Citation
The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop

Material Information

Title:
The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
Creator:
Myra & Son ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Myra & Son
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[8], 26, [4] p., [16] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dreams -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Repentance -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Insects -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Coordinates:
42 x 77
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in colors, text printed in red and blue borders.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Tommy is a little thug who drowns kittens, pesters puppies and decimates the lesser creation; he gets his comeuppance in a series of dreams in which the roles of tormentor and tormented are reversed as in The World Upside Down.
General Note:
The preface is signed M.B.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026661372 ( ALEPH )
ALG5320 ( NOTIS )
214285115 ( OCLC )

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THE TRIBULATIONS





TOMMY TIPTOP,

«HE PRAYETH BEST WHO LOVEST BEST,
fx THINGS BOTH GREAT AND SMALL.”

Coleridge.







LOND © N:
MYRA & SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET,

GOVENT | GARDEN.













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CONTENTS.

PART 1, Pay d IME. Jommy's |] Ricks.

[PART Q, Nicut dime. ‘J ommy's ‘] RIBULATIONS.



FREES

i—Tribulation with the Cats.
2—Tribulation with the Birds.
3—Tribulation with the Dogs.
4—Tribulation with the Wasp.
5—Tribulation with the Fowls.
6—Tribulation with the Butterfly, &c.
7—Tribulation with the Puppies.
8—Tribulation with the Fish. —
g—Tribulation with the Doll.
1o—Tribulation with the Parrot.
11—Tribulation with the Daddy-Longlegs.
12—Tribulation with the Mice.
13—Tribulation with the Rabbits.
14—Tribulation with the Mufhn Boy.
1s—Tribulation with the Beetle.
16—Tribulation at the Zoological Gardens.

Tommy's Awakening and Repentance.

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Our duty towards others, and especially towards
animals is now so seldom insisted on, that little
apology is needed for bringing an old fashioned
principle before our readers. The object of this
book is to show that all unkindness towards the
animal creation merits —if it does not at once
receive— punishment, and that to obey the law of.

kindness is our duty as well as our happiness.

M. B.

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THE TRIBULATIONS

TOMMY TIPTOP,

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ME was not a really Bad Boy, our Tommy Tiptop,
nee Et he was only full of mischief, full of fun, and very
thoughtless of any body but himself. Mrs. Tip-
top was a little bit to blame for this, for she had

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a petted and spoiled Tommy until he was, as the
a maids said, “a dreadful trouble and worse than
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any plague of Egypt,” but that remark was made
the day he tried to poach eggs on a gridiron, which, as you
know, is not very well adapted for that purpose.

Tommy was her eldest child and he had no little brothers
or sisters until he was four years old, so that he had more toys,
more play, and more goodies, and a great deal more indul-
gence and treats than most little boys get, which is a little
excuse for some of his naughty ways.

Then too, he was always really sorry when his much too kind
mother showed him how naughty he was, but when she was not
there, he too often forgot her gentle words of advice and only
thought of fun and frolic, and did not think of the mischief he
did, or of the pain he caused to others. His little sisters ran
from him and hid their pretty little faces in nurse’s gown;
Nurse -herself, though very fond of Tommy, put all the .best
dolls and toys well out of his reach for she said she could not
answer for the safety of Miss Victoria and Ethereda’s favourites

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when Master Tommy was “in high spirits,” which was under-
stood by all in the house to mean that Tommy was in one of
his very naughty fits of mischief. I dare not tell my dear little
readers one half of the naughty things which Tommy did,
although I feel quite sure that they would not copy him in one
of them, but it is so bad for little people, or indeed for big
people, to have naughty companions, that I know they would
be sorry to even look at Tommy’s pictures in this book, or to
read all about the dreadful things which happened to him, and
which quite cured him at last of all his tricks.

Mrs. Tiptop often told him in her gentle words that nothing
was more displeasing to the great God who made us than to be
cruel to his creatures, and yet this thoughtless boy was con-
stantly hurting some insect or animal. Mr. Tiptop was very
fond of pets, and kept a nice Tabby cat and several nice large
dogs in his stable yard; this yard was a great amusement to

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- Tommy, who was delighted to see some dear little kittens one

#; fine morning. He played for some time with the dear little

eS kittens, and gave them names, Spot and Bob, Jet and Snow. os
“i The kittens were more pleased to see Tommy than their mother
Ps was, as she well knew how very cruel he could be when he was OE
a inclined to be naughty, but the little kits purred and rubbed
4 against his hands, and jumped over his shoes, and gambolled
es round him quite prettily. Presently he trod on one and it &
squeaked so funnily that he trod on another just to hear it
*~ again. Their mother began to be cross, and Tommy thought it <@
<3 best to retreat, but he said as he went, ‘‘there are too many we
@ of you kits, some of you must be drowned; why not this one? ee
*£ His eyes are blue, a very ugly colour,” and off he ran to findhis <<
et ie Johnny, who was older and much stronger than
Â¥ ommy. o
es When the two little lads returned together, the poor little i
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a them. The boys first shut up Mrs. Tabby in the stable, and %

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$6 then put all the kittens into a basket some distance away from
their mother, who mewed and cried bitterly; they then got a
pail of quite cold water, and began to drown the poor little kits. .
Jet was the first victim; her poor pretty little black head went
under the cold water, and though she struggled hard, down she
went and soon all her sufferings were over, and poor little Jet
was dead. When Spot saw this, he struggled so when Tommy
caught him up, that he slipped out of his cruel arms and ran
mewing to the stable door. ‘“ We had better not drown all,”
said Tommy. ‘ No; we'll keep two for fighting,” Johnny replied,
“one is no good,” so that one poor little kitten was saved for
this cruel purpose, and Snow being gentle and peaceable, was
drowned on the spot, while Bob, after being well bathed in
the pail, was allowed to run shivering back to his miserable
mother, who sprang out as soon as the stable door was opened.
She ran to the pail crying so sadly that John said they had
better take the dead kittens away and bury them, so they agreed
to play at funerals, of which sport, however, they soon got very
tired, and fought a little to settle a small quarrel as to which of
the two naughty boys was to be the clergyman. This fight
together, with the fact that Johnny was so much stronger than
Tommy, and that he hurt most, reminded them that they meant
to have a cat fight, but on their return to the stable-yard, pussy
had carried her kittens up to the loft to a place of safety where
the wicked boys could not find her, and there she hoped to bring
up her sadly reduced family in peace.

These naughty boys then thought of the puppies, which
were now about six months old, and were very intelligent and

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e It was easy enough to decoy them away from their mother,
x but far more difficult to make them fight, for they were dear
S good-natured little pet things, who were always playing
together. However, each boy took a puppy, and by holding the
ve little creatures and making them scratch each other with their
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and snarled for the first time in their innocent lives. Nor was
the mischief ended when the fight was over, for they went
growling and snapping at each other all the way back to their
mother, who wondered at their naughty tempers and scolded
them well.

Johnny next showed Tommy what he called “a jolly way of
catching flies and wasps” as they sunned themselves on the
garden wall, or walked along it for fruit, of which there was
plenty in that nice garden. Tommy soon learned the art, and
after some half-dozen attempts, caught a bluebottle fly and then
a wasp. Johnny, who was really a cruel boy, then pulled off the
fly's wings, and when Tommy said, “ How it must hurt them,”
replied, ‘““They would squeak if it did,” and foolish little
Tommy believed him, and pulled several Daddy-Long-Legs
to pieces because they are considered to be naughty insects by

many little ones on account of the nursery rhyme:
“Daddy, daddy long legs,
Would not say his prayers,
Take him by the right leg,
Take him by the left leg,
And throw him down the stairs.”

After which cruel sport, Johnny told Tommy all about
birds’ nesting, and climbing trees, and taking away eggs
and little birds, and related how he had taken a nest with five
little birds in it, and had fed them with bread, and how two

choked at once, and the other three birds died in the night: for

























cover them up, and they are tender and chilly until after they
have all their feathers and can fly about and keep themselves
warm, as well as find their own food. Johnny also spoke of
shooting rabbits, and both these naughty lads fired off their
toy guns into the rabbit hutches, frightening the poor rabbits,
although they could not kill them, and causing some tiny
rabbits, two days old, to die with fright. How the poor
rabbits did scamper about! And how their little hearts went
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Tired of this thoughtless sport, they rode Johnny's bicycle by
turns through the chicken yard, terrifying the fowls, and causing
them to fly in all directions. They disturbed an old hen who
was leading her young chickens to some grits which had been
thrown down for their benefit, and ran over several poor little
chickens, killing two and quite laming several others. Round
and round the yard they went in turn, frightening all the
peaceful hens, chickens, and ducks who felt quite surprised to
see the little boy who usually brought them food and was so
kind to them, mounted on a big wheel, and actually running
over them.

When Tommy saw the poor little chickens dead on the
ground he felt sorry, and he knew quite well how naughty
he had been, and he also thought how very sorry his dear
mother would be to find her pretty brood injured, for Mrs.
Tiptop was pleased to have a brood so late in the year, for
the cold winds in spring had killed off nearly all the early
broods.

Tommy well remembered how delighted his mother was when
the gardener, who looked after the fowls, told her that eleven
chicks were hatched out by the old brown hen, who was always
a steady sitter, and how the chickens were brought in to the
house in a basket, and Tommy was allowed to see them and
to feed them with soft little seeds which his mother called
“orits,” and when Brownie had finished hatching two more
chicks, they were all placed carefully under her, and every
day Tommy was allowed to feed the chickens.

And now he had killed two, and hurt many, and what would
his mother say? He could hardly bear to think of it, and
the tears came in his eyes, for he was not naturally a wicked,
cruel boy, but was so easily led astray by his companions,
and he thought it was grown up, and grand, not to care,
and was too thoughtless to mind how he hurt others in
his amusements; all he thought of was Tommy Tiptop, and
when either boys or girls think too much of themselves they



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are certain to become selfish~and cruel, for all selfishness is
cruelty to others.

But now some words his mother had said came suddenly
into his thoughts :—

‘ Evil is wrought,
By want of thought,
As well as want of heart ;”

and he began to look very sad.

When Johnny saw this, he asked Tommy what was the
matter, and Tommy pointed to the dead chickens, and Johnny
only laughed in his rude way.

“Pooh,” he said, ‘“‘ you are a baby.” Now Tommy dreaded
of all things to be thought and called a baby, perhaps because
he often behaved like one, and cried for nothing, and so he
quickly wiped his eyes and said boldly, “‘ What. shall we do
next ?” as if all this naughty behaviour was not quite enough
for one morning, and yet, (though both boys felt hungry), it
was only half-past eleven o'clock, as they found when ‘they
went into the house for something to eat.

With a slice of plum cake in each hand, the little boys
ran out again eagerly into the bright sunshine; the garden
looked bright with flowers, and over head were butterflies,
some white ones, and also a beautiful Peacock Butterfly. “I
must have that butterfly,” cried Tommy. “I am collecting
butterflies.”

“So am I,” replied Johnny. Off the boys ran, cap in hand,
after the lovely insect; Tommy’s hat soon held the captive
which was roughly seized, and placed on a cork, the pretty
wings were blown open, and a cruel pin ran through the
quivering body, while the wings were spread open by bands
of postage stamp paper.

“It will look nice when ‘set’ properly,” Johnny said, with
a sigh of envy, for he longed for the butterfly.

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and a Sun Fly out of the roses, and, let me see, a lizard—
as soon as I catch one. Only think of a lizard, Tommy!”

“Yes, but you have not caught it yet,” replied Tommy,
who wished to keep his lovely “ Peacock ;” “and I don’t know
that I shall collect lizards. I have never seen one yet in
this garden.” By the time the poor Peacock Butterfly was
pinned down and set, the boys found that the white butter-
flies had flown away, and so they had lost the pleasure of
catching them.

Little Frisk, the black and tan terrier, ran up to Tommy
at this moment, and was at once harnessed to a very large
cart which had belonged to Tommy when he was younger, and
which he still called his own. Poor Frisk was not big enough
to pull the cart, but he had to submit, and a bit was put in
his little mouth, and the reins were fastened, and he was well
tied in to the cart, and made to draw it along the garden
path, whether he liked doing so or no.

Frisk did not like this at all, but it was worse when Tommy
got in the cart and Johnny ran alongside with a large stick
and gave poor Frisk a blow every time he stopped running,
which hurt him dreadfully. Luckily for the poor little dog,
Nurse saw them from the nursery window, which overlooked
the garden, and came down at once to relieve the poor little
dog, and to scold the boys. She took Frisk indoors, after
telling the little boys to wash their hands for dinner.

Mrs. Tiptop was extremely fond of plants and flowers of
all kinds, and her pretty conservatory was full of flowering
plants of great beauty. In the centre of the conservatory
was a small fountain, surrounded by a large stone basin, in
which lilies and other water loving plants grew. The water
from the fountain fell into a smaller basin which overflowed
into the large one and fell on the plants. In the large basin

were gold and ‘Silver fish, which were very pretty and very .

tame.
“Oh, what jolly fish you have got!” said Johnny.

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“They are so tame they will eat bread; they come up as
soon as we throw crumbs in,” replied Tommy. “Stay, the
cloth is laid, and there is sure to be bread cut in the dining-
room, I will run and get some.” ?

On Tommy’s return, Johnny proposed they should fish.
Tommy did not like the idea of his poor mother’s fish being
taken out of the water, and said so, but Johnny burst out
laughing, and again called him a baby and a coward, and
said, “ You are afraid! afraid! afraid! 1 dare you to fish!
and silly Tommy, who was so foolish as to mind being “ dared,”
at once consented. With a small hook which Johnny had in
a pocketbook, and a crumb of bread, it was easy to catch the
very tame gold fish, but how the poor fish wriggled and
writhed when the hook was taken out! And oh! how soon
the fish died, although Tommy held it in the water and tried
in vain to restore it to life: it was dead, and Tommy reflected
sadly that there was another dreadful thing to tell mother
on her return from uncle Richard’s house, where she was
spending the day with his little sisters. He wondered what
she would say, and if his father would know of it, and he
wished he had not let Johnny “dare” him to fish.

Johnny in the meantime was fishing away without a word,
and a long row of struggling, dying fish met Tommy’s eye
when he turned round.

Tommy flung as many as he could back into the water
before Johnny could stop him, and the two little boys had a
scuffle over the fish, which ended only when they were called
to dinner by Nurse, who waited on them and kept order during
the dinner. It was much too nice a dinner for such naughty
children, hot roast chicken and roly jam pudding, with.some
lovely peaches for desert.

The little boys enjoyed it all immensely and were quiet
and good for some time afterwards; they went up into the
nursery to take the peach stones to the parrot, but they teazed
that poor bird dreadfully, they poked sticks through the bars



















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of the cage, and pelted Polly with marbles, teazing her until
*~ she screamed for help, as well as annoying the poor bird by
s calling her Ugly Polly! Nasty Polly! Horrid Polly! Polly
“g is an ugly bird!” with other remarks of a similar nature. Then
they took the dolls in hand and pulled off their hair, tore
their pretty clothing, and banged their faces with a hair brush.
x Tommy pulled out the eyes of the lovely doll who opened
them when she sat up, and closed them when she lay down,
for he had often longed to see what made them act so well,
and here was a good opportunity !

Poor Dolly, of course, made no remark, but she felt bitterly
the loss of her two pretty blue eyes; she vowed vengeance,
but could not shed a tear, for she had no eyes to cry with.

The naughty boys heard Nurse’s footstep and hurried into
a large cupboard, in which brooms and brushes, pails and
dustpans were kept, so as to be handy for the maids, and
here they found a mousetrap and a little mouse; they called
‘Puss, puss,” to the terror of the little mouse, whose bright
little eyes showed how dreadfully frightened he was of the
boys, and still more so of the big cat which soon made an
end of the poor little thing, for as soon as Johnny raised
the door of the trap, out ran mousie, and snip-snap went
the cat, and mousie lay dead on the floor.

The boys then ran down to see if Mrs. Tiptop was
coming home, then they went down into the kitchen and
teazed cook by taking a beetle out of the blackbeetle trap and |
putting it on her neck. How she screamed and ran about
and flung the beetle off. Tommy saw it run towards him, and
so he stamped on it with his thick boot and killed it.

Cook drove the naughty boys away out of the kitchen;
she was now very cross and angry, and they felt they had
better run away, so up the kitchen steps they flew.

Just as they got up to the top, they met the baker’s boy
with his tray of muffins; they heard his bell tingle, and
they asked him for a muffin.

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Muffins are not good when raw and untoasted, and the
baker's boy told them so, but they did not believe him. “ We
will have some, we shall have some,” they cried, and rushed
upon the lad who tried in vain to protect his tray from the
sturdy little robbers. Johnny pulled the end of the green
baize cloth, which kept the muffins hot, and down they fell
in a shower of round white dabs, all on the garden gravel
and then they went rolling down the kitchen steps.

The poor boy cried out, “ My master will beat me, he will
never believe two young gentlemen would behave so. Oh
dear, oh dear! What shally) do! lommy and? johnny,
seized on the muffins, while the poor lad was thus lamenting,
and began to eat them as hard as they could. The baker's
boy, with tears, picked up the cleanest, and went back to his
master and told him how Master Tiptop and his friend had
thrown down all his muffins, eaten some, and spoilt others;
but the baker could not believe that a child of that nice little
Mrs. Tiptop would be so naughty, and told the poor boy he
must pay for the loss, so he would have hardly any wages
to take home to his mother, who was a very poor woman.

See what dreadful mischief these thoughtless boys did!
The poor boy begged in vain to be believed, he cried and
sobbed and asked the baker to see Mrs. Tiptop on the
subject, but he refused, saying, ‘““He must not risk offend-
ing a good customer, and that the boy must pay for his
carelessness.”

Meanwhile the two naughty boys had eaten the untoasted
muffins till they were tired of them, or rather until they felt
very uncomfortable, so that when tea time came they could
eat nothing at all.

About half-past six o'clock Mrs. Tiptop returned with
the dear little girls, and Tommy heard them run up to the
nursery at once to tell Nurse all about the pleasant day they
had passed at their uncle's house, while Mrs. Tiptop asked,
“Where are the boys?” quite surprised at their absence.

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x “T expect they are quite ashamed to see you, ma'am,” the 3%
g housemaid said; ‘they have been at mischief all day long.” x
Mrs. Tiptop at once sent Johnny home to his mother, and B
made up her mind not to again invite him to spend the day; ee:
she ordered Tommy to go to her room, and when she had
taken off her things and put them by, she called to Tommy a
to come to her, and asked him what he had done all day xe
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Tommy was a truthful child, and I am happy to say he &
# never once thought of not owning his faults, so he began &
the sad list of wrong, of cruel, and of wicked things which rd
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His drowning the little kittens in the yard. BS
Of setting the poor puppies to fight.
Of catching the wasps and flies.
Of pulling the Daddy-long-legs to pieces.
4 Of running a pin through the lovely butterfly.

Of killing the chickens.

Of driving the dog and beating it.

Of fishing for the poor gold fish.

Of breaking the dolls.

Of teazing the parrot.

Of giving the mouse to the cat.

Of frightening the rabbits to death.

Of “squashing” the blackbeetle.

And of upsetting the baker’s tray, and eating his muffins.

The tears come into Mrs. Tiptop’s eyes for she felt that
her own little son was a cruel, bad little boy, and that she
could not love him again as she did before she knew how
cruelly he could behave.

When Tommy saw his mother cry, his little heart was
very sad, she was such a dear, kind, loving mother, and he
felt so sorry that he cried too, and he promised her that he
would never, never be cruel again, and that he would ask yy
the baker’s lad to forgive him, and would pay for the muffins, of

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and would bear any punishment if she would only kiss and
love him once more.

“Ah, Tommy,” his mother replied, ‘your sorrow will not
restore the little creatures to life, the little creatures God has
made for our pleasure and comfort, and which we keep for
our own amusement. I must punish you, my boy, and I
think the best way will be to send away all our animals, our
dogs and cats, our birds and rabbits, our parrot, and our
fish, and not let you have anything at all to teaze.”

“Oh no, dear Mother, don’t do that, you will punish every
one for my fault, anything but that.”

“Well, Tommy, then I think I must say you shall not go
to the Zoological Gardens with us all on Wednesday. Your
uncle has promised to take us, and has asked me if you like
riding the elephants, and seeing the lions fed, watching the
monkeys, and giving buns to the bears, and looking at all
the curious birds and beasts which he knows all about, and
can tell you of.”

Poor Tommy felt this was indeed a punishment, but he also
knew that he well deserved even a severer punishment than
this for his wickedness, and so he said ‘‘ Good night,” and
went off to bed at once, sobbing and really sorry for his
faults.

As he was so truly sorry, Mrs. Tiptop gave him one kiss
for good night in his little bed, but it was a very sad kiss,
for she sighed and said, “Oh, Tommy, Tommy, who would
have thought you could be so cruel; pray to God to forgive
you, my boy,” and then she said:

“He prayeth best who loveth best
All creatures great and small ;
_For the Great God who loveth us,

He made and loveth all.”

Poor Tommy sobbed himself to sleep.

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TOMMY’S DREAM.
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“My gentle boy, remember this is nothing but a dream.”—Hugene Aram

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Hong *-\ H dear! dear! What is this that is scratching
5 ee N me so and holding me so hard and tight!

gba rte Oh, how you hurt me to be sure,” cried Tommy,
we ““< as he struggled in vain, for two large birds
Sa were perched on the iron railings of his crib,
a and were pulling him out of bed. “Come

‘ along with us at once,” and they pulled and
pulled until they got him out of the soft and cosy bed where
he had been tucked up only an hour before. ‘ No nonsense!

Come along, it is not worse for Tommy than it is for Dicky
to be pulled out of his nest; come along, your nest is
not half full enough of feathers like our nests are, and we
want you to play with and sing to us,” and in a minute,
they were flying along with poor Tommy, who was
frightened and giddy, and worse than all, very unhappy
at being taken away from his. dear mother and his happy
home. The Birds, however, were rejoicing, and put him into
a box with bars in front, and placed worms and slugs and
snails for him to eat, the very sight of which made him feel
sick, and they came and worried him to eat, and worried him
to sing, but all the time he tried to get out, and bruised his

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arms and legs against the bars; all the while he felt very

hungry and tired and weak, and then he remembered nothing
more.



a
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himself cuddling up to his dear mother and feeling extremely oe
comfortable, when suddenly the door opened and an enor- ¥
- mous cat, followed by two kittens, came in. Tommy nestled #&
o closer to his mother, but the cat rudely seized hold of him ©
%e saying: a
“There are too many of these cnildren about; we must &
3 drown some.” Se
e “Ket us drown Tommy,* one of the kittens said, “he is %
x ugly, he is rude, he is no good at all; oh what ugly blue
= eyes!” and the kitten scratched him. -
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2 Poor Tommy was carried off away from his mother, who 3
* sobbed and cried, and was taken into the yard close to the >
see waterbutt, where a pail of water stood which he recollected <3
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a he had d : a
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The cat held him by the feet, and the little kittens helped #8
e to push him in, and down he went into the cold water, and
%g in spite of screams and struggles, shrieks and tears, Tommy 5
#& was held under the water until he lost his senses
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Suddenly he felt a sharp pain in his nose, and found himself
hanging high out of the water, but in scarcely a better posi-
tion than if he had still been under it, for it is anything
but comfortable to be hanging by the nose from a fishing rod.

Much to his surprise “Tommy found that the fishing rod

uy was held by a large fish, who seemed delighted to have
“e caught the poor struggling boy. Mr. Fish hurt him so
a much in taking out the fish hook, that Tommy struggled
= still more, and was at last flung into a fisher’s basket with
a such a bang that he again became unconscious.

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Aroused from this lethargy, Tommy found himself held
by a big dog, and saw that his friend Johnny was in the
arms of a very large bulldog; the two boys, being always very
friendly, began to talk, but the two dogs did not allow this
for one moment, but tried to make the little fellows fight ; they
knocked their hands together and made them scratch each
other's faces with their nails, until the boys got cross with
each other and began to call each other names, to double up
their little fists, and to strike out in earnest at each other's
face; Tommy felt red and angry, but he got the worst of
it; his eyes were blackened, his nose bled, and he lost his
dear little white front tooth.



Tommy’s next adventure made him extremely uncomfort-
able; he was climbing a sunny wall in order to get some
ripe and tempting pears, and had nearly got to the top when
a large and fierce-looking wasp suddenly caught him in his
hand, exactly as Tommy caught flies on the garden wall, or
on the table cloth indoors; the wasp pinched his head hard
and hurt him so much that he shrieked out, when two large
Daddy-longlegs flew up to see what was the matter.

“Oh, this is the little wretch who pulled my sister’s legs
off, and my father’s wings, and sang a rude song about
“ Daddy, daddy longlegs,” instead of speaking of my respected
parents as ‘D. Longlegs, Esq.,’ as a gentleman should be
addressed.”

“Tet us pull him to pieces,” they all shouted, and off went
a leg, and between pain and fright Tommy knew no more—



Until he found himself in a wooden box with one slanting
side, and iron bars at the top and on the other side. A
strong smell of cheese pervaded the box.

“Hush, be quiet till I fetch puss, she will soon finish
him.” The cat which the mice brought was as big as a
tiger, and Tommy had often seen tigers at the Zoological

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Gardens and knew what he would do with him; he shut his
eyes, he felt the door of the trap open, and felt Re was sliding
out, down, down into the big mouth and hot breath, which
seemed to smother him.

Tommy tried to run; he started, got away for a moment,
and found himself in the yard with Johnny and a lot of
other boys; their mothers were at a little distance, and called
to the children to get out of the way of a large Cock-a-doodle-
doo, which, mounted on a bicycle, was driving furiously round
and round. The cock was flapping its wings, crowing and
making a hideous and alarming noise. Tommy ran on, but
he was not quite quick enough; on came the bicycle, down

fell Tommy, and both his poor little legs were cut off by

the wheel.



It was a relief to find himself flying about his garden, well,
and rejoicing in the sunshine; he was again a happy, thought-
less little boy. “I must have dreamt of that cock,” and he ran
round and round the house, not looking where he went, he
was caught in a large net of the same colour as the grass.

“Are you collecting boys only,” said a big stag beetle close
by him, “or do you collect girls as well ?”

“TI prefer urchins,” said the butterfly, who held the net;
“and this is a fine specimen. Tommy belongs to the small
roguey poguey breed, and will look very nice when I ‘set’
him on cork. At present I shall just pin him down com-
fortably; where is my little mallet? Oh, thank you,” she
said, taking it from a lizard who had kindly carried it for
her. ‘One, two, three, there Tommy will do nicely for the
present,” and off they flew, leaving poor Tommy writhing in
pain with a large pin stuck right through him.



Almost a relief to find himself able to move, although
placed in the most unpleasant position. of being tightly

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fastened into a cart, with a bit in his little red mouth,
and being driven with heavy blows by a dog very much
like his own “ Frisk,” while a fat healthy puppy was
holding the reins and driving poor To mmy on at a pretty
fast pace.

“Oh dear, I cannot go any faster,” sighed poor Tommy.

“Beat him harder,’ said the Puppy. ‘Gee up, Dobbin,”
and on and on they drove the miserable little boy.

DF

Again a change, but not a change for the better. Oh dear
no! Banging blows on the head, hair pulled; clothes roughly
dragged about, Miss Dolly was taking her vengeance on

Tommy for all the cruel tricks he had played her. What

strong arms she had, and she hit him with a hair brush
until her arms ran down with sawdust, which never happens,
you know, unless a doll is quite worn out and exhausted.
Just as Dolly was going to put Tommy’s eyes out with the
nursery scissors, he sprang away with a cry and crept into
the parrot’s cage, where he sat quietly for a time, too weary
to speak.
RAR

Tommy's quiet was speedily disturbed by the arrival of the
lawful owner of the cage—Pretty Polly herself.

“What fun!” she cried. ‘“Teazing Tommy in my cage,
sitting in my ring, and I have no doubt eating my Indian
corn and sop;” but poor Tommy was only too glad to be
quiet, and he had no wish to deprive Polly of any of her
provisions, he only asked to rest and sit in peace in the large
ring in Polly’s cage. But quietness and comfort did not suit
Miss Polly, she kept putting her claws in and scratching
the child, and also bit him with her sharp, strong beak, she
scolded at him in shrill tones which went through his head,
and made herself extremely unpleasant in every way. Still
he was too tired to mind much, but cuddled down with his
little arm over his face, and went off to sleep as he had often

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seen Polly herself do, when he had teazed and tormented her
too long. :

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When Tommy again awoke, it was to find himself hurry-
ing along in front of two rabbits, one of whom held a gun #&
just like his own toy gun, which kept popping away at him, i

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while he ran wildly about here and there, to escape the shot

which he felt certain would strike him sooner or later. Oh e
- how much he wished he had never fired at his own dear little
rabbits, and how frightened he was of these big ones!
Bang! Bang! And he rolled over and was seized and
put in a bag by the biggest rabbit, who said, “ He is fat,
what a fine one. Shall we say curry or smothered in onions?” —&
Poor Tommy felt smothered enough in the bag without any ie

onions, and thought how good he would be if only once hee sx
got back to his dear and happy home.
io anne A Q
Strangely enough he was at home, and in the kitchen too, »
he knew it well; he was just by the corner of the kitchen a
clock, and here there are generally some blackbeetles if you
go late at night, or early in the morning, and even one or a0
two in the afternoon, if the day is dull and dark. Pe
Here was the place where Johnny and he had crushed the — 3%
beetles in the afternoon, and now he saw a blackbeetle
coming towards him. As it approached, it grew bigger and

bigger, and at last it lifted up its foot, on which was a big
boot, and said, “Suppose I stamp on you, young man!” ae

Poor Tommy woke up with a start, thankful to have escaped = &
such a fate, and resolving never to tread on any beetle or 4
other insect again. 5s



A bell ringing loudly in his ears, startled Tommy out of
a quiet dose of a few minutes duration, and he saw before &
him the unfortunate baker’s boy; the lad’s eyes were swollen &
with tears, and he balanced a large tray of muffins on his #&

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x head. As he came near Tommy’s bed, he upset the whole o
“tray on the counterpane, all over Tommy, only a few muffins

e and crumpets remained on the tray, and these began to look %
4 _ like people, and to smile and laugh at him.
S All the muffins and crumpets on the bed ran about all e
over Tommy, and danced round him without a word. g
3 Tommy implored the baker’s boy to take them off him, but ee
ue the boy only said, ‘I wish I could get them back, but you es
Se upset them, and only you can get them back.” Tommy tried ct

in vain to catch the muffins and replace them on the. tray. &

As soon as he got one up, down it ran on its quaint little
black legs, and then they all laughed so loudly that Tommy
woke with the noise.

HOON

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“What a bad night I am having,” he said, and longed for
the morning. He thought of the next day, and of how lonely
he would be without his mother and sisters, for he well knew
that Johnny would not again be asked to spend the day with ©
him, and he sadly thought that if he had but been good, he
would have had a lovely ride on the elephant, and seen the
lions fed, and given buns to the bears, and have passed a
really delightful day with his dear mother and little sisters.

Sma vGdtearG cea ano Gs

xe Thinking of all this, he again fell off into a quieter sleep
= than he had yet enjoyed, and he dreamed that he was riding
&

on the dear old elephant, and that the creature could talk,
and that he said, “ Why, Tommy, I can hardly believe you
are a cruel child, you were so kind and pleasant to me last
time you came to the Zoo.”

Tommy hung his head and felt ashamed that the clever
elephant should know of his bad conduct, he did not know

FLEE BE SEO. IE EINE SE

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what to say in reply; the elephant continued, ‘You ought

to be punished, so that you would never forget your duty to xe
x dumb animals.” ‘ But you can talk, I-have no duty to you,” x
& said Tommy. “You have duties towards all animal creation ; S
e every man and every boy has his duty to do to every living a
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thing he meets, and has to do with. You must be taught
this if you do not know it,” so saying, the elephant took
Tommy up with his trunk and dropped him into the bear’s
den. In an instant he was surrounded by all the animals he
remembered to have seen; bears, the brown and the white
bear, the lion and the tiger, the wild boar and the monkey,
the kangaroo, the hyena; the giraffe stretched his long neck
down to him, and the elephant hung his head and trunk
down, while the large owl and the pelican flew down with a
great and hissing noise; thus he found himself completely
surrounded by animals and birds who closed round him and
asked him whether he was sorry for the past, and if he
intended to be in future kind and merciful, or harsh and
unkind to animals.

Tommy at once said, “I will be kind and good, do let me
go home to my mother.”

‘No, Tommy,” they all said ; ‘you must show us you mean
to be kind. What is that you have in that plate?”

“Cake,” said Tommy, ‘‘and only a little bit, not enough
for you all.”

‘Quite enough if given to me,” they cried out, and came
nearer and nearer, while Tommy in his fright began to scatter
his cake eagerly among them.

‘More cake, more cake,” they shouted, and pressed so closely
round Tommy that he shrieked with fright and woke.



He was in his own bed safe and sound, a light in the
room, and both Mother and Nurse at his bedside

“Its those nasty muffins, mum,” said Nurse. ‘ Master
Tommy has got a regular nightmare.”

Tommy clung to his mother.

“T will 2 ‘good and kind,” he said, “I will never hurt any-
thing again.”

“That is right, Tommy,” said his mother; “but now you
must just take this little dose of medicine like a good boy.”

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Tommy drank down the medicine, which was very nasty,
without a word; his head ached, he had a lump in his chest,
and his hands were burning. His kind Mother carried him
into her own bed and held him in her arms until he fell
into a quiet sleep, and in the morning he woke up much better,
but still a little pale and very quiet, for him.

The little girls were sent off with Nurse to the Zoological
Gardens, and Mrs. Tiptop and Tommy passed the day alone.
It was not a dull day to Tommy, for Mrs. Tiptop read to
him and talked to him, and told much that was interesting
about the habits of animals.

As Tommy gradually recovered from the effects of his
naughty conduct, Mrs. Tiptop took him out with her into the
garden; here he had the pain of seeing the rabbits frightened
at his appearance, and it was a long time before he could
coax them to eat the nice carrots he brought them. When
he went into the poultry yard, the fowls flew before him; in
the stable the dogs ran and hid themselves, while pussey
looked out in alarm from the loft. One day’s unkindness had
frightened them, and they looked on their little master with
terror instead of affection.

The tears were in poor Tommy’s eyes: “ When will they
love me again?” he said, sadly.

“When you have again won their confidence,” his mother
replied; “but you must be patient and quiet, feed them
regularly, and speak always very gently to them; and now
let us try to find the poor muffin boy, and tell his: master the
whole truth.”

Tommy felt in a great fright, but he knew that he must
obey, and he felt that his mother would understand how he
felt (for mothers always do feel for little boys and girls), and
would help him out of his difficulty. So he held his mother’s
hand rather tightly, and they went off together to the baker.

Mrs. Tiptop entered the shop just as the baker was piling
up the muffin tray with muffins and crumpets.

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“None o’ your tricks to-day,” said the baker, roughly; “just
you behave till your time is up on ay, Or youll: be im
gaol before you know where you are.’

The poor boy was just beginning to defend himself, when

he caught sight of Tommy and his mother, he crimsoned, and
remained silent.

“My little boy has come to pay for the muffins he ate and
destroyed yesterday, and to say how sorry he is for behaving
so wrongly.”

“Then it was true, Bob,” said the baker, “that the young
gentleman took your muffins, well I couldn’t believe as how
young gentlemen could have stole yer muffins. Oh, ma’am, I
am sorry for you.”

Tommy felt the colour rise up into his face and ears and
neck, and felt hot all over.

“Tam really sorry,” he said, “ Mr. Weighwell. I will pay
for them all, and I hope you and Bob will forgive me,” and he
began to cry.

“Looky here,” said the baker, ‘“‘ Master Tommy, what I feel
so is that I’ve been that unjust to Bob, and nigh broke his
mother’s heart by sending him off with a bad character as a
thief and a liar, and ’tis you as stole my muffins.”

“I did not mean to steal them,” said Tommy, sobbing.

“Tf you take what don’t belong to you its stealing, plain
enough,” replied Mr. Weighwell, ‘you can’t alter that.”

“It will be a lesson to Tommy for life,’ said his mother,
gently; “but I should be glad to know what Tommy can do
to make amends to Bob for the suffering he has caused him.”

“Oh, I’m all right now, ma’am,” said poor Bob, who looked
bright enough. ‘ Master won’t send me off now, and I’m sure
Master Tommy need need not cry so.”

Tommy lifted his little face, all covered with tears, and said,
“Mother, I could help Bob, I could ring the muffin bell for
him, and perhaps carry the tray.”

“No, Sir,” said Mr. Weighwell, “but you could go some-



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times and read to Bob's mother, who cannot read for herself,
and she would be very glad of a visit from you. Ringing the
bell is the best part of a muffin boy’s work, and they never
shirk that, but reading aloud is another thing, and if you read
the Bible once a week to an old woman, you'll be helping her
and yourself too.”

“Thank you, Mr. Weighwell, for the suggestion; I am
only too glad if my little boy can do a kindness,” said Mrs.
Tiptop; “and now let me know what my Tommy owes you
for the muffins and crumpets, he has brought his money-
box and will be glad to get out of debt.”

After some calculation and talk between Bob and _ his
master as to the number of muffins taken out and the few
brought home, and the three-pennyworths and the six-penny-
worths left at various homes before Bob had called at Mrs.
Tiptop’s house, and the result was that Tommy had to pay
three shillings and tenpence, which he did cheerfully, although
his little store of savings was nearly exhausted by this outlay,
but he felt happier to see the baker put the money in his
till, and to see Bob look cheerful.

‘Now remember,” said the baker, very solemnly, “that
you took these muffins without paying for them, and you
could have been sent to prison, and that you must never
take anything which does not belong to you, nor use other

~ people’s things without asking them,

3

It is a sin,
To steal a pin,
and I hope, Master Tommy, that this is the last trouble your
poor Ma will have with you.”
“Will you forgive me, Bob,” said Tommy, “I am so sorry?”
“Yes, my dear,” said Bob, who felt quite happy, ‘“ of course
I will, and Master Johnny too; it was all mischief and fun.”
“Tt is no fun to do wrong, Bob, ‘the way of transgressors
is hard,’ and Tommy has been very unhappy for many hours
after his few minutes of ‘fun.’”

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Mrs. Tiptop then took Tommy home, and the little fellow
was very silent and subdued, at last he said: |

“ Mother, I don’t think I read well enough for Bob’s mother.”

“No, dear, I do not think she would enjoy your reading
yet, but I will go and see her and read to her till you can

read well enough; in the meantime you shall read out loud a
to me, and we will choose nice amusing books about animals, <%&
and you will see how much there, is to learn about them if

you will only make them love you.”

“ But how can I make amends to Bob, he was much kinder
than Mr. Weighwell.”

“Mr. Weighwell was your true friend, Tommy, for he
showed you how very serious a matter a piece of mischier
may become; you thought nothing of destroying and taking
Bob’s muffins, but he knew perfectly well that had you come
to his shop and taken a loaf, he would have sent for the
police, and he wished to show you the danger as well as the
wickedness of your conduct.”

“Mother, I will never, never take a crumb that does not
belong to me; do believe me.”

“My dearest boy, I always do believe you, for with all
your faults you are always truthful, and now you promise I
know I may trust you; but you must think, Tommy, before
you act, and consider others more and yourself less. For
instance, you are always taking your sisters’ toys and dolls
and they do not belong to you; all the animals, except your
own rabbits and chickens and your own dog, are your father’s
and mine, and you treat everything as if it is yours.

“When you want a sheet of paper you help yourself, you
run to my pincushion for a pin, you use my brushes or
your sisters’ if they are handier than your own, you treat
everything as if it is yours by right, and it is only now
this dreadful thing has happened that I see how wrongly my
darling child has acted, and how wrong Mother has been to
allow Tommy’s naughty ways. ;

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“All the nursery toys were all your own for so long, that
is the only excuse I can see for us both, Tommy, but we
don’t want to excuse ourselves, we must do right and we
must pray to be guided in the right way; we must ask for
a right judgment in all things, and by being kind and
thoughtful for others, we shall cure our faults and avoid all
the errors of the past.

“And now, my darling boy, cheer up and begin to put
your good resolutions at once in practice to-day.”

“Mother,” said Tommy, squeezing her hand hard, “ may
I give Bob a pair of my rabbits >?”

“Yes, dear, but they will be of no use to him without a
rabbit hutch.”

“T will give him the hutch and all,” said Tommy; “or I
will try to make one for him.”

Mrs. Tiptop smiled, but she was glad to see her boy really
wish by a little self-sacrifice to make some amends, however
small, to the boy he had injured.

When Tommy reached home he found his father was quite
willing to help him in making a nice new rabbit hutch for
Bob, and while they drew plans and made measurements,
Mr. Tiptop talked to Tommy about his friend Johnny, whose
father he had seen that evening, and who told him that
Johnny was very ill indeed; the raw muffins had disagreed
with him, and he was in a violent fever, and did not even
know his mother when she spoke to him. It was many weeks
before the little friends met, and they were both very much
surprised at the change which had taken place in each other.

During the long weary hours when Johnny was recovering
from his illness, his great amusement had been a little puppy
who—thanks to his being kind and gentle with it—had learned
many pretty little tricks and nice ways, and Johnny was
proud to show Tommy that the puppy could beg, would
walk on his hind legs, would catch a piece of biscuit or

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fetch and carry at the will of his little master, and did every
trick of which a little dog is capable, Toa had learnt
patience in his illness, which was entirely brought on by his
own fault, and both boys were not only truly sorry for what
they had done, but firmly resolved to be kind and good to
all around them, and especially to dumb animals who are
unable to complain of those who inflict needless sufferings
upon them.

That the two little boys were now much happier than when
they were always in mischief and trouble, is hardly neces-
sary to say. They were always delighted to see Bob, and
to hear his account of the rabbits in which they were very
much interested.

Time passed on, as time has a habit of doing, and the boys
grew better and wiser and kinder as each day went by; they
tried to do one kind action every day to some person, or to
some thing, and soon they got into the habit of looking out
for chances of helping others, so that they were loved by all,
and they grew up good men and remained firm friends all
their lives. Being kind to all around them, they took happi-
ness with them wherever they went, and the world was happier
and better for their existence. It was but a small world at
first, just their home circle, then a larger world, that of school
life, and then the largest world of grown up, manly life. They
were quite happy, because they tried to make others happy,
and never thought about themselves, which is the secret of
being happy. To make others happy is our duty, and brings
its own reward with it, and especially it is our duty to be kind
and merciful to all animals.

A SEER SESE REE

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Foolscap gto., bound in Cloth, Gilt, IMuminated Side, and uniform with Old Bob.



ILLUSTRATIONS

BY
E. PIRODON.

































SHILLINGS

AND
SIXPENCE





E

OR TH









LONDON.

COVENT GARDEN,

389 & 40, BEDFORD STREET,

MYRA AND SON,

















BOUND,
CLOTH GILT, HANDSOME
GILT EDGES, COLOURED
BEYELLED BOARDS, WRAPPER,
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The Adventures of a Fisherman’s Son

IN SEARCH OF A SHIP.



MYRA AND SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT

GARDEN, LONDON.

















Foolscap 4to., Bound, Cloth Gilt, Illuminated Side, uniform with Pretty Polly.





30
ILLUSTRATIONS

BY
E. PIRODON.



THE MOST



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WG
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Aya









SHILLINGS
AND
SIXPENCE.





AMUSING AND CHARMING ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE OF AN ANIMAL WHICH HAS
APPEARED FOR MANY A DAY.



MYRA AND SON, 89 & 40, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON.



















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MYRA AND SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Full Text
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title The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
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The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
author role Publisher Myra & Son
extent [8], 26, [4] p., [16] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
publisher Myra & Son
pubPlace London
c1893
type ALEPH 002225048
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OCLC 214285115
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note anchored true Title page printed in colors, text printed in red and blue borders.
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Tommy is a little thug who drowns kittens, pesters puppies and decimates the lesser creation; he gets his comeuppance in a series of dreams in which the roles of tormentor and tormented are reversed as in The World Upside Down.
The preface is signed M.B.
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Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction
Dreams -- Juvenile fiction
Animals -- Juvenile fiction
Repentance -- Juvenile fiction
Insects -- Juvenile fiction
Birds -- Juvenile fiction
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^ ~TRIBULATIONS
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6 00008.jpg
Frontispiece
7 00010.jpg
Page
8 00011.jpg
THE TRIBULATIONS
TOMMY
TIPTOP,
J E PRAYETH BEST WHO LOVEST BEST,
fLL THINGS BOTH GREAT AND SMALL."
Co/kridgc.
LONDON:
MYRA & SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET,
UE NT GA RI )N.
- -- -- ----- 7- -- f
9 00012.jpg
Table of Contents
10 00013.jpg
CONTENTS.
X FART 1. PAY TIME. TOMMY S TRICKS.
SART 2. EIGHT TIME. TOMMYIS TRIBULATIONS.
i-Tribulatin wh te Cs.
I-Tribulation with the Cats.
2-Tribulation with the Birds.
3-Tribulation with the Dogs.
4-Tribulation with the Wasp.
5-Tribulation with the Fowls.
j 6-Tribulation with the Butterfly, &c.
7-Tribulation with the Puppies.
8-Tribulation with the Fish.
9-Tribulation with the Doll.
Io-Tribulation with the Parrot.
I 1-Tribulation with the Daddy-Longlegs.
S12-Tribulation with the Mice.
I3-Tribulation with the Rabbits,
i4-Tribulation with the Muffin Boy.
S5s-Tribulation with the Beetle.
16-Tribulation at the Zoological Gardens.
9 Tommy's Awakening and Repentance.
11 00016.jpg
Preface
12 00017.jpg
PREFACE.
A Our duty towards others, and especially towards
Animals is now so seldom insisted on, that little
Apology is needed for bringing an old fashioned ,:
Principle before our readers. The object of this ~
R book is to show that all unkindness towards the
A animal creation merits -if it does not at once
A receive-punishment, and that to obey the law of
Kindness is our duty as well as our happiness.
M. B.
* ,
*
*
13 00020.jpg
Chapter
head Day time
14 00021.jpg
THE TRIBULATIONS
TOMMY TITOfo
CHAPTER I. DAY TIME.
n'I; E was not a really Bad Boy, our Tommy Tiptop,
IZ. he was only full of mischief, full of fun, and very
X thoughtless of any body but himself. Mrs. Tip-
,, ,_ top was a little bit to blame for this, for she had
," petted and spoiled Tommy until he was, as the
S maids said, "a dreadful trouble and worse than
any plague of Egypt," but that remark was made
the day he tried to poach eggs on a gridiron, which, as you
know, is not very well adapted for that purpose.
Tommy was her eldest child and he had no little brothers
or sisters until he was four years old, so that he had more toys,
more play, and more goodies, and a great deal more indul-
gence and treats than most little boys get, which is a little
excuse for some of his naughty ways.
Then too, he was always really sorry when his much too kind
mother showed him how naughty he was, but when she was not
there, he too often forgot her gentle words of advice and only
thought of fun and frolic, and did not think of the mischief he
did, or of the pain he caused to others. His little sisters ran
from him and hid their pretty little faces in nurse's gown ;
Nurse herself, though very fond of Tommy, put all the best
dolls and toys well out of his reach for she said she could not
answer for the safety of Miss Victoria and Ethereda's favourites
15 00022.jpg
when Master Tommy was "in high spirits," which was under-
stood by all in the house to mean that Tommy was in one of
his very naughty fits of mischief. I dare not tell my dear little
readers one half of the naughty things which Tommy did,
S although I feel quite sure that they would not copy him in one
of them, but it is so bad for little people, or indeed for big
I people, to have naughty companions, that I know they would
S be sorry to even look at Tommy's pictures in this book, or to
S read all about the dreadful things which happened to him, and
which quite cured him at last of all his tricks. -
-.1 Mrs. Tiptop often told him in her gentle words that nothing
was more displeasing to the great God who made us than to be -
S cruel to his creatures, and yet this thoughtless boy was con-
stantly hurting some insect or animal. Mr. Tiptop was very
S fond of pets, and kept a nice Tabby cat and several nice large .
dogs in his stable yard; this yard was a great amusement to
Tommy, who was delighted to see some dear little kittens one
fine morning. He played for some time with the dear little
kittens, and gave them names, Spot and Bob, Jet and Snow. "
S The kittens were more pleased to see Tommy than their mother
was, as she well knew how very cruel he could be when he was
S inclined to be naughty, but the little kits purred and rubbed
S against his hands, and jumped over his shoes, and gambolled
S round him quite prettily. Presently he trod on one and it ^
squeaked so funnily that he trod on another just to hear it
S again. Their mother began to be cross, and Tommy thought it
best to retreat, but he said as he went, there are too many
of you kits, some of you must be drowned; why not this one?
His eyes are blue, a very ugly colour," and off he ran to find his
S playmate Johnny, who was older and much stronger than ,
Tommy.
Y When the two little lads returned together, the poor little
kittens felt uneasy; they did not understand what their little
master had said, but they very well remembered he had hurt
S them. The boys first shut up Mrs. Tabby in the stable, and
.. ..1 ,. .... ... .. .. .. .....-. .. .
.--
------------------------ -- J~~
16 00023.jpg
17 00025.jpg
3
then put all the kittens into a basket some distance away from
their mother, who mewed and cried bitterly; they then got a
pail of quite cold water, and began to drown the poor little kits. .
Jet was the first victim; her poor pretty little black head went
under the cold water, and though she struggled hard, down she
; went and soon all her sufferings were over, and poor little Jet
was dead. When Spot saw this, he struggled so when Tommy -
caught him up, that he slipped out of his cruel arms and ran
mewing to the stable door. We had better not drown all,"
said Tommy. No; we'll keep two for fighting," Johnny replied,
one is no good," so that one poor little kitten was saved for
S this cruel purpose, and Snow being gentle and peaceable, was
-: drowned on the spot, while Bob, after being well bathed in
S the pail, was allowed to run shivering back to his miserable
mother, who sprang out as soon as the stable door was opened.
She ran to the pail crying so sadly that John said they had
better take the dead kittens away and bury them, so they agreed
S to play at funerals, of which sport, however, they soon got very
S tired, and fought a little to settle a small quarrel as to which of
: the two naughty boys was to be the clergyman. This fight
together, with the fact that Johnny was so much stronger than
Tommy, and that he hurt most, reminded them that they meant
to have a cat fight, but on their return to the stable-yard, pussy
-.". had carried her kittens up to the loft to a place of safety where
)S the wicked boys could not find her, and there she hoped to bring
S up her sadly reduced family in peace.
These naughty boys then thought of the puppies, which
were now about six months old, and were very intelligent and
friendly.
It was easy enough to decoy them away from their mother,
S but far more difficult to make them fight, for they were dear
S good-natured little pet things, who were always playing
together. However, each boy took a puppy, and by holding the
little creatures and making them scratch each other with their
S little claws, the boys made them cross and savage, and they bit
"l'"o'f;.-....'..*. .... *.... ... .........-- .- -. --* .
18 00026.jpg
and snarled for the first time in their innocent lives. Nor was
the mischief ended when the fight was over, for they went
growling and snapping at each other all the way back to their
mother, who wondered at their naughty tempers and scolded
them well.
Johnny next showed Tommy what he called "a jolly way of
catching flies and wasps" as they sunned themselves on the
garden wall, or walked along it for fruit, of which there was
plenty in that nice garden. Tommy soon learned the art, and
after some half-dozen attempts, caught a bluebottle fly and then
a wasp. Johnny, who was really a cruel boy, then pulled off the
fly's wings, and when Tommy said, How it must hurt them,"
replied, "They would squeak if it did," and foolish little
Tommy believed him, and pulled several Daddy-Long-Legs
to pieces because they are considered to be naughty insects by
many little ones on account of the nursery rhyme:
"Daddy, daddy long legs,
Would not say his prayers,
Take him by the right leg,
Take him by the left leg,
And throw him down the stairs."
After which cruel sport, Johnny told Tommy all about
birds' nesting, and climbing trees, and taking away eggs
and little birds, and related how he had taken a nest with five
little birds in it, and had fed them with bread, and how two
choked at once, and the other three birds died in the night: for
they cannot live without their dear mother's warm wings to
cover them up, and they are tender and chilly until after they
have all their feathers and can fly about and keep themselves
warm, as well as find their own food. Johnny also spoke of
shooting rabbits, and both these naughty lads fired off their
toy guns into the rabbit hutches, frightening the poor rabbits,
although they could npt kill them, and causing some tiny
rabbits, two days old, to die with fright. How the poor
rabbits did scamper about! And how their little hearts went
pit-a-pat!
19 00027.jpg
20 00029.jpg
Tired of this thoughtless sport, they rode Johnny's bicycle by
turns through the chicken yard, terrifying the fowls, and causing
them to fly in all directions. They disturbed an old hen who
was leading her young chickens to some grits which had been
thrown down for their benefit, and ran over several poor little
chickens, killing two and quite laming several others. Round
and round the yard they went in turn, frightening all the
peaceful hens, chickens, and ducks who felt quite surprised to
see the little boy who usually brought them food and was so
kind to them, mounted on a big wheel, and actually running
over them.
When Tommy saw the poor little chickens dead on the
ground he felt sorry, and he knew quite well how naughty
he had been, and he also thought how very sorry his dear
mother would be to find her pretty brood injured, for Mrs.
j Tiptop was pleased to have a brood so late in the year, for
the cold winds in spring had killed off nearly all the early
broods.
Tommy well remembered how delighted his mother was when
Sthe gardener, who looked after the fowls, told her that eleven
S chicks were hatched out by the old brown hen, who was always
a steady sitter, and how the chickens were brought in to the
house in a basket, and Tommy was allowed to see them and
Sto feed them with soft little seeds which his mother called
"grits," and when Brownie had finished hatching two more
S chicks, they were all placed carefully under her, and every
S day Tommy was allowed to feed the chickens.
And now he had killed two, and hurt many, and what would
his mother say? He could hardly bear to think of it, and
the tears came in his eyes, for he was not naturally a wicked,
cruel boy, but was so easily led astray by his companions,
S and he thought it was grown up, and grand, not to care,
and was too thoughtless to mind how he hurt others in
his amusements; all he thought of was Tommy Tiptop, and
when either boys or girls think too much of themselves they
21 00030.jpg
are certain to become selfish'and cruel, for all selfishness is
S cruelty to others.
But now some words his mother had said came suddenly
into his thoughts:-
'Evil is wrought,
By want of thought,
As well as want of heart;"
and he began to look very sad.
When Johnny saw this, he asked Tommy what was the
matter, and Tommy pointed to the dead chickens, and Johnny
a only laughed in his rude way.
*" Pooh," he said, you are a baby." Now Tommy dreaded
of all things to be thought and called a baby, perhaps because
he often behaved like one, and cried for nothing, and so he
H quickly wiped his eyes and said boldly, What shall we do
next ?" as if all this naughty behaviour was not quite enough
for one morning, and yet, (though both boys felt hungry), it
was only half-past eleven o'clock, as they found when they 1
went into the house for something to eat.
S With a slice of plum cake in each hand, the little boys
S ran out again eagerly into the bright sunshine; the garden
looked bright with flowers, and over head were butterflies,
some white ones, and also a beautiful Peacock Butterfly. "I
must have that butterfly," cried Tommy. "I am collecting
butterflies."
So am I," replied Johnny. Off the boys ran, cap in hand,
after the lovely insect; Tommy's hat soon held the captive
which was roughly seized, and placed on a cork, the pretty
wings were blown open, and a cruel pin ran through the
quivering body, while the wings were spread open by bands
of postage stamp paper.
It will look nice when 'set' properly," Johnny said, with
a sigh of envy, for he longed for the butterfly.
"I will give you a Stag Beetle for the Peacock Butterfly,
~~*****g
22 00031.jpg
23 00033.jpg
and a Sun Fly out of the roses, and, let me see, a lizard-
-:, as soon as I catch one. Only think of a lizard, Tommy!"
Yes, but you have not caught it yet," replied Tommy,
who wished to keep his lovely Peacock ;" "and I don't know
that I shall collect lizards. I have never seen one yet in
This garden." By the time the poor Peacock Butterfly was
pinned down and set, the boys found that the white butter-
I flies had flown away, and so they had lost the pleasure of
catching them.
Little Frisk, the black and tan terrier, ran up to Tommy
at this moment, and was at once harnessed to a very large
cart which had belonged to Tommy when he was younger, and
S which he still called his own. Poor Frisk was not big enough
to pull the cart, but he had to submit, and a bit was put in
t his little mouth, and the reins were fastened, and he was well
S tied in to the cart, and made to draw it along the garden
path, whether he liked doing so or no.
Frisk did not like this at all, but it was worse when Tommy
got in the cart and Johnny ran alongside with a large stick
and gave poor Frisk a blow every time he stopped running,
Which hurt him dreadfully. Luckily for the poor little dog,
Nurse saw them from the nursery window, which overlooked
the garden, and came down at once to relieve the poor little
:i dog, and to scold the boys. She took Frisk indoors, after
S telling the little boys to wash their hands for dinner.
Mrs. Tiptop was extremely fond of plants and flowers of
all kinds, and her pretty conservatory was full of flowering
plants of great beauty. In the centre of the conservatory
was a small fountain, surrounded by a large stone basin, in .;
S which lilies and other water loving plants grew. The water
from the fountain fell into a smaller basin which overflowed
into the large one and fell on the plants. In the large basin
were gold and silver fish, which were very pretty and very
tame.
"Oh, what jolly fish you have got !" said Johnny.
24 00034.jpg
"They are so tame they will eat bread; they come up as
soon as we throw crumbs in," replied Tommy. Stay, the
cloth is laid, and there is sure to be bread cut in the dining-
room, I will run and get some."
On Tommy's return, Johnny proposed they should fish.
Tommy did not like the idea of his poor mother's fish being
taken out of the water, and said so, but Johnny burst out
laughing, and again called him a baby and a coward, and
said, "You are afraid! afraid! afraid! I dare you to fish!"
and silly Tommy, who was so foolish as to mind being dared,"
at once consented. With a small hook which Johnny had in
a pocketbook, and a crumb of bread, it was easy to catch the
very tame gold fish, but how the poor fish wriggled and
writhed when the hook was taken out! And oh! how soon
the fish died, although Tommy held it in the water and tried
in vain to restore it to life: it was dead, and Tommy reflected
sadly that there was another dreadful thing to tell mother
on her return from uncle Richard's house, where she was
spending the day with his little sisters. He wondered what
she would say, and if his father would know of it, and he
wished he had not let Johnny "dare" him to fish.
Johnny in the meantime was fishing away without a word,
and a long row of struggling, dying fish met Tommy's eye
when he turned round.
Tommy flung as many as he could back into the water
before Johnny could stop him, and the two little boys had a
scuffle over the fish, which ended only when they were called
to dinner by Nurse, who waited on them and kept order during
the dinner. It was much too nice a dinner for such naughty
children, hot roast chicken and roly jam pudding, with. some
lovely peaches for desert.
The little boys enjoyed it all immensely, and were quiet
and good for some time afterwards; they went up into the
nursery to take the peach stones to the parrot, but they teazed
that poor bird dreadfully, they poked sticks through the bars
25 00035.jpg
26 00037.jpg
of the cage, and pelted Polly with marbles, teazing her until
she screamed for help, as well as annoying the poor bird by
calling her Ugly Polly! Nasty Polly! Horrid Polly! Polly
is an ugly bird !" with other remarks of a similar nature. Then
they took the dolls in hand and pulled off their hair, tore
their pretty clothing, and banged their faces with a hair brush.
W. Tommy pulled out the eyes of the lovely doll who opened
S them when she sat up, and closed them when she lay down,
for he had often longed to see what made them act so well,
and here was a good opportunity
Poor Dolly, of course, made no remark, but she felt bitterly
the loss of her two pretty blue eyes; she vowed vengeance,
but could not shed a tear, for she had no eyes to cry with.
S The naughty boys heard Nurse's footstep and hurried into
a large cupboard, in which brooms and brushes, pails and
S dustpans were kept, so as to be handy for the maids, and
here they found a mousetrap and a little mouse; they called
S "Puss, puss," to the terror of the little mouse, whose bright
little eyes showed how dreadfully frightened he was of the
boys, and still more so of the big cat which soon made an
J'" end of the poor little thing, for as soon as Johnny raised ^
the door of the trap, out ran mousie, and snip-snap went
the cat, and mousie lay dead on the floor.
The boys then ran down to see if Mrs. Tiptop was
coming home, then they went down into the kitchen and
teazed cook by taking a beetle out of the blackbeetle trap and
putting it on her neck. How she screamed and ran about
and flung the beetle off. Tommy saw it run towards him, and
so he stamped on it with his thick boot and killed it.
S Cook drove the naughty boys away out of the kitchen;
she was now very cross and angry, and they felt they had
S better run away, so up the kitchen steps they flew.
Just as they got up to the top, they met the baker's boy
with his tray of muffins; they heard his bell tingle, and
they asked him for a muffin.
27 00038.jpg
Muffins are not good when raw and untoasted, and the
baker's boy told them so, but they did not believe him. We
will have some, we shall have some," they cried, and rushed
upon the lad who tried in vain to protect his tray from the
sturdy little robbers. Johnny pulled the end of the green
baize cloth, which kept the muffins hot, and down they fell
in a shower of round white dabs, all on the garden gravel
Sand then they went rolling down the kitchen steps.
The poor boy cried out, My master will beat me, he will
never believe two young gentlemen would behave so. Oh
Sdear, oh dear! What shall I do!" Tommy and Johnny
seized on the muffins, while the poor lad was thus lamenting,
" and began to eat them as hard as they could. The baker's
boy, with tears, picked up the cleanest, and went back to his
master and told him how Master Tiptop and his friend had
thrown down all his muffins, eaten some, and spoilt others;
Sbut the baker could not believe that a child of that nice little
Mrs. Tiptop would be so naughty, and told the poor boy he
must pay for the loss, so he would have hardly any wages
to take home to his mother, who was a very poor woman.
See what dreadful mischief these thoughtless boys did I!
The poor boy begged in vain to be believed, he cried and
sobbed and asked the baker to see Mrs. Tiptop on the
Subject, but he refused, saying, He must not risk offend- ,
ing a good customer, and that the boy must pay for his
Carelessnesss"
Meanwhile the two naughty boys had eaten the untoasted
muffins till they were tired of them, or rather until they felt
very uncomfortable, so that when tea time came they could
eat nothing at all.
About half-past six o'clock Mrs. Tiptop returned with
the dear little girls, and Tommy heard them run up to the
nursery at once to tell Nurse all about the pleasant day they
had passed at their uncle's house, while Mrs. Tiptop asked,
Where are the boys?" quite surprised at their absence.
28 00039.jpg
29 00041.jpg
"I expect they are quite ashamed to see you, ma'am," the
J housemaid said; they have been at mischief all day long."
Mrs. Tiptop at once sent Johnny home to his mother, and
S made up her mind not to again invite him to spend the day;
she ordered Tommy to go to her room, and when she had
taken off her things and put them by, she called to Tommy
^ to come to her, and asked him what he had done all day
in her absence. :
Tommy was a truthful child, and I am happy to say he
never once thought of not owning his faults, so he began
the sad list of wrong, of cruel, and of wicked things which :
he had done, and as he told her of-
His drowning the little kittens in the yard.
.:. Of setting the poor puppies to fight. :
-. Of catching the wasps and flies.
t" Of pulling the Daddy-long-legs to pieces.
Of running a pin through the lovely butterfly. -
Of killing the chickens.
Of driving the dog and beating it.
Of fishing for the poor gold fish.
Of breaking the dolls.
Of teazing the parrot.-'
Of giving the mouse to the cat.
Of frightening the rabbits to death.
Of "squashing" the blackbeetle.
And of upsetting the baker's tray, and eating his muffins.
The tears come into Mrs. Tiptop's eyes for she felt that
S her own little son was a cruel, bad little boy, and that she
could not love him again as she did before she knew how
cruelly he could behave. "
-2 When Tommy saw his mother cry, his little heart was :.
very sad, she was such a dear, kind, loving mother, and he
S felt so sorry that he cried too, and he promised her that he
S would never, never be cruel again, and that he would ask
the baker's lad to forgive him, and would pay for the muffins,
..<- /* .; ^Pa
30 00042.jpg
l2
and would bear any punishment if she would only kiss and
love him once more.
"Ah, Tommy," his mother replied, "your sorrow will not
restore the little creatures to life, the little creatures God has
made for our pleasure and comfort, and which we keep for
our own amusement. I must punish you, my boy, and I
think the best way will be to send away all our animals, our
l dogs and cats, our birds and rabbits, our parrot, and our
fish, and not let you have anything at all to teaze."
"Oh no, dear Mother, don't do that, you will punish every
one for my fault, anything but that."
"Well, Tommy, then I think I must say you shall not go
to the Zoological Gardens with us all on Wednesday. Your
VI" uncle has promised to take us, and has asked me if you like
W, riding the elephants, and seeing the lions fed, watching the
monkeys, and giving buns to the bears, and looking at all
the curious birds and beasts which he knows all about, and ^
can tell you of."
Poor Tommy felt this was indeed a punishment, but he also
knew that he well deserved even a severer punishment than
this for his wickedness, and so he said Good night," and
went off to bed at once, sobbing and really sorry for his
faults.
As he was so truly sorry, Mrs. Tiptop gave him one kiss
S for good night in his little bed, but it was a very sad kiss,
S for she sighed and said, Oh, Tommy, Tommy, who would
have thought you could be so cruel; pray to God to forgive
you, my boy," and then she said:
S"He prayeth best who loveth best
_All creatures great and small;
For the Great God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all."
Poor Tommy sobbed himself to sleep.
(g^r ^^5
31 00043.jpg
Night time
32 00045.jpg
H CHAPTER II.
NIGHT TIME.
S"My gentle boy, remember this is nothing but a dream."-Eugene Arami
0 ,-.- "1H dear! dear! What is this that is scratching
me so and holding me so hard and tight!
S Oh, how you hurt me to be sure," cried Tommy,
as he struggled in vain, for two large birds
-.i. were perched on the iron railings of his crib,
-:: and were pulling him out of bed. "Come
I along with us at once," and they pulled and
S pulled until they got him out of the soft and cosy bed where
he had been tucked up only an hour before. No nonsense !
S Come along, it is not worse for Tommy than it is for Dicky
to be pulled out of his nest; come along, your nest is
not half full enough of feathers like our nests are, and we
want you to play with and sing to us," and in a minute,
S they were flying along with poor Tommy, who was
frightened and giddy, and worse than all, very unhappy
at being taken away from his dear mother and his happy
home. The Birds, however, were rejoicing, and put him into
a box with bars in front, and placed worms and slugs and
snails for him to eat, the very sight of which made him feel
S sick, and they came and worried him to eat, and worried him
to sing, but all the time he tried to get out, and bruised his
|p... -..'t-f -3 X^^^o^^
33 00046.jpg
arms and legs against the bars; all the while he felt very
S hungry and tired and weak, and then he remembered nothing
S more.
When next poor Tommy came to his senses, he found
himself cuddling up to his dear mother and feeling extremely
comfortable, when suddenly the door opened and an enor-
mous cat, followed by two kittens, came in. Tommy nestled
.2; closer to his mother, but the cat rudely seized hold of him
S saying:
There are too many of these children about; we must
drown some."
S Let us drown Tommy," one of the kittens said, "he is
m ugly, he is rude, he is no good at all; oh what ugly blue
eyes !" and the kitten scratched him.
Poor Tommy was carried off away from his mother, who M
sobbed and cried, and was taken into the yard close to the
S waterbutt, where a pail of water stood which he recollected
very well, much too well, for it was the same pail in which
he had drowned the kittens.
The cat held him by the feet, and the little kittens helped
to push him in, and down he went into the cold water, and
in spite of screams and struggles, shrieks and tears, Tommy
was held under the water until he lost his senses.
Suddenly he felt a sharp pain in his nose, and found himself
S hanging high out of the water, but in scarcely a better posi-
tion than if he had still been under it, for it is anything
S but comfortable to be hanging by the nose from a fishing rod.
Much to his surprise Tommy found that the fishing rod
was held by a large fish, who seemed delighted to have
caught the poor struggling boy. Mr. Fish hurt him so
much in taking out the fish hook, that Tommy struggled
still more, and was at last flung into a fisher's basket with
such a bang that he again became unconscious.
. ^ *;. ^:^^:G ; j;0^ (? Cn:^ ^;( ^
: :".. ::", ,.:.... : : i :, :--.:.-, : ,.. ., ''.:.- -., :.. :.v, t: L' ,d::.,.-:",... .r _
34 00047.jpg
35 00049.jpg
Aroused from this lethargy, Tommy found himself held -
by a big dog, and saw that his friend Johnny was in the
arms of a very large bulldog; the two boys, being always very
Friendly, began to talk, but the two dogs did not allow this
for one moment, but tried to make the little fellows fight; they
knocked their hands together and made them scratch each
other's faces with their nails, until the boys got cross with
:40 each other and began to call each other names, to double up
their little fists, and to strike out in earnest at each other's
face; Tommy felt red and angry, but he got the worst of
it; his eyes were blackened, his nose bled, and he lost his
dear little white front tooth.
Tommy's next adventure made him extremely uncomfort-
able; he was climbing a sunny wall in order to get some
ripe and tempting pears, and had nearly got to the top when
a large and fierce-looking wasp suddenly caught him in his
hand, exactly as Tommy caught flies on the garden wall, or
on the table cloth indoors; the wasp pinched his head hard
and hurt him so much that he shrieked out, when two large
Daddy-longlegs flew up to see what was the matter.
"Oh, this is the little wretch who pulled my sister's legs
J off, and my father's wings, and sang a rude song about
Daddy, daddy longlegs," instead of speaking of my respected
parents as 'D. Longlegs, Esq.,' as a gentleman should be
S addressed."
Let us pull him to pieces," they all shouted, and off went
a leg, and between pain and fright Tommy knew no more-
Until he found himself in a wooden box with one slanting
side, and iron bars at the top and on the other side. A
* strong smell of cheese pervaded the box.
Hush, be quiet till I fetch puss, she will soon finish -
him." The cat which the mice brought was as big as a
tiger, and Tommy had often seen tigers at the Zoological
36 00050.jpg
Gardens and knew what he would do with him; he shut his
eyes, he felt the door of the trap open, and felt he was sliding
out, down, down into the big mouth and hot breath, which
'I: seemed to smother him.
Tommy tried to run; he started, got away for a moment,
and found himself in the yard with Johnny and a lot of
other boys; their mothers were at a little distance, and called
to the children to get out of the way of a large Cock-a-doodle-
) doo, which, mounted on a bicycle, was driving furiously round
S and round. The cock was flapping its wings, crowing and
making a hideous and alarming noise. Tommy ran on, but
X he was not quite quick enough; on came the bicycle, down
fell Tommy, and both his poor little legs were cut off by
the wheel.
N It was a relief to find himself flying about his garden, well,
and rejoicing in the sunshine; he was again a happy, thought-
M less little boy. I must have dreamt of that cock," and he ran
A round and round the house, not looking where he went, he
3 was caught in a large net of the same colour as the grass. A
S" Are you collecting boys only," said a big stag beetle close
W by him, "or do you collect girls as well ?"
S "I prefer urchins," said the butterfly, who held the net;
"and this is a fine specimen. Tommy belongs to the small
roguey poguey breed, and will look very nice when I 'set'
j him on cork. At present I shall just pin him down com-
N fortably; where is my little mallet? Oh, thank you," she
said, taking it from a lizard who had kindly carried it for
her. One, two, three, there Tommy will do nicely for the
present," and off they flew, leaving poor Tommy writhing in
pain with a large pin stuck right through him.
Almost a relief to find himself able to move, although
S placed in the most unpleasant position of being tightly
~I
37 00051.jpg
38 00053.jpg
17
fastened into a cart, with a bit in his little red mouth,
and being driven with heavy blows by a dog very much
like his own Frisk," while a fat healthy puppy was
S holding the reins and driving poor To mmy on at a pretty
S fast pace.
Oh dear, I cannot go any faster," sighed poor Tommy.
Beat him harder," said the Puppy. "Gee up, Dobbin,"
and on and on they drove the miserable little boy.
J Again a change, but not a change for the better. Oh dear
no Banging blows on the head, hair pulled, clothes roughly
Dragged about, Miss Dolly was taking her vengeance on
Tommy for all the cruel tricks he had played her. What
strong arms she had, and she hit him with a hair brush
S until her arms ran down with sawdust, which never happens,
you know, unless a doll is quite worn out and exhausted.
Just as Dolly was going to put Tommy's eyes out with the
nursery scissors, he sprang away with a cry and crept into
the parrot's cage, where he sat quietly for a time, too weary ]
Sto speak.
Tommy's quiet was speedily disturbed by the arrival of the
lawful owner of the cage-Pretty Polly herself.
-l "What fun!" she cried. "Teazing Tommy in my cage,
sitting in my ring, and I have no doubt eating my Indian
corn and sop;" but poor Tommy was only too glad to be
quiet, and he had no wish to deprive Polly of any of her
S provisions, he only asked to rest and sit in peace in the large
S ring in Polly's cage. But quietness and comfort did not suit
Miss Polly, she kept putting her claws in and scratching
the child, and also bit him with her sharp, strong beak, she
scolded at him in shrill tones which went through his head,
and made herself extremely unpleasant in every way. Still
S he was too tired to mind much, but cuddled down with his
little arm over his face, and went off to sleep as he had often
39 00054.jpg
--^ .?., "" 'v .4 ': '; ;, ';'; ''"" ":; .";- .. .- ..,.-. .,., : .. : .." ..
S seen Polly herself do, when he had teazed and tormented her
too long.
S When Tommy again awoke, it was to find himself hurry-
S ing along in front of two rabbits, one of whom held a gun
just like his own toy gun, which kept popping away at him,
S while he ran wildly about here and there, to escape the shot
which he felt certain would strike him sooner or later. Oh
how much he wished he had never fired at his own dear little
S rabbits, and how frightened he was of these big ones!
Bang! Bang! And he rolled over and was seized and
S put in a bag by the biggest rabbit, who said, He is fat,
what a fine one. Shall we say curry or smothered in onions ?"
S Poor Tommy felt smothered enough in the bag without any
onions, and thought how good he would be if only once he |
S got back to his dear and happy home.
Strangely enough he was at home, and in the kitchen too,
he knew it well; he was just by the corner of the kitchen
clock, and here there are generally some blackbeetles if you
S go late at night, or early in the morning, and even one or
two in the afternoon, if the day is dull and dark.
Here was the place where Johnny and he had crushed the
S beetles in the afternoon, and now he saw a blackbeetle
:l coming towards him. As it approached, it grew bigger and
bigger, and at last it lifted up its foot, on which was a big
boot, and said, "Suppose I stamp on you, young man!"
Poor Tommy woke up with a start, thankful to have escaped
such a fate, and resolving never to tread on any beetle or
other insect again.
A bell ringing loudly in his ears, startled Tommy out of
: a quiet dose of a few minutes duration, and he saw before
: him the unfortunate baker's boy; the lad's eyes were swollen
with tears, and he balanced a large tray of muffins on his
'" -,''. :,.-,-,.. .. ........ .... ..... .. ,
............................
40 00055.jpg
41 00057.jpg
S head. As he came near Tommy's bed, he upset the whole
tray on the counterpane, all over Tommy, only a few muffins
S and crumpets remained on the tray, and these began to look
like people, and to smile and laugh at him.
All the muffins and crumpets on the bed ran about all
S over Tommy, and danced round him without a word.
Tommy implored the baker's boy to take them off him, but
the boy only said, "I wish I could get them back, but you
.- upset them, and only you can get them back." Tommy tried
in vain to catch the muffins and replace them on the. tray.
As soon as he got one up, down it ran on its quaint little
black legs, and then they all laughed so loudly that Tommy
woke with the noise.
What a bad night I am having," he said, and longed for
S the morning. He thought of the next day, and of how lonely
S he would be without his mother and sisters, for he well knew
., that Johnny would not again be asked to spend the day with
him, and he sadly thought that if he had but been good, he
S would have had a lovely ride on the elephant, and seen the
S lions fed, and given buns to the bears, and have passed a
really delightful day with his dear mother and little sisters.
Thinking of all this, he again fell off into a quieter sleep
than he had yet enjoyed, and he dreamed that he was riding
on the dear old elephant, and that the creature could talk,
and that he said, "Why, Tommy, I can hardly believe you
S are a cruel child, you were so kind and pleasant to me last
S time you came to the Zoo."
Tommy hung his head and felt ashamed that the clever
elephant should know of his bad conduct, he did not know
what to say in reply; the elephant continued, "You ought
S to be punished, so that you would never forget your duty to
dumb animals." But you can talk, I have no duty to you,"
said Tommy. You have duties towards all animal creation;
:" every man and every boy has his duty to do to every living
.-. "
. ... .
42 00058.jpg
20
thing he meets, and has to do with. You must be taught
this if you do not know it," so saying, the elephant took
Tommy up with his trunk and dropped him into the bear's
den. In an instant he was surrounded by all the animals he
remembered to have seen; bears, the brown and the white
bear, the lion and the tiger, the wild boar and the monkey,
the kangaroo, the hyena; the giraffe stretched his long neck
down to him, and the elephant hung his head and trunk
down, while the large owl and the pelican flew down with a
great and hissing noise; thus he found himself completely
surrounded by animals and birds who closed round him and
asked him whether he was sorry for the past, and if he
intended to be in future kind and merciful, or harsh and
unkind to animals.
* Tommy at once said, "' I will be kind and good, do let me
go home to my mother."
No, Tommy," they all said; "you must show us you mean
to be kind. What is that you have in that plate?"
"Cake," said Tommy, "and only a little bit, not enough
for you all."
"Quite enough if given to me," they cried out, and came
nearer and nearer, while Tommy in his fright began to scatter
his cake eagerly among them.
More cake, more cake," they shouted, and pressed so closely
round Tommy that he shrieked with fright and woke.
He was in his own bed safe and sound, a light in the
room, and both Mother and Nurse at his bedside
S" Its those nasty muffins, mum," said Nurse. Master
Tommy has got a regular nightmare."
Tommy clung to his mother.
"I will be good and kind," he said, I will never hurt any-
thing again."
"That is right, Tommy," said his mother; "but now you
S must just take this little dose of medicine like a good boy."
*
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44 00061.jpg
Tommy drank down the medicine, which was very nasty,
without a word; his head ached, he had a lump in his chest,
and his hands were burning. His kind Mother carried him
into her own bed and held him in her arms until he fell
into a quiet sleep, and in the morning he woke up much better,
but still a little pale and very quiet, for him.
The little girls were sent off with Nurse to the Zoological
Gardens, and Mrs. Tiptop and Tommy passed the day alone.
It was not a dull day to Tommy, for Mrs. Tiptop read to
him and talked to him, and told much that was interesting
about the habits of animals.
3 As Tommy gradually recovered from the effects of his
ME naughty conduct, Mrs. Tiptop took him out with her into the
S garden; here he had the pain of seeing the rabbits frightened
at his appearance, and it was a long time before he could
coax them to eat the nice carrots he brought them. When
he went into the poultry yard, 'the fowls flew before him; in
S the stable the dogs ran and hid themselves, while pussey
looked out in alarm from the loft. One day's unkindness had
S frightened them, and they looked on their little master with
^ terror instead of affection.
The tears were in poor Tommy's eyes: "When will they
% love me again ?" he said, sadly.
"When you have again won their confidence," his mother
replied; "but you must be patient and quiet, feed them
regularly, and speak always very gently to them; and now
let us try to find the poor muffin boy, and tell his master the
whole truth."
Tommy felt in a great fright, but he knew that he must
XE obey, and he felt that his mother would understand how he
felt (for mothers always do feel for little boys and girls), and
would help him out of his difficulty. So he held his mother's
hand rather tightly, and they went off together to the baker. 3
Mrs. Tiptop entered the shop just as the baker was piling
up the. muffin tray with muffins and crumpets.
"h'W_)" 39
45 00062.jpg
22
None o' your tricks to-day," said the baker, roughly; "just
you behave till your time is up on Saturday, or you'll be in
gaol before you know where you are."
The poor boy was just beginning to defend himself, when
he caught sight of Tommy and his mother, he crimsoned, and
remained silent.
My little boy has come to pay for the muffins he ate and
destroyed yesterday, and to say how sorry he is for behaving
so wrongly."
"Then it was true, Bob," said the baker, "that the young
S gentleman took your muffins, well I couldn't believe as how
young gentlemen could have stole yer muffins. Oh, ma'am, I
am sorry for you."
Tommy felt the colour rise up into his face and ears and
neck, and felt hot all over.
"I am really sorry," he said, Mr. Weighwell. I will pay
for them all, and I hope you and Bob will forgive me," and he
began to cry.
Looky here," said the baker, Master Tommy, what I feel
so is that I've been that unjust to Bob, and nigh broke his
mother's heart by sending him off with a bad character as a
thief and a liar, and 'tis you as stole my muffins."
S"I did not mean to steal them," said Tommy, sobbing.
If you take what don't belong to you its stealing, plain
enough," replied Mr. Weighwell, "you can't alter that."
It will be a lesson to Tommy for life," said his mother,
gently; "but I should be glad to know what Tommy can do
to make amends to Bob for the suffering he has caused him."
Oh, I'm all right now, ma'am," said poor Bob, who looked
bright enough. Master won't send me off now, and I'm sure
Master Tommy need need not cry so."
Tommy lifted his little face, all covered with tears, and said,
"Mother, I could help Bob, I could ring the muffin bell for
him, and perhaps carry the tray."
"No, Sir," said Mr. Weighwell, "but you could go some-
9" oZ
46 00063.jpg
47 00065.jpg
times and read to Bob's mother, who cannot read for herself,
and she would be very glad of a visit from you. Ringing the
bell is the best part of a muffin boy's work, and they never
shirk that, but reading aloud is another thing, and if you read
S the Bible once a week to an old woman, you'll be helping her
S and yourself too."
"Thank you, Mr. Weighwell, for the suggestion; I am
S only too glad if my little boy can do a kindness," said Mrs.
Tiptop; and now let me know what my Tommy owes you
for the muffins and crumpets, he has brought his money-
box and will be glad to get out of debt."
After some calculation and talk between Bob and his
master as to the number of muffins taken out and the few
brought home, and the three-pennyworths and the six-penny-
worths left at various homes before Bob had called at Mrs.
Tiptop's house, and the result was that Tommy had to pay 1
three shillings and tenpence, which he did cheerfully, although
his little store of savings was nearly exhausted by this outlay,
but he felt happier to see the baker put the money in his
till, and to see Bob look cheerful.
"Now remember," said the baker, very solemnly, "that
you took these muffins without paying for them, and you
could have been sent to prison, and that you must never
take anything which does not belong to you, nor use other
people's things without asking them,
It is a sin,
To steal a pin,
and I hope, Master Tommy, that this is the last trouble your
S poor Ma will have with you."
Will you forgive me, Bob," said Tommy, "I am so sorry ?"
es, my dear," said Bob, who felt quite happy, of course
I will, and Master Johnny too; it was all mischief and fun."
It is no fun to do wrong, Bob, 'the way of transgressors
S is hard,' and Tommy has been very unhappy for many hours
after his few minutes of 'fun."'
48 00066.jpg
Mrs. Tiptop then took Tommy home, and the little fellow
was very silent and subdued, at last he said:
Mother, I don't think I read well enough for Bob's mother." .
No, dear, I do not think she would enjoy your reading
yet, but I will go and see her and read to her till you can
read well enough; in the meantime you shall read out loud
to me, and we will choose nice amusing books about animals,
and you will see how much there, is to learn about them if
you will only make them love you."
But how can I make amends to Bob, he was much kinder
than Mr. Weighwell."
Mr. Weighwell was your true friend, Tommy, for he
showed you how very serious a matter a piece of mischief
may become; you thought nothing of destroying and taking
I Bob's muffins, but he knew perfectly well that had you come
to his shop and taken a loaf, he would have sent for the M
police, and he wished to show you the danger as well as the
wickedness of your conduct."
"Mother, I will never, never take a crumb that does not
belong to me; do believe me."
My dearest boy, I always do believe you, for with all ^
your faults you are always truthful, and now you promise I
know I may trust you; but you must think, Tommy, before
you act, and consider others more and yourself less. For
instance, you are always taking your sisters' toys and dolls
and they do not belong to you; all the animals, except your
own rabbits and chickens and your own dog, are your father's
and mine, and you treat everything as if it is yours.
"When you want a sheet of paper you help yourself, you
run to my pincushion for a pin, you use my brushes or
your sisters' if they are handier than your own, you treat ;
everything as if it is yours by right, and it is only now
this dreadful thing has happened that I see how wrongly my
darling child has acted, and how wrong Mother has been to
allow Tommy's naughty ways.
N,
49 00067.jpg
50 00069.jpg
"All the nursery toys were all your own for so long, that
is the only excuse I can see for us both, Tommy, but we
don't want to excuse ourselves, we must do right and we
must pray to be guided in the right way; we must ask for
a right judgment in all things, and by being kind and
thoughtful for others, we shall cure our faults and avoid all
the errors of the past.
"And now, my darling boy, cheer up and begin to put
your good resolutions at once in practice to-day."
Mother," said Tommy, squeezing her hand hard, may
I give Bob a pair of my rabbits ?"
"Yes, dear, but they will be of no use to him without a
rabbit hutch."
"I will give him the hutch and all," said Tommy; or I
will try to make one for him."
Mrs. Tiptop smiled, but she was glad to see her boy really
wish by a little self-sacrifice to make some amends, however
small, to the boy he had injured.
When Tommy reached home he found his father was quite
willing to help him in making a nice new rabbit hutch for
Bob, and while they drew plans and made measurements,
Mr. Tiptop talked to Tommy about his friend Johnny, whose
father he had seen that evening, and who told him that
S Johnny was very ill indeed; the raw muffins had disagreed
With him, and he was in a violent fever, and did not even
know his mother when she spoke to him. It was many weeks
S before the little friends met, and they were both very much
surprised at the change which had taken place in each other.
^ During the long weary hours when Johnny was recovering M
from his illness, his great amusement had been a little puppy
si' who-thanks to his being kind and gentle with it-had learned
many pretty little tricks and nice ways, and Johnny was
proud to show Tommy that the puppy could beg, would
walk on his hind legs, would catch a piece of biscuit or
"trust" for it, and would pretend to be dead, and would
-1: .,: -b
51 00070.jpg
fetch and carry at the will of his little master, and did every
trick of which a little dog is capable, Johnny had learnt
patience in his illness, which was entirely brought on by his
own fault, and both boys were not only truly sorry for what
they had done, but firmly resolved to be kind and good to
all around them, and especially to dumb animals who are
unable to complain of those who inflict needless sufferings
upon them.
That the two little boys were now much happier than when
they were always in mischief and trouble, is hardly neces-
sary to say. They were always delighted to see Bob, and
to hear his account of the rabbits in which they were very
much interested.
Time passed on, as time has a habit of doing, and the boys
^ grew better and wiser and kinder as each day went by; they .
tried to do one kind action every day to some person, or to
some thing, and soon they got into the habit of looking out
for chances of helping others, so that they were loved by all,
and they grew up good men and remained firm friends all
their lives. Being kind to all around them, they took happi-
ness with them wherever they went, and the world was happier
and better for their existence. It was but a small world at
first, just their home circle, then a larger world, that of school
life, and then the largest world of grown up, manly life. They
were quite happy, because they tried to make others happy, A
and never thought about themselves, which is the secret of
being happy. To make others happy is our duty, and brings
its own reward with it, and especially it is our duty to be kind
Sand merciful to all animals.
THE END,
--.
. -, ;'
52 00071.jpg
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_ __._. :
Back
57 00078.jpg
58 00079.jpg
59 00080.jpg


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782dc47f930037962dbed496bf6a49462f6681e1
describe
'8695' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
c6435c1621cc099d8a1a093609a0af32
252844071d6ddf5616de01cd54749dd36ed19d09
'2011-08-26T14:35:58-04:00'
describe
'897684' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3731c51e1e0e1e55314a000c6b3227aa
449d8863a8fbd437a65a9223c15c5c8526d55886
describe
'33247' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
58501600774019cf5ae1e69e59fa3862
71004745095d2721739bbf314ce10a293e50ef8b
'2011-08-26T14:38:55-04:00'
describe
'6780' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
cfaffb59cc8bbffd13731a69d5aacd27
314d8065f6d5be87ebafd10b12845d4b253655cc
'2011-08-26T14:37:09-04:00'
describe
'21560452' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3a52fc986589fc4938b7762ab33379c6
4b0ee464f343ed0452f70b740487ddd3e28b350d
'2011-08-26T14:35:51-04:00'
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPS' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
987fe0409459589e68f9b27275594e81
80e871c71430bdc98e68f7ead4303506ee7a7c6a
'2011-08-26T14:35:30-04:00'
describe
'897678' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9cdae73a52513ed1baaef534e422b53c
7c58c5d346ef297aa57e39021f31e8041ebcdcb6
'2011-08-26T14:36:03-04:00'
describe
'105646' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b50e6ed1b065578e1455f67782778d18
db06d89e8e0660c9a4f9e71bd4b1999ad6dd7a9f
'2011-08-26T14:36:50-04:00'
describe
'18577' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPV' 'sip-files00013.pro'
43b8ce7aa1962ca6e500a102fb825aac
634dcc237b0b25996bea93af86306b1b62bff118
'2011-08-26T14:36:30-04:00'
describe
'29406' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
f4b6e08b1baae83ce08929e6b9bcfd1e
30b85c966d2a8c795d16b8c1b2a64bd839fe39ee
describe
'21564164' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a14359a6ade7fc64ba4a1aafa1c03f8f
b22c28ff8826c6ed486128b99cb5f467c1970480
'2011-08-26T14:35:32-04:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPY' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1e38f947f020ca22daf2759f88bac528
4ae8e19e8f94948e8649014e549d5475c0ca9604
'2011-08-26T14:35:56-04:00'
describe
'7718' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
85f29d1eddb79f8f414ec81feef498cf
41395a227beb117fe05a96ecd45e081a3c805820
'2011-08-26T14:37:42-04:00'
describe
'897657' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
aa5841f08e4b055f42ad28425f3613d0
a5f904a5fd20edf3ba92981acb7f67f7978ec4ca
'2011-08-26T14:36:22-04:00'
describe
'189370' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
8956b005309f8475ceec8a5259124385
8c7c0ce44b63b1d888c20a8e0ec31a242f0cdbc7
'2011-08-26T14:38:05-04:00'
describe
'43200' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQC' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b138918bf782cf05bd47adfa79ad61ed
6e612f03493937c04e1a9580128a8c971bd5b2b3
describe
'21566012' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQD' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f4b54bd46c7a1ef4021edd37cf4a36d0
7493500adfaa64cdae50eacb04a1b80f770c7556
'2011-08-26T14:39:05-04:00'
describe
'10177' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f1f05965a78a3425dc4b8826a71cd423
8f248b319384d19c641dd51edb55108cd72ca032
'2011-08-26T14:36:51-04:00'
describe
'897617' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c26bf4852b262aef9dc5e479eb7bd8b2
a1162e0f16d1a4ec59596953e6f2bc61afc4fa95
'2011-08-26T14:36:08-04:00'
describe
'85212' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
09f89441db1e226615b2e4fbc7e928f3
a9dd90978574465f69e6fbe2e9bb2b526fc1c838
'2011-08-26T14:35:41-04:00'
describe
'12394' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
12aa32e22be3761f523bce505e77f9c3
3c2f1ccedaaa7d1edf341afea971eaa416cae0ba
'2011-08-26T14:37:29-04:00'
describe
'23106' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
14cc746c80a37fb69ae56e33402d2028
87e5dc20a189887b6d94ba435ede86253bb3436b
'2011-08-26T14:38:41-04:00'
describe
'21562944' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
be16406b915df387cc47e074a4f894a8
05a7a47451fc0f38d87a551ae8a5aae5075ac318
'2011-08-26T14:37:34-04:00'
describe
'626' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6adbb2954a29a4ca809ffddf5eeb76c4
8ea81f61db793b69ba719d984410a5f7adc46755
describe
'6743' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8af238ca25a9fdda524d97bd6bbb9bf9
81e90f42096f1bc689235acead3e2c3b25e24dd0
'2011-08-26T14:38:03-04:00'
describe
'897216' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f5deb9f176bae59cde45df74f263ddf4
797673a5325d6e9fd97d2ef2058866088e81f205
describe
'179636' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d1e14a49030b54fb0a30c94794a07e76
bd7f0646688cdca860bea4e0488584082b801086
'2011-08-26T14:37:43-04:00'
describe
'41222' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
0558c16e8506b7a3188c46b3ccd99c42
1b933828d1b3d2893270b9043e6ad051433c3c11
'2011-08-26T14:38:31-04:00'
describe
'21556164' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
44885554c020c043bf39317e136d3e36
4691f2dea2dad19869618ecf70f59b65fa7c76a5
'2011-08-26T14:37:12-04:00'
describe
'9932' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
45dd5458abc222d1602c81a7c08f670b
27962b915b2d5958427c299f64c027233dc989d5
'2011-08-26T14:35:44-04:00'
describe
'897679' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
56a4f683e231fbd62cead8335b13edd4
ba2f1f32f69c6cb755e6920aefed0033247356f1
describe
'136330' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQS' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ff413e73b7e459e95e5d8bfd494bbdaf
61617d5884ae0a66a4a0d6b8c4811491571dcaed
'2011-08-26T14:36:49-04:00'
describe
'37461' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQT' 'sip-files00021.pro'
045882b161347195bcb870e61eaf2880
4a15999c25b034b5a34d51d8efd7a673d55da810
'2011-08-26T14:37:47-04:00'
describe
'37533' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQU' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
014ea8e8075fc69daad03b2400562818
4c207764bfef1e50b8684761186dcf2770b63080
describe
'21565256' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQV' 'sip-files00021.tif'
90fe2f14fb79ecced6d773fb289ce1db
e90e1f395592d8b8c5d445e08c10b43fba0bde9d
'2011-08-26T14:38:08-04:00'
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7228fbf8b88ac259d31e788f00014cb5
78e5eb60107d6f3225fa01977a27631e2192d710
'2011-08-26T14:36:46-04:00'
describe
'9624' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQX' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b95040322f9d9585d91f0ab4454eead7
0b99ce5d83454510df0f945ac46eb4dfcaf45524
'2011-08-26T14:37:44-04:00'
describe
'897686' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3afd69e412c44151f946093d8f981e57
5f1e4c439c65cbc4ff1a3eda41a688974125c865
describe
'157220' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
00baeda682efd6b7f1fbe9dc85d6ecf4
6cd26c595e01d3979b4c77f186876e7759bf96df
describe
'60442' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRA' 'sip-files00022.pro'
15a570823b6d6bf9448e52d7879fa0f8
a0d5f5f4ed126086da555c5963d2e59e7ec97fb5
describe
'43151' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
62bad2269a4941e1422b131161d36973
c6922e58c11fe334cd3694f9e94dbe02fb3ba4cb
'2011-08-26T14:39:01-04:00'
describe
'21564924' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRC' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1c22a3137bca6723805057ba0ab28b4f
da8644429d00376de6a93ee8071eb5a50b3d8cc7
'2011-08-26T14:37:25-04:00'
describe
'2593' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
5498ca665120059363b80431c581f94c
cabb540fff395d7a8429271458f9b22981af40fa
describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4005501fd047f52bf9eaffe55d114b2e
eb0056d9deb098a7e45a8cc723515e17e794fe4a
'2011-08-26T14:37:23-04:00'
describe
'897500' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRF' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
60215d1da4ad859c1cf1b60f7ae50e16
7e8b47188a8d6e35a52dd7f51c2de7a1d8dd111b
describe
'148511' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRG' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ae0c885d7ae8f5247132abf905fbce8e
883e27fedecf6b35fac5f54fa2f8b4c417f38123
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
3bca00c0a56e8369640510233692ff4b
64915d83249407b26d1a492f42b2e44aba211fa8
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1592a43a810010ad051eba590202e4bd
1d55ef8948d3d640c91595ff8098cb5740163e26
'2011-08-26T14:36:13-04:00'
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
d48fdc3165c924e414e8faa6a721d8d7
a61c38eb610b8ef090196f331e541927298a3924
describe
'897668' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
08eadcc5ee7001b2a9786f2ff734ba9e
56f56c9d607878ca1fca59b67bcf09addf79ecf8
describe
'154848' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5774e07b99652193071abcd9b86fca70
d1a5983e6e906c5a1784b4cea5fbc0c8bae99f1a
'2011-08-26T14:36:29-04:00'
describe
'58732' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e46e4558deffb478d1706743f7badc88
774002ac19d85942a4f830c1701ed086d91413bd
describe
'43558' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e68ea7568c8e3741335c70923c96ae47
54c06a2796bfb9f528b11ead5dafbdd557723dae
'2011-08-26T14:37:18-04:00'
describe
'21564988' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6e5d812ba04721783b9a3f52c00b54e5
fc62baa65b4a682e81be669bcaeeea79fa84eee2
'2011-08-26T14:35:35-04:00'
describe
'2498' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b82213fc0b9326a1a2510a9b5aab0a78
dbd2b41fea6d6a0e6b22f425c6408cedeab24c77
'2011-08-26T14:36:05-04:00'
describe
'10148' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
02a358aa7d9591f1fe0396c25e5d64e6
930aa44b737eae0910578418d54cb57b67fe57a4
'2011-08-26T14:36:10-04:00'
describe
'897675' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b40bad1ff1799ea4573276b55979dc21
a7e3a02468d70d7f736451639f546e53ceb3fc2f
'2011-08-26T14:37:41-04:00'
describe
'146391' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRS' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7cd4eac32c035f32c8af9192c1cdc6e6
7a5afc573fed3619ae8a0ab8a2b78496096191f1
describe
'50609' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
8167037f2f45027c874c1b361fb91531
10ee2c551ff08721928858cd9f4218621eef42c8
'2011-08-26T14:35:52-04:00'
describe
'41372' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d1484e58b8e8946f50490c20587b6918
f09dbbdc7c643462c3571e683c080029647b8877
describe
'21565236' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2c368d26aeec86728ada7b51373cf883
f092a09d2d342c0024f2396f7eb5392903e3b9da
'2011-08-26T14:36:28-04:00'
describe
'2148' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9f410d2cc9365c980036eff28f7488fa
1a596d2cd4768612a46a9293042f32e49f3fba1f
describe
'9888' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
803b6d14f821438020421b6423bc749e
08b57fbe0338f4b3a42f44f8b35aa4de00995c6a
describe
'897613' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
dd006795330a812d663ede08d84f1fd3
9e23a7b590db5975a44957bf4f9b90234738074d
describe
'165236' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f06a16dd3fd2fc47db631bb0926883f1
9af96b14914a7ba30c7f95d3697b81d4465ca20d
'2011-08-26T14:38:10-04:00'
describe
'37422' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
a3c3bf36ffe298b0c7ee7bb2e20cfa7c
255ea19bcc04d629f16f81d571f784ee10929a3b
'2011-08-26T14:38:34-04:00'
describe
'21565356' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
952208b21adfcd54642254d51eec257c
a5bde5dadaa37e0c3699ed764528adb76c872cd9
'2011-08-26T14:36:54-04:00'
describe
'9210' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
61c66da417649a3189f30ba5e5cfafb0
ee1f8d11c35d2406dc3d59f23dd53a89d19223e0
'2011-08-26T14:36:40-04:00'
describe
'873511' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSD' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
13f9e68f2616a87a7462b23f1cbbb98a
f84b8ac3fabccdd6ee77b83febdb8f56a844eb63
describe
'160894' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f4c6bb09e1ef002ab77c730746ec578a
9cddce4901ff757cefa0dcd33cd8f341523270e7
describe
'52648' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
bc4f149085797ed58ca21eeaa557b470
0643dbd8b602a9e71ebb4907f88896e61f3cfc8b
'2011-08-26T14:38:29-04:00'
describe
'44701' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
b29dfcfcdeac3b54c6dfd37140977f81
b04c0d0a4fc042646f220cd143759eed6ccb9dcf
'2011-08-26T14:37:49-04:00'
describe
'20985808' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
fbe0821304ea9356a47495f79ed2a646
405bd82ddb9e0db085b7f46853da251fe1d18e38
'2011-08-26T14:36:37-04:00'
describe
'2193' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ea8a7dac22344215a306b8d794a30733
59f875876c8f3bd4be9b4d8df6616f7438a49908
'2011-08-26T14:37:59-04:00'
describe
'10761' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d27535ccde7c5e5846346e3977bc5deb
a01416cf4209cb21c5ca69791a6d07a06a974e7c
describe
'888818' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b1118fb9735f98e690519dbf65737703
f90284a744d83e7ca9ed9321d30dd8543ad0a5d4
describe
'133820' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
78da85d05e77f29db2d0d8a0e9404c58
72d64a50b4e07ffd79f9318ee40983ef114da9ed
'2011-08-26T14:36:41-04:00'
describe
'44888' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2cf1a4be74ab3c4dff0e06f80aa804b5
909e765cfc83c42a795780d3dba728db08cc87a4
'2011-08-26T14:35:33-04:00'
describe
'38740' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d6dd80e7afcb9a8885ca2b6efb4645e6
8778701b5de6c60a495fb6064f2cee8aa61f305b
describe
'21352008' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSO' 'sip-files00030.tif'
7e14d892d7111720401e2b0cbc11421b
966ad8485c681615b69d20fb9753ff866b789193
'2011-08-26T14:37:53-04:00'
describe
'1996' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
46a187f05d292616955b75cd305d1666
c6fdd9bfc30c48ee71006aebbc126eca22ba408f
describe
'9444' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
e9b82ea769a0b358bdd2b0e1a48dcd0e
b36e983bc134da031753c77f8a0f2ca0f4936854
describe
'883178' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9a5145ac05df9d26ff9623aea279d7ba
314a1bf407354365da7ae641c27e5e5a32066884
'2011-08-26T14:37:46-04:00'
describe
'188656' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
19cf3bd6ab9fc18a38e3fae130910b02
04f04121c6c2277bc6b533131617a7da4b826723
describe
'43898' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACST' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7b8ebe2c7ab55091401094989d3fe7c5
5dff3676b9b111cfb670a50d840bfa410ce58a35
'2011-08-26T14:38:47-04:00'
describe
'21218476' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSU' 'sip-files00031.tif'
2ca35ba35664003cbe7ff113f8ba6914
dcf796c0c42b845dc00c3c22f187dbcf17271808
'2011-08-26T14:36:02-04:00'
describe
'10897' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
874a392639b1f4f7b33c63eddb3c9810
49d14ca8bb34224c1c7335fba6058a4106bd15b4
'2011-08-26T14:37:57-04:00'
describe
'897603' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
01416c69c24637434a20ea0bf1e4404a
f5a628964ec2211e7e81a44934d8cd2ebb378123
'2011-08-26T14:38:45-04:00'
describe
'150354' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
158418de44272dd0e38da57d3a47b6a0
f2667a08351c6c87fdb41e5f45a9d58d99e66761
describe
'52398' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a73d5aa9bde29af6decadefd5f62a36c
c8b5fb3605e4bc6a07216510cbf3cc48db6cb9f1
describe
'41124' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
1d43e02ea7d42c2366461c95a02cf487
c4c969f44e6cec09f74491f11b0b22b4aa1adff8
'2011-08-26T14:38:39-04:00'
describe
'21565116' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b52f8f805dde94c102f591785a5b9d68
951d27a3b30857d220c5c9e884dae4315358763a
'2011-08-26T14:36:15-04:00'
describe
'2178' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d9230812fa201c6f5eed9fd235bf133b
4d8895e0d0c29bea2d73e6e84837dd108abdb374
'2011-08-26T14:39:16-04:00'
describe
'9647' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
88cb86aae5a15f4e5a75a831e52e9868
bde8a2a7c5443d68d2afc7a0a373417d032d37a6
'2011-08-26T14:35:36-04:00'
describe
'888547' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
1f6b728656a7f162b7a693093e9a844a
bd6764b8d3b24721bee6c2a62ef66f83336ef170
'2011-08-26T14:36:01-04:00'
describe
'153841' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
84efc1afe60a9159b0545f41371681bc
f750375e43d4764bc4ce4731bd5adac801079f88
describe
'51968' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
dae61443256da36ea7201eaa1408c331
a5008c8884d58f780151449640790a71e3d72bad
'2011-08-26T14:38:51-04:00'
describe
'43370' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3d7fd8214640ced640290722eefb4846
1bb717b45bd15cf4e3732a0bb0e7542a416a5cb1
'2011-08-26T14:35:37-04:00'
describe
'21346364' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a49efa5999242c71ba72b814283084c1
1826904247c51cc73df5e94e4689cb61498e3a43
'2011-08-26T14:37:26-04:00'
describe
'2103' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
5b303444b52eb5e94aef852306555e05
4870be5b526840808f4b41eef4b85d048931eef2
describe
'10417' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
50a3159092d349aad38f092b73dbd280
3e1bbe16df5842e008a24be4792b62560b2b9a80
'2011-08-26T14:37:07-04:00'
describe
'897650' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
12ccdd3fdeda74269e1acb07ff1e4829
2be33ecdadc2982081a8f7d37809df7d303ea302
describe
'163301' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b35bb2cc8db64cf447af782b6fc19243
76ecffa3e279ca852721f225ac103cf3db765011
describe
'36280' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTM' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
4c5fda55072a6b9204e95e4b659412f4
cfc06d1d6d8ba0a09d8fe15de8064d74264383bf
describe
'21564760' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5d735b7dd65bdc92bd728627994fa7d9
0df5d0ff051e917a3f425c40135a013b20e0a40b
'2011-08-26T14:36:21-04:00'
describe
'8755' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTO' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
85a9cef591a053d1874396d40422960b
b7ba5fb667ccc2c4b40b82d89ecfab88b735f183
describe
'885589' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
1b170706c04a23b49170280080c62950
69191af5174f5a50633c53c4cc02852330cf360c
describe
'157498' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
325c6ef99f723a204ab27a71583276aa
6f99f0f7c2322e7de958dfe26b9174a7961b59f2
describe
'53133' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
42217ec4e2819c46bd62bc27fe39f07f
7162555889cf5059194b2297339488511ffd277a
'2011-08-26T14:38:06-04:00'
describe
'44264' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0ca5bc0613e8d18cd40db7b229860fdc
642352124850f8630eab626f55cd06afb6131c78
'2011-08-26T14:38:28-04:00'
describe
'21275576' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
d1f9266940b1717f0ab0ba5c2e937b61
eeb2681719f2fb95785970f18703749d7f1aa3ec
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
2745e18b2ce6f4bb6052f193e1801d23
9915b1d26617c620f325c77af665c1e814cae152
describe
'10500' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
44701cd2811f0be737e7a4dd097dfd8a
38c2eeaf406288294958dbb6a4fbc2209d1e40f8
'2011-08-26T14:38:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
078bca605b4a102ea4ac50ab0dd9f8f3
065f30e1d9c69978930c90135623a0632589bea2
'2011-08-26T14:36:16-04:00'
describe
'151948' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
d26d9293defb8c579ff70ca099ad6b8b
8286125beaf2b78f602fc5b3c484f435ce0beb6f
describe
'52086' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
923b1b47dfdd3ed9a6d72f502ad379e1
bb4207ea8b23b3211c5632fb97ae25fb778fa9e7
describe
'42900' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
ae03f1842fa782ef0682fde725a8e45b
b42b38c798635d11ecb904d731875c4f0d90be17
describe
'21565220' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
2a6b6924d418307ef58024a41533011b
6a7797013c2accdb9b1d498217ffb5557cf94671
'2011-08-26T14:38:13-04:00'
describe
'2143' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
102b01f753f69bd7bba6efd74e847553
a03706af21f2206aad737b4aa48676088bea8b86
'2011-08-26T14:35:50-04:00'
describe
'9893' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c14b3599c53acbab0138adc2a5af5115
87b2926501e39a47d53e23d4d12f58ad75049272
'2011-08-26T14:37:14-04:00'
describe
'897672' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
d3cfb7b2fbaf0730c7b82a1846c8052b
b39369353c5944182a76e6521b834018ebb5e541
describe
'151982' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
865b205f1affcb6cecf7d14add146ee2
ad1b44f8ded62ebbdc57dbb9701c677648eb4d8e
'2011-08-26T14:37:50-04:00'
describe
'34965' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2d9c6a87db0f230b1d319d5194c46398
e3a55c45ff264808e8aac1745dde78c16f4ecfb5
describe
'21564716' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUG' 'sip-files00039.tif'
38f22f13246d96a21836b596ae43e8bf
4d15c2c930d6cd540cb48a79a776d95feba2d55c
describe
'8611' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
2adfeed457791803fb3c0522c507dfc2
11e223953c2bfed98b09830dea0618849f1dfbc6
'2011-08-26T14:39:02-04:00'
describe
'897682' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
f93a6d79560186d3f743b76f97996b1a
8be105b13e9f284b54d5e6b47a50e33fb1adc576
describe
'132422' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
7eccc43dbc348c1faa026aa85077f2bc
71b63a26fc47efe29ebd11bcfbf621eef54a42ab
'2011-08-26T14:38:25-04:00'
describe
'47796' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
fff0a665e1a0bac1677bc0f3afb22c0b
8fb85c0b713ab84ef3a24eb3e7e66da6761b294f
describe
'36698' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
051581bf1c25441a6b44e73fd5c8900e
a0171f2f35a60ea0718c104b5a9cf4101944aab8
describe
'21564472' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
7f423243a004d4d3f5158989ec73916b
8e1f054bd862c65e791c020dd53c20e74c516bde
'2011-08-26T14:36:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e4acb935592bf5fa718d442e7534eaec
e84f680833bff2475057a3f82af00e04f3f5c846
'2011-08-26T14:37:39-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8706' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9e67bdec15fbd18d6ef3cd047b2ceb60
d2211c30bdceb114d545b1e9dc29073a93d8d25a
describe
'880765' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
9d2f624db6fc068db4ba8c1423467d6f
c967fa416ae05172aad07be5cbfb97a21bf7216a
describe
'141952' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
9da89c4c3a1fce5f5ad8be20e25eb413
9c561c3170352aee784e4265f17455f618211a19
describe
'44999' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8cbca2537bce784df5b20653403305da
262dfe1df70c8ec4c6ec35ad87ec2fdd724e6a4d
'2011-08-26T14:38:15-04:00'
describe
'38259' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
19c2bf86a72f6f82a2e76d3d71409264
457a84835036f75a30468057a12ec1de693f37d4
'2011-08-26T14:38:42-04:00'
describe
'21158776' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f6c2eb294a14d7f8ada6b983b83529b2
96c4c54817aa5f6db164a64eb73c7fa054c7b08a
'2011-08-26T14:37:03-04:00'
describe
'2043' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e060353168ea5757fb17b1d8feb54d21
8c86336d0e5b1046fa0e867431a8ee251176edfb
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9305' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
6241f2e358becf2fbf0304fd5b1d5a82
46e31f1c4881a5f33a9eae6dbc2dd4c83006e8ec
'2011-08-26T14:38:02-04:00'
describe
'897591' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9311f856a96f9e750c32332b77f330ac
082eb971a2a882cde132b22390a9b9c2384d83cd
describe
'173862' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
4e012aaf6752c93025ca0ca042d73889
bc28c9586f4c129587e82d709b0287f5a638999e
describe
'39229' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
21a8339ae921900ce033643e482ce256
7b414066974e78b777fbfcf756714dc6edf6bb18
describe
'21565428' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
20ac00701d1e39d1bafc5afc3fd25dd2
73e5771b3d1012aeca36ec97c3841e1c35a34129
'2011-08-26T14:36:35-04:00'
describe
'9410' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVA' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
147c10a48f75929da4bdc8ac66d49f55
36f0686ecaf4ea6d8350ff710c94ea3bdf7526d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
11989b5431d2aeed9d980feac8a44187
ae13d569915e3f64b108b101d47bd693ce129a5b
describe
'128475' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
acb2066b6f09082ab833c3a757b51354
01f18b3f6d1ffa73d04130934d8d6bb1121ca5a5
'2011-08-26T14:36:09-04:00'
describe
'35505' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
eb49aeaaf786be859a06e093e03ba829
2fc9e2fbd9ab1696590f9cede84c2aab67c2bcca
'2011-08-26T14:37:32-04:00'
describe
'35023' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ce857ceb600e4b57eac04f74c337aa00
03adc1c78c85b92f8c7c46f362993574ec6264f9
describe
'21564908' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
dd0abfc67f545e83ee386fc48c214c5d
afad322ad6ee1915a33d0dae8ffb5d38ad0b89b1
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
402a616b084c5e81360ee98153af71d6
a52805ab93159d62fdcc77e6c7eb9f46535fb762
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8872' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
7b966cf9cabeb936c182e1d3b63d1b77
f69a71071192361b424363fd42f043e318760485
'2011-08-26T14:35:29-04:00'
describe
'868673' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
cfc5c0d4cd5a372b68245ac60b6da2b1
3708804d1ae925fc9d4cae6145a9bdb5c587396f
'2011-08-26T14:35:38-04:00'
describe
'149012' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
38d70bd3cf2851357c16b2901ec84b5e
ea2b4ea6fd31fa4100ce05408c10050548137890
'2011-08-26T14:36:59-04:00'
describe
'51075' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
25884bf8f8961e19c49ee5486dd5a030
c641ed1212980d357c41db93fff0af9a0bca6de8
describe
'42029' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c81c3eb419b75d54a58671caea6aa263
31f972ad51e54fd9fe2592f347576bdf289646a7
'2011-08-26T14:37:17-04:00'
describe
'20869212' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a1e81867aca95a479360ed57d3e52643
a1ae0995a1a88c52b361427b5675c145b836bdf1
'2011-08-26T14:39:09-04:00'
describe
'2174' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
46898e64279fa6bc6133f35c79d8ca48
0334aa51c5702cfc5ce768c27843879d1eb1dadd
describe
'10059' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f020869e927fb6be0dcf20b4b14593e7
051f82defbd3b8dd839460c9faa95018d7e3864b
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
827f2925499655ca8a6d648805be709f
85f1e85c0fe35f870deaaaedd1025c3fc9c7bfa8
describe
'167060' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
92f3850c7ab4d5d9b2d631b5f307872c
d57b3ad84370e300271c8191a2b5aedc88506a99
describe
'37149' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVR' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4ec92894b78d362b762602e19a257f2e
3d99fad9f9aac8d5b3dde2c42c060f6ff1f87a47
describe
'21564812' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b2c4e7f9765f121e7d79937c384c9a34
836280a08852f0de443700c36b752990f8f7cd2e
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVT' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2d812e9b0cacda8276be4b7d0a56de83
f46802f6b5932a18807dca440ada413a662eec77
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2e026fa5cd871c1cbb6b7bfa05cc2b13
4291afd0b0976d6b31ee0396611cd045048066a5
describe
'145969' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3bc02eb90714f4f3c43b197161adaf73
b52dbffdda81c59eadf155720680697c103588b6
describe
'49148' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVW' 'sip-files00049.pro'
89e626efbcb19e5903e654ca1bb21a9f
2f51b18d6b3f46524895f3e68ca39ef30ad25fdb
describe
'41613' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVX' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1569d0bc883d84fb0b2ebf86d3a87d4e
f5fb4fa58f5549adc211876e8fc857b2620da100
'2011-08-26T14:36:48-04:00'
describe
'21565008' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
04b11da27eb4b613b7e221ae80456223
99ecb54610d016815994c00fd12261ace2cbd3dc
describe
'2071' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5b9426605fdbcf68e8e7845b8e15205f
d69259568b1b3ba9c82e7a0fe3e19d2846c19227
describe
'10067' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWA' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
578b3adf8c2b8cf98cf4405c2a6a972a
62da3c5f77966fd361c21938e027612460493ce6
'2011-08-26T14:38:59-04:00'
describe
'897665' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9081c91fa35dad8265706401b5cc7ba9
9b465a74f7f6f22352b4ab171d9b2b9684577643
describe
'153119' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
5a952b2f2417c67bf036a90df5947983
f69241c8533f0d6934af7597be4b73edda1fb95f
describe
'48660' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWD' 'sip-files00050.pro'
9ee3f598b2ee7342d3dbd9cf18902cd8
e91137ffc958c82637f6ba29556306e1f77f6868
'2011-08-26T14:37:16-04:00'
describe
'42703' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e650ef7d8b8556b7959df05d9b97b780
bf235830c5e8776bfc980159100ef05b7e23d835
describe
'21565556' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
e4466ca9cb3e1734316b93ec7c55bfef
af6015caccba3dfc259c80c7f770717ee43e6695
'2011-08-26T14:39:15-04:00'
describe
'2064' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
0f5daf077d1dc11ad2e67b8f2d38d694
441b40b15d8dbb686b59bf668c83dfc3d1c187a6
'2011-08-26T14:36:53-04:00'
describe
'10232' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
1cd1ffc9398e50e705f4bbfc5357464c
a74115c4cf53ee677c74a861810b056dbb41d171
describe
'897425' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWI' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
b5f7883dd44a30b63e90439a83cd0b2c
7bba86589b24a4bf57b4673b01f930e39176da13
describe
'175639' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ce9d5737c9aba8b14e9a442b92492ebc
648974e15a806a52f0d31d2066a85940156427fe
describe
'39605' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8e8fe326ba006fba0a321c3bd03a0b58
eee6869cd7a367bf0fa4ccd96eeca56e383b64ca
'2011-08-26T14:37:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d3d9ba85928227fa538cb7a1a0136dfa
01b02ce37d77f2549521f875847f53e884370437
'2011-08-26T14:36:19-04:00'
describe
'9454' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
9f6523f03b1bebb52190ab9261f2364b
14a1463ca36b0411bcd94711ffaa21d2a55c5abc
'2011-08-26T14:37:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWN' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
91a277a7383420789d750ed74736b878
de0fc23ab0e0f037fb7aa28afac24930b0a40f04
'2011-08-26T14:36:04-04:00'
describe
'146828' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
addb7403ad416cfb6c3592e7c04e6dc4
7d5c039d2d32722821f696cc59d79dca2315cfc5
'2011-08-26T14:38:46-04:00'
describe
'48510' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWP' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5bcb32db873b4831b520d7c9c19b8405
af79600462f18e99efd4e4504cd4ce5e71c37bc9
'2011-08-26T14:37:06-04:00'
describe
'41227' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
864f0d875aaa3ebd63bd0ff29f4bb0d7
9ea5e567067fbbebbc2e00dd3ca8c59eef6debdc
describe
'21565076' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
405588db2a10b41f786d2c8134b2d047
d3894f4f2ff870ac256336fa838e1958507790cd
'2011-08-26T14:35:43-04:00'
describe
'2035' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWS' 'sip-files00053.txt'
939b652b39d96ff931e0739f972e67be
5a50f0d4b3d942f31801e6493a476322026b8554
describe
'9920' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e98eb62b4f129baec670d45dda331ea1
37f9e3070578bead9d4ed13d77b480464acc2440
'2011-08-26T14:35:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWU' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
094b3fc86c8edc66fced884446102210
d90e9c334936799cd8301aae010f342bccf0c2db
'2011-08-26T14:37:00-04:00'
describe
'140542' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWV' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5a5087adb9b896cdb9a838dc8ec864fa
cbcdbff8e5ddfd51820c2e9bc5c1e4433a17a83f
describe
'53126' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWW' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b7bf84a99751a76917f6150b2f5fea8e
d797df03c5ba96a3004a1fb2dbe3477ff35d3b06
describe
'40167' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWX' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a7393dd3684c6dc5f3ecf22c2c2df7b8
4b4ed118fb0a1c790b3a1157bc7543bbe7af7fb7
describe
'21564508' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWY' 'sip-files00054.tif'
137a96d9c46ff79b7ef7ae74d18385c0
00b28cc6e36cb7d7fce10d4674c03064aab3c0e8
'2011-08-26T14:38:38-04:00'
describe
'2267' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACWZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
e05a720b98deccd66cb584b9de92e424
3ec302575e056977e3102eb8c3d2a0aa1522e198
'2011-08-26T14:39:22-04:00'
describe
'9486' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d3a1cf8f5abf6775e7762e69fb4a93df
1db8ec5548ff10e4f2ebae3f41b5f50ec4ff0694
'2011-08-26T14:35:42-04:00'
describe
'897630' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXB' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
03a94424f3f5295e64db0d09d22cb5a6
79f4e023776193d54651839bfdf0f32b20f84f92
describe
'171973' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXC' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e837045383c084b041dcb4ba15aefb2b
682edf04e47f7a27b52c0c4509ba9deecf9d37f7
describe
'38000' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
678ed93d42a40cc2d5e5eaaae2b1b681
623d135267f7396d0699ca35cf7a788f33927878
describe
'21564416' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2103cb13fe741f87f7a167429b69b7c5
665518a6463012024a95e8a4cb69786d2df81dab
describe
'8882' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXF' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
d51eb10231d5052f83e62250cc08188a
0f6b73552c0c25fe9a4784814ddc7b15965da70a
describe
'897663' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
86c1f22a1de9b53c74aca0aabc4fe317
b79177e3addf72fd2a4cf11218ee21fb05d8d901
describe
'148537' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
10628341f3859b0706b6471b4388e0ac
854b616924507ceb9aa3fff04d4024af23098026
describe
'53770' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
34fadd9569e35cc7595c8a7a01d24ab2
ba9773933364c24c7abb8070d0f72223488f201a
describe
'41350' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXJ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
3a48de84ce3eb8899121b0d610e24a01
b499afe2f306f54aaa2869a45d6451f57d2ba9da
describe
'21565036' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
cee4818714bb708ec829c30c663505bf
eb2dafa379332a6e426f1d4aa068354e76c65596
'2011-08-26T14:37:01-04:00'
describe
'2324' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXL' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1d3d1d94f3e9a22c5f0e0bb6b69ab5b0
cf23b1d47e5ead251b8571338354970b4192826e
describe
'9640' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c4bc36009a25a7e7e47953432ecc377a
31139a59cdc897934d8993bc3ec688c5bb902c3b
describe
'897677' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
20daf8b74acd718adb0d33109b35eb84
93368ab0efea45f0953dc7f19945893b41dee29d
describe
'142518' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
fc5657a43aff3fe9c7a40bb41b6c4dca
68a68a60fb0effc756b064b9626940f50f469950
describe
'45735' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
6a174d085c8c5a980d47da31e562796d
7917d01175a5273529e803c80a2d2126636fa422
describe
'40055' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXQ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8c0dbb77dca3c181b4a1df49c190463b
4153d29c11524ef0fbfc260623f157251936d5f9
describe
'21565224' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
7678e4b1ff345641edf42d57203c4ffb
d94e7b3f9a93d1bbcf88d3c8a8254182845a4840
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXS' 'sip-files00058.txt'
5676968cc8dd61a2a6b719d27efe42f3
feacaeb1d947e55935289c4eadd064b45c9207e7
describe
'9999' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
dfc4a32fd2551a1dbba5d143d088ecd9
277cd2bf01d92f7aae0af2bbc2f4af7c84a81142
'2011-08-26T14:36:18-04:00'
describe
'897681' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
45976337b677116485a1da993058b5d0
bea14978d93240b5992177e64ac8a903ba8d4cfe
describe
'164188' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
cd392a19e3de6ef6fabceb73e15db0f9
feb4caff4ddebdb24fc315a691cecaefc863acd3
describe
'36580' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXW' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
509ecfe88899d636633dd54ab815ecf9
49c017c5d7034ae547cda30790241c6b0bab1651
describe
'21565208' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
747d881df5dd89b4857ee12441f3df60
5e7ab41f1849a74ff7aaded6101599a73b8f8303
describe
'8883' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8432ff8f16e2d95c0274585b2954023f
6b76cc30761f23eb977d1cf07917007d75e6dec4
'2011-08-26T14:36:33-04:00'
describe
'897462' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACXZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
44c70ce39c5b57fd4630cee16a5429b3
7d85e4dc802b4ef8cb11ecf1963904e20b3870b7
describe
'151446' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e4ba365ba339bdb69fc8938e58c88c39
5a97bad8b7808543a731b039a64ab1d25a6a7213
describe
'51711' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
516b8b7f5fef606cc8744fdde1860a0b
0ece8a5301c38c7421b00de627bfa1944200fe6a
'2011-08-26T14:39:19-04:00'
describe
'42279' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
673a0e008c126720840cc9b4e4a5c0d5
df15a20fc1d2cefcda2b1a13e7ad53894b36c705
describe
'21565388' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e44f8d548cc60b8ab60de649128b126c
259bee469cdcd226ef11dd28730e832329f31225
describe
'2196' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1b3427b1c7f772030cf5324a4fd1dd27
9c2dac8007074d0089f46b076e8ce7521b8bb684
describe
'10088' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
44e82ff9c52d5ea4ef11fbf721a97b32
f5e7bf15cc81df3deb0fca709a076605e05ec29f
describe
'897658' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
52ae0c703c8e8e8cfa6919c21cbb76d8
3474687f1324bcd82ca0ecc761a158551159e0d5
'2011-08-26T14:37:33-04:00'
describe
'144526' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
e54ab7dbb81c6b5165c058c9c2d36e43
d5b7d13226da42ab1348b29cc9d669f171736d76
'2011-08-26T14:36:55-04:00'
describe
'48084' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9e764c4ca2fca9c66a854f19926701fd
282c9fe3084ed5bda833e3adead9a4b42455a57c
'2011-08-26T14:38:44-04:00'
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
16526bb4c2c21e4a9a5cf6837ad4ed09
c6cf86acc6376ce8e0aca64ae2fd94da24547535
describe
'21565316' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
aa4d2b68a4436a9c5d3feb3d63478705
50a66e84b75b54d2cee2a99b26bdbc6e23d3997f
describe
'2098' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
60efb7561bff7fd43190b5840f3bb3f8
b3c3f908c65d7afb9c67b4cf09cd48e97c2db85a
'2011-08-26T14:38:16-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'10066' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6d0d344beacdc23dca7539bb7ebfbf76
0170cb7e925232c1c8cdb226c1eb7bbd552a8867
describe
'897652' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ced0f660a9c2c10647843babc5bfe45f
c43f65731fa9e3176c9aeb9cb0f639d08075d16c
describe
'173129' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ba3095719a1a91d91e871ccd899914b6
f368e5d55926181abda66a6a776d87517fbae238
'2011-08-26T14:35:27-04:00'
describe
'39251' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5bc746b1c00cdf2eab6f957c4a0bfd12
2a1d3f50aadeaadb50da0000278f4d58afde7792
describe
'21565740' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
e64cc2d052f896f7c945a820fbe973c5
7d53d33e7e43cdeef6b950b733e4ba876d3b2ec8
'2011-08-26T14:36:34-04:00'
describe
'9563' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5c97156b63923efe718bcd4d1f965c61
64dcd57b2b492434a5f9f3ab7641caf250897004
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
76f2f66f49f8e1dba5ed4ada74a4149e
e992b06f461147e18a618eee3d9ff1fd09b299b3
'2011-08-26T14:38:49-04:00'
describe
'147528' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b881bc7170c3e114e3d6d96c3497a3e9
02e6bec6b2342234e0a45dd1885fa02f86c70867
describe
'48662' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
f0411f5fc825a045c9092a8a5d5d330a
8a7d45726f680cef7f4ed6f9a6369ee420204bb3
describe
'41734' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
14d8cd70b61ea10e2913300b5ec0ddc2
2dfb1158464c3f60ce7bd7cc458147e5cc41831a
describe
'21565168' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d40b90acaa680132bfbf616674c7115d
15b61b1714c7a0cb81d62b988cc2f881f9612db3
'2011-08-26T14:36:58-04:00'
describe
'2026' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
49b775037bd877c7679ae96f31e344ae
2c884867382a8e42005260975627dfe193c5e138
describe
'9708' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e2bd1e2f8eee85d40368e40b0132e491
a16f360ea3e2dc17741af289bd5345533bdf9f48
'2011-08-26T14:38:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACYZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
88e3c0981c6d9a665be82a55e545020a
6a678ce3018ca782b9e3bc1ae655388156da3445
describe
'151292' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ab8b93aceb8bec29125dfc13ffe82132
980af7ff2423b0fbcb03425a7ea4cf56ab375d64
describe
'50121' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
031c77ff0a74e8bf04a667f3cce7e136
a86726c578b890c3b50694258c400453d0caa2f7
describe
'42028' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
936e13773b0b84db7276050613432039
9ba67478b32ff69d347d06f8d0c8d87351c8a664
describe
'21565180' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
54af60d209fe060ef2be635dd16dba02
3eed4e94f070500f2503e7b88f8f988a8c3cd8fe
'2011-08-26T14:37:10-04:00'
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ee465beabcfe1151e0a66f3af6b96d83
e93ef50184760045aab6f46570da608896d9f0b2
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
4a4110477b5ed5b98bfb0a5237cda878
bcdf3ca312e1174013f29c8188d4c014df6b78e1
describe
'897494' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
b41f3e520393388bc333c3caaa5e39bf
e15326aed9af3740496a2ff51806b292c6df9bb8
describe
'174080' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c8713dd75f91f229e0c560caf044d5df
01158657b70c272fc3be042f95f7502fa699726f
describe
'38503' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZI' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4d5d7932041144623adebb21d797c589
2080da0d144d08ff3509b4df741d86888fc30c5d
describe
'21564868' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZJ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
bfc607ba09ccae0f5476384a9b4eb232
2afe9275f97bcb8fc4bede93a81d82e172bbd9d2
'2011-08-26T14:35:53-04:00'
describe
'9178' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
d816a9d9526917051db82e13b70dac00
d273ad05113aa1a833a0521f0e84f196675395e8
'2011-08-26T14:36:44-04:00'
describe
'897647' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZL' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3b28309720925fd8a192f4a80202f05c
86b28ae78125522cebdad89031ef969439769885
describe
'146667' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
aaaf473759bf7750a8f506dd7fdf7903
b3227266541440c156974c763865cb34d873decf
describe
'50051' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZN' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b5bba624beff0380981df9f34ef34519
3f122f47ed6eba262e1f81f142ddb561eb92f92d
describe
'40128' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZO' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a100da3ae796d4df3220fee2a36855dc
74f11942ebea3fd0a47f166e62016c2cda3052a0
describe
'21564920' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZP' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4b51e1de3bd97010a857ad1fd1ae8a87
a84438d2f5655df230ada0035b616f302bd078a1
describe
'2124' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZQ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
e1a1319fc50a5307e5d9c4ecf1b40dda
275fcb42a4062172ceb11b28c469895d3948cfdb
'2011-08-26T14:37:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9646' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZR' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9b3ee87f73c8eb6471d4b080f1c728fc
65cb88bd0a454026b7935c6d3fba4e937055edf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZS' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
a119e82ebf59d1367096dc20d6dbfcb7
3939d83d635d21a58d8ff02394dd1fdd869e7d05
describe
'138394' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZT' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
aacd263142ef527547add21850d0f8d0
ebd75d222ba5280040f1ce7ec6c4f308f95473bf
'2011-08-26T14:38:30-04:00'
describe
'44986' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZU' 'sip-files00070.pro'
db429f284f10b8489260854694614c48
35b919708ffab47ebd3d361cbd56adeeb1ca9e31
describe
'38746' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZV' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
489d9443962cf04ff9d4227646771d2a
5df5fb8917ebbe965ceb0b86c6c48ae10b09a1b2
describe
'21564524' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
39c68c71170c7ba6558cfa6fa7881072
38e813fdccd685480f18324f4ae9cb9760d1787d
describe
'1949' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
a2d456004175d79a07cd6f6754b75456
58b7b17010746cbb6ded7d7fa88f5268aab27508
'2011-08-26T14:37:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'9076' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZY' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
241300d113dd82a0a9795a4e147fdc17
e5facdb6790b0f278a8cefeab93e0b6d3e16a998
describe
'897625' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAACZZ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3727d190b3eabf4659c3021c46b64b27
7c04d6a6c5a103fa052590070fbcf6390cdcf96a
'2011-08-26T14:36:20-04:00'
describe
'183011' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
54389b311cf76516512c2ebdbdc9fccc
bbab84e3b7bd19fbd638917794ee64ddcd8e610a
'2011-08-26T14:38:04-04:00'
describe
'42162' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
cc042d391ce83c00ca551a23c7e1a57d
43ef89eb5760ec81efbfe6677d05809188503195
describe
'21566084' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
daa5bdb368f840bf6e0cae8e74e9fc73
fdcc11a06273d4b751ca160933d712d1e3948cd9
'2011-08-26T14:35:54-04:00'
describe
'10214' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAD' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
281769e21f16863c9e95532a1c86be79
582918ba78c55d13d3160cbb23d87534cee0efd1
describe
'945310' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
bf6baf2f1766de6d593c2facf2407f72
83633f5e38b528bd54ddbae0c72acf23615f4530
describe
'161661' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5558299f9a6816ac5d13d9a70a546e61
9a65c4335ab687cc052d2c5854497cf4147638b2
'2011-08-26T14:39:06-04:00'
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
e5985ff9e14173711f470ae505e8fe3f
02fceee60dc0b2f2599f87da844359eb64dcf48e
describe
'40630' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
769da12243a08e794d61bd977558285e
989136a6df4eb969d19542536258de5af0fc524e
describe
'7585896' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
15d1630467579a4fdc7053ece4ba7dde
a76769b734921a1cee5711f1ac7bc3897d8ce917
describe
'440' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
37bfe074afa097835293e177014b39a8
6a71ac5ab0fcd55f5a36a07ed599f802739e6abf
describe
'10047' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
7fdcf6112bad19d1e04128a9c3455014
b8c68ca50c905996cdf5a14984e8f3c16b8bd416
describe
'945319' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
e0c662d245ab999a38cf887c3746f9ad
e88da87e53e1204c4ef259e0974f7543eebab695
describe
'119229' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAM' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
612e9a3b0c24d67923b305fb136cc038
402269a4ce3689a6e8fc08fa280c328f33eeb12d
describe
'17600' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
d116b6fa01b7260de835eba99c6543bb
695d3157fd525c32f276f2e1ca398b8b06792a85
describe
'29779' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b67c1f70fc31d21fa962d92d1ec87de7
7bb916374d2d6f175dc4f4d1f92e53bff383b1f2
describe
'7584568' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
02d261602fd2328989165d51ca2e1f65
f10694665695273fd515ae9d44a4f543a0b3eea8
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2582af135b5af025b72e0229e117f9b2
c4ccc9b90727771f418266a95e4c337247866b4b
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'7895' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
ade1077450306144328950ef97400ea9
060eee3c2b95a5e6eb86c6948c41ca3858026d73
describe
'945271' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
63e3f07025bd523f7ae51e338a8bd92e
a164c356a026d8cd8749db8242f9ad83ee83395d
describe
'152352' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
f579d045bc5821a4d71de6603258909b
bac7fe3799422da318fd05c74c1dcae9fff23a7e
describe
'12368' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
59964a2ea944291e41720b0806768e4c
c4002a5dc0d5e8113ae1073c4e9f320575ba1012
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAV' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
ac6a487dec31e7393425ab52f1f01d2b
cc0777ca507a844862caaebd26af95176356a939
describe
'7585376' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAW' 'sip-files00075.tif'
dc69c7b6d6710b860f2a19bfdb1e66e3
3a648a96e47a4318f946a1ade2b939adf5d2db76
describe
'567' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAX' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fb0ea770af95b6c324c214cf57c94347
d09482dae6bb6094b83b454d8fae27469cd04fbb
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
'8826' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c01c5b225d21b9d0679901a48c5023d4
7af6fae7d82d3ea59a180460ae01dd86e2b7e0e5
describe
'945324' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADAZ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f3b7cd481b16eba250369b3c0eb9b67b
68b45325ae8ef568ad9daf01af613feced422841
'2011-08-26T14:37:24-04:00'
describe
'116662' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b56d2da1b9b7f8595a54bbabeb71c323
5337fb1b394b2c128be543925a060cc4515b442e
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBB' 'sip-files00076.pro'
6911a487f8467bd78c2a011c62a9dd75
7c9f8a85b6e16d4160d41c37f5162fe104e83836
'2011-08-26T14:37:27-04:00'
describe
'33079' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
885da13bcc7ebeda118e91bc64e4ba40
4903200fd13609a6070b6d74272d2e4efdcf9717
'2011-08-26T14:38:12-04:00'
describe
'7584888' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6dbbc3f4493a8967321031e7c06b1a78
92d9b04626dea49cfd848bcbf365ca5729671d85
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBE' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1fe21d49411cd1a3348924b4d74b7653
1b335241b52a0c892dac19988edcad60b3a7f2a6
'2011-08-26T14:37:04-04:00'
describe
'8545' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBF' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
6fa79967410e09dad5dfea449c7ecd42
6ad6d07155c7aa5a1d8235c06a060d00086ef809
'2011-08-26T14:37:55-04:00'
describe
'964672' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ddf871680ca4058733535cc4bd3e6fec
466e2ead9284815affc49174af575a514cf3619f
describe
'136120' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f964b3fb16bd89df936e98a3d360068f
f8ce070363eed8254caac902e36f215625e4fd0f
describe
'26311' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBI' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
6c15b41426c6d13f97a64da1174e195e
9ce87dda278e7e39a58a2d897fb9e7a207c0f57a
describe
'23169560' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBJ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
58202f6fec912f1bf26dd1cbd1afba7d
68b5581c7af80753a529c5be14874bacf53ae398
describe
'5420' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
2a0356c82e696cc51f5c84f528a4fb32
39638f1cd1c81c2105eb7ac6897426858a0eac3b
describe
'959808' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBL' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
c86381df0d54ca5c087cdd6a03d7d464
bbabe70d25223f3f9566d8796ae5420560439e85
describe
'169804' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBM' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
40b8c5d1b9190bbd6da253f7b0788288
0e48fee517637620a81ec1afad9b12a481ac1814
'2011-08-26T14:38:57-04:00'
describe
'35989' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
030288da26facb904534805784682b2d
28dc53ade53d601f3576a78f586d8a4a40403dc1
'2011-08-26T14:38:48-04:00'
describe
'23059424' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1e0dab4e28108e4858d67f1fb82f1ccb
b2281caccd950e407b83d25c4537dfbd6d62b0b5
'2011-08-26T14:36:38-04:00'
describe
'7038' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBP' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a1d286fceffe570d449e68256e358fb3
bf965517dbb8d0e15f93777f71c9022b05f77c31
describe
'938790' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBQ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
2ae1e3c39b0d2c0d3ff669123a6dc5ce
21474ee87791b9c90a895d058c002957828994ef
'2011-08-26T14:35:34-04:00'
describe
'143409' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
eee3d22f531b76969ebc3dfbb91972d6
1329cff1518a433c06677d2abcafdba590aca688
describe
'32356' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
61725be2a83cf8655f76da5d8d6dcc14
738cd1a5c75ebc471b317a36921ae7b47441865f
describe
'22553204' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e451cdfd107812d513ae9c5e960fcff4
50a993567954a6f85819b488612279c45935ce9e
describe
'7854' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBU' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
0d1131bf3c26e39a27eef8edb541f65e
00fba170d08f476c40f277071d538e95027374b1
describe
'176' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBV' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
47c349d8eb2c9886b3c3cbf5f56f2760
0fbc0ecd5c6c0d61655bece18bd8bd161d5413dd
describe
'91311' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBW' 'sip-filesUF00082548_00001.mets'
ccc6dd1d71dee9a2cbb18b2868ecd7fe
0ea59410739483b1bfd9bc60d55ae3b8cc3e5701
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2016-05-19T14:05:54-04:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'119160' 'info:fdaE20080619_AAAAAGfileF20080619_AAADBZ' 'sip-filesUF00082548_00001.xml'
885f636b3ddbb479dd704edc16082fa8
80844734788e74ceef0f18783e3ac410d3fc9944
describe
'2016-05-19T14:05:53-04:00'
xml resolution
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
http://www.loc.gov/standards/xlink.xsd
















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CONTENTS.

PART 1, Pay d IME. Jommy's |] Ricks.

[PART Q, Nicut dime. ‘J ommy's ‘] RIBULATIONS.



FREES

i—Tribulation with the Cats.
2—Tribulation with the Birds.
3—Tribulation with the Dogs.
4—Tribulation with the Wasp.
5—Tribulation with the Fowls.
6—Tribulation with the Butterfly, &c.
7—Tribulation with the Puppies.
8—Tribulation with the Fish. —
g—Tribulation with the Doll.
1o—Tribulation with the Parrot.
11—Tribulation with the Daddy-Longlegs.
12—Tribulation with the Mice.
13—Tribulation with the Rabbits.
14—Tribulation with the Mufhn Boy.
1s—Tribulation with the Beetle.
16—Tribulation at the Zoological Gardens.

Tommy's Awakening and Repentance.

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Our duty towards others, and especially towards
animals is now so seldom insisted on, that little
apology is needed for bringing an old fashioned
principle before our readers. The object of this
book is to show that all unkindness towards the
animal creation merits —if it does not at once
receive— punishment, and that to obey the law of.

kindness is our duty as well as our happiness.

M. B.

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THE TRIBULATIONS

TOMMY TIPTOP,

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ME was not a really Bad Boy, our Tommy Tiptop,
nee Et he was only full of mischief, full of fun, and very
thoughtless of any body but himself. Mrs. Tip-
top was a little bit to blame for this, for she had

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a petted and spoiled Tommy until he was, as the
a maids said, “a dreadful trouble and worse than
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any plague of Egypt,” but that remark was made
the day he tried to poach eggs on a gridiron, which, as you
know, is not very well adapted for that purpose.

Tommy was her eldest child and he had no little brothers
or sisters until he was four years old, so that he had more toys,
more play, and more goodies, and a great deal more indul-
gence and treats than most little boys get, which is a little
excuse for some of his naughty ways.

Then too, he was always really sorry when his much too kind
mother showed him how naughty he was, but when she was not
there, he too often forgot her gentle words of advice and only
thought of fun and frolic, and did not think of the mischief he
did, or of the pain he caused to others. His little sisters ran
from him and hid their pretty little faces in nurse’s gown;
Nurse -herself, though very fond of Tommy, put all the .best
dolls and toys well out of his reach for she said she could not
answer for the safety of Miss Victoria and Ethereda’s favourites

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when Master Tommy was “in high spirits,” which was under-
stood by all in the house to mean that Tommy was in one of
his very naughty fits of mischief. I dare not tell my dear little
readers one half of the naughty things which Tommy did,
although I feel quite sure that they would not copy him in one
of them, but it is so bad for little people, or indeed for big
people, to have naughty companions, that I know they would
be sorry to even look at Tommy’s pictures in this book, or to
read all about the dreadful things which happened to him, and
which quite cured him at last of all his tricks.

Mrs. Tiptop often told him in her gentle words that nothing
was more displeasing to the great God who made us than to be
cruel to his creatures, and yet this thoughtless boy was con-
stantly hurting some insect or animal. Mr. Tiptop was very
fond of pets, and kept a nice Tabby cat and several nice large
dogs in his stable yard; this yard was a great amusement to

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- Tommy, who was delighted to see some dear little kittens one

#; fine morning. He played for some time with the dear little

eS kittens, and gave them names, Spot and Bob, Jet and Snow. os
“i The kittens were more pleased to see Tommy than their mother
Ps was, as she well knew how very cruel he could be when he was OE
a inclined to be naughty, but the little kits purred and rubbed
4 against his hands, and jumped over his shoes, and gambolled
es round him quite prettily. Presently he trod on one and it &
squeaked so funnily that he trod on another just to hear it
*~ again. Their mother began to be cross, and Tommy thought it <@
<3 best to retreat, but he said as he went, ‘‘there are too many we
@ of you kits, some of you must be drowned; why not this one? ee
*£ His eyes are blue, a very ugly colour,” and off he ran to findhis <<
et ie Johnny, who was older and much stronger than
Â¥ ommy. o
es When the two little lads returned together, the poor little i
ee kittens felt uneasy ; they did not understand what their little x
«master had said, but they very well remembered he had hurt
a them. The boys first shut up Mrs. Tabby in the stable, and %

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$6 then put all the kittens into a basket some distance away from
their mother, who mewed and cried bitterly; they then got a
pail of quite cold water, and began to drown the poor little kits. .
Jet was the first victim; her poor pretty little black head went
under the cold water, and though she struggled hard, down she
went and soon all her sufferings were over, and poor little Jet
was dead. When Spot saw this, he struggled so when Tommy
caught him up, that he slipped out of his cruel arms and ran
mewing to the stable door. ‘“ We had better not drown all,”
said Tommy. ‘ No; we'll keep two for fighting,” Johnny replied,
“one is no good,” so that one poor little kitten was saved for
this cruel purpose, and Snow being gentle and peaceable, was
drowned on the spot, while Bob, after being well bathed in
the pail, was allowed to run shivering back to his miserable
mother, who sprang out as soon as the stable door was opened.
She ran to the pail crying so sadly that John said they had
better take the dead kittens away and bury them, so they agreed
to play at funerals, of which sport, however, they soon got very
tired, and fought a little to settle a small quarrel as to which of
the two naughty boys was to be the clergyman. This fight
together, with the fact that Johnny was so much stronger than
Tommy, and that he hurt most, reminded them that they meant
to have a cat fight, but on their return to the stable-yard, pussy
had carried her kittens up to the loft to a place of safety where
the wicked boys could not find her, and there she hoped to bring
up her sadly reduced family in peace.

These naughty boys then thought of the puppies, which
were now about six months old, and were very intelligent and

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e It was easy enough to decoy them away from their mother,
x but far more difficult to make them fight, for they were dear
S good-natured little pet things, who were always playing
together. However, each boy took a puppy, and by holding the
ve little creatures and making them scratch each other with their
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and snarled for the first time in their innocent lives. Nor was
the mischief ended when the fight was over, for they went
growling and snapping at each other all the way back to their
mother, who wondered at their naughty tempers and scolded
them well.

Johnny next showed Tommy what he called “a jolly way of
catching flies and wasps” as they sunned themselves on the
garden wall, or walked along it for fruit, of which there was
plenty in that nice garden. Tommy soon learned the art, and
after some half-dozen attempts, caught a bluebottle fly and then
a wasp. Johnny, who was really a cruel boy, then pulled off the
fly's wings, and when Tommy said, “ How it must hurt them,”
replied, ‘““They would squeak if it did,” and foolish little
Tommy believed him, and pulled several Daddy-Long-Legs
to pieces because they are considered to be naughty insects by

many little ones on account of the nursery rhyme:
“Daddy, daddy long legs,
Would not say his prayers,
Take him by the right leg,
Take him by the left leg,
And throw him down the stairs.”

After which cruel sport, Johnny told Tommy all about
birds’ nesting, and climbing trees, and taking away eggs
and little birds, and related how he had taken a nest with five
little birds in it, and had fed them with bread, and how two

choked at once, and the other three birds died in the night: for

























cover them up, and they are tender and chilly until after they
have all their feathers and can fly about and keep themselves
warm, as well as find their own food. Johnny also spoke of
shooting rabbits, and both these naughty lads fired off their
toy guns into the rabbit hutches, frightening the poor rabbits,
although they could not kill them, and causing some tiny
rabbits, two days old, to die with fright. How the poor
rabbits did scamper about! And how their little hearts went
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Tired of this thoughtless sport, they rode Johnny's bicycle by
turns through the chicken yard, terrifying the fowls, and causing
them to fly in all directions. They disturbed an old hen who
was leading her young chickens to some grits which had been
thrown down for their benefit, and ran over several poor little
chickens, killing two and quite laming several others. Round
and round the yard they went in turn, frightening all the
peaceful hens, chickens, and ducks who felt quite surprised to
see the little boy who usually brought them food and was so
kind to them, mounted on a big wheel, and actually running
over them.

When Tommy saw the poor little chickens dead on the
ground he felt sorry, and he knew quite well how naughty
he had been, and he also thought how very sorry his dear
mother would be to find her pretty brood injured, for Mrs.
Tiptop was pleased to have a brood so late in the year, for
the cold winds in spring had killed off nearly all the early
broods.

Tommy well remembered how delighted his mother was when
the gardener, who looked after the fowls, told her that eleven
chicks were hatched out by the old brown hen, who was always
a steady sitter, and how the chickens were brought in to the
house in a basket, and Tommy was allowed to see them and
to feed them with soft little seeds which his mother called
“orits,” and when Brownie had finished hatching two more
chicks, they were all placed carefully under her, and every
day Tommy was allowed to feed the chickens.

And now he had killed two, and hurt many, and what would
his mother say? He could hardly bear to think of it, and
the tears came in his eyes, for he was not naturally a wicked,
cruel boy, but was so easily led astray by his companions,
and he thought it was grown up, and grand, not to care,
and was too thoughtless to mind how he hurt others in
his amusements; all he thought of was Tommy Tiptop, and
when either boys or girls think too much of themselves they



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are certain to become selfish~and cruel, for all selfishness is
cruelty to others.

But now some words his mother had said came suddenly
into his thoughts :—

‘ Evil is wrought,
By want of thought,
As well as want of heart ;”

and he began to look very sad.

When Johnny saw this, he asked Tommy what was the
matter, and Tommy pointed to the dead chickens, and Johnny
only laughed in his rude way.

“Pooh,” he said, ‘“‘ you are a baby.” Now Tommy dreaded
of all things to be thought and called a baby, perhaps because
he often behaved like one, and cried for nothing, and so he
quickly wiped his eyes and said boldly, “‘ What. shall we do
next ?” as if all this naughty behaviour was not quite enough
for one morning, and yet, (though both boys felt hungry), it
was only half-past eleven o'clock, as they found when ‘they
went into the house for something to eat.

With a slice of plum cake in each hand, the little boys
ran out again eagerly into the bright sunshine; the garden
looked bright with flowers, and over head were butterflies,
some white ones, and also a beautiful Peacock Butterfly. “I
must have that butterfly,” cried Tommy. “I am collecting
butterflies.”

“So am I,” replied Johnny. Off the boys ran, cap in hand,
after the lovely insect; Tommy’s hat soon held the captive
which was roughly seized, and placed on a cork, the pretty
wings were blown open, and a cruel pin ran through the
quivering body, while the wings were spread open by bands
of postage stamp paper.

“It will look nice when ‘set’ properly,” Johnny said, with
a sigh of envy, for he longed for the butterfly.

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and a Sun Fly out of the roses, and, let me see, a lizard—
as soon as I catch one. Only think of a lizard, Tommy!”

“Yes, but you have not caught it yet,” replied Tommy,
who wished to keep his lovely “ Peacock ;” “and I don’t know
that I shall collect lizards. I have never seen one yet in
this garden.” By the time the poor Peacock Butterfly was
pinned down and set, the boys found that the white butter-
flies had flown away, and so they had lost the pleasure of
catching them.

Little Frisk, the black and tan terrier, ran up to Tommy
at this moment, and was at once harnessed to a very large
cart which had belonged to Tommy when he was younger, and
which he still called his own. Poor Frisk was not big enough
to pull the cart, but he had to submit, and a bit was put in
his little mouth, and the reins were fastened, and he was well
tied in to the cart, and made to draw it along the garden
path, whether he liked doing so or no.

Frisk did not like this at all, but it was worse when Tommy
got in the cart and Johnny ran alongside with a large stick
and gave poor Frisk a blow every time he stopped running,
which hurt him dreadfully. Luckily for the poor little dog,
Nurse saw them from the nursery window, which overlooked
the garden, and came down at once to relieve the poor little
dog, and to scold the boys. She took Frisk indoors, after
telling the little boys to wash their hands for dinner.

Mrs. Tiptop was extremely fond of plants and flowers of
all kinds, and her pretty conservatory was full of flowering
plants of great beauty. In the centre of the conservatory
was a small fountain, surrounded by a large stone basin, in
which lilies and other water loving plants grew. The water
from the fountain fell into a smaller basin which overflowed
into the large one and fell on the plants. In the large basin

were gold and ‘Silver fish, which were very pretty and very .

tame.
“Oh, what jolly fish you have got!” said Johnny.

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“They are so tame they will eat bread; they come up as
soon as we throw crumbs in,” replied Tommy. “Stay, the
cloth is laid, and there is sure to be bread cut in the dining-
room, I will run and get some.” ?

On Tommy’s return, Johnny proposed they should fish.
Tommy did not like the idea of his poor mother’s fish being
taken out of the water, and said so, but Johnny burst out
laughing, and again called him a baby and a coward, and
said, “ You are afraid! afraid! afraid! 1 dare you to fish!
and silly Tommy, who was so foolish as to mind being “ dared,”
at once consented. With a small hook which Johnny had in
a pocketbook, and a crumb of bread, it was easy to catch the
very tame gold fish, but how the poor fish wriggled and
writhed when the hook was taken out! And oh! how soon
the fish died, although Tommy held it in the water and tried
in vain to restore it to life: it was dead, and Tommy reflected
sadly that there was another dreadful thing to tell mother
on her return from uncle Richard’s house, where she was
spending the day with his little sisters. He wondered what
she would say, and if his father would know of it, and he
wished he had not let Johnny “dare” him to fish.

Johnny in the meantime was fishing away without a word,
and a long row of struggling, dying fish met Tommy’s eye
when he turned round.

Tommy flung as many as he could back into the water
before Johnny could stop him, and the two little boys had a
scuffle over the fish, which ended only when they were called
to dinner by Nurse, who waited on them and kept order during
the dinner. It was much too nice a dinner for such naughty
children, hot roast chicken and roly jam pudding, with.some
lovely peaches for desert.

The little boys enjoyed it all immensely and were quiet
and good for some time afterwards; they went up into the
nursery to take the peach stones to the parrot, but they teazed
that poor bird dreadfully, they poked sticks through the bars













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of the cage, and pelted Polly with marbles, teazing her until
*~ she screamed for help, as well as annoying the poor bird by
s calling her Ugly Polly! Nasty Polly! Horrid Polly! Polly
“g is an ugly bird!” with other remarks of a similar nature. Then
they took the dolls in hand and pulled off their hair, tore
their pretty clothing, and banged their faces with a hair brush.
x Tommy pulled out the eyes of the lovely doll who opened
them when she sat up, and closed them when she lay down,
for he had often longed to see what made them act so well,
and here was a good opportunity !

Poor Dolly, of course, made no remark, but she felt bitterly
the loss of her two pretty blue eyes; she vowed vengeance,
but could not shed a tear, for she had no eyes to cry with.

The naughty boys heard Nurse’s footstep and hurried into
a large cupboard, in which brooms and brushes, pails and
dustpans were kept, so as to be handy for the maids, and
here they found a mousetrap and a little mouse; they called
‘Puss, puss,” to the terror of the little mouse, whose bright
little eyes showed how dreadfully frightened he was of the
boys, and still more so of the big cat which soon made an
end of the poor little thing, for as soon as Johnny raised
the door of the trap, out ran mousie, and snip-snap went
the cat, and mousie lay dead on the floor.

The boys then ran down to see if Mrs. Tiptop was
coming home, then they went down into the kitchen and
teazed cook by taking a beetle out of the blackbeetle trap and |
putting it on her neck. How she screamed and ran about
and flung the beetle off. Tommy saw it run towards him, and
so he stamped on it with his thick boot and killed it.

Cook drove the naughty boys away out of the kitchen;
she was now very cross and angry, and they felt they had
better run away, so up the kitchen steps they flew.

Just as they got up to the top, they met the baker’s boy
with his tray of muffins; they heard his bell tingle, and
they asked him for a muffin.

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Muffins are not good when raw and untoasted, and the
baker's boy told them so, but they did not believe him. “ We
will have some, we shall have some,” they cried, and rushed
upon the lad who tried in vain to protect his tray from the
sturdy little robbers. Johnny pulled the end of the green
baize cloth, which kept the muffins hot, and down they fell
in a shower of round white dabs, all on the garden gravel
and then they went rolling down the kitchen steps.

The poor boy cried out, “ My master will beat me, he will
never believe two young gentlemen would behave so. Oh
dear, oh dear! What shally) do! lommy and? johnny,
seized on the muffins, while the poor lad was thus lamenting,
and began to eat them as hard as they could. The baker's
boy, with tears, picked up the cleanest, and went back to his
master and told him how Master Tiptop and his friend had
thrown down all his muffins, eaten some, and spoilt others;
but the baker could not believe that a child of that nice little
Mrs. Tiptop would be so naughty, and told the poor boy he
must pay for the loss, so he would have hardly any wages
to take home to his mother, who was a very poor woman.

See what dreadful mischief these thoughtless boys did!
The poor boy begged in vain to be believed, he cried and
sobbed and asked the baker to see Mrs. Tiptop on the
subject, but he refused, saying, ‘““He must not risk offend-
ing a good customer, and that the boy must pay for his
carelessness.”

Meanwhile the two naughty boys had eaten the untoasted
muffins till they were tired of them, or rather until they felt
very uncomfortable, so that when tea time came they could
eat nothing at all.

About half-past six o'clock Mrs. Tiptop returned with
the dear little girls, and Tommy heard them run up to the
nursery at once to tell Nurse all about the pleasant day they
had passed at their uncle's house, while Mrs. Tiptop asked,
“Where are the boys?” quite surprised at their absence.

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Mrs. Tiptop at once sent Johnny home to his mother, and B
made up her mind not to again invite him to spend the day; ee:
she ordered Tommy to go to her room, and when she had
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His drowning the little kittens in the yard. BS
Of setting the poor puppies to fight.
Of catching the wasps and flies.
Of pulling the Daddy-long-legs to pieces.
4 Of running a pin through the lovely butterfly.

Of killing the chickens.

Of driving the dog and beating it.

Of fishing for the poor gold fish.

Of breaking the dolls.

Of teazing the parrot.

Of giving the mouse to the cat.

Of frightening the rabbits to death.

Of “squashing” the blackbeetle.

And of upsetting the baker’s tray, and eating his muffins.

The tears come into Mrs. Tiptop’s eyes for she felt that
her own little son was a cruel, bad little boy, and that she
could not love him again as she did before she knew how
cruelly he could behave.

When Tommy saw his mother cry, his little heart was
very sad, she was such a dear, kind, loving mother, and he
felt so sorry that he cried too, and he promised her that he
would never, never be cruel again, and that he would ask yy
the baker’s lad to forgive him, and would pay for the muffins, of

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and would bear any punishment if she would only kiss and
love him once more.

“Ah, Tommy,” his mother replied, ‘your sorrow will not
restore the little creatures to life, the little creatures God has
made for our pleasure and comfort, and which we keep for
our own amusement. I must punish you, my boy, and I
think the best way will be to send away all our animals, our
dogs and cats, our birds and rabbits, our parrot, and our
fish, and not let you have anything at all to teaze.”

“Oh no, dear Mother, don’t do that, you will punish every
one for my fault, anything but that.”

“Well, Tommy, then I think I must say you shall not go
to the Zoological Gardens with us all on Wednesday. Your
uncle has promised to take us, and has asked me if you like
riding the elephants, and seeing the lions fed, watching the
monkeys, and giving buns to the bears, and looking at all
the curious birds and beasts which he knows all about, and
can tell you of.”

Poor Tommy felt this was indeed a punishment, but he also
knew that he well deserved even a severer punishment than
this for his wickedness, and so he said ‘‘ Good night,” and
went off to bed at once, sobbing and really sorry for his
faults.

As he was so truly sorry, Mrs. Tiptop gave him one kiss
for good night in his little bed, but it was a very sad kiss,
for she sighed and said, “Oh, Tommy, Tommy, who would
have thought you could be so cruel; pray to God to forgive
you, my boy,” and then she said:

“He prayeth best who loveth best
All creatures great and small ;
_For the Great God who loveth us,

He made and loveth all.”

Poor Tommy sobbed himself to sleep.

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TOMMY’S DREAM.
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“My gentle boy, remember this is nothing but a dream.”—Hugene Aram

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gba rte Oh, how you hurt me to be sure,” cried Tommy,
we ““< as he struggled in vain, for two large birds
Sa were perched on the iron railings of his crib,
a and were pulling him out of bed. “Come

‘ along with us at once,” and they pulled and
pulled until they got him out of the soft and cosy bed where
he had been tucked up only an hour before. ‘ No nonsense!

Come along, it is not worse for Tommy than it is for Dicky
to be pulled out of his nest; come along, your nest is
not half full enough of feathers like our nests are, and we
want you to play with and sing to us,” and in a minute,
they were flying along with poor Tommy, who was
frightened and giddy, and worse than all, very unhappy
at being taken away from his. dear mother and his happy
home. The Birds, however, were rejoicing, and put him into
a box with bars in front, and placed worms and slugs and
snails for him to eat, the very sight of which made him feel
sick, and they came and worried him to eat, and worried him
to sing, but all the time he tried to get out, and bruised his

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arms and legs against the bars; all the while he felt very

hungry and tired and weak, and then he remembered nothing
more.



a
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ae When next poor Tommy came to his senses, he found S
himself cuddling up to his dear mother and feeling extremely oe
comfortable, when suddenly the door opened and an enor- ¥
- mous cat, followed by two kittens, came in. Tommy nestled #&
o closer to his mother, but the cat rudely seized hold of him ©
%e saying: a
“There are too many of these cnildren about; we must &
3 drown some.” Se
e “Ket us drown Tommy,* one of the kittens said, “he is %
x ugly, he is rude, he is no good at all; oh what ugly blue
= eyes!” and the kitten scratched him. -
ee cy, a
2 Poor Tommy was carried off away from his mother, who 3
* sobbed and cried, and was taken into the yard close to the >
see waterbutt, where a pail of water stood which he recollected <3
f P
Pa very well, much too well, for it was the same pail in which 25
a he had d : a
4 e had drowned the kittens. ced
The cat held him by the feet, and the little kittens helped #8
e to push him in, and down he went into the cold water, and
%g in spite of screams and struggles, shrieks and tears, Tommy 5
#& was held under the water until he lost his senses
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Suddenly he felt a sharp pain in his nose, and found himself
hanging high out of the water, but in scarcely a better posi-
tion than if he had still been under it, for it is anything
but comfortable to be hanging by the nose from a fishing rod.

Much to his surprise “Tommy found that the fishing rod

uy was held by a large fish, who seemed delighted to have
“e caught the poor struggling boy. Mr. Fish hurt him so
a much in taking out the fish hook, that Tommy struggled
= still more, and was at last flung into a fisher’s basket with
a such a bang that he again became unconscious.

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Aroused from this lethargy, Tommy found himself held
by a big dog, and saw that his friend Johnny was in the
arms of a very large bulldog; the two boys, being always very
friendly, began to talk, but the two dogs did not allow this
for one moment, but tried to make the little fellows fight ; they
knocked their hands together and made them scratch each
other's faces with their nails, until the boys got cross with
each other and began to call each other names, to double up
their little fists, and to strike out in earnest at each other's
face; Tommy felt red and angry, but he got the worst of
it; his eyes were blackened, his nose bled, and he lost his
dear little white front tooth.



Tommy’s next adventure made him extremely uncomfort-
able; he was climbing a sunny wall in order to get some
ripe and tempting pears, and had nearly got to the top when
a large and fierce-looking wasp suddenly caught him in his
hand, exactly as Tommy caught flies on the garden wall, or
on the table cloth indoors; the wasp pinched his head hard
and hurt him so much that he shrieked out, when two large
Daddy-longlegs flew up to see what was the matter.

“Oh, this is the little wretch who pulled my sister’s legs
off, and my father’s wings, and sang a rude song about
“ Daddy, daddy longlegs,” instead of speaking of my respected
parents as ‘D. Longlegs, Esq.,’ as a gentleman should be
addressed.”

“Tet us pull him to pieces,” they all shouted, and off went
a leg, and between pain and fright Tommy knew no more—



Until he found himself in a wooden box with one slanting
side, and iron bars at the top and on the other side. A
strong smell of cheese pervaded the box.

“Hush, be quiet till I fetch puss, she will soon finish
him.” The cat which the mice brought was as big as a
tiger, and Tommy had often seen tigers at the Zoological

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Gardens and knew what he would do with him; he shut his
eyes, he felt the door of the trap open, and felt Re was sliding
out, down, down into the big mouth and hot breath, which
seemed to smother him.

Tommy tried to run; he started, got away for a moment,
and found himself in the yard with Johnny and a lot of
other boys; their mothers were at a little distance, and called
to the children to get out of the way of a large Cock-a-doodle-
doo, which, mounted on a bicycle, was driving furiously round
and round. The cock was flapping its wings, crowing and
making a hideous and alarming noise. Tommy ran on, but
he was not quite quick enough; on came the bicycle, down

fell Tommy, and both his poor little legs were cut off by

the wheel.



It was a relief to find himself flying about his garden, well,
and rejoicing in the sunshine; he was again a happy, thought-
less little boy. “I must have dreamt of that cock,” and he ran
round and round the house, not looking where he went, he
was caught in a large net of the same colour as the grass.

“Are you collecting boys only,” said a big stag beetle close
by him, “or do you collect girls as well ?”

“TI prefer urchins,” said the butterfly, who held the net;
“and this is a fine specimen. Tommy belongs to the small
roguey poguey breed, and will look very nice when I ‘set’
him on cork. At present I shall just pin him down com-
fortably; where is my little mallet? Oh, thank you,” she
said, taking it from a lizard who had kindly carried it for
her. ‘One, two, three, there Tommy will do nicely for the
present,” and off they flew, leaving poor Tommy writhing in
pain with a large pin stuck right through him.



Almost a relief to find himself able to move, although
placed in the most unpleasant position. of being tightly

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fastened into a cart, with a bit in his little red mouth,
and being driven with heavy blows by a dog very much
like his own “ Frisk,” while a fat healthy puppy was
holding the reins and driving poor To mmy on at a pretty
fast pace.

“Oh dear, I cannot go any faster,” sighed poor Tommy.

“Beat him harder,’ said the Puppy. ‘Gee up, Dobbin,”
and on and on they drove the miserable little boy.

DF

Again a change, but not a change for the better. Oh dear
no! Banging blows on the head, hair pulled; clothes roughly
dragged about, Miss Dolly was taking her vengeance on

Tommy for all the cruel tricks he had played her. What

strong arms she had, and she hit him with a hair brush
until her arms ran down with sawdust, which never happens,
you know, unless a doll is quite worn out and exhausted.
Just as Dolly was going to put Tommy’s eyes out with the
nursery scissors, he sprang away with a cry and crept into
the parrot’s cage, where he sat quietly for a time, too weary
to speak.
RAR

Tommy's quiet was speedily disturbed by the arrival of the
lawful owner of the cage—Pretty Polly herself.

“What fun!” she cried. ‘“Teazing Tommy in my cage,
sitting in my ring, and I have no doubt eating my Indian
corn and sop;” but poor Tommy was only too glad to be
quiet, and he had no wish to deprive Polly of any of her
provisions, he only asked to rest and sit in peace in the large
ring in Polly’s cage. But quietness and comfort did not suit
Miss Polly, she kept putting her claws in and scratching
the child, and also bit him with her sharp, strong beak, she
scolded at him in shrill tones which went through his head,
and made herself extremely unpleasant in every way. Still
he was too tired to mind much, but cuddled down with his
little arm over his face, and went off to sleep as he had often

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seen Polly herself do, when he had teazed and tormented her
too long. :

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When Tommy again awoke, it was to find himself hurry-
ing along in front of two rabbits, one of whom held a gun #&
just like his own toy gun, which kept popping away at him, i

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while he ran wildly about here and there, to escape the shot

which he felt certain would strike him sooner or later. Oh e
- how much he wished he had never fired at his own dear little
rabbits, and how frightened he was of these big ones!
Bang! Bang! And he rolled over and was seized and
put in a bag by the biggest rabbit, who said, “ He is fat,
what a fine one. Shall we say curry or smothered in onions?” —&
Poor Tommy felt smothered enough in the bag without any ie

onions, and thought how good he would be if only once hee sx
got back to his dear and happy home.
io anne A Q
Strangely enough he was at home, and in the kitchen too, »
he knew it well; he was just by the corner of the kitchen a
clock, and here there are generally some blackbeetles if you
go late at night, or early in the morning, and even one or a0
two in the afternoon, if the day is dull and dark. Pe
Here was the place where Johnny and he had crushed the — 3%
beetles in the afternoon, and now he saw a blackbeetle
coming towards him. As it approached, it grew bigger and

bigger, and at last it lifted up its foot, on which was a big
boot, and said, “Suppose I stamp on you, young man!” ae

Poor Tommy woke up with a start, thankful to have escaped = &
such a fate, and resolving never to tread on any beetle or 4
other insect again. 5s



A bell ringing loudly in his ears, startled Tommy out of
a quiet dose of a few minutes duration, and he saw before &
him the unfortunate baker’s boy; the lad’s eyes were swollen &
with tears, and he balanced a large tray of muffins on his #&

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x head. As he came near Tommy’s bed, he upset the whole o
“tray on the counterpane, all over Tommy, only a few muffins

e and crumpets remained on the tray, and these began to look %
4 _ like people, and to smile and laugh at him.
S All the muffins and crumpets on the bed ran about all e
over Tommy, and danced round him without a word. g
3 Tommy implored the baker’s boy to take them off him, but ee
ue the boy only said, ‘I wish I could get them back, but you es
Se upset them, and only you can get them back.” Tommy tried ct

in vain to catch the muffins and replace them on the. tray. &

As soon as he got one up, down it ran on its quaint little
black legs, and then they all laughed so loudly that Tommy
woke with the noise.

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“What a bad night I am having,” he said, and longed for
the morning. He thought of the next day, and of how lonely
he would be without his mother and sisters, for he well knew
that Johnny would not again be asked to spend the day with ©
him, and he sadly thought that if he had but been good, he
would have had a lovely ride on the elephant, and seen the
lions fed, and given buns to the bears, and have passed a
really delightful day with his dear mother and little sisters.

Sma vGdtearG cea ano Gs

xe Thinking of all this, he again fell off into a quieter sleep
= than he had yet enjoyed, and he dreamed that he was riding
&

on the dear old elephant, and that the creature could talk,
and that he said, “ Why, Tommy, I can hardly believe you
are a cruel child, you were so kind and pleasant to me last
time you came to the Zoo.”

Tommy hung his head and felt ashamed that the clever
elephant should know of his bad conduct, he did not know

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what to say in reply; the elephant continued, ‘You ought

to be punished, so that you would never forget your duty to xe
x dumb animals.” ‘ But you can talk, I-have no duty to you,” x
& said Tommy. “You have duties towards all animal creation ; S
e every man and every boy has his duty to do to every living a
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thing he meets, and has to do with. You must be taught
this if you do not know it,” so saying, the elephant took
Tommy up with his trunk and dropped him into the bear’s
den. In an instant he was surrounded by all the animals he
remembered to have seen; bears, the brown and the white
bear, the lion and the tiger, the wild boar and the monkey,
the kangaroo, the hyena; the giraffe stretched his long neck
down to him, and the elephant hung his head and trunk
down, while the large owl and the pelican flew down with a
great and hissing noise; thus he found himself completely
surrounded by animals and birds who closed round him and
asked him whether he was sorry for the past, and if he
intended to be in future kind and merciful, or harsh and
unkind to animals.

Tommy at once said, “I will be kind and good, do let me
go home to my mother.”

‘No, Tommy,” they all said ; ‘you must show us you mean
to be kind. What is that you have in that plate?”

“Cake,” said Tommy, ‘‘and only a little bit, not enough
for you all.”

‘Quite enough if given to me,” they cried out, and came
nearer and nearer, while Tommy in his fright began to scatter
his cake eagerly among them.

‘More cake, more cake,” they shouted, and pressed so closely
round Tommy that he shrieked with fright and woke.



He was in his own bed safe and sound, a light in the
room, and both Mother and Nurse at his bedside

“Its those nasty muffins, mum,” said Nurse. ‘ Master
Tommy has got a regular nightmare.”

Tommy clung to his mother.

“T will 2 ‘good and kind,” he said, “I will never hurt any-
thing again.”

“That is right, Tommy,” said his mother; “but now you
must just take this little dose of medicine like a good boy.”

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Tommy drank down the medicine, which was very nasty,
without a word; his head ached, he had a lump in his chest,
and his hands were burning. His kind Mother carried him
into her own bed and held him in her arms until he fell
into a quiet sleep, and in the morning he woke up much better,
but still a little pale and very quiet, for him.

The little girls were sent off with Nurse to the Zoological
Gardens, and Mrs. Tiptop and Tommy passed the day alone.
It was not a dull day to Tommy, for Mrs. Tiptop read to
him and talked to him, and told much that was interesting
about the habits of animals.

As Tommy gradually recovered from the effects of his
naughty conduct, Mrs. Tiptop took him out with her into the
garden; here he had the pain of seeing the rabbits frightened
at his appearance, and it was a long time before he could
coax them to eat the nice carrots he brought them. When
he went into the poultry yard, the fowls flew before him; in
the stable the dogs ran and hid themselves, while pussey
looked out in alarm from the loft. One day’s unkindness had
frightened them, and they looked on their little master with
terror instead of affection.

The tears were in poor Tommy’s eyes: “ When will they
love me again?” he said, sadly.

“When you have again won their confidence,” his mother
replied; “but you must be patient and quiet, feed them
regularly, and speak always very gently to them; and now
let us try to find the poor muffin boy, and tell his: master the
whole truth.”

Tommy felt in a great fright, but he knew that he must
obey, and he felt that his mother would understand how he
felt (for mothers always do feel for little boys and girls), and
would help him out of his difficulty. So he held his mother’s
hand rather tightly, and they went off together to the baker.

Mrs. Tiptop entered the shop just as the baker was piling
up the muffin tray with muffins and crumpets.

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“None o’ your tricks to-day,” said the baker, roughly; “just
you behave till your time is up on ay, Or youll: be im
gaol before you know where you are.’

The poor boy was just beginning to defend himself, when

he caught sight of Tommy and his mother, he crimsoned, and
remained silent.

“My little boy has come to pay for the muffins he ate and
destroyed yesterday, and to say how sorry he is for behaving
so wrongly.”

“Then it was true, Bob,” said the baker, “that the young
gentleman took your muffins, well I couldn’t believe as how
young gentlemen could have stole yer muffins. Oh, ma’am, I
am sorry for you.”

Tommy felt the colour rise up into his face and ears and
neck, and felt hot all over.

“Tam really sorry,” he said, “ Mr. Weighwell. I will pay
for them all, and I hope you and Bob will forgive me,” and he
began to cry.

“Looky here,” said the baker, ‘“‘ Master Tommy, what I feel
so is that I’ve been that unjust to Bob, and nigh broke his
mother’s heart by sending him off with a bad character as a
thief and a liar, and ’tis you as stole my muffins.”

“I did not mean to steal them,” said Tommy, sobbing.

“Tf you take what don’t belong to you its stealing, plain
enough,” replied Mr. Weighwell, ‘you can’t alter that.”

“It will be a lesson to Tommy for life,’ said his mother,
gently; “but I should be glad to know what Tommy can do
to make amends to Bob for the suffering he has caused him.”

“Oh, I’m all right now, ma’am,” said poor Bob, who looked
bright enough. ‘ Master won’t send me off now, and I’m sure
Master Tommy need need not cry so.”

Tommy lifted his little face, all covered with tears, and said,
“Mother, I could help Bob, I could ring the muffin bell for
him, and perhaps carry the tray.”

“No, Sir,” said Mr. Weighwell, “but you could go some-



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times and read to Bob's mother, who cannot read for herself,
and she would be very glad of a visit from you. Ringing the
bell is the best part of a muffin boy’s work, and they never
shirk that, but reading aloud is another thing, and if you read
the Bible once a week to an old woman, you'll be helping her
and yourself too.”

“Thank you, Mr. Weighwell, for the suggestion; I am
only too glad if my little boy can do a kindness,” said Mrs.
Tiptop; “and now let me know what my Tommy owes you
for the muffins and crumpets, he has brought his money-
box and will be glad to get out of debt.”

After some calculation and talk between Bob and _ his
master as to the number of muffins taken out and the few
brought home, and the three-pennyworths and the six-penny-
worths left at various homes before Bob had called at Mrs.
Tiptop’s house, and the result was that Tommy had to pay
three shillings and tenpence, which he did cheerfully, although
his little store of savings was nearly exhausted by this outlay,
but he felt happier to see the baker put the money in his
till, and to see Bob look cheerful.

‘Now remember,” said the baker, very solemnly, “that
you took these muffins without paying for them, and you
could have been sent to prison, and that you must never
take anything which does not belong to you, nor use other

~ people’s things without asking them,

3

It is a sin,
To steal a pin,
and I hope, Master Tommy, that this is the last trouble your
poor Ma will have with you.”
“Will you forgive me, Bob,” said Tommy, “I am so sorry?”
“Yes, my dear,” said Bob, who felt quite happy, ‘“ of course
I will, and Master Johnny too; it was all mischief and fun.”
“Tt is no fun to do wrong, Bob, ‘the way of transgressors
is hard,’ and Tommy has been very unhappy for many hours
after his few minutes of ‘fun.’”

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Mrs. Tiptop then took Tommy home, and the little fellow
was very silent and subdued, at last he said: |

“ Mother, I don’t think I read well enough for Bob’s mother.”

“No, dear, I do not think she would enjoy your reading
yet, but I will go and see her and read to her till you can

read well enough; in the meantime you shall read out loud a
to me, and we will choose nice amusing books about animals, <%&
and you will see how much there, is to learn about them if

you will only make them love you.”

“ But how can I make amends to Bob, he was much kinder
than Mr. Weighwell.”

“Mr. Weighwell was your true friend, Tommy, for he
showed you how very serious a matter a piece of mischier
may become; you thought nothing of destroying and taking
Bob’s muffins, but he knew perfectly well that had you come
to his shop and taken a loaf, he would have sent for the
police, and he wished to show you the danger as well as the
wickedness of your conduct.”

“Mother, I will never, never take a crumb that does not
belong to me; do believe me.”

“My dearest boy, I always do believe you, for with all
your faults you are always truthful, and now you promise I
know I may trust you; but you must think, Tommy, before
you act, and consider others more and yourself less. For
instance, you are always taking your sisters’ toys and dolls
and they do not belong to you; all the animals, except your
own rabbits and chickens and your own dog, are your father’s
and mine, and you treat everything as if it is yours.

“When you want a sheet of paper you help yourself, you
run to my pincushion for a pin, you use my brushes or
your sisters’ if they are handier than your own, you treat
everything as if it is yours by right, and it is only now
this dreadful thing has happened that I see how wrongly my
darling child has acted, and how wrong Mother has been to
allow Tommy’s naughty ways. ;

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“All the nursery toys were all your own for so long, that
is the only excuse I can see for us both, Tommy, but we
don’t want to excuse ourselves, we must do right and we
must pray to be guided in the right way; we must ask for
a right judgment in all things, and by being kind and
thoughtful for others, we shall cure our faults and avoid all
the errors of the past.

“And now, my darling boy, cheer up and begin to put
your good resolutions at once in practice to-day.”

“Mother,” said Tommy, squeezing her hand hard, “ may
I give Bob a pair of my rabbits >?”

“Yes, dear, but they will be of no use to him without a
rabbit hutch.”

“T will give him the hutch and all,” said Tommy; “or I
will try to make one for him.”

Mrs. Tiptop smiled, but she was glad to see her boy really
wish by a little self-sacrifice to make some amends, however
small, to the boy he had injured.

When Tommy reached home he found his father was quite
willing to help him in making a nice new rabbit hutch for
Bob, and while they drew plans and made measurements,
Mr. Tiptop talked to Tommy about his friend Johnny, whose
father he had seen that evening, and who told him that
Johnny was very ill indeed; the raw muffins had disagreed
with him, and he was in a violent fever, and did not even
know his mother when she spoke to him. It was many weeks
before the little friends met, and they were both very much
surprised at the change which had taken place in each other.

During the long weary hours when Johnny was recovering
from his illness, his great amusement had been a little puppy
who—thanks to his being kind and gentle with it—had learned
many pretty little tricks and nice ways, and Johnny was
proud to show Tommy that the puppy could beg, would
walk on his hind legs, would catch a piece of biscuit or

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fetch and carry at the will of his little master, and did every
trick of which a little dog is capable, Toa had learnt
patience in his illness, which was entirely brought on by his
own fault, and both boys were not only truly sorry for what
they had done, but firmly resolved to be kind and good to
all around them, and especially to dumb animals who are
unable to complain of those who inflict needless sufferings
upon them.

That the two little boys were now much happier than when
they were always in mischief and trouble, is hardly neces-
sary to say. They were always delighted to see Bob, and
to hear his account of the rabbits in which they were very
much interested.

Time passed on, as time has a habit of doing, and the boys
grew better and wiser and kinder as each day went by; they
tried to do one kind action every day to some person, or to
some thing, and soon they got into the habit of looking out
for chances of helping others, so that they were loved by all,
and they grew up good men and remained firm friends all
their lives. Being kind to all around them, they took happi-
ness with them wherever they went, and the world was happier
and better for their existence. It was but a small world at
first, just their home circle, then a larger world, that of school
life, and then the largest world of grown up, manly life. They
were quite happy, because they tried to make others happy,
and never thought about themselves, which is the secret of
being happy. To make others happy is our duty, and brings
its own reward with it, and especially it is our duty to be kind
and merciful to all animals.

A SEER SESE REE

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Foolscap gto., bound in Cloth, Gilt, IMuminated Side, and uniform with Old Bob.



ILLUSTRATIONS

BY
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SHILLINGS

AND
SIXPENCE





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The Adventures of a Fisherman’s Son

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30
ILLUSTRATIONS

BY
E. PIRODON.



THE MOST



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SHILLINGS
AND
SIXPENCE.





AMUSING AND CHARMING ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE OF AN ANIMAL WHICH HAS
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IN HIS NAME, a Story of the Waldenses,

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EIStORY OF ENGLAN 1s) from the Conquest of Britain

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The Christian Year. Sundays and Holy Peay
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Elistory, Elabits, aad Ilmastincers on Amimals
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FROM THE BRIDGEWATER TREATISE.
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