Citation
Driven into exile

Material Information

Title:
Driven into exile a story of the Huguenots
Creator:
A. L. O. E., 1821-1893
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
141 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Exiles -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Catholics -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Statesmen -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Huguenots -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Protestantism -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Stepfamilies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- France -- Louis XIV, 1643-1715 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1893 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
In the late seventeenth century, the Marquis la Force is banished to England with his wife and daughter for refusing to put aside his Huguenot beliefs, while his son and nephew are held in France, struggling against Catholic oppression.
General Note:
Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note:
Added title page, engraved; Title page printed in red and black ink.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Charlotte Maria Tucker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026994401 ( ALEPH )
ALH9322 ( NOTIS )
192022016 ( OCLC )

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“My duty to God must come before even my
duty to the king.”

page 36.



DRIVEN into EXILE

A Story of the Huguenots



LOUIS MADE PRISONER

page I47

T. NEBSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New Vork.



DRIVEN
INTO EXILE

A Story of the Huguenots.

By

A, D. ©. E.,

Author of * Pictures of St. Peter,” “ Exiles in Babylon,”
“The Shepherd of Bethlehem,”
oo Se.



LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.

1892



Preface.

———++—__—_

THE expulsion of the Protestants from France, after the
Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, is a fact which needs
no comment here. It is written in history in letters
broad and black, yet gilded by the faith and devotion
of those who became exiles for conscience’ sake. I have
made this expulsion the ground-work of my story; the
design of which is to show how faith like that of
Abraham enabled God’s people at a later period to follow
his example, leave home and country, and go forth as
pilgrims and strangers. As a missionary in India, I see
daily those whom the same faith has led to give up all
for the Saviour—to break asunder the closest, dearest
ties, if these ties would keep them from Him. Whether
in England, France, or India, it is the love of Christ that
constraineth ; trials but strengthen, persecutions but
brighten that golden chain which binds us to Him.
ALL. 0. E



I,

I.

TI.

Iv.

Vi.

VII.

VIII.

Ix,

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIv.

XY.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX,

@J ontents.

THE WOMAN OF TACT,
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL,
SUBMISSION, ae
THE FLAME SCORCHES,
BEHIND THE CURTAIN,

A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH,
LAST FAREWELLS,

AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE,
POVERTY AND PRIDE,

A PACKET OF LETTERS,
ALONE IN A CROWD,

THE MONASTERY,

GINS AND SNARES,

A MEETING,

A MEMORABLE NIGHT,

A SECRET,

A RACE FOR LIFE,

THE EXILES’ HOME,

A SOLEMN SCENE,

il
19
25
33
41
47
55
61
68
76
85

93

116
126
186
143
148

159



x CONTENTS.

XX. THE GRAND MONARCH,
XXI. FAITH TRIED,

XXII, FLIGHT,

XXII. IN THE SNOW,

XXIV. PLANS,

XXV. A PARTING GLANCE, ...

169
175
188
191
198

207



DRIVEN INTO EXILE.



CHAPTER IL
THE WOMAN OF TACT.

“But you must persuade your father!” cried Madame
Duval.

“ Persuade!” repeated Adéle la Force bitterly ; “can
we persuade that grand cedar to bow its tall form like
a reed? can we persuade the snow-capped mountain to
sink into a valley? As easily could we persuade my
father to draw back one inch from the spot where he
has planted his foot.”

“Does not the marquise use her influence? woman who has wit in her brain can usually guide her
husband,” said Madame Duval, making her words more
emphatic by the movements of a large painted fan which
she held in her hand. “There is coaxing”—the fan was
gently fluttered ; “ flattering”—the wave became slower ;
“reproaches”—the lady brought the fan down sharply



12 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

on her own knee; “tears, despair !”—the fan was sud-
denly closed, to express a total collapse.

“The marquise never attempts to influence my father ;
she says that it is a wife’s part to obey.” (Madame
Duval shrugged her shoulders, for she had a great con-
tempt for this axiom, and never herself acted upon it.)
“And she is right,” continued Adéle la Force; “right to
be willing to follow when she has such a man as my
father to lead.”

“ Cousin Elizabeth’s mind is very mediocre,” observed
Madame Duval ; “she has no kind of originality or esprit.
Tam always sorry on your account, ma petite, that since
the marquis chose to marry a second time, he did not
give his children a step-mother more spirituelle. But
what could one expect from an Anglaise !”

“My step-mother certainly does not understand me,”
said Adéle, a little petulantly. “I can never forget her
shocked look, and the lecture which she gave me, when she
once found Louis and me galloping on one pony, I riding
in the fashion of a boy. The marquise had lately come
from England, and I suppose that people are more dull
and solemn there, to match the climate.”

“Not at the court certainly,” said Madame Duval
with a smile; “King Charles the Second and the beauties
at Nonsuch did not trouble themselves much about pro-
prieties. But I don’t believe that Cousin Elizabeth was
ever within a hundred miles of a court; I doubt whether



THE WOMAN OF TACT. 13

she had ever put her foot into a coach, or even a sedan;
and if she ever rode, it would be on a, pillion behind her
father. I think that the marquise likes to imitate the
birds—the brown sparrows, J mean—and only wear one
style of dress, and that of the simplest. The dear crea-
ture” (the speaker’s tone was one of contempt) “ has no
more idea of fashion and ton than the sparrows possess!”

“All the better for her when this dreadful, dreadful
fall comes,” observed Adéle with a heavy sigh.

“Tt cannot come, it must not—it shall not!” exclaimed
Madame Duval. “The marquis will never be so cruel,
so insane, as to leave this beautiful home of his ances-
tors just for a few trifling differences in the matter of
religion. The king, the grand monarch, has chosen to
revoke the Edict of Nantes; he wants all his subjects
to worship as he does. Eh bien! it is easy to conform
in mere externals; as Henry of Navarre said, ‘Paris is
worth a mass. We need not be wiser than our famous
hero. I say that Chateau la Force is worth a mass, and
a great many too; there is not a fairer estate in all the
province of Normandy.”

Tears gathered in Adéle’s eyes as she glanced around
her; and, in truth, her childhood’s home was one in
which the girl might feel natural pride. The saloon in
which she was seated with the wife of her cousin was
lofty and long, one end of it richly hung with ancient
tapestry. The furniture was. antique, somewhat heavy,



14 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

but handsome. Some fine portraits hung on the wall,
painted by Holbein and Vandyck, giving an impression
that beauty was hereditary in the family of La Force.
There were also more warlike ornaments, in the shape of
banners won at Ivri, and weapons, of which some were
very ancient, with some chain armour worn by a crusad-
ing ancestor in the days of Philip Augustus. The depth
of the window recesses, in which were seats of carved
oak, showed the thickness of the massive walls, which had
stood a siege during the war of La Fronde. And most
charming was the view to be seen from these windows;
for Chateau la Force stood on a little eminence girdled
with a beautiful park, beyond which a fair expanse of
country was seen, with the sea, like a silver edging,
touching the distant horizon,

The appearance of Adéle, the marquis’s only daughter,
was in keeping with her surroundings. The girl might
be some fifteen summers old, with dark, lustrous, intelli-
gent eyes, and complexion which, though less fair than
that of an English girl, wore a richer bloom on the
cheek, a brighter coral on the lip, than are usually be-
stowed on maidens to the north of the Channel. Adéle’s
movements had the easy grace natural to one accustomed
to high society: her dress, though not of expensive mate-
rial, was elegant, and according to the costume worn by
ladies during the latter part of the reign of Louis Qua-
torze. Madame Duval was richly, even extravagantly



THE WOMAN OF TACT, 15

attired, in the height of the reigning fashion, and yet
had something of vulgarity in her appearance. Her
rich silk dress, worn with a peaked bodice, was looped
back on both sides so as to display a petticoat of costly
brocade. Her sleeves, which scarcely reached below the
elbows, were ornamented with the same kind of ex-
pensive point lace as that which edged the upper part
of her bodice. Madame Duval’s cheeks were highly
coloured, but not by the hand of Nature; and not from
Nature came the profusion of black curls which clus-
tered on each side of the head, and fell in heavy coils
on the neck. The lady’s manner was lively, her speech
rapid, and garnished with many exclamations, which sa-
voured too much of profanity to be recorded. Madame’s
frequent appeals to the bon Diew certainly belonged to
the category of idle words. Belinde Duval was what
the worldly call wise, and what the wise call worldly.
The French lady was vain of her tact, especially as ex-
ercised on her amiable but weak husband, between
whose conscience and his wife’s will there was a con-
stant and wearisome conflict.

“TI say you must protest,” continued Madame Duval ;
“you must bring your father to reason. Iam a Hu-
guenot myself, so is your good cousin my husband ; but,
as I tell him, Huguenot zeal must be tempered with
common sense. One cannot put one’s head into the
mouth of a cannon. There is such a thing as accom-



16 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

modating oneself to circumstances. See, here is my
fan” (madame again opened the pretty bauble, carried
for ornament rather than use, to help her in illustrating
her meaning). “On one side are painted high-born shep-
herds and shepherdesses, dancing round fountains and
holding garlands of roses; the other side is simple sky-
blue silk. If I am in a gay assembly, the shepherds
and their chéres amies dance at their pleasure; if I am
listening to a pasteur’s sermon, I turn the celestial colour
to the light; and when cold, miserable winter comes
with its storms—shut up fan!” (she suited the action to
the word); “there is nothing to be seen but the ebony
sides.” Madame Duval laughed at her own illustra-
tion.

“Cousin Belinde, I am in no humour for jesting, my
heart is too heavy,” sighed Adéle.

“JT do not wonder at that; you have enough to make
you désolée !” exclaimed Madame Duval. “The very
idea of flying from this beautiful home, of going beyond
reach of visits to charming Paris, of being exiled to
dreadful England, with its horrible climate, where the
air is thick as pea-soup, and the sun is seen so seldom
that men take off their hats to him when he appears—
the very idea is too shocking to be entertained for a
moment! I should be stifled in England, désolée ; I
should die of ennui.” The lady raised her shoulders

and cast up her eyes, to express a shuddering sense of
(106)



THE WOMAN OF TACT. 17

utter misery. “And you, ma petite, have been born to
such a very different fate; your name, your ancestry,
give you such a prestige. You remember, I doubt not,
Madame la grande Dauphine’s visit to the chateau, when
she was making her tour in Normandy; how she patted
your curly head, and said that you and Louis made the
prettiest pair that she ever had seen, and that you must
_both come to her at Paris. What an opening!” ejacu-
lated Madame Duval; “what would not I give for my
Felicie to have such a chance of making her way at court!
But she has not your antelope eyes, nor is her father a
marquis. You have such brilliant prospects before you;
and so has Louis—why, he might be appointed page to
the king !”

“We must not think of these things,” said Adéle bit-
terly ; “they can never be; I ought not to wish them
to be.”

“Oh! the very good little nuignonne will not even
look at the sugared cake which papa puts out of her
reach on the shelf! But tell me the truth, ma petite—
if by taking that rose out of your bodice and placing
it on yon table you could change your father’s rigid
views, and make him see things in a sensible way, tell
me, would you not do it?”

Adéle flushed, and laid a hesitating hand on the rose.

“ And would not Louis?” said Madame Duval.

“Louis would do thus!” exclaimed Adéle; and sud-
(108) 2



18 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

denly throwing down the rose, she trampled it under her
foot.

« Bravo! quite sensational! what an actress you
would make!” cried her cousin, laughing; “Madame
Maintenon should secure you for her private theatricals.”

“Hark!” exclaimed Adéle; “do you not hear the
trampling of horses ?”

“T suppose that the marquis is returning,” said Ma-
dame Duval rising; “and I must take my departure, for
I expect some visitors at home.” She went to the
window and looked out. “There is my chair waiting ;
pray make a thousand apologies to my cousin the mar-
quise. I heard that she was making preserves in the
still-room, so I came for a téte-d-téte with you.”

Then followed embraces, carefully given by the elder
lady, who feared to disarrange her false hair, and rather
coldly received by the younger. Adéle quite understood
why Cousin Belinde cared little for the society of the
marquis and his wife: there was nothing in common
between them. Adéle accompanied her visitor down the
broad oaken staircase, and saw Madame Duval enter the
gay, fanciful sedan-chair, which often in those days took
the place of the cumbrous family coach. With a waved
salute, the lady was borne away by two liveried servants.
Almost at the same moment a party of horsemen, amongst
whom the marquis was the central and most striking
figure, emerged from a thickly-wooded part of the park,



CHAPTER II.
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

THE Marquis la Force was a man of noble presence,
especially when mounted, as he now was, on a spirited
charger, which he managed with graceful ease. The
steed knew that the hand on the rein was that of a
master, and obeyed the slightest movement. La Force
had passed middle age, but was still in the full strength
of vigorous manhood. His features were fine, but more
remarkable for the expression of calm repose upon them
than for mere statuesque regularity. The marquis’s ap-
pearance was not marred by the huge wig then usually
worn by men of the upper classes. La Force had a
settled dislike to everything false: the brown hair,
lightly streaked with silver, the moustache and pointed
beard were such as we see in portraits of gentlemen of
the preceding generation, when the sword was more
often in the hand than the snuff- box, and luxury had
not made effeminate courtiers of the descendants of
warriors,



20 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

Beside the marquis rode Jacques Duval, the son of
the noble’s sister. The nephew was a contrast in ap-
pearance to the uncle. Duval looked much shorter than
La Force, even though the redundant wig under his
laced cocked hat rendered the difference less conspicuous.
A huge cravat encircled a short thick neck, and made it
look shorter and thicker. The face above that cravat
was pleasant, honest, and kindly; but the lips, full and
usually slightly apart, had none of the expression of
calm determination seen on those of the uncle. It was
evident, also, that Duval had little command over his
horse. The animal’s fidgety movements disturbed him,
and sometimes interrupted the conversation which he
was carrying on with his uncle as hey slowly ap-
proached the chateau.

“Yes, yes, you are right, you are always right; I am
entirely of your opinion,” said Jacques Duval: “it is
better to lose anything, to sacrifice everything, than to
violate conscience. I intend to signify to his Majesty
that I am going to do what you do.”

“Not as I do, but as our God commands,” said the
marquis. “Neither of us can, as Huguenots, conform to
a form of worship which we regard as idolatrous.”

“Surely not, surely not,” said Duval, stooping ner-
vously to pat the neck of his restless horse; “ but-—
but—;” the poor man kept his eyes on his steed,
avoiding meeting those of his companion as he



PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL. 21

added, “in some ways my difficulties are greater than
yours.”
“How so?” asked the marquis. “Your property is
chiefly in hard cash, much more easily removed than my
house and acres, which are pretty certain to fall into the
hands of some favourite at the court. Besides, you have
artistic talent, which would of itself secure you from all
risk of serious privation.”

“J have a wife and daughter,’ murmured Jacques.

The marquis might have said, “So have J,” but he did
not utter the sentence, nor put his nephew to the humil-
iation of explaining the difference between the two
families.

“T am not sure—I do not think—that Madame Duval
would go with me if I went into exile,” said Jacques.

“Madame Duval could not choose but go with you,”
observed his uncle, “ unless you were to settle a separate
allowance upon her, which you would not be so unwise
as to do.”

“Madame is very much opposed to my resisting the
king’s will,” said Jacques, with a piteous look on his
face.

“My nephew, it is right to show a wife every con-
sideration—every kindness consistent with our duty to
God,” observed the marquis; “but no husband must
abdicate the position which he holds by the highest
authority; he must not drop the rein which God has



22 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

placed in his hand; he must not make a woman’s will
his law ; he must serve the Lord himself, and do his best
to make his family serve the Lord also.”

“Quite right, quite right,” said Duval; “I always
thought as you did. I will do my best to persuade
Madame Duval. Ah, that’s her chair! I must hasten
after her. Madame always likes to have my protection
when she passes through that part of the forest where
she apprehends danger from robbers. Adieu, my dear
uncle; we will talk over these matters when we meet
again at supper. I will think over your good advice—
I will—.” If anything was said to complete the
sentence, the words were lost in the clatter of the
horses’ hoofs, as the sward was exchanged for the harder
road.

“Think of, but perhaps not act upon it,” thought
La Force sadly, as he rode up to the massive portico of
his dwelling. At the top of the wide steps which led
up to the open door stood his wife, the marquise, to
welcome him. Elizabeth la Force was a fair and comely
dame, of some thirty summers of age. Her demeanour
was calm and serene; the prevailing impression left on
the mind of a stranger by the sight of her face was
that she was a woman of good sense, devoid of hautewr
but not of a certain quiet dignity. A shrewd observer,
however, would notice certain slight lines on the broad
brow and near the mouth, which indicated care, and



PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL. 23

possibly something of temper. There was nothing
peculiar in the dress of the marquise; only the criticis-
ing eyes of the woman of tact would have noticed it
at all.

A little behind the marquise stood Adéle, with an
unwonted cloud on her youthful brow. Her face did
not light up with the sunny smile with which she
usually met her father.

The manners of that age were more formal than
those of the present. More stately etiquette was ob-
served in the households of grands seigneurs. The
marquis’s servants drew up in two lines on the steps to
receive their master, and low were the reverences made
as, after dismounting, he passed them and reached the
little platform on which the ladies were standing. La
Force’s reception by his wife and daughter was little
less formal; though when the marquis had passed with
them through the wide hall, and reached the oaken stair-
case, he was leading his lady with his right hand; and
Adéle, in defiance of etiquette, had both of hers clasped
around his left arm. La Force, who was a very fond
father, always gave his daughter the privilege of a
petted child.

Not a word was spoken until the marquis, having
crossed the gallery at the head of the staircase, entered
the spacious saloon in which we first found Adéle and
her cousin. La Force seated himself in one of the



24 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

heavy arm-chairs which bore the escutcheon of his
ancestors emblazoned on the back. Elizabeth, who
watched the looks of her husband and saw that a
weight was on his mind, silently took a lower seat near
him. Adéle threw herself on a footstool, rested her
clasped hands on his knee, and looked inquiringly up
into his face. Neither she nor the marquise ventured to
ask the question which was uppermost in the mind of
each. La Force gently stroked his daughter’s dark
locks, and then began the conversation in a voice calm,
but not altogether free from a tone of sadness.



CHAPTER IIT.
SUBMISSION.

“T po not like to take any important step in which the
interests of my dear ones are involved,” said the marquis,
“without making them partners in my cares. If a
sacrifice is to be made, let us make it together; J ask
no one to go forward blindfold in the track which
Providence has marked out for me. Elizabeth, Adéle,—
you know of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, that
charter of Huguenot freedom. You know that the only
choice left in France for those who hold a pure faith is
between apostasy and exile. The choice has been offered
to me.—KHlizabeth, you have from the first known my
decision,—you have expressed a willingness to follow
my fortunes.”

“Where thou goest, I will go; where thou diest, I
will die,” said the lady of La Force, using almost un-
consciously the familiar words of Scripture.

The husband turned on his partner such a look as
might have rewarded a wife for any loss of fortune or



26 SUBMISSION.

position, Adéle saw the look, and it raised bitter feel-
ings in her young heart.

“Tt is easy for her to go to England, it is her own
land!” cried the girl impatiently; “but I was born in
beautiful sunny France, I have lived all my life in this
home of my fathers—it would be anguish to leave it!”
The dark eyes were full of tears; they trembled on the
lashes, then coursed fast down Adéle’s cheeks.

“I am ashamed of your want of regard for your
father’s feelings,” said Elizabeth rather severely. “He
has enough to suffer without his daughter adding to his
burden by her childish complaints.”

The remark nettled Adéle, all the more because it
was edged by truth. The “glance which the young
maiden turned on her step-mother was one of hardly
disguised anger. Almost fiercely Adéle cried, as, dash-
ing the tear-drops aside, she sprang to her feet, “I love
my father—none loves more than I do; no one need tell
me how to behave towards him !”

“Child, you forget yourself,” began Lady la Force;
but the marquis silenced her by a look, and rising, he
took his daughter’s hand and led her to a remote part
of the saloon, where tapestry covered the wall. It was
distressing to the Huguenot to have anything like divi-
sions in his family, and especially when all should unite
more closely to resist a coming storm. La Force was a
man of too much perception not to be aware that there



SUBMISSION. 27

was no strong love between his daughter and his wife.
Adéle, a spirited, wilful child, who had had little early
discipline, had by no means welcomed the coming of
one who would counsel and restrain her, and exercise
maternal authority over a headstrong girl. Any foolish
prejudice, however, might in time have worn away—for
Elizabeth’s character was one to win respect, and she
had a kindly heart under a reserved manner—but for
the evil influence of Madame Duval. That lady’s plea-
sure was to seb her young cousin against her natural
protectress, to hold up the marquise’s manners, accent,
and dress to ridicule in her step-daughter’s presence.
Especially Belinde Duval dwelt on Elizabeth’s unpardon-
able fault—that of being of English birth. Adéle was
encouraged to hate and despise everything belonging to
what the Frenchwoman called “the island of fogs.”
Its people were talked of as little better than barbarians,
brutal savages who had risen up against their king, tried
him, and brought him to the block! To the enthusiastic
Adéle it was almost as great a crime in the English to
have won the battles of Agincourt and Cressy. The
girl’s favourite heroine was Joan of Arc; Adéle’s day-
dream was to emulate that martyr .to love for her
country. The English and their descendants were never
to be forgiven for having had a share in the cruel in-
justice which had brought on the Maid of Orleans a, ter-
rible fate. Adéle had too much respect for her father,



28 SUBMISSION.

too much fear of incurring his displeasure, to let her
feelings towards the marquise often find vent in his
presence ; but she harboured them in her heart, and gave
only too ready a hearing to the ill-natured jests of
Madame Duval.

La Force stood before the tapestry hangings with his
hand on his daughter’s shoulder. Raising his eyes to-
ward the heirloom he said calmly, “This is one of the
things to be left behind.” ;

“O father—never!” exclaimed Adéle. “The tapestry
has been in our family ever ‘since the days of Saint
Louis !”

“We shall take something from it which I hope we
may never leave behind,’ was the quiet reply. “The
subject of this tapestry picture has been familiar to you,
Adéle, ever since you were able to distinguish your right
hand from your left.”

“Tt is the history of Abraham,” said Adéle, surveying
the still rich though somewhat faded hangings. The
tapestry was divided by arabesque borders into three
compartments, representing Abraham going forth at
God’s command, the patriarch kneeling in prayer, and
his preparing to sacrifice Isaac.

“Here,” observed the marquis, “we have pictured
before us faith, prayer, and obedience. Abraham has
been dead for thousands of years (if saints can be said
to die), byt still his example lives, and shall live till





SUBMISSION. 29

time shall be no more. Think you, my Adéle, that it
was easy to the patriarch to renounce idolatry in a land
where all worshipped graven images? Think you that
it was easy to him to go forth, not knowing whither he
went, turning his back for ever on home and friends
and all that was associated with happy thoughts of his
childhood ?”

“No,” was Adéle’s scarcely audible reply.

“And did Abraham make a wise or a foolish choice,
my daughter, when he went forth casting himself submis-
sively, trustfully, entirely on the promise of his God ?”

“He did wisely; he found a blessing,’ murmured

Adéle.
“ And in him all the families of the earth are blessed,
even all who are made Abraham’s children by sharing
his faith——My child, do you not desire to become a
daughter of Abraham? If so, you must quit the land
of idols.”

Adéle heaved a sigh. “I will give up everything,”
she faltered.

“ Kuerything, my child?” said the marquis. “Con-
sider the full meaning of your words. You must give
up not only house and lands, not merely pleasures and
amusements, but the proud spirit, the rebellious will;
these, by God’s grace, must be left behind if you would
inherit the blessing. You were just now disrespectful
to your mother.”



30 SUBMISSION.

Adéle’s heart was very full; again her eyes brimmed
over with tears; the most gentle rebuke from her father |
always cut her to the soul.

La Force waited for an answer, and an almost in-
audible one came at last. “I am sorry,” said the girl,
drooping her head.

“Go and tell your mother so,” said the marquis.

There was a painful struggle between obedience and
pride. But Adéle felt a gentle pressure on her shoulder,
and that pressure was more powerful to subdue her wil-
ful spirit than the most forcible arguments would have
been. With slow step and downcast eyes the young
maiden returned to the place where the English lady
was sitting. Faintly, hesitatingly, the words, “I am
sorry,” came from the reluctant lips.

Elizabeth silently kissed her step-daughter’s glowing
cheek; and Adéle, half mortified and half relieved, went ~
away to a small side-table, and occupied herself in turn-
ing over the leaves of an English book which lay upon
it. The volume was the “Pilgrim’s Progress,” a work
then comparatively modern. Elizabeth had brought it
amongst the very few things which she had taken with
her from the land of her birth.

La Force and his wife conversed together on necessary
business connected with their departure;—what property
was portable and valuable enough to be carried with
them; and what arrangements should be made for a



SUBMISSION. 31

voyage across the Channel in the seventeenth century
—not so easy of accomplishment as in the nineteenth.
Adéle listened sadly, for she did not take in the mean-
ing of a single sentence in the book before her, though
she had some acquaintance with English.

Presently a splendid greyhound, with a silver collar,
came lightly bounding into the room. Adéle was glad
of the interruption.

“Ah, Qui-vive!” she cried, patting and caressing the
beautiful creature which licked her hand; “you are
happy, you have no troubles! What a welcome you
will give your young master Louis when he comes back
from his school! You will see him in three weeks from
this day.”

“T hope that Qui-vive will see him to-morrow,” said
La Force.

“To-morrow !” exclaimed Adéle, with a ery of de-
light, “O father! then you have sent for him: what a
joyful surprise! But what brings Louis back so soon ?”

“My wish,” said the marquis gravely.

“ And you never told me!” cried Adéle. ;

“T thought it more prudent not to mention my in-
tention to any one, except, of course, your mother and
faithful Rochet, whom I intrusted with the commis-
sion to bring my son. A relay of horses was arranged
for, so that Louis might be brought with as little
delay as possible. If my boy has not strength for so



32 SUBMISSION.

long a ride, Rochet has orders to bring him in a horse-
litter.”

“Oh! Louis will much prefer riding,” cried. Adéle,
whose spirits had risen wonderfully at the news of her
brother’s coming; though she was secretly mortified as
well as surprised that such a secret should have been
kept from her knowledge. “Louis is a capital horse-
man. Oh, what fun we shall have together, off and
away through the forest, and over the downs, as far as
—yes, as far as the sea! Qui-vive will go bounding
before us.” The poor girl’s countenance fell as another
thought struck her, and it was with bitterness that she
added, “But perhaps we shall soon neither have grey-
hound to sport with nor horse to ride!”





CHAPTER IV.
THE FLAME SCORCHES.

THE supper, or as we should call it ‘dinner, was served
at sunset at Chateau la Force, and in somewhat stately
style. The Duvals were invited guests, and the
marquise was careful to give her husband’s relatives no
oceasion to laugh at English ignorance of the art of
spreading a table. The venison pasty and the trotter-
pie, the delicate confections and the dessert of pippins,
barberries, olives, and musk~plums, had been prepared
under the immediate superintendence of the Lady la
Force. Duval was known not to be indifferent to the
pleasures of the table, and his wife was a critic in the
culinary art. Elizabeth never suffered her anxieties to
interfere with her house-keeping duties.

As the family sat in the saloon, ready to receive their
guests, a little perfumed missive was brought to the
marquise. “From Belinde, I see,” said the lady as she
opened the note; and she read it half aloud in a cursory

manner: “Had expected such pleasure, Bad headache.
(106) 3



34 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Monsieur Duval will not be persuaded to leave me—I
am désolée—Your devoted Belinde.”

“Cousin Belinde was here to-day,” said Adéle, “and
she seemed to be perfectly well.”

“ Madame’s headaches come when they are convenient
to herself, and inconvenient to those who have kindly
invited her,” said Elizabeth, tossing down the note on
the table.

“Cousin Jacques might have come,—I like him, he
is so genial and kindly,” cried Adéle.

“Madame will not let her husband be more at the
chateau than she can help,” observed the lady of La
Force; and the lines on her broad brow deepened. “It
is disgraceful to a man to let himself be so governed by
his wife. Belinde would not have treated me thus
a few months ago; but she looks on us already as—.”
La Force stopped his lady’s further speech by a glance,
as a servant entered the saloon for orders.

“Let the supper be served,” said the Lady la Force.

Nothing was wanting at that silent meal except the
appetite to enjoy it. The servants took away the dainty
dishes almost untouched. There seemed something
oppressing the spirit of parents and daughter, like the
pressure of the oe when heavy thunder-clouds
cover the sky.

The sun’s fiery globe had not long dipped below the
horizon, when the trampling of several horses was heard.



THE FLAME SCORCHES. 35

Adéle sprang up with the joyful exclamation, “It is
Louis! come even sooner than we expected.”

“Resume your seat; it cannot be Louis,” said the
marquis.

Voices were heard outside, then a loud inquiry as to
whether the Marquis la Force were within, with the
ominous addition, “We come in the name of the King.”
This was followed by the tramp of booted feet; and
a servant entering the dining-hall said, “ Monsieur le
Vicomte de Fontainebleu requests audience of my lord
the Marquis la Force.”

“Let him come in,” said the marquis, rising from
table.

Booted and spurred, with jingling swords at their
sides, wearing gold-laced coats adorned with large
bunches of ribbons, their three-cornered hats in their
hands, but heavy wigs on their heads, three gentlemen
entered the hall. Careful of the rules of court etiquette,
then thought more binding than any law, the three
bowed with obsequious respect to the ladies, and then to
the marquis, who went forward some paces to meet them.

“T regret the necessity of intruding on you, Monsieur
le Marquis,” said the Vicomte de Fontainebleu, “but the
commands of his Majesty the King leave me no option.”

“Before entering on business,” said the courteous La
Force, “let me request you to partake of some refresh-
ment after your journey.”



36 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Elizabeth made signs to her servants to bring back
the dishes, and ordered lights.

“Pardon, monseigneur, but I must first fulfil my
duty, and place in your hand this reply to your paper.”
Fontainebleu handed to La Force a large official docu-
ment, to which a huge red seal was appended. La
Force bowed as he received it, with a firm hand broke
the seal, and then read the paper with a countenance
calm and unmoved. His visitors were keenly watching
his face, and so were his wife and daughter.

“It is as I expected,” said the Huguenot noble, after
perusing the document. “His Majesty rejects my
petition: I must either recant or quit Franee within
twenty-one days.”

“JT hope—I doubt not—that Monsieur le Marquis
will conform to the wishes of his Majesty,” said the
courtier blandly.

“Tn all that concerns not conscience,” was the reply ;
“but my duty to God must come before even my duty
to the King.”

“But the ladies—the demorselle,” said Fontainebleu,
glancing at Adéle as he spoke.

“What the marquis wills, we will,” quoth Elizabeth
la Force.

“My wife, daughter, and son will be partakers of my
exile,” said her husband.

Fontainebleu slightly shrugged his shoulders, with



THE FLAME SCORCHES. 37

something like a sigh of compassion for the fair victims
of stubborn obstinacy. Then in the same courtly
manner he observed, “The ladies of the chateau
may go where they list, but his Majesty has gra-
ciously made other arrangements for the heir of La
Force !”

“Explain yourself, sir,” said the marquis sternly.

Fontainebleu avoided meeting the father’s anxious
eyes as he made reply: “His gracious Majesty, full of
benevolence for his nobility, is unwilling to let a youth
of fourteen years of age suffer for the—pardon me,
seigneur—the contumacy of a parent. The King be-
nevolently takes upon himself the care of young Louis
la Force, and will insure his receiving a good education
at some Catholic establishment.”

“But surely not without his father’s consent!” ex-
claimed the Huguenot noble.

“Such consent is quite unnecessary under the circum-
stances,” said the courtier. “His Majesty regards the
spiritual welfare of his young subjects. The matter is
not now in our hands: fortified by the royal warrant,
we called on our way hither at the seminary where the
young gentleman had been placed, and removed him
according to his Majesty's command. Monsieur le
Marquis’s son is now on his way to Paris.”

An ejaculation—it was an agonized prayer— burst
in a single word from the whitened lips of the father.



38 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Tt was not loud, scarcely audible—it was such as the
rack might have wrung from a martyr.

“Ts there no remedy for this? must I be bereaved
of my child!” cried the marquis.

“There is a very simple remedy,’ observed the
vicomte bowing. “Monseigneur has only to conform ;
nothing is required but a declaration, a few masses,
and—”

“The loss of a soul,” said the Huguenot peer.

“Ts this the justice to be found in France!” ex-
claimed Elizabeth, indignation in her honest blue eyes.
« Are children to be torn from their parents, simply
because these parents worship God according to con-
science! It never was so in England.”

Fontainebleu again gave his little shrug, with a
corresponding gesture of the hands intended to express
his polite regret at the state of affairs which distressed
a lady, and his own irresponsibility in the matter. La
Force felt that argument or remonstrance was worse
than useless, and that it was undesirable that his wite
and daughter, who might be unable to control their
feelings, should remain in the company of their most
unwelcome guests.

“Gentlemen, you will excuse the lady not presiding
at the board,” he said, as the servants brought back the
dinner, with lights which were now required, as evening
was darkening into night. “Accompany your mother,”



THE FLAME SCORCHES. 39

the marquis gently added, addressing his daughter, who
had covered her face with her hands, and bowed it in an
attitude of uncontrollable sorrow. Adéle did not wait
for the marquise to lead the way, but rushed out of the
hall, and her sobs on the staircase could be heard in the
room which she had quitted. “Louis! Louis!” were the
only words which she could utter between them.
Elizabeth, stiffly bowing to the French courtiers, with
a slow step quitted the hall.

Fontainebleu and his companions took their seat at
the board; and their host resumed his, to do the honours
of the table. The courtiers with sharp appetites
attacked the viands, and full justice was done to the
venison pasty and trotter-pie, while sack and burgundy
freely circulated round. Conversation also freely cir-
culated as the repast went on. It, however, touched on
no delicate topic. The French gentlemen talked of the
last duel, and the last grand ball, the reigning beauty in
the circle of fashion, the scenery of the country through
which the travellers had passed, the bad accommodation
at hotels, and such like matters of comparatively little
interest. La Force endured that wearisome meal, which
seemed as if it never would end. With a soul full of
trouble he forced himself to listen and reply to frivolous
questions ; he performed the hard duty prescribed by
the law of hospitality, mastering his own impatient
spirit as he had mastered his fiery steed. It was a



40 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

relief when the tedious banquet was ended, when the
last glass had been drained to the health of the king.
La Force himself conducted the courtiers to their apart-
ments; and then, after exchange of formal courtesies,
was able to retire to his own.

Adéle lay awake for hours on her little bed, and then
eried herself to sleep. Her father neither wept nor
slept. That night was spent by the Huguenot in

prayer.



CHAPTER V.
BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

ADELE awoke with a sense of something painful press-
ing on her heart, but did not for some seconds realize
what the burden was. Recollection came only too soon,
and with it a bitterness of spirit bordering almost on
rebellious despair. Adéle was utterly unaccustomed to
sorrow ; life had been to her like a summer’s day, and
she was wholly unprepared for a storm. The girl could
not, like her father, wrap herself up in the thick mantle
of faith, and take refuge in prayer from the wild wind
and the rushing rain. Adéle’s mind was full of one
subject, and she could not fix it on religion even when
her knee was bent in apparent devotion. “Why does
God suffer wickedness to triumph, tyranny to trample
down right?” was the question that burned itself into
her soul. Adéle had not gone into the sanctuary ever
open to believers; and she had as yet but little experi-
ence of the blessings which Christians find in the track
of the veiled angel—Affliction. The idea of Louis, her



42 2 BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

only brother, her companion, her pride, being in the
hands of a wicked king, to be brought up in a false
religion, and separated from his family for ever, was
frightful to the affectionate girl. Adéle almost forgot
the misery of poverty and exile in this more terrible
woe !

The family of La Force had early met for morning
prayer, followed by a slight repast. The substantial
meal (at which Adéle resolved not to appear) was re-
served for a later hour, when the luxurious guests
should emerge from their respective chambers; for the
courtiers did not, like the La Force family, rise at cock-
crow. ‘The marquis used the interval in riding out to
see a sick tenant; his wife in arranging household
affairs. Adéle could settle to no employment. She
wandered disconsolately into the large saloon, and seated
herself in one of the deep window recesses, the curtain
of which was so hanging as almost entirely to screen
her from the view of any one in the room. The saloon
was quite empty, or Adéle would not have sought it;
but as she sat, sadly looking forth on the park, there
was heard the tread of heavy feet coming along the
gallery, and the sound of men’s voices engaged in light
conversation. Adéle would gladly have fled from the
saloon, but she could not do so without meeting Fon-
tainebleu and his companions, and she could not endure
to encounter their gaze. The young maiden, without



BEHIND THE CURTAIN. : 43

the slightest idea of eaves-dropping, remained in her
secret recess, earnestly hoping to escape the notice of
the hateful visitors. Adéle had some expectation that
the courtiers would descend the staircase, and go to the
hall; but no, they entered the saloon.

“Fine place!” remarked Fontainebleu as he came in.

“Four thousand acres attached—I’ve been question-
ing the steward—they will bring in a fine revenue,”
observed some one, in a voice deeper and harsher.

“Ma foi! Lepine, you are always thinking of the
louis-d’or!” cried a third: “I warrant me you'd farm
out the Champs Elysée if you had a chance, and sow
turnips around the palace of Versailles. I say, this is a
capital place for hunting. I hope, Fontainebleu, you'll
invite me here. We'll bring down many a buck, and
perhaps have a chance of rousing a tusker in the
forest !”

“You'll not recognize the chateau, Perrot, when you
come again.” It was Fontainebleau who now spoke.
“The old place is capable of much improvement. I
shall have the staircase painted and gilded.”

“© you Goth! you Vandal!” exclaimed young Perrot.
“Would you paint and gild polished oak ?”

“Tt’s so gloomy, you can’t light it up. And what say
you to a few gods and goddesses painted on this ceiling,
showering down roses on gay dancers below ?”

“You would have to take down the pictures first—



44 BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

they would be incongruous,” observed Lepine, the elder
courtier. “But they're well painted—uncommonly well
painted ; I think that they would fetch their price.”

“Yes; and that faded old tapestry too.”

Adéle could endure to hear no more. Like a
wounded young leopard she sprang from her curtained
recess and faced the three courtiers, who were startled
at her sudden appearance. Adéle’s face was flushed, her
small hand clenched, and her dark eyes were flashing
with anger.

“And who are you—robbers!” she exclaimed in a
voice hoarse with passion, “that you dare thus to appro-
priate the property of my father, the Marquis la Force !”

The three courtiers bowed low, perhaps in mockery,
possibly in pity; and Fontainebleu made reply, with
a little hesitation in his manner,—

““ Mademoiselle has not yet heard that his Majesty has
appointed me, his unworthy servant, to take over charge
of the chateau and estate when the marquis quits the
place.” a

Adéle la Force heard no more; she fled from the
saloon, and sought her own apartment, where she flung
herself on the bed in an agony of mingled anger and
grief. She heard the gong sound for breakfast, but she
moved not. The girl did not rise from he~-tear-wetted
pillow, until sounds from below assured her that the
courtiers were taking their departure at last. Then,



BEHIND THE CURTAIN. 45

indeed, Adéle slowly went to her casement, and watched
the emissaries of the oppressor as they mounted their
horses, and then bent low from their saddles, and waved
a formal adieu to the master and mistress of the house
to which they had brought such sorrow. Adéle hardly
breathed till the courtiers, with their mounted followers,
had disappeared behind the trees.

The days that followed were very painful. La Force
addressed a most touching letter tc the monarch of
whose throne he and his ancestors had been a bulwark.
Bertrand asked for nothing but his child, complained of
nothing but separation from his only son. The letter
received no reply. Each member of the family wrote
to Louis; but from him, too, no answer came. Even if-—
as was doubtful—the letters ever reached him, he was
probably not allowed to write in return.

There were needful cares connected with leaving the
estate. Whilst the marquis rode from cottage to cottage,
the lady of the chateau was full of work at home. It
needed much thought to select, from property accu-
mulated by successive generations, what should be carried
away. To this unpleasant work an additional ele-
ment of pain was added by constant disagreements in
opinion between Elizabeth and Adéle. The marquise,
a practical woman, who had been accustomed to rigid
economy in her childhood’s home, in selecting articles to
take with her, naturally chose such as were portable and



46 BEHIND THE CURTAIN,

of intrinsic value—those that might readily be turned
into money. Adéle set her heart on carrying off heavy
suits of armour, fraught with family interest. To this
Elizabeth strongly objected.

“T would rather leave anything behind than this
precious sword!” exclaimed Adéle. “Do you not know
that it was grasped in the dead hand of a La Force at
Ivri, and that from this incident King Henry gave to
our family the crest of a hand holding a sword, with
the motto ‘ Faithful unto death !’”

“JT must make a concession in favour of that sword,
for your father values it,’ said the marquise; “the
crest and motto are carved on the back of our chairs.”

“ And the crusader’s cuirass ?”

Elizabeth shook her head. “Neither that nor his
spear and shield.”

Adéle could not suppress her indignation. “Of course
we shall take all the pictures, and the dear old tapestry,”
she cried.

“Certainly the family portraits, but without the
heavy frames. To take the cumbrous mass of tapestry
is entirely out of the question.”

“You have no feeling ”—

“You have no sense ”——were on the lips of matron and
maid, when happily the entrance of the marquis put
a stop to the unseemly dispute.



CHAPTER VI.
A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

A YET more painful struggle was going on in Courville,
the country house in which the Duvals passed the
summer months, living during the rest of the year in
their mansion in Paris. It was a struggle between a
weak, conscientious man, and the selfish, imperious
woman to whose will he had habitually yielded his
own. Night and day the struggle went on, Felicie, a
flighty, shallow-minded girl, throwing all her weight
into the scale of opposition to her pious father. Jacques,
the most good-natured, kindly of men, found himself
regarded as a tyrant. Sometimes he had to endure the
sight of fits of hysterical weeping, which wrung his
tender heart. More frequently he was overwhelmed
with bitter reproaches. Duval hardly knew which tried
him most—the blasts of anger, or the deluge of tears.
Head and heart ached with sorrow; the poor Huguenot
lost appetite, lost flesh—his home was a purgatory
to him.



48 | A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

The struggle could hardly have lasted but for the
strong support given to his nephew by Bertrand la
Force. The marquis argued with Duval, prayed with
him, stirred him up to play the part of aman. Often
they paced together the straight, formal walks of the
garden at Courville, where “each alley had its brother,”
and the very trees seemed to grow according to rule.
A fountain in the centre spouted up its waters through
the horn of a Triton. It was in one of those walks
that the following conversation took place:—

“What! would you yield to a woman’s love of the
world?” exclaimed the Huguenot noble. “If you give
way, you sacrifice your wife and your daughter ; you
throw them into the midst of temptations which you
know that they cannot withstand. For their sakes, as
much as for your own, stand out, and choose exile rather
than yield one inch in a matter of conscience.”

“I would gladly embrace exile—I would go to En-
gland, Labrador, the ends of the earth—to keep true to
my faith!” cried poor Jacques, his eyes fillmg with
tears; “but I have been in all things so accustomed to’
consult, or rather to leave all things to the management
of my wife, that it is now inconceivably difficult to me
to oppose her will.”

“My dear nephew ”—La Force laid his hand on the
arm of Duval as he spoke—“in God’s own Word it is
written that the husband is the head of the wife. If





A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 49

the head habitually stoop to a lower place than that
assigned to it by its Maker, what, in the physical frame,
is the result? The beauty, the dignity of the form is
lost altogether, and the health of the whole body is
injured.”

Duval, with his eyes on the ground, sadly murmured
assent,

“No woman,” continued the marquis,“ can perfectly
love a husband to whom she cannot look up. Conjugal
affection is given to us as the type of the highest, holiest
of unions, even that between Chiist Himself and His
Church. Do not we Protestants see in this unhappy
land the fearful consequence of what is called the Church
usurping the place of her Lord?”

Madame Duval, who greatly disliked to see her hus-
band engaged in conversation with his uncle, came out ~
to interrupt it. Belinde had strained every nerve to
prevent Duval from. visiting the chateau; but she could
not hinder the marquis from coming to Courville. She
indeed no longer gave him a flattering welcome. La
Force was no more the aristocratic connection of whom
Madame Duval was proud ; he was the ruined man who
had lost all chance of helping on her interest at court.
Madame openly, and before others, insulted the marquis,
who was too polite to retort. If she could not prevent
his visits to Courville, she could at least make them so

bitter that he would not care to repeat them.
(108) 4



50 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

“See, Monsieur le Marquis,” she cried, as she met La
Force on the terrace—“ see what comes of your obstinate
self-will! Had you conformed, had you made a few
trifling concessions, you might have kept your only son
under your influence still.” The woman of tact knew
where the sting of her malice would strike the most
tender place. “Now you abandon the care of his
up-bringing to men whom, in your superior sanctity, -
you look upon as godless reprobates; or priests, whom
_ you regard as blind idolaters. Your son will either
become a profligate at the court, or, if you like the idea
better, a shaven monk prostrate at the shrine of St.
Mary.”

“ Belinde—my dear!” exclaimed Jacques in an ex
postulating tone, which was intended to convey a
rebuke.

La Force pressed his lips tightly together to keep in
the burning words almost on his tongue. All that he
said aloud was, “ Madame, Louis is in the hands of God,
not of man,” as he turned away.

It indeed cost La Force a great deal to persevere in
visits to Courville; but he was not a man to count the
cost, He felt that his nephew’s soul might be at stake,
and therefore often turned his horse’s rein in the direc-
tion which of all others he was most inclined to avoid.

Thus the days, so full of trial, rolled on. Even the
most tedious and trying come to an end at last. When



A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 51

the time appointed for the Huguenot’s departure drew
nigh, Madame Duval’s opposition to the wishes of her
husband slackened, then actually ceased, though not her
bitter complaints. To her hushand’s inexpressible relief,
Belinde seemed to have given up the contest. Duval
was able to make arrangements for accompanying the
marquis and his family in their flight to England; a
fishing-smack was hired to convey the whole party
across the Channel, Madame Duval could not stay
behind without her husband’s money, as she possessed
none of her own, so must perforce accompany him, how-
_ ever unwillingly. Dresses and jewels were accordingly
packed up; but Duval noticed that his wife’s prepara-
tions were not on so large a scale as was required for a
complete transplantation from one country to another.

“Surely, mon amie, you will require to take much
more with you,” observed the good man. “Madame
Elizabeth has been doing nothing but packing for the
last ten days, and a waggon-load of heavy luggage went
yesterday from the chateau.”

“My brother will send after us anything that we
want,” replied Madame Duval.
' “But surely that will be difficult, troublesome, and
expensive ; remember the risk of transporting luggage
across that rough sea. Had we not better take more
with us to England?” suggested the husband meekly,

“I suppose that blankets and warming-pans can be |



52 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

bought in the foggy island,” was Belinde’s tart reply
as she turned away.

The momentous morning of departure arrived. A
large travelling coach, drawn by six horses, was at the
portico of Courville, and servants were busily employed
in piling the top with luggage and thrusting articles
into the boot. Felicie sat on a trunk looking wonder-
fully cheerful and humming a tune, which made her
father call her a brave, good girl: she giggled a little at
the praise. It had been arranged that the conveyances
of the La Forces and the Duvals should meet at an
appointed hour at a place where four roads met, so that
no time might be lost by either party going out of the
way. The two families would then proceed on their
journey together.

Duval stood in his hall watching and directing his
servants: it was a matter of self-gratulation to him
that all was clear before him at last. Jacques had not,
like his uncle, the pain of leaving an ancestral home,
Courville being only a hired house, and so full now of
unpleasant associations that poor Duval never wished to
see it again.

Madame, attired for her journey, came up to her
husband. He avoided looking at her; he almost felt as
if acting a cruel part towards his wife. If Jacques had
won a victory, none of a conqueror’s feelings of triumph
were in the kind man’s heart.





£
i
A

A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 53

“Speak to me for a few minutes in the library,” said
Madame Duval.

“One struggle more,” thought Jacques, as he sub-
missively followed his formidable wife.

Belinde motioned to him to take a chair, and sat
down beside him. “Now for the last battle,” thought
Duval. “Would that we were fairly on our way !”

Madame cleared her throat with a little cough, before
she began in a tone much more mild than her husband
expected.

“T have made a great sacrifice for you,” said Belinde.

“Great, great, mon amie,” responded Duval.

“T have consented that we should never part from
each other. But if we could have kept together and
remained in France, without your having to change your
religion, would you not have stayed with me here?”

“ Of course, of course,” was the hastily uttered reply.

“Then it is nothing but the fear of being forced to
renounce your faith that makes you depart?” Belinde
was eagerly, anxiously watching the averted face of her
husband as she asked the question.

“Tf I could stay, without giving up my religion, of
course I would do so, in deference to your wishes, mon
amie.”

“Then you promise me—you give me your word of
honour—that if you can remain without becoming a
Catholic, you will?”



54 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

“T promise, for the thing is impossible,” said Jacques.

It was with a look of triumph that Madame Duval
opened an official-looking document, of which she had
already broken the seal. The crabbed signature of the
unscrupulous prime minister of Louis XIV. was easily
recognized by Duval.

“ Read this,” cried Belinde; “or stay, I will save you
the trouble;” and she read aloud as follows: As a
special indulgence from his Majesty, Monsieur Duval
as permitted to reside in Paris without renouncing his
heretical errors, on the single condition that no meetings
for seditious or religious purposes be held in his house.

Jacques was thunderstruck at this most unexpected
turn to the course of affairs. He took the paper into
his own hand and read it.

“Ts it not clear?” asked Belinde.

Duval only nodded his head.

“And have you not pledged your solemn word that
we shall keep together if you are not forced to recant ?
I am going to Paris; you must go with me, or you are
a perjured man.”

“How did you obtain this paper ?” asked Jacques in
an agitated voice.

“J told you that I had made a great sacrifice, and
my words were true. In procuring this indulgence, I
had the wit to work through a woman. My sapphire
necklace adorns the neck of the minister’s wife.”



CHAPTER VIL
LAST FAREWELLS.

SINCE the marquis had received the royal mandate to
depart within twenty-one days, a great change had
taken place in the weather, before so warm and bright.

A touch of early frost in the beginning of October had
suddenly changed the aspect of nature, and clothed the
trees of the park in garments of yellow, crimson, and
brown. To the aching heart of Adéle their beauty
spoke only of death and decay. The showers of leaves
which the soughing wind sent whirling to the ground
seemed to her emblems of withered hopes. Adéle
wandered for hours in the forest, revisiting each spot
most beloved, and carving her initials on the bark of
some of the trees. Sometimes, seated on a gnarled root,
the poor girl wept passionately for her brother. Addéle,
on her return to the chateau, would feel impatient when
she beheld her step-mother, wearing an apron and with
no lace on her sleeves, packing delicate articles with
her own hands, or giving orders to the servants, who



56 LAST FAREWELLS,

were turning the former order of the place into what
appeared to the eyes of the girl only dust, disorder, and
confusion.

“My step-mother thinks of nothing but common
household arrangements,” said Adéle to herself, with a
feeline approaching to contempt.

The youthful maiden was wrong. Elizabeth was
thinking first of her husband. Her busy efforts were to
save him trouble. His comfort was the object which
his wife had ever in view: La Force should have no care
about minor matters from which her active love could
save him. Elizabeth worked on vigorously in spite of
fatigue. She looked serene (at least in her husband’s
presence), notwithstanding the pain at her heart. For
Elizabeth grieved over the loss of Louis, though she did
not weep viclently like his sister. What Adéle took
for want of feeling was really consideration for the
feelings of Bertrand. “My step-mother is quite happy
at the thought of going to England; leaving the dear
old chateau is nothing to her,’ thought Adéle. Again
the girl was utterly wrong. Elizabeth dearly loved her
beautiful dwelling, the only residence in which she had
known domestic peace. For Elizabeth’s early years had
been full of trial. Her father, a hard, penurious man,
had made his house a dull prison to his children. With
a strange perversion of mind, Mr. Page had regarded
Elizabeth, his eldest daughter, almost with dislike. He



LAST FAREWELLS. : 57

chose to consider her extravagant; and when he became
a widower, and housekeeping devolved on his first-born,
by no possible effort which Elizabeth made could she
please a peevish, unreasonable man. Every meal was
imbittered by reproaches, every morsel seasoned with
gall. When La Force took his portionless bride from a
home undeserving of the name, Elizabeth was like a
caged bird set free to spread its wings in the sunshine.
These early trials, to which she never alluded, had
sobered, matured, and ripened her spirit; and relief from
their pressure had added the element of fervent grati-
tude to a deliverer, to the loyal love which was borne
to a husband. The years spent at the chateau had been
to Elizabeth beyond comparison the happiest years of
her life, and she was greatly attached to the place.
Elizabeth had also her secret anxieties regarding the
future. She doubted how her generous, open-handed
husband would bear the trial of comparative poverty,
and how he would agree with a man so utterly unlike
him in everything as was Mr. Page, her father.

But Madame la Force kept these troubles and anxi-
eties to herself. Adéle had often complained that her
step-mother did not understand her; she might with much
more truth have said that she did not understand her
step-mother. Adéle compared her own sensibility with the
supposed coldness of a stronger nature, and prided herself
on what was actually selfishness under a specious disguise.



58 LAST FAREWELLS.

On the morning of departure the marquis and Eliza-
beth were in the hall ready to start at the moment
appointed. Adéle only was missing. Her step-mother
was annoyed at time being lost in search for the girl,
as it was like prolonging a painful operation which the
marquis had to endure. La Force was anxious to be
off, lest the Duvals should reach the place of rendezvous
before his party. After Adéle had been vainly sought
for in her own apartment and in the saloon, she appeared
at last on the drive, her eyes swollen with crying, after
a sad parting with her pony, her white doe, and her
doves; a parting which she now renewed with her
favourite Qui-vive, throwing her arms round his neck,
kissing him, and weeping.

The marquis read impatience on the face of his wife.
“Do not chide the poor child,” he gently said; “she has
enough to suffer already.”

Tt was at the last difficult to depart, so many
tenants, servants, neighbours, and friends had come for
a last look, a last shake of the hand of the man whom
they regarded as the noblest in all the province of Nor-
mandy. At length the marquis mounted his white steed.
The beautiful creature had already been sold; but his new
master was to receive him where the four roads met—
the place appointed for the rendezvous with the Duvals,
at the foot of a small hill, surmounted by a windmill.
For the last time the marquis gave the shake to the



LAST FAREWELLS. 59

rein which was the signal to his obedient steed to bound
forward ; then turning, La Force bent from his saddle
to bid a long farewell to his friends. He avoided
glancing up at the castle; it was surrendered to God—
‘enough, its owner would cast no “long, lingering look
behind.”

The ladies took their places in the travelling coach.
Adéle abandoned herself to grief, covering her face with
her hands. Elizabeth to the last spoke kindly words to
those who had come to say good-bye; but it was a
relief when the moving on of the cumbrous vehicle left
cher at length to comparative solitude. The lady then
repeated to Adéle a single verse of comfort from the
Scriptures; but Adéle did not choose to be comforted.
As the attempt to bestow consolation elicited no reply
but a sob, Elizabeth settled herself on her seat, and, to
Adéle’s utter disgust, quietly took out her knitting.
“Such an occupation at such a time! no one but an
Englishwoman would have thought of anything so
heartless!” said Adéle to herself. But Elizabeth had
remembered the cold wind which would meet her hus-
band on the waves of the Channel, and she was making
a soft, warm wrap to protect him from its effects. As
the lady’s busy fingers plied the ivory needles, the click-
click of which almost drove her step-daughter wild,
Elizabeth was repeating to herself verses from the
Psalmis, intermingled with silent prayers.



60 LAST FAREWELLS.

The marquis, who rode rapidly, had reached the little
hill in half the time taken by the coach. He rode up
to the heavy, luggage-piled conveyance.

“There is nothing to be seen of the Duvals,” he said
to his wife.

“ Your nephew is not always punctual, and Belinde is an
unwilling traveller. Iam not surprised at a short delay.”

But the delay was not a short one, and La Force
became uneasy.

“They were to have been here at ten, and it is now
half-past eleven,” said the marquis after some time,
looking for the twentieth time at his large gold watch,
and then anxiously glancing down the road by which
the Duvals were to come.

“T will ride off to Courville myself, and find out the
cause of this most inopportune delay,” cried La Force.
He pressed the sides of his steed and shook the rein:
there was no need of whip or spur; the horse galloped
off swiftly, as if proud of his rider.

The gate of Courville was soon reached ; it was open.
La Force passed through the grounds to the door of the
villa. The place looked empty and deserted ; the blinds
were drawn; there was no sign of a travelling carriage,
except the deep ruts which its wheels had left on the drive.

“Where is monsieur ? where is madame?” asked the
rider anxiously of a servant who was lounging about.

“They started two hours ago for Paris,” was the reply.





CHAPTER VIII.
AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

On the evening of that sad day La Force stood, with
arms folded, on the deck of a little vessel, watching the
receding shores of the land which he had quitted for ever.
“OQ God, have pity on my unhappy country!” such
was the Huguenot’s silent prayer. “Save France from
the iron hand of tyranny, and let Thy gospel have free
course. And oh, do Thou in Thy mercy watch over
my only son! Be to him as a father, as for Thy sake
he is fatherless upon earth. I commit to Thy holy
keeping one who is dearer, far dearer to me than life.”
“Guide us, guard us, O Lord,” was the quiet sup-
plication of the Huguenot’s wife. “Lead us in the
right way, for we rest our hopes upon Thee. Uphold
my beloved husband in the trials encountered for Thy
sake.” Then, turning an indignant glance on the land
which she was leaving, the Englishwoman said half-
aloud: “O guilty France, thou wilt one day repent
having cast off from thee thy bravest and best !”



62 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

Terribly was the prediction fulfilled when, with no
gallant and true Protestants to uphold it, the throne
of the descendant of Louis XIV. was overturned with a
crash which startled Europe, and the head of the in-
heritor of his title and name felt into the blood-stained ~
basket! The crimes of a despotism brought on the
horrors of a revolution. Louis XIV. sowed the wind,
and his family reaped the whirlwind.

“Farewell, dear, beautiful France!” exclaimed Adéle
la Force. “ With thee I leave all happiness behind !”

“Do not speak thus, Adéle,” said Elizabeth, who
heard the exclamation ; “keep up a brave heart—matters
might have been worse.”

“They could not be worse than they are—I could not
be more wretched than I am!” Poor Adéle had soon
to recall these hastily-uttered words.

Elizabeth did not stay to dispute the point; she went
down tothe small cabin allotted to the family, to make
all things as little uncomfortable as she could, in such
a narrow space. Then, when bags had been hung up,
and the port-hole opened to admit some air and light,
when provisions had been taken from the basket, and
berths properly arranged, Elizabeth sat down on a
trunk, and for awhile gave herself over to thought.

Her reflections were not all painful. Elizabeth was
going back to England, dear old England, where Chris-
tians had liberty to worship in spirit and in truth,



AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE, 63

albeit under a popish king. No dragonnades were there;
no children were torn from their parents to be brought
up in errors which those parents abhorred. Elizabeth
also thought of the meetings before her. Her father’s
unkindness had not destroyed though it had nipped the
plant of filial affection. His daughter had not seen him
for eight long years, and she yearned for a sight of
his and other familiar faces. What a pleasure to see
gentle Lilly and loving Bridget again, and friends,
faithful though few! Elizabeth had led a secluded life
in her early home, but she had been able to pay a few
visits, which remained as green spots in her memory.
It was during one of these few visits to a chosen friend
that she had first met with Bertrand la Force.

Elizabeth felt it a matter for thankfulness that,
though her husband had lost his estate and was pre-
cluded from drawing from it any revenue, he was in no
immediate danger of feeling the pressure of want. The
marquis had brought with him a considerable sum in gold,
besides family jewels of value. There was something
to start with, a prudent management of which might
procure needful comforts for the family; the loss of
luxuries was not to be regretted. It would be a real
pleasure, Elizabeth thought, to show her skill in making
the two ends meet, to contrive how far her personal
efforts could smooth the path of her exiled lord. The
English lady contemplated the possibility of earning



64 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

something by her needle to add to the little family
store. Elizabeth was full of her plans for the future,
when she was aroused in a startling manner from her
quiet reflections.

Chateau la Force being not more than five leagues
from the port, the exiles had calculated on embarking
but an hour or two after mid-day, and crossing the
Channel before night should set in, if the wind blew
from the south. But there had been considerable delay
caused by waiting for the Duvals, and the roads had
been in so bad a state that little remained of daylight
before the port was reached. The marquis consulted
the skipper of the smack in which his passage was
taken as to whether it was necessary to wait till the
morning before setting sail.

“We've good moonlight, and the wind in the right
quarter,” was the seaman’s reply; “Tl engage to land
all safe and sound at daybreak.”

As La Force was unwilling to linger in the port, he
accordingly embarked with his family, and one faithful
attendant, a Huguenot like himself.

The smack had not accomplished half her course over
the heaving waves, when a dull, gray sea-mist fell,
blotting out the moon and the stars, and swathing every-
thing like a shroud. Notwithstanding the damp chill,
Adéle would not quit the deck, to go down, as she said,
to be stifled below. With her arm locked in that of her



AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE, 65

father, the girl stood gazing into the mist, which, even
had the sun not gone down, would have hidden France
from her eyes. Suddenly a large high object loomed
through the fog, an object which looked to Adéle like an
enormous white wing. There was a loud shout, to the

1?

steersman,:“ Helm a-port!” a ery, “She’s on us!” and
then a violent, terrific shock, which made every plank in
the vessel quiver, and almost threw Adéle down on the
deck. The bowsprit of the smack had been smashed,
her bulwark crushed in: there had been a collision with
a larger vessel in the fog.

“Lower the boat!” shouted the skipper; “call all
hands—she’s sinking !”

“Hold on, Adéle; I must go for your mother,” ex-
claimed the marquis. But as he hastened to find his wife,
he met Elizabeth coming quickly up the companion-
ladder. She would have known by the shock that some-
thing terrible had happened, even if the water had not
been rushing into the cabin through a fracture caused by
the violent collision.

« What is it ?” was Elizabeth’s hurried question.

“A vessel has struck us in the fog. Come quickly ;
I think we are going down.”

Already the sailors were lowering the boat. Nota
minute had to be lost. The vessel that had borne down
on the smack was taking in her sails, and putting out

/
2 boat to help in preserving the passengers and crew of
(208) 5



66 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

the smaller craft. Adéle, almost too bewildered to
comprehend her situation, found herself almost thrown
down into a boat, and then, ere the oars had made more
than three strokes, caught up again by strong hands
and lifted, like a helpless burden, up the side ofa larger
vessel than that which she had quitted. She was wet,
frightened, but safe! Scarcely had all the shipwrecked
party been taken up from the boats, when the smack,
which had been greatly injured, sank, prow foremost,
under the waves! The collision—the escape—had oc-
cupied so short a space of time, that the startled pas-
sengers felt as if the whole had been but a dream.

The mist was clearing off. The moon’s pale orb
could be seen, and shed a ghastly gleam on the waves.
Adéle gazed bewildered on the bubbles and eddies which
showed where the vessel in which she so lately em-
barked had disappeared, carrying with it all the treasures
which the Marquis la Force had been taking with him
to England. She could hardly realize that the family
had now absolutely nothing but the wet garments in
which they were standing.

“Thanks to our merciful Preserver, that which is
most precious is safe!” exclaimed the Huguenot noble,
with one arm around his wife and one around his
daughter.

“But is all—all gone?” cried Adéle excitedly, still
gazing on the dark heaving waves. “My mother’s



AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE. 67

jewels—the pearls which were heirlooms—the plate
which our ancestors used and handed down from sire to
gon—the pictures, the dear. pictures which can never,
never be replaced—even the sword which was worn at
Ivri !—all swallowed up by that horrible sea!”

“We had already lost what was more precious than
gold or jewels,” said the bereaved father with a sigh ;
“and as for the sword, my child, we shall find in the
land to which we are bound one more valuable still, the
sword of the Spirit—the Word of God.” __

“Why does God strip us of everything ?” impetuously
cried Adéle la Force.

The marquis calmly replied in the words of the
patriarch Job, “The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken
away ; blessed be the name of the Lord.”



CHAPTER IX.
POVERTY AND PRIDE.

Tue heart of old England readily responds to the call
of humanity. It is matter of history that a subscrip-
tion was raised for the Protestant exiles from France,
who in tens of thousands sought refuge from persecution
after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

The La Forces met with the utmost kindness on
board the vessel which had been the accidental cause of
the loss of their own. Captain, officers, and passengers
vied in showing them attention. The same kindness
awaited the exiles on their arrival at Dover. No sooner
was it known that a Huguenot nobleman and his family,
expelled from France by the tyrant Louis, had suffered
shipwreck and loss of everything on the voyage, than
several respectable burgesses contended for the honour
of showing them hospitality. The mayor, William
Carden, succeeded in establishing his superior claim to
the honour of entertaining the Marquis la Force.

So a cask of ale was broached, huge joints of beef



POVERTY AND PRIDE, 69

ordered in—the boar’s head was to appear at the head
of the table. Even the morning repast was substantial
and abundant, though the grand feast was reserved for
a later hour. The mayor’s wife, a kind-hearted woman,
ransacked her wardrobe to bring changes of raiment to
the shipwrecked ladies. Elizabeth thankfully accepted
for herself and Adéle what was most plain and inex-
pensive, though not without expostulation on the part
of her hostess, who declared that such garments were
“not fit for the quality.” After the excitement and
fatigue of their disastrous voyage the travellers needed
rest, but they had to stand the well-meant but trying
attentions, and answer the questions of numerous vis-
itors, whom sympathy or curiosity, or both motives
combined, brought to the house of the mayor.

“TY wish that these good people had the sense to un-
derstand that to those in affliction, as we are, it would
be a luxury to be left alone!” exclaimed Adéle in
French, when there was a brief pause in the stream of
visitors.

“It is a luxury which we could only procure by mor-
tifying and disappointing those who are eager to do us
service,” observed the marquise.

“English are so different from French,” murmured
Adéle ; “of course you do not feel the change as I do.
—Ah, another rap at the door !”

The Huguenot family won golden opinions from the



70 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

good citizens of Dover. The marquise was declared to
be so nice, so free from pride, such a thorough English-
woman: the young lady was so pretty and interesting:
as for La Force himself, his noble appearance, his per-
fect courtesy, and the cause of his exile, caused a feeling
of enthusiasm in his favour.

This enthusiasm took a very practical form. While
the exhausted travellers were at length enjoying a little
much-needed repose after a crowded banquet, energetic
dames, late in the evening and early in the morning,
were hurrying from house to house, from shop to shop,
collecting subscriptions in aid of a noble family utterly
rumed by their attachment to the Protestant cause.
Money was readily contributed, and confided to the
hospitable mayor.

Elizabeth was pondering, with some perplexity, in
what way she and her party could, without money, ac-
complish a journey of some thirty miles to the house of
her father, when she and Adéle were summoned to par-
take of a late and very substantial breakfast. As on
the preceding day, the mayor and his wife did the honours
of the table with kindly but not very refined hospitality.
Beakers were filled with foaming ale; the plates of the
Huguenot guests were heaped up with more food than
they could possibly eat. Adéle, accustomed to French
cookery, surveyed almost with disgust the thick beef-
steak, somewhat underdone, which was placed before



POVERTY AND PRIDE. 71

her, and felt impatient at being urged to eat, when any-
thing like appetite was gone. The mayor and his wife
had evidently something on their minds. One or the
other now and then quitted the table to go into another
apartment, from which the breakfast-room was only
divided by folding-doors. There was a sound of per-
petual whispering and moving about in this room, heard
indistinctly when the thick doors were closed, but very
clearly when they were opened for the ingress or egress
of the mayor or his wife. It was evident that a great
many people were crowded into that room, as if awaiting
a reception. .

“What is on foot?” thought Adéle. “Cannot these
kind English boors leave us alone! It is odious to be
made a sight of, as if we were some curious animals
brought from the other side of the Channel.”

The meal was strangely prolonged after everything
like eating was over. Even conversation died down.
The mayor was evidently waiting for something, and
fidgeting at delay. The mayoress smiled mysteriously,
as if some important secret were in her keeping. The
La Forces wished to retire from table, but were chained
by the laws of courtesy; hints thrown out were appa-
rently not understood. At last the secret was disclosed.
The mayor had for the fifth or sixth time disappeared
into the adjoining room; now the folding-doors were
thrown open, and the portly man emerged with all the



72 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

dignity of the head of a deputation, carrying a scarlet
bag, which was heavy with gold. So many men, women,
and children pressed in after him, that the breakfast-
room was almost instantly filled. Some scrambled up
on chairs—two urchins even on the table, to obtain a
better view of the marquis and his family, and see the
Joy with which they would receive the charitable con-
tributions which had been collected with such zeal.

“Moonseer the Marquis,” said the mayor, advancing
towards his guest, and bowing low his bewigged head,
“I have the honour of being selected as”’—the good man
stammered a little—“of—of being selected as the me-
dium of presenting to our illustrious visitors a bag of—
of—the contributions made by the ladies and citizens of
Dover—to relieve their—their—importunate need.”

The face of the ruined nobleman was suffused with a
painful flush, even to the roots of his hair. Almost for
the first time in his life the marquis looked embarrassed,
and at a loss for words in which to reply. There was
no difficulty as regarded language, for the marquis had
been for two years in a school in Kent, and spoke flu-
ently in the English tongue. But La Force had never
before had charity money forced upon him, and the pub-
licity of the proceeding shocked his delicacy and wounded
his feelings. The marquis paused for several moments,
then, pressing his hand over his heart, made the follow-
ing reply :—



POVERTY AND PRIDE. 73

“T entreat you, Monsieur le Maire, to express our
gratitude to our generous English friends, and to believe
how deeply I feel their kindness as well as your own.
You will increase the obligation by adding the contents
of that purse to the contributions already so liberally
made for my exiled countrymen.” Then, bowing grace-
fully, first to the mayor, then to the spectators right and
left, the peer of France, followed by his wife and daughter,
made his way out of the crowded room, and proceeded
to that which had been appropriated to his private use.
Looks of disappointment and feelings of mortification
were left behind them.

“He's a bit too grand,” murmured the mayor.

“He'll have to come down,” observed a burgess’s
wife who had been most active in collecting the
money.

“ Depend on’t, the marquis didn’t guess that the money
in the bag was all gold,” remarked a grocer. “It would
have been better to have left the silver and copper as
they were; he'd have preferred a bigger bag.”

“Did I do right?” said the marquis thoughtfully, as
he seated himself near a window, after drawing the cur-
tain so that he might not be visible from the street, into
which a stream of persons was now issuing from the
dwelling of the mayor.

“O father, you could not have done otherwise!” ex-
claimed Adéle. “We are no beggars asking alms.” .



74 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

“Did I do right?” repeated la Force, his eyes resting,
not on his daughter, but his wife.

Elizabeth hesitated for a moment, and then replied:
“T think that my lord might have accepted without dis-
grace that which was given freely and cheerfully—given
to God in the person of His servant.”

“It was pride, worldly pride in my heart,” said the
marquis frankly—* pride that made me forget every-
thing but a sense of offended dignity. That pride, like
all else, must be given up. I shall learn my lesson in
time, I trust,” he added more cheerfully, “at least with
you, my Elizabeth, for a teacher.”

La Force was interrupted by the entrance of Rochet,
his faithful Huguenot attendant. The man looked em-
barrassed, and seemed as if he wished to speak to his
lady alone; but Elizabeth had no secrets to hide from
her husband.

“What did you get for the brooch, Rochet ?” she in-
quired. The brooch was the sole ornament, except her
wedding-ring, which the lady of La Force had been wear-
ing at the time of the shipwreck.

“Only this, madame,” said Rochet sadly, “ though I
went to every jeweller in the town.”

“It will be enough to take us to Raven’s Nest,”
quietly observed the lady, as she received the money from
the hand of her servant. This little incident was a start-
ling revelation to Adéle of the reality of the poverty



POVERTY AND PRIDE. 75

which had come like an armed man upon the family of
La Force.

“Rochet,” said the Huguenot noble, “remove these
silver buckles from my shoes.”

“Ah, Monsieur le Marquis!” exclaimed the poor man
with a heavy sigh, as he went down on his knees to
obey.

“And call me no more by my title; in England I am
simply Monsieur la Force.”

“O father, you will never drop your name !” exclaimed
Adéle ; “even the cruel king did not, could not, rob you
of that.”

“What are titles to the homeless and moneyless ?”
said La Force with a melancholy smile—“ like gilded
covers over dishes that have in them no food, to cover
their emptiness. There—keep these buckles for your-
self, Rochet; would that I had more to give so faithful
a servant! I have spoken in your favour to the mayor,
who has promised to find for you a good situation in
this town. God bless you, Rochet, my friend !”

La Force held out his hand, which the poor servant,
still on his knees, covered with kisses and tears.

“ Now the sooner we start for the home of your father
the better,” said the marquis, addressing his wife.





CHAPTER X.
A PACKET OF LETTERS.

THERE is no need to- describe the reception which Eliza-
beth and her family met with at the home of her father.
A few letters written from Raven’s Nest, about ten days
after the arrival of the La Forces, will give an idea of
the life spent by the exiles under the roof of Mr.
Page :—

From Adéle to Felicce Duval.

Ma chére petite Cousine, ma charmante Felicie-—Oh
that I were beside thee now! But as this is impossible,
I will not miss an opportunity of writing to thee a
second letter, and enclosing in it one for my darling
Louis. Ah! will he ever receive it? Iam quite sure
that thy amiable papa will make every effort to find out
where my brother is now. We are desolate on Louis’s
account, and I think of him day and night.

In my first letter I described our frightful shipwreck,
and our reception by the kindly but vulgar burgesses of
Dover; so I will not refer to these subjects now. Thou,



A PACKET OF LETTERS. 77

ma mignonne, wilt be dying to know what I think of
Raven’s Nest, and the people who dwell therein.

Picture to thyself, ma Felicie, a bleak common, over
which the east winds blow with such force that the few
wretched trees all bend forward in an opposite direction,
as if they would run away if not tied by the roots!
Hélas! I sympathize with the trees, and would fly too,
were I not bound as they are. By the side of this
common, we dwell in a dull, red-brick house, which has
a walled garden—yes, a garden, but not a flower grow-
ing in it! One looks out on turnips, potatoes, and
onions! Oh, for our parterres and flower-bordered ter-
race! I do believe that Mr. Page, had he come into
possession of such a garden as once was ours, would
have turned out roses to put in radishes, and camellias
to make room for cabbages. As for the interior of the
house, how shall I describe it, but by repetition of the
one word—bare—bare—bare! No carpet on floors, no
tapestry on walls; some mats, indeed, but so old that
one has to guess at their original colours. The furniture
is so rickety that one should examine the state of the
legs of a chair before venturing to sit down on it.
The ancient clock has immovable hands. If a pane of
glass happens to get broken, one of the daughters mends
it as neatly as she can with paper. ,

But enough of the house; thou wilt like to hear some-
thing about the inmates. These consist of Mr. Page and



78 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

his two unmarried daughters, Lilly and Bridget, and a
maid-of-all-work (a very old maid indeed). The sisters,
poor things, though younger than la marquise, look
prematurely old and withered, like plants that have
been reared without a gleam of sunshine, in pots no
bigger than tea-cups. They are gentle and kindly
enough, especially Bridget, but stunted in size, and sub-
dued in manner. I think they could hardly muster up
a smile between them. How thou and Cousin Belinde
would laugh at their dresses, embroidered with patches,
and made in what was doubtless the fashion with house-
maids a century ago. I wonder if my lady step-mother
would have been like those poor Misses Page, if she had
not had the happiness of being transplanted in time to
dear, dear Chateau la Force! She is certainly very
superior to the rest of the family, and her sisters simply
adore her. Her coming has been a gleam of sunshine
to them, poor creatures, streaming through the barred
windows of their prison-like home.

But, ma Felicie, how shall I describe Mr. Page? The
sight of him would fill thee with affre. Of course this
Anglais wears no wig, and the hair which I suppose
he once had has been almost entirely starved off his
head: I cannot look at it without thinking of a skull. :
I cannot tell thee the colour of Mr. Page’s eyes, for
he always wears blue spectacles; but I know well the
sound of his voice. It is always harsh and grating,





A PACKET OF LETTERS. 79

and is sometimes raised to a loud tone of anger, espe-
cially when he addresses the unfortunate Lilly and
Bridget, whom their father seems to regard as anvils
made to be hammered on. Poor Bridget, in her nervous
haste to obey her father’s orders, chanced to break a
wine-glass, three days ago. She will never hear the end
of it! I fancy that Mr. Page was somewhat pleasanter
during his wife’s lifetime, but avarice and temper have
grown with years, till he has become a miserly tyrant.
Thou wilt ask, How does the Marquis la Force get on
with a man who in everything is his very opposite ?
O Felicie, it makes my blood boil to see how that man
treats my father, my noble, courteous, chivalrous father.
It is not enough that the title of Marquis is dropped
(that gave me a pang), but even Monsiewr is too much.
Mr. Page calls a French peer “La Force,” without any
addition at all, sometimes even dropping the La. It
almost seems to me as if this misérable wanted to pick
a quarrel with a guest to whom he grudges his meagre
fare, his wretched lodging. It appears that Mr. Page,

‘ though a Protestant, holds some different opinions on

religious subjects from those held by us Huguenots. I
cannot tell thee one bit what his opinions are; but My.
Page is always trying to argue on these differences, and
gets quite angry because not every one can see through
his blue spectacles. My father keeps his own quiet
dignity, and never loses his temper, but I can see that



80 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

his patience is sorely tried. And oh, how my poor
step-mother feels when her father insults her husband !
She flushes, and looks so much distressed. I need not
say that we shall not remain one hour longer than we
can help in this horrible Raven’s Nest. There is cer-
tainly only one raven in it, but he pecks at us all round,
pigeons and eagles alike.

T must now leave off, ma petite cowsine, and write to
Louis while my candle holds out. I am committing the
crime of using up a whole tallow rushlight, for I am
penning this at night. I wonder when I shall see a
wax candle again, or a silver candelabra like that which
lies at the bottom of the sea. Pray, offer my salutations
to your maman, with much love to dear Cousin Jacques.
' Don’t let him forget to tell us anything that he can find
out about my lost brother. Believe me, amie chérve,
thy affectionate, half-starved, and désolée

ADELE LA FORCE.

From Adéle to Louis.

My-DARLING, DARLING BroTHER,—I do so hope that you
have received our letters. What would we not give for
one line from you! I am afraid that you may never
receive even this. Such a separation rends my heart!

Do you remember your once rather provoking me by
saying that I was unjust to our step-mother, and that
you thought her nice and good. Louis, you were right ;





A PACKET OF LETTERS, 81

she is good. I do not think that any one could bear
herself better under difficult circumstances; and the
position is trying indeed. I have often said that no
one loves our father as I do; our mother cannot love
him more, but I think that she loves him better. There
is a difference, I see it now, between loving much and
loving well. There is selfishness in my love, and none
in mother’s. I give way to my feelings, and that pains
my father; his wife never gives him a moment's un-
easiness that she can prevent. She bears her worries
quietly, and has always a word of cheer for her hus-
band. I never admired her at the chateau; I cannot
help admiring her here. La marquise is like my lost
opal ring, which looked dull white, except when held up
to the light, when it showed rich tints of ruby and :
green. Madame’s is a very practical kind of religion ; it
really buoys her up, and keeps her temper sweet under
no small amount of trial. Going down into that Valley
of Humiliation described in the “ Pilgrim’s Progress”,
is very hard work, at least J feel it so. J am always
tripping and stumbling; but our mother goes down
with a quick, firm step. I suppose this is because she
is ever looking towards the heavenly city beyond.

You may wonder why we stay in such a place as
Raven’s Nest. We only stay because at present we
have no other place to which we can go. Our beloved

father is making every possible effort to procure em-
(106) 6



82 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

ployment—he—the Marquis la Force—the descendant
of heroes! He is out almost all day, seeking for a
situation, and returns home looking so pale and so tired ;
a little disheartened, too, though our father never com-
plains—he always thinks that God knows best. Would
that I had such faith! Once my father thought that
he had succeeded in finding a place—such a place! I
blush as I write about it. The peer of France was
to engage to sit in a haberdasher’s shop from morning
till night, to keep accounts about tapes and buttons, and
overlook the young men at the counters. For this
wearisome, monotonous, I am tempted to say degrad-
_ing work, a French marquis was to receive less salary
than a French cook! But our father was glad to do
anything for independence, and madame cheerfully agreed
to manage without a servant. (I suppose that she is to
be cook, and I housemaid, when we commence our
ménage.) But even this miserable appointment is not
to be had. When all seemed to be arranged, the vulgar-
looking head of the firm—I think that his name is
Boggins—appeared, and asked for a word with my
father. Speaking to the marquis as he might have
done to a lackey, this man told him that his “hands”
were all ready to strike (whatever that may mean) at the
notion of being overlooked by a Frenchman. “So, Force,
my good fellow, you must look for work somewhere
else.” O Louis! Louis! to think of our falling so low!,



A PACKET OF LETTERS. 83

I must brighten this sad letter by giving you a little
incident about our mother—you see I am dropping the
“step” at last. I saw her one day ripping off the fine
lace from her dress (I need not remind you that our
jewels are under the waves). I thought the madame
was going to wash the lace, and put it again on her
sleeves. But I never saw the lace any more, and the
very next day our father had a nice cup of coffee pre-
pared by the hands of his wife. Mr. Page never allows
coffee to his guests, nor tea; and father has, I am sure,
missed that which refreshes him more than anything
else. Somehow, I connected the lace with the coffee,
for I had seen a private téte-d-téte going on between
madame and the clergyman’s nice wife, and I fancied,
from some words dropped by the latter, that mother
had disposed of something through her, our only lady
visitor here. My curiosity was awakened, so I said,
when madame and I were alone together, “Our cook at
the chateau used to make coffee out of berries roasted
and ground; have you the art of making it out of
Brussels lace?” La marquise saw that I guessed her
little secret, and she gave a pleasant smile. “I wish
that I were more like you, mother,” I said. I had never
called her before by that name, though she had told me
to do so, To my surprise, the lady took me into her
arms and gave me a kiss—a good, hearty kiss, and said
(I think that there were tears in her eyes), “ Adéle, my



84 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

child! this recompenses me for much. Henceforth you
and I will face misfortunes together, and help to carry
each other’s burdens.” Was this not nice? I do believe
that I shall get fond of the Anglaise in time.

Hélas! the rushlight has almost burned down to the
socket. I must go to bed in the dark. I have not

even time to sign my—

From the Marquis la Force to Louis.

My pear Son,—In the uncertainty that this will ever
each you, I will not write much. I would be torn by
anxiety for you, surrounded as you are by temptations,
did I not commit you to One who is able to save. Stand
fast in the faith, my boy; endure hardness, as a good soldier
of the Lord Jesus Christ. Your ancestor fell at Ivri
grasping his sword to the last—-fatthful till death. Even
so, never let go your hold of the Word of God. If the
book be taken from you, keep its words in your memory,
as steel in the scabbard, ready for use; grasped in the
hand of faith, neither man nor devil can withstand it.
Be constant and fervent in prayer: to say all in one
sentence—look wnto Jesus; let the look be one of
faith, of hope, and of love. The Lord watches the
conflict, the King’s eye is upon you; He will assuredly
give victory to those who trust only in Him. Your
loving father, BERTRAND LA FORCE.



CHAPTER XI.
ALONE IN A CROWD.

WANDERING slowly about the less frequented parts of
Paris, listless, as if impelled by neither business nor
pleasure, we see the solitary figure of a man. He is
well dressed according to the fashion of the period; in
faultless symmetry falls each curl of his costly wig; but
the face beneath that wig is sad, and the downcast
eyes are seldom raised higher than the rich shoe-buckles
on his feet. Poor Jacques Duval has aged much during
the last twelve months. Though ten years younger
than his uncle the marquis, he looks at least as old; for
sorrow and humiliation often anticipate the work of
time. Duval spends much of the day out of doors; for
it is bitter to him to be at home and see going on that
of which he cannot approve, yet which he is powerless
to prevent. Jacques’s presence is no pleasure to his
wife; he is regarded rather as an encumbrance, a
visible conscience feebly remonstrating with one re-
solved not to obey its voice. Duval has most bitterly



86 ALONE IN A CROWD.

repented of having suffered himself to be tricked into
compliance with the will of his wife.

The evil consequences of that compliance were soon
apparent. Madame Duval had had her own way ; she
had snatched the reins from the weak hand of him
who had the right to guide, and now was driving on
to destruction. The house in which the Duvals had
long resided was changed as soon as possible for one
in a more fashionable quarter; and the new dwelling
became the scene of perpetual dissipation. Money was
recklessly squandered to secure the object of madame’s
ambition—that of becoming a leader in the beaw monde.
Protestantism was, of course, an obstacle in the way of
Belinde’s obtaining her object; so she drove over it with
scarcely the semblance of hesitation. Jacques remon-
strated, entreated, even wept; but in vain. Madame
Duval and Felicie were, within a month of their return
to Paris, received into the Church of Rome. There was
even an affectation of zeal for the religion thus, from
worldly motives, embraced. Often was mass attended
in the morning when the evening had been given to the
theatre or the rout. Felicie’s mother was resolved that
her daughter should be married to an aristocrat, and so
have the much-coveted privilege of entrance into the
court circle. For this object Madame Duval unceas-
ingly laid herself out. The peer might be old, blind,
profligate, or purse-proud; but he would give his wife



ALONE IN A CROWD. 87

position, and that was what Madame Duval craved, and
was determined on having at any price. She was em-
phatically “of the earth, earthly;” the slave of the
world, and bound by its chains.

How inexpressibly lonely was a good, pious man,
such as was Jacques Duval, in such an. unhallowed
home! Often did he ask himself whether it would
not be better to follow his uncle to England; but the
Huguenot felt that to do so would be to desert his
wife and child) He was the only link—alas! but a
weak one— between his family and better things.
Were he to depart, even respectability might follow
honour and conscience.

Though in the Bible the Huguenot found some com-
fort, it was by no means comfort unmixed; the pages
of God’s Word being so full of denunciations against
the very evils which Jacques had constantly before his
eyes. Vain were his protestations against them.

“Papa, why do you interfere with us? We don't
interfere with you; you go your way, and we go ours.”
Such was the pert reply of Felicie to tender counsels
from a parent from whom she had never had a harsh
look. And these words were from his own child! from
her whose birth had caused the father such delight!
from her whom he had fondled in his bosom, danced in
his arms, and beside whose sick-bed he had offered such
fervent prayers! His parental advice was called inter-



88 ALONE IN A CROWD.

ference! The paths of father and daughter were sepa-
rate indeed: one trod a narrow, thorny one, leading to
life ; the other, the broad way of destruction.

A few gleams of reflected light sometimes fell on the
painful road followed by Jacques Duval, from acts of
kindness which he secretly performed. If he was sel-
dom seen in gay assemblies, he was often seen in the
dwellings of the poor. If the courtier despised him,
the widow blessed him; and Jacques felt that, however
lonely, he was not quite useless on earth.

It had been more than a gleam of joy to Duval
when he had sent off by private hand, unknown to his
wife, a large sum of money to the Marquis la Force.
Jacques had done this, as soon as he could find safe
means of conveyance, after hearing of the loss of all his
uncle’s property by the collision at sea. The supply
had arrived most opportunely on the very day after the
letters given in the last chapter had been penned. The
marquis had been greatly touched by the liberality and
consideration of his relative.

“ What is my lord’s intention regarding this money ?”
inquired Elizabeth somewhat anxiously ; for she could not
help fearing that her chivalrous husband might send
back to Duval the gold which the La Forces so sorely
needed. That very morning Mr. Page had ungraciously
told his daughter that he could not afford to fill three
extra mouths. Bertrand’s reply was a relief ta_his wife.



s
ALONE IN A CROWD. 89

“JT will accept the gift with gratitude to God and
my generous nephew; but I will not retain so large a
sum. One-tenth will supply our present need, and the
remainder I shall invest in the name of Jacques Duval.
The kind man may be glad to have it some day; for I
cannot believe that the true-hearted Huguenot will stay
very long in Paris.”

“No, indeed,” said Elizabeth earnestly ; “surely the
Lord will reward poor Jacques for his goodness to us
by bringing him safely out of that Sodom.” .

The following day La Force left inhospitable Raven's
Nest. He offered his father-in-law money to pay for
the small expense to which he had been put. Poor
Elizabeth blushed with shame at a parent’s meanness,
for Mr. Page clutched at the money.

But let us return to the Huguenot dwelling in Paris.

Duval had a special object in view, of which, under
all discouragements, he never lost sight. That object
was, to find his young cousin, Louis la Force. Jacques
pursued his search cautiously but steadily, yet for
nearly a year found it impossible to gain any certain
information regarding the youth. Being well known
to be a Huguenot, Duval was always a suspected man.
Ministers of State would grant him no audience, his
letters were returned unanswered—he could neither see
nor hear anything of the lost heir of La Force. At

last some information came in an unsuspected way.



90 ALONE IN A CROWD.

“For the love of Mary, monsieur, come and see my
husband!” cried a thin, worn-out-looking woman, who
met Jacques one day at the corner of a street. “My
poor Jean—he’s a carpenter—fell from a scaffolding a
fortnight ago, and has never lifted up his head since.
I think he is dying.” Tears fell fast from the poor
woman’s eyes.

“ Where do you live?” asked the pitying Jacques.

“Just down yon alley, monsieur. It’s a poor place
to take your honour to. We only lodge in a garret.”

“There was One who lodged in a stable,” thought
Jacques; and he bade her show him the way to her
husband.

A long, dark, dirty stair was ascended, and then the
French gentleman entered the small but neat room, in
which lay a dying man. Sickness had brought poverty ;
but the carpenter was no beggar. He did not ask for
the relief which his visitor. willingly gave. Jacques
gave sympathy as well as money. He sat down on
the sufferer’s pallet and, as his days were evidently num-
bered, repeated slowly to him some texts from Scripture.

“Sir, you are a Huguenot?” said the sick man.

“T am,” was the quiet reply.

“The Huguenots are—God’s people,” faintly mur-
mured the sufferer. “I served one of them once—the —
Marquis la Force. He is a good man, if there was
ever a good one on earth.”



ALONE IN A CROWD. 91

“Yet he is banished from his country—ruined—his
only son taken from him,” said Duval with a sigh.

“JT know where that young gentleman is,” the car-
penter said.

“You know! Where—where is he?” exclaimed
Duval in an excited tone of surprise. “For the love
of Heaven, speak! I am the youth’s own cousin.”
The sick man looked strongly interested.

“ Monsieur, I know little,” he said, “but I will tell
you all that I know.—Fauchon, give me a drop of
water. Lift me up a little I must speak while I
can.” With effort the poor man went on: “I was
employed to do some repairs at the Monastery of the
Holy Sponge—it is not two leagues from Paris, to the
north—”

“I know it, I know it,” interrupted the impatient
hearer, who feared that the sick man’s strength might
fail him before he could finish his story.

“T was busy at work on the scaffolding when the
prior and monks came in for vespers,” continued the
carpenter, ever and anon stopping as if to gasp for
breath. “With them came—the students who are
brought up under their care. Amongst them was one
—one unlike the rest. I had not seen him for years,
and—he was so much changed! But I knew him at
once—he for whom I had made—the rabbit-hutch—
the son—yes, yes—the heir of the Marquis la Force.”



92 ALONE IN A CROWD,

“Did he see you——had you any word with him 2”
eagerly asked Duval.

“Monsieur, that was impossible. He never looked
up; but—but I kept my eye on him. The service was
soon over,” said the carpenter faintly; “he went away
with the rest.”

“Did Louis la Force kneel to the Host?” asked the
Huguenot anxiously.

“Tt was not high mass, monsieur. He—knelt in
prayer ; but—but I ean tell you no more.”

“Did he look well—happy ?” interrogated Jacques.

But the sufferer could no longer give a reply. His
eyes were closed, his strength was exhausted. But he
had said enough. Jacques Duval was grasping a clew.
He thrust a silver crown into the hand of the carpen-
ter’s wife, promised to come soon again, and hastened
out of the room.

“T have found him at last!” Jacques joyfully ex-
claimed, as with quickened steps he descended the dark,
rickety stair.



CHAPTER XII.
THE MONASTERY.

Hacer to make the most of his unexpected discovery,
Duval, without returning to his own house, stopped the
first empty public conveyance which he met, and bade the
driver take him direct to the monastery. Jacques had
a handsome coach of his own, but he seldom entered it.
Madame Belinde liked to have it always at her own
disposal.

The monastery was a building of solid brickwork,
gloomy in appearance, and surrounded by walls so high
that it conveyed rather the idea of a prison than that
of a place devoted to religious uses. Looking between
the iron bars of the heavy gate, Duval noticed that the
windows, which were small and high from the ground,
were strongly grated. The bell which Jacques sounded
had a sound so deep and dull that it reminded him of
a death-knell. A tonsured monk, with a heavy bunch
of keys hanging from his leathern girdle, a bare-footed
man, who looked as if he never had smiled or could



94 THE MONASTERY.

smile, answered the summons of the bell. Without
attempting to open the gate, the monk, through the
bars, asked the stranger what he wanted.

“JT wish to see one of the students,” said Duval.

“You cannot do so without the permission of the
reverend prior,” was the reply.

“ Let me ask the prior, then. Open the gate. I have
a relative here; my name is Duval.”

The warder looked critically at the stranger before he
decided whether Duval should be admitted or not. But
the monk concluded that the wearer of so expensive
and faultless a wig must be a gentleman, and possibly
connected with the court. Duval quickened the monk’s
movements, as he was slowly fitting a large key into
the lock, by thrusting a piece of gold between the bars.
This settled the question regarding the stranger’s rank ;
the key was turned, and with an ominous grating sound
the heavy gate swung back on its hinges.

Duval entered a paved court which encircled three
sides of the building. Two or three bare-footed monks,
with rosaries in their hands, were slowly pacing this
court, and paused a moment in counting their beads, to
see who it was who had ventured to enter the precincts
of their prison. Duval eagerly scanned their faces, but
none in the slightest degree resembled that of Louis la
Force.

Another minute, and the threshold of the building



THE MONASTERY. 95

was crossed. The interior felt singularly cold, and
Jacques shivered as he entered the large gloomy hall.
Having traversed this, he was conducted to the private
parlour, in which the prior received his visitors. The
only ornaments of this room were a large crucifix, and a
painful picture of the martyrdom of some obscure saint.
A black rosary hung from a nail in the wall, and one
end of the apartment was covered by the sable drapery
of a heavy curtain. The monastery was one where the
rules were severe and rigid; it was utterly unlike:
others where the monks could feast and carouse, and
exchange all the gossip of the day. Duval felt un-
pleasantly reminded of tales which he had heard of the
Inquisition in Spain; he turned his back to the picture
of horrors, and rather nervously awaited the arrival of
the prior.

Jacques had to wait some time; he almost began to
think that his message had either not been delivered or
that it had been forgotten, when at last the black
curtain was moved back, and the prior entered. Duval
bowed low as the Roman priest, clad in a black robe,
girded with a rope, and holding a crucifix in his hand,
with air stately and severe, advanced a fow paces towards
him. The prior did not ask the visitor to resume the
seat from which Jacques had risen on his entrance, but
himself remained standing, as if to indicate that the
interview should be brief. The hard lines on the



96 THE MONASTERY.

prior’s stern pale features gave the impression that his
was a nature that had undergone a gradual process of
petrifaction.

“What is your business with me?” asked the prior,
surveying the stranger with stern but impassive gaze.

“T am very desirous to obtain your kind—gracious
permission—to see my young cousin,” stammered forth
Jacques in a nervous manner.

“Who is your relative?” inquired the prior.

“Louis la Force,” was the reply.

The prior’s gaze became more keen and penetrating.
“You are a Huguenot,” he sternly observed, moving one
pace backwards, as if to breathe the same air as a
heretic breathed involved some moral pollution.

“T am a Huguenot,” replied Duval, who never denied
his faith ; “but I have his Majesty’s gracious permission
to reside unmolested in Paris.”

“You have not mine to intrude into these sacred
precincts in order to instil the poison of your heresy
into the minds of our youth.”

“You will grant me a brief interview with my
relative,” pleaded Duval; “it may be held in your
presence.”

“T grant nothing,” said the prior with a frown; “and
I must request you, monsieur, not to repeat visits which
are utterly vain. Your nephew—cousin—has abjured
his heretical opinions, he has conformed to our rules, and



THE MONASTERY. 97

received his first communion according to Catholic rites.
When old enough, Louis la Force will receive the tonsure
also, take his vows, and become one of the community
here.”

Duval was greatly distressed. “Can this be true!”
burst from his lips.

“Do you presume to doubt my word?” said the prior
severely. He pointed with an unmistakable gesture
towards the door, then added, “ Heretics find no place
within these walls; never approach them again.”

Jacques bowed, and made his retreat into the open
air. As he passed through the paved court, the heavy
gate was a second time unclosed for a visitor, and a
gaily-attired gentleman of the court, who had come in a
dashing vehicle, entered the place. The courtier, who
has already been introduced to the reader as Baron
Perrot, bowed politely to Duval as he passed him; but
the Huguenot’s mind was so preoccupied that he
searcely noticed the greeting. Duval did not recog-
nize the gentleman whom he had met but once before,
and that in the preceding year; but Perrot remembered
him.

The prior was still in his parlour when Baron Perrot
was announced. He was received far more graciously
than Duval had been, and was requested to take a seat.
The young courtier was lively and bold; his cheerful

voice sounded strangely incongruous in that solemn place.
(108) 7



98 THE MONASTERY.

“T saw Monsieur Duval coming out as I entered,”
said Perrot, after the first salutations had passed ;
“doubtless he came to see his young cousin. But you,
reverend father, are not likely to let him carry off a
lamb from your flock.”

“A lamb!” muttered the prior; “say rather a lion’s
cub. Such an untamable young heretic I had never
met with before.”

“You have doubtless been trying to draw his fangs
and clip his claws,” said the gay young baron.

“In obedience to his Majesty’s will I have done all
that I could to reclaim the youth,” was the gloomy
prior’s reply. “Of course his books were taken away
from the first, but he seems to have learned their
contents by heart. For every argument brought for-
ward by us the young heretic has an answer.”

“But there are some sharp arguments which are not
easily answered,” observed Perrot, with a significant
smile.

“Such have been tried again and again. The young
reprobate has had a good many more fasts than the
Church prescribes,” said the prior grimly, “and solitary
confinement besides. Sterner discipline has also been
applied, but the wretched boy has borne all with the
air of a martyr. Then his health failed, and we were
afraid that he might slip out of our hands. Louis’s case
is hopeless. One cannot wash out the veins in marble



THE MONASTERY. 99

with holy water. I believe that if that boy were cut
into a hundred pieces, his last drop of blood would be
tainted with the poison of heresy.”

“Reverend father, we are now going to take your
troublesome patient out of your hands, and try a
different kind of treatment,’ said Baron Perrot. “It
appears that Madame la grande Dauphine took a faney
to the handsome boy as well as to his sister some time
ago, and thought that he would make a remarkably
good-looking page. His father, though a Huguenot, is
a man of high rank and stainless honour. His an-
cestors rendered great services to the State, which our
gracious monarch deigns to hold in remembrance. The
great king has determined that this youth shall keep the
La Force title and estate as a Catholic peer.”

“He is an out-and-out heretic,” muttered the prior. ©

“Have you never, reverend father, heard the fable of
the sun and the wind contending for the traveller's
cloak? The sunshine of a princess’s smile will do more
to make a spirited youth cast off his heretical rags than
all the wind of priestly exhortation, or the pelting hail
of castigation. Here is my warrant,” continued the
young baron, politely handing over a paper to the prior.
“You see that I have royal authority for taking La
Force with me to the palace. Will it please you to
summon the young gentleman at once? for I have a
double engagement for this evening, and no time to spare.”



100 THE MONASTERY.

With ill grace the prior rang sharply a hand-bell that
lay on the table beside him. The summons was
answered by a bare-footed monk.

“Bring the boy La Force into my presence at once,”
said the prior. As the monk retired to obey the com-
mand, the head of the monastery remarked with a
frown which belied his words, “I am heartily glad to
get rid of my heretic charge.” He then added, “It is
but fair to let you know, Monsieur le Baron, that you
will have a slippery subject to deal with. This wretched
youth has, in the most daring manner, twice attempted
to escape; and the second time, in spite of extraordinary
precautions, he almost succeeded.”

“We will have silken fetters for the wild bird,”
- laughed Perrot; “they bind faster than those of iron.”

A few minutes of silence ensued, and then the black
folds of the curtain were again drawn aside, to admit
the entrance of the heir of La Force. Perrot was
shocked at the change in the appearance of the youth
whom he had taken, radiant in health and beauty, from
the Huguenot establishment in which the marquis had
placed his son. Louis had become. much taller, much
thinner, and much paler. His fine hazel eyes had lost
their brilliance, and, sunken as they were, looked un-
naturally large. The captive, however, entered the
. room with no faltering step, but with an air of
resolution, as one prepared to endure. Great was the



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3ff14d502b9e952662db2dc97821357d
87a8921c5cdbb4bc38204c496c8184e6045e7593
'2011-12-11T03:28:09-05:00'
describe
'24236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
34fe2518183cd45390a8d195007afb7e
00920603e07b4c647f94cb60a9e7cb69ad304e8b
describe
'2860880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e6faa6d937d49aaff635bac755273899
0838f1e7b2b25d3004bb1bc34665e31c4b0d8f15
'2011-12-11T03:27:50-05:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
edfb7c22073b9a4cab18feedca61b4e0
5643e527bdf2db236836e7e31608aa5f267ab8df
describe
'6369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAD' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c294930f251187ea3378b6d91fde35be
422f5a5a52d6efef6afd01201316d7d30570f655
describe
'368451' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
50998e15335d5ce581f0e46a13f7ca97
200c8ead5fa156c10149af9067bbe615eeee5005
describe
'125320' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f4f3d8f665eaeb7313ed240a17650ddd
7a01437cc1d78a902ffac2c56d79c3204b48fb50
'2011-12-11T03:30:01-05:00'
describe
'40101' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
03b39512ad82b2885587388f89522039
d6fac515e6e0dc07d0f3e070f417aeeefacf6633
'2011-12-11T03:28:46-05:00'
describe
'2970512' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2a5773718fe6b83cc697e7b27aab9466
407c10b5a42c2682eb07dfbc3c3c2f213918826a
'2011-12-11T03:28:15-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
1bdad9f8e82b1763be1996dccf528026
c9cdc9e909861609705ed62286828b1a3ddb547f
'2011-12-11T03:26:36-05:00'
describe
'9482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
62cfb90da007a824b4c28578b868db56
e470a828836bcab2e386d624a3c8619164db01f7
describe
'368421' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
35d076bc9e4e960e9f155d5d65a02bb0
d9b595c87939d91144ef69f8f6456e1752849c26
'2011-12-11T03:28:57-05:00'
describe
'125253' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c1972783c930eea86e6dff393ff5a14d
8a9b4d6caa3452de130429f973a148f3d2cf7dc4
describe
'39683' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAM' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
79e908893729c77829619e0fb21d81c1
2b8839777c8099d8e5df134052217336393df104
'2011-12-11T03:29:44-05:00'
describe
'2970276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
40d805cae0322b09554ff372d11fe075
103c86d46c073f318e4b1454dee47f4cf07fb45d
'2011-12-11T03:25:39-05:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
98b99ba566f617444f4f769c86bcf19b
304be87bf58da6a03d726f4e2d0c1f6c6ce0c388
'2011-12-11T03:26:37-05:00'
describe
'9627' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAP' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
332942eeb8c960936b3bc400aa535d3e
5b7687698bfaabbc8215038211fcc5a5784de360
'2011-12-11T03:27:47-05:00'
describe
'368429' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
758abb68faa3c9ef5fc3053aed9c620a
56fdb3745e5056e032bebd25a7ba97a67f564311
describe
'128672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAR' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c0beb024f57fa53b2a0db8d48932814c
7a98cf1ce4ea5d78d020ebd071251380c1e39f7d
'2011-12-11T03:29:35-05:00'
describe
'40746' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAS' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
996495b8081a5d6cd4b8bfe62298652e
e0392aa0011c4b8f1cc288d6fb290b29d226560d
describe
'2970248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
72f975e98a60d6f68dda238c3e43937a
b10bde286e5136a5b9778aca425f0015b83c9d36
'2011-12-11T03:27:57-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAU' 'sip-files00018.txt'
171498d299b8fcf4bbf8c9ad7c5274ba
152cd511372264f17b161a22f690f7472ce8e0cd
'2011-12-11T03:25:47-05:00'
describe
'9669' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAV' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
aab8a0adcccdf86c245be46f192efd4e
ffe3f11a8760f5f12212a104c05d72f2ad57c2c5
'2011-12-11T03:28:59-05:00'
describe
'368407' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAW' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f9ae87c0c7c7f07f5e1e42239d9c9445
506bdb103950580cd012f8f7cd2be173fdac5af0
'2011-12-11T03:28:00-05:00'
describe
'123395' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
328b6105f7f4ce472be0774f935480b0
65f4c87bc57ecc32b138ebc4a303589b0805a84c
'2011-12-11T03:28:03-05:00'
describe
'39700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3e2db49942742b6fd30d3c909a14beef
fbe56eeec29ba62db8fa85a85d3caa08a68aa172
'2011-12-11T03:25:45-05:00'
describe
'2970068' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
ca6c84ff20d192d6b1943d164c5bdf59
93a476bd3e18d1af6cb6d1a4a14745c2b1450e6e
'2011-12-11T03:28:39-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
1e3427906c3ae282f56a23f483919448
e1c72971fc9573684a1dd318295c8ae1236bf2e8
'2011-12-11T03:26:48-05:00'
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
6c11d5d69783ee82ee2937883c23423e
e49f69278d21ca0375f1cfd60af5ff80fef201a6
'2011-12-11T03:26:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
3ff4bf3c7cbdbe41ca61c1bd5a79d15e
729c39d374eeb31ef4d3bd2b16580bf28264873d
'2011-12-11T03:29:51-05:00'
describe
'122304' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
293f346d00ee576be9c69526a5d0986e
4adbc89f52b9ea3d1f4f808742c1c2e537515eb5
'2011-12-11T03:30:00-05:00'
describe
'38575' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ab838dfb5564aca363c78da15f1c36a9
1907664a267281f1528d8d4e0ac3b48df51807fa
'2011-12-11T03:28:29-05:00'
describe
'2970168' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
b6046cd5b5bd6cd5030f2e3528a02b7b
153121c6660f5ce6fc961d6d14275fa5ef8ca04c
'2011-12-11T03:26:54-05:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b61df9eeb4266806e25ecb61c560a9e5
3454498de3908bf23c552c381acfd675463d561e
'2011-12-11T03:27:51-05:00'
describe
'9631' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
ef4012be805c82a037d430d63683a949
538717962746e0a63f95b9acd2cae9d08b7ed35d
describe
'348592' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1e6776bd277827f54992c55548703eb8
e39ef0f3325341984cd6d3f7eb0747941933b303
describe
'123655' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
75a605887dced59502f694a74350ccce
255071fff188cb82ca8be3064d386a74ae14235b
'2011-12-11T03:30:07-05:00'
describe
'38787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6873e8dcc2316ee188502e6b4fa4da7f
f58822326d1fb94f019b3cf8238d7e129cfc53ee
'2011-12-11T03:29:32-05:00'
describe
'2811300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
eece1d95c8de274f72cdee9fef6ca651
b00f021795ac2bba73be203ff24445f80f7e6b21
'2011-12-11T03:26:35-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
30ffc950823e0b541877ffe70dcf698c
6577ae500efd1e4b7cb8a3ce678d53b6a986a5df
describe
'9548' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0028b3a29a5cb5a6ac3cc011fb01de36
c03974f82719ff3b109b042e72a1664a8653b1cc
'2011-12-11T03:30:03-05:00'
describe
'355256' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
e3cfa330eaa6525fddbb62a98cb88746
c60e7fe704e6540a003789f2b398ae6754b5df6e
describe
'121963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
aee870a32412d8eade1fc2f346766275
c3871f892890bf731449dd9b972b4a1a5196800d
'2011-12-11T03:26:09-05:00'
describe
'40067' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
73a894044d2b0b5670bddab06feed4a0
d914d28faea69d2294f8ff121a05b56b0a697d1f
'2011-12-11T03:28:36-05:00'
describe
'2864988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ea71012b976953ee8a23effc1d91f561
2270ba18270c6a16cf64f0a1258c6dc7b8c160e4
'2011-12-11T03:27:20-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
35fb0054a128edd1e196033fd9aa534e
25b1afb8631407e332d2ad9868ae1cb6f818922a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBT' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f66e7e86e2c8bf3cee066d32f5339234
1f40b43c7be11f021f65ef7d5500ef6d584e9894
'2011-12-11T03:30:12-05:00'
describe
'355286' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBU' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
42345a5fa95c08bcf050dc704b794179
d83930f52f7ff47770b344e4a2555b4974dfc0d0
'2011-12-11T03:26:10-05:00'
describe
'88624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c4e17f896db820602858d199491ea01d
cf9e3961b8ea5a9912a1c7e83a0adc93dbb08260
describe
'28841' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
dcecfc76fb2bba8a31b5ea0b614ba807
917fa872d0c0346f81472008bdc86d8e271c3caa
'2011-12-11T03:29:50-05:00'
describe
'2863356' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
62e5cd7bfa8ff8bae7803d30b0e24a49
3f0b36403946ac7e18963576b5273bf3b3442dce
'2011-12-11T03:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
9fd39efd8964861451b85ebff8d5dfd8
136efe8199ca6c9948c5c23948b0ecfa219f6fa2
'2011-12-11T03:29:02-05:00'
describe
'7330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
34e066c9dc6ff9436737be7b148ed9c2
45e30a91bfc582e4fc65db23b97a6d2848149c1a
'2011-12-11T03:27:11-05:00'
describe
'368420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2ded7cf0a530a0569d6d3216d8ced74b
b694459ec4e867d99a1e70e779da86b2ef83f261
'2011-12-11T03:29:07-05:00'
describe
'121893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2cdee0b9ef6418ee79c032131a4c7754
73abe4e0ff81728134145a8a640838c48696ef51
describe
'37958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
bd219f173d1b3759493a9f7966f76cc5
ba3187f6ca5d3d453fc1e624a1eb283fa4e9b28d
'2011-12-11T03:29:01-05:00'
describe
'2969872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c0b73f2214a23fe2c3fffbb8ad3e02f0
e81b527a6c8b1942abb2079d94d71a8328585442
'2011-12-11T03:30:09-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
50e24e688fe5050a967d734bd36f5095
e373b20418f19727c71336f44b0720281780f9a9
'2011-12-11T03:27:19-05:00'
describe
'9331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6b7cf320436e3171a047e0a229fa7644
a9ace7b98368f5e79ab1b35bfa1e60bbb91d16af
'2011-12-11T03:30:23-05:00'
describe
'368439' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
8743d9f31c0e65ed1a63dd241264664c
a59ba8656956977062378d0f90f98a9d2dfa39cc
'2011-12-11T03:26:22-05:00'
describe
'111707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
45f9a713828a586f74c209595c1f24cd
f8beb326659232beb6c60feaffdabeff3b273992
'2011-12-11T03:29:31-05:00'
describe
'35239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCI' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
c0cd9e49181fbde75deb3e8692bdb746
5efeff20230bf8b9c854da9239c07e5e34a0cffe
'2011-12-11T03:27:59-05:00'
describe
'2969896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
ca9ca33e65dbb1784df169c8954c3908
67cbf1a394eda71db750e4c27cabe00462e0f23a
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCK' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1c2ad54380039a71c4c3fa91c5a81494
05bd7d6f61d967a1d877abfa78520fc9510045cf
'2011-12-11T03:29:29-05:00'
describe
'9008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCL' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
773c1a672677e568c1d5cf1238d776e9
7bafbd4975d9dbf96de390140555e9a6b50ffb21
'2011-12-11T03:28:08-05:00'
describe
'358369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCM' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
db7dee1ef4623c70e27f2564e816d5c4
d8b9ea0aca8203798454a979dd1f983635c7fab3
describe
'127947' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4658a7d6721075eb61e946862df73bcc
e14131088201dfb84e6405cef7f1d90e2c0e77a5
'2011-12-11T03:29:21-05:00'
describe
'40984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCO' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4ae72255a99d79518d5eb8010ef1c389
b96508b2253ba4330d2321b95a4349cb5f9b76ea
'2011-12-11T03:27:42-05:00'
describe
'2889816' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCP' 'sip-files00026.tif'
568785c6f0d033f0cd7d468026ccbb22
db9cd4e6203ef7f4dc20df917b60d535fbe1d325
'2011-12-11T03:26:55-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
b24e4dcbc7e1df36dab07234711ff664
ccbba803e035898875abbe27bd87d34c213073e3
describe
'9818' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCR' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
267bac2257d9b2db537f9276f6d600e9
99c594618fcbe345aa6a8e6818ee9ec8e1f5a5d1
describe
'353820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCS' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d7f627497ac4f64305f31dc415c45374
b32aa60bc8ee5602ad324591ce4dd29e297c1370
describe
'124226' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCT' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3a00277c2861c6f9d4e93c4a21d7d073
35e28470f14104fc5c6fb893b09ba9d8c07faeab
describe
'38923' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCU' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
80e0cb856c38c4e978d5e5ce6157bc6e
94acfd40c29000c17a50e2e23d3142b882841eeb
'2011-12-11T03:26:47-05:00'
describe
'2852896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCV' 'sip-files00027.tif'
c8eb21b64baa5c5838898aa9af31a89a
bffec01f70ed0cf408758d0c306a52c7d615661b
'2011-12-11T03:26:27-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
777ee70be789e9a9aea8cd0750b069d1
f3f33ef9d77cb163365b01adb21fc0bdf825cf40
describe
'9998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCX' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ac15477d825c1211c92364fd6c20bc51
4c7bc4ddfed6ffad2aa29cc7479d806b3286debd
'2011-12-11T03:26:50-05:00'
describe
'361462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e923ae04463acaf4269b79c7c070fccb
2b1877e1292a29b0a005647de052bef902aa01eb
'2011-12-11T03:29:08-05:00'
describe
'68565' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSCZ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e6b5a2b1581c38be0ba5542877a3455f
4e2b6dd8ff2c5e8510cb390b57ab312595551486
'2011-12-11T03:26:03-05:00'
describe
'19218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
320388163de6b6a393310d28ef6bc8f2
d245f5afb14eb88bc323d0c9f18c038ab76745b1
'2011-12-11T03:30:15-05:00'
describe
'2911452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
94e770318896aedcad66cd00578e3ee9
16237ad22a6c0429454d1f21bda59e2284b89092
'2011-12-11T03:25:41-05:00'
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
937d123441b1912efbcd2c0b8ac10738
418bfa8183268ed4dbf1efa972e392d30df803e0
'2011-12-11T03:28:17-05:00'
describe
'4906' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
550b39dbeab120281ab6f74af3d3191f
5e7d4d9945c59d5e08aae06033e4c5e7a1477fae
describe
'352938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
308e9c95684cb82ff9389003714460d8
328b00ac5cd96f3a7acdff16c197f9a47cd4ee1a
'2011-12-11T03:29:40-05:00'
describe
'91260' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
6ac616e69de151984552b5c58b5fa1ad
e855b1a8fd093ba00bdbdf03587bbd3dfab8e870
'2011-12-11T03:27:40-05:00'
describe
'28443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
46dd2bf2be768743c30658f6ed73b39c
6b66a58bbc9de76ff70f5564e509bd106aa83086
'2011-12-11T03:26:33-05:00'
describe
'2844484' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
6e070d4af43238ee76a90a696336d13f
4c56c724e45b49af715ba9ba7db20e5bd72cba3d
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ce8d86e4dc8d85133df854532b7406af
34d045bc867d22b9d83aec36c66cbff58e742816
'2011-12-11T03:27:00-05:00'
describe
'7066' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
85fe1d530edea31a9e408eb6976b9b73
640749908ecb04972ba3b7022697b773bac3c609
describe
'368443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
53e8eecfa64b85b92dfa70b63afa870e
0a423868b9acdca8a2a382b6b75c6418e6933381
'2011-12-11T03:29:46-05:00'
describe
'118768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
511534df5bf6cd6c11a9d8308a917f83
d6d1d0f3b8e1e1007578e20d4af00f30349d3cea
'2011-12-11T03:30:31-05:00'
describe
'38231' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDM' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6e9a66163288f8a3670bc8c13e46a696
8f5140190f9de7b185e3302bafcdde1a64536501
'2011-12-11T03:29:00-05:00'
describe
'2970180' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDN' 'sip-files00030.tif'
d42186f20bc9603223713e938bb4abb3
e43899a9d678702d4310be55ef3495a5777ff557
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDO' 'sip-files00030.txt'
3e751c704de45cd6e2b78cdf29e25b90
e405153a8b068d7edeb9fa451f028c5c8b40bbfe
describe
'9137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDP' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
aff9d48a1d88e0e6920a65cb179d5d9c
14981bfa3613f32914889433caff0ea68140888b
'2011-12-11T03:27:24-05:00'
describe
'368149' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDQ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
2698f1e082999b94cecf322625554928
5e2d4a61a328058203c4941dae71f23907f39962
'2011-12-11T03:27:41-05:00'
describe
'123789' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDR' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
c07f067c9f5ef8c6b10deac60994dc9b
cfb4eef8c9962d87e7f889fa796a01be69f3121a
describe
'39534' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b7e4a79d84b1b6c874bc280247d4325a
60c50d4072d5e34cb34ac6b961f5b1c29ac9ad82
'2011-12-11T03:25:40-05:00'
describe
'2968000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
22761d953d8f9a98d97fad9f8152c48d
299916f7db89001f2727eac32f02004b4bc40fb3
'2011-12-11T03:25:46-05:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
89caa5e9e396ac4d20dec61deb61c3e6
ebe05ec9a32e1036140d29b967fd821e7de72129
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6287f2417d8f51929dbdda700ea0ff9f
660a4982314712441e6d7a96340504080eefa082
describe
'368190' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
4759170e7a67b669657abf59dff9bb28
c20eb7382eaa67e1de606bc219883333f970a737
'2011-12-11T03:29:52-05:00'
describe
'114088' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
76486bba253cfbb3ff1c3cf2a77a24be
cc9b24524e98216097a71edb511c64a1bd00adbb
'2011-12-11T03:27:45-05:00'
describe
'35798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
686ec5d5ddea486c32cdfdf9bf720678
b8a7ff3cc90158a104084018e769bdfe2437d4a8
'2011-12-11T03:27:43-05:00'
describe
'2967568' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSDZ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
afea96be9ddb97076bcc4e93c016db90
44303e77a8786b2c84aad92cb734608ea7de452a
'2011-12-11T03:29:03-05:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEA' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8d24715bf4c0e71114f19589f22c148c
775d037094e759f01fdad4b592ee72ce8fe30b7e
'2011-12-11T03:28:40-05:00'
describe
'8621' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEB' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f055563ae8d739c18f42bebebbe55d84
814296f1ca6366f5b045dd29a3ab4b931f775f60
'2011-12-11T03:29:56-05:00'
describe
'368449' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7712c6417fd68b223ab100e0f221421d
cb940b5a5a2bb56f7831a42a9d9aa88a064b1278
describe
'107544' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSED' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
82c1a65cabff7fb800a8e928137ceb37
4265f2138fb36a02aa001c7562da8c8001164646
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4e36ec7ea26b98daf1453ab5e656f670
3e45034957b7ca495653d4464b77ad6a6aaad3cb
'2011-12-11T03:27:17-05:00'
describe
'2969516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEF' 'sip-files00033.tif'
372db99e5b178928455960ecfc62114a
3ba3c21543509061e6fde49f6fc8e1cca692e173
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
f0ee27a5d917dd474c45903bec4b227e
23e9782bdeb438ba1b6173eb299e9af115d276b8
'2011-12-11T03:29:20-05:00'
describe
'8425' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
ce9a9053ca190cc67c7119a4555275c3
358573ae53bcb89eace52a39431fbbed7880a0c5
'2011-12-11T03:29:59-05:00'
describe
'368376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
28254d4200e0149884001da6eacf9c79
12b631dd7d5472ab56d28bd034d340bf842bda35
describe
'119387' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
cdcb68314dbdb9ddde93d08cbbf6f50c
ead2da7a361c4c054e6f715bab7e34f61abb6478
'2011-12-11T03:28:32-05:00'
describe
'37268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
be626c6641afd6a7cceeba48bd446462
66e8d0398e3e14cc8ffbbc6f0af8376c01f9df86
'2011-12-11T03:29:27-05:00'
describe
'2970136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
3948e6334387302c17de51df20e09cef
53088190462c65a2125d3091171de920aff1cc0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEM' 'sip-files00034.txt'
edbd3fbee956f9bc53e0cad1a1916034
ea547b63857ae46c8e51d5e1f1985ed22392a28f
'2011-12-11T03:30:22-05:00'
describe
'9169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e8c393f5b5d9083b02a1b1d59511a3c2
d82e607ec46ca181d6b50a1f4e7e5735bd1e44eb
'2011-12-11T03:26:32-05:00'
describe
'353190' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ddae4ea473c123246ddb3bd738203266
977f855218e54ba3cb72610839d323f6c2b5db60
describe
'117762' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b15b164162317444777ded2deaca8613
cee67ea37c0e74383896382b4c95cced48989a62
'2011-12-11T03:29:42-05:00'
describe
'37507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b590b4b1ac0f0ecf94275472ebadf1e8
c957a4ffd9b0aacf53fda73e49513e13e93c20d1
'2011-12-11T03:30:20-05:00'
describe
'2847884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSER' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0484c8d0e4545840c4594bfcaeeb19ba
1c89a3db11131c9af6c07f383f2c8a18441de466
'2011-12-11T03:26:23-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSES' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4b825651298c031b8b7abfc88099a2ea
404de7116a7ce76e5cf6da8531a3f258348494d7
'2011-12-11T03:26:02-05:00'
describe
'9618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSET' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
64dd1f811a14fccadef2f4bcd58a2575
238b85903b3b30ad3634e38cf97c7187bdd520fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
e469db2cc5d1666db06c0cca1ad7bc2f
49a5233bfa4142b71d7d628417b1d91f7e159244
describe
'72968' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4b0243c4faed836cd5cfc46e29a6c4a4
64bcb19b66d7322a57849ebf6d6530e873d845be
describe
'20685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEW' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f47185c614bc366913d2b7cf7a24952f
9fb53a526484d1309ccd027e5e6f5322bd87e429
describe
'2967552' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d5e77ead6368f2b830055e2827f2ff8a
d0762002cb07b9ed4fc60938a08d674dcfc4cbf7
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
db87ea5d7accf4c6a27f6b18a08c9141
51c7a727ff4507f0b1b8a2127faaff019acdbbf8
'2011-12-11T03:26:19-05:00'
describe
'5282' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSEZ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c47803767facb9ec98bb1ded9ab593f5
925c4d6d1798402b8f0611d0137993139f21369e
'2011-12-11T03:30:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFA' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
996b632b6defde1f34142d7fb5026d7a
6cb9dc721aa60e7d8a7c77f452c87d76f9290957
'2011-12-11T03:27:26-05:00'
describe
'94413' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFB' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c59f63ed7e2bb5e66960a28b329c1cee
94e901c98279dbd05b21caf7e6d600dd7161ac83
'2011-12-11T03:26:13-05:00'
describe
'28881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFC' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f173f40f8204dc5d815bc5df8c636ecd
b31672ea9f64baf952da3da0553377b6efc522ac
'2011-12-11T03:27:35-05:00'
describe
'2968408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFD' 'sip-files00037.tif'
03d4d90180843de1f5fa5a378cc617d8
c6c8612261aa5c62b44150910babc1b8681a54e0
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFE' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ff3d25ca39fdeed516c4d1c2e447f26c
5e09c7e01cb82b63fbe4531a618965bb55912fa6
describe
'6963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFF' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d05ada7e44c7c45351c84aa4c51a0767
301f5083e633a40384697bc12f87050bf8ba24a9
'2011-12-11T03:26:59-05:00'
describe
'362254' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFG' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
dd4812ffb1253aead8b2850676f034d8
af70dd43accc9a5762c172629458d4bea41fd75b
'2011-12-11T03:29:54-05:00'
describe
'116745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
bf94fb1e990d3b4ce83107dd3ecec6be
9e6838a6650d43343964da7dbc0bb5a362afe2fb
'2011-12-11T03:26:52-05:00'
describe
'36529' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
81e907f3be496f877573f94bb4878987
5d54e2440fe1f4aa4bb122b2e520e42658490781
'2011-12-11T03:26:15-05:00'
describe
'2920388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7bb94367c6674b6007be0c815e864e65
f6b0af38b2e30a04ec2716324bf96a246f27ec4b
'2011-12-11T03:30:25-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1d4e1248662c032c0d8a71baaf6413f7
bc89bdac407d5824596c03de3ab93c1fb16fa66a
'2011-12-11T03:29:19-05:00'
describe
'9181' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
0e24163d15527b5a1fbfbb07753a0f1a
7275df18e3077ceefb1231740bf51f4a650fc368
describe
'368196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b60c7ef6ba3112586940aa56d8752fe4
a2c46e197c53c48060f8568d64743cc24d105142
describe
'111951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
7b3d0d3f1533a2e04bd5e1dc0759c5ba
a5d6ea570d9c0af3e5e100887a48247945369f59
'2011-12-11T03:25:34-05:00'
describe
'35270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFO' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
cd67ee2ba7cac328a0e542ba0d413489
98e27fc477cdffd3478b068c57b86edbf9fe033e
'2011-12-11T03:26:51-05:00'
describe
'2967604' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
6478aa87b38f204c26352200ec21457f
294a2de150dbe9a4e1ab96413f6315b8575424b0
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFQ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
b558022fcc757e2e14bad069e917640b
6e04c38fcede400afdaf18736d984e34a8320a58
describe
'8731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFR' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3d6f017bbb127ca2bfe7767ce0df37b6
c5dfcf14228bba3e8a7f26a31302661fe87f52b2
'2011-12-11T03:28:44-05:00'
describe
'368423' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFS' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4aa027f363a246cccc79c099dedd902c
1e7395f64cc9e06f921386cd187b00cd7683fa99
'2011-12-11T03:25:55-05:00'
describe
'107795' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFT' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
e5862dd0fdc89d8812bd3b20bed98206
c695edda509f698c111f2db57bbeb116de3647c1
'2011-12-11T03:29:26-05:00'
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4f086583fed9cee82acbfa43a4fa3ae0
1974b3677160151db7dee58861278041769906c1
describe
'2969644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f7bfc5035a1678e17596e1d1f623b961
bf49ccd59a95553354dce9751da22ba8290f429c
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
394f9d15404fa3b2b36a77dbd3152c37
877997bd8abbbb2f519953168c9b6fbc2f2a2919
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
83d02ccf5f478aef647260bb31ff52a6
97a7d0f028e56cf5ed29e029b84402197d3262ea
describe
'368380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
7198cb9dc289a961cf576f10d2c50ba3
bc12052968becddba9e204981b974f20a45b7b5a
'2011-12-11T03:29:58-05:00'
describe
'115800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSFZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
061374b8172e447a338f2350baa6e392
d6a2e65ceb0c841efc52f44875947fbc817ae2e6
'2011-12-11T03:27:01-05:00'
describe
'36649' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGA' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a1b775ef295e003ceb567ef5d711e787
9386eb179d647b529f3ec0bcebec0f10e46753b0
describe
'2969668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
11e6793d5a84d7d8ebfe830de8184d24
3a9afcfe5972ecbbf1113e0daa729779322e506c
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a3addc96ab3ba1e7d3c28f1e5b74edf6
210d809b97780c4feca6f4886c825661e641f9c2
'2011-12-11T03:25:58-05:00'
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGD' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
2b84e00448a212488ad3ca2ea4c23a0e
bf731f2e1e5b0e8906a2fbcce7c0d00b668e23a5
'2011-12-11T03:27:33-05:00'
describe
'368440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGE' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
279321c9f4c82432e57a89c71b789e64
8f088e509e70a64671ecb61474c29cc3f1146655
describe
'113216' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
bb1504cfbdbe80aaf05b0621dce34583
8dbfcc2ed0cfff8217d80701552e5043f038504a
'2011-12-11T03:27:36-05:00'
describe
'36420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c78082b0ba2b7cac1963e719b4d95dba
f525d796df49fdf7f35a64dac4733737ba39b6a6
'2011-12-11T03:27:10-05:00'
describe
'2969764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
85ee41d08d1ca72c76e28f8a171d3aa6
842e13d50ba82bd5eaa66548d624e6ba1080278e
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
98986d5f0452985109f8ec442dcd40c2
79cd74d72f3086e68354c034ce5884a62a0b3975
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
7800ffd9534ec7fcda0ede1208828203
503e62f5dbe72e16153c77f02bb12d37a07e447c
describe
'368432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e7fb00ff73aca98aca3023dec3702ffb
a90a8411ee7c3c8c02b697c9af2ee2eb3372c968
describe
'122203' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9bda4f0af095f54f5fa4f67b6d98bb40
3cddabd17bf20eaa6f72ab4649ef9cde81c982ca
'2011-12-11T03:29:17-05:00'
describe
'39532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGM' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
690796e24aad9c03d3caae3a80a9d429
f35e5abbd257222d2c8ba8e500d3a3642fd3e5d5
'2011-12-11T03:29:25-05:00'
describe
'2970132' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGN' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c7411ea7422e928d64a9173b208b9846
775b09a28fdca54599693c01a32c2e7eefab1e73
'2011-12-11T03:27:05-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGO' 'sip-files00043.txt'
9c3a56a25de73b4215ff070bfdf49743
2776c04360b937545c1113696f9fa219522ab904
describe
'9301' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGP' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3a3f8e07a57eda48c85f993d1d338bf6
e5501bb38dacb8253cd016e5972d3e0940e1818e
'2011-12-11T03:28:12-05:00'
describe
'368450' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGQ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3d97e25a445642102a695b322f9fa700
aa9243b687c823b2fcad624f72b3726965b98ee5
'2011-12-11T03:26:01-05:00'
describe
'54775' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGR' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e1cd3380b01cd53cdf270685a93916ec
57475d813bbb5209aa342c0de2d2bac5b63aaccf
'2011-12-11T03:27:22-05:00'
describe
'14776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
fd79d549745530870a712c8dcb4dfdff
c28d3129872622c748552f43c22de6674e47fadc
'2011-12-11T03:25:49-05:00'
describe
'2966628' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e012cd374a420d103edc0ae595ee42ea
d9160b0920c772c2a228acc7cecb4c725fb096c8
'2011-12-11T03:29:53-05:00'
describe
'475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8cac89135cfd690a1be4b72b91b0b328
3bac56a87c11ac9b8a6b5628b24008d47c07e18c
'2011-12-11T03:28:33-05:00'
describe
'3764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
4eae42df68a08966b178386d459a39d9
0c140a6ecec80c71c3b1e6b8c8e9955700cb43cc
describe
'368122' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
73b0d78506c2fb108900c8a02a734623
d349ac3fde10667d02feec95b198f52834f9b683
'2011-12-11T03:30:18-05:00'
describe
'91215' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
0ed0bcc174cc2d053c3af192f3a255d7
a6c29c060ec4bf0fb06aebf3103f419a532e3799
'2011-12-11T03:25:48-05:00'
describe
'27779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
69b6416f61ef147869cd962235fc0616
e94d3ad2bc19cfb26ef2530b15e8e2f2ba86950a
describe
'2966272' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSGZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
474c99cb4674d7f52cc92591a66f22cc
3026c4a38a91b9967717801b56e8ebe7afbe97de
'2011-12-11T03:27:58-05:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
f3756cef673621abedf5d9e854dfee0a
6f64a0b22b7ee21844ae54e4ddfc2bfd3ee52bf0
describe
'6792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c8c68816d584dc0ff96ab74a567314fc
9a681ccaadf5f950709efe84ad363ceb9d7a0941
'2011-12-11T03:26:07-05:00'
describe
'368366' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
2f0d086be26779fac6b80027e57f86be
f42be963fb03b7d37b5b1a619e53573fbe83063d
describe
'120778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
44e4f70f3f79a19552b54e2ad38bb9a7
b9a7a9e6c6777490b40139977738a995d134f54f
describe
'38633' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e4d9e01fe6400bd5562062ee16e4917e
dfc2d3046321eb4144f2c9db46f9665e394ea220
describe
'2969836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c3cbc3d1aa1404745102ccf8452cd19a
d398db48d72e6532a94437650dd334c43cd263ed
'2011-12-11T03:29:23-05:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHG' 'sip-files00046.txt'
7cba698d3df95eb1b62ab7e046f603b4
80eb786c12a45aca6c857a95efa96c1224e604ad
'2011-12-11T03:29:47-05:00'
describe
'9575' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
df1af54cd5aa25a7716c63b2551f5e38
59b4b98ae90ca8bc71043fbecef87bf471ef09f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHI' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9db7a4f9603c928e97611a50121ba4a8
ae0f98be2a42132790b4e652d5ead7c97ba535c3
'2011-12-11T03:29:36-05:00'
describe
'114965' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
58385618c535c609f3088b8fa58615ac
86d02a8d37db7dd6dce562d81f185c1eafd4c51e
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
37d87ed61393de344c1eb7990798e99f
09a21e394df4681f219a491f50ed970fae5e7b1d
'2011-12-11T03:26:57-05:00'
describe
'2967792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
16eefbb5542b5c32554f1cae8ebf7bef
fe0739c76fe0248d184989f333137a28716a72b0
'2011-12-11T03:29:28-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f4eeb673ad5d65685dfef93250a95b1a
96b73072d1446a28d3787674d96cf6ad68ecaaa7
'2011-12-11T03:28:27-05:00'
describe
'8994' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
04701d57b14216f00354e9c5fbaa0325
7dbfee8a32ff76f1497a329e0879318a77a12d9d
'2011-12-11T03:28:21-05:00'
describe
'368436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a14d67e169e548b044e9e926a7f683a3
efab878a1680ae30d14b93395add4223699625d9
describe
'117334' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b9e4733948ee702a4d1d4325a97c7d2e
dadad13ab4fac285f16c913d27aac847f23664e2
describe
'36092' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHQ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8b72ba64cc79acd33bb83019b032f45e
43f2a397003cd3f2da7919914ead7f9b619361f7
'2011-12-11T03:30:17-05:00'
describe
'2970008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHR' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d30f756f1d9b5a7e30db9eb5f66c819c
2485c13cf4b7482fcdd54e6469e659a8a4376371
'2011-12-11T03:29:34-05:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHS' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a006ceacfb31ac9abc7de197c1ed5ea7
eba810c2cf992dea3bddb65d0ed9cc840129f56e
'2011-12-11T03:28:50-05:00'
describe
'9042' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHT' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
1753d0a9323f28d58a34b6803cac5e7e
5c08ee81697e56b0ce063e58ac3e24065f38ec22
'2011-12-11T03:29:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHU' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2ab50c970b1020e1683c2a245f881a30
38e6428d83c712ae0bb5a01c02b328e68cfa1513
'2011-12-11T03:25:57-05:00'
describe
'122408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8f0ffc5c6b35b08ddd36ebff26197b05
bad555570d74a8b8bdcc19824a756c51c67c738c
'2011-12-11T03:26:20-05:00'
describe
'38130' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ff9a4e24f922afdf57115e5731694201
4d46850ca0c65eda4437a75febf3f108adbe5da8
describe
'2969912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e81b2fe76c97453f5724ccb71d7f79e7
d75d631921b10054d4b9dff475d9adc9baed26dc
'2011-12-11T03:30:02-05:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
a44bf6500e1a845bff22fc3233d84eae
3da385a104c194896f56ab51ddfe2da665166da5
'2011-12-11T03:29:48-05:00'
describe
'9121' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSHZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1de0c64fadfa0159d755cb3f72f89bcb
369efcdc6e3b4428750e9ae8d4de10e35d2171d0
'2011-12-11T03:27:23-05:00'
describe
'368448' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
99a5c65300294f8f2e788e1b12d5431b
444911b59077e752d9a5b358b24502c5c2a19b0e
'2011-12-11T03:26:26-05:00'
describe
'107649' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f98cbb1aa576a2b5ad6e9c2d2cca8586
f5264829bd30f079675d86a7db4dcb31b605e0ba
describe
'32084' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6457c8b0fd26c0b26d59336c6f487a45
74e04ed624be55ba51077ca6cf34080517df5229
describe
'2969496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSID' 'sip-files00050.tif'
80f65bfa20187ee66b64aeabae5209be
436af6c7af25e584c9b5b4bfeb9df52c47390685
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
5ca4e25731fb047958849784fe8e73f4
89685b2bcccbca6c5ea774e94bcbc84d83f6ffae
describe
'8420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
7f2ab384ef7a4321101b6cbb84dac43e
ab03498c1672ba3ea65636540a3d509bbb40b7d3
'2011-12-11T03:27:15-05:00'
describe
'368173' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
532755844c80d737bf3deb68b25dc94f
7061698c13b0be9b6ae30bf5391c6cfe54e405c1
describe
'89574' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ac8056a8e0bf1ae021fddc3de9f261db
36ee9b6fc87f688a485e7108f619d23fd67c8882
describe
'27184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSII' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1fdfb56268ea69a08418521b01530bb3
7dbced92ed6f4c11aee72523552f6bdcae5cc11e
describe
'2966276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIJ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ed95671c3b73c4b951e28ed7fed52304
3c3873334dad56e3d3172391900ca3feae05e330
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIK' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c0a39c459889059a6232219a165e2775
e9a14d60f9659e8df0176bb010ede5d93b9b5f10
describe
'6696' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIL' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
1ad88a4cae3b6608b32acf87deca6415
28b7ce4ddfad34ccb63e3cc79ea6d87e9315f5ca
describe
'368413' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIM' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
b2a85c0f1e995c664669e21a24926e67
d833ca79b75f5ac90da48c05132a44388afe6ffc
'2011-12-11T03:30:29-05:00'
describe
'116087' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIN' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
5a443aa0863cc2ad2fc027c95975e0ea
f9059ee101a94f954ddc60908368769532fdf35b
describe
'38398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIO' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
863fb603b779a95cd902488dec0a6f76
3994076e8d7b416233fb4ebfa94a19d3cbfe1784
'2011-12-11T03:27:02-05:00'
describe
'2970148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIP' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e8a26c80a3999b9722b4ca0666f35ea1
7b715cc5fb695cc2e3987a004a1cb4f455bcd022
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
1341bf3cedfe0cab86cafa42694972ef
dc67011cfdfff25b3bebf7ae7d9047f4ab438c60
'2011-12-11T03:28:41-05:00'
describe
'9462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIR' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
fa2c0adf184dce90ca077be0401a1c17
a24e1065ba01d24080c52984de6ec2542124a333
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIS' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
267d757414efd2ef2034fc8b14aef9e0
0f7682785c6aae327cda5d7d19d9b7314c69c4b9
describe
'113327' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIT' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4a2544f0c53722b1404342193b83c1eb
21f7b63d49df85ec43d1b1ebedd4af0027331c39
describe
'37137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
7452366c53d5ae7ba21231b9c2802d64
c1f677a51c1cd759a5ecc86ad5372af0eb42ca3e
describe
'2970120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
79f3d03d65e8b6b5689befdf275bbf6e
260fbebe77bfcffc2369606fef813b1b7fb74337
'2011-12-11T03:28:37-05:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8e1de3024b23758fb2ee8f9c0078c038
2217baa98b56d87fa6c1f2ac7288be317d76bc79
describe
'9069' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
ff946077c1568ffbc6e52625052d0902
ba8e00ae7a27020bf69aa05da420363703ef60a6
'2011-12-11T03:26:49-05:00'
describe
'368384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b1c677497a719404efdb5e5776c7c5fa
0cb5f28b0f4f0c68c8b53aabcf3de24f771b585a
describe
'116264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSIZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
578e2c52d2b74216abd085ca06d4600f
8e35fe8f17bceaf6b4ca36264391e452ecdc770a
'2011-12-11T03:27:56-05:00'
describe
'35744' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJA' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
14fa67994619cb9b1083daa917300e18
abf337183315ec5d363aef821eba0245b0cede01
describe
'2969984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3c7bf5bcef5ccce84c2cc6f61be8ef27
2cd17981a49eda4ce69364c430a90c8429e0e2f0
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJC' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1bb9fc3f658e0ffc7680942dc5b7b72c
3bfc095d33c64919913e6d1bad84908589ffb04c
describe
'9104' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJD' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8e8680f12efebbd349e4d6c468060b68
180b8e09d51524b9af7111a7813538966580fa6e
describe
'368393' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJE' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3f78d2673d3c991e2d20774112af56ef
36221c126773026f964d32d8169ee01e4fb645c0
'2011-12-11T03:29:39-05:00'
describe
'121595' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2ea85971930cd62b97928cd5f4b70800
1e10c5e5ea42ff544f58250f9debabae05adc669
'2011-12-11T03:26:25-05:00'
describe
'38247' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJG' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d4ec9dbde0edbeffb82a23278f760bb9
8dd3a90fae8b311eaf0549f1757f67494df255db
describe
'2969988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e9683f1259a91bc49dad93d52c81e540
721bbfa5dba866d12de8bc5e941536f76c9f75cb
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
2060cf829372d22e67b8b90df4b5709c
4fc6a5484530e185a06a5286193e410410c90c66
describe
'9218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
a8be0e3f7133e443ba0d0f41c933912c
ad382c5f61333e15d0b59b8109fce0d00fd5a516
describe
'368454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
b67ce64b7732b3deafd641c2fe1b0a2a
6b7d32c1d40a3a4e1e1859d9e1617545d2910bbc
'2011-12-11T03:27:12-05:00'
describe
'111946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
8188a545990a6120b2d375307fd58472
ae50ad6c859edc4e4d832ec12cfeb65ea7b675e4
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJM' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0b7e97fed5dc55d7588d3faa523f950f
803785584309bf752735e14931fba002d4791c6a
describe
'2969996' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJN' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6ae7da1efe50190de08b8bda2a782c3e
88216864979727f52f7040bf8145c20d38be9b9a
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
0295c5ba7d88cbce54dc1a9ac1c282b4
9ab42d6f23fa282a7d71d1055f0b8d9e5b9668cf
'2011-12-11T03:29:41-05:00'
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJP' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e39a745e10be2ae932545fbd879fbae7
b01b14e78403f75a16d9d42364081754e4b5e5b6
describe
'368434' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJQ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
4ac9540cda0b4da3cb84a7cef083d8e4
039b998d53353b495b643d8419c2de1e63dcbac3
describe
'105803' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJR' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d84f5f828d186c64975ce7df31efb9a0
4f8c688a17925e022f4e651cbe0f6886113a234f
'2011-12-11T03:27:39-05:00'
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJS' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4f9ddbed916105437d11c239f20548d3
2896aa88f7f231a89ffd9425e6692665cd4b644f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJT' 'sip-files00057.tif'
86b762c02ab1613ccccddcee4b65ac00
de6a00ccec864f87cc0f39d98f6f468b2ade5d07
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJU' 'sip-files00057.txt'
bdbaef9432fd03b4ef301057167bfd0b
404caa24a7dd7c8b4b1075a5a4e03799346c33e1
describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJV' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
5fde69cbc47c79c3c22a6fa7454a4a0e
1e4ab68fe22f1547c7f31e6631050a5dd05d4a43
'2011-12-11T03:29:15-05:00'
describe
'368442' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJW' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
87e94ed2cb539a7debebc2c88e403ba3
6a9c3801ea15d2ab45effdf8b1ea565c9fff9bb2
'2011-12-11T03:29:38-05:00'
describe
'113899' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJX' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a30841a2734826278b6b65d1ea30fae9
da59793d3d25e751e6b01affb7741c7ff855d64a
describe
'35134' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f1c754e8d0f15e480794e541c0d6ecf1
d279d1a61ef68d2b7122fb3433cfaa7c581eb31e
'2011-12-11T03:29:12-05:00'
describe
'2969604' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSJZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a264df13a835841afb4dcbd42820443a
2fc237847033827880f8f3e11b7ed59c2eb8e9af
'2011-12-11T03:25:50-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
63561956d3cfcf5e4ee70be807c4916e
0677350e4c37081be3f2e8279d0df3c232b55ced
describe
'8557' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
ecdc5dd85b27b985d8cc0245d124425a
fdf076ea5338b280076a85d3aa90329db33a2c4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
243782eb00ea47fbd824488e4a9b968f
0632a932211e29167c37ab2cb4c29180c9adc022
describe
'90882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
95ca95c065759779f473c177bc00606f
e838fd4163a65f00b2b0f1c26f8d66d35bd582c3
'2011-12-11T03:29:37-05:00'
describe
'27244' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKE' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
aff9cf0c7cfcc5484dafe624de752f16
a383346db2b617fd508f6d9d3657891075f8398a
describe
'2968356' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKF' 'sip-files00059.tif'
8278f1287f36c4fb75ada2ddc1b165dd
114215dfef3a336252c48c7051aa5899b8b37b6f
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKG' 'sip-files00059.txt'
29784897189449dd351d980fdc90f095
bbc8ad91e992030c25b393aa1ac421150c0f18bb
describe
'6809' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKH' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
83cdb8f9bb72bb77e5799678d7debe6e
6badf0209dc45d61929c3c016c8de26491f21dda
describe
'368410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKI' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
adec91351aac733566fc1ca509f1c188
1849ff6855d776aa9fcdc66032870ea248c39b68
describe
'119903' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKJ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
09d9a851bcab43dfcdc04b2dc720aa5c
0d10e92ab371cf505068a2560f234e5853ce4bdc
describe
'38271' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8dcb8958a9b6003d0dc5700bf3904526
1453d58c9edfe0babdf9cf4072ffe49cea8e649a
describe
'2970072' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
0a27ebe4131716df0fc4afd66224f95a
ae55596aba95dc6e070834c1261b54e902669182
'2011-12-11T03:28:26-05:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
69851d30941b133857200f4efc23ac17
264edb542efcdcc25a3ffa5c0c708895e1592b42
'2011-12-11T03:28:38-05:00'
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
09efbdfe50a738c2d1a959bbd6aad17a
fa0c2f6bcf74ebe076b200b50227336b58b08d5d
'2011-12-11T03:28:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
9ac008e30db6ad6504c131b3cdbb6ed5
79e85da2bba466c3959cdbc59fad2b22f5f27283
'2011-12-11T03:25:37-05:00'
describe
'123967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ebc48ec2578ac9c017b554137a49d67f
2e0c26258fc388d41d0d974acf5cd03d4433ca9b
'2011-12-11T03:28:34-05:00'
describe
'39139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKQ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
eded9652477ce25802625002f69f32a0
d6fc91ec38c0f136f1a42cc350a0af01a3701345
'2011-12-11T03:30:28-05:00'
describe
'2969804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKR' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8d8eab640ced63a6388d3120b01d464d
d6083ac6cf7e3ca83802c2e50d2905eeeb48dfc0
'2011-12-11T03:26:40-05:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKS' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0ca783f101c8696f5c2146d8c2b2b202
09f7311ffad732dc6d209488514ff52aef22e02e
'2011-12-11T03:27:46-05:00'
describe
'9017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKT' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
aa04e177ec4ddd38c6b95bafafc3aaca
5ef7fefcae1f1095c29f7c32a36b207db1a33518
'2011-12-11T03:26:18-05:00'
describe
'368446' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKU' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
52b689926d5dfbcf995fb554a9027d97
f647fe102b08020809c1504fa9146a0769c24907
describe
'116658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKV' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
c4df00967e22f44bb2c6fd3e159dbdd9
9537f98936208310113aec8a73b351d29be2a5c5
describe
'38416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKW' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e3129f5bbb898cd33b4c9bf0e33bfce1
03328bfe925e2df2a28e1ce0a3a32542ea3011b4
'2011-12-11T03:28:10-05:00'
describe
'2970208' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKX' 'sip-files00062.tif'
62f2a4843ff3d86449ab855ed3fcb8f3
3f09be0169e2d2f9f3fe7f68119194bafc1c39af
'2011-12-11T03:30:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKY' 'sip-files00062.txt'
2d1234ba070207e4b06f32cc0006f3ec
762ed945a273f7dbf9833bf2882b8cdf2ebbe646
describe
'9205' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSKZ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
01fcbbaf9bbc016bc31a9e9987aa76d3
a7b92a33019fcb3dd1153d16479be2204a71530a
describe
'368435' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
bbb2991e9f5e358c896128b81392db4f
42e56b5365f9e61ae995132456468696292dcd5c
'2011-12-11T03:29:16-05:00'
describe
'116345' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLB' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
9a0e6741c0d45af6b680021fb8081b2e
119a53d761140745d5070a0664c36bda8288879a
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLC' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
80bcb1663c4022651fdc97773889f790
71f8b620f760a61d17d9888ddb9fa0af169c581b
describe
'2970032' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLD' 'sip-files00063.tif'
e527b4c9a8f9e48422605d682b3514a0
df472df3fc5d5c6b3888c1348747281c1c5af38c
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLE' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e46194aa9c0b95766b93296eef8c9393
6d8a533db1c620d6da5326be4808025fe669f5f2
describe
'9074' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLF' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
00dbc9a8fd001f46fa9d938ec2e4fcca
cc28f674a34d97262ce6bd89884277c2b6f4a37f
'2011-12-11T03:25:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLG' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
093241b18baae6a97a6cec30b31570d1
4fc76c3584995723f77650e4c55cb90f37c7cd48
describe
'117316' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLH' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
f363238f4782e7e84b08571cff03bd1e
b5b03b4f017383f18e1e55d7afed5594b9a03d56
describe
'35907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4111e458ff505128c860f0048511ca79
5dcf273ec18aa78212ce087c2b5314dee129e6b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
07fe0958dbd12b6ac4f31c750d9720db
76cedd91270bf88af236031084833f1b22bd5c68
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLK' 'sip-files00064.txt'
097f6492cfa9a6291c380ec42fd9c9aa
131a0237a7fb3e5e3bf42d1a50a5d9ad03410057
describe
'9276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLL' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fb4c3fb7e224939e5a349267cd6b13be
3c906291ae4d04c1f76cbe4b54da7cbe6d9d3e16
describe
'368426' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bed80acd28eb5dd729570caded404614
6ea568a2d2a169b7c37cd8dcf14d975eb91f0d30
'2011-12-11T03:28:05-05:00'
describe
'91577' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLN' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f1b0e6f9770b234f4a411fb9b0028650
27b5f68e78bd2e6b21d4dc95c25f77cfa09ded52
describe
'27625' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
44e4c4e1b8d5652d8c9aeeb9f708efe0
774b425249bcc50779189f6b4b1a26067da2825f
describe
'2968452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b78ebcd8d14366480536d9f23991eef7
223017120c987f856162e797800ee0626283ad1e
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
39d2b8f2f26ad95579d9df4a5847c65c
a68b31f115c719b2d34080129fce2c0b506db30d
'2011-12-11T03:30:36-05:00'
describe
'6656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
4462472ef394c856b14e95452fd670de
cfec44ad51beffa41e77eb48fed2e0a3e55b1386
'2011-12-11T03:28:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
377d29d673fa74d48a25ba4a2539e79b
7ceee63a1b08c35138230ab0d7d99a69f8cacd59
describe
'119060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
03ebae2d86ed47c38c2f01c71b4c37b3
497999ef7286ff43cf7b561f0ea97c5d9e1d08df
describe
'37745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
09c927adaaf70a8507cb6abdcd3da6b1
035739812f84bd97adeef3a4fc43d2e379a8e713
describe
'2969948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
271f13df0d5214be09d62bbe57863235
8c47a38018eb8aceb58bdbdb1cfc42d8c3b73805
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ef5cfcfaaad7db937dc963583ed293c1
dc01ce4f101333833f7f55b779eb3ae762bc2318
describe
'9300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5243fc88f3645e3c23b54010a1dfb93f
06b25d9af5d8ac8cbf860d9f9a9891631efc6fd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6c9566bfcecea2318a452da5ec01b938
6988eae06b3732a46f767b677596ba2dc8e52795
describe
'124687' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSLZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6029ea626514679b2b7d54c413e43f8b
29725d05e0554b5f88f094650d9b523c7d916a1c
describe
'39023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMA' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
782ccbd27bf2b88dcfdd98768ccbc5a9
1883a3a2c0613c5ca59ba88699b53fffe42aa719
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMB' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2a51627d391daf8030866d4c788bf0a1
58f7b897291975fcbe67a5f32fdc260420aa04ba
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMC' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d58ab6dbb15f3100ed7729fdfa8d9614
d23e5541e86942d43e691ef59f6cb47769b607a2
describe
'9280' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMD' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
973f55f517d1224a59c767a7fae092e2
e0bdef350995a77213388ddc446b8771003095db
describe
'368447' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSME' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b8f08f73877cea9cf8165e8afa96adc7
fe2f1aff4773a6fd304bc6fe2f3fa394ebf2ed2c
describe
'120843' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMF' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c5f85c9e9b03b7ecc8ad5b31d1ff34c0
c878d74afe8e1db8176d14dc04fbfaeca0608476
'2011-12-11T03:26:42-05:00'
describe
'37783' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
eae40e0b3634517e173b8ca8f69bd31b
040db30c4f1dd58aa9b354cc3d5cc736e117ce6b
describe
'2969752' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a9e34b4f4f615c6fb4678fd775fb0aed
a72f2fd2e1521a33ddd856c1b5497f4c2c35ef02
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
190d8f89bec9653020f974e6af1cd4b0
394ee8fed283b8d313b371e9d9ab1b3d9804bfcb
describe
'9053' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
b43c54d9e3bb52e99b6d91600ca0a4eb
75fc775548eba8f56066a73066a103a976da4bfb
describe
'368430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9cae884b3b4ae18b6f95324c2d4c4283
5d0373a479829f2542db327e62b72793a72d9cd7
'2011-12-11T03:26:17-05:00'
describe
'117761' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSML' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
081f343e1f3a1fb1a05143e156c9cafa
47ed802b652d05e11f09cb551f2cdbb85e019a48
describe
'36804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c739e9e77bd01362e1e183cb5a0b8b35
e42547eabc29cc2bf9c052f432ef6d0bedc49326
describe
'2969512' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMN' 'sip-files00069.tif'
636f7e8d3424306c0b21870477deb991
7c29bfea0a3fb50e503166b5055c54d9a5655241
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMO' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1b2f1bc6e07c0ecae42107b5d768f700
ad6aa003cd47fd510ff7b64d1815b18687b3a171
describe
'9030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMP' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
84ca93eb900c5eefc136ae7433ef09c2
0dcaeb8dd510d7c549de5a6a9c157076fabf155c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
efd54ed0b88f2778d7358923b1308ffc
e68d5b5b322fe6194dc1f6deb15c340db93a71d5
describe
'120459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMR' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
d520b94bbf65678f906646c7fe741b25
166bb3fa4ed388e9778a6007759211da62527324
describe
'37705' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
0a8b9c8cbaffb84d5a1c105985821039
9b8fe1085fc13455f7633c5893444702950af5f2
describe
'2969856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
ae4803107e0d35453e547bf159adbe79
34b8ecd91e149af6135233be23bb89c2ab410122
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f367e638362df38c1a61a9a936ad8e05
f8d027aea54b7d93c641c53ced32a95c0a02eccc
'2011-12-11T03:26:14-05:00'
describe
'9313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e0356cfdee77d30e527a5b295dd31c30
64f895b8ad69d1eeeaa1739045113ad7c1728af5
'2011-12-11T03:26:00-05:00'
describe
'368189' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6081532a8bcb6709c9cfbf3db87ac16d
891eae387c434c890561b061ec710fb131204734
describe
'72512' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a88d0a4d58a446d7d94ce68a33b86028
dff40398e14476767e2281d7d48298d5ea4e5f4f
describe
'21158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
2d1407d71acaac0ec748c29b4bcf89b3
185e6a8c833c500c2eec5dcc44017601394b1c7f
describe
'2965524' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSMZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
481f83ee84cfe48cae822657c5ec5430
3e438062cbd1027767e4fed2ed21519fe9ca3d9e
describe
'815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ea1c273cd735e50994e4240781bcb6a7
edb6e912175c6d58f7935491f28eef20d60a5000
describe
'5352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
af3fa5ae039afd89d63970626b9642fd
f9d1c18185884fa8565700e4d9aecd38f303d212
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ec1e19e53659acf27f56309f819527e9
9108a6ef8f604ff6e9368453c40a9c5621951c15
describe
'90825' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSND' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
09286b3fd7108909e05afd8213bc6475
eabe4f5a76123a7f7b4f7998a161c42d69eeff76
'2011-12-11T03:29:06-05:00'
describe
'28078' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
07a3c44122e5cfd2620fe10f15841ad6
4556fbab67bfea457fd8fa5497789a671e80b02a
describe
'2968632' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
1c454edd958c45265c40a773561c191a
618922cb539416c4aec1b1e7d3ce94b25c899813
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
87a2f9edd488a9db29df8836e3ecf9c2
46adad902d24252f18b7da531f97a88d233ba7d6
'2011-12-11T03:27:21-05:00'
describe
'6945' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7e41105f0c27db31156c5caabee91c60
a58ef3b6c2ffea61fa0b532642e7c16b8d642cc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
14ec8b23cc55d48e8ce727c752d5153e
e236ddbd3a8f38f23962282cb5bbcc998d094656
describe
'115306' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
245ce079e35dfa8cdb9c30ef318ad8ca
91d90ae83e9833c856019ba28c37f8d1020e0bb3
describe
'36163' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNK' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
484ae1f1d1764f027ae45ed2641e88d1
707a55979a6cae13c2743c172591ed5aed233e2d
'2011-12-11T03:28:06-05:00'
describe
'2967652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
fb7e14aaa5f377d4154a196e1f32504b
1107b71dae7d8a6192ccc8e3b3b8e7c7e45e7470
'2011-12-11T03:25:53-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNM' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5f4e087e5756bdb4bb419978fed93efb
b0866aa39cff91d06fd12eb40c669825b4469195
describe
'9034' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNN' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6bcf41889ca26b279dc5aa32d1245bb0
7e02792ca442f79692eb5965eb6f2b4a2b72e2db
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
a6935af556e247a2a13b73d1d1b93987
3aa9c2f16dc6c13157ec9796eebdbcbe94d44168
'2011-12-11T03:30:16-05:00'
describe
'122519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
aca0a1e19215d9eda8306346c9af8ca4
eca375bc176941c4de0826faec8c94a3f8dd7f4a
describe
'38220' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d746844f6fb413707d4e6ce2f3922b70
3267970d9784f9ad2a61c3e8eb61b03f03177794
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNR' 'sip-files00074.tif'
aed3cb48fa0a18af346a5f122e01160e
2a9fe55a80f349abff9b7e15d613d820ec442751
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNS' 'sip-files00074.txt'
acf795f12fda2509a567b4a25f0a64e4
816604ab81c67b27de7c60bd4313b9d1cd2c3152
describe
'9465' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNT' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
3c0ee33901627906ccf58a535c71abf1
d8c4c32a75eb534129423fdd6aef3f13ad1fa856
describe
'368182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNU' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
de63cd386d134ff857a16f63c435886f
573200e858e036e751b554611bc92666eb9e0363
describe
'120815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNV' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
26d55d321dba45dfff49db814b6e2e01
a8a2d73d6d110ba5df6cd8b6e1f53e09ce23197b
describe
'38602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
421b1f3250d8de3f9c22f075055a7a6e
6283aaf9b5afc7c91790af105be52fe9539b2a41
'2011-12-11T03:25:32-05:00'
describe
'2967804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6042f6586eeb0056530d8b76954d825f
a20728be4141ef84408f84262ff7f0f799f15b5d
'2011-12-11T03:26:24-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
29a87242ce49809113c0b54a2a4fd6e9
1d536e160804e1ba8971c1ad4005116948b55d2d
describe
'8770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSNZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
b535cdc5aa96c4acb5675f8febe785e2
5072cf31db8db3a3858815bf6768a1ba7feac0c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b0eed9109f613d839cc43eafd04f6ba9
79ad74a92ed2d950e33966c8202ff9f7b7353f7f
describe
'124637' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
6a3e4a20ed115d0df8f4447b718a20bf
cab781e9382a58fa865998d024227ebe940df917
'2011-12-11T03:27:52-05:00'
describe
'39343' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a9b721d9b8c64ccbdfacd2eb9ab8efc3
329da349acad37d33418602b0c131cbf1f9396f9
'2011-12-11T03:28:51-05:00'
describe
'2970040' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
459e7dde922ca11349ac3b76e83db3a6
d23530bf6070a558ad3313aa11367fcc3f997cea
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOE' 'sip-files00076.txt'
ef5ec487a3d88d42eba53fe1579d697c
7fff53b3bf7e05dd3bbf969331f1ef06ff5816b9
'2011-12-11T03:28:56-05:00'
describe
'9367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOF' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
39e806349e1b734bc2cd4418365738f0
139a25ad8d4e10468d8df5232132d816350e2b4f
describe
'368419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d0b8415b50cbb92425ab8c483630528d
17ae3e010f12645548032220dfc9f861988354b0
'2011-12-11T03:27:03-05:00'
describe
'114937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
5b7dd4a57592fb3ec9109f29cf54770f
0a3ef7297229ede3a5bf67818b20a21428387f12
describe
'34936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOI' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
b5a2dadf73c7cd58a98a9815e5c2e922
1d8319ecb13dd6770af702229aea3e44a1ce3e80
'2011-12-11T03:27:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOJ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f0e7bfc3c6eb84523221b2bd06c7e5fe
ef5fbf541cb943b6fff23c94534dc81a6ba61cae
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOK' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8d2273df559c09ab1ea78796e64411b1
519ec1438752833fd55667e8e80564e420fd9a51
describe
'8472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOL' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2930c14d387232e003d49b7e9a530c70
c4e4d5432d2088f34e64fbc2f36f3cc6ac0be223
'2011-12-11T03:27:25-05:00'
describe
'368171' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOM' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
8d3e755f1ea4e9b3a2a4f1d04ff3f51a
eca3d12a507730f90fc3125ce77e154f3a0c0ae8
describe
'115743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSON' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6e5a3e0962a6db3f04676f7c6a75afd7
1c37d8d823ec41ad4b715501aecb15d0d17f9159
describe
'35325' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
87b1ac120472848e3355e1f0c3d85087
932c63b4fb53da74b4aced5ffabbc3d3f5a002f9
describe
'2967796' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOP' 'sip-files00078.tif'
95f4e17253bb4d289d1ff19514bd049a
0be04ee12664aa6b0d011ae941a8cefa658d6302
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
5481c5c938dadfc8cd5cd4e8ac66e114
83f30a975408051e679c4d88577c970e2eb8455c
'2011-12-11T03:30:19-05:00'
describe
'8627' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
92cec7f12d1426146c75d665cff78646
965539a5d4d325648bfcb7c25e105b936bd0f344
describe
'367805' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
89a57d6198ca89ee4cab0a8cdbfe50e7
ec65427449d2bd13e6546e2f541ec0a38545179c
describe
'98093' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
fa4180ef867ce03c588fce9ab19f052e
8162a16eb3886cf10fc1eebd01cb9e009b38d41d
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ae4a3f3adc721bcb9e8e452e0f1ced2d
922c86c19dac4aac8ac3cb7b18147d1118febc70
describe
'2966960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
77a0405838c1277f7cc502bea5aa9aa3
1d5ae11a44828ac4f8bb92d450f8bfadc1dc1946
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6d8612a56c2d5ecbf17669339d69e00c
d4fedfaed6180e18b8817985acdb91ff4821f1e5
describe
'7620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5218fb33bb15292c281ee11fe3ac6c39
4a5839acc1e3f1d4a1c0d56079aa40330c4106b5
describe
'368336' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
407f8c5bba7f9b745d77d16eafb3b1fd
1d2ed52a51ad176f84fa4a50d4ee1dd83557629f
describe
'85939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSOZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
9536e693db8d8f296f869d1116813b1d
f583b882585550859273f3eb135b43692dc80885
'2011-12-11T03:25:36-05:00'
describe
'25832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
1482eebd21045681d089e5274f5ba9ea
307b2653f80ba7af19d4d99f9634519953bd7214
describe
'2968540' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPB' 'sip-files00080.tif'
1978d1adc2492057b2414d96640ccc0e
6c4ad8ab329eeee52ab7a69a8f1f653c8ca71e33
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPC' 'sip-files00080.txt'
d030e1e3423c1a54de126b74d5ef2804
3eff53b84f59af7a06543197fa8b666e75d0cf67
describe
'6618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
052140ea2bdd1b415bdf660e3e1e1f95
4641139ad510bdaa6a2582f440cae658762ded40
describe
'368433' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPE' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
9adc586f2a0677b9b3f22a2728fdad14
7d4d605e2177dc06bb9b50020959d46f5cf15822
describe
'122139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPF' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
cbd3a66a4329340dba65bc78ab7c2ad5
f0595fd6a54b75efc8a438e83f99110a73396f8a
describe
'38515' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
fe5ff81fe0ea8aa06a73919e89eab5cb
bbb5e69b870e5c96c1cc13e588171eca5317982c
describe
'2970172' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e54f5d71857c0a15b380ca6244e25939
62f7bc74b1f527309bc5d034fa27ae084cad77c6
'2011-12-11T03:27:27-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
72e399397420c8e54f469adea4521292
967f1aef1ca613b8dc34e8e8d9a1d197a1b4c713
describe
'9324' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
be6c94ea70fb1d95354a6a6eac30dfdc
13cf415eb166ebdbdb2ed3170689822a6f6bf625
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
76a681b8240423baa1c9ab98617335e1
9639f183c5910e3be191e948fab988399bd1b6a9
describe
'122497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
f48c3795345bf569bfbf2d80ca14bf3e
b901817da3fbc2c7c615cf4f43dab24af7439de0
describe
'39870' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPM' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
890c0d7e6614fdd017c98e7380b84bf9
216365d3e8b3db6b78adaf8d26817bb1b428d9aa
'2011-12-11T03:26:12-05:00'
describe
'2970616' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPN' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d373a59a9d82c1b2585ac9327fa1a080
d7e3cef92cea4107ea35352eb176b8e0205688a3
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPO' 'sip-files00082.txt'
9d796eadb3555df6f1a475acec24f838
ee0c5b8b25f4ff6a50953d62348be05e50916c7a
describe
'9958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPP' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c60aaea04f9e55d2e504d6d21f0dfd89
19b8e44b934202f19b22e37623efa543ddbacd8d
describe
'368188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
83c70cf45335bde68f6ce5cc927a8b18
3e393383d9e13fc8f06a8b4c990d188ef2701371
describe
'121788' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPR' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
aa890aa478902e81cd89481b04d7a6f4
c750f2e3a7990dfcd88cfc382e1a678cc5ed7632
describe
'39958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPS' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
14f6fb67602755dae36ed3ccb378bdfb
3d25ae473a74d39731f63f66a58b5c70036f8c41
describe
'2967976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPT' 'sip-files00083.tif'
97d7d64d6fc6f010a00f02c6b669d0d6
b657af21afebc663c39517c8c09aead45c2dc42b
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPU' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8798d8bd66f82984124019c85a333b68
a5be5b9b812eb80e518901e42f797a12c5c44ba9
'2011-12-11T03:28:14-05:00'
describe
'9470' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPV' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ea403bda4c16712bff5c1cda6b4e2121
7b97ae7e5dd40c77016d165baf5554ed9c1804f1
'2011-12-11T03:26:34-05:00'
describe
'368375' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPW' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
267275fb330af269d02c85287178b6c4
e415fe705252c6f91c75a1a91335468e5cb9dfc4
describe
'109545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPX' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
c88f07307629dcaf8b3aed0e9828196e
0051610aa27e7b31417859d5946d7ac70e27b1fc
'2011-12-11T03:27:53-05:00'
describe
'35708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPY' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
b97ac203df252dc84787e9df735041ca
0c8506582d20eb8dde13b501a399b07ee03b776c
describe
'2969908' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSPZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
59da8487306dbdf527314a1cbef3e18f
56fbbdd7d6e5e56d31e5907167dcedd1dae2dd12
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
a15dbb72ff64d406ed5e8298e81faa57
d4b99ff7b32391e98bae262f6ed2dc844ae6c935
describe
'8938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQB' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
9ef9f665c3552d5f67d938e4b38fd918
0f3c3ac3ac78203f9592db4d049f96e2d83b0c64
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQC' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
26b85e3c4d8f29ad73b10f9627e2980a
02bcac822de8a84a754d70d6039055f38f479c01
describe
'118223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1a1755264a708f8b312b915aa7553c32
f55089fddca503e71c9dd891b157e8688501b6f3
'2011-12-11T03:28:49-05:00'
describe
'39109' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQE' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
e306d38f5b882b4a3037f892cb495c4d
7d8393a7d139a73545101ed3bcfb904da6f2c0cb
describe
'2970184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQF' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4b304a8a705b26ef4d4ad038b59e86aa
f2af33d9bf8c33d4f72980a226473ce03892a251
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQG' 'sip-files00085.txt'
894e0ef97e1688a7b3303a3905247bdd
7fc1b46fb2af3efb551d9fa8fb48e140f481f811
describe
'9464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQH' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
c1fff34ca756e7b3192cd5a4a904e1e5
cfddc2e03234c9681c5fc3345858c808bb80fca3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQI' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
3f299c53451c8ac5223ee372d9eae6eb
9e539d5a06cbf877265eebf2b3428333cf2aec81
describe
'125044' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQJ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ad4bdfaa303e2274b645b1705bf2dda8
826c3ea25e51347354d27b08f439ee4a7ea3357c
describe
'38969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
2d39898e28655f38f1e0a5585f589b80
789a67443fc9aae28ff94443d1c0bc707f384f7f
describe
'2970100' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
aefd4e66858d2816e00c79020d67ba04
b5b88d8a0c857b3b55a14427df24131c6691117c
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
4985c8ccbe05b8de1722c67c102effc7
d9950bbe0c43fa5489d777c3ad5421f35f8b9203
describe
'9395' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b57d12bd9eda9ef6a7176c47a4182ba7
c1c4dd8716b9340584032867dfc3075257f94deb
'2011-12-11T03:26:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
117c9d1831be5a76ba1d3184fb5d335b
1aa0f64cbbfcbe28d93ac43fba1dc62abc580ba1
describe
'122998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
901637ff2509b8e8b2b032a4a8a2c5d3
6258c2f18b1e50591ea579f81e12c849b187eb26
describe
'39768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b6547d5f8744e98d326758212b136ec4
aa3d216051e6fd80f1c71c088ea1350eeb679f65
describe
'2969880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
34724cb9036216e15fa71a0066d48dea
fb98ff367687415891e20d3e72676734b7cdb30a
'2011-12-11T03:28:18-05:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
7a08429b5e372abdafd00fbb044670ad
afef19134de39457e0cdd9e8b0b3d9be5d3b8ab6
describe
'9456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
75bbb500c77a4381a271df1d74eab9dc
d79d9cbbbff5a0e477813fbbd10a2ad977f83a5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQU' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
7313c0928f44307c53bff3b4cc94e2a7
caf6e56813dec8d7c8d4d14e39e6e69f40b65f55
describe
'109403' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQV' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f7e7cee84c9ec8baf4c31740b5031368
89c3ef5efeabe609cfb03141270e526f90f34690
describe
'34410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQW' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
7a0c8a8224364d5a826c28d4242ccb73
3181e7091f2c25f9d34a878b1dcfccb63a823e5b
'2011-12-11T03:28:19-05:00'
describe
'2969704' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQX' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7ff5644f2c80bb6c62cbfdef3eda86ef
a4429528be03382d5e1f67af3f7f4824f2516f87
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQY' 'sip-files00088.txt'
56eda3810d7c760547be3738000fe9e9
de14a87743473ea024a5e2a819b2acf0657f5c62
'2011-12-11T03:28:43-05:00'
describe
'8543' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSQZ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4c30eb30be6d8934f65e93c6ee9ada15
21f9821f698d6b6303b72e4294fe28852db5b2d4
'2011-12-11T03:28:30-05:00'
describe
'368412' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
b16ca1a5e020702b1e3c1f5ea4e536aa
d182163f486989e5d8a37bb42b33cc90679eb110
describe
'87813' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRB' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
17c4cef741793c1f5fe98c9e35b3b038
57eb69d5b6a070e655cc50c6bef1e2e13194fc01
'2011-12-11T03:30:08-05:00'
describe
'27792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRC' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
8fd06d48099d6e987fbd55aa91c3c494
91fd6af8de5a49557e5a643aa1e85af52de2ba12
describe
'2968720' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRD' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0635ac47ad1ec376379206db893b1992
ba9d2612ce445220dbc8438b0b9081bddbd5a6ec
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRE' 'sip-files00089.txt'
adceb257461012df9db390dfcdcf5e02
71c4bf87a933011754a4a9da80fbd78991dec17d
describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRF' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
773c3f6f3792a98bfc0a2b33f65783fd
3c55cb0def8af0b55c41c34d6d5a52a7510a9cec
describe
'368120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRG' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
5b81c839062106c665de2e3db217b28b
395e8ba6c01cb2f27c692b581116962926789227
'2011-12-11T03:27:54-05:00'
describe
'124602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRH' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
547ea1292e11d603c575954f23fb6300
6f74aa52b3c93c50174dcf700684b90d00fb7255
describe
'39581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
530869d0b846205b3ff9648d2d892343
4b3410a208f24928a516798ced5bb8836a965f0d
describe
'2967868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
2b72c9315757564e5fbc98765ef0b0f4
2bbaad7e5827043ad89ec7ef9b29a87b52922fe5
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
689771416686a40a02eb0b6a917d7a7d
1a46f92a1ea1987e388e8dfe75f9000f3548d388
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRL' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
2099defd448bf64722d51642750b306b
eae31f77237feebbea181bbb2b07a6d84216dcd4
describe
'368431' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
8803e9e8cf000313c2731db6348e86aa
c0ed4bd72d9bb62dc11eb2bf75c623fb594c51fe
'2011-12-11T03:27:38-05:00'
describe
'118541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
50824aef5e1b75b80dbb86f600652c1f
eb621c30d481eb6c20744ee18f81eacbeb01a09c
describe
'37539' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRO' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
f3f7611e1f4581f4cff48d476adee28f
0e598325af2b6231c414e5c4b33486f79c354526
'2011-12-11T03:29:04-05:00'
describe
'2970088' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1697e704633a7f32a23758feda59d233
76d22eb7df6ba63ab9497e31f683c71fa9377d1c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRQ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
96f62c202a6d910f017a2dfda3c17ca6
6a2f1f96cb4873361e0f2400cb58bfc8975762de
describe
'9240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRR' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
98e97a8680cbe4119a0e1616ce940d3e
bfa886aa9174b7b3681a46cacd2776c0157dfcb7
'2011-12-11T03:25:52-05:00'
describe
'368445' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
f9001d6d491084436eabe6c7749cfc83
94caf3a6649b67f1b61fe4cbddbecc769e5e4d45
describe
'121475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRT' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9429fe9b1d17c07c0a879dd25413ed91
b40c8e208715d6d421d8cdcb031781416cf4749c
describe
'38303' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRU' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a504161f05c0cb72c775421e860f3347
a99e0350a3d42ddc83f446d640c8ab2103c891ef
'2011-12-11T03:26:05-05:00'
describe
'2970116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRV' 'sip-files00092.tif'
e102350bc7a8b4aa07c4573b8b48d94b
87f4cf3e1e8c0c1c42e0de350374e8804a93eb16
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
613737ae73f46e479b19222fe13322b3
3f74ab8dab66afc6ca55e09973cd0f53886f60af
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
19e4c3fd961968a16024a8a4b28a70e5
0298c9df3a2ddb134a277ebd1da1d165a41b7fd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
355ea98b7763fc90ce4c21dbb5cc001a
9245ed68e80905abb3f9ea2d42160879156213c6
describe
'115960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSRZ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8559424eb0f9953ea559851ebadbf001
891f1c8d72098e570d8a51f1828d5249dbd361c6
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSA' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
9647f75e3716b88fca63bb3477aa560b
907e02c40208fd5a732e6be52f144f5b78d55449
describe
'2969888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSB' 'sip-files00093.tif'
b3db8d1a901d74f4a941e62c9ec4bf73
458596a3dcd3899250a56f543502b0938339b7d4
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSC' 'sip-files00093.txt'
7d6cf5d74587e514b264f6275ee069e3
e8cf2f9fab37755b171f09ca20612f09bca3a1ef
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSD' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
7c230fc32f53e28730a417eeca7e9f92
b45de98e7b5cc30041eb6a32a152b3026876a998
'2011-12-11T03:26:44-05:00'
describe
'368392' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSE' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
085114fe08078863bcb0eeb45a250476
a83f3094571fb3627770dd3f7d4b9c32961ff9e9
describe
'111668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSF' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
df0177c05e4fa1c876f98ab1f999ecb8
6ac4d29a7408f2e96a7288973bb90dbe92b09b96
describe
'34655' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
0ac61213c924f39aa1212ed4a6a04ab5
7d6e08dd12188fa42eeb16de1874fa36b40d4b2c
describe
'2969816' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d6cd4c94627b9e3dee78c566fda793e5
3ef90329993a7ec9e34db515591184b29a921a80
'2011-12-11T03:27:28-05:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
efd5799a38b7c8995e216f2f7093e6fb
f6666289418371f6b61d4138f6f06043894136bc
'2011-12-11T03:26:58-05:00'
describe
'8581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
25300c9761c8663756e33e577988d9aa
67ad07c89723d44fb21abc1f1733683f6f01f55d
'2011-12-11T03:27:07-05:00'
describe
'368424' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0ec2ef8b51febf2f8f38b6767abac46f
b70c61c85c9d5991485d6c5ea5152bc5e9a80269
describe
'109798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
63a47379928fad147c56997b89ee97ae
912b56ba1c9648262d83bff5416c06a22ec3ad18
describe
'35419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
704739757833363793ed083611c213c8
ec897ff366346e2cb03b3537fde8c907c2b6f354
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
80999af89b172e60b1781d284fd0116c
9bdb16d5ace1cf0358c18a9aebf7d9230320622d
'2011-12-11T03:25:42-05:00'
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
0446e7c410ed51108ca8a14698248ee7
f971d61bf064157e3d31e3ade7d34e5bcd8b8dc8
describe
'8861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSP' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
a1c9b3bc4b99f0c83e24e7ff8603952d
2983f3fe45013b581c791f081156728ec55ffbf9
describe
'368368' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSQ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f92fdd0fe3740905244b713f2ce70c79
c49ee33eedd7590b115a2ea26872fc38770626d7
describe
'82369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSR' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a66c0f2068285321c03d2f8a25085c36
3380a0d3080addf62ca3074d60e3c8f795b6ca25
describe
'25211' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSS' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
e05706483b7196bf759e38f9cf969905
ac613fd6dcc5ea30ac7d6101526f1b3db6f0beec
describe
'2968560' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSST' 'sip-files00096.tif'
80e65b8a7850b011803148f3f456693d
ff8e56b42880c9ae05134315025f6da065de4097
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSU' 'sip-files00096.txt'
549e70b34301375e0f05e666e6d71b1b
6fdfe139ff127531bb84d8837d5412379ba97f45
describe
'6571' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSV' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
701f1eadefffd31f6bf196669cc05b6c
484563fade67c5577acbd683c0c2989d17b0a90d
'2011-12-11T03:26:08-05:00'
describe
'368378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSW' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
4555f6489bea184ac72052f0d8e110c1
03b87f27691c18ea1c6f1a2cf839f6d79dbfbcfe
describe
'88861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSX' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
efd0686eaccebef2274d28e29eac8c5f
2b9e35ea9a151747b7a22c42111a6d37e9e8ed0b
describe
'26896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
6ac7bc4c12404bd70fa78b06f090d447
191311c003f4140bad06e5b9d807a17c19856f3a
describe
'2968464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSSZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9f9d8f4ccbe5605a0f6bd671ac614c6d
1da934510b15c51b69d118b6e0e7bfce20aae39e
'2011-12-11T03:28:13-05:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
30e7657d0b73b693c45300bd63be842d
71d7504e77d770a29f9c60141a4ea581a8fa0e1b
'2011-12-11T03:26:29-05:00'
describe
'6467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
01ddf68868ff2c0629d971e49bcb89ac
ef7325b536e5bcb139ac50791a07be626766bd52
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
816846c10ce97a398f2b144cc06aad30
f53919c46ede84f9e5cd2016ad610315a4a7d29c
describe
'117915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
607fac6b5d02057576a73a864b644012
ada11a0d4b3c4851b3598c5e78b59850ecc9a120
describe
'36458' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
573667a785ff3999fa3d0ef28c8db284
f57d1f8988ebbd3bc537ad1a1133333df6966e63
describe
'2969760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2129f82d63bc37abdb14e1308e28aaef
ed2e9e632e1a647fba86815d7417d483627b73b1
'2011-12-11T03:29:57-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
ef56ad713ee877de981316e7eef777ef
8f0750db578de8e0d804f5a5b586556d1438486f
describe
'8878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0a05833328de7eb0abcca8b1937e1f37
429d1a02b2af9e6a91c0ad167bd09f148dafff7e
describe
'368453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
baf7c139f71cbf80b482f203d893c990
7dcb976192a5e76ac0b486f928e8c28060b30a5a
describe
'122613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
be3d5fd63ccaae8d5c9661312c32cb45
e161a7fb6aa365e5eb79e2a877d73ca9ebc20bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
28aaa59b00b67c2c99e59e763107fedc
9efc9b373b12a37e6554df1a52013ef7fccd2d88
describe
'2969688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e795b9b6ac84c5502b00be5bbddc84a3
0c2395c6543fcbdf2025e42def49441899d797bf
'2011-12-11T03:28:28-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
fca44599d606a26270b7818dd7ff5ba5
06ca81d117f7244ded2753fba41ff99b903e7821
describe
'8912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTN' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
c5cfa3c07aa15aa5f34e0b064a631c8d
48c71dd392e70b706b7ca6a3b8502ff10c92c873
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
20a287fac79c912e21f150189a88ffd2
03fce9b7326a5a6aa466bb0d56501d506c2a90b6
describe
'112137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTP' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
6dce454a34664b74363cc6e09eeebff2
8f18b5edd6618e117a81a59a2e7a94b5423a0508
describe
'35312' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTQ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
82c86d6e3435aa45d347ad19b99a4de4
cf64c0e1f107480a307bf377a43665963957e3c6
describe
'2969608' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTR' 'sip-files00100.tif'
ef42d5689b68b8682f81527409ade44a
1216d2071f407609def261379c2f46b9d1c88584
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
33f65f4b16f73a628f7200d2c7da7c9a
a6857b658bb361e6b71ccc98cde81f26595f5627
describe
'8821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTT' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
522b56e459120845cd0d980db0c895de
873c306d54f9996b8d1b800f6dcf520736a4ad51
describe
'368136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
08e94dfa32fe57de5105ef3046cced75
3747930d8d7ab46987e5150e8974f73a2b1bebcf
describe
'116636' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
ff41d334d67261fd5dfceffd84e73602
760421e82e3afebf63dc3b0428c45559294a199c
describe
'37550' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
01f985939282d8eda1fbf4acdf8e6376
65a2f1359ffc77e50c3394e39cc31a5a67222bd5
describe
'2967728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
975c79071a8e175a60627dac7d375973
aa863c7a9232025b8f87211726fa51ecc77dbee8
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
216dafa2fcad78e7e4f91408fc211a92
5f585b835eacb5433e6344edc496c69562ccb45f
'2011-12-11T03:29:11-05:00'
describe
'9252' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
cab85d9cbd5f41e8794cc9964501b475
a9ef7df819b95d371815c1ad8fb9e1eefc0dae3f
'2011-12-11T03:30:30-05:00'
describe
'368416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
4f829edccf6bd0ca798617bcf9e0f0cf
695df43c2346b67998fe7ce93a1d184a8e79694e
describe
'114242' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
4190c96bc1952f1f33fa2bbf94fc151c
9d9775b595823d30c44bd8a54cd2603cd3fa6fae
describe
'36273' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUC' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
fe0eaa7ee7baf6a86f4c2039a3973270
d7a48f280a847a8a67f32d791e72568f73bd4d61
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
e0ee1103f065d84d62b29e642f9818ad
1ae62d39bfd3945d24d9f9687518c4bedda021b2
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
3134aae1e24cda540f4f84a0f046d32f
d86e96745a454586d90a4407079bfb8689732bef
'2011-12-11T03:25:56-05:00'
describe
'9044' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUF' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
0ed5d56e58703521acb0c01b095563ba
8eabd31a47da4a4a47ec2a38ce2ab42b94464cb1
describe
'367936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
796da04053581e9bd0a3202788387049
1db29aafc8de2d40b3e2c9e6af9da798f46f4390
describe
'121832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e6376ac67797c44db99f147ae0ea130d
b76179447cb887282d3b705ff5ab9d398125d3b2
describe
'38258' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
fd15b57d0ca4189ce677d7986459c5e3
a01d2d2f95c50ac988ed89427aad3a227fb0da54
describe
'2968656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
39e1539dc3d335b214dec2113605fdc0
2b2fc4d0aa37ac58d225947c3c3e8fc4a2801458
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
f8292afd5451188c55307a598a77d1d8
7b7235f297c46d063838227aac32e5c0992f13aa
describe
'9189' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUL' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e913edff6c4ec4c5ef71d44eaf045ec9
1af3d50c60630a23e86b55b4d0150468b16bba99
describe
'368401' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUM' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6895f3b7063e24415c40859e1d1e0680
a62cf811173d19ba118ebbee90674b8e4dcab215
describe
'115381' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUN' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
b43daa0c8e99cc4237235bb1d501eab9
27c61b01d82e6940ae291938b1834e5fa7da58fb
describe
'38211' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2da734fe56064b28e0375830d2349377
c2b59546495c017d839ba91459d624539fe50a42
'2011-12-11T03:28:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
c543734bab0b5b16c68f1bac4d792ea7
f1693eea1ae521f8b3845aca3c6f115a43a8186a
'2011-12-11T03:28:23-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a9a64e284171177a3d7ca986081b5e9e
75cd47eb955e203572e3734776e705769ed76d9d
'2011-12-11T03:30:32-05:00'
describe
'9400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
89d66dd50d97fb0fd2521305af477d83
564d42fb9ff690e35e1ab0675b7ea1f5973de623
'2011-12-11T03:28:22-05:00'
describe
'368455' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
1f662b32dc685788ca844dfd0aaef658
82b0361eb90b9f8cbf6639079978121f1583f33e
'2011-12-11T03:28:31-05:00'
describe
'112143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
9b3e44e1f94f9a6a4a96280f5acddc94
39b799e68fdfe0bfad03fdbac85e457498af56f0
describe
'36213' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
1734bc8ff7df0db2c5b89df6851af636
11fb371873ff0cf16da7389e8cfa675f9031dea5
describe
'2970272' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
a13271cdae7b90b69d864d059ca224c1
67d21c5fc99d8e73b9ca3363914ed5f7bb2493a2
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ca92c81553cadd93aa1c967f88255652
ce737da3c0f1b285e63051bc15c5a894e62555b2
'2011-12-11T03:29:33-05:00'
describe
'9266' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
087a4e3f3bd81c106f3c8245931fd354
96fa6520e07e9dc593cb94435d8c50499139b210
describe
'368166' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUY' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
35a98d4e167773568052a82da1a36018
c98cf70e5727c502002aa4a99555a804c6d0c895
describe
'115050' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d94ee53af916529755892b83cefffe5a
1764481a4e8f4bdcc712a48bb573ad7e480a7c4f
'2011-12-11T03:27:13-05:00'
describe
'35946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
0d444d24a18fa307bf5ad72d07a6d298
6d12231beecfcbd63fa3e8562c2ba609ffa8b7da
describe
'2967904' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVB' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8b25ee4ce94523f1a99d055c74b94bcc
46946218d3c3d6b505077ef30e13e625709659a0
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
0acde30c152c10816ddcd5d5c975414d
5dcb403ed464e277c9af0df7e87ee94fe9bb5a3b
describe
'9072' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
6528258a3128bf1a1198d4838fb10e89
163760275beba4bfb6a181bf4d592c58d96cc8b9
'2011-12-11T03:28:07-05:00'
describe
'368403' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
bf5bedb5773aa4a172f6c993b7075b92
6a7aa85f71fe485a1fc5471a5d45b040a769a0a3
describe
'120495' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
57248562dd2c40cc371d224c3896a298
f4d0a5565ac278d8aab392e7163200ff9ec015c3
describe
'38745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
e00ec307793ceab90270e640008821fd
dc12a3b62877074abd539869d9bc5d5a79f48fcc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
f9bf9e872d4a619043bcfc7713164f5b
2ee5bfba65b9a1872d4abf8a5c2ab9dcd1b6e6d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a14581472ec5d80dffb1d39d8a6f16d3
21265ab24c08ef1e82904d5529ef53fd826898ee
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
43eb8a3f2707e62441d00c22683207d9
2fbb1a7d5d9e12c7cb3f7a22747babdb88831c85
describe
'368258' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d156b8e8566dce59cf0108f1c17620c6
97e028b287c108da03f84ac7d6400cbe011e0a7e
describe
'83707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b98091753bd3bf5a77d57bba2cbf1aa0
a3ff8f6b49d12422b5b710bf653154000aec3e05
describe
'25428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
7ef07d7fac49b1e5ea745d4666259945
dd52ce60c0a43cf56194f647155e78b8e4cc20de
describe
'2968372' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
d1739e913109d23b87c8e9de47b35020
a64bcbee7f8225a12aa66957af4bc28f7cf27e10
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f1690d2dcfd5274ca3dc67aa92a789ce
e8b34a0324ab36a9d2e6af01ea27f3f341f5057e
describe
'6519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
15c04afda16fad8d57704cdfeb013e81
a3d2e24b781b80f476f70b7492947ddbdd9f6256
'2011-12-11T03:29:09-05:00'
describe
'368206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
c250bf63a926550aa7d844df530ed933
0f7cebe98253b2bdc22398330983fe4fe59547f8
describe
'90211' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
94d4cb7be145f0832c79c5d329ecdab2
3aa47c53ead2d167d5d467e69fd200e951177809
'2011-12-11T03:27:04-05:00'
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVS' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
7fd08a456b1a973e7bb8b0eb178c730a
65be073a448f22eb3a20c41f084927cd709c419e
describe
'2967440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVT' 'sip-files00109.tif'
43032f77a155f4575b4771cb938b7ef5
cff22c51e3394bd49b628bba7468994f13ba34d5
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVU' 'sip-files00109.txt'
fd9e30b3d238f3bbdb5f465e88964ab5
ef1499a4e1b733172a9b27f88834276c72671e79
describe
'6946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVV' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
10d5a28b5303e2cc45cc4e3d54cf7317
5f8502912bba8a8707148449b89ada36580a492d
describe
'368385' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVW' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
ed6955718a9f60246f6c882f6157151b
c6436686852604d55cc904b2dfa142158e531ab4
describe
'119889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVX' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
85cd6a54b674ee21b56c2ebabf783bdc
0c0849e88bb76d2f01bd30c0165b5ff3faa95e03
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
401b65e30b1a9ec4363e111265cf9581
26f4d2678873e0ca555d6e5b81b7a436b5167a34
describe
'2970060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
4928aeb3c9ef7fbb5ea2fcb34a34e6d7
dc18a37d17c60bc16806369e35468c3d791c73ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f5bd4f17b70374709d09fafe190bfbde
e9ac275292c788a50d0e4e9418cd86b880727d68
describe
'9373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWB' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
d341873e8d0e5a6843bfc0af70534440
4b51efe554d638793a9ff006750bd214033dd293
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWC' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e2af53d9a72723f898f5659e52abf000
4ba45c48f9c41e3a30869f13749049366310e9d3
describe
'115235' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWD' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
5820e7a6137569a1e7e3a2e87231fdc0
5f897b2979f76a4281f41ba06c727aed0fe3c9e7
describe
'36378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWE' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
6b81bd0c7a177a3483f8a0980030fcf9
2b9d413e2bda01a3699903eac8a3aa92894b132c
describe
'2970092' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1fc5c03c7146f086d3a26f09d49657cc
68b343bbae67c40080c007a24fff3eb67f70cfc1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
60a596b4edd8aa773754e12163470e77
ccda2cfe63c172f5cc65bdbd462453e469424f63
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
6a991b994fe2010b0c547c3e120fac25
195533a6f6bddeb441965a26e2ed54e03b25f46d
'2011-12-11T03:28:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
c88e3b5fa05425fe09926f3c337ae0dc
1a00a23316ece1adae548e7a888400de9383688a
describe
'111880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9ecfe531164c5102ef82422650ab72ca
4ed485d5fa351260622ec0752f0629e4e8953351
describe
'36739' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
19450d8f167db45f6e2190ccf3d58edd
77bd38c62e2aeb6e6b5d9a1348cfad3a4a0484b7
describe
'2970200' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
80651218db6b92dbfd1205cce15255c3
7846c6df366ae447bfb045e63bd0f578ff985888
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b92b1a9284e85bf46090078bef7da57b
14e8032be292373a7104466d6782e0631e76f851
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ecd52dd98577d1f30f1de387d1303350
548aa857d34ed79e05632ba944bc3b03b0a50f9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
bc2aaea6b8b5d2b4849f9ae29f627736
e0b2e429af031262adfb42ffac55be1d6c994469
describe
'107872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
76f3ef314767d098da7fbe9d4024bc9a
1b66309befd5a026beeec71f345fb51155cd06f4
describe
'36107' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
a100be123a83f294308347f7e99a04f3
2cb8c8f0b014783445e327c27f11413dc53e9c72
describe
'2969976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWR' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ddfbcd31e43fcbf28511391d8f65eddd
9f19188d4db102617586e672b85a3500779c6b1f
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWS' 'sip-files00113.txt'
4e4fe4040d198661c15c004dd7dc4323
cb8457adb5c78fece9bf53503852480b6b6bbb05
describe
'8787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3e53b773bf089887fcfc90038e90a38a
ce58e240cb2b7049a0ac699b5b8714af4dc75400
'2011-12-11T03:25:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWU' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
fc574506cbaf72a2a08c9700aea45cb1
fce7b1ab68fd21aab5c1abeff68f65a38b523f00
'2011-12-11T03:29:10-05:00'
describe
'121454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
56d009ab61f10a3c105c32c6bd7f37aa
258a63408cd3dcaf01319399ff865d94d3a336f0
describe
'37406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
7955e400dc18ecd448725b285277a798
efb4b0dbbd54f36da1b0931e2a96a5920f25f943
describe
'2970188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
fdf410052d0174d47c85dc37c57ba239
5896c8035ba69ba5fce0b7e32517df6dc3df51b1
'2011-12-11T03:25:54-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b7b661f215c7980f15ab11104b31b9e2
f6e002804bc438a79056094b829934cefa870ab7
describe
'9283' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
d264b1ffdfeb9a9b80909f421001658b
919d635c059734a3201c58b1a8b2df61eb23fdf5
describe
'368428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
16208d12478f77afb004c35b918d756f
cf5ae73813f813f5bc7cb94c80164537785a0085
describe
'124053' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXB' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
51eafdc93ed0d8b60ecdd555cf4b6647
3b0fc74861f9096ce1ea24d756c27b3a79490ecd
describe
'38936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXC' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ca05f986710d01e764ccf576a5d245be
1614f55c05f76c4bb05cae1af24dd9de323e9aa9
describe
'2969972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXD' 'sip-files00115.tif'
961c8dcd048521b13b8f8127699de741
e27db575a8a92ceecaef2e06a9be7cf48a093591
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXE' 'sip-files00115.txt'
8c9ff237e841cc586399075ef08df6ce
6107b9b6e82bde419608b977af4e919b563d6ce3
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXF' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
2e00fa68b7edd924f527e50567e6b8bb
abb8b0f1e5a03acea64c47d2d5cfad9d1ecc0cce
'2011-12-11T03:29:45-05:00'
describe
'368411' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXG' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
49cabd02c0d9e939d83239e4f9e0b957
ff8561a94f55363a56e4d218764f8e02f38dbcd5
describe
'119988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXH' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
bffe7a740112315254560e6862f3f731
6c912c9fad53b447a9046ee9fee1a064be57ea9a
describe
'39104' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
991994669f1560c660dc9c369f0d34c1
3df62aec943d72876ae0aa36d79911245bff1fed
describe
'2970300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0cc38a53d0aeabafccdc8f640804b30c
daa34d0d6cadcd8e28fa0bd1f77f3765ea53b368
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXK' 'sip-files00116.txt'
5dcdd6d14bbe1d6e31c0af11fd78947c
6ddbe84bacf9f998645ba3dd7ab6abd4da2860f8
'2011-12-11T03:30:21-05:00'
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXL' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
929bd7d04884baee453253f086eaa935
7a65d26a4d389549b8886087c298a891ed0add45
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ca80c491c9abb2d202f2fe812bf7cb8a
4a9f90ab02dcca8b801a7004fd1946759f0a4593
describe
'114736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXN' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
0298ecfc6ff183339644bfad0dd338c4
9b8dc95eaac084f896a489855b00aa3316d2c340
'2011-12-11T03:26:38-05:00'
describe
'38330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXO' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e979700ec036311dfe93aba80d47adda
2220a5e9ba2cc3a1a861e9abc1ab57d5d40f34cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
3cd4503a68c6394778e4aed38751c68a
fc17ba0145129db590e39d486e79217719525649
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
f82fb6c34e795614fdd152afe29ed64e
6113068af019a45754e1c12517018d8d18e3ec19
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXR' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
cd1f0c9e72580c32901a12420b6612bb
0a965e8f0e571bceb64ab1fbdcb883edfbe4082b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
b298144c8803becdbc5d47f356959c4a
80d0e5dcf65b93094dcf0fbe5f25160bb2410466
describe
'123777' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXT' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
8acf377277d27cb1f5131517e40538d2
319575b92eb3e1210b854b1f5deab36aa8945fee
describe
'39709' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXU' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
7ad3f292c57e4f01017f948a87872815
4430f4c624a91edbd853a4358556abce727cc527
describe
'2970204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXV' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ee66142233424ff78c1a90d24c9b28cf
92fd852f6eeb13133c02e1529148b40d184dd46a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXW' 'sip-files00118.txt'
7af5319cdc0aabfea873df117c140e15
78e23de0655f4d0f4df94f04e66be4548c9c7600
'2011-12-11T03:28:20-05:00'
describe
'9639' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXX' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
b5062b45a2d47a9f9b1370915d1b3038
faebbd42e5c20411fbf91101eace244ae76b6f08
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXY' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
59e4e96b853ecfc5b0ab7cdc90d6d2bf
b6b207312e79d43b4f2c308b7e9d963d284047e8
describe
'67991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
0aeeab3f91d91becdb2bd34ad06432d5
b6a8904b2801a2fc5d3e91d845eb0eea212e44ef
describe
'19489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYA' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
d238c45e82c10ba7503d082e2f3f2a36
3e52f3810992281d879e9218a551f1874139d15e
describe
'2967388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYB' 'sip-files00119.tif'
bab2d4cb86ed96c39cf9c84ba293f5e4
6f0a02535ae76a460219c0f6be8a28a85b2a94a6
describe
'694' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYC' 'sip-files00119.txt'
05f36b7bd71837e30534a472e49eba11
8883906e667399d59321ae3cfc64df9824196490
describe
'4761' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYD' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
4667aa225e52653a38292d1e56131728
fca693889b1dd2aa95dd85eb69357c21d6c90084
describe
'368343' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYE' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c912f30dd3cab98de98ebd0b6aac8828
e08c8b9252ad1768d466163604451ef30e7c17a9
describe
'88116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYF' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
24a7242d609d13f457a7013410bc3e7f
5eb2e6c62f0beff6abdd2dc8ac54e04705d09fc3
describe
'27443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYG' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e847062591c791c935d6b2b5e18a6e62
6d302c22014c150b288bf4c71296786a8318167f
describe
'2968668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYH' 'sip-files00120.tif'
35afab94db8172398ade5ebb5b7b3b7e
38a1e648fdf04832f66f092dfa656c5e826ecfb5
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYI' 'sip-files00120.txt'
afad0dcb458dea58e4df0ecb66fbc152
7851816939a9521338a5b2a2c82e39f4263fca92
'2011-12-11T03:26:04-05:00'
describe
'6780' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
e78a712a4dcca62d7c3d4b74bd624511
294d8df6d73347c1bd2a6f67616631088b07bef5
describe
'368441' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYK' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
4dcc37321060807b21e29e4fdc383f87
4484c13e5e5ce87998e59608544f202a99c6285d
describe
'102956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYL' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
aed5a492c6043906c96494c5d803d7a8
a7142e6c855248d5ca3f095e4dc1662c1a61a1ca
describe
'33002' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYM' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c0a3b44b1f4231769671e1b40bfafed4
5674da66d17894567eabca455c5b1603a6c5973d
describe
'2969772' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYN' 'sip-files00121.tif'
12c0c37ac0a50c236f1863d5d8b9ffe1
2e1ac12fc7619112da1204e75c56113ce1c66ffe
'2011-12-11T03:30:26-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYO' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e96144d46de7aad424c912c7ee1f62ae
302c176f4540401dfa10770ea36651e5de5808bf
describe
'8519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYP' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0b01e90599fee9f81e815fba107cf5d0
52270c4466067230a51cd2bcfa8c97b0e6deea79
describe
'368408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a11d9672c9a7ea40fb60e239e41ddf23
08c239d9ebcd3a9b3f768e0ac528a9af24a33293
describe
'117826' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYR' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
fbc60565598aaf1641b048ccc700f5ab
31bca047a4fece1f9fc7da4f89b0cd435716858c
describe
'36563' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
8a3cc546c415e0d4a028bf68531e96fd
dbbee1d8ab36dd233ee1c512ccc1fe67ec625885
describe
'2969828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6a192620c0b6585fedca195e5abd1deb
9d231cbaf7a4ea20a6c638efa9270bb922a5208d
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYU' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4f191fb7dfcc863a19610654ce44607d
76f68eda2e61478d646319615db5f87b56e617d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
b1b51360fbc8470f61848cf1b12e508b
5775c938da5e92a8d1954c12e3db66ae8ad550da
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
9e3f235ea723a228de1e70431ef97e60
51508402d9bf33f471e88067941d961cb84bd084
describe
'121944' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
bed8ba47a354a791db1578d34b4a593f
29aee0f9d90ec6828e007899bc70b51bbb05cc52
describe
'37784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
a88a20f17dbed47be6efd41090b3b6de
3416c65c35d7131f283ca9cc85640302ff13e536
describe
'2967776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1aebf778c4b1c840528144519612be7f
98b44c0490bd75fa767db1492d9ebb206b86fc31
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
351d971115ce625eedf37e671c2894be
a6cb0bd7c3aba8fe903f1daae2b9d40264e34c7d
describe
'9360' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
f7e3dff61e9a121d9349b237d9c712cc
c2020ba668e0361275af92ae11602a3034b83706
describe
'368397' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
2af33fdb8886db2367af27f085436b8e
be90ba19c9d2119a5e82575244671dd72b8aea0f
describe
'115831' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c403adea42e5dbd326238a91a169ac32
7612f77f72a35c3e834232bcc38cb13793017314
describe
'37084' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
46863b0e3aaa1ffd808f424b3fce9696
9a4d755a7dba6637c22f5f6cf7d3c6cfc48d90f5
'2011-12-11T03:28:11-05:00'
describe
'2969940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
ecec0cf48bd4dfdfc93168fbd2a5a0b8
afc43655a582c8e1ee9354b824cb9c7ea8cd5c41
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f5b3adf0ddfb9644859033c7e8a31451
23fd44a04e5aec0df3181103ccc9a1d485d3a8ee
describe
'8824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
ac70dc7d5a7179032add4c82cb4308f4
cabb48990ca73c3f6ffa87ae035f50b48d7a9bda
describe
'368127' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
64cb10db97c517542439fd3cd3d6eb90
daa67b42e0c6ec7bd3a56911aeded2a19b483761
describe
'104901' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a137dd5624c7a286f2e2203cdf7916be
dc2c12773b72491cbf2f40fb0ad675deeca6be0a
describe
'33075' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
0f8323cad6b482936565dc3a4783ad3b
4d76aa1e90d33f57aec718157296150e9a83a173
describe
'2967632' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
392423ab95b25b6097393c1b6d0aad4c
50d284e9fe8987c7419a768a46297d837c5ab30a
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZM' 'sip-files00125.txt'
0fdccfe3aa863d08daaff6885af327cd
029a38ab487aa69f65b10a21c374c37139b3e3c3
describe
'8849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZN' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ef48965f091b07a0e13be411806d05ae
b8461d61084649603d7c48029461778e25f14367
describe
'368444' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZO' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
84323d3a9bfbc63654f1a7f62b37058f
10365be5addff1fc0ecc57b9753d685a78ed09d1
describe
'116294' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZP' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d0e7c0574f6a4857b8facd90c64a3885
afa222b0ce3b9d457659e4e63393451ad1aed63f
describe
'35941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f3d2808e17fb4b41158483160423af3a
08adb6547918e39eea070d7bae77ae04f4508699
describe
'2969864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c5567f230b0e1d80ad519fb5222e2964
d4800281eec284ac62cb6354baf51455cc07d273
'2011-12-11T03:30:35-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZS' 'sip-files00126.txt'
3d40d6108b9c80f822f971776bb79197
033cadff5522396b26cd4ca1d93e2b2ebe6a755b
describe
'9054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZT' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
365738a772d0ae6ff756a803fde3e929
6d7221f834de78444e284d7e4de5e865d3e74457
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZU' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
2480134498a982db31da4053152667a9
8ce6abf931b983bfa8f9c8c5d947b704e2486c96
describe
'114658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZV' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
dd20a4501466fa63718e7e59652ccca4
9c8a8792cec32225c7257ddd6c1ac645368f611b
describe
'35041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZW' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b00a22cf852871df8345761bb167eb49
07453bb7996e09abe38f228fb3e5472be4fd853a
describe
'2969868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZX' 'sip-files00127.tif'
037efc7b1c2c96accd02068ca6f0f5de
28fa8ff46c319fd2b62020271bd92f7f347107e9
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZY' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d5ee5a1e6d8abfe20ac7cc30afe71164
a15d632ad86837439e9006e5ee9a607fa83b5730
describe
'8489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
aa92d106da609326990f72671e5801a0
dc85ef67ab110222e2dd7b60cff4458d601766f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7dee2ad66c4837cc278ecb02f734b106
1f073b15ec7d9d36d496cdcc767fdf7ad652479e
describe
'115155' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAB' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e16990bd0544e1e9d377f57cc8e13e8b
810c57889d6b9000cc75677d5729928295bed8a1
describe
'35829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
2ebaae0c11f2ffafb96f1af0530969a8
b6e7ec712ed993b88292726d1c9d236306d98a29
describe
'2969952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
05647beb65b1826099d46e7c486bdb9a
6e065a85fa5dc7120656fe360155ca08f750fac9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
6aa4b87196be1b71e0fa14bc947b3341
ead9f55bf04f1822270d6a5b519301f0b5b0a6f6
describe
'8675' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1b083a8859868743fe13e19b4a5373b2
5b6aeeac484bb3ca5758030c062aeb9d640271c2
describe
'368112' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
938587bea345977b1dd74757b7540278
bbd81f635a46f40005f68e20117e1c2beb785f20
describe
'53635' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
5ac124e85f7032bf05848a2cbec9a991
6bfe92a5f92c89b3078619edb3d1e4dcd7b18541
describe
'13850' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAI' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
7189b242fafbfd244d6495a1e6653133
8d9de6e8b3b2b47338c632982295a083a4402a4b
describe
'2964368' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
fb686a89b98897fb7ebd3bb3511fcd5e
26e2ff9bfa6a07d7da5d13276ea4fdd147379057
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAK' 'sip-files00129.txt'
6f99aef6683449a5d9b5ca0b24b3ee37
59a0ea2093eeb02a4f6362a8d30c9c513cf1d83b
describe
'3462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAL' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
c30ae83dd9b09379301882195fdfad50
1cc970c000309e98403d0c374a5bc0bca26a99e1
describe
'368417' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAM' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9ac2833d4c03b62e385719f83884dca3
f5dd1ffd4c43ad17f1d29338756550b199e3680b
describe
'81406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAN' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
671ed8d7ae3725887e71880d31fb98e5
080ec647458ad3e47575ba115f6e000e1584c386
describe
'25130' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAO' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a0a064ac7cf3811da72b96f373be0e95
420c46713a9e08ec8b44fd9bb6d1a918036cb5ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAP' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c320f16cd27c7236387a8e3d337ab799
48ac5ec254ff7a4d5eaf1fc80f31e9ffdc60b666
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
03a6c6d82ab7df68545939a56b947f4e
adc2fc623e89c4e6018a467b41a30c54aa1d3088
describe
'6233' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
32b334d49dac00772a839a3464ea8186
ecf3cf026dab093a9f594cfe9f6a13ed5893bf0b
describe
'368118' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ff910027568553bf1908745585e62a50
5cc2872ad48cdd1f795d27bf582198f2202b7815
describe
'110985' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
c4ce773c726d5cefd7fdf4d76cd45188
28fda927c643dbe7a075793450c87b44a577ee25
describe
'35507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAU' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
e1d8b5a205056d16ae07896fe9843af6
30261a75ce3ec74bd09bd8c7db8e59b28cabb289
describe
'2967648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
4edb1fc6d73f1677c910c3ebb521f542
3e4af8b24261287663e17cfc04922980eec040fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAW' 'sip-files00131.txt'
560149d4de493c0b4faf21854fef84cf
686814b945d0716363869281a6ef6c2d3f1aee54
describe
'8753' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAX' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
e9102bc8d393c39e7be2db6798e5cfc6
97e22cc6269477b70a2af14f0cc8ab726fcb9abd
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAY' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
57136ef2857533f6aa9105de8d7647ef
03958d04f2517d41e2e2b65f27babcd82b365e73
describe
'114799' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
b7a950180696df864203cbefe6ef378b
09399c10ac500e6485fc2a87d526e9a5e61d6bcf
describe
'34988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
6705320706da03c07c86c2928bedbe58
f8b2fe1aba15fe613075aff0467072f590b9fe76
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBB' 'sip-files00132.tif'
1b9c68e1288815120f8a08191cf40fbe
bac49c66534ca6df95bd9aa51087d35338bc738d
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBC' 'sip-files00132.txt'
187cf7aff1c3365c67d980188c795829
e1ecc3ceae6ac8d7b75641281d3c75b41a869d08
describe
'8949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBD' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
492975c8807856926bdda18dbcb3ba39
6e61a4588d4610d4c811b90e43f9e0bea045965c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBE' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9ae1655143c145b6fd50d376312e7690
53f0b445b12b5f06a6e95f8f12ee972a1631e989
describe
'120893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBF' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
dd846ef12d1895447480559fbd6d3fe2
666d01b3e473290864831a8de64251f13f7502b8
describe
'38066' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBG' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
a4f71f3584e98f0b45209f1aef844e63
e68f2d589f18c65e61908eda2aa3dcf21f105856
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBH' 'sip-files00133.tif'
460423944b8031d90874a4bc96533b95
8c2dc13affba4a727deb2ea3374e463d7300d0e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
55825f2c128cbc504a4692d6a2606fe6
c5c3adbd042857114b6c5f758b2c684dd2a9afdd
describe
'9134' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBJ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
d972682650e1223fd617b0029095bea3
8f7d6ad555b8e4231a03ca80b39b62db668c45a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
20405305b06a0a4c7b1082c359d1ad78
c2d6e820123175cc00cd15b9a09ca9cb5e6c3a14
describe
'117048' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0a92eaf0850739bc2a6c5d375afbe140
eba1fbae004eabc002c60862d869361c70bba7ec
describe
'36479' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBM' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
c1b57169c5aec082c8de7d2b2a3de11b
1a8233acdde5020971c30726e719d30d7ef49957
describe
'2969956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
932d19039a6bd514f685c4d29438ea07
78a9cdf1426880aff0047f7ad3979c6f9f54f76d
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
4d768b5a66388a25d1b477b96f5dee39
c8e9e493a5723c0c592ac427dba33def716ac856
describe
'9222' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBP' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
65a0f20ea4db62fb357f6c58f83a12b5
d96a55ae14c3cc0b201328a2c8fdd39bff72bd83
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
8e45d087fd261a3d7c918d99b0455494
8671d634869eb4f20ce70bac780ea1104c25bec5
describe
'116308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBR' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
e4bfd19954faab8c0a8e7d31685c83e2
818c8709a68686d99ee2cb49495eae4056b9b7d7
describe
'37197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBS' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
faf59aa1bdc370060e4af5ca3150345a
61ac1e5ebb19df0ee0ca22e6eb6497c946ea77fb
describe
'2970096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBT' 'sip-files00135.tif'
548da3f51ad0bcada13ba77e7935f5ec
1c524c102be7d1ecc3d16f3258f8b20ca3f14240
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0b38c0002a319612c0e7f470c896174c
2c790ab7f1d80d71a48c3c1920c56afdf56f8261
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBV' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
e1abc4220ef82bfce0cffeab4bbd2a41
238b5a2c342464c850e46ab86ef9def41f57aec6
describe
'368394' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBW' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
70062cae5f1df7e0644a95b0cee82357
2110136004398297b136f9fb2712763adbc4975e
describe
'114998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
5f4be2fc235f7afa84c69d3ca3674254
f00880bbcaa26d42516df313792c9a77e3262d20
describe
'37528' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBY' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
ec370a86849d76afcd63997fc0a871dd
ebd539e7bb36fe26d11381e90cdf94def1c9396e
'2011-12-11T03:27:30-05:00'
describe
'2970108' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTBZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
881db9624b19132d40e2a1ea007cf6c2
73abc439109eccafa92b76b2f1e0f313452a79d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
1fd8abb05ae7e83f189eab906e62db23
c746d9782d0f22be1bb1b79ae6b41fc2b49df2fb
describe
'9410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCB' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fee05a4c4b75d57e5a4fcf3796478f0c
967b624268885af9a8a4cd351260be3a4868ab98
describe
'368382' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
cd8563374a061fab92f428db9fa75cf5
4013f188b1ee647bacf451ff136538b8a38a3504
describe
'119023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCD' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
c287d6d710027d831f32fb23784c997a
27334d3c6e79cfec0fcbf3e829dda7671f87499e
describe
'38776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCE' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
5f7dac7c3c94ecdd58a1d00231a6707a
554af568e87a2d3f757428da8d89eba938823a1a
describe
'2970308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCF' 'sip-files00137.tif'
4618b40a53df6d2ba08e75126f2a658c
0c1dfc17f7320f619010df2c009f8fd090e57b6d
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
b1e772d1a7e59f8c53dc31321b190dcc
ded97ae2c0eead512dda518491fe64fb8ea50434
describe
'9562' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCH' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6c7478eaf3e5d9b9c65fbe81bb45731f
c2d946cc2dd2b3caf8b6932613574e4c14f6da78
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCI' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
3e63dc288adf0b61dfd164f397a6f47c
8472779a58ba9e7e808d8df5cf241e9deba5e140
describe
'119671' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCJ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2f3e0d8bfcf89df987ee8de485fd811f
a27e122e2675ce3d8a7ec1ffcff3e2cf8e9be93a
describe
'38566' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
55c542e4397e749b7181896f23d4ce4d
d3844ecb963776522f2274eb6d297326d3fba19b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
5f6ddc1eec58942909233e757f5588ee
8f87050bb89d12246e25c81be1aaee7c5c542392
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c491313039829e255d79a122a6c97888
e5f939a2d03c23cb17555dcc75189d8c17838689
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
bf59193b30fe846401436ae056a90afb
5f8dc223ee669bebcd731b9b119ea0464ff379a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCO' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
842ba9f873cb5f24487f6e7a83c4bd44
8fbdf319668270abbe0a264d9f00b3f06f09c85f
describe
'92346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCP' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
11e72369fbab2903703000f8e627824d
8e973267d43de65eae8b3d104b19a5ea02f4ba91
describe
'30442' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCQ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
623039e6446f3ff7c1a4241124d54ce1
9ebe34260c55692052e42bd6c6f4e129817fb1d8
describe
'2969136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCR' 'sip-files00139.tif'
b41a912cdf0215ac318090c81c96fe4a
8656ec59ddd141c898ed1013ce303f30af760b54
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCS' 'sip-files00139.txt'
ed42c245443468e1fbef172195bd87de
380278283780d308fc8728dd83d3600dd1a775b4
'2011-12-11T03:30:11-05:00'
describe
'7358' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCT' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
7632cda6e877b43b8e1aa9dda2095eb1
51a3a4f3fb1189aca842cf3969fe07931cb1705b
describe
'368131' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCU' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
72133354ea62f5131c245b305fd8dd21
5c53bb0a195cce8ac8117fe34f5d18a0dfaa53f9
describe
'91722' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCV' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
c1facaafaa7cccaecdf05f7202d62baf
dd08981b5078e6fcc0176aafe663adea88115c28
describe
'27434' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCW' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
563243e8045f7113e1fbc0f5a2b1c5e4
a9af98101562a22e14cb34dff23df777e356b1b8
describe
'2966204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCX' 'sip-files00140.tif'
bb0c4402ebd082e15403602c9bd58075
c2c8ff2cbf7c768f4b99a2e4e4ee1133e74522e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCY' 'sip-files00140.txt'
ddc7702dd65bf35a5e850f59201dc9cc
1efd8b4b20a31cff70833f401fc925c3472181b5
describe
'6736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTCZ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
43a9caeefb7733265b4329dc68e6293f
0952c4a99f5c1e15cd00ad336bf74a991fc17768
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDA' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
482ce04b418014ce9c05c79642e43703
1a6e1707edba88bdaa012f9358a2adaa6d85b78c
describe
'112377' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDB' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c20e157ffb44e9dffdcb8ad033e1b93d
b403c71e65a49cfdfcfa809ba7934c24eebada87
describe
'34681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDC' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
dd86ceedcbbe7d097a2a4ad659359a52
e4be160bc02b76f47357c51a9dcb35254421c5b2
describe
'2969692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDD' 'sip-files00141.tif'
76b86e2094cfb8db1396267fdae85177
84a78b464e8b00083fdb23005ba1a86c18af34c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDE' 'sip-files00141.txt'
25acd4af112ab2bf2a002a2aae6e9654
367d16b6ad5b8e21eb890d5157848f08b166aec1
describe
'8288' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDF' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
33116b45efb141d8fe6ef0610dd91dac
0ab813de3adec22b699ed333970c5ae3746f5535
describe
'368138' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
2e4dd02825e7b87179cd20ee91881b9c
83729030ec253bbf143666a019b9b6a61af6953f
describe
'118456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDH' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e7fa51aa5d0baf170601f433ec51c474
6b23bd9d505ac4fb7e3002c33260b28549405523
describe
'36498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDI' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
d647655c3f383dea7d49ddcdfb1badfd
76fb727173205c79a9e5b80d8c1be12951ab9a1b
describe
'2967660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDJ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a831a4b36c78cb72d0ead18f3e69958e
7aa40ab538844af52b40bddae02816cd7ca735c1
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDK' 'sip-files00142.txt'
e07948e88ccc3aeaaa2eaed483907cfd
2d35c279ecbc8ec77837ac2814349aaaac5768a3
describe
'8945' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDL' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
3631adef2b6c26d16170147b7a650bd6
829a844de13a2dcd089ff942370eb2867dc52f8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDM' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
75ebb939cb28fc6a7cb2f872eac0a06c
cade658ab362ac25798e11211b77e0c39bce5164
describe
'114956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDN' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
fc1dd574de19fae4fa095458c65ea55f
a5a47206e9090e13c184ba3e35e978a2f9b2fe12
describe
'36380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDO' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
cf6274c2cea4e637c693a695f7547514
afc956202c027072c5dbd231c904f8ef1df91dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDP' 'sip-files00143.tif'
3194df281829ceb137a9065960374cbf
8361d2eb3879dc1a0fa6d2635104819a6af8f2f6
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDQ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
11f564d599bfa7982e77355d418c8299
545da3159dbbd9d7f7c5f43caafd79bc4b6cf10e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDR' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
95da2c3d0f457c201b43ffc7688adf8b
af1cd0af678a615a422edbb044aa4ad601ba495a
describe
'368177' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDS' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
a5d34ea849d824f2463d6e9cc048770a
9db3a8900a122fbace63a076a3347bfa4ca3c6f5
describe
'112145' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
3397762f995029b73721ebdee3e6c6c8
acb3339278ce6fa230d24d83559f9dd9c8b502f8
describe
'36591' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
b55a592dd1799a1d6f63b6ab9685f475
b6cae61787799d0dee419f03ea6748be0b0b5b6f
describe
'2967832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDV' 'sip-files00144.tif'
657d2e01d440bb26ca8ee48a5496136b
a4c56b51c4e55e9292ea689b89c06dc4d1cff4a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDW' 'sip-files00144.txt'
59790bac14096e2d6e9d10ddade92d78
fb41d97c34e27d80373aec3e290fbd5839d47197
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDX' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0781485d70d1c24f4336a9ad1e68b26f
b0cf32503e64957a621c1ea32a18e0b546b8d514
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDY' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
d0e449563fffe21e4ad996dcf670fa06
7bd718f8fbc2ff77501c456cf2aaeb860baae5c6
describe
'104532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTDZ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
dcb76f09a47790b32cf843f7a62b96e2
2e87614d25b29c5b9a1c271d04fccd35d25466dc
'2011-12-11T03:28:04-05:00'
describe
'33747' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEA' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
2dc7e084d56d6e304d53da22aec4aa96
ad47e64286269b6187368aa8d2459e5c6eb5c19a
describe
'2969892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEB' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ec200c60c2ec1ff84ad6ed849b27fb76
02e85b54bc9df3c069987a7a4381ac19bb0c827e
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEC' 'sip-files00145.txt'
944f7a55110b3c577d2e0c48dba190c2
f30c5127b6bf91f398f2ab2fc1d66402f47b9093
describe
'8324' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTED' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
a98cc99702f3ea1b64e40c08b6fe189e
fc9e6e833f857b8576a43ba58eac148d4dedfaae
'2011-12-11T03:29:49-05:00'
describe
'368195' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEE' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
60c2148a6c6b11f5a0017da9baf8aca8
0cdb647bba56e8b00c4280b11a480280dbc45446
describe
'33972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEF' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
8073a7462e0fc5389a1191d85cfe65f4
d0141bee21550c82043371d62a6aa609092523f1
describe
'10593' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEG' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c27bf4ea3eddf5ec45e8f0447e3d0a10
09460755735b610fbcbeb58a0eb0c35468b5aeb0
describe
'2964224' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
923d72d828e262f030808cea4e999b9c
3a602e427fd58766ced62960a7eae987d7370ff6
describe
'389' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9e47c1ba8c5ef40c535592885c2bda1c
f3a1ee0cab3242ccadf53f85a01166a22bd1a069
describe
'3217' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEJ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
ffe828b3dbb56c376fddbead8e2c0902
96baa9593dcae0c5cee2e6557d67498818296d1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEK' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
f5db01c3ae42659614fe2c4517827ae0
79ba17437aaa9c7022b20df7940b78457b88df9f
describe
'82947' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEL' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
65d6c419f5a14c532e34aa047d9f47c9
df4008bd0158e55a5f826da85266768000baf123
describe
'26767' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEM' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e123a73a92f95eb46f4cef0caefae4cd
ef4821322e7972db24b0a1de7dc5dc8bf42a55af
describe
'2966396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEN' 'sip-files00147.tif'
cf7da8f6451011abbd5583cd7ac45544
7ab9bee4034d91ad12de3de4334866bc90ac296b
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
845b1dd0d1811a6bcf03608133ea2b25
8a21d52a76ce583c96e1d34ed5c48a8266c918c4
describe
'6695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEP' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3610dcae90c391b0c46bc5ac88866909
1755977e1ccb65b011f0b363857369c304f921d9
describe
'368162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEQ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b6b1aeb3e0a2cf04aeb3fcaca9e7bc8e
82556b0d35febdd5b5fd5821fca84ce5737ec453
describe
'116980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTER' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
715aae0015a8b301cf47496c8acc0118
4de32e63c948e784ecc568bc6b9ca2c69898faa9
describe
'38927' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTES' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
3d6d07741d887a4f0ad0c5249509a80f
2a00b4f8e8aa3bf2b317600eb56a8197cf569946
describe
'2967956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTET' 'sip-files00148.tif'
67938b3842acf807200542bda65032e4
8dc297924c39f53b3ebccc690ab72baa5065688d
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEU' 'sip-files00148.txt'
85f9baec24562639005d6021955c89fd
f196c03249ff6de0d6e40fc3ecc3a2582ab42236
describe
'9496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEV' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
164e801d9cb98d590a20e6fa908821bd
cc74e270b8e9ec86bd6f2d46baef4f9ea4243ee2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEW' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
29d5eff632d31dbd1c32303fa7637b25
405b5209ee52b6b34344cedbce6df4a50b9803dd
describe
'105179' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEX' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
1753137f1ccdfdc6f91aa105f3b1771d
491c82727bca0d47c74ebf124ddac4f1f3bd9506
describe
'34670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEY' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
7402a2e29c04b6498922a7e7598bb18e
9537f51e17a979e09c41ed38bab9fa8fa5714aa8
describe
'2970016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTEZ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a2b7c2e973443e2f828c2ec438f84ee5
834a42e30256eef56bc9f417b02586a4415ff227
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
31c191e86119c961175d3b726bb1184c
5bbe1030b5c9c78ce50093c1cde31b8328ac1ab4
describe
'8680' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFB' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
b72db114b813cf57ccd36b7734f05d25
730838ac4acb20effe9caceea369eb36a81c2c56
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFC' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
d57f4621808992c4b693e938bd8e89da
26c285c166ebb2e3544655f3a6f43aa6b3f2d7f1
describe
'117407' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFD' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
03eade265ff04d2c7c0dc18ef37e5c8c
def8533cd0b59a22478c48e9c808d9b681f7923f
describe
'37275' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9edb7e1d7668f6ee5400ee6eeca64702
78984ca4653013e2d2b88fca6dd6535b9bfc5da8
describe
'2969932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
55ef9d1748d4d2501a0208eb9ae49705
6a1a2581678f221579fb26a1ebc98830fd36d050
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
f997a14f30539f19be3c23e7c9163b35
20040cd5f45f9032fe66f53b4f6bc58a90318700
describe
'9495' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
6b9cc71dd3310a235074059b045d1e31
8307cf4d099ca981744bf002187dfbc9afcc6ac4
describe
'368374' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
ba774034b53bfeae23f9d98649f7ebe7
2d39bb42f7c2da8223c99b4663208a4edfa73aff
describe
'97831' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
6ce4d35e2d59ceb3e97b11251db9c6b1
49a4a07a47b623f3fa90589533fbbe28b1890239
describe
'31960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
31b6066e118dae2e9644a2c31c0c0d4f
5d16d6ca603eeded47e443e667b2df6c0494f5ea
describe
'2969416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
bbbae335ba82a32c247a755b87d1e715
7485ac412fed3dea5e5bc8100bf7a2f7a473670c
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
34531888184c8fca638288d95376054c
56d6d7c2b5193b0b2959cd1ca769d1195effc8e1
describe
'7804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFN' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
f3a37a40c40dbdd7c5dcd6c6535f2df3
5beb659243c6443be73a212c6575147342ed65b5
describe
'368142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
604e56bf7779dbdc016b096dc2a4fccd
7d3ec8f0e7fe198b7436df060084cd67586cd921
describe
'83299' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFP' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
76903e4f5d6f102902c67c74ab8fbbc8
b1ffac0baf968b1c87fd309ce3378bbee8d258a1
describe
'27320' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFQ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
e59ebd6f661fb076dd495674a143e0bc
c25942972efc44208c83ea48f3b609b5aa8ecb76
describe
'2966580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFR' 'sip-files00152.tif'
7fc3f3f5482e30ccd19deeb64e826bd3
e9fedffe000658d8feb161f7e947102d323bc805
'2011-12-11T03:27:08-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFS' 'sip-files00152.txt'
9d63ab8eec52f1a2b0dfb6d3c8308015
6b958f366d5bf8899d73c4b391911cc23dabef9e
describe
'6769' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFT' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
3eaf876a65d5e3e93886f76ecb53a5c8
08bb6fd55603b5180b0b21d074c69d59ce8adb9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFU' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
00f04c21c78a690b5d32407547314207
6bea227fa481aadb87fdf77f013d43ed00fc8dcb
describe
'114911' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFV' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
0127bd50a67db6b3bfb013ad8617ab9c
78e247a6645941b30270675790f670c49a6d708e
describe
'37859' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFW' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
d51bfa0eedb0d20d367c4938e1b06711
4e7d7de637fc85964796db534f65f4ea2d6ddeae
describe
'2970348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFX' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a4550804a5968fb20b48d2c40f3844f8
4a7a008b1c99dea0bda6391597a37f742ae7b09e
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFY' 'sip-files00153.txt'
b03422295b30434bda5bb5facfa3a9fc
04e2a49e497f59c897c17173b5163450b859a136
describe
'9120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTFZ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
4a24b0a932b2e236e2b73016c427a2ef
52892e40cd24a51d09d92312cc401b94d8bb8724
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
119fc3a58f9b3a4ece46c62c15cede1b
f37c3f366064bc8341bb10c516a734b4f31a11d4
describe
'122754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGB' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
f8d97516303146db15ed33479ce23bfb
49e24730bc6e512f0833a1cda0ef9079e88a7ab8
describe
'39525' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGC' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
2076c768ee766429e3986def4d2c0b76
69ae17b968e3ed9b470707d3e837562b4b7301dd
describe
'2970364' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGD' 'sip-files00154.tif'
1a1255619d93b59bab604df9ea8a9f4d
c037af788562975de80d5a773e7c27f8b7530a73
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGE' 'sip-files00154.txt'
99c68e7c7c52a1d276b7ec953e717ed1
cdb19e0e28ea25b694a06de3f2d8e820089100f8
describe
'9674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGF' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
51d52426fbdae95b0d2fda6ad0956658
8c1185eeb9f4d7da37f0bb1bca1acda5b2c0f873
describe
'368101' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGG' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
767892fef4d3995e56bdfe35249e1e8e
3ad54bebf3b01e7eea238a473e04ca909bf8e276
describe
'112364' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGH' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
3c475e251e99a518961c8bb0b93755fd
110bc2fe630247a1aeb9a8578b0fcb88e552dec4
describe
'36721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGI' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2fd2316f205f2f757ce5f6b4d00732f4
7e44d88588a3f7c12e21dc0df3504c710898cd92
describe
'2968232' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGJ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d54da3585e48da6c659d1005c16cbed6
f82280684f1ff1892ea4d9885e1d12efd50508aa
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGK' 'sip-files00155.txt'
8e96b488beefb474f9bfe16d201ecf1d
eb350d2f5d6ba0a046ff01c9ea39f0ccea00ea64
describe
'8779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGL' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
9ce8032080fcdd0d7687b88d46e1b2bf
666750a4d4aa85f32efcca7ae553bc189f4644d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGM' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
b3a43a3a2a4ef9afc42d1211d2179336
16efeb1a40326742ce764a0023f4c51bfebac0f3
describe
'123123' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGN' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
aed0c4cfa99dc003ba76f228299efc4f
d5bc9e71f1a245e6c9bf725e877cf1e75860ae78
describe
'38710' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGO' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
426d4e2953a97cfe30e856fb11c68683
5e29eb06abdc887502beca1ad79d257460274684
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGP' 'sip-files00156.tif'
d3516b15d096e965315c056fd1a43eaa
4ba618187f1913236352f3248d1be705b4b5f6fa
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
d849a17ef13ebbb775566991acc9fd8b
fabecb6e44467c95af37b743518e4afa4eee7969
describe
'9356' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGR' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
901502d260c865849678cec33e1c16ee
d845add1838527286d5e0d245be6fb1d27752bcd
describe
'368169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
f4e82eb7b5b9634ead3db4d396b046d9
dd994542dd34916e77c864382f7e6299bc528c74
describe
'118855' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
122e9bf57cf629540ef9fb0b346fce5f
b3bff30b660d414493ea796780801e14ad1d52b3
describe
'36661' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGU' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
b2cc550d0d5e2fc57a3b1ce088e936cb
cf57045c82db5018d8cbeb6fbbf3c9673a78ef6b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGV' 'sip-files00157.tif'
8f20852239b1d0d49ac72b461a23c9bc
f8f1bf2ca3b497ef55b71a830a9441cdefa78e4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGW' 'sip-files00157.txt'
e81674ba1d84abc1f40d664540f6247c
d36ea8af7e5027572ea547d0305e6f844df4d381
describe
'9187' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGX' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
3fc2ce98423759a3057e76204674b6b7
aa3b21470e0e178c36ca792550a4ea5a97d7542b
describe
'368406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGY' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
e89a874110ab323a5729478decfa867c
a09102b4f63f6dc7b860f582b1732315360a7e71
describe
'115758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTGZ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
ecaa3213e2000c8606f5918c1036d0be
f6fce0fb0c27848c872d7a57ca8633d42f9d7f86
describe
'36523' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHA' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a41c9e27bca9c099b615f1ff21f0c0ff
ce0dabffd4c532f97daf10470c26612f767065b0
describe
'2970024' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHB' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d30f8ef4c134b43c39397c4a853c74be
6d6073802ad7cb2d335fa1dba0cebdf511b6ee31
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHC' 'sip-files00158.txt'
2db546b52872634eb12afd283329317d
cc71dcbfe700f28c4c18da5fe5d21d1eb0fc72ad
describe
'9001' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHD' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
5b3f08047098032af16380cbe6081ff3
fc73b9ffda9fcbb6c764a86f57ac8ad9ca676f64
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHE' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
bc67421423249dddaba3dbf2b3c23e21
073946de4995dabc2852722e3cd597c5b5a5097a
describe
'109296' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHF' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
fda06afd57b453eeaf44df05c65f1dae
4fae3356ebf35ebbc72b14f24f65ee71465bb8b3
describe
'34496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHG' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
6b77d38876b568b0ea4fef34169b0ee8
56ce66ef56a843dff71fc5fb497ec9d0cb61190e
describe
'2967480' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHH' 'sip-files00159.tif'
54cd73ea22cd657cbd1e7d1e34f090b8
a584f7d56d7e37165931ad0e54286bfb1890380e
'2011-12-11T03:28:48-05:00'
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
50606ad4525c2dd025baa7f458dea893
a69c117639e24ef9292024247f29433d40a07eba
describe
'8707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHJ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
83e6582ea6afb50a5210f09d0872da9f
8bc8f5b616e3e92541e107e5a19da25c7e335de0
describe
'368351' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHK' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
49ede6cff7bda26d4704174cbbfb94a8
0d78f7ee547201bed13eb534d980cf92cc983519
describe
'118407' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHL' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
32edafe239a551005e27e35dffc098c5
4fe55de53d8cae59226e44a5086c39f45dfa4235
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHM' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
0f1549ee2c5eafd8168790bb7cdcd47b
b7bb0aabcd3e5270a9f22afac7a5cec8dbf41787
describe
'2969904' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHN' 'sip-files00160.tif'
bb59f93263ee3a18c9080407945bfaf9
23faef341bd04cc7d28ced4edeb1b469f3b70203
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHO' 'sip-files00160.txt'
fb9f116f83d0591411136d02a3d8bbed
b363652aebb409bd4994bd6e9e28e621aa971dca
describe
'8827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHP' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
e2a74842650a771e3d41073aa7fbc0b4
9313cd4b382056eb58870f82e76bc5004edbb533
describe
'368157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHQ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
2ebef8874ec4167e6a3e8bc9863b3b45
d854eb6d516e8b9225f9e5ecbbf278452d2038ca
describe
'119651' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHR' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
91aaf0fe095b78c1771c0f6b72bb4fb8
3d7337603cbb1de7e48ebfbd93f776cddb6900b6
describe
'36774' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHS' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
a33e69d52da54d761e95955a467e610d
3fecb44445205b9fdcb5086acf312ce615e3c392
describe
'2967756' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHT' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c78c76b70d72108ba524b84f2ec51e01
df84701d5f4247df3f0f35a554c9e4a6630b4457
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHU' 'sip-files00161.txt'
e6d23574b86c1b73267d63b49a06ad74
686841390eb76057b1f6b5d4f80d96b3433e9006
describe
'9214' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHV' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
58139dd5c33b83073b508aa1a5ce8dee
164ee051185119b4402dac40fd9846ca41844cf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
102e8d13b97914dd5eb0f53f6bea53a9
0025b88e7027da587038426b5b63ecd9d4dba3c4
describe
'111976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHX' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
689462cbb608756b651694fd8d4d62ec
5514bc10319f0fd0858263e4d549951e60c2b98a
describe
'34849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHY' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
9971b795778077edbfc7277b337d38d1
a695acc0d79b4a03ad2206fe08f050e32274b4d1
describe
'2967348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTHZ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
bed4b79bd559d899f71ee0d507cfa9bd
784a9496ce9144fc9478f59a3b325678097d2905
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIA' 'sip-files00162.txt'
c71cc4bec4d394cd640fdca402e4ef91
53479900d33efe3ac993d26572859ee8add2561c
describe
'8761' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIB' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
3e6d9b33fdeb1daaabb9115e7da1903f
c4f22b75d404e16cbd93f97eb73b8b595199650f
describe
'368193' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e625e46b828c52991697a8c7acb73e38
0fa9d4a3aec810b29a352de236d4e681f9f22fe7
describe
'91689' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTID' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
da49ad29517f4f99338e2b8cc4359297
73bf053231fd118ab7bb6bc5a49234926493fac1
describe
'27729' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIE' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e1ece3c52def373ced1768deaf489069
7c8cbcc3383dde59e04a5988196e8db7ebaa818f
describe
'2966292' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
089d3cce78b5192f7d060d2c2b016ed6
5cd407b68a1eb43c5b04ff7600af88757e1fad53
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
45927900d807a80ea31cb0fa210df905
4e08119f1f3da92130cc4a9434c5bea6c33980d2
describe
'6724' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIH' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
2444a8187792493e48448f14fed76833
a0863ab58d0679dafc9ed5a25bdce8083b2b22d2
describe
'368391' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTII' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
485c7dd7b33b52abf93991b30ee17c38
058ea128828320fb88e85d3f57f476822fe4b3b9
describe
'116105' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIJ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
ada8643c7ae6847b4bcf925ab9e10437
a65757675a9cde4a878488ae41a1fc108b4fc6ba
describe
'35681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
014c719c22e70b5dc76a4b5962c1bd92
573b531843090eb7dc17c0743d98a1b87dac1156
describe
'2969624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
aec233bee72d49ee423d3c7cd2449791
aea3ab8797abc7ecda4626dc953957f76aed6ee9
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIM' 'sip-files00164.txt'
9d39ee9fddc630540b55dc273646ecce
2d117dbf47c5022a31636ac7d6cef063d62890aa
describe
'8910' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIN' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
672742427bb2c51a44e2795347d96e52
4f0d6b9b42d836f263e73c01ac72a32eac4e505c
describe
'368404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIO' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
8c7a9b3a12a164040cc83df85565b019
1cc9dfb08f55775018a5dc383662eb62b0d6db17
describe
'111421' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ab2b8fea4578229b2dce606d08ba2dd1
6c2a89a290c3bca3e0bc5e64554d62f7ad138c5d
describe
'36686' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIQ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7732ccedd522bfdc384b888a2842a213
4b31c69a5a0a9d7067558d4bc18a16176030cb6b
describe
'2969924' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIR' 'sip-files00165.tif'
bed8f3efbb6eaafd3edd0a0c448c324d
13b0f9d73bc479fb4161070ca786c80b1e2015ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
3b4b481ea1626fa7faf0d6e1b7413638
3c95c3baca7dccccd7bcdc9da6cecaf93f1a96d1
describe
'8902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIT' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
46e44815f3f9487a24064b9d23bcebbf
3c43443b1934566b625b8958ef88fde64f297c87
describe
'368191' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIU' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
2d3695aa994e3199c27acc76e58a2c79
e5aa994cd91615e8eb0c91333c2bdab20a44e160
describe
'118984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIV' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
02945ab4a71468e7b7301446c0176261
634d7adfe775a8c67ab473b93b6edb3b837b6bb7
describe
'37361' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIW' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f86cb532f2e6ea355e42fff732841801
f292aafca640c0c05e5bf9ad81a8ce126ce91edc
describe
'2968076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIX' 'sip-files00166.tif'
119579bdaba5613efe3ac0103697cf39
ed8f1ff3ebc2645b7e0d7db8ad0b488dacbcc094
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIY' 'sip-files00166.txt'
d4a77f7356483d52fb8056cd67905f80
700e44ac5da7d1478f709a6cf45e40c015169304
describe
'9219' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTIZ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
cdca8c115c886fb5e2fb5fbf7023cae5
997e84b66b48df97b2fcbc38f7675b2db22d40a9
describe
'368390' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJA' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
d8e5612962604db8c990abbd2128432c
9986c60909fb28baef15bba4b41f5ecde396895c
describe
'118022' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJB' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
6ea5ec7dac897f5515243409cdb8e5a6
915023ef922350318538f50affb0147e5d5d0f44
describe
'37078' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
d94ff92f6498a5cdfd8499aab6f429d2
bc7a1d3f0a6c9fb81134fc367469c676ba6ed28a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJD' 'sip-files00167.tif'
df518f7e3f4165afd459213badd06175
53c112ec0b2ab073c44431414932a8b13125279a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJE' 'sip-files00167.txt'
c1ea7b559ec20265e99bf0578f0e671b
e0482b9b4abaefe9102c7125f4fa4cfc09682395
describe
'8848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJF' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
22dc98f9d8059e1615115ec397fe0234
f4681588117a14e7785223805abeddb69eb3d89d
describe
'368113' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJG' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
3809c0f8d3e3d9364501e4a7b4b2ae6b
dc489e745d25c12fe08bea0456bcffcd9380ccd8
describe
'126056' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJH' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
95424ac713794b295f5f99a963e1efca
7a7e327fe29d82549603752aff991e36944cbdb3
describe
'40747' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJI' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
25416f1384a060cb68be4fd87d65b593
65e36800b65d80844d7aae37e58551f68fc5da28
describe
'2968068' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJJ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
7dc00d427d8fe6e502438217c4e6f0ca
235856a5ffb79cced596d7a28133aebae6fefa47
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJK' 'sip-files00168.txt'
7fb2f8e39676013b14fea9638448bb7d
e0b16a3e44c17f3603521d3787e8181d8ad3f96a
describe
'9573' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJL' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
a65ec360fd5eae184d2b8b88486c83cb
ad619f09f41497fcbf172f9ac7bdd94e8d195560
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJM' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
1ac28aeff3bec1bec0da6ec6622405e6
a777b760febede6f378cdf953c420429437daa01
describe
'116981' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJN' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
e3444720b6fabe0e5de6f2bc7ee4d5d3
a9f60d658b7fe319d02abb0e225ba8ce062bba65
describe
'37114' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJO' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
afd63b5816139ba2d3186b20410237db
a5cca698cf024387fb3cefa0bcec2720f30dc9ee
describe
'2967864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJP' 'sip-files00169.tif'
0ad12498ea894f66841e957bfdc0598d
a8ca7640293919e0822623bbe73e666a1d47f022
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJQ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
7aff35e9f8900283c92a3ca873978066
0f6af2bfcdf6e509098c032878335ed3dcff5d14
describe
'9079' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
97a99e607e2f46876f561e8313ef961d
2dbfaf790849127ac3e171a21c831bb9a90acef9
describe
'368179' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJS' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
03f4996051a9dd0a4c7c62015c827ba9
76e89414958e77ea3a8a75832b6cee9054bcbd51
describe
'122843' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJT' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
484778f3499345e134b56c39156aff1c
40dcaa5ea4bed831b92cc7ee8aed22e8bef27f72
describe
'38367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
8647e879b9c6fbade1f100f6d3ade108
c733104ea8ef4c9d2160557c59fac58fc6e914f5
describe
'2967692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
3f5f932393e992b7488accddf0a7bd91
65cfd6b5f0e1b913926f85906a2aedc42f75e73a
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJW' 'sip-files00170.txt'
ea9256bcc9c599ef8303b1cce0c34c75
413992bf98235f1c19fa16c322d53e239e6c84ba
describe
'9438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f0c60a42c5b8f64023fea3a131b4f3f3
4af87aecae2f5080e17e03eb86c2c7ef74423c26
describe
'367938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJY' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
a73949bb8c4b31279dcc99e5cd954cc5
b3acc508ec5b468022924ba8bb83a0658ed0ae64
describe
'123987' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTJZ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
48dd86afd0f9188575bcda11071fa5f3
2a9a06b3f6b21967607b8b6fb721d40bc19cf1dc
describe
'38812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKA' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
4b988abfb3452759ffe45b6c2bc7c850
83bf41cb0bdc8e43ebd7117fd63b93e88e6b6b19
describe
'2967848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKB' 'sip-files00171.tif'
51137fe8ca08cadb4aae8011dc10f700
a26082798ef997ff97cedcab49238bbf8306893b
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKC' 'sip-files00171.txt'
62c1ad66fdeddc8827bdae150f64acee
bbd99698b5c2d2785d34d8b0acf050839bced0c3
describe
'9588' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKD' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
bc128d4317f5384efc6831f17776259a
9facac3981bdbc1a234a32974479ae3421b9a133
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKE' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
b93282273f086503ed804de7508af3f0
5c8aacb68f32563099d3b3b703e3fc92dd50e9c4
describe
'102191' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKF' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
921218bada40f08b79c2bb5466699b99
070f9e6d6bbcaf68e366ee521aca47e20e35e287
describe
'31054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKG' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
4b199f8f3a9705e6e88076fef5e23639
7b44b481fac0101229f70265cb931c20da37ce5d
describe
'2968856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
56033a64937abe29a2bad634abc72810
512d23f40d7d58781e521a3b5a2a6b9b6768a38d
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKI' 'sip-files00172.txt'
939a79d14d247f7525b31a37bbaa2712
677bf2bcdbdcddbb1ef790903a6c2c68bf11d5e4
describe
'7611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
e4bf81453a9f37bef775b332e97b1d68
869fc5cc9e3f90e11e2ded8cce69f7d46fe0a790
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
ba67a92f6e788de97501050c7257728a
cd95b0d4cb9c7134095e43f5d3a9cf8a151ab1ab
describe
'92373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKL' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
d8d7ea28522bcf5e0f6e0abfb90c1bc4
2346b47945afe227d6c579a18d0ab68158322951
describe
'27640' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKM' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
162c4bd6e4d052e0614984ca2c2ee821
f7cc12b85435a19802f4bf91dcbbc3bdf7b223e7
describe
'2968612' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKN' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c500d29e354f0fab0a38b2a200e7f829
d02ce67aab8c20bfcefcd5e3df3d2a256f7a7a25
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKO' 'sip-files00173.txt'
18e53dc76b2ab5420766930b4ff336b7
6b00805b459b7da26fe6212f14ebf63ae224965d
describe
'6842' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKP' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
d1de2085b2177bfd1b95d8e2edc1927f
ff559a870009a4ed2e64f9d1b7aebfd5e0532707
describe
'368452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKQ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
93f5b32eeb5214ebab5f06d0c96f7eb0
050e3119d97f204cba8fcfc2b66114bc05f3d77f
describe
'128928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKR' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
573cb61efd22b156b7ef89f9c3295728
2ce44b7f226e2bf34d51ab8d1b37651db4d22725
describe
'40381' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKS' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
5d14f278d0520f95e0184e4b6c090d3f
c85fcdff8f757e1fb6f00b9fd85da630ba634889
describe
'2969920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKT' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d1e0c4bb5e605711dda074ddd6296520
f7ec0f44c14d039f710d31113603b1dca7141b00
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKU' 'sip-files00174.txt'
0f79f73412bcea56848e435cb26c1243
8106fa55922a175a01c460f2f5814ebff7c51c5d
describe
'9579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKV' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
95e53d92096b30914fbf6153cac0fe63
a2d9ddf9055b9a811cfe41b40988656fffdab24f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKW' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
451ad66ead3be0ca0926abac74c7f73a
56d5ef02a5041070390a4075944727d29e4448ae
describe
'119970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKX' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
06efd78ea7735b60f0caa22a68cc33a0
45d22522eaaa184b2db7573b42060081bf6fc6f7
describe
'37607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKY' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
0d727c385041ed80ab2d28eec14456cf
6b34dd548a9ae1d2569a7d7208d07f724d7ed8b6
describe
'2967840' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTKZ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4c3a46134f8de2a6eb940645879d9a9b
4a2c45e0be3c5b98d33aff9fcf1e96b0201069bb
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
7009cb356a9c3ec872ae2e1c4acaf6a1
fb8a0aa3b08ee4377abcedf1502fbd4cb94f1b35
describe
'9248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
bd59ea61ec5313bd4cdc77386a2760dd
32ce770d83239b6f4c54474dd04ef7567d3fe77f
describe
'368387' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLC' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
667ac42bda4eb2fe8d877dee6380c87f
3b859c68a440c7756c59557840a3a492b2edd5bb
describe
'118766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLD' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
42686b8813f5e78a04afb994b205b0be
73f726822a989b41add1d79f73960f52fbd73f85
describe
'37893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
a4748d358048c297a7275024fcaf3671
a2084f816369c7f904bd1a5e57c21514cf9f10f3
describe
'2970332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
79f0d9224767011ea97300889935252e
d9ea1dc1f5320d94409dbc056d0cc48b9cce4253
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLG' 'sip-files00176.txt'
df26e48484e24e9e7d2f18cf5e835d9b
2dd00786b12af6f08afadd5c80cc1882ed2a33a2
describe
'9095' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
acec555518826f0e25506bafc53b3f81
36799af7e86eed46e3bdb1b238a06ba3aec73364
describe
'368152' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
117c7df1d6f5c60ed5437fbb4f67582d
e46d5e9213359a5425f78f6dad8051c1adcff572
describe
'116853' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
ca9eef1d1925adf48cbd74d24d7d7a10
b7dd921f30527812a39a4eb0ccf848d440c89559
describe
'36632' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLK' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
173feb812cd383baf8cea8602691af9f
3403f6b6cbcc2eaa8730be3c8ea7dff09849d2c7
describe
'2967932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
2b49c152a1065f435be894433a7da009
a6f2669cf0df7f136b399af50dc9163d6693de8f
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLM' 'sip-files00177.txt'
9d7a20c27273e0dd0a4309399dd19ad5
c372b718291565ed542f0f5c9fa2afe156b78905
describe
'9246' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
6b98067f91105fee37e9b6bd9793ceab
ed47bba8adce6764b3295a12414214747f2580c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLO' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
4718f7f28e07d5a9cc760de74cc7ccc0
a9f0e4b8f921ddf1007fc82b5ac1589278d480c1
describe
'74041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLP' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
cd6ccda4dc4ebd5c334aebb2f87967b7
2771c07cf4003604f2f62a98287eac280151052a
describe
'20812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLQ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
e117a894446c5caed5815095288e03fc
e3a50ed2d6e357a1ac2930a6290b0049f9d70855
describe
'2967424' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLR' 'sip-files00178.tif'
fb400f2f454e892fe020c2ccdb9e5dd3
0580b99a9e441bd34c6e6404e9c69be6864542b1
describe
'670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLS' 'sip-files00178.txt'
3290a637f5882ea6ee15d5003b45beaa
09280730e536c914fecae1300471f4bc077e79db
describe
'4887' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLT' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
6adfeaef28c08f55ce91ddd2573ffc48
8fe941a5a3b5b4357707898daf011b17087bd663
describe
'368030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLU' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
58f1a97dd61c19bdaba3ae4113b1dbd7
1c35dba50f8b75906e8068eb6fe0955019e6d7fe
describe
'85237' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLV' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
8044a40eacc177566d6903f55bd497e8
7716d6574d26cde14f913db60deb1163234a4b6f
describe
'24002' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLW' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
66f644c3b39e9fb60bab09c7f8cecff2
c9ac32c513cdd8847a782cebe4ccb53325fcbbc0
describe
'2965888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLX' 'sip-files00179.tif'
2e738c78fddf3f4b0ef7aa7eb0fad33a
c47b1286f78f135d642f3f88527981e7d27e4a0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLY' 'sip-files00179.txt'
c143079127e8f4a7d22fc8bd9f8f4bda
110507c3d5ed9c7d170d344017a4f37f2c19e6d4
describe
'6024' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTLZ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
b13c6c521dc8f339a33c8680f0329070
27e52b8b3d2eb0520d3250869847b2581860002b
describe
'368175' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
c777b16c3410b7bcc6c8dc15bc5602f1
36d443e5ebcef6f6ffce93d0e9588dae0d29507b
describe
'125420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMB' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
10b2b9d7332628ee54f41d81adc1543e
805a1edd4f1ce19e6f145753679209732d2e19fc
describe
'39204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMC' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
4694750730abe49d1ad93590f3b66e14
ade8bd2699b4a18cbf41501041c0bc3461df0644
describe
'2967916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMD' 'sip-files00180.tif'
8dcc827ef7c99e426cb81125284b4fc6
652d8768e89d5be6f61b220d49325ef2ae9736de
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTME' 'sip-files00180.txt'
9f05710ab3e1a75dab59cd2b47f6a266
ef5e76c770c001321030c79a944634e816169e57
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMF' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
cdf10fcc3e43fb5b4634b9cac38e53ee
123449a0abe8563d1858b640768bd45df4cd9004
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMG' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
4ab95f5b0c1f5c0ca5547e9852d89f11
919b03198db0897c44406c82be4fb6e6e84eaf93
describe
'120146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMH' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7230de23fa84a17270eee37dafc2e360
e62349585882a70d54f19fc26e52a6d9947cf895
describe
'37162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMI' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
02d179ec3952c7e0cb14d4b32ff09a39
8a8f405a315a8b2133d386ee5d9d89cd946cf1b5
describe
'2969884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMJ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
c0f34d1e5c91369237eb1e0e128b4e30
80e98e8db292036e3815ea466c33f61bbc6acf0c
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMK' 'sip-files00181.txt'
279dd9c1539c28a8569b7af0b104f7fd
0182ae4576dd223ed716f44e8c9e353ad6e36aab
describe
'8964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTML' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
cba355316195a6ab2d086f3f5b3d411d
2bfffa072a2795c1a5dbd555ceb51e5672a91945
describe
'368180' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMM' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d4bbf8d416e2c298427869cf2fd15456
c508f6a4649dc61f5443885ed22d25d9700ef915
describe
'119490' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMN' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
966dae754394d1c770cf354aad48e22e
069738460b4701376ee6423e995c202c7c5b51e8
describe
'37988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMO' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
a268f1498b5b3dc06a75306899047790
fd307c12514710ff92c69e8b4bd37548f73451ff
describe
'2968020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMP' 'sip-files00182.tif'
e6d931472b274ee117d95fc875b4ea6b
327cddf678c4991b7e04363e154003dcf99f17ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMQ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
0db0f8d49eba75ac76c6f1a5ec8e825a
e39870b1c626e217cea67843f96901b748ab6129
describe
'9278' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMR' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
27b6dad444e0cc9ca09512157fd18d75
e6f2c8e9faca0629a21e683d89495be95c7a9b9c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMS' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
226ddf58c942a7a8618686607148dbeb
acd1f484967ebdfe11270110ccc1495199e8a801
describe
'120923' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMT' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
38e698dcae04172ee36e69ff12cef9f4
9e12547ed725b784a94481f3d1173f179556cb1c
describe
'38882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMU' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
829f792ab0fc6d9c3453250e264ec719
a0d1ecaca1f4878d2f8a33b49cf677bbc2aa05c1
describe
'2969968' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMV' 'sip-files00183.tif'
7d53e0166aa732f82f45de6a54be949e
5582f8267ca2af5e987c82d509cb473b54420df0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMW' 'sip-files00183.txt'
22f9526ca8284995bf68112970bfc4be
601060da09be75a5cdfba90afd37b8664a482b0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMX' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b65aca2383dd8c8a3c81e30b868644de
dc73ddc6d0899e9d870a3bc2de12212c6c9ac734
describe
'368192' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMY' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
cc5ee5ec65b18582e5bf74d756276b65
6191189f46b6dce19f2e7c4e8790b224d376537a
describe
'119039' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTMZ' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
7ffbb79e9ad6c2cc92a3101b4f0c1283
20e2aaba0e777d2fa2d6b4daaf8196482a2c84e4
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
b1ff809a86cf7de205da6d12d869e6d0
6e2543ae57430661929a2fe747f49b2f794806af
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNB' 'sip-files00184.tif'
719dcfdab87c90b61ac7cbdaacaeb76c
a8f1546c53e8e510ccb965627c6c167d318c41eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNC' 'sip-files00184.txt'
01576a520540a1be1aba27bf0d5468e8
eb1049e2affabb0e286f72f5591f7594e40db038
describe
'9128' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTND' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
a23b7f839e0a522b11e75ab14d6ee23f
3265cad1ac316d4347df2e3a247fe670f09dff33
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNE' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
6146889747a7040457b9f9a585c914c3
4b3c073cdb3513549b8954bbd2618b334dce5819
describe
'121907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNF' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
1c71776606d2d568ab2fa79d7e713995
7ea87b6578308e3cfc5b752cc7cac2eac2f56c7c
describe
'38293' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNG' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
82f51bd330ecb7d4940210030978d564
1a0551ee5efcf306f4c34744ee538f9501a18706
describe
'2969928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNH' 'sip-files00185.tif'
7f83280611e2c6eaf3966d703b7b9033
f5831126742f5ad8992d2cb851aaf35ac96d9962
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNI' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c5caa932bc4516f231c5b4b6f5ababd6
4221e0c8f2a3d6ed1de955c6a6d019d4f97a40f1
describe
'9298' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNJ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
24af46f82f9b48c6197040016aba4796
baa76735bf28c86a67d6aac440ef876e6dda60ca
describe
'368134' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNK' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
5001701c707c4007588f32b5e8b729c1
d75dc50d4038d072532bf00656e5a4c39c71ec7d
describe
'83824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNL' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
7c5f6cf1532de9cfe52fcae5cea7f30c
81dbf62709cbf683b0395affd56ba7f69a1eca5a
describe
'24620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNM' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
d3a1112676e939d1fa9fcc233c0fc769
a7106ed93b0dde7369e813adb6c7e8d61ba5473a
describe
'2965892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNN' 'sip-files00186.tif'
36a59081f92e3c41020b822a56e0328d
b25e51d00f79d6b7fc071f744aa4921a5a709c61
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNO' 'sip-files00186.txt'
84fa7d77ec065a2c23374ded81bbe077
08a79da1116bb44b7b33bfa3af020b901a8e703e
describe
'6159' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNP' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
8d467b9933a330ca2a298e4e1ee2d0c0
1c4cdc796c5c1ce7483a7557c08a3a7729186d4f
describe
'368042' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNQ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
a813c6f59338ef2f9077d80ed3d0fa5f
e677340390a9e1f570db1d6842e02ec4cd565748
describe
'89504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNR' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
ffe351bd6430429ad44ca4517b8d18a0
5821c74803f6e1c09a8b2994a185d47638c2c96d
describe
'26795' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNS' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
5345112151b3cc75bdb89c071509ff5f
894960f55dc1fd27bb73bc4bb2a5e7ab41ce1ac3
describe
'2966388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNT' 'sip-files00187.tif'
3dc75dce40969a5490fee44a4b499005
edd59fff6412200384d1b16dd08d3e02ad1ffc34
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNU' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b62134acab98dc42de381a4674f9ea25
ca8e629aa29b559c53ac76f338c1022b119eaeff
describe
'6886' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNV' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
def92991d13bb1f1df42931db6920011
a52daed96bfebb245a4955e6d38ae218c83a275e
describe
'368143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNW' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5750b3cc71a670b6da85afcac83f967a
ff5f74488a49ff45f5d884b33722cfff24cbc988
describe
'115164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNX' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a3592d114995b274746b9b4b48f69ce5
8b4ff49d46ebf9d308b8bc92898646d08200c5cf
describe
'35836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNY' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
70b1935ccf105aba29e53942ec5fe8eb
dfc6d8cd377ad55cc805ce07bfab4abf0a0a7f2e
describe
'2967500' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTNZ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
77d6a2669b78386f71fc3d4caff74b16
159eb29125c52b2d43608273ea99e8f7b75a7629
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOA' 'sip-files00188.txt'
ec0bf8756e2f9195a813940c7f479c7a
45b544470d94572dca2e444ea3aefd8f58a4e108
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOB' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
302a76c33431d759299aa2f1c906907f
71aebb658a7c43b1be21fdf6a8b8cd0de82e4752
describe
'368164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOC' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
a7f5a1d3ed264a19c0dee518ff25d643
16a08bc373907c18ad94b0feb4a35099392c07e7
describe
'113535' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOD' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
b754b91ba33fcaa093b040c0870de6fb
c455c48fcc5bcfe4201f755f7386b4084daec052
describe
'35451' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
8963b66e18d64a054701069e78fb6e8c
c92c3d3890828512e4eee23d72b9b13264aeb7ec
describe
'2967532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOF' 'sip-files00189.tif'
c051f61a489743b5db71960f161b6b81
e116c74f8f04240348262b13886075133e46437e
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
724b1b2e91f14a26ccb2e0a19e5098a6
5c37d19885f435dfc0dc013431918c10b327d9ae
describe
'8743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOH' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
60e63fca238cbdda4116897457337f27
a3a38c7309e37e4564a32488032b24f7dae2bf43
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOI' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
12c01dfb897b74741439f7efe0677afc
73e5d609a4855069d81471f5a0b7aa4c1b7c98da
describe
'118805' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOJ' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
af01071533e4145964c60a0d88725059
c889e992c15365975dc48a2e64437b67018b916e
describe
'36687' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
a2dd1ec29eb9a340a77e24b5baad2fe3
b21aa09af455ed14cb53c2855a0409035fe27e87
describe
'2970056' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOL' 'sip-files00190.tif'
b9591baf603334a3eb4635402238c4f0
f0ae1f89e4cd056d7cd4009a7060d8d20ca6cc2a
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
f96fa716967f99821c9cf48c1068de63
01fd3eaf665fc09fbf4949bed6467f311c36529b
describe
'9267' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTON' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
08494774fec058291487c1ce137a4004
ca2e4b2dd07300d50c2278d9403b6ac30208eafe
describe
'368415' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOO' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
2d710882963efb6a1083bf68bcbcdf95
000551e5b83425732a2d49308ece2b5656609156
describe
'114151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOP' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
91e8c0540ffc36ebab1ef8ed1fe92b8a
f0ce8c052c8aeb33a2ddaf28f8137c6d0bff0586
describe
'36234' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOQ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
49dbd4ecc759767dfb809e3066394be4
79f22124da096e651e89913c18685821e4131bbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOR' 'sip-files00191.tif'
8d1cca895cce6ceec67fc5b9718c06d8
19bc901ef371bf71998b7fb62eeb3fd9ed7a74e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOS' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3efe47678d9e930aebc16330b37ecf45
198a22bfa4d7bc48f77da47088944dee5f501b3e
describe
'9050' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOT' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
ef677fdb89817c1127e43d1657eb7e5f
61fd1ec5ed744514c8c35b190140dfebcd0a0852
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOU' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
225d83142dd3c2558c6d2cf51f57b5cc
4401c5423c2962cb32fb56134458330af908418a
describe
'110928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOV' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
f83ddee642ece020649dcf179279c125
e975b9c7adf4628f4ebbaaa223165143caca57ce
describe
'33909' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOW' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
f739dc0a59249facbc3dcdd182cbc355
d7a8a6d3b7f63d32d22e1c8dc355d00de3bef323
describe
'2969832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOX' 'sip-files00192.tif'
6c47c648f83c81ae856dcae60d28bb1d
69996e64075f9796e31957baec812fc776776fed
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOY' 'sip-files00192.txt'
8fbe766ddfe1b6a4299996e48dc10e28
7bbd9b085bafb95bd550c4bf09c0d5ed9b626080
describe
'8783' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTOZ' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e3769c09ccab30f4e65df6aab6ad7dbe
afeb9f2286251915dd9a7538826f767637e59076
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPA' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
215dab8619593256f4a5a60f250ecdd9
c138bb32a96aa150454c5c635b3cf6a0dc303358
describe
'123423' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPB' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
84659c081a7a060b76f4eb9cd1a2615b
0e08bb87a0c2a5983dc0ba7dc21fb9963e445733
describe
'38299' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPC' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
0d495b980b5a4b01d133f87c8e8945c8
93117cc8cf7df2775662455a78b862cfecfdcac8
describe
'2967900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPD' 'sip-files00193.tif'
33bc266cd6dcca4a86277f2a4d1c4e97
c90e03b82f7c2afa9efd9db86354c9c7477a84be
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPE' 'sip-files00193.txt'
af54c7c86b9c21d7432749cf2800e81f
ddff89a09824bafef20da4ee4f5625c17d7a393e
describe
'9255' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPF' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
db1d27faf5db079660ea27469970d0ff
500bf2a7befeab979553b73b858bc44a038cb436
describe
'368332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPG' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
42eb4686502555249e2b93289e5e2f93
259babecd13a3ac822bad303acc4d66e4e730167
describe
'49229' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPH' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
44f4d56134fa6f30e20567cd03ccdbe1
d8bb8f6b1743aa0f757dea2a62425ae2a9490172
describe
'12116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPI' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
ee75cafc89ca975b47ebf327aab6e5bf
f1e5ba0ceed8595c3b8324e2d15c83f1f49268ca
describe
'2966176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
3024cdcb20be697a0bdec849d0d9fa84
ff1fc8827b1b7f8795e52163a93e5da71e55676b
describe
'335' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPK' 'sip-files00194.txt'
2c6cabf607ba888bae6f27b7dc6fc83c
53c1c155be939e2a36bc73f1ed473c58d83d2534
describe
'3071' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPL' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
c266192c64341c5ab7bd23642432f6f1
cd7ced3cbeee75bbac7dd5fe3f25e55b7f3a1751
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPM' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
56892382fd104b18eea6101c5ee707c7
678f23157a7779ebed9d77335bd0dd5122cc5dd9
describe
'92573' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPN' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
ab3f470de5a9f80d36921eebd1b62c62
2a6d236842d9ac4300d8953ef4b81e7058945e31
describe
'28240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPO' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
19a3bd3467ed9b491e0f745a2293cba0
5b8bf905a47bf2b03b43d1cdf4c82a7b6736825c
describe
'2966432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPP' 'sip-files00195.tif'
025cde1f57eda7e29ad848959e6215b2
5a68c9c088b398436f4243826aa51c5c746f5ac1
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
4d7e1fe3a53207e0b285df4e4405619e
ba563fb116fc88d63c6d678e8bce2620769c297d
describe
'7056' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPR' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
b026bf0331c7bcb8d2ec2ec257c596e9
a48bfd2de210921392ab4a1ca8552ca5db79ba63
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPS' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
edf0bbafadbda0bde230861a90745054
c93d0381a39c20c2880835dd71e843127e223de7
describe
'117247' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPT' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
9ada7f6303b596908facc7b60a013da2
fcee2e6c67d9afe11b88edf1ccf9a919dec22069
describe
'35553' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPU' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
0a9aa8ad85a7ddfcec368614a8fc2788
a24edc073e614d244177b34e4edd1f8804f5f059
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPV' 'sip-files00196.tif'
7138cac885db6674585f20604a37e4de
75193d42867c3455dd0c3be5054950542027fc83
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPW' 'sip-files00196.txt'
b4dfc202c13ba252efdb8439dd5f2152
68c49e2b86ac790643ff3388aabc295fa724f20c
describe
'8946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPX' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
2d268c5281ef97e204f12eb515668126
51d70e79b271d92d9afdcbfa3e718a349ac07f49
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPY' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
b61f83fcd31571acc6f5e1af6dda726a
e13065bd2ee5ed5758dcf4ab11b79f6375a96fe7
describe
'115688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTPZ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
aedcb0693aa63c95b6b0c93fd9cf425b
ed690a1d059dde3a5fc320d853128501cc7fb9cf
describe
'34992' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQA' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
87b1eb53fce88a77d0390ef243993d6a
02857c77dda253bc958f9866dfb9dce42752ecd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQB' 'sip-files00197.tif'
4195fa7afe496b57b6b6daf6012ecc5c
038ce8a18edc966646b0437b4b4c3a72a84a1ee6
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQC' 'sip-files00197.txt'
0dd89190d21108b144803189a4da54b0
bacf69c41831be083ac80cd8543a6e217fc535c3
describe
'8566' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQD' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
cf0749ad466621686e64e9dcd0d0afa5
d0a7bb8ef48ea0fdad4363dd4b66a2b9af0884e9
describe
'368409' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQE' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
d77812e6c8567a632faa67580dd1dfd6
99697a2f7c48f37b802bce2ca493970b966822bb
describe
'113638' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQF' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
48320e9788e9fc397554afcc4aa3d4c1
2ca32cee8d4ae97ec0b76ea8191646123dc33909
describe
'36108' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQG' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
269e122bbc9eb766f22b1fe7dd028dbb
fc3c73c6e87c0d4c91a442e994a9c6a37700fe22
describe
'2969784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQH' 'sip-files00198.tif'
0dce261528a46ca704150c7b362375a7
ea6dc936c0409cdb434fa1bb6ec63b4258ce7740
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQI' 'sip-files00198.txt'
08c71f400ba35c3b604ba6bdfefa1043
78714a39fd23f5d4781ab411a241131d82281b75
describe
'8819' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQJ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
b3e4b799123d9086d49f267e083ae786
e59b7aec9a67807f8eef3f4fbebf18f80cccb7f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQK' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
f27b054deb0093e088adcbe856ccdece
d9d171f09902ff264ed6c5e36152a0c57034c0c7
describe
'120140' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQL' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
066d02f5173fb5ced7e7efe24c7bd09e
f09a2967ea439deaea7ec6370e6b4e7918780f5a
describe
'37889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQM' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
736526c80da1efe18dcc01982a461439
2d6d0127f02d661e5db58622e57e07e5a3f01432
describe
'2970228' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQN' 'sip-files00199.tif'
69d21394f1b9a8f5d75c22bbf15357dd
4a0a713cab413e74f063aeabe3d05c9f0cf03fd2
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQO' 'sip-files00199.txt'
f0b3620ff3baa721713db1e2cf4f26c2
d223ed3dbc312d3ea34c7667c91a1f1676fd2cc7
describe
'9309' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQP' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
26f8d94ea5d429669688f88aa0e7952d
b05e7bc7bf23cbb3533244db1b1faefba8fb3346
describe
'368251' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQQ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
6b40f5526a935ba6e65cfdc2a177b7a7
a8e70f047e70bba055851e2b1d3d241c955dbca4
describe
'120679' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQR' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
f10e27ff62e1fc8b8bfd83e79efcfc61
47b71a2a695e7314ef8667c25387384096c1d009
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
bbd86d2c9ebca28131cc9e90247f0688
f14d39dd7931f5747cfe67eb81a5f47ae0752269
describe
'2968304' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQT' 'sip-files00200.tif'
9c8d949879b7174be6ffe026a99e492d
2fe01d87b0271c3e63989a5cec97b84fdc20b407
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
309eec967b6c39cb7e64c3f7db48cc83
2cf0a5c69f825cb68aac047384926ce248a868e1
describe
'9124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQV' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
41365d995bb92bbb4a50cbb184cc7dce
dcfb47604bbafdbec9a01b072dc41c3a8a8789e6
describe
'368418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQW' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
e1d8d7caeb3898d6dfe321c4a8c3f2c7
1a32dfbe7e58a1bf3aa3710a5ddb63bf084d5279
describe
'105849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQX' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
c8192d39ef29541ce2f1ed921804cc6c
c1fa92805c96b429b689c5fb6ed87d2b3a0a75d3
describe
'32202' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQY' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
cdf73ec8c120d6e07259426d62acabb5
564b5cc6b8f62a0f5dbed9f6fb531bc77ffdb4ef
describe
'2968964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTQZ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
78cfa57d0205cebfbcafd69880380e1a
9490be9764be376273f07efa241b7f8194396ca4
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRA' 'sip-files00201.txt'
57816ce7bbe0fe6342e3607c58afb2ce
babc438d9a6b16543105963a0e8e80b33b8b1171
describe
'7626' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRB' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
05dbf128db518d63b5cf05fba84b3df3
ead984d584d0af3cb2e88da5dc431bf543028aac
describe
'368281' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRC' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
cf218f703c83cab01d702eca5a0cd5fd
feb1ca83ee8165b13e774316c89c726157cbd637
describe
'87902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRD' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
8844680fe5c87c9a70daa804a5126296
76185b33eacf3ed5d5ca07cc286b71bfb80bcde2
describe
'26857' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRE' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
e1246743925d399c176442d571fb0168
583f4ae171982d0fc47f05cff878496d349f21cd
describe
'2968524' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRF' 'sip-files00202.tif'
54f59eb367f5549a0d3c161064580013
2c2cfdd0c9367d667a5c43f9cd0c983d5ef51353
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRG' 'sip-files00202.txt'
3b4eb7b96948007bbf59fa4a50fb257d
958f115f9e626b733dcb821e01cd8a807798e09b
describe
'6578' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRH' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
69b0f7a86998567ab1798c88f85d2953
1b19ee2437592558b44a8b744187c2e3a4122bb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRI' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c9f5db2b1aa556dc6fc37229ce161117
52f33f8884590365133b6c7563c0e45016816782
describe
'112332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRJ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
34a16b7559cd7c939c17d9a8fc4fb443
dcb78da99145b5796e10e7e3537513c50eb399f3
describe
'35123' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRK' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
adf682a979aa3e021360b79c2ac97914
22023b4364a2df43d99035acf0011bd7a22860ad
describe
'2969848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRL' 'sip-files00203.tif'
83993ffdc2b0a2748df1ca5d022e5b70
ee517b343c6665d455d5a2a0a68573654363f5f9
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRM' 'sip-files00203.txt'
2cdf7cdf69a8f32f3729c0ce87269374
ad16fc333c99c0b971ef6da2746718e6e35e785a
describe
'8858' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRN' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
cc99d52febc835193c9be257ff6c26d1
0a4da489c84a7c82ff7efbe3a69a43aec06cddd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
3acd300c80f26243a922133363cf24b2
ca2a99bf588ddaeadc0ab177d367cf6f3571dde4
describe
'117494' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRP' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
6e530dfbabafcdf05a95ee93ad190eeb
3523315061e912264ece5053552bf2a92ce3d8a9
describe
'35897' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRQ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
24e6343095617a4166d9e4e9d894d84a
7208d6e61276230ada68c00965af775b579b47c0
describe
'2967768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRR' 'sip-files00204.tif'
8adf48c853ca1fe67271cbd6be7d06e1
5c6193157829994edf483e4e47c0a70e367043ab
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRS' 'sip-files00204.txt'
f74a76475823a8746483522b826a0c3e
9645068640015da7878869e05ce6f419664b6569
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRT' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
26e17a01d03b3b12b597246823feb8eb
3bef847c77b5d101360a272569c0aa8f7af1ec9c
describe
'368010' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRU' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
f328bb928da9841e0a733ac5d2a7b042
ecc159e9c796a7a8d836c46f3f6152ae3f2e5d38
describe
'112896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRV' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
80351a1c1b963a5718761daa2618c688
939d6e7f052ab8f4c0fec02ed5d26fa8c3e752f2
describe
'35051' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRW' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
632497ce829755b4ea0808b4ba9be879
4f1ad06b8147f18366fd8f01c4f32800b4e8521e
describe
'2966060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRX' 'sip-files00205.tif'
a64609eea86eb24e70aa7fb8534a038e
bfbbad4720f554779eae71a64d3d29df35844931
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRY' 'sip-files00205.txt'
152288ae15953170736d9c43fd2f748a
5c153397f5356e0761876c5db41823c55a6b037e
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTRZ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
adfd55d2b0b1c16634483ef83ceecb60
10a608f9a5f1168a435cc6eb4af16b4e53e0cddf
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSA' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
af993481009a859860ada0d7e148a33b
81e097706e937d90e9a263329991d2b580ac4758
describe
'111789' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSB' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
96f78246e75580269a16f75850395b69
12c4d4b49f621e43750c6a280d50dbf648d0a004
describe
'35482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSC' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
892aead7046c61266815d9f32391a5ff
64356cf8366e86baebb1a00b98c7bfaae0f46103
describe
'2969648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSD' 'sip-files00206.tif'
ff979ecf1b44f1f4ccd6fcf684ffba0c
38535ba95ea2af13543205162548bb3147e4b799
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSE' 'sip-files00206.txt'
088a9387a615a77a94ae1800ef934ddf
67d10b6d2616e89a6f37fceb84166c2496a86b24
describe
'8832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSF' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
0294b532368344fef0637b8166ad68bb
c416676524eae12811a29add9efd1696d8574f13
describe
'368292' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSG' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
aa69d569fa0da4f91e06efc1a72a7eea
a65cc5d6afab1db755335d0095bbff4c9d26501b
describe
'107374' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSH' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
0d802f30102bddbebe72815498ea7e9b
a11568f4c0042846e46a8c763a42c8deb1e8ebb5
describe
'33463' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSI' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
09821e29ab68607a8543f34635515300
4833ac437924b843687f0757505170a8e282dc59
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSJ' 'sip-files00207.tif'
302f8bf1ef28f00064716dc8655afca1
885de64cbbc5e51d1f7f41e6a0d3c74512b265af
'2011-12-11T03:30:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSK' 'sip-files00207.txt'
af4385717d35bc951dd85163006caaac
257972eb1604f06e6ebbb9e5078f2a261604a6ef
describe
'8466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSL' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
0ae3dcd049665d567e95ab803b8de635
2b149ab4b9f6f6c4fcd08d4221e6849c0244c8f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSM' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
fec653000ea1a746c7383c4c5d7f8e33
243d20b2d6acf4ef49dc3aa0f9c16b5eb62429a2
describe
'119136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSN' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
e87a03f740a05143ef43f677e6a3d863
f7e94d772f729b7d259aa6f65b15863d46fbfce9
describe
'36496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSO' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
405965756e0adee1fb4c2af927566172
ad8e15112057eb36774f8d3774d794a6de09b04a
describe
'2967544' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
16cf294e6e273c5e4d1230db4eff780d
176160cfacf8a0565ce436fd7f85c0e318c4be0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSQ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
8999198c09135e7416298ccccd792429
25debde2851f61c5313da809dd823ed908ffe3c6
describe
'9132' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSR' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
2daba649968c315a4a1d20d9b6232990
79f793d717454728a83fdf8f342fd06cbc8e789a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSS' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
e0767a4705defd4ebcca84c91b5d05b4
28f1c5695e97df740d880d4ab9a849fd67bc5219
describe
'117275' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTST' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
31a01ad803e1f49031e5ced69957df54
f1a183c69140cf7d4289088941589fcc4fa9fb99
describe
'35954' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSU' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
893b1a1cd1e66a204e7e9b0f5bffac06
52c101304593f6313817809270cbbd2b25ca3629
describe
'2969980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSV' 'sip-files00209.tif'
3bc8540a336edb05d3d44428350cd5fd
0463a467e1a6443d04f99ac275077ed5d0c6bd1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSW' 'sip-files00209.txt'
9b59e4536df11965fc9aa0d726e546c2
ac6156ad17940b439d66784d6d30e6d409b4b3ce
describe
'8791' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSX' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
f618e96e7c43dbcc9e92272becdebed1
0774ce3e19c8e542eafcf18b460c81097bd282b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSY' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
5f97e666813a95bc2c3e9089971c64b1
a17ed86c993ed94c6a52ca8c6e1a6fd60f802dce
describe
'60414' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
e4a2ca37d6340686314db159b6a41930
9284f1b01372f549f2870776c7f759f4d03f5298
describe
'16338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTA' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
1b263defa9f5969f6b4772b1885ce747
def65cce96793b146883bfc3398ca035ae3930a1
describe
'2966708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTB' 'sip-files00210.tif'
4d1a5667e7645c33e86bf8cd0f20b4df
eef6c30e93e28612afd317f434adf04af7acb00d
describe
'495' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTC' 'sip-files00210.txt'
85d335da9ef47efa454ee9e6526a3d54
62c5591308fa5f9de9cfe11a72a7c375fbf7fec2
describe
'3984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTD' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
17fab90d675c2540de80f4734e875e2a
2644b3c306aea5df98e3e5af73e1727f5a082403
describe
'368184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTE' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
d076b9a3c2ba4b54cfa59d108a6b7a64
6baa988ad266ef5dcb8394cafdd66d8aeb8b224f
describe
'95198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTF' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
0c3d1c4d5d20220d5a0939f0c04d8ef7
06f03fd000ea36c41e82afbfcc1d24a950f98eab
describe
'28630' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTG' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
14bd8d5c46a8f5427af09fa74b495bf2
ac0552a3b172654414b60438fd15482317236125
describe
'2966552' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTH' 'sip-files00211.tif'
1b56b5849022f355fb184e28ef8eff4a
ff4d984441e430a0a461741dc28d4f723a52e3df
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTI' 'sip-files00211.txt'
1fe5fc023f6e18c2f86873407d5780c8
39fa1632f8179c2c8ae6a7d5c93fa3c59e14fc68
describe
'7188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTJ' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
6a1502813726712469bb42c096a128b8
bbbd064e1a0c75d37f35eaa91a5ec14ee5fa5c75
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTK' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
05cfc8a19e2d352340f41a4257c5f69f
50f8062b10ad29d3cb7bbedef25d971b9ad21a5c
describe
'123270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTL' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
296d98bd2b207595566375f37f5ed74b
0d1d4f251b5f44be7f87442f1ffa9e2b7ec58e49
describe
'38508' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTM' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
353f35e3ae8f0a143aeb20ef1995ff68
27a7ad7311e1ea70403c9a34c4168a05abd0d493
describe
'2969936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTN' 'sip-files00212.tif'
4f1b68b4c815a99e265524165db1d4b2
c41b7feac88626576a2b63967c24fcf914772987
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTO' 'sip-files00212.txt'
13aadcd1eedeeeb4c641ae21570b42e3
58ede95d218356608bc69ba269574a9e24263819
describe
'9139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTP' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
85605e2c3bc09595c4a2e767f182cf98
cb36206602e3d544ceadf0c29d9d74d770ff336f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTQ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
83ad53e337ef8f834ed06d7c1da50555
6ee2a825b26ab5fe641e739eb25b1876da9d1a87
describe
'115199' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTR' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
da38d597fa7f59e98ceffd3b621be073
9074b97463d0f246984b7cf59c295ab1e824b236
describe
'36428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTS' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
87ce53b5d0600c48a63ff06c1bffc083
f4d300b7fc17cd5040ad8e313d9ad42ce03b22f7
describe
'2970156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTT' 'sip-files00213.tif'
603127b033f6395b73ac02b5b7a2a978
ad5f684df336ab78fa8f1329dce107fc3ae4e018
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTU' 'sip-files00213.txt'
49ef71139409b61a4400a012a8e99068
3252199d9a9c5003c3b00d69f5366aa18038c926
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTV' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
5c5b5f6fe1245a6f135f8b37b96b26ca
55ed8735f2210f361e7e62f15a6de27fb77670ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTW' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
af4f211d985673a91597eb74a50f0cd6
fda9a06212bf506f00a0b413be6a4cd197d376fd
describe
'123120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTX' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
c4ad2a1695ab8062e1dcbcc1725c5505
ff8a0960a4d3687c9c0048dc188c786608e069a4
describe
'39047' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTY' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
4b9cda2a9ed82a56a28936fb34cfcf5e
73c901e5b8449b61bcd89bc003e09377483a996e
describe
'2970160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTTZ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
044435679b954fb3087c47023c9d4c8f
c32808ee42de2c6b2d5b92ae258f857c547c8931
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUA' 'sip-files00214.txt'
934ce0fadccd6da52f45343a7b1be7ef
15ad57c807017e5e997407ab53e89df47808bf18
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUB' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
92bd021df8d8b873397557201f9d8378
24b2288e988397e08eeead8718781fe90cb36a89
describe
'368174' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUC' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
775652f47dedc61b16d14ffec9751153
236269507bc80752c7e30c421a851a19038a1a37
describe
'115012' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUD' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
667a9bfba5fc51d01942e48bb06c4ad9
937ba4f1975b4ed57481e283b344880f01c159f8
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUE' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
580b1c74253c5db661f0915210523b2b
7e34bb727513e974ea743544e64fe6eb993c5ca4
describe
'2967912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUF' 'sip-files00215.tif'
b606fdb702a65ab54cb2892d9e0b4759
19dae9d4b7b79e4acc7cd5c857be28f8b89f1bb7
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUG' 'sip-files00215.txt'
0006d612a41b3a1e9604ebe06947d9c6
09c113e492efc111aa9caf735645e2540e36a56f
describe
'9060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUH' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
99aee9834400b0d708f9892c8b5d3101
e00560d0369172bfc8e87cce587c50be4f9d2317
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUI' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
37403d66ebd0bacead342d2f7a742180
07549486be5686a610070742d2d163bb6977a6ed
describe
'79926' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUJ' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
5b85e2a890080c291f01cd9ee4763522
3e112e8b8c507431154e036786e04bd4ba5bf608
describe
'22394' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUK' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
357007eb03cf3ed200f3f66c9f278155
93673b7da899f5f309609ca1fe7a3bf169bf2c13
describe
'2965884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUL' 'sip-files00216.tif'
ee2cd4aa3cd4f3029c0e7aeaeac4731c
645b3bfef1c69750fd4832b0dd1032f06eb88da7
describe
'743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUM' 'sip-files00216.txt'
65d8b70780ccd99a7540ba7295df902e
57b60c3737be4c0818a0d3df91412174c1fee79e
describe
'5636' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUN' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
9b3f8e6cd5d97cea92670f626be187bd
131f43a5320292540f59a8c66f60c3beffb6f93e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUO' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
5afe81ef2106c9f2896d3cb1368cf644
4c105533904a46689d7f904602babdab53a04f60
describe
'75095' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUP' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
8459ce9d615f653c9c87898bf05e7934
580dbada4c0bde93985693a0359b0a9692fb31dd
describe
'16900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUQ' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
2e24a5f3143566969fb4b39cba44bd9e
4c843d73b97033e0862945ec113298fdf5c3fff8
describe
'8848344' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUR' 'sip-files00218.tif'
42de9326d49b197bd5f1f1f325ec1b74
2e18b5d73032601aa97a82f29ad2d757a5d1f765
describe
'4034' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUS' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
6166c7e611d83249da98a6f417f966b6
c7ff496fdf5faadcb2b22b790083d8a043309c32
describe
'446387' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUT' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
efff4f23f2b0120259b22dbe35777b51
2eea830a3e7c07dcf810ac0aeea00a4f27865030
describe
'106591' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUU' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
47b98ad013e83aa59c1013bb11692d3d
dc6c055ce984381463d4afdf874d702f02aca3d4
describe
'26504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUV' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
d1a0461291444eb12928758806d4451c
cf5c10aaca1c4093a84484bd94f7ed6125686f9f
describe
'10720124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUW' 'sip-files00219.tif'
7ddbd2d360c989ced3fe62d2a1fc37c4
bcfad29c40c10df8ec2ad5481ca7c6f56c439f41
describe
'6167' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUX' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
2e614cb95fc4d67a49bac1d6a95354db
ab825dd79ed976faad9eeca2f3224161cc3cbe41
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUY' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
c1312ad59accbb19a14a506064cbf6a6
3af88c5cd5ff6864660e20e00868cdc3e7166948
describe
'139381' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTUZ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
d07d46a84d61fe46763ad1d9460ed9cc
494d01ba24065b3f763a75c5740df251a5c725e1
describe
'24122' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAACCfileF20080512_AABTVA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
67fb2bb80857699cb763b1c9980ec812
0d890d4d2fdd86d29c9c91833e88d4f2cfd5bb21
describe
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7
“My duty to God must come before even my
duty to the king.”

page 36.
DRIVEN into EXILE

A Story of the Huguenots



LOUIS MADE PRISONER

page I47

T. NEBSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and New Vork.
DRIVEN
INTO EXILE

A Story of the Huguenots.

By

A, D. ©. E.,

Author of * Pictures of St. Peter,” “ Exiles in Babylon,”
“The Shepherd of Bethlehem,”
oo Se.



LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK.

1892
Preface.

———++—__—_

THE expulsion of the Protestants from France, after the
Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, is a fact which needs
no comment here. It is written in history in letters
broad and black, yet gilded by the faith and devotion
of those who became exiles for conscience’ sake. I have
made this expulsion the ground-work of my story; the
design of which is to show how faith like that of
Abraham enabled God’s people at a later period to follow
his example, leave home and country, and go forth as
pilgrims and strangers. As a missionary in India, I see
daily those whom the same faith has led to give up all
for the Saviour—to break asunder the closest, dearest
ties, if these ties would keep them from Him. Whether
in England, France, or India, it is the love of Christ that
constraineth ; trials but strengthen, persecutions but
brighten that golden chain which binds us to Him.
ALL. 0. E
I,

I.

TI.

Iv.

Vi.

VII.

VIII.

Ix,

XI.

XII.

XIII.

XIv.

XY.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XIX,

@J ontents.

THE WOMAN OF TACT,
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL,
SUBMISSION, ae
THE FLAME SCORCHES,
BEHIND THE CURTAIN,

A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH,
LAST FAREWELLS,

AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE,
POVERTY AND PRIDE,

A PACKET OF LETTERS,
ALONE IN A CROWD,

THE MONASTERY,

GINS AND SNARES,

A MEETING,

A MEMORABLE NIGHT,

A SECRET,

A RACE FOR LIFE,

THE EXILES’ HOME,

A SOLEMN SCENE,

il
19
25
33
41
47
55
61
68
76
85

93

116
126
186
143
148

159
x CONTENTS.

XX. THE GRAND MONARCH,
XXI. FAITH TRIED,

XXII, FLIGHT,

XXII. IN THE SNOW,

XXIV. PLANS,

XXV. A PARTING GLANCE, ...

169
175
188
191
198

207
DRIVEN INTO EXILE.



CHAPTER IL
THE WOMAN OF TACT.

“But you must persuade your father!” cried Madame
Duval.

“ Persuade!” repeated Adéle la Force bitterly ; “can
we persuade that grand cedar to bow its tall form like
a reed? can we persuade the snow-capped mountain to
sink into a valley? As easily could we persuade my
father to draw back one inch from the spot where he
has planted his foot.”

“Does not the marquise use her influence? woman who has wit in her brain can usually guide her
husband,” said Madame Duval, making her words more
emphatic by the movements of a large painted fan which
she held in her hand. “There is coaxing”—the fan was
gently fluttered ; “ flattering”—the wave became slower ;
“reproaches”—the lady brought the fan down sharply
12 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

on her own knee; “tears, despair !”—the fan was sud-
denly closed, to express a total collapse.

“The marquise never attempts to influence my father ;
she says that it is a wife’s part to obey.” (Madame
Duval shrugged her shoulders, for she had a great con-
tempt for this axiom, and never herself acted upon it.)
“And she is right,” continued Adéle la Force; “right to
be willing to follow when she has such a man as my
father to lead.”

“ Cousin Elizabeth’s mind is very mediocre,” observed
Madame Duval ; “she has no kind of originality or esprit.
Tam always sorry on your account, ma petite, that since
the marquis chose to marry a second time, he did not
give his children a step-mother more spirituelle. But
what could one expect from an Anglaise !”

“My step-mother certainly does not understand me,”
said Adéle, a little petulantly. “I can never forget her
shocked look, and the lecture which she gave me, when she
once found Louis and me galloping on one pony, I riding
in the fashion of a boy. The marquise had lately come
from England, and I suppose that people are more dull
and solemn there, to match the climate.”

“Not at the court certainly,” said Madame Duval
with a smile; “King Charles the Second and the beauties
at Nonsuch did not trouble themselves much about pro-
prieties. But I don’t believe that Cousin Elizabeth was
ever within a hundred miles of a court; I doubt whether
THE WOMAN OF TACT. 13

she had ever put her foot into a coach, or even a sedan;
and if she ever rode, it would be on a, pillion behind her
father. I think that the marquise likes to imitate the
birds—the brown sparrows, J mean—and only wear one
style of dress, and that of the simplest. The dear crea-
ture” (the speaker’s tone was one of contempt) “ has no
more idea of fashion and ton than the sparrows possess!”

“All the better for her when this dreadful, dreadful
fall comes,” observed Adéle with a heavy sigh.

“Tt cannot come, it must not—it shall not!” exclaimed
Madame Duval. “The marquis will never be so cruel,
so insane, as to leave this beautiful home of his ances-
tors just for a few trifling differences in the matter of
religion. The king, the grand monarch, has chosen to
revoke the Edict of Nantes; he wants all his subjects
to worship as he does. Eh bien! it is easy to conform
in mere externals; as Henry of Navarre said, ‘Paris is
worth a mass. We need not be wiser than our famous
hero. I say that Chateau la Force is worth a mass, and
a great many too; there is not a fairer estate in all the
province of Normandy.”

Tears gathered in Adéle’s eyes as she glanced around
her; and, in truth, her childhood’s home was one in
which the girl might feel natural pride. The saloon in
which she was seated with the wife of her cousin was
lofty and long, one end of it richly hung with ancient
tapestry. The furniture was. antique, somewhat heavy,
14 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

but handsome. Some fine portraits hung on the wall,
painted by Holbein and Vandyck, giving an impression
that beauty was hereditary in the family of La Force.
There were also more warlike ornaments, in the shape of
banners won at Ivri, and weapons, of which some were
very ancient, with some chain armour worn by a crusad-
ing ancestor in the days of Philip Augustus. The depth
of the window recesses, in which were seats of carved
oak, showed the thickness of the massive walls, which had
stood a siege during the war of La Fronde. And most
charming was the view to be seen from these windows;
for Chateau la Force stood on a little eminence girdled
with a beautiful park, beyond which a fair expanse of
country was seen, with the sea, like a silver edging,
touching the distant horizon,

The appearance of Adéle, the marquis’s only daughter,
was in keeping with her surroundings. The girl might
be some fifteen summers old, with dark, lustrous, intelli-
gent eyes, and complexion which, though less fair than
that of an English girl, wore a richer bloom on the
cheek, a brighter coral on the lip, than are usually be-
stowed on maidens to the north of the Channel. Adéle’s
movements had the easy grace natural to one accustomed
to high society: her dress, though not of expensive mate-
rial, was elegant, and according to the costume worn by
ladies during the latter part of the reign of Louis Qua-
torze. Madame Duval was richly, even extravagantly
THE WOMAN OF TACT, 15

attired, in the height of the reigning fashion, and yet
had something of vulgarity in her appearance. Her
rich silk dress, worn with a peaked bodice, was looped
back on both sides so as to display a petticoat of costly
brocade. Her sleeves, which scarcely reached below the
elbows, were ornamented with the same kind of ex-
pensive point lace as that which edged the upper part
of her bodice. Madame Duval’s cheeks were highly
coloured, but not by the hand of Nature; and not from
Nature came the profusion of black curls which clus-
tered on each side of the head, and fell in heavy coils
on the neck. The lady’s manner was lively, her speech
rapid, and garnished with many exclamations, which sa-
voured too much of profanity to be recorded. Madame’s
frequent appeals to the bon Diew certainly belonged to
the category of idle words. Belinde Duval was what
the worldly call wise, and what the wise call worldly.
The French lady was vain of her tact, especially as ex-
ercised on her amiable but weak husband, between
whose conscience and his wife’s will there was a con-
stant and wearisome conflict.

“TI say you must protest,” continued Madame Duval ;
“you must bring your father to reason. Iam a Hu-
guenot myself, so is your good cousin my husband ; but,
as I tell him, Huguenot zeal must be tempered with
common sense. One cannot put one’s head into the
mouth of a cannon. There is such a thing as accom-
16 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

modating oneself to circumstances. See, here is my
fan” (madame again opened the pretty bauble, carried
for ornament rather than use, to help her in illustrating
her meaning). “On one side are painted high-born shep-
herds and shepherdesses, dancing round fountains and
holding garlands of roses; the other side is simple sky-
blue silk. If I am in a gay assembly, the shepherds
and their chéres amies dance at their pleasure; if I am
listening to a pasteur’s sermon, I turn the celestial colour
to the light; and when cold, miserable winter comes
with its storms—shut up fan!” (she suited the action to
the word); “there is nothing to be seen but the ebony
sides.” Madame Duval laughed at her own illustra-
tion.

“Cousin Belinde, I am in no humour for jesting, my
heart is too heavy,” sighed Adéle.

“JT do not wonder at that; you have enough to make
you désolée !” exclaimed Madame Duval. “The very
idea of flying from this beautiful home, of going beyond
reach of visits to charming Paris, of being exiled to
dreadful England, with its horrible climate, where the
air is thick as pea-soup, and the sun is seen so seldom
that men take off their hats to him when he appears—
the very idea is too shocking to be entertained for a
moment! I should be stifled in England, désolée ; I
should die of ennui.” The lady raised her shoulders

and cast up her eyes, to express a shuddering sense of
(106)
THE WOMAN OF TACT. 17

utter misery. “And you, ma petite, have been born to
such a very different fate; your name, your ancestry,
give you such a prestige. You remember, I doubt not,
Madame la grande Dauphine’s visit to the chateau, when
she was making her tour in Normandy; how she patted
your curly head, and said that you and Louis made the
prettiest pair that she ever had seen, and that you must
_both come to her at Paris. What an opening!” ejacu-
lated Madame Duval; “what would not I give for my
Felicie to have such a chance of making her way at court!
But she has not your antelope eyes, nor is her father a
marquis. You have such brilliant prospects before you;
and so has Louis—why, he might be appointed page to
the king !”

“We must not think of these things,” said Adéle bit-
terly ; “they can never be; I ought not to wish them
to be.”

“Oh! the very good little nuignonne will not even
look at the sugared cake which papa puts out of her
reach on the shelf! But tell me the truth, ma petite—
if by taking that rose out of your bodice and placing
it on yon table you could change your father’s rigid
views, and make him see things in a sensible way, tell
me, would you not do it?”

Adéle flushed, and laid a hesitating hand on the rose.

“ And would not Louis?” said Madame Duval.

“Louis would do thus!” exclaimed Adéle; and sud-
(108) 2
18 THE WOMAN OF TACT.

denly throwing down the rose, she trampled it under her
foot.

« Bravo! quite sensational! what an actress you
would make!” cried her cousin, laughing; “Madame
Maintenon should secure you for her private theatricals.”

“Hark!” exclaimed Adéle; “do you not hear the
trampling of horses ?”

“T suppose that the marquis is returning,” said Ma-
dame Duval rising; “and I must take my departure, for
I expect some visitors at home.” She went to the
window and looked out. “There is my chair waiting ;
pray make a thousand apologies to my cousin the mar-
quise. I heard that she was making preserves in the
still-room, so I came for a téte-d-téte with you.”

Then followed embraces, carefully given by the elder
lady, who feared to disarrange her false hair, and rather
coldly received by the younger. Adéle quite understood
why Cousin Belinde cared little for the society of the
marquis and his wife: there was nothing in common
between them. Adéle accompanied her visitor down the
broad oaken staircase, and saw Madame Duval enter the
gay, fanciful sedan-chair, which often in those days took
the place of the cumbrous family coach. With a waved
salute, the lady was borne away by two liveried servants.
Almost at the same moment a party of horsemen, amongst
whom the marquis was the central and most striking
figure, emerged from a thickly-wooded part of the park,
CHAPTER II.
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

THE Marquis la Force was a man of noble presence,
especially when mounted, as he now was, on a spirited
charger, which he managed with graceful ease. The
steed knew that the hand on the rein was that of a
master, and obeyed the slightest movement. La Force
had passed middle age, but was still in the full strength
of vigorous manhood. His features were fine, but more
remarkable for the expression of calm repose upon them
than for mere statuesque regularity. The marquis’s ap-
pearance was not marred by the huge wig then usually
worn by men of the upper classes. La Force had a
settled dislike to everything false: the brown hair,
lightly streaked with silver, the moustache and pointed
beard were such as we see in portraits of gentlemen of
the preceding generation, when the sword was more
often in the hand than the snuff- box, and luxury had
not made effeminate courtiers of the descendants of
warriors,
20 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

Beside the marquis rode Jacques Duval, the son of
the noble’s sister. The nephew was a contrast in ap-
pearance to the uncle. Duval looked much shorter than
La Force, even though the redundant wig under his
laced cocked hat rendered the difference less conspicuous.
A huge cravat encircled a short thick neck, and made it
look shorter and thicker. The face above that cravat
was pleasant, honest, and kindly; but the lips, full and
usually slightly apart, had none of the expression of
calm determination seen on those of the uncle. It was
evident, also, that Duval had little command over his
horse. The animal’s fidgety movements disturbed him,
and sometimes interrupted the conversation which he
was carrying on with his uncle as hey slowly ap-
proached the chateau.

“Yes, yes, you are right, you are always right; I am
entirely of your opinion,” said Jacques Duval: “it is
better to lose anything, to sacrifice everything, than to
violate conscience. I intend to signify to his Majesty
that I am going to do what you do.”

“Not as I do, but as our God commands,” said the
marquis. “Neither of us can, as Huguenots, conform to
a form of worship which we regard as idolatrous.”

“Surely not, surely not,” said Duval, stooping ner-
vously to pat the neck of his restless horse; “ but-—
but—;” the poor man kept his eyes on his steed,
avoiding meeting those of his companion as he
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL. 21

added, “in some ways my difficulties are greater than
yours.”
“How so?” asked the marquis. “Your property is
chiefly in hard cash, much more easily removed than my
house and acres, which are pretty certain to fall into the
hands of some favourite at the court. Besides, you have
artistic talent, which would of itself secure you from all
risk of serious privation.”

“J have a wife and daughter,’ murmured Jacques.

The marquis might have said, “So have J,” but he did
not utter the sentence, nor put his nephew to the humil-
iation of explaining the difference between the two
families.

“T am not sure—I do not think—that Madame Duval
would go with me if I went into exile,” said Jacques.

“Madame Duval could not choose but go with you,”
observed his uncle, “ unless you were to settle a separate
allowance upon her, which you would not be so unwise
as to do.”

“Madame is very much opposed to my resisting the
king’s will,” said Jacques, with a piteous look on his
face.

“My nephew, it is right to show a wife every con-
sideration—every kindness consistent with our duty to
God,” observed the marquis; “but no husband must
abdicate the position which he holds by the highest
authority; he must not drop the rein which God has
22 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

placed in his hand; he must not make a woman’s will
his law ; he must serve the Lord himself, and do his best
to make his family serve the Lord also.”

“Quite right, quite right,” said Duval; “I always
thought as you did. I will do my best to persuade
Madame Duval. Ah, that’s her chair! I must hasten
after her. Madame always likes to have my protection
when she passes through that part of the forest where
she apprehends danger from robbers. Adieu, my dear
uncle; we will talk over these matters when we meet
again at supper. I will think over your good advice—
I will—.” If anything was said to complete the
sentence, the words were lost in the clatter of the
horses’ hoofs, as the sward was exchanged for the harder
road.

“Think of, but perhaps not act upon it,” thought
La Force sadly, as he rode up to the massive portico of
his dwelling. At the top of the wide steps which led
up to the open door stood his wife, the marquise, to
welcome him. Elizabeth la Force was a fair and comely
dame, of some thirty summers of age. Her demeanour
was calm and serene; the prevailing impression left on
the mind of a stranger by the sight of her face was
that she was a woman of good sense, devoid of hautewr
but not of a certain quiet dignity. A shrewd observer,
however, would notice certain slight lines on the broad
brow and near the mouth, which indicated care, and
PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL. 23

possibly something of temper. There was nothing
peculiar in the dress of the marquise; only the criticis-
ing eyes of the woman of tact would have noticed it
at all.

A little behind the marquise stood Adéle, with an
unwonted cloud on her youthful brow. Her face did
not light up with the sunny smile with which she
usually met her father.

The manners of that age were more formal than
those of the present. More stately etiquette was ob-
served in the households of grands seigneurs. The
marquis’s servants drew up in two lines on the steps to
receive their master, and low were the reverences made
as, after dismounting, he passed them and reached the
little platform on which the ladies were standing. La
Force’s reception by his wife and daughter was little
less formal; though when the marquis had passed with
them through the wide hall, and reached the oaken stair-
case, he was leading his lady with his right hand; and
Adéle, in defiance of etiquette, had both of hers clasped
around his left arm. La Force, who was a very fond
father, always gave his daughter the privilege of a
petted child.

Not a word was spoken until the marquis, having
crossed the gallery at the head of the staircase, entered
the spacious saloon in which we first found Adéle and
her cousin. La Force seated himself in one of the
24 PREPARING FOR THE ORDEAL.

heavy arm-chairs which bore the escutcheon of his
ancestors emblazoned on the back. Elizabeth, who
watched the looks of her husband and saw that a
weight was on his mind, silently took a lower seat near
him. Adéle threw herself on a footstool, rested her
clasped hands on his knee, and looked inquiringly up
into his face. Neither she nor the marquise ventured to
ask the question which was uppermost in the mind of
each. La Force gently stroked his daughter’s dark
locks, and then began the conversation in a voice calm,
but not altogether free from a tone of sadness.
CHAPTER IIT.
SUBMISSION.

“T po not like to take any important step in which the
interests of my dear ones are involved,” said the marquis,
“without making them partners in my cares. If a
sacrifice is to be made, let us make it together; J ask
no one to go forward blindfold in the track which
Providence has marked out for me. Elizabeth, Adéle,—
you know of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, that
charter of Huguenot freedom. You know that the only
choice left in France for those who hold a pure faith is
between apostasy and exile. The choice has been offered
to me.—KHlizabeth, you have from the first known my
decision,—you have expressed a willingness to follow
my fortunes.”

“Where thou goest, I will go; where thou diest, I
will die,” said the lady of La Force, using almost un-
consciously the familiar words of Scripture.

The husband turned on his partner such a look as
might have rewarded a wife for any loss of fortune or
26 SUBMISSION.

position, Adéle saw the look, and it raised bitter feel-
ings in her young heart.

“Tt is easy for her to go to England, it is her own
land!” cried the girl impatiently; “but I was born in
beautiful sunny France, I have lived all my life in this
home of my fathers—it would be anguish to leave it!”
The dark eyes were full of tears; they trembled on the
lashes, then coursed fast down Adéle’s cheeks.

“I am ashamed of your want of regard for your
father’s feelings,” said Elizabeth rather severely. “He
has enough to suffer without his daughter adding to his
burden by her childish complaints.”

The remark nettled Adéle, all the more because it
was edged by truth. The “glance which the young
maiden turned on her step-mother was one of hardly
disguised anger. Almost fiercely Adéle cried, as, dash-
ing the tear-drops aside, she sprang to her feet, “I love
my father—none loves more than I do; no one need tell
me how to behave towards him !”

“Child, you forget yourself,” began Lady la Force;
but the marquis silenced her by a look, and rising, he
took his daughter’s hand and led her to a remote part
of the saloon, where tapestry covered the wall. It was
distressing to the Huguenot to have anything like divi-
sions in his family, and especially when all should unite
more closely to resist a coming storm. La Force was a
man of too much perception not to be aware that there
SUBMISSION. 27

was no strong love between his daughter and his wife.
Adéle, a spirited, wilful child, who had had little early
discipline, had by no means welcomed the coming of
one who would counsel and restrain her, and exercise
maternal authority over a headstrong girl. Any foolish
prejudice, however, might in time have worn away—for
Elizabeth’s character was one to win respect, and she
had a kindly heart under a reserved manner—but for
the evil influence of Madame Duval. That lady’s plea-
sure was to seb her young cousin against her natural
protectress, to hold up the marquise’s manners, accent,
and dress to ridicule in her step-daughter’s presence.
Especially Belinde Duval dwelt on Elizabeth’s unpardon-
able fault—that of being of English birth. Adéle was
encouraged to hate and despise everything belonging to
what the Frenchwoman called “the island of fogs.”
Its people were talked of as little better than barbarians,
brutal savages who had risen up against their king, tried
him, and brought him to the block! To the enthusiastic
Adéle it was almost as great a crime in the English to
have won the battles of Agincourt and Cressy. The
girl’s favourite heroine was Joan of Arc; Adéle’s day-
dream was to emulate that martyr .to love for her
country. The English and their descendants were never
to be forgiven for having had a share in the cruel in-
justice which had brought on the Maid of Orleans a, ter-
rible fate. Adéle had too much respect for her father,
28 SUBMISSION.

too much fear of incurring his displeasure, to let her
feelings towards the marquise often find vent in his
presence ; but she harboured them in her heart, and gave
only too ready a hearing to the ill-natured jests of
Madame Duval.

La Force stood before the tapestry hangings with his
hand on his daughter’s shoulder. Raising his eyes to-
ward the heirloom he said calmly, “This is one of the
things to be left behind.” ;

“O father—never!” exclaimed Adéle. “The tapestry
has been in our family ever ‘since the days of Saint
Louis !”

“We shall take something from it which I hope we
may never leave behind,’ was the quiet reply. “The
subject of this tapestry picture has been familiar to you,
Adéle, ever since you were able to distinguish your right
hand from your left.”

“Tt is the history of Abraham,” said Adéle, surveying
the still rich though somewhat faded hangings. The
tapestry was divided by arabesque borders into three
compartments, representing Abraham going forth at
God’s command, the patriarch kneeling in prayer, and
his preparing to sacrifice Isaac.

“Here,” observed the marquis, “we have pictured
before us faith, prayer, and obedience. Abraham has
been dead for thousands of years (if saints can be said
to die), byt still his example lives, and shall live till


SUBMISSION. 29

time shall be no more. Think you, my Adéle, that it
was easy to the patriarch to renounce idolatry in a land
where all worshipped graven images? Think you that
it was easy to him to go forth, not knowing whither he
went, turning his back for ever on home and friends
and all that was associated with happy thoughts of his
childhood ?”

“No,” was Adéle’s scarcely audible reply.

“And did Abraham make a wise or a foolish choice,
my daughter, when he went forth casting himself submis-
sively, trustfully, entirely on the promise of his God ?”

“He did wisely; he found a blessing,’ murmured

Adéle.
“ And in him all the families of the earth are blessed,
even all who are made Abraham’s children by sharing
his faith——My child, do you not desire to become a
daughter of Abraham? If so, you must quit the land
of idols.”

Adéle heaved a sigh. “I will give up everything,”
she faltered.

“ Kuerything, my child?” said the marquis. “Con-
sider the full meaning of your words. You must give
up not only house and lands, not merely pleasures and
amusements, but the proud spirit, the rebellious will;
these, by God’s grace, must be left behind if you would
inherit the blessing. You were just now disrespectful
to your mother.”
30 SUBMISSION.

Adéle’s heart was very full; again her eyes brimmed
over with tears; the most gentle rebuke from her father |
always cut her to the soul.

La Force waited for an answer, and an almost in-
audible one came at last. “I am sorry,” said the girl,
drooping her head.

“Go and tell your mother so,” said the marquis.

There was a painful struggle between obedience and
pride. But Adéle felt a gentle pressure on her shoulder,
and that pressure was more powerful to subdue her wil-
ful spirit than the most forcible arguments would have
been. With slow step and downcast eyes the young
maiden returned to the place where the English lady
was sitting. Faintly, hesitatingly, the words, “I am
sorry,” came from the reluctant lips.

Elizabeth silently kissed her step-daughter’s glowing
cheek; and Adéle, half mortified and half relieved, went ~
away to a small side-table, and occupied herself in turn-
ing over the leaves of an English book which lay upon
it. The volume was the “Pilgrim’s Progress,” a work
then comparatively modern. Elizabeth had brought it
amongst the very few things which she had taken with
her from the land of her birth.

La Force and his wife conversed together on necessary
business connected with their departure;—what property
was portable and valuable enough to be carried with
them; and what arrangements should be made for a
SUBMISSION. 31

voyage across the Channel in the seventeenth century
—not so easy of accomplishment as in the nineteenth.
Adéle listened sadly, for she did not take in the mean-
ing of a single sentence in the book before her, though
she had some acquaintance with English.

Presently a splendid greyhound, with a silver collar,
came lightly bounding into the room. Adéle was glad
of the interruption.

“Ah, Qui-vive!” she cried, patting and caressing the
beautiful creature which licked her hand; “you are
happy, you have no troubles! What a welcome you
will give your young master Louis when he comes back
from his school! You will see him in three weeks from
this day.”

“T hope that Qui-vive will see him to-morrow,” said
La Force.

“To-morrow !” exclaimed Adéle, with a ery of de-
light, “O father! then you have sent for him: what a
joyful surprise! But what brings Louis back so soon ?”

“My wish,” said the marquis gravely.

“ And you never told me!” cried Adéle. ;

“T thought it more prudent not to mention my in-
tention to any one, except, of course, your mother and
faithful Rochet, whom I intrusted with the commis-
sion to bring my son. A relay of horses was arranged
for, so that Louis might be brought with as little
delay as possible. If my boy has not strength for so
32 SUBMISSION.

long a ride, Rochet has orders to bring him in a horse-
litter.”

“Oh! Louis will much prefer riding,” cried. Adéle,
whose spirits had risen wonderfully at the news of her
brother’s coming; though she was secretly mortified as
well as surprised that such a secret should have been
kept from her knowledge. “Louis is a capital horse-
man. Oh, what fun we shall have together, off and
away through the forest, and over the downs, as far as
—yes, as far as the sea! Qui-vive will go bounding
before us.” The poor girl’s countenance fell as another
thought struck her, and it was with bitterness that she
added, “But perhaps we shall soon neither have grey-
hound to sport with nor horse to ride!”


CHAPTER IV.
THE FLAME SCORCHES.

THE supper, or as we should call it ‘dinner, was served
at sunset at Chateau la Force, and in somewhat stately
style. The Duvals were invited guests, and the
marquise was careful to give her husband’s relatives no
oceasion to laugh at English ignorance of the art of
spreading a table. The venison pasty and the trotter-
pie, the delicate confections and the dessert of pippins,
barberries, olives, and musk~plums, had been prepared
under the immediate superintendence of the Lady la
Force. Duval was known not to be indifferent to the
pleasures of the table, and his wife was a critic in the
culinary art. Elizabeth never suffered her anxieties to
interfere with her house-keeping duties.

As the family sat in the saloon, ready to receive their
guests, a little perfumed missive was brought to the
marquise. “From Belinde, I see,” said the lady as she
opened the note; and she read it half aloud in a cursory

manner: “Had expected such pleasure, Bad headache.
(106) 3
34 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Monsieur Duval will not be persuaded to leave me—I
am désolée—Your devoted Belinde.”

“Cousin Belinde was here to-day,” said Adéle, “and
she seemed to be perfectly well.”

“ Madame’s headaches come when they are convenient
to herself, and inconvenient to those who have kindly
invited her,” said Elizabeth, tossing down the note on
the table.

“Cousin Jacques might have come,—I like him, he
is so genial and kindly,” cried Adéle.

“Madame will not let her husband be more at the
chateau than she can help,” observed the lady of La
Force; and the lines on her broad brow deepened. “It
is disgraceful to a man to let himself be so governed by
his wife. Belinde would not have treated me thus
a few months ago; but she looks on us already as—.”
La Force stopped his lady’s further speech by a glance,
as a servant entered the saloon for orders.

“Let the supper be served,” said the Lady la Force.

Nothing was wanting at that silent meal except the
appetite to enjoy it. The servants took away the dainty
dishes almost untouched. There seemed something
oppressing the spirit of parents and daughter, like the
pressure of the oe when heavy thunder-clouds
cover the sky.

The sun’s fiery globe had not long dipped below the
horizon, when the trampling of several horses was heard.
THE FLAME SCORCHES. 35

Adéle sprang up with the joyful exclamation, “It is
Louis! come even sooner than we expected.”

“Resume your seat; it cannot be Louis,” said the
marquis.

Voices were heard outside, then a loud inquiry as to
whether the Marquis la Force were within, with the
ominous addition, “We come in the name of the King.”
This was followed by the tramp of booted feet; and
a servant entering the dining-hall said, “ Monsieur le
Vicomte de Fontainebleu requests audience of my lord
the Marquis la Force.”

“Let him come in,” said the marquis, rising from
table.

Booted and spurred, with jingling swords at their
sides, wearing gold-laced coats adorned with large
bunches of ribbons, their three-cornered hats in their
hands, but heavy wigs on their heads, three gentlemen
entered the hall. Careful of the rules of court etiquette,
then thought more binding than any law, the three
bowed with obsequious respect to the ladies, and then to
the marquis, who went forward some paces to meet them.

“T regret the necessity of intruding on you, Monsieur
le Marquis,” said the Vicomte de Fontainebleu, “but the
commands of his Majesty the King leave me no option.”

“Before entering on business,” said the courteous La
Force, “let me request you to partake of some refresh-
ment after your journey.”
36 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Elizabeth made signs to her servants to bring back
the dishes, and ordered lights.

“Pardon, monseigneur, but I must first fulfil my
duty, and place in your hand this reply to your paper.”
Fontainebleu handed to La Force a large official docu-
ment, to which a huge red seal was appended. La
Force bowed as he received it, with a firm hand broke
the seal, and then read the paper with a countenance
calm and unmoved. His visitors were keenly watching
his face, and so were his wife and daughter.

“It is as I expected,” said the Huguenot noble, after
perusing the document. “His Majesty rejects my
petition: I must either recant or quit Franee within
twenty-one days.”

“JT hope—I doubt not—that Monsieur le Marquis
will conform to the wishes of his Majesty,” said the
courtier blandly.

“Tn all that concerns not conscience,” was the reply ;
“but my duty to God must come before even my duty
to the King.”

“But the ladies—the demorselle,” said Fontainebleu,
glancing at Adéle as he spoke.

“What the marquis wills, we will,” quoth Elizabeth
la Force.

“My wife, daughter, and son will be partakers of my
exile,” said her husband.

Fontainebleu slightly shrugged his shoulders, with
THE FLAME SCORCHES. 37

something like a sigh of compassion for the fair victims
of stubborn obstinacy. Then in the same courtly
manner he observed, “The ladies of the chateau
may go where they list, but his Majesty has gra-
ciously made other arrangements for the heir of La
Force !”

“Explain yourself, sir,” said the marquis sternly.

Fontainebleu avoided meeting the father’s anxious
eyes as he made reply: “His gracious Majesty, full of
benevolence for his nobility, is unwilling to let a youth
of fourteen years of age suffer for the—pardon me,
seigneur—the contumacy of a parent. The King be-
nevolently takes upon himself the care of young Louis
la Force, and will insure his receiving a good education
at some Catholic establishment.”

“But surely not without his father’s consent!” ex-
claimed the Huguenot noble.

“Such consent is quite unnecessary under the circum-
stances,” said the courtier. “His Majesty regards the
spiritual welfare of his young subjects. The matter is
not now in our hands: fortified by the royal warrant,
we called on our way hither at the seminary where the
young gentleman had been placed, and removed him
according to his Majesty's command. Monsieur le
Marquis’s son is now on his way to Paris.”

An ejaculation—it was an agonized prayer— burst
in a single word from the whitened lips of the father.
38 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

Tt was not loud, scarcely audible—it was such as the
rack might have wrung from a martyr.

“Ts there no remedy for this? must I be bereaved
of my child!” cried the marquis.

“There is a very simple remedy,’ observed the
vicomte bowing. “Monseigneur has only to conform ;
nothing is required but a declaration, a few masses,
and—”

“The loss of a soul,” said the Huguenot peer.

“Ts this the justice to be found in France!” ex-
claimed Elizabeth, indignation in her honest blue eyes.
« Are children to be torn from their parents, simply
because these parents worship God according to con-
science! It never was so in England.”

Fontainebleu again gave his little shrug, with a
corresponding gesture of the hands intended to express
his polite regret at the state of affairs which distressed
a lady, and his own irresponsibility in the matter. La
Force felt that argument or remonstrance was worse
than useless, and that it was undesirable that his wite
and daughter, who might be unable to control their
feelings, should remain in the company of their most
unwelcome guests.

“Gentlemen, you will excuse the lady not presiding
at the board,” he said, as the servants brought back the
dinner, with lights which were now required, as evening
was darkening into night. “Accompany your mother,”
THE FLAME SCORCHES. 39

the marquis gently added, addressing his daughter, who
had covered her face with her hands, and bowed it in an
attitude of uncontrollable sorrow. Adéle did not wait
for the marquise to lead the way, but rushed out of the
hall, and her sobs on the staircase could be heard in the
room which she had quitted. “Louis! Louis!” were the
only words which she could utter between them.
Elizabeth, stiffly bowing to the French courtiers, with
a slow step quitted the hall.

Fontainebleu and his companions took their seat at
the board; and their host resumed his, to do the honours
of the table. The courtiers with sharp appetites
attacked the viands, and full justice was done to the
venison pasty and trotter-pie, while sack and burgundy
freely circulated round. Conversation also freely cir-
culated as the repast went on. It, however, touched on
no delicate topic. The French gentlemen talked of the
last duel, and the last grand ball, the reigning beauty in
the circle of fashion, the scenery of the country through
which the travellers had passed, the bad accommodation
at hotels, and such like matters of comparatively little
interest. La Force endured that wearisome meal, which
seemed as if it never would end. With a soul full of
trouble he forced himself to listen and reply to frivolous
questions ; he performed the hard duty prescribed by
the law of hospitality, mastering his own impatient
spirit as he had mastered his fiery steed. It was a
40 THE FLAME SCORCHES.

relief when the tedious banquet was ended, when the
last glass had been drained to the health of the king.
La Force himself conducted the courtiers to their apart-
ments; and then, after exchange of formal courtesies,
was able to retire to his own.

Adéle lay awake for hours on her little bed, and then
eried herself to sleep. Her father neither wept nor
slept. That night was spent by the Huguenot in

prayer.
CHAPTER V.
BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

ADELE awoke with a sense of something painful press-
ing on her heart, but did not for some seconds realize
what the burden was. Recollection came only too soon,
and with it a bitterness of spirit bordering almost on
rebellious despair. Adéle was utterly unaccustomed to
sorrow ; life had been to her like a summer’s day, and
she was wholly unprepared for a storm. The girl could
not, like her father, wrap herself up in the thick mantle
of faith, and take refuge in prayer from the wild wind
and the rushing rain. Adéle’s mind was full of one
subject, and she could not fix it on religion even when
her knee was bent in apparent devotion. “Why does
God suffer wickedness to triumph, tyranny to trample
down right?” was the question that burned itself into
her soul. Adéle had not gone into the sanctuary ever
open to believers; and she had as yet but little experi-
ence of the blessings which Christians find in the track
of the veiled angel—Affliction. The idea of Louis, her
42 2 BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

only brother, her companion, her pride, being in the
hands of a wicked king, to be brought up in a false
religion, and separated from his family for ever, was
frightful to the affectionate girl. Adéle almost forgot
the misery of poverty and exile in this more terrible
woe !

The family of La Force had early met for morning
prayer, followed by a slight repast. The substantial
meal (at which Adéle resolved not to appear) was re-
served for a later hour, when the luxurious guests
should emerge from their respective chambers; for the
courtiers did not, like the La Force family, rise at cock-
crow. ‘The marquis used the interval in riding out to
see a sick tenant; his wife in arranging household
affairs. Adéle could settle to no employment. She
wandered disconsolately into the large saloon, and seated
herself in one of the deep window recesses, the curtain
of which was so hanging as almost entirely to screen
her from the view of any one in the room. The saloon
was quite empty, or Adéle would not have sought it;
but as she sat, sadly looking forth on the park, there
was heard the tread of heavy feet coming along the
gallery, and the sound of men’s voices engaged in light
conversation. Adéle would gladly have fled from the
saloon, but she could not do so without meeting Fon-
tainebleu and his companions, and she could not endure
to encounter their gaze. The young maiden, without
BEHIND THE CURTAIN. : 43

the slightest idea of eaves-dropping, remained in her
secret recess, earnestly hoping to escape the notice of
the hateful visitors. Adéle had some expectation that
the courtiers would descend the staircase, and go to the
hall; but no, they entered the saloon.

“Fine place!” remarked Fontainebleu as he came in.

“Four thousand acres attached—I’ve been question-
ing the steward—they will bring in a fine revenue,”
observed some one, in a voice deeper and harsher.

“Ma foi! Lepine, you are always thinking of the
louis-d’or!” cried a third: “I warrant me you'd farm
out the Champs Elysée if you had a chance, and sow
turnips around the palace of Versailles. I say, this is a
capital place for hunting. I hope, Fontainebleu, you'll
invite me here. We'll bring down many a buck, and
perhaps have a chance of rousing a tusker in the
forest !”

“You'll not recognize the chateau, Perrot, when you
come again.” It was Fontainebleau who now spoke.
“The old place is capable of much improvement. I
shall have the staircase painted and gilded.”

“© you Goth! you Vandal!” exclaimed young Perrot.
“Would you paint and gild polished oak ?”

“Tt’s so gloomy, you can’t light it up. And what say
you to a few gods and goddesses painted on this ceiling,
showering down roses on gay dancers below ?”

“You would have to take down the pictures first—
44 BEHIND THE CURTAIN.

they would be incongruous,” observed Lepine, the elder
courtier. “But they're well painted—uncommonly well
painted ; I think that they would fetch their price.”

“Yes; and that faded old tapestry too.”

Adéle could endure to hear no more. Like a
wounded young leopard she sprang from her curtained
recess and faced the three courtiers, who were startled
at her sudden appearance. Adéle’s face was flushed, her
small hand clenched, and her dark eyes were flashing
with anger.

“And who are you—robbers!” she exclaimed in a
voice hoarse with passion, “that you dare thus to appro-
priate the property of my father, the Marquis la Force !”

The three courtiers bowed low, perhaps in mockery,
possibly in pity; and Fontainebleu made reply, with
a little hesitation in his manner,—

““ Mademoiselle has not yet heard that his Majesty has
appointed me, his unworthy servant, to take over charge
of the chateau and estate when the marquis quits the
place.” a

Adéle la Force heard no more; she fled from the
saloon, and sought her own apartment, where she flung
herself on the bed in an agony of mingled anger and
grief. She heard the gong sound for breakfast, but she
moved not. The girl did not rise from he~-tear-wetted
pillow, until sounds from below assured her that the
courtiers were taking their departure at last. Then,
BEHIND THE CURTAIN. 45

indeed, Adéle slowly went to her casement, and watched
the emissaries of the oppressor as they mounted their
horses, and then bent low from their saddles, and waved
a formal adieu to the master and mistress of the house
to which they had brought such sorrow. Adéle hardly
breathed till the courtiers, with their mounted followers,
had disappeared behind the trees.

The days that followed were very painful. La Force
addressed a most touching letter tc the monarch of
whose throne he and his ancestors had been a bulwark.
Bertrand asked for nothing but his child, complained of
nothing but separation from his only son. The letter
received no reply. Each member of the family wrote
to Louis; but from him, too, no answer came. Even if-—
as was doubtful—the letters ever reached him, he was
probably not allowed to write in return.

There were needful cares connected with leaving the
estate. Whilst the marquis rode from cottage to cottage,
the lady of the chateau was full of work at home. It
needed much thought to select, from property accu-
mulated by successive generations, what should be carried
away. To this unpleasant work an additional ele-
ment of pain was added by constant disagreements in
opinion between Elizabeth and Adéle. The marquise,
a practical woman, who had been accustomed to rigid
economy in her childhood’s home, in selecting articles to
take with her, naturally chose such as were portable and
46 BEHIND THE CURTAIN,

of intrinsic value—those that might readily be turned
into money. Adéle set her heart on carrying off heavy
suits of armour, fraught with family interest. To this
Elizabeth strongly objected.

“T would rather leave anything behind than this
precious sword!” exclaimed Adéle. “Do you not know
that it was grasped in the dead hand of a La Force at
Ivri, and that from this incident King Henry gave to
our family the crest of a hand holding a sword, with
the motto ‘ Faithful unto death !’”

“JT must make a concession in favour of that sword,
for your father values it,’ said the marquise; “the
crest and motto are carved on the back of our chairs.”

“ And the crusader’s cuirass ?”

Elizabeth shook her head. “Neither that nor his
spear and shield.”

Adéle could not suppress her indignation. “Of course
we shall take all the pictures, and the dear old tapestry,”
she cried.

“Certainly the family portraits, but without the
heavy frames. To take the cumbrous mass of tapestry
is entirely out of the question.”

“You have no feeling ”—

“You have no sense ”——were on the lips of matron and
maid, when happily the entrance of the marquis put
a stop to the unseemly dispute.
CHAPTER VI.
A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

A YET more painful struggle was going on in Courville,
the country house in which the Duvals passed the
summer months, living during the rest of the year in
their mansion in Paris. It was a struggle between a
weak, conscientious man, and the selfish, imperious
woman to whose will he had habitually yielded his
own. Night and day the struggle went on, Felicie, a
flighty, shallow-minded girl, throwing all her weight
into the scale of opposition to her pious father. Jacques,
the most good-natured, kindly of men, found himself
regarded as a tyrant. Sometimes he had to endure the
sight of fits of hysterical weeping, which wrung his
tender heart. More frequently he was overwhelmed
with bitter reproaches. Duval hardly knew which tried
him most—the blasts of anger, or the deluge of tears.
Head and heart ached with sorrow; the poor Huguenot
lost appetite, lost flesh—his home was a purgatory
to him.
48 | A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

The struggle could hardly have lasted but for the
strong support given to his nephew by Bertrand la
Force. The marquis argued with Duval, prayed with
him, stirred him up to play the part of aman. Often
they paced together the straight, formal walks of the
garden at Courville, where “each alley had its brother,”
and the very trees seemed to grow according to rule.
A fountain in the centre spouted up its waters through
the horn of a Triton. It was in one of those walks
that the following conversation took place:—

“What! would you yield to a woman’s love of the
world?” exclaimed the Huguenot noble. “If you give
way, you sacrifice your wife and your daughter ; you
throw them into the midst of temptations which you
know that they cannot withstand. For their sakes, as
much as for your own, stand out, and choose exile rather
than yield one inch in a matter of conscience.”

“I would gladly embrace exile—I would go to En-
gland, Labrador, the ends of the earth—to keep true to
my faith!” cried poor Jacques, his eyes fillmg with
tears; “but I have been in all things so accustomed to’
consult, or rather to leave all things to the management
of my wife, that it is now inconceivably difficult to me
to oppose her will.”

“My dear nephew ”—La Force laid his hand on the
arm of Duval as he spoke—“in God’s own Word it is
written that the husband is the head of the wife. If


A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 49

the head habitually stoop to a lower place than that
assigned to it by its Maker, what, in the physical frame,
is the result? The beauty, the dignity of the form is
lost altogether, and the health of the whole body is
injured.”

Duval, with his eyes on the ground, sadly murmured
assent,

“No woman,” continued the marquis,“ can perfectly
love a husband to whom she cannot look up. Conjugal
affection is given to us as the type of the highest, holiest
of unions, even that between Chiist Himself and His
Church. Do not we Protestants see in this unhappy
land the fearful consequence of what is called the Church
usurping the place of her Lord?”

Madame Duval, who greatly disliked to see her hus-
band engaged in conversation with his uncle, came out ~
to interrupt it. Belinde had strained every nerve to
prevent Duval from. visiting the chateau; but she could
not hinder the marquis from coming to Courville. She
indeed no longer gave him a flattering welcome. La
Force was no more the aristocratic connection of whom
Madame Duval was proud ; he was the ruined man who
had lost all chance of helping on her interest at court.
Madame openly, and before others, insulted the marquis,
who was too polite to retort. If she could not prevent
his visits to Courville, she could at least make them so

bitter that he would not care to repeat them.
(108) 4
50 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

“See, Monsieur le Marquis,” she cried, as she met La
Force on the terrace—“ see what comes of your obstinate
self-will! Had you conformed, had you made a few
trifling concessions, you might have kept your only son
under your influence still.” The woman of tact knew
where the sting of her malice would strike the most
tender place. “Now you abandon the care of his
up-bringing to men whom, in your superior sanctity, -
you look upon as godless reprobates; or priests, whom
_ you regard as blind idolaters. Your son will either
become a profligate at the court, or, if you like the idea
better, a shaven monk prostrate at the shrine of St.
Mary.”

“ Belinde—my dear!” exclaimed Jacques in an ex
postulating tone, which was intended to convey a
rebuke.

La Force pressed his lips tightly together to keep in
the burning words almost on his tongue. All that he
said aloud was, “ Madame, Louis is in the hands of God,
not of man,” as he turned away.

It indeed cost La Force a great deal to persevere in
visits to Courville; but he was not a man to count the
cost, He felt that his nephew’s soul might be at stake,
and therefore often turned his horse’s rein in the direc-
tion which of all others he was most inclined to avoid.

Thus the days, so full of trial, rolled on. Even the
most tedious and trying come to an end at last. When
A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 51

the time appointed for the Huguenot’s departure drew
nigh, Madame Duval’s opposition to the wishes of her
husband slackened, then actually ceased, though not her
bitter complaints. To her hushand’s inexpressible relief,
Belinde seemed to have given up the contest. Duval
was able to make arrangements for accompanying the
marquis and his family in their flight to England; a
fishing-smack was hired to convey the whole party
across the Channel, Madame Duval could not stay
behind without her husband’s money, as she possessed
none of her own, so must perforce accompany him, how-
_ ever unwillingly. Dresses and jewels were accordingly
packed up; but Duval noticed that his wife’s prepara-
tions were not on so large a scale as was required for a
complete transplantation from one country to another.

“Surely, mon amie, you will require to take much
more with you,” observed the good man. “Madame
Elizabeth has been doing nothing but packing for the
last ten days, and a waggon-load of heavy luggage went
yesterday from the chateau.”

“My brother will send after us anything that we
want,” replied Madame Duval.
' “But surely that will be difficult, troublesome, and
expensive ; remember the risk of transporting luggage
across that rough sea. Had we not better take more
with us to England?” suggested the husband meekly,

“I suppose that blankets and warming-pans can be |
52 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

bought in the foggy island,” was Belinde’s tart reply
as she turned away.

The momentous morning of departure arrived. A
large travelling coach, drawn by six horses, was at the
portico of Courville, and servants were busily employed
in piling the top with luggage and thrusting articles
into the boot. Felicie sat on a trunk looking wonder-
fully cheerful and humming a tune, which made her
father call her a brave, good girl: she giggled a little at
the praise. It had been arranged that the conveyances
of the La Forces and the Duvals should meet at an
appointed hour at a place where four roads met, so that
no time might be lost by either party going out of the
way. The two families would then proceed on their
journey together.

Duval stood in his hall watching and directing his
servants: it was a matter of self-gratulation to him
that all was clear before him at last. Jacques had not,
like his uncle, the pain of leaving an ancestral home,
Courville being only a hired house, and so full now of
unpleasant associations that poor Duval never wished to
see it again.

Madame, attired for her journey, came up to her
husband. He avoided looking at her; he almost felt as
if acting a cruel part towards his wife. If Jacques had
won a victory, none of a conqueror’s feelings of triumph
were in the kind man’s heart.


£
i
A

A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH. 53

“Speak to me for a few minutes in the library,” said
Madame Duval.

“One struggle more,” thought Jacques, as he sub-
missively followed his formidable wife.

Belinde motioned to him to take a chair, and sat
down beside him. “Now for the last battle,” thought
Duval. “Would that we were fairly on our way !”

Madame cleared her throat with a little cough, before
she began in a tone much more mild than her husband
expected.

“T have made a great sacrifice for you,” said Belinde.

“Great, great, mon amie,” responded Duval.

“T have consented that we should never part from
each other. But if we could have kept together and
remained in France, without your having to change your
religion, would you not have stayed with me here?”

“ Of course, of course,” was the hastily uttered reply.

“Then it is nothing but the fear of being forced to
renounce your faith that makes you depart?” Belinde
was eagerly, anxiously watching the averted face of her
husband as she asked the question.

“Tf I could stay, without giving up my religion, of
course I would do so, in deference to your wishes, mon
amie.”

“Then you promise me—you give me your word of
honour—that if you can remain without becoming a
Catholic, you will?”
54 A BATTLE AND A TRIUMPH.

“T promise, for the thing is impossible,” said Jacques.

It was with a look of triumph that Madame Duval
opened an official-looking document, of which she had
already broken the seal. The crabbed signature of the
unscrupulous prime minister of Louis XIV. was easily
recognized by Duval.

“ Read this,” cried Belinde; “or stay, I will save you
the trouble;” and she read aloud as follows: As a
special indulgence from his Majesty, Monsieur Duval
as permitted to reside in Paris without renouncing his
heretical errors, on the single condition that no meetings
for seditious or religious purposes be held in his house.

Jacques was thunderstruck at this most unexpected
turn to the course of affairs. He took the paper into
his own hand and read it.

“Ts it not clear?” asked Belinde.

Duval only nodded his head.

“And have you not pledged your solemn word that
we shall keep together if you are not forced to recant ?
I am going to Paris; you must go with me, or you are
a perjured man.”

“How did you obtain this paper ?” asked Jacques in
an agitated voice.

“J told you that I had made a great sacrifice, and
my words were true. In procuring this indulgence, I
had the wit to work through a woman. My sapphire
necklace adorns the neck of the minister’s wife.”
CHAPTER VIL
LAST FAREWELLS.

SINCE the marquis had received the royal mandate to
depart within twenty-one days, a great change had
taken place in the weather, before so warm and bright.

A touch of early frost in the beginning of October had
suddenly changed the aspect of nature, and clothed the
trees of the park in garments of yellow, crimson, and
brown. To the aching heart of Adéle their beauty
spoke only of death and decay. The showers of leaves
which the soughing wind sent whirling to the ground
seemed to her emblems of withered hopes. Adéle
wandered for hours in the forest, revisiting each spot
most beloved, and carving her initials on the bark of
some of the trees. Sometimes, seated on a gnarled root,
the poor girl wept passionately for her brother. Addéle,
on her return to the chateau, would feel impatient when
she beheld her step-mother, wearing an apron and with
no lace on her sleeves, packing delicate articles with
her own hands, or giving orders to the servants, who
56 LAST FAREWELLS,

were turning the former order of the place into what
appeared to the eyes of the girl only dust, disorder, and
confusion.

“My step-mother thinks of nothing but common
household arrangements,” said Adéle to herself, with a
feeline approaching to contempt.

The youthful maiden was wrong. Elizabeth was
thinking first of her husband. Her busy efforts were to
save him trouble. His comfort was the object which
his wife had ever in view: La Force should have no care
about minor matters from which her active love could
save him. Elizabeth worked on vigorously in spite of
fatigue. She looked serene (at least in her husband’s
presence), notwithstanding the pain at her heart. For
Elizabeth grieved over the loss of Louis, though she did
not weep viclently like his sister. What Adéle took
for want of feeling was really consideration for the
feelings of Bertrand. “My step-mother is quite happy
at the thought of going to England; leaving the dear
old chateau is nothing to her,’ thought Adéle. Again
the girl was utterly wrong. Elizabeth dearly loved her
beautiful dwelling, the only residence in which she had
known domestic peace. For Elizabeth’s early years had
been full of trial. Her father, a hard, penurious man,
had made his house a dull prison to his children. With
a strange perversion of mind, Mr. Page had regarded
Elizabeth, his eldest daughter, almost with dislike. He
LAST FAREWELLS. : 57

chose to consider her extravagant; and when he became
a widower, and housekeeping devolved on his first-born,
by no possible effort which Elizabeth made could she
please a peevish, unreasonable man. Every meal was
imbittered by reproaches, every morsel seasoned with
gall. When La Force took his portionless bride from a
home undeserving of the name, Elizabeth was like a
caged bird set free to spread its wings in the sunshine.
These early trials, to which she never alluded, had
sobered, matured, and ripened her spirit; and relief from
their pressure had added the element of fervent grati-
tude to a deliverer, to the loyal love which was borne
to a husband. The years spent at the chateau had been
to Elizabeth beyond comparison the happiest years of
her life, and she was greatly attached to the place.
Elizabeth had also her secret anxieties regarding the
future. She doubted how her generous, open-handed
husband would bear the trial of comparative poverty,
and how he would agree with a man so utterly unlike
him in everything as was Mr. Page, her father.

But Madame la Force kept these troubles and anxi-
eties to herself. Adéle had often complained that her
step-mother did not understand her; she might with much
more truth have said that she did not understand her
step-mother. Adéle compared her own sensibility with the
supposed coldness of a stronger nature, and prided herself
on what was actually selfishness under a specious disguise.
58 LAST FAREWELLS.

On the morning of departure the marquis and Eliza-
beth were in the hall ready to start at the moment
appointed. Adéle only was missing. Her step-mother
was annoyed at time being lost in search for the girl,
as it was like prolonging a painful operation which the
marquis had to endure. La Force was anxious to be
off, lest the Duvals should reach the place of rendezvous
before his party. After Adéle had been vainly sought
for in her own apartment and in the saloon, she appeared
at last on the drive, her eyes swollen with crying, after
a sad parting with her pony, her white doe, and her
doves; a parting which she now renewed with her
favourite Qui-vive, throwing her arms round his neck,
kissing him, and weeping.

The marquis read impatience on the face of his wife.
“Do not chide the poor child,” he gently said; “she has
enough to suffer already.”

Tt was at the last difficult to depart, so many
tenants, servants, neighbours, and friends had come for
a last look, a last shake of the hand of the man whom
they regarded as the noblest in all the province of Nor-
mandy. At length the marquis mounted his white steed.
The beautiful creature had already been sold; but his new
master was to receive him where the four roads met—
the place appointed for the rendezvous with the Duvals,
at the foot of a small hill, surmounted by a windmill.
For the last time the marquis gave the shake to the
LAST FAREWELLS. 59

rein which was the signal to his obedient steed to bound
forward ; then turning, La Force bent from his saddle
to bid a long farewell to his friends. He avoided
glancing up at the castle; it was surrendered to God—
‘enough, its owner would cast no “long, lingering look
behind.”

The ladies took their places in the travelling coach.
Adéle abandoned herself to grief, covering her face with
her hands. Elizabeth to the last spoke kindly words to
those who had come to say good-bye; but it was a
relief when the moving on of the cumbrous vehicle left
cher at length to comparative solitude. The lady then
repeated to Adéle a single verse of comfort from the
Scriptures; but Adéle did not choose to be comforted.
As the attempt to bestow consolation elicited no reply
but a sob, Elizabeth settled herself on her seat, and, to
Adéle’s utter disgust, quietly took out her knitting.
“Such an occupation at such a time! no one but an
Englishwoman would have thought of anything so
heartless!” said Adéle to herself. But Elizabeth had
remembered the cold wind which would meet her hus-
band on the waves of the Channel, and she was making
a soft, warm wrap to protect him from its effects. As
the lady’s busy fingers plied the ivory needles, the click-
click of which almost drove her step-daughter wild,
Elizabeth was repeating to herself verses from the
Psalmis, intermingled with silent prayers.
60 LAST FAREWELLS.

The marquis, who rode rapidly, had reached the little
hill in half the time taken by the coach. He rode up
to the heavy, luggage-piled conveyance.

“There is nothing to be seen of the Duvals,” he said
to his wife.

“ Your nephew is not always punctual, and Belinde is an
unwilling traveller. Iam not surprised at a short delay.”

But the delay was not a short one, and La Force
became uneasy.

“They were to have been here at ten, and it is now
half-past eleven,” said the marquis after some time,
looking for the twentieth time at his large gold watch,
and then anxiously glancing down the road by which
the Duvals were to come.

“T will ride off to Courville myself, and find out the
cause of this most inopportune delay,” cried La Force.
He pressed the sides of his steed and shook the rein:
there was no need of whip or spur; the horse galloped
off swiftly, as if proud of his rider.

The gate of Courville was soon reached ; it was open.
La Force passed through the grounds to the door of the
villa. The place looked empty and deserted ; the blinds
were drawn; there was no sign of a travelling carriage,
except the deep ruts which its wheels had left on the drive.

“Where is monsieur ? where is madame?” asked the
rider anxiously of a servant who was lounging about.

“They started two hours ago for Paris,” was the reply.


CHAPTER VIII.
AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

On the evening of that sad day La Force stood, with
arms folded, on the deck of a little vessel, watching the
receding shores of the land which he had quitted for ever.
“OQ God, have pity on my unhappy country!” such
was the Huguenot’s silent prayer. “Save France from
the iron hand of tyranny, and let Thy gospel have free
course. And oh, do Thou in Thy mercy watch over
my only son! Be to him as a father, as for Thy sake
he is fatherless upon earth. I commit to Thy holy
keeping one who is dearer, far dearer to me than life.”
“Guide us, guard us, O Lord,” was the quiet sup-
plication of the Huguenot’s wife. “Lead us in the
right way, for we rest our hopes upon Thee. Uphold
my beloved husband in the trials encountered for Thy
sake.” Then, turning an indignant glance on the land
which she was leaving, the Englishwoman said half-
aloud: “O guilty France, thou wilt one day repent
having cast off from thee thy bravest and best !”
62 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

Terribly was the prediction fulfilled when, with no
gallant and true Protestants to uphold it, the throne
of the descendant of Louis XIV. was overturned with a
crash which startled Europe, and the head of the in-
heritor of his title and name felt into the blood-stained ~
basket! The crimes of a despotism brought on the
horrors of a revolution. Louis XIV. sowed the wind,
and his family reaped the whirlwind.

“Farewell, dear, beautiful France!” exclaimed Adéle
la Force. “ With thee I leave all happiness behind !”

“Do not speak thus, Adéle,” said Elizabeth, who
heard the exclamation ; “keep up a brave heart—matters
might have been worse.”

“They could not be worse than they are—I could not
be more wretched than I am!” Poor Adéle had soon
to recall these hastily-uttered words.

Elizabeth did not stay to dispute the point; she went
down tothe small cabin allotted to the family, to make
all things as little uncomfortable as she could, in such
a narrow space. Then, when bags had been hung up,
and the port-hole opened to admit some air and light,
when provisions had been taken from the basket, and
berths properly arranged, Elizabeth sat down on a
trunk, and for awhile gave herself over to thought.

Her reflections were not all painful. Elizabeth was
going back to England, dear old England, where Chris-
tians had liberty to worship in spirit and in truth,
AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE, 63

albeit under a popish king. No dragonnades were there;
no children were torn from their parents to be brought
up in errors which those parents abhorred. Elizabeth
also thought of the meetings before her. Her father’s
unkindness had not destroyed though it had nipped the
plant of filial affection. His daughter had not seen him
for eight long years, and she yearned for a sight of
his and other familiar faces. What a pleasure to see
gentle Lilly and loving Bridget again, and friends,
faithful though few! Elizabeth had led a secluded life
in her early home, but she had been able to pay a few
visits, which remained as green spots in her memory.
It was during one of these few visits to a chosen friend
that she had first met with Bertrand la Force.

Elizabeth felt it a matter for thankfulness that,
though her husband had lost his estate and was pre-
cluded from drawing from it any revenue, he was in no
immediate danger of feeling the pressure of want. The
marquis had brought with him a considerable sum in gold,
besides family jewels of value. There was something
to start with, a prudent management of which might
procure needful comforts for the family; the loss of
luxuries was not to be regretted. It would be a real
pleasure, Elizabeth thought, to show her skill in making
the two ends meet, to contrive how far her personal
efforts could smooth the path of her exiled lord. The
English lady contemplated the possibility of earning
64 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

something by her needle to add to the little family
store. Elizabeth was full of her plans for the future,
when she was aroused in a startling manner from her
quiet reflections.

Chateau la Force being not more than five leagues
from the port, the exiles had calculated on embarking
but an hour or two after mid-day, and crossing the
Channel before night should set in, if the wind blew
from the south. But there had been considerable delay
caused by waiting for the Duvals, and the roads had
been in so bad a state that little remained of daylight
before the port was reached. The marquis consulted
the skipper of the smack in which his passage was
taken as to whether it was necessary to wait till the
morning before setting sail.

“We've good moonlight, and the wind in the right
quarter,” was the seaman’s reply; “Tl engage to land
all safe and sound at daybreak.”

As La Force was unwilling to linger in the port, he
accordingly embarked with his family, and one faithful
attendant, a Huguenot like himself.

The smack had not accomplished half her course over
the heaving waves, when a dull, gray sea-mist fell,
blotting out the moon and the stars, and swathing every-
thing like a shroud. Notwithstanding the damp chill,
Adéle would not quit the deck, to go down, as she said,
to be stifled below. With her arm locked in that of her
AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE, 65

father, the girl stood gazing into the mist, which, even
had the sun not gone down, would have hidden France
from her eyes. Suddenly a large high object loomed
through the fog, an object which looked to Adéle like an
enormous white wing. There was a loud shout, to the

1?

steersman,:“ Helm a-port!” a ery, “She’s on us!” and
then a violent, terrific shock, which made every plank in
the vessel quiver, and almost threw Adéle down on the
deck. The bowsprit of the smack had been smashed,
her bulwark crushed in: there had been a collision with
a larger vessel in the fog.

“Lower the boat!” shouted the skipper; “call all
hands—she’s sinking !”

“Hold on, Adéle; I must go for your mother,” ex-
claimed the marquis. But as he hastened to find his wife,
he met Elizabeth coming quickly up the companion-
ladder. She would have known by the shock that some-
thing terrible had happened, even if the water had not
been rushing into the cabin through a fracture caused by
the violent collision.

« What is it ?” was Elizabeth’s hurried question.

“A vessel has struck us in the fog. Come quickly ;
I think we are going down.”

Already the sailors were lowering the boat. Nota
minute had to be lost. The vessel that had borne down
on the smack was taking in her sails, and putting out

/
2 boat to help in preserving the passengers and crew of
(208) 5
66 AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE.

the smaller craft. Adéle, almost too bewildered to
comprehend her situation, found herself almost thrown
down into a boat, and then, ere the oars had made more
than three strokes, caught up again by strong hands
and lifted, like a helpless burden, up the side ofa larger
vessel than that which she had quitted. She was wet,
frightened, but safe! Scarcely had all the shipwrecked
party been taken up from the boats, when the smack,
which had been greatly injured, sank, prow foremost,
under the waves! The collision—the escape—had oc-
cupied so short a space of time, that the startled pas-
sengers felt as if the whole had been but a dream.

The mist was clearing off. The moon’s pale orb
could be seen, and shed a ghastly gleam on the waves.
Adéle gazed bewildered on the bubbles and eddies which
showed where the vessel in which she so lately em-
barked had disappeared, carrying with it all the treasures
which the Marquis la Force had been taking with him
to England. She could hardly realize that the family
had now absolutely nothing but the wet garments in
which they were standing.

“Thanks to our merciful Preserver, that which is
most precious is safe!” exclaimed the Huguenot noble,
with one arm around his wife and one around his
daughter.

“But is all—all gone?” cried Adéle excitedly, still
gazing on the dark heaving waves. “My mother’s
AN EVENTFUL PASSAGE. 67

jewels—the pearls which were heirlooms—the plate
which our ancestors used and handed down from sire to
gon—the pictures, the dear. pictures which can never,
never be replaced—even the sword which was worn at
Ivri !—all swallowed up by that horrible sea!”

“We had already lost what was more precious than
gold or jewels,” said the bereaved father with a sigh ;
“and as for the sword, my child, we shall find in the
land to which we are bound one more valuable still, the
sword of the Spirit—the Word of God.” __

“Why does God strip us of everything ?” impetuously
cried Adéle la Force.

The marquis calmly replied in the words of the
patriarch Job, “The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken
away ; blessed be the name of the Lord.”
CHAPTER IX.
POVERTY AND PRIDE.

Tue heart of old England readily responds to the call
of humanity. It is matter of history that a subscrip-
tion was raised for the Protestant exiles from France,
who in tens of thousands sought refuge from persecution
after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

The La Forces met with the utmost kindness on
board the vessel which had been the accidental cause of
the loss of their own. Captain, officers, and passengers
vied in showing them attention. The same kindness
awaited the exiles on their arrival at Dover. No sooner
was it known that a Huguenot nobleman and his family,
expelled from France by the tyrant Louis, had suffered
shipwreck and loss of everything on the voyage, than
several respectable burgesses contended for the honour
of showing them hospitality. The mayor, William
Carden, succeeded in establishing his superior claim to
the honour of entertaining the Marquis la Force.

So a cask of ale was broached, huge joints of beef
POVERTY AND PRIDE, 69

ordered in—the boar’s head was to appear at the head
of the table. Even the morning repast was substantial
and abundant, though the grand feast was reserved for
a later hour. The mayor’s wife, a kind-hearted woman,
ransacked her wardrobe to bring changes of raiment to
the shipwrecked ladies. Elizabeth thankfully accepted
for herself and Adéle what was most plain and inex-
pensive, though not without expostulation on the part
of her hostess, who declared that such garments were
“not fit for the quality.” After the excitement and
fatigue of their disastrous voyage the travellers needed
rest, but they had to stand the well-meant but trying
attentions, and answer the questions of numerous vis-
itors, whom sympathy or curiosity, or both motives
combined, brought to the house of the mayor.

“TY wish that these good people had the sense to un-
derstand that to those in affliction, as we are, it would
be a luxury to be left alone!” exclaimed Adéle in
French, when there was a brief pause in the stream of
visitors.

“It is a luxury which we could only procure by mor-
tifying and disappointing those who are eager to do us
service,” observed the marquise.

“English are so different from French,” murmured
Adéle ; “of course you do not feel the change as I do.
—Ah, another rap at the door !”

The Huguenot family won golden opinions from the
70 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

good citizens of Dover. The marquise was declared to
be so nice, so free from pride, such a thorough English-
woman: the young lady was so pretty and interesting:
as for La Force himself, his noble appearance, his per-
fect courtesy, and the cause of his exile, caused a feeling
of enthusiasm in his favour.

This enthusiasm took a very practical form. While
the exhausted travellers were at length enjoying a little
much-needed repose after a crowded banquet, energetic
dames, late in the evening and early in the morning,
were hurrying from house to house, from shop to shop,
collecting subscriptions in aid of a noble family utterly
rumed by their attachment to the Protestant cause.
Money was readily contributed, and confided to the
hospitable mayor.

Elizabeth was pondering, with some perplexity, in
what way she and her party could, without money, ac-
complish a journey of some thirty miles to the house of
her father, when she and Adéle were summoned to par-
take of a late and very substantial breakfast. As on
the preceding day, the mayor and his wife did the honours
of the table with kindly but not very refined hospitality.
Beakers were filled with foaming ale; the plates of the
Huguenot guests were heaped up with more food than
they could possibly eat. Adéle, accustomed to French
cookery, surveyed almost with disgust the thick beef-
steak, somewhat underdone, which was placed before
POVERTY AND PRIDE. 71

her, and felt impatient at being urged to eat, when any-
thing like appetite was gone. The mayor and his wife
had evidently something on their minds. One or the
other now and then quitted the table to go into another
apartment, from which the breakfast-room was only
divided by folding-doors. There was a sound of per-
petual whispering and moving about in this room, heard
indistinctly when the thick doors were closed, but very
clearly when they were opened for the ingress or egress
of the mayor or his wife. It was evident that a great
many people were crowded into that room, as if awaiting
a reception. .

“What is on foot?” thought Adéle. “Cannot these
kind English boors leave us alone! It is odious to be
made a sight of, as if we were some curious animals
brought from the other side of the Channel.”

The meal was strangely prolonged after everything
like eating was over. Even conversation died down.
The mayor was evidently waiting for something, and
fidgeting at delay. The mayoress smiled mysteriously,
as if some important secret were in her keeping. The
La Forces wished to retire from table, but were chained
by the laws of courtesy; hints thrown out were appa-
rently not understood. At last the secret was disclosed.
The mayor had for the fifth or sixth time disappeared
into the adjoining room; now the folding-doors were
thrown open, and the portly man emerged with all the
72 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

dignity of the head of a deputation, carrying a scarlet
bag, which was heavy with gold. So many men, women,
and children pressed in after him, that the breakfast-
room was almost instantly filled. Some scrambled up
on chairs—two urchins even on the table, to obtain a
better view of the marquis and his family, and see the
Joy with which they would receive the charitable con-
tributions which had been collected with such zeal.

“Moonseer the Marquis,” said the mayor, advancing
towards his guest, and bowing low his bewigged head,
“I have the honour of being selected as”’—the good man
stammered a little—“of—of being selected as the me-
dium of presenting to our illustrious visitors a bag of—
of—the contributions made by the ladies and citizens of
Dover—to relieve their—their—importunate need.”

The face of the ruined nobleman was suffused with a
painful flush, even to the roots of his hair. Almost for
the first time in his life the marquis looked embarrassed,
and at a loss for words in which to reply. There was
no difficulty as regarded language, for the marquis had
been for two years in a school in Kent, and spoke flu-
ently in the English tongue. But La Force had never
before had charity money forced upon him, and the pub-
licity of the proceeding shocked his delicacy and wounded
his feelings. The marquis paused for several moments,
then, pressing his hand over his heart, made the follow-
ing reply :—
POVERTY AND PRIDE. 73

“T entreat you, Monsieur le Maire, to express our
gratitude to our generous English friends, and to believe
how deeply I feel their kindness as well as your own.
You will increase the obligation by adding the contents
of that purse to the contributions already so liberally
made for my exiled countrymen.” Then, bowing grace-
fully, first to the mayor, then to the spectators right and
left, the peer of France, followed by his wife and daughter,
made his way out of the crowded room, and proceeded
to that which had been appropriated to his private use.
Looks of disappointment and feelings of mortification
were left behind them.

“He's a bit too grand,” murmured the mayor.

“He'll have to come down,” observed a burgess’s
wife who had been most active in collecting the
money.

“ Depend on’t, the marquis didn’t guess that the money
in the bag was all gold,” remarked a grocer. “It would
have been better to have left the silver and copper as
they were; he'd have preferred a bigger bag.”

“Did I do right?” said the marquis thoughtfully, as
he seated himself near a window, after drawing the cur-
tain so that he might not be visible from the street, into
which a stream of persons was now issuing from the
dwelling of the mayor.

“O father, you could not have done otherwise!” ex-
claimed Adéle. “We are no beggars asking alms.” .
74 POVERTY AND PRIDE.

“Did I do right?” repeated la Force, his eyes resting,
not on his daughter, but his wife.

Elizabeth hesitated for a moment, and then replied:
“T think that my lord might have accepted without dis-
grace that which was given freely and cheerfully—given
to God in the person of His servant.”

“It was pride, worldly pride in my heart,” said the
marquis frankly—* pride that made me forget every-
thing but a sense of offended dignity. That pride, like
all else, must be given up. I shall learn my lesson in
time, I trust,” he added more cheerfully, “at least with
you, my Elizabeth, for a teacher.”

La Force was interrupted by the entrance of Rochet,
his faithful Huguenot attendant. The man looked em-
barrassed, and seemed as if he wished to speak to his
lady alone; but Elizabeth had no secrets to hide from
her husband.

“What did you get for the brooch, Rochet ?” she in-
quired. The brooch was the sole ornament, except her
wedding-ring, which the lady of La Force had been wear-
ing at the time of the shipwreck.

“Only this, madame,” said Rochet sadly, “ though I
went to every jeweller in the town.”

“It will be enough to take us to Raven’s Nest,”
quietly observed the lady, as she received the money from
the hand of her servant. This little incident was a start-
ling revelation to Adéle of the reality of the poverty
POVERTY AND PRIDE. 75

which had come like an armed man upon the family of
La Force.

“Rochet,” said the Huguenot noble, “remove these
silver buckles from my shoes.”

“Ah, Monsieur le Marquis!” exclaimed the poor man
with a heavy sigh, as he went down on his knees to
obey.

“And call me no more by my title; in England I am
simply Monsieur la Force.”

“O father, you will never drop your name !” exclaimed
Adéle ; “even the cruel king did not, could not, rob you
of that.”

“What are titles to the homeless and moneyless ?”
said La Force with a melancholy smile—“ like gilded
covers over dishes that have in them no food, to cover
their emptiness. There—keep these buckles for your-
self, Rochet; would that I had more to give so faithful
a servant! I have spoken in your favour to the mayor,
who has promised to find for you a good situation in
this town. God bless you, Rochet, my friend !”

La Force held out his hand, which the poor servant,
still on his knees, covered with kisses and tears.

“ Now the sooner we start for the home of your father
the better,” said the marquis, addressing his wife.


CHAPTER X.
A PACKET OF LETTERS.

THERE is no need to- describe the reception which Eliza-
beth and her family met with at the home of her father.
A few letters written from Raven’s Nest, about ten days
after the arrival of the La Forces, will give an idea of
the life spent by the exiles under the roof of Mr.
Page :—

From Adéle to Felicce Duval.

Ma chére petite Cousine, ma charmante Felicie-—Oh
that I were beside thee now! But as this is impossible,
I will not miss an opportunity of writing to thee a
second letter, and enclosing in it one for my darling
Louis. Ah! will he ever receive it? Iam quite sure
that thy amiable papa will make every effort to find out
where my brother is now. We are desolate on Louis’s
account, and I think of him day and night.

In my first letter I described our frightful shipwreck,
and our reception by the kindly but vulgar burgesses of
Dover; so I will not refer to these subjects now. Thou,
A PACKET OF LETTERS. 77

ma mignonne, wilt be dying to know what I think of
Raven’s Nest, and the people who dwell therein.

Picture to thyself, ma Felicie, a bleak common, over
which the east winds blow with such force that the few
wretched trees all bend forward in an opposite direction,
as if they would run away if not tied by the roots!
Hélas! I sympathize with the trees, and would fly too,
were I not bound as they are. By the side of this
common, we dwell in a dull, red-brick house, which has
a walled garden—yes, a garden, but not a flower grow-
ing in it! One looks out on turnips, potatoes, and
onions! Oh, for our parterres and flower-bordered ter-
race! I do believe that Mr. Page, had he come into
possession of such a garden as once was ours, would
have turned out roses to put in radishes, and camellias
to make room for cabbages. As for the interior of the
house, how shall I describe it, but by repetition of the
one word—bare—bare—bare! No carpet on floors, no
tapestry on walls; some mats, indeed, but so old that
one has to guess at their original colours. The furniture
is so rickety that one should examine the state of the
legs of a chair before venturing to sit down on it.
The ancient clock has immovable hands. If a pane of
glass happens to get broken, one of the daughters mends
it as neatly as she can with paper. ,

But enough of the house; thou wilt like to hear some-
thing about the inmates. These consist of Mr. Page and
78 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

his two unmarried daughters, Lilly and Bridget, and a
maid-of-all-work (a very old maid indeed). The sisters,
poor things, though younger than la marquise, look
prematurely old and withered, like plants that have
been reared without a gleam of sunshine, in pots no
bigger than tea-cups. They are gentle and kindly
enough, especially Bridget, but stunted in size, and sub-
dued in manner. I think they could hardly muster up
a smile between them. How thou and Cousin Belinde
would laugh at their dresses, embroidered with patches,
and made in what was doubtless the fashion with house-
maids a century ago. I wonder if my lady step-mother
would have been like those poor Misses Page, if she had
not had the happiness of being transplanted in time to
dear, dear Chateau la Force! She is certainly very
superior to the rest of the family, and her sisters simply
adore her. Her coming has been a gleam of sunshine
to them, poor creatures, streaming through the barred
windows of their prison-like home.

But, ma Felicie, how shall I describe Mr. Page? The
sight of him would fill thee with affre. Of course this
Anglais wears no wig, and the hair which I suppose
he once had has been almost entirely starved off his
head: I cannot look at it without thinking of a skull. :
I cannot tell thee the colour of Mr. Page’s eyes, for
he always wears blue spectacles; but I know well the
sound of his voice. It is always harsh and grating,


A PACKET OF LETTERS. 79

and is sometimes raised to a loud tone of anger, espe-
cially when he addresses the unfortunate Lilly and
Bridget, whom their father seems to regard as anvils
made to be hammered on. Poor Bridget, in her nervous
haste to obey her father’s orders, chanced to break a
wine-glass, three days ago. She will never hear the end
of it! I fancy that Mr. Page was somewhat pleasanter
during his wife’s lifetime, but avarice and temper have
grown with years, till he has become a miserly tyrant.
Thou wilt ask, How does the Marquis la Force get on
with a man who in everything is his very opposite ?
O Felicie, it makes my blood boil to see how that man
treats my father, my noble, courteous, chivalrous father.
It is not enough that the title of Marquis is dropped
(that gave me a pang), but even Monsiewr is too much.
Mr. Page calls a French peer “La Force,” without any
addition at all, sometimes even dropping the La. It
almost seems to me as if this misérable wanted to pick
a quarrel with a guest to whom he grudges his meagre
fare, his wretched lodging. It appears that Mr. Page,

‘ though a Protestant, holds some different opinions on

religious subjects from those held by us Huguenots. I
cannot tell thee one bit what his opinions are; but My.
Page is always trying to argue on these differences, and
gets quite angry because not every one can see through
his blue spectacles. My father keeps his own quiet
dignity, and never loses his temper, but I can see that
80 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

his patience is sorely tried. And oh, how my poor
step-mother feels when her father insults her husband !
She flushes, and looks so much distressed. I need not
say that we shall not remain one hour longer than we
can help in this horrible Raven’s Nest. There is cer-
tainly only one raven in it, but he pecks at us all round,
pigeons and eagles alike.

T must now leave off, ma petite cowsine, and write to
Louis while my candle holds out. I am committing the
crime of using up a whole tallow rushlight, for I am
penning this at night. I wonder when I shall see a
wax candle again, or a silver candelabra like that which
lies at the bottom of the sea. Pray, offer my salutations
to your maman, with much love to dear Cousin Jacques.
' Don’t let him forget to tell us anything that he can find
out about my lost brother. Believe me, amie chérve,
thy affectionate, half-starved, and désolée

ADELE LA FORCE.

From Adéle to Louis.

My-DARLING, DARLING BroTHER,—I do so hope that you
have received our letters. What would we not give for
one line from you! I am afraid that you may never
receive even this. Such a separation rends my heart!

Do you remember your once rather provoking me by
saying that I was unjust to our step-mother, and that
you thought her nice and good. Louis, you were right ;


A PACKET OF LETTERS, 81

she is good. I do not think that any one could bear
herself better under difficult circumstances; and the
position is trying indeed. I have often said that no
one loves our father as I do; our mother cannot love
him more, but I think that she loves him better. There
is a difference, I see it now, between loving much and
loving well. There is selfishness in my love, and none
in mother’s. I give way to my feelings, and that pains
my father; his wife never gives him a moment's un-
easiness that she can prevent. She bears her worries
quietly, and has always a word of cheer for her hus-
band. I never admired her at the chateau; I cannot
help admiring her here. La marquise is like my lost
opal ring, which looked dull white, except when held up
to the light, when it showed rich tints of ruby and :
green. Madame’s is a very practical kind of religion ; it
really buoys her up, and keeps her temper sweet under
no small amount of trial. Going down into that Valley
of Humiliation described in the “ Pilgrim’s Progress”,
is very hard work, at least J feel it so. J am always
tripping and stumbling; but our mother goes down
with a quick, firm step. I suppose this is because she
is ever looking towards the heavenly city beyond.

You may wonder why we stay in such a place as
Raven’s Nest. We only stay because at present we
have no other place to which we can go. Our beloved

father is making every possible effort to procure em-
(106) 6
82 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

ployment—he—the Marquis la Force—the descendant
of heroes! He is out almost all day, seeking for a
situation, and returns home looking so pale and so tired ;
a little disheartened, too, though our father never com-
plains—he always thinks that God knows best. Would
that I had such faith! Once my father thought that
he had succeeded in finding a place—such a place! I
blush as I write about it. The peer of France was
to engage to sit in a haberdasher’s shop from morning
till night, to keep accounts about tapes and buttons, and
overlook the young men at the counters. For this
wearisome, monotonous, I am tempted to say degrad-
_ing work, a French marquis was to receive less salary
than a French cook! But our father was glad to do
anything for independence, and madame cheerfully agreed
to manage without a servant. (I suppose that she is to
be cook, and I housemaid, when we commence our
ménage.) But even this miserable appointment is not
to be had. When all seemed to be arranged, the vulgar-
looking head of the firm—I think that his name is
Boggins—appeared, and asked for a word with my
father. Speaking to the marquis as he might have
done to a lackey, this man told him that his “hands”
were all ready to strike (whatever that may mean) at the
notion of being overlooked by a Frenchman. “So, Force,
my good fellow, you must look for work somewhere
else.” O Louis! Louis! to think of our falling so low!,
A PACKET OF LETTERS. 83

I must brighten this sad letter by giving you a little
incident about our mother—you see I am dropping the
“step” at last. I saw her one day ripping off the fine
lace from her dress (I need not remind you that our
jewels are under the waves). I thought the madame
was going to wash the lace, and put it again on her
sleeves. But I never saw the lace any more, and the
very next day our father had a nice cup of coffee pre-
pared by the hands of his wife. Mr. Page never allows
coffee to his guests, nor tea; and father has, I am sure,
missed that which refreshes him more than anything
else. Somehow, I connected the lace with the coffee,
for I had seen a private téte-d-téte going on between
madame and the clergyman’s nice wife, and I fancied,
from some words dropped by the latter, that mother
had disposed of something through her, our only lady
visitor here. My curiosity was awakened, so I said,
when madame and I were alone together, “Our cook at
the chateau used to make coffee out of berries roasted
and ground; have you the art of making it out of
Brussels lace?” La marquise saw that I guessed her
little secret, and she gave a pleasant smile. “I wish
that I were more like you, mother,” I said. I had never
called her before by that name, though she had told me
to do so, To my surprise, the lady took me into her
arms and gave me a kiss—a good, hearty kiss, and said
(I think that there were tears in her eyes), “ Adéle, my
84 A PACKET OF LETTERS.

child! this recompenses me for much. Henceforth you
and I will face misfortunes together, and help to carry
each other’s burdens.” Was this not nice? I do believe
that I shall get fond of the Anglaise in time.

Hélas! the rushlight has almost burned down to the
socket. I must go to bed in the dark. I have not

even time to sign my—

From the Marquis la Force to Louis.

My pear Son,—In the uncertainty that this will ever
each you, I will not write much. I would be torn by
anxiety for you, surrounded as you are by temptations,
did I not commit you to One who is able to save. Stand
fast in the faith, my boy; endure hardness, as a good soldier
of the Lord Jesus Christ. Your ancestor fell at Ivri
grasping his sword to the last—-fatthful till death. Even
so, never let go your hold of the Word of God. If the
book be taken from you, keep its words in your memory,
as steel in the scabbard, ready for use; grasped in the
hand of faith, neither man nor devil can withstand it.
Be constant and fervent in prayer: to say all in one
sentence—look wnto Jesus; let the look be one of
faith, of hope, and of love. The Lord watches the
conflict, the King’s eye is upon you; He will assuredly
give victory to those who trust only in Him. Your
loving father, BERTRAND LA FORCE.
CHAPTER XI.
ALONE IN A CROWD.

WANDERING slowly about the less frequented parts of
Paris, listless, as if impelled by neither business nor
pleasure, we see the solitary figure of a man. He is
well dressed according to the fashion of the period; in
faultless symmetry falls each curl of his costly wig; but
the face beneath that wig is sad, and the downcast
eyes are seldom raised higher than the rich shoe-buckles
on his feet. Poor Jacques Duval has aged much during
the last twelve months. Though ten years younger
than his uncle the marquis, he looks at least as old; for
sorrow and humiliation often anticipate the work of
time. Duval spends much of the day out of doors; for
it is bitter to him to be at home and see going on that
of which he cannot approve, yet which he is powerless
to prevent. Jacques’s presence is no pleasure to his
wife; he is regarded rather as an encumbrance, a
visible conscience feebly remonstrating with one re-
solved not to obey its voice. Duval has most bitterly
86 ALONE IN A CROWD.

repented of having suffered himself to be tricked into
compliance with the will of his wife.

The evil consequences of that compliance were soon
apparent. Madame Duval had had her own way ; she
had snatched the reins from the weak hand of him
who had the right to guide, and now was driving on
to destruction. The house in which the Duvals had
long resided was changed as soon as possible for one
in a more fashionable quarter; and the new dwelling
became the scene of perpetual dissipation. Money was
recklessly squandered to secure the object of madame’s
ambition—that of becoming a leader in the beaw monde.
Protestantism was, of course, an obstacle in the way of
Belinde’s obtaining her object; so she drove over it with
scarcely the semblance of hesitation. Jacques remon-
strated, entreated, even wept; but in vain. Madame
Duval and Felicie were, within a month of their return
to Paris, received into the Church of Rome. There was
even an affectation of zeal for the religion thus, from
worldly motives, embraced. Often was mass attended
in the morning when the evening had been given to the
theatre or the rout. Felicie’s mother was resolved that
her daughter should be married to an aristocrat, and so
have the much-coveted privilege of entrance into the
court circle. For this object Madame Duval unceas-
ingly laid herself out. The peer might be old, blind,
profligate, or purse-proud; but he would give his wife
ALONE IN A CROWD. 87

position, and that was what Madame Duval craved, and
was determined on having at any price. She was em-
phatically “of the earth, earthly;” the slave of the
world, and bound by its chains.

How inexpressibly lonely was a good, pious man,
such as was Jacques Duval, in such an. unhallowed
home! Often did he ask himself whether it would
not be better to follow his uncle to England; but the
Huguenot felt that to do so would be to desert his
wife and child) He was the only link—alas! but a
weak one— between his family and better things.
Were he to depart, even respectability might follow
honour and conscience.

Though in the Bible the Huguenot found some com-
fort, it was by no means comfort unmixed; the pages
of God’s Word being so full of denunciations against
the very evils which Jacques had constantly before his
eyes. Vain were his protestations against them.

“Papa, why do you interfere with us? We don't
interfere with you; you go your way, and we go ours.”
Such was the pert reply of Felicie to tender counsels
from a parent from whom she had never had a harsh
look. And these words were from his own child! from
her whose birth had caused the father such delight!
from her whom he had fondled in his bosom, danced in
his arms, and beside whose sick-bed he had offered such
fervent prayers! His parental advice was called inter-
88 ALONE IN A CROWD.

ference! The paths of father and daughter were sepa-
rate indeed: one trod a narrow, thorny one, leading to
life ; the other, the broad way of destruction.

A few gleams of reflected light sometimes fell on the
painful road followed by Jacques Duval, from acts of
kindness which he secretly performed. If he was sel-
dom seen in gay assemblies, he was often seen in the
dwellings of the poor. If the courtier despised him,
the widow blessed him; and Jacques felt that, however
lonely, he was not quite useless on earth.

It had been more than a gleam of joy to Duval
when he had sent off by private hand, unknown to his
wife, a large sum of money to the Marquis la Force.
Jacques had done this, as soon as he could find safe
means of conveyance, after hearing of the loss of all his
uncle’s property by the collision at sea. The supply
had arrived most opportunely on the very day after the
letters given in the last chapter had been penned. The
marquis had been greatly touched by the liberality and
consideration of his relative.

“ What is my lord’s intention regarding this money ?”
inquired Elizabeth somewhat anxiously ; for she could not
help fearing that her chivalrous husband might send
back to Duval the gold which the La Forces so sorely
needed. That very morning Mr. Page had ungraciously
told his daughter that he could not afford to fill three
extra mouths. Bertrand’s reply was a relief ta_his wife.
s
ALONE IN A CROWD. 89

“JT will accept the gift with gratitude to God and
my generous nephew; but I will not retain so large a
sum. One-tenth will supply our present need, and the
remainder I shall invest in the name of Jacques Duval.
The kind man may be glad to have it some day; for I
cannot believe that the true-hearted Huguenot will stay
very long in Paris.”

“No, indeed,” said Elizabeth earnestly ; “surely the
Lord will reward poor Jacques for his goodness to us
by bringing him safely out of that Sodom.” .

The following day La Force left inhospitable Raven's
Nest. He offered his father-in-law money to pay for
the small expense to which he had been put. Poor
Elizabeth blushed with shame at a parent’s meanness,
for Mr. Page clutched at the money.

But let us return to the Huguenot dwelling in Paris.

Duval had a special object in view, of which, under
all discouragements, he never lost sight. That object
was, to find his young cousin, Louis la Force. Jacques
pursued his search cautiously but steadily, yet for
nearly a year found it impossible to gain any certain
information regarding the youth. Being well known
to be a Huguenot, Duval was always a suspected man.
Ministers of State would grant him no audience, his
letters were returned unanswered—he could neither see
nor hear anything of the lost heir of La Force. At

last some information came in an unsuspected way.
90 ALONE IN A CROWD.

“For the love of Mary, monsieur, come and see my
husband!” cried a thin, worn-out-looking woman, who
met Jacques one day at the corner of a street. “My
poor Jean—he’s a carpenter—fell from a scaffolding a
fortnight ago, and has never lifted up his head since.
I think he is dying.” Tears fell fast from the poor
woman’s eyes.

“ Where do you live?” asked the pitying Jacques.

“Just down yon alley, monsieur. It’s a poor place
to take your honour to. We only lodge in a garret.”

“There was One who lodged in a stable,” thought
Jacques; and he bade her show him the way to her
husband.

A long, dark, dirty stair was ascended, and then the
French gentleman entered the small but neat room, in
which lay a dying man. Sickness had brought poverty ;
but the carpenter was no beggar. He did not ask for
the relief which his visitor. willingly gave. Jacques
gave sympathy as well as money. He sat down on
the sufferer’s pallet and, as his days were evidently num-
bered, repeated slowly to him some texts from Scripture.

“Sir, you are a Huguenot?” said the sick man.

“T am,” was the quiet reply.

“The Huguenots are—God’s people,” faintly mur-
mured the sufferer. “I served one of them once—the —
Marquis la Force. He is a good man, if there was
ever a good one on earth.”
ALONE IN A CROWD. 91

“Yet he is banished from his country—ruined—his
only son taken from him,” said Duval with a sigh.

“JT know where that young gentleman is,” the car-
penter said.

“You know! Where—where is he?” exclaimed
Duval in an excited tone of surprise. “For the love
of Heaven, speak! I am the youth’s own cousin.”
The sick man looked strongly interested.

“ Monsieur, I know little,” he said, “but I will tell
you all that I know.—Fauchon, give me a drop of
water. Lift me up a little I must speak while I
can.” With effort the poor man went on: “I was
employed to do some repairs at the Monastery of the
Holy Sponge—it is not two leagues from Paris, to the
north—”

“I know it, I know it,” interrupted the impatient
hearer, who feared that the sick man’s strength might
fail him before he could finish his story.

“T was busy at work on the scaffolding when the
prior and monks came in for vespers,” continued the
carpenter, ever and anon stopping as if to gasp for
breath. “With them came—the students who are
brought up under their care. Amongst them was one
—one unlike the rest. I had not seen him for years,
and—he was so much changed! But I knew him at
once—he for whom I had made—the rabbit-hutch—
the son—yes, yes—the heir of the Marquis la Force.”
92 ALONE IN A CROWD,

“Did he see you——had you any word with him 2”
eagerly asked Duval.

“Monsieur, that was impossible. He never looked
up; but—but I kept my eye on him. The service was
soon over,” said the carpenter faintly; “he went away
with the rest.”

“Did Louis la Force kneel to the Host?” asked the
Huguenot anxiously.

“Tt was not high mass, monsieur. He—knelt in
prayer ; but—but I ean tell you no more.”

“Did he look well—happy ?” interrogated Jacques.

But the sufferer could no longer give a reply. His
eyes were closed, his strength was exhausted. But he
had said enough. Jacques Duval was grasping a clew.
He thrust a silver crown into the hand of the carpen-
ter’s wife, promised to come soon again, and hastened
out of the room.

“T have found him at last!” Jacques joyfully ex-
claimed, as with quickened steps he descended the dark,
rickety stair.
CHAPTER XII.
THE MONASTERY.

Hacer to make the most of his unexpected discovery,
Duval, without returning to his own house, stopped the
first empty public conveyance which he met, and bade the
driver take him direct to the monastery. Jacques had
a handsome coach of his own, but he seldom entered it.
Madame Belinde liked to have it always at her own
disposal.

The monastery was a building of solid brickwork,
gloomy in appearance, and surrounded by walls so high
that it conveyed rather the idea of a prison than that
of a place devoted to religious uses. Looking between
the iron bars of the heavy gate, Duval noticed that the
windows, which were small and high from the ground,
were strongly grated. The bell which Jacques sounded
had a sound so deep and dull that it reminded him of
a death-knell. A tonsured monk, with a heavy bunch
of keys hanging from his leathern girdle, a bare-footed
man, who looked as if he never had smiled or could
94 THE MONASTERY.

smile, answered the summons of the bell. Without
attempting to open the gate, the monk, through the
bars, asked the stranger what he wanted.

“JT wish to see one of the students,” said Duval.

“You cannot do so without the permission of the
reverend prior,” was the reply.

“ Let me ask the prior, then. Open the gate. I have
a relative here; my name is Duval.”

The warder looked critically at the stranger before he
decided whether Duval should be admitted or not. But
the monk concluded that the wearer of so expensive
and faultless a wig must be a gentleman, and possibly
connected with the court. Duval quickened the monk’s
movements, as he was slowly fitting a large key into
the lock, by thrusting a piece of gold between the bars.
This settled the question regarding the stranger’s rank ;
the key was turned, and with an ominous grating sound
the heavy gate swung back on its hinges.

Duval entered a paved court which encircled three
sides of the building. Two or three bare-footed monks,
with rosaries in their hands, were slowly pacing this
court, and paused a moment in counting their beads, to
see who it was who had ventured to enter the precincts
of their prison. Duval eagerly scanned their faces, but
none in the slightest degree resembled that of Louis la
Force.

Another minute, and the threshold of the building
THE MONASTERY. 95

was crossed. The interior felt singularly cold, and
Jacques shivered as he entered the large gloomy hall.
Having traversed this, he was conducted to the private
parlour, in which the prior received his visitors. The
only ornaments of this room were a large crucifix, and a
painful picture of the martyrdom of some obscure saint.
A black rosary hung from a nail in the wall, and one
end of the apartment was covered by the sable drapery
of a heavy curtain. The monastery was one where the
rules were severe and rigid; it was utterly unlike:
others where the monks could feast and carouse, and
exchange all the gossip of the day. Duval felt un-
pleasantly reminded of tales which he had heard of the
Inquisition in Spain; he turned his back to the picture
of horrors, and rather nervously awaited the arrival of
the prior.

Jacques had to wait some time; he almost began to
think that his message had either not been delivered or
that it had been forgotten, when at last the black
curtain was moved back, and the prior entered. Duval
bowed low as the Roman priest, clad in a black robe,
girded with a rope, and holding a crucifix in his hand,
with air stately and severe, advanced a fow paces towards
him. The prior did not ask the visitor to resume the
seat from which Jacques had risen on his entrance, but
himself remained standing, as if to indicate that the
interview should be brief. The hard lines on the
96 THE MONASTERY.

prior’s stern pale features gave the impression that his
was a nature that had undergone a gradual process of
petrifaction.

“What is your business with me?” asked the prior,
surveying the stranger with stern but impassive gaze.

“T am very desirous to obtain your kind—gracious
permission—to see my young cousin,” stammered forth
Jacques in a nervous manner.

“Who is your relative?” inquired the prior.

“Louis la Force,” was the reply.

The prior’s gaze became more keen and penetrating.
“You are a Huguenot,” he sternly observed, moving one
pace backwards, as if to breathe the same air as a
heretic breathed involved some moral pollution.

“T am a Huguenot,” replied Duval, who never denied
his faith ; “but I have his Majesty’s gracious permission
to reside unmolested in Paris.”

“You have not mine to intrude into these sacred
precincts in order to instil the poison of your heresy
into the minds of our youth.”

“You will grant me a brief interview with my
relative,” pleaded Duval; “it may be held in your
presence.”

“T grant nothing,” said the prior with a frown; “and
I must request you, monsieur, not to repeat visits which
are utterly vain. Your nephew—cousin—has abjured
his heretical opinions, he has conformed to our rules, and
THE MONASTERY. 97

received his first communion according to Catholic rites.
When old enough, Louis la Force will receive the tonsure
also, take his vows, and become one of the community
here.”

Duval was greatly distressed. “Can this be true!”
burst from his lips.

“Do you presume to doubt my word?” said the prior
severely. He pointed with an unmistakable gesture
towards the door, then added, “ Heretics find no place
within these walls; never approach them again.”

Jacques bowed, and made his retreat into the open
air. As he passed through the paved court, the heavy
gate was a second time unclosed for a visitor, and a
gaily-attired gentleman of the court, who had come in a
dashing vehicle, entered the place. The courtier, who
has already been introduced to the reader as Baron
Perrot, bowed politely to Duval as he passed him; but
the Huguenot’s mind was so preoccupied that he
searcely noticed the greeting. Duval did not recog-
nize the gentleman whom he had met but once before,
and that in the preceding year; but Perrot remembered
him.

The prior was still in his parlour when Baron Perrot
was announced. He was received far more graciously
than Duval had been, and was requested to take a seat.
The young courtier was lively and bold; his cheerful

voice sounded strangely incongruous in that solemn place.
(108) 7
98 THE MONASTERY.

“T saw Monsieur Duval coming out as I entered,”
said Perrot, after the first salutations had passed ;
“doubtless he came to see his young cousin. But you,
reverend father, are not likely to let him carry off a
lamb from your flock.”

“A lamb!” muttered the prior; “say rather a lion’s
cub. Such an untamable young heretic I had never
met with before.”

“You have doubtless been trying to draw his fangs
and clip his claws,” said the gay young baron.

“In obedience to his Majesty’s will I have done all
that I could to reclaim the youth,” was the gloomy
prior’s reply. “Of course his books were taken away
from the first, but he seems to have learned their
contents by heart. For every argument brought for-
ward by us the young heretic has an answer.”

“But there are some sharp arguments which are not
easily answered,” observed Perrot, with a significant
smile.

“Such have been tried again and again. The young
reprobate has had a good many more fasts than the
Church prescribes,” said the prior grimly, “and solitary
confinement besides. Sterner discipline has also been
applied, but the wretched boy has borne all with the
air of a martyr. Then his health failed, and we were
afraid that he might slip out of our hands. Louis’s case
is hopeless. One cannot wash out the veins in marble
THE MONASTERY. 99

with holy water. I believe that if that boy were cut
into a hundred pieces, his last drop of blood would be
tainted with the poison of heresy.”

“Reverend father, we are now going to take your
troublesome patient out of your hands, and try a
different kind of treatment,’ said Baron Perrot. “It
appears that Madame la grande Dauphine took a faney
to the handsome boy as well as to his sister some time
ago, and thought that he would make a remarkably
good-looking page. His father, though a Huguenot, is
a man of high rank and stainless honour. His an-
cestors rendered great services to the State, which our
gracious monarch deigns to hold in remembrance. The
great king has determined that this youth shall keep the
La Force title and estate as a Catholic peer.”

“He is an out-and-out heretic,” muttered the prior. ©

“Have you never, reverend father, heard the fable of
the sun and the wind contending for the traveller's
cloak? The sunshine of a princess’s smile will do more
to make a spirited youth cast off his heretical rags than
all the wind of priestly exhortation, or the pelting hail
of castigation. Here is my warrant,” continued the
young baron, politely handing over a paper to the prior.
“You see that I have royal authority for taking La
Force with me to the palace. Will it please you to
summon the young gentleman at once? for I have a
double engagement for this evening, and no time to spare.”
100 THE MONASTERY.

With ill grace the prior rang sharply a hand-bell that
lay on the table beside him. The summons was
answered by a bare-footed monk.

“Bring the boy La Force into my presence at once,”
said the prior. As the monk retired to obey the com-
mand, the head of the monastery remarked with a
frown which belied his words, “I am heartily glad to
get rid of my heretic charge.” He then added, “It is
but fair to let you know, Monsieur le Baron, that you
will have a slippery subject to deal with. This wretched
youth has, in the most daring manner, twice attempted
to escape; and the second time, in spite of extraordinary
precautions, he almost succeeded.”

“We will have silken fetters for the wild bird,”
- laughed Perrot; “they bind faster than those of iron.”

A few minutes of silence ensued, and then the black
folds of the curtain were again drawn aside, to admit
the entrance of the heir of La Force. Perrot was
shocked at the change in the appearance of the youth
whom he had taken, radiant in health and beauty, from
the Huguenot establishment in which the marquis had
placed his son. Louis had become. much taller, much
thinner, and much paler. His fine hazel eyes had lost
their brilliance, and, sunken as they were, looked un-
naturally large. The captive, however, entered the
. room with no faltering step, but with an air of
resolution, as one prepared to endure. Great was the
THE MONASTERY. 101

youth’s surprise when the gaily-dressed courtier rose on
his entrance, and going forward to meet him, as if he
were an intimate friend, saluted him in French fashion,
by embracing him, and kissing him on each cheek. The
prior surveyed the greeting with undisguised disgust ;
but Perrot cared little for the prior, and was rather
pleased at this opportunity of teasing the reverend
priest.

“Mon ami! I am charmed to see you,” said the
courtier blandly. “I suspect that the air of this holy
place has not agreed with your health. I have come to
take you to brighter scenes. His Majesty has com-
manded your attendance at court: you, like myself, will
be attached to the retinue of Madame la grande
Dauphine.” .

When an invalid is suddenly taken from the darkness
and confinement of a sick-room into the open air, the
change is sometimes overpowering. The sunshine
dazzles him, the fresh breezes make him at first feel
faint and dizzy. Such was the effect of Perrot’s unex-
pected reception and address upon the long-persecuted
Huguenot youth. Louis could not speak, but leaned on
the back of a chair for support.

“Come,” said Perrot good-naturedly, “I have too long
intruded on the time of the reverend prior, keeping him
from I know not what charitable avocations.” There was
a touch of satire in the tone of the courtier. “He will
102 THE MONASTERY.

be pleased to send after you what property you may
have confided to his parental care. Come” (Perrot laid
a kindly hand on the arm of Louis), “my coach waits,
and my horses are impatiently pawing the ground.—
Monsieur le Prior, reverend father, I have the honour of
kissing your feet;” and bowing low, with affected respect,
Perrot drew Louis towards the door.

‘The son of La Force also bowed to his persecutor: the
act of courtesy was intuitive, but the youth’s lips
refused to utter a word. As Louis crossed the paved
court, and felt the fresh breeze on his pallid cheek, he
fervently hoped that he might not awake and find that
he had only been dreaming of freedom.

It was not till Louis was seated beside Perrot in the
handsome equipage that the youth found power to
speak. “Monsieur,” he said, “whither are you going to
take me ?”

“To the palace of Her Royal Highness Madame la
grande Dauphine,” was the courtier’s reply. “She will
possibly grant you the honour of an appointment
amongst her pages.”

“You are—the princess is probably under a mis-
apprehension,” said Louis. “I have not forsaken, and,
God helping me, will never forsake the faith of my
father.”

“Oh, mon amt, you are not in the Inquisition, nor
in a monastery now. If you do not wear your heresy
THE MONASTERY. 103 |

ostentatiously, like a satin bow on your sleeve, no one
will ask you whether you have a rosary or a hymn-
book under your vest. Only one thing I must require
of you,” said Perrot in a more peremptory manner. “ I
have heard that you are a slippery sort of fish, always
trying to get out of the net; and small blame to you,”
he added laughing, “if it be made of monastic whip-
cord. I think that I myself, in your place, would have
risked life to get fairly out. But we can’t be watching
you night and day,” continued Perrot more gravely. “ If
the fish be let out of the net, it must be into an enclosed
piece of water, where he can be fed with dainty crumbs,
but not find his way to the open sea. You must pledge
the word of a Norman gentleman that you will never
attempt to leave Paris without the King’s express per-
mission.”

“JT cannot bind myself never to attempt to see my
father and family again,” said Louis.

“Then I regret to say that I must bid the coachman
turn back, and convey you again to your prison,” said
the young baron. Seeing that Louis turned paler at the
threat, Perrot added with a good-natured smile, “ Suppose
that we have a compromise—life is made up of com-
promises. Give me your word of honour that you will
not attempt to escape for two or three months—say, to
the end of this year: after that,’ he added gaily, “I
would stake my gold snuff-box against a brass nail that
104 THE MONASTERY.

you will never have the slightest wish to escape. Come,
give your parole, or—;” Perrot bent towards the open
window of the conveyance, as if about to issue a com-
mand.

“Stay—lI pledge my word, I promise that, till the
end of this year, I will make no attempt to quit Paris
without the permission of the King,” cried Louis.

Little did poor Jacques Duval guess that the gay
equipage which dashed on so rapidly, overtaking and
passing his slow conveyance, contained the very being
for whom he had been vainly searching, the boy over
whose apostasy he was mourning.

“TJ will tell the marquis nothing about this sad visit
of mine,” said Jacques with a sigh; “such news would
break his heart. Far better that my uncle should think
of his boy as persecuted or dead than as a renegade
from the truth, a shaven monk, a slave of the Church
of Rome.”
CHAPTER XIII.
GINS AND SNARES.

In Bunyan’s far-famed allegory, the pilgrim, after his
desperate conflict with the demon, his passage through
the horrors of the Valley of the Shadow of Death,
finds himself in a place full of gins and snares, even
more perilous to the soul. Such was the experience of
Louis la Foree. He had had his wrestle with the
powers of darkness, he had had much to endure, yet
had bravely held on his way; but in the palace of the
dauphine he was exposed to still greater peril to his
soul than in the monastic cell. The youth soon re-
covered health and spirits, and with them his remarkable
personal beauty. His mistress, the dauphine, looked on
him as a child might regard a goodly toy; she called
him her Endymion, and treated him with marked
favour. With the ladies of the court Louis was also
a favourite. He was richly clad in velvet and lace,
sumptuously fed and luxuriously lodged, and, whilst
performing his duty as page, was taken to all kinds of
106 GINS AND SNARES.

amusements, such as have a fascination for the young.
Louis could not avoid them, and, not unnaturally, began
keenly to enjoy them.

The poor tempted youth sorely lacked spiritual food ;
his body was well fed, but his soul was starved. On
the first opportunity Louis had tried to procure a Bible,
to replace that which the prior had burned. But in
luxurious Paris everything seemed to be procurable ex-
cept the pure Word of God. The page was only stared
at in surprise when he asked for a Bible.

There was not a single companion with whom Louis
could hold refreshing converse on spiritual things. All
at court were either slaves of superstition or slaves of
the world, some skilfully combining the service of both.
Real, vital religion seemed to be a thing utterly un-
known. Louis thought of his cousin Duval. It
seemed probable that Jacques had accompanied the
marquis to England; Louis knew that to do so had been
his relative’s declared intention. But on the faint
chance of Duval’s having remained in France, Louis
took advantage of the first respite from attendance in
the dauphine’s palace to seek his relative in the house
which he used to occupy before the Revocation of the
Edict of Nantes.

“Tf I could but see Cousin Jacques and learn from
him the address of my family, how happy I should be!”
thought Louis, as with rapid steps he passed along the
GINS AND SNARES. 107

Boulevards. “I have. plighted my word not to try to
escape; but I am in no wise bound not to correspond
with my father.”

The former dwelling-place of Duval was reached, but
its aspect was so utterly changed that Louis could
scarcely recognize its identity. The mansion which the
Duvals had quitted was in process of being converted
into a shop. Louis approached a workman who was
engaged in putting up a counter, and asked him if he
knew anything of a gentleman of the name of Duval, to
whom the place used to belong.

“JT think I heard that was the name of the last
owner,” replied the man, pausing, hammer in hand. “I
know anyways that he was a rabid Huguenot; and
when he sold the premises, doubtless he went off to
England or Holland, as the rest of the heretics did.”

With a bitter pang of disappointment Louis turned
from the place. He now felt utterly cut off from com-
munication with any one whom he loved, any one who
could give him advice and help in his struggle against
sin.

Perrot, from his attractive qualities, combined with a
character frivolous and worldly, was a dangerous com-
panion to Louis, more dangerous far in his gay urbanity
than the prior in his sternness had been.

“When Madame la Dauphine’s retreat to a convent in
the holy season next spring gives you and me respite
108 GINS AND SNARES.

from attendance at court, I propose that we make an
excursion into Normandy together—of course with his
Majesty’s permission,” said the young courtier, as he
and Louis, in an antechamber, were awaiting the
princess’s coming out for a drive. “ We will go to your
fine old chateau, and have a famous hunt in the forest.”

“T should not like to see the place, so much changed
as it must be,” said Louis.

“Tt is not in the least changed,” cried Perrot. “His
Majesty gave strict command that everything should be
kept up as in the days of your father—not a tenant
discharged, not a tree cut down. Fontainebleu told me
this himself, and with no little mortification. He had
expected to have permanent possession of the estate,
with a right to do what he pleased, and finds that he
is merely holding the fine old property in trust, until
your coming of age.”

“ But the King will never suffer the estate to be in
Huguenot hands,” observed Louis.

“No, dear heretic, cela va sans dire; but I have too
much confidence in your common sense to believe that
at the age of one-and-twenty you will be a Huguenot
still, You will, long ere that time, be as good a Catho-
lic as—as I am.” Perrot laughed as he finished the
sentence, for he was well known to have little regard
for any kind of religion.

“Were I so base as to wear such a mask, I should
GINS AND SNARES. 109

bring shame and grief on my father!” cried the heir
of La Force. ;

“Depend upon it, your father would be glad to see
his son enjoying the good things which he himself
recklessly flung away.”

“You do not know my father!” exclaimed Louis.
“He would rather see his son a martyr than an apostate!”

The French courtier shrugged his shoulders and
smiled: his was the bland, compassionate smile of one
who from the height of his worldly wisdom looks down
with pity on the weak scruples of those whom he deems
less wise.

It may to some be a matter of surprise that Louis,
though often in gay assemblies, never should meet
Madame Duval and Felicie, whose lives were given to
worldly pleasures. But those who know what rigid
barriers divided different circles of society in those days
of most oppressive -etiquette will hardly feel surprise.
The planets do not cross each other’s orbits; there is an
impassable space between those nearest to the sun and
such as are more remote. Louis was far nearer society’s
sun, as King Louis was recognized to be, than the
family of his father’s half-sister, who had married below
her rank.

The mental struggles of young La Force may be
shown by the following extracts from a journal which
he kept, a journal intended for no eye but his own.
110 GINS AND SNARES,

Louis, in the absence of a Christian companion, felt that
to note down his own trials, temptations, and falls might
be a help to his soul :—

“ December 1.—I am utterly disgusted with my own
frivolity and weakness. I had formed so many good
resolutions; but which of them have I kept? Regular
prayer, at morning, noonday, and night, this was one
broken resolution! I do, indeed, usually pray in the
morn, when I open my eyes to the light; the world
then seems more still—I can hold communion with God.
It is then that I remember my dear parents and sweet
Adéle. Oh, shall I ever see them again! The thought
of them, the assurance that they are praying for me,
braces my soul, as the pure air braces my spirits. But
soon the racket and bustle of the day drives from me
all good thoughts. I often do not remember the noon-
day prayer at all; or, if I remember it, have no oppor-
tunity for praying. The night is worst of all. I come
home so tired, or so excited, from amusements carried
on late, that either my mind is full of what I have seen,
or I fall asleep on my knees whilst making an attempt
to pray.

“ December 5—I think that at the monastery the
prior was like a tider who uses whip and spur to make
his horse leap over a precipice. The horse sees the
danger, starts, rears, backs, and refuses the leap. But
the creature may be led gently down a winding road,
GINS AND SNARES, ii

till he come to the very spot which his rider in vain
tried to force him to reach. Is it not thus with me?
I fear that I am on a downward course, and I actually
find it pleasant! I know that the atmosphere which I
breathe is choking the life out of my religion; that I
am not so earnest, so devoted, as I once thought myself
to be. Oh, my God, have mercy upon me!

“ December 7.—I was quite. angry to-day because the
tailor had made a mistake in slashing my sleeves, and
my doublet was a misfit! I am afraid that T am vain.
It was a real pleasure to beat Perrot at rapier-practice,
and to hear what the ladies said about it. My prayers
so lifeless and cold!

“ December 10.—I was to-day actually intoxicated
with pride and pleasure by a gracious word from the
King himself. The grand monarch condescended to
notice the page, and made me at once an object of envy.
The King said: ‘The boy looks like a true La Force.
He will lead my troops on the battle-field one day, and
show himself a true descendant of the prewa chevalier
who died at Ivri’ My face flushed, my heart beat fast;
I felt ab the moment that the grandest object in life was
fame—the greatest reward, a monarch’s favour! Oh,
my Lord, my heavenly King, what is all earthly fame
and honour and praise compared to Thy ‘Well done! ‘
Shall I forget that the earthly King has banished my
father, has tried to crush my religion?—shall I forget
112 GINS AND SNARES.

that he is stained with the blood of martyrs? But it is
so hard not to bow down to a golden idol, when it is
worshipped. by all the rest of the world.

“ December 12.—I have been thinking of that parable
in the Pilgrim book which our mother used to read to
us in the evening—the parable of the fire which con-
tinued burning though so much water was poured upon
it to quench it and put it out. There was One behind
the wall secretly pouring oil to keep the flame alive.
Sometimes I think that One is near me now; that the
Lord is really helping with His Spirit His poor tempted,
backsliding child. I certainly wish to be His—body
and soul—His now and for ever!

“ December 13.—Have found some aid from repeating
psalms. It is well that I was taught to learn by heart
a good deal from the Scriptures. If I could but once
hear my father’s voice, and feel his dear hand on my
head as when he used to give me his blessing at night
in the happy, holy days of my childhood, I think that
I should press on with fresh vigour in the race set
before me; that I should not care for the worldly vanities
which he despised. Shall I ever look on his face again?
I often meditate on the possibility of flying to England,
when the ending of the year shall free me from my
parole. But the more I think over the matter, the
more impossible escape seems to be. In the dress which
I wear I should be at once recognized as belonging to
GINS AND SNARES. 118

the court; I should be arrested, and sent back to my
hated cell. How to change this dress I know not.
Strangely enough, the clothes which I wore on coming
to Paris have disappeared, and I have no means of pro-
curing more. I once thought of selling my silver-
hilted dagger and buttons to procure the means of
flight; but these things are not actually mine, they
belong to my mistress, the dauphine. My every want
is supplied, except the want of money.

“ And even if I should succeed in reaching England,
—if, trampling on impossibilities, I should find myself
in the land of the free——how should I accomplish my
great object, that of rejoining my family? I have not
the smallest clew to guide me to the residence of my
father. Oh, my vain hopes!—my vain search for a door
of escape from this place of sin and temptation! I
can but cast myself on the mercy of Him who is able
to save !

“ December 15.—My foot has well-nigh slipped. I
happened to mention about an hour ago to Perrot that
mine is an empty purse (we are naturally intimate from
being so much together), when he laughingly said, ‘I
will show you the way to fill it. Jl lend you a
couple of louis-d’ors, and you shall return them to me
when you have made a hundred at the card-table.’
Then Perrot mentioned such and such a one who had

had ‘a run of luck, and laughing, expressed his con-
(106) 8
114 GINS AND SNARES.

viction that I should carry all before me. He threw
the gold pieces clinking down on the table; and I
actually laid my hand upon them, and tried to persuade
myself for a moment that my reason for wishing for
money would justify the means I might take to acquire
it. I was afraid, too—coward that I am !—that Perrot
would ridicule scruples on my part, and I do so hate to
be laughed at. Then it almost seemed as if I heard a
voice of warning sounding in my ears, ‘Watch and
pray, lest ye enter into temptation’ I gave back the
two pieces, and said—I blush to remember what an
effort it cost me to do so— My father forbade all gam-
bling; he never himself touched a card’ To my sur-
prise, instead of laughing, Perrot remarked, as he
pocketed the gold, ‘If my father had been as sensible
as yours, I should have inherited many a broad acre
which he lost at the gaming-table before I was born.’

“ December 30.—Madame la Dauphine is spending
the Christmas season at the country seat of the Duc de
Nismes. Perrot and I are left behind, so we have the
dangerous privilege of having nothing to do but to
amuse ourselves as we please. Perrot has been urging
me to go with him to-morrow to the reception of a
certain Madame la Rouge, who was once an actress,
married a rich man, and is now famed—TI might use a
harder word—I mean that all the world talks about
her. Perrot says that in the beaw monde it is the
GINS AND SNARES. 115

fashion to go to this woman’s receptions, and that he is
able to introduce me. There is to be wonderful sing-
ing, and the private acting of a play which has been
condemned as unfit for the stage. Here seems to be a
point where I ought to make a stand against the current
which is drifting me along. It is better to offend
Perrot than to go to a place where my father would be
ashamed to see his son. I will not accompany Perrot
to the mansion of Madame la Rouge. I will spend the
last day of this eventful year alone with my God.”

This was the last entry which Louis la Force was
ever to make in that journal.
CHAPTER XIV.
A MEETING.

Mapame Duvat has at length attained her object.
Felicie is engaged to the Vicomte Tallin, the pre-
sumptive heir of a dukedom. What matters it that he
is a gambler, and bears by no means a character un-
stained? Such a marriage opens a prospect to Belinde’s
frivolous daughter of at length reaching the very pinnacle
of her ambition, occupying a tabouret in the presence of
royalty itself! Mother and daughter are alike intoxi-
cated by such worldly advancement, and an anxious
father expostulates and counsels in vain. Frelicie is
Duval’s only child, and the Huguenot is reported to be
rich; his wife having contrived to give a general im-
pression that he is stingy, and that his expenditure is
greatly below his means, though the contrary is the
actual fact. Madame Duval’s extravagance is draining.
her husband’s purse; but this troubles her little—she
thinks money well spent if it bring her the honour of
being mother-in-law to a peer. The marriage is to take
A MEETING. 117

place in January, and to be celebrated with great pomp
and expense. Poor honest Jacques is burdened with
sorrow and care, but he is a cipher in his own
house.

“ Mon anvie, you and our child are not going to leave
me again this evening, the last in the year!” said Duval
to Belinde, as she sat, in embroidered dressing-gown,
sipping her coffee, previous to putting on her more
sumptuous evening attire.

“T thought you knew that we were engaged to sup
at Madame Froissy’s; but you have no memory,” said
the lady pettishly.

“But you will come home early, mon amie; I will
sit up—”

“Oh! pray do not sit up for us, or you may have to
wait till daylight. Madame and her party are all to go
together to a charming reception at the house of Madame
la Rouge.” p

Jacques was startled at the name, and a shadow of
displeasure crossed his mild face. “I cannot allow you
to take our daughter to that. house,” he said, with un-
usual decision. It was an ineffectual effort to catch up
a rein which Duval had long ago suffered to drop from
his hand.

“Monsieur le Vicomte Tallin is going, and we are
going,” said Belinde, with a slight toss of her head.

“Oh, would that I had accompanied my uncle to
118 A MEETING.

England!” exclaimed Jacques, in the bitterness of his
soul.

“T wish that you had,” was the tart reply, as Belinde
added more cream to her coffee. “You do nothing but
cross and worry us here; I wish that you would go to
the foggy island now.”

“© Belinde! and desert you and my daughter !” cried
the poor husband, with a choking voice. “ What would
become of you if I left you?”

“Felicie will have her home in the halls of a peer of
France, and my daughter’s residence will be mine,” said
the woman of the world. Madame Duval rose from her
seat with an impatient movement, which upset her
coffee over her dress.

Jacques did not wait to hear his wife’s exclamations
of annoyance; he left. the room, he left the house—its
atmosphere seemed to choke him. Duval went forth
into the streets, which were crowded with gay loungers
and those busy in making purchases for the morrow’s
féte of the New Year. The shops of Paris were more
than usually gay, glittering with all kinds of jewellery,
real and false, boxes of confectionery, toys, dolls dressed
in every style that could be imagined. There was
everything to attract the eye and charm the taste; but
Jacques, absorbed in sad thought, saw little of the
brilliance of the world’s Vanity Fair. He was a bur-
dened pilgrim, weighed down mote by the sins of others
A MEETING. 119

than by his own. His great fault had been weakness of
character—a fault most severely punished and repented
of most sincerely.

“Tt is too early to go to Casseau’s; the lamps are not
yet lighted,” said Jacques to himself. “I shall just
walk about to keep myself warm; but not in all this
racket and whirl, this gaiety in which I have no part.”
Duval turned down into a street in which there were
no shops, and fewer passengers, though it was by no
means empty of them. He had no aim but to while
away the tedious time, and no companion but bitter
thoughts and regrets.

Presently the comparative quiet of the street was
invaded by a religious procession, A company of
priests, dressed in their robes, bearing crosses, and
swinging censers of incense, was passing along, the
monks carrying aloft the Host, on their way to ad-
minister the last rites of the Church of Rome to a
dying nobleman of distinction. At the sound of the
bell, which was rung at the head of the procession, all
the passengers in the street, except one, lifted their hats
and dropped on their knees to do homage to what their
superstition regarded as Divinity shrouded in a wafer.
Duval alone stood upright. A crowd of gamwns and
roughs, who were following the procession, and who
were glad of a safe opportunity of insulting one of the
upper class, shouted out, “ Hat off! down on your knees!”
120 z A MEETING.

But Duval did not obey. His was not a strong char-
acter, but his weakness was. not want of personal
courage. Jacques was too conscientious a Protestant to
be frightened into paying homage to a wafer because it
had passed through the hands of a priest.

“ He’s a Huguenot—a heretic! down with him—kick
him!” shouted the mob which had followed the pro-
cession. The spark of hatred toward the aristocrates,
who were considered oppressors, that spark which at
the Revolution blazed up into a voleano, was smoulder-
ing in the breasts of the poor of Paris. The strong
hand of despotism kept it down; but that hand would
not be stretched out to protect a Huguenot. A Protes-
tant might be insulted, perhaps even murdered, without
any one being in danger of being sent to the dreaded
Bastille. There was a savage rush made at Duval, his
hat was rudely knocked off his head, and he was violently
' struck to the ground; whilst the procession moved on,
scarcely a priest glancing back to see what was passing,
not one interfering to save a heretic from brutal treat-
ment at the hands of the mob.

Duval managed to struggle to his feet, gasping,
bruised, and excited. He would have been instantly
knocked down again, but for the sudden interposition
of a youth who had happened to turn down into
the street from another which crossed it at right
angles.
A MEETING. 121

“What is this? Back, back, ruffians! What! all on
one unarmed man?” exclaimed an indignant voice.

The crowd divided at once to make passage for a
stranger who wore the well-known livery and badge of
the dauphin, the heir to the crown. He would have
been a bold man indeed who should not, in those days,
have paid respect to an officer of the royal household.
The mob left Duval alone with his unexpected protector,
and ran to catch up the procession again.

“Louis la Force!”—*“Cousin Jacques!” were the
exclamations exchanged between the two who, with
extreme surprise, recognized each other at the same
moment. They embraced with affection, then each
drew back, surveying his newly-found relative with a
look of painful suspicion.

“You in Paris, cousin! Then you have conformed—’

“No, I am a Huguenot still,” cried Jacques. “But
you are—”

“ Fatthful till death is our motto,” was the page’s
reply.

“ But is it possible that—”

“Oh, tell me of my family!” exclaimed Louis, with
an impatience which brooked no delay. “My father—
mother—Adéle—”

“All safe and well in England,” was the reply.
“There is a budget of their letters awaiting you in my
house; but I knew not where to find you. I was
122 A MEETING.

told that you had recanted, and were going to be a
monk.”

“A foul lie!” exclaimed Louis fiercely.

Jacques had been so much startled by the unexpected
appearance of his lost cousin, that it was not till the
first words had been exchanged that he had had time
to think of his own state. His large wig, soiled and
trampled on, lay on the ground near his crushed hat;
and the sleeve of his coat was torn, while his face was
dust-stained and bruised. Duval was too much of a
Frenchman to be indifferent to his own personal appear-
ance; he stooped, and picking up his wig, surveyed it
with a pathetic sadness which brought a smile to the
lips of the page.

“T doubt whether even Casseau will quite set this
right,” said Duval, mentioning the name of a hairdresser
well known in the highest circles of fashion. “I will
go to his shop. I was going there, but at this hour it
will be quite full; every Parisian is preparing to appear
at some evening entertainment.”

“Never mind the perruquier!” exclaimed Louis.
“Let us go to your home at once; I long for my letters
—I long to hear everything that you can tell me about
my father.”

Jacques replaced his damaged wig and hat on his
head after carefully shaking the dust from each: he was
by no means in such a hurry as was the younger La
A MEETING. 123

Force. Duval led his cousin through the less frequented
streets by a very circuitous route to his own house: he
did not wish to reach it till his wife and Felicie should
have left it to keep their evening engagement. But the
way did not seem long, for each of the cousins had so
much to tell and so much to hear. |

“My father—the Marquis la Force—he stoop to be a
teacher in a girls’ school!—he, with his intellect, his
talents, his rank!” exclaimed Louis, with a thrill of
pain, as he contrasted his parent’s present position
with that which he had held in his fair ancestral
home. “How does my father bear the degrada-
tion ?”

“He accounts it no degradation,” replied Jacques.
“Tn his last letter my noble kinsman wrote that if he
could but have good tidings of his son, he would be
contented, thankful, and happy.”

“And my mother ?”

“The tone of her letters is cheerful; but she is too
busy to write much. From what Adéle tells us, it
appears that the marquise helps to supply the family
purse by her needle.”

“Noble woman!” exclaimed Louis. “And Adéle, my
charming sister, how does she bear the change ?”

“She feels it bitterly,” replied Jacques. “It is not
so much poverty that distresses her, as the dulness and
sameness of the life which she leads, the utter absence
124 A MEETING.

of anything like the little diversions so dear to a child
of belle France.”

“Ah, my poor sister! She so delighted in her free,
bright life at the chateau—her horse and her pets, her
flowers, her glorious woods, her lyre, and her youthful
companions.”

“Adéle seems now to have no companions,” said
Jacques, “at least none that she cares to consort with.
Your sister cannot endure any one.who addresses her as
‘Miss Force, and forgets that she is the daughter of a
Norman. noble.”

“Poor Addle! The absence of congenial companions
is no small trial,’ observed Louis; “at least J have
sorely felt it. I should have found it such a help to
have had one, only one, to have sympathized with me
in my troubles and counselled me in my tenptations.”

“Would you like me to introduce you to Christian
friends?” asked Duval, intuitively lowering his voice,
though Louis was the only listener neav.

“Are there any such in Paris?” asked young La
Force. “Until I met you to-day, I thought that I was
the only Huguenot in this city.”

“Elijah knew not of the seven thousand who had
never bowed the knee to Baal,” was his cousin’s reply.
“The Lord has His Huguenot flock, a very small one
indeed, in this city, and a faithful shepherd who watches
over their spiritual state, although”’—Jacques glanced
A MEETING. 125

anxiously behind him to see that no one was stealing on
him in the deepening twilight ere he added—“ although
you know that he must do so at the risk of his life.”

“ His name?” asked Louis, with interest.

“Gerard Martine,” was the scarcely audible reply.

The name was familiar to the Huguenot youth as
that of a gifted preacher, the son of a martyr.
CHAPTER XV.
A MEMORABLE NIGHT.

Louis, at the house of Duval, read his home-letters with
the eagerness with which a man parched with thirst
drains the life-giving cup. When for the third time he
had read his father’s, he looked up with a smile. “Now
I am ready for anything!” said the son of La Force.

“You will wish to write answers to your family,”
remarked Duval.

“Yes; at once.” Louis snatched up a quill which
lay on the table at which he was seated. :

“Not more than two lines now,” said Duval. “There
is an opportunity of sending at daybreak; but if you
desire to be present at the secret meeting of our per-
secuted brethren, we must be off at once. There will
be another post to England in a few days.”

“T could not wait,’ exclaimed Louis, whose eager
hand was already engaged in rapid writing.

“T at least must keep my appointment,” said Jacques
Duval, rising from. his seat.
A MEMORABLE NIGHT. 127

Louis reluctantly closed his short epistle ; he resolved,
as he said with a smile, to “make amends for its brev-
ity by writing volumes by the next post. I must
have my father’s latest address, for I see that he is
no longer under Mr. Page’s inhospitable roof.” The
youth drew out the little ivory tablet which he carried
on his person.

While Louis was writing down the address, Duval
sealed the letter which was to carry such delight into
a home beyond the Channel, and promised to send the
despatch in the morning.

“Now we must go; we are late,” observed Jacques.

Louis’s heart was bounding with happiness, and his
brain was full of projects for rejoining his father. The
youth walked silently beside his cousin; and Jacques,
on his part, was little disposed for conversation. To be
present at a Huguenot religious service was always
attended with peril, and Jacques was not one to love
danger for danger’s sake.

It was Louis who broke the silence, “Why, we are
going towards one of the gayest streets of Paris!
Whither are you taking me?”.

“To Casseau, the perruquter,” was the reply.

Louis was surprised, almost indignant, at what he
deemed the frivolity of a middle-aged man. “Oh!
you cannot surely spare these precious moments to—.”
Courtesy forbade the completion of the sentence,
128 A MEMORABLE NIGHT.

Jacques smiled, but his smile could not be seen in the
darkness, for the street through which they were passing
was only illuminated here and there by an oil-lamp
suspended from a rope which extended across the narrow
way.

“I go to the perruquier from regard to something
beyond the care of my wig,” said Jacques, “though that
gives me a fair excuse. Casseau is a mainstay of our
cause.”

“But is it possible that a Huguenot is suffered to
pursue his trade here in Paris, at least if his principles
are known ?” :

“His principles are suspected, but winked at,” replied
Duval, still speaking in a low, confidential tone. “Our
friend’s skill makes him indispensable to those connected
with the court, even to Madame de Maintenon, that queen
without the name. No one can make a wig like Casseau,
so his faith is not inquired into too curiously.”

“But Casseau’s shop, in a gay thoroughfare, is one of
the last places in which a secret meeting could possibly
be held.” =

“T did not say that it was held in the shop,” replied
Jacques, smiling again. “Casseau has a cellar, which is
used for something besides holding wine or wood. The
back entrance is in a lane so narrow that it will hardly
admit the cart which holds the fagots. If I were to
enter by that low lane, I should cause suspicion. I go
A MEMORABLE NIGHT. 129

through the shop; but I and Casseau are the only ones
who do so. But before we enter yon lighted street, I
had better give you our watchword—we take it from the
name of a martyr of old; but as it happens to be that
of a late assistant in the shop, even if overheard it
would hardly awake suspicion. If you would make
yourself known as a Huguenot brother, say in an in-
different tone, as if inquiring for a servant, “ Where is
Farel?” If the reply be, “ With his Master,” you
recognize in the speaker a brother in the faith. But
now let us talk on indifferent subjects; we are in
Rue Royale.”

There was a colour of romance in this night expedition,
which had a fascination for the son of La Force: the
shade of danger deepened the effect. Following the
hint of Duval, Louis chatted as merrily as if no object
were in view but the repair of his cousin’s trampled
wig. Casseau’s fashionable shop was brilliantly lighted,
but at that late hour was almost empty. Only one
customer was under the perruquier’s hands, and that
one was in an impatient, angry mood.

“T say, make haste! I have an engagement: the
theatricals will have begun, and— Ah! Monsieur Duval,
I kiss your hands. You are even later than, myself.”
And Jacques, little to his gratification, had to exchange
a ceremonious greeting with the Vicomte Tallin.

“T suppose,” said the latter, “ that you, like myself,
(106) 9
130 A MEMORABLE NIGHT.

are bound to the reception of Madame la Rouge-—Make
haste!” The last words were addressed to Casseau, who
stood behind, girt with apron, and comb in his hand.
“Pray, who is your young companion ?” inquired the
Vicomte of Duval, curiously surveying Louis la Force.

“My young cousin,” was Jacques’ brief reply. In his
heart he was repeating Tallin’s “Make haste,’ for he
was impatient to have the place clear from the Vicomte’s
unwelcome presence.

Casseau did make what haste he could; but his
customer was hard to be pleased. The false curls would
not fall in the most becoming manner: Tallin again and
again consulted the mirror.

“ Possibly you too are in haste, Monsieur Duval,” said
the Vicomte rising at last; “1 see that you require
Casseau’s skilful touch even more than I did. I have
the honour to bid you adieu.” And with the low formal
bow which etiquette required, Tallin at length quitted the
shop, leaving behind him the sickly odour of musk.

Casseau, as he laid down the comb, looked inquir-
ingly, suspiciously, at the page of Madame la Dauphine.

“Give him the word,” whispered Jacques.

“Where is Farel ?” asked Louis.

“With his Master—in. Heaven,” was the low reply.
“T see, monsieur, that you are one of us—Gentlemen,
will you follow me? I have something worthy your
notice,” continued Casseau in a louder tone, leading the
A MEMORABLE NIGHT. 131

way into an inner show-room. In this was a collection
of various wigs, some kept under glass, some fitted on
wax models of heads. It need hardly be said that no
one now paused to examine these specimens of the
perruquier’s art.

Casseau, after first glancing round, drew a curtain
which conéealed a door. Opening this door, he led his
companions into a passage which was very dimly lighted,
after carefully closing the door behind him, when he
and the other two had passed through. Proceeding
along the passage, the guide opened another door to the
left, and then, followed by Jacques and Louis, groped
his way down a steep dark staircase till he reached a
cellar. Never could Louis forget the impression left on
his mind when he entered that strange underground
place of worship.

There was but a small congregation, and that appa-
rently of the lower class of artisans, men and women in
almost equal proportion. There was the baker, just as
he had left his oven, with his sleeves rolled up; the
workman in his coarse fustian;—sons of toil, with their
hard-working wives. They were seated on fagots,
with fagots around. The very table on which were
the elements for celebrating the Holy Supper was of the
same material, half hidden under a pure white cloth.
Most of the cellar was in shadow, for a single lamp very
ineffectually lighted the place. Louis looked to see
132 A MEMORABLE NIGHT.

how the people had entered, and how they could quit
their subterranean chapel. He noticed a ladder at the
farther end, but it was too dark for him to see the trap-
door above it, which could be fastened on the inside.
This little door opened on the back lane by which the
Huguenots stole to the place of meeting.

Duval’s entrance caused no surprise, for he was well,
known to all present; but that of the handsome »age in
the royal livery occasioned not only surprise but alarm.
Several men sprang to their feet, and one exclaimed,
“We are betrayed!”

“Nay; my cousin knows Farel, and Farel’s Master,”
cried Duval. “He is the son of the exiled Marquis la
Force.”

“Then he is indeed our brother,’ eried one who
emerged from a dark part of the cellar, and on whose
emaciated but noble features the lamp now shed its full
light. Louis recognized Gerard Martine, and was at
once pressed in his loving embrace. Then hard horny
hands were eagerly extended from every side, and were
successively grasped by Louis la Force. Distinction of
rank seemed forgotten in that cellar-church ; there was
the family tie, love to the brethren, to which a young
Indian convert gave the beautiful name of glory-love.

The interest felt by Louis in that little assembly of
“the true and the tried” culminated in the shepherd who
was feeding a persecuted flock. Every time that Gerard
A MEMORABLE NIGHT. 183

Martine showed forth the Lord’s death according to the
simple rites of a pure church, he knew that he did so
at the peril of his life. The fagots around him were
remembrancers of the fate which might be before him.
Louis looked with loving reverence on the pale, worn
man, whose countenance told of so much suffering, and
yet of so much peace. And when Gerard began his
exhortation, the youth hung on the words of counsel
and comfort, as if a St. Paul, fresh from the torment
of the scourge, had stood before him. When the holy
service proceeded, it seemed to Louis that, as at Pente-
cost, the Spirit of life and love was poured down on the
children of God. “It is good to be here,” was the young
Huguenot’s silent thought.

The service, which every one present felt might be
his last upon earth, lasted till nearly midnight. When
all was over, when each individual had ‘received the
pasteur’s fervent blessing, the little assembly broke up.
The trap-door was unfastened by a man standing on the
ladder, and presently the stars and dark-blue sky were
visible through what looked like a square hole, and the
cold wintry air rushed in. While the poorer Huguenots
were passing one by one through this aperture, which
was barely large enough to admit the exit of the larger
men, Casseau and the cousins mounted the staircase and
soon reached the empty show-room. The shop was
almost as dark now as the cellar, for a trusty servant
134 — A MEMORABLE NIGHT.

had extinguished all the lights but one. Not a word
was spoken by any of the three Huguenots; it was no
small relief to Casseau when the two gentlemen had
silently quitted his shop without attracting notice, for
the street was now deserted. .

Louis and his cousin parted, as their way lay in-
opposite directions. The page did not regret being
alone, for he needed solitude in order fully to realize the
deep, inexpressible happiness which was filling his breast.
It was as if Louis had been in the immediate presence
.of his Master; had asked from Him pardon, grace, and
strenoth; and had received the gracious reply, “Go in
peace; thy sins are forgiven thee.” Louis had found his
lost earthly parent; and he had found the Heavenly
Father from whom he had been in danger of wandering.
The pilgrim was clad in the best robe, the shining ring
was upon his hand, he was wearing the sandals of
peace, ready to dare anything, endure anything for the
Lord whom he loved. Now and then Louis passed some
gaily-lighted mansion, from which sounds of music and
mirth told of revels held to welcome in the New Year.
But with what changed emotions did Louis now regard
the pomps and vanities of the world! He felt that he
had been amused and well-nigh led astray by following
mere bubbles floating on a river which was tainted with
pollution and tinted with blood.

“J must escape from these dangerous environments,
A MEMORABLE NIGHT. 185

and rejoin my father on the first opportunity that I can
find,” thought Louis, as he sped along, with the bright
stars sparkling overhead. “What intense happiness it
will be to see him again, to look him in the face, and to
be able to tell him that I have been kept from doing
anything that would have made him blush for his son!
I will welcome poverty shared with my family. I will
shrink from no kind of work: the meanest labour would
be glorified by the thought that it is done for God. My
whole being is flooded with light and joy. Bless the
Lord, O my soul !”

On entering the dauphin’s palace, Louis was met by
Perrot, who looked jaded and out of spirits.

“Tt was a dull affair after all,’ said Perrot, whose
vanity had received and whose pride resented some
slight at the house of Madame la Rouge. “But, La
Force, where have you been roaming? You look as if
you had been in Elysium. Have you discovered some
way of enjoying yourself on the sly ?”

‘Louis’s only answer was a bright smile, as he mounted
the gilded staircase to seek his own apartment.
CHAPTER XVL
A SECRET.

Louts’s first employment, after he had ended his morn-
ing devotions, was to write a batch of letters to England.
A delightful occupation he found it, and so absorbing
that thrice the clock chimed, and sheet after sheet was
covered with close manuscript, before the page laid
down his pen. To communicate again with his family,
to pour out his heart on paper, to imagine the interest
with which his epistles would be read, was a luxurious
feast to one long debarred from all intercourse with his
relatives. Louis folded a large sheet of paper over his
enclosures—envelopes at that time being unknown—
carefully sealed and directed the packet, and then arose
from his seat.

“T cannot send this from the palace,” he said to him-
self. “Such a packet would awake suspicion, and
probably never reach England at all. It will be far
safer to forward my despatches through my good cousin
Duval. He said that there would soon be another
A SECRET. 137

opportunity. I will just snatch a hasty breakfast, and
then be off to him at once.”

Soon afterwards Louis placed his tasselled velvet cap
over his flowing locks, and sallied forth with his packet
safe in his bosom. With the New Year had come free-
dom from parole. La Force trod lightly, as if on air, so
full of joy was his heart. Duval’s house was reached ;
Louis knocked at the door of his relative’s mansion, and
when it was opened by a gaudily-dressed menial, he
was disappointed on hearing that Monsieur Duval had
. gone out.

“But the ladies are within, monsieur,’ said the ob-
sequious servant. He was but one of several who were
in attendance, for Madame Duval affected state.

“T certainly ought to see my relatives,” thought Louis,
as he followed his conductor, after giving his own
name,

Louis was soon in the presence of madame and her
daughter, who, in the glories of brocade, lace, and jewels,
sat ready to receive the throng of visitors whom they
had expected to pay their compliments on the festival of
the New Year.

The entrance of the long-lost Louis occasioned great
surprise, and the court-costume which he wore caused
not a little pleasure. To have a relative in Madame la
grande Dauphine’s household seemed to these quality-
hunters a link with royalty itself. Louis was over-
138 A SECRET.

whelmed with compliments at which he knew not
whether to blush or to laugh. He had grown so tall, so
handsome, so distingué, any one could see at a glance
that he lived in a court! Then came eager questions,
not always easily answered. Louis longed for the
arrival of other visitors, to draw attention from himself.

“We must have you at our little masque next week!”
cried Felicie: “it is not exactly a masque, but something
more original and delightful. Six gentlemen are to
come in disguised as country boors; we have their
coarse blouses and wooden shoes all ready. The Vicomte
Tallin is to object to their intrusion; and just as he is
about to turn them out, off go the blouses and sabots, the
supposed peasants suddenly blaze forth in silk and
jewels as Eastern princes, single out partners, and have
adance! Is it not a charming idea? It was suggested
‘by Madame la Rouge.”

Louis, whose mind was full of weightier matters, could
scarcely give the attention which courtesy demanded to
his cousin’s frivolous talk, but took advantage of the
first pause to inquire where he could find his cousin
Duval.

The look of pleasure and interest which had been on
the ladies’ faces turned to one of cold indifference; and
madame spoke of one whom she was bound to honour
in a careless tone—a tone almost of contempt—which
roused her hearer’s indignation.
A SECRET. 139

“Qh! no one knows where he has gone; one never can
tell what fancy monsieur may take into his head.
Jacques has nothing in common with us. He is some-
times away all the day, and sups at Les Trois Biseaux
instead of doing the honours here to the guests whom I
invite.” Madame took for granted that the dauphine’s
page was a pervert like herself, or she would not have
sneeringly added, “Monsieur cares for nothing but
hunting out old beggars, or searching for Huguenot
fools.”

Louis rose, with flushed cheek and sparkling eyes.
“ Pray remember, madame,” he said, “that J am to be
counted amongst these Huguenot fools 1” and with cold,
stiff salutations, the page hastened out of the room,
meeting several visitors on the staircase.

“Where and how can I have a private interview
with Cousin Jacques?” thought Louis la Force.
“He is evidently no master in his own house. Ma-
dame mentioned Les Trois Biseaux. I will go there
this evening on the chance of meeting my good, kind
cousin.”

Louis did not forget his intention. When in the
salons of the numerous restaurants of Paris shining
lamps threw their light on gilded labels, and tempting
dishes, and savoury scents from soups and stews tanta-
lized hungry gamins, lingering around doors that they
might not enter, Louis crossed the threshold of one
140 A SECRET.

which displayed in gold letters the name of Les Trois
Biseaux. Groups of men of the upper class were seated
at marble tables, examining the cartes beside them,
busily discussing the viands, or giving orders to the
garcons who hurried from place to place, bringing dishes
and uncorking bottles of wine. Louis gave an inquiring
glance around, but nowhere did the short portly form of
Duval meet his eye. The page was. going to retreat,
when Perrot called from his place at a table at the end
of the room,—*“ You here, La Force! This is an unex-
pected rencontre. Come; you arrive just in time to save
me from taking a solitary meal.”

Louis could not in courtesy avoid going and taking °
a seat beside the courtier, though he had no wish to con-
verse with him then. .

“Tet me order your supper; this pdté de foie gras is
perfection,” said Perrot, who was a connoisseur in what
regarded the table.

“Excuse me, I have supped,” replied Louis.

“Then you shall talk whilst I eat. I want you to
tell me where you spent such a lively time last night.
I promise you to be a discreet father-confessor; and you
see that we need not fear eaves-dropping.” Perrot
glanced as he spoke at the occupants of the next table,
who were English,, and who showed by their blun-
dering attempts to give orders to the garcon that
they were almost entirely ignorant of French. “I
A SECRET. 141

am really curious to know where you went,” continued
Perrot.

“Suppose that I do not choose to confess,” said Louis.

“Come, come, I don’t suppose that you were up to
much mischief. Perhaps you visited one of the gam-
bling salons, and came off with a heavy purse.”

“No use guessing,” said Louis.

“Now I'll barter a secret of my own for yours, I
can tell you something worth hearing.”

“J want to hear no man’s secrets, so you may lock up
yours,” said the page.

But the lively Perrot was not one who could shut up
a secret; “the cat symbolic” would always with him be
peeping out of the bag. <“T'll be generous and not
barter,” said he, drawing his chair a little closer to that
on which Louis was seated. “We shall have a sensation
in Paris to-morrow. Your old friend the prior, who is
always on the qwi-vive to smell out heretical rats, has
discovered a nest of them in a cellar, and the weasels
will be at them to-night.”

“What do you mean?” cried Louis.

“What I mean to say is, that a heretic priest, a
pastewr they call him, is lurking in some hole in Paris,
and that the prior is on his scent. We shall again have
the entertainment of having a Huguenot hanged, burned,
—or—maybe broken on the wheel.”

“You forget, sir, that you speak to a Huguenot!”
142 A SECRET.

exclaimed Louis, starting from his seat; and without
another word, the page strode rapidly out of the restau-
rant’s salon. ;

“What a temper the young cock is in!” muttered
Perrot ; “it is rather too early for him to show his spurs.
If this pdté were not so uncommonly good, I’d be after
him, and make him apologize for his rudeness.”
CHAPTER XVII.
A RACE FOR LIFE

It was well that Perrot was too well engaged to follow
Louis, though he would hardly have overtaken one who
was hurrying on at the utmost speed compatible with
not actually running. Louis dared not obey the im-
pulse to rush on as if racing, lest he should attract
attention. At this féte of the New Year the streets
were filled with loungers and pleasure-seekers ; and
others there were, besides, engaged on a sterner quest.
The young Huguenot caught sight of a party of gen-
darmes going in the direction of Casseau’s shop; he
even distinguished the black frock of a monk amongst
them. Louis knew the locality well, so dashed down a
side street. to take a short cut. There, indeed, he took
to running—nearly knocked over a child, and narrowly
escaped being run over himself. It was a race for life ;
for well the Huguenot knew that Gerard Martine, if
seized, must expect no mercy.

Casseau’s lighted shop is reached. Gentlemen are
144 A RACE FOR LIFE.

there, having the last touches given to their flowing
wigs before going to theatre or assembly. Casseau
himself is busy with a customer's hair. There is no
time for delay; Louis merely gives the perruguier one
warning look, and passes into the show-room, which is
happily empty. Louis, pushing back the curtain, goes
straight to the door in the passage, by which, on the
previous night, he had reached the narrow stair leading
down to the cellar. The second door is shut—he cannot
open it; it has evidently been fastened on the inside
by some one in hiding below. Louis knocks impa-
tiently—no reply; knocks again and more loudly, but
there is still no answer. The page is almost in de-
spair ; then remembrance of the watchword flashes across
his mind. “Where is Farel?” he cries out, careless
now whether he be overheard by stranger§ or not. The
door on the staircase so instantly opens that it is evident
the knocking must have brought a silent listener to the
top of the stairs. Louis rather feels than sees that it

. is Gerard Martine who stands before him.

“You must fly—the bloodhounds are upon you!”
gasps forth the breathless youth as he enters. “Let
me bolt the door again; if the enemy have to force it
open, that will cause a little delay.”

The door is bolted, and the two Huguenots noise-
lessly and rapidly make their way down the steep,
narrow stair. Gerard is the less excited of the two.
A RACE FOR LIFE. 145

The cellar, as before, is lighted by a single lamp.
Louis glances anxiously at the rope-ladder at the end,
by which he knows that the Huguenots are wont to
ascend to the trap-door, which is the only means of
exit to those who dare not pass through the shop.

“ Quick !—up the ladder and away!” cries Louis.
“You have not a moment to lose—I hear a noise
above !”

“You first, my generous friend.”

“No, no; never mind me,” cries the youth, across
whose mind not a thought of possible risk to himself
has passed before. “I am a favourite at court; they
will not harm me.”

Loud voices are indeed now heard through the closed
~ door, telling that the gendarmes are already in the
shop. The mavements of Martine are quickened. He
thrusts his Bible into his vest, takes out the key of the
trap-door, and then, as rapidly as he can, ascends the
rope-ladder." The officers are now thundering at the
door above the staircase.

“Throw down the key!” cries Louis.

Martine does so. He is now in the open air, and
only stops a second to utter one word of fervent grati-
tude to his young preserver, with another urging him
to follow quickly. ‘

Louis springs up the ladder, pulls down the trap-door,

and with fingers trembling with excitement locks it
(406) 10
146 A RACE FOR LIFE.

above his head. The youth has doubted for a moment
whether he should not escape by the trap-door himself ;
but that must involve his leaving it open, and he thinks
it better to give Martine a chance of distancing his pur-
suers by opposing a barrier to their following him
quickly. Every moment is precious. The pursuers are
evidently battering open the door in the passage. Louis
springs down the ladder, then taking out and opening
a penknife which he has with him, he exerts all his
energy to cut the ropes asunder. Blows and kicks are
being rained on the door above, accompanied by loud
oaths and curses. Soon a tremendous crash tells that
the door has given way—it has fallen on the stair, for
a few minutes obstructing the passage of the pursuers.

The rope of the ladder is thick and strong, it does
not readily yield to the knife, though Louis is using all
his strength. The blade snaps in two; but the rope
on one side is so nearly severed that Louis is able to
break it with his hand. This has rendered the ladder
useless.

Louis springs to’ the lamp and extinguishes it by
flinging it on the floor of the cellar. But the precaution
is vain, as two of the pursuers who are now thronging
into the place carry torches.

“Seize him—and after the other!” cries the prior,
who is one of the band. “The arch-heretic has flown—
a thousand crowns for him, dead or alive !”
A RACE FOR LIFE. 147

“Some of you go round by the back street to inter-

{?

cept him, others mount the ladder!” is the command of
the chief of the guard.

“ The ladder is useless,” says a soldier.

“Cannot any one climb? A large reward to whoever

4?

is first through!” cries the prior, pointing to the trap-
door above.

The bribe stimulates to exertion. “Stand by the
wall,” says the soldier to a comrade. “T1l mount on
your shoulders.”

Almost as quickly done as said. The lithe, active
soldier is in a minute on a level with the trap-
door, and stretches down his hand for an instrument
with which to force open the lock. Louis, though a
prisoner, is not in bonds. He springs forward, catches
hold of the climber’s hand, and gives it such a sudden,
vigorous pull, that the man, unable to keep his unsteady
footing, falls heavily to the floor. Another precious
interval of delay is thus gained. Those minutes have
preserved the life of Gerard Martine. He has found
refuge under the roof of a humble Huguenot, ready,
like Louis, to risk all to save his brother in the faith.

But the heir of La Force is a prisoner in the hands
of the officers of the Crown.
CHAPTER XVIII.
THE EXILES HOME.

WE will now return to England, and the less exciting
scenes which are passing there.

In a small apartment on the second floor of a dwelling
situated in a manufacturing town sits Adéle la Force.
Her surroundings are very different indeed from those
amongst which we found her when she was first in-
troduced to the reader in Chateau la Force. The
apartments rented by the exiles consist merely of par-
lour, sleeping-room, and dressing-room, the last-named
being appropriated to the use of Adéle. In it she has
her little bed: there is not space for much besides. On
that bed, used by day as her table, lie the young
maiden’s writing materials; and, seated on a footstool,
Adéle is engaged in penning a long letter to Felicie, now
her only correspondent in France, as for a protracted
period nothing has been heard of Louis. The little
room is miserably chilly, for rain and hail are falling
without, and within there is not even a fire-place.
THE EXILES’ HOME. 149

_Adéle’s fingers tremble with cold, and it is with diffi-
culty that she guides the pen. There is, indeed, a good
fire in the sitting-room, and Elizabeth has told her step-
daughter to bring her writing-case there; but Adéle is
wilful, and prefers solitude and discomfort to scribbling
away in the presence of Madame la Force. Adéle knows
that her father’s wife dislikes and disapproves of the
close intercourse kept up by letters between the cousins.

“ Adéle can learn nothing good from Felicie,” Hliza-
beth once observed to her husband. “I notice that
after every letter received from Paris the girl has a fit
of depression, and is less disposed to set cheerfully to
any useful occupation.”

“But we cannot deprive our poor child of the con-
solation of keeping up that intercourse which is almost
her only link with the land of her fathers,” was the
reply of La Force.

We will glance over Adéle’s shoulder as she writes,
and in her letter trace some of the workings of a yet
wilful, undisciplined heart, struggling against the yoke
whose pressure it needed :—

“Your charming letter, ma bien-aimée Felicie, has
given me more pleasure than my desolate heart has
known since we parted—as it seems to me ages ago!
I congratulate you a thousand thousand times on your
approaching nuptials. Dear wcomtesse (I call you so
in advance), may your path be as brilliant, as cheerful,
150 THE EXILES’ HOME.

_as happy, as your poor Adéle’s is dark, miserable, and
triste. I do not know why I should cast the shadow
of my troubles upon you, only it is so sweet to have
some friend to sympathize with one’s misery; and to
sympathize with me is the one thing which my step-
mother cannot do. I do not mean to complain of her;
madame is very good, and all that, but we can never
understand one another. The different senses of the
same word in our two languages just describe us two.
Madame is sensible (English), and I am sensible (French)
—a very sensitive plant, which madame handles as if it
were a cabbage. I am very delicate, often ailing; but I .
am almost afraid to complain of my pains and aches.
‘You ought not to sit so much in your cold little room’—
‘Take a good quick walk ; it will warm you ’—or, ‘ Help
me with a little cooking for your father; it is an occu-
pation to bring you to the fire: if you worked more,
you would be stronger and better. O Felicie! imagine
what physic such advice is to a drooping spirit and a
suffering frame! My father thinks his wife perfection;
and this (I am almost ashamed to confess my weakness
even to my Felicie) often provokes my spirit. Yester-
day he said, ‘You have a rare example before you in
your mother, Adéle.’ I was tempted to say, but I had
not courage to do so, ‘Is there no Frenchwoman, then,
for me to copy, that I must have Mr. Page’s daughter
always held up as a pattern?’ I bit my lip and kept
THE EXILES’ HOME. 151

in the words, which would have greatly displeased my
father.

“Would you like to know what sort of a boudoir Iam
writing innow? It is a room not larger than our china
closet at home, with no table, no chair, no pictures—
only a pallet-bed, a footstool, and a bit of drugget which
madame has given me to serve as a carpet. There is
scarcely space for my white kitten Bijou to frolic in: she
is the only pet that I possess—I may say that she is my
sole companion. If I look out of the window, what do
I see? Instead of our glorious park, with its magnifi-
cent trees, only a view over house-roofs and horrid black
chimneys; or, if I look down, a dull, dismal street.
Along that street a well-dressed person hardly ever
passes ; even a sedan-chair is a rare sight here. Oh, for
one day in the Paris which you describe with so glow-
ing a pen!

“Your friend Madame la Rouge must be a most
fascinating person. Her idea of the six nobles disguised
as paysans is charming. Oh that my darling brother
could be one of the six! He would not have to throw
aside the blouse and sabots to. be recognized as a gentle-
man of France; he would look distengué in the rags of
a beggar !—Ah, my Louis! shall I ever see thee again ?
—But I must not write to a fiancée on a subject so sad
as our loss.

“TI gee very little of my father. He teaches in two
152 THE EXILES’ HOME.

schools, which lie in different parts of this town. He
gives three hours to each, so you may imagine how
weary he is before the day’s drudgery is over. Madame
is always busy, except when my father comes home, and
then she attends to nothing but his pleasure and com-
fort. Madame is embroidering an exquisite table-cover,
which she has been working at for six weeks. Ah,
Felicie, would that I could send it to you as a bridal
present! Madame calls it her coal-mene (not a very
poetical name), because she expects that, when it is fin-
ished, the sum it will bring will supply us with half
a year’s fuel. Certainly a good fire is not a small com-
fort: you would think so were you freezing beside me
now.

“T hear my father’s well-known rap at the street door
below: he has at last come home from his work: how
wet and tired he will be! I am glad that he has a nice
fire: from sounds in the next room I know that madame
is stirring it into a blaze. A hot supper will be on the
table almost before my father has time to take off his
wet cloak. I must pause and go to meet him, for I have
not yet seen him to-day. I was too languid to get up
for breakfast or early prayers. Adieu for awhile, my
charming Felicie! I will sit up to-night to write more.”

Adéle threw down her pen, and ran to embrace and
welcome her father. The marquis looked pale and tired,
and coughed as his wife removed his dripping cloak.
THE EXILES’ HOME. 153

La Force wearily took a seat by the fire, and held out
his chilled hands to the blaze. He had had a day of
more than usual trial, having been exposed to the vulgar
impertinence of a low-bred schoolmistress, and the tit-
terings of saucy girls, who, had they seen the marquis
at Chateau la Force, would scarcely have dared to raise
their eyes in his presence. The white streaks in the
Huguenot’s hair were visibly increasing. Even home
had its trials for the exile.

“ Adéle, my child, are you ill?” cried the anxious
father, grieved to see the change in the looks of his
once blooming and lovely daughter. “You have grown
pale and thin, my darling; and your poor little hand is
like ice.” La Force was tenderly stroking the slender
hand which rested on his knee.

“Tt is cold, dear father,” said Adéle with a shiver ;
“England has a very trying climate.”

“For those who persist in sitting in a draughty, fire-
less room,” observed Elizabeth, who could hardly bear
to see the lines of care deepen on the face of her hus-
band.

La Force was tenderly affectionate, and as he looked
on his fading daughter, a terrible fear was arising in his
mind—*“ Am I to be bereaved of both my children ?”

The evening meal was more silent than usual. Adéle
had a headache and refused to eat; which took away
from her weary father all appetite for his food. Eliza-
154 THE EXILES’ HOME.

beth was suffering from neuralgia, but said nothing
about it ; perhaps her pain made her feel more irritated
against the girl, who never concealed any trouble in
order to spare another distress. Adéle never dreamed
that her craving for pity and sympathy had selfishness
at the root. La Force was a man oppressed with a
heavy burden; but he bore it with fortitude, for he
leaned on a Friend unseen.

When the cheerless meal was concluded, Madame la
Force went into the inner room for her work; so Ber-
trand and his daughter were left alone. Adéle took her
favourite seat on the hearth-rug at her father’s feet, rest-
ing her hands on his knee. The exile had covered his
face with his hand: he felt himself almost worn out,
and wondered whether he could keep up the struggle
much longer.

“ Father,” said Adéle aaeae “J think that trouble
makes one wicked; at least it does me. It is much
more easy to be religious and good when one is happy.”

La Foree removed his hand from his brow, and laid
it caressingly on the tresses of his young daughter.

“Tt is easier, perhaps, to carry a light tinsel shield
than one of firm, strong metal,” he said, with an attempt
at a smile. “Perhaps each may look equally well at a
masque, but the difference is soon seen in the field. That
faith is a shield not worthy the name which can bear no
heavy blows.”
THE EXILES’ HOME. 155

“ Misery makes such wicked thoughts come into the
mind,” said Adéle. “It is not possible to believe that
God is love, when He takes away everything that we
enjoy, and leaves us nothing but wretchedness.” -Adéle’s
eyes brimmed over with tears.

“Such evil thoughts are the fiery darts of the devil,
my child; they fall blunted from the shield of true
faith.”

“JT am afraid that I have little faith,” sighed Adéle.

“My daughter knows where to seek for more. Ask,
and tt shall be given.”

“ But, father, are you never tempted to murmur—to
think that God has forgotten us ?”

La Force did not reply for some moments ; then gently
made answer :—

“Tam often tempted, my child; but God makes for
us a way out of temptation. I look to the Cross; I
remember what was endured for me there, and I do not,
I cannot doubt the love of my Lord.”

Elizabeth returned to the sitting-room, with her piece
of delicate work in her hand. Flowers, under her skil-
ful fingers, were gradually covering the dark material
- with brightness and beauty, looking all the more brilliant
from the gloominess of the background.

There was but one table in the scantily-furnished
room, with a single small lamp in the centre. La Force’s
writing materials were placed before him by his wife:
156 THE EXILES’ HOME.

he had to prepare lessons for his pupils and write to
Duval. Adéle crouched as close to the fire as she could,
and amused herself with her white kitten, throwing a
ball of worsted here and there for the playful creature
to catch. Then Adéle arose, and with Bijou in her
arms went up to the table to ask her father for a sheet
of paper.

On that table lay a ball of bright red embroidery silk,
which madame was converting into roses. Pussy had
an idea that all balls were made for the special benefit
of kittens, and, springing from Adéle’s arms, made a
sudden dash at the prize, unfortunately striking against
the lamp, and overturning it as she did so. The little
lamp was extinguished but not broken by the fall.

The bright fire gave sufficient light to show the mis-
chief done. The marquis’s half-written sheet was marred
with oil; and a little stream of it, running over the table,
had fallen on Elizabeth’s beautiful work.

“ Destroyed the labour of six weeks! I must begin
all over again!” cried Madame la Force. It was enough
for a moment to disturb the serenity of the best-tem-
pered of women.

“T am so sorry !—Oh, naughty, naughty Bijou !” cried
Adéle.

Elizabeth saw that her husband looked grieved, and
recovered her equanimity with an effort.

“We must make the best of the matter,” she said, |
THE EXILES’ HOME. 157

trying to smile, but with no great success. “ Bertrand,
you need a warm garment to keep out the cold; there
is enough material left, untouched by the oil, to make
one. You will not mind a few flowers on the garment,
since no one will see them but yourself.”

“My love, it is you who always provide me with
flowers,” said Bertrand la Force, with the gallantry of
a young lover. “I shall wear your roses next to my
' heart.” ,

Warmed by the praise, Elizabeth set cheerfully to her
task of refilling and relighting the lamp, and clearing
away as well as she could all signs of the mischief done.
She then went into the inner room to wash her hands,
and returned with a serene countenance, just as the post-
man’s knock was heard at the door.

Adéle ran downstairs to bring the letter, for her parents
kept no servant. Elizabeth was cook, housemaid, and
sempstress in one.

“Cousin Duval’s hand! how well one knows it! he
always directs to Monsieur le Marquis,” said Adéle on
her return, as she handed the letter to her father.

La Force broke the seal and opened the folded sheet.
Tt was blank, and contained only a tiny enclosure. At
the sight of that enclosure, almost to the alarm of wife
and daughter, the exile sank on his knees, clasping the
little note in his trembling hands, and burst into tears.
Elizabeth had never before seen her husband weep.
158 THE EXILES’ HOME.

The brimming drops were not those of sorrow, but of
almost overwhelming delight. “Myson! my boy! Oh!
thank God! thank God!” broke from the Huguenot’s
lips.

“Louis!” cried Adéle, darting to her father, and al-
most snatching the letter out of his hand—* Louis!” she
repeated, half wild with delight, so that she could scarcely
refrain from bounding about the room in the exuberance
of her joy.

With scarcely less pleasure, though more quietly ex-
pressed, Madame la Force read the few lines hastily
penned by Louis on New-Year’s eve, before going to the
meeting in the cellar of Casseau :—

“ DEAREST, MOST HONOURED OF FATHERS,—I have re-
ceived the delicious home-letters, and they have made
me more happy than words can tell. Cousin Jacques
tells me that I have only three minutes in which to
write my despatch; and he is directing it in order to
save time. Let me just assure you that I am safe and
well, and as joyous as I can possibly be before I see
you again. I mean to escape and join you as soon as
I can ;—would that the day were to-morrow !

“Much love to dear mother and Adéle. Tell them
that, in spite of Pope and priest, and pleasures more dan-
gerous still, I am a Huguenot to my heart’s core.
Adieu !—L.”
CHAPTER XIX.
A SOLEMN SCENE.

THAT little piece of paper, fragrant with happiness and
affection, worked like a spell in the home of the exiles.
Had they suddenly found themselves transported to
Chateau la Force, all their old friends around them, and
the icy chill of winter changed into the balmy breath
of June, the transformation would hardly have been
greater. La Force felt several years younger; he bent
no longer under the pressure of an earthly burden; the
clouds above him seemed all to have rolled away.
Adéle forgot her delicacy and her troubles; indeed,
every one was so engaged in eager talking, making
plans, and discussing probabilities, that even the fire
was forgotten. It died out, and had to be relighted ;
Adéle’s letter to Felicie helped to get up the blaze,
Louis’s happy sister was now ashamed to send an
epistle so full of complaints. Will not their grumblings,
doubts, and complainings appear shameful to Christians
in another world, when—
160 A SOLEMN SCENE.

Seat e “ ‘The dawning of day
Shall chase all the night-clouds of sorrow away”?

Will not the ransomed ones say, “ How could I ever have
uttered a word of complaint, or have thought that my
loving Lord could make a mistake !”

Adéle sat up late that night writing, heedless of the
cold, for her heart was so warm. It need scarcely be
said that this time her effusions were not poured forth
to Felicie.

A very different letter arrived on the following
morning. It found all the family together; for La Force
had taken a chill from the yesterday’s rain, and for once
consented to stay away from his work. He could not
help feeling that at any hour his boy might arrive.
The letter was not from the other side of the Channel,
and was directed to Mrs. la Force, in the neat but
rather formal and stiff handwriting of her younger
sister Bridget. cles

“Poor Bridget is a nice kind creature,” thought
Adéle, “but what she writes is sure to be very dull and
uninteresting. In that dismal Raven’s Nest nothing
ever happens that is worth putting down on paper.”

The colour rose to Elizabeth’s cheek as she read, then
retreating, left it exceedingly pale. She silently handed
the letter to her husband. Poor Bridget’s simple epistle
ran thus, with much interlining :—

“Oh! dear sister, we are in such trouble. You know
A SOLEMN SCENE. 161

that papa has been ailing for a long, long time. We could
not find out what was the matter, for he would not hear
of sending for a doctor. Now he has taken to his bed,
and does not attempt to rise. He can hardly utter a
word, only groans, and tastes not a morsel of food.
Our dear parson Day and his wife are so good—they
help us in every way that they can; but, oh! I wish
that yow could be here. Mr. Day insisted on sending
for Dr. Brind; and when he saw papa he shook his
head and said, ‘He cannot last long ; I should have been °
sent for before.” Lilly and I do not know what to do.
We both long to have our darling wise sister to comfort
and help us.”

“You should go to them, my love,” said La Force, as
he handed back the letter to his wife, who passed it on
to Adéle.

“But when you are unwell, and without a servant,
how can I leave you?” said Elizabeth, who felt drawn in
opposite directions.

“Oh! I will take care of father; nurse him, sing to
him, read to him!” exclaimed Adéle with a beaming
face.

“But can you cook for him, trim the lamp for him,
make the beds, dust, and keep all neat?” asked
Elizabeth, her countenance and tone expressing more
than a doubt. ?

“My Adéle will do all that she can,” said the marquis
(106) ll
162 A SOLEMN SCENE.

smiling, “and her father will be easily pleased. I think
that your course of duty is clear.”

Elizabeth thought so too, and she was not one to
shrink from duty; but it cost her more than any one
guessed to make a long journey in the depth of winter,
for her neuralgia had increased almost to agony.
Madame la Force, for the sake of economy, travelled on
the outside of a coach: the reader need hardly be re-
minded that in the days of the Second James, the easy
transit from place to place by means of railways was
altogether a thing unknown. Anxious about her
husband, distressed about her father, in violent physical
pain, with the rain and sleet forcing their way through
an old umbrella, which suddenly developed half a dozen
rents, Elizabeth was jogged over miserable roads, till
long after nightfall, terribly chilled, she reached the
halting-place nearest the home of her childhood.
Raven’s Nest was more than a mile’s distance from the
inn, from which lights and a blazing fire cast a cheerful
glow, very tempting to weary travellers.

The hostler came out to look after the horses, and
glanced up at the solitary shivering traveller perched on
~ high.

“You gets down here,” said he ; “just hand me your
luggage.”

Elizabeth was so numbed with cold that she had
hardly power to descend from her lofty place. When
A SOLEMN SCENE. 163

the light of the lamp which the hostler carried fell on
her face, the man recognized her at once.

“You'll be a-going to Raven’s Nest, mistress,” he said,
“where the squire’s lying sick. Yell want a horse,
or some kind of conveyance. Just step inside for a
warm, and a drop of something to keep out the cold,
while I go to see what can be done.”

“No, no, John, I mean to walk; it will do more to
warm me than anything else.”

“T’se get a lad to carry yer bundle, and a lamp—’

“Thanks, but I will carry it myself; and as for light,
I know every inch of the way, and could find the house
in the dark.” The former lady of Chateau la Force had
not even the coppers left in her purse with which to
pay for a guide! |

Resolutely the lady set out on a night dark and
bitterly cold, herself carrying her bundle. Elizabeth’s
faith was not weak; hers was the deep conviction of
the heart, not evaporating in sensibility, but prompting
her to calm, steady, resolute action, What God gave
her to do she would do, and trust to Him for strength
to fulfil her duty.

Adéle, notwithstanding the impetus given to her by
joy and hope, and a secret wish to show that she could
do nearly if not quite as well as her step-mother, found
it very difficult indeed to fill Elizabeth’s place. The
French demoiselle had rather despised mere house-
164 A SOLEMN SCENE.

keeping qualifications, the power to make a shilling go
as far as a shilling could go. Adéle had not cared to
acquire any knowledge of cookery, and had a rooted
aversion to having anything to do with raw meat. The
cleaning of a lamp made taper fingers dirty, and in
the hands of Adéle lamps were as difficult to manage as
children spoiled and perverse. Elizabeth’s last charge to
Adéle had been to prepare a hot posset for her father ;
she had told the girl how to do it, and poor Adéle tried
hard to fulfil the charge. How came the posset to smell
of smoke? When Addéle brought the triumph of her
art to her father, he smiled, thanked her, took a spoonful
from the cup, and did not venture upon a second.
Twice in one day did Adéle let the fire out, and how to
light it again was almost as great a puzzle as how to
unloose the Gordian knot. Safety matches were not
dreamed of in those days; sparks were produced by
striking steel on flint, and those sparks falling on a
tinder-box were carefully breathed on, that a brimstone-
tipped bit of wood might be ignited. Adéle put her
little hand on the steel, and hit and hit and struck and
struck, till she hurt her own knuckles; but if a spark
came, it was certain to die. At first the girl laughed at
her own awkwardness, but she soon grew impatient over
the unmanageable flint and steel. Perhaps Adéle would
never have succeeded in lighting her fire had not her
father come to her help.
A SOLEMN SCENE. 165

“Oh, I was never born to be a housemaid!” ex-
claimed Adéle, as the marquis took the flint and steel
from her poor bruised hand.

“My child,” said La Force, with playful good-humour,
“if you have been dreaming that you are the daughter
of a peer, I fear that you have scarcely yet opened your
eyes to the fact that you are a poor school-teacher’s
child. But,’ he added more gravely, “poverty is neither
a disgrace nor an evil to those who are rich im farth.”

In the meantime, Elizabeth, in a state of exceeding
weariness, had reached her father’s dreary home. There
was no need to knock; her sisters, who had been
anxiously watching for her coming, flung open the door
wide, threw themselves into her arms, and wept.

“We have been so longing to see you!” cried Lilly.

“We were sure that you would come,” sobbed
Bridget.

“Father?” was the only word which Elizabeth
uttered, her anxious eyes asking the question which she
was unable to speak.

“He has eaten nothing—said nothing since yesterday ;
we both sat up with him all night.”

Elizabeth hurried up the dark staircase ; she needed
no light to find her way into the chamber where her
dying parent lay. The clergyman and doctor were seated
beside him, the latter with one hand on the patient’s
pulse, and the other on his own watch. The first glance
166 A SOLEMN SCENE.

at the poor old man on the bed told that he wag indeed
passing through the dark valley.

“Father!” said Elizabeth softly, as she bent over the
sufferer. The hollow eyes unclosed for a moment, her
name came from the ashen lips, and then eyes and lips
again closed, never to reopen on earth. A few spasms
convulsed the frame; the sands of life had almost run
out. Not ten minutes had elapsed after Elizabeth’s
arrival ere Page's spirit had passed to its awful account.
He expired, supported in the arms of his eldest daughter,
with his head on her breast.

We will pass lightly over that night and the sad day
that succeeded. When the need for exertion ceased, and
not till then, Elizabeth’s strength gave way. Page died
on a Thursday night; throughout the Friday Madame
la Force was unable to leave her bed. Mr. and Mrs.
Day undertook all arrangements, the former having been
appointed sole executor by Mr. Page. A will, duly
witnessed, signed, and sealed, was found in a desk. It
was terse, and characteristic of the testator. Page
bequeathed his property to his daughters, to be divided
in equal portions amongst them. He desired that his
funeral should take place as quickly as possible after his
death, “with no idle forms, no needless expense.” The
miser strictly forbade conformity to existing customs;
“mourning, pall, and coffin” were prohibited as “an idle
waste of money.”
A SOLEMN SCENE. 167

Elizabeth, with effort, rose on the Saturday morning,
to attend her parent’s simple funeral, and pay the last
tribute of respect to one who had done little to earn the
esteem even of his children. Happily, from a change of
wind, the day was mild for the season.

After the service was over, and the funeral party had
returned to the dreary house, Mr. Day requested
Madame la Force to come with her sisters, and remain
in the vicarage with himself and his wife.

Elizabeth gratefully accepted the kind invitation for
Lilly and Bridget; it relieved her for the present of
anxiety on their account. “As for myself,” said the
marquis’s wife, “I must hasten back at once. I left my
husband far from well, and we are in daily hopes of the
arrival of our boy; nothing but a parent’s illness would
have induced me to leave home, even fora day. J must
be back to-night, as I would not travel on Sunday. Add ~
to your many acts of kindness that of taking a place for
me in the coach which starts at mid-day.”

Mr. Day was too wise and kind to offer any opposition
to Elizabeth’s wish. He then, in a delicate way, spoke
to her of necessary business. The executor had been
grieved and disappointed to find that hardly any
property had been left. Raven’s Nest could, of course,
be sold; but it had been left unrepaired for so many
years that a purchaser could with difficulty be found,
and even if found, the sum realized by sale must be
168 A SOLEMN SCENE.

small. Mr. Day scarcely touched on the state of the
furniture ; Elizabeth knew too well that if put up to
auction, rickety chairs and tables and cracked crockery
would bring in little indeed.

Elizabeth, when she heard of the poverty of the
deceased, silently reproached herself with having ever
misjudged a parent. “I attributed to penuriousness,”
she said to herself, “that which was only an honour-
able desire to keep out of debt.”

After bidding a loving farewell to her sisters, thankkful
that God had raised up for them such kind protectors,
Madame la Force again took her place on the top of a
coach, and after a tiring journey arrived at her home.
The events of the last three days seemed to Elizabeth
like a long sad dream. But there was calm satisfaction
in her heart from a sense of duty performed, and deep
joy from being again with her husband, and finding him
better than she had ventured to hope. Happiness is
one of the best of medicines, and no doctor’s prescription
could have done so much for the health either of the
marquis or Adéle as Louis’s tiny letter had done.
CHAPTER XX.
THE GRAND MONARCH.

Bur in the meantime where was Louis himself ?

Whilst the La Force family were rejoicing over the
safety of the Huguenot youth, the object of their affec-
tion, the cause of their joy, was himself in sore tribula-
tion, shut up, as a state prisoner, within the gloomy
walls of the dreaded Bastille.

Louis’s trial had been a mere form—his condemnation
was sure. The page had not only aided the escape of
a ringleader of the heretics, but he had struck down an
officer of the Crown in the very act of executing the
monarch’s commands. Death was the punishment for
such a crime. Louis, a little paler than usual, but with
a countenance calm and serene, heard his sentence pro-
nounced, and silently thanked the Lord for counting him
worthy of suffering for Christ’s sake, and calling him so
early to join the noble army of martyrs.

But the fate of one so young, so attractive, so well
known at court, roused great sympathy in high quarters.
170 THE GRAND MONARCH.

The dauphine, a kind-hearted princess, interceded, even
with tears, for her favourite page. The letters of Louis
to his family, which had been taken from him at the
time of his arrest, were read with interest and compas-
sion. That from such a pinnacle of innocent happiness
there should be but one terrible step to the block, awoke
pity even in worldly hearts. There were but two men
who felt anything like satisfaction in the sentence passed
upon young La Force; the one was the stern, vindic-
tive prior, the other was Fontainebleu, the favourite
courtier of the King. This nobleman hoped that the
death of the heir to the large estate which he himself
held only in trust, would convert temporary enjoyment
of the property into permanent possession.

Let us enter for a few moments the splendid audience-
chamber of the “Grand Monarch,” brilliant with mirrors
and gilding, more brilliant from the splendidly-attired
assembly within, What gorgeous robes! what magnifi-
cent jewels !—all the pomp and vanity of the world
appears before us. The most formal etiquette is ob-
served in the presence of the King. To all but a few of
the highest rank it would be an unpardonable crime to
sit down in the presence of one regarded almost as a god
upon earth. On a giddy pinnacle of grandeur stood the
despot of France, and its height had turned his brain.
Any one who opposed the monarch’s will should be as
an insect to be crushed beneath his proud foot.
THE GRAND MONARCH. 171

And yet Louis XIV. was by no means devoid of
kindliness of heart, as was afterwards shown by his
chivalrous courtesy to the exiled royal family of En-
gland. When the dauphine pleaded that to risk life to
save that of a fellow-creature was hardly a sufficient
crime to bring a brave boy to the block, to quench in
blood a life of such singular promise, the stately Louis
lent an attentive ear. He had considered the father of
that boy to be the noblest and bravest of all his peers.
He had regretted the exile of which his own mandate
had been the cause; and the king had no wish to strike
another, and a more deadly blow, at the man whom he
already had ruined.

The monarch turned towards Madame de Maintenon,
who was indeed his wife and queen, though royal pride
denied her the title. This lady wore the crimson velvet
mantle of royal state, and had more influence over the
king than was possessed by any other person. Fon-
tainebleu, who was in attendance, listened anxiously
for her reply to the question asked by the ruler of
France.

“What say you? shall we accede to the wishes of our
royal daughter, and grant a gracious pardon to the
young rebel ?” |

Madame de Maintenon, in the later part of her strange
career, affected great zeal for the Church of Rome. She
thought this a favourable opportunity for acquiring
172 THE GRAND MONARCH.

merit in the eyes of a superstitious King by making a
convert instead of a martyr.

“If I might presume to offer an opinion, sire,” the
lady replied, “I should say that the best course to pursue
would be to offer the young rebel life, and even a return
to your Majesty’s favour, on the sole condition of his
renouncing heretic errors, and praying to be received
into the bosom of our holy Church.”

Fontainebleu, who was alarmed at the prospect of
young La Force accepting such a condition, as he him-
self would certainly have done in his place, looked eager
to speak, but was restrained by etiquette from uttering
a word in the royal presence. The King, however,
noticed the look and the forward gesture, and deigned
to grant the courtier an opportunity of expressing his
thoughts.

“My lord of Fontainebleu knows the young heretic
well,” said the monarch; “is it his opinion that the
youth will yield and accept our mercy ?”

“Your Majesty’s power is well-nigh unlimited,” said
the courtier ; “but not even the Sovereign of France can
bend the will of a proud La Force.”

The remark nettled the King, as the speaker had
intended that it should. The words had been true as
regarded the past. The grand monarch had not suc-
ceeded in turning the marquis one step, one hair’s-
breadth, from the straight path which he trod; but the
THE GRAND MONARCH. 173

despot silently vowed that the words should not be true
as regarded the future. The ruler of millions could and
would subdue the spirit not only of the younger but of
the elder La Force.

“Madame,” said the King, turning courteously towards
the dauphine, “any request made by you demands, and
shall have, our serious consideration. We must, how-
ever, defer giving an immediate reply. Rest assured
that we have every desire to spare the forfeited life of
your page. Young La Force shall be removed for the
present to the Monastery of the Holy Sponge, where we
hope that he may profit, more than he did before, by the
prayers and exhortations of the ghostly fathers.” By a
dignified wave of his jewelled hand, the great monarch
then put an end to all further discussion upon the
subject.

An hour later Louis la Force, in his dungeon, heard
the clank of steel and the measured tread of soldiers
approaching the cell.

“The hour is come!” he said, folding his arms.
«The soldiers are sent to lead me forth to execution.
May the Lord give me strength to endure to the last, to
remain faithful unto death !”

But the hour of death had not come. Was it with
a sense of relief, or a sense of pain, that the youth found
himself on his way to the gloomy monastery where he
‘had already suffered so much? Perhaps there was
174 THE GRAND MONARCH.

a mingling of both feelings, for with the young life is
sweet and hope is strong. Never had Louis known
such intense happiness as just before the time when he
was called so suddenly to leave it. As with a firm step
and undaunted bearing the youthful Huguenot crossed
the threshold of his monastic prison, then turned to give
one look at the blue sky which would soon be shut out
from his view, the thought in his mind was this: “Iron
bolts and bars may shut me in, watchful enemies sur-
round, and a monarch condemn, but there is One above
all, and, if it be His will, I shall yet behold my father

12?

again !
CHAPTER XXTI.

FAITH TRIED.

‘¢ Judge not the working of his brain
And of his heart thou canst not see:
What seems to thy dim eyes a stain,
In God’s pure sight may only be
A scar, won from some well-fought field -
Where thou wouldst only shrink and yield.”

Ir would have been well if Adéle had acted in the
spirit suggested by these admirable lines; but, on the
contrary, she did judge another, and that hardly and
unjustly. Elizabeth la Force’s self-control was set down
to want of feeling.

“Madame neither weeps with the mourner nor re-
joices with the happy,” thought the girl. “Who would
believe that my step-mother has just come from a father’s
death-bed, or that she shares our delight in the prospect
of soon seeing darling Louis! Her heart must be made
of leather. I hate people who are like clocks, which go
on with cold precision striking the hours, whether there
be a wedding or a funeral in the house.”
176 FAITH TRIED.

Adéle would have thought very differently of Eliza-
beth could she have seen the workings of the English-
woman’s heart. Madame la Force never thought of her
unhappy parent without an acute pang, nor of Louis
without a silent thanksgiving. Worn out as she was
with weariness and physical pain, Elizabeth was also
tried with many cares with which she burdened no one.
The journeys which she had taken had almost emptied
her slender purse; and the destruction of the piece of
embroidery on which she had reckoned to supply it, was
no light matter to one who had an abhorrence of debt.
The supply of coals was nearly expended, and the lady
was afraid to order more for which she could not pay.

Elizabeth was also anxious about her two sisters, left
almost unprovided for, and unfitted by lives of long
privation, and latterly by broken rest at night, for earning
their subsistence by their own efforts. Lilly and Bridget
knew nothing of the world; they had been almost
entirely excluded from intercourse with their fellow-
creatures ; they were like plants reared in a cellar: how
could they fight the battle of life as their elder sister
was doing? When Elizabeth was pondering over these
troubles, it is hardly to be wondered at that her manner
appeared to Adéle hard and cold. The struggle which
Elizabeth was bravely sustaining would have laid Adéle
prostrate and weeping, désolée, as she would herself have
expressed it.
FAITH TRIED. 177

But Elizabeth was no perfect character, and pent-up
sorrow did occasionally find vent in what Adéle called
“very bad temper.” When Elizabeth, on the Monday
morning following her return, made up the week's ac-
counts, and found that Adéle had spent in three days
what ought to have sufficed for seven, the matron’s brow
was knit into a frown, and she angrily said, “I will take
good care, child, never to leave the house-keeping again
in your hands.”

Adéle returned the frown with interest. She hated
to be called “child” by her English step-mother, and all
her pride rose in arms at anything like a sharp rebuke
from one whom she chose to consider as of inferior birth
to her own. With pert words and an insolent manner,
which gave pain—she meant them to give pain—Adeéle
quitted the room, and shut herself up in her own. She
determined not to make her appearance again till her
father came home. “It is intolerable,’ Adéle muttered
to herself, “to be subjected to the temper of such a
peevish, hateful womari !”

Often did Adéle run to her little window and look
down into the street, with a vague hope that either her
brother might himself appear, or that a letter from him
might arrive. What a fairy rainbow-tinted castle in
the‘air Adéle built of hopes founded on the return of
her idolized Louis !

La Force’s coming home from his work in the schools
(106) 12
178 FAITH TRIED.

was usually the event of the day. On this Monday his
looks made his watchful wife uneasy.

“ Bertrand is gradually wearing himself out,” thought
Elizabeth; “and I can do so little to help one for whom
I would gladly lay down my life.”

La Force certainly looked tired and thin, but he was
in excellent spirits. If his cheerfulness did not rise to
the point of playfulness, it was from respect to the
feelings of a wife who had so recently lost a parent.
His heart was full of gratitude, hope, and peace.

It was the calm before a storm. After the afternoon
meal, which was always ready when La Force returned
from his round, as the short winter’s day approached its
close, the weleome sound of the postman’s knock made
every one rise from table. Every heart beat quicker
with pleasant expectation. Adéle, a swift-footed messen-
ger—for hope gave her speed—sprang out of the room,
flew down the stairs, and soon returned with two letters
in her hand. One of these was very large, with a red
seal of formidable size. Adéle had once before seen a
despatch resembling it, and the outward appearance of
the document gave to all present a thrill of apprehension.
Could anything good come with the ominous signature
of the French minister on the cover ?

The seal of the official communication was that which
La Force broke first, even though the other, in the hand-
writing of Jacques, might contain a letter from Louis.
FAITH TRIED. 179

The countenance of the marquis became of an ashen
hue as he read the following despatch :—

“Monsieur le Marquis la Force, it is my painful office
to inform you that your son Louis has committed a very
serious crime, which has subjected him to the severest
penalty of the law. He has not only procured the
escape of a criminal, but has violently struck an officer
of his Majesty when executing the royal commands,
For these offences Louis la Force has been condemned
to lose his head, and the execution of this sentence is
appointed to take place on the fifteenth day of the
current month. But his gracious Majesty, taking into
consideration the former services rendered to the State
by your house, holds out to you one last opportunity of
procuring at once your own pardon and that of your
son. If before the fifteenth you make your appearance
in Paris, and there openly abjure your heretical errors,
and, receiving absolution, become obedient to Holy
Church, not only you yourself but your son will receive
his Majesty's gracious pardon, and be even restored to
all your ancestral rights. His Majesty commands me to
say that this is the last time that mercy will be offered ;
and that, if you obstinately persist in your errors, the
law shall take its course, and Louis la Force shall die
on the scaffold. JI have the honour,” ete.

Silently La Force gave the terrible letter to his wife
and daughter. Silently he opened that of Jacques,
180 FAITH TRIED.

which gave distressing confirmation of the evil tidings,
with particulars which drew from the father’s blanched
lips' the exclamations, “ My own boy!—my noble boy !”

Adéle sank on her knees before her father, her whole
frame convulsed with passionate emotion.

“OQ father—father!” she exclaimed, “all is in your
hands. You will never, never suffer our darling to die!”
La Force continuing to gaze on the letter of his cousin,
either would not hear or could not reply. Elizabeth,
seated at the table, had buried her face in her hands.
She was engaged in agonized prayer.

“Father!” again gasped Adéle, grasping with both
hands the arm of La Force as if to force attention,
“you will yield now to the King; you will never sacri-
fice your own——your only son!”

“Be silent, temptress! I must not hear you!” said the
wretched father, rising and freeing himself from her
clinging hands. “Go, pray—not to man, but to Him
who is King of kings; I must be alone with my God!”
With unsteady step, like one who has received a mortal
wound, La Force sought the inner apartment, closing the
door behind him.

Adéle sprang up from her knees and desperately
turned to her mother. “He will not hear me—he casts
me off—but he will hear you. Oh! entreat him—im-
plore him to save our Louis!”

Elizabeth raised her tear-stained face, and with emo-
FAITH TRIED. 181

tion replied, “I cannot, dare not, entreat your father to
imperil his soul.”

This answer made Adéle’s anguish blaze up into furi-
ous rage. She looked on her step-mother as an enemy ;
and in her wild, frenzied excitement, uttered words which
in a calmer moment she never would have spoken. All
past jealousies, prejudices, misunderstandings, culminated
in one uncontrollable burst of passion.

1?

“Oh! cruel—heartless—wicked woman!” exclaimed
Adéle, clenching her hand as if to strike, and raising
her voice almost to a shriek of fury, “ you will have my
brother’s blood on your hands—-and mine, for I will
not survive Louis! I will die—you will be the mur-
deress of us both!”

Without waiting for a reply, Adéle dashed wildly out
of the room, banging the door behind her. She did not
go to her own little room; it was too close to where her
father was, and seemed too narrow to contain her in the
fieree mood which bordered on madness. Down the
stairs, through the doorway, into the street, fled the
miserable girl; and seeking intuitively some wide open
space, Adéle made her way into the country beyond the
town. What cared she that no covering was on her
head, no wrap on her shoulders! what cared she that
the red, rayless globe of the sun had almost disappeared,
and that heavy clouds were lowering above her! Adeéle
was as one possessed by an evil spirit; she could not
182 FAITH TRIED,

reason, she could hardly think—she was maddened by
utter misery. Adéle uttered no word but the name of
-her brother ; there were no tears in her eyes—she was
too wretched even to weep !

When Adéle, panting for breath, stopped at length in
her wild course, she was far, she knew not how far, from
home. Large flakes of snow were falling from the
darkened sky; faster and faster they fell, till every
trace of a path was obliterated from view. The white-
ness of the ground alone rendered it visible, for the
moonless, starless, bitterly cold night had set in. Adeéle
knew not where she was; she could not return if she
wished to do so, and not a single light in any direction
showed that a dwelling was near. Exhausted, shiver-
ing, lost in the snow, there seemed to be nothing before
the daughter of La Force but to lie down—-and die!
CHAPTER XXII.
FLIGHT.

“Tr is not right, Belinde, it is not seemly; the world
itself will condemn you if you are seen at the theatre
whilst a sentence of death is hanging over our unhappy
young cousin.” Thus pleaded Jacques Duval with his
wife, as she was preparing to go out with Felicie to a
public place of amusement.

“JT am not responsible for the folly of a young fanatic,
who has chosen to run his head into a lion’s mouth,” was
Belinde’s reply, as she drew the embroidered glove over
her jewelled fingers. “I wish to show publicly that I
disclaim connection with Louis la Force.”

“Of course we are sorry for the handsome youth,”
said the flippant Felicie; “but it will do Louis in his
prison no good to have us sit moping at home. It is
very shocking to think of the axe falling on the neck
of so charming a cousin; but—but—I suppose that all
must die sooner or later.”

Yes, careless worldling ! Death is not far from any
184 FLIGHT.

one. What if his solemn shadow be even now fall-
ing on. the threshold over which thou dost trip so
lightly !

The ladies, in their rustling silks, descended the
staircase. Jacques heard the sound of the wheels of
their coach as it was driven away. The good man’s
heart was exceedingly sore. He questioned himself as
to whether it had been right or wise to introduce Louis
to the Huguenot meeting, which had proved a step to
the scaffold. Jacques taxed himself with imprudence,
and was so absorbed in painful thought that he
noticed not that some one with light, noiseless step had
" entered the room, till a low voice whispered, “Cousin
Duval!”

Jacques started up in amazement. Was it Louis or
his ghost that was now standing beside him? Duval
could scarce stammer out, “How came you here ?”

“T had tried to escape from the monastery twice be-
fore; this third time I succeeded. I leaped a height—
never mind how great; I was mercifully preserved from
breaking a bone. Now I do not wish to bring you into
trouble, Cousin Duval,” continued Louis, speaking in
low, rapid tones; “perhaps the bloodhounds will trace
me here. But I can’t get clear in my convent dress;
this is almost as bad as a page’s. Can you help me
with a little money, and something in the way of
a disguise ?”
FLIGHT. 185

1??

« A disguise!” repeated Jacques, looking bewildered.

“Your wife said something about sabots and blouses
ready for some masquerade,” said Louis, who had well
thought over his plans.

The face of Duval brightened a little “I think
there’s a bundle of such things kept in madame’s
boudoir,” he observed.

“Let's seek them out at once,’ exclaimed Louis.
“With scissors to clip off my locks, I can transform
myself into a peasant in less than five minutes.”

Jacques, trembling with eagerness, led the way into a
side-room, where, in a large ottoman, sundry things
required for the masque were kept. Duval lifted the
lid, and a bundle of some size was soon pulled out, and
its contents scattered on the carpet. A pair of scissors
was amongst them. A large fire was burning in the
grate; Louis’s long locks were soon curling and black-
ening in the flames. But great was his surprise when
Duval’s capacious wig followed! The whole room was
pervaded with the odour of burning hair.

“Cousin! what are you doing?” exclaimed Louis.

“T am going to disguise myself too; we will escape
together to England, and leave this den of corruption
for ever.”

“But your wife—Felicie—”

“They have chosen their own path and their own
protector,” said the Huguenot bitterly. “I leave them
186 FLIGHT.

this house and all that is in it; they will soon have
another home. I will peril my soul no longer, nor my
life either,” he added; “for I am a suspected person
already, and you will be sure to be looked for in your
relative’s dwelling. I do not want to end my days
either in the Bastille or on the scaffold.”

Whilst he was speaking, Louis's appearance was
undergoing a very rapid transformation. Blackened
cork was amongst the other paraphernalia for masquer-
ading, and the fair, smooth lips and chin of the dauphine’s
page were darkened as if by three days’ growth of hair.

The boudoir was adorned with mirrors, and Louis
laughed to behold his own reflection.

“Adéle would not know me,” he said; “and I can
speak the rough language that country-folk speak.—
Hated black dress, go after the hair!—Cousin, you
must let me transmogrify you too. The flames must
burn up your goodly clothes also—gold lace and all.
What a smell of burning there is in the room! I must
let in fresh air, or we shall be smothered.”

Whilst Louis, with quick, skilful fingers, played the
valet and helped Jacques to assume his strange dress,
and destroy the old one, so as to leave no clew to his
manner of flight, the youth chatted merrily, but in a
low tone of voice, stopping ever and anon to throw | a
fresh fagot on the fire.

“Cousin, you must take not only gold coin about you,
FLIGHT. 187

but silver and copper too; for if we changed a louis-d’or
we should betray ourselves at once. We must content
ourselves with peasants’ fare, and eat black bread with
relish. Cousin Duval, you really make a capital peasant
to look at; only you must not talk—you must leave that
to me—nor bow as if you were in a saloon, nor be too
polite, nor turn out your toes. Swing your arms heavily
—like this.”

When the cousins were thoroughly disguised, Louis
deftly rolled up the bundle of blouses again, put ib into
the ottoman, and closed down the lid. He caught up
and burned every fragment that might have awakened
suspicion.

“Ah! the buttons won’t burn, nor the buckles; we
must conceal them about our persons. If one were
found it would tell a tale.”

Louis was full of a boyish love of adventure, which
gave zest even to danger, and the prospect of rejoining
his family increased the buoyancy of his spirits. With
poor Jacques the case was very different: he had passed
the age when adventure has charms, and was extremely
unhappy at the thought of leaving his family behind.
It was sheer necessity that was driving the poor
Huguenot from his home, but it was necessity which
brooked no delay.

“We have but one difficulty now,” observed Louis,
after all preparations had been made; “it is that of
188 FLIGHT,

passing your porter. I was rather surprised: at his
not questioning me at my entrance; he seemed half
asleep.”

“Honest Pierre takes care always to be half asleep
when it would be inconvenient to his master to have
him awake,” observed Jacques. “Were it not for the
good fellow’s dumb fidelity, I should hardly have been
able so often to come home late from Casseau’s.”

“You think that he may be depended on?” inquired
Louis.

“Asa watch-dog might be,” replied Jacques.

The porter was not asleep, but gave a surprised,
questioning look, when two men, apparently peasants,
approached him.

“Go to sleep again, honest Pierre,” said Jacques, in
his familiar voice, as he slipped a gold piece into his
servant's hand. “There is no need for you to awake
again until your mistress come home.”

Pierre nodded, smiled, rose and opened the gate; then
silently watched while the two men in blouses passed.
forth.

Quietly Louis and his cousin threaded the streets of
Paris: they were unchallenged, hardly noticed, till,
beyond even the suburbs, they stood on the showy plain
outside the city.

Then poor Jacques, with a heavy heart, turned to
take a last look of beautiful Paris, which he never agaln
FLIGHT. 189

would behold. A faint light spread over the royal city
from the innumerable lamps in its streets, the fires and
candles in all its dwellings. But in one quarter there
was a red flush, which increased in brightness, whilst
over it dark smoke-clouds hung.

“There must be a fire somewhere in that quarter,”
said Jacques.

A simple observation, carelessly made, and quickly
forgotten ; for a fire in a large metropolis is no unusual
occurrence. It was well for Duval that he knew not
how nearly he himself was interested in the result of
that fire. It was well that he could not see the horrors
enacted in a crowded theatre, when the curtain caught fire,
and the conflagration rapidly spread to the back-scenes,
then leaped from gilded pillar to pillar, till the whole
building was wrapped in a glowing blaze! It was well
for Jacques that he could not hear the cries, the shrieks
_of crowds struggling to quit the burning theatre, pushing,
trampling down, crushing each other, in the vain attempt
to escape the fiery death! It was well that, when on
the next day the charred remains of what had been two
women, only recognized by their half-melted ornaments,
were borne on stretchers to his house, he was not there
to look on the ghastly forms! When poor Felicie had
lightly said, “ All must die sooner or later,” little did she
know that she would not survive to see another dawn.
She and her mother had gone to a theatre to seek
190 FLIGHT.

pleasure, and had found a fiery death. A father and
husband's heaven-bestowed authority had been despised
and his will disobeyed; but a mandate had come that
could neither be disobeyed nor disregarded ; the selfish,
worldly apostates had suddenly been summoned to their

awful account. .
CHAPTER XXIII.
IN THE SNOW.

Over Adéle la Force also hung the shadow of death;
not in dense clouds of stifling smoke, but in the white
shroud of snow, which she felt would be her winding-
sheet. If Adéle should remain in the open field or road
(she could not distinguish on which she stood), it was
impossible that she should survive until morning. drowsy feeling was stealing over her, and Adéle had
often heard that from sleep, under such circumstances,
there is no awakening on earth. Death was to Adéle
as a terrible phantom approaching nearer and nearer,
with slow but steady. step. Weights appeared to be
fastened to the poor girl’s feet, so that she had no
power to flee. Adéle was as the hapless bird be-
witched by the serpent’s glittering eye. In anguish and
remorse she recalled her own menace, “J will die,”
uttered in a moment of passion. Was not the Lord
taking her at her word? Adéle knew that she was
not fit to die: death was to her no angel coming to
192 IN THE SNOW.

take her to a heavenly home, but a fearful messenger
of wrath.

“This very day,” thought the wretched girl, “I have
been as Satan to my father—a temptress; even he bade
me begone! I have been most insolent to my mother;
and oh, how rebellious against my God! The spirit of
my martyred Louis will rise from the scaffold, bright,
glorious, and blessed; but J—I—shall never see him
again. Death will not re-unite us!” The thought was
agony. Adéle sank in the snow, feeling that she should
rise from it no more. She pressed her half-frozen
hands together, but her lips could only gasp forth,
“Mercy! mercy!” then her eyes heavily closed, and
even consciousness fled.

It must be urgent business indeed that induces any
one to travel on a night like this; yet three mounted
men, one carrying a lantern, are riding along the snow-
covered road, hardly able to see where they are going,
so thickly fall the white flakes from above. At every
step taken by the horses they sink up to the fetlocks
in snow.

“ Are you certain, sir, that you can find your way?”
inquired the eldest of the three of a young Englishman,
who was the one supplied with a lantern.

“T know every inch of the ground,” was the reply.
“We are taking a short cut through a part of my
father’s estate, doing which will save you a good half-
IN THE SNOW. 193

mile. But I would fain persuade you, gentlemen, to
pass the rest of the night under my father’s roof; he—
Sir Miles Grey—would be proud to welcome Huguenot
exiles. There you could rest, and proceed to the town
in the morning.”

“T can hardly endure to wait. Oh, if you knew the
impatience which spurs me on!” cried the youngest of
the party, who spoke with a French accent.—“ But
perhaps, Cousin Jacques, for you it would be better—”

“To warm myself at a good fire, and not go wander-
ing about on a freezing night like this, to perish with
cold,” said Duval, for it was he “I am not an im-
patient boy like you. JI am sure that we are much
indebted to Mr. Grey for his offer of hospitality, and I
esteem it a most fortunate occurrence that we chanced
to meet with him at the inn.”

“Let us turn our horses to the right,” said Eustace
Grey; “we shall see the lights in our Hall as soon as we
pass yon clump of trees.”

“What is that object close to yon bush?” eried Louis
la Force, as the light of the lantern fell on a little heap.

“Only a snow-drift,” was the young Englishman’s
reply.

“Not so; it is a human being, and perishing!” ex-
claimed Louis, springing down from his horse, and
throwing the bridle on its neck. “TI pray you, give me

the lantern.”
(106) 18
194 IN THE SNOW.

As rapidly as the deep snow would permit, the young
La Force made his way to the spot, where indeed a
human form was lying. He dashed the thick covering
aside, and raised a senseless body in his arms, then
exclaimed in accents of horror, “It is the corpse of my
only sister !”

“Life may linger yet,” cried Grey; “let us bear. her
at once to our house. Take her before you on your
horse.”

Pulling off his cloak, Louis enveloped in it the slight
fair form of Adéle, her dark locks, heavy with snow,
hanging over his shoulder. Just as he was about to
remount his horse, pressing to his beating heart what
appeared to be a figure of ice, a light, not stationary,
but moving, appeared in the distance. Through the
chill, frosty night ‘air, came a reiterated call—« Adéle!
Adéle !”

“Tt is my father’s voice!” exclaimed Louis; and
raising his own to its highest power, again and again he
repeated the word “Father!” Louis dared not move
one step to meet one whom he had so intensely desired
to see. His first care must be to preserve Adéle, if
indeed she were not beyond reach of aid. Oh, what
a terrible shadow had the wilfulness of the poor girl
cast over what would otherwise have been the brightest
moment in the life of her father and brother, as well as
her own!
IN THE SNOW. 195

La Force, who in terrible anguish had for hours been
searching in vain for his child, heard the shout of his
son, but thought at first that his senses must have
deceived him. With renewed energy, with a wild hope
which seemed to himself almost madness, La Force
pressed on to the spot from where the voice had come,
and where a lantern’s light showed indistinctly forms
on horseback. Struggling to make his speed match his
impatience, the marquis actually succeeded in overtaking
the equestrians ; for the horse of Louis, floundering in
the snow, had fallen under its double weight. It was
thus that in cold, darkness, and fear, without time even
for an embrace, the Marquis la Force met his long-lost
son.

Borne to the horse of Sir Miles Grey, which happily
was not far off, every means was employed to restore
animation to the half-frozen Adéle. The marquis sent
a messenger to relieve the anxiety of his wife, and
Elizabeth herself accompanied him on his way back.

“O mother!” exclaimed Louis, as they embraced,
“Adéle has not yet spoken a word! I fear—tI fear—
she will never again open her eyes!” *

“She is in God’s hands, dear boy,” said Elizabeth :
“has He not rescued you, and given you back to our
prayers from the very gates of the grave?”

Elizabeth showed readiness of resource and unweary-
ing perseverance in carrying out the directions of the
196 IN THE SNOW,

doctor, who had been hastily summoned by Lady Grey.
But for hours all efforts appeared to be made in vain;
the life-spark was all but extinguished.

At length, however, a faint sigh—-a moan—showed
that yet the poor sufferer breathed. With intense
thankfulness, with tearful joy, La Force and Louis re-
ceived the tidings, “She lives; she has opened her eyes !”

But for weeks it appeared that Adéle was but spared
to endure lengthened torture. The exposure of that
terrible night had brought on rheumatic fever, a danger-
ous illness accompanied by agonizing pain. A heavy
price indeed had poor Adéle to pay for her wilful folly.
La Force and his wife nursed the invalid night and day,
Elizabeth taking the heavier share of the work. Louis
for long was not suffered to enter the sick-room, lest
the sight of him, the agitation of a meeting, should
increase the sufferer’s fever. But La Force whispered
to his daughter the joyful tidings of a brother's safety :
Adéle received them with tears.

Elizabeth’s strength gave way under the long strain
of nursing. Lady Grey suggested hiring a helper, at
least to sit up at night.

“JT have a dear, kind sister,’ said Madame la Force ;
and Bridget was accordingly sent for. ~ Her gentle min-
istrations in the sick-room made her a comfort to all;
and Adéle learned to value one whom she had formerly
almost despised.
IN THE SNOW. 197

Much that was profitable was learned by poor Adéle
in her darkened chamber, when she knew not whether
she ever should quit it but as a confirmed invalid or a
helpless cripple. She learned that to struggle against
God’s chastising hand is indeed to “kick against the
pricks ;” that the sorrows which a merciful Father
sends are easier to bear than those which our wilfulness
brings on ourselves. Adéle learned to appreciate good-
ness in others, and to feel herself utterly unworthy of
the kindness which she received. She was humbled at
last—her proud will was subdued; she had learned her
painful lesson, and rested in meek submission at the
Master’s feet.

After a while the brother and sister were permitted
to meet. With noiseless step Louis entered the sick-
room, and then bent over the sufferer’s pillow. His
heart bled at the change which he saw in one whom he
had left radiant in youthful beauty. Adeéle’s rich locks
had been all clipped off, her eyes were sunken, her
features drawn with pain. Yet sweet and thankful
was her smile as she gazed on the bright countenance —
of him for whom she had so passionately mourned.
CHAPTER XXIV.
PLANS.

A sHorRT time afterwards the following conversation
occurred between Sir Miles Grey and his son Eustace, in
the library of the mansion where the La Forces were
experiencing such generous hospitality.

“T am as anxious, Eustace, as yourself,” said the
former, “to do something for these sufferers for con-
- science’ sake. But I shrink from offering pecuniary
assistance to such a man as the Marquis la Force.”

“He would shrink more from accepting it,’ was
Eustace’s reply. “The marquis would rather earn a
dry crust than live in luxury on the bounty of others.
But look around you, father. Is not this library of
yours in a state of most admired disorder, the shelves
heaped with a chaos of papers, over which only spiders
preside? There is not such a thing as a catalogue; to
search for a deed is like looking for a needle in a bundle
of hay.”

The state of his papers had long been a vexation to
PLANS. 199

the baronet, who knew that he had some of great value,
if he could only lay his hands on them.

“Do you think that a peer of France would stoop to
be my librarian?” said Sir Miles in a hesitating tone.

“He has stooped to the drudgery of teaching French
to shopkeepers’ daughters,” was the reply.

“A thought occurs to me,” said the baronet. “I know
that many of my manuscripts are transcripts of French
hymns, and valuable works, as yet untranslated, of
Huguenot religious writers. To translate and edit these
valuable writings might be a congenial work to our
noble guest, while to bring them out in a suitable
form is a wish which I have cherished for years.”

“Such a work would be the very thing to engage
the heart and the mind of the marquis!” exclaimed
Eustace.

“And I might perhaps succeed, after a time, in pro-
curing a commission in the army for that fine young
fellow Louis. In a year or two he would make a
splendid soldier.”

Eustace shook his head with a smile. “I suggested
that to Louis,” the young Englishman said, “ but he
would not entertain the idea for a moment. ‘I would
never place myself in a position, he cried, ‘which might
compel me to draw my sword against my own country
and king.’”

“Right, right!” said Sir Miles emphatically. “We
200 PLANS.

must look out for some other employment for our young
Huguenot friend.”

“Why not, in the meantime, give him the now vacant
place of your park-ranger ? He would have the pretty
cottage under the elms. The family might dwell there
in comparative comfort, and the marquis would be with-
in easy reach of the library here.”

“A capital thought,” said Sir Miles; “only there
would be hardly room in the cottage for that good
fellow whom they call Cousin Jacques.”

“We need take no thought for him, honest man,” said
Eustace. “Monsieur Duval had the wit to bring some
ready money with him, and I understand that some has
been invested for him in England. He has already
secured what he calls an atelier for himself in the town.
Cousin Jacques is really a capital artist, and is likely to
be a popular one; many a burgess’s wife will be glad to
appear on his canvas.”

“He is a very light-hearted, agreeable Frenchman,
all politeness and good nature,” observed the baronet
smiling,

“Poor Duval is in great trouble now,” said Eustace,
“for shocking news has reached him from Paris, and
he is erying like a child over the deaths of his wife and
daughter. But I think that, like a child, he will be
comforted soon. If I do not mistake our French friend,
his mind is like a mirror, which reflects vividly what is
PLANS. 201

directly before it, but keeps no impression long. With
the marquis the feelings flow like a full river, deep and
calm, whether glittering in sunshine or gliding under
deep shadows. With Monsieur Duval the current is
more noisy and shallow.”

The Greys were not the only persons in the Hall who
laid out plans. Adéle, still exceedingly weak, in pain,
and unable to rise from her bed, was absorbed in busy
thoughts, sad as regarded the past, but hopeful as re-
garded the future.

Elizabeth was seated in a partially darkened room
beside the invalid, whom she thought to be asleep, when
a deep sigh from Adéle drew her attention.

“Are you in worse pain, dear child?” she asked
gently.

“No, but I am thinking—thinking ; I have nothing
to do but think,” was the sorrowful reply.

As Elizabeth made no observation, after a brief pause
Adéle went on:—“T have been thinking what an utterly
wasted life mine has hitherto been. I have given you
and my dear father nothing but trouble and grief; and
oh, how good you have been! You have watched over
me and nursed me—me, the most selfish, ungrateful,
unworthy of beings. I know that you have forgiven
me, but I cannot. forgive myself.”

“T must punish you by forbidding you to talk thus,”
202 PLANS.

said Elizabeth playfully, pressing a kiss upon Adéle’s
pale brow. But Adéle was not in a silent mood.

“When I am strong again—if I ever get well, I will
not be such a burden on you, God helping me,” said the
girl. “I will do something to help my family; I have
various plans in my mind.”

“Take no thought for the morrow,” said Madame la
Foree. “We shall not be so straitened now, dear child.
The kind friends whom God has given us have just
offered pleasant employment both to your father and
Louis.”

“T think that I could teach a little,” said Adéle
faintly ; “just a class of small children.” Tuition had
been Adéle’s aversion.

“Do not trouble your mind with plans,” said the step-
mother kindly; “ your present work is to get well as
fast as you can.”

“But there is one thing which I must do,” cried
Adéle, “it is so much on my conscience. O mother! I
have written much to Felicie, much for which I now feel
sorrow and shame. She is my cousin, my most intimate
friend, and I have not helped her one step on the way
to heaven. I have been an evil companion. When
Felicie wrote to me that she had given up heretical
fancies and burned her Bible—O mother, I never told
her how grievous was her sin!”

“Poor Felicie!” sighed Madame la Force.
PLANS. 203

“J will write—no, my hand cannot hold a pen; but
I will dictate to you a letter to Felicie. Please bring
your desk. I have been meditating over what I should
say. I lay awake half the night composing an earnest
letter to my cousin.”

“You must not dictate now, ib will tire you.”

“T do not care for being tired!” cried Adéle with
vehemence. “I must have that letter off my mind.”

“Tt would be useless,” said Madame la Force in a low
tone of voice.

“Not useless—if I pray very hard.” Adéle’s eyes
filled with tears as she spoke. “Mother, is Felicie now
married ?”

Elizabeth only shook her head. She avoided meeting
the earnest gaze of those glistening eyes.

“When will she be married?” asked Adéle.

In vain Elizabeth rose and went to stir the fire, in
order to evade further questions regarding Duval’s mis-
erable daughter. Adéle’s suspicions were roused.

“Why do you not tell me all?” cried Adéle, the fever
flush mounting to her cheek.—“O Louis!” she con-
tinued, as her brother entered the room, “I am so un-
happy about Felicie.”

“So are we all,” said Louis gravely. “I thought that
you were not to be told of her death.”

“Death!” echoed Adéle, and the red flush changed in
a moment to the colour of ashes,
204 PLANS.

Adéle knew not the frightful particulars for many
days, but what she had heard was enough. A new
element of bitterness was added to the sufferer’s cup of
trial. Many a tear wet Adéle’s pillow as she thought
of what she might have done, and what she had resolved
to do—too late!

On the following day Madame la Force received
a communication from Mr. Day, her father’s executor,
which gave her mingled pleasure and pain. The follow-
ing is an extract from the letter :—

“Whilst we were removing the furniture, previous to
the sale, we were surprised at the weight of a large box
which Mr. Page had always kept in his room, and which,
when we opened it, had appeared to contain nothing but
his clothes and a few old papers. On examining the
box more closely, we discovered that it had a false
bottom. On raising this, we found a most unexpected
treasure beneath. There were numerous small packets,
neatly wrapped up in paper and carefully sealed, each
containing a hundred guineas. I counted sixty of these
packets, evidently the savings of a lifetime, and conveyed
them at once to the bank. I propose investing two-
thirds of the money for the benefit of your sisters, and
await your directions as to forwarding the remaining
third, which is your portion according to the will of Mr.
Page.”

Deeply grateful was Elizabeth to the Giver of all
PLANS. 205

good for this portion, which relieved her mind from all
anxiety regarding pecuniary matters. She was specially
thankful on account of her sisters; and yet it was a
pang to think how much suffering would have been
averted if but a tenth part of that hoarded gold had
been spent in her father’s lifetime.

With the letter open in her hand, Elizabeth sought
her husband, whom she found in the library, with Louis,
both deeply engaged in sorting and arranging papers
that looked as if they had the dust of a century upon
them.

“Now, Louis,” said Madame la Force, as La Force and
his son finished reading the letter which she had brought,
“a, wish of yours and of mine can be gratified. I know
your desire for a college education, to enable you to
enter the ministry of the Church. There is now no
difficulty in the way. Your father and I may yet see
you in the pulpit—a Protestant pastor.”

“Do you think that I would consent to rob you, my
mother, of your little inheritance !” exclaimed Louis, his
gratitude beaming in his eyes.

“If you did not consent,’ was Hlizabeth’s smiling
reply, “I should say that you denied me the privilege
and name of a mother.”

La Force returned to his occupation amongst the
papers with a spirit full of thankful joy. It might be
regarded by the world as a great coming down for a
206 PLANS.

peer of France, a once wealthy noble, to occupy a
humble position as librarian, and accept a salary from
an Englishman’s hand; but La Force was no slave to
the pride of birth. The thought of his heart was at
this moment, The lines have fallen to me im pleasant
places; I have a goodly heritage. Well might the exile
for conscience’ sake appropriate those beautiful words ;
for, with much to sweeten life below, his rich inheri-
tance was above!
CHAPTER XXV.
A PARTING GLANCE.

LET us now pass over three years, and give a parting
glance at the dwellers in Sunshine Lodge; a place which
deserves its name, as, whatever the weather might be
outside, there seemed to be always sunshine within.

“If there be a happy spot on earth, it is this!” said
Jacques Duval half aloud, as on one spring afternoon he
crossed the velvet lawn, enamelled with buttercups and
daisies. Blithe was the song of the thrush, still sweeter
the blackbird’s mellow note, and the voice of the cuckoo
from the neighbouring wood mingled with the sky-lark’s
carol dropping down from the sky. The garden was
bright with blossoms, all spoke of peace and joy; yet the
face of Jacques Duval wore an anxious expression, to
which of late it had been a stranger. He was one to
take life cheerfully, but at this moment there was
evidently some care pressing on the honest man’s mind.

Duval was about to go up to the cottage, when the
sound of voices in an arbour near made him turn in
208 ' A PARTING GLANCE.

that direction. The arbour, made by Louis, was con-
sidered by his family a miracle of beauty. Every rustic
pillar had its own peculiar creeper, planted by Elizabeth
or Bridget; honeysuckle, clematis, and roses contended
for the prize of loveliness and fragrance. It was in this
arbour that Adéle gave daily instruction, especially from
the Bible, to the children of Lady Grey’s tenants, this
being to the Huguenot maiden a labour of love. It was
here that she often sat with her mother and Bridget, as
the one lady worked delicate embroidery and the others
made clothes for the poor. But the voices which reached
the ear of Jacques were neither those of children conning
lessons, nor of matron or maiden singing over her work.

Something was going on within that fragrant arbour
which would have made the entrance of most visitors a
very unwelcome intrusion. But Cousin Jacques knew
himself to be a privileged person, so he pushed the
clematis aside, and entered, to be a greatly interested
witness of the scene before him.

La Force, his noble countenance lighted up with more
than its usual expression of benevolence, was in the very
act of giving his paternal blessing, as he joined together
the hands of Eustace Grey and Adéle. Elizabeth and
her sister stood by, smiling with affectionate pleasure;
while Louis’s eyes beamed with pride as he looked on
his lovely sister, his Normandy rose, the affianced bride

of his friend.
A PARTING GLANCE. 209

Jacques, who was taken aback when he saw what
was going on, was almost inclined to beat a retreat,

“Come, my dear nephew and faithful friend, my help
in need, the preserver of my boy—come and add your
blessing to mine,” said the marquis. “I hope that you
will regard my daughter's future husband as a brother ;
in the faith he is your brother already.”

Jacques cordially shook his new cousin’s hand, but still
looked shy and embarrassed, almost to a painful degree.
He felt that he was called upon to say something, so
in a stammering voice observed, “A good wife is a gift
from the Lord.”

“Poor Jacques!” thought Elizabeth; “his uneasy
manner shows that he feels that such a gift was denied
to himself.”

“TI have proved the truth of those words,” said the
marquis, turning with a smile towards his wife. “I
have known the blessing of being given a counsellor in
trouble, a comforter in sorrow, one to share every joy
and lighten every care, and draw one nearer to the God
whom she serves, My child has had a good example
before her. I doubt whether the world holds another
like Elizabeth la Force.”

“ Except—perhaps—her sister,” faltered Duval, with
a heightened colour, glancing timidly towards Bridget,
who was standing beside Adéle. The honest man’s

secret was out. He too was longing for the domestic
(106) 14
210 A PARTING GLANCE.

happiness which he had never yet known, but which
his kindly, affectionate heart would dearly prize.

Every eye was intuitively turned towards the gentle
Bridget, who bent her head timidly, “with a smile on
her lip and a tear in her eye.” A vista of peaceful
contentment was opening before one who had passed
childhood and youth in a dreary wilderness of trial.
She could truly value and faithfully return the love of
an honest and God-fearing man.

“Come,” said the marquis gaily, “I think that I must
to-day join another pair of hands.” And he did so.

And so there were two weddings in the little country
church which Sir Miles had built near his mansion, and
' in which Louis la Force was to minister to a Protestant
flock. Though the one couple was more richly endowed
with youth, talent, and personal attractions, it would be
difficult to decide which was the happier pair.

As time rolled on, in two dwellings were heard the
patter of little feet, the merry sound of children’s
laughter. From both were heard the morning hymn of
praise, the evening prayer and thanksgiving. Though
the La Forces never again beheld fair France, they had
no cause to regret that for conscience’ sake they had
left the land of their fathers. The transplanted trees
took root in England, and flourished. Huguenot fugi-
tives came to our island to receive shelter and impart
a blessing. Never were the La Forces happier than
A PARTING GLANCE. 211

when they opened their doors to persecuted countrymen,
and amongst them Gerard Martine! The Huguenot pastor
passed his last days on earth under the roof of Louis,
who tended him as a father. Though the marquis was
never wealthy in the worldly sense of the word, he
had enough both to spend and to give.. The blessing
of the Lord, it maketh rich, and He addeth no sorrow
with wt.

Nearly two centuries after the date of my story, a
party of English travellers made a tour in Normandy,
and amongst other places of note visited the picturesque
ruins of Chateau la Force. The place was almost more
beautiful in decay than it had been when ‘it stood in
proud strength, and it interested the tourists more than
anything else that had met their view in France. An
old peasant showed them over the place, told legends
of the chateau, and pointed out where its unfortunate
owner, the last of the Fontainebleus, had been, at the
time of the Revolution, hanged over his own door.

“But was there not another family in the chateau,
before any Fontainebleu came here?” inquired a brent,
eyed young lady.

“Ah! ows, the La Forces ; they are remembered still.
We call that fine old oak yonder the Marquis’s Tree, for
it was there that he bade farewell to his people when
the wicked king turned him out of his home.”
212 A PARTING GLANCE.

_“What became of his family?” asked a handsome
young Englishman.

The peasant shrugged his shoulders. “God knows,”
was his careless reply.

“ Yes, God knows,” said the young man with reverence ;
“for the marquis has left descendants who are to be
found in every quarter of the globe. We,” he added, ~
glancing with a smile at his sisters, “are a small detach-
ment of the race.”

“O Louis!” exclaimed the young maiden, “when you
look at these glorious towers, are you not proud that
our ancestor owned them ?”

“Far more proud that our ancestor resigned them,”
replied young La Force; “that, faithful unto death for
the sake of Gospel Truth, he was driven into exile!”

THE END.




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