ; and when the long hand gets round to XII again, the short
hand will be at I (one), and it will be One o'clock.

So that while the short hand is moving from XII to I, the long hand has
gone right round the face.

Let us start at Twelve o'clock. Both hands, you see, are now
together on the figure XII.

When the long hand is at I, (one) the short hand has moved a
very little way, and it is Five minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at II (two), the short hand has moved
a little further on, and it is Ten minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at III (three), the short hand has
moved one quarter the space between XII and JI, and it is a
Quarter past Twelve.

When the long hand is at IV (four), the short hand has moved
a little further on still, and it is Twenty minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at V (five) it is Twenty-five minutes
past Twelve.





1H B= CLOCK,

When the long hand is at VI (six) the short hand is half-way
between XII and I: and it is half-past Twelve.

When the long hand is at VII (seven) it is Twenty-five minutes
to One.

When the long hand is at VIII (eight) it is Twenty minutes
to One.

When the long hand is at IX (nine) the short hand, which has
been slowly moving all the while, has gone three quarters the



space between XII and I, and it is a Quarter to One.

When the long hand is at X (ten) it is Ten minutes to One.

When the long hand is at XI (eleven) the short hand is very
near the figure I, and it is Five minutes to One.

When the long hand has got round to XII again, the short —
e Sy hand is at I, and it is One o’clock.



And in the same way the short hand will move from I to II, while the long
hand is going right round the face again, and it will then be Two o'clock.

So that when the short hand has pointed out all the hours, one after
another, it will only have gone round the face once, but the long hand will
have gone round it twelve times.

GA



MONEY IS COINED IN COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD.

MONEY IS MADE FROM COPPER IN THREE FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—





A FARTHING.



A HALFPENNY.
A PENNY.

MONEY IS MADE FROM SILVER IN SEVEN FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—





A FLORIN
(OR TWO SHILLINGS),

A SIXPENCE,




A HALF-CROWN SS
(OR TWO SHILLINGS AND SIXPENCE). vee ony ‘ A CROWN
(OR FOUR SHILLINGS (OR FIVE SHILLINGS).

MONEY IS MADE FROM GOLD IN TWO FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—
TABLE OF VALUE. |



2 FARTHINGS MAKE I HALFPENNY.
2 HALFPENNIES » 1 PENNY.
12 PENNIES » I SHILLING.
2 THREEPENNIES 3 I SIXPENCE.
z SIXPENCES » 1 SHILLING.
— 2 SHILLINGS » 1 FLorRIn.
A HALF SOVEREIGN. A SOVEREIGN 2 Hatr-CROwNS 3 I CROWN OR 5 SHILLINGS.
: (OR A POUND). 10 SHILLINGS » 1 HAatr SOVEREIGN.
There is a Double Sovereign as well, but it 1s so 2 HALF SOVEREIGNS ,, I SOVEREIGN.



little used that we do not give a picture of tt.

THE OBVERSE SIDE OF THE COIN ALWAYS SHOWS THE HEAD OF THE REIGNING MONARCH.
85



THE KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND.



WILLIAM I. (conQquEror.) WILLIAM JI. (rurus.) |
1066—1087. 1087—1100. 1100—1135,
|
|
|
|

HENRY 1. (BEAUCLERC.)







HENRY II. RICHARD T. (c@ur DE Lion.)
1154—1189. 1189—1199,







JOHN. HENRY IIL.
1199—1216. ' 1216—1272. |









| / Y WSS S
EDWARD Il. EDWARD IIL
13071327. 13271377.

86



RICHART) 11.
1377-—1399.

Gt Wi



THE KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND.



|
|
|



HENRY IV HENRY VIL
1399—1413. | 1422—1461,











hh Vit 1
EDWARD IV. EDWARD V. RICHARD HII.
1461—1483. 1483, 1483—1485.











HENRY VII. HENRY VIII. EDWARD VI.
1485—1509. 1509—1547. 1547—1553,











A





QUEEN MARY. QUEEN ELIZABETH. JAMES I.
1553—1568. 1558—16083, 1603—1625.

87



THE KINGS




OLIVER CROMWELL.
1653—1658 THE PROTECTORATE.










SS 3 INS)

\E AWS

\ aN FWA
INGA

JAMES II. |
1685—1688. }

GEORGE I.
1714—1727.:













Sy
ic

I)



CHARLES II.
1660—1685.



ANNE.
1702—1714.





GEORGE IV.
1820—183¢.

WILLIAM IV.





1830—1837.
88

OR
1837.



RASY POETRY.



THE BEE.

I Love to see
‘The busy bee
I love to watch the hive :
When the sun’s hot
They linger not,—
It makes them all alive.

Wesee their skill,
How with good-will

They do their work attend ;
Each little cell

Is shaped so well

|

That none their work can mend.

Now in, now out,
They move about,
Yet all in order true;
Each seems to know
Both where to go
And what it has to do.

89

"Midst summer heat,
The honey sweet
Tt gathers while it may,
In tiny drops,
And never stops
‘To waste its time in play. —

I hear it come—
I know its hum,
It flies from flower to flower ;
And to its store
A little more
It adds each day and hour.

Just so should I
My heart apply,

My proper work to mind;
Look for some swect
In all I meet,

And store up all I find.

—ANonymous.



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

Wuo show’d the little ant the way
Her narrow hole to bore, |
And spend the pleasant summer day

In laying up her store? -

The sparrow builds her clever nest
Of wool, and hay, and moss: |
‘Who told her how to weave it best,

And lay the twigs across?

Who taught the busy bee to fly
Among the sweetest flowers,
And lay his feast of honey by,

To eat in winter hours?

"Twas God, who show’d them all the way,
And gave their little skill,

And teaches children, if they pray,
To do His holy will. |

—Noursery Ruymes.





THE PATH THROUGH THE WOOD.

91



THE STAR.

Twink, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,

Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,

Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

‘Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
He could not see which way to go,

If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,

Till the sun is in the sky,

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.
—Nursery Ruymes.



THE HOMES OF ENGLAND.

THE stately homes of England,
How beautiful they stand,

Amidst their tall ancestral trees,
O’er all the pleasant land!

The deer across their greensward bound,
Through shade and sunny gleam ;

And the swan glides past them with the sound
Of some rejoicing stream. |

The ‘merry homes of England!
Around their hearths by night,

What gladsome looks of household love
Meet in the ruddy light!

There woman's voice flows forth in song,
Or childhood’s tale is told,

Or lips move tunefully along
Some glorious page of old.

Tne blesséd homes of England!
How softly on their bowers
Is laid the holy quietness
That breathes from Sabbath hours!
Solemn, yet sweet, the church-bell’s chirne
Floats through their woods at morn ;
All other sounds, in that still time,
Of breeze and leaf are born.

The cottage homes of England!
By thousands on her plains,

They are smiling o’er the silvery brooks, |
And round the hamlet fanes.

Through glowing orchards forth they peep,
Each from its nook of leaves;

And fearless there the lowly sleep,
As the bird beneath their eaves.

The free fair homes of England!
Long, long, in hut and hall,
May hearts of native proof be reared
To guard each hallowed wall !
And green for ever be the groves,
And bright the flowery sod,
Where first the child’s glad spirit loves
Its country and its God! —Mrs. HEMANS.
93





THE LORD'S PRAYER.

Our Father, which art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy Name.

Thy kingdom come. |

Thy will be done in earth,

As it is in heaven. |

Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,

As we forgive them that trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation;
But deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom, ~
The power, and the glory, |

For ever and ever. -















1



Seve
eee By
as ae
i
ae
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afi:

__LITH.IN HOLLAND BY EMRIK & BINGER,937 STRAND,LONDON.

er i 1 - estes i 5





ee Sievert it ie





Full Text


LONDON

FREDERICK WARNE & C°

AND NEW YORK



AUNT LOUVISA’S
FIRST BOOK

FOR CHILDREN.


Copyris, ht.
/ DREAMLAND, By permission of Messrs, HENRY GRAVES & Co,


AUNT LOUISA’S

FIRST BOOK

FOR CHILDREN.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.



LONDON:

FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,,

AND NEW YORK.
1894.




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INSECTS.






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A BIG DOG AND A. LITTLE. DOG;





















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SMALL WRITING LETTERS.

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OLD ENGLISH ALPHABET.

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syllable,

a word or
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QUAIL.»

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KINGFISHER.





WOLF.
THE. ALPHABET. OUT OF ORDER.





YACHT.

















































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PEACOCK.
THE ALPHABET OUT OF ORDER.



OSTRICH.

NIGHTINGALE.



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SPELLING LESSONS IN WORDS OF TWO LETTERS.



by he
do if

Le ee

THE LITTLE SWEEPER.



JOHN AND IIIS DOG.

to up us we_ ye





. FIRST READING LESSON.
Do go up. It is my ox. AS ye go.
No. He is | If my ox is to go.| We go up.
to go to it. | I am at it. Itis I.| He. is at it.
We go on. | So it isi’
‘LESSON .
We go up to it. Is it by me?
Ye go:up to us.) VWedo it.
Igo up toit. He is up it.
Oh! go up by me, do. No.





LESSON. 3.

Do it so. He is to do it.
We or ye go. We do So.
it is it. Is it’so, or no?

Itisso. As heis. Itis to be.
Onanox. On! No. Of it.

=
——eoaeaeaeaNaeaewoanawawsasSeeeeooawswasoaoa=s*=~=~qaomoeooDonOwjlqqmnon0n0=$”$*qQM eee ————

LESSON 4.

It is he. DolIdoso? No!

Go in to it. If it be so.

He is at it. So itis by me.
Do as we do. My ox is to go.
LESSON 5.
Do we go up to it?
We dogo up. So dol.
He is to do so. If he be in.
Is it he? Is it I?
lt am to go on to it.
AS we go; aS 1 go. Do So.

LESSON 6.

Be 1t so. Do as we do.

It is my Ox. Go up to it..
An oX is it? As it is So.
It ison an ox. If itis he,
No itis I. Do go to it.

To me itis so. Is it so?

~_———-.



LESSON 7.
Is it to be so? No, it is he.
He is to do it if he is up.
As it is in it, go to it.
Heisto goto us as he is.
Oh! no. By me—to me.
If we go. I am to do it.
So is he. OF it; to it; by it.
FIGURES AND OBJECTS.



~, act

4,--FOUR®








yEGGS.



re OIG Eg Ok LE en tail 2a
"14 Geren MeN es






@—SIX ODDITIES.


FIGURES AND OBJECTS.

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9—NINE KITTENS. 10.—TEN BALLS.








34





SS a

PAPA’S HORSE AND DOG.
35
SPELLING LESSONS IN



FLY.
are
boy
can
pan



Do you
see the fly?
ee OO:
No, I do
not, but I

ant
bee
cup



FLY AND ANT
36

too
her
put
cub
inn





see an ant;
do you?

Oh, yes, I
do.
LESSON. 1,
cat eat and fat ham pet
rat pit ram hat = jam let

My cat can eat a rat. She is
my pet. Do you see her? He
has a dog and it is his pet; as
the cat is my pet. Has she a
cat? No, she has not one, but
he has.





LESSON 2. 7

It is a ram you see. A fat
ram, but it is no one’s pet.
It can run, and the dog can
run too... He has a hat, so has
she. Get me a bit of ham for
the cat to eat. Oh! no, do.
not let her eat it.



LESSON 3. -
My cat can run and get the rat and eat it.
The rat was in my cot.
How did it get in? No
*. one saw it. Oh! yes, he
- saw it go in. No, he did



——

RAT. nN ot.

a7
| LESSON 4.
who may out mow _ hot

The boy is hot, he is- in
the sun. Let us go to the
new-cut hay, and we can see
the men who mow. May I
go out? No, it is too hot for
you to go. |



LESSON 5.
axe ash oak log sit old

The man. has an
axe. See, he can
cut the ash. No, it
is not an ash; it is
an oak. Sit on a log
out of the sun. _ Are
youhot? =x}
No, Iam not. Go in the hay. Do
go. No, let me sit by you. It is an
old oak. The man can cut it, can
he not? He can. Goto her. I am
by you. The boy, too, has an axe.



LESSON 6.





He has He has a
a cow. It ‘cap... Put
is a fat it:-on. “It
cow. Men 1S is .net,
mow hay. B® .too; ~ ‘and
for the : ee his) ink
cow to eat. mrs | arid pen.

_ She has a fat pig. My pen is bad, and so is
the ink. Get emer-=mpgg@s my cap for me.
{tis on my bed. , YZ» I am to go out
now to see the cow and the

pig. Are you ~a sere togo? Yes.

39.


LESSON 8.



Did you see the eft? Yes, I saw it. It
is his top, and her tub. Did you see the
fox run? No, I did not. An eel is in
my net. Can you eat an eel? We do not
eat it. How the fox can run! Has Ann a
jug? Yes, she has. My cap is on. She
has a mop. He has atop. She has not
a top.

40 .
LESSON 9.
bad did Tom cot wet ice
box day big fed mud" fit:



hit pie beg
saw tie bat
gay win Ann

DOG.
Tom has a big dog; and he has a bat
too, aS you see.
The sky is red to-day, we can see it in
our cot. |
The dog is fed by Ann. She can let |
him eat a bit of pie if he can eat it, or
we you may cut it, Ann. No, I do
S——=7 not eat pie. You can go and
om mop up the wet mud now. The
men are on the ice. Do you
see the men on the ice? Yes, I
do. Get me a bit of ice to
eat. Do not eat it, Ann. It is
not fit to eat. I beg. you not
to eat it.









‘41


Os) DP EA Ss


SPELLING LESSONS OF THREE AND FOUR LETTERS:

rose kite

Sai =
lark
dark
park
bark
farm

harm

4,
fish
dish
last

past
cast

fast |

e 7.
Jay
pay
nay
ray
_ sly
pry







JAY. .











DOVE.

pink — cock

2.
bird... dove. milk. silk gate: late.

5

rest

best
west
mill
fll
bill

6.
wing
sing
morn

born

song
long

8,
kit

pin

lip
Sip
dip

‘TIp



The child ts to find the first eight words

on the pictures when they are learnt.
. LESSON = 10:





good _ | here
kind 7 have
slow — \e hive.
mine Mfj, wood
kept ,, must
draw well
lost == \ me pond
Seen “TWO. ASSES, anaes frog

The ass is good and _ kind, but slow.
One of these asses is mine. ‘They are kept
at the farm to draw the cart. .Our farm is a
nice one: we have six cows and an ox: and |
a hive for our bees. We must be kind to
the ass and to the cows. In the wood
we find bees as well as in the hive; and
by the pond in the wood
we have seen a frog jump
Up: “Here 1s. a “a frog. Do you
like it? No, I : “eee donot. I have
a hen of my own, and she lays eggs for
me; one a. day. Have you seen my hen?
No, I have not. I will give you an egg?


LESSON 11.

vat. port
gnat fort
hold = air
sold fair
told drum

wine hum
pine plum
line wasp

A vat is made to hold
wine. This vat is for port
wine. We hear by our ears,
When a drum is beat, our
ears can hear it.



A wasp has a sting. It will sting you if you
put your hand on it, so pray do not do so. A
fly will eat jam. Here
are some by a jar of
plum jam. They do
AN not sting to hurt, but a
— enat does; its sting
will hurt, but not as much as that
of a wasp.



DANCE OF FLIES,




The gnats are hy to be seen 1 by the
pond. Here are QW ok eq, Some of them.
When the sun Sa ty oR F sets, they fly up

seem glad.
LESSON. 12.



kid this
owl © ~ know
web | - nice
S near make
Ze tree take
oe like wake

WEB.

Do you see the web up in the tree? Yes,
I do. Can you make a web like it? Oh, no,
| a cannot. Here is an inn, you see; and
f@".an owl is on a tree near it. An owl
fesigecan fly. Has Tom a kid? I do not
wy. know if he has one or not. A kid is
a nice pet for a boy. Who is Tom? He isa
boy who has an ass. Did you see the owl?
Yes, I did see it; it was near the inn, and so
was the kid. ~The kid is the pet of the men
of the inn as well as of Tom. Do you know
Tom? He is a kind boy, ym

and is good to his ass and ~
to his kid and to his dog. Yaa
He made me a kite, one @EVe





re

5

ne
Yr

ay

13

MARY AND THE

47



TINY DUCKS.
LESSONS IN WORDS OF TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX











LETTERS.
i 2. 3. 4,
these might cream | bleat
those night dream cheat
could chair gleam treat.
would stair steam | wheat
ay 6. 7. s
arms nurse .
knee child field | boat
head aunt yield = float
face plant | boast fruit
place aase | coast | suit
hair Lease | earn | mute
pair seas | learn | cute
fey 16; if; te 12,
chase stain foam | earth
race main roam | mirth
brain vain moan | birth
chain heart | groan | beach
drain part | oar peach
grain start | boar | teach
train mart | | roar reach
, 14. | 15;

sail slice hymn fling sand grand

fail price swim strong pull |

ship dwell |spring prong full

slip shell string wrong fern
spell Am stern
swell broom Me
fell room jae
fall thank Me
eall prank Ze
small |mark stars |sent 2am

lhark cars BROOM.





48





went
LESSON “4;





















quite oS walk
proud town
tail rent
rail street
mane threw
please stone
friend James
spend throw
end faces
lend loud
right ground
sight caught
fight pony

JAMES AND HIS PONY.

James loves his wee po-ny. He gives it
sweets and bits of bread, and pats it; its
name is Fun. James can ride quite well,
and Fun goes fast when he has James on
his back, and James is proud of Fun’s nice
tail and mane. Fun is fond of the boy,
and will try to please him; and James is
kind to Fun; they are good friends, that
po-ny and boy. James has a kind, good
heart.

49 4
LESSON? 2:
grows bread mouse look _ stalk

rich sheaf flour shall house
enough flies means stile —_ drive

Wheat grows in the rich earth
to make us bread. Men cut it
down, and tie it up like this, in
what is said to be a sheaf. The
grain is ground at the mill, and
it is then the flour, that we make
into bread. Cook makes it, not I.
A small mouse has put her nest
in the wheat. Look at her. Here
she is on the stalk of the wheat.
Hers is a small house, but it is big
enough for her. Do you see the
bee that flies over the sheaf ?



This boy does not live in the
town. He has a whip, and he
means to get over the stile, and go
to the wheat field, to drive the cart
home. He is a good boy. |


LESSON 3.



pick seed
much plough
ere goes
climb spoon
a-gain floor
uses John
tools thin
gave © stout
things short
Bonne HOME Win THE FLOWERS. toys poor

Rose has been out in the fields to pick the
spring buds. She has her lap full of them. She
will give them to her sick Aunt to make her
room smell sweet and look bright.

John is a good boy; he would not
take a nest or hurt a_ , eo. Jae
poor bird. When he has ¥ = \\ Ss
time to play, he uses the q
tools his Aunt gave him, :

\ 2 a





and makes nice things ‘iM
with them. He has just |
made a box to hold his








tools. Does it not look %%@ aa
nice ? TN ae or





51
EVIL ARTUR S DAY.















WAKING UP. © GOING DOWN STAIRS.

Little Arthur wakes at the He is dressed, and goes down
peep of day ; the stairs to play.

\i er NO



DIGGING IN THE GARDEN. DRIVING THE COW,

To dig his garden he eagerly And then in the field the
strives ; old cow he drives.
LITTLE ARTHURS DAY.






At. YS he .

SO hts
YS, ea
oN



PLAYING AT BEING A CARPENTER. RIDING THE ROCKING HORSE,
As a carpenter next, a box he Then a ride on his rocking-
makes ; horse he takes,



OF ~ | xe 9
SEN a, (Ce ee es
ASKING FOR A STORY. SAYING “GOOD NIGHT.”

For astory he begs in the failing In bed the boy murmurs a sweet

light ; “Good night.”
53
NELL..AND: THE. BUDS,

sweet twists
buds large

creep-er thinks
fold horns

leaves queen

Nell loves the
sweet buds of the
bind-weed_ that
grows in the field.
It twists round a
small tree. She
thinks the buds
look like horns, so
she calls down one
to the queen of the
buds to ask where
she lives, and if
she will come out
of one and havea
game of play with
her. But there is
no queen of the
buds or the leaves.
Who made them?
You can tell
Freddie, can you
not? Yes, the good God made them grow.

54







HAUL ed Y
a Ty WU; f; |
C AZSBL YY 4 Med
LU GE

[Le
A SMALL MAID.

Jane will only hard dust moves
clean maid sweeps
raises round soon

next would these does













Jane thinks she can
clean the house as well as
the maid can, so she takes
the broom and sweeps and
sweeps quite hard, and
raises a great dust; but she
goes round and round, and
so the dust moves only
from one place to the next,
but it is still there. We
must learn how to do all
things, or we cannot do
them. If Ann would teach
Jane how to sweep,
she would soon do it
very well. Jane has
put on Ann's cap,
and’ thinks she is
like Ann now; but
she cannot sweep
as Ann does.





ee \ EE)

17 s
Nd





eas

WCE

NY
\
GOING TO WAR.

a \ ——
SAN
7% : .,
fo wvis.
4 Fe" NNN
I~ oS





war march wall die

flag along laugh brave

sword horse first sure

The boys play at go-ing to war. Here
they are! They have a gun, a horse, a

drum, a flag, a horn, a sword, and they march
along; they mean to fight and win the day.
Old Tom and Ann are on the wall; they
look at the boys and laugh. Tom says,
“On you go, boys! Fight and win; do not
let any one take our flag” “No, we will
die first,” cry the boys. They are brave lads,
and will fight well, we feel sure.

56
THE FIVE LIT-TLE PIGS.








“
This lit-tle pig stayed
at home;

This lit-tle pig went
to mar-ket,

This lit-tle pig ate
roast beef a :
This lit-tle pig
had none.

This lit-tle pig said, “Wee! wee! wee!
T can’t find my way home! |
57
THE FOUR SEASONS.

SAGES
ioe
Lee





SUMMER.
58
Layik

‘



EIOERY





ANS i
SFT ITIT pare \
A tags



WINTER.
59
BY “FHE- SEA.
| LESSON 1.

Do you like to go on the sands? Oh, yes! I
am so glad when pa-pa says that it is time to go
to the sea. I love the sands and the shells and
sea-weeds. Donotyou? Yes,I do; I love themall.



























































































































































































don-key EF __ 7 ic StCer
kick ae beam
hoofs seen
shoes tide
seat ride
thrown wide
scream ebb
trot flow
orew storm
drew spade
weeds ee : rake
erie a — build

LESSON <2.

John one day went on a don-key to the sands
to have a ride; but the ass was a bad one. It
gave a kick and threw up its hoofs, and John was
thrown off on the sand, but I am glad to say he

Was: not hurt
60
LESSON 3.




leave deep
heap white
flow-ers green
home plume
black grey
cheeks wih ESS pee cloak

ROSE’S WALK.

Rose has had leave to walk in the wood
near the house. It is Spring, and she has
got a great heap of flow-ers to take home.
Rose is a good girl, and minds all that is said
to her; so ~ her Ma-ma-is fond of her, and is
glad to do any thing to please her. She
gave Rose a doll to-day. It has black eyes
and hair, and red cheeks, and its dress is of
white silk, with green stripes on it. It has a
white hat, with a plume in it, and a grey
cloak. It is a nice doll, and Rose loves it,
but she did not bring it out to-day, as she
meant to go to the woods.

61





her

CAT KITTENS.

and

some

PUPPIES:

DOG

and

MARE

and

Some

OE EP
COW

and

Two
GOATS



A COCK
and
A HEN




with their
“CHICKENS.









her
DUCKLINGS.














THE SWALLOW. THE SONG THRUSH.

The Swal-low comes to us The Thrush can sing, and
in May. It flies very fast; | its song is very sweet. It
but it does not sing, sings in March.























THE CUCKOO.

THE SKYLARK.

When we hear the Cuc-koo
in the tree,we know that Spring
iscome. We like to hear him
cry “ Cuc-koo, Cuc-koo!”

This bird gets up when
the sun rises, and sings a
sweet song as it flies up to
the sky.

64










MAUR oN Pony

. e =o
a Ww, why (e a





THE STARLING.

E BLACKBIRD :
Rae eR The Starl-ing can be taught

to speak, and will say any

This bird sings a sweet
word we teach it.

song. It is ve-ry kind to
its young birds.



































































































THE HOUSE SPARROW. THE WREN.
The spar-row lives in a The wren is a small bird,
nest in the wall and on the | but singsa sweet song to us all
house-top. It does not sing. | the win-ter, even in the snow.

65 5
SPELLING LESSONS OF FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX LETTERS,
LESSON 1.

shines gone
warm ripe
knock stick
boughs bush
down work
shade throws



IN THE WOOD.



into the woods to play. The
nuts are ripe, and Tom wants to
knock some down with his stick.
Nell and Ann pick some from a
low bush; Rose is on her knees
to look at the ants at work, and
Ned throws stones into the pond at the leaves.
The sun shines, but they are in the shade, and
do not feel too warm under the fine old trees.
By-and-by, Nurse will bring out some cups and
the teapot, and they will have tea; the boughs of
the oak-tree will shade them. Ann will drink
milk, she does not like tea; but all six of them

will eat the nice cake Nurse gives them.
66
LESSON 2.

cold thus wind wool
snow |. poke thaw sheep
fire coals time frost
flames poles world smoke |
storm clothes each road
freeze cloth — cloud roof
hard rain ~ block skate
bard hail clock prate

‘It is cold; snow is on the earth and on
the trees, and the road is quite hard from the
frost. The snow is on the roof of the house
and on the ground, and all the world looks white.
Last night the rain and hail fell; to-day there
Is no wind, no rain, no hail, but it freezes
, hard. Let us make
a good fire; put
on coals, but first
poke it. Thus we
shall make the

WINTER, _ room warm.
67


LESSON 3.



































bells porch
chimes church
heat o-ver
stands hedge
lane three
leads miles



It is warm in the sun, though there are
clouds in the sky; so the girls and boys go out
of the house and lie on the grass, in the shade
of the trees. Their house stands in the lane that
leads to the town, but it is quite three miles
from it. They do not lke the town. They love
the green fields, the grass, and the trees. Do

you see the sheep in the field over the stile and
the church which is far off? Yes, I do.

68 ae
LESSON 4,

Will nought
Jane brought
tale sought
light tells
though tongs
when prongs



Jane and Will like to sit by the fire when it
is cold and dark. Some-times Jane tells Will a
tale; some-times they look in the fire and think
they see faces in the red-hot coals. Did you see
some when you sat by the fire? No, I did
not, and I do not think they did.
LESSON. 5.

BRAVE HUGH.

ce OO OVUM

Hugh was out for a
walk one day in the
town, and as he went
downone of the streets,
a boy threw a stone
at him, and hurt him.

Hugh told him not to |

throw stones; but the

bad boy only made §
faces at him. Hugh}
went on, but by-and-

by he heard a loud
cry. He cast a look
back, and saw the bad











boy on the ground, and some horses just about
to go over him. Hugh tan and’ caught the
horses’ heads, and held them whilé:the bad boy
got up. So, though the boy had hurt him with
a stone, he saved the lad’s life at the risk of his
own, for the horses might have gone over him.
Was not Hugh a good, kind boy?
NURSERY RHYMES AND NURSERY DITTIES.
The King of







Tue Queen of Tee ree
Hearts she
' called for
a sae the tarts,
He
, And beat the
All on a Knave fuil
: ummers oe
ay ; Ti K
The Knave of of Hearts
Hearts, he brought
the back the
arts, tarts,

And took | [Sire lef 4 And * rowed
them clean [iy/e- he'd | steal
away. eos

_THE QUEEN OF HEARTS. aie
SEE a pin and pick it up, :
All Mie eiyrsou ll teve-ooed | Tue north wind doth blow,

loc: | And we shall have snow,
See a pin and let it lay, And what will poor Robin de
Bad luck you'll have all the day. | then? .
Poor thing !

Tom, Tom, the piper’s son, He'll sit in a barn,

Stole a pig and away he run. | ~— And to keep himself warm,

Tepe was eat, and, | Omywas) reese head ander his
beat, wae
: >?
And Tom went -roaring down Poor thing!
the street.

a
—
NURSERY RHYMES AND NURSERY DITTIES.

Jacx and Jill went up the . Litrre Jack Horner sat in a
hill, corner,

To fetch a pail of water; Eating his Christmas pie;
Jack fell down and broke his He put in his thumb, and
crown, took out a plum,

And Jill came tumbling And said, “What a good

after, |



Here am I, little jumping Joan;
When nobody’s with me,
1 am always alone.

Turrty days hath September,

April, June, and November ;

a February has twenty-eight alone,

| All the rest have thirty-one,

Excepting Leap-year, that’s the time

When February’s days are twenty-nine.
72
THE TEN. LITTLE KITTENS. Gg

TEN TLE KIT TENS
wm ALL NALINE |

LONE: RARE: spo: ThE ae WEREN INI } Ni E. .

af ay i 4 i
es

A

* di
sor LITTLE: IT TENS TO: FISHING: WERE:GIVEN;



73
THE TEN LITTLE KITTENS.




e mio hé
au

eS
na =



Five Lae 1 TTENS:-WENT: TO:

ROBASTORES
ONE-GOT-LOCKED-UP»KND‘THEN:

“Wary SRERE ERE FOO:


THE TEN LITTLE KITTENS.

FOUR: aL ae saat
TAKING: TREIR-DEGREE

\ TS WOLINTLE: MITTENS
\ PLAYING WITH:

BY ‘TAKIN GTO! 4IMSELF:
ASWEET LITTLE WIFE* 2
KAISHA D-ALITTLE> FPeRMILY
EN
OF-TEN KITTEN S+MORE#\ 35
VYWHO-PLAY: AND*ROMP-ABGUT>
| AS THE: OTHERS:-DID-BE FORE


PAB LES.

——_e—__

THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

Once upon a time a small
mouse found a lion asleep and
ran up on his back. The lon
woke, and was first going to kill
the mouse by a blow from his
great paw, when she begged him
to forgive her and let her go. The
lion was kind and said that he
would not hurt her, and the mouse
thanked him and told him that if ever she could help him she
would. The lion laughed to himself at the promise. How could
a little mouse help such a great lion? But one day the lion was
caught in a net, and could not get out. The mouse heard him
roar, and came to see what was the matter. When she saw the
net she set to work, and gnawed the ropes through, and set her
friend the lion free. Weare never |
too small to help one another.



Wie DOG AND “TELE
MANGER.

A voc once made his bed
on some hay in a manger.
By-and-by an ox came and
wished to eat the hay, but the dog growled and would not let
him. “How can you be so silly and unkind?” said the ox;

“you can't eat hay yourself, and you will not let me eat it!”
76


THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.

at ~






A poe, going across a plank
over a little stream, with ‘a piece
of meat in his mouth, saw his
own shadow in the clear water,
and believing it to be another
dog who had a larger piece of
meat, he greedily snapped at it, ==
and in doing so, of course, he
dropped his own piece into the water and lost it. So his greedi-
ness was punished by the loss of his dinner. In grasping at a

\ “hy

shadow we may lose the substance.

“THE POX AND THE CROW.

A crow having taken a large piece of cheese out of a cottage
window, flew up in a tree to eat it. A fox, who wished to get it,
came under the tree, and began
to flatter the crow on her fine

































voice. Now you know a crow’s.



























voice is very hoarse; but the.
silly bird was so pleased at his.
praise that when he begged her
to sing she tried to do so, and,.
of course, dropped the cheese.
The cunning fox caught it up
and ran off with it: he did not care for the crow’s song. Do not.
believe people when they praise you unjustly.
77


THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

OnE hot day a wolf and a lamb
came to drink at the brook at the same
time. Now, the wolf wanted an excuse
for eating up the lamb, so he said,

“Why do you make the water so
muddy that I cannot drink it?” The
lamb answered very gently, “I cannot
make it muddy for you, since you drink
it before it runs down to me.” ‘ Well,”
said the wolf, “that is true, but I hear

that you spoke ill of me about half a year ago.” “But,” replied the lamb,

“I was not born then.” ‘ Then,” said the wolf, “if it was not you it was

your father, and that is all the same!” So he seized the poor little lamb
and ate it up.

Any excuse will do to make a quarrel, but only wicked people make them.



THE CAT AND: THE MICE.

THERE was once a house very full of mice, so the people who lived in it
bought a cat who every day ate some of them. The mice talked together
about it and resolved to keep out of Pussy’s nays so they hid, cunningly, on
an upper shelf. The cat finding that
they did not come out, thought that
she would try to deceive them. So
she hung by her hinder-legs on a peg
in the wall, and pretended to be quite
dead. She thought that then they
would not be afraid of her; but the
mice were not to be imposed upon.
A clever old mouse peeped at the
cat and said, “So you are there! I
would not trust you, though your skin were stuffed with straw. It is best

always to keep away from wicked creatures.”
78






THE COUNTRY CHURCH.

79
THE DAYS OF THE WEEK.

1.—Sunpbay is the First Day ........
2.—Monpay is the Second Day...... IT. |
3.—Tuespay is the Third Day ...... HI.
4.—WEDNESDAY is the Fourth Day .. IV.
5.—Tuurspay is the Fifth Day...... V.
6.—Fripay is the Sixth Day ........ VI.

7.—SATURDAY is the Seventh Day.... VII.

The Year is divided into 365 Days.

There are 52 Weeks in a Year, which

is divided into Twelve Months.

80
THE YEAR.






















THE MONTHS OF THE YEAR.























Pie CLOCK

CAN you tell what time it is by the Clock? No. Then I will teach you.

You see that there are Twelve Figures on the Face, and Two hands that
move round and point to them.

The long hand tells the Minutes and the short aa tells the hours.

When the long hand and the short hand are both at XII (twelve), it is
Twelve o'clock ; and when the long hand gets round to XII again, the short
hand will be at I (one), and it will be One o'clock.

So that while the short hand is moving from XII to I, the long hand has
gone right round the face.

Let us start at Twelve o'clock. Both hands, you see, are now
together on the figure XII.

When the long hand is at I, (one) the short hand has moved a
very little way, and it is Five minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at II (two), the short hand has moved
a little further on, and it is Ten minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at III (three), the short hand has
moved one quarter the space between XII and JI, and it is a
Quarter past Twelve.

When the long hand is at IV (four), the short hand has moved
a little further on still, and it is Twenty minutes past Twelve.

When the long hand is at V (five) it is Twenty-five minutes
past Twelve.


1H B= CLOCK,

When the long hand is at VI (six) the short hand is half-way
between XII and I: and it is half-past Twelve.

When the long hand is at VII (seven) it is Twenty-five minutes
to One.

When the long hand is at VIII (eight) it is Twenty minutes
to One.

When the long hand is at IX (nine) the short hand, which has
been slowly moving all the while, has gone three quarters the



space between XII and I, and it is a Quarter to One.

When the long hand is at X (ten) it is Ten minutes to One.

When the long hand is at XI (eleven) the short hand is very
near the figure I, and it is Five minutes to One.

When the long hand has got round to XII again, the short —
e Sy hand is at I, and it is One o’clock.



And in the same way the short hand will move from I to II, while the long
hand is going right round the face again, and it will then be Two o'clock.

So that when the short hand has pointed out all the hours, one after
another, it will only have gone round the face once, but the long hand will
have gone round it twelve times.

GA
MONEY IS COINED IN COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD.

MONEY IS MADE FROM COPPER IN THREE FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—





A FARTHING.



A HALFPENNY.
A PENNY.

MONEY IS MADE FROM SILVER IN SEVEN FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—





A FLORIN
(OR TWO SHILLINGS),

A SIXPENCE,




A HALF-CROWN SS
(OR TWO SHILLINGS AND SIXPENCE). vee ony ‘ A CROWN
(OR FOUR SHILLINGS (OR FIVE SHILLINGS).

MONEY IS MADE FROM GOLD IN TWO FORMS, WHICH ARE CALLED—
TABLE OF VALUE. |



2 FARTHINGS MAKE I HALFPENNY.
2 HALFPENNIES » 1 PENNY.
12 PENNIES » I SHILLING.
2 THREEPENNIES 3 I SIXPENCE.
z SIXPENCES » 1 SHILLING.
— 2 SHILLINGS » 1 FLorRIn.
A HALF SOVEREIGN. A SOVEREIGN 2 Hatr-CROwNS 3 I CROWN OR 5 SHILLINGS.
: (OR A POUND). 10 SHILLINGS » 1 HAatr SOVEREIGN.
There is a Double Sovereign as well, but it 1s so 2 HALF SOVEREIGNS ,, I SOVEREIGN.



little used that we do not give a picture of tt.

THE OBVERSE SIDE OF THE COIN ALWAYS SHOWS THE HEAD OF THE REIGNING MONARCH.
85
THE KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND.



WILLIAM I. (conQquEror.) WILLIAM JI. (rurus.) |
1066—1087. 1087—1100. 1100—1135,
|
|
|
|

HENRY 1. (BEAUCLERC.)







HENRY II. RICHARD T. (c@ur DE Lion.)
1154—1189. 1189—1199,







JOHN. HENRY IIL.
1199—1216. ' 1216—1272. |









| / Y WSS S
EDWARD Il. EDWARD IIL
13071327. 13271377.

86



RICHART) 11.
1377-—1399.

Gt Wi
THE KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND.



|
|
|



HENRY IV HENRY VIL
1399—1413. | 1422—1461,











hh Vit 1
EDWARD IV. EDWARD V. RICHARD HII.
1461—1483. 1483, 1483—1485.











HENRY VII. HENRY VIII. EDWARD VI.
1485—1509. 1509—1547. 1547—1553,











A





QUEEN MARY. QUEEN ELIZABETH. JAMES I.
1553—1568. 1558—16083, 1603—1625.

87
THE KINGS




OLIVER CROMWELL.
1653—1658 THE PROTECTORATE.










SS 3 INS)

\E AWS

\ aN FWA
INGA

JAMES II. |
1685—1688. }

GEORGE I.
1714—1727.:













Sy
ic

I)



CHARLES II.
1660—1685.



ANNE.
1702—1714.





GEORGE IV.
1820—183¢.

WILLIAM IV.





1830—1837.
88

OR
1837.
RASY POETRY.



THE BEE.

I Love to see
‘The busy bee
I love to watch the hive :
When the sun’s hot
They linger not,—
It makes them all alive.

Wesee their skill,
How with good-will

They do their work attend ;
Each little cell

Is shaped so well

|

That none their work can mend.

Now in, now out,
They move about,
Yet all in order true;
Each seems to know
Both where to go
And what it has to do.

89

"Midst summer heat,
The honey sweet
Tt gathers while it may,
In tiny drops,
And never stops
‘To waste its time in play. —

I hear it come—
I know its hum,
It flies from flower to flower ;
And to its store
A little more
It adds each day and hour.

Just so should I
My heart apply,

My proper work to mind;
Look for some swect
In all I meet,

And store up all I find.

—ANonymous.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

Wuo show’d the little ant the way
Her narrow hole to bore, |
And spend the pleasant summer day

In laying up her store? -

The sparrow builds her clever nest
Of wool, and hay, and moss: |
‘Who told her how to weave it best,

And lay the twigs across?

Who taught the busy bee to fly
Among the sweetest flowers,
And lay his feast of honey by,

To eat in winter hours?

"Twas God, who show’d them all the way,
And gave their little skill,

And teaches children, if they pray,
To do His holy will. |

—Noursery Ruymes.


THE PATH THROUGH THE WOOD.

91
THE STAR.

Twink, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,

Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,

Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

‘Then the traveller in the dark
Thanks you for your tiny spark;
He could not see which way to go,

If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,

Till the sun is in the sky,

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.
—Nursery Ruymes.
THE HOMES OF ENGLAND.

THE stately homes of England,
How beautiful they stand,

Amidst their tall ancestral trees,
O’er all the pleasant land!

The deer across their greensward bound,
Through shade and sunny gleam ;

And the swan glides past them with the sound
Of some rejoicing stream. |

The ‘merry homes of England!
Around their hearths by night,

What gladsome looks of household love
Meet in the ruddy light!

There woman's voice flows forth in song,
Or childhood’s tale is told,

Or lips move tunefully along
Some glorious page of old.

Tne blesséd homes of England!
How softly on their bowers
Is laid the holy quietness
That breathes from Sabbath hours!
Solemn, yet sweet, the church-bell’s chirne
Floats through their woods at morn ;
All other sounds, in that still time,
Of breeze and leaf are born.

The cottage homes of England!
By thousands on her plains,

They are smiling o’er the silvery brooks, |
And round the hamlet fanes.

Through glowing orchards forth they peep,
Each from its nook of leaves;

And fearless there the lowly sleep,
As the bird beneath their eaves.

The free fair homes of England!
Long, long, in hut and hall,
May hearts of native proof be reared
To guard each hallowed wall !
And green for ever be the groves,
And bright the flowery sod,
Where first the child’s glad spirit loves
Its country and its God! —Mrs. HEMANS.
93


THE LORD'S PRAYER.

Our Father, which art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy Name.

Thy kingdom come. |

Thy will be done in earth,

As it is in heaven. |

Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,

As we forgive them that trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation;
But deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom, ~
The power, and the glory, |

For ever and ever. -









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__LITH.IN HOLLAND BY EMRIK & BINGER,937 STRAND,LONDON.

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