Citation
Brownies and rose-leaves

Material Information

Title:
Brownies and rose-leaves
Alternate title:
Brownies and rose leaves
Cover title:
Brownies & roseleaves
Creator:
White, Roma
Brooke, L. Leslie ( Leonard Leslie ), 1862-1940 ( Illustrator )
A. D. Innes & Co ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
A.D. Innes & Co.
Manufacturer:
William Clowes and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
199, [1] p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1892 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1892 ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Roma White (Blanche Oram) ; with numerous illustrations by L. Leslie Brooke.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026591506 ( ALEPH )
ALJ0175 ( NOTIS )
40769223 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
iuhheseerenert|
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Ts:





























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AERA eae Ay
SS Ge









BROWNIES AND ROSE-LEAVES







BY THE SAME AUTHOR.



PUNCHINELLO’S ROMANCE.

Crown 8v0. 65. ~



PRESS NOTICES.

“The description of Dorothy’s poor deformed guardian Humpty
Dumpty, as she calls him, is full of pathos, and Dorothy herself is
very bewitching.” —Guardian.

‘*We give Roma White the warmest of welcomes into the world
of fiction—admirably and irresistibly comic without anything in
the nature of farce, or even of apparent exaggeration, ready at the
least expected moments to run into equally true pathos.”—Graphic.

“‘The book is one that every one should put on his drawing-room
table and into his village library. Its tone is that of the music of
the spheres, and no one can fail to be refreshed with its pure
melodies.”"—Church Times.

“Ts worked out with many delicate touches of real life and real
pathos. Miss Roma White ought to be welcomed into the ranks of
the novelists.”—Queen.

‘A tale full of delightful fancies and high thoughts.”—Sa/a’s
Journal.

Lonpon: A. D. INNES & CO.,
31 & 32, BEpForD STREET, W.C.










GAT. ENE

EUG Ws RS
> nc aN
1 LS
\

Ye ,
‘ iW



MRS, TOM TIT’s ‘AT HOME,”





BROWNIES AND
ROSE-LEAVES

By

Roma White

(Blanche Oram)

With numerous tllustrations by

L. Leslie Brooke

London

A. D. Innes & Co.
31 & 32 Bedford Street
1892



cy

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.



Contents

PAGE
THE SONG OF THE RIVER-BROWNIES . . . 7

THE STORY OF THE WHITE VIOLETS . . 7 . . 13
THE SONG THE VIOLETS SING TO THE BEES . . . 27
THE FAIRY AND THE BUBBLE . . . : 7 » 29
THE SONG OF THE MARCH WIND : . . : . 40
THE STORY OF THE JAPANESE FANS . : . . » 43
THE COMING OF SPRING . . . . : : » 59
THE STORY OF THE BLUEBELLS . . : : : . 65
MAyY-SONG . . : . . . : . . 8
THE STORY OF THE SILVER BOWL. . nn . 83
A CHARM OF ROSES -. . . . . . . - 100
THE STORY OF THE PRINCESS’S CROWN. . . - O04
THE SONG OF THE BUTTERFLIES . : . . . rg
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “AT HOME” . : . . 7 . 21
A SONG OF THE AUTUMN Moors . . . . - 137
THE STORY OF ISOBEL . . . . . . . I4I
A CHARM OF BEECH TREES 7 . . . . a «197
THE STORY OF THE GORSE. . 7 . : . - I81

THE ECHO NYMPH . 7 7 ‘ . . . - 197

EPILOGUE . . 7 = 7 : : . + 200






Brownies and Rose-Leaves

HE Brownies come to you from Brownie-land, and
TT the Rose-leaves are taken straight out of Mother
Carey’s pot-pourri jar.

Mother Carey’s pot-pourri jar—what is that ? Well, it
is a very wonderful, very beautiful jar indeed. Mother
Carey tucks away all her sweetest rose-thoughts into it.
Don’t you know what rose-thoughts are, either? Why,
they are sweeter even than rose-leaves, and they bloom
when the roses themselves are asleep under the snow.
I’m not going to tell you who Mother Carey is, for dear
Charles Kingsley told you that long ago. But I am
just going to gather a handful of leaves out of the jar
and make them into a modest little book. And the first

leaf is called—



The Song of the River-

Brownies

â„¢ OME where, drooping to the stream,
C Tender, dew-bathed blossoms grow,
Where the ripples glint and gleam,
Where the golden king-cups blow !
Where in lily-cups we hide,
Rocking idly on the tide.
Ripple along,
Midsummer song,
Born of the rivulet’s fleetness !
Float to the sea,
Blithesome and free,

Full of a whimsical sweetness !









ce Ss :
Sy
ane

Wy
Apes
- A.






lite

‘Come where we, with dainty brush,

Paint the insects’ gauzy wing,
And, amid the summer hush,

Teach the ripples how to sing ;
Where with scent we load the breeze

Whisp’ring through the willow-trees.

Here the gentle wood-deer browse ;
Here, when autumn frosts shall creep
All along the leafless boughs,
We shall put the world to sleep.



I2

Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Day by day, here have their birth
All the lovely things of earth.

Ceaseless anthem of the foam,
Whisper us who gave thee voice.

Didst thou, in thy mountain-home,
Learn already to rejoice,

In such fashion dainty-sweet,

With such harmony complete ?

Sweeter than a church’s bell
Sounds thy carol evermore!
Breaking from the ripple swell
In clear cadence on the shore !
Quaint half-elfin music, wed
To thy mossy pebble-bed.
Ripple along,
Midsummer song,
Born of the rivulet’s fleetness !
Float to the sea,
Blithesome and free,

Full of a whimsical sweetness.



The Story of the White
~ Violets |

“THAT? No fairies nowadays, do you say,
V \/ children? Dear me, what shocking
. ignorance! Who in the world do you
think looks after the ferns and flowers inGod’s big
garden? Who teaches the thrushes the new tunes, and
attends to the winter wardrobe of the robin-redbreasts ?
Who watches over the hedge-sparrow’s eggs, and takes
care of the nestlings when Mrs. Dickey hops off to get
her afternoon tea? Mr. Dickey brings her.dinner to- her,
you know, but he doesn’t approve of afternoon tea’ for
ladies, so she always ‘has to get that for herself. Why,
the world would go all wrong were it not for the fairies !
In fact, I do believe that even the sun would forget
to get up r



14 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And talking of getting up reminds me of the story of
the White Violets. Would you like to hear it? The
elves told it to me themselves one drowsy summer after-
noon, so it must be true. And, if you are really going to
believe it, I will tell it to you. But if you think it is all
nonsense, why then you can go back to your English
grammar and your sums, and believe them, because they
can all be proved, and the story of the White Violets
can’t.

Once upon a time there were no white violets in
the world. They were all blue: some pale blue, almost
like a little bit of the sky when it is touched with purple
by the sunset; some a faint sweet lavender; and some
deep and rich, like the inside of a- storm-cloud - And
they peeped out from their green leaves, and -smelled
as sweet as possible. And they lived underneath the
hedges, and warmed themselves in the sun, and drank
the clear cold dew, and were as happy and good as
they could be.

The elves took care of them, just-as ‘they took care
of all the flowers. They put them to bed every night,
and woke them up and. dressed them every morning.
And they filled their little cups with honey, smelling
so sweet and fresh that the great brown bees came



The Story of the White Violets 15

. buzzing over the hedge to find it, and carried it away
to make stiff and sweet and golden for the little children.
who danced to school down the green lane. And the
violets did not care, not a bit! For, strangely enough,
the more honey they gave away the sweeter and bigger
and bluer they grew, until the very robins and blackbirds
composed sonnets about them. In fact, there was a
rumour that one very spruce young robin had actually
proposed to the biggest and bluest among them, but
the elves had thought the match unsuitable, so they had
broken off the engagement.

Well, it was a great pity that the violets were not
always good, for then they would always have been happy.
But, as it was, they were sadly naughty one day, and had
to pay very, very dearly for it. It was-all the fault of
Mrs, Caterpillar’s party—at least, so they said after-
wards; but the elves shook their heads and didn’t seem
to think so. The elves said that if the violets had been
obedient, no harm would have come of the party
at all.

The truth was, Mrs, Caterpillar had issued cards of
invitation to all the neighbouring grubs and beetles. She
was having an “at home” in the beech tree that grew
just over the violets’ heads. And she had made the dew



16 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

negus just a little too strong for the young cockchafers,
and one or two of them fell right into the middle of the
violets. The elves came at’ once, and picked them up
and carried them home to their mothers; but the violets,
although they had been put to bed long ago, were wide
awake with the excitement, and refused to go to sleep
again. In vain. did the elves come and sing them
lullabies, and shade their eyes from the moonlight with
curtains of grass and leaves. The violets interrupted
the lullabies with giggles, and pushed aside the curtains
to peep at the gay scene above their heads. For was
not a fat caterpillar waltzing solemnly with a brown
earwig, and a white maggot, rather overcome by the negus,
making love to a dainty young green fly? Altogether,
it was too exciting, and the violets refused to go to sleep
at all. And at last the elves were obliged to leave them,
for they heard the stream quarrelling with a big grey
stone that had sat down right in the middle of it, and
they were sadly needed to make peace.

So the naughty little violets peeped and giggled until
the party was over, and the caterpillars and the maggots
and the earwigs had waddled home arm-in-arm, discussing
the supper and the dresses. And by that time the violets
were so tired and sleepy that they could hardly wish one



The Story of the White Violets 17

another good-night, but tucked their heads under their
green blankets, and went off into a sound slumber.

Well, at sunrise the elves came to wake them. The
roses were'up and dressed long ago, and the daisies were
blinking their golden eyes at the sun. But the violets
were very sleepy. They opened one eye each, and
murmured, “ All right,” and then went to sleep again..
For, you see, they had been awake so very late the night
before. And in vain the elves shook them, and called to
them, and told them that very soon all the dew would
have gone away into the clouds, and there would be
nothing left in which to give them their baths. They only
said that they “didn’t want baths, they were quite clean,”
and went to sleep again. One of the elves even went to
the stream, and brought back a leaf full of cold water,
and dashed it over their faces. But they only peeped at
him from under the blankets, and nodded their heads,
and were back in dreamland before you could say
“Jack Robinson.”

_ Now, all this was very perplexing to the dear little
brownies. They were not used to sleepy flowers. -As a
rule, the sweet hedge blossoms opened their dewy eyes
the moment that they were told to do so, and stretched
out their petals to the morning breeze. The elves, there-

Cc



18 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

fore, were very much puzzled indeed, and had to hold
a council about it, sitting down under the mushrooms.

Some thought that the violets must need a little
medicine, and suggested a wild-rose draught or a ragged-
robin pill. One or two were afraid that the nightshade
had come into flower much too early in the year, and had
made its home over the violets’ heads. And when this
was suggested, there was quite a stampede to the hedge-
row to see if such a terrible thing could really have
happened. But no, there was nothing growing in the
hedge except the pearly white May, and no deadly
nightshade was drooping its purple flowers over the path.
But the violets were sleeping still.

And then the elves, standing sorrowfully by en
came to a very sad conclusion. They began to believe
that it was only naughtiness and laziness on the part of
the violets after all. No flowers had any business to
sleep after the sun rose, any more than they had any:
business to lie awake after he had gone to bed. And
the elves reluctantly confessed that the violets were
“naughty.”

Then, when they had confessed that to one another,
they were in a worse dilemma than ever. What was to
be done? They had never had anything to do with



The Story of the White Violets 19

naughty flowers before. They had nursed sick flowers,
and they had lovingly tended the poor little withered
ones thrown carelessly down on to the path, and they
had laid the dead ones tenderly away in the earth without
sorrow, for would they not bloom again? But naughty
flowers were things that they had never had anything to
do with. And they talked about it very anxiously and
solemnly indeed.

“What is to be done?” said one, perching himself
astride a grass-stalk. “This is very shocking.”

“There must be a cure for it somewhere,” said another,
puckering up all his face in thought.

“Vou, Briarlet,” cried a third, “ you, who go near men’s
houses, cannot you suggest something? What would
they do in such a case?”

Briarlet wrinkled his forehead and pondered. Presently |
a light came into his eyes, and he looked up.

“T remember,” he said, “a case a few mornings since.
I was peeping in at the window of a little child’s room.
I had just been driving the ‘green flies away from the
roses, and it was hot, and I was resting for a time. While
I ‘sat there, watching the face of the child, the nurse
came in. to take.it-out of bed, but——” And Briarlet’s

sweet little voice grew mournful.



20 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Yes, but?” cried all the brownies in chorus.

“ But,” said Briarlet, quite distressed, “it refused. It—
it screamed. It—even—even—kicked /”

Briarlet quite blushed as he told the story, and
looked so miserable that the elves could not press him
to go on, but sat in a silent ring around him. Presently,
however, one bolder than the rest took courage.

“Yes,” he whispered, “and how did they cure it?”
For the elves could not get rid of the idea that being
naughty was something like being ill. ,

Briarlet’s face brightened.

“They did cure it,” he said softly, “but only by
making the child stay in bed—all day.”

“And that is the very thing!” again cried all the
elves in chorus. “That is how we must cure the violets.
They too shall stay in bed all day !”

The little brownies were quite pleased and happy
again. Here was a cure—a way out of all their per-
plexities. Suddenly, however, their faces fell.

“ How,” they asked solemnly, each of his neighbour—
“ how are we to prevent the violets from getting up?”

Here was a new difficulty, and again they turned to
Briarlet to help them. Once more he wrinkled his brows
and thought.



The Story of the White Violets 21

“TI know!” he exclaimed at last. “They took away
the child’s clothes !”

“Of course! What an excellent plan!” came the
delighted chorus of voices. And then all the elves shook
hands with each other, and congratulated one another
solemnly on Briarlet’s wonderful acuteness.

Then they went, in a body, back to the violets, for all
the world like a troop of town councillors. And the
violets were sleeping still. And in a stately and dignified
fashion, as if they were performing some important
ceremony, did those little brownies carry away the
violets’ purple frocks, and deposit them in a wardrobe
in Fairy-land.

Well, by-and-by, when the sun was high up in the
blue dome above them, the violets woke up. They had
“slept themselves out,’ as the old nurses say, and they
were quite tired of bed and dreamland, and wanted to
get up and flirt with the thrushes. So they began
clamouring for the elves to come and dress them, and
make them tidy for the day.

But the elves all stood in a row and shook their
heads, and looked very important indeed. And one
of them, who was spokesman, made the violets. a little
speech,



22 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

_ “We are afraid,” he said solemnly, “that you have
been naughty, and so we are obliged to punish you.
We have resolved that you shall stay in bed all day.
So we have taken away your clothes.” :

“But,” objected the violets, “we shall catch cold.”

The brownie shook his head, and one little violet
began to cry. .

“T want to get up, ’ she sobbed, “ an I—I—don't a
_ sitting in my night-gown.”

“We are very sorry,” said the brownie; and indeed
he did look troubled and tearful. “But we think that
it is for your good.” .

And then, because they were very tender-hearted,
and could not bear to see any one in trouble, the
brownies all went sorrowfully away, telling one another
that it was for the violets’ good, and persuading one
another not to go right off to Fairy-land and fetch the
little purple frocks away from the Queen’s wardrobe.

And so all the violets sat in their little white night-
gowns under the hedge. They felt, oh, so ashamed of
themselves! The robins gazed at them in such amaze-
ment, and the bull-finches positively blushed pink up to
the ears. Even the May-blossoms took a rosy tinge, and

one little briar-bud, peeping out upon his beautiful new



The Story of the White Violets 23

world, went quite red with the shock to his feelings. But
the violets themselves were beyond blushing, and only
drooped their heads lower and lower, and wished that the
earth would open and swallow them up.

And so they drooped and wept all day, and when
evening came, and the brownies hastened to them, the
tender-hearted little elves could do nothing but kiss the
sweet white, nodding heads, and promised them that they
should have their frocks again in the morning. And the
violets went to sleep, comforted and forgiven.

But when morning came, and the brownies hurried off

in the early dawn to Fairy-land, some terrible news awaited
them. You know the violets’ purple frocks had been put
into the Queen’s wardrobe. Well, the court tailor had
found them there, and, thinking that they were some
wonderful new fairy stuff, he had carefully picked them
to pieces and made a lovely robe for his royal mistress,
And she was so pleased with it that she had sent out
invitations at once for a grand dinner-party, and all the
household was busy preparing for it.

Now, was not that a terrible thing to happen? You
may imagine what a state of consternation the brownies
were in, They tried to get audience of the Queen, but

she was interviewing the court cook, and could not. see



24. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

them for ever such atime. And when at last they were
admitted to her presence they could hardly tell their tale,
she looked so radiant and beautiful in her purple gown.

However, they told her the story, and she seemed very
sad and disappointed. -

“My poor gown!” she said pitifully. “And I have
told all my friends about it! Still, if the violets are very
She paused and looked thoughtfully at

»



unhappy
the elves. “Could you not get them some others?” she
asked. ;

They shook their heads. “We can’t make them,” they
said. “Only the angels can do that.”

The Queen looked very thoughtful and uncertain what
to do, Then suddenly she cried, “ Take me to the violets
themselves. I am sure théy will give me the gowns.”

So the brownies took her, themselves drawing her wee
golden coach, far away from Fairy-land, down to the green
lane where the violets waited under the hedge. And when
she saw them she sprang out of the coach, and exclaimed
in wonder—

“Was that their punishment?” she cried—“that, to
become more beautiful than their fellows! Why, look at
them!”

And the brownies looked, and saw that what she had



The Story of the White Violets 25

said was true. The violets in their sweet white gowns

were fair with a new humility, and drooped their tender

heads like children who had sinned and been forgiven,



“ We see,” said the brownies, softly. ‘“ You shall have
their gowns.”

And the violets, peeping up, and seeing the Queen in
her wonderful purple, bowed their heads and whispered,

“ You shall have our gowns,”



26 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Hush!” whispered the Queen to the brownies. “Do
not tell them how beautiful they are.” And then, turning
to the violets, she said, “ Children, answer me; which shall
it be? Will you have back your purple, or will you
always wear your white, in memory of your fault and its
forgiveness ?”

And the violets whispered, “ We will wear our white,”
and bowed their heads even lower than before.

“It is well,” said the Queen, softly. “For out of your
own fall have you lifted your own purity.”

And then she went away again to Fairy-land, but the
violets sat in their little white night-gowns for ever.



The Song the Violets sing
to the Bees

ERE are cups all sweet with honey
H For the brown and golden bees,
Humming through the meadow sunny !
Here is treasure for your money
Underneath the hawthorn trees.
Here is nectar clear and fragrant—
Drink your fill, brown-coated vagrant,
Sail away upon the breeze!

“Honey ! Honey!” we are singing.
Hear the invitation ringing

From the violets to the bees.

On each bee there rides a brownie:
Snug his coach, and warm, and downy,

Set about with windows twain—



28 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Windows crystal, windows painted
With the tints from picture sainted
That about a church have lain.

’ Hearken! for the bees are humming,
“Coming! coming! We are coming,
Underneath the hawthorn-trees !”
And the violets, without measure,
Offer all their dewy treasure
To the brown and golden bees.



The Fairy and the Bubble

, N old professor once sat upon the rocks by the
A sea-shore. The rocks were very beautiful, and
were covered with brown seaweed, and grey
limpets, and anemones dressed in purple and green and
red. But the professor was not thinking about the
anemones just then. For what do you think he was doing ?
He was blowing soap-bubbles as hard as ever he could.
What a very foolish thing for an old professor to do,
do you say? Well, I am not so sure about that. I
believe you have all done things that were infinitely more
foolish, only you have done them quietly, when nobody
was looking, instead of openly upon the sea-shore. And
nobody took much notice of the old professor, after all.
So he went on blowing his soap-bubbles as quietly and
as busily as possible.

His little grandson sat by him, watching the beautiful



30 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

transparent balls float away over the sea. And presently
he lifted his face and asked a question.

“ Gran’pa, why do you do that?”

The professor paused for a moment. It was rather
a good thing that he did so, for he had been blowing and
gurgling down his long clay pipe until he was quite black
in the face. And he puffed some little flecks of soap all
over his frock-coat as he replied—

“Why do I do it, little one? Because I want to make
beautiful things. And I have tried all my life—all my life
—and have never yet made anything that was half so
beautiful as these.” .

And then he dipped his pipe into the suds, and

breathed down it, and another opal ball floated into the
air, |

“Do you make them for the fairies?” asked the child,
gravely.

“ For the fairies—for men—and for Mother Carey,” said
the professor. And his voice was reverent and low as he
mentioned Mother Carey’s name.

The child sat silent for a moment, and then spoke
again.

« Does everybody make beautiful things, gran’pa?”

“No,” said the professor, rather sadly, “some people



The Fairy and the Bubble 31

make very ugly things indeed, and the world is sad
because of them, and the only people who get any benefit
are the people who write in the newspapers. The whole
world had much better come and blow soap-bubbles on
the sea-shore with me.”

“TI will blow soap-bubbles some day,” said the child,
softly. ‘“Gran’pa, shall we sail away in one of them,
now ?”

“ Sail away, little one! How shall we manage that?”

“T know how,” the child told him confidently. “See!

there are two big ones floating away now from the pipe.
You can easily climb inside one of them, gran’pa, if you
try.”
Now, the professor was a very sensible man, and he
understood that children know a great deal more about
some things than any grown-up people do. So he just —
looked at the child, and then at the soap-bubble, and then
he said gently—

”



“T am trying—I am try

But he couldn't finish his sentence. He could only
gasp with amazement. For—what do you think?—he
found himself sitting inside one of the beautiful big
bubbles, and the child was nodding asia: to him from
the inside of the other ball.



32 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Bless my soul!” said the professor. He did not
mean to say anything irreverent, but, you see, it was the
only expression that he could think of in his astonishment.

“T told you you could doit if you tried,” called out
the child. “And, gran’pa, I have found out something
else. If you blow very gently with your mouth, the
bubble will go the way that you are blowing. Look
at me.”

‘The child made a round O of his rosy lips, and
breathed: upon the side of his bubble. And it floated
away more lightly and easily than a boat skims over
the waves. The professor tried to imitate him, but at
first he blew too hard, and then too gently, and then
too high, and then too low, and the bubble bobbed up
and down as if it were in a hurricane; and the poor
professor was very nearly sea-sick.

He learnt to manage it better by-and-by; and
presently he discovered that he could steer quite cleverly.
And when he had practised a little, and had got over
his feeling of amazement, he began to enjoy the gliding
easy motion, and to admire the beautiful crystal ball
in which he sat. . . ,

The child was lying upon the transparent floor of
his prison, his head pillowed upon one arm, and his blue



The Fairy and the Bubble 33

eyes looking up to the sky. “Rock-a-by, rock-a-by,
baby,” he sang. “ Gran’pa, shall we sail away to
Heaven ?”

“Can we?” said the professor. He. believed that
the child would know.

“No,” said the child softly, after a little silence, “we
can’t, although I don’t know why. We can only sail
to Fairy-land. Let us start now.”

So he blew upon the side of the bubble; and the
professor, very gently, did the same. And they floated
away over the blue looking-glass of the sea.

A water-fairy sat below the waves, twining green
seaweed in her hair. She was very beautiful, and her
hands and arms gleamed white through the ripples. The
professor looked down upon her, but he could not see
her. Only the child could see, and he stretched himself
upon the floor of his bubble, and smiled.

The fairy looked up, and caught sight of the
professor's bubble hanging, like a ball spun from the
foam of the sea, above her head. At first she thought
that a little bit of the rainbow had fallen from the sky.
And then she thought that one of the ripples had been
playing leap-frog, and had stuck in mid-air. And then
she thought that some foreign fairy had come to visit

Dp



34. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

her, and she fell headlong in love with the beautifu
gleaming ball, and stretched out her hands and arms to
draw it closer to her.

Did you ever hear of anybody falling in love with
a soap-bubble before? No, I suppose not, because, you
see, only fairies do such things.

Well, the fairy fell in love with the soap-bubble, but
she could not see the professor, sitting with his knees
drawn up to his chin, inside. And when she found that
she could not reach the beautiful ball from her bedroom
below the waves, she came right out of the water alto-
gether, and stood on tiptoe on the very crest of a ripple.
And still the professor could not see her, nor could she
-see the professor. But the child saw, well enough.

“Stop! stop!” he cried, pressing his face to his
crystal window ; “ you mustn’t pull it down. My gran’pa
is sitting inside, and he will get drowned.”

The fairy looked up, and saw that another of the
gleaming balls was swaying in the breeze above her
head. And when her eyes fell upon the child she
laughed.

“T have seen you before,” she said. “I have seen
your eyes in the face of the dawn, and have felt your
little hands in the splash of the foam. I have heard




















































The Fairy and the Bubble 37

your voice when the breeze has sung like a harp, and
I have watched your figure flee across the waters before
the storm. We are old friends, you and I. But I do
not want you—I want this beautiful gleaming ball for
my own. It shall be my spirit-love, and I will sing
to it, and rock it in the cradle of the waves.”

But the child’s tears fell warm upon his crystal
throne.

“My gran’pa is inside,” he said, “and he has fallen
asleep.”

For the professor lay snugly at the bottom of the
bubble, rocked by the motion into'a gentle doze.

“There is nobody inside,” said the fairy, wonderingly
—“nobody that I can see. Look! the gleaming ball is
floating down, down, to my heart. I will draw it to
my home below the sea.’

But the child clasped his little hands epee in
pleading.

“Leave my gran’pa,” he said softly. “You cannot
see him, but he lies in the crystal ball asleep. My
voice cannot reach him to wake him. Leave him to
sleep, because he makes beautiful things—always. I
will come to you, and give you my crystal ball for

your own,”



38 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And the child breathed upon the floor of the bubble,
and it floated down to the crest of the waves, and poised
lightly upon their foam.

“See,” he said gently, “ your spirit-love is here.”

And the fairy laughed for joy, and drew the crystal
ball towards her; and, as her fingers touched it, it
vanished away, and the child fell down—down—down—
through the green depths of the waters, till he lay silent
and still upon the coral-beds below. And the fairy sat
and wept for sorrow, because she had broken the crystal
ball.

And the professor floated away on the breeze to
the shore ; so that she could not catch the other bubble,
and carry it to her home under the waves.

But, as she sat and wept, the face of the child peeped
at her from a little cloud that sailed over the sea. And
she checked her tears, and looked up at him. “You?”
she said; “I thought you were asleep on the coral-beds?
Do you know I have broken the crystal ball ?”

“Yes,” said the child, softly ; “I know.”

And then he smiled at her, and went away up into
the blue. ae

And the professor's bubble caught on a sharp rock,

and burst, and left him lying asleep among the seaweed.



The Fairy and the Bubble 39

And when he awoke, they came to him, and told him
that the child was drowned.
But the professor knew better than that. And he.
looked at the basin of bubbles and the long clay pipe.
“He said we could not sail away to Heaven,” he
whispered softly; “but, for the first time in his little
life, he made a mistake.”





The Song of the March
Wind

VER the hill, over the hill, over the hill the
breeze is blowing,

Fresh from the high green mountain-top,
Defying the trees his journey to stop!
The pointing branches he’ll toss and tear,
And scatter the new-blown leaves in the air !
Away, then, away !
Away, then, away !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going?

The grass bends low
As the breezes blow,

As if in homage to Spring ;



The Song of the March Wind 41

» And kissing the ground
Will the blades be found,
Till the frolicsome wind
Has changed his mind,
And, rushing back
On his former track,
All the blades will backwards fling !
And they scarce can say,
On a stormy day,
What is their sweet green fashion of growing !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going ?

He catches the foam
From the streamlet’s home,
And tosses it here and there.
Pitter patter !
What does it matter ?
The bright drops shatter,
Their fragments scatter
Like diamonds all through the air.
Then back to the stream they whisk away,
Now creamy and white on its bosom showing !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going?



42 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And the birds peep round with inquiring eyes,
And cock their heads in a quaint surprise,
For their feathers are ruffled to twice their size,
As, rushing past them, the mad wind flies,
Till they wonder what he is doing.
And the clouds sweep over the pale blue skies,
For the Spring is going a-wooing,
And is courting the Earth with a merry rush ;
So safe in his suit that he cares not to hush
His rare fresh bluster and blowing!
And his kisses are hearty and wholesome and sweet,
And the violets blossom beneath his feet,
And he blows all the mists of winter away !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,

Where can the wild March wind be going ?



ee

|
|







The Story of the Japanese
Fans

HREE Japanese fans hung upon a drawing-room
wall, their handles tied together with a big

yellow bow. They were very beautiful fans,
and everybody who came to the house admired them
very much, They had -painted ladies upon them, and
gentlemen dressed in scarlet and gold, with pigtails as
long as a railroad. And what did it matter that they
were all sitting on the top of each others’ heads? They
smiled all day long, so perhaps they liked it.

There was a great jar of pot-pourri below them, that



44 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

scented the whole room. And there were screens of
peacocks’ feathers, and Eastern draperies in silver
embroidery. But there was nothing quite so beautiful
as the Japanese fans.

Little Lucy thought so too, as she stood underneath -
them every day, and she wished that she could go to
the country whence the beautiful ladies and gentlemen
came. They would willingly have taken her, for they
were, oh! so tired of sitting on the top of one another
upon the drawing-room wall. And somehow the brownies
got to hear of their wish, and came one evening to see
if they could do anything for the patient ladies and
- gentlemen with the gay clothes and the pigtails.

Well, the ladies and gentlemen told the brownies how
tired they were of looking at the peacocks’ feathers, and
smelling the everlasting pot-pourri. And they said, too,
how much they should like to take little Lucy to their
own country, and show her its wonders and delights.
And the brownies were so tender-hearted and sympathetic
that they went straight to the King and Queen of
Japanese-Fan-Land, and begged them to release their
faithful subjects for one night. And the King and Queen
consented, to the brownies’ great delight.

Little Lucy was in dreamland that night, when she



The Story of the Japanese Fans 45

was wakened by. a gentle touch upon her cheek. And,
rubbing her eyes and looking up in wonder, she saw a
dark-haired lady, with almond-shaped eyes, bending over
her. And another dark-haired lady was sitting upon the
counterpane, fanning herself languidly, and a third and
fourth were exploring the wonders of the toilet-table,
puffing their faces with baby’s powder, and rubbing lip-
salve on their cheeks for rouge. While a whole row of
tiny gentlemen nodded at the sleepy child from the
bottom of the bed, doing it so vigorously that their
pigtails flew up and down in wild confusion.

“Come with us, Lucy,” they cried in a soft chorus ;
“we are going to Japanese-Fan-Land,. and the brownies
say that we may take you too.”

How pleased Lucy was, to be sure! She sprang out
of bed, and began asking excitedly for her clothes. But

. the ladies had thought of that beforehand, and, before

she could say a word, they put her into a long silver
skirt that wobbled against her toes as she walked ;
crammed her soft little body into a queer round-shaped
garment all covered over with a wonderful crimson
pattern ; popped curly shoes upon her feet, and tiny round
fans into her hair, and floated away with her down the
staircase, into the dark stillness of the hall.



46 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“ How shall we go?” asked Lucy, wonderingly. But
the little ladies and gentlemen all said “Hush!” together,
and then, where do you think they took her to?

Why, straight into the jar of pot-pourri, They
seemed to float, rather than to climb, up its shining sides,
and to sink lightly down on to the soft brown rose-
leaves as if they had been so many balls of thistle-
down.

And then a very strange and wonderful thing hap-
pened. The pot-pourri jar just got up from where it
had been sitting in its corner, and walked quietly away,
through the drawing-room door, across the hall, and out
into the dewy moonlight of the summer night, and then
set off at a comfortable jog-trot down the garden, swaying
with a soft motion, the little ladies and gentlemen lying
among their cushiony leaves.

Lucy was quite excited by this time, and would
very much have liked to peep out of the jar, and see
where in the world they were going to. She could see
nothing through the top of the jar but a bit of the
moon, and three stars. The little ladies and gentlemen
were not so curious. The jar knew the way, they said.
For their own part, they were uncertain as to the exact

route—it was so long since they had seen the Company’s












The Story of the Japanese Fans 49 |

time-tables, But Lucy need not be anxious ; the brownies
would see that they arrived safely at their destination.

And, with this, Lucy had to be content. They
seemed to come to some rising ground presently, for
the jar puffed and panted a little heavily, although it
stumped along as gallantly as ever. And then, all of
a sudden, it gave a little hop into the air and stood quite-
still.

“We must get out here,” said the little ladies and

gentlemen in a chorus. And, as before, they floated
upwards, through the mouth of the jar, and sank gently
downwards until they stood with their feet upon the
ground. .
’ Where were they? Why, standing upon the borders
of a moonlit lake. The trees drooped dark and heavy
about it, and the shadows blackened the ground where
they stood. But right in the centre of the brightest
spot of moonlight floated a little boat, shaped like a
white swan, and rowed by twelve men who wore long
pigtails, fierce moustaches, and large shady hats.

They beckoned the little ladies and gentlemen to
them ; and so Lucy and her quaint wee friends sprang
into the boat, and were rowed away into the shining.
silver of the lake. Whilst the jar.just waited to see that

E



50 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

they were safe, and then turned round, and trotted
contentedly home again.

Lucy had no time, at first, to notice which way they
were going; she was so busy admiring the boatmen’s
short jackets, and pale green baggy trousers.. But
presently the little ladies and gentlemen all broke out
into a cry of delight, and, looking up, Lucy saw an
island stretching away before them, and knew that it
must be Japanese-Fan-Land. What a funny shape it
was, to be sure! One little neck of land stuck straight
out towards them, and the mainland swept away from
it in an immense circle. And in the distance, the whole
island looked like a wonderful mosaic of colouring. ,

They drew nearer and nearer, however, and presently
came to a little landing-place; and then the boatmen
helped them to alight, and, touching the ground with
their heads three times, by which they meant to say
“ good-bye,” sprang back into the little boat, and rowed
away. ; ,

A great many of the inhabitants of the island were
gathered together to welcome the little ladies and gentle-
men, for the brownies had sent word they were coming.
And so much saluting went on, so much touching of the

ground with be-pigtailed heads, that Lucy felt quite



The Story of the Japanese Fans 51

giddy. Indeed, by the time they had finished, several
of the gentlemen had quite lost their balance, and had
turned head-over-heels into the lake.

They were fished out, however, and did not seem
to mind. And, while they went home to change their
clothes, the rest of the party walked on into the interior,
chattering so constantly and so fast that Lucy was
thoroughly bewildered. She was quite sure, too, that
they were glancing at her feet, which really seemed
enormous in comparison with their own. And, although
they were too polite to say anything, she felt certain
that they must be shocked at the vulgar proportions of
her shoes. ;

However, they were very kind to her, in spite of her
ignorant disregard of Japanese-Fan etiquette, and very
soon she forgot all about her feet, in the wonders of
the island. For there were in it, oh! such marvellous
things. First of all, they came to a quaint little house,
built in a circle, and with a golden ball whirling round
on the top. But the funniest thing about it was, that
it was built upon nothing at all. It just balanced itself
up in the air as comfortably as possible, and looked
down upon the world as much as to say, “I am-no

common house; I am an aeronaut. I hang without effort



52 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

between the earth and sky. You may come. and look
at my inside, if you like. You will find me comfortably
furnished, and of superior attractions.”

Well, while Lucy gazed at the conceited little house
in astonishment, the host came out of it. He had two
pigtails which reached down to his heels, and a long
blue coat trimmed with teapots. And he bent himself
double to do honour to the little ladies and gentlemen,
and invited them graciously to come and dine with him,

Well, after a little consultation, they accepted the
invitation. But while they were making up their minds,
Lucy had time to notice what she had not observed
before. And that was that a little stream, coming
apparently from nowhere, flowed uninterruptedly down ©
one of the chimneys, and issued from the back door of
the little house, as unconcernedly as if nothing had. been
in its way. The host saw her looking at it, and nodded
his head with much self-satisfaction.

“Ah!” he said, “ that’s a fine thing, now, isn’t it?”

“What is it for?” asked Lucy, wonderingly.

“Well, it isn’t for anything, exactly,” he told her. ~
“Tt just happened to be there. But you've no idea how
convenient we find it. It saves the water-works a

tremendous lot of expense. You see, the Town Council



The Story of the Japanese Fans 53

had no need to bother after taps and drainage and a
‘comfortable water-supply. We've a good many of them
in Japanese-Fan-Land,” he added, looking at the blue
stream.

Lucy was much impressed, and still more so when
he unrolled a flight of steps, as easily as she could have
unrolled a reel of silk, and hung them out over the
balcony. And all the little ladies and gentlemen tripped
daintily up them, and went inside the quaint, hanging
house.

The host said dinner was ready, and himself led
the way into the dining-room. Such a pretty room,
all over fans and funny red feathers and silver stars.
And little tables were dotted about it with only two legs
apiece, and those both on the same side, so that the
tops balanced themselves aloft in the curious fashion
peculiar to Japanese-Fan-Land. The only wonder was
that the tea-trays did not fall off on to the floor; but,
somehow, they didn’t. Lucy, who was a wise little
morsel of humanity, came to the conclusion that Japanese-
Fan-Land must have laws of gravitation of its own.

The host had invited them to dinner, but there was
nothing to eat or drink except tea. ‘In Japanese-Fan-
Land they never do drink anything except tea. It was



ca Brownies and Rose-Leaves

very sweet and hot, however, and Lucy enjoyed it very
much. As for the little ladies and gentlemen, they
drank cup after cup, until Lucy grew quite anxious, about
their powers of digestion.

Well, when dinner was over, they all of them turned
to her, as their most honoured guest, and asked her what
she would like to do. She didn’t hesitate a moment.
She said that, above all things, she would love to sail
away down the little stream that flowed out of the back
door.

All the little ladies and gentlemen looked very much
pleased indeed. It was just what they had been dying
to do themselves, only they had been too polite to say so.
So the host sent a message by one of his servants, and
very soon a funny little boat was waiting for them outside.
It curled up at both ends, and had a tiny wooden house
in the middle, painted blue and hung all over with silver
bells.

So they said good-bye to their gentle host, and sailed
away in the little boat, down the blue stream. It was the
very bluest stream that Lucy had ever seen, only varied
here and there by a streak of white running down the
middle. And, as they sailed along it, the little silver bells

played the sweetest music in the world.



The Story of the Japanese Fans 55

And oh! what wonderful things they gaw as they sailed
along! The blue stream zig-zagged so delightfully, and
never troubled its head about the way it went; but then,
there are no boards in Japanese-Fan-Land with “ Tres-
passers will be prosecuted.” So now and then the stream
went into a garden where more almond-eyed ladies were
drinking more tea, under funny drooping trees that were
trimmed with blue and scarlet ribbons, and that seemed
to grow upon nothing. And occasionally it flowed right
over the ladies’ heads, but they just looked up and nodded
to it, and waved their handkerchiefs when they caught
sight of the little blue boat.

Sometimes, by way of a change, the little stream would
flow in a lovely water-fall down a gentleman’s pigtail, or
would climb up to the top of a tree and startle the storks,
or would pay a short visit to the sky, and come down
again as if nothing had happened ; while running through
a gentleman’s private mansion was quite a common
occurrence, and did not alarm anybody in the very
least.

Then, too, they saw such marvellous sights upon the
journey. Storks balancing themselves on trees a great
deal smaller than themselves ; silver and gold stars grow-

ing like flowers among the grass ; roses twice as large as



56 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Lucy’s head tied together with magenta streamets ;
wonderful birds with long red tails catching bright blue
fish in their enormous beaks; and a thousand and one
other things, each more startling than the last.

Presently they came to another hanging house, and
this was the scene of a great commotion. A pair of
lovers had just eloped from it, and were running away as
hard as ever they could, their hands outstretched and
their pigtails flying. There was a temple exactly in front
of them, but that didn’t seem to trouble them in the least.
They were making for the door as straight as possible.
Perhaps they thought they might have time to go in
and get married before they were overtaken by the
angry father. He was pursuing them with a scimitar
in each hand and a teapot upon his head, but he could
not see them just at that moment, for the gardener had
planted a rose-tree right in front of the hall-door, and
the angry father was on one side of it, and the flying
lovers were on the other. Lucy could not help hoping
that the cross old gentlemen would fall head first into
the rose-tree, which he seemed on the point of doing,
and that his poor pretty daughter would escape.

Everybody that they passed, except the eloping couple,

who were too agitated, and the father, who was too angry,



The Story of the Japanese Fans 57

saluted them by kneeling down and bumping the ground
with the tops of their heads. Lucy came to the conclusion
that it must be the constant friction that made them all so
bald except just where their pigtails grew into those great
long thick plaits) And they often stopped, in answer
to a pressing invitation to have a cup of tea from the
funny upright trays.

At last Lucy saw that they were drawing near the
coast. The stream had one last zig-zag before it went
into the lake, and took a farewell ripple over a lady
sitting on a high-backed chair. And then the little boat
slid away from Japanese-Fan-Land, into the moonlit
waters of the lake, and the little ladies and gentlemen
all brought out their flowered pocket-handkerchiefs, and
cried.

But the silver bells played a sweet “ Hush, hush-a-by,”
and presently Lucy and the little ladies and gentlemen
began to nod. For the brownies had hold of the boat,
and were swimming over the lake with it in their arms.
And they laid poppy-leaves over their charges’ eyes, and
held camomile scent-bottles under their noses, until at
last Lucy and all the little ladies and gentlemen lay at
the bottom of the boat, fast asleep.

Lucy never remembered how they got home. The



58 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

brownies might have told her, but they never did. Only
when she awoke, she was lying in her own little bed, and
Nurse was standing over her, and scolding her for having
overslept herself.

Lucy went down into the drawing-room by-and-by
and looked up at the Japanese fans and down at the pot-
pourri jar. The latter looked so very solemn and heavy,
Lucy could hardly believe that it had ever done anything .
so frivolous as trot away with her and the little ladies and
gentlemen to the silver lake. As for the little ladies and
gentlemen themselves, they were, as usual, smiling with
an imbecile expression, and sitting upon one another's
heads. And it’s my belief that they never went to
Japanese-Fan-Land again, but sat upon one another’s

heads for ever.

1



The Coming of Spring

\ A J OOD doves are cooing,
All the world’s wooing,
Bridal-decked meadows lie waiting for
Spring.
“Hush! for he cometh!”
So the bee hummeth,
Poised o’er her hive on a quivering wing.
Down the hill tripping—
Where the stream, slipping
Over the pebbles and under the thorn,
Laughs through her glances—
Down the boy dances,
Down to the world where his daisies are born !

Rosy the mouth where his kisses lie sleeping,

Starry the eyes where his glances coquette !



60 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Ah! would you steal them ?
Will he reveal them,

Toss down his treasures? No fear of it yet!
Dancing with sunbeams one day on the mountain,
Down come his tears, the next day, in a fountain !

Think you're beguiling

The boy into smiling—
Back to their goal flash the stars that were peeping,
Back flies the laugh through his lips that was creeping,
High on the hilltop the Spring sits a-weeping,

Rosy mouth puckered, and sunny eyes wet !
Celandine-pied lies the lap of the meadows,

Waiting to cradle him should he come down,
Down from the mountain-top into the shadows,

Where the green lacework has cobwebbed the brown.

On the hill dancing,
Earthwards he’s glancing ;
Say, what will tempt him away from the height ?
In the stream dipping,
Out of it tripping,
Shaking the drops off, he’s taken to flight !
Up in the skies now,

See where he flies now,

Snatching the sunbeams to weave him a crown!



The Coming of Spring 61

Peeps through his fingers,
Mocks at the singers,

Throbbing their psalm out to welcome him down.
On a cloud lying,
O’er the blue flying,

Pillowed his head on the white of her breast!
Where are they going,
As the breeze, blowing,

Bosoms the cloud on the gold of the west?

Back again, mocking
The violets, befrocking
Nodding green buds with the purple of love—
Purple for passion,
Such is their fashion !
Fain would they woo him, that elf-boy above!
Woo him and wed him where all the Earth, throbbing,
Veils her fair bosom in emerald gown,
Pants out her love-song with breath that, half-sobbing,

Pearls into kisses to kiss the Spring down !

“ Hush! for he cometh !”
So the bee hummeth,
So the thrush pipes through his sweet dropping note.



62 Brownies and Rose Leaves

Soft, the breeze hushes,
Falls to the rushes,
Slides down the river, a whispering boat !
Slides to the shadows—
. But, see, in the meadows,
Over the daisies, milk-pale, steals a blush!
Down the hill creeping,
’Tween his hands peeping,
Down to the Earth comes the Spring through the hush !

One moment after,
Out rings his laughter!
Earth has embosomed him! Caught to her breast,
Cradled in kisses,
There’s where his bliss is !
Moss-bed for bridal-bed, daffodil-drest !
So he surrenders,
Hangs her with splendours,
Weds her, and queens her with may-blossom crown !
All the world singing
Bridal-hymns, ringing
Out the glad story—the Spring has come down!




















LLL















Designed and drawn by a S. Schofield.



The Story of the Bluebells

NCE upon a time there was a little brownie who
was very much in love. He was so much in
love that he lost all his appetite, and went

about Brownie-land writing sonnets to the moon. And
the little lady-brownie that he was in love with was
called Mayblossom, and was the sweetest, prettiest
brownie in the world. ,
Unfortunately, however, she was rather a capricious
little lady. And, as half the householders in Elf-land
were in love with her, she felt that she had every right
to pick and choose. So she refused their offers, one after
the other. The first was too stout; she was sure he
could never drive comfortably in the front seat of her
chariot, for it was made, like Queen Mab’s, of the half of
a hazel nut.’ The second was too thin, and it made his
clothes fit badly; he had never yet been able to find a
F



66 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

rose-leaf that would really “sit” properly, and always had
to pad himself out with cobwebs. The third was vulgar ;
he always ate with the wrong end of his grass-stalk, which
in Brownie-land is quite as bad as eating with the handles
of your knife and fork! The fourth had set up house-
keeping in’an empty nest, and Mayblossom did not care
for old-fashioned residences ; they encouraged earwigs!
And so on with the fifth and the sixth and the seventh,
until the whole of Brownie-land was in despair.

But, at last, the wilful little lady made an announce-
ment. She had been sitting one evening on the hillside,
and had heard the far, far distant chimes of bells. They
were the bells of the village church, softened into tender
sweetness before their echo reached her ear. And she
was so charmed with them that she declared whoever
could make a chime of bells that should sound as sweetly
for Elf-land as the church-bells sounded for the big world
should be rewarded by her heart and hand.

Well, no sooner was her announcement made than
oh! such a carpentering and joinering, and smelting and
forging began in Brownie-land. The farmers declared
that the woodpeckers were busier than ever this year,
they heard such a deal of tapping going on in the wood;
Tt wasn’t the woodpeckers at all, really, but the elves,



The Story of the Bluebells 67

who were trying with all their might and main to make
bells. Some went far down into the diamond mines, and
brought up great blazing white jewels, and hollowed them
into beautiful shapes, and hung a ‘tiny gold clapper inside
them. But though they shone amazingly, and looked
very lovely, when the brownies tried to ring them they
only gave a little glassy sort of “tinkle, tinkle,” and
Mayblossom shook her head, and said, “No, those
wouldn’t do at all.”

Well, after that, they climbed up the hazel trees, and
with great difficulty pulled down the tiniest, daintiest nuts,
and scooped away the sweet white kernel. Then they
hung a frozen dew-drop in the opening, and tried to sound
a soft peal. But the chime was wooden and tuneless, and
Mayblossom stopped up her ears when she heard it,
and put her head right under a big red toadstool.

Then they found a whole collection of wee, deserted
snail-shells, and tied caterpillars’ eggs in them for clappers,
and swung them up and down at the end of a spidet’s
thread. But, although the tone was softer than any they
had yet procured, the eggs soon broke, and stuck against
the sides of the shells; and Mayblossom first laughed at
them, and then ran right away into the forest, and declared
that she would have nothing to do with them! They,



68 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

who taught all the music of the woods, not able-to make
a chime of bells! She was ashamed of them, and wouldn’t
marry one of them! ,

‘Well, the brownies were very disconsolate. But the
little elf, who was so very much in love, did not: yet
despair. He determined, instead, that he would not be
beaten, but would make such a chime of bells as neither
Mayblossom, nor the brownies, nor the whole world itself
had ever heard. And then he would marry his little
lady-love, and be happy with her for ever.

But, being a sensible brownie, he was not going to
try any more experiments himself. He had seen that
all Elf-land could not succeed in making a chime of bells,
and he was not going to waste his valuable time over
useless efforts. So he went quietly about his daily work,
which was that of sowing daisy-seeds all up a little lane,
until night came on. And then he put his wee cap firmly
on his head, gathered up his basket and trowel, and went
away down to the big city below the hills.

“ Where was he going to?” do you ask? To the cradle
of a new-born babe, that was all. For there he knew he
should find the sky-fairies, and it was to them that he
meant to make his appeal. He trotted along the deserted
streets till he came to a house with a light in the window.



_ The Story of the Bluebells 69

And then he crept through the keyhole of the front door,
stole up the broad staircase, and passed softly into the
room where the mother and her baby lay.

A light was burning dimly on a table, but the rest of
the room was in shadow. There was a white face on the
pillows of the bed, and a wee pink one on the pillows of
the cradle; and, just as the brownie had foreseen, the
sky-fairies were very busy in the room.

They were all grouped about the little cradle, laying
tender thoughts and tender blessings upon the babe.
The light shone softly on their white wings and pure
foreheads, and the brownie bent his head, and took off
his little cap reverently in their presence. They beckoned
him near to them, and smiled at him, and softly uncovered
the babe, and bade him look at the little sleeping face.
And then they brushed with their wings the forehead of
the mother, and floated. silently away out into the moon-
light, carrying the brownie with them.

As soon as they had passed from the tender stillness
of the room, the brownie made his request. Would the
sky-fairies tell him how to make a chime of bells that
should sound as sweetly in Fairy-land as the church bells
sounded in the big world? The sky-fairies smiled, well-
pleased at the thought, for they loved the brownies, and



70 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

the work they did in the great Palace of Earth. Then,
too, the sky-fairies were always glad to make lovely
things, and they believed that such a chime would be
very lovely indeed. So they left the brownie in. the
topmost twigs of a great oak, and told him to wait for
them upon the moss below, and they would try what they
could do for him.

So the brownie slid down to the ground, and sat
patiently waiting upon the moss; while the fairies flew
up, up, up to Heaven, and took into their hands a great
piece of the sky, purple-blue with the shadows of night.
And then they gathered ever so many of the stars, and
floated back to the brownie down the moonbeams.

“See,” they said, “we have brought you these.”

“But how,” asked the brownie, wonderingly, “am I to
make out of them a chime of bells?”

“We will show you,” said the fairies. And they
moulded the piece of sky that they had brought into
tiny nodding bells, and hung them on green stalks, and
popped wee fragments: of the stars into their hearts.
And then they set them upon the green moss under the
oak-trees, and, smiling at the brownie, floated away. again
up. to the stars, ©

And the brownie sat on in silent delight. He had



The Story of the Bluebells 71

forgotten all about Mayblossom, forgotten about the
chime of bells, forgotten all his own hopes and fears;
and could only sit watching the nodding bluebells, and
rejoicing because the sky-fairies had given to the Earth a
new flower.

But by-and-by there came the amber light of morning,
and with the morning there came a tiny, tender breeze.
It rustled the oak-leaves softly upon the boughs, and
kissed the wood anemones with a gentle kiss. It bent
the heads of the grasses, and just ruffled the bosom of the
stream. And it shook the drooping heads of the blue-
bells, and, to the brownie’s wonder and delight, out to
the whole of Fairy-land there sounded a sweet, faint chime.

Never was there such a chime before. Tender and
low and clear, it seemed an echo of the sky-fairies’ own
song. And Brownie-land had its church-bells at last. .

Little Mayblossom heard it, for she had taken her
head from under the red toadstool. And when she heard
it, she just ran straight to the spot where the brownie sat,
and put her arms round his neck and kissed him. And
then they sat, hand-in-hand, for the whole of the day,
doing nothing but listen to the sweet, wonderful chimes.

Well, they were married, and by-and-by the brownies

got used to the new music, and men and women got



72 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

used to the bluebells. But there was one person in the
world who had never in his short life seen the sweet,
nodding flower, and he was the little child by whose
cradle the brownie had found the sky-fairies.

And they were “zs flowers, after all, his and his
mother’s. Because the fairies, after they had planted the
bluebells, had heard a soft call from the dimly lit room ;
and, flying swiftly back to it, had seen the mother’s arms
stretched out to them, and the mother’s face lifted wist-
fully up to their own. And they had taken her in their
arms, and floated with her out into the night, and -carried
her away to the stars. And so the bluebells were her
birthday flowers.

And the baby in the cradle grew fat and rosy, and
crowed the whole day long. And presently his nurse
took away his long white robes, and dressed him in a
little soft frock with blue ribbons. And then that too
was taken away, and he was put into a quaint little skirt
with'a blue sash, and wore a sailor hat, and learnt to
make mud-pies. And at last there came the proudest
day of all, when his fat little legs were put into knicker-
bockers, and his dimpled’ arms into a comical little sailor's
jacket. ,

“Bless him!” said nurse, fondly, looking at him with



The Story of the Bluebells 73

great satisfaction, and not seeming to notice that he
looked precisely as broad as he was long. “How proud
his dear mother would have been of him!” —

Archie—for that was the little fellow’s name—glanced
up at the words. He often wanted to see his mother, and
whenever he asked for her they always told him she was
“up in the sky.” To-day he asked another question, and
it was whether “the sky was such a very, very long
way off?”

“Yes, my dear, a very long way,” nurse told him
sorrowfully.

“Farther off than the top of the beech-trees?” Archie
wanted to know then, peeping up at the tall trees from
under his broad hat. -

“Yes, farther off than them; farther off even than the
chimneys of the big, grey house where he lived.” And
when he heard that, he sighed a little, for he had had a
vague idea of finding the sky, and showing mother his
new clothes. |

He was playing all alone in the garden that afternoon,
when the thought came back to him. He was tired, and
wanted to sit on somebody’s lap, just as little Johnnie,
who lived opposite, sat on Mrs. Green’s. He was sure

mother would have let him sit on Her lap, instead of



74. Brownies and Rose Leaves

squatting, as he was doing, in the gardener’s big wheel-
barrow, which was rather dirty and earwiggy. And while
he was thinking all this, he looked at the blue hills in
the distance, and saw, what he had never noticed before,
that the sky was lying right on the very top of
them.

What a fortunate thing, to be sure! He would go
away, all by himself, down the green lane, and would
climb up to the hilltops, and walk away over the sky,
until he had found mother. What a splendid plan! And
how pleased nurse would be that he had shown mother
his new clothes !

So he set his hat on the back of his head, and took
his little walking-stick—made from a green elder-stalk—
in his hand, and marched sturdily away out into the
spring-world. There were, oh, so many perils to be
passed! First, there was a big doggie that would cough
at him, right down in its throat, and poor wee Archie
dared not run past it for ever so long. Then.there was a
large buzzing bee that he had to hide’ from, behind a
sprouting oak. Then there was a brown-eyed cow, that
moo’d at him. All that she really wanted was to be
milked, but Archie did not know that, and was very much
startled indeed. But at last he got right away from his



The Story of the Bluebells 75

troubles, down a sweet-smelling boggy green lane, that
led him to the foot of the woods.

The woods were on a hillside, and looked deliciously
cool and dark this warm spring day. Archie trotted away
into them, climbing with some difficulty over the trailing
roots. He was not afraid any more, not even when a big
spider came and stared him quite out of countenance.
He was going up, up, up the mossy hillside, and he
' made sure that he should find the sky and mother at
the top.

Suddenly he stopped short, and gave a little shout of
joy. There, right in front of him, lay the gleaming blue,
stretching away as far as his eyes could see it. He had
found the sky at last, as he knew he would, lying sweet
and blue among the moss and tree-trunks at the top. of
the hill. “Mother! mother!” he shouted gleefully, and
stumbled and panted up the little pathway until his foot
tripped, and he fell headlong into the soft bed of blue-
bells,

“Well,” thought Archie, as he sat up and looked at
the sweet crushed flowers about him, “I-never guessed
the sky would be like zhzs /”

. He filled his lap with bluebells: as he sat there, and
laughed softly over his spoil. His baby-soul had for-



76 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

gotten for a moment about mother. And so he covered
himself with the tender blue flowers, and tossed them in
the net of sunlight that lay like a golden web about him.
And there, sitting among the bluebells, the brownies
found him.
' They knew what he had come for, bless you! The
brownies find out everything. And they were rather sad
at heart, because he must find out by-and-by that this
was not the sky at all, and that mother was very far
away. And little Mayblossom, who very often. visited
the bluebells, quite cried when she thought of how
disappointed he would be.

She would try to lull him to sleep, she said, and
perhaps he might be found before morning. So she, and
_ her little husband, and everybody else in Brownie-land set
' the bluebells ringing. And their chimes were so sweet
and soft and drowsy that they made a lullaby, and little
Archie listened to it, and nodded his head lower and
lower, until it sank right down upon the moss, and he
fell fast asleep. oa

But the brownies went on chiming the bluebells,
for they knew that the sky-fairies would hear the
echo, and would come to earth to see what was the

matter.



The Story of the Bluebells 77

And sure enough, when the moon peeped over the
hillside and laid her tender pale kisses on the cowslip
meadow below, the fairies floated silently down towards
the tree-tops, and stood upon the earth round about the
little sleeping child; while the bluebells hushed their
music as the brownies, in tender whispers, told little
Archie’s tale. .

And a deep tenderness came into the eyes of the sky-
fairies as they listened. And one of them, Archie’s own
mother, took the child into her arms, and kissed the little
sleeping face. And then she spread out her shining white
wings and lifted him to her bosom, and flew away with
him over the tree-tops, down the boggy green lane, past
the buzzing bee and the dog that coughed right down
in its throat, and the gardener’s wheelbarrow, and laid
him in his own little cot at home. And when she had
done this, she stooped again and kissed him, and went
back to the waiting elves.

“Are you not going to take him home with us?”
asked the sky-fairies wonderingly.

Archie’s mother smiled, and shook her head.

“Not yet,” she said, “for the bluebell’s music has
sounded right down into his heart, and their beauty and

fragrance have crept into his soul. And he has their



78 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

message to give to the world. I have given him back
again to men, and to——” >

“ And to whom ?” asked little Mayblossom.

“To Mother Carey,” said the sky-fairy. “For until
he belongs to Mother Carey he can never belong to me.”

The brownies did not quite understand all that; but
the sky-fairies did. And they sang a carol of gladness as
they flew away again to the stars.

And Archie one day grew into a strong man, and
believed in the brownies, as all sensible people do, And
not only did he believe in them, but he tried to teach the
world all about them. For were not the sky-fairies his
godmothers, and the’ church-bells of Fairy-land his birth-
day flowers?








==

Soul

i x MHS,
Nagi

“ipa

we Lot WED aay

‘ ye 1 onl FF ae ol Wil pees

- at
pag: ge
Se ie et i
wey Db oon oy he
say of











May-Song

ING a song of a May-day morning!
S Trip the dance to a May-day tune!
Fresh and cool is the May-day morning,
Noontide heat will come all too soon !
May-thorn buds upon the hedges
Gléam like flakes of prisoned snow ;
May-month flow’rs among the sedges
Nod their blossoms to and fro!
Fair, the light of it,
Sweet, the sight of it,
Fragrant May-day morning !

Swallows, ’mid the willows flying,
Seek a mate for the summer hours ;
Ferns, against the hemlock lying,
Steal the dewdrops out of the flow’rs ;
G



82 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Birds are bursting into singing ;
Diamonds sparkle on the lawn,
As the sun, his glory flinging,
Crowns with gold the May-day dawn!
Fair, the light of it, |
Sweet, the sight of it,
Fragrant May-day morning !



The Story of the Silver
Bowl

HE Lady Violetta was a Princess, very rich
and very beautiful. She had a King for a

father, and a Queen for a mother; a Duchess
for a governess, and a Lord High Chamberlain for a
history master; a Countess for a lady’s maid, and an Earl
for a courier. She ought to have been as happy as the
day was long, and, instead of that, she was always crying
her eyes out about something or other.

She had’so many toys that she did not know what to
do with them, so she spent an hour or two each day in
breaking them to pieces. She had so many picture-books
that she declared she hated them; and she tore them
every one to bits. And then she threw her battledore
and shuttlecock at the Lord High Chamberlain, hitting him

somewhat severely upon the nose, and went away into the



84. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

garden, declaring that the only nice things in the world
were the flowers.

Well, the Lord High Chamberlain went about his work
with a swollen nose, and Princess Violetta sat among the
flowers. She really did love them, and watered and
tended them very carefully. She often declared that they
were the only things that gave her any real pleasure.
But she was very cross to-day, and so what do you think
that foolish little Princess actually did? She sat down in
the middle of the grass-plot, and cried as hard.as ever she
could, because a// the flowers did not bloom a the year
round, and so she could not gather snowdrops in June
and honeysuckle in December.

Well, she cried and screamed so loud that the brownies .
heard her, and came running to see what was the matter.
Now, it was a very strange thing, but Lady Violetta loved
the flowers so very much that she was now and then
allowed to have a peep at the brownies as they went
about their busy work. Funnily enough, this did
not make her good, as it should have done; because,
you see, she ‘only. loved the flowers for the pleasure
they gave to herself, and she had not yet learnt their
best lessons.

However, to-day the brownies made up their minds to



The Story of the Silver Bowl 85

try and help her; and, of course, they planned to do it in
their own way, which was the most original way possible.
They came creeping tenderly about her shoulders and
knees, and made themselves visible to her. That was the
first thing. And then, while she, touched and comforted
by their tenderness, caressed them softly, they told her
that they had heard her complaint, and would fulfil her
wishes.

“See here,” said one, “I have in my cap a tiny silver
bell. I will take it out and give it to you, and you must
put it in the sunniest window of your chamber, when it
will swell and grow into a great magic silver bowl. What-
ever flowers you put into it will retain their freshness and
fragrance for ever.”

Well, the Princess was very much delighted. She
would now have every kind of flower in bloom all the
year round. And as she kissed and thanked the brownies,
she never noticed that they looked anxious and sad. So
she said good-bye to them very happily, and they promised
that, in a year’s time, they would come back to her sight,
and would ask her how she liked her silver bowl. And
then they seemed to be gathered away into the hearts of
the roses and jessamine and lilies, and she saw them no

more.



86 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

_- So the Princess was left alone with her tiny silver bell.
And she carried it carefully up the broad marble staircase,
into her bedchamber, and laid it in the warmest, sun-
niest corner she could find. And then she sat down to
watch it grow. But, so long as she watched, nothing
happened, and at last she made up her mind that she
must be patient; and so she went away, and, in a fit of
repentance, tried to find some sticking-plaster for the
Lord High Chamberlain’s nose.

And, no sooner had she gone, than the tiny silver bell
began to puff itself out tremendously. And it puffed and
swelled and grew bigger and bigger, and broader and
broader, until at last it had grown into a magnificent
silver bowl, the shape of a harebell, and filled with clear,
sweet, limpid dew.

Well, when the princess came back to look at it,
she broke out into a little cry of delight, and ran off
at full speed into the garden, tearing her beautiful
gold thread frock on the bushes as she went. And
she gathered a great nosegay of lilies and roses and
pansies and carnations, and all the most beautiful
summer flowers that grow. And she put their stalks
into the clear dew, and laid their sweet heads tenderly
against the sides of the silver bowl. And_ they



The Story of the Silver Bowl 87

seemed to grow bigger and brighter every time she
looked at them.

And the brownies’ promise came quite true. No dead.
leaves drooped on the green stalks, no withered petals
lay about the fragrant hearts. The flowers were the
same, morning after morning, and night after night;
and the Princess never tired of smelling and looking
at them. .

Presently she put great sprays of honeysuckle and
white sweet peas, and big pale anemones by their
side, And then fragrant stocks and plumy asters,
and dahlias that looked like folded satin pin-cushions.
And soon she twined trails of red autumn leaves about
the bowl, and brightened it with scarlet berries. And .
then she placed in it a great bunch of chrysanthemums,
bronze and pink and crimson and white, and laid
maiden-hair fern over all. And at last she added great
snowy Christmas roses, and dark glistening holly and
yew.

That was on Christmas Eve, and that night, as the
Princess lay in bed, she had a strange dream. She
thought that Santa Claus came into the room, and stopped
short in amazement at the sight of the flowers in the big

silver bowl,



88 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Why, what are you doing here?” he cried out to
them. “Why aren’t you.asleep under the ground with
your brothers and Sisters?” ,

“We are obeying the wishes of the brownies,” the roses’
told him ; “but we are very sad. We sigh for the summer
sunshine, and forthe butterflies, for the soft breeze and
the little showers of rain. Our hearts are sorrowful and:
weary in the winter snow. It dims our eyes and freézes:
our souls. And we are tired of wakefulness, and want to
go to sleep.”

“We weep for the bees,” whispered the violets, sadly.
“Our cups are full of honey, and there’ is nobody to ease
the burden. We have no greén leaves to cover us, no
running stream to bring joy into our hearts; and when
the spring-time comes, we shall be tired with our long
vigil, and unable to rejoice with our companions in the
dawn-time of their life.”

_ “We are lonely among the early flowers of summer,”
sighed the foxgloves. “We have only the trailing
leaves to sympathize with our needs. They alone can
understand how we pine for the free autumn wind to
toss our freckled cups,-for the early frosts to spangle
our leaves; how we fain would once more watch

the herb-robert dying sweet and crimson in the hedge-



The Story of the Silver Bowl 89

rows, and the dormouse preparing her winter's nest.
We were not meant to lay our lips against the June
roses, nor to nod our ruddy bells over the pansies’
heads.”

“Our comrades are passing away,’ murmured the
chrysanthemums. “We long to go with them into’ the
drowsy land of sleep. We want to gain strength for
next year, that we may bloom fairer than before’ Some
of our buds lie still unfolded against our stalks, and
weigh heavily upon the tender leaves’ Our season
is over, and’ we are weary because we may not pass
away.”

Only the Christmas roses did not complain, but lifted
their pure white faces up to Santa Claus, and murmured,
“Peace on earth, good will towards men.”

“Ay,” said Santa Claus, softly, “I see how it is.”
And then he went up to the little Princess, and looked
down upon her as she slept.

“Child,” he whispered, bending over her, “ your poor
flowers are very sad.”

The Princess sighed, and stirred uneasily in her sleep,
and he went on—

' “They are blooming, bright and beautiful as ever, in

obedience to the wishes of the brownies ; but they sigh



go Brownies and Rose-Leaves

for the sun, for the breezes, for the showers, and for all the
things that give them birth and death. They are tired,
and they may not sleep. They are hungry and thirsty,
and the winter can ‘give them no food. They are home-
sick, and you keep them here in a strange land. Will you
not lay your own wishes on one side, for the sake of the
little tender flowers that ae so much for an ungrateful
world ?”

The clock struck twelve as he spoke, and he went to
the window and drew aside the curtain.

“See!” he said ; “ Christmas is flying, swift and white,
to the world.”

And Christmas stepped on to the earth that very
moment, and came straight into the Princess’s heart. And
she tumbled out of her warm little bed, and ran straight
to her magic bowl. And then she gathered up all the
flowers into her hands, and gave them to Santa Claus.
All except the Christmas roses, and they bloomed bigger
and sweeter than ever.

“Take them,” said the Princess, breathlessly ; “take
‘them back to their homes, I will give them to you for a
Christmas gift.”

’ And Santa Claus smiled, well pleased, and, as he laid

the lilies and carnations and asters against his white



The Story of the Silver Bowl 91

bosom, they faded quietly away, and left nothing but the
perfume hanging about the room.

“See! they have gone already,” he said, smiling, “as
soon as you released them from the bowl.”

“Who took them?” asked the Princess.

And Santa Claus had just time to whisper, “ Mother
Carey,” before he too faded away.

Well, the Princess awoke on Christmas morning, and
peeped out from under her eider-down quilt. The room
was full of toys. Dolls stared at her from every chair. A
great big rocking-horse swung slowly up and down in the
middle of the room. Silken skipping-ropes hung over the
bed-posts, and coloured balls were tied to the rails,
Santa Claus had brought her so many beautiful things
that, as usual, she wondered what in the world she should
do with them.

She slipped quietly out of bed, and went through the
toys to her magic silver bowl. Yes, it was empty, all
except the Christmas roses, and they floated on the
dew, pure and. spreading, like water-lilies upon a quiet
stream. The Princess looked .at them, and felt rather
sad. _ But there’ was a great gladness in her heart all
the same. She had learnt the real lesson of the
Christmas joy.



Q2 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

The Lord High Chamberlain couldn’t imagine what
had come over his little mistress. She was so gentle all
that day, so sweet and quiet; and she had quite left off
throwing her battledores and shuttlecocks at his head. She ©
only broke one toy to pieces, too, and that was a dancing
plush monkey, and, as she explained, she really did want
to know what it had got inside. In fact, she was so good,
that the King and Queen were. sure she must be ill, and
sent off in great haste for the Court physician, and his box
of pills.

The Court physician wore a white wig, and a great
gold and scarlet hat, and he arrived in a coach drawn by
four horses. And he stumped up the stairs with his ivory
cane, and felt the Princess’s pulse, and looked at her
tongue, and said “Ha!” a very great many times, and
“Hem!” occasionally. And at every symptom mentioned
by the Queen, he nodded his head, as much as to say that
he knew much more about it than she did. And at last
the little Princess, who felt perfectly well, and only wanted
to begin to be goody quite forgot all her resolutions, and
threw the remains of the plush monkey right into his face ;
and they went into his eyes, and made him cry big tears;
and up his nose, and made him sneeze several times in

succession ; and down his throat, and made him cough



The Story of the Silver Bowl 93

until he didn’t know whether he were on his head or his
heels. . So he went home, and put his feet into hot
mustard and water, and went to bed for a week. But the
King and Queen were happy, for now they were quite sure
that the little Princess was in her customary state of
health. ;

By-and-by, however, the Princess began to feel sorry.
She had had such a peaceful feeling at her heart, ever
since she had given Santa Claus the flowers out of
the great silver bowl. And directly she had thrown
the plush monkey at the Court physician, the old dis-
content had come back again. She wanted to feel
good. She didn’t so much want to be good as to feel
good. You see, the little Princess had still a very great
deal to learn.

However, she had a suspicion that the peaceful feeling
was the result of having given the flowers to Santa Claus.
And, as she did so long to get it back again, she began
giving away her things, right and left! She gave her
best wax doll to the Lord High Charhberlain, and all the
skipping-ropes to her grandmother, who was bedridden.
She presented a stately Duchess with the rocking-
horse, and offered a Punch and Judy show to the

General of the army. She insisted upon her old nurse



94 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

accepting a toy bow-and-arrows, and pressed an A BC
picture-book upon the Court fiddler, who was blind. She
gave her nicest ball-frock to the baby, and sent her nine-



pins to the Court physician, by Parcels Post. She fed
a little ragged girl with ice-cream and bonbons, and

insisted on sending her share of the Christmas plum-



The Story of the Silver Bowl 95

pudding to a poor dying man. And altogether she did
her very best to turn the world upside down.

But she did not feel very happy. You see, she was
still thinking of herself. The only time she had not
thought of herself was the moment when she had given
Santa Claus the flowers, She hadn’t wanted to feel happy
then; she had-only wished to give happiness to the
flowers.

And a proof that she was still thinking of herself was
that she went on filling the great silver bowl. She kept
the Christmas roses in the dew, and put a handful of
snowdrops to them by-and-by. Then she added white
jonquils, and yellow-eyed narcissus,; and Lenten lilies,
And presently filled up the corner with sweet violets,
and primroses tender and pale, like forgotten stars.
And then came the time of daffodils, and the drooping
golden heads were more beautiful than the shining silver
of the bowl. And she twisted among them blue forget-
me-nots, and purple lilac, and laburnum like golden rain.
And then she added meadowsweet, and pearly white
may, and little early tender rosebuds. And the summer.
sun shone in at the window, and laid warm kisses upon
the flowers.

And again the Princess had a wonderful dream.



96 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

It was Midsummer Eve, and the fairies were all abroad.
And they came about the little bed of the Princess as it
stood right in a silver streak of moonlight, and they laid
their magic touch upon her eyelids. And she opened her
eyes and saw that somebody was in the room.

Who was it that stood there with star-bound hair and
soft green gown, with roses about her trailing garments,
and hands outstretched in loving, tender greeting? She
was a woman, but her eyes and lips were the eyes and lips
of Santa Claus; and the little Princess held out her arms :
to her, and whispered, “ You have come back ? ”

“I heard the snowdrops weeping,” said the Spirit, in
grave sweet tones. “I heard the Christmas roses pleading
for dark. and quiet, I listened to the primroses crying
pitifully for the green moss and the-budding elms and the
lark’s spring song. And I came to plead for my little
children,”

“Are you Mother Carey?” asked the Princess,
breathlessly. “Take them ; they are yours.”

She tumbled out of bed just as she had done on
‘Christmas Eve, and took the flowers in her little trembling
hands and laid them upon the Spirit’s breast. And a
long contented sigh echoed through the room, as they
faded away. —



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BROWNIES AND ROSE-LEAVES




BY THE SAME AUTHOR.



PUNCHINELLO’S ROMANCE.

Crown 8v0. 65. ~



PRESS NOTICES.

“The description of Dorothy’s poor deformed guardian Humpty
Dumpty, as she calls him, is full of pathos, and Dorothy herself is
very bewitching.” —Guardian.

‘*We give Roma White the warmest of welcomes into the world
of fiction—admirably and irresistibly comic without anything in
the nature of farce, or even of apparent exaggeration, ready at the
least expected moments to run into equally true pathos.”—Graphic.

“‘The book is one that every one should put on his drawing-room
table and into his village library. Its tone is that of the music of
the spheres, and no one can fail to be refreshed with its pure
melodies.”"—Church Times.

“Ts worked out with many delicate touches of real life and real
pathos. Miss Roma White ought to be welcomed into the ranks of
the novelists.”—Queen.

‘A tale full of delightful fancies and high thoughts.”—Sa/a’s
Journal.

Lonpon: A. D. INNES & CO.,
31 & 32, BEpForD STREET, W.C.




GAT. ENE

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MRS, TOM TIT’s ‘AT HOME,”


BROWNIES AND
ROSE-LEAVES

By

Roma White

(Blanche Oram)

With numerous tllustrations by

L. Leslie Brooke

London

A. D. Innes & Co.
31 & 32 Bedford Street
1892
cy

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.
Contents

PAGE
THE SONG OF THE RIVER-BROWNIES . . . 7

THE STORY OF THE WHITE VIOLETS . . 7 . . 13
THE SONG THE VIOLETS SING TO THE BEES . . . 27
THE FAIRY AND THE BUBBLE . . . : 7 » 29
THE SONG OF THE MARCH WIND : . . : . 40
THE STORY OF THE JAPANESE FANS . : . . » 43
THE COMING OF SPRING . . . . : : » 59
THE STORY OF THE BLUEBELLS . . : : : . 65
MAyY-SONG . . : . . . : . . 8
THE STORY OF THE SILVER BOWL. . nn . 83
A CHARM OF ROSES -. . . . . . . - 100
THE STORY OF THE PRINCESS’S CROWN. . . - O04
THE SONG OF THE BUTTERFLIES . : . . . rg
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “AT HOME” . : . . 7 . 21
A SONG OF THE AUTUMN Moors . . . . - 137
THE STORY OF ISOBEL . . . . . . . I4I
A CHARM OF BEECH TREES 7 . . . . a «197
THE STORY OF THE GORSE. . 7 . : . - I81

THE ECHO NYMPH . 7 7 ‘ . . . - 197

EPILOGUE . . 7 = 7 : : . + 200
Brownies and Rose-Leaves

HE Brownies come to you from Brownie-land, and
TT the Rose-leaves are taken straight out of Mother
Carey’s pot-pourri jar.

Mother Carey’s pot-pourri jar—what is that ? Well, it
is a very wonderful, very beautiful jar indeed. Mother
Carey tucks away all her sweetest rose-thoughts into it.
Don’t you know what rose-thoughts are, either? Why,
they are sweeter even than rose-leaves, and they bloom
when the roses themselves are asleep under the snow.
I’m not going to tell you who Mother Carey is, for dear
Charles Kingsley told you that long ago. But I am
just going to gather a handful of leaves out of the jar
and make them into a modest little book. And the first

leaf is called—
The Song of the River-

Brownies

â„¢ OME where, drooping to the stream,
C Tender, dew-bathed blossoms grow,
Where the ripples glint and gleam,
Where the golden king-cups blow !
Where in lily-cups we hide,
Rocking idly on the tide.
Ripple along,
Midsummer song,
Born of the rivulet’s fleetness !
Float to the sea,
Blithesome and free,

Full of a whimsical sweetness !






ce Ss :
Sy
ane

Wy
Apes
- A.






lite

‘Come where we, with dainty brush,

Paint the insects’ gauzy wing,
And, amid the summer hush,

Teach the ripples how to sing ;
Where with scent we load the breeze

Whisp’ring through the willow-trees.

Here the gentle wood-deer browse ;
Here, when autumn frosts shall creep
All along the leafless boughs,
We shall put the world to sleep.
I2

Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Day by day, here have their birth
All the lovely things of earth.

Ceaseless anthem of the foam,
Whisper us who gave thee voice.

Didst thou, in thy mountain-home,
Learn already to rejoice,

In such fashion dainty-sweet,

With such harmony complete ?

Sweeter than a church’s bell
Sounds thy carol evermore!
Breaking from the ripple swell
In clear cadence on the shore !
Quaint half-elfin music, wed
To thy mossy pebble-bed.
Ripple along,
Midsummer song,
Born of the rivulet’s fleetness !
Float to the sea,
Blithesome and free,

Full of a whimsical sweetness.
The Story of the White
~ Violets |

“THAT? No fairies nowadays, do you say,
V \/ children? Dear me, what shocking
. ignorance! Who in the world do you
think looks after the ferns and flowers inGod’s big
garden? Who teaches the thrushes the new tunes, and
attends to the winter wardrobe of the robin-redbreasts ?
Who watches over the hedge-sparrow’s eggs, and takes
care of the nestlings when Mrs. Dickey hops off to get
her afternoon tea? Mr. Dickey brings her.dinner to- her,
you know, but he doesn’t approve of afternoon tea’ for
ladies, so she always ‘has to get that for herself. Why,
the world would go all wrong were it not for the fairies !
In fact, I do believe that even the sun would forget
to get up r
14 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And talking of getting up reminds me of the story of
the White Violets. Would you like to hear it? The
elves told it to me themselves one drowsy summer after-
noon, so it must be true. And, if you are really going to
believe it, I will tell it to you. But if you think it is all
nonsense, why then you can go back to your English
grammar and your sums, and believe them, because they
can all be proved, and the story of the White Violets
can’t.

Once upon a time there were no white violets in
the world. They were all blue: some pale blue, almost
like a little bit of the sky when it is touched with purple
by the sunset; some a faint sweet lavender; and some
deep and rich, like the inside of a- storm-cloud - And
they peeped out from their green leaves, and -smelled
as sweet as possible. And they lived underneath the
hedges, and warmed themselves in the sun, and drank
the clear cold dew, and were as happy and good as
they could be.

The elves took care of them, just-as ‘they took care
of all the flowers. They put them to bed every night,
and woke them up and. dressed them every morning.
And they filled their little cups with honey, smelling
so sweet and fresh that the great brown bees came
The Story of the White Violets 15

. buzzing over the hedge to find it, and carried it away
to make stiff and sweet and golden for the little children.
who danced to school down the green lane. And the
violets did not care, not a bit! For, strangely enough,
the more honey they gave away the sweeter and bigger
and bluer they grew, until the very robins and blackbirds
composed sonnets about them. In fact, there was a
rumour that one very spruce young robin had actually
proposed to the biggest and bluest among them, but
the elves had thought the match unsuitable, so they had
broken off the engagement.

Well, it was a great pity that the violets were not
always good, for then they would always have been happy.
But, as it was, they were sadly naughty one day, and had
to pay very, very dearly for it. It was-all the fault of
Mrs, Caterpillar’s party—at least, so they said after-
wards; but the elves shook their heads and didn’t seem
to think so. The elves said that if the violets had been
obedient, no harm would have come of the party
at all.

The truth was, Mrs, Caterpillar had issued cards of
invitation to all the neighbouring grubs and beetles. She
was having an “at home” in the beech tree that grew
just over the violets’ heads. And she had made the dew
16 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

negus just a little too strong for the young cockchafers,
and one or two of them fell right into the middle of the
violets. The elves came at’ once, and picked them up
and carried them home to their mothers; but the violets,
although they had been put to bed long ago, were wide
awake with the excitement, and refused to go to sleep
again. In vain. did the elves come and sing them
lullabies, and shade their eyes from the moonlight with
curtains of grass and leaves. The violets interrupted
the lullabies with giggles, and pushed aside the curtains
to peep at the gay scene above their heads. For was
not a fat caterpillar waltzing solemnly with a brown
earwig, and a white maggot, rather overcome by the negus,
making love to a dainty young green fly? Altogether,
it was too exciting, and the violets refused to go to sleep
at all. And at last the elves were obliged to leave them,
for they heard the stream quarrelling with a big grey
stone that had sat down right in the middle of it, and
they were sadly needed to make peace.

So the naughty little violets peeped and giggled until
the party was over, and the caterpillars and the maggots
and the earwigs had waddled home arm-in-arm, discussing
the supper and the dresses. And by that time the violets
were so tired and sleepy that they could hardly wish one
The Story of the White Violets 17

another good-night, but tucked their heads under their
green blankets, and went off into a sound slumber.

Well, at sunrise the elves came to wake them. The
roses were'up and dressed long ago, and the daisies were
blinking their golden eyes at the sun. But the violets
were very sleepy. They opened one eye each, and
murmured, “ All right,” and then went to sleep again..
For, you see, they had been awake so very late the night
before. And in vain the elves shook them, and called to
them, and told them that very soon all the dew would
have gone away into the clouds, and there would be
nothing left in which to give them their baths. They only
said that they “didn’t want baths, they were quite clean,”
and went to sleep again. One of the elves even went to
the stream, and brought back a leaf full of cold water,
and dashed it over their faces. But they only peeped at
him from under the blankets, and nodded their heads,
and were back in dreamland before you could say
“Jack Robinson.”

_ Now, all this was very perplexing to the dear little
brownies. They were not used to sleepy flowers. -As a
rule, the sweet hedge blossoms opened their dewy eyes
the moment that they were told to do so, and stretched
out their petals to the morning breeze. The elves, there-

Cc
18 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

fore, were very much puzzled indeed, and had to hold
a council about it, sitting down under the mushrooms.

Some thought that the violets must need a little
medicine, and suggested a wild-rose draught or a ragged-
robin pill. One or two were afraid that the nightshade
had come into flower much too early in the year, and had
made its home over the violets’ heads. And when this
was suggested, there was quite a stampede to the hedge-
row to see if such a terrible thing could really have
happened. But no, there was nothing growing in the
hedge except the pearly white May, and no deadly
nightshade was drooping its purple flowers over the path.
But the violets were sleeping still.

And then the elves, standing sorrowfully by en
came to a very sad conclusion. They began to believe
that it was only naughtiness and laziness on the part of
the violets after all. No flowers had any business to
sleep after the sun rose, any more than they had any:
business to lie awake after he had gone to bed. And
the elves reluctantly confessed that the violets were
“naughty.”

Then, when they had confessed that to one another,
they were in a worse dilemma than ever. What was to
be done? They had never had anything to do with
The Story of the White Violets 19

naughty flowers before. They had nursed sick flowers,
and they had lovingly tended the poor little withered
ones thrown carelessly down on to the path, and they
had laid the dead ones tenderly away in the earth without
sorrow, for would they not bloom again? But naughty
flowers were things that they had never had anything to
do with. And they talked about it very anxiously and
solemnly indeed.

“What is to be done?” said one, perching himself
astride a grass-stalk. “This is very shocking.”

“There must be a cure for it somewhere,” said another,
puckering up all his face in thought.

“Vou, Briarlet,” cried a third, “ you, who go near men’s
houses, cannot you suggest something? What would
they do in such a case?”

Briarlet wrinkled his forehead and pondered. Presently |
a light came into his eyes, and he looked up.

“T remember,” he said, “a case a few mornings since.
I was peeping in at the window of a little child’s room.
I had just been driving the ‘green flies away from the
roses, and it was hot, and I was resting for a time. While
I ‘sat there, watching the face of the child, the nurse
came in. to take.it-out of bed, but——” And Briarlet’s

sweet little voice grew mournful.
20 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Yes, but?” cried all the brownies in chorus.

“ But,” said Briarlet, quite distressed, “it refused. It—
it screamed. It—even—even—kicked /”

Briarlet quite blushed as he told the story, and
looked so miserable that the elves could not press him
to go on, but sat in a silent ring around him. Presently,
however, one bolder than the rest took courage.

“Yes,” he whispered, “and how did they cure it?”
For the elves could not get rid of the idea that being
naughty was something like being ill. ,

Briarlet’s face brightened.

“They did cure it,” he said softly, “but only by
making the child stay in bed—all day.”

“And that is the very thing!” again cried all the
elves in chorus. “That is how we must cure the violets.
They too shall stay in bed all day !”

The little brownies were quite pleased and happy
again. Here was a cure—a way out of all their per-
plexities. Suddenly, however, their faces fell.

“ How,” they asked solemnly, each of his neighbour—
“ how are we to prevent the violets from getting up?”

Here was a new difficulty, and again they turned to
Briarlet to help them. Once more he wrinkled his brows
and thought.
The Story of the White Violets 21

“TI know!” he exclaimed at last. “They took away
the child’s clothes !”

“Of course! What an excellent plan!” came the
delighted chorus of voices. And then all the elves shook
hands with each other, and congratulated one another
solemnly on Briarlet’s wonderful acuteness.

Then they went, in a body, back to the violets, for all
the world like a troop of town councillors. And the
violets were sleeping still. And in a stately and dignified
fashion, as if they were performing some important
ceremony, did those little brownies carry away the
violets’ purple frocks, and deposit them in a wardrobe
in Fairy-land.

Well, by-and-by, when the sun was high up in the
blue dome above them, the violets woke up. They had
“slept themselves out,’ as the old nurses say, and they
were quite tired of bed and dreamland, and wanted to
get up and flirt with the thrushes. So they began
clamouring for the elves to come and dress them, and
make them tidy for the day.

But the elves all stood in a row and shook their
heads, and looked very important indeed. And one
of them, who was spokesman, made the violets. a little
speech,
22 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

_ “We are afraid,” he said solemnly, “that you have
been naughty, and so we are obliged to punish you.
We have resolved that you shall stay in bed all day.
So we have taken away your clothes.” :

“But,” objected the violets, “we shall catch cold.”

The brownie shook his head, and one little violet
began to cry. .

“T want to get up, ’ she sobbed, “ an I—I—don't a
_ sitting in my night-gown.”

“We are very sorry,” said the brownie; and indeed
he did look troubled and tearful. “But we think that
it is for your good.” .

And then, because they were very tender-hearted,
and could not bear to see any one in trouble, the
brownies all went sorrowfully away, telling one another
that it was for the violets’ good, and persuading one
another not to go right off to Fairy-land and fetch the
little purple frocks away from the Queen’s wardrobe.

And so all the violets sat in their little white night-
gowns under the hedge. They felt, oh, so ashamed of
themselves! The robins gazed at them in such amaze-
ment, and the bull-finches positively blushed pink up to
the ears. Even the May-blossoms took a rosy tinge, and

one little briar-bud, peeping out upon his beautiful new
The Story of the White Violets 23

world, went quite red with the shock to his feelings. But
the violets themselves were beyond blushing, and only
drooped their heads lower and lower, and wished that the
earth would open and swallow them up.

And so they drooped and wept all day, and when
evening came, and the brownies hastened to them, the
tender-hearted little elves could do nothing but kiss the
sweet white, nodding heads, and promised them that they
should have their frocks again in the morning. And the
violets went to sleep, comforted and forgiven.

But when morning came, and the brownies hurried off

in the early dawn to Fairy-land, some terrible news awaited
them. You know the violets’ purple frocks had been put
into the Queen’s wardrobe. Well, the court tailor had
found them there, and, thinking that they were some
wonderful new fairy stuff, he had carefully picked them
to pieces and made a lovely robe for his royal mistress,
And she was so pleased with it that she had sent out
invitations at once for a grand dinner-party, and all the
household was busy preparing for it.

Now, was not that a terrible thing to happen? You
may imagine what a state of consternation the brownies
were in, They tried to get audience of the Queen, but

she was interviewing the court cook, and could not. see
24. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

them for ever such atime. And when at last they were
admitted to her presence they could hardly tell their tale,
she looked so radiant and beautiful in her purple gown.

However, they told her the story, and she seemed very
sad and disappointed. -

“My poor gown!” she said pitifully. “And I have
told all my friends about it! Still, if the violets are very
She paused and looked thoughtfully at

»



unhappy
the elves. “Could you not get them some others?” she
asked. ;

They shook their heads. “We can’t make them,” they
said. “Only the angels can do that.”

The Queen looked very thoughtful and uncertain what
to do, Then suddenly she cried, “ Take me to the violets
themselves. I am sure théy will give me the gowns.”

So the brownies took her, themselves drawing her wee
golden coach, far away from Fairy-land, down to the green
lane where the violets waited under the hedge. And when
she saw them she sprang out of the coach, and exclaimed
in wonder—

“Was that their punishment?” she cried—“that, to
become more beautiful than their fellows! Why, look at
them!”

And the brownies looked, and saw that what she had
The Story of the White Violets 25

said was true. The violets in their sweet white gowns

were fair with a new humility, and drooped their tender

heads like children who had sinned and been forgiven,



“ We see,” said the brownies, softly. ‘“ You shall have
their gowns.”

And the violets, peeping up, and seeing the Queen in
her wonderful purple, bowed their heads and whispered,

“ You shall have our gowns,”
26 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Hush!” whispered the Queen to the brownies. “Do
not tell them how beautiful they are.” And then, turning
to the violets, she said, “ Children, answer me; which shall
it be? Will you have back your purple, or will you
always wear your white, in memory of your fault and its
forgiveness ?”

And the violets whispered, “ We will wear our white,”
and bowed their heads even lower than before.

“It is well,” said the Queen, softly. “For out of your
own fall have you lifted your own purity.”

And then she went away again to Fairy-land, but the
violets sat in their little white night-gowns for ever.
The Song the Violets sing
to the Bees

ERE are cups all sweet with honey
H For the brown and golden bees,
Humming through the meadow sunny !
Here is treasure for your money
Underneath the hawthorn trees.
Here is nectar clear and fragrant—
Drink your fill, brown-coated vagrant,
Sail away upon the breeze!

“Honey ! Honey!” we are singing.
Hear the invitation ringing

From the violets to the bees.

On each bee there rides a brownie:
Snug his coach, and warm, and downy,

Set about with windows twain—
28 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Windows crystal, windows painted
With the tints from picture sainted
That about a church have lain.

’ Hearken! for the bees are humming,
“Coming! coming! We are coming,
Underneath the hawthorn-trees !”
And the violets, without measure,
Offer all their dewy treasure
To the brown and golden bees.
The Fairy and the Bubble

, N old professor once sat upon the rocks by the
A sea-shore. The rocks were very beautiful, and
were covered with brown seaweed, and grey
limpets, and anemones dressed in purple and green and
red. But the professor was not thinking about the
anemones just then. For what do you think he was doing ?
He was blowing soap-bubbles as hard as ever he could.
What a very foolish thing for an old professor to do,
do you say? Well, I am not so sure about that. I
believe you have all done things that were infinitely more
foolish, only you have done them quietly, when nobody
was looking, instead of openly upon the sea-shore. And
nobody took much notice of the old professor, after all.
So he went on blowing his soap-bubbles as quietly and
as busily as possible.

His little grandson sat by him, watching the beautiful
30 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

transparent balls float away over the sea. And presently
he lifted his face and asked a question.

“ Gran’pa, why do you do that?”

The professor paused for a moment. It was rather
a good thing that he did so, for he had been blowing and
gurgling down his long clay pipe until he was quite black
in the face. And he puffed some little flecks of soap all
over his frock-coat as he replied—

“Why do I do it, little one? Because I want to make
beautiful things. And I have tried all my life—all my life
—and have never yet made anything that was half so
beautiful as these.” .

And then he dipped his pipe into the suds, and

breathed down it, and another opal ball floated into the
air, |

“Do you make them for the fairies?” asked the child,
gravely.

“ For the fairies—for men—and for Mother Carey,” said
the professor. And his voice was reverent and low as he
mentioned Mother Carey’s name.

The child sat silent for a moment, and then spoke
again.

« Does everybody make beautiful things, gran’pa?”

“No,” said the professor, rather sadly, “some people
The Fairy and the Bubble 31

make very ugly things indeed, and the world is sad
because of them, and the only people who get any benefit
are the people who write in the newspapers. The whole
world had much better come and blow soap-bubbles on
the sea-shore with me.”

“TI will blow soap-bubbles some day,” said the child,
softly. ‘“Gran’pa, shall we sail away in one of them,
now ?”

“ Sail away, little one! How shall we manage that?”

“T know how,” the child told him confidently. “See!

there are two big ones floating away now from the pipe.
You can easily climb inside one of them, gran’pa, if you
try.”
Now, the professor was a very sensible man, and he
understood that children know a great deal more about
some things than any grown-up people do. So he just —
looked at the child, and then at the soap-bubble, and then
he said gently—

”



“T am trying—I am try

But he couldn't finish his sentence. He could only
gasp with amazement. For—what do you think?—he
found himself sitting inside one of the beautiful big
bubbles, and the child was nodding asia: to him from
the inside of the other ball.
32 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Bless my soul!” said the professor. He did not
mean to say anything irreverent, but, you see, it was the
only expression that he could think of in his astonishment.

“T told you you could doit if you tried,” called out
the child. “And, gran’pa, I have found out something
else. If you blow very gently with your mouth, the
bubble will go the way that you are blowing. Look
at me.”

‘The child made a round O of his rosy lips, and
breathed: upon the side of his bubble. And it floated
away more lightly and easily than a boat skims over
the waves. The professor tried to imitate him, but at
first he blew too hard, and then too gently, and then
too high, and then too low, and the bubble bobbed up
and down as if it were in a hurricane; and the poor
professor was very nearly sea-sick.

He learnt to manage it better by-and-by; and
presently he discovered that he could steer quite cleverly.
And when he had practised a little, and had got over
his feeling of amazement, he began to enjoy the gliding
easy motion, and to admire the beautiful crystal ball
in which he sat. . . ,

The child was lying upon the transparent floor of
his prison, his head pillowed upon one arm, and his blue
The Fairy and the Bubble 33

eyes looking up to the sky. “Rock-a-by, rock-a-by,
baby,” he sang. “ Gran’pa, shall we sail away to
Heaven ?”

“Can we?” said the professor. He. believed that
the child would know.

“No,” said the child softly, after a little silence, “we
can’t, although I don’t know why. We can only sail
to Fairy-land. Let us start now.”

So he blew upon the side of the bubble; and the
professor, very gently, did the same. And they floated
away over the blue looking-glass of the sea.

A water-fairy sat below the waves, twining green
seaweed in her hair. She was very beautiful, and her
hands and arms gleamed white through the ripples. The
professor looked down upon her, but he could not see
her. Only the child could see, and he stretched himself
upon the floor of his bubble, and smiled.

The fairy looked up, and caught sight of the
professor's bubble hanging, like a ball spun from the
foam of the sea, above her head. At first she thought
that a little bit of the rainbow had fallen from the sky.
And then she thought that one of the ripples had been
playing leap-frog, and had stuck in mid-air. And then
she thought that some foreign fairy had come to visit

Dp
34. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

her, and she fell headlong in love with the beautifu
gleaming ball, and stretched out her hands and arms to
draw it closer to her.

Did you ever hear of anybody falling in love with
a soap-bubble before? No, I suppose not, because, you
see, only fairies do such things.

Well, the fairy fell in love with the soap-bubble, but
she could not see the professor, sitting with his knees
drawn up to his chin, inside. And when she found that
she could not reach the beautiful ball from her bedroom
below the waves, she came right out of the water alto-
gether, and stood on tiptoe on the very crest of a ripple.
And still the professor could not see her, nor could she
-see the professor. But the child saw, well enough.

“Stop! stop!” he cried, pressing his face to his
crystal window ; “ you mustn’t pull it down. My gran’pa
is sitting inside, and he will get drowned.”

The fairy looked up, and saw that another of the
gleaming balls was swaying in the breeze above her
head. And when her eyes fell upon the child she
laughed.

“T have seen you before,” she said. “I have seen
your eyes in the face of the dawn, and have felt your
little hands in the splash of the foam. I have heard











































The Fairy and the Bubble 37

your voice when the breeze has sung like a harp, and
I have watched your figure flee across the waters before
the storm. We are old friends, you and I. But I do
not want you—I want this beautiful gleaming ball for
my own. It shall be my spirit-love, and I will sing
to it, and rock it in the cradle of the waves.”

But the child’s tears fell warm upon his crystal
throne.

“My gran’pa is inside,” he said, “and he has fallen
asleep.”

For the professor lay snugly at the bottom of the
bubble, rocked by the motion into'a gentle doze.

“There is nobody inside,” said the fairy, wonderingly
—“nobody that I can see. Look! the gleaming ball is
floating down, down, to my heart. I will draw it to
my home below the sea.’

But the child clasped his little hands epee in
pleading.

“Leave my gran’pa,” he said softly. “You cannot
see him, but he lies in the crystal ball asleep. My
voice cannot reach him to wake him. Leave him to
sleep, because he makes beautiful things—always. I
will come to you, and give you my crystal ball for

your own,”
38 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And the child breathed upon the floor of the bubble,
and it floated down to the crest of the waves, and poised
lightly upon their foam.

“See,” he said gently, “ your spirit-love is here.”

And the fairy laughed for joy, and drew the crystal
ball towards her; and, as her fingers touched it, it
vanished away, and the child fell down—down—down—
through the green depths of the waters, till he lay silent
and still upon the coral-beds below. And the fairy sat
and wept for sorrow, because she had broken the crystal
ball.

And the professor floated away on the breeze to
the shore ; so that she could not catch the other bubble,
and carry it to her home under the waves.

But, as she sat and wept, the face of the child peeped
at her from a little cloud that sailed over the sea. And
she checked her tears, and looked up at him. “You?”
she said; “I thought you were asleep on the coral-beds?
Do you know I have broken the crystal ball ?”

“Yes,” said the child, softly ; “I know.”

And then he smiled at her, and went away up into
the blue. ae

And the professor's bubble caught on a sharp rock,

and burst, and left him lying asleep among the seaweed.
The Fairy and the Bubble 39

And when he awoke, they came to him, and told him
that the child was drowned.
But the professor knew better than that. And he.
looked at the basin of bubbles and the long clay pipe.
“He said we could not sail away to Heaven,” he
whispered softly; “but, for the first time in his little
life, he made a mistake.”


The Song of the March
Wind

VER the hill, over the hill, over the hill the
breeze is blowing,

Fresh from the high green mountain-top,
Defying the trees his journey to stop!
The pointing branches he’ll toss and tear,
And scatter the new-blown leaves in the air !
Away, then, away !
Away, then, away !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going?

The grass bends low
As the breezes blow,

As if in homage to Spring ;
The Song of the March Wind 41

» And kissing the ground
Will the blades be found,
Till the frolicsome wind
Has changed his mind,
And, rushing back
On his former track,
All the blades will backwards fling !
And they scarce can say,
On a stormy day,
What is their sweet green fashion of growing !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going ?

He catches the foam
From the streamlet’s home,
And tosses it here and there.
Pitter patter !
What does it matter ?
The bright drops shatter,
Their fragments scatter
Like diamonds all through the air.
Then back to the stream they whisk away,
Now creamy and white on its bosom showing !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,
Where can the wild March wind be going?
42 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And the birds peep round with inquiring eyes,
And cock their heads in a quaint surprise,
For their feathers are ruffled to twice their size,
As, rushing past them, the mad wind flies,
Till they wonder what he is doing.
And the clouds sweep over the pale blue skies,
For the Spring is going a-wooing,
And is courting the Earth with a merry rush ;
So safe in his suit that he cares not to hush
His rare fresh bluster and blowing!
And his kisses are hearty and wholesome and sweet,
And the violets blossom beneath his feet,
And he blows all the mists of winter away !
Rollicksome, frolicsome, careless, and gay,

Where can the wild March wind be going ?
ee

|
|







The Story of the Japanese
Fans

HREE Japanese fans hung upon a drawing-room
wall, their handles tied together with a big

yellow bow. They were very beautiful fans,
and everybody who came to the house admired them
very much, They had -painted ladies upon them, and
gentlemen dressed in scarlet and gold, with pigtails as
long as a railroad. And what did it matter that they
were all sitting on the top of each others’ heads? They
smiled all day long, so perhaps they liked it.

There was a great jar of pot-pourri below them, that
44 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

scented the whole room. And there were screens of
peacocks’ feathers, and Eastern draperies in silver
embroidery. But there was nothing quite so beautiful
as the Japanese fans.

Little Lucy thought so too, as she stood underneath -
them every day, and she wished that she could go to
the country whence the beautiful ladies and gentlemen
came. They would willingly have taken her, for they
were, oh! so tired of sitting on the top of one another
upon the drawing-room wall. And somehow the brownies
got to hear of their wish, and came one evening to see
if they could do anything for the patient ladies and
- gentlemen with the gay clothes and the pigtails.

Well, the ladies and gentlemen told the brownies how
tired they were of looking at the peacocks’ feathers, and
smelling the everlasting pot-pourri. And they said, too,
how much they should like to take little Lucy to their
own country, and show her its wonders and delights.
And the brownies were so tender-hearted and sympathetic
that they went straight to the King and Queen of
Japanese-Fan-Land, and begged them to release their
faithful subjects for one night. And the King and Queen
consented, to the brownies’ great delight.

Little Lucy was in dreamland that night, when she
The Story of the Japanese Fans 45

was wakened by. a gentle touch upon her cheek. And,
rubbing her eyes and looking up in wonder, she saw a
dark-haired lady, with almond-shaped eyes, bending over
her. And another dark-haired lady was sitting upon the
counterpane, fanning herself languidly, and a third and
fourth were exploring the wonders of the toilet-table,
puffing their faces with baby’s powder, and rubbing lip-
salve on their cheeks for rouge. While a whole row of
tiny gentlemen nodded at the sleepy child from the
bottom of the bed, doing it so vigorously that their
pigtails flew up and down in wild confusion.

“Come with us, Lucy,” they cried in a soft chorus ;
“we are going to Japanese-Fan-Land,. and the brownies
say that we may take you too.”

How pleased Lucy was, to be sure! She sprang out
of bed, and began asking excitedly for her clothes. But

. the ladies had thought of that beforehand, and, before

she could say a word, they put her into a long silver
skirt that wobbled against her toes as she walked ;
crammed her soft little body into a queer round-shaped
garment all covered over with a wonderful crimson
pattern ; popped curly shoes upon her feet, and tiny round
fans into her hair, and floated away with her down the
staircase, into the dark stillness of the hall.
46 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“ How shall we go?” asked Lucy, wonderingly. But
the little ladies and gentlemen all said “Hush!” together,
and then, where do you think they took her to?

Why, straight into the jar of pot-pourri, They
seemed to float, rather than to climb, up its shining sides,
and to sink lightly down on to the soft brown rose-
leaves as if they had been so many balls of thistle-
down.

And then a very strange and wonderful thing hap-
pened. The pot-pourri jar just got up from where it
had been sitting in its corner, and walked quietly away,
through the drawing-room door, across the hall, and out
into the dewy moonlight of the summer night, and then
set off at a comfortable jog-trot down the garden, swaying
with a soft motion, the little ladies and gentlemen lying
among their cushiony leaves.

Lucy was quite excited by this time, and would
very much have liked to peep out of the jar, and see
where in the world they were going to. She could see
nothing through the top of the jar but a bit of the
moon, and three stars. The little ladies and gentlemen
were not so curious. The jar knew the way, they said.
For their own part, they were uncertain as to the exact

route—it was so long since they had seen the Company’s



The Story of the Japanese Fans 49 |

time-tables, But Lucy need not be anxious ; the brownies
would see that they arrived safely at their destination.

And, with this, Lucy had to be content. They
seemed to come to some rising ground presently, for
the jar puffed and panted a little heavily, although it
stumped along as gallantly as ever. And then, all of
a sudden, it gave a little hop into the air and stood quite-
still.

“We must get out here,” said the little ladies and

gentlemen in a chorus. And, as before, they floated
upwards, through the mouth of the jar, and sank gently
downwards until they stood with their feet upon the
ground. .
’ Where were they? Why, standing upon the borders
of a moonlit lake. The trees drooped dark and heavy
about it, and the shadows blackened the ground where
they stood. But right in the centre of the brightest
spot of moonlight floated a little boat, shaped like a
white swan, and rowed by twelve men who wore long
pigtails, fierce moustaches, and large shady hats.

They beckoned the little ladies and gentlemen to
them ; and so Lucy and her quaint wee friends sprang
into the boat, and were rowed away into the shining.
silver of the lake. Whilst the jar.just waited to see that

E
50 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

they were safe, and then turned round, and trotted
contentedly home again.

Lucy had no time, at first, to notice which way they
were going; she was so busy admiring the boatmen’s
short jackets, and pale green baggy trousers.. But
presently the little ladies and gentlemen all broke out
into a cry of delight, and, looking up, Lucy saw an
island stretching away before them, and knew that it
must be Japanese-Fan-Land. What a funny shape it
was, to be sure! One little neck of land stuck straight
out towards them, and the mainland swept away from
it in an immense circle. And in the distance, the whole
island looked like a wonderful mosaic of colouring. ,

They drew nearer and nearer, however, and presently
came to a little landing-place; and then the boatmen
helped them to alight, and, touching the ground with
their heads three times, by which they meant to say
“ good-bye,” sprang back into the little boat, and rowed
away. ; ,

A great many of the inhabitants of the island were
gathered together to welcome the little ladies and gentle-
men, for the brownies had sent word they were coming.
And so much saluting went on, so much touching of the

ground with be-pigtailed heads, that Lucy felt quite
The Story of the Japanese Fans 51

giddy. Indeed, by the time they had finished, several
of the gentlemen had quite lost their balance, and had
turned head-over-heels into the lake.

They were fished out, however, and did not seem
to mind. And, while they went home to change their
clothes, the rest of the party walked on into the interior,
chattering so constantly and so fast that Lucy was
thoroughly bewildered. She was quite sure, too, that
they were glancing at her feet, which really seemed
enormous in comparison with their own. And, although
they were too polite to say anything, she felt certain
that they must be shocked at the vulgar proportions of
her shoes. ;

However, they were very kind to her, in spite of her
ignorant disregard of Japanese-Fan etiquette, and very
soon she forgot all about her feet, in the wonders of
the island. For there were in it, oh! such marvellous
things. First of all, they came to a quaint little house,
built in a circle, and with a golden ball whirling round
on the top. But the funniest thing about it was, that
it was built upon nothing at all. It just balanced itself
up in the air as comfortably as possible, and looked
down upon the world as much as to say, “I am-no

common house; I am an aeronaut. I hang without effort
52 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

between the earth and sky. You may come. and look
at my inside, if you like. You will find me comfortably
furnished, and of superior attractions.”

Well, while Lucy gazed at the conceited little house
in astonishment, the host came out of it. He had two
pigtails which reached down to his heels, and a long
blue coat trimmed with teapots. And he bent himself
double to do honour to the little ladies and gentlemen,
and invited them graciously to come and dine with him,

Well, after a little consultation, they accepted the
invitation. But while they were making up their minds,
Lucy had time to notice what she had not observed
before. And that was that a little stream, coming
apparently from nowhere, flowed uninterruptedly down ©
one of the chimneys, and issued from the back door of
the little house, as unconcernedly as if nothing had. been
in its way. The host saw her looking at it, and nodded
his head with much self-satisfaction.

“Ah!” he said, “ that’s a fine thing, now, isn’t it?”

“What is it for?” asked Lucy, wonderingly.

“Well, it isn’t for anything, exactly,” he told her. ~
“Tt just happened to be there. But you've no idea how
convenient we find it. It saves the water-works a

tremendous lot of expense. You see, the Town Council
The Story of the Japanese Fans 53

had no need to bother after taps and drainage and a
‘comfortable water-supply. We've a good many of them
in Japanese-Fan-Land,” he added, looking at the blue
stream.

Lucy was much impressed, and still more so when
he unrolled a flight of steps, as easily as she could have
unrolled a reel of silk, and hung them out over the
balcony. And all the little ladies and gentlemen tripped
daintily up them, and went inside the quaint, hanging
house.

The host said dinner was ready, and himself led
the way into the dining-room. Such a pretty room,
all over fans and funny red feathers and silver stars.
And little tables were dotted about it with only two legs
apiece, and those both on the same side, so that the
tops balanced themselves aloft in the curious fashion
peculiar to Japanese-Fan-Land. The only wonder was
that the tea-trays did not fall off on to the floor; but,
somehow, they didn’t. Lucy, who was a wise little
morsel of humanity, came to the conclusion that Japanese-
Fan-Land must have laws of gravitation of its own.

The host had invited them to dinner, but there was
nothing to eat or drink except tea. ‘In Japanese-Fan-
Land they never do drink anything except tea. It was
ca Brownies and Rose-Leaves

very sweet and hot, however, and Lucy enjoyed it very
much. As for the little ladies and gentlemen, they
drank cup after cup, until Lucy grew quite anxious, about
their powers of digestion.

Well, when dinner was over, they all of them turned
to her, as their most honoured guest, and asked her what
she would like to do. She didn’t hesitate a moment.
She said that, above all things, she would love to sail
away down the little stream that flowed out of the back
door.

All the little ladies and gentlemen looked very much
pleased indeed. It was just what they had been dying
to do themselves, only they had been too polite to say so.
So the host sent a message by one of his servants, and
very soon a funny little boat was waiting for them outside.
It curled up at both ends, and had a tiny wooden house
in the middle, painted blue and hung all over with silver
bells.

So they said good-bye to their gentle host, and sailed
away in the little boat, down the blue stream. It was the
very bluest stream that Lucy had ever seen, only varied
here and there by a streak of white running down the
middle. And, as they sailed along it, the little silver bells

played the sweetest music in the world.
The Story of the Japanese Fans 55

And oh! what wonderful things they gaw as they sailed
along! The blue stream zig-zagged so delightfully, and
never troubled its head about the way it went; but then,
there are no boards in Japanese-Fan-Land with “ Tres-
passers will be prosecuted.” So now and then the stream
went into a garden where more almond-eyed ladies were
drinking more tea, under funny drooping trees that were
trimmed with blue and scarlet ribbons, and that seemed
to grow upon nothing. And occasionally it flowed right
over the ladies’ heads, but they just looked up and nodded
to it, and waved their handkerchiefs when they caught
sight of the little blue boat.

Sometimes, by way of a change, the little stream would
flow in a lovely water-fall down a gentleman’s pigtail, or
would climb up to the top of a tree and startle the storks,
or would pay a short visit to the sky, and come down
again as if nothing had happened ; while running through
a gentleman’s private mansion was quite a common
occurrence, and did not alarm anybody in the very
least.

Then, too, they saw such marvellous sights upon the
journey. Storks balancing themselves on trees a great
deal smaller than themselves ; silver and gold stars grow-

ing like flowers among the grass ; roses twice as large as
56 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Lucy’s head tied together with magenta streamets ;
wonderful birds with long red tails catching bright blue
fish in their enormous beaks; and a thousand and one
other things, each more startling than the last.

Presently they came to another hanging house, and
this was the scene of a great commotion. A pair of
lovers had just eloped from it, and were running away as
hard as ever they could, their hands outstretched and
their pigtails flying. There was a temple exactly in front
of them, but that didn’t seem to trouble them in the least.
They were making for the door as straight as possible.
Perhaps they thought they might have time to go in
and get married before they were overtaken by the
angry father. He was pursuing them with a scimitar
in each hand and a teapot upon his head, but he could
not see them just at that moment, for the gardener had
planted a rose-tree right in front of the hall-door, and
the angry father was on one side of it, and the flying
lovers were on the other. Lucy could not help hoping
that the cross old gentlemen would fall head first into
the rose-tree, which he seemed on the point of doing,
and that his poor pretty daughter would escape.

Everybody that they passed, except the eloping couple,

who were too agitated, and the father, who was too angry,
The Story of the Japanese Fans 57

saluted them by kneeling down and bumping the ground
with the tops of their heads. Lucy came to the conclusion
that it must be the constant friction that made them all so
bald except just where their pigtails grew into those great
long thick plaits) And they often stopped, in answer
to a pressing invitation to have a cup of tea from the
funny upright trays.

At last Lucy saw that they were drawing near the
coast. The stream had one last zig-zag before it went
into the lake, and took a farewell ripple over a lady
sitting on a high-backed chair. And then the little boat
slid away from Japanese-Fan-Land, into the moonlit
waters of the lake, and the little ladies and gentlemen
all brought out their flowered pocket-handkerchiefs, and
cried.

But the silver bells played a sweet “ Hush, hush-a-by,”
and presently Lucy and the little ladies and gentlemen
began to nod. For the brownies had hold of the boat,
and were swimming over the lake with it in their arms.
And they laid poppy-leaves over their charges’ eyes, and
held camomile scent-bottles under their noses, until at
last Lucy and all the little ladies and gentlemen lay at
the bottom of the boat, fast asleep.

Lucy never remembered how they got home. The
58 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

brownies might have told her, but they never did. Only
when she awoke, she was lying in her own little bed, and
Nurse was standing over her, and scolding her for having
overslept herself.

Lucy went down into the drawing-room by-and-by
and looked up at the Japanese fans and down at the pot-
pourri jar. The latter looked so very solemn and heavy,
Lucy could hardly believe that it had ever done anything .
so frivolous as trot away with her and the little ladies and
gentlemen to the silver lake. As for the little ladies and
gentlemen themselves, they were, as usual, smiling with
an imbecile expression, and sitting upon one another's
heads. And it’s my belief that they never went to
Japanese-Fan-Land again, but sat upon one another’s

heads for ever.

1
The Coming of Spring

\ A J OOD doves are cooing,
All the world’s wooing,
Bridal-decked meadows lie waiting for
Spring.
“Hush! for he cometh!”
So the bee hummeth,
Poised o’er her hive on a quivering wing.
Down the hill tripping—
Where the stream, slipping
Over the pebbles and under the thorn,
Laughs through her glances—
Down the boy dances,
Down to the world where his daisies are born !

Rosy the mouth where his kisses lie sleeping,

Starry the eyes where his glances coquette !
60 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Ah! would you steal them ?
Will he reveal them,

Toss down his treasures? No fear of it yet!
Dancing with sunbeams one day on the mountain,
Down come his tears, the next day, in a fountain !

Think you're beguiling

The boy into smiling—
Back to their goal flash the stars that were peeping,
Back flies the laugh through his lips that was creeping,
High on the hilltop the Spring sits a-weeping,

Rosy mouth puckered, and sunny eyes wet !
Celandine-pied lies the lap of the meadows,

Waiting to cradle him should he come down,
Down from the mountain-top into the shadows,

Where the green lacework has cobwebbed the brown.

On the hill dancing,
Earthwards he’s glancing ;
Say, what will tempt him away from the height ?
In the stream dipping,
Out of it tripping,
Shaking the drops off, he’s taken to flight !
Up in the skies now,

See where he flies now,

Snatching the sunbeams to weave him a crown!
The Coming of Spring 61

Peeps through his fingers,
Mocks at the singers,

Throbbing their psalm out to welcome him down.
On a cloud lying,
O’er the blue flying,

Pillowed his head on the white of her breast!
Where are they going,
As the breeze, blowing,

Bosoms the cloud on the gold of the west?

Back again, mocking
The violets, befrocking
Nodding green buds with the purple of love—
Purple for passion,
Such is their fashion !
Fain would they woo him, that elf-boy above!
Woo him and wed him where all the Earth, throbbing,
Veils her fair bosom in emerald gown,
Pants out her love-song with breath that, half-sobbing,

Pearls into kisses to kiss the Spring down !

“ Hush! for he cometh !”
So the bee hummeth,
So the thrush pipes through his sweet dropping note.
62 Brownies and Rose Leaves

Soft, the breeze hushes,
Falls to the rushes,
Slides down the river, a whispering boat !
Slides to the shadows—
. But, see, in the meadows,
Over the daisies, milk-pale, steals a blush!
Down the hill creeping,
’Tween his hands peeping,
Down to the Earth comes the Spring through the hush !

One moment after,
Out rings his laughter!
Earth has embosomed him! Caught to her breast,
Cradled in kisses,
There’s where his bliss is !
Moss-bed for bridal-bed, daffodil-drest !
So he surrenders,
Hangs her with splendours,
Weds her, and queens her with may-blossom crown !
All the world singing
Bridal-hymns, ringing
Out the glad story—the Spring has come down!














LLL















Designed and drawn by a S. Schofield.
The Story of the Bluebells

NCE upon a time there was a little brownie who
was very much in love. He was so much in
love that he lost all his appetite, and went

about Brownie-land writing sonnets to the moon. And
the little lady-brownie that he was in love with was
called Mayblossom, and was the sweetest, prettiest
brownie in the world. ,
Unfortunately, however, she was rather a capricious
little lady. And, as half the householders in Elf-land
were in love with her, she felt that she had every right
to pick and choose. So she refused their offers, one after
the other. The first was too stout; she was sure he
could never drive comfortably in the front seat of her
chariot, for it was made, like Queen Mab’s, of the half of
a hazel nut.’ The second was too thin, and it made his
clothes fit badly; he had never yet been able to find a
F
66 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

rose-leaf that would really “sit” properly, and always had
to pad himself out with cobwebs. The third was vulgar ;
he always ate with the wrong end of his grass-stalk, which
in Brownie-land is quite as bad as eating with the handles
of your knife and fork! The fourth had set up house-
keeping in’an empty nest, and Mayblossom did not care
for old-fashioned residences ; they encouraged earwigs!
And so on with the fifth and the sixth and the seventh,
until the whole of Brownie-land was in despair.

But, at last, the wilful little lady made an announce-
ment. She had been sitting one evening on the hillside,
and had heard the far, far distant chimes of bells. They
were the bells of the village church, softened into tender
sweetness before their echo reached her ear. And she
was so charmed with them that she declared whoever
could make a chime of bells that should sound as sweetly
for Elf-land as the church-bells sounded for the big world
should be rewarded by her heart and hand.

Well, no sooner was her announcement made than
oh! such a carpentering and joinering, and smelting and
forging began in Brownie-land. The farmers declared
that the woodpeckers were busier than ever this year,
they heard such a deal of tapping going on in the wood;
Tt wasn’t the woodpeckers at all, really, but the elves,
The Story of the Bluebells 67

who were trying with all their might and main to make
bells. Some went far down into the diamond mines, and
brought up great blazing white jewels, and hollowed them
into beautiful shapes, and hung a ‘tiny gold clapper inside
them. But though they shone amazingly, and looked
very lovely, when the brownies tried to ring them they
only gave a little glassy sort of “tinkle, tinkle,” and
Mayblossom shook her head, and said, “No, those
wouldn’t do at all.”

Well, after that, they climbed up the hazel trees, and
with great difficulty pulled down the tiniest, daintiest nuts,
and scooped away the sweet white kernel. Then they
hung a frozen dew-drop in the opening, and tried to sound
a soft peal. But the chime was wooden and tuneless, and
Mayblossom stopped up her ears when she heard it,
and put her head right under a big red toadstool.

Then they found a whole collection of wee, deserted
snail-shells, and tied caterpillars’ eggs in them for clappers,
and swung them up and down at the end of a spidet’s
thread. But, although the tone was softer than any they
had yet procured, the eggs soon broke, and stuck against
the sides of the shells; and Mayblossom first laughed at
them, and then ran right away into the forest, and declared
that she would have nothing to do with them! They,
68 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

who taught all the music of the woods, not able-to make
a chime of bells! She was ashamed of them, and wouldn’t
marry one of them! ,

‘Well, the brownies were very disconsolate. But the
little elf, who was so very much in love, did not: yet
despair. He determined, instead, that he would not be
beaten, but would make such a chime of bells as neither
Mayblossom, nor the brownies, nor the whole world itself
had ever heard. And then he would marry his little
lady-love, and be happy with her for ever.

But, being a sensible brownie, he was not going to
try any more experiments himself. He had seen that
all Elf-land could not succeed in making a chime of bells,
and he was not going to waste his valuable time over
useless efforts. So he went quietly about his daily work,
which was that of sowing daisy-seeds all up a little lane,
until night came on. And then he put his wee cap firmly
on his head, gathered up his basket and trowel, and went
away down to the big city below the hills.

“ Where was he going to?” do you ask? To the cradle
of a new-born babe, that was all. For there he knew he
should find the sky-fairies, and it was to them that he
meant to make his appeal. He trotted along the deserted
streets till he came to a house with a light in the window.
_ The Story of the Bluebells 69

And then he crept through the keyhole of the front door,
stole up the broad staircase, and passed softly into the
room where the mother and her baby lay.

A light was burning dimly on a table, but the rest of
the room was in shadow. There was a white face on the
pillows of the bed, and a wee pink one on the pillows of
the cradle; and, just as the brownie had foreseen, the
sky-fairies were very busy in the room.

They were all grouped about the little cradle, laying
tender thoughts and tender blessings upon the babe.
The light shone softly on their white wings and pure
foreheads, and the brownie bent his head, and took off
his little cap reverently in their presence. They beckoned
him near to them, and smiled at him, and softly uncovered
the babe, and bade him look at the little sleeping face.
And then they brushed with their wings the forehead of
the mother, and floated. silently away out into the moon-
light, carrying the brownie with them.

As soon as they had passed from the tender stillness
of the room, the brownie made his request. Would the
sky-fairies tell him how to make a chime of bells that
should sound as sweetly in Fairy-land as the church bells
sounded in the big world? The sky-fairies smiled, well-
pleased at the thought, for they loved the brownies, and
70 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

the work they did in the great Palace of Earth. Then,
too, the sky-fairies were always glad to make lovely
things, and they believed that such a chime would be
very lovely indeed. So they left the brownie in. the
topmost twigs of a great oak, and told him to wait for
them upon the moss below, and they would try what they
could do for him.

So the brownie slid down to the ground, and sat
patiently waiting upon the moss; while the fairies flew
up, up, up to Heaven, and took into their hands a great
piece of the sky, purple-blue with the shadows of night.
And then they gathered ever so many of the stars, and
floated back to the brownie down the moonbeams.

“See,” they said, “we have brought you these.”

“But how,” asked the brownie, wonderingly, “am I to
make out of them a chime of bells?”

“We will show you,” said the fairies. And they
moulded the piece of sky that they had brought into
tiny nodding bells, and hung them on green stalks, and
popped wee fragments: of the stars into their hearts.
And then they set them upon the green moss under the
oak-trees, and, smiling at the brownie, floated away. again
up. to the stars, ©

And the brownie sat on in silent delight. He had
The Story of the Bluebells 71

forgotten all about Mayblossom, forgotten about the
chime of bells, forgotten all his own hopes and fears;
and could only sit watching the nodding bluebells, and
rejoicing because the sky-fairies had given to the Earth a
new flower.

But by-and-by there came the amber light of morning,
and with the morning there came a tiny, tender breeze.
It rustled the oak-leaves softly upon the boughs, and
kissed the wood anemones with a gentle kiss. It bent
the heads of the grasses, and just ruffled the bosom of the
stream. And it shook the drooping heads of the blue-
bells, and, to the brownie’s wonder and delight, out to
the whole of Fairy-land there sounded a sweet, faint chime.

Never was there such a chime before. Tender and
low and clear, it seemed an echo of the sky-fairies’ own
song. And Brownie-land had its church-bells at last. .

Little Mayblossom heard it, for she had taken her
head from under the red toadstool. And when she heard
it, she just ran straight to the spot where the brownie sat,
and put her arms round his neck and kissed him. And
then they sat, hand-in-hand, for the whole of the day,
doing nothing but listen to the sweet, wonderful chimes.

Well, they were married, and by-and-by the brownies

got used to the new music, and men and women got
72 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

used to the bluebells. But there was one person in the
world who had never in his short life seen the sweet,
nodding flower, and he was the little child by whose
cradle the brownie had found the sky-fairies.

And they were “zs flowers, after all, his and his
mother’s. Because the fairies, after they had planted the
bluebells, had heard a soft call from the dimly lit room ;
and, flying swiftly back to it, had seen the mother’s arms
stretched out to them, and the mother’s face lifted wist-
fully up to their own. And they had taken her in their
arms, and floated with her out into the night, and -carried
her away to the stars. And so the bluebells were her
birthday flowers.

And the baby in the cradle grew fat and rosy, and
crowed the whole day long. And presently his nurse
took away his long white robes, and dressed him in a
little soft frock with blue ribbons. And then that too
was taken away, and he was put into a quaint little skirt
with'a blue sash, and wore a sailor hat, and learnt to
make mud-pies. And at last there came the proudest
day of all, when his fat little legs were put into knicker-
bockers, and his dimpled’ arms into a comical little sailor's
jacket. ,

“Bless him!” said nurse, fondly, looking at him with
The Story of the Bluebells 73

great satisfaction, and not seeming to notice that he
looked precisely as broad as he was long. “How proud
his dear mother would have been of him!” —

Archie—for that was the little fellow’s name—glanced
up at the words. He often wanted to see his mother, and
whenever he asked for her they always told him she was
“up in the sky.” To-day he asked another question, and
it was whether “the sky was such a very, very long
way off?”

“Yes, my dear, a very long way,” nurse told him
sorrowfully.

“Farther off than the top of the beech-trees?” Archie
wanted to know then, peeping up at the tall trees from
under his broad hat. -

“Yes, farther off than them; farther off even than the
chimneys of the big, grey house where he lived.” And
when he heard that, he sighed a little, for he had had a
vague idea of finding the sky, and showing mother his
new clothes. |

He was playing all alone in the garden that afternoon,
when the thought came back to him. He was tired, and
wanted to sit on somebody’s lap, just as little Johnnie,
who lived opposite, sat on Mrs. Green’s. He was sure

mother would have let him sit on Her lap, instead of
74. Brownies and Rose Leaves

squatting, as he was doing, in the gardener’s big wheel-
barrow, which was rather dirty and earwiggy. And while
he was thinking all this, he looked at the blue hills in
the distance, and saw, what he had never noticed before,
that the sky was lying right on the very top of
them.

What a fortunate thing, to be sure! He would go
away, all by himself, down the green lane, and would
climb up to the hilltops, and walk away over the sky,
until he had found mother. What a splendid plan! And
how pleased nurse would be that he had shown mother
his new clothes !

So he set his hat on the back of his head, and took
his little walking-stick—made from a green elder-stalk—
in his hand, and marched sturdily away out into the
spring-world. There were, oh, so many perils to be
passed! First, there was a big doggie that would cough
at him, right down in its throat, and poor wee Archie
dared not run past it for ever so long. Then.there was a
large buzzing bee that he had to hide’ from, behind a
sprouting oak. Then there was a brown-eyed cow, that
moo’d at him. All that she really wanted was to be
milked, but Archie did not know that, and was very much
startled indeed. But at last he got right away from his
The Story of the Bluebells 75

troubles, down a sweet-smelling boggy green lane, that
led him to the foot of the woods.

The woods were on a hillside, and looked deliciously
cool and dark this warm spring day. Archie trotted away
into them, climbing with some difficulty over the trailing
roots. He was not afraid any more, not even when a big
spider came and stared him quite out of countenance.
He was going up, up, up the mossy hillside, and he
' made sure that he should find the sky and mother at
the top.

Suddenly he stopped short, and gave a little shout of
joy. There, right in front of him, lay the gleaming blue,
stretching away as far as his eyes could see it. He had
found the sky at last, as he knew he would, lying sweet
and blue among the moss and tree-trunks at the top. of
the hill. “Mother! mother!” he shouted gleefully, and
stumbled and panted up the little pathway until his foot
tripped, and he fell headlong into the soft bed of blue-
bells,

“Well,” thought Archie, as he sat up and looked at
the sweet crushed flowers about him, “I-never guessed
the sky would be like zhzs /”

. He filled his lap with bluebells: as he sat there, and
laughed softly over his spoil. His baby-soul had for-
76 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

gotten for a moment about mother. And so he covered
himself with the tender blue flowers, and tossed them in
the net of sunlight that lay like a golden web about him.
And there, sitting among the bluebells, the brownies
found him.
' They knew what he had come for, bless you! The
brownies find out everything. And they were rather sad
at heart, because he must find out by-and-by that this
was not the sky at all, and that mother was very far
away. And little Mayblossom, who very often. visited
the bluebells, quite cried when she thought of how
disappointed he would be.

She would try to lull him to sleep, she said, and
perhaps he might be found before morning. So she, and
_ her little husband, and everybody else in Brownie-land set
' the bluebells ringing. And their chimes were so sweet
and soft and drowsy that they made a lullaby, and little
Archie listened to it, and nodded his head lower and
lower, until it sank right down upon the moss, and he
fell fast asleep. oa

But the brownies went on chiming the bluebells,
for they knew that the sky-fairies would hear the
echo, and would come to earth to see what was the

matter.
The Story of the Bluebells 77

And sure enough, when the moon peeped over the
hillside and laid her tender pale kisses on the cowslip
meadow below, the fairies floated silently down towards
the tree-tops, and stood upon the earth round about the
little sleeping child; while the bluebells hushed their
music as the brownies, in tender whispers, told little
Archie’s tale. .

And a deep tenderness came into the eyes of the sky-
fairies as they listened. And one of them, Archie’s own
mother, took the child into her arms, and kissed the little
sleeping face. And then she spread out her shining white
wings and lifted him to her bosom, and flew away with
him over the tree-tops, down the boggy green lane, past
the buzzing bee and the dog that coughed right down
in its throat, and the gardener’s wheelbarrow, and laid
him in his own little cot at home. And when she had
done this, she stooped again and kissed him, and went
back to the waiting elves.

“Are you not going to take him home with us?”
asked the sky-fairies wonderingly.

Archie’s mother smiled, and shook her head.

“Not yet,” she said, “for the bluebell’s music has
sounded right down into his heart, and their beauty and

fragrance have crept into his soul. And he has their
78 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

message to give to the world. I have given him back
again to men, and to——” >

“ And to whom ?” asked little Mayblossom.

“To Mother Carey,” said the sky-fairy. “For until
he belongs to Mother Carey he can never belong to me.”

The brownies did not quite understand all that; but
the sky-fairies did. And they sang a carol of gladness as
they flew away again to the stars.

And Archie one day grew into a strong man, and
believed in the brownies, as all sensible people do, And
not only did he believe in them, but he tried to teach the
world all about them. For were not the sky-fairies his
godmothers, and the’ church-bells of Fairy-land his birth-
day flowers?


==

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May-Song

ING a song of a May-day morning!
S Trip the dance to a May-day tune!
Fresh and cool is the May-day morning,
Noontide heat will come all too soon !
May-thorn buds upon the hedges
Gléam like flakes of prisoned snow ;
May-month flow’rs among the sedges
Nod their blossoms to and fro!
Fair, the light of it,
Sweet, the sight of it,
Fragrant May-day morning !

Swallows, ’mid the willows flying,
Seek a mate for the summer hours ;
Ferns, against the hemlock lying,
Steal the dewdrops out of the flow’rs ;
G
82 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Birds are bursting into singing ;
Diamonds sparkle on the lawn,
As the sun, his glory flinging,
Crowns with gold the May-day dawn!
Fair, the light of it, |
Sweet, the sight of it,
Fragrant May-day morning !
The Story of the Silver
Bowl

HE Lady Violetta was a Princess, very rich
and very beautiful. She had a King for a

father, and a Queen for a mother; a Duchess
for a governess, and a Lord High Chamberlain for a
history master; a Countess for a lady’s maid, and an Earl
for a courier. She ought to have been as happy as the
day was long, and, instead of that, she was always crying
her eyes out about something or other.

She had’so many toys that she did not know what to
do with them, so she spent an hour or two each day in
breaking them to pieces. She had so many picture-books
that she declared she hated them; and she tore them
every one to bits. And then she threw her battledore
and shuttlecock at the Lord High Chamberlain, hitting him

somewhat severely upon the nose, and went away into the
84. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

garden, declaring that the only nice things in the world
were the flowers.

Well, the Lord High Chamberlain went about his work
with a swollen nose, and Princess Violetta sat among the
flowers. She really did love them, and watered and
tended them very carefully. She often declared that they
were the only things that gave her any real pleasure.
But she was very cross to-day, and so what do you think
that foolish little Princess actually did? She sat down in
the middle of the grass-plot, and cried as hard.as ever she
could, because a// the flowers did not bloom a the year
round, and so she could not gather snowdrops in June
and honeysuckle in December.

Well, she cried and screamed so loud that the brownies .
heard her, and came running to see what was the matter.
Now, it was a very strange thing, but Lady Violetta loved
the flowers so very much that she was now and then
allowed to have a peep at the brownies as they went
about their busy work. Funnily enough, this did
not make her good, as it should have done; because,
you see, she ‘only. loved the flowers for the pleasure
they gave to herself, and she had not yet learnt their
best lessons.

However, to-day the brownies made up their minds to
The Story of the Silver Bowl 85

try and help her; and, of course, they planned to do it in
their own way, which was the most original way possible.
They came creeping tenderly about her shoulders and
knees, and made themselves visible to her. That was the
first thing. And then, while she, touched and comforted
by their tenderness, caressed them softly, they told her
that they had heard her complaint, and would fulfil her
wishes.

“See here,” said one, “I have in my cap a tiny silver
bell. I will take it out and give it to you, and you must
put it in the sunniest window of your chamber, when it
will swell and grow into a great magic silver bowl. What-
ever flowers you put into it will retain their freshness and
fragrance for ever.”

Well, the Princess was very much delighted. She
would now have every kind of flower in bloom all the
year round. And as she kissed and thanked the brownies,
she never noticed that they looked anxious and sad. So
she said good-bye to them very happily, and they promised
that, in a year’s time, they would come back to her sight,
and would ask her how she liked her silver bowl. And
then they seemed to be gathered away into the hearts of
the roses and jessamine and lilies, and she saw them no

more.
86 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

_- So the Princess was left alone with her tiny silver bell.
And she carried it carefully up the broad marble staircase,
into her bedchamber, and laid it in the warmest, sun-
niest corner she could find. And then she sat down to
watch it grow. But, so long as she watched, nothing
happened, and at last she made up her mind that she
must be patient; and so she went away, and, in a fit of
repentance, tried to find some sticking-plaster for the
Lord High Chamberlain’s nose.

And, no sooner had she gone, than the tiny silver bell
began to puff itself out tremendously. And it puffed and
swelled and grew bigger and bigger, and broader and
broader, until at last it had grown into a magnificent
silver bowl, the shape of a harebell, and filled with clear,
sweet, limpid dew.

Well, when the princess came back to look at it,
she broke out into a little cry of delight, and ran off
at full speed into the garden, tearing her beautiful
gold thread frock on the bushes as she went. And
she gathered a great nosegay of lilies and roses and
pansies and carnations, and all the most beautiful
summer flowers that grow. And she put their stalks
into the clear dew, and laid their sweet heads tenderly
against the sides of the silver bowl. And_ they
The Story of the Silver Bowl 87

seemed to grow bigger and brighter every time she
looked at them.

And the brownies’ promise came quite true. No dead.
leaves drooped on the green stalks, no withered petals
lay about the fragrant hearts. The flowers were the
same, morning after morning, and night after night;
and the Princess never tired of smelling and looking
at them. .

Presently she put great sprays of honeysuckle and
white sweet peas, and big pale anemones by their
side, And then fragrant stocks and plumy asters,
and dahlias that looked like folded satin pin-cushions.
And soon she twined trails of red autumn leaves about
the bowl, and brightened it with scarlet berries. And .
then she placed in it a great bunch of chrysanthemums,
bronze and pink and crimson and white, and laid
maiden-hair fern over all. And at last she added great
snowy Christmas roses, and dark glistening holly and
yew.

That was on Christmas Eve, and that night, as the
Princess lay in bed, she had a strange dream. She
thought that Santa Claus came into the room, and stopped
short in amazement at the sight of the flowers in the big

silver bowl,
88 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Why, what are you doing here?” he cried out to
them. “Why aren’t you.asleep under the ground with
your brothers and Sisters?” ,

“We are obeying the wishes of the brownies,” the roses’
told him ; “but we are very sad. We sigh for the summer
sunshine, and forthe butterflies, for the soft breeze and
the little showers of rain. Our hearts are sorrowful and:
weary in the winter snow. It dims our eyes and freézes:
our souls. And we are tired of wakefulness, and want to
go to sleep.”

“We weep for the bees,” whispered the violets, sadly.
“Our cups are full of honey, and there’ is nobody to ease
the burden. We have no greén leaves to cover us, no
running stream to bring joy into our hearts; and when
the spring-time comes, we shall be tired with our long
vigil, and unable to rejoice with our companions in the
dawn-time of their life.”

_ “We are lonely among the early flowers of summer,”
sighed the foxgloves. “We have only the trailing
leaves to sympathize with our needs. They alone can
understand how we pine for the free autumn wind to
toss our freckled cups,-for the early frosts to spangle
our leaves; how we fain would once more watch

the herb-robert dying sweet and crimson in the hedge-
The Story of the Silver Bowl 89

rows, and the dormouse preparing her winter's nest.
We were not meant to lay our lips against the June
roses, nor to nod our ruddy bells over the pansies’
heads.”

“Our comrades are passing away,’ murmured the
chrysanthemums. “We long to go with them into’ the
drowsy land of sleep. We want to gain strength for
next year, that we may bloom fairer than before’ Some
of our buds lie still unfolded against our stalks, and
weigh heavily upon the tender leaves’ Our season
is over, and’ we are weary because we may not pass
away.”

Only the Christmas roses did not complain, but lifted
their pure white faces up to Santa Claus, and murmured,
“Peace on earth, good will towards men.”

“Ay,” said Santa Claus, softly, “I see how it is.”
And then he went up to the little Princess, and looked
down upon her as she slept.

“Child,” he whispered, bending over her, “ your poor
flowers are very sad.”

The Princess sighed, and stirred uneasily in her sleep,
and he went on—

' “They are blooming, bright and beautiful as ever, in

obedience to the wishes of the brownies ; but they sigh
go Brownies and Rose-Leaves

for the sun, for the breezes, for the showers, and for all the
things that give them birth and death. They are tired,
and they may not sleep. They are hungry and thirsty,
and the winter can ‘give them no food. They are home-
sick, and you keep them here in a strange land. Will you
not lay your own wishes on one side, for the sake of the
little tender flowers that ae so much for an ungrateful
world ?”

The clock struck twelve as he spoke, and he went to
the window and drew aside the curtain.

“See!” he said ; “ Christmas is flying, swift and white,
to the world.”

And Christmas stepped on to the earth that very
moment, and came straight into the Princess’s heart. And
she tumbled out of her warm little bed, and ran straight
to her magic bowl. And then she gathered up all the
flowers into her hands, and gave them to Santa Claus.
All except the Christmas roses, and they bloomed bigger
and sweeter than ever.

“Take them,” said the Princess, breathlessly ; “take
‘them back to their homes, I will give them to you for a
Christmas gift.”

’ And Santa Claus smiled, well pleased, and, as he laid

the lilies and carnations and asters against his white
The Story of the Silver Bowl 91

bosom, they faded quietly away, and left nothing but the
perfume hanging about the room.

“See! they have gone already,” he said, smiling, “as
soon as you released them from the bowl.”

“Who took them?” asked the Princess.

And Santa Claus had just time to whisper, “ Mother
Carey,” before he too faded away.

Well, the Princess awoke on Christmas morning, and
peeped out from under her eider-down quilt. The room
was full of toys. Dolls stared at her from every chair. A
great big rocking-horse swung slowly up and down in the
middle of the room. Silken skipping-ropes hung over the
bed-posts, and coloured balls were tied to the rails,
Santa Claus had brought her so many beautiful things
that, as usual, she wondered what in the world she should
do with them.

She slipped quietly out of bed, and went through the
toys to her magic silver bowl. Yes, it was empty, all
except the Christmas roses, and they floated on the
dew, pure and. spreading, like water-lilies upon a quiet
stream. The Princess looked .at them, and felt rather
sad. _ But there’ was a great gladness in her heart all
the same. She had learnt the real lesson of the
Christmas joy.
Q2 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

The Lord High Chamberlain couldn’t imagine what
had come over his little mistress. She was so gentle all
that day, so sweet and quiet; and she had quite left off
throwing her battledores and shuttlecocks at his head. She ©
only broke one toy to pieces, too, and that was a dancing
plush monkey, and, as she explained, she really did want
to know what it had got inside. In fact, she was so good,
that the King and Queen were. sure she must be ill, and
sent off in great haste for the Court physician, and his box
of pills.

The Court physician wore a white wig, and a great
gold and scarlet hat, and he arrived in a coach drawn by
four horses. And he stumped up the stairs with his ivory
cane, and felt the Princess’s pulse, and looked at her
tongue, and said “Ha!” a very great many times, and
“Hem!” occasionally. And at every symptom mentioned
by the Queen, he nodded his head, as much as to say that
he knew much more about it than she did. And at last
the little Princess, who felt perfectly well, and only wanted
to begin to be goody quite forgot all her resolutions, and
threw the remains of the plush monkey right into his face ;
and they went into his eyes, and made him cry big tears;
and up his nose, and made him sneeze several times in

succession ; and down his throat, and made him cough
The Story of the Silver Bowl 93

until he didn’t know whether he were on his head or his
heels. . So he went home, and put his feet into hot
mustard and water, and went to bed for a week. But the
King and Queen were happy, for now they were quite sure
that the little Princess was in her customary state of
health. ;

By-and-by, however, the Princess began to feel sorry.
She had had such a peaceful feeling at her heart, ever
since she had given Santa Claus the flowers out of
the great silver bowl. And directly she had thrown
the plush monkey at the Court physician, the old dis-
content had come back again. She wanted to feel
good. She didn’t so much want to be good as to feel
good. You see, the little Princess had still a very great
deal to learn.

However, she had a suspicion that the peaceful feeling
was the result of having given the flowers to Santa Claus.
And, as she did so long to get it back again, she began
giving away her things, right and left! She gave her
best wax doll to the Lord High Charhberlain, and all the
skipping-ropes to her grandmother, who was bedridden.
She presented a stately Duchess with the rocking-
horse, and offered a Punch and Judy show to the

General of the army. She insisted upon her old nurse
94 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

accepting a toy bow-and-arrows, and pressed an A BC
picture-book upon the Court fiddler, who was blind. She
gave her nicest ball-frock to the baby, and sent her nine-



pins to the Court physician, by Parcels Post. She fed
a little ragged girl with ice-cream and bonbons, and

insisted on sending her share of the Christmas plum-
The Story of the Silver Bowl 95

pudding to a poor dying man. And altogether she did
her very best to turn the world upside down.

But she did not feel very happy. You see, she was
still thinking of herself. The only time she had not
thought of herself was the moment when she had given
Santa Claus the flowers, She hadn’t wanted to feel happy
then; she had-only wished to give happiness to the
flowers.

And a proof that she was still thinking of herself was
that she went on filling the great silver bowl. She kept
the Christmas roses in the dew, and put a handful of
snowdrops to them by-and-by. Then she added white
jonquils, and yellow-eyed narcissus,; and Lenten lilies,
And presently filled up the corner with sweet violets,
and primroses tender and pale, like forgotten stars.
And then came the time of daffodils, and the drooping
golden heads were more beautiful than the shining silver
of the bowl. And she twisted among them blue forget-
me-nots, and purple lilac, and laburnum like golden rain.
And then she added meadowsweet, and pearly white
may, and little early tender rosebuds. And the summer.
sun shone in at the window, and laid warm kisses upon
the flowers.

And again the Princess had a wonderful dream.
96 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

It was Midsummer Eve, and the fairies were all abroad.
And they came about the little bed of the Princess as it
stood right in a silver streak of moonlight, and they laid
their magic touch upon her eyelids. And she opened her
eyes and saw that somebody was in the room.

Who was it that stood there with star-bound hair and
soft green gown, with roses about her trailing garments,
and hands outstretched in loving, tender greeting? She
was a woman, but her eyes and lips were the eyes and lips
of Santa Claus; and the little Princess held out her arms :
to her, and whispered, “ You have come back ? ”

“I heard the snowdrops weeping,” said the Spirit, in
grave sweet tones. “I heard the Christmas roses pleading
for dark. and quiet, I listened to the primroses crying
pitifully for the green moss and the-budding elms and the
lark’s spring song. And I came to plead for my little
children,”

“Are you Mother Carey?” asked the Princess,
breathlessly. “Take them ; they are yours.”

She tumbled out of bed just as she had done on
‘Christmas Eve, and took the flowers in her little trembling
hands and laid them upon the Spirit’s breast. And a
long contented sigh echoed through the room, as they
faded away. —
a


The Story of the Silver Bowl 99

The Spirit did not go, as Santa Claus had done; she
stood looking down upon the little Princess with her calm
tender eyes.

“Santa Claus, or Mother Carey, or the Vision of
Midsummer Eve, it is all the same,” she said softly.

“Ts it?” asked the Princess, wonderingly.

“All the same, all the same,” echoed the Spirit.
“ Have you learnt the lesson yet ? ”

“T don’t know,” the Princess answered sadly, looking
at her empty bowl. /

“Vou will learn it in time,” said the Spirit. “It is
written in the hearts of my children.” And then she too
went away. -

But the little Princess was happy. And the next day
she went into the garden and waited for the brownies,
with her dear silver bowl.

They came to her very soon. And their faces were
questioning, and their eyes ready to be glad or sorry at
what she had to say.

“T will give you back my bowl,” said the Princess,
softly ; and laid it beside them on the moss.

And the brownies’ eyes were glad, because they knew

then that the Princess had learnt the lesson after all.
A Charm of Roses

HE summer sun has kissed the ground
And bid the earth surrender
The stores he in her bosom found

Of rich unripened splendour.

In field and garden, wood and lawn,
The dewy blossoms muster,
And, fresh and blushing as the dawn,

The roses twine and cluster.

Half hidden in their sheltering green,
And round the lattice creeping,
Their dainty nodding heads are seen

Within the window peeping,
A Charm of Roses 101

And little trembling drops of dew,
Their presence half concealing,

The fragrant velvet cells creep through,
Within the deep heart stealing.

Until each petal, zephyr-kissed,
Its crystal guest discloses,

And then a little silver mist
Seems blown about the roses.

And some in mingled fragrance meet,
Pink lips together crushing,
And some are deeply crimson sweet,

And some are always blushing.

Like tiny schoolmaids, quaint and shy,
Their blushing never ceases.
Their little winsome petals lie

In little winsome creases.

One second are they blown apart,
Their daintiness unfurling ;
Then back about the golden heart

In tender wrinkles curling.
102

Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And some in quiet stillness lie
Against their thorns serenely ;
And some are climbing to the sky ;

And some are rare and queenly ;

And some in fragrant stateliness
Their velvet heads are holding,
And smiling on the world they bless,

Such beauty by unfolding.

And little merry gusts of breeze—
The good-for-nothing vagrants !—
Will steal, without an “ If-you-please,”

And carry off their fragrance.

While, calm and smiling, unaware
What naughty Zephyr’s doing,
The roses bend with stately air

Before his courtly wooing.

Until, to make them all his own,
The damask leaves he'll scatter ;
And round the sweet dismantled throne

The weeping raindrops patter.
A Charm of Roses 103

But little new-born buds the sun
The morrow morn discloses !

And, with each fragrant life begun,
We bless God for the roses !
The Story of the Princess’s

Crown

kingdom ; for the Queen of the land had had

a wonderful gift. Not a diamond necklace nor

a pair of ruby ear-rings ; not a pearl-embroidered gown,

nor a brand-new family coach: but a little pink baby,

as pink as coral all over, lying in a little pink cradle, and
crinkling up its rosebud of a face, ready for a good cry.

Well, the Queen was so proud of her baby that she

said it must have a golden crown. Was it not a Princess,

TT HERE was great rejoicing, once, in a far-away

and did not Princesses always wear golden crowns? And
she would not trust the Court jewellers or the Royal
diamond merchants to make it, but sent a particular
message to Brownie-land, asking the elves if they would
be so very good as to make her a fairy crown, fit for her

little daughter to wear.
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Designed and drawn by S. Schofield.


The Story of the Princess’s Crown 107

Of course the brownies were quite agreeable. They
always are. And they went down, deep, deep, deep into
the mines, and brought up the shining gold, and the
blazing diamonds, and the rubies of crimson glow. And
they dived into the sea, and fetched up lovely pale pearls,
and coral as pink as the baby herself. And they made
a crown with five points to it, and at each point they put
a precious stone. There was first a diamond; that was
for wit. Next was a ruby; that was for love. Thirdly,
a sapphire; that was for good fortune. Fourthly, an
amethyst; that was for riches. And, fifthly, a great
tender shining pearl; and that was for charity.

And then the brownies laid soft kisses and blessings
upon the crown, and sent it away to the King’s palace.
And it fitted the little Princess just like the crown of her
own bald little head, and grew as she grew, until the
Royal household would have been as much astonished
to: see the King without his wig, as to see his fair-haired
little daughter without her crown.

The Princess soon knew the names of all the stones
in her beautiful crown, and knew their meanings too.
And she valued them very much, for were they not the
gift of the brownies? And she grew daily wittier, and

richer, and more fortunate, and more lovable, and more
108 Brownies and Rose=Leaves

full of tender charity for everybody. And the whole
kingdom declared that the best thing in it was its own
fair, sweet Princess.

She grew into girlhood at last, and began to look out
on the troubles and perplexities in the world with two
sweet wondering eyes. She was so sorry for all the sad-
ness, and would always help any one in trouble; so that,
by-and-by, everybody who was in anxiety or need brought
all their griefs to the Princess. And she very seldom
failed to comfort them, and to send them away happy
and content.

She would take long rides on her gentle white palfrey,
accompanied only by a stable-lad, who worshipped the
very ground upon which she trod. And one day she
rode far away into the country, and came to a little village
in the very heart of the hills.

She was thirsty, so she stopped at a cottage door and
asked for some milk. The woman brought it to her, and
blessed her sweet face as she did so, although she never
guessed that it was her own King’s daughter riding by.
And the Princess saw traces of tears upon the woman's
face, and so, instead of remounting her palfrey, she asked
leave to come into the cottage and to rest for a little
while. “For,” she thought to herself, “I may be able
The Story of the Princess’s Crown 109

to find out this poor woman’s trouble, and to help
her.” :

She did not take long about it. Very soon her
questioning eyes and tender vivid sympathy had brought
out the whole tale. The woman had a son, a lad who

“had been the “ pride of her life,’ as she told the Princess
in ‘trembling tones, but he had overtaxed his nervous
sensitive brain, and had lain for many weeks in a fever.
She never thought he would lift his head, nor raise his
eyes to the sunshine again. But he fought the great
fight between life and death, and life, that was strong
within him, won. But—and the mother’s voice broke,
and she could tell no more of her tale, only led the
Princess out into the sweet-smelling garden, fragrant with
lavender and quaint with heart’s-ease, and pointed out to
her an idiot boy, sitting with his face turned up to the
sunshine, and trying to catch the golden rays in his
feeble fingers.

And, when the Princess looked, a great pity stole into
her heart. And she went softly down the little path, and
stood by the idiot child among the hollyhocks, And he
laughed with pleasure, and stretched out both his un-
certain trembling hands towards her crown.

She took it off, for the first time in her life, and gave
Ifo Brownies and Rose-Leaves

it to him. And he wound his little fingers round the
sparkling diamond, and laughed as it flashed between
them. And then suddenly a great sharp pain came over
the Princess. The whole world seemed to be rocking
about her, and when the mist and noise went away
from sight and hearing, the idiot child was gazing up
at her. with grave, calm eyes, and the diamond was
broken from the crown, and was held tightly in his little
fingers.

Was he really the same child? She looked down
upon him in wonder, and marvelled at the clear, open
forehead, the steadfast eyes, and the tender lips. “TI have
found it,” was all that he said; but a great gladness rested
upon his face, and sounded in his grave, soft tones.
“ And I have lost it,’ murmured the Princess, passing her
hand over her brow, and knowing that a great gift had
gone from her.

She placed the crown once more upon her head, and
for a moment gazed wistfully at the diamond. Then,
stooping down, she kissed the child, folded his little
fingers more firmly over the precious jewel, and. led him
to his mother. The woman opened her arms with a great,
tender cry of joy, and the child ran straight into them
and rested his happy face upon her bosom. And_ the


The Story of the Princess’s Crown 111

Princess just looked once at them, very sadly, and then
mounted her palfrey and rode away.

There was a change in her after that. She was no
longer the centre of wit and reading at the court. She
only smiled now when the great questions of the day
were talked of in her presence, and shook her head when
any one appealed to her judgment. “Such things were
too clever for her,” she told them gently ; and by-and-
by they believed her, and pitied her, and talked in low
compassionate whispers of the unfulfilled promise of her
childhood.

But they loved her still; they could not help it, she
had such-a sweet, wonderful charm. Oh, how one of her
ladies-in-waiting sighed for the same charm! The lady’s
name was Ermentrude, and she had a loving, tender,
generous heart, but none of the nameless something that
brought the Princess so much love. And poor Ermentrude
was in great trouble just then, for her true knight gave
signs of being her true knight no longer, and seemed
inclined to remove his affection to a certain haughty
Duchess of his acquaintance. Ermentrude did not know
how to keep his dying love, and she loved him> so .
earnestly and generously herself that her poor little
heart was nearly broken.
\

112 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Well, the Princess found her crying bitterly in her
boudoir one day. She had cried so many quarts of tears
that she had spoilt all the new satin coverings. But the
Princess never even noticed that. She was so sorry for
poor Ermentrude, and so anxious to hear what was the
matter.

Of course Ermentrude told her, and ended her
pathetic little story with a great sob, and the exclama-
tion, “ Oh, if only I had your gift, my own dear mistress!”
And then kissed the Princess's hands, and cried over them
instead of over the furniture.

But the Princess went away to the window, and looked
out upon the autumn world, The wind was wailing sadly,
and the swallows were preparing to fly away from the
falling leaves. And the autumn sadness came into the
Princess’s heart, as she quietly broke away her ruby
from her wonderful golden crown, and, going back to
Ermentrude, hung it round her neck. “Your knight will
come back to you,” said the Princess, softly ; “you need
not cry any more.”

And then she went silently away, and the world knew
nothing of what she had done.

Of course Ermentrude’s knight came back to her, but
he did not find his betrothed all bliss, Ermentrude would
The Story of the Princess's Crown 113

flirt, although she really did love him dearly. But then,
how could she help it, when the gallants came to her -like
flies to honey? For she had suddenly become the most
lovable little lady in the whole world. She knew it
herself, and the court knew it, and the kingdom. knew
it; but nobody knew it better nor rejoiced in it more
heartily than the Princess.

The Princess was not so fascinating as she used to be,
visitors said to one another. She was—well, a little slow,
not to say stupid, and her charm of manner was entirely
gone. And the ladies of the household shunned her, and
the knights and nobles found no beauty in her calm, grave
eyes. And the Princess looked out on the world with sad
-wonder, but with a great peace in her heart.

She was always fortunate, she told her few friends
gratefully. She was never ill, and all her undertakings
turned out well. And sometimes she would take off
her crown and look tenderly at its three remaining
stones,

But there. came a day when her dearest friend of all
must go from her.. He was a young knight, and he was
going out into the world to win his spurs. He came
to the Princess to bid her a reverent farewell, for. he felt
towards her as he might have felt towards a very dear

I
114. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

sister. But she—she loved him better than the whole
world, and her face was pale as a lily, and her hands
trembling as aspen leaves as she bade him farewell.
And she laid in his hands a little casket, and bade him
keep it for her sake. And then she told him to be brave
and good and true, and she kissed his forehead, and
smiled her good-bye. And he went away, often turn-
ing back to look at her, and each time he turned she
smiled. And at last he was quite out of sight, and
then the Princess put down her face and wept very
bitterly.

Well, the young knight opened the casket, and found
in it a ring set with a sapphire and an amethyst. And
then he rode on, while the Princess dried her eyes and
went patiently about her daily occupations, with a great
peace resting in her calm eyes.

And the knight found good fortune wherever he went.
And he grew into a good, noble man, and gained great
riches. And he married another King’s daughter, very far
away, and sent a letter to the Princess, telling her of the
goodness and sweetness of his little wife. And the Prin-
cess wrote back tender words of joy and gentle advice,
and said that she felt very happy in thinking of their

love
The Story of the Princess’s Crown r15

But, although she said nothing about it, great trouble
had come into the Princess’s life. Illness had shattered
her, and her father and mother were dead, and she was
left to govern the kingdom. And she was not clever
enough to rule, nor fascinating enough to win the hearts
of her people, as she had been able to do in the days
gone by. And no fairy prince came to marry her; but
war and dissension arose; and at last her own cousin
came to her, and said that the nation had proclaimed him
King, and that she was a beggar, and as a beggar might
go out into the world.

The Princess did not cry. She only looked wistfully
at her cousin with those grave, calm eyes, and took off her
crown and laid it aside. But she broke away the pearl
and placed it in her bosom. And then she put on the
ragged clothes with which, only, he provided her; and
took off her shoes and stockings, as he roughly bade her
do; and went into the big, cruel world alone.

And her heart was very sad as she went, barefoot,
through her kingdom. Not for herself, but for the trouble
and poverty that she saw about her. And she knew that
her cousin, whom the people had elected King, was clever
and fascinating, and very, very rich, and, had he only been

charitable, would have made an excellent ruler of the
116 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

nation that she-had so failed in governing. So she called
a little ragged girl to her, and, seeing truth and honesty
written upon the little smutty face, gave into her keeping
the beautiful pale pearl, and bade her carry it herself to
the King. And the little grimy girl promised to do so;
and then, with a lighter heart, the Princess went away, out
into the green woods beyond the town.

And there she found the brownies. And she told
them, softly, all the story of her life. And the brownies
wept over her, and kissed her, but the Princess did not
cry. She only set to work to stitch up some holes in
some of the younger brownies’ frocks.

And presently news came from the big world. The
new King had turned out an excellent ruler. Order and
justice had sprung up beneath his sway, and the old
poverty and discontent had vanished from the kingdom.
But, said the newsmongers, he was very sad. A new
gentleness ‘seemed to have come ‘over him, and he longed
to find the Princess whom he had sent out alone into the
world.

Well, when the Princess heard that, she looked very
sorrowful. She had been so contented with the brownies ;
so happy mending their clothes, and helping them in
their work. But she never hesitated a moment. She said
The Story of the Princess’s Crown 117

‘a tender good-bye to the elves, and went away to the
palace, and stood before the King.










Hy

mi | a gt i
i ARV Hi
Oe al fete

He was, oh! so rejoiced to see her, and begged her
118 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

to take back her kingdom and her riches and her honour.
For the little beggar-girl had given him her pearl, and
charity had stolen into his heart. But the Princess only
smiled and shook her head.

“TIT am not clever enough to rule,” she said; “and I
have neither beauty, nor riches, nor fortune. But my
people are prosperous, and I am content.”

Then the King begged her to become his wife, and
swore to cherish and love her for ever. But she only
shook her head a second time, and told him that it was
not for her.

“T am not one of those whom men love,” she said
softly ; “it is better not.” And she never told that her
heart was far away, faithful to the young knight. .

And at last the King, seeing that she really wished it,
let her go back to the brownies. And there, among the
birds and the flowers, and the tender winsome little elves,
the Princess lived for a long, long time, and was quiet and
content. But she faded day by day, and her great beau-
tiful soul looked more and more wistfully out of her grave
eyes. Until at last the brownies laid her tired body under
the ferns and moss, and her spirit went away up into the
blue, and nobody mourned her except the elves. ~

But the world was a holier place ever afterwards,
The Song of the Butterflies

AIL with us, on painted wings,
S Where the white-belled clover springs,
Where the tall seed-laden grass

Droops and trembles as we pass ;
Where the hooded arums grow,

Lords and ladies of the glade,
Waiting in a courtly row,

Underneath the hawthorn shade.

Come, Brownies! Spirits, come!
Who shall call our voices dumb,
When the fairy-whispers within our wings
Lull the trembling air into magic rings,
And the gentle beat
Of our unseen feet

Falls soft, like an echo of elfin things?
120 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Merrily, merrily, so we fly

Athwart the kisses of earth and sky !

Daintily, daintily, so we float

Down a sunbeam-sea, for a white-winged boat.
Painted and powdered all, we seem

The old-world dames of a brownie’s dream.

Come, Brownies! Fairies, come !
Where the dancing insects hum !
We will alight
On the hawthorn’s white,
And, folding our wings to a trembling sail,
Will whisper to you our grandame’s tale!
How a white wild rose flew away to the skies,
And stole their blues
And their sunset hues,
And started the fashion of butterflies !


Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home”

HE was Mrs. Yom Tit. She took care to tell
S everybody that, lest they might mistake her for
her mother-in-law, which she wouldn’t have liked
at all. And so all her friends called her Mrs. Tom Tit,
and, when they were’ particularly good-tempered and
friendly, Mrs. Tom,
Well, Mrs. Tom Tit was going to give an “At
Home,” and she invited all the brownies to it. She sent
out her invitations on a bay-leaf, for it was Christmas-

time; and she put—
122 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Mrs. Tom Tit.
At Home.

on them, and “R.S.V.P.” in one corner, and “Private
Theatricals” in the other. For she had heard that private
theatricals were the fashion nowadays.

She gave a_three-weeks’ invitation—partly because
that, too, was the fashion, and partly to give her daughters
time to rehearse, for they were determined to have a very
grand and very beautiful play indeed.

For a long time they couldn’t think what sort of a
play to act. You see, they didn’t know anything about
theatricals, except when they had peeped in at the
nursery windows and seen the little mortal children acting
charades. Miss Tit thought that if they all stood up and
said whatever came first into their heads, it would be an
excellent plan. And Master Tit didn’t care about any-
thing so long as he might wear a cocked hat. He had
seen a little boy once in a cocked hat, and had wanted
to wear one ever since. He said he would be Julius
Cesar, or King Alfred, or the Prince in the story of
“Cinderella.” He didn’t much mind what he was, so long
as he might wear a cocked hat.

Well, Mrs. Tit was obliged to call in the brownies,
after a day or two, for she and her family wrangled and
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 123

jangled and quarrelled and argued to such an extent,
that she began to think they would have no play ready
at all. And the brownies made peace, as they always
did, and promised to be stage managers, and to find a
nice little play that should just be suitable for the Masters
and the Misses Tit.

So that evening the brownies crept into the library of
the big house close at hand, and with great difficulty, for it
was a very large book, dragged away the old “Shakespeare”
from the shelves. They didn’t know of any plays except
Shakespeare’s, you see, but they remembered him quite
well; for he had known and loved them during his
pilgrimage on earth, three hundred years ago. And they
thought that his plays were the most beautiful books in
the whole world.

Well, they brought the book to Mrs. Tom Tit, and
began reading some of it to her. But what do you think?
Mrs. Tom didn’t admire it at all! She said the words
were too long, and the poetry was too difficult, and, for
her part, she preferred Dr. Watts! He didn’t make such
senseless remarks as “That which we call a rose, By any
other name would smell as sweet ;” but wrote common
sense, and with real poetry in it, too. And there was
nothing half so fine in the old brown book, as the verses
124 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

her mother taught her when she was a child, beginning,
“Let dogs delight to bark and bite!” And her children
should never act such absurd plays, and if the brownies
couldn’t write them a drama as Dr. Watts would have
written it, she wouldn’t give an “At Home” at all. And
then she ruffled up her feathers until she looked like a
bundle of thistle-down, and turned her back on the
brownies, and sulked.

Well, the elves were such dear good-tempered little
fellows, that they didn’t lose patience. They were a little
distressed and puzzled at the idea. of rewriting Shake-
speare’s plays on the model of Dr. Watts, but they
determined not to be down-hearted, And so, after some
consideration, they fixed upon “Romeo and Juliet,” and
set to work to revise it in a fashion that should be suit-
able for the little ones, and agreeable to the feelings of
Mrs. Tom.

But somehow they couldn’t get on with it at all. To
begin with, they all cried so hard over. the sad tender
story, that not one of them could compose a line. And,
when one at last dried his eyes and began, he found his
task very difficult indeed. . .

He was so conscientious, you see; so very anxious to
please Mrs. Tom Tit. And he racked his brains to
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 125

think what Dr. Watts would have made Romeo say
when he saw sweet Juliet sitting at her window in the
moonlight. He rather thought, did this perplexed little
brownie, that Dr. Watts wouldn’t have approved of such
a proceeding at all; and he ended by making Romeo say
some moral little speech, in this strain :—

“What! at this hour up and drest !
Juliet, it were hardly wise.
Early bed-time were the best!
Early then can you arise.
Lead the goat-herds out to browse,
Feed the pigs and milk the cows!

“See, the moon is shining bright,
You'll be moonstruck by its rays! _
’Tis the. middle of the night,
Nights are nights, and days are days!
Juliet, hear my wise refrain,
Hie you off to bed again!”

While the brownie was quite sure that Juliet would have
replied something in this fashion :—

“Romeo, in the garden there?
What, my love, are you about ?
Surely, in the midnight air,
It were foolish to be out!
Nothing, too, upon your head !
Pray go home and go to bed.
126 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“And, in case you’ve caught a chill—
I’m not certain you have not—
Try a powder or a pill, /
With a glass of something hot.
Also, for precaution’s best,
Put some mustard on your chest ! ”

Well, the little brownie got so far, and then stuck fast
_ in a Watts-cum-Shakespeare bog. If Romeo and Juliet
did nothing but make wise little proverbs into wise little
rhymes, they would never arrive at a proper understand-
ing, and it was quite necessary that they should arrive at
a proper understanding, or there would be no play of
“Romeo and Juliet” at all, And when the little brownie
had got so far in his reasoning, he came to the wise con-
clusion, that it was quite impossible to rewrite Shakespeare
on the model of Dr. Watts, and that, whether Mrs. Tom
were displeased or not, he would waste no more of his
valuable fairy time.

Well, he said all this to the other little brownies, and
they quite agreed with him. And they went in a body
to Mrs. Tom, and stated the case as gently and reasonably
as they could. ,

Mrs. Tom was a little better tempered that day. She
had just engaged a very good cook, and had also found

her great-great-grandmother’s recipe-book, which con:
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 127

tained excellent instructions for the making of snail
omelette and holly-berry jam. And she was so pleased
about this that she listened quite graciously to the
brownies’ explanations, and even consented to alter
her arrangements slightly, and to give a miscellaneous
entertainment of music and recitations. And as the
brownies assured her that drawing-room recitations were
the very height of the fashion, and promised to drill the
performers and to superintend the glees, she beamed
benevolently upon them, and appeared to be quite
content.

Everybody was very busy all next week, and the
brownies were busiest of all. They smiled all day at the
thought of Mrs. Tom’s grand and wonderful entertain-
ment. And when the eventful evening arrived, there was
quite a flutter of excitement through the length and
breadth of Fairy-land.

The party was to be given in a very old and very
hollow tree. There was a little hole in the trunk that did
duty for a door, and when the brownies arrived by twos
and threes, they found a young thrush, in a new suit of
speckled livery, waiting to show them in, And the in-
side of the tree trunk was, oh, so beautifully decorated !

There were glow-worms for fairy-lamps, and strings of
128 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

ash-berries, and bunches of dried thyme. And refresh-
ments were laid out on a table at one end of the room;
mistletoe jellies, and rhododendron creams; beetles in
aspic, and galantine of slugs, and a great many other rich
and delicious dishes.

The brownies liked the fruit best, the apples stolen
from the store-room, and the nuts that had been stored
from last October. But the blackbirds and the robins
and the bull-finches and the wrens enjoyed the savouries,
In fact, they were all so busy eating that they were quite
sorry when there was a request for attention and silence,
and the real business of the evening began.

The proceedings opened with a glee. Several of the
young tits stood up, and, blushing nervously, made their
best bows. Then they all began to sing. The words of
the song were—. .

“ Bitter blows the northern breeze,
Falls the last leaf, brown and sere,

Weep the birds upon the trees,
Round a frozen robin’s bier.”

And all the tenors sang, “ Bitter, bitter, bitter, bitter,” in
quavers ; while the basses chanted, “ Bier, bier, bier, bier,”
in crotchets, until one teetotal lady in the audience actually

got up and walked out! -
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 129

Then they began again with the second verse :-—

“Black and gloomy lie the clouds ;
And the wind their stillness wafts
Into floating wreathing shrouds,
Tossed and broken by the draughts.”

And then the trebles took up the refrain of “Black, black,
black, black;”~ while the altos warbled, “Draughts,
draughts, draughts, draughts,” until the family doctor was
quite touched, and wiped his eyes with emotion; and at
last went up to the singers and insisted on shaking hands
all round, before he would allow them to go on.

Well, with a few exceptions they got through the
glee, Mrs. Tom beating time all the while, and looking
very much pleased with herself. And then the young Tits
sat down, flushed and delighted at the applause; and the
guests refreshed themselves with hip-negus and _ cater-
pillar ice.

The next item on the programme was—
“Recitation. By Miss Wren.”

And with a great deal of chirping and flustering, and -
arranging of feathers, Miss Wren hopped upon the twig
that did duty for a stage, and began.

Kk
130 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“LOSING HER ANCHOR; OR, THE COWARDLY WREN’

“The wren stood on a little bough,

A-learning how to fly.

A frown was on her feathered brow,
A tear-drop dimmed her eye!

And in a fearsome plight she stood,
While her unspoken thought

Was, ‘ There! it’s not the slightest good ;
My wings are much too short !

“« Father, could you your offspring see,

You would not treat her so!’

Her father answered not, for he
Was eating worms below.

‘Oh, mother, listen to my cry,
You would not be unkind !’

Her mother gave her for reply
A gentle push behind!

“ There came a sudden chirp of fright !

The wren? oh, where was she ?

She'd taken an unwilling flight
From that old apple-tree ;

And sitting gasping on the ground,
Her breath entirely spent,

Confessed, with pride, that she had found
A new accomplishment !”

Well, they clapped. Miss Wren vigorously ; and she
hopped down so much overcome by her reception, that

Mrs. Tit had to doctor her with negus, behind the door.
‘Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 131

And by the time she was quite recovered, Master Thrush
was in the middle of a solo, accompanied by Miss Black-

bird upon the banjo, and Mr. Yellow-Hammer upon the
violin,

It was a very beautiful solo indeed, and Master Thrush
sang it in a most affecting fashion, with one claw upon his
heart, and glancing sideways at Miss Speckles all the
time. And he sang—

“ Lonely was a linnet, sitting
On a budding hawthorn tree!
Other birds, about him flitting,
Sang a chorus full of glee !
Joined he ne’er a warble in it,
Swelled it not by e’en a note.
That poor melancholy linnet
Only gurgled in his throat.

““* Weddings,’ sighed he, ‘are the fashion ;

Spring has brought them by the score.

I’ve an unrequited passion,
I'll be single evermore.

Words of love that I have spoken
Are the subject of a jest,

And a little heart that’s broken
Palpitates within my breast.

“Fair of feather was the maiden,
Bright of eye, and sweet of note!
Love, with which my heart was laden,
Throbbed all warmly through my throat.
132 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Scarce we’d sworn we'd ne’er be parted,
Came a rival, fair to see ;

And that maiden, fickle-hearted,
Married him, and jilted me.

«Hips and haws have lost their flavour ;

Caterpillars crawl in vain ;

Daddy long-legs have no savour ;
Worms [’ll never taste again !

Grubs henceforth I’ll freely pardon,
Leave the green-fly on the tree ;

And, within the kitchen garden,
Nevermore dig up the pea.

“« Scarecrows can no more offend me,
For my earthly course is run ;
And to-morrow will I wend me
Close to Farmer Jones’s gun !
Farewell, living! Welcome, dying !
Glad its breath my body yields ;
Soon a corpse shall I be lying
On the ploughed-up turnip fields

yo

Half the audience was in tears before Master Thrush
had finished, and the other half was quite lost to view
among the pocket-handkerchiefs. Mr. Tit blew his nose
vigorously, and Mrs. Tit sobbed, “I never treated you so,
Tom, did I?” While Miss Speckles had to be carried
out in hysterics. As for Master Thrush, he bowed right
and left, and cleared his throat, and bowed again ; and
Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 133

smiled, well pleased at the congratulations that were
. poured upon him.

However, it was now time for supper, and the birds
and the brownies all went down, two by two. Such a
magnificent supper, it was! and occupied fully an hour
out of the evening, And when it was over, and they
returned to the concert-room, they found that the
entertainment was to conclude with a grand series of
“tableaux vivants.”

Of course the brownies managed all these, and copied
them from the mortal children’s last Christmas party.
First of all, they gave the story of the “ Sleeping Beauty.”
Tableau No, I. was the Christening Party. Mrs. Tit, dressed
up in a bonnet and shawl, held Miss Wren with great
difficulty in her claws. Miss Wren wore a long white robe
and. a crown. While twelve fly-catchers, in short white
muslin skirts, and carrying gold wands, represented the
twelve fairy god-mothers. And a large black crow, with
a wicked eye, was the cruel fairy who had not been invited
to the feast.

This tableau was a great success, and, if Miss Wren’s
crown had not fallen off just at the end, it would have
been better still. But Mrs. Tit was very much pleased
with it, and called everybody’s attention to the way in
134. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

which she had dandled Miss Wren, seeming to consider
that quite the best part of the whole performance.
“Having brought up five of my own every year, you
know, my dears,” she said over and over again to her
intimate friends ; and they all nodded their heads wisely,
and congratulated her again on her admirable acting.

Tableau No. II. was the Spinning Scene. Mrs.
Speckles in a -frilled cap and spectacles, sat beside a
wheel made of twigs and holly-leaves. And Miss Wren,
in a wonderful spangled garment, leant over her shoulder,
with one claw grasping a very large prickle. This tableau,
too, was somewhat marred at the close ; for, unfortunately,
Miss Wren lost her balance, and fell head-over-heels into
the very middle of the wheel, breaking it to bits, and
startling poor Mrs, Speckles so very much that she
jumped up with a loud scream.

Miss Wren was soothed and comforted by the gentle-
men, but the ladies began to be a little vexed, and jealous
of her, and to say that she had spoilt two tableaux
already, and that each of them could have done much
better. And Miss Wren, in an injured voice, offered to
give up her part in the Jast tableau, and said she knew
she couldn’t act, but Mr. Fly-Catcher had been so very
pressing. And then Mr. Fly-Catcher, who was to be
“Mrs. Tom Tit’s “At Home” 135

the Prince, said that if Miss Wren did not act, he wouldn't ;
and I am afraid there would have been a sad quarrel if

the brownies had not stepped in at this point and made
peace.

So Miss Wren took her part in the last tableau, and
everybody agreed that she did it excellently. She lay
quite flat and rigid upon her back, with her two little legs
sticking right up into the air. And Mr. Fly-Catcher
stooped over her so naturally and easily, that everybody
declared they were not a bit surprised to see him really
kiss her at the finish, he threw himself so thoroughly into
the part. While Mr. Thrush, quite inspired by such an
example, actually proposed to Miss Speckles behind the
door, and was accepted immediately.

They had a few more tableaux. “Beauty and the
Beast””—they had to call in a field mouse to be the beast
—and “Cinderella trying on the Glass Slipper,” and “ Red
Riding Hood,” and “ Little Miss Muffet.” But the long
delightful evening came to an end at last, and everybody
was obliged to go home, thanking Mrs. Tit heartily for
her hospitality, and declaring that they had never enjoyed
an evening so much in their lives, “so novel, so instructive,
so artistic.” While the brownies tidied up the inside of

the old tree, and carried the glow-worms home to their
136 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

wives and families. For the reason that the world is
always so tidy in its own beautiful wonderful fashion, is
because the brownies believe the proverb, “A place for

everything, and everything in its place.”


Kao

he

Ss 8
nT eae, 2
— oat

eels



A Song of the Autumn
Moors

I.

OME away! Come away!
Leave the city’s workaday !
Come where the brown hill-summit tries
To top the blue of the autumn skies,

Where the heather hangs down its pink-lipped bells,
And prisons the dew in its waxen wells,
And the wind blows fresh and the wind blows high,
And the whole world’s only the moors and I!
138 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

The brown road climbs, with many a turn,
And follows the course of the fern-fringed burn
With its tumbling creaming waters.

In the rock-piled hollow the ash-trees grow,
And toss to the world, when the breezes blow,

The berries, their red-cheeked daughters.

Oh, the great brown stones in their glistening wet,

And their jagged crowns with the lichens set,
And the moss in velvet growing !

And the twisted bramble-trail, that dips

To the waterfall its crimson lips,

And the rare fresh breeze that’s blowing !

Oh, the sweep of the uplands, grand and free,
And the mountain-burn and the berried tree,
And the whinberry slopes in their glossy green,
And the mist on the purpled fruit between,

And the deep blue peaks in the distant sky!
Earth holds out her arms, and her children cry, .
“We are yours, we are yours, for an autumn day ;

Come and kiss us, and kiss us, and kiss us away!”
A Song of the Autumn Moors 139

II.

Hearken to a brownie grumbling,
All his trouble he is mumbling
To himself among the grass.
Bees, in brown and golden glory,
Catch the love-lilt of his story,
Wafted to them as they pass.

“Velvet-coats! I ask you, whether

Human poets call my heather
Purple, in their foolish song ?

Oh, these poets and their fancies !

Purple? ’Tis the tint of pansies!
Go and tell them they are wrong!

“Tell them that my heather, lying
Far upon the hilltop, dying,

Then, maybe, is purple gowned.
But my heather in its beauty,
Loveliness its only duty,

Never yet was purple found!

“ Take the pale-rose flush, adorning.
With its blush a Christmas morning,
Lay it gently on the green.
140

Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Steal the deep blue summer shadows
From the depths of Alpine meadows,

Paint their softness in between.

“ Look at it, and tell me whether
You have limned, or not, my heather,
With its wee pink-painted bells.
Gather yonder spike, and show it
To that blind-eyed mortal poet,

Who in song such folly tells !”

The brownie’s grumble is over—
Maybe it was only a dream.
But the golden-brown honey-bees hover
By the side of the mountain stream
Where the heather, pink-pale as the clover,

Lies back in the sunset-gleam.
| -LSO-
BCL



HE story that I am going to tell you now is very

TT beautiful, but in some parts very sad. There
are a great many fairies in it. It begins with

fairies, and fairies make the middle of it beautiful, and
dance and sing through it until it is done. And it is
so full of fairy music that I have had to write down some
of their songs for you; because, you see, the brownies
always sing, instead of talking as we do. I will tell you,
first of all, the lullaby that they sang one night to the

flowers :—
142 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“ Golden sunbeams, fare you well !
Grey-clad eventide, good-bye !
Hark! From where the fairies dwell
Rises sweet a lullaby. :
Kissed to silver by the moon
Round the trees the dewdrops weep !
Hushed to slumber by our tune,
All the blossoms go to sleep!

“Lullaby, Roses ;

Lilies, lullaby!

Each blossom closes
Its dewy eye.

All through the shadowed hours
Sleeping they lie.

Lullaby, little flowers,

Lullaby !

“ Onward, onward, through the glade!

We have work to do to-night.

All the blossoms must be laid
Fast asleep till morning light,

Rocked by swaying sister-leaves,
Nestling to their mother-stem,

Whiie the trembling moon-mist weaves
Silver cov’ring over them.

“Lullaby, roses,

Lilies, lullaby !

Each blossom closes
Its dewy eye.

All through the shadowed hours
Sleeping they lie,

Lullaby, little flowers,

Lullaby !”
The Story of Isobel 143

Suddenly one of the elves gave a little start. He
had been sitting between two thorns, singing the lullaby
to a wee pink bud, and it had brushed its soft lips against
his cheek, and a whisper had come softly from the brown
and golden heart. He listened in silence for a minute,
and then he jumped down on to the moss, and called all
the other fairies to him.

“Brothers,” he said, very eagerly and anxiously
indeed, “the little Rose has told me a very sad and
dreadful secret. The south wind was kissing her this
afternoon. I must speak to her about ¢#at later on—but
he whispered to her that the Witch-Queen of the Marsh
has vowed to steal the soul of the little Earth-child,
Isobel !” .

Then the elves looked very sorry and troubled, and
‘began asking each other what they must do; and while
they were talking in low sad whispers, another song came
echoing over the moss, and all the little elves that teach
the Earth her beautiful songs came in sight. And
they were the Spirits of Music, and this is what they
sang :—

“Sings the stream a dainty song
Yonder in the hollow.

Whereso’er we pass along,
Sweetest sounds do follow.
144 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

We have taught the thrush his lay,
And the bee her humming,

All Earth’s music, night and day,
Wakens at our coming !

Ever, ever, o’er the grass
Melody is ringing,

All the tuneful things we pass
Bursting into singing.

Onward through the throbbing night,
Full of Nature’s voices,

Burdened with her own delight,
Mother-Earth rejoices.

They stopped singing when they saw the sad faces of
the Spirits of the Flowers. But they knew what was the
matter, for the ripples had sung it to them as they passed.
Because, you see, all the lovely and tuneful things that
lived in the forest loved that dear little maiden, Isobel,
for she often came and watched and listened to them.
And so the Spirits of Music joined in the talk, and all the
elves wondered how they were to save the child, And
they determined to ask advice of the Spirits of Beauty,
who were even now dancing towards them in the moon-
light. For, however sad the rest of the world may be,
the Spirits of Beauty are never unhappy, for they always
find out something lovely, and rejoice over it. And you
must read their song if you want to find out what
they do.
The Story of Isobel 145

“Trip it merrily, trip it merrily,
Over the soft-green sward !
Under the oak-tree shadows verily
Beautiful things are stored.
And the pure faint gold of the stars,
And the depth of the purple shade,
And the trembling light of the moonlit night
Are the best things Heaven has made!
We have painted the butterflies’ wings
With the colours we kissed from the flowers.
We have tinted all beautiful things
With the beauty that ever is ours.
We have silvered the rays of the moon,
Tossed diamonds into the foam,
And we'll trip it away till the dawn of day
In our beautiful forest home.
Trip it cheerily, trip it cheerily,
Here, where the shadows lie.
Is there a heart can wander wearily
Under a jewelled sky ?
For the calm of the starry night,
And the breath of the sleeping flowers,
And the beautiful things Mother Nature brings
Make her solemn gladness ours.”

No sooner had the last note of their beautiful happy
song gone away up to the stars than all the waiting elves
began talking at once. It was rather unmannerly of them;
but, you see, they were not thinking of themselves, but of
Isobel. However, the Spirits of Beauty knew more about
it than any of them. The butterflies had told them, and
the butterflies flit from flower to flower and hear all the

L

%
146 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

news. The Spirits of Beauty knew that the Witch-Queen
would have a birthday with the dawning of the morrow’s
sun. She would be a thousand years old! But the sad
part about it was that she had spent all those years in
being as wicked as she possibly could be, and now she
had to be punished. For she had given away her soul to
the King of Evil, and to-morrow it would be his for ever-
more, unless she could steal the sweet sinless soul of a
pure maiden, to give him in place of her own. And so she
was going to try and steal the soul of Isobel. And the
Spirits of Beauty said that the only way in which Isobel
could be saved was by allowing no shadow of sin to fall
upon her that night. If once a wrong thought or a sinful
wish crossed her mind, the Witch-Queen would throw her
cruel spell about the child, and steal her tender white soul
away from her.

So all the elves promised one another to leave their
work for that one night, and to watch over Isobel until the
day. The Spirits of the Flowers promised to wave their
sweet blossoms before her, and to offer her the incense
of their fragrance, that her eyes might look only upon
the innocence and the purity of the flowers. The Spirits
of Music promised to sing to her their softest, brightest
songs, that her ears might be deaf to all except Earth’s
The Story of Isobel 147

music. And the Spirits of Beauty promised to fill her
mind with lovely and holy thoughts, so that there should
be no room in it for the guests of Sin. And, when they
had promised this, their faces grew bright and sweet with
the love that they felt for Isobel, and they went softly

away into the shadows of the forest, all singing together—

“ Cool and sweet the night-wind, blowing,

Wafts our love-vows to her side—

Little Earth-child, all unknowing,
Coming through the eventide.

Lips all rosy—rich with laughter ;
Eyes all starry—sweet with calm ;

Breezes ! holy echoes waft her !
Nature ! keep her free from harm ! ”

And the nightingales heard the love-song, and began
‘to sing it, far away in the copse. But somebody else
heard it too, and that somebody was the Witch-Queen of
the Marsh. And she rose from her home on the borders
of the forest, and stood like a wicked purple shadow
among the reeds, her arms and face gleaming white
against the darkness, while jewelled snakes flashed in her
hair, and ugly brown toads squatted at her feet. And the
song that she sang was weird and wild, and echoed like an

angry wailing over the slimy water, and silenced the echo

of the Spirits’ prayer.
148 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“ Hear you the water flowing

Down to the sea?

So are the minutes going
Left still to me!

Hear you the breezes sweeping
Over the grass?

Swifter the moments, leaping,
Shriek as they pass!

“Will o’ the Wisp, come hither! I await thee!
Thou who hast made all mortal men to hate thee!
To a fit task, this midnight, would I mate thee! ”

Then, across the mud and the brown water and the
oozing slime, came Will 0’ the Wisp, dancing eerily along
with his blue lantern. And as he sprang, light as thistle-
down, from the surface of the marsh, and danced up and
down in front of his mistress, he seemed to be a little
black imp bathed in blue light, with wicked laughing eyes,
and feet that were never still. He laughed as he danced
there, and he laughed as she spoke to him and told him
to hasten away to his work—to decoy the sweet maiden
Isobel to the marsh; for already an army of bats had
tempted her from her chamber, and she stood in the
castle grounds alone. And Will o’ the Wisp laughed all
the time, and was still laughing wildly and uncannily, as
he danced away into the forest to do his mistress’s
bidding.
The Story of Isobel 149

And then, through the trees, came a strange flapping
and whirring sound, and a whole army of bats flew out,
and made great blots of blackness against the calm
whiteness of the moonlight. And they told their mistress,
in harsh shrill voices, the story of the wicked deed that
they had done :— .

“In the dreary castle ground,
Where the darkest shadows dwell,
Where the frog-notes echo round,
Stands the maiden Isobel !
Fearless are her lifted eyes,
Full of courage is her smile,
In her heart no evil lies,
Pure her soul from thought of guile.”

And then they told how they had whirred and flapped
‘against the chamber-window of the child, so that she had
been tempted out into the moonlight, and had wandered
farther and farther away from the house, until they had
decoyed her to the spot where Will o’ the Wisp’s work
was to begin. And, when they had told their story, they
hung themselves in black unlovely clusters about the
trees, and waited for the coming of Isobel.

And presently, through the tree-trunks, there came
back the dancing light, and Will o’ the Wisp flitted once
150 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

more into sight, and, following his blue lantern, came
Isobel.

What shall I tell you about her, except that she was
just Isobel? Was she an Earl’s daughter, do you ask, as
they always are in the fairy-stories? Or was she the
child of a wood-cutter living on the borders of the Earl’s
territory? I do not know, for I never asked the fairies
about that. And, you see, the fairies told me the tale. I
only know that she had two clear eyes, and that her soul
was as clear as they were. That she had a sweet, true
face, and her soul was as sweet and true as that was.
And that she wore a pure white gown, falling in soft folds
over her fect, and that her soul was every whit as white
and pure as her gown. For, you see, the fairies were not
thinking of her father or her mother, or her riches or her
appearance, but only about her soul. And so that was all
they told me.

She came out into the moonlight, with her little hands
stretched before her, and her two eyes shining like stars.
She had never been so close to the moonshine before, and
she thought what a very wonderful and beautiful thing it
was. She-neither saw the Witch-Queen of the Marsh
hiding among the bulrushes, nor the bats hanging all

about the trees; and she had not glanced at the blue
Se.
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The Story of Isobel 153

light of the Will o’ the Wisp when once she had seen the
white still glory of the moonbeams. All that she thought
of was the beauty of God’s wonderful earth, and she gazed
and gazed at it until her heart was so full of love and
wonder that she felt as if it must break. And at last
she knelt down upon the moss, and said her prayers,—not
that she had not already said them that evening, but
somehow she felt as if it were a natural thing to do;
and then, finding a cosy spot upon the very brink of the
marsh, and making a pillow out of her own pink little
palms, she cuddled her cheek into them, and fell fast
asleep. And then all the elves came back again out of
the forest to begin their watch. The Spirits of the Flowers
waved their blossoms about her, and crowned and covered
her with sweet-smelling bloom, and hid her from the
cunning eyes of the bats. The Spirits of Music sang to
her about truth and goodness, and hushed into silence the
croaking of the toads in the marsh. And the Spirits of
Beauty knit all the silver moonbeams into white armour,
to protect her from the light that Will o’ the Wisp kept
flashing across her closed eyes, But, somehow, even the
white armour of the moonbeams could not prevent
Will o’ the Wisp from dancing about the sleeping form of

Isobel. Beauty was powerless against him ; because, ycu
154. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

see, he had a‘strange eerie beauty of his own. And at
last the Spirits of Music, seeing the sore. strait of their
brothers, took each one his lyre, and sang until the echo
of their song reached the stardrifts of Heaven, and sum-

moned the Spirits of Zrue Light to their aid :—

“Music and Beauty’s power,

Spell of each little flower,

Fail in this midnight hour,
Seek we for aid !

Stretching imploring arm,

Groping for higher charm,

Struggling ’gainst cruel harm, .
Guarding the maid.

“ Lamps of the dewy night,
Clear to our yearning sight,
Radiant with inward light,

Pure, undefiled,
Look down with pitying eyes,
Stoop from the far-off skies,
Hearken ! Earth’s music cries, -
‘Come to the child !’”

That was the litany they sang, and the answer came

swiftly to them, falling like a sweet echo from the stars :—

“ Children of Love and Light,
Haste from the dome of night,
Taking swift earthward flight

Down moonlit bars !


The Story of Isobel 155

Straight from the far-away,

Marshaled in fair array,

Earnests of sunlit day,
Souls of the Stars !”

And all the Spirits of Light came sailing down the
moonbeams, looking like beautiful white angels, with a
golden star shining upon the forehead of each one of
them ; and all the Earth-fairies bowed their heads for a
moment, because the children of Light were higher than
they, and had left their home in the stardrifts to care for
little Isobel. And they stepped to earth from the moon-
beams, and came lovingly and tenderly about the
child.

“Will o’ the Wisp,” they said, “begone! Hide thee
thy false light, and shrink from the true radiance of the
Stars, that draw man’s spirit upwards, while thou dost but
lure him to his death. Begone!”

Then Will o’ the Wisp flung his arms above his head
with a low cry, and, wrapping his dark cloak about his
lantern, hid himself and his false blue light among the
reeds. For he hated the steady radiance of the Stars ;
and the clear light that they shed all around them had
disclosed his foulness. For Will o’ the Wisp is the child
of disease and death.

But the Spirits all drew closely about Isobel ; and
156 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

thanked the Souls of the Stars for what they had done;
and sang softly, playing upon their lyres :—

“ Brothers, thank you for your aid :
Evil shrinks away dismayed ;
Holy thoughts and holy mood
Have the little maiden wooed ;
Nature’s pure and mystic spell
Shields the earth-child, Isobel.”

The Spirits of the Stars promised that they too would
guard the soul of the child until the day. And so the
fairies of Earth and the fairies of Heaven stood like an
army about Isobel, and the bats and the toads and Will o’
the Wisp dared not come near her.

But the Witch-Queen of the Marsh had been watching
the battle between Good and Evil, and now she thought
that 4er turn had come. And she chuckled to herself,
wickedly and softly; for she knew that so strange, so
wonderful is the power of the King of Evil, that even the
fairies cannot fight against it at times, and the only thing
by which it may be conquered is a pure white human
soul, kissed with Mother Carey’s kiss of everlasting love.
Isobel’s soul was like that, but the wicked Witch-Queen
hoped that by her arts she could cast a stain upon it, and
then steal it away to be her own. So she wound her
The Story of Isobel roy

dark gown all about her, and stepped from the shadow of
the rushes into the radiant light of the Stars.

She shrank a little as she did.so, for even she, bold
in her crafty wickedness, feared the glory of their rays.
And then, in a harsh voice, she told them to stand aside,
because it was now “er hour, der turn; and she was all-
powerful in the short time of darkness before the dawn.
For one little hour she was permitted to wear human
shape, and so to tempt the soul of Isobel, that by her
own purity the child should stand—or else by her own
frailty she should fall. And all the Spirits knew then that
it must be so, and they were very sad. So they went
away to a little distance, singing a soft warning to
Isobel :—

“Child, about thee we have thrown

Mystic panoply of good !

Child, henceforth thou stand’st alone,
Armoured with thy maidenhood.

Guard thy thoughts, oh, guard them well,
From all taint of evil free ;

Keep thy whiteness, Isobel,
Lest she steal thy soul from thee

1»

' Meanwhile the Witch-Queen disguised herself under
human form, and hid with a long cloak the slimy shadows

of her gown. Her hands were human, but they were long
158 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

and white and cruel. Her feet were human, but they trod
silently and swiftly across the ground. And her face was
human, but it was like no other woman’s face, for it had
never been crossed by a single ray of tenderness. So it
was scarcely human after all, for it had never seemed:
Divine. And she went up to where Isobel lay, and put
her hand upon the child, and awoke her.

Isobel did not seem ‘startled. She had never been
afraid of anybody or anything in her whole life. That
was because her soul was still quite white and pure. So
she only rubbed her eyes, and looked up into the Witch-
Queen’s face, and rubbed her eyes a second time, and lay
back on the moss and went to sleep again. And then ~
the Witch-Queen spoke, and her voice was so harsh and
yet so strange and low, that Isobel woke up and stayed
wide-awake, for very wonder.

“Isobel,” the Witch-Queen said, “how is it that you
are sleeping here?”

The child smiled as she answered. Isobel always
smiled when she spoke, partly from politeness, and partly
because she had never in her life been unhappy.

“Madam,” she said, “I came out to look for the
fairies, and the moonlight was so beautiful that it sent

me to sleep, Who are you?”
The Story of Isobel 159

You must not think that Isobel meant to be rude when
she asked the Witch-Queen who she was, so abruptly.
She always tried to be courteous to everybody. But she
thought it was a little strange to meet an old lady in a
forest in the middle of the night, and for the old lady to
address her by name. I dare say that you would have
thought it a little strange too.

“J am a messenger from those very fairies that you
came out to see,” the Witch-Queen told her, triumphantly.
For she knew that Isobel could not see the Spirits standing
round. “They have given me a gift for you.”

“Have they?” said Isobel; and she smiled again.
She did not like to ask what it was, but she hoped that
it was a rag-doll for little Mary, or a story-book for lame
Tommy, or a basket of flowers for Widow Green ; for,
somehow, Isobel had never learnt to think about herself.

“T have three,” the Witch-Queen told her then, “and
you shall have your choice. The first is Wealth. Isobel,
would you not like to be rich? to live in luxury. all
your life, and have men do you homage for your shining
gold? to drink from a diamond chalice, and to eat from
a platter of pearl? to be robed in satins and velvets,
and to lie on couches made of roses? to be waited on

by white handmaidens from Greece and dark slaves
160 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

from Arabia? Would you not like all this, Isobel?”
But Isobel looked a little disappointed. She thought
of her own wholesome daily dinner, and came to the
conclusion that she would be very hungry and thirsty
indeed if she only drank her milk out of a diamond, and
ate her roast mutton and rice-pudding off a pearl. And
she could never saunter about the forest any more, if she
were to wear silk and velvet all day long. The couch of
roses sounded rather nice, but how it would crush the
poor roses that she loved! So she looked mournfully up
at the Witch-Queen with her great blue eyes, and, not
wishing to seem ungrateful to the fairies, murmured,
“You are very kind, ma’am.”

But the Witch-Queen tapped her foot impatiently upon
the moss. She saw that she had placed no temptation
before the child, and, speaking in the oiliest tones she
could command, she laid her second gift before Isobel.

“Then, have you no desire for Rank? Listen, Isobel ;
you shall be a mighty Queen. Emperors and Kings shall
bow to your decree. You shall rule over many countries.
and over many men. The whole world shall be at your
feet. Isobel, have you no desire for Rank?”

But Isobel looked more than mournful this time.
She almost looked vexed. She felt that the fairies were
The Story of Isobel 161

offering her very stupid gifts indeed. She began to think
that they must be laughing at her. And her eyes filled
with tears as she shook her head.

“What? You do not care for Rank?” exclaimed the
Witch-Queen, pretending to be very much surprised.
“Then, Isobel, I have only one more gift to offer you.
And that is Beauty. You shall be fairer than the moon-
light and sweeter than the dawn. Your loveliness shall
bring its sister, love. You shall be a fair sweet woman,
and rule men’s hearts. Come, Isobel, is not that a noble
aim?”

Then at last Isobel hesitated. Was not “a fair sweet
woman” what she always longed to be? And could this
dark-mantled dame really turn her into one by a single
stroke of her wand. She paused, and the Witch-Queen
was swift to see it.

“ Think of it, Isobel,” she whispered. “ Fhink of being
loved and admired by everybody! No more dull lessons,
no more childish play! But lovers and flowers and music,
and long happy days in-the forest, and yourself the centre
of it all. And I can give you this Beauty, Isobel; i can
give you this good.”

And then at last Isobel was tempted. She did so

love Beauty, and she did not see the subtle sin. But the
M
162 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

fairies saw it, and their warning came to her in sorrowful

melody :—

“ Little Earth-child, have a care.
Vanity, to maidens fair,
Is a subtle, cruel snare,
Fatal to thy Purity.
Call it by some other name,
Make it seem a noble aim,
Little Earth-child, all the same,
It is always vanity.

“ Stains of ‘self’ upon the soul,
Are the sprinklings from the bowl
That can crimson-dye the whole,
Steal it for Eternity.
Gaze upon the flower-gemmed ground,
Hear Earth’s music all around,
Till in Nature thou hast found
Once again thy Purity.”

Isobel heard them, and thought it was the nightingales ;
but she forgot herself for the moment in listening to them,
and would not have thought of herself again if the Witch-
Queen had not been swift to bring back the memory.

“Will you have my gift?” she whispered. “See, here
is its token!” She drew from beneath her cloak what
seemed to Isobel to be a jewelled crown. It was really
a jewelled snake; but the shadow of Sin had fallen
across the child’s eyes, although it had not yet reached
The Story’ of Isobel 1623

3

the whiteness of her soul. And her little hands went out
to grasp the crown, for she thought that it was very
beautiful indeed.

“See, I will put it upon your brows,” cried the Witch-
Queen, eagerly ; “I will twine the jewels in your golden
hair, and then you shall gaze in the mirror of the marsh,
and see that you are very beautiful.”

She laid the child’s head against her knee, and twisted
the snake about her forehead and hair; and then, rising
from the moss, took her by the hand, and led her to the
blue-lit mirror of the marsh.

And Isobel stood there, and gazed upon her image in
the water. And, as she gazed, a strange spell came over
her, and her childhood went away for ever. She had
grown into a maiden, loving and sweet as maidens are,
. but with one dark spot nestling in the quiet recesses of
her soul. And that one dark spot was Vanity. She saw
and: knew that she was beautiful, and she began to love
her beauty ; and, as she gazed, the spot grew into a big,
dark ‘shadow, and soiled all the whiteness of her soul.
And she began to laugh, and to dance, and to stretch out
her arms to the water, rejoicing in the reflection of her
loveliness, -

Then the Witch-Queen lifted her hands and naked arms

=
Die
164 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

up to the darkness, and summoned the deadliest of her
sprites to her aid :—

“ Gnomes of the Nightshade!
Do ye now your duty !
Instil your poison !
Steep her in her beauty !
Fill her with selfish joys surpassing number !
Weave her in web of sloth until she slumber! ”

And all the Gnomes of the Nightshade came creeping
and gliding from the wood, bearing their green strands
with the purple bloom. And they crept to the feet of
Isobel, and bound them fast; and they climbed about her
dainty limbs and wove them in the poisonous web. And
they knit her rosy fingers together, and wound themselves
about her white neck. And so they cast their spell of
deadly sleep upon her, until she lost consciousness and
fell, prone and senseless, upon the moss, the shadows about
her seeming to tell of the shadow that had fallen across
her soul.

Then all the Spirits wept, and were very sorry; and
their tears fell upon the moss, and the wood-sorrel
bloomed where they fell. For the wood-sorrel is like a
fairy’s tear. But the Witch-Queen was glad. She had

now won the soul of the child in lawful fight, and she
The Story of Isobel 165

raised her voice in a cruel hungry song to claim it for

her own.

“Maiden, yield up thy soul to my command !
See! I hold forth to thee expectant hand !
With panting bosom issue my decree!
Maiden, thou’rt mine! Yield up thy soul to me!



“ Cheeks snowy white,
Slow fitful breath !
Eyes starry bright,
All dimmed with death !
Loose, then, the strand ;
Break, then, the bowl!
Maid, I command,
Yield me thy soul!”
166 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

She stooped over Isobel, and laid her hand upon the
child’s bosom, and the witchery of her will had almost
drawn the sweet white soul from its home, when a long
cry echoed through the forest, a rapid footstep sped
through the ferns and the meadow-sweet, and young
Fabian flung himself upon the ground beside Isobel.

Who was Fabian, do you ask me? Ah! the fairies
did not tell me that, either. But he was brave and young
and true, and he loved the child Isobel with a strong
sweet love. Perhaps he was her father’s page. Perhaps
he was only a scullion in the kitchen of an Earl. Perhaps
he was the woodcutter’s assistant. It doesn’t matter, one
way or the other. But these were the days of chivalry,
and he was Isobel’s most tender knight. So that is how
you must think of him—as the brave soul that was one
day going to guard and cherish the tenderer one of his
little companion.

He had come to look for her, for she had been missed
from home. And through an opening in the trees he had
seen the Witch-Queen bending over her, and he had cried
aloud in his sudden fear, and had crushed all the
fragrance out of the meadow-sweet as he sprang forward,
And now he knelt beside her upon the ground, and im-

plored her to speak to him.
The Story of Isobel —-167

Meantime the Witch-Queen had started back. She
was a coward, and truth and strength and goodness terri-
fied her. And she hid her face in her long cloak when
Fabian looked at her with his clear earnest eyes, and
asked her what she had been doing to his Isobel.

“Away!” she muttered hoarsely in reply; “away,
and leave me to my spoil. The maiden is mine. I have
won her. Let me claim the soul that belongs to me!”

“The maiden is zo¢ yours,” said Fabian, sternly. “She
gave herself to mea year ago, and we sealed our betrothal
with a kiss. Fiend that you are, in what way have you
harmed my Isobel? She is not dead, because a colour
lies about her sweet mouth. But why is she so still and
cold? Why does she lie here with the nightshade strands
round her tender limbs, and toads from yonder marsh
across her feet ?”

“Because she is mine, I tell you;” and the Witch-
Queen’s voice rose to an angry shriek. “ Boy, away, lest
I do you some harm ; for while you are here, while you
throw the armour of Love about her, I cannot secure the ~
soul that belongs to me.”

“Then I will protect her so for evermore,” he cried
fearlessly, flinging his arms across Isobel. “Tell me

{”

what you want, and begone
168 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

_ “A soul, a soul, I want a pure white soul,” moaned the
Witch-Queen ; “and I have won it, and it is mine.”

“Listen ; you shall have mune,” then Fabian told her.
“Take your cruel spell from about the maiden’s heart, and
I will give you my soul, to be yours for evermore.”

His face was all bright with love as he spoke. And,
stretching his hands out to her, he offered her his own
soul in sacrifice. And somehow the words that he said
grouped themselves into tender harmonies, and floated

away up to the stardrifts, like a softly sung hymn :—

“ Seekest thou a spirit white,
Cleansed from every thought of sin ?
Love has filled my soul to-night,
Evil cannot enter in.
Pure as Heaven’s falling snow,
Such a soul must ever be ;
It is Love that made it so:
And I give it up to thee.

“ Thoughts of self must shrink and fade,

Evil cover both its eyes,

When Love’s banner is displayed,
Scrolléd with ‘self-sacrifice ’

Love, whatever men may say,
Cannot help but holy be:

Love has filled my soul to-day,
And I give it up to thee!”

He came towards her, still holding out his hands. But
The Story of Isobel 169

the Witch-Queen only shrank away, and, wailing ‘Go,
go! go!” wrapped herself closer in her mantle. For she
was awed and dazzled by the whiteness of his soul, and
had no power to touch its purity.

Then Fabian turned away and left her, and, kneeling
again beside Isobel, lifted his clasped hands, and prayed
‘to the great Mother Nature in whose lap they both lay.
“© Mother Nature, nurse of weary man, and minister
to all his need! Send thy children to help us. Open
mine eyes that they may pierce thy veil, and mine ears
that they may understand the music of thy language.
And show me the balm wherewith I may awaken Isobel,
and restore to her soul its lost purity.”

He prayed to Nature, for what is Nature but God?
And Nature answered him, and the Spirits of Light flung
their radiance on everything about him, so that he saw
the fairies standing round. And when Fabian saw them,
he was very glad, because he knew that his prayer had
been heard. And he bared his head, and waited until
they spoke.

Then one of the Spirits of Light came forward ; he
was the soul of the Morning Star. And he told the lad,
very softly indeed, that they had all come to help

him.
170 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Then tell me what to do,” Fabian pleaded — tell me
how to restore to my Isobel her lost purity.”

“Only one family of Nature’s children can do that,”
the Spirit told him; “and they are the snowflakes,
emblems of highest purity.”

“ But the snow is far away,” said Fabian, sadly ; “how,
then, can they come to her?”

“ They lie in their home close to the distant stardrifts,”
replied the Spirit, “waiting for Winter. But the prayer
of a pure mortal can bring them to earth.”

“And if I pray to them?” asked Fabian, hesitatingly,
“what then?”

“Then they will fall softly to earth, and will fold the
sleeping child in their white arms, and they will kiss her
into the long sleep that men call death. But her soul will
grow pure again, and will fly away to the stars.”

Then Fabian was very sad, but he thanked the
Morning Star all the same. And all the Spirits comforted
him, and told him that it must be best. And so he kissed
Isobel very tenderly and reverently, and then lifted up

his litany to the snow :—

“ Isobel, my Isobel,
Death alone can break the spell
Resting all about thee, dear ;
Hush thee, Sweetheart, I am near.
The Story of Isobel 171

Mine the hand,
_ Mine the call.
O’er the land
The snow shall fall,
Take thee to its pure embrace,
Kiss thy hands and shroud thy face,
Isobel, my Isobel!

‘Gentle spirits of the snow,
Stealing from the far-off skies,
Falling, falling, soft and slow,
Come to where the maiden lies.
I who love her, ah ! so well,
Yield to you my Isobel.

“ Isobel, my Isobel,
I am near thee, it is well.
Sweet, it is with sobbing breath
That I yield thee up to death.
Dear, afraid
Thou need’st not be !
I am laid
All close to thee.
Thus together will we lie,
Thus together will we die,
Isobel, my Isobel.”

And when he had finished his sorrowful prayer, he lay
down quite close to Isobel, and shut his eyes and fell
asleep. Then a strange music came floating down the
moonbeams, and white misty forms filled the forest

glades. And the song they sang was very sad :-—
172 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

“Boy, in answer to thy song,
Yet with tears that, falling, freeze,
In a pure and shining throng
Flit the snowflakes through the trees.
Strange to them the summer night,
Where the northern winds are dumb,
New and wondrous is the sight
Unto which the snowflakes come.

“We will weave a wedding veil,
Fabian, for thy little bride,—
Lace that glimmers silver-pale,
Hair with shining jewels tied.
Bridal gown is bridal shroud,
As the frosts about them creep.
Voices low and faces bowed,
Hush! The boy and maiden sleep.”

The Spirits floated away again as soon as they had
finished their song. But Isobel and Fabian lay hidden
in a drift of snow. And all the other fairies came softly

about them, and sang them their last lullaby :—

“Sleep, maiden sleep!
Pure again thy heart,
No more hath evil part
Sweet soul, with thee.
We cannot even weep
It so should be.
Sleep, maiden, sleep.

“Where the March-blooms sweet,
And all pearly-neat
The Story of Isobel 173

Lie pure on the leafless thorn ;
Where the king-cups hold,
In a chalice of gold,

The dew of the early morn;
Where the wind-flower blows
And the sorrel grows

On the forest’s leaf-strewn floor,
O’er the tender grass

. Will the maiden pass
With her footsteps nevermore.

“Then sleep, children, sleep !
Snowclad though the ground,
Roses bloom around,

And night birds sing,

And fairies watch will keep

In fairy ring.

Slee , children, sleep.”

The last echo of the lullaby had scarcely died away,
when a clear amber light came creeping over the hill tops,
and made all the stars lock quite pale. And the bats,
when they saw it, flew away to hide in the ruins near at
hand. And the toads slunk silently into the rank grass.
And Will o’ the Wisp hid himself under a flat stone.
And the Gnomes of the Nightshade hastened away into
the forest, because the strands that they had woven about

Isobel were quite frozen and dead. And they all cried
174 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

out, “ Lost! lost! lost!” as they fled, until echo repeated
it, and the woods rang with the sound :—

“Lost! lost! lost!
Away, then, all away !
Lost ! lost! lost !
For yonder shines the day !
The moon and stars are paling,
And ever, echo-tossed,
Comes back the Witch’s wailing,
Lost! lost! lost !”

And then the Witch-Queen gave a great cry, and her
human form went away from her, and, flinging her arms
above her head, she sank slowly in the waters of the marsh,
and was lost to sight for ever. But the fairies all turned to
welcome the dawn of day. And they sang a happy song

again, because the long sorrowful night was over at last :-—

“Welcome, welcome, Queen of Day !
Lift a solemn, gladsome lay,
For the night has passed away.

“Comes the Dawn with silent tread,
Leaving gold the cowslip-bed,
Lifting, aureoled, her head.

“Radiant glances from her eyes .
Flash upon the pearly skies,
Where her rosy footprint lies.”

And, as they sang, the Queen of the Dawn herself
The Story of Isobel 175

stepped slowly down the hillside, and came into the forest,
filling it with rosy mist. For she had missed the Morning
Star from his place in the sky, and had seen him shining
far below her on the earth, And she had come to
question him,

And so all the fairies clustered lovingly and respect-
fully about her, and told her, in hushed tones, the story of
the night, and pointed out the snow-drift where Isobel and
Fabian lay. And the eyes of the Queen of Dawn filled
with tears as she spoke.

“They shall not die,” she said; “they shall awaken
from their sleep, and be the nobler man, the braver woman,
for what they have borne. For through much suffering
must men sometimes walk to Good.”

And she went, and laid her warm strong hands upon
the snowdrifts, and they fell away from about the children’s
forms, and turned into morning dew. And where every
dewdrop fell a snowdrop sprang up, so that Iscbel and
Fabian lay in a bed of nodding white flowers. But the
nightshade strands were gone, for they had been frozen
into nothingness. And the colour crept back to the lips
of the sleeping children, and the warmth to their hands ;
and they woke and looked up into the face of the Queen

of Dawn.
176 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And she smiled at them, and told them all that they
had forgotten about the night. And she told them to go
out into the world, but to always keep the whiteness of
their souls. And she bade Fabian watch over Isobel, and
Isobel be loving and true to Fabian. And then she went
away back to her home among the clouds, and all the
Spirits of the Stars went with her, and the other
fairies hastened away to the Palace of the Earth. For .
they were behindhand with their work, and had a very
great deal to do.

And Isobel and Fabian looked into each other’s eyes,
and saw each other's souls shining in them: for when
people love each other very much they can always do that.
And when they had looked, they kissed each other. And
this time their souls got quite mixed, through their lips.
But they didn’t mind that at all, but just clasped their

hands together, and went slowly home.


A Charm of Beech Trees

I.

IGHT and shadow, shadow and light,
{ Down with the fern leaves playing ;
Little sun-fairies, emerald dight,
Over the richness straying.
Vista of silver touched with grey,
That far to the eastward reaches ;

Moonlight caught ’twixt the palms of day!
Home of the silver beeches!

Green and silver, silver and green,
Mingling one with another.

Aisles where the God Pan walks unseen,
Church of the great Earth Mother.

N
178

Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Chancel and transept, nave and choir,
Where the brook’s soft anthem, ringing
Up to the point of each silver spire,
Joins in the wild birds’ singing.

Gold and purple, purple and gold,
Bitter and sweet together.

The trailing blossoms of sleep unfold
In the hum of the magic weather.

Ivy-wreathed carpets, pearled with dew
Dropped in the wild flower’s chalice ;

Brownies tripping it, two by two,

Elves of the wondrous palace.

II.

A fairy with silver fingers
Has slid from a silver sky, .
And the grace of her presence lingers
Round the beech-trees, slender and high !
For the forest elves tell the story
That she stole all the moon-gems bright,
And twisted their fair pale glory
Round the beech-tree trunks one night!
A Charm of Beech Trees 179

III.

Next, a cobweb, for its lightness,
Painted she with sea-wave brightness,
Tossed it, laughing, to the breeze ;
Bidding zephyr float a measure,
Sail the mazes with his treasure,

Till it cobwebbed all the trees.

Zephyr spun the pale-green glory

Round about the beech-trees hoary,
And the green the silver kissed.

Tender lacework hung he round them,

Left them fairer than he found them,
Folded in an emerald-mist.

IV.

Green and silver, silver and green,
Under the blue together,
Touched with the tender vapour sheen

Of the misty summer weather.
180 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Whispering vows to the courtly breeze
As their topmost shrine he reaches,
Aisle upon aisle of moon-dyed trees,

Home of the silver beeches !


The Story of the Gorse

TT HERE is an old, old saying—is there not ?—that,

“when the gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out

of fashion.” And it is quite true, every word of
it, because the gorse never zs out of bloom, and so kissing
is always the most fashionable thing in the world.

But it is every bit the doing of the brownies, all the
same. They found out the secret of kissing long ago, and
they sent the message out to the world on the breath of
the gorse. For its breath is so warm and soft and sweet, .
that there is nothing else so like a kiss in Creation.

When men and women first smelt the gorse they wanted
182 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

to invent something that was just like the scent. So they
invented kissing—at least, they thought they did; but it
was the work of the brownies really.

However, the brownies knew that if once the gorse
stopped blooming the world would forget its new accom-
plishment, so they took care to prevent such a sad thing
happening. They planted gorse-bushes up and down all
over the mountains, and covered the hills with the tender,
golden bloom. And they told off a great many of their
number to keep constant watch over the flowers, and to
water and tend them very carefully, so as to be sure of
always having a little thorny spray of blossom somewhere.
This was hard work now and then in winter-time, but the
elves were so quick and watchful that the catastrophe they
dreaded had never yet taken place, and the world had
gone on kissing as comfortably and lovingly as usual.

However, there came at last one very hard, very snowy
winter. Oh, how busy the brownies were! As well-as
having to look after the snowflakes, and keep the robins
warm, and comfort the poor little children who had no
fires, they had all this trouble with the gorse. And it
didn’t like the cold at all, When it poked out its little
yellow buds and saw the snow, it wanted to go to sleep
like the other flowers, and the brownies had to coax and
The Story of the Gorse 18 3

humour it to make it come out at all. Even then it
grumbled the whole time, and tried to prick the poor little
elves, and said that kissing was a ridiculous custom, and,
for its part, it wasn’t going to encourage any such thing.
And at last it grew so cross and unmanageable that every
bit of it went to sleep in spite of the brownies, all except
one unselfish little spray somewhere up in the north of
Scotland, that was so sorry for the elves it declared it
would go on blooming as long as ever it could.

But it could not go on blooming for ever, and the elves
knew it. How careful they were of that little spray, to be
sure! How anxiously they watched the yellow buds
opening out from their wee brown sheaths! How ten-
derly they guarded them from the rough wind, and coaxed
down to them the wintry sunbeans! And what excur-
sions they made over the country to try and find just one
little sprig that should bloom before the gallant yellow
flowers had faded away. But it was all in vain. The
poor, good little spray could not help fading, although it
tried its very best to live. And the rest of the gorse was
crosser than ever, and stuck out its prickles like a porcu-
pine when the brownies tried to reason with it, and refused
to let the tiniest peep of amber shine among its thorny

green; so that, at last, all the tender kisses of the whole
184. Brownies and Rose-Leaves

world were depending upon one yellow bud of gorse right
up in Scotland.

It was the last bud of the dying spray, and though it
smiled hopefully at the brownies, and swelled itself out to
quite an unnatural size, it too began at last to fade; and
one night, the evening before Christmas Eve, a great
snowstorm came whirling over the moors, and tossed the
little spray upon its windy bosom, and tore the last
bud away from its mother-stem, and swept it off across the
hilltops, like a fragrant golden flake of snow.

And when Christmas Eve dawned, clear and white
after the storm, the gorse was out of bloom, and all the
men and women in the big snowy world had forgotten
how to kiss one another.

How strange it was, to be sure! Little Effie was the
first to find it out. You see, she and her toddle of a
brother had quarrelled the night before, because Effie said
‘that Mother Carey was plucking her chickens, and that
their white feathers were whirling about in the air, and
Ronald declared that he didn’t believe a word of that
rubbish—the snowflakes were diamonds, and would sink
down, down, down into the earth, and cuddle up together
in the big mines below, until the miners came to dig them

out; and they argued about it until Effie had cried with
The Story of the Gorse 185

vexation, and Master -Ronald had marched off to bed as
proudly as his fat little legs would carry him, declaring
that Effie was “a girl;” and, although it was quite true,
Effie did not like it being remarked upon in that scornful
manner. :

So they had both gone to bed without kissing one
another, and their hearts were rather heavy when they
awoke. Effie could not remember at first what was the
matter. She puzzled and puzzled, feeling quite sure that
something was wrong, but not knowing what in the world
it could be. She had been cross to Ronald, yes, she
remembered that. And she wanted very much to ask
him to forgive her, and to—to—to—what was it that she
wanted to do to him? She couldn’t think, but she was
sure something was needed to make them friends again,
She would go and ask him himself; perhaps he might be
able to tell her what it was that they always did when
they had quarrelled and made it up again. So she
tumbled out of her little white cot, and pattered across the
landing to the room where Ronald slept. He sat up in
bed when he heard her coming, and held out his arms.
And she tumbled straight into them, and laid her cheek
against his, and held him close, and when they had both
whispered, “I’m sorry,” they cuddled up together like two
186 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

roses on one stalk. But still they hadn’t done that some.
thing, and presently Effie sat up and began to wonde
about it.

“Ronnie,” she said, in a very puzzled tone, “what do
we generally do when we are forgiving one another ?”

Ronald shook his head.

“T can’t think,” he murmured disconsolately ; “I know
we don’t seem to have dorie it properly.”

He gazed at Effie in silence, and by-and-by she made
a suggestion.

“Suppose,” she said, with a feeble attempt at bright-
ness, “ suppose we shake hands.”

“Very well,” answered Ronald. So they shook hands
in a very solemn and depressed fashion, and then sat
looking at one another like a couple of very wise and very
perplexed little owls.

Nurse came in presently to dress them, and her bright
good-humoured face made them both feel a little happier.
She wished them “Good morning” very merrily, and
carried Effie off to her own room. But when she had
bathed and dressed the little girl, somehow nurse too
began to look anxious and depressed.

“Bless me! Miss Effie,” she said, “ have I fastened all
your hooks and eyes?”
The Story of the Gorse 187

“Yes, every one, nurse,” Effie told her; “look and
see.” She twisted round, with her back to nurse, who
anxiously ran her fingers down the fastenings of the
child’s frock.

“Well, well! I never!” she muttered ; “I am certain I
haven’t done a// as I ought to have done. Miss Effie,
dear, have you really said your prayers?”

“Really and truly, nurse,” said Effie, earnestly.
“Don’t you remember ?”

“Well now, I declare,” cried nurse, “if I don’t feel as
if I’d forgotten something, but what it is I can’t for the life
of me think! I don’t believe I gave you a proper bath,
Miss Effie.”

Nurse looked so inclined to undress little Effie and
wash and dress her all over again, that the child took
alarm, and ran away down the stairs to breakfast, feeling
sure that the nurse had forgotten something, but quite
unable to say what it was.

How was it that breakfast seemed so unnatural that
Christmas Eve? Mother said “Good morning” to her
children as sweetly and as brightly as ever, but there was
still the feeling of something missing. Mother looked a
little anxious herself, and did not answer when father

cried, “ Bless me, how late it is! I must be off to the
188 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

city!” But she called him back in a puzzled voice when
he hastened away from breakfast, and, looking into his
face, said, “My dear?” in an inquiring sort of way, while
he gazed back at her, and rubbed his forehead.

“Ay, ay, mother,” he said perplexedly, “I have
forgotten something, I feel sure; but I can’t think what
it is. However, find it if you can and send it after me!”
And in another moment he was gone,

Sister Agatha, too, was troubled that day, although she
was to be married in a month or two, and Effie’s and
Ronald’s new brother was the “ nicest, dearest man in the
world ;” at least, such was Effie’s opinion. He came to see
Agatha in the afternoon, and although her face was as
sweet and bright, her manner as serene as ever, there was
a wistful look somewhere in the shadows of her eyes that
was reflected in his. They both looked as if they had lost
something, and nobody in the whole world could find it

_ for them.

“This is a very disagreeable Christmas Eve,” said
little Ronald, grumpily, sitting in the twilight when the
long, long day was nearly over. “I hope Christmas Day
won't be as nasty.”

“It oughtn’t to be as horrid as it is,” said Effie,

plaintively, “when we have eaten so many goodies, and
The Story of the Gorse 189

everybody has been so kind, and pussy has had kittens,
and everything.”

She cuddled one of the wee kittens as she spoke, and
put it up against her little face. She would have kissed it,
but, you see, she had forgotten how, so she could only put
it down again with the new vague feeling of something
missing. ,

“T can’t think what girls find nice about kittens,” said
Ronald, scornfully, after another pause. “J think they
are horrid. I should like to cut them into two pieces
with my new sword.”

“Oh, Ronnie!” cried Effie, looking alarmed, and
seeming to think her little brother very bloodthirsty
indeed.

“Well, I should,” said Ronald, defiantly. “I don’t love
them.”

“Ronald, that is rather naughty,” said Sister Agatha,
gently.

“TI don’t care; I want to be naughty,” Ronald an-
nounced. “I don’t think anybody loves anybody now.”

“Why?” asked Agatha, doubtfully, for she had rather
the same feeling herself.

“T don’t know,” muttered Ronald ; “they don’t sew it,

anyhow.”
190 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

And everybody was silent, for nobody could say that
they did.

But the brownies were sitting unseen in the globe of
the gold fish, having come there with messages of comfort
for the poor little prisoners, from their distant wives and
families, and when they heard what Ronald said, and saw
how unhappy the whole world was because the gorse was
out of bloom, they simply cried with sorrow and per-
plexity. And they cried so much that the water in the
bowl overflowed and ran all over the floor. And then they
dried their eyes, and went away to the mountains again,
and hunted up and down for a little bit of yellow gorse,
but there was not one bit in the whole wide world.

And what the world would have done that Christmas
is more than I can tell you, had it not been for a little
ragged girl who lived among some big mills somewhere in
Lancashire.

She believed in the brownies, bless you! She had
plenty of sense, and knew that the more wonderful a thing
seemed, the more likely it was to be true. But she was
not thinking of the brownies when she went up on to the
snowy moors in the dim twilight of that Christmas
Eve.

No, she was thinking of the story of the Christ-Child
The Story of the Gorse 191

born on the morrow; and she was humming over her new
Christmas hymn. She did not guess the calamity that
had overtaken the world. Nobody had ever kissed her,
that she could remember, so she did not miss anything
out of her life ; but she wanted to celebrate the Christ-
Child’s birthday, and she wanted to do it with a “bit of
green.” :
She would have liked some of the box and holly that
she saw going up to the master’s house, but as she could
not have that, she cheerfully made up her mind that she
must find something else instead ; and she knew that the
gorse was poking up its fresh green prickles through the
snow on the hillside, and she thought joyfully that it was
the very thing for her Christmas garland ; so she plodded
bravely off to the moorlands and filled her pinafore with
the prickly green, making her poor little fingers bleed in
the gathering of it.
And when the brownies, who were all sitting in rows
on the hillside, very nearly crying their eyes out over the
trouble that the gorse was giving, saw her trotting back so
contentedly homewards, holding up her ragged pinafore
with its little burden of green, they smiled at one another
through their tear-drops, and took up the soft music of her

Christmas hymn. “Peace on earth,’ sang all the brownies
192 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

in a chorus, “ peace and good will ;” for they felt sure that
the trouble was going to be set right after all.

And the little mill-girl went straight home, and, sitting
down on the kitchen-floor, wove her gorse into a prickly
wreath, singing all the time; it didn’t hurt her fingers
very much,’she touched’ it so. softly and tenderly, and
knew just which were the yielding parts of the stalks, and.
when ‘she had made her wreath she hung it over the
chimney-corner, and stood looking at it thoughtfully for a
minute. or two... It reminded her of another crown that
her teacher had told her about last Sunday, so she looked.
quite serious for a little while, but then remembered the
Christmas joy and went to bed, saying softly to herself,
“Peace on earth, peace and good will.”

The little mill-girl slept soundly, for she had done a
hard day’s work. It was a bitterly cold night, and the
gorse on the hillside had shut itself up tighter than ever.
It was cross and ‘chilly, but the wreath hanging over the
chimney-corner began to get warm; it was close to the
fire, you see, and the cottage walls shut out the bitter
wind ; warmer and ‘warmer it grew,.and the little frozen
flakes of snow that had hidden themselves among the
prickles turned into a warm soft shower like summer

rain. The brownies came one by one to see how it was

























The Story of the Gorse 195

getting on, and when they saw what was happening they
sent in joyful haste for the others, and very soon the
kitchen was quite full of brownies, all of them whispering
words of tender encouragement to the gorse, for, what
with the warmth and the cosiness and the moisture lying
about it, the little wreath was actually beginning to bloom!
It couldn’t help it; it was so warm and comfortable in the
chimney-corner, that bud after bud burst its brown sheath
and poked out a wee yellow nose to see the reason of the
change, and when once they had poked out their little
noses they had no wish to go to sleep again, but bloomed
bigger and sweeter and yellower every moment, listening
to the brownies’ softly sung carol, so that when the dawn
came creeping through the shutters it fell on what seemed
to be a great golden crown hanging on the wall, while all
the brownies sat in a ring underneath it and wept tears of
joy.

The little mill-girl woke up by-and-by, and came to
look at her Christmas garland; when she saw the sweet
golden crown she stood quite still for a minute or two.
It did not seem wonderful to her, and she only smiled
softly to herself, ‘The Crown of Thorns,” she whispered :
““T will-tell teacher about it.” And a far-away look came

into her eyes as she stood on tip-toe to smell the amber
196 Brownies and Rose-Leaves

blossoms ; for the little mill-girl found a beautiful meaning
lying about her Christmas wreath.

The brownies kissed her before they went joyfully
away into the winter-dawn, bearing the message that the
gorse had bloomed again. “Peace and goodwill,” they
sang, and the world believed them ; and men and women
kissed one another with a Christmas kiss.

“A merry Christmas,’ cried Ronald to Effie, with a
hearty hug, and “A merry Christmas,” echoed nurse,
stooping down to embrace her babies. “A happy
Christmas, mother,” said father, tenderly pressing his lips
to the calm smooth forehead ; and “A happy Christmas,”
whispered Agatha to Effie’s new brother, looking up at
him with eyes from which all the shadows had gone
away.

For the world had found what it had lost on Christmas
Eve, and the little mill-girl looked with happy reverence
at her golden crown. Nobody kissed the little mill-girl
except the brownies, but she did not know it; she had
found something even better than the gorse, and-the
brownies, and the Christmas kisses of love.

And did the gorse go on blooming after that? Yes,
ever afterwards, although never so sweetly as the little

mill-girl’s garland bloomed on Christmas Day.
rs

The Echo-Nymph

USH! the Echo-Nymph is calling!
H Calling, calling, rising, falling,
Dying into spirit-fancies ;
Like a harp with crystal strings,
Swept by elfin-fingered things,
Dreaming ’mid the wild wood pansics.

Dropped upon the breeze, a breath,
Which in birth is wed with death !

Brownies! where is Echo born?

In a fairy’s silver horn?

In the rounded cradle lying,

Down the stream of music sighing,
Born, a song ; an echo, dying?
Whisper, spirits of the earth,

Where the mocking nymph has birth!
Brownies and Rose-Leaves

Does she rise, a spirit-maiden,
From a dreaming, singing sea,
Where the ripples, silver-laden,
Break in music round her knee >—
Where the shining furrows throng,
Draw one sobbing note along
From their palaces of song ;
Curve it to a crystal, rounded,
Break it on a pebble-floor,
And the note of music, sounded,

Dies, an echo, on the shore ?

Hark! The Echo-Nymph is calling !
Calling, calling, rising, falling !

All about her caved retreat

Falls the lilt of fairy feet, -

Falls the memory of song,

Hollow, hushed, once sweet and strong

Ss:

Swells it never—nevermore
Sweeps the sunlit hilltop o’er.
Fain would echo-music soar,
Lift its cadence’ to the skies ;
In its flight it falls and dies,

Tombed in its own lullabies.

OO
The Echo-Nymph 199

Calling, calling,

Rising, falling,
Echo seeks her soul for ever !
Shall she find it? Never, never!

Never—never !


Epilogue

OLEMNLY, softly, the sunshine is dying,
Resting awhile on the brow of the hill ;

Low in the valley the shadows are lying,

Dim and reposeful and misty and still.

Over the ripples the twilight is creeping,
Weaving a shroud for the fair summer-day ;
Down on the meadows the dew-drops are weeping,

Mourning the beauty that’s passing away.

Sweetest the day in the hour of its dying,
Fairest the tints the last sunbeams beget :
So may our lives, with their dawn-beauty vying,

Shine out the tenderest just as they set!
















































































































































































































































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'2011-12-12T04:14:57-05:00'
describe
'9966' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00001.pro'
c2511a1bcb6ee86bbc158a04baf544c8
961bc7e09632d7345ce056bf699edb117c6c2477
'2011-12-12T04:17:06-05:00'
describe
'48708' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
d81bc596be84801cd7c3160a249c3f1c
0a923ac0f44241de9c125b9ee0fad4a3f26caaaa
'2011-12-12T04:14:45-05:00'
describe
'11887792' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00001.tif'
64d98dd9572f59317ba93bc7866c84d3
12feedf02a2ef639b20556b01c53dba14fd60278
'2011-12-12T04:16:52-05:00'
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00001.txt'
c193f8e2f22fb7c0c3c5776fa0efee14
a643d9c803a84eaa7e39e1f6e28e7b1860182bfb
'2011-12-12T04:13:09-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10684' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
e1c3c3e34d5062d8478889a071f61871
f3d8c576a221c9fd169951c286cfca04a0823123
'2011-12-12T04:12:30-05:00'
describe
'427700' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
47160ef7cc85ee92e755d8d011c3c48e
69617bbabba8ca506a7107e5d7d7aa8e077c83d1
'2011-12-12T04:17:13-05:00'
describe
'202700' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
f03f4f05f90cd8293f770d3ae664b5b4
6a4a778d48138861b4897fd3e6c4f685ccceeb61
describe
'49430' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
86a9c341c17a60ab6d945924c6d24efe
a28edaef7e1b6caa7a7cd3f0a33d65f632f5776e
'2011-12-12T04:16:39-05:00'
describe
'10273068' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
c70108299dbc1bdf167de5d94cd24568
2438069f6bf3436f7966474775f732ecb124dd52
'2011-12-12T04:16:21-05:00'
describe
'10704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
9207d9c671854f2ef0c4a1957d793dcd
be8ed1eab49ca0c090f0a93e079c008966c40abb
'2011-12-12T04:15:34-05:00'
describe
'93099' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
25ce3f9459932fad50e91b288d1ae173
2920adb33ec215acb145479773ccacb7a94a5550
'2011-12-12T04:15:29-05:00'
describe
'14351' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
1c1d27c3934c2d9b3b5248ce5424d5b4
7a706d7f835da2cf79b07f838e0d713fe3b6d578
'2011-12-12T04:14:25-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00004.pro'
4306340f3b3302abbc1a6353ad61c3ad
39a609a78ca06d6a6a5a19b445737b1f98e56ba0
'2011-12-12T04:16:50-05:00'
describe
'4437' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
e60a9e2dad5c4853e16c502dffa9282e
11b2125232693e11384e2406d37e95e056123676
'2011-12-12T04:15:32-05:00'
describe
'3345768' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00004.tif'
9b13270bcd3c6f64b9cab5e900040ead
eb1441de97467421e2e5437544634c6ab76cc165
'2011-12-12T04:13:14-05:00'
describe
'125' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c8ed45605b52d48fa19a6fbdaac5f5a9
12d992f68858be63d9e820443d3bca712165895f
'2011-12-12T04:17:05-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
5ecad31039d11734baef128d8fec6206
783d60fa3c8bf3a91b00d17f2ae7fbc78d6996f1
'2011-12-12T04:13:53-05:00'
describe
'371509' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
40992fe030cabc3f9740e8ff35d1a9c8
5bde16c3971ea75e5208a9d322d02e543347ecec
'2011-12-12T04:17:03-05:00'
describe
'54333' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
ea68679547a6d02bdc43d49b7a15b895
d8dc7994f39baeeae410604afec6e13a7f8d8aab
describe
'25308' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
a76aca104315147ff498715cb97a5d16
e342d7bacdc2baf229e909375d6d07120a9797a9
'2011-12-12T04:12:33-05:00'
describe
'15248' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
bdcb173940e8a608abd550b98e7bd7b4
3274da43575bbd920f455e6da4262592e965d351
'2011-12-12T04:15:31-05:00'
describe
'3346764' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00005.tif'
df6c749b60b288591471f81e52d02763
42170cd41451caaaf2a9221db9caa65e13af7217
'2011-12-12T04:13:55-05:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5cd3a98a13144751976b2bd12640d28c
03986a2394dee82be24ba5665a52c12d7d4593f5
'2011-12-12T04:15:02-05:00'
describe
'4129' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
91f8f0da56cef1b85af7c0a6be508743
05335eebc70e5969c0ff7f80723fc43cd7ee29dc
'2011-12-12T04:15:25-05:00'
describe
'55672' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
4648835d8a971c3cd39b8aab2428d4d1
e6f63d08596b774d903aaac772d254ae3583e9df
'2011-12-12T04:13:10-05:00'
describe
'9307' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
a083f3e15423006acc297d39082c8d07
2c48c40bd797c6343dec6058c484c101a71dbc42
'2011-12-12T04:13:35-05:00'
describe
'2722' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
ee2d6e544f32a581a0a818618fa2c066
1bb78b04f6a465c83c0091b42928c2beb0be38b4
'2011-12-12T04:14:26-05:00'
describe
'3345512' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00006.tif'
1981d5ad33d03364a41352f6db58691d
4a56a42003160054a4d73770d65c23ae5081ca29
'2011-12-12T04:14:10-05:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
55c362204a6242732280c37654b0e112
24bcc8fa720043a2379d021a9e20bf110865d2dc
'2011-12-12T04:15:59-05:00'
describe
'417400' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
da887d423bea93dd906779565999ef29
21a9277978cf71edbb02be1fd4b73a2f471d9f76
'2011-12-12T04:13:31-05:00'
describe
'176161' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
8991ab6eac00d19f0d2942a5744756c2
554c440d17ce7022eefff42c917658f3693bd077
'2011-12-12T04:15:39-05:00'
describe
'2070' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00007.pro'
a192c6d87f101906a86ea0f85cfb8e1a
b4c68d1ff47758d3aeb72e9f1644a5c1c89b9885
describe
'47819' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
f57583b63ed9b54023937b90d3fe3306
11863b3fb67bcc1c95607d13fcfc1512f1bab64d
'2011-12-12T04:16:59-05:00'
describe
'3350348' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c8bd3a88f4c9355e6accd9824838a779
2a4b4a480fb0658cdf9a5aa277ad234bcada087b
'2011-12-12T04:17:18-05:00'
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00007.txt'
29ada6f85bb40b5614d5cbf825ea9537
a70fcc37322d625c995ddd9d3f59239f76c21b2f
'2011-12-12T04:12:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'12367' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
cbece26912cb60667dff416c0755b421
a1e9b469197ff92fbc9b23f7e5715dcdf5cbafce
'2011-12-12T04:16:29-05:00'
describe
'181321' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
44d0772f69c27003899b330cd5ff05c5
8011ac4c67e08e1b224f2bdb5fe919cb9ed5e286
'2011-12-12T04:16:45-05:00'
describe
'31441' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ed3e49f5fdbddb26d31bf9ed0a4dad5b
dd9a8d1170c687c2b33013ff2835fa936e248737
'2011-12-12T04:14:02-05:00'
describe
'4579' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
b65d7d2460319d4dd25738fe5d3747e2
bef676f61c76cc22ab558db91ec0c266443d9226
describe
'11117' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
39b82e4a8ddd7678d3dc0836ce3b58cf
926b028362dab204ab2f7997916636a9a8a8637a
'2011-12-12T04:15:36-05:00'
describe
'3348200' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
c83ea78cf607ca38512416c2b1aee01c
0a04897bbfd85dba9d01ad8ce4f930b25a7f05a0
'2011-12-12T04:15:23-05:00'
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
6761ece460d277fbf04d473714c1d9dc
a920c0a84f7e08e574762075490b195eccca4cce
'2011-12-12T04:15:17-05:00'
describe
'3598' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
56511b089d36a029dc973676a0f41fdf
2a60a08fc23df01b7acdf700648abf978f0a90a6
'2011-12-12T04:12:55-05:00'
describe
'72788' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
d075810264bd9c3731be82a5a71f495a
d53c2fea0989ab6cac2e9d98a0d0f8c173521ef3
'2011-12-12T04:13:45-05:00'
describe
'12165' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
1d4aac426f890efdd28df49a51322db0
e5f17d455d65882b7d85f8665c65e01616425add
'2011-12-12T04:16:47-05:00'
describe
'2447' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d7e8f16956cca6841e8a0f0a5b54d275
17700e30426a52f7c722a98f02aa2fc62c48c0d0
'2011-12-12T04:17:07-05:00'
describe
'3622' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ad98ffb5eeb74eca9ac29a94990129b3
f29303440dcc521b373e76494df64a683993bb3f
'2011-12-12T04:13:38-05:00'
describe
'3345632' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
6e465f86a0f1fb3bfc3c6d3f3ce7c0c2
097230466812bd92b7c1db839d845581f907ff89
'2011-12-12T04:14:46-05:00'
describe
'207' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1888f6cd5707ea2816768c64cdcff3ac
97880f0abd465978c52967028ab5419bdd666385
'2011-12-12T04:13:51-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f49972dda6e7cf01a6c13e89bbd181fc
01b13a4f9ee5595d0e36cad62f8a878a83a0246c
'2011-12-12T04:12:24-05:00'
describe
'365050' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0de0d63a1f4e81e8754f24b3074711f4
561dec78ed3454984524f50d03697cc6b053536d
'2011-12-12T04:15:54-05:00'
describe
'55353' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
19a2210958dabb3a3ad2ce9bcf7184f3
3231e22410a76e7a7a47e1601ee97e4a7757952e
'2011-12-12T04:13:13-05:00'
describe
'17581' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3e13239b5e2dca6de7e510c633bf4ea3
d85b41d4b327317c334526f5ee20e439f5eb008e
describe
'19965' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9051a224ac870fc5d138351f0fe95eb1
6bece97ebf958aa2473654bb80083c23e3c0f433
describe
'3347156' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
769f6153dc7250570cbaf6137f99c303
86977904533b5a63bd78f180648c59046b22e2fb
'2011-12-12T04:15:43-05:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
cbd449e976c115d21e55964387001be5
f1308aa7b29902dd610072488df768d3810c22b9
'2011-12-12T04:14:00-05:00'
describe
'5432' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
82e2332399211ab3aa1b608fb9041130
b8ec892c7c63181457eb26233d39152c84f0d884
'2011-12-12T04:15:11-05:00'
describe
'50066' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
6983d0f849950aa3f883545b2993ed7d
9fd530209d5d03e0105d9198afc9f9d788f3fade
'2011-12-12T04:16:42-05:00'
describe
'9345' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c78f18ae7427f27bbf1adcbf860fe1a4
eb70db94a68d72ac34180a9244db74e0f28768a0
'2011-12-12T04:16:32-05:00'
describe
'2783' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
dcd5cbcf635c00df07dcf45e9dbcea98
f8bea5b48ffd906925325ff5fec67777dfbde9b6
'2011-12-12T04:12:16-05:00'
describe
'3345508' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
998a3eef4e2eac5e18b135c153f9530d
06611d2b132302af87c7867d8e355cb08721aabb
'2011-12-12T04:16:26-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0f0ea95d84209e313aa661c46dc51385
ed13fa8c5e99412eb89aaf1694f79d14541a9cf0
'2011-12-12T04:12:27-05:00'
describe
'417579' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d1da5f3d9b648f8c39ecdad9066ce712
22a4efef5f2ba3719de79cdd9475d9e9d33c914a
'2011-12-12T04:14:31-05:00'
describe
'64497' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
48a26ad1ebe4e1a51d30a87014321106
d79cfb459cc3c6c061dbe09d8e57bd7811432641
'2011-12-12T04:16:05-05:00'
describe
'18786' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
b59029c1e287c325de77ce05aaa33d3c
40434562a7871cdbef17a606936a4a65dba8174f
'2011-12-12T04:16:38-05:00'
describe
'22515' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
58125258f9037cfd58c81abe3b90b1d4
ab3e0108f42c196fec489780d1bf131a7330af02
'2011-12-12T04:16:33-05:00'
describe
'3349704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a78ce9f8bd8e9010fb360271b97a62b8
94608499f01cdb5cb89e294c1c010521ab6fe243
'2011-12-12T04:16:25-05:00'
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ab1dc84928a725f59abda4515849816d
6ed5cafc92da5cc71c58e036d3725386e7c00918
'2011-12-12T04:14:33-05:00'
describe
'5687' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
3e00f06747ca19ba8edbb62941ae709e
96e9d63ac050a14b98d4fd8db67de26c2eb59eca
'2011-12-12T04:16:43-05:00'
describe
'253832' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0d5ec5b03bedbb0cece2106f83a01924
29777b34195a422d6ed265a9e2862dff2e861375
'2011-12-12T04:16:09-05:00'
describe
'40436' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
5c3a6e6735e60259403a4a005792eafc
657955df99f120746c468aa7f027b474d055886e
describe
'9772' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
06120df1d02223682bfed36fb8ac6796
d2ff6daef2e770a5d65e39fdcfbbf2352e096202
'2011-12-12T04:13:57-05:00'
describe
'13560' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
583a335a02ea801dfacc5604473d3380
165e6ea9020df60c9ce7e9cdb84cebce5f273e34
'2011-12-12T04:15:33-05:00'
describe
'3346704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
bb20e501460e969ab3214c7264e5723e
6f93da7d64068e518702d61ed7f988428304839f
'2011-12-12T04:15:20-05:00'
describe
'544' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
379573e3a82123042054f632510b4cd4
649af2e3d4ad37b598c76ee07d4cad7a282e2e65
'2011-12-12T04:13:50-05:00'
describe
'4011' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
1e2cc7e401963a18ef2aec58b65248ac
1af8732a9f563c52b95f0c024e3813e124c1d655
describe
'417369' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
3ec43ffbadae9dbb34de9bf11affab19
a733b21769e63a08b9680732e94e2c3cc3edc021
'2011-12-12T04:15:40-05:00'
describe
'102416' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
2569e8cd3119c892a517e2484b547a75
3c80e5ba9fdb3ca2362fe57dd3d0f3ab05b7088c
'2011-12-12T04:12:29-05:00'
describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
22f2fd89ec79384358bbac011935d804
d6fc52e9185ae1d543090d6c8a084556153f0f9b
'2011-12-12T04:12:56-05:00'
describe
'28186' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
41f991b5a549e70dd55cba76aed73c83
4c75f604d005c586d1c84655685a0edcb33f2471
'2011-12-12T04:16:00-05:00'
describe
'3348044' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
afa5bcb8c8d3e8e7e5b5cc05d6bea05d
1ec61a950336868d79bee671bae5c2fe97d2a54c
'2011-12-12T04:16:07-05:00'
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
5492d060c45396731f57a40a3d6e050f
b5e218e8d65eed4a1f95455ae7db1b39cd45a1e6
describe
Invalid character
'7182' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
99afdad433958938bb2df2661f3b4bd9
f3c878133d6c63880adf3da07f6af599c4f8ef7f
'2011-12-12T04:17:17-05:00'
describe
'345265' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5997182ec948748fbd07d8ac43d6c4ee
4c911898d4514e0f4f7ce7248aa006bbaf2ac141
'2011-12-12T04:15:49-05:00'
describe
'53342' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUID' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e1b43b776765495269d27341543138bc
70d628745bc616715ebda28488f6371dbfa11462
'2011-12-12T04:14:15-05:00'
describe
'15596' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
cd17109285ed14cce08529874fae85e9
ba46567b62352da4b9e4b800ef5541125bf3ef45
describe
'17123' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4ec9f53065dbca37ef7bad5d1484823c
9ab67b6146ed2d4dfbb0bf01efd05d368e6d9c31
'2011-12-12T04:13:12-05:00'
describe
'3347032' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
983ebd7e414bd364fc99fd1f49ca95cb
308850441a8f476a799511b3281b680bad0af9a2
'2011-12-12T04:12:38-05:00'
describe
'669' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
86a637ff1e954fcd49de2fa7d97fb7c2
e13a8a34a93f687b137957766748f7c719f922ce
describe
'4659' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUII' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
2178e44fa8b089db2c90a8ee35196ba7
d3f6d4603cadf31ebab155bcf43b20c2a944de5c
'2011-12-12T04:16:28-05:00'
describe
'417377' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e7b980b12300468dd5d0fbc4e2663630
7245326eed50595214e2e17d463ff6e814126ae3
'2011-12-12T04:12:43-05:00'
describe
'70792' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
12cae500a6d8858f18f4f8a92d8b32b6
e20895c61baaed89baacac715d78c322e5340c88
describe
'18521' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
fe8760df7b5973a54a0978012dd9eeac
59841f50de527cfd1cc3ee829771acc7c267a9aa
'2011-12-12T04:15:45-05:00'
describe
'23927' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
704ab5de515e676a2c5b72aa87dd2a54
e23b8ec894f973c0d0f270765aeaa9b894f58465
'2011-12-12T04:15:48-05:00'
describe
'3347600' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
6a4b798c541d1ae1764f1f85ae939376
a2c4c3057417b20ccb3e73841a779ad1ea41477c
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a0fb381899a7fc17522729d967f7a9e6
014fdb2c209854ab95281580bae3c41f73e8c80c
'2011-12-12T04:16:53-05:00'
describe
'6015' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
74ce20bc9f55fdb26ee54c0d3e50e45c
862a41b6ee909e5f09497b1c8f0bbcaac2e1bdf8
'2011-12-12T04:14:49-05:00'
describe
'417374' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
abb270d0fd7d084c02410b324c0b4a1b
03e1adf080b946a335307df4de70bc2df7bca684
'2011-12-12T04:14:34-05:00'
describe
'101224' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
cbad9d0a55030ebe375a170f9f6c2a05
52fdcaea7050456c1c27041141413bc6836802fc
'2011-12-12T04:15:01-05:00'
describe
'32331' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ee6f5203c75c4dc4440ad92cf466a3e5
1156deb91f91ca43a6eefbca7d813bbdb838309f
'2011-12-12T04:13:25-05:00'
describe
'35563' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
501573c140eaa5f9a5716e67f48d6052
154fc97ee335bf8bde1b8750ed09b3537a7bb39c
'2011-12-12T04:14:43-05:00'
describe
'3348560' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e930ba76b38e7a7ae4924d66df8ee696
271129a9d756f3d4da392d99fb445a1dd29680c1
'2011-12-12T04:13:22-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
d24d636f9b203871b5945f9f847bd07a
0d96a064f6ab16f7d8941424dacf33474aa56e41
'2011-12-12T04:13:17-05:00'
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
af1c743a64153a111a1ff7e2077ec2b3
3805788ac2edd059867a8f04a44cad7730561ad8
describe
'417345' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
cec337218e1de46f12de240eb191d5de
1aee82282f7dfe99ec28e491ae34aaadaceab02b
'2011-12-12T04:15:04-05:00'
describe
'104257' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
415f6ed09b71f8fa7fd386e3e7d57e86
30c8571846bcd69b891fecd35f89d89d0228d80c
describe
'33173' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
ad93fae1dc99d1aee1e4df6b7104ab8c
5fc50a3390f7828a69f99d6256741cca6602f533
describe
'36057' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a57c862fafe3d701ba0c3a153b62b0b1
07de657ee61585b77c022452af84201d869255de
'2011-12-12T04:17:28-05:00'
describe
'3348580' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
9fe6ffff7831aeef4db3fe5ec87a3202
648743749afd4bce655002ee43052c7fba320a29
'2011-12-12T04:16:24-05:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0357c6daf45a4620d81b2a6f71fd4841
584fa67388ae77973e88bb7925dcc2b0632394a7
'2011-12-12T04:17:16-05:00'
describe
'9365' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bddf45f9df0bd25c8eaffb7d80d562c5
6d9f083d9a7cbe492dde53c2107878e1deaf10d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
c90edbe876876c106a8d3dd69947cdc9
bbf48bc614eaed553ca14c8ec15e259ef7641754
describe
'110185' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
915f389ac7285c0ba70b3082b53b206a
ebbe32c49ad08d6acfe6dd0f0f77f022e20b4c5b
'2011-12-12T04:17:20-05:00'
describe
'35431' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
97abc26a7b728cf883726b1555543909
269e8ccd2bd0de718e35a4c0050e8836b9572d91
'2011-12-12T04:12:57-05:00'
describe
'37501' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
13b7466059b6921e95023df9b43079d1
77176e42b3d6a9b7bd3d34d23576424a03e48a46
describe
'3348544' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
50a5d4c9fb13284279629ada30c67864
777f183523d250051aeb6304c33bc0133b0a871e
'2011-12-12T04:13:24-05:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
11111f678ec2fc12ce50cb5558870565
c5241b1cbfd4c3b949d4717c95fadc1d1d50ff71
'2011-12-12T04:15:16-05:00'
describe
'9320' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3d1a560b51852c1e2dce17258d34c43b
f7600d9ed8f57fe2a22f28b1aa227f75421dcdb2
'2011-12-12T04:12:44-05:00'
describe
'417393' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ba6a3e79948ce30b959b1487e6af40dc
3fb74def84208014330b84c304a30b279e93391b
'2011-12-12T04:17:21-05:00'
describe
'106247' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
65dac3938877a695ba1de15d160665c9
c500b6957603a8846d9e92f97172ad1073a9b862
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
6f7684d54d4cb20a689fffa3040663c4
effc1dd9943937063cbeecb575697b1a3d745770
'2011-12-12T04:16:57-05:00'
describe
'37278' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e7ab5c72a963488b3113a80072f88152
5d76e41f2a7442cd59a0d1a32dd860c4def1f7fb
'2011-12-12T04:16:22-05:00'
describe
'3348608' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1f6d6f1fa47e8ed69cf12cafc2fbc42f
df104a142ccc12b95523a17dec2d9451bab7470a
'2011-12-12T04:14:52-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e0f24e84868e1030f7577c992052931b
21f241c42b95b5eaad603576734b20c49908ab5e
'2011-12-12T04:13:05-05:00'
describe
'9187' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ec1331b669147715f1648ad0de4ba6f2
4f2cccb7ae9535d741e2413f13a3aed511af5a23
'2011-12-12T04:13:43-05:00'
describe
'417391' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8b8e7b32fdd2b3ecb1f331235b86f58f
f1f0c5d85a97aaa5b22df4ca6991a6d4b27f5ce6
'2011-12-12T04:15:13-05:00'
describe
'100363' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
bf99387040811d6d8f278903cecb2524
f1a8d46b5b9cd8c22ddbb921700e13bf59012833
'2011-12-12T04:14:18-05:00'
describe
'32903' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5d431194d414e71e717c368fa5cc7d51
1a7de026c10463f49e88ed654e781501e785c186
'2011-12-12T04:12:49-05:00'
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1dfe559add7335fe6cd4024be68a3301
8fe03f743a0e8e0b2cf20c868f9a51d38a938958
'2011-12-12T04:12:50-05:00'
describe
'3348388' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a453060405c379abe1b61958551aeb5d
d8ee3f88a1e4f168ad16f2b40bc01cac801c5bef
'2011-12-12T04:12:37-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5c1479aee48594b5386cc472c962c95b
c42001c8795325b920ebb35b0a28fce406da3999
'2011-12-12T04:15:35-05:00'
describe
'8674' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7996edace62e23c0897254538aa8f59e
0a34eb8391a8f76ce23de8fe385c4ec911626e4c
'2011-12-12T04:15:46-05:00'
describe
'417672' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ceb78b968bf2b49294b50fd78b64ee9b
b461feedc9b1bbb433cc19ff6a6caf3a99e96595
describe
'99981' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
af16185f4d4665a883fe21760b6e587d
b3af1179b33958915c1be50a7cb4a30eb992a885
describe
'32114' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
313de2a8bd07f34be51a24fb7e71c7a7
4b8ad5be46131703f133cfdd317d892eefcc3f0f
describe
'34173' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9b0402af299cb441127fee86fea2a232
d42299d99f522667af291dabe0ddd50d02976dcb
'2011-12-12T04:13:56-05:00'
describe
'3350608' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3e9306ba705690c0d8ac1d124a233fe6
a3f6d852a4a1fe697037e8c7b430e056f359b1d8
'2011-12-12T04:12:53-05:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
92ca8eec59a3ed56573a1df899f61f64
eb9a0763e76d888bfb58142eb204fd1b4bc9b542
'2011-12-12T04:13:06-05:00'
describe
'8667' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0ef20c2f7b1cf25b9a28eb329cbb30fd
5c7442dd8cba6abe4456ad772a5140a594f62919
'2011-12-12T04:16:58-05:00'
describe
'417394' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
56455e6b32f5efe5aabe80fd02aa7e73
adecd23275c4485f21b5e316aa3069e1037c9416
'2011-12-12T04:16:01-05:00'
describe
'94637' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
63d9920f3308f5013c914e233271ec2e
5e6111a37a994548af75dd43c5f92c2e4a528e80
'2011-12-12T04:14:11-05:00'
describe
'30584' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fa932caa7ff0611c0c9b7f5b9e9ae36e
43cd370c95262ac7d7c5f1ed4f670e975d4a24ff
describe
'32801' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f68d7d2d03494c89dfc07576d94c27ef
5f15f5ba056c8e6c900aa1d7388005da63a70801
'2011-12-12T04:17:24-05:00'
describe
'3348400' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
6ecc8997886f4b7c441ffdf0b4d178a0
9fd33ca1e06f8f0183b70d84451e08501a5666b7
'2011-12-12T04:16:20-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
2014a9de09adf6d39badb0247902da60
9e323a6e01494ab24e912fd4bebb58ed295ffcaf
describe
'8243' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
633e03b13350c3b074ba5d13fbe921f4
b032a38ac8bdf597aa8f2d8c99a358e517d954b4
'2011-12-12T04:14:24-05:00'
describe
'417357' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0743f989f4bf1e06a20fbe8293f47694
fe088296cd546e66ab79e5b3367eeae0e4bbefdd
'2011-12-12T04:16:37-05:00'
describe
'96446' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
82bed0cd9c352a329c6430d36c0651e9
9d69825e603af87da03c38e2da68c8cdc1a8d500
'2011-12-12T04:13:23-05:00'
describe
'30215' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
cc4d7380915beeac4e50377d7e39a893
1f9df9482109c79ced41ded2b777b916b228e692
'2011-12-12T04:13:54-05:00'
describe
'34330' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b24d281ae5fcf4bbee5de57ee42e219f
e9df5bd241e250eb90546eb45828691ddbe1ef80
'2011-12-12T04:12:22-05:00'
describe
'3348496' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7ee9c0391e66f68cecd3004e6566d733
9e9b010ad66cd1b815ad727c36ba1faf3952613b
'2011-12-12T04:13:44-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
988eb1487e2fe9e9af4f858755e28c07
98a8e568d8c9b76ea1a7ecd6cf31889bc11d10d2
'2011-12-12T04:16:31-05:00'
describe
'8409' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
971ed8a6db0dffe8615dbfa1c4c54f16
fed038a83156db7fce41c24bc5a71447bd30c940
'2011-12-12T04:14:36-05:00'
describe
'417335' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
76190ff3b47ea31325fa40cd463a4df6
7da76c8ea8409e2caba563209f9680dd59075658
describe
'96987' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
43d211174456e1d7721558a5cb08174b
6f6f7f8827a18360a1dcf86ef7dcddf29fa725f8
'2011-12-12T04:17:11-05:00'
describe
'31467' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ec3b7ffa714341572efdfe04c4d594aa
f980966be61856f584308d82046568a5f8cb2416
'2011-12-12T04:15:09-05:00'
describe
'32864' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
9cb81b0ad77aab754c680554eb8fcae0
4aa5fb7b60d7cca2eeb68445569ac02d33e5e7df
'2011-12-12T04:12:39-05:00'
describe
'3348256' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fcaf7d6f0ea573f90fa1e114c7b9e753
7d1aeffe165d511a7574f6d510948dbbe02fac5d
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3c5c8121127d1ee0cfffb7cc547a3eab
89674ffcc3e261328d97a51e39c0a23740913c03
describe
'8402' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3faa1162c583d14f158aa59f14831815
d26ab4f7e4479fd9b3c45608a7c81d3460521298
'2011-12-12T04:14:01-05:00'
describe
'417365' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
006a79bad1a8d78d7b5cb3431f6bf1f2
eef2ead5a92950aca5c6f8675cf947044b1ed58a
describe
'106704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
64971405a0b4a9a76c2c7a54d4d94c2f
4e9af2c5368d8c45e1ae2f2718c4b5c031157156
'2011-12-12T04:13:36-05:00'
describe
'34399' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
964baf030402588acbba75e072bfad30
507278f383d16849a295c821b0686697581ffd01
'2011-12-12T04:16:36-05:00'
describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
c2fb98a04c487869fd5597644f925452
f6fdf4cf29656a443a9190a1b85d543281eeacfb
'2011-12-12T04:14:13-05:00'
describe
'3348524' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a4e6aa8d47ff7b0f851460b43b6f0465
90dc81d5b9fbad9746898e83ead378f819aa0ba0
'2011-12-12T04:14:56-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
3e8cfd6b355f5ce04c5195f864566362
05ac8424bb0e14e275e4eadc043f659dbf199970
'2011-12-12T04:14:21-05:00'
describe
'9581' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
7addd5d0071d0e539d8b7d0db5ba1298
91d6b3e7f504587574acf433ed59a9c9272478de
'2011-12-12T04:14:59-05:00'
describe
'417397' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c1378f80e4526659ede72cf60d049dcf
fff22ca218ca6f6f25613fae8589f9df558718a0
'2011-12-12T04:17:02-05:00'
describe
'95805' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e56a653fecad8ba3e0c7ecd1633d9474
698fd19939dd48460e52bb1f147b2e0d0a3030cf
'2011-12-12T04:13:04-05:00'
describe
'30485' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
b3c2b030b3a61fe42e397912937734c1
1632c8f53f56836c594b96521ff0b50b58fb7b2a
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
30e92c60dedb140261abdb9846f45ef5
285a2a9d05bde9e85979415336a1822ce9b029af
'2011-12-12T04:14:20-05:00'
describe
'3348352' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
23ac7e34b7c0b09bdece70a956825a30
17c1faf618bb89e5b1506e9ccf543c5da4660525
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
3d05eebb431c5ad2af20d7286b0eb16c
7e5940bb3bef8706652cc593294104927cdbfd72
describe
'8611' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
cf47e3c1e25f3530ace56222be6f0de3
46c576ca59d16cae6821168b3d8b012391c6e9bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0e230cfaca4849ca942de4ab884b704d
52344ab980836b3abb2b3c3489d6ee7e3c08ef36
'2011-12-12T04:13:01-05:00'
describe
'93938' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b8e394520bd01d8ebe2586da49ae123d
052bbdf0b9ade4e90f779b50f7fa87a89d4ac7d6
describe
'11041' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
52e560095280a9a0c1fdc06ca94a529d
228becacc7d329bfb3e887c677755b354bb6b58a
'2011-12-12T04:15:26-05:00'
describe
'27259' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3de0bba39f0a2aeb4a32de4f3d19e15e
ed71ee7edcc06f9869365f9474a98ab84f7ba955
'2011-12-12T04:13:16-05:00'
describe
'3348276' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fcf54dc7dc8a32223bdb7f85dbe1e7be
74a5e5a2342b9d48d0ad0b2c8b50183b6f704307
'2011-12-12T04:13:46-05:00'
describe
'456' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
aa9984f3e5f35c5e465bc80bacb080ca
b93684029c60661c98bdfb1cc816a3c665ba3f7b
'2011-12-12T04:16:55-05:00'
describe
'7377' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3932ae56d6f5328b471a0a69aabd2b32
c8db4a03a5bdae6b9b4dc616dd19f52ff0bcb3d4
'2011-12-12T04:15:53-05:00'
describe
'369507' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d8c5df9e9328f52ec4fc965515135628
8fe5fad89c61c2cb88663e0f55dd742eff40de68
describe
'56964' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5418391b55975fb01964d5b0b773d324
15a5abc124be7b17923f7c4013b245174a56eba9
'2011-12-12T04:13:29-05:00'
describe
'16642' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
98c3fe622ce12f724682acbae4447e8f
e72f2b76e876d829a0a89f277c0dd430de43cc04
'2011-12-12T04:15:08-05:00'
describe
'18494' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
b9a22900a1d4199a460429729391f984
266eef83183a0365f2348563b323a616af489775
'2011-12-12T04:14:44-05:00'
describe
'3347124' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b7b2c5142ff202350f736f5d24619443
cadf5d5856581de34efd574b3eb26fd5b3da97ba
describe
'670' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
0d0fe5de7effeba24ac853d3828b49bb
6caa86ec81c314698b5210f5cd5efe780236a18e
'2011-12-12T04:12:41-05:00'
describe
'5130' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0721814f976d59846a0d94d265601cfc
64f5b3bf7839d15ed2aea634fc669fc818b49f90
describe
'332168' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
68c7da746c12ca09867f59f02f2e3398
501590eaa078d691da78663734de30dbeb89f77c
describe
'51525' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUME' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
98c0c2a6af709ac2217a21819e628a76
f7bea3223c93b7f1ea68ee43dde0da34d8553e1a
'2011-12-12T04:17:10-05:00'
describe
'13567' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3b2c28dd04add11fdbd763633a95492e
36e337def813c836cfc7041c4b6a3ffbb2558794
'2011-12-12T04:15:15-05:00'
describe
'17063' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f2590b6ff5ce686661543ccde8936da8
d451ffacd97c99cad7113abab6ccb2eeb9d03463
'2011-12-12T04:12:47-05:00'
describe
'3347104' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
099a69384accbb9a7ab038b2b2228f14
2c80e66870a5667474bafcc375979eac3455f8fd
describe
'719' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ec14ee4157f102afb5ad90b2e878d638
2a3ae4af1a53ffbc7d406a27061b4342e48b1c41
describe
'4655' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
d6099a01f882993549bea3484796df7a
95202373aaea025595221a4e4e0abe3242961123
'2011-12-12T04:14:19-05:00'
describe
'273837' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7f990f4a95ff377c0b2d371c9336eb7f
4bb3103b64e13a0e60054a020e4b77c8f58795db
describe
'39200' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUML' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
505290b0e32d6d48f89e3639ba93cd27
3ed7d5430d214c802abd2fc4a72c0ff8b2628142
describe
'8949' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ea5722b0d3accbe751f40142311b4e04
566693638a69a31862a2c30b21362166fbf88d2f
describe
'13117' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
749c1385a3dd94037577d97d47b0dc15
5835c7b519ede8c61f8f136426e18c224b8bce73
'2011-12-12T04:14:08-05:00'
describe
'3346592' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c959afd4b953820f91a61716677ed3e7
742601973324a3f3f6b7614a9d582c6524a52865
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1b472db86d6e7a0a87ce36f767a6b223
8b0f293cbb74b39aff4d0d62bf972107d9c765a0
describe
'3446' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
93c66e304cf4ddf9561591d3e020dd44
bc2963dbfc0ce9520a10c705bc2dd2ee166b6585
'2011-12-12T04:16:04-05:00'
describe
'417382' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
6ca820265f75e658477a842b0d5921b7
ea83222ba8afdea0440ea95124530cf2512b3792
'2011-12-12T04:17:22-05:00'
describe
'78368' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b025fbe90edff031bf3e5e7237a14efd
3d5e91cb656b4aa0851e2960dc5ff8ca2267a288
'2011-12-12T04:16:35-05:00'
describe
'22134' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b489e116432c688d5ca12909c8bb22cc
53cb40d133e132f4416bedd7bef4f4191775f6ce
'2011-12-12T04:17:09-05:00'
describe
'26699' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
849ed7bbb6003f153f0ea876d36e18e8
d9b9b9044d58568948dd01021090163c62afd60a
describe
'3347952' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
1d1b27db8909398bd1cf2e3365c85fcb
53e18b70de1fce602b67212dd44b129e196d3a66
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
20880ee3ca8bd656c5cc86565f9492ce
d638d919224d8cc65aa4b4963670580bfb03e7ce
describe
'7359' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
ef0cce12c7b334b03faec254f85760b1
d74dbd28df78e2f89495dc4eb1158938129f3e2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6d208d301dd4d36d707a4eebda8b29d6
b61920cb376b98e849d36d309020180d111f77ef
describe
'88915' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a094b878ced1329e17a0c6010592872a
9f41ce10619b336f790c449ebc5be8f641864d6d
describe
'28330' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
8ec3da0cbb41488e8761a29f24ea92bd
6ecbbff0c36147c717d0c14dca37396f491b42e7
'2011-12-12T04:15:58-05:00'
describe
'29580' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1461815de89c8cc3a8d9f26633045fb5
eb4b1079968eba6aca9f8f8bb887e42e76e6efc1
describe
'3348300' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
735123c4854384111e47624cb86917ac
2ed27d2ab623d073dbe7df9e57cfda9aa64b328e
'2011-12-12T04:16:10-05:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUND' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f9813800086a2bb2ed9ed09db351414c
8d71e96a6869bbc53a5d625acde0bb355be3b2e4
'2011-12-12T04:16:11-05:00'
describe
'8009' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
494aa6cebe7b1c47ecda67228ff4bf1b
09e2a784850feff8c54a8678a3a1dcb35fa83421
'2011-12-12T04:17:27-05:00'
describe
'417402' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
62e70ead2a20fe3fc9d03c895c34d1ee
26f30937e51d69444951e59d845d79ed219589a6
describe
'91138' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
07f149c1afdc125836a179a4a9b98801
405177097a925202c90a1feeabce038c1715a4da
'2011-12-12T04:16:54-05:00'
describe
'28997' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f90c4300f27315569367a7222ab02c5e
271325a17b12d20b4c3b0d9b3b4923b151c317e2
'2011-12-12T04:16:48-05:00'
describe
'31224' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
e4c7151e657270d0145a1396324e3bc6
8221e09d284048cc53c9957026f6c85bab336e7a
describe
'3348316' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
88463a060a62a65714024214cb98b0fc
345ef99c43a71e46b0535e74bc9345a473bab176
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
b6c80fda195ed4c0ad0d20a676b2738f
06f8a3fa7ebdf5cfc3bf4e08adc924767cd26787
'2011-12-12T04:16:30-05:00'
describe
'8072' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6209907726596491f0ae45d7d1a0470e
d6ef063322db1ecaf3d8bc9706b0cef2bd8c58ec
describe
'417380' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
66f8213ae38ae358390de974b4902bd4
ebca06c09c9e2e52888eee6da77cb2eebbeb8886
'2011-12-12T04:17:15-05:00'
describe
'99511' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
ced0c639267929f3ccad732455bcef8b
880c10fcd15776a50e6802ea18e99c2902663813
'2011-12-12T04:13:18-05:00'
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
f22b47663d91781686c5420be7cb8235
c084636c0c04009dc7cf5b1f9da44ae952b718fa
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
69ef13e467969671562802e12de767fd
b7fadcc0035d1aedc07b67da6702400c7f9a4fe0
'2011-12-12T04:12:26-05:00'
describe
'3348512' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
960e11e7a7f649e03ec76d3960a00556
bdb285724dfed4b5fb07e97e7c25439c97c47ce1
'2011-12-12T04:14:23-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e9128284b79dc685bf6bc838f4476c87
f687da96555542025453d5fdaf5c58da7de889d7
'2011-12-12T04:12:48-05:00'
describe
'8912' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
baa5790e9f5b6a1b3071bf292ac1a634
06c6c29069adcc0c223255fb48c550c6f94e008e
'2011-12-12T04:17:04-05:00'
describe
'417371' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
53ce3efd261341b8a19d5672448c955d
7eab14c84b0886bd4c7a6acc598b7ba13ea9939a
'2011-12-12T04:16:02-05:00'
describe
'94584' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f0625d75a2a7e2a4aa8159be65ea0924
c16ab5b074590e21354abd05ed051d7117430d53
describe
'31213' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
75f6f782fda82b0fc52b3024613b3537
a621b7f76d8c2735743ced90d1e20583f5115816
describe
'32825' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
47f7005e2dfd45fd2a81c2194b0963fb
e38df57f0262eec7daf367679fa75a8288b42a6c
describe
'3348264' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
429ad4115571984f1837f5a538ae8da3
3b70ceb8df8a0cdff0c3611aed242d90c2c0667f
'2011-12-12T04:16:51-05:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
3c7e8c035ad7426e344ceb610fc6e0ea
6a66abc32c23e41d5046af7951ac6c046c2fe3d8
describe
'8757' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ff6801fc7fd754276b5e120da7e91cf7
7f83ca8670b5b4a1a9d94601ac467f38a5170560
'2011-12-12T04:15:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
449177c120e5dfdec228a26fb76824fd
3bdb66ac4842827cef91cc9d9f259c0968ec5f64
'2011-12-12T04:13:40-05:00'
describe
'96742' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
79bb57d6e6dc3b0a274ac9b76e135311
13a2bd927deac44d5e77e2b6340ef6b41b93b2f7
'2011-12-12T04:13:42-05:00'
describe
'31863' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
02be56cb369e03750829e17b88a9d489
cdaebcd966cb284d88a0261289e34a311f0e0bda
describe
'33215' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
cce25ca88f5a5ad0274a36ff70367640
6c16f25dc189099aefe247d3a8713e8b260c9904
'2011-12-12T04:16:41-05:00'
describe
'3348332' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c34b639ebf1c84cf79ee1f49b167f398
39072c4eddbf1a840394334b91fee81793492dcb
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
33c1e64c3be8e426b75e2291b16a0c88
84f0326044526d4caaaa82925b18b5d56c445632
describe
'8354' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
bcb41339bafc6a5955c88b6db5badc55
7bb65e2dd271ce8166dddd9a271dbcedf0326ded
'2011-12-12T04:17:08-05:00'
describe
'417273' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
6ea4eafdaff1e1af075ccceddc683825
0230669f300b8620889ac831fefd13fabc93aa0f
'2011-12-12T04:15:51-05:00'
describe
'165850' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
dedf338f1990151577e8a647f266f2c8
c2a0a74d6a1369bf0385ff93aa22b04c76b09e29
describe
'43476' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
873fad3cf1b7b62d3192f82223ef5266
3048b88caab1e70c6dd83ebceb2db2a6262eb818
describe
'3349248' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00040.tif'
04b3dee2da63e402293c4875d1ad2625
8c2d75d099c7efce16771fb10e1673b8416cfa6e
describe
'10769' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
6df3c9ab3de7ba4727134de24e508e74
ae7213e96ea69b2d6b454aa629003d0ce8119c7e
describe
'32892' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9ac50c08a4226be8b12162b905167d7d
5f2fd02cb50c1ab2ea34b014d14605182dbdba4b
describe
'8569' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUON' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
46f31fbea6c66f5163f926208a36ab2d
d392913115635dcbd1c31dc8400e56d162686fef
'2011-12-12T04:15:10-05:00'
describe
'2531' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
703428cf4239360d56ffd97f6b68a94b
1f9bceccc155803a2a624cafd2e2a03b2423c613
'2011-12-12T04:13:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9a38f9df4c53b47ac4127f6412955a5d
081eb205a1dbf373479b9e7e561056bb8a88f3e4
'2011-12-12T04:15:57-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
31c683457fa0a32188f4c765aaa0565e
b8ff457bf93bf500fefa5891384201a69de41f75
describe
'417370' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a5ddb59346f02e55c321f5dfd796117c
4a2e3d3dee6093b6f25553e52bdd1ac954c0191b
'2011-12-12T04:16:16-05:00'
describe
'87076' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
eec97fb34dd2fc076c8c8158d11942a4
695707c848fa8701d2279eee6775b86df8df67dc
'2011-12-12T04:15:06-05:00'
describe
'28175' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f12535dbf9a4e42153059ed1f73d7fb4
d79aada93aabb939d8a1e7f31d30fc9c4221ea45
describe
'30434' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8cd889c37af4b00003a7e16ab809343e
35ffdd44ff05b55d11dacfea35b5df3daf9637ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7020e32ac3b90059abbdf5533f0eae82
341fe430ded3676893dfb3cd04be20974b1ad859
'2011-12-12T04:12:35-05:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4c8c98f86f1cfc8022e5805b9bb01f66
b17c2dad8910efded22e11243427763f0a7fbad8
describe
'8142' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c69fbbd834b899f74a2697862c7d5522
fa7d4b6a3dc8276e2b836091eb07eaf8cacc376e
'2011-12-12T04:13:52-05:00'
describe
'417399' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
97a6ab501a5eda421f59eafbfd374f7f
3650b3db6f4c172d7a47cfb6c65a231fb34c3e15
'2011-12-12T04:17:25-05:00'
describe
'92580' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
386bef3df588f612ccdd8006be59f956
8278ef1a9c5071f7ff8d5fccb91ffc55fa8a34d7
describe
'30948' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fd02ff8bc3e618ed3ba93619e5378def
acc08a895f6b485168abd37ebf5b02e217316e0c
describe
'29753' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8849bd05057eef00e86b87cf6e05bca9
ccf456cfdd0399c9ab070916a93b4c14e4f4a36f
'2011-12-12T04:14:35-05:00'
describe
'3348120' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
86468c9ea5805660d4916858dd2859f1
44115808ee3660e70da1ece143d77bac3099bc6e
'2011-12-12T04:12:58-05:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00043.txt'
331f0c286e34635e2dc68944db5692a8
7ba1a2369c4a560aec5100c93dbbfa00f2f3ae47
'2011-12-12T04:17:14-05:00'
describe
'8034' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
78cd43f6c2983ec1d56f27547775981c
e6eaf9059f2e30f5c0ec8377bc0ac1817008e1f0
'2011-12-12T04:12:17-05:00'
describe
'255394' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
20fdf50f7223af765bc88707af8ba0eb
eb208554f6eb8d96d844969729103a191bec01a1
'2011-12-12T04:14:28-05:00'
describe
'39193' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
655e58e759ac2fe89d5d44c7b20ae997
6f141ec097cb14eac790f173c09fdac777ef89ee
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c13c68035a61c47af7c011a718f9dc61
ca8138fcf8178b4f79dca1e18a9b75230da9cb3d
'2011-12-12T04:13:27-05:00'
describe
'13680' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
5d0a3b4c674580eb8d6fae6ef880982b
f6d8726ffb9c5e468a06c759201c5d9899958f92
describe
'3346832' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
5ef7fa0a88681b33116cc20a81b9bd28
7151921679e47f234f74f24019aa801193be838f
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00044.txt'
59da4fa6b597bd1f08f7eb5ade73e511
1c2f712859799ef8f22d05b81e2d8cadd942a342
'2011-12-12T04:15:55-05:00'
describe
'3936' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
e87b7c73b18991d5ff2d31fda7226077
0b041b2fd2d05764f9dde71028a149e7a8ef41fc
describe
'292489' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
1bc959a35f3c466df13d1befb27d6f46
a7a4b3e2d42b1fb5ad7cbe2e7c98510e3dc80bf7
describe
'47101' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c57ee368cbfa1c402b9e8156c922151f
619cd1f31b65c7f8e66374d1c9eac386ca64a211
describe
'12436' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
0ea120242bcc9c6c5e245034c5aaf345
fd9422f717fa203665f2ad7166f59cc324e733b8
'2011-12-12T04:14:03-05:00'
describe
'16062' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
5b12170edcceefa61d70a5ca16428e26
3412eba4f1115caac6436891cc608513665c3de3
describe
'3346808' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
5da8bfa7fb1444984e283ae7a2318947
f11e258237ed0da1a7c609fa9bc6dd3ad977ea16
'2011-12-12T04:13:34-05:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00045.txt'
dac4177dfe829f69c24c8fe640325215
68d2ac9430d2768efaeb6f55b89953605e373206
'2011-12-12T04:13:00-05:00'
describe
'4558' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
df93eaf691799fda0d160ce4d04e2f15
2ae4ee037def08a8baac6a0f68fc301daa2b3b6b
describe
'414589' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
2d1317e4daae1ed01454b79038fbda30
03f939108452379b624ea58d30167f76b2678d0f
describe
'64110' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
087801049b5839aee13c9e47144e5e3b
38ab9cb652e489706c9619f0a1ecd5cdec1bc262
'2011-12-12T04:16:23-05:00'
describe
'20199' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e9252947003bbec7639da0c06e872b6b
df5188d113d5ee0cc2923fd902b7c1d0702d89d3
describe
'20433' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5c7b37d1c045fd203e39263e0f6b7a77
031cbb54a62b5e83d66efacf965207e2a7924554
describe
'3347212' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
332fae697d32193c22a7b0210e93d146
dd5591aa188de33c1743576fce91f3e107c22b3f
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
ba63af88fa2d01efe41902e016fe9143
ef086a79e3e67f1b00e4a42edaf6443f71dc1bb3
describe
'5345' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
658cc868ab99cc4dec5f905cd5c680ef
5565b20fcedecdb1175473fc21ac9cf1343e21ce
'2011-12-12T04:15:37-05:00'
describe
'404567' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9e3a419d2a81732ea7a4f27884c32ab1
4de8d264ef0bc7bfba47f12ccf53fe64d2024a4e
'2011-12-12T04:13:03-05:00'
describe
'59056' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
548170b65e47027f2a7fc0fabb6736c8
5a1df6b5694aff828e3f840163d6e619e98f5089
'2011-12-12T04:17:12-05:00'
describe
'18095' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1863a1ae65cd9ab124247df2c506f269
719a26fa99e085596d08af4ed16ab069a4044156
describe
'19192' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b3254e4503a8d74d5ca3df1312806b32
7acf85141b992c837dceff8cc1ae3c6c06f2f4a3
describe
'3346972' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00047.tif'
34e1d768500371fe7d30675799e3bfaf
dee92725936fea3bc0a955434c38e9e921829f77
'2011-12-12T04:12:19-05:00'
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1b6b770c36290b4a7f407a0b6206a30f
7b4ee5945318e016d3fef40beb5cfedc0a173d48
describe
'4948' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
dca2edf627375f0dd55d977e02eface4
df06260d7678f0daeb65c9baf422df58050572d1
describe
'417378' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
fa223ab5b624730de9a36ea6080d1363
7ecfc614ade612068c2d52865f1f87d670ce14ef
'2011-12-12T04:16:49-05:00'
describe
'97811' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c4a46daeef49e7a3bba36a10e93592a3
8f89b8f42eebb64feb6b26440cd5c5ee0c8f397b
describe
'14117' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b0d7ca5c1aa79c2e3d7c7672cc038f97
53ecd085da4f9d9561e8e92af5a3524b545537d0
describe
'30206' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
fdab2e65d301257fbf074e50b18f283a
9608f0b3debd7f7363d8f04bc54f03034cb1e07d
'2011-12-12T04:14:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7fb50dc02233a887614f99ffa17be270
b7b5fc1ef1c4e008a3d4789377b13cf1d17cce93
describe
'624' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5a688bcb4c050a660a6a2153ff75b1d7
8e6b2ad34eda5f1b75d5cfb39420b86393d3ac26
'2011-12-12T04:15:12-05:00'
describe
'8096' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2b47bc7ea797d4a0a4d13b967ac4fb94
fdf4e571ff956b8699e19075b52b6f73c140a3a1
'2011-12-12T04:15:27-05:00'
describe
'417356' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
feb518cf094de05823afc163326bc66d
22d4af64c001acbfa7f47c2fae076ec263c56b83
'2011-12-12T04:14:55-05:00'
describe
'101391' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8757fa9fa709eabc6b937004b78f2fb9
09bcd584f50a8c1edebeb924212f336339635207
describe
'33343' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
ca1b4e0b2de8975b2ff392200a0f4826
83a194d98136bc621790492eb8b2afaadc2a55c5
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0a2b4d044ddc94da77e4ad384cd39b61
3f5db7bbdd0b4c8db828231768027d6b7faab85a
describe
'3348208' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5f270dbdf140c2a340cfbd45bedecd75
58703ce32c07e8a1448e7f974be1e526c52a5583
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
b2a043d8302767cddb516252c4f2a383
9cc9c45a4139dcc978213280ef5c69e83302cf82
describe
'8887' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
ada26c2275a27ca18aff8e5aa2ecb6a6
6d59e0e3e49770cdbc108d635fabeb74e6f4e99e
'2011-12-12T04:13:47-05:00'
describe
'417392' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
f896c3fc71ecef4b6cf735a954dcda68
e62526fb205019fc4b90e08a34151006b48a2036
describe
'104494' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1c103a56e7b686c18928febf2bd0ca48
ad819da5813fc710a568dd166f8fe17b6c419e7a
describe
'33874' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8b04cf5d1b2926d42eccc8e85bda2b4c
52bb9594c33d359a97bd39483d14e2508f3b7291
'2011-12-12T04:17:26-05:00'
describe
'35562' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
898aae19d73bad34369d23bf01337042
c6b2f961b1ab0089c8afd4591fc2100b349fccbf
describe
'3348480' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6001cd111615bda36b161e3dc35f53ab
b499dec11cbd5b2a06407e0512cbb7adc6bb5497
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURA' 'sip-files00050.txt'
41c1976c27b7f6d263c3451da07827b0
42c4c3a826426d79c5219439b133d6465be1e547
'2011-12-12T04:16:06-05:00'
describe
'9209' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURB' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
8ab0b35d766771eb6890684ccee4dc9f
d508320c15cf39a176e8c18d29ec07a461a014f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6eab8621ae95b84637b6d61ec5cb5ec3
767d992bfc92784cde33f41c274c50754b46b8e3
'2011-12-12T04:12:18-05:00'
describe
'100285' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b0201ab02bff43fbd900d088c7a4f97d
be059269e98010904c928ae84e2bc3d009faaad5
'2011-12-12T04:13:19-05:00'
describe
'32755' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURE' 'sip-files00051.pro'
eee8d827da1d013cf27c7d19b6c17f33
70d79708706fe288df2970eb8a0e810d19e47461
describe
'35274' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURF' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9f5284f5bcfa20970e78390548774819
01cfd81b476e9e5b30ac1cf901ac3c8bdf268d10
'2011-12-12T04:12:52-05:00'
describe
'3348392' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
cc4d2bf415564b415054b192d4f1b3db
82c1e29d46a6274f2b44a22023263970a67cd6a3
'2011-12-12T04:16:13-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURH' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1f43720c4c303a80cf23e46e0341eb40
ac57b58e3b250148cbfc57adec9ed2e3d02071ee
'2011-12-12T04:16:46-05:00'
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
fbe8d23f20315416f59796479c1f2e97
dc741d2f8f8731197a16e5c56a92cb154bdc0b3d
describe
'30698' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
7921b7e8618cddd097b0f091050d4a8e
38dafbcbbede74d53818792898944598abb7d03e
'2011-12-12T04:16:12-05:00'
describe
'8659' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURK' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
fe987e3976c70c795953c0d4dbf408ca
0f83a0e376cf36c869c87280e602fa4274dea8fa
describe
'2607' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
903a350da6daf72e6e5f5d2d578f8863
5927e585dea0a6f0877f7fe604e209fccf80cd7d
describe
'3204844' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
dc1ee2d4b922bb581627bf93d908f1d8
13d2704d6c4a159ce181352a5dde456a9f5d42fe
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURN' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
251be3861b5dbae897d51fa418937e93
73e3571d413a1872677be5cfb514559d86d28ff9
describe
'424045' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURO' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
c8432ac83c54841590b8561b5991e32f
dba4bcdda48b05a392f71b8451ed111eef29a0ec
'2011-12-12T04:17:00-05:00'
describe
'174812' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
326cb281f9bea5d068c4dc294434db9d
1525ee4ba7d72307a9190c34c29c8e25bf08b6db
describe
'46433' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
b549c911d9895ec68ed7a34d03848c4a
0ab5a3108ac4ad98eb6743ae1b560e1407b754b0
describe
'3403644' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
2cab1a1c5905a053036bb4e375db85b0
8706b815dbe19ae0570d9e9db985c099129b78f5
'2011-12-12T04:13:37-05:00'
describe
'11395' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
09f871259b8307e3e9023246a4ea054c
8b48db46cf6a96a0dffd6d2bb0863e808d2c64ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1beea778e3ec17d9065eebaa697d5517
a261eba871e65183ef36c130c7cd6d983a6cb63c
describe
'102787' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5c5a82e57fbefc6151a700f678916d31
d6bcf7986fa45ed17d1e5a304a256a330777b995
describe
'31899' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c596c9ec53fdb9bc2746ecd8c7c369f4
3616f403b4ef140842646973d0e9f49192ef036b
'2011-12-12T04:14:53-05:00'
describe
'34423' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
2ca48503aab380d326ed8aafd9a02652
cfcf3ecb3a7830f60aa26c6749f83656c724b8e9
'2011-12-12T04:16:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
49cb2eab0acf01e587338563a8330fe3
53da938c901cb88bd6de84785e79c81a59ae5298
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f9ed0262e849b8022adf5660014a1ec8
39507e4f4cb8dad6ed5e60f97f82bbe1bec6f49f
'2011-12-12T04:14:51-05:00'
describe
'9398' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
ccc340193e1b0cde1e5602bef0b8098d
509e9a7219d5b399e99069a09a627f3072fc8167
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
43f8ebb77d27f66dbf511428c97f9de3
9404ea3cc45e3020781a1cafe1f2132bf47b392f
'2011-12-12T04:14:17-05:00'
describe
'100030' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
809cb0baac55bcf4a2adc240b6f0eb23
a3dd28afc68c10a29dfe24e2fc44fbbcf4b38ce5
describe
'32437' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1e4d7b4c892469ff88db59c8dd060679
bdf35799c2c26f28908be72ff08b00a27a9df506
describe
'33945' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
1a9aba8f17a933460b5552abc3370fe6
6fe6e06e5e69aa5cf45856bf4c8ade43517ec43a
'2011-12-12T04:14:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2d179211a021cc040b5a5d8f5530d30b
b8eb615493b77e9249229c1da95b9aab5097fa7e
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3b2f36c5ecb6dd83408cd177d251cbc3
dcd29e332db918bd9846afb69c45edd1612a4b8f
describe
'8313' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
f322b3808b763cc6e2792a8636516ba0
da431c6aec6aa2ae18e7fb5b9e3e1fbbc62fcb62
'2011-12-12T04:15:42-05:00'
describe
'417334' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dbd7c86bfb1c1bb38fd992344339068e
efc2ddeb2c43e56d47aadf78ebef292a25f2d9ef
'2011-12-12T04:14:16-05:00'
describe
'100729' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
60f4adf027b468c522abcb6dd2bff078
e78edc2bdf05a02d38fd97cd39d5a6b51e347616
describe
'33260' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
87a3dbc507c2f7e46b7a832443d117c5
074ba82825263b89c3a50249dabca5b50cf2a4fb
'2011-12-12T04:13:15-05:00'
describe
'35212' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b9b8e9b4c14cc9cf4455af58156dda23
6f741ddeea53c30e54b997669d64b2436526b1d0
'2011-12-12T04:12:34-05:00'
describe
'3348436' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1cebfc2f747fdcfab9c12ec13c701d3f
2d9436a5bcffc036fe12ac775e03c46a261e562b
'2011-12-12T04:14:50-05:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
069d514774e6ae4c85e1bef063518ba4
2df91390940a83dacf74db7a97b11deac9321098
describe
'8723' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
27f60564900d899a652be07accff1697
decc3203afcdcf7f244b4f19d0f98ab8f0cbd749
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5eb232132fb8954795959d118e3ea24e
d3694f73544b59bc5d7bba8f4dd81348e3ee2a3e
'2011-12-12T04:16:15-05:00'
describe
'101625' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
979f2e172dbcb5fee536449b6471f1e7
05a4231fe09d042d3644384f85395867b0823ac5
'2011-12-12T04:12:20-05:00'
describe
'33744' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e6b3cf47ff543eb221dabf681ca21d90
2d1eff454d221770d5adbe2412876f6f4c294064
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
8b103466091cb80262a9aaa677012a8a
907c91e11a9de2a6bfcbcf253f19c9b407326617
describe
'3348320' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
95765a8e73f2bd27a35ca37055a0c345
e3779ffe366ceb01405ab7871f15ce4a0cfbdbd6
'2011-12-12T04:15:07-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUST' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9b804e058118311268f58ed6a4ae90fc
ad7e05a516b770e09bb3bec75227df437f209f9d
describe
'8599' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ef15c0f00754e488c258b303b599f4bc
44ffec4dbbc749184eda58f67c78435065ecf1ba
describe
'417342' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
5406355420d0bb36de19d096f884a68c
1621fba3642acc6e27f09d11413c86cd32c62f99
describe
'97114' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7e01e05a244419e9e162c83f2646e0e5
a5871f19e45998a0a4e23c12be48b276c0a5f252
'2011-12-12T04:14:54-05:00'
describe
'32101' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
4fa6fb982f20a91841b74f11caf52557
9a62b9cd907e4cb4ba53b03d9edd84a3729d7980
describe
'33589' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fb2cd553407a0012b91537c4d28a50ac
19da22c72cd2fcbd36aa66d8142eae9a413f432b
describe
'3348324' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
a788fdf272e12761ae36cb9de9cc3144
e3483375e36ce1a784393307a98d7b96965a71b7
'2011-12-12T04:16:40-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
1501ad55bbc0e0f964d16bc72d5760ce
9e0e1997e9aec0da1ca12e6d1ff4f25d1608d336
describe
'8709' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
e2b467d02dedfccb41e93cdff2bc4e57
a7e249b6beac6998cfe1c251cffa2073c5448615
'2011-12-12T04:16:17-05:00'
describe
'417336' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
727f853e58f333621da6c3b02f3c4549
e03b8e0d675b2d569661732e619107fef0d3d4b9
'2011-12-12T04:16:03-05:00'
describe
'96704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e9486b3dea8693f87abd86ccbf8a4ae9
6d553c3d7553c756ef33317dfa10ce21585b479b
describe
'32349' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
f6cbb6078113299cc13815b6b2d66717
c2d4f40d59d4e458697720afa65a48b91fc75312
'2011-12-12T04:14:42-05:00'
describe
'32943' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ad2c3b58aee167e1b3c771e5b6870094
4b010e747128d7a37a55d405f9b71fb8eba2d3bc
describe
'3348280' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f9fa88d026bf46b0f6c76ec071d610c1
3fdfc84fafbb915565bef82280f7e2f00a088480
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e22337f6b28b3b4c0af98225fc36114f
182f55e8603e7fe3fcc6c1b6cc7705b7ab1f074d
'2011-12-12T04:13:39-05:00'
describe
'8370' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
22c1c5347e08b4080d1621c25fca36e2
21fc9e9d66e1f9ffe3d6076a97852f8229bdcbf6
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
aec17aa3b587607206111ad5243723f5
629eef3cb66697f36de9610cb87743b2504deab9
'2011-12-12T04:13:08-05:00'
describe
'102513' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
4bd4d8e50d15cb44648ec764e09a3346
4d7f3cfc7141289995903832db4417f1c229718c
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
fbab0f38c303ea5a0daae18146fa6640
1230a55357315030d5005545112b2b2ffa894736
describe
'34692' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
15ef5dc3ef7b83d19fe05018f565a8fa
2b278c3cf5a190fd3ccb606c2058a70e230653a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
7dbc92555c60a8e62505edc66f48baed
0271bf456882fbb4b5ddc0348a2114d93eabd647
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
fdd5ff0ad6a0935a35c3001c4ee0ae72
1af745110636f8ac0c3bb90e19a6f52f7bec9c0a
'2011-12-12T04:13:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
33054bc055dc97a055a6aa5a5c9a1c7e
916a3682f628cacf9288bc27c674d153e94d7fd8
describe
'417362' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
61076248ee429267752a8cab86d94a90
6e5cc6241fe38240df4f9012f8c3a60ce769fda8
describe
'106329' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e7b9cc5f1847b1cf642250f8bb6e24ed
bff97d9cfa087b0ac41787c9a89e54361078cdc2
describe
'34933' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00061.pro'
ab0b9ffa717eecce3f205fa982f87f95
9cb6a0e0a89221065b95c28cc14af4fc4c1298fe
describe
'36462' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c8f04f814d255292b064b003aa1d2435
83c992e77964b53ab2d7ce90cafc4ece18bf559b
describe
'3348360' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7166750826cf44d3486dbbedaa2f8199
a7413660661ade6718ff8065937ba7addaf91df8
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
4c69e00cfbdbab966988cc1f9189d67e
4a3fe99c62e0727c31f2d818bf1389eb5f17c3be
describe
'9058' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
edc610992fe2dd5056b920344acd5968
426c09e563d1de57dc593353a8e2342bfe7a3be8
'2011-12-12T04:15:14-05:00'
describe
'417395' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
34973312ad509d4ad2b9320518a3e0d6
cd660fc342b8ee9255b4e2af7adb29eb46dc06df
'2011-12-12T04:13:26-05:00'
describe
'99765' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
af8908b77bfb5dda6fdddea1f714becf
d6290e79591ef50caa4b5165b7826667bcb5f4f9
describe
'32885' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
58e54d4cf4598633abe164e5c40b3d6e
4b52e8def84f3aa9eb6ab2f1f2c8364f39ee0869
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
96018064d0103ecb114c8ea473893014
ee0c9a9d23e6b8e92a9907a9e233d8e8554301c4
'2011-12-12T04:12:42-05:00'
describe
'3348368' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3677040d80be42413abc2d9ad7b61cf1
56a124ca7c2557c451833973fb407b70a7abced9
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
baa9d8760c70b1f15d2b8def427fc6c0
e213e6826c1d890053dec295476c803d2c952141
'2011-12-12T04:14:14-05:00'
describe
'8570' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
85df2dc11e6b5732497aba28633ebfdb
f898848975e0d852bf5d6879fa097dd29ac97044
describe
'417350' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
b335dcfc6e68d843b3d686a95a5e3a41
3bf437f2f7366b65fa08a1ace5a447d37130c959
describe
'68208' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
93b15e062cdd32dd73254771d1ce0d20
1999fc1bdde5db95f997071db515021def942553
describe
'20852' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
510c26b692d11e1ad4ff9f8a8e6a1c50
eb54e3ab02770ffc84c0d860b5d6db538d24c7b1
describe
'23096' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
08cc47e6f0b0c72f26f8647c68f0d4e7
27c3db1834223668ba6ddf1e4db063686934b829
'2011-12-12T04:15:22-05:00'
describe
'3347376' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
374d2036f625a55b8b16f98527126b29
62d864231ce68dfb6990dd965896132f9db54076
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
55385e6fbeb182ff71e09038334574de
d343173d4950ea6059bc9676e85fac8930ea82f4
describe
'5771' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4058b76dd05271eb455e519a2e2d545e
f5a918be165ea1010f79f9b546dbbec3edb8f931
describe
'315748' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6e1eac5c344573aa67db4d8bc949d77c
a43bd551dc69b0ed106930cc049af500eaea5e84
describe
'48335' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d239798524d959b11853bea08f065496
f155ca827a6e0521902e870a2dfe913f46a4b48c
describe
'12863' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b0a217c89e20d8506240f55e7c288d31
3566a7911d9eb53252ea053d4d25ad980817512f
'2011-12-12T04:13:58-05:00'
describe
'16476' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c3759f9725907159df6ff29986f78293
151c5b0545814c8789c7ed46ab19959f2787fec1
'2011-12-12T04:15:52-05:00'
describe
'3346960' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e2bf4afa3a440f26095553b20679c05b
4ef44e56d98dbbfa527112dc94d0f8a8dbe60b41
describe
'652' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d054adaf0619b42140b271ca7e2dd06e
535c8ecae474e1906e69402992af2a06ad4bdbde
describe
'4645' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c1d3b959f13742e135c026d630e9d9ed
3b1e623e01ac11a5fee3250c4c72106eca96e38a
describe
'417398' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ee37e5a8c28dd66ff37ef25b78c00014
e777868808597b42d5c4f51fee1001690cbb7087
describe
'77067' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
0ecabf8a272e3a4e54ae44b7de481262
d7de2f40d709becdeab0f7006876522ad5b33f44
describe
'24557' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ac9e840d5d9d104c49f5466420e10904
74bb390b280c34474bbedc5bc0ec4c3e990580a3
describe
'24649' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d831a028bafee794c496c0ab3044f8ca
db38bc63dd5a69fdfe6f9e8447ee92b2ddae6e9b
describe
'3347572' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
7480d60f3e1e1d8d14312ca6431b3372
fe7b5649b58a6b620eb629c85eb6121941141e2b
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bf2647c63bac2b8fa12bda5f64ab842b
6c98f50378db7b9758b16791b9678a9f6c7c2a1f
'2011-12-12T04:14:30-05:00'
describe
'6662' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8be85f0e8609f85637ab96643c3a1c9e
f94df7fceca9cb620bdc3825038f035fe9af0c6e
'2011-12-12T04:16:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e74d98618b6edfb10c3455167ed69277
acbf0130660be0e3c03d12134e6892b328511868
describe
'66308' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ec49d11dcbd3cbbca3dfaeb91a5d4061
c493afceb0012f77a917806ff4b999c5c1d92aaa
'2011-12-12T04:13:59-05:00'
describe
'20307' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c6d37641610f5a06c40c5894c799b52f
7d7d60ea495ec36c58c5b9b0d608a6d3e22af93e
describe
'21931' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
758b4a7589192981b4494ea8ce1167fa
3a9afe2859367c7eeae355879a54baf3f08cdd4a
describe
'3347476' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00066.tif'
bfef541a586db6036a44052c183131cf
9185d8043faa77b0bcd65293e7748347409ce0d6
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
112808b6e8ee8f9e4f86a73553f4bab5
c867c01b0ede33a01349d2d8574e3cfaca0c40ae
describe
'5774' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
9fde390bc8f226252e22c3b7138b7278
cc2a678ba4837b7798ecaa1dfbdc81e85f44b11a
describe
'417349' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c4e64fe7cda45ce7e44c4597080e3145
5aa3b5794ffd7dc2d77d4e533ecc4ebd89015ff6
describe
'60830' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
2f1b100f2325e085274a4132b3da35f0
d7ae46b4050df791d4c945d4305f0ad300751595
describe
'18164' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
e1cec79d5bfc19dc90a80013ab4aa600
56dbf283b8bdb6bc62fa9bf57430c2951c47339a
describe
'19956' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
5d715aaad6b4836caf84e3bae8967ffa
84e14f5bc1c838cef5cb17258b57cf3b4c62ff2b
describe
'3347252' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00067.tif'
2f5f51e441e4ce2daa8c358ff99a3e1b
12fd7c41f128ebf3f5f724b7e9d3495ec5be0206
describe
'868' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
4cf2f8a52d2b874fa415fe36d9aa7398
e3eee84b242df9fb9897423850b34963ec652aa6
'2011-12-12T04:13:28-05:00'
describe
'5347' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
569f643f5a30693ccf1c652886ec97eb
fc738f7a32198b393f6823b7163513a2e09f187a
describe
'67182' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
9480f685679726dfe652ba77d385b071
533e7278b98523773ef7e29cc247778d29661a81
'2011-12-12T04:15:30-05:00'
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
36609fbdaf31e570e7739f8e9d9c1aa4
8596916765fe60af439e5394ccc972fe5bc66ba2
describe
'2566' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
166d5f5f0372c9ed6a0663ef4852f502
547ad93e2a972721ecf3cdf503e8566ebd3d93dc
describe
'3347740' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
ab6aa28fecdb7926b309d01d199c733d
120d918e11103ed181c1ae05ed53863832251c0e
'2011-12-12T04:14:37-05:00'
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2bfc33aa54a2244796f472a8b38ad664
99deb79026dbbcd71340d6d7826a4fa06969a91f
describe
'417113' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
365edb5c75bc7f90d8fb2af95170cc10
1fd5f17d6bc60f0a7138a6e12d27309f75440994
describe
'174344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
251c463388aaa86744b0729be3d162ed
89cdbe150707773643e8fffe02a0a11766cda435
'2011-12-12T04:17:29-05:00'
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
0b40d2ace512a9e07e84206c14b9fdf5
74cc1da9a41aa4c77bd5cd244d4e5ceaf20498a8
'2011-12-12T04:12:23-05:00'
describe
'45825' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
38c2f4164f46eb6332e7ad61972e9a87
bd6c95567aee0b7334b6c1c5a94a0df63fc45e61
'2011-12-12T04:14:48-05:00'
describe
'3349536' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
29822a32a05cd31221e4925b7730741d
796afc472a7dde1e9451e6be5f4701e1a76f722f
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
96efee5033d9dd2976498c6ddc815bcb
0493b45dcf03b2b24212fac3fc6f6c6e6c1d798e
describe
'11075' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
3a4fbc4fa0eaa13f836441e2e19fd988
eb77068282c31125c682221090c9dc39118e3acb
describe
'417681' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
fb1c951f2735681d0deb9f5c5678eb62
59431b7e0fd36749f09edaca225a496091380e01
'2011-12-12T04:13:30-05:00'
describe
'73731' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
6fe0d340c6a8b4845979e971dfd1cd58
8ac0599281f6ef8f0886e230eb06d8573eaf8bf4
'2011-12-12T04:17:19-05:00'
describe
'22203' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d5f92a7f3bddcd88a831dfcb12122944
c961f86011a395a9e635893f82b6b4b5443db334
'2011-12-12T04:17:01-05:00'
describe
'25678' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1011df9a0a1609a941c802aac595c41c
41692e8cd9417ec3d55609b1118d0f21a1ccd261
describe
'3349996' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
d16ce16827cd620ee68476d1449fe9f8
4f41e06cfb4a19efe7128d5cfb7f9cbdf0e58fa7
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
9979578fe4d52f62efd41ea10bfc5492
faf3565e40919d642c271b8d3adec8fab2829b29
describe
'6308' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
eb162fc636ab284b5c9c7f60ad6fc196
7b1f50477f2db8ecbdb927ede1dd53c8c072e3fa
describe
'417386' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
df32595c20c811a0680e82f10ff90453
9411cd6f0f6f6391b143650d06a8e56b18fe9d53
describe
'107761' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
651d3230c9d8cd5ae92fa09f4b3a276c
4cf0c4e909c93676cf98d67351e69a0258346b66
describe
'35415' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
94ac4583a309a382af9383d5b9ee3d7b
762e470afc2e809ccc50a9f0c61baf5b72d125a6
describe
'36135' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
40e15b6c24c59584111da9daf1c7a524
74bb774a1afc73152986443086dee26f165afcc2
describe
'3348420' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00071.tif'
034de8d0019ae6f5c37fbae590a6982e
2dcc9e04eb04c321d36f1809d3d59476850690da
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00071.txt'
2527d9c28004b1dae71d40a347cc8622
c4d0b1e851d60c627a92ce8798e96c2df4e9820a
describe
'8883' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
181b2ea2bcf91ec6e2731ef740f0c0da
23dda3a77ec9d130bca1747fab664c8f4fd1b561
describe
'417319' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
98b40cf508ad4adaa27a3a87d53d3958
fb36b4d499e91cdf9482c89001865b866d4e3e1c
describe
'106095' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
88529474eb4ce278ae28a04378c5a517
b88f1a815506e7d3a730231d6c27da17aefb2a13
describe
'34587' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ef62471854e7205456007a1741b0390d
37dbc1f7bd9a3a8822c73bcac036305765e7e89d
'2011-12-12T04:16:14-05:00'
describe
'36179' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
06f9d914c48e83e7f02c563bb9c12081
7b37bc76c17bb75cfecb617cd58e62906555b828
describe
'3348476' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
11a6f149edce2c45b4bbd245b9ae43e2
5df3e5ed5bc5cf3d7bd14c7e2cec6ee3d090ce35
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00072.txt'
123330376c2ec0c80191551ac1db587e
9366a3edcc6cc3d6d92e7f516221afefbf732bbf
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
a0b7e2826a11a0f60e58a0a9c7c4034c
ce1fd2b6b0349217cb3468ecd5694e80edb5a8e8
describe
'417373' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
15b0a8780fdf7a72f9cb982decdf92f7
d457360464519a5bb17cf80eda1d50c8a5dd6fb2
describe
'104241' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f03e4c117015046458e3634b744b0774
5935e0a0e757723fcc8f50dcdce3d930c84750bf
'2011-12-12T04:16:19-05:00'
describe
'34108' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
65826915bf06fbe3db5d14ef39df4715
88bebe5df9397ba36808eb6ebd5bf6be894f5c63
describe
'35681' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0b042e30404fab445ab261dcf55cfa3e
419e3ab5c89720a5e9063f94d09fa6aff6b0e5d7
describe
'3348376' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
888bf2f45514e05294c0d71ffae4003b
46ea2dde569b0cf16538448c51a6edaca50afc1d
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
b7acbc0e825fac471f03e09697eb687f
a8c9cc41ee4fca78512e61bd73d142b15cedb015
'2011-12-12T04:15:19-05:00'
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b57b8596fb3b13b5899bc69b0993feb2
17e6ba8a421e97079569f662c299cc2afda41de6
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
898070ffe7849b3c558ed6885c38c8ff
6ccfa6040d1dd7625fdc3c963c06d90509a1e196
describe
'105449' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
93eac57359a8737d9d09a70e3c3c0a43
893760c3442b50a360f3dce69e0cc2235d6cb0af
describe
'34594' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
629e7743b6135813e395d36ec604843a
341d49d4435612d2e63c055395b28bf40685e8a0
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ff1587a702641725bff1858aac36190b
a36972e6583cc4164d653bbcf6ce6998a73ad7f0
describe
'3348468' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
07b63a8ac04aec9d14b0d3578324a5dd
481caf4ee4e3b18d8d3ccec6476365066a90673e
'2011-12-12T04:15:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2a2c0c881c780f318325a704dbe397ea
aada38e592b82ace145f6da6375d806f4fb2420c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
af74cef6d68cc355c1197704ef30ac60
86d39ad1e65b42f425d05ff071b46a72a86c3857
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3d7e12c986c3da38cfa753b1f586a4ac
e6dde9f2e6b4686f7ba46a9ae1b89705384f7de4
'2011-12-12T04:14:41-05:00'
describe
'99946' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
fe7036fb54b0c6670f3dee1d74e41f78
69e395f00a5ce1f35fac922f613da0f7bfc93df6
'2011-12-12T04:14:29-05:00'
describe
'31904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0ce2f461dd0af1e2f5ed857d589264bd
5159d050ac97435727b8579d91c3ae5ad20a4a52
describe
'34546' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a28afe0fff3e956a241589a14f4ce254
1d657bf7353d54ef3f6923c728b407c2804232db
describe
'3348396' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
baad6f3bd56fcebd7fe48ff16d23bee3
563faea2af4857055c879fdbfeacd4310c251cbd
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
cc8545be964d7aed32e2c06df8929e6b
3344bdc51421af06dae6fcaa6ec5daba1a95110d
'2011-12-12T04:16:56-05:00'
describe
'8803' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
57af65682a6a89b07c7968ebf1169813
683808731311d4034f77ccd10aeff22e31e7ce4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
de8e3d027d25f305186d4b4c8d3ab138
ad293be553643b6221c5f42cf1347e17efa3b7f1
describe
'104073' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
acbc3bfad6b69a349c4aceeef60ef5f5
7f62e04be6432ff482bbfc8f4c692ba2907dc89c
describe
'34046' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
83dfc4f7a1d5ddcd25e6c0bb15007462
5f2e5cf36eeb9d70105809c366654895f363776d
'2011-12-12T04:14:04-05:00'
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
181fe14882bda99504d56049802fa17b
ae3218e36e574614e4a30d0135e7753bd317626b
describe
'3348432' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
9bc25c5a514e10a8095f12a085d714a6
56c509996a88958a4133371390476bd89baaae44
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
125a6f33320894ba5a3950f2d72b5801
afbcc3e150f9414ef2c3d3e1dba771c45d62e35a
'2011-12-12T04:14:47-05:00'
describe
'8716' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
4dcea935705f0efb43af3604229a613b
1e44f8936a0335bc6469a36d476dd56d19071ebf
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c4bff1d075dbfea5478def39a54fc5ca
e8a7f90a9204fd79b023b4659bf570eeb5d2c9a6
describe
'100381' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e4e09709bf8dc34fee570b67c2c945e6
4869ab6cffbc4acaf7718034f1e98887c9a44d1e
describe
'33207' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
74684530d6e48391cf040585e20f5718
3772aa99ec7fefdad70cd393eb3f8d332dbb69fd
describe
'34343' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
db107b81e52c2a6c8d8160874f7cbcea
a059e075f3e881c33e45a7d83d333ab66aeb20e1
describe
'3348408' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a18fd2adddf5cb0dba3d316dd6169889
b90d73a26df57e362127d36c6c31e140b71214ea
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
6963c8e7f2152e6de848bddec172a11c
66f0a15eff5a6e2d70a006086abaa1c00ee17c57
describe
'8893' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
9eb1de82377196a7a9a12f4fdeb02b24
9d96b99a1fa022bf1ce545d104538511c80e7128
describe
'417401' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c3882ec8edc7efd6568207c7e53990d5
3df0309029436108ead9d30e5264ede668af53c6
'2011-12-12T04:17:30-05:00'
describe
'93669' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
ab63e20d0c2a679c8da47dbdd33177b4
b3542dbde5adefb47a46f7751de7623fc2ac1aff
describe
'30690' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00078.pro'
cce4260d1e555fe9d6b5a41ad0033ed7
de332f57d128bb92c13dc10a920e357ae9fa7465
describe
'31652' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e1139901d9ba617d52122d512db20661
cd78b7b1f1e539fcaca652b7fc0ccbc66754958d
describe
'3348372' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00078.tif'
5b6c26c3daf448699321960eba1403b9
2016c5fa69ac48f3ed293135005e26e646efcfbf
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2b606ebf7e0368d7e861de8b7b5a2d83
362fba7e95170c7e10ff31c1be2d7e7f66eda617
describe
'8405' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0f9ccdd4077c837121a6e74684eba6d3
f5866d6dba700eb37bf8506de10d0d082d71c0a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
534eee6c149980aa90c41088496165a2
905e0cd5497450fe0a3102313b95e3c581089e09
describe
'100896' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f1828cc2bc9b28f276a2627d5e490ccf
4d23e4d05c8475b0187b8f91da345fa479e603de
describe
'32593' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cddcb99e6c4cbdf0f19eb7a1dfe11e77
62fd8688ff8338540633044f65e68cf60fa2c068
describe
'34396' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f2bd20247bab9104f7f569822cde8e10
9feb6c42aea0d5f66f974457501475cbc01d64e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2e4b5f658eb83d3b7f418a1460b93635
f3833bdc538af138017062dac1438da915cb005d
'2011-12-12T04:12:32-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00079.txt'
59fe3425a01b79bcd4d74303bfdd4d64
60f08331f5487fe21f39f0c12a713409c96d58b1
describe
'8953' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c8287f11ec0c1e0fb94f06f03d241840
24129f8d01ea2bd04d101f140d8405fa6ea698b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bbcd63a61292e0243aa5b8a2a21a4f1a
84b6613b3436658730191d9b7db60fefce0c1e33
describe
'99656' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
72e8407703ce05016283318224709510
6070bb47e14f870c4bdad2f71731b27d09cebd81
describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
0cda3d6952c1bc1db19d9bba4a34825a
e565ee51118461b8495e3cf6c39e7a7bdc207e74
'2011-12-12T04:14:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
ae8e1f81f62c4b7b614e9b97087c7fa6
b0b4a41cca886efa187af86732862f3788f3a26f
describe
'3348460' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c54d875b5518815998d84b2add9a2eb8
e5fe553f4cdc32795905deee8f4c5ce73c0ee904
'2011-12-12T04:13:41-05:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
96ba9ac4e3d4ac2cca30282d86f4b0e6
5a2912c5ca340cb0e881d2b933bd8ddf4f1c095f
'2011-12-12T04:16:08-05:00'
describe
'8662' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6918f6af07de5f150d5939f2efc966b0
d67c90f5b05caa73136abdf911ffddd73a37ad79
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
23a8e67ab95c0c647a890ca88652a912
846841f113034429ca0e6e3af3b7a560c28c1360
'2011-12-12T04:14:38-05:00'
describe
'96380' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
8ead812f8d544bb60f532869efb4f945
b57c27f4180832bbd35ef34e9078c80ce798c06f
describe
'30529' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
7145e896be40c53e97dfa28ce7171b8e
af4dedf757d2b40b100c809b48a18d1c3f0cabce
describe
'33897' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
2300d0e3ff77434a47db5877d4587e0c
441165876c915d8806f465c9107b4a4db9b18e38
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2a8cfab41bb4fcc232768261078386db
f2d69772a7a4bc9e0af6f292dd5bc2ae4ebb789b
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00081.txt'
47cf67a3eeaee389d0909bfd70c22ec2
1969d36bb339e850b6c65048c27fc4ddc8287dcc
'2011-12-12T04:12:31-05:00'
describe
'8461' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
902e9c9eddb21610523acf796d92509c
caaf55d171931fa3c7553033f4b5fe46860a71cc
describe
'417387' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
48905548f973129dd47d3324a72b7b7e
d217e3eebda25360c9c4e7b9e36c49b22e4330a6
describe
'101113' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
845c71ec396e131d1aa031c15479fc34
5dea0ecd64d85489efe9c08398195333cbd717db
describe
'32710' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00082.pro'
2239c9653383daa851f29efb9c199f0f
2907068593b9f1f9a886ce9298896208d6fbd678
'2011-12-12T04:12:51-05:00'
describe
'34137' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c18a949cf208c93ead5c7b2d7be2b81c
27fc31df34fcb8ff4a4cfa1007b3a605e9ce5758
'2011-12-12T04:15:03-05:00'
describe
'3348348' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d069b22acb57e699b89cd892731366d9
b7dda0de9ece53ed304d299cd393704631d8fbc3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00082.txt'
7266feb652a912c4b65f66d510982844
979bb857beaaf366ee8288c6a5c9983c2ffdb376
describe
'8905' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
fe38b2bec504f0fbe5fe29484114e992
ff4d4f3852f9a26d1032096e7b31c077e9bb9327
describe
'417348' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
39989545062c700ae6d20d07fa089749
e7a88e71ebe3be37e6c8a541cb69544e1be1316d
describe
'64958' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
abf3198994db6410610546029ca2ecf7
d11f67c1878ac9a53ea267cdfd2f44686f8b4d61
describe
'18243' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3ee9b1af96808cc1e3e5a39e11128605
57b6a6ac86a3a2087ea81c9d13fdbbc3762a5f52
describe
'21134' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0ced43bc6618c412812a1adfc3cd2bac
c2fd657adc04a5fda76af0e83c6660736e98ff98
describe
'3347412' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
090bfa53be530cbadb6050d8e775099a
bd981e8cd2d13f1d03db9056468819cd5f3f7d10
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00083.txt'
de9f4285b5b19491f206b6d0aa2bb969
522619ea30acfaa8e1285961216ec24ae6af4e05
describe
'5778' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
7a75d02a467edba79e9f75c0e05ab7f8
6391a6ab0b0d2c4225ffde30dbb2add7101e13be
describe
'30817' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f4c72dc4508022ca326ba1ab938e0e78
611fdb5f7bfc4efd21fe1f28b8e19e80ba924701
describe
'8613' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
6c38e3fe5b247b43bfd3626d017fe63b
67a9060d25efc396f6f1b2c596b758310e933af4
describe
'2587' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
762177ca7a6ea5612850992a06a49b61
4781751989f571be28dfb9b4ed5385bd6e70b949
describe
'3345564' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
573d4f70cdad870d3828b0f157f2b9a1
df1aad1421abe3756cae96df637804202a14258a
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
7e93d3209f1b14560a376d927e49a0bb
a63f5b9b21d0f95248b1754163f43c555fb62872
'2011-12-12T04:12:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
82e481849c2a46306473a6cce525de88
05a4e4830c7de87fb555f49d2db85623fc407698
describe
'165756' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2e0a49c1769c3ce9a8269137f86db51e
d80231cdd204109660c79005951827e48a9287fd
describe
'43602' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0d670273b4781b1bfe92772b383e212c
54a112c235ec55d451f4f71969ea8a244ab75442
describe
'3349612' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
504fc681d77d63cefffafe993d9b7fe9
8b35d911878a54470f2285b1d4a04b283b6456bb
describe
'11021' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
45e692352ebc08f2913d75f1254178df
f141124ce12914be0765f55d87555e7bcbc260c2
describe
'310097' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
290e9d6ba706cf449a74d75b31910d71
a3d7e9b0478e825e0daf01dca3e9bcb5cc91c577
describe
'48286' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
233110d38965535de3e0edb072c3f5aa
51e99e88f7530307e7aae045d0fe794476872b5a
describe
'13645' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
780cc3bb61c9fc459f76c553c69af293
fa076f90ba4552e6741cfe50d6abb955bfede61f
describe
'15591' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
d00238bf63a692ed9781abb6279cd0d7
101559330c83634f988d483ff1094fdc0c43ffe6
describe
'3346820' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7678e81875efa28d3bcacc57d2b05e94
94d168e668200797ef5820057833c33dcf7a098c
describe
'635' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00086.txt'
0cc6b8d2567e01ba6be4567d7992397d
7f2744c71b49a71df18c365b5f4dfc7ed01d165d
'2011-12-12T04:15:41-05:00'
describe
'4169' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bf02a5fe8c153e5a81c20fe90cfe2aa0
ca45f5923898d4776da621f3b0b8ff88a3724835
'2011-12-12T04:14:07-05:00'
describe
'181143' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
e5347fcd4850822120bcdadd41fca459
cb3783eb6895832df9ea8f44445514f8c8c1f76f
describe
'29442' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d9275106431c3b2a0055288a194679b9
a581aba72410c96461d5c443295013a4415c3c9a
describe
'6541' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
cb4674e5c7139970bf36febbb11838ba
b2fabe2797c77157434ae841d19cb29ca562345f
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
024249abbdca280728243fe467e717b5
7bdad4862ce035232316058933eb688322c9a568
describe
'3346332' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b7c80597ffda0fe187f67172c5204cb1
054272f46c19519baf00e68f3644b1f460e29a12
describe
'344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00087.txt'
b8264b3f38cca09002ca01f1a24eed0c
f7a48640a6662c6a383e07e4873348bf881118ae
describe
'2820' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8c103794aab81952267f4133681c0e23
1b1868e4fb6bdf6d4b2fa145cbf441a2187b9f58
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
f46f7ce14ecc8a93a1a3591e1d950170
9de3b546aba1e44212b04e57d2b6c43cd1ad35a8
describe
'76158' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c7bb7658cf0cf8ea119d3bababe14c08
28be71435ea5a00eae74ff919c39dfda38217382
describe
'21112' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00088.pro'
84cf611413fd6b307720d99ee8a5674a
81cb86eacf54d59a14a3c6949be7d8cacfeea039
describe
'25149' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2a4c561bed9722f97aac2ca21dc61efb
7be4e89a91d89f12ffc120476e1f45b0872d7425
describe
'3347812' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cb326847e03656ba96b0e03cec378a2c
8540eb0d826925d8bb64bd6d5d7a0970ce4e3373
'2011-12-12T04:15:56-05:00'
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00088.txt'
fc8004e61d3668b5044dd1b184c76840
9ddf60a554d8cd341c3558073ab2e581277028a4
describe
'6537' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
246af7a263ad8826f567ab58d97b4d66
8cb0244a4f05453174b678672053e4a19edf55ac
describe
'417327' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
eeda4266e7cee334d7cafa9454537505
c80fdab2230090463f3d3731251e900ca2326b59
describe
'100130' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
473a5c91bb60976f31f12536d0d37f0a
9b3ac4fc3c80f2d4bf0fce4ab6b819d38b428f11
describe
'32726' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00089.pro'
294766f31355d6cff8e7c55e94c497c2
bc29a077a5c6442a822a2b93ccab726377dc89f2
describe
'34174' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ab68a9fe16e30b90bfe9f9376726f3a4
3e17f95f3948117ff92f22b0dc8decadcfe671f0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6f5fe2323ad1f2ded5985eda8d15d7ac
d6e8b29341143a43c99c28bc6f5ed45107fe13f7
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00089.txt'
af73f371f098ca5e3fe37ca5110fffd7
43912ec70196ccc95f8764a2c54cae5994140c96
describe
'8521' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
3ea30556b0e3218f8212dcf93846e298
10694ecdfd7b647dd1a76f2e41d7535a1060f9e0
describe
'417396' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
7ff57ac82d5b738755508768d18e5fc1
74d34d6ddbde19f2a0ab7838f47bef39dc7a82f3
describe
'100317' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
67d3659bb234a8067bd0f1a1690fce30
ca57b0ee2b5ac6f2439bb8d3f4a62b643fa81115
describe
'32623' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00090.pro'
95d16143cfa4bcbb422fbc603df6f273
dc1c5c932f63d89d9f322c63e6723ca360485357
describe
'33362' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
569f804c70e04dac4c564a6fd435a640
b05df0ca2aac09ac2547a56957e08c677251e955
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f812a50203ce563a694afca48c2fb8d1
49c1f3ea306c3eaa2c1a241cae957cdaeb0d63b1
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
e8caa365954933fefc294227b7286228
334786e1bc61733ea98484045d81f650e8672908
describe
'8607' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
6d26df69680ee98448094370c406a0e6
78fb456a2a8dc3c005bcb6801ea4426824d1e10b
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
8325680c5d267f3f5b06f67ab129e30b
8d617905df201e5306f0d82ce3c9c3cea3a19460
describe
'102016' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
acd28ac021c0cfa803ceb00576e26bab
dc771aa8b4e5059db08c36c1d5f1595707e989b0
describe
'33724' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9dc709b996bcfc3d58bdaa3c7590a4d8
04efb1cb9b06f3de903e25c8adcf930f71ec2da3
describe
'35545' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7fffa75566970934ddb95606f3222649
be112b8fcfccacbb510824e7d97455fe4f5f1aa5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
df810cdc91f004904932e38378718c92
d3ead715c252d855e30df675e8253c419de406d8
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00091.txt'
46f7a724cbe6ce1d6817fab4b5b3e0bf
d800645e2627a7a06a31701d38ec87eb0b56012e
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
04acc1b3208123e5b85aab35287f0030
2aada4ae583c57976ec60729d7b04c7168c03049
describe
'417383' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b53ab741024a78dfb10c1bfc69cc962b
d78d290f7cf56a90dd68a1daf05f675a1de2291a
describe
'91875' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9e82b46027324db614daebaaeb5f5ef4
c14c2727b6ddd043424e79dd082eac134e6d0302
describe
'29759' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d4b291ad19f4fcb67b09225f97c0c00d
cc37a4a809e43be360063203066b1c119859233d
describe
'32106' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
b2342d9ea6ed65cae2a4fd9db9444636
cf22e8a7d5bb13c6c18319ecb51a3e053f684a2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d9eaf91a0183a6b82cbf419a7a1add9c
f70a8caa5e7255ae9faa6e41e41080830dab0824
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b24cc42eea235d801b4c6c68c6845da4
da0f792e20d1dca57340c1599e8c42686c7b60c5
describe
'8037' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
657162680f7cb061d21ba5a660fc27c2
2eccb6096c2a6c0c7a1082d7e0045656480589be
describe
'417376' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c7362934c94bbedaa431c417edc8d535
1c3f81108ad9efd9bc1bbc2ddde4791c96451b3d
'2011-12-12T04:15:50-05:00'
describe
'97939' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
2e3b22102dedfb232ed5720ff7c2ab46
064c583106fec48ff07de06f65e067ee8310d2a7
describe
'32486' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
dcb933df480e103fe3471f3dffa1ee2e
b949e5cd90264ae41d5f99fb595db0bce46f3443
describe
'34993' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c72d56e505e7f34a45c3e6885ca312a8
8314c433d07ef50857aab2b62685989fbf9a2f73
describe
'3348304' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
af5980e6baf17da07136ff625b21d21f
271e6a40605dad625ff0ec01d808c3d6931f8d07
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
60aefc2903ab580dae7693fe705fddf9
002b2ffc1fc91e08d8e213a02bd712115d9c5f1a
describe
'8771' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
15eb56067d69188bdfd8a7ac4544f6a3
c0e98da7a96e0285c3ae6231a02c72978bb57a82
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
74711086cc9a571390975b1ab63f247a
4d65f38b7b5ebb6df068cfa01e9c8b8d5035ccd6
describe
'89164' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d876e4cccf3d4535c2d5004ac7608f56
54fd778476fd2d64eede3fcadac10f97b9bd5f93
describe
'29224' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b27d887a0ff5322daca090d73bcc9cf2
289189e6c0af224ca0bffe25a3a6abd4cbc07e98
describe
'31427' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b77921df638ce734f08c385965aecac3
f36151c63e62e05eed30a63bf9c8ed1947af697c
'2011-12-12T04:17:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
33cdba829613fa724d86afe29f392a75
cb06569d607533a727fb2265a23368db04c5c5a8
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
a022e01f4301d9c512bb46eb20499519
a3fb175cc6bef234005359805bf4ac85243e9b78
'2011-12-12T04:15:18-05:00'
describe
'8630' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
49688ab2504cc04fe652c797449dfa05
82432ef14f0b66d61d5fd5e251e80f13c258047a
describe
'417583' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ec574ad549f6c3a3e37017dfbd598b80
b293509c2787a3c8da66579ec010d27b51b3458d
describe
'96769' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c5aef8820a98773109be10f6cdf1b12e
4bf698cf63023ab41a750469c52bec7ff53a528e
describe
'31047' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
175c7ee1707e052138bde4e0c10e30f4
de3a61591c0e6a5db8f622b7e9d8d4145bc9f805
describe
'33111' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d46fe90b87fcba63fcb78d1bbb92b0b4
08c2d2ab4fc83962c5372d29c2029fae07c3af1a
describe
'3349900' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bfefad97d96efc5295aed0dd44250955
7d16a45d4b34bcfbaf7f6c3caa576d04df3d8afc
'2011-12-12T04:16:34-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00095.txt'
2ac3115be08486c54a28df3feedef15a
3582bb2f8bc0fb6f7c707cc771726d6280bc0535
'2011-12-12T04:15:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
72b7f9f0704dd967b063747f7a7d8f88
fbac49093b67db5166ca9f11bd6b742dfe9adc89
describe
'417389' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9d2ba50665fbf1f09d7ff7dcfdb9427c
84611606235d516ab5777d4a71d7e050cc27d26d
describe
'96749' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
75506a69e52193b10c9c59b0c355cabf
1f1546ca20a3bc831936e5746450c25e6821daed
describe
'30992' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
6f33bfc84fc0e95f31906bc4df8649cc
7fcd52fd0b71ffccd813c935ec323a7861fa828d
'2011-12-12T04:14:39-05:00'
describe
'32965' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
0c89bd2d0b6e4070637db6f3ecfd46a4
f9230274d17a6f111a75b3cc231201770c47b4a7
'2011-12-12T04:13:11-05:00'
describe
'3348344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
98c9595e8679be7cbdb256dfa6d0f946
b544e2297edeab182964bffdb4f1888aa38a2607
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4fff13e8c777ba2a257abe163ac4c25e
dad366dd438d7e03e58a26617df20792c6ba5414
describe
'8657' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
582886958697a33807eb2ba7b39d5ea4
deb3c2982d55d6443609b96ff1ce328da058238b
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
64cc4db46390a6914f6536ead52469d0
28d2a5e84878178e388d20c3fff629490a915d8f
describe
'108051' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
22f507cc0c410a4d0163e0f30846c34c
e18f923fd5361da457d6cedeee14045a020ab5dd
describe
'34956' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00097.pro'
80cc7384835ae6ffc03a140aedf2caee
96325b08750347b5cd3f421df1a85d5e97323c72
describe
'36494' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
66c5944a6ca9c26883bbec978a9a3c64
42c4f8e9a4db5dc3847010df9ac1d7db98d9733d
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ce12074770824a3d7cd01a7c45223e1f
e3028f6d839e45b8d7b264688251509cf37b828d
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00097.txt'
4ddc52e80f009b14d30cf571832ddac2
a5cf4e7cdd61f2f055c7148eddc29a41a446afc9
describe
'9213' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
0d8e4dc071a263c8a319b3b01f10036b
17b50f59f28adddb9bb0a2b34fca8978fb683a3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
57a208976d740f80e68e98581b9f2530
94242a3bafbb7929dd076b8254f3e390cfcbbf4a
'2011-12-12T04:13:21-05:00'
describe
'100832' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0dd7184d6d7364eb8ff7bfe1184cf19d
08aa81f7d1e106e32c88e2a84e2a709e441da4ac
'2011-12-12T04:15:38-05:00'
describe
'32443' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00098.pro'
0bcd0bdd57be30237d39a774f5d09539
b1359585a0364da4246d83b28850ef1258281fd1
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
bed7931304663724d23874aa23205523
b7a23d22cbf2359f954bffa5936ded92a056cd35
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00098.tif'
3ea4e64454139a1571f099b8d999f23b
9c0cb15730bfb9f243be3d2d6039ac1dcfb64506
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00098.txt'
7a98b00b5237751abea36950cf821489
d71c6c5abd34696c90ba91fa54969376f9b2fce8
'2011-12-12T04:14:58-05:00'
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
31919b8615837a48c5136d6c742eb36b
1c9049dec7c5274803b94d33632ccfb0a21a923c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2213b5e3a647d869f56f129f3f2dd1ea
5521f989e94fb80a68661e501555146905269b99
describe
'100457' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
63ccefd474c1d6f40be4a9ba36d35d82
bc45a8b88384e56a59577be4a290b3642d0a41b1
describe
'9599' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4812ae719ab628da4af6af309a97362f
4279f0878552b14c80efd86e6686b0df0f3a3a22
describe
'29053' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
65a2b2b5596d05fde78a0cb34b178d8f
8ef2062d03e0e8a3296a7cc49a385544d2b3203a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00099.tif'
37f12ffdb00ef8935607baab0fba1b1c
4d98049588179a91da3f2bcc140a19c89864cbe6
describe
'382' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00099.txt'
3487bda02db759b40acf7049ab5e180c
dac37e89c585f01cac446e2f40530e5868d978cc
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7297fef52d72145eaa63644b1394a77e
34f1e7e962de0071767c833419dc94e188e98ade
describe
'417661' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
baa3c48ac02ccdb5144e9052a2319fbb
b10f128edd2b82048211d40757f6f6ec0efcd8b3
describe
'99474' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
eebd7e13920c2171acaa4faa3baa3162
b34bdf77eb4c81b4ab9a54cb9183f0b150827cd2
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
79e9667a2b4b976745760b4279b0a93d
48688398469127c3c179f23ae1bd1110b8e72874
describe
'33756' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8347a881e03066d4fc0e32067867bcdc
b602a61fa412e4d673fbf70b54e204b2b959e643
describe
'3350644' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
070e2574c37b26356a8e90a3fecd34a2
059f9aa50234c3e5ef59c8819f44cd27cdf03554
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
178a72b3e896c1fb9033e3a7344402bd
d8f2051763f949d515607271e995e2c09b49b2d5
describe
'8298' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVED' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
037d4219433c739549b9568f4c70ebd2
b9b37358554b56a8cc37b5843d892c5b9b65ef68
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
b9953ec0df21450478889c980f00da48
77c5cdd1fc7f068a942d1ba4a6051c8f31145828
describe
'100132' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
4ea5f3b6ffb76f7565586df382032d11
45ea19f458e4465f8947a9e5068a26d83197ebf2
describe
'32452' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00101.pro'
b2146047f5384bcc514d2d5cd198c458
db5e0d2d4d93906ef1192d7d6c9aab648334f69d
describe
'33066' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
bbdad581708f8e99e6a5656a59cd5c34
84583e9070d245651eefdd73e4cdc01e251d32bc
describe
'3348288' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00101.tif'
e42fd42027c3baa8deb7355a6288979e
1cbd4a2e7bc8171212357faa7a8adb4059c3da67
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
ae58dfce8df6a6220b5403dff3e27066
64cfb93597302f0c786e127c08f880912b0e1e12
describe
'8639' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6d77fc549d584f3620b44dd5a88ae3e6
bb5508381b6155deef38a5d5cae606d4dd541dbf
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
99f7eb18f8af05bbe0c776ce71b5634e
7048794d1ea7abec0b994e62cddf2ee569ec1343
describe
'178729' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
316cfc5626bc66f3ece6409063f61bbc
a63e3bc5bee717a35ca7c76e7a066bbf25465191
describe
'47844' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
e7dd91e8f4bde66a53bccb3414b89743
1df974b11a7b29c11ad2e007b15ec8cce9883219
describe
'3350228' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
4e613f68687685ca4429542993bbc52b
8df1847afdefe336fdab3eb1769793ad18e6783f
'2011-12-12T04:13:20-05:00'
describe
'11958' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
f3396d1c0783ac52c0c2a794094f8deb
655111cbd7c34f98604cce563b5e9c664cd9678d
describe
'46787' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
07bbdcbb54ed97e4ac02c05195ff5c2c
b646f84d6619c4d0d5931eb9a170bdea04cb9e24
describe
'9164' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVER' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
8623f3db0adb503f6993ff53b215b504
d46d95312050d484deab43c296fbfef37c54210f
describe
'2698' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVES' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
9fd54f32f31aa1da9b666c9ce30b939f
cdbb8aaa0f56c58e72c4550688079409ecde9f9c
describe
'3345492' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVET' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7dec4409527b08f2559146cefe68d435
06ef8f29a07f4efd7dc94c839cb7dd919dbd8522
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e8e66f7bc7d33d0ecacb97d0828087be
8902539efd786f3e4bb7efb8a74fc97084ae947f
describe
'417384' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
dc95e8688b7524debc836b5b94e66e8a
6a693e6102829e1dea40dd6456b2b7677c1f9103
describe
'83579' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
3de4b479907f23454e9479c14e45888c
5eb1ee51335396d57b9b27fd4ea09db61aa4124c
describe
'27549' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ca7279be79f60944439cb36f2a05acfe
33b3e1533684deb2fdfbd9c2d12d4d614b6ff3e1
'2011-12-12T04:12:28-05:00'
describe
'27222' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
c2bbbe955e4f36867b2c91b9358e9e52
a1d1f27122bdb7a58546b2f10ac3be83b3dd8a1d
describe
'3347988' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a71067fb134534d12b44ee3b56b73c99
45ad27d036b052edbb0aed0afb2deb58352c6145
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
d3de381fc592e7b59dc5480c67e1ed7f
f8e3208d26369ecac4fa757df8b086722c12bd79
describe
'7959' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
14aff04155b51577434ee1be1392053e
a523a8404e27eeff7d77e04edbd2dffa7ea79c42
describe
'262698' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
e4691da5d4d0f61fe6973bd4427fe416
0c86aea6b6937cf5efadfd000af87e5343fc1a8c
'2011-12-12T04:12:46-05:00'
describe
'41212' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
da886762568b37fe006bb9b1df1100f0
f75012f0ff1a0a0a93d5048b6a8ea6ca72662a27
describe
'11005' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f211ec4e46898759450d28a4dfc0c01b
dfc43599d5e1f57d68976a3b1ab74d2f57e004f5
describe
'13876' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4d5cd7a50661623f63fcc159438b3d10
ac00ab3781f4a69260b7607e5814d902fe50ab02
describe
'3346748' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
efdaac506593c9fceeb76d11ddc6b8ef
7a0f23bdd059a5fa6f9f0d3ffafc74429e66fc08
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00105.txt'
4a1f8d6a705cfcb79d067a7348c3aafc
d7c8e41010c307f3b52577149908069dc5859156
'2011-12-12T04:15:00-05:00'
describe
'4065' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
5e2929ad7cf849a1f27d6f4b5bdba9a5
dfd05c2e576222da67b1dccf660a093bf1f03924
describe
'372290' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c1701de0dc33706219a322509141cf73
e223a133fe78cf47b20d412827a9e170139d0493
describe
'56983' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d3fffb85003f14951f9291549145f98d
276ca0e69f21aca5c40d02b9e8ff96bcf5f42745
describe
'17858' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b2a151e0bb98f5d7f102fdadbdd96183
53d28dd11586caa16290278378e0dce14846d056
describe
'18908' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
dc85b045a026185c96fd84c3b9f34d72
9e926afa5e3957af0411b2c11731f6820682094e
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00106.tif'
38b8e82b2650b5e7f473cd9e3bc38bfa
6d74d1525f6f8034330efc0608a078e16d926300
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00106.txt'
6152fe3c5cdbe6b25ca1206060cc1663
63df506af052d290ca79cad3f8fd1e3d44c20c18
describe
'5263' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ffc8090d689db55b8a3f91850fda259e
b239107c392cfb578a5791ff38151dbaf1ff0889
describe
'379825' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
cc2659aa520dcd273f4e48ec8115554a
877b6674788b5da7b644389886a6d7662cfaf8d0
describe
'58634' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
afa78348c88f61b1066d76e78636f546
4debc2f2d6613217b2430e5185ab83907c9b1048
describe
'18366' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFS' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e5d0741e70d281d44554eef479b68906
93f1cabd19c8a7a32a6f1f6f3f4e6d5b8e9dcc28
describe
'18701' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFT' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
cb5b728e335aae3a87c954a756c81a64
77e94badf42f29f1b15120fca5a54d78b7a082f3
describe
'3347136' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
9e7f59a5c61a945ceb88adb4e6e54fd7
b572c6679e4c56020054beeab82d67cf3e8cca2c
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFV' 'sip-files00107.txt'
f6e91a69b6843c9ac828c197faf3553a
2ba1f47de7fd96cddebb14e1757d6e14b2bf04e5
describe
'4978' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFW' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
36a0a60490e4d08e2ea1b0f5172dbf2f
694b3c94ceeb02e9ba41a0f2cf3cb0d2c8e46e1c
describe
'145878' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFX' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d3a1357d5d3ef8f5edba5230aa56b8a6
f69e7cda9e1788b83f6d5fa8efffec9f2fe16320
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
3b6064823f9cd90ba38cc08f5bcd75aa
a5638a4731067c310ac12a036e96f4c58405b814
describe
'4331' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVFZ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
9419817609aa688e93be2a0e082abed8
8a8ed22367af78b9b6a628d6f3b9c2dd292986cb
describe
'7691' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9f0cf9661e076dc18a34ab91a2f8e343
f85b84ea9672ea45d900c158cdd47348c8edad28
describe
'3346120' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9db976c2706811eca0bc57fbd0da5d91
089cdacd8f84d81f82906426f53e02618d683028
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
06915f303bd9ba2dc0b0be23af3755c9
3a7bdf45881c22e75d0966ad691d92b1aa702834
describe
'2318' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGD' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
6983bf768bd4c1b1a4105d10c73fe144
3e5347cf9c945a45df075eb83318384bc0d62197
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGE' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
c9e6f778026d526f42224da7a05b7d27
3e78ffd78b2c4e1998815c3ea86c072548f02942
describe
'71748' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGF' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
1a03197b42f68adc3d054e8b69fd641f
9b01eb46bf04ca191660b995abb6b2aab668c402
describe
'21433' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
cffec3ae85c90c35e581afe1c5360788
9a44fb73f8c55ef6fc29cbacdf855c1fa14b303d
describe
'24398' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
aefd62f23b92831dc87eb2b4eb0d43c7
0ca985cd4cd4e2f9b63ae4145b85d934403368dc
describe
'3347772' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
cd0aa82646ad339f9fe5e86cb155d441
69995be53b6b3ddf28b5a641a24d5480c2027ae7
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGJ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
021a63e881a2406c46d984a6fba8cbdc
785e0e02d9b1d3f8954d8a7fceb3db61d6d2f669
describe
'6082' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGK' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
78c049e0990583d64f6e14ad15bf0ca4
23c3ba49ce2d28efb3bed96a5bba21ac75cf52ff
'2011-12-12T04:15:21-05:00'
describe
'417358' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGL' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
767e50e1f10d93da73a397fd2b771eae
42dac69a8b536b52b63c8c2b730c74fdd1103a91
describe
'197528' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
3d1be3fd46087caff4e4a01e0f6e83cd
344af611984f639ddbe129dab57474a2d84783b7
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGN' 'sip-files00110.pro'
bc409cb3ab1abf178857272c7c8b9713
70eb4dace4d79817e3925185a9fd9da474954fd3
describe
'50443' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGO' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
55df9a2d1b82423b3cddbe0408e5d749
34db46d79392e6de964ab71fe978a5a699ee1a4d
describe
'3349708' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGP' 'sip-files00110.tif'
648d95fc5171a5eafc37f26acad074a8
4caa3bf5f94fbf40c6cd5c597074c42c88dfec09
'2011-12-12T04:12:59-05:00'
describe
'202' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGQ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ff8bf5f8afa957f3c9e883b39906618f
bf5a14a292118aed2748022c02146ba50553accb
describe
'11688' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGR' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9ac05fd297c1d1125d69ecd8078da1f5
b5ae8882a5526813aeab556f4384db26f9003980
describe
'33952' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGS' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
7eebf957c077513e7af287d7b52131c8
468b20504a28d2fe84410d92521fa0cce9bbf7c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGT' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
d45148da6242f602d807ea59ebd16492
d251c3346b1324029a7402f1c581e8ff72e679e6
describe
'2571' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGU' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
91f303772d6c70e80e54665edc2be64d
f076a57297a81d091025d5b334d8bd6c71745f4c
describe
'3345520' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8741c341a66922825f6003c9f6da119e
14e9871c0b81c186f7652f0df5e12b40439b951c
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f0f432d43993b07abb88a31247965e23
5604f9fad844a9138d779ddff84bb532a405a0ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
e3ea29586a6ac86fcab4853b5684bfb4
00643921c4c06e5d0465def7d3f48231b46abde8
describe
'102805' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
28b8fb6df9d84a9d9b6e5b7d7f88f0be
2897ad20a41b6797be535bd864d0e35dfb71221e
describe
'34457' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
cb1419f225fc82956dbad5b8d6444d10
8bd99c853db4f44f68792d2bd6fe2ebda7803a1d
describe
'35391' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
3efdb6ae20f946d4e81a222ac2c3f9b1
098ea3c8b5cffe8ef92a8d810d8edef6d61c1d4e
describe
'3348328' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00112.tif'
f76e72b4c12a567aa975d3e538eeed8d
6acd641970692b2e8d83b5527d4328554420fd84
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
80dc6a2f16cd586392ad7b0511a3ae72
d6cc79ce16803969dd56051025e828c986b2c5d9
describe
'8814' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4f60d80ab42065bdb32a903ad7c4303d
8d869f19ca8dacd07644664fea7d3e04cf7ed1d4
describe
'417333' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
5965fa2685fdd1b28ebf78debe173cb9
d285c8db4fbce63072196392365d41b8f29dc336
describe
'100532' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
7f45ece5c61f88811a01334df42b4016
bb3655323c09f19ff7f910f97587e11fb9dbc047
describe
'33204' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00113.pro'
8ed0b44d5f9891a8c7b23437faa198b0
69dc864bfa5306e2ab12d71593bf70ca51504863
'2011-12-12T04:14:12-05:00'
describe
'35269' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
a909372be31962547c91e86a6440ed0a
e21ea3eca40f69244f5362b3926fa7a68102c073
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5b74ab8be5dce63fd0f6485f2571f48a
f3fd5ded6e8d7c312058ac6440cb8878502c1219
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6faf82d6257e5bea550954def0c1ae26
c6a7be5f585fc4800823c5ab208e1d5567659e45
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
566a740930838dd26fa7e66f6bd4e387
63931144c6bb8ccc395d0987104c66395c238f93
describe
'417372' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
f6b44fade9570c2bc3fb6ca4068dfda9
febdadd3122f2bda37a2835b5ec7018f79e2ef42
describe
'102510' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
e05d39e5c6772c960388e72b8195e501
1fc29b50bb4df77f8a02c8aa04904d175d1974b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00114.pro'
f597fc94d0b7c84956e0a05de5be6add
f70655f7aa317116c8ecba0382762357c0f7f1ef
describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
5478352bac1df7eba744eff1eb9710ad
9c626055c509406c6dfbcf9fc3e90495a9777e04
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
15404b03d7cf9a1273d740c4a1de6600
a1f55feaa0a25f08b95949e6e511bc2dff87da23
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
7bcbf9e3e7e85c6c72a79441206695a1
797698d398af08cdb0314dc0b02f040de4d1efd1
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
2af9d847fc5f2e21bd08e3e71f6ec3fc
4b750d26f659c02cbd80248703397afa599b748c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
705a01858dec26867fa71cec61f3bbb9
31ba0b60be70895d911adaa938521e2451a1c596
describe
'99575' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
0e17ebb1df049bc80ac511a0261ad6a1
1f482050a7ba79c0d7a7e5af4ce464cd0ebb5f83
describe
'32666' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
708b0a3defbd03836f7c5bff024dbdf6
ec34613397b79e70c78120ad9cb6060d35a00dfd
describe
'34237' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
f7c75329c2f192c5e02ba8db2cf4e34f
8248ad9aab926faf4bca90f2a0e7430577338f98
describe
'3348380' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00115.tif'
26df8c301244819ac837786e2f314ea7
499df5a6da1fca68571dcf4b5a9defe8a6e97ecc
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00115.txt'
f9823b4cfe26b37cebce2435ffa42383
257cc827b89fbff862c5e1edfd075e45aa662796
describe
'8914' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
3abd3cc07409696de66291b267e9af5d
cd51e98841314f34a688fe73aaf2dc587847abf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
60a145807a5c6a26a9d9af355d302fde
cd306daf2d1172d5f6f2bc24482893a757a83beb
describe
'102953' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e763f0690a0a5bb8e8cd5c73adb1a649
91ebc76995e4c986a5b896e3f3691a89628bd781
describe
'32997' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
2ff420eb718a8028a5a684e8aea79e87
83c78c414c9ba0d1eb9c4607df0748cdb4bc548b
describe
'34505' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
59cae96b7fcc0c75d39217d3786cffb5
12eb495846bba663331be9331a99a0019ffa6946
describe
'3348428' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVID' 'sip-files00116.tif'
23870ebae82045168b2a95bd39f86f0e
b2dcd08048810f0df16d001999aa26aa11a8d532
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00116.txt'
17cbca13e4edb360ac6224e0e4067304
4de4df879b10dd76123dec17a4dc9d1c976d86c4
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f1efcecf521993148bedd0ee295fe3e8
a827f341acaecc81bc70eee77c163034e205aa63
describe
'417375' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
2253603ea82a126b6a50e4d67d0bca13
aeebfa9359be1cc52c00df21946c17b42b452ee0
describe
'98951' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
6e66709f58cff5d736406cabf60455d7
061a20d0a3221a4bf387b0d22369809b741eeca5
describe
'31897' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVII' 'sip-files00117.pro'
d29f90b77d8ff7ec40125921035c8bb2
5e024928a360eca8e318573e414b82a83d1d588d
describe
'33177' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
dc4ff3ebc26348c7208ba16b863467ed
27621382d272b6250ff85e8e93c8a3b95fa35ef1
describe
'3348424' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
4dab38fbcc50824e11f8b81628242598
d395c8e1d0185c9207bc256b4047c4e17a8d00e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00117.txt'
99dd6d92e3911b45bbbecc037c585051
27d6cafd790975d45b565b2183868ed17ac02c79
describe
'8537' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
b2c6782d8c5243a898ee9eb43fbdd799
d821c08aac726cf694406031e92c66c52b1368e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
a9a5c4e202cfab3fdf337327a420d52e
50bf69e59823a5772311226d01e6f3f777e9fda5
describe
'101839' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
aa3d6ed24a355991c429054c1f1f0b5e
169cfa8ae9d5c2084b5de4bde6cfe3698d4227d7
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
4a21934bb02120fd77befde09de24f18
699f15d5004caf81fadf931061fb22e965380354
describe
'34515' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
c703b47912869d394c3c5d32f16d68f3
b4505a5d46e4fc00c20c49d169715159f153c4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00118.tif'
cadf025f7ba002125630e6a05a9e8efa
3351d4480af1c334625858e7c9f2e2ddd2341548
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3e96f8c66c8dd1a1e1e2d2662b80ec54
bfd39082fdd317b64f72a64af58a423dd0f444d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
bba8f5bf478a48f353a1ad80e1b5682e
4ca6c1029d7bed01bb0088c60b083c97ea568439
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
235b9c6cca4f29d391a6ab430b957c68
8ecd3a48051e65c1f4dbc1b2281a632a244fe5d0
describe
'94417' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
72e33dad99bb3a346197b6868afaaeb5
1b6c8e15f08e05a37a8c27aee6cd9707bf3e3b7c
describe
'32128' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
f5be9bd4a31039717e7f01b0322b8370
82b0657254f03d7857ca50fcab5d6991d9851749
describe
'33244' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
06b43a91fe7fa454cbe20b03e1102427
09c487640aa20f851d46fca3929f6c35af35a9c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d58b53df214e9f1193d37aae7438457b
1c97b1e15364b533ce08e00c6ad1d84e49e55174
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
90e0c3dd173ac094578af7e6838b6263
63bf065fcb75fb28fde9155314f63ff36e0c807a
describe
'8411' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
78dc80d31e666a3d22ea467bfb6cde08
50dc58d056f78669d0330e5e06417200df8fe535
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b1cddeabea5e7255d0031bceb463a124
caef84c29550a23e509e65ed5daf1ef822fc5034
describe
'105355' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
fbd761a51e130ff53c80d8db305307cd
755ad3065e27dba16b65eeab7f21d977b136c84f
'2011-12-12T04:15:05-05:00'
describe
'34765' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00120.pro'
dc7ecf34920db97dc952cae5bc78c4f7
f3a2797034e327f7ec31af6c4406b86227e55491
describe
'36788' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
11932feb2de81d28d96726b8fb4141ce
ad2e395d75fd44b902b96de04c36cefe4a727cfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
e8c71333260656587c6018dc5acde73b
8cbd1f8a32714f35e0fb6d38eaba2caf2b7b71a5
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
a5c13a772c7571a2b013f5558f564601
b146fff3406bd572c9c8e309ed04183587809d1b
describe
'9196' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3977f535aedf211df98f282b8795fef4
a0bf6552c1685d8649c223398c4c920893b9aa6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
aaa0b89726174e1d2f289d43271dbc4a
e7faae48555a749c7d1140d2a7f499e6158876c8
describe
'101881' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f885729ea6a7ec71b78f815517a59ebf
65bf6e27cb5b14f8f690c9118f257ae08c43e9e1
describe
'33407' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00121.pro'
b3eee95222659daaeb9d1ca3e489df13
827deab8379eff3cb51a53656a034d9b43d7d3f7
describe
'35300' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
99312d3454d29db9f19163e1caa7ee2d
e4c22aa803e3cec2063f04b81aec51e608723a63
describe
'3348404' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e0af1668ffd040e374c55926fcbc1b9f
f3f0b709e9b276850f9926302edf1a69727999aa
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
d701520ca375ab5ce17915b78635ab94
880b5c8efe7ae12bbf494d156eb9ffe2c1906a13
describe
'8845' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
31d7a6c450c274a4a19d41b6b4b32d18
d476d85c295a773d2d8f5d5ec2943741a9ca1fe0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
00df6efa4f344e57614cc818bfd44ae6
60b01e47c35f277a2569ba05799c20407d3b9bac
describe
'94236' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
3c3c5f424d644c5c4a89b90c6b8a0706
1237e8fdb26855c4f225a70b2e6669fa88cedfe7
describe
'5100' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00122.pro'
fa181f493a444092bc6fd1d81e9afcdc
20eff4b0e8d352bffdad97872c66b3b0a062801e
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
81ee68b5cd47f6354970fa70e412e9bd
fd745109fda2a3a5f6ff4ac62949687ec3687372
describe
'3348024' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
897e69825a6354a19ab4e3a6df9cd0b1
fe3eb56e65ec128ee7ce4fd3b1136f75bf53a89d
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00122.txt'
323484083625f6a11dd9bb61b78ccf05
d4dc4f48acbdb840b14ed1210ad3f9a59a4f31c2
describe
'6997' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ca6d636a33974e57bd0b7243c8c8a63f
507abd3447b41d3f4518f5d4d72fd93489bbc0b8
describe
'417344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bee25a2d186d75109e06fc40a3150367
9ac1f2a3b72d96c072e9292b00033f962b63ad38
describe
'99860' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
db1b55a5c84fd3b6a42a62c77a9d60e1
aee60344f6a536d7b2a5f9d02fe5fc04c5d8efa0
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e8b4c55127c833fee6cab23ae8a31954
c3d03abe8cc2887f7460e5dbb99cba7864fc8830
describe
'35027' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
1abfd11a550355ff135a61da48fa0392
3325d71d19122061a4cd94465daf8f14cd48dba6
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
550e21c4212f3f14020abef99187d472
84c0b9ecdb63a50fc5e649be7524a16cddccfdc0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e3c6ca34b76c8bbbe643fba598029ac5
143d2e086cfc7693d4daa3f90cd0b5c002f6565a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
775bb1db107d4b53eceac55b775b35c6
7e4aa440c9695c319958b7a9a0138b6e756913b6
'2011-12-12T04:12:36-05:00'
describe
'328683' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
5c9c2d530c2941290e704c786f7a56d0
0080f2d034bb71dd81a9216355df5758ba50e678
describe
'50299' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
cda7c36c398941ee4e4be344aac75299
6bbc1ccadbb7bb5cd3b27c1dfd6c9b0a75c7fb1e
describe
'13698' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00124.pro'
984a0994bc27af5564b9177479eaeb5d
3d1c887086de664f6571b46a4301e3cb38c890d4
describe
'16883' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
905c6607d374979d9f8c9f54747f3d5f
2f254588e179ec02a39a75e59caca26936b9d847
describe
'3346932' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c426f35d8729c6fe59dda954e4adc35d
0be56198a60adb4cfc2cfe77e073a7ae8c7ac5cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00124.txt'
967b22f32b66624c4c6e8922d63a2349
a44a7a8f79360d07ebf96aa3d25e1d442c9d4ce6
describe
'4603' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
2e1589bed412ab9621efdff96f76e178
e552f459ec803dc9fb9371fd6604e5b02d61c9d9
describe
'328572' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e1aa00c5c1a3cb8fe02e97ce492bd599
a0efc129c95b4b3a8704ad3f4682c190d5086749
describe
'50222' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
eaf9562e087bd5974f37634ec6f9548a
f2313ce53f4d7edbb3cf93e281c4296b53a14edf
describe
'15412' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00125.pro'
079a54ec2eb962d45a195b3a97db8bd1
323df0094c01af82cd0119aff47281520b8ce584
describe
'16096' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
f015cae1322090aaf5411ad682800c3f
772842eb9564fa65139e68749058dfbbf0dc16f0
describe
'3346908' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2076e31ae1e9bcc80211a214cf6b2e59
6b59897eb2055952a4b00c3121f2d97606153163
'2011-12-12T04:12:25-05:00'
describe
'699' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
030405a36b733078c95dba263a01d1d2
e170792d9b8ed2fed92f8e20b32876f529aad78e
describe
'4350' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d408c1d3ce77052da1029804f20875b0
94a6cd1c7909896bc6e07a3d9879e66547c52c38
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
ab2f29091a6d04b57b0064b06986f4dd
04c96a0260677caa428706bc52cef27c1880cee2
describe
'79072' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKS' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
09cd95c581ede0813cfa77afeb818baa
67e20ebf506f9e2834ed319d2156006a5f9e09c7
describe
'12589' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1436dc99651d3a3e7ad2ae1418e86ff1
310d829022f21994dbacfaebbf6013d890e6df16
describe
'25516' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKU' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d312167235291517138af061b21fd46d
11c2c878cb34e529ed4ff31ee9d703bcd0865c4e
describe
'3348176' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKV' 'sip-files00126.tif'
5b68df26fbfc69fcbf4170b192330101
b1eb6cb1a18fa42ebe74acc9a15ad74fad7cf470
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKW' 'sip-files00126.txt'
88b37c22b1706b0820c2cbd050e19011
bf213fea16ca74cdb94fbc0be5594f00d0d28c8e
describe
'6759' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKX' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1f1c09f545167f0fcf83794ac311b86f
3c08811e2fd957624a30f489331479c1a4ee3bb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
4a25ba908fbda55df795ea4b730a6956
71a65d524477d01c55f91732a17905e9aec1ee36
describe
'95595' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
002b62262e56352653679592808fda31
3ed76475250568f5d0836ebf0023cef6afabf6c4
describe
'31808' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLA' 'sip-files00127.pro'
57d5f8d6c8a9fda1b9eb769fa3480770
2690867794cd8475fff056322c47825c94b02bdb
describe
'32418' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLB' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
6251f6a25c50f92cc724dea161da9829
d96384a1ceb57022779cbcfa07a42095323344cc
describe
'3348272' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
abfff1b3b6a9592ee488ae6a1401f248
2162ecb7d86ac329c38cfc0269566874cad6ff53
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLD' 'sip-files00127.txt'
ad80ca1338e3fbc79d0717e8e2445c98
9603b7151cb80a299da89a1b75850582f64378f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLE' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
0dd3e9b096376a8a49f4d7f9809986e4
eed5f725e5ca6065025e37d349f98c68411e4fa0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLF' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
ce6819e6a0f47b7078e47ae4402275b7
005fceb18ccdd841e401ecca049cf147d33d445a
describe
'102986' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLG' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
d33bc43726c2d4a2d04d6d5a09c40bbd
9f7e65fc07894e4edd85493538b95061b5e0eb7f
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
ad012d01cd695be75ac60ee611c26dc7
a3ff5bf364b904bf5683d2efa9b3357572ead0b9
describe
'34879' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
457a7eb20f42c80a381620e1d765b9ca
7d95f212e0e84083a674dc9d72985e8cf591bdfc
describe
'3348556' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
4d0cf8341d8eba0f4cfab5e43c7bb62e
394681ea5d5292f346165b728597e2cd622d6b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
9f8f77d0f9030aef40071fe5c9c94882
c375ad255b7b27eaaabbbdd0cc44910f1bcda8b8
describe
'8985' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLL' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5ee17c88c7040369bf9cfbc58465e817
3cf07b23ef33e4a07d5aa8a199f8a835919985b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLM' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
1668a69f8885e64ef2b17026d3b1c7fb
9bbdd31ae6c0c13ca15b5dff8f4e6a4fb0b1da38
describe
'97082' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLN' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
25148d00a0e3f15e24e5e0886ac785e5
ba5405b785358830bea7cb372131a95379c619be
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
93aa9e83b9e8e94212d6b390573ac0bb
ea384703266a8bfcd128fd012d019640447adc34
describe
'32665' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
4dd43b4657a5b564c955b766ec23eadf
983ea9c9c6e9d4a0c5c62e225007ca3aa7877bd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
f3dbd49d565ebe8ce40e8604fbbee90e
ee87eccdb071e607b83aa27cec3f064fe0617760
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
13f87f917daa911681d8370d91583d45
772c207aebc5ba23f10aacc1cd5fa1f38086cb3f
describe
'8687' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
472c3d0f0b1f742eb3f4f2b7eac5a581
5918faf25f5f4e2cbf08fa61959fc678df8b8c8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
db4dac1a5f5271e0c73567edc4a00b1e
c8a1839238cf783fa286b23843ba7727d6c23ff1
describe
'73366' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
c583bdd8936cc3625d8c9152834e1834
0719f857afd3edbc399fc8b4f5a3b55f4fede7a9
describe
'25930' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c9c1379d302fc39131f25822e5161725
5a5a395d46ac7e10f4266e31993eac6b72d018ae
describe
'23535' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLW' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
fb932ba155a00cfcb203e2070c23a695
a28b8065b7b53b8b76a0e026ced0bab0636d5186
describe
'3347512' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
4635801ea26e82f627e8838786d9a651
825cb62b37e875676e5af5cd8167089cd56277ca
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLY' 'sip-files00130.txt'
47cf1dfb89393e07c62d785cee29e2ea
a80dcb0e8334910d6999b8fe10361219dc5875e1
describe
'6141' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
97431b99f1b9326835f06749d2928374
95f41c954535813453cedfe6e029077cb520008e
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMA' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
045e018372199e4e3908d6b1e2611ebe
bc63b1994fab87f0fa8a479ed47e57fa52c9fb6e
describe
'94690' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
aa1d122f92db698f344c53e0a44a95af
34c17c315fc5d6e3fc8c37922f62258e7978f8ee
describe
'31474' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMC' 'sip-files00131.pro'
e07b5d1f25bc4d16400ccb0095ab83d8
ff674ae0a532ec02abd6409b851c2e240d8489e4
describe
'32042' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
5b0cd646343e9375d56be014d8b43ccb
b76d6892e8ae24b97519609576acbb5fbb9757f7
describe
'3348132' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVME' 'sip-files00131.tif'
7edec6436a1218bf8d36a570342f1630
f4017a8598bb73dd43a10541e06ca7b3e5a43a23
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMF' 'sip-files00131.txt'
0173a7dcc08b8e38048441cbe8054937
bef2627bc05c56990e17fb3e4547a4866c1de4b7
describe
'8190' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMG' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
959bcf98092e554c389cf50b3a81a888
7d52bf740d4abb9c3b9e8b712752eaae79dcee77
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f75811ebc3beb2f050b002a33ba9c465
d90b48f1ca2b76b4a3867fd88ba66694f4373014
describe
'100304' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
5098ed8f3ccf4f9439fe4084968a51d0
37dfdfecbcf802d4ee5b9b8b9665633b8abb6cb9
describe
'33046' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
d04cb46973174ff750c8536ac2a14562
03387a0f4f1ab14bce458a5dd2a795c4618ac0bc
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
c31db6222ca97c7e0ec74daef5d52177
b5dffc8f81d631277cbf2854b50d9b4b9835e833
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVML' 'sip-files00132.tif'
9736b7a9f1824abbdef869e189dd278f
dd7f9de9b45b17fcf14a17431191ed9692a57c6f
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
2330cd488be25d50549eadc891adfd71
8127a8c1e41d17cd711395fe22b91ea84daea362
describe
'8934' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMN' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b7c581b6434dcdb798523ef29e324701
545a518c912340fc1153e61eb9dc654df1bc61c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMO' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
41558162a247cc0025e58d99625fb696
069cd143ae3ad8c0ccac42e2d6884e474353fa98
describe
'92556' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMP' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c30db7b7e9a736dbcae75adfe957b78a
8f25394775c73a09f7ae3d0a8117c7d68cb3811d
describe
'31140' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
172e128298299566587b929b5a4e07c2
b1f074df6fc40aaa8973d987ffe4d9ea93ab690c
describe
'30845' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
48170db2e812c6692723abd856a6fa6e
195b3b137367e542608d2d2f5e172aebbccde66a
describe
'3348108' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0328ff5ef0e25d3c1ee3929b0d4383ca
a1fd803d396f2f681d2db691d8b1ada9c18e12ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c90e8160c1d807786162ca5dc0899889
cc9170cb2af6f78b90d8bb9b2aae46c1896f22f4
describe
'7861' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMU' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
de7788b1ba04fce5754ff665d57b24ae
34a7db0ac0ec0c63caa2a383e519186a9d01c882
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
eabf59035c5e87f514efa5592c248828
ef293b1d89f372196c8eda952e20dd0cd532f853
describe
'81387' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
d26914cd19eff5d7dbcdf7d2bee9900f
c14c7aa4c4fbd68679f92ff4fa6db0954d10ee6f
describe
'27454' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
784a688744dd29a93e1ba6778f6e4995
64ccea5e79b9e43484c88b13689d616a416fdc7e
describe
'27420' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2721812afd3cd5adfc8a69b26cb846ee
713d8df7a050410ef8b3bdc28f9e57a8ee4ef178
describe
'3347868' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
6270f9e5c0ab5f92c8938070590fde4e
9fb503343cb9c3c6d78b0ece0a5343d1331b87a2
'2011-12-12T04:14:22-05:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNA' 'sip-files00134.txt'
9fcc2eba90c4a6a07500f76c030ccfc1
e159765491992c214e1f7c1f20e5e2246e3bbccb
describe
'7131' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNB' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
d1e285f56b5cc7b1dfa403964c453eb9
9f462f916145365656a26a5c57fd5edc5ba7000b
describe
'417235' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNC' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
013122c801c1f84d2e6025f1d5beeb6e
2e700d3fc2ebc3cb99acf73082f7aabe1d2154b0
describe
'67847' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVND' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
fc0a6c715e978272ea9f7d5ba94e346c
d5cbce418e4c5b1499ca34f24e3eb406284248f5
describe
'25370' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNE' 'sip-files00135.pro'
86f3119a6ba46dea0afc125b45fe40ee
117e95aeb83aa5836ce1225fefaad7d972f74447
describe
'20970' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
c200765f16ff72418d28c70d411dbbaa
9ddcd51c1c927c200f345475658bbdb667128b0f
describe
'3347300' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
baedfe7361b935f3717be2befc3d70ad
3630170e4a3256fb1a2d327eea50d2cd15a7989a
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNH' 'sip-files00135.txt'
48ff5f30584a1aeaac0f8363300265de
979ff13b292a45470c6ab81af58dd0d32e0fffaa
describe
'5649' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNI' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
97585e944e265fff7942e4468a6b873a
e6b252064c4f1bb6462f6e0d89340ef6eb1b5e8b
describe
'417379' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d7d4346e3cead69dc8caed4d717fe5ec
bd97d912154d623eaea4a6e31235cc85a13f861f
describe
'71324' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
946d9978f3a841af0f15cda0c24ce67e
a4298d4ced40aa5ccf48572a22329028e28a97ac
describe
'26951' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNL' 'sip-files00136.pro'
0791c86a00d5d08aa32fe33772579389
fd7a7fa8e654cc36ce8723af0a0dcaaed144ead2
describe
'22585' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
30a8e26e89ed781028e1128435a756e5
d5583c5fa41a8286eef6a9563d9efdb3f6e133e3
describe
'3347416' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
f743bd9b6f5ea23fb42dbac4c7eb3309
9a5e05840946cd76f7476c422dbd319edd0d3e61
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNO' 'sip-files00136.txt'
af95a4b77a91d320048d95def314740c
d428946e71aca37a6675858ed125f0df9bd879ee
describe
'5752' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNP' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
0a9ebd0c0e38c2d665c24afb405ab83a
6c8f8b7ad0290d047f970768b6e02583fd2d1881
describe
'417292' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0da3078c3f4c66b1658a23241da7798d
2ed0a5db96338e09246604a2a59ddbd1d3a5a862
describe
'76528' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
37dd3cb0790962edccd054bc2cc57de0
f34f31d82ce2c6baa186ff59b903ace6ee984bba
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNS' 'sip-files00137.pro'
8d5825fd2afd846e4a30abe1a6777983
f078e9c4cea142e09f6cfa48603994219a49637a
describe
'24201' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
da43f62f7fbcb328415d16256b432025
31f44ce754b646ac68ba3d067b6aecd529508c87
describe
'3347504' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
dcdfb53b2366bb11e9190eb3a1356c99
262898f1a58454e7cfd5bda1285a5c1530817e8b
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
eec155ec2b41fc4c25887de96733d4d6
69b7d7fbed77ca3e92959a5fadd4d3dd79df3570
describe
'6091' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c4162e28c859aad0bdc011c9d9aba1d9
d11d8ea2c2714b5a8cf29e5cf88258bd41fb1d05
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
c49381ad5b835799692bd2495f09fcea
8e06504ade592e67797b947403b04fb50276744b
describe
'96013' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
b994f2bed31edd31ffb01920e0d0eb86
6f0ceb63fe8b21e5cbd40b663c7273cae4e4d44c
describe
'32739' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
4b9a0f8534d808582298b993a2764f03
ad2135d566473afd1648d9a3cf28de213648389c
describe
'33050' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
c60fc079641c18d93eca585aa10fb3ca
faadb362a1f163f57cb2cde4a20e891bf44a679c
describe
'3348336' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
de469ebc892b61f71f2681e367837e38
a31e8b61c116a8f35b2a24afdcd605e4e98f3f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
ede81dc5b0608c30106a5714bcedccf2
a128a96beaaa6e2a46c3c2ebe7568ebbdbbc1285
describe
'8615' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOD' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
db29e9986e92040740498ad655490722
01e4f511d3da816c9d74f06144d8cf43b38a8daf
describe
'417351' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
9141064b894aa209c33aeee9a2a965b1
73229b94f2a64be29994ecfec7c9d9082d4c335a
describe
'102326' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOF' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b1da6dc74a67c408bbb004927b4c3cc2
1d7f72eed3862e81a28905153c531f03e794b693
describe
'34590' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
6d59fb9ba8f57ea234513e368dab8e61
291b54516b5616441f82cbc745bbe09b9a77089a
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
c2808cca3c73f17838f763778ebbfa3e
7afa05d9bfb8f60ff685d2dff4274e17c903051a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
3307d52e0be81a9b335c695d41e2805b
6b34c321e299f50862eaffee631f5f61db4e350b
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
2552c19e941d03e5b7333c80673eb2a3
2dba463cb7b55f029f69bffa908a18f5744c3e3c
describe
'8842' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOK' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
2eb066deec81afc010dd43a0f71cf0ab
f158963e4e8acb7046200ee87cf64db2d4d36e93
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
8b8e097812b118e83a9e905345fa039c
34c3204db59628d75a89d4d271383a31a3622ce5
describe
'103032' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
83ca0ed9b26e3d64b331605f46e52d3f
6a6241e928e658a5320e2f3d9c43cad816c033cd
describe
'34528' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVON' 'sip-files00140.pro'
f764a815c88ccd0a9888c3563d9eb008
85114978fa0642dfdb323aab28e8d02cd5962b9a
describe
'35128' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
1fb3404673a3c90f02587aeffff0badf
0bd83aaf341a87683f5a618fad64dbe891f2d7a1
describe
'3348412' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
217e127a3db7aa54c792d821ee1b94e1
b3482f931d4ec45dbbc558f47cb56de187b1c40f
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
dde70abeb3ca47dea9a2c93012933aa4
d40e666e964758ee627df70ad50991adabe2db9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
e986eef30b6303b126993ffed7ba6ff4
57d75c8d545ca31d54bb96e2bfc81319ffa8b2e7
describe
'167943' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
88eb7738d9cfc27b96655fdd3de0f9c0
0162d9627298f5731c835e949e34bdeff69e0073
describe
'27133' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
552e1e74d2d4ad30c63ac3ca8b424c81
870b6654153a19e003e7b32c07cab65ae6c54e7e
describe
'6552' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
9b486398139bd2c1447a1b7c64f22113
2e4ca17d9f77113ca0a2d7cd2eca6481a3cecd8b
describe
'8737' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
b7234491ce8e9f37887c42b6a49e99c5
a87639f083a86d305260952641da4e8ddda8cd3d
describe
'3346288' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
b8349f127d8f6b4598f3d7d24b6c0789
8570939ff36f9c8c27fbbb57f296da4fc9013609
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c00268a27fbe33cb798a8902af5113e3
4788b2b7183cf29420fac8dc7dbcf803205b252c
describe
'2904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
ae880eae456d6e0b09c2a23f683e1639
97bdc9cdc2e8b9591e5df9811c22a44821f46d11
describe
'417658' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
55e80e3af1c45ab3e3f3e21dcea8ab7a
f2cb587e485885d185f2333847352af0f6c053ba
describe
'93762' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
6e5a1a3e4ea8fc84f740079e101fbb3e
0524dcbe667c363226c04b6c5c57758a9bc99014
describe
'13867' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
8b6400f6d6f55050baafd1c8f4c0c6f2
5fd7dc6a537e06845cabe8add1d67bf7eaf156aa
describe
'27487' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
ce00b7614ea95e441c17f17a02aa2f82
3fc87ed35ed5e9916d120fb9f73f46165f105a30
describe
'3350180' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3cbf7afd121b2ca8643927dea7306d70
9c215ec53982551ca08ec5bdc6cf3da201b2faa3
describe
'663' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
2bbcbd228e886630ce3d0e10756b3adf
fe92aa496e2ebe80293b512c748ac17868fa8168
describe
'7112' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPF' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
e01f9c9fe9f8e68d8d8ec9c242077bd7
56e775bf824e618e6395b156020090f226347d2b
describe
'417381' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPG' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
53aa01db2f8738a2d2a9c3812336fd33
fccfcd0511580ce1be817b76e2f2f5783da3efb5
describe
'74982' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
295a6744e805d31b7688cd30ad9c4b13
a0ac0c70c54f1d5c62165e7f92d49da6c4fab32b
describe
'24340' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
9babf59b7ec57040d4e1cfffc2bb4795
389f39ca46ed9274c5bd2d4af088ac633744f02f
describe
'24725' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0561aeadba79e992f8748475b532d27e
c4d427726abf41e0b961d402e13e467a0b7d4e28
describe
'3347508' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
cfbc9fc30a28d331e08086e648d65904
072f81af3b194f26a83da0036342f4f059bacffc
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
97d2fe96ce93f2ed02bed7fb2d6b21a0
a151bb9ac31cab7b8c3cf042e99f9e83b9b96d79
describe
'6411' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b2bb3a16c30e45580c66fca99e06f0f8
ee22b27fdf873108f5e13b2aca665668fa7a968e
describe
'386468' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
046c7380256b82dd47550be5fc661c63
b50fcc19bc75135f9d63656b0fcfafb47bd5f641
describe
'59901' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
56521bf037848ec81680a9514043d067
fd55fe8d3110b7808f76882fd3d758e73c54cc99
describe
'18843' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPP' 'sip-files00144.pro'
767e9fedfd3fb9f7f0fe655d7f02c706
3d0a5442111a3bce7e19713b4f083d52a2bfdc2d
describe
'19921' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
c70dd5ad36b28b71e257a335883bc5c5
0843da30d22da9216d0bdfe576f916996127c4f5
describe
'3347060' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
dc7fca795bd708f15065a0db1ba9dde9
65e73f8645bc861316559ef111a5073b3486e0f6
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPS' 'sip-files00144.txt'
98fa23c23273e5d7d6460095986f7161
ea27f0398bba942612ec411a66ef4c1699f293f4
describe
'5365' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPT' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
4a17ad45a4aea658da11780d55972da8
89a46b0efb109670f059c14afab2febd6caacd1f
describe
'303904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPU' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
0703949229827e8e6da32af255b501d7
8e7a4a90059deca1b602135ab5d2b18771cc76d2
describe
'47582' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPV' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
43ff3e14f914a6ef970d9db4a7df98f9
6fff087979ddedfffdf7ccb3da23568d68ce1771
describe
'14623' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
c6a33815f7f3a15ffb3963a7c45b4a17
1a80cd9768b10641374e5f7ea0a965abebaf1328
describe
'16016' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPX' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
7eb44ffc4077a080f992ca402623ed43
f58b58482d86e7fb0d75754fc57c61e221551987
describe
'3346868' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPY' 'sip-files00145.tif'
62813d6925950c6ba42c98bf1f52f125
00aa6f86c1f6ee192faaae6dd8b1757651217527
describe
'740' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
555b43fb6da71eafd1148bf683967274
7ed257545e65b545382028dc136e1a695fbb3065
describe
'4366' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
ab243fab8203e3b307b7e4199729fe7c
8a3250eaffd5759a67bd92e254f20c9982f60a40
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQB' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
81d1dcb65dcdaffc04ba1bfa4c1af192
f3842d4266c5faac02d2d934b4ea2e113b51412e
describe
'83492' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQC' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
d27032c378a9c92197d26687fe3e4a11
1fb54bbeb40a931eb6a395c6371e0f94838f758a
describe
'14186' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQD' 'sip-files00146.pro'
effe97926645819b92b277a4a9dd7c8a
f474dd86a6490e5020ce41ff95bfc571da24db33
describe
'26226' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQE' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
a936ee2befe081042d296673844940f4
836ad2a6e5c017689f1785e124f2111fe4d1f441
describe
'3347872' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQF' 'sip-files00146.tif'
aed14270f61dd6ffbf7d0db301e83039
4a9b3b44640cada51ee4d5617626e6396d3488a6
describe
'596' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
0d965c4ecb4c3b07e45f9a2ba659112c
dbe08cc25f9be65e1ae9a6559a89060ae524b80f
describe
'6948' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQH' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
690a1d8d3d7d9588d3ad4dbedb4f98bf
8fcce17326c23e683dbee47afe3d369a222accd3
describe
'392853' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQI' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
69608db161254b41d38bcf39d6d4648d
0cdb8f94864aa92998dcee8380f099c92a66eb21
describe
'56952' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
bba9d8913df4cb785f1f41a4da5f568c
10b13a24a2303375b0b313e05565cf735c95cf4b
describe
'21956' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQK' 'sip-files00147.pro'
7765103636cd8e8f4adfcf16b92a98ce
9b5bfc97a54b085ada6c76aaee2dd3f5331df0df
describe
'16338' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQL' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
f1a597c267a0f85f24dcb93f02ec4930
86b857667a9e58185950776dbdcae108754304db
describe
'3346980' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQM' 'sip-files00147.tif'
d52c214dbc9bea54208b3b7b51a10525
e76c0f38396cbc96921d5f2c3dc6dba7d1c13a23
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQN' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d36331e2a202d72dfe935810c09107fe
aac4af9c45313b84fbec190eebf0b056ddd8cf57
describe
'4636' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQO' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
08b5ca44a3f35ea2dfa3704cd44fce87
21ca23921e32629e9e6caa4969722eda7490a000
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQP' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c2834236d1c2aec0e25309a3cb269d96
267112ccf68a1ff202f67d2e2e080b02d6cf2f48
describe
'88865' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
ad12d6761fdf48aee785ec003864353f
08cc3b8488e990b356f64d4f03ec552df09826c4
describe
'30315' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQR' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a68e8714ac51e503e8ba3863b90512b0
0493b6453bf07359b22b89127f5810010ccf9455
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQS' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
e018dabcf971fb8d0ab9fb98a5b5022e
86272f490559bdfe38d1f4e7418f823398376804
describe
'3348048' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQT' 'sip-files00148.tif'
a6cd3d281e599942f102b651d11ae014
eacbe11b47e820ad6df118c9b270bc5605775119
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQU' 'sip-files00148.txt'
58c81a5e8d940d27cd82977a3b190306
55cc9b9930ddab730d2dc315117696064b308331
describe
'7949' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQV' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
29d8237bccb8cfbaead967c5ee9a634d
02235c21c33ca6c0f98a42fdb1dc8f2ad7df0fec
describe
'417388' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQW' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
496b62c7ca37d5972cdb23fd237ec52e
285e9b9745a7e031c14a7c9e420ecde641851946
describe
'86125' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQX' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
0e1138f7ac7935c4340a7cd2d6705d12
31a1d9684b9cbff2fdf9eb379be20c8d423cc2b0
describe
'29313' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQY' 'sip-files00149.pro'
0a528707c017fda8d5ada74e89f17a3b
f57d58f87e44a93a2b8d19144e6e4cb40f780182
describe
'28352' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
9154565570148b3eaa1309fb04b79b11
c19e2d4cb54a693f43b53ae6dd60dee3bc02326a
describe
'3347840' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRA' 'sip-files00149.tif'
7fe755922a8e8c9d5f6c15833c61b9b3
39c5addb302e9bea34a2510f17ee8dd90ae0e8ff
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRB' 'sip-files00149.txt'
4891beaaf37e86bb993520fb6f15f587
0ad99d3d92e3fa4ba4b919f81f28c7cff167c875
'2011-12-12T04:13:32-05:00'
describe
'7453' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRC' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
2c9e57d2afc7809be7d66f376eeaf3a4
c7c78dbf80e070c20e9a61e76f6086ccd8126489
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRD' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6c6be8c7de6b3eea7737d137656e6704
c3e5f68d2c4cb44284e3b1803b27f03b73c9aa36
describe
'88635' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRE' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
c02396f9ca565fd6e26a8315fd626c0e
2522035aeabfbf466334b24d9e8ebafbb1e13bd9
describe
'33180' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRF' 'sip-files00150.pro'
1f659abe605323b9ba24796e31d37d91
1be435bb76baade3b61f8e36540e5954567dfbe3
describe
'27249' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRG' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
3520eb875621d6c111b653c912046c6b
b088cc3ad5bcb6c6ddf24d7112130fd7ceb168f6
describe
'3347656' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRH' 'sip-files00150.tif'
f58e842d623263259bd4cd2835a270ae
c11915f4eeade0761e5799e20f1aba36bcca63fd
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRI' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4dfe6117a63641d9581c38a35bf676aa
1a4d80db631cbc123cac77853db18cf0adcc7734
describe
'6744' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
a42708267c5dbd4da3f43a78fa5d1d15
c04ab6476fef567e16c744a1421f105dc949613a
describe
'417626' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRK' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
1451773225f2902523c43681b72966ba
4395f8fd721df15effa52db42e759989206d3a95
describe
'104108' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRL' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
969cafff16d796927355871c490c7663
3af45472922f9f11f32717bd766d1f68f5144a0b
describe
'35386' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRM' 'sip-files00151.pro'
b2e8f7cea08e853e1896fa33de765fe5
859c0cbeb14cafd558b5f78c1cff490813c4dd12
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRN' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
f9571b31e6e6ca8430a79c8cb8abc914
7d62e83a2c3a07e9fe2f4412ed4357fcb8b29057
describe
'3350588' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRO' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f1b376d75db71aa81f3593a2bc9f350b
210ac8f390619646044466a5083c46829a5503b0
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRP' 'sip-files00151.txt'
6d495f1fcd5ce434e62aba5eb5b8c3ec
8d1f33d688ea1dbf668677c3cf5f67c9cfcf5baa
describe
'8385' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
aab92e1c466e6d5811214b93e54cb7f8
8e3d24f92f196e6c69ec3e587ec060dd8bcd2f28
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRR' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
3dfa871be5252546b0ef04a683a6e041
5f4a941eda35c40fd7c9cd93924579060b7bba38
describe
'92378' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRS' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
853dec5d45a95881ea1fccdebe546d64
dabd798a660f8fd4aca19f0fb31cf8f917826ac2
describe
'31986' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRT' 'sip-files00152.pro'
8ffcdb5604fb26b12a28b98f0d20e387
c90ea5887e5c468f670bde06808b2b27dba64768
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRU' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
6c4dde0472e3574d0d1d83cc76c5d2f0
ccaedcfec4cb3668013d3520a518e610e6818cbb
describe
'3348080' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRV' 'sip-files00152.tif'
136df19c656d0953101b0533e92a855f
645fa9986eb661bdc1d08c5defe4ee247540888a
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRW' 'sip-files00152.txt'
15bfb2f205d030657511308d6aea9bbc
7ec08219c1b4617dfde4d0ee4bfe6e3e0d2edb33
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRX' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
ba9b5f0a7d43d885466835f3178fb32c
c81ba983aaec66d047be89b3f8117344881a0828
describe
'417665' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRY' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
21d4af7f863fb3ae44e86309e1da539f
148756f33ffc536442e4d015a2535e005f33a63c
describe
'85740' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
a5d4191dc1a1959d54db551a1039d698
db4c0c03049fa2eeee041458b09335f7bb21565b
describe
'30151' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSA' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5b67e5825f9cde5fb82253671362d300
9699219db3d065d1f0e37b0a8a68eda4040087d3
describe
'28800' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSB' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
7fa8992d4668dafffc9adf44b0964dcd
87c25f14e708fa38ab26a587696c9a83c00b9e8f
describe
'3349972' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSC' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a92b3d90e72cec2c697e809aab20bc12
f7be2b2f76891c730b2a9433d8298620b0902c68
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSD' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e4a4e7634598f33e3cac27ea1922e170
134109306d64b4b3442b247e79b3444be49608ed
describe
'7354' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSE' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
232621caee7efac842287c6bb2e2f519
835588305e01f2b8678376f922dd0cd4b9702329
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSF' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
3cf7c2bab94aaa18e61eeebe0005b28a
28600ab1325e1a83bf93c962d491ef7863141389
describe
'83812' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSG' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
d2c81a7f49e21bc9a74bbe0bc76cff84
4fc3d95761c96c705df8cf95bfe5e1b60a51925c
describe
'29265' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSH' 'sip-files00154.pro'
bd107e087014b33c4d02dfd333c71c2f
511f09c7c625ce884da227743fc62924b639c9cc
describe
'28004' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSI' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
f250c4ae9aab44b4939e2659c3a0b688
6799fec6e13b719907f36435f2d132e3a7b79612
describe
'3347760' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
0a7a80b32869e201eda98db87e7857e1
a0ca4c54c9cc3ad6ce0fcec60293f8fb1f88e789
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSK' 'sip-files00154.txt'
b7a5aef40c0355112ee5eeb20cfb1bed
f46b746312352274ecc841c2058a5ef962e8660a
describe
'6949' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSL' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
d6dcf4ed7ba84af60fa2dc8fdb81957b
73f4c5db513972cbf9403c01a37bdea39b851b51
describe
'417318' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSM' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
70a6581b27daa0976f3f446b7f1ca208
abb8e8ae22cfe3f68e4e602bad00334a15f3105c
describe
'97327' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSN' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
281708a6146226c834e2de7fc363a3bf
98cd2840866061c3004d26fce11a795ed5ad5fbd
describe
'33981' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSO' 'sip-files00155.pro'
97593791925be0e62f9fd2ab2c42862a
f3b75da17c523c072848e93e7ae0b2dee3b21bcc
describe
'33695' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSP' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
19ee0efa46ee1240617c56dab1f4211c
d7b89f5bd47c105df99157192c109c808b734aef
describe
'3348072' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
5bb062187c3100bd9b401814b2203c81
9ae15e559b2adc9ffbdcacb6228caca62a2527a0
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSR' 'sip-files00155.txt'
91add06905873a1d8c4d87a1f43a7014
152ab5d1bff257c8c315cce49bd87ecdc7b0807a
describe
'8576' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSS' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
60c41e6a6e241846dc6d129c2bfbba08
52c9e6c46348c88173817656ff9391bf3680b3ea
describe
'417574' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVST' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
a6d03fe09e0dce6d0eb06084843edcaf
5504bb45c10f5a7622ae5beea9db3596c5609b0c
describe
'200350' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSU' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
64f0117cddf6a37d83e7ffd2e70309cd
2055374dafe5e91439e313f11c26673738736fad
describe
'50509' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
83c199e0d08e784afb2dc628a3e66ace
92662b0b3ac2f098a28290caea28c655b678a738
describe
'3351904' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSW' 'sip-files00156.tif'
307fc72f904b6a8d80289184cbacb0cf
a6e43334edd69b7f39949a89a7b0e4d27f0c3988
describe
'11775' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
10baa1faa792b2b4a8e87d5d92e982f2
3a64c5c826e2f365ddee847f0ce84a277d4ff822
describe
'33977' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
8ffd6bfd35a714479b98a05d662f522b
348029eeecf41ff8a4445063c054aaa6bae9ca20
describe
'8332' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
de6dd9f30a7a93ea6648f562d39a641b
097c480b19c1a414be3164d6451496da474042eb
describe
'2459' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTA' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
77c084019536c4dae8d8a218fa783d50
e13bd38f4ebd18bbe3c085b91ed66cf6d938c0a5
describe
'3345504' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTB' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b073dabd55dedf729ece070dd60c622f
e146479cb1a114a22eb7b8b8156131c031288738
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTC' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9e1b5fa8ffdc5494a4a244803f105143
02fd7982f185b488de35e1dd82cc64bec2180d0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTD' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
4bdf145dad2fb817ab7e1edd01ec5efc
f558655f5859e0310b3ad287c16a58aab6c8fe28
describe
'107828' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTE' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
6701110159ee577a7d0647e0cfc63d33
16e42f6f342596b08136fcb5c61a69aad7c66491
describe
'35752' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTF' 'sip-files00158.pro'
178f6328d1a5a3fd384f9b14bdce749f
26d925e5993eb8a88dd9e2e2646f368a7dab0fe5
describe
'37017' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTG' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
e65941d0345d4a27336bd68bf8eabb94
0e57dc9382e7455b5118e3ebd0d2804d10f79f08
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTH' 'sip-files00158.tif'
50a0d3607abd2ed7a0cdd9b0fe3ab65d
e521e05cc28c9776b7dc412d03a96942ca67da31
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTI' 'sip-files00158.txt'
a85645e45cd9188acc27a1eb7e6d4991
07fa00dd40772221eb9aa53337feca702d165a4f
describe
'9276' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
4abddda50a6ab34e3c3e59af2b77d9a4
862f1a829e01ce3294ede5b535978598da03b181
'2011-12-12T04:13:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTK' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
91ff8947e51431e94b7d9d068f0efb60
244b54e9b6557ce7964e01c534086cbb09163523
describe
'70737' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTL' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
a2a669cbba5474e46535a9fa7c5e8442
994d5abf07854059cb04e9d94cf85f67685ac934
describe
'24792' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTM' 'sip-files00159.pro'
2f51cba892d4f4f65c220c6a15bb9ee9
6d8a79df62fbc618f41ec9acc9b4806f0e276546
describe
'22194' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTN' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
be466b9d4c511fec4ba3d346169fd324
927b5604c3a7d245922d255438d7520dbe2376df
describe
'3347320' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTO' 'sip-files00159.tif'
65a05f6188d8ab2076201dae43c40124
da71e4ddee5f7c6033a6fb3965054a4760ad3cfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTP' 'sip-files00159.txt'
5f6617a0004e183bfddad3a56f53f503
f8edd3d28ca39cf7506624ce9cca2adef5931dbf
describe
'6070' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
e0fe978fd8ad051349816fc15768deaa
b4639a8458a6dcbdb65a1e2b6968ee30a0273bec
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTR' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
0f5e592f093c192f31256e17f99aa005
bd47add1693152477b74215580559130f2ce9c5e
describe
'91549' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTS' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
6c6cdfff9ca18101398aa0b81434825e
af3072d52f042933b3a537373c466c7eda1f313b
describe
'31379' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTT' 'sip-files00160.pro'
45072d1e595ebd9947cce9c2671f1fb2
1ac0036bcbfd2788e76edb21e37f7432b9d480e5
describe
'30894' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTU' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
9d2dfe6e6eb2f50fbad1058ef0697d9c
54f39b4894ac50301fe641c5ce0a2e3bacbb5c68
describe
'3348060' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTV' 'sip-files00160.tif'
c9171ca31b93767f1314145a4ded0e39
d89587867ebd8fc3d0d7738ad1f2d66f0152b397
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTW' 'sip-files00160.txt'
416174ae6106c61f05ebc0e03eeb6a5f
ad610444262641fd98772bf6c7df8061cc2e5924
describe
Invalid character
'8163' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTX' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
de7ee88b0aececbca2415c54f49cb223
99c2f94a478ab0e72d9910c41658a3465ca04eb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTY' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
653f222150010ddc9a73cb21c2cbd521
7a9d84a686162d1b21b531448d1f81f048467ce3
describe
'92112' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
fba18e117d13f6c6ba650189d365e785
f6f006c51b1aa2d6b7c1b81c0d81923708a1bd44
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUA' 'sip-files00161.pro'
db5c8579e47335febf11d24b9668d60a
3e3e57337ff54bf258dcf2db4b3ed9322d09302c
describe
'31221' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUB' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
247e0f636587ea2fd41c075c00d18e91
7a6d21308399634ff5b01f50c927da54c35b2be7
describe
'3348084' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUC' 'sip-files00161.tif'
77fe9ba9b3e25f948ab6bd3d39f9a990
9f2e234a8f180c90d43069df0c761f458e9dbe9b
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUD' 'sip-files00161.txt'
1b22632bb592f7a16a771db128f9cd7d
4dd3bdf176578e4f860d0a10ae5f34552318c796
describe
'7667' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUE' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
0c5219879bded28a90ee3acab07752e8
8f7746b12665f4c41ce525f372fe31faa231c4d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUF' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
3475e416697f9a9e4e3c1f67a892d122
4e136e7d460c3093b95293988dbdb224ec0f8897
describe
'87763' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUG' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0d4c0441227599d4124bcd31b4617bab
ab1583ab4c55f5e24203eb19127f982cbe9ac667
describe
'30825' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUH' 'sip-files00162.pro'
faacedeeb5bfbc7ec216a257e6d1b68d
5a49477f5c4a69f7ca8a716ea9a9b854b466fd60
describe
'28524' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUI' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b9f9de5013bf718d94da1bb6634fe610
e9d9d3fce7f4e99a7a6f63c55a26770e3a5fc58b
describe
'3347984' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
9d70468617e1171573083ea0055dd490
ac6c8fa6d28967c9694a17390930b92a14ff2bd4
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUK' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0565642101ff351e72804a9c9c5611fc
9ea56079dc8142f58307661522502b576ff77150
describe
'7715' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUL' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
5ea4c3ed8c554250a926f816b857dee4
be0a23e369f36a9b1ec0b893f9e99b97e88f6c06
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUM' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4d85b6c9c57e462d7456fd20b6676e05
0ff9049072de004210dc677e78800e75354ae953
describe
'94570' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUN' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
d0618a963987849acb48b5ee4a7525f6
bf627c75ba891ae88e1a746f7a9c290ff4420b80
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUO' 'sip-files00163.pro'
34ff6e311c6d145f1794aa3dbc4d02f5
4802f8a72c2a59af46bc8ac7bbbaf7c178cd6f42
describe
'33012' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUP' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
b2996a3f3badf3c8b37c94363d73f236
501abdbc69e4652c44127d37d23234a7096359bf
describe
'3348252' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
55d46f185e0ac52bebaca8ecf26e55d4
93ad0e6e9b9013ad9f6662ff5be0e65c66992d5d
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUR' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c53b198aef9158a3510adacc34e2d0ff
6895fd1a471e83616b4f8039762dcc7e10985fbf
describe
'8391' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUS' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
79ba525a0914f8f791b3de654255ee04
7599f7266114468bedf32230b80cbf31e54a5052
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUT' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
be42f1cc397ba42628892e9ac34b3642
726ed1a4f3a95473e998df5787996d3bb6f9d9bc
describe
'100186' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUU' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
7e50ce694e7c0954a16bdb28576d7b51
9270e11f6403028eb664918a40b60a062e03918d
describe
'34447' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUV' 'sip-files00164.pro'
dad0b966e7ba19b4da829c6db265acc2
21b40f6cd0da03510fac70701f15402c2f2bdea9
describe
'34816' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUW' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
24af221bf20447b0e6434f14d9745cb7
2cc48d6f8b30bb01ed6f97f899a544c82b3c23e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
dd10ea64ee382d8bdcb06aaf901a9f71
100441c3977fb040807c6b0ea85e096cf4b35555
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
62980367d1e341ba28b444238865ace5
580ccbbe90d15e5b3ec69524a0bc79661cd0475c
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
5c38d3fc6cb7eb7b9ece62c51ce866c4
2f722e6d32b29a398f37c3290bdfbfbc695acad5
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVA' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
bb0de34f197c3cdb6b8d26b9f408f677
6d27996d6f9857f6b6919a53f559cc4f731f6044
describe
'101925' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVB' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d1a16fec36077ab34d1c2be8e024cfb6
3d3228366abaad92719c3e04a8926e96af5ce2c8
describe
'34068' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVC' 'sip-files00165.pro'
cb1b654c9b8b144901de6e88c189751f
567d6aee4dcb3f2eaa7ae9a54dad5c0afade445a
describe
'35544' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
bf166f25dfb66da8ccab4cf8ee6fad34
b13626e288a40baee87b5ab4b8ba9179db3388c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVE' 'sip-files00165.tif'
f1768b8bbde4daf28443f97f79c21282
cd336f1f33562c63d9f26bf4e486b05ba29e9732
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVF' 'sip-files00165.txt'
cb31388a918d75a2c77b0ce90fb4820a
3cf9bc56e2937e66bced28bf0fe19d145e750287
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVG' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
72a4d702c3d6277108b0e1e5e17401cb
74432cdb154348c8623e85e878ab9e911bac8db0
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVH' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
19668225ea412cafc3c8ba3bfe4437b1
71298a76feee919b6bc7cd3b405771f34df5722c
describe
'93625' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVI' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
12c3886033122fdcfee4bf736eb96fe0
85d5346d0eb176d315fbd561b5902df6e969a9dc
describe
'31813' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files00166.pro'
c2cae900234dcb216020f0fedafcc501
417e664055aa174cfb946940b71eee5a9631f184
describe
'31528' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVK' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
819a86be41f7e1e7a6485405c7bef2bf
ff26d395557b71f0bf6410390e94590a42be2f88
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVL' 'sip-files00166.tif'
c2c09a1b56b45564de13f6c8959a73b0
65ad4c3d15fed4a71df5802619a287a34e9fd5ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVM' 'sip-files00166.txt'
3ec09c75840fd7d0ce5cbac0dae7dfcc
9fecd846b8acc39856cc917e1704833c598e924f
describe
'8323' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVN' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
e4274dff2b8f21e54000f6edc721e834
81820f490f63c1881a8f6b47b58a8c16a7976fa7
describe
'417341' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVO' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
28fe4807edb16aa12ea480caef21f634
2ae00adacb774b1cb51209385db8419829b846c2
describe
'76070' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVP' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
ad73b6bfda19be3851fa1b8ea1852bae
f8e435f2d52c93e2f2236ed600664576245bc71b
describe
'27717' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
81999cd775bd62db83aa8f4f1dcb5f5d
38a34470635089207e9ea9b03dc71a0191f3bbf8
describe
'24799' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVR' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
2d7ef1e14aefa21bdd4c249d5972581f
26360c3e1be2257d7a03af3a09f25becc6794a10
describe
'3347624' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVS' 'sip-files00167.tif'
b8a8febd1502011bfe5a0423c69c6e01
9e2f69b7704e53d986308bdc65abfbac53c52164
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVT' 'sip-files00167.txt'
b3661d919a1a1b77fbc34320cf5e8a75
ef3fa2cf21c9c15898136d3878ec9d01f183e129
describe
'6334' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVU' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
2a62c20159ba8cd1a864ebb2f40d1a2c
119c9d1dc264584308efd158629081a3968eb371
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVV' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
2f41310f012d7100ce8abec8d17794e6
a48fbd6d52eaf983141d12891d8d1afcf43ec10b
describe
'95720' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVW' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
76ac8e270f61bc23633f58d99da4c4dd
aa0eee9b010c65544fa3ab6c03433ec2d01f4f83
describe
'32496' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVX' 'sip-files00168.pro'
93b29361ef52f3f3a7abb523674610a6
58a86d585fa545cf0013979ce7082f8fe1cd1688
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVY' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
a11a2860ae5de38b0bb65ae24e031a68
347da0cee924426881b841b8f71e75b207e7be5c
describe
'3348224' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files00168.tif'
e56386eceaf3e3c460b2bdca8dab6cbb
ddd21f095dc59efd940ba3408c9b0c8b728e0dfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWA' 'sip-files00168.txt'
fc336bdceb63c3bd4c721cacae9efb12
f177f5e0fe8f1d826ae08ad25521ff42348df2b3
describe
'8093' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWB' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
43d4bc7f72c510e03b487408b73a6776
dd50c87849bb9ae32372cd40cad03dc73c52fffc
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWC' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
8d126441d07af1d838620502f785ae46
66f1c356a4450718088595db2608edcf5d5b8b94
describe
'85402' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWD' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
f7f83adcfffd52e18b988f5315c5abae
9cc861b9f9d71f4469d86cf42822cb0a9b8fa2e1
describe
'29766' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWE' 'sip-files00169.pro'
dddcc9f57cefb8d8b44c6572f5b16d97
852e2c3fcce8651072759c0779dd1fa0ad8b64f5
describe
'28401' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWF' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
32149c3274d0b518ae133c08a9cfccf2
f6cee8192cb88410a5d45be3bf95c4e3bec047d2
describe
'3347940' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWG' 'sip-files00169.tif'
e0fdd46a263237381f6d4ff48aa2ef18
22b202f1ee36416678417eee6d69181305d9500e
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWH' 'sip-files00169.txt'
47b166a0ba0adcffd7835b0d6871e83c
d8b470c684db4f78d74f160e8b5915d8afeacbfa
describe
'7458' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWI' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
a10d9218e44965bbf83b881c434fa219
287edc05bb8ed72791ab9ff23e58898b7f9d15aa
describe
'417307' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
eeaa241a43e96e2a7e6ce621667660b4
b8330dd21582f21ea70a7e364407c27d78c33745
describe
'83920' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWK' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
fb762bb352db0c811b915fa9f4ccf452
a656b2b36d0a7a6c5990e72f0c519c9bfb431bcd
describe
'11472' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWL' 'sip-files00170.pro'
0f7cb659cd7103691a0732c540081490
743f158eab4ea5b33963146c2e60da80630d1822
describe
'23517' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWM' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
45468d4acfb8944c596e3335306b6976
067a48c7761e3f7e14a8106e9d8a1c45078ed11f
describe
'3347776' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWN' 'sip-files00170.tif'
bec4bdb87e874beb23a37c030e7a59e2
75f08b4cbd75deb4cc091629aa655e6201ab2b3d
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWO' 'sip-files00170.txt'
4985fa7a99feb99c0c41990a0f23829d
514ca4ef6853eda0a2bc30c3ddf7dc380ecbd9ce
describe
'6068' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWP' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
06115d5f6de83e85137f1b2ba5c30add
c42c08a197439f5eadc5132b5fdcebd550c5c26c
describe
'417385' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4952dcaf77105103ea32157b767d803b
da7ea4b7e51821646aac743d1757921a7c2d7604
describe
'98730' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWR' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
f37d97468584c61e6501a633e331118a
7a65d52d708be19bea522ec5e462908246720302
describe
'33399' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWS' 'sip-files00171.pro'
d86d4f99c852b0a801138411c1801666
0f90043624c8ad30f4860b14715a785e213023c4
describe
'33777' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWT' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7598729257f73d4596faa0cbf13f8a86
209c05cb2fd87f7ca47a3b46298385b4072831ca
describe
'3348236' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWU' 'sip-files00171.tif'
282d64ed1b94f2c4437b17ae36ac0e89
b7352bb9b26115e81d0f8617b350efaec357828f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWV' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b5072db318480b22924853ce2c167376
8b72874668c105302ffd1edda30b606d292831d2
describe
'8390' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWW' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ddaebf16947e228e1fb3518e466249fc
559787500caa9d1d3ed8a5168e838ad414dad67c
describe
'417361' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWX' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
86a1b46826d938032eae24bbf569f29a
51f61fcc7ef1b31b9a22b4d8d0523eaa0f2dbbcb
describe
'95495' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWY' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
574bbeb8b5ab5400d8fde27e8dc538a2
dd849f241eefc4a2f19307dd0745463526c474d1
describe
'32431' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
209380250e8fdef8f5a14e8311816053
c76eed0dcfe37d5f897873d1b96bf9e7befb9c62
describe
'32733' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXA' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
b273761ca40fc98d821bd5a01c01b922
5429771fff79203ce43d4c7ee5b0ddcbbfa21138
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXB' 'sip-files00172.tif'
b954041f118c94dab88fc75adce0581e
1596a941a4c5074e855b6f94e98b504a80857743
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXC' 'sip-files00172.txt'
f3507da88952cefd9facd46fa87eb89f
edc2079868391eb6dd129d6abcd8fdd7a978fa08
describe
'8260' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXD' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
0f62d86cf3b94da15c5245f15b0b852b
ddbf09e5afcb512fea0d7b40c2ad74fcd40a9282
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXE' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
b14752db75be037bff9e56ea89c2df81
8373bbd241b9517c5d7a324d2271c5ccba7588c5
describe
'78329' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXF' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
9e830a2e9b2faad73c18ced11be4b872
096abc4fd5c2f159ae1c817df5b7048ddb410eb8
describe
'29074' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXG' 'sip-files00173.pro'
13f694fd2201461d941943ff64266dde
5991e63f7eefae13cc9034d9573d99fed4082e44
describe
'24377' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXH' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
d8045b7a53ddbf59d1d67a2769f87d43
92b90da22c1c0e30a231b5f9f9861472b009f5a9
describe
'3347568' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXI' 'sip-files00173.tif'
93e651852d88a7c962a65c0a64974eed
6886fd68bb7a632470a10832fb16e1d70a2a0554
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
565e8a19de42fd87bc8124f9064ef0d3
8be4719c45f9739c22c3f50c0e912a0c6269c1a7
describe
'6557' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXK' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
b45601212982ba2fb037fa073c7c9a4e
f501abe8c8c95a1ed094b22482ec869f291e81cc
describe
'417339' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXL' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
406c2672f968f545448be46612d50dcb
037d8d14bd167437338979de5cbe5c500201c6f9
describe
'94344' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXM' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
c132bfab44667adcd6e846c03bf9ba85
c310297545a0dd1d062f314f7a6a60fbd7f01c43
describe
'31390' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXN' 'sip-files00174.pro'
c7b4a8e739b292c130d42b298eccc47b
c64e1f938cef17957382c353d884b153e91e3747
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXO' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
a02bda5c23f010779c9ca7d57e5d5403
66c6da87b7c38ebdff06a545dbf0a016de207b3f
describe
'3348284' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXP' 'sip-files00174.tif'
0e880c6b2b7f12e5738aca6ded2a67b2
b4976e50528fe8052c73d933dda388ee20b2e9cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
6918a7e53e95a03de052d60475550fa8
dc9fc6cd39f886c7d754254ad5ed8763bda90581
describe
'7944' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXR' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
4c538340eded10d0411cf036a942625d
425363ae42af4ca8f7a70f836ded83121df8b08d
describe
'417360' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXS' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
41db6c0449c2c118eeb427c66f763f6e
dfe55ee0e8ce47464dea22f2b7086507610f15cf
describe
'88501' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXT' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
cc6f7a5d33211ce5a221e31cf4db5e10
c82df65973d99674c715deeb173fce2b2ec67f08
describe
'30613' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXU' 'sip-files00175.pro'
2aabec41fa7c7549f777af517a5be2a1
9de0a6f5a1f60b1b14ef15a377474db4501c88e1
describe
'29713' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXV' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
c1df5a16530c07e1b26115c797cc6ac6
93fe7c98881c1cf2af757b8bfecdb2d62b7b4c3e
describe
'3348112' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXW' 'sip-files00175.tif'
37e8cf4a6300097b973a0b72cdccd448
02c056a7b16dcc14521dd6247ad7db0bab3b628a
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXX' 'sip-files00175.txt'
982ac86c747c69b0a7c7c49292d6ff86
63c9d43547acba3f998b2bd13b03f8f776ecf9df
describe
'7915' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
2a76fc21e9434b156a9cb98d70edf635
cd7cdcf7b253e75cba246443743a07a176500e50
describe
'396122' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
2d6ccf913b0bbc00d8236fa54e7d3556
fcd8e9e2b973073cc758f97c079153853ae18988
describe
'60636' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYA' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
4799006c23b286d0cfd7337e85b625ff
22b192001cc6c925d09f19b996e1225b33f5fe8d
describe
'22714' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYB' 'sip-files00176.pro'
e01d89f82b336e9f1214b2349fa257fc
875b6b2491a4d4455d58965c8ee49952a012eb3b
describe
'19203' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYC' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
720a43c6b19edaea73b60f557df1bdb6
9a0c1512b876e61720db5bf5e476e8b7a22ffa6d
describe
'3347180' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYD' 'sip-files00176.tif'
85bfb7de2f8bc6c9558ff1334ae00823
85facfb9627d9b83ae3aba5e6e39e5e14e48d2ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYE' 'sip-files00176.txt'
3b1ba45d0c3d128b1481a97f1f54844f
c684ca6d390cea231968e8173722d0860fa43a74
describe
'5047' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYF' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
45135aafdd769e95b0e9d6234d688b9d
539ce9bd46c2c30f0b2af6798d54d98caaf3bae9
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYG' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
b164b54cd3d2cd841094b0c3ada5434f
3e2a5c82200d55271468c16f11db8608b7979bec
describe
'67180' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYH' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
56f3c7346434f3824cc2a2bc6eeca8b2
5db947460f2af5a427a6fa2f6ec3cdbb93360a56
describe
'24622' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYI' 'sip-files00177.pro'
0386826d1ec69d6adab6f9c382ab5d35
c0779ce13dcdc6a66272a9953a08eac455ffb90f
describe
'20362' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
9462da9b2bf345762b003add283bf6c3
c9b890dc7606713d68c84c84a114a6af76789f22
describe
'3347296' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYK' 'sip-files00177.tif'
bff31766bf4b224442848e18b9f82bc5
f57f70cff02a6b128746b3b00e3ba238f1a1ad9b
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYL' 'sip-files00177.txt'
216f568512ce7691d642e943c4c3292a
7707779f31f0f5fe2ea7a6023eae16cd39ce55ba
describe
'5567' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYM' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
09269ea86f0467587196319049596069
4a65136b6e21fa250eebc28ae15d78e9c7d9565e
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYN' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
cf7dc73f90c86236cbbfbdc297fb55a2
8e106d3780e5209975c9e74157753aa7446dadc0
describe
'69778' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYO' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
e6a96fbdc2bb5c1378300e3b4af007f1
baf84da031cefbbdd1be7b8fce0065f21d6cc57a
describe
'24646' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYP' 'sip-files00178.pro'
ea537da4ecca5ff084e59781a1a243c3
a6a97855c054e3b3d138fabac8f4b25f9db1f724
describe
'22083' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
65dea570981e67b87b8e8b0b065b59aa
b1e2cba79baedb42cdb6d0b80eea2f044234b0ea
describe
'3347436' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYR' 'sip-files00178.tif'
5a773179ec3910f5fc7308480bb9c9e9
fd801e451cfbb274b7efe2b0fb4240d265544381
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYS' 'sip-files00178.txt'
fcc4cf2477e9e81075a062ff669142d5
3439cc0ff31b98a9d9cf51e9719264bc9469bccf
describe
'5940' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYT' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
8067b9db845f79adddaf471d34ef9251
d35ecd33f3148c7e55dceb095dfd10eaac13bfed
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYU' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
246a253be319609e49e951f2ff6f1616
4f7c1b6133ed67bf83e6ff80c1e0214fb99131e9
describe
'72998' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYV' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
ae8a6e5bd5b9da31bda4b7d71627d243
593ac0b0de248fc890665a7e4867f16994de138c
describe
'26184' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYW' 'sip-files00179.pro'
07c0446bb991911904522abfb172efee
67861db63da2fa5717c2b4be00afc7b18e5fd896
describe
'22975' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYX' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
14779ed0c03e5dbe8b1a91e4a9b76958
eb86d720163d30a923870ad61de61a213538c4b1
describe
'3347564' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYY' 'sip-files00179.tif'
8d2d642da0bd0515ef3d5f871e97c921
4542fc3ec24b439d7ee79a8e15557b2b66fac1c7
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files00179.txt'
daa5cca14f6ff093b43ea598ebb2c630
1c76406a1a706f2fdab241fdeb741d8c1b3c94fb
describe
'6228' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZA' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d3a3e8a747dfb28b3874dd92e758ad71
172ef048a9598f79c6137130906d5c4087764ff5
describe
'417340' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZB' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
901854ea21db32c3fdc60c144847342b
54448038721a14ba9787cdec09f5d692897aedec
describe
'94543' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZC' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
b771f95d82a58923b27f478027fe5021
1fd2bce0377dc7b597f650c3a7d652673f00abb5
describe
'32108' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZD' 'sip-files00180.pro'
742e4136ac787faa9a0738527a2d7f8e
8da3fd7933c76090a192b4b29a799fce27dfbc99
describe
'31791' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZE' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
f91332b8c4b7aadc71baf746e77d23c9
edeb113b6b477e95ea2c472aa13474da7112b6b0
describe
'3348116' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZF' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a25b328c4a89a287692a9701166dc9d8
82567107b359321ab178df7b358aac02338e7a05
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZG' 'sip-files00180.txt'
fe9328c707e06b10731c923d613a1d2a
118fc5e282f10c803952e332f2d4965190491cd2
describe
'8353' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZH' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
c568404b307598e5d07a27bb86c92e23
f2d410fdd92b72db31e43bda75dd36b9f02c7a13
describe
'417329' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZI' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
d1b2dc73a92bbd2e47340ca5a70fb20e
a2432f38f0d47ed6e2f86e7f2b232e1a34bf3633
describe
'77138' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
42cbd8752aed19050ec8b0a7df28b17b
cf4d59be1bfd83871e0d2adb03ce0c5c259e74e7
describe
'24003' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZK' 'sip-files00181.pro'
cb03cacd0fde87a6911e808e7eb3d8ae
551773db2166755917f68f2b3202e27d50f1b93a
describe
'26215' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZL' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
07f04b55284bacd650d2865aadaf644f
ea357de2195bb305d3d10608e1c76a3f417e662c
describe
'3347756' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZM' 'sip-files00181.tif'
6a5039c54a609feca3d9770dfef1caa2
93ac597e2e0ff427ff3e9ae0d2a16cfc03e4a3b5
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZN' 'sip-files00181.txt'
7320b808f779bafbb8f25acec3d6956b
3fe5b40e667f889d98842080263ae8641cfae628
describe
'6875' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZO' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
76be935022dadf394aa51b10356fec1d
bb91875dc2c09ad61317f4951b840272466672ca
describe
'278985' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
095f89d7038f7e9c7f05b4b50d9f1d70
bda5e55fa30914d9d1d45369a1bfcb19478a8fa2
describe
'43486' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
55993f2f20fa1368fa91ad47ca0159f9
607fa889a070f5718792f3dd40f608b8b54a3ec7
describe
'11795' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZR' 'sip-files00182.pro'
44fb8391ee10ca1e33cbd66e31ea7064
bd6490eb77285016b6d2b8e571f1e0fdbfd4df40
describe
'14617' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZS' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
f2509c5f0deffc59251c743116f07cd8
6c67b92c0ab93d21ca2c6f8eeca767db6ea6abc1
describe
'3346744' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZT' 'sip-files00182.tif'
ea95d89d5f28a8d16025be4c700a6d4c
06277fc9740ea1444ff5dc9cf32b84ce9c8f4235
describe
'618' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZU' 'sip-files00182.txt'
e26fd4883e7767389c51cf7465212447
d61cdd1f8a500e5b8dcf19013a86a3a7119ff3e1
describe
'4246' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZV' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
f7a100d319952df3e8c77651dbe76291
9e017e14569789b46ed74adb5ec89fb9ba2e4d91
describe
'410728' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZW' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
c6c5e4a82a2c3b5c2300d091d3dde1cd
3d3d09df2dc14df0b26f7245b5fdc8c87a357002
describe
'63014' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZX' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
3e7aa81ffa7543e5e845542b87ffc897
a74437a477e27f26fde6c96044b4113080c4a557
describe
'19949' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
84a486c0cb474084720f8020af011423
a6ed9b4e9ffe91130a7b848085d2e0b2c8f01334
describe
'20379' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
ee3f8e10c9516e960d88c8cf9c8579aa
3ab8344f7b35bdd269450e926710d534b9e7be00
describe
'3347232' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAA' 'sip-files00183.tif'
b9d49a99945d48c5733df71390be5e09
3d6e12c1a2572576c359d460801c33b076070cf6
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAB' 'sip-files00183.txt'
2a6c5ad71701ea55f36894e23857106a
663a9ea9704ee9e7c892246191ee9d2c39121799
describe
'5764' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAC' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
e85915b625c3a86e008f489f93b15150
8c3907a7105442050ee2578f41c0e852f983508b
describe
'332849' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAD' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
bac9deccb3aac21092d0e7afdda4bfda
61a691b3403bc4b5ecd44ad2fe9c2759956d36c4
describe
'50466' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAE' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
ebcff29f259c403e825ffd96982eec0f
51dd04fcc1da9cd3d3bad000e242b36733d699ea
describe
'15570' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAF' 'sip-files00184.pro'
2c4785a6b3e7b753b9756fe184108ef3
1f5dca27dc131464e66bcf8b6772a15e57afd901
describe
'16728' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAG' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
0f145f609cb0d5c31b73b3ce9d31badc
c05086882abd7c6e79e8584e5e1480c89bb500a1
describe
'3346984' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAH' 'sip-files00184.tif'
e32480c2b46ffd0b9a5abc894eb0fdaa
c2afab810ec46c764dc7fc2d54959753a56101c7
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAI' 'sip-files00184.txt'
3ba89daccd49dc9405aba53ebd3db480
6478d79c8688a3783904be02bbc88841d572bf4a
describe
'4315' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
1eea333606236aca55143fa6f768147c
039ce7a83edbb84dd026f8ad0f839a5fc500473a
describe
'168072' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAK' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8987e63350f8d21762ea01c243f2c1b4
3c8d962b757279114c26b2aaa887b14de4c908d1
describe
'25773' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAL' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
7aa2e18560d018e814edecaa5f404e9c
dee8c800b0f028844a3df043d6ffce8604db8c4f
describe
'4819' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAM' 'sip-files00185.pro'
259bc81b98c244eec0fd51b66e544873
38bbf97ced1ee9e4576b4070e3351fe374a0fcd3
describe
'8563' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAN' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
e302668fe872ac01eee1cabbe7a49f90
ab3912adcdd934594bd5635e956e91e8c33f5683
describe
'3346276' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAO' 'sip-files00185.tif'
5af850d60a4e82e6e65ab9adeb791614
3d962e716b7b8b40338dc0f55412a9fa98482ae3
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAP' 'sip-files00185.txt'
8e8a1514078149ddfc737f3d9ae8e721
11877b30f225e1c034918bd4e2409e50e569cdb6
describe
'2640' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
8d25bcd66a52ae534a80a91a5bb2d093
138d9d48b186ef372ee0d5714be7a7e82f18bcb4
describe
'417322' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAR' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
7afbb3553b1ea188ceafc87b9ca05fe6
fe59055edc40a2280d706c0dba94ed4c5cebeb7b
describe
'93034' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAS' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
9f3b5d6e8983d74ce04d169e7464fa9e
9ff8b7891aac1afb91bce899a2072eebb3108ad3
describe
'16443' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAT' 'sip-files00186.pro'
dd24124cbe95b40008cda81e8c8e02a3
23f88a1ccfaebdc29f90c06630e4cbe7910b5267
describe
'28785' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAU' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
a99e375be3509c394ed02e410efd969e
cf7c99acf4e014e4563762471ecafaed7a5871ca
describe
'3348180' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAV' 'sip-files00186.tif'
c7a27f5e00ee0f294cf5e608e42eb267
c66006b1ef2686aa30d8b5645e248fa7d6a6c0b0
describe
'703' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAW' 'sip-files00186.txt'
19999b90006cf2250321271b7251bdb3
9ca5174db5172a5df9e2fe34a8d5c3aee36b526c
describe
'7358' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAX' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
bdece287ff04694f85456bd6e9bbc8ce
5eaaa57bc636ac6d0d66063692f5f753ad5f5f56
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAY' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
751e3efb8e8ff9d6118d2892d25aaa32
a74d501f59076b01f8abf961e311927ecfb72945
describe
'104437' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
c48a2e28ddf1301d9e147ef7413ffdc7
824bfd566ba536ed89be5fa73025ec7e25e2e6f8
describe
'35533' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBA' 'sip-files00187.pro'
ea16438d001b1519f91d62d733517c94
efe105b7b909367cb4c0144043ce70a687af0f8d
describe
'35556' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
8417d4546d1b3fb2a6d13b86e58a8b17
12955d3cb1ceb4194689e201761193d34ae3f62f
describe
'3348364' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
b8b170d1130bdf4d3067da0f02df192c
cf9256a52917f2197650cdafe88fbe2ff7ed9913
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
c90b81ac1cbc47764de659ac8badeb57
17bea3ddcac17242168ecfa9ed019752c29a5aa5
describe
'9005' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBE' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
9d1258b8522d6ebff8bbbbeb91c7bfc0
54722bb2d6c3925b70a4260962bb48f7aa979e7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
3c7c83c2fef622283d65c9180b9c735e
bdfb1e00eeab17c27319e9a96325b8bd83603d50
describe
'104194' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
ffbe8c56028834c648cd60251c749446
83ff2811c1f7b25a1d1a21d0d90c8d1e128306cb
describe
'36394' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBH' 'sip-files00188.pro'
1d01d40a49f9c4006fcbec11187fad97
540395ea911e2c2b32834759305e8e1a8cc04e4f
describe
'35773' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBI' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
2fc6ac7ae504389df7b03c7163354d22
6f23c972218c04e3ad614b1906fe439efa940788
'2011-12-12T04:15:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
e159c511d5d67287644af8f20c0d77e4
7733d81c1d58897d18cd58e711e0a9c86854acfa
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
313d1cab2687ffd10a61fd1c40c4d4d9
c165bb36e491e89c0bc5c88c446eea0db80d4639
describe
'9115' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBL' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
52a5965c6b2c6cb08a5d3f7b8e50c2a6
ab798971f11f25ee76316f1461aa97c65cdf2014
describe
'417317' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBM' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
4075bcb234d6993e5762771caec91185
1baa9aaf7853ad362643e3c3d51b456e54689df7
describe
'100145' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBN' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
164da6eb093b31edd68414bfeb5b3d2e
7b0aee69da8d8741cbfa4f194629c7e3fa660732
describe
'33849' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBO' 'sip-files00189.pro'
59b3449eeb80487e9238c7ebdce0b456
8c497f9e01bd359dd18817ea1176e068c83bc304
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBP' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
29539d691b12c1b0422eb513539f3b56
303db3e15c584fa6bc50992d20610a795bff73f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
0b425eb0406b8d918a5c2523bb4dd6e9
b7981aaacf53f090834eddb1da02eff7eac7541c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBR' 'sip-files00189.txt'
1e777e727b3fddc8699752dc85c8dda8
74e68f3142a5431905dad5713ecaa2ff9ae8dcb8
describe
'8730' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBS' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
9c6378fb4485e4096ad550f10b207c42
509d75dc49677f11b48c8d8b7136b2743c01e332
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBT' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
24496e3bfb73c86a7bb824d384a2766f
e4ae1a20f7597473e9a569f97db93eba4c4a73aa
describe
'101271' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBU' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
7a20273d1fc1393c0e2da30e8735326a
da250aaf845e872d8edd1e2f6f9a50c1c906b7e7
describe
'34143' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBV' 'sip-files00190.pro'
8460ecbaa0059102f6bfa2883b0c4673
adb50a92b122be09f3f3a5bc32b2d2081f0d3000
describe
'34938' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBW' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
23f14f82c95f6084d09e690553eb2fe1
b9d4afee64dc6f2fd56c829b8ef8e0b5d7669c85
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBX' 'sip-files00190.tif'
84105cdcc706411972f7a72ac503d48c
13bf0866b7a1a8082a1d8dcfa7dc542ad66fefa8
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBY' 'sip-files00190.txt'
849e9954ca16cc2a17525203db0eed82
24702d6f50657a9aea63d0e3463b324e67720ffc
describe
'8669' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
cd41dfff7c0124e3b4fdf562faf85081
25381a78a7b50d8db2bdcc2bfae724721a4f6dc9
describe
'418239' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCA' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
93a58127e6e9b53784acb8655e11c144
391d905baabb2fc3b886319cd4863a5181e9081a
describe
'86827' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCB' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
8a60349ff874b936d3d2dc0dd3b287f9
bd2b52ddd8042890e5fc48a5f60557f714bffe12
describe
'29237' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCC' 'sip-files00191.pro'
fe4d76af604349f32e4e998387ac09a9
783a437d2e37145bc5fe1449499336e9a7755eaf
describe
'29332' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
ee54f5ebc110ef19df2922f8778c852d
2bc71944d7fae30a3253c6a522e31970814a9e16
describe
'3358036' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCE' 'sip-files00191.tif'
0ef1a43144dde7a5aeda3766390f1a2f
b392b97e88a0c796564fa40125d2fbc4bc7e013d
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
f424a6d418b53caa464714614e8d0818
d858ac73330586b00afa96af94acac76cfd5ac26
describe
'8129' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCG' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
b4ca44b3ec3b175a35a06d33fbd10c7f
f3a8f239d36672697641a5eae8d81e6abbba468d
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCH' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
8c585a3bb52a6a4e0d5655c96a867154
ef0b4839f033b95a9ce019580dbb1193e648122d
describe
'91690' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCI' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
14f1aa2b24a57417b9f7b9f78b8a7c0e
7e557abd44b59be6ad153eaba75bf263d7dfefdd
describe
'31504' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
843c330d900deb981468e3a84234d4da
70ba923699f172145b7a2a1e923715bd3ae1b780
describe
'31525' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCK' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
976f564a4cc81417baf33d8f1a6c3d3b
6e62bf342bb82e59a4a8794e4e89be9917cb9d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCL' 'sip-files00192.tif'
f648dfc57f79091c30d977933b5d100c
743529d5c1796a00450018ffa4fceaeb61ac01c0
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCM' 'sip-files00192.txt'
0917828eecd44f116c533dc8356809f3
c50f5053b906d5bb0575a37679a187082b7a1677
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCN' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
be57827c59d64e72f33644ff393d0efc
0052a6687a23acc6b314f027a45be2ffeeab7757
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCO' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6b8661cab23e196ddf3523722d37eedf
27a1ac6338fc9b0075295b7577b314af9dde0a2c
describe
'98662' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCP' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
ff69f0f05b6c8b8eea702581f28aff96
11d22fa719f15f1ccc03c8d8274d747e626ff8b8
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
dd6f50641522e78c88d15db68a6aa6bf
079385cfe996186bc1203fd46a86e1e481d7cdf5
describe
'32346' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCR' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
cc6c8e152696fc0ef6d20123f55149c0
5cb257581fe689ed666229b25d1d77452be18edd
describe
'3348296' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCS' 'sip-files00193.tif'
d836f7bc96965541ab9119b4a0c26224
d95f1a313d446a42a9e8f7ca5df9a47d553a79d8
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCT' 'sip-files00193.txt'
8e523000632d90ca8db199689546dae0
8efddc4d0e869e74d1f1c513f27e799725c3a481
describe
'8426' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCU' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
98d5cc40b76a7bae3d3f1beafb3c0962
1a69fa59a30dc9c78650ab8361142bb07b1ecd05
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCV' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
f8180b71a1ecff97a25bbb05e4ff300d
6e99b03e27a16a5c2ee6be1e3cd9f11ff0550aa1
describe
'82000' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCW' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
86d63044c97f96180af31d4f1d051940
5ec3dc88eeb2a1df3ea3cf40fe71ec18154ca6c3
describe
'26606' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCX' 'sip-files00194.pro'
481614b32c92061b7090f0463e0ed5a7
d673f7377d54448bdd88c296692548eb79838ff2
describe
'27966' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCY' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
52be13256a2af6d6571d708406b317b4
d70f8c86034d799471197069c61f4470d5952f31
describe
'3348032' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
aa3cd8eb9f0dd14470d5cae8631d09d5
e7a920d94803aaf1b348d982e1e9cde98b5b1443
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDA' 'sip-files00194.txt'
d927df4475b1aa9c0540df2599459119
99db87062fbed80ec505de08d0c21e70a4b73c51
describe
'7585' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDB' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
7e23cce5d13922f8eda82ceb13c39b8f
a934b7fa31e7bdaf5a2386ad8990c9c85ed28ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDC' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
ca9533c102b4537c7e62f1c18eeb55ab
856d2f564ab518ed6876755dc24954984349deb8
describe
'96480' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d86b26d468116999c40a3d08fd91e826
1d41bd016e6f8af841e6cd4f1fbaf581a58766e1
describe
'32020' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDE' 'sip-files00195.pro'
aa58a86546c6540299f2432ce0d2bf3c
b97f299212bc0231ea096f1602d2683b61a41dfa
describe
'32656' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDF' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
a90a41a6c91d4bc1fc99043d28aecd6f
9f881a6563fcdc8a95f06e7867af7c71a1dee8c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDG' 'sip-files00195.tif'
b2adcfa71bd3018e5c204b65569d8323
e404afa7309a2065ece4d1f7180e4fac1e8a81db
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDH' 'sip-files00195.txt'
6bb9ee18416a133d6ec76e7496cde713
a3a36ca4b2fe6cc1e8f7678b4fcc8fcb0551c1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDI' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
af4ca350143f2bc1cc4ea3f6cc6e2f4e
faca355bab9a23a6c9a48b376c236d7dcf5975df
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
4b54a3a96c2991e96262f6d2ff4e336f
5c1387933689d39005c43ee1a6add6ab02273b70
describe
'102821' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a02048df3c6267749b677540c06729a4
2a463d7ab67c5f11d203313b082b0f4eb0580eda
describe
'34126' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
322bd49a1f76d394038a9a98fc3b1670
4cc1c9122e6770efa0a93d4c39409a8eea260626
describe
'35014' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDM' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
893d6db97b4c57c1cdafd59f3da5234a
9ea19035c86a8394a7fdc2730cf1eab4aa3ef01f
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDN' 'sip-files00196.tif'
cc2e2228c43ee2f3f133f010e64bbe00
64def1faa18631ebe22ac99e8a865e961c57477c
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDO' 'sip-files00196.txt'
c7e1890b200c895e12a7009388391141
f1d1c7f5503a21a053684cf456aac1a86d3698ce
describe
'8683' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDP' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
aca56eb3ff1b119268fb5830de19177f
f5c7ab7cde91ef0252cd999f46077ca93a5c1736
describe
'417639' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c2a035e3c4c041678ff257eb6b25fed9
3e759b204ca50877af23ad0c8f2e37213dcff560
describe
'106975' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDR' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
50c466c5774b7c6fa252b2be8b65ae77
63f4081b014832b11db5c384246e3fb9391f17d3
describe
'35831' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDS' 'sip-files00197.pro'
368ff0c35ff8cd7cca8882648d773b8c
8c2fcf50237b7fe4b9960de557d8c901466c2246
describe
'35683' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDT' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
6125d8af86c6822a904cd5435d7e5d62
e7343cab5b6b3fbb334233390d919bc8fcc7e9e7
describe
'3350580' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDU' 'sip-files00197.tif'
8e384fa4a3a8ebc12be2532565488364
1a4e2adb97fd2457f8bc3bdc098311bcc4927a37
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
bc05a7c3698a622f272d223b6d6aeffb
c0bae0309fa63148c9d175b0480b8321d0476046
describe
'8836' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDW' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
fbbb6b8ea85aa2ebeb412d64ab44b6b3
9fc4c4c9ed8ff19a88b2421ced69cc599af9709f
describe
'417328' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b67dd709b085806b8739183aac3a285c
94b62e1f4add3690a556fa20ccba99098fb54e3f
describe
'215130' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDY' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
02f5e8322e5229395876cfaa2bada0c1
acc51100cc0a74db8c8a5e2efa973478c83b1485
describe
'51013' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
68be4d55d59a867b0066d43234a684f5
482f10470cf8a68ae51e304ac2adf7d93171e25d
describe
'3349560' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEA' 'sip-files00198.tif'
02c7592a099db445d2e4ec9e63dbca11
77a5e0ba797cb6665e3e7488d8943c1529bb1c8e
describe
'11509' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEB' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
c5e15bc546ded051ecbea2d695b6efac
315093997aed12ea6c15e70facbe2497b211cdf5
describe
'30532' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEC' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
547e842480a5020d4bb546bb9ebe9a47
c9ff04d90b53bc31fc3e6b5dc24793b4d0075708
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWED' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
948257703f7bf894b05ea1326aee5477
7d80c1935e343a4ff788497597ab9018adeec19f
describe
'2505' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEE' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
27e798d78320543219efae3fe3b0e47c
ff2cb2e98c61cf9664c92a2a462a808e5fe3f99a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEF' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7720813e7221f989c7330c734fc62d32
c0e6c45f3dc0b1845d2d395c437a8b1e16877dd4
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEG' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ed2f02ab837023afc486bf5df8572212
8788d5da55934426a96c58b4007718e3c7e5505a
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEH' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
ca3c09e97ee6d35651996d4fe6dd6eda
1c8150eeb610e3fc07148dc0349c8cafb458a8fd
describe
'101819' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEI' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
b051031c5e5cd2c3390a64379cd1e556
d1f2895799659c658f71d146451c4fba8d580ca1
describe
'35153' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
f49e87aa49d2880d094922892cbcc9d8
1ae94183c1f99803c1c2acf2f909d3ebec4980cb
describe
'34164' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEK' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
702e989b28f849d3726c06a5044e34fb
28066b891dc105d744f03fc0de7f68e3e49564fb
describe
'3348248' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEL' 'sip-files00200.tif'
36ba274a50875011dcd8059969c272c7
825fabbc172c78c1d56931a831c8c1a9dacfd292
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEM' 'sip-files00200.txt'
d04b53c8d036bbb02e7421c8642fa510
a84b87cfea00863830b55dcd339c678819916792
describe
'8643' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEN' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
5a7ea9d17a68671ca989eb4627e1b94d
712633f9cc420b4bfdba80f88a7bb9024cb30fe2
describe
'417346' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
d1145a4a3973f87187b06362e7983ac8
8fbdffe2a84f3cdd6b0f4c35c8ff28ad8c3625a2
describe
'98935' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEP' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8f61b66955f128126b5629e4ab58af5f
300c626a6012032d85076056361db7bb5d8a277f
describe
'32573' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
c17f72e3932ffa9fa38dba577b1f97d8
a5356424c6d783f3125f85f9c1dce9d840bb4dfa
describe
'33826' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWER' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
df1dd91ba3a3efadf618255df89f7a9d
72eb55a9aa40a7f30b45e614124fc012041a687d
describe
'3348308' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWES' 'sip-files00201.tif'
0864210a69677e143be7d21f41c25c8f
a3669a136aae1a2888b13d48a9cc033b8b45cecc
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWET' 'sip-files00201.txt'
969d0d34a234798dae2133803dd20fd0
04146b0651df7ba73fde8afcb0a2ee8e7a87a8a8
describe
'8395' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEU' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
5dc196fe2265f5d8c539714ace74dde0
0786172c68f42c1328f3165d6b86ab67de3fb784
describe
'353091' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEV' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
efbc3b878c4fbe7d0e12cad5a15d2959
01d90ab858bc99972e8680b0f6096efdd690c59e
describe
'49771' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
2911f01e571db46d56f41114fa8655c8
a7eba25a905a212b2ba4893055d73d64fccbca8e
describe
'13521' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEX' 'sip-files00202.pro'
86fb7924fe336dc094443f0135194d93
b43567acd2118c3235b9d21690a466fed6f499e7
describe
'15982' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEY' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
d79e18055c2141bdc73fcf7d1884be85
4df99e31950d36d0a4e4b40c8b4924c53cd2d501
describe
'3346956' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
212ae4e3aa206ac906224627b0f39ac0
aedf108dd7ddd62b600a55b23a47022057a0aaee
describe
'592' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
b9e83ed872d51d2f6ac9c482825ee880
7aa7885d151dde0a957bd80ad5dcadd9dcb2eb03
describe
'4707' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFB' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
9d981e88e32f930dac956d4b7b3e6d5f
40d9417e48f03ac69a90641501ef5d53ce48dcc5
describe
'412171' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFC' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
375eee375cde9ad708c61cee2adbfea3
77e7f933c708cb9d565caabaf4d17fcf8e77f4a1
describe
'61747' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFD' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
6b992addc1377c9b443f8f9708839376
3a420b7e78ee675a0afa6dc11bc8004c31eca3d5
describe
'19970' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFE' 'sip-files00203.pro'
f736fdbcb9cb2a3ccfe36a1e149eebf9
a74c0db42d93342fd16ecc7e111af0b870328cfa
describe
'20612' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFF' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
81394c0beae1144c3657e6f3078708b8
0b84f0e6ef5d7c176fdf0d7024b2e2793eee106d
describe
'3349424' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFG' 'sip-files00203.tif'
87e2bce4a7e54592b1b7ef16d42ab357
5b66195406b76d15491ac035525fc68106c613bd
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
7af84a70df2c8c8fe316e62cc925d0b0
4a361bca7869629b588e83cdc6383e8136f778c7
describe
'5341' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFI' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
13a9a3ab1a8ddae40a0f603c7be12eb0
e94f9596e609c5525c8f1602d6da4080a78e4536
describe
'137093' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
fab3a045a9811880163224ae75e01173
3eefe9b1b19bbfca5ce71e4ebd24525afdff4d9d
describe
'22523' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFK' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
5ee20ca85f452449fd7fd274ef50d60c
01d5000a4eb08625cf397c316656bd2145166b28
describe
'4014' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFL' 'sip-files00204.pro'
b688d64c21aa55619f61134622efeff5
6ee72a2cef7495f4d5218ba90409392d87188a69
describe
'7190' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
b35466cd90bc55109fe3bb2d1fb176ab
65f7a457e805863975350df634aa50651effca60
describe
'3346132' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFN' 'sip-files00204.tif'
d6706fd0a98945da181686269ea19a80
5cea4363e5da4d63d780cecc9c30e68e63b1c775
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFO' 'sip-files00204.txt'
2a6246e794a06b22b0de58c99b80c173
090fb9f801a39202a79bfd02e793624871a9b9b5
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFP' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
33a853418b24ab8738ebfc3ff57bff4e
9a074ad5892b74d00f032124b4110596873a3d04
describe
'304647' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
048559f4503c9544c77cde3a62dec6d0
fb190acfd689fd376c74dbd616fc811a85e87538
describe
'47536' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFR' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
51cb97de59f83356f9a96371b1b2d9ae
f20b4f64cbdec1a08962d824838fe1d3331d4b8a
describe
'13917' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFS' 'sip-files00205.pro'
054cd0d193087d2f856b096da135260f
ecb5c0bf949f794e1b997f0dbd8d6ff7e3b36b9a
describe
'15067' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFT' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
a6c2834fb5147b9d6896885377866889
07a6343fa204470dc6b40f1b9cda033c012ba531
describe
'3346752' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
62923eb83ac82869cccc42e66d8145f7
a98c3b2f878b7abd47d59d219f1fcd22cd6d48ac
describe
'605' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFV' 'sip-files00205.txt'
1aa97e4f6ce84e19774ee4f513a677ef
37b252d6c817d0f66fdff1e607d91a84d25ab9ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFW' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
146f0ae0a58087d0177316a7a961a401
309c104f2ac737f1ad79fe9c3551fd908ed2c51e
describe
'444872' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFX' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
e13f6f261cb9c2638ff4011cff5d13ab
f0082367b7e417a1fc91442c1e45302ff2d7b410
describe
'202787' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFY' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
5bdccc3b594d26534b80b69d93a21941
8f5a562955e53f98142053499a30f68157bdf320
describe
'49203' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
7e8a297d59d429c5cd25a6eb8c7a3fb1
8e94d41df177d7fba393e9bbb0e5d0417aedb03d
describe
'10687268' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGA' 'sip-files00207.tif'
e41850c0613b2ba3ab26a22faaa10817
7aea038778a835717ac8a27d5806fbe92b084165
describe
'10661' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGB' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
708fdac2ad7f6bfe4192009072eda748
dd0981e600fd52a3a150eeccb60cc6dc1bc28429
describe
'492686' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGC' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
fd2011b75816ee26f32de3796d945c91
fff6134ee7e6be1788a33e17a0c3d25f2175b547
describe
'210676' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGD' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
f827480d4157afc7199cd2997b4085b3
bfda952655af804512c42679cc5e0077a8ca2c35
describe
'50442' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGE' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
e75839d1974c3575d981c135bc2bdb01
a5f3c618725f49ee73fcbc329c4a80f724dad73e
describe
'11832664' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGF' 'sip-files00208.tif'
0ba6f64d8aa684fcf070ad079d9c3f56
3a200eb03c5d18ff001ef99fbfe6ab15ca9d74ce
describe
'10897' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGG' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
db1b6ce91f0823326a4cb1912696ac29
4472d9cdc033253e7deae81654ee129e843e7609
describe
'478642' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGH' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
80d089b8e066bbc5bd5c077b78f1a976
6baa18ef909487669482e901906b95727cd129cb
describe
'183230' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGI' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
2720b3957e5f7dd1108af88fc91ae351
95fb4e8a28d1bc0612072b4e5dad6742679a7ae4
describe
'38732' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
c3a9d973be4fc4326321fed90c9a8dab
f5014d29efeef65b863fe59117475f7fdbb89838
describe
'11496372' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGK' 'sip-files00209.tif'
de73bd339a350501eb16fdb51d949e3c
3607440b0065f0840cbd8d80e36d1c67f7f2941f
describe
'8269' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGL' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
0c11055aaa67023f0ce67f20c2da0301
883805a7106a63a4407de74a3fdec397cb494063
describe
'105349' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGM' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
882f927db0de166569196842b32d79d4
480e4159c7b30b15af487c4465ca3d7b3bd0adba
describe
'49784' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGN' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
ca9f1d88acd995a41f7d6e4150c721e1
a14ec399a7385d7a2941fbd8d58decd48656961b
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGO' 'sip-files00210.pro'
ba43f7fd43a4b777adc9c7f215439abf
c25c488c1a31066f640beb295f86d330696fd12b
describe
'12269' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
fd36e4311dd921b49fcfaf5ee09fdfb8
2981ba980eef069bac3c01bfcc09aca3e6c327ad
describe
'2534456' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
fc407ccdd9bf47292f0bab2ce37058a8
d3bdd2843d0ae33466765eaca1e3f35b6d67c1d2
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGR' 'sip-files00210.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'4818' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGS' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
cc9c3fcbb4e9c90d15129259e62da049
35afc2e874d8d5bdcf980d32d13f842dae4401a5
describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGT' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
57f3f28554e29971baf7c9bb40d5e97c
2524cd41dd6b43dd55b535a950f1c7e694400cfc
describe
'335018' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGU' 'sip-filesUF00081255_00001.mets'
57a65df3b6eb430606bead97fb208680
c51b01eedcd0378c083d762878f0a66dec107f13
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T11:02:44-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'435981' 'info:fdaE20080513_AAAAESfileF20080514_AAAWGX' 'sip-filesUF00081255_00001.xml'
d9ab0b06715e5719af217f88a4db825f
0d7527ecfe6d633a0a8bea17c918a16cc02c6f0f
describe
'2013-12-18T11:02:41-05:00'
xml resolution