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Women's Program of the Gambian Mixed Farming Project

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Title:
Women's Program of the Gambian Mixed Farming Project
Series Title:
Conference on Gender Issues in Farming Systems Research and Extenion, University of Florida, February 26 to March 1, 1986
Creator:
Norem, Margaret
Russo, Sandra
Sambou, Marie
Marlett, Melanie
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Africa ( LCSH )
Spatial Coverage:
Africa -- Gambia

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
African Studies Collections in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. This item may be protected by copyright but is made available here under a claim of fair use (17 U.S.C. §107) for non-profit research and educational purposes. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.

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... --at the rl ersity f -F6oniaa
Conference on
GENDER ISSUES IN FARMING SYSTEMS
RESEARCH AND EXTENSION
























The Women's Program of the Gambian


Mixed Farming Project
















Margaret Norem
Sandra Russo
Marie Sambou
Melanie Marlett








The Women's Program of the Gambian Mixed Farming Project


Minimum Data Set


Information for the minimum data set was taken mainly from Land Resource

Study #22, The Agricultural Development of the Gambia: an agricultural,

environmental and socio-economic analysis(Dunsmore et al.,1976). This study

was conducted by the Ministry of Overseas Development.

Location

The Gambia is an independent republic within the Commonwealth. It is one

of the smallest countries in Africa, 250 miles long and 15-30 miles wide.

Senegal surrounds the Gambia on three sides, the fourth is bordered by the

Atlantic Ocean. The Gambia is on the west coast of Africa between 1303' and

13049'N latitude and between 16048' and 13o47'W longitude. The total land area

is 10,367 sq.km. The Gambia lies within the valley of the Gambian river.

The highest point above sea level in the country is 90 m.

Temperature and Precipitation

The air temperature varies considerably throughout the country.

Temperature and diurnal variation are moderated in the west by the Atlantic

Ocean. Inland diurnal and seasonal variations are more extreme.

With regardto precipitation, the Gambia has a 7 month dry season and 5

month rainy season (June-October). The heaviest rainfall months are July and

August. Average annual rainfall is 900-1100mm. Average annual rainfall

declines south to north(2.5-5.0mm/km) and declines from the coast inland. The

rainy season is characterized by storms of 1 1/2 to 3 km diameter, thus

adjacent land areas have different rainfall over short periods. The daytime

high temperature during the rainfall months is 30-34o C.

Calculated crop evapotranspiration, assuming an albedo of 0.25, shows the

maximum use of water by irrigated crops would be in March to June with a








constant evapotranspiration(Et) rate of 3.5mm per day throughout the wet

season. The relative humidity varies considerably over a day, but there is

not a major change in vapor pressure, therefore relative humidity does not

clearly describe atmospheric moisture. Water vapor decreases in the dry

season.

Soil

Soils of the Gambia can be divided into upland soils and bottom soils.

The characteristics of the upland soils will be discussed first. Upland soils

are gentle colluvial slopes formed from the Continental Terminal. Most of

these soils can be classified as ferruginous tropical soils. In most Gambian

soils the surface horizon is a sand or loamy sand. Subsoils are sandy clay

loams or sandy clays. In surface horizons, clay content is very low and

organic matter content.high, resulting in a fairly uniform brownish color. The

coarse sand fraction(>50024) of these soils is generally less than 10%.

Structure of these soils is not well-developed. The surface horizon pH ranges

from 5.8-6.4; subsoil is 5.0-6.0. Cation exchange capacity(CEC), the total of

exchangeable cations that a soil can absorb, ranges from 1.5-5.5meq/100g soil.

These values are very low, indicating low fertility. Principal crops of

upland soils are groundnuts, millet, sorghum, maize, and cotton.

Bottom soils are the alluvium deposits in the flood plains of the Gambian

river and its tributaries. The principal crop in these soils is rice.

Surface horizons are darker than subsurface due to organic matter. They are

commonly dark grey or greyish brown. Most of the soils of the alluvium are

hydromorphic soils. Alluvial soils consist of over 80% silt and clay.

Structure is well-developed. Lower grassland soils tend to be granular or

subangular blocky in the surface horizons, becoming prismatic with depth.

Structure of the high-lying soils tends to be subangular blocky throughout. pH







varies seasonally in many alluvial soils. Most of the alluvium is of moderate

or low base status. CEC of alluvial soils is 10-20 meq/lOOg of soil

indicating they are much more fertile than upland soils.

Socio-economic

Present occupation ot land has been established by historical factors.

The original members of a patrilineage moved to unoccupied land and had

exclusive rights to the land. Each village has an identifiable area of land

that falls under the village Alkalo. Any compound has the right to clear

unclaimed land outside village jurisdiction and claim this land for the

village. Land is transferred from generation to generation along male lines.

Women obtain rice land primarily from their husbands but also from their

parents.

Five main ethnic groups in the Gambia account for 95% of the

population(Alers-Montalvo et al., 1983):

Ethnic Group Z

Mandika 42.3
Fula 18.2
Wolof 15.7
Jola 9.5
Serahuli 8.7

Marketing outlets are local markets, village traders, Gambian Produce and

Marketing Board, and "other" sources.

Credit is available primarily from cooperatives, but also from Rural

Development Projects and banks.

Cropping System

Certain crops are farmed in the Gambia according to sex. Groundnuts are

traditionally a male crop although women are beginning to grow more

groundnuts. Millet and sorghum are also men's crops but women help with

harvesting. Alluvial rice is a women's crop. Maize is grown by both sexes.

Vegetables are grown by women. Strange farmers are seasonal migrants from







otner parts or the Gambia or other countries. In return for working in the

compound head's fields two or three days per week, they are given land to farm

or casn crop on. Strange farmers return to their own village at the end of

the cropping season.

Much of the farming is done by manual labor. Land preparation is usually

done by animal traction although clearing by hand is still quite common.

Farm equipment and draft animals are desirable purchases if cash is

available. Pesticides, improved seed, and fertilizer are other inputs farmers

desire to purchase if money is available to do so.

Trial details

Cowpeas and maize were intercropped on one hectare. Women's societies

provided their own maize and MFP provided them with local cowpea cultivars.

Planting began in early July after the rains began. Harvesting of maize was

in October. Cowpea harvests varied with the cultivar. For maize and cowpeas,

five rows were selected at random and 10m of each row was harvested.

The objective was to introduce intercropping to the women's societies as

a beneficial agronomic practice in soils of low fertility where little

fertilizer is available. At the same time a crop high in protein would be

introduced to the Gambian diet and a desirable cash crop would be planted.

Crop residues would be more nutritious for animals with the inclusion of

cowpea leaves and stems. Planting cowpeas was additional work for the women

but most were interested because cowpeas is such a desirable crop.

Lite expectancy of Gambians is 32 years for males and 34 years for

females(Dunsmore et al, 1976). Out of every 1000 births, 285 children die

before reaching two years of age. Lack of food and malnutrition cause many of

these deaths. The MFP Women's Program attempted to address this problem by

introducing more nutritious crops and teaching the preparation of these crops.








Background for Maize Program and Mixed Farming Project


In 1979 the Department of Agriculture in the Gambia introduced a cereal

package deal to encourage an increase in the production of millet, maize,

sorghum and upland rice. This cereal package demonstrated the advantage of

using good seed, fertilizer, timely operations, insecticides and improved

farming implements (Kidman,1984). Maize was introduced through this program

as a crop with export potential.

The Mixed Farming Project (MFP) began in the Gambia in 1981. The

objective of this project was "to improve the well-being of the rural people

through intensified integration of crop and livestock production within

existing Gambian farming systems." One component of this project was the

maize production program. Maize was selected for emphasis because it is an

easy crop to grow and a good cash crop, particularly since the government

offered a guaranteed price. Another advantage of maize is that it is an early

food crop, requiring only 60-70 days to mature. Maize can be safely stored in

the dry season. NCB, a Nigerian maize cultivar, was chosen for the MFP

trials. The choice was based on results of maize cultivar trials conducted

from 1975-1982.

The MFP maize program emphasized improved farm management practices to

increase yields. Seminars were conducted for training extension personnel.

the selecLion or farmers to participate in the program was based on their

established credit. Some women were also selected to participate in the MFP

maize program. This involvement eventually led to the development of the

women's component of MFP.







Women's Societies

In numerous Gambian villages the women have organized women's societies.

The extension service of the Department of Agriculture encourages the

formation of these societies because they provide a means of bringing women

together to be taught improved agricultural methods. The women's societies

use cropping projects as a means of obtaining funds for social and charitable

purposes. Income is generated from the sale of crops harvested from the

society field. Each society has a savings account. Money is saved to

purchase inputs for the next growing season and to contract the field

preparation. Seea is reserved from the harvest to plant in the following

year.

Women's societies can be hired to work on another field to receive

additional income for the society. MFP hired women's societies to transplant

grasses upcountry and to weed fields at the experimental station at Yundum.

Women's societies may also be called on for nonprofit community service. For

example, if the village is building a school, the society members may be asked

to help with construction or cook for those doing the work.

Women's society members typically range in age from 15-40. These

societies are an ideal network for channeling education to village women.


Women's Societies and MFP

The MFY 1982 introductory maize program involved a few women's societies.

In 1983, 42 women's societies grew maize. During the 1984 season, 78 women's

societies grew maize. Extension workers and MFP staff instructed the women

with regard to maize cultural practices such as time of planting and harvest,

rate and spacing of planting, and fertilizer application.







Hand Shellers and Hand Mills

Prior to cooking maize it must be shelled, cleaned, dehulled, and then

pounded into a meal or flour(Marlett and Sambou, 1985). This preparation is

tedious and time consuming and can deter women from preparing maize. MFP

distributed 50 hand sellers and 40 hand mills throughout the country to

facilitate maize processing. Use of these tools was demonstrated by extension

workers and MFP personnel. Although superior to hand pounding, there were

problems with the mills. After dehulling, maize had to be dried before

grinding which lengthened the processing time. Another drawback was that

maize had to be ground two or three times to obtain the desired texture.

Nevertheless, using this tool was considered superior to hand pounding of

maize.


Cooking Demonstrations

In conjunction with the Extension Aids Training Unit of the Department of

Agriculture, the Women's Program of MFP initiated maize cooking demonstrations

in December, 1984. The objective of these demonstrations was to introduce

Gambian women to methods of food preparation using maize as the staple

ingredient.

Forty female agriculture demonstrators from throughout the country were

taught to conduct cooking demonstrations. The training sessions were two days

long; the first day covered economic and nutritional benefits of maize and the

second day was the actual cooking demonstration.

Fifty-four villages were selected for cooking demonstrations. Villages

that had grown maize in 1984 were given priority in this selection. Villages

were required to provide firewood, cooking utensils, and maize. MFP provided

D17,000($4,857.00) for cooking ingredients, night allowances, and training of

the demonstrators.







Eleven recipes were prepared, including a maize weaning food consisting

of fine maize meal, groundnut butter, milk, sugar, pumpkin, and bananas.

Representatives from surrounding villages were invited; approximately 100

women were instructed at each demonstration. The cooking demonstrations were

well received by the villages and evolved into festive celebrations.

Demonstrators were requested to conduct follow-up cooking demonstrations

at the compound level. Cassette tapes with cooking instructions in Mandinka,

Wolof, and Fula were distributed to women's societies to assist with these

demonstrations.


1985 Maize-Cowpea Intercropping Program

The MFP Women's Program designed a project to introduce maize-cowpea

intercropping to the women's societies during the 1985 growing season, the

objectives of the intercropping project were to improve the human diet,

improve stover quality for livestock, increase the rural family income, and

introduce a valuable agronomic practice.


Advantages of Intercropping

Cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) is a summer crop which grows best with 750-

1000 mm of rainfall. It is a drought tolerant crop and has been reported to

do well in the Sudan with only 400 mm of rainfall (Skerman, 1977). Cowpeas

are quick growing and compete well with low growing weeds.

Cowpeas are a valuable cash crop and would provide a source of income for

the women farmers as well as improve the nutritional balance of local food

production. They are high in protein therefore valuable for human nutrition

and animal forage. Intercropping maize with cowpeas provides one crop high in

carbohydrates complemented by one high in protein. In Tanzania, Jeffers and

Triplett (1979) considered the nutritional benefits of intercropping cereals

and legumes to be one of the most important measures of the success of








intercropping. Although yield is an important measure for evaluating the

success of a crop, it does not reflect nutritional value or land use which are

important benefits of an intercropping system (Francis, 1978).

In Eastern Gambia, Weil (1980) describes the soil as low in clay, sandy,

free draining, and low in fertility. Decline in soil nitrogen content

naturally accompanies agricultural development (Greenland, 1980). In the

Gambia, groundnuts are rotated with millet but maize is monocropped on the

same field each year. Average fertilizer application is two bags per hectare

(Eckert and Fulcher, 1983). Intercropping legumes and grains may be a viable

alternative to nitrogen application in agricultural systems such as the Gambia

where nitrogen is unavailable or unaffordable. Legumes are commonly included

in an intercropping situation since potentially they may fix some of their

nitrogen and consequently conserve soil nitrogen for the benefit of other

crops (Nambian et al, 1983). To enhance nitrogen fixation, inoculation with a

specific strain of cowpea Rhizobia is beneficial, however cowpeas are

nonspecific and will nodulate freely with native Rhizobia so inoculation is

not essential (Skerman, 1977).


Intercropping Method

The technical package for the women's societies intercropping program

(Marlett and Sambou, 1985) was designed considering results of intercropping

studies conducted by the MFP maize agronomist on the experimental station in

1984. The technical package was distributed to extension workers in each

division who were responsible for explaining the package to the societies and

assisting the women in its implementation. Society selection for

participation was based on the society's financial status and village

location. Twenty-eight of the seventy-eight societies that had grown maize in
1984 were able to pay back their loan to the FAO fertilizer revolving fund








credit scheme. These societies were selected to participate in the

intercropping program. All five agricultural divisions in the Gambia were

represented.

Fields were cleared by hand or animal traction. The society paid for the

clearing from its savings. Once the heavy rains began, 15-15-15 compound

fertilizer was broadcast over the field at a rate of 200 kg/ha with 90 cm

between rows and 25 cm between plants. Two weeks after planting maize, fields

were weeded and cowpeas were planted between the maize rows. Several local

varieties of cowpeas were distributed to the women's societies.


Results

In some villages the agricultural extension personnel were more effective

than in others and spent more time assisting the Women's Societies. The

extension workers changed the intercropping design in some villages. In

others, the technical package was abandoned completely and cowpeas and maize

were grown separately. Too many societies were involved for MFP to assume

complete responsibility for monitoring of the society fields. Consequently,

it was essential that MFP personnel instruct agricultural extension personnel

thoroughly with regard to the technical package.

The women's society fields are frequently the last fields assigned by the

village Alkalo and are often in poor condition. Women plant society fields

after tneir own planting is concluded, so typically planting is late. Time

available for field maintenance is very limited. Women usually work in their

society field on Wednesday, their day of rest. Almost all of the labor is

hand labor. Women work together as a group, singing while they work.

In the 1985 growing season, abundant rainfall resulted in high weed

infestations in many of the fields. Presence of cowpeas in between maize rows

suppressed weed growth in some fields, however in others the weeds were not








deterred by the cowpeas. The women were aware of the need to weed their

fields more frequently but simply had no time for the additional task.

One disadvantage of growing cowpeas is that they are plagued with insect

pests. Agricultural demonstrators and society members were advised to monitor

fields for insect pests and contact Crop Protection Service (CPS) when pests

were observed. CPS was provided with a list of participating villages and was

to provide chemicals for spraying as needed. Fuel shortages often made

pesticide distribution difficult. Thrips (Megalurothrips siostedti) is a

major insect pest in cowpeas during the flowering stage. They infest cowpea

blossoms, causing them to abort. If untreated, the cowpea plants continue

developing vegetatively but lose all their blossoms before pod development can

occur. Thrips are very small and can go unnoticed to the untrained eye.

Society fields were visited by MFP personnel(Norem, Sambou)throughout the

growing season. Progress was monitored and problems discussed during these

visits. The importance of monitoring for thrips was emphasized during these

visits.

Each society was required to provide its own maize seed and to pay MFP

D100 ($28.57) to participate in the program. This is a significant sum of

money and its payment should have indicated society interest in the program.

Of the 28 women's societies participating, nine did not harvest either maize

or cowpeas from their fields. It is important to examine whether these

failures were due to lack of interest, time constraints, or pest damage.

Several societies planted maize and then had no time to maintain the

fields. Fields became densely overgrown with weeds and cowpeas were never

planted. One society explained that the severe rice shortage had forced the

women to spend much of their time searching for rice and consequently they did

not have time for the society field. A common problem for several villages








was ttat they were assigned fields 2 km or further from their village. As

they became busier in their own fields they did not have time to travel the

distance to maintain the society fields. When fields were so distant, it was

difficult to have a society member or child guard the field and watch for

insects or monkeys. One society reported that its distant field was destroyed

by monkeys.

Fifteen of the societies did harvest maize. Yields varied from very high

to quite low. The women had experience with maize from previous growing

seasons and were aware of the investments needed for a good crop.

Results of cowpeas were unsuccessful with only two villages reporting

harvests. As previously mentioned, in several fields cowpeas were not even

planted due to dense weeds. Weeds were a major problem in fields in which

cowpeas were planted as well. In many fields the thrips infestations went

unobserved or had developed too far before CPS was contacted. Sometimes CPS

could not respond to calls due to fuel shortages.

Another problem was that the cowpea seed that was distributed was local

cultivars from throughout the Gambia and the Cassamance region of Senegal. The

seed had been purchased at the local markets and growth characteristics,

including day length requirements were not known. Possibly several of these

cultivars were not planted at the right time of year to produce pods.

Using cultivars of known characteristics would have enhanced the chances

of obtaining a cowpea harvest. However, the use of a known cultivar is no

guarantee due to the severe insect problems which accompany cowpea

cultivation. On the experimental station at Yundum, many known cultivars

produced only vegetative growth due to thrips infestations.

This method of intercropping was new to the Gambian women, however,

growing cowpeas was not new. Cowpeas are a desirable food crop and are







frequently grown in backyard gardens. Undoubtedly local cultivars are used

and pesticides are not available. In a backyard garden the cowpeas are close

to the compound and easier to monitor for insects. Pests are also easier to

control since fewer plants are grown.

While visiting some women's societies, they were asked about local

customs for controlling insect pests. Practices for controlling the cowpea

weevil Callosobruchus maculatus, a severe problem in harvested seed, included

steaming seeds or storing them in oil, ash, or chillies to repel the weevils.

A survey conducted by CPS(Sagnia, 1984)revealed several local methods

which may be effective in controlling insect pests on cowpeas as well as other

crops. Broadcasting wood ashes on plants, particularly vegetables, to protect

them from insects is widely practiced in the Gambia. Insects can be attracted

to a stie away from the field using bran, fresh cow dung, or green baobab

fruit. They are then killed by burning or burying. Burning blister beetles

is reported to produce an odor which discourages other blister beetles from

the area. Another practice of dubious value is cutting the ovipositors off of

ten female blister beetles and using these insects to frighten away others.

Neem tree berries(Azadirachta indica)are dried, pounded, and used as seed

dressing or to ward off field pests.

These local methods of pest control are important to identify and

evaluate. Instructing village women to use particular customs such as these

may be more valuable than teaching them to rely on pesticides which are

frequently unavailable and often too late in arriving to be effective.

In retrospect, it is apparent that local Gambian customs for cowpea

production should have been better understood prior to implementing this

program. The technical package should have included more information on

insect pests and extension agents should have received training regarding

these pests. Ideally, a pesticide spraying program should have been set up in









advance rather than relying on contacting CPS once pests were observed.

Finally, a known cowpea cultivar with proper day length requirements should

have been distributed. Unfortunately, this is the final season for MFP so an

important follow-up program is not possible. Hopefully these suggestions will

be useful to other projects carrying on future intercropping work in the

Gambia.

Despite the failure of the cowpea crop the work with the women's

societies should be regarded positively. The village women were recognized as

farmers and singled out for instruction. The women seemed eager to learn and

always receptive to MFP personnel. The women's societies in the Gambia are an

ideal network that is already established and could easily be used by

developmental projects for the WID efforts. In 1986 the DOA of the Gambia

established a permanent Women's Program. Marie Sambou, a MFP staff member and

my counterpart was assigned to this group.








References


Alers-Montalvo,M., F.O. Dumbuya, G.D. Fulcher, B. Gai and J. Haydu. 1983
Farming Activities in the Gambia, A Preliminary Report. CID/GAM.

Dunsmore, J.R., A.B. Rains, G.D.N.Lowe, D.J.Moffatt, T.P.Anderson, and J.B.
Williams. 1976. Land Resources Division #22,The Agricultural Development of
the Gambia: An Agricultural, Environmental and Socioeconomic Analysis.

Eckert,J.B., and G.D.Fulcher. 1984. Annual Administrative Report No.4 for
the Gambian Mixed Farming and Resources Management Project. CID/GAM-O1.

Francis, C.A. 1978. Multiple cropping potential of beans and maize.
Hortscience 13: 12-17.

Greenland,D.J. 1980. The nitrogen cycle in West Africa-agronomic
considerations. In T. Rosswall(ed.)Nitrogen Cycling in West African
Ecosystems.

Jeffers, D.L. and G.B. Triplett,Jr. 1979. Management needed for relay
intercropping beans and wheat. Ohio Report, Ohio Agricultural Research and
Development Center, 64(5): 67-70.

Kidman,D. and S. Owens. 1985. The commercialization of maize in the Gambia.
CID/GAM.

Marlett, M. and M. Sambou. 1985. Food production/consumption linkage.
CID/GAM.

Nambian, P.T.C., H.R. Rao, M.S. Reddy, C.N.Floyd, P.J. Dart, and R.W. Willey.
1983. Effect of intercropping on nodulation and N2 fixation by groundnuts.
Expl.Agric. 19: 79-86.

Sagnia, S.B. 1981. Pest control methods used by Gambian farmers. Crop
Protection Service, Ministry of Agriculture, The Gambia.

Skerman, P.J. 1977. Tropical Forage Legumes. Food and Agricultural
Organization of the United States(FAO). Rome, Italy.

Well, P.M. 1980. Land use, labor and intensification among the Mandinka of
Eastern Gambia. Paper presented at the 23rd meeting of the African Studies
Association Oct. 1980. Philadelphia, Pa.




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UF00081701_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 1 Front Cover
PAGE1 cover Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PDIV2 2 Title
PAGE2 page
PDIV3 3 Chapter
PAGE3
PAGE4
PAGE5
PAGE6 4
PAGE7 5
PAGE8 6
PAGE9 7
PAGE10 8
PAGE11 9
PAGE12 10
PAGE13 11
PAGE14 12
PAGE15 13
PAGE16 14
PDIV4 References
PAGE17 15
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1 Main
FILES1
FILES2
FILES3
FILES4
FILES5
FILES6
FILES7
FILES8
FILES9
FILES10
FILES11
FILES12
FILES13
FILES14
FILES15
FILES16 16
FILES17 17
FILES18 18