Citation
Young Americans in Tokio

Material Information

Title:
Young Americans in Tokio
Series Title:
Roundabout books
Uniform Title:
Wonderful city of Tokio
Alternate title:
Young Americans in Tokyo
Creator:
Greey, Edward, 1835-1888
Charles E. Brown & Co ( Publisher )
S.J. Parkhill & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Charles E. Brown & Co.
Manufacturer:
S.J. Parkhill & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xiii, 301 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Temples -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Costume -- Juvenile fiction -- Japan ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Tokyo (Japan) ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Japan ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1892 ( local )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1892 ( local )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Originally published under title: The wonderful city of Tokio. Boston : Lee and Shepard, 1883.
General Note:
Title page printed in green and blue.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Edward Greey.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026626722 ( ALEPH )
ALG3862 ( NOTIS )
37651095 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






The Baldwin = =|
Univers













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CONCERT BY JAPANESE LADIES.



































al =I
po snl
wilh é |
INT il |

|
Kill



EDWARD. GREEY

“YOUNG AMERICANS-IN JAPAN
YOUNG AMERICANS IN YEZO”
BLUEJACKETS ETC.

LEBU STRATED

BOSTON, .
GHARLES E.BRown & Co.



ee ee





























































































































































































Full Text























The Baldwin = =|
Univers






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CONCERT BY JAPANESE LADIES.






























al =I
po snl
wilh é |
INT il |

|
Kill



EDWARD. GREEY

“YOUNG AMERICANS-IN JAPAN
YOUNG AMERICANS IN YEZO”
BLUEJACKETS ETC.

LEBU STRATED

BOSTON, .
GHARLES E.BRown & Co.



ee ee












WET GODS.
264 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

the characters Marita san, and another hung just below it
bore the legend Ko-gu Guild.”

“Yes,” said Fitz, with a nod, “but the amar-saké-urt was
a curiosity. He had two boxes, one of which contained a lit-
tle furnace, surmounted with a copper vessel full of sweet
wine, while the other
was inscribed amaz-
saké, and held his cups,
trays and other articles.
He was very thin, and
was so polite te his cus-
tomers that he crouched
even when he walked.
Johnnie and I patronized
the old fellow, but we
only tasted the stuff. He
charged three sez for a
big cuptull.”

“We also saw the
dat-ku- gora (street-
jugglers),” continued
Johnnie. “They were
outside a _ fashionable
tea-house and were at-



tracting the attention of

PEDDLER OF SWEET WINE.

its patrons. The elder
performer was a very big man with nostrils that appeared to
have quarrelled with one another, they were so wide apart.
We kept three balls in the air at once and sent them whirling
through a bamboo basket. Then the dancer held up a bag and
caught them, which so overjoyed the ball-player’s son that he
raised his hands above his head and hopped round and round,
shricking, —*Oh, very good! Oh, very good!’”
ON yi oe ) aK
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br TY, SS
Ze mS

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25 _Â¥


266 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

“We met another sappore,” said Fitz. “He was exceed-
ingly funny,and wore a domino and a curious white head-dress
decorated with a mask of Uzumé. He played a samdsen and
as he danced sang and hopped first on one foot and then
on the other. A boy, who was passing, said to him, —



KKAPPORE,

‘Why don’t you move quicker? In my part of the coun-
try, even the bears caper more rapidly than you do.”

““Yeh!” shouted the kappore, tuning his instrument.
“Any one can see you came from Yeso.”

“Dr. Nambo is at the gate,” said Cho.

“Tam glad he has arrived,” exclaimed Sallie. “ Boys, go
and bring him here.”
HARVESTING THE RICE. 267

In a few moments Oto made his appearance, and, after salut-
ing his friends, observed, —“ What do you say? Will you run
down to Kamakura? Do you not want to have another look
at the Dai-Butsu? If you hurry up we can catch the next
train to Yokohama and take j7zn-rzki-sha from there. My
father and mother wish to join us. Why cannot your parents
go too?”































HARVESTING RICE.

Everything was soon arranged and the party started.
There are many rice ficlds between Tokio and the port, so the
young Americans had an opportunity of seeing the crop har-
vested.

Women and men, armed with quaintly shaped sickles, were
cutting the partly ripe grain or tying it into bundles, which they
fastened to high racks, in order that it might dry and harvest.

As the train passed, the laborers would pause in their oc-
cupation and gape at the swiftly moving carriages, then resume
their work with a will.
268 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

In some places the land was so wet that the rice had to be
carried a long distance to the drying frames or was. laid on
coarse matting upon the ground.

vf
Nn
i

WK

Wii atin
347k i
Say

EN) \
Ys



CUTTING THE RICE.

“There is a Lome-tsuki (rice-cleaner) at work,” said Mrs.
Nambo. ‘What strength he must have to use that heavy mal-
let. Do you observe the cord round his waist and that stout —
loop of cotton cloth in which he rests the butt of his
pounder?
HARVESTING THE RICE. 269

* He wears an apron,” remarked Sallie.
* They all do,” answered the old lady. “See the chicken
near him. We have a saying, ‘If you want to find your hen,

go to where the home-tswhk7 is working.”



RICE-CLEANER.

® How do they clean the grain? ” inquired Fitz.

©They put the rough mome into the mortar,
Mr. Nambo, “then pound it with that heavy mallet and the
friction separates the husks from the rice.”

“Here we are at Yokohama,” said Sallie. “How beauti-

ful the bay looks.”

” answered
270 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

“Our sin-riki-sha are waiting for us,” said Oto. “I have
ordered you some good strong runners, who can make the jour-
ney quickly.”

They entered the vehicles and started at a rapid pace, only
stopping for a short time at Kanazawa to give their men a
rest.

When they arrived at the boundary line between the prov-
inces of Musashi and Sagami, Fitz pointed to a stone figure,
carved in the rock by the wayside, and said, — “ What do you
call that?” :

“Hanakake Jizo” (the noseless Jizo), said Mrs. Nambo.
“Would you like to make a little offering to him?”

The boy shook his head, noticing which the good old lady
sighed and did not volunteer any more information.

The friends arrived in Kamakura as the sun was setting, so
had no time to see the Dai-Butsu that night.

The next day they were up bright and early, and visited the
temple of Hachiman, where Fitz almost ruined himself by his
lavish patronage of the mame-uwrt (bean-seller.)

One old woman. who kept a stall near the main temple,
was chatting with a nurse and two children who were watch-
ing a fat rooster filling his crop with the grain intended for the
opal-breasted doves. The boy on the servant’s back was in a
high state of excitement, and his brother, who was mounted
upon thick clogs, jumped backwards and forwards and yelled,
“Oh, go away! go away, greedy bird! Let the pigeons
come.”

He had a red fringed purse suspended from his girdle,
which was tied in a big knot behind his back.

The mame-urt doled out her stock in trade in small saucers
and kept her receipts, consisting of brass cash and tempo, on
skewers inserted in a little slab of pine wood.
HARVESTING THE RICE. 271

While the strangers were watching the scene, they heard
a whirring sound, and presently a flock of pigeons alighted all
around them.

“Why do they always have so many doves in the temple
of the god of War?” asked Sallie.

Mrs. Nambo inclined her head and replied in her gentle
way,— “Those birds are
Hachiman’s messengers.
When he wishes to com-
municate with another god,
he dispatches one of those
beautiful creatures.”

They ascended the hill
and visited the grave of
Yoritomo, before which
they found an offering of
lovely flowers.

* T wonder who brought
these here,” said Fitz. “I
do not see why they should
make such a fuss about
Yoritomo. No doubt he
was a great man, but one



can never forget that he

SIDE VIEW OF DAI-BUTSU.

caused his brother, Yosit-
sune, to be assassinated. He did not gain the decisive victo-
ries over the Taira, and he killed both the men who did, one
of whom was his own brother.”
Ee was successful,” said Johnnie. “I suppose that is
why he is not forgotten. Nothing succeeds like success.”
About five o’clock they once more visited the Dai-Butsu*

* Vide. -— Young Americans in Japan, p. 377.
272 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

(image of Buddha). The sun was setting as they regarded
the grand statue from the hillside on its right.

* Ah!” exclaimed the Professor, “there it sits, calm and
majestic, the embodiment of the faith that has enchained mil-
lions.”

“Yes,” added Fitz, to the amusement of his mother, “and
that pilgrim is walking over the majestic bronze and sounding



GRAVE OF YORITOMO AT KAMAKURA.

it with his staff, as a railway employee does the axles of the car-
wheels. Hear how it chinks.”

“Brother, I am afraid you will never be a poet,” said
Sallie.

“J hope not,” was the unabashed reply. “I intend to be a
lawyer. I wonder how much money it cost to make that fig-
ure? Oto, I suppose you call it one of the wet gods.”

While he was speaking, they saw a number of foreigners
ascend to the lap of the statue and group themselves on
Buddha’s jointed thumbs.

Presently a quavering sound of singing proceeded from the
new-comers, on hearing which Mrs. Nambo innocently in-
quired, —‘“'What is the matter with those people?”
HARVESTING THE RICE. 2493

* They are worshipping,” said Fitz. “Do you know, some
travellers think the correct thing to do at Kamakura is to
mount upon Buddha’s thumb and sing the doxology?”

The good old lady, who was puzzled at this reply, regarded
the eccentric group and murmured to herself, —“I suppose it
is one of their religious ceremonies. What strange beings
these Americans are!”
274 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

(CABUAN IEP IB AR: XO

A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS.

“When the gods created the flowers, they chose the most superb.
Among which were the lotus, the tree peony, and the chrysanthemum ;
The last, the emblem of the sun, unfolds its glory in the eleventh month.”

( NE November morning, Sallie Jewett stood at the window
of her room, watching a man who was moving stealthily
about the grounds of the yashzk7.

He was comfortably dressed, in well-worn cotton clothes
carried a pipe and tobacco-pouch, suspended from the right
side of his girdle, had a basket with a trap mouth tied about
his waist, and wore the left sleeve of his dress looped up with
a towel. Healso had a mushroom-shaped sun-hat on his head,
and carried in his hand a long, light bamboo, which he ma-
neeuvred in a very peculiar way. He slunk along as though
ashamed of what he was about, peeped round corners with a
furtive air, and conducted himself like one who is engaged in a
disreputable business.

“T wonder what he is after,” murmured the girl.

“Don’t you know, Sallie?” said Fitz, who, with his brother
had silently joined her. “That is a ¢ord-sasht. You will hear
him call presently.”

As the boy spoke, the man put an instrument between his
lips and twittered just like a sparrow. A number of the birds
answered him and flew down from the trees to attack the new-
comer, when, quick as thought, he made a pass at them with
his bamboo and entangled the feathers of one of the plump
little fellows in the ¢or¢-moch7(bird-lime), with which the rod
was tipped.



A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS.

Ul.

a

ee oe

Sa

5

Ny
Ws G
Sawn,

Ween:
Pai

BEAN-SELLER.

As he removed the trembling prisoner and

transferred it to his basket, he noticed the young Americans,
and said, “ Honorable master boys, do you want some nice
276 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

sparrows for your breakfast? I can sell you a lot of beauties
at three sez each.”
“You wicked man,” indignantly answered Sallie. “I
thought you Buddhists never ate anything that had lived?”
The bird-catcher smiled, bowed and_ politely replied,



BIRD-CATCHER.

“Honorable young lady, I am not a Buddhist, though, for
the matter of that, everybody likes a nice broiled sparrow.”

“Yes, and we are going to have some for breakfast,” said
Fitz. “Come along, sissy, and let the man pursue his honor~
able occupation.”


ASAIN

SQUASH SELLER.

aS


278 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

At first Sallie protested that she would never eat the poor
little creatures, however, when some of them were placed
upon the breakfast table, she forgot all about the way they had
been captured, and enjoyed them as much as any one.

After the meal was over Oto came in, and proposed they
should go to the Hana yashiki at Asakusa, and see the chrys-
anthemums.

“Will you accompany us, mother?” asked Fitz.

“No, we will go later in the month,” replied Mrs. Jewett.
“I have something to do to-day, and your father will not
return from the college until late.”

The young people bade her adieu and soon were on their
way, laughing, chatting, and enjoying the beautiful cool
morning.

“My gracious!” said Johnnie, as they descended the hill,
“look at that fonasu-uré (squash-seller). What a queer shape
the vegetables are.”

“Only the very poorest of our people buy those things,”
said Oto. “They are considered to be inferior food. Gentle-
men seldom partake of them.”

“Of course you never make pumpkin-pies,” said Fitz,
adding to his brother, “ What are you staring at, Johnnie?”

“ At that octopus the woman is carrying. It is laughing,”
he replied. “Although she has run a cord through its body, it
is moving its tentacles.”

“Did you ever see such ankles as hers?” whispered Fitz.

“Hush,” said Sallie. “Let us hear what the man is
saying.”

“Fionorable wife,’ derisively exclaimed the tonasu-urd,
“stop one moment and look at my stock. It is no use pretend-
ing that you don’t like pumpkins. Why, you have a pumpkin
face .
A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS. 279

“Yeh!” she replied. “Go home. I have no pumpkin
money. If you choose to give me one I will take it.”

They left the pair bantering each other and indulging in
loud laughter.

ect)

ry

;
hyo



MAKER OF BROILED BEAN-CURD.

“See,” said Johnnie, “there is a ¢ofu-yaku-ya (broiled
bean-curd seller). Let us stop and buy some.”

The shop consisted of one room, divided by a screen, and
was occupied by the tradesman and his wife, who worked to-
gether and seemed to be very happy and prosperous.
280 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

The party halted, and Sallie asked the woman, “* How do

you make that food?”

The proprietress bowed until the child on her back almost
slipped over her head, then said, “ We soak the best white



VENDOR OF A HOT INFUSION OF LOQUAT-LEAVES.

beans in yonder
tub,” pointing be-
jovinel Ine, My
husband grinds
them between those
circular pieces of
wood, and as the
soft paste runs out,
he collects it in the
ladle he holds in
his left hand. We
strain it through a
sieve and boil it,
then turn the mass
into a cloth and
press out the water.
The fofe (bean
cheese) which is
left is very tender
and nice. Some
Heo ollS jowsier — ite
cold, like this in
the baskets on my

right, others want it broiled. You see I am cooking a num-
ber of slices. When one side is done I turn it over.”

While speaking, she pointed to some oblong cakes of ¢ofu,
resting upon the iron bars of a trough-like fire-box, upon

the counter before her.
A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS. 281

* Why do you use that fan?” asked Sallie.
“To keep the charcoal in a glow,” replied the woman.

“Your tofu yaku is now ready.

Eat it while it is hot.”

The young Americans partook of the food, but, as Fitz

said, did not hanker after more than one portion each, the

article not being as
tempting to them as
some other Japanese
preparations.

A little farther on
they encountered a
jovial-looking Japan-
ese, who, as Johnnie
observed, was carry-
ing his store about
with him.

The apparatus
consisted of two ob-
long lacquer boxes
connected by a wood-
en bar, and holding
tubs, bowls, and
other appurtenances
of, his trade.

Sallie read the
inscriptions on the
cases which ran as



PAPER STORE.

follows: In front, written horizontally, were two characters, Lan

kiyo, signifying licensed.

Then a circle in which was de-

picted a three-legged crow (a mythical bird) regarded as lucky
by the Japanese, who say when you meet a three-legged crow,

you will be fortunate.

Below this picture was inscribed
282 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

Kioto FHon-ke (original house of Kioto). The sides of the
box bore the inscription Bzwa-yoto (loquat-leaf tea).

On seeing the foreigners, the man placed his boxes on the
ground and bowing, said, —“ Honorable strangers, will you try
some of my delicious beverage? ue

“Yes, go ahead and serve us,” said Fitz.

The fellow quickly produced some little cups and fanning
the charcoal fire that warmed the liquid, suavely remarked, —
“It is getting late for my business. I come up from Kioto
with the butterflies. Now that the weather is growing cool,
people do not want medicine to correct the hot principle.
Still, Biwa tea is a very good thing at any time.”

As he spoke, he ladled out some of the beverage, and
bowing, said, — “ Everything is now ready for your honorable
approval.”

His customers sipped the tea and Sallie said, —“ It tastes
like orange-flower water.”

“There is a fly in mine, so T cannot tell what it might taste
like without it,” said Fitz, pointing to something black among
the dregs in his cup. “Oto, I do not think your hot drinks
amount to much.”

“You do not come from Kioto,” said the young doctor to
the man.

The fellow grinned, bowed and replied, —* Honorable Sir,
Iam afraid you recognize me; my name is Goro.. You were
very kind to me when I was in the hospital. I have an honor-
able mother and a wife and family to keep, so I am sometimes
obliged to pretend to be what Iam not. In the spring I sell
an infusion of ginger, to warm people; in summer, biwa-tea to
cool them; and in winter I do anything. As to Kioto, my
honorable mother left that place when she was first married,
so I consider that I came from there.”






















JAPANESE WOLF.
284 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

“With the butterflies?” slyly inquired Fitz.

They paid him a few cash and left the merry fellow shout-
ing, —“Bewa-yo! Biwa-yo!”

When the party neared Asakusa, they halted before a
kami-ya (paper store), in which sat a man warming his hands
at the hzbachz.

In front of the establishment were bales of paper, strongly
bound with rattan cords and from the eaves depended four
signs.

Number one bore a picture of the copper handles used on
the paper inner doors and sliding screens of the Japanese
houses, and was inscribed,—“On hzki te Suhin” (all kinds
of door handles sold here).

Number two had on its sides, “Daz fuku chio” (cash

books), and on its front edge was “Atsw swraz” (made to
order).

Number three read “Afsw razon,” beneath which were the
characters “Aara kamt ji” (all kinds of paper for sliding
doors).

Number four had two vertical inscriptions, namely “\Shzo-
ga-yo sht-rut” (all kinds of paper used for writing and paint-
ing), and “Ond te hon-sut” (all kinds of copying books).

Number five, the sloping awning which shaded the store-
keeper from the sun, bore the trade-mark and an inscription
Kami rut” (all kinds of paper). The narrow strip of white
cloth under the eaves was marked with three characters
“Saku-ya” (manufacturer’s store).

Before the place was a barrel marked. “Water stored for
use in case of fire.”

“That is a manufacturing stationer’s,” said Oto. “He is
well-known and does avery large business. Whatever you
buy of him is sure to be of very good quality. Let us go on,
we are close to Asakusa.”
A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS. 285

They entered the temple grounds and spent three hours in
viewing the chrysanthemum blossoms, then wandered toward
the exhibitions of the so-called wax-works and the shows con-
taining various rare animals.

“Walk in, honorable foreign gentlemen,” said one of the
proprietors. “I have on view a genuine Okami (Japanese
wolf) Canis Hodophylax. It has eaten five hundred men
and is one of the most wonderful creatures in existence.”

“Are you afraid to go in, Sallie?” asked Johnnie.

Not with you,” she replied. “I hope the Okami will not
want to make a meal of us.”

Outside the booth was the picture of an enormous creature
witha tail shaped like an Indian club, and inside was a cage
among the straw of which was coiled a miserable cub not
much bigger than a cat.

On seeing the young Americans the exhibitor stirred up
the poor brute with a stick and pompously exclaimed, —“ This
okamt was captured in the island of Yeso, where it had killed
and eaten over one thousand people.”

“They must have been pigmies,” said Fitz, as though
thinking aloud.

“You may imagine that I am asserting a fiction,” said the
man, affecting indignation. “This monster was the terror of
the country for miles around. Now, honorable gentlemen, af-
ter inspecting this ferocious animal, perhaps you will kindly
walk out and make room for some one else.”

The half-starved okam7 gaped wearily, coiled itself down
for another brief doze and pretended to slumber, and its
keeper squatted in a corner of the room and attacked a bowl
of cold boiled rice.

Oto and his friends then inspected the wax-works, which
proved to be exceedingly life-like figures of the miracles of
Kuwannon, the goddess being modelled in various shapes.
286 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

The men who had charge of the groups gabbled their for-
mula so comically that Fitz made them repeat it several times;
however, they soon discovered he was making fun of them,

and sulkily declined to comply with his request.




WY

pnw

a

FARMERS WINNOWING RICE.

“Sallie,” inquired Oto, “would you like to visit a farm-
house in the suburbs. I have a patient who lives beyond the
river, suppose we pay him a visit?”

They found their j7n-riki-sha waiting at the entrance to.












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































FARMERS GRINDING RICK,
288 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

the temple grounds, whither they had been sent by Mrs.
Jewett. Jn a short time the friends were seated.and ex route.

After crossing the Obashi, they found themselves in quite a
rural district, where the farmers were busily occupied pre-
paring the grain for market.

Large mats were spread upon the ground, and piles of rice
were heaped on them to sun and dry for the mills. The
hiyaku-sho (farmers), who wore artistically-patched clothes,
had wide, scoop-like baskets which they filled with the grain,
then raised high above their heads and emptied upon the mats.
As the rice descended, the wind blew away the chaff and thus
prepared the cereal for the huller.

The young people rode some distance, then turned into a
private road, and presently stopped before a shed where two
men and a boy were grinding rice. The farmer, who was
superintending the operation, bowed to Oto and said, * Honor-
able doctor, excuse me from rising, my rheumatism is still so
bad that I feared I should again have to come to you for advice.
You did me so much good last time, I have no longer faith
in our quacks.”

Oto introduced his companions to the man, who, when they
were seated, said to his employees, “Now, show these honora-
ble foreigners how you make rice-flour.”

The head laborer took some of the hulled grain in a wicker-
scoop and filled the funnel-shaped hole in the top of the mill,
then with his companions grasped the bar and walked round
and round with it, thus moving the upper section. Ina few
seconds, the coarsely ground flour began to drop from between
the surfaces, and soon it poured out in little streams. The
men sang as they worked, and made more noise than a hun-
dred American laborers.

When they paused to rest, Sallie asked, “ What is that
apparatus on our right?”
A RAMBLE IN THE STREETS. 289

A rice-winnower,” replied the farmer. “We are not like
the poor h7yaku-sho in the village. We clean our grain thor-
oughly. Have you any agricultural machines in your honor-
able country?”

“You make me smile,” said Fitz. “Why, we prepare our
ground, plant our cereals, weed, cultivate, cut, harvest, and
clean them by machinery driven by steam.”

How do your farmers employ themselves? ” queried their
entertainer.

© They walk round and boss things,” merrily answered the
boy. “You ought to go to America, you would be aston-
ished.”

The man thought a while, then said, “I suppose we, who
have never been in your honorable land, cannot quite compre-
hend the difference between your ways and ours. You appear
to have machines to do everything, so of course your people
have no need to work.”

“Indeed they have,” returned the boy. * They work the
machines. Ah! our country is a wonderful one. We have
bigger farms, broader prairies, more extensive forests, enter-
prising men_and talented women, than any other land in the
world. You can have no idea what it is like, and you have
much to learn from us.”

Their host smiled, and, bowing, answered: “ Although we
are very ignorant people, still we have been permitted to live,
and have somehow contrived to exist without all your wonder-
ful improvements. IfI were to use the machinery you tell me
about, what would become of my poor workmen?”

“They could turn farmers,” said the boy. “We want good
men in the States, and could take a few thousands of your sur-
plus population. How much money do you make a-year? ”

About one hundred and eighty dollars,” was the reply.
290 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

“ Buy a passage-ticket, and go out and settle in South Caro-
lina,” said the boy. “You would make your fortune in two
years.”

The man listened respectfully, and said, “ My father taught
me to work in one way. I am now too old to learn new
things; but if my son chooses to go abroad he can. As for
myself, I shall continue to plod along as my ancestors have
done.”

He entertained them with tea and cakes, and at the conclu-
sion of the meal accompanied them to the high road.

“Tam afraid your agricultural class is not progressive,” re-
marked Johnnie to Oto. “That man did not seem to under-
stand what we said to him.”

The young doctor laughed quietly, and answered, “ When
I lived in New England I met several of your farmers, who
were almost as far behind your Westerners as ours are. We
are going fast enough, Johnnie. A hundred years from this
our people will be sending agricultural implements to your
State fairs. Have you ever heard our motto:

‘He who progresses slowly generally wins the race.’ ”
PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES. 291

CHAPTER XII.

PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES

“ The last golden glow lingers on the maples of Meguro;
The szochz men are beginning to appear on the streets ;
These things are signs of the twelfth month.”

HE young Americans, like all the people of leisure in

Tokio, went out to Meguro to see the glorious foliage of

the maples. As they viewed the sight, Sallie said, “ Oto, this

reminds me of home; however, I think the colors of your

maples are more brilliant than ours. The woods look as

though they were on fire. I shall try and secure some young
trees to plant at Cromlech.”

* Do you tap your maples for syrup?” inquired Fitz.

“No,” answered Oto, “ but we have imported a vast num-
ber of sugar-maples and they are doing admirably. We can
grow almost any of your trees here.”

The friends spent nearly the whole day in the lovely spot,
and saw many devotees performing penance by standing for a
long time beneath a stream of water, that flowed from the
mouth of a brazen dragon near the temple of Kuwannon.

As they returned homeward they met a waiter on his way
to a restaurant, at the entrance of which was suspended a
lantern inscribed with the characters Go-shin-to (God’s light).
The man carried on his left hand a lacquer tray piled with
boxes of buckwheat-vermicelli, which he balanced with the
dexterity acquired by long practice. In his girdle was tucked
his lantern, bearing the name of his. employer’s house, Jse ya,
292 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

and on the back of his coat was a circle containing his

name.
“Let us follow him in and order some vermicelli,” said

ulin.

=,



WAITER BRINGING BUCKWHEAT VERMICELLI TO A RESTAURANT.

Oto. “I know that fellow, he belongs to a first-rate establish~
ment.”

®*T do not care about soda (buckwheat),” said Fitz. “It
reminds me of cold tripe. Besides, the light is failing and
our parents are expecting us.”
PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES. 293

“You are right,” said Oto. ‘To-morrow I shall have
another holiday, and we will go for our last stroll this year.”

The next morning Oto called for them early, and they
started out for a long walk. After quitting the yash7k7, they
noticed that the entrances of many houses were decorated
with green bamboo and
branches of pine-tree,
emblems of the new
year.

HeNG.” senel, JF ine,
as they watched a boy
flying a kite, on which
was depicted a cuttle-
fish. .“Here comes a
nan-zat” (New Year’s
dancer).

Presently a melan-
choly-looking vaga-
bond, who wore a yedo-
sht (ceremonial hat),
perched on the top of
his head, came striding

toward them, making a



great clacking with his

MANZAI.

clogs in order to attract
attention. His dress was marked with the sign saz (three),
he had a toy sword thrust in his girdle, and, though the
weather was quite cool, he carried a large fan.
Behind him came his assistant, bearing a heavy weight
of properties tied up in a cotton cloth.
“What is the meaning of manzaz?” inquired Johnnie.
“Literally translated, it means ten thousand years, while
294. THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

really it is a form of congratulation. That fellow is evidently
going somewhere to give an entertainment, and will not
condescend to stop and amuse us. Which way shall we
go?”

“Towards Asakusa,” said Sallie. ‘Cho told me that this
is the festival of ford no macht, the last day of the rooster
in the month. I want to buy a kumade (bamboo rake).”

Oto laughed, and replied, “So you wish to rake in good
fortune next year. Well, you shall have one, Sallie.”

On their way they heard a drumming noise, and, looking
into a house, beheld two children at play. One, who wore
a fox’s mask, was dancing and waving a gohez, while the other
beat a drum. Seeing the strangers they stopped their perfor-
mance, and the elder boy said to the other, “Look at those
Chinese. Are they not comical?”

“Don’t be rude,” said Johnnie. “Go on with your
dancing.”

“He can speak our language,” said the drummer to his
companion. “I thought those barbarians never had sense
enough for that.”

“Excuse his impudence,” whispered Oto to Sallie.

“He is not as bad as the Cromlech boys,” answered the
girl. “For one rude speech made to us in Tokio, fifty were
addressed to you in our native place. What people are those
coming towards us?”

“Those are folks who have been to buy the Aumade,” said
the young doctor. “The one on the right bears a picture of
the Zakara-bune (treasure-boat), the boy is carrying a rake
decorated with a picture of Ota fuku men (goddess of good
fortune) and the one borne by the man on his right represents
a kane bako (money safe.)”

“How pretty that woman looks in her winter hood,” said
PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES. 295

Sallie. “It is much more becoming than those worn by the
men, it gives the latter a ferocious appearance.”

“Why do some people buy only plain rakes?” inquired
Johnnie.





















ote
Aree



cy





























BOYS AT PLAY,

“Tt is all according to the state of one’s purse,” answered
their friend. “Persons who are not well off can only afford a
plain £umade; others, like those men who have just passed us,
spend yuite a sum, thinking to attract good fortune for the next
year. I have seen rakes that cost as high as twenty-five dol-
296 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

lars each. On New Year’s day every house in Japan will be
decorated with one or more of the articles. It is a quaint su-
perstition, that gives employment to many thousands of people.”

The streets about the temple of Asakusa were lined with
peddlers selling the toys, and all of them drove a brisk trade.

The young folks amused themselves by watching the inter-
esting scene and did not return home until dusk. On their
way they encountered a yomd-ur¢ (pamphlet peddler), vending
news sheets containing sensational accounts of imaginary inci-
dents. These men are something like our sellers of extras, and
afford great amusement to the Tokio street boys.

Ie carried a lantern over his shoulder and read off the con-
tents of his papers in a comical sing-song.

*Come,” said Oto, “I promised my parents to take you
home to supper with me.”

“Very well,” said Fitz, “we will go, and I will buy a nice
kumade for your mother. She would not be offended, would
she?”

* No, indeed,” answered their friend.

They invested quite liberally in the lucky toys and then
proceeded to Oto’s house, where they arrived as the lamps
were being lighted.

Mrs. Nambo received them in her usual kindly manner,
and said,“ You have come just in time to see my husband
make his first offering to Yebis and Dai-koku. We have long
wished to have those figures in the house, and now he has
treated himself to them. Come this way.”

The young doctor did his best to conceal his annoyance,
then, with his friends, followed his mother.

They found Mr. Nambo in a little room on one side of
which was a raised recess, supporting two carved figures, Dai-
koku, the god of wealth, and the luck-bringing Yebis.














































































































































































































A vine
aH



NA-MACHI.

TORI
298 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

In front of the figures were three saméo (stands) support-
ing respectively two cakes of mochz, two cooked fishes, and
two bottles of sa#é, the necks of which were stopped with
rolls of paper. ‘Two candles, on tall sticks, and two oil lamps
flared and flickered, partly illuminating the quaint scene.

Mr. Nambo, who
was kneeling, filled a
cup with saké and ex-
tended it towards the
gods, then drank, which
ceremony he repeated
thrice. Having accom-
plished this he rose and

x

Se
i

saluting his visitors,
said, —
“What I have done

has comforted me very

U
1
i}
[
rl

il
t

much. I feel sure that
both of the gods will
extend their benevolent

th
rH
i

PrOrwckhon Over my
TOS Cael O gece Cement exe
year.”

“Yes,” said his wife,
“if Oto would only
follow your example,



how happy I should
ne.”

The doctor shook his head and quietly replied, —“ Hon-
orable mother, although it would afford me great happiness to
give you pleasure, still I could not perform an act so distasteful
to me as the one you have suggested. After living so long in

PAMPHLET-SELLER.
PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES. 299

the States, I do not feel very much veneration for the seven
gods of luck.”

Mrs. Nambo thought a while, then said, “Ah! my son,
how pleasant it would be if I could feel as you do. You only
worship one God, while we have a dozen. I Suppose that you
really know more than we do.”

“Yes,” said Mr. Nambo, “you are right, wife. I wish I

i" THT TT
i a ae

en

a















































































































































































































































































































































MR. NAMBO AT PRAYER.

could be like our son, but I have believed in the gods of my
ancestors too long to be able to turn my back upon them.”

A few evenings after this conversation, Mr. and Mrs.
Nambo and Oto visited the Kaga Yashiki, and spent several
hours with the Jewetts.

As usual, the dear old lady was exceedingly chatty, and
afforded the mirth-loving Fitz great amusement. When the












300 THE WONDERFUL CITY OF TOKIO.

clock indicated the approach of the hour of midnight, she
turned to them and said, “The Zakara-bune (treasure-ship),
manned by the gods of Luck, Dai-koku, Yebis, Benten, Bisha-
mon, Hotei, Jiuro, and Fuku-roku-jin, is entering the Bay of
Yedo, laden with all manner of good things for everybody.
May it bring you health, wealth, happiness, and all that your
hearts can desire in the New Year, and may you enjoy many
more delightful holidays with our dear son Oto.”

“T heartily echo your wish,” said Mrs. Jewett.

* And I,” added her husband. “Our young people have
spent their time both pleasantly and profitably. Now, Sallie,
what would you like me to promise you for the coming
year?”

The girl looked at her brothers, then replied, “We have
been talking about something, but fear you will not grant our
request.”

“ Go on,” said her father, smiling at her.

“Tell him, brother,” she whispered to Johnnie.

The latter hesitated, whereupon Fitz said, in his off-hand
fashion, “ Well, it is just this, sir. We have all heard a great
deal of Yeso, and would like to visit that wonderful island.
Will you promise to take us there? ”

The Professor laughed, and after thinking a while, said,
“Nothing would give me greater pleasure. The government
has requested me to visit Northern Japan, to make a special
report upon certain of its productions. If all goes well I will
take you, and Oto must accompany us as our medical adviser.”

“Good!” cried Fitz; then turning to the young doctor, he
slyly added, “Oto, mind you do not forget to bring a supply of
your honorable plasters. We hear extraordinary stories about
the wild men, the ferocious bears, the primitive travelling, and
the monstrous size of the mosquitoes of that mysterious land,
PREPARING FOR NEW-YEAR’S FESTIVITIES, 301

so it will be as well to take every precaution. Say, won’t we
have fun! We can fish for salmon, visit the bear temples, see
them worship their live gods, and learn a language that con-
sists of a gamut of grunts. Just fancy, — we shall be among a
people who still use the bow and arrow, and are more primitive
than our Indians. Won’t we havea rattling good time! Come, »
wake up, Johnnie, what do you say?”

“T believe we shall thoroughly enjoy our holiday,” quietly
answered the boy. ‘Don’t you think so, Sallie?”

The girl smiled, and, nodding, replied, * Yes, brother, I
expect to behold something entirely new. Still, I do not
imagine anything can be much more interesting than the sights
we have seen in the wonderful City of Tokio.”



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