Citation
Chatterbox circus

Material Information

Title:
Chatterbox circus
Creator:
Francis, Laurence H ( Editor )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Dana Estes & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Dana Estes and Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre:
Children's stories
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Laurence H. Francis ; with illustrations by Harrison Weir and others.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026614057 ( ALEPH )
ALG3339 ( NOTIS )
214285211 ( OCLC )

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THE SNOW FIGHT.



PHATIERBOX CIRCUS

EDITED BY

LAURENCE H. FRANCIS

With Zllustrations

By HARRISON WEIR AND OTHERS

BOSTON
DANA ESTES AND COMPANY
PUBLISHERS



Copyright,
1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1898,
By Estes AND LAURIAT.







THE GRIFFIN VULTURE.

HE griffin vulture is an inhabitant of Southern

Kurope, Northern Africa, and some parts of Asia.

It makes its nest on the most inaccessible rocks of the

Pyrenees or other mountains, and sometimes in tall

forest trees. It is a large and handsome bird, with yel-

lowish-brown plumage and a fierce eye. The ruff on
its neck is beautifully white.

When this vulture has found a carcass on which to
feed, it will remain on the spot, gorging and torpidly
resting by turns, till not a morsel of flesh remains. It
is on record that on some battlefields the horrible sight
has been seen of vast numbers of vultures assembling
together in order to devour the dead. This, if true,
may account for the disgust and loathing which many
persons feel for this rapacious bird.







HOW TO SCARE LIONS.

ISHOP HANNINGTON, one day when taking his
walk abroad in the jungles, saw a pretty little
animal which came fawning up to him like a puppy.
He picked it up and began to fondle it, whereupon
some natives who were with him howled and ran away.
The good missionary had taken a lion’s whelp to his
bosom; and the infuriated parents soon made their
appearance on the scene.

The Bishop showed equal pluck and presence of mind.
Dropping the cub, he put up his umbrella, and gallantly
charged the lion and lioness, dancing and yelling as if
he had been one of the unconverted pagans celebrating
some diabolical rite. Terror at the sight and sounds |
got the better of paternal and maternal affection, and
the great cats turned tail and rushed back to their lair
in the forest.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE DOG AND THE DOVE.

T Tullibelton, in Perthshire, there is a well-bred
pointer, named “ Fop,” who, when not engaged in
his professional pursuits on the moor, lives chiefly in a
kennel adjoining the stables. Nearly a year ago, one
of a pair of Jacobin pigeons, who lived in and about the
stable-yard, died, and its mate at once attached itself
to the dog, and has been its constant companion ever
since. On the days when the sportsmen are not seeking
grouse, the dog is in his kennel, and the pigeon is al-
ways his close attendant. On the days when “Fop”
is taken onto the moor, the pigeon is much concerned.
She follows him as far as she dare, until a little wood
is reached, through which the keeper and dogs have to
take their way. At this point her courage fails her,
and she returns to the stable, to wait hopefully for her
comrade’s return.













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THE CONDOR.

HIS remarkable bird is mainly found along the
entire length of the immense mountain chain of
the Andes, which may be called the backbone of the
South American continent. |
The condor lives mainly upon carrion. When he
sees the carcass of a dead horse or cow, or some such
earrion, he descends upon it in a sweeping flight, and
gorges himself with it so that sometimes he cannot fly
off. The condor will sometimes pounce upon living ani-
-mmals; it has been known to carry off a lamb, and when
pressed with hunger it will kill and devour a huge snake.
Of the many birds which soar to a great height in the
atmosphere, — such as the eagle, the frigate-bird, and
others,— the condor surpasses them all! Humboldt
observed them in the Andes at a height of not less
than 20,000 feet above the level of the sea.





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A STRUGGLE WITH A WOLF.

IGISMUND DONIOWSKTI nearly lost his life in an
encounter with a large grey wolf. While travel-
ling along a lonely forest path he seated himseif to rest
and fell asleep. He was suddenly awakened by some
creature which had fallen on him, at the same time fix-
ing its fangs in his thick jacket. He attempted to
shake off the wolf and to reach his axe which had been
forced out of his belt. The struggle was a severe one;
but Sigismund was a very muscular man, and, suddenly
clinching his right hand, he drove his fist with all his
force against the nose of the wolf, which compelled it
to start back. Before the monster could recover from
its surprise, Sigismund had seized it by its thick hair,
and, lifting it high into the air, he dashed it with all
his force to the ground. The wolf’s spine was injured,
and Sigismund quickly killed it with his axe.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AN ELEPHANTS REVENGE AND REMORSE.

A FAVOURITE elephant, whose name was Malleer, |

had to contend with a most formidable opponent
of his own race. In a moment of extreme excitement, —
Malleer suddenly rushed upon his keeper, and at a sin-
gle stroke of his trunk killed him. The keeper’s wife,
frantic with grief, rushed forward, exclaiming, “Oh,
Malleer, Malleer, savage beast! See what you have
done! You have killed my husband, whom you loved
so well,—now kill me and his son!” But Malleer’s
rage was appeased, and he now felt remorse for what
he had done. As the woman turned now and then to
the elephant to reproach him, he stood as if conscious
of his crime, looking sadly at her. From that day she
was his keeper; he would have no other. Even when
in a fury of excitement, she had only to command and
he obeyed. i —



























































































































































































































































































































































































































PIGTAILS,

| DARE say you think the Chinese a funny sort o

people, with long pigtails, little eyes, and thick-solec
shoes, and who are mostly engaged in the tea trade
They certainly have small eyes, or rather narrow ones
and they do wear very thick, white soles to their shoes
but as for their pigtails, they have only worn those fot
the last two hundred years.

One of the greatest indignities that can be inflictec
on a Chinaman is to cut off his pigtail: yet the appen
dage serves various purposes which are neither dignified
hor pleasant to the owner thereof. If a prisoner is
brought before a magistrate, the warder drags him intc
the hall of justice by his pigtail. Ifa thief is pursued.
he is often caught by his pigtail; so those of the lower
classes, who think that it may prove a too convenient
handle, usually wear it twisted round their heads.



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THE RATTLESNAKE.

JOSEPH FLUDE, having set out to go to the house

of a neighbour one stormy night, lost his way and
accidentally trod on a large snake which fastened on his
leg; but fortunately for him its fangs only caught on
his trousers. He seized a thick stick which happened
to be lying on the ground, and with it he battered the
snake till he stunned it. But to his horror a vivid flash
of lightning revealed hissing reptiles on every side. He
ran for his life; but another snake had fastened on his
leg, and as he ran, he dragged it with him along the
ground. He arrived at his destination completely
exhausted; but the snake dropped off on the way, hav-
ing, like the first one, only caught its teeth in his trou-
sers. To this circumstance he owed his life; for had
its poisonous fangs pierced his skin, his fate would have
been sealed.







KITE-FLYING IN CHINA.

QOME of the amusements of children in Europe are

in China the pastimes of grown-up people; and
old men may often be seen flying kites, whilst the chil- —
dren look on.

At a certain season of the year, when the weather is
favourable, great numbers of people take part in this
- amusement. Some of them are big boys, but they are
mostly grown-up men, and amongst them may be seen
old gentlemen, with grey beards and huge goggle spec-
tacles, earnestly engaged managing their kites which
they send up to a surprising height. The chief fun to
the younger men is to try and bring down each other's
kites, either by entangling them or dividing the string.
Meanwhile the children look on and solemnly discuss
the merits of the kites or the skill of their different
owners.































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A CLEVER GANDER.

QGOME years ago I went with my sister to call ata

cottage. In approaching it we passed a goose and
a gander, with a thriving family of young ones, the
gander being at the time busy in inflicting punishment,
with beak and wings, on one of his goslings. My sister
went into the cottage, and while I waited for her I saw
the old man who lived in the cottage walking along a
footpath leading from it, followed by the gander, which
had left its family and its quarrel to walk meekly at
his heels like a dog. When it saw, however, that he
was going off the open ground, it mounted an eminence,
watched him till he was out of sight, and then returned
to its proper sphere. Asking the old man’s daughter
what method her father used in gaining the gander’s
affection, she replied, “ Not by feeding or petting. He
just claps it on the head, and says, ‘My man.’”









































































































































































































































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HOW “SNOB” SAVED HIS MASTER.

()NE day, Snob’s master had gone into his dressing-
room to put on his boots before going out, and he
was followed into the room by the dog. He sat down,
took one of the boots up, and was in the act of putting
it on, when Snob seized hold of it in his mouth, and,
dragging it away, would not allow his master to come
near it. He thought this very strange, and tried to get
it from him, but the more he tried, the more Snob
barked. At last his master began to wonder if there
really was anything in the boot, and approaching as.
near as the dog would let him, he examined it well,
and after a short time out came a small snake, which
had, no doubt, been coiled up fast asleep all the time.
He killed it immediately, and upon looking closely he
found it to be one of a very poisonous nature, and had
the creature bitten him he would not have lived long.

















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A MOTHER WATER-RAT.

| WAS standing on a bridge over a small brook, when

I saw a water-rat swimming up the stream towards
me, and making for the archway, where it disappeared ;
and on returning towards the same spot shortly after-
wards, I caught sight of the rat coming from under the
arch with something in its mouth, and swimming
quickly towards me. Close at hand was a rail with an
upright post, around which clung a good deal of float-
ing weed. To this the rat made her way, still carrying
her burden, which she laid upon it, and then began to
climb up herself. When she was fairly up I saw that
her burden was a young one of about three inches long,
which nestled under the mother, till, a slight shower
coming on, they both made for the rail, the mother
pushing her child up onto it first in safety, and then
getting up herself and nursing it as before.





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ANTICIPATION, —

[STANCE (so the bard has shown us)
Lends enchantment to the view;
And what seems a splendid bonus,
Sometimes is not worth a sou.

Rover, like his lord, is gifted —
He can eat his dinner twice;
When it hangs on high uplifted,

‘Looking, oh, so very nice!

And when — mutton, beef, or bacon —
(As his doggish tastes may run),

_In his mouth capacious taken,

Proves a sorry scrap of bun.

As you eye old Rover dining
Off the little bits that fall,
Sweetly-tempered, unrepining,
Be contented, one and all!



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JUDGING BY APPEARANCES.

N civilised countries the greatest man in an assembly
is often the most plainly dressed. But amongst
savage races, this is very seldom the case.
In the earlier years of the reign of Queen Victoria,
a band of Canadian Indians, of the Ojibbeway tribe,
was brought over to this country, and exhibited at the
Egyptian Hall, where they gave illustrations of their
native customs, dances, and games. The Queen being
desirous of seeing the Redmen, they were taken in
cabs to Buckingham Palace, and as they entered the
doors of the palace, their attention was arrested by an
imposing personage, arrayed in scarlet and_ blue,
trimmed with gold lace. Surely, they thought, here
was some mighty chief; and they swooped down on
the astonished and alarmed porter, and shook his.
unwilling hand until his fingers ached again.



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“HATS OFF.”

T has, from‘an early period, been the custom in
European countries to uncover the head in the pres-

ence of a superior, as a mark of respect. When the |
Society of Friends, or Quakers, as they were called,
refused to remove their hats out of respect to any
human being, there were some very odd scenes.

Notwithstanding his peculiarities, William Penn was
liked by King Charles I].. When he was planning his
American colony he had occasion to go to Whitehall,
where the King held his court. Entering the room,
and advancing amid all the bareheaded courtiers with
his hat on, the King, with a smile, took off his own.

“Friend Charles,” said Penn, “wherefore dost thou
uncover thyself ?”

“Friend Penn,” replied the King, “ it is the custom of
this place for only one man at a time to wear his hat.”









A QUEER SALUTE.

N different parts of the world people have various

ways of saluting or showing respect to one another.

Europeans generally show peepee by bowing, and
taking off their hats.

The New Zealanders, and other inhabitants of Aus-
tralasia, greet each other by rubbing their noses
together, and the natives of Tahiti show respect to a
superior by removing their upper garments.

But the strangest of all modes of salutation is that
practised by the Tibetians. Though Tibet forms a part
of the Chinese empire, the natives have never adopted
any of the Chinese fashions, except that some of them
wear queues. The Chinese manner of saluting is by
bending the body, joining the closed hands together
and raising them to the forehead; but when two Tibe-
tians meet, they bow, scratch their ears, and put out
their tongues.



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THE JEWEIS.

A RICH Chinaman was very proud of wearing a

dress which was trimmed all over with costly
jewels. An old priest, who was very shabbily dressed,
one day met him in the street. He stood in front of
him, and looked him over from head to foot, then he
bowed down to the ground before him, and thanked

him in the warmest manner for his jewels. “My
friend,” said the rich man, “I have not given you any
jewels.”

“Certainly not,’ replied the old priest, “but you
have given me the pleasure of seeing them, and you
yourself can get no further enjoyment from them.
Therefore the only difference between us is, that you
have the trouble of wearing and guarding them, whilst
I am spared that burden, and can also enjoy them
when I see them.”



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THE PUMA; OR, AMERICAN LION.

HE Puma, or Cougar, sometimes called the Ameri-
ean Lion, is rivalled in America only by the
Jaguar, which is somewhat larger. Its fur is thick
and close, reddish-brown above, and of a paler colour on
the breast and lower parts of the body. Young pumas,
however, have dark-brown spots all over the back,
which spots disappear when the animal is full-grown.
The puma climbs trees with great ease, and generally
secures its prey by darting down upon some unwary
animal, such as an antelope, which may be passing
below. It is not only very active in its habits, but it
is a powerfully built animal, though fortunately it is
rather cowardly, seldom venturing to attack a man face
to face, though quite willing to dog his footsteps day
after day, in the hope of finding him off his guard or
asleep, when it will at once attack and destroy him.































THE ELEPHANT.

“THE elephant is endowed with extraordinary sagac-

ity. He is so immense, so unwieldy, so strong,
that he could crush any one of us to death with one —
stamp of his foot; and yet so amiable, so good-natured,
that he allows children to ride upon his back, and
would step aside from the path lest he should crush
some fallen infant to death.

Water to all elephants is an absolute necessity. In
their native haunts the bath is always taken in the
cool of the evening, when a herd of these gigantic
creatures have been seen by sportsmen to approach
Some deep forest pool with such a noiseless tread that
scarcely a sound can be heard. Whenever the leading
elephant makes up his mind that no concealed enemies
are near, he gives a signal to his companions, and they
all rush into the water, and enjoy themselves.



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PERILS BY GUNPOWDER.

[ N the year 1812, the English-army was fighting in
Spain. The town ofCiudad Rodrigo) had just been
taken; and a Captain J ones hat martered some of the
soldiers in a warehouse, and had then gone on towards
a church near which Lord Wellington and his principal
officers were standing. The instant he stepped into
the building he saw that the church had been used as a
powder-magazine by the French. Barrels were stand-
ing round, gunpowder lay loosely scattered on the
pavement, and in the midst was a fire, probably lighted
by the Portuguese soldiers. Without a moment’s loss
of time, he and the sergeants entered the church, took
up the burning embers piece by piece, and carried them
safely over the scattered powder and out of the church.
Thus they saved, probably, not only the soldiers, but
Lord Wellington and his officers, from a terrible death.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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THE MARINER'S COMPASS,

| ancient times ships were steered by the position of

the sun by day, and at night by certain clusters of
stars. But as these were invisible in stormy weather,
it was often mere chance if the vessel reached the port
for which it was bound. Now a ship can be steered to
any part of the world with the greatest accuracy by
means of the mariner’s compass, which consists of a
magnetised needle working on a pivot in the centre of
a circular card, on which are inscribed the thirty-two
points of the compass. It is placed in a box so con-
structed that the compass retains a horizontal position,
however much the ship rolls; and as the needle always
points towards the north, the captain can, at any time,
by looking at it, tell in what direction his vessel is
going. The needle acquires its magnetic power by
being rubbed with a loadstone.











































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A CIRCASSIAN VIEW OF EUROPEAN CUSTOMS.

HEN Dr. Clarke was travelling through the Rus-
sian Empire he arrived at the banks of the River
Kuban, just as a conference was about to take place by
which terms of peace might be arranged between the
Turkish Pasha and Circassian chiefs on one side, and
the Cossacks on the other. When the conference was
ended the Turkish Pasha took his departure as quickly
as possible; but Dr. Clarke wished to cross to the
Asiatic side to get a nearer view of the people. The
Circassians, seeing the party advancing, seized their
arms and began talking loudly and rapidly. The Doc-
tor, wishing to show his friendly feelings towards them,
took off his hat and made them a low bow. The
Circassians burst into a loud peal of laughter, and
mimicked his gesture until the Doctor and his party
had reached the European side of the river.



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A GOOD EXAMPLE.

ARY ALLEN was the only daughter, among eight
children, of a widow feeble and poor. Mary had
so loving and generous a disposition that she was will-
ing to take upon her young shoulders the whole burden
of her seven brothers. But Mary’s unselfish routine of
duty was brought to a sudden close one day by an
_attack of influenza; and for some weeks an aunt came
to take charge of the household and to nurse the good
daughter. After this illness had passed, Mary was
sent to a country village to recover her strength. This
was a time of happiness to her, for there were aged
people and neglected children there to whom her loving
heart prompted her to be as kind as possible. When
Mary left to return home, many blessings were given
her by her various friends, one old lady telling her
that her bonny face was like a sunbeam to her heart.









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EURIPIDES.

URIPIDES, the last of the three great tragic poets
of Athens, was born in Salamis, B.c. 480. He
exhibited his first tragedy when in his twenty-fifth
year. The King of Macedonia, a great patron of
learned men, invited him to his Court and treated him
with the greatest honour; but this excited the envy of
rival poets at the Court. They set the King’s dogs upon
him, and the aged dramatist was so badly bitten that
he died of his injuries. He received a magnificent
funeral, the King himself showing his grief by going
into mourning. Euripides was seventy-five years old>
when he met with his death. He is said to have written
seventy-five dramas. His poetry was held in higher
esteem abroad than in his own country; for when the
Athenians were routed in a great battle in Sicily, many
gained their liberty by teaching his verses to their
conquerors. —







AN ASTOUNDED WAITER.

ONE-EYED engineer, a one-armed cavalry officer,

and a one-legged sea-captain seated themselves in
the corners of a room in a hotel, and called for the
waiter. “ Waiter,” cried the engineer, “take off my
eye-glass, and while you are about it, take out my eye.”
Hye-glass and glass eye came away together, and the
waiter looked at them doubtfully as they lay in his
hand. Just then, the one-armed dragoon called,
“ Waiter, take off my glove, and also my arm.” Glove
and hand gave way, when the one-legged sailor shouted,
“Waiter, pull off my leg and my boot, too.” The poor
waiter complied, and the previously loosened straps of
the cork leg gave way, and down went the dignified
waiter on his back, with the artificial limb in his grasp.
The waiter, casting a terrified glance at the limbs which
strewed the carpet, rushed frantically downstairs. -



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INDIAN STOICS.

HE Micmacs were the most numerous of the Cana-
dian tribes, and they were divided into two parties,
under separate chiefs, named respectively, “Sam Soap ”
and “Peter Basket.” Some difficulty arose about the
land, and Peter Basket determined to go to England
and lay his case before Queen Victoria.

When he arrived there, he made numerous friends;
so, instead of going home when his business was com-
pleted, he remained in England for fifteen years!

At last he remembered his old home and set out on
his return voyage. One day he suddenly walked into
his old wigwam in a brand-new suit of English clothes,
and sat down without a word. His old squaw turned
to her grown-up daughter, who had been a baby when
her father left her, and said, “ Nancy, here’s the old man
come back again in a new hat!”





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WINTER.

A DEAR little robin once sat on a tree
(The snow lay quite thick on the track),
And the sweet little pet was as bright as could be.
“J must just make the best of the weather,” thought he, :
“ For I know that sweet spring will come back.

“JT am hungry, of course, and would like a few crumbs;
Oh, would n’t I think them so good!

But I know very well when the little girl comes,

Who sits at that window and works at her sums,
She will throw me some morsels of food.

“ Ah, here comes the dear little maid! In her hand
She carries a dish full of crumbs. .

I’m sure she’s the best little girl in the land,

And I hope she may always have crumbs at command
To feed us when cold winter comes!”



































































































































































































































“THE TALENTED KITTENS.”

Ne: a saucy youngster, an impudent boy,

Owns a pair of pug puppies, his pride and his joy ;
And he dared to declare we’d no sense in our head,
While his puppies could take in each word that he said.

So, after we’d practised in private awhile,

We advanced to the table with sweet Cheshire smile,
And we balanced ourselves on our little hind legs,
Unsurpassed by the cleverest puppy that begs,

While glad little Kathleen clapped hands with delight,
And Jim scarce could credit the wonderful sight;

He hardly could speak, with astonishment smitten,
And humbly owned each was a marvellous kitten.

And ever since then, and for aye, I expect,

We have won from that urchin the deepest respect,
Since, without being taught, we had managed the trick,
And proved that our talents were nimble and quick.



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THE EAGLE OWL.

WLS are not only harmless but very useful, as
their food consists of mice and other vermin.
There are exceptions, however, to every rule, and it is
true enough that some of the larger owls, such as the
dignified-looking bird before us, are bold and powerful,
and not unwilling to add young pigeons, chickens, and
small game to their usual bill of fare.

Our captive owls are perfectly happy in their exile;
they have plenty of food, their meditations are undis-
turbed, and what more could an owl desire ?

There are upwards of sixty species of owls, widely
spread over the known world. One species is very pecu-
liar in its habits, as it is a burrowing owl. It is only
met with in parts of America where it shares the bur-
row of the prairie dog, and may almost always be seen —
near its companion.



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POLAR BEARS.

ane watch the playful gambols of the Polar bears in

the Zoological Gardens is a source of much amuse-
ment to visitors. The larger animal is heavy and
uncouth, while his smaller companion likes to get some
fun out of him, especially while in their bath. There
they roll and tumble about together, often splashing so
vigorously that the unwary onlooker sometimes has an
unexpected shower-bath, to the great amusement of
those who have contrived to escape in time.

The larger animal has been in the Gardens for many
years, living all the time in what he must have felt to
be a dreary solitude indeed. At length a pretty little ©
bear being procured as a companion for him, it was soon
seen that they were disposed to be friendly, and they
have long shared each other’s exile, doubtless to the
great contentment of both.





















THE EAGLE.

HERE are many varieties of this fine bird, and they
are found in almost every quarter of the globe.
Hagles are all fierce and powerful, with a great stretch
of wing, so that their flight is beautiful and majestic.
The natural food of these majestic birds, when at
liberty, is hares, rabbits, young lambs, and sometimes
even sheep; while it is on record that a large male bird
has actually been seen, in the wilds of Scotland, boldly
to attack a stag, swooping down upon its back from a
great height, tearing the flesh from its neck with its
claws, and attempting to deprive it of sight by repeated
strokes from its beak. .
The nest of the eagle is a tangle of sticks and rushes,
built generally on a flat shelf of rock at a great height.
It is extremely dangerous to approach the nest after
the eaglets are hatched, as at that time the parent-
birds are fierce and daring.



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ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP.

MONG the great variety of wild sheep, none are —
more interesting than the species which inhabits
the Rocky Mountains of North America. The abode
of these sheep is in the most craggy and inaccessible
parts of that great mountain chain, where they roam —
about in little danger. The flesh of these sheep is of
the very best quality; the wool is also very fine. The
general colour is brown, although in spring the old rams
become almost white.

Both male and female of this variety are supplied
with horns, although the horns of the latter are much
smaller and also less twisted than those of her partner ;
the horns of the ram being so large and so much curved
downwards and forwards that, in many cases, the
creature is quite unable to feed on level ground; but
as they inhabit a mountainous region they have little
need to go hungry.



















































PERFORMING HIS TOILET.

LADY in India, returning to her bungalow one cool

evening, was surprised to catch glimpses of a brush
in active use before her looking-glass. She could not
see who was wielding it, but she suspected her Ayah or
native maid. She entered her apartment very softly,
and there saw, perched on a chair before the dressing-
table, a large monkey. He used the brush in quite a
skilful way, and turned his head from side to side in
most grotesque imitation of a human being similarly
occupied. After watching for a few moments the lady
clapped her hands, when out went Mr. Monkey in one
flying leap through the window. ‘The owner of the
brush afterwards remembered how a group of monkeys
had watched her toilet from the outside, and she found
that she had been unconsciously giving a lesson in
hair-dressing.















































































































































































































































































































































THE BOAT-BILL.

“[ Bs curious bird is generally found near water,

haunting the rivers, marshes, and swamps of South,
America, where it can find ample supplies of food. The
boat-bill is by no means uncommon in Guiana and
Brazil; sometimes it frequents the sea-coast, feeding
upon the small crabs and various other things which
are left by the retiring tide; but its usual places of
resort are rivers and inland swamps. Its method of
procuring its food resembles that of the king-fisher. It
perches upon some branch which overhangs the water,
and then pounces ‘upon its prey beneath.

Its appearance is remarkable, especially the head and
beak. It is called the boat-bill from the singular form
of its bill, which resembles a boat reversed, having a
strong ridge or keel down the middle of the upper
mandible, and the sides spread out and bowed. °







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE IRISH WOLF-HOUND.

T what date wolves ceased to exist in England it is
impossible now to say. The hounds used in the
chase of wolves were fleet of foot, strong, and very
courageous. When they seized the prey, they held
on with a grip which they refused to relax as long as
life remained in the victim. The animals, known now
as wolf-hounds, have degenerated from the original type.
They are, however, still marked by fineness of scent and
by docility and sagacity. The muzzle is not so sharp
as in the greyhound, nor is the form so slender. The
ears are long and drooping, The dogs attach them-
selves closely to man; indeed, to own one of those
intelligent animals is to possess a friend whose fidelity
may be counted on as long as it has life.
In the days of King Edgar, criminals were granted
a pardon if they could produce a certain number of
wolves’ paws.



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CROCODILES.

HE crocodile is the largest of known reptiles. It
is lizard-like in form, and its mouth presents a
very formidable appearance. Each jaw has a single
row of large, strong, conical teeth. It preys on fish
and on warm-blooded animals, which go to the river
to drink. Some of the larger crocodiles do not scruple
to attack a man, pursuing him on land, or, if having |
seized him in the river, they drag him into the deeper
water, and hold him under till he is drowned.

The neck of the crocodile is very stiff, which makes
it very difficult for the unwieldy creature to turn:
therefore, should a man be pursued by one of these ani-
mals, he may escape if he can be cool enough to turn
swiftly from side to side.

Crocodiles are found in fresh water and estuaries, but
only in the warmest parts of the world.

































































THE HOOPOE.

HIS bird is well known in many parts of the world;
its history may be traced far back into the shad-
owy past.

The appearance of the Hoopoe is somewhat remark-
able; its beak is long and slender and finely pointed.
The tongue is forked and capable of being extended so
as to enable it to reach the juices of flowers. The
arched, fan-like crest is formed by two parallel rows of
long feathers, of a ruddy buff colour tipped with black ;
the feathers of the crest: can be elevated or depressed.
at pleasure, in a slow and graceful manner. The tail
‘is long and has a bar of white crossing it. The bird
generally remains concealed among the trees, but con-
stantly utters the syllable bu, bu, bu, with such a strong
penetrating voice that it may be heard at a great
distance.







THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

AFRICA is the only quarter of the globe in which

the hippopotamus is found. He is one of the
largest of existing quadrupeds, his bulk being little
inferior to that of the elephant, although he does not
stand nearly so high, the legs being so short that the
body almost touches the ground. The head of the hip- |
popotamus is enormous, with small ears, and small eyes
placed high in the head. The muzzle is very large and
swollen in appearance, with large nostrils, and great
lips concealing the huge front teeth.

As the animal only éats vegetable matter, one feels
almost astonished at the size and strength of these
teeth; but such is the luxuriance of tropical vegeta-
tion that unless furnished with teeth such as these he
could never drag out the roots and great stems. of
aquatic plants upon which he delights to feed.





























































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THE NEOMORPHA.

A REMARKABLE bird is found among the hills in

New Zealand; it is named Neomorpha (or new
form), as its form is peculiar and almost unknown,
except, of course, to the natives. When it was first
observed by Mr. Gould, he thought that the specimen |
with the straight beak was of a different species from
that which has the curved bill, and put them down in
his notes under different titles; but, afterwards, he
found that they were only the male and female of the
same birds. These birds are in great demand among the
natives, on account of the feathers of the tail; these
tail feathers are sent as presents to all parts.of the
island, The natives regard the bird with the straight
and stout beak as the male, and the other as the female.
These fine birds can only be obtained with the help of
a native, who calls them with a shrill prolonged whistle.





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WILD DUCKS.

“HERE is a bewildering variety of wild ducks. But
of all these birds it may be said that there is a
marked difference in colour between the males and the
females, which difference is not nearly so a ae in
the case of geese and swans.

Conspicuous among the wild ducks to be seen at the
Zoological Gardens is the summer duck of North Amer-
ica, a really beautiful bird, and which is said (in
common with the mandarin duck) to possess the sin-
gular power of perching on trees. Another very
handsome bird is the pintail duck, rather longer in
shape than most ducks, and with a tail which tapers to
a point. This bird regularly visits many parts of the
British coasts, and is much esteemed for the table.
Besides these, there are the Javanese duck, the whist-
ling duck of the warmer parts of America, the black
duck, and many others.





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THE LEOPARD.

HE leopard, now generally supposed to be the

same as the panther, has a peculiar gracefulness

and flexibility of form, with a very long tail and

spotted fur, each spot composed of five or six small
spots arranged in a circle or rosette.

The leqpard is extremely agile, and- has wonderful
power in leaping, and also in climbing trees.

There can be no prettier sight than to witness the
gambols of these pretty and graceful creatures in the
Zoodlogical Gardeus, where every convenience for climb-
ing and otherwise amusing themselves is afforded them.
No animal can be kept in a healthy condition if it is
not happy; it is therefore not only kind, but wise, that
all the variety of curious and rare creatures assembled
in the Gardens should be treated in such a manner as.
to make them happy in exile.



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THE CRESTED HORNBILL.

ANY conjectures have been made as to the use or
purpose of the extraordinary helm and beak of
the hornbill. Some think that it may assist the bird
in producing the extremely loud, hoarse cry for which
it is remarkable.
Our illustration shows the ota hornbill; its gen-
eral colour is a rich violet black. The bill is yellowish-
white, with the base of the lower mandible black. The
bird in the picture with a smaller casque is the adult
female; the young has an admixture of brown in the
plumage, and is without the pointed ridge to the casque.
When in a tame condition the hornbill soon becomes
much attached to its owner. If any quarrelling is going
on among the other tame birds of the establishment,
the hornbill rushes into the affray like a policeman,
and speedily puts an end to the dispute.







A BIRD IN HAND. —

KHOLD Master Fox hurrying off with a plump

duck which he has managed to secure, and which
_ will soon have quacked for the last time! No doubt he
thinks that the “bird in hand” —rather, we should
say, “in mouth” —is better than two, or any number
of rabbits, in the hedgerow. As he rushes along to his
den, the rabbits in the copse fly hither and thither,
alarmed at his approach; but for the present they are
safe; he is not likely to meddle with them just now.
Still, when he is strong and well, a fox has a remarkably
good appetite, and poultry of all sorts — game, hares,
and rabbits—are acceptable to him; and he is bold
enough to make a prize of a very young lamb if he has
the chance.

Foxes are such thieves that it is necessary that they
should not be allowed to multiply too fast.













































































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RECOLLECTIONS OF “SPEED.”

( )UR dog: “Speed” was a beautiful creature, and he
soon became a great favourite in the household,
with one exception, — Snap, the ancient pug, could not
endure him, and kept up this animosity to the close of
his life without the least provocation; for Speed never
was known to retaliate. When the younger members
of the family were chatting around the fire, the door
would be gently pushed open and Speed’s head would
be seen; and the moment he was perceived, Snap would
dart upon him, worrying him in a most irritating man-
ner. Speed would watch his friends, hoping for the
coveted invitation which was soon forthcoming. It was
delightful to see the grateful look that shone in his
eyes as he made one of the happy circle round the fire.
When we moved to the city he was allowed much
liberty, which developed in Speed a taste for wrong.



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OUR DOG SPEED.

PEED discovered one day, on a side-table, a tempt-
ing roll of butter, also an ox-tongue which had just
been boiled and laid there to cool. The delicious odour
was too much to withstand; and when discovered these
viands were almost entirely consumed, and the unfor-
tunate Speed was already beginning to suffer from the
indigestion which followed. We almost feared he
would die; and after his’ recovery he actually seemed
to connect his sufferings with his transgression, and
never again was known to steal food. One day, while
chained, a pet rabbit which belonged to the children
escaped from its hutch and ventured within Speed’s
reach, and he seized the poor little thing in his paws,
and killed it in a moment. Speed, apparently some-
what penitent, was found looking ae at his dead
victim and slowly wagging his tail.



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- HOMER. -

CCORDING to tradition, Homer was not the origi-

nal name of the poet, but he received that name, ~
meaning a blind person, after losing his sight while
making a voyage when quite young. He afterwards
was very poor and in a starving condition, having had
his verses stolen from him, and otherwise suffering from
the unkindness of man. At Chios he opened a school
for music and poetry, and was successful at last and
married. There he composed his two greatest works,
—the Iliad and Odyssey. He then made a voyage
to Greece, but died on the way at the island of Ios.
He was buried near the seashore; and though he had
lived in poverty, after his death seven cities contended
for the honour of being his birthplace. The Iliad and
Odyssey are the only undoubted epic poems of Homer
that are extant.































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A LARGE: AVIARY. —

|X the great bird-house at the Zoological Gardens we
find a large and happy family.

One of the birds, a quiet-looking individual, seated
on the roof of his house, is the Laughing Jackass, an
Australian bird, whose strange name has been given to
him because his voice is so harsh and unmusical that it
sounds exactly like the bray of a donkey. _

Quite near him may be seen storks, found in many
European countries, and easily tamed. They have no
voice, though they sometimes make a clattering noise
with their mandibles, as though they wished to speak
to each other. Then on the ground we see several
strange-looking birds with very long legs. These birds
all live upon fish, and in their wild state they find their
food by wading in the rivers.

We see other birds of the duck tribe quite contented
and happy.



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THE SNOW FIGHT.
PHATIERBOX CIRCUS

EDITED BY

LAURENCE H. FRANCIS

With Zllustrations

By HARRISON WEIR AND OTHERS

BOSTON
DANA ESTES AND COMPANY
PUBLISHERS
Copyright,
1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, and 1898,
By Estes AND LAURIAT.

THE GRIFFIN VULTURE.

HE griffin vulture is an inhabitant of Southern

Kurope, Northern Africa, and some parts of Asia.

It makes its nest on the most inaccessible rocks of the

Pyrenees or other mountains, and sometimes in tall

forest trees. It is a large and handsome bird, with yel-

lowish-brown plumage and a fierce eye. The ruff on
its neck is beautifully white.

When this vulture has found a carcass on which to
feed, it will remain on the spot, gorging and torpidly
resting by turns, till not a morsel of flesh remains. It
is on record that on some battlefields the horrible sight
has been seen of vast numbers of vultures assembling
together in order to devour the dead. This, if true,
may account for the disgust and loathing which many
persons feel for this rapacious bird.

HOW TO SCARE LIONS.

ISHOP HANNINGTON, one day when taking his
walk abroad in the jungles, saw a pretty little
animal which came fawning up to him like a puppy.
He picked it up and began to fondle it, whereupon
some natives who were with him howled and ran away.
The good missionary had taken a lion’s whelp to his
bosom; and the infuriated parents soon made their
appearance on the scene.

The Bishop showed equal pluck and presence of mind.
Dropping the cub, he put up his umbrella, and gallantly
charged the lion and lioness, dancing and yelling as if
he had been one of the unconverted pagans celebrating
some diabolical rite. Terror at the sight and sounds |
got the better of paternal and maternal affection, and
the great cats turned tail and rushed back to their lair
in the forest.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE DOG AND THE DOVE.

T Tullibelton, in Perthshire, there is a well-bred
pointer, named “ Fop,” who, when not engaged in
his professional pursuits on the moor, lives chiefly in a
kennel adjoining the stables. Nearly a year ago, one
of a pair of Jacobin pigeons, who lived in and about the
stable-yard, died, and its mate at once attached itself
to the dog, and has been its constant companion ever
since. On the days when the sportsmen are not seeking
grouse, the dog is in his kennel, and the pigeon is al-
ways his close attendant. On the days when “Fop”
is taken onto the moor, the pigeon is much concerned.
She follows him as far as she dare, until a little wood
is reached, through which the keeper and dogs have to
take their way. At this point her courage fails her,
and she returns to the stable, to wait hopefully for her
comrade’s return.










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THE CONDOR.

HIS remarkable bird is mainly found along the
entire length of the immense mountain chain of
the Andes, which may be called the backbone of the
South American continent. |
The condor lives mainly upon carrion. When he
sees the carcass of a dead horse or cow, or some such
earrion, he descends upon it in a sweeping flight, and
gorges himself with it so that sometimes he cannot fly
off. The condor will sometimes pounce upon living ani-
-mmals; it has been known to carry off a lamb, and when
pressed with hunger it will kill and devour a huge snake.
Of the many birds which soar to a great height in the
atmosphere, — such as the eagle, the frigate-bird, and
others,— the condor surpasses them all! Humboldt
observed them in the Andes at a height of not less
than 20,000 feet above the level of the sea.


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Pull
A STRUGGLE WITH A WOLF.

IGISMUND DONIOWSKTI nearly lost his life in an
encounter with a large grey wolf. While travel-
ling along a lonely forest path he seated himseif to rest
and fell asleep. He was suddenly awakened by some
creature which had fallen on him, at the same time fix-
ing its fangs in his thick jacket. He attempted to
shake off the wolf and to reach his axe which had been
forced out of his belt. The struggle was a severe one;
but Sigismund was a very muscular man, and, suddenly
clinching his right hand, he drove his fist with all his
force against the nose of the wolf, which compelled it
to start back. Before the monster could recover from
its surprise, Sigismund had seized it by its thick hair,
and, lifting it high into the air, he dashed it with all
his force to the ground. The wolf’s spine was injured,
and Sigismund quickly killed it with his axe.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AN ELEPHANTS REVENGE AND REMORSE.

A FAVOURITE elephant, whose name was Malleer, |

had to contend with a most formidable opponent
of his own race. In a moment of extreme excitement, —
Malleer suddenly rushed upon his keeper, and at a sin-
gle stroke of his trunk killed him. The keeper’s wife,
frantic with grief, rushed forward, exclaiming, “Oh,
Malleer, Malleer, savage beast! See what you have
done! You have killed my husband, whom you loved
so well,—now kill me and his son!” But Malleer’s
rage was appeased, and he now felt remorse for what
he had done. As the woman turned now and then to
the elephant to reproach him, he stood as if conscious
of his crime, looking sadly at her. From that day she
was his keeper; he would have no other. Even when
in a fury of excitement, she had only to command and
he obeyed. i —





















































































































































































































































































































































































































PIGTAILS,

| DARE say you think the Chinese a funny sort o

people, with long pigtails, little eyes, and thick-solec
shoes, and who are mostly engaged in the tea trade
They certainly have small eyes, or rather narrow ones
and they do wear very thick, white soles to their shoes
but as for their pigtails, they have only worn those fot
the last two hundred years.

One of the greatest indignities that can be inflictec
on a Chinaman is to cut off his pigtail: yet the appen
dage serves various purposes which are neither dignified
hor pleasant to the owner thereof. If a prisoner is
brought before a magistrate, the warder drags him intc
the hall of justice by his pigtail. Ifa thief is pursued.
he is often caught by his pigtail; so those of the lower
classes, who think that it may prove a too convenient
handle, usually wear it twisted round their heads.
/

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THE RATTLESNAKE.

JOSEPH FLUDE, having set out to go to the house

of a neighbour one stormy night, lost his way and
accidentally trod on a large snake which fastened on his
leg; but fortunately for him its fangs only caught on
his trousers. He seized a thick stick which happened
to be lying on the ground, and with it he battered the
snake till he stunned it. But to his horror a vivid flash
of lightning revealed hissing reptiles on every side. He
ran for his life; but another snake had fastened on his
leg, and as he ran, he dragged it with him along the
ground. He arrived at his destination completely
exhausted; but the snake dropped off on the way, hav-
ing, like the first one, only caught its teeth in his trou-
sers. To this circumstance he owed his life; for had
its poisonous fangs pierced his skin, his fate would have
been sealed.

KITE-FLYING IN CHINA.

QOME of the amusements of children in Europe are

in China the pastimes of grown-up people; and
old men may often be seen flying kites, whilst the chil- —
dren look on.

At a certain season of the year, when the weather is
favourable, great numbers of people take part in this
- amusement. Some of them are big boys, but they are
mostly grown-up men, and amongst them may be seen
old gentlemen, with grey beards and huge goggle spec-
tacles, earnestly engaged managing their kites which
they send up to a surprising height. The chief fun to
the younger men is to try and bring down each other's
kites, either by entangling them or dividing the string.
Meanwhile the children look on and solemnly discuss
the merits of the kites or the skill of their different
owners.




























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A CLEVER GANDER.

QGOME years ago I went with my sister to call ata

cottage. In approaching it we passed a goose and
a gander, with a thriving family of young ones, the
gander being at the time busy in inflicting punishment,
with beak and wings, on one of his goslings. My sister
went into the cottage, and while I waited for her I saw
the old man who lived in the cottage walking along a
footpath leading from it, followed by the gander, which
had left its family and its quarrel to walk meekly at
his heels like a dog. When it saw, however, that he
was going off the open ground, it mounted an eminence,
watched him till he was out of sight, and then returned
to its proper sphere. Asking the old man’s daughter
what method her father used in gaining the gander’s
affection, she replied, “ Not by feeding or petting. He
just claps it on the head, and says, ‘My man.’”






































































































































































































































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HOW “SNOB” SAVED HIS MASTER.

()NE day, Snob’s master had gone into his dressing-
room to put on his boots before going out, and he
was followed into the room by the dog. He sat down,
took one of the boots up, and was in the act of putting
it on, when Snob seized hold of it in his mouth, and,
dragging it away, would not allow his master to come
near it. He thought this very strange, and tried to get
it from him, but the more he tried, the more Snob
barked. At last his master began to wonder if there
really was anything in the boot, and approaching as.
near as the dog would let him, he examined it well,
and after a short time out came a small snake, which
had, no doubt, been coiled up fast asleep all the time.
He killed it immediately, and upon looking closely he
found it to be one of a very poisonous nature, and had
the creature bitten him he would not have lived long.














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A MOTHER WATER-RAT.

| WAS standing on a bridge over a small brook, when

I saw a water-rat swimming up the stream towards
me, and making for the archway, where it disappeared ;
and on returning towards the same spot shortly after-
wards, I caught sight of the rat coming from under the
arch with something in its mouth, and swimming
quickly towards me. Close at hand was a rail with an
upright post, around which clung a good deal of float-
ing weed. To this the rat made her way, still carrying
her burden, which she laid upon it, and then began to
climb up herself. When she was fairly up I saw that
her burden was a young one of about three inches long,
which nestled under the mother, till, a slight shower
coming on, they both made for the rail, the mother
pushing her child up onto it first in safety, and then
getting up herself and nursing it as before.


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ANTICIPATION, —

[STANCE (so the bard has shown us)
Lends enchantment to the view;
And what seems a splendid bonus,
Sometimes is not worth a sou.

Rover, like his lord, is gifted —
He can eat his dinner twice;
When it hangs on high uplifted,

‘Looking, oh, so very nice!

And when — mutton, beef, or bacon —
(As his doggish tastes may run),

_In his mouth capacious taken,

Proves a sorry scrap of bun.

As you eye old Rover dining
Off the little bits that fall,
Sweetly-tempered, unrepining,
Be contented, one and all!
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JUDGING BY APPEARANCES.

N civilised countries the greatest man in an assembly
is often the most plainly dressed. But amongst
savage races, this is very seldom the case.
In the earlier years of the reign of Queen Victoria,
a band of Canadian Indians, of the Ojibbeway tribe,
was brought over to this country, and exhibited at the
Egyptian Hall, where they gave illustrations of their
native customs, dances, and games. The Queen being
desirous of seeing the Redmen, they were taken in
cabs to Buckingham Palace, and as they entered the
doors of the palace, their attention was arrested by an
imposing personage, arrayed in scarlet and_ blue,
trimmed with gold lace. Surely, they thought, here
was some mighty chief; and they swooped down on
the astonished and alarmed porter, and shook his.
unwilling hand until his fingers ached again.
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“HATS OFF.”

T has, from‘an early period, been the custom in
European countries to uncover the head in the pres-

ence of a superior, as a mark of respect. When the |
Society of Friends, or Quakers, as they were called,
refused to remove their hats out of respect to any
human being, there were some very odd scenes.

Notwithstanding his peculiarities, William Penn was
liked by King Charles I].. When he was planning his
American colony he had occasion to go to Whitehall,
where the King held his court. Entering the room,
and advancing amid all the bareheaded courtiers with
his hat on, the King, with a smile, took off his own.

“Friend Charles,” said Penn, “wherefore dost thou
uncover thyself ?”

“Friend Penn,” replied the King, “ it is the custom of
this place for only one man at a time to wear his hat.”



A QUEER SALUTE.

N different parts of the world people have various

ways of saluting or showing respect to one another.

Europeans generally show peepee by bowing, and
taking off their hats.

The New Zealanders, and other inhabitants of Aus-
tralasia, greet each other by rubbing their noses
together, and the natives of Tahiti show respect to a
superior by removing their upper garments.

But the strangest of all modes of salutation is that
practised by the Tibetians. Though Tibet forms a part
of the Chinese empire, the natives have never adopted
any of the Chinese fashions, except that some of them
wear queues. The Chinese manner of saluting is by
bending the body, joining the closed hands together
and raising them to the forehead; but when two Tibe-
tians meet, they bow, scratch their ears, and put out
their tongues.
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THE JEWEIS.

A RICH Chinaman was very proud of wearing a

dress which was trimmed all over with costly
jewels. An old priest, who was very shabbily dressed,
one day met him in the street. He stood in front of
him, and looked him over from head to foot, then he
bowed down to the ground before him, and thanked

him in the warmest manner for his jewels. “My
friend,” said the rich man, “I have not given you any
jewels.”

“Certainly not,’ replied the old priest, “but you
have given me the pleasure of seeing them, and you
yourself can get no further enjoyment from them.
Therefore the only difference between us is, that you
have the trouble of wearing and guarding them, whilst
I am spared that burden, and can also enjoy them
when I see them.”
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THE PUMA; OR, AMERICAN LION.

HE Puma, or Cougar, sometimes called the Ameri-
ean Lion, is rivalled in America only by the
Jaguar, which is somewhat larger. Its fur is thick
and close, reddish-brown above, and of a paler colour on
the breast and lower parts of the body. Young pumas,
however, have dark-brown spots all over the back,
which spots disappear when the animal is full-grown.
The puma climbs trees with great ease, and generally
secures its prey by darting down upon some unwary
animal, such as an antelope, which may be passing
below. It is not only very active in its habits, but it
is a powerfully built animal, though fortunately it is
rather cowardly, seldom venturing to attack a man face
to face, though quite willing to dog his footsteps day
after day, in the hope of finding him off his guard or
asleep, when it will at once attack and destroy him.

























THE ELEPHANT.

“THE elephant is endowed with extraordinary sagac-

ity. He is so immense, so unwieldy, so strong,
that he could crush any one of us to death with one —
stamp of his foot; and yet so amiable, so good-natured,
that he allows children to ride upon his back, and
would step aside from the path lest he should crush
some fallen infant to death.

Water to all elephants is an absolute necessity. In
their native haunts the bath is always taken in the
cool of the evening, when a herd of these gigantic
creatures have been seen by sportsmen to approach
Some deep forest pool with such a noiseless tread that
scarcely a sound can be heard. Whenever the leading
elephant makes up his mind that no concealed enemies
are near, he gives a signal to his companions, and they
all rush into the water, and enjoy themselves.
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PERILS BY GUNPOWDER.

[ N the year 1812, the English-army was fighting in
Spain. The town ofCiudad Rodrigo) had just been
taken; and a Captain J ones hat martered some of the
soldiers in a warehouse, and had then gone on towards
a church near which Lord Wellington and his principal
officers were standing. The instant he stepped into
the building he saw that the church had been used as a
powder-magazine by the French. Barrels were stand-
ing round, gunpowder lay loosely scattered on the
pavement, and in the midst was a fire, probably lighted
by the Portuguese soldiers. Without a moment’s loss
of time, he and the sergeants entered the church, took
up the burning embers piece by piece, and carried them
safely over the scattered powder and out of the church.
Thus they saved, probably, not only the soldiers, but
Lord Wellington and his officers, from a terrible death.






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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THE MARINER'S COMPASS,

| ancient times ships were steered by the position of

the sun by day, and at night by certain clusters of
stars. But as these were invisible in stormy weather,
it was often mere chance if the vessel reached the port
for which it was bound. Now a ship can be steered to
any part of the world with the greatest accuracy by
means of the mariner’s compass, which consists of a
magnetised needle working on a pivot in the centre of
a circular card, on which are inscribed the thirty-two
points of the compass. It is placed in a box so con-
structed that the compass retains a horizontal position,
however much the ship rolls; and as the needle always
points towards the north, the captain can, at any time,
by looking at it, tell in what direction his vessel is
going. The needle acquires its magnetic power by
being rubbed with a loadstone.








































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A CIRCASSIAN VIEW OF EUROPEAN CUSTOMS.

HEN Dr. Clarke was travelling through the Rus-
sian Empire he arrived at the banks of the River
Kuban, just as a conference was about to take place by
which terms of peace might be arranged between the
Turkish Pasha and Circassian chiefs on one side, and
the Cossacks on the other. When the conference was
ended the Turkish Pasha took his departure as quickly
as possible; but Dr. Clarke wished to cross to the
Asiatic side to get a nearer view of the people. The
Circassians, seeing the party advancing, seized their
arms and began talking loudly and rapidly. The Doc-
tor, wishing to show his friendly feelings towards them,
took off his hat and made them a low bow. The
Circassians burst into a loud peal of laughter, and
mimicked his gesture until the Doctor and his party
had reached the European side of the river.
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A GOOD EXAMPLE.

ARY ALLEN was the only daughter, among eight
children, of a widow feeble and poor. Mary had
so loving and generous a disposition that she was will-
ing to take upon her young shoulders the whole burden
of her seven brothers. But Mary’s unselfish routine of
duty was brought to a sudden close one day by an
_attack of influenza; and for some weeks an aunt came
to take charge of the household and to nurse the good
daughter. After this illness had passed, Mary was
sent to a country village to recover her strength. This
was a time of happiness to her, for there were aged
people and neglected children there to whom her loving
heart prompted her to be as kind as possible. When
Mary left to return home, many blessings were given
her by her various friends, one old lady telling her
that her bonny face was like a sunbeam to her heart.






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EURIPIDES.

URIPIDES, the last of the three great tragic poets
of Athens, was born in Salamis, B.c. 480. He
exhibited his first tragedy when in his twenty-fifth
year. The King of Macedonia, a great patron of
learned men, invited him to his Court and treated him
with the greatest honour; but this excited the envy of
rival poets at the Court. They set the King’s dogs upon
him, and the aged dramatist was so badly bitten that
he died of his injuries. He received a magnificent
funeral, the King himself showing his grief by going
into mourning. Euripides was seventy-five years old>
when he met with his death. He is said to have written
seventy-five dramas. His poetry was held in higher
esteem abroad than in his own country; for when the
Athenians were routed in a great battle in Sicily, many
gained their liberty by teaching his verses to their
conquerors. —

AN ASTOUNDED WAITER.

ONE-EYED engineer, a one-armed cavalry officer,

and a one-legged sea-captain seated themselves in
the corners of a room in a hotel, and called for the
waiter. “ Waiter,” cried the engineer, “take off my
eye-glass, and while you are about it, take out my eye.”
Hye-glass and glass eye came away together, and the
waiter looked at them doubtfully as they lay in his
hand. Just then, the one-armed dragoon called,
“ Waiter, take off my glove, and also my arm.” Glove
and hand gave way, when the one-legged sailor shouted,
“Waiter, pull off my leg and my boot, too.” The poor
waiter complied, and the previously loosened straps of
the cork leg gave way, and down went the dignified
waiter on his back, with the artificial limb in his grasp.
The waiter, casting a terrified glance at the limbs which
strewed the carpet, rushed frantically downstairs. -
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INDIAN STOICS.

HE Micmacs were the most numerous of the Cana-
dian tribes, and they were divided into two parties,
under separate chiefs, named respectively, “Sam Soap ”
and “Peter Basket.” Some difficulty arose about the
land, and Peter Basket determined to go to England
and lay his case before Queen Victoria.

When he arrived there, he made numerous friends;
so, instead of going home when his business was com-
pleted, he remained in England for fifteen years!

At last he remembered his old home and set out on
his return voyage. One day he suddenly walked into
his old wigwam in a brand-new suit of English clothes,
and sat down without a word. His old squaw turned
to her grown-up daughter, who had been a baby when
her father left her, and said, “ Nancy, here’s the old man
come back again in a new hat!”


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WINTER.

A DEAR little robin once sat on a tree
(The snow lay quite thick on the track),
And the sweet little pet was as bright as could be.
“J must just make the best of the weather,” thought he, :
“ For I know that sweet spring will come back.

“JT am hungry, of course, and would like a few crumbs;
Oh, would n’t I think them so good!

But I know very well when the little girl comes,

Who sits at that window and works at her sums,
She will throw me some morsels of food.

“ Ah, here comes the dear little maid! In her hand
She carries a dish full of crumbs. .

I’m sure she’s the best little girl in the land,

And I hope she may always have crumbs at command
To feed us when cold winter comes!”





























































































































































































































“THE TALENTED KITTENS.”

Ne: a saucy youngster, an impudent boy,

Owns a pair of pug puppies, his pride and his joy ;
And he dared to declare we’d no sense in our head,
While his puppies could take in each word that he said.

So, after we’d practised in private awhile,

We advanced to the table with sweet Cheshire smile,
And we balanced ourselves on our little hind legs,
Unsurpassed by the cleverest puppy that begs,

While glad little Kathleen clapped hands with delight,
And Jim scarce could credit the wonderful sight;

He hardly could speak, with astonishment smitten,
And humbly owned each was a marvellous kitten.

And ever since then, and for aye, I expect,

We have won from that urchin the deepest respect,
Since, without being taught, we had managed the trick,
And proved that our talents were nimble and quick.
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THE EAGLE OWL.

WLS are not only harmless but very useful, as
their food consists of mice and other vermin.
There are exceptions, however, to every rule, and it is
true enough that some of the larger owls, such as the
dignified-looking bird before us, are bold and powerful,
and not unwilling to add young pigeons, chickens, and
small game to their usual bill of fare.

Our captive owls are perfectly happy in their exile;
they have plenty of food, their meditations are undis-
turbed, and what more could an owl desire ?

There are upwards of sixty species of owls, widely
spread over the known world. One species is very pecu-
liar in its habits, as it is a burrowing owl. It is only
met with in parts of America where it shares the bur-
row of the prairie dog, and may almost always be seen —
near its companion.
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POLAR BEARS.

ane watch the playful gambols of the Polar bears in

the Zoological Gardens is a source of much amuse-
ment to visitors. The larger animal is heavy and
uncouth, while his smaller companion likes to get some
fun out of him, especially while in their bath. There
they roll and tumble about together, often splashing so
vigorously that the unwary onlooker sometimes has an
unexpected shower-bath, to the great amusement of
those who have contrived to escape in time.

The larger animal has been in the Gardens for many
years, living all the time in what he must have felt to
be a dreary solitude indeed. At length a pretty little ©
bear being procured as a companion for him, it was soon
seen that they were disposed to be friendly, and they
have long shared each other’s exile, doubtless to the
great contentment of both.















THE EAGLE.

HERE are many varieties of this fine bird, and they
are found in almost every quarter of the globe.
Hagles are all fierce and powerful, with a great stretch
of wing, so that their flight is beautiful and majestic.
The natural food of these majestic birds, when at
liberty, is hares, rabbits, young lambs, and sometimes
even sheep; while it is on record that a large male bird
has actually been seen, in the wilds of Scotland, boldly
to attack a stag, swooping down upon its back from a
great height, tearing the flesh from its neck with its
claws, and attempting to deprive it of sight by repeated
strokes from its beak. .
The nest of the eagle is a tangle of sticks and rushes,
built generally on a flat shelf of rock at a great height.
It is extremely dangerous to approach the nest after
the eaglets are hatched, as at that time the parent-
birds are fierce and daring.
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ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP.

MONG the great variety of wild sheep, none are —
more interesting than the species which inhabits
the Rocky Mountains of North America. The abode
of these sheep is in the most craggy and inaccessible
parts of that great mountain chain, where they roam —
about in little danger. The flesh of these sheep is of
the very best quality; the wool is also very fine. The
general colour is brown, although in spring the old rams
become almost white.

Both male and female of this variety are supplied
with horns, although the horns of the latter are much
smaller and also less twisted than those of her partner ;
the horns of the ram being so large and so much curved
downwards and forwards that, in many cases, the
creature is quite unable to feed on level ground; but
as they inhabit a mountainous region they have little
need to go hungry.













































PERFORMING HIS TOILET.

LADY in India, returning to her bungalow one cool

evening, was surprised to catch glimpses of a brush
in active use before her looking-glass. She could not
see who was wielding it, but she suspected her Ayah or
native maid. She entered her apartment very softly,
and there saw, perched on a chair before the dressing-
table, a large monkey. He used the brush in quite a
skilful way, and turned his head from side to side in
most grotesque imitation of a human being similarly
occupied. After watching for a few moments the lady
clapped her hands, when out went Mr. Monkey in one
flying leap through the window. ‘The owner of the
brush afterwards remembered how a group of monkeys
had watched her toilet from the outside, and she found
that she had been unconsciously giving a lesson in
hair-dressing.









































































































































































































































































































































THE BOAT-BILL.

“[ Bs curious bird is generally found near water,

haunting the rivers, marshes, and swamps of South,
America, where it can find ample supplies of food. The
boat-bill is by no means uncommon in Guiana and
Brazil; sometimes it frequents the sea-coast, feeding
upon the small crabs and various other things which
are left by the retiring tide; but its usual places of
resort are rivers and inland swamps. Its method of
procuring its food resembles that of the king-fisher. It
perches upon some branch which overhangs the water,
and then pounces ‘upon its prey beneath.

Its appearance is remarkable, especially the head and
beak. It is called the boat-bill from the singular form
of its bill, which resembles a boat reversed, having a
strong ridge or keel down the middle of the upper
mandible, and the sides spread out and bowed. °

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE IRISH WOLF-HOUND.

T what date wolves ceased to exist in England it is
impossible now to say. The hounds used in the
chase of wolves were fleet of foot, strong, and very
courageous. When they seized the prey, they held
on with a grip which they refused to relax as long as
life remained in the victim. The animals, known now
as wolf-hounds, have degenerated from the original type.
They are, however, still marked by fineness of scent and
by docility and sagacity. The muzzle is not so sharp
as in the greyhound, nor is the form so slender. The
ears are long and drooping, The dogs attach them-
selves closely to man; indeed, to own one of those
intelligent animals is to possess a friend whose fidelity
may be counted on as long as it has life.
In the days of King Edgar, criminals were granted
a pardon if they could produce a certain number of
wolves’ paws.
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CROCODILES.

HE crocodile is the largest of known reptiles. It
is lizard-like in form, and its mouth presents a
very formidable appearance. Each jaw has a single
row of large, strong, conical teeth. It preys on fish
and on warm-blooded animals, which go to the river
to drink. Some of the larger crocodiles do not scruple
to attack a man, pursuing him on land, or, if having |
seized him in the river, they drag him into the deeper
water, and hold him under till he is drowned.

The neck of the crocodile is very stiff, which makes
it very difficult for the unwieldy creature to turn:
therefore, should a man be pursued by one of these ani-
mals, he may escape if he can be cool enough to turn
swiftly from side to side.

Crocodiles are found in fresh water and estuaries, but
only in the warmest parts of the world.



























































THE HOOPOE.

HIS bird is well known in many parts of the world;
its history may be traced far back into the shad-
owy past.

The appearance of the Hoopoe is somewhat remark-
able; its beak is long and slender and finely pointed.
The tongue is forked and capable of being extended so
as to enable it to reach the juices of flowers. The
arched, fan-like crest is formed by two parallel rows of
long feathers, of a ruddy buff colour tipped with black ;
the feathers of the crest: can be elevated or depressed.
at pleasure, in a slow and graceful manner. The tail
‘is long and has a bar of white crossing it. The bird
generally remains concealed among the trees, but con-
stantly utters the syllable bu, bu, bu, with such a strong
penetrating voice that it may be heard at a great
distance.

THE HIPPOPOTAMUS.

AFRICA is the only quarter of the globe in which

the hippopotamus is found. He is one of the
largest of existing quadrupeds, his bulk being little
inferior to that of the elephant, although he does not
stand nearly so high, the legs being so short that the
body almost touches the ground. The head of the hip- |
popotamus is enormous, with small ears, and small eyes
placed high in the head. The muzzle is very large and
swollen in appearance, with large nostrils, and great
lips concealing the huge front teeth.

As the animal only éats vegetable matter, one feels
almost astonished at the size and strength of these
teeth; but such is the luxuriance of tropical vegeta-
tion that unless furnished with teeth such as these he
could never drag out the roots and great stems. of
aquatic plants upon which he delights to feed.


























































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THE NEOMORPHA.

A REMARKABLE bird is found among the hills in

New Zealand; it is named Neomorpha (or new
form), as its form is peculiar and almost unknown,
except, of course, to the natives. When it was first
observed by Mr. Gould, he thought that the specimen |
with the straight beak was of a different species from
that which has the curved bill, and put them down in
his notes under different titles; but, afterwards, he
found that they were only the male and female of the
same birds. These birds are in great demand among the
natives, on account of the feathers of the tail; these
tail feathers are sent as presents to all parts.of the
island, The natives regard the bird with the straight
and stout beak as the male, and the other as the female.
These fine birds can only be obtained with the help of
a native, who calls them with a shrill prolonged whistle.


7

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WILD DUCKS.

“HERE is a bewildering variety of wild ducks. But
of all these birds it may be said that there is a
marked difference in colour between the males and the
females, which difference is not nearly so a ae in
the case of geese and swans.

Conspicuous among the wild ducks to be seen at the
Zoological Gardens is the summer duck of North Amer-
ica, a really beautiful bird, and which is said (in
common with the mandarin duck) to possess the sin-
gular power of perching on trees. Another very
handsome bird is the pintail duck, rather longer in
shape than most ducks, and with a tail which tapers to
a point. This bird regularly visits many parts of the
British coasts, and is much esteemed for the table.
Besides these, there are the Javanese duck, the whist-
ling duck of the warmer parts of America, the black
duck, and many others.


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THE LEOPARD.

HE leopard, now generally supposed to be the

same as the panther, has a peculiar gracefulness

and flexibility of form, with a very long tail and

spotted fur, each spot composed of five or six small
spots arranged in a circle or rosette.

The leqpard is extremely agile, and- has wonderful
power in leaping, and also in climbing trees.

There can be no prettier sight than to witness the
gambols of these pretty and graceful creatures in the
Zoodlogical Gardeus, where every convenience for climb-
ing and otherwise amusing themselves is afforded them.
No animal can be kept in a healthy condition if it is
not happy; it is therefore not only kind, but wise, that
all the variety of curious and rare creatures assembled
in the Gardens should be treated in such a manner as.
to make them happy in exile.
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THE CRESTED HORNBILL.

ANY conjectures have been made as to the use or
purpose of the extraordinary helm and beak of
the hornbill. Some think that it may assist the bird
in producing the extremely loud, hoarse cry for which
it is remarkable.
Our illustration shows the ota hornbill; its gen-
eral colour is a rich violet black. The bill is yellowish-
white, with the base of the lower mandible black. The
bird in the picture with a smaller casque is the adult
female; the young has an admixture of brown in the
plumage, and is without the pointed ridge to the casque.
When in a tame condition the hornbill soon becomes
much attached to its owner. If any quarrelling is going
on among the other tame birds of the establishment,
the hornbill rushes into the affray like a policeman,
and speedily puts an end to the dispute.

A BIRD IN HAND. —

KHOLD Master Fox hurrying off with a plump

duck which he has managed to secure, and which
_ will soon have quacked for the last time! No doubt he
thinks that the “bird in hand” —rather, we should
say, “in mouth” —is better than two, or any number
of rabbits, in the hedgerow. As he rushes along to his
den, the rabbits in the copse fly hither and thither,
alarmed at his approach; but for the present they are
safe; he is not likely to meddle with them just now.
Still, when he is strong and well, a fox has a remarkably
good appetite, and poultry of all sorts — game, hares,
and rabbits—are acceptable to him; and he is bold
enough to make a prize of a very young lamb if he has
the chance.

Foxes are such thieves that it is necessary that they
should not be allowed to multiply too fast.










































































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RECOLLECTIONS OF “SPEED.”

( )UR dog: “Speed” was a beautiful creature, and he
soon became a great favourite in the household,
with one exception, — Snap, the ancient pug, could not
endure him, and kept up this animosity to the close of
his life without the least provocation; for Speed never
was known to retaliate. When the younger members
of the family were chatting around the fire, the door
would be gently pushed open and Speed’s head would
be seen; and the moment he was perceived, Snap would
dart upon him, worrying him in a most irritating man-
ner. Speed would watch his friends, hoping for the
coveted invitation which was soon forthcoming. It was
delightful to see the grateful look that shone in his
eyes as he made one of the happy circle round the fire.
When we moved to the city he was allowed much
liberty, which developed in Speed a taste for wrong.
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OUR DOG SPEED.

PEED discovered one day, on a side-table, a tempt-
ing roll of butter, also an ox-tongue which had just
been boiled and laid there to cool. The delicious odour
was too much to withstand; and when discovered these
viands were almost entirely consumed, and the unfor-
tunate Speed was already beginning to suffer from the
indigestion which followed. We almost feared he
would die; and after his’ recovery he actually seemed
to connect his sufferings with his transgression, and
never again was known to steal food. One day, while
chained, a pet rabbit which belonged to the children
escaped from its hutch and ventured within Speed’s
reach, and he seized the poor little thing in his paws,
and killed it in a moment. Speed, apparently some-
what penitent, was found looking ae at his dead
victim and slowly wagging his tail.
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- HOMER. -

CCORDING to tradition, Homer was not the origi-

nal name of the poet, but he received that name, ~
meaning a blind person, after losing his sight while
making a voyage when quite young. He afterwards
was very poor and in a starving condition, having had
his verses stolen from him, and otherwise suffering from
the unkindness of man. At Chios he opened a school
for music and poetry, and was successful at last and
married. There he composed his two greatest works,
—the Iliad and Odyssey. He then made a voyage
to Greece, but died on the way at the island of Ios.
He was buried near the seashore; and though he had
lived in poverty, after his death seven cities contended
for the honour of being his birthplace. The Iliad and
Odyssey are the only undoubted epic poems of Homer
that are extant.

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A LARGE: AVIARY. —

|X the great bird-house at the Zoological Gardens we
find a large and happy family.

One of the birds, a quiet-looking individual, seated
on the roof of his house, is the Laughing Jackass, an
Australian bird, whose strange name has been given to
him because his voice is so harsh and unmusical that it
sounds exactly like the bray of a donkey. _

Quite near him may be seen storks, found in many
European countries, and easily tamed. They have no
voice, though they sometimes make a clattering noise
with their mandibles, as though they wished to speak
to each other. Then on the ground we see several
strange-looking birds with very long legs. These birds
all live upon fish, and in their wild state they find their
food by wading in the rivers.

We see other birds of the duck tribe quite contented
and happy.
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“KEEP THE GATE SHUT.”

A FARMER was walking in his fields when he saw

a party of huntsmen riding about his farm. He
had one field which he was anxious that they should
not ride over, as it would be likely to do a great deal of
harm to the crop which was growing in it. He called
one of the boys who worked for him, and told him to
go and fasten the gate of that field, and on no account
to let the hunters in.

Soon one of the hunters rode up and asked him to
open the gate, but the boy refused, saying, “ No, sir;
master told me to keep it shut.”

One of the huntsmen said, “Do you know who you
are speaking to? It is the Duke of Wellington.”

The boy replied that nevertheless the Duke must
get permission from his master before he could pass
through the gate; and the Duke, pleased with his firm-
ness gave him a half-sovereign.

















































































































SIXTY YEARS AGO.

GIXtY or eighty years ago, our grandfathers and
“grandmothers took life much more quietly than
we are able to do. Travelling was a matter for careful
arrangement, men making their wills, and their wives
arranging all their household matters as though they
never expected to see their homes again.

We pity the-folk of long ago when we remember |
all this; but perhaps they were quite as happy as we
are. We must admit that travelling by stage-coach
must have been very: pleasant, especially during the
delightful season of early summer. |

The first coach ever seen in England is said to have
been one made for the Earl of Rutland in 1555. In
those far-off times coaches had very wide and_ broad
wheels, the only kind which suited the wretched roads.
Coaches of this date were open overhead.



































SEA GULLS AND CORMORANTS.

HESE wild birds are inhabitants of the sea-coasts

of all parts of the world.

They are very voracious, and when fish cannot be
procured, many of the common gulls may be seen in
meadows and ploughed lands, where they search for
worms. Their plumage is thick and soft, almost entirely
white, though in some species it is mixed with grey,
brown, and black.

Among the gulls represented in our picture may be
seen the Black-headed Gull, the length of which is
about sixteen inches; the common gull or Sea-mew, a
still larger bird; the Kittiwake, smaller than these, and
‘very plentiful around the narrow ledges of rocky preci-
pices where it makes its nest.

Cormorants are web-footed birds which live on fish,
and are proverbial for their excessive voracity.
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THE CRESTED GREBE.

eae Crested Grebe in appearance is very curious.

The head is adorned with a kind of ruff or collar
and a pair of feathery horns, giving to the bird a pert
expression. He swims with equal ease either on or
beneath the surface of the water, uses his wings as if
flying when under water. He can easily traverse under
water a distance of two hundred feet in half a minute. ©
Wien in want of air, he rises, and, quietly projecting
bis beak out of the water, takes in a fresh supply.

The nest of the grebe is composed of half-decayed
roots, dried weeds, and leaves of rushes, very roughly —
constructed. An ordinary observer would never sus-—
pect that this tangled mass was the nest of the grebe.
The nests of these birds are found in the marshes. The
food of the grebe consists of small fish, insects, and
aquatic reptiles.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE PHEASANT HOUSE.

HE handsome bird in the foreground of our picture
is the silver pheasant, originally a native of
northern China, though long since introduced into our
own country. It is one of the largest of the tribe, and
is a bold and somewhat pugnacious bird, always seeking
to drive away the common pheasant from the preserves
to which it has been introduced. The crest on the top
of the head is of a deep purple-black, the prevailing
colour of the upper parts of the body and tail of the
male bird being white, finely pencilled with black. The
naked skin round the eyes is bright scarlet.

The Golden Pheasant, also from China, is another
very handsome variety, distinguished, not only by its
finely developed crest of a rich golden-yellow colour,
but by a large ruff of orange and black feathers. The
tail of the golden pheasant is very long.






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ARISTIDES THE JUST.

RISTIDES was elected archon or chief magistrate
of Athens, and he administered his office with
such integrity that he gained the title of “the Just.”
Themistocles, who had gained great influence with the
people, determined to banish Aristides, being jealous of
him. But this:banishment entailed no disgrace, and
was called “ Ostracism,” from the name of the person to
be banished being written on an Ostrakon, or a piece of
tile. On the day fixed the judges were all seated in
the market-place, with the urn before them, into which
the citizens were dropping their votes, whilst Aristides
was talking with some friends. An ignorant country-
man requested him to write the name of Aristides on a
tile for him. “ What has Aristides done that you should
wish him banished?” “Truly,” replied the countryman,
“Tam tired of hearing him called the Just, as if he were
better than other people.”

ARISTOMENES.

A RISTOMENES was a Greek hero who, in a battle

with the Spartans, with other prisoners, was thrown
into a pit, and he alone reached the ground unhurt.
Escape seemed impossible, for all around him rose the
precipitous sides of the rock, at the base of which was
a dark cavern; so wrapping himself in his cloak, he
lay down awaiting death. On the third day, however,
his hopes revived, for he saw a fox in the cavern. He
thought that he might get out by the way by which
it had entered. Seizing it by the tail, he followed it
as it struggled to eseape along a dark passage in the
rock; at length he saw a glimmer of light which shone
through a hole. He enlarged this with his hands till
he made his way out into the open air; and the next
day he was again in Hira, a fact which the Spartans
soon learned to their sorrow.
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EPAMINONDAS.

PAMINONDAS was born in Thebes, B.c. 411. As
he grew to manhood, he began to form designs for
freeing his country from the dominion of the Spartans,
who then held possession of the citadel of Thebes.
Epaminondas, as general, defeated the Spartans, but in
the next campaign, failed, and was degraded from his
rank, and served as a private soldier. He preserved the
army from destruction by the tactics which he sug-
gested, and was again appointed general. In an attempt
to get possession of Sparta, Epaminondas was mortally
wounded, and after being assured his shield was safe,
expired with the name of his country on his lips. He
was buried where he died, and his tomb was sur-
mounted by a column on which a shield was hung,
emblazoned with the figure of a dragon. Though he
had filled. the highest offices in the Theban state, he
died poor.





































































LEONIDAS.

HEN Xerxes, King of Persia, invaded Greece,
Leonidas, King of Sparta, was appointed com-
mander of the land forces, and stationed himself in the
pass of Thermopyle. Xerxes came down to Ther-
mopyle expecting to force an entrance with his multi-
tudes of men; but he was furiously resisted by the
Spartan king and his men for three days. Then Leoni-
das was betrayed by a treacherous Greek, who showed
Xerxes a secret path over the mountains. As soon as
Leonidas learned this he prepared to die.

Leonidas was slain amongst the foremost fighters,
but his body was rescued and carriéd off by the Spar-
tans. When Xerxes heard of the heroism he asked
a Greek if he was likely to be opposed by many more
such men, and was answered that there were fully
eight thousand more quite as brave.
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PHOCION, THE ATHENIAN STATESMAN,

HOCION was born about 402, before the Christian
era. He studied philosophy under Plato. He first
distinguished himself in a victorious sea-fight, but was
not appointed general until some years after. Alexan-
der the Great was his friend, and offered him presents ;
but Phocion refused them all, but asked the release of
some Greek prisoners, —a request which was at once
granted. His friendship with some of the chief Mace-
donians was the cause of his destruction. He was
accused of treason, and was obliged to fly with others
to the Macedonians for protection. But the ruler, think-
ing to conciliate the Athenians, sent them all back
again as prisoners to Athens Here, in the midst of a
howling mob, Phocion vainly strove to obtain a hearing.
He was condemned to die by drinking the juice of the
hemlock, and perished at the age of eighty-five.













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SOPHOCLES.

OPHOCLES was one of the poets who raised Greek
drama to its highest perfection. He was remark-
able in his boyhood for the grace and beauty of his
person. He was distinguished for his proficiency in
athletic exercises and his skill in music. He was a
soldier as well as a poet, was general of the Athenian
army in several engagements, and was joint commander
with the great Pericles in the expedition against Samos.
Sophocles filled the office of chief magistrate. His
eldest son accused him before the Areopagus of being
insane, and therefore unfit to manage his estate; but
the venerable poet replied to the charge by reading
to the judges some passages from “ Cidipus at Colonos,”
a tragedy which he had just completed, and asked them
if they thought the man who could write so well was
of weak intellect. He was at once acquitted.
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THE AOUDAD.

AMONG the bewildering variety of sheep, both wild
and domesticated, none present so strange or for-
midable an appearance as the Aoudad, or wild sheep of
Barbary, which chiefly inhabit the loftier parts of the
Atlas Mountains. |
This is a large and handsome species, with a rather
long tail, tufted at the end, and with horns which,
although not so large as those of some other wild
sheep, are yet very formidable. But the most marked
feature of this animal is the long shaggy hair which
covers the throat, the chest, and the front of the fore-
legs as far as the knees, almost reaching the ground.
This strange appendage, however, belongs only to the
male. ‘The hair on other parts of the body is short,
with an underclothing of fine wool. The colour is a
uniform reddish-yellow.
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THE CRANE AND THE TROUT.

A CRANE who, in her usual way,
Was fishing in a stream one day,

Had seized upon a little trout,

Who straight began to whimper out,

“Oh, let me free! I am too small

To do you any good at all!

Let me but live a month, and then

You ’ll have me quite as big again;

Meanwhile you cannot fail to find

Here plenty greater of my kind.”

“ Not L, indeed,” replied the crane,
“So you implore and weep in vain.
You say a month, but in a day
You will be gone; and let me say,
That one fish in my bill I deem
Worth half a dozen in the stream.”
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A KNOWING DOG.

A CERTAIN gentleman, possessed of a fine dog, was

accustomed every morning to give his pet a penny
that the dog might buy his own breakfast. The dog
always took the penny in his mouth and at once ran to
a bakery. Here he laid his penny on the counter, and
received, in exchange, a large roll, with which he at
once scampered off. On one occasion the journeyman,
having at hand a roll much hotter than the rest, on the
doeg’s arrival, proffered it to him. The animal, as usual,
seized the bread, but finding it too hot to hold, he
dropped it; he again took it up, but was again burned.
Then, as if guessing the trick, he jumped on the counter,
caught up his penny, and left the store. He went ever
afterwards to a rival establishment, always, however,
calling first at the deceiver’s store to let him see the
coin and custom he was losing.
















































































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THE FROGS AND THE EET.

NE summer evening a number of frogs were croak-

ing on the margin of a pond. Each frog seemed

to be trying to outcroak his neighbour, and the result

was deafening. In the midst of the uproar an eel was
seen slowly swimming by.

A certain frog, who had distinguished himself among
his associates for the hoarseness of his croaking, noticed
the eel. “ Well, friend,” he cried out to him, “ will you
sing with us?”

“T cannot,” replied the eel. “I have no voice.”

The absence of a voice seemed to the garrulous frog
to be a terrible calamity, and he looked at the eel with
pity. “You have no voice! You cannot sing, then.
Poor little fellow, how sorry I am for you!”

“ Without cause,” replied the eel; “people who have
heard you have told me that a discreet silence is better
than an incessant chattering.”






















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THE GARDENER’S FRIEND.

HE swallows, swifts, and night-hawks are the guar-
dians of the atmosphere. They check the increase

of insects that otherwise would overload it. Wood-
peckers, creepers, and chickadees are the guardians of
the trunks of trees; warblers and fly-catchers protect
the foliage; blackbirds, crows, thrushes, and larks pro-
tect the surface of the soil; snipe and woodcock protect
the soil under the surface. Each tribe has its respec-
tive duties to perform in the economy of Nature; and
it is an undoubted fact that if the birds were all swept
off the face of the earth man could not live upon it;
vegetation would wither and die, insects would become
so numerous that no living thing could withstand their
attacks. The great and inestimable service done to
the farmer, gardener, and florist by the birds is only |
becoming known by sad experience.
WZ


A DOG’S INSTINCT,

ANY stories have been told of the wonderful in-
stinct of dogs, but the one that [am about to relate
seems to me to be even more surprising than the usual
anecdote of canine intelligence. A friend of mine has
a curly, woolly-haired, black and white dog, something
of aretriever, very fond of sugar. My friend constantly
gives him a lump, but always makes him work for it
by performing sometimes one trick, sometimes another.
One day, to see what the dog would do, we placed a.
lump of sugar on the mantelpiece where the dog was
unable to reach it. After two or three ineffectual
jumps, the wise animal ran to the other side of the
~ room, seized a footstool between his jaws, dragged it
by a series of jerks all the way across the room, and
then, leaping on it, easily reached the coveted morsel.
This seemed to us to be something more than mere
instinct. |

SAGACIOUS COWS.

NE very sultry morning two cows came to our
gate, evidently on the look-out for something, and
after at first being puzzled by their pleading looks, the
thought struck me that they might be in want of
water. No sooner had this occurred to me than I had
some water brought in a large vessel, which the poor
animals at once sucked up with the greatest eagerness.
The pair then sauntered away contentedly to a field
near at hand. In about half an hour or so, we were
surprised, and not a little amused, by seeing our friends
marching up to the gate accompanied by three other
cows. ‘The water-tap was again called into requisition,
and the new-comers were in like manner treated liber-
ally. Then, with repeated and gratified “boo-oos,” our
visitors slowly marched off to their pasture. Since that
time they have never failed in their morning calls.
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REMARKABLE INSTINCT OF A HARE.

()NCE while walking on the seashore, I watched for

some time the curious behaviour of two hares.
The little animals came down from the hills and went
directly to the water’s edge. They remained there but
a moment before returning. In a few minutes they
again approached the water and again ran back. This
manoeuvre was repeated several times, and I finally
came to the conclusion that they were waiting for high
tide before venturing into the water. I was not mis-
taken, for precisely at high tide one of them boldly
sprang into the sea and swam towards an island about
a mile from the shore. I have no doubt that they were
of different sexes, and that it was the male who, like
Leander, daily made his perilous journey to join his
lady-love. It showed remarkable instinct that the hare
should have waited for high tide, when there was no
current.







































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































PRINCE KRAPOTKIN’S CAT.

Hi question whether a cat sees its reflection in a
glass has been raised in the columns of a French
periodical. Among others, Prince Krapotkin has sent
his experience from his prison. “I see,” says the prince,
“that there yet exists a doubt as to whether a cat can
see its reflection in a glass. I have a cat about four-
teen months old, which I have brought up in prison,
and as regards it, at least, there can be no doubt upon
this subject. When it was little it amused us much by
seeking a cat behind the glass, even when I showed it
a very small glass. I have just repeated the experi-
ment by showing it an oval mirror twenty centimetres
long. When it saw its own reflected image it immedi-
ately assumed a serious air. It endeavoured to touch
it with its paw, but finding that there was glass inter-
posed, it peeped behind the mirror.






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THE CONVERTED GIANT.

HERE is an old legend that there once dwelt in
Spain a giant named Morgante. This Morgante
was a pagan, and so fierce and cruel that he was feared
and hated by every one. One night the giant had a
strange vision. A ferocious serpent assaulted him. He
prayed in vain to his god Macone, but when he called
on the Christian God, the serpent left him. Strangely
moved by this dream the giant deserted his evil ways
and entered a monastery, where he desired to devote
himself to the service of God. One day he was in the
forest when he was attacked by a herd of wild swine;
but he stood his ground and killed large numbers of
them. He loaded himself with his prey and returned
to the monastery. To such deeds as this he devoted
the remainder of his life, and died as much beloved for
his good deeds as he had once been hated for his
wickedness. |






















































































































































































































































































































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THE PARROT’S REVENGE.

"| HE cat and the parrot were usually pretty good

friends, but one day they had a quarrel. It was
all the cat’s fault, and I was glad when the parrot had
his revenge. I do not remember just what Pussy had
done, but I think she had upset Polly’s food, or some-
thing of that kind. Poll pretended not to mind Pussy’s
evil deed, but I could see that there was more trouble
brewing. Polly was on his stand and seemed to be
thinking deeply. He kept looking over at the cat, who.
was dozing before the fire. Finally, Polly seemed to
have made up his mind. He called out in a tone of
extreme affection, “Puss, Puss, come then, — come
then, Pussy!” Pussy went and looked up innocently
enough; Polly with his beak seized his tin of food and
tipped its contents all over the cat, then chuckled as
Puss ran away half drowned.







SET FREE.

| [_ [PTLE Ernest lay dying in his mother’s arms, Not
a sound was heard except the mother’s pitiful
sobs, as she realised that her darling was about to leave
her. Suddenly the song of a bird breaks the stillness.
It is the pet lark, which sings of the joyous days long
ago, when it was free and happy. The dying child
slowly turns his head and gazes at his little pet; then,
with an effort, he whispers to his weeping mother,
“Mother, will you bring me the little lark? I think I
would like to set him free before I die.’ His little
hands are too weak to open the cage door, but his
mother helps him, and it is done. There is a flutter of
wings, a joyous rush to the window, and the bird is
gone, back to his native sky. But the little boy closes
his eyes and sinks into that sleep from which there is
no awakening.



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE HORNED TRAGOPAN.

HIS beautiful bird is to be found on the borders of
China and Thibet, and on the slopes of the Hima-
laya Mountains. The plumage is very beautiful, being
dotted with round white spots on a brown and: reddish
ground. The male bird is distinguished by the large
wattles, which extend from the cheeks down the whole
length of the neck, while behind each eye rises a soft,
fleshy horn. Both the horns and wattles may be dilated
or contracted at pleasure. They are of a bluish-purple
colour, mingled with scarlet. The colour deepens when
the bird is excited by anger or pleasure.

The feathers of the crest, the chin, and the back of
the neck, are black; the upper part of the breast, the
neck, and the shoulders are light cinnamon, with a dash
of carmine and purple; the wings and part of the back
are rich amber, mottled with brown, and also decorated
with white spots.













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE TOUCAN.

HE Toucan is a native of Demerara. There are
three species of the toucan in Demerara, and
they often resort to the same trees to feed and chatter,
retiring together, in the middle of the day, to some
cool, shady retreat in the recesses of the forest. In the
morning and evening they are very noisy, particularly
in rainy weather.

With regard to the appearance of the toucan, it is
very singular. The most prominent feature about him
is the bill, which seems out of all proportion to the size
of the body. You might think it unwieldy and useless;
but on a closer acquaintance you will find that you are
wrong. The bird itself, as well as its eggs, would easily
become the prey of the numerous monkeys which are
always jumping about, if he had not this formidable
bill with which to defend himself and his young.















































































































































































































































































































THE PARADISE FLY-CATCHER.

HE Paradise Fly-catcher belongs to Asia, and is to
be met with over the greater part of India. He
is by no means uncommon. He frequents the clusters
of tall bamboos, in gardens, shrubberies, and planta-
tions. His methods of obtaining his food vary a good
deal; he generally takes up a position at some height
from the ground, waiting until some heedless insect
passes within easy reach; he darts upon it with the
greatest precision, making a loud snap with his beak.
He returns at once to his former position, and remains
in readiness for another victim. He also searches for
insects among the branches, and on the bark or hidden
beneath its irregularities, and picks them off with great
certainty of aim. He is a most restless bird, flitting
from branch to branch, or darting after his winged
prey with ceaseless activity. .


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PINNATED GROUSE.

\N the great prairies of North America these birds
are found in large numbers. They prefer open,
dry plains, where scrubby trees, long grass, and brush-
wood afford them the kind of shelter which they desire.
The male of this species is a handsome, fine-looking
bird. The attitude and habits of this bird during
courtship are grotesque and amusing. Mr. T. Wood
states that the ear tufts, or néck plumes, are erected so
that they meet over the crown of the head, the wings
are lowered, and make a buzzing sound; the two bare
orange-coloured sacs, one on each side of the neck,
which can be inflated at will, he inflates to the fullest
extent; and with these he makes his curious hollow
sound, audible at a great distance. _
The males at this season fight desperately; but
there is a suspicion that the fight is got up mainly for
display.




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THE CHINESE JACANA.

“[ HE Chinese Jacana is about twenty-five inches in

length. The front of the neck and chest is
white. The upper or back part of the head and neck
is of a bright orange colour, a thin black line dividing
the two colours. The rest of the body is of a deep
chocolate brown. Its toes are long and slender, and
appear unsuitable for use in the water; but its motive
power under water is in the wings. When in search
of food, the Jacana may be seen on the surface of some
clear stream or lake, tripping about upon the broad
leaves of the lotus or water-lily, looking for insects;
the use of his long, slender toes is then very apparent.
When he seeks food, which is to be found only in the
water, he dives from his platform of broad leaves;
reaching the bottom, he runs about, perfectly at home,
searching for the kind of food he desires.
















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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PLUCK REWARDED.

[)UBING Captain White’s travels in Cochin China,
the then viceroy gave him a magnificent tigress.
On reaching Saigon, where he found dogs dirt-cheap,
he used to give his pet one of these animals every day.
The dog was thrown alive into her cage. She would
play with it for a while. Then her eyes would begin
to glisten and her tail to quiver; she seized her prey
by the scruff of the neck, and in a minute or two it
was all up with poor “ bow-wow.” |
One day, however, a puppy, instead of tamely sub-
mitting to its fate, showed fight. It snapped at the
tigress’s nose, and bit it till the blood came. The tig-
ress, far from resenting the attack, seemed to treat it
as a joke. Thenceforth they were the best of friends.
To humour this queer friendship, Captain White had a
small hole cut in the tigress’s cage, that the puppy
might go and come as it pleased.

THE CHEETAH OR HUNTING LEOPARD.

HE Cheetah belongs to the feline family, but differs
from the rest of that family in having longer and
narrower feet, greater length of limb, and less retractile |
Claws. It is not so handsome as the common leopard,
but is much more intelligent and docile, allowing itself
to be handled and instructed in the art of hunting deer.
The hunters, having first carefully covered the head
-of the cheetah with a leathern hood, set out in a light
cart drawn by a horse, proceeding very cautiously till
the game is discovered. The hood is then taken off the
cheetah, when the animal begins to creep stealthily
towards the unsuspecting herd, taking advantage of
every bush or hillock to hide his approach. If unsuc-
cessful in his first bound, the cheetah does not attempt
to follow the herd by running, but he creeps slowly
back to the hunters, as though ashamed of his failurc. —
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THE ARGUS PHEASANT,

HIS extraordinary bird is to be met with in South

India, and also in some districts of Sumatra, and

like the lyre bird is fond of seclusion, frequenting

wooded mountains and rocky valleys, where the limpid

stream flashes in the sunlight in its merry course
around the massive boulders.

The size of the argus is smaller than the turkey, but
the wings are very large, and seem out of all proportion
to its body; in fact, the wings are its chief peculiarity.
The primary feathers are very short in comparison with
the secondary ones, the latter being nearly three times
as long as the former. Each feather is beautifully orna-
mented with a row of eyes along the outer side, — the
eyes, as they are called, resembling those of the tail

feathers of the peacock.
_ The argus is a good runner, yet with all his fine
wings he cannot fly far. /












































































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BIRDS OF PARADISE.

“| HE lovely creature of the air known as the bird of
paradise is found chiefly in New Guinea and the

' neighbouring islands, and is remarkable for the splen-

dour of its plumage. Tufts of feathers generally grow
from the shoulders of this bird, which are so prolonged
as to cover the wings, while in the species known as.
the Great Emerald Bird of Paradise these shoulder
tufts are so great that they extend far beyond the
body, and even beyond the tail. These are exquisitely
light and delicate, and constitute the most magnificent
part of the well-known bird-of-paradise plumes.

The common bird of paradise is as large as a jay. It
is of a cinnamon colour, the upper part of the head and
neck yellow, the front and throat emerald green, and
the shoulder tufts yellow. The whole length to the
extremity of these is not less than two feet.


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HORSE OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT,

HEN Alexander, the son of Philip, King of Macedon,

was a youth, a Thessalian dealer brought to the

Court a beautiful and high-spirited horse, which he

offered to the king for sale. The king would gladly

have bought the horse, but none of the courtiers could

manage the creature. Whenever any of them mounted

him he reared, and threw his rider, with the result that
he broke some of their bones.

The young Prince Alexander, carefully watching the
horse’s proceedings, noticed that he swerved aside and
became unruly from fear of his own shadow; and having
asked and obtained his father’s permission to try his
hand, he boldly mounted the animal, and rode him full
against the sunshine, so that his shadow fell behind
him. Bucephalus, no longer seeing the object of his
dread, became quite docile, and carried the prince
quietly.






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A GOOD-NATURED BEAR.

DUKE of Lorraine had a bear called Marco, which

was kept in a hut. A Savoyard boy, perishing |
with cold, one day entered the hut. The bear took
him in his paws and warmed him by pressing him to
his breast. This friendship increased, and the boy went .
in and out, and was always received by Marco with
affection, reserving for him a portion of his food. One
night the servant brought Marco’s supper later than
usual, and was astonished to see him roll his eyes furi-
ously lest the boy should be disturbed, being asleep in
his arms. For one or two nights this was watched, and
the same thing continued. The boy awaking and find-
ing himself watched, was afraid of being punished for
his temerity and supplicated pardon. Having listened
to the history of this singular alliance, the duke ordered
that good care should be taken of the little Savoyard.





















































































THE BEAR AND THE BEES.

N olden times when animals could make men under-
stand what they wished, there was a hive of bees |
which lived on the borders of a forest. Not far from
them dwelt an old bear who used to steal the honey as
fast as they gathered it. They tried to drive him away
with their stings, but this did not seem to hurt him.
So they held a meeting, and they said they would ask
a king to come and help them to drive the bear away.
The king promised to send some soldiers on the morrow.
When they came, they not only killed the bear but
smothered the bees also, and took their honey. After
they had gone, a few bees who had escaped said, “ What
fools we were to ask the king for his assistance ; for we
have not only lost our honey, but many of us our
lives.” ,
Mora: Of two evils choose the least.

THE AFRICAN WATER-FOV’L.

OUR knowledge of this bird is due mainly to the
observation and untiring researches of Mr. Gould.
Its appearance is very remarkable, resembling in some
respects the boat-bill, another singular-looking bird.
With regard to the habits and peculiarities of the Afri-
can water-fowl not very much is known. It frequents
the lakes and marshy districts of Africa, and feeds upon
. fish, frogs, and small reptiles, which abound there in
astonishing numbers. The head and beak of this bird
are strange and unusual. The head itself is rather
small, the beak large in proportion and very broad, not
unlike a boat with its keel upwards. The end of the
beak is furnished with a formidable hook, in this respect
resembling that of the dodo. The colour of the beak
in the male is yellow, and reddish-brown in the female.
The nostrils are conspicuous, and of unusual length.
THE DOG AND THE MONKEYS

NCE upon a time a number of monkeys went toa

great forest to pick up nuts. Their way led them

past a woodman’s house, near which lay a large dog,

seemingly asleep. One day they met a fox, and asked

him if the dog outside the woodman’s house were really
alive, “ Because,” they said, “it never seems to move.”

The fox said, “I would advise you to let him alone,
or you will dearly pay for your experiment.”

But the monkeys would not listen to him. So, the
next time they were going to the forest to pick nuts
one of them went up to the dog and scratched his nose,
which made him spring up immediately and run after
the monkeys, and bite all those whom he could catch.
After this they were always obliged to go to the forest
by another way for fear of the dog.

Mora: Let sleeping dogs lie.



































































THE LION AND REYNARD.

A LION, the king of the forest, once requested all
the animals to bring him that in which they were

most interested. So one day they all assembled before

the throne and presented his Majesty with presents.

The king of beasts beckoned to the fox, who pros-
trated himself full length before the royal presence.

“ Well, knave, what hast thou brought ?” thundered
the King.

“Myself,” answered the fox. “You commanded us
to bring what we are most interested in, and I beg
leave to say that I am most interested in myself”

“Ah, ah!” growled the lion, as he laid his paw
lightly on the fox, “but for thy ready wit I would have
laid thee dead at my feet. Go thy way, and henceforth
think not so much of thyself as of others.”

MorAL: In many a secret breast self reigns supreme,
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A CREW RESCUED BY A DOG.

Na recent gale at Halifax, Nova Scotia, the fishing
schooner, “Senator Morgan,” during the night was
dashed ashore at Cow Bay. The sea was so high that
it meant certain death to try to land on the rocky
beach. The crew lighted a fire on deck in order to
attract attention to their perilous position. Two broth-
ers named Mosher, on perceiving the flames, hastened
to the scene, and made every effort to afford assistance.
The captain of the “Senator Morgan” threw a tub
overboard containing a life-line, but it did not reach
the land. The brothers Mosher were, fortunately,
accompanied by their dog, which they encouraged to
enter the foaming water. The animal, with marvellous
Sagacity, swam out to the tub, secured the life-line, and
brought it to shore. A hawser by this means was
hauled to the beach, and the crew succeeded in scram-
bling to land,





JACKO, WOLF, AND BRENDA.

WEY what is this? Here’s Brenda, I declare,
Quite fast asleep. A famous chance for me.
Wolf is away, or else I should not dare
To interfere with madam, lest that he
Should show his teeth and make it hot for me.

This peacock’s feather on her nose
Will tickle her. She ll wonder what’s the row,
And start and snap if she awakens; but here goes.
Whatever happens, I’m in for it now;
And, after all, I rather like a row!

Why, Wolf, have you come back? Now, dear old friend,
Pray do not growl so savagely at me!

On your goodwill I constantly depend.
I’ve just been fanning Brenda; for, you see,
The flies are troublesome as they can be!













































ANXIOUS MOMENTS.

LL who have seen that excellent and well-conducted

London Home for Lost Dogs, near Battersea Park,
~ must have observed the wonderful variety of form and
expression of the canine refugees. Any one going to
the front of the cages who is a stranger, soon attracts
the keen notice of many a “lost one,” waiting — and
often, alas! waiting in vain— to be claimed. A few
days and then it is “too late,” and never again will the
anxious gaze meet that of his loving master. But this is
not always so, for many and many a one is found and
is returned to its rightful owner, or sleeps before the fire
of anew master; and yet thousands necessarily perish
week by week, — dogs for whom “nobody cares.”

Truly, this Dogs’ Home is an excellent institution, —
a home and rest, with food and care, for the waifs and
strays of man’s true friend, “the dog!”


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WAR

M* lot, I think, is very hard;

I’m chained up always in a yard.
Wish as I may, I cannot travel |
Beyond my round of dreary gravel.

And if I’m savage, as they say,

And dangerous, I’m one at bay;
Wrong’d grievously by all, I feel,
Except the girl who brings my meal.
The very household I defend

Do anything but play the friend;
When I outside the kennel doze
They aim their pebbles at my nose.

A chained dog can’t retaliate,

But he can answer hate with hate,
As I do now. War be it then,

To all the world of dogs and men!

PEACE.

AM the favourite of the Squire,
Sprung from a very famous sire;
I’m fit beside a Duke to jog,
A gentlemanly, well-bred dog.

I always eat, whoever’s there,
~My chop beside old Master’s chair ;
And no one hinders if I gnaw
A bone in Lady Die’s boudoir.

I might be cross, if I’d the mind,
And bite old Master when I’d dined; ©
Or, waxing loud and furious, fly

At the white throat of Lady Die.

But if I did it, where’s the use?
Give dogs ill names; and then — the noose:
Oh, oftentimes I wonder why

Dogs can’t love peace as well as I!





A NARROW ESCAPE.

OME Indian hunters were paddling in their little
bark canoes across one of the large Canadian lakes,
and noticed a stag swimming in the water some dis-
tance ahead. A young Indian thought that he might
enjoy a little amusement at the stag’s expense; so,
quick as thought, he caught up a cord that lay beside
him, threw it over the stag’s horns, and attached the
other end to his canoe, thus compelling the creature to
draw his canoe and himself through the water. The
water became shallow, and the stag gained a footing
sooner than the Indian had calculated, and with two or
three frantic bounds, he sprang forward and reached the
shore. Here, in an instant, the man was precipitated
on the stones, and the canoe dashed into a thousand
pieces, and the stag made his way off triumphantly
into the depths of the forest.










































































































































































































































































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BITERS.

OST of the horses that are said to be vicious have

been taught tricks by grooms or stable-boys teas-
ing them. Of course, some horses are naturally ill-tem-
pered, and bite and kick with the intention of hurting,
but they are comparatively few.

I remember a horse that used to draw a cart belong-
’ ing to a wholesale merchant; and as it stood beside the
curb-stone, whilst the driver was in some shop transact-
ing business, the vicious creature would snap at every
one who passed. The children were all afraid of it; —
and when it laid its ears flat, and curling up its lip,
showed its great teeth, they would exclaim, “ Look, he
bites!” and they were careful not to come within its
reach. But one day the animal caught an unwary boy
by the shoulder, biting him severely; and as the mer-
chant found that the horse was incurably vicious, he
had it killed.
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THE CHINESE BUFFALO.

HE native Chinese buffaloes, employed in ploughing
up the rice-fields or turning water-wheels, are
perhaps the most uncouth-looking of all the members
of the genus bos. They have a bare, wrinkled hide
like that of an elephant, of a dark slate colour, and
with only a few hairs about the dewlap and at the end
of the tail. They have a hump, or rather a rising, at
the shoulders, smaller than the hump of the Indian
oxen. Their shape is clumsy, and their only claim to
beauty is in their large, lustrous eyes. Their bare skin
being unprotected by hair, they are exposed to the
attacks of swarms of flies in summer; and to escape
from their tormentors, they plunge into the tanks, and
rolling in the ooze, emerge covered all over with a coat-
ing of mud, which dries in the sun. This does not im-
prove their looks; and their large horns give them a
formidable appearance.


















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THE ENGLISH GREYHOUND.

[HE greyhound is a native of the British Islands,
It appears to have been a bolder and stronger dog
in former days, but the more formidable kinds of wild
animals were early exterminated in England, and the
greyhound having been bred for centuries for swiftness
alone, has lost its courage, whilst its form has become
more slender and its coat finer. |
Charles I. was fond of greyhounds, as Sir Philip War-
wick, who was secretary to the unfortunate monarch,
_ tells us in his memoirs. He says: “Methinks, because
it shows his dislike of a common court vice, it is not
unworthy the relating of him, that one evening, his.
dog scratching at his door, he commanded me to let in
Gipsy; whereupon I took the boldness to say, ‘Sir, I
perceive you love a greyhound better than you doa |
spaniel” ‘Yes,’ says he, ‘for they equally love their
masters, and yet do not flatter them so much.’ ”
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THE DEADLY FIGHT.

OUR friends and a native hunter were mounted on
two elephants, each animal having a driver seated
on its neck. They were pushing their way slowly
through grass twenty feet high when the elephants
showed unaccountable signs of fear. The position was
dangerous, as the drivers could not see in front of them
on account of the high reeds, and the dust of the grass
seeds almost suffocated them. Suddenly the foremost
elephant was knocked over, and the second elephant
turned and fled for nearly a quarter of a mile before it
could be stopped, and no force could indwee it to return.
The wild animal which attacked the party was a rogue
elephant, a dangerous animal to meet with. The fight
was severe, and all would have been destroyed, had not
the wild elephant been shot behind the ear, — the only
vulnerable spot.
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BEN ACHMA CLAIMING HIS HORSE.

EN ACHMA, a wise sheik, heard some Arabs dis-
coursing about the wisdom of the Kadi of Meshid.
He started on his horse to see the sage himself. On
his way an old man begged to ride with him, and at
last, on account of his feebleness, claimed the horse for
his own. They agreed to let the wise Kadi decide their
quarrel, and after waiting for him to dismiss other
quarrels, their case was brought before him, and the
men were taken separately to the stables. Ben Achma
was told to pick out the horse he claimed, as also the old
pilgrim. The magistrate adjudged the horse to Ben
Achma, while the old man was condemned to suffer
thirty lashes. The sheik asked why the horse was
adjudged to him, as both recognised the beast. “ Your
adversary did of a truth recognise the horse, but the
horse did not recognise him; whereas, I noticed even
your walk was known.”






































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A MONKEY AND HIS CIGAR.

QOME years ago I was bringing two monkeys home

from the West Indies, which I had named “ Jack ”
and “Jill.” One day Jack was diving into my pockets,
and among other things, he fished out a cigar. He smelt
it, then bounded off to his cage with his prize. Jill
rushed after him to see - what he had got, and he con-
siderately allowed her a smell, and no more. Then he
tore it up, and began to chew it, and presently worked
himself up into an ecstasy of delight, taking the half-
chewed cigar from his mouth, and smearing it over his
face and body, until his excitement began to get too
much for him; then he rolled about in his straw and
twisted himself into all sorts of contortions, and at last
fell down in a helpless state of intoxication. There-
upon Jill carefully covered him over with straw, and
mounted guard over him, resisting my attempts to see
how he fared.





























































































































































































THE OLD DRAGOON HORSE.

[y the beginning of the year 1794 a ludicrous incident

occurred in the Castle Yard, Dublin. A farmer
had, some time previously, purchased at one of the.
sales an old troop-horse which was unfit for service.
The animal being quiet, the farmer mounted his daugh-
ter on it, and sent her to town with milk and eggs.
She unluckily arrived at the Exchange just at the time
of relieving guard. The horse, hearing the music to
which it had been so long used, in spite of the efforts
of its rider bolted into the Castle Yard with her and
her milk-pails, and took its place in the ranks, to the
great amusement of all present.

In spite of all that the girl could do, the horse
maintained its position, and only when the ceremony
was over did it allow itself to be ridden to the
Exchange.
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_CAT-AND-MOUSE FRIENDS.

GENTLEMAN, the owner of a fine cat, noticed
that when he used to play the flute a mouse
would come out of its hole and frisk playfully about
the room. The mouse soon became quite tame, and
would come out to the music in the presence of the cat,
who never tried to hurt it. These two animals thas
got quite fond of each other, and the mouse would
come out of its hole to the mew of the cat, run over
the cat’s body, and carry on frequent frolics. One day,
however, a strange cat entered the room, and hearing a
mew, the mouse came, thinking to meet its friend; that
friend, however, not being present, poor Mousey became
a prey to the intruder. Just then the other cat came
into the room. She saw what had happened and at
once flew at the intruder, and, after a terrific battle,
killed her.

THE SYRIAN BEAR.

() UR picture represents the Syrian bear, which is
still at long intervals met with in Lebanon and
Hermon. The colour of the Syrian bear varies accord-
ing to age. When it is young it is of a greyish blue
colour, but it becomes lighter as it grows older, and
when it has reached its full age it is nearly white. The
Syrian bear, like all other bears, lives on both vegetable
and animal food, though it is more of a vegetarian
than its numerous relatives. |
“A bear robbed of her whelps ” was in ancient times
a proverb used to denote extreme ferocity, and. this is»
certainly true of the Syrian bear. Although it usually
flees from the presence of man, yet, if robbed of its
whelps, its nature changes, and it attacks man with
great ferocity, and many a man has thus lost his
life.











































































































































































































































































































































































































THE SICK THRUSH.

()NE day, while taking my usual walk, I saw a young

thrush in the road; he was injured and unable to
fly. I caught him and carried him home, and I turned
him loose in the stable, where he had plenty of room,
light, and air.

There he hopped and fluttered about for more than a
month. He increased in size, health, and strength
very quickly. He was fed chiefly on earthworms.

When he was able to fly he was set free, and I saw
with deep regret the beautiful and graceful creature
depart for the wild woods and to sweet liberty again.

The number of worms eaten by this bird — which
were carefully counted every day —amounted to over
4,100 during his captivity. This will show what great
good is done in the garden by them, and it serves as a
lesson to those who kill these beautiful birds.
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A TRUE STORY.

HE dog in our picture belonged to the Ven. Arch-
deacon Bland. He was half-Danish, and was
attached to a pony belonging to the same owner. On
one occasion the pony was severely hurt, and when he
was well enough to be turned into a field carrots and
other good things used to be taken to him. Frequently
the dog, whose name was Traveller, was a contributor
to the pony’s taste; he used to run into the garden and
collect the fallen apples, which he would bring in his |
mouth and lay before the pony, and then would sit and
watch his friend eat them with many signs of pleasure.
The pony recovered but slowly, and the dog was con-
stant in his attentions. When the pony was pro-
nounced strong enough to be returned. to the barn, no
one was more overjoyed than the dog, who showed his
pleasure in every possible way.
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PUSSY AND THE GUINEA-PIG.

C Als, when deprived of their kittens, sometimes adopt

strange pets to fill their places. Poor Pussy’s
motherly feelings are very strong, and when she loses
her own little ones she is greatly distressed. There is
an instance on record of a cat having adopted two
young rats, which she carefully nursed in a stable,
under the guardianship of the coachman.

A cat I once had took a young guinea-pig to nurse, and
the pair became very much attached to each other.
Pussy would lie before the fire, and Piggy, nestled at
her side, would slily amuse himself by nibbling at her
fur whilst she was tenderly licking his bristly little
back; but she forgot it was bristles and not fur, and
when she licked him up the wrong way it made him
grunt with anything but pleasure. He knew, however,
that the cat did not mean to hurt him.



































































































































































































WAITING FOR A CHANCE.

Wwurat are you sitting so quietly for, Pussy, with
your ears laid back, and your nose in the air?

Oh,I see! there isa linnet in the lilac-bush, and though
you do not care to listen to his singing, you would like
very much to eat his poor little body for your dinner.

That naughty kitten of yours looks even more eager
than you do. Iam sure she feels inclined to make a
rush up into the lilac boughs at once; but you are such
a cautious old cat, that I think you have made up your
mind to wait until the linnet’s song is ended, and then,
if the pretty brown bird spies out a worm on the lawn,
he will perhaps come flying down to. catch it, and
then —!

But I remember, to my comfort, that you are so cau-
tious, Mrs. Puss, that nine times out of ten you miss
your bird altogether.


















































































































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THE PRISONER'S PET.

Gomes years ago, in a European prison, there was a

man so fierce and vicious that he was carefully
watched, and when not at work, kept continually in
chains. One day it was observed that his fierce humour
seemed to be somewhat softened, After the hour of
labour was over, he seated himself in a corner with his
head bent down and a smile upon his face. He was
watching some object which he had concealed in his
breast, all the time muttering to himself words of, ten-
derness. The wardens did not feel comfortable. What
could he be planning now, — some new outbreak, some
attempted murder, or what? They must find out. Two
of them approached him stealthily from behind and
succeeded in seizing and binding his arms before he
could offer any resistance. They then searched him,
and drew out from the folds of his coat a fine rat!
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THE MOLE.

"| HERE are certain animals which have an evil repu-

tation. “Give a dog a bad name, and you may as
well hang him at once!” So says the proverb, and few
will deny its truth. But dogs are by no means the
only creatures to whom a bad name brings destruction.
There are many poor animals which are accused of
crimes quite alien from their natures, in consequence of
which they are sought out and doomed to death. Such
a oneis the mole. He has been unfortunate enough to
incur the enmity of the British farmer, who sends his
mole-catchers forth summarily to rid his land of these
quiet burrowers. And yet it is allowed that the under-
ground passages of the mole form a system of subsoil
drainage, and that he is continually enriching the soil
by bringing fresh earth from a considerable depth, and
thus performing the office of a plough or spade.
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THE DUET.

I RETIRED last night a happy, healthy man, and I

rose this morning a perfect wreck. It was all owing
to those two cats. Every night, just as sure as fate,
they serenade me from the back-yard fence. Last
night it was worse than usual. Not only did they
begin earlier, but their notes were sharper, louder, and
more piercing. Try as I would, I could not sleep. I
do not know how long I lay awake, but it must have
been almost morning before my tormentors left me
in peace. I at last fell asleep, but even in my sleep
those cats pursued me. I dreamed that I was in
church and that when the organ started, instead
of the usual singers, the two cats arose. The singing
began. Such a noise as they made! Even after
I awoke I could remember vividly the horrors of
that duet. |

“ARMED AT ALL POINTS.”

KRE are two mischievous boys trying to make a
quarrel between their dog and this round ball
covered with sharp quills called a hedgehog. But the
dog, though eager to obey them, is a little backward
about attacking such a formidable bunch of spears. I
hope the dog will decide to run away, for if he meddles
with the hedgehog the latter will shoot the quills in
every direction, and that bright-looking little dog may
get his eyes put out, or, at least, the quills will make
him cry with pain. The boys do not think of anything
but the fun they will have watching the two animals
fight. The hedgehog is a small animal, having the
hair on the upper part of its body mixed with prickles
or spines. It is able to roll itself into a ball so as to
present the spines outwardly in every direction. It is —
nocturnal in its habits, feeding chiefly upon insects.
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HUNTING NANDUS.

NCE, while Hans and I were hunting, there sprang
quite suddenly from behind a clump of pampas
grass a pair of nandus, noble-looking birds, which,
spreading out their wings like fans, passed before our
startled horses, and would have fled along the pampas
had not Hans been too quick for them. His dull eye
lighted up in a moment, and taking from the pommel
of his saddle two balls like large bullets connected by
a long cord, he whirled these round his head and =
launched them at one of the birds. They struck its.
legs and twined themselves round and round, so thor-
oughly entangling the creature that in another moment
it was down on the grass. Before Hans or I could leap
to the ground the dogs had killed it. Its mate had
hidden its head in the grass, and speedily fell a prey, —
also, to our dogs. | ,












































































































































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JACKO AND THE PIG.

“[ OMMY and his monkey Jacko were out one day in

a yacht which anchored near a picturesque village.
On the way back to the yacht Tommy and Jacko
lagged behind the rest of us, and finally we lost sight
of them. After waiting on board I decided to go back
to try and find them. After whistling I hurried in the
direction from whence I heard an answering signal. On
looking over a pigstye wall I saw Jacko sitting in front
of a small pig, doing what he could to irritate the ani-
mal, whilst Tommy, in convulsions of laughter, was
trying to get the monkey away. As for the pig, his
rage was mixed with wonder at the first sight of a
monkey, and was not wholly free from fear. The scene
was so absurd I could not end it until my own laughter
had been exhausted. Then I took Jacko away and
made him behave properly until we got on board again.


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THE LAUGHING JACKASS.

HIS curious bird is a native of Australia. It is
‘ound chiefly in the south-eastern district of that
country, and in New South Wales. |
This bird is a member of the kingfisher family. He
feeds upon insects and reptiles. It is well known that
he devours snakes, seizing them with great skill, and
crushing their heads with his powerful beak. The
cry of this bird is most singular and startling, a sud-
den, strange, mocking laughter, and when heard for the
first time, the listener is astonished or even alarmed. .
The male is adorned with a dark-brown crest, the
prevailing tint of the back and upper surface is olive-
brown, the wings are brown-black, and the breast and
under portions are white and pale brown; the tail is
rather long, and of a rich chestnut colour, banded with
deep black, and tipped with white.



















































































THE DARTER.

HERE are two species of this remarkable bird; one

belongs to Africa, the other to Florida, in Amer-

ica. The darter has a very long, slender, snake-like

head and neck; when swimming, the body is generally
under the water, the neck and head only is to be seen.

The darter is found in many parts of America, par-
ticularly along the banks of rivers and marshes.

The nest of the darter is rather a large structure,
composed of sticks, and it is built upon trees which
grow in the marshy lands which the darters frequent.
The eggs are blue. The colour of the adult bird is of |
adeep green. A strip of brownish-white runs from the
eye partially down the sides of the neck. The wings
are black variegated with silvery white. The darter
seems to avoid flying as much as possible, and has some
difficulty in getting under way in the air.


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































—L———
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A. CRANStON DEL =


THE FRIGATE BIRD.

[N appearance and habits the frigate bird is one of
the most remarkable of the whole feathered race.
The air is his home. The whole structure of this ele-
gant bird is adapted to rapidity of flight. |
The general colour of the frigate bird is of a rich
glossy black; under the throat a large pouch is sit-
uated, extending down the front of the neck, capable of
being distended at pleasure with air from the lung's ;
the air can also be communicated to the hollow bones
of the wings, which are extremely long and very light.
The pouch and tubes thus form an apparatus similar to
an inflated balloon, and when the bird’s wings are
extended it can sustain itself without a movement of a
muscle for any length of time; indeed, it has been
asserted by some that it actually sleeps in this manner.
The colour of the pouch in the neck is a beautiful
scarlet.









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE UMBRELLA BIRD.

HE umbrella bird is a very remarkable creature.
The extraordinary arrangement of the plumage on
the head and breast cannot fail to attract the attention |
of those who are fortunate enough to see this singular-
looking bird, which is a native of the country bordering
the river Amazon and the islands of the South Ameri-
can rivers. He is about the size of an English crow,
and is very similar in appearance. The prevailing
colour of this bird is a rich, glossy black, with varying
tints of blue and violet-purple.

Its crest is composed of long, slender feathers rising
from a contractile skin on the top of the head. The
shafts are white, and the plume of a glossy purple-blue.
The food of the umbrella bird consists chiefly of berries
and various fruits. As his cry is loud and deep, the
natives call this bird by a name which signifies a pipe.

HONORIUS AND HIS HEN “ ROME.”

HEN the great Theodosius, having overcome all
his enemies, died in A.D. 395, he left the vast
Roman Empire to his sons, Arcadius and Honorius.
Whilst the streets of the capital were streaming
with blood, Honorius was calmly employing his time at
Ravenna feeding his poultry. He was very fond of |
these fowls, and had named his favourite hen “ Rome.”
One day a servant said to him, “ Rome is destroyed!”
“ And yet she just now ate from my hand!” exclaimed
the alarmed Emperor.
“T mean,” said the servant, “that the City of Rome
is destroyed by Alaric!” |
“Oh,” said the emperor, “I thought my hen ‘Rome,’
was dead!” |
Thus the feeble son of Theodosius the Great amused
himself whilst the Roman Empire tottered to its fall.
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THE LOST CHILD.

SPENT some weeks this summer in an old farm-

house in Kent. One evening the youngest daughter
of my host was missing. We did not think much of it
at first, but, as it grew later and later, we feared that
the child had wandered off and lost her way. There
was no real danger, since the night was warm and no
harm could come to the child, but we thought of how
frightened the little thing must be, all alone in the
darkness, and therefore organized a. search-party to
hunt for her. With lanterns in our hands we wandered
through the fields and woods but could find no trace of
the child. Finally, after several hours of fruitless
search, we returned home. Early the next morning
the search was renewed, when the little girl was dis-
covered near a hedge, fast asleep, between two sheep,
having crept in between them for warmth and rest.
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THE HELMSMAN.

()VER twenty years ago two daring men set out

from New York in a small 26-ft. boat. Their
object was to cross the Atlantic to England. They
took with them a young dog. At first the dog was
very restless and unhappy in the cramped space of the
little boat, but he soon became accustomed to his
strange life, and was as happy as a dog can be. He
was a very knowing fellow and his master soon taught.
him to hold the tiller. He would sit for hours with
the tiller in his mouth while the weary seamen slept; .
but he did not intend to do all the work, and always
waked his master by his barking when he considered
that he had been keeping watch long enough. The
hardy mariners were fortunate in encountering nothing
but fair weather, and arrived in England safe and sound,
after a voyage of thirty-four days.

























































































































































































































































































































































JACK.

ACK is our tame crow. When he was young he fell
from the nest and the children carried him home.
We made him a nice cage, but he soon became so tame
that there was no longer any need of shutting him up,
and now the cage door is always open. Such a droll
fellow he is! He is always getting into some scrape
or other. One day he saw a piece of lace hanging
before the fire to dry. Jack immediately seized it,
dragged it all about the room, and finally left it, torn
and dirty, in the middle of the room. At that moment -
the cook came in and missed her piece of finery. The
next moment she saw it lying on the floor completely
spoiled. She knew at once who was the culprit; but
Jack, who knew that he would be punished for his fun,
had disappeared and did not put in an appearance for
several hours. |























































































































































































































































































































































LITTLE BESSIE.

ESTERDAY, little Bessie went to spend the day in
the country with her cousins. As soon as she got
to the farm she was taken to the barn to see the
puppies. There were four of them cuddled up in a
large box. What cute little things they were! No
wonder their mother was proud of them. Bessie went
into ecstasies over the little beauties, but there was
one of them that she liked more than all the rest.
She carried it about with her all the day, and when
evening came, could not bear to leave it. She was so
anxious to keep the little creature that her uncle prom-
ised her that as soon as the puppy was old enough to
leave its mother, she should take it home with her
and have it for her own. This satisfied Bessie, and
she went home happy and proud of the little pet she
was to have so soon.
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THE ADJUTANT.

F the numerous birds that inhabit the East, none,
perhaps, is more useful than-the adjutant. Stand-
ing some five feet high, he stalks about on his long legs
with such a military air that no wonder he has acquired
the name of the officer whose movement he so closely
imitates. There is no strutting like a young military
man, but a slow, deliberate gait. No heap of rubbish
escapes him, but he does not rush towards it like other
carrion birds; he seems perfectly aware that his impos-
ing appearance is quite enough to scare away the crows,
cats, and dogs that may have begun rummaging.

As he bends over, examining the rubbish, his black
wings and tail cocked out behind, and white breast,
give him the most ridiculous resemblance to a very
thin-legged, long-necked gentleman, with his hands
behind him, inspecting a book-stall.














































































































































































































































































































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DONETTIS BABOONS AND MONKEYS.

N Italian, by the name of Donetti, after a study of
many years, succeeded in training a number of
baboons and monkeys to do his bidding.

In one scene Mdlle. Minié came in, riding on a mag-
nificent dog, and went through her exercises in a cred-
itable manner, jumping on and off her courser with the
greatest agility, and performing in imitation of circus
riders, going through all her feats with a serious face,
and with the greatest apparent satisfaction. M. Donetti
then introduced the tight-rope dancer, a mandrill of the
largest size, who, in imitation of the rope-dancer, had
his feet chalked, and then commenced his dancing and
jumping on the rope, with a balance-pole in his hands.
At the rise of the curtain, and at the sound of martial
music, the Marchioness of Batavia entered, riding in
her barouche, drawn by two white poodles.
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THE MASTIFF.

"[ HERE are several species of mastiffs, but the Eng-

lish is the most valued.: Its colour is buff, vary-
ing in shade, with dark nose and ears. As a watch-dog,
the mastiff has no superior.

A young man once going into a house of public
entertainment at Paris, was told that his dog, a fine
mastiff, could not be permitted to enter, and he accord-
ingly was left with the guard at the door. The young
man had scarcely entered the lobby when his watch |
was stolen. He returned to the guard, and prayed that
his dog might be admitted, as through his means he
might discover the thief. The dog was suffered to
accompany his master, who intimated to the animal
that he had lost something. The dog set out immedi-
ately: in quest of the stolen article, and fastened on
the thief, whose guilt, on searching him, was made
apparent.
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THE SEA-BIRDS.

()NE lovely summer evening a four-oared boat swept

out from the tiny harbour of one of the smaller
western isles of Scotland. The object of the expedi-
tion was to gather birds’ eggs, and they had with them
avery active little dog named “Jim.” take had been made in letting him go, for while the
party were amusing themselves on one of the islands,
their attention was suddenly attracted by a dismal
yelping and howling from poor Jim. A crowd of infu-
riated birds had attacked him in revenge for the indis-
criminate slaughter of their little ones. Swooping
down upon him they beat him with their wings till.
poor Jim was fain to howl for mercy. But the anger
of the birds was now aroused, and as a blow across the
eyes from their stout pinions is no small matter, the
party left the island rather hurriedly, taking with them
a few eggs as specimens.







































THE PRIZE-FIGHTER.

|X my dream I saw a prize-ring all staked out.
A crowd with eager faces surges round
And waits until the champion comes out.
A cheer! The Hero’s found!

How can I paint the monster that I saw?

It was a man until you reached its head,

And then a bull-dog, with grim, murderous jaw
And rabid eyes and red!

Then came a louder cheer, as, by its side

Another brute, half man, half bull-dog, stood,

Each looking as if ’*t were life’s noblest pride
To have a brother’s blood!

They licked their fangs, their wicked eyes they roll’d,
Then at each other flew with deadly rage;
And every bite and every blow that fold,

Was writ in glory’s page.
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THE MONKEYS’ REVENGE.

[_4PY BARKER, when living in India, had a small,
long-haired terrier, who was always barking at
the monkeys which abounded around the station. The
barking seemed to annoy the monkeys greatly, and
they waited a fit occasion for revenge. Such an occa-—
sion at last offered itself. One day, when Lady Barker
was walking with her pet “Fury” she saw a thin brown
arm protride through the masses of gorgeous foliage,
and the offending Fury grasped by his long hair and
drawn within the cover of the bushes. It was vain for
Lady Barker to try to rescue her little pet, and she had
to see him passed from branch to branch, while each
avenging monkey pulled out his hair, and pinched him
according to fancy, till, when a branch overhanging a
deep valley had been reached, the monkeys completed
their revenge by dropping Fury into the depths below.
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FUNNY FACES OF BEASTS.

HAT a great variety of beasts there is, and how
queer some of them look! Some of the animals
are noble in appearance, notably the lion and the tiger,
—also some of the domestic animals, such as the horse
and the larger species of dogs; but a large majority
of the beasts are funny in face and in form. Take the
monkeys for example. Is there anything so laughable
as those little creatures with their funny faces and
droll antics ? Then there is the hippopotamus with his -
immense mouth and snout, the rhinoceros, with his
horn in the middle of his face, the elephant with his
trunk and flapping ears, and the giraffe with his long,
Slender neck. - All the animals seem to have some
peculiarity of face or feature, and I might go on naming’
them for a long time; but I have merely given a few
examples, and you can learn the rest by looking at
the pictures.
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