Citation
The Little twin roses

Material Information

Title:
The Little twin roses : a story for little girls and boys
Creator:
Brine, Mary D ( Mary Dow ) ( Author, Primary )
E.P. Dutton ( Publisher )
Rockwell and Churchill
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
E.P. Dutton and Co.
Manufacturer:
Rockwell and Churchill
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
64 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Twins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Turkeys -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1892 ( local )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary D. Brine; with ten illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026609241 ( ALEPH )
ALG3133 ( NOTIS )
02722775 ( OCLC )
44029786 ( LCCN )

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THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES





Af. An

‘CWE MUST MANAGE IT SOMEHOW, I TELL you!” — Page 45.



THE

PithLe IWIN ROSES

A STORY FOR LITTLE GIRLS AND BOYS

BY

MARY D. BRINE

Author of “The Little New Neighbor,” “Bonnie Little Bonibel,” “Dan,” etc.

WITH TEN ILLUSTRATIONS

NEW YORK
E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY
31 WEST TWENTY-THIRD STREET

1892



Copyright, 1892
‘By E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY

PRESS OF
Rockwell and Churchill
BOSTON



EIST OF IEEUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

“ WE MUST MANAGE IT SOMEHOW, I TELL you!” Frontispiece

“LISTEN, WILLIE!”

“KITTY WAS QUITE READY TO CRY FROM DISAPPOINT-

VEEN oe Nr eee ee ia ee
GOING A—FISHING

“WISH YOU'D BUY SOMETHIN’, MA’AM” .

Kirty WAITS, AND THINKS OF THOSE TURKEYS.

“SucH A HEADACHE!”
SO SYORSUMORIOID sc ee ee
A LULLABY DUET WITH THE KETTLE

“* GOBBLE, GOBBLE,’ YOURSELVES” .

9

17
20
31
3T
58
5d:
oT

61





‘LISTEN, WILLIE!” — Page 10.

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.



HEY sat at the table eating their supper of
bread and milk. Very pretty little Roses they
were, too. Sometimes they were called “ Wild Roses,”
sometimes “Blush Roses,” and quite frequently they
deserved to be called “Climbing Roses,” as every
fence and tree on the place could tell you, had

they only tongues to speak and tell tales.



LO THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Just now they were. out of mischief, these little
twins, for Mamma Rose had given them their early
supper, and soon they would be snug and safe in
their small beds, and out of harm’s way till the
sunbeams should hunt them up again.

“Listen, Willie!”

“T’m_ listenin’.”

“There’s Rosebud a-cryin’ again.”

“That ain’t anythin’ new; she’s forever a-cryin’
lately.”

Willie paused in the act of tilting his cup for its
last drop of milk, as he spoke, and Kitty stopped stir-
ring the lump of sugar in hers, as they listened with
grave little faces to baby’s cry in the next room.

Baby Rose, or, as she was oftener called, “ Rose-
bud,” was being teased and fretted by one or two
wee pearls of teeth which were pushing through the
sensitive little gums, and making life very miserable
for the little bud of sweetness so dear to the family
of Roses.

For several nights mamma had been kept awake

by baby’s restlessness, and during the days it had



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 11

been one constant effort to make baby comfortable,
and so she had grown very tired and anxious, this
dear, patient mamma; and the little twins felt sorry
for her, and almost vexed with the poor little Rose-
bud, who didn’t know really just how much trouble
she was making.

The twins went on with their supper, and Rose-
bud’s little plaintive wail subsided gradually, while
mamma sang lullabies wearily, and the shadows of |
night fell softly down from the skies above.

“Oh, dear! don’t you wish we were rich folks,
Willie?” asked Kitty, presently, with a little sigh.

“Guess I do, Kit, but what’s the use wishin’?”

“Oh, I’'d go an’ buy mamma _ the beautifulest
things, an’ make her have such easy times.”

“But shed be rich, too, if we were, an’ could
buy beautiful things her own self, an’—”

“But maybe we'd have somethin’ ’sides bread an’
milk for our supper nights, an’ we could have silk
things to wear like those child’en at the hotel down
yonder. But ’tain’t the leastest use wishin,’ cause I

most know we won't ever be rich like them.”



12 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“Well, there’s lots poorer ’n we are, Kitty Rose;
we don't have to wear rags like beggars we read
of in our story-books, an’ we have other things
‘cept bread an’ milk when its breakfast an’ dinner,
you know. ‘Sides, papa, he’s got a ship somewhere
what’s goin’ to bring him lots of money some
day.

“Why, Willie Rose, what a great, big story! I
don’t b’lieve papa’s got a ship at all, else we'd
seen it sailin’ sometime.”

“He has, too, ‘cause one night I heard him tell
mamma that when his ship came home she shouldn’t
be so bothered ‘bout things, an’ he could take some
rest; so now, do you think I told a big story?”

Kitty was quite puzzled. Strange she had never
known that her father owned a ship! where was
it sailing now, she wondered, and why didn’t he
take them all for a sail in it, and let them have
fun like the people at the hotel who went sailing
in the lake sometimes? Well, it was all very
strange, and she meant to ask grandma about it

the first chance she got.



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 13

When the supper was finished, the twins scampered
out to the small garden to have a race and frolic
before going to bed; (oh, how they hated to go to
bed!) and after baby was sound asleep, and laid
softly down in her little crib, mamma called her
wild Roses in to get ready for their night’s rest.

“Tt isn’t half dark yet, mamma,’ complained
Kitty, reluctant to leave the grassy playground before
she had had one more game of “tag” with Willie.

“ All the chickies have gone to roost, don’t you
see?” she replied, with a smile, “and why should
mine be up and about at the nesting-time ?”’

“We ain’t chickies, mamma,” laughed roguish
Willie, “we're Zoses, an’ the roses are staying up,
see?” He pulled off a rose, as he spoke, and held
it up to her.

“Ah, if the little rose had hidden away in its
bed of leaves, it would have been out of harm's
way, wouldn’t it?” she replied, “and a mischievous
little hand could not have torn it from the mother-
bush. Come, little son, say good-night to all out-

doors, and get into your bed as soon as possible.”



14. THE LITTLE TWLN ROSES.

It didn’t take long for that business, and soon
the moonbeams stole in through the open window
of a quiet, small chamber, and shone tenderly about
the beds where our twin Roses were sleeping peace-
fully side by side, the dark-haired little sister and

the fair-haired, blue-eyed little brother.

The next morning Kitty, happening to remember
the “ship” of which Wille had told her, went to
grandma’s room for a private conversation.

Sitting on a little stool at the dear old lady’s
knee, Kitty began:

“Gran’ma, where’s papa’s ship?”

Grandma's eyes opened wide behind her spectacles.

“Papa's what?” she asked.

“Papa's ship, you know; where's he sailin’ it,
gran’ma?”

“Bless me, child, what do you mean? Papa has
nothing to do with a ship.”

“Oh, yes,” gravely, “for Willie heard him tell

mamina ‘bout it, an’ it’s comin’ in some day with,



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 15

oh, a lot of money, an’ we're all goin’ to be rich,
gran’ma, an’ I want you to tell me all bout where
it’s sailin’ to now, an’ where did papa buy it?”

How old grandma did laugh, and how indignant
little Kitty was! Grandma chuckled and chuckled,
and her fat, short body shook all over, and joggled
Kitty's head as it lay against grandma’s knee.

But finally the laugh subsided, and the dear old
face grew less merry, and the soft old hand rested
lovingly on Kitty’s tangled dark locks.

“My darling, Willie didn’t understand just what
papa meant, and you have neither of you heard
the old saying, I suppose, ‘when my ship comes in,’
so, of course, you didn’t know what papa _ really
meant. Grandma will explain ; but what were you
and Willie talking about, and when did Willie hear
the remark?”

Kittie was quite ready to cry from disappointment,
but she bravely kept back the tears, and explained

to grandma the conversation she and Willie had

* had the evening before, and she couldn’t bear to give

up the anticipation even yet, that one fine day



16 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

papa would have a ship come sailing in all full of
good things for them all.

Grandma explained the “sayimg” (which even all
my little readers know akout, so old a saying it is),
and explained also to discontented Kitty how much
she had to be thankful for, and how much _ better
off she and Wilhe were, notwithstanding the fact
that papa had to work hard for the support of
his family. She reminded Kitty of the fact that
many little girls and boys had no dear mother and
father, and that they (the twins) could not be
grateful enough for the blessing of their own dear
parents, and the little rosebud of a baby besides ; and
she made her comprehend, too, that all the riches
in the world could not make a person happy unless
there was a contented heart and loving, kindly dis-
position behind it all. And Kitty nestled closer to
grandma’s knee, and began to love mamma, papa,
baby, grandma, and Willie more and more from that
very minute. Pretty soon she climbed into grandma’s
lap and put two loving little arms about the dear
old neck.







FROM DISAPPOINTMENT.” — Page 15.

SCRITTY WAS QUITE READY TO CRY







THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 19

“Willie an’ I ought to be very good an’ sweet
‘cause we're oses, you know, gran’ma, an’ roses
are always so sweet and nice. I don’t care if papa
isn't rich like hotel folks, he’s dear, an’ so are you,
an’ mamma’s precious, an’ Rosebud’s the bestest
baby when she ain't cryin’ an’ worryin’ mamma,
an’ Willie an’ I, we love each other lots, we do,
an’ — oh, gran’ma, I don’t care if there ain’t any
ship!”

So she ran singing and skipping out of the room
im search of Willie. She found him sitting in the
swing disconsolately.

“Ii I were a girl twin an’ had a boy twin, I
guess I wouldn’t go hidin’ away from him jus’ to
be mean, I wouldn’t!” he complained. “I couldn’t
find you any place at all.”

“Why, Willie Rose! yow’re-cross as can be, an’
—an’ yowre a—a Rose with a big thorn stickin’
out an’ prickin’ me, you are! I ain’t been anywhere
to hide, only in my gran’ma’s room, an’ there ain’t
any ship at all, not the leastest bit of a ship sailin’

home to papa, for eran’ma told me so her own
2 oO



20 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

self, an’ she says that’s only a sayin’, an’ means
when people want anythin’ very much, oh, dre‘fully,
they make a plan to get it, an’ then they keep
hopin’ things will turn out right, an’ they make
believe they've got a ship sailin’ from a way-off
shore, all full of good things for ’em, an’ when the
good things don’t keep comin’, they say, ‘Never mind,
some day my ship’ll come home an’ bring ’em;’
that’s all it means, you see, Willie, so papa was
only tryin’ to comfort himself and mamma by maki’
believe, an’ that’s lots better “n whinin’ an’ frettin’,
an’ bein’ discouraged, gran’ma says.”

Willie listened attentively to this speech, and com-
prehended it thoroughly, and, like Kitty, had his
disappointment, and bravely kept back tears, before
he was ready to take the second instalment of
gran’ma’s conversation with Kitty.

He was an affectionate little fellow, and as ready
as his twin sister to be a fragrant Rose in the
bower of roses which he called Home.

He and Kitty were so good all that day, keeping

out of mischief, and helping mamma all they could,



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 21

that she was quite amazed, and wondered what
had come over her Wild Roses all of a sudden.
That speech of hers turned them speedily into
“Blush Roses,” for somehow they felt as if they
were keeping a secret from mamma, and that was
something quite new for them.

At their quiet little bread and butter supper that
night, Willie confided to Kitty that he saw grandma
knitting some slippers that afternoon, and she had
told him as a secret that they were a present for
mamma on her birthday. “She said it was a secret,
but I don’t b’lieve she meant me not to tell my
twin sister, do you?” he added, a little anxiously.
And Kitty replied, seriously, “Oh, no, ‘cause we're
Same as one, you know. I didn’t know mamma’s
birthday, was for ever so long, did you ?”

S No.5. an, oh. Kitty, papa wont be home! He
said in his last letter he couldn’t come till fall,
an’ here it is right in the middle of the summer,
an’ the birthday comes next week, grandma says.”

“Oh, Willie!” She clasped her hands with the last

exclamation, and compressed her lips as though



22 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

bursting to tell something she was not quite ready
to confide.

“You made me most jump an’ spill my milk,”
said the boy, half pettishly.

“Well, but I’ve got a splendid idea, Willie Rose,
an’ it must be every bit our own secret, too, else
it won't be any fun at all.”

Willie was all ears, and pushed his empty bowl
away, wiping his moist little lips with the back
of his hand instead of his napkin, and prepared
to agree with his twin in everything she sug-
gested. :

Kitty having finished also, the two retired to a
private corner, and the followmg conversation went
on in excited whispers :

“Willie, we must give Mamma Rose a_ birthday
present as well as gran’ma, an’ we jus got to go
ahead an’ do it ’thout lettin’ her ‘spect a single .
thing “bout it, you see.”

Willie saw.

“ An’ we must think of somethin’ awful nice, an’

jus what she’s been a-wantin’ mostest, if we can,



eo

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. ee

you know, so’s to make her gladder ’n the slippers
will make her.”

Willie nodded excitedly.

“An’ you'll be sure not to let on "bout it?”

“Course not,” replied Willie, indignantly.

“Pon your word an’ sacred honor ?”

“Oh, yes, I tell you, Kitty Rose, ain’t you ever
a-goin’ to believe a body?”

“Well, now let’s guess what mamma wants very
much; maybe—”

“Olve fe know |” interrupted Willie, “for don’t
you know she said one day to papa she did wish
we had turkeys? They’d be a nice in—invester, or
somethin’ like that, an’ papa, he said maybe some-
time he’d manage to get her some.”

“Well, he ain’t managed yet,” replied Kitty, glee-—
fully, “so maybe we can, Willie, an’, oh, won't it
be the bestest fun we ever had?”

“I wonder what an ‘invester’ is, anyway, said
Willie, somewhat anxiously; “do you spose it’s a
partic’ler kind of a turkey?”

“Maybe it’s a very nice, tender kind that makes



24 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

nice Thanksgivin’s, you know,” replied Kitty, quite
wisely, in her opinion, for what elise would her
mother want turkeys for if not to eat when Thanks-

giving-time came ?

So now the twins had a real secret from mamma,
and the first thing for them to do was to earn,
as secretly as possible, a little money with which to
go to a farmer who lived a long way off — they
had been there once in a wagon with their father
—and buy a turkey or two from the many he
owned. That the money must be earned was very
certain, but how to earn it they didn’t know, and
erew quite worried over the matter. They were
strongly tempted at one time to go to grandma,
but resisted the temptation, and determined to put
the whole business through by themselves, by hook
or by crook. And finally by “hook” they started
it in this way :

It was a bright morning when Willie and Kitty
started off in high glee, by mamma’s permission, to

have a little picnic of their own down by the





Page 27.

GOING A—FISHING.









we

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 27

brook a short distance from the little home. Baby
Rose was unusually troublesome that morning, and
mamma had her hands full, and grandma too, for
that matter, and the twins asked so innocently if
they might go on their little picnic and have a
nice time, and they promised so earnestly to take
care and not get into mischief, and the day was
so bright and glad, and they had been so used to
going on walks and wandering about by themselves,
never getting into serious trouble of any kind, that,
to tell the truth, I thnk mamma and grandma
were rather glad to have the house quiet for a
time. So off they started, with basket and fishing-
pole, for Willie had whispered to Kitty his plan to
catch fish and sell them to the hotel people, and
maybe earn enough in that way to buy the
turkeys.

Very happy little folks they were as they went
gayly along the road and finally turned into the
woods by the brook. But oh, dear me! what a
pity it was that not a single little fish was goosie

enough to be caught! Willie’s hook was an old one,



28 THE “LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

and he didn’t know how to bait it very well, and
Kitty couldn’t bear to touch a worm. So after a
while they gave up fishing in despair and ate the
nice luncheon grandma had put up for them, with
only half the appetite they would have had with
better luck. Finally, “Z don’t care!” cried Kitty,
starting up. “If we can’t get fish to sell, we can
try ferns an’ things, ‘cause sometimes folks buys ’em
at the hotel. I saw a girl sellin’ some once, myself,
an’ the ladies paid her for ’em right off. Let’s try.”

Willie was ready, and the more so because he
couldn’t fish any more if he wanted to, for his rod
—a long switch cut from a tree, and not strong
at its best— suddenly broke in two, and his line
and hook caught in a stone and snapped off, and
he was altogether a very disgusted little fisherman.

So the twins gathered a quantity of fragrant ferns
and wood blossoms, and filling their basket started
for the village hotel, not far off. On the way Kitty
was seized with the brilliant idea of filling her din-
ner-pail with berries which were growing along the

roadside.



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 29

“Folks always are hungry for berries,’ she said,
and Willie stopped pulling and eating berries him-
self, and helped his sister fill the pail with the
pretty red raspberries which he felt sure somebody
would want to buy. When they reached the village
——both feeling a little troubled in their hearts lest
mamma would not have been quite willing to trust
them so far— Kitty decided to try the experiment
of calling at the kitchen doors of some houses along
the way, while Willie went straight to the big hotel
piazza with his basket of ferns and pretty flowers.
They were carefully covered from the sun, and he
hoped they would look quite fresh and pretty for

his anticipated customers.

The piazza of the hotel seemed quite crowded with
guests as Willie drew near, and everybody was well
dressed, and seemed happy as could be. There was
plenty of laughing and talking, and even singing
going on, and there were fat, healthy babies with

their nurses and rich mammas, and little boys and



30 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

girls of the same age as he and Kitty, and they
were dressed in fine clothes, and having such gay
times, with nothing to do but be happy.

As Willie began to ascend the broad steps at the
main piazza, one of the gentlemen saw him, and
called out carelessly, “Needn’t come up, little boy,
we don’t want to buy anything to-day;” and poor
Willie, blushing furiously because everybody turned
and looked at him, and feeling so disappointed he
didn’t know how he could keep the tears out of his
blue eyes, turned away and walked slowly on.

Maybe he did give a little stifled sob, because he
couldn’t help it, and he was only seven years old,
—such a little fellow, you know, —or maybe when he
drew his sleeve across his eyes somebody saw him;
at any rate, just as he passed the corner of the
house where there was a little lonely piazza, quite
apart from the large crowded one behind him, a
sweet voice called, “What’s the matter, little boy?”
and there was a young gurl lounging in a steamer
chair, and trying to keep cool with her fan and her

magazine. I don’t think she was more than fourteen











‘‘wIsh YOU’D BUY SOMETHIN’, Ma’AM.” — Page 33.









THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 33

years old, but to Willie she looked like a real young
lady, and so he ascended the steps with his basket,
and said, very politely :

“T wish you'd buy somethin’, ma’am.”

Now, little Miss Sallie Lunn (we will call her that,
because, perhaps, she’d rather I would not give her
real name) was not used to being addressed as
“ma'am,” and it gave her a very dignified feeling to
hear herself so addressed by Willie just now. Conse-
quently she took an immediate interest in him, and
asked what he had for sale.

He set his basket down at her feet, and dis-
played his ferns, and some pretty red berries, and
other wild flowers which we often find hidden away
in the beautiful woods every summer.

Some people —more’s the pity— don’t care for such
things, and won’t take the trouble to look for them;
but, on the other hand, a great many lovers of
Nature and of her beautiful treasures are met with
in this dear old world of ours, and to such Miss
Sallie Lunn, very fortunately for Willie, belonged.

So she put down her magazine and fan and looked



34 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

over Willie’s basket, and bought quite a large bunch
of ferns for pressing, and then she kindly called
one or two of her friends from the crowd on the
main piazza and induced them to buy also. And
before ten minutes had passed, lo and behold! the
boy’s basket was quite empty, and he was full of
smiles and dimples. He couldn't help confiding to
Sallie — and wondered a minute after if it was
breaking his promise to Kitty to have done 0,
though he truly didn’t mean to break his word —that
he and his sister were going to buy a_ birthday
present for mamma, and had to sell things in order
to get money to buy with. And when she asked
what he was going to buy, he very nearly blurted
out “Turkeys!” in his eagerness. But he caught
himself in time, and all Sallie heard was the sound
Ole,“ Te and she could hardly make anything out
of that. Willie blushed a good deal as he exjlained
why he couldn’t tell more, “’cause it was such a
secret, an’ Kitty had told him to be sure not to
tell a single soul.”

“Oh, very well, then, never mind, you'll tell me



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 35

some day, and I’m going to help you all I can.
You can bring me some more ferns to-morrow, and
get the smallest you can, because I want to press
them; they make very nice decorations in winter,
and I shouldn’t wonder a bit if some of the other
ladies bought some too.” Cee

That was very encouraging to Willie, and he slung
his basket over his arm, and, bidding Miss Sallie
Lunn good-by, went to the broad village square
where he had arranged to meet Kitty.

And there he had quite a “wait,” till he grew
a little frightened, and wished he had stayed at home,
notwithstanding the pennies knocking together so
merrily in his pocket in place of the ferns in his
basket.

But what was keeping Kitty all this time?
Well, the little girl was having an experience, and
truly this had been, or was being, perhaps I should
say, a very unusual and odd kind of a day for
these twin Roses who had strayed so far from their
own safe bower.

Kitty had really succeeded in selling her berries,



36 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

and sold them all, in fact, at the first house at
which she called. Her timid little knock had brought
to the kitchen door a kind-faced old woman, about
-as old, Kitty thought, as her own grandma at home,
and so she found her courage, which had been growing
faint, rising again hopefully, and offered her little
wares with such an earnest tongue, and such an
eager pair of eyes, that the woman said cheerily :

“Want your berries? of course we do, little one,
and Td like to buy you too. What is your name,
my dear?” So Kitty emptied her pail as Willie
had his basket, and meanwhile was coaxed out of
her secret, by the kind questions of the old woman
(who was “some one’s else gran’ma,’ though not
Kitty’s), until she had betrayed even more than
Willie had dared to.

“Ta sakes! what a child you are!” laughed the
woman, patting Kitty’s brown head. “I do hope
youll get those turkeys, sure enough; and _ here,
now, are a few extra pennies to help you out.”

Kitty blushed very red for pure joy, and made

‘a funny little courtesy to her customer, as she sup-





THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 3

~T



KITTY WAITS, AND THINKS OF THOSE TURKEYS. — Page 38.

posed was the polite and proper way of expressing

her thanks.



38 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“You are a very nice, kind lady!” she said,
“and I shall ask my brother Willie to thank you,
too, in his heart.”

“Do so, my little dear,” replied the woman, kindly,
“and—wait a minute, sit here untit I return.”

So Kitty sat down in a_ kitchen chair and
waited, and thought of those turkeys until she could
almost hear them gobble right there in her ears.
She had sold her berries for fifteen cents (more
than they were worth, of course, when berries were
so plentiful, but you see the woman had been kind
and generous, because she had taken a liking to
Kitty), and the extra pennies given as a gift made
twenty-five cents in all to carry to Willie and put
with his money, if he had earned any, and, oh,
how she hoped and hoped he had!

Presently the woman came back. “Tve_ been
talking to my next-door neighbor,’ she said, “and
she wants you to bring her your pail full to the
brim of berries to-morrow, and after that you can
bring me some more. And you didn’t tell me, my

dear, where you expect to get your turkeys. I do



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 39

hope you won't be disappointed about them.” So
Kitty told her of the large farm away out in the
country. “He's a kind man,” she added, “’cause
once when papa had something to do ‘bout a pig,
he took me an Willie with him, an’ he smiled
at us real kindly. His name’s Jones, an’ he has,
oh, such a lot of turkeys!”

The woman laughed. “Why, Jones is my name,
too,’ she said. “Well, I wish you good fortune,
dearie.”

‘So, swinging her pail by its handle, and in more
of a flutter than she had ever been in her short
life before, and as rosy as her name with her glad
anticipations, Kitty hurried down the road to the
meeting-place where her brother awaited her so
impatiently.

There they compared experiences, and turned home-
ward, talking as they went, as fast as their little
tongues could wag.

And what do you think that nice old woman —
Kitty’s “customer,” as she called her—did the very

minute the little girl’s back was turned? Why, she



40 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

sat down at her old-fashioned desk and wrote a

note, and this is what it said:

“Dear Brotuer Dick: If two mites of children
come to you wantmg to buy a turkey or two. for
a handful of pennies, don’t you say anything to
bother them, but let them have the turkeys, and
pretend they are paying the right price. I will be
out in a day or two and explain; but I want you
to be sure and not disappoint the children. You
won't be sorry when I tell you all about it.
Good-by; no time for more now, this is baking-

day, you know. Hope your folks are all well.
“Your sister,

“HANNAH.”

Having written this, and read it over to see if
she had made things all plain, Miss Jones —or, as
the village children. loved to call the dear little fat
maiden lady who was so good to them all, Auntie
Jones — hurried to the post-office and mailed her note

Just a few moments, fortunately, before the stage



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 4]

would come along and pick up the mail for de
livery farther along a mile or so.

Meanwhile, our twin roses had made good speed
towards home. The distance was short, and all they
had accomplished had not kept them longer from
their home than the morning of fun and picnicking,
according to mother’s permission, would have detained
them. Consequently neither mamma nor grandma
were at all worried, and imagined the twins to be
peacefully playing together in the woods so near
at hand.

“They'll come home when they’re tired,” said
grandma, placidly knitting away on her slippers; and
as it was only a little after the noon hour, mamma
expected every minute to hear the wild, merry little
voices shouting out, as usual, as her twins returned
hungry and dusty from their impromptu picnic of
two.

What a nice, quiet morning it had been, to be
sure! and Baby Rose was certainly as good as a
sick, drooping little Rosebud could be. No childish,

noisy laugh had awakened her from her morning



42 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

nap, and mamma had had plenty of time to attend
to her duties, for you must know that she was
housekeeper, kitchen-maid, cook, and maid, and mis-
tress of the house, and nurse and mamma, all in’
one, and no wonder she grew very tired sometimes.
Well, the twins trotted on over the road, through
the woods, and out by the lane, until at last, sure
enough, mamma heard the sound of happy little
voices, ‘and presently two little figures chased each
other up the garden path, and tumbled into her arms.

“Bless me!” said grandma, looking over her spec-
tacles, “what a nice, long picnic you have had!
Have you had a splendid time?”

“Oh, splendid!” shouted the twins together, and
the empty basket and pail went flymg out on the
grass, as the children, heedless of order, only thought
of how they could coax mamma to let them have
just such a nice picnic to-morrow.

“ Mamma, mamma!” they began, but —

“Go first and pick up the basket and pail. They
don’t belong out on the grass, you know,” said

mamma.



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 43

“Oh, yes,” replied quick-witted Willie, who found
a place in which to push his wedge in. “We must
be careful of them, of course, ‘cause, mamma, we

“want to go on a picnic again to-morrow, it’s such
fun, an’ — an’ we've tooken such good care of us,
mamma, you see.”

“An? we don’t keep wakin’ Rosebud up when
we're on a picnic,” chimed in Kitty, “an’ so I
should think youd like us to be ’way,” coaxingly.

Mamma looked at them in surprise. “Two days
in succession of picnic? Why, that’s a funny idea!
What do you do to have such a good time that
you can’t wait awhile for another picnic?”

The twins exchanged glances, and grew red as
the red roses out on the bush.

“Children!”’ cried mamma, sternly, “what are
you hiding from me? Are you doimg anything
wrong?”

They threw little arms around her neck, nearly
choking her in their energy, and rained kisses all
over her face from their warm little lips, even yet

sticky with the warmth of the August day.



44 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Oh, 10, me, no, nota ‘single wrong thing,
mamma!” they cried; and Kitty added, “We’re
only havin’ some fun, an’ when it’s finished we're
goin’ to call you an’ gran’ma to see it.”

“Very well, Ill trust you,” said mamma; “ you
may go to-morrow, but I do hope you will be very
careful, and not be naughty in any of your plans.”

With a whoop (and that woke baby up, sure
enough) the twins bounded away, while grandma
said in her grandmotherly way, “Lor, dear, I sup-
pose the little souls are building a dam in the
brook, and are as proud of their work as if they

were real bridge-builders!”’

The next day had just such a fine, bright morn-
ing as the children had enjoyed before, as they
started bright and early for the “picnic” in the
woods.

The luncheon was eaten at once, so as to make
room for the berries in the pail, and the ferns were

gathered by quantities for the basket. Dainty little



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 45

ferns, such as Sallie Lunn, you remember, had asked
Willie to bring her, and pretty blossoms, and little
trailing vines, all found a place, huddling together
in a fragrant confusion in the basket, and covered
from the hot sun-rays by the napkins grandma had
provided for the lunch. Then the children sat down
by the roadside to discuss matters.

“How we goin’ to go an’ buy those turkeys, I’d
jus’ like to know, Willie Rose, when mamma _ was
so “fraid to let us come off alone ‘gain to-day?
It's a drefful long way to that man’s house, an’ we
won't get back for so late, an’ mamma’ll scold an’
be so worried!”

“We must manage it somehow, I tell you!” re-
plied Willie. “I wouldn’t be such a ’fraid-girl ’f I
were you, Kitty Rose! We can ask mamma to let
us take a walk, an’ then we can run as fast as
anythin’, an’—vwell, we can't help it if we are
scolded; it'll be all for her sake, an’ she'll be sorry
when she knows what we were doin’ all that time
she thought we were bein’ naughty.”

“We can't make b’lieve we were losted, ‘cause.



46 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

that would be a story; an’ if mamma didn’t know
it, God, that’s up in heaven, would, ‘cause He’s
always seein’ us, you know.”

“Oh, no! we don’t tell stories, we ain’t that kind,
and ’sides, that would spoil our present to mamma.
But maybe —oh, Kitty, maybe we'll get losted really
an’ truly, an’ then—then we can’t help it, an’ it
won't be a story.”

“ But I don’t want to have that happen,’ whined
Kitty; “Td get drefful scared if it really did.”

Willie picked up his basket and shrugged his fat
little shoulders.

“Come on,” he said, “’taint any use thinkin’ things

933)

now; weve jus’ got to go somehow, an’”’’—he put
his little lips close to Kitty’s ear and whispered —
“oran’ma says the Father in heaven loves little
children, an’ I ’most feel sure He knows how we
want to get those turkeys for our dear, sweet,
darlin’ mamma, when she’s so patient an’ good, an’
so tired, an’ has got a birthday comin’, an’— an’
He'll jus’ fix a way for us to get ’em, see if He
don’t.” That was a comforting thought to both



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. AT

children, and they went on their way, fillmg the
pail with berries as they walked along.

We need not take time nor space to go through
with the details of the visit to the village this time,
because we already know that as the children were
expected, they were profited accordingly, and when
they turned homeward again they had, all in all,
the handling of fifty cents in pennies and_ nickels.
Kitty's kind Miss Jones—to whom she had this
time found a chance to introduce Willie — had
counted their money for them (as they, the seven-
year-old twins, were hardly arithmeticians as yet),
and they felt as rich as kings and queens, as they
trudged home, quite determined to take the first
chance offered and set out on the journey turkey-ward.

Where to keep that precious money was a matter
of serious thought and grave importance, but finally
Kitty decided to hide it im dolly’s stocking, and
shut dolly, with her mine of wealth, up in the
playhouse closet till she could be relieved of her

responsibility later on.



48 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Well, days—a very few of them—went on un-
excitedly enough after that, so far as appearances
went; but the twin Roses were ready to droop and
chang their pretty heads in despair as the birthday
drew near, and they were still puzzling how to go
the long distance for the wonderful birthday gift. At
last, however, Willie plucked up courage, and bravely
told mamma that he and Kitty were “jus’ crazy
an’ pinin’ away for a reg’ler long walk ’way up the
road, an’ if she’d let ‘em go an’ promise to trus’
“em, an’ not be scared if they didn’t get home for
‘most dinner-time, they'd be so good afterwards she
wouldn't have to scold ’em ever again!”

She laughed and asked grandma what she thought,
and of course grandma sided with her pets; and the
long and short of it all was that they did start off
the very next morning, quivering all over with
suppressed excitement and happy anticipation.

They walked and walked straight on, as they
remembered the road their father had taken, and
by more good fortune, when, by and by, they came
to a fork in the road, they turned in the right



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 49

direction, and so at last reached the farm, and asked
for Mr. Jones. A nice, jolly old fellow he was, as
good-natured as his sister, and so like her in looks
that Kitty wondered if all fat, kind people looked
like each other.

He put his hands in his pockets and spread his
feet apart comfortably, and looked quizzically down
upon the twins before him.

“Wal, I declar’!”” he chuckled, “if you ain’t as
like as two peas in a pod. If you both had hair
the same color, I declar’ I shouldn't know which
from tother. Wal! what can I do for ye?”

Willie explained, helped along by Kitty in a con-
fusing sort of way, which would have puzzled the
farmer if his sister’s note hadn't reached him in
advance of the turkey buyers.

“Oh, I see, ye want to buy three turkeys of me.
Can ye afford it, do ye think?”

fa

“Oh, yes, sir; we've got fifty centses replied
Kitty, beginning to untie the knot in her handker-
chief. The man chuckled, and shook all over with

the laugh he couldn’t wholly restrain.



50 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“Wal, turkeys is usually a Jeetle more’n that in
price, but I’m havin’ a sale just now an’ want to
clear out some of them turkeys, an’ so being as it’s
you twins, I'll sell ‘em at your price.”

“Oh, thank you! youre a kind man, like a lady
-we know in the village!” exclaimed Kitty; and Willie
added impulsively, ‘“ You're as kind to us as if we
were your twins ‘stead of papa’s an’ mamma’s.”

That pleased the farmer, and set him shaking
again. Then he showed the children the turkeys
they could have,—a fine big one and two smaller
ones; and after they had finished capering about for
joy, the question of “how to get them home”
arose.

“Oh, we never thought of that,” said Kitty to
Willie.

“So we didn’t,” replied Willie to Kitty.

“Wal, can’t your folks send for ‘em?” questioned
the farmer.

The twins looked startled.

“Ole mo; no! one, sim! veried Walle, “ You see

its a birthday present to my mamma, an’ we



_ THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 51

wouldn’t have her know till we show it to her.”
Then the children explained all their plan, and the
farmer was full of interest, of course. Finally it was
agreed that he should get the turkeys over when he
went to the village, as he had to do soon, and put
them in a little corner lot which happened to be
fenced on all sides, and where papa kept odd tools
and rubbish sometimes ; they would be safe there
till mamma could see them. And the good-natured
farmer, finding that the birthday would occur on the
day after to-morrow, agreed to make his trip past

the “Rose Bower’

>

on that morning early, and leave
the turkeys without being seen, as the lot in ques-
tion was behind some high bushes, and in the rear
of the house.

He claimed a kiss from each twin to complete
the bargain, and then the little travellers started for
home. Oh, what a hot day it was! And how long
the walk seemed! When they reached the fork of
the road they were puzzled, and ready to cry at
last. Kitty’s dread of getting “losted” returned, and

Willie was too tired to think which was the right



52 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

or wrong way. The sun had mounted high up in
the sky by this time, and the noon hour was at
hand.

But at last—perhaps the dear guardian angel,
whom we like to fancy keeps loving watch over
little children and keeps them from harm, helped our
twin Roses to choose the right way, for they took
it, tempted by the shade of trees which the other
road lacked, and finally reached the cool little home,
where mamma was beginning to be anxious for
them.

Neither of the children cared for dinner with
their usual hearty appetites, and when, by and by,
Willie began to look flushed, and wanted to put
his head down on grandma’s knee, and said baby’s
crying hurt him in his forehead, it was plain to
be seen that he had that very unusual thing for
him, a headache, and a bad one, too.

“Would he go and get into bed and be quiet?”

“No, he didn’t want to; he wanted to sit up
and be well pretty soon.” :

“Would he let grandma give him some medicine?”



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 53



‘SUCH A HEADACHE!” — Page 52.

“No, not yet; he wanted to wait and see if he
wouldn’t soon be better.”

He was getting to be very cross and miserable,
and mamma regretted sincerely that she had allowed
the children to take so long a walk. She didn’t
know that they had run most of the way, poor

little things! so as not to be late home. To



rv

a4 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

have told her that would have let out part of the
secret.

So she fixed him a nice bowl of milk porridge,
and tied his head in a wet towel, and let him sit
quietly in his chair until he felt it wiser to go to
bed and to sleep. Meanwhile, where was Kitty?
Grandma, gomg through the upper hall a few
moments later, saw a little figure huddled on the floor
against the wall, near the dolly’s house, with dolly
sprawling at its side, and Kitty No. 2 snuggled
in its lap. The little figure proved to be Kitty
Rose, and fast asleep, too, as a tired, worn-out
little maid could be.

She had tried so hard not to let mamma know
how very tired and uncomfortable she was, and she
had gone so bravely to play with her doll and
kitten, trying to forget her tiredness and the sleepy
feeling she wasn’t used to right in the middle of
the day.

But, oh, dear! it was of no use. Sleep caught
little Kitty Rose right there in the midst of her
play, and so grandma found her. Before long they



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 59

were both in bed, however, and dreaming of turkeys

as, big as their own selves.



“By-oh, baby dear, by-by!

Hush, my Rosebud, do not cry!
Little birds are in the nest,

Goimg softly now to rest.



56 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

My wee bird must slumber too,
Sweetly, all the long night through,
Till the sunbeams come to say,
‘Wake up, baby, it is day!’
By-oh-by, my baby dear,

Mother loves you, do not fear. -
On your mother’s loving breast
You, sweet bird, shall go to rest.
Lullaby, oh, lullaby,

Stars are peeping from the sky;
By-oh-by, my Rosebud dear,

Mother loves you, do not fear.”

To and fro, to and fro, rocked Mamma _ Rose,
with baby in her arms, and the kettle singing
away to make a sort of duet with her voice.

The twins snug in bed, and baby soon to be,
she and grandma would have a nice, cosey supper
by themselves, and a good, long evening to sew.

Mamma was thinking of many things as she sat

there before the stove at the close of a rainy day,





A LULLABY DUET WITH THE KETTLE. — Page 56.







THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 59

when there had been little of August weather
warmth and cheer, and the twins had been dolefully
confined to the house.

It was well for them that they had gone to buy
their turkeys the day before, since the weather had
so suddenly changed in the night, and brought about
such a miserable kind of day as this had been
Baby had cried a good deal, the twins had been.
good and naughty by turns (quite forgetful of their
promise the day before when the longed-for walk
had been granted them), and poor, tired mamma
was glad to sit down in her rocker before the
comfortable warmth of the stove, and rock and sing
her Rosebud to sleep. But as she sang, her thoughts
were on many things. To-morrow would be her
birthday, and for the first time in many years her
husband would not be with her, to take her in his
arms and count her years in loving kisses, as her
children loved to do. That was one sad thought
to mix in with baby’s IWllaby. Then she knew that
times were hard with them lately; that was one

reason poor papa was kept away so long from



60 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

home, trying in every way to see how he could
better his circumstances. Then, again, baby was so
sick, and there was danger that she might grow
worse. All these were rather grave thoughts, you
see, and perhaps the gloomy day had turned them so.

But when, pretty soon, grandma came in and
lighted the lamps, and the curtains were drawn
snugly, and the nice little healthy supper was
finished, and the mother and daughter sat down to
sew together, mending little garments, and loving the:
little wearers so much, why, then the sad thoughts flew
away with the vanished shadows, and mamma was as
bright as could be, and just as gay as if she had
discovered the secret of the twins, and knew what a
“be-youtiful present” would await her in the morning.

Early on the morning of the birthday —the next
morning, as I have said, to the doleful rainy one —

the twin Roses awoke, all full of happy thoughts.

“Had Mr. Jones remembered his promise? Oh, if

he should have forgotten, what should they do?”





‘** GOBBLE, GOBBLE,’ YOURSELVES.” — Page 63.









THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 63

They dressed themselves as far as they could
without help (only asking grandma to “button the
‘toppest button” and “tie the little, soft bow in
front”), and then away they flew into the garden,
behind the thick bushes, and down to the little
three-cornered plot of ground where they hoped to
find the turkeys. :

Ah! there they were, the three of them! the
“lovely, precious turkeys.” Oh, how Willie and Kitty
did jump up and down, and look over the fence,
and hop up and down again !

“Gobble, gobble,” said the turkeys; and the big
one strutted about, so vain, and with such airs.

“ as they scampered back to the house.

“Mamma! mamma!” they cried, pulling at her
gown. “And you, too, gran’ma! oh, do come and
see something we’ve found in the yard!”

Wondering what it could be, the mother and old

lady followed the twins, and — can you guess better



64 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

than I can tell you what happened when mamma
saw her birthday gifts from her twin Roses, her
Wild Roses, her Blush Roses, her sweet, szeet little
Roses? How she stared, and how she laughed, and
how she finally sat down in the grass and cried,
because of the love and thoughtfulness of her little
twins, and of all the trouble they had taken for
her sake !

They told her all about it from beginning to end,
and grandma had to wipe her spectacles a great
many times before the story was done.

And as their story finishes, so must mine, dear
little readers; and now we will say good-by to the
twin Roses and the Rosebud, and hope that they
may continue to bloom and grow amidst the brightest
sunshine the beautiful skies can spare them for

many years.

THE END.



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THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES


Af. An

‘CWE MUST MANAGE IT SOMEHOW, I TELL you!” — Page 45.
THE

PithLe IWIN ROSES

A STORY FOR LITTLE GIRLS AND BOYS

BY

MARY D. BRINE

Author of “The Little New Neighbor,” “Bonnie Little Bonibel,” “Dan,” etc.

WITH TEN ILLUSTRATIONS

NEW YORK
E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY
31 WEST TWENTY-THIRD STREET

1892
Copyright, 1892
‘By E. P. DUTTON AND COMPANY

PRESS OF
Rockwell and Churchill
BOSTON
EIST OF IEEUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

“ WE MUST MANAGE IT SOMEHOW, I TELL you!” Frontispiece

“LISTEN, WILLIE!”

“KITTY WAS QUITE READY TO CRY FROM DISAPPOINT-

VEEN oe Nr eee ee ia ee
GOING A—FISHING

“WISH YOU'D BUY SOMETHIN’, MA’AM” .

Kirty WAITS, AND THINKS OF THOSE TURKEYS.

“SucH A HEADACHE!”
SO SYORSUMORIOID sc ee ee
A LULLABY DUET WITH THE KETTLE

“* GOBBLE, GOBBLE,’ YOURSELVES” .

9

17
20
31
3T
58
5d:
oT

61


‘LISTEN, WILLIE!” — Page 10.

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.



HEY sat at the table eating their supper of
bread and milk. Very pretty little Roses they
were, too. Sometimes they were called “ Wild Roses,”
sometimes “Blush Roses,” and quite frequently they
deserved to be called “Climbing Roses,” as every
fence and tree on the place could tell you, had

they only tongues to speak and tell tales.
LO THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Just now they were. out of mischief, these little
twins, for Mamma Rose had given them their early
supper, and soon they would be snug and safe in
their small beds, and out of harm’s way till the
sunbeams should hunt them up again.

“Listen, Willie!”

“T’m_ listenin’.”

“There’s Rosebud a-cryin’ again.”

“That ain’t anythin’ new; she’s forever a-cryin’
lately.”

Willie paused in the act of tilting his cup for its
last drop of milk, as he spoke, and Kitty stopped stir-
ring the lump of sugar in hers, as they listened with
grave little faces to baby’s cry in the next room.

Baby Rose, or, as she was oftener called, “ Rose-
bud,” was being teased and fretted by one or two
wee pearls of teeth which were pushing through the
sensitive little gums, and making life very miserable
for the little bud of sweetness so dear to the family
of Roses.

For several nights mamma had been kept awake

by baby’s restlessness, and during the days it had
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 11

been one constant effort to make baby comfortable,
and so she had grown very tired and anxious, this
dear, patient mamma; and the little twins felt sorry
for her, and almost vexed with the poor little Rose-
bud, who didn’t know really just how much trouble
she was making.

The twins went on with their supper, and Rose-
bud’s little plaintive wail subsided gradually, while
mamma sang lullabies wearily, and the shadows of |
night fell softly down from the skies above.

“Oh, dear! don’t you wish we were rich folks,
Willie?” asked Kitty, presently, with a little sigh.

“Guess I do, Kit, but what’s the use wishin’?”

“Oh, I’'d go an’ buy mamma _ the beautifulest
things, an’ make her have such easy times.”

“But shed be rich, too, if we were, an’ could
buy beautiful things her own self, an’—”

“But maybe we'd have somethin’ ’sides bread an’
milk for our supper nights, an’ we could have silk
things to wear like those child’en at the hotel down
yonder. But ’tain’t the leastest use wishin,’ cause I

most know we won't ever be rich like them.”
12 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“Well, there’s lots poorer ’n we are, Kitty Rose;
we don't have to wear rags like beggars we read
of in our story-books, an’ we have other things
‘cept bread an’ milk when its breakfast an’ dinner,
you know. ‘Sides, papa, he’s got a ship somewhere
what’s goin’ to bring him lots of money some
day.

“Why, Willie Rose, what a great, big story! I
don’t b’lieve papa’s got a ship at all, else we'd
seen it sailin’ sometime.”

“He has, too, ‘cause one night I heard him tell
mamma that when his ship came home she shouldn’t
be so bothered ‘bout things, an’ he could take some
rest; so now, do you think I told a big story?”

Kitty was quite puzzled. Strange she had never
known that her father owned a ship! where was
it sailing now, she wondered, and why didn’t he
take them all for a sail in it, and let them have
fun like the people at the hotel who went sailing
in the lake sometimes? Well, it was all very
strange, and she meant to ask grandma about it

the first chance she got.
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 13

When the supper was finished, the twins scampered
out to the small garden to have a race and frolic
before going to bed; (oh, how they hated to go to
bed!) and after baby was sound asleep, and laid
softly down in her little crib, mamma called her
wild Roses in to get ready for their night’s rest.

“Tt isn’t half dark yet, mamma,’ complained
Kitty, reluctant to leave the grassy playground before
she had had one more game of “tag” with Willie.

“ All the chickies have gone to roost, don’t you
see?” she replied, with a smile, “and why should
mine be up and about at the nesting-time ?”’

“We ain’t chickies, mamma,” laughed roguish
Willie, “we're Zoses, an’ the roses are staying up,
see?” He pulled off a rose, as he spoke, and held
it up to her.

“Ah, if the little rose had hidden away in its
bed of leaves, it would have been out of harm's
way, wouldn’t it?” she replied, “and a mischievous
little hand could not have torn it from the mother-
bush. Come, little son, say good-night to all out-

doors, and get into your bed as soon as possible.”
14. THE LITTLE TWLN ROSES.

It didn’t take long for that business, and soon
the moonbeams stole in through the open window
of a quiet, small chamber, and shone tenderly about
the beds where our twin Roses were sleeping peace-
fully side by side, the dark-haired little sister and

the fair-haired, blue-eyed little brother.

The next morning Kitty, happening to remember
the “ship” of which Wille had told her, went to
grandma’s room for a private conversation.

Sitting on a little stool at the dear old lady’s
knee, Kitty began:

“Gran’ma, where’s papa’s ship?”

Grandma's eyes opened wide behind her spectacles.

“Papa's what?” she asked.

“Papa's ship, you know; where's he sailin’ it,
gran’ma?”

“Bless me, child, what do you mean? Papa has
nothing to do with a ship.”

“Oh, yes,” gravely, “for Willie heard him tell

mamina ‘bout it, an’ it’s comin’ in some day with,
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 15

oh, a lot of money, an’ we're all goin’ to be rich,
gran’ma, an’ I want you to tell me all bout where
it’s sailin’ to now, an’ where did papa buy it?”

How old grandma did laugh, and how indignant
little Kitty was! Grandma chuckled and chuckled,
and her fat, short body shook all over, and joggled
Kitty's head as it lay against grandma’s knee.

But finally the laugh subsided, and the dear old
face grew less merry, and the soft old hand rested
lovingly on Kitty’s tangled dark locks.

“My darling, Willie didn’t understand just what
papa meant, and you have neither of you heard
the old saying, I suppose, ‘when my ship comes in,’
so, of course, you didn’t know what papa _ really
meant. Grandma will explain ; but what were you
and Willie talking about, and when did Willie hear
the remark?”

Kittie was quite ready to cry from disappointment,
but she bravely kept back the tears, and explained

to grandma the conversation she and Willie had

* had the evening before, and she couldn’t bear to give

up the anticipation even yet, that one fine day
16 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

papa would have a ship come sailing in all full of
good things for them all.

Grandma explained the “sayimg” (which even all
my little readers know akout, so old a saying it is),
and explained also to discontented Kitty how much
she had to be thankful for, and how much _ better
off she and Wilhe were, notwithstanding the fact
that papa had to work hard for the support of
his family. She reminded Kitty of the fact that
many little girls and boys had no dear mother and
father, and that they (the twins) could not be
grateful enough for the blessing of their own dear
parents, and the little rosebud of a baby besides ; and
she made her comprehend, too, that all the riches
in the world could not make a person happy unless
there was a contented heart and loving, kindly dis-
position behind it all. And Kitty nestled closer to
grandma’s knee, and began to love mamma, papa,
baby, grandma, and Willie more and more from that
very minute. Pretty soon she climbed into grandma’s
lap and put two loving little arms about the dear
old neck.




FROM DISAPPOINTMENT.” — Page 15.

SCRITTY WAS QUITE READY TO CRY

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 19

“Willie an’ I ought to be very good an’ sweet
‘cause we're oses, you know, gran’ma, an’ roses
are always so sweet and nice. I don’t care if papa
isn't rich like hotel folks, he’s dear, an’ so are you,
an’ mamma’s precious, an’ Rosebud’s the bestest
baby when she ain't cryin’ an’ worryin’ mamma,
an’ Willie an’ I, we love each other lots, we do,
an’ — oh, gran’ma, I don’t care if there ain’t any
ship!”

So she ran singing and skipping out of the room
im search of Willie. She found him sitting in the
swing disconsolately.

“Ii I were a girl twin an’ had a boy twin, I
guess I wouldn’t go hidin’ away from him jus’ to
be mean, I wouldn’t!” he complained. “I couldn’t
find you any place at all.”

“Why, Willie Rose! yow’re-cross as can be, an’
—an’ yowre a—a Rose with a big thorn stickin’
out an’ prickin’ me, you are! I ain’t been anywhere
to hide, only in my gran’ma’s room, an’ there ain’t
any ship at all, not the leastest bit of a ship sailin’

home to papa, for eran’ma told me so her own
2 oO
20 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

self, an’ she says that’s only a sayin’, an’ means
when people want anythin’ very much, oh, dre‘fully,
they make a plan to get it, an’ then they keep
hopin’ things will turn out right, an’ they make
believe they've got a ship sailin’ from a way-off
shore, all full of good things for ’em, an’ when the
good things don’t keep comin’, they say, ‘Never mind,
some day my ship’ll come home an’ bring ’em;’
that’s all it means, you see, Willie, so papa was
only tryin’ to comfort himself and mamma by maki’
believe, an’ that’s lots better “n whinin’ an’ frettin’,
an’ bein’ discouraged, gran’ma says.”

Willie listened attentively to this speech, and com-
prehended it thoroughly, and, like Kitty, had his
disappointment, and bravely kept back tears, before
he was ready to take the second instalment of
gran’ma’s conversation with Kitty.

He was an affectionate little fellow, and as ready
as his twin sister to be a fragrant Rose in the
bower of roses which he called Home.

He and Kitty were so good all that day, keeping

out of mischief, and helping mamma all they could,
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 21

that she was quite amazed, and wondered what
had come over her Wild Roses all of a sudden.
That speech of hers turned them speedily into
“Blush Roses,” for somehow they felt as if they
were keeping a secret from mamma, and that was
something quite new for them.

At their quiet little bread and butter supper that
night, Willie confided to Kitty that he saw grandma
knitting some slippers that afternoon, and she had
told him as a secret that they were a present for
mamma on her birthday. “She said it was a secret,
but I don’t b’lieve she meant me not to tell my
twin sister, do you?” he added, a little anxiously.
And Kitty replied, seriously, “Oh, no, ‘cause we're
Same as one, you know. I didn’t know mamma’s
birthday, was for ever so long, did you ?”

S No.5. an, oh. Kitty, papa wont be home! He
said in his last letter he couldn’t come till fall,
an’ here it is right in the middle of the summer,
an’ the birthday comes next week, grandma says.”

“Oh, Willie!” She clasped her hands with the last

exclamation, and compressed her lips as though
22 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

bursting to tell something she was not quite ready
to confide.

“You made me most jump an’ spill my milk,”
said the boy, half pettishly.

“Well, but I’ve got a splendid idea, Willie Rose,
an’ it must be every bit our own secret, too, else
it won't be any fun at all.”

Willie was all ears, and pushed his empty bowl
away, wiping his moist little lips with the back
of his hand instead of his napkin, and prepared
to agree with his twin in everything she sug-
gested. :

Kitty having finished also, the two retired to a
private corner, and the followmg conversation went
on in excited whispers :

“Willie, we must give Mamma Rose a_ birthday
present as well as gran’ma, an’ we jus got to go
ahead an’ do it ’thout lettin’ her ‘spect a single .
thing “bout it, you see.”

Willie saw.

“ An’ we must think of somethin’ awful nice, an’

jus what she’s been a-wantin’ mostest, if we can,
eo

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. ee

you know, so’s to make her gladder ’n the slippers
will make her.”

Willie nodded excitedly.

“An’ you'll be sure not to let on "bout it?”

“Course not,” replied Willie, indignantly.

“Pon your word an’ sacred honor ?”

“Oh, yes, I tell you, Kitty Rose, ain’t you ever
a-goin’ to believe a body?”

“Well, now let’s guess what mamma wants very
much; maybe—”

“Olve fe know |” interrupted Willie, “for don’t
you know she said one day to papa she did wish
we had turkeys? They’d be a nice in—invester, or
somethin’ like that, an’ papa, he said maybe some-
time he’d manage to get her some.”

“Well, he ain’t managed yet,” replied Kitty, glee-—
fully, “so maybe we can, Willie, an’, oh, won't it
be the bestest fun we ever had?”

“I wonder what an ‘invester’ is, anyway, said
Willie, somewhat anxiously; “do you spose it’s a
partic’ler kind of a turkey?”

“Maybe it’s a very nice, tender kind that makes
24 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

nice Thanksgivin’s, you know,” replied Kitty, quite
wisely, in her opinion, for what elise would her
mother want turkeys for if not to eat when Thanks-

giving-time came ?

So now the twins had a real secret from mamma,
and the first thing for them to do was to earn,
as secretly as possible, a little money with which to
go to a farmer who lived a long way off — they
had been there once in a wagon with their father
—and buy a turkey or two from the many he
owned. That the money must be earned was very
certain, but how to earn it they didn’t know, and
erew quite worried over the matter. They were
strongly tempted at one time to go to grandma,
but resisted the temptation, and determined to put
the whole business through by themselves, by hook
or by crook. And finally by “hook” they started
it in this way :

It was a bright morning when Willie and Kitty
started off in high glee, by mamma’s permission, to

have a little picnic of their own down by the


Page 27.

GOING A—FISHING.



we

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 27

brook a short distance from the little home. Baby
Rose was unusually troublesome that morning, and
mamma had her hands full, and grandma too, for
that matter, and the twins asked so innocently if
they might go on their little picnic and have a
nice time, and they promised so earnestly to take
care and not get into mischief, and the day was
so bright and glad, and they had been so used to
going on walks and wandering about by themselves,
never getting into serious trouble of any kind, that,
to tell the truth, I thnk mamma and grandma
were rather glad to have the house quiet for a
time. So off they started, with basket and fishing-
pole, for Willie had whispered to Kitty his plan to
catch fish and sell them to the hotel people, and
maybe earn enough in that way to buy the
turkeys.

Very happy little folks they were as they went
gayly along the road and finally turned into the
woods by the brook. But oh, dear me! what a
pity it was that not a single little fish was goosie

enough to be caught! Willie’s hook was an old one,
28 THE “LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

and he didn’t know how to bait it very well, and
Kitty couldn’t bear to touch a worm. So after a
while they gave up fishing in despair and ate the
nice luncheon grandma had put up for them, with
only half the appetite they would have had with
better luck. Finally, “Z don’t care!” cried Kitty,
starting up. “If we can’t get fish to sell, we can
try ferns an’ things, ‘cause sometimes folks buys ’em
at the hotel. I saw a girl sellin’ some once, myself,
an’ the ladies paid her for ’em right off. Let’s try.”

Willie was ready, and the more so because he
couldn’t fish any more if he wanted to, for his rod
—a long switch cut from a tree, and not strong
at its best— suddenly broke in two, and his line
and hook caught in a stone and snapped off, and
he was altogether a very disgusted little fisherman.

So the twins gathered a quantity of fragrant ferns
and wood blossoms, and filling their basket started
for the village hotel, not far off. On the way Kitty
was seized with the brilliant idea of filling her din-
ner-pail with berries which were growing along the

roadside.
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 29

“Folks always are hungry for berries,’ she said,
and Willie stopped pulling and eating berries him-
self, and helped his sister fill the pail with the
pretty red raspberries which he felt sure somebody
would want to buy. When they reached the village
——both feeling a little troubled in their hearts lest
mamma would not have been quite willing to trust
them so far— Kitty decided to try the experiment
of calling at the kitchen doors of some houses along
the way, while Willie went straight to the big hotel
piazza with his basket of ferns and pretty flowers.
They were carefully covered from the sun, and he
hoped they would look quite fresh and pretty for

his anticipated customers.

The piazza of the hotel seemed quite crowded with
guests as Willie drew near, and everybody was well
dressed, and seemed happy as could be. There was
plenty of laughing and talking, and even singing
going on, and there were fat, healthy babies with

their nurses and rich mammas, and little boys and
30 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

girls of the same age as he and Kitty, and they
were dressed in fine clothes, and having such gay
times, with nothing to do but be happy.

As Willie began to ascend the broad steps at the
main piazza, one of the gentlemen saw him, and
called out carelessly, “Needn’t come up, little boy,
we don’t want to buy anything to-day;” and poor
Willie, blushing furiously because everybody turned
and looked at him, and feeling so disappointed he
didn’t know how he could keep the tears out of his
blue eyes, turned away and walked slowly on.

Maybe he did give a little stifled sob, because he
couldn’t help it, and he was only seven years old,
—such a little fellow, you know, —or maybe when he
drew his sleeve across his eyes somebody saw him;
at any rate, just as he passed the corner of the
house where there was a little lonely piazza, quite
apart from the large crowded one behind him, a
sweet voice called, “What’s the matter, little boy?”
and there was a young gurl lounging in a steamer
chair, and trying to keep cool with her fan and her

magazine. I don’t think she was more than fourteen








‘‘wIsh YOU’D BUY SOMETHIN’, Ma’AM.” — Page 33.



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 33

years old, but to Willie she looked like a real young
lady, and so he ascended the steps with his basket,
and said, very politely :

“T wish you'd buy somethin’, ma’am.”

Now, little Miss Sallie Lunn (we will call her that,
because, perhaps, she’d rather I would not give her
real name) was not used to being addressed as
“ma'am,” and it gave her a very dignified feeling to
hear herself so addressed by Willie just now. Conse-
quently she took an immediate interest in him, and
asked what he had for sale.

He set his basket down at her feet, and dis-
played his ferns, and some pretty red berries, and
other wild flowers which we often find hidden away
in the beautiful woods every summer.

Some people —more’s the pity— don’t care for such
things, and won’t take the trouble to look for them;
but, on the other hand, a great many lovers of
Nature and of her beautiful treasures are met with
in this dear old world of ours, and to such Miss
Sallie Lunn, very fortunately for Willie, belonged.

So she put down her magazine and fan and looked
34 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

over Willie’s basket, and bought quite a large bunch
of ferns for pressing, and then she kindly called
one or two of her friends from the crowd on the
main piazza and induced them to buy also. And
before ten minutes had passed, lo and behold! the
boy’s basket was quite empty, and he was full of
smiles and dimples. He couldn't help confiding to
Sallie — and wondered a minute after if it was
breaking his promise to Kitty to have done 0,
though he truly didn’t mean to break his word —that
he and his sister were going to buy a_ birthday
present for mamma, and had to sell things in order
to get money to buy with. And when she asked
what he was going to buy, he very nearly blurted
out “Turkeys!” in his eagerness. But he caught
himself in time, and all Sallie heard was the sound
Ole,“ Te and she could hardly make anything out
of that. Willie blushed a good deal as he exjlained
why he couldn’t tell more, “’cause it was such a
secret, an’ Kitty had told him to be sure not to
tell a single soul.”

“Oh, very well, then, never mind, you'll tell me
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 35

some day, and I’m going to help you all I can.
You can bring me some more ferns to-morrow, and
get the smallest you can, because I want to press
them; they make very nice decorations in winter,
and I shouldn’t wonder a bit if some of the other
ladies bought some too.” Cee

That was very encouraging to Willie, and he slung
his basket over his arm, and, bidding Miss Sallie
Lunn good-by, went to the broad village square
where he had arranged to meet Kitty.

And there he had quite a “wait,” till he grew
a little frightened, and wished he had stayed at home,
notwithstanding the pennies knocking together so
merrily in his pocket in place of the ferns in his
basket.

But what was keeping Kitty all this time?
Well, the little girl was having an experience, and
truly this had been, or was being, perhaps I should
say, a very unusual and odd kind of a day for
these twin Roses who had strayed so far from their
own safe bower.

Kitty had really succeeded in selling her berries,
36 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

and sold them all, in fact, at the first house at
which she called. Her timid little knock had brought
to the kitchen door a kind-faced old woman, about
-as old, Kitty thought, as her own grandma at home,
and so she found her courage, which had been growing
faint, rising again hopefully, and offered her little
wares with such an earnest tongue, and such an
eager pair of eyes, that the woman said cheerily :

“Want your berries? of course we do, little one,
and Td like to buy you too. What is your name,
my dear?” So Kitty emptied her pail as Willie
had his basket, and meanwhile was coaxed out of
her secret, by the kind questions of the old woman
(who was “some one’s else gran’ma,’ though not
Kitty’s), until she had betrayed even more than
Willie had dared to.

“Ta sakes! what a child you are!” laughed the
woman, patting Kitty’s brown head. “I do hope
youll get those turkeys, sure enough; and _ here,
now, are a few extra pennies to help you out.”

Kitty blushed very red for pure joy, and made

‘a funny little courtesy to her customer, as she sup-


THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 3

~T



KITTY WAITS, AND THINKS OF THOSE TURKEYS. — Page 38.

posed was the polite and proper way of expressing

her thanks.
38 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“You are a very nice, kind lady!” she said,
“and I shall ask my brother Willie to thank you,
too, in his heart.”

“Do so, my little dear,” replied the woman, kindly,
“and—wait a minute, sit here untit I return.”

So Kitty sat down in a_ kitchen chair and
waited, and thought of those turkeys until she could
almost hear them gobble right there in her ears.
She had sold her berries for fifteen cents (more
than they were worth, of course, when berries were
so plentiful, but you see the woman had been kind
and generous, because she had taken a liking to
Kitty), and the extra pennies given as a gift made
twenty-five cents in all to carry to Willie and put
with his money, if he had earned any, and, oh,
how she hoped and hoped he had!

Presently the woman came back. “Tve_ been
talking to my next-door neighbor,’ she said, “and
she wants you to bring her your pail full to the
brim of berries to-morrow, and after that you can
bring me some more. And you didn’t tell me, my

dear, where you expect to get your turkeys. I do
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 39

hope you won't be disappointed about them.” So
Kitty told her of the large farm away out in the
country. “He's a kind man,” she added, “’cause
once when papa had something to do ‘bout a pig,
he took me an Willie with him, an’ he smiled
at us real kindly. His name’s Jones, an’ he has,
oh, such a lot of turkeys!”

The woman laughed. “Why, Jones is my name,
too,’ she said. “Well, I wish you good fortune,
dearie.”

‘So, swinging her pail by its handle, and in more
of a flutter than she had ever been in her short
life before, and as rosy as her name with her glad
anticipations, Kitty hurried down the road to the
meeting-place where her brother awaited her so
impatiently.

There they compared experiences, and turned home-
ward, talking as they went, as fast as their little
tongues could wag.

And what do you think that nice old woman —
Kitty’s “customer,” as she called her—did the very

minute the little girl’s back was turned? Why, she
40 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

sat down at her old-fashioned desk and wrote a

note, and this is what it said:

“Dear Brotuer Dick: If two mites of children
come to you wantmg to buy a turkey or two. for
a handful of pennies, don’t you say anything to
bother them, but let them have the turkeys, and
pretend they are paying the right price. I will be
out in a day or two and explain; but I want you
to be sure and not disappoint the children. You
won't be sorry when I tell you all about it.
Good-by; no time for more now, this is baking-

day, you know. Hope your folks are all well.
“Your sister,

“HANNAH.”

Having written this, and read it over to see if
she had made things all plain, Miss Jones —or, as
the village children. loved to call the dear little fat
maiden lady who was so good to them all, Auntie
Jones — hurried to the post-office and mailed her note

Just a few moments, fortunately, before the stage
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 4]

would come along and pick up the mail for de
livery farther along a mile or so.

Meanwhile, our twin roses had made good speed
towards home. The distance was short, and all they
had accomplished had not kept them longer from
their home than the morning of fun and picnicking,
according to mother’s permission, would have detained
them. Consequently neither mamma nor grandma
were at all worried, and imagined the twins to be
peacefully playing together in the woods so near
at hand.

“They'll come home when they’re tired,” said
grandma, placidly knitting away on her slippers; and
as it was only a little after the noon hour, mamma
expected every minute to hear the wild, merry little
voices shouting out, as usual, as her twins returned
hungry and dusty from their impromptu picnic of
two.

What a nice, quiet morning it had been, to be
sure! and Baby Rose was certainly as good as a
sick, drooping little Rosebud could be. No childish,

noisy laugh had awakened her from her morning
42 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

nap, and mamma had had plenty of time to attend
to her duties, for you must know that she was
housekeeper, kitchen-maid, cook, and maid, and mis-
tress of the house, and nurse and mamma, all in’
one, and no wonder she grew very tired sometimes.
Well, the twins trotted on over the road, through
the woods, and out by the lane, until at last, sure
enough, mamma heard the sound of happy little
voices, ‘and presently two little figures chased each
other up the garden path, and tumbled into her arms.

“Bless me!” said grandma, looking over her spec-
tacles, “what a nice, long picnic you have had!
Have you had a splendid time?”

“Oh, splendid!” shouted the twins together, and
the empty basket and pail went flymg out on the
grass, as the children, heedless of order, only thought
of how they could coax mamma to let them have
just such a nice picnic to-morrow.

“ Mamma, mamma!” they began, but —

“Go first and pick up the basket and pail. They
don’t belong out on the grass, you know,” said

mamma.
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 43

“Oh, yes,” replied quick-witted Willie, who found
a place in which to push his wedge in. “We must
be careful of them, of course, ‘cause, mamma, we

“want to go on a picnic again to-morrow, it’s such
fun, an’ — an’ we've tooken such good care of us,
mamma, you see.”

“An? we don’t keep wakin’ Rosebud up when
we're on a picnic,” chimed in Kitty, “an’ so I
should think youd like us to be ’way,” coaxingly.

Mamma looked at them in surprise. “Two days
in succession of picnic? Why, that’s a funny idea!
What do you do to have such a good time that
you can’t wait awhile for another picnic?”

The twins exchanged glances, and grew red as
the red roses out on the bush.

“Children!”’ cried mamma, sternly, “what are
you hiding from me? Are you doimg anything
wrong?”

They threw little arms around her neck, nearly
choking her in their energy, and rained kisses all
over her face from their warm little lips, even yet

sticky with the warmth of the August day.
44 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Oh, 10, me, no, nota ‘single wrong thing,
mamma!” they cried; and Kitty added, “We’re
only havin’ some fun, an’ when it’s finished we're
goin’ to call you an’ gran’ma to see it.”

“Very well, Ill trust you,” said mamma; “ you
may go to-morrow, but I do hope you will be very
careful, and not be naughty in any of your plans.”

With a whoop (and that woke baby up, sure
enough) the twins bounded away, while grandma
said in her grandmotherly way, “Lor, dear, I sup-
pose the little souls are building a dam in the
brook, and are as proud of their work as if they

were real bridge-builders!”’

The next day had just such a fine, bright morn-
ing as the children had enjoyed before, as they
started bright and early for the “picnic” in the
woods.

The luncheon was eaten at once, so as to make
room for the berries in the pail, and the ferns were

gathered by quantities for the basket. Dainty little
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 45

ferns, such as Sallie Lunn, you remember, had asked
Willie to bring her, and pretty blossoms, and little
trailing vines, all found a place, huddling together
in a fragrant confusion in the basket, and covered
from the hot sun-rays by the napkins grandma had
provided for the lunch. Then the children sat down
by the roadside to discuss matters.

“How we goin’ to go an’ buy those turkeys, I’d
jus’ like to know, Willie Rose, when mamma _ was
so “fraid to let us come off alone ‘gain to-day?
It's a drefful long way to that man’s house, an’ we
won't get back for so late, an’ mamma’ll scold an’
be so worried!”

“We must manage it somehow, I tell you!” re-
plied Willie. “I wouldn’t be such a ’fraid-girl ’f I
were you, Kitty Rose! We can ask mamma to let
us take a walk, an’ then we can run as fast as
anythin’, an’—vwell, we can't help it if we are
scolded; it'll be all for her sake, an’ she'll be sorry
when she knows what we were doin’ all that time
she thought we were bein’ naughty.”

“We can't make b’lieve we were losted, ‘cause.
46 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

that would be a story; an’ if mamma didn’t know
it, God, that’s up in heaven, would, ‘cause He’s
always seein’ us, you know.”

“Oh, no! we don’t tell stories, we ain’t that kind,
and ’sides, that would spoil our present to mamma.
But maybe —oh, Kitty, maybe we'll get losted really
an’ truly, an’ then—then we can’t help it, an’ it
won't be a story.”

“ But I don’t want to have that happen,’ whined
Kitty; “Td get drefful scared if it really did.”

Willie picked up his basket and shrugged his fat
little shoulders.

“Come on,” he said, “’taint any use thinkin’ things

933)

now; weve jus’ got to go somehow, an’”’’—he put
his little lips close to Kitty’s ear and whispered —
“oran’ma says the Father in heaven loves little
children, an’ I ’most feel sure He knows how we
want to get those turkeys for our dear, sweet,
darlin’ mamma, when she’s so patient an’ good, an’
so tired, an’ has got a birthday comin’, an’— an’
He'll jus’ fix a way for us to get ’em, see if He
don’t.” That was a comforting thought to both
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. AT

children, and they went on their way, fillmg the
pail with berries as they walked along.

We need not take time nor space to go through
with the details of the visit to the village this time,
because we already know that as the children were
expected, they were profited accordingly, and when
they turned homeward again they had, all in all,
the handling of fifty cents in pennies and_ nickels.
Kitty's kind Miss Jones—to whom she had this
time found a chance to introduce Willie — had
counted their money for them (as they, the seven-
year-old twins, were hardly arithmeticians as yet),
and they felt as rich as kings and queens, as they
trudged home, quite determined to take the first
chance offered and set out on the journey turkey-ward.

Where to keep that precious money was a matter
of serious thought and grave importance, but finally
Kitty decided to hide it im dolly’s stocking, and
shut dolly, with her mine of wealth, up in the
playhouse closet till she could be relieved of her

responsibility later on.
48 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

Well, days—a very few of them—went on un-
excitedly enough after that, so far as appearances
went; but the twin Roses were ready to droop and
chang their pretty heads in despair as the birthday
drew near, and they were still puzzling how to go
the long distance for the wonderful birthday gift. At
last, however, Willie plucked up courage, and bravely
told mamma that he and Kitty were “jus’ crazy
an’ pinin’ away for a reg’ler long walk ’way up the
road, an’ if she’d let ‘em go an’ promise to trus’
“em, an’ not be scared if they didn’t get home for
‘most dinner-time, they'd be so good afterwards she
wouldn't have to scold ’em ever again!”

She laughed and asked grandma what she thought,
and of course grandma sided with her pets; and the
long and short of it all was that they did start off
the very next morning, quivering all over with
suppressed excitement and happy anticipation.

They walked and walked straight on, as they
remembered the road their father had taken, and
by more good fortune, when, by and by, they came
to a fork in the road, they turned in the right
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 49

direction, and so at last reached the farm, and asked
for Mr. Jones. A nice, jolly old fellow he was, as
good-natured as his sister, and so like her in looks
that Kitty wondered if all fat, kind people looked
like each other.

He put his hands in his pockets and spread his
feet apart comfortably, and looked quizzically down
upon the twins before him.

“Wal, I declar’!”” he chuckled, “if you ain’t as
like as two peas in a pod. If you both had hair
the same color, I declar’ I shouldn't know which
from tother. Wal! what can I do for ye?”

Willie explained, helped along by Kitty in a con-
fusing sort of way, which would have puzzled the
farmer if his sister’s note hadn't reached him in
advance of the turkey buyers.

“Oh, I see, ye want to buy three turkeys of me.
Can ye afford it, do ye think?”

fa

“Oh, yes, sir; we've got fifty centses replied
Kitty, beginning to untie the knot in her handker-
chief. The man chuckled, and shook all over with

the laugh he couldn’t wholly restrain.
50 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

“Wal, turkeys is usually a Jeetle more’n that in
price, but I’m havin’ a sale just now an’ want to
clear out some of them turkeys, an’ so being as it’s
you twins, I'll sell ‘em at your price.”

“Oh, thank you! youre a kind man, like a lady
-we know in the village!” exclaimed Kitty; and Willie
added impulsively, ‘“ You're as kind to us as if we
were your twins ‘stead of papa’s an’ mamma’s.”

That pleased the farmer, and set him shaking
again. Then he showed the children the turkeys
they could have,—a fine big one and two smaller
ones; and after they had finished capering about for
joy, the question of “how to get them home”
arose.

“Oh, we never thought of that,” said Kitty to
Willie.

“So we didn’t,” replied Willie to Kitty.

“Wal, can’t your folks send for ‘em?” questioned
the farmer.

The twins looked startled.

“Ole mo; no! one, sim! veried Walle, “ You see

its a birthday present to my mamma, an’ we
_ THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 51

wouldn’t have her know till we show it to her.”
Then the children explained all their plan, and the
farmer was full of interest, of course. Finally it was
agreed that he should get the turkeys over when he
went to the village, as he had to do soon, and put
them in a little corner lot which happened to be
fenced on all sides, and where papa kept odd tools
and rubbish sometimes ; they would be safe there
till mamma could see them. And the good-natured
farmer, finding that the birthday would occur on the
day after to-morrow, agreed to make his trip past

the “Rose Bower’

>

on that morning early, and leave
the turkeys without being seen, as the lot in ques-
tion was behind some high bushes, and in the rear
of the house.

He claimed a kiss from each twin to complete
the bargain, and then the little travellers started for
home. Oh, what a hot day it was! And how long
the walk seemed! When they reached the fork of
the road they were puzzled, and ready to cry at
last. Kitty’s dread of getting “losted” returned, and

Willie was too tired to think which was the right
52 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

or wrong way. The sun had mounted high up in
the sky by this time, and the noon hour was at
hand.

But at last—perhaps the dear guardian angel,
whom we like to fancy keeps loving watch over
little children and keeps them from harm, helped our
twin Roses to choose the right way, for they took
it, tempted by the shade of trees which the other
road lacked, and finally reached the cool little home,
where mamma was beginning to be anxious for
them.

Neither of the children cared for dinner with
their usual hearty appetites, and when, by and by,
Willie began to look flushed, and wanted to put
his head down on grandma’s knee, and said baby’s
crying hurt him in his forehead, it was plain to
be seen that he had that very unusual thing for
him, a headache, and a bad one, too.

“Would he go and get into bed and be quiet?”

“No, he didn’t want to; he wanted to sit up
and be well pretty soon.” :

“Would he let grandma give him some medicine?”
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 53



‘SUCH A HEADACHE!” — Page 52.

“No, not yet; he wanted to wait and see if he
wouldn’t soon be better.”

He was getting to be very cross and miserable,
and mamma regretted sincerely that she had allowed
the children to take so long a walk. She didn’t
know that they had run most of the way, poor

little things! so as not to be late home. To
rv

a4 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

have told her that would have let out part of the
secret.

So she fixed him a nice bowl of milk porridge,
and tied his head in a wet towel, and let him sit
quietly in his chair until he felt it wiser to go to
bed and to sleep. Meanwhile, where was Kitty?
Grandma, gomg through the upper hall a few
moments later, saw a little figure huddled on the floor
against the wall, near the dolly’s house, with dolly
sprawling at its side, and Kitty No. 2 snuggled
in its lap. The little figure proved to be Kitty
Rose, and fast asleep, too, as a tired, worn-out
little maid could be.

She had tried so hard not to let mamma know
how very tired and uncomfortable she was, and she
had gone so bravely to play with her doll and
kitten, trying to forget her tiredness and the sleepy
feeling she wasn’t used to right in the middle of
the day.

But, oh, dear! it was of no use. Sleep caught
little Kitty Rose right there in the midst of her
play, and so grandma found her. Before long they
THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 59

were both in bed, however, and dreaming of turkeys

as, big as their own selves.



“By-oh, baby dear, by-by!

Hush, my Rosebud, do not cry!
Little birds are in the nest,

Goimg softly now to rest.
56 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

My wee bird must slumber too,
Sweetly, all the long night through,
Till the sunbeams come to say,
‘Wake up, baby, it is day!’
By-oh-by, my baby dear,

Mother loves you, do not fear. -
On your mother’s loving breast
You, sweet bird, shall go to rest.
Lullaby, oh, lullaby,

Stars are peeping from the sky;
By-oh-by, my Rosebud dear,

Mother loves you, do not fear.”

To and fro, to and fro, rocked Mamma _ Rose,
with baby in her arms, and the kettle singing
away to make a sort of duet with her voice.

The twins snug in bed, and baby soon to be,
she and grandma would have a nice, cosey supper
by themselves, and a good, long evening to sew.

Mamma was thinking of many things as she sat

there before the stove at the close of a rainy day,


A LULLABY DUET WITH THE KETTLE. — Page 56.

THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 59

when there had been little of August weather
warmth and cheer, and the twins had been dolefully
confined to the house.

It was well for them that they had gone to buy
their turkeys the day before, since the weather had
so suddenly changed in the night, and brought about
such a miserable kind of day as this had been
Baby had cried a good deal, the twins had been.
good and naughty by turns (quite forgetful of their
promise the day before when the longed-for walk
had been granted them), and poor, tired mamma
was glad to sit down in her rocker before the
comfortable warmth of the stove, and rock and sing
her Rosebud to sleep. But as she sang, her thoughts
were on many things. To-morrow would be her
birthday, and for the first time in many years her
husband would not be with her, to take her in his
arms and count her years in loving kisses, as her
children loved to do. That was one sad thought
to mix in with baby’s IWllaby. Then she knew that
times were hard with them lately; that was one

reason poor papa was kept away so long from
60 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

home, trying in every way to see how he could
better his circumstances. Then, again, baby was so
sick, and there was danger that she might grow
worse. All these were rather grave thoughts, you
see, and perhaps the gloomy day had turned them so.

But when, pretty soon, grandma came in and
lighted the lamps, and the curtains were drawn
snugly, and the nice little healthy supper was
finished, and the mother and daughter sat down to
sew together, mending little garments, and loving the:
little wearers so much, why, then the sad thoughts flew
away with the vanished shadows, and mamma was as
bright as could be, and just as gay as if she had
discovered the secret of the twins, and knew what a
“be-youtiful present” would await her in the morning.

Early on the morning of the birthday —the next
morning, as I have said, to the doleful rainy one —

the twin Roses awoke, all full of happy thoughts.

“Had Mr. Jones remembered his promise? Oh, if

he should have forgotten, what should they do?”


‘** GOBBLE, GOBBLE,’ YOURSELVES.” — Page 63.



THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES. 63

They dressed themselves as far as they could
without help (only asking grandma to “button the
‘toppest button” and “tie the little, soft bow in
front”), and then away they flew into the garden,
behind the thick bushes, and down to the little
three-cornered plot of ground where they hoped to
find the turkeys. :

Ah! there they were, the three of them! the
“lovely, precious turkeys.” Oh, how Willie and Kitty
did jump up and down, and look over the fence,
and hop up and down again !

“Gobble, gobble,” said the turkeys; and the big
one strutted about, so vain, and with such airs.

“ as they scampered back to the house.

“Mamma! mamma!” they cried, pulling at her
gown. “And you, too, gran’ma! oh, do come and
see something we’ve found in the yard!”

Wondering what it could be, the mother and old

lady followed the twins, and — can you guess better
64 THE LITTLE TWIN ROSES.

than I can tell you what happened when mamma
saw her birthday gifts from her twin Roses, her
Wild Roses, her Blush Roses, her sweet, szeet little
Roses? How she stared, and how she laughed, and
how she finally sat down in the grass and cried,
because of the love and thoughtfulness of her little
twins, and of all the trouble they had taken for
her sake !

They told her all about it from beginning to end,
and grandma had to wipe her spectacles a great
many times before the story was done.

And as their story finishes, so must mine, dear
little readers; and now we will say good-by to the
twin Roses and the Rosebud, and hope that they
may continue to bloom and grow amidst the brightest
sunshine the beautiful skies can spare them for

many years.

THE END.
Aan AQ Se






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'2011-12-05T13:54:55-05:00'
describe
'389' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
3176d2b6112cccbedf5e6b78d4ae7d88
f33bb109388f50ba892fc98c9566d71f3da046d8
'2011-12-05T13:53:48-05:00'
describe
'2794' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ff6d7e881d89002391967f26e7b686eb
fbf72312c20cdba043ce10e91d8ff5aeb06af38d
'2011-12-05T13:55:04-05:00'
describe
'518868' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
64ba0b75a99d04cc1acc6a4f0ea3a1b9
b97103bf1ff049694d6002662edf4ca47f83de55
describe
'25493' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
6b401c534901950812da491c57cc83e3
ec06f0bf628771bef49cdc3c311536f73c09a6ef
describe
'4810' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
1e80a548ffc3766007f3334ed7f3b835
eaac7f4530c94b4c00386e00d2e5f4d192b3ec08
'2011-12-05T13:53:43-05:00'
describe
'4168792' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
941dbb39fb175eb70a6cc6e35c604fdd
e922d696877725dfcc539b5f59e60e587831d2ca
'2011-12-05T13:53:49-05:00'
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKAZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
6a742da554ee5096dedd8f700eafe926
7f1111642c9e0ac5bffa1337eded2ffb521fc0bc
'2011-12-05T13:54:52-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBA' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
278559368ed2a025a7ba16f92e7d2eb6
1a349380a0db5bc51077f487c3d66c466ef98169
describe
'518561' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d49f8c115b2d7a10193ec749537b632f
14160caa9f46eb21dced0c459db1795c4f82bd41
'2011-12-05T13:54:22-05:00'
describe
'48172' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
c2b7e9eaedc2b66017d52a0a0626063d
a1a62b196803736ecb40580bd05445f4b1c6ab17
describe
'13321' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBD' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ef8a4a2c30e7eeb420bc86eff2f2f5c0
7cc9d4e00654ee5e38a8a54f509626d8bee5a1db
'2011-12-05T13:54:50-05:00'
describe
'4170212' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBE' 'sip-files00010.tif'
429bb936449a09a3e7f4f79957366760
f1ad363a10befe78643c27ace8e3155fb2c84f99
'2011-12-05T13:53:57-05:00'
describe
'671' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBF' 'sip-files00010.txt'
55172ba03e26caae0c446cf060a7ff81
ffc6e426c4a8d8c9294f543ecbdec7b1e1b9d615
describe
'518902' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBG' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2814861701ff800cc762a0a554b96342
4268ba1b3016b12164372f29b06d78ca2609e1f4
'2011-12-05T13:54:46-05:00'
describe
'3315' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ab86fba563f69b7a0a35d7ae4f86bb9c
7788bd2c36c42c84acc11d8f81b6c99e6f633a79
'2011-12-05T13:54:09-05:00'
describe
'83278' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBI' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
989222819175471c1d55e6b9bf752e61
082d52019fbc3dc930fcef0cfb2278e350a7866f
'2011-12-05T13:54:35-05:00'
describe
'21006' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
1f36d385f2070896d2d9f9f94e9a0d68
1abb0902b3edca17839c5076b537626f73c3bd39
describe
'4171644' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBK' 'sip-files00012.tif'
e19608e544244718af06a7b25ed4b1c9
95daaf1e89a142c8e8248540706ac24dcee7eabb
describe
'493' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBL' 'sip-files00012.txt'
35efd11154c6ba8ef8945c0ea6d02bb5
386207059cfd76130a475d82cdd419d17658a5d0
describe
'5483' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBM' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
423193f50c2e6cb880641cdbae5f87a9
1acc23a36194b1383eadbddcd04079f2e1a9c1ef
'2011-12-05T13:54:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
aa4408b44018f14f348bd9a91f1d1296
1e4e148913578627c622c14a5622461e6cc196cb
describe
'80859' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ad115edd4caec0b16911604435e9179d
b1681298fc76656da436f07a4078b3b346f7a14d
describe
'24123' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
90c72cb01ea449dab4ffe9027b8e3283
0f6f3c9ac2ab56df0ecbcfe7dbba8aa32ba0ffbf
'2011-12-05T13:54:21-05:00'
describe
'4171648' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
e80b24928216698dfbe778fac26d4707
96240db84908c6549b7d1ff25506c04d1696ab69
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
51c48c136efcbc51d8c34801d9d0efc3
4f96343b16b29f2d35f6e360a078447f827e6d26
'2011-12-05T13:54:44-05:00'
describe
'6163' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
8ed258a99cd399594276caee6b8148ef
744cf8e769faa8d538e904cb3112096b1fd49f54
describe
'518899' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
433ab60b3e2ff802512ab473396ca8a9
7f5894a071ae53e9d4b2eb998e7152422ac7d734
'2011-12-05T13:54:32-05:00'
describe
'88893' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f7ecb14410543974b82cafa0563bfb3f
c5ad6ba08fcbd0dd5bbac799959cc0900215be0f
describe
'26332' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
af04e8267517eb8db375215f076dec07
ce47a7a7c0af9e866d16878c1aa9f6ad1196e4f1
'2011-12-05T13:55:07-05:00'
describe
'4171952' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBW' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f32157107e42c08db6ada8582d704d85
66d43118f233920de17e10b1367afab4248a199b
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBX' 'sip-files00014.txt'
33e55c37af49a91e25e5d0878aaedb77
9553cbc088007b35341d7184f1318978bab40947
'2011-12-05T13:54:06-05:00'
describe
'6795' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBY' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
273632e40a2df886eca9e9be6365586e
e9db3f6b5558e04aa7b8baccf5724b5d12058fdc
'2011-12-05T13:54:14-05:00'
describe
'518881' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKBZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
95041c00b1f491daf24e6cee6d065677
1a3b7b04a5e69010659460866cb2b3ebe84c1339
describe
'79667' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c794aa2d1719b0e97ee15026c5279fc4
023db3542e41bd4de1cb852caf82b1b7e111125b
'2011-12-05T13:54:08-05:00'
describe
'24158' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
8cceb90ba0de3570a8f9531edf950fef
71b7d18bc67be443d0231e3563aca7325bae091f
describe
'4171916' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3d9e633dcf0e7ca3d258994c45b53844
a55b14b033c12e6d537a5cfd6ffd0fe089a5d3d7
'2011-12-05T13:53:53-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
81752534058de5df4bbc8d8e06f64f8d
6d74cf3c04c08e92eda7d847c0e9142988a4c939
describe
'518906' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7ce1a5844d11d61c1f5891f003bb6e92
3efd32636220f5a93a61e9abe2102d603bbeb939
'2011-12-05T13:54:57-05:00'
describe
'6293' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCF' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
1bf4c32de8ea76612fc068518aef0e03
546f203dc91f9be201caf718b4ab4eebe4d2b710
'2011-12-05T13:54:59-05:00'
describe
'84303' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e633381ab5da7dfd58dd33f7614d8a2f
ae1860fb755f0eacefa27d34935f0d45db1001a9
'2011-12-05T13:54:16-05:00'
describe
'25762' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f6afc457b646301ee524902fc1b5ce5a
955da7c7668dc09544be57893c45bfb8d7136b55
describe
'4171888' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCI' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a73cf3783d01ed6fd200333243f3a366
54fda4554c917a9d9d7e01d0f545b94c6c2cfa51
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b6b30390d1e69aa85aa0ec32864caef9
2f853633428d305162d601bd05e9db0687cfb601
'2011-12-05T13:53:40-05:00'
describe
'6604' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCK' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
c33dec9766ab18f8e2845755555c97d9
abcee0d0f730bee9eaa547d69afebfcb50e4f52b
'2011-12-05T13:54:54-05:00'
describe
'518912' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCL' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1828732798adc5e6de15aab4a05cf0fd
0289e1258dea640e951173cd404f00ed09c67160
'2011-12-05T13:54:33-05:00'
describe
'72819' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
824916a0e456931c4afb4c4fc9290aa7
32e9223cc9ee90f361c4e663e8be7ee9859dddeb
'2011-12-05T13:54:04-05:00'
describe
'21662' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
0e2779285806218b4a29a7f7021aa777
c0b6168ba8c86be8e03235c972f41ef15b7f0b3e
describe
'4171532' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
84c30694b997df093b58b2781f18ae70
731de49319a8f697378688769aae50babd78c03c
'2011-12-05T13:54:02-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
089cb72681c7ce445fbe551a7c1f6982
87bdb4ce4e440c1be50f5c49c07c27b0e0fcd58b
'2011-12-05T13:54:05-05:00'
describe
'6021' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e8032764b33759a6234c5a41d7a96715
99cc51be1ffbe25c8134011680b12c15dcfaab32
describe
'518848' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
ae5157a15b5254d732495b4f6c21a7af
0b485c7d50a01de4b8393f907543293d9391f48a
describe
'88403' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e3b847fcd8a679b64dc058683094e623
93acb42c2f66b9c5fc1782538d4128dcb00a9ed7
'2011-12-05T13:53:55-05:00'
describe
'26863' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
9efe197550b921a68ffd5f2fb8b4c39a
10c138a0d170c5703eac084a9862fc7d5bd495ac
describe
'4172068' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
548ed3d9257a4cfe0f150fe3c9973859
363c334860dd322f1a6b818e797fe5864cb11f75
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCV' 'sip-files00018.txt'
bf5adad6189227bc0f05fd508f1857e7
991e57477f19c56f7d400f0cc15af54221e417f6
describe
'6708' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
0163b4cbca5385eac0a6b57d04df8942
6c9b1f4068bbdb5bd75151a8d873234682b930cc
describe
'518891' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCX' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
509bb01ebbe266f392f580140799c72c
5e6b2af1bccb274ec7582140911b0511f1709953
describe
'82116' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
214afe8a284429490e24fbf551e80e14
6f2a517fb46a239c171b97c31b3cea66e0aee529
'2011-12-05T13:54:40-05:00'
describe
'24267' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKCZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a8f3b3a4a520aa507d7c2201d73fdc7c
428c8725abad466b9f09c8742ad6dc5ed27066fd
describe
'4171696' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDA' 'sip-files00019.tif'
19c1563294196b6321c3bb9ae20296b2
99d64b4462a5a8fb2c21976466c17649ee5e8fd5
'2011-12-05T13:54:13-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDB' 'sip-files00019.txt'
46dfa7e13955007ac6b5c4ec03fdb5c0
361e3f4bc43704816c90fd9895676bafcbd39999
'2011-12-05T13:55:03-05:00'
describe
'513115' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e7b2f33ccf14122c49e2d7d5f5f4d86a
3b3d585fefeb0ecc681726fc15fdde63a1392f5a
'2011-12-05T13:55:08-05:00'
describe
'6459' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDD' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
98df4f549d311b985b5e46df2c37ef73
14522497ffb9243c70b79c22c0d9b5c659754bc1
'2011-12-05T13:54:03-05:00'
describe
'52960' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDE' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
95b00b759cf3a5a661eaf5f798096e14
5324295297a5b9d189657ff04ef623a3463af6c0
describe
'12088' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
7dd00ee87d58081e3f183e11e097c887
3f2ada7d6ff441d6860079d49ba1a8cbb67f33b5
describe
'4125820' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
95368e1df643b1ee9b3d19fa92c823e5
aea1c65cd78a1fb461daf748e6433816264cf5d6
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
72d2e27bb4546ca13aa5c1e326ad27af
a4958fcb7228ca6711729c1060e3cb620ce696a0
describe
Invalid character
'3100' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bc484930c4495942ee0ed38cdf8a7418
e21b4bafc0787efed74c58c86a22cf7b3a33da01
describe
'518609' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
60404b618613e84851c2560124f9908f
702f028046ecd5f428bd8d488ee6c1a7880bef22
'2011-12-05T13:54:28-05:00'
describe
'19052' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
fac260ab898ba018bd268dec0794f46d
7a9955c83ebd8af2804cda9766158a15374fcc6a
'2011-12-05T13:53:35-05:00'
describe
'3275' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
71a4a7aaf85c8213531fe6b3e6b6d916
e4fd652b33ca397127729f5ff53b59e03fa875f9
'2011-12-05T13:55:01-05:00'
describe
'4168600' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a388d9dd4573b7007453a940ed8d946e
feb7031142757e0165f923bb221a57efdcd33fcc
'2011-12-05T13:53:41-05:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c42de2ab1e9bcf088b5d0466cf53292b
e57ecdaf45f993b998c7a43e6dae34a036c50d7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
9b3bbf7db32faca9e906b475ac6edeea
cf99f7328228dcd0572db1fd58d64e59c1b2ffa1
describe
'80885' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
84872023fd943e11b0dd61ee660e8a67
de0cb9e479d37d954c3c431cb70c1693f14e778a
describe
'24877' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
16bb5373269bda85879f9874a4a97e18
c905fa4dc1eea4026056c324b4c833630a3de0c2
'2011-12-05T13:54:42-05:00'
describe
'4172000' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
f25d103d99cc96de2712909dbb995db5
a57af81057a7faf22da8b29856818b90200b25d1
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ab30e36099d4838c9de2b77cae720b30
befb247f6a243ed06dd7c286a6dee45864255f37
describe
'6535' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
7b4466054b0f921d2dc6a124ccc415db
e5c9ecda2923f401e0d9db914237cf3c054bd4e8
describe
'518886' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
15e4a37c2c9f4c018ea5ec286c3485f5
4dfb48f92f2e6dad2e4a8c5c84a39471e86b9331
describe
'85053' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cd3f8fda76fddcf58d8878d9dad93a6b
543b9dfade8733c30e2a5dbf0aeabdb8203dffc3
describe
'26026' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2c3c61af7dd02a133fa39918d68e21fd
9007ddfd7c51e4ef23d99cd748ee889fbba8920d
describe
'4171932' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
f9a32cdef6ba9ede94a705277a870e2f
53dd4d58b8c2965f6799981d2b00d64a02e72cf4
'2011-12-05T13:54:39-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c0ac1df06ba256cd7e0621ddd5831b4f
d0550ae15a9f983a2e1f165b736d22ed96555961
describe
'6609' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKDZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
6466939cf4263b465039448c9b74f991
145662000756e9fbfab3d59fcefbcf4548be383c
'2011-12-05T13:55:05-05:00'
describe
'518916' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
13e744699a4a5d55c923cc2ef0df67d1
3a3a661697db8a59e9a7c185527a11a1891969a1
describe
'86682' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
572cfdd64cbc4471aa609d1e325be3f0
3c77e2e1dc4bafddc1329c816fe13c3d468312f0
'2011-12-05T13:55:11-05:00'
describe
'26092' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
22312769dfe139490ffe8bcf6a3264e1
d29144afe842dd4c21a6f3f0caf8dc9b4ab1e8f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKED' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ef9369393acaae384ccf2f50f49fa7dc
9d1c43455db0a03c0b320541c33993e5fe6c245b
'2011-12-05T13:54:17-05:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
00e780e4974c5ba82d664d534785bec7
71e61f701eb9c154e9e7e7697ca282bd8df8ce3f
describe
'6732' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
71a975318548ad14ef7a417b255be427
0028872d895bc6926a20a9928d8f865ef81ac931
describe
'518887' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8ba8de431a5ad0b3f72c1509eb499ea9
8ba62eac5457a6cb5719dcac8780111ec6842126
describe
'73277' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
99decb007931275dadb4ac76f074befc
1c1f170ad7f72949b362363177011c9553d36d9a
describe
'22910' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEI' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
eb7840201e8bb0b856f779051d96b143
662ca5a669776c6acb5e4ac1078a52afeb6c50bc
describe
'4171860' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
117866e2b1a99867a7d7b7768b08bea5
201c3c072137c064aebe1377464b7f7925e57606
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ca35a82fd2ce81e363d086042c7f3966
86e806af8a316e003fb2a44a40b99c76d264bf30
describe
'5967' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEL' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0fa7d78cfc9e16bbd90a08d29b79bbf8
4aa887a9bb8606ef401cb488d4479512b2cca2a9
'2011-12-05T13:54:48-05:00'
describe
'518882' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ca7ecc211f06d2ad2fd0f84840795034
93e961fa4e9baabce6d3c4747d87c303911ecc42
describe
'76062' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
63a88636c5dbbac87d183a171bafa86e
73c15ea19c1d6c6d732a057fc1eb754bbb4fd288
'2011-12-05T13:54:53-05:00'
describe
'23139' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
522679c0c45952386ec0cf7bd34ce2f8
5da45b0a3da437e463a6f0a13658c7c2d5883d17
describe
'4171844' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fbd178651bfa0464755f31c4075c75aa
149a290cdac2d1c2c4852f9c54ed416a5bf5ce56
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
f93255fa352a5840147be1cfd4a52ad4
db86bb3edf514b947bf382d17884834c0e882009
describe
'6278' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKER' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
4619fa87aded37b7ccccc4fc26c54a61
7633312b221cc02c336168f580eff0c663fd7301
describe
'518901' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKES' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
550f163ab2ee25fcdfdb33cd879fd0bc
9c34a5ae1e2fe322da40cd29122e24e732192561
describe
'77604' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKET' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c1035e3f8444cfd2e79c409857346c5e
afc8bc324b9a7cf253288900fd20767c24b6ff71
describe
'23711' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
02f03f635dc01d85c9cacfb530d06e27
d46085aebd992bfe5a94d45a767bba94e4eecf93
describe
'4171812' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
741cd95c71b28d928c33c5f02c35439a
48f5919eae201f6eb84e352bfb121cfb15fa20ed
'2011-12-05T13:54:01-05:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
10e1c5ccdb18ce4142327d630dfdc1e4
40434943c630828caa9c4ba0f923d26dc08ddc64
describe
'6379' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a7d6213c198bd9117a75ce8fcfb72869
209782c8157d714840a99c2942c1f6f3098e1830
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e77ad1df1e32c930c4b67499e3365656
cfde5eb5c077597c3bd8f94c9f39206cbe37190b
describe
'129241' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKEZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
423a0e0370be2bc2bf727b0f5a1094a2
d4d9698f93520300c02f96149b443c7e5bebb15f
describe
'29235' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
960a284b25a318fee238252c0539edb8
7a419b2f894847dc7f394fefce556f59d99b1fd7
describe
'4172248' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
56eb0521ed2f59b9e9102bb03be1f567
53228be7c910687c56f4ddd7ac42093d80175d47
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
730ff110e5f1d2b0bd28cc27cdb1ba65
e8be891b2d60d5b81bc680ee68672a8b40f562da
describe
Invalid character
'6754' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
19567eed1ee7fca2d5cc29e9a0df42a6
9e81869acceae617357425330e2f1493bc0acbb8
describe
'518449' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
203e080c996f23014959138851e847af
460bb51711b29f56246eca3037801494664e25a9
'2011-12-05T13:54:45-05:00'
describe
'18323' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3c5b15d11d871d2bbce6de22eb09a3b3
b4faea99d454d64d2a3ebde2f3a9f560ac5b671c
describe
'3219' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
80985acffb3ab2d5a6ef02486290f0fb
291077da8023da78338efec434f782737d7f0355
describe
'4168596' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9ceaf4ff30fb61f0f0dedab39fd31e67
3d753ad9a688c2c1a105530718d14c4fd3bb6ad8
'2011-12-05T13:53:59-05:00'
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFI' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
faaffe0baab3692fdd07ff691978caea
257640d18db86685d866e1da5de9390418a61ee5
describe
'518911' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFJ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
406cff5e7912e7ec424629bbc10352da
002b725b2ebb0ab7fdec500239ca87d953a58207
describe
'82627' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFK' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8da1a478f13c89d4f875ae346d21ae2f
f9a82abf61a505bec833eab400b89e873d38c92d
'2011-12-05T13:54:19-05:00'
describe
'25644' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFL' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9d4fb329ef8be897c5f7b14500de616d
3b6309d36fa10094a200f608005708dbcdf3be77
describe
'4172096' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9d2bd2e02c1c1f4914d37bf579f35d19
e58b897846b76c6ae68426245f8ef55bc3fcee2c
'2011-12-05T13:54:49-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFN' 'sip-files00030.txt'
947d6180ba4c80d6cfff8fe379c3758d
58d304f76d2654d9f1e9227879cf45072cf3ae5f
describe
'7203' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
f867fdc41e1bd921f158147c3efb068a
0b5dcf92e3f65b3739e1906a00f60d3eafca7492
'2011-12-05T13:53:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5384c1a61d9ea7556a9b24ad1e06f0ed
f9407357a9c0974a6b0ad0a2d33cec26ea5bda80
describe
'83629' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
eede84b394cdabfb02c8add458a27657
9c064bb4f86d91e027c60cdfa5db220fcc4ed85e
describe
'25593' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFR' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
f9424bb9fdbf46d74686ee382b0c4b1e
370cc56333ba18b119d6efac41c6e61c40ddc4c8
describe
'4172004' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1cb0a2a165d5d0f1ca945fe53b794b53
9c34b45c2fa51762ea06cd4ee96b106f8f134883
'2011-12-05T13:53:38-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b45d4b4ce68df3e0401235be6d344a87
f4fcaf6e2137e2e0d991909b031fdc17e85a0673
describe
'6487' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
091771a911bf79de6d9fada13452a566
36f89a9fba429b352606fba4ddcca0b5b7675fb0
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFV' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
b57c4b36a1c58a041c66185506eea93c
f88913b50935305670b670d1e96d507fa0f6fc00
describe
'82620' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFW' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
6af430e6c627e38a21edf96eaaa2d368
52a59063e7004604d4d2db2b4c0942e97b4c648b
describe
'25257' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
79620a49b8338eb9bb77b61228dd836b
1be5610578e006f4396a0bea6544118fb5143764
'2011-12-05T13:54:24-05:00'
describe
'4171876' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFY' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0e3f2750355bb48f8af215de1d8c5453
a7fc5b578e58332964226286df180e550390ac75
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
bc3577341705e2846374474078ccd6fe
4d527f2083fbae97dc3566b4c75a89bb704bcf73
describe
'6424' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
58dc7b373fa2518cb65f523060f31294
81bdc33705fff0ef7656e3155ed8de444a2a453b
'2011-12-05T13:54:15-05:00'
describe
'518915' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
51362e436206434d179969fff9096eb1
989d8d9eedc40ba8b14378b03f04e805d286d9ef
describe
'88212' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
935d51c1ffecfc22837ee8d013e3c062
5af0200f347a708ea4ad734c68e65609fcc5e8ff
describe
'27334' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6b1cb1b230864e2b0a159a0645d9c503
78a3ed6b2e21e262249c7ca3ef153cde81e6ea6d
describe
'4172228' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
30eb9c44e38859e6c31b4cfd76e49014
b6287d0bc00e9887b5c5e98361b5a64be88ab3dd
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
96b57c5c10bad3f20d4bcd49295e6b53
feba54211800cf894eedc0d2b2584bbb23ff682e
describe
'7060' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
3e657f0854b8a1c0812f9cd8c0441ead
8e021bb5d0e6ef33683472773c5c41ca566b105e
describe
'519814' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
269848a290ffae0e8369ce3e20e0cb57
8b927d6450083d918fb72ca6545a0b8bcf5e14fb
describe
'60469' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
e6c2053ad565d761f5bf7b548457ce5d
b2919f6884e4eb1dc05ea94d1fc55a2d6f9e09cd
'2011-12-05T13:53:46-05:00'
describe
'14096' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9ba349b5e21f74a21ad59914660870ec
02b285206390b9bd7f676c17f37e7d6b236746a3
describe
'4180212' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
848ea70ab229ac10fa61399b6e4f3230
1e31ebd75ab42bfc13ce6cb6f8f4befed2ec7720
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
41c280e6827f65f55e09020002ebb26c
0e9340176ac66280f8ffd2141d135e0d3820889e
describe
Invalid character
'3681' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8dcc0378dd2788c2c49231cbb6d6d459
81248041b95e8ab3fb07ac640211e57309819e22
'2011-12-05T13:54:26-05:00'
describe
'518834' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
517d8c69a8ef7a9c513d9204d1569474
2d13534d9bc075d28cb4757c7cf969a149227496
describe
'17025' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
2de347f597cf8c996174ff30d8c52764
0e4ab843d3793897089b6f65474c40732edf82d0
describe
'3139' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGP' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
6cd4de61b3fd9f377f211724f72e167c
c6699145b24a52e74cc899a6f227dd53a1b6e135
describe
'4168572' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0e17275a4c7e9449f779d346afecafd9
c1eb42ac951a6a2f6d82958f29c5c3d5d83f9c1c
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGR' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
5f79665b55e78c68fcf3a4b8a5d89942
479ba2ea9b1c23c171864685daaf1d9216f781ae
'2011-12-05T13:54:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGS' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3dc64b45a3bd23c75807b66f2439766e
cf3a603c789e25ab10fc81c2683248b44b589b46
describe
'86910' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGT' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d781bfce83050fbbcfd4b4fb191a2a21
752db8b74c2ee45a9090caba7d4176a5b304c2dd
describe
'26827' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f7dd4bba99a8cd5adec48cccedda717d
38cc2df9dc67776a3667056258b14036bed90657
describe
'4172208' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c2f6d2c66c0768a7da47e2dbe7c7e0fb
5297e663155dc4594380ceac8e638dfad7b2a562
'2011-12-05T13:54:47-05:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
63b6236c1c904e289f938f4792343ff1
f284d7e73dde5b4738fc29e781a4473ba9e6c89b
describe
'6822' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0e31cb3ea3fcfe98488149d94fd4cc40
14aa4d2afef2ed04c0623822bf5e15501b1e4cb1
describe
'518872' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
8d0e1beb94308eca2d0eee27d66a52d3
95707b6196f80f93b7902b387ccd2b67af100918
describe
'85102' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
73064ebe66d00ffdb34680daf9bccd35
edcb0f7b40ad46189acb7076aef46d743a7b5d40
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7f1df40e06c1cd558b462eb6839925ef
2e0819247ac6b5c798cd5a29035de8dffe659d2b
describe
'4172184' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
bc94b49705a9952fa5813564c7e47a71
c3ad8d386f5f0326be696487caf590aa483bc894
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
95d0abc033161a0ca1539f1012fabbbf
03f898d5398335a303f65a7350f8a5a4d4b37b9b
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
ff5c0ec1a52cac922704f67d20c99356
466f151cfd344b75c2e7759de9e6b3bd79f60820
describe
'518897' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
64911c7a06988444294c867010837c2e
760974227dc443d0d39a92a3eee44fa7317aaa16
describe
'83353' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
c1df361735683d038c1f6d574c336c79
951d06c0bf44fb365e9df5655c0432ff77dd2937
describe
'24945' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0a872d690276d823f6479c8ef0ffb12b
3cf5fe910f565179d169dbbd045c3ba4d4c0d522
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
929d399c99804cd1edee722c358c9dea
c362d2fc6db5904ded16a1ffcd424fa5b9083222
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e5b5ed61de294d715e1a3ba73bda0e82
18c7eafe1603595c49f79a8d4688c884503663d2
describe
'6762' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
9245602ba2c36f950dbc81a33516e9a8
6d048176838a505e12243b83ac685da52fa9d604
describe
'518903' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
cd5b38b752c15ee00b6c53829b765617
758d801698879cd8472bfa543cfe4d6119866df9
describe
'84567' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
368875da66e11bb4eb373973b7cc5198
d916bcfe993f8abe055eff91632bdec457699c28
describe
'25404' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
989ce99c374f8dd6b0f8fe523ffd1fde
e3c6179ab1f973d600ef63e93bd930345aeeb37e
describe
'4172036' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3c00af9e84c154fe4acc81ccd97f1868
db88c95d5a1bca18481963bff80fa65759b12255
'2011-12-05T13:55:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
de9a15c88bf86e5c8aea863ee1dea176
25e28885a7dedb4aa5ac9b0d95fa9cc28487c2b5
describe
'6725' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
1e32b64d7bf2c842e3fd56e0716a5f0e
115893305340907bfde947e3877018a55235cace
'2011-12-05T13:54:31-05:00'
describe
'518850' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
2aeb019ca9081b66ee99102a0eb63b68
395f6b62aa2b50c5e49d609c3d57985a401cfd3a
describe
'97217' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4909fc791e1d7bc400ae156fd12a585b
32b544d813fbbaf48d4f23f1ab156024f0357996
'2011-12-05T13:54:37-05:00'
describe
'22146' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
6b593dcc55bf3f8de6f75dc6a098f022
65340afe337d5f139177a4fe200ec5adecec4ca9
describe
'4171368' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
caa09e7ab17f0e63fc41bbb323ec7914
bba5ed5141ef1df2ec3496c45c48ce0d89236d76
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
fa80a5f90e0953da3480e6592d4ebf50
090daa27912ad004634b1bef149f59fe216d5b30
describe
'5175' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
ae2adde2d618ea062a6dcd3669606e15
595f658e0bc279c501ac1b6d9d651c86e869658f
'2011-12-05T13:54:30-05:00'
describe
'518849' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2dbea41e85272e3209629b5455433b84
55c172d49671b691f3e1c240cff087d3815812ed
describe
'82066' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
475afd94a0de57e7e4e7a37aac38050d
a74926d082fb4cb977ed20025538b44dfeae5a04
describe
'25748' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
cfdec1a8328ef3daba0cc0f43a34cd6d
5838f984f2ab92427a652e4b4d59d452df17cc40
describe
'4172060' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKHZ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
eb4cca89c65c2f3deb547fc7328dda73
9f8da6cdca32cb5023dcded59d6c56e0ee85b1b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIA' 'sip-files00041.txt'
820f861ca840636bb625007013a2059e
19b0f968aa2e11a4efc519778eb361c75153ce5b
describe
'6490' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIB' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
ab6e4a7b9642f646d78575dde8402e73
eebbc7933875e7c7d5cf40ccf8961983f21df8fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIC' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
308aa7d556f9360697daa1d9caf729f4
3253c0fc270db010c6899aeb6a4473474acbf1b9
describe
'80721' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKID' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0ad6aefd785a1a779951b03c1781708a
b2675d5a9c3118514fa3c1edc5f70b6d07436af7
describe
'24527' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e6ebde3a6299bc7fc951804f7b0d60ab
466723c0006e6b58491ea60347a1c44d293721d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7afeddc07e668622addf2b45372de082
d13cc57a8f4796291c1990cc82af523cb2ba77ae
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1fe38cce2f720a81e95cc876567aabd9
325661096d12dbb856d47384607442291965db00
'2011-12-05T13:54:41-05:00'
describe
'6505' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
9d6d9b3eadb1de5a49ad16d8940e72e5
d4faaf47af890cbb2172833f2e77c80d3fb7e420
describe
'518894' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKII' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
cbf7db00907346946b0f2579b01f9002
2f280796fe45f907c22fe471bfea3a209289e210
describe
'73451' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
435598db3caf285d684d0a8717aaecb4
321de8b832ffd17c3d2ef5afa6547c19e19fbda1
describe
'22788' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c74a854e662c8b4055addbd3675c8180
72e584ba7d8deaeb8d38aebb0a88136b76a4438f
describe
'4171496' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
08a598cc37842a70b0741504a0c697e3
603150a2baf568f76af6ffe78e025abf124d2082
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
e13f5afc0fbd073765cf78434d13ed51
198d635561ad7fc1fcccf0922c2381874231a3ce
describe
'5788' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
42ed806b1f7763a3765999f083631fae
a6bf5831e58219de2a69d1520442fca7e6512f7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c6e51e69e9c4df11ea5bb1bb443055c3
1e1bdc3e8e29822aee9762ae624bf38499e97392
describe
'82441' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
a17d0e68264c40c209692241c500acde
043ee4cd8756350feeeb077d6b6bc3d60f318a86
describe
'25195' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIQ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
f6052c326c04ddb22a91fe09909532ef
3fa1f50d19255f40ab57d237103faf0d331ab067
describe
'4171792' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
20a052a80c3c90a0b0d073fcf4512f34
a20e3c28529b4f0fac735b576cfbc6a8b21a3c4e
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
c3820496b0b6dc37a23b8f9a20325e75
7fe6872a064ea546d9fe3c76f237151170b3712b
describe
'6520' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
91f9af7ccb1653aba198597e0b13f2fa
9e73d7661e5461806018b661c92e7b1c76a2e0e0
describe
'518900' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIU' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
4cd46ba399a370b106e75a1a581f8f02
603869618bad8d5e1388233fe7551a93575a698b
describe
'77432' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
6161c6c2309b06c423b52263a41497e8
07599cb9e2453dbd7b39bde9f6ad0811b3822ac6
describe
'24093' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
8cad28d163fb26ebf786ee7af02160c3
ce5f2f227ca5282ac845f410543932d6511994b6
describe
'4171660' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
8caf27f07d2c914e147bae4fff2f9eee
497f7bd31cba324d1fac6a9f6b4aa210de37b4c5
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ae2a11f5b7f556759c505579dc61c22c
5d58161687631d3151de947332f35d0c870a9592
describe
'6253' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKIZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e67c83726950ccac25e787b1ee406c46
422028f0736f3e5aa367057b6202e308dbc34c48
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
844c0571d65b8e8054bf9820a5b49214
6c69177014b378802f973479d616a7faa1869222
describe
'80275' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c809aa9554e8f7b428423debcba7ef8d
c300f18d60606ef18db8fb413ab6c3237a0bf076
describe
'24495' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6a5f2da7dd5eb8c81c46fee729f99221
45fd851970d3224bb25d0a76730e1d83e55b8945
describe
'4172156' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJD' 'sip-files00046.tif'
4212d2966d15a976d49af2cb3ebec573
853597e185accf2cb906661cedb85601d5945aff
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
7c8d420561d204443db84bb75348cfa2
d95f716f92fb47ce5f6351a09a93fbff74536605
describe
'6496' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
cd54244b38c5aba4aea1fe21844cdaf2
8be7726d97acf3bd8fcaff391bb91c117fee5741
describe
'518665' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
8a281adcda137739dcd60686f6b6ffae
7049fa84e41eba0c1bd44266160fd3e69f7f1e21
describe
'80413' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e465afaee7668bf0ead2a6495bbbca55
df41c43d60c997728a17a2601b455cd6e6a14d4e
'2011-12-05T13:54:11-05:00'
describe
'23952' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e30e12dc14e4bf87b4c8f276762defdc
874843741dd162fdaedb791f9e01cbcc53e4e68b
describe
'4171864' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
ff68309a285f456c6ed8526d86935e08
ee9dcf929f540e92cb8183ed96f2eb698c96044b
'2011-12-05T13:55:15-05:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
c0541013f4492ae45cf2bba7a2dcd88d
c24d21bbcb47fefe4476d31d43a669decd077777
describe
'6135' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
1b5827bd22b2f7e1ba87c56ba9a3047d
192888cb24627690d22663d2d10e431afa65f72a
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
e46aae6cb12af7a6b604a091e0858d3e
476bd1bbbe7887c69608b0d04408a6d11cc59354
'2011-12-05T13:54:36-05:00'
describe
'88888' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f2d7aaafe6ea1fe07fded001cfe535b6
92468ddfedf22ef23588eb7d49471e833fa483b9
describe
'26939' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c382974d191aebe36166b0380092f1b0
9a5be4942e63d19f9f590066123bda8963a9e59f
describe
'4172268' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
413699be9d353e5d8309e2699813e4be
2654cc014cc1b4360cbde15e784ae605bb5148f1
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c11e4a330148e846e40fd52c5f369f75
460d4f289ba940c0a4e3f9b42dec9461a6aaf019
describe
'6896' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
7f3ad069a7dfda84e417c18c4dd7787a
c13732c9d0e6e46bbd67a9b3147bc568d5fd08da
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
1ac3c4e2465fdb4a84c52dab315100e3
95f6c51687c8097d6d02606830e47fa87fdfd588
describe
'79256' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ac5d510066c028255a01a92402eaa46c
cf592f982a6580056e0b6b264707f41604817e84
describe
'25317' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJU' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
01e7dc136f5cbcbda00be5d233f9ff81
99cf93dad239aa4c48e17840ca260c29fa3746df
describe
'4171948' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
08e2fbc25466753f7a354ce4c55518e5
5bc50db4a4e5a28314deda80bac455d100085f87
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
a70065065c9813433da6682b1560144f
1c86980f92885d5ba620a7bcf0c14a0e151e7188
describe
'6531' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJX' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
4e27af4d124241cf25143ddab7d28d1d
1a9a8be8e43442ee45aaf66ba9e69829b2e08629
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
08f45823b95b989dc9ce7cc561df8470
9e1dd21ed5cd1d92fe174a91d10cb45edab8ab89
describe
'84345' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKJZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b6eb8ee1b6724e505381756ab72f6948
da3fd61ccdd74709cbb16704511740dc3538c572
describe
'25717' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
16d8e0dc460008c9be2925df7648ab5a
d0ef9556afb3547e581eb7025008fbe8a3087b90
describe
'4172088' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
1406d3456fc135b9fd93dbcf9b3cc6fb
6b445be44482c6ca2190fbbbeebaf7336b993141
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
064a909cdab4ac1a0a23ab4266a71c10
a3c8e53dca13768dab9059e8ff25dbc6f34feea7
describe
'6622' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ca2158dd784d8b0a8ec9190390b91a32
8679e4b0c213f47f51578fc5016a31602256c9f7
describe
'518914' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKE' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9910d6fe731b8913df54dde2d29d8ab5
e87c80fc0f95b418ae51d3a4d3dd533b759d429d
describe
'90848' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b906c7218a19bec6a3254e9bc536f430
2338d8cdcec6e7776de7415a6164eaa48b466036
describe
'27308' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
89a5818d01971ee571d1772d83f103c1
f6f835a3d1615fce80ea0cff2cede534c5b80728
describe
'4172200' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
471bd536ffd4cee345de27651c4aced8
7443f2a55cd451351a684808261a0a6c1b79b625
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
43b1c40a582ff4cac9ec6aba428f8836
b261ffdbddf93b3e24f880d5f349344721ca2482
describe
'6945' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
df30fb20e7a7905c2bf725c169fc35ba
015d34d7909d906f6b5be63b39e9889c5c2f200a
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
cc1d1027dd29148e124f841033f855e8
fc9444c3ca2301429784efa17a4c0f172f581e97
describe
'83163' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
f0e2cb235cd0f84d086bd73561b51ca8
c26f632387dcd2a3914bb0dd498351eab6931283
describe
'25719' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKM' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
a4e6fc107e168ed32b8ad7f1870cc0c0
6073f74ea1054d200bd88f8b74e01c5202e0ebd6
describe
'4171996' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
98f15416d1bc87a89146d5ab1adef835
292fd1b45325579636d6c5edff629725331e0a17
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKO' 'sip-files00052.txt'
454ecd48023dfe0c3cd2303131b1a93e
c949e66f6090e4afed3b56b69f964637320ee2c0
describe
'6528' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d789bfbcc82a9d61f07f79a36a738e32
78975a51988932dbf4f02371000b38b5cf24b191
describe
'518908' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
072b4efc4b6c140beabe42aa4ec13c71
f916f43ef6178ddb22708abf8a58ffd29cdbe5fb
describe
'79284' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKR' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9f84aeb0a4bd67f9e2269ad790197fd8
86de710bba66a2ead682e54b2262376e365f3479
describe
'23602' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3463ec65d42ea8dace560c853a694822
09a774e5e9fc23a9d98d1a478c46456e3a3e7daf
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
86895582c0adaf53fa4844cc348e6bcf
e49237409117cf5dc569d83523456348d73d8108
'2011-12-05T13:53:51-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
da63d5931cabb7d167d442663f9637ee
a58b0098bd2be3aedab417f0235aaa082ad9f89c
describe
'6161' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c33c9a0ad6c69c49000a0ec711792525
60cb912748b83d46e80933387aa7221e41dc286c
describe
'518877' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
d3cb74869c3ea92a21bb4c5ed1a4179e
ee4e7ee9e99bcb627b0c89f39d1354b460a6340d
describe
'90588' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
553620bf6a3866e0b1f657cbb2b719ec
ba52975b865fef67d0064e9bac150b4ad3b1ab12
describe
'28155' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
099c5060be31e22ec27364134502bed0
fb1ac84f08a884b917ccab73955cab8a64f04c62
describe
'4172224' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKKZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
17ecd314ad6b4c66f7c0041ef2981ca1
6843917bd22814ad93bcfae91d8dc6990bbcac38
'2011-12-05T13:53:50-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
6cc6a6b23db318d59b886bbc978a48cd
a877bf6656dda79583ea2ac7b2972596c4e54f92
describe
'6862' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
539e3bb442d8378b9ae944d5a8866ea2
d6940679ef2edc5ab6f1907f01b6945a4b318324
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
683994c2b6421cfb554a3272e85c3d19
31a945a4fc22ea65dd7513ba2ff6a2c12c837b54
describe
'81476' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
52cf26cc074c050c8b0b1994999cab19
f4428f4baa1f10538cef2eb4f6fd337ca6efed45
describe
'24714' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bc096b254bd873b5b55e655b711ad973
d7c0132afa38d263d1e899bb3128be5284f4927a
describe
'4171900' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
21dfac053bae4e63ce753d21c8c03e53
7e79cd4c6ef4f635609828b93f9ea530302d6243
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLG' 'sip-files00055.txt'
f089ed6fa43312054c27d77251bba9da
eabb23fe543a28071b012cb974092b03b3dea133
describe
'6336' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLH' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
5480ba2702f379110a17c76c59a302ee
6f802427d3e691a54afcbfda10f8a2f4316bf904
describe
'518540' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLI' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
17c80193c2c22e5e938917678307a3f1
1de69dc73847097231028ada3eade918f76cbb73
describe
'95220' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
07c86018caf65c51019d0430b2d32d04
0575e5d4af376547d855e25b9c30c3d06bc9d0a1
describe
'22815' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4e6c5b7fb74afd75beb5ff4e40ca1f43
6a96b8408e1f1abf33babe8ce1775394291e8abc
describe
'4171540' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2250e4e5fd2a0fc814a5ca64cf588e10
ef03ecc8d4211264f42d1e0272b7efab5c11a986
describe
'472' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e9dc617886659eecdbc48707a98d405b
129d2cb8dc4c65f49a652a5b46c5373dc7bbb0a8
describe
'5453' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
4b4a0e63a7b1b5805d6be2109425a737
d26a2efba0257292bc0d633988cfbcacf47ac1d4
describe
'518878' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
871bf10f989e9145ad5c7963f457ad31
739826cbbd10a0626a3e7440bcafc0259fc4fe93
describe
'80125' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
435b7cf7292ea5aea51ac13ec2a54350
4f943dd6584a58ed50d4f04745f05cd3cea9e0ea
describe
'24756' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLQ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4636caf0c83b4e81f3a6462fcab01280
83ae7f53729286223904019dacf136fbfe2aa3e2
describe
'4172084' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLR' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b96227c7c2d8f654b35fc8898a982b94
a54ad5985bc3f09f33d431e3e8441c871c7a8738
'2011-12-05T13:54:00-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLS' 'sip-files00057.txt'
50bc58f5458bf8647c1dc8dd84d47f14
d8ba23970b3d8a7122f171fec87b3a202cc058c7
describe
'6254' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLT' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
65f276e04043ac08bb4308db3d34d3e7
d0f5dc28ec166ebfaec24db101f9aae8a37a63b0
describe
'518730' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLU' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
a68b5ba61f35c8d66e47e2db06b79e37
eeba7b8f1dca9390cee5f5ccbf368168448af97a
describe
'86283' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLV' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9b37009b44cb251d5ce0fd5323a3293e
df367b5d5f7cc50dfc28c22fd1e97f7d55a87b01
describe
'19489' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e9e98a05daa235a4576888091df707ba
a359964fa5e6b723615f8b6b582342819aa4e6e4
describe
'4171052' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
ac72636925a8c885b5f82477208bdc93
1eb8922ce89f13baecc79f33fa20c6977c616e94
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
0e6dd7036005f8c43cf5653af8c62030
4da7c46506694e8f38c3a7bc01fc3f1be4d8107d
describe
'4705' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKLZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
26bce61b8b7292facf8f4c9c6b801979
f73679a7dac6b0eb0418beb73bf6852c1771de90
describe
'518690' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
27f203c406c371a883ed3360e5b1500b
891c36bad51ef15544af08b623960e95b2ca4c0a
describe
'68565' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ef77eac3c535523e92be461a46e3e7ec
d0b55194655bc39dbc85aa250f1c2b6c6308febe
describe
'20289' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
acc9e0fd4e4d26853c3703bedceea109
cba5b9d63175bec05ad70af124528e4be1c04324
describe
'4171164' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
6d155e771e3935e4332493167f300f19
b66531a2aa0fceefbaf6aeea6e1468efff0fb366
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKME' 'sip-files00059.txt'
32d7349c6f3ffdaaf55334627a9c4239
3628d41a402cf303e31b03b755d953226e7838c3
describe
'5243' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
02372f162192fe580f2bd4b6fd51f4bf
e6338bffed5049906ec14bf95946b135c14bdf46
describe
'537268' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
016f9a716b79523f175b0cf9811f20d5
6cbfc751ab982edaccef7f0b62f6dc5f5fefd412
describe
'56310' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f3a19cd7bd89eb3ab8c5214f06c3439d
c229ef83d40108e3a738160acc140846b17b85b5
describe
'12919' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
769f71f0e376e4eb5b0f04067e2d55d4
84ea373da83ef0f35f4bad22e96f023a52c8fa94
describe
'4319484' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
20173296d3ef6e50bfeb37a7d6159ce1
3680becbea4a7a1a9209d2d2f61afb17fa72ca57
describe
'117' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7f23571e8c795a015ffd9eaa68f3d3d2
a3859ee9c905ec399562bf14975b5c6826f7c7fd
describe
'3232' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKML' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
6e76a36561914061d0b2cbf94b3effe2
9ce73109ee98f7d82d317dfb1234fc0a6e204137
describe
'518754' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
9013e0724448c68b0874e97862318daf
3ecda6940f4811e9d0ba013f8539f41cbaf7ecbb
describe
'20520' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMN' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
918d344152ef3559a1ced877dc291a3b
08f7c14856658210284f3ad7bbf2597f25e9696a
describe
'3659' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMO' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4a56ddf988640ab0479f0704b3115c87
82c5515b4dd499bf548af326b9600a441c695ebf
describe
'4168636' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
45357066ca5ceaf5239e9830d5ecc9b7
49c223ff06445900f743f8a685257b271ea4e8df
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMQ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
91229fc8e9296ef44a44349d2f391666
121bd88ee6cbe9b17b90117e554716fae7af9b19
describe
'518896' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
03ca9953cb3f5f025bc984e5edeea552
1e2f8bc6d5b41c50c7e1ee9810318844f712090b
describe
'88083' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
946ef7e8c11d9646de684e004533a89a
a5083a237e94356643642efbe2d9e77921191cc5
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
5c6e9e3a5af979303d99de8cd100ac2c
e43c3fdc08f8c5671b19cc5fa2332d6451384c3b
describe
'4172108' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
61257f0d690ec2ddb3fec5c76dab0f19
b1facd9041b30aaec537b18cc88dc13e16a680bc
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
82933639ab2ca58be27827a2c4468e63
98b9b3f1878763388629fd156f1252729be7a0cb
describe
'6761' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
83980665efe05df3ad3064a44084beef
8139a5a03eab24c29dec43f02c90a31efd50b2c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4138bb9a803ddee17ebd5bedbd4339ae
27f3a8f258581d8a90a40caee9588545425cf27f
describe
'83404' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
21899c0cab7c37fb259522ce921b6e12
6cdeba337fba6d40f8d16a356e1120b487cdf711
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKMZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8f7c9f8693fd9024e80cafbc3d52b9c2
359054c302353c4d578ecb5b8877f21052da39a7
describe
'4171744' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
dfed127f894296aaf5a939f9ed52974d
1c41e12224ff8986fb91071286b3868d44a9f784
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
544add61909439bb4a40f04f04027316
524812cbc387561c47bd4986544fc55a16230c23
describe
'6244' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0792e9af2d757e7393834f4b3adec06c
e416fc12a60483d1791374388b1211c8c6ede58f
describe
'533904' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKND' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
72bc79caeecc0626cb28dde49944d99b
a24423b97427ccfc3786cd68c1b87b6e7b09f6fb
describe
'53607' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
ab58645b62d4efa33a9dd4d97b46f3f7
25a5cbcf86eaa6086c6de1397ae367b2588d9d92
describe
'4291996' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a7fe43c641f720acd50cd051cf970fe2
485a7e17b6ca7101dea031c1bd0922fee49fc869
describe
'12528' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
2d1492b96263b98885882dcf034fe577
a781d69703ec48457cdc38e8f191838cd26afd9b
describe
'104' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNH' 'sip-files00064.txt'
a328f18871ab605a5b35d2014d8ea249
cc061de9502df294f1543c9c73769625d0882acd
describe
'3208' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNI' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
1506063ab52efdac630ef8e80c085498
c73010f49cb68aa03fc60671d269ee616893d70e
describe
'518889' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNJ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0527c03c5a196d34b43a076deba464fa
abfa91ce729edb5c3d5db7e84020b311dde39f7b
describe
'21706' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNK' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
cc0c5be773a424c01e1fe8878ecf46b3
b68db21003a3ca78ebdc287821bd349872d09955
describe
'3636' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2a6c1a8cc86e9a215db245c8f3b44427
43763462bdc0678ba5cc128ae76ee9740ccc43e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
eeaa45d918516c307280d3d60d9cdbd7
ddf65e0be3308633f2539bf3fa67e48f383608b1
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNN' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
6138e602684decd54648ac9c471c6abb
91c41e06abbecbe19afc77ed00df6ede5d4139ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNO' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
d38b0527c3383f5cab81c058a7846f4a
648754f337d22a02fd58c7faee0a255aae8d690e
describe
'80066' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
33570fda894e4ce8f3fb53abd2b92f47
ced58e87676decd082c3393b7184059bea651aa1
describe
'23392' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2ca18d1346cbdafbf7a63588e5ab2537
83cb7a1916472e6128dbef12690402e7ba63543c
describe
'4171736' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2c507851e34e688d4b0b27a50f2a2816
0beafb5d1f2259f87d38773a96582fae63b74db8
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
57818fc7147bdc1d2b6029c1201cd735
59d4a81acc0aee7e0313673f72b1fd14e5e535cd
describe
'5959' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
dd48946687b4748d1bc8151887c8e459
4133fc52eed3128744e572b8dd5aace94d0b7734
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bfe3778dc9a2980434a8f7da6b4787f5
48d6fd300f9f39f28a3f9f70fcb8dff8db98b84f
describe
'68768' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8850f9705cd41c453ce434dcb28f22e5
0751c970a89dfe4cc9a2dbb1369373c2b67d0513
describe
'20480' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
846eb0131b9f6274e5e954374e9b5530
be17a7c085e2643e61e53d4e2390069647cb97a1
describe
'4171184' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d2ab36c540e81c8e8f5749c4f0b41134
a42522b7a477b82cf65ce6d1c5f8d0d3e421c3d3
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
9a3d24959e5d49384a84ac11c84ebed4
267e75a0ed560154b6a480949d995483ed001e89
describe
'5302' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKNZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
8a61bcf443c56302c179d8f67b09a377
fa507acdaf575f0bdc3948f5ce61c57429a59934
describe
'569589' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOA' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
9db2119a104e5d86a9a903ff4c990146
ec8a8a412c9d0efb1512152f385d8fb1a4dfefb0
describe
'64784' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOB' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6a6eabba79c6dcabb26c4d5f032af266
d4459be5c246491dd53457defa85f91aa6684470
describe
'14276' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d6e598484fc195182b267d0594b9765b
93641dc0a1e818eae9097e7c8c321d542a35f87c
describe
'13678720' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
23d2154dd26310d6518d8a694958178a
538828df9bed25a30b39feafb4827b81d0d33a25
describe
'3510' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOE' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9c5c50e2e8d4eafcb507e3f72d8e6dc4
c0aed7946a1eced5162aeb0f255d2da4f964cdd0
describe
'583391' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOF' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
62a2302bff19a0bbbb59c981485a14a9
d5f46ea7ac8ee714910c475b8ae97a667ea7fd6a
describe
'125104' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOG' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c37797542c6163b15f6547369851307c
879da3d41a05ee65f30a3a1ee95432abd5e8577c
describe
'30043' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
ceb4305fff6d90b7dc6d7f36484a993d
07c105b233c5deac88cbd017b684e9ce7d1b3965
describe
'14011036' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
40165b04616b27de4e93084de2b4b731
cb86f77000cbc724ef71646f9e0982394f1eb054
describe
'7519' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOJ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
8f6773abb60ed200226921b3054725f5
97cef70975445a0fb4ddf2a760ae88e0e7260734
describe
'64' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
88532ccff1a5aec617c319d46b96be51
a3142b10ab98a4dd5bfd084c9cb610fd2a185bd8
describe
'92840' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOL' 'sip-filesUF00081640_00001.mets'
4d7c82a6fa94b62d77e0b558d5ef26c6
e158ad57442722c64748c9a03a5cf43be53ae290
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T18:25:02-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'124007' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABOIfileF20080429_AABKOO' 'sip-filesUF00081640_00001.xml'
fa9a91330e6c464e1710c9c06909d14e
3a00f44b35d30e6d6cfe126cf36d218f9b50f8ed
describe
'2013-12-18T18:25:03-05:00'
xml resolution