Citation
Little folks east and west

Material Information

Title:
Little folks east and west : comprising "Prairie stories" "Mother Goose stories" "Fairy stories" and "True stories"
Added title page title:
Prairie stories
Added title page title:
Mother Goose stories
Added title page title:
Fairy stories
Added title page title:
True stories
Creator:
Shattuck, Harriette R ( Harriette Robinson ), 1850-1937 ( Author, Primary )
Lee and Shepard ( Publisher )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Printer )
S.J. Parkhill & Co
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lee and Shepard
Manufacturer:
Typography and electrotyping by C.J. Peters & Son
S.J. Parkhill & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1891
Language:
English
Physical Description:
95, [4] p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1892 ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1892 ( local )
Genre:
Children's stories
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue precedes and follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Harriette R. Shattuck.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026954349 ( ALEPH )
ALH7842 ( NOTIS )
191867852 ( OCLC )

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Full Text









73,CLARK &Co,

TATIONER





By HARRIETTE R. SHATTUCK

THE WOMAN’S MANUAL OF PARLIA-
MENTARY LAW

With Practical Illustrations especially adapted to
Women’s Organizations . . . . : . 75 cents

OUR MUTUAL FRIEND

A Drama, from Dickens . : . : 7 7 25 cents

LITTLE FOLKS EAST AND WEST

Stories for Children. Illustrated . ‘ . + 75 cents

MISS MIFFINS’S WINDOW

A Christmas Story. Illustrated. (/u press.)

LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS BOSTON













Littte Fotxs East anp West

“PRAIRIE STORIES”
“MOTHER GOOSE STORIES”
“FAIRY STORIES” AND
“TRUE STORIES”

BY

HARRIETTE R. SHATTUCK

BOSTON 1892
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS

10 MILK STREET NEXT “OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE”?



COPYRIGHT, 1891, By LEE AND SHEPARD

All rights reserved

LITTLE FoLKs EAST AND WEST

TYPOGRAPHY AND ELECTROTYPING BY
C. J. PETERS & SON, BOSTON.



S. J. PARKHILL & CO., PRINTERS, BOSTON.



DEDICATION.

TO

(My Sister Slizaheth,

IN MEMORY OF THE DAYS WHEN WE WERE LITTLE
FOLKS TOGETHER.



CONTENTS

PRAIRIE STORIES
Da, BUNCH AND Ony .
Buncn’s Movine Day.
Buncu’s FLOWER GARDEN

How Louis rounp a Home

MOTHER GOOSE STORIES
HICKERTY PICKERTY’s PARTY
More azpout Little Miss MurFer .

THREE LITTLE WISE MEN .

FAIRY STORIES
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE Fay
LirTLe LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND

How THE Moon GoT HER HALo

TRUE STORIES
A LITTLE Marp oF Lonc Aco
A LITTLE MaIp oF To-Day

WHAT MARJORIE SEES IN THE MORNING

77

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DA, BUNCH AND ONY.








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A WAS a boy twelve years
old, Bunch, a little girl of six,
and Ony, a tiny black pig.
The rest of the “little folks”
will come in by and by. Da,

Bunch, and Ony lived at

~ Plum Creek—‘‘way off out

West,” but why it was named
«Plum Creek,” I’m sure I don’t know, for there were
no plums ters and no creek either. Da and Bunch’s
real names were David and Blanche, but they had
been called these easier names by little Bunch her
self, before she could talk plainly, and now everybody
called them so. ‘ Bunch” was just the right name
too, for she was a real little bunch of a girl, as plump
and round and rosy as a ripe cherry. They lived
with their father and mother in a little sod house in
one of the hollows of the rolling prairie, five miles



4 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

from any neighbor. Ony lived with his brothers and
sisters, ten in all, almost anywhere. He ran about
wherever he liked all day, and rested beside the old
mother pig when night came. As real name was
Ebony, because he was black all over, while his
brothers and sisters were black and white spotted.
Ony was always clean, and so smart and cunning
that sometimes they let him run about in the kitchen,
and then he would eat corn from Bunch’s hand and
drink the buttermilk left from the churning. Bunchie
had no other pet, for she was a poor little girl; so
she made a pet of Ony, who followed her about
everywhere she went—just like ‘Mary’s little lamb,”
and showed a great deal of love for her, even if he
was only a little black pig!

The children’s home was a very pleasant one,
though it was only a house built all of sods which
they dug from the ground and piled one on another.
There were two small windows, one low door, and a
hole in the roof for the stove pipe. There were three
rooms opening one into another, all of the same size,
nicely plastered and with wooden floors.

There was a stove too, in which hay was burned in
summer and wood in winter, two beds, a bureau (in
the upper drawer of which was the Plum Creek post-
office), six chairs, a small table, and two shelves full
of dishes and the pans for milk. The house was quite
low, so it was easy to throw the farming tools upon
the roof and get them out of the way. Sometimes



en

DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 5

the sod roof looked very queer, all stuck over with
hoe-handles and rake-handles and other kinds of han-
dles. A little way from the house was the sod cellar,
a small room made by digging a hole in one of the
little hillocks of the prairie and shaping it with sods.
Here the milk was set for cream, the pork was salted
down and all the food was kept, except the yellow
squashes, green melons and ripe corn, which were
stored in nice, clean wooden sheds.

Then there was the shed thatched with hay, where
the three strong farm horses were kept, the sod stable
for the cows, the little pond for the ducks, and the
sty for the pigs, though only the old mother pig staid
in the sty, her large family liking better to trot about
all over the farm and visit the other animals. Of
course, there were hens, too, but they lived anywhere.

Three times a week came the mail, brought by a
tall man on horseback, who wore a soft, wide-brim-
med hat, and always smiled pleasantly at little Bunch,
as she stood in the doorway watching him. He
would stay all night and go away the next morning
to Valloosa, the county seat, carrying with him the
letters and papers which the Plum Creek folks wanted
‘to send to their friends. Sometimes he would have
as many as seven or eight letters, and he always
brought a good many papers, for out West the men
and women want to know all that is going on.

Although they saw so few persons, Da and Bunch
were not lonely. Da had plenty of work to do. He

Se Oe



6 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

milked the cows, harnessed the horses and took care
of them, and helped his father about the farm. Bunch
and her mamma staid at home and. “did the work,”
the little girl not doing a great deal except to wipe
the dishes, set the table and feed the chickens and
ducks, because she was too little to do anything
else. When her work was done she would run out
on the prairie, and, with Ony at her heels, would
chase the round “tumble weeds” and run in the wild
wind until her cheeks were as red as roses and her
gown was covered with the prickly sand-burrs that
grow in the tall prairie grass.

The farmer was very set in his ways. He had just
such a time for everything, and then and only then
must it be done. The mother was too busy all the
time to think when she would like to do this or that.
There was always a next thing that could not wait.
She had to work very hard, and often Bunch would
see tears in her eyes and wonder about it. Once the
mother had lived in Valloosa, and er mother lived
there now, and she had not seen her for so long!
That was why there were tears in the mother’s eyes
sometimes.

The bright summer had gone, and the fall had come.
The prairie roses and sunflowers were dead, and the
tall grass was yellow and dry. In the night the sky
was lit up in many directions by distant prairie fires,
and the mother had warned her husband several times
that it was time to make his fire-guards; that is, to



DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 7

plough a wide path all around his house and sheds so
that if the fire came, it would be stopped by the
ploughed ground, .s there would then be nothing
more to burn. But the farmer had set apart the
thirtieth day of the month for this job, and he would
not do it sooner. What he wanted to do, he always
did, no matter if it did not seem best to other people.
We shall see whether he was sorry that he did not
plough sooner. The twenty-ninth had been set apart
for going to Valloosa to sell corn and to buy some
things they needed at home, and the mother was
going to spend a few hours with er dear mother, and
carry her some new butter and a fine squash for
Thanksgiving. Da was old enough to leave now. He
could take care of Bunch for a day, even though she
was such a fly-a-way!

So two of the strong horses were harnessed into the
big wagon, the wagon was filled with corn, and away
they drove, leaving the children to take care of each
other and the animals. All went on beautifully. Da
did his chores, while Bunch ran about with Ony and
kept out of mischief quite well for a fly-a-way. Soon
came dinner-time, and the children sat down to eat a
nice cold dinner, fixed beforehand by their mamma.
They sat a long time eating and playing, for they had
invited Ony to dinner, too, just for fun, and were
much delighted at the way he acted. They put him
into a chair and tied a bib under his chin and then
Da fed him with mush and milk out of a spoon, while



8 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND IVEST.

Bunch tried to hold his “hands,” as she called them,
to prevent him from rushing right into the big yellow
bowl of milk and gobbling it all up at once.

Suddenly, Bunch looked up and cried, “Oh, Da!
see! see!” and Da turning quickly and looking out of
the window, saw something that made his cheeks and
lips turn white. It was a prairie-fire, not ten miles
away. Da ran to the door and looked eagerly to see
if the fire was coming toward them. Bunch followed
him, and Ony, left to himself, plunged, bib and _ all,
into the milkbowl! What cared he for prairie-fires !
Yes, the fire was coming that way; the wind was
rising, as it always does when a fire comes, and in a
few minutes the great prairie all around them would
be in a blaze, for it takes a very, very short time for
a prairie-fire to travel a great distance; even a horse
cannot run so fast!

‘“O, why didn’t papa plough sooner?” said poor Da.
But there was no time for regrets, or for talking.
Something must be doze, and at once.

‘Here, Bunchie, you sit right down there, and don’t
you stir till I tell you,” said the brave boy, in such a
tone that the frightened little girl did not dare to
disobey. She sat down on the doorstep, and Ony
coming along just then (with his black face and feet
spotted with milk, so that now he looked like the rest
of his mother’s family, and with the bib dangling be-
tween his feet and tripping him every step), Bunch
threw her arms around him and hugged him tight



DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 9

till he squealed and struggled, so that she had to let
him go, when he sat down beside her and began to
lick the milk from his feet.

In the meantime, Da had run as fast as he could go
to the horse-shed. He knew that the only thing he
could do was to get with Bunch on the horse, and
when the fire came near the house to ride straight
through the flames on to the burned ground beyond.
If his father and mother had been at home, they might
have fought the fire back with wet brooms and bags.
But he could not do it alone. AJl he could do was
to save darling Bunch. He found the horse all right,
and hurried with him back to the house. Then he
tied Bunch on the horse’s back with a blanket, threw
an end of the blanket over her head and told her
to keep still. Then he sprang up behind her, clasped
his arms around her, and catching tight hold of the
reins, drove straight into the hot, roaring flames.
Brave boy as he was, he shrank from the scorching
heat as it singed his hair, burned his hands, and
almost blinded and choked him. But on went the
horse, leaping up high to get above the fiames, and
bounding over the prairie with terrific speed, brave
Da and little Bunch clinging breathlessly together
upon his back.

The farmer and his wife left Valloosa in good sea-
son, and drove homeward. As they came near home
they saw the smoke, and the farmer began to wish he
had put out his guards before. “O, why did I wait?



IO LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

I'll never wait again” he said, “if I can only get there,
Pll always plough in season after this!” When they
came still nearer, they saw that it would be only with
the greatest haste that they could reach home and
fight the fire back from their house. The sheds and
barns must go. ‘But where are the children? O,
why did I leave them!” said the mother in agony, as
they hastened toward their home. They urged the
horses on, and got there just in time to beat back the
fire from the house at great peril of their lives, every
minute thinking of the children, but not having time
to look for them.

Soon the fire swept by, leaving ruin where before
there had been plenty, and then the anxious father
and mother saw, slowly coming toward them over the
black burned ground, the grey horse, with almost
every hair burned off, carrying on his back what
looked like a very big bundle, but really was little
Bunch all safe and sound, and Da, very much burned,
and with a throat so dry that he could not speak
for many hours. But they were safe, and that was
enough. And what is this coming along behind them,
this little burnt fellow on four lame legs? It is Ony!
Ebony no longer though, but a rusty brown, with one
ear nearly gone and no tail left to speak of, —lame,
half-blind Ony!

Ony had followed Bunch, of course, as he always
did, and had even run after her through the dreadful
fire, and here he was home again. But what was this



DA, BUNCH AND ONY. II

around his neck? A string and a rag! The last of
the calico bib that Bunch had tied around his neck
before the fire came! Poor little faithful Ony! He
was not quite the same lively little fellow for a long
time, for he had to limp about, instead of trotting
along, and often would run into things, too, for one
of his eyes was hurt. Bunchie kept the piece of a bib
to remember the fire by and hung it on the “Home
Sweet Home” over the door. After a while Ony
grew strong and well and big and he always ran after
Bunch whenever he saw her, just like a dog, even
when he was grown up. But he never had to run
through any more fires, for after that, just as soon as
Autumn came and the grass grew dry, and the wind
began to blow the big round ‘tumble weeds” over
and over across the prairie, Da and his father took
the plough and the horses and ploughed all round
the house and the barns and the sheds, so that no
fire could ever come near them again.





BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY,

V'YBODY moves the first of May,
and so we must.”
So said little Bunch to Miss
, Penelope Cora, as she sat talking
wise" with her and Dolly Dikes in their
own little play-house, which was made of a big, strong
dry-goods box that a man had left there one day and
brother David had fixed for his sister. Da had made
two holes in it for windows, and all one side was the
door. Outside there was a real door-bell, and inside
areal room. On one side of the room was a shelf,
and in one of the corners a little, make-believe stove,
made out of a tin dipper turned upside down. On
the shelf were a round stone, the nose of a tin tea-
pot, half of a blue sauce-dish, the handle of an iron
spoon, the cover of a pepper-box, four wooden button-
moulds and the neck of a green glass bottle. In the
middle of the room was the table—a_ match-box,
covered with a piece of pink calico. Three chairs,
made of green pasteboard and with very weak legs,
stood stiffy against the wall.





BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY. 13

This was little Bunch’s play-house. At present, the
cups and saucers and plates and bowls and tureens
and spoons and all the other dishes (for those were
the veal names of the things on the shelf) were all
nicely washed and set in a row. The three weak-
legged chairs had just had their legs straightened,
“for the fifty’leventh time,” as Bunch said. Dolly
Dikes was sitting on the stove, the fire being out for
the day, and Miss Penelope Cora, in a scalloped white
gown, was gracefully leaning against the table, her
real hair tied with a pink ribbon, which you wouldn't
have known was a piece of the table-cloth if I hadn't
told you. Miss Penelope’s housework was all done,
and she and Dolly Dikes were “receiving” as they
used to do when they lived in New York, before
Bunch’s papa came out West to live and ‘“‘try to
begin life over again.”

New York was very different from Plum Creek;
and so was Boston; and Vermont too, where Grandma
lived; for in those places Bunch used to have a great
many little playmates — there were Ethel and Mar-
jorie and Beeze (whose real name was Louise) and
Emma and Emma’s little brother and Lena and baby
Francy and Madie and Altie and a good many more,
while here, off on the prairie, there were only Da and
the dollies and Ony the pig, except once in a while
when Louis used to ride over to see Da, which was
not very often, for Louis lived five miles away, in a
sod house just like Bunch’s home. So the little girl



14 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

had to play by herself most of the time and, as to-
day was the first of May, she was playing ‘“‘ move.”

But where was there a new house for Bunch’s family
to move into? That was a serious question, for there
was no other doll-house that they knew of for miles
around. And really there was nothing the matter with
this house, only it was the faskzow to move and sc
they must move.

The little girl crouse and thought for a long time,
and then, gayly enpping her hands, she said, “O, I
tell you what/ We need'nt move ow¢ of the house;
we can move zz the house,— house and all!”

This idea delighted her so that she danced wildly
up and down and round and round, while Miss Pene-
lope and Dolly Dikes nodded their heads in approval,
and the three poor chairs fell together in a heap on
the floor at the very thought.

To be sure! There was no rule about ow folks
move, only they must move. So the next day every-
thing was carefully packed in mamma’s starch-box,
and then the play-house and the box of things were
tied on Da’s sled, which had been made into a wagon
by turning it upside down. Da was to help, of course.
He would be the horse, and a fine one he was. But
after everything was packed and ready, Bunch sudden-
ly remembered that she hadn’t decided where to move
to. Da wanted to move down by the creek, but
Bunch thought that was too far from home. Then
Bunch wanted to move into the prairie-dog town, but



BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY. 15

Da said that the dogs would take Miss Penelope for
a root and eat her up. It was too cold on the hill
and too wet behind the barn. The children looked at
each other in despair. Where could they move to?
At last Bunch said: “ Let’s ask Dolly Dikes. She’s
very centsubble.”

Dolly Dikes sat in the wagon holding the reins all
ready to drive to her new home. As Bunch ran up
to her, she dropped one rein, and without saying a
word pointed straight to the place which they had
just left.

“She wants to go back,”' said Bunch, ‘she don’t
want to move at all. .

“Well, I think that zs the best place, Bunchie,”
said Da.

“But I wanted to move,” cried Bunch. It’s the
first of May, and ev'ydody moves.”

“T tell you what let’s do,” said Da, “we can move
all the same and play this is a new place. Don't you
see, Bunchie?”

“O, yes,” said the little girl, who was always ready
to make the best of everything, ‘‘so we can! And
we'll call it 557 West Fourteenth Street, instead of
143 Fifth Avenue.”

So the horse was harnessed into the wagon, Miss
Dolly took the reins again, and off they all went, Da
and Bunch side by side and Ony trotting along be-
hind the wagon. I suppose they realty went up Fifth
Avenue to Twenty-eighth Street, and then up to the



16 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

Forty-second Street Station, and so down to Fulton
Ferry, and then up again to 557 West Fourteenth
Street, though, of course, they seemed to be only run-
ning across the empty prairie and up and down the
rough hillocks and in
and out of the mounds
of the dog-town, with
their little ans
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bright faces shining in the
glow of the noonday sun.

And when at last they came back and
went to housekeeping in the new home,
as they called it, how much finer it seemed
than the old one! The sun seemed to shine in more
brightly through the windows and the garden was
surely much better and finer.

“This is a much better resindunce than our old

oy
shill Al
Bu i)





BUNCH’S MOVING DAY, 17

one, isn’t it?” said Bunch grandly, as she introduced
Miss Penelope and Dolly Dikes to their new home,
“for,” she sweetly added to Da, ‘‘of course it 7s a
new home, if we féay it is, isn’t it, Da?”





BUNCH’S FLOWER GARDEN.






UNCH wanted a flower garden,
x/ oh, so much! Her one sweetest memo-
) ry was of the beautiful garden at grand-
J ma’s, “way off” in Vermont, where she
had played when she was “littler than
now.” In this wonderful garden of grandma’s were
big white and red roses, great yellow marigolds, scarlet
poppies, feathered pinks, tiny lilies of the valley,
waving prince’s-feathers, sweet williams, china-asters,
bachelor’s-buttons, lady’s-slippers, candytuft, mignonette,
“bluebenas,” and, best cf all, a round bed of lady’s
delights. How Bunch loved them all! and how much
she wanted a garden just like this for her very own!

She did not fret about it though, for she was a
sweet little girl and tried not to trouble mamma, and
thus make her work all the harder. But it was too
bad that here in Nebraska there were no flowers to
speak of, only the tall, wild, yellow and blue flowers
that grow in the stiff prairie grass. There was not
even any real grass such as they have in Vermont:
all the grass around Bunch’s home was tall and stiff



BUNCHS FLOWER GARDEN. 19

and thick, and not a bit pretty. ‘Wild grass” they
call it, and the velvety grass that grows in Vermont,
and makes lawns and meadows, people out where Bunch
lives call ‘tame grass,” and sometimes they bring a
root all the way from the East to plant and keep very
choice as a great treasure. Bunch’s father had not
thought to do this, so there was not even any ‘“‘ tame
grass” for the little girl’s garden.

Bunch thought about her garden a good deal, but
she went on having as good a time as she could without
it. Sometime it would come, she knew. And one
day it did, but in a very different way from that she
had expected, as most good things do.

The top drawer of the bureau at Bunch’s house
was the post-office, and all the letters and papers that
were sent to the people of Plum Creek were put there
to be called for. Sometimes a circular or a pamphlet
would come, addressed only ‘“P. M., Plum Creek,
Nebraska,” and then Bunch, who always looked over
the mail, knew that it was meant for her father. For
she knew that “P. M.” meant ‘ postmaster,” and she
thought it meant nothing else. Once she was well
laughed at by brother David for this mistake. She
read in a book that ‘the train was to start at three
P. M.,” and she thought “three P. M.” meant ‘“ three
postmasters,” and asked Da about it. He laughed
and told her that “P. M.” doesn’t afwvays mean
“postmaster.”

Well, one day there came quite a large book ad-



20 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND VEST.

dressed to the postmaster. Bunch opened it eagerly,
and when she saw the covers she screamed with de-
light: “Oh flowers, flowers, look at the flowers |”
and, running to her father, she said: « O may I have
it, papa, say, may 1?” Her father was willing, so the
little girl clasped the book to her heart and. ran off
to be alone with her new treasure. The book was
Fick's Floral Guide, and many folks would have thrown
it into the waste basket. But Bunch was perfectly
happy with it. She pored over it all the rest of the
day, and when she went to bed her ‘flower book”
was under her pillow. Perhaps she dreamed about it.
At any rate, when she woke in the morning she had
a beautiful idea. She said nothing about it, not even
to Da, but as soon as the dishes were done, she bor-
rowed her mother's scissors and began to cut the
flowers out of the book, very carefully, so as not to
spoil them. It almost broke her heart when she had
to cut into a big rose that was on the other side of
a tulip, but she liked the tulip best and she couldn't
have everything ! By and by, the flowers were nicely
cut out and then she gathered them in her apron and
went softly out-of-doors.

Da had been working all the forenoon in the corn-
field, and when he came home to dinner Bunch met
him with dancing feet and beaming eyes. ‘Da, O Da!
come! look! see my garden!” And she led him to the
spot where her play-house stood, and there, beside it,
neatly stuck, one by one, on the long spears of prai-



BUNCH’S FLOWER GARDEN. 21

rie grass, were the paper flowers she had cut from
the big “flower book.” At first Da thought he szas¢
laugh, they looked so stiff and queer. But a glance
at his little sisters triumphant face prevented him.
So he only said, “Why, how nice! Did you do it
all yourself, Bunchie?”

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Ni gS vied an

fit fut

“Ves, I did it! It’s my garden! O [ve got a
garden at last!” And the little girl threw her arms
round Da’s neck and burst into tears of joy.

“Why, Bunchie, I didn’t know you wanted a garden
so much,” said the kind brother, kissing away the tears.

“O I did, I did! I almost thought I should cry



22 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

if I didn't have one. And it’s come, it’s come! Of
course it isn’t gzzte so good as truly flowers, ’cause
they smell,” she confessed, “but then my garden will
last always, and won't die like a truly one, will it, Da?”

“No, dear, but you'll have to take them in when
it rains,” laughed Da.

“OQ yes! and won't that be fun? Why, I can have
a new garden every day if I want to. I can change
them round, and — everything!” And with fresh de-
light the dear little thing danced around her “ garden
made out of a book.”

But Da began to think very seriously, and the re-
sult was that he did not spend the dollar that his fa-
ther gave him for sorting letters in the post-office for
a book as he had intended. And when the next
Christmas came, there came with it a package addressed,
“Little Blanche, care P. M., Plum Creek, Neb.”; and
in it were seeds and seeds and seeds! And, the next
summer, Bunch had a real flower garden, like the one
in Vermont; for Da had remembered this, too, and
had sent for marigolds and lady’s-slippers, candytuft
and prince’s-feathers, poppies and pinks and china-
asters and bachelor’s-buttons and lilies of the valley
and mignonette and ‘“bluebenas;” and “ best of all,”
said Bunch, “there is a darling little bed of lady’s
delights ’most ’xactly like grandma’s.”





HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME.

=/ VERY little boy with a very dirty
face and a very ragged jacket, a
tattered fur cap pulled down over
his ears, two cold hands in his
trousers’ pockets, and a pair of old
shoes much too big for him! Such

.- was Louis, when Mrs. Maxwell
found him. And he was screaming at the top of his
voice, “Extra! extra! Telegram, extra! Post, extra!”

It was late; nearly all the men had bought their
papers and gone to their warm homes. Louis could
not sell one. He had kept up his call for a long
time and now he began to grow discouraged and the
tears started in his eyes, for he knew that the five
cents in his pocket would not buy him a supper and
a bed to sleep in, too. This was the first day he



had tried being a newsboy, and somehow he hadn't
succeeded so well as the other boys. Before to-day
his mother had taken care of him, but last night she



24 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

did not come home at all and Louis knew he should
never see her any more. He had never had a father.
And now his mother was gone too. She used to be
very kind to him and give him bread and sometimes
cake. But they didn’t get much to eat. It cost a
great deal for their one little room, and even much
more for the dresses his mother must have to dance
in at the theatre. She must dance every night and
look bright and happy and pretty, while her heart
was breaking; and she would come home very late
and cry herself to sleep, and wish that she might die,
if only it weren’t for Louis. But now she was gone.
There had been a terrible fire the night before.
Louis had heard the alarms and had stood spellbound
at a distance and seen the big theatre all in flames.
He asked no questions, he did not even cry; he
knew that he should never see his mother again.

It seemed a year since that time, as now he stood
on the street-crossing, watching the other newsboys
running about playing with one another and quarreling
over the bits of cigar stumps or apple cores that they
found in the gutter. He had sold only two papers,
and it was almost dark. Just then he saw a lady
coming, and he thought he would try once more.
Perhaps the lady would like a paper. So he screamed
“Telegram! Extra!” quite courageously. The lady
was passing by without minding him when a look in
his little motherless face attracted her, and she stopped
and said, “You haven’t sold many, have you?” ‘No



HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 25

ma’am,” said Louis, ‘but perhaps I shall to-morrow.
I only began to-day.” But here his courage failed
and the tears came, for he was a very little boy, only
six, and not too big to cry yet.



The lady had three little boys of her own, and her
Allan was just Louis’ size. She did not like to see
little boys cry, and so she said quickly, ‘Here, my
dear, don’t feel so. Give me one of each kind of
your papers and tell me where you live. Perhaps I



26 LITTLE FOLKS EAST AND WEST.

can come and see your mother sometime. Would
you like to have me?”

But instead of being cheered by this, Louis now
began to cry in earnest, and between his sobs the
lady heard the words: ‘“‘ My —mother — is — gone — 1
—shall—never see her again.”

And then he tried not to cry, and looked up very
bravely, and thanked the lady for the two five-cent
pleces she gave him. But Allie Maxwell's mamma
could not bear to leave Louis yet. So she asked him
to come with her into the warm room in the station
where she was to take the train; and there he told
her his little story, and how he had become a news-
boy, because old Auntie, who kept the apple stand,
had told him to, and had given him the money to
start with. But Auntie could not take care of him.
She had a bad husband who would beat little boys,
and “sometimes he beats poor old Auntie, too,” said
Louis, with a clench of his poor little dirty fist.

Mrs. Maxwell could not help smiling, and then she
could not help sighing right afterward. For what
should she do with this mite? She didn’t want to
take him home and she couldn’t bear to leave him
there. At last she decided to take him home for
that night and talk it all over with Allie’s papa. So
Louis got on board the train and went to Mrs. Max-
well’s warm pretty home. And after such a supper
as he had never had before—bread and duéter and
two whole doughnuts and a piece of custard pie such



AIOIV LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 27

as he had sometimes seen in the windows but never
tasted, he was tucked into such a bed as he had
never seen before! When all the boys were fast
asleep, Mrs. Maxwell told her husband all about little
Louis and how she could not bear to leave him, but
still she didn’t see how she could take care of another
boy.

“T'll tell you what to do,” said Mr. Maxwell; send
him out West to Tom and Mary.”

“But he is so little. He could never go ‘way out
there alone.”

“©, yes, he can. There are always people enough
to look after a child.”

“Well,” said Mrs. Maxwell, “I know it would be a
splendid thing for him. And Tom wants a boy so
much. We'll talk with him in the morning.”

Brother Tom and his wife lived far away on the
plains of Nebraska. They had no children, and every-
body out there wanted to keep their own boys and
girls themselves, no matter how poor they were. Tom
had often written to his sister to find him a_ boy.
But Mrs. Maxwell had never yet seen a boy that she
thought good enough for her brother until she found
- Louis. Now Louis was just the one. He was bright
and loving and sweet—after the nice bath she gave
him. Yes, Brother Tom would like Louis.

And Louis was very glad to go after he heard of
the horses and cows and pigs and hens that were on
the wonderful farm; and how he could run about all



28 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

day and never see a gutter nor a high brick wall, nor
be almost run over by hacks and big express wagons
and horse-cars. And he need not sell newspapers any
more! After a few days Mr. Maxwell found a gentle-
man who was going West and who was willing to take
Louis as far as Omaha, where brother Tom would find
him. Louis had a nice new suit of clothes and a
basket of luncheon, and being very little he was so
happy at the thought of the horses and pigs that he
almost forgot that he was sorry to leave kind Mrs.
Maxwell.

He was very tired of riding before he came to Omaha,
though the cold chicken and doughnuts helped along
a good deal, and he was in constant delight at the
cows and sheep and the big hay-stacks and the beauti-
ful houses and the long trains of cars that they passed
on their way. But the last day he took a good many
naps, and began to wish for a good run out-of-doors.
And when the big brown Missouri river was crossed
and the cars came to a stop and Louis was taken in
the arms of the kind gentleman and lifted from the
car at Omaha, he was very glad. Here brother Tom
(‘‘Mr. Marsh” the gentleman called him, and Louis
soon learned to call him “ father”) took him in his
long, strong arms and carried him to another car, and
again away they went. This train went more slowly
than the other one, and after a while there were no
houses only once in a great way, and the grass was
very tall and there were bright yellow flowers every-



HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 29

where. They traveled all day and after a night spent
in a funny little room almost as small as where Louis
and his mother used to live, they started for “home.”

There were no more cars now, only wagons to travel
in. And so Louis, mounted on a big box with a heap
of straw all around his feet and legs to keep them
warm and with Mr. Marsh at his side, rode for miles
and miles across the lonely prairie with the wind al-
most blowing his breath away! How the big gray
horses strode along! And how the prairie chickens
flew up, up and away as they drove by! And how
the little prairie dogs peeped forth from their holes
and barked at them! On they went, through the long
grass, over the hills and down the dales, across the
brooks and past the queer little sod houses where the
rakes and hoes were stuck upon the roof and the
grass grew out of the walls; and where the barn was
so much like the house that Louis wondered which
one the folks lived in. So at last they reached home
and there was a sweet lady all ready to love Louis
and keep him good and true. Little ones forget; and
the pretty lady before long was “ mother” to our Louis,
and he loved her with all his heart.

All this happened seven years ago. Louis is now
a big boy of thirteen, but he has been happy every
minute since kind Mrs. Maxwell found him a home.
And last summer, when Mrs. Maxwell and Allan went
out West to see “brother Tom,” it was Louis who
went to the station for them and so carefully drove



30 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

over all the rough places. You would not have
known him for the sad, pale little boy of seven years
ago. His cheeks were rough and rosy, his arms
strong and his legs able to run almost as fast and as
far as old Towser, the big shepherd dog.






ae














ae ee a I
Hi tl a:
MN ONS

i

les Yd

Had you seen him as he came to meet them —
standing erect in the big wagon, driving the gray horses
swiftly down over the hills, his rubber cape flying be-
hind him in the wind, his cheeks rosy, his eyes bright,
his fair hair flying all about his face in wet curls, his



HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 31

cap dripping with the rain that was pouring in torrents,
laughing in glee at the fun of the wind and the rain
and the drive and everything,—he was so happy! —
and singing at the top of his voice “Hold the fort,
for 7 am-coming!” — you would have said, How much
better for Louis to live out here on the big, broad
prairie than to be a poor, ragged little newsboy in the
streets of New York!

WES













HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY.

Hickerty-Pickerty, my black hen,
She lays eggs for gentlemen,
Gentlemen come every day

To see what my black hen doth lay.’

?

Tuts is what old Grandma Grimes used to say, and
she said it to Mother Goose and then Mother Goose
told ws all about it. Well, when the black hen was just
one year old, Grandma Grimes, who lived away up in
Vermont, thought she would have a birthday-party for
her Hickerty-Pickerty. It was funny to celebrate a
hen’s birthday, wasn’t it? But, you see, Hickerty-Pick-
erty was such a nice hen that old Mrs. Grimes felt that
she. must do something to make her happy.

At first she only invited the “gentlemen who came
every day,” but these little gentlemen, who were about
ten or twelve years old, begged so very hard to be
allowed to bring their little sisters with them, that
Grandma said they might.

The next day came the nine little gentlemen, dressed
in their best, bringing with them nine little ladies all

35
«



36 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

dressed in their very best, too. In those days, when
Hickerty-Pickerty was young, little girls did not dress
as they do now. Instead of looped-up over-skirts, broad
sashes and crinkly hair, each little girl wore a blue or
a pink calico frock, a long-sleeved apron with a narrow



edge of tatting around it, and a big hat with a piece of
ribbon, called a bridle, fastened to it to hold on by and
to keep the hat from being carried off by Mr. Wind.
Their hair was cut short and parted neatly in the mid-
dle, and every one had on copper-toed shoes. As for
the boys, of course they had jackets with pockets, and



HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY. 37

trousers with pockets, and soldier caps and sailor caps
and red-white-and-blue neckties.

After Grandma Grimes had kissed them all and given
each a nice seed-cake with a plum on top, there was
still one little girl who all the boys said wasn’t ¢heir
sister. This girlie’s frock was torn and her shoes were
full of holes, and, instead of a hat with a pretty ribbon,
she had only a green cape-bonnet. But her blue eyes
shone and her pretty brown curls peeped out from
-under the green checked cape of her poor little bon-
net, and as she stood looking at Grandma and trying
with all her might to eat up her green bonnet-string,
she was a pretty and a funny little thing to see.

‘“Who are you, little girl?” said Grandma. “ My is
Altie” said thé cunning little thing, “My comed to a
party.” And then she went on trying to eat up her
green bonnet-string. ‘“It must be little Elsie that
lives ’way down town” said Grandma, ‘but she is wel-
come all the same.”

So Grandma gave her a seed-cake too, and she went
off to play with the rest; but there she found, oh, dear!
that the girls didn’t like her because she had shabby
clothes and that the boys were all too busy eating pea-
nuts and climbing the gate-posts to take any notice of
her.

So poor Elsie went away by herself, down the yard,
through the back gate to the barn, and nobody saw her
go and nobody missed her.

All this time Grandma Grimes was baking a big plate-



38 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

ful of apple-tarts and a tin pan full of ginger-snap
horses, dogs and elephants for her company. She set
the table under the smoke-bush and put on it the tin
cups and saucers and plates and the cunning tin tea-
pot that her little girl used to play with ever so many
years ago. And there was a blue cream-pitcher, too,
and a sugar bowl with a blue rose for a handle, and
some tiny knives and forks, just big enough to cut
up ginger-snaps and jelly-tarts.

When all was ready—and nice, creamy biscuits and
sweet molasses and water were not forgotten — old
Grandma Grimes rang the big dinner-bell, and the
children came trooping in. But, before they had din-
ner, Grandma had something to tell them. So when
she had said “hush” several times and they were
pretty quiet, she said: ‘‘You know, my dears, that
you came here to-day to see my black hen and her
wonderful egg. Now, she always comes off the nest
just as the bell rings for dinner, she’s such a wonder-
ful hen! So now, I want you to form a procession
and march around the yard to the barn and find the
speckled egg up high in the hay-loft and bring it
to me for my dinner, and each of you shall have a
taste. The little gentlemen know the way.”

‘Come on!” said Jamie, “I'll show you! I’ve been
there much as seventy-leven times.” So Jamie took
Ida by the hand and Harry took Florence and Emma
took ‘little brother” and the others marched after
them, all singing: “ Little fairy, light and airy,” until



HICKERTY-PICKERTY'S PARTY, 39

they came to the big old barn. Here there was a
ladder to climb and the children went up one by one
and stepped softly over the hay till they came to
Hickerty-Pickerty’s nest. But what was this in the
nest? A torn gown, a green cape-bonnet and a
bunch of brown curls! The poor little girl had fallen
asleep in the black hen’s nest.

“O, what a negg!” said Alfred, “and where's
Hickerty-Pickerty gone to?”



‘She must ha’ goed when her comed up,” said baby
Winnie.

“T shall just go and tell Grandma Grimes,” said Ida
proudly. ‘She won't like it, 7 know.

‘But she didn’t mean any harm,” said Eva, “and I
don’t believe Grandma will care a single bit.”

And Grandma didn’t care, for when the children
scrambled into the house and told her about it, she
laughed merrily and came to see. There lay little
‘“‘Altie,” fast asleep still; but where was the black



40 LITTLE FOLKS, LAST AND WEST.

hen? The children hunted all over the loft and they
talked so loud that at last they waked Altie, who looked
very much frightened and began to chew her bonnet-
strings very hard when she saw them all.

“Where's Hickerty-Pickerty?” they all asked in a
chorus.

“You pulled her off, you naughty thing,” said Bon-
nie.

“No, my didn’t, neiver,” said the tiny thing, still
eating up her bonnet-string, “her was cold, my keeped
her warm.”

“T should say so,” said Grandma, laughing, and she
lifted a corner of her frock and there found Hickerty-
Pickerty, looking as contented as if she had had little
girls for bed-fellows all her life.

After that, Altie was queen of the day. Grandma
carried her off in her loving arms and set her in a
tip-cart, and put a wreath of roses on her curls.
George was footman and Alfred and Harry and Ger-
ald made a nice tandem team, while Ida and Winnie
and Emma and all the rest were maids of honor and
pages to the queen. :

Then they all sat down to dinner, and Gerald and
Eva were host-and hostess and passed the nice things
round to their little guests. Last of all came barley-
candy-sticks and gum-drops and jujube-paste that “ pulls
out and makes more,” as Altie said. Then each had
a tin cup of lemonade and drank to the health of
Hickerty-Pickerty who was contentedly pecking at the



HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY. 41

corn and oats grandma had given her for a treat on
her birthday. She didn’t care for birthdays! But the
children did, and they had a happy time. The little
birds sang in the cherry-tree and the fairy men peep-
ed out of the blue-bells; and Altie sang a song
about a butterfly in a boat made of cobwebs, and
Alfred said a piece about a pig at a party.

At last all of them joined hands about the little
brown queen (who wasn’t poor any longer because
she was happy and they loved her) and they all sang
about the sweet rose-buds and the violets blue, who
send their love to me and you; the pretty birds and
the gardens gay, where the darling babies dance and
play. Then the party was over. They all kissed Al-
tie and filled her pocket and her apron with cookies
and carried her home the happiest little girlie in the
world,







ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT.

y7, LL we know now about little
Miss Muffit is what Mother
Goose has told us. She sat on
a ‘‘tuffet,” whatever that may
be, and I’m sure / don’t know,
but she “sat on a_tuffet,” so
Mother Goose says, ‘‘eating of curds and of whey,
when there came a BLACK SPIDER and sat down BESIDE
HER and FRIGHTENED Miss Muffit away. Now I sup-
pose you all want to know what happened after that,
and so here is the rest of the story.

After little Miss Muffit ran off home, the black
spider ate up all her curds and whey and built a nice
web over the bowl, so that when Miss Muffit came
back to get it, there sat Mr. Spider looking at her
with his many bright eyes. But this time she didn’t
feel frightened, and she wasn’t surprised when the
spider spoke to her and said, “Sit down, little girl,
and I will tell you a pretty story.” So she sat down





MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 43

on the tuffet and leaned her head in her hands
and gazed out over the great lake and listened to
the spider's story. This is what he told her: —
“Once upon a time, my dear,—long, long ago, be-
fore Mother Goose was born,—once upon a time
there were no little girls in the world. Everybody
was grown up, and the world was very still and sad.





rel Vales

¢ \ .
herr =



The people used to say, ‘Oh, if only we could have
some little things to pet and love, how happy we
should be.’ So they went to petting cats and dogs
and birds, for every one must have something to love
and care for. ‘

‘Now, there was a good, beautiful princess who lived



44 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

in a glass palace, and she wanted a little pet, too, —
but she must have something nicer than a cat or a
dog—so she sat down and thought and thought, till
she thought it all out, and she knew that what she
wanted was a little pet just like herself, only small
and cunning and sweet. But how could such a thing
be made?

“She looked in all her gilded receipt-books and read
every history and story-book that she could find.
But no such thing was spoken of. At last she re-
membered that somewhere she had once heard of a
wonderful magician who ‘could do everything. So she
sent heralds all over the world to find him, and late
one night he came riding up to her castle on a
snow-white pony. He was a very little man and his
hair was long and of a bright red color, and in his
hand he held a long white wand tipped with a gold-
en star. The princess took him into her parlor and
gave him some pink tea and plum cake, and then told
him what she wanted.

“*Ah!? said the magician, ‘you want a little one
like yourself.’

“<«Ves,’ said the princess, ‘something to love and
pet, —not like a dog—something that will love me,
too, and that will always be my darling.’

“The magician shut his eyes and buried his face
in his hands to think. Seven days and nights he sat
thus and did not speak, only muttered now and then
some unknown words; and he would eat nothing but a



MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 45

piece of sugar every day, and drink a glass of straw-
berry lemonade.

“At last he arose and calling the princess, bade her
bring him a gold kettle and a silver ladle, and when



she had done this, he asked for some sugar and cin-
namon and nutmeg and lemon-juice and citron and
raisins and molasses candy and ice-cream and mince
pie, and when these were brought, he mixed them up



46 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

together in the gold kettle and stirred them with the
silver ladle and sang this song three times over it

all: —
‘ What are little girls made of ?

What are little girls made of?
Sugar and spice,

And all things nice,

That’s what little girls are made of.’

“Then the old magician took a rose-leaf and laid
it on the top of this wonderful mixture, and two
little blue violets by its side. Then he called me
from under the door-mat, for J am 10,000 years old
and remember all about it, and told me to weave
my nicest web about the gold kettle. I weaved
about and about for a whole day, and then bit off
my thread and waited to see what would happen.
The magician then waved his hand over the whole
and said :—

‘ Sugar and spice
And all things nice
Make us a sweet little girl again.’

And there, right before me, stood the dearest little
thing, all silver and gold, with violets for eyes and
roses for cheeks and gold-colored hair, while my brown
web had turned to a dress of finest silk.

“She screamed quite naturally when she saw me,
and ran to the princess for protection, as every little
girl has done ever since in all the world; though I



MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 47

don’t see. what there is about me to frighten them.
I'm sure I love them dearly, and have often spun
webs in the sunshine on purpose for their pleasure.

“Now, when all the people saw this little dear they
also wanted one, and the magician became very busy
in making little girls for everybody. The princess
and all the rest were full of joy and rewarded the
good old man more than he had dreamed of.

‘Now,’ said they, ‘we have something real to love
and it will always be little and we can always pet and
fondle it.’

‘But we can never be quite happy! By some mis-
take, the candy-man had sent some jujube-paste with
the molasses candy, and the magician did not discover
it, and so the little girls could not stay little, but
stretched up and grew tall and large like the older
people after a while. But, on the whole, their friends
were glad, for it is not best always to be a little
girl.”

The spider’s story was over, and little Miss Muffit
jumped up and ran home, after thanking the kind, old
spider and telling him she would not be afraid of him
any more.

The next morning (for all this happened in the
night, you see), little Miss Muffit told her mamma
all about the spider and the candy-man and the
beautiful princess and the sweet little girl; and as
she jumped out of her crib, and put on her shoes
and stockings, she said, ‘‘Mamma, I hope there is



48 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

lots of jujube-paste in me, don’t you? for I want to
grow up big, right away quick, so I can have a great,
long dress like yours, mamma, and play on the pin-
anner same as sister, and oh — lots and lots of
things!”





THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN,

“Three Wise Men of Gotham
Went to Sea in a Bowl.”

O says Mother Goose, but she never
told us who the wise men were, or
why they went to sea in a bowl, or
what they did when they got there,
and it is only a little while ago that
we found all this out.

The three little wise men lived in
Gotham, which was Mother Goose's
name for the great city of New York,
and their names were Bobby Shafto,
Peter Piper and Simple Simon. They
went to sea in a bowl because they
had heard of a magic fish, a golden
fish with silver scales, and they wanted to catch him
and put him in their museum.

Mother Goose had told them that if they could
only catch this wonderful fish they would be the
wisest and richest little men in the whole world. So
Bobby Shafto and Peter Piper and Simple Simon





50 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

agreed that they would help one another to catch the
magic fish, and the only way to do this was to go to
sea in a bowl.

Well, at last the bowl was ready and the great day
arrived. The big bay of Gotham was dotted with




ts

little boats filled with people waiting to see these
three little wise men as they got on board their bowl
and pushed off toward the open sea. The bowl was
the largest one they could find in Gotham, and was



THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN. SI

made of blue porcelain painted with red and yellow
and green figures of horses and chariots and ships
and elephants and trees and people. The three little
wise men were all very fat and had to sit pretty close
together to keep from tipping the bowl, so it was not
as comfortable as it might have been.

Bobby Shafto sat at the helm and Peter Piper
tended the paddle, while Simple Simon opened his
big telescope and searched into the water for the
golden fish with silver scales. It was a part of
their plan that nothing should be eaten till they
arrived at their first stopping place,—a coral island
at the entrance of Silent River, about three hundred
miles east of Gotham —and not a word should be
spoken till their journey’s end, for fear of frightening
away the magic fish.

The three little wise men had each brought a wise
story-book and held it open on his knee, so that he
might spend every spare moment in reading. Bobby’s
book was called “ Afloat and Ashore,” Simon’s was
‘Two Years before the Mast,” and Peter Piper had a
book written by himself which he thought he would
call “ Five Pickled Peppers.”

Simple Simon was so enchanted with the wonders
that he saw through his telescope that he found no
time to read. He saw many beautiful things— huge
whales puffing and snorting, porpoises gliding at their
side, and white jelly fish floating on the top of the
waves. He saw that the big fish were always eating



52 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

up the little fish, while they in their turn ate the flies
and water-snakes, and all were happy. The long
grass waved in and out among the rough rocks, and
the little hard barnacles creaked as the waters rushed
over them. The moss and waving grasses made many
a beautiful nook among the coral beds, and Simple
Simon was quite sure that once he saw a mermaid
combing her green hair with a golden comb and wip-
ing the salt tears from her eyes with the tip of her
scaly tail. The big sharks glared at the three little
wise men with hungry eyes, and once a swordfish
tried to pierce the bowl with his long sharp sword.

Meanwhile, Bobby Shafto sat at the helm and
watched the sea-birds and the lights glimmering from
the tall light-houses, and steered the bowl safely
through the deep waters, and Peter Piper paddled,
and watched the sea and the wind.

Thus they rode on for seventeen days, and then they
reached the mouth of Silent River and landed on a coral
island covered with trees and birds, and had a supper
of doughnuts and apple-turnovers and hot peanuts.

The next morning they started again, and for
many days silently glided over the waves. Simple
Simon saw many beautiful fishes, large and small, but
not one of ‘gold with silver scales.” Bobby Shafto
had read his book through nine times, and_ twice
backwards; and Peter Piper had written and re-written
his poem until even he was tired of it, and still their
journey did not end.



THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN. 53

At length, one night, Simple Simon, tired of gazing
so long into the sea, laid down the telescope and
went to sleep. Bobby Shafto caught it up, and had
scarcely put it to his eyes before he saw, following
the boat as if unable to escape from it, the magic
fish! Bobby need only reach forth his hand to grasp
the fish around its body.

But now came a wicked thought into Bobby’s mind.
If he could gain the magic fish without his friends’
. knowing it, then he, and he alone, would be the
wisest and richest little man in the world, and would
not need to share his wisdom and riches with his
friends, Peter and Simon.

With this wicked wish to cheat his companions, he
leaned gently forward and caught the fish firmly in
both hands; but in doing this he had let go the
helm, and as Peter was paddling rapidly, before Bobby
could quite catch the fish, or Simon awake, or Peter
turn his head to see, the blue bowl was driven upon
a coral reef and smashed into a thousand pieces.

And

“Tf the bowl had been stronger,
My story ’d been longer.”















WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE FAY.

“ily-cup lived a dear
little fay. Her gar-
ments were of silver,
and her bright, curling
\ hair shone like the
river in the moonlight.
She had wings on her
little feet and wings
on her little shoulders,
and around her tiny
waist she wore a bright
scarf of crimson embroidered with silver lilies. The
little fay was beautiful, but the little fay was sad; for
that morning, just as the sunbeams touched the
petals of her lily-cup and brightened with gold every
dew-drop, a great misfortune had befallen her. The
yellow spider, whose web had been her constant cov-
ering and shelter from the night dew, had curled up
as if in pain, and fallen from her lily resting-place.





58 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST:

The little fay could not tell what had befallen her
friend — only she felt that she was gone and that no
more would the bright web be spread above her bed
every night. So the little fay wept tears of sadness,
and could not be glad at the bright sun and the
shining morning.

Meanwhile the harebells in the garden were ringing
glad songs, and the sweet white violet was peeping at
her purple sister by her side, and the big sunflower
was welcoming the day, shaking her yellow hair and
sprinkling all the flowers with dew. But the little fay
saw none of this, for her eyes were dim with tears.

At last the whole world of flowers was awake, and
every head was raised to catch the sweetness of the
morning air. The lark came fluttering down from his
morning concert and sang a welcome to the blooming
little world, and the yellow butterfly, sailing to and
fro, kissed the lips of the rose and bade her good-
morning. All the world was beautiful, and all the
world was glad, except the little fay. Still she wept
in her lily-cup and would not look above its rim at
the blue and golden day. .

By and by the sun, mounting higher and higher,
burned away the web above her bed and smiled a
kind welcome to her. There lay the little fay, her
eyes red with weeping and her silvery robe tumbled.
Silly thing! she had not even reached forth her hand
to catch the dew-drop all ready for her morning drink,
but had let it dry and be lost.



WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE FAY. 59

The big sun laughed at her, and said: “ What is
the matter with my little daughter this bright day?
Look! all the flowers are glad and gay, and still you
lie here in sorrow.” But the little fay hid her face
in her crimson scarf and did not answer.

Then the sun looked
around for some one who
could comfort his little
girl, and he saw a brown
butterfly sipping honey
from the white rose. He
spoke to him, and the
butterfly flew straight to
the lily-cup, and bending
over its edge whispered
to our little fay: “Come,
wake. up; dearie! See
how the poor lily faints
beneath your weight; see
how the dew-drops are
all wasted because you
have not done your morn-
ing work; see how the
spider's web is burned up,
because you were not
awake to lay it safely away!”

Then the little fay was ashamed, and she lifted her
head and smoothed her hair from her eyes, and throw-
ing her arms around the brown butterfly, she mounted





60 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

his back, few to the brook, washed her pretty face
and hands and ate her breakfast of honey and dew.
All the flowers were glad to see her, for they had
begun to miss her. She it was who, early in the
morning, always waked them with soft pinches, brushed
the dew from their petals with her wings, and sang to
them that the sun was up and all the world was glad.

Now she flew from one to the other asking forgiv-
ness, and she whispered a pretty story in the white
violet’s ear and kissed the red rose good morning.
The big sunflower greeted her with a loud “Good
day,” and she sat and swung on his long spikes, and
played with the flies and midges as they sailed by.

Thus all day she played and smiled, and made
the garden happy with her songs, and all the flow-
ers said, ‘What should we do without our little
fay?” Do not think that she had forgotten her sor-
row —no indeed! She had only resolved that it was
better not to trouble others with it. But when the
flowers had gone to sleep, and the frogs began to
sing, she crept to her lily, and nestling there, wept
again, and promised the lily that she would always
love her friend the spider, but never, never let any
one know.

By and by the moon came up, and creeping slowly
over the garden, looked down into the lily-cup and
saw the little fay fast asleep. The moon smiled on
her tear-drops and loved her the more because she
could be sad as well as gay.



WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITILE FAY. 61

So the night went by and when the sun again
laughed out of the sea, the little fay awcke and
jumped up smiling from her bed. But what did she
see? The dear old web again stretched above her,
golden in the morning light, and her friend, the
spider, looking at her with the kind old glance. She
had imagined all her sorrow after all, for the spider
had only gone on a journey, and had not waited to
tell her. She sang with joy, and spreading her wings,
flew up through the light web to the clear air. And
the sun was up, and all the world was glad.





LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND.

—



VERYONE else in the house was

fast asleep except little Louise,
no, I mean little “ Loubeeze,” for
that is what our baby calls herself,
and so we all call her “ Beeze”
for short. Little Loubeeze, you see, was keeping
awake as hard as she could, so that she might see
Jack Frost, when he came tapping at the window —
as Aunt Marthy said he always did on a very cold
night, like this. Her little pink toes were nestled
deep down in the blanket, and her yellow curls were
tossing about, as she twisted and turned, to keep her-
self awake. She said “ Jack and Jill,’ and the “Five
Pond Lilies,” over and over again, and at last she
thought she would “make carpets,” as she had often
done before, with sister Lena.

Lena was fast asleep now, and Beeze must make
carpets alone. So she shut her eyes tight, and pressed
her little fat fingers against her eyelids, not hard, so
as to hurt, but just hard enough to keep out the





LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 63

light and make the “carpets” come; and, with her
face deep down in the pillow, waited to see what
would happen.

First, all was dark, but pretty soon a bright circle
of light came, and it grew larger and larger, until it
seemed to fill the whole world. Inside this big circle
were lots of bright-colored little circles, like round
mats on the bright carpet. Did you ever see a kal-
eidoscope? Well, it was something like that, only the
carpets were prettier, and did not last so long. Beeze
only had time to say ‘Oh how pretty!” before this
carpet was gone, and another had come, and so on.

To-night, the carpets were prettier than ever, and
she was so pleased with them that she had forgotten
all about Jack Frost, when something happened that
never happened before, in making carpets.

The carpet was now bright green, covered with
white dots, and suddenly, right in the middle, some-
thing began to grow upward. It did not come from
the outside, but suddenly popped up right through
the middle of the carpet, and began to grow and
grow, until, in about three seconds, it was a fine tree,
all covered with pink and white blossoms.

And now, on the very top of the tree, came a little
scarlet and black thing, that tossed its head and
opened its mouth, as if it would like to swallow the
world.

‘Oh, oh!” whispered the little girl, “it is a birdie,
a booful birdie!” So it was, and singing, too, at the



64 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND IWEST.

top of its voice, though it was so far away that Beeze
_ could only see it sing. But this was only the first of
many wonderful things. Before the birdie had ceased
his song, there came running toward the tree, a little
brown boy and a little
pink girl, carrying a bright
yellow pail between them.
They set the pail down
under the tree, and began
to talk and play together,
as Beeze knew by their
looks and motions. But
she could not hear a word,









they were so
far away, so |
very far away.
The little boy
wore a long
brown. bib-
apron, and the |
little: girl.a..-"
pink-checked
frock; and pretty soon the boy took two apples and
a doughnut from his pocket, and the girl unrolled a
big piece of paper, and found two sticks of candy





LITTLE LOUVBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 65

and a seed cake. They sat down, she on the big
water pail, and he on the green grass, and ate up
every bit.

Then they brushed off the crumbs, and hand in hand,
the boy carrying the pail alone this time, they skipped
away, off the carpet, out of sight. Where did they go?
Beeze looked, and looked, but they were gone, and
had left nothing behind them but the brown bib-apron
which the little boy had dropped when he wiped his
sticky face and hands, and then had forgotten all about
it.

All this time the carpet was changing, much faster
than I can tell you. The light green had become dark
green, mixed with brown; the pink and white blossoms
had fallen from the tree. The bright bird, looking
down through the green leaves, had spied the brown
bib, and flying down, had caught it in his bill, and
flown with it up into the topmost branches.

Then all at once, there were the little boy and girl
again, this time bearing a basket of flowers. Beeze
knew them by their sweet faces, although the pink
frock was changed to a long pink gown, and in place
of the brown bib, there was a dark brown coat. She
thought they must have come back for the brown bib,
and she spoke right out and said:

‘“Look up in the tree!”

But they did not hear, they were so far away! And
the birdie in the tree had made a nest of the brown
bib, and it was full of speckled eggs! Slowly the boy



66 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and girl walked away together out of sight, and the
green carpet changed to brown, and the leaves on the
tree grew red and yellow, and began to fall.

Then the carpet grew browner, the branches of the
tree were bare, and the brown nest looked lonely, in
the topmost branch. White specks fell over every-
thing, until the carpet became a beautiful white, fluffy
mass, out of which the tree stood, tall and dark.

The brown nest was full of snow; and ‘ Little Lou-
beeze” felt like crying when she saw how cold and
lonely it looked, when suddenly, a_ bright light shone
over the carpet, and made it sparkle like a carpet of
diamonds, and a great many people came running and
dancing over it, toward the old tree. Beeze saw
among them a pink hood and a pair of brown mittens,
and then she knew her own boy and girl, though
they were muffled in furs and shawls, and their hair
was the color of the white carpet. Then she saw the
rest of the people gather round these two, and hug
and kiss them, and form a ring and dance around
them, until they were tired from very fun and laugh-
ter. The carpet of snow seemed to laugh too, as it
sparkled in the light.

Suddenly there was a noise overhead, and the brown
nest fell to the ground, at the feet of the pink lady,
and the brown man picked it up, and looked at it, and
then laughed, and then the lady laughed, and Beeze
seemed to hear him say, as he held it up, to show
them all:



LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 67

“ Here is that brown bib-apron, I lost so long ago.
Don’t you remember, mother? when we were chil-
dren?” And they all gathered around, and Beeze
wished she could hear what they said. But she couldn't,
they were so far away. So she watched them, until
they went away, and the light went away too, and
she was left alone, with the white carpet, and the
tree. Not even the nest was there now.

She grew tired of watching, the carpet did not change
any more, and at last she raised her head, and rubbed
her eyes. It was morning! She had not seen Jack
Frost after all, for he had come while she was dream-
ing, and had painted 7s carpets on the window panes.
She wanted to cry, but she remembered the beautiful
things she had seen, and so she laughed instead, and
running into mamma’s room, she cried:

“OQ, mamma, I did see fairyland! But, mamma,
it was so far away /”









HE short winter day is over. The

sun, so unwilling to give any
warmth all through the day, has
gone to bed behind the row of
white hills. Just for a minute he
leaves a red glow on the clouds,
as a sort of good-by, and then the
gray twilight shuts down.

It is very cold. The frost fairies
begin to trace their pictures on
the window-panes, and the men and women are hurry-
ing homeward, shutting close the doors and putting
more wood on the fires. The babies are cuddled up
warm in their mammas’ arms, or tucked snugly down
under the blankets. Even the kitties are glad to stay





HOW ®HE MOON GOT HER HALO. 69

in and warm their toes by the fire. Nobody wants to
be out-of-doors to-night. .

Nobody, did I say? Yes, there is somebody, — the
moon! As the sun goes down, she peeps above the
horizon, just as round as he is, and almost as warm.
Certainly she is a great deal more rosy and jolly than
he has been to- day. She is happy to be out-of-doors
to-night, for it is one of the longest nights_of the
year. Up out of the blue water she comes, slowly
sailing up the eastern sky,— queen of the night and
of the stars.

And how lovely the world is that she sees beneath
her,— the rolling ships and gleaming lighthouses, the
long, quiet beaches, the frosty hills and the frozen
rivers, and, best of all, the great city. Here the
moon sees many strange sights, and it is a long time
before she discovers why it is that all the houses
where the rich folks live are so wonderfully lighted
up. Then she remembers that it is Christmas-eve.
The rich Boston people are having Christmas parties
and Christmas trees for their children. The churches,
too, are lighted; and the people are going back and
forth, running fast to keep warm, laden with baskets
and bundles and lanterns and rocking-horses and dolls
and baby-carriages and trumpets and drums and books
and whips and cornucopias of candy and bright-colored
glass globes and festoons of evergreen, all to hang
upon the trees for the children.

This makes the moon happy, for she knows what



70 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

Christmas means, and she is glad when the people
remember it. She smiles brightly, but suddenly grows
very sober, for she sees something that ought not to
happen on Christmas-eve.

A little girl, very small and very thinly dressed, her
bare feet and hands blue with the dreadful cold, is
kneeling on the top of the marble steps of one of the
houses and trying to look through the curtains at the
warmth and happiness within.:

She cannot see very much, but what she can see is
so beautiful that she almost forgets her cold and
hunger. Suddenly the door opens, and a man comes
out. He is dressed like the men who sit on the
tops of fine carriages, and he carries a whip in his
hand. The child jumps up in fear; and then the man,
who had not seen her till then, seizes her by the arm,
and threatening to strike her if she doesn’t “clear
out,” thrusts her off the steps into the street. Oh,
how dreadful, how dreadful it is! The moon _ hides
her face behind a cloud, and the whole world grows
dark.

A minute later the moon looks out again. Where
is the poor little child now? The door of the great
house is still open, and a long line of light streams —
out over the snow. The door-way is crowded with
people, and down at the bottom of the steps kneels
a beautiful little girl. She is talking to the poor child
and trying to make her stop crying; for the rough
man had hurt her, and her cry of pain had been



HOW THE MOON GOT HER HALO.





72 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

heard by the company in the parlor. A finely dressed
lady hurries down the steps, saying, ‘“ Madie, Madie,
come back!” and then she beckons to the coachman
to come and “take that ragged child away.”

But Madie clings fast to the little girl’s hand; and

as the lady, with a stern look, bends over her, she



says, ‘Why, mamma, she is crying! and see how she
shivers. Please let me take her into the parlor.”
And then, as her mother still frowns, she says,
“Mamma, gow wouldn't like to be out here in the
cold.”

The mother is silent; and Madie, still holding fast
the poor little girl’s hand, leads her through the
crowd of people into the beautiful room, where it is
light and warm, and where there is something so good
to eat! And it is all for her,—the poor, little,
ragged child! She can hardly believe it. Oh, how
beautiful, how beautiful it is! The moon looks through
..@ curtains and sees the two happy little girls and



HOW THE MOON GOT HER HALO. 73

the people around them, led by the love of the child
to see what Christmas-eve really means.

‘“Yes, it means something more than presents and
Christmas-trees and a good time,” says the smiling
moon. She says it so loud that the stars hear her
and nod back to her. ‘ Yes, indeed,” they sing, “ Yes
indeed, help one another, help one another.” And
the little white cloud, sailing by on the wind, catches
the moon’s happy smile, turns it into rainbows, and
makes a halo round her kind old face.








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A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO.

A's WAY off in the beautiful country

\ of Greece, a long, long time
ago, there lived a little maiden,
the daughter of a king. Her
name was Gorgo, —not a very
pretty name, perhaps, to us who are used to calling
little girls “Ida,” and “Ethel” and ‘Marjorie,’ but a
strong name, and therefore just the name for this little
maid,—as you shall see.

In those old times there used to be many wars,
and the country of Sparta, the part of Greece where
Gorgo lived, was famous for its brave soldiers, who
never thought for a moment of themselves when their
country was in danger, but would always stand ready
to fight for their dear native land.

Sometimes these were not good wars, but wars for
revenge, instead of for freedom and for loyalty to
beautiful Greece. Some wicked man would be angry at
an injury he had received, and in order to revenge
this injury he would go about among the different
kingdoms and persuade the rulers to join with him





78 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and try to overcome his enemy ; and then there would
be a terrible war in order to satisfy one wicked man’s
wicked wish.

Aristagoras was such a man as this. He did not
like the king and wished to become king himself in-




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Suen 6G
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stead. So one day he came to Sparta, and tried to
persuade King Cleomenes, the father of little Gorgo,

to help drive the rightful king away and put himself
on the throne.

He talked with the king a long time. He promised



A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO. 79

him power and honor and money if he would do as
he wished; more and more money, and, as the king
refused, still more and more money he offered, and at
last King Cleomenes almost consented.

But it happened that when Aristagoras came into
the presence of the king, the king’s little daughter
was standing by his side with her hand in his. Aris-
_ tagoras wanted Cleomenes to send her away, for he
knew very well that it is much harder to persuade a
man to do something wrong when there is a dear
little child near by. But the king said, “No, say
what you have to say in her presence, too,” and so
little Gorgo stood by her father’s side, looking up into
his face with her innocent eyes and listening intently
to all that was said.

She felt that something was wrong, and when she
heard the strange man offer her father money and
honors, and saw her father look troubled, and cast
down his eyes, she knew that Aristagoras was trying
to make her father do something he did not quite
want to do. So she stole her little hand softly into
his, and said: —

“Papa, come away, come, or this strange man _ will
make you do wrong.”

This made the king feel strong again, and clasping
the little maid’s hand tightly in his own, he rose and
left the bad man who had tempted him to do wrong,
and went away with the child who had saved him
and the country from disl-onor.



80 LITTLE FOLKS, HAST AND WEST.

Gorgo was only ten years old then, but she was
worthy to be a king’s daughter because, being good
and true herself, she helped her father to be good and
true also.

When she grew to be a woman Gorgo became the
wife of a king, and then she showed herself as noble
a queen as she had been a princess. Her husband
was that King Leonidas who, you remember, stood in
the narrow pass of Thermopyle with his small army
and fought back the great hosts of the Persians until
he and all his brave band were killed.

But before this happened, there was a time when
the Grecians did not know that the great Persian army
was coming to try to destroy them, and a friend of
theirs who was a prisoner in the country where the
great Xerxes lived, wishing to warn the Spartans of
the coming of the Persians, so they might prepare,
sent a messenger to King Leonidas. But when the
messenger arrived all he had to show for his message
was a bare, white, waxen tablet. The king and all
the lords puzzled over this strange tablet a long time,
but could make nothing out of it. At last they began
to think it was done in jest and did not mean any-
thing,

But just then the young queen Gorgo said: “Let
me take it,” and after looking it all over she said ;
“There must be some writing underneath the wax!”

They scraped away the wax from the tablet, and
there, sure enough, written on the wood beneath, was



A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO. SI

the message of the Grecian prisoner and his warning
to King Leonidas that the great Persian army was
coming.

Thus Gorgo helped her country a second time, for
if the Spartans had not known that the army was
coming they could not have warned the other king-
doms and perhaps the Persians would not have been
conquered. But, as it was, Leonidas and the other
kings called their armies together and when the Per-
sian army appeared the Greeks were ready to meet
them and to fight and die for their beautiful Greece.

So this one little maid who lived hundreds of years
ago, a princess and a queen, helped to save her
father from disgrace and her country from ruin. And
we may feel sure that she was strong and true always,
even when her brave husband, Leonidas, lay dead in
the fearful pass of Thermopylae, and she was left to
mourn alone in the royal palace at Sparta.







we
ae = ea
ae



A LITTLE MAID OF TO-DAY.



HERE is a little girl I

know who thinks she is
_ of no use in the world.
/ She is always wishing

that she might do some

great thing; and when
she hears that one of her schoolmates has done some-
thing very nice, she always wishes that she had done
it, and mourns that she can “never be or do any-
thing like other girls.” She never thinks of what she
2s doing every day. So we always call her “ Little
Do-Nothing.”

“Why cannot / paint a wild rose like Jennie, or
play a piece on the piano like Maud?” she said to
me one day; and when I replied, ‘“ Because you have
not tried, Lena,” she said, “But I couldn't if I did
try. Everybody but me can do things. /’m of no.
use, Auntie.”

She looked up at me so sorrowfully that I wanted
to comfort her. So I took her upon my lap (though
she is almost too big for that now) and said to
her : —







A LITTLE MAID OF TO-DAY. 83

‘“Now, Lena, try to think if there is not something
you do that is worth while. Tell me just what you
do every day.” After a minute the little girl
began :—

“ Why, I wipe the dishes, and make my bed, and
set the table, and —I guess that’s all.”

‘“Well, even that is something,” I said; “ but don’t
you help take care of grandma, and get her supper
for her when Mamma is away ?”

“Oh, yes!” said Lena; “but that isn’t anything.
Of course I do that.”

‘““And don’t you go to school, dearie ?”

“Why, yes, I go to school; but everybody does
that.”

“And don’t you get a good lesson almost every
day ?”

‘Teacher says so,” modestly replied “Little Do-Noth-
ing.”

‘“But I suppose all this amounts to nothing, doesn’t
it? You want to do something grand! that Is’ df)
isn’t it, dear 2”

“JT never thought ¢kose things were anything,” she
said ; “of course I do those, because I want to help
Mamma and learn something at school.”

‘And I suppose you think ‘everybody’ does that
too, don’t you, Lena?”

Lena saw that I was laughing at her, but could
not see the reason why; and I did not wish to tell
her that not all little girls wazt to help their mam-



84 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

mas and learn their lessons. So I only kissed her
and rocked her in my arms like a baby, — this sweet
little girl who thought she was cf no use in the
world.

After that, I used to watch when she was not look-
ing, just to see the little things she would do that
she thought of ‘‘no account.” And I will tell you
about one day, which was very much like all other
days. After doing all the little things she could to
help, and playing with baby Francis till he forgot
what it was to cry, Lena started to do an errand at
the grocery store. I happened to be going out too,
and so I went with her. She always told me all her
little troubles, and this day she said, just as we left
the gate :—

« Auntie, Ethel has made her dolly a whole new
suit. I wish I could sew as nicely as Ethel does.”

I did not say anything, for just then we heard a
great laughing and shouting, and a poor, ugly, little
yellow dog ran toward us, followed by a crowd of big
boys. I caught Lena’s hand and tried to draw her
out of the way, but she left me, and running toward
the dog, she knelt down, threw her apron over him,
and kept him there till the boys had gone by. I was
afraid that the dog might bite her, and said: “ How
did you dare to go up to him so, Lena? I would
not.”

“Oh, that’s nothing!” said she; “I wasn’t going
to let him get hurt, of course!”



4 LITTLE MAID OF T>-DAY. 85

Presently we came to a store window where there
were ribbons and laces, and Lena stopped and looked
in.

“Anything you want, dear?” J] asked, smoothing
her pink check.

“I was wondering,” she replied, “if Rosie's papa
would tell her how sick Mamie Gray is, so she could
go and see her. Would you tell him, Auntie?”

Of course I went with the dear little girl while she
sent the message,

A little way farther we saw on the ground a little
brown bird trying to learn to fly. He had fluttered
along from the tree into the middle of the sidewalk,
where people could hardly help treading on him. In-
deed, I did not see him at all; but Lena did, and
quickly picked him up and set him inside the fence,
almost before I knew what she was doing. Just then
some of her schoolmates came riding by, and when
they saw her they invited her to take a ride with
them to the beach. My little girl wanted to go, for
she loves the sea; but after a moment’s hesitation she
said : —

“I want to go ever so much, but I promised Mam-
ma to come straight home and take care of Francy.”

If I had not been with her the dear little thing
would have lost her ride, but I told her to go, while
I went home and told her mother and took her place
by Francy’s cradle. And on my way home I thought
a great deal about Lena, and made up my mind that



86 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

she should not go on any longer thinking she did
nothing of value, when, in one day, she had done
more vea/ things than Ethel and Jennie and Maud
all put together.

So when we were all seated at the supper table, —
Lena and I side by side, —I said I wanted to tell a
story. And I told this very story I have been telling
you, — how a little girl who thought she did nothing
of any use in the world, had spent one day,—tell-
ing just what Lena had done that day, only I called
the little girl “Mollie” instead of “ Lena.” As I went
on, Lena's eyes grew bigger and bigger, and finally
she said: —

“Why, Auntie, do you mean me?”

“Yes, you darling,” said I, hugging her close to my
side and giving her a kiss; ‘yes, I mean you. That
is what you are doing every day and thinking it is
of ‘no account, while it is of the best account in
the world. And remember, dearie,” I said, turning her
face toward me so that I could look right down into
her eyes, “remember that the little things you do
every day are of some account; and if you keep right
on doing them, the great things will come by and by.”





Pwa HE always was a perfect little owl,” says
- mamma, and indeed I think mamma was
right, for there she would sit, straight
upright in bed, just as still as a mouse,
looking out of the window, long before the sun was
up, and while all the rest of the folks were sound
asleep. Yes, she is a little owl, though not a “truly”
owl of course, with puffed up feathers and little pointed
ears and round yellow eyes. Her eyes are round
enough, to be sure, as round and big as saucers (doll-
saucers I mean), but they are deep, dark brown just
like mamma's and her ears are little and pink and she
hasn’t any feathers except her little white nightie with
the blue feather-stitching round the edge —unless you
count her hair, which is soft and fluffy and the color
of sun-light. They just ca// her an owl, that ’s all,
because she is awake when folks ought to be asleep,
as grandma says. But then you know grandma is
old-fashioned and doesn’t know that now-a-days the



88 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

time to be awake is just when the birds wake up,
long, long before the sun gets out of bed. Her little
crib is right beside the window and there she sits
every morning with her soft, chubby hands folded
together as you do at kindergarten, looking to see
what she can see.

And what does Marjorie see in the morning? Well,
first and best, there is the black and white kitty.



It isn't her own kitty,—she has a white rabbit, in-
stead, in a coop behind the wood-shed—but it is
Ethel’s kitty who lives in the brown house opposite.
Ethel has a dog, too, and a canary bird and lots of
buzzing bees that sometimes fly over into Marjo-
rie’s garden for their breakfast. O, how round and
fuzzy they are and what a pretty, soft humming they
make when they dip down into the morning glory
flowers and come up laden with sweets for their



WHAT MAR YORIE SEES IN THE MORNING. 89

honey! Ethel’s dog comes over very early too, and
Marjorie hears his sharp bark and sees him run up
the street after the milk-wagons. His name is ‘‘ Cap”
which means “Captain” and he ought to be very
brave, but I’m afraid he isn’t, for when there is a big
noise or an express wagon, or a man with a whip he
runs away and hides. The black and white kitty isn’t
a bit afraid of him. She has a cubby-hole in papa’s
asparagus bed, just where Marjorie can’t help seeing
her every morning. The black
and white kitty wakes up early,
just like Marjorie. Up she jumps
out of her basket, washes her face
and hands (and as she has four
hands it takes her a long while,
twice as long as it does you, for
four is twice two), and comes for
a walk over to Marjoric’s. Then
she snuggles down in her cubby-
hole and sits looking up at the window blinking her
yellow eyes at Marjorie and purring very loud, and
then off she goes again after a grasshopper for break-
fast.

Then there are the two big dogs that live in the
corner house where the cow lives that smells so sweet
and breathes so hard and rolls up her eyes at you
when you pass by so that you might be frightened if
-you did not know that it is only her way of getting
acquainted. One of the dogs is feeble and shagg





go LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and very, very old. But the other one, whose name
is Czesar, is young and strong, so he takes care of his
old friend in their walks together. They walk slowly -
up and down in front of Marjorie’s window and make
no noise at all. They never bark unless there is
something to bark at. They often reprove Cap for
his silliness, but, dear me, he hasn't sense enough to
see how much better behaved they are, and so he
goes on being silly, just like some folks that are not
dogs. The old, old dog
is almost blind, and un-
less Caesar is with him he
is apt to get lost. He
did once, and Czesar found
him and brought him
home. It is funny to see
them march along to-
gether and then sit down
side by side and look solemnly up the street; Czesar
very politely waiting till his old friend Max is rested,
though fe isn’t tired a bit. Then they will go on
again, and, having had their walk, turn and come
home to breakfast.

Then there are the milk-cart men with their cans
rattling and their horses bobbing along, one after the
other. First comes the red milk-man. His horse is
red and his cart is red and his face and hair are all
red, too. He comes very early, so early that, in the
winter, he has to bring a lantern, and the light bobs





WHAT MARFORIE SEES IN THE MORNING. 9!

up and down on the wall in Marjorie’s room like the
“birdie on the wall” in the looking-glass song at
kindergarten. He stops at Ethel’s house and leaves
two big cans of milk for Ethel’s breakfast. One sum-
mer when the family was away, the red milk-man
used to fill a dipper with milk every morning for the
black and white kitty and leave it behind the barn.
He filled it brimful, and then jumped back into his
wagon and said “hudup” and away went the. “red *
horse —to the next kitty’s house, I suppose —and the
black and white kitty lapped up the milk for her
breakfast. Sometimes she did not get it, though, for
Daisy Pease and Kitty Baxter and Tiger Lily and
little Midget Mankins were there before her and
drank it all up. But she didn't care very much.
There were plenty of grasshoppers and flies, and
sometimes a nice bone that Cap had left, so she got
along very well. ets

Next after the red milk-man, comes the white milk-
man and he stops at Marjorie’s house, just far enough
along so that the tip of his white horse’s white nose
peeps in at the window. He is a white man like his
horse, but he isn’t quite so honest, for the white
horse is so honest that his very name is “Sir Hon-
esty,” while the white man used to pick grapes: off the
vine beside Marjorie’s window when he thought no
one was looking. If he heard any sound he would
run, which showed he knew he was doing wrong, for
he knew very well that Marjorie’s papa’s grapes were



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describe
'358' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e33663588b60b8f8c78227a3eb3ddbff
41e94bd0c0747326c2f7b2d1b6b2a2e2f3bff908
'2011-12-07T06:55:11-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1771c4771a1cafe68024a314a9164505
a825afa6ddd6a6549211fe1da35723fa0d4e5f37
describe
'81278' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
c1ced5f0d472a1fa3a286126b7771ae9
bc744d7b6efb56c0856dc7e5191797da6ce308cd
'2011-12-07T06:54:59-05:00'
describe
'15390' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
2e7ba0a80cb0c338b0ac07a52fc0f555
43118b9b125e7e1c0f9eeaab8b80b02a1218b2c4
'2011-12-07T06:57:00-05:00'
describe
'2127' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRK' 'sip-files00008.pro'
d216c56fdaea561d64f74c349276c822
7b34b4cc269da93900f91745de9249dc2d4e4a4c
'2011-12-07T06:54:46-05:00'
describe
'4806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRL' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
9917c062cf2585580e0b4f5b49c2ebf5
282b398caa762bf4e389dab1ebdb487aabd446aa
'2011-12-07T06:55:58-05:00'
describe
'3452308' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRM' 'sip-files00008.tif'
ae10d33fea67536fbf4a1c2c6c9e9a0d
2a3dc02847bf3eeecc8612e4416ca8e9e9627f0a
'2011-12-07T06:55:09-05:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRN' 'sip-files00008.txt'
7d65039836dffaa5a45a16d0ba72c21c
f245e7842d6a816d57971169daed305f6c423dcc
'2011-12-07T06:55:49-05:00'
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRO' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
3786a5cc188bc8997eb5f2d446e2f63d
fc6f212da46cb6cc3216531f149426d1e860de75
'2011-12-07T06:56:18-05:00'
describe
'265138' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRP' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5dfec48989d0912c2d466c6b31dc8c5b
5f167637eae279f2614bcdafefaa3313dd12dbbc
'2011-12-07T06:55:14-05:00'
describe
'39423' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRQ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
888c3afc4148c098410dd2c9d55c5713
ea89ce84241cd343c828ebaf385f396f0359a99b
describe
'19983' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRR' 'sip-files00010.pro'
a2f32a4ff92ec208f84e296a2dd2e153
07267ef20ba17941c2e2241c5e10fcfae12cebb7
describe
'14184' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRS' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a92c7280ee53d19909616b3f6bf94034
dd342234548061f3755f0846eb839a51b1009ab8
'2011-12-07T06:56:35-05:00'
describe
'3453116' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRT' 'sip-files00010.tif'
ac327c28c9f2bcdee06379c7ef3c93b0
35736539dc031189e4199b1ab5bab23657ab9e93
'2011-12-07T06:55:35-05:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRU' 'sip-files00010.txt'
59580d56179be8a708851656a245e344
b6a126e980bd9e700d6426f85a3389fee6bb985a
describe
'3483' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRV' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
61cbaf83bdab7d3d89535a01c5f8dd87
5bebc72329433b44a3e55fab75bf36d8ddb89637
describe
'276223' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
534f51d11665fa73f53ff06033e4a783
c823a8693101d08a0e96ece2fe3a4d53ea93126f
describe
'37062' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRX' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
95810873210c01183755cf425cfaa669
702b6dceb2942b3cdcf9496e4aab88886e93de90
'2011-12-07T06:56:02-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRY' 'sip-files00012.pro'
3c44e70fe563b422848c9adddc8cc6da
de41081dd86731c00a187c0a737f3b7473626ad0
describe
'11637' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJRZ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
23df126fa6b1886bffbb87f1808b64dc
f967c26258a8e91ea95a311e14b45a5cee316303
'2011-12-07T06:56:41-05:00'
describe
'3453440' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSA' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f062bc214eadd7dbb6d71051b41a0a15
b9acf79c211dd957fd60cc7617f7076319c7f537
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSB' 'sip-files00012.txt'
ee0bac25cd64502a3f84843d337ce53c
817c4c81b69161214b8f88c330651897af74955e
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3510' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
90f8d70280e33038ebb0fb12336efbba
a0107e3538531e141b211b78e23b36f205ed05c5
'2011-12-07T06:55:18-05:00'
describe
'430464' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSD' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a3711b4cff380b1aa8f0633729d43b3a
e97a6503af6aa9dbbd84fdd63e209df596fb5d10
'2011-12-07T06:57:11-05:00'
describe
'98709' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
214f6def5a5fcf446c5a1ec27c2ed987
2eae6523d691286fda79d1d317916dcc4ac58221
'2011-12-07T06:57:14-05:00'
describe
'22722' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSF' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ee8da5ddd9b2560478a751f6e5a3496b
6c5dc6632b2d5d105414f9e88c0b255adf244abe
describe
'29901' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
58cdcc9d9166f403a01f4a9e47542bef
ad8e3276507db19c7cd2c201274fa14f91e8595e
describe
'3453196' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSH' 'sip-files00014.tif'
16c1ca6fe2afd1d91140b62c8a526a52
cf1d6ce3f13902f3779c4b59b26c616da96c7f8e
'2011-12-07T06:55:50-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSI' 'sip-files00014.txt'
62e78139cdca9bc3726b0288a3d3869d
bc90dfddb8503856f7009a25a8d918db918d5c35
'2011-12-07T06:56:43-05:00'
describe
'7369' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSJ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2f0b3a259b4a85dff796328fb4507ae3
2afc4181442069d887114b1ff7f684c903ae1454
'2011-12-07T06:56:33-05:00'
describe
'446706' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9aa4484d1a96c605e19564c89cf8b0bc
78cb5f4320fd44550bc8054ba5bed27db82ad84c
describe
'105126' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSL' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f97baf55131012a54a956cfa7bd2d7c0
24153a9bd78dc495ff43f7b997e13434954b70d5
describe
'38712' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b45f15f5f99df17eefa3a0b7b6f679b4
993b5e92c7cd1e580260cbf8471436f1f1a30874
describe
'33595' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3501dde16da255b6b71ec0d7997ce73d
8464e84d7f45b29483a06d0239f05bee0e9cb3e1
'2011-12-07T06:56:00-05:00'
describe
'3583920' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
f37699a3fe8e79fc9165c81c3678eefd
1a01fc993a3a1ffeee4e9beed284f5cb888b3dcb
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSP' 'sip-files00015.txt'
f26cd3634e0f98c5270845c483b16e6d
2b6b3fedc7c1de8929d47d9722178bcf93951b42
describe
'7882' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
2cae9e892177c3064750e34c546eb296
03c009874069b0d735f3ad9e4b2da3b31d7164b4
'2011-12-07T06:56:05-05:00'
describe
'446525' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2ade34bae1551537b2a75bce121c39d6
95086201e08aef5ebf82662f5b1f566a82a8842d
'2011-12-07T06:55:52-05:00'
describe
'110994' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
2bfb67e5b8c108c7a496e9424d929038
2bcb1c730ac4d876e74fa9cde584d5c2f32f8c35
describe
'39322' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJST' 'sip-files00016.pro'
bb87e0db47ae0f128d8f351f46238ec5
9cd06660dd41b517aa49365414330cdc76a230f8
'2011-12-07T06:54:56-05:00'
describe
'35543' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ff90a9b5775103e9ab89cd0880173b59
fff071c27f2dfee7fc76f6d300d35502289f8d3d
'2011-12-07T06:54:40-05:00'
describe
'3582152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2d0823e2bfbad7000201f7cdc40d21d7
9ec0d4633b0d7246c961bd81f75e176808cdd378
'2011-12-07T06:55:59-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
ef535b5e817ac5758da9663c456f476c
6ac85b0e87f468ebd57a68df6a7c034725d92976
'2011-12-07T06:56:22-05:00'
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
f8e84fcff1743e890eca3bcc20e952d4
6e1b4a8fa634032ddf5daeb932c4f6c88a387748
describe
'446786' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
6670abf916518ebbdd6198f5d84edd3d
ea88805028b2b4baf09bddb796c39e1e50f83cfd
describe
'103284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJSZ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b6b27d6e09669857fc4407f5e88149a5
62dedfdfc7943a3f64d247db86b6bb8b21fd3d6a
describe
'38358' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
14093f2f05c447bdfe9d2105e933b02f
b3703ebf4251c4a123036e26a68993ebdeaf1e4b
'2011-12-07T06:55:02-05:00'
describe
'33455' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTB' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
dbe463904b61b96b7829cd8968bcb9b1
5b10a2ef63660b764d287f3f90e927262ec4db2d
'2011-12-07T06:57:05-05:00'
describe
'3583908' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTC' 'sip-files00017.tif'
9894e78d522d426780e3ff0103fbbea3
48407a1546f0bbfaf60311991b6f2dbd5005afcb
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cb474ef62e7c9054b89476d0e12f96a1
8593a61f584c0279c04a1b430053643eeb845f1d
describe
'7818' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e5639e55291707311eaccd395cfa1ff7
5415a15d8c541bb48dda55221d6ba28fee6c8c3f
'2011-12-07T06:57:06-05:00'
describe
'427483' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTF' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c2fdc7d5c484be44a626d1879b90b339
6daf793ebb185590fa44a6d371f8f3055f159f9c
'2011-12-07T06:55:39-05:00'
describe
'114133' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
639168b22994dae8f6c0e5b6375c88c2
7bae00bc1110d650cffc57a30d62e0b921eb401c
describe
'38819' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTH' 'sip-files00018.pro'
98ee3f4d50442180cc96c3fb4b4fc01f
b58bac17dd2ef78357d60a11b60357df84e6a14d
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTI' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
12d29b5a6aa5bf7873fafdffb87bb29b
d49b375e1abef8c57226bccfba03c72a460f0296
describe
'3429944' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTJ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4fa1972ae171851dc40372a6f06ed059
be6e3d57d7c615ba834cb91be676da04fcb9ccb4
'2011-12-07T06:55:22-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTK' 'sip-files00018.txt'
8b9ede18b20927401b74c257e90b4e65
0421c666837b4adc4e392f05b00df8db8080abda
'2011-12-07T06:55:21-05:00'
describe
'8759' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTL' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
34963491be0cb5d7cf9ee3c9bfd28525
a836a20f7c37ed577dca72353a4010d05073df78
describe
'446781' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTM' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
86be32bf50f4ed0a37a89406b2f1c02a
d98317bec0fc556dfa37c446adc9565091e13073
'2011-12-07T06:55:41-05:00'
describe
'104198' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ab3aa1b3c8c6f049053d9edfe65912cf
8f3f01b3b1359ce0b01ada549f74ceca71a74985
describe
'39269' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTO' 'sip-files00019.pro'
f6465a5f649868e9d29ba11340279688
ab7a9afa4ee6c2e1351f8e15364707dff0986f45
'2011-12-07T06:55:05-05:00'
describe
'33541' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTP' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
221095e2a2c3f12b4ce6a6dc0f0dec71
8610747a578e365bfdff1714ae4f5bb8322b3ac0
'2011-12-07T06:55:53-05:00'
describe
'3583776' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
49322f0970396f1806c603f4de912f0b
f10598fc3cdb7a3292d6ae52b28d7f80c88b340c
'2011-12-07T06:56:13-05:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
e7d4add2ce143a982fc9f89b0e2db819
69efeec88403b63787c09a5399911087b722bbd4
'2011-12-07T06:56:49-05:00'
describe
'7963' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTS' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2c1343169a44822bb3bb1abf8fdc2f7a
bb53820ae3de39fdb53a2eeeb5602aebd81df3a3
describe
'446738' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
33f6b5821598f0b8ddeca7344c7fc34e
b3fa677f0c2ec331078fb6d8c99533f867190997
describe
'104370' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTU' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7e036516bd98fba12dfa2dbf8df1ecb0
9977762a1f02765e11cfe4aefdf30de4e8c9a0d7
describe
'37965' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTV' 'sip-files00020.pro'
1d0cda3a711ed2977f69bcc33ee72601
ba765dc08e0e9dbf7b3753125436bad8b04176de
describe
'33316' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c1bc44b6e9309bacd08021ca1886b33c
e696eae3d679299864c051886619ce46dcc804b6
'2011-12-07T06:54:44-05:00'
describe
'3583768' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTX' 'sip-files00020.tif'
25f13349ebf370948f35c6b0981696ea
933e8cc97280930a9da3ed384a1e36fbadce8104
'2011-12-07T06:54:36-05:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTY' 'sip-files00020.txt'
47cd82889515594b68a83ee8711874b6
17b95728636b5bc9384007a3f5806632ee84e29b
'2011-12-07T06:54:38-05:00'
describe
'7921' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJTZ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
18b2db6e923677efaaf228e14f7de234
8b843711a8a12584d7d4ec9ea2a673d9837ace6c
describe
'446731' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUA' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
808c22aee701abf6b3765e049e639554
962751a4012e91edff785a3b8a3684322637d42a
describe
'107713' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUB' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
7b3d23f2f9b646d2fa2b4d1b581fdaaa
ca1f6d47e81557f853b4fe5c1fded34f9da9c691
'2011-12-07T06:55:20-05:00'
describe
'38462' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUC' 'sip-files00021.pro'
e9ff9d2df1e1bb0e194853ea7506b98e
2334ac38579d15ab33c8725e37ac0c120207fe48
'2011-12-07T06:55:30-05:00'
describe
'34387' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUD' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
53c5aa2b035a0ca6f7ec36775c991964
4feb6f77e3ec56cb4f2c2e08decbdcc0e0939968
'2011-12-07T06:56:38-05:00'
describe
'3584104' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUE' 'sip-files00021.tif'
578b1170ec7edb86a992236de5023dad
2818ce4bcf87d5a108abb56be4d21c3af82cc509
'2011-12-07T06:55:47-05:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUF' 'sip-files00021.txt'
1de35df144319eec1b7f81240bb20f79
972b7359da4c9c1d18701dda82bdec8a2fbec2e0
describe
'8182' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUG' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3636e565b2f24e7e884c522f7dfdbb5c
3e9e4ec772f692327def6e16b6736defde23e739
describe
'446520' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ef28426a5f0047b3d26cc76e39e97b87
8bb8c3f00e06bf1b99123361c913e82002f050e4
describe
'76369' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
284523095b95f17485cf2a8142a54dda
d6a9b60ea0889d8a665077e767c892dd7d2bd79e
describe
'25685' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
85cc107e655e35524f945f955fa396e5
631dbec7a73a114cc73760727d5349be23d64b3f
describe
'23787' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6a8b309f0ea75937eae28b59669e2008
765c98d057759070c19a4ea542732beb7ab8956c
describe
'3581008' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e19c21d7696f2579fc624f2f8149024d
9e94e2db1250ea0697514cf2c36108f40276594a
'2011-12-07T06:55:56-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
c39b0d17846e7338ab480d11bf5d8eb2
bbcee2a0438697a457a14e1bcdeee61a5bf80916
'2011-12-07T06:57:04-05:00'
describe
'5656' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUN' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
66e1743a2299a9390bbbb67e4a249977
683bcf15fc0cb37ad7c3e977aa6f7a49015a63fb
'2011-12-07T06:56:30-05:00'
describe
'446790' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a5a9a67a5fa056d4157f3eaf1ecd7bca
53972c16b0510e4620273344a2b8d8e4aac3502f
describe
'77639' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
88ada7cef72e8e44fde810b729872ba9
922817022b4f4bd7af1e577d6feeba67df4a188f
describe
'25630' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
01e3c7d75e48b018d023a1e5ca4dfa5c
0c8cdcc98f9f848b347497a436440feb94f026c0
'2011-12-07T06:56:34-05:00'
describe
'24780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUR' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
4e1cefd3e231a54fb32e54986dcfe9f4
f560fd94103ea43a478561480b662a9648e665f1
'2011-12-07T06:55:43-05:00'
describe
'3583180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a227c3b507f98bb502fd42e0f2ec1d5b
a8a20c664292c8c7b94570de798582be6dfcb0e9
'2011-12-07T06:55:40-05:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0ae96e808ddd5a7062e99e6be3d59957
d8d753cad823312f0e2175e6d12403bcaa0089fd
describe
'5981' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUU' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
00134e6901692554827c4f82dd9d9348
46027e04a80c5ea06974a76af0016acbd788cf88
'2011-12-07T06:56:04-05:00'
describe
'446531' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUV' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ad3816eb0962f376a36fb59316622461
7ec80c95a6f67c70317970f8b151611e2453e1c0
'2011-12-07T06:56:57-05:00'
describe
'108155' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUW' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
55c955bcae028e961cd3440ee049ced3
73454f45ff6378a3a4935e71cbbf867cc57c1c03
describe
'38850' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUX' 'sip-files00024.pro'
626a524f962fb9a5aea3084bdaa4ed90
85d7ffe4a9e951031ebb2552c59b4e903a34e0a7
'2011-12-07T06:54:43-05:00'
describe
'33820' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9d815e442cba0bac23a3823a4ff99412
6b112af4a87a6abba70614951787745db864a3e9
'2011-12-07T06:54:48-05:00'
describe
'3581856' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJUZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
58a99cd2c8822e8e50f50c07901d5de5
3e7069b1fbda34d68f3f8be31905e57e40ecc055
'2011-12-07T06:55:54-05:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVA' 'sip-files00024.txt'
5dbec7878a852d21b7522af1a46132d5
4631c1dc13284a38b78b1a5048a23fde4481bb29
describe
'7912' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVB' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
72a89d005e264d53fe2ef3948bf8543c
5e1907501c9234359dc4eeb5b664e8e4539cd0e9
describe
'446795' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
960daec8d53cde28c24d550f8b907b6e
297c7effb4c882df67ce62fc696a38f08874ac1d
describe
'105175' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
62d8206acc6470c2d8d2670ecb7e4e03
bc242ca19ffae223b59be349f6802b09e159591b
'2011-12-07T06:55:32-05:00'
describe
'37997' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVE' 'sip-files00025.pro'
01e25b7f922c2d524353243da3ca502b
6773a4d176d5e481e3b5eb2b9d5b0746a3154969
describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVF' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
1423c801320bfb35a407a8a4d9a597b9
30d0a34bbf9d4ae2e8a33843d8b4d48b785bd2bf
'2011-12-07T06:56:17-05:00'
describe
'3584204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVG' 'sip-files00025.tif'
ffc01183319c4357b300400eda1c70e3
f4e48828c2b26f44e4fbf392b5e04bb2cdbcf7bc
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVH' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d988c9c3dc52b99c722e6a1cc447e9ff
72833a38a76a9cd6af0a14ddaee26f059eef0735
'2011-12-07T06:57:02-05:00'
describe
'7843' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
5559a75b7349662ad83581ca73c828b2
91e2142019dfbcc6182d571b6c8db95d4d32c349
describe
'446512' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVJ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
fd448ea5902b2932e9a9bc78a90b6215
88fb6cf1e184447643a3302474fba293968bcab0
'2011-12-07T06:54:58-05:00'
describe
'93085' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVK' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ab51aef0b128f8e29607f2e5d9f48589
ffabe54b1466b4096f1554779f6309abf60648c6
describe
'33317' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVL' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e8dabcbf7e9de98d7f803be4cf99f929
c62055216d56f9d127a423b0788360ad2701ed56
describe
'29865' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b8bc50e7138cacd882582b2c9a93ba81
2b8ee379bb733978d5e782256aa286e8bcf86521
'2011-12-07T06:54:31-05:00'
describe
'3581832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fa14b1be40c8df5873b49dadc53d05ac
79ad9b1631471bdfbfb6126fb52af3bed0f5188d
'2011-12-07T06:56:50-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
1869dc392a18e06ec54453324a194f29
8d00d10e86fcaf8af33554a222bd7d6ba93ed6ae
describe
'7724' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b8cdda004444cc6fbf91fc9921263458
335a76fe19c91a999edeefa25d45c426a06a438b
describe
'446767' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
67711b997e0e1dd8bcc0c1778735f294
4945389ef92154fe4275c3b53169ab9c90dce698
describe
'99274' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0ad20c674505a5b59d2fa6893fa7d242
f7587270e1b1d3d968de10fb5b811bea1099eccc
describe
'21446' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
f16558af909351621c9d65821d3d1dd6
ef29501c2ff6c9a426f978ddcb93909bd17c9ec9
'2011-12-07T06:55:00-05:00'
describe
'28690' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2a449bf73315eb37b724211fb5225012
a65747cebd323694d94fa33f4a0b1caecbe90ad6
'2011-12-07T06:54:34-05:00'
describe
'3583916' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVU' 'sip-files00027.tif'
858cda49dac42350d5ab3f4ed6c2a939
74c6f602facedf5a62966ca0c18d5d330bb8e1c5
'2011-12-07T06:56:32-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4526e57a5e2fe953690d2eff03a5d42f
bec54c7bff34f1f1bc718d9aa970c00ddfd20121
describe
'7093' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
7e28469ef8c814d175bf004ab79e11d1
66ae46d4233f23565697d19494d5cbbb3a1654a5
describe
'153094' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
21cd1c733cc743a6dfd3c2f48f932bff
331afe57b3bf5f5f8c837bc56fc6c24562d9b662
'2011-12-07T06:56:21-05:00'
describe
'23133' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVY' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
02fb0f47edf48c532ad92439877ac8b8
466a98c31a7bcfc12a8bfe7288c9679ec92fce97
describe
'6068' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJVZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
493e84605115183cfe0e7b699e53a5f6
37236553bf1ab028fed0e7e62348edced36162ca
describe
'7518' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6c9ed8b363aa04d231287992acf59aae
048878c265be878a308894a8d5d0eb7685b7b5b1
describe
'3581444' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
fca3b291f4148b15667d71625320da2e
dadb4d455a234781f2654a66a09dc66ee4780c1b
describe
'264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
0c4ee3f382b8bcdfe90e53bd4b47190b
dc903dbfe72b7f0512588882af6f7821d1df7860
describe
'2118' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c161cbcd3bd3f6db70e46eab61a1bfd6
d9254eb8abdd8b3b529d05b97175791d2a7a22ad
describe
'446730' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d25dfd428a4816c44bdb1ff02049eb6a
da687f4d2839810951580f27140489f90cdf5406
'2011-12-07T06:56:24-05:00'
describe
'83020' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
275dd9eb90abfb3414a6fa0aa5b5582a
967508010f058909132ed04e2270578e17961348
describe
'27937' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0e0fb8e9c2d561890c5b66a2d0fa0dbc
9c2bdfe5998b177cdfd9c76fc0a4080f14a66ffb
describe
'25988' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWH' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
57b1b40d6816f5d6863964570d5fdb5e
429d6909dac0653ceed9e14d598d3239066ecf36
describe
'3583380' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a65fa5905599899cdfc7aa00215c9492
9573618707b69fbf28d5565c31b43ee86ef94475
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
2e5c73a7dcda0f7688fb7bdd59b77a11
51c13826afebe662d1d9009fc1ed529b7402b06d
describe
'6290' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWK' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1a47f3ef1f5a5645d8313ec585e2d556
df2969ff5095d07dec3a82c4d02280b803226148
'2011-12-07T06:54:51-05:00'
describe
'446797' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e0688170c3f86239fdb30b493cfbb3ab
69e347549241957f726cf32229fbb27116c4bdae
describe
'105547' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWM' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
26488ba6529479909315b1c2b6ec86e2
318db138164713034240ce0ddf2f44ab2c70b43f
'2011-12-07T06:55:48-05:00'
describe
'37963' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWN' 'sip-files00030.pro'
820d47b08ef6d93a0bc5c9526ce7593f
ddeaa9c0ea99229d51bb6900eea0b614184c478a
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWO' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2b5cb05a43a3b388a459593ddc7e412a
8414f41c6a44dff14fbb33173983fb94c9e1fc1a
'2011-12-07T06:56:53-05:00'
describe
'3583980' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
681f1e343b56260096456bce23fe85a3
8bc69e3017551680798fa26a893a3d796eaa4584
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWQ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a7f4516a3cef09897b79ebf63d63ee89
ddd623383e27c623bfcf18dfe7df1c88041fd313
describe
'7837' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
50d4ade4d60d12cfa706d2332ff0eabf
54e98895fc8791214c6abb5f96df978cec6f508e
describe
'446780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWS' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
951ce3b8487274f7c251b21e4404589b
477598dcb2d27aba49c2c9bf3d7077dc432eccf6
describe
'105297' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
86b4908e808b09e8cc77b8c80f249b00
e73f3ef53072b6d7437ecb2f594a7f568991968f
'2011-12-07T06:55:04-05:00'
describe
'39743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWU' 'sip-files00031.pro'
89e761296de4880ea6aad76e3d2e8368
1377843dd2677e6e1643bb252f359862f3e2ab7a
describe
'32872' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bf69f398886811e378be1200fc3d8fce
c32553d0a7b2ea0ce71c7496be8d2fe1ffe27e91
'2011-12-07T06:56:26-05:00'
describe
'3583792' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWW' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b859f2172e7d2c3e2e3aab02b99208ef
e3cceceeb46613968d75a764ce3bef8d1ae6b758
'2011-12-07T06:56:46-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWX' 'sip-files00031.txt'
3560731bdd04371b14cf2ddb18103e18
c4f50e483dadc3d06a182033c28d037d8b8f98e7
describe
'7710' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWY' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
4b88ed0d82648459a8b7cae7127eca7c
7f48f8cfc1a66034bc92177b24998af419f443ef
describe
'446775' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJWZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6c1045673ea0a647926a455faa5686fc
cf09f789c518a4ef17b1bc962b975dc7815dac15
describe
'83082' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXA' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0a352abdeb32da0a072f4bacaae1e3cb
654a5a3d89de1860254eff11f2f3dfc1b49ae338
'2011-12-07T06:55:33-05:00'
describe
'17072' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXB' 'sip-files00032.pro'
40d5a41073cf32868d2913380a37974a
ec79d089ad1b49d759b6376753c0aad57100e28f
'2011-12-07T06:56:12-05:00'
describe
'22951' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
73f05a138f3f393d466eb4f6387144c3
1206663b13430f49d427fd9a5d5ab4ae731835df
'2011-12-07T06:55:16-05:00'
describe
'3583096' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
dd7f8b7e43057ac64d4962caab1f9497
4b00b6f65a954ed4b651565c48212fe221c3620b
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
eecd84dfec2a1683eecc3d3929b5a859
a0b2c1d612e63b0e306e0ce1edd47dba5cfee065
describe
Invalid character
'5975' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
017d76cb9d9cefbc5cf206225b75f339
6eea98d125b94f60268aeb99c17b8457421fc3d3
'2011-12-07T06:55:01-05:00'
describe
'446791' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
359a81d1ae2854c9e451f0c04b4641b4
452aa417ac1a58b0a6003ec8a4cf2945bad170d6
describe
'100259' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXH' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d3daf7b7295e5aad5113b4f30ca7a08b
e159ebd5ee2f90e4af13da6a2fa9e4531fd63a37
describe
'35370' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2011a17b33e8a4a256d5d8f5a191b279
b353a423bcd6c2466ecfd9f958614960c4b04525
'2011-12-07T06:56:03-05:00'
describe
'30863' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
0b2c530eaddd209c8863a91305a4ac27
7842b2ac74cb30b47e768c01890b432452eb883b
describe
'3583844' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
acb08016ea958678c396977de85db057
4b48f9fe4e552637bd3b21392f6b5e6546e934c9
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXL' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7e3d00d4c337ebac30732aed39e50680
6ba98448ea81623a54da685788283836d48d779b
describe
'7397' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
46e5c3e0a502eacee026b4d45249de17
4745bcc44b1dd6d4f0469977abbb0b46d23aff94
describe
'446745' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
22d18c0898ace6cf093452e60f9129e6
8f45ab4e4c35ab57fb06e9af13e09356a122caf7
'2011-12-07T06:56:56-05:00'
describe
'73932' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXO' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
891518562f3d8450a9c1d41ebdb720c7
f9cb702e17aa035de599abe81f22b2b7a6fc3bd2
describe
'23615' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
9d3b2d4b300a59d45c86db3306951ba2
f609c040dad6492696c73c897103af6890222072
describe
'23400' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXQ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
409a0d4ac90fbe6d7e427afa25de6086
7a5291d6751332b3115a30073257d4bef00e6608
describe
'3583144' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
3fe000569bb17d0861da5dadc9b758e6
f58e3e92cf867d86a165f04274ad9664d0edf8a9
'2011-12-07T06:55:28-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
21a66fd878d1f06ce0375d054bffb1ca
d15348e85c9003d57d4a9993f70208fcee222c91
describe
'5738' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
ca7c196d421de68688e55adc1b62b8cd
9f22211be13f0fba14a8723da5ea3d5ffa53d31e
describe
'446771' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
fa89c659bf28a17539ea77ab944750c3
06f23c42afdffd220e421c9815a50c5331fd2fe0
describe
'108817' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e48f5eaf716559efa9c14e049c3da3c4
6f25934f637b8aa87be363944eaf84a5ff01c612
describe
'39485' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
107b1994d26d38c641b94822795047e7
5c3993f8b87eac08afeee74138674f4d587ace73
describe
'34545' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
26da093c8307c42b59a856cadd868901
8f423acebf765ee856d9e7f565b301e661446b4f
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d8a9b002e4056cab756281cd7f25fab4
bba61a7de32eb51b2ae3759602ce1f384d804369
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJXZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5c074e6d5490f26d6a6d86aa68f45cf7
221d448f2028f993382e4cf63936d7643ad069dd
describe
'8040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYA' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b1b374c164f6e46391241feb4bcd9f25
0aa5617f4ac97dacd71f0d631ae4747bff0f60e9
'2011-12-07T06:54:47-05:00'
describe
'446498' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a316e40089a2f9d37c2d56ca8f0a679b
4ecb3f47739c3d285727ba6e29a18cc675ee1646
describe
'77130' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
967ab0d630541a6069d2850dd0829706
a5e3bf89e4fda696becbeca75c8e6b1af7302344
'2011-12-07T06:56:23-05:00'
describe
'21575' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
fe84742d316f35681dcc1e679aa64d1f
4a7fae5ebc36a0ab6e369207a4edb61eab2e0858
'2011-12-07T06:55:57-05:00'
describe
'23100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6fcc3d33c8c0b991e3cd20960e36964f
1168fe92e0edf42a8045621430a262407c91aadb
'2011-12-07T06:54:50-05:00'
describe
'3581116' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0b82f433d15a85111f31cea60df644d6
0cfb1c14fb57334d14bd4b9a4016084a17b9f8af
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
19408394561caa9c1c14e1b9276d42d0
6e9152b8161a8a588c0443898c1a25bbd680b523
describe
'6041' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
98f7b711201db4dd263137d558401128
5c661dcf7a55a1c12134b8b834a87b18d91f1277
describe
'446794' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3ffbbb47302d3d59bdc7a7ba65acf0c1
cbfc0c61f5ce4592104239a87af2708245f40591
'2011-12-07T06:54:33-05:00'
describe
'101128' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
750a13d090fc6d9e03270b511888d53b
3c32c070be4613ee22ccce621abf59cb00ce2fad
'2011-12-07T06:56:11-05:00'
describe
'37821' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c0ea90561749ee327c25547bf2281842
755185b257a00c7058cd31614b0b5953acb45616
'2011-12-07T06:56:07-05:00'
describe
'32450' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
91762e302e68683fd2bbc2e297672ab9
c7bc05841f8933d89827eb3dd7a4439aebe651e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
98d2241f7b00964e72b6eccb3e605583
eb2bfd506a0f1e0eafbf5560a107a7fcbe51a2ea
'2011-12-07T06:54:37-05:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
ead9df4e67ef95f1e95cc4d045d31318
7a08e21fad057008c68d3d57405ce9f8bc9de761
describe
'7676' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6ce9f474f1aa486ff3d7bea986644111
8d1da1da217afb0121119b9160d3cf796b12495e
'2011-12-07T06:56:54-05:00'
describe
'446529' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
da21204a37b8bc829056ea8b777a3e15
a6c6c0c1b143534b0354f1038df137665ed6e75c
describe
'96349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9847425f03c03dab858384530f9deabf
e974bf74136250938a39d80e9bc6fcdfc51d8cd6
'2011-12-07T06:56:40-05:00'
describe
'35514' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0826dc9033f81c2c25341f7f8796f272
6ee01f3d3c38369caf2177a332622b9ae6a9a588
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
f97554ec2ebb204467753bc32c511684
9f27027ecfb8a10613470a7006bcea7b6339fef3
describe
'3581552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8fb513fd122b85513009e1528f4004ab
b98b1f19fb845c20f2f031e9fbcbe616e97ccb89
'2011-12-07T06:55:13-05:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
038a8739a4f1eaf15cf4d6ae8ece3659
ef8c94dce3285c8e8dbd6f1ea1b63f85507a47e9
describe
'7633' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
f33fb067c3eeaf31f5879706354dcd62
4cca100b5cdce00a0e029d27b613b1bce42fad48
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2b9781b334921eec1c240a6ec3bc88b7
cda43af7616627743ca2e67a725bfada46fee5f3
describe
'108516' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYX' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2b7155011744cc0c75eec821ddbb6acc
45017e8aa3552bb94a8fa43583470e40ec3281b9
describe
'39008' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYY' 'sip-files00039.pro'
66eee08c5856c5580d74286dd52301d6
fda8ee7d693af3bdf40ae998f9c81dd8b93bc05b
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJYZ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
4eb695a4518404e8c917db6a96c7ef47
a3dc44cca237451c6d1311c4461e6d5b09d17cae
describe
'3584152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZA' 'sip-files00039.tif'
c04de1e26faad3c1cc5b28c836fed48d
b7563c43a4a5b36775249e1485855df5f41197c3
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZB' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3e8224640b88c5ad0c20e953ce49272b
b444ebb23c8c4d0fc09407e20509a13def8c91b0
describe
'8066' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZC' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
809f27f2d7af1be63f0911424cf8e45f
341d14211892eb68d8e8ea41fc1795df45c1499a
'2011-12-07T06:56:39-05:00'
describe
'446530' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
07ac9e9d134f39c29d456fad6b7bac72
ad2762161b34da3a6c054a535a01ec4fd06b80ee
describe
'110948' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZE' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3a3514ed97726545044fe448bc44985e
2ce11958953811f476818dfcdfb783e3ac1d70ec
'2011-12-07T06:57:07-05:00'
describe
'39450' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZF' 'sip-files00040.pro'
768deed263fb191a61e4e11aecfbc424
e66263744392b812c7034ebc912ea3aa6681e5ca
'2011-12-07T06:55:25-05:00'
describe
'34874' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
99ee512be5f016aa399720961b7fc63c
13dceab214f72a9759ba7559191c9dd0b5a6719f
describe
'3582068' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
40b0887b1ae2d6826361b5aa6fc3c460
1234849783b8b6b5bfe0ae9d8ac3ba66cd8593c1
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
bd4fb1087772201cf653f53b2bc89457
ef9cfc696cc3d867b9d4fd0b76d4b1a174b8b965
'2011-12-07T06:55:51-05:00'
describe
'8106' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZJ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
27537952549ca9056ba3d2e3b47b3ed6
dc62e399b14e8f0731446effd3b2c082a629b4f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
c2fe6cbf69683acdac8604cff9575802
5ce2595b399ebb3ffe2d53916a84db7c5965700a
describe
'85447' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
bf6835505a956b225c9469cd5fb8bd28
7e4b360e3d46160cef44c873a17037263d51383e
describe
'14770' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f7bc7b85b61d29e26bec3b3b1b155672
c40afcdf5370327fab75f5b09d077bab281ab303
'2011-12-07T06:56:37-05:00'
describe
'23826' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d5a6af26cfec0ed576eff3617ed71d6b
ff02324fca82b6ae781e38d04589e6412c51815f
describe
'3583464' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
89bc9851f1ca6b0b00a429eff254d532
86e5752483ce4ca4fb84ceac2055a9601cfd5d8b
describe
'620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ea7d9814d4795cc2a15f93865a82aba1
d565834278c505c2c8e0e8310d792428cce5e297
'2011-12-07T06:56:19-05:00'
describe
'5996' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
145c39a470788416a9891b2ed628eb6e
e36bb4e71a87f83c553c766249d7134a72de03ea
describe
'287238' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
87e03f17a64c1a706dd024f125957a67
c392789ee971ad4ce959de20ff7f40b558867fb4
describe
'39426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0e88c2c272a043e8a977d83b7ecba376
1c531056e8e16fc56ad88d16ab1a13c52ff515cc
describe
'11320' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
89ae750daf4d056c42e0788838b932c5
acfcddb5b02be57bb7871d6559decba46adc0db7
describe
'12352' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
cda3350f2f397bc23414eb5c17ec0a01
fbc070299aa4b522db63ab97ca4750d564c92530
describe
'3579800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
3872f039a645ab13ee644d0cfce38f26
d4eb05514dd53a01360a540811a92d3ba4b45fec
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
da42dd14456fb805f901ff208023145e
bbf8073bcb1aeaa6b8ac8e858043ed49e1505ddb
describe
'3189' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
146683bd92c8d06dd02e3bab25359711
f0ca21f75898ea98790f7bb011505af82e19e278
'2011-12-07T06:56:01-05:00'
describe
'7002' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4a1f8d8dd2bed18af8c9ba8afd45c77f
369e2d5fad1afe7cb7d42352c0f6bfca314eba51
describe
'6486' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABJZZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
5d9c14fc9ecd8c414cc8f0f2e4369e2d
3a5a2290df40ade84eb8b2412937a42db49f841d
describe
'1952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
d31578acdedc2e64d89d5f6aa77470c6
e39431ef03da9af339f94270691d27bafeb491a5
describe
'3580704' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
2d7975c571a7da41f613366049f806c0
e89ba266a8ffdb25a9ed82c3ad90610474255f9b
'2011-12-07T06:57:09-05:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
07682d7ba1d0ce68d4a7e0d45252f278
2320e71546eb380ec5845b764a52e7f1ca6abfba
describe
'368733' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAD' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
236e0b54dacb39109c161b5751d91a17
4e15a6511563a9d03cf96298cd6bf47fd0e2c684
'2011-12-07T06:56:08-05:00'
describe
'44698' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
cbba802ef0a65cdf1339820b2c3a5a69
063d21a2ec98577b0df89d27805794d0a25d142d
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5fcb7444e7a0bc4663374c1e60cf8e56
07e9ba0c634315674a548baed74f6d643ee1f8f1
'2011-12-07T06:54:42-05:00'
describe
'14200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
73371a43bd2c62f0ec1575683cf54519
1b140d7cb065b7f0942f7e77e0d0ea2a9eba8772
'2011-12-07T06:55:24-05:00'
describe
'3580804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8011df7132f1f5a16057d0c2a10c0f34
b92346e35a1a926df81ebf83a53b19dbbca8bc7b
'2011-12-07T06:57:01-05:00'
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
3698d27cf0e05a7c66d747d700b90e59
510bbf47276d03b409a3b2d5cd0f7c0b15036069
describe
'4303' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
1dc957abcd07d63fcc3b5997a8a75ed7
79a79d00a3515bef96b32e98bcd29482f8c1430b
describe
'9302' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7d066540805472969057832fdfbcbbfb
0c699469cfa6c22a42efa6382595402bb4886440
describe
'6600' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8c386a5c77c34487a9e515fa5d9cf050
6ae85b233c7bce76dd8de236f6e11cd8d84c6dea
'2011-12-07T06:55:08-05:00'
describe
'2076' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
99e7acd6639aad8f6279ba4d2c100133
8e0541ae71d8ffb84b8584eeae4597ccf257f221
describe
'3580736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0b99f301c777a6154a50bb61941026a0
e408f6aa44733971bf42f870bcc1ef775712359b
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAO' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9ab7dcafd60949b825928d6270483fab
bb368f898507f22254b5536f4ccf6905648a5748
describe
'446493' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAP' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
8a3f2ef6ed487bb6cc64a33d5daef9b1
fd665d050a43ca770adb2eed8c349536a76eca28
describe
'73089' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAQ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ea99f10148b433a92e1859fd568af760
e585e8a696894ae4247a4892567c1b381519b90d
'2011-12-07T06:55:07-05:00'
describe
'25378' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
ead63200ab39b71aed6d276247c6a41b
4fbaef23ca15771f625a03a21d4b874fb8062a5f
describe
'22422' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2e1aa542c44323c21253524da30fb863
cade0839ada9f626fa5cea005ccd864e2fedc3f7
describe
'3580812' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5ab69d16a181e89f6ed2665904e51974
78761c8423e6e035b1e2e953fbee1ca67e765ffb
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
db3c636853ff0884e72bfbf64355b021
50845602d5feab1f0b437889f8a874d5df73cbb7
describe
'5373' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ce493df76ad9e27fc08e1132c6cf1c47
34c0e8354e521f10be01310cd2dc9246ec8eb6f4
'2011-12-07T06:55:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
76117ed61d873db237937175c2cb5ca9
a3f5a4425807236a97b4d701f51998e19ea24199
describe
'96945' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
bf0a375dfdaa9860975b5e09595f6ae0
31aeea9d86e5cf3d5113e145a45891e0199e0f8e
describe
'20500' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0b310bd52f5b162b11de0f651f3d060b
7928d5752e4a4c32a493a0e59caf2c1a3b2dd3f7
describe
'27461' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKAZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
e6bbbaaa6973ecb81832d9f76bd982de
1ba05f3d478f1cb9ccf89754e7155990353d0f34
'2011-12-07T06:54:52-05:00'
describe
'3583760' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
68f1da81c96e023d984983ad83421936
c6f37cf56bf7d6814c11e32c8884ba918d729ae4
'2011-12-07T06:54:57-05:00'
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
97287f13c5805963a8f7c6ef1a170a20
7b72cf67f7d008fc237e9a57f2e0bfc51ca82a57
describe
'6698' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
70569c84278bc03cb6090bc45a5c465a
881f58466586211a15fc48a828d4205f8e0efe6e
describe
'446756' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
34e04b3bb736e742723821ac53b014da
04cd304a25373d3490f4c61779209fd86dd14eb0
describe
'103743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
4339cc8136567db891eda6546e59ed4f
89a7a1c3ce844eb667ecb6b845a6af02ffb230e2
describe
'38114' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
23f92885b5c88026c92a2bbfae760f33
20be0398e09aca74366175818463c77f444aab8d
describe
'32899' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4b3658be430e3b58eac098fc10d96a8f
cb390bf581e1b6027dcb285a465e64db007216dd
describe
'3583896' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
0001bb45e2acc581f4403ec09c6a46d1
974e6391d04c230abff4525e5f1402015795a382
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBI' 'sip-files00048.txt'
3bd1d4a9b40eb623c2ed534dfb58374d
4301bbbe36a7b4d5c793aa63bbc184b4a26526c6
describe
'7738' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBJ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a322a877d9636db6ffe9218cce7b1b37
09ebf04f9ec1a90aa5e673b8cbc5b8f000b83491
'2011-12-07T06:55:26-05:00'
describe
'446700' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
03dd9e3dbf0dbc009d90d60da8acf6b6
e1e480876d916e04bbee7674a321f2dc0374070d
describe
'109141' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a33383bd5a97f77bbe50d1b7dca0101d
6c70c374ae11724a953018121b561fbc747b4840
describe
'39389' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBM' 'sip-files00049.pro'
220089e105f45489ab60ff5712d4110a
e7e39af26398816275a2b0394ce83d1480ab717f
describe
'34891' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBN' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
f482c2dcd6402db09d9b4107a9669140
50d2d5ff279833fe97380848bc463ca08f39fc1f
describe
'3584100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBO' 'sip-files00049.tif'
2ab8e65383b6fa81cdd926daab76d0be
5f1861a9b0ccc183bb7f670e45169356f720f20a
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBP' 'sip-files00049.txt'
8cd5e7994e2d8332f1fbce9812a6f295
2cacc2ec129530556ca0c138889e42edb586e5cf
describe
'8184' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBQ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a451c5b937ee80f589d6c1a504b41f25
8a5dae90a0feeee105efefe680ca319059250040
'2011-12-07T06:55:37-05:00'
describe
'446486' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBR' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9f8f64e463278df97bb802b6e2005e82
4c8c31e6936ba2e7926435aa73e8af1c18d19276
describe
'87821' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
d1d228b252afec23da0cc75a50bddc6a
b2592fe6a806f099b797a1af4a5581c91cfd1aed
describe
'23935' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBT' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e2f8735b1ef89d3fad822737349ef112
efcaa2543cb121263af8d8e8b333b726fb66d5b5
describe
'26489' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBU' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
22dfb03e255bac7a55cd746605279db1
67d968aeea87c8e21d71c2cdcbfc4521f2f0956d
describe
'3581492' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6ce56314a30bf8efac7920da7b6abf25
9473a78e66ee7db0880fb748df402403b0d1fd81
'2011-12-07T06:56:51-05:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBW' 'sip-files00050.txt'
956b3d1cb72ebd533d39f375a498c8ad
e071331f885d52daf4dbf903d6651bff1d71a04c
describe
'6645' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBX' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
5110a2c80401e05fbd7fc9dc4a77afcf
4ee092ad427f1f25bcf350bf335786d0a571cfe0
describe
'446788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
23f4d082f1310921474b48942c42a374
a5bffec981bb88fded200b48d761fc04787fd63a
describe
'98362' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKBZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
68be8bf4a71e7223bb7cc4dcf06dbcf0
c04dc37c5afb67ae19faff48af85f65217db946d
describe
'35693' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCA' 'sip-files00051.pro'
48f565da1010d2bc38efed8a2096f014
08994355e6eb311c4f9bfd8cfa60e28bce72531b
describe
'31202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCB' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
4c6a1c428ce42aec7158cf72759d729a
431c25410833938c30a07a5baf821b2cd2367fdd
describe
'3583928' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
afa66904d103a9185110f79bc05b4695
a98e500582875209c4160fc39b94c2b2be32cdd3
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCD' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c8a225ba9a07e57003c4a0cf3c778ea6
06ebaa04b5136d8b17fef3c5a256ff12be4b961a
describe
'7742' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCE' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
f508e7c68b136b53b6e5c7b684e8abd1
3495a296d4bdc4ea292315c4921661ff56a551fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCF' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2c98568b32692fabad0897568f89d02b
dbef8aba54aaee396d0035018f3590dad5c2de13
describe
'80120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCG' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0c7d00d6b6fd9ebc105609723c3cc9e0
caebd9f8fbfc1af8c98f347ce34ab017ef90d914
describe
'22505' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCH' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1cbf6c503a91ec4b0d7e6cdd139d67a9
ed9eca0dea20313160c9f8ee463bb89bae5665fa
describe
'24888' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCI' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
918881a236ee20a1fe7ecbb3849afc8b
40d69c1d43db267af52fc5e15ef677a7490d90cf
describe
'3581328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCJ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
b3b0674ef751f75d1726397cd7015930
e753c849e9c6f10dd87ae208d3480d440352fd62
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCK' 'sip-files00052.txt'
440e7be2f398a1c38939068200f5e787
5075559bfdc343a1b16885a1f400cb1943d886d0
describe
'6152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCL' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
39b87cac89f1a84ac3fe708b05cd6ac1
f5238bc56d801aec91cc722439b7bc56949883f7
'2011-12-07T06:54:41-05:00'
describe
'446741' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCM' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
da1f8adc6cda123b370729e0bd7f2f04
efe79f53a6824c7b4218c01b73ef75bff71e8a52
'2011-12-07T06:55:29-05:00'
describe
'75175' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCN' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7c91e4b983e026e6ac1249cb875dd5d1
db35d7cc49278a9afcb0db52f660e6d70a770421
describe
'23202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
cada193b1e77c92c8448fea714106494
faffd2df4b4d3be9320551ee2da6d3848588d229
describe
'23582' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c7fc01ec2ac9223a62e1d05a465a2c11
01baa883dfa30da500b6f61fb48499d2bf392010
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
9700b935c2dcedbd17c5ab60b6f63f96
67c6cd5748fe79cf2b402d71df89b01826c6ee09
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
fccf250c629680dde660e5e9df5596aa
869d682abc6bc5316d045139ecc12d242a5ff210
describe
'5966' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCS' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
f835a2c7889fb1db7ba84fd42f886185
be985309fbb77470bae3bd076d18216c428dc3cc
describe
'446789' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCT' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a04cac57f8798654aaa120989c10b6fe
6c209bb6e24d4abdad0a97302fd2d81cf697fef2
describe
'79200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCU' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
896d49d5e5d65dec3c819fee7d230455
2f2a752520be447eb4479757c3b939c4f618a6ae
describe
'19069' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
04d514d70e770e4ec0818e9a90685cab
0f72dac8c1e73f57ceb38529c127cec489b6a601
'2011-12-07T06:55:55-05:00'
describe
'24264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCW' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
657542fe3bb27e201caa7de27967c6cf
98414c93b914ab507c493958c31ade3f635c2ee6
describe
'3583452' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCX' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9230c0d9a9bf552314e6c71b707fdc33
003b515cf520165bd06045c3a946032075f432dc
describe
'840' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCY' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d3bf7f23051e9e34ab46639f7eb06467
2a44e050561504d874b71c55226d03feed52f833
describe
'6197' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKCZ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6fe8eafb08b3f9ffe5c5c50d9d1dc168
a6772fc28e5a7672109c699c405a95fe0d806a1a
describe
'446311' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b60a362774c6ba16c61a238c5e247a64
e52968751d5e4f1dcbef22527a2569182f1d4005
describe
'99719' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
dc503dfab413629b78af560913e10d5b
622feead285cf13bd0d57a967cc2a2efcb63a372
'2011-12-07T06:56:27-05:00'
describe
'36746' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
5fc0cd76a7f95b7d6a64e7dcf2e896c3
20e72fa01699e3906b95e116504d1783f1985301
describe
'31804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDD' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e2269b8b3f8eacf2dd7857a10bf7c8ec
4e9ca20975fc4b15987f4a90d603b751c909f1e2
describe
'3580028' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a3bb43b280a836644a3f449be1d7fb81
ff8cbfd671bd45f10e59fc597aaeca1b88416c6c
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDF' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3f3046a3bc9c22fa94cc8d85151d73b5
9fe9596a537a0961f0364b07d65e0f821d7c531b
'2011-12-07T06:56:47-05:00'
describe
'7975' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDG' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fa56fcd71a38c32f3e0a2fed5ec9968a
f0954a2c929798dee1bf0f5cb12685ce1002ed08
'2011-12-07T06:56:14-05:00'
describe
'430651' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4a9656aa9b8cb13ec8d74bb55fdb13ff
3f846752f3eb209c827fe0e0cda626d19d515b3e
describe
'98879' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDI' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
9d390ef9abb7ed886a341b4da7215842
9b39f8d6db71b98b9ae04e025b8b0fda5dbd54b0
describe
'10919' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDJ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
3bd24171ab878f22fba1403a1e5b94b9
6766af7eb6cf93c8d361d49af879544cc1a039a0
describe
'28487' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d03e0ee1885a0833f1d437989fcce8f6
f9da2a324b8287659d44be8167ec6a287f0ae615
describe
'3454696' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
7ca68d73255f78835c9dd19cf99d2b19
aca9bd61915bb4a16e49d882a240468841e14f26
describe
'436' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
9cc593929643578f923c504b4ad20089
683e6ecc6de48a9f118ff3ebf2f06eacc17102d0
describe
'6952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
eafc3f394d2b85928d105fb2f4527eec
19fc174ebe4c262363eab480638e0b4c129e9e8e
describe
'430684' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e6c99d9581f35feb149eacff87ee5d69
cf15c04476c1b59b7cbc3522d61622ad6c6f057a
describe
'86597' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
63456addc53e36a5122761af5c79604c
682cf68c2d64e55dd43acbf13ce1e12cdbf670c4
describe
'30805' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDQ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
c2d324e248de69a73d7d81504f46a3b0
4aeb6f50132d93fe15d68eb3b57a52c2157a6897
describe
'28162' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDR' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
49bffbb373788fc8304bd3dca9653e6d
ccf0a7b3efc50baa2a6e06afae2eea22071347dc
describe
'3454804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDS' 'sip-files00057.tif'
784333a672436859d4f7310cc9332491
48c3e98ab17c17b26709c0daf4272d7647edb2ae
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDT' 'sip-files00057.txt'
64bcfa8b54c49e5d0f58b778559a9fc2
ccc3b5bfe229df6a77c63bec9bd920976722c0a9
describe
'7340' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ca8997ca45f4651cc4ebb140f993b783
d1e2219e22f7c3cb5e75c7822a16db1a53b03bbd
describe
'430647' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDV' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
e401bd0c5844995e9168e0bf62afa7f0
a1cb9eb00b66813fcbb7ffc657d590887baf22e0
describe
'106604' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
86d5efaafef65150a78cd0fe3d0fd6f1
365dda236b8562154ed96d89858786f691f96cda
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDX' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b92e82f732bedadcd83fe9be84ded17e
bef395087ea4fe3535b47664a7254bb4396481da
describe
'34749' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8f5bb449f3d20d521e883402070d654b
6741c893dc2293bd38e9fad0f9df8945e5784876
describe
'3455264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKDZ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
74f4c20fae9b9eb500714972d27dd8d7
0ed2930e371d36dda6363196086ac3e5e03a2ec9
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEA' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ff87d81fae931654fcc2c63bd0b0d223
b4c9a72f2ba0a89adfd2ecfeba1f127a10863bc5
describe
'8011' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
d580b54789c2c727dc36651d9acfa574
3e3bdce067676c779165ed36be40a449b80ad31a
describe
'326287' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
afaee56249f2e5db5872cd1ef8cd4c28
c562c477ff5064d2e80916fbdca17d008763b567
describe
'43489' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKED' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f4ae27047eb067ad8f31a2638a6be3f6
24f82edb83baaf1c8a7e5b43cb1a0ecee763bdad
describe
'8359' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2c053fc2eae7908dbfba371a9168d944
cd498194475893ae6ca064ce3fea2364864c1a46
describe
'13866' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
8648c512377ac59a6e7099002bc3e763
0472f5dde9432865608eac78a25ad4faded1430a
'2011-12-07T06:55:06-05:00'
describe
'3455608' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEG' 'sip-files00059.tif'
4e695b6bd298bf390690f9cab40174be
763a0fde503c731c1af6c10fc05fe38812095f05
describe
'396' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEH' 'sip-files00059.txt'
2ed7f3d72d1c80b999c1b618bced2c8f
aeb054417225b45a729c822f0aa2dea8d37eb65d
describe
Invalid character
'4145' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEI' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
37e71fdc6601c4ab2bc70dacc35c975a
b05dd2f3fe18c92167fda7c30e97b4751f1eb8fd
describe
'430616' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEJ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
68ea0e4e482592e7bd7f6404d2c98dcd
d95f0616da3a1503cd86387bc61335dc69b3777e
describe
'70609' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
845cb1377cf8893eb8fb8f6619dad3c4
10561e8af450e3d5ea19f1657be54787702ab1b0
describe
'21418' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEL' 'sip-files00060.pro'
b5eadf72ea7583b97688bb5c7c0fce6d
2168dc2ac4db18ad17fae2dbfd3f83e2c8049f85
describe
'23144' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEM' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
854b5d90242ae6f24f06d3487869bd4f
3cd143de67cc2fa7095cd89834cb426853fccb15
describe
'3454420' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9d82c76b987ebe23dbbb3ff84c861b0b
d51c0cc16bfff7518ba9da761f3b3f4769ae51ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEO' 'sip-files00060.txt'
081e267cba2c75688c0650ac86ade654
ad959a19f8bfbd51ef5982f904a515f4f402607b
describe
'6390' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEP' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ab3011d85cd4e9b353a537ed7c100d27
6dd489b369f467b0a4594b183cdd8fbaa3ee6b6c
describe
'430912' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEQ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
cc43dd07d134bd45d36985a2f06f4e0c
b9cbed0fe2a800dd069be01f3a3f12e54f74ba2f
describe
'94415' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKER' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
42ad6d6f86bf688c1b1680423c4c3d8c
7664c58ee0e8eb61fc3fb15b78074e0b3917d1ad
describe
'15868' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKES' 'sip-files00061.pro'
757237f0fd3cfe310c6a79cde0b710f6
c6bc5ecc2bdfa10d2f1a030a119a50cbeaa3dc58
describe
'27419' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKET' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
4d513009bc66a0db95722cb7109593ca
20a6efbd5c72e1a235aee4e178487629a0094589
describe
'3456900' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEU' 'sip-files00061.tif'
80a4dadb05d7da4fc20b0e5ebc14fb73
59dbfb4a677cfbcdf72e037a268b6094f82b8529
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEV' 'sip-files00061.txt'
0b741743f9ba7c5234ee708ac0c1cfee
baf0d2c06903ea8954ab550717b585c4939251ae
describe
'7108' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEW' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8fe5be025c7af95e573ad00df4d2ef60
c52abe7182480de9c620b57a8e3e6a1e945898cb
describe
'430690' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEX' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1c0f545bd9ec8227c2de406e30865940
dd8b2cb7fa41e7f1d5104c2a90c18b4d7f76a182
describe
'111191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ce2fc8bad30b6d1bc9b3caf33d2c58ad
94fdd9a7299d97d83ff454386eb96bdf9bd18d57
describe
'38259' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKEZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8fa4d4c2994b77e37423c94715677703
7ffb45d4b63de75480f11f672663f4f721c0ae84
describe
'36076' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b5b4768bff2f9816010c5245095a3f1e
7df45d8fa2bc5b15c8e7d1b301379e359f7ea2f7
describe
'3455220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFB' 'sip-files00062.tif'
27882bb1046750edd0ff6a64619a33a0
bce31f5b6cc83e025e4cc77591d580ab1c48cef3
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFC' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c544ab38e63b90b96f9d4f1ee876ed45
49879647e8562bf43f27b9b7a21ed16f4df1d669
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c59d2891bf198d0fba2defffa8025a67
6f45a7f97dd1e83528c24cd646efe0fb20f5e89d
describe
'430954' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5cdf01824b3b35361a67dc04492efb20
7233b5fa0d7e6b06c3ebf90cbd1686bd42f847f8
describe
'112674' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFF' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
eed676c98f8e52601716a237892f9c77
2503771e47d3b9e3b25ec467fe51272a524c8d7a
describe
'38627' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d80025f8b52b8a5b320e7f49287e07b8
b0480ee15d345cd5eed13a5811ab194f9b0c9ab4
describe
'36359' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1b395d2131aa5384936e9bcd53d52463
f5448fd6143989ebba73316563fdf6a8b322feb5
'2011-12-07T06:55:31-05:00'
describe
'3457304' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFI' 'sip-files00063.tif'
02f1cc524405c049d8e546b583cc26f3
514b18bcbef487131aa0958cdaa32e7584f4a5b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFJ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
f63cc2905bbe3f06bbbdbd88d9bff616
74e60d69d1fdeb52cf0ccd3af2c97934b0ee0c9b
describe
'8122' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7b162f1e348fa8cde4c1c98ebcee7571
ed341d042d25ec4ae3e90558ea4e9c4ddc68b839
describe
'430693' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
8c9a4ecec216629ff05fff51cf43fa31
7c6d6a539c59a63f0a3ee848409f32e3a87865ad
describe
'95713' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
6057c05732350feaa30fc4ec1b722bc0
3b6e8b88b887cffc849f46f6afb5a94951e30e92
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
dae8dcd6082e43fd2c31b51aa48d9ab2
daced515f7826c59488c8f88b9b759b2f3f9a562
describe
'30233' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFO' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
83f05c57ac85be7b8408cd8bf78c0c35
1dcd0b6c46a272a34e5ec30bb4ee334b76eea606
describe
'3454908' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a4aefe8e8bbc160ff065531bbf0dfaec
6349f7d4d25e4a6b9a4ed2633442c8fd06b78bcd
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
178bc047c0ec963445af781fea3cb37b
21281521163d835f0cef70d41941a5a2e0bbf95f
describe
'7449' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFR' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
020ad0ef237f6650b4154d6b548366a2
49ec44d641722be54eb58efd95c1cb8e9b0c912e
describe
'6788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
b0ea2ff06c84ca50bbb40b62650029b2
df4d42d6bbaa96e078f8797648ca977df319e379
describe
'6672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
fb4b9ca7ac9a0518753a253d982ebd61
06e16e3374b1affc28bcdcfefcc5eafd43e52bff
describe
'2026' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFU' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
36d7c9f30636a92ab4fa669d4ab10a90
68cd44cbc54be571126d280f981f6a1119f1977c
describe
'3453968' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFV' 'sip-files00065.tif'
60db5dc63b346a3481290814b216c300
c01e07ca90e58fa9059e8945916699e5f2156874
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1dc5d73f7e32843794f3db28d51a7c18
c06e13928c4138c591febda4b2569c39b6d6cfda
describe
'119513' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
77075016a643580b5ea5e04cc899d41e
50dbecaf0e753864106dd26db46ecef064318ab9
describe
'19314' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4215d8cc892673ba5a5e401e834ff53a
ca847034098c2b22db35b3319fa51bf41629ae67
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e6d184905f69f2d02575df2211711c7c
61fbb26319e8a7a7e0809f11d3b00b0841bf2f39
describe
'6378' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
dff5360bf19bcbdbdb15fb64919ed936
2e4437632ccc73cc07adb5dbdacbce735f0adebf
describe
'3452652' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
6ca8b90149b4ff64d3da0a7ec5a9a14a
4c642c7baedc4d1a1c5abca514af50f0c63b2b28
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
331411b924f70158d588457cbadcbc89
4437ad331f5be25389dc87e6366c51d9a7dd118b
describe
'2164' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGD' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
93773cfd38e8db8c5494a13c52f4c779
1f212105a80919553188a59793011687b659e56f
describe
'7973' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
6a0d82a40b7227fe787f99855b5176e5
9efbd36c3549d00d9e49c83b00f1499f68fb18c1
describe
'6610' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
1ece6b4496630db02314ffb2d1cb5f64
de9237296a4caec22208979759669ae0a6b29c90
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGG' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1fa146c3909b9379a880b40990e20dd0
139aee5e9fb1af9ddd284efdd1fd8bb74b01c1c2
'2011-12-07T06:55:27-05:00'
describe
'3453960' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGH' 'sip-files00067.tif'
356360f1a1a21dc1cd861d1498407d2d
68e6c7d812d5280c94c05ff4e31436adfad7a537
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGI' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e83a17656bfc333fb9ed0da52b737318
70ecb6328cd2ae5f04ab19c810fcbb8252f936f9
describe
'430625' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0df4f0c16e034d5afba759605481620c
1dbee5725fcf82669b71fa08310806c494db51d4
describe
'77352' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGK' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ff507f9f78e0d17dfe6b77e775ac3b62
0abfb4bdf7d10a1033673ed932cb268763602658
describe
'20480' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c3910b1ba5cac4e2cc9704ea05711870
dfc443ad78c9e715b2b7eb2954d335e90a4d500f
describe
'24395' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGM' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
bf767bd2e67eb66abe5e54181b7feda1
14d2bf521d837cfb405121f9101b76c9d1ec287a
'2011-12-07T06:54:55-05:00'
describe
'3454204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGN' 'sip-files00068.tif'
9d7aa14a2f2b3594affe229205e58b1c
677a8556df80d496f46f09f6ddfeef1197746d54
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGO' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e7f9d794d37cf0b84a84aa2da10d7d22
43df4ecf412bc900c20cc48da580a569e1e1647a
describe
'6118' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGP' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
ac58bd25ac481c7b82ce41fa4df4b17d
949b905cb97663940dbeccb50f124ebc56a83bfb
describe
'430949' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c55d98bec6d20f6d3f0c09e6d0a24a2a
0501041ca68a3b6b7fb0ce03b4f021337b215e60
describe
'108273' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
55ffc9fe9884c4b3ae1623bb6caa1277
f5db39d3aa9e1c67db77e09c92d9c49f395d3ba6
describe
'38203' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
f285fce12650a2c47d86223200db6432
fbd52058fa99942dbbb6cee509de7517d2d24ac7
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ce79a046f092352b436e85d5031dfd62
ba6745bda55103bec50f4bc7a441e421743ea527
describe
'3457064' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6f337dfe120604afcce6f092597ea588
23f56b5cd91f7f2e08df1a6ab0aaacae43e509e9
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a777b922ae45d361259083dd192b7d1f
c63025e8c95310c6211445bee53c35e35372f13d
describe
'8171' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
592ba3870e7b2806f33d7cdd397b8440
468bccd2bd13b4ffc8fed8db9864a2e91c29aa7e
describe
'430691' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGX' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c36bff06944f48163187da0dfc27a015
da833b53c33eb9ba8d0d9d0f6ae9f1b1b14c9cf0
describe
'96916' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGY' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
75d4507e443bbfee6e079896f2bae3aa
bc076c97c60ba56f5172e28ca29d3c0fb9e0b014
describe
'27264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
c42ad52f267945ba91d016dd1b36ecd8
802b8491403ed9ea7cf716cb2006d1e2c2bf135e
describe
'29859' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHA' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
11324384208609a560cdbcbcaf175f2c
c8b3001a2271a1a35703776d0a336a539f3e60c7
describe
'3454996' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHB' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5cbab84b919def33dfaf16bfbf82f504
75ea77dbc846c786c58ae7930853e2be5fa14136
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHC' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c18d4bdd3ca6f4ad26247d056437c91c
7b667805b003a22bc3bb2df397339bf01dceca22
describe
'7333' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHD' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e9029e9ea777d632b2f858160f594e40
7ed2324e893f6f5ed9f82c7cd3962ccb77e4f27b
describe
'430915' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHE' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
70b5c09c35ad130b9e5693bc3356fea0
8c4748f4af44ba1cf0be5b4f5840053ee955f146
describe
'107063' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHF' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
7111e137ff8c678ed19642c01a202297
b56f8d794e2854d152210cd76afa19d03d3efd2c
describe
'38088' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
6421134af7cce871b2a4af123874a150
27facae9b05418986ae312dcfc71ede16c0e6984
describe
'34695' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHH' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
068d1d388bee61594fc393cb1801ff7e
00cdbd7d224a66d91bf5d1947717cade368a3b02
'2011-12-07T06:56:48-05:00'
describe
'3457220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0da4832f6b2af4ccecd59d6ca6c5bea1
63de1723562fd37f4a384c2e3d01377d9d5c82ca
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
428965839686202589deff167b4255a3
75063e6d2b6012158181fb774c14eb77acec4a93
describe
'8160' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHK' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e7563d030a682b353dee627664bff749
9103474df3eda03e07529417b0e332a475cac7b1
describe
'430634' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHL' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9d23ee261cf692c2b92259417a67bc8f
f5b7075481ae274ed755659822dcfc5407db4d42
describe
'66562' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
3ebf45d88bb6fa9e9d5e602897f666b0
8ee971c4d6df93ca76f85c742ca39cfa69c88a3c
describe
'16718' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHN' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6a410fd60cdcdfe65fbef3a655ceff1c
f3ddc2d09f08f5c3e6c075bc67be3b982c4cd5c0
describe
'20181' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
9193cc0e1c3c592278f2c7318674e3f6
f9916861e03edfb5baa88cdc91cd42ae383ac4c8
describe
'3454000' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHP' 'sip-files00072.tif'
242b97f6edbb361dde0090c0bdeecdb0
6d70730564446f0fce90c68c87f598ed0e2b039d
describe
'680' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
170d3eb3cfec2ddcac3947c91c2411d1
df378e214d9ef97f4ec4666d52a7de35964ed3af
describe
Invalid character
'5377' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHR' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
46b4b0ac678117e5bda15ff04a1b315e
f36e49b82d1102b4cda64e3020fc2ea009c805bc
describe
'430941' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHS' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
95c5151e5f5e1cc031f4a5faa1ed1c68
1e30366c3513aafd71ad4ade5fdf7fb2476923af
describe
'81374' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
0a60068466ceda9e8fe4563baf72a5f8
ddeca9994bdf62c3977c5aeb3e34a8a17eff4560
describe
'25063' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHU' 'sip-files00073.pro'
1fbf97e7aad69ef75f22000a0cf19c90
58275ea8c7d6bb2b8752abaf7bbfa8dabdd0bfb6
describe
'26535' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
08528c26b2c69003501c7b523c3cc27d
92667b2c877b54bc5a65c55d2368b0ff2228d3f9
describe
'3456544' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHW' 'sip-files00073.tif'
0e48d385dad1dd3b6d65cb846d9e5e16
b368a24dbd7e4fd04ea3c51acc7f9555ef6940ed
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHX' 'sip-files00073.txt'
21401c38377b81562f0bb040dc1c1eac
4d4e84b15ebf94e92ae2d58a07c9dd77d90bc314
describe
'6320' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHY' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
aca27baf25061aae2a231cc1662fa2a6
6a25e3be1d83d1eb52299a44b4e4626414f8a45c
describe
'430957' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKHZ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9e5bce7ed8ab5f2390600a87d9d20b27
880b3eac0376ed18077102f71bca6634ecab06d9
describe
'103580' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIA' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
31bd29ac69d1a195a666b50585edfd05
6a610d45437fe5f333ff4fb219b990a2d457adc1
describe
'37832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIB' 'sip-files00074.pro'
bf84d5c212994715cc98056a5f3e9fc3
a969a32c3b4db7c3487e7da28745eeb670cfc976
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIC' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d105193e557abadef1e2d452f89215ea
cfe16a77101a7a93df02070f0a731500437de965
describe
'3457000' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKID' 'sip-files00074.tif'
438d39362814195fec7e51dcf00e73f3
4d46597cbf3314e6bf64d0aa9c74b3965106f6f7
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIE' 'sip-files00074.txt'
fa3e9e740eaf97936b0c7afe1f315c35
2dccb27522c0ca80e1147d831b8964d1bc7f73d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
eabccdcd1fac5c5be2f9b48c2615e6f7
ecb0ca9b9a8b272f6be8701c4ce94645d6ae6d86
describe
'430933' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIG' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a0c82c67f99b5ee71c0c2d2899af8200
9914ec1e4402db6de39243ca3d0ab3bc3ece4516
describe
'112108' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIH' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
3e00f3e5f20d01810600a29b9bfc22bb
cef1967cb25dc97f5896b44ef0d45c4c64af48d7
describe
'25143' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKII' 'sip-files00075.pro'
d8510801fd366e62a0fbd4256d418ea8
8e4c281addc87aa052995c65a08e88aa25a549cc
describe
'33806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIJ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
71029297ed51ec18fdfdedce51c6297f
6f2559002ecd7dc04a688c548d963980b496f770
describe
'3457400' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIK' 'sip-files00075.tif'
31f5f7537ffe377862a923433b3bec0d
619ccf2783892aca38c7bad705e0feed12928626
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIL' 'sip-files00075.txt'
5bfe5c5f13a0c177334ffce3180d606f
74a2271c5cdbf4429f28aeb9e9aa2f935380bb07
describe
'7974' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIM' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
87fc3adfd3cb845e55d006ccadcae98f
ede2e270fa4de1e6fd0c74372ff360ad9e4fbc3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIN' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
49ff03ef649d305060a3dc98777c8742
1bca7f434d8f1b5f9bd5c6526acd8b242ab5aab2
describe
'106290' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIO' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c0f0c39deba5c0754af5fdac4dadc085
ac312cf95467aa003f5b76bae6b653ff831b7d57
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIP' 'sip-files00076.pro'
98daf68c54a1790b27c14b39f85cf00a
340732bf198b33e130982c8146849f4b5342b50a
describe
'34057' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIQ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
d9c586fad8363905ebbff7d7f9f3171b
455b4f16f92cae0f90d2ef619756a86f7e32b835
describe
'3454944' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
91ef2a9d5f1630aaa1dad2b518d79efe
fcf1fb39dee04a70dee337a6af385bb0b8998978
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIS' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d6ff90bb0a568e903ee40dd6e0a6e253
cd765efd74fc8fa6524f07e4e307e8d24333b456
describe
'8299' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIT' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
d704810239c043b6fedc15acd46ef876
6d73f5dff1dce134fd51c35601baea09629dfc1c
describe
'430654' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIU' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d0e2e8701f05d445483227f3fafb3725
d8fd32380824241ea8481000406f928e018cd32f
'2011-12-07T06:54:49-05:00'
describe
'105898' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIV' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
61d769e1200351de73f9ab40908688e1
07cfcf18c9302a7bef140bb4afa74ace9c50d059
describe
'38032' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIW' 'sip-files00077.pro'
609163b20da19e69cfcf9242f5e96a05
c3bbb07c3d9985c6f260231149a1158f5693685f
describe
'34093' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
17495efd9b883d52738f45c4f97c5bf4
ac0f74acd9e9bd0d698fa8c421d097a014713d3a
describe
'3454936' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIY' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b1bda965076774f5c830d0fb9fd8a25b
a0e603608b573ec899e9d37767b1e7dfe2cb995d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKIZ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
41383243bc491ea425da2fd937fecdf9
e8f3ecad466ccce80841ae131f3c1a88665bcfd6
describe
'7892' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJA' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
dc9e89480a55f75db3d58aaca44f8dc1
171302a926e41b88c7e11862c0c9e75cd21409a1
describe
'430902' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJB' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
725ba149bd6dd261533dffcdf6927ffa
bdabff5052ffabd33c4d92863063da0c574e03aa
describe
'75207' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJC' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6d9be96973598abcf1b76956ab309efd
a71734e5c49b425a8c78d4cc20bbaf401b5ae2b3
describe
'23670' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJD' 'sip-files00078.pro'
0f08f59de6c768cd43bf4111da11cc27
872b5314c5df6ec6d97f413a3c071e08da8ff894
describe
'23945' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJE' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
51e95206f8edb91816cfe3e6b6749910
11695154774114672b33eb3ef659dbad4cd89429
describe
'3456264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
e11ff0c2f685f3dd6a9458584633b80f
9e57c078c866363ca5d31f3935113b84842e1ebf
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJG' 'sip-files00078.txt'
7bc0998cd98da0c5041c2b16c2b38de8
3ee9225be3569244a903f8d70bb1e4fb67dfb945
describe
'5927' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJH' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
daeb340732d3f50b628ce1b4589cdee9
23288a2efedb0d4fc0b401246abfe0ec857be5a1
describe
'430649' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJI' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
44da614f95498642487b0ee5a64ae854
5b9e6909b74b4a656605a7a6899d2001e63d97c2
describe
'112881' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1376ca2adcc91f64127951338480e095
6b485f215f8864e5ae9d7a5545f5e3111441dfb4
describe
'16807' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJK' 'sip-files00079.pro'
627f09ccf263972c68840c162caad70f
5185fad57348968b940df228d1978090fbf1eb6b
'2011-12-07T06:56:25-05:00'
describe
'31460' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJL' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5e8f47fe9fac18509b38febdab8bbf8e
e451f85fbc6e26e5c5d5dfcfa1840be51007e7f2
describe
'3455344' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
777049d463577380882d7de40432c860
f25ac1c587ceddee0159cf898a81160ee9aab800
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJN' 'sip-files00079.txt'
67b1950f9faa92271d63088583a3861f
dbbbf2d0bc670d7cc63de06bb4241de9f756c33f
describe
'7763' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
01495c3b44c096e123cb2085cb3b5756
a6f3d7d8d54550296bfc0af2a3533fe2b14d2373
describe
'430689' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJP' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
0b25b6a0c13301e18fb1410f5721db7b
517f8d306710460cd37d4dd4b3bcefd217b56750
describe
'108885' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJQ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
3b2961f04daa05e5e1ee1daa4a5ddce7
d2e70a997bddc28a74c9e7d0563979389a459876
describe
'38125' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJR' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9f9e3e4589bb890a96e85a297d680c4b
c19e1f292bd1972d29e27bb361c4a2a05b6b6bf8
describe
'35233' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
aa5046b48778b4be60b791d777914770
b8d8f553721df6d3f1ecf6d69db4fe603d3b839a
describe
'3455188' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fcb022585cb4545aee5665f75d1a1562
7198e0c8395e8917bba4e5b8737abdc0abab0d32
'2011-12-07T06:55:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJU' 'sip-files00080.txt'
cef7f8b41561378382a147eb05357e7d
6cbae730d7c87b1988fbe669f9af436d46ae32df
describe
'8279' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJV' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
5e2817d9cff320446d6505f131f008be
da53e0087a3f6bce577e6ad37edb8d65b48c4646
describe
'430876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
068d19f66122727074d0b8b7298b1d6a
881da84baa3ff52e565c74c7ce63d98a46e57183
describe
'107854' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJX' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
4407aeff50a2d37cc47096301adcb7a0
5031b665b5ed05ad5ad255e0d6479981fe01d4bc
describe
'37530' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJY' 'sip-files00081.pro'
aecd48a36a31b3906a74735c1c32fa9d
515eafb759ebbdb5ccd6a30c10b2308f9c33dac8
describe
'34560' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKJZ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9059532fff281c54091726e772fe9821
25308a4723b7198542467e977a1fad1720234f45
describe
'3457284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f053d4cb86498de896c880381551490d
d3391ace7c58f210350167686f0aed24ba440ff7
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKB' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1525974e1c5634080ffb7a16c7602098
af09307b225d0df3894e2bf10d6d0d63b070f2ce
describe
'8214' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKC' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
9f3ffd53cb43535c8dd7af1220cb091d
c76be4d518522722e78ff00356338137dff02e3f
describe
'430663' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKD' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
da5442817e11026df1ae973d19221681
d4e25e311a44d53b985589a92a180d4cd49eb5c6
describe
'147155' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a6eaf4c3db1ae6a7918c7ebabea1d274
9d26f57824bbed8b1bb6ff52c67767d3343d8f3a
describe
'3564' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKF' 'sip-files00082.pro'
73f61548eb23b6f62f52d2990a33d7c1
55b2639abd683a05bb0e9f30db3ef327856674be
describe
'36038' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKG' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
06fc0e1678a30bedbee5fece8da06c8c
2caddd52fd961fc2adb8a8b378e297356ae63d95
describe
'3455784' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKH' 'sip-files00082.tif'
731200a15813882eac5131ed8494d436
6ffeffe91f2345eac0b075654971259501e91c46
describe
'191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKI' 'sip-files00082.txt'
9bdf0e8efad078cdb8b6fea74be56587
87ecc13f49932816170535c55acbbc8ac590c76e
describe
Invalid character
'8567' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKJ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
7965ffa1fbe5cc987c66f64a31998c76
1e28b387c3f69b5dfa41e6b71a793c4b1c3ea1d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKK' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
97ef0ac871580055318f2a7f9397bad3
b7f85079fd9f6709a720202605e4792b04657958
describe
'88487' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKL' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a116ef234321c5d7c32a486df2aae9d6
6fa14166a54006aa11fd352059adc5cc5830a449
describe
'25434' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKM' 'sip-files00083.pro'
40f47265f9a3cdd57284dd684428f35e
815bdc8438ee214bf89b7875c22aca02252e7e69
describe
'27036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKN' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0fba0378e5f195a04c26ba2ff2a2d9e8
c4bcc04ebd0fb88c57052105362f35d15ede2e32
describe
'3454620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKO' 'sip-files00083.tif'
74d9f34c4e7ce1398f08e3c4dcd51117
411e7ecd1562ad532f2d69da36ace1a1371749e7
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKP' 'sip-files00083.txt'
2456d0bfd1dc71d31d71c6b73ae6cde2
6d8d949986a5428c6c0dfc2c4a0f788a63f75447
describe
'7175' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKQ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
b30577b32cc6771fddc45276c2975e27
4f4332dc81133aea5fc07a8222a63d98d4cb17c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKR' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
450f2a136db181a5d53b9eab27afe615
53054e8839325f164e200cd637332efad2e617b8
describe
'61857' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKS' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d87d2a0c65682231d31a699ddc7f790c
92dace2c7b9a107c5f9b8c0af295fef71e175528
describe
'14298' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKT' 'sip-files00084.pro'
b9a565a0bbdd5fee8c27ff9cae6ebbdb
f1f7174dab227026a1935eb51808c5ec286c48b5
describe
'18261' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKU' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
dabf4fa6a05819f991aa7493b2cc5a22
eea01810ee5e4ecc3790dd080c00168b6b60f198
describe
'3453672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKV' 'sip-files00084.tif'
83e59ce84a179a1f0357f466f9bdf1a9
14df10972fba929652f64f3abe1d7bad520942b5
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
684f48dd99ca2f8a30f52c10a2b8beeb
bd932e59bc584305e362f75e0e4a421b4e767794
describe
'4597' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKX' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
441aac0d257b4b122cebc047b842f904
e0efa032258a83b32bbe9c2ab7416041bc046ee5
describe
'8887' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b098a576ee7447eeb804a1574e3657b9
04dfab4a403b1b2d991ea511244f4f6fcd350c1a
describe
'6685' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKKZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
5824ebd82e122e3cc04034fbf5f4c0d5
3c3c785aaab08b960753bef63b36adc8a6491fcb
describe
'2036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
38b7d9088ae50a5174428962d4f9b0f4
e0d66eea4c103d5405c9995a73b9c1a7ce944c2a
describe
'3451880' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLB' 'sip-files00085.tif'
3dde3947799a9cacb0fa7452faef9877
e5d334c37e839500b3e35d90150f5d71f5b3dba1
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLC' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
63712348dd7dc62bf35aa4a46aaaec1e
bd7be00f195f38a531f8dd3ca3d11e4feb809402
describe
'313639' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
8ff32afa213b948053be7cf81ce0cd83
657b3e9239dc991b441448eede419ce11ac9508a
describe
'40019' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLE' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
27c3857154f8323756fbd6f87316435c
8005fa4b68ba49ec43dcaad63df3a61fbfeb8c05
'2011-12-07T06:57:12-05:00'
describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
9e0e97b093169ab7c5c10e4716bc482e
873067ad37697b3594b866855d121759afe4f716
describe
'11695' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
22307c2ad573f4412178e8655a9f713a
b694fc60ecbe85232446a8493e0233c9645510b3
describe
'3455456' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
675c2f97d88a0b953e2eeb7b6ac0ded4
ec67946c49c3456295a70ed99d41af0cc4df7081
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLI' 'sip-files00086.txt'
d4abb0ac614a49627e29d86aae2df6a9
d7fb72a0ddc267f3ca201b45057279415e4a6ec3
describe
'3425' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLJ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
618860f442dff6070e5496cfe05cda86
1e8aab56a74063e1be10bb3adac723498830e9d1
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4fc6bdf6b640e06bdddcf46355424a36
2cc52d39e062ecf820104ee56e80c1d480e7ce91
describe
'6741' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLL' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
b88d8db9f398d91aed63872cde414841
c844e873bbc0449077197d82e00986a2aaac1703
describe
'2019' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLM' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
ba4626f3e360f0c782dd9b0ecdf9428c
b9045dd057722a77793b52e1367c2103690936c3
describe
'3451876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7e3420cc0547226295d99e4e68985d8f
06bb6e78f6566ef36fe94ea37fb6253a4308de62
describe
'776' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLO' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
36731ce652d89457cf9a0e63d63ea101
f68d1cbf4e9938d3817da786874088b00a954fe5
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
4932d14416bbb9bf16c8dfc561c42a9f
5db3438eec7b4d9e721a8f30fd5434829e43db9e
describe
'86220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLQ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2fa4f4fcbcfa632ef8bdb7a2c27eb8f8
34bc050210788408705eb5fa9de82a6546404ccb
describe
'26218' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
eab99c375097e2f6856140f649bcb985
c250a45c3ce0099cc9fbac1db00db9eaa462bb4f
describe
'27630' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLS' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d9aab6ba10425a0614ba6d17cc902a27
800961ac5b8e08898061bf5ea601ab0e817dfb2a
describe
'3456624' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLT' 'sip-files00088.tif'
b65af30aa98584e19b912245181196a9
5db2b0eb016ba4a3fb299efe47cfab79eb67dda0
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLU' 'sip-files00088.txt'
f9167f446a783c12e81b28be4911adf9
dc9c2f1030366e6b0ac985e09007bee0a7a06282
describe
'6591' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLV' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
93d83f96b66e2c413c7d50ae42d23abc
316d1c09b047c230ccfb118d812c26fd6d1ce07d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLW' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
962c3d8798fa392400a97718f7d87688
aa2ce1e5426aa31e530bfbeca1677bc60f034326
describe
'90908' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLX' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e1666ea25f00aa46ded9660b015b63e5
20c48a72b24f453c4f7c73620c4b284aaaf4e59a
describe
'14427' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLY' 'sip-files00089.pro'
203a50e06baf3418bb60f084504aab95
d606d3770f5df70bfebcab0c50f4a93d1e68d3ad
describe
'27402' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKLZ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
7caf50929ed2979faea1ce9f5417ead5
261e4a4cd9ca33722e4c838fb8fd8790493da5cf
describe
'3454752' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMA' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0e4e31527a87211e5fdf8bc083d06836
e2460ca219f8e91878838aa78b0df923e6dd5578
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMB' 'sip-files00089.txt'
4c405729b24e7f0b1932a5f86b6ae342
76e7a9cdb824f6c3ce608af7f5a323e1bb32828d
describe
'7120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMC' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ba858522eb8a3d4fb66e6154adb473f7
956917fe5db592483abc7d6359c097cf9003bc33
describe
'430939' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMD' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
fb9e955b5e2278e06d7e2a8642ebb5d5
606cdf79bf5d36c5ba54ceb1c6e66acbcac9e4c7
describe
'106036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKME' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
eaa583add20b8d4466e79e93af33d905
39c4ed33d3d5dd0f141d811a9465e4077240c8f2
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMF' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e3d4b6745f43afd6de9b2a23df4f42a7
b32a7cb0409fd120191065b56ecdd348b91922ba
describe
'34227' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMG' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
91d499110386cd5ccdae74f296197189
0525fe2ef62b7072ad8c8bffe4238afbc0b22804
describe
'3457340' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
84b166dac97ac05d97a17fa9502682ec
7d2f77d1c7bbbc04d87481fd6a00191ca4f3fa1d
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
49080e06838077ffbffe003e5d189a24
4e21eab6dccf8a1d01a7cc980851afb16cfa11d6
describe
'8412' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
6e61d3a05ff79e0d471e6dfaaab7898c
46d62e87cb722c6e8b7047166e1707a6a6865fd5
describe
'430620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e8f2d48d096b03fac239b9712f35a6c7
79fe7b67c5761bfffc8aadb4e37b9f312113cecd
describe
'107721' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKML' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
7a2f0b3c4ff9f3b924d17841040158cb
5b6a1a050215c6a26f03cb4692c59b67e6a67867
describe
'37136' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMM' 'sip-files00091.pro'
de96750a8b8fce9e934f255b65ac4344
eab8bebe98fc3089fe5fa6ccb368d146fba927a7
describe
'34585' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMN' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
79543697b34b6e30c288df0d18ca054c
9b7281c40222a689887c6b6375d914d0dd259857
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMO' 'sip-files00091.tif'
3905f35986332b7e1e1e046e87e21c34
ae656b2d4485f14445fc85da149c441b033f6bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMP' 'sip-files00091.txt'
4a2fbb95dcb69d322d61514d50eb1fc1
2fd65ae8d1d60225eebc67e09249ecbc466114a1
describe
'8256' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMQ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
7d025734669abd6daeb6a11a48d2e9fa
ad41a76985b27062b28823e420b935697868cd27
describe
'430951' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMR' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
de864de573f68b9ca4512fbfc26a83ca
5e40ceca98a0c66d4ba85944749ca0c47facc37e
describe
'87862' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMS' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
b5881a676ce93a5be82b4a87f31abf53
7d23986f862d00d1dd25124754f899869953fc9a
describe
'25539' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMT' 'sip-files00092.pro'
67a89cd700a8dc31f450c88f86df93a7
2133134a403204484462f3f4a13d75db31ffa132
describe
'27053' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMU' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
86d53398ab0cd71a361cc9f435f91654
c5cf47ed5897955faff8986de2f2f9b8bc19a7ca
describe
'3456552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMV' 'sip-files00092.tif'
9a9feac776f874c6d7dbcbe5bb2b7461
a28ebe9c5ab298302f5cbb802047fab27e9d31f5
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMW' 'sip-files00092.txt'
0a8e829bc52f91e9fe1fab80c5acd4cf
2d7e96f91a24e16471ef9e4c0c50326c7e74c08b
describe
Invalid character
'6502' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMX' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
48f7644f34b2d01648fb21baa833ca45
223a8d596658abca147f458cc0271a97f37b6b23
describe
'430935' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
3dc23be204741a0cdd3c7efb29b64b11
9c93199d2d28975426ac36df833a27771c4fa542
describe
'76591' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKMZ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
64a22c9097dba3252c5a5f001de5e3c0
58e725d42206f62aab8d421515c92d7c92cdc710
describe
'23007' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNA' 'sip-files00093.pro'
eaaa18143ed75fcd814589826ef34a5f
7524e9b0127894cf3858fd7c4073cb34b762b3f2
describe
'25792' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
fbd37d6f5424ca1b44a2400c2a3cd6fb
c13d2d7a5a4f50c5425e4124273a5696f6698570
describe
'3456748' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNC' 'sip-files00093.tif'
edbf963a08865d35fadeebda57478cbd
c4bdc7132ec87b848554816220e2df61ca16f9c4
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKND' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ddf316a483a4b764fea70c30bc345e76
ce536e1c4737c994fb765e917eab3274be8e7b35
describe
'6431' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNE' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
871e03147043e1fffb9910a4b7d5aede
eaca93e4c8ca8dc6bfbe4d86a623c910180fa4ad
describe
'438554' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
d0745b91dea798f608ba1a2a5c6d853e
5f0174a0ee41faeff15502632b19ddc4ce1a2b2e
describe
'52191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNG' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f6904af6cd7f397a8467815a90f7f16e
2710897bd9d5982392c9a087034fc6a0e7037f8a
describe
'12783' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNH' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c6ca99c4645c285b32b72fb7fa763730
48727285824b16024ca8456e4fa243e70179af64
describe
'3517424' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNI' 'sip-files00094.tif'
efe650d405a0b0b37039746cb68e96b2
33c8f60cfda6a7c31bc3b054976249648cc8a58b
describe
'3296' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
180acde1662b9e109d50cf1a6480f69f
b26efff2d0b05d9c9b3ee15232538b49d8923d5a
describe
'430931' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
4a28f45adb71b23ab728ee86db7b441c
674ba675ce349b2ceac09016c7dc95c8bc72526e
describe
'89603' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
8590680ddeb6b06797be05fe06a40826
9ec0b6c62f73f24a51013dca9184a35bb02228d1
describe
'30730' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
cc24492d51351274180cec38d3936799
d5c034b522fbb4952ae35e8f58b1fff661601ac0
describe
'28401' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
5d8430f1269a3ce089d5c18e2fb69aa8
0d28555191fe0b27d0478a6c53dc45fb5c64a0c4
describe
'3457044' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
a420ace25e9c44e604f0cc5f57c8c5dc
d42c7b71ebeb4f2399ff557c71fd5b4bccbb5986
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
ac23efd87db3c01573e27225bd01841a
f790072962eaf478e57c838e8277ad1fe7d150dc
describe
'7603' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
112d56204676bf656e7997c9970f07d8
ecaeace2ae7bce000cf6156dfa9fc6e8c34a2182
describe
'430657' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
e38f6de5b79d287ba644477d0561951b
154e919e84424836416b07cb2dbfe50baf687af7
describe
'103915' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
a3efde1a2835b460f07a2bdb353b59b1
11f1c6180b39bf9f5d3da122100248c5db99408c
describe
'35877' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
db35b2ed2ac3e9022b4e4b5dbfa3cd97
ca55cd15259d21a1a4e85f78ae5d8504effbecf7
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8d0089ee54acb94a0df8a30607d8ed6b
793b44c5cb07a5ac9c2a5509a2f7d17304cb4510
describe
'3455232' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
11fa1078ef36eba67f72721e08fcf874
e94108b17dc175b09251f04b664976937f656c26
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
5d26142139007f3a79f5ae8aa8186482
4fa19f8dfc69f79ea406cfba8c6d8a868a5aa00b
describe
'8202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f6e25fb3289f6cfd42672ac6838e5b66
4efab7898d7afe42756230e3969b26808c0000cd
describe
'430891' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
107799d976fd15ba375a0fc3afe8ad0d
f3c02398afa6c04915eaedfdedb028b40ae4c19a
describe
'102792' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKNZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
212b90e9d605d69b53f3221a263640c9
575e3296c8ab359c0f422a4e8caa1c803f65f0e9
describe
'35115' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ac444a176a3a76b3c2a618d62f745398
0e080c598c290c1b9a9347d44b3b5e7c0daa015f
describe
'33630' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
22a1cb631e0c4ab08627394a71924c56
013845e9426c30c41cc7c7467fb5cf4181382cad
describe
'3457244' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
208d78cef8f05a50622187e6f1dbbfd4
cc0509617edb8ca9b6f90db21172ff7afb13cd18
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
fea443204ec7314950f644ae0720e02b
444a16cc4b89110c704a424354ea3091979b0f9b
describe
'8287' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOE' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
c39b33666e757f3c028c67b710e89c27
cb45d158936ae05717be5fad8aaf3c832f4552c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
a1c17e2be65ac9aca2d4a7c4b8780a90
a171540adc6e556f762d7e87909b349e1bba3f38
describe
'85350' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
750508c211df93636302b47676e0d2d1
cc804d6db6dad15d02f2701ba7d33bca24717ab5
describe
'29831' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
6c7c186fd6539e248dd4663f12a2e690
548c797cee0a95a0c6fb2ee72caef6500df07304
describe
'27698' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e0076f08801786c4fb8bc3486047e277
92ce147c26e35235233cd399dcfb4ac1297ba22e
describe
'3454292' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
602924976174b8062bc82fb1b4a2a3d6
e96291298a11efd921702d8f53cd9615363c345b
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
5f623a401854df88d94e2f7fe59999fb
c0840e00b2683fa0d87a5574dbc3102fdc523d25
describe
'6707' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a9d0551a1ac4c1e5bea8accd1107194d
08125fc45ff476d090bde213d686a634030da194
describe
'430946' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
4fa2a0a4f993289e3d601c95c93f3e46
81ae0847e23ce7aadfb69c56c19713e7df54a878
describe
'94948' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKON' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
112bf0cce16d4014f00e854e1b80a4bb
430d816d938fb497bb8be734d7eb5459fa8ec9c7
describe
'26503' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
360763c6f949da44f271e22c85e8159a
988080f56719c820ef1d7f8802a2c0c343322146
describe
'29452' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c5249e70f9f090ae81e503a76df644e6
c67f0c43a02d3e31e4a574b40bcff0525b5f29c2
describe
'3456760' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
46a89dfbe11ea7f646e7c33998ff5003
578946168971448b2585b6407fdc364ec4e35cd1
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4cf4129229df0efeb92c474c7fb6f7aa
f704e699a78924fde469169a9510f54d7ec446d5
describe
'7128' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
774ce44be6a5fed12140646f4236feb5
eb09948eb69e3e2313af65a9be6fe217971f0b94
describe
'430671' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7f71691f5d83a28f866ea0758868c467
5981517c6f78d14af5b676b61e2cf3183c4b6238
describe
'86838' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
bd0d4c1d0cb42b92872e717816ee3978
1fbda9fcfff4998925498792d9e38a6c0c29905d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
07d8aa2975142165bae0d77a498a8bcb
d6d5878abeb1f09864d5f61c345847ef42de9172
describe
'27206' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
753bf3218021d8679d55073117616ed3
979afc9fcfca6c0f0ee4c08f1211214580d57c5b
describe
'3454644' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
a463e002d93fc69fb4c73037fa36329d
729c745d172395a16ec918ee2521baf0dc5c1d44
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
74c9de09340ccfa4d9f446dda7121f6e
7da780427e9566376dcb6bc0707f08ca89c23efd
describe
'7192' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKOZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e90c4afd0089c0da78b063ab70e043f7
0ffc199133ffa37f0d498b67e65b4cf0b40b2bb7
describe
'430687' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f5549b5c55da021b6734264c07ebfa64
1cea21de213fd8d539102fdd12501a84b67b3394
describe
'103297' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f1ebf947f2ff8e3d93aa38be7250fdc4
35929ff90b82afaa82c0ba3d5f48c52968d24e6e
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2d5d5bf4afff9e870737898f37359570
db5a215e63cd23b614465bdf2dfe7c4183b91345
describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
fa27f9dd18039e354cf571ca2b0d4b70
fdef53b9e0053c89756f2b3eb63e395ecbdb359a
describe
'3454952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d42385056f37fb90b5c3562422413439
b6fa16afcca078d3128b3b50e4e7205536d2ef99
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
05dab4e26fb0193c6fb017f9c9f23a7b
b018f0a9ccc520c0b332f42ecabec4771ea6e09b
describe
Invalid character
'7948' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
d91b373a6688b3f6ea2c6edbfb3b8c0c
d6fe21775a1c79fab4cac723db7da0240c222cc0
describe
'430638' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
6e35eaffbbab3f1b48f7ec9776ba12d3
82da15b92276895a030c3c5db706119a6ee865bf
describe
'104017' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
229ed3d2ec265a582ce3440b23a955b1
8b44b1970f41d8a5791f89816a24aa76f6d05e1e
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
86cddf21194ba21cba14b68d67942752
8da8c2a7936180f95db721bf202a2224555d3741
describe
'33428' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
18004820942012e7461ac0bc1dba31ba
4df91fbb95606294770008774b3d1f97828fdcbc
describe
'3455192' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
8da4a1c7aa7c5ef97b3f3947ef867f3b
46243627c5d69489217b242222909a2047b80e5d
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
1d2e00e83b4fedccf9a2b21464a3e07c
5a1417fa3d847af6408a33feacf08481a5fcd7c0
describe
'8313' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
926d78dada67624c1f090b98a08b6fc1
7044659af12780c18ecb2c6dcb57f3b1212da43b
describe
'430692' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
acbeae95bc62f7f2e564e137963d0f52
93a2bfc2c3958603ebe5d348826f85832cc93679
describe
'114916' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
ba99b032a6af8dffedc12a2eb66293a7
c9c91e5c9be524ae7dd4420ccaeb87b3fe675b70
describe
'38909' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
aad07556465b96a684e2f0cb58c0d1a8
0e21091c47974ba49d1fe70218fbb11f51c3959d
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
5dd7f4892d49edd6f2c111466661d7ff
210408d70637f985398bdd6ca9fddd085514a4ef
describe
'3455376' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
c5039a799015b3764963f15d7280db72
5ba1da6fc812c1f47b07fda91aea948ea8427fcb
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
58b406d18fc39027d020a73889f5e506
680f922c610e72d0dcd53d2538670d279e268b04
describe
'8646' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f79babe67e831085920040b2266005ea
97b8d9908cedf3876710dcf5bb3900aa94610dac
describe
'430686' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
a5b681267389de83b1951f78fb0b8834
62781b8d1b2a415d915a13d8637a7021d6a1f5bb
describe
'110764' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b7310b7c9eeb78683b4a5e12883fd758
1c1b81a5e75d06b5481b05d02b51f79e5fa75174
describe
'38664' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
00215dcdc68a05a53d4e8e0fe3894cd4
d185daa1c3858215762ae5814660be4a06ad9f1c
describe
'35439' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c620512b1a9bb7e97de1be31f4d6afb3
23286d02cd0859f99e85c48d284dbd5fed0069e9
describe
'3455024' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKPZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
47fb7cc173fc5946fac52e2a6032413d
60b7f1d4af31ed117a0ad105612e7378cbd2ca94
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQA' 'sip-files00105.txt'
add4e4da6536eff8dd060502ca7ec4fe
4ad76f56550e0b8e7ae5145302813c48b8694b92
describe
'8102' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQB' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
37b7ac663f17e53a5e309c57d97f234d
9da62f8d821e4dfe9d0b28bd250a83d080c4acae
describe
'430694' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
c70bc9ae02861ebb0d40686470bdfa40
d1c3832acbb2dc80fac467b497b547ffb9584df5
describe
'112244' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
dcafdc96426c3ed206c1305cf2893634
7a97689a5d009a6c8c375a6bbdb3b79be707038c
describe
'39274' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
90a7d4ef5466b2a4ab74ba22def6b1ca
0dab919369f006dfe98de3444c5a9320c53b633e
describe
'36571' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
6052457d2211f4cb035cfbab5d331a99
5baa778b0ca185b9faf2e6d87d74c5f69788145d
describe
'3455228' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8eefc59d7e0295905fb181a80b9ba8a1
57d25cdfacc7fb89a9ed8be188198c816a41bada
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
225888454ee0d93262e802bba6768535
8eb35d34f4d059270ca4775a9f6552511b4a988b
describe
'8569' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQI' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
932dca84b3f5267af92f06fb7fca6252
aaddd88a3d21a3c5969cf796896d46822f689022
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e6a8f644f58ddc9197f1016448f60619
751b30ddc88f7246b5fac6e37702ea5a51e41573
describe
'111471' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
55838bd2fabce649e15b0fc98f3f306f
257bd01d4ac376377a062c1a94693259a5710927
describe
'39150' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQL' 'sip-files00107.pro'
13594925ad8bb9b4b9c42b3266518445
23eed7ff36bc37ae61775c1fb080426348b450bd
describe
'36588' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQM' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
a0aa1117a9abc8162e4cac5697408a63
ca0e0ffc453892de9b9ae4aa3903bbb129761af5
describe
'3455112' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQN' 'sip-files00107.tif'
5d2fb023555a217bab1a10aff436b0f1
c9cc9b155d1b27a89ac9bf46218b18dc0fb1a6a1
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
fc0c3e4084680cc7dc84e100d108eb86
723e0fcd86677cc994e69396f863de4e5a13e811
describe
'8506' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c0e4438228af3ae86c7fab83f9c2727e
95edebb88c6238fbf53e2b12d067b8eeefcaefdf
describe
'430653' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
8c45304845dc7f188bf79af2adaf5dab
9317d060b8eb4e1affde75d571211a1331e1ff12
describe
'88021' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQR' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
caf38f6816e4c407b9ae33a6f406f2d0
34a6559ec6cfea5c074bb89bf1cedb5733716941
describe
'30243' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQS' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f6b3edb82dfb7b4684baf2634780e4f8
8464a5da6a834a28ac28d88d1b6d8b1d06db631d
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d574694da56780f39fbff8807188130f
6586e84d7c5a6ae83ad45b92cb995a44bc44f941
describe
'3454400' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
45c86a70b56fc1b4cc7bf050cb65ac3b
4254a4de336f0d80553069a312fec877df13aeff
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
bcb32b7ac583751834fbf43a7728711f
882859cf827b06c84fb823ce24502d56aea1de86
describe
'7042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
56344097a63dae22fde546ef2664bf2d
8db8b8fe2ce140bab355b999232a8cf561c450ca
describe
'430643' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
b164c7e0fb5eb8104786a132d875fbf1
6b0fde5066cabd791de95e38b33adf856db84688
describe
'102537' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
0e91d00b28caeab4ae34fd53cc96e52b
70a933d1ef5ad7d5e0326630a4d5a418bd8df4c6
describe
'48061' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKQZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9de45d99f946f5e472bf4b9a58075b21
13f4ce5f1565e270c885b4c61fdc5eca3531df4d
describe
'28213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
771cfdc94b9e8a00bba683203de857ae
a4e5a75e9937f9704886043516a2d1200169dce1
describe
'3454896' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
65575574dabc87bda3e6f9d6bfe4e5d4
4e01ce9a71083160f8ab087034b25736abd6cdbf
describe
'2027' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
cbdb198a2c4f244d83850c835ffbd90e
bc49fde69c642fb90c428dd925dbf10119cf832a
describe
'6988' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f99a11543e3d454172876b426e03bd6d
af00bae286c57de40446ba2f61a4ae0e5b90249a
describe
'430659' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
eb2b69e2a46dc7bc80c1b0195010555e
dc0334471ede371f9b643e55326099690d8f94a1
describe
'61904' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
92aa631e6d09710cb9ee3c5cc38c9ed1
3d5258efc4a9cd52c96479954993e97e4d093127
describe
'25471' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRG' 'sip-files00111.pro'
bc2a55257db896c2bf3ace28ac89b4a1
4dd46117145fa5e3a63f3e19cd0898f8229bf48f
describe
'17854' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
2194de1e6099cb89124b15bc23875dc9
cfcdb18c9912dbaa17d9f3d170f88eeeca3660e2
describe
'3454020' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
30efd93907474a052079df8bc61f48bd
5b1683c548ff2ab6ba00c7f5dd5f153d9c9ee36b
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e55323a70de37079e42a2892340bb790
a920de352bc49e64f611089043f73667fb9e4fc0
describe
'5168' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
85e10702f918127a64260c4e26102df7
a634ee18c5e8de21b1503bd96a07dac55d430830
describe
'430669' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1091c677a0585216752c51b745d36b8c
b901e9ac894787ac8f6155cac97f7ba6a8715af3
describe
'77545' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
ebeee8e1f6a0e47c208b4cd8365f9d17
182009e31766c3d21ff0f469bebbdee94d27e0f7
describe
'41869' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRN' 'sip-files00112.pro'
46cfda9f2b03d1431a7dbfc1a6a5d5b2
26109663ad95fc24fe574bfff2e470ea10444f8d
describe
'22093' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d4dffb88b3fc25108739c37fcb60c188
0fa5c9783dd64ddbf1bf266bd1701b7e05e6eedf
describe
'3454328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
884599b5abcda13b79bec87310726dc2
4ce65a7f574950f0e3540bdcdb452a0ab755476c
describe
'1862' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRQ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
264f85598c5f2d0d39498e72cf8baa3c
402ba9dabe762bd277d04c65945e41eaa2cd146d
describe
'5712' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
a06e1e386abb39017f4b2e8c5981f5cd
cf5a33d7330627e95ffd8e587d4636f563e8c3a9
describe
'430942' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
cd902f24436d522a46682a68770cd613
50dc52fb562b33bcc48f5d616623b8d569d517a6
describe
'89681' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
3dd4c9a7d996554da8c0414f333293e1
116acf535483e0a7384a09ed2c9269e5d085ca43
describe
'55220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABATfileF20080504_AABKRU' 'sip-files00113.pro'
992d1f149ee58f2af98006aa3960b9c2
b492c7fbe0553aed7b7445ba28a67b9f255bd57d
describe
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73,CLARK &Co,

TATIONER


By HARRIETTE R. SHATTUCK

THE WOMAN’S MANUAL OF PARLIA-
MENTARY LAW

With Practical Illustrations especially adapted to
Women’s Organizations . . . . : . 75 cents

OUR MUTUAL FRIEND

A Drama, from Dickens . : . : 7 7 25 cents

LITTLE FOLKS EAST AND WEST

Stories for Children. Illustrated . ‘ . + 75 cents

MISS MIFFINS’S WINDOW

A Christmas Story. Illustrated. (/u press.)

LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS BOSTON







Littte Fotxs East anp West

“PRAIRIE STORIES”
“MOTHER GOOSE STORIES”
“FAIRY STORIES” AND
“TRUE STORIES”

BY

HARRIETTE R. SHATTUCK

BOSTON 1892
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS

10 MILK STREET NEXT “OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE”?
COPYRIGHT, 1891, By LEE AND SHEPARD

All rights reserved

LITTLE FoLKs EAST AND WEST

TYPOGRAPHY AND ELECTROTYPING BY
C. J. PETERS & SON, BOSTON.



S. J. PARKHILL & CO., PRINTERS, BOSTON.
DEDICATION.

TO

(My Sister Slizaheth,

IN MEMORY OF THE DAYS WHEN WE WERE LITTLE
FOLKS TOGETHER.
CONTENTS

PRAIRIE STORIES
Da, BUNCH AND Ony .
Buncn’s Movine Day.
Buncu’s FLOWER GARDEN

How Louis rounp a Home

MOTHER GOOSE STORIES
HICKERTY PICKERTY’s PARTY
More azpout Little Miss MurFer .

THREE LITTLE WISE MEN .

FAIRY STORIES
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE Fay
LirTLe LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND

How THE Moon GoT HER HALo

TRUE STORIES
A LITTLE Marp oF Lonc Aco
A LITTLE MaIp oF To-Day

WHAT MARJORIE SEES IN THE MORNING

77

87
07

oo~

Ly

o




Ling?
wth ds

aay.




ey
ae OO posit Mann

DA, BUNCH AND ONY.








Rass
SS YS

WS



A WAS a boy twelve years
old, Bunch, a little girl of six,
and Ony, a tiny black pig.
The rest of the “little folks”
will come in by and by. Da,

Bunch, and Ony lived at

~ Plum Creek—‘‘way off out

West,” but why it was named
«Plum Creek,” I’m sure I don’t know, for there were
no plums ters and no creek either. Da and Bunch’s
real names were David and Blanche, but they had
been called these easier names by little Bunch her
self, before she could talk plainly, and now everybody
called them so. ‘ Bunch” was just the right name
too, for she was a real little bunch of a girl, as plump
and round and rosy as a ripe cherry. They lived
with their father and mother in a little sod house in
one of the hollows of the rolling prairie, five miles
4 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

from any neighbor. Ony lived with his brothers and
sisters, ten in all, almost anywhere. He ran about
wherever he liked all day, and rested beside the old
mother pig when night came. As real name was
Ebony, because he was black all over, while his
brothers and sisters were black and white spotted.
Ony was always clean, and so smart and cunning
that sometimes they let him run about in the kitchen,
and then he would eat corn from Bunch’s hand and
drink the buttermilk left from the churning. Bunchie
had no other pet, for she was a poor little girl; so
she made a pet of Ony, who followed her about
everywhere she went—just like ‘Mary’s little lamb,”
and showed a great deal of love for her, even if he
was only a little black pig!

The children’s home was a very pleasant one,
though it was only a house built all of sods which
they dug from the ground and piled one on another.
There were two small windows, one low door, and a
hole in the roof for the stove pipe. There were three
rooms opening one into another, all of the same size,
nicely plastered and with wooden floors.

There was a stove too, in which hay was burned in
summer and wood in winter, two beds, a bureau (in
the upper drawer of which was the Plum Creek post-
office), six chairs, a small table, and two shelves full
of dishes and the pans for milk. The house was quite
low, so it was easy to throw the farming tools upon
the roof and get them out of the way. Sometimes
en

DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 5

the sod roof looked very queer, all stuck over with
hoe-handles and rake-handles and other kinds of han-
dles. A little way from the house was the sod cellar,
a small room made by digging a hole in one of the
little hillocks of the prairie and shaping it with sods.
Here the milk was set for cream, the pork was salted
down and all the food was kept, except the yellow
squashes, green melons and ripe corn, which were
stored in nice, clean wooden sheds.

Then there was the shed thatched with hay, where
the three strong farm horses were kept, the sod stable
for the cows, the little pond for the ducks, and the
sty for the pigs, though only the old mother pig staid
in the sty, her large family liking better to trot about
all over the farm and visit the other animals. Of
course, there were hens, too, but they lived anywhere.

Three times a week came the mail, brought by a
tall man on horseback, who wore a soft, wide-brim-
med hat, and always smiled pleasantly at little Bunch,
as she stood in the doorway watching him. He
would stay all night and go away the next morning
to Valloosa, the county seat, carrying with him the
letters and papers which the Plum Creek folks wanted
‘to send to their friends. Sometimes he would have
as many as seven or eight letters, and he always
brought a good many papers, for out West the men
and women want to know all that is going on.

Although they saw so few persons, Da and Bunch
were not lonely. Da had plenty of work to do. He

Se Oe
6 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

milked the cows, harnessed the horses and took care
of them, and helped his father about the farm. Bunch
and her mamma staid at home and. “did the work,”
the little girl not doing a great deal except to wipe
the dishes, set the table and feed the chickens and
ducks, because she was too little to do anything
else. When her work was done she would run out
on the prairie, and, with Ony at her heels, would
chase the round “tumble weeds” and run in the wild
wind until her cheeks were as red as roses and her
gown was covered with the prickly sand-burrs that
grow in the tall prairie grass.

The farmer was very set in his ways. He had just
such a time for everything, and then and only then
must it be done. The mother was too busy all the
time to think when she would like to do this or that.
There was always a next thing that could not wait.
She had to work very hard, and often Bunch would
see tears in her eyes and wonder about it. Once the
mother had lived in Valloosa, and er mother lived
there now, and she had not seen her for so long!
That was why there were tears in the mother’s eyes
sometimes.

The bright summer had gone, and the fall had come.
The prairie roses and sunflowers were dead, and the
tall grass was yellow and dry. In the night the sky
was lit up in many directions by distant prairie fires,
and the mother had warned her husband several times
that it was time to make his fire-guards; that is, to
DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 7

plough a wide path all around his house and sheds so
that if the fire came, it would be stopped by the
ploughed ground, .s there would then be nothing
more to burn. But the farmer had set apart the
thirtieth day of the month for this job, and he would
not do it sooner. What he wanted to do, he always
did, no matter if it did not seem best to other people.
We shall see whether he was sorry that he did not
plough sooner. The twenty-ninth had been set apart
for going to Valloosa to sell corn and to buy some
things they needed at home, and the mother was
going to spend a few hours with er dear mother, and
carry her some new butter and a fine squash for
Thanksgiving. Da was old enough to leave now. He
could take care of Bunch for a day, even though she
was such a fly-a-way!

So two of the strong horses were harnessed into the
big wagon, the wagon was filled with corn, and away
they drove, leaving the children to take care of each
other and the animals. All went on beautifully. Da
did his chores, while Bunch ran about with Ony and
kept out of mischief quite well for a fly-a-way. Soon
came dinner-time, and the children sat down to eat a
nice cold dinner, fixed beforehand by their mamma.
They sat a long time eating and playing, for they had
invited Ony to dinner, too, just for fun, and were
much delighted at the way he acted. They put him
into a chair and tied a bib under his chin and then
Da fed him with mush and milk out of a spoon, while
8 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND IVEST.

Bunch tried to hold his “hands,” as she called them,
to prevent him from rushing right into the big yellow
bowl of milk and gobbling it all up at once.

Suddenly, Bunch looked up and cried, “Oh, Da!
see! see!” and Da turning quickly and looking out of
the window, saw something that made his cheeks and
lips turn white. It was a prairie-fire, not ten miles
away. Da ran to the door and looked eagerly to see
if the fire was coming toward them. Bunch followed
him, and Ony, left to himself, plunged, bib and _ all,
into the milkbowl! What cared he for prairie-fires !
Yes, the fire was coming that way; the wind was
rising, as it always does when a fire comes, and in a
few minutes the great prairie all around them would
be in a blaze, for it takes a very, very short time for
a prairie-fire to travel a great distance; even a horse
cannot run so fast!

‘“O, why didn’t papa plough sooner?” said poor Da.
But there was no time for regrets, or for talking.
Something must be doze, and at once.

‘Here, Bunchie, you sit right down there, and don’t
you stir till I tell you,” said the brave boy, in such a
tone that the frightened little girl did not dare to
disobey. She sat down on the doorstep, and Ony
coming along just then (with his black face and feet
spotted with milk, so that now he looked like the rest
of his mother’s family, and with the bib dangling be-
tween his feet and tripping him every step), Bunch
threw her arms around him and hugged him tight
DA, BUNCH AND ONY. 9

till he squealed and struggled, so that she had to let
him go, when he sat down beside her and began to
lick the milk from his feet.

In the meantime, Da had run as fast as he could go
to the horse-shed. He knew that the only thing he
could do was to get with Bunch on the horse, and
when the fire came near the house to ride straight
through the flames on to the burned ground beyond.
If his father and mother had been at home, they might
have fought the fire back with wet brooms and bags.
But he could not do it alone. AJl he could do was
to save darling Bunch. He found the horse all right,
and hurried with him back to the house. Then he
tied Bunch on the horse’s back with a blanket, threw
an end of the blanket over her head and told her
to keep still. Then he sprang up behind her, clasped
his arms around her, and catching tight hold of the
reins, drove straight into the hot, roaring flames.
Brave boy as he was, he shrank from the scorching
heat as it singed his hair, burned his hands, and
almost blinded and choked him. But on went the
horse, leaping up high to get above the fiames, and
bounding over the prairie with terrific speed, brave
Da and little Bunch clinging breathlessly together
upon his back.

The farmer and his wife left Valloosa in good sea-
son, and drove homeward. As they came near home
they saw the smoke, and the farmer began to wish he
had put out his guards before. “O, why did I wait?
IO LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

I'll never wait again” he said, “if I can only get there,
Pll always plough in season after this!” When they
came still nearer, they saw that it would be only with
the greatest haste that they could reach home and
fight the fire back from their house. The sheds and
barns must go. ‘But where are the children? O,
why did I leave them!” said the mother in agony, as
they hastened toward their home. They urged the
horses on, and got there just in time to beat back the
fire from the house at great peril of their lives, every
minute thinking of the children, but not having time
to look for them.

Soon the fire swept by, leaving ruin where before
there had been plenty, and then the anxious father
and mother saw, slowly coming toward them over the
black burned ground, the grey horse, with almost
every hair burned off, carrying on his back what
looked like a very big bundle, but really was little
Bunch all safe and sound, and Da, very much burned,
and with a throat so dry that he could not speak
for many hours. But they were safe, and that was
enough. And what is this coming along behind them,
this little burnt fellow on four lame legs? It is Ony!
Ebony no longer though, but a rusty brown, with one
ear nearly gone and no tail left to speak of, —lame,
half-blind Ony!

Ony had followed Bunch, of course, as he always
did, and had even run after her through the dreadful
fire, and here he was home again. But what was this
DA, BUNCH AND ONY. II

around his neck? A string and a rag! The last of
the calico bib that Bunch had tied around his neck
before the fire came! Poor little faithful Ony! He
was not quite the same lively little fellow for a long
time, for he had to limp about, instead of trotting
along, and often would run into things, too, for one
of his eyes was hurt. Bunchie kept the piece of a bib
to remember the fire by and hung it on the “Home
Sweet Home” over the door. After a while Ony
grew strong and well and big and he always ran after
Bunch whenever he saw her, just like a dog, even
when he was grown up. But he never had to run
through any more fires, for after that, just as soon as
Autumn came and the grass grew dry, and the wind
began to blow the big round ‘tumble weeds” over
and over across the prairie, Da and his father took
the plough and the horses and ploughed all round
the house and the barns and the sheds, so that no
fire could ever come near them again.


BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY,

V'YBODY moves the first of May,
and so we must.”
So said little Bunch to Miss
, Penelope Cora, as she sat talking
wise" with her and Dolly Dikes in their
own little play-house, which was made of a big, strong
dry-goods box that a man had left there one day and
brother David had fixed for his sister. Da had made
two holes in it for windows, and all one side was the
door. Outside there was a real door-bell, and inside
areal room. On one side of the room was a shelf,
and in one of the corners a little, make-believe stove,
made out of a tin dipper turned upside down. On
the shelf were a round stone, the nose of a tin tea-
pot, half of a blue sauce-dish, the handle of an iron
spoon, the cover of a pepper-box, four wooden button-
moulds and the neck of a green glass bottle. In the
middle of the room was the table—a_ match-box,
covered with a piece of pink calico. Three chairs,
made of green pasteboard and with very weak legs,
stood stiffy against the wall.


BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY. 13

This was little Bunch’s play-house. At present, the
cups and saucers and plates and bowls and tureens
and spoons and all the other dishes (for those were
the veal names of the things on the shelf) were all
nicely washed and set in a row. The three weak-
legged chairs had just had their legs straightened,
“for the fifty’leventh time,” as Bunch said. Dolly
Dikes was sitting on the stove, the fire being out for
the day, and Miss Penelope Cora, in a scalloped white
gown, was gracefully leaning against the table, her
real hair tied with a pink ribbon, which you wouldn't
have known was a piece of the table-cloth if I hadn't
told you. Miss Penelope’s housework was all done,
and she and Dolly Dikes were “receiving” as they
used to do when they lived in New York, before
Bunch’s papa came out West to live and ‘“‘try to
begin life over again.”

New York was very different from Plum Creek;
and so was Boston; and Vermont too, where Grandma
lived; for in those places Bunch used to have a great
many little playmates — there were Ethel and Mar-
jorie and Beeze (whose real name was Louise) and
Emma and Emma’s little brother and Lena and baby
Francy and Madie and Altie and a good many more,
while here, off on the prairie, there were only Da and
the dollies and Ony the pig, except once in a while
when Louis used to ride over to see Da, which was
not very often, for Louis lived five miles away, in a
sod house just like Bunch’s home. So the little girl
14 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

had to play by herself most of the time and, as to-
day was the first of May, she was playing ‘“‘ move.”

But where was there a new house for Bunch’s family
to move into? That was a serious question, for there
was no other doll-house that they knew of for miles
around. And really there was nothing the matter with
this house, only it was the faskzow to move and sc
they must move.

The little girl crouse and thought for a long time,
and then, gayly enpping her hands, she said, “O, I
tell you what/ We need'nt move ow¢ of the house;
we can move zz the house,— house and all!”

This idea delighted her so that she danced wildly
up and down and round and round, while Miss Pene-
lope and Dolly Dikes nodded their heads in approval,
and the three poor chairs fell together in a heap on
the floor at the very thought.

To be sure! There was no rule about ow folks
move, only they must move. So the next day every-
thing was carefully packed in mamma’s starch-box,
and then the play-house and the box of things were
tied on Da’s sled, which had been made into a wagon
by turning it upside down. Da was to help, of course.
He would be the horse, and a fine one he was. But
after everything was packed and ready, Bunch sudden-
ly remembered that she hadn’t decided where to move
to. Da wanted to move down by the creek, but
Bunch thought that was too far from home. Then
Bunch wanted to move into the prairie-dog town, but
BUNCH’S MOVING-DAY. 15

Da said that the dogs would take Miss Penelope for
a root and eat her up. It was too cold on the hill
and too wet behind the barn. The children looked at
each other in despair. Where could they move to?
At last Bunch said: “ Let’s ask Dolly Dikes. She’s
very centsubble.”

Dolly Dikes sat in the wagon holding the reins all
ready to drive to her new home. As Bunch ran up
to her, she dropped one rein, and without saying a
word pointed straight to the place which they had
just left.

“She wants to go back,”' said Bunch, ‘she don’t
want to move at all. .

“Well, I think that zs the best place, Bunchie,”
said Da.

“But I wanted to move,” cried Bunch. It’s the
first of May, and ev'ydody moves.”

“T tell you what let’s do,” said Da, “we can move
all the same and play this is a new place. Don't you
see, Bunchie?”

“O, yes,” said the little girl, who was always ready
to make the best of everything, ‘‘so we can! And
we'll call it 557 West Fourteenth Street, instead of
143 Fifth Avenue.”

So the horse was harnessed into the wagon, Miss
Dolly took the reins again, and off they all went, Da
and Bunch side by side and Ony trotting along be-
hind the wagon. I suppose they realty went up Fifth
Avenue to Twenty-eighth Street, and then up to the
16 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

Forty-second Street Station, and so down to Fulton
Ferry, and then up again to 557 West Fourteenth
Street, though, of course, they seemed to be only run-
ning across the empty prairie and up and down the
rough hillocks and in
and out of the mounds
of the dog-town, with
their little ans
feet flying ~~
and their ~~











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wo dons,
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bright faces shining in the
glow of the noonday sun.

And when at last they came back and
went to housekeeping in the new home,
as they called it, how much finer it seemed
than the old one! The sun seemed to shine in more
brightly through the windows and the garden was
surely much better and finer.

“This is a much better resindunce than our old

oy
shill Al
Bu i)


BUNCH’S MOVING DAY, 17

one, isn’t it?” said Bunch grandly, as she introduced
Miss Penelope and Dolly Dikes to their new home,
“for,” she sweetly added to Da, ‘‘of course it 7s a
new home, if we féay it is, isn’t it, Da?”


BUNCH’S FLOWER GARDEN.






UNCH wanted a flower garden,
x/ oh, so much! Her one sweetest memo-
) ry was of the beautiful garden at grand-
J ma’s, “way off” in Vermont, where she
had played when she was “littler than
now.” In this wonderful garden of grandma’s were
big white and red roses, great yellow marigolds, scarlet
poppies, feathered pinks, tiny lilies of the valley,
waving prince’s-feathers, sweet williams, china-asters,
bachelor’s-buttons, lady’s-slippers, candytuft, mignonette,
“bluebenas,” and, best cf all, a round bed of lady’s
delights. How Bunch loved them all! and how much
she wanted a garden just like this for her very own!

She did not fret about it though, for she was a
sweet little girl and tried not to trouble mamma, and
thus make her work all the harder. But it was too
bad that here in Nebraska there were no flowers to
speak of, only the tall, wild, yellow and blue flowers
that grow in the stiff prairie grass. There was not
even any real grass such as they have in Vermont:
all the grass around Bunch’s home was tall and stiff
BUNCHS FLOWER GARDEN. 19

and thick, and not a bit pretty. ‘Wild grass” they
call it, and the velvety grass that grows in Vermont,
and makes lawns and meadows, people out where Bunch
lives call ‘tame grass,” and sometimes they bring a
root all the way from the East to plant and keep very
choice as a great treasure. Bunch’s father had not
thought to do this, so there was not even any ‘“‘ tame
grass” for the little girl’s garden.

Bunch thought about her garden a good deal, but
she went on having as good a time as she could without
it. Sometime it would come, she knew. And one
day it did, but in a very different way from that she
had expected, as most good things do.

The top drawer of the bureau at Bunch’s house
was the post-office, and all the letters and papers that
were sent to the people of Plum Creek were put there
to be called for. Sometimes a circular or a pamphlet
would come, addressed only ‘“P. M., Plum Creek,
Nebraska,” and then Bunch, who always looked over
the mail, knew that it was meant for her father. For
she knew that “P. M.” meant ‘ postmaster,” and she
thought it meant nothing else. Once she was well
laughed at by brother David for this mistake. She
read in a book that ‘the train was to start at three
P. M.,” and she thought “three P. M.” meant ‘“ three
postmasters,” and asked Da about it. He laughed
and told her that “P. M.” doesn’t afwvays mean
“postmaster.”

Well, one day there came quite a large book ad-
20 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND VEST.

dressed to the postmaster. Bunch opened it eagerly,
and when she saw the covers she screamed with de-
light: “Oh flowers, flowers, look at the flowers |”
and, running to her father, she said: « O may I have
it, papa, say, may 1?” Her father was willing, so the
little girl clasped the book to her heart and. ran off
to be alone with her new treasure. The book was
Fick's Floral Guide, and many folks would have thrown
it into the waste basket. But Bunch was perfectly
happy with it. She pored over it all the rest of the
day, and when she went to bed her ‘flower book”
was under her pillow. Perhaps she dreamed about it.
At any rate, when she woke in the morning she had
a beautiful idea. She said nothing about it, not even
to Da, but as soon as the dishes were done, she bor-
rowed her mother's scissors and began to cut the
flowers out of the book, very carefully, so as not to
spoil them. It almost broke her heart when she had
to cut into a big rose that was on the other side of
a tulip, but she liked the tulip best and she couldn't
have everything ! By and by, the flowers were nicely
cut out and then she gathered them in her apron and
went softly out-of-doors.

Da had been working all the forenoon in the corn-
field, and when he came home to dinner Bunch met
him with dancing feet and beaming eyes. ‘Da, O Da!
come! look! see my garden!” And she led him to the
spot where her play-house stood, and there, beside it,
neatly stuck, one by one, on the long spears of prai-
BUNCH’S FLOWER GARDEN. 21

rie grass, were the paper flowers she had cut from
the big “flower book.” At first Da thought he szas¢
laugh, they looked so stiff and queer. But a glance
at his little sisters triumphant face prevented him.
So he only said, “Why, how nice! Did you do it
all yourself, Bunchie?”

e.








J) Rael”
\ econ i

Ni gS vied an

fit fut

“Ves, I did it! It’s my garden! O [ve got a
garden at last!” And the little girl threw her arms
round Da’s neck and burst into tears of joy.

“Why, Bunchie, I didn’t know you wanted a garden
so much,” said the kind brother, kissing away the tears.

“O I did, I did! I almost thought I should cry
22 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

if I didn't have one. And it’s come, it’s come! Of
course it isn’t gzzte so good as truly flowers, ’cause
they smell,” she confessed, “but then my garden will
last always, and won't die like a truly one, will it, Da?”

“No, dear, but you'll have to take them in when
it rains,” laughed Da.

“OQ yes! and won't that be fun? Why, I can have
a new garden every day if I want to. I can change
them round, and — everything!” And with fresh de-
light the dear little thing danced around her “ garden
made out of a book.”

But Da began to think very seriously, and the re-
sult was that he did not spend the dollar that his fa-
ther gave him for sorting letters in the post-office for
a book as he had intended. And when the next
Christmas came, there came with it a package addressed,
“Little Blanche, care P. M., Plum Creek, Neb.”; and
in it were seeds and seeds and seeds! And, the next
summer, Bunch had a real flower garden, like the one
in Vermont; for Da had remembered this, too, and
had sent for marigolds and lady’s-slippers, candytuft
and prince’s-feathers, poppies and pinks and china-
asters and bachelor’s-buttons and lilies of the valley
and mignonette and ‘“bluebenas;” and “ best of all,”
said Bunch, “there is a darling little bed of lady’s
delights ’most ’xactly like grandma’s.”


HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME.

=/ VERY little boy with a very dirty
face and a very ragged jacket, a
tattered fur cap pulled down over
his ears, two cold hands in his
trousers’ pockets, and a pair of old
shoes much too big for him! Such

.- was Louis, when Mrs. Maxwell
found him. And he was screaming at the top of his
voice, “Extra! extra! Telegram, extra! Post, extra!”

It was late; nearly all the men had bought their
papers and gone to their warm homes. Louis could
not sell one. He had kept up his call for a long
time and now he began to grow discouraged and the
tears started in his eyes, for he knew that the five
cents in his pocket would not buy him a supper and
a bed to sleep in, too. This was the first day he



had tried being a newsboy, and somehow he hadn't
succeeded so well as the other boys. Before to-day
his mother had taken care of him, but last night she
24 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

did not come home at all and Louis knew he should
never see her any more. He had never had a father.
And now his mother was gone too. She used to be
very kind to him and give him bread and sometimes
cake. But they didn’t get much to eat. It cost a
great deal for their one little room, and even much
more for the dresses his mother must have to dance
in at the theatre. She must dance every night and
look bright and happy and pretty, while her heart
was breaking; and she would come home very late
and cry herself to sleep, and wish that she might die,
if only it weren’t for Louis. But now she was gone.
There had been a terrible fire the night before.
Louis had heard the alarms and had stood spellbound
at a distance and seen the big theatre all in flames.
He asked no questions, he did not even cry; he
knew that he should never see his mother again.

It seemed a year since that time, as now he stood
on the street-crossing, watching the other newsboys
running about playing with one another and quarreling
over the bits of cigar stumps or apple cores that they
found in the gutter. He had sold only two papers,
and it was almost dark. Just then he saw a lady
coming, and he thought he would try once more.
Perhaps the lady would like a paper. So he screamed
“Telegram! Extra!” quite courageously. The lady
was passing by without minding him when a look in
his little motherless face attracted her, and she stopped
and said, “You haven’t sold many, have you?” ‘No
HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 25

ma’am,” said Louis, ‘but perhaps I shall to-morrow.
I only began to-day.” But here his courage failed
and the tears came, for he was a very little boy, only
six, and not too big to cry yet.



The lady had three little boys of her own, and her
Allan was just Louis’ size. She did not like to see
little boys cry, and so she said quickly, ‘Here, my
dear, don’t feel so. Give me one of each kind of
your papers and tell me where you live. Perhaps I
26 LITTLE FOLKS EAST AND WEST.

can come and see your mother sometime. Would
you like to have me?”

But instead of being cheered by this, Louis now
began to cry in earnest, and between his sobs the
lady heard the words: ‘“‘ My —mother — is — gone — 1
—shall—never see her again.”

And then he tried not to cry, and looked up very
bravely, and thanked the lady for the two five-cent
pleces she gave him. But Allie Maxwell's mamma
could not bear to leave Louis yet. So she asked him
to come with her into the warm room in the station
where she was to take the train; and there he told
her his little story, and how he had become a news-
boy, because old Auntie, who kept the apple stand,
had told him to, and had given him the money to
start with. But Auntie could not take care of him.
She had a bad husband who would beat little boys,
and “sometimes he beats poor old Auntie, too,” said
Louis, with a clench of his poor little dirty fist.

Mrs. Maxwell could not help smiling, and then she
could not help sighing right afterward. For what
should she do with this mite? She didn’t want to
take him home and she couldn’t bear to leave him
there. At last she decided to take him home for
that night and talk it all over with Allie’s papa. So
Louis got on board the train and went to Mrs. Max-
well’s warm pretty home. And after such a supper
as he had never had before—bread and duéter and
two whole doughnuts and a piece of custard pie such
AIOIV LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 27

as he had sometimes seen in the windows but never
tasted, he was tucked into such a bed as he had
never seen before! When all the boys were fast
asleep, Mrs. Maxwell told her husband all about little
Louis and how she could not bear to leave him, but
still she didn’t see how she could take care of another
boy.

“T'll tell you what to do,” said Mr. Maxwell; send
him out West to Tom and Mary.”

“But he is so little. He could never go ‘way out
there alone.”

“©, yes, he can. There are always people enough
to look after a child.”

“Well,” said Mrs. Maxwell, “I know it would be a
splendid thing for him. And Tom wants a boy so
much. We'll talk with him in the morning.”

Brother Tom and his wife lived far away on the
plains of Nebraska. They had no children, and every-
body out there wanted to keep their own boys and
girls themselves, no matter how poor they were. Tom
had often written to his sister to find him a_ boy.
But Mrs. Maxwell had never yet seen a boy that she
thought good enough for her brother until she found
- Louis. Now Louis was just the one. He was bright
and loving and sweet—after the nice bath she gave
him. Yes, Brother Tom would like Louis.

And Louis was very glad to go after he heard of
the horses and cows and pigs and hens that were on
the wonderful farm; and how he could run about all
28 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

day and never see a gutter nor a high brick wall, nor
be almost run over by hacks and big express wagons
and horse-cars. And he need not sell newspapers any
more! After a few days Mr. Maxwell found a gentle-
man who was going West and who was willing to take
Louis as far as Omaha, where brother Tom would find
him. Louis had a nice new suit of clothes and a
basket of luncheon, and being very little he was so
happy at the thought of the horses and pigs that he
almost forgot that he was sorry to leave kind Mrs.
Maxwell.

He was very tired of riding before he came to Omaha,
though the cold chicken and doughnuts helped along
a good deal, and he was in constant delight at the
cows and sheep and the big hay-stacks and the beauti-
ful houses and the long trains of cars that they passed
on their way. But the last day he took a good many
naps, and began to wish for a good run out-of-doors.
And when the big brown Missouri river was crossed
and the cars came to a stop and Louis was taken in
the arms of the kind gentleman and lifted from the
car at Omaha, he was very glad. Here brother Tom
(‘‘Mr. Marsh” the gentleman called him, and Louis
soon learned to call him “ father”) took him in his
long, strong arms and carried him to another car, and
again away they went. This train went more slowly
than the other one, and after a while there were no
houses only once in a great way, and the grass was
very tall and there were bright yellow flowers every-
HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 29

where. They traveled all day and after a night spent
in a funny little room almost as small as where Louis
and his mother used to live, they started for “home.”

There were no more cars now, only wagons to travel
in. And so Louis, mounted on a big box with a heap
of straw all around his feet and legs to keep them
warm and with Mr. Marsh at his side, rode for miles
and miles across the lonely prairie with the wind al-
most blowing his breath away! How the big gray
horses strode along! And how the prairie chickens
flew up, up and away as they drove by! And how
the little prairie dogs peeped forth from their holes
and barked at them! On they went, through the long
grass, over the hills and down the dales, across the
brooks and past the queer little sod houses where the
rakes and hoes were stuck upon the roof and the
grass grew out of the walls; and where the barn was
so much like the house that Louis wondered which
one the folks lived in. So at last they reached home
and there was a sweet lady all ready to love Louis
and keep him good and true. Little ones forget; and
the pretty lady before long was “ mother” to our Louis,
and he loved her with all his heart.

All this happened seven years ago. Louis is now
a big boy of thirteen, but he has been happy every
minute since kind Mrs. Maxwell found him a home.
And last summer, when Mrs. Maxwell and Allan went
out West to see “brother Tom,” it was Louis who
went to the station for them and so carefully drove
30 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

over all the rough places. You would not have
known him for the sad, pale little boy of seven years
ago. His cheeks were rough and rosy, his arms
strong and his legs able to run almost as fast and as
far as old Towser, the big shepherd dog.






ae














ae ee a I
Hi tl a:
MN ONS

i

les Yd

Had you seen him as he came to meet them —
standing erect in the big wagon, driving the gray horses
swiftly down over the hills, his rubber cape flying be-
hind him in the wind, his cheeks rosy, his eyes bright,
his fair hair flying all about his face in wet curls, his
HOW LOUIS FOUND A HOME. 31

cap dripping with the rain that was pouring in torrents,
laughing in glee at the fun of the wind and the rain
and the drive and everything,—he was so happy! —
and singing at the top of his voice “Hold the fort,
for 7 am-coming!” — you would have said, How much
better for Louis to live out here on the big, broad
prairie than to be a poor, ragged little newsboy in the
streets of New York!

WES

HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY.

Hickerty-Pickerty, my black hen,
She lays eggs for gentlemen,
Gentlemen come every day

To see what my black hen doth lay.’

?

Tuts is what old Grandma Grimes used to say, and
she said it to Mother Goose and then Mother Goose
told ws all about it. Well, when the black hen was just
one year old, Grandma Grimes, who lived away up in
Vermont, thought she would have a birthday-party for
her Hickerty-Pickerty. It was funny to celebrate a
hen’s birthday, wasn’t it? But, you see, Hickerty-Pick-
erty was such a nice hen that old Mrs. Grimes felt that
she. must do something to make her happy.

At first she only invited the “gentlemen who came
every day,” but these little gentlemen, who were about
ten or twelve years old, begged so very hard to be
allowed to bring their little sisters with them, that
Grandma said they might.

The next day came the nine little gentlemen, dressed
in their best, bringing with them nine little ladies all

35
«
36 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

dressed in their very best, too. In those days, when
Hickerty-Pickerty was young, little girls did not dress
as they do now. Instead of looped-up over-skirts, broad
sashes and crinkly hair, each little girl wore a blue or
a pink calico frock, a long-sleeved apron with a narrow



edge of tatting around it, and a big hat with a piece of
ribbon, called a bridle, fastened to it to hold on by and
to keep the hat from being carried off by Mr. Wind.
Their hair was cut short and parted neatly in the mid-
dle, and every one had on copper-toed shoes. As for
the boys, of course they had jackets with pockets, and
HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY. 37

trousers with pockets, and soldier caps and sailor caps
and red-white-and-blue neckties.

After Grandma Grimes had kissed them all and given
each a nice seed-cake with a plum on top, there was
still one little girl who all the boys said wasn’t ¢heir
sister. This girlie’s frock was torn and her shoes were
full of holes, and, instead of a hat with a pretty ribbon,
she had only a green cape-bonnet. But her blue eyes
shone and her pretty brown curls peeped out from
-under the green checked cape of her poor little bon-
net, and as she stood looking at Grandma and trying
with all her might to eat up her green bonnet-string,
she was a pretty and a funny little thing to see.

‘“Who are you, little girl?” said Grandma. “ My is
Altie” said thé cunning little thing, “My comed to a
party.” And then she went on trying to eat up her
green bonnet-string. ‘“It must be little Elsie that
lives ’way down town” said Grandma, ‘but she is wel-
come all the same.”

So Grandma gave her a seed-cake too, and she went
off to play with the rest; but there she found, oh, dear!
that the girls didn’t like her because she had shabby
clothes and that the boys were all too busy eating pea-
nuts and climbing the gate-posts to take any notice of
her.

So poor Elsie went away by herself, down the yard,
through the back gate to the barn, and nobody saw her
go and nobody missed her.

All this time Grandma Grimes was baking a big plate-
38 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

ful of apple-tarts and a tin pan full of ginger-snap
horses, dogs and elephants for her company. She set
the table under the smoke-bush and put on it the tin
cups and saucers and plates and the cunning tin tea-
pot that her little girl used to play with ever so many
years ago. And there was a blue cream-pitcher, too,
and a sugar bowl with a blue rose for a handle, and
some tiny knives and forks, just big enough to cut
up ginger-snaps and jelly-tarts.

When all was ready—and nice, creamy biscuits and
sweet molasses and water were not forgotten — old
Grandma Grimes rang the big dinner-bell, and the
children came trooping in. But, before they had din-
ner, Grandma had something to tell them. So when
she had said “hush” several times and they were
pretty quiet, she said: ‘‘You know, my dears, that
you came here to-day to see my black hen and her
wonderful egg. Now, she always comes off the nest
just as the bell rings for dinner, she’s such a wonder-
ful hen! So now, I want you to form a procession
and march around the yard to the barn and find the
speckled egg up high in the hay-loft and bring it
to me for my dinner, and each of you shall have a
taste. The little gentlemen know the way.”

‘Come on!” said Jamie, “I'll show you! I’ve been
there much as seventy-leven times.” So Jamie took
Ida by the hand and Harry took Florence and Emma
took ‘little brother” and the others marched after
them, all singing: “ Little fairy, light and airy,” until
HICKERTY-PICKERTY'S PARTY, 39

they came to the big old barn. Here there was a
ladder to climb and the children went up one by one
and stepped softly over the hay till they came to
Hickerty-Pickerty’s nest. But what was this in the
nest? A torn gown, a green cape-bonnet and a
bunch of brown curls! The poor little girl had fallen
asleep in the black hen’s nest.

“O, what a negg!” said Alfred, “and where's
Hickerty-Pickerty gone to?”



‘She must ha’ goed when her comed up,” said baby
Winnie.

“T shall just go and tell Grandma Grimes,” said Ida
proudly. ‘She won't like it, 7 know.

‘But she didn’t mean any harm,” said Eva, “and I
don’t believe Grandma will care a single bit.”

And Grandma didn’t care, for when the children
scrambled into the house and told her about it, she
laughed merrily and came to see. There lay little
‘“‘Altie,” fast asleep still; but where was the black
40 LITTLE FOLKS, LAST AND WEST.

hen? The children hunted all over the loft and they
talked so loud that at last they waked Altie, who looked
very much frightened and began to chew her bonnet-
strings very hard when she saw them all.

“Where's Hickerty-Pickerty?” they all asked in a
chorus.

“You pulled her off, you naughty thing,” said Bon-
nie.

“No, my didn’t, neiver,” said the tiny thing, still
eating up her bonnet-string, “her was cold, my keeped
her warm.”

“T should say so,” said Grandma, laughing, and she
lifted a corner of her frock and there found Hickerty-
Pickerty, looking as contented as if she had had little
girls for bed-fellows all her life.

After that, Altie was queen of the day. Grandma
carried her off in her loving arms and set her in a
tip-cart, and put a wreath of roses on her curls.
George was footman and Alfred and Harry and Ger-
ald made a nice tandem team, while Ida and Winnie
and Emma and all the rest were maids of honor and
pages to the queen. :

Then they all sat down to dinner, and Gerald and
Eva were host-and hostess and passed the nice things
round to their little guests. Last of all came barley-
candy-sticks and gum-drops and jujube-paste that “ pulls
out and makes more,” as Altie said. Then each had
a tin cup of lemonade and drank to the health of
Hickerty-Pickerty who was contentedly pecking at the
HICKERTY-PICKERTY’S PARTY. 41

corn and oats grandma had given her for a treat on
her birthday. She didn’t care for birthdays! But the
children did, and they had a happy time. The little
birds sang in the cherry-tree and the fairy men peep-
ed out of the blue-bells; and Altie sang a song
about a butterfly in a boat made of cobwebs, and
Alfred said a piece about a pig at a party.

At last all of them joined hands about the little
brown queen (who wasn’t poor any longer because
she was happy and they loved her) and they all sang
about the sweet rose-buds and the violets blue, who
send their love to me and you; the pretty birds and
the gardens gay, where the darling babies dance and
play. Then the party was over. They all kissed Al-
tie and filled her pocket and her apron with cookies
and carried her home the happiest little girlie in the
world,




ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT.

y7, LL we know now about little
Miss Muffit is what Mother
Goose has told us. She sat on
a ‘‘tuffet,” whatever that may
be, and I’m sure / don’t know,
but she “sat on a_tuffet,” so
Mother Goose says, ‘‘eating of curds and of whey,
when there came a BLACK SPIDER and sat down BESIDE
HER and FRIGHTENED Miss Muffit away. Now I sup-
pose you all want to know what happened after that,
and so here is the rest of the story.

After little Miss Muffit ran off home, the black
spider ate up all her curds and whey and built a nice
web over the bowl, so that when Miss Muffit came
back to get it, there sat Mr. Spider looking at her
with his many bright eyes. But this time she didn’t
feel frightened, and she wasn’t surprised when the
spider spoke to her and said, “Sit down, little girl,
and I will tell you a pretty story.” So she sat down


MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 43

on the tuffet and leaned her head in her hands
and gazed out over the great lake and listened to
the spider's story. This is what he told her: —
“Once upon a time, my dear,—long, long ago, be-
fore Mother Goose was born,—once upon a time
there were no little girls in the world. Everybody
was grown up, and the world was very still and sad.





rel Vales

¢ \ .
herr =



The people used to say, ‘Oh, if only we could have
some little things to pet and love, how happy we
should be.’ So they went to petting cats and dogs
and birds, for every one must have something to love
and care for. ‘

‘Now, there was a good, beautiful princess who lived
44 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

in a glass palace, and she wanted a little pet, too, —
but she must have something nicer than a cat or a
dog—so she sat down and thought and thought, till
she thought it all out, and she knew that what she
wanted was a little pet just like herself, only small
and cunning and sweet. But how could such a thing
be made?

“She looked in all her gilded receipt-books and read
every history and story-book that she could find.
But no such thing was spoken of. At last she re-
membered that somewhere she had once heard of a
wonderful magician who ‘could do everything. So she
sent heralds all over the world to find him, and late
one night he came riding up to her castle on a
snow-white pony. He was a very little man and his
hair was long and of a bright red color, and in his
hand he held a long white wand tipped with a gold-
en star. The princess took him into her parlor and
gave him some pink tea and plum cake, and then told
him what she wanted.

“*Ah!? said the magician, ‘you want a little one
like yourself.’

“<«Ves,’ said the princess, ‘something to love and
pet, —not like a dog—something that will love me,
too, and that will always be my darling.’

“The magician shut his eyes and buried his face
in his hands to think. Seven days and nights he sat
thus and did not speak, only muttered now and then
some unknown words; and he would eat nothing but a
MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 45

piece of sugar every day, and drink a glass of straw-
berry lemonade.

“At last he arose and calling the princess, bade her
bring him a gold kettle and a silver ladle, and when



she had done this, he asked for some sugar and cin-
namon and nutmeg and lemon-juice and citron and
raisins and molasses candy and ice-cream and mince
pie, and when these were brought, he mixed them up
46 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

together in the gold kettle and stirred them with the
silver ladle and sang this song three times over it

all: —
‘ What are little girls made of ?

What are little girls made of?
Sugar and spice,

And all things nice,

That’s what little girls are made of.’

“Then the old magician took a rose-leaf and laid
it on the top of this wonderful mixture, and two
little blue violets by its side. Then he called me
from under the door-mat, for J am 10,000 years old
and remember all about it, and told me to weave
my nicest web about the gold kettle. I weaved
about and about for a whole day, and then bit off
my thread and waited to see what would happen.
The magician then waved his hand over the whole
and said :—

‘ Sugar and spice
And all things nice
Make us a sweet little girl again.’

And there, right before me, stood the dearest little
thing, all silver and gold, with violets for eyes and
roses for cheeks and gold-colored hair, while my brown
web had turned to a dress of finest silk.

“She screamed quite naturally when she saw me,
and ran to the princess for protection, as every little
girl has done ever since in all the world; though I
MORE ABOUT LITTLE MISS MUFFIT. 47

don’t see. what there is about me to frighten them.
I'm sure I love them dearly, and have often spun
webs in the sunshine on purpose for their pleasure.

“Now, when all the people saw this little dear they
also wanted one, and the magician became very busy
in making little girls for everybody. The princess
and all the rest were full of joy and rewarded the
good old man more than he had dreamed of.

‘Now,’ said they, ‘we have something real to love
and it will always be little and we can always pet and
fondle it.’

‘But we can never be quite happy! By some mis-
take, the candy-man had sent some jujube-paste with
the molasses candy, and the magician did not discover
it, and so the little girls could not stay little, but
stretched up and grew tall and large like the older
people after a while. But, on the whole, their friends
were glad, for it is not best always to be a little
girl.”

The spider’s story was over, and little Miss Muffit
jumped up and ran home, after thanking the kind, old
spider and telling him she would not be afraid of him
any more.

The next morning (for all this happened in the
night, you see), little Miss Muffit told her mamma
all about the spider and the candy-man and the
beautiful princess and the sweet little girl; and as
she jumped out of her crib, and put on her shoes
and stockings, she said, ‘‘Mamma, I hope there is
48 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

lots of jujube-paste in me, don’t you? for I want to
grow up big, right away quick, so I can have a great,
long dress like yours, mamma, and play on the pin-
anner same as sister, and oh — lots and lots of
things!”


THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN,

“Three Wise Men of Gotham
Went to Sea in a Bowl.”

O says Mother Goose, but she never
told us who the wise men were, or
why they went to sea in a bowl, or
what they did when they got there,
and it is only a little while ago that
we found all this out.

The three little wise men lived in
Gotham, which was Mother Goose's
name for the great city of New York,
and their names were Bobby Shafto,
Peter Piper and Simple Simon. They
went to sea in a bowl because they
had heard of a magic fish, a golden
fish with silver scales, and they wanted to catch him
and put him in their museum.

Mother Goose had told them that if they could
only catch this wonderful fish they would be the
wisest and richest little men in the whole world. So
Bobby Shafto and Peter Piper and Simple Simon


50 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

agreed that they would help one another to catch the
magic fish, and the only way to do this was to go to
sea in a bowl.

Well, at last the bowl was ready and the great day
arrived. The big bay of Gotham was dotted with




ts

little boats filled with people waiting to see these
three little wise men as they got on board their bowl
and pushed off toward the open sea. The bowl was
the largest one they could find in Gotham, and was
THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN. SI

made of blue porcelain painted with red and yellow
and green figures of horses and chariots and ships
and elephants and trees and people. The three little
wise men were all very fat and had to sit pretty close
together to keep from tipping the bowl, so it was not
as comfortable as it might have been.

Bobby Shafto sat at the helm and Peter Piper
tended the paddle, while Simple Simon opened his
big telescope and searched into the water for the
golden fish with silver scales. It was a part of
their plan that nothing should be eaten till they
arrived at their first stopping place,—a coral island
at the entrance of Silent River, about three hundred
miles east of Gotham —and not a word should be
spoken till their journey’s end, for fear of frightening
away the magic fish.

The three little wise men had each brought a wise
story-book and held it open on his knee, so that he
might spend every spare moment in reading. Bobby’s
book was called “ Afloat and Ashore,” Simon’s was
‘Two Years before the Mast,” and Peter Piper had a
book written by himself which he thought he would
call “ Five Pickled Peppers.”

Simple Simon was so enchanted with the wonders
that he saw through his telescope that he found no
time to read. He saw many beautiful things— huge
whales puffing and snorting, porpoises gliding at their
side, and white jelly fish floating on the top of the
waves. He saw that the big fish were always eating
52 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

up the little fish, while they in their turn ate the flies
and water-snakes, and all were happy. The long
grass waved in and out among the rough rocks, and
the little hard barnacles creaked as the waters rushed
over them. The moss and waving grasses made many
a beautiful nook among the coral beds, and Simple
Simon was quite sure that once he saw a mermaid
combing her green hair with a golden comb and wip-
ing the salt tears from her eyes with the tip of her
scaly tail. The big sharks glared at the three little
wise men with hungry eyes, and once a swordfish
tried to pierce the bowl with his long sharp sword.

Meanwhile, Bobby Shafto sat at the helm and
watched the sea-birds and the lights glimmering from
the tall light-houses, and steered the bowl safely
through the deep waters, and Peter Piper paddled,
and watched the sea and the wind.

Thus they rode on for seventeen days, and then they
reached the mouth of Silent River and landed on a coral
island covered with trees and birds, and had a supper
of doughnuts and apple-turnovers and hot peanuts.

The next morning they started again, and for
many days silently glided over the waves. Simple
Simon saw many beautiful fishes, large and small, but
not one of ‘gold with silver scales.” Bobby Shafto
had read his book through nine times, and_ twice
backwards; and Peter Piper had written and re-written
his poem until even he was tired of it, and still their
journey did not end.
THE THREE LITTLE WISE MEN. 53

At length, one night, Simple Simon, tired of gazing
so long into the sea, laid down the telescope and
went to sleep. Bobby Shafto caught it up, and had
scarcely put it to his eyes before he saw, following
the boat as if unable to escape from it, the magic
fish! Bobby need only reach forth his hand to grasp
the fish around its body.

But now came a wicked thought into Bobby’s mind.
If he could gain the magic fish without his friends’
. knowing it, then he, and he alone, would be the
wisest and richest little man in the world, and would
not need to share his wisdom and riches with his
friends, Peter and Simon.

With this wicked wish to cheat his companions, he
leaned gently forward and caught the fish firmly in
both hands; but in doing this he had let go the
helm, and as Peter was paddling rapidly, before Bobby
could quite catch the fish, or Simon awake, or Peter
turn his head to see, the blue bowl was driven upon
a coral reef and smashed into a thousand pieces.

And

“Tf the bowl had been stronger,
My story ’d been longer.”



WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE FAY.

“ily-cup lived a dear
little fay. Her gar-
ments were of silver,
and her bright, curling
\ hair shone like the
river in the moonlight.
She had wings on her
little feet and wings
on her little shoulders,
and around her tiny
waist she wore a bright
scarf of crimson embroidered with silver lilies. The
little fay was beautiful, but the little fay was sad; for
that morning, just as the sunbeams touched the
petals of her lily-cup and brightened with gold every
dew-drop, a great misfortune had befallen her. The
yellow spider, whose web had been her constant cov-
ering and shelter from the night dew, had curled up
as if in pain, and fallen from her lily resting-place.


58 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST:

The little fay could not tell what had befallen her
friend — only she felt that she was gone and that no
more would the bright web be spread above her bed
every night. So the little fay wept tears of sadness,
and could not be glad at the bright sun and the
shining morning.

Meanwhile the harebells in the garden were ringing
glad songs, and the sweet white violet was peeping at
her purple sister by her side, and the big sunflower
was welcoming the day, shaking her yellow hair and
sprinkling all the flowers with dew. But the little fay
saw none of this, for her eyes were dim with tears.

At last the whole world of flowers was awake, and
every head was raised to catch the sweetness of the
morning air. The lark came fluttering down from his
morning concert and sang a welcome to the blooming
little world, and the yellow butterfly, sailing to and
fro, kissed the lips of the rose and bade her good-
morning. All the world was beautiful, and all the
world was glad, except the little fay. Still she wept
in her lily-cup and would not look above its rim at
the blue and golden day. .

By and by the sun, mounting higher and higher,
burned away the web above her bed and smiled a
kind welcome to her. There lay the little fay, her
eyes red with weeping and her silvery robe tumbled.
Silly thing! she had not even reached forth her hand
to catch the dew-drop all ready for her morning drink,
but had let it dry and be lost.
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITTLE FAY. 59

The big sun laughed at her, and said: “ What is
the matter with my little daughter this bright day?
Look! all the flowers are glad and gay, and still you
lie here in sorrow.” But the little fay hid her face
in her crimson scarf and did not answer.

Then the sun looked
around for some one who
could comfort his little
girl, and he saw a brown
butterfly sipping honey
from the white rose. He
spoke to him, and the
butterfly flew straight to
the lily-cup, and bending
over its edge whispered
to our little fay: “Come,
wake. up; dearie! See
how the poor lily faints
beneath your weight; see
how the dew-drops are
all wasted because you
have not done your morn-
ing work; see how the
spider's web is burned up,
because you were not
awake to lay it safely away!”

Then the little fay was ashamed, and she lifted her
head and smoothed her hair from her eyes, and throw-
ing her arms around the brown butterfly, she mounted


60 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

his back, few to the brook, washed her pretty face
and hands and ate her breakfast of honey and dew.
All the flowers were glad to see her, for they had
begun to miss her. She it was who, early in the
morning, always waked them with soft pinches, brushed
the dew from their petals with her wings, and sang to
them that the sun was up and all the world was glad.

Now she flew from one to the other asking forgiv-
ness, and she whispered a pretty story in the white
violet’s ear and kissed the red rose good morning.
The big sunflower greeted her with a loud “Good
day,” and she sat and swung on his long spikes, and
played with the flies and midges as they sailed by.

Thus all day she played and smiled, and made
the garden happy with her songs, and all the flow-
ers said, ‘What should we do without our little
fay?” Do not think that she had forgotten her sor-
row —no indeed! She had only resolved that it was
better not to trouble others with it. But when the
flowers had gone to sleep, and the frogs began to
sing, she crept to her lily, and nestling there, wept
again, and promised the lily that she would always
love her friend the spider, but never, never let any
one know.

By and by the moon came up, and creeping slowly
over the garden, looked down into the lily-cup and
saw the little fay fast asleep. The moon smiled on
her tear-drops and loved her the more because she
could be sad as well as gay.
WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LITILE FAY. 61

So the night went by and when the sun again
laughed out of the sea, the little fay awcke and
jumped up smiling from her bed. But what did she
see? The dear old web again stretched above her,
golden in the morning light, and her friend, the
spider, looking at her with the kind old glance. She
had imagined all her sorrow after all, for the spider
had only gone on a journey, and had not waited to
tell her. She sang with joy, and spreading her wings,
flew up through the light web to the clear air. And
the sun was up, and all the world was glad.


LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND.

—



VERYONE else in the house was

fast asleep except little Louise,
no, I mean little “ Loubeeze,” for
that is what our baby calls herself,
and so we all call her “ Beeze”
for short. Little Loubeeze, you see, was keeping
awake as hard as she could, so that she might see
Jack Frost, when he came tapping at the window —
as Aunt Marthy said he always did on a very cold
night, like this. Her little pink toes were nestled
deep down in the blanket, and her yellow curls were
tossing about, as she twisted and turned, to keep her-
self awake. She said “ Jack and Jill,’ and the “Five
Pond Lilies,” over and over again, and at last she
thought she would “make carpets,” as she had often
done before, with sister Lena.

Lena was fast asleep now, and Beeze must make
carpets alone. So she shut her eyes tight, and pressed
her little fat fingers against her eyelids, not hard, so
as to hurt, but just hard enough to keep out the


LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 63

light and make the “carpets” come; and, with her
face deep down in the pillow, waited to see what
would happen.

First, all was dark, but pretty soon a bright circle
of light came, and it grew larger and larger, until it
seemed to fill the whole world. Inside this big circle
were lots of bright-colored little circles, like round
mats on the bright carpet. Did you ever see a kal-
eidoscope? Well, it was something like that, only the
carpets were prettier, and did not last so long. Beeze
only had time to say ‘Oh how pretty!” before this
carpet was gone, and another had come, and so on.

To-night, the carpets were prettier than ever, and
she was so pleased with them that she had forgotten
all about Jack Frost, when something happened that
never happened before, in making carpets.

The carpet was now bright green, covered with
white dots, and suddenly, right in the middle, some-
thing began to grow upward. It did not come from
the outside, but suddenly popped up right through
the middle of the carpet, and began to grow and
grow, until, in about three seconds, it was a fine tree,
all covered with pink and white blossoms.

And now, on the very top of the tree, came a little
scarlet and black thing, that tossed its head and
opened its mouth, as if it would like to swallow the
world.

‘Oh, oh!” whispered the little girl, “it is a birdie,
a booful birdie!” So it was, and singing, too, at the
64 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND IWEST.

top of its voice, though it was so far away that Beeze
_ could only see it sing. But this was only the first of
many wonderful things. Before the birdie had ceased
his song, there came running toward the tree, a little
brown boy and a little
pink girl, carrying a bright
yellow pail between them.
They set the pail down
under the tree, and began
to talk and play together,
as Beeze knew by their
looks and motions. But
she could not hear a word,









they were so
far away, so |
very far away.
The little boy
wore a long
brown. bib-
apron, and the |
little: girl.a..-"
pink-checked
frock; and pretty soon the boy took two apples and
a doughnut from his pocket, and the girl unrolled a
big piece of paper, and found two sticks of candy


LITTLE LOUVBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 65

and a seed cake. They sat down, she on the big
water pail, and he on the green grass, and ate up
every bit.

Then they brushed off the crumbs, and hand in hand,
the boy carrying the pail alone this time, they skipped
away, off the carpet, out of sight. Where did they go?
Beeze looked, and looked, but they were gone, and
had left nothing behind them but the brown bib-apron
which the little boy had dropped when he wiped his
sticky face and hands, and then had forgotten all about
it.

All this time the carpet was changing, much faster
than I can tell you. The light green had become dark
green, mixed with brown; the pink and white blossoms
had fallen from the tree. The bright bird, looking
down through the green leaves, had spied the brown
bib, and flying down, had caught it in his bill, and
flown with it up into the topmost branches.

Then all at once, there were the little boy and girl
again, this time bearing a basket of flowers. Beeze
knew them by their sweet faces, although the pink
frock was changed to a long pink gown, and in place
of the brown bib, there was a dark brown coat. She
thought they must have come back for the brown bib,
and she spoke right out and said:

‘“Look up in the tree!”

But they did not hear, they were so far away! And
the birdie in the tree had made a nest of the brown
bib, and it was full of speckled eggs! Slowly the boy
66 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and girl walked away together out of sight, and the
green carpet changed to brown, and the leaves on the
tree grew red and yellow, and began to fall.

Then the carpet grew browner, the branches of the
tree were bare, and the brown nest looked lonely, in
the topmost branch. White specks fell over every-
thing, until the carpet became a beautiful white, fluffy
mass, out of which the tree stood, tall and dark.

The brown nest was full of snow; and ‘ Little Lou-
beeze” felt like crying when she saw how cold and
lonely it looked, when suddenly, a_ bright light shone
over the carpet, and made it sparkle like a carpet of
diamonds, and a great many people came running and
dancing over it, toward the old tree. Beeze saw
among them a pink hood and a pair of brown mittens,
and then she knew her own boy and girl, though
they were muffled in furs and shawls, and their hair
was the color of the white carpet. Then she saw the
rest of the people gather round these two, and hug
and kiss them, and form a ring and dance around
them, until they were tired from very fun and laugh-
ter. The carpet of snow seemed to laugh too, as it
sparkled in the light.

Suddenly there was a noise overhead, and the brown
nest fell to the ground, at the feet of the pink lady,
and the brown man picked it up, and looked at it, and
then laughed, and then the lady laughed, and Beeze
seemed to hear him say, as he held it up, to show
them all:
LITTLE LOUBEEZE IN DREAMLAND. 67

“ Here is that brown bib-apron, I lost so long ago.
Don’t you remember, mother? when we were chil-
dren?” And they all gathered around, and Beeze
wished she could hear what they said. But she couldn't,
they were so far away. So she watched them, until
they went away, and the light went away too, and
she was left alone, with the white carpet, and the
tree. Not even the nest was there now.

She grew tired of watching, the carpet did not change
any more, and at last she raised her head, and rubbed
her eyes. It was morning! She had not seen Jack
Frost after all, for he had come while she was dream-
ing, and had painted 7s carpets on the window panes.
She wanted to cry, but she remembered the beautiful
things she had seen, and so she laughed instead, and
running into mamma’s room, she cried:

“OQ, mamma, I did see fairyland! But, mamma,
it was so far away /”






HE short winter day is over. The

sun, so unwilling to give any
warmth all through the day, has
gone to bed behind the row of
white hills. Just for a minute he
leaves a red glow on the clouds,
as a sort of good-by, and then the
gray twilight shuts down.

It is very cold. The frost fairies
begin to trace their pictures on
the window-panes, and the men and women are hurry-
ing homeward, shutting close the doors and putting
more wood on the fires. The babies are cuddled up
warm in their mammas’ arms, or tucked snugly down
under the blankets. Even the kitties are glad to stay


HOW ®HE MOON GOT HER HALO. 69

in and warm their toes by the fire. Nobody wants to
be out-of-doors to-night. .

Nobody, did I say? Yes, there is somebody, — the
moon! As the sun goes down, she peeps above the
horizon, just as round as he is, and almost as warm.
Certainly she is a great deal more rosy and jolly than
he has been to- day. She is happy to be out-of-doors
to-night, for it is one of the longest nights_of the
year. Up out of the blue water she comes, slowly
sailing up the eastern sky,— queen of the night and
of the stars.

And how lovely the world is that she sees beneath
her,— the rolling ships and gleaming lighthouses, the
long, quiet beaches, the frosty hills and the frozen
rivers, and, best of all, the great city. Here the
moon sees many strange sights, and it is a long time
before she discovers why it is that all the houses
where the rich folks live are so wonderfully lighted
up. Then she remembers that it is Christmas-eve.
The rich Boston people are having Christmas parties
and Christmas trees for their children. The churches,
too, are lighted; and the people are going back and
forth, running fast to keep warm, laden with baskets
and bundles and lanterns and rocking-horses and dolls
and baby-carriages and trumpets and drums and books
and whips and cornucopias of candy and bright-colored
glass globes and festoons of evergreen, all to hang
upon the trees for the children.

This makes the moon happy, for she knows what
70 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

Christmas means, and she is glad when the people
remember it. She smiles brightly, but suddenly grows
very sober, for she sees something that ought not to
happen on Christmas-eve.

A little girl, very small and very thinly dressed, her
bare feet and hands blue with the dreadful cold, is
kneeling on the top of the marble steps of one of the
houses and trying to look through the curtains at the
warmth and happiness within.:

She cannot see very much, but what she can see is
so beautiful that she almost forgets her cold and
hunger. Suddenly the door opens, and a man comes
out. He is dressed like the men who sit on the
tops of fine carriages, and he carries a whip in his
hand. The child jumps up in fear; and then the man,
who had not seen her till then, seizes her by the arm,
and threatening to strike her if she doesn’t “clear
out,” thrusts her off the steps into the street. Oh,
how dreadful, how dreadful it is! The moon _ hides
her face behind a cloud, and the whole world grows
dark.

A minute later the moon looks out again. Where
is the poor little child now? The door of the great
house is still open, and a long line of light streams —
out over the snow. The door-way is crowded with
people, and down at the bottom of the steps kneels
a beautiful little girl. She is talking to the poor child
and trying to make her stop crying; for the rough
man had hurt her, and her cry of pain had been
HOW THE MOON GOT HER HALO.


72 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST,

heard by the company in the parlor. A finely dressed
lady hurries down the steps, saying, ‘“ Madie, Madie,
come back!” and then she beckons to the coachman
to come and “take that ragged child away.”

But Madie clings fast to the little girl’s hand; and

as the lady, with a stern look, bends over her, she



says, ‘Why, mamma, she is crying! and see how she
shivers. Please let me take her into the parlor.”
And then, as her mother still frowns, she says,
“Mamma, gow wouldn't like to be out here in the
cold.”

The mother is silent; and Madie, still holding fast
the poor little girl’s hand, leads her through the
crowd of people into the beautiful room, where it is
light and warm, and where there is something so good
to eat! And it is all for her,—the poor, little,
ragged child! She can hardly believe it. Oh, how
beautiful, how beautiful it is! The moon looks through
..@ curtains and sees the two happy little girls and
HOW THE MOON GOT HER HALO. 73

the people around them, led by the love of the child
to see what Christmas-eve really means.

‘“Yes, it means something more than presents and
Christmas-trees and a good time,” says the smiling
moon. She says it so loud that the stars hear her
and nod back to her. ‘ Yes, indeed,” they sing, “ Yes
indeed, help one another, help one another.” And
the little white cloud, sailing by on the wind, catches
the moon’s happy smile, turns it into rainbows, and
makes a halo round her kind old face.


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A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO.

A's WAY off in the beautiful country

\ of Greece, a long, long time
ago, there lived a little maiden,
the daughter of a king. Her
name was Gorgo, —not a very
pretty name, perhaps, to us who are used to calling
little girls “Ida,” and “Ethel” and ‘Marjorie,’ but a
strong name, and therefore just the name for this little
maid,—as you shall see.

In those old times there used to be many wars,
and the country of Sparta, the part of Greece where
Gorgo lived, was famous for its brave soldiers, who
never thought for a moment of themselves when their
country was in danger, but would always stand ready
to fight for their dear native land.

Sometimes these were not good wars, but wars for
revenge, instead of for freedom and for loyalty to
beautiful Greece. Some wicked man would be angry at
an injury he had received, and in order to revenge
this injury he would go about among the different
kingdoms and persuade the rulers to join with him


78 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and try to overcome his enemy ; and then there would
be a terrible war in order to satisfy one wicked man’s
wicked wish.

Aristagoras was such a man as this. He did not
like the king and wished to become king himself in-




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stead. So one day he came to Sparta, and tried to
persuade King Cleomenes, the father of little Gorgo,

to help drive the rightful king away and put himself
on the throne.

He talked with the king a long time. He promised
A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO. 79

him power and honor and money if he would do as
he wished; more and more money, and, as the king
refused, still more and more money he offered, and at
last King Cleomenes almost consented.

But it happened that when Aristagoras came into
the presence of the king, the king’s little daughter
was standing by his side with her hand in his. Aris-
_ tagoras wanted Cleomenes to send her away, for he
knew very well that it is much harder to persuade a
man to do something wrong when there is a dear
little child near by. But the king said, “No, say
what you have to say in her presence, too,” and so
little Gorgo stood by her father’s side, looking up into
his face with her innocent eyes and listening intently
to all that was said.

She felt that something was wrong, and when she
heard the strange man offer her father money and
honors, and saw her father look troubled, and cast
down his eyes, she knew that Aristagoras was trying
to make her father do something he did not quite
want to do. So she stole her little hand softly into
his, and said: —

“Papa, come away, come, or this strange man _ will
make you do wrong.”

This made the king feel strong again, and clasping
the little maid’s hand tightly in his own, he rose and
left the bad man who had tempted him to do wrong,
and went away with the child who had saved him
and the country from disl-onor.
80 LITTLE FOLKS, HAST AND WEST.

Gorgo was only ten years old then, but she was
worthy to be a king’s daughter because, being good
and true herself, she helped her father to be good and
true also.

When she grew to be a woman Gorgo became the
wife of a king, and then she showed herself as noble
a queen as she had been a princess. Her husband
was that King Leonidas who, you remember, stood in
the narrow pass of Thermopyle with his small army
and fought back the great hosts of the Persians until
he and all his brave band were killed.

But before this happened, there was a time when
the Grecians did not know that the great Persian army
was coming to try to destroy them, and a friend of
theirs who was a prisoner in the country where the
great Xerxes lived, wishing to warn the Spartans of
the coming of the Persians, so they might prepare,
sent a messenger to King Leonidas. But when the
messenger arrived all he had to show for his message
was a bare, white, waxen tablet. The king and all
the lords puzzled over this strange tablet a long time,
but could make nothing out of it. At last they began
to think it was done in jest and did not mean any-
thing,

But just then the young queen Gorgo said: “Let
me take it,” and after looking it all over she said ;
“There must be some writing underneath the wax!”

They scraped away the wax from the tablet, and
there, sure enough, written on the wood beneath, was
A LITTLE MAID OF LONG AGO. SI

the message of the Grecian prisoner and his warning
to King Leonidas that the great Persian army was
coming.

Thus Gorgo helped her country a second time, for
if the Spartans had not known that the army was
coming they could not have warned the other king-
doms and perhaps the Persians would not have been
conquered. But, as it was, Leonidas and the other
kings called their armies together and when the Per-
sian army appeared the Greeks were ready to meet
them and to fight and die for their beautiful Greece.

So this one little maid who lived hundreds of years
ago, a princess and a queen, helped to save her
father from disgrace and her country from ruin. And
we may feel sure that she was strong and true always,
even when her brave husband, Leonidas, lay dead in
the fearful pass of Thermopylae, and she was left to
mourn alone in the royal palace at Sparta.







we
ae = ea
ae
A LITTLE MAID OF TO-DAY.



HERE is a little girl I

know who thinks she is
_ of no use in the world.
/ She is always wishing

that she might do some

great thing; and when
she hears that one of her schoolmates has done some-
thing very nice, she always wishes that she had done
it, and mourns that she can “never be or do any-
thing like other girls.” She never thinks of what she
2s doing every day. So we always call her “ Little
Do-Nothing.”

“Why cannot / paint a wild rose like Jennie, or
play a piece on the piano like Maud?” she said to
me one day; and when I replied, ‘“ Because you have
not tried, Lena,” she said, “But I couldn't if I did
try. Everybody but me can do things. /’m of no.
use, Auntie.”

She looked up at me so sorrowfully that I wanted
to comfort her. So I took her upon my lap (though
she is almost too big for that now) and said to
her : —

A LITTLE MAID OF TO-DAY. 83

‘“Now, Lena, try to think if there is not something
you do that is worth while. Tell me just what you
do every day.” After a minute the little girl
began :—

“ Why, I wipe the dishes, and make my bed, and
set the table, and —I guess that’s all.”

‘“Well, even that is something,” I said; “ but don’t
you help take care of grandma, and get her supper
for her when Mamma is away ?”

“Oh, yes!” said Lena; “but that isn’t anything.
Of course I do that.”

‘““And don’t you go to school, dearie ?”

“Why, yes, I go to school; but everybody does
that.”

“And don’t you get a good lesson almost every
day ?”

‘Teacher says so,” modestly replied “Little Do-Noth-
ing.”

‘“But I suppose all this amounts to nothing, doesn’t
it? You want to do something grand! that Is’ df)
isn’t it, dear 2”

“JT never thought ¢kose things were anything,” she
said ; “of course I do those, because I want to help
Mamma and learn something at school.”

‘And I suppose you think ‘everybody’ does that
too, don’t you, Lena?”

Lena saw that I was laughing at her, but could
not see the reason why; and I did not wish to tell
her that not all little girls wazt to help their mam-
84 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

mas and learn their lessons. So I only kissed her
and rocked her in my arms like a baby, — this sweet
little girl who thought she was cf no use in the
world.

After that, I used to watch when she was not look-
ing, just to see the little things she would do that
she thought of ‘‘no account.” And I will tell you
about one day, which was very much like all other
days. After doing all the little things she could to
help, and playing with baby Francis till he forgot
what it was to cry, Lena started to do an errand at
the grocery store. I happened to be going out too,
and so I went with her. She always told me all her
little troubles, and this day she said, just as we left
the gate :—

« Auntie, Ethel has made her dolly a whole new
suit. I wish I could sew as nicely as Ethel does.”

I did not say anything, for just then we heard a
great laughing and shouting, and a poor, ugly, little
yellow dog ran toward us, followed by a crowd of big
boys. I caught Lena’s hand and tried to draw her
out of the way, but she left me, and running toward
the dog, she knelt down, threw her apron over him,
and kept him there till the boys had gone by. I was
afraid that the dog might bite her, and said: “ How
did you dare to go up to him so, Lena? I would
not.”

“Oh, that’s nothing!” said she; “I wasn’t going
to let him get hurt, of course!”
4 LITTLE MAID OF T>-DAY. 85

Presently we came to a store window where there
were ribbons and laces, and Lena stopped and looked
in.

“Anything you want, dear?” J] asked, smoothing
her pink check.

“I was wondering,” she replied, “if Rosie's papa
would tell her how sick Mamie Gray is, so she could
go and see her. Would you tell him, Auntie?”

Of course I went with the dear little girl while she
sent the message,

A little way farther we saw on the ground a little
brown bird trying to learn to fly. He had fluttered
along from the tree into the middle of the sidewalk,
where people could hardly help treading on him. In-
deed, I did not see him at all; but Lena did, and
quickly picked him up and set him inside the fence,
almost before I knew what she was doing. Just then
some of her schoolmates came riding by, and when
they saw her they invited her to take a ride with
them to the beach. My little girl wanted to go, for
she loves the sea; but after a moment’s hesitation she
said : —

“I want to go ever so much, but I promised Mam-
ma to come straight home and take care of Francy.”

If I had not been with her the dear little thing
would have lost her ride, but I told her to go, while
I went home and told her mother and took her place
by Francy’s cradle. And on my way home I thought
a great deal about Lena, and made up my mind that
86 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

she should not go on any longer thinking she did
nothing of value, when, in one day, she had done
more vea/ things than Ethel and Jennie and Maud
all put together.

So when we were all seated at the supper table, —
Lena and I side by side, —I said I wanted to tell a
story. And I told this very story I have been telling
you, — how a little girl who thought she did nothing
of any use in the world, had spent one day,—tell-
ing just what Lena had done that day, only I called
the little girl “Mollie” instead of “ Lena.” As I went
on, Lena's eyes grew bigger and bigger, and finally
she said: —

“Why, Auntie, do you mean me?”

“Yes, you darling,” said I, hugging her close to my
side and giving her a kiss; ‘yes, I mean you. That
is what you are doing every day and thinking it is
of ‘no account, while it is of the best account in
the world. And remember, dearie,” I said, turning her
face toward me so that I could look right down into
her eyes, “remember that the little things you do
every day are of some account; and if you keep right
on doing them, the great things will come by and by.”


Pwa HE always was a perfect little owl,” says
- mamma, and indeed I think mamma was
right, for there she would sit, straight
upright in bed, just as still as a mouse,
looking out of the window, long before the sun was
up, and while all the rest of the folks were sound
asleep. Yes, she is a little owl, though not a “truly”
owl of course, with puffed up feathers and little pointed
ears and round yellow eyes. Her eyes are round
enough, to be sure, as round and big as saucers (doll-
saucers I mean), but they are deep, dark brown just
like mamma's and her ears are little and pink and she
hasn’t any feathers except her little white nightie with
the blue feather-stitching round the edge —unless you
count her hair, which is soft and fluffy and the color
of sun-light. They just ca// her an owl, that ’s all,
because she is awake when folks ought to be asleep,
as grandma says. But then you know grandma is
old-fashioned and doesn’t know that now-a-days the
88 LITILE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

time to be awake is just when the birds wake up,
long, long before the sun gets out of bed. Her little
crib is right beside the window and there she sits
every morning with her soft, chubby hands folded
together as you do at kindergarten, looking to see
what she can see.

And what does Marjorie see in the morning? Well,
first and best, there is the black and white kitty.



It isn't her own kitty,—she has a white rabbit, in-
stead, in a coop behind the wood-shed—but it is
Ethel’s kitty who lives in the brown house opposite.
Ethel has a dog, too, and a canary bird and lots of
buzzing bees that sometimes fly over into Marjo-
rie’s garden for their breakfast. O, how round and
fuzzy they are and what a pretty, soft humming they
make when they dip down into the morning glory
flowers and come up laden with sweets for their
WHAT MAR YORIE SEES IN THE MORNING. 89

honey! Ethel’s dog comes over very early too, and
Marjorie hears his sharp bark and sees him run up
the street after the milk-wagons. His name is ‘‘ Cap”
which means “Captain” and he ought to be very
brave, but I’m afraid he isn’t, for when there is a big
noise or an express wagon, or a man with a whip he
runs away and hides. The black and white kitty isn’t
a bit afraid of him. She has a cubby-hole in papa’s
asparagus bed, just where Marjorie can’t help seeing
her every morning. The black
and white kitty wakes up early,
just like Marjorie. Up she jumps
out of her basket, washes her face
and hands (and as she has four
hands it takes her a long while,
twice as long as it does you, for
four is twice two), and comes for
a walk over to Marjoric’s. Then
she snuggles down in her cubby-
hole and sits looking up at the window blinking her
yellow eyes at Marjorie and purring very loud, and
then off she goes again after a grasshopper for break-
fast.

Then there are the two big dogs that live in the
corner house where the cow lives that smells so sweet
and breathes so hard and rolls up her eyes at you
when you pass by so that you might be frightened if
-you did not know that it is only her way of getting
acquainted. One of the dogs is feeble and shagg


go LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

and very, very old. But the other one, whose name
is Czesar, is young and strong, so he takes care of his
old friend in their walks together. They walk slowly -
up and down in front of Marjorie’s window and make
no noise at all. They never bark unless there is
something to bark at. They often reprove Cap for
his silliness, but, dear me, he hasn't sense enough to
see how much better behaved they are, and so he
goes on being silly, just like some folks that are not
dogs. The old, old dog
is almost blind, and un-
less Caesar is with him he
is apt to get lost. He
did once, and Czesar found
him and brought him
home. It is funny to see
them march along to-
gether and then sit down
side by side and look solemnly up the street; Czesar
very politely waiting till his old friend Max is rested,
though fe isn’t tired a bit. Then they will go on
again, and, having had their walk, turn and come
home to breakfast.

Then there are the milk-cart men with their cans
rattling and their horses bobbing along, one after the
other. First comes the red milk-man. His horse is
red and his cart is red and his face and hair are all
red, too. He comes very early, so early that, in the
winter, he has to bring a lantern, and the light bobs


WHAT MARFORIE SEES IN THE MORNING. 9!

up and down on the wall in Marjorie’s room like the
“birdie on the wall” in the looking-glass song at
kindergarten. He stops at Ethel’s house and leaves
two big cans of milk for Ethel’s breakfast. One sum-
mer when the family was away, the red milk-man
used to fill a dipper with milk every morning for the
black and white kitty and leave it behind the barn.
He filled it brimful, and then jumped back into his
wagon and said “hudup” and away went the. “red *
horse —to the next kitty’s house, I suppose —and the
black and white kitty lapped up the milk for her
breakfast. Sometimes she did not get it, though, for
Daisy Pease and Kitty Baxter and Tiger Lily and
little Midget Mankins were there before her and
drank it all up. But she didn't care very much.
There were plenty of grasshoppers and flies, and
sometimes a nice bone that Cap had left, so she got
along very well. ets

Next after the red milk-man, comes the white milk-
man and he stops at Marjorie’s house, just far enough
along so that the tip of his white horse’s white nose
peeps in at the window. He is a white man like his
horse, but he isn’t quite so honest, for the white
horse is so honest that his very name is “Sir Hon-
esty,” while the white man used to pick grapes: off the
vine beside Marjorie’s window when he thought no
one was looking. If he heard any sound he would
run, which showed he knew he was doing wrong, for
he knew very well that Marjorie’s papa’s grapes were
92 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST:

not fzs grapes. And Marjorie knows it too, for
mamma told her so once when she wanted to take a
red candy-ball off the counter in the store where they
sell ice-cream, The candy-ball wasn’t Marjorie’s candy-
ball, said mamma, and so she must not touch it.
Then comes the brown milk-man’s horse and of
course he must be a brown milk-man, for the red
horse’s milk-man is red and the white horse’s milk-
man is white. At any rate, if he isn’t brown “he
ought to be,” as the nice man who wrote the “ Water
Babies” says. He goes right past Marjorie’s window
and is all shut up in his cart just like a turtle in his
shell. And when he drives by, he says, “ gid-ap, gid-
ap, gid-ap” right along, as a clock ticks, without stop-
ping. The brown milk-man leaves milk at Daisy’s
house, where once they caught a wood-chuck, and
when the brown milk-man saw the wood-chuck he
said “gid-ap” just as he does to his brown horse.
The brown milk-man has a brown baby, too! The
black and white kitty saw the baby one morning while
she was washing her face after breakfast, so she knows
all about it, for just then the brown milk-man drove
by, and the little, clean, brown baby looked out of the
wagon and clapped his little, clean, brown hands at the
black and white kitty, so she couldn’t help seeing him.
The brown baby has had Azs breakfast; you can tell
that by his looks! All these things Marjorie sees in
the morning while she is waiting for mamma to wake
WHAT MAR FORTE SEES IN THE MORNING. 93

and papa to kindle the fire and sister Lizzie to open
the windows and let in the sunlight.

But dear me, this isn’t all that she sees. It would
take a whole book to tell you all, for she keeps her
eyes wide open and there are lots of things to see
every morning. There is the great, tall ice-man with
his great yellow and black cart and two big, slow
horses, all thundering down the street and making
noise enough to wake the sleepiest of all sleepy heads.
He says ‘good morning” to papa, who gets up to let
him in, and he is very polite and gentlemanly even
though he does drive an ice-cart and wear old clothes.
He is straight and tall and walks along with his big
piece of clear ice as if it were a little bundle, —he
is so strong! Once mamma gave him some apples
to eat and Marjorie saw him hold one in each hand
in front of the big horses to see if they would come
and get them. At first they didn’t know what it
meant, they didn’t get apples every day for breakfast,
but at last up they started and each got an apple and
a nice pat on the neck from the ice-man, who was
very much pleased.

Then there is the canary-bird over on Ethel’s pi-
azza. Marjorie can just see him, a little yellow dot in
the midst of the green branches, hopping about in
his cage and singing for joy in the sunlight. He
loves to stay in his cage because he doesn’t know
any better and he thinks he wouldn't like to get out,
because if he did, the black and white kitty might eat
94 LITTLE FOLKS, EAST AND WEST.

him up; for kitties, you see, think that birdies are
made to kill and eat— ¢hey don’t know any better —
so the yellow birdie is quite content, and looks down
on the little grey sparrows and does not envy them
at all. But the sparrows wonder how he can be happy
in a cage. They know how much nicer it is to be
free than it is to be safe. They would rather fly
away from kitty than have a wire cage all around
them to keep her away, while they could not fly at
all. So they are quite happy too, and they fly past
Marjorie’s window and settle down in the garden and
peck away for worms and berries and crumbs, saying
‘chip, chip, chip” for company, while the big robin
red-breasts come and find them and get their break-
fast too. And what big worms they do find! Bigger
than they are, almost, but down they go, down Mr.
Robin’s fat throat, and off he hops fatter than ever!

Then there is the darling litthke humming-bird that
comes every morning and gets his breakfast from the
trumpet-vine that grows round the window. Dip, he
goes, down into the trumpet blow, almost the whole
of his little body hidden in its crimson tube, and then _
out again, and then dip, dip, again and again, till he
has gathered all the sweetness, dip, dip, dip, all round
the window. :

There are tne doves, too, that go sliding on the
roofs for exercise. That is great fun. And they can’t
get hurt, for if they slip, why there are their wings!

And the wasps in the honeycomb nest up in the
WHAT MARFORIE SEES IN THE MORNING. 95

cedar tree, flying in and out, out and in, building a
home for winter. They are not so sociable as the
bees though. Zey hum all the time they are working,
the music helps it along, you know.

The grasshoppers, too, and the black cricket with
her family, and the dusty old toad hopping out to
find some water to drink, and the tree-toad that
Marjorie thought was a piece of mud, he was so ex-
actly the color of mud and all rolled up in a ball, and
the black ants who keep so still when there is any
danger near, and the long, purple darning-needle and
the grey spider in the corner under the roof with his
web all wet with dew and the sunshine shining through
—oh, I can’t begin to tell you the things that Mar-
jorie sees in the morning!

And then comes mamma, and puts on Marjorie’s
little pink dress and combs her hair and washes her
face and hands and ties up her little shoes, and then
she is ready —ready for what? she knows. ‘Now
I'm ready for my breakfast, too,” she says, “just like
kitty and Cap and the two great, big horses and the
birdies and the bumble-bees and the brown baby and
ev'y-body else.”
JEE AND SHEPARD’S
<< STAR JUVENILES

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Old Hickory Young Folks’ Life of General Andrew Jackson
The Little Corporal Young Folks’ Life of Napoleon Bonaparte
The Swamp Fox Young Folks’ Life of General Francis Marion
The Mill-Boy of the Slashes Young Folks’ Life of Henry Clay
The Great Expounder Young Folks Life of Daniel Webster

GOOD AND GREAT SERIES 6vols _ Illustrated

Good and Great Men The Whales We Caught
Women of Worth House on Wheels.
A Quaker among the Indians Inn of the Guardian Angel

AROUND THE WORLD LIBRARY By Jules Verne
Round the World in Eighty Days Wreck of the Chancellor
A Winter in the Ice
DORA DARLING LIBRARY

Dora Darling Dora Darling and Little Sunshine
The Year’s Best Days



Sel? dy all booksellers and sent by mail postpaid on receipt of price

E AND SHEPARD Publishers Boston



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