Citation
A treasury of stories, jingles and rhymes

Material Information

Title:
A treasury of stories, jingles and rhymes short stories; fairy tales; Mother Goose jingles
Creator:
Humphrey, Maud, b. 1868
Humphrey, Maud, b. 1868 ( Illustrator )
Thomas, Edith Matilda, 1854-1925 ( Author )
Tucker, Elizabeth S ( Author )
Cone, Helen Gray, 1859- ( Author )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Donor:
Egolf, Robert
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Frederick A. Stokes Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
251 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894 ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1894 ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1894 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title vignette.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy donated by Robert Egolf.
Statement of Responsibility:
with one hundred and forty vignette illustrations in half-tone after Maud Humphrey ; verses by Edith M. Thomas, Elizabeth S. Tucker and Helen Gray Cone.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026991918 ( ALEPH )
ALH9224 ( NOTIS )
01069814 ( OCLC )

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A TREASURY

OF

STORIES, JINGLES AND
RHYMES.





WHO CARES FOR DINNER! THEY WOULD RATHER PLAY WHERE THEY ARE.—fage 11.



A TREASURY

SFORIES, JINGEES. AND
RHYMES

WITH ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY VIGNETTE ILLUSTRA-
TIONS IN HALF-TONE AFTER

MAUD HUMPHREY

SHORT STORIES; FAIRY TALES; MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES;
VERSES BY EDITH M. THOMAS, ELIZABETH S. TUCKER
AND HELEN GRAY CONE



NEW YORK
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS



Copyright, 1894, by
frederick A. Stokes Company





CONTENTS.

STORIES

BY

MRS. MARY RICE MILLER

AND
ELIZABETH S. TUCKER.

A Dandelion Dream
The Nursery Band .
Fauntleroy Park

The Holly Boy
Chocolate Creams

Six Wide-awakes

“ Six Best Babtes”

In Japan.

Four Little Plums

The Fairies of To-day
“« Peaches and Cream!”

RHYMES

BY
HELEN GRAY CONE.
A Lecture. i : ‘ ; :
Little Butter flies
The May Basket
November Plumes
Spring Wonder
Secrets 3
Under the Mistletoe
The First Foreboding
© One, Two, Three—Miss”
Lily : ; :

II
14
16
20
22
26
28

2

34

40



6 CONTENTS.

Bo-Peep

A Christmas “Stocking

The Dandelion Chain

Hidden Pearls

Fairy Wine-skins

A Soldier of the Snows

A Rhyme of Changing Ce cn

FAIRY TALES.

The Three Bears

Cinderella

Little Red Riding Hood

The Babes in the Wood
Tom Thumb :

Jack and the Beanstalk

Goody Two Shoes

Beauty and the Beast

Puss in Boots

The Ugly Duckling

The Sleeping Beauty

Little Snow White

Hop O My Thumb

Aladdin :

Jack, the Giant Killer

The Bluebird

The White Cat

The Musicians of Bremen

Blue Beard :

Pretty Goldilocks

RHYMES

BY

ELIZABETH 8S. TUCKER.

Guinea Pigs ;
Child and Lamb

64
66
69
ia
73
75
77

80
86
89
94

98
102
104
107
IIO
112
115
117
120
124
125
128
129
130
133

137
139



CONTENTS.

Pussy Cat Gray
My Donkey
Pretty Poll!
Little White Mouse
The Doves
the Squirrel

“ Chicks”
The Gold-Fish Speaks
The Rabbit Dance
Dear Puggy

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES.

Little Bo Peep

Tommy Snooks and Betse ‘y Brooks
Little Tom Tucker

Lucy Locket :
The North Wind doth Blow
Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat

Little Miss Muffeti :

As Tl was going up Primrose Hill
Little Nancy Etticote

There was a Little Boy and a Little Girl
flush a bye Baby

Little Polly Finders

Little Jack Horner

Ding, Dong, Bell

Curly Locks,

Hot Cross Buns,
Sack and Jill

Little Boy Blue

Sing a Song of Sixpence
Mistress Mary

When I was a Bachelor

Bobby Shaftoe

There was an Old Woman

I4I
143
145
147
149
151
153
155
157
159

162
164
164
166
166
168
168
170
170

180
182
182
184
186
187



8 CONTENTS.

RHYMES

BY
EDITH M. THOMAS.

The Snow-ball Chieftain
The Little Prophet ‘
March and Pussy-willow.
April the Trickster

Ln the Orchard

The Daisy :
July and the Bumble-bee
The Water-lily
September

October the Artist

The Folly

The Mistletoe

American Child :
African Child (To the Hollyhock)
Dutch Child

A Little Highlander
German Child

The Fleur-de-lis
Canadian Child

Swedish Child

Spanish Child

The Russian Child
English Child :
May Italian Child)

240

250



STORIES

BY

MRS. MARY RICE MILLER

AND
ELIZABETH 3. FUCKER:









A DANDELION DREAM.

ANDELION-DAY in the park !
How did the babies know it?

How did the birds and the bees know it? Somehow
they feel their way to what they so dearly love; they do
not wait to be told. Blue sky overhead—green grass be-
neath, sprinkled over with dandelions and babies, the best
blossoms of the spring. Little Kate is trying a dandelion
under Rob’s chin, to see if he likes butter. ‘“ Zzat isn’t the
way to make butter!” says Ruth, peeping; ‘You can't
make read butter shine on his chin without a buttercup !”

Fat little Grace toddles along to help Kenneth, the
cutest pet of all, down on the ground, too busy to speak
under his sunbonnet.

Harold and Helen are puffing away with plumped
cheeks, to blow off the down of the dandelion top.

Nurse says the flower has gone to seed; so many seeds
from each flower; and each seed has a fuzzy wing; and
they must blow and blow, and scatter the seeds, and each
one will fall somewhere and grow, and make a mintfull of
dandelion dollars for poor little girls and boys.

Now count how many fuzzy seeds are left; one, two,
why there are twelve; and that is the time of day. Come
away, for it is dinner-time!

Who cares for dinner! They would rather play where
they are than eat the best dinner in anybody’s house !

But the sun will shine another day, and dandelions will

It



A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

be as yellow as gold to-morrow. One other thing is cer-
tain, baby’s eyes will not be half so wide open, to see; and
baby will be so tired (who said so cross?) that she. cannot
half see the flowers unless she has her dinner and her nap.

One of these babies dreamed that she was lost in the
meadow on grandpa’s farm ; that the grass was tall and the
dandelions kept reaching up higher and higher, till they
hid her completely. She could not see the other children,
neither could nursey find her, though she cried as loud as
ever she could—in a dream.

“OQ, dear dandelions!” she said, please go to seed and
blow away down to twelve, to bring the dinner-time, and
surely my mamma will come to find me!”

Then she heard something which sounded like a mowing-
machine, coming, clickity-click, to cut down the grass.

-“O, what now shall Ido!” sobbed the poor baby, in her
dream. “O, dear grasshopper ; please let me sit on your
back, and jump me out of this high grass!” But he hopped
the other way. Then she felt a big bird, flying low over
her head ; he brushed her face with his black wings.

“O, if I can just catch you now, you shall fly up with
me, away, out of these tiresome old dandelions!”

She reached up her hands and caught—what do you think?
Why, her papa’s black whiskers: his dear face bending
down to kiss her, asleep. Beside her, in the crib lay the
wilted dandelions, she had brought home in the hot sunshine.
Next day, there she was again, with the others—the dearest
dandelion baby of them all!

12





ERY BAND!

S

HURRAH FOR THE NUR



THE NURSERY BAND.

oes for the Nursery Band!
Eleanor is first violin ; Beatrice has the mandolin:
Edna takes the pretty tambourine, and Marie the banjo.

Eleanor has just jumped out of her pony-cart, and run
away from her dogs, in time to begin. It is not any tune
you ever heard, she is playing. Mamma’s violin will hardly
forgive itself for giving such squeaks and shrieks,

Baby Beatrice, with the softest voice is quite satisfied
with the way she is singing, “ Daithy, Daithy you mutht
be crathy !” and her mamma’s mandolin is astonished at
its own voice, and is so proud of its musical family.

Edna thumps with her white fist at the tambourine;
whirls it merrily about to hear the tinkling of the fairy
bells; then peeps around it singing, ‘‘ Peek-a-boo, I see
you!” “I’m a band, too!” cries Marie, bobbing her yellow
curls,

“ Hey-day!” cries grandmamma; “Who ever heard every
piece in the orchestra playing a different tune, at the same
time!” ‘Zo¢s 0’ music!” said Eleanor, smiling sweetly,
with her ear upon the wailing violin.

‘Um, me make music too!” said Marie, tum-ti-tum-
tumming on her banjo.

The invitations which Aunt Carra had sent said “three
o'clock,” azd “ music by the band.”

It was almost three o'clock, and here was the band!

14



THE NURSERY BAND.

“We'll put you up on the roof”; growled Uncle Harry,
pretending to be vexed.

“©O, Uncle Harry!” cried Edna. “ You bea vead bear,
you do growl so lovely. You can dance on your hind
legs, and we will make the music for you!”

And that was really what handsome Uncle Harry was
doing, when the door opened softly, and who do you think
stood there, seeing the fun? Why, Uncle Harry’s sweet-
heart, who had come with Marie’s mamma to grandma’s
birthday party. Up and down went the dear fellow, shak-
ing his paws, bobbing his head, wobbling his russet feet as
clumsily as ever he could. The dear little band was
squealing away four—no, forty—different tunes at once.
Oh, it was the funniest dance you ever saw!

“Ting-a-ling! Tum-ti-ttum! Tra-la, tra-la!”

O, you know one can’t write such music any more than
one can hug a dancing bear—while he is dancing !

But all of a sudden the fun stopped. The bear happened
to look over his shoulder and saw his lady-love laughing
heartily, although grandma’s finger was on her lips, a sign to
keep the ladies quiet. Beyond the portiere all the mammas
were waiting to pay for the music with bon-bons and kisses.

Wasn't Uncle Harry tired? And didn’t the pretty lady
love him better than ever, when she saw how very fond of
him the /¢¢le girls were !

After the birthday supper, Uncle Harry played the
violin, while the ladies and the little girls danced ;
grandma sat smiling, enjoying this dance better than the
other—the ezghty-year-old darling.

5



FAUNTLEROY PARK.

———__
—
lo

OU don’t know where Fauntleroy Park is? Why, it is
the babies’ park ; where the sun seems glad to shine
and the children love to play.

All around it are such pretty houses, and each house has
a baby or two, and a key which unlocks the park gates.

The park calls together the people who have children.
The every-day baby parade is so distracting that folks who
have no baby to play in the quiet walks, or to sleep in the
pleasant shade, or to laugh at the sprinkling fountain, are
here tempted to buy or beg one of the dimpled darlings.

Fall pampas grass used to grow here. When the white
feathery plumes were cut down, they were given to the
children who happened to be inside the gates.

Once upon a time, a little boy carried home his arms
full: his mamma placed the gay grass flowers in a mantel
vase. Very pretty it was, until a match, which a maid was
striking, lit the plumes, which flashed and flared a pyramid
offire. It caught the white curtains ; it snatched the pretty
hangings from the poles; it quickly spoiled that pretty
house on Fauntleroy Park.

No more pampas grass’ there after that mischief: the
place where it grew is every year planted with lilies.

16



I



7

THE LILIES

G

THE BLESSED BABIES WERE SENT TODDLING AMON



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

The white-capped nurses, trundling the baby-carriages,
watch the sprouting of the bulbs in the early spring; watch
them send up their pointed leaves, and open a bit to let a
tall stalk shoot upward ; to shiver off into another leaf, and
another. At last the bunch of flower-buds is seen; rather
clumsy at first; the new babies can have no ideaof what is
coming.

Day after day the wicker carriages go by, and the babies
coo and chatter, and the buds are growing.

Mammas look out of the windows upon the Square, to
welcome the lilies, as they open in the sunshine. Now and
then a real bee, from nobody knows how far away, flies from
lily to lily, helping himself to sweets.

Sometimes sad-faced men and women peep through the
railings, walking slowly, wondering at the lilies and “the
Square-babies,” there are so many of each.

At last the lilies are all in blossom. When they begin to
fade the old park gardener comes to cut them down.

“Oh, please wait a minute!” cried agentle voice. ‘Do
let me make a picture of those darlings !”

The nurses pushed the empty carriages down the tulip
walk.

The blessed babies were sent toddling among the lilies,
where their good fairy made this picture of them.

Now, when the lilies are cut again, in Fauntleroy Park,

~may you be there to see!

18





SO HERE GOES THE HOLLY!

19



THE HOLLY BOY.

ILL WINTER does not think himself quite dressed

till somebody lends him a muff, for his dimpled

hands. He has been with his sister to the church where the

young people are winding Christmas wreaths. A lady gave
him this bunch of holly.

Holly is the favorite Christmas trimming for the house
where Will is taking it, as fast as his fat, short legs can go.

His mamma’s name is Hollis; papa calls her Hollie, and
they live in Holliston. So here goes the holly!

Will could travel faster if he were not in rubber boots.

They live where the snow lies deep in open squares, and
where boys snowball each other. Will coaxed papa to buy
these boots, so that he could frolic in the snow.

He does enjoy them very much; he feels tall and manly
when he stands up in them.

When he was called in from play, to be washed and
dressed for the walk to-day, pretty long stockings and dainty
button shoes ‘were laid out for him to wear.

He looked from boots to shoes, and began to whimper.

“Dust look at doze ‘ittle shoes!” he said scornfully ;
* Dey so ‘ittle nobody will see my feet !”

When sister found he felt so badly, she said; “O mamma!
Let him wear the boots; heis so happy in them!”

No foot-gear since Cinderella’s glass slipper has had more
to do with a body's happiness than the new rubber boots

20



THE HHOILILYY BOW,

for this Tithe mam, [His white wooll cap matehes his white
coat; the ned! stimpes on cach, match the color of the hellly-
bennies. His checks are almost as red, amd his eyes are
dark amd lowimg. His soft voice iim brokem words, his
gentile ways, you can hardly imagine, even with his picture
in your hand. Bit you see lhe is a daurlimg !

Next to midiimg, lhe lowes best to play horse. He was
idiing Ibis stick horse ome day rownd and round the room,
whem mamuna lhad a Iheadkache..

“Please, Will” she said, “be a Give more quiet !”

Boy began to move slowly, saying : “I won't let him trot,
mammal!” But soon he forgot and was making mamma giddy,

“ Deer mama. |!” he begwed, “ dust let me show his gait |”

The stick-horse wemt slower and slower, till it stopped ;
and the little rider curled wp om the foot of mamma’s couch
and wemt to sleep.

He has a crooked tomgue, when he is talking fast; at
least, he said : “Mammawamts her blub-euttoner !” when he
wemt to sister for the elove-buttoner. The vinegar-jug he
calls the yrmegur-bug. One day he came home from riding
and told that they had gome as far as the ¢az/-goat, when
he meant toll-ate.

When a mew horse was brought home Will asked with
delight : “Do we belong to that horse, now, papa?”

When sister crowds him a little, he says: “P’ese sit a
“ittle mearer off!” He does not like much butter on his
bread ; “It makes it so sippy!” he says.

Good-bye, dear Will Winter !









21



CHOCOLATE CREAMS!

TOT the kind of chocolate creams that you buy ina
shop, but four nice little brown-faced girlies, in white
frocks. They looked as sweet as any chocolate, and their
frocks were like the cream part. I felt like eating them
right up! You see I was very lonely, as we were away
«down South in Dixie” where mamma took me to get
well, one winter, I was sitting on the verandah doing
nothing—when the gate opened, and the chocolate creams
came walking in one by one, and stood all in a row before
me. One was shy and held her finger in her mouth all the
time. One giggled behind a fan, one turned her back to
hide a big bunch of flowers, and smiled at me over her
and the other one had a muf/—on that very



shoulder-
warm day !

They all stood still, till I said “Good-morning.” Them
they all giggled, and the one with the flowers said, ““ Momnim’
youl” Thenls ae “What's your name?” and the one
with the muff said, “Sara Ann ‘Mufiina—calls me Muff for
short, "kase I likes a all to carry.” Then she nudged the
one with the flowers, and she said, “Name's Judy Bhue-
bell, “kase [likes flowers so much.” The one with the fan
never took it down from her face, but said from belhiind itt iim
a muffly voice, “My name's Ethelberta Fancy—calls me
Fan for short—kase I always has a fan,”"—and them she
giggled. The one with her finger in her mouth would m't
say a word—and the flower girl “had to tell her mame, Slhe
said, “Name’s Tilly Pepp’mint—kase she lowes pep mints
so an’ she always has one in her mouth, an’ can’t spealk |!”

22



to
Ga



THEY WERE THE JOLLIEST LITTLE CHOCOLATE CREAMS I EVER SAW.



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then the muff girl said, “ What's your name?” AndI
told them “ Charlie,” and she said, “I’ve brought you some-
thin’ right here in my muff—guess what?” And [had to
guess a lot of things—but none of them was right, so she took
outa little paper Box from her muff, and I undid it, and what
do you think! A lot of glass beads—red and blue and all
colors. She said, ‘“ Youcan string ‘em on a thread, an’ make
necklaces an’ rings.” And then the flower girl said, ‘I’ve
brought you somethin’ too!”—and she gave me her big
bunch of lovely flowers.

Then the fan girl said, “So have I brought you a pres-
ent.” And she took her hand from behind her back and
gave me—what do you suppose? A dear little live ¢urdle
tied by a string! Was n't ¢haé nice?

Then they all looked at the peppermint girl—and she put
her finger in her mouthand hung herhead. They all giggled
again—an’ when [I said, «What's the matter?” hens the
flower girl said, ‘Tilly Pepp’mint, she set out to bring
you some pepp’mints—but ‘fore she got here, she eat them
all“up!”

Then Tilly Pepp’mint said, “I’ve got one left”—but I
said, “ No thank you. Yoweat it.” Soshe popped it in her
mouth, and they all giggled together !

I asked them to stay and play with me—but they only
giggled again, and went out of the gate one by one, and
away down the road. They were too shy to stay. But
they were the jolliest little chocolate creams I ever saw.

Elizabeth S. Tucker.

24





O, YOU DEAR LITTLE TROUBLESOME TOTS!







SIX WIDE-AWAKEsS.

IX wide-awake babies, bless them !
That means six baths, six breakfasts this morning ; at
least as many kisses as there are toes and fingers apiece.
O, you dear little troublesome tots !
What a small place in the house you seem to fill; the
smallest chair, the tiniest bed. But if you slip away, there
is a hollow which ‘all the king’s horses, and all the king’s

men” cannot fill.
Each one, as it comes along, its grandma has called the

d

dearest and sweetest she ever saw.

Babies are like parrots and monkeys in doing and saying
what people about them do and say.

No cross nurse has ever slapped one baby in this picture ;
no naughty brother has struck one. Only gentle hands
and voices have been around them—at least we hope so.
Only pleasant thoughts and fancies are dropped into their
mind gardens; so, only lovely actions spring up and blos-
som there; peep through their eyes and see.

Of course they are not all the time so dreadfully clean as
when they were having their picture taken. A little fresh
dirt does not hurt any baby.

The boy who is pulling-his playmate’s hair seems to be
doing it politely! Behind him is another fellow, a whole-
sale dealer in flowers. He has given the girl on each side
of him a handful, and the patient one in the corner knows
she will have some, soon.

26



SIX WIDE-AWAKES,

You would have a heartache if you knew how many little
folks in great cities have no flowers.

Paradise Park in New York is a shabby bit of dry grass,
with a few miserable trees, and some wooden benches.

It is never like the Paradise we dream about, except on
Saturday afternoons in summer time. Then, down the
narrow street, drives a big wagon, filled with country flowers.

These are given into dirty little hands that get soap and
water as rarely as they get flowers, there. Old people come,
carrying babies, all forlorn; every one gets a flower.

O, how the children push and crowd to get near, for fear
there will not be enough for all. Hundreds of boys and
girls, shouting : ‘‘O, please give mea rose!” “O, lady, my
mother is sick ; do send her a growing flower!” “Say, mister !
This’ere little chap didn’t get any!”

O, dear! You cannot hear your own voice in the hub-
bub.

At last the flowers are all given away; the basket must
be turned up side down, and the wagon driven out of sight
before the children start.

There they go! They carry the bright, sweet-smelling
flowers up into garrets, down into cellars, where there is not
‘one other single pretty thing.

Yellow haired German babies; dark skinned Italian
‘babies; milk white Irish babies.

Listen to papa! He says they are all Amerzcan babies ;
we must never forget that; although their fathers and
mothers came over the sea.

27



“SIX BEST BABIES.

Some people say they like six babies best when they

are fast asleep !
Six shops full of candies, six cafés full of cakes and pies.

which we cannot reach, are not so good as one box of
sweets at home, to eat with someone we love.

So, six little pets asleep in the public garden, are not
worth so much to you and me as our one baby at home,
asleep or awake.

If we could only help ourselves to one of these tired
babes, who has nodded off to sleep among the posies !
But how could we choose, while the fringed curtains are
down before the windows of baby’s face ?

Step softly! There! One has heard you and lifts her
head, rubbing her dimpled knuckles against her sleepy eye.
Now if she catches sight of us, she may cry long and loud!

Wonder if she has any teeth! Suppose she can talk?

How came these human flowers here? Did they fall, to-
gether, from some balloon passing overhead? It would.
be a pity to let one fall where it was not wanted !

Somebody loves these babies ; for see how cunning are
their little gowns and bibs. This small jacket shows how
fast this fellow has grown.

It may be a baby show, and we have come too early.

28



6z



IT MAY BE A BABY SHOW.



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Wise babies! When there is nothing else to do it is
best to go to sleep. That will save your shoes and your
nerves, and keep the spectacle man far off.

You know some one who loves a pug?

You ask what babies are good for?

Good for earth and good for heaven; good to frolic, to
learn, to love, to grow up to be good boys and girls.

Pugs and puppies are amusing; but don’t put one in the
scales against a dewy-lipped, starry-eyed baby! Pug would
be ashamed of himself, and wriggle away, and run to the
kennel or the stable.

But you have no baby at your house?

Well, you can find places where there is a baby for
every brick in the sidewalk. To give one of them a nice
home, with a bed and a bath and something to eat would be
jolly; bye-and-bye it would be better than a dog when it
could talk to you and sing.

You know a cat that is loved like a baby ?

Don’t bother to tell us about that, either.

Why, babies are even better than flowers, for they bloom
all the year round!

In some countries, people do not think very much of
baby-girl ; but here she is worth her weight in gold ; worth
just as much as her brother.

Hush! The babies are sleeping yet !

Perhaps this is all the show there is to be!

Let us tiptoe home, and leave them dreaming among the
flowers.

30



re



DEAR LITTLE JAPANESE GIRLS.



IN JAPAN.

ERHAPS your name is Rose or Lily; or perhaps you
know some little girls who have been named after
those flowers. But did you ever know one named Azku ?
That isa common name in Japan; the chrysanthemum
is called Azéu there; it is much easier to spell and to
speak, surely. In this picture of dear little Japanese girls,
Kiku is showing you some of her name-flowers.

The little friend next to her is named Haru. You think
that is a queer name? Everything is queer in Japan, but
the flowers! Haru, and all the girls and ladies must have
a ribbon tied about the waist; what we call a sash, they
call oz.

Next to Haru is pretty Ilo. Do you see how the hair
of each little beauty is tucked up in a puff, waxed smooth
and shiny? Nobody’s hair in Japan is dressed every day!
At night, people do not tumble about on hot feather pil-
lows, soft beds and bouncing springs. They sleep upon
mats on the floor, which keep them straight; and their
heads rest on a box; in that way the hair is not rumpled,
but keeps beautifully smooth for several days. You would
rather see it allrumpled ? But you are not in Japan! How
would you like to wake up and find your house rocking;
glass and silver jingling; pictures swinging from the walls ;
and know it was an earthquake that was rocking you?
They are quite used to such little things in Japan.

32



IN JAPAN.

The fourth pet is Sono; she wonders if you were ever
carried on your brother’s back? In Japan, you might see a
boy coming towards you on the street and think he surely
had two heads! But as he passed you would see he was
taking his younger brother or sister for a walk ; or, perhaps
was playing with a baby tied to his back!

You would admire the splendid kites which are almost
always to be seen flying in the air, with wonderful shapes
and faces. Men make the kites and fly them with the
boys. And what is just as delightful, the women play with
dolls! They make clothes for them, and carry them out
on the streets, just as you little girls do in our parks.

Everybody in Japan has flowers and umbrellas.

They spend most of their time out of doors: they do
not teach the children very much; they play about almost
as idly as kittens, and are good-natured and gentle.

They have black hair, bright eyes and clear yellow skin.

You would not change your blue-eyed baby for Kiku’s
little sister!) And she would not have such an ugly black
umbrella as your mamma’s !

The umbrellas in Sono’s house are of bright colors, with
flowers and pictures on them. On the mantel are lovely
snakes and toads, in bronze and china, and over the doors
are horrid big heads with great round eyes and grinning
mouths and long red tongues.

You would want to run away from the sight?

But you would laugh at it if you had grown where these
Jap babies grew, in Japan. :

33



FOUR LITTLE -PLUMS!1

Rk. PLUM lives ona Long Island farm, where there is
room and time for these little Plums to grow and
ripen in the sun. The smallest, sweetest Plum is a graft
from a Quaker farm; her great-grandma sat on the facing
seat ina Friend’s Meeting-house, and never said anything
more severe than thee and thou.
The next Plum has another flavor. Her other great-
grandma went up on the roof and rang a bell, when the
British soldiers were in the house, looking for money and
silver spoons. Crack, went the muskets, daxg went the
guns below; ding-a-ling-aling, went the girl’s dinner-bell ;
not a shot hitting her. The soldiers were scared, and
jumped into their boats; they were rowing out of the har-
bor when the neighbors came to help. Look at this second
Plum ; she could do the same.

Master Ned battles with the bugs in the melon patch and
potato field as his great-grandfather fought for Molly
Stark, with all his might. Master Ned feeds the chickens
and has a share of eggs and fowls to sell.

They have a garden patch and plant what they please;
they sow seeds, they pull weeds, and their father sells their
lettuce and radishes with his own,

The mother—the best Plum of all !~gives the children a
sum of money every Saturday. They keep account books,
and put down what money they get, where it goes and
what it buys. At the top of the cover of Ned’s book, is this :

34







FOUR LITTLE PLUMS!



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

NED PLUMS ALOUENS.

You will make al/owance for his spelling; his counting is
all right.

Out of this money must come all the presents they make
in the year; Birthdays and Christmas. They do not give
what other people buy for them. .

If you could be in this Plum orchard a while you would
learn many things you are not expected to learn in the city.

Patty and Ned counted twenty kinds of weeds in a walk
with me ;—dandelion, catnip, mullein, plantain, snap-dragon,
mayweed, dock, clover, smartweed, burdock, chickweed,
thistle, sheep-sorrel, pigweed, horse-sorrel, tansy, pepper-
mint, penny-royal and spearmint. All in a morning walk,
by the roadside, in the woods and by the brook.

And the birds! The country children love the birds, and
know their names and how and where they build their nests.

Louise, the big sister, is a little mother to baby, and saves
her dear mamma many steps in each busy day.

It is too bad that their Newfoundland dog, Roger, is not
in the picture. In the country, a big, faithful dog, seems part
of a child’s life. Roger hunts the weasel in the stone wall,
which catches the young chickens. Roger finds the wood-
chuck, and keeps him shut in, till Ned or his father comes.

You may be sure that wide-awake country children have
many chances to learn easily, from day to day, what city
boys and girls learn slowly, from books and tutors.

Do you wish you were a Plum?

36



Le



THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY,



THE PAIRIES OF - TO-DAY.

HE first fairy was looking out of her mother’s window

when she spied a pale-faced lady, alone, at a window

opposite. She kissed her hand; the lady smiled, but wiped
her eyes. Somebody said that lady had lost her children.

“Mamma,” said the first fairy, ‘you say my bright eyes
find lost things! May I help that lady find her children ?”

“You may, dear Sunbeam !”

And when Sunbeam shone into the quiet room across the
street, the lady grasped the little hand, which led her down
the street, around a corner into a dark alley.

“There are so many children here,” she said, “if your
lost babies are not among them, you can help yourself !”

The sunbeam and the lady’s gold lighted up the alley,
and a Day Nursery grew out of the first fairy’s heart.

The second fairy was dancing among the flowers when
she saw an old man going by ; all bent with troubles. The
fairy filled his hands with flowers. Looking down upon her
smiling face, he breathed the sweetness of her lilies and
roses, until “e smzled/ Only a fairy could make old Mr.
Moneybags smile.

The third fairy saw little Sammy Bowlegs hobbling upon
his ankles, before his mother’s door.

“What makes him walk so queerly?” the fairy asked.

Mrs. Bowlegs (so the street-boys called her) answered
from the door:

‘“T wash all day, honey ; and Sammy takes care of him-

38



THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY.

self; he walked too soon, and made his legs crooked for
lite le

“T think not!” said fairy ; hurrying on to see her uncle,
a very great doctor.

“Why, Fly-away ; how came you here alone?” he asked.

“T could n’t wait for mamma! I just found the lamest
boy! Cure him, and I will give you my darling dog!”

Now, if you pass that laundry door, you will see Sammy,
quite happy, with a sort of harness on his feet and with
splinted legs. No more tears fall into the tub ; he and his
mother believe in fairies !

My fourth fairy, like a honey-bee, sucks sweets from
every thing! If it rains, she says: ‘“ Now I can clean my
dollys’ house and wash their clothes !”

If the company expected does not come, she says:
“Never mind, mamma; wecan play with each other!”

When -Meg broke off the best doll’s head, she said,
“We'll wrap it up and play it is a mummy!”

When papa goes away she comforts mamma: ‘‘ There
will be the letters! And we will meet him when the steamer
comes in!”

Her mouth is a rainbow between her smiles and tears.

Perhaps she is the best kind of every-day-fairy, for a
pattern, to copy after. She is ready to make the best of
everything. Are you ?

Don’t be looking in hollow trees and under toad-stools
for fairies. But look in the glass. You will see there a

good fairy, or a bad fairy—which shall it be ?

39



“PEACHES AND CREAM]!”

Haris is the luscious name by which these lovely, lively
little women are known.

If you do not like this kind of Peaches and Cream, per:
haps you have not any heart, or it has fallen into the place
where you put the other kind of peaches and cream.
Such jolly little Peaches—such sweet little Creams !

It was Aunt Bess, in her studio at Woodstock, who
gave them this name. She had invited these four little
neighbors to visit her boys, Max and Fritz.

One of these little women loves to sew. Aunt Bess has
given her a work-bag with a doll’s apron in it, blunt scis-
sors and a wee thimble. This is Mabel. Max made that
wreath for her to wear while her picture is being painted.
Mabel is as sweet as cream.

One of the Peaches, Constance, is fond of “making
believe” stories and plays. Aunt Bess has given her a
pad tied with bright ribbons, to make a book.

The pink-cheeked Peach, Agatha, wanted a slate like
Fritz’s; so Aunt Bess has hung one on her arm, to have
all to her own self, forever and ever, or till it is broken.

The shyest little Cream, Dorothy, wanted to write a
letter to her mamma, who is far away; so Max gave hera
big sheet of paper.

40



Iv



SUCH JOLLY LITTLE PEACHES—SUCH SWEET LITTLE CREAMS}



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

These four little women are growing too fast; that is
all the fault anybody can find with them.

Aunt Bess says there is only one thing to do about it.
And she is going to do it!

They have had a tea-party, on her piazza; where the
white roses climb on the lattice. The pitcher of tea-kettle
tea is empty, and the goodies are all eaten, and now for
ithe picture! Za¢ will not let them grow, after to-day.
Here they shall stay, so little—so big. :

Now if there were a market, really and truly, where a
Mr. Cupid was selling such Peaches and Cream, which one
of these would you like to buy, little boy? Wahzsper, no
one shall hear!

Agatha, with the slate, would tease you to make pictures,
all day. :

Dorothy would perhaps get crying for her mamma and
the Cream would be a/most¢ sour.

Constance would make a “ Little Boy Blue” of you, or a
“Jack the Giant-killer;” you must always be playing you
are somebody else, when Constance is the mistress.

And Mabel is so fond of cutting! Your hair and your
kite, and your heart-strings might all be snipped before
you knew it.

Don’t be in a hurry, dear little man, to get this kind of
Peaches and Cream. Be v-e-r-y sure which kind you really
want. Then wait till you have a nice place all your own
to put one in; a place to lock up; and there will be only
one key, and you will carry that safely in your heart.

42



RHYMES
HELEN GRAY CONE.



A TREASURY OF STORIES, /INGLES AND RHYMES.

A LECTURE.

===

H® subject was a chestnut ;
Her lecture was a treat;
She said, a fairy hid inside

~ And lived upon the meat.

And if you tried to roast it,
You'd find if this were true;

The shell would open with a “pop!”
While off the fairy flew.

The only proof still lacking,—
And somehow hard to get,—
Was just to see the fairy fly,
Which had not happened yet!
ffelen Gray Cone.

44





J

HER SUBJECT WAS A CHESTNUT

HER LECTURE WAS A TREAT.

45



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

LITT BULLERFCIES.

HAT are you following, wistful eyes?
The golden flocks’ of the butterflies ?
What is the secret you long to know?

Whence and whither they come and go?

Whence each comes like a flying flower,
Is a fairy tale for a twilight hour;
Of a wingless creature that can but creep,

Of a silken shroud and a folded sleep.

Whither each goes. is a dream for you

To dream on your pillow a long night through ;

Of boundless fields and a wind set free,

And a blue sky deep as the soundless sea!
Helen Gray Cone.

40







WHAT ARE YOU FOLLOWING, WISTFUL EYES?
THE GOLDEN FLOCKS OF THE BUTTERFLIES?

47



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

THE MAY BASKET.

IOLET and Maidenhair,

Once in happy weather,

Went to hang a May-basket,
Straying off together.

Up the street and down the lane
They wandered east and west ;

But brought it back to mother’s door,
Because they loved her best!

fTelen Gray Cone.

48



VIOLET AND MAIDENHAIR,
ONCE IN HAPPY WEATHER,

WENT TO HANG A MAY-BASKET,
STRAYING OFF TOGETHER.

49





A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RAYVAIES.

NOVEMBER PLUMES:

LOVE the white chrysanthemums ;
For when their time of blooming comes
I think of Fairy Princes brave,

With great snow-plumes that float and wave.

Like proud white princes, fair and bold,
They grace the gardens in the cold.
And toss along the Autumn air
b e
A scent of something strange and rare ;
Fit flowers for my white prince to wear!
flelen Gray Cone.

5°





aXe

A SCENT OF SOMETHING STRANGE AND RARE;
FIT FLOWERS FOR MY WHITE PRINCE TO WEAR!

51



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

SPRING WONDER.

OVELOCKS and ‘Sweetlips,
Rose and Kiss-me-quick,
All wonder, wonder, wonder

At the downy baby chick.

‘““Cheep, cheep,” the chick says;
The meaning can you tell?
‘“‘T wonder, wonder, wonder

At the world outside the shell!”

O big world, O bright world,
And wider than they know,
Be good to little chirping chicks
That wonder at you so!
Flelen Gray Cone.

52





ALL WONDER, WONDER, WONDER
AT THE DOWNY BABY CHICK.

53



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

SECRETS.

OU’LL never tell about the humming-bird
That came into the garden yesterday—
No, not a word! for may be if he heard
He'd
stay

away !

And other secrets we will keep just.so,
And you'll tell only me, and I'll tell you;
And Toddles, when he’s big enough, you know,
We'll
tell
him

too!

fLelen Gray Cone.

54



wi

AND OTHER SECRETS WE WILL KEEP JUST SO,
AND YOU’LL TELL ONLY ME, AND I’LL TELL YOU.

55





A TREASURY O# STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

UNDER THE MISTLETOE.

——_-
=

Aco the rosy boys and girls
The mystic shoots like watchers lean,
With glistening berries grey as pearls,

And listening elfin eas of green.

“Though folks are queer, this time of year,
We'll do just what they told us to;

lust why it is, we’re not so clear,
But you kiss me and I'll kiss you!”

Flelen Gray Cone.

56



JUST WHY IT IS WE’RE NOT SO CLEAR,
BUT YOU KISS ME AND PLL KISS YOU!

57





A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

THE FIRST FOREBODING.

OT many griefs has Daffodil;
Not many dews her dear eyes fill;
Her voice is gay, her smile is sunny,

Her little heart is full of honey.

Yet I have seen her sad, because
Her own gray kitten, Velvet-Paws,
Will grow and change—just think of that !—

Will change and grow, and be a cat!

How pleasant life would be, oh dear!
If daffodils bloomed all the year,
And willow catkins stayed just so,
And own gray kittens didn’t grow!
flelen Gray Cone.

58











HOW PLEASANT LIFE WOULD BE, OH DEAR!
IF OWN GRAY KITTENS DIDN’T GROW!

59



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

“ONE, TWO, THREE—MISS1”

OW, Flaxen-Vioss in the red riding hat,
What is the thing that you are puzzled at?
I fancy it is something like to this:
Why cannot anybody keep right on?
Why is it, that however high you've gone,

At last you miss?

I can’t tell why; but this is the amount—
If you should jump longer than you can count,

As many times as grass-blades are, and past,—
As many times as there are stars in heaven,—
Yes, if you jumped right on to twenty-leven,

You'd miss at last!

It’s just the reason why the bubbles break;
Why water-lilies cannot hold awake ;
Why fire-fly lanterns go out now and then;
Why often elder folk, in life’s grave game,
Just have to stop, sigh “miss!” and without shame
Begin again.

flelen Gray_ Cone.

60





WHY IS 1T, THAT HOWEVER HIGH YOU’VE GONE,

AT LAST YOU MISS?

67



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RAHYVMES.

LILY.

LILY, wonder-sweet
And pure as snow,
I cannot touch you,

Though I love you so.

It seems as though,
From out the blue aloft,
A cloud of angels drifted,

Slow and soft.

And resting on your tall green stalks
I found them.
With wings half-folded, and

Heaven’s fragrance round them.

Flelen Gray Cone.



|
|





O LILY, WONDER-SWEET AND PURE AS SNOW.
- 1 CANNOT TOUCH YOU, THOUGH | LOVE YOU SO.

63



ee te eae My ee Sh a ene



A LREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

BO-REEP.

Ae anl Dimplechin,
Chancing on the clever plan,
Played Bo-peep, with merry din,

Round an outspread fan.

“Now I see you!” What delight !
“ Now then, now then, 7 see youl”
How they laughed! The day was bright,

And the fan was blue.

Why was this so sweet? Ah, why?
Weary women, grown-up men,
That’s the secret you and IJ
Neer shall know again !
fT[elen Gray Cone.

64





PLAYED BO-PEEP, WITH MERRY DIN,
ROUND AN OUTSPREAD FAN.

65



A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

A CHRISTMAS STOCKING.

UST be patient, dolly,
We will get you out!
Seems to me she’s very good,

Doesn’t cry nor pout!

Didn’t hear the sleigh-bells—
Wonder when he came?
Aren’t you glad her eyes are brown?

Wonder what’s her name?

Guess he wouldn’t like it,
Smothered up all night,
If he found a chimney once
Fitted him so tight.
: flelen Gray Cone.

66







JUST BE PATIENT, DOLLY, WE WILL GET YOU OUT!
SEEMS TO ME SHE’S VERY GOOD, DOESN’T CRY NOR POUT!

67





BLUE EYES,

’

’S BLUE

BABY

AS CLEAR AS SKIES OF SPRING,
ARE WIDE WITH INNOCENT SURPRISE.

WHILE BLOSSOM:

68



THE DANDELION CHAIN.

HE green field smoothed
her velvet gown
The gifts of Spring to hold;
Spring laughed, and in her
lap threw down
A shower of guinea-gold.

The burnished dandelions
burn
Beneath the sunny sky;

But dandelion-gold will turn

To silver by and by.



So let us lnk a chain, to
deck,
In this gay golden hour,
Our Blossom-Baby’s rose-leaf
neck,
That’s softer than a flower:

While Blossom-Baby’s blue,
blue eyes,
As clear as skies of Spring,
Are wide with innocent. sur-
prise
To see the shining thing!

Llelen Gray Cone.







TELL ME, WHAT DOES THE HUSK YOU HOLD
IN THE WARM LITTLE FINGERS, HIDE?

7°



HIDDEN

ILKEN-LOCKS
summer corn,

Softly a-stir in the dreamy

air,
Two round years, since you

were born,

Have rolled away and been
lost somewhere.

in the

People are wise at two years
old,
Serious-lipped and_ sober-
eyed ;
Tell me, what does the husk
you hold
In the warm little fingers,
hide?

71

PEARLS.

What if we pried and tried
to see ?—
Under the
tangled silk,
Folded away from you and
me,
Wonderful pearls, as white
as milk!

light-green,

—Ah, she looks up, and smiles,
and shows,

Parting her lips, my grave
wee girl,
Milky-white in
rows,

Treasures of dearer pearl!

flelen Gray Cone.

their tiny











I KNOW THE ROGUE WHO DRAINS THEM,
A ROBBER BOLD AND SMALL;

THE LAST DROP IN THE WINE-SKIN
HE LIKES THE BEST OF ALL.

72





FAIRY WINE-SKINS.

FAIRY WINE-SKINS.

HEN dusky grapes in clusters
Weigh down the ropes of vine,
Like dusty leathern bottles,

Plumped out with fairy wine,

I know the rogue who drains them,
A robber bold and small;

The last drop in the wine-skin
He likes the best of all.

Each russet sack he presses,
And stains with red the tips
Of all his gypsy fingers,
And both his eager lips.

O Peach-Cheeks, when the fairies
By moonlight seek the vine,
And find a heap of empty sacks

But not a drop of wine,

73



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Just fancy how they’ll grumble
Because you've spoiled the feast,

While you are soundly sleeping,
Not caring in the least;



Lids fast and lashes fallen,
And dreaming that it’s true

That all the world’s a great round grape,
Full ripe, and meant for you!

74



A SOLDIER OF THE SNOIVS.

A SOLDIER OF THE SNOWS.

Y brave boy loves the winter-time ;
He loves the bright, wild days
When the strong sun shines, and the icy trees
With a host of bayonets blaze;
And the silver bullets drop left and right,
And the wind goes charging past
With the whirl of a thousand cuirassiers

And the sound of a trumpet-blast !

From a veteran tree, all.scarred and gray,
He has wrested a steely bough;

He has captured the enemy’s colors gay,—
In his face he bears them now!

He bears them in his merry face,
That’s like the bold red rose;

And henceforth he shall ever be
My Soldier of the Snows!

75







FROM A VETERAN TREE, ALL SCARRED AND GRAY,
HE HAS WRESTED A STEELY BOUGH.

76



A RHYME OF CHANGING CHILDREN,

A RHYME OF CHANGING
CHILDREN.

HERE are last year’s little folk,
Whom we loved and knew?
—Hair a trifle browner gold;

Eyes not quite so blue.

Where’s that curve in Rose-Red’s cheek
Used to please me so?

Where, the curls that Love-Locks had
Not so long ago?

Just as Spring in Summer’s lost,
Sure it is and clear,
Every child is children four

In a single year!

77





eS

WHERE’S THAT CURVE IN ROSE-RED’S CHEEK
USED TO PLEASE ME SO?

78



FAIRY TALES.





THE THREE BEARS.

ID you ever hear of the three Bears who lived in the

middle of a wood, in a- little house of their own?

One was a great big Bear with a very gruff deep voice;

the second was a middling-sized Bear, with an ordinary

middling-sized voice; and the third was a little wee Bear,
with a tiny voice like a squeak.

One day, they all went out for a walk in the wood be-
fore breakfast, and while they were gone, a little girl called
Silver-locks passed by and saw the nice little house stand-
ing there. So she opened the door and walked into the
Bears’ sitting-room. On the table she saw three bowls of
smoking-hot porridge, and by the side of each bowl was a
spoon. The first bowl was very large, and by it lay a large
spoon. So Silver-locks tasted the large bowl of porridge,
but it was so hot that it burned her mouth. Then she tried
the second bowl, which was a middling-sized bowl, and had a
middling-sized spoon, but this porridge was not hot enough.

80





OS gaat



THEN SHE TRIED THE MIDDLING-SIZED BED.

81 o



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then she tried the third bowl, which was a little wee bowl,
with a little wee spoon, and the porridge was so delicious
that she ate it all up. Then she felt tired and thought that
she would like to sit down. She looked round the room,
and saw that there were three chairs there. One was a
very large chair, so she got up on that, but she found it so
hard that she soon clambered down again. Then she tried
the second chair, which was a middling-sized chair, but this
was so soft that she sank down in it, and felt quite lost.
So this did not please her, and she got off it and tried the
third chair, which was a little tiny chair, and this was so
comfortable that she sat there until the bottom came out.
And when this happened, little Silver-locks thought that
she had better go through the house and see what else was
there. So she went up-stairs, and there she found a nice
tidy little bedroom with three white beds in it. One was
quite big, and she got into that, but it was hard, like the big
chair down-stairs, so she got up again. Then she tried the
middling-sized bed, but that was too soft, like the middling-
sized chair, so that did not please her. And then she lay
down on the little bed, and this was so comfortable that she
fell fast asleep. After atime, the three Bears came in from
their walk to have their breakfast. First came the big
Bear, and when he saw the spoon in his porridge, he
roared in his big gruff voice: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN
EATING MY PORRIDGE!” Then the second Bear
came in, and he looked at his bowl, and said in his middling
voice: “ SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE!” And

82



THE THREE BEARS.

when the little bear looked at his bowl, he squeaked:
“ Someone has been eating my porridge, and has eaten tt all

up!”



“ SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE, AND HAS EATEN
IT ALL UP!”

Then the three Bears knew that someone had been in-
the house, so they looked round the room, and the big
Bear roared out: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING
IN MY CHAIR!”

‘“SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, TOO!” said
the middling-sized Bear. ‘“ Someone has been sitting in my
chair,” squeaked the little Bear, “and has sat the bottom

83



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

out /” Then the three Bears looked very grave, and they
went up-stairs to their bedroom. The big Bear found his
bed all tossed, so he roared: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN
LYING IN MY BED!” SomeEonE HAS BEEN LYING IN
MY BED, TOO!” said the middling-sized Bear. Then the
little bear squeaked in his wee voice: ‘Someone has been
lying in my bed, and here shezs/” And they all three col-
lected round Silver-locks, who was gazing at them in terror,
for when she heard the voice of the big Bear she thought
it was thunder in her dreams. When the second Bear had
spoken she had not noticed him at all because his voice
was quite an ordinary voice, but when she heard the little
Bear squeaking, she had waked immediately. Suddenly
she jumped off the bed, and: leaped out of the open window,
and fled away into the wood.

“WELL, SHE MIGHT HAVE TOLD US HER
NAME,” roared the big Bear.

‘CERTAINLY,’ said the middling-sized Bear.

“ Certaznly,” squeaked the little wee Bear.

But little Silver-locks was never seen or heard of any
more,

84











ON HER FEET WERE SLIPPERS THAT SHONE LIKE GLASS.

85



CINDERELLA.

NCE upon a time there lived a widower and his
daughter, and she was as sweet a child as ever lived!

The father decided to marry again, and took for a wife a
widow with two daughters, who he fancied would be company
for his own little girl. But they were cross and unpleas-
ant, and treated the child most shamefully, making her work
like a servant and dress in rags, while they took their ease,
and dressed in silks and fine laces.) When her work was
done she sat on the hearth, among the ashes and cinders,
and for that reason they called her Cinderella. The
stepmother treated her just as unkindly, and the poor girl
had a hard time of it, but made no complaint to her father.
One day the king sent heralds to proclaim that a ball
would be given for the prince, his son, and all the young
girls were invited to dance at it. Such a time as there
was! The two sisters were in a great flutter of prepara-
tion, and Cinderella was kept busy from early morning till

86



CINDERELLA.

late at night. At last the evening came, and Cinderella
dressed her two sisters, and they went off to the ball in
grandeur, while she sat down in the chimney corner and
wept bitter tears, While she sat thus her fairy godmother
appeared and asked what was the matter. “ You want to
go to the ball?” said she. ‘Well, so you shall.” “But
how can I go in these rags?” cried Cinderella. ‘I'll soon
fix that. Only do as I tell you,” was the reply. A pump-
kin was brought in and a rat-trap filled with rats and mice,
and these, at a touch from the magic wand, were trans-
formed into a fine coach with driver and footmen. Another
touch of the wand, and Cinderella’s rags turned into a
beautiful dress, and on her feet were slippers that shone
like glass. “Now go to the ball,” said the godmother,
‘but be sure and come away before twelve o’clock, or you
will find yourself in rags.”

Cinderella went to the ball, and was the most beautiful
woman there, and the prince fell madly in love with her.
It was nearly twelve o’clock when Cinderella remembered,
and flew away—just in time. For outside the door her
clothes turned to rags, and the rats and mice went scurry-
ing off. Soon after she reached home the sisters came in
and told her all about the ball, and the lovely princess who
was there. She begged to go to the second ball, which
was to take place the next night; but they laughed at her
scornfully. The fairy godmother came again, and used
her magic wand, and at the ball Cinderella was the admira-
tion of all. The prince was so attentive and the time

87



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

passed so swiftly that Cinderella forgot. And when she

looked at the clock, it was on the stroke of twelve! She

-— left in haste, and as she ran down the

stairs her clothes changed to rags, and

away went one of her glass slippers.

The prince picked it up, and

though the porters at the door

were questioned, they said that

no princess had passed,—only a

little kitchen-wench had run

through.

Meanwhile Cinderella had
run home all the way in
had only just arrived
returned, full of wonder

happened, and of conjec-

the beautiful

















her rags, and
when the sisters
at what had
ture as to who
princess really : > was.

And the prince oo fell sick with
love; so the a king sent heralds
round the town 4 to inform the

people that os “ whoever could
put on . the gage = little glass slip-
per dropped at = the ball should

marry his son. 4s SHE RAN DOWN THE STAIRS
Everyone HERCLOTHES CHANGED tried it on, but

TO RAGS.

it was too tiny, and fitted no

one.

88



CINDERELLA.

Finally, the heralds came to the two sisters, but they
fared no better, tug and strain as they would.

“Let me try it,” said Cinderella; and the sisters
objected. But the herald said that his orders were to try it
on everyone.

So Cinderella put it on with the greatest ease, and then
she drew the fellow-slipper from her pocket, and when she
had put this on, she stood up in her robes of gold and
silver, and the sisters knew that she was the princess they
had seen, and begged her forgiveness,

Then Cinderella married the prince, and soon after the
two sisters, who had learned to subdue their pride, married
two lords of the court.

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

HERE was once a wood-cutter and his wife, who had
one little girl. She was very pretty, with sweet blue
eyes and golden hair; and she could feed the pigs, and sew
seams, and churn the butter; so she was very useful to her
mother. In the next village lived her old grandmother,
who loved her so much that she made a scarlet hood for her
to keep her warm, and when the neighbors saw it they called
her “ Little Red Riding Hood.”

One day her mother said to her: “Granny has been very
ill. Put on your hood and run and see her, and take her
these cheesecakes and this pat of fresh butter that I have
made for her.” Little Red Riding Hood started off very

89



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

happily, with her basket on her arm, and soon came to a
wood that lay between the two villages. Just then a wolf,
who was passing, saw her, andcame uptospeaktoher. He
would very much have liked to. kill her and eat her, but
there were some wood-cutters cutting trees close by, and he
did not dare to touch her. So he came up to herin the
most friendly way and said: ‘‘ Where are you going, Little
Red Riding Hood ?”

“T am going to see my grandmother, dear Mr. Wolf,”
answered the little girl. ‘Where does she live?” asked
the wolf. ‘Oh, she lives in the first-cottage past yonder
mill. She is very ill, so I am taking her these cheesecakes
and a pat of butter that my mother has made for her.”

“Tf she is so ill, I will go and see her too,” said the wolf.
“T will go this way, and go you through the woods, and we
will see which gets there first.” So saying, he shambled off,
and then ran all the way to the cottage.

Tap, tap, he knocked at the cottage door. ‘“ Who is
there?” asked grandmother. ‘It is I,” answered the wolf,
in a soft voice, “ Little Red Riding Hood; I have brought
you nice fresh cakes and butter.” |

“Pull the bobbin, and the latch will lift up,” called ‘out
the old grandmother.

And the wolf pulled the bobbin, and lifted the latch, and
entered the cottage. Then he ate up the poor old grand-
mother, and when he had quite eaten her up, he put on her
night-gown, and pulled her frilled night-cap right over his
ugly rough head, and got into bed. “The old lady was

go





HOOD OPENED THE DOOR.

NG

LITTLE: RED RID!

gt



A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

tough,” he said, “but the little girl will be a delicate
morsel.”

But Little Red Riding Hood lingered on in the wood.
It was so bright and fresh there. Everything was happy
and full of life. She chased the dainty butterflies for
very glee, and then she gathered a posy of primrosés and
violets for the old grandmother, who could not get out and
see the spring flowers grow. At last, tired with her play,
she set off to reach her grandmother’s cottage.

She knocked at the door, and the wolf, softening his
voice as much as possible, called out: “Pull the bobbin and
the latch will lift up.” Little Red Riding Hood opened
the door and walked in.

“Put the basket on the table, and come into bed with
me,” said the wolf, “for I feel cold.” Little Red Riding
Hood thought that her grandmother’s voice was very hoarse,
but then she remembered that this might be on account of her
bad cold, and being an obedient little girl, she gotinto bed.

But when she saw the hairy arms she began to grow
frightened. “What long arms you have, grandmother.”

“The better to hug you with, my dear!”

Then she saw the long ears sticking up outside the night-
cap. “ What great ears you have, grandmother.”

“Phe better to hear you with, my dear!”

‘What large eyes you have, grandmother.”

‘The better to see you with, my dear!”

“But what great teeth you have, grandmother.” “The
better to eat you with, my dear!” And so saying, the

92



LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

wicked wolf fell upon poor Little Red Riding Hood and
ate her all up.

That evening, as the wood-cutters were coming home
from their work, they saw Little Red Riding Hood pulling
flowers in the wood. They called her, but she took no
notice, and walked on through the wood till she came to
the grandmother's cottage. Here she vanished, and the
woodcutters, bursting open the door, found the wolf lying
there asleep, and slew him with their axes.

Oftentimes in the woods you will see Little Red Riding
Hood walking along with the basket on her arm, and her
posy of wild flowers in her hand, sweet and happy, as she
was in life.

ed
Es fi. AK

»



a?

“THE BETTER TO EAT YOU WITH, MY DEAR!”

93





THE BABES IN THE WOOD.

NCE upon atime a rich gentleman and his wife lived

happily with their two little children, a boy anda

girl, until a sad time came, when both the father and the
mother died.

The father had a brother, to whom he gave the care of
his beloved children.

After they became orphans, the two little children went
to live with this uncle, who was a bad man at heart,
although he was thought to be kind and good.

Their father had left to these children a large sum of
money, which was to be divided between them; but, in
case of their death, their uncle was to have it.

One day this wicked uncle sent for two robbers, and bar-
gained with them to take the children away, and kill them,
so that he might secure their fortune.

So the two robbers carried them off to the woods; but
on the way the children prattled: so innocently that one of
the robbers took pity on them, and tried to persuade the
other to allow the children to live. The other robber re-
fused, and the two fought over the matter until one of
them was killed.

The other robber then took the babes by the hand, and
told them to wait for him, and he would go away, and
come back, bringing them food; but the poor little brother
and sister wandered up and down, and the robber never
came back.

Finally, with their arms about one another, they fell
asleep, never to wake again ; and the birds came and sang
over them, and covered them with leaves.

After years had passed away, the wicked uncle met with
many misfortunes, and finally was sent to prison, and died
there.

94







THE BIRDS CAME AND SANG OVER THEM, AND COVERED
THEM WITH LEAVES.

95



TOM THUMB.

LONG time ago a ploughman wished for a child, even

if it was no bigger than his thumb. So one day

when he went home he found his wife nursing a wee baby,
that grew to the size of his thumb and then never grew
any more. One day while his mother was making a plum-
pudding, Tom fell into the bowl, and his mother stirred him
up and put him in the pot. The hot water made him kick,
and his mother took out the pudding and gave it to a pass-
ing tinker. Tom cried out “Hello!” when the tinker
sneezed, which so scared him that he threw the pudding
into a field and it tumbled to pieces. Tom crept out and
went home to his mother, who was glad to see him, though
he was all over a crust of dough and plums. One day he
was nearly drowned in the milk-jug ; another time he was
lost in the salt-box ; and when he went with his mother into
the fields to milk the cows, she tied him to a thistle with a
piece of thread, for fear he should be blown away by the
wind. Soon after, a cow ate up the thistle and swallowed

96



TOM THUMB.

Tom; but Tom scratched and kicked so she was glad to
throw him out of her mouth again. Once
as he was ploughing with his father, a great
eagle swooped down, caught him in its beak,
and carried him off to a giant’s castle.
The giant would have eaten him up, but
Tom bit his tongue, and held on by his
teeth till the giant in a rage took him
out of his mouth and
threw him into the
sea, where a large fish <
swallowed him im-
mediately. The fish
was caught and made ==
a present to King
Arthur, and when
the cook opened it,
there was Tom
Thumb inside. He HIS MOTHER WAS GLAD TO SEE HIM.

was carried to the king and became a great favorite and a

Knight of the Round Table.







97



Full Text



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The Baldwin Library

University
RMB vk
Florida



A TREASURY

OF

STORIES, JINGLES AND
RHYMES.


WHO CARES FOR DINNER! THEY WOULD RATHER PLAY WHERE THEY ARE.—fage 11.
A TREASURY

SFORIES, JINGEES. AND
RHYMES

WITH ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY VIGNETTE ILLUSTRA-
TIONS IN HALF-TONE AFTER

MAUD HUMPHREY

SHORT STORIES; FAIRY TALES; MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES;
VERSES BY EDITH M. THOMAS, ELIZABETH S. TUCKER
AND HELEN GRAY CONE



NEW YORK
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS
Copyright, 1894, by
frederick A. Stokes Company


CONTENTS.

STORIES

BY

MRS. MARY RICE MILLER

AND
ELIZABETH S. TUCKER.

A Dandelion Dream
The Nursery Band .
Fauntleroy Park

The Holly Boy
Chocolate Creams

Six Wide-awakes

“ Six Best Babtes”

In Japan.

Four Little Plums

The Fairies of To-day
“« Peaches and Cream!”

RHYMES

BY
HELEN GRAY CONE.
A Lecture. i : ‘ ; :
Little Butter flies
The May Basket
November Plumes
Spring Wonder
Secrets 3
Under the Mistletoe
The First Foreboding
© One, Two, Three—Miss”
Lily : ; :

II
14
16
20
22
26
28

2

34

40
6 CONTENTS.

Bo-Peep

A Christmas “Stocking

The Dandelion Chain

Hidden Pearls

Fairy Wine-skins

A Soldier of the Snows

A Rhyme of Changing Ce cn

FAIRY TALES.

The Three Bears

Cinderella

Little Red Riding Hood

The Babes in the Wood
Tom Thumb :

Jack and the Beanstalk

Goody Two Shoes

Beauty and the Beast

Puss in Boots

The Ugly Duckling

The Sleeping Beauty

Little Snow White

Hop O My Thumb

Aladdin :

Jack, the Giant Killer

The Bluebird

The White Cat

The Musicians of Bremen

Blue Beard :

Pretty Goldilocks

RHYMES

BY

ELIZABETH 8S. TUCKER.

Guinea Pigs ;
Child and Lamb

64
66
69
ia
73
75
77

80
86
89
94

98
102
104
107
IIO
112
115
117
120
124
125
128
129
130
133

137
139
CONTENTS.

Pussy Cat Gray
My Donkey
Pretty Poll!
Little White Mouse
The Doves
the Squirrel

“ Chicks”
The Gold-Fish Speaks
The Rabbit Dance
Dear Puggy

MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES.

Little Bo Peep

Tommy Snooks and Betse ‘y Brooks
Little Tom Tucker

Lucy Locket :
The North Wind doth Blow
Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat

Little Miss Muffeti :

As Tl was going up Primrose Hill
Little Nancy Etticote

There was a Little Boy and a Little Girl
flush a bye Baby

Little Polly Finders

Little Jack Horner

Ding, Dong, Bell

Curly Locks,

Hot Cross Buns,
Sack and Jill

Little Boy Blue

Sing a Song of Sixpence
Mistress Mary

When I was a Bachelor

Bobby Shaftoe

There was an Old Woman

I4I
143
145
147
149
151
153
155
157
159

162
164
164
166
166
168
168
170
170

180
182
182
184
186
187
8 CONTENTS.

RHYMES

BY
EDITH M. THOMAS.

The Snow-ball Chieftain
The Little Prophet ‘
March and Pussy-willow.
April the Trickster

Ln the Orchard

The Daisy :
July and the Bumble-bee
The Water-lily
September

October the Artist

The Folly

The Mistletoe

American Child :
African Child (To the Hollyhock)
Dutch Child

A Little Highlander
German Child

The Fleur-de-lis
Canadian Child

Swedish Child

Spanish Child

The Russian Child
English Child :
May Italian Child)

240

250
STORIES

BY

MRS. MARY RICE MILLER

AND
ELIZABETH 3. FUCKER:



A DANDELION DREAM.

ANDELION-DAY in the park !
How did the babies know it?

How did the birds and the bees know it? Somehow
they feel their way to what they so dearly love; they do
not wait to be told. Blue sky overhead—green grass be-
neath, sprinkled over with dandelions and babies, the best
blossoms of the spring. Little Kate is trying a dandelion
under Rob’s chin, to see if he likes butter. ‘“ Zzat isn’t the
way to make butter!” says Ruth, peeping; ‘You can't
make read butter shine on his chin without a buttercup !”

Fat little Grace toddles along to help Kenneth, the
cutest pet of all, down on the ground, too busy to speak
under his sunbonnet.

Harold and Helen are puffing away with plumped
cheeks, to blow off the down of the dandelion top.

Nurse says the flower has gone to seed; so many seeds
from each flower; and each seed has a fuzzy wing; and
they must blow and blow, and scatter the seeds, and each
one will fall somewhere and grow, and make a mintfull of
dandelion dollars for poor little girls and boys.

Now count how many fuzzy seeds are left; one, two,
why there are twelve; and that is the time of day. Come
away, for it is dinner-time!

Who cares for dinner! They would rather play where
they are than eat the best dinner in anybody’s house !

But the sun will shine another day, and dandelions will

It
A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

be as yellow as gold to-morrow. One other thing is cer-
tain, baby’s eyes will not be half so wide open, to see; and
baby will be so tired (who said so cross?) that she. cannot
half see the flowers unless she has her dinner and her nap.

One of these babies dreamed that she was lost in the
meadow on grandpa’s farm ; that the grass was tall and the
dandelions kept reaching up higher and higher, till they
hid her completely. She could not see the other children,
neither could nursey find her, though she cried as loud as
ever she could—in a dream.

“OQ, dear dandelions!” she said, please go to seed and
blow away down to twelve, to bring the dinner-time, and
surely my mamma will come to find me!”

Then she heard something which sounded like a mowing-
machine, coming, clickity-click, to cut down the grass.

-“O, what now shall Ido!” sobbed the poor baby, in her
dream. “O, dear grasshopper ; please let me sit on your
back, and jump me out of this high grass!” But he hopped
the other way. Then she felt a big bird, flying low over
her head ; he brushed her face with his black wings.

“O, if I can just catch you now, you shall fly up with
me, away, out of these tiresome old dandelions!”

She reached up her hands and caught—what do you think?
Why, her papa’s black whiskers: his dear face bending
down to kiss her, asleep. Beside her, in the crib lay the
wilted dandelions, she had brought home in the hot sunshine.
Next day, there she was again, with the others—the dearest
dandelion baby of them all!

12


ERY BAND!

S

HURRAH FOR THE NUR
THE NURSERY BAND.

oes for the Nursery Band!
Eleanor is first violin ; Beatrice has the mandolin:
Edna takes the pretty tambourine, and Marie the banjo.

Eleanor has just jumped out of her pony-cart, and run
away from her dogs, in time to begin. It is not any tune
you ever heard, she is playing. Mamma’s violin will hardly
forgive itself for giving such squeaks and shrieks,

Baby Beatrice, with the softest voice is quite satisfied
with the way she is singing, “ Daithy, Daithy you mutht
be crathy !” and her mamma’s mandolin is astonished at
its own voice, and is so proud of its musical family.

Edna thumps with her white fist at the tambourine;
whirls it merrily about to hear the tinkling of the fairy
bells; then peeps around it singing, ‘‘ Peek-a-boo, I see
you!” “I’m a band, too!” cries Marie, bobbing her yellow
curls,

“ Hey-day!” cries grandmamma; “Who ever heard every
piece in the orchestra playing a different tune, at the same
time!” ‘Zo¢s 0’ music!” said Eleanor, smiling sweetly,
with her ear upon the wailing violin.

‘Um, me make music too!” said Marie, tum-ti-tum-
tumming on her banjo.

The invitations which Aunt Carra had sent said “three
o'clock,” azd “ music by the band.”

It was almost three o'clock, and here was the band!

14
THE NURSERY BAND.

“We'll put you up on the roof”; growled Uncle Harry,
pretending to be vexed.

“©O, Uncle Harry!” cried Edna. “ You bea vead bear,
you do growl so lovely. You can dance on your hind
legs, and we will make the music for you!”

And that was really what handsome Uncle Harry was
doing, when the door opened softly, and who do you think
stood there, seeing the fun? Why, Uncle Harry’s sweet-
heart, who had come with Marie’s mamma to grandma’s
birthday party. Up and down went the dear fellow, shak-
ing his paws, bobbing his head, wobbling his russet feet as
clumsily as ever he could. The dear little band was
squealing away four—no, forty—different tunes at once.
Oh, it was the funniest dance you ever saw!

“Ting-a-ling! Tum-ti-ttum! Tra-la, tra-la!”

O, you know one can’t write such music any more than
one can hug a dancing bear—while he is dancing !

But all of a sudden the fun stopped. The bear happened
to look over his shoulder and saw his lady-love laughing
heartily, although grandma’s finger was on her lips, a sign to
keep the ladies quiet. Beyond the portiere all the mammas
were waiting to pay for the music with bon-bons and kisses.

Wasn't Uncle Harry tired? And didn’t the pretty lady
love him better than ever, when she saw how very fond of
him the /¢¢le girls were !

After the birthday supper, Uncle Harry played the
violin, while the ladies and the little girls danced ;
grandma sat smiling, enjoying this dance better than the
other—the ezghty-year-old darling.

5
FAUNTLEROY PARK.

———__
—
lo

OU don’t know where Fauntleroy Park is? Why, it is
the babies’ park ; where the sun seems glad to shine
and the children love to play.

All around it are such pretty houses, and each house has
a baby or two, and a key which unlocks the park gates.

The park calls together the people who have children.
The every-day baby parade is so distracting that folks who
have no baby to play in the quiet walks, or to sleep in the
pleasant shade, or to laugh at the sprinkling fountain, are
here tempted to buy or beg one of the dimpled darlings.

Fall pampas grass used to grow here. When the white
feathery plumes were cut down, they were given to the
children who happened to be inside the gates.

Once upon a time, a little boy carried home his arms
full: his mamma placed the gay grass flowers in a mantel
vase. Very pretty it was, until a match, which a maid was
striking, lit the plumes, which flashed and flared a pyramid
offire. It caught the white curtains ; it snatched the pretty
hangings from the poles; it quickly spoiled that pretty
house on Fauntleroy Park.

No more pampas grass’ there after that mischief: the
place where it grew is every year planted with lilies.

16
I



7

THE LILIES

G

THE BLESSED BABIES WERE SENT TODDLING AMON
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

The white-capped nurses, trundling the baby-carriages,
watch the sprouting of the bulbs in the early spring; watch
them send up their pointed leaves, and open a bit to let a
tall stalk shoot upward ; to shiver off into another leaf, and
another. At last the bunch of flower-buds is seen; rather
clumsy at first; the new babies can have no ideaof what is
coming.

Day after day the wicker carriages go by, and the babies
coo and chatter, and the buds are growing.

Mammas look out of the windows upon the Square, to
welcome the lilies, as they open in the sunshine. Now and
then a real bee, from nobody knows how far away, flies from
lily to lily, helping himself to sweets.

Sometimes sad-faced men and women peep through the
railings, walking slowly, wondering at the lilies and “the
Square-babies,” there are so many of each.

At last the lilies are all in blossom. When they begin to
fade the old park gardener comes to cut them down.

“Oh, please wait a minute!” cried agentle voice. ‘Do
let me make a picture of those darlings !”

The nurses pushed the empty carriages down the tulip
walk.

The blessed babies were sent toddling among the lilies,
where their good fairy made this picture of them.

Now, when the lilies are cut again, in Fauntleroy Park,

~may you be there to see!

18


SO HERE GOES THE HOLLY!

19
THE HOLLY BOY.

ILL WINTER does not think himself quite dressed

till somebody lends him a muff, for his dimpled

hands. He has been with his sister to the church where the

young people are winding Christmas wreaths. A lady gave
him this bunch of holly.

Holly is the favorite Christmas trimming for the house
where Will is taking it, as fast as his fat, short legs can go.

His mamma’s name is Hollis; papa calls her Hollie, and
they live in Holliston. So here goes the holly!

Will could travel faster if he were not in rubber boots.

They live where the snow lies deep in open squares, and
where boys snowball each other. Will coaxed papa to buy
these boots, so that he could frolic in the snow.

He does enjoy them very much; he feels tall and manly
when he stands up in them.

When he was called in from play, to be washed and
dressed for the walk to-day, pretty long stockings and dainty
button shoes ‘were laid out for him to wear.

He looked from boots to shoes, and began to whimper.

“Dust look at doze ‘ittle shoes!” he said scornfully ;
* Dey so ‘ittle nobody will see my feet !”

When sister found he felt so badly, she said; “O mamma!
Let him wear the boots; heis so happy in them!”

No foot-gear since Cinderella’s glass slipper has had more
to do with a body's happiness than the new rubber boots

20
THE HHOILILYY BOW,

for this Tithe mam, [His white wooll cap matehes his white
coat; the ned! stimpes on cach, match the color of the hellly-
bennies. His checks are almost as red, amd his eyes are
dark amd lowimg. His soft voice iim brokem words, his
gentile ways, you can hardly imagine, even with his picture
in your hand. Bit you see lhe is a daurlimg !

Next to midiimg, lhe lowes best to play horse. He was
idiing Ibis stick horse ome day rownd and round the room,
whem mamuna lhad a Iheadkache..

“Please, Will” she said, “be a Give more quiet !”

Boy began to move slowly, saying : “I won't let him trot,
mammal!” But soon he forgot and was making mamma giddy,

“ Deer mama. |!” he begwed, “ dust let me show his gait |”

The stick-horse wemt slower and slower, till it stopped ;
and the little rider curled wp om the foot of mamma’s couch
and wemt to sleep.

He has a crooked tomgue, when he is talking fast; at
least, he said : “Mammawamts her blub-euttoner !” when he
wemt to sister for the elove-buttoner. The vinegar-jug he
calls the yrmegur-bug. One day he came home from riding
and told that they had gome as far as the ¢az/-goat, when
he meant toll-ate.

When a mew horse was brought home Will asked with
delight : “Do we belong to that horse, now, papa?”

When sister crowds him a little, he says: “P’ese sit a
“ittle mearer off!” He does not like much butter on his
bread ; “It makes it so sippy!” he says.

Good-bye, dear Will Winter !









21
CHOCOLATE CREAMS!

TOT the kind of chocolate creams that you buy ina
shop, but four nice little brown-faced girlies, in white
frocks. They looked as sweet as any chocolate, and their
frocks were like the cream part. I felt like eating them
right up! You see I was very lonely, as we were away
«down South in Dixie” where mamma took me to get
well, one winter, I was sitting on the verandah doing
nothing—when the gate opened, and the chocolate creams
came walking in one by one, and stood all in a row before
me. One was shy and held her finger in her mouth all the
time. One giggled behind a fan, one turned her back to
hide a big bunch of flowers, and smiled at me over her
and the other one had a muf/—on that very



shoulder-
warm day !

They all stood still, till I said “Good-morning.” Them
they all giggled, and the one with the flowers said, ““ Momnim’
youl” Thenls ae “What's your name?” and the one
with the muff said, “Sara Ann ‘Mufiina—calls me Muff for
short, "kase I likes a all to carry.” Then she nudged the
one with the flowers, and she said, “Name's Judy Bhue-
bell, “kase [likes flowers so much.” The one with the fan
never took it down from her face, but said from belhiind itt iim
a muffly voice, “My name's Ethelberta Fancy—calls me
Fan for short—kase I always has a fan,”"—and them she
giggled. The one with her finger in her mouth would m't
say a word—and the flower girl “had to tell her mame, Slhe
said, “Name’s Tilly Pepp’mint—kase she lowes pep mints
so an’ she always has one in her mouth, an’ can’t spealk |!”

22
to
Ga



THEY WERE THE JOLLIEST LITTLE CHOCOLATE CREAMS I EVER SAW.
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then the muff girl said, “ What's your name?” AndI
told them “ Charlie,” and she said, “I’ve brought you some-
thin’ right here in my muff—guess what?” And [had to
guess a lot of things—but none of them was right, so she took
outa little paper Box from her muff, and I undid it, and what
do you think! A lot of glass beads—red and blue and all
colors. She said, ‘“ Youcan string ‘em on a thread, an’ make
necklaces an’ rings.” And then the flower girl said, ‘I’ve
brought you somethin’ too!”—and she gave me her big
bunch of lovely flowers.

Then the fan girl said, “So have I brought you a pres-
ent.” And she took her hand from behind her back and
gave me—what do you suppose? A dear little live ¢urdle
tied by a string! Was n't ¢haé nice?

Then they all looked at the peppermint girl—and she put
her finger in her mouthand hung herhead. They all giggled
again—an’ when [I said, «What's the matter?” hens the
flower girl said, ‘Tilly Pepp’mint, she set out to bring
you some pepp’mints—but ‘fore she got here, she eat them
all“up!”

Then Tilly Pepp’mint said, “I’ve got one left”—but I
said, “ No thank you. Yoweat it.” Soshe popped it in her
mouth, and they all giggled together !

I asked them to stay and play with me—but they only
giggled again, and went out of the gate one by one, and
away down the road. They were too shy to stay. But
they were the jolliest little chocolate creams I ever saw.

Elizabeth S. Tucker.

24


O, YOU DEAR LITTLE TROUBLESOME TOTS!




SIX WIDE-AWAKEsS.

IX wide-awake babies, bless them !
That means six baths, six breakfasts this morning ; at
least as many kisses as there are toes and fingers apiece.
O, you dear little troublesome tots !
What a small place in the house you seem to fill; the
smallest chair, the tiniest bed. But if you slip away, there
is a hollow which ‘all the king’s horses, and all the king’s

men” cannot fill.
Each one, as it comes along, its grandma has called the

d

dearest and sweetest she ever saw.

Babies are like parrots and monkeys in doing and saying
what people about them do and say.

No cross nurse has ever slapped one baby in this picture ;
no naughty brother has struck one. Only gentle hands
and voices have been around them—at least we hope so.
Only pleasant thoughts and fancies are dropped into their
mind gardens; so, only lovely actions spring up and blos-
som there; peep through their eyes and see.

Of course they are not all the time so dreadfully clean as
when they were having their picture taken. A little fresh
dirt does not hurt any baby.

The boy who is pulling-his playmate’s hair seems to be
doing it politely! Behind him is another fellow, a whole-
sale dealer in flowers. He has given the girl on each side
of him a handful, and the patient one in the corner knows
she will have some, soon.

26
SIX WIDE-AWAKES,

You would have a heartache if you knew how many little
folks in great cities have no flowers.

Paradise Park in New York is a shabby bit of dry grass,
with a few miserable trees, and some wooden benches.

It is never like the Paradise we dream about, except on
Saturday afternoons in summer time. Then, down the
narrow street, drives a big wagon, filled with country flowers.

These are given into dirty little hands that get soap and
water as rarely as they get flowers, there. Old people come,
carrying babies, all forlorn; every one gets a flower.

O, how the children push and crowd to get near, for fear
there will not be enough for all. Hundreds of boys and
girls, shouting : ‘‘O, please give mea rose!” “O, lady, my
mother is sick ; do send her a growing flower!” “Say, mister !
This’ere little chap didn’t get any!”

O, dear! You cannot hear your own voice in the hub-
bub.

At last the flowers are all given away; the basket must
be turned up side down, and the wagon driven out of sight
before the children start.

There they go! They carry the bright, sweet-smelling
flowers up into garrets, down into cellars, where there is not
‘one other single pretty thing.

Yellow haired German babies; dark skinned Italian
‘babies; milk white Irish babies.

Listen to papa! He says they are all Amerzcan babies ;
we must never forget that; although their fathers and
mothers came over the sea.

27
“SIX BEST BABIES.

Some people say they like six babies best when they

are fast asleep !
Six shops full of candies, six cafés full of cakes and pies.

which we cannot reach, are not so good as one box of
sweets at home, to eat with someone we love.

So, six little pets asleep in the public garden, are not
worth so much to you and me as our one baby at home,
asleep or awake.

If we could only help ourselves to one of these tired
babes, who has nodded off to sleep among the posies !
But how could we choose, while the fringed curtains are
down before the windows of baby’s face ?

Step softly! There! One has heard you and lifts her
head, rubbing her dimpled knuckles against her sleepy eye.
Now if she catches sight of us, she may cry long and loud!

Wonder if she has any teeth! Suppose she can talk?

How came these human flowers here? Did they fall, to-
gether, from some balloon passing overhead? It would.
be a pity to let one fall where it was not wanted !

Somebody loves these babies ; for see how cunning are
their little gowns and bibs. This small jacket shows how
fast this fellow has grown.

It may be a baby show, and we have come too early.

28
6z



IT MAY BE A BABY SHOW.
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Wise babies! When there is nothing else to do it is
best to go to sleep. That will save your shoes and your
nerves, and keep the spectacle man far off.

You know some one who loves a pug?

You ask what babies are good for?

Good for earth and good for heaven; good to frolic, to
learn, to love, to grow up to be good boys and girls.

Pugs and puppies are amusing; but don’t put one in the
scales against a dewy-lipped, starry-eyed baby! Pug would
be ashamed of himself, and wriggle away, and run to the
kennel or the stable.

But you have no baby at your house?

Well, you can find places where there is a baby for
every brick in the sidewalk. To give one of them a nice
home, with a bed and a bath and something to eat would be
jolly; bye-and-bye it would be better than a dog when it
could talk to you and sing.

You know a cat that is loved like a baby ?

Don’t bother to tell us about that, either.

Why, babies are even better than flowers, for they bloom
all the year round!

In some countries, people do not think very much of
baby-girl ; but here she is worth her weight in gold ; worth
just as much as her brother.

Hush! The babies are sleeping yet !

Perhaps this is all the show there is to be!

Let us tiptoe home, and leave them dreaming among the
flowers.

30
re



DEAR LITTLE JAPANESE GIRLS.
IN JAPAN.

ERHAPS your name is Rose or Lily; or perhaps you
know some little girls who have been named after
those flowers. But did you ever know one named Azku ?
That isa common name in Japan; the chrysanthemum
is called Azéu there; it is much easier to spell and to
speak, surely. In this picture of dear little Japanese girls,
Kiku is showing you some of her name-flowers.

The little friend next to her is named Haru. You think
that is a queer name? Everything is queer in Japan, but
the flowers! Haru, and all the girls and ladies must have
a ribbon tied about the waist; what we call a sash, they
call oz.

Next to Haru is pretty Ilo. Do you see how the hair
of each little beauty is tucked up in a puff, waxed smooth
and shiny? Nobody’s hair in Japan is dressed every day!
At night, people do not tumble about on hot feather pil-
lows, soft beds and bouncing springs. They sleep upon
mats on the floor, which keep them straight; and their
heads rest on a box; in that way the hair is not rumpled,
but keeps beautifully smooth for several days. You would
rather see it allrumpled ? But you are not in Japan! How
would you like to wake up and find your house rocking;
glass and silver jingling; pictures swinging from the walls ;
and know it was an earthquake that was rocking you?
They are quite used to such little things in Japan.

32
IN JAPAN.

The fourth pet is Sono; she wonders if you were ever
carried on your brother’s back? In Japan, you might see a
boy coming towards you on the street and think he surely
had two heads! But as he passed you would see he was
taking his younger brother or sister for a walk ; or, perhaps
was playing with a baby tied to his back!

You would admire the splendid kites which are almost
always to be seen flying in the air, with wonderful shapes
and faces. Men make the kites and fly them with the
boys. And what is just as delightful, the women play with
dolls! They make clothes for them, and carry them out
on the streets, just as you little girls do in our parks.

Everybody in Japan has flowers and umbrellas.

They spend most of their time out of doors: they do
not teach the children very much; they play about almost
as idly as kittens, and are good-natured and gentle.

They have black hair, bright eyes and clear yellow skin.

You would not change your blue-eyed baby for Kiku’s
little sister!) And she would not have such an ugly black
umbrella as your mamma’s !

The umbrellas in Sono’s house are of bright colors, with
flowers and pictures on them. On the mantel are lovely
snakes and toads, in bronze and china, and over the doors
are horrid big heads with great round eyes and grinning
mouths and long red tongues.

You would want to run away from the sight?

But you would laugh at it if you had grown where these
Jap babies grew, in Japan. :

33
FOUR LITTLE -PLUMS!1

Rk. PLUM lives ona Long Island farm, where there is
room and time for these little Plums to grow and
ripen in the sun. The smallest, sweetest Plum is a graft
from a Quaker farm; her great-grandma sat on the facing
seat ina Friend’s Meeting-house, and never said anything
more severe than thee and thou.
The next Plum has another flavor. Her other great-
grandma went up on the roof and rang a bell, when the
British soldiers were in the house, looking for money and
silver spoons. Crack, went the muskets, daxg went the
guns below; ding-a-ling-aling, went the girl’s dinner-bell ;
not a shot hitting her. The soldiers were scared, and
jumped into their boats; they were rowing out of the har-
bor when the neighbors came to help. Look at this second
Plum ; she could do the same.

Master Ned battles with the bugs in the melon patch and
potato field as his great-grandfather fought for Molly
Stark, with all his might. Master Ned feeds the chickens
and has a share of eggs and fowls to sell.

They have a garden patch and plant what they please;
they sow seeds, they pull weeds, and their father sells their
lettuce and radishes with his own,

The mother—the best Plum of all !~gives the children a
sum of money every Saturday. They keep account books,
and put down what money they get, where it goes and
what it buys. At the top of the cover of Ned’s book, is this :

34




FOUR LITTLE PLUMS!
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

NED PLUMS ALOUENS.

You will make al/owance for his spelling; his counting is
all right.

Out of this money must come all the presents they make
in the year; Birthdays and Christmas. They do not give
what other people buy for them. .

If you could be in this Plum orchard a while you would
learn many things you are not expected to learn in the city.

Patty and Ned counted twenty kinds of weeds in a walk
with me ;—dandelion, catnip, mullein, plantain, snap-dragon,
mayweed, dock, clover, smartweed, burdock, chickweed,
thistle, sheep-sorrel, pigweed, horse-sorrel, tansy, pepper-
mint, penny-royal and spearmint. All in a morning walk,
by the roadside, in the woods and by the brook.

And the birds! The country children love the birds, and
know their names and how and where they build their nests.

Louise, the big sister, is a little mother to baby, and saves
her dear mamma many steps in each busy day.

It is too bad that their Newfoundland dog, Roger, is not
in the picture. In the country, a big, faithful dog, seems part
of a child’s life. Roger hunts the weasel in the stone wall,
which catches the young chickens. Roger finds the wood-
chuck, and keeps him shut in, till Ned or his father comes.

You may be sure that wide-awake country children have
many chances to learn easily, from day to day, what city
boys and girls learn slowly, from books and tutors.

Do you wish you were a Plum?

36
Le



THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY,
THE PAIRIES OF - TO-DAY.

HE first fairy was looking out of her mother’s window

when she spied a pale-faced lady, alone, at a window

opposite. She kissed her hand; the lady smiled, but wiped
her eyes. Somebody said that lady had lost her children.

“Mamma,” said the first fairy, ‘you say my bright eyes
find lost things! May I help that lady find her children ?”

“You may, dear Sunbeam !”

And when Sunbeam shone into the quiet room across the
street, the lady grasped the little hand, which led her down
the street, around a corner into a dark alley.

“There are so many children here,” she said, “if your
lost babies are not among them, you can help yourself !”

The sunbeam and the lady’s gold lighted up the alley,
and a Day Nursery grew out of the first fairy’s heart.

The second fairy was dancing among the flowers when
she saw an old man going by ; all bent with troubles. The
fairy filled his hands with flowers. Looking down upon her
smiling face, he breathed the sweetness of her lilies and
roses, until “e smzled/ Only a fairy could make old Mr.
Moneybags smile.

The third fairy saw little Sammy Bowlegs hobbling upon
his ankles, before his mother’s door.

“What makes him walk so queerly?” the fairy asked.

Mrs. Bowlegs (so the street-boys called her) answered
from the door:

‘“T wash all day, honey ; and Sammy takes care of him-

38
THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY.

self; he walked too soon, and made his legs crooked for
lite le

“T think not!” said fairy ; hurrying on to see her uncle,
a very great doctor.

“Why, Fly-away ; how came you here alone?” he asked.

“T could n’t wait for mamma! I just found the lamest
boy! Cure him, and I will give you my darling dog!”

Now, if you pass that laundry door, you will see Sammy,
quite happy, with a sort of harness on his feet and with
splinted legs. No more tears fall into the tub ; he and his
mother believe in fairies !

My fourth fairy, like a honey-bee, sucks sweets from
every thing! If it rains, she says: ‘“ Now I can clean my
dollys’ house and wash their clothes !”

If the company expected does not come, she says:
“Never mind, mamma; wecan play with each other!”

When -Meg broke off the best doll’s head, she said,
“We'll wrap it up and play it is a mummy!”

When papa goes away she comforts mamma: ‘‘ There
will be the letters! And we will meet him when the steamer
comes in!”

Her mouth is a rainbow between her smiles and tears.

Perhaps she is the best kind of every-day-fairy, for a
pattern, to copy after. She is ready to make the best of
everything. Are you ?

Don’t be looking in hollow trees and under toad-stools
for fairies. But look in the glass. You will see there a

good fairy, or a bad fairy—which shall it be ?

39
“PEACHES AND CREAM]!”

Haris is the luscious name by which these lovely, lively
little women are known.

If you do not like this kind of Peaches and Cream, per:
haps you have not any heart, or it has fallen into the place
where you put the other kind of peaches and cream.
Such jolly little Peaches—such sweet little Creams !

It was Aunt Bess, in her studio at Woodstock, who
gave them this name. She had invited these four little
neighbors to visit her boys, Max and Fritz.

One of these little women loves to sew. Aunt Bess has
given her a work-bag with a doll’s apron in it, blunt scis-
sors and a wee thimble. This is Mabel. Max made that
wreath for her to wear while her picture is being painted.
Mabel is as sweet as cream.

One of the Peaches, Constance, is fond of “making
believe” stories and plays. Aunt Bess has given her a
pad tied with bright ribbons, to make a book.

The pink-cheeked Peach, Agatha, wanted a slate like
Fritz’s; so Aunt Bess has hung one on her arm, to have
all to her own self, forever and ever, or till it is broken.

The shyest little Cream, Dorothy, wanted to write a
letter to her mamma, who is far away; so Max gave hera
big sheet of paper.

40
Iv



SUCH JOLLY LITTLE PEACHES—SUCH SWEET LITTLE CREAMS}
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

These four little women are growing too fast; that is
all the fault anybody can find with them.

Aunt Bess says there is only one thing to do about it.
And she is going to do it!

They have had a tea-party, on her piazza; where the
white roses climb on the lattice. The pitcher of tea-kettle
tea is empty, and the goodies are all eaten, and now for
ithe picture! Za¢ will not let them grow, after to-day.
Here they shall stay, so little—so big. :

Now if there were a market, really and truly, where a
Mr. Cupid was selling such Peaches and Cream, which one
of these would you like to buy, little boy? Wahzsper, no
one shall hear!

Agatha, with the slate, would tease you to make pictures,
all day. :

Dorothy would perhaps get crying for her mamma and
the Cream would be a/most¢ sour.

Constance would make a “ Little Boy Blue” of you, or a
“Jack the Giant-killer;” you must always be playing you
are somebody else, when Constance is the mistress.

And Mabel is so fond of cutting! Your hair and your
kite, and your heart-strings might all be snipped before
you knew it.

Don’t be in a hurry, dear little man, to get this kind of
Peaches and Cream. Be v-e-r-y sure which kind you really
want. Then wait till you have a nice place all your own
to put one in; a place to lock up; and there will be only
one key, and you will carry that safely in your heart.

42
RHYMES
HELEN GRAY CONE.
A TREASURY OF STORIES, /INGLES AND RHYMES.

A LECTURE.

===

H® subject was a chestnut ;
Her lecture was a treat;
She said, a fairy hid inside

~ And lived upon the meat.

And if you tried to roast it,
You'd find if this were true;

The shell would open with a “pop!”
While off the fairy flew.

The only proof still lacking,—
And somehow hard to get,—
Was just to see the fairy fly,
Which had not happened yet!
ffelen Gray Cone.

44


J

HER SUBJECT WAS A CHESTNUT

HER LECTURE WAS A TREAT.

45
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

LITT BULLERFCIES.

HAT are you following, wistful eyes?
The golden flocks’ of the butterflies ?
What is the secret you long to know?

Whence and whither they come and go?

Whence each comes like a flying flower,
Is a fairy tale for a twilight hour;
Of a wingless creature that can but creep,

Of a silken shroud and a folded sleep.

Whither each goes. is a dream for you

To dream on your pillow a long night through ;

Of boundless fields and a wind set free,

And a blue sky deep as the soundless sea!
Helen Gray Cone.

40




WHAT ARE YOU FOLLOWING, WISTFUL EYES?
THE GOLDEN FLOCKS OF THE BUTTERFLIES?

47
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

THE MAY BASKET.

IOLET and Maidenhair,

Once in happy weather,

Went to hang a May-basket,
Straying off together.

Up the street and down the lane
They wandered east and west ;

But brought it back to mother’s door,
Because they loved her best!

fTelen Gray Cone.

48
VIOLET AND MAIDENHAIR,
ONCE IN HAPPY WEATHER,

WENT TO HANG A MAY-BASKET,
STRAYING OFF TOGETHER.

49


A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RAYVAIES.

NOVEMBER PLUMES:

LOVE the white chrysanthemums ;
For when their time of blooming comes
I think of Fairy Princes brave,

With great snow-plumes that float and wave.

Like proud white princes, fair and bold,
They grace the gardens in the cold.
And toss along the Autumn air
b e
A scent of something strange and rare ;
Fit flowers for my white prince to wear!
flelen Gray Cone.

5°


aXe

A SCENT OF SOMETHING STRANGE AND RARE;
FIT FLOWERS FOR MY WHITE PRINCE TO WEAR!

51
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

SPRING WONDER.

OVELOCKS and ‘Sweetlips,
Rose and Kiss-me-quick,
All wonder, wonder, wonder

At the downy baby chick.

‘““Cheep, cheep,” the chick says;
The meaning can you tell?
‘“‘T wonder, wonder, wonder

At the world outside the shell!”

O big world, O bright world,
And wider than they know,
Be good to little chirping chicks
That wonder at you so!
Flelen Gray Cone.

52


ALL WONDER, WONDER, WONDER
AT THE DOWNY BABY CHICK.

53
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

SECRETS.

OU’LL never tell about the humming-bird
That came into the garden yesterday—
No, not a word! for may be if he heard
He'd
stay

away !

And other secrets we will keep just.so,
And you'll tell only me, and I'll tell you;
And Toddles, when he’s big enough, you know,
We'll
tell
him

too!

fLelen Gray Cone.

54
wi

AND OTHER SECRETS WE WILL KEEP JUST SO,
AND YOU’LL TELL ONLY ME, AND I’LL TELL YOU.

55


A TREASURY O# STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

UNDER THE MISTLETOE.

——_-
=

Aco the rosy boys and girls
The mystic shoots like watchers lean,
With glistening berries grey as pearls,

And listening elfin eas of green.

“Though folks are queer, this time of year,
We'll do just what they told us to;

lust why it is, we’re not so clear,
But you kiss me and I'll kiss you!”

Flelen Gray Cone.

56
JUST WHY IT IS WE’RE NOT SO CLEAR,
BUT YOU KISS ME AND PLL KISS YOU!

57


A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

THE FIRST FOREBODING.

OT many griefs has Daffodil;
Not many dews her dear eyes fill;
Her voice is gay, her smile is sunny,

Her little heart is full of honey.

Yet I have seen her sad, because
Her own gray kitten, Velvet-Paws,
Will grow and change—just think of that !—

Will change and grow, and be a cat!

How pleasant life would be, oh dear!
If daffodils bloomed all the year,
And willow catkins stayed just so,
And own gray kittens didn’t grow!
flelen Gray Cone.

58








HOW PLEASANT LIFE WOULD BE, OH DEAR!
IF OWN GRAY KITTENS DIDN’T GROW!

59
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

“ONE, TWO, THREE—MISS1”

OW, Flaxen-Vioss in the red riding hat,
What is the thing that you are puzzled at?
I fancy it is something like to this:
Why cannot anybody keep right on?
Why is it, that however high you've gone,

At last you miss?

I can’t tell why; but this is the amount—
If you should jump longer than you can count,

As many times as grass-blades are, and past,—
As many times as there are stars in heaven,—
Yes, if you jumped right on to twenty-leven,

You'd miss at last!

It’s just the reason why the bubbles break;
Why water-lilies cannot hold awake ;
Why fire-fly lanterns go out now and then;
Why often elder folk, in life’s grave game,
Just have to stop, sigh “miss!” and without shame
Begin again.

flelen Gray_ Cone.

60


WHY IS 1T, THAT HOWEVER HIGH YOU’VE GONE,

AT LAST YOU MISS?

67
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RAHYVMES.

LILY.

LILY, wonder-sweet
And pure as snow,
I cannot touch you,

Though I love you so.

It seems as though,
From out the blue aloft,
A cloud of angels drifted,

Slow and soft.

And resting on your tall green stalks
I found them.
With wings half-folded, and

Heaven’s fragrance round them.

Flelen Gray Cone.



|
|


O LILY, WONDER-SWEET AND PURE AS SNOW.
- 1 CANNOT TOUCH YOU, THOUGH | LOVE YOU SO.

63
ee te eae My ee Sh a ene



A LREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

BO-REEP.

Ae anl Dimplechin,
Chancing on the clever plan,
Played Bo-peep, with merry din,

Round an outspread fan.

“Now I see you!” What delight !
“ Now then, now then, 7 see youl”
How they laughed! The day was bright,

And the fan was blue.

Why was this so sweet? Ah, why?
Weary women, grown-up men,
That’s the secret you and IJ
Neer shall know again !
fT[elen Gray Cone.

64


PLAYED BO-PEEP, WITH MERRY DIN,
ROUND AN OUTSPREAD FAN.

65
A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

A CHRISTMAS STOCKING.

UST be patient, dolly,
We will get you out!
Seems to me she’s very good,

Doesn’t cry nor pout!

Didn’t hear the sleigh-bells—
Wonder when he came?
Aren’t you glad her eyes are brown?

Wonder what’s her name?

Guess he wouldn’t like it,
Smothered up all night,
If he found a chimney once
Fitted him so tight.
: flelen Gray Cone.

66




JUST BE PATIENT, DOLLY, WE WILL GET YOU OUT!
SEEMS TO ME SHE’S VERY GOOD, DOESN’T CRY NOR POUT!

67


BLUE EYES,

’

’S BLUE

BABY

AS CLEAR AS SKIES OF SPRING,
ARE WIDE WITH INNOCENT SURPRISE.

WHILE BLOSSOM:

68
THE DANDELION CHAIN.

HE green field smoothed
her velvet gown
The gifts of Spring to hold;
Spring laughed, and in her
lap threw down
A shower of guinea-gold.

The burnished dandelions
burn
Beneath the sunny sky;

But dandelion-gold will turn

To silver by and by.



So let us lnk a chain, to
deck,
In this gay golden hour,
Our Blossom-Baby’s rose-leaf
neck,
That’s softer than a flower:

While Blossom-Baby’s blue,
blue eyes,
As clear as skies of Spring,
Are wide with innocent. sur-
prise
To see the shining thing!

Llelen Gray Cone.




TELL ME, WHAT DOES THE HUSK YOU HOLD
IN THE WARM LITTLE FINGERS, HIDE?

7°
HIDDEN

ILKEN-LOCKS
summer corn,

Softly a-stir in the dreamy

air,
Two round years, since you

were born,

Have rolled away and been
lost somewhere.

in the

People are wise at two years
old,
Serious-lipped and_ sober-
eyed ;
Tell me, what does the husk
you hold
In the warm little fingers,
hide?

71

PEARLS.

What if we pried and tried
to see ?—
Under the
tangled silk,
Folded away from you and
me,
Wonderful pearls, as white
as milk!

light-green,

—Ah, she looks up, and smiles,
and shows,

Parting her lips, my grave
wee girl,
Milky-white in
rows,

Treasures of dearer pearl!

flelen Gray Cone.

their tiny








I KNOW THE ROGUE WHO DRAINS THEM,
A ROBBER BOLD AND SMALL;

THE LAST DROP IN THE WINE-SKIN
HE LIKES THE BEST OF ALL.

72


FAIRY WINE-SKINS.

FAIRY WINE-SKINS.

HEN dusky grapes in clusters
Weigh down the ropes of vine,
Like dusty leathern bottles,

Plumped out with fairy wine,

I know the rogue who drains them,
A robber bold and small;

The last drop in the wine-skin
He likes the best of all.

Each russet sack he presses,
And stains with red the tips
Of all his gypsy fingers,
And both his eager lips.

O Peach-Cheeks, when the fairies
By moonlight seek the vine,
And find a heap of empty sacks

But not a drop of wine,

73
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Just fancy how they’ll grumble
Because you've spoiled the feast,

While you are soundly sleeping,
Not caring in the least;



Lids fast and lashes fallen,
And dreaming that it’s true

That all the world’s a great round grape,
Full ripe, and meant for you!

74
A SOLDIER OF THE SNOIVS.

A SOLDIER OF THE SNOWS.

Y brave boy loves the winter-time ;
He loves the bright, wild days
When the strong sun shines, and the icy trees
With a host of bayonets blaze;
And the silver bullets drop left and right,
And the wind goes charging past
With the whirl of a thousand cuirassiers

And the sound of a trumpet-blast !

From a veteran tree, all.scarred and gray,
He has wrested a steely bough;

He has captured the enemy’s colors gay,—
In his face he bears them now!

He bears them in his merry face,
That’s like the bold red rose;

And henceforth he shall ever be
My Soldier of the Snows!

75




FROM A VETERAN TREE, ALL SCARRED AND GRAY,
HE HAS WRESTED A STEELY BOUGH.

76
A RHYME OF CHANGING CHILDREN,

A RHYME OF CHANGING
CHILDREN.

HERE are last year’s little folk,
Whom we loved and knew?
—Hair a trifle browner gold;

Eyes not quite so blue.

Where’s that curve in Rose-Red’s cheek
Used to please me so?

Where, the curls that Love-Locks had
Not so long ago?

Just as Spring in Summer’s lost,
Sure it is and clear,
Every child is children four

In a single year!

77


eS

WHERE’S THAT CURVE IN ROSE-RED’S CHEEK
USED TO PLEASE ME SO?

78
FAIRY TALES.


THE THREE BEARS.

ID you ever hear of the three Bears who lived in the

middle of a wood, in a- little house of their own?

One was a great big Bear with a very gruff deep voice;

the second was a middling-sized Bear, with an ordinary

middling-sized voice; and the third was a little wee Bear,
with a tiny voice like a squeak.

One day, they all went out for a walk in the wood be-
fore breakfast, and while they were gone, a little girl called
Silver-locks passed by and saw the nice little house stand-
ing there. So she opened the door and walked into the
Bears’ sitting-room. On the table she saw three bowls of
smoking-hot porridge, and by the side of each bowl was a
spoon. The first bowl was very large, and by it lay a large
spoon. So Silver-locks tasted the large bowl of porridge,
but it was so hot that it burned her mouth. Then she tried
the second bowl, which was a middling-sized bowl, and had a
middling-sized spoon, but this porridge was not hot enough.

80


OS gaat



THEN SHE TRIED THE MIDDLING-SIZED BED.

81 o
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then she tried the third bowl, which was a little wee bowl,
with a little wee spoon, and the porridge was so delicious
that she ate it all up. Then she felt tired and thought that
she would like to sit down. She looked round the room,
and saw that there were three chairs there. One was a
very large chair, so she got up on that, but she found it so
hard that she soon clambered down again. Then she tried
the second chair, which was a middling-sized chair, but this
was so soft that she sank down in it, and felt quite lost.
So this did not please her, and she got off it and tried the
third chair, which was a little tiny chair, and this was so
comfortable that she sat there until the bottom came out.
And when this happened, little Silver-locks thought that
she had better go through the house and see what else was
there. So she went up-stairs, and there she found a nice
tidy little bedroom with three white beds in it. One was
quite big, and she got into that, but it was hard, like the big
chair down-stairs, so she got up again. Then she tried the
middling-sized bed, but that was too soft, like the middling-
sized chair, so that did not please her. And then she lay
down on the little bed, and this was so comfortable that she
fell fast asleep. After atime, the three Bears came in from
their walk to have their breakfast. First came the big
Bear, and when he saw the spoon in his porridge, he
roared in his big gruff voice: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN
EATING MY PORRIDGE!” Then the second Bear
came in, and he looked at his bowl, and said in his middling
voice: “ SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE!” And

82
THE THREE BEARS.

when the little bear looked at his bowl, he squeaked:
“ Someone has been eating my porridge, and has eaten tt all

up!”



“ SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE, AND HAS EATEN
IT ALL UP!”

Then the three Bears knew that someone had been in-
the house, so they looked round the room, and the big
Bear roared out: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING
IN MY CHAIR!”

‘“SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, TOO!” said
the middling-sized Bear. ‘“ Someone has been sitting in my
chair,” squeaked the little Bear, “and has sat the bottom

83
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

out /” Then the three Bears looked very grave, and they
went up-stairs to their bedroom. The big Bear found his
bed all tossed, so he roared: “SOMEONE HAS BEEN
LYING IN MY BED!” SomeEonE HAS BEEN LYING IN
MY BED, TOO!” said the middling-sized Bear. Then the
little bear squeaked in his wee voice: ‘Someone has been
lying in my bed, and here shezs/” And they all three col-
lected round Silver-locks, who was gazing at them in terror,
for when she heard the voice of the big Bear she thought
it was thunder in her dreams. When the second Bear had
spoken she had not noticed him at all because his voice
was quite an ordinary voice, but when she heard the little
Bear squeaking, she had waked immediately. Suddenly
she jumped off the bed, and: leaped out of the open window,
and fled away into the wood.

“WELL, SHE MIGHT HAVE TOLD US HER
NAME,” roared the big Bear.

‘CERTAINLY,’ said the middling-sized Bear.

“ Certaznly,” squeaked the little wee Bear.

But little Silver-locks was never seen or heard of any
more,

84








ON HER FEET WERE SLIPPERS THAT SHONE LIKE GLASS.

85
CINDERELLA.

NCE upon a time there lived a widower and his
daughter, and she was as sweet a child as ever lived!

The father decided to marry again, and took for a wife a
widow with two daughters, who he fancied would be company
for his own little girl. But they were cross and unpleas-
ant, and treated the child most shamefully, making her work
like a servant and dress in rags, while they took their ease,
and dressed in silks and fine laces.) When her work was
done she sat on the hearth, among the ashes and cinders,
and for that reason they called her Cinderella. The
stepmother treated her just as unkindly, and the poor girl
had a hard time of it, but made no complaint to her father.
One day the king sent heralds to proclaim that a ball
would be given for the prince, his son, and all the young
girls were invited to dance at it. Such a time as there
was! The two sisters were in a great flutter of prepara-
tion, and Cinderella was kept busy from early morning till

86
CINDERELLA.

late at night. At last the evening came, and Cinderella
dressed her two sisters, and they went off to the ball in
grandeur, while she sat down in the chimney corner and
wept bitter tears, While she sat thus her fairy godmother
appeared and asked what was the matter. “ You want to
go to the ball?” said she. ‘Well, so you shall.” “But
how can I go in these rags?” cried Cinderella. ‘I'll soon
fix that. Only do as I tell you,” was the reply. A pump-
kin was brought in and a rat-trap filled with rats and mice,
and these, at a touch from the magic wand, were trans-
formed into a fine coach with driver and footmen. Another
touch of the wand, and Cinderella’s rags turned into a
beautiful dress, and on her feet were slippers that shone
like glass. “Now go to the ball,” said the godmother,
‘but be sure and come away before twelve o’clock, or you
will find yourself in rags.”

Cinderella went to the ball, and was the most beautiful
woman there, and the prince fell madly in love with her.
It was nearly twelve o’clock when Cinderella remembered,
and flew away—just in time. For outside the door her
clothes turned to rags, and the rats and mice went scurry-
ing off. Soon after she reached home the sisters came in
and told her all about the ball, and the lovely princess who
was there. She begged to go to the second ball, which
was to take place the next night; but they laughed at her
scornfully. The fairy godmother came again, and used
her magic wand, and at the ball Cinderella was the admira-
tion of all. The prince was so attentive and the time

87
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

passed so swiftly that Cinderella forgot. And when she

looked at the clock, it was on the stroke of twelve! She

-— left in haste, and as she ran down the

stairs her clothes changed to rags, and

away went one of her glass slippers.

The prince picked it up, and

though the porters at the door

were questioned, they said that

no princess had passed,—only a

little kitchen-wench had run

through.

Meanwhile Cinderella had
run home all the way in
had only just arrived
returned, full of wonder

happened, and of conjec-

the beautiful

















her rags, and
when the sisters
at what had
ture as to who
princess really : > was.

And the prince oo fell sick with
love; so the a king sent heralds
round the town 4 to inform the

people that os “ whoever could
put on . the gage = little glass slip-
per dropped at = the ball should

marry his son. 4s SHE RAN DOWN THE STAIRS
Everyone HERCLOTHES CHANGED tried it on, but

TO RAGS.

it was too tiny, and fitted no

one.

88
CINDERELLA.

Finally, the heralds came to the two sisters, but they
fared no better, tug and strain as they would.

“Let me try it,” said Cinderella; and the sisters
objected. But the herald said that his orders were to try it
on everyone.

So Cinderella put it on with the greatest ease, and then
she drew the fellow-slipper from her pocket, and when she
had put this on, she stood up in her robes of gold and
silver, and the sisters knew that she was the princess they
had seen, and begged her forgiveness,

Then Cinderella married the prince, and soon after the
two sisters, who had learned to subdue their pride, married
two lords of the court.

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

HERE was once a wood-cutter and his wife, who had
one little girl. She was very pretty, with sweet blue
eyes and golden hair; and she could feed the pigs, and sew
seams, and churn the butter; so she was very useful to her
mother. In the next village lived her old grandmother,
who loved her so much that she made a scarlet hood for her
to keep her warm, and when the neighbors saw it they called
her “ Little Red Riding Hood.”

One day her mother said to her: “Granny has been very
ill. Put on your hood and run and see her, and take her
these cheesecakes and this pat of fresh butter that I have
made for her.” Little Red Riding Hood started off very

89
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

happily, with her basket on her arm, and soon came to a
wood that lay between the two villages. Just then a wolf,
who was passing, saw her, andcame uptospeaktoher. He
would very much have liked to. kill her and eat her, but
there were some wood-cutters cutting trees close by, and he
did not dare to touch her. So he came up to herin the
most friendly way and said: ‘‘ Where are you going, Little
Red Riding Hood ?”

“T am going to see my grandmother, dear Mr. Wolf,”
answered the little girl. ‘Where does she live?” asked
the wolf. ‘Oh, she lives in the first-cottage past yonder
mill. She is very ill, so I am taking her these cheesecakes
and a pat of butter that my mother has made for her.”

“Tf she is so ill, I will go and see her too,” said the wolf.
“T will go this way, and go you through the woods, and we
will see which gets there first.” So saying, he shambled off,
and then ran all the way to the cottage.

Tap, tap, he knocked at the cottage door. ‘“ Who is
there?” asked grandmother. ‘It is I,” answered the wolf,
in a soft voice, “ Little Red Riding Hood; I have brought
you nice fresh cakes and butter.” |

“Pull the bobbin, and the latch will lift up,” called ‘out
the old grandmother.

And the wolf pulled the bobbin, and lifted the latch, and
entered the cottage. Then he ate up the poor old grand-
mother, and when he had quite eaten her up, he put on her
night-gown, and pulled her frilled night-cap right over his
ugly rough head, and got into bed. “The old lady was

go


HOOD OPENED THE DOOR.

NG

LITTLE: RED RID!

gt
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

tough,” he said, “but the little girl will be a delicate
morsel.”

But Little Red Riding Hood lingered on in the wood.
It was so bright and fresh there. Everything was happy
and full of life. She chased the dainty butterflies for
very glee, and then she gathered a posy of primrosés and
violets for the old grandmother, who could not get out and
see the spring flowers grow. At last, tired with her play,
she set off to reach her grandmother’s cottage.

She knocked at the door, and the wolf, softening his
voice as much as possible, called out: “Pull the bobbin and
the latch will lift up.” Little Red Riding Hood opened
the door and walked in.

“Put the basket on the table, and come into bed with
me,” said the wolf, “for I feel cold.” Little Red Riding
Hood thought that her grandmother’s voice was very hoarse,
but then she remembered that this might be on account of her
bad cold, and being an obedient little girl, she gotinto bed.

But when she saw the hairy arms she began to grow
frightened. “What long arms you have, grandmother.”

“The better to hug you with, my dear!”

Then she saw the long ears sticking up outside the night-
cap. “ What great ears you have, grandmother.”

“Phe better to hear you with, my dear!”

‘What large eyes you have, grandmother.”

‘The better to see you with, my dear!”

“But what great teeth you have, grandmother.” “The
better to eat you with, my dear!” And so saying, the

92
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

wicked wolf fell upon poor Little Red Riding Hood and
ate her all up.

That evening, as the wood-cutters were coming home
from their work, they saw Little Red Riding Hood pulling
flowers in the wood. They called her, but she took no
notice, and walked on through the wood till she came to
the grandmother's cottage. Here she vanished, and the
woodcutters, bursting open the door, found the wolf lying
there asleep, and slew him with their axes.

Oftentimes in the woods you will see Little Red Riding
Hood walking along with the basket on her arm, and her
posy of wild flowers in her hand, sweet and happy, as she
was in life.

ed
Es fi. AK

»



a?

“THE BETTER TO EAT YOU WITH, MY DEAR!”

93


THE BABES IN THE WOOD.

NCE upon atime a rich gentleman and his wife lived

happily with their two little children, a boy anda

girl, until a sad time came, when both the father and the
mother died.

The father had a brother, to whom he gave the care of
his beloved children.

After they became orphans, the two little children went
to live with this uncle, who was a bad man at heart,
although he was thought to be kind and good.

Their father had left to these children a large sum of
money, which was to be divided between them; but, in
case of their death, their uncle was to have it.

One day this wicked uncle sent for two robbers, and bar-
gained with them to take the children away, and kill them,
so that he might secure their fortune.

So the two robbers carried them off to the woods; but
on the way the children prattled: so innocently that one of
the robbers took pity on them, and tried to persuade the
other to allow the children to live. The other robber re-
fused, and the two fought over the matter until one of
them was killed.

The other robber then took the babes by the hand, and
told them to wait for him, and he would go away, and
come back, bringing them food; but the poor little brother
and sister wandered up and down, and the robber never
came back.

Finally, with their arms about one another, they fell
asleep, never to wake again ; and the birds came and sang
over them, and covered them with leaves.

After years had passed away, the wicked uncle met with
many misfortunes, and finally was sent to prison, and died
there.

94




THE BIRDS CAME AND SANG OVER THEM, AND COVERED
THEM WITH LEAVES.

95
TOM THUMB.

LONG time ago a ploughman wished for a child, even

if it was no bigger than his thumb. So one day

when he went home he found his wife nursing a wee baby,
that grew to the size of his thumb and then never grew
any more. One day while his mother was making a plum-
pudding, Tom fell into the bowl, and his mother stirred him
up and put him in the pot. The hot water made him kick,
and his mother took out the pudding and gave it to a pass-
ing tinker. Tom cried out “Hello!” when the tinker
sneezed, which so scared him that he threw the pudding
into a field and it tumbled to pieces. Tom crept out and
went home to his mother, who was glad to see him, though
he was all over a crust of dough and plums. One day he
was nearly drowned in the milk-jug ; another time he was
lost in the salt-box ; and when he went with his mother into
the fields to milk the cows, she tied him to a thistle with a
piece of thread, for fear he should be blown away by the
wind. Soon after, a cow ate up the thistle and swallowed

96
TOM THUMB.

Tom; but Tom scratched and kicked so she was glad to
throw him out of her mouth again. Once
as he was ploughing with his father, a great
eagle swooped down, caught him in its beak,
and carried him off to a giant’s castle.
The giant would have eaten him up, but
Tom bit his tongue, and held on by his
teeth till the giant in a rage took him
out of his mouth and
threw him into the
sea, where a large fish <
swallowed him im-
mediately. The fish
was caught and made ==
a present to King
Arthur, and when
the cook opened it,
there was Tom
Thumb inside. He HIS MOTHER WAS GLAD TO SEE HIM.

was carried to the king and became a great favorite and a

Knight of the Round Table.







97
JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

—¥—_-
=
——

HERE was once a widow with an only son named
Jack. He was a lazy fellow, and would not work,

but spent his mother’s money so fast that she grew poorer
and poorer. At last she had nothing left but a white cow;
and Jack, being sorry for his ways, took it off to sell it.
He met a butcher who offered him some bright, colored
beans for the cow, and the silly boy gave the cow to the
butcher and was happy over his bargain. But his mother
was very angry, and took the beans and threw them all
into a hole in the garden, and Jack went supperless to bed.
The next morning early Jack went out to look at the beans,
and found they had sprouted in the night and had a thick
stalk that went up to the sky. He at once climbed the
stalk, and when he got to the top he found himself in a
strange country. A fairy met him, and told him how he
might undo the mischief he had done. She told Jack that
his father once owned all the land in this country; but a
giant killed him, and took all his possessions. She would
help Jack find the giant, and guard him from danger so
long as he did well. Jack started off, and at sunset came

98


A FAIRY MET HIM,

99 .
to a large white house which he
knew was the giant’s. He knocked
at the door, which was opened
by a thin old woman of whom he asked |
shelter for the night. She said, “My
husband is a giant, and will kill and eat
you.” But Jack begged so hard she let
him in, and gave him something to eat.
Soon the giant came in, and Jack slipped into





\\ the oven just in time. After the giant had
Ss eaten his supper, he called for his hen that laid
>)

him a golden egg, whenever
he said “ Lay.”

After a time he grew tired
of this play, and fell asleep,
and as soon as Jack heard
him snoring he seized the
hen, and slid down the bean-
stalk. His mother was over-
joyed to see him; and the hen laid
golden eggs for them, which they sold,
and grew very rich.

After a time Jack climbed the bean-
stalk again, and made his way to the
white house, where he begged for food
and shelter. The old woman shook her
head. But Jack begged so hard that she
let him in, and hid him in the copper
boiler. Soon the giant came in and, hav-
JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.

ing eaten his supper, called for his money bags. He
counted over his gold and silver, then tied up the bags
and went to sleep. As soon as Jack heard him snore he
jumped out of the boiler, seized the bags, and made off for
home as fast as he could.

For a long time Jack stayed at home; but at last he had
such a strong desire to visit fairy-land again, that he got
up early one morning and climbed the beanstalk, hoping to
get back before his mother missed him. The old woman
did not recognize him, but when he asked for food she
shook her head. But Jack begged so hard that she let him
in, and when she heard the giant coming she hid him
under a barrel. As soon as the giant entered the house he
roared out “I smell meat!” and would not be satisfied
until he had made a thorough search. When he had
finished he cried out, “ Bring me my harp!” and when it
was brought to him he shouted “‘ Play!” and it played the
most exquisite music, which soon put the giant to sleep.

As soon as the giant began to snore Jack crawled out,
seized the harp and started onarun, The harp on being
touched screamed out; the giant woke and gave chase, but
when he reached the top of the beanstalk Jack was at the
bottom, and in a moment he took an.axe and chopped
down the beanstalk. The giant fell headlong and was
killed ; and Jack never went up the beanstalk again,


GOODY TWO SHOES.

HERE was once a sweet little girl who was called Goody

Two Shoes. For a long time she had only one shoe,

and when a kind friend gave her two new ones she was so

‘proud that she ran through the village, crying, ‘See my

two shoes, my lovely two shoes.” So the people laughed,

and gave her the name of Goody Two Shoes, by which she
was known ever afterwards.

She soon learned to read and write, and then taught the
other children of the village who were too poor to go to
school. She cut letters for them out of wood and made
them set up all the words they wanted to spell. She was
good and kind to everybody, and when the old school-
mistress died, Goody was made school-mistress in her place.
She had all sorts of pets and they were all very fond of her.

Goody knew so much that the people in the next village
accused her of being a witch. But a host of her friends
came and told the judge how kind Goody was, and instead
of being hanged or burnt alive, she was publicly thanked
for her kindness to the poor. One of the judges of the
court feli in love with her, and in a short time they were
married, and Goody Iwo Shoes became Lady Margery.
She lived for many years, doing good to all, and making
everybody around her as happy as possible.

102


“SEE MY TWO SHOES, MY LOVELY TWO SHOES.”

103
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

RICH man had three daughters, the youngest of

whom was named Beauty. She was a good girl, and
her father loved her dearly. When he lost nearly all his
money, and had to live in a poor way, Beauty kept things
bright and cheerful, and did all the housework without
grumbling. One day he was called to the next town on
business; and the eldest daughter said, ‘Bring me a new
silk dress ;” and the second said, “ Bring me a purse full of
gold.” But Beauty only asked for arose. The old father
came back without the money he had hoped to get ; and on
the way passed a garden full of roses, and leaned over the ©
fence to get one. As he broke the stem he heard a low
growl, and looking up saw a great Beast with a club in its
hand. The man begged for mercy, and the Beast said he
would let him off, if he would send instead one of his
daughters. Beauty went, and found the Beast’s house very
lovely, and in the breakfast-room was a table set for two.

104
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

She sat down and poured the coffee, and the Beast sat
opposite to her and seemed very happy. He was very kind
to her, and every day heasked her to marry him. One day



EVERY DAY HE ASKED HER TO MARRY HIM.
he found her crying because she was homesick, and he told
her to run home, but to be sure to come back to breakfast
the next morning.

105
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Her father was glad to see her, for he thought she was
dead: but her sisters were ugly and jealous, and gave her
something to drink which made her sleep late. When
Beauty woke she ran all the way to the Beast’s house, and
hunted through every room, but could not find him, Then
she ran out into the garden, and there under arose-bush he
lay as if dead. Beauty knelt beside him, put her arms
around his thick neck, and kissed his big ugly head.

‘ “Dear Beast, wake up!” she cried. ‘Don’t die, or I
shall die too! I love you so!” At these words the Beast
jumped up, the rough skin dropped from him, and he was
the most beautiful Prince that was ever seen. Hehad been
enchanted, and only Love had power to change his shape.
So Beauty and the Beast were married and lived happy
ever after.

106
PUSS IN BOOTS.

HERE was once a Miller who died leaving three sons.

The eldest received his mill; the second his cow; and

the youngest nothing but his cat. ‘You need not be

anxious, dear master” said the cat, seeing his trouble, “ get
me a bag and a pair of boots, and you shall be rich.

The young man complied, and Puss went a hunting.
When he had bagged some fine rabbits he went to court,
and laying them before the King, said: ‘My Master, the
Marquis of Carabas’ best service to your Majesty,” and
the King, well pleased, accepted the gift.

Puss then made his master bathe in a stream by which
the King was to dine, and as. the royal suite drew near
cried, “Help! help! thieves have stolen my master’s

clothes, and the Marquis will drown.” Then the King see-

107






A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

ing his old friend Puss, sent at once for garments, and the
Miller's son, dressed like a prince, was taken into the King’s
own carriage.

Meantime, sly Puss runs on before, telling men at
work in the meadows, and reapers at work in the
fields, ‘‘ These lands belong to the Marquis of Carabas, and
unless you tell the ie so when he passes you shall be
chopped to mince meat.”

Puss then came to a castle where an ogre lived, famed for
being able to change himself into different animals, and he
begged the ogre to show his power. The ogre at once
became a lion, and Puss, frightened, asked him to be some-
thing smaller. Then the ogre obligingly became a mouse
and Puss gobbled him up in a flash. Thus Puss gained
a castle for his master, and the King pleased with what he
had seen of the young man chose him for a son-in-law.

So the Miller's son wedded the King’s daughter, and they
all lived in great prosperity and happiness, never forgetting
to show Puss the greatest respect and attention.

108


“YOU NEED NOT BE ANXIOUS, DEAR MASTER” SAID
THE CAT.

10g
THE UGLY DUCKLING.

OWN by the water sat a Duck

upon

At last one
broke, and

the mother
couraged,



her nest, for she had

to hatch her ducklings, and was
almost tired out before they came.

egg-shell after another
little creatures stuck

up their heads crying, ‘Peep! -
peep!” But there was one egg
that would not seem to hatch, and

Duck was quite dis-
At last the egg-shell

burst and there crept forth a very

large and

very ugly Duckling.

The old Duck thought it must

be a turkey chick, for it was not like
her other young ones. But the ugly
gray Duckling could swim as _ well
as the rest, if not better. But so

ugly was it that it was scoffed at |

by all the poultry in the farm-
yard, and at last it flew over the

IIo


THE UGLY DUCKLING.

fence and went down among the wild ducks. But the wild
ducks did not like its looks, and it went where some wild
geese were, but had to hide among the reeds for fear of
being shot, for the hunters were out. Late in the day it
came to a peasant’s hut, where lived an old woman with her
Tom Cat and her Hen. These two did not think much of
the Duckling because it could neither purr nor lay eggs.
So it went away, and when winter came on it was nearly
frozen to death. But when the glad spring came the ugly
Duckling crept down to the water and found itself among
some lovely Swans. ‘If I go near them they will kill me!
well let them;” and as it swam toward them it looked down
in the water, and lo and behold! it was no longer an ugly
Duckling but a graceful Swan.

IIt
ee Le EE ee ee TTR eee oer, uae



THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.

KING and Queen had a dear little baby girl born to

them, and all the fairies but one were invited to the
christening. Each of these fairies presented the child with
agift; one gave wealth, another virtue, another beauty,
and so on.

Then the cross old fairy, who had been left out, hob-
bled into the room, and stretching out a bony finger,
said: ‘On her fifteenth birthday she shall prick her finger
with a spindle and die of the wound.”

Then there was great sorrow at the court; but another
fairy spoke up and said: ‘She shall not die but shall fall
into a deep sleep for a hundred years.”

The day the child was fifteen years old she chanced
to be left alone in the castle. Roaming about she came
to a room in the tower, the door of which was locked.

She turned the key, and saw there an old woman spinning

I1i2




WHERE THE SLEEPING PRINCESS LAY.

113
A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

flax. “What is this?” asked the Princess, taking the
spindle in her hand. Then she gave a loud scream and
fell into a deep sleep. When the King and Queen came
back, they too fell asleep, and every living thing in the
palace became as if dead. And so it was for a hundred
years.

One day a king’s son was hunting in the woods when he
came to the Enchanted Palace. With a stout heart he went
through all the rooms until he came to the couch where the
sleeping Princess lay. The Prince was so overcome that
he knelt down and kissed her on her forehead. Sheat once
awoke, and so did everybody else in the house. The spell
was broken, and there were great rejoicings. The next
day the Prince and Princess were married—the good fairy

came to bless them—and they lived happily ever after.

114


LITTLE SNOW WHITE.

Ore upon a time a Queen sat by the window with an
ebony frame in her hand, doing some fine embroidery.
It was snowing, and she pricked her
finger, and as the drops of blood fell
on the snow, she thought to herself,
“Oh, if I could only have a child
as white as snow, as red as blood,
and as black as this ebony frame!”
Not long afterwards a daughter was
' born to her whose skin was snow
. white, whose lips were blood red,
and whose hair was black as night,
-She was named Snow White; and
‘when the child was born the mother
died.
In about a year the King married
i again, and his wife was very beautiful,
)} but very vain. Every day her mirror
THE eee sAIp so, told her that she was the loveliest




kat ‘ i

II5
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

woman in the world. Then she was happy. But when
Snow White grew up, she became more beautiful
than the Queen, and the mirror said so. This made
the Queen very jealous, and she tried in every way
to get rid of Snow White, but failed. The huntsman
could not kill her, nor the wild beasts devour her. She
made her home with Seven Dwarfs, who charged her to let
no one into the house when they were away. But the
Queen came in disguise, and Snow White was deceived:
first with a pair of stays, next with a poisoned comb, and
lastly with a poisoned apple, which killed her. The Dwarfs
could not bury her, but kept her in a glass case, and with
tears bewailed her loss. By and by a King’s son passed
through the forest, and stopped at the Dwarfs’ house over
night.

He fell in love with Snow White, and offered a large
sum for the case containing her. But the Dwarfs would not
sell it at any price. The Prince begged so hard that they
took pity on him and gave him the case, and as his attend-
ants bore it away they stumbled, and the piece of poisoned
apple fell out of Snow White’s mouth. .

Opening her eyes and raising the lid of the glass case,
she exclaimed, ‘Where am1?” Full of joy the Prince
answered, ‘‘ Safe with me !” and told her all that had taken
place. She consented to go with him to his castle, and
there was a grand wedding ; and the old Queen was there
and danced till she fell down dead.

116
HOP O”’ MY THUMB.

—>—_—
_——

HERE was once a poor wood-cutter who had seven
children, the youngest of whom was so small they
called him Hop o’ My Thumb. One night Hop overheard
his father say, ‘‘ Wife, we cannot keep these children any
longer. We shall all starve todeath. Let ‘us take them in
the woods and lose them.” And the mother agreed.

So Hop got up early the next morning and filled his
pockets with pebbles, and when the family went into the
woods he dropped a stone now and then along the way.
When night came the children found themselves alone, and
they began to cry. But Hop o’ My Thumb told them not
to cry, for he would lead them home; which he did.

That night the mother could not sleep, but kept crying out,
‘“‘T wish the children were here!” and with that the door
opened and in they all ran, shouting, ‘“‘ Here we are, mother !”
By-and-by they were too poor again to feed so many mouths,
and the children were taken to the woods for the fairies to
look after. This time Hop o’ My Thumb had only some

117
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

crumbs of bread with him, which the birds ate up as soon
as he scattered them.

The children cried and cried until they had no more
tears to shed, and then walked on and on in search of
a house. They came to an Ogre’s castle, and as he
was out the Ogress let them in and gave them some-
thing to eat, and hid them under the bed. When the Ogre
came home he cried out, “I smell little children, and I'll
have them for supper!” When they heard this they crept
out and ran as fast as they could, and hid under a big rock.
The next day the Ogre gave chase, and being tired lay
down on this rock and took off his seven-league boots. As
soon as the old Ogre was asleep, Hop o’ My Thumb put on
the fairy boots, and hurried away to the Ogre’s castle, and
said :

“Ogress, Ogre cannot come,
Give great key to Hop o’ My Thumb.”

She saw the boots and thought it was allright, so gave
him the key, and he took away all the gold that was in the
castle, and gave it to the poor people around. And Hop
o’ My Thumb married the King’s Daughter, and they were
as happy as the day was long.

118


THIS TIME HOP O’ MY THUMB HAD ONLY SOME CRUMBS
OF BREAD WITH HIM, WHICH THE BIRDS ATE UP
AS SOON AS HE SCATTERED THEM.

Ig
ALADDIN.

—__—_—
=—_—
—————

ee was the only child of a poor tailor named
. Mustafa. Hewas an idle fellow, and would not work,
nor learn any trade, but spent all his time in the streets.
Mustafa fell ill and died, and then Aladdin and his mother
were poorer thanever. One day, as Aladdin was lounging
through the streets, a man came up, and clasping him in
his arms told Aladdin that he was his uncle, his father’s
younger brother. He made much of the boy, and one
morning took him for a long walk in the country. At a
certain place he told Aladdin to build a fire, and he did so;
when the fire and smoke died away, there was seen a great
flat stone with a ring in the centre. The pretended uncle,
who was really a magician, told Aladdin to lift the stone
and go down into the cavern, and bring him the lamp he
would find there. Aladdin did as he was told, and passed
through a garden ablaze with jewels, many of which he
picked up and put in his pockets and in the bosom of his
shirt, where he placed the lamp. When he came to the
steps he asked the magician to give him his hand. But
this the magician would not do until Aladdin first gave him
the lamp. This Aladdin refused to do, and the magician

I20
ALADDIN.

in a great rage stamped on the ground, threw some perfume

on the fire, and the stone slipped

Aladdin cried in vain for
help, for no one could hear
him. In his distress he
wrung his hands, and hap-
pened to rub aring the magician
had given him. Instantly a
Genie stood before him, and
said, “I am your slave as long

as you wear that ring. What /

do you want?” ‘Take me
home,” said Aladdin; and ina
moment he found himself at his
own door, and his mother was
delighted to see him. All went
well with them now, as they had
only to rub the lamp or the ring
to have all their hearts could
wish.

Then Aladdin fell in love
with a beautiful Princess, and
tried hard to win her for his
bride. The slave of the lamp
built him a magnificent palace,
and after a while he married



y
Ke

back into its place.







INSTANTLY A GENIE STOOD
BEFORE HIM.

the Princess he loved, and the two lived happily together.
But it was not long before the old magician began to make |

I21I
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

trouble. Finding that Aladdin was living in splendor, he
bought many new lamps and went through the streets of
the city crying, ‘‘ New lamps for old ! New lamps for old!”
Aladdin was away, and the Princess and her maids were
alone in the palace ; and one of the girls took the old lamp
and gave it to the magician for a new one. As soon as it
was dark the magician rubbed the lamp and ordered the
slave to remove Aladdin’s palace to the centre of Africa.
When Aladdin came back, there was no palace and no
Princess; and the Sultan said if his daughter was not brought
to him within three days Aladdin should be put to death.

Aladdin was in despair. The lamp was gone, but the
ring was left !—and giving that a rub the Genie appeared,
and transported Aladdin to the very walls of his palace.
His wife was watching for him, and let him in through a
secret door, and how glad the two were to meet again!
The lamp was found and well rubbed, and the slave took
the palace and all back again, and everybody was as happy
as could be.

122


~JACK, THE GIANT KILLER,

123
JACK, THE GIANT KILLER.

——_—
=
———

apes was a small boy, but he was not afraid of giants.

He killed the great giant Cormoran, and cut off his
head. Afterwards he slew the great Welsh giant, whom
everybody feared. The King’s son became very fond of
Jack, and told him that the Princess he wished to marry
was in the hands of an enchanter, and there was no one to
set her free. Jack said, “I will do it;” so he went to a
castle where lived a three-headed giant, and obtained from
him an old coat, an old hat and an old pair of shoes.

The coat made Jack invisible, and putting it on he went
to the house of the enchanter, Gala Gantua, over whose
door hung a great horn, with the words on it:

“Whoever can this trumpet blow,
Shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”

Jack blew a blast that made the walls shake, and all the
animals fell down dead. All were Princes and Princesses
who had been changed into animals by the enchanter, who
never let them escape. The Prince, who came with Jack,
found that the Princess whom he loved had been changed
into a gazelle. They were soon married, and went to live
in the Prince’s own palace. Jack married a high-born lady
and they lived happily together in the enchanter’s castle.

124
THE BLUEBIRD.

OX upon a time there was a very rich king whose
wife died, leaving him a beautiful daughter, named

f 1 Flora, Andhe married again,

na. a» and the new queen also had
c | I ja daughter, who was neither
accomplished nor beautiful.
/~ She was called Troutina, be-
y cause her face was covered
with freckles, like the spots
on the back of a trout. But
the fairy, Soressio, was her
godmother, and she was dressed in
robes of splendor, while poor Flora
was clothed in rags and dirt. When it
became known that Prince Charm-
ing was in search of a wife, the
queen determined he should marry
her daughter; but he caught
sight of Flora, who needed not
dress to set off her charms,




THE TWO HAD sweET and he had eyes for no one
TALKS TOGETHER. else. The queen was furious;

and to punish him the fairy

125
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

changed him to a Bluebird, and Flora was locked up ina
tower. But the Bird flew here and there, and at last found
his dear Flora and sang love-songs at her window. He
brought her rich gifts from his own castle, and the two had
sweet talks together. The queen found it out and set
traps around the window, so he could not get near it, and
he thought Flora had proved false, and she wept because he
came no more. Meanwhile a ‘friend of the prince’s, an
enchanter, went all over the world in search of him, and
found him at last, wounded and nearly dead. He took the
poor Bluebird from the tree, stanched its blood, and then
set out to have a talk with Soressio. The prince was on
the point of losing his throne, and the fairy would not
change him back to his own shape unless he would marry
Troutina. In the meantime Flora was pining herself to
death, and one day she set off in disguise in search of Prince
Charming. She reached his palace, and by means of a
whispering gallery near where he slept, made her presence
known, and assured him of her continued love and
Troutina’s treachery. The enchanter and another kind
fairy joined forces against Soressio, and changed Troutina
to a pig, and Prince Charming and Flora were married, and
great was the joy of all the people.

126




u

THE PRINCE CUT OFF HER HEAD, AND THERE STOOD:
BEFORE HIM THE LOVELIEST PRINCESS IN THE WORLD.

127
THE WHITE CAT.

KING had three sons and he could not make up his
mind which one should be king after him. So he

said the one that brings me the prettiest dog at the end of
a year shall be king; and the three princes started off to
hunt for dogs. The eldest went to the right, the second
to the left, and the third one, Felix, went straight ahead
till he came toa castle where lived a white cat. He told
her about the dog, and she said she would give him one if
he would stay with her till the end of the year. So he did,
and when the time came to part they both shed tears.
The white cat gave Felix a walnut, saying, “The dog is
in that.” The other brothers had lovely dogs, but when
Felix cracked the walnut out dropped a filbert. He
thought it was a trick; but when he cracked the filbert
there was the loveliest dog in the world. “You have
won!” said the king, but now try which one can bring me
the finest piece of linen. The elder princes brought pieces
that would go through a wedding-ring and ear-ring, but
Felix cracked a filbert inside of which was a cherry-stone,
and inside the cherry-stone forty yards of stuff that could
be drawn through the eye of a needle. ‘You have won
again!” said the king; but now see who can find the most
beautiful lady for a wife. When the time came round the
white cat said to Felix, “Cut off my head!” ‘No, no!”
said the prince, ‘I love you too well!” “Do as I tell
you!” said the white cat, and the prince cut off her head,
and there stood before him the loveliest princess in the
world. The old king said, ‘You have won, Felix; and
you shall be king!” “But he did not care to be king, but
left the crown to his brothers and went to live with his
dear princess in the Castle of the White Cat.

128
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.

DONKEY, a Dog, a Cat, and a Cock set off for Bre-

men, where they planned to make music together,
and to be admired for their fine voices). When night came
on, the Donkey and the Dog lay down to rest under a tree,
while the Cat and the Cock climbed up in the branches.
The Cock saw a light in _ ‘ the distance,
and called to his compan- ions; and all
four decided to move on, in hopes of
finding there some thing good to eat.
) They found
it a robber’s
cottage, and
robbers were
there eating and drinking. The
Donkey put his fore feet on the
window-sill, the Dog jumped on
his back, the Cat elimbed on the
Dog, and the Cock flew up and
ecm perched on the Cat. Thenata
given signal the Donkey brayed, the Dog barked, the Cat
mewed, and the Cock crew, and the robbers ran out of the
house in a great fright. The four musicians, having eaten
all they wanted, put out the light and went to bed. At
midnight the robbers sent a messenger back to the house,
and the Cat spit at him, the Donkey kicked him, the Dog
bit him, and the Cock cried out ‘ Cock-a-doodle-do !” and
the man ran away as fast as he could, and the robbers
"never came near the house again.






129


BLUE BEARD.

GENTLEMAN had two daughters, Anne and
Fatima. A rich man asked that one of the girls
should marry him. But he was ugly and had a blue beard,
and Anne said she could not love sucha man. But Fatima
said she was sorry for him, and consented to be his wife.
The truth was she wanted to be mistress of his fine house.
One day Blue Beard said to his wife, “I am going away
for a year, and will give you the keys of the house. You
may open every door but the one to which this is the key.”
She promised never to use it, and he kissed her good-bye
and went away.

Anne and Fatima spent much time in wondering what
could be in that room they were forbidden to enter, and
one night Fatima took the key and opened the door. She
saw the heads of five ladies, cut off, and hanging to the

130












THE KEY DROPPED FROM HER HAND AND WAS
STAINED WITH BLOOD.

131
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

wall by their long hair. The key dropped from her hand
and was stained with blood. She and Anne tried to rub it
off, but they could not cleanse it.

Then they heard a voice in the hall. Blue Beard had

come home! He at once asked for his keys. He saw the
stain, and said to Fatima, “In half an hour I will cut off
your head to hang with the others.”
' The two sisters looked in vain for help. Anne leaned
out the window thinking each cloud of dust was
some one coming to their rescue.* Blue Beard broke
open the door, and dragged Fatima out to cut off her
head ; when, just as he raised his sword, there was a shout,
and Fatima’s brothers rushed into the hall, and Blue
Beard’s head went off ina flash. Fatima’s life was saved,
but ever after she was careful about opening doors that
were locked.

132




PRETTY GOLDILOCKs.

OLDILOCKS was a lovely Princess, with long golden

hair, and as soon as the young King saw her he fell



GOLDILOCKS WAS A
LOVELY PRINCESS, WITH
LONG GOLDEN HAIR.

desperately in love with her. He
sent her rich presents, but she sent
them all back, and said she did not
wish to marry. Now there lived
at the court a young man, named
Charming, and he said, ‘“ I wish the
King had sent me to Princess
Goldilocks. I am sure ats would
have come back with me.’ When

228 this was told the King he became

“jealous at once and shut the-Prince
up ina tower. After awhile he felt
sorry, and set Prince Charming
free, and sent him with rich gifts to
the Princess. As he rode along
he saw a fish lying gasping on
the grass, and he sprang from
his horse and threw it back into
the river. A little further on

133


A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES,

he rescued a Raven from an Eagle that was just going
to kill it. After this he found an Owl caught in a
net, and set the poor bird free. When he came to the
Palace where the Princess lived he offered her the gifts the
King had sent. But she would have none of them, “|
have made a vow to marry the one who brings me the gold
ring I lost in the river some time ago.” Charming .was
miserable as he walked by the river Sides but soon to grief

was turned to joy, when the fish whose life he had saved
swam with his head out of the water and the ring in his
mouth, Still the Princess would not return with Prince
Charming to marry the King, and the Prince was dis-
couriged, Then she said to the Prince, “Why do you not
remain here and marry me and I will make you King of my
country?” This he was too honorable to do; so he took
the Princess home to his King, and the two were married,
and there was a magnificent wedding. But the King was
still jealous of Charming, and shut him up in the tower to
die of hunger and thirst. But the King died first, and the
Queen at once ran to the tower and set Prince Charming
free. A month later Prince Charming and Goldilocks were
married, and were the happiest King and Queen that ever

lived.

134
RHYMES

BY

ELIZABETH -S.: TUCKER.




LITTLE “PIGS IN CLOVER,”
SNUGGLING, SOFT AND WHITE.

136




GUINEA PIGS.

GUINEA PIGS.

PET LE Pigs. in Clover,”
Snugeling, soft and white,
Peeping from under cover

With eyes so round and bright.

You're not like “pigs” the least, dears,
You're really clean and neat.
Nibble away at your feast, dears,

Cozy and safe and sweet.
Llvzabeth S. Tucker.

137






WHAT ARE YOU ALL SOFT AND WHITE,
STARING WITH YOUR EYES SO BRIGHT?













138
CHILD AND LAMB.

CHILD AND LAMB.

Child.

HAT are you all soft and white,
Staring with your eyes so bright?
Do you live out here?
Did your mother say you might
Play here in the warm sunlight?
Do you stay here all the night ?
Tell me, woolly dear!

Zamb.

HAT is this, so like a Rose,
Just the biggest kind that grows?
Can it run and eat?
Has no wool, and just two toes!
Will it fear me, do you s’pose,
If I kiss it with my nose,—
Will you, little sweet ?
Llizabeth S.. Tucker.

139




YOU DIDN’T MIND IT;
YOU KNEW IT WAS PLAY.

140
PUSSY CAT GRAY.

PUSSY CAT GRAY.

USSY -Cat Gray,
Do you ’member the day
I harnessed you

And you ran away ?

’Twas only fun,
Sweet Pussy Cat Gray!
You didn’t mind it;

You knew it was play.

Lilizabeth S. Tucker.

I4t




BUT THE BEST IN ALL THE STABLE
IS MY OWN LITTLE DONKEY GRAY!

142
MY DONKEY.

MY DONKEY.

ite HER may have her pony,

Father may ride his “Bay ”—
But the best in all the stable
Is my own little Donkey Gray!
| Elizabeth S. Tucker, ue

143




OH POLLY—P-R-E-T-T-Y POLLY.

144
oT er



PRETTY POLL!

FREE TY POLE!

Ro and a-buying
A bonnet grand in Town,
With bows on, and a rose on,
To match my new pink gown.

A-crooking, and a-looking
In the little looking-glass,
‘Tis true I thought I saw there
A very lovely lass.

When a-bridling and a-sidling
Said a very horrid bird—

“Oh Polly—P-r-e-t-t-y Polly”
In a tone the folks all heard.

He called it, and he squalled it,
And made the people laugh!
Now do you think he meant it,

Or was it only “chaff”?
Llrzabeth S. Tucker.

145




BRIGHT EYES AND SOFT WHITE COAT,
PINK NOSE AND GLOVE!

146
LITTLE WHITE MOUSE.

LITTLE WHITE MOUSE:

UDDLE down, cuddle down,
Soft little Dear.
Carlo and Pussy Cat

Shall not come near.

Under my long soft curls
Find a warm house,
No one shall touch you there,

Little white mouse.

Bright eyes and soft white coat,
Pink nose and glove!
Better than all my pets

Mousie I love!

LEtlizabeth S. Tucker.

147




WHY DO YOU FLY
DOWN FROM THE SKY?

148
THE DOVES.

THE DOVES.

RAY doves and white,
Through morning light
Wheeling soft wings in air,
Why do you fly
Down from the sky,

Isn’t it best up there?

“Oh,” they all cooed,
“Red Riding Hood
Gives us our daily crumbs,
Though winds do blow,
Though deep the snow,
We know she always comes.”
Elizabeth S. Tucker.

149


I MET A SQUIRREL. IN THE PARK,
ONE FROSTY MORNING EARLY.

150
THE SQUIRREL,

THE SQUIRREL.

MET a squirrel in the Park,
One frosty morning early,
He couldn’t quite tell which 1 was—
A Squirrel, or a Girlie.
Elizabeth S. Tucker.

Iot


*S WEE CHICKS ARE YELLOW GOLD.

BIDDY

152
“CHICKS.”

CHICKS.”

OUR little Chicks in the springtime,
Out in the warm sunshine.
Three of the chicks are Biddy Hen’s,

And one of them is mine.

Biddy’s wee chicks are yellow gold,
Mine like a rose so fair,
Hers are in downy jackets soft,

Mine must have clothes that tear.

I wonder sometimes if Biddy Hen,
Clucking the whole day through,
Isn’t answering. countless questions,

Just as I have to do.
Elizabeth S. Tucker.

153


SOMETIMES WITH STRANGE SOUNDS IT COMES.

154
THE GOLD-FISH SPEAKS.

THE GOLD-FISH SPEAKS.

| the World outside our Dish
Lives the queerest-looking fish!
Which swims about in the oddest way.

Changing its colors every day.

Two black “fins,” and two of white,
Dance and wave from morn till night,
It has floating hair of golden hue,

Its “gills” are red and its eyes are blue.

Sometimes with strange sounds it comes,
Bringing us delicious crumbs;

But its eyes and mouth, so big and wide,
Frighten us all to the other side.

Elizabeth S. Tucker.

155


8
% eS
THE RABBITS.

156
THE RABBIT DANCE,

THE RABBIT DANCE.

[* the night-time,

At the right time—

So I’ve understood—
’Tis the habit
Of Sir Rabbit

To dance in the Wood!

And perhaps if you and I are bold,

And wait till the Moon is big and old,

We can creep—and the Rabbit’s Dance behold!
Elizabeth S Tucker.

157


OF ALL THE PETS TO LOVE AND HUG
THE NICEST IS A LITTLE PUG.

158


DEAR PUGGY.

DEAR PUGGY.

F all the pets to love and hug
The nicest is a little Pug.
With velvet nose
And nimble toes,
He’s always ready for a run
He’s always full of play and fun.

He'll sit, and ‘“ Lady calling” play,
And “shake hands” in the nicest way
With Lady Poll,
My biggest doll.
And when we walk out in the street
In every race he’s sure to beat!

Oh you'ld believe me, if you knew
A little cunning Puggy too;
And you'ld agree
I think with me,—
Of all the pets to love and hug,
The nicest is a darling Pug!
Llizabeth S. Tucker.

159



MOTHER GOOSE
JINGLES.
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RAVITES,



MOTHER HER GOOSE.

Li TLE Bok Bo- Peep
Has lost her sheep

And can’t tell

Where to find them

Leave them alone,

And they'll come home
Wagging their tails behind them.

162


LITTLE BO-PEEP;

163
A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.



S Tommy Snooks and
6 Lf Betsey Brooks
7 Were walking out one Sun-
day,
Said Tommy Snooks to Bet-
sey Brooks
To-morrow will be Monday.

Le Tom Tucker

Sings for his supper
What shall he sing for

White bread and butter

How shall he cut it
Without e’er a knife

How will he marry
Without e’er a wife.

164




ER

TLE TOM TUCK

IT

L

6
A TREASURY OF STORIES, SINGLES AND RHYMES,

UCY Locket lost her pocket,
Kitty Fisher found it.
There was not a penny in it,

But a ribbon ’round it.

HE North Wind doth, blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor Robin do then

poor thing?



He will hop to the barn,
And to keep himself warm,
Will hide his head under his wing:

poor thing.

166




THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW.

167
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

USSY cat, Pussy cat,
where have you been?”
“T’ve been to London
to look at the Queen.”
“Pussy cat, Pussy cat
what did you there?”
“T frightened a little mouse

Under the chair.”



ITTLE Miss Muffet, sat on a tuffet,
Eating some curds and whey,

Along came a spider
And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away !

168








LITTLE MISS MUFFET

169
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

S I was going up
Primrose Hill
Primrose Hill was dirty,
There I met a pretty miss,
And she dropped me a

courtesy.



ITTLE Nancy Etticote,
In a white petticoat
With a red nose,
The longer she stands

The shorter she grows.

170


LITTLE NANCY ETTICOTE.

171
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.



HERE was a little boy and a little girl
Lived in an alley,
Says the little boy to the little girl,
“Shall I, Oh! shall 1?”

Says the little girl to the little boy,
“What shall we do?”

Says the little boy to the little girl
“T will kiss you.”

USH a bye baby on the tree top
When the wind blows the cradle will rock
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
Down tumbles baby, cradle and all.—

172


HUSH A BYE BABY ON THE TREE TOP,

173


ITTLE Polly Flinders
Sat among the cinders,
Warming her pretty little toes.
Her mother came and caught her,
And whipped her little daughter,
For spoiling her nice new clothes.

ITTLE Jack Horner
Sat in a corner
Eating a Christmas pie.
He put in his thumb
And pulled out a plum
And said: ‘ What a good boy am I!”

174
LITTLE JACK

ELS



HORNER.

tie


ING, dong, bell, Who pulled her out ?

Pussy in the well! Little Johnny Stout ;
Who put her in? What a naughty boy was that,
Little Tommy Green. To try and drown poor
pussy-cat ?
URLY-locks, Curly-locks But sit on a cushion
Wilt thou be mine ? And sew a fine seam
Thou shalt not wash dishes And feast upon strawberries
Nor yet feed the swine. Sugar and cream !

176


CURLY-LOCKS.

177
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

OT cross buns, hot cross buns,
One a penny, two a penny,

Hot cross buns.



If your daughters don't like them
Give them to your sons,

One a penny, two a penny,

j
2

ee oo Hot cross buns.

ACK and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water,
Jack fell down and broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after !


JACK AND JILL,

179
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

ITTLE Boy Blue, ~
Come blow your horn
The sheep’s in the meadow
The cow’s in the corn !
Where is the little boy minding his sheep ?
Under the hay-cock fast asleep ?

180


LITTLE BOY BLUE

181
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.



ING a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.

When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing,

Wasn’t that a dainty dish,
To set before the King ?

ISTRESS Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow ?
With silver bells, and cockle shells,
And pretty maids all in a row.

182


QUITE CONTRARY.

MISTRESS MARY,

183
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

HEN I was a bachelor I lived by myself,
And all the bread and cheese I got I put upon the
shelf.
The rats and the mice they made such a strife

I was forced to go to London to buy myself a wife.

The streets were so broad and the lanes were so narrow
I had to bring my wife home on a wheel-barrow.
The wheel-barrow broke and my wife had a fall,

Down came wheel-barrow, little wife and all.

184




WHEN | WAS A BACHELOR.

185
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.



OBBY Shaftoe’s gone to sea,
Silver buckles on his knee.
He'll come back and marry me,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.

Bobby Shaftoe’s fat and fair,
Combing down his yellow hair.
He’s my love for evermore
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.

186
THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN,



HERE was an old woman tossed up in a basket
Ninety times as high as the moon
And where she was going I couldn’t but ask it
For in her hand she carried a broom.

“Old woman, old woman, old woman,” quoth I,
“Oh whither, Oh whither, Oh whither so high ?”

“To sweep the cobwebs off the sky!
“Shall I go with you?” “Aye. By-and-by.”

187

RHYMES
EDITH M. THOMAS.
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

THE SNOW-BALL CHIEFTAIN.

LL in the tingling frosty weather
I met a chieftain brave and bright;
He’d scarlet hat with snow-white feather,

His step was brisk and light.

His twinkling eyes were soft and starlike,
His lips and cheeks were rosy red;
“He doesn’t look so very warlike!”

Beneath my breath I said.

So I a kind good-morning bid him.—

With snow-balls three he pelted me;

190


”

KE

T LOOK SO VERY WARLI

SN’

“HE DOE

BENEATH MY BREATH | SAID

Ig


A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then laughed, and ran, and quickly hid him

Behind a hemlock tree!

Edith M. Thomas.




YM A PROPHET; I CAN SPY
IN THIS BRANCH SO BROWN AND DRY
LEAVES AND FLOWERS THAT SOON WILL WAKE.

193
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

THE LITTLE PROPHET.

(FEBRUARY SPEAKS.)

HOUGH the clouds are hanging low,
And the streams can hardly go
(All their babbling voices dumb),
Trust me, better days will come!
Don’t despair.

I’m a prophet, I’m a seer:

I can see, and I can hear,

Singing travellers on their way

To this Northland bleak and gray ;
Don’t despair.

I have seen the field-mice run

All abroad, to take the sun;

I have heard the peeper’s plaint,

From the marshes, far and faint;
Don’t despair.

194


THE LITTLE PROPHET.

I’m a prophet; I can spy

In this branch so brown and dry

Leaves and flowers that soon will wake

And their prison-fetters break

Don’t despair.
Edith M. Thomas.



195
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES,

MARCH AND PUSSY-WILLOW.

[° you ask me why I am laughing so,
I will tell: you true.—An hour ago,
As I played on the bank of the silvery creck,

I broke off a branch from the Willow sleek.

Oh ho! it was fun to hear and to see
How she fretted and fumed and scolded me.
She called on the Wind—the Wind came light—

And together they beat me left and right.

But all her lashes and all her whips
Only tickled my cheeks, with their fleecy tips:

196


SHE FANCIED SHE HURT ME—SHE DIDN’T, YOU KNOW,—
AND THAT IS WHY | AM LAUGHING SO!

197
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

She fancied she hurt me—she didn’t, you know,-—

And that is why I am laughing so!

Edith M. Thonias.




ASK ME NOT WHY APRIL'S EYES
FILL WITH TEARS AND SMILES TOGETHER,

199
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

APRIL THE TRICKSTER.

SK me not why April’s skies
Every hour show some new weather ;
Ask me not why April's eyes

Fill with tears and smiles together.

April’s sweet, yet April’s shrewd—
You will trust him to your cost!
Though the fields with flowers are strewed,

He may send a nipping frost.

If you put your sunshade on,

With a hail-storm he will greet you ;

200
APRIL THE TRICKSTER.

If your water-proof you don, :
To fine weather he will treat you!
Edith M, Thomas.



2or
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

IN THE ORCHARD.

*”

NDER the blooming orchard tree,
I hear the little maid May,
Singing, “Why can’t you stay with me,

Dear blossoms, why can’t you stay?

I'll love you true, my whole life through,”

Promises little maid May.

“hen I seem to hear the blossoms sigh.
“ Sweetheart, it cannot be;
Your brother September will by and by

Seek apples under this tree:


“WHY CAN’T YOU STAY WITH ME,
DEAR BLOSSOMS, WHY CAN’T YOU STAY?”

203
TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

We blossoms all must wither and fall,

Or apples there'll never be!”

Edith M. Thomas.



204




WHAT DOES THE DAISY SEE,
IN THE BREEZY MEADOW TOSSING?

205


A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES

THE DAISY.

HAT does the daisy see,
In the breezy meadow tossing ?
It sees the wide blue overhead

And the little cloud-flocks crossing.

What does the daisy see,

‘Round the sunny meadow glancing?
It sees the butterflies’ chase,

And the filmy gnats at their dancing.

What does the daisy see,
Down in the grassy thickets?
The grasshoppers green and brown,

And the nimble, coal-black crickets.

It sees the bobolink’s nest

That no one else can discover,

206
THE DAISY.

And the brooding mother-bird,

With the floating grass above her.
Edith M, Thomas.
Ast


4 TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

JULY AND THE BUMBLE-BEE.

ULY comes with song and laughter,
Clover-blossoms in her hands ;
Bumble-bee comes buzzing. after,—

Jacket brown with yellow bands,

“JT have been the whole field over,
North and south and east and west;
And if I’m a judge of clover,

You, July, have found the best!

“T’ll give all my honey-pleasures
That in fields and gardens lie,
If you'll share the stolen treasures,

In your dainty hands, July!”

208


IF ?M A JUDGE OF CLOVER,
YOU HAVE FOUND THE BEST!

209
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

“No sir! for you fret and grumble ;
(Grumble-bee ’s the name for you!)
But if ever you grow humble

What you ask me, then I’ll do!”
Edith MZ. Thomas.



eens roti LLL


THE WATER-LILY HAS A HEART OF GOLD,
RUT YET SHE HIDES A SECRET NEVER TOLD.

211
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

THE WATER-LILY.

HE Water-lily has a heart of gold,
But yet she hides a secret never told;
The dragon-fly could tell it if he would;

The piping sand-lark too has understood!

She loves the burning sun, she loves the shade;
Her lonely mystery makes me half afraid:
When I my eager hands reach out to her,

She floats away,—a fairy voyager!

I only know, before the lily blooms,

A long time she must sleep in watery glooms;.

212
THE WATER-LILY.

And when she dies, she droops her lovely head

Down, down upon the river’s shaded bed!
Edith M. Thomas.


A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

SEPTEMBER.

OUNT all the plumes of golden-rod,
That by the country roadsides nod;
Count all the little feathery blooms

That make the golden-rod’s gay plumes—

So many times I love this sprite,
With sun-burnt cheeks and eye-beams bright,
Who shoulder-deep in yellow flowers,

Spends all the lazy sunshine hours.

The finches, dressed in gold and black,

Are always flitting on his track,

214


I] LOVE THIS SPRITE,
WITH SUN-BURNT CHEEKS AND EYE-BEAMS BRIGHT.

215




A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

And sometimes frolic spiders lay

Their tickling webs across his way !

Edith M. Thomas.






HE TOUCHES FIRST THE MAPLE LEAF
WHICH BITING FROSTS HAVE BROUGHT TO GRIEF.

217


A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/INGLES AND RHYMES.

OCTOBER THE ARTIST.

CTOBER is an artist rare,
He paints new pictures, every day;
His colors come from who knows where ?—
Red, orange, purple, misty gray:
He touches first the maple leaf

Which biting frosts have brought to grief.

He paints the grass, and every vine
That clambers over fence or wall:
His hazel eyes mischievous shine,

For when the leaves begin to fall,

218
OCTOBER THE ARTIST

around,

He makes them dance around,

ound !

In elfin rings along the gr

M. Thomas.

Edtth



219
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

THE HOLLY.

S dreaming by my fire I sat,
; I heard a merry din;
The door I opened. wide; at that,
A stranger-child stepped in.
He wore a fleecy, warm, white hat

Tied round his dimpled chin.

Green leaves and berries red he brought ;
His face and voice were jolly :—
‘“T have no flowers; but these, I thought,

Would cure your melancholy.


GREEN LEAVES AND BERRIES: RED HE BROUGHT.

221
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.

V'll sing a song, that I’ve been taught,—

It’s called, ‘ Heigh. ho, the holly !’”
Lidith M. Thomas.



222


A GOOD-NIGHT KISS TO YOU | BLOW,
AS I TRIP UNDER THE MISTLETOE!

223
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHVMES.
#@

THE MISTLETOE:

LY elf, with rosy finger tips
Pressed tightly on your rosy lips,
I pray you, tell us what you know

About this branch of mistletoe.

DECEMBER SPEAKS.

The Mistletoe is old and wise,

And always watched by cunning spies ;

I do not dare to tell you how

And where I found this curious bough,
Oh, if I should forget, and speak,

They ’d pull my ear, and pinch my cheek!
And this is why my finger tips

I press so tightly on my lips.

224
THE MISTLETOE.

A good-night kiss to you I blow,

As I trip under the mistletoe!

Edith M, Thomas.


AMERICAN CHILD.

The Wolunteer Speaks.

ES, I am ready to be
A soldier by land or sea,

For my heart is warm







and true;

I am my Country’s knight,
Peace will I keep-—or fight—
Just as she bids me do!
Ledith M. Thomas.

226


YES, | AM READY TO BE
A SOLDIER BY LAND OR SEA.

227
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

AFRICAN CHILD.
(To the tbollpbock.)
ERRY friend and jolly fellow,—

Children of the sun are we;
I am brown and you are yellow,

Yet we always do agree.



You and I are never fretting—
Sweet, old, homely Holyhock—

"Bout the freckles we'll be getting,

If we venture out to walk !

You can’t walk—but then you’re growing
Taller every day than I ;—

You can’t walk—yet there’s no knowing
But you'll sometime reach the sky!

Edith M. Thomas.

228


YOU AND I ARE NEVER FRETTING—SWEET, OLD, HOMELY
HOLLYHOCK.

229
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

DUTCH CHILD.

H, a sturdy little pilgrim
All the way from Hollow-Land,
With your cosey cap and muff,
And your skates in hand!

If I tried to catch and kiss you
poe -poly, round, and sweet,

{1 suspect that you would tie



Wings upon your feet.

_ Away, away you
will be flitting
Down the river

smooth as glass ;
I, upon the bank,

will throw

Kisses as you pass.

Edith M. Thomas.


Toe

WITH YOUR COSEY CAP AND MUFF, AND YOUR SKATES
IN HAND!
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

A LITTLE HIGHLANDER.

ERE’S a brave lad from the highland and heather—
Here’s a true lad with tartan and feather,—
Full of the joy of the wild spring weather !
March !
March!

Who within doors with
dull care would be_
staying

When the wind,
through the naked
treetops straying,

Sounds like a_ pibroch
that minstrels are
playing ?

March !
March !



Here’s a blithe heart as light as the swallow,
Here’s a bold chieftain—who’ll follow, who’ll follow,
Over the meadow, up hill and down hollow?
March!
March !
Edith M. Thomas.

232


HERE’S A TRUE LAD WITH TARTAN AND FEATHER,

233
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

GERMAN CHILD.

pou as ripe September peach
(On the bough just out of reach),

Cheerful as September sun

When the bravest work is done,

Bright your face as morning sky!

Liebling-—darling—why so shy?

Simple little German maid,
With your cap and flaxen braid,
Snowy kerchief smooth and neat,
Wooden shoes upon your feet—
Lift to mine your modest eye—
Liebling——larling—why so shy ?

2340


BRIGHT YOUR FACE AS MORNING SKY! LIEBLING—
DARLING—WHY SO SHY?

235
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Dear home-body, homely dressed—
(Like a brown thrush in its nest)—
Here’s'a little song in praise

Of your helpful hands and ways !
With a dimpled smile reply ;—
Liebling—darling—why so shy ?

Ladith M. Thomas.



236
THE FLEUR-DE-LIS.

THE PLEUR-DE-Els:

“Ge midget maiden, sweet to see
(And sweet to kiss.if that might be),
Go search the garden through and through,

And bring the flower you love most true.”

The midget maid from La Belle France
Threw back an arch and laughing glance:
“T’m April’s pet and precious tease,

I change my mind just when I please.”

She plucked a rose, a sprig of May,
A daffodil, a tulip gay,

A pink, a modest violet,

A daisy white, and mignonette ;

237


BUT THEN, JUST THEN, SHE CHANCED TO SEEâ„¢
THE FLOWER OF FRANCE, THE FLEUR-DE-LIS.

238
THE FLEUR-DE-LIS.

But then, just then, she chanced to see
The flower of France, the fleur-de-lis ;
She laughed outright, and dropped the rest,—

“This flower I love the very best !”
Ldith M. Thomas.





239
A TREASURY OF STORIES, /INGLES AND RHVMES.

CANADIAN CHILD.

- AY little cousin
Beyond the Great Lakes
(A darling rose-bud
Amid the white flakes !)

How far is it,
pray,
To the foot of
the hill?”
“A swallow’s
flight
So smooth and
so still!”

‘‘ And, prithee, how far
je Tothe top of the hill?”
“Oh, a snail’s pace
With a patient will!”

Edith M. Thomas.






Y :

“ GAY LITTLE COUSIN, BEYOND THE GREAT LAKES.”

241
A TREASURY OF STORIES, J/{INGLES AND RHYMES.

SWEDISH CHILD.

MET a little Swedish child,
And deep and thoughtful were her eyes ;
My willing fancy she beguiled
With many a legend strange and wild.

. She told of witching




Sy

water-sprites
Of nimble dwarfs
and giants grim,
, Of dancers ’mid the
Northern Lights
' That wave their ban-
ners oer the

heights.

She sang me many a cunning rhyme,
Then up she rose in haste, and cried,
“T must be gone, the church-bells chime,

I'll tell the rest another time !”

Ldith M,. Thomas.

242


% % ee

I MET A LITTLE SWEDISH-CHILD, AND DEEP AND
THOUGHTFUL WERE HER EYES,

243
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

SPANISH CHILD.

SOFT brown eye and a loving heart,
A winsome smile—yet a roguish art,

For my little lady has learned the trick,

With motion slow and motion quick,

To make her fan
speak whatever
she will,

Though her dainty
lips are perfectly
still.

Take care! when
the days are
drowsy and
warm,

She will put you
to sleep with a

waving charm!

Edith M. Thomas.



244


TO MAKE HER FAN SPEAK WHATEVER SHE WILL,
THOUGH HER DAINTY LIPS ARE PERFECTLY STILL.

245
THE RUSSIAN CHILD.

LITLE subject of the-Czar,
Tell us what your projects are.

“Oh, beneath the singing pine
I will build a palace fine
All of sparkling snow and ice,
Decked with many a rich device!
And I’ll not be there alone,
For I'll build a royal throne
And Pll make a Czar of snow
And trim courtiers bowing low.
On his head a crown he'll wear,
In his hand a sceptre bear !
Then a guard of snow I'll set,
With an icy bayonet,
At the door to keep afar

All who plot against my Czar.”
Edith M. Thomas.




LITTLE SUBJECT OF THE CZAR, TELL US WHAT YOUR
PROJECTS ARE,

247
A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES,

ENGLISH. CHILD.

YOU’RE not content with

the roses alone

The roses’ lover you too
would bind!

Ah, little fingers be soft and
kind,

Lightly, lightly, the butterfly
hold! 3

He has only one day to call
his own,

And you, my sweet, have a

thousand-fold.

Edith M. Thomas.



248


AH, LITTLE FINGERS BE SOFT AND KIND, LIGHTLY
LIGHTLY, THE BUTTERFLY HOLD!

249




MAY.

(Mtalian Child.)

“When you tell your
beads, dear May, x

For what blessings do you pray?”
(“That no frost my flowers may

fear,
That no danger shall come near




Any helpless downy thing
Still too young to fly or sing?”

“

Edith M. Thomas.

250




“WHEN YOU TELL YOUR BEADS, DEAR MAY, FOR WHAT
BLESSINGS DO YOU PRAY?’

251