Citation
Little Arthur at the zoo, and the birds he saw there

Material Information

Title:
Little Arthur at the zoo, and the birds he saw there
Creator:
Seymour, Mary, fl. 1880-1896 ( Author, Primary )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
viii, 175 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Birds -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Zoos -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animals -- Identification -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal behavior -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1892 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1892
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page, engraved.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary Seymour ; with forty-eight illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026953939 ( ALEPH )
ALH7828 ( NOTIS )
43665769 ( OCLC )

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BIRDS IN THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS,



LITTLE ARTHUR

PA ~~ ZO@

And the Birds he Saw Chere.



AN AVIARY—LONDON ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,

AND NEW YORK.

EDINBURGH,

LONDON,






LITTLE ARTHUR
Alt the Zoo
And the Birds he Saw There,

By

MARY SEYMOUTR,

Author of “ Shakespeare's Stories Simply Told,” ‘‘ Chaucer's Stories Simply Told,
&o &e

With Forty-eight Illustrations.

Teondow:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

1892.






G@fountents.

THe GOLDEN EAGLE,

Tyr Wuite-Heapep SEA-EAGLe,

Tur WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE, ... ee a
Tue Harry Eacte, ... ne one tee
Tue BRAZILIAN CARACARA TAGLE,

Tur Kine oF THE VULTURES,

Tre SoctaBie VULTURE,

TuHE Convor, wee re ie

THE PEREGRINE FALcon, a on

THE Snowy Owt1,

TuHE VIRGINIAN EAGLE OWL,
Tue Barn Ow1,

Tue OSTRICH,

Tue Emu,

THE CROWNED CRANE, an ne
Tur DEMOISELLE,

THE WHITE STORK,

Tue Biack STORK,

Tur Marazout SToRK,

THe Common Heron,

Tue Ticer BITrEern,

THe WHITE SPooNsBILL,

Tue Scarter Isis,

Tuer PELICAN, ae

il
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
42
46
49
53
56
60
64
67
70
73
76
80
84

91
94



Vill CONTENTS,

Tue Witp Swan, ... a bs om ae be ww. (OOF
THE Tame Swan, ... ee ee te oe ae «101
Tue CEREOPSIS, ae oe, ae ie ite tee .. 104
TuHE Summer Duck, ... aes hts ote eet wee «108
THE CresteD Curassow, ss ve bt sit oe 12
THE GUAN, ... i hg oe ics wee oes .. =116
Tue Witp Turkey, ... aoe Zot nee - ee w. -120
THE JAVANESE PEA-Fow1, Sie ane ee 195
THE GOLDEN PHEASANT, ae ee re Pas eee «» 180
Tue SItverR PHEASANT, ne cee Pr ose be we: 188
THE Renp-LeccED ParTRiper, tee e oe a. 186
THE CALIVORNIAN QUAIL, Aes ite i me ite w= 140
THE TurtTLE-Dove, ... us ise ei ts vee 148
THE Pipine Crow, ... se aes tee ae .. «146
Tye CHINESE STARLING, ee ete ats ae te ss. 150
Ture Winow Fincz#, ... te it we ie a w. 154
THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEET, wae on ve as s. -158
THE VazA PARRAKEET, ao oe ae we ie we = 162
Tue Rep ann BivE Macaw, age ae fice, eat s :165
THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO, ... a wee .. 168

THE RosE-CRESTED CocKATOO, oi Wee ae res we 172





LITTLE ARTHUR AT THE ZOO
And the Birds be Saw There.



I FLATTER myself that to some young readers the above
title may not be unfamiliar. It may remind them of my
former account of LirrL—E ARTHUR and his excursions to
the wonderful gardens of Regent’s Park, London. That
volume is occupied ‘entirely with the animals he saw there;
this one shall be devoted to the birds.

It was a great pleasure to me to write down all the
information I could collect concerning these strange and
beautiful creatures for the instruction and amusement of my
little nephew ARTHUR, and it occurred to me afterwards that
many other little boys and girls might like to read what
had interested him so much. I hope many did like reading
about the animals; and now, if any of them care to hear
about the birds, let them come with me in fancy to those
famous gardens and have a good look at the numberless
aviaries, or bird-houses, there. Let us go in search of the
mighty eagle, the fierce vulture, the long-legged ostrich, and



10 AT THE ZOO.

the sleepy owl. We shall see many gaily-plumaged crea-
tures, and hear many wonderful stories regarding them.

And I am sure, when you meet any of them in real
life by-and-by, you will enjoy seeing them ever so much
more because you know something of their nature and
habits. ,







THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

THE bird about which I must first ask you to read is the
eagle, for he is the king of the feathered tribes.

In this picture you see how large and powerful he is,
and what strong sharp talons he has for grasping his vic-
tims. The feet are yellow ; and though the colour of the
feathers is brown, the sunshine falling on them gives them a
beautiful golden tinge, from which this eagle gets his name.

His home is on the highest crag of some mountain top ;
and thence he looks down on forests and rocks, deep chasms
and precipices, over which he has passed easily with his won-
derful wings. The golden eagles build on all the mountain
chains of Europe, Asia Minor, Tartary, the north of Africa,



12 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

and the northern regions of America, Scotland is a very
favourite place with these great birds, especially the isles
of Orkney, where they find secure places for their nests on
the storm-worn cliffs overhanging the sea.

The mother-bird finds sticks, twigs, heather, and layers
of reeds, and with these she forms a place for her young
ones, seldom sitting on more than two or three eggs. As
soon as the little eagles are able to fly, their parents drive
them away and keep the nest for themselves. Until that
time, they take good care of their feathered. children, seek-
ing grouse and other kinds of dainties for their food.

The bright fierce eyes of the golden eagle can see a long
way off’ Thus he is able to look down on the flocks, and
to choose a moment when the shepherd is not watching, in
order to descend and to seize a nice young lamb, which he
bears off to his mountain home and devours eagerly. Hares,
rabbits, foxes, fawns, and birds of all kinds, are hunted by
these tyrants, and they have been known to make off with
a moderate-sized pig. It is said that they have carried off
children as old as four or five years; but I am not sure
that this last charge against the golden eagle is strictly true.

Tt is no easy matter to catch one of the young eagles,
for very few people have courage enough to climb up to
their nests. Sometimes a man is daring enough to allow
himself to be let down over the face of a steep and lofty
cliff till he reaches the ledge on which the mother eagle has
built her nest. Setting fire to the nest, he scares the old



THE GOLDEN EAGLE, 13

birds, and then manages to secure one of the startled young
birds, and to carry it away to begin the work of taming it.

When fully grown, an eagle of this kind measures
three feet long, and more than seven feet across when his
wings are outspread. The beak is large and powerful, and
you will see how deeply it is curved if you will glance again
at the picture. The older this eagle is, the lighter is the
shade of brown which his feathers attain. The tail is
nearly black, varied with narrow stripes of gray, which dis-
appear in age, and which are plainest in very young birds.

The golden variety of long-winged eagles is the only
kind in which the legs are covered with plumes quite down
to the toes. Just at the base the feathers are white; but
this is noticed only when the wind chances to ruffle them.
The bold, defiant way in which these kings among birds
perch themselves, seems to show how proud and fearless
they are. There is something very grand about the eagle ;
but the cruelty of his nature must keep us from loving him.

Even while a whole pack of hounds and a number of
huntsmen have been in full chase after a hare, a golden
eagle has been known to drop into their midst, and to dis-
appoint them by securing the poor frightened victim for
himself! He flies so very swiftly, too, that if he has
marked another bird for his prey, though a long way off,
he is quite certain to overtake it. But he always chooses
the largest living thing that he can carry ; and so he takes
a lamb rather than a lark or a thrush,



14 THE GOLDEN EAGLE,

In olden times the golden eagle was used for hawking ;
but he was so large and heavy to carry on the wrist, and
so very disobedient to his master, that he was let off such
service after a short trial.

A tame eagle is rather clever in giving a sharp and
dangerous bite to any dog’ or cat that may come within his
reach; nor would he scruple to let you or me feel the
power of his terrible beak, unless, indeed, he had been
trained into a very friendly feeling toward us. For these
reasons, it is quite as well that a golden eagle is not com-

monly an inmate of our homes.







THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

HerE we have the picture of one of the large eagle family
whose head becomes white at the age of four years. When
the bird is younger there is not a great deal of difference
between him and the common sea-eagle, because he has
feathers of mingled brown and gray. About the third
year the white begins to appear on the head, neck, wings,
and tail, but it is of a somewhat dingy hue. It becomes
gradually creamy, and at length is of a very pure shade.
The full-grown bird measures about three feet in length
from head to tail, and more than seven in width when the
wings are spread for flight. The beak is by that time
changed from dusky brown to a bright yellow, and the tail
is white, as you see it in the portrait of this kind of sea-eagle.

His native home is North America, where he is found



16 THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

on the banks of the broad lakes and rapid rivers as well as
on the sea-coast.

Perhaps you have heard of the’ great cataract or falls of
Niagara. These white-headed sea-eagles collect in numbers
upon the rocks there to catch the fish which is their fa-
vourite food. But another cause of their watchfulness is
that many a poor beast that has ventured to wade a few
steps into the stream above gets carried on by the torrent
and hurled down into those tremendous waterfalls. This
will be the opportunity for these eagles to have a splendid
banquet, for like all the rest of their family they are birds
of prey.

If the vulture has come there for the same purpose, he
is forced to give place to the sea-eagle, who is a great
tyrant, and will keep all other birds at a distance until his
own appetite is quite satisfied.

One writer tells us that some thousands of tree-squir-
rels were once drowned as they tried to cross the river
Ohio, and a number of vultures collected to feed on them.
But a single white-headed eagle came on the scene, and he
put an end to their enjoyment by driving them off and
keeping possession of their prey for several days; after
which he went away, because he had eaten enough. It
has been said that eagles never attack any but living
animals; but the sea-eagles depart from this rule, and feed
on dead creatures too.

Now, I must tell you of a very mean way he has of
(84)







THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE, 17

taking food for which another bird has watched and toiled.
Sitting high up on some of the giant trees that abound in
America, the white-headed eagle has a fine view over sea
and shore. The white gulls do not move without his eye
being on them; and he knows exactly what the ducks and
cranes and all the other feathered things are doing. When
he catches a glimpse of one called the fish-hawk he is all
attention, for he knows that presently there will come the
chance of a theft. This fish-hawk sees something worth
drawing out of the water, and down he goes to secure it.
When he has met with success, he rises with his prey in
his beak, and screams with triumph as he mounts in the
air. Away flies the eagle in pursuit, and soon overtakes
the fish-hawk : he in his mingled fear and anger drops his
fish, and the winged thief snatches it before it falls into
the water, and carries it off to the woods, where I need not
say it is quickly swallowed.

If, however, a band of the fish-hawks are together, the
sea-eagle does not attempt to play the shabby trick, but
goes off to hunt for his own food. He is likely to turn
inland and do a good deal of damage among any little
pigs or lambs he may chance to find. If these are not
to be caught, he chooses what he thinks next best—ducks
and geese that are tender and fat. Gulls too will please
his greedy appetite, and he will despatch a good many of
them in a short space of time.

You may be very sure that all farmers and _shep-
(84) 2



18 THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

herds have a great dislike to the sea-eagle, that robs
them of their poultry and young lambs. If they
can creep along the ledge of a rock and set. fire to
the nest of their enemy, they do not mind the risk or
the difficulty, for they want to lessen the number of
birds of prey. ,

The nest of the sea-eagle is built in the most dreary
places that the mother-bird can find, because she wants to
keep it hidden from man’s eye. It is always very large
in size, and is made of sticks, hay, moss, dead sea-weed,
and other such materials; and it is mended and added to
year after year.

Here two white eggs will be laid. There are just a
few red dots about them at the larger end, but they are of
a very pure tint.

The little birds are well cared for by both parents
while they are weak and small; but afterwards neither
father nor mother will have anything to do with them, and
they are driven away to manage for themselves. Some-
times fish are carried to the nest in such large numbers
that there is quite a disagreeable smell of it some hundreds
of yards away, and this may be the means of finding where
the eagle has built her home. If the cleft of a rock has
not been chosen, the top of some tall pine tree is a
place where this bird likes to nest; and as it is so large,
it can easily be seen from below, though far above
reach.



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THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE.

HERE is an eagle that is only seen in a wild state upon
the coast of Australia. Two of them were brought from
there long ago, and placed in the Paris exhibition of birds,
where they were much valued because so rare. Since
then others have come from their distant home to live in
the Zoological Gardens, and it is the picture of one of these
that you have before you.

In their habits they seem to be much like the moun-
tain eagles well known in the Old World, and nature has
given them also a vast deal of strength and fierce courage.



20 THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE,

But, like all the tribe, they are not possessed of any re-
markable intelligence whereby they could learn if men
wished to teach them. They cannot even weave their
nests with the skill of many a little common bird; while
their voices are as disagreeable as they well can be, so it
is only for their strength and size we can much admire
the different branches of the eagle family.

In the full-grown bird of the kind you see now, the
general colour is either a deep brown or a dull black, with
a red tinge on the head, the neck, and the breast.

About the wings there are some white markings, and
also a shade of light brown. Do not forget to notice that
this wedge-tailed eagle has feathers to cover the greater
part of his legs; that part of them which is not pro-
tected by plumage is of a horn-colour, and the talons
are black. The middle feathers of the tail are longer
than the rest by about four inches, and thus give it its
peculiar shape. The wings when closed extend a good
deal beyond the middle of the tail, and therefore being
so long they are able to carry the bird high up in the
air, and keep him aloft for a good time without growing
weak and weary.

The female wedge-tailed eagle when she is young has
plumage of a lighter and brighter brown. There will be
very pretty shades of this colour on the wings, and dark
bands upon the fawn-coloured ground of her tail, which is
edged with a border of dull red.



THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE. 21

You have already made sufficient friends among the
different eagles to know that they are all birds of prey,
seizing and devouring smaller birds, and attacking a great
many harmless animals,

There is a story told of an old Scottish minister who
was but poor, and set great store by a young pig which
had been given to him. He was keeping it a while until
it grew rather fatter and larger; but one day a mountain
eagle, that had been keeping an eye on piggy also, decided
that it was fit for eating, and therefore came down and
carried off the prize. The old gentleman heard a great
squealing, and running out to see what was the matter,
arrived just in time to behold the eagle soaring out of reach
with the little pig held tightly in his powerful grasp.

I do not know if the wedge-tailed eagle would carry off
a pig, but I think it very likely, because he does so many
things that are common to the mountain eagle. He preys
upon the emus and other large birds, which you might
suppose were quite able to resist him, only unfortunately
they have not the courage to do it. He carries off the
little kangaroos from their mother, and will even manage
to secure one that has grown to a fair size. The natives
have a great dread of this wedge-tailed eagle, and object
to go near where he is likely to be seen. We can scarcely
wonder at their fear of a bird so strong and savage.

Once a traveller had managed to capture one of them
by slightly wounding it in the wing, and with a good deal



22 THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE,

of difficulty the strong legs were tied together, and the
bird was laid in the bottom of the boat near at hand.
Even then as a captive it managed to force its talons
through a man’s leg, and in the early morning it was found
to have divided the strands of the rope by which it was
confined, and so had made its escape. I feel sure that this
same eagle would never put itself in the way of another
traveller who was armed with a gun, but for the rest of

its life would keep all human beings at a safe distance.







THE HARPY EAGLE.

I NEED scarcely tell you that this eagle is one of the most
savage of all his family, for you can judge of his character
by the picture we have of him.

There is no beast so fierce that the harpy will not dare
to attack it; he has even been accused of wishing to prey
upon a man, and splitting the skull with one blow of his
powerful beak. .

But if as much to be dreaded as this when in a
wild state, several harpy eagles, when taken from the
nest and tamed, have become quite gentle and friendly
with human beings, allowing themselves to be handled and

caressed.



24 THE HARPY EAGLE.

The usual length of a full-grown bird of this sort is
rather more than three feet and a half.

The entire head is covered with a soft, thick gray
down, and from the back there rises a crest of broad black
feathers, which are slightly tipped with gray. When the
harpy is quiet this crest is only raised a very little from
the back of the neck ; but sudden anger or any excitement
will cause him to raise it high on his head.

Below the crest the broad collar that circles the front
of the neck, and the whole of the back and wings, are
black, each feather ending in a somewhat lighter streak.
The under surface of the breast is of snowy whiteness, and
the tail feathers are in bands of black and white with a
tip of ash colour. The beak and the claws are black, and
the legs are yellow; and as all these tints and markings
were seen on a harpy that had lived for more than seven
years in England, we may be quite sure they are those of
a full-grown bird. The very young eagles of this species
have a fawn-coloured collar round the neck, with a few
black spots on it, and the under surface has dots of fawn
colour upon the white ground. At each change of plumage
they get more patches of black, until at last they become
like the bird of our picture.

South America is the natural home of the harpy, and
amid the forests of Guiana he finds plenty of prey. There
. are two varieties of the sloth found there, and both are in

great favour with this eagle, and form a large proportion



THE HARPY EAGLE. 25

of his meals. He always lives in the depths of some
gloomy forest, caring for no company, and keeping very
still and silent. When disturbed from his sullen repose he
proves himself to be quarrelsome and fierce in temper.

When he has caught a hare or a rabbit he removes the
skin with his beak before eating the flesh ; and the bones
of birds and animals, with any bits he has not had a fancy
for, lie scattered about his nest or the ground beneath it.
This harpy has rather short wings, so he is not one of
those that soar high in the air and perch on the mountain
crags; a tall tree is easy enough for him, but he could not
fly like the longer-winged birds of prey. He is not at all
the kind of neighbour one would desire to have, so it is all
the better that he chooses to be somewhat of a hermit.

A traveller in South America gives an account of one
of these harpies that he brought down by a shot which
broke the wing. Thus wounded, the bird .was made a
prisoner, and fastened by one leg to the boat from which
the traveller had landed to inspect the forest depths. For
several days the harpy refused all food; but he did not
even try to do any mischief nor to get away.

Another was taken when but a nestling; but during
the voyage to Europe he was killed by the sailors. Their
motive was revenge; for, with his natural instinct of
destroying animals, the young harpy had seized and de-
voured several monkeys which in playing about had ven-
tured too near his cage. He had skinned them before he



26 THE HARPY EAGLE.

began to eat; but nearly all their bones were swallowed
with their flesh. As the sailors were fond of the monkeys,
they destroyed the handsome bird that had caught the
little creatures in his strong talons, and thus made a speedy
end of them.







THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

I HOPE you are not quite tired of hearing about eagles, for
I want to tell you of another kind that is found in the
southern parts of America. He is supposed to be a sort
of link between the eagles and the vultures, having a, little
of the character of both species of birds. In the nakedness
of parts of his head he is like the last-named bird of prey,
and also in the eyes, which are not deeply set; but in habits
and ways of life this caracara eagle is like the golden, the
sea, and other of the many. different varieties of eagles.
Our picture shows us that he is a sharp, wide-awake look-
ing bird. There is nothing of sleepiness or indolence about
him, and very little would escape his bright keen eyes.



28 THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

You will notice, he has a long beak hooked at its tip—
such a beak as we would not like to close upon our fingers.
The wings in this kind of eagle are nearly the length
of the tail, and rather rounded in form. The legs are not
feathered ; the claws are moderately long, but we are told
that they are not very powerful in their grasp of anything.
_ These birds cannot fly to any lofty height, and they
are not able to bear their prey with them when on the
wing to carry it to a distant nest. They are most com-
monly seen walking, and there is not one of the many
destructive birds of prey that can walk so well as this
Brazilian caracara eagle.

Those feathers that he has upon his head are long and
black, and can be partly raised so as to form a pointed
sort of crest. The neck is of a light brownish gray, and
the breast is the same shade, but marked with wavy bars
of a deeper brown. Nearly all the rest of the plumage
is of a dark blackish brown; but the tail is of a dirty
white hue at the base, and marked with narrow dusky
bands, though black at the tip, as a glance at the bird’s
portrait will show you. The skin on the cheeks, like that
of the vultures, is bare of plumage, is of a dull red colour ;
the legs are yellow and the claws are black. That cruel-
looking beak is horn-coloured at the tip and of a bluish
shade at its base. But a good many changes are noticed
in the tint of the birds that from time to time appear at
the Zoological Gardens, as they advance in age.



THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE. 29

When fully grown, an eagle of this kind measures
about twenty-one inches long, and with his wings out-
spread his width will be some fifty inches. At one period
of his life there are some white feathers among his wings
marked with spots of brown, and the throat as well as the
sides of the head are as light as they can be.

This is the most common bird of prey to be found in
Brazil and Paraguay. The nest for the rearing of the
young ones is built on the tops of the trees, and those are
always chosen that have the most climbing shrubs clinging
to the trunk and branches.

If none of this kind are to be found, the mother-bird
gives up the idea of a tree altogether and turns to some
bushy thicket. Here she arranges sticks and twining
branches according to her fancy, and lines them with a
thick layer of hair.

" Two eggs will be deposited here, very pointed in their
shape at the one end, and with spots of crimson on their
brownish ground.

There is no difficulty about the food of these eagles of
South America—nothing comes amiss to them. They
consume both dead and living prey, and they do not de-
spise toads or frogs, worms or snails. Lizards, grass-
hoppers, even the winged ants of that country, snakes and
flies, are watched for and most eagerly devoured. The
greedy bird will even turn up the ground to see what
small insects he may find there. One writer says that this



30 THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

eagle neglects the little birds because he cannot fly after
them high or long enough to manage their capture. But
a second writer considers this a mistake, for as in the
bodies of some Brazilian eagles when opened he found the
remains of many of the small birds, it is clear that there
is some successful way of catching them known to this
cruel, greedy fellow.

They live in pairs or sometimes alone; but three or
four will often join together to pursue some prey that is
too large or strong for a single eagle to manage with
success. Herons and other birds of size and strength are
often chased and overcome by three or four of these cara-
caras that have united against them.

Then they will try to rob vultures of the flesh they
are eating. Even when a sportsman has managed to shoot
some game he may very possibly see it earried off by this
eagle, which suddenly appears and snatches it away before
there is time to interfere.

You may suppose that this is not at all a shy bird.
As the flesh is quite unfit to eat, he has not been much
sought after, and this may be why he is so bold that he
will perch on trees quite near to inhabited places, even on
the roofs of houses, and never try to conceal himself.

The name caracara has been given these eagles by the
Brazilians because they have a cry which is somewhat like

this word, uttered in their hoarse disagreeable voices.







THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

THE king of the vultures has not gained his title from his
size, for he is much smaller than others of his kith and
kin. Perhaps he is so called because he is very much less
awkward than some birds; indeed he is said to be the
most elegant of all the vultures. He has a very strong-
looking beak, as you see in the picture, on each side of
which there falls a sort of comb, bright orange in colour,
about an inch and a half long. The hues of his plumage
are very bright, and are full of contrasts which make him
a somewhat remarkable-looking bird. The upper part of
the neck has no covering, so that you only see the light-
coloured skin; but at its base there is a ruffle of the softest,



382 THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

downiest ash-gray feathers that could be imagined. All the
under parts of this king are white, with here and there a
tinge of flesh colour, and his back and parts of his tail are
fawn colour, which grows lighter and lighter as he passes
from youth to age. The quill feathers of the wings and
tail are a’splendid glossy black. Round -each eye the skin
is bright scarlet, and on the sides of the head it is of the
darkest purple. The base of the beak is red, with a shade
of black; the legs and claws are sometimes dusky, and
now and then of a yellowish white. But I have not even
yet told you all the varied shades of skin or plumage
which you would see if you made the acquaintance of this
king of the vultures. The back of his head is covered with
a patch of short black down. Behind his eyes there are
several deep wrinkles of skin which become a thick fold
passing down to the sides of the neck. This fold is red-
brown mixed with blue, and there are several lines of
minute black hairs passing across it. A very young bird
of this kind is of a bluish tint all over, excepting for his
white under plumage and a few white feathers in his tail.
In the second year of his life his hue becomes duskier, and
he is marked by long-shaped white spots. In the third
year he gets the many shades of the full-grown vulture.
These birds extend over a large range in America.
They are met with as far north as Florida, and are any-
thing but strangers in the United States. They are quite
common in Paraguay, and great flocks of them are seen



THE KING OF THE VULTURES, 33

in Mexico, from whence the first living specimen was
brought to Europe.

The wings of this king of the vultures are so exceed-
ingly strong that they will not only carry him to any
height he may wish to reach, but bear him up for several
hours without fatigue. They walk very slowly on the
ground, keeping their bodies erect. When thesé birds
wish to mount into the air the first starting does not seem
quite easy, for they take several leaps before they are
fairly off. Once off the ground, away they go, easily and
rapidly enough.

Their eye-sight is wonderfully strong and piercing, so
that glancing down on the earth as they are flying they can
see any dead bird or animal, no matter how great may be
the distance, and come down to feed if they are so inclined,

I am very glad to be able to tell you that this king of
the vultures will not attack the smallest living thing. If
even a tiny bird was hurt and wounded so that it could
not fly, but lay panting on the ground, it would be quite
safe from this bird of prey as long as a breath remained.
In summer-time he will feed upon the fish that have been
dried up by the scorching heat of the sun; also upon dead
snakes. and lizards, if there is-nothing better to- be had.

. * These. vultures carry about ‘them thé odour of the: food
they eat; even after they have’ been killed and stufféd: the
skin keeps the same disagreeable’ scent for a good many

years.
(84) 3



34 - THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

It is not a habit of the tribe to perch on trees, but this
king of the vultures departs from the usual rule and chooses
the highest branches for a dwelling.

Here he lives alone or with a mate, and when the
female bird wants to build a nest she chooses the hollow
trunk of the tree in which to lay two eggs.

A great many little dead animals and birds will have
to be found to keep the young vultures well fed until such
time as they can take care of themselves, for they are
hungry creatures. The parent birds have a wonderful
patience in bearing hunger, and are never tempted by it to
eat any but their natural food.

They have no liking for the society of man, and as
they desire to live as far removed from his haunts as they
possibly can, their dwelling is always chosen among trees
which are in a solitary and unfrequented part of the
country.

Though, as I have told you, these vultures live alone
or in pairs, there are generally others of their kind in the
neighbourhood, and that is how it comes to pass that
travellers disturb large bands of these birds when they fire
a gun.

Some say that all other vultures pay a particular
respect to this king, and leave their prey if he takes a
fancy to it; but as this report is contradicted by other
writers, I cannot assure you it is true.





THE SOCIABLE VULTURE,

THE first sociable vulture that was ever seen in Europe
came from the Cape of Good Hope in the summer of 1829,
and was given to the Zoological Society. It is more com-
mon in the interior of Africa than anywhere else.

The sociable vulture is a very large bird, measuring
upwards of ten feet across the wings when they are out-
spread. The head and most of the neck are of a colour
that is more like that of raw flesh than anything else to
which we could compare it; and these parts have no

covering of down or of feathers.



36 THE SOCIABLE VULTURE.

By looking now at the picture you will see that the
lower part of the neck behind has a sort of ruffle which is
quite black in hue. When the great bird is sleepy, he
draws back his head within these crisp feathers as into a
hood, and so takes his rest very comfortably. The body,
the wings, and the tail are all blackish brown; the breast
and the under parts are covered with very thick white
down ; and so are the legs, though upon them there is a
brownish tinge.

When the little vultures of this kind are first hatched,
they are. quite covered with down. At the time when
they are old enough to leave the nest, the feathers are
red-brown in colour. Like all the Vulture family, this
one makes his home among the caves and fissures of the
mountains. There he passes the night, or rests during the
day after his large appetite has been quite satisfied.

When the sun rises, large bands of them may be seen
perched on the rocks near their dwelling-places, looking
out for prey. However high they are above the plains
and valleys, their strong and piercing sight enables them
to perceive what is going on below. If some large animal
has been killed by the hunters, and its dead body is left
unguarded only an instant, these vultures surround it at
once and devour it in their greedy and horrible fashion.
A sociable vulture very seldom feeds on a living victim ;
in such a case it would only be some very small animal.

He delights in continuing his meal even after the carcass



THE SOCIABLE VULTURE. 37

has begun to grow corrupt; for he does not leave it until
he has had all he can get. We all have a natural dislike
to vultures, because they are such cruel and gluttonous
birds ; but as it is with human beings so I fancy is it with
the feathered tribe: despite their bad points, there is gen-
erally something good or useful about them, every one!
Well, then, this is the one thing I can say in favour of the
bird of our picture, as well as of other members of his
large family :—

Away in the warm countries he dwells in, disease
might be spread about if he were not there to clear off
rubbish—the remains of animals and such like things.
The people of those parts would not take the trouble.
These vultures, then, do the service which is done in civil-
ized lands by dust and rubbish carts; and in this way they
prevent a good deal of harm. Happily we do not need
them in England; and no one is at all sorry that we never
see them among us, except as an exhibition, when we have
no reason to fear their attacks. Ifa camel falls dead on
the burning African desert, these vultures appear at once,
and soon employ themselves in making an end of the poor
beast. If a mule drops down among the mountainous
passes, a band of these birds of prey is on the spot with-
out any loss of time, leaving nothing behind but a heap of
bones, picked as clean as ever a hungry dog picked the
bone of a mutton chop!

When the female of these sociable vultures has made



388 THE SOCIABLE VULTURE.

her nest, she lays two or at most three eggs in it. One
traveller in Africa has mentioned eating these eggs, which
he thought very good indeed; but it is a hard matter to
get them, because the nest is so cleverly hidden.

Two or three birds often build quite near together in
the same cavern. I do not know if this is why they are
called sociable vultures; but it proves that they are very
friendly among themselves, and indeed one single mountain
seems to be the home of an immense number of these great

birds.







THE CONDOR.

Art the beginning of this century, very little was known
about the condor except what had been learned from
travellers’ tales. Then, the great German naturalist Hum-
boldt made us understand the size and the appearance as
well as the habits of this great bird.

Like the eagle, he seizes on living prey; but like the
vulture, too, he feeds on that which is dead. Whatever
he secures he eats on the spot, never trying to bear it
away with him to his home. Though the condor has never
been given the name of king, it is not withheld because he
is not large enough for the office. He is stronger, larger,
and fiercer than the eagle; and he is very handsome, with
his shining black feathers, the white tips to his wings, and

the snowy ruffle around his neck.



40 THE CONDOR.

lf a journey is made to the snowy regions of the
mountain-ranges in South America, that is where the con-
dors may be seen in little groups of three or four. They
never collect in large troops, as do the true vultures,
When a great sense of hunger drives the condor down
from the heights he loves, it is only to stay until his
appetite is quite satisfied, for the warmer air of the lower
world does not please him.

If you will turn to the picture, you will see a sort of
comb on this bird’s head: the female has nothing of the
kind. Nor can she show white patches on her wings, for
they are of a dark gray shade. Both birds have rather
short tails; and their strong legs are of a blue-gray colour,
and are not plumed to the toes after the fashion of the
golden eagle.

The mother-bird does not make a nest, but leaves her
egos on the open ledge of a rock in some hollow. Both
parents take food to their young ones, and are devoted in
their care; but after some six weeks the little condors
begin to flutter their wings, and in a very few months
they go off altogether, to seek their own home and live-
lihood. | .

Two of the full-grown birds will sometimes fly down
from the mountains and attack a llama, a calf, or a cow.
They pursue the poor animal for some little way, wound-
ing it so much with their cruel beaks and talons, that at

last it falls on the ground from weariness and loss of blood.



THE CONDOR. 41

Then the condors tear out the tongue of their prey, and
begin devouring the parts they like best. Last of all, they
gorge themselves with the intestines; and their greediness
is such that they are quite unable to fly for some time after
their horrible banquet.

Many stories have been told of children, and even of
men and women, being attacked by these birds; but Baron
Humboldt has said that he never heard of any such case,
even though the Indians who collect the snow from the
mountains leave their little ones sleeping in the open air in
the midst of the resorts of the condors. He told also that
he had himself often been within a few feet of three or
four as they perched on some rock, yet they made no
attempt to do him any harm,

When left in his natural state, the condor lives to a very
great age—longer, it is said, than a man lives). When
caught, he is at first both sullen and timid; but as he
becomes used to his new life he gains courage, and is often
very savage and dangerous. After a time, however, he
learns to be content with his prison and his keepers, and

becomes quiet if not happy.





THE PEREGRINE FALCON.

Nong of us can be sure what birds tell each other; but if
the peregrine faleon is proud, he might certainly boast
that he belongs to a good old family.

In long past days, his ancestors went hawking with
the kings and nobles of “merry England ;” no birds were
so high in favour or were tended with such care. It was
rather a cruel way of taking pleasure, and we have quite
done with it now-a-days. No longer are falcons blind-
folded and carried on the wrists of their owners to the
fields, and there unhooded and sent to strike down their
prey.

I am afraid the peregrine falcon is much like human



THE PEREGRINE FALCON. 43

beings who are not in favour with the world. No one
wants him now, so he may be left to take care of himself ;
and if any person shoots him, or robs his nest, no trouble
or penalty will follow.

Of all the noble faleon family, the peregrine used to be
the favourite. His long pointed wings help him to rise
higher in the air than his relative the hawk, and he is
more easily taught and trained than the eagle.

He has been found in most of the mountainous parts
of Europe, in the clefts of the rocks away in Australia,
and throughout both North and South America. There
are still falcons in England, but Scotland is more in favour
with them, especially the most lonely parts of the Shetland
Islands.

The mother-bird is always larger than the male; her
plumage is a little redder on the lower feathers, and not
quite of so blue a shade on the upper ones. The male
peregrine falcon grows lighter as he gets older. In the
first year the upper feathers are light brown, with an
ash-coloured tinge here and there. The head and the
neck are then whitish, and are marked with brown and
red spots; the throat and the under parts are of a dirty
white with brown marks; and the legs are yellow.
Afterwards the upper feathers turn gray, and are marked
by dark-brown bands. The beak is lead-colour, the head
and the neck are bluish black on the upper parts, but
‘quite white about the throat. The quill feathers of the



44 THE PEREGRINE FALCON.

wings and tail are of a dusky black, but the under parts
are white, marked by streaks of brown.

You must look at the picture and notice the bold,
bright eyes of this handsome bird; and his strong, curved
claws, which are so well able to seize and grasp his prey.

I scarcely think that falcons of this kind are so
common now as to be seen much in the great busy city
of London; but it is said that sixty or seventy years ago
they often made their winter quarters on the top of
Westminster Abbey and other large churches, descending
to seize the tame pigeons that they caught a glimpse of.

The nest of a peregrine falcon is built on the face of
some high cliff, quite out of the reach of man. It is of a
large size, and is made of sticks mixed cleverly with the
stems of the mountain grasses.

Here, then, the mother-bird lays either three or four
eggs, which are of a dull red colour and marked with
dark spots.

You may be quite sure that when the little falcons are
hatched they never are in want of food; for the parents
keep them well supplied, and they feast on grouse, pheas-
ants, partridges, and other excellent fare.

It is only while he has a little family to care for that
the falcon makes any sound; at other times he is quite
a silent bird. I suppose the care of his children makes
him timid lest danger should happen to them, and more

eager too after prey ; whatever the cause may be, he utters



THE PEREGRINE FALCON. 45

every now and then a shrill, clear cry, which is never
heard from him at any other period.

Falcons of this kind are not sociable; you do not see
other nests upon the same cliff. The gulls and other sea-
birds build near, and I am sorry to say they are apt to
suffer by such rashness, for the falcon gets hold of many a
nice young gull for his supper.

He waits until the parents have gone off to get food
for the little ones, and then he drops down on the nest and
carries off one of the helpless young things that he has had
his eye on for some time.

. Perhaps you may have heard the long word “ pere-
grinations” used for wandering and roaming about. If so,
you will at once guess why this is called the peregrine

faleon—he often travels about seeing many countries.





oy
a en \y
see |
aut

a



THE SNOWY OIVL.

I DARESAY you know that owls are for the most part birds
of the night. This one of which you have now the picture
is unlike some of his relatives, for he comes out and shows
himself in broad daylight. He lives in both hemispheres,
but in Europe he is not often seen south of Sweden, and in
America he likes best the region of Hudson Bay.

You may be sure from his name that this owl has beau-
tiful white plumage. Here and there may be seen very
small dots of brown on the head and the wings, and there
are some narrow stripes of the same shade about his body ;
but the legs are covered to the claws with long, thick
feathers, of the purest white, and at a short distance it



THE SNOWY OWL. 47

would be very difficult to distinguish him from the snowy
branches of the trees in the cold countries he dwells in.

The margins of lakes and rivers are the places where he
goes a-fishing; but he is quite as clever in catching hares
and squirrels as they dart from the thick underwood of
some great gloomy forest. A rat, too, is not at all dis-
agreeable to this owl’s taste; and indeed you might almost
fancy that he would feel uncomfortable from eating as he *
does. To admit of him satisfying a very large appétite,
however, he has the power of stretching his stomach to
take in as much as he chooses.

There is not one of the owl tribe that can fly as fast as
this beautiful snowy species; and he can also stay much
longer in the air than most birds do.

The full-grown female is rather larger than her mate,
measuring five feet in width and two in length.

She arranges her nest among the branches of a tree, in
some hole of a rock, or sometimes even on the ground.
Two eggs are laid there, snow-white in colour, and she sits
patiently on them until her little ones come forth from the
shell.

Although the snowy owl prefers the most northern
countries of the Old World, he inhabits the Shetland Islands,
and has been seen in Orkney. There, however, he does
not fly about by day as he does in America. He keeps
more to the usual habits of an owl.

About twilight he knows it will be a famous time for



48 THE SNOWY OWL.

getting hold of the little field-mice and small birds, so away
he starts in quest of them. The crows and such like birds
fly at him, as if they thought to provoke him to a fight ;
but the snowy owl treats them with great scorn, and dart-
ing through the air leaves them far enough behind.

The feet of the snowy owl are so formed that he can
easily grasp his prey. “The claws are long, curved, and
very sharp indeed.

Sometimes sportsmen are made very angry by the way
in which this bird serves them. He will follow them all
through a long day, perching on the highest trees above
their heads. When a bird has been shot, down comes this
greedy owl and carries it off before any one has time to
look round.

A reward is sometimes offered to those who will destroy
these owls; but an idea prevails that to meddle with them
brings what people call ill-luck, so few care to do anything
to a bird of such evil omen.

The voice of this snowy owl is very dismal. It would
frighten those who heard it in the stillness of a dark night

and did not know what it was.





THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL,

I po not think we can find any beauty in the portrait
of this bird; but he is a strange-looking fellow, and
I hope you will not mind reading about him and _ his
habits.

The name tells at once that he lives in America. Per-
haps he is most common in the United States, but these
eagle-owls are found in many other parts. No place could
be too dark or too damp for his retreat. He will choose
the hollow of a tree in some swampy forest and there make
himself both happy and comfortable. ;

The chief colouring of this bird is a sort of mixed black,

white, and yellowish brown. The throat is quite white,
(84) 4



50 THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL.

edged with a brown band, and the under parts are marked
by countless little dark bars on the reddish surface, mingled
with a very little white. You can just see the tail in the
picture, and notice that it has six or seven black bands
across it. The face is brown, and is bounded on each side
by a black stripe. The legs and toes are of a light brown,
and the beak and claws are black. Those bright searching
eyes, which note all that is going on, are yellow. The
female Virginian eagle-owl is rather darker and duller in
her shading, and the white about the throat is not so pure
in its tint. Her nest is rather large, and is made of
branches, which are held together by roots and twigs, and
then well lined with leaves. Two eggs are laid here, which
in size are much the same as the eggs of a hen.

When the young are hatched they give their parents
plenty to do in the way of bringing food to the nest, for
they are always hungry, and need a great deal to eat.
Mice, moles, rats, frogs, and young lizards are among the
meals which the old eagle-owls provide for their children,
but a leveret or a plump little rabbit will please them
better, if such a thing can be found.

_ Partridges and other well-tasting birds are prey that
this eagle-ow] takes pains to secure, hunting chiefly at dusk,
because. that is the time when the little feathered creatures
are getting to roost, and so are caught more easily than
when they are wakeful and sprightly.

If this greedy bird can get to a hen-house it is very



THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL. 51

sure that not a chicken will be left unless the robber is
disturbed before his deed is done.

From all the accounts that travellers have given us, the
cries of the eagle-owl at night are enough to strike terror,
into the bravest. Sometimes it may be a sudden shout)
that one could never believe came from any bird; or per-
haps the sounds are like half-stifled screams, as from some
person who is being suffocated.

Then the movements of this eagle-owl are very stealthy
and quiet, so that he can approach unawares. His power
of flying is not very great, because the feathers of his
wings are so soft and downy that he can use them best
near the ground. They have not force enough to help him
to soar in the air to any wonderful height. The darkness
of his retreat just suits his eye-sight, because the full light
of sunshine would dazzle him. He looks forward to twi-
light as the time when he can move about without suffering
any discomfort of this kind.

Should any one disturb. this bird in his retired home,
he does not fly right away. He will shuffle from place to
place uneasily, or stay as if fixed to one spot by surprise,
ruffling his plumage and looking quite bewildered, while he
utters a sharp hissing sound, or makes a chattering with
his beak.

At such times the little thrushes, blackbirds, and others
grow quite saucy. They know that this enemy of theirs

is, for the moment, stupified, and cannot gather his wits



52 THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL.

together for an attack, so they peck at him.and flutter
round his head, and so add to his uneasiness. It is rather
mean of them truly to take such advantage of the eagle-
owl’s perplexity, but their families and friends have suffered
so much from his greediness that it is not to be wondered
at if they hate him. Still there is a proverb which says,
“ Every one has his turn,” and at the approach of twilight
our Virginian eagle-owl may punish some of these venture-

some little creatures with death.







THE BARN OWL,

HERE we have an owl that is very useful. But for him as
watchman and guardian in the barn, there is no telling
how much mischief the rats and mice might do there.
When he drops from his perch to the ground he makes no
noise, so the destructive little animals do not know what
great enemy is near until they feel his sharp talons. By
that time their chances of escape are all over.

While the sun shines brightly, the barn owl sleeps ;
towards evening he rouses himself and bethinks him of
what he has to do:

You may see by his picture that the owl’s eyes are
very large. They take in so much light, that in the day-
time he is dazzled and blinded by it, and this gives him a
stupid and bewildered air if he is exposed to it.



54 THE BARN OWL.

He flies without any noise, and thus when he comes
out in the dusk of a summer’s evening from behind some
old tomb in a churchyard, or after hiding in a crumbling
wall, he startles the passer-by terribly, as he gives a hideous
sereech and darts on his way. In country districts, where
peasants believe many old sayings that really have no truth
in them, it is supposed that an owl flitting by with that
wild cry is telling those who hear it of some great mis-
fortune that is about to befall them.

As the barn owl is the commonest of all the tribe, and
is well known in England, it is not needful to describe him
closely. You see by his portrait that he has no tufts on
the top of the head like the horned owl; and that his
beak is not curved all the way down, but is arched only
near the point. Round the eyes there are straight, stiff
feathers, which give the bird a very strange expression.

In colour the owl is gray, mingled with dusky brown,
which increases as he grows older.

He loves solitary places, and thus he chooses a home in
some ruined building or in the hollow of some old tree.

Like the snowy owl, he has a very large appetite ; and
he does not turn a deaf ear to its voice, you may be sure.
He can see the very smallest speck on the ground, when
you and I could perceive nothing; and a mouse cowering
in the corner of a corn-rick has no chance of passing un-
noticed by the barn owl. a

He may not be a general favourite—for birds of prey



THE BARN OWL. 55

are not greatly beloved by most of us—but the farmer
gives him a good character; and so he ought, for this bird
does him better service than a dozen or two of cats.

It is said, though, that if he can rob the hen-roost it
will be a great pleasure to him, and this certainly is against
him; but then people ought not to give him the chance of
such a night’s work.

I have not space in which to tell you half the stories
I have heard of people being terrified by the noises of the
barn owl. Many a ghost-tale might be traced to the
sounds he has made in the top of unused chimneys or in
the ledge of some water-spout.

The nest of the barn owl is very well built of sticks
piled together, and-the inside is lined with feathers and
dry leaves. After the young ones have gone away and it
is quite deserted, a good many bones and feathers are found
there, to tell of the terrible end of many a little mouse and
bird.







THE OSTRICH.

THE bird about which I am now to tell you is the largest
of all birds,—so large, that his weight keeps him from try-
ing to fly. In ancient times, the size of the ostrich, and
his swift pace, caused learned men to say that he was half
bird and half beast. The Greeks and the Romans knew
him by the name of “camel-bird;” for, like the camel, he
can go a long time without drinking any water, and he also
bends his legs and lies down in the same way as the camel.

If you happeried to be travelling in the deserts of Africa
or of Asia, you might see a band of these huge birds in



THE OSTRICH. 57

the distance, and might fancy them to be men on horseback.
The mistake has been made many a time, so strange do
they look, until they are near enough to be known as
gentle, harmless ostriches.

In our picture you see a male and a female bird. The
male has the lowér part of the neck and the whole of the
body covered with black feathers, mingled with a few
white ones. _ The female is of a gray-brown shade, just
fringed with white. Both birds have white tails, and the
larger plumes of their wings are of the same pure colour.
Only while they are young have ostriches any feathers on
their legs; and even then they fall off after the first year,
and never appear again.

I have said that this huge bird is too heavy to fly;
but there is another reason for his powerlessness to raise
himself from the ground. Nature has given him very
small wings, and the feathers do not fit closely together as
in the case of flying birds. They are little, loosely-floating
plumes, which can be spread out as the ostrich runs, but
are of no other use to him. It is for these light and grace-
ful plumes, which ornament our hats and bonnets, that the
poor bird is hunted and robbed.

Have you ever heard it said of any person that he has
“the appetite of an ostrich”? Let me tell you what this
means, An ostrich never seems to have had too much, and
nothing is too hard or too heavy for him to swallow.

Pieces of leather, lumps of iron, stones, nails—these and



58 THE OSTRICH.

other such things are consumed without causing him any
uncomfortable feelings.

Although these birds always live together in large
bands, each male chooses one particular female ostrich to
be his companion. The eggs are very heavy, and have
extremely hard shells of a dirty white colour. The con-
tents of an ostrich egg’would make as much as thirty of
the largest eggs any of our common hens lay. They are
thought to be a great dainty.

The female bird does not build a nest; she scoops out
a large hole, and there leaves her eggs. The burning rays
of the sun all day are quite enough to hatch them without
her sitting on them, as most mother-birds do; but some-
times she comes to them during the night, when the air is
cool. When the little ostriches come forth from the shell,
they are not helpless as most young birds are; they can
run swiftly on their strongly-built legs, and search for food
without troubling their parents.

The chase of the full-grown ostrich needs a great deal
of skill and patience, both in the Arab and in his. horse.
He is a very gentle bird, never even attempting to do harm
when hurt or attacked; still the speed with which these
great long legs get over the ground would make it almost
impossible to overtake an ostrich if he had the sense to run
in a straight line.’ But though on first seeing an enemy
the bird begins to run swiftly, fear soon. makes him turn
from side to side, Thus the hunter gains on him, and



'
t
i
3
|





ee lll

THE OSTRICH. 59

seizes the right moment for throwing a stick between his
legs, which stops his course sufficiently to allow him to be
made captive.

Sometimes, as a last resource, he hides his head in the
sand, as if he supposed that he could in that fashion escape
being seen! Even when the chase is easy, it takes at least
six or eight hours before the frightened bird can be secured.
When taken, he does not show any ill-temper. In time, he
becomes so tame that his Arab master can mount and ride

him as if he were a horse.







THE LMU.

HERE we have a bird nearly as large as the African
ostrich. In form the two are somewhat alike; but the
emu stands lower on the legs, his neck is shorter, and his
body is thicker. You might almost fancy that he had no
wings, for, except when he lifts them up, they cannot be
seen. They look then as if they were covered with rough
hair instead of with feathers. On the head and neck
there is so little plumage that the skin shows quite plainly.



THE EMU. 61

Down the bird’s back there is a parting, and the feathers
fall on either side.

In colour the emu is dull brown mottled with gray.
Both the male and the female are of the same hue; but
the little ones, when first coming out of the shell, are much
handsomer as regards the shading of their feathers.

If you will look at the picture you will see that this is
a very long-legged bird. It stands sometimes as high as
seven feet, though most of those that have been brought
to England have not been more than five or six feet in
height.

The emus are found in Australia and in the islands
near it. In former times the greatest numbers of them
were seen about Port Jackson and Port Phillip; but since
settlers in Australia have increased, the birds have moved
off to seek shelter in the quieter parts of the country.

The food of the emu is always vegetable; he seeks
roots, fruit, and herbs, and thus is quite harmless to all
other living things. You may suppose that such a large
bird, with legs so long and powerful, is able to run very
swiftly. When he takes flight from those who want to
secure him, he manages to leave them so far behind that
it is not easy to get a shot at him. Travellers tell us that
the dogs of New South Wales have a great dislike to
attack the emu. The odour of the bird’s flesh is disagree-
able to them; and then he has a habit of striking out his

feet in a way that sometimes injures them very much.



62 THE EMU.

To avoid the blow, those dogs that have been well trained
to the chase make a sudden spring at the neck, and by so
doing the bird is quite overcome.

On King’s Island, in Bass Strait, there was once a band
of English seal-fishers, whose dogs had been taught neither
to fear nor to shun the emu. While their masters were
busy with the seal-fishery, these clever animals would go
forth hunting in the woods, and thus they destroyed every
day some bird or small animal that served for the food of
the whole party. Sometimes they caught a kangaroo, the
flesh of which is said to make capital soup; and some-
times an emu, which when cooked is a little like beef.
The dogs would go back to the fishermen’s dwelling after
their chase, and by signs get them to follow to the spot
where the supply would be found all ready to be carried
home and turned into a meal. .

It is not every part of an emu that can be eaten.
The legs are the best, and to carry these some distance is
a wearying business even for a strong man. Their egos
are thought to be extremely good, and the natives have
scarcely any other food while these are plentiful. They
are as large as fhe ege of an ostrich, with thick shells of
a dark-green colour.

We have not had any account of the way in which the
female emu makes her nest when she is living in a wild
state. Those that have hatched their young in the collec-
tions of birds in several large cities of Kurope, lay generally



THE EMU. 63

six or seven eggs. The male takes his share of the work
of sitting on them till the little ones break the shell, and
come forth in their grayish-white feathers, with broad
black stripes running down the back.

When living thus in captivity, the emu gets perfectly
tame, and seems to keep in good health in our English
climate. For this reason it has never been difficult to
breed young ones; so the bird is not so scarce as some of
those that are brought to us across the ocean. When
William the Fourth was King of England, he had some
emus among his collection at Windsor Castle, and some of
the young ones came from there to the Zoological Gardens.

Go when you may to Regent's Park, I do not think you
are likely to find the emus’ house empty, so you will be
able to say whether this picture of the great bird is a good

one,







THE CROWNED CRANE.

WE have here a bird that was first known about four
hundred years ago. At that time the Portuguese were
finding out the western coast of Africa. Among other dis-
coveries, they made that of the crowned crane, which they
had never seen in Europe. Since that time, many of these
cranes have been brought away from their native country.
They are called “crowned” because of their crest, which, as
you see in the picture, is a little after the shape of a royal
crown.

’ The front of the head is covered with close black feathers
as soft as velvet, and behind this there rises the strange-

looking crest. It is yellow in colour, and fringed with



THE CROWNED CRANE. 65

black at its edges. The shade of the crowned crane’s
body and neck is a bluish-slate, and the quill feathers of
the tail and wings are black. There are also some bright
brown feathers in the tail, and some in the wings that are
of snowy whiteness. There is no plumage on the cheeks
and temples, which are of a rose-red hue. Sometimes the
other unfeathered parts are just as bright, but now and
then they are without any colour.

On the upper part of the throat this crane has a fold
of brilliant crimson skin, very much like the wattle of a
turkey, which you must have noticed often in such a well-
known British bird. Beneath this fold the feathers are
long and slender, falling gracefully down over the crane’s
breast.

The crowned crane is very much admired for his form
and plumage. He walks in a very stately, dignified way,
as if he felt himself a handsome and important fellow,
never looking clumsy and awkward—not even when (after
the family habit) he stands on one leg.

All cranes like damp and marshy places, and this
crowned bird prefers them to any other spot; for there
abound the fishes, worms, and insects that form his chief
food. He eats grain and other vegetable substances also,
but he does not like them so well as he does a nice
long wriggling worm, a little eel, or something equally
tasty.

I cannot say that this bird has a sweet voice, for indeed
(84) 9)



66 THE CROWNED CRANE,

the noise he makes has been compared to the harsh sounds
of a trumpet. He has another note also, which is a little
like the clucking of a hen, only being much louder it is
much more disagreeable.

He does not belong to the class of birds that are noted
for song. Indeed, many a bird of handsome plumage has
nothing in the way of voice with which he may hope to
charm our ears.

When resting on one long leg, and with his neck drawn
inwards, this crane is not off guard. A very little noise
will rouse him at once; and then, lengthening out his neck,
he looks boldly round to see what is likely to happen, and
whether he has need to think of self-defence. If there be
danger near, he utters a loud ery, as if to give warning to
all his friends and relations.

Like other cranes, this crowned bird does not care for
the life of a hermit. When you see one you may expect
soon to come upon others; for they bear each other com-
pany in their fishing expeditions, and make their dwellings
among the same reeds and bushes.









THE DEMOISELLE.

HERE is another member of the crane family; but as it puts
itself into attitudes rather like those of an affected young
lady, it has become known by the name of “ Demoiselle.”

The form of this demoiselle is very graceful. When
standing upright it measures about three feet six inches
high; and its length is usually three feet from the point
of the bill to the tip of the tail.

Please look now at the picture, and notice the shades
of this bird’s plumage. The whole upper part of the head
is of light gray; and the sides of it, as well as the neck
and the long pointed feathers that hang over the breast,
are deeply black in hue. Behind each eye there is a tuft



68 THE DEMOISELLE,

of pure white feathers, which float loosely in the air with
every movement of the bird. The rest of the body is
covered with plumage of a slaty-gray colour, excepting that
the points of the quill feathers are black; and so also is
the tail. JI am sure you will say that the demoiselle is
very prettily coloured.

This bird is one of those that like change of air and
scene. It travels to many countries, and it could tell us
many interesting things, if only we were able to hold a
conversation with it. Very few living specimens of the
demoiselle have been brought either to England or to
France ; but about a hundred years ago there were six in
the collection at Versailles (near Paris) that had all been
bred there, and were in capital health.

They are very good-tempered, gentle birds, and always
seem to bear captivity happily enough. When noticed and
admired, they show that they are pleased by bowing and
bending: sometimes they even take to dancing—after a
style of their own, I need scarcely tell you.

In its natural state the demoiselle chooses a damp,
marshy place for a dwelling; and there it finds fish and
insects when it chooses, though it prefers vegetable food to
any other.

When on its travels, this bird is never seen very far
north ; it visits chiefly Constantinople and that part of
Europe. Africa is really its native country, and there you
may find it all along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea



THE DEMOISELLE. 69

and the Atlantic from Egypt to Guinea; but it is most
common about Tripoli. Travellers in the interior of the
south of Africa have also seen the pretty bird there, par-
ticularly near the Cape.

When resting, the demoiselle droops its head and hides
it under one of its wings. Among a band of them, one
always keeps watch, and utters a ery of warning when any
danger threatens. Two eggs are generally laid in the nest,
on which the mother-bird sits with much patience; and
by the time the little ones are able to fly, it is about the
season for them to follow their parents to the warm south.

If the demoiselle’s voice is heard much in the daytime,
rainy weather may be expected. When it is more than
usually loud, it is thought to be a sign of coming storms.
If a group is seen flying quietly about in the early morn-
ing, it is pretty sure that the day will be calm and fair;
otherwise they keep on the ground, and do not use their
wings even for a short flight.

Some very handsome specimens of this bird were sent
from Tripoli to the Zoological Society many years ago.





THE WHITE STORK.

TuIs bird spends his winter in a warm climate, and passes
the spring and summer in the cooler parts of Europe.

The people of Holland are very glad to see this bird ;
and as there is a saying that they bring good fortune to
any one who entertains them as guests, men and women, as
well as the rosy-faced Dutch children, put wooden boxes or
frames outside the houses, or on the tops of the chimneys,
hoping to persuade the stork to stay with them.

The ancient Egyptians worshipped this bird as some-
thing sacred, second only in their reverence to the ibis.
One reason, perhaps, why the white stork is such a favourite
is, that he destroys snakes, mice, rats, and other troublesome
creatures.

Before we find out any more as to his habits, please



THE WHITE STORK. 71

look at the picture and notice the long slender legs of this
bird; his sharp bill, which is quite seven inches in length,
and of an orange-red colour; and the black feathers of his
wings, that are such a contrast to the snowy plumage of
his body. When fully spread out, these wings of his
measure quite eight feet across.

The movements of the stork are slow, and he takes
very long steps, as you may easily believe. In flying he
looks awkward, for then the head and neck are extended
forward, while the long legs stretch out behind him; but
he cuts the air rapidly, and that, we must suppose, is the
chief object of a bird when he takes wing.

About the end of August the storks collect in com-
panies, and seem to discuss their plans for the coming
winter. At any rate they make a great fuss, and a loud
clattering with their beaks, which serve them instead of
voices.

Hundreds of these birds meet thus together in one
spot, coming from all the districts around ; and their “ par-
liament,” or whatever we like to call it, lasts several days.
_ At length their decision is made, and all the storks mount
at once into the air, and are soon out of sight, because of
the great height at which they fly.

They return in much smaller bands when spring comes.
The only storks that remain all the winter in the northern
countries of Europe are those that are confined, or that

have become so fond of their human friends as not to care



72 THE WHITE STORK.

any longer to follow the fashion of their family in a natural
state.

But even the storks which have not been made captives
are very fond of being among men and women. ‘They
choose such parts as are most frequented for building, and
they will stalk along a crowded street without showing the
least alarm. It is to be feared that a stork that came into
London, or any other of our large cities, would fare very
ill; but in Holland or in Germany you could not find the
roughest street lad who would do harm to one of these
sociable birds. Year after year the same storks come back
to their old dwelling-places, and they are welcomed with
delight.

In the dikes and marshes of those countries that the
white stork likes best there are plenty of small reptiles
which serve him for food. He is very fond of frogs, and
will stand on one leg in a thoughtful way for a long time,
with his head resting on his shoulder, and his eyes steadily
fixed upon the rushes and damp weeds among which he
expects to find this dainty meal.







THE BLACK STORK.

Now we have a stork that is not at all so friendly as the
one of which we read last. Instead of making his home
among men, he gets as far from them as he can. Rather
than seek the black stork in cities, you must follow him to
the banks of some lonely river, or to some lake which is
not visited often by the human race.

He always goes to the South for the winter; but when
he returns in spring he chooses one of the most northern
countries of Europe for his dwelling-place. The black
storks are therefore almost unknown in Holland, and are
much commoner in Sweden and Norway. Even as far off
as in European Russia and Siberia there are a great many
that settle in some solitary place, until the end of summer

warns them to fly away to more genial regions.



74 THE BLACK STORK.

The black stork is not entirely of that hue which
gives him his name. His head, neck, and upper feathers
are of a deep and glossy black, but these colours are mingled
with various shades of green and violet. Then the under
surface of this stork’s body is covered with white plumage ;
but the tail is quite black.

He has extremely long wings, and they bear him up so
high when he flies, that not even the longest-sighted pair
of eyes that we could boast among us would be able to
make out anything beyond a sort of speck in the sky.

The mother-bird lays two buff-coloured eggs, and then
sits patiently till they are hatched. Afterwards she brings
lizards and little serpents to feed her young ones with ;
and the male stork also helps in providing for the wants of
his family. When the young stork is taking its first lessons
in flying, the parents keep near—one on either side—to
support it in the air and to give it courage.

Sometimes the top of a tall pine tree is chosen as the
site of the nest of this unsociable bird. There, at least, it
is very sure that no human beings will come too near.
Sticks, twigs, and reeds are the stork’s building materials ;
and the inside of the nest is lined with moss, herbs, and
little bits of down.

The only noises these birds make are with their
wings, and a sharp clattering with the bill. I must tell
you that this sharp, strong weapon, which is seven
or eight inches long, is never used by the stork to do



THE BLACK STORK. 75

any harm, not even when he is a prisoner, and has many
a chance of giving a “peck” that would not be very soon
forgotten.

In some of the eastern parts of France, and also in
Germany, black storks may be seen, in the most silent and
deserted spots. They are never loved, like their white
relation, about whose return the children sing as many
songs as they do about the return of the swallow. Still,
no one would kill or wound a black stork wantonly.

Sometimes a flock of them, when flying towards the
South, will stretch a half-mile in breadth, and will take two
or three hours in passing by.

The black stork is not so large as the white one, but
there is no difference in their form. The young birds have
rather a browner tinge on their feathers, and their bills do
not show such an orange shade as the bills of the parents.







THE MARABOUT STORK.

You could never mistake this stork for our friend which
is so well known in Europe. The picture shows you how
unlike he is to his relative, even though he belongs to the
same long-legged, long-billed family. In height he is about
five feet, so he is a tall bird as he stands in a thoughtful
attitude by the reeds and water-plants of one of his favourite
marshy places. He would not like the driest, sunniest
meadow you could find for him, nor stay upon any breezy



THE MARABOUT STORK. 7

hill-top that we should think a pleasant and healthy place
for a dwelling.

You will notice at once that he has no plumage about
his dusky head, nor on the neck and the sort of pouch at
the end of it. These last are of a pale flesh colour, but if
the stork is excited they deepen to a red shade. Now, in the
way of feathers, he has his back and wings clothed in black,
about which there will be a tinge of dark green. But the
longer feathers have no such shade, and are of a very deep
black, with a few bands of white, which are broad or
narrow, according to the age of the bird. The under parts
are all of white, and these furnish the plumes for which
the marabout stork is so much in favour.

I fear that when there is a great demand for “ma-
rabout feathers ” to deck the heads of ladies of fashion, it is
the sentence of death for numbers of these quiet, gentle
birds.

Take another glance, if you please, at his large bill
and his long black legs. Sometimes, though, these legs
have rather a gray hue over them, because the stork shakes
out from his wings a sort of white dust that falls over
them.

Every part of tropical Africa is a natural home to the
marabout stork. Sometimes he is seen as far south as the
Cape of Good Hope; but he is more commonly found about
Senegal, and from there come most of the graceful plumes
that people in Europe will give a good price for. There



78 THE MARABOUT STORK.

is one thing in which this bird is like the vulture. He
will clear up all the dead birds and animals he may come
upon; and this certainly makes the air more healthy for
human beings, as well as the disappearance of the refuse
heaps in the villages and towns for which the inhabitants
may thank this stork. This will tell you that the bird has
a large appetite, which he finds it hard. to satisfy, other-
wise he would be too dainty to eat dirt and carrion, A
little animal such as the rat he will swallow whole. To
take it in a slower way would be, in his judgment, like
“making two bites of a cherry,” as we sometimes say.

But in regard to mankind the marabout stork is all
peace and friendliness, so that when caught it is a very
easy matter to make him tame, When they are at rest
they usually stand on one leg, with the neck drawn close
in, so that the bill falls on the breast. But there are times
when they will sit on the ground with their long legs
stretched out before them, and this has a very laughable
effect. If something should happen to excite a marabout
stork much he will draw himself up to his full height,
lengthen out his neck, and appear to threaten to do some
harm with his bill. It is not, however, a reason for alarm,
because he has not the courage to try to do any; and
even if such a thing was natural to him, he has no great
strength in that large bill of his.

A gentleman who had been travelling about in Africa

lived some time in a part of the country where these ma-



THE MARABOUT STORK. 79

rabout storks were well known, and took a young one to
bring up as a domestic animal. At dinner time this bird
learned to take up his post behind his master’s chair, and
he was always fed from such dishes as he best liked.

The appetite of this stork led him to try to avoid the
trial of long waiting. He would watch for a good chance
of snatching at a dish as it passed him, and though the ser-
vants were watchful he sometimes managed to succeed in
his evil projects. At such times he would seize a whole
fowl and swallow it in one mouthful without any uncom-
fortable results. The same bird was in the habit of flying
where he liked and roosting in the top of the tallest trees ;
but from there he managed to see if anything to eat was
being carried across the hall, and he would come down at

once to try to get hold of it.







THE COMMON HERON.

WE will now, if you please, read about a bird that used to
be very often seen in England. In those old days when
hawking was the amusement of the nobles, the chase of
the heron was thought the greatest exercise of skill;
because its powerful wings raised it to such a height that
even the cleverest falcon had some difficulty in coming up
with it. Heronries were made then, where the birds were
kept ready for this amusement; but I do not think one
could be found at the present day. Even about a hundred
years ago, it was said that only one heronry had been
preserved in England.

There are several different kinds of herons, but that
of which you have the picture is, as its name tells you, the
best known of all the group.



THE COMMON HERON, 81

It is not a heavy bird, and that is why it can fly so
well. The weight of a full-grown common heron is seldom
more than three and a half pounds,

They are birds of passage, and may be seen, sometimes
in Russia, sometimes in Poland, but oftener in Germany
and Holland. They choose an oak or some such lofty tree
in which to build; but they take care to dwell in the
neighbourhood of some marsh or stream, where they find
plenty of food. The nest is large, and twigs, herbs, and
reeds are got together to form it, while inside it is warmly
lined with feathers and bits of wool. Here the mother-
bird lays three or four greenish-brown egos, about the size
of a hen’s ego. On these she sits with patience, while the
male bird flies about to find food. Falcons, martens, and
weasels of all kinds will rob the heron’s nest if a chance
come; even the raven will play the same shabby trick.
When the young ones appear, both parents watch over
them, and bring them fish to eat ; but as soon as they are
strong enough to fly, they are driven away from the nest—
as if Mr. and Mrs. Heron thought it high time for their
sons and daughters to provide for themselves.

About the middle of August the old birds desert their
nest, and wander about from one stream to another,
forming quite a band that will take flight for warmer lands
as soon as the summer is quite over. With the first frost
the herons disappear southward, taking to their wings by

moonlight.
(84) 6



82 THE COMMON HERON.

They stay away until the end of March, when ice and
snow are no longer to be feared. If by chance any herons
spend the winter in the northern countries of Europe, it is
because the weather gives no sign of being very severe.

The food of these birds is the fish they find in the
running streams. Nothing could be greater than the
patience with which the heron waits for its prey. Stand- -
ing on one foot, with the head drooping on the breast, you
might think the bird was asleep. Perhaps the poor little
trouts do fancy this; for seeing that no notice is taken of
them, they grow bold, and come too near. It is for such a
moment that the heron has been waiting so quietly. Down
goes its sharp-edged bill, and I need not tell you that the
life of the venturesome fish comes to an end then and
there.

When fish is scarce, these birds eat frogs very will-
ingly ; nor do they despise snails and worms, or the green
duck-weed that you see so often floating on the surface of
a stagnant pool.

The general colour of the common heron is gray, with
a tinge of blue. You may see by the picture that a crest
of black feathers ornaments the back of the head, shading
the neck. The quill feathers are black, and the under
part of the plumage is pure white. Very little difference
can be seen between the male and the female bird. The
young ones have no crest at all, and their backs and wings

are of a darker gray.



THE COMMON HERON, 83

You cannot look at the heron without noticing what a
very long bill he has, so that fishing is an easy task for
him; or that his legs are slender and his toes long. I
must not forget to tell you something about the bird’s
throat, while we are thinking of his personal appearance.
It might be made of elastic, from the way in which it can
expand. If the heron has caught a fish which you would
say was big enough to choke him, it does not matter ;
this convenient throat stretches out in a fan-like shape,
and down goes the choice dainty as nicely as possible.

There is a handsome member of the heron family that
belongs only to America, and is of a spotless white hue.
The habits and character of this kind are much the same

as in our common heron of Europe.







THE TIGER BITTERN.

WE will now make the acquaintance of a bird that is a
distant relation of the heron.

He is one of the long-billed kind that are so clever in
catching the creeping, crawling things which abound in
damp and marshy places. You will see in this picture of
the bittern that his toes are long and slender, his legs not
covered with plumage, and that there is a space near the
eyes without any sign of feathers. In all these respects
you may trace a likeness to the herons, which are better
known among us.

There is a European bittern, but the one of which we

are speaking here is a native of Guiana.



THE TIGER BITTERN. 85

When his neck is drawn out to its full extent he
measures altogether about two feet and a half long. To
look at him in his picture this tiger bittern has rather a
round, plump form, because for a bird of his class the neck
and legs are short in comparison with others.

On the upper part of his plumage are various shades
of brown, and they are crossed by bars of black,

The ground of head and neck is of the lightest shade,
and. the black markings might be better called spots than
bars. On the under surface of this bittern’s plumage the
brown hue is as light as it can be, so that on the throat it
becomes nearly white; but still it is crossed like the other
parts with numerous little black bars. So you could not
reckon him among the bright-liveried birds; his dress is
of sober tints, which would not attract the eye of any one
passing carelessly by his haunts.

Very likely his want of beauty is often the safeguard
of his life and liberty. He would be more often made a
mark for the sportsman or the victim of some snare if he
could boast a brilliant plumage, a sweet voice, or some very
interesting and clever ways that would be amusing to
watch in a state of captivity. His custom is to stand, like
the herons, with his eyes fixed on the water or on the
places near where he knows the frogs and insects are lurk-
ing, which he hopes by patience and perseverance to make
his repast. But he does not stand in the one-legged
fashion of the herons; or at any rate if he does, it is not a



86 THE TIGER BITTERN.

common habit which we see him indulging in. During the
dry seasons of Guiana the tiger bittern finds his prey
among the high-growing grass on the banks of the rivers,
and there he will watch for any length of time until some
lizard or small snake or such like reptile presents itself
within easy distance. He keeps up a melancholy, absent
sort of air, as if he had no thought of catching anything ;.
indeed, his expression would seem to say that nothing was
further from his thoughts. This is a clever trick on Mr.
Bittern’s part, because if he showed himself too lively and
active the frogs would not come leaping his way, and the
lizards would glide from him instead of drawing near. He
will even see his prey and feign to take no notice, and so
the victory is easier, because these small creeping and
hopping live things fancy they are unseen or forgotten.

Little do they know how good a memory and how
strong an eyesight this quiet brown bird possesses. The
right moment comes, and quick as thought he has snapped
out what he wants and swallowed it like a pill.

The female bittern builds her nest on the ground, and
there lays seven or eight eggs, which in due time give her
a nice little family of soft downy young ones. In cap-
tivity this tiger bittern does not become sociable and tame;
for we read of one that even after two years disliked all
-notice, and would hide in corners and assume an angry and
threatening air when his owner drew near. Another is

told of that was kept in his own country in a state of



THE TIGER BITTERN. 87

captivity. His constant amusement was watching for rats,
which he caught with great skill; and as they happened
to infest the place, the bittern was more clever in the
work of putting an end to the nuisance than any cat would
have been.







THE WHITE SPOONBILL.

THERE is no need for any one to ask how this bird comes
by his name. One glance at the spoon-shaped bill will be
enough. In other ways he is a good deal like both the
storks and the herons of which we have heard. His food
is the same; but it is said that when the spoonbill is very
much pressed by hunger, and cannot find the small fish and
insects he likes best, there is scarcely anything that he will
refuse.

In plumage the bird is entirely white, except a band of
buff-coloured feathers in front~of the neck, which passes
upwards on either side like a narrow stripe. Look now at
the picture, and notice the crest falling so gracefully back-
wards. The beak is black, except at the rounded part,
and the long legs as well as the feet are black also. The



THE WHITE SPOONBILL. 89

female bird is always smaller than the male; but there is
no other difference between them.

If you were to see a little spoonbill, you would not
admire him so much as you would his father and mother.
He has no beautiful plume on his head, and no buff ring
about his neck; and his general colour is a dingy white,
with black quill feathers.

The spoonbill likes Holland very much for his summer
quarters ; but when the cold season draws near, he wings
his flight to sunny Italy, or even as far south as to Africa.
You would never meet with these birds in inland countries
unless water were near; they choose the coast. Now and
then a spoonbill has been seen in England in its wild state;
but this has happened so rarely of late years, that you
must only expect to find him tamed and imprisoned at the
Zoological Gardens.

The nest is made either among the branches of some
tall tree on a river’s bank, or else among reeds or bushes.
There, three or four whitish eggs are laid, from which in
due time the little birds will come forth.

The spoonbill is one of those birds that have no voice.
He cannot utter a note; and all he is able to do in the way
of making a noise is to clatter and snap with his bill.
This is a way he has of showing when he is angry or
frightened.

In size the spoonbill is smaller than the wild goose;

>

his length from the beak to the tip of the tail is not more



90 THE WHITE SPOONBILL.

than two feet and some six or eight inches. When the
wings are fully spread, the width of the bird is about four
feet.

They are very sociable birds, always being seen in
company, especially when about to set forth on one of their
journeys. Instead of hiding in lonely places, they show a
liking for being within easy reach of the dwellings of men ;
though they do not, like the stork, walk in the streets, or
make a home upon the house-roofs. When at rest, or
waiting to secure the fish they like, the spoonbills usually
stand on one leg. All their movements are slow except
when they are on the wing, and then they move very
quickly through the air.

Perhaps because they have no song, and ‘are So very
quiet and harmless, we think of the spoonbills as melan-
choly sort of birds. Though they show no discontent when
kept confined, there is no liveliness in them; and thus they
do not win so much favour as birds that please the ear
with their voices, or charm the eye with richly-coloured
plumage.






= Y coe i
Setamnt ° PG ot ul
THE SCARLET IBIS.

WE will now read about one of the most splendidly coloured
birds that can be found. It comes from the south of
America, and may be seen on the banks of the large rivers
there, gathered in companies, and feeding on insects, shrimps,
and the smaller kinds of fish. During the heat of the day
and throughout the night this ibis conceals itself in the
depths of the forest; it is only at sunrise and towards sun-
set that it comes out in search of food.

You will see by the picture of this bird that it has
some likeness to the tribe of storks. For many years it
was mistaken for a new variety of stork; but at length
scholars discovered that it was of a different family.



92 THE SCARLET IBIS.

In very ancient times the ibis was worshipped by the
Egyptians as a sacred bird: for century after century it
was the object of their deepest devotion, and they cut
figures of it on their monuments. Then it seemed to dis-
appear from the world’s knowledge, until a British traveller
pointed out the fact that the figures engraved by those
ancient people, and a living bird still commonly seen on the
banks of the river Nile, were all the same ibis.

When found in the Old or the New World, this class
of birds may be known by a long bill, by wings that are
not very large, and by the head being little feathered ;
sometimes the neck also is almost bare of plumage.

The scarlet ibis is entirely of the colour by which it is
known, excepting the tips of its wing feathers, which are
black. Its legs are covered with scales, and are pale red-
brown in colour, like the bill and the feet.

When the young birds first come forth from the nest,
which the mother has carefully hidden in the thicket, they
are covered with black down. After a short time this
changes from black to ash-colour, and at last it becomes
nearly white; by which time the little ibis is of an age to
fly. When the second moulting season is over, the bird
gets a slight tinge of red upon his soft back, which quickly
Spreads over the sides and the under parts of the body.
As he grows older, his bright colour deepens; and when
full grown, he is of as brilliant a scarlet as you could ask
to see,



THE SCARLET IBIS. 93

If the scarlet ibis were not so delicate a bird, there is
no doubt that he would be more commonly seen in our
country: his beautiful plumage would make him a hand-
some ornament, and all lovers of feathered things would be
proud to own him and see him showing off his brilliant
colouring on our green lawns. But England has not the
climate to suit a bird whose native home is under a tropical
sky, and very few of the ibis family are preserved among us.

It is said that he would make more savoury eating
than any fowls in our poultry-yards; but it is very certain
that we shall never get a chance of tasting his flesh, be-
cause of his rarity; and I daresay few of us would wish
to have an ibis served for our dinner.

When taken as a young bird, he soon loses his wildness
and fear, and does not seem to fret over his loss of freedom.







THE PELICAN.

A FABLE has been told about this bird. People hav: ejdaid
that he feeds his young ones with his own blood ; tice
is no truth in the tale. Underneath the pelican's 8 there
is a bag or pouch into which he drops some of the fishes,



he has caught, and so he carries them to his family. The*
tip of his bill is as red as blood; and when he presses this
against his breast, and so forces the fish out of the pouch
into the open mouths of the little ones, it has been imagined
that he has drawn blood from himself for their nourish-
ment. When the female is sitting on her eggs, the male



THE PELICAN. 95

_ bird carries food to her in the same way ; and both parents
do this for their young.

You see by the picture that the pelican’s plumage is of
snowy whiteness; but the quill feathers are black, though
you could not see them unless the wings were spread for
flying. » As*the bird grows old, he gets.a slight tinge of
flesh colour; and when he is of a great age this is mingled
with a very pale yellow. On the head and the neck there
is nothing more than,a thick, short down, which gradually

Seine a kind of tuft behind. The
young pelicans have grayish feathers on their backs and

passes into feathers,

wings, their necks are: of a tinge of ash-colour, and under-
neath they are a dingy white. Sometimes birds at this
age have “been brought home by travellers under the idea
that they were of a different kind from the common pelican;
but” ‘when the feathers have begun to change, and when
they tive become all snowy white, the mistake has been
found” out, of course.



Ka fall-grown pelican is one of the largest specimens of
that class ‘of birds. He will measure about five feet from

Sthe tip of his long bill to his tail, and nearly ten feet across



‘when he spreads out his wings. There is not much strength
‘in his bill, yet he fishes very cleverly. He does not swallow
his prey at once, but dropping it into the pouch of which
you have already heard, he goes off ‘to some rock (when he
has found enough to satisfy his appetite) and there makes

his meal ; which, I can assure you, is a very large one. To



96 THE PELICAN.

let. you know the size of this pouch that lies beneath the
pelican’s bill, I may say that it would hold two or three -
gallons of water ; so you may suppose that a great many
fish can be stowed away in it, either. for the bird or for his
young ones in the nest. These nests are built among the
rocks on the shore of the sea, or by the edge of lakes and
large rivers. . :

It is in America that the largest number of these
white birds may be.seen, wading in the water where
fish is plentiful, either about the rising or the setting of
the sun.

The mother pelican does not make much preparation
for her little ones; she drops her eggs into some crevice in
the rock, or some hole on the river’s bank, and hatches
them there.

These birds can be made very tame, and they. do not
seem unhappy when they have lost their freedom.

The Indians of the North American wilds have taught
them to go out in the morning and fish, and to bring home
what they catch. The master then makes the pelican give
up the contents of its bag; but a fair share is returned to
it for its own eating.

The sparkling eyes of these birds, as well as their
orange-coloured bills and snowy feathers, are very much
admired.





THE WILD SWAN.

As you look at the picture of the wild swan, you will say
that he is very much like those you see so often living
near us in a tame state; yet there are some points in which
the two kinds differ, and we will now find out what these
are. ;

The tame swan has eleven ribs, and the wild bird has
twelve ; and that proves them to be distinct. They differ
from each other also in the colour of their bills—that of
the wild swan is black, while the bill of the tame bird is
of an.orange colour. Then the windpipe in the tame
swan passes directly from the neck to the chest; while

in the wild swan it is curved in a very strange way,
(s4) 7



98 THE WILD SWAN.

which causes him to produce those sounds that have led
to the fanciful idea that he sings just before he is about
to die.

This is now believed to be a mere fable, by all who
have had a chance of watching the bird’s habits. In
olden times, a great deal was written about the beautiful
voice of the dying swan; so that it has become quite a
habit to say of any great poem or other work of genius
which is the last before its author’s death: “It was the
song of the swan.”

If any one lingers rather late on a fine summer evening
in the Zoological Gardens, he may very likely hear the
sounds which the wild swans that live as captives there
are able to make. Some have said they are like the sounds
of the French horn; others compare them to the noise of
two small trumpets such as children use for toys. In
either case we do not get the idea of any very lovely
melody.

You will notice by his portrait that the wild swan does
not hold his long neck in a very graceful way. It is gen-
erally stretched upwards, and thus looks rather out of
proportion. The plumage is as white as that of the tame
bird, but it has here and there a slight tinge of yellowish
gray.

The young ones are of a dusky gray colour during
the first months of life; but they change for the better
in the second year, so passing gradually into the beauty



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61827cbb11fef8693b3ae72ebbae8e9654f1756e
'2011-12-11T06:26:08-05:00'
describe
'216347' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABING' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
1e5230c565488c935e49e6d9cbb271ac
cc226c1cc80716010d132e46f7b3ac4c603a1fa9
'2011-12-11T06:26:09-05:00'
describe
'35871' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
7e781b976e72b57f040100fe2f23f914
4be0d375139e1ad71007743afaef37d582beb0a4
'2011-12-11T06:26:12-05:00'
describe
'7587' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINI' 'sip-files00006.pro'
36c29673c8a535f526391b5b21af55cc
8f715514d89edf4dafbf5b40af51c6b9d1a266f6
'2011-12-11T06:26:04-05:00'
describe
'12607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
cad7bfdfc700dead4c61ff9538ea7b52
394687e4cb811c80b426a556963dab09ea44bd1b
'2011-12-11T06:23:30-05:00'
describe
'3005592' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
0f1cfb343b2a8e1df3401fa1a49ef839
be0e74c04b2ee09df5b19f3c0ef50f3182971d14
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINL' 'sip-files00006.txt'
181f581d32e666e71a58e9723854631e
d3d64c7d1e5d958f68bc94cb649ac37c0ec24f5b
'2011-12-11T06:23:12-05:00'
describe
'4124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
6fb0eac8108c46ad10afa095cf4a792a
07cd2ea0f9d54bca5886a22f7d330f36097cc998
'2011-12-11T06:27:21-05:00'
describe
'44967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
c05c939f52d49e7fd7b210c67743f708
077e5ac67a76f75dfc16ca30398bcbc7a37de923
'2011-12-11T06:26:25-05:00'
describe
'9319' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
ba05432941be064ad06f1e8021dd4b96
7d89e82e90ec13c8b4f4c3c3500388f1b1a48ba3
'2011-12-11T06:24:23-05:00'
describe
'2769' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINP' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
ee8879b37ab16285866dad1da555511f
01cb68d040d8222df100a0d9d5f2d49cf9d8fceb
'2011-12-11T06:24:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINQ' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c49200257ea205c27243259742e10a97
afc22f9323bff8d6592608b3ce42095a7472ce84
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINR' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
169ba85655e2ca2e4d7cc7b18355068e
395703fa88ba99e383255f50b7e9a8a462ae7906
'2011-12-11T06:23:04-05:00'
describe
'338440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINS' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
5979822bf239a39f2f9312aa7409b856
2a4ccff26c07cf4b89468dc7f770be3419e956e0
'2011-12-11T06:23:25-05:00'
describe
'53419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
ce0134438cc03ce1dee35a4bbd78be77
2b7b3ec931695e0ae6c6199daaee923841ddfefd
'2011-12-11T06:24:07-05:00'
describe
'35023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINU' 'sip-files00008.pro'
87435710f3bf09cd6a8de49195cadfe9
ea8a52c8b2aa7c333c798dc924f99ef89b102f1c
'2011-12-11T06:27:20-05:00'
describe
'18936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINV' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
d0d1aedc1b5e75bb8ad7ab68775e3cd6
7062bec599888faab4a64323f134b5f6e2fae9f0
'2011-12-11T06:26:41-05:00'
describe
'3005576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINW' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8c532cf9ff0c16350483a442fee1074e
7e57a25f05a4623a447fe8b2ef608806e747c30b
'2011-12-11T06:26:53-05:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
36b1273aa266a13df0f88a68641755e9
789669c6e2e6cc484ae3f4a40cb9b968b02c4fc4
describe
'4811' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINY' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
88772e941f43bab80146a330166581b9
8f0178321f66b7c82b20d2dfd33f4bfb54348743
'2011-12-11T06:23:45-05:00'
describe
'374705' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABINZ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
abd0d4dea77146e65589ad9a2305b09f
5c7f25f7a1217be0bd1927950ea79c3c1d54c9c6
'2011-12-11T06:25:13-05:00'
describe
'74491' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOA' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4a4316919eb07a7a02033f82cfcaf815
01bd601f7aaa819a962ef2e365587517c3138693
'2011-12-11T06:24:55-05:00'
describe
'33462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOB' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d9f4a05bcfa066a7426b007436f04962
39f1d6f9ffa769ab55f5e7c7667a7d7fdfcb28ce
'2011-12-11T06:24:19-05:00'
describe
'23685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOC' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
55cae7dd95e524afeb93a3a5c81d9768
715372d86a5d60832e7f1fe67c044a582eadb4be
'2011-12-11T06:26:48-05:00'
describe
'3006100' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOD' 'sip-files00009.tif'
44c996cd8273d2a1e7761e8de131739c
2ae779b055c8f652d2cf30165022b0d47dbb3349
'2011-12-11T06:24:03-05:00'
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOE' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e3393c6aaf9f0f7980cf0276bb16bb75
e42dd530839b367a8de51e57105bc0b406951120
'2011-12-11T06:24:35-05:00'
describe
'6262' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOF' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
f9bcaca0663b630136fa07df832af7c0
a1937dad19e4c3aaa1ec469266a5914a3bfacb06
'2011-12-11T06:26:00-05:00'
describe
'374616' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b98777ac7ff8616945b89856023e865a
3f1aadc16bd7897d7f82e0bac868c063f08974ae
'2011-12-11T06:23:44-05:00'
describe
'91791' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e076cd1dac3d930442b231f15ec0e6b1
65b215efd949e215fae9f4face055022d1e3013c
'2011-12-11T06:23:56-05:00'
describe
'26365' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOI' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3ca268ca69a676967ee84361b6ab4068
22121927f6a096d091d9f945405815a70bf56ba5
'2011-12-11T06:26:58-05:00'
describe
'31418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
d20e8b21a4bc43630bc63e315e087ac2
972a4e2d443e509b86b249043f2d857dcb44a1bd
'2011-12-11T06:24:21-05:00'
describe
'3006788' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOK' 'sip-files00010.tif'
d0fc89bbb9ff5d704aa1d58f8c2e8b53
3adc828f4ab723dff44e2863b7a0bbd7f66c0af5
'2011-12-11T06:26:51-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOL' 'sip-files00010.txt'
95a61b28db433a07c8d1775a47434282
d07c5b43a81b947a302fcfcf342c16fdeb173294
'2011-12-11T06:24:54-05:00'
describe
'8020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
91868ef967432c6fa5dbad2afd0b07ec
942d7cab0fa4d9a67179fdaddbfef095ed96785b
'2011-12-11T06:24:33-05:00'
describe
'374695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABION' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a75f6a3ddee647a67f5012e44732eb88
ea85204a82867736e5e962885ddc61c107555e65
describe
'58167' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
29a86932ffe7fcdc4222aecb6451edad
f0cbcdfe6cb30d075d9dcc0a55e201b9ce0d9959
describe
'7998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
fece167cd7efbad702579c78c4ad362a
8bf33486e582c381332b21f82613bd282e3fe4ec
'2011-12-11T06:25:51-05:00'
describe
'16668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
aa1e4eaebc4bc9154f637dd1b4d92895
b952a23c1d5e03820e87126a68ac0fd227213728
'2011-12-11T06:25:36-05:00'
describe
'3005484' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
9c281348548ecc48402cbe9c4fcb5fac
d4cdabaec4b10b38d5f0aaa2a944b84a8bc8a123
'2011-12-11T06:24:56-05:00'
describe
'331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
2485830f11b5a8668e47569c5f8f36d5
20d1d6cb5dee479df3b849b930e64948aca063c8
'2011-12-11T06:25:49-05:00'
describe
'4388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d0a00c5dacded80a5ef8af8c2cb32bea
0970f4cb2ff2e71766c987ea82bae56d831ac919
'2011-12-11T06:25:12-05:00'
describe
'374702' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
c0e39df1b57b7ebbc9fa31b428196429
12cf151cb5708628d64e817ec1a0973d656b7280
'2011-12-11T06:25:20-05:00'
describe
'124595' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
1bac6bcd9f207f0b2ae53d60b14e8d16
1d0ed4277d9edce67832a98ef6c61e91404a3a16
'2011-12-11T06:25:21-05:00'
describe
'19054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
da55cafd859d3cb341aba85c7d2b910d
ea721e54a7f066542a66d9e5eaad4b6c7605573e
'2011-12-11T06:23:15-05:00'
describe
'35269' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
3ef55c9e2b6d01b2cdd488f8957e5691
384e08fd9da905601ee0a4fc85c1d11b69833331
'2011-12-11T06:23:46-05:00'
describe
'3007068' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a2f45b31574c4d3d79e64b9766c6133a
1a372a0cc9106245cae1a178f8d4adcc57d02402
'2011-12-11T06:23:31-05:00'
describe
'780' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIOZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d8db6fbdfb33889b9981639b78ebf304
573a9306a4c1a3506d0c98e8b1f50689f86f268d
'2011-12-11T06:23:28-05:00'
describe
'8894' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d433cae02714c0d074148cb944f8f7d9
5a196127de7bf0c32bd1dc66e6a6debcd8eaebbb
describe
'374697' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
c6fe0b823678748685a6495e3e0e78c3
3882c2ab888ee48eafdca4f4e45a8edadafa0176
'2011-12-11T06:25:30-05:00'
describe
'130111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b3c10493d3ddfe4042d7610e546fd11f
2b06fa59d0b81902f1b031a1664712422002ddb4
describe
'41236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5cc0076c92113263aae9db20b064c330
f08f08c5a2fe97e79a1e2c7a9195e342223bf3cb
'2011-12-11T06:24:25-05:00'
describe
'43340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5035d8ec1e9ac6a5b4b2ad5e14ebe317
f533b57d1a09b15da87f7f4ab7972ebc5e187e73
'2011-12-11T06:23:57-05:00'
describe
'3007600' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
633948c949acedcd2786cfa2587515eb
19ce00558624fae964e1c3ac462e0b977149b47c
'2011-12-11T06:23:14-05:00'
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
88caeecabd0f6a63d57997cdd005ef19
48d03a6e9466f210436353571cd02a174bae8870
'2011-12-11T06:26:29-05:00'
describe
'10798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
685601bbdcd9fed33b511fc308ae9faf
87992c70e8e19b684346d0a356db2c4584aadf95
'2011-12-11T06:23:39-05:00'
describe
'374963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
64c7162629b80b3c0c04d14c2dbfb1d6
a88ac09eaf6319adc2d1a5109a9d90654b7f146d
describe
'127487' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f2bbb3877c8f277eb82a650944b609aa
a1798034b79a8f09f43d56b518f23174f9a1abf6
'2011-12-11T06:24:32-05:00'
describe
'40497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ff56b5d849614ce3f7860cfc06bb0000
1d75cc59d0f01c254a9584fc919c730bc9fb9bc8
'2011-12-11T06:26:18-05:00'
describe
'42656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d72fd740b4f229cbe36aec05e1c1e031
7391e4502a91710253296db9a5b722a7c36d3231
describe
'3009868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPM' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a3d20a416662361cd82bd039a69a7038
1f52ff76cb7321e0473dfb369184ecc44b962145
'2011-12-11T06:25:45-05:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ad5bea455e8eb358a7a37fc4d698b218
5cc3356692de63900cd00b060df9d5b18d592068
describe
'10588' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
4e92ec9022a6af8bb912f2dd3a4f175b
4669438bc7f8421274c66b75c990ec492ed05bdd
'2011-12-11T06:23:55-05:00'
describe
'374611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
431836649bddaf1af9d0c3b0bd227d85
240b6a9e208290e46f58c69004026dde2991eca0
describe
'80112' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
7cc7b021c8b4b3e4423d352e5c34519f
f3b86f40dbda41c4086fbf9a787521682f768aa1
'2011-12-11T06:24:44-05:00'
describe
'16263' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
fb8845c581e867d5b8f41cb6a79b63af
354dd45caa2b23aa51472eb006101b934171466d
'2011-12-11T06:26:49-05:00'
describe
'24363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d73a67bb96a2e33cce1997211209249e
79d4cb723ff02623548227d20bb2acba6510a94d
describe
'3006116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0c3fcb6ea5a5e5cbe3b8e4bd96db3d05
ee57a946c9ea7cb449758644606b612c4915e857
'2011-12-11T06:24:04-05:00'
describe
'682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
ecd97744aaaeae7a435f80c0a2034729
619e2323c3cf54b9f1f4d178472012d0c2da3e3f
describe
'6450' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
56e74a5cb37936c438b81bc0f63f6be2
f95f27972d5c28bec7d085c4c1a2c223ecd6fc53
'2011-12-11T06:23:02-05:00'
describe
'374713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
ee07f3a00a2f021fd5840a2acefc37af
73a73a510e22b47cb366c3988bac739074a8abfc
'2011-12-11T06:26:13-05:00'
describe
'133516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
9fb13e98ffe1165df5f643539da77a8c
38d4d0fd5e172b6771354f2a78f737227c832158
'2011-12-11T06:24:27-05:00'
describe
'21653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f33fef40c24ebed85514d60e69b519e4
d76a7c5a8acc21b06b69760323244b7fb4c202cc
describe
'38257' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIPZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ac9fcdf611e06c7a8dba3a47c1ea68c6
db249f0416c317efc7525affb6489e89006afe8e
describe
'3007212' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
31fa0d878468bd7042941b84d130b577
214cfebbb0c5e76517b50140a197c37052a1d805
'2011-12-11T06:23:58-05:00'
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f94e5ebde119277f3ba362f90d0b5414
978d872ad4ef3962cef0123d753125be61241d08
describe
'9192' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3d936052a03a2949fccb53fcd49efa57
88386fd2a1d064a4046bd4b0b3a7551ed630bcee
describe
'374715' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQD' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
fcae95a429819dd35d8d13d68d9d928f
441170d2d46c6612e1df73cf37873c668d3d47c0
'2011-12-11T06:24:06-05:00'
describe
'117797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
302c597ffc16a3f3dbaa7feead93ecac
5d38f5b9ef9361018561b3f0d44d3ff2ef2501f5
describe
'37248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
2140ca5365ff9014b403c065c93eb410
87548f37dc40c15d2f9701a19fadd3c46b4175e4
'2011-12-11T06:23:19-05:00'
describe
'39983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
c2a179bff583d8ea90c75061391789de
5b25e3c74dcb01e7b2a2d053fbd603534b24764e
'2011-12-11T06:27:07-05:00'
describe
'3007500' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d511beb321856cbdd08878a294546750
359080b254fc3d27b66a6615b3d086d8718927bc
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a3793b7499c3e556a8a0565381dd5a2e
eb6d1c9d4059f01e9a7c00b58681d97a17e16ba2
'2011-12-11T06:23:03-05:00'
describe
'10224' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
7d87fbaea2258a1ab1c1d00ae3fddd6a
38ec68fbab4b9900058e5ab54dc673ad8bf24644
'2011-12-11T06:24:41-05:00'
describe
'374649' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
166effcb7db8013bad31714e16f5658c
851ffdaaedf688cc8cab241d62a68fb45dedefd2
'2011-12-11T06:23:37-05:00'
describe
'128517' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e6e0d9f238511c1db6c1f4cc16d4ca6d
2874c4d8f69800608d3f16fdf103d0ce4d6f5625
'2011-12-11T06:24:43-05:00'
describe
'39666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
50faabd83b24bc6fa5b5c64966b3abd7
15a4a393f1a0614e7130ed41c9e71a4f13f5d24a
'2011-12-11T06:24:09-05:00'
describe
'44267' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQN' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
97b9646eaff6179f0f1d51431aa034de
1f52d02bb3c58e3e7dee286e644ccace24e15a7d
describe
'3007908' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQO' 'sip-files00018.tif'
e832d4daac04e7c5d6b79d309ad0395e
2d93066f2538a0296169c992c43d1527be17d169
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ee3a5ed3df2247d65a49c6946ce898ae
11cb089086e455ae6696c76a531475a65146b460
'2011-12-11T06:24:29-05:00'
describe
'11141' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
0d9117297880d61ba986ddd16f93e14e
152a6531dce85d32b4d3654f7433e2fe33304640
'2011-12-11T06:26:35-05:00'
describe
'374719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
2fbad7ba0944b088e5a503650fe3e078
f958e4f877ed6ac91ddda88bc4f8a17bed883cc0
describe
'112207' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQS' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
232820fb0d3e0e5b1c6c157e7d584b27
8736e3843aa128061ce2cf12775f1ff14a3710cb
describe
'35925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQT' 'sip-files00019.pro'
dada4d34fc4f2746e949aee5c138c5e8
c9edfe2bb7466fba61e64f08c1c95493520259ea
describe
'38790' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4b863201b4fb21c5228eb6e73212a02d
239fad9ee8e103a342fa6c6e9a35d1d62fc8eeea
'2011-12-11T06:26:03-05:00'
describe
'3007352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b2321bf8788afe65e1293a4e96cf3b66
d208a97e87502ba307914fb3823c9040ff1a9546
'2011-12-11T06:24:05-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5ccb7cd0803c485b294e38090411c074
95af20e9d687601e3043c0b7ffe520a93a7d63b3
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
dd49cc199abdd5da76b7264a22fea5b8
c909115eac5f1dd910ccf8b851de6575a3128a71
'2011-12-11T06:23:54-05:00'
describe
'374877' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fe9c04d0fae7e0d4709e23492c776393
487be47cb67580fbf5894247e6f52ec3646503be
'2011-12-11T06:24:10-05:00'
describe
'101236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIQZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
84c1c9ab390aadcf8ebb9e0dc60c13f3
8cffd71fcce6736eeb55ea53381366303b058bcd
'2011-12-11T06:25:08-05:00'
describe
'14902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
945130e28b2c6f4b6165cf37d1b7046e
99b52742e0e95484370e8f22477077b3dffc1b4c
'2011-12-11T06:24:57-05:00'
describe
'30069' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b2cec3d3e14e3eba07932d1e3e63e208
d1825a64a9a92d7dd0dbca48126161f52e48351f
'2011-12-11T06:23:17-05:00'
describe
'3008196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
a16be3afe1ea6d32e363efb0cb258014
18e577155e55558343028855f83895cb56ec7d64
describe
'638' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRD' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4b453ffaae825dc593d103c869d12818
72b5d25708923ade31183ab0295b533ce7377c81
'2011-12-11T06:24:22-05:00'
describe
'7824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
e999960563ea6f9db8cd6bf3255fc83b
fac7a99e8244cdaaa4d2672ea57450c682ff5b7f
'2011-12-11T06:24:01-05:00'
describe
'389016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
12dc5d065fd2eb6b509cedee97ad6348
fb0b99ce48e20420bbfdeb51c9280faea4257a1a
'2011-12-11T06:23:34-05:00'
describe
'115989' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dfd8375419c3e82dea834292ddef955d
f1686f6cd0b5a1edbd7ddd4caa14fd7cacfe0e70
'2011-12-11T06:27:08-05:00'
describe
'38128' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
b463f6e6ae79ded92f047c39d710235b
e51fdba0c0bdcd33650e9a1bdc4d33b430eb6782
'2011-12-11T06:25:43-05:00'
describe
'39964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
90e42360c380d9afe3164801dfad1a73
f81feb8265ec952b52ef74d343768064851492a8
'2011-12-11T06:24:00-05:00'
describe
'3122456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ac9f74de3877364d4d29c58b68bb74eb
5d41c37d4672591c2ecef2ef5d9c2d298c1d4b32
'2011-12-11T06:27:02-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
0940cb3d787c11a8a5c2813deeb49513
751c960f77ee5ed428d079edbd212d9593a73b2a
describe
'9939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
73ef4bad52d10422191f77c5a9e53f23
5b0976fc372425f89358169234e2f9f60e3e765b
'2011-12-11T06:25:48-05:00'
describe
'376317' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
7e9a4d1eece9b3bf62e5479a5234a122
a4085c563b4f13e2ddb414e68587c69f1d5e5fb9
'2011-12-11T06:25:15-05:00'
describe
'127593' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
188bbe9d566dd819cbda39d9138b7253
977f42d88ff0bc05baf7f595518d4a1dbb6932a4
'2011-12-11T06:25:01-05:00'
describe
'39486' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRO' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d970d295ae6bf132aa4ac6246d1c793b
a2d303d78f1a56b6f09d632cd386f78211cead3e
'2011-12-11T06:26:22-05:00'
describe
'43488' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
45ac1beb76673579b98ef71ccafd4a3e
f6e60707cc696150dcbc17d1a50db9ece12d6f8b
describe
'3020536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0922f615a107777a01a24f9f63c4afb2
7b12a8f171f157105ee8d3e495360660d4d09383
'2011-12-11T06:26:34-05:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
21c1bc71462b0a33e2aae9786aa29542
8ee00d528ee1d254116a5060ad0eedd0b32cb75b
'2011-12-11T06:26:40-05:00'
describe
'11029' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
857321775fd37df495b1eb990ec09369
f28172bcd1b14b05a920e1da109c02de032b8bcf
describe
'389307' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
fb8f68eafdf3fade430d48ae6ffe44e9
1681eb5e80511f5fe181183f2ec2bc1babefaba2
describe
'69229' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
70f4470d3e4453699500c6886706c249
c970c2aa5da6d3cbbe2e2977ae93689d4a2a4b96
'2011-12-11T06:26:15-05:00'
describe
'14412' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
790fb36f3a2667294205c9658c9a2832
beaeb2984b0bfa70ba8d2eac1f1ac253ca60bc47
'2011-12-11T06:24:24-05:00'
describe
'21087' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
6d7c7425ef2060828b605650064cfa41
4453eb26ca02a6d9836416ee233dc818e7c41c95
'2011-12-11T06:24:38-05:00'
describe
'3122800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5736ac1469b7ff63995058c749287e7b
1ec4a1ec5fa4ac973cd880efc06ff8f2ba05ecb3
describe
'575' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
26612f89ec6a132b2977ebc152aba39f
9e2c6e9ecf6de3dc6d644eed880b9dcf103eb41b
describe
'5544' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIRZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
3ec0f8a251192842b0ba1f405279df5c
3e825a3841bc7abb8012b6291e6157854f19edc6
describe
'379721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
6cdd5d1ed57c7012c05d1305f4cafeb2
72a5b08fbb2a351c10f64b28b341ca0c7a2215dd
'2011-12-11T06:24:37-05:00'
describe
'112702' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9958a0fd563a6c46cb7d0188b5057580
349bf5506fdfab0a1ee89a9a86178973d1c7b149
'2011-12-11T06:23:16-05:00'
describe
'15361' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
f79077dec21edcd1686c7c40b73baf3b
8e842df0089e20bfb88bcb13bfcf3aadbeed44c6
'2011-12-11T06:23:43-05:00'
describe
'32760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e82b31d14574097f68408886e8110e69
451af65e99c45391d8b1acc70457bf5a4a1cef43
describe
'3047328' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
543cbe3e822c59e31477df5f51619e6c
fc0b1d5a5632d9780914c49a523cdd71f82caab1
'2011-12-11T06:25:55-05:00'
describe
'654' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3408717475c30bd626ffe021dc2a8b46
b3c64b848df6876962311915956e3ef6d0abe760
'2011-12-11T06:25:10-05:00'
describe
'8230' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
8e83483da9863d5e8c7d47703dfcfc95
e90e9f204fec03ecb94e2ee2a86e9eb0148aade2
'2011-12-11T06:27:01-05:00'
describe
'389293' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISH' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1073afd5953bdbdb70f0aafc8ba3c3a5
62136a51ac981f6c2d0c349f968cbbbbdf01cac2
'2011-12-11T06:22:59-05:00'
describe
'118226' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e6e34b2567ff19157e3abb198b743f1f
73e390b12972f1618b7f289b48754269e3aea8bb
describe
'39170' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISJ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e4f5c88f39c7c0dbf42c9c191473f71a
1b5f24dc636df87111c38216a6e2b4b3479c1e6d
'2011-12-11T06:26:07-05:00'
describe
'40152' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISK' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d88bd8cc8a9d448cb3ff332ba9fd1b20
09271a18a25b625155ab5d797fe66ea6aa668833
describe
'3124348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISL' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d737306c2b7ce214e4f994eea627a1a8
3e1fa1a448753dd3d7d13e00e894950816725d7e
'2011-12-11T06:25:18-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISM' 'sip-files00025.txt'
292bd0f362cbaef3e70ccd1252b465f8
c92992e6bda4fc577c0b9bd51a6cad28a94c9c32
'2011-12-11T06:26:32-05:00'
describe
'9960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISN' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
491e500801ec9c397c4496e74cb49b7e
8e2e771843a18a68e0de419a8b9206cd3539d984
'2011-12-11T06:26:23-05:00'
describe
'381337' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISO' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
7548a929def74aef5e11ae2802c4f3e0
2fd138445acf2829709b299aea29412f9257954d
'2011-12-11T06:25:34-05:00'
describe
'123038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c6a1c615a991e96fc1cb8d77d6882f6b
423bba9a13b28ae555708b14dd0f2fc3c5700fde
'2011-12-11T06:27:06-05:00'
describe
'39725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
43abe6659337ff79accee44812630a68
90947bd1f9e69d929b2cca78cae5cc8f6e710eda
describe
'41964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b327ab30fc9805fb80be3bf146f021cb
321395c4601ae28c7dd5b65d620a9af27682ce79
'2011-12-11T06:25:14-05:00'
describe
'3060624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISS' 'sip-files00026.tif'
eea871d0ba038cc6e953903257580ac8
b0cf6397ec9289f2e5ac6c22afb10f929a50d0d4
'2011-12-11T06:24:47-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIST' 'sip-files00026.txt'
812499eb447603f130856263b12d6f98
fb25c43eb557b75e79b54e782db362c2ebb2a552
'2011-12-11T06:25:00-05:00'
describe
'10436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISU' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5220df397db5a4a95faa219141c58290
b1ab48e941443a7abbb8645af949fe22b978db32
describe
'388995' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
4560e4a7898b0baef72a2c309646fa9e
ca123e83ed864bed0927342fbc4a29c0e9ffe96e
describe
'51813' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7b0488d354e6e079a239df765593f05e
ea5af1730759bcec8e16c217583ad0617599bbcf
'2011-12-11T06:24:30-05:00'
describe
'7238' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISX' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e5d1e9230e1f069c1eab019a6fc64eb9
d497e87bea96c8e532edc93dc8905338423484b4
describe
'14621' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISY' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
984da8afc53eb5d34a9c4a0717010dbc
79ddc4c6a9f7d8efa3dffbc3b36defda777486d6
describe
'3120032' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABISZ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1e454fa5c21d8d771effa57d0f20882a
07afa4bfebe27fc32e863c78820b969c48d71e9d
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITA' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6c91ce05b195b6fbce704b03637a8cc6
34e6ccfea8759c868facb3a88387e8ce49e0b748
'2011-12-11T06:26:24-05:00'
describe
'3754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITB' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c7b8ca71f8e23b2749a214c58408a5e2
ff8df0b303ad83f179f9dc47c18ddcef4f73e622
describe
'389281' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITC' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b784e4590d5407c87eae78b6862fb064
8a6102b587b941877dc32f638761d04ca3e9b101
describe
'116462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITD' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a9e361314aab6cccebb6741b9ab92743
31b82bd639d5c138bd06c9d7a7f2844a1d013f29
'2011-12-11T06:25:50-05:00'
describe
'19490' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITE' 'sip-files00028.pro'
cc7f982b334a8f008d1b1547dabfbec0
97613ffdc8a6e4a63061e0dbe8fd572e7a3eb4ae
'2011-12-11T06:27:19-05:00'
describe
'34297' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITF' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b9012e8c4fdfa50708b652fd54f19935
73bc0500b7eeeb40ef74a3958c16cdffea1d76f6
describe
'3123868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
655f37f7fe7f245c3da8cf6732405275
2d205ab201f37faa2062b8dc9174df1c6cd32e8b
'2011-12-11T06:26:50-05:00'
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
238cc56fde54bae351a3d2aa59d19193
b5bb1e685daa3ff629cb5a38b7d189b545d1f986
'2011-12-11T06:27:14-05:00'
describe
'8627' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
665285fa10cbec0d16d76614cbbf71e9
862a26f8dfba1097b3bdc64c9b3592eef36708c1
describe
'389046' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c62d0d8589c00bc0440f1d829123f40b
11be0e679b82c7c7cde8cf63df04f451f2fd0a27
'2011-12-11T06:25:59-05:00'
describe
'120754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
60a4c8dd4912eaa7e9be2f8a3abdd739
4a0de15c8297127f9e86d8cfbea48a2c8092f273
describe
'39657' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
32350d03126a52809a8c9ec0648ee2a7
efce0a1ffcd76442cdd429b397c8710fca7925ff
describe
'40976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0581457e6f4cb50054b3375a30701b00
375931d4e19a56df797858e5084e7f120a98ae46
'2011-12-11T06:23:27-05:00'
describe
'3122200' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e339bb38c15c3ffb51a440203ef3e27d
d0a7ff3fb13cc09356e2dcd29e2b4a378c0a558a
'2011-12-11T06:26:06-05:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9fcb030bd433fee3a173cdaf6c46d270
62b3510c2fb7ec36357b55ec8e43c31606b8897b
describe
'9828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
67080bafeff20d8e8801ca0a24c71490
c1916e43f0cf93a7a9daf2900f6f4b85a9284ca1
'2011-12-11T06:26:19-05:00'
describe
'389311' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a45216f34fa3d3dceaf940526843bad0
21278034d960238f4dcaa8130c72c704a51a6562
describe
'114506' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b2715c3c6ff9c03a4f81c2b20fffed6d
61c3d91684f5020ba50b3f18b1a2fd77e6fd749a
'2011-12-11T06:24:08-05:00'
describe
'37267' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
93d50bb0e334cccdf0e1b8e5dd0c5bae
908991d821df8ed5f2ae938e05f088e37105121a
describe
'39376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d2692e76d0ce768bf5fc0f95fa460b16
ef1a558e799069232624077700f849963c35925b
'2011-12-11T06:23:26-05:00'
describe
'3124276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3452fc2bf2a80af3feb258dd0fef2634
0ff6bb3780721cb54f81d31962243da67f77c870
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e32899741a807c2614d89c4a3aa5c511
2deb7df330cbcf64a606c4a2950643ceb47a1f34
describe
'10190' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1774575f3ccecec6521bc70873a79b19
3ab2ea72550ac17e14ba75c7c214cc7694492cac
'2011-12-11T06:25:32-05:00'
describe
'389038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5b84eb34192d38f838e7b80d02e0554a
4788aa776527c34e76be41d69a7eabd8e3d136ee
'2011-12-11T06:24:51-05:00'
describe
'111152' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5ab95102e5fc78885122bf189e3531fc
4e58e053163bb7e8d46d233ae7f35407873dda27
describe
'36902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABITZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
7f89c6131b35842f5a831aae12f6d2d3
d7f2264f385c537cf90036ebfae9973b8c49557c
describe
'37762' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
eea05df3ba62d4224e89e3d46e06f931
4f222826759e380ecd4d780ded80155a1b6ff625
describe
'3122000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
b20af43caa05c5ece3b549e6920780c2
45fdd772999277597f74c06f8ec9d79bf14536fd
'2011-12-11T06:23:00-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
154337754b2cec4868c3f00011288a0b
d4c0031e5b099501e50051633a63dc21ee84235c
describe
'9502' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUD' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
7fbfcbbed2546855579e7f56823c4730
989b39873409fbbfa53b96d45a9671527a83338d
describe
'388979' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
756225fe84169b708b76d41fd4b15e7c
ef6b230d0b7b8709e52859711d912d3d6aef613b
describe
'115137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
bec11507e68817aae0f6f19a55e1cd65
e3a3f70adfd8d85a121982b2141b41855dd608d7
'2011-12-11T06:26:01-05:00'
describe
'19852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
0cf86f9dcaf2a2dbe78c821c3354155b
e8d611d4f2e5b674074406270a64a7af06b53ed0
'2011-12-11T06:26:16-05:00'
describe
'33489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d43f11dea724ce23d113c411aec3ac16
f448e6574a517f35a80f993ad0572e602d3c997f
'2011-12-11T06:24:59-05:00'
describe
'3121656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
472cd120907f32f7e53e1e1c9b22b742
043da69d7a26a7bd185ae6eb78abbf6b769e59fb
'2011-12-11T06:26:27-05:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
537dc279c56cb4bc4cd10e96f86c2fcd
86c0c1d8cac3be1d23ef13ae711088e7bc4619a7
describe
'8296' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1f05b0bec52cb1c376d045142e59d280
f70ddd3484fe6f5887caebd6ffa7ede23445953c
'2011-12-11T06:23:05-05:00'
describe
'389048' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
72442cf2cbe3b38fcf3e80312aaf868d
5d16313abe78a02367b6ccd0f2ddde816cc74256
describe
'124005' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f8c79c90c40061496abc4bce385523e4
218be7a29df2906880da622c0f56ae461bc50f06
describe
'40963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
46c88af682932df1a73fd82558f1a7ba
a7922364bfda669f35e687ea2f4c54df9fe769b4
'2011-12-11T06:24:02-05:00'
describe
'41745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4f6713a3b487c2ecb1aba37b657667a1
05a21113e3f1a1b304fdbae57d73a407224223c4
'2011-12-11T06:23:51-05:00'
describe
'3122620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
17926e66ae941f26911d62c7616d3b61
642cfd1f4547add4c2fb7fdd78a8859380e67ba5
'2011-12-11T06:23:59-05:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e3419e7588c9db4eca227eda17f6e818
395096d849aeb7c7f56ca38642170a2d6f06e059
'2011-12-11T06:23:48-05:00'
describe
'10358' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
07210b98f56170037f6149c91ff9d544
0a2f6c30e34015542bdee6628a06f847fdf0d192
describe
'389004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b7c6b47e71e8da2f4e4bfd31345486ee
2a0f8f19a135592cb10db11bb1326b60cf36b473
'2011-12-11T06:23:32-05:00'
describe
'113086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
65608f97acf85b3b0d8d721e8e511e89
692d0b741402690c48b0868dc2695d1b27e6a1d8
'2011-12-11T06:23:20-05:00'
describe
'38041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
dfc99b12f107f58bd62d2a6e290680d1
4973c3c5b23c1240864db6cde951daba4809d68e
describe
'37731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7d3f4c052e3387a25e23ea0871d14d86
5c961c78e09f22cdd76b4fb279b267a7926a6f32
'2011-12-11T06:23:50-05:00'
describe
'3121932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8067d245926eb9eeb65e7f0a7ff299cb
5716e0a7b04bb04c8cc945eeae97c2cd7c38ab83
'2011-12-11T06:23:06-05:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
866716cd89cf8a105c5335765c401151
6dc539d5f8ff57eaf39a4f1de9f2c50f61ee6644
describe
'9546' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9ebd0ed6cf0760e58d546d32d93a3d8c
54e35c323d753ce5b8a76438b58dcfb32de5a8e9
'2011-12-11T06:24:14-05:00'
describe
'389027' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIUZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
45c3d35071b40cc4436fc5d085ad35c4
c69a27bb4a961b0ea6a10f408433d015f2cbe0bf
describe
'102223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9e56604de24492043982ad16611d9e1f
a79eac2800d46f8c11d81624749d00df377ee413
describe
'34623' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
ed14e430d80d898d0bc7a085e25cac41
b2ee96994d53b2d20c85c7a2961b9b33118052bb
describe
'34281' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
adaad26ff21208f3a7a320e6122004b6
3be2013e2d81c7e71dfa6b76a052677571053433
describe
'3121768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a134691e3e8a4c056fa94509a8fbc4b2
b868a62d00d5fa2361905e29f385bdff1b458773
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
cba64b9f79ba19caff3c47349ed92253
405d5e38c079fec0dc7e5b245e23774e6a4e4104
describe
'9148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
2b1b42a541e0e6745253d2476fa429a8
67f8c4a52a8167f62940f2a09616362f5561a6b0
'2011-12-11T06:24:20-05:00'
describe
'388969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1627d93b0607aba9d751f5464bf83278
276da3a13ce1adb95f1af313202ba59390c99267
describe
'109828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
a4e52a48772493186aef98ec9306c518
351a1ae41f35f17e95a944e207f26b0d9ef7bb23
describe
'14713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e8dc07abc5eee01add47d69ad2d48afa
f8aa2c645dcafd1b401fcfeb187e7f408605f554
describe
'30359' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9e6eece18555a86c2784b929fc268417
36d1f9069e4e330ff9f5d0070f17d507f7184e3e
'2011-12-11T06:25:35-05:00'
describe
'3121352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
311778911d33add9a1c47c2b1bdce61d
85b3153410197b4f266c7bc98775f427c5d7ca1a
'2011-12-11T06:24:16-05:00'
describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c107ad36b4d31936b7afd22975964e27
726c67e702e94c856252980774cf2cebe831441f
describe
'7485' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0e2e6e3a0ea86d79b1aaadc6f6c239ea
3d846dd116278befaf66d72f7232ea4fa23c8d91
'2011-12-11T06:26:56-05:00'
describe
'388993' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f4dc197bfbc8f754e0c501ea8c9a403a
1823ccb84783defc06e66cb9549bd98f9473f20a
'2011-12-11T06:23:40-05:00'
describe
'118493' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
df646b0d220a70664eddb8019aaa6bea
f435a2608ea862b76ea4fa0ab4a95b1fc53d8fe3
describe
'39268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1bf0f41a606747df77e66528b9b2ff60
3ffb48b2c3331a5094d635d3ad691e6bf3ad6205
'2011-12-11T06:25:44-05:00'
describe
'40182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f0e8bdd121a540c30cd124c2d5753b38
fd554850c62e18eb7e7f3f5d8e73216917ead90f
'2011-12-11T06:25:19-05:00'
describe
'3122080' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
98488cbba050ba59caf385d66ac096dc
a27292552da8a742a6e41aec712aa120c592ada5
'2011-12-11T06:23:41-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9badd618531ea0d4f859a6e9de37d7f6
62be897cc789af3e83fa466145ae8517905f1744
describe
'9839' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d9b8a481abb51307d5aac7eb3de637bd
762675aa7b994b14080cadef162584ebd93300e5
'2011-12-11T06:23:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
7c727c8df1c2940e6855061f8e93c820
b0a67efb7461ad608681a843c21065cf2b11ba1f
'2011-12-11T06:25:23-05:00'
describe
'114238' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
bd0057487bfd3ce47ffc312b79ee192c
e7287eaab4bfbee44a15565c346cba9627c9cede
describe
'38728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
83d1d4356dc6cdda851f208c9ed847f1
5033681561b5c22888daa1f49dbfb05d892098d2
describe
'38197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
a1ecd7f9aeabf8ef05f6f7bd7cc68241
58a7e9795d747e65ff68b52ac2803c10887ae9c0
describe
'3121888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9136880a54a2ea24afc1657f734149ed
33f5ac85ed7511a1d6c136284f6c965950d602bd
'2011-12-11T06:27:17-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIVZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1c90edfb886c1543a61ee9bba4e14462
2414784cae6b9aca5536f581fb964edf4906a9d1
'2011-12-11T06:25:22-05:00'
describe
'9432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
d6f8a7aa8dcbb0313b3fecfbfcf69262
8dd69571f9ce64394fadd8f1cd450fad6d48f581
describe
'389029' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a5621b9a6ddefc6c3e6d0637826ab9ce
4d3a338d9c6633985ea5b7b07de6b13b0d577352
describe
'72385' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c9d8b32377f5e7d57d7bc9070c266623
2d028a3cd7779048104e6df390c43fb6a53001d7
describe
'17098' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d9c93089724fdc218446c6bc48020170
671a10232ecb342a8a1cfec9d507eed966299d6e
'2011-12-11T06:23:53-05:00'
describe
'21623' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
dfcd68225c45abd63017f2a3666bc46f
5311683f61adc2846ca11d57aea8b8613e2ba8bb
describe
'3120532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3831bf7634161d568a220d79052d6f88
75756ea5cb220971f641248322572129734fd589
'2011-12-11T06:26:39-05:00'
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
15a93989b3e7e39a8def8b96739d981f
a6623780bd61b395a5dce99b02cdb6ece7ff2900
describe
'5437' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
5531a1693d28911898c4b3acf2fce3af
664819878e03666d0785051fef4278f47d508e09
describe
'389023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
5b596fc94ed01fffe26cdf2659da41bb
929f4cf61eff38663b6e338d02da8b0adc2ada1a
describe
'117850' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0213e10a949be44015bf7a2a53cd7878
3673c65da43c5458f1534c941db03f5f1c2c405f
'2011-12-11T06:26:30-05:00'
describe
'20755' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
98b6868a5f94cbee7fe1b5ce280d9b97
6972c0ab4f4a37ba12e5fbec77b8b373e50e5c47
'2011-12-11T06:23:42-05:00'
describe
'33466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
351d4886d44c9e407761d43f0b6c3310
fa4eff41787fa544d1b56b88156145f0f6db8f4c
describe
'3121652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWM' 'sip-files00040.tif'
fc81270fb7e9d31af3c232481468205b
bd71cc8b72273693f5b67410945f0461e188dacf
'2011-12-11T06:23:29-05:00'
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
c1e71844e15bbf399f79ae3aaf99d384
f722c6c8dd85f25f95c1596e545699425842ca08
describe
Invalid character
'8341' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
ee105b259322ec20e3ebcbfa73c37bc1
38a62fa09560579d037189091448d89d29fb0541
describe
'389024' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWP' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
cb433e969a277728023e1f6136a1ef7b
8200e08e62587e3fff513865f7f4a184a574ac6e
'2011-12-11T06:25:11-05:00'
describe
'108384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a5e0de09487b154df1e632debec256a9
6a676c9a3806b448da0fc9a93c9bca8a985d1f76
describe
'36946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWR' 'sip-files00041.pro'
05d7fe9f7cf6fe648a34571d46a21864
21c58e940edd1c3d92a9a85b3f34c5719971e674
'2011-12-11T06:23:38-05:00'
describe
'36000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
261895b3ac06c655dfd7aab9caece32e
1ca504e51a087f88db73f8643f051b1f9029ca3c
describe
'3121840' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ab2271314d19ff47b068e197df11ae34
0bf9e845cfeb0c03b6f5717d69bd3a7375ec5da7
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f41beb7b9d4b0a4278c9daa9cfad9239
8bbdeec9e7e3796c4f86d8163b4c518562eb6e07
'2011-12-11T06:25:16-05:00'
describe
'9278' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7cd6fe4b109f084bd0ad0e80846dd948
92746fbfda7c7dad9300af26e10b6fbb59d56ce3
'2011-12-11T06:25:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5cd507465b3a8a316728462100ac4737
f1ab5fc7eda8129d9ed9189ab3208fffc489d983
'2011-12-11T06:26:05-05:00'
describe
'87719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e9459cad93db03eed589624fd82f1add
b3a539455da5b6cf8325118c5b98582e8cd0ab6c
'2011-12-11T06:23:13-05:00'
describe
'29515' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWY' 'sip-files00042.pro'
1dc3d0439d335357a3aa4300c0a767ca
703d7cc33bd8f6e26b0482e0fca9693793896766
'2011-12-11T06:24:53-05:00'
describe
'29507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIWZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
dbbf61c0e74858704dcd1476fed7df63
db29ef4182a76d80b2fc081a7a24ac0b357cf7b4
describe
'3121256' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
497b1efb9fcd868a312538c3210fa0d6
e954aec64f422e6365aa135050a0c8636986e932
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
9c5bf24329b193157fa07bcac6f2dc22
463c043841c3abb90bf612cce7c04c02c761fb7e
describe
'7322' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
dab0bc00ff3f4c04aa8111bf13385fb2
c1eeee212d4dff29585077da97bcdb74274d8fdc
describe
'388956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
5ad1db8483705f6e32a3602d5e5f02ee
f911fe67da3c631a834e9d96fb2adb7888375c30
describe
'103852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8d1ea4cc5fb04c24562bf0c708828387
8cd48d8720b366f02fdcb5c1c5a85332843247d3
describe
'16453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
babb15b92d6b44edf3aa11c43db10aa2
95e79957b3a1428232148849c76d9cffdf2aa369
describe
'29729' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
cac1a8bd930f1d995ed269b1ac90fae9
a0ceb8b548c072af44bd777200bdf9a9268c0c15
describe
'3121408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
750eb243f7586909a6d6fd5d7d4276a4
cb25fc84a748d5c886bb04467f316810f1723923
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
15f986196541d37c8e569c52490521e6
1241348825cb7f9aee16dbce717859332e82e272
describe
'7425' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
83c03400710e658953a2a56fa30142e0
a6a208d53fd784b6963e0a68354b01188ac668a7
'2011-12-11T06:25:37-05:00'
describe
'389043' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
12974ba3440eefda4963a62acd36a56d
010a6ade1aec8e38ea01e7a3b0d361a96eccf1e8
'2011-12-11T06:24:49-05:00'
describe
'110648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
800d4be554621f0940749d31862c2d70
f0230bd42caafad60db08369df6258395bd62fc4
describe
'37756' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
479cf2ed4e0df1a7bc11a0ca18a2caf2
c4ed00bd836f4ed7669380f253f69f5ef6bae2e5
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1007adc6bd36fdeb7dbc89a40c2835fd
b36004159c71e6a7d1d3a49f34d92e069fc49d20
describe
'3121832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
fde2fa4d90ee82df42a6c4515d8f1f43
58a0c9c2cccee57b94dc702dc47cded588d5264e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
5ba5faf9cebd285f0dfdefb8ec3945fb
0c0974f32da58a6057393f84239b970945b1f2af
'2011-12-11T06:26:28-05:00'
describe
'9511' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d13b84db864f6d6678636f6acf3c7860
e7723f700de3444d30c52568ab9bca9537285246
describe
'389041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
6e3f2c51aa741f3fd78ad1a3469ee613
dbd3ae7eb65882e9e0fe4293de1f23d4affae00d
'2011-12-11T06:25:17-05:00'
describe
'111606' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
4a37eb8213b12eb9acea3bc9b91ce3cf
be4372419db090dea883e9a4b64be4de9a34191a
describe
'37287' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c56be5e83cf1236fd71d654ffa519fac
914dec76ab4db2cba99fd372ba8382520d75969e
describe
'36915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
90dc7a8ed3323afff8e9f80b0abd28ea
7f2d187c353db50871d0585371682d9062b26582
describe
'3122140' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
89fc33da3c4a6b4c282f2ac97c1b2821
d5d5cc4d0b168af130da47a9ea31172e44477c6f
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
210d352c58436021b85b485be9f5943b
3c0086f9c77ef27cd290b07f8a27f01d16d7b0cc
describe
'9492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
0f217d31d183a435870325485fd231cc
073fef52a84e777e038c22164e115c400a5f979d
describe
'388750' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
55dd0b9e18a837dd686776aecdafb3f8
c5f98786bcb06705ad717790b8ad28c641f3b610
describe
'86330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIXZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
27e6619ee0dc6414fb0bc47350dd7cad
dc8826d44d447a381b64f05053526fe1594e1d9e
describe
'21048' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
70a2a0400dc26b5e4ee0a37caf99943f
7ac2c1f5de83ba5d6536e6df53d65e302df57111
'2011-12-11T06:24:26-05:00'
describe
'27393' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
bafaa0a6be2d2004b2a5d0c622bacdf4
873dec1e46c812644cadb1146142b24ea7177a53
describe
'3121124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
bdda796b43eeab9333d8a32ecfbc9cb1
1c299623617936356149fe002d17ddeeb37cc95f
describe
'842' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
1c2734bf6cca934f6c58c4607b54b0ae
2c5526dcd7c7e32e335cc404aa70047ff13abe6f
describe
'7116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYE' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8cdf7dca9a0c95688cb5673cd0c76489
15bd1119d5a60c68220a00712cf973b6eeae37c4
describe
'389013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9251e426ef8e227d26f5d9ea78aece28
34a180adf06c5ba36bdb7e3a1e1f8cdc04a8dfd1
describe
'122526' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
baf2dfa38798c1bca2880788b1da8f57
9142c0ceb6dda2845685e47d4b39f7004e6a41b2
describe
'18276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
74d7b4ee3fdd8c357d347cd0127b24f4
b5c0a52e1af990f78f63e818beef26b993794ec7
'2011-12-11T06:23:07-05:00'
describe
'34535' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a9a67127f11cfb25e6f37a4ff779d613
0e161d110fcd024590c33683e7ec87c408d4e86e
describe
'3121708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
87b91db1045f8d1b0304f31d9d49c767
a92114957c8d644d8cc2859da70d189031aedd9e
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
99f3c0a6e637fa3f65448abdbb2e453b
17bf0c3ad5835bf5f737a88711561e6d13441a6b
describe
'8371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYL' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0a9ee1caddaa69ebe87cec7ae005b4bd
6afae19061f00b26fd6bc7afa32fcf267b4d2e79
'2011-12-11T06:26:59-05:00'
describe
'389045' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
27fb475e62ad58d542a2fa48d6933b47
6dcea32fa84d29054e4819b88e2b8cbdde3b0372
'2011-12-11T06:25:07-05:00'
describe
'110443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
3e9f5637a4b47c3c714b4f99383a775b
cdde157cdc551c45ad880864dd3bdd816d2678e4
describe
'37151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
046b91a64f2c748cc0603139b974915e
e37c7c08d65e3e77898e4f3b5e3173540e660e11
'2011-12-11T06:26:46-05:00'
describe
'36729' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
477cff3caddbb5b879b354eb5411e3af
62e54488950bcbc4de4f52878272bcdd4c93b633
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
9ebd754914a4dd808383c59b80a1ef8c
ed66fe5c592289e26e3c91f7151ce5468a7058f1
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d1889c3d99fc08d438d08d19ef06fe4f
08aa15ffd539744f0c5102d9680e5764962fecfa
'2011-12-11T06:24:31-05:00'
describe
'9073' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9f2202f4691ae647932c055e06aabefb
eff470f8b5fd096902d837811f458a25e30544f7
describe
'389049' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
21634c2acb95feec6be5ebd4edcbae6b
f225578a47c467d65df7bc151dd325e992cebd39
describe
'86160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7dfafd0cead03684b7e4c778ea018e37
a6ae6a9c4305601ccc3bfdb53b400fa99971da1d
describe
'28087' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b7133ad318cdc84db315fb088c9f33db
ca145d5b6e00f4a3d334cb4a4e6f74e4105bbf94
describe
'28005' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8ec7ec4c718877f21b4483729382c046
01476be339c010b66d88b799c35806f98248fe53
'2011-12-11T06:26:57-05:00'
describe
'3121196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9ac172a7fbadc9bc3a47edb573c22401
8edb646d76bc51a6f285902b154b254260149744
'2011-12-11T06:26:55-05:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
caf73387cba7d690986db2daa3e93f8e
4fe11ffeec67df90a028a49fe5cc32737b5ed1d6
'2011-12-11T06:27:09-05:00'
describe
'7397' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIYZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8f31d539641cf43856952191150dd921
578417b7022eb626368a1f230b5f73732177be77
'2011-12-11T06:23:09-05:00'
describe
'389000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
8a60ab16a0ab36870264173567e6d593
ab5f212664f4909da7c1a4be743c7922d336ba49
describe
'103227' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
238209f14574539089c37acf90124b53
a6c31c84ea49c52eb0a9b965fb82c80ab34c64ce
describe
'17111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
cf9016049b5286be1056a0f847858ecf
ca56c334138df8c521ada9b7a643855dd67cc976
describe
'28476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZD' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1fd484f83577c3c0beba3b9e88721191
8e6bc46298acb8372e8aee47205a91d325d4a890
describe
'3121244' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
4e296c9ddb0c654d3415d50a2494ad18
6b694112339ff4b3c7c0ee39008ed01d95da8ba7
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9c0c4494a1a5b05722dbae31dea3ec98
cc1230b473b3ccd77ed138b3eb983232f0288924
'2011-12-11T06:23:21-05:00'
describe
'7509' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
4e80ce075c8f100a91f5b6a600a372bd
f585e6cd0aa3d07f40363be35d1ec8c6b71de660
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7ed55a23d359c30103855414fde06401
2f9ed8d313a2bd514c35aa225d1a11b62cb14853
'2011-12-11T06:25:06-05:00'
describe
'118494' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7a2526e34897a55850690d55395a512c
b13c743dc13624fd1b8081beb4bc6856ccb0507c
'2011-12-11T06:25:39-05:00'
describe
'40077' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a346285a85d5fb49977b98ef5a65d5a7
5818b0c0ebf225b49cb45f304821dcc0386166fa
'2011-12-11T06:25:56-05:00'
describe
'38942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
433e0a60643a1a8a37d8841854d1178c
f3476ae1ae992f31d579e77dcd3ad9d26880bab4
'2011-12-11T06:27:10-05:00'
describe
'3122160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
031e853a1da3704b5ad472b4ca6b33a5
b24e67e3420a659930c151670789d8d72bc30acf
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c9981451f507d0c73c2f0f88bff51b76
3ef2ab5b9d1d706e432b5b89bf646edd7e5a9f4c
describe
'9411' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
429bb8dc70fe7f3304dc3566177ebbab
df8c5eb869ed00dd8eb825a3facacd0b1596d0e1
describe
'389020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
30f2ed08d5085a8ff960134e7a2b7b79
b5a10eb9c909a537aa38cda58f8df61a08424e28
'2011-12-11T06:26:52-05:00'
describe
'113581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
57cb81815cdc4f6189be7aabb1260800
74457d6062ca309f595106bd5906f5e176df90d8
'2011-12-11T06:27:11-05:00'
describe
'37999' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c1b7d4eb6867133bdac11b199bc729d0
30c64dd3ec55c3109f97a9ddf3911acd96ba6ffe
'2011-12-11T06:25:25-05:00'
describe
'37384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
5a1100bac7726a7a026a93490f542434
493b6d96a58627974cc769f09e16fc92f2c41e96
describe
'3121880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
1f2dd768bc983a39f42d6f429dcef050
892cf6a498d580d799a5651585b91b48402f1e15
'2011-12-11T06:26:37-05:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
bd96146a18bcdc9cad561a7535b60351
78abedac95c9eda4aed8188b7c6ec0f1c117e24d
describe
'9468' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
283c544e1565e4208f6e4048c618f158
be51faade7eab6bff7c1e28aa1940c0055076673
describe
'389044' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e0720842651e926af5e6cd2b8eef1c67
81b5dcbbf07eff95feafb4fc88c20690d4f22c64
describe
'69679' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
df99ea5b4e8d4fe474c6a52805135dc6
a55dacfb0f48709d9d9b215ecf0358732cfa159d
describe
'14579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3d496a46f45965012fce708165377373
2e88f82e5663b07c46852fa6a67d3b8f16c07e08
'2011-12-11T06:24:39-05:00'
describe
'21058' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
33d7e1629f10cf266cba272bc9970af9
f42e33554ce8ccd388a6e40cb136f037493c9842
describe
'3120476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABIZZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
dd0a67b20ebaaa868cfd300be4b07028
d28b3884c74a58b1f72cfa8ad76e57c29fe717d4
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b49d592731db327a40e00a840ce1ea35
c7cdc1f5384df5aaff45f5d46515b4832c3f6c95
describe
Invalid character
'5264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
484d36ea814981c43b4c1218a168282d
e206851922ad3292da8253c7293a79509d38a48b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
4844f3afc0406e637c35a349e4107162
5b4eb581ad9c24271fd82ccbc2db9f5d18c279b1
describe
'116348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
8c63312582ecadfe0e80c9ec500e26ad
46df92f23df741ac0319c17bc91e19a09e47abe3
describe
'19703' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
85a42ad70dd766b3ccc14003efa032e0
b636b9768073e4dc0d41cb1bd9797ec640a3819d
describe
'33410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d349402f88880be316585b5ccc977306
30cded77996187cd4113fc656f6d87a1c2dcea94
describe
'3121572' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8757720620ffb8d10c564477a8bbf784
d2276e064740f8254f72b6dbfae87ce06320dafa
describe
'795' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2ad2db729d47c9000fbdfa1c8f5ab9e9
6b9a4f099e538c1aedecb7a05bf62fd7819a45e6
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
36d1013c2c5ceed5bb1608cede0d5c77
5c39d33b948bb8d3d337dbaa1ebe1472da749898
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
e756a3bb2c586ddf1c8c45b05fa0d366
6ef423adbd674aa095143a6706214e49d49bf17d
describe
'114599' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d072c87c70f11a05f05312128e89b03c
0d087020b75a9d4b28e86c902b53625ced36b49f
describe
'38608' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d4fe7a1893877922365ede1457b7012d
5d0253bdaa9b950efcf692ef367056d43ec38fae
describe
'38466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fb3b7aec88425f1d3672283393f4daa1
80399e29ff5245d64cb1796e12ddb12dd8fb210e
describe
'3122016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d2649a5c0ab7fcaa1dfa0fafdc3a11c8
1bda829cb91bb77ace0afb3d807c978fb5609a56
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
99cc44d850d83d28803254e344ba5377
d06fcd2eedd9ba0ea2204fad51749111fd309752
'2011-12-11T06:25:33-05:00'
describe
'9440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b13669aec50132a12cf9ca1a6f3a0c19
94b352286d6862efa17f2961d047bc85be2e3d71
'2011-12-11T06:23:52-05:00'
describe
'388759' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
298aaed7bc8676a8c6800b14be4bf717
bf4db30a141eafdd969b11c47d3960da6e8caaa8
describe
'102936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
423c3680d0d09bc202fc63f77c523708
239da817eaa2bc9d55f78e7ca0f1cc8822ae6362
describe
'24456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e16e3b3c04634b4d602c0b3d83189105
4a107de3a6e37a89ec47e8ca8e9f64a80eeb0876
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0b69678789215cd8ca3125123b9c6d87
716e87d9b2b2e38e50927ceed68aad40b6120aa3
describe
'3121568' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
551ec17a8619b863709a330adc2908ab
7eb30d700d3871ecaacdfa801376aaac56810a69
'2011-12-11T06:27:12-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
3611b2f76b6ef74b3043b9fd7a6ac602
45c443d324cb2c87958b03b3a6816d5010ca53cd
describe
'7902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
9a8f946f6cbd4aba43b7368e9ba5b757
f36e8e7626c0da059670dff27665b0625c2a40e8
describe
'388998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
40b363ba3787403cd249960978e2d8db
b1aaa28af775824c3068af044014a0225bbeaa73
describe
'103230' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
7718a8f42c629e48dc973037c9607ba4
d010196594691f85dec81f676c4b229e0b4d2e6c
'2011-12-11T06:26:44-05:00'
describe
'15712' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJAZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e23843812e0c27cbc45d47039b36da53
84c185d6b5c2b2d5b60d3e1b0127a931443e3eb9
describe
'28990' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
e57e98df297478b778653447f81da1e7
f30a6ef778884ca747ca2dbb8d51b57112ce6a94
describe
'3121384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
12e71bc87b24aa17574ad6df82c46a46
a42a666811cd8af6a7c6a32b1704b6135b0e88be
'2011-12-11T06:24:48-05:00'
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1b49a4bdf858caaff919736f13462ba1
f0901e65942ea33441532a301fd0b6bf81005ee5
describe
'7260' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
cde3fbeacbaac05b1bab8a338f55c06f
d8114bd9c616fce0229189bce13bf0ccef5506c5
describe
'389007' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
28350e505a237f0b4c74089e63b0e861
7e1d0c952019d89fb8983d318d6dab77f61e079c
describe
'111135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
623a8d0f4b64395782cba008a2091664
0a47333234ac1c873ade0e97c8540ab490cd9ede
describe
'38441' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
24ed905e4eba25ed46aa8aa63b2470ae
667a1e2fbb3d203d5876ad60ac19936bb45a5f0a
describe
'37674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBH' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ad3e6f3ea1cb0b52ff271f19e5768581
cf1f9414b6ffd9d41d7d445a0229870a1d3b8560
describe
'3121892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
e350cd72abfa119aeea6817204ef84b4
5ef2a5e0cfc935f21d4b64cd6ec60986e1cd87ea
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBJ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fa1e622562e25f09003eda07f5e8774f
3ba85556efb670be101394821d49013a427cb886
'2011-12-11T06:25:58-05:00'
describe
'9327' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBK' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
601931e7707ff6fd0f764776e2582424
e85c6bd3b2931e455238c7ff79c5485e4ee8161b
describe
'389035' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBL' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7acb4aa9d1777a6754c6217c435fa464
481df7478d5672c4e878e0f4aa1040d1a51e38ce
describe
'116993' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBM' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bb78183c955c436c3ffb8592fe61a613
f713ae8bdfc0fb1b4549bf5376b667ef21d0e4d2
describe
'38601' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBN' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0873b3df9282413cf600b1a32c118db4
a0f65f5ee256661223ffe3bdd62cac2045278ad5
'2011-12-11T06:26:43-05:00'
describe
'38759' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBO' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
04dbe17c0148f5286a992549914b88df
104c0f1f279cd40f5a6bbaa218227fdea50a3b04
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBP' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d24dda1008b9b0d468cc39fb8ac194fb
eb0288a5b66a3f4c2d8a0b60f926e648dfbfa630
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBQ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
e5b486a8a588066ca194478d6b47eb08
1373e74b3dcdfcf4f3ab5d7e5bdd8eafc7f42163
'2011-12-11T06:24:34-05:00'
describe
'9806' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBR' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4534d995e5a2a76575f62b77f221a119
726e09689a357329ecbc690490a1ab4e1344ba2e
describe
'389033' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBS' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
af0dfaa4eba96a2071d40bcc37bccdd0
bbc202c56a119852777a976de4dfb028b92bae2f
describe
'74467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBT' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
2bac5b41b777258ad7a2b5805d440726
dd40ebdaa3f6b1fb49eb4f3d2c5b2eafa6afcbb9
describe
'14183' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBU' 'sip-files00060.pro'
40f85aadca1f77d6df2b3f32c38644ad
49d828f90e91dd31fbd01181d08cce1298f6c131
describe
'22396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBV' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
3dbce5da42ffada67ced5371cbfb6ff2
8ef1035d0337121426eb6292c364706f28791310
'2011-12-11T06:23:10-05:00'
describe
'3120728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBW' 'sip-files00060.tif'
d9f5a8d50df4eef4c1c5c03d8ffb2842
f6d888400b1c4954fd203641fd10abd85a95d692
describe
'564' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBX' 'sip-files00060.txt'
ac0a290ff27e7137bfa29ad2711c3532
33dfe0fc5bea79d5279a14e816cb7f39f2c12245
describe
'5934' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBY' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
5888189327b37f4b21f1ef98d5469b7d
0faf260ffee37c140e22953fe92bd89d60cf4213
describe
'389309' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJBZ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
33f5fca0df5e38956e5e156b80363fac
1329d51d4150ec9633656773a57c542d79e9bdf0
describe
'115991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCA' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3f19cd9099a392619d4263956f36f7af
c492185a6cf32e017e26b8de13807fb1c5cea48f
'2011-12-11T06:27:22-05:00'
describe
'13203' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
bea70a815d7c3666f9021190299bc39f
a3f9b319a24bbb7b5d35106d075f546713c78ddf
'2011-12-11T06:26:45-05:00'
describe
'31662' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1955a09859d3c007430169100879b2d6
74900b061313b7243d66c1053f33ea318042d833
describe
'3123648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f83aaeed1cb6c81c29cd3fb10dfd0093
3898e4c28992c99fec2062c59451b9bf41ac6dee
describe
'629' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2075e96aa65026a005c7b9dbb7adfc18
b8d36a85711f6c45b74e927dcf6513518fdb385d
describe
Invalid character
'7714' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
27907163f9149ece6f44a6e56aaea8d8
65102f415c3ce8636c412dd9644d4b33cadf436c
'2011-12-11T06:24:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
62334ba056b382c4eb4434804d47c99d
13e2bbd05432fda5333357603e9a1b1ab82a14fc
'2011-12-11T06:23:33-05:00'
describe
'109898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
4c10a334f4d673c6102de9a01e6e7fc7
1479b440425d98c7f9f25006db4f247f7df96cc5
describe
'37734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCI' 'sip-files00062.pro'
2d369726164a6ef9b81b61198112c741
0737f499468e05ef1bc866650ef19c82d2c71cf6
describe
'36677' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a833be83c70f6c7452118d8a9bf20ea7
3e2fec9577deb936a678a6a149f9b6ab1305e26a
describe
'3121844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ae63136d9c376e7ae8513d99306e9328
9758873fc5b5d081f123b54069b206033a7a68c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f153b95b56eebfc8cd44bea8c955c2e2
90cead56ad138730fd4b63954dc13bfc98db65e4
describe
'8745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCM' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
27a9687d41a0bf3ef1a851183b46904f
d387db00d558b8254757d8212258fad5d5523d1b
describe
'389303' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
b20d0fbcf130ba47cfd934d7eea2beb1
9563b5696468353d3dd96c51d14ecec5ad2a50c7
describe
'114547' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5bcd8dde85f56481684d9be4afac1a39
d3b257de32d2803c0c5ae1bad83a4eb325a19b57
'2011-12-11T06:27:15-05:00'
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1577ea0d5f586380930ca7d90026a830
1026579d7f08d0e693731866f740095035f5a8fb
describe
'38497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
77920c2334873aa890401861da8e72e6
f1696b9ac33af013966618bc4bf3007502061564
describe
'3124184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ab23f4dcb30e1ff1b9c37990332c4a45
7453f355f7f7a511f809d8d8da70d4bf7fd3ee9f
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
93d4f54c96c15aba435591aea2d3776a
0460f9ba7ce07e34661f6491165dffbf20ba4127
describe
'9507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8628daff79039f9e8d2e36acaf68d140
94f8ad80503da53fc572ebebc4f5bce2fb445a5f
describe
'389037' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCU' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
75042e2c7454206538fc04f59bd2ff54
e4a825a38cc5f7809b7087c34485b8e056390934
describe
'93268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCV' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d6c35712c2eccca50ce357ffd0f3c20b
a0f85a8117baf71ea68b8e9e437fbb6f09db8989
describe
'22009' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCW' 'sip-files00064.pro'
82f976bdbc82da1cb48bd1154932a8d7
dccbaea9ef6c2ad3ab93e9c5d7c23b07a7d44688
'2011-12-11T06:23:24-05:00'
describe
'28786' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCX' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
754221db188761a59fd12c699bfa5d19
8d2a928e8e0a6af7fcb6faa4b3168ed6911a4f18
describe
'3121096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCY' 'sip-files00064.tif'
50cdaa6fea8ad5609c9d58ebfec4dd0a
9a1092aeac0f47e1d6564001f1d636cb92190ac2
'2011-12-11T06:24:42-05:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJCZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e346c6111b30ee8384bbccd15fc7a5bc
b1ab7c7c7beb3348bf385f770473527e1cecaa0b
describe
'7323' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8f37bfeb962f06963c2c139d3c4e86f4
7774e34caac373dfe83fe0c9617a03a9bf6e8a52
describe
'389022' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDB' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
403977ae8795a1aa8b540ab8101f1dcc
f3af3ca54da57f687843a820dfb01e79e0e67efa
describe
'103931' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDC' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e360bfc258bef5a8f818bca9313326da
82232b6d80d618647d8ad30f642aea21f473e7f4
describe
'17680' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDD' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8f03ccec4932e0910dd36880dbde0fd0
2eb790519ab4747def0b7da584cb99334741bc35
describe
'30829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDE' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
34c3501125c07728232a71d34a5e353b
de00db48b5399d213cc2818b4795963a8b025305
describe
'3121520' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDF' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d18c6c7b335f93fb17c121c18ea58e7f
07fc445c1250d38b8717095582a534446b5f4282
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
b1b9ac6fbd721cef6aac0f0f1a539cbd
58fc4ba8a29ed4451c79bd7358c2f0493adad1f3
describe
'7851' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDH' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ab0f442c4024e2a14f6fc04c88707a9d
3f81c45fd0d69b390fb98019f99f5ff6f27ffade
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDI' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
131b097114d774139c8b97c61bc2a90c
de07134fdea030020b3152dff54577cf557ac552
describe
'108513' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
bbe51065728b97dc09bda05bf8fc8111
79a2b61d088ad289a290b9f66463ab28f667e91b
describe
'36925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDK' 'sip-files00066.pro'
12e7cb67e26bf17b7f61d1e72f160ae9
a291b8fa4da3a170cb7355dd69c4a1122988dbd8
describe
'37094' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
ea12652e69846bc5864e681e9ea82b96
e7bf23206807299b48eb018bf375232876f6bf8e
describe
'3121940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDM' 'sip-files00066.tif'
3140e3d78f974de693d00d6ceeaa915f
7dabc57a3d9a65aaa72ebb2eeb59addeaba23679
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
5b385e60f6858a32062a0b7eaea83c78
2b09b26709a789ee97ea48442921a7a5bcad8d3f
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
3e8ec75b63e3e35b73606ae0e1e5acfa
9d64c876d26b89233ee78bf2f4ee0ce8d7bb5544
describe
'389006' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDP' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
682eb67494210a8765cb53c533e99062
e4f03a6daf64a6546d7a8ca30c787503c79ca196
'2011-12-11T06:26:42-05:00'
describe
'83524' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
52639c239d96f46f1d9b2a79c8bd4c3e
1ed6b2ddec02c4cd7793049bb50b7503ec340b25
describe
'27258' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDR' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b2b652b4d01565e7154be77cf9eb9150
68c7a30e01cf0f78871c16b3df509c93ee870a88
describe
'27505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDS' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
3fdd47ada52dd22e7282cb38d0b6a25f
bc9ea283a9a9a855813c6336a6daba9b2636cc0e
describe
'3121248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
632db27e4868e25f1d3c70d60ddf22fd
4bbc9fe5eb0eafae03ab42410663b9cda5103e2a
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
99d3386b670f8494702825981d214e7e
6da18c78cd900ed8d4d476134bd7a45efc28cfc3
describe
'7333' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
a109f94340cfd639716014b07f8afb38
949816f3f26084bfffa91959253080ac6d37b65a
'2011-12-11T06:25:54-05:00'
describe
'389039' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
64460a072ac09fdbf7bd733c456ebc93
4ad315f7daf6f88abca93d5ce15a192c24c54318
describe
'111797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
77d55a04bd612969bd9e9b659219970e
69f85359ba55eaed7e0ad289f5ed2dc1b993fba2
describe
'18062' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
dad469f9b3ef27b366689ef422dce865
65ffa326c93e22e358aaf0b1d6ede0a39dd6810c
describe
'32317' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJDZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7aeb659d58e7f72f4510008bf30461e0
8af5f9f5367528b70f90661d99fea6444f5539e5
'2011-12-11T06:25:24-05:00'
describe
'3121552' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
af7390e7f440a004d37842d1a7b787e6
97a5b2898d08f101e50333ccd507f68eca077f26
'2011-12-11T06:26:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
712e6d897e9103dc7a25d5171221d210
e1c2f3ac4dc4aa401181a13ce6c8fe42fdcd9f30
describe
'7982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
725424c0356ff00acbed8a78410e8ad8
f781fb9ba497f5de925af1f01c116adbfff313a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJED' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f3a9fcba0ef82b7ce3971aee3224a610
bfdbe2584f79f6e09c7674675375d61d2570f050
describe
'113508' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
f4352063d50385124e199335b54e0b02
1b3522e47328a260aa691c5d6146533f1515cf82
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b29fb8eeedbb45b248abdcf468d37ed3
f2d47812e01037b390cb1b9e578b2465a7a4a44c
describe
'38166' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0c51949103585a2812db60ce574769c4
b6fde27d6661490180ba57d3d6c52eeaf2d1fe42
describe
'3122308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
bf5f2ea33e50af066830651748ad19b1
e139e6269d66b2443df71f97c186b1f45e3e30a6
'2011-12-11T06:23:35-05:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3a15d44dc635a3c7f10d1dc2b51d5fbe
253f0ba5fe871a0c40e68d10d93d03e17fd4a7a6
describe
'9516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e6272a183b9987699d6ecfd427f9c00b
d1c9e70b7ed3d7c7683c134135ba4cc5f7addf34
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7bf87f77b5e39bf3bdfa49197daf43e3
c00cf2e9a8f637f05188b4027641d565732255f4
'2011-12-11T06:24:40-05:00'
describe
'89373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
5083504900ecdbb8364ee2d35d682735
4228c4716b410e1dc655bb8da6c454fc8454e0d9
describe
'28574' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ca4ca3228609b9ece66a242d293a48f0
22c0053027a882ebd1f897322fa00b3b107c71b8
describe
'29970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
fae8a90b2cd7a5ea3debbd810d5abd0c
e7023e5620f8d6aed77caf098ea7dd7cee4c3de9
describe
'3121308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
d36b6995d7046dd25ecc23ae42cfb677
7f7f1bb445eef5c4f23808d88baaea586258af6f
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
96a592b2bac8d5af6377b6e35017c85f
4faec6b65d6df7fd20444125afd4a9b64374910f
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
279e1257c16a7c2467e4cacc321de71d
69c377e52c966a7e84491bfcd45195a386aafa8e
describe
'388977' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJER' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
2e06d79b8122fd690f2c85e6575a055f
1ab1c6395158286d3fc710b50729459c0fce4e9e
describe
'122910' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJES' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1e58fc3a01fdade3486ea7e3f9df0862
342f9f2d50606cdb4f69de0f166388ef8129cc60
describe
'20187' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJET' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f05666ae73d60c7509aa5c8dc2122547
2f62f30333b527129f0c4dd5d7a5aaa572159d06
describe
'34229' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
8d68a6f5b647eb3d77403e6b046a2750
3e8692db4d0515ac548a1fc32ec68cb1a05e9970
describe
'3121640' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a479801740f9719b07bd3ee53a77004d
5b8e54014a7a4eca969162dc83e54a3fa6e3ce4b
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
165d58415b8c3efe466ea0004b2a3320
b00c680a4c6847797c152bd2660a95f5ff83dc82
describe
'8355' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
b0fe3c5447d2f7f0ad49ed3b15283dc0
9a90f4d1de276a4c69efd0fdfdaa5411c45af88f
describe
'388981' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a48d07bc0eaff3e256cd480c11de1ff6
56a888f70333de8927830c3bdf06f1f56eed1bd3
describe
'113440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJEZ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
6efc898f65eff1eb65bd22d934737824
0bc9dcab2a7099016a9d3e400456b3482f67d4b2
'2011-12-11T06:26:14-05:00'
describe
'37939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFA' 'sip-files00072.pro'
cda87c3ad8716ab6b6d779e128649afb
04b89adee3c985a6728ff4cf8086e13ff2f83bbb
'2011-12-11T06:26:02-05:00'
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
cf5539ff410a5e77bcbb0f172a175ca3
25b1b79d9f060d9c6c9526771531bcfe2335257b
describe
'3121960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFC' 'sip-files00072.tif'
791f30f238b719d02d5b5373db553b5f
47399f00166084b5040cdde3c80f2fb1e6181b56
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFD' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b3172fb3e1eb1eddf627b9a674f1137a
c5669fbee73b932a7b29f201f066a698a74969c6
describe
'9496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFE' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ab42f88fd586902781f05ce2c2bf185e
a1a5cb45f0ea0d5765ab76f0911f6991d99276ef
describe
'389017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFF' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b14733c0b45f48f2a747ca39f732fb3a
6aa02433e055109b897540261bc665f8d860c1a2
'2011-12-11T06:24:58-05:00'
describe
'85418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFG' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4dd7c2b7aeb585e2827728320c0b5928
581ad3e8e936859d2543439f9a3474a2de7c673b
describe
'27334' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFH' 'sip-files00073.pro'
bb190fc24fbd97ef3e2df38ee88f0c72
cd2d5854230f937b84a3d04615f942d536b40be6
describe
'28464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
beda232fb23834ba5ee43145984f0b0a
b96e1f0b2eea0010d629a151d03fe0dcd87473ba
describe
'3121156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
0a8965c398c1341209c1694e30b8a04f
bea8480592f4d21664b7dd968454b55c0cd42e41
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
c9c9279278c1450fcb4609a2db2b2549
78e96296ef42e7c6e6e0bcf284cbd4fa1baea186
describe
'7334' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b5a129e92a10497431873ac88223dd76
26dcfcdf1e1e7fc8752519e91081b6157751a782
describe
'388900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d4d7371fa792cee47759f2bd4043052c
04f5337a571704c370c229932855fc31475c5d91
describe
'121080' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e96920269dfb1ebf9db8215b74903b90
91354f9e9badd203243cba16174a5f36a4dce4e7
describe
'20417' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3828f6355229fb8a987e22c6e52d72f9
badff6c55b3e131c903a415021d75d13bd530e93
describe
'35324' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFP' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
c0938e7fd2b8d308190253e99c65174a
25f0ba69b5823bc0f18f1986f679132773385f73
describe
'3121660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFQ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
bfda04d79707123f6f2f7c085cbf1157
f811cd421a0666b825613067e2d3f932c82b76fd
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
21855af22823fbd9fd2a140c426ffc08
3307d0d5979a15fb61e09d843c82c99eec7f1be0
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFS' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
81a408b7723d393085debebd864c1711
f41c50527fca75604b3aa89fa878a07afb3f8ad6
describe
'389031' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
d4a9a1257a4508407d26caf9bd5856f2
8d3035403c689fc3127c7880906cf0958a00d88f
describe
'118337' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFU' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
41646dbb076f7d10bb7249a73da7a279
c1beee7ad6456517e10e2c8c0bf4a21a0c756c7b
describe
'38624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e1d6a314f657aeaf59253814a3e1e81b
cc02e0f1b144d2e5205d3a89ecf0ff829091ec0c
describe
'40164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
826ccfb9166e1ae96c40cd658f507ed3
de864dab3b83f3953f0c976586daabb008e1c4e2
describe
'3122292' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b86bf3859a75cf013ae187fb8cd1faf8
da1a98e0bdcce87316c61d0eb1d6110a43e50fe8
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d749c092a6897dfc8f1931261f5933cb
91f9fdf9e52549966d77b977b45cd88fc3b1b98c
describe
'9749' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJFZ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c3e6dfb8197a82dc6e24646ba3aa8d22
77fa4e2ba7783d1cac6e5a91235d3498a9dce83a
describe
'388965' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2d1b9f0781c01be9712942555b7504a6
88a2811487b64899ebeacf5e2ec39acfe66cdbc0
describe
'96754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGB' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5ef9cd6ee17a5129902a8b06950a7ec2
d253a632005e67cdb00857351bd0b161571502b8
describe
'22239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGC' 'sip-files00076.pro'
6772e4aa64860a3aa9b2ece7370fde0f
010954cda0c601af815a77c5703cdc9a711b64cc
describe
'29964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGD' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f332fa7c3c368484b194ebc65da62835
04a81b87c4f2f228a59dfadb8d18d46fab8df4ef
describe
'3121496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGE' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c511422062504f8944d14842f8536ff5
d34ea0112526d2628889b91748b4b400c41aa391
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4896fa777c20e2d56d4ef8715a491784
9d8cb7429b84890b5a8dc1e0b994fb770d2f4a7f
describe
'7683' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
2452e611a158167935fa8a216830b6e4
b88b5d536639a265e8acef13eed57dd17108a875
describe
'388997' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGH' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
7fcc12d74bb2d0594d69d293f467f9e3
fbd5fded8d8aaf8dfed0e1bad23ef8dacdaea9f6
describe
'112097' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGI' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
6ed584d1f0925e03779e3fe25d2ba948
badd084b439b1cbfa6b018db34a089ee7f621a48
describe
'13839' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGJ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
5f31188bec6f9796caf30ef65d28c4d2
601b4840c73be8f2753ede16c23495ca84c13d03
describe
'31587' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGK' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9de9d8e070f93c94ab82d2b785e2e3d7
c1ba14d972e64be1dfb4ccc04166537a3a04dfb7
describe
'3121680' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
e4574097ce6d98e6c68f34d69289fc34
e436606e7db5b5074d4b1f52e55792aac5d3b4d2
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
76938bee3cde47ac6d80e16242545601
de0b1436dff743786df36e9a9081cb5cfe7f449d
describe
Invalid character
'7750' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGN' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
1cc716915960a7ec5ae4d4ff351caad4
2449aff3cd15752c8bf34a090611de080110da3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGO' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6dab6ca5f170693479ebc5daa0e50d25
bd2f45a2ca295b639f9a81ec443d6808e847a35a
describe
'112087' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGP' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
30226cf0c72ea49d63f0706269ebcf38
f9d2f4c2949e0b30b4c8704ea28ad3c18163451d
'2011-12-11T06:24:36-05:00'
describe
'36778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
f7beded8c90457d03ce1e8b9c546c513
fdfc541649b4e559a98d245c06fa87513c72f8f2
describe
'37787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
600cf362ed6c0d555c9fb78cbe93e5fd
6658f8182d26a193f910a5a816dba93a167672a0
describe
'3122164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
2ba1162bb6505da79b9c1a0046f05c82
4ad600b8c29ba8860d7f0e2913ab064b60426e74
'2011-12-11T06:27:00-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9a7c37ce0b0f97a82d00ae46c9c6770f
7e33bd8d77bd03bc9c0f9130c3354ce61cfb0b88
describe
'10143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGU' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
340093d29ec10236fd45f86371fd6404
fd22337a1eebad9ceede561a1e186e5f82e9d46d
'2011-12-11T06:25:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGV' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
07a195263a15531a8b3ea25d0de11329
d8612a2bc84589f219899e5314daff7e493b23bf
describe
'117855' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
bfb7c0f8d62e03f00ceb29826725466e
9b839a36ab603bf53cd3d1ccc83a90656993c0b5
describe
'39845' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGX' 'sip-files00079.pro'
2c738097aa07f165745420114dff5e89
11aa803190ef33a4a74e01ab8f999919dab8b647
describe
'39859' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGY' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cc9feccf07dcbcbbbbef533ceab3461e
568596fbc995fa76fea2583e8fa452830269cfec
describe
'3122236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJGZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
981d190b79cc0ae6417a1268cf1e480f
e445c0e05ef92c044d0bc3fb1bdbfd2d76a702cc
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1b9304faa54d8e45936d39cda7b527f5
41c2c4f3a72cbe6a80653f08e3f39b8b9aa39da4
describe
'9688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
980cb7debd216dbcd1df5ac185d8ea64
a9191f1d04b5af380144a96400144689dde2b63b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
c8559b31795d464c3987ae73da327934
97ddce7a9c89806502e32a01bb6ea8ccd3c71997
describe
'91146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHD' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
4ad9bdbcd03f28e14789ae2b905ffc4e
9a1993289d0f4d1443cc79a1c50055877e20ead6
describe
'22401' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHE' 'sip-files00080.pro'
28736af9ccfabdd69b997cfc2e2916ce
903e76596d707a4e6a52d1d0ab23e48388c5700f
describe
'29080' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHF' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
1c298ec067ef2b0165511119c97e4d49
c1a597d27665aad9c33949d1022cb75bc3006589
describe
'3121264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHG' 'sip-files00080.tif'
dac0a68ef94861f8ef2b5495f4369868
c9799b812c91a3c73e5594c4c4db3cbf6fae0ccb
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ca3ca4da316e296d2660bf00760e65c5
d7d8074e6a434b866dcd975e9ce76c7ca6c78640
describe
'6985' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHI' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
6efff04fb2201bec139eb6e36a1c2681
0609c43dc7dbc2baa5a5199b79df0f4224c67fd6
describe
'388963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c9e1ae6803db40a0a853860ac3bc0a27
9f8a7e1ba4014cebd8bed5cc1eaa75c73e47d80b
describe
'113313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1e859d63f1f60bd4481f940d10004910
f47c43d9a5383db7149ed52efc4c78696e2bb432
describe
'19736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
05ef5ede75076d37067421a221b3f087
0ac6c6634e0bcbf276a0617425e46061837e965a
describe
'33089' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
df180d97fb6f6d5070a2658911e60787
cf1463a93b6bc2e611f0636cc50ab7e873bf4b16
describe
'3121856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
dcbeeaa4c1d87ab2fd7b3dad7515b0cf
9b4ac747d0eef7d12e49c6f5063f2d9f98435aee
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8972d209e140f6a231a2299fa4c74bd5
494c8b9ae901d15b00861fae2a8adac3f29e2eb2
describe
'8393' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
cdc6174a2825986fdfc05ee09b40fccd
197b065da75ed2f5f29ec940ce3d59009be7dbc7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
54074f880c06e9155f271f9f41c6d49e
37da9025ff0ee36bc6811893e9cd70e2cb35788a
describe
'115287' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
73fac1646a95196245f841b04ce8152e
06d16e47b6df173468fe4a82fbccacce1adde31b
describe
'38967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ba8a033bccac8b6621a32d674172e377
27391523af157e95ac96d371de01333c03a57f10
describe
'38443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
1b47c21fef45c42ce881b57e458a1300
169eae60bcfb8903594aecdf55acf1e5048f1680
describe
'3121972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3f236ae28bf6f14ea335d6836a445ce7
d2022d2e315a88695094c17d4f757e1c3273d8b0
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
a893839ec478fbf1ba90ecd6ec434c50
72817558d81cd12cbc54694ce2f7124206997683
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
10fa6b0eb0439753e0ffe02164af89ae
611084c976bb81eae33c0a78b0692e11875146e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9624a6187416be0c12309175cb7e52cb
c51d3307cffac6a9c8eecfb8e3943b4429151a98
describe
'111363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a42a5a25f8ec67e85b06202dbc69e679
c4eb1d8fc4dd14a73147d9b7576320b886bb0628
describe
'37537' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJHZ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
0117c4e25f6ef1937b0b9c3a2fa6d747
c8fed957193eb84af848a4a9a2e1c6d9e4d61305
describe
'36998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIA' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
d17da31fa7c0076249c72163515cd800
c01231359dd323abdb2806521e61301c71ac910c
describe
'3122064' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIB' 'sip-files00083.tif'
35b1fd0cd6d031e2bfcaa8892149eaf1
0f2090704f7a2b9b620ba693dd033608ee711086
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIC' 'sip-files00083.txt'
4884cc69d318e5a1b0f02dcd147b98e2
395937a4910b424e886135665bc351816cc7c826
describe
'9279' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJID' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
23ce38c784881168ace785398f25177c
acd8fb8c816692be40f14da9984b4027eb41489e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIE' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b7dd4078ef7ec56a4b2aefd328fb8af2
56572fb57e3746f3693e7359575f7b0f04249a3f
describe
'89326' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIF' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e59c88ab18a42809ce7dc61dce346c13
b5f711b30863966e8d91022c79b9eaa4c0414b64
describe
'20565' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
85c687592f1ce36d58f2995add23a194
c4d5c646ab6e898be58529e6916560ae5821f2a6
describe
'27181' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIH' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
f12cf89937da092531ffa070c996929e
52c41a51d2489670e5f584bf1302250215a77775
describe
'3121048' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJII' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8cc78ac32df35ace7c6421e47d954a71
3371c40c68cbd2243372e2f04075695ee7f2199d
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIJ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
56814bcb4cdd81bf01d25a35ffcdf5ae
e26f53f8dbe85f6feebe5ad71a56178f56def3fb
describe
'6872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIK' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
22b220e8740ff5b5a54c1796739bf73f
51f316df5f7e5e97f4c7bac14b93bc2c166781b4
describe
'389030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIL' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
53017de4360418a4be5015200c79f7ca
ab0b5e530341e055b54a16f3eb8f817d15beb1f7
describe
'113096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIM' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0b10de1deaf7a5cb54d691a9d7619485
91a74b2d0e68b117de5f41c165170c6d551d9e13
describe
'16260' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIN' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5956f78c67eb8dea8949fb1d07d28ca5
83816adf5805d6935fd1a1dd67454737baf5331c
describe
'32570' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIO' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7abcd2dcb11b1dc8594d591ff0dfa603
d5e6459be769d1bb61405c4776b7994c32b34d92
'2011-12-11T06:23:47-05:00'
describe
'3121580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIP' 'sip-files00085.tif'
694ff66a4323ad6f94af602e7cf72825
62a950c97d048e9c74fa458e7d5ccea86b9c5cf3
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIQ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
067cdfedc2599ed753d3fcf4f00b62e5
515f96d00ffe0d08834f86d1c42f69b0851051cf
describe
'8111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIR' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
44e0f3723064907b1ffead8f43ebd83f
38e12dbce072687d93b1d366679187fa181aa33d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIS' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f4ef1777d68b770b3583f16e723196cf
6a49c6dae61050197b1b4a40c589b9a1409df5d8
describe
'118594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIT' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5bb6cb3390d2bcd6675a414cc8e4a43e
b8665e3f41dbc6bb3d6a5f585658077a4291fa98
describe
'39736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIU' 'sip-files00086.pro'
b417730f058229723209fe895468af3e
f7bbd65acf3ac8f7cd3d2e499d9eefef62b2390d
describe
'39555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIV' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
acced3581a3de04b7104f2e954f9f1fd
6349472df736698b122cd926cedb8581929ea6c1
describe
'3121964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIW' 'sip-files00086.tif'
6e54ff88ef2885fa67ef889bc5019162
b4499908f681032b6b046a9aac48cc274d2ba1c2
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIX' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2289b677be596c4118aa91d2539f6a8e
e1e826369fc9c74d3d2edfad10eaffc71faaf02f
describe
'9553' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIY' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
a704e4a73dc7677a8d7ea52ef430bcfd
5c6f9b813297fb759e25686bfb7ea844f8bf14b1
describe
'388982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJIZ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0e6389024ab4923b956cea0814bcfb81
363cf5551e9201e9305ff0edff732d3922be2eee
describe
'120679' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJA' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a7cceaef052bdf74993cb1013406efe6
1148fe1a851a0e775dc9e181e7a8f97df09a2eba
describe
'40342' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e4b76ab62a39eb462edd97d7791208c3
9b47cf0cf0d153b8b7422a1b1cb8107e2c114dc1
describe
'39773' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
f9147ef1783201b7bd92bd1473276181
6b8b40b7374ecede99e2d1552f9df18a743a3dba
describe
'3121996' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJD' 'sip-files00087.tif'
22ae76d4304309e2e959e85c33135f68
53c9f6401df6cd627b30cb651f08b48d36e00ca6
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJE' 'sip-files00087.txt'
950bd90bc65db9d3d5fd4fc7dafb8a66
f6871935cc7166ad7d3df0a86f82c031834d9304
describe
'9633' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJF' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2036050f6700fe1a7b029f025357d26d
e8b016d2b52fd42ed84bb880d694e518c0659675
describe
'388966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
39dd9cbd657d87027620b15cc8c81b49
0d22d63ce9902058488425cc91d1cec906aefcb2
describe
'52712' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJH' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b578bbd06a9885066bf4c212f362874f
024ebdbc97b0f72efaf96335180d4c5e9015439d
describe
'7112' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJI' 'sip-files00088.pro'
2d0cf6612b6a226a3a3e7e0c40ee171c
bef7460425b7fd5fc7460536f338ab33bf4346f6
describe
'15061' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1b61f2f6e253e19bccf883a43300e5fe
4b30a2706a234ae1823a2f7ef0d2a82ff0a65549
describe
'3119980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
852a647df1275959b3924611bf2a15f3
b34b494c64a60529c9a7a17be9ad855b5fba7136
describe
'311' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
6a30cd8d8e4635b59a7c9e37b4978c32
5955936609645e8bc6751af2f80d63264e1748b8
describe
'3819' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJM' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
ef08b08906be76473cf2ad38479d886e
f642f57d032c87ece106efe09eafc403eba612d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
49154426d7cd6776f9cea707abf52cec
de6cf95aae6a9d37e882449c520a3797e97283f7
describe
'123093' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJO' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
58a835d212b7244ad155eef2e3ce8bcf
fbec9be08d105897e3a012122a86785a5a12d058
describe
'20700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJP' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a89d0b2b29f8aff532aec5ba387a7764
c73f0a99b171a1f1d807c69bb4357c1b09a3650c
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJQ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
59a50e6d4e85c57bbcdcf14adec05549
7c2f384536bd3202fc1fb7b5c50db2da06347c2a
describe
'3121668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7ea7fb66d5b55726486c648c6970563b
9096341b64ce632d76415036b544530f21923374
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
f750af1afd9960460ac9b958929ff10d
a533904f9a7100c6f148f62b9ce69db681548b5b
describe
'8688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
09fb39d7510cd03d9fb484c77f5809a1
4cb684429fa15f4f2990e183dba7815fb69eb956
describe
'388973' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJU' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
cb1468f503b2374d527b637928563df6
e1960d6fec12acf30a514646545d6a44e55723c7
'2011-12-11T06:24:50-05:00'
describe
'108688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJV' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
77060c8878e0f55f9954019e89d13592
ca75f5c8d9ec25a2752d5664cf38a935f9f5e575
'2011-12-11T06:24:45-05:00'
describe
'36795' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJW' 'sip-files00090.pro'
1ca05066bf91c3616d82c250f1ee659d
c0eb8457500470eda594260e4b02ebbb55b39489
describe
'36212' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJX' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e90aba22c661c5792375e128ffa972f8
a774f694144859840712f763ad6449602dad0fd9
describe
'3121864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a6d6e0d6265821bfbaeb1d81fdcfb265
f4c25b49fa1bfe203de4a29da050ff2b6d601d8d
'2011-12-11T06:25:40-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJJZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
97c285a883b213591e538726c092380a
04e9c7dba5ae32887c04c789649353b2aefc55bc
describe
'9175' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKA' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
a0bb9ea160e79f49361b8ebc41bff18d
e9f97ac2d3ae727bb9f1dc7706cb1184f52e0739
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKB' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
99cb3f026d415503da35600908a8b3d0
f14dc7a7368ab815b0de1d43e4dfb89f7846682a
describe
'89446' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKC' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
881da5104194dab1fccc9a7087df494c
c4f43d117a6f8bcb92803376d29379b10a3919ea
'2011-12-11T06:26:47-05:00'
describe
'26928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKD' 'sip-files00091.pro'
fdd3f5b072f391aba813bed0c7c8c6b9
0dcf075be849c3044786d7f9e485cf1842b1572d
describe
'29541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKE' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7e2ba5b14a7799addea103a9191af9b2
71d35c2503f1f55736acfe7906ade0a66bcb1e4f
describe
'3121472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
72e55919a02eb37f2f92b67eb403831d
78bc531846610fce677caeee3e0e9020e2426856
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
17862f7a7ad8ff0ee584ca476f63ada0
daf387fef96874aaac0c69d997ae55624553b0ef
describe
'7588' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKH' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
558e7858fb80920b99cd0e7f83e49a26
3658ec83c1c2f0b2d488e1cb92870ecfa8e8c6e7
describe
'389040' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKI' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4291194010c8cf76b6fd360158598a05
363d59e90e863c1c1faa0748922843f4fb9003d8
describe
'128419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f9e868db788f563c4bddc8f65f218052
bde4d41f9460365c6841c9ee66b20637f0f84b1d
describe
'18677' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKK' 'sip-files00092.pro'
036ff2e3d6c86170c946c5f3db84e5d4
5735dc5a0777164ea1ca81d6a333db2e02ad0cf2
describe
'36384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d141fd59d6f0ff1b7b7985a7a7d62624
8b2ed79d6a567bb29ecbccbe7e91816a1aaca6ca
describe
'3121948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKM' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b8751324583975d7dc75bf760a1a0158
668bbb8e2d944cb096e5472acaaa4e8b91187a0e
describe
'745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKN' 'sip-files00092.txt'
fe12808b1ed5f283223f43239acd2c00
eccf098bb1644a9beee0f937ac58a0bac03dbd06
'2011-12-11T06:27:03-05:00'
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
01529b749024acde7ad0b0073b66ddd2
9d1ae74454ff4c0dc3bbe965c7a4625b39dd6f49
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKP' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9350e11c22d2590cdb07ca4a15adc5d7
2c5cbdfb617c3290d704b349dd577a4bcd80bdae
describe
'115941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKQ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f35d07529c1d63ec3111ffbc3a3639d2
81f80526f0d2ccb7a638e2259666f190ea83962b
describe
'38986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
7af0020ca3a20d8dcf2cb49e31ce8438
9ad6b71a709d96ae780c5e4c2eed4f0a20503833
describe
'39167' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKS' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
89e2e570a52f4bd5fc7969f60b920402
e3e3cd3a2aaf7ade201f8357789aeb09de2daaf4
describe
'3122008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKT' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e3554fa027c85b806c8a86ba680f6389
a945733799456067f3e9145f4ccaccf0af99c8c6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
9da35df582a4487f7c14c67fc5debdef
9e3f85cb744429da8024a5f83c778e5398dc05da
'2011-12-11T06:27:13-05:00'
describe
'9369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKV' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
2e970035e4c53147da8563012eedb1a3
2d8abab5979740f51e20b3c53759d68bb0374cad
describe
'389289' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
188c278bd364e35c497d837e3f58dced
49af221d89bd64eb36fabfead7a5d773e63848d3
'2011-12-11T06:23:18-05:00'
describe
'92107' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5528a79579eac9deb5fc58cdd653ac44
1004e706e6ee725d958c3b4749759dd825162493
describe
'23827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKY' 'sip-files00094.pro'
6051f028e895037719dc2c5d85c7c3e9
0a4501adf3aa6b692f43b44461b75ba68b8b273b
describe
'28014' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJKZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
dcaf0674091ea98a869299326211c95a
a099e705f696c06f744a24570cf90231193ccf19
describe
'3123096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLA' 'sip-files00094.tif'
45f604aebef5a7bc4f06e3078e31b3cd
90c44951afd358e5a16881fe6d549a974a907505
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLB' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5a0c143eda8672cd5e1e48f70677fa4f
ac27e8af2360e5ed9e250f15deff0b699605deee
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
71774bb64049cc51891a6b12f716853e
62a34c1db32db5ba4cbfde1594508ee1da555f37
describe
'389157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLD' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
74204aca420b2580a1072b866cd5c712
45a9830422e9136cdd6c5b711a7d0cb5e9e2ad5f
describe
'112734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLE' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
51b07902e8abdb74d3e1bd9a311f4047
5ccdfd9a765d4e12bcfcb39ac993379846bfe4a1
describe
'15812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
cf282b476c4917ba47182f8173a2014f
edff1c7c642c29d3411ab22f3859362bfd6536a4
describe
'32331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
bb772d431d26edb9487661a0f66fbea4
1a45041d5305f7517ed59f1f9745d8e8c9033a16
describe
'3123064' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e83bb0b2e8f3837feee4f817d6a90806
e4071cf6f491756f0a8a6953166c26c1ea2e1651
describe
'681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
ef4651b510456884bf40ef07e13cbb2a
8ed7c001e9d74b9a41f3eb650bdd2d353b24a614
describe
'7888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
42d1976fe6ff07cda4ac230a66303825
f264f976536589cb69728369652abba277e3be52
describe
'374658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f91f0a10ccbe252ba5df7e3e1e747ead
69be0057a4ba43d4a53e1d98cf36fa3861c2184a
describe
'137219' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
3b3b25c48fe0278cddf9e442f8552da5
1f3d4a08899d1b39da060b3ff75c65ea6e091ad8
describe
'39548' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e8ee05be37babd4d964735d88a9d339f
d3a680ab152b1aba97c7d8622c2a0e9489e5ceb6
describe
'44854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
fc63972925a523a74dc5ca6642521b48
689c80afba98b6af841fc60d861e1a81b5bfc982
describe
'3007832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
49c00c25667a6cba51fd2517e535f667
d3ba98fe0a8ddab0c7e7c800493ee21060c012fa
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
fe3d2d0129d748c915416f2287fc669e
bd497cae284620ed65b390d0abcb2ef28afff193
describe
'11116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
91b77e2c5c26f2c97a90263772981e1a
dc7690253664206ec0a2136d4558c00ef372565b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c80fdd68823cd2e14052df81158770ee
e1d4b62985a1af394c236c4b11e95c29136be016
describe
'111762' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
900298f0e9538d745cbfcbbcbe307b03
bac41a0592918b4ae93537a04c7e9f96f4d6ddf1
describe
'31481' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
f52c192df7bfb7df33020550e4f80239
18c5d546067d9f3baae552f6992c00610b776cf7
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
ba2a6cfc1dfebd1efedf0349369b3109
09b069882d99a651eb40082d4ddc07d0aa4f2dd5
describe
'3007320' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
1e8a95aa2810009670de99c7ff54c2c3
ca6011bfaa191bc70d3daa640ae00e878be3d1ec
'2011-12-11T06:24:12-05:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLW' 'sip-files00097.txt'
e84ca78ab9efa8e9acdddd33653de246
dd8b99b9f04ad4947d6003bc2db600cb5136d7b0
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLX' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
497f70ecae617df7e5eb357536831656
e9f55c5c221697b12bb6e0dd3d54f5cc5ec15339
describe
'374692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
46485fa756bc83035eb62ca6364ad589
45916358b15fae64098458f557ebf62e43625dbd
describe
'128014' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJLZ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
bd4553e4169a388dd33031f5fe844641
e831b38f59b165a1de72996ace91ee86112b9161
describe
'17797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMA' 'sip-files00098.pro'
1677ca6dc2a4f72d50f420db36dec7d3
ed0cea0f5581ba2562c8188c22cc8c6f650ab293
describe
'36428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7a04bc020283d769fbe535b4d7eb4943
13cbfc8411f864f1dd656c976818897abed18376
describe
'3007164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMC' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2c1457721fc7fa2044ee4c7fa78cb538
f8fd8154422bc89e19b20a7edeb23c23430177a3
'2011-12-11T06:23:36-05:00'
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMD' 'sip-files00098.txt'
43a1558bcd2caeee1399108e105ceb6f
c741525e5a778272a953149d9b044f4f820601dd
describe
'9082' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJME' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0f99a2cfe1b7c71d386897e8b80e495d
c5d3408d092d41942876ab63d71a4cace164c779
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMF' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
8db34a59107fc30ab96cd4a66bc68b21
d6459aac06debfa08a675fbb0c31a933c8359918
describe
'112683' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0bec6ac71f55a466788aee063b3dd3f0
3267187114108e855b9422dad7a812ffe3655b2a
describe
'35098' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMH' 'sip-files00099.pro'
fc5c96cad6b05ec07440c31a2bc9fba1
5f4e1bbc9299f877710f66db52225007133240f8
describe
'39282' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
51eb51b76a269b6fe27fe9868f6d9baa
5d8ea1e1998474973233d72ce315d5be22cf838c
describe
'3007568' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
db3ebe8e135590dfebed15e3e1f9b582
140a106d44be1391371e867b44b1396b4ebaf279
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
77153bb4a4c447a99de388600d78f170
08228bba4f208a3fdea7de8236027b61c285c409
describe
'10316' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJML' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
6d881b8fdad92a59dcc77f59dabed831
85a03c5862f269d317b7fc3e7337da8943262a7d
describe
'374730' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
05ca13cbee453a0ffbec6a006e4b4893
7b6cee30f151705bc1e8062bdaf0292acd9e997f
describe
'116643' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
946ffc67b3ce62dee0073cb2bbb7b881
b83142d9c9c3e55fee9ddad8ca24db06b7d2393c
describe
'36713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
008d2ac5b7b22c6f8c7e67220e76511a
fd48591b86ef270599f981896cd35dfe725dd288
describe
'39970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3328730808d8a26f6138cccb3d322d25
95184641f8cf17ff89ff2b4a247139ad2dd50701
describe
'3007424' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMQ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
be1e63cf4d1b8ea7394b6e56e630468b
3f0443704acda3c303e1c8dbdca03925aae97759
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMR' 'sip-files00100.txt'
a97d092708ea393039afbdf09aef29a1
d0706d8d9748b48c91ebf4b2eaa6af066c970ace
describe
'10140' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMS' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
8e0b84e0404fe8b3dd69ece2d971e8f6
dcbf7b8edb6c2728f3a1d70b964ff04e676d22bf
describe
'374709' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
36ec44200b444c16b0371d91ee00acb9
3df45f73c958b464ebbe84678bd4e7759c4c30f3
describe
'104086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMU' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
bd14abb5b297e9eef3ef17643ee2f8de
ac7e6ef93baa4846d1aa7497d53b5559fa5e11e6
describe
'25401' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMV' 'sip-files00101.pro'
f9eb7aef545d2748582ad64bac4bebb0
43ba2bb02df5fd043165ff1306b6fcc271a19396
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
a2bcd5505627a3ad31b42064354cf111
b55111a4e46dccfd63c82e981b98e9aa27022750
describe
'3007124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
1cee0b259f9eb23acfc6b0bfdd4f6f7e
63e24866117a119463bdc9f6148407c183180732
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
dbff2154e00658ab1bfec1b6ec747675
43126106850d0885cefff977de5058821526c3ff
describe
'8653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJMZ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
04fd7984bc265688e732200a0f55e121
07617b1164059f38adee08c5a9e0e3552eb8a507
describe
'374721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
b91a2425cb952f102f1e4903ef7c572a
1f1ce75dbd72f4e1ee226c849701f36901982039
describe
'127315' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNB' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
c1a8ec036b62b93b2c2b1123eeed7018
f7c8240f4f3de26e10f13aade64abe98a1d76cc1
describe
'18829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNC' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1d8636e6bbc980cd9d6c12b3da451456
6bc355628dbf1f633daf3fc6670eef279878b35c
describe
'36516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJND' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
df21635f359e3be1ead1c89d38f310fc
097c51a487fecc895355e496451c2ce60ac6f8d9
describe
'3007228' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
3a010610b1ea3d3d1c6afb54546f9b88
ca318b5a775a8872d18b271f5340dc3ee7aee28c
'2011-12-11T06:25:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
3236f39ad8cc493b9fbffe65a4d9daa2
7740b1de937e7d3a4058e9f7480ba81e11931f82
describe
Invalid character
'8981' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
890cf1a0f6bd42b4b6a3348401f87cb7
48208f32e2310315284ae6d9cb209f2802586186
describe
'374657' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
be1980ee7a5f9b5bcc6ae1473cb6e013
10afd53f196e9f2a63e57c34fadecf97a76bd1fc
describe
'118478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
c1ce9c536ebd2ee25832facbcaf3a2e4
ff4269835410602d492accd41d3f68d52a293175
describe
'37043' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNJ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
5ba69d5cc1cd4d6d6ae09829c98131c6
c5f56d81942fc7aee7daeaead3dd0933bb2f82e6
describe
'39844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
3f8ef0541671a09fdbde6e652f816177
319602fc06252a593db0606824048ba74b81f475
describe
'3007452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a1140f1cb98c2e20a499337fcbbdb2d6
0d643bb720430b99ff170fac31a7e3fd9904c9e6
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
c104828dc47bbcf417e2a17c5543d158
f0874fe9ccbca1eaaa0d4adf7c739143e1e49728
describe
'10160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
1461a0270ba43e244bb4939d30794bd5
bc5200a2a6240aa1a3e428cd411a9266c88e1ece
describe
'374686' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
a10afac082fdb3d298f9b181bca15194
95577bc7f7d2763b907a9040e3e0c0d03a1f1bb4
describe
'101539' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
65909a1e2c2aa319441bbc5a0e10269b
30d3b4f07c8992974a8fc2ea1efb28a40eeaabe3
describe
'23211' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
95e5193c6354038791b50063a59ae607
eaaaec0b98d293bd0fc96c315cea0531b70b4c6d
describe
'32159' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
1b52758ff25301ecdf9b43d013890fe9
40db73e5a06d30eacdebe13190ab30c26e14f66e
describe
'3006940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
fd97f34428fb552d33e2e341f9d4d1df
d285b1a640afa10d793db0fe34ece132e090ce4f
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
af88565170dfcef5b565ebf24b63fd72
a0c57d49d44577e3123eadc8465229b17e0ae815
describe
Invalid character
'8207' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2d60a62c069d1ad54899f4e8b663ac07
c0b5e72b3ab4967a3f3715c52f2df40898f6341b
describe
'374990' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
77c2ec2432cfcca27a0b9bc4cf85d40c
ff48c43b37d831d2aacaaf1fb7a556fa226c3467
describe
'124526' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b591b3ca52d6c9f559e80f2b32100389
479209a0fd7e44a16e7c0b6a197f2e7340ed0bec
describe
'17545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d8ba17b4483130a3b455c35ec7fdb635
dbcd77d0ae57cade5af20adba3cbe7139d84096a
describe
'34777' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
f37453a137977a21d54969b2133c4dcb
ebb6bb2a58e4c54a6462b1d07e0ec876b1fd2a6a
describe
'3009248' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJNZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c1b2917132a028706096fc719bc57b28
4ca3bc45727a5798505405ac9538dc871c6df9cc
describe
'732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOA' 'sip-files00105.txt'
466a584b38499457975e6f26a283284a
15f493074fb711da4772a4923d1f7562435b01e1
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOB' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
224f8d210668d0ade4d745ec35e45870
00c104ca833f33449ed8c26da94aada1142ebb28
describe
'374984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOC' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
695717e1dbe9f467f909116cd34c4c46
240f5e3a87f042a374c6a77e659cf32bdd0b8675
describe
'117330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOD' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0c5e32749fab188d17e7faa3662aaea6
db68e789937f0272c5c12a7104854ae9cc5bdbdb
describe
'37170' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOE' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0630ffcdad21162505fa897debb7ad75
9a84f2a5c20884a6af9b1693c8fb65f3dad8482c
describe
'39630' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOF' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
b2fd8c91f3476d1c70487da20d3b87cd
376c1775e023a1d912c6eaea99b4b976dc893f2f
describe
'3009456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOG' 'sip-files00106.tif'
68a059a5c0cb563563a4c847ff8f93f7
28f7629db72b30010dbda890e5f3c594232c695b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
c3471e000549cb553624573eb5efa168
506a2c5fc31b275c0795f92d7c3333d09684ad9b
describe
'10132' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOI' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
f620c626378d7ee7d5cc03f9eaa187bb
f4823bdd113fe6bb5f3717b27c4d4f0def061230
describe
'374967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
dc3284acfa07042016a514251349d55b
ffb464e3fe2d05281345a8d925e655f484ffebae
describe
'136011' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
7d9de5d9a7cb121ab20401f08d42bcec
a9d4d6278a279edaea1f14d6a0102bc7d4365383
describe
'38684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOL' 'sip-files00107.pro'
748cb0ed8653fd0ee99d35b214d54710
1b783b3dbee81d2ff56f9641710ba20ba2dccbf4
describe
'44216' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOM' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
d27f7fbe2a377f9f5b2d15c5da66d658
2ce092b2c28381277ea713cca4cbe298916f2493
describe
'3009784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJON' 'sip-files00107.tif'
2b07c83a212372da586b5c97c0cbf698
1d384e491bdb919ddc064ec73632986e584e91e8
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOO' 'sip-files00107.txt'
81cecfb15819f157a2cec00511b8383f
0c0c65f82e80e3f7f4358575231db2a001e90a93
describe
'11038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOP' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
58392a6e1335a158b10c36c23ca8c1af
2ecfa2bb332ba22fb94a6927f60b45d971a358a5
describe
'374930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOQ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
929464c6fa60302ab12bd5f8a3c5c1d7
4f8a61230b68331a6219b3fd72c190a29d2bb530
describe
'81969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOR' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
5ce4c347c82bdb9db4df82f7cf4d77e4
b16e1f9b07e3b10f04b13e3e71cf1809915d3012
describe
'10434' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOS' 'sip-files00108.pro'
da27c0a8b1890d573b7d95a572205858
8ac0e8829ffe5a7c2bc51477faf65b383205a1af
describe
'22136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOT' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
53430cf9819d5d1af31cb84c703131e9
4d74af1bfdc8fb09f9eb23615c4991a95d76ff06
describe
'3008000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
247399d3b8e18404ad51300e667fe7f6
8c5380df9bf8d883c2af781f0f5f2fcf1d2e2770
describe
'443' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOV' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8d43aec374462bb1f7b89374f23c6589
504054dafaf50ccf81a3e47429e5c559d3bddbc0
describe
'5676' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
cfbbc0f53cb35bf0a2ea4022e431df64
df302fc13ff17fd9f94bf727fc50f9f1f4b6496b
'2011-12-11T06:25:42-05:00'
describe
'374694' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ebddaeba4589046f8a508a3f84dc0b8c
7cb8c1bf99e9b6947d33e3d92d66fdedaae81fdf
describe
'118958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOY' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
224b66858d5956489e8c8b28a3104cd1
d0d9746c87a15c65300ca5c0c77d7f88dd44b5ac
describe
'20222' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJOZ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
97e1c86ac163be97c677301569a5726c
93881342f2ac328f614337d59cc49ebf85aea04e
describe
'34820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPA' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
67ebb3badf3f39c42b5a57960dace4a6
7391ead9bfd6c8863f41fa84f17aeaaf351d0eae
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPB' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8a71802706bdc4d4b68ddc636b925276
e47789863a0ac7fa9033d50ab12a5834756b44f0
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
17de4c011eda8acc6b94456ef2432669
6abff87170f8659f7607c914468d53e53d63b3fb
describe
Invalid character
'8816' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPD' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ef20ab7da9618c97c80cce2c2b08179f
9387e44bfb13627e0d4d53cf38cd97fc898ebd32
describe
'374996' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPE' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d6a82d465cb7f1bd18947b2f7dc6ea45
c4ff1e8b388849f2158ac368461cab1aa772e9bf
describe
'122906' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPF' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
76ff19639ec5b34b0b6d2b12106f21cd
c438303a4a1b21bd04640fc125e03577099a3d54
describe
'39296' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
c91c55f026382199706dcc56af70c07f
daec45d677fb447881cfc2516be5d19c82d58714
describe
'42047' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPH' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6f87449b8d0036b0ad11a83f1c8cfdcd
d36e260d9c2115c797c0798c11547fb5a2419bc6
describe
'3009668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPI' 'sip-files00110.tif'
73e97648bd274b3c7f99832a273d8299
cae44b26785e026c6e616ac606d60d7397bd2dec
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPJ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
c3bd8877f49d844ec912af62caa3abe8
7d318851649d74d424bae320866bcea4dac1af91
describe
'10331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPK' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9355d5feb110661b070b8d627517f97b
225dddeb2a274b1a704b3f3e14143994fe6654b6
'2011-12-11T06:23:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
ae02ae69c845584e43721a9b2652a3bd
158bbc031e927b1999542d14cc85b2938c4337a7
describe
'123963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPM' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
42eeec3170f2cdf84b4e49162b531c0a
b023813f4a661be46660fd3d7e4ac43e4a2672ac
describe
'39164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e3042034a649f7f104da77f36d42ab05
d4bb32d17b1f66a8acae89977d759590095b52ff
describe
'41469' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPO' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d1345425d9d18a073b0a692f1c0b1638
af9d40df9c93382b4abe6c8cc96a54476a6499da
describe
'3007504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPP' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9065ff9291555a47c5029c5f5e0bdce4
44b6405584ad840e638cc977ab251a26a65f02e8
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPQ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c361d521986e5457e8a46a323ac118a3
1141b9677264691ab53825455e69d702af35d52c
describe
'10373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPR' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
b33abe96285832273198b183cc49f848
f9c3cf0c065017f8303ecdfb6ba7d026698e3d19
describe
'374920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPS' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
963ee6473e98e5a124c744bc7f8d7375
67a9b7a8aa7862834b3f3a25fa39b728de25fc0b
describe
'63519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPT' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3b5336c59362e5f43faab483b46e84ed
8a512f52d29cad317ca1663a50a50c6221d67a8b
describe
'10755' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPU' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8509317ed3ec74f2347d2b9ef6000878
b7f690ab1813393fe71aef9eeeb42487e3f31e48
describe
'18792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPV' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
b83547fb9a29a48a5d3302e679d4087d
1014ef8cc3504a399a16055d417e445701459e98
describe
'3007856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPW' 'sip-files00112.tif'
374f30495681e5eb07077ec657d09127
f771b033726a5881756b895f5c25f7d95006025a
describe
'462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPX' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b16e964f840f4b7be95c100f39da985a
13ea6f57200d4deb49995c817bda93d18a0eade9
describe
'5017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
29ce7c0a4f3b01da48bfb93ec063ccb1
4f3c7a31f4d8bfcd5d4ef398e8f775d8ac5b5caa
describe
'374727' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJPZ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b4ef76ada48316792c661e92dc4c77f7
5e7751207a33e85902927c0a2dc5391be5eda606
describe
'130476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
16df6b4e3150f5c921bbf3ef9112a312
fa8d7e43fb00564562220a3f69249a9037a38312
describe
'21760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQB' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e5fee1fef4bad6f90e11178da15a63b7
57c2b63f4840af2736e91a9301736a6ce9b58398
describe
'38369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0f3035984a01ec1056294250aee1eba9
2a4be4fb41c1cfdf3dd0357c9de52b14c3638242
describe
'3007428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQD' 'sip-files00113.tif'
4044b32d7c1f7837a193641ec14a301a
d0076342d5b736f7f0c4ea27199aff554f891d2a
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQE' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9db4a028d5b68c1d1f3c9490cee11258
6656ec5085c08b38039aad115558acbc837710b2
describe
'9415' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQF' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f96e85fac6dd15ca87c524befd61916d
0d625fb04d692c8a40993c9970d1f502ea41652a
describe
'374723' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQG' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
02b3e57a123b916b354fe991b00565f8
def4ed71c2e2fe5ae1873f3eeaca51819dfb5eca
describe
'123836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQH' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7ba4ad7b56652ad615937a53539365a3
d279a98b090ecef93688358f6bf70ad09c50ee99
describe
'39732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQI' 'sip-files00114.pro'
6df73630fd889d5c7ef3ac48a60ce47a
1ce0df882326ff2aec4eefcd2fba2c781eb3cff3
describe
'41992' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQJ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
da3792740f5410a7f316450f4ca37066
c118a2e71f6e29079120ec5de8dbcd1704434c02
describe
'3007384' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQK' 'sip-files00114.tif'
aa1ee567140e525cffb9506d5eb12341
aef9c2bb1bff36149f773a9cbb06665022534146
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQL' 'sip-files00114.txt'
101a2c851b5e6e59237636a08e416143
c0594f21990aad4a68760106aef06056deb15fff
describe
'10329' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQM' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
372a1bd740c53e41e8467c4fcdbc59b9
4197ca8d63fd096fc9098bfeb8b4cde9b29e84d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
14c6e5a444351a4a148db5a7acb46a13
e7a190328588de2137289ac859558b1130dc2a14
describe
'113338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQO' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
29dbc6173115fe910b82e330ef73bb62
d54baa1fe0204898a3bb223c05aebd8323d241eb
describe
'35460' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQP' 'sip-files00115.pro'
f9c1bb9b1f9565c05e381ab52b8716c1
0c290dff08a874345362c84738db452d5fdcff4d
describe
'38156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQQ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c69b92c13c1be1d6e2317c8751c797ef
599ae4107f0ff4748dc479bce2c147bf187049be
describe
'3007360' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
381177bcff24444440effdbe62447e47
895931bc2838afbf5931bbd832932c33a404782c
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
fc79c354473dc0ba608e71921aa7b0de
355d1fbbe6a69f6dfa2e0cf1a987b55bd9383103
describe
'9802' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQT' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
62f1232c1fe71b3409ae2b3f7b26ad96
339719628a20a00e087dcb07623f495db9af54fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQU' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
7f40f08fe0181f9352e3721e704fbf77
c7ff8f70d959dc547fae61e8acde69381ef448b0
describe
'66709' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQV' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
28aa00dce4a13e3a1ca7ff920c6267c3
9c9dde487eff1a3e431d3485cfc8629555d49d26
describe
'11874' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQW' 'sip-files00116.pro'
93d30b0b126107365fb83795e1dc0066
a4d4c998f35bf459fca74f2bbbe4288c414820a9
describe
'19837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQX' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
1e9afd7026007fd011662a9613cfcbd7
5aa55a5d64947e6202623d525b53da7e9184ee99
describe
'3005732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQY' 'sip-files00116.tif'
431392926f0be5c0c8d155e182a0b4d9
e814ec10c13610d79c62d244f5fc75765a145c4e
describe
'498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJQZ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
80d1826f0a8c13c7ec0f8ec2f5665f95
b6ad4ce7b411a38b0bb27e0ce86bb335c6772195
describe
'4966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRA' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
3b0337b040cb185489b872cbe030c9f6
1d4b78f64ae3c47338670a29394fd5cdf4c58410
describe
'374690' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRB' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a9018974fc8974becaa8603283556874
a86fb49436f16fb87addd072004f45cb60180ac2
describe
'120330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRC' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d4fda1e2d9522e16911f4777c499c739
c4c664cd96bdc8729b7281c1854671e03fa0bded
describe
'20305' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRD' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ea9605d283bcb9d56cc855c3200eaa88
52cfc032e626fa8213df6a4d64330af331080f46
describe
'35059' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRE' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f857ccd2cc0fdbafff6271fa8245aa52
e6e7b080153c2399ae39c1fb6be7dd33815b122f
'2011-12-11T06:26:36-05:00'
describe
'3007136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRF' 'sip-files00117.tif'
4bbfbcf7cfb68fe30005c9531be52f4a
32e1fdffc4b722aa451288378e957871f3b2b145
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRG' 'sip-files00117.txt'
489502b454c6ca75028e7b8f43a4943b
761ae30a752ab7761d4b147c79ee0120c486fe44
describe
'8742' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRH' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
3598c4e92bf054dd64c9033a5d9e654a
d6b1f03b51a84cbf4f15af269fd5872041312127
describe
'374710' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5118eb02c0be9e357d616fa10774aa16
ead2a810e3483fa5622323a7cb1744d19f1e6ac6
describe
'128765' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRJ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
89cbd05a779ff1f1f4d8b9b519675dfc
056b48d14eb0be9e6b39f612a4a7ae0f6c3cbf25
describe
'40220' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRK' 'sip-files00118.pro'
4ba63181230d3d728cd2ad190c59a109
206c64a71ef25a3232d1255622eb4f1fe078c2f3
describe
'42883' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRL' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a025fd26f15c5219c593f4471aa8a40e
13a3ef18a6fb3efe2ba45c9ee939d4209f5d62be
describe
'3007488' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRM' 'sip-files00118.tif'
07d49328896ea2277722fced0f8ddf1c
121d2dbf6c5bada762015c32d9cacce9df968fe7
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRN' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3e3657adc60fcc036f444548bfb58628
af856120accaa04121ed650df5f9d046d91570a7
describe
'10371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
24bb9b65b95f237435b03645e23b430a
6965cd6961b47975bd44a17c8d20abf68c47d420
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRP' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
b3421e12c125ab617cee0c784435f40d
bc5b4a8643c96af40a01c5d8b52a119528ba5877
describe
'125191' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRQ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
fa7f8b30d255dcc1bcf7e39957d3de3d
ab8a238c2184c655f1ff039474b20c9535c6557d
describe
'39730' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRR' 'sip-files00119.pro'
4457d64d8bd7cc0141deae0e4e074f13
dca784276fa267b3e66a0fe6681e4ff3c96c7fdb
describe
'42972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRS' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
ea610a0391f306e3ba0f0624e426614d
47b8faa42d1e971388f526997ae2fb11edd09945
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRT' 'sip-files00119.tif'
769e4253466d310360bb86dfc46c9576
3e88b4cfebb0231265d0bb75375367b694a51d6f
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
fa719595aed53cea6b885f6922f44bdb
3f295dc31b38148ae8cf4e297acd64b8eaefe0dc
describe
'10273' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRV' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
1653278c445ee20d67d2f6f2f8b24004
cf98ab0f6e0f41bbae15ed8077619d38870c68e9
describe
'374394' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRW' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
d32a3e1b76d670e0ae187f815082bcc1
0523efe79d95e2c6a52271b9d3eefecd9ec7bcc8
describe
'66117' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
3e972855b0de0c96adca52c9e60b9c88
4a8c8f3cc8a705dd1003a09668593341f34d1c43
describe
'9038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRY' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ecc20517ea887ec97ca0be3c0a800702
3d0c54179f4c945f95b1fc793b427099ce696078
describe
'19449' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJRZ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c9322c135f263282bfa08bb885b2c55b
5d83d4df9f30f228c26e354af949614f00ea6bab
describe
'3005828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSA' 'sip-files00120.tif'
c139e87b6705662f348652d69b877b05
85be00df1e0991a8dba17f7474abd3feae9ca939
describe
'393' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSB' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8acc7d20ac31a82064c0f6da37c7da0f
971760ee663a82cc3fa63411ddbacffbe66051a6
describe
'5067' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSC' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
24bb46397f2ae4d5a99ccd9ce250e96d
a85c9a995a3c4ca5974e4525d04c53e5eaebd321
describe
'374682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSD' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
1dbf1b9efcd9dd02c85abfcf85bd3113
98db542567cf5269fd42be42d9a07d6d6b79b882
describe
'123810' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSE' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
bde1a57657ec608fcb3e5628373593bf
ba67252a17032ad6b247f4f3b2786bef02311768
describe
'16719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSF' 'sip-files00121.pro'
2abd5b478ecebd1ee338fcb3e4ac8c2e
9b297e0f7f1c63a197916cbd07785b1579de5a2e
describe
'35350' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSG' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a049a2773ba1cbd9e8bee9a4f2ce804c
ebff2b0845a15033567197e11d62c50a58554c20
describe
'3007168' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
bbf557c263ee08a52bb3cb75d7b417f4
16b272e8a6d0951479ec3b28d8044aee191152d7
describe
'708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSI' 'sip-files00121.txt'
b925ad26338253739b4f63a6d598ea2a
b75ee21d0a49f6e38d1abb039069d75de1e05f9a
describe
'9047' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSJ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
fa0e57d9fe0d16af9bcadbcb9817d5c2
8087e20d7c5283f77df5620c02ae9cb234155b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSK' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5634aa4df9a5e4c879d7574f97199158
bc73809f5a6a51baecbaf5549f4c428db4c725e6
describe
'121766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSL' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6122ac0daa5f77ab72e08e4c42b5b2b1
2618c0979a67abec5820aca99ba4f1fdfc50cbb4
describe
'38940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSM' 'sip-files00122.pro'
23dc5b6aae956f27dc7daca475431298
99bd1ddf4192e2eb676cc71fa8739132b8360ac3
describe
'41072' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSN' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
39d6b0580b8a2d5246436b3f83b12d81
bac7fa16a81989832f1206c13b518555638cfd76
describe
'3007540' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSO' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f3a0df7ea0f06c3b8582281c886cda27
6067adfd2ca1023a9acc45fbdad0cafe3f13f944
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSP' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2cd2b4502da57b09eb0944f1cad6573b
f149b41857608d403395e55db3c38109a4765cef
describe
'10076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSQ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
4ba35adfb9b278aa6cba8769f6435c97
78b7a89f73f4c07f8a2d7a8ba1b93ffe0aafb534
describe
'374704' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSR' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
5debe14db330a7adc063506c57bc3f0e
ed52705c2985b5793647acda315fd8e032c02607
describe
'121906' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSS' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
905b989780a9b5e3cbac7c0abbe2b100
3a727842e524dc4726c57bd5eaa4e1a8befc1afb
describe
'38124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJST' 'sip-files00123.pro'
eb7b157ffb679ea75119c0ef462e94d1
c5b5d5a6ee24c2f8bcd450452d313a80288ae41a
describe
'40736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSU' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3abefe3236c7fb0de1c302546b073469
6330d3f54d3850ffde448ee34460eae368276859
describe
'3007420' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSV' 'sip-files00123.tif'
80b778e7390184120097bb355779710e
0470d38ff83590accc346b437e3cbf3536d2f77e
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSW' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2699786ad49baf06c546508c5856a5cc
c70bd4efa44337317dcfe35d2cb277120657f155
describe
'10386' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSX' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
1209b9731d1c619657c5aeab05fe4483
7ba33a84e125498520716d6021ede12cfbec9be6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSY' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d08a181d576d7fa08db5a56bd4014bdd
1b912431a8d07bf77fac28f1b8ed692dc63a14db
'2011-12-11T06:26:31-05:00'
describe
'127073' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJSZ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c70a25a7fe78738861b6337093f8a2e3
32ebb1a67e0a1cf3e3bd1ad142778d403f91b068
describe
'39754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTA' 'sip-files00124.pro'
dc3454dca682f5fc4aac78abc9adf435
0bc173c846b6ad079094bb6c787cc8f636941c4a
describe
'43202' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTB' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2b550e7e51b3b9cd56e91243380b29b6
9e0db11aa87842996548f842f0403f8351057069
describe
'3007536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTC' 'sip-files00124.tif'
39e6aa62bd8a42a60b7db1e4816056ec
b78ccd8dcb5a1ba91c8d2771df20be9b8ce576e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTD' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3e6599c25b62cc1976048f57a30b857b
0286d3ba4bd9e6fd9f9e51497cd223433767cd3d
describe
'10707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTE' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b7e8b954e6cd14949b6ae323b6b87339
587c497b2a39eb6654dfb379501d4731622234f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTF' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a91ec3c06d9893b3d2445dca93c1b49d
70406cc4ceb7258b38aa61d7185358792c3a3fac
describe
'53242' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTG' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
0ddd16472b1306cbc5e0317d39cfe751
b13b3ec58d79beb8b64de63a5761bc2bafd34a2f
describe
'5770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTH' 'sip-files00125.pro'
79885c6cd480a494ea139bc984e2422b
5f4ce067e8abb25863f175570cbc84c3d1ee0e7a
describe
'15156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
75866b02203e22bad37270abc02eddb0
420bdf7e96acd6abf2bbcd3bec6051a19204d2c0
describe
'3005392' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTJ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f0969ca83fdc9ffebbb4c5d235f7df84
4ae9f16718b7dd6665eab4fbc5cc02f310a833ca
describe
'239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTK' 'sip-files00125.txt'
dadad25b328b6eb665ff9df0d4ca7c7c
8458e0c5c86bd5c713832b6bd3cda398f7cae967
describe
'4055' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTL' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ceb2dc799ca45ca10ce4d97fbaeabaf2
51718ebcc78a575a2d7cfb95b393cae19b8c12d0
describe
'374908' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTM' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
981581b1df24b0b9b5e1b648ac5079aa
acd30b204854de15282c54978c84ca6b9d7f2778
describe
'135610' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTN' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1a73afaa15eed3dafede35c626739c14
6bb39cf03dc56724de4b5cad367a5b9a7285fb5c
describe
'11618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTO' 'sip-files00126.pro'
7f143da5b89b7f5c1c1d9073c1aebc0e
69533870f2e31b30fa2dd06ee19c83b21d243297
describe
'36260' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTP' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
949b6a9e0130f60717565a83ccdec209
f8789441e3fccb7c9968debe51dc51809b281886
describe
'3009492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTQ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
935c26a5f0e634af13710f9cbd8ab8b7
69222797d84e2e8bd4ac52a13c1799054c9c95d4
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTR' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1383cd78d15ffa3455a5a89c42e839b2
5a5cd4d58b6c8b9bd6c290f6bffb1bae4c74d510
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTS' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
95d7425c9718c1ec840bd1411651a96f
b4a168a3b1450bd61317b67adede00d8dfd5b742
describe
'374703' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTT' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
6cb326c7bdb895f1989f6ca3a4658aed
322d186d65c1783ec271551d133f739655da453c
describe
'118776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTU' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
4d782178eaf02ab3a6bb6f28a7777a37
b43bee5a351be6dd600586fd070134889c2df1fe
describe
'36951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTV' 'sip-files00127.pro'
62066a8141095080a81bf20905243b25
e8790fe386d7f805b80ac86d966d4045c892fac4
describe
'40720' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTW' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
0d8f33220b9720b4020f5420cdefa72b
2a69104cc8be7eccddd90d7265d1bd6b9f4eac35
describe
'3007432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTX' 'sip-files00127.tif'
722ed42f778d72ff5279c3378cc844b6
4eea244e4fa05c8460ab0ea74e499b0645609c0f
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTY' 'sip-files00127.txt'
bef5f83fa854f87a751dc20427375c71
2eea24ce724f70f554b5a50ddd2b0783e6509b6b
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJTZ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
38cbfea96b951bb925d32e3a7eb6e371
587a5786750425ee2efc876936cd7cf6d325fd91
describe
'374706' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
51e77dee3a78ada66749d8cfca7dfcda
aae48ea039c5e5393733edd752891c9df8072e9d
describe
'121872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUB' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9e19eae35c8cebb593cfd3615c77c440
08f498183ee8c61a5037dee292db95919dc02d39
describe
'39041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUC' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d476e99350a3de2f35d3262db0abb546
b1989ca9920d6581190fe61f4c1ece351bf98e62
describe
'40725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUD' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f14fd4ba75eb7cf10e047d0693963dc3
d3521b4693224d655cccb6d948c79157e72acd22
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUE' 'sip-files00128.tif'
269f358fff4307c5726dae885d955e63
c9546b929487397bd3ba0d17f433eac0cb2eff94
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUF' 'sip-files00128.txt'
7f6c634be76685b3592cd7ee98c39076
b55167e6e839719a0f6f9b943da4113bdaf6b623
describe
'10350' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUG' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
f201ae327b0b78ae7807478b4eb6f01d
f0779b2fcb138553c7c20f362f01d445424a5834
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUH' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
4f239de1d8d49507b43e2439ddeb346b
0aadf54f42c53dfe0f40ce1d598c9d1fc2323541
describe
'125207' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUI' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a50920f338bf5512ffe10ec643729a62
b96a0c0b8c95b8212da2cd2fe129c1260d023147
describe
'39435' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUJ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e6fcd746ac0fca5eec0009a07bc44eac
fa067d0aad947c86bd3f4db81d7c03ab1b8e113e
'2011-12-11T06:25:26-05:00'
describe
'42713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUK' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
05ff7c50258bab0b11fd6b773ea860a2
4f94828df946d03d23ceb877348fa1093107b484
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUL' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c8a4aec244026e22d59d26d9a74e4e39
1379bf54e310a76c8effb49981b17d2e0824e74f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUM' 'sip-files00129.txt'
94555bf2e818524296d59a669ca8c6a6
a5e06cd84164dba42a464b7f9b4c6fd5437a9f9b
describe
'10198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUN' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
27741bc7d58a213608470067f4c9b86b
d6481cdc5f2f3cafa59baae6647fc8a89c788ceb
describe
'374603' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUO' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1b3ccc343b8a835a31bb871636476311
42c78e225bc1105eca18b11b438d59e4b41a0abd
describe
'75766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUP' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1611fdca483fb7c33a22fb487e8b3533
0c1f1f289a94ef0f085b700fd199b0750c790b44
describe
'13317' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUQ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
f0d64efaa47fc535b83e6126211e6b03
dab1a68e858cc484b589a6ddc2d5fcf5298f6b76
describe
'22381' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUR' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a9744068cd08a53f2c37d77a497e2357
b45db0b2cd630ff0fb99b9e68dd1391dbfaa2a33
describe
'3006064' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUS' 'sip-files00130.tif'
5d5ebee77db4ad325b05f3d30092f5ee
c781e25fd621ce784c594c538f609013ace57ec9
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUT' 'sip-files00130.txt'
cef389288c30d7d308d05b46fe02e337
0dae6d3897965e4581e6a6df79c75ceebf6c0d70
describe
'6035' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUU' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7bca9df3ec77708b47bf37f4b6776857
2e0ca510e671f3f0b3758bbd41e639dc1a05f730
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUV' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
adc2836e221a4cb5f63126771a034c44
cd206e6091b8eed6bb0f88e537d031da5a8da85a
describe
'132416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUW' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
45abe00cea850cb129869ccb95ab9d78
0dab556fb57315b76e8cd8ce254372e8f56018e4
describe
'21899' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUX' 'sip-files00131.pro'
73fc41b28a9ef00a37aad00e581c6729
2ee986aeae5767d7866e721d5ea2a94595c58b75
describe
'38452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUY' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
5b4d1f73b601f3adfeb396f815815e09
77309eedcb4f4d7b7f7925bf1496d167c05e2ef5
describe
'3007344' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJUZ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e4775a110116815155d9e375063101a3
4a865de378f47b5acf400f2254a25f1e5ab212fe
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVA' 'sip-files00131.txt'
ce8af665b6632d50a1e01713d25ef946
6ecd45d60f0b89914c006269e8a76f0d7c84adb2
describe
'9456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVB' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
961febce5e3b0335c041d132c4b21d35
41ead32601bd6e42fc8303d4affbdf2279b28cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVC' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b95b91a435f44933189f86cee3d4c6e1
9a4096419fe1fb4ac61a39ddfb84fe7bd9ed6437
describe
'122994' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVD' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
885bbc98a67186c61a915ae9fa767ddb
76fc97030afb4874c7f6c0f65046e50fff58a91f
describe
'38559' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVE' 'sip-files00132.pro'
26d0057d7186171033692c952b1a4a9b
37cf4c94b10e92e1ca77c5495f0eacb3817bb39c
describe
'41818' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVF' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
7c8168ef69c500470005600081fc41a2
4c3bb9257d64f0eca94564e3d15c9b673ee48eb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVG' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e1bd7ac59e913a2fb3081af8afe72f51
fb63ee6ebcc00135e62f114821ba7dd80cdbff5a
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVH' 'sip-files00132.txt'
5aae1d3294051850708494a035849fc7
03a30d647470a954ce1fd2006c78ba65ef9bab0c
describe
'10519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVI' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
898b5c6ce6a3d851cbeb738f3a9af975
58986653ca1ae526b628831c145d614ed91a526a
describe
'374714' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVJ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
a9e8a914d0776116cb5380ca320ca746
5bff61d6941ae051c385d2f0c9ab6b1f34c0d8ca
describe
'97183' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVK' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
774fa7a115d08b3df93f7002407b2bc7
036f112dcccaafb5a0ee48bcb2bcf0008a6f59c8
describe
'30074' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVL' 'sip-files00133.pro'
1666733c6ed98e3bb8fa4da65e925642
48cfe40fdb34d81fc21ee89fb6f9d5dc2ab4e063
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVM' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d6f3ac7782a17dae8daeace0fcd0feae
4135dc18e6a649b8687da1246e6ccecf2e461c21
describe
'3006816' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVN' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e4d15f5738668c8565874f7868abd26f
abcb1cc6eb978a502bb660b7ca2758bad8ae97b6
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVO' 'sip-files00133.txt'
5d2c422c5f1122e69677eb7dff17c4f2
13d4806355d547131fcf9bce52f6c2a880046ce5
describe
'8484' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVP' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
2e4da17ba5eab9c790d6a756a41f1576
14e466e6368c880a463fb32b8830b519582d7a21
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVQ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a2039cb74635614572968cb7b55dd54e
b4e5eaa9d5099753417d4135b037d23697179df1
describe
'128106' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVR' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ccb106eeed7d41f370b47ca8f7b30a5f
691875fa57ac1d42be7310a0dc3a461f3b3de291
describe
'19227' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVS' 'sip-files00134.pro'
18544271a7c29f21f667c74d733049ab
4cae182a71c59be2f1c0a9b8daceccd637b19cdf
describe
'36347' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
9f431b9c7bf501e0da40b14a7b2832c2
30f0217806c903668f44ef593c02f8f9825fcb3a
describe
'3007176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
5eee50936dd235f6e336f14af89d2362
17848de2a6622a1eeb418a74e5daf8e1d5630271
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVV' 'sip-files00134.txt'
01595fb322a293289c06eaa914ffe0a9
afd7750e0dcb14fa33553bf6eb52988d1c0faac4
describe
Invalid character
'8789' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVW' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
b9f500c1951a37177d1d706d29533287
b15718ab0bdf6c22c75d3bdb4aeab2025ea62dd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVX' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
7bd89aa38699552f7e2136a3144318a8
81a453f0fbfbcc5b75fb20a7ff8e72d0a24ca2c3
describe
'126888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVY' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
6a521ef2796e0cbb4ce59598d58d097a
7d1b0abe787e9683ae08f739edf2155d11c3cf04
describe
'39721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJVZ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
ffca70603715874b796a002dc65da623
8fb7660e6aa47071b36d9ff10a9ddd70123f684e
describe
'42346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWA' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
f973e0d23e90856b71dcfc816f199396
b47db28a1220c6ecfe5834426c2d70d5c87c8ce6
describe
'3007396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWB' 'sip-files00135.tif'
082f73bccb729117e852198446d22afe
77223a33147fc5ca5b098932faeb85442d4b5229
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWC' 'sip-files00135.txt'
a1db8127defba5ba7f96b9d219676b1f
73e95437f459976f6d181451fd1e3f29a03eee2a
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWD' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
c40bcccd0b676120a3d372c64dfcecc6
1dd8a6c4df4a20af50437d73d68a6a73fb48367e
describe
'374732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWE' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
395a80389b313a57468c3f2233c9a0c7
068e64822d6c9b70ba458393d20d9d5e45f813de
describe
'94828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWF' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
48fedbe7d1d3e8ede4005b36251085bf
14710426bf1e8e08a43efcb7c9aa820fa1ee0581
describe
'29665' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWG' 'sip-files00136.pro'
a06542de5161aa80ba752828fa821841
4df0def723a1bdf5ef09359c5482650f95228394
describe
'32340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWH' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
3a59dc29f224855f1918c944e69cb541
cf662bf40067ca74d2c0132ecdc88cd5b950b832
describe
'3006700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWI' 'sip-files00136.tif'
e5e5fac7979e3d7774bd7915dcb60d2a
a784ebd71e0303073201e4bebe1dae9cecb39648
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWJ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
72bc8bcc658bf530150a6b4f82548d8d
8b4af89f73e812678acf7b4f9b241518ff25a452
describe
'8132' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWK' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
0842cdc3c163307ba20feb142f3974d3
7a246fa26114b52fb0e13df3b0c184fae99dd598
describe
'374653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWL' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
768f79277e08ace131d555c331a58b97
3ca85c0ab91f519eabcebbf34b1224fc30cedf14
describe
'120011' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWM' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
3e838779c511786533fca8d01ceea2ff
8f620e3f1bc49cf3d80470248ea1264fb1d5f014
describe
'20664' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWN' 'sip-files00137.pro'
01c416dd3efdef86a4b7617a35d2aa58
a415593dfc2f4d58fd2d6e3ea01ab7d0adf30275
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWO' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
73cb6c3802e3b4e6ca1eb096c0b8c888
bc564b1798a6517c85339a6be58f5e0a1e5f4c8c
describe
'3007016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWP' 'sip-files00137.tif'
1779c2409885f2db4e5610300fff0db7
3c29421bee34a7546a46537fbbc39fd990b9e679
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWQ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
2df158701dd52b9dddab127cdc210a07
7b04a1e9e52bb2af975c07a647623d741bebecdb
describe
Invalid character
'8881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWR' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
528b76c47f4841d6daf21580176e981e
eba07b081bf00c0dbb6a4ddc33af95054aca9ab2
describe
'374952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWS' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
4ee8eae0407cd2ae7ce4547d26494032
fccb5044c218d2a27357e9a807daebb95eaf07d3
describe
'125939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWT' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
ff8711678f47cc4da824cd70638e3e24
41f66634972c3e4db62b559ffdc1ea1143ebd481
describe
'39280' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWU' 'sip-files00138.pro'
f86dbb2619f3c6c06206b7bd6c865609
fa99edefe02337ada456e548a695e4c3ae2e45f2
describe
'42148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWV' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
a25016fa5ec633878b1af589b92d7826
894aa7e110c691224b4956cd3091750839e798bb
describe
'3009604' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWW' 'sip-files00138.tif'
41ffb9a4f66b945a6af23348b28a4efc
a1ef7387acdef13a3dc2b605d737f0e5b216fbde
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWX' 'sip-files00138.txt'
f3e4452263e1493ce518d7c5a8c8dbce
a6f6ad1e1ac50792fadb4068be03cc32e37e9efb
describe
'10695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWY' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
e05d5a3a26575f18fa1151b9ebe6a30d
4b92fb5654b6f31713ef21645037029a1b278a3a
describe
'374731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJWZ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
ce5659305e3f10c6d942020f599a8051
e9d7e154219bffc854a0cf3f4de2ac971933fb12
describe
'119897' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXA' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
740bbdb85cf7b49def84e763e1d4b9be
1d3e4f910d3ba9dd1e063fd0e914936a0dca5096
describe
'38306' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXB' 'sip-files00139.pro'
f8d3564cde8e5cb1b5b1243b2dd4a722
e4f9a8e65da47e522f1d04c83d8e580992457195
describe
'40500' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXC' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
86f3ca538a12c6ba56289c453f66ae2b
ccfe0014498ed6aa61468e33c91785766b6f2bee
describe
'3007372' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXD' 'sip-files00139.tif'
23b646679f9c6cb6f697af4674efddc5
d629f6545bf460810c12e7e9eb1998c817071ef6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXE' 'sip-files00139.txt'
16d2ff62f4940573b63581a7cde513db
263eb979e8e006a29f3e2c4bc3cc949302e0ede9
describe
'10211' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXF' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ad2c161065b7dc81b8ec660fa61c2812
8771c34195ed9a6cb551c470871ac2b8722fda1d
describe
'361658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXG' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
86deb58de5d11484c7a3564cfc8bac96
34b0e75fb743f4a6e62932126905a744b4d6c1e7
describe
'52175' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXH' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
f87c5e0bdb17ad555638db8325d5c725
2e7987f82b087a44936ee3ddf997628e8535b471
describe
'7363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXI' 'sip-files00140.pro'
6406fbe80ac637bc1458ea3da71a08e1
1dfb6e4701624aca49307fd48f1fed4848a6784a
describe
'14634' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXJ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
e0ae77640b73346ff051d38791316cec
79a90a64dd9973d5c98b547ae155e9c6e7d8c023
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXK' 'sip-files00140.tif'
8d0581c8da6d908146b920c4af8c5079
3a9d50735de590260197a75bb3b996bef6027873
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXL' 'sip-files00140.txt'
9de0ea1ddd4cf4a83fbea1bb2b83ebe5
cc7ccef6913b87b133bc501e46f595f0d2055c50
describe
'4154' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXM' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
374c4bbf9e33c843fe88efda1980dfff
eaf4d45be1e3c1c0a60646c0b6a14c25930614e5
describe
'374652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXN' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
0ba1459ff0d8271946004e679a30372d
d2bea38ba964d93ed91e51c2dd63e485e7a64883
describe
'129919' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXO' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e93509cbe7c13e92dfbcf3bdab4fd6e5
ed7977aac823ffc7786eeae995570b2183dd7cf9
describe
'21407' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXP' 'sip-files00141.pro'
00fd72f9c0872648bcecf1fe329bca8f
226dd43e5f8c252540dd5edf82dba572933f08cd
describe
'38148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXQ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c32f99e59e16ae71fe3d874891b248e2
a86db1c1ce2eb459211dc28abe4e6087fc422bdf
describe
'3007196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXR' 'sip-files00141.tif'
bdb9fbbb600eaf5abd0b7d6549f3a823
b8007228fcd8dfcd6b03ba360e6afb1f95f11c59
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXS' 'sip-files00141.txt'
3899140cf3bb6c9487380b9dc3238937
b5d91cc66b02e55faddb4c78de08e1d6b00da83a
describe
Invalid character
'9441' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXT' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
e381d5bb195c15a8955fddcf6052ce1a
001f77fe479082faf68f184874ea475d77625c87
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXU' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
e88631cc9c3315345617e16b6d87e927
bb8dffa58f7c2e070ad3bc1a8efd3c9c94794ea1
describe
'117743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXV' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
92ce4057be49be4d264008428599e4b4
a2f7e106aa1818b70558b82f0b7e7a666182a4fc
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXW' 'sip-files00142.pro'
d921135e2578cfd21fcb836340631cdd
d5d724c44c678d82dc2327c2f791d607780115d7
describe
'39719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXX' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
e4d2f716f7a1e0f8c684219689b22d2a
c23fb3cb74a24e3bff1d107f90879493db5c1b07
describe
'3009532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXY' 'sip-files00142.tif'
63c6072dff8ec9266f9fff0c44f18756
f789142709285398a0d3500e5d127f5211e9eacf
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJXZ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
6d5e78d8f9e3b308ab38c2a06260868a
2c3af9f0cd0b1d79df81ab499025454f48592aa1
'2011-12-11T06:23:22-05:00'
describe
'10220' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYA' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
37f6de95299f7660184f03a187ec9a53
708eafba7d0ce84512a3565906ec208a5074c300
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYB' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
8af01a3f02f3c9de44de5dba8e09e274
7f80549872385f523316195682c7fdb82434a97f
describe
'104218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYC' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d9e0ee9bd5bc2e83a178c8229b70051a
147cc36a08997e54f2912867cdf55e4455208df3
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYD' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0fe0fe09809ff471ccb9da641baddbca
25be8dc66f83a43afd61f30d028e89a9cc943702
describe
'34513' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYE' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
b54e68a62f7100aa3fa8a49412c6fc6e
d3780889318592f6edfd14e9b388f639de83b47a
describe
'3007100' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYF' 'sip-files00143.tif'
62ccfc70cd64984491e91af7f23d4003
9c070529127ed031e47d4fa9edba6f3e57a07c1c
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYG' 'sip-files00143.txt'
10b9ff1a64f50ddfa3ed7784a3563e31
1e11a0c00a704a89c1073e2954baa82e096c11c8
describe
'9130' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYH' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
8a82faa477ee9442e9d3e2b2403610b9
7d96b7f7a0dd600abb9e49790ea2196cacd01a8d
describe
'374876' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYI' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
e478390038cf1da6e12c8e917aaec8e9
e70675a44aa57d7dc811bd5246d814d552c1eb82
describe
'123620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYJ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
69e9e6a5276ebbf7cbe9c6e0b8cd1a9e
97f05921466edcf14996abfd89ec0569b053547d
describe
'20065' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYK' 'sip-files00144.pro'
aaecbff1351db2edd97210b4275ea5e0
a177160cb8473052c817ff46e564214ea0f2faae
describe
'36567' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYL' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e9786333937fc1924265a1a5bc9046c0
51bdfb4d26f8b6d9150972c1e66bc687ed5dd5db
describe
'3009292' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYM' 'sip-files00144.tif'
1423566f043914b4623f1c668595771d
a5b61a2db629af1f360b1a68062428105cb4b01a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYN' 'sip-files00144.txt'
940646bc0664dafedf34bdedf5216b1e
6f3026b1303b1c44f53b9a754976533f418312c6
describe
'9197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
a859ebdcac5b36702fd817fff93bfbb4
30aa324e538d4895ac884698501b557241bbfd0d
describe
'374642' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYP' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
9f30ba706c256f140696d486bbbafddd
e38a085d4a666ab98123f1d054f92b31b0c74dde
describe
'124701' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYQ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
654a6d8c10faf4387ba7988f50d6048c
a1434e69d203923e58cb04b971ae0da556646423
describe
'38766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYR' 'sip-files00145.pro'
1e0b4a91d2bff7dd1742b952f6509d82
fde7da94a3a195312ed3016f8e5e9e8c8dfb7c39
describe
'42532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYS' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
3df6287cf0baab939ebe5428a80ddd70
1f3f8325a2c667ed07da449c9af167728cbc871c
describe
'3007492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYT' 'sip-files00145.tif'
060515fb603db3c417a66319d54253ac
b8de85aa42096d853133c9f6cf5e431359b3c33f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYU' 'sip-files00145.txt'
7b9b6d18af25d0aa560562ec53161bce
e2e1cd7fee48e69a98a426d89fe86750229a09d4
describe
'10765' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYV' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
b4a6370dd627b35cfb1a8d67f4b8603d
f3a0da1d6c7dec6677bd5a73e773676613ed6bf7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYW' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
968fb4fc543a645d3117a625699f2bc4
e054d530a83557fd1972fa5d6b56b30bb6d0a89e
describe
'108340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYX' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
95e6a133d03923ccd1ebb0d3903a3abb
a114e9bf63c62dc4f4388582773be8b75c132d04
describe
'25162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYY' 'sip-files00146.pro'
cc3fc4b490578ffdd406ee8e37b3ee47
8115ecaedf2b97f36029181242f606897bfce765
describe
'34461' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJYZ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
bb2faaeb66e7d294f9fd03ec80ad5155
233e942673101d4b2757ff8ace217e1786e2d24c
describe
'3007144' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZA' 'sip-files00146.tif'
adf87913edc8321ad65b361cfb66fdda
235f1ef91dbcbde076ba13d57e1e6272a0303f7e
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZB' 'sip-files00146.txt'
f5ca2ac8bbfedadb0e2814058e4d7f8a
000cd95a307d2251ae4774270b1a895464b8e9c9
describe
'8812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZC' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
6a3b98014331d746e19cd8b9abbb5d62
7a18859ead0ef621b0ec63a63f0c204481850c4c
describe
'374725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZD' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
35d50e37584a1fdb8418288d2acea1ab
851b8c618892a1833bca63c6b4d2f714c9d9f663
describe
'106083' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZE' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
553b562ebaa90e4c05a507a0593d76b9
df352abe7d30d01b818fa0e8853c21cad8bb27c1
describe
'17692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZF' 'sip-files00147.pro'
71a4124b163dbd349a5732e733588d3b
73c56d5e1737d781f3730cbc9fb147b553383c72
describe
'31437' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZG' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
66e7dd448a326ea923ab5d66c107a921
ff9d87a121dcaa177a406a6e2dd14404c5a8d361
describe
'3006964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
62a8500b41072c466dd2c7af3c77f385
256bfa17e17f977679af176260427534c96bbcbe
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZI' 'sip-files00147.txt'
6b52c7a8655f1c334e0fec9e5bddc057
fc7f181e98d00bc4beba681d741fc2cf61de8f6b
describe
'8314' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZJ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
abeb80003ffd3f3ad56e79e4d4200e27
b96b28c922a5837160b1aa840461be961c93e297
describe
'374956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZK' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
667ea01f3c01ff987bac74a42a629a3c
3a097e10e7981ecd5df10779eef15610624eb0c3
describe
'124293' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZL' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3fb6ab413da9f3616fa8b37feb88e460
68c9d34362d61057c59cba6f3fcbd0219db79d32
describe
'39436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZM' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a006be63bcf96dab2492704f7f7ae9e6
0499441a58faa0f5f329d7b9336a549b61615596
describe
'41847' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZN' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
1f731e242b5ffe8b080911e5a28f01dd
526c63d9ca0728b7266b07d5ec9fba677eeecbf1
describe
'3009676' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZO' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c7d35a116938b272e620dd8f3bfd8aae
c04996e40dba507e0e97b8beff7819510fa6819c
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZP' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0567012afe122f2c9afd82cc65151e5d
bd80bff7a5e8286884b55bcef105872dc482acd1
describe
'10368' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZQ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
3e03bdd3018b114fb723f064dd1fa029
c6cc81a857a1a88211f5be6d251ac7e3cdf07613
describe
'374708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZR' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
fa20599bcae60cffc7591fe4073d3aa0
58294019d04553ceab269f678e61c51a8a98386e
describe
'127558' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZS' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
cdb3fde9484c48c83804f7243e935a74
30bdd17d8333e485c65b2bbfda9449ea801058e7
describe
'40581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZT' 'sip-files00149.pro'
c0e884d925adb90306fc7bfacd737611
8ba3bca4004a8f061f29195d20495a546fb5b8f4
describe
'43039' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZU' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
87ca3e95c8eda93e4c6fdad5daba07d2
0850c0035b21244185809117652b89f7113c8882
describe
'3007548' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZV' 'sip-files00149.tif'
f32a4f948f82550196bdbb8524effca6
8a25994cc347d0b422f8650bf22afa5e6195bd66
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZW' 'sip-files00149.txt'
37ca5946b51449b4a2830c1d0c00bfe8
bb77651de7b90755ca8c94ad88e84d6c348920e1
describe
'10533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZX' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
399929c084c8541e46292f3afb583952
d23ae6983962294801d69a8a01ff44bf4139fa12
describe
'374827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZY' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5e2ccb293a9654246eb73f4fd7857ef8
980f1ffcbff4a00cf03cd6ccde9c3533f044168e
describe
'56836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABJZZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
35d58bc1acabe7a81a124cc41c5f4894
ccfaf0f6c5a197571804db31b0a953db3ad75896
describe
'7988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAA' 'sip-files00150.pro'
ae0c3fb8e5263cdece104e8d1ff19f6c
a9521fb41b4eba376d92a5abf0a675ba151d90df
describe
'16338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAB' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
6096b72e810974b103e8ef6d0d656129
96e0e8ee05c58e83c991feddd7bf52aacc1aa56d
describe
'3007684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAC' 'sip-files00150.tif'
1338749145df615de5a700fb589ffdd8
19e918b78c7e00c2d58bf85998d0ea492622f336
describe
'334' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAD' 'sip-files00150.txt'
ded2c8be37eec43f822033c761e5519d
7d66fef99bcb2b86d931c68171d7d346c80f3f06
describe
Invalid character
'4400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAE' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
d373b21b3ea7441fa77b9cab3eb74977
e76bb5d332912dedbf69d4e39dcf0b7996efa568
'2011-12-11T06:22:58-05:00'
describe
'374729' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAF' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
ffd16624d9f94d6b3f31e913ea86c61c
3dbe6149391a4d7718b0b822d142e5c66338ee72
describe
'124764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAG' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
b976c659683ace007af0b77b45bc7d71
4f5efb2ed57d09a57b12d88f06c568eed6d2c479
describe
'22033' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAH' 'sip-files00151.pro'
01981a176280202bc14cb78d1e14639f
487d4f0038d54f06f1c411180ec000c6b848f6b1
describe
'36322' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAI' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
6622b4fa4f33eec9f0b7c8c7c560b50a
12701685af18812150c3e6d7197bef4605c35c43
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAJ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f2a04998d8f8218667e4d1858d83b099
feb36b5861dc005553d1ff0c42184420590a0749
describe
'920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAK' 'sip-files00151.txt'
e9744d051d9df1907b415eed193b477d
74dfacbe939597c94fa75aa50768201b619789db
describe
'8980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAL' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
d56308a1a41a2e285148f1b7dc7f1030
cfc3292d85fd345b662aa9f1e50c13b485e42620
describe
'374958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAM' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
2a97e90bdf8d090a02e9a0f9813ddb07
e9ffec4d6c4fd06a759d11046f0691b119c9cfd5
describe
'121146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAN' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
c06138398be74ca3e475490176382852
7739469351a2e021eca940d088408ab1dd50c8ec
describe
'38492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAO' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6ba1a73a33ffabcd56c8613981a0c910
cd812fc4ea790352fea941377df0e2cb0eb48914
describe
'40878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAP' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
01419692c74827f5b3397a2b33a4df0c
e6345101b11ea055faa492528199bb630e7602db
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAQ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
bbbe75b933de58bc8187a46803a85b62
0aba17465da961676a552a5a5ff2ddc898e5bc48
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAR' 'sip-files00152.txt'
e99743ad987f974cfac16cbac9fe34ff
b2b54de490bf4b3f68b71833fd7e884f7d6c7e5c
describe
'10549' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAS' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
37762b3bf13b8f73a2dd932bd928caa0
a821988282a96f728f8fd346fd1488627e1fc9da
describe
'374707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAT' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b9151d485d63bc93f0971c73fbd13a4d
7a61ebe47f3ad07033d57e7f95ea5cca5de17fc2
describe
'119468' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAU' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
304c142032d66da4d5653945edb6129c
e4882f716a179b1a1fd4034fba563baaef6142b6
describe
'36611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAV' 'sip-files00153.pro'
802e2eb3e49f25250b70191bd1b96913
4e193b74d602407101b1637d11e88b373bf824df
describe
'41073' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAW' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
854ce44e170b290ff6bcc6c9c8fa7e14
0bfd108c2520bccdc23ac64af2343a6e1e303fd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAX' 'sip-files00153.tif'
4cb5d1ebb507ebe9fa69cc5389dd125f
44318d3419d65643134c7956062a168d0d79fa0e
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAY' 'sip-files00153.txt'
6edcdd3af99084f20acf73657982e914
70d0c678858e729e5cf142851643c02a7a8fb0a0
describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKAZ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
81bb30f9f14061bad604cc611d49261f
1aa6403b6d9a1ab08e8684c2c3b134dd4f57f726
describe
'374991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
02c135333ba776f2b1227d7c6ede5280
0fb1250de98b0dc4ee6779bcf5940ae7a3a326e1
describe
'63376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBB' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8c9e1740f78897d67575c534167d9890
339dfc76696d092d8b452be8b024c6fd01418ffa
describe
'10997' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBC' 'sip-files00154.pro'
c2e8047eca28a9ac485046cb2c84986f
7c146212a236cda64ac4233fb01b716d5bbed683
describe
'18301' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBD' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
883e214867ff7731cce29101981d9300
7b5d384d2bf0921f9ab3e40f259c084cc093e6f2
describe
'3007804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBE' 'sip-files00154.tif'
cc579c96d1fcea553c2b813138ebc63e
50e3f7423acaf9371d79f4e5eefbafe9a63b546e
describe
'460' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBF' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e7f9a28fec2a132bd4f9909c0188d9b3
74587228a5b25afe6826afb5306d213a401abf83
describe
'4837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBG' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
3400de9488c5c2e5a26a6d2130b8bbb2
304f67d7badb3236d6e1d235bf5d80ae4770f12a
describe
'374724' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBH' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
df8ca4c35cfe39b987ac22e978fb6dad
256dbfe5631bd8cac0fae974575464d623532b21
describe
'123821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBI' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
100ab8950b3926717c731733ae83e8f5
21c7c8b2b425015bcd394d8e02c3875743ed722d
describe
'17784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBJ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
fe76c34010bbf7aa750109559c7c01ec
afeaa57d15eb0719396376a20b99bbd821ee9ccf
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBK' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
b8b8155a482c2a2fdfc12761fbdb6796
4c35652af354a0426e2192e91af97c3ce4afbc6d
describe
'3007300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBL' 'sip-files00155.tif'
59c9c96897915da5de8b0aa6cae49c75
21fc07db03bb3cdd8d02cd2448f1a37dd736b835
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBM' 'sip-files00155.txt'
79b10013974337635c79bf24fa973275
188aa6d3fcabfcd91c8bcc690d7fd5bda7de331b
describe
'8916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBN' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
57430212d9c00d9fefa02d7b9d10d791
fca6590c822c20b60f6b8850053989feacd5b14a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBO' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
da82e9fc2a02a0d06ec8861df90fb10e
486894a5d79e3e31a68dbc43f3a154bf25c78378
describe
'119969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBP' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b630b99bffe978da1392cc1da7818271
ae7115692cdf40a86a6dfb46aacf082acede150d
describe
'37054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBQ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
040f398ff375d746547df9e64f3f5e67
bc95dddc31757bbde26bc3ce60467528790bc93b
describe
'40171' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBR' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
46c8b54aab70af2710a3279b9abe7525
e367f12f99577987302d49597ba1d162c5132a74
describe
'3009620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBS' 'sip-files00156.tif'
5ec6fe7f6743b16ec276c879c7370f80
4997ebbdfa6095a9c4557327577cc8d8698f69f7
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBT' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2f84bca5f6b50ad7af82f9f0ee6e8609
9c92de61311ab88a7bd6d77ad68651bbaf4e5821
describe
'10647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBU' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
10a9059ea6ed6f2ec9db6cdd31ef837d
d9e6df19a89804bf806198cbea4bf8cfd869af55
describe
'374966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBV' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
951050ec792bc484821c3492a417fcc8
1b97c386ecdfe53d8015faf35371a443ca2f46b4
describe
'119023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBW' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
597f05e3c74edbeb7395ad43ba5c3fde
25ce6cef53c8c413c6d5c68cd6a1ef0c05ba4c1d
describe
'37312' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBX' 'sip-files00157.pro'
47b049f6050a9a01aabdbcbce8f24d0a
56317dc89056c8e388f57dee7626074c5a66d7c9
describe
'40348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBY' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
342b4dbbff4ab61b7d5f7611bb8b49a0
dad661ee6a0a6cbabd0f8f465ab2067bc15e972c
describe
'3009624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKBZ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
68369e32359b2add11d7ad96e1c1e2cc
7292b3b3d238e9c7c4c1e793d3055cc4a4435395
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCA' 'sip-files00157.txt'
5224c9bb206d016e06eb9d588316212c
43f580d1a3b52b7dac0877916fc39b6e77263c42
describe
'9971' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCB' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
06a05aee2d4ca742cdbbe1091c7a7e17
a768cc1c3d5f187da78e0a780637b4e00b55f716
describe
'374955' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCC' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
067a3e97706f518c4f8c96281a25e945
ffd03746fbd25949ddd3d967a581ae31cf7ac04c
describe
'92797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCD' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
c16f14eb90c1879819fc6965763933b8
99a4959f3eeeca473f262df93282cf6852a4c9d9
describe
'20634' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCE' 'sip-files00158.pro'
37107194c67941adf5a4c165f85ceca5
73fccbd8d5511ab91300625480cf3ad6ab9fd6f1
describe
'29119' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCF' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
5e4379d33d47887cefcc550312e8a4e2
a80b844a86f7a129daf892ffedc29d225f47232d
describe
'3008596' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCG' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4f36352f1cc0a5c3dbc70ca77be3df2c
108101cb22ff92bd1c37697d35bbdeec5ec1c9d1
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCH' 'sip-files00158.txt'
3cecae65a9ab6c84ce5e1ea6f043a399
9d685b320c17c5f7b481cc454fad6f7c21b213f9
describe
'7558' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCI' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
4c7ece348528c08c70c7ae509dedde93
6f57bef9b9d45cb91a9af94c503c7930b0233f08
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCJ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
ac774eb814ec1d36b649afc3d81be05a
a3ab6d60aabe6cc633d804de69c93408f2519cce
describe
'130726' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCK' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
a654f75431a1ff011455f1b8649c7b00
3cd4bc5d3885b17e04fd7532191bbdc9d1107cda
describe
'22824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCL' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f4b63fdc5d856a0d4ebea1cca0651dbd
ad59578e90110043c93197441ecc8352833f6e50
describe
'37815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCM' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
6a0b711443db64b1176c1ea55453ae2f
5bd2cdfa17a0b936bafa7542e6f4719e4b3dfb61
describe
'3007288' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCN' 'sip-files00159.tif'
40a5a2274bdabb9b360feba8e3643775
eefe59d061d00efe4df18169baa14fb23a5aa161
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCO' 'sip-files00159.txt'
e32148113473c0c317b62ca8c5f4ef7b
6fc0deb3ba9933839f64696490d7b5f67bb691db
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCP' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
1ad48f7d8da900be2104097c4eb9a1c1
554782863652671b2f52a5e142de3a5d8199e741
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCQ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
5184e9e9916f5d478caf8d3e290a0f8e
b21e312db521c24f02454bf81da02756e4297294
describe
'119967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCR' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
44dfcee92cea1bfcbfed26e986f4f0cb
cded05906ea0d0ea32e7f3f4dc7e768efca1f05b
describe
'37648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCS' 'sip-files00160.pro'
f9ddc87abcab89fb43ffacabdc108772
009440a34431ddb297b01167c3430cfce964637d
describe
'40889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
063e8f96943d1c87cfd214905f4d9a12
dc0db898dba1d0947f17e7efe06e2eb4c2e2269a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
9b45f1590687824b26223408a591aa97
66e11063844a589eb4418aa263017e7337438130
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCV' 'sip-files00160.txt'
3063cd15fa52da30747446ce861021ca
e0a25f1c7504f3bcaf9d033e3fc0e7ee7eeb8ed8
describe
'9898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCW' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
52f1402c2130ed6f39e2b04234cd31c7
8799e98d7d1a0d504c1c1260c5941e473665fb80
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCX' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
8f6a4455ff4a7f57d0ba2b95e73024f0
427182ead20decc632df8ae7ba4b1fba579eb710
describe
'127058' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCY' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e9a72c2357ea2ceaf6e980e22ce54ecc
e741b07b3ba1fa599464ceae8aac0a6aad647a9b
describe
'40290' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKCZ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
55b4547b4e54348596e66f4a3e9c4973
4d0c9bd5c54b16ce1bbd2bf3f3598526b2960f25
describe
'43237' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDA' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
5f4548b2b57f6fc926b0f1d061447dcc
6047699ac4612c9189f86c27908971b334eb6e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDB' 'sip-files00161.tif'
b42350c1a1a16aae9fc77f4f8516e468
a76f3a5800e5ef3c841706e6736fa9bed49bd49b
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDC' 'sip-files00161.txt'
28314215a13f235b5541bcab2a92f6ee
4f5f94c76ab1e668c8f378b30b6ad54ce9af9f84
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDD' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
bee0c6e1d0c4927f968cdd3f7a5725d3
4979a0cead0277868193d0298b40405ddd220289
describe
'374621' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDE' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
14f66226a9c1873b395b5ebb9d9242bb
7542dd7f01d7b0f1ab34c49cb5bc176bba6fa19a
describe
'59115' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDF' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
2622ef174860863bde2fe82450290a63
6be78d5db3d0ae7be70574e29d7f0f5a8a7cdac0
describe
'10398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDG' 'sip-files00162.pro'
50e914beaa8f3e12bd89c5a20328cff7
9479f90953218bf1746c16b7f9e7dd0333edf12c
describe
'17991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDH' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
f1746b876eca915b5c3fad1980fe69f8
5788f4b141e8dc83410dec3816e08111c4e87dfa
describe
'3005688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDI' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2fdba9f0a05ebd39879defd0cb1899a2
ba912ac3d6a6794f07e01a00b35c70b1608322da
describe
'459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDJ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
9e46a81151eebd226f10572d8f6808e0
c89d1028ef1fff9019136a1ca7d9d0781ce97d1c
describe
'4771' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDK' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
53ca3c39702554ce626fd9c644eac0a7
23d8e9148d03ddaeb6b87202bc037808c1299ec6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDL' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
e843101bc1ee63519fea392f4075b22c
fa00cdd15c656ccfc8c06211f7910ceda7f5b5cc
describe
'125852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDM' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
7f0082872553417c0a924a5c2358ae71
d9e5f36eb6ca660762e6bdb0d0b5810498b3ce5b
describe
'22314' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDN' 'sip-files00163.pro'
cbd40bd6c9091bfa1715643db4eb4431
b4fc865be627ebfb26889f498c49ad84a5ee7925
describe
'36433' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDO' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
0f71738e9013a8a6c5b44d7c744ff91f
251e72f0cd4edee1d382c793c1fba2ac8c8727a1
describe
'3007240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDP' 'sip-files00163.tif'
a79589493580a57c05ab7d3d93303eef
d477a44c2d4e7c692c1798f3eb5e39e284140583
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDQ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
15a0a5dba4cb9c3e956399dbf62da7c4
1167dbffb928c647cc67d4566f1c12f6af733e0f
describe
'8952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDR' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
06a0abb73b406db21ff13f8a7d16e9ed
252408a52ccdc9383508fe530b59264a9cccf8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDS' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
909e65188c28999245a37d11ec33518e
78d3a547c7c3ce5f12174173acf3c9df9fa2e660
describe
'121456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDT' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
39f00c6df31988f7fa8183f2cfeebe92
ad95333f20c409f8365dbea0339b60e0a9ffeab0
describe
'38416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDU' 'sip-files00164.pro'
d3d910b3ab5935aa7dd085da23281f4e
a215eea5a7782f12fcfd9a9580ed9ff65c288e87
describe
'41956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDV' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
1ad709268f0eb5474874e4a3616e50b0
ed292121efb1e7c82b0ad303ba457a0650a750c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDW' 'sip-files00164.tif'
966306f6058c8cdda58a4ae97daad35f
040d30ac727e3c51a382143c1090ea1f855d79b4
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDX' 'sip-files00164.txt'
a9d90b55f3a9f5355877877e87148cb7
c859385b641361b7bab1409b7110f4b5e573975f
describe
'10206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDY' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
0e50b57238ce6e8b13188c74cab4ea54
21fc741ef1521dd35f384e6a6070668f528804ca
describe
'374666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKDZ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
1f8a60dd28998ae7350323a1016316a1
8b4a4bb1e151e328c928a1202520977fd13e6468
describe
'118913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEA' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
6f85cd0b91db8ea7699c45866b9e24bc
d2e83afa93e633c951f365670d4ac4391f9da83e
describe
'37360' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEB' 'sip-files00165.pro'
32e56b13f7eca5229e87ebe2dffb9b70
18e1b0c18c1068d233530264f7b854fe61905c85
describe
'40016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEC' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
baeb829c73e0c81d22066b3aa261f46e
9e1aa38f062011cb15781f6c52c3f196ff8fa52b
describe
'3007340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKED' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6bf5a23b5eaabcc90e5778b29879fd8c
e5dff5fc2f2cc0f98b3e057d6989a4cbf4481495
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEE' 'sip-files00165.txt'
2b1f023c531cf24a7d9c34f9af7d670b
e36cf89aa78aa7a027e237c5f812806550293d80
describe
'9613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEF' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
1ccba17a94cc17189db3277c17dc8f15
91ddf5cde560e4562d534995effca96d8f881575
describe
'374602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEG' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
aa94bd5047ae27a3bca737da573323d2
2998edecd17e12e02f81092fbe46a37781bd6363
describe
'142197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEH' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
9da58eadfdfe08766722dfb4ecc640ef
ebb0a891a9125a1f1c4a7fab3c5feb95485f758a
describe
'23518' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEI' 'sip-files00166.pro'
0495cbefadcbf07ea8230e65adf5c7ef
b7d75a5efcce2e5617aea94da013caae88c4b7d8
describe
'41123' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEJ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
042220bfdd630e0f5f4b8759117a0714
f5195daf5dc8e569ee6ff09c1d9e05bf23289c40
describe
'3007444' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEK' 'sip-files00166.tif'
6f0390818edae03bcda0de9f4d343222
b46e146f9637aed9414a137f7c249594f0b4b8ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEL' 'sip-files00166.txt'
a6de331c16b76d9a12761ed1705fad69
0ec94231697bb379ad7dbf8c8a2201a7b924cb31
describe
'9882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEM' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
ad3e95065cadc42c4fbfa98d357a2355
900b813b21b285aefdfdb913b8ad12f9a3f95598
describe
'374698' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEN' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5825a37b39580d53b404dcd2f32b0bfd
bb3c76e9ba436abfba66be778c0d297cb978cf74
describe
'124982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEO' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
e688a47de312219164faa095f046db62
15a8b9121f1a5799f373a5072f89c90b26966f5d
describe
'39717' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEP' 'sip-files00167.pro'
11b95563794830c03f33e4b12e1db0c7
e15978ed377eed4c481a772e78b791d6c354dfc0
describe
'42359' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEQ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
b599b432076dff13dc0eb57a27bea0c4
e453c699ae6cc584af9757d0d91071671c945e1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKER' 'sip-files00167.tif'
2b6f5c445cd6c264ce0febd07edb5cd8
49f7a4cf281bdb7b383b3328e47b704fd2771ad3
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKES' 'sip-files00167.txt'
ea2fbea7f49eadb48aa830f1e707fd4c
d957d6a607301773ed006320ac96f6d6f4963a89
describe
'10372' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKET' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
4028294e444f57f14f1b1f34b8b83504
cc7e7d45ea705186e901545dee789174fcc9b691
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEU' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
dfb5bd7abd1e4010aca14a7e737c06db
ac5d0abbc122d3bee114ffe2ff1064e11069a2c3
describe
'122275' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEV' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
50f88c7421eaaeef39d25a39f321c572
1dc435ffbff6676ec2a7034fdcc3d685b813d6f0
describe
'38979' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEW' 'sip-files00168.pro'
29ddbae8dd27a76aad57a9c5aae2a099
756fefd8c012cdc3dad2937a5c2eea4bb369bcbd
describe
'41454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEX' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
4f42a21c4ae7723cc1567b55e4594475
54a2f880af33e36fb281cb37ca1ff663a5438bf1
describe
'3007392' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEY' 'sip-files00168.tif'
6d71339a1d25aa5d726861f5b67bcc3d
65c362404cb8233ac4be0b39556ad359aa4dd768
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKEZ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
09fe2372923ffad70b934f00765b58a8
6d0735b8f318a392226ab0111225d50cfcae7e16
describe
'10265' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFA' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
2b5b285811fdbddd974fde81553ed9a3
fd4cb04a4a5d59030bd681124656b00a9c652bb8
describe
'374904' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFB' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
fc0d5ced6e175deace27e27d44933c25
60b13b499de9c703d502232ba9e99571f4f6d536
describe
'127348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFC' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
90c906bf3a957f60f72f853ed22b6ebe
6ab30a0686d9764e17b948682072417299ff4f08
describe
'18627' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFD' 'sip-files00169.pro'
aaecd362368fe4897996847dffc5ca1f
05eb0ac6de0521c0f6d6c2d9ace7aedf0006d0b2
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFE' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
38d9c5f542d85b2a199a4a380e82f428
aa987ee7f129e08c010056d5d8f6fa1c8269f9de
describe
'3009432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFF' 'sip-files00169.tif'
0523c05d562236b35bbcc2da4a46b85b
d7ce44cde706079cdaa9b425b98d24f7dcd2efd8
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFG' 'sip-files00169.txt'
abbb746b5a94d7370dfec648644d930e
cc58ddabbc91790008f14e4beb5acaa1e647476b
describe
'9235' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFH' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
466d940aba1271f74e79fa8cde28510e
021065e1ccf8b3b3dcda0547378414d866fab7b1
describe
'374701' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFI' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
4a18ad72bfdc08ed01d2edcc11b9d04f
cd2df80e7ebdbf821ad38add158c42d7b1615163
describe
'126009' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFJ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
7cda7d281abd6d9795f4a64d634ea236
ced1204f106690bf073c8b3f3ff6467a5b6f4e75
describe
'39939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFK' 'sip-files00170.pro'
2787726c6a95dbac9e2de71832ee381a
a14f98cde53be8615d1b34f06986a392081324c5
describe
'42951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFL' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
f158fdf9a860da87ebb63dae2e2275bd
56ffaa141e6cffe30efe37558d15984f93b64125
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFM' 'sip-files00170.tif'
d4d671981819ceac6cbd0d82fa382043
cd18d3e5193a7e6fae23f66a05125149d5dd4dd9
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFN' 'sip-files00170.txt'
229f7fa7dad54735b4415b24d3034ee9
299c894c4f861a8c11b8d29ff12d071a05da5785
describe
'10376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
4284bdf3bcf6c31b7d34279e06de55bc
03b5b92dd035635a8462d139d08c82baca071bd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFP' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
df53e708f1acbec4126671b3b21051cd
10b60d66176efb8f6793c06ecac4dab7ddba5b0b
describe
'128978' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFQ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
851c2865f965b22624435f1a87edb0a0
4f39731c52d7213c7f17dfa2fd07823aa70c2fa8
describe
'40644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFR' 'sip-files00171.pro'
ec1f1954c75ab980b7fc47aa2dfc0aa2
c4b482c15499ac02545e8987783dd42c92d22186
describe
'43937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFS' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
701b452fca7453bb35c9a3b7611f1f7a
4e1a6984d748c33085def4781d899102570afa16
describe
'3007572' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFT' 'sip-files00171.tif'
04645c95f192292108ce68a9555db187
380c52c75ba6204f7bce86f3838ee945d87a9676
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFU' 'sip-files00171.txt'
0fe6acd7e75e565c629d80fefcd65b96
5641f50385d1f351ae4e070c507638b1883aa2eb
describe
'10700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFV' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8942b8fd9bfda8c68579f5db9372899a
e4f39ed0ebdad19df116b50d35c755d911861e9f
describe
'368457' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFW' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
3265cc4686737c1f6ab0a26aeadd9e73
5a919516a66f8d5c4ed03a3b5642f20174d33237
describe
'49440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFX' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
2f2142c50a4311f94cd6139bda2102ff
e373257a4d3dc231e434b134e22a8980d3edd88c
describe
'4676' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFY' 'sip-files00172.pro'
ab75cfb3b67f60c93394d4a46ee1887d
a890b59ce660235b31e1b9b1a91a8a7080488e71
describe
'13283' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKFZ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
96209fe36316863eb76ca1bc5aa1cb12
b776fade98108d4c0993ac7a097a120117ac65c2
describe
'3005332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGA' 'sip-files00172.tif'
47f3c9cc0a1b6a4c8d72701dc2bde086
b24f51e400598088ecc4520bda335ae13283d53e
describe
'205' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGB' 'sip-files00172.txt'
9c41d41e08b9ee294d80322450c9092e
1c4558ce112551a59b85c683096cc60340974e38
describe
'3827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGC' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
04e5bd5bb2e6318c9699b32fb71021b6
18c11d0f8c7b368cef25ceab2431911cd9aeca05
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGD' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
e1ac5755aabf8f91a45662179d9c1f7e
d77cd5d26a95b367b4dc2c93494a368e4a413afd
describe
'119763' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGE' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
dda8fb8d8eec9f1c2ef5d492764e0a18
270b70d10f8a44ba5917c162c694c8a436b89575
describe
'17693' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGF' 'sip-files00173.pro'
d0037a1a39ce0dd5c64a1e5e630b3109
f2388605bc62b70d858600dc9c43e9b4f02a5fb1
describe
'34136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGG' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0d1f69548ca7374f182d5beab55ef990
2df0d9401b61829a9802524b8cc7269e11a56a25
describe
'3006980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
fa1d19658328b3dbfec85ae432a94b4d
7faf28a6c787d46a1ec03ef35ed02cbc2f6dbdc8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGI' 'sip-files00173.txt'
2560839bffbde7fe4903e07371ab8b87
9994e315f2c0ef3c2b9f1fd4f92412c3239ac0db
describe
'8616' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGJ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
3a46bce3f6c5ba9f1ac57b9279883b3d
4079636193440ea037bc803a9cd823c97c04083f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGK' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
4f71c0a79e23cfc36d711b6e97d01f87
30a009c2a0f3113bc9f2c715ce09ad0b343623b3
describe
'124708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGL' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
740917f1b18e6281e3fb83ca18868971
dcfa36cfa54b2f4d8fe854270e9a8a51545c995e
describe
'40297' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGM' 'sip-files00174.pro'
8c50b7f7c115d9c7c037c386f2e11696
e53497be703cdcde4c4c094a6c593234425f1b1c
describe
'42020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGN' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
3f5f91cd4b7e96e481c9c1b53e5b4f5d
aa4ed0f6e658b29fc5745cee10c6c935e8b0821f
describe
'3007516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGO' 'sip-files00174.tif'
75b88ae39a02cf383f9b37a8d9dc79fb
f17d9afadcd6d1fd71e254c0d88ee48df40e134b
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGP' 'sip-files00174.txt'
074c2b04a1ce03258abf1629e2e7c04c
a4ac83799eb6e1d5d481abeba319055ab6697c43
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGQ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
096972f0630a133b81b4cb6b79567b9f
92ee8a601e3f590148c5c37eb792af0af9e54c19
describe
'374685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGR' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
6c02847c0113a744bafc3bd700882d96
f25062c6aa5960839ce9de0161ce28ac64e33053
describe
'118390' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGS' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
7671736c898d4d5cfc013e4daea51d9c
6066935ae6cd7ee2b9c382fe9cc59a4d64f99eb4
describe
'36931' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGT' 'sip-files00175.pro'
3198d06318bb9c84eb30cc9a5caec3ab
3e2245893de2dad1bdb1d5dc20c7910079164fb4
describe
'40103' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGU' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
3247432b0c2be470555b5893c2b80a81
a9219e54e908c6df2c83482e00f68a2af1600149
describe
'3007464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGV' 'sip-files00175.tif'
a074891de6c8858d6910dd2f8b7e4930
3b1669b5714b4310f59160ae8027e0d0da6f9a58
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGW' 'sip-files00175.txt'
59b5957c0ef2a5929e2cf28594d80c84
5ad0ba002184878d29035e4b5111c2227986a834
describe
'9893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGX' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
1b8472f7af41045cac098d3805d3848a
5fc971c3b0dd091c2d4ae6a453e3ee50b9a3541e
describe
'307156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGY' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c9595985432317f106b2d9721d155f56
2c600c6fd569c68619bca29e857ebd507a5355c2
describe
'53143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKGZ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
772f15aea67b943945f702b590494e8f
d7080234d96233e29417f7dd3ef2b131cc0c7d54
describe
'15740' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHA' 'sip-files00176.pro'
18c8382068d9771adb6dbdf5b705076b
0de87d0a03172a61e3fb044f46feefe2a88cf0e4
describe
'17671' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHB' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
2ad54de4d59b5bf2a3158a9cd8a417a0
61fa28a9f8985870b2f303740f3ade78c33ca2a0
describe
'3005504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHC' 'sip-files00176.tif'
244e527d6b79e2af286c936f27a8b90b
a3726ec95110a21c7fa52b474a346758f4f23648
describe
'633' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHD' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ccc8c193a240ef194a91bdc49460ca63
ab171a3a02355527367ef7d08ca375066886ae6a
describe
'4601' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHE' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
8bac16f302eeb24fdc17bcd24bb3715b
823a4fe0a2c8bf8d13f2102af95ccffaebfab60e
describe
'443445' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHF' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
116b6dc1bb9aa94111259398430fa921
8fff38e93264a431e7ded38c24cfc0989f143f68
describe
'133196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHG' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
1ad8961613c6660ba229d5e2326699cf
ff7e0068fe773361bd7688b5da6e900ec09544cd
describe
'28903' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHH' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
a7fa33c9e3fe3a9dde33b9c1d8582708
d307fe632d76a0edf51c841d689629244d83930c
describe
'10650528' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHI' 'sip-files00178.tif'
53f61ef3f5c487ed383597e568910e22
0c25fa98bbe97e784a5073ee0b56be08ad33e192
describe
'5884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHJ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
73d05c39fc7e2845d20a2140a5e78b00
1e1e9aafa707a4580b60cd8f255bc2b272b398ee
describe
'432321' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHK' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
f556bb3957a80d4948c32b91b9d358e4
c10a2e24b39b7bc35239237defbe1ee414a3e3b9
describe
'91907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHL' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
9be15ae8d707bcd3a3c14900b27faedc
24f53349f86c7cefc816c079688ecdca4b327dc0
describe
'14467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
c5de98466d0c6d6c0044127198f1c14a
b4162bcd3e6fafab2a0274a205e7626c7a3cb738
describe
'10383500' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
bcfc88f5a8dfb8de04aa9aed50265ca9
f4f5b6e5ad3384430e35ef48177ecef4ad885019
describe
'2978' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
cd8e6bd8ffe13c61d26b4c543afad8a6
489f8d5675aeb91b8bef8042252e97828b5385ef
describe
'92183' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
edc5b7a8e800275815d559fb9a96f601
5d876cd79ee59d4e2e7f3fd98d0d9f3945cc5559
describe
'44790' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
aeec434dddf97a6183e2cb3de07ac42d
a9a17902e333378d924c0f9eca919706d3a50108
describe
'705' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHR' 'sip-files00180.pro'
c1c51a320f24085f243bf1021e4816ea
97856e4e18e70c9634466264df57816da64f9e65
describe
'10773' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
49e2cd8223eeec58762bc2ff69b6c081
7615dfe0f49ee87e629c59478bf139eb3be94699
describe
'2219000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHT' 'sip-files00180.tif'
890ee9d605ae2cf6cc6fcccd5a0127fc
d57138222591464efe71ef04672dd7fdc8d87ef5
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
e75d1a4fc6bfcac473daae8513e10456
1133fb74c0390597c9a6806a040771c144c34bcf
describe
'4199' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
9bb7bf7ab5b176bcda93a171181fca74
120f2cb99859ff3fe2268ee96547b45b03dd5500
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
5125db8793b57cb26f9762d418c84f15
1d1b6db19aac8cab1a401e28b671c8a8a98083e7
describe
'301320' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKHX' 'sip-filesUF00081250_00001.mets'
ea766b2541e1bbd932c85da00d96a4b5
a26f63a010c7f7599a0172e3a672e82950c69883
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T12:29:10-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABWfileF20080512_AABKIA' 'sip-filesUF00081250_00001.xml'
c4abd175ab65e9d0fc1847a8f0ae655a
622815d712782889ef42c30edbe0642c00941d76
describe
'2013-12-18T12:29:06-05:00'
xml resolution




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BIRDS IN THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS,
LITTLE ARTHUR

PA ~~ ZO@

And the Birds he Saw Chere.



AN AVIARY—LONDON ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS,

AND NEW YORK.

EDINBURGH,

LONDON,
LITTLE ARTHUR
Alt the Zoo
And the Birds he Saw There,

By

MARY SEYMOUTR,

Author of “ Shakespeare's Stories Simply Told,” ‘‘ Chaucer's Stories Simply Told,
&o &e

With Forty-eight Illustrations.

Teondow:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

1892.
G@fountents.

THe GOLDEN EAGLE,

Tyr Wuite-Heapep SEA-EAGLe,

Tur WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE, ... ee a
Tue Harry Eacte, ... ne one tee
Tue BRAZILIAN CARACARA TAGLE,

Tur Kine oF THE VULTURES,

Tre SoctaBie VULTURE,

TuHE Convor, wee re ie

THE PEREGRINE FALcon, a on

THE Snowy Owt1,

TuHE VIRGINIAN EAGLE OWL,
Tue Barn Ow1,

Tue OSTRICH,

Tue Emu,

THE CROWNED CRANE, an ne
Tur DEMOISELLE,

THE WHITE STORK,

Tue Biack STORK,

Tur Marazout SToRK,

THe Common Heron,

Tue Ticer BITrEern,

THe WHITE SPooNsBILL,

Tue Scarter Isis,

Tuer PELICAN, ae

il
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
42
46
49
53
56
60
64
67
70
73
76
80
84

91
94
Vill CONTENTS,

Tue Witp Swan, ... a bs om ae be ww. (OOF
THE Tame Swan, ... ee ee te oe ae «101
Tue CEREOPSIS, ae oe, ae ie ite tee .. 104
TuHE Summer Duck, ... aes hts ote eet wee «108
THE CresteD Curassow, ss ve bt sit oe 12
THE GUAN, ... i hg oe ics wee oes .. =116
Tue Witp Turkey, ... aoe Zot nee - ee w. -120
THE JAVANESE PEA-Fow1, Sie ane ee 195
THE GOLDEN PHEASANT, ae ee re Pas eee «» 180
Tue SItverR PHEASANT, ne cee Pr ose be we: 188
THE Renp-LeccED ParTRiper, tee e oe a. 186
THE CALIVORNIAN QUAIL, Aes ite i me ite w= 140
THE TurtTLE-Dove, ... us ise ei ts vee 148
THE Pipine Crow, ... se aes tee ae .. «146
Tye CHINESE STARLING, ee ete ats ae te ss. 150
Ture Winow Fincz#, ... te it we ie a w. 154
THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEET, wae on ve as s. -158
THE VazA PARRAKEET, ao oe ae we ie we = 162
Tue Rep ann BivE Macaw, age ae fice, eat s :165
THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO, ... a wee .. 168

THE RosE-CRESTED CocKATOO, oi Wee ae res we 172


LITTLE ARTHUR AT THE ZOO
And the Birds be Saw There.



I FLATTER myself that to some young readers the above
title may not be unfamiliar. It may remind them of my
former account of LirrL—E ARTHUR and his excursions to
the wonderful gardens of Regent’s Park, London. That
volume is occupied ‘entirely with the animals he saw there;
this one shall be devoted to the birds.

It was a great pleasure to me to write down all the
information I could collect concerning these strange and
beautiful creatures for the instruction and amusement of my
little nephew ARTHUR, and it occurred to me afterwards that
many other little boys and girls might like to read what
had interested him so much. I hope many did like reading
about the animals; and now, if any of them care to hear
about the birds, let them come with me in fancy to those
famous gardens and have a good look at the numberless
aviaries, or bird-houses, there. Let us go in search of the
mighty eagle, the fierce vulture, the long-legged ostrich, and
10 AT THE ZOO.

the sleepy owl. We shall see many gaily-plumaged crea-
tures, and hear many wonderful stories regarding them.

And I am sure, when you meet any of them in real
life by-and-by, you will enjoy seeing them ever so much
more because you know something of their nature and
habits. ,




THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

THE bird about which I must first ask you to read is the
eagle, for he is the king of the feathered tribes.

In this picture you see how large and powerful he is,
and what strong sharp talons he has for grasping his vic-
tims. The feet are yellow ; and though the colour of the
feathers is brown, the sunshine falling on them gives them a
beautiful golden tinge, from which this eagle gets his name.

His home is on the highest crag of some mountain top ;
and thence he looks down on forests and rocks, deep chasms
and precipices, over which he has passed easily with his won-
derful wings. The golden eagles build on all the mountain
chains of Europe, Asia Minor, Tartary, the north of Africa,
12 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

and the northern regions of America, Scotland is a very
favourite place with these great birds, especially the isles
of Orkney, where they find secure places for their nests on
the storm-worn cliffs overhanging the sea.

The mother-bird finds sticks, twigs, heather, and layers
of reeds, and with these she forms a place for her young
ones, seldom sitting on more than two or three eggs. As
soon as the little eagles are able to fly, their parents drive
them away and keep the nest for themselves. Until that
time, they take good care of their feathered. children, seek-
ing grouse and other kinds of dainties for their food.

The bright fierce eyes of the golden eagle can see a long
way off’ Thus he is able to look down on the flocks, and
to choose a moment when the shepherd is not watching, in
order to descend and to seize a nice young lamb, which he
bears off to his mountain home and devours eagerly. Hares,
rabbits, foxes, fawns, and birds of all kinds, are hunted by
these tyrants, and they have been known to make off with
a moderate-sized pig. It is said that they have carried off
children as old as four or five years; but I am not sure
that this last charge against the golden eagle is strictly true.

Tt is no easy matter to catch one of the young eagles,
for very few people have courage enough to climb up to
their nests. Sometimes a man is daring enough to allow
himself to be let down over the face of a steep and lofty
cliff till he reaches the ledge on which the mother eagle has
built her nest. Setting fire to the nest, he scares the old
THE GOLDEN EAGLE, 13

birds, and then manages to secure one of the startled young
birds, and to carry it away to begin the work of taming it.

When fully grown, an eagle of this kind measures
three feet long, and more than seven feet across when his
wings are outspread. The beak is large and powerful, and
you will see how deeply it is curved if you will glance again
at the picture. The older this eagle is, the lighter is the
shade of brown which his feathers attain. The tail is
nearly black, varied with narrow stripes of gray, which dis-
appear in age, and which are plainest in very young birds.

The golden variety of long-winged eagles is the only
kind in which the legs are covered with plumes quite down
to the toes. Just at the base the feathers are white; but
this is noticed only when the wind chances to ruffle them.
The bold, defiant way in which these kings among birds
perch themselves, seems to show how proud and fearless
they are. There is something very grand about the eagle ;
but the cruelty of his nature must keep us from loving him.

Even while a whole pack of hounds and a number of
huntsmen have been in full chase after a hare, a golden
eagle has been known to drop into their midst, and to dis-
appoint them by securing the poor frightened victim for
himself! He flies so very swiftly, too, that if he has
marked another bird for his prey, though a long way off,
he is quite certain to overtake it. But he always chooses
the largest living thing that he can carry ; and so he takes
a lamb rather than a lark or a thrush,
14 THE GOLDEN EAGLE,

In olden times the golden eagle was used for hawking ;
but he was so large and heavy to carry on the wrist, and
so very disobedient to his master, that he was let off such
service after a short trial.

A tame eagle is rather clever in giving a sharp and
dangerous bite to any dog’ or cat that may come within his
reach; nor would he scruple to let you or me feel the
power of his terrible beak, unless, indeed, he had been
trained into a very friendly feeling toward us. For these
reasons, it is quite as well that a golden eagle is not com-

monly an inmate of our homes.




THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

HerE we have the picture of one of the large eagle family
whose head becomes white at the age of four years. When
the bird is younger there is not a great deal of difference
between him and the common sea-eagle, because he has
feathers of mingled brown and gray. About the third
year the white begins to appear on the head, neck, wings,
and tail, but it is of a somewhat dingy hue. It becomes
gradually creamy, and at length is of a very pure shade.
The full-grown bird measures about three feet in length
from head to tail, and more than seven in width when the
wings are spread for flight. The beak is by that time
changed from dusky brown to a bright yellow, and the tail
is white, as you see it in the portrait of this kind of sea-eagle.

His native home is North America, where he is found
16 THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

on the banks of the broad lakes and rapid rivers as well as
on the sea-coast.

Perhaps you have heard of the’ great cataract or falls of
Niagara. These white-headed sea-eagles collect in numbers
upon the rocks there to catch the fish which is their fa-
vourite food. But another cause of their watchfulness is
that many a poor beast that has ventured to wade a few
steps into the stream above gets carried on by the torrent
and hurled down into those tremendous waterfalls. This
will be the opportunity for these eagles to have a splendid
banquet, for like all the rest of their family they are birds
of prey.

If the vulture has come there for the same purpose, he
is forced to give place to the sea-eagle, who is a great
tyrant, and will keep all other birds at a distance until his
own appetite is quite satisfied.

One writer tells us that some thousands of tree-squir-
rels were once drowned as they tried to cross the river
Ohio, and a number of vultures collected to feed on them.
But a single white-headed eagle came on the scene, and he
put an end to their enjoyment by driving them off and
keeping possession of their prey for several days; after
which he went away, because he had eaten enough. It
has been said that eagles never attack any but living
animals; but the sea-eagles depart from this rule, and feed
on dead creatures too.

Now, I must tell you of a very mean way he has of
(84)




THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE, 17

taking food for which another bird has watched and toiled.
Sitting high up on some of the giant trees that abound in
America, the white-headed eagle has a fine view over sea
and shore. The white gulls do not move without his eye
being on them; and he knows exactly what the ducks and
cranes and all the other feathered things are doing. When
he catches a glimpse of one called the fish-hawk he is all
attention, for he knows that presently there will come the
chance of a theft. This fish-hawk sees something worth
drawing out of the water, and down he goes to secure it.
When he has met with success, he rises with his prey in
his beak, and screams with triumph as he mounts in the
air. Away flies the eagle in pursuit, and soon overtakes
the fish-hawk : he in his mingled fear and anger drops his
fish, and the winged thief snatches it before it falls into
the water, and carries it off to the woods, where I need not
say it is quickly swallowed.

If, however, a band of the fish-hawks are together, the
sea-eagle does not attempt to play the shabby trick, but
goes off to hunt for his own food. He is likely to turn
inland and do a good deal of damage among any little
pigs or lambs he may chance to find. If these are not
to be caught, he chooses what he thinks next best—ducks
and geese that are tender and fat. Gulls too will please
his greedy appetite, and he will despatch a good many of
them in a short space of time.

You may be very sure that all farmers and _shep-
(84) 2
18 THE WHITE-HEADED SEA-EAGLE.

herds have a great dislike to the sea-eagle, that robs
them of their poultry and young lambs. If they
can creep along the ledge of a rock and set. fire to
the nest of their enemy, they do not mind the risk or
the difficulty, for they want to lessen the number of
birds of prey. ,

The nest of the sea-eagle is built in the most dreary
places that the mother-bird can find, because she wants to
keep it hidden from man’s eye. It is always very large
in size, and is made of sticks, hay, moss, dead sea-weed,
and other such materials; and it is mended and added to
year after year.

Here two white eggs will be laid. There are just a
few red dots about them at the larger end, but they are of
a very pure tint.

The little birds are well cared for by both parents
while they are weak and small; but afterwards neither
father nor mother will have anything to do with them, and
they are driven away to manage for themselves. Some-
times fish are carried to the nest in such large numbers
that there is quite a disagreeable smell of it some hundreds
of yards away, and this may be the means of finding where
the eagle has built her home. If the cleft of a rock has
not been chosen, the top of some tall pine tree is a
place where this bird likes to nest; and as it is so large,
it can easily be seen from below, though far above
reach.
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THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE.

HERE is an eagle that is only seen in a wild state upon
the coast of Australia. Two of them were brought from
there long ago, and placed in the Paris exhibition of birds,
where they were much valued because so rare. Since
then others have come from their distant home to live in
the Zoological Gardens, and it is the picture of one of these
that you have before you.

In their habits they seem to be much like the moun-
tain eagles well known in the Old World, and nature has
given them also a vast deal of strength and fierce courage.
20 THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE,

But, like all the tribe, they are not possessed of any re-
markable intelligence whereby they could learn if men
wished to teach them. They cannot even weave their
nests with the skill of many a little common bird; while
their voices are as disagreeable as they well can be, so it
is only for their strength and size we can much admire
the different branches of the eagle family.

In the full-grown bird of the kind you see now, the
general colour is either a deep brown or a dull black, with
a red tinge on the head, the neck, and the breast.

About the wings there are some white markings, and
also a shade of light brown. Do not forget to notice that
this wedge-tailed eagle has feathers to cover the greater
part of his legs; that part of them which is not pro-
tected by plumage is of a horn-colour, and the talons
are black. The middle feathers of the tail are longer
than the rest by about four inches, and thus give it its
peculiar shape. The wings when closed extend a good
deal beyond the middle of the tail, and therefore being
so long they are able to carry the bird high up in the
air, and keep him aloft for a good time without growing
weak and weary.

The female wedge-tailed eagle when she is young has
plumage of a lighter and brighter brown. There will be
very pretty shades of this colour on the wings, and dark
bands upon the fawn-coloured ground of her tail, which is
edged with a border of dull red.
THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE. 21

You have already made sufficient friends among the
different eagles to know that they are all birds of prey,
seizing and devouring smaller birds, and attacking a great
many harmless animals,

There is a story told of an old Scottish minister who
was but poor, and set great store by a young pig which
had been given to him. He was keeping it a while until
it grew rather fatter and larger; but one day a mountain
eagle, that had been keeping an eye on piggy also, decided
that it was fit for eating, and therefore came down and
carried off the prize. The old gentleman heard a great
squealing, and running out to see what was the matter,
arrived just in time to behold the eagle soaring out of reach
with the little pig held tightly in his powerful grasp.

I do not know if the wedge-tailed eagle would carry off
a pig, but I think it very likely, because he does so many
things that are common to the mountain eagle. He preys
upon the emus and other large birds, which you might
suppose were quite able to resist him, only unfortunately
they have not the courage to do it. He carries off the
little kangaroos from their mother, and will even manage
to secure one that has grown to a fair size. The natives
have a great dread of this wedge-tailed eagle, and object
to go near where he is likely to be seen. We can scarcely
wonder at their fear of a bird so strong and savage.

Once a traveller had managed to capture one of them
by slightly wounding it in the wing, and with a good deal
22 THE WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE,

of difficulty the strong legs were tied together, and the
bird was laid in the bottom of the boat near at hand.
Even then as a captive it managed to force its talons
through a man’s leg, and in the early morning it was found
to have divided the strands of the rope by which it was
confined, and so had made its escape. I feel sure that this
same eagle would never put itself in the way of another
traveller who was armed with a gun, but for the rest of

its life would keep all human beings at a safe distance.




THE HARPY EAGLE.

I NEED scarcely tell you that this eagle is one of the most
savage of all his family, for you can judge of his character
by the picture we have of him.

There is no beast so fierce that the harpy will not dare
to attack it; he has even been accused of wishing to prey
upon a man, and splitting the skull with one blow of his
powerful beak. .

But if as much to be dreaded as this when in a
wild state, several harpy eagles, when taken from the
nest and tamed, have become quite gentle and friendly
with human beings, allowing themselves to be handled and

caressed.
24 THE HARPY EAGLE.

The usual length of a full-grown bird of this sort is
rather more than three feet and a half.

The entire head is covered with a soft, thick gray
down, and from the back there rises a crest of broad black
feathers, which are slightly tipped with gray. When the
harpy is quiet this crest is only raised a very little from
the back of the neck ; but sudden anger or any excitement
will cause him to raise it high on his head.

Below the crest the broad collar that circles the front
of the neck, and the whole of the back and wings, are
black, each feather ending in a somewhat lighter streak.
The under surface of the breast is of snowy whiteness, and
the tail feathers are in bands of black and white with a
tip of ash colour. The beak and the claws are black, and
the legs are yellow; and as all these tints and markings
were seen on a harpy that had lived for more than seven
years in England, we may be quite sure they are those of
a full-grown bird. The very young eagles of this species
have a fawn-coloured collar round the neck, with a few
black spots on it, and the under surface has dots of fawn
colour upon the white ground. At each change of plumage
they get more patches of black, until at last they become
like the bird of our picture.

South America is the natural home of the harpy, and
amid the forests of Guiana he finds plenty of prey. There
. are two varieties of the sloth found there, and both are in

great favour with this eagle, and form a large proportion
THE HARPY EAGLE. 25

of his meals. He always lives in the depths of some
gloomy forest, caring for no company, and keeping very
still and silent. When disturbed from his sullen repose he
proves himself to be quarrelsome and fierce in temper.

When he has caught a hare or a rabbit he removes the
skin with his beak before eating the flesh ; and the bones
of birds and animals, with any bits he has not had a fancy
for, lie scattered about his nest or the ground beneath it.
This harpy has rather short wings, so he is not one of
those that soar high in the air and perch on the mountain
crags; a tall tree is easy enough for him, but he could not
fly like the longer-winged birds of prey. He is not at all
the kind of neighbour one would desire to have, so it is all
the better that he chooses to be somewhat of a hermit.

A traveller in South America gives an account of one
of these harpies that he brought down by a shot which
broke the wing. Thus wounded, the bird .was made a
prisoner, and fastened by one leg to the boat from which
the traveller had landed to inspect the forest depths. For
several days the harpy refused all food; but he did not
even try to do any mischief nor to get away.

Another was taken when but a nestling; but during
the voyage to Europe he was killed by the sailors. Their
motive was revenge; for, with his natural instinct of
destroying animals, the young harpy had seized and de-
voured several monkeys which in playing about had ven-
tured too near his cage. He had skinned them before he
26 THE HARPY EAGLE.

began to eat; but nearly all their bones were swallowed
with their flesh. As the sailors were fond of the monkeys,
they destroyed the handsome bird that had caught the
little creatures in his strong talons, and thus made a speedy
end of them.




THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

I HOPE you are not quite tired of hearing about eagles, for
I want to tell you of another kind that is found in the
southern parts of America. He is supposed to be a sort
of link between the eagles and the vultures, having a, little
of the character of both species of birds. In the nakedness
of parts of his head he is like the last-named bird of prey,
and also in the eyes, which are not deeply set; but in habits
and ways of life this caracara eagle is like the golden, the
sea, and other of the many. different varieties of eagles.
Our picture shows us that he is a sharp, wide-awake look-
ing bird. There is nothing of sleepiness or indolence about
him, and very little would escape his bright keen eyes.
28 THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

You will notice, he has a long beak hooked at its tip—
such a beak as we would not like to close upon our fingers.
The wings in this kind of eagle are nearly the length
of the tail, and rather rounded in form. The legs are not
feathered ; the claws are moderately long, but we are told
that they are not very powerful in their grasp of anything.
_ These birds cannot fly to any lofty height, and they
are not able to bear their prey with them when on the
wing to carry it to a distant nest. They are most com-
monly seen walking, and there is not one of the many
destructive birds of prey that can walk so well as this
Brazilian caracara eagle.

Those feathers that he has upon his head are long and
black, and can be partly raised so as to form a pointed
sort of crest. The neck is of a light brownish gray, and
the breast is the same shade, but marked with wavy bars
of a deeper brown. Nearly all the rest of the plumage
is of a dark blackish brown; but the tail is of a dirty
white hue at the base, and marked with narrow dusky
bands, though black at the tip, as a glance at the bird’s
portrait will show you. The skin on the cheeks, like that
of the vultures, is bare of plumage, is of a dull red colour ;
the legs are yellow and the claws are black. That cruel-
looking beak is horn-coloured at the tip and of a bluish
shade at its base. But a good many changes are noticed
in the tint of the birds that from time to time appear at
the Zoological Gardens, as they advance in age.
THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE. 29

When fully grown, an eagle of this kind measures
about twenty-one inches long, and with his wings out-
spread his width will be some fifty inches. At one period
of his life there are some white feathers among his wings
marked with spots of brown, and the throat as well as the
sides of the head are as light as they can be.

This is the most common bird of prey to be found in
Brazil and Paraguay. The nest for the rearing of the
young ones is built on the tops of the trees, and those are
always chosen that have the most climbing shrubs clinging
to the trunk and branches.

If none of this kind are to be found, the mother-bird
gives up the idea of a tree altogether and turns to some
bushy thicket. Here she arranges sticks and twining
branches according to her fancy, and lines them with a
thick layer of hair.

" Two eggs will be deposited here, very pointed in their
shape at the one end, and with spots of crimson on their
brownish ground.

There is no difficulty about the food of these eagles of
South America—nothing comes amiss to them. They
consume both dead and living prey, and they do not de-
spise toads or frogs, worms or snails. Lizards, grass-
hoppers, even the winged ants of that country, snakes and
flies, are watched for and most eagerly devoured. The
greedy bird will even turn up the ground to see what
small insects he may find there. One writer says that this
30 THE BRAZILIAN CARACARA EAGLE.

eagle neglects the little birds because he cannot fly after
them high or long enough to manage their capture. But
a second writer considers this a mistake, for as in the
bodies of some Brazilian eagles when opened he found the
remains of many of the small birds, it is clear that there
is some successful way of catching them known to this
cruel, greedy fellow.

They live in pairs or sometimes alone; but three or
four will often join together to pursue some prey that is
too large or strong for a single eagle to manage with
success. Herons and other birds of size and strength are
often chased and overcome by three or four of these cara-
caras that have united against them.

Then they will try to rob vultures of the flesh they
are eating. Even when a sportsman has managed to shoot
some game he may very possibly see it earried off by this
eagle, which suddenly appears and snatches it away before
there is time to interfere.

You may suppose that this is not at all a shy bird.
As the flesh is quite unfit to eat, he has not been much
sought after, and this may be why he is so bold that he
will perch on trees quite near to inhabited places, even on
the roofs of houses, and never try to conceal himself.

The name caracara has been given these eagles by the
Brazilians because they have a cry which is somewhat like

this word, uttered in their hoarse disagreeable voices.




THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

THE king of the vultures has not gained his title from his
size, for he is much smaller than others of his kith and
kin. Perhaps he is so called because he is very much less
awkward than some birds; indeed he is said to be the
most elegant of all the vultures. He has a very strong-
looking beak, as you see in the picture, on each side of
which there falls a sort of comb, bright orange in colour,
about an inch and a half long. The hues of his plumage
are very bright, and are full of contrasts which make him
a somewhat remarkable-looking bird. The upper part of
the neck has no covering, so that you only see the light-
coloured skin; but at its base there is a ruffle of the softest,
382 THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

downiest ash-gray feathers that could be imagined. All the
under parts of this king are white, with here and there a
tinge of flesh colour, and his back and parts of his tail are
fawn colour, which grows lighter and lighter as he passes
from youth to age. The quill feathers of the wings and
tail are a’splendid glossy black. Round -each eye the skin
is bright scarlet, and on the sides of the head it is of the
darkest purple. The base of the beak is red, with a shade
of black; the legs and claws are sometimes dusky, and
now and then of a yellowish white. But I have not even
yet told you all the varied shades of skin or plumage
which you would see if you made the acquaintance of this
king of the vultures. The back of his head is covered with
a patch of short black down. Behind his eyes there are
several deep wrinkles of skin which become a thick fold
passing down to the sides of the neck. This fold is red-
brown mixed with blue, and there are several lines of
minute black hairs passing across it. A very young bird
of this kind is of a bluish tint all over, excepting for his
white under plumage and a few white feathers in his tail.
In the second year of his life his hue becomes duskier, and
he is marked by long-shaped white spots. In the third
year he gets the many shades of the full-grown vulture.
These birds extend over a large range in America.
They are met with as far north as Florida, and are any-
thing but strangers in the United States. They are quite
common in Paraguay, and great flocks of them are seen
THE KING OF THE VULTURES, 33

in Mexico, from whence the first living specimen was
brought to Europe.

The wings of this king of the vultures are so exceed-
ingly strong that they will not only carry him to any
height he may wish to reach, but bear him up for several
hours without fatigue. They walk very slowly on the
ground, keeping their bodies erect. When thesé birds
wish to mount into the air the first starting does not seem
quite easy, for they take several leaps before they are
fairly off. Once off the ground, away they go, easily and
rapidly enough.

Their eye-sight is wonderfully strong and piercing, so
that glancing down on the earth as they are flying they can
see any dead bird or animal, no matter how great may be
the distance, and come down to feed if they are so inclined,

I am very glad to be able to tell you that this king of
the vultures will not attack the smallest living thing. If
even a tiny bird was hurt and wounded so that it could
not fly, but lay panting on the ground, it would be quite
safe from this bird of prey as long as a breath remained.
In summer-time he will feed upon the fish that have been
dried up by the scorching heat of the sun; also upon dead
snakes. and lizards, if there is-nothing better to- be had.

. * These. vultures carry about ‘them thé odour of the: food
they eat; even after they have’ been killed and stufféd: the
skin keeps the same disagreeable’ scent for a good many

years.
(84) 3
34 - THE KING OF THE VULTURES.

It is not a habit of the tribe to perch on trees, but this
king of the vultures departs from the usual rule and chooses
the highest branches for a dwelling.

Here he lives alone or with a mate, and when the
female bird wants to build a nest she chooses the hollow
trunk of the tree in which to lay two eggs.

A great many little dead animals and birds will have
to be found to keep the young vultures well fed until such
time as they can take care of themselves, for they are
hungry creatures. The parent birds have a wonderful
patience in bearing hunger, and are never tempted by it to
eat any but their natural food.

They have no liking for the society of man, and as
they desire to live as far removed from his haunts as they
possibly can, their dwelling is always chosen among trees
which are in a solitary and unfrequented part of the
country.

Though, as I have told you, these vultures live alone
or in pairs, there are generally others of their kind in the
neighbourhood, and that is how it comes to pass that
travellers disturb large bands of these birds when they fire
a gun.

Some say that all other vultures pay a particular
respect to this king, and leave their prey if he takes a
fancy to it; but as this report is contradicted by other
writers, I cannot assure you it is true.


THE SOCIABLE VULTURE,

THE first sociable vulture that was ever seen in Europe
came from the Cape of Good Hope in the summer of 1829,
and was given to the Zoological Society. It is more com-
mon in the interior of Africa than anywhere else.

The sociable vulture is a very large bird, measuring
upwards of ten feet across the wings when they are out-
spread. The head and most of the neck are of a colour
that is more like that of raw flesh than anything else to
which we could compare it; and these parts have no

covering of down or of feathers.
36 THE SOCIABLE VULTURE.

By looking now at the picture you will see that the
lower part of the neck behind has a sort of ruffle which is
quite black in hue. When the great bird is sleepy, he
draws back his head within these crisp feathers as into a
hood, and so takes his rest very comfortably. The body,
the wings, and the tail are all blackish brown; the breast
and the under parts are covered with very thick white
down ; and so are the legs, though upon them there is a
brownish tinge.

When the little vultures of this kind are first hatched,
they are. quite covered with down. At the time when
they are old enough to leave the nest, the feathers are
red-brown in colour. Like all the Vulture family, this
one makes his home among the caves and fissures of the
mountains. There he passes the night, or rests during the
day after his large appetite has been quite satisfied.

When the sun rises, large bands of them may be seen
perched on the rocks near their dwelling-places, looking
out for prey. However high they are above the plains
and valleys, their strong and piercing sight enables them
to perceive what is going on below. If some large animal
has been killed by the hunters, and its dead body is left
unguarded only an instant, these vultures surround it at
once and devour it in their greedy and horrible fashion.
A sociable vulture very seldom feeds on a living victim ;
in such a case it would only be some very small animal.

He delights in continuing his meal even after the carcass
THE SOCIABLE VULTURE. 37

has begun to grow corrupt; for he does not leave it until
he has had all he can get. We all have a natural dislike
to vultures, because they are such cruel and gluttonous
birds ; but as it is with human beings so I fancy is it with
the feathered tribe: despite their bad points, there is gen-
erally something good or useful about them, every one!
Well, then, this is the one thing I can say in favour of the
bird of our picture, as well as of other members of his
large family :—

Away in the warm countries he dwells in, disease
might be spread about if he were not there to clear off
rubbish—the remains of animals and such like things.
The people of those parts would not take the trouble.
These vultures, then, do the service which is done in civil-
ized lands by dust and rubbish carts; and in this way they
prevent a good deal of harm. Happily we do not need
them in England; and no one is at all sorry that we never
see them among us, except as an exhibition, when we have
no reason to fear their attacks. Ifa camel falls dead on
the burning African desert, these vultures appear at once,
and soon employ themselves in making an end of the poor
beast. If a mule drops down among the mountainous
passes, a band of these birds of prey is on the spot with-
out any loss of time, leaving nothing behind but a heap of
bones, picked as clean as ever a hungry dog picked the
bone of a mutton chop!

When the female of these sociable vultures has made
388 THE SOCIABLE VULTURE.

her nest, she lays two or at most three eggs in it. One
traveller in Africa has mentioned eating these eggs, which
he thought very good indeed; but it is a hard matter to
get them, because the nest is so cleverly hidden.

Two or three birds often build quite near together in
the same cavern. I do not know if this is why they are
called sociable vultures; but it proves that they are very
friendly among themselves, and indeed one single mountain
seems to be the home of an immense number of these great

birds.




THE CONDOR.

Art the beginning of this century, very little was known
about the condor except what had been learned from
travellers’ tales. Then, the great German naturalist Hum-
boldt made us understand the size and the appearance as
well as the habits of this great bird.

Like the eagle, he seizes on living prey; but like the
vulture, too, he feeds on that which is dead. Whatever
he secures he eats on the spot, never trying to bear it
away with him to his home. Though the condor has never
been given the name of king, it is not withheld because he
is not large enough for the office. He is stronger, larger,
and fiercer than the eagle; and he is very handsome, with
his shining black feathers, the white tips to his wings, and

the snowy ruffle around his neck.
40 THE CONDOR.

lf a journey is made to the snowy regions of the
mountain-ranges in South America, that is where the con-
dors may be seen in little groups of three or four. They
never collect in large troops, as do the true vultures,
When a great sense of hunger drives the condor down
from the heights he loves, it is only to stay until his
appetite is quite satisfied, for the warmer air of the lower
world does not please him.

If you will turn to the picture, you will see a sort of
comb on this bird’s head: the female has nothing of the
kind. Nor can she show white patches on her wings, for
they are of a dark gray shade. Both birds have rather
short tails; and their strong legs are of a blue-gray colour,
and are not plumed to the toes after the fashion of the
golden eagle.

The mother-bird does not make a nest, but leaves her
egos on the open ledge of a rock in some hollow. Both
parents take food to their young ones, and are devoted in
their care; but after some six weeks the little condors
begin to flutter their wings, and in a very few months
they go off altogether, to seek their own home and live-
lihood. | .

Two of the full-grown birds will sometimes fly down
from the mountains and attack a llama, a calf, or a cow.
They pursue the poor animal for some little way, wound-
ing it so much with their cruel beaks and talons, that at

last it falls on the ground from weariness and loss of blood.
THE CONDOR. 41

Then the condors tear out the tongue of their prey, and
begin devouring the parts they like best. Last of all, they
gorge themselves with the intestines; and their greediness
is such that they are quite unable to fly for some time after
their horrible banquet.

Many stories have been told of children, and even of
men and women, being attacked by these birds; but Baron
Humboldt has said that he never heard of any such case,
even though the Indians who collect the snow from the
mountains leave their little ones sleeping in the open air in
the midst of the resorts of the condors. He told also that
he had himself often been within a few feet of three or
four as they perched on some rock, yet they made no
attempt to do him any harm,

When left in his natural state, the condor lives to a very
great age—longer, it is said, than a man lives). When
caught, he is at first both sullen and timid; but as he
becomes used to his new life he gains courage, and is often
very savage and dangerous. After a time, however, he
learns to be content with his prison and his keepers, and

becomes quiet if not happy.


THE PEREGRINE FALCON.

Nong of us can be sure what birds tell each other; but if
the peregrine faleon is proud, he might certainly boast
that he belongs to a good old family.

In long past days, his ancestors went hawking with
the kings and nobles of “merry England ;” no birds were
so high in favour or were tended with such care. It was
rather a cruel way of taking pleasure, and we have quite
done with it now-a-days. No longer are falcons blind-
folded and carried on the wrists of their owners to the
fields, and there unhooded and sent to strike down their
prey.

I am afraid the peregrine falcon is much like human
THE PEREGRINE FALCON. 43

beings who are not in favour with the world. No one
wants him now, so he may be left to take care of himself ;
and if any person shoots him, or robs his nest, no trouble
or penalty will follow.

Of all the noble faleon family, the peregrine used to be
the favourite. His long pointed wings help him to rise
higher in the air than his relative the hawk, and he is
more easily taught and trained than the eagle.

He has been found in most of the mountainous parts
of Europe, in the clefts of the rocks away in Australia,
and throughout both North and South America. There
are still falcons in England, but Scotland is more in favour
with them, especially the most lonely parts of the Shetland
Islands.

The mother-bird is always larger than the male; her
plumage is a little redder on the lower feathers, and not
quite of so blue a shade on the upper ones. The male
peregrine falcon grows lighter as he gets older. In the
first year the upper feathers are light brown, with an
ash-coloured tinge here and there. The head and the
neck are then whitish, and are marked with brown and
red spots; the throat and the under parts are of a dirty
white with brown marks; and the legs are yellow.
Afterwards the upper feathers turn gray, and are marked
by dark-brown bands. The beak is lead-colour, the head
and the neck are bluish black on the upper parts, but
‘quite white about the throat. The quill feathers of the
44 THE PEREGRINE FALCON.

wings and tail are of a dusky black, but the under parts
are white, marked by streaks of brown.

You must look at the picture and notice the bold,
bright eyes of this handsome bird; and his strong, curved
claws, which are so well able to seize and grasp his prey.

I scarcely think that falcons of this kind are so
common now as to be seen much in the great busy city
of London; but it is said that sixty or seventy years ago
they often made their winter quarters on the top of
Westminster Abbey and other large churches, descending
to seize the tame pigeons that they caught a glimpse of.

The nest of a peregrine falcon is built on the face of
some high cliff, quite out of the reach of man. It is of a
large size, and is made of sticks mixed cleverly with the
stems of the mountain grasses.

Here, then, the mother-bird lays either three or four
eggs, which are of a dull red colour and marked with
dark spots.

You may be quite sure that when the little falcons are
hatched they never are in want of food; for the parents
keep them well supplied, and they feast on grouse, pheas-
ants, partridges, and other excellent fare.

It is only while he has a little family to care for that
the falcon makes any sound; at other times he is quite
a silent bird. I suppose the care of his children makes
him timid lest danger should happen to them, and more

eager too after prey ; whatever the cause may be, he utters
THE PEREGRINE FALCON. 45

every now and then a shrill, clear cry, which is never
heard from him at any other period.

Falcons of this kind are not sociable; you do not see
other nests upon the same cliff. The gulls and other sea-
birds build near, and I am sorry to say they are apt to
suffer by such rashness, for the falcon gets hold of many a
nice young gull for his supper.

He waits until the parents have gone off to get food
for the little ones, and then he drops down on the nest and
carries off one of the helpless young things that he has had
his eye on for some time.

. Perhaps you may have heard the long word “ pere-
grinations” used for wandering and roaming about. If so,
you will at once guess why this is called the peregrine

faleon—he often travels about seeing many countries.


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a



THE SNOWY OIVL.

I DARESAY you know that owls are for the most part birds
of the night. This one of which you have now the picture
is unlike some of his relatives, for he comes out and shows
himself in broad daylight. He lives in both hemispheres,
but in Europe he is not often seen south of Sweden, and in
America he likes best the region of Hudson Bay.

You may be sure from his name that this owl has beau-
tiful white plumage. Here and there may be seen very
small dots of brown on the head and the wings, and there
are some narrow stripes of the same shade about his body ;
but the legs are covered to the claws with long, thick
feathers, of the purest white, and at a short distance it
THE SNOWY OWL. 47

would be very difficult to distinguish him from the snowy
branches of the trees in the cold countries he dwells in.

The margins of lakes and rivers are the places where he
goes a-fishing; but he is quite as clever in catching hares
and squirrels as they dart from the thick underwood of
some great gloomy forest. A rat, too, is not at all dis-
agreeable to this owl’s taste; and indeed you might almost
fancy that he would feel uncomfortable from eating as he *
does. To admit of him satisfying a very large appétite,
however, he has the power of stretching his stomach to
take in as much as he chooses.

There is not one of the owl tribe that can fly as fast as
this beautiful snowy species; and he can also stay much
longer in the air than most birds do.

The full-grown female is rather larger than her mate,
measuring five feet in width and two in length.

She arranges her nest among the branches of a tree, in
some hole of a rock, or sometimes even on the ground.
Two eggs are laid there, snow-white in colour, and she sits
patiently on them until her little ones come forth from the
shell.

Although the snowy owl prefers the most northern
countries of the Old World, he inhabits the Shetland Islands,
and has been seen in Orkney. There, however, he does
not fly about by day as he does in America. He keeps
more to the usual habits of an owl.

About twilight he knows it will be a famous time for
48 THE SNOWY OWL.

getting hold of the little field-mice and small birds, so away
he starts in quest of them. The crows and such like birds
fly at him, as if they thought to provoke him to a fight ;
but the snowy owl treats them with great scorn, and dart-
ing through the air leaves them far enough behind.

The feet of the snowy owl are so formed that he can
easily grasp his prey. “The claws are long, curved, and
very sharp indeed.

Sometimes sportsmen are made very angry by the way
in which this bird serves them. He will follow them all
through a long day, perching on the highest trees above
their heads. When a bird has been shot, down comes this
greedy owl and carries it off before any one has time to
look round.

A reward is sometimes offered to those who will destroy
these owls; but an idea prevails that to meddle with them
brings what people call ill-luck, so few care to do anything
to a bird of such evil omen.

The voice of this snowy owl is very dismal. It would
frighten those who heard it in the stillness of a dark night

and did not know what it was.


THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL,

I po not think we can find any beauty in the portrait
of this bird; but he is a strange-looking fellow, and
I hope you will not mind reading about him and _ his
habits.

The name tells at once that he lives in America. Per-
haps he is most common in the United States, but these
eagle-owls are found in many other parts. No place could
be too dark or too damp for his retreat. He will choose
the hollow of a tree in some swampy forest and there make
himself both happy and comfortable. ;

The chief colouring of this bird is a sort of mixed black,

white, and yellowish brown. The throat is quite white,
(84) 4
50 THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL.

edged with a brown band, and the under parts are marked
by countless little dark bars on the reddish surface, mingled
with a very little white. You can just see the tail in the
picture, and notice that it has six or seven black bands
across it. The face is brown, and is bounded on each side
by a black stripe. The legs and toes are of a light brown,
and the beak and claws are black. Those bright searching
eyes, which note all that is going on, are yellow. The
female Virginian eagle-owl is rather darker and duller in
her shading, and the white about the throat is not so pure
in its tint. Her nest is rather large, and is made of
branches, which are held together by roots and twigs, and
then well lined with leaves. Two eggs are laid here, which
in size are much the same as the eggs of a hen.

When the young are hatched they give their parents
plenty to do in the way of bringing food to the nest, for
they are always hungry, and need a great deal to eat.
Mice, moles, rats, frogs, and young lizards are among the
meals which the old eagle-owls provide for their children,
but a leveret or a plump little rabbit will please them
better, if such a thing can be found.

_ Partridges and other well-tasting birds are prey that
this eagle-ow] takes pains to secure, hunting chiefly at dusk,
because. that is the time when the little feathered creatures
are getting to roost, and so are caught more easily than
when they are wakeful and sprightly.

If this greedy bird can get to a hen-house it is very
THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL. 51

sure that not a chicken will be left unless the robber is
disturbed before his deed is done.

From all the accounts that travellers have given us, the
cries of the eagle-owl at night are enough to strike terror,
into the bravest. Sometimes it may be a sudden shout)
that one could never believe came from any bird; or per-
haps the sounds are like half-stifled screams, as from some
person who is being suffocated.

Then the movements of this eagle-owl are very stealthy
and quiet, so that he can approach unawares. His power
of flying is not very great, because the feathers of his
wings are so soft and downy that he can use them best
near the ground. They have not force enough to help him
to soar in the air to any wonderful height. The darkness
of his retreat just suits his eye-sight, because the full light
of sunshine would dazzle him. He looks forward to twi-
light as the time when he can move about without suffering
any discomfort of this kind.

Should any one disturb. this bird in his retired home,
he does not fly right away. He will shuffle from place to
place uneasily, or stay as if fixed to one spot by surprise,
ruffling his plumage and looking quite bewildered, while he
utters a sharp hissing sound, or makes a chattering with
his beak.

At such times the little thrushes, blackbirds, and others
grow quite saucy. They know that this enemy of theirs

is, for the moment, stupified, and cannot gather his wits
52 THE VIRGINIAN EAGLE-OWL.

together for an attack, so they peck at him.and flutter
round his head, and so add to his uneasiness. It is rather
mean of them truly to take such advantage of the eagle-
owl’s perplexity, but their families and friends have suffered
so much from his greediness that it is not to be wondered
at if they hate him. Still there is a proverb which says,
“ Every one has his turn,” and at the approach of twilight
our Virginian eagle-owl may punish some of these venture-

some little creatures with death.




THE BARN OWL,

HERE we have an owl that is very useful. But for him as
watchman and guardian in the barn, there is no telling
how much mischief the rats and mice might do there.
When he drops from his perch to the ground he makes no
noise, so the destructive little animals do not know what
great enemy is near until they feel his sharp talons. By
that time their chances of escape are all over.

While the sun shines brightly, the barn owl sleeps ;
towards evening he rouses himself and bethinks him of
what he has to do:

You may see by his picture that the owl’s eyes are
very large. They take in so much light, that in the day-
time he is dazzled and blinded by it, and this gives him a
stupid and bewildered air if he is exposed to it.
54 THE BARN OWL.

He flies without any noise, and thus when he comes
out in the dusk of a summer’s evening from behind some
old tomb in a churchyard, or after hiding in a crumbling
wall, he startles the passer-by terribly, as he gives a hideous
sereech and darts on his way. In country districts, where
peasants believe many old sayings that really have no truth
in them, it is supposed that an owl flitting by with that
wild cry is telling those who hear it of some great mis-
fortune that is about to befall them.

As the barn owl is the commonest of all the tribe, and
is well known in England, it is not needful to describe him
closely. You see by his portrait that he has no tufts on
the top of the head like the horned owl; and that his
beak is not curved all the way down, but is arched only
near the point. Round the eyes there are straight, stiff
feathers, which give the bird a very strange expression.

In colour the owl is gray, mingled with dusky brown,
which increases as he grows older.

He loves solitary places, and thus he chooses a home in
some ruined building or in the hollow of some old tree.

Like the snowy owl, he has a very large appetite ; and
he does not turn a deaf ear to its voice, you may be sure.
He can see the very smallest speck on the ground, when
you and I could perceive nothing; and a mouse cowering
in the corner of a corn-rick has no chance of passing un-
noticed by the barn owl. a

He may not be a general favourite—for birds of prey
THE BARN OWL. 55

are not greatly beloved by most of us—but the farmer
gives him a good character; and so he ought, for this bird
does him better service than a dozen or two of cats.

It is said, though, that if he can rob the hen-roost it
will be a great pleasure to him, and this certainly is against
him; but then people ought not to give him the chance of
such a night’s work.

I have not space in which to tell you half the stories
I have heard of people being terrified by the noises of the
barn owl. Many a ghost-tale might be traced to the
sounds he has made in the top of unused chimneys or in
the ledge of some water-spout.

The nest of the barn owl is very well built of sticks
piled together, and-the inside is lined with feathers and
dry leaves. After the young ones have gone away and it
is quite deserted, a good many bones and feathers are found
there, to tell of the terrible end of many a little mouse and
bird.




THE OSTRICH.

THE bird about which I am now to tell you is the largest
of all birds,—so large, that his weight keeps him from try-
ing to fly. In ancient times, the size of the ostrich, and
his swift pace, caused learned men to say that he was half
bird and half beast. The Greeks and the Romans knew
him by the name of “camel-bird;” for, like the camel, he
can go a long time without drinking any water, and he also
bends his legs and lies down in the same way as the camel.

If you happeried to be travelling in the deserts of Africa
or of Asia, you might see a band of these huge birds in
THE OSTRICH. 57

the distance, and might fancy them to be men on horseback.
The mistake has been made many a time, so strange do
they look, until they are near enough to be known as
gentle, harmless ostriches.

In our picture you see a male and a female bird. The
male has the lowér part of the neck and the whole of the
body covered with black feathers, mingled with a few
white ones. _ The female is of a gray-brown shade, just
fringed with white. Both birds have white tails, and the
larger plumes of their wings are of the same pure colour.
Only while they are young have ostriches any feathers on
their legs; and even then they fall off after the first year,
and never appear again.

I have said that this huge bird is too heavy to fly;
but there is another reason for his powerlessness to raise
himself from the ground. Nature has given him very
small wings, and the feathers do not fit closely together as
in the case of flying birds. They are little, loosely-floating
plumes, which can be spread out as the ostrich runs, but
are of no other use to him. It is for these light and grace-
ful plumes, which ornament our hats and bonnets, that the
poor bird is hunted and robbed.

Have you ever heard it said of any person that he has
“the appetite of an ostrich”? Let me tell you what this
means, An ostrich never seems to have had too much, and
nothing is too hard or too heavy for him to swallow.

Pieces of leather, lumps of iron, stones, nails—these and
58 THE OSTRICH.

other such things are consumed without causing him any
uncomfortable feelings.

Although these birds always live together in large
bands, each male chooses one particular female ostrich to
be his companion. The eggs are very heavy, and have
extremely hard shells of a dirty white colour. The con-
tents of an ostrich egg’would make as much as thirty of
the largest eggs any of our common hens lay. They are
thought to be a great dainty.

The female bird does not build a nest; she scoops out
a large hole, and there leaves her eggs. The burning rays
of the sun all day are quite enough to hatch them without
her sitting on them, as most mother-birds do; but some-
times she comes to them during the night, when the air is
cool. When the little ostriches come forth from the shell,
they are not helpless as most young birds are; they can
run swiftly on their strongly-built legs, and search for food
without troubling their parents.

The chase of the full-grown ostrich needs a great deal
of skill and patience, both in the Arab and in his. horse.
He is a very gentle bird, never even attempting to do harm
when hurt or attacked; still the speed with which these
great long legs get over the ground would make it almost
impossible to overtake an ostrich if he had the sense to run
in a straight line.’ But though on first seeing an enemy
the bird begins to run swiftly, fear soon. makes him turn
from side to side, Thus the hunter gains on him, and
'
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ee lll

THE OSTRICH. 59

seizes the right moment for throwing a stick between his
legs, which stops his course sufficiently to allow him to be
made captive.

Sometimes, as a last resource, he hides his head in the
sand, as if he supposed that he could in that fashion escape
being seen! Even when the chase is easy, it takes at least
six or eight hours before the frightened bird can be secured.
When taken, he does not show any ill-temper. In time, he
becomes so tame that his Arab master can mount and ride

him as if he were a horse.




THE LMU.

HERE we have a bird nearly as large as the African
ostrich. In form the two are somewhat alike; but the
emu stands lower on the legs, his neck is shorter, and his
body is thicker. You might almost fancy that he had no
wings, for, except when he lifts them up, they cannot be
seen. They look then as if they were covered with rough
hair instead of with feathers. On the head and neck
there is so little plumage that the skin shows quite plainly.
THE EMU. 61

Down the bird’s back there is a parting, and the feathers
fall on either side.

In colour the emu is dull brown mottled with gray.
Both the male and the female are of the same hue; but
the little ones, when first coming out of the shell, are much
handsomer as regards the shading of their feathers.

If you will look at the picture you will see that this is
a very long-legged bird. It stands sometimes as high as
seven feet, though most of those that have been brought
to England have not been more than five or six feet in
height.

The emus are found in Australia and in the islands
near it. In former times the greatest numbers of them
were seen about Port Jackson and Port Phillip; but since
settlers in Australia have increased, the birds have moved
off to seek shelter in the quieter parts of the country.

The food of the emu is always vegetable; he seeks
roots, fruit, and herbs, and thus is quite harmless to all
other living things. You may suppose that such a large
bird, with legs so long and powerful, is able to run very
swiftly. When he takes flight from those who want to
secure him, he manages to leave them so far behind that
it is not easy to get a shot at him. Travellers tell us that
the dogs of New South Wales have a great dislike to
attack the emu. The odour of the bird’s flesh is disagree-
able to them; and then he has a habit of striking out his

feet in a way that sometimes injures them very much.
62 THE EMU.

To avoid the blow, those dogs that have been well trained
to the chase make a sudden spring at the neck, and by so
doing the bird is quite overcome.

On King’s Island, in Bass Strait, there was once a band
of English seal-fishers, whose dogs had been taught neither
to fear nor to shun the emu. While their masters were
busy with the seal-fishery, these clever animals would go
forth hunting in the woods, and thus they destroyed every
day some bird or small animal that served for the food of
the whole party. Sometimes they caught a kangaroo, the
flesh of which is said to make capital soup; and some-
times an emu, which when cooked is a little like beef.
The dogs would go back to the fishermen’s dwelling after
their chase, and by signs get them to follow to the spot
where the supply would be found all ready to be carried
home and turned into a meal. .

It is not every part of an emu that can be eaten.
The legs are the best, and to carry these some distance is
a wearying business even for a strong man. Their egos
are thought to be extremely good, and the natives have
scarcely any other food while these are plentiful. They
are as large as fhe ege of an ostrich, with thick shells of
a dark-green colour.

We have not had any account of the way in which the
female emu makes her nest when she is living in a wild
state. Those that have hatched their young in the collec-
tions of birds in several large cities of Kurope, lay generally
THE EMU. 63

six or seven eggs. The male takes his share of the work
of sitting on them till the little ones break the shell, and
come forth in their grayish-white feathers, with broad
black stripes running down the back.

When living thus in captivity, the emu gets perfectly
tame, and seems to keep in good health in our English
climate. For this reason it has never been difficult to
breed young ones; so the bird is not so scarce as some of
those that are brought to us across the ocean. When
William the Fourth was King of England, he had some
emus among his collection at Windsor Castle, and some of
the young ones came from there to the Zoological Gardens.

Go when you may to Regent's Park, I do not think you
are likely to find the emus’ house empty, so you will be
able to say whether this picture of the great bird is a good

one,




THE CROWNED CRANE.

WE have here a bird that was first known about four
hundred years ago. At that time the Portuguese were
finding out the western coast of Africa. Among other dis-
coveries, they made that of the crowned crane, which they
had never seen in Europe. Since that time, many of these
cranes have been brought away from their native country.
They are called “crowned” because of their crest, which, as
you see in the picture, is a little after the shape of a royal
crown.

’ The front of the head is covered with close black feathers
as soft as velvet, and behind this there rises the strange-

looking crest. It is yellow in colour, and fringed with
THE CROWNED CRANE. 65

black at its edges. The shade of the crowned crane’s
body and neck is a bluish-slate, and the quill feathers of
the tail and wings are black. There are also some bright
brown feathers in the tail, and some in the wings that are
of snowy whiteness. There is no plumage on the cheeks
and temples, which are of a rose-red hue. Sometimes the
other unfeathered parts are just as bright, but now and
then they are without any colour.

On the upper part of the throat this crane has a fold
of brilliant crimson skin, very much like the wattle of a
turkey, which you must have noticed often in such a well-
known British bird. Beneath this fold the feathers are
long and slender, falling gracefully down over the crane’s
breast.

The crowned crane is very much admired for his form
and plumage. He walks in a very stately, dignified way,
as if he felt himself a handsome and important fellow,
never looking clumsy and awkward—not even when (after
the family habit) he stands on one leg.

All cranes like damp and marshy places, and this
crowned bird prefers them to any other spot; for there
abound the fishes, worms, and insects that form his chief
food. He eats grain and other vegetable substances also,
but he does not like them so well as he does a nice
long wriggling worm, a little eel, or something equally
tasty.

I cannot say that this bird has a sweet voice, for indeed
(84) 9)
66 THE CROWNED CRANE,

the noise he makes has been compared to the harsh sounds
of a trumpet. He has another note also, which is a little
like the clucking of a hen, only being much louder it is
much more disagreeable.

He does not belong to the class of birds that are noted
for song. Indeed, many a bird of handsome plumage has
nothing in the way of voice with which he may hope to
charm our ears.

When resting on one long leg, and with his neck drawn
inwards, this crane is not off guard. A very little noise
will rouse him at once; and then, lengthening out his neck,
he looks boldly round to see what is likely to happen, and
whether he has need to think of self-defence. If there be
danger near, he utters a loud ery, as if to give warning to
all his friends and relations.

Like other cranes, this crowned bird does not care for
the life of a hermit. When you see one you may expect
soon to come upon others; for they bear each other com-
pany in their fishing expeditions, and make their dwellings
among the same reeds and bushes.






THE DEMOISELLE.

HERE is another member of the crane family; but as it puts
itself into attitudes rather like those of an affected young
lady, it has become known by the name of “ Demoiselle.”

The form of this demoiselle is very graceful. When
standing upright it measures about three feet six inches
high; and its length is usually three feet from the point
of the bill to the tip of the tail.

Please look now at the picture, and notice the shades
of this bird’s plumage. The whole upper part of the head
is of light gray; and the sides of it, as well as the neck
and the long pointed feathers that hang over the breast,
are deeply black in hue. Behind each eye there is a tuft
68 THE DEMOISELLE,

of pure white feathers, which float loosely in the air with
every movement of the bird. The rest of the body is
covered with plumage of a slaty-gray colour, excepting that
the points of the quill feathers are black; and so also is
the tail. JI am sure you will say that the demoiselle is
very prettily coloured.

This bird is one of those that like change of air and
scene. It travels to many countries, and it could tell us
many interesting things, if only we were able to hold a
conversation with it. Very few living specimens of the
demoiselle have been brought either to England or to
France ; but about a hundred years ago there were six in
the collection at Versailles (near Paris) that had all been
bred there, and were in capital health.

They are very good-tempered, gentle birds, and always
seem to bear captivity happily enough. When noticed and
admired, they show that they are pleased by bowing and
bending: sometimes they even take to dancing—after a
style of their own, I need scarcely tell you.

In its natural state the demoiselle chooses a damp,
marshy place for a dwelling; and there it finds fish and
insects when it chooses, though it prefers vegetable food to
any other.

When on its travels, this bird is never seen very far
north ; it visits chiefly Constantinople and that part of
Europe. Africa is really its native country, and there you
may find it all along the shores of the Mediterranean Sea
THE DEMOISELLE. 69

and the Atlantic from Egypt to Guinea; but it is most
common about Tripoli. Travellers in the interior of the
south of Africa have also seen the pretty bird there, par-
ticularly near the Cape.

When resting, the demoiselle droops its head and hides
it under one of its wings. Among a band of them, one
always keeps watch, and utters a ery of warning when any
danger threatens. Two eggs are generally laid in the nest,
on which the mother-bird sits with much patience; and
by the time the little ones are able to fly, it is about the
season for them to follow their parents to the warm south.

If the demoiselle’s voice is heard much in the daytime,
rainy weather may be expected. When it is more than
usually loud, it is thought to be a sign of coming storms.
If a group is seen flying quietly about in the early morn-
ing, it is pretty sure that the day will be calm and fair;
otherwise they keep on the ground, and do not use their
wings even for a short flight.

Some very handsome specimens of this bird were sent
from Tripoli to the Zoological Society many years ago.


THE WHITE STORK.

TuIs bird spends his winter in a warm climate, and passes
the spring and summer in the cooler parts of Europe.

The people of Holland are very glad to see this bird ;
and as there is a saying that they bring good fortune to
any one who entertains them as guests, men and women, as
well as the rosy-faced Dutch children, put wooden boxes or
frames outside the houses, or on the tops of the chimneys,
hoping to persuade the stork to stay with them.

The ancient Egyptians worshipped this bird as some-
thing sacred, second only in their reverence to the ibis.
One reason, perhaps, why the white stork is such a favourite
is, that he destroys snakes, mice, rats, and other troublesome
creatures.

Before we find out any more as to his habits, please
THE WHITE STORK. 71

look at the picture and notice the long slender legs of this
bird; his sharp bill, which is quite seven inches in length,
and of an orange-red colour; and the black feathers of his
wings, that are such a contrast to the snowy plumage of
his body. When fully spread out, these wings of his
measure quite eight feet across.

The movements of the stork are slow, and he takes
very long steps, as you may easily believe. In flying he
looks awkward, for then the head and neck are extended
forward, while the long legs stretch out behind him; but
he cuts the air rapidly, and that, we must suppose, is the
chief object of a bird when he takes wing.

About the end of August the storks collect in com-
panies, and seem to discuss their plans for the coming
winter. At any rate they make a great fuss, and a loud
clattering with their beaks, which serve them instead of
voices.

Hundreds of these birds meet thus together in one
spot, coming from all the districts around ; and their “ par-
liament,” or whatever we like to call it, lasts several days.
_ At length their decision is made, and all the storks mount
at once into the air, and are soon out of sight, because of
the great height at which they fly.

They return in much smaller bands when spring comes.
The only storks that remain all the winter in the northern
countries of Europe are those that are confined, or that

have become so fond of their human friends as not to care
72 THE WHITE STORK.

any longer to follow the fashion of their family in a natural
state.

But even the storks which have not been made captives
are very fond of being among men and women. ‘They
choose such parts as are most frequented for building, and
they will stalk along a crowded street without showing the
least alarm. It is to be feared that a stork that came into
London, or any other of our large cities, would fare very
ill; but in Holland or in Germany you could not find the
roughest street lad who would do harm to one of these
sociable birds. Year after year the same storks come back
to their old dwelling-places, and they are welcomed with
delight.

In the dikes and marshes of those countries that the
white stork likes best there are plenty of small reptiles
which serve him for food. He is very fond of frogs, and
will stand on one leg in a thoughtful way for a long time,
with his head resting on his shoulder, and his eyes steadily
fixed upon the rushes and damp weeds among which he
expects to find this dainty meal.




THE BLACK STORK.

Now we have a stork that is not at all so friendly as the
one of which we read last. Instead of making his home
among men, he gets as far from them as he can. Rather
than seek the black stork in cities, you must follow him to
the banks of some lonely river, or to some lake which is
not visited often by the human race.

He always goes to the South for the winter; but when
he returns in spring he chooses one of the most northern
countries of Europe for his dwelling-place. The black
storks are therefore almost unknown in Holland, and are
much commoner in Sweden and Norway. Even as far off
as in European Russia and Siberia there are a great many
that settle in some solitary place, until the end of summer

warns them to fly away to more genial regions.
74 THE BLACK STORK.

The black stork is not entirely of that hue which
gives him his name. His head, neck, and upper feathers
are of a deep and glossy black, but these colours are mingled
with various shades of green and violet. Then the under
surface of this stork’s body is covered with white plumage ;
but the tail is quite black.

He has extremely long wings, and they bear him up so
high when he flies, that not even the longest-sighted pair
of eyes that we could boast among us would be able to
make out anything beyond a sort of speck in the sky.

The mother-bird lays two buff-coloured eggs, and then
sits patiently till they are hatched. Afterwards she brings
lizards and little serpents to feed her young ones with ;
and the male stork also helps in providing for the wants of
his family. When the young stork is taking its first lessons
in flying, the parents keep near—one on either side—to
support it in the air and to give it courage.

Sometimes the top of a tall pine tree is chosen as the
site of the nest of this unsociable bird. There, at least, it
is very sure that no human beings will come too near.
Sticks, twigs, and reeds are the stork’s building materials ;
and the inside of the nest is lined with moss, herbs, and
little bits of down.

The only noises these birds make are with their
wings, and a sharp clattering with the bill. I must tell
you that this sharp, strong weapon, which is seven
or eight inches long, is never used by the stork to do
THE BLACK STORK. 75

any harm, not even when he is a prisoner, and has many
a chance of giving a “peck” that would not be very soon
forgotten.

In some of the eastern parts of France, and also in
Germany, black storks may be seen, in the most silent and
deserted spots. They are never loved, like their white
relation, about whose return the children sing as many
songs as they do about the return of the swallow. Still,
no one would kill or wound a black stork wantonly.

Sometimes a flock of them, when flying towards the
South, will stretch a half-mile in breadth, and will take two
or three hours in passing by.

The black stork is not so large as the white one, but
there is no difference in their form. The young birds have
rather a browner tinge on their feathers, and their bills do
not show such an orange shade as the bills of the parents.




THE MARABOUT STORK.

You could never mistake this stork for our friend which
is so well known in Europe. The picture shows you how
unlike he is to his relative, even though he belongs to the
same long-legged, long-billed family. In height he is about
five feet, so he is a tall bird as he stands in a thoughtful
attitude by the reeds and water-plants of one of his favourite
marshy places. He would not like the driest, sunniest
meadow you could find for him, nor stay upon any breezy
THE MARABOUT STORK. 7

hill-top that we should think a pleasant and healthy place
for a dwelling.

You will notice at once that he has no plumage about
his dusky head, nor on the neck and the sort of pouch at
the end of it. These last are of a pale flesh colour, but if
the stork is excited they deepen to a red shade. Now, in the
way of feathers, he has his back and wings clothed in black,
about which there will be a tinge of dark green. But the
longer feathers have no such shade, and are of a very deep
black, with a few bands of white, which are broad or
narrow, according to the age of the bird. The under parts
are all of white, and these furnish the plumes for which
the marabout stork is so much in favour.

I fear that when there is a great demand for “ma-
rabout feathers ” to deck the heads of ladies of fashion, it is
the sentence of death for numbers of these quiet, gentle
birds.

Take another glance, if you please, at his large bill
and his long black legs. Sometimes, though, these legs
have rather a gray hue over them, because the stork shakes
out from his wings a sort of white dust that falls over
them.

Every part of tropical Africa is a natural home to the
marabout stork. Sometimes he is seen as far south as the
Cape of Good Hope; but he is more commonly found about
Senegal, and from there come most of the graceful plumes
that people in Europe will give a good price for. There
78 THE MARABOUT STORK.

is one thing in which this bird is like the vulture. He
will clear up all the dead birds and animals he may come
upon; and this certainly makes the air more healthy for
human beings, as well as the disappearance of the refuse
heaps in the villages and towns for which the inhabitants
may thank this stork. This will tell you that the bird has
a large appetite, which he finds it hard. to satisfy, other-
wise he would be too dainty to eat dirt and carrion, A
little animal such as the rat he will swallow whole. To
take it in a slower way would be, in his judgment, like
“making two bites of a cherry,” as we sometimes say.

But in regard to mankind the marabout stork is all
peace and friendliness, so that when caught it is a very
easy matter to make him tame, When they are at rest
they usually stand on one leg, with the neck drawn close
in, so that the bill falls on the breast. But there are times
when they will sit on the ground with their long legs
stretched out before them, and this has a very laughable
effect. If something should happen to excite a marabout
stork much he will draw himself up to his full height,
lengthen out his neck, and appear to threaten to do some
harm with his bill. It is not, however, a reason for alarm,
because he has not the courage to try to do any; and
even if such a thing was natural to him, he has no great
strength in that large bill of his.

A gentleman who had been travelling about in Africa

lived some time in a part of the country where these ma-
THE MARABOUT STORK. 79

rabout storks were well known, and took a young one to
bring up as a domestic animal. At dinner time this bird
learned to take up his post behind his master’s chair, and
he was always fed from such dishes as he best liked.

The appetite of this stork led him to try to avoid the
trial of long waiting. He would watch for a good chance
of snatching at a dish as it passed him, and though the ser-
vants were watchful he sometimes managed to succeed in
his evil projects. At such times he would seize a whole
fowl and swallow it in one mouthful without any uncom-
fortable results. The same bird was in the habit of flying
where he liked and roosting in the top of the tallest trees ;
but from there he managed to see if anything to eat was
being carried across the hall, and he would come down at

once to try to get hold of it.




THE COMMON HERON.

WE will now, if you please, read about a bird that used to
be very often seen in England. In those old days when
hawking was the amusement of the nobles, the chase of
the heron was thought the greatest exercise of skill;
because its powerful wings raised it to such a height that
even the cleverest falcon had some difficulty in coming up
with it. Heronries were made then, where the birds were
kept ready for this amusement; but I do not think one
could be found at the present day. Even about a hundred
years ago, it was said that only one heronry had been
preserved in England.

There are several different kinds of herons, but that
of which you have the picture is, as its name tells you, the
best known of all the group.
THE COMMON HERON, 81

It is not a heavy bird, and that is why it can fly so
well. The weight of a full-grown common heron is seldom
more than three and a half pounds,

They are birds of passage, and may be seen, sometimes
in Russia, sometimes in Poland, but oftener in Germany
and Holland. They choose an oak or some such lofty tree
in which to build; but they take care to dwell in the
neighbourhood of some marsh or stream, where they find
plenty of food. The nest is large, and twigs, herbs, and
reeds are got together to form it, while inside it is warmly
lined with feathers and bits of wool. Here the mother-
bird lays three or four greenish-brown egos, about the size
of a hen’s ego. On these she sits with patience, while the
male bird flies about to find food. Falcons, martens, and
weasels of all kinds will rob the heron’s nest if a chance
come; even the raven will play the same shabby trick.
When the young ones appear, both parents watch over
them, and bring them fish to eat ; but as soon as they are
strong enough to fly, they are driven away from the nest—
as if Mr. and Mrs. Heron thought it high time for their
sons and daughters to provide for themselves.

About the middle of August the old birds desert their
nest, and wander about from one stream to another,
forming quite a band that will take flight for warmer lands
as soon as the summer is quite over. With the first frost
the herons disappear southward, taking to their wings by

moonlight.
(84) 6
82 THE COMMON HERON.

They stay away until the end of March, when ice and
snow are no longer to be feared. If by chance any herons
spend the winter in the northern countries of Europe, it is
because the weather gives no sign of being very severe.

The food of these birds is the fish they find in the
running streams. Nothing could be greater than the
patience with which the heron waits for its prey. Stand- -
ing on one foot, with the head drooping on the breast, you
might think the bird was asleep. Perhaps the poor little
trouts do fancy this; for seeing that no notice is taken of
them, they grow bold, and come too near. It is for such a
moment that the heron has been waiting so quietly. Down
goes its sharp-edged bill, and I need not tell you that the
life of the venturesome fish comes to an end then and
there.

When fish is scarce, these birds eat frogs very will-
ingly ; nor do they despise snails and worms, or the green
duck-weed that you see so often floating on the surface of
a stagnant pool.

The general colour of the common heron is gray, with
a tinge of blue. You may see by the picture that a crest
of black feathers ornaments the back of the head, shading
the neck. The quill feathers are black, and the under
part of the plumage is pure white. Very little difference
can be seen between the male and the female bird. The
young ones have no crest at all, and their backs and wings

are of a darker gray.
THE COMMON HERON, 83

You cannot look at the heron without noticing what a
very long bill he has, so that fishing is an easy task for
him; or that his legs are slender and his toes long. I
must not forget to tell you something about the bird’s
throat, while we are thinking of his personal appearance.
It might be made of elastic, from the way in which it can
expand. If the heron has caught a fish which you would
say was big enough to choke him, it does not matter ;
this convenient throat stretches out in a fan-like shape,
and down goes the choice dainty as nicely as possible.

There is a handsome member of the heron family that
belongs only to America, and is of a spotless white hue.
The habits and character of this kind are much the same

as in our common heron of Europe.




THE TIGER BITTERN.

WE will now make the acquaintance of a bird that is a
distant relation of the heron.

He is one of the long-billed kind that are so clever in
catching the creeping, crawling things which abound in
damp and marshy places. You will see in this picture of
the bittern that his toes are long and slender, his legs not
covered with plumage, and that there is a space near the
eyes without any sign of feathers. In all these respects
you may trace a likeness to the herons, which are better
known among us.

There is a European bittern, but the one of which we

are speaking here is a native of Guiana.
THE TIGER BITTERN. 85

When his neck is drawn out to its full extent he
measures altogether about two feet and a half long. To
look at him in his picture this tiger bittern has rather a
round, plump form, because for a bird of his class the neck
and legs are short in comparison with others.

On the upper part of his plumage are various shades
of brown, and they are crossed by bars of black,

The ground of head and neck is of the lightest shade,
and. the black markings might be better called spots than
bars. On the under surface of this bittern’s plumage the
brown hue is as light as it can be, so that on the throat it
becomes nearly white; but still it is crossed like the other
parts with numerous little black bars. So you could not
reckon him among the bright-liveried birds; his dress is
of sober tints, which would not attract the eye of any one
passing carelessly by his haunts.

Very likely his want of beauty is often the safeguard
of his life and liberty. He would be more often made a
mark for the sportsman or the victim of some snare if he
could boast a brilliant plumage, a sweet voice, or some very
interesting and clever ways that would be amusing to
watch in a state of captivity. His custom is to stand, like
the herons, with his eyes fixed on the water or on the
places near where he knows the frogs and insects are lurk-
ing, which he hopes by patience and perseverance to make
his repast. But he does not stand in the one-legged
fashion of the herons; or at any rate if he does, it is not a
86 THE TIGER BITTERN.

common habit which we see him indulging in. During the
dry seasons of Guiana the tiger bittern finds his prey
among the high-growing grass on the banks of the rivers,
and there he will watch for any length of time until some
lizard or small snake or such like reptile presents itself
within easy distance. He keeps up a melancholy, absent
sort of air, as if he had no thought of catching anything ;.
indeed, his expression would seem to say that nothing was
further from his thoughts. This is a clever trick on Mr.
Bittern’s part, because if he showed himself too lively and
active the frogs would not come leaping his way, and the
lizards would glide from him instead of drawing near. He
will even see his prey and feign to take no notice, and so
the victory is easier, because these small creeping and
hopping live things fancy they are unseen or forgotten.

Little do they know how good a memory and how
strong an eyesight this quiet brown bird possesses. The
right moment comes, and quick as thought he has snapped
out what he wants and swallowed it like a pill.

The female bittern builds her nest on the ground, and
there lays seven or eight eggs, which in due time give her
a nice little family of soft downy young ones. In cap-
tivity this tiger bittern does not become sociable and tame;
for we read of one that even after two years disliked all
-notice, and would hide in corners and assume an angry and
threatening air when his owner drew near. Another is

told of that was kept in his own country in a state of
THE TIGER BITTERN. 87

captivity. His constant amusement was watching for rats,
which he caught with great skill; and as they happened
to infest the place, the bittern was more clever in the
work of putting an end to the nuisance than any cat would
have been.




THE WHITE SPOONBILL.

THERE is no need for any one to ask how this bird comes
by his name. One glance at the spoon-shaped bill will be
enough. In other ways he is a good deal like both the
storks and the herons of which we have heard. His food
is the same; but it is said that when the spoonbill is very
much pressed by hunger, and cannot find the small fish and
insects he likes best, there is scarcely anything that he will
refuse.

In plumage the bird is entirely white, except a band of
buff-coloured feathers in front~of the neck, which passes
upwards on either side like a narrow stripe. Look now at
the picture, and notice the crest falling so gracefully back-
wards. The beak is black, except at the rounded part,
and the long legs as well as the feet are black also. The
THE WHITE SPOONBILL. 89

female bird is always smaller than the male; but there is
no other difference between them.

If you were to see a little spoonbill, you would not
admire him so much as you would his father and mother.
He has no beautiful plume on his head, and no buff ring
about his neck; and his general colour is a dingy white,
with black quill feathers.

The spoonbill likes Holland very much for his summer
quarters ; but when the cold season draws near, he wings
his flight to sunny Italy, or even as far south as to Africa.
You would never meet with these birds in inland countries
unless water were near; they choose the coast. Now and
then a spoonbill has been seen in England in its wild state;
but this has happened so rarely of late years, that you
must only expect to find him tamed and imprisoned at the
Zoological Gardens.

The nest is made either among the branches of some
tall tree on a river’s bank, or else among reeds or bushes.
There, three or four whitish eggs are laid, from which in
due time the little birds will come forth.

The spoonbill is one of those birds that have no voice.
He cannot utter a note; and all he is able to do in the way
of making a noise is to clatter and snap with his bill.
This is a way he has of showing when he is angry or
frightened.

In size the spoonbill is smaller than the wild goose;

>

his length from the beak to the tip of the tail is not more
90 THE WHITE SPOONBILL.

than two feet and some six or eight inches. When the
wings are fully spread, the width of the bird is about four
feet.

They are very sociable birds, always being seen in
company, especially when about to set forth on one of their
journeys. Instead of hiding in lonely places, they show a
liking for being within easy reach of the dwellings of men ;
though they do not, like the stork, walk in the streets, or
make a home upon the house-roofs. When at rest, or
waiting to secure the fish they like, the spoonbills usually
stand on one leg. All their movements are slow except
when they are on the wing, and then they move very
quickly through the air.

Perhaps because they have no song, and ‘are So very
quiet and harmless, we think of the spoonbills as melan-
choly sort of birds. Though they show no discontent when
kept confined, there is no liveliness in them; and thus they
do not win so much favour as birds that please the ear
with their voices, or charm the eye with richly-coloured
plumage.



= Y coe i
Setamnt ° PG ot ul
THE SCARLET IBIS.

WE will now read about one of the most splendidly coloured
birds that can be found. It comes from the south of
America, and may be seen on the banks of the large rivers
there, gathered in companies, and feeding on insects, shrimps,
and the smaller kinds of fish. During the heat of the day
and throughout the night this ibis conceals itself in the
depths of the forest; it is only at sunrise and towards sun-
set that it comes out in search of food.

You will see by the picture of this bird that it has
some likeness to the tribe of storks. For many years it
was mistaken for a new variety of stork; but at length
scholars discovered that it was of a different family.
92 THE SCARLET IBIS.

In very ancient times the ibis was worshipped by the
Egyptians as a sacred bird: for century after century it
was the object of their deepest devotion, and they cut
figures of it on their monuments. Then it seemed to dis-
appear from the world’s knowledge, until a British traveller
pointed out the fact that the figures engraved by those
ancient people, and a living bird still commonly seen on the
banks of the river Nile, were all the same ibis.

When found in the Old or the New World, this class
of birds may be known by a long bill, by wings that are
not very large, and by the head being little feathered ;
sometimes the neck also is almost bare of plumage.

The scarlet ibis is entirely of the colour by which it is
known, excepting the tips of its wing feathers, which are
black. Its legs are covered with scales, and are pale red-
brown in colour, like the bill and the feet.

When the young birds first come forth from the nest,
which the mother has carefully hidden in the thicket, they
are covered with black down. After a short time this
changes from black to ash-colour, and at last it becomes
nearly white; by which time the little ibis is of an age to
fly. When the second moulting season is over, the bird
gets a slight tinge of red upon his soft back, which quickly
Spreads over the sides and the under parts of the body.
As he grows older, his bright colour deepens; and when
full grown, he is of as brilliant a scarlet as you could ask
to see,
THE SCARLET IBIS. 93

If the scarlet ibis were not so delicate a bird, there is
no doubt that he would be more commonly seen in our
country: his beautiful plumage would make him a hand-
some ornament, and all lovers of feathered things would be
proud to own him and see him showing off his brilliant
colouring on our green lawns. But England has not the
climate to suit a bird whose native home is under a tropical
sky, and very few of the ibis family are preserved among us.

It is said that he would make more savoury eating
than any fowls in our poultry-yards; but it is very certain
that we shall never get a chance of tasting his flesh, be-
cause of his rarity; and I daresay few of us would wish
to have an ibis served for our dinner.

When taken as a young bird, he soon loses his wildness
and fear, and does not seem to fret over his loss of freedom.




THE PELICAN.

A FABLE has been told about this bird. People hav: ejdaid
that he feeds his young ones with his own blood ; tice
is no truth in the tale. Underneath the pelican's 8 there
is a bag or pouch into which he drops some of the fishes,



he has caught, and so he carries them to his family. The*
tip of his bill is as red as blood; and when he presses this
against his breast, and so forces the fish out of the pouch
into the open mouths of the little ones, it has been imagined
that he has drawn blood from himself for their nourish-
ment. When the female is sitting on her eggs, the male
THE PELICAN. 95

_ bird carries food to her in the same way ; and both parents
do this for their young.

You see by the picture that the pelican’s plumage is of
snowy whiteness; but the quill feathers are black, though
you could not see them unless the wings were spread for
flying. » As*the bird grows old, he gets.a slight tinge of
flesh colour; and when he is of a great age this is mingled
with a very pale yellow. On the head and the neck there
is nothing more than,a thick, short down, which gradually

Seine a kind of tuft behind. The
young pelicans have grayish feathers on their backs and

passes into feathers,

wings, their necks are: of a tinge of ash-colour, and under-
neath they are a dingy white. Sometimes birds at this
age have “been brought home by travellers under the idea
that they were of a different kind from the common pelican;
but” ‘when the feathers have begun to change, and when
they tive become all snowy white, the mistake has been
found” out, of course.



Ka fall-grown pelican is one of the largest specimens of
that class ‘of birds. He will measure about five feet from

Sthe tip of his long bill to his tail, and nearly ten feet across



‘when he spreads out his wings. There is not much strength
‘in his bill, yet he fishes very cleverly. He does not swallow
his prey at once, but dropping it into the pouch of which
you have already heard, he goes off ‘to some rock (when he
has found enough to satisfy his appetite) and there makes

his meal ; which, I can assure you, is a very large one. To
96 THE PELICAN.

let. you know the size of this pouch that lies beneath the
pelican’s bill, I may say that it would hold two or three -
gallons of water ; so you may suppose that a great many
fish can be stowed away in it, either. for the bird or for his
young ones in the nest. These nests are built among the
rocks on the shore of the sea, or by the edge of lakes and
large rivers. . :

It is in America that the largest number of these
white birds may be.seen, wading in the water where
fish is plentiful, either about the rising or the setting of
the sun.

The mother pelican does not make much preparation
for her little ones; she drops her eggs into some crevice in
the rock, or some hole on the river’s bank, and hatches
them there.

These birds can be made very tame, and they. do not
seem unhappy when they have lost their freedom.

The Indians of the North American wilds have taught
them to go out in the morning and fish, and to bring home
what they catch. The master then makes the pelican give
up the contents of its bag; but a fair share is returned to
it for its own eating.

The sparkling eyes of these birds, as well as their
orange-coloured bills and snowy feathers, are very much
admired.


THE WILD SWAN.

As you look at the picture of the wild swan, you will say
that he is very much like those you see so often living
near us in a tame state; yet there are some points in which
the two kinds differ, and we will now find out what these
are. ;

The tame swan has eleven ribs, and the wild bird has
twelve ; and that proves them to be distinct. They differ
from each other also in the colour of their bills—that of
the wild swan is black, while the bill of the tame bird is
of an.orange colour. Then the windpipe in the tame
swan passes directly from the neck to the chest; while

in the wild swan it is curved in a very strange way,
(s4) 7
98 THE WILD SWAN.

which causes him to produce those sounds that have led
to the fanciful idea that he sings just before he is about
to die.

This is now believed to be a mere fable, by all who
have had a chance of watching the bird’s habits. In
olden times, a great deal was written about the beautiful
voice of the dying swan; so that it has become quite a
habit to say of any great poem or other work of genius
which is the last before its author’s death: “It was the
song of the swan.”

If any one lingers rather late on a fine summer evening
in the Zoological Gardens, he may very likely hear the
sounds which the wild swans that live as captives there
are able to make. Some have said they are like the sounds
of the French horn; others compare them to the noise of
two small trumpets such as children use for toys. In
either case we do not get the idea of any very lovely
melody.

You will notice by his portrait that the wild swan does
not hold his long neck in a very graceful way. It is gen-
erally stretched upwards, and thus looks rather out of
proportion. The plumage is as white as that of the tame
bird, but it has here and there a slight tinge of yellowish
gray.

The young ones are of a dusky gray colour during
the first months of life; but they change for the better
in the second year, so passing gradually into the beauty
THE WILD SWAN. 99

of their snow-white feathers, for which they are so much
admired.

The wild swans can fly very swiftly, and so it is very
difficult to shoot one as a flock sails by. In a brisk gale
they travel at the rate of about one hundred miles an hour ;
but when the wind is against them, their progress is slower,
and that is the time when a shot from a gun is likely to
bring one or two down.

In those countries where they are most common they
are sought for their flesh, which when roasted is said to be
very good. Their quill feathers and their down also make
these birds valuable prizes.

You might find the wild swan in nearly all parts of
the northern hemisphere. He passes as far north as to
Iceland and Kamtchatka in the Old World, and he flies
about Hudson Bay in America during the summer months.
In winter he wings his way to the south of Europe, and
even goes to Egypt and Barbary in search of sunshine and
a pleasant climate.

The wild swans are the first of all water-fowl to appear
again in the regions of Hudson Bay, sometimes arriving
while the rivers are still frozen. At such times they keep
near the falls and rapids, and it is then easy for the Indians
to shoot great numbers of them. At the season when they
cast their feathers (which we call moulting) the natives
give them chase; but even then, though less active, they
can skim along the surface of the water very rapidly.
~

100 THE WILD SWAN.

They are hunted at the moulting-time in Iceland also,
dogs and horses being used in the pursuit. The wild
swans are fleeter than any horse; but the dogs manage
to gain on them, and seizing them by the neck drag
them to the ground, and then the men dismount and do
the rest.

The female bird generally lays from five to seven eggs
in the nest she has made on some little island of a lake or
a river. These eggs are of a greenish white, and are so
large that a hungry man might well be satisfied with such
a meal as he would make on one of them.

If two male birds happen to disagree, they fight savagely
with each other. Such a combat is likely to last a whole
day, and almost always ends in the death of the one or the
other.

When caught and kept in a captive state, these birds
submit easily, and appear contented and happy; but as
they are less graceful in their movements, they will never

be thought so ornamental as the beautiful tame swan.
































THE TAME SWAN.

WE come now to the handsomest of all our swimming
birds. The swan looks very noble and graceful on a lake
or a piece of ornamental water; and I daresay there is not
one of us who has not admired him and fed him at some
time in our lives.

The wild swan is found in most of the eastern coun-
tries of Europe, but is commonest of all in Siberia. The
tame swan of our picture may be seen in any of the coun-
tries of the northern hemisphere.

Without looking at his portrait, you know this bird by
his very long, arching neck ; but I will ask you to take a
glance and notice his straight, broad bill, his short legs, and

his feet, which are divided into four toes.
102 THE TAME SWAN.

How surprised we should be now-a-days if a swan
were to be served up for our dinner ; yet in former times this
was the chief dish at any great banquet. In the reigns of
Edward the Fourth and Henry the Seventh, there was a
law in England by which any one who took the eggs of the
swan, or who wantonly destroyed such a valuable bird, was
punished. "

The chief food of the swan consists of the water plants
and the roots that are easily reached with its long, grace-
ful neck. These birds devour all kinds of insects, and
also frogs. It is said that they take fishes also; but this
is denied by some writers, because they think that if it
were so the fish in the ponds whereon the swan lives
would be much more scarce than they are.

When first hatched, the little bird (which we call a
cygnet) is dusky gray, and has a leaden-coloured bill and
legs. In the second year the plumage grows lighter, and
the bill and the legs are pale yellow. In the third year
the young thing turns into a lovely snow-white swan,
as handsome as his parents, and with the same black
legs.

Thirty years is the usual length of life in these beauti-
ful birds; but stories have been told of them reaching a
much greater age. It is not certain that such accounts
should be believed. The weight of a fine swan is from
twenty to twenty-five pounds. The female is smaller
than the male, and her neck is a trifle more slender.
THE TAME SWAN. é 108

She builds on the banks of the river or the lake which
is her home, making a rough sort of nest out of twigs and
reeds, but taking care that the inside is warmly lined with
a coating of her own breast-feathers. Here six or eight
gray eggs are laid, and in five weeks later the young birds
ave hatched. ‘For a fortnight or so the parents give them
a course of swimming lessons, bearing the little creatures
on their own backs or sheltering them under their great
warm wings.

The swan never attempts to injure the smaller birds
(such as the duck) that swim near him; but he would be
very angry with another swan if it ventured to disturb
his nest, and a fight might follow which would last until
the one or the other was killed.

Excepting in such a case, these beautiful white birds

are gentle enough, and quite merit the favour in which we
hold them.




THE CEREOPSIS.

Now, by way of a change, let me tell you of a bird which
T expect you do not know very well by name. The picture
will show you that the cereopsis is somewhat of the same
form as.a goose, except that his legs are a little longer, and
so is his bill.

About a hundred years ago all the travellers who went
to visit and make discoveries in Australia, wrote or
talked about this bird, which they found in large numbers
upon the sea-coast. Some called it a variety of the well-
known goose; others said it must be some smaller kind of
swan than had before been noticed; and there were many

who felt quite puzzled as to what name they ought to give
THE CEREOPSIS. 105

“it. Since those days it has been proved a swimming bird,
called the cereopsis, of which several stuffed specimens have
long been preserved in the large collections of Europe.
During the reign of our last King of England four of the
living Australian cereopsis were kept at Windsor, and
they thrived well. They had several broods of young ones,
and as those were given away, and had in their turn nest-
lings of their own, the cereopsis has found a place in the
Gardens at Regent’s Park, and in other exhibitions of birds
shown in large cities such as Paris.

Thus people know more now of this native of Aus-
tralia than when it was first found in its wild state.

Upon the top of his head this bird has a broad patch
of dull white plumage. He is not one of the smart
feathered tribe, for all the rest of his body is clothed
with rather dingy gray plumage, deeper in shade on the
upper parts, and marked about the tail and wings with
round spots.

The quill feathers of both tail and wings are entirely
black. The bill, though yellow, has a black tip, the legs
are of an orange-red shade, and the feet, as well as a streak
up the leg, are black. I think now I have told you all the
colours that a cereopsis has about him, and you will agree
that he must be of more use than ornament.

We never think the goose a sociable bird; he does not
grow fond of man, and mostly tries to keep us all at a
distance. ,
106 ji THE CEREOPSIS.

In this respect the cereopsis is not like his European
cousin. He is not in the least shy, and will draw close to
a stranger without showing any fear lest harm to himself
may be the unhappy result of his trustfulness.

‘When I say this, I am speaking of the natural habit
of the cereopsis. Like all other birds he loses his confidence
after he has seen that it does not answer well.

At the first they were easily caught by the hand on
account of their friendly feelings to mankind. But those
that remained had the sense to see the mistake which other
members of their family had fallen into; so now they take
to flight, and are not secured without a good deal of patience
and. trouble.

The sailors who land on the Australian coast get many
a savoury dinner off the flesh of the cereopsis; indeed they
eat scarcely anything else in the form of meat while they _
stay there. They employ a good deal of time in chasing the
birds and knocking them down with sticks, so that many
may be caught alive and fed up until needed for cooking
purposes. Doubtless, after a voyage, anything savoury tastes
' particularly good; but the likeness of the cereopsis of Aus-
tralia to an English goose helps us to believe that one of
these birds makes a very excellent dinner. We are told
that its flesh is better flavoured and more delicate than
that of our goose.

It is but seldom that the cereopsis:| leaves the coast to
wander among the woods of the interior country. He makes
THE CEREOPSIS. 107

his dwelling in the grass on the shore, and rarely takes a
swimming excursion. As his food is grass, or the insects
he finds amongst it, he cannot well choose a more conveni-
ent home, and there he grows and fattens until he reaches
about the weight of nine or ten pounds. What voice he
has is deep and hoarse, so that no one could be anxious to
hear it too often.




THE SUMMER DUCK.

WE have here a duck that comes to us from the American
continent, and it is one of the most handsome birds of its
family.

It is well known in the United States, and is just as
plentiful in Mexico and in some of the West India islands.
It came by its name, swmmer duck, because it generally
goes off southwards at the beginning of winter, and returns
to spend the sunimer season in the north. Sometimes it
happens that these birds remain in the south of America
all the year; but generally they find it warmer than they
care about. :

You would rarely see one of these ducks upon the sea-
coast ; its favourite dwelling is by a pond or muddy creek.

Look, if you please, at the picture, and then say if the
THE SUMMER DUCK. _ 109

summer duck has not a right to be admired. We will
speak first of the colours of the male bird, for he is rather
more handsome than his mate. The upper part of the
head is covered with dark-green plumage, with the feathers
of the crest ending in a rich tint of violet. There are
white feathers that’ take the form of curved lines above
and beneath the eye, and there is white also to contrast
with the violet of the sides of the duck’s neck. His breast
is of a deep brown, with little spots of white that gradu-
ally grow larger until they spread into the general white
of the under parts. The back and tail are dark, with
a gloss of green on them; and on the wings there are
mingled shades of blue, violet, and green. The sides of
‘Mister Duck’s body are of a drab colour, marked with
_ little wavy black lines; and just beneath the wings there
are broad bands of black and white. The bill is red, and
the legs and feet are of a reddish yellow.

The female bird has not that fine black pencilling on
her sides. The neck and sides of her head are drab; her
breast is dusky, with large three-cornered spots of
white; and her back is glossy brown, with many shades
and gleams of green and gold among the feathers. The
crown of her head is deep purple, the throat is white, and
there is a bar of white near the eye. I am sure you will
admit that we cannot boast so smart a pair of ducks
among those that are natives of England.

In size they are about nineteen inches long, and rather
110 % THE SUMMER DUCK.

less than two feet and a half in width when the wings are
spread. They can fly both fast and well if they wish to _
do it, but they walk about still more easily. Unless some
one is chasing them they do not often dive under water.

For food these summer ducks are not very particular ;
no one could call them dainty. Water-plants and seeds
content them if they see nothing else to be had; insects
they find extremely pleasant eating, while fishes and reptiles
are better still,. Ducks of all kinds are thought rather
greedy; they devour what comes in their way, as if it were
a hard matter to get enough to satisfy their large appetites.
In this respect the American summer duck is much like
his European relations.

If she is not disturbed, the mother-bird will build her
nest in the same spot for several years running. She will
get together a few sticks, laying them between the forked
branches of a tree, or sometimes she finds a hollow in the
trunk, and this pleases her still better. A good many eggs
are to be found in a nest; most likely twelve or thirteen.
They are not so large as those of a hen. They are very
smooth and shining, and of a yellowish colour. For about
twenty-three days the patient bird sits quietly on her nest,
then the little downy ducklings break the shell, and are
led by their proud mother to the water when they are a
day old. ,

This kind of American bird is not commonly seen in

great numbers. It is usual to find them in pairs, or else
THE SUMMER DUCK. ut

about four together. They are very quickly tamed, and
will then let themselves be stroked and fondled.

Their flesh is good to eat, but not of such a pleasant
flavour as the flesh of commoner ducks.

When they come to England we do not want to eat
them ; their beauty is what they are prized for, and people

are proud to show such ornamental birds as their own.




THE CRESTED CURASSOIW.

Many a South American traveller, while wandering among
some of the thick woods of Guiana, has been delighted to
find how many of the curassows are quietly looking down
at him from the branches above his head. They are so
tame and unsuspicious of any harm from man that they
never think of hiding; so as it is easy to get a shot at two or
three, and as the flesh is very good to eat, a hungry person
with a gun in hand would not be likely to pass them by.
Now please look atthe picture and mark the crest of this
curassow. It is between two and three inches in length,
and covers all the upper part of the head. It is curly, as
soft as velvet, and can be raised or lowered as the bird
wills. The entire plumage of head, crest, neck, back,
wings, and the upper part of the tail is deeply black, with
THE CRESTED CURASSOW. 113

a slight gloss of green upon it. The lower feathers of the
tail and the under parts are a dull shade of white.
This is one of the birds that love to perch on high trees
and build their nests there. Small boughs are got together
by the hen curassow, and the stalks of grasses are twined
and laced in and out of these to keep them together.
Next, some leaves must be found for a lining; and then all
is ready for the eggs, which will be five or six in number,
and of about the size of the eggs of a turkey, though as
white as those of a hen, and with a much thicker shell.
Although I have told you how free these birds are from
fear of us when they are living in a natural state in the
deep forests, you must know that those which live nearer
inhabited places have not the same confidence.

Perhaps by watching the doings of human beings they
learn to be sharp and shrewd, for they begin to look out
for the hunters, and escape when it is possible. They are
very friendly among themselves, and always live in flocks.
Though as large as our European turkey, these. curassows
are not inclined to quarrelling and fighting as he is.

Being so large and of such a good flavour when cooked,
there are many parts of South America where these birds
have been tamed so as to become domesticated like ducks,
fowls, and other poultry. If they were equally common in
England we would find them more savoury and delicate
eating than even the pheasants that are in such high favour

with us.
(84) 8
114 THE CRESTED CURASSOW.

There is but a very slight difference in the male and
female curassows. The little ones have rather a browner
tinge upon their feathers.

When first hatched, their food is worms and insects ;
but they very soon begin to eat berries and vegetable
substances. If brought to our country they bear the
change of climate well, so they are not among the deli-
cate sort of birds that it is so difficult to keep alive and
healthy.

One of this curassow family has a red knot above and
two beneath his beak, but otherwise he is very much like
the one of which you have the picture, having the same
crest and glossy black plumage.

There is another kind that has deep chestnut-brown
feathers on his body and small white ones tipped with
black upon his head and neck. Still another of them may
be seen that has a hard bony substance above his bill
which is rather the shape of a pear and stands up quite
two inches, This bird comes from Mexico, and lives there
in very large bands.

Lastly, there is a razor-billed curassow, but few indeed
of these, compared with the rest of the family, have been
brought to Europe.

He is a very handsome and elegant bird, domesticated
in Brazil, and on his black feathers there is a beautiful
shade of violet in place of the usual greenish tinge.

The ways and habits of all these varieties are so much
THE CRESTED CURASSOW. 115

like those of the crested curassow that it is not needful to
talk about them separately.

All are large and handsome, and very peaceable and
mild in character. Many years ago there were numbers of
these crested curassows taken to Holland, where the people
hoped to make them at home. But the place where the
rearing of young ones was carried on came to an end, and

I do not know that the scheme has been tried again.




RG Ayes
MEE Vas



Bh way
THE GUAN.

We have here a bird that is somewhat like the curassows
of which you have just been reading.

In a wild state the guan inhabits Guiana and Brazil,
and may also be found somewhat further north. You may
see by the picture that the bill is not so deep as that of the
curassow, and that the skin of the throat is not covered
with any plumage and may be stretched out a good deal
at will. When he has quite attained full growth the guan
is about thirty inches in length, but of course the tail
forms part of this measurement.

All the upper surface of the body is dusky black or
bronze colour, with a beautiful gloss of green which becomes
olive colour in certain lights. On the back of the head the
feathers are long and make a thick tufted crest. Accord-
THE GUAN. 117

ing to the temper and feelings of the bird, this crest may
be either lowered or raised. In anger or excitement the
crest generally stands erect in all those of the feathered tribe
that have this ornament, while when they are calm and well
pleased it lies flat upon the head. In noticing the guan’s col-
ouring you find that there are marks of white about his neck
and breast, because each feather has a white edge. The same
marks are about the under parts, but there are tints of
dull red among the lower feathers of the tail. The cheeks
are covered with a sort. of purple skin, but the elastic fold
already spoken of beneath the throat is of the brightest
scarlet shade you could see. The female guan is much
like her mate, excepting that there is a slight tinge of red
over the whole of her plumage. She also has this power
of stretching out or drawing in the little bag at the throat,
and what she does in this way depends upon whether she
is quiet or excited.

In manners the guans and curassows are much like
each other. Both birds could be easily made into domes-
tic fowls, for they are tamed with ease; yet there have
been many more curassows than guans brought over from
their South American home to Europe, though I am not
able to tell you why one has been sought more than the
other bird. Their chief food is fruit and the different seeds
they find. They usually eat on the ground, flying off when
their repast is finished to the highest trees within reach.

The nest of the guan is always built among the topmost
118 THE GUAN.

branches, and three or four eggs are laid within. it, from
which in due time the little ones appear. It would not be
possible for these birds to soar up into the air like the
great powerful eagles, or even after the fashion of the active
larks. Their wings are short, so their flight is heavy, and -
all they can well manage is to reach the tree tops and
there be satisfied to stay for the chief part of their lives.

Those persons who have eaten roasted guan speak of
it as a most excellent dish, which no one tasting it could
help wishing to have some again. Some of these birds
were captured and borne off a good many years ago to
Utrecht. They were very soon reconciled to live like cocks
and hens and other poultry. They laid their eggs and
hatched their little ones, and with proper care were kept in
very good condition.

In Brazil these birds are chiefly known by the name of
“yacon,” which has been given them because the sound they
make is rather like that word. But you must not suppose
they have sweet and pleasant voices, or you will be making
a great mistake, If noise is wished for, the guan can make
plenty, for the travellers in that part of the world say that
the woods re-echo with his clamour; but it is hoarse and
disagreeable to the ear, so that if many were collected
together it would be almost unbearable. 7

It is not very often that they are found in large bands.
Each guan pairs with a companion, and does not seem to

get weary of a mate and seek a second; and a few of these
THE GUAN. 119

couples will live amongst the same group of trees in a
kindly, friendly fashion.

I must not forget to tell you that the tail of this bird
can be stretched out in the form of a fan, and when he
wants to mount to his home in the trees he spreads his

feathers thus, or he could scarcely manage to reach the
height.




THE WILD TURKEY.

WE who only know the turkey as a British domesticated
bird have no idea what a handsome fellow he is in his
natural state.

America is his native country, and though there are
not so many wild turkeys as in bygone times, they may
still be found in large numbers in certain regions.

Our picture shows you that this bird has rather a
small head as compared with the size of the body, and it
is covered with a bluish skin quite without plumage.

On the under part of the neck this skin extends down-
wards in the form of large wattles. Just at the base of
the bill there is a little growth of flesh, with a few black
THE WILD TURKEY. 121

hairs at the tip. This is elastic, and will lengthen out
until the bill is quite covered with it. If the turkey gets
very angry or excited this always happens, but when he is
calm this little fleshy bag looks as you see in his portrait.

On the lower part of the neck please notice a tuft of
stiff black hair that’is several inches in length and separate
from the plumage of the bird’s breast. The beautiful
changing hues of the turkey are due to the three divisions
of each of the feathers of his body. Close to the skin they
are downy and dusky in shade; then there comes a band
which is bronze, purple, and violet, according to the light
that falls on it; and, lastly, the tip is like black velvet for
colour and softness.

The wings are not very long, and they have white and
yellowish marks here and there. The tail is about fifteen
inches long, and opens out into the shape of a lady’s fan.
In shade it is brown, mixed with black, and crossed by
numberless little lines. Near the tip there is a broad
black band.

The female bird is not so large as her mate; she has
no blunt spurs like he has to fight with, and her bill and
legs are not so strong. Instead of a bare head and neck
she can show a little plumage there, but it is of a dull gray
colour that is not very pretty. Nor is her back so hand-
some as that of the male turkey. There is a good deal of
gray about it, and all the tints are duller.

Many wonderful stories are told of the weight of these
122 THE WILD TURKEY.

wild turkeys. Sixty pounds is spoken of as quite a com-
mon weight; but those writers who may best be trusted
seem to think that twenty pounds is about what a male
bird will weigh, unless he is unusually large.

These turkeys like a change of food. They will eat
fruit, grass, and all sorts of berries; but they also have a
wonderful taste for beetles, tadpoles, and young frogs, nor
are they likely to turn away from a tempting-looking
little lizard. The pecan-nut which they find in their native
haunts is in great favour with them, too; but acorns are
still better, and when these are plentiful the wild turkeys
get fat very quickly. About the month of October great
numbers of these big black birds come to those parts where
there is a good crop of acorns, the males keeping together,
and the females moving about with their young ones. If
they all mixed together, the quarrelsome male turkey
would attack and kill the little ones, so the mother keeps
them well out of his way.

But they all travel in the same direction, and when
they arrive at the side of some river they generally take
a day's rest, “gobbling” and strutting about upon the
grass. When quite ready to make a fresh start they
mount to the top of the highest trees and, at a sign from
their leader, spread their wings and fly over to the opposite
bank.

The nest where the mother-bird lays her eggs is made
of only a few dry leaves dropped upon some dry ridge of
THE WILD TURKEY. 123

ground, under a hedge, or in the fallen top of some dead
tree. She begins to look about for a nice safe place
towards the end of April, for she has to be watchful lest
the crow’s sharp eyes may find the home chosen for her
little ones, he being very fond of turkey’s eggs. ,

There are generally about fifteen of these white eggs
with their red-brown spots laid, when the mother takes up
her sitting, and it will not be a small alarm that drives
her away. Sometimes two or three female birds make one
nest do between them, and rear their young together.

On first peeping from the shell the little turkeys are
covered with a very soft down, but this is not thick enough
to shield them from rain, so in a very wet season they
often die. At about a fortnight old these little birds can
“follow their mother to some low branch of a tree, where
they nestle under her wings as they have before done on
the ground. Very soon they are strong enough to seek
berries for themselves, and they grow so fast that by the
month of August they can run with other broods of young
ones about the forests, flying up into the trees if any wolf
or fox draws near. It is from these animals, and from the
eagles, the owls, and the hawks, that the little wild turkeys
have the most to fear. It is far easier for them to run
away from the men who want to catch them.

It is supposed to be the Spaniards who first brought
turkeys from the New World to Europe. It was not long
before the useful birds became known in England, about
124 THE WILD TURKEY.

the fifteenth year of Henry the Eighth’s reign. From that
time the turkey became a favourite dish on festive days,
and we keep up the usage of dining on him when Christ-

mas comes round.




THE JAVANESE PEA-FOWL.

Amone all our bird-pictures we have had nothing smarter
to show than this one. If the peacock looks so handsome
here, and still more beautiful alive in our aviaries and
collections, how much more splendid an appearance he
makes in his natural home in Asia. There he struts
proudly among the glades of the great forests, with the
brilliant hues of his tail glittering in the full light of the

tropical sun.
126 THE JAVANESE PEA-FOWL.

The first peacocks that were brought to Europe came
from the Hast Indies, and many are found upon the island
of Ceylon. These birds are spoken of, too, in the early
history of Greece, when a cock and a peahen were sold for
about thirty pounds of our English money.

Not only were they admired in those long-past. days
for their beauty, but they were served up as a chief dish
at the great banquets given in old Rome. Now-a-days, a
peahen is sometimes seen on a grand occasion at some rich
person’s table; but in the usual course we only find these
birds kept for ornament.

You have here the portrait of the peacock of Java,
which has not been known from such an early date as the
Indian bird.

Not one has so long a crest as this Javanese specimen
may boast of; and in colour it is’ of a changing blue and
green like the head.

The feathers of the neck and breast are broad, short,
and rather rounded in shape, and are of the same brilliant
tints as the head, with a bordering that is lighter and a
little like bronze. There are wonderful shades of bronze
and blue about the wings, and the tail feathers are of a
rich brown changing into green, marked with that large
spot by which even the youngest child would know the
peacock from all other gay-plumaged birds. Have you
looked at this spot and made out its colouring? The deep
purple in the centre is about as large as a shilling, and
THE JAVANESE PEA-FOWL. 127

this is surrounded by a band of green. Then comes a
brownish band, and, last of all, a tiny black ring edged
with bright chestnut. All these hues seem shifting and
changing in a wonderful way as the light falls upon them.

The hen-bird is quite plain by the side of her splendid
mate, and need not be described here, because you are not
looking at her picture.

The young male-birds are not so brilliant as they will
be when they grow older, nor have they the large spurs which
we see on the peacock that has passed his earliest days.

At night this bird will roost on the highest branches
of the trees. If he is living in a domesticated state, he
would be very well pleased to settle himself on the house-
top for the night. But he is a very destructive creature,
and will trample down all the flowers in a garden, or kill any
number of little chickens that are so unlucky as to come
within his reach.

There can be nothing much more disagreeable than the
sound of a peacock’s voice. It is a harsh scream, which
you could never forget when once you had heard it. For
food he will eat any sort of grain and insects; he also
picks the buds off plants to satisfy his appetite, and would
strip the thatch from a cottage and devour it also.

Whole flocks of pea-fowls are seen in the fields of their
native country; but if they observe any one drawing near
they will run quicker than even the active little partridge

to hide where it will be impossible to find them. They
128 THE JAVANESE PEA-FOWL.

are usually caught by a way which the fowler has in-
vented as a snare. He will walk into the places frequented .
by these birds, carrying a banner which has a peacock
painted on each side of it and a lighted torch at the top.
Frightened by so strange a sight, the foolish bird runs
towards what he fancies is one of his own kindred, and he
is then caught in a noose which is hanging just in the way,
and holds him fast.

There are a great many tigers in Java, and the natives
live in constant fear of these cruel beasts, and keep great
fires burning all night to drive them away. Sometimes as
they watch they hear the harsh voice of the peacock ; then
they always say that the tiger is not far away, for strangely
enough the bird and the beast are often seen near together.

We have a habit of saying of any person who seems to
think somewhat too highly of himself, “He is as proud as
a peacock.” I am not quite sure if our gaily-feathered
friend deserves his character for conceit and vanity. True,
he walks in a very stately, show-off manner; but with such
a tail to carry it would not be easy to move in a more
rapid, simple fashion. _

If you have watched the peacock, you will have found
out that he can not only spread out this beautiful tail like
a train to sweep the ground, but is also able to raise it
straight up in the air still more widely spread, so that its
splendid markings and colours may be seen to the best
advantage. Despite all his grandeur he is really a very
THE JAVANESE PEA-FOWL. 129

near relative of our common barn-door fowl, concerning
which we never say a word of praise excepting for its
usefulness. This proves that there is great truth in the
old saying, “ Fine feathers make fine birds.”

I have not been able to find out the reason why some
foolish people think ill-luck will befall them if they haye
peacocks’ feathers in their houses. Certainly many who
have screens formed of these pretty changeful plumes do
not seem to suffer any disagreeable results.



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THE GOLDEN PHEASANT.

AFTER the peacock, the golden pheasant is perhaps the
most beautiful of birds. Not only is the plumage of a
lovely colour, but the different shades are so wonderfully
mingled that he indeed makes a brilliant show.

He comes to us from China, and at first it was thought
that his bright hue must be the effect of the climate, and
that he was only a common pheasant, despite his beauty.
This was proved a mistake when numbers of the common
pheasant also were found in China, which had not the
same colouring as this splendid bird called “ golden.”

The picture shows you how long a tail he has. It is
narrow and arched, and is formed of eighteen feathers, the
two middle ones being always longer than the rest. When

he is in good plumage, the golden pheasant measures three
THE GOLDEN PHEASANT. 131

feet long with this handsome tail. The feathers on the
front of the head are very long, very silky, and of a bright
yellow. They hang over those on the back of the head,
which are of an orange colour marked with rays of black.
Then the feathers at the back of the neck are tinged with
green and gold and bordered with black; those on the -
pheasant’s back are yellow, with a crimson tip. At the
base of each wing he has a patch of blue so deep in its
shade that you might almost call it violet; the quill
feathers are in many different shades of chestnut and
brown, and the tail feathers are variegated with chestnut
and black. Just above the base of the tail the hue is scarlet,
and so are the breast and the under parts. The throat
is dusky brown, the bill and the legs are yellow. And
now I am sure you will say that the golden pheasant is
much smarter than most of the birds that you read about.

The mother-pheasants are never so handsome as the
male birds; they can show only a few shades of brown in
their plumage, wings and tail barred with black, and a
white throat.

In the natural state this pheasant dwells amid the
thickets of a wood or plantation, and sleeps on the ground
when the weather is warm. In the colder months of the
year he chooses a tree and roosts among its branches.

For food, he roams each morning in search of the
young shoots of grass, or of some plants he finds among

the meadows; if worms or insects happen to come in his
1382 THE GOLDEN PHEASANT.

way, so much the more pleased will he be. Later in the
‘year there are the wild berries and acorns to furnish his -
repasts.

The short wings of the pheasant do not let him fly
much. He cannot soar into the air, and indeed he never tries
to raise himself above the ground unless he is very fright-
ened, and then his flight is heavy and low, and soon comes
to an end. His custom is to walk about as as our com-
mon cocks and hens do.

The female bird does not take much trouble about a
nest in which to rear her little ones. Having found out a
small hollow in the ground, she drops a few leaves into it
and there lays her eggs. Sometimes she will not even be
at the pains of sitting on them; and if this happens when
she is living in a tame state, a common hen has to be
found to hatch the tiny pheasants and be a good mother
to them.

It is only the common pheasants that we are in the
habit of seeing served at our tables. These beautiful gay
fellows from China are too costly and rare to be cooked
and eaten; and those who have them are proud of such
ornamental birds, and keep them as long and as carefully
as possible. °


THE SILVER PHEASANT.

Let me tell you next of a very near relation of the bird
about which you have just been reading.

Whether you admire him as much as the golden phea-
sant must depend on your taste. If you like a great deal
of bright, rich colouring, you will not choose the silver
pheasant as your favourite. Still you cannot help giving
him some of your admiration, because he really deserves to
be thought much of.

When living in a tame state, in our own or some
neighbouring country of Europe, this bird is more hardy
than the golden-plumaged kind, so there is not the same
risk of his dying soon after he has felt a little cold
weather.

In habits, this pheasant is a good deal like our domestic
134 THE SILVER PHEASANT.

fowl; yet I am sure a glance at his picture will show you
that he is handsomer than any cock that ever crowed, or
hen that ever clucked to her chickens.

The total length of the male bird is about two feet
eight inches, and the female is always rather smaller.

The cheeks are covered with a bright red skin quite
bare of plumage. On the top of the head there is a tuft
of long black feathers that hang down over the upper part
of the neck behind. The sides of the head, the neck, the
back, the wings, and the top feathers of the tail are all of
a silvery white; so you will not need to ask why this bird
is known by the name that distinguishes him from other
pheasants. Across these snowy plumes there pass a number

_of fine black lines, so delicate and so regular that. they
look like pencil-markings; you see them quite plainly in
this portrait of the pretty silver pheasant.

He is all the more handsome because, in contrast to all
these light feathers, the front of the neck, the breast, and
the under parts of the body are of a deep purple black.
The two longest feathers of the tail are quite white in the
lower half; the legs are deep red; and the bill is of a
yellow tint, getting duller toward the point.

There are no beautiful silvery plumes barred with fine
tracings of black on the hen’s back: her feathers are of an
earthy-brown tinge about the neck, the breast, and the
upper parts; while the lower parts are of a dingy white
mixed with brown, and crossed with black bands. The
THE SILVER PHEASANT. 135

quill feathers of her wings are nearly black ; and the tail
is a mingling of black, white, and brown.

In shape, however, this female bird is graceful, and the
breed is in great favour in the different countries of Eu-
rope. A great many have been brought at different times
fvom their native China, and they thrive well in their new
life. I cannot say that the mother-bird bears a better
character for care of her little ones than the golden phea-
sant: it is the habit of all the species to be very idle about
building their nests, and they have not always the patience
to sit on their eggs till the young birds are hatched.

I must not forget to tell you that, though the hen-
bird among all the pheasant family is not so handsome as
her mate during her young days, she sometimes surprises
her owners by becoming just as brilliant in colours as he is
when she is getting quite old.

It seems that no one who has studied the ways of birds
can explain how this comes to pass; but they all agree that
now and then an old hen-pheasant becomes quite a curi-
osity by taking the bright-coloured plumage of the male.


THE RED-LEGGED PARTRIDGE.

WHEN little girls first began to wear bright red stockings
in contrast to their dark winter dresses, people said that
the fashion was copied from the red-legged partridge.

The legs of this partridge are indeed very bright, and
so is the bill, The general colour of the feathers is red-
dish brown, but the breast has a shade of blue on its ash-
tinted plumage, and the throat is pure white, bordered by
a deep black band which passes upwards to the eyes.

The beauty of these partridges is made more striking
by the markings of the side feathers, They are crescent-
shaped bars of white, black, and chestnut, and you will
not notice this on the common partridge, which we are
accustomed to see hanging up for sale in the poulterers’
shops.
THE RED-LEGGED PARTRIDGE. ~ 137

There are a great many of these red-legged birds in
France, and they are common also in Italy. But they
never live by choice in Switzerland, Germany, or Holland,
so we may suppose the climate of these three countries
does not suit their health or please their fancy.

No doubt you have heard of the little Channel Islands
that belong to England, but are so very near to the French
coast. On one of these—the pretty isle of Guernsey—you
may see many a red-legged partridge. When (on very
rare occasions) one or two of these birds have flown across
to the southern coast of England, people have given them
the name of the island from which they came.

These birds are larger than the common species, and as
an article of food are better liked. Yet even our little
English partridges are in high favour, or else there would
not be so many shot every autumn when the first of Sep-
tember has come. They are all prettily shaped, plump
birds, with rounded wings, which is the result of the short-
ness of some of the quill feathers. The tail also in every
member of the partridge family is short, the bill is slender,
and there are no feathers upon their legs. Of late years,
a great many of these red-legged birds have been kept in
English game preserves, so they may be seen without much
difficulty.

They do not like the common partridges, and will peck
and drive them away, so that the two breeds will never be
persuaded to live together on friendly terms, as some other
138 THE RED-LEGGED PARTRIDGE.

kinds of birds do that are nearly related. I cannot give
you any reason for this, because the likes and dislikes of
the feathered creatures are quite beyond explaining. But
they have all kinds of strange whims and ways that are
very interesting to watch and wonder about; and they are
not at all stupid and indifferent about what happens to
them, as some people who have given no time to studying
bird-life are apt to fancy.

The red-legged partridge will always choose to live on
hilly ground if he can; and the female builds her nest in a
field or a copse, under the safe shelter of some thick hedge-
row or brushwood. Here fifteen or sixteen eggs are laid;
they are of a dirty white colour, and marked with reddish-
brown spots.

The little common partridge that we know best is very
sociable ; he is on the most friendly terms with others of
his kind, and it would seem as if his idea was “the more
the merrier,” for he likes to be one of a large company.
The red-legged bird is not like his English relative in this
matter. He has been seen among a large covey of birds,
to be sure; but they do not keep very near together, nor
take to flight at the same moment.

When made captive they are not so shy as the smaller
partridges, and so they are more quickly tamed.

There is another of the family of partridges that comes
from Sumatra, and he is even more timid and mistrustful
of mankind than these two kinds. So he hides himself in
THE RED-LEGGED PARTRIDGE. 139

the forests, and very seldom ventures out into the open
plains, where he would be easily seen.

We must own that if the pretty partridges have no
trust in us we cannot be surprised, for so many are killed

every year and served at our tables.


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THE CALIFORNIAN QUAIL.

THE quail is a bird about as large as a partridge. Num-
bers of them come from Africa when the winter is over,
and spend the spring and the summer months in the south-
ern countries of Europe; but the kind of which you have
now the picture is found, as the name tells you, in Cali-
fornia.

He is larger than the quail that we have in our quarter
of the world, for he is fully eight inches in height, and nine
or ten inches long from the bill to the tail. The general
colour of this bird is dusky brown, with a tinge of slate on
the tail and on the front part of the breast. The head is
of an ash-gray mixed with brown, and from the back part
of it there rises a crest of five or six black feathers, that
stands erect for about half its length and then curves for-
THE CALIFORNIAN QUAIL. 141

ward very gracefully. Most of the feathers on the back
of the neck have a tip of white, and between them and the
throat there is a stripe of whitish feathers that ends beneath
the eye on either side, as you see in the picture. The
plumage of the under parts is yellowish white, with a shade
of brown, and edged with black in the shape of a half-
moon or crescent. The legs are partly covered with brown
feathers.

These birds are found among thickets and bushes in
large bands; and as they are of a rather quarrelsome dis-
position, they often have disagreements and little battles
with one another.

When about to change to either summer or winter
quarters, they gather in immense numbers ready for the
journey, and always fly off at night.

The mother-bird makes her nest in a little hole which
she has scraped in the ground, and having filled this with
grass and clover she lays her eggs in it. They are of a
dull orange colour spotted with brown, The young quails
soon learn to run about and pick up the seeds and grain
and insects they may find ; and by the time for changing
their home they have strength enough to take wing with
their parents.

Among the low woods and plains of California these
birds grow fat, and their well-flavoured flesh is in great
request for the tables of those who like good things.

One way of catching the quail is to imitate the note of
142 THE CALIFORNIAN QUAIL.

the hen-bird, and thus to get a number into the net which
has been spread carefully, and which they either have not
noticed or have not feared. Once caught, there is no
difficulty about getting a good price for a bird which is so
much in favour.

A captain once brought over a number of these Cali-
fornian quails to England, hoping to rear young ones and
make the breed quite at home in our country. On the
voyage all the female birds died ; so his hope of eggs and
nestlings was quite at an end for that time. The male birds
were given to the Zoological Society; and though that is so
long ago that they are dead now, others have been brought
to England since then with better success.

These Californian birds are just like the quails of Europe
as regards manners and habits, but they are more graceful
in their movements and bearing. The female birds never
have the white crescent that borders the throat of the male,
the feathers of the crest are smaller, and the whole plumage
is fainter in its hue.

In Europe the quails are spread about to the number
of hundreds of thousands during the month of April; for
they have arrived then to make their summer quarters in

Italy, France, and other countries.







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THE TURTLE-DOVE.

WE have read about many birds that prey on others and
are cruel of disposition, but here is one of the gentlest
creatures.

Excepting in the very coldest countries, you might find
the turtle-dove in all parts of the Old Continent. It is
one of the travelling birds that winter in the south and
arrive in England and other lands of moderate temperature
about the end of May, when good weather is to be expected.
As they have very strong wings, it is an easy matter for
them to make a long journey in a short space of time.

When about to build a nest, a pair of turtle-doves will
seek a quiet spot, and generally one that has water near.
Sometimes they choose the higher branches of the trees, but

more often they lodge themselves in thickets and copses,
144 THE TURTLE-DOVE.

and occasionally in some hole in a rock, or on the ground. *
The nest is then made of small branches loosely twined -
together. Several pairs of the gentle birds build near one
another, so that when they need to fly out in search of food
they go in a company.

All kinds of seeds and berries are welcome to them,
but they like peas better than anything else, and they
often do a good deal of damage in vegetable gardens in
which these happen to be plentiful. After the reaping of
the corn, these birds are very busy picking up the ears that
have fallen on the ground.

In length the turtle-dove is rather more than twelve
inches. Its head and neck are ashy-gray, and the upper
wing feathers dusky brown, with a bordering of red.
The quill feathers are brown also, but are tipped with
grayish white. The sides of the neck are marked by a
patch of little black feathers with white points, but only in
the full-grown dove. You would look in vain for this on
a very young bird. The throat and breast are of a bright
chocolate brown, rather paler in the lower part. The under
parts of the body are of pure white, and there are some
white marks among the brown and blackish feathers of the
tail. A tinge of blue may be seen about the brown bill.
The legs and feet are red, and the claws are black. The
female of these doves is never quite so bright in her colour-
ing, but otherwise she is just like the male bird.

Every one, I suppose, has heard the mournful note of
THE TURTLE-DOVE. 145

the turtle-dove. Some people think it very pleasant; but
as it is always the same, even those who like it best may
grow a little tired of the sound.

It would be scarcely possible, among all the many kinds
of birds that we have in the world, to find any that are
better. parents than ‘are these pretty gentle doves. When
the hen is sitting on her eggs, her mate takes her place as
soon as she leaves them to get her food, or to exercise her
wings. As soon as the young ones break the shell, the
father and mother birds are devoted in their care; and as
the tiny things are unfledged and blind, they could not pos-
sibly provide for themselves if they had neglectful parents.

When two birds of this kind have chosen each other for
companions, they do not grow tired and seek a change of
society. As long as they both live they are very affection-
ate; and sometimes when one dies the solitary bird is not
content with a new mate, but pines away.



(84) 10


THE PIPING CROW.

WE all know the crow, and I do not think he is held in
much esteem, for he is both mischievous and dishonest.
Here is an Australian relative of our well-known friend,
that can be taught to whistle any tune that he hears, so
he bears the title of “ Piping Crow.”

They do not seem to be among the migratory or trav-
elling birds. No desire to see other countries, or to fly
here and there in search of the warmest sunshine, seems to
be given them. They live on always in certain parts of
the far-off land which is their home, until some one catches
them to bring away as a curiosity to friends in Europe,

who like to see and to possess foreign birds.
THE PIPING CROW. - 147

One was brought from the Blue Mountains to France a
long time ago, which had grown quiet and tame during the
voyage. He had learned to crow like the cocks and cackle
like the hens that were on board the vessel, and to whistle
the airs that the sailors amused themselves with. After a
time the bird forgot a little that he had excelled in; but if
_ he was prompted, the recollection came back at once, and he
could make himself extremely amusing.

Our picture shows you that this piping crow is much
the same size as the common variety we are used to see.
The back of his neck, as well as the shoulders, are white ;
all the rest of his plumage is of a deep, shining black,
excepting the base of the tail, which is like snow. The
legs and claws are dull black, and the bill is blue at the

base and black at the tip.

. These birds build their nests in trees, making them of
twigs with a lining of grass. They have three young ones
to feed and watch over, and the mother-bird is especially
careful that her children get as much as they can possibly
eat. Early in the morning the old birds make a great noise
of whistling up in the trees; but later in the day they are
too busy seeking food to amuse themselves in this fashion,
and perhaps towards night they get tired and sleepy, for
then their voices are but rarely heard.

Have you noticed the long, hard bill of this Australian
crow? It can do a great deal of mischief, for it is strong
enough to drag many a young bird out of its nest. If he
148 THE PIPING CROW.

saw one that was ill or wounded he would be sure to attack
and destroy it, because he has such a cruel character.

Usually in England the crow is a somewhat solitary
bird. We often see him alone, or at least with but one or
two of his kindred near; but the Australian crow is found
in rather numerous bands among the mountains. The eggs
that other birds have laid are just what all crows love to
steal; the wild duck, the pheasant, and many more are
robbed in this way. The hen-crow will attack lambs here
in England, or when she is building she is impudent enough
to lodge on the back of a sheep and tear out the wool with
her beak, so that she may carry it off to line the nest of
her little ones. I do not know if the piping crow is guilty
of the same meanness ; but it is quite likely she would do so
if the chance came, because we hear that they are much
the same in their habits. But it is perhaps worse that the
crow’s nature leads him to steal things that are of no use
at all either to himself or his family.

It is a real pleasure for him to get hold of something,
just for mischief’s sake, and carry it off to his nest, as the
raven and the magpie do. A good many stories have been
told about innocent people being suspected of stealing rings
and chains and such like ornaments, that from their bright-
ness have tempted the crow (and others like him) to be a
thief. So if a crow, either English or Australian, happens
to be at liberty, you must take care that you leave nothing
about which you would be sorry to lose.
TUE PIPING CROW. 149

The natural voice of our crows is so hoarse and unpleas-
ant that I scarcely think they could be taught to whistle
airs of music. It is the Australian cousin that does all the
piping, and shows himself a clever mimic after a little pains
has been taken with his education.


hs,
ba lf Aa ies



THE CHINESE STARLING.

Tus pretty little bird is often caught and kept in cages
by the Chinese, who feed it on rice and on the insects which
it has been in the habit of finding for itself.

The starling family is a very large one; there are
members of it spread about in many distant countries, such
as Syria, Egypt, and Africa. The one of which you have
the picture here is found in very large numbers about Java
and China. In colour he is almost entirely black, with a
shade of gray on some parts, and some white marks among
the wing feathers as well as at the end of the tail.

He has a long, sharp bill, just slightly arched; in hue
it is yellow, and there is a space round the eyes of exactly
the same shade. The legs have rather a deeper colour. In

size this Chinese starling will be about eight inches long, and
THE CHINESE STARLING. 151

when his wings are closed they will reach to the middle
of his tail, and thus you may be sure they help him to fly
well and lightly. He has a little crest of longish feathers
upon the front part of his head.

All the starlings are very intelligent, and can be taught
to whistle and to talk almost as well as a parrot. This
Chinese variety is especially quick in taking a lesson, and
easily imitates the words and sounds he has.the chance of
listening to.

But besides being amusing these starlings are useful.
They are so clever in destroying quantities of insects, that
a number of them were taken to a place. in which locusts
spoiled all the crops, and in a short space of time the land
was quite freed from this nuisance. Still it must be
owned that they also lay waste some of the cultivated
ground, because they search so closely and continually for
their favourite food of worms and insects.

The cattle certainly ought to be very much obliged to
these little starlings that rid them of the insects which
tease them. The sheep also must be grateful, for these
birds seize on the insects that infest their fleeces and give
them a good deal of uneasiness.

Very sociable are the starling family, and they seem a
live in great harmony, without any disputing over their
gains. Their nests are built in the holes of walls or ruins,
perhaps in some crumbling. old church tower. The eggs

are pale blue in colour, and are laid carefully in the grassy
152 THE CHINESE STARLING.

lining of the straw and roots which the mother-bird has
woven cleverly together.

In some of the fens of Lincolnshire and such other parts
of England, the young starlings roost in great numbers among
the reeds when they have grown too large for the nest.
The weight of them, when there are a great many, will
crush down the reeds just as if a heavy storm had passed
over the place.

There are large bands of starlings upon the western
coast of Scotland, and if any one is up early enough in the
morning, he may expect to see them coming from their
rocky homes to search in the meadows and fields for food.
They like farm-yards very much, for no better hunting-
ground could be desired by a starling.

While they dig up worms and grubs they make a
chattering noise; but if a little scream is heard away
they all fly, for one has been on guard, and this is his
note of warning. When the weather is very warm and
sunny the wild starlings may be heard singing softly; it
is not a powerful song certainly, but when a number of
them are joining together it is quite a pleasant little bird-
concert.

There is a relative of the Chinese bird that we know
by the name of the rose starling, because his beak is of
that hue, and so are parts of his wings as well as his back.
He is very rarely seen in England, but in India he makes
one of a large band that seem to darken the air as they
THE CHINESE STARLING. 153

fly past. Another of the family lives in Africa, and his
feathers shine like satin; he is so bright that he has been
compared to a flash of lightning when he moves very
quickly. These beautiful starlings are never seen in En-
gland, except perhaps as a very rare specimen. They all
have the same pleasant, lively ways as the Chinese starling,
whose portrait you have now before you.




THE WIDOW FINCH.

Have we not found a bird with a strange name? Let me
first tell you how he came by it.

The first writer who gave any account of it, said that
the Portuguese called it the “ widow,” because of its colour
and long black train. Some time later, he said that he
found this was not correct. It was the “ whidah,” and so
called because it was brought to Lisbon from the kingdom
of Whidah on the coast of Africa. I suppose by then the
first name had pleased the fancy of every one who cares to
hear about the birds; for although it began in a mistake,
this has always been called the “ widow finch.”

Your first glance at the picture will show you the
THE WIDOW FINCH. 155

length of the tail feathers. The bird itself is small, and
has much the manners of our well-known linnets, being
very lively and active. In the summer time his plumage
is best and brightest, being all glossy black, except for a
chestnut band.on the back of the neck, the ruddy brown
of the breast, and the whitish under parts.

During winter he loses his longest tail feathers, which
measure about twelve inches ; and his black back changes to
a dull orange hue, varied with spots. Itis black and white
also about the head during that season; therefore we must
see the widow finch before he begins to lose his feathers in
the autumn, if we would judge of his beauty.

The younger hen-birds are much like the male in his
winter dress all through the year. As they grow older,
they get darker and handsomer; but they never have the
long feathers of their mates, even if they become more like
them in good looks. .

All the widow birds come from Africa, and are most
common on the western coast between Senegal and Angola,
which places perhaps you have seen marked upon a map.

As captives they manage to be very happy, if we may
judge by the brisk way in which they jump from perch to
perch, raising and lowering their handsome tails as they feel
inclined. |

They are very fond of bathing; and to keep them
healthy and satisfied with their lot, there must be water
placed every day in the cage for a bath.
156 THE WIDOW FINCH.

The male bird has a sharp note, but it is pleasant to
hear. After his long winter silence, he gets back his voice
with the bright spring days. They will feed upon different
kinds of small grain, and be very grateful for a few green
herbs every now and then. If well cared for, and sheltered
from the cold of our climate, this is a bird which lives from
twelve to fifteen years.

Although it has been long known in Europe, the widow
finch has never become common amongst us like the canary
and other small birds. All the large family of finches,
from whatever country they come, are very easily tamed
and very full of intelligence.

They are useful birds in the way of destroying insects,
and they also feed upon the seeds of many weeds that
might otherwise increase even faster than they do.

The nest of a finch is not made in a careless, untidy
fashion, as are the nests of many of the large birds you
have been hearing about lately. Fine twigs, blades of
grass, feathers, and bits of wool are all got together to
form a soft, snug home for the little ones; and when
they come out of the shell, their parents take good care
of them, and bring plenty of food to the hungry young
things.

Our own goldfinch and the smart chaffinch are both
related to the widow finch of the glossy black plumage.

There is another of the numerous family that lives in
the tropical countries, where rice grows as commonly as
THE WIDOW FINCH. 157

corn does in England. This kind of finch does so much
harm to the crops that a number of strings are arranged
with bits of paper on them by which the birds may be
seared. There are little huts spread about over the field, in
each of which a man is kept sitting to pull the strings and
so make the papers rustle and twirl about. Each time the
strings move this thieving finch flies away, but soon comes
back and eats afresh. They get so fat on their meals of
rice that the natives think them quite worth cooking, and
so catch as many as possible.

I do not think any such tales are told of the African
finch in our picture; and when kept in our English
collections of foreign birds, he always has a good character,
and is liked for his blithe merry ways.




THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEET.

Ir is time we began to talk a little of the parrot family,
for there are a great many different kinds.

The parrakeets are perhaps more graceful than some of
their kindred ; their claws are not so strong as those of the
parrot, and they have very slender feet, which enable them
to run quickly along the ground.

As long ago as when Alexander the Great made a journey
into India, this bird of our picture was found and brought
by him to Europe, so it is called the Alexandrine parrakeet.
Their usual length is about eighteen inches ; but the female
is rather smaller. In colour almost all the different parra-
keets have an emerald-green body, a deep red beak, and a ~
rose-tinted collar of feathers at the neck, while the two long
plumes of the tail are of a most beautiful and rich shade

,
THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEET. 159

of blue. The Alexandrine bird has rather a deeper shade
about the neck and shoulders, and is more rare than many
of the others. There is also a patch of black about the
throat which passes to the sides of the neck, and from the
base of the bill a line of black passes towards the eyes.
Then on the wings there is a deep purple patch which
makes a contrast to the other shades of his plumage, so
that altogether he is a very gay and handsome fellow with
his varied colours. The noise which these parrakeets
make is something no one can believe unless it has been
heard, and a traveller among those Indian forests would
hear them screaming to one another before he came near
where they were.

As captives they continue very noisy; but they can
be taught to talk, so that words and a few funny sen-
tences are not so wearisome to hear as their constant cries
and shrieks. They lead a very happy life among the
trees, and are affectionate to each other. For food they
like all kinds of berries and grains. The parrakeets which
we see most commonly in England are called the ringed
kind, and become very tame indeed.

There is a little green parrakeet that lives in the Spice
Islands, and the natives are always trying to catch them,
not to make pets, but to use them as food. Their flesh has
a very dainty flavour, because they feed on the fruit of the
spices. |

When they have grown fat the hunters come and take
160 THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEET.

them in numbers ; but the green leaves among which they
perch are so much the colour of their feathers that they are
not seen at the first glance. You will wonder, then, why
this parrakeet is so often caught. It is because he is like
some small human beings, and cannot manage to keep quiet.
If he could but remain still, he might save his life ; yet this
is not his nature. He wants to flit from bough to bough
so constantly that he begins rustling, and then the natives
see where he is, and take aim at the restless little bird,
shooting as many as they care to have.

The Alexandrine birds can climb as well as any of the
parrot tribe, for their claws help them to lay firm hold of
the branches as they mount higher and higher. When
they find nuts, the hard shell is no difficulty, for their
sharp-notched bills will soon crack it, and they reach the
kernel in a second, enjoying it greatly.

When they want to rob the plantations of the fruit
that has been cultivated there, these parrakeets do not go
off one or two together. They are wise enough to form a
large band, and so they have the advantage of plenty of
cheerful company, and can besides do their work of mischief
in a very short space of time.

I do not think you will be likely to see an Alexandrine
parrakeet at the home of one of your friends, nor to possess
the pretty creature as a pet of your own. Though there
are plenty of them in India, and particularly in the island
of Ceylon, it is not so easy to keep them as tame birds in our
THE ALEXANDRINE PARRAKEFT. 161

chilly country. Still, with care, they are preserved among
the collections of foreign birds which Antwerp, Paris, and
London, as well as other large cities of Europe, possess ; so
if you pay a visit to the Zoological Gardens, that will be
your best chance of seeing this gaily-coloured and elegant

parrakeet, of which you have here the likeness.



(84) 11


THE VAZA PARRAKEET.

THOUGH in the usual way the parrakeets are of brilliant
coloured plumage, we have a rare sort here that has a very
sombre livery. Many of his class have been found in Aus-
tralia, but a few are seen about the islands of the Pacific
Ocean, and the bird of which you have the portrait here
was brought a long time ago from Madagascar.

In the form of the bill this parrakeet is a little like the
macaws, for the upper part is short and the lower part is
deeply notched. The tail is broad, and in its length equals
the body. The wings do not reach above a third part of
the length of the tail when they are closed. You see by
the picture that the colour of this bird’s feathers is a sooty
black, but if he is placed in a strong light there may be seen

a shade of slate passing over them. The legs and claws
THE VAZA PARRAKEET. 163

are black, the bill is of a dusky horn colour, and round
the eyes the narrow ring of skin is white. So the Vaza
parrakeet has not one single bright tint about him; and
if there is any jealousy among birds he must wish that
he had the brilliant plumage of the relations amongst
which he finds himself in the aviaries of the Zoological
Gardens or in the houses of those who possess foreign
birds as pets.

Like all the parrakeets he moves lightly and swiftly,
and the speed with which he can run along the ground is
amusing. Far different is it with the large parrots and
cockatoos, that move in an awkward way, except when they
are climbing.

The character of this Vaza bird is excellent. When-
ever he has been brought amongst us he has been in high
favour, because he is so gentle and so easily made tame.

But he is very timid, and thus he will not grow friendly
on first acquaintance with his visitors. He likes to make
quite certain that they have no evil intentions towards him,
and once sure of this he takes pleasure in being noticed.

Like most tame birds of the parrot kind, he will let
himself be carried on the hand of his owner without show-
ing any wish to give an angry peck. He is also very will-
ing to be stroked, especially among the soft feathers of his
head. He is very unlike some of his family in the way of
noise. Usually their shrill voices are rather a nuisance ;

but the Vaza bird is almost always silent, and this I think
164 THE VAZA PARRAKEET.

to be a strong point in his favour. It is only on very rare -
occasions, and when he is in the highest spirits, that he
gives vent to a scream which I must own is loud and harsh.
As, however, it happens but rarely, there is no great annoy-
ance to be feared from his voice. The habits of those Vaza
parrakeets that have been brought from Australia are just
the same as were noticed in this bird that was caught in
Madagascar.

They all grow contented prisoners, and move as nimbly
in their cages as the space given will allow them to do.
But it is in the woods and forests of their own sunny lands
that we should see the parrakeets best—both those that are
brightly coloured and those rarer birds of dusky hue that
have such graceful, rapid movements. The food of all the
species is pretty much the same. Grains, berries, nuts, and
other vegetable substances, they can find for themselves
when they are free. There is an Australian variety that
does not care for fruit, but chooses rather to get the sugary
Juice out of the flowers that grow in the country. He has
a tongue formed like that of no other member of his family,
and it helps him to sweep off this honey, which is his favourite
banquet. Sad to say, he is so busy over the search that he
does not see when some one with a gun is drawing near,
and thus he often gets captured or killed for the sake of
his flesh, which is thought a dainty dish.


THE RED AND BLUE MACAW.

No bird’s life can be much more joyous than that which
the parrots lead amongst the branches of the trees. They
climb about by the help of beaks and claws. They swing,
they chatter and scream to one another, and go down to take
a bath in the clear streams every day. They are very
punctual birds, and it is always just the same hour at which
they set off on a bathing excursion in a large company.
When they have enjoyed the water long enough, they fly
back to the trees, and take great pains in dressing their
feathers and putting themselves in order. In the middle
of the day, when the heat of the sun is greatest, they become
silent, and drop asleep, to wake up as lively as ever with
the cool breeze of evening. Fora roosting-place the parrots
choose a hollow tree, getting into the hole one after another

until it will hold no more. Those of the band that are
166 THE RED AND BLUE MACAW.

thus left outside hook themselves on to the nearest branch by
their beaks and claws, sleeping very soundly in that position.

Among all the family of parrots the macaws are the
largest and the most brilliantly coloured. They are mild
in temper, and become very docile when they are captured
and borne away to live as pets in a strange country. The
red and blue macaw is one of the most ornamental of his
kind. He is a large fellow, too, for he measures nearly
three feet from the top of his head to the tip of his long
tail. The general colour of his plumage is a deep, bright
red, with a band of bluish green between the shoulders
and some deep violet feathers in his wings. His tail is
generally blue at its base, crimson in the middle, and then
blue again at the end, and blood-red underneath ; but in
different birds the colours vary a little in their depth of
tint. There is no plumage to cover the cheeks of this
macaw, but three or four lines of minute crimson feathers
may be seen on their light skin.

This kind of parrot is found chiefly in Brazil, and also in
some of the West India islands. They are said to have
very long lives; but however this may be in their wild state,
it is certain that when brought to our country they must
be well protected from the cold if we want to keep them
long. For food, the macaws live chiefly on fruits and seeds;
these they can find in plenty when at home in their own
forests, and in captivity they seem contented with whatever

is given them.
THE RED AND BLUE MACAW. 167

Although so handsome, this red and blue macaw cannot
rival the plainer coloured parrots in intelligence, nor has
he got so much power of imitation as they have ; neither
is he so full of activity nor so very sociable with those
who own and feed him.

As macaws can find ready purchasers, the catching of
them is quite a business with the natives of those parts
where they are common. It is not part of the hunter's
plan to injure the bird, for this would lessen his value, so
he arms himself with a blunt arrow and strikes the pretty
bright head suddenly, so that being stunned the macaw falls
to the ground and is easily taken. Another way of getting
him is this, which is generally the easiest and most suc-
cessful plan. A fire will be lighted under the trees, and a
kind of plant is burned in it which makes a strong, stupi-
fying smell. After a short time the poor tricked birds
begin to feel stupid and drowsy, and dropping off to sleep
they fall from the branches of the trees as if they were
dead. Then is the moment when the natives pick them
up and make off with them to the ships, where the sailors
are always ready to buy these gay parrots.

They are such sociable creatures, and so fond of being
' amongst a large number of their own kind, that one shut
up in a cage must indeed be unhappy for a time. But
though they wear a drooping, dejected air when imprison-
ment is new to them, we may see for ourselves that they

get over their grief in time.


THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO.

-Do you want to see one of these birds at home? Then
you must take ship and sail away to Australia; and you
will find him flying about in the high trees on the banks
of some river, screaming (because he does not talk or sing),
feathering himself in the sunshine, or taking a nice doze at
hot noontide.

His plumage is all white; but his crest is formed of
yellow feathers, about the tint of sulphur, as his name tells
you. The longer feathers of this handsome crest will
sometimes measure seven inches.

Like all cockatoos and parrots, this one is of a sociable
character. He will not be met with alone, but among a
large company of his fellows. They are very shy birds,
THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO. 169

and take flight as soon as they see any one approaching.
If you look at his picture, you will notice that he has a
strong, sharp bill; and indeed he could bite your finger
nearly in two, if he felt spitefully inclined. But they are
not often ill-tempered birds; and this yellow-crested fellow
very seldom hurts any one, unless he has a strong dislike
to a person who perhaps has not treated him well. Still,
let me caution you not to be too familiar at first sight with
one of these cockatoos that we have living in captivity
amongst us. You may think him to be asleep, but only
let your fingers approach him, and he will whirl round his
head to snap at you. The nests of these wild cockatoos
are built in the rotten branches of the trees, and they are
formed of mould instead of twigs. The mother-bird lays
two pure spotlessly white eggs, and then sits on them till
her little ones appear. I am very sorry to tell you that
these young cockatoos are often killed and eaten, and the
older ones are sometimes made into soup, by the natives of
Australia.

There are two ways of catching these pretty birds by
those who do not take out a gun with which to shoot them.
The native will watch until he sees a flock of cockatoos,
and, by hiding behind a bush, he keeps them ignorant of
their danger. He chooses the time when they are going to
roost among the trees, and then throws a spear in among
them. One or two at least are sure to be wounded, and,

falling to the ground, are easily caught.
170 THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO.

Then there is a trick played by the natives which I
think very cruel. They will fasten a wounded cockatoo to
a tree, and hide away to see the success of their scheme.
He cries loudly to let his friends know what distress he is
in; and they are so fond of one another, that every bird
within hearing comes flying to see what he can do to help
his poor brother. Of course this is a good chance for others
to be hurt and caught in their turn.

You must not suppose that these yellow-crested cock-
atoos are not clever and watchful. Two or three of a band
are always on the look-out, and give notice by loud cries if
an enemy is to be seen. But if a man will not grow weary
of hiding in the bushes, perhaps for hours, he may be able
to get hold of two or three in the way I have just described
to you. A great number of these birds are brought to
Europe by sailors and travellers, and you may always see
them in the Zoological Gardens and in the rooms set apart
for the feathered creatures in our London bazaars. The
mischief they used to do among fruits and grains in their
days of liberty is all at an end. But it is their nature to
destroy what they can, so, as prisoners, they work away
with their bills at every bit of wood within reach. No
one must have a yellow-crested bird of this kind for a pet,
unless he can bear a good deal of noise.

He will not repeat sentences like a parrot, but he can
scream and call, and make a sort of jabbering that is not
always pleasant. The warm sunshine is very much to his
THE GREATER SULPHUR-CRESTED COCKATOO. 171

taste, and will send him snugly asleep on his perch, with
his head partly turned and nestling among his soft white

plumage.




THE ROSE-CRESTED COCKATOO.

Tuts is a member of the large parrot family, and he always
has aecrest upon the top of his head, that can be moved up
and down at his pleasure.

The rose-crested cockatoo is brought to us from Sumatra
and the islands of Molucca, and he is a very noisy fellow,
let me assure you. As for the mischief he can do with
that hard bill of his, I may call it boundless; but before
we talk about his behaviour we will study his appearance
a little.

He is not a large bird, as you may see by the picture ;
not more than sixteen or seventeen inches long. The

plumage is white, with a rosy tinge upon it, and the crest
THE ROSE-CRESTED COCKATOO. 173

is formed of bright red feathers. The legs are gray, and
the bill is of a bluish black. In their wild state these
cockatoos are on the most friendly terms with one another,
so they form large companies, and find their way to a field
where the rice is growing. Here they eat and tear and break,
doing all the damage that is possible, and vastly enjoying
the amusement. The owner of the field takes another view
of the case, and bears a good deal of ill-will towards these
pretty but dishonest cockatoos.

They are very happy among the tree-tops, flying here
and there, and coming down for a bath when they feel
inclined. It must be hard for them to bear captivity in a
cage, or to be chained to a wooden stand as we often see them.
Despite their tricks and troublesome ways, these birds are
very affectionate, and grow fond of those who are kind to
them in their new life.

If ever you have the chance, watch one of these cocka-
toos getting the kernel out of a nut. He needs no one to
crack the shell for him; it is done in a minute. Then he
holds the nut in his foot very daintily, and digging the
sharp end of his bill into it, manages to pull out the kernel
bit by bit with his tongue. The tongue of a cockatoo is
thick and stiff, and he can push it out to a great distance.

Some people have said that the rose-crested bird is not
so clever as others of his relatives; but I cannot think this
is true, because for many years I was watching the tricks
of one of this kind every day. When first he came to his
174 THE ROSE-CRESTED COCKATOO,

English home he was chained to a stand; but he could
undo the swivel and get free so easily that at last no one
tried to fasten him up. He had the sense to know that
he was to stay in the kitchen (unless invited upstairs),
and there he had a chair of his own with an iron back
to it.

I should tell you that he had bitten away three wooden
chairs before this plan was thought of. The cook and
the cockatoo were very great friends, but he played her
many a mean trick. When she was busy, he was always
perched on the edge of the kitchen table, watching every
movement with his keen black eyes. While he felt him-
self looked after, his behaviour was excellent; but if his
friend only turned her back an instant, he would dip his
beak into her jars, and toss currants, or rice, or whatever it
might be, on to the floor, pretending to be fast asleep when
she came near.

I suppose the memory of his old freedom came back to
the cockatoo, for on very fine summer days he sometimes
tried how far his clipped wings would carry him. To be
sure he had his walk on the green lawn every morning ;
but it so happened that this did not content him, and he would
suddenly fly into a tree or up to the roof of the house.

Far too wise was he to go away from those he loved.
He only teased them by keeping out of reach for an hour
or two, and then he came down, seeming all the better for
his flight.
THE ROSE-CRESTED COCKATOO. 175

The stories I could tell you of this bird would take up
all the space in our little book.

I wish I could have shown him to all my young
readers, perching on the back of a large cat, nestling by
her while she slept before the fire, or picking little bits of
meat out of the plate that contained her dinner, just for the
pleasure of strewing them about. For food he ate seeds,
bread and butter, and soaked bread, also nuts, almonds, and
dry biscuits. Our picture of the rose-crested cockatoo
might be the portrait of my old pet, it is so exactly like

him!

THE END.

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ROX
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