Citation
Aesop's fables

Material Information

Title:
Aesop's fables
Uniform Title:
Aesop's fables
Creator:
Aesop
Garrett, Edward, 1843-1914 ( Editor )
Zwecker, Johann Baptist, 1814-1876 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel, Thomas Bolton Gilchrist Septimus, 1823-1906 ( Illustrator )
Wolf, Joseph, 1820-1899 ( Illustrator )
J.B. Lippincott Company ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
J.B. Lippincott Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xii, 148 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1892 ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fables ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
Statement of Responsibility:
edited by Edward Garrett, with one hundred illustrations by J. Wolf, J.B. Zwecker, and T. Dalziel.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
002464224 ( aleph )
AMG9612 ( notis )
07863328 ( oclc )

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Full Text




EDITED BY ae .
EDWARD GARRETT, M. A. | x

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3 5
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X
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The Baldwin Library











ESOP’S FABLES.

















THE DOG AND THE SHEEP.



oO igs Sh ia) IE eS)

EDITED BY

EDWARD GARRETT, M.A.

WITH ONE HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS
BY

J. WOLF, J. B. ZWECKER, AND T. DALZIEL.



PHILADELPHIA:
J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY.
1892.






FABLE
\.—The
I1.—The
IWI.—The
1V.—The
V.—The
| VI—The
VII.—The
VIII—The
IX.—The
X.—The
XI.—The
XI1.—The
XIII.—The
XIV.—The
XV.—The
XVI—The
XVII.—The
XVIII.—The
XIX.—The
XKX.—The
XXI.—The
XXIIl.—The
XXIII.—The
XXIV.—The
XXV.—The

CONTENTS.

—

Cock and the Jewel . d . .
Wolf and the Lamb. , . :
Lion and the four Bulls . é .
For and the Frog . : .
Ass eating Thistles . . 7 :
Lark and her Young Ones

Cock and the Fox : a
Fox in the Well : 5 . .
Wolves and the Sheep

Eagle and the Fox .«

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing .
Sportsman and the Ringdove

Sow and the Wolf

Horse and the Ass

Wolf, the Laml, and the Goat

Kite andthe Pigeons . .
Country Mouse and the City owes
Swallow and other Birds .

Hunted Beaver . fs ‘ .

Cat and the Fox 5 7 :
Cat and the Mice . , ;

Lion and other Beasts 6 : f
Lion and the Mouse. ° ; '
Fatal Marriage 4 ; .
Mischievous Dog - ; . .

37



FABLE
XXVI.—The
XXVII—The
XXVIII.—The
XXIX.—The
XXX.—The
XXX1.—The
XXXII.—The
XXXIII.—The
XXXIV.—The
XXXV.—The

XXXVI.—The
XXXVII.—The

XXXVIIL—The
XXXIX.—The
XL.—The
XLI—The
XLII.—The
XLUI.—The
XLIV.—The
XLV.—The
XLVI.—The
XLVII.—The
XLVII.—The
XLIX.—The
L—The
LI.—The
LII.—The

CONTENTS.

Ox and the Frog. F 6 .
Fox and the Lion . 5 % 5
Ape and the For

Dog mm the Manger . .
Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat.

For and the Tiger

Lioness and the Fox

Oak and the Reed

Wind and the Sun . a
Kite, the Frog, and ‘the Mouse .
Frogs deswrang a King

Old Woman and her Matas

Lion, the Bear, and the For . a
Crow and the Pitcher i : :
Porcupie and the Snakes

Hares and Frogs in a Storm . :
Fox and the Wolf. : - ‘
Dog and the Sheep . ;
Peacock and the Crane

Viper and the File. : : :
Ass, the Lion, and the Cock . 5
Jackdaw and Peacocks. : .

Ant and the Fly

Ant and the Grasshopper .
Countryman and the Snake , .
Fox and the Sick Lion

Wanton Calf .

LIl].—Hercules and the Carter . . z .

LIV.—The
LV.—The
LVI.—The

Belly and the Members
Horse and the Lion .
Hustandman and the Stork





“PABLE
LVII.—The
LVIII.—The
LIX.—The
LX.—The

CONTENTS.

Cat and the Cock
Leopard and the Fox
Shepherd’s Boy

For and the Goat

LXI— Cupid and Death

LXII.—The
LXII.—The
LXIV.—The

Old Man and his Sons
Stag and the Fawn .
Old Hound

LXV.—Jupiter and the Camet

LXVI.—The
LXVII.—The
LXVIII.—The
LXIX.—The
LXX.—The
LXXI—The
LXXI —The

LXXIIH.—The
LXXIV.—The
LXXV.—The
LXXVI.—The
LXXVII.—The
LXXVII.—The

LXXIX.—The
LXXX.—The
LXXXI.—The

LXXXII.—The
LXXXIII.—The
LXXXIV.—The

LXXXV.—The
LXXXVI.—The

LXXXVII.—The

Fox without a Tail .

Fox and-the Crow

Hawk and the Farmer

Nurse and the Wolf.

Hare and the Tortoise
Fighting Cocks and the Eagle .
Ass ww the Lion’s Skin
Mountains in Latour

Satyr and the Traveller

Sick Kite 4 :
Hawk and the Nightingale
Peacock’s Complaint .

Angler and the Little Fish
Geese und the Cranes

Dog and the Shadow

Ass and the Little Dog

Wolf and the Crane. é -
Envious Man and the Covetous
Two Pots

Fox and the Stork

Bear and the Bee-hives
Travellers and the Bear . :

x1
PAGE

77
79
80
81
82
83
84
86
87
88
go

92
93
95

97

98
- 100
. 101
» 102
» 103
. 105
- 106
- 107
. 108

+ 109

» IT10
e T12
Heny3
+ 154



xii

FABLE
LXXXVII.—The
LXXXIX.—The
- XC.—The
XCI.—The
XCII.—The
XCII.— The
XCIV.—Ths
XCV.—The
XCVI.—The
XCVII.—The
XCVIII.— The
XCIX —The
C.—The
CI.—The
CII.—The
CIlI.—The
CIV.—The
CV.—The
CVI.—The
CVII.—The
CVIII.—The
CIX —The
CX.—The
CXI.—The
CXII.—The
CXIN—The
CXIV.—The
CXV.—The

CONTENTS.

Trumpeter taken Prisoner 3 eit

Partridge and the Cocks . .
Falconer and the Partridge ; .
Eagle and the Crow

Lion, the Ass, and the For
Fox and the Grapes

Horse and the Stag

Young Man and the Swallow
Man and his Goose .

Dog and the Wolf.

Wood and the Clown

Old Lion . 4 :
Horse and the Loaded Ass
Old Man and Death

Boar and the Ass

Tunny and the Dolphin . :
Peacock and the Magme . . .
Forester and the Lion

Stag looking mto the Water
Stag in the Ox-stall

Dove and the Ant

Lion in Love . . : :
Tortoise and the Eagle . . .
Wild Boar and the For . .
Wolf and the Lion . . .
Bull and the Goat . . ° .
Fox and the Mask . 6 . .
Fine and the Goat . d . °

PAGE

- 115
- 117
Ba wid
. 118
- 119
. 121
- 122
. 123
- 125
- 126
- 128
- 129
. 131
- 132
+ 133
EIgs

136

+ 137

137

+ 139 ©
- 140

14!

- 142
- 144
» 145

146
147
148



JESOP’S FABLES.













































Fase I.— Zhe Cock and the Jewel.

A BRISK young Cock, in company with two or three
pullets, his mistresses, raking upon a dunghill for some-
thing to entertain them with, happened to scratch up a
jewel. He knew what it was well enough, for it sparkled
with an exceeding bright lustre; but, not knowing what
to do with it, endeavoured to cover his ignorance under
a gay contempt; so, shrugging up his wings, shaking
his head, and putting on a grimace, he expressed him-
self to this. purpose :—‘“ Indeed you are a very fine

A 1



2 ZESOP’S FABLES.

thing, but I know not any business you have here. I
make no scruple of declaring that my taste lies quite
another way; and I had rather have one grain of dear
delicious barley than all the jewels under the sun.”

Never express contempt for what you do not under-
stand: you will only betray your ignorance.

an

Fase Il—Zhe Wolf and the Lamb.

One hot, sultry day, a Wolf and a Lamb happened
to come, just at the same time, to quench their thirst
in the stream of a clear silver brook that ran tumbling
down the side of a rocky mountain. The Wolf stood
upon the higher ground, and the Lamb at some distance
from him down the current... However, the Wolf, hav-
ing a mind to pick a quarrel with him, asked him what
he meant by disturbing the water, and making it so
muddy that he could not drink? and at the same time
demanded satisfaction. The Laub, frightened at this
threatening charge, told him in a tone as mild as possi-
ble that, with humble submission, he could not con-
‘ceive how that could be, since the water which he
drank ran down from the Wolf to him, and therefore
it could not be disturbed so far up the stream. “Be
that as it will,” replies the Wolf, “ you are a rascal, and
T have been told that you treated me with ill language,
behind my back, about half a year ago.” “ Upon my
word,” says the Lamb, “the time you mention was be-



ZESOP’S FABLES. 3

fore I was born.” The Wolf, finding it to no purpose
to argue any longer against truth, fell into a great pas-
sion, snarling and foaming at the mouth as if he had



been mad ; and drawing nearer to the Lamb, “ Sirrah,”
says he, “if it was not you, it was your father, and that
is all one.” So he seized the poor innocent helpless
thing, tore it to pieces, and made a meal of it.

A person bent on injuring one more innocent than him-
Self will never lack excuses.



4 #SOP’S FABLES.



Fas.e IlIl.— The Lion and the Jour Bulls.

Four Bulls, which had entered into a very strict
friendship, kept always near one another, and fed to-

gether. The Lion often saw them, and as often had a

mind to make one of them his prey; but, though he
could easily have subdued any of them singly, yet he
was afraid to attack the whole alliance, as knowing
they would have been too hard for him, and therefore
contented himself, for the present, with keeping at a
distance. At last, perceiving no attempt was to be
made upon them as long as this combination held, he



ZESOP’S FABLES. 5

took occasion, by whispers and hints, to foment jea-
lousies and raise divisions among them. This strata-
gem succeeded so well, that the Bulls grew cold and
reserved towards one another, which soon after ripened
into a downright hatred and aversion, and at last ended
in a total separation. The Lion had now obtained
his ends; and, as impossible as it was for him to hurt
them while they were united, he found no difficulty,
now they were parted, to seize and devour every Bull
of them, one after the other.

Tale-bearers have more power to do deadly injury to
friends than the strongest open enemy; therefore they
should not be encouraged or listened to.

Fasie IV.—Zhe Fox and th: Frog.

A Fros, leaping out of the lake, and taking the
advantage of a rising ground, made proclamation to
all the beasts of the forest, that he was an able physi-
cian, and, for curing all manner of distempers, would
turn his back to no person living. This discourse,
uttered in a parcel of hard cramp words, which noboby
understood, made the beasts admire his learning and
give credit to everything he said. At last the Fox,
who was present, with indignation asked him how he
could have the impudence, with those thin lantern
jaws, that meagre pale phiz, and blotched spotted body.



6 FSOP’S FABLES.



to set up for one who was able to cure the infirmities
of others.

We should not set ourselves up to cure others while we
ourselves are in need of cure.

——~—_

FasLe V.— Zhe Ass cating Thistles.

Aw Ass was loaded with good provisions of several
sorts, which, in the time of harvest, he was carrying
into the field for his master and the reapers to dine



#SOP’S FABLES. 4





















upon. By the way he met with a fine large thistle,
and, being very hungry, began to mumble it, which,
while he was doing, he entered into this reflection :
“ How many greedy epicures would think themselves
happy amidst such a variety of delicate viands as I
now carry! But to me this bitter prickly thistle is
more savoury and relishing than the most exquisite
and sumptuous banquet.”

We should not expect other people to share either our
opinions or tastes, and ought therefore to be fair and tole-
rant towards them.



8 #ESOP’S FABLES.

Fase VI.—Zhe Lark and her Young Ones.

A Lark, who had young ones in a field of corn
which was almost ripe, was under some fear lest the
reapers should come to reap it before her young brood
were fledged, and able to remove from the place ;
wherefore, upon flying abroad to look for food, she left
this charge with them—that they should take notice
what they heard talked of in her absence, and tell her
of it when she came back again. While she was gone,
they heard the owner of the corn call to his son—
“Well,” says he, “I think this corn is ripe enough; I
would have you go early to-morrow, and desire our
friends and neighbours to come and help us to reap
it.’ When the old Lark returned, the young ones
fell a quivering and chirping round her, and told her
what had happened, begging her to remove them as

fast as she could. The mother bid them be easy;
“ For,” says she, “if the owner depends upon friends
and neighbours, I am pretty sure the corn will not be
reaped to-morrow.” Next day she went out again
upon the same occasion, and left the same orders with
them as before. The owner came and stayed, expect-
ing those he had sent to; but the sun grew hot, and
nothing was done, for not a soul came to help him.
“Then,” says he to his son, “I perceive these friends
of ours are not to be depended upon; so that you
must even go to your uncles and cousins, and tell
them I desire they would be here betimes to-morrow
morning to help us to reap.” Well, this the young



#SOP’S FABLES. 9



ones, in a great fright, reported also to their mother.
“Tf that be all,” says she, “do not be frightened, chil-
dren; for kindred and relations do not use to be so
very forward to serve one another; but take particular
notice what you hear said the next time, and be sure
you let me know it.” She went abroad the next day
as usual; and the owner, finding his relations as slack
as the rest of his neighbours, said to his son, “ Hark
ye, George: do you get a couple of good sickles ready
against to-morrow morning, and we will even reap the
corn ourselves.” When the young ones told their
mother this, “Then,” says she, “we must be gone



Io FESOP’S FABLES.

indeed! for when a man undertakes to do his business
himself, it is not so likely that he will be disappointed.”
So she removed her young ones immediately, and the

corn was reaped the next day by the good man and
his son.

Tf you would escape sorrow and disappointment, never
dipend on others to do for you what you can best do for
yourself.

ee

Faple VII.—Zhe Cock and the Fox.

TuE Fox, passing early one summer’s morning near
a farm-yard, was caught in a spring, which the farmer
had planted there for that end. The Cock, at a dis-
tance, saw what happened ; and, hardly yet daring to
trust himself too near so dangerous a foe, approached
him cautiously, and peeped at him, not without some
horror and dread of mind. Reynard no sooner per-
ceived it, but he addressed himself to him with all the
designing artifice imaginable. ‘“ Dear cousin,” says he,
“you see what an unfortunate accident has befallen
me here, and all upon your account; for, as I was
creeping through yonder hedge in my way homeward,
I heard you crow, and was resolved to ask you how
you did before I went any farther; but by the way I
met with this disaster ; and therefore now I must be-
come a humble suitor to you for a knife to cut this
plaguy string, or, at least, that you would conceal my
misfortune till I have gnawed it asunder with my teeth.”



ESOP’S FABLES. II

The Cock, seeing how the case stood, made no reply,
but posted away as fast as he could, and gave the
farmer an account of the whole matter; who, taking a



7

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good weapon along with him, came and did the Fox’s
business before he could have time to contrive his
escape.

There is no greater error than to bestow sympathy and
ad on undeserving subjects.



12 ASOP’S FABLES.

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AGT tf

a LS
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Nh





Fase VIIl.—Zhe Fox in the Well.

A Fox, having fallen into a well, made a shift, by
sticking his claws into the sides, to keep his head
above water. Soon after, a Wolf came and peeped
over the brink, to whom the Fox applied himself very
earnestly for assistance, entreating that he would help
him to a rope, or something of that kind, which might
favour his escape. The Wolf, moved with compassion
at his misfortune, could not forbear expressing his con-
cern. “Ah! poor Reynard,” says he, “I am sorry for
you with all my heart! how could you possibly come
into this melancholy condition?” “Nay, prithee,



4ESOP’S FABLES. 13

friend,” replies the Fox, “if you wish me well, do not
stand pitying of me, but lend me some succour as fast
as you can; for pity is but cold comfort when one is

up to the chin in water, and within a hair’s breadth of
starving or drowning.’

Pity is good when accompanied by some more substantial
aid ; wis poor comfort without help, when help is possible.



Fase 1X.— Zhe Wolves and the Sheep.

Tue Wolves and the Sheep had been a long time in
a state of war together. At last a cessation of arms
B



I4 ZESOP’S FABLES.

was proposed, in order to a treaty of peace, and host-
ages were to be delivered on both sides for security.
The Wolves proposed that the Sheep should give up
their dogs, on the one side, and that they would de-
liver up their young ones, on the other. This proposal
was agreed to; but no sooner executed than the young
Wolves began to howl for want of their dams. The
old ones took this opportunity to cry out, the treaty
was broke; and so falling upon the Sheep, who were
destitute of their faithful guardians, the dogs, they
worried and devoured them without control.

In cases of difficulty and extremity we should be careful
not to part with what our real safety depends on.

oe

FasLe X.— Zhe Eagle and the Fox.

An Eagle that had young ones, looking out for some-
thing to feed them with, happened to spy a Fox’s cub
that lay basking itself abroad in the sun. She made a
stoop and trussed it immediately ; but before she had
carried it quite off, the old Fox, coming home, implored
her, with tears in her eyes, to spare her cub, and pity
the distress of a poor fond mother who should think
no affliction so great as that of losing her child. The
Eagle, whose nest was up in a very high tree, thought
herself secure enough from all projects of revenge, and
so bore away the cub to her young ones, without show-
ing any regard to the supplications of the Fox. But



ZESOP’S FABLES. 15



that subtle creature, highly incensed at this outrageous
barbarity, ran to an altar, where some country people
had been sacrificing a kid in the open fields, and catch-
ing up a firebrand in her mouth, made towards the
tree where the Eagle’s nest was, with a resolution of
revenge. She had scarce ascended the first branches,
when the Eagle, terrified with the approaching ruin of
herself and family, begged of the Fox to desist, and,
with much submission, returned her the cub again safe
and sound.

Lf you intentionally injure your neighbour, you put
yourself in his power.



16 ESOP’S FABLES.



Faste X1.—TZhe Wolf in Sheep's Clothing.

A Wortr clothing himself in the skin of a sheep, and
getting in among the flock, by this means took the
opportunity to devour many of them. At last the
Shepherd discovered him, and cunningly fastening a
rope about his neck, tied him up to a tree which stood
hard by. Some other Shepherds happening to pass
that way, and observing what he was about, drew near
and expressed their amazement at it. ‘‘ What,” says one
of them, “brother, do you make hanging of sheep?”
“No,” replies the other, “ but I make hanging of a wolf



ZESOP’S FABLES. 17

whenever I catch him, though in the habit and garb of
asheep.” Then he showed them their mistake, and they
applauded the justice of the execution.

Do not respect appearances ; but, in whatever garb you
find hypocrisy or evil, be sure to expose and punish it.



Fase XII].— Zhe Sportsman and the Ringdove..

A Sportsman took his bow and went into the woods.
a-shooting. He spied a Ringdove among the branches:
of an oak, and intended to kill it. He drew the bow
to his shoulder, and took his aim accordingly. But,

2



18 ESOP’S FABLES.

sust as he was going to loose the arrow, an Adder, which
he had trod upon under the grass, stung him so pain-
fully in the leg that he was forced to quit his design,
and threw his bow down in a passion. The poison
immediately infected his blood, and his whole body
began to mortify ; which when he perceived, he could
not help owning to be just. “Fate,” says he, “has
brought destruction upon me while I was contriving the
death of another.”

Those who seek to do ill to others are certainly in the
way of il to themselves. ;

FasLe XIII.— Zhe Sow and the Wolf.

A Sow had just farrowed, and lay in the sty, with
her whole litter of pigs about her. A Wolf, who longed
for one of them, but knew not how to come at it, en-
deavoured to insinuate himself into the Sow’s good
opinion, and accordingly coming up to her—“ How
does the good woman in the straw do?” sayshe. “Can
I be of any service to you, Mrs. Sow, in relation to
your little family here? If you have a mind to go
abroad, and air yourself a little, or so, you may depend
upon it I will take as much care of your pigs as you
could do yourself.” “Your humble servant,” says the
Sow. “I thoroughly understand your meaning ; and, to



ZESOP’S FABLES. : 19

let you know I do, I must be so free as to tell you I
had rather have your room than your company; and




AB

WI

L

iy

therefore, if you would act like a wolt of honour, and
oblige me, I beg I may never see your face again.”

Distrust those who make too great show of civility:
their intentions are not seldom bad.



20 ZESOP’S FABLES.









FasLe XIV.— Zhe Horse and the Ass.

Tue Horse, adorned with his great war saddle, and
champing his foaming bridle, came thundering along
the way, and made the mountains echo with his loud
shrill neighing. He had not gone far before he over-
took an Ass, who was labouring under a heavy burden,
and moving slowly on in the same track with himself.
Immediately he called out to him, in a haughty, im-
perious tone, and threatened to trample him in the
dirt if he did not break the way for him. The poor
patient Ass, not daring to dispute the matter, quietly



#ESOP’S FABLES. : 21

got out of his way as fast as he could, and let him go
by. Not long after this, the same Horse, in an engage-
ment with the enemy, happened to be shot in the eye,
which made him unfit for show, or any military busi-
ness, so he was stripped of his fine ornaments and sold
to a carrier. The Ass, meeting him in this forlorn
condition, thought that now it was his time to insult;
and so says he, “ Heyday, friend! is it you? Well, I
always believed that pride of yours would one day have
a fall.”

Those who, from pride, treat others sternly and cruelly,
may themselves come into such straits as to give oppor-
tunity for the same treatment of them.

—»~—

Fase XV.—Zvhe Wolf, the Lamb, and the Goat.

A Wo r meeting a Lamb one day in company with
a Goat, “ Child,” says he, “you are mistaken: this is
none of your mother; she is yonder ;” pointing to a
flock of sheep at adistance. “It may be so,” says the
Lamb ; “ the person that happened to give birth to me
because she could not help it, and then left me, she
did not care where, is, I suppose, what you call my
mother; but I look upon this charitable Goat as such,
that took compassion on me in my poor, helpless, des-
titute condition, and gave me suck ; sparing it out of
the mouths of her own kids, rather than I should want
it.” “ But, sure,” says he, “you have a greater regard



22 ESOP’S FABLES.



































for her that gave you life than for anybody else?” “I
should like to know what reason I have for feeling
greater regard for one to whom I am so little indebted,
than for those from whom I have received all the bene-

volence and kindness which have hitherto supported
me in life?”

Parental tenderness and affectionate behaviour make the
parent ; and where these are wanting, filial respect is likely
to be a mere shadow.



@SOP’S FABLES. 23

FasLe XVI.— Zhe Kite and the Pigeons.

A Kite who had kept sailing in the air for many
days near a dove-house, and made a:stoop at several
Pigeons, but all to no purpose (for they were too nimble
for him), at last had recourse to stratagem, and took his
opportunity one day to make a declaration to them, in
which he set forth his own just and good intentions,
who had nothing more at heart than the defence and
protection of the Pigeons in their ancient rights and
liberties, and how concerned he was at their fears and
jealousies of a foreign invasion, especially their unjust
and unreasonable suspicions of himself, as if he in-
tended, by force of arms, to break in upon their con-
stitution, and erect a tyrannical government over them.
To prevent all which, and thoroughly to quiet their
minds, he thought proper to propose to them such
terms of alliance and articles of peace as might for ever
cement a good understanding between them ; the prin-
cipal of which was, that they should accept of him for
their king, and invest him with all kingly privilege and
prerogative over them. The poor simple Pigeons con-
sented: the Kite took the coronation oath, after a very
solemn manner, on his part, and the Doves, the oaths
of allegiance and fidelity on theirs. But much time
had not passed -over their heads before the good Kite
pretended that it was part of his prerogative to devour
a Pigeon whenever he pleased. And this he was not
contented to do himself only, but instructed the rest
of the royal family in the same kingly arts of govern-



24 ‘ESOP’S FABLES,

ment. The Pigeons, reduced to this miserable condi-
tion, said one to the other, “ Ah! we deserve no better.
Why did we let him come in?”

We should be very careful and circumspect as to the choice
of those to whom we intrust the peace and happiness of
ourselves and others : the effects of an error in this respect
can never be got over.

—~—.

FasLe XVII.— Zhe Country Mouse and the C: wy Mouse,

An honest, plain, sensible country Mouse is said to
have -ntertained at his hole one day a fine Mouse of
the town. Having formerly been playfellows together,
they were old acquaintance, which served as an apology
for the visit. However, as master of the house, he
thought himself obliged to do the honours of it in all
respects, and to make as great a Stranger of his guest
as he possibly could. In order to this, he set before
him a reserve of delicate grey pease and bacon, a dish
of fine oatmeal, some parings of new cheese, and, to
crown all with a dessert, the remnant of a charming
mellow apple. In good manners, he forbore to eat
any himself, lest the stranger should not have enough ;
but, that he might seem to bear the other company, sat
and nibbled a piece of a wheaten straw very busily.
At last says the spark of the town, “ Old crony, give
me leave to be a little free with you: how can you
bear to live in this nasty, dirty, melancholy hole here,



' ZSOP’S FABLES. 25

with nothing but woods, and meadows, and mountains,
and rivulets about you? Do not you prefer the con-
versation of the world to the chirping of birds, and the
splendour of a court to the rude aspect of an unculti-
vated desert? Come, take my word for it, you will find

KG P wi



wy:

we)

B

it a change for the better. Never stand considering,

but away this moment. Remember we are not immor-

tal, and therefore have no time to lose. Make sure of

to-day, and spend it as agreeably as you can ; you know

not what may happen to-morrow.” In short, these and

suchlike arguments prevailed, and his country acquain-
c



26 FESOP’S FABLES.

tance was resolved to go to town that night. So they
both set out upon their journey together, proposing to
sneak in after the close of the evening. They did so,
and about midnight made their entry into a certain
great house, where there had been an extraordinary
entertainment the day before, and several tit-bits, which
some of the servants had purloined, were hid under the
seat of awindow. The country guest was immediately
placed in the midst of a rich Persian carpet: and now
it was the courtier’s turn to entertain; who, indeed,
acquitted himself in that capacity with the utmost rea-
diness and address, changing the courses as elegantly,
and tasting everything first as judiciously, as any clerk
of a kitchen. The other sat and enjoyed himself like
a delighted epicure, tickled to the last degree with this
new turn of affairs, when, on a sudden, a noise of some-
body opening the door made them start from their
seats and scuttle in confusion about the dining-room.
Our country friend, in particular, was ready to die with
fear at the barking of a huge mastiff or two, which
opened their throats just about the same time, and
made the whole house echo. At last recovering him-
self, “ Well,” says he, “if this be your town life, much
good may you do with it: give me my poor quiet hole
again, with my homely but comfortable grey pease.”

A humble life with peace and quietness is better than
a splendid one with danger and risk.



4ESOP’S FABLES. 29

ANNEZ
wae
SNL

SW

SSN
a
eS

= QN

AN



FasLe XVIII.—TZhe Swallow and other Birds.

A FARMER was sowing his field with flax. The
Swallow observed it, and desired the other birds to
assist her in picking the seed up, and in destroying it ;
telling them, that flax was that pernicious material ot
which the thread was composed which made the fowler’s
nets, and by that means contributed to the ruin of so
many innocent birds. But the poor Swallow, not
having the good fortune to be regarded, the flax sprang
up, and appeared above the ground. She then put
them in mind once more of their impending danger,



28 FESOP’S FABLES.

and wished them to pluck it up in the bed before it
went any further. They still neglected her warnings,
and the flax grew up into the high stalk. She yet
again desired them to attack it, for that it was not yet
too late. But all that she could get was to be ridiculed
and despised for a silly pretending prophet. The
Swallow, finding all her remonstrances availed nothing,
was resolved to leave the society of such unthinking,
careless creatures, before it was too late. So quitting
the woods, she repaired to the houses, and forsaking
the conversation of the birds, has ever since made her
abode among the dwellings of men.

Good advice may be thrown away. After we have re-
peatedly warned our friends of danger, and they poy no
heed, we are justified in separating ourselves from them.

—_p>—

FasLe XIX.— Zhe Hunted Beaver.

Ir is said that a Beaver (a creature which lives
chiefly in the water) has a certain part about him which
is good in physic, and that upon this account he is
often hunted down and killed. Once upon a time, as
one of these creatures was hard pursued by the dogs,
and knew not how to escape, recollecting the reason
of his being thus persecuted, with great resolution and
presence of mind, bit off the part which his hunters
wanted, and threw it towards them, by these means
escaping with his life.



fESOP’S FABLES. 29






A a SYE NY pane TA
SS —

Ge ii BY Zp At Wa UNS
fo ES IS We
“= AAOR ASS Mi

LES Se AA ccf

\
<3)




































When one is sore bestead, it is sometimes wise policy to
give up that which he is pursued for.

——

Faste XX.—Z%e Cat and the Fox.

As the Cat and the Fox were talking politics toge-
ther, on a time, in the middle of a forest, Reynard
said, let things turn out ever so bad, he did not care,
for he had a thousand tricks for them yet, before they
should hurt him. “But pray,” says he, “Mrs. Puss,



30 JESOP’S FABLES.

suppose there should be an invasion, what course do
you design to take?” “Nay,” says the Cat, “I have
but one shift for it, and if that won’t do I am undone.”
“YT am sorry for you,” replies Reynard, “with all my



heart, and would gladly furnish you with one or two of
mine ; but, indeed, neighbour, as times go, it is not
good to trust: we must even be every one for himself,
as the saying is ; and so your humble servant.” These
words were scarce out of his mouth, when they were
alarmed with a pack of hounds, that came upon them



ZESOP’S FABLES. 31

full cry. The Cat, by the help of her single shift, ran
up a tree, and sat securely among the top branches ;
from whence she beheld Reynard, who had not been
able to get out of sight, overtaken with his thousand
tricks, and torn in as many pieces by the dogs which
had surrounded him.

Fe that affects to be more cunning than his neighbours
will usually come off worse than they when a crisis
comes.

FasLe XXI.—Zhe Cat and the Mice.

A CERTAIN house was much infested with Mice ; but
at last they got a Cat, who catched and ate every day
some of them. The Mice, finding their numbers grow.
thin, consulted what was best to be done for the pre-
servation of the public from the jaws of the devouring
Cat. They debated, and came to this resolution, That
no one should go down below the upper shelf. The
Cat, observing the Mice no longer came down as usual,
hungry and disappointed of her prey, had recourse to
this stratagem—she hung by her hinder legs on a peg
which stuck in the wall, and made as if she had been
dead, hoping by this lure to entice the Mice to come
down. She had not been in this posture long before a
cunning old Mouse peeped over the edge of the shelf,
and spoke thus : “ Aha! my good friend, are you there?





32 SOP’S FABLES.



























































































































































































































































































































there may you be! I would not trust myself with you,
though your skin were stuffed with straw.”

Beware of the character you make to yourself, for you
will be judged by i.

——

FaBLeE XXIIl.—Zhe Lion and other Beasts.

The Lion and several other Beasts entered into an
alliance, offensive and defensive, and were to live very



ZESOP’S FABLES. 33

sociably together in the forest. One day, having made
a sort of an excursion by way of hunting, they took a
very fine, large, fat deer, which was divided into four
parts ; there happening to be then present his majesty
the Lion and only three others. A‘ter the division



was made, and the parts were set out, his majesty

advancing forward some steps, and pointing to one of

the shares, was pleased to declare himself after the

following manner: “This I seize and take possession

of as my right, which devolves to me, as I am de-
3



34 ZESOP’S FABLES,

scended by a true, lineal, hereditary succession from
the royal family of Lion ; that” (pointing to the second)
“TJ claim by, I think, no unreasonable demand, con-
sidering that all the engagements you have with the
enemy turn chiefly upon my courage and conduct;
and you very well know that wars are too expensive to
be carried on without proper supplies. Then” (nod-
ding his head towards the third) “that I shall take by
virtue of my prerogative ; to which I make no ques-
tion but so dutiful and loyal a people will pay all the
deference and regard that I can desire. Now, as for
the remaining part, the necessity of our present affairs
is so very urgent, our stock so low, and our credit so
impaired and weakened, that I must insist upon your
granting that, without, any hesitation or demur; and
hereof fail not at your peril.”

Lt is not wise for any one to form alliances with those
who are far stronger than him.

——»—

FABLE XXIIL—7) he Lion and the Mouse.

A Lion, faint with heat and weary with hunting, was
laid down to take his repose under the spreading boughs
of a thick shady oak. It happened that, while he
slept, a company of scrambling Mice ran over his back,
and waked him; upon which, starting up, he clapped
his paw upon one of them, and was just going to put



ZESOP’S FABLES. 35

*t to death, when the little suppliant implored his
mercy in a very moving manner, begging him not to
stain his noble character with the blood of so despi-
cable and small a beast. The Lion, considering the
matter, thought proper to do as he was desired, and



immediately released his little trembling prisoner. Not
long after, traversing the forest in pursuit of his prey,
he chanced to run into the toils of the hunters; from
whence, not being able to disengage himself, he set up
a most hideous and loud roar. The Mouse, hearing the
voice, and knowing it to be the Lion’s, immediately

Ss— 2



36 ZESOP’S FABLES,

repaired to the place, and bid him fear nothing, for
that he was his friend. Then straight he fell to work,
and with his little sharp teeth gnawing asunder the
knots and fastenings of the toils, set the royal brute at
liberty.

Never needlessly hurt even the humblest: he may aid
you in an extremity.

FasLlE XXIV.—TZhe Fatal Marriage.

THE Lion aforesaid, touched with the grateful pro-
cedure of the Mouse, and resolving not to be outdone
in generosity by any wild beast whatsoever, desired his
little deliverer to name his own terms, for that he might
depend upon his complying with any proposal he should
make. The Mouse, fired with ambition at this gracious
offer, did not so much consider what was proper for
him to ask, as what was in the power of his prince to
grant, and so presumptuously demanded his princely
daughter, the young Lioness, in marriage. The Lion
consented ; but when he would have given the royal
virgin into his possession, she, like a giddy thing as
she was, not minding how she walked, by chance set
her paw upon her spouse, who was coming to meet
her, and crushed her little dear to pieces.

We should try to make our judgments fit and proper ;
for of they are not, even our well-wishers cannot atid us.



fESOP’S FABLES, 37

ba



















































FaBLeE XXV.— The Mischievous Dog.

A CERTAIN man had a Dog, which was so fierce and
mischievous that he was forced to fasten a heavy clog
about his neck to keep him from running at and wor-
rying people. This the vain cur took for a badge of
honourable distinction, and grew so insolent upon it,
that he looked down with an air of scorn upon the
neighbouring dogs, and refused to keep them com-
pany. But a sly old Poacher, who was one of the
gang, assured him that he had no reason to value him-

D



38 ZESOP’S FABLES.

self upon the favour he wore, since it was fixed upon
him rather as a mark of disgrace than of honour.

We should be careful not to cherish our faults so that
they come to be regarded as merits.













me
=i

Y
Ve.
Nayar
owt
a























































Faste XXVI.—Zhe Ox and the Frog.

An Ox, grazing in a meadow, chanced to set his
foot among a parcel of young Frogs, and trod one of
them to death. The rest informed their mother, when
she came home, what had happened, telling her that
the beast which did it was the hugest creature that
they ever saw in their lives. “What, was it so big?”



ESOP’S FABLES. 39

says the old Frog, swelling and blowing up her speckled
belly to a great degree. “Oh! bigger by a vast deal,”
say they. “And so big?” says she, straining herself
yet more. “Indeed, mamma,” say they, “if you were
to burst yourself, you would never be so big.” She
strove yet again, and burst herself indeed.

Serious ills come to folks from aspiring after what
Nature never intended them to be.































































FABLE XXVII.— Zhe Fox and the Lion.

THE first time the Fox saw the Lion, he fell down
at his feet and was ready to die with fear. The second



40 ZESOP’S FABLES.

time, he took courage, and could even bear to look
upon him. The third time, he had the impudence to
come up to him, to salute him, and to enter into
familiar conversation with him.

We should cultivate a due and proper bearing towards

others. Over-bashfulness and indecent famitiarity are
alike faults of behaviour.



THE APE AND THE FOX.



ESOP’S FABLES. Al

Fase XXVIII.— Zhe Ape and the Fox.

Tur Ape, meeting the Fox one day, humbly re-
quested him to give him a piece of his fine long brush
tail, to cover his naked back, which was exposed to
all the violence and inclemency of the weather ; “ For,”
says he, “ Reynard, you have already more than you
have occasion for, and a great part of it even drags
along in the dirt.”. The Fox answered, “That as to
his having too much, that was more than he knew ;
but be it as it would, he had rather sweep the ground
with his tail as long as he lived, than deprive himself of
the least bit to cover a creature like an Ape.”

Lf the favours of fortune are unequally distributed,
little in the way of assisting those who lack is to be hoped
from people who are notorious for their avariciousness
and cunning; they would rather waste their wealth than
aid others by it.

—+~—

FapLe XXIX.—TZhe Dog in the Manger.

A Doc was lying upon a manger full of hay. Four
Horses, being hungry, came near, and offered to eat of
the hay; but the envious illnatured cur, getting up
and snarling at them, would not suffer them to touch it.
Upon which one of the Horses, in the bitterness of his
heart, said, “A curse light upon thee for a malicious
wretch, who wilt neither eat hay thyself, nor suffer others
to do it.”



42 ZESOP’S FABLES.



Envy ts a most contemptible and wasteful vice; it can-
not use and enjoy what it possesses, nor will it allow

others to do so.
eee

FasLE XXX.—TZhe Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat.

ONCE upon a time there commenced a fierce war
between the birds and the beasts; when the Bat,
taking advantage of his ambiguous make, hoped by
that means to live secure in a state of neutrality. It
was not long before the forces on each side met and
gave battle, and, their animosities running very high,
a bloody slaughter ensued. The Bat, at the beginning



4ESOP’S FABLES.



WY Hye»
M yy, “i ey
{ ie

ee
Ue

YF

of the day, thinking the birds most likely to carry it,
listed himself among them, but kept fluttering at a
little distance, that he might the better observe, and
take his measures accordingly. However, after some
time spent in the action, the army of the beasts seem.
ing to prevail, he went entirely over to them, and en-
deavoured to convince them, by the affinity which he
had to a mouse, that he was by nature a beast, and
would always continue firm and true to their interest.
His plea was admitted ; but, in the end, the advantage
turned completely on the side of the birds, under the
admirable conduct and courage of their general the



44 #ESOP’S FABLES.

Eagle. The Bat, to save his life and escape the dis-
grace of falling into the hands of his deserted friends,
betook himself to flight ; and ever since, skulking in
caves and hollow trees all day, as if ashamed to show
himself, he never appears till dusk, when all the fea-
thered inhabitants of the air are gone to rcost.

He who has no settled convictions on great matters, and,
for the sake of personal ease or interest, flutters between
this side and that, will in the end bring on himself the
contempt and hatred of both.

FaBLE XXXI.—TZhe Fox and the Tiger.

A SKILFUL Archer, coming into the woods, directed
his arrows so successfully that he slew many wild beasts,
and pursued several others. This put the whole savage
kind into a fearful consternation, and made them fly to
the most retired thickets for refuge. At last the Tiger
regained courage, and bidding them not be afraid,
said that he alone would engage the enemy; telling
them they might depend upon his valour and strength
to revenge their wrongs. In the midst of these threats,
while he was lashing himself with his tail and tearing
up the ground for anger, an arrow pierced_his ribs, and
hung by its barbed point in his side. He set up a
hideous and loud roar, occasioned by the anguish which
he felt, and endeavoured to draw out the painful dart



ZESOP’S FABLES. 45

with his teeth ; when the Fox approaching him, inquired,
with an air of surprise, who it was that could have
strength and courage enough to wound so mighty and



valorous a beast. “Ah!” says the Tiger, “I was mis-
taken in my reckoning: it was that invincible man
yonder.”

Strength and courage, when through want of wisdom
they are misdirected, are less powerful than prudent fore-
thought.



46 ZESOP’S FABLES,



FasLeE XXXII.— Zhe Lioness and the Fox.

. THE Lioness and the Fox, meeting together, fell
into discourse ; and the conversation turning upon the
fruitfulness of some living creatures over others, the
Fox could not forbear taking the opportunity of ob-
serving to the Lioness, that, for her part, she thought
Foxes were as happy in that respect as almost any other
creatures, for that they bred constantly once a year, if
not oftener, and always had a good litter of cubs at
every birth. “And yet,” says she, “there are those who’
never have more than one at a time, and that perhaps



ZESOP’S FABLES, 47

not above once or twice in their lives, who hold up
their noses, and value themselves so much upon it, that
they think all other creatures beneath them, and scarce
worthy to be spoken to.” The Lioness, who all the
while perceived at whom this reflection pointed, was
fired with resentment, and with a good deal of vehe-
mence replied, ‘‘ What you have observed may be true,
and that not without reason. You produce a great
many ata litter, and often; but what are they? Foxes.
The one cub I have, you should remember, is a Lion.”

Things are not to be judged by their quantity, but by
their quality.

FaBLe XXXIII].— Zhe Oak and the Reed.

An Oak, which hung over the bank of a river, was
blown down by a violent storm of wind, and as it was
carried along by the stream, some of its boughs brushed
against a Reed which grew near the shore. This struck
the Oak with a thought of admiration, and he could
not forbear asking the Reed how he came to stand so
secure and unhurt in a tempest which had been furious
enough to tear an Oak up by the roots. “ Why,” says
the Reed, “I secure myself by putting on a behaviour
quite contrary to what you do: instead of being stub-
born and stiff, and confiding in my strength, I yield and



48 ZESOP’S FABLES.





















































bend to the blast, and let it go over me, knowing how
vain and fruitless it would be to resist.”

Where it is impossible for us to overcome, the wisest
thing is to submit patiently and cheerfully.

Faster XXXIV.— The Wind and the Sun.

A DISPUTE once arose between the North Wind and
the Sun about the superiority of their power, and they

Secs



ZESOP’S FABLES. 49











agreed to try their strength upon a traveller, which:
should be able to get his cloak off first. The North
Wind began, and blew a very cold blast, accompanied
with a sharp driving shower. But this, and whatever
else he could do, instead of making the man quit his.
cloak, obliged him to gird it about his body as close as.
possible. Next came the Sun, who, breaking out from
a thick watery cloud, drove away the cold vapours from
the sky, and darted his warm sultry beams upon the
head of the poor weatherbeaten traveller. The man
growing faint with the heat, and unable to endure it any
E 4



50 ZESOP’S FABLES.

longer, first throws off his heavy cloak, and then flies for
protection to the shade of a neighbouring grove.

Strong things are the gentlest: sweet tempers often con-
quer where passionate ones fail,













































































































































Ly) ¥

ay
NEARY

FasLe XXXV.— Zhe Kite, the Frog, and the Mouse.

THERE was once a great emulation between the Frog
and the Mouse, which should be master of the fen, and
wars ensued upon it. But the crafty Mouse, lurking
under the grass in ambuscade, made sudden sallies, and
often surprised the enemy at a disadvantage. The







ZSOP’S FABLES. 51

Frog, excelling in strength, and being more able to leap
abroad and take the field, challenged the Mouse to
single combat. The Mouse accepts the challenge ; and
each of them entered the lists, armed with a point of a
bulrush instead of a spear. A Kite, sailing in the air,
beheld them afar off; and while they were eagerly bent
upon each other, and pressing on to the duel, this fatal
enemy descended souse upon them, and with her
crooked talons carried off both the champions.

People who wrangle and fight only give their common
enemies opportunities of surprising and worsting them.

—~—

FasLe XXXVI.— Zhe Frogs desiring a King.

Tue Frogs, living an easy free life everywhere among
the lakes and ponds, assembled together one day ina
very tumultuous manner, and petitioned Jupiter to let .
them have a King, who might inspect their morals and
make them live a little honester. Jupiter, being at
that time in pretty good humour, was pleased to laugh
heartily at their ridiculous request, and throwing a little
log down into the pool, cried, “ There is a King for
you.” The sudden splash which this made by its fall
into the water, at first terrified them so exceedingly
that they were afraid to come near it; but in a little
time, seeing it lay still without moving, they ventured
by degrees to approach it; and at last, finding there
was no danger, they leaped upon it, and, in short,

4—2



52 #SOP’S FABLES.





















































































































treated it as familiarly as they pleased. But not con-
tented with so insipid a King as this was, they sent
their deputies to petition again for another sort of one,
for this they neither did nor could like. Upon that he
sent them a Stork, who, without any ceremony, fell
a-devouring and eating them up, one after another, as
fast as he could. Then they applied themselves pri-
vately to Mercury, and got him to speak to Jupiter in
their behalf, that he would be so good as to bless them
again with another King, or to restore them to their
former state. “No,” says he, “since it was their own
choice, let the obstinate wretches suffer the punishment
due to their folly.”



AESOP’S FABLES, 53

Be content with the state in which you have been placed :
to have your wishes granted might be a misfortune.





ill

Aw !
v 4



























FaBLE XXXVII.— Zhe O42 Woman and her Maids.

A CERTAIN old Woman had several Maids, whom
she used to call up to their work every morning at the
crowing of the cock. The wenches, who found it
grievous to have their sweet sleep disturbed so early,
combined together, and killed the cock ; thinking that,
when the alarm was gone, they might enjoy themselves
in their warm beds a little longer. The old Woman,







54 SOP’S FABLES.

grieved for the loss of her cock, and having, by some
means or other, discovered the whole plot, was resolved
to be even with them; for, from that time, she obliged
them to rise constantly at midnight.

By getting rid of what we think an evil in a wrong
way we only bring upon ourselves a greater,

——_»—

Faste XXXVIIL— Zhe Lion, the Bear, and the Fox.

A Lion and a Bear fell together by the ears over
the carcase of a Fawn which they found in the forest,
their title to him being to be decided by force of arms.
The battle was severe and tough on both sides, and
they held it out, tearing and worrying one another so
long, that, what with wounds and fatigue, they were so
faint and weary, that they were not able to strike
another stroke. Thus, while they lay upon the ground,
panting and lolling out their tongues, a Fox chanced
to pass by that way, who, perceiving how the case
stood, very impudently stepped in between them, seized
the booty which they had all this while been contend-
ing for, and carried it off. The two combatants, who
lay and beheld all this, without having strength enough
to stir and prevent it, were only wise enough to make
this reflection: “Behold the fruits of our strife and
contention! that villain, the Fox, bears away the prize,
and we ourselves have deprived each other of the
power to recover it from him.”



4ESOP’S FABLES. 55













Those who fight with each other often lose all and give
others the chance of enriching themselves.

FaspleE XXXIX.—TZhe Crow and the Pitcher.

A Crow, ready to die with thirst, flew with joy toa
pitcher which he beheld at some distance. When he
came, he found water in it, indeed, but so near the
bottom, that with all his stooping and straining he was
not able to reach it. Then he endeavoured to over-



56 4ESOP’S FABLES.



turn the pitcher, that so, at least, he might be able to
get alittle of it. But his strength was not sufficient
for this. At last, seeing some pebbles lie near the
place, he cast them one by one into the pitcher, and
thus by degrees raised the water up to the very brim,
and satisfied his thirst.

Patient care often succeeds where mere strength fails.

—»—

Fase XL.— Zhe Porcupine and the Snakes.

A Porcupine, wanting to shelter himself, desired a



J
4ESOP'S FABLES, 57

Uj



nest of Snakes to give him admittance into their cave.
They were prevailed upon, and let him in accordingly,
but were so annoyed with his sharp prickly quills, that
they soon repented of their easy compliance, and en-
treated the Porcupine to withdraw, and leave them
their hole to themselves. “No,” says he, “let ¢hem
quit the place that don’t like it; for my part, I am
well enough satisfied as I am.”

We should be careful whom we admit as our com-
panions or neighbours ; for once admitted, it may be diffi-
cult to remove them.



58 ZESOP’S FABLES.

a wyfivie
SL



Swed, yw
PANN











































Faste XLI.— Zhe Hares and Frogs in a Storm.

Upon a great storm of wind that blew among the
trees and bushes, and made a rustling with the leaves,
the Hares (in a certain park where there happened to
be plenty of them) were so terribly frightened, that they
ran like mad all over the place, resolving to seek out
some retreat of more security, or to end their unhappy
days by doing violence to themselves. With this reso-
lution they found an outlet where a pale had been
broken down, and bolting forth upon an adjoining
common, had not run far before their course was





ESOP’S FABLES. 59

stopped by that of a gentle brook, which glided across
the way they intended to take. This was so grievous
a disappointment that they were not able to bear it,
and they determined rather to throw themselves head-
long into the water, let what would come of it, than
lead a life so full of dangers and crosses. But, upon
their coming to the brink of the river, a parcel of Frogs,
which were sitting there, frighted at their approach,
leaped into the stream in great confusion, and dived
‘to the very bottom for fear; which a cunning old Puss
observing, called to the rest and said, “ Hold! have a
care what ye do: here are other, creatures, I perceive,
which have their fears as well as we: don’t then let us
fancy ourselves the most miserable of any upon earth ;
but rather, by their example, learn to bear patiently
those inconveniences which our nature has thrown upon
us.”

We should take example, from the tls of others, to be
satisfied with and to improve our own condition in life.

eee gn

Fase XLIL—TZhe Fox and the Wolf.

THE Wolf, having laid in a store or provision, kept
close at home and made much of himself. The Fox
observed this, and thinking it something particular,
went to visit him, the better to inform himself of the
truth of the matter. The Wolf excused himself from
seeing him, by pretending he was very much indisposed.



60 JESOP’S FABLES.





All this did but confirm the Fox in his suspicions :
so away he goes to a Shepherd, and made discovery of
the Wolf; telling him, he had nothing else to do but
to come with a good weapon and shoot him in the
head as he lay in his cave. The Shepherd followed
his directions, and killed the Wolf. The wicked Fox
enjoyed the cave and provisions to himself, but enjoyed
them not long; for the same Shepherd passing after-
wards by the same hole, and seeing the Fox there, dis-
patched him also.

To btray another, who is no worse than yourself, for
the sake of a little advantage, is most mean and cowardly.



ZESOP’S FABLES. 61

Faple XLIII—TZhe Dog and the Sheep.

THE Dog sued the Sheep for a debt, of which the
Kite and the Wolf were to be judges. They, without
debating long upon the matter, or making any scruple
for want of evidence, gave sentence for the plaintiff,
who immediately tore the poor Sheep in pieces, and
divided the spoil with the unjust judges.

There is nothing bad men will do so readily as Join to
pervert law to injure the weak.



















oe

FasLe XLIV.— Zhe Peacock and the Crane.

Tue Peacock and the Crane by chance met together
F



62 ESOP’S FABLES.

in the same place. The Peacock, erecting his tail,
displayed his gaudy plumes, and looked with contempt
upon the Crane, as some mean ordinary person. The
Crane, resolving to mortify his insolence, took occasion
to say that Peacocks were very fine birds indeed, if
fine feathers could make them so; but that he thought
it a much nobler thing to be able to rise above the
clouds, than to strut about upon the ground, and be
gazed at by children.

Lt is foolish to slight another because he wants some-
thing which we have; for he may possess other good
qualities to which we are strangers.

ee oe

Fase XLV.—TZhe Viper and the File.

A VIPER entering a smith’s shop, looked up and
down for something to eat; and seeing a File, fell to
gnawing it as greedily as could be. The File told him,
very gruffly, that he had best be quiet and let him
alone, for he would get very little by nibbling at one
who, upon occasion, could bite iron and steel.

We should be very careful whom we attack or censure,
Jor if we are vain and foolish in doing so, our words will
recou upon ourselves.



SOP’S FABLES, 63











































FastE XLVI.—TZhe Ass, the Lion, and the Cock.

Aw Ass and a Cock happened to be feeding together
in the same place, when on a sudden they spied a Lion
approaching them. ‘This beast is reported above all
things to have an aversion, or rather antipathy, to the
crowing of a cock; so that he no sooner heard the
voice of that bird, but he betook him to his heels, and
ran away as fast as ever he could. The Ass, fancying
he fled for fear of him, in the bravery of his heart
pursued him: and followed him so far that they were
quite out of the hearing of the Cock ; which the Lion



64 ZESOP’S FABLES.

no sooner perceived but he turned about and seized
the Ass; and just as he was ready to tear him to
pieces, the sluggish creature is said to have expressed
himself thus: “ Alas! fool thatIwas, knowing the cow-
ardice of my own nature, thus by an affected courage
to throw myself into the jaws of death, when I might
have remained secure and unmolested!”

To run into danger out of mere pride often brings loss
and injury.

Fapte XLVII.—Zhe Jackdaw and Peacocks.

A cerTaIN Jackdaw was so proud and ambitious,
that, not contented to live within his own sphere, he
picked up the feathers which fell from the Peacocks,
stuck them in among his own, and very confidently
introduced himself into an assembly of those beautiful
birds. They soon found him out, stripped him of his
borrowed plumes, and falling upon him with their
sharp bills, punished him as his presumption deserved.
Upon this, full of grief and affliction, he returned to
his old companions, and would have flocked with them
again ; but they, knowing his late life and conversation,
industriously avoided him, and refused to admit him
into their company; and one of them, at the same
time, gave him this serious reproof: “ If, friend, you
could have been contented with our station, and had



AESOP’S FABLES. 65

not disdained the rank in which Nature had placed
you, you had not been used so scurvily by those upon
whom you intruded yourself, nor suffered the notorious





























slight which now we think ourselves obliged to put
upon you.”
Those who aspire at being higher than Nature intended

them, will fall under the contempt of their own class, and
also of that which they long to join.



66 FESOP’S FABLES.

FasLeE XLVIII.— Zhe Ant and the Fly.

One day there happened some words between the
Ant and the Fly about precedency, and the point was
argued with great warmth and eagerness on both sides.
Says the Fly, “It is well known what my pretensions
are, and how justly they are grounded: there is never
a sacrifice that is offered. but I always taste of the
entrails, even before the gods themselves. I have one
of the uppermost seats at church, and frequent the
altar as often as anybody. I have a free admission at
court, and can never want the King’s ear, for I some-
times sit upon his shoulder. There is not a maid of
honour or handsome young creature comes in my way,
but, if I like her, I settle betwixt her balmy lips. And
then I eat and drink the best of everything, without
having any occasion to work for my living. What is
there that such country pusses as you enjoy, to be
compared with a life like this?” The Ant, who by
this time had composed herself, replied with a great
deal of temper and no less severity: ‘Indeed, to be
a guest at an entertainment of the gods is a very great
honour, if one is invited; but I should not care to be
a disagreeable intruder anywhere. You talk of the
King, and the court, and the fine ladies there, with
great familiarity; but, as I have been getting in my
harvest in summer, I have seen a certain person under
the town walls, making a hearty meal upon something
that is not so proper to be mentioned. As to your
frequenting the altars, you are in the right to take





ZESOP’S FABLES. 63

sanctuary where you are like to meet with the least
disturbance ; but I have known people before now run
to altars, and call it devotion, when they have been
shut out of all good company, and had nowhere else
to go. You do not work for your living, you say—
true: therefore, when you have played away the sum-
mer, and winter comes, you have nothing to live upon ;
and, while you are starving with cold and hunger, I
have a good warm house over my head, and plenty of
provisions about me.”

Honesty and industry make the true gentleman, not the
pretence of keeping fine company and boasting about tt.

Faste XLIX.— Zhe Ant and the Grasshopper.

In the winter season a commonwealth of Ants was
busily employed in the management and preservation
of their corn, which they exposed to the air in heaps
round about the avenues of their little country habita-
tion. A Grasshopper, who had chanced to outlive the
summer, and was ready to starve with cold and hunger,
approached them with great humility, and begged that
they would relieve his necessity with one grain of
wheat or rye. One of the Ants asked him how he had
disposed of his time in summer, that he had not taken
pains, and laid in a stock, as they had done. “Alas!
gentlemen,” says he, “I passed away the time merrily

5—2





68 SOP’S FABLES.



























and pleasantly, in drinking, singing, and dancing, and
never once thought of winter.” “If that be the case,”
replied the Ant, laughing, “all I have to say is, that
they who drink, sing, and dance in the summer, must
starve in winter.”

We should never lose a good opportunity ; it may not
return till we are unable to use it, and losing it may put
us ever after at great disadvantage.

—>—.

Fase L.— Zhe Countryman and the Snake.

A VILLAGER, in a frosty, snowy winter, found a Snake
under a hedge, almost dead with cold. He could not







ZSOP’S FABLES. 69



help having compassion for the poor creature, so he
brought it home, and laid it upon the hearth near the
fire; but it had not lain there long, before (being re-
vived with the heat) it began to erect itself and fly at
his wife and children, filling the whole cottage with
dreadful hissings. The Countryman, hearing an-outcry
and perceiving what the matter was, catched up a
mattock, and soon dispatched him, upbraiding him at
the same time in these words: “Is this, vile wretch !
the reward you make to him that saved your life?
Die, as you deserve; but a single death is too good
for you.”



70 ZESOP’S FABLES.

Kindness may be wasted, and great evil done, by our
not bestowing it upon fit objects.

FaBLe LI.— Zhe Fox and the Sick Lion.

It was reported that the Lion was sick, and the
beasts were made to believe that they could not make
their court better than by going to visit him. Upon
this they generally went; but it was particularly taken
notice of that the Fox was not one of the number.
The Lion therefore dispatched one of his Jackals to
sound him about it, and ask him why he had so little
charity and respect as never to come near himat a .
time when he lay so dangerously ill, and everybody
else had been to see him. “Why,” replies the Fox,
“pray present my duty to his majesty, and tell him
that I have the same respect for him as ever, and have
been coming several times to kiss his royal hand; but
I am so terribly frightened at the mouth of his cave, to
see the prints of my fellow-subjects’ feet all pointing
forwards and none backwards, that I have not resolu-
tion enough to venture in.” Now, the truth of the
matter was, that this sickness of the Lion’s was only a
sham to draw the beasts into his den, the more easily
to devour them.

No important action should ever be taken hastily.



ZESOP’S FABLES. __ 71











FasLe LIl.—Zhe Wanton Calf.

A Ca tr, full of play and wantonness, seeing the Ox
at plough, could not forbear insulting him. “ What a
sorry poor drudge art thou,” says he, “to bear that
heavy yoke upon your neck, and go all day drawing a
plough at your tail, to turn up the ground for your
master; but you are a wretched dull slave, and know
no better, or else you would not do it. See what a
happy life I lead: I go just where I please ; sometimes
I lie down under the cool shade; sometimes frisk
about in the open sunshine ; and, when I please, slake



72 SOP’S FABLES.

my thirst in the clear sweet brook. But you, if you
were to perisn, have not so much as a little dirty water
to refresh you.” The Ox, not at all moved with what
he said, went quietly and calmly on with his work ;
and, in the evening, was unyoked and turned loose.
Soon after which he saw the Calf taken out of the
field, and delivered into the hands of a priest, who
immediately led him to the altar, and prepared to sa-
crifice him. His head was hung round with fillets of
flowers, and the fatal knife was just going to be applied
to his throat, when the Ox drew near, and whispered
him to this purpose: “ Behold the end of your inso-
lence and arrogance! It was for this only you were
suffered to live at all; and pray, now, friend, whose
condition is best, yours or mine?”

Those who are idle and useless are prone to insult the
honest and diligent ; and their fate is not seldom a miser-
able and pitiable one.

—_—

Fase LII].—ercules and the Carter.

As a clownish fellow was driving his cart along a
deep miry lane, the wheels stuck so fast in the clay
that the horses could not draw them out. Upon this
he fell a bawling and praying to Hercules to come and
help him. Hercules, looking down from a cloud, bid
him not lie there, like an idle rascal as he was, but get
up and whip his horses stoutly, and clap his shoulder





?
SOP'S FABLES. 73



to the wheel; adding that this was the only way for
him to obtain his assistance.

The only way to get real assistance from others is to be
active and resolute oneself.

—

FasLe LIV.—TZihe Belly and the Members.

In former days, when the Belly and the other parts
of the body enjoyed the faculty of speech, and had
separate views and designs of their own, the several
parts, it seems, each in particular for himself, and in

G



74 FESOP’S FABLES,

the name of the whole, took exception at the conduct
of the Belly, and were resolved not to grant him sup-
plies any longer. They said they thought it very hard
that he should lead an idle, good-for-nothing life, spend-
ing and squandering upon himself all the fruits of their
labour; and that, in short, they were resolved for the
future to strike off his allowance, and let him shift for
himself as well as he could. The Hands protested
they would not lift up a finger to keep him from sta:v-
ing; and the Mouth wished he might never speak
again if he took in the least bit of nourishment for
him as long as he lived; and, say the Teeth, “ May we
be rotten if ever we chew a morsel for him for the
future.” This solemn league and covenant was kept as
long as anything of that kind can be kept, which was
until each of the rebel members pined away to the
skin and bone, and could hold out no longer. Then
they found there was no doing without the Belly, and
that, idle and insignificant as he seemed, he contri-
buted as much to the maintenance and welfare of all
the other parts as they did to his.

Many things which appear useless or insignificant are
as indispensable as those which seem more inportant, and
nothing but evil can arise from the attempt to dispense

with them.
sec an

FasLle LV.— Zhe Horse and the Lion.

A Lion, seeing a fine plump Nag, had a great mind
to eat a bit of him, but knew not which way to get



ZESOP’S FABLES. 75

him into his power. At last he bethought himself of
this contrivance: he gave out that he was a physician,
who, having gained experience by his travels into
foreign countries, had made himself capable of curing
any sort of malady or distemper incident to any kind



of beast,—hoping by this stratagem to get an easier
admittance among cattle, and find an opportunity to
execute his design. The Horse, who guessed at his
intent, was resolved to be even with him; and so,
humouring the thing as if he suspected nothing, he
prayed the Lion to give him his advice in relation to a



76 ZESOP’S FABLES.

thorn he had got in his foot, which had quite lamed him,
and gave him great pain and uneasiness. The Lion
readily agreed, and desired that he might see the foot.
Upon which the Horse lifted up one of his hind legs,
and, while the Lion pretended to be poring earnestly
upon his hoof, gave him such a kick im the face as
quite stunned him, and left him sprawling upon the
ground. In the meantime the Horse trotted away,
neighing and laughing merrily at the success of the
trick by which he had defeated the purpose of one
who intended to have tricked him out of his life.

Cunning persons are often caught in their own snare.

‘Faste LVI.—Zke Husbandman and the Stork.

THE Husbandman pitched a net in his fields to take
the cranes and geese which came to feed upon the
new-sown corn. Accordingly he took several, both
cranes and geese, and among them a Stork, who
pleaded hard for his life, and among other apologies
which he made, alleged that he was neither goose nor
crane, but a poor harmless Stork, who performed his
duty to his parents to all intents and purposes, feeding
them when they were old, and, as occasion required,
carrying them from place to place upon his back.
“ All this may be very true,” replies the Husbandman ;
“but, as I have taken you in bad company, and in the





ZESOP’S FABLES. 17



same crime, you must expect to suffer the same punish-
ment.”

People are judged by the company they keep.

FapLe LVIL—Z%e Cat and the Cock.

Tuer Cat, having a mind to make a meal of the
Cock, seized him one morning by surprise, and asked
him what he could say for himself why slaughter should



78 ZESOP’S FABLES,

not pass upon him. The Cock replied that he was
serviceable to mankind by crowing in the morning,
and calling them up to their daily labour. “That is
true,” says the Cat, “and is the very objection that I



have against you; for you make such a shrill imperti-
nent noise that people cannot sleep for you.”

Justice and reason have usually little chance against
wickedness when tt is in power.











®SOP’S FABLES. 79



e

Seg















Faste LVIIl—Z%e Leopard and the Fox.

Tue Leopard one day took it into his head to value
himself upon the great variety and beauty of his spots,
and truly he saw no reason why even the Lion should
take place of him, since he could not show so beautiful
askin. As for the rest of the wild beasts of the forest,
he treated them all, without distinction, in the most
haughty, disdainful manner. But the Fox, being among
them, went up to him with a great deal of spirit and
resolution, and told him that he was mistaken in the
value he was pleased to set upon-himself, since people



80 ESOP’S FABLES.

of judgment were not used to form their opinion of
merit from the outside appearance, but by considering

the good qualities and endowments with which the’

mind was stored within.

Modesty is more than the half of beauty; vanity spoils
the highest personal charms.



Fase LIX.— Zhe Shephera’s Boy.

A CERTAIN Shepherd’s Boy kept his sheep upon a
common, and, in sport and wantonness, would often
cry out, “The wolf! the wolf!” By this means he



ZESOP’S FABLES. 81

several times drew the husbandmen in an adjoining
field from their work ; who, finding themselves deluded,
resolved for the future to take no notice of his alarm.
Soon after the wolf came indeed. The Boy cried out
in earnest ; but no heed being given to his cries, the
sheep were devoured by the wolf.

He who tells lies is not believed even when he speaks.
the truth, and is sure to suffer in the end.

ined
\

1 ii - 5
Ae hy a

i a hi \

GG 5
a why AN Wm

i



age

Fase LX.—Zhe Fox and the Goat.

A Fox having tumbled by chance into a well, had
6



82 ESOP’S FABLES.

been casting about a long while, to no purpose, how
he should get out again; when at last a Goat came to
the place, and, wanting to drink, asked Reynard whether
the water was good. “Good !” says he, “ay, so sweet
that I am afraid I have surfeited myself, I have drunk
so abundantly.” The Goat upon this, without any
more ado, leaped in ; and the Fox, taking the advantage
of his horns, by the assistance of them as nimbly
leaped out, leaving the poor Goat at the bottom of the
well to shift for himself.

Do not judge things from other people's words, but by
due reftection on them.

——

Fase LXI.—Cupid and Death.

CupIb, one sultry summer’s noon, tired with play and
faint with heat, went into a cool grotto to repose himself,
which happened to be the cave of Death. He threw
himself carelessly down on the floor, and his quiver
turning topsy-turvy, all the arrows fell out, and mingled
with those of Death, which lay scattered up and down
the place. When he awoke, he gathered them up as
well as he could; but they were so intermingled that,
though he knew the certain number, he could not
rightly distinguish them ; from which it happened that
he took up some of the arrows which belonged to
Death, and left several of his own in the room of them.
This is the cause that we now and then see the hearts
of the old and decrepit transfixed with the bolts of



#ESOP’S FABLES. 83

Love, and with equal grief and surprise behold the
youthful blooming part of our species smitten with the
darts of Death.

Good and evil are so mixed in this world, that many
of the apparent irregularities of life are by Providence
meant for good ends; and we should not always guarrel
with what seem evils, for they may only be hidden benefits.

—>—.

Faster LXII.— Zhe Old Man and his Sons.

An old Man had many sons, who were often falling.
out with one another. When the father had exerted
his authority and used other means in order to recon-
cile them, and all to no purpose, at last he had recourse
to this expedient: He ordered his sons to be called
before him, and a short bundle of sticks to be brought,
and then commanded them, one by one, to try if, with
all their might and strength, they could any of them
break it. They all tried, but to no purpose; for the
sticks being closely and compactly bound up together,
it was impossible for the force of man to do it. After
this, the father ordered the bundle to be untied, and
gave a single stick to each of his sons, at the same time
bidding him try to break it ; which when each did with
all imaginable ease, the father addressed himself to
them to this effect: “O my sons, behold the power of
unity! for if you, in like manner, would but keep your-
selves strictly conjoined in the bonds of friendship, it

6—2



84 ZESOP’S FABLES.



would not be in the power of any mortal to hurt you;
but when once the ties of brotherly affection are dis-
solved, how soon do you fall to pieces, and are liable
to be violated by every injurious hand that assaults
you!”

True strength lies in union.
eon
Fasie LXIII.— Zhe Stag and the Fawn.

A Srac, grown old and mischievous, was, according
to custom, stamping with his foot, making offers with



g

SOP’S FABLES. 85



his head, and bellowing so terribly, that the whole herd
quaked for fear of him, when one of the little Fawns
coming up, addressed him to this purpose: “ Pray,
what is the reason that you, who are so stout and for-
midable at all other times, if you do but hear the cry
of the hounds, are ready to fly out of your skin for
fear?” ‘What you observe is true,” replied the Stag,
“though I know not how to account for it. Iam
indeed vigorous, and able enough, I think, to make my
party good anywhere, and often resolve within myself
that nothing shall ever dismay my courage for the
future ; but, alas! I no sooner hear the voice of a
H



86 #ESOP’S FABLES.

hound but all my spirits fail me, and I cannot help
making off as fast as ever my legs can carry me.”

Many a very cowardly person will assume airs, and
lord it over those who are weaker than himself.

AY



FasLe LX1IV.— Zhe Old Hound.

Aw old Hound, who had been an excellent good one
in his time, and given his master great sport and satis-
faction in many a chase, at last, by the effect of -years,







ZESOP’S FABLES. 87

became feeble and unserviceable. However, being in
the field one day when the boar was almost run down,
he happened to be the first that came in with him, and
seized him by one of his haunches; but his decayed
and broken teeth not being able to keep their hold,
the boar escaped, and threw him quite out. Upon
which, his master being in a great passion and going
to strike him, the honest old creature is said to have
barked out his apology : “Ah ! do not strike your poor
old servant! It is not my heart and inclination, but
my strength and speed, that fail me. If what I now
am displeases, pray don’t forget what I have been.”

People often err in losing sight of the intention with
which a thing is done.

FasLe LXV.—/upiter and the Camel.

THE Camel presented a petition to Jupiter, com-
plaining of the hardship of his case, in not having, like
bulls and other creatures, horns, nor any weapons of
defence, to protect himself from the attacks of his
enemies, and praying that relief might be given him
in such a manner as might be thought most expedient.
Jupiter could not help smiling at the impertinent
address of the great silly beast, but, however, rejected
the petition, and told him that, so far from granting
his unreasonable request, henceforward he would take



88 Sor FABLES,

care his ears should be shortened, as a punishment for
his presumptuous importunity.

True wisdom consists in using well the organs and
opportunities we have, and not in wishing and sighing for
what ts against our nature and circumstances.

FasLe LXV1.—Z%e Fox without a Tail.

A Fox being caught in a steel trap by his tail, was
glad to compound for his escape with the loss of it;
but, upon coming abroad into the world, began to be
so sensible of the disgrace such a defect would bring
upon him, that he almost wished he had died rather
than left it behind him. However, to make the best
of a bad matter, he formed a project in his head to call
an assembly of the rest of the Foxes, and propose it
for their imitation as a fashion which would be very
agreeable and becoming. He did so, and made a long
harangue upon the unprofitableness of tails in general,
and endeavoured chiefly to show the awkwardness and
inconvenience of a fox’s tail in particular ; adding, that
it would both be more graceful and more expeditious
to be altogether without them; and that, for his part,
what he had only imagined and conjectured before, he
now found by experience, for that he never enjoyed
himself so well, and found himself so easy, as he had
done since he cut off his tail. He said no more, but



Full Text






EDITED BY ae .
EDWARD GARRETT, M. A. | x

}

3 5
\ t K
X
" 4 te


The Baldwin Library





ESOP’S FABLES.











THE DOG AND THE SHEEP.
oO igs Sh ia) IE eS)

EDITED BY

EDWARD GARRETT, M.A.

WITH ONE HUNDRED ILLUSTRATIONS
BY

J. WOLF, J. B. ZWECKER, AND T. DALZIEL.



PHILADELPHIA:
J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY.
1892.
FABLE
\.—The
I1.—The
IWI.—The
1V.—The
V.—The
| VI—The
VII.—The
VIII—The
IX.—The
X.—The
XI.—The
XI1.—The
XIII.—The
XIV.—The
XV.—The
XVI—The
XVII.—The
XVIII.—The
XIX.—The
XKX.—The
XXI.—The
XXIIl.—The
XXIII.—The
XXIV.—The
XXV.—The

CONTENTS.

—

Cock and the Jewel . d . .
Wolf and the Lamb. , . :
Lion and the four Bulls . é .
For and the Frog . : .
Ass eating Thistles . . 7 :
Lark and her Young Ones

Cock and the Fox : a
Fox in the Well : 5 . .
Wolves and the Sheep

Eagle and the Fox .«

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing .
Sportsman and the Ringdove

Sow and the Wolf

Horse and the Ass

Wolf, the Laml, and the Goat

Kite andthe Pigeons . .
Country Mouse and the City owes
Swallow and other Birds .

Hunted Beaver . fs ‘ .

Cat and the Fox 5 7 :
Cat and the Mice . , ;

Lion and other Beasts 6 : f
Lion and the Mouse. ° ; '
Fatal Marriage 4 ; .
Mischievous Dog - ; . .

37
FABLE
XXVI.—The
XXVII—The
XXVIII.—The
XXIX.—The
XXX.—The
XXX1.—The
XXXII.—The
XXXIII.—The
XXXIV.—The
XXXV.—The

XXXVI.—The
XXXVII.—The

XXXVIIL—The
XXXIX.—The
XL.—The
XLI—The
XLII.—The
XLUI.—The
XLIV.—The
XLV.—The
XLVI.—The
XLVII.—The
XLVII.—The
XLIX.—The
L—The
LI.—The
LII.—The

CONTENTS.

Ox and the Frog. F 6 .
Fox and the Lion . 5 % 5
Ape and the For

Dog mm the Manger . .
Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat.

For and the Tiger

Lioness and the Fox

Oak and the Reed

Wind and the Sun . a
Kite, the Frog, and ‘the Mouse .
Frogs deswrang a King

Old Woman and her Matas

Lion, the Bear, and the For . a
Crow and the Pitcher i : :
Porcupie and the Snakes

Hares and Frogs in a Storm . :
Fox and the Wolf. : - ‘
Dog and the Sheep . ;
Peacock and the Crane

Viper and the File. : : :
Ass, the Lion, and the Cock . 5
Jackdaw and Peacocks. : .

Ant and the Fly

Ant and the Grasshopper .
Countryman and the Snake , .
Fox and the Sick Lion

Wanton Calf .

LIl].—Hercules and the Carter . . z .

LIV.—The
LV.—The
LVI.—The

Belly and the Members
Horse and the Lion .
Hustandman and the Stork


“PABLE
LVII.—The
LVIII.—The
LIX.—The
LX.—The

CONTENTS.

Cat and the Cock
Leopard and the Fox
Shepherd’s Boy

For and the Goat

LXI— Cupid and Death

LXII.—The
LXII.—The
LXIV.—The

Old Man and his Sons
Stag and the Fawn .
Old Hound

LXV.—Jupiter and the Camet

LXVI.—The
LXVII.—The
LXVIII.—The
LXIX.—The
LXX.—The
LXXI—The
LXXI —The

LXXIIH.—The
LXXIV.—The
LXXV.—The
LXXVI.—The
LXXVII.—The
LXXVII.—The

LXXIX.—The
LXXX.—The
LXXXI.—The

LXXXII.—The
LXXXIII.—The
LXXXIV.—The

LXXXV.—The
LXXXVI.—The

LXXXVII.—The

Fox without a Tail .

Fox and-the Crow

Hawk and the Farmer

Nurse and the Wolf.

Hare and the Tortoise
Fighting Cocks and the Eagle .
Ass ww the Lion’s Skin
Mountains in Latour

Satyr and the Traveller

Sick Kite 4 :
Hawk and the Nightingale
Peacock’s Complaint .

Angler and the Little Fish
Geese und the Cranes

Dog and the Shadow

Ass and the Little Dog

Wolf and the Crane. é -
Envious Man and the Covetous
Two Pots

Fox and the Stork

Bear and the Bee-hives
Travellers and the Bear . :

x1
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81
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FABLE
LXXXVII.—The
LXXXIX.—The
- XC.—The
XCI.—The
XCII.—The
XCII.— The
XCIV.—Ths
XCV.—The
XCVI.—The
XCVII.—The
XCVIII.— The
XCIX —The
C.—The
CI.—The
CII.—The
CIlI.—The
CIV.—The
CV.—The
CVI.—The
CVII.—The
CVIII.—The
CIX —The
CX.—The
CXI.—The
CXII.—The
CXIN—The
CXIV.—The
CXV.—The

CONTENTS.

Trumpeter taken Prisoner 3 eit

Partridge and the Cocks . .
Falconer and the Partridge ; .
Eagle and the Crow

Lion, the Ass, and the For
Fox and the Grapes

Horse and the Stag

Young Man and the Swallow
Man and his Goose .

Dog and the Wolf.

Wood and the Clown

Old Lion . 4 :
Horse and the Loaded Ass
Old Man and Death

Boar and the Ass

Tunny and the Dolphin . :
Peacock and the Magme . . .
Forester and the Lion

Stag looking mto the Water
Stag in the Ox-stall

Dove and the Ant

Lion in Love . . : :
Tortoise and the Eagle . . .
Wild Boar and the For . .
Wolf and the Lion . . .
Bull and the Goat . . ° .
Fox and the Mask . 6 . .
Fine and the Goat . d . °

PAGE

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JESOP’S FABLES.













































Fase I.— Zhe Cock and the Jewel.

A BRISK young Cock, in company with two or three
pullets, his mistresses, raking upon a dunghill for some-
thing to entertain them with, happened to scratch up a
jewel. He knew what it was well enough, for it sparkled
with an exceeding bright lustre; but, not knowing what
to do with it, endeavoured to cover his ignorance under
a gay contempt; so, shrugging up his wings, shaking
his head, and putting on a grimace, he expressed him-
self to this. purpose :—‘“ Indeed you are a very fine

A 1
2 ZESOP’S FABLES.

thing, but I know not any business you have here. I
make no scruple of declaring that my taste lies quite
another way; and I had rather have one grain of dear
delicious barley than all the jewels under the sun.”

Never express contempt for what you do not under-
stand: you will only betray your ignorance.

an

Fase Il—Zhe Wolf and the Lamb.

One hot, sultry day, a Wolf and a Lamb happened
to come, just at the same time, to quench their thirst
in the stream of a clear silver brook that ran tumbling
down the side of a rocky mountain. The Wolf stood
upon the higher ground, and the Lamb at some distance
from him down the current... However, the Wolf, hav-
ing a mind to pick a quarrel with him, asked him what
he meant by disturbing the water, and making it so
muddy that he could not drink? and at the same time
demanded satisfaction. The Laub, frightened at this
threatening charge, told him in a tone as mild as possi-
ble that, with humble submission, he could not con-
‘ceive how that could be, since the water which he
drank ran down from the Wolf to him, and therefore
it could not be disturbed so far up the stream. “Be
that as it will,” replies the Wolf, “ you are a rascal, and
T have been told that you treated me with ill language,
behind my back, about half a year ago.” “ Upon my
word,” says the Lamb, “the time you mention was be-
ZESOP’S FABLES. 3

fore I was born.” The Wolf, finding it to no purpose
to argue any longer against truth, fell into a great pas-
sion, snarling and foaming at the mouth as if he had



been mad ; and drawing nearer to the Lamb, “ Sirrah,”
says he, “if it was not you, it was your father, and that
is all one.” So he seized the poor innocent helpless
thing, tore it to pieces, and made a meal of it.

A person bent on injuring one more innocent than him-
Self will never lack excuses.
4 #SOP’S FABLES.



Fas.e IlIl.— The Lion and the Jour Bulls.

Four Bulls, which had entered into a very strict
friendship, kept always near one another, and fed to-

gether. The Lion often saw them, and as often had a

mind to make one of them his prey; but, though he
could easily have subdued any of them singly, yet he
was afraid to attack the whole alliance, as knowing
they would have been too hard for him, and therefore
contented himself, for the present, with keeping at a
distance. At last, perceiving no attempt was to be
made upon them as long as this combination held, he
ZESOP’S FABLES. 5

took occasion, by whispers and hints, to foment jea-
lousies and raise divisions among them. This strata-
gem succeeded so well, that the Bulls grew cold and
reserved towards one another, which soon after ripened
into a downright hatred and aversion, and at last ended
in a total separation. The Lion had now obtained
his ends; and, as impossible as it was for him to hurt
them while they were united, he found no difficulty,
now they were parted, to seize and devour every Bull
of them, one after the other.

Tale-bearers have more power to do deadly injury to
friends than the strongest open enemy; therefore they
should not be encouraged or listened to.

Fasie IV.—Zhe Fox and th: Frog.

A Fros, leaping out of the lake, and taking the
advantage of a rising ground, made proclamation to
all the beasts of the forest, that he was an able physi-
cian, and, for curing all manner of distempers, would
turn his back to no person living. This discourse,
uttered in a parcel of hard cramp words, which noboby
understood, made the beasts admire his learning and
give credit to everything he said. At last the Fox,
who was present, with indignation asked him how he
could have the impudence, with those thin lantern
jaws, that meagre pale phiz, and blotched spotted body.
6 FSOP’S FABLES.



to set up for one who was able to cure the infirmities
of others.

We should not set ourselves up to cure others while we
ourselves are in need of cure.

——~—_

FasLe V.— Zhe Ass cating Thistles.

Aw Ass was loaded with good provisions of several
sorts, which, in the time of harvest, he was carrying
into the field for his master and the reapers to dine
#SOP’S FABLES. 4





















upon. By the way he met with a fine large thistle,
and, being very hungry, began to mumble it, which,
while he was doing, he entered into this reflection :
“ How many greedy epicures would think themselves
happy amidst such a variety of delicate viands as I
now carry! But to me this bitter prickly thistle is
more savoury and relishing than the most exquisite
and sumptuous banquet.”

We should not expect other people to share either our
opinions or tastes, and ought therefore to be fair and tole-
rant towards them.
8 #ESOP’S FABLES.

Fase VI.—Zhe Lark and her Young Ones.

A Lark, who had young ones in a field of corn
which was almost ripe, was under some fear lest the
reapers should come to reap it before her young brood
were fledged, and able to remove from the place ;
wherefore, upon flying abroad to look for food, she left
this charge with them—that they should take notice
what they heard talked of in her absence, and tell her
of it when she came back again. While she was gone,
they heard the owner of the corn call to his son—
“Well,” says he, “I think this corn is ripe enough; I
would have you go early to-morrow, and desire our
friends and neighbours to come and help us to reap
it.’ When the old Lark returned, the young ones
fell a quivering and chirping round her, and told her
what had happened, begging her to remove them as

fast as she could. The mother bid them be easy;
“ For,” says she, “if the owner depends upon friends
and neighbours, I am pretty sure the corn will not be
reaped to-morrow.” Next day she went out again
upon the same occasion, and left the same orders with
them as before. The owner came and stayed, expect-
ing those he had sent to; but the sun grew hot, and
nothing was done, for not a soul came to help him.
“Then,” says he to his son, “I perceive these friends
of ours are not to be depended upon; so that you
must even go to your uncles and cousins, and tell
them I desire they would be here betimes to-morrow
morning to help us to reap.” Well, this the young
#SOP’S FABLES. 9



ones, in a great fright, reported also to their mother.
“Tf that be all,” says she, “do not be frightened, chil-
dren; for kindred and relations do not use to be so
very forward to serve one another; but take particular
notice what you hear said the next time, and be sure
you let me know it.” She went abroad the next day
as usual; and the owner, finding his relations as slack
as the rest of his neighbours, said to his son, “ Hark
ye, George: do you get a couple of good sickles ready
against to-morrow morning, and we will even reap the
corn ourselves.” When the young ones told their
mother this, “Then,” says she, “we must be gone
Io FESOP’S FABLES.

indeed! for when a man undertakes to do his business
himself, it is not so likely that he will be disappointed.”
So she removed her young ones immediately, and the

corn was reaped the next day by the good man and
his son.

Tf you would escape sorrow and disappointment, never
dipend on others to do for you what you can best do for
yourself.

ee

Faple VII.—Zhe Cock and the Fox.

TuE Fox, passing early one summer’s morning near
a farm-yard, was caught in a spring, which the farmer
had planted there for that end. The Cock, at a dis-
tance, saw what happened ; and, hardly yet daring to
trust himself too near so dangerous a foe, approached
him cautiously, and peeped at him, not without some
horror and dread of mind. Reynard no sooner per-
ceived it, but he addressed himself to him with all the
designing artifice imaginable. ‘“ Dear cousin,” says he,
“you see what an unfortunate accident has befallen
me here, and all upon your account; for, as I was
creeping through yonder hedge in my way homeward,
I heard you crow, and was resolved to ask you how
you did before I went any farther; but by the way I
met with this disaster ; and therefore now I must be-
come a humble suitor to you for a knife to cut this
plaguy string, or, at least, that you would conceal my
misfortune till I have gnawed it asunder with my teeth.”
ESOP’S FABLES. II

The Cock, seeing how the case stood, made no reply,
but posted away as fast as he could, and gave the
farmer an account of the whole matter; who, taking a



7

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SS Se
: es
a cea

X

SS




good weapon along with him, came and did the Fox’s
business before he could have time to contrive his
escape.

There is no greater error than to bestow sympathy and
ad on undeserving subjects.
12 ASOP’S FABLES.

i a je qf

AGT tf

a LS
i i wi UH gC
Nh





Fase VIIl.—Zhe Fox in the Well.

A Fox, having fallen into a well, made a shift, by
sticking his claws into the sides, to keep his head
above water. Soon after, a Wolf came and peeped
over the brink, to whom the Fox applied himself very
earnestly for assistance, entreating that he would help
him to a rope, or something of that kind, which might
favour his escape. The Wolf, moved with compassion
at his misfortune, could not forbear expressing his con-
cern. “Ah! poor Reynard,” says he, “I am sorry for
you with all my heart! how could you possibly come
into this melancholy condition?” “Nay, prithee,
4ESOP’S FABLES. 13

friend,” replies the Fox, “if you wish me well, do not
stand pitying of me, but lend me some succour as fast
as you can; for pity is but cold comfort when one is

up to the chin in water, and within a hair’s breadth of
starving or drowning.’

Pity is good when accompanied by some more substantial
aid ; wis poor comfort without help, when help is possible.



Fase 1X.— Zhe Wolves and the Sheep.

Tue Wolves and the Sheep had been a long time in
a state of war together. At last a cessation of arms
B
I4 ZESOP’S FABLES.

was proposed, in order to a treaty of peace, and host-
ages were to be delivered on both sides for security.
The Wolves proposed that the Sheep should give up
their dogs, on the one side, and that they would de-
liver up their young ones, on the other. This proposal
was agreed to; but no sooner executed than the young
Wolves began to howl for want of their dams. The
old ones took this opportunity to cry out, the treaty
was broke; and so falling upon the Sheep, who were
destitute of their faithful guardians, the dogs, they
worried and devoured them without control.

In cases of difficulty and extremity we should be careful
not to part with what our real safety depends on.

oe

FasLe X.— Zhe Eagle and the Fox.

An Eagle that had young ones, looking out for some-
thing to feed them with, happened to spy a Fox’s cub
that lay basking itself abroad in the sun. She made a
stoop and trussed it immediately ; but before she had
carried it quite off, the old Fox, coming home, implored
her, with tears in her eyes, to spare her cub, and pity
the distress of a poor fond mother who should think
no affliction so great as that of losing her child. The
Eagle, whose nest was up in a very high tree, thought
herself secure enough from all projects of revenge, and
so bore away the cub to her young ones, without show-
ing any regard to the supplications of the Fox. But
ZESOP’S FABLES. 15



that subtle creature, highly incensed at this outrageous
barbarity, ran to an altar, where some country people
had been sacrificing a kid in the open fields, and catch-
ing up a firebrand in her mouth, made towards the
tree where the Eagle’s nest was, with a resolution of
revenge. She had scarce ascended the first branches,
when the Eagle, terrified with the approaching ruin of
herself and family, begged of the Fox to desist, and,
with much submission, returned her the cub again safe
and sound.

Lf you intentionally injure your neighbour, you put
yourself in his power.
16 ESOP’S FABLES.



Faste X1.—TZhe Wolf in Sheep's Clothing.

A Wortr clothing himself in the skin of a sheep, and
getting in among the flock, by this means took the
opportunity to devour many of them. At last the
Shepherd discovered him, and cunningly fastening a
rope about his neck, tied him up to a tree which stood
hard by. Some other Shepherds happening to pass
that way, and observing what he was about, drew near
and expressed their amazement at it. ‘‘ What,” says one
of them, “brother, do you make hanging of sheep?”
“No,” replies the other, “ but I make hanging of a wolf
ZESOP’S FABLES. 17

whenever I catch him, though in the habit and garb of
asheep.” Then he showed them their mistake, and they
applauded the justice of the execution.

Do not respect appearances ; but, in whatever garb you
find hypocrisy or evil, be sure to expose and punish it.



Fase XII].— Zhe Sportsman and the Ringdove..

A Sportsman took his bow and went into the woods.
a-shooting. He spied a Ringdove among the branches:
of an oak, and intended to kill it. He drew the bow
to his shoulder, and took his aim accordingly. But,

2
18 ESOP’S FABLES.

sust as he was going to loose the arrow, an Adder, which
he had trod upon under the grass, stung him so pain-
fully in the leg that he was forced to quit his design,
and threw his bow down in a passion. The poison
immediately infected his blood, and his whole body
began to mortify ; which when he perceived, he could
not help owning to be just. “Fate,” says he, “has
brought destruction upon me while I was contriving the
death of another.”

Those who seek to do ill to others are certainly in the
way of il to themselves. ;

FasLe XIII.— Zhe Sow and the Wolf.

A Sow had just farrowed, and lay in the sty, with
her whole litter of pigs about her. A Wolf, who longed
for one of them, but knew not how to come at it, en-
deavoured to insinuate himself into the Sow’s good
opinion, and accordingly coming up to her—“ How
does the good woman in the straw do?” sayshe. “Can
I be of any service to you, Mrs. Sow, in relation to
your little family here? If you have a mind to go
abroad, and air yourself a little, or so, you may depend
upon it I will take as much care of your pigs as you
could do yourself.” “Your humble servant,” says the
Sow. “I thoroughly understand your meaning ; and, to
ZESOP’S FABLES. : 19

let you know I do, I must be so free as to tell you I
had rather have your room than your company; and




AB

WI

L

iy

therefore, if you would act like a wolt of honour, and
oblige me, I beg I may never see your face again.”

Distrust those who make too great show of civility:
their intentions are not seldom bad.
20 ZESOP’S FABLES.









FasLe XIV.— Zhe Horse and the Ass.

Tue Horse, adorned with his great war saddle, and
champing his foaming bridle, came thundering along
the way, and made the mountains echo with his loud
shrill neighing. He had not gone far before he over-
took an Ass, who was labouring under a heavy burden,
and moving slowly on in the same track with himself.
Immediately he called out to him, in a haughty, im-
perious tone, and threatened to trample him in the
dirt if he did not break the way for him. The poor
patient Ass, not daring to dispute the matter, quietly
#ESOP’S FABLES. : 21

got out of his way as fast as he could, and let him go
by. Not long after this, the same Horse, in an engage-
ment with the enemy, happened to be shot in the eye,
which made him unfit for show, or any military busi-
ness, so he was stripped of his fine ornaments and sold
to a carrier. The Ass, meeting him in this forlorn
condition, thought that now it was his time to insult;
and so says he, “ Heyday, friend! is it you? Well, I
always believed that pride of yours would one day have
a fall.”

Those who, from pride, treat others sternly and cruelly,
may themselves come into such straits as to give oppor-
tunity for the same treatment of them.

—»~—

Fase XV.—Zvhe Wolf, the Lamb, and the Goat.

A Wo r meeting a Lamb one day in company with
a Goat, “ Child,” says he, “you are mistaken: this is
none of your mother; she is yonder ;” pointing to a
flock of sheep at adistance. “It may be so,” says the
Lamb ; “ the person that happened to give birth to me
because she could not help it, and then left me, she
did not care where, is, I suppose, what you call my
mother; but I look upon this charitable Goat as such,
that took compassion on me in my poor, helpless, des-
titute condition, and gave me suck ; sparing it out of
the mouths of her own kids, rather than I should want
it.” “ But, sure,” says he, “you have a greater regard
22 ESOP’S FABLES.



































for her that gave you life than for anybody else?” “I
should like to know what reason I have for feeling
greater regard for one to whom I am so little indebted,
than for those from whom I have received all the bene-

volence and kindness which have hitherto supported
me in life?”

Parental tenderness and affectionate behaviour make the
parent ; and where these are wanting, filial respect is likely
to be a mere shadow.
@SOP’S FABLES. 23

FasLe XVI.— Zhe Kite and the Pigeons.

A Kite who had kept sailing in the air for many
days near a dove-house, and made a:stoop at several
Pigeons, but all to no purpose (for they were too nimble
for him), at last had recourse to stratagem, and took his
opportunity one day to make a declaration to them, in
which he set forth his own just and good intentions,
who had nothing more at heart than the defence and
protection of the Pigeons in their ancient rights and
liberties, and how concerned he was at their fears and
jealousies of a foreign invasion, especially their unjust
and unreasonable suspicions of himself, as if he in-
tended, by force of arms, to break in upon their con-
stitution, and erect a tyrannical government over them.
To prevent all which, and thoroughly to quiet their
minds, he thought proper to propose to them such
terms of alliance and articles of peace as might for ever
cement a good understanding between them ; the prin-
cipal of which was, that they should accept of him for
their king, and invest him with all kingly privilege and
prerogative over them. The poor simple Pigeons con-
sented: the Kite took the coronation oath, after a very
solemn manner, on his part, and the Doves, the oaths
of allegiance and fidelity on theirs. But much time
had not passed -over their heads before the good Kite
pretended that it was part of his prerogative to devour
a Pigeon whenever he pleased. And this he was not
contented to do himself only, but instructed the rest
of the royal family in the same kingly arts of govern-
24 ‘ESOP’S FABLES,

ment. The Pigeons, reduced to this miserable condi-
tion, said one to the other, “ Ah! we deserve no better.
Why did we let him come in?”

We should be very careful and circumspect as to the choice
of those to whom we intrust the peace and happiness of
ourselves and others : the effects of an error in this respect
can never be got over.

—~—.

FasLe XVII.— Zhe Country Mouse and the C: wy Mouse,

An honest, plain, sensible country Mouse is said to
have -ntertained at his hole one day a fine Mouse of
the town. Having formerly been playfellows together,
they were old acquaintance, which served as an apology
for the visit. However, as master of the house, he
thought himself obliged to do the honours of it in all
respects, and to make as great a Stranger of his guest
as he possibly could. In order to this, he set before
him a reserve of delicate grey pease and bacon, a dish
of fine oatmeal, some parings of new cheese, and, to
crown all with a dessert, the remnant of a charming
mellow apple. In good manners, he forbore to eat
any himself, lest the stranger should not have enough ;
but, that he might seem to bear the other company, sat
and nibbled a piece of a wheaten straw very busily.
At last says the spark of the town, “ Old crony, give
me leave to be a little free with you: how can you
bear to live in this nasty, dirty, melancholy hole here,
' ZSOP’S FABLES. 25

with nothing but woods, and meadows, and mountains,
and rivulets about you? Do not you prefer the con-
versation of the world to the chirping of birds, and the
splendour of a court to the rude aspect of an unculti-
vated desert? Come, take my word for it, you will find

KG P wi



wy:

we)

B

it a change for the better. Never stand considering,

but away this moment. Remember we are not immor-

tal, and therefore have no time to lose. Make sure of

to-day, and spend it as agreeably as you can ; you know

not what may happen to-morrow.” In short, these and

suchlike arguments prevailed, and his country acquain-
c
26 FESOP’S FABLES.

tance was resolved to go to town that night. So they
both set out upon their journey together, proposing to
sneak in after the close of the evening. They did so,
and about midnight made their entry into a certain
great house, where there had been an extraordinary
entertainment the day before, and several tit-bits, which
some of the servants had purloined, were hid under the
seat of awindow. The country guest was immediately
placed in the midst of a rich Persian carpet: and now
it was the courtier’s turn to entertain; who, indeed,
acquitted himself in that capacity with the utmost rea-
diness and address, changing the courses as elegantly,
and tasting everything first as judiciously, as any clerk
of a kitchen. The other sat and enjoyed himself like
a delighted epicure, tickled to the last degree with this
new turn of affairs, when, on a sudden, a noise of some-
body opening the door made them start from their
seats and scuttle in confusion about the dining-room.
Our country friend, in particular, was ready to die with
fear at the barking of a huge mastiff or two, which
opened their throats just about the same time, and
made the whole house echo. At last recovering him-
self, “ Well,” says he, “if this be your town life, much
good may you do with it: give me my poor quiet hole
again, with my homely but comfortable grey pease.”

A humble life with peace and quietness is better than
a splendid one with danger and risk.
4ESOP’S FABLES. 29

ANNEZ
wae
SNL

SW

SSN
a
eS

= QN

AN



FasLe XVIII.—TZhe Swallow and other Birds.

A FARMER was sowing his field with flax. The
Swallow observed it, and desired the other birds to
assist her in picking the seed up, and in destroying it ;
telling them, that flax was that pernicious material ot
which the thread was composed which made the fowler’s
nets, and by that means contributed to the ruin of so
many innocent birds. But the poor Swallow, not
having the good fortune to be regarded, the flax sprang
up, and appeared above the ground. She then put
them in mind once more of their impending danger,
28 FESOP’S FABLES.

and wished them to pluck it up in the bed before it
went any further. They still neglected her warnings,
and the flax grew up into the high stalk. She yet
again desired them to attack it, for that it was not yet
too late. But all that she could get was to be ridiculed
and despised for a silly pretending prophet. The
Swallow, finding all her remonstrances availed nothing,
was resolved to leave the society of such unthinking,
careless creatures, before it was too late. So quitting
the woods, she repaired to the houses, and forsaking
the conversation of the birds, has ever since made her
abode among the dwellings of men.

Good advice may be thrown away. After we have re-
peatedly warned our friends of danger, and they poy no
heed, we are justified in separating ourselves from them.

—_p>—

FasLe XIX.— Zhe Hunted Beaver.

Ir is said that a Beaver (a creature which lives
chiefly in the water) has a certain part about him which
is good in physic, and that upon this account he is
often hunted down and killed. Once upon a time, as
one of these creatures was hard pursued by the dogs,
and knew not how to escape, recollecting the reason
of his being thus persecuted, with great resolution and
presence of mind, bit off the part which his hunters
wanted, and threw it towards them, by these means
escaping with his life.
fESOP’S FABLES. 29






A a SYE NY pane TA
SS —

Ge ii BY Zp At Wa UNS
fo ES IS We
“= AAOR ASS Mi

LES Se AA ccf

\
<3)




































When one is sore bestead, it is sometimes wise policy to
give up that which he is pursued for.

——

Faste XX.—Z%e Cat and the Fox.

As the Cat and the Fox were talking politics toge-
ther, on a time, in the middle of a forest, Reynard
said, let things turn out ever so bad, he did not care,
for he had a thousand tricks for them yet, before they
should hurt him. “But pray,” says he, “Mrs. Puss,
30 JESOP’S FABLES.

suppose there should be an invasion, what course do
you design to take?” “Nay,” says the Cat, “I have
but one shift for it, and if that won’t do I am undone.”
“YT am sorry for you,” replies Reynard, “with all my



heart, and would gladly furnish you with one or two of
mine ; but, indeed, neighbour, as times go, it is not
good to trust: we must even be every one for himself,
as the saying is ; and so your humble servant.” These
words were scarce out of his mouth, when they were
alarmed with a pack of hounds, that came upon them
ZESOP’S FABLES. 31

full cry. The Cat, by the help of her single shift, ran
up a tree, and sat securely among the top branches ;
from whence she beheld Reynard, who had not been
able to get out of sight, overtaken with his thousand
tricks, and torn in as many pieces by the dogs which
had surrounded him.

Fe that affects to be more cunning than his neighbours
will usually come off worse than they when a crisis
comes.

FasLe XXI.—Zhe Cat and the Mice.

A CERTAIN house was much infested with Mice ; but
at last they got a Cat, who catched and ate every day
some of them. The Mice, finding their numbers grow.
thin, consulted what was best to be done for the pre-
servation of the public from the jaws of the devouring
Cat. They debated, and came to this resolution, That
no one should go down below the upper shelf. The
Cat, observing the Mice no longer came down as usual,
hungry and disappointed of her prey, had recourse to
this stratagem—she hung by her hinder legs on a peg
which stuck in the wall, and made as if she had been
dead, hoping by this lure to entice the Mice to come
down. She had not been in this posture long before a
cunning old Mouse peeped over the edge of the shelf,
and spoke thus : “ Aha! my good friend, are you there?


32 SOP’S FABLES.



























































































































































































































































































































there may you be! I would not trust myself with you,
though your skin were stuffed with straw.”

Beware of the character you make to yourself, for you
will be judged by i.

——

FaBLeE XXIIl.—Zhe Lion and other Beasts.

The Lion and several other Beasts entered into an
alliance, offensive and defensive, and were to live very
ZESOP’S FABLES. 33

sociably together in the forest. One day, having made
a sort of an excursion by way of hunting, they took a
very fine, large, fat deer, which was divided into four
parts ; there happening to be then present his majesty
the Lion and only three others. A‘ter the division



was made, and the parts were set out, his majesty

advancing forward some steps, and pointing to one of

the shares, was pleased to declare himself after the

following manner: “This I seize and take possession

of as my right, which devolves to me, as I am de-
3
34 ZESOP’S FABLES,

scended by a true, lineal, hereditary succession from
the royal family of Lion ; that” (pointing to the second)
“TJ claim by, I think, no unreasonable demand, con-
sidering that all the engagements you have with the
enemy turn chiefly upon my courage and conduct;
and you very well know that wars are too expensive to
be carried on without proper supplies. Then” (nod-
ding his head towards the third) “that I shall take by
virtue of my prerogative ; to which I make no ques-
tion but so dutiful and loyal a people will pay all the
deference and regard that I can desire. Now, as for
the remaining part, the necessity of our present affairs
is so very urgent, our stock so low, and our credit so
impaired and weakened, that I must insist upon your
granting that, without, any hesitation or demur; and
hereof fail not at your peril.”

Lt is not wise for any one to form alliances with those
who are far stronger than him.

——»—

FABLE XXIIL—7) he Lion and the Mouse.

A Lion, faint with heat and weary with hunting, was
laid down to take his repose under the spreading boughs
of a thick shady oak. It happened that, while he
slept, a company of scrambling Mice ran over his back,
and waked him; upon which, starting up, he clapped
his paw upon one of them, and was just going to put
ZESOP’S FABLES. 35

*t to death, when the little suppliant implored his
mercy in a very moving manner, begging him not to
stain his noble character with the blood of so despi-
cable and small a beast. The Lion, considering the
matter, thought proper to do as he was desired, and



immediately released his little trembling prisoner. Not
long after, traversing the forest in pursuit of his prey,
he chanced to run into the toils of the hunters; from
whence, not being able to disengage himself, he set up
a most hideous and loud roar. The Mouse, hearing the
voice, and knowing it to be the Lion’s, immediately

Ss— 2
36 ZESOP’S FABLES,

repaired to the place, and bid him fear nothing, for
that he was his friend. Then straight he fell to work,
and with his little sharp teeth gnawing asunder the
knots and fastenings of the toils, set the royal brute at
liberty.

Never needlessly hurt even the humblest: he may aid
you in an extremity.

FasLlE XXIV.—TZhe Fatal Marriage.

THE Lion aforesaid, touched with the grateful pro-
cedure of the Mouse, and resolving not to be outdone
in generosity by any wild beast whatsoever, desired his
little deliverer to name his own terms, for that he might
depend upon his complying with any proposal he should
make. The Mouse, fired with ambition at this gracious
offer, did not so much consider what was proper for
him to ask, as what was in the power of his prince to
grant, and so presumptuously demanded his princely
daughter, the young Lioness, in marriage. The Lion
consented ; but when he would have given the royal
virgin into his possession, she, like a giddy thing as
she was, not minding how she walked, by chance set
her paw upon her spouse, who was coming to meet
her, and crushed her little dear to pieces.

We should try to make our judgments fit and proper ;
for of they are not, even our well-wishers cannot atid us.
fESOP’S FABLES, 37

ba



















































FaBLeE XXV.— The Mischievous Dog.

A CERTAIN man had a Dog, which was so fierce and
mischievous that he was forced to fasten a heavy clog
about his neck to keep him from running at and wor-
rying people. This the vain cur took for a badge of
honourable distinction, and grew so insolent upon it,
that he looked down with an air of scorn upon the
neighbouring dogs, and refused to keep them com-
pany. But a sly old Poacher, who was one of the
gang, assured him that he had no reason to value him-

D
38 ZESOP’S FABLES.

self upon the favour he wore, since it was fixed upon
him rather as a mark of disgrace than of honour.

We should be careful not to cherish our faults so that
they come to be regarded as merits.













me
=i

Y
Ve.
Nayar
owt
a























































Faste XXVI.—Zhe Ox and the Frog.

An Ox, grazing in a meadow, chanced to set his
foot among a parcel of young Frogs, and trod one of
them to death. The rest informed their mother, when
she came home, what had happened, telling her that
the beast which did it was the hugest creature that
they ever saw in their lives. “What, was it so big?”
ESOP’S FABLES. 39

says the old Frog, swelling and blowing up her speckled
belly to a great degree. “Oh! bigger by a vast deal,”
say they. “And so big?” says she, straining herself
yet more. “Indeed, mamma,” say they, “if you were
to burst yourself, you would never be so big.” She
strove yet again, and burst herself indeed.

Serious ills come to folks from aspiring after what
Nature never intended them to be.































































FABLE XXVII.— Zhe Fox and the Lion.

THE first time the Fox saw the Lion, he fell down
at his feet and was ready to die with fear. The second
40 ZESOP’S FABLES.

time, he took courage, and could even bear to look
upon him. The third time, he had the impudence to
come up to him, to salute him, and to enter into
familiar conversation with him.

We should cultivate a due and proper bearing towards

others. Over-bashfulness and indecent famitiarity are
alike faults of behaviour.



THE APE AND THE FOX.
ESOP’S FABLES. Al

Fase XXVIII.— Zhe Ape and the Fox.

Tur Ape, meeting the Fox one day, humbly re-
quested him to give him a piece of his fine long brush
tail, to cover his naked back, which was exposed to
all the violence and inclemency of the weather ; “ For,”
says he, “ Reynard, you have already more than you
have occasion for, and a great part of it even drags
along in the dirt.”. The Fox answered, “That as to
his having too much, that was more than he knew ;
but be it as it would, he had rather sweep the ground
with his tail as long as he lived, than deprive himself of
the least bit to cover a creature like an Ape.”

Lf the favours of fortune are unequally distributed,
little in the way of assisting those who lack is to be hoped
from people who are notorious for their avariciousness
and cunning; they would rather waste their wealth than
aid others by it.

—+~—

FapLe XXIX.—TZhe Dog in the Manger.

A Doc was lying upon a manger full of hay. Four
Horses, being hungry, came near, and offered to eat of
the hay; but the envious illnatured cur, getting up
and snarling at them, would not suffer them to touch it.
Upon which one of the Horses, in the bitterness of his
heart, said, “A curse light upon thee for a malicious
wretch, who wilt neither eat hay thyself, nor suffer others
to do it.”
42 ZESOP’S FABLES.



Envy ts a most contemptible and wasteful vice; it can-
not use and enjoy what it possesses, nor will it allow

others to do so.
eee

FasLE XXX.—TZhe Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat.

ONCE upon a time there commenced a fierce war
between the birds and the beasts; when the Bat,
taking advantage of his ambiguous make, hoped by
that means to live secure in a state of neutrality. It
was not long before the forces on each side met and
gave battle, and, their animosities running very high,
a bloody slaughter ensued. The Bat, at the beginning
4ESOP’S FABLES.



WY Hye»
M yy, “i ey
{ ie

ee
Ue

YF

of the day, thinking the birds most likely to carry it,
listed himself among them, but kept fluttering at a
little distance, that he might the better observe, and
take his measures accordingly. However, after some
time spent in the action, the army of the beasts seem.
ing to prevail, he went entirely over to them, and en-
deavoured to convince them, by the affinity which he
had to a mouse, that he was by nature a beast, and
would always continue firm and true to their interest.
His plea was admitted ; but, in the end, the advantage
turned completely on the side of the birds, under the
admirable conduct and courage of their general the
44 #ESOP’S FABLES.

Eagle. The Bat, to save his life and escape the dis-
grace of falling into the hands of his deserted friends,
betook himself to flight ; and ever since, skulking in
caves and hollow trees all day, as if ashamed to show
himself, he never appears till dusk, when all the fea-
thered inhabitants of the air are gone to rcost.

He who has no settled convictions on great matters, and,
for the sake of personal ease or interest, flutters between
this side and that, will in the end bring on himself the
contempt and hatred of both.

FaBLE XXXI.—TZhe Fox and the Tiger.

A SKILFUL Archer, coming into the woods, directed
his arrows so successfully that he slew many wild beasts,
and pursued several others. This put the whole savage
kind into a fearful consternation, and made them fly to
the most retired thickets for refuge. At last the Tiger
regained courage, and bidding them not be afraid,
said that he alone would engage the enemy; telling
them they might depend upon his valour and strength
to revenge their wrongs. In the midst of these threats,
while he was lashing himself with his tail and tearing
up the ground for anger, an arrow pierced_his ribs, and
hung by its barbed point in his side. He set up a
hideous and loud roar, occasioned by the anguish which
he felt, and endeavoured to draw out the painful dart
ZESOP’S FABLES. 45

with his teeth ; when the Fox approaching him, inquired,
with an air of surprise, who it was that could have
strength and courage enough to wound so mighty and



valorous a beast. “Ah!” says the Tiger, “I was mis-
taken in my reckoning: it was that invincible man
yonder.”

Strength and courage, when through want of wisdom
they are misdirected, are less powerful than prudent fore-
thought.
46 ZESOP’S FABLES,



FasLeE XXXII.— Zhe Lioness and the Fox.

. THE Lioness and the Fox, meeting together, fell
into discourse ; and the conversation turning upon the
fruitfulness of some living creatures over others, the
Fox could not forbear taking the opportunity of ob-
serving to the Lioness, that, for her part, she thought
Foxes were as happy in that respect as almost any other
creatures, for that they bred constantly once a year, if
not oftener, and always had a good litter of cubs at
every birth. “And yet,” says she, “there are those who’
never have more than one at a time, and that perhaps
ZESOP’S FABLES, 47

not above once or twice in their lives, who hold up
their noses, and value themselves so much upon it, that
they think all other creatures beneath them, and scarce
worthy to be spoken to.” The Lioness, who all the
while perceived at whom this reflection pointed, was
fired with resentment, and with a good deal of vehe-
mence replied, ‘‘ What you have observed may be true,
and that not without reason. You produce a great
many ata litter, and often; but what are they? Foxes.
The one cub I have, you should remember, is a Lion.”

Things are not to be judged by their quantity, but by
their quality.

FaBLe XXXIII].— Zhe Oak and the Reed.

An Oak, which hung over the bank of a river, was
blown down by a violent storm of wind, and as it was
carried along by the stream, some of its boughs brushed
against a Reed which grew near the shore. This struck
the Oak with a thought of admiration, and he could
not forbear asking the Reed how he came to stand so
secure and unhurt in a tempest which had been furious
enough to tear an Oak up by the roots. “ Why,” says
the Reed, “I secure myself by putting on a behaviour
quite contrary to what you do: instead of being stub-
born and stiff, and confiding in my strength, I yield and
48 ZESOP’S FABLES.





















































bend to the blast, and let it go over me, knowing how
vain and fruitless it would be to resist.”

Where it is impossible for us to overcome, the wisest
thing is to submit patiently and cheerfully.

Faster XXXIV.— The Wind and the Sun.

A DISPUTE once arose between the North Wind and
the Sun about the superiority of their power, and they

Secs
ZESOP’S FABLES. 49











agreed to try their strength upon a traveller, which:
should be able to get his cloak off first. The North
Wind began, and blew a very cold blast, accompanied
with a sharp driving shower. But this, and whatever
else he could do, instead of making the man quit his.
cloak, obliged him to gird it about his body as close as.
possible. Next came the Sun, who, breaking out from
a thick watery cloud, drove away the cold vapours from
the sky, and darted his warm sultry beams upon the
head of the poor weatherbeaten traveller. The man
growing faint with the heat, and unable to endure it any
E 4
50 ZESOP’S FABLES.

longer, first throws off his heavy cloak, and then flies for
protection to the shade of a neighbouring grove.

Strong things are the gentlest: sweet tempers often con-
quer where passionate ones fail,













































































































































Ly) ¥

ay
NEARY

FasLe XXXV.— Zhe Kite, the Frog, and the Mouse.

THERE was once a great emulation between the Frog
and the Mouse, which should be master of the fen, and
wars ensued upon it. But the crafty Mouse, lurking
under the grass in ambuscade, made sudden sallies, and
often surprised the enemy at a disadvantage. The




ZSOP’S FABLES. 51

Frog, excelling in strength, and being more able to leap
abroad and take the field, challenged the Mouse to
single combat. The Mouse accepts the challenge ; and
each of them entered the lists, armed with a point of a
bulrush instead of a spear. A Kite, sailing in the air,
beheld them afar off; and while they were eagerly bent
upon each other, and pressing on to the duel, this fatal
enemy descended souse upon them, and with her
crooked talons carried off both the champions.

People who wrangle and fight only give their common
enemies opportunities of surprising and worsting them.

—~—

FasLe XXXVI.— Zhe Frogs desiring a King.

Tue Frogs, living an easy free life everywhere among
the lakes and ponds, assembled together one day ina
very tumultuous manner, and petitioned Jupiter to let .
them have a King, who might inspect their morals and
make them live a little honester. Jupiter, being at
that time in pretty good humour, was pleased to laugh
heartily at their ridiculous request, and throwing a little
log down into the pool, cried, “ There is a King for
you.” The sudden splash which this made by its fall
into the water, at first terrified them so exceedingly
that they were afraid to come near it; but in a little
time, seeing it lay still without moving, they ventured
by degrees to approach it; and at last, finding there
was no danger, they leaped upon it, and, in short,

4—2
52 #SOP’S FABLES.





















































































































treated it as familiarly as they pleased. But not con-
tented with so insipid a King as this was, they sent
their deputies to petition again for another sort of one,
for this they neither did nor could like. Upon that he
sent them a Stork, who, without any ceremony, fell
a-devouring and eating them up, one after another, as
fast as he could. Then they applied themselves pri-
vately to Mercury, and got him to speak to Jupiter in
their behalf, that he would be so good as to bless them
again with another King, or to restore them to their
former state. “No,” says he, “since it was their own
choice, let the obstinate wretches suffer the punishment
due to their folly.”
AESOP’S FABLES, 53

Be content with the state in which you have been placed :
to have your wishes granted might be a misfortune.





ill

Aw !
v 4



























FaBLE XXXVII.— Zhe O42 Woman and her Maids.

A CERTAIN old Woman had several Maids, whom
she used to call up to their work every morning at the
crowing of the cock. The wenches, who found it
grievous to have their sweet sleep disturbed so early,
combined together, and killed the cock ; thinking that,
when the alarm was gone, they might enjoy themselves
in their warm beds a little longer. The old Woman,




54 SOP’S FABLES.

grieved for the loss of her cock, and having, by some
means or other, discovered the whole plot, was resolved
to be even with them; for, from that time, she obliged
them to rise constantly at midnight.

By getting rid of what we think an evil in a wrong
way we only bring upon ourselves a greater,

——_»—

Faste XXXVIIL— Zhe Lion, the Bear, and the Fox.

A Lion and a Bear fell together by the ears over
the carcase of a Fawn which they found in the forest,
their title to him being to be decided by force of arms.
The battle was severe and tough on both sides, and
they held it out, tearing and worrying one another so
long, that, what with wounds and fatigue, they were so
faint and weary, that they were not able to strike
another stroke. Thus, while they lay upon the ground,
panting and lolling out their tongues, a Fox chanced
to pass by that way, who, perceiving how the case
stood, very impudently stepped in between them, seized
the booty which they had all this while been contend-
ing for, and carried it off. The two combatants, who
lay and beheld all this, without having strength enough
to stir and prevent it, were only wise enough to make
this reflection: “Behold the fruits of our strife and
contention! that villain, the Fox, bears away the prize,
and we ourselves have deprived each other of the
power to recover it from him.”
4ESOP’S FABLES. 55













Those who fight with each other often lose all and give
others the chance of enriching themselves.

FaspleE XXXIX.—TZhe Crow and the Pitcher.

A Crow, ready to die with thirst, flew with joy toa
pitcher which he beheld at some distance. When he
came, he found water in it, indeed, but so near the
bottom, that with all his stooping and straining he was
not able to reach it. Then he endeavoured to over-
56 4ESOP’S FABLES.



turn the pitcher, that so, at least, he might be able to
get alittle of it. But his strength was not sufficient
for this. At last, seeing some pebbles lie near the
place, he cast them one by one into the pitcher, and
thus by degrees raised the water up to the very brim,
and satisfied his thirst.

Patient care often succeeds where mere strength fails.

—»—

Fase XL.— Zhe Porcupine and the Snakes.

A Porcupine, wanting to shelter himself, desired a
J
4ESOP'S FABLES, 57

Uj



nest of Snakes to give him admittance into their cave.
They were prevailed upon, and let him in accordingly,
but were so annoyed with his sharp prickly quills, that
they soon repented of their easy compliance, and en-
treated the Porcupine to withdraw, and leave them
their hole to themselves. “No,” says he, “let ¢hem
quit the place that don’t like it; for my part, I am
well enough satisfied as I am.”

We should be careful whom we admit as our com-
panions or neighbours ; for once admitted, it may be diffi-
cult to remove them.
58 ZESOP’S FABLES.

a wyfivie
SL



Swed, yw
PANN











































Faste XLI.— Zhe Hares and Frogs in a Storm.

Upon a great storm of wind that blew among the
trees and bushes, and made a rustling with the leaves,
the Hares (in a certain park where there happened to
be plenty of them) were so terribly frightened, that they
ran like mad all over the place, resolving to seek out
some retreat of more security, or to end their unhappy
days by doing violence to themselves. With this reso-
lution they found an outlet where a pale had been
broken down, and bolting forth upon an adjoining
common, had not run far before their course was


ESOP’S FABLES. 59

stopped by that of a gentle brook, which glided across
the way they intended to take. This was so grievous
a disappointment that they were not able to bear it,
and they determined rather to throw themselves head-
long into the water, let what would come of it, than
lead a life so full of dangers and crosses. But, upon
their coming to the brink of the river, a parcel of Frogs,
which were sitting there, frighted at their approach,
leaped into the stream in great confusion, and dived
‘to the very bottom for fear; which a cunning old Puss
observing, called to the rest and said, “ Hold! have a
care what ye do: here are other, creatures, I perceive,
which have their fears as well as we: don’t then let us
fancy ourselves the most miserable of any upon earth ;
but rather, by their example, learn to bear patiently
those inconveniences which our nature has thrown upon
us.”

We should take example, from the tls of others, to be
satisfied with and to improve our own condition in life.

eee gn

Fase XLIL—TZhe Fox and the Wolf.

THE Wolf, having laid in a store or provision, kept
close at home and made much of himself. The Fox
observed this, and thinking it something particular,
went to visit him, the better to inform himself of the
truth of the matter. The Wolf excused himself from
seeing him, by pretending he was very much indisposed.
60 JESOP’S FABLES.





All this did but confirm the Fox in his suspicions :
so away he goes to a Shepherd, and made discovery of
the Wolf; telling him, he had nothing else to do but
to come with a good weapon and shoot him in the
head as he lay in his cave. The Shepherd followed
his directions, and killed the Wolf. The wicked Fox
enjoyed the cave and provisions to himself, but enjoyed
them not long; for the same Shepherd passing after-
wards by the same hole, and seeing the Fox there, dis-
patched him also.

To btray another, who is no worse than yourself, for
the sake of a little advantage, is most mean and cowardly.
ZESOP’S FABLES. 61

Faple XLIII—TZhe Dog and the Sheep.

THE Dog sued the Sheep for a debt, of which the
Kite and the Wolf were to be judges. They, without
debating long upon the matter, or making any scruple
for want of evidence, gave sentence for the plaintiff,
who immediately tore the poor Sheep in pieces, and
divided the spoil with the unjust judges.

There is nothing bad men will do so readily as Join to
pervert law to injure the weak.



















oe

FasLe XLIV.— Zhe Peacock and the Crane.

Tue Peacock and the Crane by chance met together
F
62 ESOP’S FABLES.

in the same place. The Peacock, erecting his tail,
displayed his gaudy plumes, and looked with contempt
upon the Crane, as some mean ordinary person. The
Crane, resolving to mortify his insolence, took occasion
to say that Peacocks were very fine birds indeed, if
fine feathers could make them so; but that he thought
it a much nobler thing to be able to rise above the
clouds, than to strut about upon the ground, and be
gazed at by children.

Lt is foolish to slight another because he wants some-
thing which we have; for he may possess other good
qualities to which we are strangers.

ee oe

Fase XLV.—TZhe Viper and the File.

A VIPER entering a smith’s shop, looked up and
down for something to eat; and seeing a File, fell to
gnawing it as greedily as could be. The File told him,
very gruffly, that he had best be quiet and let him
alone, for he would get very little by nibbling at one
who, upon occasion, could bite iron and steel.

We should be very careful whom we attack or censure,
Jor if we are vain and foolish in doing so, our words will
recou upon ourselves.
SOP’S FABLES, 63











































FastE XLVI.—TZhe Ass, the Lion, and the Cock.

Aw Ass and a Cock happened to be feeding together
in the same place, when on a sudden they spied a Lion
approaching them. ‘This beast is reported above all
things to have an aversion, or rather antipathy, to the
crowing of a cock; so that he no sooner heard the
voice of that bird, but he betook him to his heels, and
ran away as fast as ever he could. The Ass, fancying
he fled for fear of him, in the bravery of his heart
pursued him: and followed him so far that they were
quite out of the hearing of the Cock ; which the Lion
64 ZESOP’S FABLES.

no sooner perceived but he turned about and seized
the Ass; and just as he was ready to tear him to
pieces, the sluggish creature is said to have expressed
himself thus: “ Alas! fool thatIwas, knowing the cow-
ardice of my own nature, thus by an affected courage
to throw myself into the jaws of death, when I might
have remained secure and unmolested!”

To run into danger out of mere pride often brings loss
and injury.

Fapte XLVII.—Zhe Jackdaw and Peacocks.

A cerTaIN Jackdaw was so proud and ambitious,
that, not contented to live within his own sphere, he
picked up the feathers which fell from the Peacocks,
stuck them in among his own, and very confidently
introduced himself into an assembly of those beautiful
birds. They soon found him out, stripped him of his
borrowed plumes, and falling upon him with their
sharp bills, punished him as his presumption deserved.
Upon this, full of grief and affliction, he returned to
his old companions, and would have flocked with them
again ; but they, knowing his late life and conversation,
industriously avoided him, and refused to admit him
into their company; and one of them, at the same
time, gave him this serious reproof: “ If, friend, you
could have been contented with our station, and had
AESOP’S FABLES. 65

not disdained the rank in which Nature had placed
you, you had not been used so scurvily by those upon
whom you intruded yourself, nor suffered the notorious





























slight which now we think ourselves obliged to put
upon you.”
Those who aspire at being higher than Nature intended

them, will fall under the contempt of their own class, and
also of that which they long to join.
66 FESOP’S FABLES.

FasLeE XLVIII.— Zhe Ant and the Fly.

One day there happened some words between the
Ant and the Fly about precedency, and the point was
argued with great warmth and eagerness on both sides.
Says the Fly, “It is well known what my pretensions
are, and how justly they are grounded: there is never
a sacrifice that is offered. but I always taste of the
entrails, even before the gods themselves. I have one
of the uppermost seats at church, and frequent the
altar as often as anybody. I have a free admission at
court, and can never want the King’s ear, for I some-
times sit upon his shoulder. There is not a maid of
honour or handsome young creature comes in my way,
but, if I like her, I settle betwixt her balmy lips. And
then I eat and drink the best of everything, without
having any occasion to work for my living. What is
there that such country pusses as you enjoy, to be
compared with a life like this?” The Ant, who by
this time had composed herself, replied with a great
deal of temper and no less severity: ‘Indeed, to be
a guest at an entertainment of the gods is a very great
honour, if one is invited; but I should not care to be
a disagreeable intruder anywhere. You talk of the
King, and the court, and the fine ladies there, with
great familiarity; but, as I have been getting in my
harvest in summer, I have seen a certain person under
the town walls, making a hearty meal upon something
that is not so proper to be mentioned. As to your
frequenting the altars, you are in the right to take


ZESOP’S FABLES. 63

sanctuary where you are like to meet with the least
disturbance ; but I have known people before now run
to altars, and call it devotion, when they have been
shut out of all good company, and had nowhere else
to go. You do not work for your living, you say—
true: therefore, when you have played away the sum-
mer, and winter comes, you have nothing to live upon ;
and, while you are starving with cold and hunger, I
have a good warm house over my head, and plenty of
provisions about me.”

Honesty and industry make the true gentleman, not the
pretence of keeping fine company and boasting about tt.

Faste XLIX.— Zhe Ant and the Grasshopper.

In the winter season a commonwealth of Ants was
busily employed in the management and preservation
of their corn, which they exposed to the air in heaps
round about the avenues of their little country habita-
tion. A Grasshopper, who had chanced to outlive the
summer, and was ready to starve with cold and hunger,
approached them with great humility, and begged that
they would relieve his necessity with one grain of
wheat or rye. One of the Ants asked him how he had
disposed of his time in summer, that he had not taken
pains, and laid in a stock, as they had done. “Alas!
gentlemen,” says he, “I passed away the time merrily

5—2


68 SOP’S FABLES.



























and pleasantly, in drinking, singing, and dancing, and
never once thought of winter.” “If that be the case,”
replied the Ant, laughing, “all I have to say is, that
they who drink, sing, and dance in the summer, must
starve in winter.”

We should never lose a good opportunity ; it may not
return till we are unable to use it, and losing it may put
us ever after at great disadvantage.

—>—.

Fase L.— Zhe Countryman and the Snake.

A VILLAGER, in a frosty, snowy winter, found a Snake
under a hedge, almost dead with cold. He could not




ZSOP’S FABLES. 69



help having compassion for the poor creature, so he
brought it home, and laid it upon the hearth near the
fire; but it had not lain there long, before (being re-
vived with the heat) it began to erect itself and fly at
his wife and children, filling the whole cottage with
dreadful hissings. The Countryman, hearing an-outcry
and perceiving what the matter was, catched up a
mattock, and soon dispatched him, upbraiding him at
the same time in these words: “Is this, vile wretch !
the reward you make to him that saved your life?
Die, as you deserve; but a single death is too good
for you.”
70 ZESOP’S FABLES.

Kindness may be wasted, and great evil done, by our
not bestowing it upon fit objects.

FaBLe LI.— Zhe Fox and the Sick Lion.

It was reported that the Lion was sick, and the
beasts were made to believe that they could not make
their court better than by going to visit him. Upon
this they generally went; but it was particularly taken
notice of that the Fox was not one of the number.
The Lion therefore dispatched one of his Jackals to
sound him about it, and ask him why he had so little
charity and respect as never to come near himat a .
time when he lay so dangerously ill, and everybody
else had been to see him. “Why,” replies the Fox,
“pray present my duty to his majesty, and tell him
that I have the same respect for him as ever, and have
been coming several times to kiss his royal hand; but
I am so terribly frightened at the mouth of his cave, to
see the prints of my fellow-subjects’ feet all pointing
forwards and none backwards, that I have not resolu-
tion enough to venture in.” Now, the truth of the
matter was, that this sickness of the Lion’s was only a
sham to draw the beasts into his den, the more easily
to devour them.

No important action should ever be taken hastily.
ZESOP’S FABLES. __ 71











FasLe LIl.—Zhe Wanton Calf.

A Ca tr, full of play and wantonness, seeing the Ox
at plough, could not forbear insulting him. “ What a
sorry poor drudge art thou,” says he, “to bear that
heavy yoke upon your neck, and go all day drawing a
plough at your tail, to turn up the ground for your
master; but you are a wretched dull slave, and know
no better, or else you would not do it. See what a
happy life I lead: I go just where I please ; sometimes
I lie down under the cool shade; sometimes frisk
about in the open sunshine ; and, when I please, slake
72 SOP’S FABLES.

my thirst in the clear sweet brook. But you, if you
were to perisn, have not so much as a little dirty water
to refresh you.” The Ox, not at all moved with what
he said, went quietly and calmly on with his work ;
and, in the evening, was unyoked and turned loose.
Soon after which he saw the Calf taken out of the
field, and delivered into the hands of a priest, who
immediately led him to the altar, and prepared to sa-
crifice him. His head was hung round with fillets of
flowers, and the fatal knife was just going to be applied
to his throat, when the Ox drew near, and whispered
him to this purpose: “ Behold the end of your inso-
lence and arrogance! It was for this only you were
suffered to live at all; and pray, now, friend, whose
condition is best, yours or mine?”

Those who are idle and useless are prone to insult the
honest and diligent ; and their fate is not seldom a miser-
able and pitiable one.

—_—

Fase LII].—ercules and the Carter.

As a clownish fellow was driving his cart along a
deep miry lane, the wheels stuck so fast in the clay
that the horses could not draw them out. Upon this
he fell a bawling and praying to Hercules to come and
help him. Hercules, looking down from a cloud, bid
him not lie there, like an idle rascal as he was, but get
up and whip his horses stoutly, and clap his shoulder


?
SOP'S FABLES. 73



to the wheel; adding that this was the only way for
him to obtain his assistance.

The only way to get real assistance from others is to be
active and resolute oneself.

—

FasLe LIV.—TZihe Belly and the Members.

In former days, when the Belly and the other parts
of the body enjoyed the faculty of speech, and had
separate views and designs of their own, the several
parts, it seems, each in particular for himself, and in

G
74 FESOP’S FABLES,

the name of the whole, took exception at the conduct
of the Belly, and were resolved not to grant him sup-
plies any longer. They said they thought it very hard
that he should lead an idle, good-for-nothing life, spend-
ing and squandering upon himself all the fruits of their
labour; and that, in short, they were resolved for the
future to strike off his allowance, and let him shift for
himself as well as he could. The Hands protested
they would not lift up a finger to keep him from sta:v-
ing; and the Mouth wished he might never speak
again if he took in the least bit of nourishment for
him as long as he lived; and, say the Teeth, “ May we
be rotten if ever we chew a morsel for him for the
future.” This solemn league and covenant was kept as
long as anything of that kind can be kept, which was
until each of the rebel members pined away to the
skin and bone, and could hold out no longer. Then
they found there was no doing without the Belly, and
that, idle and insignificant as he seemed, he contri-
buted as much to the maintenance and welfare of all
the other parts as they did to his.

Many things which appear useless or insignificant are
as indispensable as those which seem more inportant, and
nothing but evil can arise from the attempt to dispense

with them.
sec an

FasLle LV.— Zhe Horse and the Lion.

A Lion, seeing a fine plump Nag, had a great mind
to eat a bit of him, but knew not which way to get
ZESOP’S FABLES. 75

him into his power. At last he bethought himself of
this contrivance: he gave out that he was a physician,
who, having gained experience by his travels into
foreign countries, had made himself capable of curing
any sort of malady or distemper incident to any kind



of beast,—hoping by this stratagem to get an easier
admittance among cattle, and find an opportunity to
execute his design. The Horse, who guessed at his
intent, was resolved to be even with him; and so,
humouring the thing as if he suspected nothing, he
prayed the Lion to give him his advice in relation to a
76 ZESOP’S FABLES.

thorn he had got in his foot, which had quite lamed him,
and gave him great pain and uneasiness. The Lion
readily agreed, and desired that he might see the foot.
Upon which the Horse lifted up one of his hind legs,
and, while the Lion pretended to be poring earnestly
upon his hoof, gave him such a kick im the face as
quite stunned him, and left him sprawling upon the
ground. In the meantime the Horse trotted away,
neighing and laughing merrily at the success of the
trick by which he had defeated the purpose of one
who intended to have tricked him out of his life.

Cunning persons are often caught in their own snare.

‘Faste LVI.—Zke Husbandman and the Stork.

THE Husbandman pitched a net in his fields to take
the cranes and geese which came to feed upon the
new-sown corn. Accordingly he took several, both
cranes and geese, and among them a Stork, who
pleaded hard for his life, and among other apologies
which he made, alleged that he was neither goose nor
crane, but a poor harmless Stork, who performed his
duty to his parents to all intents and purposes, feeding
them when they were old, and, as occasion required,
carrying them from place to place upon his back.
“ All this may be very true,” replies the Husbandman ;
“but, as I have taken you in bad company, and in the


ZESOP’S FABLES. 17



same crime, you must expect to suffer the same punish-
ment.”

People are judged by the company they keep.

FapLe LVIL—Z%e Cat and the Cock.

Tuer Cat, having a mind to make a meal of the
Cock, seized him one morning by surprise, and asked
him what he could say for himself why slaughter should
78 ZESOP’S FABLES,

not pass upon him. The Cock replied that he was
serviceable to mankind by crowing in the morning,
and calling them up to their daily labour. “That is
true,” says the Cat, “and is the very objection that I



have against you; for you make such a shrill imperti-
nent noise that people cannot sleep for you.”

Justice and reason have usually little chance against
wickedness when tt is in power.








®SOP’S FABLES. 79



e

Seg















Faste LVIIl—Z%e Leopard and the Fox.

Tue Leopard one day took it into his head to value
himself upon the great variety and beauty of his spots,
and truly he saw no reason why even the Lion should
take place of him, since he could not show so beautiful
askin. As for the rest of the wild beasts of the forest,
he treated them all, without distinction, in the most
haughty, disdainful manner. But the Fox, being among
them, went up to him with a great deal of spirit and
resolution, and told him that he was mistaken in the
value he was pleased to set upon-himself, since people
80 ESOP’S FABLES.

of judgment were not used to form their opinion of
merit from the outside appearance, but by considering

the good qualities and endowments with which the’

mind was stored within.

Modesty is more than the half of beauty; vanity spoils
the highest personal charms.



Fase LIX.— Zhe Shephera’s Boy.

A CERTAIN Shepherd’s Boy kept his sheep upon a
common, and, in sport and wantonness, would often
cry out, “The wolf! the wolf!” By this means he
ZESOP’S FABLES. 81

several times drew the husbandmen in an adjoining
field from their work ; who, finding themselves deluded,
resolved for the future to take no notice of his alarm.
Soon after the wolf came indeed. The Boy cried out
in earnest ; but no heed being given to his cries, the
sheep were devoured by the wolf.

He who tells lies is not believed even when he speaks.
the truth, and is sure to suffer in the end.

ined
\

1 ii - 5
Ae hy a

i a hi \

GG 5
a why AN Wm

i



age

Fase LX.—Zhe Fox and the Goat.

A Fox having tumbled by chance into a well, had
6
82 ESOP’S FABLES.

been casting about a long while, to no purpose, how
he should get out again; when at last a Goat came to
the place, and, wanting to drink, asked Reynard whether
the water was good. “Good !” says he, “ay, so sweet
that I am afraid I have surfeited myself, I have drunk
so abundantly.” The Goat upon this, without any
more ado, leaped in ; and the Fox, taking the advantage
of his horns, by the assistance of them as nimbly
leaped out, leaving the poor Goat at the bottom of the
well to shift for himself.

Do not judge things from other people's words, but by
due reftection on them.

——

Fase LXI.—Cupid and Death.

CupIb, one sultry summer’s noon, tired with play and
faint with heat, went into a cool grotto to repose himself,
which happened to be the cave of Death. He threw
himself carelessly down on the floor, and his quiver
turning topsy-turvy, all the arrows fell out, and mingled
with those of Death, which lay scattered up and down
the place. When he awoke, he gathered them up as
well as he could; but they were so intermingled that,
though he knew the certain number, he could not
rightly distinguish them ; from which it happened that
he took up some of the arrows which belonged to
Death, and left several of his own in the room of them.
This is the cause that we now and then see the hearts
of the old and decrepit transfixed with the bolts of
#ESOP’S FABLES. 83

Love, and with equal grief and surprise behold the
youthful blooming part of our species smitten with the
darts of Death.

Good and evil are so mixed in this world, that many
of the apparent irregularities of life are by Providence
meant for good ends; and we should not always guarrel
with what seem evils, for they may only be hidden benefits.

—>—.

Faster LXII.— Zhe Old Man and his Sons.

An old Man had many sons, who were often falling.
out with one another. When the father had exerted
his authority and used other means in order to recon-
cile them, and all to no purpose, at last he had recourse
to this expedient: He ordered his sons to be called
before him, and a short bundle of sticks to be brought,
and then commanded them, one by one, to try if, with
all their might and strength, they could any of them
break it. They all tried, but to no purpose; for the
sticks being closely and compactly bound up together,
it was impossible for the force of man to do it. After
this, the father ordered the bundle to be untied, and
gave a single stick to each of his sons, at the same time
bidding him try to break it ; which when each did with
all imaginable ease, the father addressed himself to
them to this effect: “O my sons, behold the power of
unity! for if you, in like manner, would but keep your-
selves strictly conjoined in the bonds of friendship, it

6—2
84 ZESOP’S FABLES.



would not be in the power of any mortal to hurt you;
but when once the ties of brotherly affection are dis-
solved, how soon do you fall to pieces, and are liable
to be violated by every injurious hand that assaults
you!”

True strength lies in union.
eon
Fasie LXIII.— Zhe Stag and the Fawn.

A Srac, grown old and mischievous, was, according
to custom, stamping with his foot, making offers with
g

SOP’S FABLES. 85



his head, and bellowing so terribly, that the whole herd
quaked for fear of him, when one of the little Fawns
coming up, addressed him to this purpose: “ Pray,
what is the reason that you, who are so stout and for-
midable at all other times, if you do but hear the cry
of the hounds, are ready to fly out of your skin for
fear?” ‘What you observe is true,” replied the Stag,
“though I know not how to account for it. Iam
indeed vigorous, and able enough, I think, to make my
party good anywhere, and often resolve within myself
that nothing shall ever dismay my courage for the
future ; but, alas! I no sooner hear the voice of a
H
86 #ESOP’S FABLES.

hound but all my spirits fail me, and I cannot help
making off as fast as ever my legs can carry me.”

Many a very cowardly person will assume airs, and
lord it over those who are weaker than himself.

AY



FasLe LX1IV.— Zhe Old Hound.

Aw old Hound, who had been an excellent good one
in his time, and given his master great sport and satis-
faction in many a chase, at last, by the effect of -years,




ZESOP’S FABLES. 87

became feeble and unserviceable. However, being in
the field one day when the boar was almost run down,
he happened to be the first that came in with him, and
seized him by one of his haunches; but his decayed
and broken teeth not being able to keep their hold,
the boar escaped, and threw him quite out. Upon
which, his master being in a great passion and going
to strike him, the honest old creature is said to have
barked out his apology : “Ah ! do not strike your poor
old servant! It is not my heart and inclination, but
my strength and speed, that fail me. If what I now
am displeases, pray don’t forget what I have been.”

People often err in losing sight of the intention with
which a thing is done.

FasLe LXV.—/upiter and the Camel.

THE Camel presented a petition to Jupiter, com-
plaining of the hardship of his case, in not having, like
bulls and other creatures, horns, nor any weapons of
defence, to protect himself from the attacks of his
enemies, and praying that relief might be given him
in such a manner as might be thought most expedient.
Jupiter could not help smiling at the impertinent
address of the great silly beast, but, however, rejected
the petition, and told him that, so far from granting
his unreasonable request, henceforward he would take
88 Sor FABLES,

care his ears should be shortened, as a punishment for
his presumptuous importunity.

True wisdom consists in using well the organs and
opportunities we have, and not in wishing and sighing for
what ts against our nature and circumstances.

FasLe LXV1.—Z%e Fox without a Tail.

A Fox being caught in a steel trap by his tail, was
glad to compound for his escape with the loss of it;
but, upon coming abroad into the world, began to be
so sensible of the disgrace such a defect would bring
upon him, that he almost wished he had died rather
than left it behind him. However, to make the best
of a bad matter, he formed a project in his head to call
an assembly of the rest of the Foxes, and propose it
for their imitation as a fashion which would be very
agreeable and becoming. He did so, and made a long
harangue upon the unprofitableness of tails in general,
and endeavoured chiefly to show the awkwardness and
inconvenience of a fox’s tail in particular ; adding, that
it would both be more graceful and more expeditious
to be altogether without them; and that, for his part,
what he had only imagined and conjectured before, he
now found by experience, for that he never enjoyed
himself so well, and found himself so easy, as he had
done since he cut off his tail. He said no more, but
SOP’S FABLES. 89

looked about with a brisk air to see what proselytes he
had gained ; when a sly old thief in the company, who
understood traps, answered him with a leer, “ I believe
you may have found it convenient to part with your tail,





and when we are in the same circumstances, perhaps
we may do so too.”

Livil-doers will always try to lessen their disgrace, by
making others like themselves.
go ZESOP’S FABLES.



A Crow, having taken a piece of cheese out of a
cottage window, flew up into a tree with it, in order
to eat it; which a Fox observing, came and sat un-
derneath, and began to compliment the Crow upon
the subject of her beauty. “TI protest,” says he, “I
never observed it before, but your feathers are of a
more delicate white than any that ever I saw in my
life! Ah! what a fine shape and graceful turn of body
is there! And I make no question but you have a
tolerable voice : if it is but as fine as your complexion,
I do not know a bird that can pretend to stand in com-
petition with you.” The Crow, tickled with this very
SOP’S FABLES. gl

civil language, nestled and wriggled about, and hardly
knew where she was; but, thinking the Fox a little
dubious as to the particular of her voice, and having a
mind to set him right in that matter, began to sing,
and in the same instant let the cheese drop out of her
mouth. This being what the Fox wanted, he chopped
it up in a moment, and trotted away, laughing to him-
self at the easy credulity of the Crow.

Lf you listen to flattery you are certain to be the loser.



\SsS a

Bees iY <2 :
Zs
st {WE

Vr.

.

pes
BNE
MIN
NESSES
ANTARS ZS

Ss

FasLe LXVIIL.—The Hawk and the Farmer.

A Hawk, pursuing a pigeon over a corn-field with
92 ZSOP’S FABLES,

great eagerness and force, threw himself into a net
which a Husbandman had planted there to take the
crows ; who being employed not far off, and seeing the
Hawk fluttering in the net, came and took him 3 but,
just as he was going to kill him, the Hawk besought
him to let him go, assuring him that he was only follow-
ing a pigeon, and neither intended nor had done any
harm to him. To whom the Farmer replied, “ And
what harm had the poor pigeon done to you?” Upon
which he wrung his head off immediately.

Lixcuses are of no avail when one is caught tn the very
act of deing wrong.

Fase LXIX.-—Zhe Nurse and the Wolf.

A Nurse, who was endeavouring to quiet a froward
bawling child, among other attempts threatened to
throw it out of doors to the Wolf, if it did not leave
oft crying. A Wolf, who chanced to be prowling near
the door just at that time, heard the expression, and
believing the Woman to be in earnest, waited a long
while about the house, in expectation of seeing her
words made good. But at last the child, wearied with
its Own importunities, fell asleep, and the poor Wolf
was forced to return back to the woods empty and
supperless. The Fox meeting him, and surprised to
see him going home so thin and disconsolate, asked
him what the matter was, and how he came to speed
fESOP’S FABLES. 93



no better that night. “Ah! do not ask me,” says he:
“T was so silly as to believe what the Nurse said, and
have been disappointed.”

ft is not always wise to take people at their word.

FasLte LXX.—TZhe Hare and the Tortoise.

A Hare insulted a Tortoise upon account of his
slowness, and vainly boasted of her own great speed
904 ASOP’S FABLES.

in running. “ Let us make a match,” replied the Tor-
toise : “I will run with you five miles for five pounds,
and the Fox yonder shall be the umpire of the race.”
The Hare agreed, and away they both started together.
But the Hare, by reason of her exceeding swiftness,

f





outran the Tortoise to such a degree that she rnade a
jest of the matter; and finding herself a little tired,
squatted in a tuft of fern that grew by the way, and
took a nap; thinking that if the Tortoise went by, she
could at any time fetch him up with all the ease ima-
ginable. In the meanwhile the Tortoise came jogging


ZSOP’S FABLES. 95

on with slow but continued motion ; and the Hare, out
of a too great security and confidence of victory, over-

sleeping herself, the Tortoise arrived at the end of the
race first.

People who are quick are apt to fancy themselves too
secure of winning, and thus slower persons outwit them.



et
SS

VS

oe

Fase LXXI—TZhe Fighting Cocks and the Eagle.

Two young Cocks who had frequently set upon each
other, one day began a-fighting as fiercely as though
they had never fought before. So they had gone on,
96 ZESOP’S FABLES.

till one of them being so much worsted that he saw no
hope of turning the tide in his favour, made up his
mind to be beaten, and betook himself to the corner
of the hen-house, full of wounds. On this, the con-
queror, giving way rather readily to the natural elation
felt in such circumstances, flew to the top of the house,
and began to clap his wings and crow lustily in an-
nouncement of his victory. His proud show-off, how-
ever, only brought him under the notice of those by
no means well disposed to him. Just then an Eagle
sailing by seized him by his talons and carried him off.
The other then came out from his hiding-place, and
took possession of the dunghill for which they had
contended.

Those who gain the victory should let others celebrate
a, lest they suffer by their vanity.

Faste LXXII.— Zhe Ass in the Lion's Shin.

An Ass, finding the skin of a lion, put it on, and,
going into the woods and pastures, threw all the flocks
and herds into a terrible consternation. At last, meet-
ing a Fox, he would have frightened him also ; but
Reynard, seeing his long ears stick out, and hearing his
voice, knew that, notwithstanding his being dressed in
a lion’s skin, he was really no more than an Ass.


ZESOP’S FABLES. 97






SANS
Sir

eo EN NLU ROT Wy
SSS ei ——

— Ne .

Never try to seem other than you are, or you will
most likely be found out and disgraced,

———

FasLe LXXIII.— Zhe Mountains in Labour.

THE Mountains were said to be in labour, and ut-
tered most dreadful groans. People came together far
and near to see what birth would be produced; and,
after they had waited a considerable time in expecta:
tion, out crept a Mouse!

I 7
98 ESOP’S FABLES.



The importance of things should not be Judged by thé
noise they make.

—_#—_

FastE LXXIV.— Zhe Satyr and the Traveller.

A Satyr, as he was ranging the forest in an exceed-
ing cold snowy season, met with a Traveller half-starved
with the extremity of the weather. He took compas-
sion on him, and kindly invited him home to a warm
comfortable cave he had in the hollow of a rock. As
soon as they had entered and sat down, notwithstand-
ing there was a good fire in the place, the chilly Tra-
veller could not forbear blowing his fingers’ ends. Upon
a





ZESOP’S FABLES. 99



the Satyr’s asking him why he did so, he answered that
he did it to warm his hands. The honest sylvan, hav-
ing seen little of the world, admired a man who was.
master of so valuable a quality as that of blowing heat,
and therefore was resolved to entertain him in the best
manner he could. He spread the table before him with
dried fruits of several sorts, and produced a remnant
of cold cordial wine, which, as the rigour of the season
made very proper, he mulled with some warm spices,
infused over the fire, and presented to his shivering
guest. But this the Traveller thought fit to blow like-
wise ; and, upon the Satyr’s demandiug a reason why
he blowed again, he replied, To cool his dish. This
i—2
I0o ESOP’S FABLES.

second answer provoked the Satyr’s indignation as
much as the first had kindled his surprise ; so, taking
the man by the shoulder, he thrust him out of doors,
saying, he would have nothing to do with a wretch who
had so vile a quality as to blow hot and cold with the
same mouth.

We should be careful not to mislead others by apparent
double dealing or inconsistency.



Faste LXXV.—TZie Sick Kite.

A Kite had been sick a long time, and finding there
were no hopes of recovery, begged of his mother to go


ZESOP’S FABLES. IOI

to all the churches and religious houses in the country,
to try what prayers and promises would effect in. his
behalf. The old Kite replied, “Indeed, dear son, I
would willingly undertake anything to save your life,
but I have great reason to despair of doing you any
service in the way you propose; for with what face
can I ask anything of the gods in favour of one whose
whole life has been a continual scene of rapine and
injustice, and who has not scrupled, upon occasion, to
rob the very altars themselves?”

Sich-bed repentances seldom atone for a bad life.

—_¢—

FasreE LXXVI.—Zhe Hawk and the Nightingale,

A NIGHTINGALE, sitting all alone among the shady
branches of an oak, sang with so melodious and shrill
a pipe that she made the woods echo again, and alarmed
a hungry Hawk, who was at some distance off watch-
ing for his prey. He had no sooner discovered the
little musician, but, making a stoop at the place, he
seized her with his crooked talons, and bid her prepare
for death. “Ah!” says she, “for mercy’s sake don’t
do so barbarous a thing, and so unbecoming yourself.
Consider, I never did you any wrong, and am but a
poor small morsel for such a stomach as yours: rather
attack some larger fowl, which may bring you more
credit and a better meal, and let me go.” “Ay!” says
the Hawk, “ persuade me to it if you can: I have been
to2 ESOP’S FABLES.



upon the watch all day long, and have not met with
one bit of anything till I caught you, and now you
would have me let you go in hopes of something bet-
ter, would you? Pray, who would be the fool then?”

They who despise small things in the hope of obtaining

great ones, are likely to lose all: our wisdom lies in using
what we have.

—_4+—-
Fapte LXXVII—TZhe Peacock's Complaint.

THE Peacock presented a memorial to Juno, im-
porting how hardly he thought he was used in not


ZESOP’S FABLES. 103

having so good a voice as the nightingale ; how that
pretty animal was agreeable to every ear that heard it,
while he was laughed at for his ugly screaming noise,
if he did but open his mouth. The Goddess, concerned
at the uneasiness of her favourite bird, answered him
very kindly to this purpose: ‘If the nightingale is
blessed with a fine voice, you have the advantage in
point of beauty and largeness of person.” “Ah!”
says he, “but what avails my silent unmeaning beauty,
when I am so far excelled in voice?” The Goddess
dismissed him, bidding him consider that the proper-
ties of every creature were appointed by the decree of
Fate: to him beauty; strength to the eagle; to the
nightingale a voice of melody; the faculty of speech
to the parrot; and to the dove innocence: that each
of these was contented with his own peculiar quality ;
and, unless he had a mind to be miserable, he must
learn to be so too.

Those who desire to possess more good qualities should
unceasingly cultivate those they have: fretting over wants
as but loss of time.

—_—+——

Faste LXXVIII.—TZhe Angler and the Little Fish.

A Maw was angling in a river, and caught a small
Perch, which, as he was taking off the hook and going
to put it into his basket, opened his mouth, and began
to implore his pity, begging that he would throw it into
the river again. Upon the Man’s demanding what
104 ESOP’S FABLES,

reason he had to expect such a favour—“ Why,” says
the Fish, “because, at present, I am but young and
little, and consequently not so well worth your while
as I shall be, if you take me some time hence, when IJ



am grown larger.” ‘That may be,” replies the Man,
“but I am not one of those fools who quit a certainty
in expectation of an uncertainty.”

Never quit a certainty for what is future and there-
fore uncertain.


4ESOP’S FABLES, 105















































































































































Te is
ee
Pp 1h Mie"



Fase LXXIX.—TZhe Geese and the Cranes.

A FLock of Geese and a parcel of Cranes used often
to feed together in a corn-field. At last the owner of
the corn, with his servants, coming upon them of a
sudden, surprised them in the very fact ; and the Geese,
being heavy, fat, full-bodied creatures, were most of them
sufferers ; but the Cranes, being thin and light, easily
flew away.

In times of peril riches are a burden and hindrance,
and often bring those who have them into such dangers as
poorer men mostly escape.
106 ZSOP’S FABLES.











































































































































































































































Fase LXXX.— Zhe Dog and the Shadow.

A Dos, crossing a little rivulet with a piece of flesh
in his mouth, saw his own shadow represented in the
clear mirror of the limpid stream ; and believing it to
be another dog, who was carrying another piece of
flesh, he could not forbear catching at it; but was so
far from getting anything by his greedy design, that he
dropped the piece he had in his mouth, which imme-
diately sank to the bottom and was irrecoverably lost.

He who catches at more than belongs to him, deserves
to lose what he has.
AESOP’S FABLES. 107

Faste LXXXI— Zhe Ass and the Little Dog.

Tue Ass observing how great a favourite the little
Dog was with his master—how much caressed and
fondled, and fed with good bits at every meal, and for
no other reason, as he could perceive, but skipping and
frisking about, wagging his tail, and leaping up into his
master’s lap—was resolved to imitate the same, and
see whether such a behaviour would not procure Azm
the same favours. Accordingly, the master was no
sooner come home from walking about his fields and
gardens, and was seated in his easy chair, but the
Ass, who observed him, came gambolling and braying
towards him in a very awkward manner. The master
could not help laughing aloud at the odd sight; but
his jest was soon turned into earnest, when he felt the
rough salute of the Ass’s fore feet, who, raising himself
upon his hinder legs, pawed against his breast with a
most loving air, and would fain have jumped into his
lap. The good Man, terrified at this outrageous beha-
viour, and unable to endure the weight of so heavy a
beast, cried out ; upon which, one of his servants run-
ning in with a good stick, and laying on heartily upon
the bones of the poor Ass, soon convinced him that
every one who desires it is not qualified to be a
favourite.

Lt is most necessary for a man to consider his parts
and abilities, to discover what he is fit for, and to keep
hirmly by that.
108 ESOP’S FABLES.



FasLe LXXXII.—TZhe Wolf and the Crane.

A Wo rr, after devouring his prey, happened to have
a bone stick in his throat, which gave him so much
pain that he went howling up and down, and impor-
tuning every creature he met to lend him a kind hand,
in order to his relief; nay, he promised a reasonable
reward to any one that should undertake the operation
with success. At last the Crane, tempted with the
lucre of the reward, and having first procured him to
confirm his promise with an oath, undertook the busi-
ness, and ventured his long neck into the rapacious
felon’s throat. In short, he plucked out the bone, and
ESOP’S FABLES. 10g

expected the promised gratuity ; when the Wolf, turn-
ing his eyes disdainfully towards him, said, “I did not
think you had been so unconscionable. I had your
head in my mouth, and could have bit it off whenever
I pleased, but suffered you to take it away without any

damage, and yet you are not contented !”

‘People who are tempted with great promises often come
off the losers.

NS
SANE
TAINRARNN
Bt NY
cK}



iy ii

ii)
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=
eat

\

Se





ame
pe
FS
SS
es

j Uy,



An envious Man happened to be offering up his
prayers to Jupiter just in the time and place with a
K


IIo #ESOP’S FABLES.

covetous miserable fellow. Jupiter, not caring to be
troubled with their impertinences himself, sent Apollo
to examine the merits of their petitions, and to give
them such relief as he should think proper. Apollo
therefore opened his commission, and withal told them
that, to make short of the matter, whatever the one
asked the other should have it double. Upon this, the
covetous Man, though he had a thousand things to
request, yet forbore to ask first, hoping to receive a
double quantity, for he concluded that all men’s wishes
sympathized with his. By this means the envious Man
had an opportunity of preferring his petition first, which
was the thing he aimed at ; so, without much hesitation,
he prayed to be relieved by having one of his eyes put
out; knowing that, of consequence, his companion
would be deprived of both.

A miserly man is distressed with fears that another
should be richer than himself, and the envious man will
vather lose the chance of good things than see others receive
the same. Both injure themselves by their selfishness,

—_@—

FasLtE LXXXIV.— Zhe Two Pots.

An Earthen Pot, and one of Brass, standing toge-
ther upon the river's brink, were both carried away by
the flowing in of the tide. The Earthen Pot showed
some uneasiness, as fearing he should be broken; but
his companion of Brass bid him be under no ‘appre-
ZESOP’S FABLES, IIl

hensions, for that he would take care of him. “Oh,”
replies the other, “ keep as far off as ever you can, I
entreat you: itis you I am most afraid of; for, whether
the stream dashes you against me, or me against you, I









































































































































































































































































































































AZ:









am sure to be the sufferer ; and therefore I beg of you,
do not let us come near one another.”

They are wise who, having a moderate fortune, are
content, and do not seek to consort with people much greater
than themselves ; for it is difficult to escape from such com-
pany without wjury.
112 ZESOP’S FABLES.

KC

















Faste LXXXV.—The Fox and the Stork.

Tue Fox invited the Stork to dinner, and being dis-
posed to divert himself at the expense of his guest,
provided nothing for the entertainment but a soup, in
a wide shallow dish. This himself could lap up with a
great deal of ease; but the Stork, who could but just
dip in the point of his bill, was not a bit the better all
the while. However, in a few days after he returned
the compliment, and invited the Fox; but suffered
nothing to be brought to table but some minced meat
in a glass jar, the neck of which was so deep and so
narrow, that, though the Stork with his long bill made
















ESOP'S FABLES. 113

a shift to fill his belly, all that the Fox, who was very
hungry, could do, was to lick the brims, as the Stork
slabbered them with his eating. Reynard was heartily
vexed at first; but when he came to take his leave,
owned ingenuously that he had been used as he de-
served, and that he had no reason to take any treat-
ment ill, of which himself had set the example.

Those who love practical jokes and offer witty affronts
must not think wl of it, if some time they have the tables
turned against them.



= == SS ay ° BG.
Faste LXXXVI.—7Z%e Bear and the Bee-hives.

A Bear, climbing over the fence into a place where
8






m4 ESOP’S FABLES.

Bees were kept, began to plunder the hives, and rob
them of their honey. But the Bees, to revenge the
injury, attacked him in a whole swarm together ; and,
though they were not able to pierce his rugged hide,
yet with their little stings they so annoyed his eyes
and nostrils, that, unable to endure the smarting pain,
with impatience he tore the skin over his ears with his
own claws, and suffered ample punishment for the

injury he did the Bees in breaking open their waxen
cells.

Lor the sake of indulging their appetites men wantonly
wygure crowds of weaker creatures, and it is not to be
wondered at if sometimes they are severely punished,

—@—

FasLeE LXXXVIIL--Zhe Travellers and the Bear.

Two Men being to travel through a forest together,
mutually promised to stand by each other in any danger
they should meet upon the way. They had not gone
far before a Bear came rushing towards them out of a
thicket ; upon which one, being a light, nimble fellow,
got up into a tree; the other, falling flat upon his face
and holding his breath, lay still while the Bear came
up and smelled at him; but that creature, supposing
him to be a dead carcase, went back again into the
wood, without doing him the least harm. When all
was over, the spark who had climbed the tree came
down to his companion, and, with a pleasant smile,
asked him what the Bear said to him—“ For,” says he,
ZESOP’S FABLES. ° IIs

ih
hae

eis FAN BRN ee
y

j; WES
POT



“T took notice that he clapped his mouth very close
to your ear.” “Why,” replies the other, “ he charged
me to take care, for the future, not to put any confi-
dence in such cowardly rascals as you.”

Professions of friendship are of little avail till they
have been tried.

—>—

FastE LXXXVIII.—Zhe Trumpeter taken Prisoner.

A TRUMPETER, being taken prisoner in a battle,
begged hard for quarter, declaring his innocence, and
8—2


116 ESOP’S FABLES.

protesting that he neither had nor could kill any man,
bearing no arms but only his trumpet, which he was
obliged to sound at the word of command. “For
that reason,” replied his enemies, “we are determined
not to spare you; for though you yourself never fight,





yet, with that wicked instrument of yours, you blow
up animosity between other people, and so become
the occasion of much bloodshed.”

The tongue is a most dangerous enemy, and those who
stir up strife amongst others, though not mingling in tt,
are as blameworthy as Uf they did.
ZSOP’S FABLES. 117

Faste LXXXIX.—TZhe Partridge and the Cocks.

A CERTAIN Man, having taken a Partridge, plucked
some of the feathers out of its wings, and turned it
into a little yard, where he kept game Cocks. The
Cocks for a while made the poor bird lead a sad life,
continually pecking and driving it away from the meat.
This treatment was taken the more unkindly because
offered to a stranger, and the Partridge could not but
conclude them the most inhospitable, uncivil people
he had ever met with. But at last, observing how fre-
quently they quarrelled and fought with each other, he
comforted himself with this reflection: that it was no
wonder they were so cruel to him. since there was so
much bickering and animosity among themselves.

There is sometimes a comfort in finding that those who
oppress and injure us cannot agree with cach other.

_—<> -

FasteE XC.—Zhe Falconer and the Partridge.

A Fatconer having taken a Partridge in his net,
the bird begged hard for a reprieve, and promised the
man, if he would let him go, to decoy other partridges
into his net. “No,” replies the Falconer, ‘I was de-
termined not to spare you, but now you have condemned
yourself by your own words; for he who is such a
scoundrel as to offer to betray his friends to save himself,
deserves, if possible, worse than death.”
118 FESOP’S FABLES.



There is no more contemptible character than he who

would betray his friends: he is not to be trusted in word
or act.

—_»—

Faste XCI.—TZhe Eagle and the Crow.

Aw Eagle flew down from the top of a high rock,
and settled upon the back of a Lamb; and then in-
stantly flying up into the air again, bore his bleating
prize aloft in his pounces. A Crow, who sat upon an
elm and beheld this exploit, resolved to imitate it; so
flying down upon the back of a Ram, and entangling
AESOP’S FABLES. I1g



his claws in the wool, he fell a chattering and attempt-
ing to fly; by which means he drew the observation of
the Shepherd upon him, who finding his feet hampered
in the fleece of the Ram, easily took him, and gave
him to his boys for their sport and diversion.

feople who out of vanity undertake things they are not
Jit for, are certain to be disgraced and punished.

ea
FasLe XCII.—Zhe Lion, the Ass, and the Fox.

THE Lion, the Ass, and the Fox went a-hunting to-
gether in the forest, and it was agreed that whatever
120 ESOP’S FABLES.

Ce
N Ww

‘Hh WWndy
oO BS



was taken should be divided amongst them. They
happened to have very good sport, and caught a large
fat Stag, which the Lion ordered the Ass to divide.
The Ass, according to the best of his capacity, did so,
and made three pretty equal shares. But such levelling
doings not suiting at all the craving temper of the
greedy Lion, without further delay he flew upon the
Ass, and tore him in pieces; and then bid the Fox
divide it into two parts. Reynard, who seldom wanted
a prompter, however, had his cue given him sufficiently
upon this occasion ; and so, nibbling off one little bit
for himself, he laid forth all the rest for the Lion’s por-
FESOP’S FABLES. I21

tion. The royal brute was so delighted at this dutiful
and handsome proof of his respect, that he could not
forbear expressing the satisfaction it gave him, and
asked him withal, where he could possibly have learned
so proper and so courtly a behaviour. “ Why,” replies
Reynard, “to tell your majesty the truth, I was taught
it by the Ass that lies dead there.”

We should think well before we give offence to our
superiors.











































Faste XCIIL—7Z%e Fox and the Grapes.
A Fox, very hungry, chanced to come into a vineyard
=
122 ESOP’S FABLES.

where there hung branches of charming ripe grapes,
but nailed up to a trellis so high that he leaped till he
quite tired himself, without being able to reach one of
them. At last, “Let who will take them,” says he,
“they are but green and sour; so I will even let them
alone.”

That is a mean nature which, when it is disappointed
in obtaining what it desires, pretends dislike to it.

















































Faste XCIV.—The Horse and the Stag.

Tue Stag with his sharp horns got the better of the
Horse, and drove him clear out of the pasture where
ASOP’S FABLES. 123

they used to feed together. So the latter craved the
assistance of Man, and, in order to receive the benefit
of it, suffered him to put a bridle into his mouth and
a saddle upon his back. By this way of proceeding he
entirely defeated his enemy; but was mightily disap-
pointed when, upon returning thanks and desiring to
be dismissed, he received this answer: “No, I never
knew before how useful a drudge you were: now I
have found what you are good for, you may depend
upon it I will keep you to it.”

Lf for the time being we part with our liberty for the
sake of revenging ourselves upon those who have offended
us, we may be assured we have only put ourselves in the
power of some other person.

oe

Fapte XCV.—TZhe Young Man and the Swallow.

A PRODIGAL young spendthrift, who had wasted his
whole patrimony in taverns and gaming-houses, among
lewd idle company, was taking a melancholy walk near
a brook. It was inthe month of January, and happened
to be one of those warm sunshiny days which some-
times smile upon us even in that winterly season of the
year; and, to make it the more flattering, a Swallow,
which had made its appearance by mistake too soon,
flew skimming along upon the surface of the water.
The giddy youth observing this, without any further
consideration concluded that summer was now come,
124 ZESOP’S FABLES.



and that he should have little or no occasion for clothes,
so went and pawned them at the broker’s, and ven-
tured the money for one stake more, among his sharp-
ing companions. When this too was gone the same
way with the rest, he took another solitary walk in the
same place as before. But the weather, being severe
and frosty, had made everything look with an aspect
very different from what it did before: the brook was
quite frozen over, and the poor Swallow lay dead upon
the bank of it; the very sight of which cooled the
young spark’s brains; and coming to a kind of sense
of his misery, he reproached the deceased bird as the
ZSOP’S FABLES, 125

author of all his misfortunes. “Ah! wretch that thou
wert!” says he, “thou hast undone both thyself and
me, who was so credulous as to depend upon thee.”

They who have fallen into bad courses are deceived by
the merest chances into new risks and excesses, until at last
they find themselves ruined and helpless.





FasLE XCV1.—TZhe Man and his Goose.

A cerTAIN Man had a Goose which laid him a
golden egg every day. But, not contented with this,
which rather increased than abated his avarice, he was
resolved to kill the Goose, and cut up her belly, that
126 ESOP’S FABLES.

so he might come at the inexhaustible treasure which
he fancied she had within her. He did so; and to his
great sorrow and disappointment, found nothing.

They who, through greed, try to grow rich all at once,
and make as though they would outrun Nature and Pro-
vidence, are pretty certain in the long run to be deprived
even of what they have.

a

FasLe XCVII.—The Dog and the Wolf.

A LEAN, hungry, half-starved Wolf, happened, one
moonshiny night, to meet with a jolly, plump, well-fed
Mastiff; and, after the first compliments were passed,
says the Wolf, “ You look extremely well, I protest:
I think I never saw a more graceful, comely person.
But how comes it about, I beseech you, that you should
live so much better than I? I may say, without vanity,
that I venture fifty times more than you do, and yet I
am almost ready to perish with hunger.” The Dog
answered very bluntly, “ Why, you may live as well, if
you will do the same for it that I do.” “ Indeed ! what
is that?” says he. “Why,” says the Dog, “ only to
guard the house a-nights, and keep it from thieves.”
“With all my heart,” replies the Wolf, “for at present
I have but a sorry time of it; and, I think, to change
my hard lodging in the woods, where I endure rain,
frost, and snow, for a warm roof over my head and a
belly-full of good victuals, will be no bad bargain.”
“True,” says the Dog ; “therefore you have nothing
SOP’S FABLES. 127



more to do but to follow me.” Now, as they were
jogging on together, the Wolf spied a crease in the
Dog’s neck, and, having a strange curiosity, could not
forbear asking him what it meant. “ Pooh! nothing,”
saysthe Dog. “Nay, but pray,” says the Wolf. “Why,”
says the Dog, “if you must know, I am tied up in the
day-time, because I am a little fierce, for fear 1 should
bite people, and am only let loose anights. But this
is done with design to make me sleep a-days, more
than anything else, and that I may watch the better in
the night-time ; for, as soon as ever the twilight appears,
out I am turned, and may go where I please. Then
128 ASOP’S FABLES.

my master brings me plates of bones from the table
with his own hands, and whatever scraps are left by
any of the family, all fall to my share; for you must
know I am a favourite with everybody. So you see
how you are to live. Come, come along: what is the
matter with you?” “No,” replied the Wolf, “I beg
your pardon. Keep your happiness all to yourself.
Liberty is the word with me, and I would not bea
king upon the terms you mention.”

The lowtliest condition of life with freedom may be better
than the showiest position with slavery.

—_>—

FasLte XCVIII.— Zhe Wood and the Clown.

A country fellow came one day into the wood,
and looked about him with some concern ; upon which
the Trees, with a curiosity natural to some other crea-
tures, asked him what he wanted. He replied that he
only wanted a piece of wood to make a handle to his
hatchet. Since that was all, it was voted unanimously
that he should have a piece of good, sound, tough ash
But he had no sooner received and fitted it for his
purpose, than he began to lay about him unmercifully,
and to hack and hew without distinction, felling the
noblest trees in all the forest. Then the Oak is said
to have spoken thus to the Beech in a low whisper:
“ Brother, we must take it for our pains.”

' People should be careful that th y put not even the most
ZESOP’S FABLES. 129



insignificant weapon in ther enemies’ hands: it may soon
be used against them.

ge

FaBLE XCIX.—Zhe Old Lion.

A Lion, worn out with old age, lay fetching his last
gasp and agonizing in the convulsive struggles of death ;
upon which occasion several of the beasts, who had for-
merly been sufferers by him, came and revenged them-
selves upon him. The Boar, with his mighty tusks,
drove at him in a stroke that glanced like lightning
and the Bull gored him with his violent horns ; which

9
130 ZESOP’S FABLES.

when the Ass saw they might do without any danger,
he too came up and threw his heels into the Lion’s face.
Upon which the poor old expiring tyrant uttered these

ipl ily ye

ie iM (
Ae fe :

(Ee
ed.
axl Vi
mle f Ui;
Vie








ZN
—— a

words with his last dying groan: “ Alas! how grievous
it is to suffer insults even from the brave and valiant ;
but to be spurned by so base a creature as this—the
very disgrace of Nature—is worse than dying ten thou-
sand deaths.”

He who would have the true respect of his fellows
must lay the foundation of it in virtue and affection.
ZESOP’S FABLES, 131





Fase C.— Zhe Horse and the Loaded Ass.

An idle Horse, and an Ass labouring under a heavy
burden, were travelling the road together: they both
belonged to acountry fellow, who trudged on foot along-
side of them. The Ass, ready to faint uncer his heavy
load, entreated the Horse to assist him, and lighten his
burden by taking some of it upon his back. The Horse
was ill-natured, and refused to do it; upon which the
poor Ass tumbled down in the midst of the highway,
and expired in an instant. The countryman ungirthed
his pack-saddle, and tried several ways to relieve him,
but all to no purpose; which when he perceived, he

9—2
132 ZESOP’S FABLES.

took the whole burden, and laid it upon the Horse,
together with the body of the dead Ass; so that the
Horse, by his moroseness in refusing to do a small
kindness, justly brought upon himself a great incon-
venience.

Sometimes, by refusing to do a small kindness, which
would be easy for us, we bring upon ourselves heavy bur-
dens.

—_@—

FasLe Cl.— Zhe Old Man ana Death.

A poor feeble old Man, who had crawled out into
a neighbouring wood to gather a few sticks, had made
up his bundle, and, laying it over his shoulders, was
trudging homeward with it; but, what with age, and
the length of the way, and the weight of his burden,
he grew so faint and weak that he sank under it, and,
as he sat on the ground, he called upon Death to come,
once for all, and ease him of his troubles. Death no
sooner heard him than he came and demanded of him
what he wanted. The poor old creature, who little
thought Death had been so near, and frightened almost
out of his senses with his terrible aspect, answered him
trembling, that, having by chance let his bundle ot
sticks fall, and being too infirm to get it up himself, he
had made bold to call upon him to help him; that,
indeed, this was all he wanted at present; and that he
hoped his worship was not offended with him for the
liberty he had taken in so doing.
4
4ESOPS FABLES. 133



People often wish they were out of the world; but
when Death comes, they are fain to send him away from
them as quickly as possible.

—_~—_

FapLe CIl.—Zhe Boar and the Ass.

A LITTLE scoundrel 0° an Ass, happening to meet
with a Boar, had a mind to be arch with him, and so
“ Brother,” says he, “ your humble servant.” The Boar,
somewhat nettled at his familiarity, bristled up to him, .
and told him he was surprised to hear him utter so

M


134 ZESOP’S FABLES.

impudent an untruth, and was just about to show his
noble resentment by giving hima rip in the flank; but
wisely stifling his passion, he contented himself with
only saying, “Go, you sorry beast! I could be amply











and easily revenged of you, but I do not care to soil
my tusks with the blood of so base a creature.”

fools, with their raillery, often run at better people than
themselves, and only their mean character saves them Srom
punishment.
?
ASOP’S FABLES, 135





























FasLe CIIL.— Zhe Tunny and the Dolphin.

A FISH called a Tunny, being pursued bya Dolphin,
and driven with great violence, not minding which way
he went, was thrown by the force of the waves upon a
rock, and left there. His death now was inevitable ;
but, casting his eyes on one side, and seeing the Dol-
phin in the same condition lay gasping by him, “ Well,”
says he, “I must die, it is true; but I die with pleasure
when I behold him who is the cause of it involved in
the same fate.”

There is sometimes pleasure in seeing those who have
drawn us into danger, themselves sharing it with us.
136 FESOP’S FABLES,

Faster CIV.—TZhe Peacock and the Magpie.

THE birds once upon a time met together to choose a
King, and the Peacock standing candidate, displayed his
gaudy plumes, and took the eyes of the silly multitude
with the richness of his feathers. ‘The majority declared
for him, and clapped their wings with great applause ;
but just as they were going to proclaim him, the Mag-
ple stepped forth in the midst of the assembly, and ad-
dressed himself thus to the new King: “ Mayit please
your majesty elect to permit one of your unworthy
subjects to represent to you his suspicions and appre-
hensions, in the face of this whole congregation. We
have chosen you for our King, we have put our lives
and fortunes into your hands, and our whole hope and
dependence is upon you; if, therefore, the eagle, or
the vulture, or the kite, should at any time make a
descent upon us, as it is highly probable they will, may
your majesty be so gracious as to dispel our fears, and
clear our Co 1bts about that matter, by letting us know
how you intend to defend us against them?” This
pithy question drew the whole audience into so just a
reflection, that they soon resolved to proceed to a new
choice. But, from that time, the Peacock has been
looked upon as a vain insignificant pretender, and the
Magpie esteemed as eminent a speaker as any among
the whole community of birds.

Ln a guide appearance and manners should not so much
be considered as wisdom and power to defend.
ZESOP’S FABLES. 137

‘Fase CV.—Z%e Forester and the Lion.

Tue Forester meeting with a Lion one day, they
discoursed together for a while without differing much
in opinion. At last, a dispute happening to arise about
the superiority between a man and a lion, the Man,
wanting a better argument, showed the Lion a marble
monument, on which was placed the statue of a man
striding over a vanquished lion. “If this,” says the
Lion, “is all you have to say for it, let us be the carvers,
and we will make the lion striding over the man.”

One-sided representations are certain to be false: a true
judge would look at both sides.

—@—

Fasie CVI.—Zhe Stag looking into the Water.

A Srac, that had been drinking at a clear spring, saw
himself in the water; and, pleased with the prospect,
stood afterwards for some time contemplating and
surveying his features and shape from head to foot.
“Ah!” says he, “what a glorious pair of branching
horns are there! how gracefully do those antlers hang
over my forehead, and give an agreeable turn to my
whole face! If some other parts of my body were
but proportionable to them, I would turn my back to
nobody ; but I have a set of such legs as really makes
me ashamed to see them. People may talk what they
please of their helpfulness, and what great need we
138 ZESOP’S FABLES



















































































































































































































































































































































stand in of them upon several occasions ; but, for my
part, I find them so very slender and unsightly, that I
had as lieve have none at ull.” While he was giving
himself these airs, he was alarmed at the noise of some
huntsmen and a pack of hounds that had been just
struck on the scent, and were making. towards him.
Away he flies, in some consternation, and, bounding
nimbly over the plain, threw dogs and men at a vast
distance behind him. After which, taking a very thick
copse, he had the ill fortune to be entangled by his
horns in a thicket, where he was held fast till the
hounds came in and pulled him down. Finding now
ZESOP’S FABLES. 139

how it was like to go with him, in the pangs of death
he is said to have uttered these words: “ Unhappy
creature that Iam! I am too late convinced that what
I prided myself in has been the cause of my undoing,
and what I so much disliked was the only thing that
could have saved me.”

Those charms we most admire are most likely to be
dangerous to us, while we may overlook and despise others
far more serviceable.

—p—

Faste CVII—TZhe Stag in the Ox-stall.

A Stac, roused out of his thick cover in the midst
of the forest, and driven hard by the hounds, made
towards a farm-house, and seeing the door of an ox-
stall open, entered therein, and hid himself under a
heap of straw. One of the Oxen, turning his head
about, asked him what he meant by venturing himself
in such a place as that was, where he was sure to meet
his doom. “Ah!” says the Stag, “if you will only be
so good as to favour me with your concealment, I hope
I shall do well enough; I intend to make off again the
first opportunity.” Well, he stayed there till towards
night: in came the ox man, with a bundle of fodder,
and never saw him. In short, all the servants of the
farm came and went, and not a soul of them smelt
anything of the matter. Nay, the Bailiff himself came
according to form, and looked in, but walked away no
140 “ESOP’S FABLES.

wiser than the rest. Upon this the Stag, ready to jump
out of his skin for joy, began to return thanks to the
good-natured Oxen, protesting that they were the most
obliging people he had ever met with in his life. After
he had done his compliments, one of them answered
him gravely, “ Indeed, we desire nothing more than to
have it in our power to contribute to your escape ; but
there is a certain person you little think of, who has a
hundred eyes: if he should happen to come, I would
not give this straw for your life.” In the interim, home
comes the master himself irom a neighbour's, where he
had been invited to dinner; and because he had ob-
served the cattle look but scurvily of late, he went up
to the rack, and asked why they did not give them
more fodder ; then casting his eyes downward, “ Hey-
day !” says he, “why so sparing of your litter? pray
scatter a little more here. And these cobwebs—but I
have spoken so often, that, unless I do it myself—”
Thus, as he went on, prying into everything, he chanced
to look where the Stag’s horns lay sticking out of the
straw, upon which he raised a hue and cry, called all
his people about him, killed the poor Stag, and made
a prize of him.

Nobotly looks after a man’s affairs so well as himself.

—_@—.

Faste CVIII.— Zhe Dove and the Ant.

THE Ant, compelled by thirst, went to drink from a
clear purling rivulet ; but the current, with its circling
SOP’S FABLES. I4I

eddy, snatched her away, and carried her down the
stream. The Dove, pitying her distressed condition,
cropped a branch from a neighbouring tree, and let it
fall into the water, by means of which the Ant saved
herself and got ashore. Not long after, a Fowler, hav-
ing a design upon the Dove, planted his nets in due
order, without the bird’s observing what he was about ;
which the Ant perceiving just as he was going to put
his design in execution, she bit him by the heel, and
made him give so sudden a start that the Dove took
the alarm, and flew away.

One good turn deserves another: if we aia the most
insignificant person in peril, he may some time substan-
tially serve us.

—_+——

Fase CIX.—TZhe Lion in Love.

Tue Lion by chance saw a fair maid, the Forester’s
daughter, as she was tripping over a lawn, and fell in
love with her. Nay, so violent was his passion, that
he could not live unless he made her his own ; so that,
without any more delay, he broke his mind to the father,
and demanded the damsel for his wife. The Man, odd
as the proposal seemed at first, yet soon recollected that
by complying he might get the Lion into his power, but
that by refusing he should only exasperate and pro-
voke his rage. He therefore consented, but told him
it must be upon these conditions : that, considering the
girl was young and tender, he must agree to let his teeth
@SOP’S FABLES.

i
us
NO





be plucked out, and his claws cut off, lest he should hurt
her, or at least frighten her with the apprehension of
them. The Lion was too much in love to hesitate; but
was no sooner deprived of his teeth and claws, than
the treacherous Forester attacked him with a huge club,
and knocked his brains out.

Nothing can be more fatal to peace than the ill-assorted
marriages into which rash love may lead.

—_#—_

Faste CX.— The Tortoise and the Eagle.

THE Tortoise, weary of his condition, by which he
was confined to creep upon the ground, and being am-
7
fESOP’S FABLES, 143















































































































































































































































































bitious to have a prospect and look about him, gave
out that if any bird would take him up into the air and
show him the world, he would reward him with a dis-
covery of many precious stones, which he knew were
hidden in a certain place of the earth ; the Eagle un-
dertook to do as he desired, and, when he had per-
formed his commission, demanded the reward; but
finding the Tortoise could not make good his words,
he stuck his talons into the softer parts of his body,
and made him a sacrifice to his revenge.

Ambition is a dangerous thing, and always brings
grief and pain in the end.


144 4®SOP’S FABLES.







Faste CXI.—Zhe Wild Boar and the Fox.

A Fox one day came upon a wild Boar whetting
his tusks against a tree, and his curiosity being excited,
he was constrained to ask him why he did so. “I see
no reason for it,” said he: “ there is neither hunter nor
hound in sight, nor any other danger I know of at
hand.” ‘“ Quite true,” replied the Boar; “but when
danger does arise, I shall have other work to do than
sharpen my weapons.”

It is too late to make preparations when the enemy ts
actually upon us.
#ESOP’S FABLES. 145



Fasple CXI].—The Wolf and the Lion.

A Wo tr had one day seized a sheep from a fold, and
was carrying it home to his own den, when he met a
- Lion, who laid hold of the sheep and bore it off. The
Wolf, as he stood at a distance, cried out that it was a
shame, and that the Lion had robbed him of his own.
But the Lion only laughed at this, and said, “I am to
suppose, then, that your good friend the shepherd gave
it to you?”

Those who obtain things by doubtful means, must not
whine at being reproached, nor even complain at their
prise being taken from them.

N 10
146 ZESOP’S FABLES,





Fase CXIII.— Zhe Bull and the Goat.

A Lion being in pursuit of a Bull, the latter sought

shelter in a cave where a wild Goat had taken up his

abode. The Goat at once began to molest him, and
to butt at him vigorously with his horns. “If I take
this at your hand quietly now,” said the Bull, “don’t
suppose it is because I am afraid of you. Ifthe Lion
were only out of sight, I will soon show the difference
between a Lion and a Goat.”

There is nothing more mean than to take advantage of
a neighbour's difficulty in order to wantonly annoy him.
7
#SOP’S FABLES. 147

HABE ule © XLV ewan Gai? the Mask:

A Fox, having stolen into the house of an actor,
was rummaging among his various properties, when he



came upon a very fine mask. “Ah, a very fine-looking
head!” cried he; “but what a pity that it wholly lacks
brains !”

A fine appearance makes up but poorly for real worth.
10—2
148 SOP’S FABLES.



FasLe CXV.— Zhe Vine and the Goat.

THERE was once a Vine which teemed with ripe fruit
and tender shoots. A wanton Goat came up to it,
gnawed the bark, and ate the tenderest of the young
leaves. “I will be avenged upon you for this insult,”
said the Vine; “for when ina few days you will be
brought as a victim to the altar, the juice of my grapes
shall be the death-dew on thy brow.”

Though we may long escape retribution for our wrong
doing, it will certainly come at last.








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