Citation
Little Nell

Material Information

Title:
Little Nell : the flower seller
Creator:
Brodie, Emily ( Author, Primary )
John F. Shaw and Co ( Publisher )
R. & E. Taylor (Firm) ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John F. Shaw and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed.
Physical Description:
64, 16 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Street life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Success -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poor -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1893 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1893 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1893
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
Little Nell sells flowers to help her poor sick mother but finds a street urchin who needs her help even more.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Emily Brodie.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026606151 ( ALEPH )
ALG3007 ( NOTIS )
213482908 ( OCLC )

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Page 64.

Many people turned to look at the little pair.”







BY



EMIEY BRODIE,

AUTHOR OF
‘*RIGHT ABOUT FACE;” ‘LONELY JACK;” ‘DANDY BLUE;”
“UNCLE FRED'S SHILLING;” ETC.



New EDITION.

LONDON:

JOHN F. SHAW AND CoO.,,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C.









SUNDAY SCHOOL REWARDS.

In attractive cloth covers, Illustrated.

Price SIXPENCE each.

LUCIA’S TRUST. DAFF’S CORNER.
se renee aay mun, | 7WO LITTLE HELPERS.
AND THIN. | CLAUD'S VICTORY.

BIRDIE’S CHAMPION.
HUMP AND ALL. LITTLE BRIGHTEYES.

THOSE TWO. DODY AND JOSS.
LITTLE TED. ON HIS METTLE.
THE BOY MARTYR. LITTLE NELL.
CHRISTIE'S GIFT. DUST HO!
MANLY AND BRAVE. HOLIDAYS.

ADVENTURES of a SIXPENCE. MIGHT BE WORSE.

Lonpon: Joun F. SHaw & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.









CONTENTS.

—_*—

CHAPTER I,
SWEET VIOLETS

CHAPTER II.
NELL’S HOME.

CHAPTER III.
THE LOST PENNIES

CHAPTER IV.
DRESSING DOLLS

CHAPTER V.
GERTY . .

CHAPTER VI,
GERTY’S NEW HOME

‘CHAPTER VII,
THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE

CHAPTER VIII,
NELLIE’S FLITTING . 3

PAGE

It

28

35

43

49

57













SEIT TLE MeL.



CHAPTER I.
SWEET VIOLETS.

46 OTHER, just look, is not my basket
i pretty? I am sure I shall sell my



flowers to-day, and then you will
have some dinner,” said little Nell, for though
she was nearly twelve, still she was “little Nell,”
and would be all her life. “Good-bye, mother,
T’ll be back as soon as I can.”

“Good-bye, my child, and may God bless
you,” her sick mother said, as she kissed the
bright face.



8 LITTLE NELL.



So out Nell went with her basket, full of
hope that she would find customers. Surely
every one would want flowers on such a fresh
spring morning. :

“Any violets or snowdrops, sir; violets or
snowdrops?” she sang in her cheerful voice,
which made more than one passer-by look at
her. ‘
Nell and her mother had only. lived in the
noisy city of London about two years, and she
could well remember the pleasure of picking
flowers in the old country lanes. She had little
thought then that she would ever be a little
flower-seller. But Nell’s face was happy still,
for in spite of many anxious cares in the home,
she and her mother possessed something that
nobody could take away from them. God’s
love makes the poorest home a home of peace.

Nell made her way to a railway station, some
little distance from the street in which she lived.
She had found that people were often tempted
with her flowers when they passed through
those great doors, She had sold nearly half



SWEET VIOLETS. 9



her little bouquets when she noticed a girl sitting
on the stone step. Her feet were bare, her poor
dress torn and ragged. Nell could not help
looking at her every ‘now and then as she sold
her flowers, and she wondered who she was
and where she came from. The child had
large, wistful eyes, and every time Nell looked
the eyes seemed watching her and her basket.
_ “Would you like one of my flowers ?” asked
Nell, going up to her side. x

The child stretched out her poor thin hand
and took the snowdrop eagerly. ae eS ;
a Nobody never gave me a flower before," a she
said. “Oh, ain’t it pretty ? Paras

“Yes, I love flowers,” said Nell.’ “I used to
‘pick them when I lived in the country.”

“Did you?” said the child; “did they grow
in the fields ?” ‘ oN

“Ves, and-in the woods. I think I like snow-
drops best of all, because they come after the
cold long winter. Mother says they make her
think of God, because they are so pure and
white.”



io.” LITTLE NELL.

“Who is God ?” asked the poor child.

“Don’t you know about Him?” said Nell,
in an astonished voice. ‘Why it was God who
made us, and loves us so.”

The child shook her head. “I never heard
of Him,” she said wonderingly.

“Poor little girl!” said Nell pityingly. “I
am so sorry you don’t know about Jesus, ’cause
He’d make you happy. He loves children,
mother says.”

“I wish He would love me,” said the poor
child. “I’ve nobody to love me.”

“You must come here again, and I will tell
you more about Jesus. I must try and sell my
flowers now; but take this penny, you look so
hungry. I am sure mother would say that we
could spare one.”

Waiting for no thanks, Nell turned away,
her cheery voice singing, “Any violets or
snowdrops?” while her face looked _ still
brighter for the little kindness she had shown
to the unloved child. :





CHAPTER IL.

NELL’S HOME.

YCELL did not find the last half of
her bunches so easy to sell. The



d bright spring morning had changed,
and a heavy shower had helped to empty the
streets of people who had time to think of
buying flowers. She stood under the shelter
of a house for some time, but everybody
hurried past, anxious to get to their journey’s
end. But the shower was over at last, and
once more the sun peeped out. Nell peeped
out too from the sheltering doorway, and though
the street still looked very sloppy and miserable,

she determined to make a start. She remem-
II



I2 LITTLE NELL.



bered her mother waiting at home for the
money to buy her dinner, and then she set off
at once, never heeding that her poor boots were
not as weather-tight as they might have been.

It was more than an hour later than she
intended when she felt she could turn towards
home, carrying a light basket and a still lighter
heart, for her day’s work was done as far as
selling flowers went.

“Mother dear,” she said as she entered the
one room she called home, “have I seemed a
very long time to-day? I was getting on so
beautifully till the rain came, and then every-
body set off running home as fast as their legs
would carry them. I could not help laughing
to see them.” 3

“Did you get wet, Nell?” asked her mother
rather anxiously.

“Oh, no, mother, not one bit. I know just
the right place to go to when it rains hard.”
“Why, Nell, you have nearly emptied your
basket to-day ; you must have found a great
many customers.” !



























Se aa,

TAY RS RL



Page 9.

i id.”
* € Nobody never gave me a flower before,’ she sai
**Nol







NELL’S HOME. ; 15



“Yes, mother, is it not splendid? But I
thought I should sell my flowers well to-day.”

“Why, dear ?”

“ Because I asked God to help me,” said Nell
softly. “Teacher said on Sunday that she was
sure God cares whether I sell my bunches or
not, and so I just told Him how poorly you
were, and how much you wanted some dinner.
And you see, mother, He does care, doesn’t
He?”

“Yes, dear, I am quite sure He cares. Jesus
would not have told us that not a sparrow falls
to the ground without His knowledge, if He
had not wished to teach us that He knows all
about us, and really cares for us.”

“Qh, mother, I do wish a poor little girl I
spoke to to-day knew about Jesus! She was
sitting on the steps at the railway-station, and
looked so sad and miserable.”

“Poor little child, I am afraid there are many
like that in this great city.”

“T gave her one of my flowers, and she said
nobody had ever given her a flower before;



16, LITTLE NELL,



and, mother, just think, she had never. heard.-of
God!”

“And yet she lives in 1 London, where there
are so many good people.”

“Teacher was telling us the other day ‘about
the poor black children who have never heard
about God, and she called them little heathen;
but I think this little girl must have been a
heathen too, though she wasn’t black. She
looked so very hungry, mother, that I could
not help giving her a ‘penny. You won’t mind,
will you? I would rather go without some
of my dinner if you really think we could not
spare it,”

“Yes, my Nell, I think we can Pelle spare
the poor. child the penny, though we have~so
few. I am glad you thought of it, for I think
her need must be greater than ours.”

“But, mother, I am forgetting that you must
want your dinner; it’s always so nice to tell
you everything.”

“Well, Nell, I have something to tell you

»

too...



NELL’S HOME. 17





“Have you? What is it?” asked Nell,
looking up eagerly.

“Why, Miss Burdon has been here.”

“What, my own dear Miss Burdon?” said
Nell, clapping her hands in her excitement.

“Yes, your own dear Miss Burdon; and
she was so kind, and brought me such a nice
dinner. Wasn't it good of her?”

“Yes, very, very good; and did you enjoy it,
mother ?”

“Yes, more than anything I have had for
a long time; and there is a little piece waiting
for you, my little Nell.”

“Oh, mother dear, you® should have eaten
every bit yourself; you need it so.”

“Yes, but you forget. I should not have
enjoyed it so much if I had eaten it all myself.
I should not have been happy if my brave little
Nell had not shared it with me.”

Nell was very hungry with her morning’s
work, and the tempting food was specially
welcome. She had learnt to be very content with:

her humble fare, but there were many days
B



18 LITTLE NELL.

when she could have eaten.a little more without
any difficulty. >

“And how have you got on with your work
this morning, mother?” asked Nell, when she
had finished.

“I could not do much, for my head ached
badly, and for-a long time after you were gone
I could only lie quite still; but Miss Burdon’s
visit cheered me up, and after she was gone I
set to work. ‘See, I have finished one young
lady ;” and Mrs. Healey held up her work: for
Nell to inspect.

“Oh, mother, she is a real beauty!” cried
Nell, looking at th@ gaily-dressed doll with
admiration. “She is the very best you have
ever done.”

“Yes, I really think she is; and Miss Burdon
' says she has been speaking of my work to
the manager of some grand toy-shop at the
West End, and as her family have been cus-
tomers there for many years, he has promised
to take some of my dolls and try and sell them..
He has ordered three to begin with. And just:



NELL’S HOME, i9



look here, Nell, at these beautiful pieces of
silk and satin and lacevand fur that Miss Burdon
brought me; for she said these dolls must be
beautifully dressed, ‘like real ladies. She has
been looking at the dolls in the shop-windows,
so that she might give me some fresh ideas, for
she knows I cannot go out myself.”

“Tt is very, very kind,’ said little Nell.
“Why, mother dear, you have not looked so
bright and well for a long time. You have got
just a wee bit of colour in.your cheeks.”

“Yes, I do feel cheered up, Nell. -A kind,
cheery word goes a long way, and your Miss
Burdon knows how to “give it if anybody
does.”







CHAPTER III.

THE LOST PENNIES.




a

MNCELL’S Miss Burdon lived about
( ANS three-quarters of a mile away from
tos PSD the court in which Mrs, Healey had
found a home. Shé had lived in that big,
sombre London house all her life, for her




\
Z



mother had gone there as a bride. Little
by little since the time May. Burdon had
left school she had grown to know something
of her poorer neighbours, and now many a
weary mother welcomed her visits. She had
from the first been much interested in Nell and
her mother, and Nell returned her love, believing
there was no one half so good as her Miss

20



THE LOST PENNIES. at



Burdon in all the country through. It had
been Miss Burdon’s suggestion that Mrs. Healey
should try her hand at doll dressing. Her
fingers seemed just fitted for such dainty work,
and indeed the poor woman had no strength
to seek work outside her home. Her first
attempts had been so successful that Miss
Burdon had determined to try and get orders
for her at a good West-End shop. Having
supplied her with some suitable materials, she
was very anxious to know how she had
succeeded. So when two days had passed she
determined to pay another visit, and see how
the work progressed. Her little niece, Margery,
or Madge, as she was more often called, had
heard a great deal about little Nell. She had
heard, too, of the grand new dolls, and now
begged to be allowed to go with her aunt to
see them.

The warm spring weather of a few days
earlier had given place to cold north-easterly
winds, and little Madge was glad of her warm
fur cape and all her winter garments. As she



22 LITTLE NELL.

trudged along by her aunt’s side she ome
stopped short.

“Auntie, do stop! Just look at that poor
little girl. How bitterly she is crying! Do let
us ask what is the matter!”

Miss Burdon was always ready to comfort
anybody, old or young, but she felt especially
for a little child’s sorrows, and this child seemed
to have a very big sorrow indeed.

“What is the matter? Can you tell me
what troubles you so?” asked Miss Burdon
kindly.

The little arms looked blue with cold, for
there was nothing to cover the poor thin
shoulders. There was no hat on her head,
which showed to the full the tangled brown
hair, and her boots looked two or three sizes
too big for her. Altogether she was a very
pitiful picture. Miss Burdon had to repeat her
question more than once before the sobs ceased
‘a little, and the poor child ventured to look
up at her questioner.

“Ah, that’s right!” said Miss Burdon. “I



THE LOST PENNIES. 23



want to try and help you, but you know I can’t
till I hear what is the matter. Have you lost
your way ?”

The tangled head shook decidedly, so Miss
Burdon tried something else.

“Have you been sent to a shop, and lost
your money on the way?”

“Yes; I ’ve—lost—my—pennies,” the child
said between her sobs.

“Is that it? Come, let us see if we can help
you find them. Stop crying, little one, and
then you can tell us all about it, and where you
dropped them.”

The child wiped her eyes with the corner of
her frock, and then for the first time looked
up into Miss Burdon’s face. It was such a
kind one that the child seemed to gain
courage. |

“It was Jim Hatcher; he gave my arm a
nudge, and then I dropped the pennies.”

“And do you think he picked them up?”
“Yes. Jim’s a bad boy; he wanted them
hisself.”



24 LITTLE NELL,

“ And what were you going to buy with the
pennies?”

“JT was going to the ‘Three Bears’ to get
some beer for Mrs. Lawson; and, oh, she’ll kill
me when she knows I haven’t any.” And at
this the sobs came back again so pitifully
that Miss Burdon had a hard matter to pacify
her. :

“What is your name, my poor child, and
where do you live?”

“I’m Gerty,” she managed to say at last,
“and I lives along o’ Mrs. Lawson in Nether
Court.”

Miss Burdon looked round at little Madge,
who was standing by with her kind eyes full of
pity.
“ Auntie, won’t you give the. little girl the
pennies?” she asked as she saw her aunt's
hesitation:

“TI should like to help the poor child more
than giving her the pennies,” said Miss Burdon.
“I must go and take her home, but I should
not like to take you there, my little Madge. I





a
bo pA IL

“2



§©T 've—lost—my—pennies,’ the child said between her sobs.”

Page 23.







THE LOST PENNIES. 27
tell you what I can do: I will take you to
Mrs. Healey’s, and you can be looking at the
dolls while I take Gerty home.”

So the three walked together-a little farther
down the street, till they came to Mrs. Healey’s
door, and Miss Burdon left little Madge to wait
for her return.

“Now, Gerty, you must show me the way,”
said Miss Burdon, taking the little thin hand
in hers. “It is not very far, is it?”

“Not very far,” said Gerty.

“Have you no mother, my child?”

Gerty shook her head.

“Are you sent very often to the ‘Three
Bears’ ?”’

“Yes, very often if Mrs.. Lawson isn’t there
herself.”

A few steps more brought them to Nether
Court, and Miss Burdon felt the little hand
tremble in hers as they turned the corner.

S- S—-







CHAPTER IV.

DRESSING DOLLS.






¢ a f ISS BURDON felt as she walked
(||) along by Gerty’s side that perhaps
zi > she was undertaking a difficult task ;
but she thought if the Lord Jesus Christ had
been walking by, He would have comforted a
Jittle child’s sorrow, and so she would do what
she could. She was scarcely prepared, however,
for her reception. Mrs. Lawson had already
been drinking too much, and her anger was
terrible to see when she looked upon Gerty with
no pot of beer in her hand. She lifted her
hand, and would have struck the child a heavy

blow had not Miss Burdon drawn Gerty close
28



DRESSING DOLLS. 29



to her, saying firmly, “You will not strike this
child in my presence.”

After a time she got the woman to speak a
_ little more calmly ; but she still affirmed that
Gerty was an idle, good-for-nothing child, and
she would turn her right out of the house that
very night, that she would.

“Will you be willing then to give the child
over into my keeping?” asked Miss Burdon,
speaking very slowly.

“T don’t care what you do with her—she’s
none of mine. The sooner that she’s out of
Nether Court the better. Good riddance of
bad rubbish.”

So in a few more minutes Miss Burdon was
once more out in the street, with little Gerty’s
hand in hers. The child, simply feeling that
she had found a friend, walked on unquestion-
ingly, Miss Burdon felt that God had sent her
a. little child to care for, and He would show
her how to do it. She made her way back to
Mrs, Healey’s, where little Madge was waiting
for her. The time had not been long to her, so:



30 LITTLE NELL. -
interested was she in the dolls that Mrs. Healey
had been dressing.

“Now, auntie, do they not look just like real
ladies ?” she said, directly Miss Burdon appeared.
She was so intent on the dolls, that for the
moment she quite forgot about Gerty.and her
troubles.

In another’ moment, however, she had caught
sight of the forlorn little figure that stood
timidly behind Miss Burdon.

“Why, auntie, you have brought the little girl
with you!” was Madge’s next exclamation.
“Could you not find her: home?”

“Gerty must be my little girl now,” said Miss
Burdon. “Poor child,she has no mother to care
for her.”

“She do look cold, poor bairn,” said Mrs..
Healey. ‘Here, Nell, put your little stool close.
to the fire, and let her have a good warm. Poor:
child, why she’s no hat-or jacket on, and it’s
a bitter cold day.”

Gerty did as she was told, seating herself
silently on the stool Nell placed for her.



DRESSING DOLLS. 31



“Why, mother!” exclaimed Nell joyfully,
“it’s the little girl I told you about the other
day. Don’t.you remember, I gave her a flower,.
and she said nobody had ever given her a
flower before?” .

Gerty looked up at Nell as she spoke, and a
wan smile of recognition passed over the sad
little face.

“Qh, Miss Burdon, I am so glad you have
found her! Now you will tell her all about
Jesus, and how He loves us.”

Miss Burdon sat looking at Gerty. She was
thinking what she must do with her. Of one,
thing she felt quite sure—God had sent her, and
He would find a way of providing for her; but
how and when she could not see at present.

“We must not forget what I came for, Mrs.
Healey,” she said, turning towards her. “I am
so anxious to know how you have succeeded
with the new dolls.”

“Well, miss, here they are; I don’t know
what you will think of them,” said Mrs. Healey, «
holding up a handsome young lady.



32 LITTLE NELL.





“You have succeeded admirably,” said Miss
Burdon, surveying the doll with satisfaction.
“She is just like the one I saw last week in
the Burlington Arcade. You have managed
the dress capitally. Now let me look at the
others.”

Mrs. Healey next handed to Miss Burdon a
doll dressed in seaside costume.

“Come here, little Madge. Did you ever see
such a pretty young lady ?” said Miss Burdon,

“Oh, Auntie, she is charming! She looks just
as if she were at the seaside, and was going
down for her bath. She is carrying her bathing
dress and towel. You are clever, Mrs. Healey,
to make it all so complete.”

“JT should never have thought of it, my dear,
if Miss Burdon had not kindly told me how
to do it. Now you must look at the third young
lady. I was just trimming her hat when you
came in.”

“Then please go on. Perhaps you can finish
it while I think what I can do with my little
girl,”



DRESSING DOLLS. 33
A ees Sea Pia NES

“Tt is awkward for you, miss, to know what
to do with her all of a hurry. Would you like
her to stay with us for to-night, till you have
thought over what to do?”

“Do you think you could manage with her?
I should not like her to increase your cares.”

“T am sure we could. do with her, if it would
be any comfort to you, miss.”

“Tt would, indeed, be a very great accommo--
dation. Though I was most thankful to be
allowed to take the child out of so much misery,
still, I did not quite know what to do with
her first.”

So it was soon arranged that for that night
Gerty was to find a resting-place with Mrs.
Healey, and Miss Burdon went home to think
what God would have her do with the lonely
child He had given into her keeping.

Gerty seemed well content with her new
quarters, and looked a very different little girl
after she had had a good warm bath, and the
tangled hair had been put into something like

order, The hot bread and milk brought quite
c



34 . LITTLE NELL.

a glow to the pale face, and she listened
intently as Mrs. Healey told of Christ’s love
to little children. No wonder that the story
of His great love fell sweetly on the ear of
the unloved child. Nobody had told her about
Him before. As little Nell said, she was as
much a heathen as the little black children of
whom Miss Burdon had told her.







CHAPTER V.

GERTY.

ELL’S Miss Burdon liked to ask
God about everything. She thought
there was nothing too great and



nothing too small to take to Him. So that
night she told Him all about little Gerty,
and asked Him to teach her what to do with
her. Then it came to her mind that, perhaps,
Mrs. Healey would be willing to keep the child
a little while, if a weekly sum were promised
for her. She knew that she would be in kind,
motherly hands, which was just what the child
most needed.

On her way Miss Burdon visited the toy shop,

35



36 LITTLE NELL.

and was delighted to find that the dolls were
approved of, and a good order promised for
Mrs. Healey; so that there was every hope
of her getting regular employment. Then Miss
Burdon set off with a glad heart to tell Mrs.
Healey her good news.

As she went along she saw Nell with her
basket on her arm, busy as usual selling her
flowers. Her bright face looked almost brighter
than usual as she caught sight of Miss Burdon.

“T am just going to see your mother, Nell,
for I have such good news. The manager of
the toy shop seems willing to give her regular
work in dressing dolls, for those she sent gave
great satisfaction. You must not forget to
thank our heavenly Father, my child, for this is
another proof of His loving care, isn’t it?”

“Yes; He is good to us, isn’t He, Miss
Burdon?” :

“Yes, dear child, very good; and He likes
us to thank Him for His love. And how is
Gerty this morning ?”

“Oh, she’s getting on fine, Miss, thank you,



GERTY. 37

She said, this morning, as how she hoped you
wouldn’t let her go back to Mrs. Lawson any
more.”

“Never, if I can help it, Nell; but I must
not keep you from selling your flowers.” And
as Miss Burdon passed on her way, she could
hear the sweet young voice crying, “ Any violets
to-day, sweet-scented violets ?”

Mrs. Healey was as pleased as anyone could
wish with Miss Burdon’s good news. It had,
indeed, lifted a heavy care from the poor
woman’s heart, for she knew she could. only
work at home, and now there was hope of
being able to provide for their slender wants.
She was quite willing to fall in with Miss
Burdon’s plan for Gerty to remain under her
care for the present; and so the unloved child
found a temporary home with Nell and her
mother.

Not many weeks had passed, however, before
Miss Burdon found that, with all Mrs. Healey’s
kind care, it could no longer be a safe home
for little Gerty. They lived too near to Mrs.



38 LITTLE NELL.



Lawson, and Gerty came running in like a
frightened hare one morning, saying that Mrs.
Lawson was coming after her, and declared
she would have her some day. With all Gerty’s
true love to her new mother and little Nell,
she could not get over her constant fright,
and very unwillingly Miss Burdon decided that
she must find another home for her little waif.
Nell was quite broken-hearted when she heard
that Gerty would have to leave ‘them, for the
little girls’ love to one another had grown very
strong.

Miss Burdon was anxious to hear of some
motherly woman in the country who would
be willing to take the child, and suddenly
Mrs. Healey thought of a neighbour of hers
in her old country home who had lost her only
child. Perhaps she would let little Gerty find
a place in her sad heart. So Miss Burdon
wrote and asked her if she felt she could receive
poor motherless Gerty.

The lonely widow wrote back after two days
to say that she was quite willing to receive



GERRY = "39



the child as Miss Burdon suggested. She did
not tell what a struggle it had been to her to
make up her mind, and how many tears she
had shed as she brought out the little bed once
more that had been unused so long, and made
preparations to receive the little stranger.

It would be hard to tell which was the saddest
of the two children when the last night came
for them to be together.

_ “But, Gerty, you do know now that Jesus
loves you, don’t you?” said Nell through her
tears.

“Yes, Nell, Iam sure He does; and I know
you told me about Him first, didn’t you?”

“Ves, I think I did,” said Nell, with a bright
smile; “but it was mother who told you all
about His dying for us, and rising again, that
we might be forgiven, wasn’t it?”

“Yes; it was mother told me that. She has
read me the story over and over till I know
it all myself,” said Gerty..

“You will try and be good, won’t you, Gerty,
so that you'll please Him? You won't say



40 LITTLE NELL.
what isn’t true for anything, will you, ’cause
it would grieve Him so?”

“No; I'll ask Him to help me to be good,”
said Gerty solemnly.

Then the little girls began trying to picture
what Gerty’s new home would be like.

“Tt will be in the real country, Nell, won’t
it? Oh, I want to see it so much; for I can’t
think how it will seem to have no houses,” ©
said Gerty.

“You will like it ever so much better,” said
Nell, a little sadly.

“I wish you were going too, Nell,” said
Gerty, slipping her hand in hers. “I think I
should have all I want if you were only going
too.”

“JT wonder if we shall have grown quite big
before we see each other again. You see I
couldn’t leave mother for anything, she wants
me so much.” Here Mrs, Healey’s voice was
heard calling to them, and telling them that
it was time to go to bed, for Gerty would have
to be up quite early in the morning.









‘She could hear the sweet young voice crying, ‘Any violets to-day,
sweet-scented violets? ’”

Page 37.











CHAPTER VI. ’

GERTY’S NEW HOME.

pa ~~

| (%%, HE next day Miss Burdon was to
| take Gerty to her new home, and,
childlike, she was delighted with the

novelty of a journey. Sometimes, on very




wet days, she had ventured within the heavy
doors that led into the railway station where
Nell had seen her first. She had _ stood
on the bridge and watched the great snorting
engines with wondering eyes, and the shrill
sounds that issued from them.had. many a
‘time made the timid child tremble. She had
‘watched the crowds of people as they came
-and went, and sometimes wished that she might
43



44 LITTLE NELL.



join them, but she had not the faintest idea
where the trains went to. For all she knew
they might go on and on through crowded
streets such as she knew so well. She had never
seen anything greener than the neighbouring
churchyard, which had lately been laid out as a
recreation ground.

When at last, seated by Miss Burdon’s side,
she found herself being actually whirled along,
she was silent for very wonder, and Miss
Burdon found her nestling a little nearer to her
side, till the small hand slipped into hers with a
sense of protection.

“The train is rather noisy, isn’t it?” said Miss
Burdon kindly.

“Yes, and don’t the things move fast?” said
Gerty, gazing steadily out of the window.

“Tt is you that are moving along so fast, the
trees and houses are standing quite still while
we pass them.

“Wouldn’t Nell like this?” said Gerty after a
long silence, while she had been gradually
getting more used to her new surroundings,



GERTY’S NEW HOME. 45

“ She used to live in the country, and she’s told
me as how she used to pick the wild flowers.
Look! look! Miss Burdon, are they not lovely ?
I’d like just to get out and pick as many as I
could carry.”

The grass was nearly ready for cutting, and
the fields were golden with buttercups; no
wonder that Gerty, the poor London child, was
delighted with all the fresh beauty.

In a little over three quarters of an hour the
train drew up at the small station at Rooklands.
It was not difficult to tell why the village had
received its name, for not far from the station
stood a cluster of tall venerable elms, in which
the busy rooks were at that moment. holding
forth to each other in most excited fashion.

“Oh, Miss Burdon, do look at those great
black birds, what a chattering they make!”

“Yes, indeed they do; and do you see what a
number of big nests they have built right at the
top of the great trees?”

“Don’t you wonder they don’t fall down?
said Gerty.



46 LITTLE NELL,



“One would think they would, but they are
so cleverly built that they stand even on a
windy night. Is it not wonderful to think that
God has taught the birds to build their nests,
and make them warm and cosy for their young
ones?” .

“Have they got their young ones right up
there?” asked Gerty, gazing up to the high
trees.

“Yes, in the early spring they get their nests
all ready ; you would be amused to see how
busy they are. They pull away the twigs with
their strong beaks and fly away to the tree they
have chosen. Then they twist them in and out
and into shape till they have made the nest
quite to their fancy, and they are ready for their
eggs.” 3

“They must be very happy in their nests I
think,” said Gerty. “I’ve sometimes stopped
to look at the poor birds in cages near our
court, and they keep beating against the wires.
They must be much happier flying about like
that.”



' GERTY’S NEW HOME. 47-



The lambs next claimed Gerty’s interest; and
Miss Burdon had some difficulty in urging the
little girl to go on, so fascinated was she with
all the new scenes around her.

But at last her new home was in sight.

“Look, Gerty, there is the cottage ; how pretty
it is. You see what a different roof it has to
the London houses.”

“What is it made of?” asked Gerty.

“That is a thatch roof,” said Miss Burdon;
“it is made of straw, and makes the cottage
very warm and comfortable. Thatched roofs
are not used much now, because they burn
easily if they get on fire; but I think they look
very pretty.”

“ And are those roses growing up the side?”
asked Gerty eagerly. “Oh, how I wish that
Nell was here!”

“T think that must be Mrs. Bailey who is
going down to the pond for some water. She

‘has some ducks I see, and I dare say she has
some chickens too; how you will enjoy feeding
them.” But Gerty forgot the pond and the



48 LITTLE NELLI.

ducks as Miss Burdon mentioned Mrs. Bailey’s
name, for it reminded her that she would soon
have to part with the friend who had been so
kind and good to her, and make her home with

a stranger.







CHAPTER VII.

THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE.



she turned round and saw Miss Burdon
and Gerty standing at the cottage door. As
she hastened toward them, Miss Burdon caught
sight of a kind motherly face, and she felt at
once that she was going to leave Gerty in good
hands.

“Good morning, ma’am,” she said, curtseying
to Miss Burdon, “I hope you have found your
way easily; it’s a bit of a walk from the station,

and the sun’s warm this morning.”
L 49-



conee LITTLE ‘NELL,



“Yes, thank you, quite easily. A, porter kindly
gave us very plain directions; he said we could
not mistake your pretty thatched cottage covered
with roses.”

“Well, it is pretty, ma’am, isn’t it? Eh, there
are plenty of beautiful things in God’s world if
folks has only got the eyes to see’em. And is
this the little girl, ma’am ?”

“Yes, this is Gerty,” said Miss Burdon. “I

hope you will find her a useful, loving little
maiden.”
_ “Oh! yes, I am sure I shall,” said Mrs. Bailey
cheerily, “ we shall soon understand one another.
You would like to run down to the pond and
see my little ducklings, I dare say. I have
fourteen altogether, and they are such a pretty
little family, only I can’t help feeling sorry
for the poor hen who has mothered them.
She stands at the waters edge, and calls
and calls in such a-pitiful fashion. I do wish
sometimes as she could go after.them. There,
my dear, you run down and have a look at
them all.”



THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE. 51



“She’s a nice little lassie,” said Mrs. Bailey,
as Gerty disappeared down the little path.

“Yes, I hope she will grow up good,” said
Miss Burdon. “Mrs. Healey has been like a
mother to her, and it is wonderful how much
she has improved since she has been with her.
Poor child, she had nothing to make her good
or happy in the old miserable home.”

“There’s not much happiness anywhere,
ma’am, I’m thinking, where folks shut God
out of their homes. It beats me how it’s such
hard work to persuade people that God loves
’em. What can they want more than to know
that He spared not His only Son to die for
them? But here am I talking, and you must
be tired, ma’am, with your walk, please come
in and have a rest.” .

So Miss Burdon followed Mrs. Bailey into the
cottage, and she found the inside seemed as
sunny as the outside. The window was bright
with geraniums in full flower, and the stove
looked as if its owner took a pride in its

polishing.



52 TITTLE NEL.



“Do you live here all. alone?” asked Miss
Burdon, as she seated herself.

“Yes, ma’am, I’ve lived here all alone for nigh
seven years. If my wee girlie had lived she
would have been gone fourteen by this time; but,
you see, the Lord knew best. He’d given her
tome, and He’d aright to take away just as He
thought best. You see my husband had only
been taken from me a few months before, so
that my little girl and I were everything to each
other. Perhaps that was just why the good
Lord took her away to live along o’ Him. He’s
been just everything to me all these seven years.

‘Ive had nobody but Him, but eh, ma’am, He’s
been good company.”
“I am afraid that Gerty will rather change
your quiet life. Are you sure that you will like
to have her?”
_ “Well, ma’am, when the letter came first from

Mrs. Healey I laid it down, and I said to myself,
‘No, no, I don’t want no child here. She’d
worry me like with chattering when I’d fain be
quiet, and she’d come in with dirty feet just as







“The porter said we could not mistake your pretty thatched cottage.”
Page 50.







THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE. 55



the cottage floor was clean. So I seemed to

put it aside, and didn’t trouble myself much :
about it. But somehow I didn’t answer the
letter that day, and when I opened the Bible
that night I came in my reading to Pharaoh's
daughter finding Moses in the ark of bulrushes.
There was the words plain enough, ‘Take this
child and nurse it for me.’ Well, it seemed just
like a message from God, and I cried out I am
sure quite loud, and said, ‘O Lord, if it is for Thee
I am willing.” I sat and thought it all over for
a long time, and the more I thought of it the
more I felt sure that God meant me to have the
child. It all came easy then as if He’d planned
it. The very next day I brought out the little
bedstead that had been my wee girlie’s, and I
determined that I would use it for this lonely
child that God had sent me. I didn’t think as
I could have borne to look at it, but I am sure
it will be much better making a comfortable
bed for her than standing idle in the lumber
closet. Can you mount the stairs and have a

look at it?”



56 LITTLE NELL.



“Ves, indeed, I should like to see it very
much,” said Miss Burdon warmly.

“You must take care how you come, ma’am ;
the stairs are a bit steep, if you don’t know
them as I do.”

Miss Burdon soon reached the top, and there
in the sunny room stood the child’s small bed-
stead, with its counterpane white as the driven
snow.

“It does indeed look comfortable,” said Miss
Burdon, surveying the little room with pleasure.
“JT only hope that Gerty may be kind and
loving to you, and brighten up your home once
more.”

“Thank you, ma’am; I think we shall get on
nicely.”

Then Miss Burdon went downstairs, and found
Gerty at the cottage door wondering where they
were. With a few kind parting words she said
good-bye to her, and Mrs. Bailey and Gerty ran
down to the gate to watch her kind friend until
she was out of sight.





CHAPTER VIII.

NELLIE’S FLITTING.



as ‘hp coming had been a great delight, and
she had taken the lonely child to her heart as a
sister. Her mother had been wonderfully cheered
by Miss Burdon’s visits, and the regular work
she had obtained for her; but when the warm
days of summer came she began to fail, and
oftentimes the doll-dressing was very hard to do.
She always managed to brighten up when
Nell came home. But Nell saw more than her
mother knew, and often her young heart was sad
as she thought of her mother’s weakness.
37



58 LITTLE NELL.



Miss Burdon was struck one Sunday with
the grave look on Nell’s usually bright face,
and after the lesson was over called the child
to her.

“Is something the matter, Nell?” she asked.
“Ts something troubling you?” .

The kind words soon brought tears to Nell’s
eyes.

“Oh, it’s mother!” she said, as soon as she
could speak.

“Ts she worse, Nell?” asked Miss Burdon.

“Yes, miss, 1 am sure she is, though she
dosn’t say much ; but she is getting so thin, and
I know sometimes she can hardly make the
dolls’ dresses.” ;

“I am so sorry,” said Miss Burdon kindly.
« [ will come and see her very soon.”

It was not long before Miss Burdon kept her
promise. She found Nell’s account of her
‘mother was.a very true one. The poor woman
‘looked so. sadly weary, and unequal to her
‘work, that Miss Burdon fetched the doctor
there and then. She was relieved to find that



NELLIE’S FLITTING. 59



he did not think her seriously ill—only very
weak and needing air.

“The sooner she leaves this close house the
better,” the doctor said. “The kindest thing
you can do for her is to. get her away to fresh
air, and the sooner the better.”

‘Miss Burdon listened, and after he was gone
decided that Mrs. Healey must move without
delay. She promised to see a friend who lived
at Highgate, and ask her to find rooms for her
:in that more healthy neighbourhood.

It was the first week in June when Nell and
her mother found themselves in their new cottage
home. To Nell it was a day of supreme
happiness, and as she looked out upon the green
sunny fields, they reminded her of her old
country home.

“ Mother, isn’t it beautiful?” she said joyously.
“You will soon get well now. Oh, how sweet
the flowers smell!”

The door. of the cottage was opened by a
‘kind, motherly-looking woman, with a baby in
‘her arms, and close behind. her stood a merry-



60 LITTLE NELL,



faced boy of seven, anxious to catch sight of
the new-comers.

“Come in,” said the woman kindly; “you’re
tired, I’ll be bound; for the lady said as you
were not very strong. I’ve got a cup o’ tea
ready ; there’s nothing like a cup o’ tea, to my
thinking.”

So Mrs. Healey took the offered seat, while
Mrs. Turner proceeded to pour out the welcome
cup of tea. As she did so, Mrs. Healey glanced
up at the wall, and there she read these words:
“As for me and my house, we will serve the
Lord.” Then she knew the secret of Mrs.
Turner’s happy face and kind ways: the love
of Christ reigned in the home. Mrs. Healey
had not felt so much at rest for many a day.
Her heart was filled with hope. Surely she might
get well and strong in this peaceful cottage !

“Now you will like to come and see your
room,” said Mrs. Turner, when the tea was
finished. “It’s this way up the stairs; you
must take care how you come—it’s a bit dark
to strangers, but you’ll soon get used to it.



NELLIE’S FLITTING. +) Oi



Here, Jemmie, you open the kitchen door.
That’s right; now we shall get on.”

It was a pleasant, bright room into which
Mrs, Turner ushered Nell and her mother.
It looked across the pleasant fields towards
Hampstead, which were bathed in the beautiful
June sunshine.

“Here’s the cart, mother,’ said Nell, “just
when we are ready for it,’ and soon Jemmie
was as busy as any one bringing up the things,

“ What a useful little fellow he is?” said Mrs.
_ Healey to his mother, as she watched him
going to and fro. “Is he your eldest ?”

“Yes, my eldest now,” she said, with a tender
look in her eyes; “our first-born and our little
Elsie are gone home to be with God. Our
little girl came between Jemmy and Baby; she
was one of the merriest little girls that a mother
ever had. Our home seemed very lonesome
after she was gone. Yes, Jemmie is a useful
lad,” she added brightly, as the little fellow
appeared once more, carrying a chair almost as
big as himself; “he has gone out lately selling



62 LITTLE NELL. ~





spring flowers, and I think the ladies like to
buy of him, he looks so happy.” F
“Why, that is what my Nell does!” said
Mrs. Healey.
“Does she? Then they.can go out together
now, and take care of each other.”
Mrs. Turner was one of those kindly persons
that are never happier than when helping some-
body else. Seeing how weary Mrs. Healey
was, she set to work to help in putting things
straight, and very soon the: room began to look
quite homelike. :
“She is kind, mother, isn’t she?” said Nell,
when at last the kind-hearted landlady had
gone downstairs. : :
. “Yes, indeed, she is. Oh, Nell, how true
God’s promises are! how He-has cared for us
step by step, and led us on safely.”
. Very peacefully the mother and child slept
that night, and before many days were over ~
there was an evident improvement in Mrs.
Healey; a little tinge of colour began to show.
in her face, and her spirits were brighter. It



NELLIE’S FLITTING. 63,



was no longer such a burden to dress the dolls,
and kind Miss Burdon would often come in
and give her some fresh idea, so that the sale
for them continued very satisfactory.

Nell was not long before she wrote to Gerty,
and told her all about the bright new home; and.
Gerty wrote back telling her how happy she
was in the pretty thatch-roofed cottage. She
had much to tell about the ducks and chickens,
in which she took a keen interest, and saved
Mrs. Bailey many a journey down the garden.
It would have been difficult for anyone to
recognize the round-faced happy little girl who
so merrily ran in and out of the cottage as the
poor forlorn little maiden that Miss Burdon had
befriended some months before. Though far
from being perfect, she was every day trying
hard to do right, and Mrs. Bailey proved one of
the kindest and most patient mothers. She
never forgot her little friend Nell, and would
sometimes tell Mrs. Bailey how Nell had first
told her about Jesus.

Nell and Jemmie too became fast friends,



64 LITTLE NELL. -

They went to the same school together, and on
Saturdays they would find their way down to
the busier streets with their tempting-looking
baskets, and many people turned to look at
the little pair. So Nell was comforted, but she |
never forgot her first friend Gerty.



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OUR LITTLE LADY; or, Six Hundred Years Ago. 3).

** 4 charming chronicle of the olden time.”— The Christian.

THE WAY OF THE CROSS. A Tale of the Early Church. 1/6,
THE SLAVE GIRL OF POMPEII. with Illustrations. Cloth extra, 1,6,
ALL FOR THE BEST;; or, Bernard Gilpin’s Motto. 1)-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.



Fohn F. Shaw & Co.s Publications.



STORIES BY BRENDS.

UNCLE STEVE’S LOCKER. Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

‘© Brenda has never drawn two more charming pen and ink sketches.” —Sfeclator,

* An attractive story of one of the bravest and sweetest of girl-heroines.”
Saturday Review.

THE SHEPHERD’S DARLING. Large Cr. 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.

‘A pretty pastoral with an attractive heroine, whose chequered life-story is told
with the grace and delicacy that harmonize with the author’s original conception
of the child Bonnie; and a story that is well told and well devised must needs
be good.”Saturday Review.

THE PILOT’S HOUSE; or, Five Little Partridges.
With Illustrations by M. Irwin. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.
“One of those admirable sketches of child-life which this writer can so well
portray.” —Booksedler.

FROGGY’S LITTLE BROTHER. A Story of the East End.
New Illustrated Edition. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
“Very pathetic and yet comical reading.” —Guardian.

A SATURDAY’S BAIRN.
With Illustrations. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 5/-.
“A pleasing story, skilfully written, and in an excellent spirit.”—Record,

LITTLE COUSINS; or, Georgie’s Visit to Lotty.
With Illustrations by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘Sure to satisfy any little girl to whom it may be given.” Atheneum,
“Little girls who read it will long dream of the delights of the shops and the
Zoo.” —Guardian. }

VICTORIA BESS; or, The Ups and Downs of a Doll’s Life.
With Illustrations by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘4 charming book for little girls.” —Lzterary World.
‘Told with Brenda’s usual brightness and good aim as to teaching.” —A unt Judy,

LOTTY’S VISIT TO GRANDMAMA.
A Story for the Little Ones. With Fifty Illustrations. Square, cloth extra, 2/6,
“ An admirable book for little people." —Literary World.
“*A capital children’s story.’"—Record.
‘© Would form a nice birthday present."—A unt Fudy.

NOTHING TO NOBODY.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-
‘*A very pretty story.” —A theneum.

THE MERCHANT AND THE MOUNTEBANK.
With Illustrations by H. PerHerick. Cloth, 1/6,
“One of Brenda's delightful tales.”"—British Weekly.
‘A sparkling little sketch, very prettily got up.”—The Record.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, EC,
5



John F. Shaw & Co.’s Publications.

STORIES BY LOUISE MARSTON.

MISS MOLLIE AND HER BOYS; or, His Great Love.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 3/6.
“The love of God is charmingly illustrated by a recital of the loving devotion
of a young woman who bestowed affectionate care upon some poor lonely lads.”
The Christian.

TWO LITTLE BOYS; or, I’d Like to Please Him.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
““A wonderfully pathetic story. It will be read with deep feeling, especially by
children.” —7he Record.

MR. BARTHOLOMEW’S LITTLE GIRL.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
“A story that should turn the hearts of many to the Saviour. It is well written,
and the teaching is pure and true.” —The Christian.

CRIPPLE JESS. The Hop Picker’s Daughter.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
“ Fully as engrossing as anything from the pen of Hesba Stretton.”
The Christian.
“ A sketch well drawn of a sweet flower blooming in a very humble place.”
Woman's Work.

ROB AND MAG. A Little Light in a Dark Corner.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 1/6.
“A beautiful sketch.”"—Churchman’s Magazine.
“We believe this little volume will be found the means of leading many to
Jesus.” —The Christian.

BLIND NETTIE; or, Seeking Her Fortune. 1/-
JITANA’S STORY; or, Light in the Darkness. 1/-
BENNIE, THE KING’S LITTLE SERVANT. 1)



STORIES BY JENNIE CHAPPELL.

BERNE’S BARGAIN.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 8/6.
“A delightful story. Boys cannot fail to like it. It is full of incident and
adventure. The illustrations are excellent.’—Manchester Examiner.

FOR ELSIE’S SAKE; or, A Seaside Friendship.

Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.

LITTLE RADIANCE. A Year ina Child’s Life.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
“A charming book for children.” —/ootsteps of Truth.

HAND IN HAND; or, Radiance at Beechdale.

Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
LEFT BEHIND; or, A Summer in Exile. Cloth, 1/-
OUGHTS AND CROSSES. A Story for Boys. 1)/-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48,. PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
6



Foln F. Shaw & Cos Publications. —

STORIES BY AGNES GIBERNE.

LIFE IN A NUTSHELL. A Story.
Crown 8vo, bevelled boards, 2/6.

IDA’S SECRET; or, The Towers of Ickledale.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.

WON AT LAST;; or, Mrs. Briscoe’s Nephews.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“‘The treatment is so admirable we can understand Miss Giberne’s book being a.
help to many.” —A ¢heneum.

HIS ADOPTED DAUGHTER;; or, A Quiet Valley.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 5/- E
‘* A thoroughly interesting and good book.”—Birmingham Post.

THE EARLS OF THE VILLAGE.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.
‘A pathetic tale of country life, in which the fortunes of a family are followed
out with a skill that never fails to interest.” —Scotsman.

THE OLD HOUSE IN THE CITY; or, Not Forsaken.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.
“ An admirable book for girls. The narrative is simply written, but there is a
good deal of quiet force that deserves special notice.”—Teachers’ Aid.

FLOSS SILVERTHORN ; or, The Master’s Little Handmaid.
Crown 8vo, 2/6.
‘*Thoroughly interesting and profitable, as Miss Giberne’s tales always are.
We should like to see this in every home library.” —The News.

MADGE HARDWICKE; or, The Mists of the Valley.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.

‘An extremely interesting book, and one that can be read with profit by all.”
The Schoolinaster.

WILL FOSTER OF THE FERRY. Crown 8vo, 2/6.

“ We are glad to see this capital story in a new shape.”—ecord.
P'

TOO DEARLY BOUGHT. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.



NEW SUNDAY STORY-~-
Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.
By M. S. COMRIE.

THE KING’S LIGHT-BEARER;; or, Shining for Jesus.
A Story of Little Louise.



Lunpon:; JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
7



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY EMMA MARSHALL,

.THE CHILDREN OF. DEAN’S COURT;
Or, Lady-bird and her Friends. Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.

BLUEBELL. A Story of Child Life Now-a-days.

Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6. .
LITTLE QUEENIE. A Story of Child Life Sixty Years Ago.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 3/6.
**¢Little Queenie’ is particularly pleasing.” Saturday Review.
EVENTIDE-LIGHT. The Story of Dame Margaret Hoby.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 5/-
“A charming gift book, especially to girls in their teens.”—The Record.
THE END CROWNS ALL. A Story of Life.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 5/-

‘* A most exciting story of modern life, pervaded as Mrs. Marshall's tales always
are by a thoroughly wholesome tone.”—Record.

BISHOP’S CRANWORTH; or, Rosamund’s Lamp.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 5/-
“This is a delightful story, with a considerable flavour of romance.”—Baptist.

LITTLE MISS JOY. Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
‘A pretty picture of childish influence.”—Brighton Gazette.
HURLY-BURLY; or, After a Storm comes a Calm.
Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 2/.
‘*Simply and touchingly told.”—AJderdeen Fournal,
CURLEY’S CRYSTAL; or, A Light Heart Lives Long.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6, a
“ The vehicle of good thought as to life and its duties.”— The Christian.
ROBERT’S RACE; or, More Haste Less Speed.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6,
‘Is both cheap and good.”—Teachers’ Aid.
PETER’S PROMISES; or, Look before you Leap.

Crown 8vo, Illustrated, 1/6.

STORIES BY M, k. WINCHESTER,

Author of ‘A Nest of Sparrows,” etc.
CITY SNOWDROPS; or, The House of Flowers.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 5/-
‘We have read very few stories of such pathos and interest.” —British Weekly.
GRANNY’S CABIN; or, All He Does is Love.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6. 2
‘*Will do any one’s heart good to read.” —Sfectator.
LOST MAGGIE;; or, A Basket of Roses.
Cloth, Illustrated, 1/-
‘°A pathetic and interesting story.”—Record.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PareRNosTER Row, EC.
8



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY HE. EVERETT-GREEN. .

FRIENDS OR FOES. __A Story for Boys and Girls. Crown 8vo, with illus.”
trations, bevelled boards, 2/6.

SHADOWLAND; or, What Lindis Accomplished.
Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 1/6,
«A charming story for children, very prettily got up.”—Record.

HER HUSBAND’S HOME; or, The Durleys of Linley Castle.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.
“Some of the scenes are particularly effective.” —Sfectator.

MARJORIE AND MURIEL; or, Two London Homes.
Small 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.
‘*A capital story, very prettily got up.’—Record.

HIS MOTHER’S BOOK. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-
“Little Bill is so lovable, and meets with such interesting friends, that every-
body may read about him with pleasure.”—Sfectator.

LITTLE FREDDIE; or, Friends in Need. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-

‘There is real pathos in this story, telling how a poor little waif is protected
from evil by the recollection of a lost mother's teaching.” —Liverpool Courier.

BERTIE CLIFTON; or, Paul’s Little Schoolfellow.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/-
“Seldom have we perused a tale of the length of this with so much pleasure.”
The Schoolmaster.
LITTLE RUTH’S LADY. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 2/-
‘*A delightful study of children, their joys and sorrows.” —A theneum.
‘© One of those children’s stories that charm grown people as well as little folk.”

Guardian.
_OUR WINNIE;; or, When the Swallows Go.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
‘The beautiful life of little Winnie is one which all children will do well to take
as an example.”—Banner.







STORIES BY J. M. CONKLIN,

JUST AS IT OUGHT TO BE; or, The Story of Miss Prudence.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 5/-
‘Very original, interesting, with many good and suggestive thoughts.”
**A capital book for girls.” —Bafzis¢. English Churchman.

BEK’S FIRST CORNER, AND HOW SHE TURNED IT.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 3/6.
“Bek Westerley is a very charming person.” —Standard.

OUT IN GOD’S WORLD; or, Electa’s Story. Large Crown 8vo, 2/3.

“One of the best girls’ stories we have read.” —The Congregationalist.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C,
9



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



STORIES BY Ll. T. MEADE.

Author of ‘Scamp and I,” &c.

GREAT ST. BENEDICT’S; or, Dorothy’s Story.

New and Cheaper Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.
‘The description of Dorothy’s life is excellent.” Spectator.
“At once a noble book, and a most interesting story.”—Court Circular.

A KNIGHT OF TO-DAY. A Tale.
New and Cheaper Edition. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘A finely-imagined story of a good man. It is a book well worth reading.”

The Guardian.
BEL-MARJORY. A Tale. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6/-

‘Most interesting ; we giveit our hearty commendation.” —Luglish Independent.

SCAMP AND I. A Story of City Byeways.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.
‘* All as true to life and as touchingly set forth as any heart could desire.”

° Atheneum.
THE CHILDREN’S KINGDOM;

Or, The Story of a Great Endeavour. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“A really well-written story, with many touching passages. Boys and girls
will read it with eagerness and profit.” — The Churchman.

WATER GIPSIES. A Tale.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations 2/6,

“Tt is full of incident from beginning to end, and we do not know the person
who will not be interested in it.”—Chrvistian World,

DAVID’S LITTLE LAD.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.

‘A finely-imagined story, bringing out in grand relief the contrast between quiet, °
steady self-sacrifice, and brilliant, flashy qualities.” —Guardian.

DOT AND HER TREASURES.

With Illustrations. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-

“One of the tales of poor children in London, of which we have had many
examples; but none finer, more pathetic, or more original than this.”

x Nonconfor nist,
OUTCAST ROBIN;; or, Your Brother and Mine.

Illustrated. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-.

WHITE LILIES, AND OTHER TALES.

With Illustrations. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.
«Stories of a singularly touching and beautiful character."—Rock.

LETTIE’S LAST HOME. | small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6,
“Very touchingly told."—Aunt Fudy's Magazine.

THOSE BOYS. A Story for all Little Fellows. small svo, 1/-
LITTLE TROUBLE THE HOUSE. small 8vo, 1/-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOsTER Row, E.C.
10



yohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY CATHARINE SHAW,

Price Three Shillings and Sixpence each.
THE STRANGE HOUSE; or, A Moment’s Mistake.

‘“A charming story. It is characterised by simplicity of treatment, but the
interest is cleverly sustained, and the characters are well drawn.”
Manchester Examiner.
LILIAN’S HOPE. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.
“One of the best gift books for girls we have seen. ‘The story throbs with the
power and pathos of real home life.” =/z His Name.

HILDA; or, Seeketh Not Her Own. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“*A charming story, illustrative of the blessedness of self-sacrifice.”
Literary World.



Price Two Shillings and Sixpence each.
ALICK’S HERO. Large Crown 8vo, cloth. Illustrated.

“Mrs. Shaw has added to our delight in noble boyhood, as well as to her own
reputation, in this most charming of her works.” —The Christian.

ONLY A COUSIN. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“Tn our excavations among heaps of tales we have not come upon a brighter
jewel than this.”—Rev. C. H. SpurGEON in Sword and Trowel.
THE GABLED FARM; or, Young Workers for the King.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“A charming story, wherein the children are described naturally.”

Evangelical Magazine,
IN THE SUNLIGHT AND OUT OF IT. :
A Year of my Life-story. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“One of the pleasantest books that a girl could take into her hand, either for
Sunday or week-day reading.” —Daily Review.
NELLIE ARUNDEL. A Tale of Home Life.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, Illustrated.
“We need scarcely say that Mrs. Shaw holds out the light of life to. all her

readers, and we know of few better books than those which bear her name.’
Record.

SOMETHING FOR SUNDAY.

SELECTED BY CATHARINE SHAW.

Price One Shilling each.
ist. OUTLINE TEXTS FOR PAINTING. 48 Texts in Packet.
end. HAPPY HOURS WITH THE BIBLE. Devices for Bible Searching.
3rd. ECHOES FROM THE BIBLE. Illustrated Papers for Bible Study.
4th, ALPHABET TEXTS FOR PRICKING OR PAINTING. Specially
for the Little Ones.
sth MESSAGES FROM HEAVEN. Small Outline Texts for Painting.
(Suitable for Flower Missions.) [Study.
6the GLEAMS OF GLORY FROM THE GOSPELS. Subjects for Bible
7th, A LARGE THOUGHT IN A LARGE WORD. Outline Texts for
&h. SCRIPTURE FEAR NOTS. Texts for Painting. (Painting.
gth. ‘ALL THINGS ARE YOURS.” Outline Texts for Painting, with Hints
for Bible Searching.
roth, TEXTS FOR THE CHILDREN. For Pricking or Painting.

Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
II



Fohn F. Shaw & Co.’s Publications.



POPULAR HOME STORIES.

By EMILY BRODIE.

OLD CHRISTIE’S CABIN. Crown 8vo, 2/6. Illustrated.

‘*A capital book for young people, depicting the loveliness of a ministering life
on the part of some happy children.”—The Christian,

COUSIN DORA; or, Serving the King. Large Crown 8vo, 2/6.

“© An admirable tale for elder girls.” —Wonconformist.

HIS GUARDIAN ANGEL. Large Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“ Should find its way into school libraries as well as into homes.”
Sunday School Chronic/e.

FIVE MINUTES TOO LATE; or, Leslie Harcourt’s Resolve.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.

NORMAN AND ELSIE;; or, Two Little Prisoners.
Large Crown 8vo, extra cloth, 3/6.
‘So true and delightful a picture that we can hardly believe we have only read
about it; it all seems so real, and has done us so much good.” — 7 he Christian.

NORA CLINTON; or, Did I Do Right? Crown 8vo, 3/6.

‘© Will be read with pleasure and profit.” —Christian Age.

LONELY JACK and His Friends at Sunnyside. Crown 8vo, 2/3.

“Tts chapters will be eagerly devoured by the reader.” —Christian World.

THE HAMILTONS;; or, Dora’s Choice. Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“Miss Brodie’s stories have that savour of religious influence and teaching
which makes them valuable as companions of the home.”—Congregationalist,

UNCLE FRED’S SHILLING: Its Travels and Adventures.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6,
“Children will follow it with as eager interest as the little people who listened
to it in the book itself." Christian World.

ELSIE GORDON;; or, Through Thorny Paths.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.
“The characters have been well thought out. We are sure the volume will
be welcome at many a fireside.”— Daily Express.

JEAN LINDSAY, the Vicar's Daughter. Crown 8vo, 2/3.
“The tale is admirably told, and some capital engravings interpret its principal
incidents.” —Bookselier.

ROUGH THE TERRIER. His Life and Adventures.
Illustrated by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 2/6; or boards, 1/6.
‘¢ A clever autobiography, cleverly illustrated.” —The Christian.

SYBIL’S MESSAGE. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.

EAST AND WEST;; or, The Strolling Artist. 1/6.
THE SEA GULL’S NEST;; or, Charlie’s Revenge. 1/6,
RUTH'S RESCUE; or, The Light of Ned’s Home. 1-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C,
tT?



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

BOOKS FOR BOYS.

BY M. L. RIDLEY.





Price Two Shillings and Sixpence each, with Illustrations.
SENT TO COVENTRY; or, The Boys of Highbeech.

Illustrated. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
‘A really good story of boys’ school-life."—Pall Mall Gazette.
“‘Eminently interesting from start to finish.” —Pictorial World.

KING’S SCHOLARS; or, Work and Play at Easthaven.
Illustrated. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra.

“Full of all those stirring incidents which go to make up the approved life of
schoolboys. Both adventure and sentiment find a place init.”-—Pad? Mali Gazette.

“A schoolboy tale of very good tone and spirit.” —Guardian.

OUR CAPTAIN. The Heroes of Barton School.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“A first-class book for boys.”’—Dazly Review.
“A regular boy’s book.”—Christian World.

OUR SOLDIER HERO. The Story of My Brothers.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.

“Contains the healthiest of matter presented i in the most entertaining of ways.”
Schooltmaster.

THE THREE CHUMS. A Story of School Life.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.

‘*A book after a boy’s heart. How can we better commend it than by saying
it is both manly and godly?”—Rev. C. H. SpuRGEON in Sword and Trowel.

“‘Ingeniously worked out and spiritedly told." —Guardian.

Price Three Shillings and Sixpence each, with Illustrations.
GOLDENGATES;; or, Rex Mortimer’s Friend. Large Crown 8vo.

An excellent story of boyish love." —Swzday School Chronicle.

‘A first-rate story for boys. The hero is a fine specimen of a manly young
Christian.” —Congregational Review.

WALTER ALISON: His Friénds and Foes.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.
“ Schoolboys are sure to like it.” —Churchiman.
“ 4 book boys will be sure to read if they get the chance.” —Sword and Trowel.

HILLSIDE FARM;; or, Marjorie’s Magic.
Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Two SHILLINGS.
© A very well-written tela which all girls will thoroughly enjoy.”—Guardian.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.

tae



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



STORIES BY GB&CH STSBBING.

A REAL HERO. A Story of the Conquest of Mexico.

With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.

“We can cordially recommend this to all youthful lovers of adventure and
enterprise. ’— Academy.

IN ALL OUR DOINGS. A Story for Boys. Large Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“A story for boys, in which the lessons of the daily Collects are brightly
brought home to them.”—7Z7zxes.

GRAHAM McCALL. A Tale of the Covenanters.

Large Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 5/-
“Stirring, and ably written.”— Guardian.
‘We heartily commend it to English boys and girls.” —Suzday School Chronicle.

WINNING AN EMPIRE;; or, The Story of Clive.
Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 3/6.

“Miss Stebbing is one of the few ladies that can write really good boys’ stories,
She has caught, not only the phraseology, but the spirit of boys.” —Standard.

ONLY A TRAMP.

Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 3/6,

‘Miss Stebbing holds the attention and extorts the admiration of the reader
from first to last. Many a weighty lesson may be learnt from her pages.’

The Christian.
FUN AND FAIRIES.
Fully Illustrated by T. Pym. 4to, cloth extra, 3/6.
“With its dear little pictures, is quite charming.”—A theneum.

SILVERDALE RECTORY; or, The Golden Links.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 2/6.

““ We can heartily recommend this story.”
Church of England Sunday School Magazine.

BRAVE GEORDIE. The Story of an English Boy.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.

“Tt is refreshing to meet with such a spirited and thoroughly good story.”
The Christian.

IN WYCLIFFE’S DAYS; or, A Safe Hiding Place.
Small 8vo. With Illustrations. Cloth extra, 2/6.
“A delightful invigorating story.”—Dazly Review.

LOST HER SHOE AND OTHER THREADS.
Small 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 1/6.
‘* Five short stories sure to be devoured by young people.”—Szord and Trowel,



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, ECh



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

THE PINAFORE PICTURE BOOKS.

Price EIGHTHENPENCH, in Cloth Gilt.

eae oe
PINAFORE DAYS.
By IsMay THorN . __. With Illustrations by T. Pym.

MY SUNDAY STORY BOOK.

With Illustrations,



ONLY FIVE.
By Ismay THORN , - With Illustrations by T. Pym.

ROUGH THE TERRIER.
By EmiILy BRopvie. . With Illustrations by T. Pym,

MY SUNDAY PICTURE BOOK.
With Illustrations,
A SIX YEARS DARLING.
By Ismay THORN . . With Illustrations by T. Pym,

SUNDAY BIBLE PICTURES.

With Illustrations,



SHILLING PICTURE BOOKS.

Coloured Boards, Crown 4to, with many Illustrations.
—__—_——__

JINGLES & CHIMES & NURSERY RHYMES.
With 74 Original Illustrations.

BY SEA AND LAND.

Stories of Adventure, Travel, and Conflict. With many
Illustrations,

SOMEBODY'S DARLING.

By CATHARINE SHAW. With Ico Illustrations.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
Tz



Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



| SPLENDID STORIES FOR BOYS,

By Dr. GORDON STABLES, R.N.
FACING FEARFUL ODDS. A Tale of Flood and Field. -

Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

HEARTS OF OAK. A Story of Nelson and the Navy.
Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

**Tom Burn, the hero, will charm every boy that gets hold of it.”
Literary World.

“* A Story of the navy and of mighty Nelson, told with excellent spirit.”

Saturday Review.
TWO SAILOR LADS.
A Story of Stirring Adventures on Sea and Land. _ L. Cr. 8vo, with Illustns., 5/-

‘© A sea story, big with wonders.” —Saturday Review.
“A capital story in Dr. Stables’ best style.” —Sfectator.

_FOR ENGLAND, HOME, AND BEAUTY.

A Tale of Battle and the Breeze. Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, price 5/-

“Dr. Stables has almost surpassed himself in this book. Certainly we have
read nothing of -his which has pleased us more—perhaps we might say, as much.”

The Spectator.
EXILES OF FORTUNE.
The Story of a Far North Land. Large Cr. 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 5/-

“A capital book; written with this popular writer’s accustomed spirit, and
sure to be enjoyed.” —Scotsman.

FROM SQUIRE TO SQUATTER.
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Full Text





| |The Baldwin Lib |
Taae,
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for pee conduc!

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Page 64.

Many people turned to look at the little pair.”




BY



EMIEY BRODIE,

AUTHOR OF
‘*RIGHT ABOUT FACE;” ‘LONELY JACK;” ‘DANDY BLUE;”
“UNCLE FRED'S SHILLING;” ETC.



New EDITION.

LONDON:

JOHN F. SHAW AND CoO.,,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C.






SUNDAY SCHOOL REWARDS.

In attractive cloth covers, Illustrated.

Price SIXPENCE each.

LUCIA’S TRUST. DAFF’S CORNER.
se renee aay mun, | 7WO LITTLE HELPERS.
AND THIN. | CLAUD'S VICTORY.

BIRDIE’S CHAMPION.
HUMP AND ALL. LITTLE BRIGHTEYES.

THOSE TWO. DODY AND JOSS.
LITTLE TED. ON HIS METTLE.
THE BOY MARTYR. LITTLE NELL.
CHRISTIE'S GIFT. DUST HO!
MANLY AND BRAVE. HOLIDAYS.

ADVENTURES of a SIXPENCE. MIGHT BE WORSE.

Lonpon: Joun F. SHaw & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.






CONTENTS.

—_*—

CHAPTER I,
SWEET VIOLETS

CHAPTER II.
NELL’S HOME.

CHAPTER III.
THE LOST PENNIES

CHAPTER IV.
DRESSING DOLLS

CHAPTER V.
GERTY . .

CHAPTER VI,
GERTY’S NEW HOME

‘CHAPTER VII,
THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE

CHAPTER VIII,
NELLIE’S FLITTING . 3

PAGE

It

28

35

43

49

57







SEIT TLE MeL.



CHAPTER I.
SWEET VIOLETS.

46 OTHER, just look, is not my basket
i pretty? I am sure I shall sell my



flowers to-day, and then you will
have some dinner,” said little Nell, for though
she was nearly twelve, still she was “little Nell,”
and would be all her life. “Good-bye, mother,
T’ll be back as soon as I can.”

“Good-bye, my child, and may God bless
you,” her sick mother said, as she kissed the
bright face.
8 LITTLE NELL.



So out Nell went with her basket, full of
hope that she would find customers. Surely
every one would want flowers on such a fresh
spring morning. :

“Any violets or snowdrops, sir; violets or
snowdrops?” she sang in her cheerful voice,
which made more than one passer-by look at
her. ‘
Nell and her mother had only. lived in the
noisy city of London about two years, and she
could well remember the pleasure of picking
flowers in the old country lanes. She had little
thought then that she would ever be a little
flower-seller. But Nell’s face was happy still,
for in spite of many anxious cares in the home,
she and her mother possessed something that
nobody could take away from them. God’s
love makes the poorest home a home of peace.

Nell made her way to a railway station, some
little distance from the street in which she lived.
She had found that people were often tempted
with her flowers when they passed through
those great doors, She had sold nearly half
SWEET VIOLETS. 9



her little bouquets when she noticed a girl sitting
on the stone step. Her feet were bare, her poor
dress torn and ragged. Nell could not help
looking at her every ‘now and then as she sold
her flowers, and she wondered who she was
and where she came from. The child had
large, wistful eyes, and every time Nell looked
the eyes seemed watching her and her basket.
_ “Would you like one of my flowers ?” asked
Nell, going up to her side. x

The child stretched out her poor thin hand
and took the snowdrop eagerly. ae eS ;
a Nobody never gave me a flower before," a she
said. “Oh, ain’t it pretty ? Paras

“Yes, I love flowers,” said Nell.’ “I used to
‘pick them when I lived in the country.”

“Did you?” said the child; “did they grow
in the fields ?” ‘ oN

“Ves, and-in the woods. I think I like snow-
drops best of all, because they come after the
cold long winter. Mother says they make her
think of God, because they are so pure and
white.”
io.” LITTLE NELL.

“Who is God ?” asked the poor child.

“Don’t you know about Him?” said Nell,
in an astonished voice. ‘Why it was God who
made us, and loves us so.”

The child shook her head. “I never heard
of Him,” she said wonderingly.

“Poor little girl!” said Nell pityingly. “I
am so sorry you don’t know about Jesus, ’cause
He’d make you happy. He loves children,
mother says.”

“I wish He would love me,” said the poor
child. “I’ve nobody to love me.”

“You must come here again, and I will tell
you more about Jesus. I must try and sell my
flowers now; but take this penny, you look so
hungry. I am sure mother would say that we
could spare one.”

Waiting for no thanks, Nell turned away,
her cheery voice singing, “Any violets or
snowdrops?” while her face looked _ still
brighter for the little kindness she had shown
to the unloved child. :


CHAPTER IL.

NELL’S HOME.

YCELL did not find the last half of
her bunches so easy to sell. The



d bright spring morning had changed,
and a heavy shower had helped to empty the
streets of people who had time to think of
buying flowers. She stood under the shelter
of a house for some time, but everybody
hurried past, anxious to get to their journey’s
end. But the shower was over at last, and
once more the sun peeped out. Nell peeped
out too from the sheltering doorway, and though
the street still looked very sloppy and miserable,

she determined to make a start. She remem-
II
I2 LITTLE NELL.



bered her mother waiting at home for the
money to buy her dinner, and then she set off
at once, never heeding that her poor boots were
not as weather-tight as they might have been.

It was more than an hour later than she
intended when she felt she could turn towards
home, carrying a light basket and a still lighter
heart, for her day’s work was done as far as
selling flowers went.

“Mother dear,” she said as she entered the
one room she called home, “have I seemed a
very long time to-day? I was getting on so
beautifully till the rain came, and then every-
body set off running home as fast as their legs
would carry them. I could not help laughing
to see them.” 3

“Did you get wet, Nell?” asked her mother
rather anxiously.

“Oh, no, mother, not one bit. I know just
the right place to go to when it rains hard.”
“Why, Nell, you have nearly emptied your
basket to-day ; you must have found a great
many customers.” !
























Se aa,

TAY RS RL



Page 9.

i id.”
* € Nobody never gave me a flower before,’ she sai
**Nol

NELL’S HOME. ; 15



“Yes, mother, is it not splendid? But I
thought I should sell my flowers well to-day.”

“Why, dear ?”

“ Because I asked God to help me,” said Nell
softly. “Teacher said on Sunday that she was
sure God cares whether I sell my bunches or
not, and so I just told Him how poorly you
were, and how much you wanted some dinner.
And you see, mother, He does care, doesn’t
He?”

“Yes, dear, I am quite sure He cares. Jesus
would not have told us that not a sparrow falls
to the ground without His knowledge, if He
had not wished to teach us that He knows all
about us, and really cares for us.”

“Qh, mother, I do wish a poor little girl I
spoke to to-day knew about Jesus! She was
sitting on the steps at the railway-station, and
looked so sad and miserable.”

“Poor little child, I am afraid there are many
like that in this great city.”

“T gave her one of my flowers, and she said
nobody had ever given her a flower before;
16, LITTLE NELL,



and, mother, just think, she had never. heard.-of
God!”

“And yet she lives in 1 London, where there
are so many good people.”

“Teacher was telling us the other day ‘about
the poor black children who have never heard
about God, and she called them little heathen;
but I think this little girl must have been a
heathen too, though she wasn’t black. She
looked so very hungry, mother, that I could
not help giving her a ‘penny. You won’t mind,
will you? I would rather go without some
of my dinner if you really think we could not
spare it,”

“Yes, my Nell, I think we can Pelle spare
the poor. child the penny, though we have~so
few. I am glad you thought of it, for I think
her need must be greater than ours.”

“But, mother, I am forgetting that you must
want your dinner; it’s always so nice to tell
you everything.”

“Well, Nell, I have something to tell you

»

too...
NELL’S HOME. 17





“Have you? What is it?” asked Nell,
looking up eagerly.

“Why, Miss Burdon has been here.”

“What, my own dear Miss Burdon?” said
Nell, clapping her hands in her excitement.

“Yes, your own dear Miss Burdon; and
she was so kind, and brought me such a nice
dinner. Wasn't it good of her?”

“Yes, very, very good; and did you enjoy it,
mother ?”

“Yes, more than anything I have had for
a long time; and there is a little piece waiting
for you, my little Nell.”

“Oh, mother dear, you® should have eaten
every bit yourself; you need it so.”

“Yes, but you forget. I should not have
enjoyed it so much if I had eaten it all myself.
I should not have been happy if my brave little
Nell had not shared it with me.”

Nell was very hungry with her morning’s
work, and the tempting food was specially
welcome. She had learnt to be very content with:

her humble fare, but there were many days
B
18 LITTLE NELL.

when she could have eaten.a little more without
any difficulty. >

“And how have you got on with your work
this morning, mother?” asked Nell, when she
had finished.

“I could not do much, for my head ached
badly, and for-a long time after you were gone
I could only lie quite still; but Miss Burdon’s
visit cheered me up, and after she was gone I
set to work. ‘See, I have finished one young
lady ;” and Mrs. Healey held up her work: for
Nell to inspect.

“Oh, mother, she is a real beauty!” cried
Nell, looking at th@ gaily-dressed doll with
admiration. “She is the very best you have
ever done.”

“Yes, I really think she is; and Miss Burdon
' says she has been speaking of my work to
the manager of some grand toy-shop at the
West End, and as her family have been cus-
tomers there for many years, he has promised
to take some of my dolls and try and sell them..
He has ordered three to begin with. And just:
NELL’S HOME, i9



look here, Nell, at these beautiful pieces of
silk and satin and lacevand fur that Miss Burdon
brought me; for she said these dolls must be
beautifully dressed, ‘like real ladies. She has
been looking at the dolls in the shop-windows,
so that she might give me some fresh ideas, for
she knows I cannot go out myself.”

“Tt is very, very kind,’ said little Nell.
“Why, mother dear, you have not looked so
bright and well for a long time. You have got
just a wee bit of colour in.your cheeks.”

“Yes, I do feel cheered up, Nell. -A kind,
cheery word goes a long way, and your Miss
Burdon knows how to “give it if anybody
does.”




CHAPTER III.

THE LOST PENNIES.




a

MNCELL’S Miss Burdon lived about
( ANS three-quarters of a mile away from
tos PSD the court in which Mrs, Healey had
found a home. Shé had lived in that big,
sombre London house all her life, for her




\
Z



mother had gone there as a bride. Little
by little since the time May. Burdon had
left school she had grown to know something
of her poorer neighbours, and now many a
weary mother welcomed her visits. She had
from the first been much interested in Nell and
her mother, and Nell returned her love, believing
there was no one half so good as her Miss

20
THE LOST PENNIES. at



Burdon in all the country through. It had
been Miss Burdon’s suggestion that Mrs. Healey
should try her hand at doll dressing. Her
fingers seemed just fitted for such dainty work,
and indeed the poor woman had no strength
to seek work outside her home. Her first
attempts had been so successful that Miss
Burdon had determined to try and get orders
for her at a good West-End shop. Having
supplied her with some suitable materials, she
was very anxious to know how she had
succeeded. So when two days had passed she
determined to pay another visit, and see how
the work progressed. Her little niece, Margery,
or Madge, as she was more often called, had
heard a great deal about little Nell. She had
heard, too, of the grand new dolls, and now
begged to be allowed to go with her aunt to
see them.

The warm spring weather of a few days
earlier had given place to cold north-easterly
winds, and little Madge was glad of her warm
fur cape and all her winter garments. As she
22 LITTLE NELL.

trudged along by her aunt’s side she ome
stopped short.

“Auntie, do stop! Just look at that poor
little girl. How bitterly she is crying! Do let
us ask what is the matter!”

Miss Burdon was always ready to comfort
anybody, old or young, but she felt especially
for a little child’s sorrows, and this child seemed
to have a very big sorrow indeed.

“What is the matter? Can you tell me
what troubles you so?” asked Miss Burdon
kindly.

The little arms looked blue with cold, for
there was nothing to cover the poor thin
shoulders. There was no hat on her head,
which showed to the full the tangled brown
hair, and her boots looked two or three sizes
too big for her. Altogether she was a very
pitiful picture. Miss Burdon had to repeat her
question more than once before the sobs ceased
‘a little, and the poor child ventured to look
up at her questioner.

“Ah, that’s right!” said Miss Burdon. “I
THE LOST PENNIES. 23



want to try and help you, but you know I can’t
till I hear what is the matter. Have you lost
your way ?”

The tangled head shook decidedly, so Miss
Burdon tried something else.

“Have you been sent to a shop, and lost
your money on the way?”

“Yes; I ’ve—lost—my—pennies,” the child
said between her sobs.

“Is that it? Come, let us see if we can help
you find them. Stop crying, little one, and
then you can tell us all about it, and where you
dropped them.”

The child wiped her eyes with the corner of
her frock, and then for the first time looked
up into Miss Burdon’s face. It was such a
kind one that the child seemed to gain
courage. |

“It was Jim Hatcher; he gave my arm a
nudge, and then I dropped the pennies.”

“And do you think he picked them up?”
“Yes. Jim’s a bad boy; he wanted them
hisself.”
24 LITTLE NELL,

“ And what were you going to buy with the
pennies?”

“JT was going to the ‘Three Bears’ to get
some beer for Mrs. Lawson; and, oh, she’ll kill
me when she knows I haven’t any.” And at
this the sobs came back again so pitifully
that Miss Burdon had a hard matter to pacify
her. :

“What is your name, my poor child, and
where do you live?”

“I’m Gerty,” she managed to say at last,
“and I lives along o’ Mrs. Lawson in Nether
Court.”

Miss Burdon looked round at little Madge,
who was standing by with her kind eyes full of
pity.
“ Auntie, won’t you give the. little girl the
pennies?” she asked as she saw her aunt's
hesitation:

“TI should like to help the poor child more
than giving her the pennies,” said Miss Burdon.
“I must go and take her home, but I should
not like to take you there, my little Madge. I


a
bo pA IL

“2



§©T 've—lost—my—pennies,’ the child said between her sobs.”

Page 23.

THE LOST PENNIES. 27
tell you what I can do: I will take you to
Mrs. Healey’s, and you can be looking at the
dolls while I take Gerty home.”

So the three walked together-a little farther
down the street, till they came to Mrs. Healey’s
door, and Miss Burdon left little Madge to wait
for her return.

“Now, Gerty, you must show me the way,”
said Miss Burdon, taking the little thin hand
in hers. “It is not very far, is it?”

“Not very far,” said Gerty.

“Have you no mother, my child?”

Gerty shook her head.

“Are you sent very often to the ‘Three
Bears’ ?”’

“Yes, very often if Mrs.. Lawson isn’t there
herself.”

A few steps more brought them to Nether
Court, and Miss Burdon felt the little hand
tremble in hers as they turned the corner.

S- S—-




CHAPTER IV.

DRESSING DOLLS.






¢ a f ISS BURDON felt as she walked
(||) along by Gerty’s side that perhaps
zi > she was undertaking a difficult task ;
but she thought if the Lord Jesus Christ had
been walking by, He would have comforted a
Jittle child’s sorrow, and so she would do what
she could. She was scarcely prepared, however,
for her reception. Mrs. Lawson had already
been drinking too much, and her anger was
terrible to see when she looked upon Gerty with
no pot of beer in her hand. She lifted her
hand, and would have struck the child a heavy

blow had not Miss Burdon drawn Gerty close
28
DRESSING DOLLS. 29



to her, saying firmly, “You will not strike this
child in my presence.”

After a time she got the woman to speak a
_ little more calmly ; but she still affirmed that
Gerty was an idle, good-for-nothing child, and
she would turn her right out of the house that
very night, that she would.

“Will you be willing then to give the child
over into my keeping?” asked Miss Burdon,
speaking very slowly.

“T don’t care what you do with her—she’s
none of mine. The sooner that she’s out of
Nether Court the better. Good riddance of
bad rubbish.”

So in a few more minutes Miss Burdon was
once more out in the street, with little Gerty’s
hand in hers. The child, simply feeling that
she had found a friend, walked on unquestion-
ingly, Miss Burdon felt that God had sent her
a. little child to care for, and He would show
her how to do it. She made her way back to
Mrs, Healey’s, where little Madge was waiting
for her. The time had not been long to her, so:
30 LITTLE NELL. -
interested was she in the dolls that Mrs. Healey
had been dressing.

“Now, auntie, do they not look just like real
ladies ?” she said, directly Miss Burdon appeared.
She was so intent on the dolls, that for the
moment she quite forgot about Gerty.and her
troubles.

In another’ moment, however, she had caught
sight of the forlorn little figure that stood
timidly behind Miss Burdon.

“Why, auntie, you have brought the little girl
with you!” was Madge’s next exclamation.
“Could you not find her: home?”

“Gerty must be my little girl now,” said Miss
Burdon. “Poor child,she has no mother to care
for her.”

“She do look cold, poor bairn,” said Mrs..
Healey. ‘Here, Nell, put your little stool close.
to the fire, and let her have a good warm. Poor:
child, why she’s no hat-or jacket on, and it’s
a bitter cold day.”

Gerty did as she was told, seating herself
silently on the stool Nell placed for her.
DRESSING DOLLS. 31



“Why, mother!” exclaimed Nell joyfully,
“it’s the little girl I told you about the other
day. Don’t.you remember, I gave her a flower,.
and she said nobody had ever given her a
flower before?” .

Gerty looked up at Nell as she spoke, and a
wan smile of recognition passed over the sad
little face.

“Qh, Miss Burdon, I am so glad you have
found her! Now you will tell her all about
Jesus, and how He loves us.”

Miss Burdon sat looking at Gerty. She was
thinking what she must do with her. Of one,
thing she felt quite sure—God had sent her, and
He would find a way of providing for her; but
how and when she could not see at present.

“We must not forget what I came for, Mrs.
Healey,” she said, turning towards her. “I am
so anxious to know how you have succeeded
with the new dolls.”

“Well, miss, here they are; I don’t know
what you will think of them,” said Mrs. Healey, «
holding up a handsome young lady.
32 LITTLE NELL.





“You have succeeded admirably,” said Miss
Burdon, surveying the doll with satisfaction.
“She is just like the one I saw last week in
the Burlington Arcade. You have managed
the dress capitally. Now let me look at the
others.”

Mrs. Healey next handed to Miss Burdon a
doll dressed in seaside costume.

“Come here, little Madge. Did you ever see
such a pretty young lady ?” said Miss Burdon,

“Oh, Auntie, she is charming! She looks just
as if she were at the seaside, and was going
down for her bath. She is carrying her bathing
dress and towel. You are clever, Mrs. Healey,
to make it all so complete.”

“JT should never have thought of it, my dear,
if Miss Burdon had not kindly told me how
to do it. Now you must look at the third young
lady. I was just trimming her hat when you
came in.”

“Then please go on. Perhaps you can finish
it while I think what I can do with my little
girl,”
DRESSING DOLLS. 33
A ees Sea Pia NES

“Tt is awkward for you, miss, to know what
to do with her all of a hurry. Would you like
her to stay with us for to-night, till you have
thought over what to do?”

“Do you think you could manage with her?
I should not like her to increase your cares.”

“T am sure we could. do with her, if it would
be any comfort to you, miss.”

“Tt would, indeed, be a very great accommo--
dation. Though I was most thankful to be
allowed to take the child out of so much misery,
still, I did not quite know what to do with
her first.”

So it was soon arranged that for that night
Gerty was to find a resting-place with Mrs.
Healey, and Miss Burdon went home to think
what God would have her do with the lonely
child He had given into her keeping.

Gerty seemed well content with her new
quarters, and looked a very different little girl
after she had had a good warm bath, and the
tangled hair had been put into something like

order, The hot bread and milk brought quite
c
34 . LITTLE NELL.

a glow to the pale face, and she listened
intently as Mrs. Healey told of Christ’s love
to little children. No wonder that the story
of His great love fell sweetly on the ear of
the unloved child. Nobody had told her about
Him before. As little Nell said, she was as
much a heathen as the little black children of
whom Miss Burdon had told her.




CHAPTER V.

GERTY.

ELL’S Miss Burdon liked to ask
God about everything. She thought
there was nothing too great and



nothing too small to take to Him. So that
night she told Him all about little Gerty,
and asked Him to teach her what to do with
her. Then it came to her mind that, perhaps,
Mrs. Healey would be willing to keep the child
a little while, if a weekly sum were promised
for her. She knew that she would be in kind,
motherly hands, which was just what the child
most needed.

On her way Miss Burdon visited the toy shop,

35
36 LITTLE NELL.

and was delighted to find that the dolls were
approved of, and a good order promised for
Mrs. Healey; so that there was every hope
of her getting regular employment. Then Miss
Burdon set off with a glad heart to tell Mrs.
Healey her good news.

As she went along she saw Nell with her
basket on her arm, busy as usual selling her
flowers. Her bright face looked almost brighter
than usual as she caught sight of Miss Burdon.

“T am just going to see your mother, Nell,
for I have such good news. The manager of
the toy shop seems willing to give her regular
work in dressing dolls, for those she sent gave
great satisfaction. You must not forget to
thank our heavenly Father, my child, for this is
another proof of His loving care, isn’t it?”

“Yes; He is good to us, isn’t He, Miss
Burdon?” :

“Yes, dear child, very good; and He likes
us to thank Him for His love. And how is
Gerty this morning ?”

“Oh, she’s getting on fine, Miss, thank you,
GERTY. 37

She said, this morning, as how she hoped you
wouldn’t let her go back to Mrs. Lawson any
more.”

“Never, if I can help it, Nell; but I must
not keep you from selling your flowers.” And
as Miss Burdon passed on her way, she could
hear the sweet young voice crying, “ Any violets
to-day, sweet-scented violets ?”

Mrs. Healey was as pleased as anyone could
wish with Miss Burdon’s good news. It had,
indeed, lifted a heavy care from the poor
woman’s heart, for she knew she could. only
work at home, and now there was hope of
being able to provide for their slender wants.
She was quite willing to fall in with Miss
Burdon’s plan for Gerty to remain under her
care for the present; and so the unloved child
found a temporary home with Nell and her
mother.

Not many weeks had passed, however, before
Miss Burdon found that, with all Mrs. Healey’s
kind care, it could no longer be a safe home
for little Gerty. They lived too near to Mrs.
38 LITTLE NELL.



Lawson, and Gerty came running in like a
frightened hare one morning, saying that Mrs.
Lawson was coming after her, and declared
she would have her some day. With all Gerty’s
true love to her new mother and little Nell,
she could not get over her constant fright,
and very unwillingly Miss Burdon decided that
she must find another home for her little waif.
Nell was quite broken-hearted when she heard
that Gerty would have to leave ‘them, for the
little girls’ love to one another had grown very
strong.

Miss Burdon was anxious to hear of some
motherly woman in the country who would
be willing to take the child, and suddenly
Mrs. Healey thought of a neighbour of hers
in her old country home who had lost her only
child. Perhaps she would let little Gerty find
a place in her sad heart. So Miss Burdon
wrote and asked her if she felt she could receive
poor motherless Gerty.

The lonely widow wrote back after two days
to say that she was quite willing to receive
GERRY = "39



the child as Miss Burdon suggested. She did
not tell what a struggle it had been to her to
make up her mind, and how many tears she
had shed as she brought out the little bed once
more that had been unused so long, and made
preparations to receive the little stranger.

It would be hard to tell which was the saddest
of the two children when the last night came
for them to be together.

_ “But, Gerty, you do know now that Jesus
loves you, don’t you?” said Nell through her
tears.

“Yes, Nell, Iam sure He does; and I know
you told me about Him first, didn’t you?”

“Ves, I think I did,” said Nell, with a bright
smile; “but it was mother who told you all
about His dying for us, and rising again, that
we might be forgiven, wasn’t it?”

“Yes; it was mother told me that. She has
read me the story over and over till I know
it all myself,” said Gerty..

“You will try and be good, won’t you, Gerty,
so that you'll please Him? You won't say
40 LITTLE NELL.
what isn’t true for anything, will you, ’cause
it would grieve Him so?”

“No; I'll ask Him to help me to be good,”
said Gerty solemnly.

Then the little girls began trying to picture
what Gerty’s new home would be like.

“Tt will be in the real country, Nell, won’t
it? Oh, I want to see it so much; for I can’t
think how it will seem to have no houses,” ©
said Gerty.

“You will like it ever so much better,” said
Nell, a little sadly.

“I wish you were going too, Nell,” said
Gerty, slipping her hand in hers. “I think I
should have all I want if you were only going
too.”

“JT wonder if we shall have grown quite big
before we see each other again. You see I
couldn’t leave mother for anything, she wants
me so much.” Here Mrs, Healey’s voice was
heard calling to them, and telling them that
it was time to go to bed, for Gerty would have
to be up quite early in the morning.






‘She could hear the sweet young voice crying, ‘Any violets to-day,
sweet-scented violets? ’”

Page 37.





CHAPTER VI. ’

GERTY’S NEW HOME.

pa ~~

| (%%, HE next day Miss Burdon was to
| take Gerty to her new home, and,
childlike, she was delighted with the

novelty of a journey. Sometimes, on very




wet days, she had ventured within the heavy
doors that led into the railway station where
Nell had seen her first. She had _ stood
on the bridge and watched the great snorting
engines with wondering eyes, and the shrill
sounds that issued from them.had. many a
‘time made the timid child tremble. She had
‘watched the crowds of people as they came
-and went, and sometimes wished that she might
43
44 LITTLE NELL.



join them, but she had not the faintest idea
where the trains went to. For all she knew
they might go on and on through crowded
streets such as she knew so well. She had never
seen anything greener than the neighbouring
churchyard, which had lately been laid out as a
recreation ground.

When at last, seated by Miss Burdon’s side,
she found herself being actually whirled along,
she was silent for very wonder, and Miss
Burdon found her nestling a little nearer to her
side, till the small hand slipped into hers with a
sense of protection.

“The train is rather noisy, isn’t it?” said Miss
Burdon kindly.

“Yes, and don’t the things move fast?” said
Gerty, gazing steadily out of the window.

“Tt is you that are moving along so fast, the
trees and houses are standing quite still while
we pass them.

“Wouldn’t Nell like this?” said Gerty after a
long silence, while she had been gradually
getting more used to her new surroundings,
GERTY’S NEW HOME. 45

“ She used to live in the country, and she’s told
me as how she used to pick the wild flowers.
Look! look! Miss Burdon, are they not lovely ?
I’d like just to get out and pick as many as I
could carry.”

The grass was nearly ready for cutting, and
the fields were golden with buttercups; no
wonder that Gerty, the poor London child, was
delighted with all the fresh beauty.

In a little over three quarters of an hour the
train drew up at the small station at Rooklands.
It was not difficult to tell why the village had
received its name, for not far from the station
stood a cluster of tall venerable elms, in which
the busy rooks were at that moment. holding
forth to each other in most excited fashion.

“Oh, Miss Burdon, do look at those great
black birds, what a chattering they make!”

“Yes, indeed they do; and do you see what a
number of big nests they have built right at the
top of the great trees?”

“Don’t you wonder they don’t fall down?
said Gerty.
46 LITTLE NELL,



“One would think they would, but they are
so cleverly built that they stand even on a
windy night. Is it not wonderful to think that
God has taught the birds to build their nests,
and make them warm and cosy for their young
ones?” .

“Have they got their young ones right up
there?” asked Gerty, gazing up to the high
trees.

“Yes, in the early spring they get their nests
all ready ; you would be amused to see how
busy they are. They pull away the twigs with
their strong beaks and fly away to the tree they
have chosen. Then they twist them in and out
and into shape till they have made the nest
quite to their fancy, and they are ready for their
eggs.” 3

“They must be very happy in their nests I
think,” said Gerty. “I’ve sometimes stopped
to look at the poor birds in cages near our
court, and they keep beating against the wires.
They must be much happier flying about like
that.”
' GERTY’S NEW HOME. 47-



The lambs next claimed Gerty’s interest; and
Miss Burdon had some difficulty in urging the
little girl to go on, so fascinated was she with
all the new scenes around her.

But at last her new home was in sight.

“Look, Gerty, there is the cottage ; how pretty
it is. You see what a different roof it has to
the London houses.”

“What is it made of?” asked Gerty.

“That is a thatch roof,” said Miss Burdon;
“it is made of straw, and makes the cottage
very warm and comfortable. Thatched roofs
are not used much now, because they burn
easily if they get on fire; but I think they look
very pretty.”

“ And are those roses growing up the side?”
asked Gerty eagerly. “Oh, how I wish that
Nell was here!”

“T think that must be Mrs. Bailey who is
going down to the pond for some water. She

‘has some ducks I see, and I dare say she has
some chickens too; how you will enjoy feeding
them.” But Gerty forgot the pond and the
48 LITTLE NELLI.

ducks as Miss Burdon mentioned Mrs. Bailey’s
name, for it reminded her that she would soon
have to part with the friend who had been so
kind and good to her, and make her home with

a stranger.




CHAPTER VII.

THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE.



she turned round and saw Miss Burdon
and Gerty standing at the cottage door. As
she hastened toward them, Miss Burdon caught
sight of a kind motherly face, and she felt at
once that she was going to leave Gerty in good
hands.

“Good morning, ma’am,” she said, curtseying
to Miss Burdon, “I hope you have found your
way easily; it’s a bit of a walk from the station,

and the sun’s warm this morning.”
L 49-
conee LITTLE ‘NELL,



“Yes, thank you, quite easily. A, porter kindly
gave us very plain directions; he said we could
not mistake your pretty thatched cottage covered
with roses.”

“Well, it is pretty, ma’am, isn’t it? Eh, there
are plenty of beautiful things in God’s world if
folks has only got the eyes to see’em. And is
this the little girl, ma’am ?”

“Yes, this is Gerty,” said Miss Burdon. “I

hope you will find her a useful, loving little
maiden.”
_ “Oh! yes, I am sure I shall,” said Mrs. Bailey
cheerily, “ we shall soon understand one another.
You would like to run down to the pond and
see my little ducklings, I dare say. I have
fourteen altogether, and they are such a pretty
little family, only I can’t help feeling sorry
for the poor hen who has mothered them.
She stands at the waters edge, and calls
and calls in such a-pitiful fashion. I do wish
sometimes as she could go after.them. There,
my dear, you run down and have a look at
them all.”
THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE. 51



“She’s a nice little lassie,” said Mrs. Bailey,
as Gerty disappeared down the little path.

“Yes, I hope she will grow up good,” said
Miss Burdon. “Mrs. Healey has been like a
mother to her, and it is wonderful how much
she has improved since she has been with her.
Poor child, she had nothing to make her good
or happy in the old miserable home.”

“There’s not much happiness anywhere,
ma’am, I’m thinking, where folks shut God
out of their homes. It beats me how it’s such
hard work to persuade people that God loves
’em. What can they want more than to know
that He spared not His only Son to die for
them? But here am I talking, and you must
be tired, ma’am, with your walk, please come
in and have a rest.” .

So Miss Burdon followed Mrs. Bailey into the
cottage, and she found the inside seemed as
sunny as the outside. The window was bright
with geraniums in full flower, and the stove
looked as if its owner took a pride in its

polishing.
52 TITTLE NEL.



“Do you live here all. alone?” asked Miss
Burdon, as she seated herself.

“Yes, ma’am, I’ve lived here all alone for nigh
seven years. If my wee girlie had lived she
would have been gone fourteen by this time; but,
you see, the Lord knew best. He’d given her
tome, and He’d aright to take away just as He
thought best. You see my husband had only
been taken from me a few months before, so
that my little girl and I were everything to each
other. Perhaps that was just why the good
Lord took her away to live along o’ Him. He’s
been just everything to me all these seven years.

‘Ive had nobody but Him, but eh, ma’am, He’s
been good company.”
“I am afraid that Gerty will rather change
your quiet life. Are you sure that you will like
to have her?”
_ “Well, ma’am, when the letter came first from

Mrs. Healey I laid it down, and I said to myself,
‘No, no, I don’t want no child here. She’d
worry me like with chattering when I’d fain be
quiet, and she’d come in with dirty feet just as




“The porter said we could not mistake your pretty thatched cottage.”
Page 50.

THE THATCH-ROOFED COTTAGE. 55



the cottage floor was clean. So I seemed to

put it aside, and didn’t trouble myself much :
about it. But somehow I didn’t answer the
letter that day, and when I opened the Bible
that night I came in my reading to Pharaoh's
daughter finding Moses in the ark of bulrushes.
There was the words plain enough, ‘Take this
child and nurse it for me.’ Well, it seemed just
like a message from God, and I cried out I am
sure quite loud, and said, ‘O Lord, if it is for Thee
I am willing.” I sat and thought it all over for
a long time, and the more I thought of it the
more I felt sure that God meant me to have the
child. It all came easy then as if He’d planned
it. The very next day I brought out the little
bedstead that had been my wee girlie’s, and I
determined that I would use it for this lonely
child that God had sent me. I didn’t think as
I could have borne to look at it, but I am sure
it will be much better making a comfortable
bed for her than standing idle in the lumber
closet. Can you mount the stairs and have a

look at it?”
56 LITTLE NELL.



“Ves, indeed, I should like to see it very
much,” said Miss Burdon warmly.

“You must take care how you come, ma’am ;
the stairs are a bit steep, if you don’t know
them as I do.”

Miss Burdon soon reached the top, and there
in the sunny room stood the child’s small bed-
stead, with its counterpane white as the driven
snow.

“It does indeed look comfortable,” said Miss
Burdon, surveying the little room with pleasure.
“JT only hope that Gerty may be kind and
loving to you, and brighten up your home once
more.”

“Thank you, ma’am; I think we shall get on
nicely.”

Then Miss Burdon went downstairs, and found
Gerty at the cottage door wondering where they
were. With a few kind parting words she said
good-bye to her, and Mrs. Bailey and Gerty ran
down to the gate to watch her kind friend until
she was out of sight.


CHAPTER VIII.

NELLIE’S FLITTING.



as ‘hp coming had been a great delight, and
she had taken the lonely child to her heart as a
sister. Her mother had been wonderfully cheered
by Miss Burdon’s visits, and the regular work
she had obtained for her; but when the warm
days of summer came she began to fail, and
oftentimes the doll-dressing was very hard to do.
She always managed to brighten up when
Nell came home. But Nell saw more than her
mother knew, and often her young heart was sad
as she thought of her mother’s weakness.
37
58 LITTLE NELL.



Miss Burdon was struck one Sunday with
the grave look on Nell’s usually bright face,
and after the lesson was over called the child
to her.

“Is something the matter, Nell?” she asked.
“Ts something troubling you?” .

The kind words soon brought tears to Nell’s
eyes.

“Oh, it’s mother!” she said, as soon as she
could speak.

“Ts she worse, Nell?” asked Miss Burdon.

“Yes, miss, 1 am sure she is, though she
dosn’t say much ; but she is getting so thin, and
I know sometimes she can hardly make the
dolls’ dresses.” ;

“I am so sorry,” said Miss Burdon kindly.
« [ will come and see her very soon.”

It was not long before Miss Burdon kept her
promise. She found Nell’s account of her
‘mother was.a very true one. The poor woman
‘looked so. sadly weary, and unequal to her
‘work, that Miss Burdon fetched the doctor
there and then. She was relieved to find that
NELLIE’S FLITTING. 59



he did not think her seriously ill—only very
weak and needing air.

“The sooner she leaves this close house the
better,” the doctor said. “The kindest thing
you can do for her is to. get her away to fresh
air, and the sooner the better.”

‘Miss Burdon listened, and after he was gone
decided that Mrs. Healey must move without
delay. She promised to see a friend who lived
at Highgate, and ask her to find rooms for her
:in that more healthy neighbourhood.

It was the first week in June when Nell and
her mother found themselves in their new cottage
home. To Nell it was a day of supreme
happiness, and as she looked out upon the green
sunny fields, they reminded her of her old
country home.

“ Mother, isn’t it beautiful?” she said joyously.
“You will soon get well now. Oh, how sweet
the flowers smell!”

The door. of the cottage was opened by a
‘kind, motherly-looking woman, with a baby in
‘her arms, and close behind. her stood a merry-
60 LITTLE NELL,



faced boy of seven, anxious to catch sight of
the new-comers.

“Come in,” said the woman kindly; “you’re
tired, I’ll be bound; for the lady said as you
were not very strong. I’ve got a cup o’ tea
ready ; there’s nothing like a cup o’ tea, to my
thinking.”

So Mrs. Healey took the offered seat, while
Mrs. Turner proceeded to pour out the welcome
cup of tea. As she did so, Mrs. Healey glanced
up at the wall, and there she read these words:
“As for me and my house, we will serve the
Lord.” Then she knew the secret of Mrs.
Turner’s happy face and kind ways: the love
of Christ reigned in the home. Mrs. Healey
had not felt so much at rest for many a day.
Her heart was filled with hope. Surely she might
get well and strong in this peaceful cottage !

“Now you will like to come and see your
room,” said Mrs. Turner, when the tea was
finished. “It’s this way up the stairs; you
must take care how you come—it’s a bit dark
to strangers, but you’ll soon get used to it.
NELLIE’S FLITTING. +) Oi



Here, Jemmie, you open the kitchen door.
That’s right; now we shall get on.”

It was a pleasant, bright room into which
Mrs, Turner ushered Nell and her mother.
It looked across the pleasant fields towards
Hampstead, which were bathed in the beautiful
June sunshine.

“Here’s the cart, mother,’ said Nell, “just
when we are ready for it,’ and soon Jemmie
was as busy as any one bringing up the things,

“ What a useful little fellow he is?” said Mrs.
_ Healey to his mother, as she watched him
going to and fro. “Is he your eldest ?”

“Yes, my eldest now,” she said, with a tender
look in her eyes; “our first-born and our little
Elsie are gone home to be with God. Our
little girl came between Jemmy and Baby; she
was one of the merriest little girls that a mother
ever had. Our home seemed very lonesome
after she was gone. Yes, Jemmie is a useful
lad,” she added brightly, as the little fellow
appeared once more, carrying a chair almost as
big as himself; “he has gone out lately selling
62 LITTLE NELL. ~





spring flowers, and I think the ladies like to
buy of him, he looks so happy.” F
“Why, that is what my Nell does!” said
Mrs. Healey.
“Does she? Then they.can go out together
now, and take care of each other.”
Mrs. Turner was one of those kindly persons
that are never happier than when helping some-
body else. Seeing how weary Mrs. Healey
was, she set to work to help in putting things
straight, and very soon the: room began to look
quite homelike. :
“She is kind, mother, isn’t she?” said Nell,
when at last the kind-hearted landlady had
gone downstairs. : :
. “Yes, indeed, she is. Oh, Nell, how true
God’s promises are! how He-has cared for us
step by step, and led us on safely.”
. Very peacefully the mother and child slept
that night, and before many days were over ~
there was an evident improvement in Mrs.
Healey; a little tinge of colour began to show.
in her face, and her spirits were brighter. It
NELLIE’S FLITTING. 63,



was no longer such a burden to dress the dolls,
and kind Miss Burdon would often come in
and give her some fresh idea, so that the sale
for them continued very satisfactory.

Nell was not long before she wrote to Gerty,
and told her all about the bright new home; and.
Gerty wrote back telling her how happy she
was in the pretty thatch-roofed cottage. She
had much to tell about the ducks and chickens,
in which she took a keen interest, and saved
Mrs. Bailey many a journey down the garden.
It would have been difficult for anyone to
recognize the round-faced happy little girl who
so merrily ran in and out of the cottage as the
poor forlorn little maiden that Miss Burdon had
befriended some months before. Though far
from being perfect, she was every day trying
hard to do right, and Mrs. Bailey proved one of
the kindest and most patient mothers. She
never forgot her little friend Nell, and would
sometimes tell Mrs. Bailey how Nell had first
told her about Jesus.

Nell and Jemmie too became fast friends,
64 LITTLE NELL. -

They went to the same school together, and on
Saturdays they would find their way down to
the busier streets with their tempting-looking
baskets, and many people turned to look at
the little pair. So Nell was comforted, but she |
never forgot her first friend Gerty.



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FROGGY’S LITTLE BROTHER. A Story of the East End.
New Illustrated Edition. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
“Very pathetic and yet comical reading.” —Guardian.

A SATURDAY’S BAIRN.
With Illustrations. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 5/-.
“A pleasing story, skilfully written, and in an excellent spirit.”—Record,

LITTLE COUSINS; or, Georgie’s Visit to Lotty.
With Illustrations by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘Sure to satisfy any little girl to whom it may be given.” Atheneum,
“Little girls who read it will long dream of the delights of the shops and the
Zoo.” —Guardian. }

VICTORIA BESS; or, The Ups and Downs of a Doll’s Life.
With Illustrations by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘4 charming book for little girls.” —Lzterary World.
‘Told with Brenda’s usual brightness and good aim as to teaching.” —A unt Judy,

LOTTY’S VISIT TO GRANDMAMA.
A Story for the Little Ones. With Fifty Illustrations. Square, cloth extra, 2/6,
“ An admirable book for little people." —Literary World.
“*A capital children’s story.’"—Record.
‘© Would form a nice birthday present."—A unt Fudy.

NOTHING TO NOBODY.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-
‘*A very pretty story.” —A theneum.

THE MERCHANT AND THE MOUNTEBANK.
With Illustrations by H. PerHerick. Cloth, 1/6,
“One of Brenda's delightful tales.”"—British Weekly.
‘A sparkling little sketch, very prettily got up.”—The Record.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, EC,
5
John F. Shaw & Co.’s Publications.

STORIES BY LOUISE MARSTON.

MISS MOLLIE AND HER BOYS; or, His Great Love.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 3/6.
“The love of God is charmingly illustrated by a recital of the loving devotion
of a young woman who bestowed affectionate care upon some poor lonely lads.”
The Christian.

TWO LITTLE BOYS; or, I’d Like to Please Him.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
““A wonderfully pathetic story. It will be read with deep feeling, especially by
children.” —7he Record.

MR. BARTHOLOMEW’S LITTLE GIRL.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
“A story that should turn the hearts of many to the Saviour. It is well written,
and the teaching is pure and true.” —The Christian.

CRIPPLE JESS. The Hop Picker’s Daughter.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
“ Fully as engrossing as anything from the pen of Hesba Stretton.”
The Christian.
“ A sketch well drawn of a sweet flower blooming in a very humble place.”
Woman's Work.

ROB AND MAG. A Little Light in a Dark Corner.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 1/6.
“A beautiful sketch.”"—Churchman’s Magazine.
“We believe this little volume will be found the means of leading many to
Jesus.” —The Christian.

BLIND NETTIE; or, Seeking Her Fortune. 1/-
JITANA’S STORY; or, Light in the Darkness. 1/-
BENNIE, THE KING’S LITTLE SERVANT. 1)



STORIES BY JENNIE CHAPPELL.

BERNE’S BARGAIN.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 8/6.
“A delightful story. Boys cannot fail to like it. It is full of incident and
adventure. The illustrations are excellent.’—Manchester Examiner.

FOR ELSIE’S SAKE; or, A Seaside Friendship.

Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.

LITTLE RADIANCE. A Year ina Child’s Life.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
“A charming book for children.” —/ootsteps of Truth.

HAND IN HAND; or, Radiance at Beechdale.

Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
LEFT BEHIND; or, A Summer in Exile. Cloth, 1/-
OUGHTS AND CROSSES. A Story for Boys. 1)/-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48,. PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
6
Foln F. Shaw & Cos Publications. —

STORIES BY AGNES GIBERNE.

LIFE IN A NUTSHELL. A Story.
Crown 8vo, bevelled boards, 2/6.

IDA’S SECRET; or, The Towers of Ickledale.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.

WON AT LAST;; or, Mrs. Briscoe’s Nephews.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“‘The treatment is so admirable we can understand Miss Giberne’s book being a.
help to many.” —A ¢heneum.

HIS ADOPTED DAUGHTER;; or, A Quiet Valley.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 5/- E
‘* A thoroughly interesting and good book.”—Birmingham Post.

THE EARLS OF THE VILLAGE.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.
‘A pathetic tale of country life, in which the fortunes of a family are followed
out with a skill that never fails to interest.” —Scotsman.

THE OLD HOUSE IN THE CITY; or, Not Forsaken.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.
“ An admirable book for girls. The narrative is simply written, but there is a
good deal of quiet force that deserves special notice.”—Teachers’ Aid.

FLOSS SILVERTHORN ; or, The Master’s Little Handmaid.
Crown 8vo, 2/6.
‘*Thoroughly interesting and profitable, as Miss Giberne’s tales always are.
We should like to see this in every home library.” —The News.

MADGE HARDWICKE; or, The Mists of the Valley.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.

‘An extremely interesting book, and one that can be read with profit by all.”
The Schoolinaster.

WILL FOSTER OF THE FERRY. Crown 8vo, 2/6.

“ We are glad to see this capital story in a new shape.”—ecord.
P'

TOO DEARLY BOUGHT. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.



NEW SUNDAY STORY-~-
Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.
By M. S. COMRIE.

THE KING’S LIGHT-BEARER;; or, Shining for Jesus.
A Story of Little Louise.



Lunpon:; JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
7
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY EMMA MARSHALL,

.THE CHILDREN OF. DEAN’S COURT;
Or, Lady-bird and her Friends. Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6.

BLUEBELL. A Story of Child Life Now-a-days.

Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 3/6. .
LITTLE QUEENIE. A Story of Child Life Sixty Years Ago.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 3/6.
**¢Little Queenie’ is particularly pleasing.” Saturday Review.
EVENTIDE-LIGHT. The Story of Dame Margaret Hoby.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 5/-
“A charming gift book, especially to girls in their teens.”—The Record.
THE END CROWNS ALL. A Story of Life.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 5/-

‘* A most exciting story of modern life, pervaded as Mrs. Marshall's tales always
are by a thoroughly wholesome tone.”—Record.

BISHOP’S CRANWORTH; or, Rosamund’s Lamp.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 5/-
“This is a delightful story, with a considerable flavour of romance.”—Baptist.

LITTLE MISS JOY. Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6.
‘A pretty picture of childish influence.”—Brighton Gazette.
HURLY-BURLY; or, After a Storm comes a Calm.
Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, 2/.
‘*Simply and touchingly told.”—AJderdeen Fournal,
CURLEY’S CRYSTAL; or, A Light Heart Lives Long.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6, a
“ The vehicle of good thought as to life and its duties.”— The Christian.
ROBERT’S RACE; or, More Haste Less Speed.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6,
‘Is both cheap and good.”—Teachers’ Aid.
PETER’S PROMISES; or, Look before you Leap.

Crown 8vo, Illustrated, 1/6.

STORIES BY M, k. WINCHESTER,

Author of ‘A Nest of Sparrows,” etc.
CITY SNOWDROPS; or, The House of Flowers.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 5/-
‘We have read very few stories of such pathos and interest.” —British Weekly.
GRANNY’S CABIN; or, All He Does is Love.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 2/6. 2
‘*Will do any one’s heart good to read.” —Sfectator.
LOST MAGGIE;; or, A Basket of Roses.
Cloth, Illustrated, 1/-
‘°A pathetic and interesting story.”—Record.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PareRNosTER Row, EC.
8
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY HE. EVERETT-GREEN. .

FRIENDS OR FOES. __A Story for Boys and Girls. Crown 8vo, with illus.”
trations, bevelled boards, 2/6.

SHADOWLAND; or, What Lindis Accomplished.
Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 1/6,
«A charming story for children, very prettily got up.”—Record.

HER HUSBAND’S HOME; or, The Durleys of Linley Castle.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.
“Some of the scenes are particularly effective.” —Sfectator.

MARJORIE AND MURIEL; or, Two London Homes.
Small 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.
‘*A capital story, very prettily got up.’—Record.

HIS MOTHER’S BOOK. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-
“Little Bill is so lovable, and meets with such interesting friends, that every-
body may read about him with pleasure.”—Sfectator.

LITTLE FREDDIE; or, Friends in Need. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-

‘There is real pathos in this story, telling how a poor little waif is protected
from evil by the recollection of a lost mother's teaching.” —Liverpool Courier.

BERTIE CLIFTON; or, Paul’s Little Schoolfellow.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/-
“Seldom have we perused a tale of the length of this with so much pleasure.”
The Schoolmaster.
LITTLE RUTH’S LADY. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 2/-
‘*A delightful study of children, their joys and sorrows.” —A theneum.
‘© One of those children’s stories that charm grown people as well as little folk.”

Guardian.
_OUR WINNIE;; or, When the Swallows Go.
Crown 8vo, cloth, Illustrated, 1/6.
‘The beautiful life of little Winnie is one which all children will do well to take
as an example.”—Banner.







STORIES BY J. M. CONKLIN,

JUST AS IT OUGHT TO BE; or, The Story of Miss Prudence.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 5/-
‘Very original, interesting, with many good and suggestive thoughts.”
**A capital book for girls.” —Bafzis¢. English Churchman.

BEK’S FIRST CORNER, AND HOW SHE TURNED IT.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, 3/6.
“Bek Westerley is a very charming person.” —Standard.

OUT IN GOD’S WORLD; or, Electa’s Story. Large Crown 8vo, 2/3.

“One of the best girls’ stories we have read.” —The Congregationalist.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C,
9
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



STORIES BY Ll. T. MEADE.

Author of ‘Scamp and I,” &c.

GREAT ST. BENEDICT’S; or, Dorothy’s Story.

New and Cheaper Edition. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.
‘The description of Dorothy’s life is excellent.” Spectator.
“At once a noble book, and a most interesting story.”—Court Circular.

A KNIGHT OF TO-DAY. A Tale.
New and Cheaper Edition. With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.
‘A finely-imagined story of a good man. It is a book well worth reading.”

The Guardian.
BEL-MARJORY. A Tale. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6/-

‘Most interesting ; we giveit our hearty commendation.” —Luglish Independent.

SCAMP AND I. A Story of City Byeways.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.
‘* All as true to life and as touchingly set forth as any heart could desire.”

° Atheneum.
THE CHILDREN’S KINGDOM;

Or, The Story of a Great Endeavour. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 3/6.

“A really well-written story, with many touching passages. Boys and girls
will read it with eagerness and profit.” — The Churchman.

WATER GIPSIES. A Tale.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations 2/6,

“Tt is full of incident from beginning to end, and we do not know the person
who will not be interested in it.”—Chrvistian World,

DAVID’S LITTLE LAD.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 2/6.

‘A finely-imagined story, bringing out in grand relief the contrast between quiet, °
steady self-sacrifice, and brilliant, flashy qualities.” —Guardian.

DOT AND HER TREASURES.

With Illustrations. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-

“One of the tales of poor children in London, of which we have had many
examples; but none finer, more pathetic, or more original than this.”

x Nonconfor nist,
OUTCAST ROBIN;; or, Your Brother and Mine.

Illustrated. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 2/-.

WHITE LILIES, AND OTHER TALES.

With Illustrations. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.
«Stories of a singularly touching and beautiful character."—Rock.

LETTIE’S LAST HOME. | small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6,
“Very touchingly told."—Aunt Fudy's Magazine.

THOSE BOYS. A Story for all Little Fellows. small svo, 1/-
LITTLE TROUBLE THE HOUSE. small 8vo, 1/-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOsTER Row, E.C.
10
yohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

STORIES BY CATHARINE SHAW,

Price Three Shillings and Sixpence each.
THE STRANGE HOUSE; or, A Moment’s Mistake.

‘“A charming story. It is characterised by simplicity of treatment, but the
interest is cleverly sustained, and the characters are well drawn.”
Manchester Examiner.
LILIAN’S HOPE. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.
“One of the best gift books for girls we have seen. ‘The story throbs with the
power and pathos of real home life.” =/z His Name.

HILDA; or, Seeketh Not Her Own. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“*A charming story, illustrative of the blessedness of self-sacrifice.”
Literary World.



Price Two Shillings and Sixpence each.
ALICK’S HERO. Large Crown 8vo, cloth. Illustrated.

“Mrs. Shaw has added to our delight in noble boyhood, as well as to her own
reputation, in this most charming of her works.” —The Christian.

ONLY A COUSIN. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“Tn our excavations among heaps of tales we have not come upon a brighter
jewel than this.”—Rev. C. H. SpurGEON in Sword and Trowel.
THE GABLED FARM; or, Young Workers for the King.

Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“A charming story, wherein the children are described naturally.”

Evangelical Magazine,
IN THE SUNLIGHT AND OUT OF IT. :
A Year of my Life-story. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“One of the pleasantest books that a girl could take into her hand, either for
Sunday or week-day reading.” —Daily Review.
NELLIE ARUNDEL. A Tale of Home Life.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, Illustrated.
“We need scarcely say that Mrs. Shaw holds out the light of life to. all her

readers, and we know of few better books than those which bear her name.’
Record.

SOMETHING FOR SUNDAY.

SELECTED BY CATHARINE SHAW.

Price One Shilling each.
ist. OUTLINE TEXTS FOR PAINTING. 48 Texts in Packet.
end. HAPPY HOURS WITH THE BIBLE. Devices for Bible Searching.
3rd. ECHOES FROM THE BIBLE. Illustrated Papers for Bible Study.
4th, ALPHABET TEXTS FOR PRICKING OR PAINTING. Specially
for the Little Ones.
sth MESSAGES FROM HEAVEN. Small Outline Texts for Painting.
(Suitable for Flower Missions.) [Study.
6the GLEAMS OF GLORY FROM THE GOSPELS. Subjects for Bible
7th, A LARGE THOUGHT IN A LARGE WORD. Outline Texts for
&h. SCRIPTURE FEAR NOTS. Texts for Painting. (Painting.
gth. ‘ALL THINGS ARE YOURS.” Outline Texts for Painting, with Hints
for Bible Searching.
roth, TEXTS FOR THE CHILDREN. For Pricking or Painting.

Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
II
Fohn F. Shaw & Co.’s Publications.



POPULAR HOME STORIES.

By EMILY BRODIE.

OLD CHRISTIE’S CABIN. Crown 8vo, 2/6. Illustrated.

‘*A capital book for young people, depicting the loveliness of a ministering life
on the part of some happy children.”—The Christian,

COUSIN DORA; or, Serving the King. Large Crown 8vo, 2/6.

“© An admirable tale for elder girls.” —Wonconformist.

HIS GUARDIAN ANGEL. Large Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“ Should find its way into school libraries as well as into homes.”
Sunday School Chronic/e.

FIVE MINUTES TOO LATE; or, Leslie Harcourt’s Resolve.

Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.

NORMAN AND ELSIE;; or, Two Little Prisoners.
Large Crown 8vo, extra cloth, 3/6.
‘So true and delightful a picture that we can hardly believe we have only read
about it; it all seems so real, and has done us so much good.” — 7 he Christian.

NORA CLINTON; or, Did I Do Right? Crown 8vo, 3/6.

‘© Will be read with pleasure and profit.” —Christian Age.

LONELY JACK and His Friends at Sunnyside. Crown 8vo, 2/3.

“Tts chapters will be eagerly devoured by the reader.” —Christian World.

THE HAMILTONS;; or, Dora’s Choice. Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“Miss Brodie’s stories have that savour of religious influence and teaching
which makes them valuable as companions of the home.”—Congregationalist,

UNCLE FRED’S SHILLING: Its Travels and Adventures.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6,
“Children will follow it with as eager interest as the little people who listened
to it in the book itself." Christian World.

ELSIE GORDON;; or, Through Thorny Paths.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 2/6.
“The characters have been well thought out. We are sure the volume will
be welcome at many a fireside.”— Daily Express.

JEAN LINDSAY, the Vicar's Daughter. Crown 8vo, 2/3.
“The tale is admirably told, and some capital engravings interpret its principal
incidents.” —Bookselier.

ROUGH THE TERRIER. His Life and Adventures.
Illustrated by T. Pym. Square, cloth extra, 2/6; or boards, 1/6.
‘¢ A clever autobiography, cleverly illustrated.” —The Christian.

SYBIL’S MESSAGE. Small 8vo, cloth extra, 1/6.

EAST AND WEST;; or, The Strolling Artist. 1/6.
THE SEA GULL’S NEST;; or, Charlie’s Revenge. 1/6,
RUTH'S RESCUE; or, The Light of Ned’s Home. 1-



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C,
tT?
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

BOOKS FOR BOYS.

BY M. L. RIDLEY.





Price Two Shillings and Sixpence each, with Illustrations.
SENT TO COVENTRY; or, The Boys of Highbeech.

Illustrated. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
‘A really good story of boys’ school-life."—Pall Mall Gazette.
“‘Eminently interesting from start to finish.” —Pictorial World.

KING’S SCHOLARS; or, Work and Play at Easthaven.
Illustrated. Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra.

“Full of all those stirring incidents which go to make up the approved life of
schoolboys. Both adventure and sentiment find a place init.”-—Pad? Mali Gazette.

“A schoolboy tale of very good tone and spirit.” —Guardian.

OUR CAPTAIN. The Heroes of Barton School.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.
“A first-class book for boys.”’—Dazly Review.
“A regular boy’s book.”—Christian World.

OUR SOLDIER HERO. The Story of My Brothers.
Large Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.

“Contains the healthiest of matter presented i in the most entertaining of ways.”
Schooltmaster.

THE THREE CHUMS. A Story of School Life.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra.

‘*A book after a boy’s heart. How can we better commend it than by saying
it is both manly and godly?”—Rev. C. H. SpuRGEON in Sword and Trowel.

“‘Ingeniously worked out and spiritedly told." —Guardian.

Price Three Shillings and Sixpence each, with Illustrations.
GOLDENGATES;; or, Rex Mortimer’s Friend. Large Crown 8vo.

An excellent story of boyish love." —Swzday School Chronicle.

‘A first-rate story for boys. The hero is a fine specimen of a manly young
Christian.” —Congregational Review.

WALTER ALISON: His Friénds and Foes.
Crown 8vo, cloth extra. With Illustrations.
“ Schoolboys are sure to like it.” —Churchiman.
“ 4 book boys will be sure to read if they get the chance.” —Sword and Trowel.

HILLSIDE FARM;; or, Marjorie’s Magic.
Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Two SHILLINGS.
© A very well-written tela which all girls will thoroughly enjoy.”—Guardian.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.

tae
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



STORIES BY GB&CH STSBBING.

A REAL HERO. A Story of the Conquest of Mexico.

With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3/6.

“We can cordially recommend this to all youthful lovers of adventure and
enterprise. ’— Academy.

IN ALL OUR DOINGS. A Story for Boys. Large Crown 8vo, 3/6.

“A story for boys, in which the lessons of the daily Collects are brightly
brought home to them.”—7Z7zxes.

GRAHAM McCALL. A Tale of the Covenanters.

Large Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 5/-
“Stirring, and ably written.”— Guardian.
‘We heartily commend it to English boys and girls.” —Suzday School Chronicle.

WINNING AN EMPIRE;; or, The Story of Clive.
Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 3/6.

“Miss Stebbing is one of the few ladies that can write really good boys’ stories,
She has caught, not only the phraseology, but the spirit of boys.” —Standard.

ONLY A TRAMP.

Crown 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 3/6,

‘Miss Stebbing holds the attention and extorts the admiration of the reader
from first to last. Many a weighty lesson may be learnt from her pages.’

The Christian.
FUN AND FAIRIES.
Fully Illustrated by T. Pym. 4to, cloth extra, 3/6.
“With its dear little pictures, is quite charming.”—A theneum.

SILVERDALE RECTORY; or, The Golden Links.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 2/6.

““ We can heartily recommend this story.”
Church of England Sunday School Magazine.

BRAVE GEORDIE. The Story of an English Boy.
With Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2/6.

“Tt is refreshing to meet with such a spirited and thoroughly good story.”
The Christian.

IN WYCLIFFE’S DAYS; or, A Safe Hiding Place.
Small 8vo. With Illustrations. Cloth extra, 2/6.
“A delightful invigorating story.”—Dazly Review.

LOST HER SHOE AND OTHER THREADS.
Small 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth extra, 1/6.
‘* Five short stories sure to be devoured by young people.”—Szord and Trowel,



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, ECh
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.

THE PINAFORE PICTURE BOOKS.

Price EIGHTHENPENCH, in Cloth Gilt.

eae oe
PINAFORE DAYS.
By IsMay THorN . __. With Illustrations by T. Pym.

MY SUNDAY STORY BOOK.

With Illustrations,



ONLY FIVE.
By Ismay THORN , - With Illustrations by T. Pym.

ROUGH THE TERRIER.
By EmiILy BRopvie. . With Illustrations by T. Pym,

MY SUNDAY PICTURE BOOK.
With Illustrations,
A SIX YEARS DARLING.
By Ismay THORN . . With Illustrations by T. Pym,

SUNDAY BIBLE PICTURES.

With Illustrations,



SHILLING PICTURE BOOKS.

Coloured Boards, Crown 4to, with many Illustrations.
—__—_——__

JINGLES & CHIMES & NURSERY RHYMES.
With 74 Original Illustrations.

BY SEA AND LAND.

Stories of Adventure, Travel, and Conflict. With many
Illustrations,

SOMEBODY'S DARLING.

By CATHARINE SHAW. With Ico Illustrations.



Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.
Tz
Fohn F. Shaw & Co’s Publications.



| SPLENDID STORIES FOR BOYS,

By Dr. GORDON STABLES, R.N.
FACING FEARFUL ODDS. A Tale of Flood and Field. -

Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

HEARTS OF OAK. A Story of Nelson and the Navy.
Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

**Tom Burn, the hero, will charm every boy that gets hold of it.”
Literary World.

“* A Story of the navy and of mighty Nelson, told with excellent spirit.”

Saturday Review.
TWO SAILOR LADS.
A Story of Stirring Adventures on Sea and Land. _ L. Cr. 8vo, with Illustns., 5/-

‘© A sea story, big with wonders.” —Saturday Review.
“A capital story in Dr. Stables’ best style.” —Sfectator.

_FOR ENGLAND, HOME, AND BEAUTY.

A Tale of Battle and the Breeze. Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, price 5/-

“Dr. Stables has almost surpassed himself in this book. Certainly we have
read nothing of -his which has pleased us more—perhaps we might say, as much.”

The Spectator.
EXILES OF FORTUNE.
The Story of a Far North Land. Large Cr. 8vo, cloth extra, with Illustrations, 5/-

“A capital book; written with this popular writer’s accustomed spirit, and
sure to be enjoyed.” —Scotsman.

FROM SQUIRE TO SQUATTER.
A Tale of the Old Land and the New. Large Crown 8vo, Illustrated, price 5/-

“Just the sort of book that boys delight in, as the story is crowded with exciting
incidents.” —Schoolmaster.

‘The story is naturally and brightly written, and shows a marked advance over
former productions by the same author.” —Standard.

IN THE DASHING DAYS OF OLD; or, The World-wide Adven-
tures of Willie Grant. Large Crown 8vo, Illustrated, price 5/-
‘*We can commend this book as the best story for boys which we have read for
many a day.”—Lglish Chuchman.
‘*Can be safely recommended as one of the very best books that could possibly
be placed in a boy’s hand.” —Schoolmaster.

By W. C. METCALFE.
ROGUE’S ISLAND; or, The Pirate Lair.

Large Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, 5/-

By LADY FLORENCE DIXIE.
THE TWO CASTAWAYS; or, Adventures in Patagonia,

Large Crown 8vo, cloth, with Illustrations, price 5/-

“A lively story of adventure, drawn a good deal from personal experience.”
The Guardian,

Lonpon: JOHN F. SHAW & Co., 48, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C,