Citation
Paul and Virginia

Material Information

Title:
Paul and Virginia
Uniform Title:
Paul et Virginie
Creator:
Saint-Pierre, Bernardin de, 1737-1814
Leloir, Maurice, 1853-1940 ( Illustrator )
Thomas Y. Crowell & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York ;
Boston
Publisher:
Thomas Y. Crowell & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
197, [1] p., [7] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nature (Aesthetics) -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Slavery -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Mauritius ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1892 ( local )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Text and front matter in green decorative borders.
Statement of Responsibility:
Bernardin de Saint-Pierre ; with illustrations by Maurice Leloir.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026943729 ( ALEPH )
ALH7447 ( NOTIS )
191867848 ( OCLC )

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Bernardin de Saint-Pierre
PAUL AND VIRGINIA

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

MAURICE LELOIR



NEW YORK: 46 East 14TH STREET.
THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO.

BOSTON: 100 PurcHaAsE STREET.







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Love of Nature, that strong feeling of enthusiasm
which leads to a profound admiration of the whole
works of creation, belongs, it may be presumed, to
a certain peculiarity of organization, and has, no
doubt, existed in different individuals from the be-
ginning of the world. The old poets and philoso-
phers, romance-writers and troubadours, had all
looked upon Nature with observing and admiring
eyes. They have most of them given incidentally
charming pictures of Spring, of the setting sun, of
particular spots, and of favorite flowers.

There are few writers of note, of any country or
of any age, from whom quotations might not be made

I



2 MEMOIR OF

in proof of the love with which they regarded Nature.
And this remark applies as much to religious and
philosophic writers as to poets, — equally to Plato,
_ St. Francois de Sales, Bacon, and Fénelon, as to
Shakespeare, Racine, Calderon, or Burns; for from
no really philosophic or religious doctrine can the
love of the works of Nature be excluded.

But before the days of Jean Jacques Rousseau,
Buffon, and Bernardin de St. Pierre, this love of
Nature had not been expressed in all its intensity.
Until their day, it had not been written on exclu-
sively. The lovers of Nature were not, till then, as
they may perhaps since be considered, a sect apart.
Though perfectly sincere in all the adorations they
offered, they were less entirely, and certainly less
diligently and constantly, her adorers.

It is the great praise of Bernardin de St. Pierre,
that coming immediately after Rousseau and Buffon,
and being one of the most proficient writers of the-
same school, he was in no degree their imitator, but
perfectly original and new. He intuitively perceived
the immensity of the subject he intended to explore,
and has told us that no day of his life passed with-
out his collecting some valuable materials for his
writings. In the divine works of Nature he dili-
gently sought to discover her laws. It was his early
intention not to begin to write until he had ceased to
observe; but he found observation endless, and that
he was ‘‘ like a child, who with a shell digs a hole in
the sand to receive the waters of the ocean.” He
elsewhere humbly says, that not only the general
history of Nature, but even that of the smallest



BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 3

plant, was far beyond his ability. Before, however,
speaking further of him as an author, it will be
necessary to recapitulate the chief events of his
life. .
Henri-Jacques Bernardin de St. Pierre was born at
Havre in 1737. He always considered himself de-
scended from that Eustache de St. Pierre, who is
said by Froissart (and I believe by Froissart only)
to have so generously offered himself as a victim to
appease the wrath of Edward the Third against
Calais. He, with his companions in virtue, it is also
said, was saved by the intercession of Queen Phil-
ippa. In one of his smaller works, Bernardin asserts
this descent, and it was certainly one of which he
might be proud. Many anecdotes are related of his
childhood, indicative of the youthful author, — of his
strong love of Nature, and his humanity to animals.
That ‘‘the child is father of the man” has been
seldom more strongly illustrated. There is a story
of a cat, which, when related by him many years
afterwards to Rousseau, caused that philosopher to
shed tears. At eight years of age he took the
greatest pleasure in the regular culture of his garden,
and possibly then stored up some of the ideas which
afterwards appeared in the ‘‘ Fraisier.” His sym-
pathy with all living things was extreme. In ‘ Paul
and Virginia” he praises, with evident satisfaction,
their meal of milk and eggs, which had not cost any
animal its life. It has been remarked, and possibly
with truth, that every tenderly disposed heart,
deeply imbued with a love of Nature, is at times
somewhat Braminical. St. Pierre’s certainly was.



4 MEMOIR OF

When quite young, he advanced with a clinched
fist towards a carter who was ill-treating a horse.
And when taken for the first time, by his father, to
Rouen, having the towers of the cathedral pointed
out to him, he exclaimed, ‘‘ My God! how high they
fly!” Every one present naturally laughed. Ber-
nardin had only noticed the flight of some swallows
who had built their nests there. He thus early re-
vealed those instincts which afterwards became the
guidance of his life, the strength of which possibly
occasioned his too great indifference to all monu-
ments of art. The love of study and of solitude
were also characteristics of his childhood. His tem-
per is said to have been moody, impetuous, and in-
tractable. Whether this faulty temper may not have
been produced or rendered worse by mismanage-
ment, cannot now be ascertained. It undoubtedly
became, afterwards, to St. Pierre, a fruitful source of
misfortune and of woe.

The reading of voyages was with him, even in
childhood, almost a passion. At twelve years of age,
his whole soul was occupied by Robinson Crusoe and
his island. His.romantic love of adventure seeming
to his parents to announce a predilection in favor of
the sea, he was sent by them with one of his uncles
to Martinique. But St. Pierre had- not sufficiently
practised the virtue of obedience to submit, as was
necessary, to the discipline of a ship. He was after-
wards placed with the Jesuits at Caen, with whom he
made immense progress in his studies. But, it is to
be feared, he did not conform too well to the regula-
tions of the college, for he conceived, from that time,



BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 5

the greatest detestation for places of public educa-
tion. And this aversion he has frequently testified
in his writings. While devoted to his books of
travels, he in turn anticipated being a Jesuit, a mis-
sionary, ora martyr: but his family at length suc-
ceeded in establishing him at Rouen, where he
completed his studies with brilliant success in 1757.
He soon after obtained a commission as an engineer,
with a salary of a hundred louis. In this capacity he
was sent (1760) to Diisseldorf, under the command
of Count St. Germain. This was a career in which
he might have acquired both honor and fortune ; but,
most unhappily for St. Pierre, he looked upon the
useful and necessary etiquettes of life as so many
unworthy prejudices. Instead of conforming to them,
he sought to trample on them. In addition, he
evinced some disposition to rebel against his com-
mander, and was unsocial with his equals. It is not
therefore, to be wondered at, that at this unfortunate
period of his existence he made himself enemies; or
that, notwithstanding his great talents, or the cool-
ness he had exhibited in moments of danger, he
should have been sent back to France. Unwelcome,
under these circumstances, to his family, he was ill
received by all.

It is a lesson yet Zo de learned, that genius gives no
charter for the indulgence of error, —a truth yet Zo be
remembered, that only a small portion of the world
will look with leniency on the failings of the highly
gifted ; and that, from themselves, the consequences
of their own actions can never be averted. It is yet,
alas ! zo de added to the convictions of the ardent in



6 MEMOIR OF

mind, that no degree of excellence in science or lit-
erature, not even the immortality of a name, can
exempt its possessor from obedience to moral disci-
pline, or give him happiness, unless ‘‘ temper’s
image” be stamped on his daily words and actions.
St, Pierre’s life was sadly embittered by his own con-
duct. The adventurous life he led after his return
from Diisseldorf, some of the circumstances of which
exhibited him in an unfavorable light to others,
tended, perhaps, to tinge his imagination with that
wild and tender melancholy so prevalent in his writ-
ings. A prize in the lottery had just doubled his
very slender means of existence, when he obtained
the appointment of geographical engineer, and was
sent to Malta. The Knights of the Order were at
this time expecting to be attacked by the Turks.
Having already been in the service, it was singular
that St. Pierre should have had the imprudence to

sail without his commission. He thus subjected.

himself to a thousand disagreeables, for the officers
would not recognize him as one of themselves. The
effects of their neglect on his mind were tremendous :
his reason for a time seemed almost disturbed by the
mortifications he suffered. After receiving an insuffi-
cient indemnity for the expenses of his voyage,
St. Pierre returned to France, there to endure fresh
misfortunes.

Not being able to obtain any assistance from the
ministry or his family, he resolved on giving lessons
in the mathematics. But St. Pierre was less adapted
than most others for succeeding in the apparently
easy, but really ingenious and difficult, art of teach-







BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 7

ing. When education is better understood, it will
be more generally acknowledged, that, to impart
instruction with success, a teacher must possess
deeper intelligence than is implied by the profound-
est skill in any one branch of science or of art. All
minds, even to the youngest, require, while being
taught, the utmost compliance and consideration ;
and these qualities can scarcely be properly exercised
without a true knowledge of the human heart, united
to much practical patience. St. Pierre, at this period
of his life, certainly did not possess them. It is
probable that Rousseau, when he attempted in his
youth to give lessons in music, not knowing any-
thing whatever of music, was scarcely less fitted for
the task of instruction than St. Pierre with all his
mathematical knowledge. The pressure of poverty
drove him to Holland. He was well received at’
Amsterdam by a French refugee named Mustel, who
edited a popular journal there, and who procured him
employment, with handsome remuneration. St.
Pierre did not, however, remain long satisfied with
this quiet mode of existence. Allured by the en-
couraging reception given by Catherine II. to foreign-
ers, he set out for St. Petersburg. Here, until he
obtained the protection of the Maréchal de Munich
and the friendship of Duval, he had again to contend
with poverty. The latter generously opened to him
his purse, and by the Maréchal he was: introduced to
Villebois, the Grand Master of Artillery, and by him
presented to the Empress. St. Pierre was so hand-
some, that by some of his friends it was supposed —
perhaps too, hoped, — that he would supersede



8 MEMOIR OF

Orloff in the favor of Catherine. But more honor-
able illusions, though they were but illusions, occu-
pied his own mind. He neither sought nor wished
to captivate the Empress. His ambition was to
establish a republic on the shores of the lake Aral,
of which, in imitation of Plato or Rousseau, he was
to be the legislator. Pre-occupied with the reforma-
tion of despotism, he did not sufficiently look into
his own heart, or seek to avoid a repetition of the
same errors that had already changed friends into
enemies, and been such a terrible barrier to his suc-
cess in life. His mind was already morbid, and in
fancying that others did not understand him, he for-
got that he did not understand others. The Em-
press, with the rank of captain, bestowed on him a
grant of 1,500 francs; but when General Dubosquet
proposed to take him with him to examine the mili-
tary position of Finland, his only anxiety seemed to
be to return to France: still he went to Finland;
and his own notes of his occupations and experi-
ments on that expedition prove that he gave himself
up in all diligence to considerations of attack and
defence. He, who loved Nature so intently, seems
only to have seen in the extensive and majestic
forests of the North a theatre of war. In this in-
stance, he appears to have stifled every emotion of
admiration, and to have beheld alike cities and coun-
tries in his character of military surveyor.

On his return to St. Petersburg, he found his pro-
tector, Villebois, disgraced. St. Pierre then resolved
on espousing the cause of the Poles. He went into
Poland with a high reputation, —that of having







BERNARKRDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 9

refused the favors of despotism, to aid the cause of
liberty. But it was his private life, rather than his
public career, that was affected by his residence in
Poland. The Princess Mary fell in love with him,
and, forgetful of all considerations, quitted her family
to reside with him. Yielding, however, at length,
to the entreaties of her mother, she returned to her
home. St. Pierre, filled with regret, resorted to
Vienna; but, unable to support the sadness which
oppressed him, and imagining that sadness to be
shared by the Princess, he soon went back to Poland.
His return was still more sad than his departure, for
he found himself regarded by her who had once loved
him as an intruder. It is to this attachment he
alludes so touchingly in one of his letters. ‘* Adieu!
friends dearer than the treasures of India! Adieu!
forests of the North, that I shall never see again ! —
tender friendship, and the still dearer sentiment
which surpassed it!— days of intoxication and of
happiness, adieu! adieu! We live but for a day, to
die during a whole life!”

This letter appears to one of St. Pierre’s most par-
tial biographers as if steeped in tears ; and he speaks
of his romantic and unfortunate adventure in Poland
as the ideal of a poet's love.

‘To be,” says M. Sainte-Beuve, ‘a great poet,
and loved before he had thought of glory! To ex-
hale the first perfume of a soul of genius, believing
himself only a lover! To reveal himself, for the first
time, entirely, but in mystery !.”

In his enthusiasm, M. Sainte-Beuve loses sight of
the melancholy sequel, which must have left so sad a



Io MEMOLR OF

remembrance in St. Pierre’s own mind. His suffer-
ing from this circumstance may perhaps have con-
duced to his making Virginia so good and true, and
so incapable of giving pain.

In 1766 he returned to Havre; but his relations
were by this time dead or dispersed, and after six
years of exile, he found himself once more in his own
country, without employment, and destitute of pecu-
niary resources.

The Baron de Breteuil at length obtained for him
a commission as engineer to the Isle of France,
whence he returned in 1771. In this interval his
heart and imagination doubtless received the germs
of his immortal works. Many of the events, indeed,
of the ‘‘ Voyage a He de France,” are to be found
modified by imagined circumstances in ‘“‘ Paul and
Virginia.” He returned to Paris poor in purse, but
rich in observations and mental resources, and
resolved to devote himself to literature. By the
Baron de Breteuil he was recommended to D’Alem-
bert, who procured a publisher for his ‘‘ Voyage,”
and also introduced him to Mlle. de l’Espinasse.
But no one, in spite of his great beauty, was so ill
calculated to shine or please in society as St. Pierre.
His manners were timid and embarrassed, and, unless
to those with whom he was very intimate, he scarcely
appeared intelligent.

It is sad to think that misunderstanding should
prevail to such an extent, and heart so seldom really
speak to heart, in the ‘intercourse of the world, that
the most humane may appear cruel, and the sympa-
thizing indifferent. Judging of Mlle. de l’Espinasse





BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. Il

from her letters, and the testimony of her contem-
poraries, it seems quite impossible that she could
have given pain to any one, more particularly toa
man possessing St. Pierre’s extraordinary talent and
profound sensibility. Both she and D’Alembert
were capable of appreciating him; but the society in
which they moved laughed at his timidity, and the
tone of raillery in which they often indulged was not
understood by him. It is certain that he withdrew
from their circle with wounded and mortified feelings,
and, in spite of an explanatory letter from D’Alem-
bert, did not return to it. The inflicters of all
this pain, in the meantime, were possibly as un-
conscious of the meaning attached to their words
as were the birds of old of the augury drawn from
their flight.

St. Pierre, in his ‘‘ Préambule de l’Arcadie,” has
pathetically and eloquently described the deplorable
state of his health and feelings, after frequent hu-
miliating disputes and disappointments had driven
him from society; or rather, when, like Rousseau, he
was ‘‘ self-banished ” fromit. ‘*I was struck,” he says,
‘with an extraordinary malady. Streams of fire,
like lightning, flashed before my eyes: every object
appeared to me double or in motion: like CEdipus,
Isawtwo suns... In the finest day of summer, I
could not cross the Seine in a boat without experi-
encing intolerable anxiety. If, in a public garden, I
merely passed by a piece of water, I suffered from
spasms and a feeling of horror. I could not cross a
garden in which many people were collected: if they
looked at me, I immediately imagined they were







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I2 MEMOIR OF

speaking ill of me.” It was during this state of suf-
fering that he devoted himself with ardor to collect-
ing and making use of materials for that work which
was to give glory to his name.

It was only by perseverance, and disregarding
many rough and discouraging receptions, that he
succeeded in making acquaintance with Rousseau,
whom he so much resembled. St. Pierre devoted
himself to his society with enthusiasm, visiting him
frequently and constantly, till Rousseau departed
for Ermenonville. It is not unworthy of remark that
both these men, such enthusiastic admirers of Nature
and the natural in all things, should have possessed
factitious rather than practical virtue, and a wisdom
wholly unfitted for the world. St. Pierreasked Rous-
seau, in one of their frequent rambles, if, in delineat-
ing St. Preux, he had not intended to represent him-
self. ‘‘No,” replied Rousseau, ‘‘St. Preux is not
what I have been, but what I wished to be.” St.
Pierre would most likely have given the same answer
had a similar question been put to him with regard
to the Colonel in ‘‘ Paul and Virginia.” This, at least,
appears the sort of old age he loved to contemplate
and wished to realize.

For six years he worked at his ‘‘ Etudes,” and
with some difficulty found a publisher for them. M.
Didot, a celebrated typographer, whose daughter St.
Pierre afterwards married, consented to print a man-
uscript which had been declined by many others.
He was well rewarded for the undertaking. The
success of the ‘‘ Etudes de la Nature” surpassed the
most sanguine expectation, even of the author. Four



BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 13

years after its publication, St. Pierre gave to the
world ‘* Paul and Virginia,” which had for some time
been lying in his portfolio. He had tried its effect,
in manuscript, on persons of different characters and
pursuits. They had given it no applause, but all had
shed tears at its perusal; and perhaps few works of
a decidedly romantic character have ever been so gen-
erally read, or so much approved. Among the great
names whose admiration of it is on record, may be
mentioned Napoleon and Humboldt.

In 1789 he published ‘‘ Les Vceux d’un Solitaire”
and “La Suite des Veeux.” By the A/onzteur of the
day these works were compared to the celebrated
pamphlet of Siéyes, ‘* Qu’est-ce que le tiers état?”
which then absorbed all the public favor. In 1791
‘* La Chaumiére Indienne” was published ; and in the
following year, about thirteen days before the cele-
brated roth of August, Louis XVI. appointed St.
Pierre Superintendent of the ‘‘ Jardin des Plantes.”
Soon afterwards the King, on seeing him, compli-
mented him on his writings, and told him he was
happy to have found a worthy successor to Buffon.

Although deficient in exact knowledge of the sci-
ences, and knowing little of the world, St. Pierre
was, by his simplicity and the retirement in which he
lived, well suited, at that epoch, to the situation.
About this time, and when in his fifty-seventh year,
he married Mlle. Didot.

In 1795 he became a member of the French
Academy, and, as was just, after his acceptance of
this honor, he wrote no more against literary socie-
ties. On the suppression of his place. he retired to



14 MEMOIR OF

Essonne. It is delightful to follow him there, and
to contemplate his quiet existence. His days flowed
on peaceably, occupied in the publication of ‘‘ Les
Harmonies de la Nature,” the republication of his
earlier works, and the composition of some lesser
pieces. He himself affectingly regrets an interrup-
tion to these occupations. On being appointed In-
structor to the Normal School, he says, ‘“‘I am
obliged to hang my harp on the willows of my river,
and to accept an employment useful to my family and
my country. Jam afflicted at having to suspend an
occupation which has given me so much happiness.”

He enjoyed, in his old age, a degree of opulence,
which, as much as glory, had perhaps been the ob-
ject of his ambition. In any case, it is gratifying to
reflect, that after a life so full of chance and change,
he was, in his latter years, surrounded by much that
should accompany old age. His day of storms and
tempests was closed by an evening of repose and
beauty.

Amid many other blessings, the elasticity of his
mind was preserved to the last, He died at Eragny
sur l’Oise, on the 21st of January, 1814. The stir-
ring events which then occupied France, or rather
the whole world, caused his death to be little noticed
atthe time. The Academy did not, however, neglect
to give him the honors due to its members. Mons.
Parseval Grand Maison pronounced a deserved
eulogium on his talents, and Mons. Aignan, also, the
customary tribute, taking his seat as his successor.

Having himself contracted the habit of confiding
his griefs and sorrows to the public, the sanctuary of







BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 15

his private life was open alike to the discussion of
friends and enemies. The biographer who wishes to
be exact, and yet set down naught in malice, is forced
to the contemplation of his errors. The secret of
many of these, as well as of his miseries, seems
revealed by himself in this sentence:

‘*T experience more pain from a single thorn than
pleasure from a thousand roses.” And elsewhere,
‘« The best society seems to me bad, if I find in it
one troublesome, wicked, slanderous, envious, or per-
fidious person.” Now, taking into consideration that
St. Pierre sometimes imagined persons who were
really good to be deserving of these strong and very
contumelious epithets, it would have been difficult
indeed to find a society in which he could have been
happy. He was, therefore, wise in secking retire-
ment, and indulging in solitude. His mistakes, —
for they were mistakes, — arose from a too quick
perception of evil, united to an exquisite and diffuse
sensibility. When he felt wounded by a thorn, he
forgot the beauty and perfume of the rose to which
it belonged, and from which, perhaps, it could not be
separated. And he was exposed (as often happens)
to the very description of trials that were least in
harmony with his defects. “Few dispositions could
have run a career like his, and have remained un-
scathed. But one less tender than his own would
have been less soured by it. For many years he
bore about with him the consciousness of unacknowl-
edged talent. The world cannot be blamed for not
appreciating that which had never been revealed.
But we know not what the jostling and elbowing of



16 MEMOIR OF

that world, in the meantime, may have been to him
—how often he may have felt himself unworthily
treated, or how far that treatment may have preyed
upon and corroded his heart. Who shall say that
with this consciousness there did not mingle a quick
and instinctive perception of the hidden motives of
action — that he did not sometimes detect, where
others might have been blinded, the undershuffling
of the hands in the by-play of the world?

Through all his writings, and throughout his cor-
respondence, there are beautiful proofs of the tender-
ness of his feelings, —the most essential quality,
perhaps, in any writer. It is at least one that, if not
possessed, can never be attained. The familiarity
of his imagination with natural objects, when he was
living far removed from them, is remarkable, and
often affecting.

He returned to this country, so fondly loved and
deeply cherished in absence, to experience only
trouble and difficulty. Away from it, he had yearned
to behold it, —to fold it, as it were, once more to his
bosom. He returned to feel as if neglected by it,
and all his rapturous emotions were changed to bit-
terness and gall. His hopes had proved delusions
—his expectations, mockeries. Oh! who but must
look with charity and mercy on all discontent and
irritation consequent on such a depth of disappoint-
ment —on what must have then appeared to him
such unmitigable woe! Under the influence of these
saddened feelings, his thoughts flew back to the
island he had left, to place all beauty, as well as all
happiness, there!







BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 17

One great proof that he did beautify the distant
may be found in the contrast of some of the descrip-
tions in the ‘*‘ Voyage a I’Ile de France,” and those
in ‘‘Paul and Virginia.” That spot which, when
peopled by the cherished creatures of his imagination,
he described as an enchanting and delightful Eden,
he had previously spoken of as a ‘‘ rugged country,
covered with rocks,” — ‘‘a land of Cyclops blackened
by fire.” Truth, probably, lies between the two
representations ; the sadness of exile having dark-
ened the one, and the exuberance of his imagination
embellished the other.

St. Pierre’s merit as an author has been too long
and too universally acknowledged to make it needful
that it should be dwelt on here. A careful review of
the circumstances of his life induces the belief that
his writings grew (if it may be permitted so to
speak) out of his life. In his most imaginative pas-
sages, to whatever height his fancy soared, the
starting-point seems ever from a fact. The past
appears to have been always spread out before him
when he wrote, like a beautiful landscape, on which
his eye rested with complacency, and from which his
mind transferred and idealized some objects without
a servile imitation of any. When at Berlin, he had
had it in his power to marry Virginia Tanbenheim ;
and in Russia, Mlle. de la Tour, the niece of General
Dubosquet, would have accepted his hand. He was
too poor to marry either. A grateful recollection
caused him to bestow the names of the two on his
most beloved creation. Paul was the name of a friar
with whom he had associated in his childhood, and



18 MEMOIR OF

whose life he wished to imitate. How little had the
owners of these names anticipated that they were to
become the baptismal appellations of half a genera-
tion in France, and to be re-echoed through the
world to the end of time!

In ‘Paul and Virginia” he was supremely fortu-
nate in his subject. It was an entirely new creation,
uninspired by any previous work, but which gave
birth to many others, having furnished the plot to
six theatrical pieces. It was a subject to which the
author could bring all his excellences as a writer and
a man; while his deficiencies and defects were neces-
sarily excluded. In no manner could he incorporate
politics, science, or misapprehension of persons,
while his sensibility, morals, and wonderful talent for
description, were in perfect accordance with, and
ornaments to it. Lemontey and Sainte-Beuve both
consider success to have been inseparable from the
happy selection of a story so entirely in harmony
with the character of the author; and that the most
successful writers might envy him so fortunate a
choice. Bonaparte was in the habit of saying, when-
ever he saw St. Pierre, ‘¢M. Bernardin, when do you
mean to give us more Pauls and Virginias, and Indian
Cottages? You ought to give us some every six
months.” ;

The ‘ Indian Cottage,” if not quite equal in inter-
est to ‘‘ Paul and Virginia,” is still a charming pro-
duction, and does great honor to the genius of its
author. It abounds in antique and Eastern gems of
thought. Striking and excellent comparisons are
scattered through its pages; and it is delightful to





BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 19

reflect that the following beautiful and solemn answer
of the Paria was, with St. Pierre, the result of his
own experience: ‘‘ Misfortune resembles the Black
Mountain of Bember, situated at the extremity of the
burning kingdom of Lahore; while you are climbing
it, you only see before you barren rocks; but when
you have reached its summit, you see heaven above
your head, and at your feet the kingdom of Cache-
mere.”

When this passage was written, the rugged and
sterile rock had been climbed by its gifted author.
He had reached the summit, — his genius had been
rewarded, and he himself saw the heaven he wished
to point out to others.

For the facts contained in this brief Memoir the
. writer is indebted to St. Pierre’s own works, to the
‘« Biographie Universelle,” to the ‘¢ Essai sur la Vie
et les Ouvrages de Bernardin de St. Pierre,” by M.
Aimé Martin, and to the very excellent and interest-
ing ‘* Notice Historique et Littéraire ” of M. Sainte-
Bewve.













PREBAGE

I PROJECTED a very grand design in this little book.
I undertook to describe in it a soil and a vegetation
different from those in Europe. Our poets have long
enough placed their lovers on the borders of streams,
in meadows, and beneath leafy beech-trees. I have
chosen to seat them by the margin of the sea, at the
foot of the rocks, beneath the shade of cocoanut-
trees, banana-trees, and flowering lemon-trees. A
Theocritus and a Virgil are only needed in the other
hemisphere to give us scenes at least as interesting
as those in our own land. I am aware that travellers
of fine taste have given us charming descriptions of
many islands of the southern seas; but the manners
of their inhabitants, and still more those of the
Europeans who land there, spoil the landscape. I
wished to unite with the beauties of Nature in the
tropics, the moral beauty of a little community. I
purposed also to bring out many grand truths, and
this amongst others: that our happiness consists in
living according to the dictates of Nature and Virtue.

2i



22 PREFACE.

Nevertheless there has been no need for me to go to
fiction for my description of such happy families. I
can assert that those of whom I write actually ex-
isted; and that their history is true in its principal
incidents. This has been certified by many residents
known to me in the Isle of France. I have only
filled in some unimportant details, but which being
personal to myself have still the stamp of reality.
When several years ago | drew out a very imperfect
sketch of this kind of pastoral,.I requested a lady
well known in society, and several grave signiors who
lived far away from the great world, to come and hear
it read, so that I might estimate the effect the tale
would produce upon readers of such completely op-
posite characters. I had the satisfaction to see them
shed tears. This was the only criticism I could ob-
tain from them, and that was all I desired to know.
But as a great vice often follows a little talent, this
success inspired me with the conceit to call my work
the “* Picture of Nature.” Fortunately I recollected
how great a stranger I was to Nature, even in my-
native land, and in countries wherein I had merely
seen her productions ex voyageur, how rich, how
varied, beautiful, wonderful, and mysterious she is;
and how devoid I was of talent, taste, and mode of
expression to appreciate and to describe her! I
drew back into my shell again. Thus it happens that
I have included this feeble attempt under the name
and in the set of my Studies of Nature, which the
public have received so kindly; so that this title,
while recalling my incapacity, will always be a
memorial of their indulgence.







“PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

SITUATE on the eastern side of the mountain which
rises above Port Louis, in the Mauritius, upon a piece
of land bearing the marks of former cultivation, are
seen the ruins of two small cottages. These ruins
are not far from the centre of a valley, formed by
immense rocks, and which opens only towards the
north. On the left rises the mountain called the
Height of Discovery, whence the eye marks the dis-
tant sail when it first touches the verge of the hori-
zon, and whence the signal is given when a vessel
approaches the island. At the foot of this mountain
stands the town of Port Louis. On the right is
formed the road which stretches from Port Louis to
the Shaddock Grove, where the church bearing that

23



24 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

name lifts its head, surrounded by its avenues of
bamboo, in the middle of a spacious plain; and the
prospect terminates in a forest extending to the far-
thest bounds of the island. The front view presents
the bay, denominated the Bay of the Tomb: a little
on the right is seen the Cape of Misfortune; and
beyond rolls the expanded ocean, on the surface of
which appear a few uninhabited islands; and, among
others, the Point of Endeavor, which resembles a
bastion built upon the flood.

At the entrance of the valley which presents these
various objects, the echoes of the mountain inces-
santly repeat the hollow murmurs of the winds that
shake the neighboring forests, and the tumultuous
dashing of the waves which break at a distance upon
the cliffs; but near the ruined cottages all is calm
and still, and the only objects which there meet the
eye are rude steep rocks, that rise like a surrounding
rampart. Large clumps of trees grow at their base,
on their rifted sides, and even on their majestic tops,
where the clouds seem to repose. The showers,
which their bold points attract, often paint the vivid
colors of the rainbow on their green and brown
declivities, and swell the sources. of the little river
which flows at their feet, called the river of Fan-
Palms. Within this enclosure reigns the most pro-
found silence. The waters, the air, all the elements
are at peace. Scarcely does the echo repeat the
whispers of the palm-trees, spreading their broad
leaves, the long points of which are gently agitated
by the winds. A soft light illumines the bottom of
this deep valley, on which the sun shines only at









PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 25

noon. But, even at break of day, the rays of light
are thrown on the surrounding rocks; and their
sharp peaks, rising above the shadows of the moun-
tain, appear like tints of gold and purple gleaming
upon the azure sky.

To this scene I loved to resort, as I could here
enjoy at once the richness of an unbounded land-
scape, and the charm of uninterrupted solitude. One
day, when I was seated at the foot of the cottages,
and contemplating their ruins, a man, advanced in
years, passed near the spot. He was dressed in the
ancient garb of the island, his feet were bare, and he
leaned upon a staff of ebony: his hair was white,
and the expression of his countenance was dignified
and interesting. I bowed to him with respect; he
returned the salutation; and, after looking at me
with some earnestness, came and placed himself upon
the hillock on which I was seated. Encouraged by
this mark of confidence, I thus addressed him: —
‘‘ Father, can you tell me to whom those cottages
once belonged?” — « My son,” replied the old man,
‘those heaps of rubbish, and that untilled land,
were, twenty years ago, the property of two families,
who then found happiness in this solitude. ‘Their
history is affecting; but what European, pursuing his
way to the Indies, will pause one moment to interest
himself in the fate of a few obscure individuals?
What European can picture happiness to his imagina-
tion amidst poverty and neglect? The curiosity of
mankind is only attracted by the history of the
great, and yet from that knowledge little use can be
derived.” — « Father,” I rejoined, ‘‘ from your man-



26 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ner and your observations, I perceive that you have
acquired much experience of human life. If you
have leisure, relate to me, I beseech you, the history
of the ancient inhabitants: of this desert; and be
assured, that even the men who are most perverted
by the prejudices of the world find a soothing pleas-
ure in contemplating that happiness which belongs
to simplicity and virtue.” The old man, after a short
silence, during which he leaned his face upon his
hands, as if he were trying to recall the images of
the past, thus began his narration: —

Monsieur de la Tour, a young man, who was a na-
tive of Normandy, after having in vain solicited a
commission in the French army, or some support
from his own family, at length determined to seek his
fortune in this island, where he arrived in 1726. He
brought hither a young woman whom he loved ten-
derly, and by whom he was no less tenderly
beloved. She belonged to a rich and ancient
family of the same province; but he had married her
secretly and without fortune, and in opposition to the
will of her relations, who refused their consent be-
cause he was found guilty of being descended from
parents who had no claims to nobility. Monsieur
de la Tour, leaving his wife at Port Louis, embarked
for Madagascar, in order to purchase a few slaves, to
assist him in forming a plantation in this island. He
landed at Madagascar during that unhealthy season
which commences about the middle of October; and
soon after his arrival died of the pestilential fever
which prevails in that island six months of the year,
and which will forever baffle the attempts of the







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 27

European nations to form establishments on that
fatal soil. His effects were seized upon by the
rapacity of strangers, as commonly happens to per-
sons dying in foreign parts; and

his wife, who was pregnant,
found herself a widow in a
country where she had
neither credit nor ac-
quaintance, and no
earthly possession,

or rather sup-
port, but one
negro woman.
Too delicate
to solicit pro-










tection or relief from any one else after the death of
him whom alone she loved, misfortune armed her
with courage, and she resolved to cultivate, with her
slave, a little spot of ground, and procure for



28 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

herself the means of subsistence. Desert as was
the island, and the ground left to the choice of
the settler, she avoided those spots which were
most fertile and most favorable to commerce:
seeking some nook of the mountain, some secret
asylum where she might live solitary and unknown,
she bent her way from the town towards these
rocks, where she might conceal herself from obser-
vation. All sensitive and suffering creatures, from
a sort of common instinct, fly for refuge amidst
their pains to haunts the most wild and desolate; as
if rocks could form a rampart against misfortune —
as if the calm of nature could hush the tumults of
the soul. That Providence, which lends its support
when we ask but the supply of our necessary wants,
had a blessing in reserve for Madame de la Tour,
which neither riches nor greatness can purchase: —
this blessing was a friend.

The spot to which Madame de la Tour fled had
already been inhabited for a year by a young woman
of a lively, good-natured, and affectionate disposi-
tion. Margaret (for that was her name) was born in
Brittany of a family of peasants, by whom she was
cherished and beloved, and with whom she might
have passed through life in simple rustic happiness,
if, misled by the weakness of a tender heart, she had
not listened to the passion of a gentleman in the
neighborhood, who promised her marriage. He soon
abandoned her, and adding inhumanity to seduction,
refused to insure a provision for the child of which
she was pregnant. Margaret then determined to
leave forever her native village, and retire, where her



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 29

fault might be concealed, to some colony distant from
that country where she had lost the only portion of
a poor peasant girl—her reputation. With some



borrowed money she purchased an old negro slave,
with whom she cultivated a little corner of this dis-
trict.

Madame de la Tour, followed by her negro woman,
came to this spot, where she found Margaret en-
gaged in suckling her child. Soothed and charmed
by the sight of a person in a situation somewhat



30 PAUL AND VIRGINIA,

similar to her own, Madame de la Tour related, in a
few words, her past condition and her present
wants. Margaret was deeply affected by the recital;
and, more anxious to merit confidence than to create
esteem, she confessed, without disguise, the errors
of which she had been guilty. <‘‘ As for me,” said
she, ‘‘I deserve my fate; but you, Madam!— you!
at once virtuous and unhappy” — and, sobbing, she
offered Madame de la Tour both her hut and her
friendship. That lady, affected by this tender recep-
tion, pressed her in her arms, and exclaimed, ‘‘ Ah!
surely Heaven has put an end to my misfortunes,
since it inspires you, to whom I am a stranger, with
more goodness towards me than I have ever experi-
enced from my own relations!”

I was acquainted with Margaret; and, although
my habitation is a league and a half from hence, in
the woods behind that sloping mountain, I ‘consid-
ered myself as her neighbor. In the cities of
Europe, a street, even a simple wall, frequently pre-
vents members of the same family from meeting for
years ; but in new colonies we consider those persons
as neighbors from whom we are divided only by
woods and mountains; and above all, at that period,
when this island had little intercourse with the
Indies, vicinity alone gave a claim to friendship, and
hospitality toward strangers seemed less a duty than
a pleasure. No sooner was I informed that Margaret
had found a companion than I hastened to her, in
the hope of being useful to my neighbor and her
guest. I found Madame de la Tour possessed of all
those melancholy graces which, by blending sympa-







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 31

thy with admiration, give to beauty additional power.
Her countenance was interesting, expressive at once
of dignity and dejection. She appeared to be in the
last stage of her pregnancy. I told the two friends
that, for the future interests of their children, and to
prevent the intrusion of any other settler, they had
better divide between them the property of this wild,
sequestered valley, which is nearly twenty acres in
extent. They confided that task to me, and I
marked out two equal portions of land. One in-
cluded the higher part of this enclosure, from the
cloudy pinnacle of that rock, whence springs the
river of Fan-Palms, to that precipitous cleft which
you see on the summit of the mountain, and which,
from its resemblance in form to the battlement of a
fortress, is called the Embrasure. It is difficult to
find a path along this wild portion of the enclosure,
the soil of which is encumbered with fragments of
tock, or worn into channels formed by torrents ; yet
it produces noble trees and innumerable springs and
rivulets. The other portion of land comprised the
plain extending along the banks of the river of Fan-
Palms, to the opening where we are now seated,
whence the river takes its course between those two
hills, until it falls into the sea. You may still trace
the vestiges of some meadow land; and this part of
the common is less rugged, but not more valuable,
than the other; since in the rainy season it becomes
marshy, and in dry weather is so hard and unyielding
that it will almost resist the stroke of the pickaxe.
When I had thus divided the property, I persuaded
my neighbors te draw lots for their respective posses-















32 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

sions. The higher portion of land, containing the
source of the river of Fan-Palms, became the prop-
erty of Madame de la Tour; the lower, comprising
the plain on the banks of the river, was allotted to
Margaret; and each seemed satisfied with her share.
They entreated me to place their habitations to-
gether, that they might at all times enjoy the sooth-
ing intercourse of friendship and the consolation of
mutual kind offices. Margaret’s cottage was situated
near the centre of the valley, and just on the boun-
dary of her own plantation. Close to that spot I
built another cottage for the residence of Madame
de la Tour; and thus the two friends, while they
possessed all the advantages of neighborhood, lived
on their own property. I myself cut palisades from
the mountain, and brought leaves

of fan-palms from the seashore,
in order to construct those

two cottages, of which you
can now discern neither





the entrance nor the roof. Yet, alas! there still remain
but too many traces for my remembrance! Time,







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 33

which so rapidly destroys the proud monuments of
empires, seems in this desert to spare those of friend-
ship, as if to perpetuate my regrets to the last hour
of my existence.

As soon as the second cottage was finished,
Madame de la Tour was delivered of a girl. I had
been the godfather of Margaret’s child, who was
christened by the name of Paul. Madame de la
Tour desired me to perform the same office for her
child also, together with her friend, who gave her the
name of Virginia. ‘‘She will be virtuous,” cried
Margaret, ‘‘and she will be happy. I have only
known misfortune by wandering from virtue.”

About the time Madame de la Tour recovered,
these two little estates had already begun to yield
some produce, perhaps in a small degree owing to
the care which I occasionally bestowed on their im-
provement, but far more to the indefatigable labors
of the two slaves. Margaret’s slave, who was called
Domingo, was still healthy and robust, though
advanced in years: he possessed some knowledge,
and a good natural understanding. He cultivated
indiscriminately, on both plantations, the spots of
ground that seemed most fertile, and sowed whatever
grain he thought most congenial to each particular
soil. Where the ground was poor, he strewed
maize; where it was most fruitful, he planted wheat ;
and rice in such spots as were marshy. He threw
the seeds of gourds and cucumbers at the foot of the
rocks, which they loved to climb, and decorate with
their luxuriant foliage. In dry spots he cultivated
the sweet potato; the cotton-tree flourished upon the









4
|
|
1
;
|

34 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

heights, and the sugar-cane grew in the clayey soil.
He reared some plants of coffee on the hills, where
the grain, although small, is excellent. His plantain-
trees, which spread their grateful shade on the banks
of the river, and encircled the cottages, yielded fruit
throughout the year. And, lastly, Domingo, to
soothe his cares, cultivated a few plants of tobacco.
Sometimes he was employed in cutting wood for
firing from the mountain, sometimes in hewing pieces
of rock within the enclosure, in order to level the
paths. The zeal which inspired him enabled him to
perform all these labors with intelligence and activity.
He was much attached to Margaret, and not less to
Madame de la Tour, whose negro woman, Mary, he
had married on the birth of Virginia; and he was
passionately fond of his wife. Mary was born at
Madagascar, and had there acquired the knowledge
of some useful arts. She could weave baskets, and
a sort of stuff, with long grass that grows in the
woods. She was active, cleanly, and, above all,
faithful. It was her care to prepare their meals, to
rear the poultry, and go sometimes to Port Louis,
to sell the superfluous produce of these little planta-
tions, which was not, however, very considerable. If
you add to the personages already mentioned two
goats, which were brought up with the children, and
a great dog, which kept watch at night, you will have
a complete idea of the household, as well as of the
productions, of these two little farms.

Madame de la Tour and her triend were constantly
employed in spinning cotton for the use of their
families. Destitute of everything which their own











PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 35

industry could not supply, at home they went bare-
footed: shoes were a convenience reserved for Sun-

day, on which day, at an early hour, they attended
mass at the church of the Shaddock. Grove, which
you see yonder. That church was more distant from



their homes than Port Louis; but they seldom vis-
ited the town, lest they should be treated with con-
tempt on account of their dress, which consisted
simply of the coarse blue linen of Bengal, usually
worn by slaves. But is there in that external defer-
ence which fortune commands, a compensation for
domestic happiness ? If these interesting women had
something to suffer from the world, their homes on
that very account became more dear to them. No
sooner did Mary and Domingo, from this elevated
spot, perceive their mistresses on the road of the
Shaddock Grove, than they flew to the foot of the



36 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

mountain in order to help them to ascend. They
discerned in the looks of their domestics the joy
which their return excited. They found in their re-
treat neatness, independence, all the blessings which
are the recompense of toil, and they received the
zealous services which spring from affection. United
by the tie of similar wants and the sympathy of sim-
ilar misfortunes, they gave each other the tender
names of companion, friend, sister. They had but
one will, one interest, one table. All their posses-
sions were in common. And if sometimes a passion
more ardent than friendship awakened in their hearts
the pang of unavailing anguish, a pure religion,
united with chaste manners, drew their affections
towards another life: as the trembling flame rises
towards heaven, when it no longer finds any aliment
on earth.

The duties of maternity became a source of addi-
tional happiness to these affectionate mothers, whose
mutual friendship gained new strength at the sight of
their children, equally the offspring of an ill-fated
attachment. They delighted in washing their in-
infants together in the same bath, in putting them to
rest in the same cradle, and in changing the mater-
nal bosom at which they received nourishment.
«My friend,” cried Madame de la Tour, ‘‘ we shall
each of us have two children, and each of our chil-
dren will have two mothers.” As two buds which
remain on different trees of the same kind, after the
tempest has broken all their branches, produce more
delicious fruit, if each, separated from the maternal
stem, be grafted on the neighboring tree; so these













THE CHILDREN’S BATH.



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 37

two infants, deprived of all their other relations,
when thus exchanged for nourishment by those who
had given them birth, imbibed feelings of affection
still more tender than those of son and daughter,
brother and sister. While they were yet in their
cradles, their mothers talked of their marriage.
They soothed their own cares by looking forward to
the future happiness of their children; but this con-
templation often drew forth their tears. The mis-
fortunes of one mother had arisen from having
neglected marriage; those of the other from having
submitted to its laws: one had suffered by aiming to
rise above her condition, the other by descending
from her rank. But they found consolation in reflect-
ing that their more fortunate children, far from the
cruel prejudices of Europe, would enjoy at once the
pleasures of love and the blessings of equality.
Rarely, indeed, has such an attachment been seen
as that which the two children already testified for
each other. If Paul complained of anything, his
mother pointed to Virginia; at her sight he smiled,
and was appeased. If any accident befel Virginia,
the cries of Paul gave notice of the disaster; but
the dear little creature would suppress her complaints
if she found that he was unhappy, When I came
hither, I usually found them quite naked, as is the
custom of the country, tottering in their walk, and
holding each other by the hands, and under the arms,
as we see represented the constellation of The Twins.
At night these infants often refused to be separated,
and were found lying in the same cradle, their cheeks,
their bosoms pressed close together, their hands



38 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

thrown round each other's neck, and sleeping, locked
in one another’s arms.

When they began to speak, the first names they
learned to give each other were those of brother and
sister, and childhood knows no softer appellation.



Their education, by directing them ever to consider
each other’s wants, tended greatly to increase their
affection. Inashort time, all the household econ-
omy, the care of preparing their rural repasts, be-
came the task of Virginia, whose labors were always
crowned with the praises and kisses of her brother.
As for Paul, always in motion, he dug the garden with
Domingo, or followed him with a little hatchet into
the woods; and if, in his rambles, he espied a beau-
tiful flower, any delicious fruit, or a nest of birds,
even at the top of a tree, he would climb up, and
bring the spoil to his sister. When you met one of
these children, you might be sure the other was not
far off.







PAUL. AND VIRGINIA. ‘39

One day, as I was coming down that mountain, I
saw Virginia at the end of the garden, running
towards the house with her petticoat thrown over
her head in order to screen herself from a shower of
rain.

At a distance, I thought she was alone; but as I
hastened towards her in order to help her on, I per-



ceived that she held Paul by the arm, almost entirely
enveloped in the same canopy, and both were laugh-
ing heartily at their being sheltered together under
an umbrella of their own invention. These two
charming faces, in the middle of the swelling petti-
coat, recalled to my mind the children of Leda, en-
closed in the same shell.



40 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Their sole study was how they could please and
assist one another; for of all other things they were
ignorant, and indeed could neither read nor write.
They were never disturbed by inquiries about past
times, nor did their curiosity extend beyond the
bounds of their mountain. They believed the world
ended at the shores of their own island, and all their
ideas and all their affections were confined within its
limits. Their mutual tenderness, and that of their
mothers, employed all the energies of their minds.

Their tears had never been called forth by tedious
application to useless sciences. Their minds had
never been wearied by lessons of morality, super-
fluous to bosoms unconscious of ill. They had
never been taught not to steal, because everything
with them was in common; or not to be intemperate,
because their simple food was left to their own dis-
cretion; or not to lie, because they had nothing to
conceal. Their young imaginations had never been
terrified by the idea that God has punishments in
store for ungrateful children, since, with them, filial
affection arose naturally from maternal tenderness.
All they had been taught of religion was to love it;
and if they did not offer up long prayers in the
church, wherever they were, —in the house, in the
fields, in the woods, they raised towards heaven their
innocent hands, and hearts purified by virtuous affec-
tions. All their early childhood passed thus, like a
beautiful dawn, the prelude of a bright day. Already
they assisted their mothers in the duties of the
household. As soon as the crowing of the wakeful
cock announced the first beam of the morning,







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 41

Virginia arose, and hastened to draw water from a
neighboring spring; then returning to the house, she
prepared the breakfast. When the rising sun gilded
the points of the rocks which overhang the enclosure
in which they lived, Margaret and her child repaired
to the dwelling of Madame de la Tour, where they
offered up their morning prayer together. This
sacrifice of thanksgiving always preceded their first
repast, which they often took before the door of the
cottage, seated upon the grass, under a canopy of
plantain: and while the branches of that delicious
tree afforded a grateful shade, its fruit furnished a
substantial food ready prepared for them by nature;
and its long glossy leaves, spread upon the table,
supplied the place of linen. Plentiful and whole-
some nourishment gave early growth and vigor to
the persons of these children, and their countenances
expressed the purity and the peace of their souls.
At twelve years of age the figure of Virginia was in
some degree formed: a profusion of light hair shaded
her face, to which her blue eyes and coral lips gave
the most charming brilliancy. Her eyes sparkled
with vivacity when she spoke; but when she was
silent they were habitually turned upwards, with an
expression of extreme sensibility, or rather of tender
melancholy. The figure of Paul began already to
display the graces of youthful beauty. He was taller
than Virginia: his skin was of a darker tint; his
nose more aquiline; and his black eyes would have
been too piercing, if the long eyelashes, by which
they were shaded, had not imparted to them an ex-
pression of softness. He was constantly in motion,



42 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

except when his sister appeared, and then, seated by
her side, he became still, Their meals often passed
without a word being spoken; and from their silence,
the simple elegance
of their attitudes,
and the beauty of
their naked feet,
you might have
fancied you beheld
an antique group of
white marble,repre-
senting some of the
children of Niobe,
but for the glances
of their eyes, which
3,were constantly
- seeking. to meet,
* and their mutual
soft and tender
smiles, which sug-
gested rather the
idea of happy celes-
tial spirits, whose
nature is love, and
who are not obliged to have recourse to words for
the expression of their feelings.

In the mean time Madame de la Tour, perceiving
every day some unfolding grace, some new beauty, in
her daughter, felt her maternal anxiety increase with
her tenderness. She often said to me, ‘‘ If I were
to die, what will become of Virginia without for-
tune?”





PAUL AND VIRGINIA, 43

Madame de la Tour had an aunt in France, who
was a woman of quality, rich, old, and a complete
devotee. She had behaved with so much cruelty
towards her niece upon her marriage, that Madame
de la Tour had determined no extremity of distress
should ever compel her to have recourse to her hard-
hearted relation. But when she became a mother,
the pride of resentment was overcome by the stronger
feelings of maternal tenderness. She wrote to her
aunt, informing her of the sudden death of her hus-
band, the birth of her daughter, and the difficulties
in which she was involved, burthened as she was with
an infant and without means of support. She
received no answer; but, notwithstanding the high
spirit natural to her character, she no longer feared
exposing herself to mortification; and although she
knew her aunt would never pardon her for having
married a man who was not of noble birth, however
estimable, she continued to write to her, with the
hope of awakening her compassion for Virginia.
Many years, however, passed without receiving any
token of her remembrance.

At length, in 1738, three years after the arrival of
Monsieur de la Bourdonnais in this island, Madame
de la Tour was informed that the Governor had a let-
ler to give her from her aunt. She flew to Port
Louis: maternal joy raised her mind above all trifling
considerations, and she was careless on this occasion
of appearing in her homely attire. Monsieur de la
Bourdonnais gave her a letter from her aunt, in
which she informed her that she deserved: her fate
for marrying an adventurer and a libertine; that the



"44 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

passions brought with them their own punishment;
that the premature death of her husband was a just
visitation from heaven; that she had done well in
going toa distant island, rather than dishonor her
family by remaining in France; and that, after all,
in the colony where she had taken refuge, none but
the idle failed to grow rich. Having thus censured
her niece, she concluded by eulogizing herself. To
avoid, she said, the almost inevitable evils of mar-
riage, she had determined to remain single. In fact,
as she was of a very ambitious disposition, she had
resolved to marry none but a man of high rank; but
although she was very rich, her fortune was not
found a sufficient bribe, even at court, to counterbal-
ance the malignant dispositions of her mind, and the
disagreeable qualities of her person.

After mature deliberation, she added, in a post-
script, that she had strongly recommended her niece
to Monsieur de la Bourdonnais. This she had indeed
done, but in a manner of late too common, which
renders a patron perhaps even more to be feared than
a declared enemy; for, in order to justify herself for
her harshness, she had cruelly slandered her niece,
while she affected to pity her misfortunes.

Madame de la Tour, whom no unprejudiced person
could have seen without feelings of sympathy and
respect, was received with the utmost coolness
by Monsieur de la Bourdonnais, biassed as he was
against her. When she painted to him her own sit-
uation, and that of her child, he replied in abrupt
sentences, ‘‘ We will see what can be done; there are
so many to relieve; all in good time. Why did you





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 45

displease your aunt? You have been much to
blame.”

Madame de la Tour returned to her cottage, her
heart torn with grief, and filled with all the bitter-
ness of disappointment. When she arrived, she
threw her aunt’s letter on the table, and exclaimed
to her friend, ‘‘ There is the fruit of eleven years of



SSAaB

patient expectation!” Madame de la Tour being
the only person in the little circle who could read, she
again took up the letter, and read it aloud. Scarcely
had she finished, when Margaret exclaimed, ‘* What
have we to do with your relations ?. Has God then for-
saken us? He only is our father. Have we not hith-
erto been happy ? Whythenthis regret ? You have
no courage.” Seeing Madame de la Tour in tears,



46 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

she threw herself upon her neck, and pressing her in
her arms, ‘‘ My dear friend!” cried she, ‘‘my dear
friend!” — but her emotion choked her utterance.
At this sight Virginia burst into tears, and pressed
her mother’s and Margaret’s hands alternately to her
lips and heart; while Paul, his eyes inflamed with
anger, cried, clasped his hands together, and stamped
with his foot, not knowing whom to blame for this
scene of misery. The noise soon brought Domingo
and Mary to the spot, and the little habitation re-
sounded with cries of distress, — ‘‘ Ah, Madame! My
good mistress! My dear mother! Do not weep!”
These tender proofs of affection at length dispelled the
grief of Madame de la Tour. She took Paul and Vir-
ginia in her arms, and, embracing them, said, ‘‘ You
are the cause of my affliction, my children, but you
are also my only source of delight! Yes, my dear chil-
dren, misfortune has reached me, but only from a dis-
tance: here, I am surrounded with happiness.” Paul
and Virginia did not understand this reflection; but,
when they saw that she was calm, they smiled, and
continued to caress her. Tranquillity was thus re-
stored in this happy family, and all that had passed
was but asa storm in the midst of fine weather, which —
disturbs the serenity of the atmosphere but fora short
time, and then passes away.

The amiable disposition of these children unfolded
itself daily. One Sunday, at daybreak, their mothers
having gone to mass at.the church of the Shaddock
Grove, the children perceived a negro woman be-
neath the plantains which surrounded their habita-
tion. She appeared almost wasted to a skeleton,





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 47

and had no other garment than a piece of coarse
cloth thrown around her. She threw herself at the
feet of Virginia, who was preparing the family break-
fast, and said, ‘My good young lady, have pity on
a poor runaway slave. For a whole month I have
wandered among these mountains, half dead with
hunger, and often pursued by the hunters and their
dogs. I fled from my master, a rich planter of the
Black River, who has used me as you see;” and she
showed her body marked with scars from the lashes
she had received. She added, ‘I was going to
drown myself; but hearing you lived here, I said
to myself, Since there are still some good white
people in this country, I need not die yet.” Vir-
ginia answered with emotion, ‘‘ Take courage, unfor-
tunate creature! here is something to eat;” and she
gave her the breakfast she had been preparing, which
the slave in a few minutes devoured. When her
hunger was appeased, Virginia said to her, ‘* Poor
woman! I should like to go and ask forgiveness for
you of your master. Surely the sight of you will
touch him with pity. Will you show me the way ?”
“Angel of heaven!” answered the poor negro-
woman, ‘‘I will follow you where you please.” Vir-
ginia called her brother, and begged him to accom-
pany her. The slave led the way, by winding and
difficult paths through the woods, over mountains,
which they climbed with difficulty, and across rivers,
through which they were obliged to wade. At
length, about the middle of the day, they reached
the foot of a steep descent upon the borders of the
Black River. There they perceived a well-built



48 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

house surrounded by extensive plantations, and a
number of slaves employed in their various labors.
Their master was walking among them with a pipe in
his mouth, and a switch in his hand. He was a tall,
thin man, of a brown complexion; his eyes were



af
A ated

sunk in his head, and his dark eyebrows were joined
in one. Virginia, holding Paul by the hand, drew
near, and with much emotion begged him for the love
of God, to pardon his poor slave, who stood trembling
a few paces behind. The planter at first paid little
attention to the children, who, he saw, were meanly

dressed. But when he observed the elegance of







SLAVE PARDONED

THE







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 49

Virginia’s form, and the profusion of her beautiful
light tresses, which had escaped from beneath her
blue cap; when he heard the soft tone of her voice,
which trembled, as well as her whole frame, while she
implored his compassion; he took the pipe from his
mouth, and lifting up his stick, swore, with a terrible
oath, that he pardoned his slave, not for the love of
Heaven, but of her who asked his forgiveness. Vir-
ginia made a sign to the slave to approach her mas-
ter; and instantly sprang away, followed by Paul.
They climbed up the steep they had descended;
and having gained the summit, seated themselves at
the foot of a tree, overcome with fatigue, hunger, and
thirst. They had left their home fasting, and had
walked five leagues since sunrise. Paul said to Vir-
ginia, ‘‘ My dear sister, it is past noon, and I am sure
you are thirsty and hungry: we shall find no dinner
here; let us go down the mountain again, and ask
the master of the poor slave for some food.” — ‘* Oh,
no,” answered Virginia, ‘‘ he frightens me too much.
Remember what Mamma sometimes says, ‘The
bread of the wicked is like stones in the mouth.’ ” —
** What shall we do then ?” said Paul; ‘‘ these trees
produce no fruit fit to eat; and I shall not be able to
find even a tamarind or a lemon to refresh you.” —
‘* God will take care of us,” replied Virginia; ‘‘ He
listens to the cry even of the little birds when they
ask Him for food.” Scarcely had she pronounced
these words when they heard the noise of water fall-
ing from a neighboring rock. They ran thither, and
having quenched their thirst at this crystal spring,
they gathered and ate a few cresses which grew on



50 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

the border of the stream. Soon afterwards, while
they were wandering backwards and forwards in
search of more solid nourishment, Virginia per-
ceived in the thickest part of the forest, a young
palm-tree. The kind of cabbage which is found at |
the top of the palm, infolded within its leaves, is
well adapted for food; but although the stalk of the
tree is not thicker than a man’s leg, it grows to
above sixty feet in height. The wood of the tree,
indeed, is composed only of very fine filaments ; but
the bark is so hard that it turns the edge of the
hatchet, and Paul was not furnished even with a
knife. Atlength he thought of setting fire to the
palm-tree; but a new difficulty occurred: he had no
steel with which to strike fire; and although the
whole island is covered with rocks, I do not believe
it is possible to find a single flint. Necessity, how-
ever, is fertile in expedients, and the most useful in-
ventions have arisen from men placed in the most
destitute situations.

Paul determined to kindle a fire in the manner of
the negroes. With the sharp end of a stone he made
a small hole in the branch of a tree that was quite
dry, and which he held between his feet; he then,
with the edge of the same stone, brought to a point
another dry branch of a different sort of wood, and
afterwards, placing the piece of pointed wood in the
small hole of the branch which he held with his feet,
and turning it rapidly between his hands, in a few
minutes smoke and sparks of fire issued from the
point of contact. Paul then heaped together dried
grass and branches, and set fire to the foot of the



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 51

palm-tree, which soon fell to the ground with a
tremendous crash. The fire was further useful to
him in stripping off the long, thick, and pointed
leaves, within which the cabbage was enclosed.

Having thus succeeded in obtaining this fruit, they
ate part of it raw, and part dressed upon the ashes,
which they found equally palatable. They made this
frugal repast with delight, from the remembrance of
the benevolent action they had performed in the
morning: yet their joy was embittered by the
thoughts of the uneasiness which their long absence
from home would occasion their mothers.

Virginia often recurred to this subject: but Paul,
who felt his strength renewed by their meal, assured
her, that it would not be long before they reached
home, and, by the assurance of their safety, tranquil-
lized the minds of their parents.

After dinner they were much embarrassed by the
recollection that they had now no guide, and that
they were ignorant of the way. Paul, whose spirit
was not subdued by difficulties, said to Virginia, —
‘*The sun shines full upon our huts at noon: we
must pass, as we did this morning, over that moun-
tain with its three points, which you see yonder.
Come, let us be moving.” This mountain was that
of the Three Breasts, so called from the form of its
three peaks. They then descended the steep bank
of the Black River, on the northern side; and
arrived, after an hour’s walk, on the banks of a large
river, which stopped their further progress. This
large portion of the island, covered as it is with for-
ests, is even now so little known, that many of its



52 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

rivers and mountains have not yet received a name.
The stream, on the banks of which Paul and Virginia
were now standing, rolls foaming over a bed of rocks.
The noise of the water frightened Virginia, and she
was afraid to wade through the current: Paul there-
fore took her up in his arms, and went thus loaded
over the slippery rocks which formed the bed of the
river, careless of the tumultuous noise of its waters.
““Do not be afraid,” cried he to Virginia, ‘‘I feel
very strong with you. If that planter at the Black
River had refused you the pardon of his slave, I
would have fought with him.” — ‘‘ What!” answered
Virginia, ‘‘with that great wicked man! To what
have I exposed you! Gracious heaven! How diffi-
cult it is to do good! and yet it is so easy to do
wrong.”

When Paul had crossed the river, he wished to
continue the journey carrying his sister; and he flat-
tered himself that he could ascend in that way the
mountain of the Three Breasts, which was still at
the distance of half a league; but his strength soon
failed, and he was obliged to set down his burthen,
and to rest himself by her side. Virginia then said
to him, — ‘‘ My dear brother, the sun is going down ;
you have still some strength left, but mine has quite
failed: do leave me here, and return home alone to
ease the fears of our mothers.” — ‘‘Oh, no,” said
Paul, ‘*I will not leave you. If night overtakes us
in this wood, I will light a fire, and bring down
another palm-tree: you shall eat the cabbage, and I
will form a covering of the leaves to shelter you.”
In the mean time, Virginia being a little rested, she







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 53

gathered from the trunk of an old tree, which over-
hung the bank of the river, some long leaves of the
plant called hart’s tongue, which grew near its root.
Of these leaves she made a
sort of buskin, with which
she covered her feet, that were
bleeding from the sharpness
of the stony paths; for, in her
eager desire to do good, she
had forgotten to
put on her shoes.
Feeling her feet
cooled by the
freshness of the
‘ leaves, she broke
off a branch of
bamboo, and
continued her
walk, leaning
with one hand
on the staff, and
with the other
on Paul.

They walked on
in this manner
slowly through
the woods ; but from the height of the trees, and the
thickness of their foliage, they soon lost sight of
the mountain of the Three Breasts, by which they
had hitherto directed their course, and also of the
sun, which was now setting. At length they wan-
dered, without perceiving it, from the beaten path in







54 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

which they had hitherto walked, and found them-
selves in a labyrinth of trees, underwood, and rocks,
whence there appeared to be no outlet. Paul made
Virginia sit down, while he ran backwards and for-
wards, half frantic, in search of a path which might lead
them out of this thick wood; but he fatigued himself
to no purpose. He then climbed to the top of a lofty
tree, whence he hoped at least to perceive the moun-
tain of the Three Breasts: but he could discern
nothing around him but the tops of trees, some of
which were gilded with the last beams of the setting
sun. Already the shadows of the mountains were
spreading over the forests in the valleys. The wind
lulled, as is usually the case at sunset.

The most profound silence reigned in those awful
solitudes, which was only interrupted by the cry of
the deer, who came to their lairs in that unfrequented
spot. Paul, in the hope that some hunter would hear
his voice, called out as loud as he was able, —
“«Come, come to the help of Virginia!” But the
echoes of the forest alone answered his call, and
repeatea again and again — ‘‘ Virginia — Virginia!”

Paul at length descended from the tree, overcome
with fatigue and vexation. He looked around in
order to make some arrangement for passing the
night in that desert; but he could find neither foun-
tain nor palm-tree, nor even a branch of dry wood fit
for kindling a fire. He was then impressed, by expe-
rience, with the sense of his own weakness, and
began to weep. Virginia said to him, — ‘‘ Do not
weep, my dear brother, or I shall be overwhelmed
with grief. I am the cause of all your sorrow, and





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 55

of all that our mothers are suffering at this moment.
I find we ought to do nothing, not even good, with-
out consulting our parents. Oh, I have been very
imprudent !”— and she began to shed tears. ‘‘ Let
us pray to God, my dear brother,” she again said,
‘cand He will hear us.” They had scarcely finished
their prayer, when they heard the barking of a dog.
‘It must be the dog of some hunter,” said Paul,



“‘who comes here at night, to lie in wait for the
deer.” Soon after, the dog began barking again
with increased violence. ‘‘Surely,” said Virginia,
‘it is Fidéle, our own dog: yes, —now I know his
bark. Are we then so near home?—at the foot of
our own mountain?” A moment after, Fidéle was at
their feet, barking, howling, moaning, and devouring
them with his caresses. Before they could recover
from their surprise, they saw Domingo running
towards them. At the sight of the good old negro,



56 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

who wept for joy, they began to weep too, but had —
not the power to utter a syllable. When Domingo
had recovered himself a little, — ‘* Oh, my dear chil-
dren,” said he, ‘‘ how miserable have you made your
mothers! How astonished they were, when they
returned with me from mass, on not finding you at
home. Mary, who was at work a little distance,
could not tell us where you were gone.

‘‘T ran backwards and forwards in the plantation,
not knowing where to look for you. At last I took
some of your old clothes, and showing them to
Fidéle, the poor animal, as if he understood me,
immediately began to scent your path ; and conducted
me, wagging his tail all the while, to the Black River.
I there saw a planter, who told me you had brought
back a Maroon negro-woman, his slave, and that he
had pardoned her at your request. But what a par-
don! he showed her to me with her feet chained to a
block of wood, and an iron collar with three hooks
fastened round her neck! After that, Fidéle, still on
the scent, led me up the steep bank of the Black
River, where he again stopped, and barked with all
his might. This was on the brink of a spring, near
which was a fallen palm-tree, and a fire, still smok-
ing. At last he led me to this very spot. We are
now at the foot of the mountain of the Three
Breasts, and still four good leagues from home.
Come, eat, and recover your strength.” Domingo
then presented them with a cake, some fruit, and a
large gourd, full of a beverage composed of wine,
water, lemon-juice, sugar, and nutmeg, which their
mothers had prepared to invigorate and refresh them.







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 57

Virginia sighed at the recollection of the poor slave,
and at the uneasiness they had given their mothers.
She repeated several times —
“¢ Oh, how difficult it is to do
good!”

While she and Paul were
taking refreshment, it be-
ing already night, Domingo
kindled a fire; and having








found among the rocks a particular kind of twisted
wood, called Jo7s de rounde, which burns when
quite green, and throws out a great blaze, he made
a torch of it, which he lighted. But when they
prepared to continue their journey, a new difficulty
occurred; Paul and Virginia could no longer walk,



58 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

their feet being violently swollen and inflamed.
Domingo knew not what to do; whether to leave
them, and go in search of help, or remain and pass
the night with them on that spot. ‘ There was a
time,” said he, ‘‘when I could carry you both
together in my arms. But now you are grown big,
and I am grown old.” While he was in this per-
plexity, a troop of Maroon negroes appeared at a
short distance from them. The chief of the band,
approaching Paul and Virginia, said to them, —
“Good little white people, do not be afraid. We
saw you pass this morning with a negro-woman of the
Black River. You went to ask pardon for her of her
wicked master: and we in return for this, will carry
you home upon our shoulders.” He then made a
sign, and four of the strongest negroes immediately
formed a sort of litter with the branches of trees and
lianas, and having seated Paul and Virginia on it, car-
ried them upon their shoulders. Domingo marched
in front with his lighted torch, and they proceeded
amidst the rejoicings of the whole troop, who over-
whelmed them with their benedictions. Virginia,
affected by this scene, said to Paul, with emotion, —
*‘Oh, my dear brother! God never leaves a good
action unrewarded.”

It was midnight when they arrived at the foot of
their mountain, on the ridges of which several fires
were lighted. As soon as they began to ascend, they
heard voices exclaiming, — ‘‘ Is it you, my children?”
They answered immediately, and the negroes also,
«Yes, yes, itis.” A moment after they could dis-
tinguish their mothers and Mary coming towards





;
i
‘





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 59

them with lighted sticks in their hands. ‘* Unhappy
children,” cried Madame de la Tour, ‘‘ where have



you been? What agonies you have made us suffer!”
— ‘We have been,” said Virginia, ‘‘to the Black
River, where we went to ask pardon for a poor
Maroon slave, to whom I gave our breakfast this



60 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

morning, because she seemed dying of hunger; and
these Maroon negroes have brought us home.”
Madame de la Tour embraced her daughter, without
being able to speak; and Virginia, who felt her face
wet with her mother’s tears, exclaimed, — ‘‘ Now I
am‘ repaid for all the hardships I have suffered.”
Margaret, in a transport of delight, pressed Paul in
her arms, exclaiming, —‘‘ And you also, my dear
child! you have done a good action.” When they
reached the cottages with their children, they enter-
tained all the negroes with a plentiful repast, after
which the latter returned to their woods, praying
Heaven to shower down every description of blessing
on those good white people.

Every day was to these families a day of happi-
ness and of tranquillity. Neither ambition nor envy
disturbed their repose. They did not seek to obtain
a useless reputation out of doors, which may be pro-
cured by artifice, and lost by calumny ; but were con-
tented to be the sole witnesses and judges of their
own actions. In this island, where, as is the case
in most colonies, scandal forms the principal topic of
conversation, their virtues, and even their names,
were unknown. The passer-by on the road to the
Shaddock Grove, indeed, would sometimes ask the
inhabitants of the plain, who lived in the cottages
up there ? and was always told, even by those who
did not know them, ‘‘ They are good people.” The
modest violet thus, concealed in thorny places, sheds
all unseen its delightful fragrance around.

Slander, which, under an appearance of justice,
naturally inclines the heart to falsehood or to hatred,





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 61

was entirely banished from their conversation; for it
is impossible not to hate men if we believe them to
be wicked, or to live with the wicked without con-
cealing that hatred under a false pretence of good
feeling. Slander thus puts us ill at ease with others
and with ourselves. In this little circle, therefore,
the conduct of individuals was not discussed, but the
best manner of doing good to all; and although they
had but little in their power, their unceasing good-
will and kindness of heart made them constantly
ready to do what they could for others. Solitude, far
from having blunted these benevolent feelings, had
rendered their dispositions even more kindly. Al-
though the petty scandals of the day furnished no
subject of conversation to them, yet the contempla-
tion of nature filled their minds with enthusiastic
delight. They adored the bounty of that Providence,
which, by their instrumentality, had spread abun-
dance and beauty amid these barren rocks, and had
enabled them to enjoy those pure and simple pleas-
ures, which are ever grateful and ever new.

Paul, at twelve years of age, was stronger and
more intelligent than most European youths are at
fifteen; and the plantations, which Domingo merely
cultivated, were all embellished by him. He would
go with the old negro into the neighboring woods,
where he would root up the young plants of lemon,
orange, and tamarind trees, the round heads of
which are of so fresh a green, together with date-
palm trees, which produce fruit filled with a sweet
cream, possessing the fine perfume of the orange
flower. These trees, which had already attained to



62 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

a considerable size, he planted round their little en-
closure. He had also sown the seeds of many trees
which the second year bear flowers or fruit; such as
the agathis, encircled with long clusters of white
flowers, which hang from it like the crystal pendants
of a chandelier; the Persian lilac, which lifts high in
air its gray flax-colored branches; the papaw-tree,
the branchless trunk of which forms a column
studded with green melons, surmounted by a capital
of broad leaves similar to those of the fig-tree.

The seeds and kernels of the gum-tree, terminalia,
mango, alligator pear, the guava, the bread-fruit
tree, and the narrow-leaved rose-apple, were also
planted by him with profusion ; and the greater num-
ber of these trees already afforded their young culti-
vator both shade and fruit. His industrious hands
diffused the riches of nature over even the most bar-
ren parts of the plantation. Several species of aloes,
the Indian fig, adorned with yellow flowers spotted
with red, and the thorny torch-thistle, grew upon the
dark summits of the rocks, and seemed to aim at
reaching the long lianas, which, laden with blue or
scarlet flowers, hung scattered over the steepest
parts of the mountain.

I loved to trace the ingenuity he had exercised in
the arrangement of these trees. He had so disposed
them that the whole could be seen at a single glance.
In the middle of the holluw he had planted shrubs
of the lowest growth; behind grew the more lofty
sorts; then trees of the ordinary height ; and beyond
and above all, the venerable and lofty groves which
border the circumference. Thns this extensive on







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 63

closure appeared, from its centre, like a verdant
amphitheatre decorated with fruits and flowers,
containing a variety of vegetables, some strips of
meadow-land, and fields of rice and corn. But, in
arranging these vegetable productions to his own
taste, he wandered not too far from the designs of
Nature. Guided by her suggestions, he had thrown
upon the elevated spots such seeds as the winds
would scatter about, and near the borders of the
springs those which float upon the water. Every
plant thus grew in its proper soil, and every spot
seemed decorated by Nature’s own hand. The
streams which fell from the summits of the rocks
formed in some parts of the valley sparkling cas-
cades, and in others were spread into broad mirrors,
in which were reflected, set in verdure, the flower-
ing trees, the overhanging rocks, and the azure
heavens.

Notwithstanding the great irregularity of the
ground, these plantations were, for the most part,
easy of access. We had, indeed, all given him our
advice and assistance, in order to accomplish this
end.

He had conducted one path entirely round the
valley, and various branches from it led from the
circumference to the centre. He had drawn some
advantage from the most rugged spots, and had
blended, in harmonious union, level walks with the
inequalities of the soil, and trees which grow wild
with the cultivated varieties.

With that immense quantity of large pebbles which
now block up these paths, and which are scattered



64 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

over most of the ground of this island, he formed
pyramidal heaps here and there, at the base of which
he laid mould, and planted rose-bushes, the Barba-
does flower-fence, and other shrubs, which love to.
climb the rocks.

Ina short time the dark and shapeless heaps of
‘ stones he had constructed were covered with verdure,
or with the glowing tints of the most beautiful flow-
ers. Hollow recesses on the borders of the streams,
shaded by the overhanging boughs of aged trees,
formed rural grottos, impervious to the rays of the sun,
in which you might enjoya refreshing coolness during
the mid-day heats. One path led to a clump of for-
est trees, in the centre of which, sheltered from the
wind, you found a fruit-tree, Jaden with produce.
Here was a corn-field; there, an orchard: from one
avenue you had a view of the cottages ; from another,
of the inaccessible summit of the mountain. Beneath
one tufted bower of gum-trees, interwoven with
lianas, no object whatever could be perceived: while
the point of the adjoining rock, jutting out from the
mountain, commanded a view of the whole enclo-
sure, and of the distant ocean, where, occasionally,
we could discern the distant sail, arriving from
Europe, or bound thither. 4

On this rock the two families frequently met in the
evening, and enjoyed in silence the freshness of the
flowers, the gentle murmurs of the fountains, and
the last blended harmonies of light and shade.

Nothing could be more charming than the names
which were bestowed upon some of the delightful
retreats of this labyrinth. The rock of which I have







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 65

feen speaking, whence they could discern my ap-
proach at a considerable distance, was called the
Discovery of Friendship. Paul and Virginia had
amused them-
selves by plant-
inga bamboo on

oy .
al that spot; and
aw whenever they






saw me coming,
they hoisted a little white handkerchief
by way of signal of my approach, as they
had seen a flag hoisted on the neighbor-
ing mountain on the sight of a vessel at
sea. The idea struck me of
», engraving an inscription on
the stalk of this reed; for I
never, in the course of my
travels, experienced anything
like the pleasure in seeing a
statue or other monument of
ancient art, as in reading a
well-written inscription. It
seems to me as if a human
voice issued from the stone,
and making itself heard after
the lapse of ages, addressed
man in the midst of a desert,
to tell him that he is not alone, and that other men,
on that very spot, had felt, and thought, and suffered
like himself.

If the inscription belongs to an ancient nation,
which no longer exists, it leads the soul through





66 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

infinite space, and strengthens the consciousness of
its immortality, by demonstrating that a thought has
survived the ruins of an empire.
I inscribed then, on the little staff of Paul and
Virginia’s flag, the following lines of Horace: —
: ... fratres Helena, lucida sidera,

Ventorumque regat pater,
Obstrictis aliis, praeter Iapiga.

‘May the brothers of Helen, bright stars like you, and
the Father of the winds, guide you; and may
you feel only the breath of the zephyr.”

There was a gum-tree, under the shade of which
Paul was accustomed to sit to contemplate the sea
when agitated by storms.

On the bark of this tree I engraved the following
line from Virgil : —

Fortunatus et ille, Deos qui novit agrestes.
“Happy art thou, my son, in knowing only the
pastoral divinities.”

And over the door of Madame de la Tour's cot-
tage, where the families so frequently met, I placed
this line : —

At secura quies, et nescia fallere vita.

“Here dwell a calm conscience, and a life that knows
not deceit.”

But Virginia did not approve of my Latin: she
said that what I had placed at the foot of her flag-
staff was too long and learned.

‘*T should have liked better,” added she, ‘to have
seen inscribed, EVER AGITATED, YET CONSTANT.” —







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 67

«« Such a motto,” I answered, ‘‘ would have been still
more applicable to virtue.” My reflection made her
blush.

The delicacy of sentiment of these happy families
was manifested in everything around them. They
gave the tenderest names to objects in appearance the
most indifferent.

A border of orange, plantain, and rose-apple trees,
planted round a green-sward where Paul and Vir-
ginia sometimes danced, received the name of Con-
cord. An old tree, beneath the shade of which
Madame de la Tour and Margaret used to recount
their misfortunes, was called The Burial-place of
Tears. They bestowed the names of Brittany and
Normandy on two little plots of ground, where they
had sown corn, strawberries, and pease.

Domingo and Mary, wishing, in imitation of their
mistresses, to recall to mind Angola and Foulle-
pointe, the places of their birth in Africa, gave those
names to the little fields where the grass was sown
with which they wove their baskets, and where they
had planted a calabash-tree.

Thus, by cultivating the productions of their re-
spective climates, these exiled families cherished the
dear illusions which bind us to our native country,
and softened their regrets in a foreign land. Alas!
I have seen these trees, these fountains, these heaps
of stones, which are now so completely overthrown
—which now, like the desolated plains of Greece,
present nothing but masses of ruin and affecting re-
membrances, all but called into life by the many
charming appellations thus bestowed upon them!



68 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

But perhaps the most delightful spot of this enclo-
sure was that called Virginia’s Resting-place. At the
foot of the rock
which bore the
name of The Dis-
covery of Friend-
‘ship is a small
“ crevice, whence
issues a foun-
tain, forming,
_hear its source,
a little spot of marshy
soil in the middle of a
field of rich grass.

At the time of Paul’s
birth I had made Mar-
garet a present of an
Indian cocoa which
had been given me,
and which she planted
on the border of this
fenny ground, in order
that the tree might one
day serve to mark the
epoch .of her son’s
birth. Madame de la Tour planted another cocoa,
with the same view, at the birth of Virginia. These
nuts produced two cocoa-trees, which formed the
only records of the two families : one was called Paul’s
tree, the other, Virginia’s. Their growth was in the
same proportion as that of the two young persons,
not exactly equal; but they rose, at the end of twelve






PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 69

years, above the roofs of the cottages. Already their
tender stalks were interwoven, and clusters of young
cocoas hung from them over the basin of the foun-
tain. With the exception of these two trees, this
nook of the rock was left as it had been decorated by
nature.

On its embrowned and moist sides broad plants of
maiden-hair glistened with their green and dark stars ;
and tufts of wave-leaved hart’s-tongue, suspended
like long ribands of purpled green, floated on the
wind. Near this grew a chain of the Madagascar
periwinkle, the flowers of which resembled the red
gillyflower ; and the long-podded capsicum, the seed-
vessels of which are of the color of blood, and more
resplendent than coral. Near them, the herb balm,
with its heart-shaped leaves, and the sweet basil,
which has the odor of the clove, exhaled the most
delicious perfumes. From the precipitous side of
the mountain hung the graceful lianas, like floating
draperies, forming magnificent canopies of verdure on
the face of the rocks. The sea-birds, allured by the
stillness of these retreats, resorted here to pass the
night.

At the hour of sunset we could perceive the cur-
lew and the stint skimming along the seashore; the
frigate-bird poised high in air; and the white bird of
the tropic, which abandons, with the star of day, the
solitudes of the Indian Ocean. Virginia took pleas-
ure in resting herself upon the border of this foun-
tain, decorated with wild and sublime magnificence.
She often went thither to wash the linen of the fam-
ily beneath the shade of the two cocoa-trees, and



7° PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

thither too she sometimes led her goats to graze.
While she was making cheeses of their milk, she
loved to see them browse on the maiden-hair fern
which clothed the steep sides of the rock, and hung
suspended by one of its cornices, as on a pedestal.
Paul, observing that Virginia was fond of this spot,
brought thither, from the neighboring forest, a great
variety of birds’ nests. The old birds, following
their young, soon established themselves in this new
colony. Virginia, atstated times, distributed amongst
them grains of rice, millet, and maize. As soon as
she appeared, the whistling blackbird, the amadavid
bird, whose note is so soft, the cardinal, with its
flame-colored plumage, forsook their bushes ; the par-
roquet, green as an emerald, descended from the
neighboring fan-palms ; the partridge ran along the
grass: all advanced promiscuously towards her, like
a brood of chickens: and she and Paul found an
exhaustless source of amusement in observing their
sports, their repasts, and their loves.

Amiable children ! thus passed your earlier days in
innocence, and in obeying the impulses of kindness.
How many times, on this very spot, have your
mothers, pressing you in their arms, blessed Heaven
for the consolations your unfolding virtues prepared
for their declining years, while they at the same time
enjoyed the satisfaction of seeing you begin life
under the happiest auspices! How many times, be-
neath the shade of those rocks, have I partaken with
them of your rural repasts, which never cost any
animal its life! Gourds full of milk, fresh eggs,
cakes of rice served up on plantain leaves, with bas-





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 71

kets of mangoes, oranges, dates, pomegranates, pine-
apples, furnished a wholesome repast, the most
agreeable to the
eye, as well as
delicious to the
taste, that can
possibly be im-
agined.

Like the re-
past, the con-
versation was
mild, and free
from everything
having a tenden-
cy to do harm.
Paul often talked
of the labors of
the day and of
the morrow. He
was continually
planning some-
thing for the accommodation of their little society.
Here he discovered that the paths were rugged, there
that the seats were uncomfortable: sometimes the
young arbors did not afford sufficient shade, and
Virginia might be better pleased elsewhere.

During the rainy season the two families met
together in the cottage, and employed themselves in
weaving mats of grass, and baskets of bamboo.
Rakes, spades, and hatchets were ranged along the
walls in the most perfect order; and near these in-
struments of agriculture were heaped its products —





72 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

bags of rice, sheaves of corn, and baskets of plan-
tains. Some degree of luxury usually accompanies
abundance; and Vir-
ginia was taught by
her mother and Mar- 4
garet to prepare sher-
betand cordials from
the juice ofthesugar-









cane, the lemon, and the
citron.

When night came, they all supped together by.the
light of a lamp; after which Madame de la Tour
or Margaret related some story of travellers be-
nighted in those woods of Europe that are still in-
fested by banditti; or told a dismal tale of some
shipwrecked vessel, thrown by the tempest upon the



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 73

rocks of a desert island. To these recitals the .chil-
dren listened with eager attention, and earnestly
hoped that Heaven would one day grant them the
joy of performing the rites of hospitality towards
such unfortunate persons.

When the time for repose arrived, the two families
separated and retired for the night, eager to meet
again the following morning. Sometimes they were
lulled to repose by the beating of the rains, which
fell in torrents upon the roofs of their cottages, and
sometimes by the hollow winds, which brought to
their ear the distant roar of the waves breaking upon
the shore. They blessed God for their own safety,
the feeling of which was brought home more forcibly
to their minds by the sound of remote danger.

Madame de la Tour occasionally read aloud some
affecting history of the Old or New Testament. Her
auditors reasoned but little upon these sacred volumes,
for their theology centred in a feeling of devotion
towards the Supreme Being, like that of nature; and
their morality was an active principal, like that of the
Gospel. These families had no particular days de-
voted to pleasure, and others to sadness.

Every day was to them a holiday, and all that sur-
rounded them one holy temple, in which they ever
adored the Infinite Intelligence, the Almighty God,
the friend of human kind. A feeling of confidence
in His supreme power filled their minds with con-
solation for the past, with fortitude under present
trials, and with hope in the future. Compelled by
misfortune to return almost to a state of nature, these
excellent women had thus developed in their own and



74 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

their children’s bosoms the feelings most natural to
the human mind, and its best support under affliction.

But as clouds sometimes arise, and cast a gloom
over the best regulated tempers, so whenever any
member of this little society appeared to be laboring



under dejection, the rest assembled around, and en-
deavored to banish her painful thoughts by amusing
the mind ‘rather than by grave arguments against
them. Each performed this kind office in their
own appropriate manner: Margaret, by her gayety;
Madame de la Tour, by the gentle consolations of
religion; Virginia, by her tender caresses; Paul, by
his frank and engaging cordiality. Even Mary and
Domingo hastened to offer their succor, and to weep
with those that wept. Thus do weak plants inter-









PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 75

weave themselves with each other, in order to with-
stand the fury of the tempest.

During the fine season, they went every Sunday to
the church of the Shaddock Grove, the steeple of
which you see yonder upon the plain. Many wealthy
members of the congregation, who came to church
in palanquins, sought the acquaintance of these
united families, and invited them to parties of pleas-
ure. But they always repelled these overtures with
respectful politeness, as they were persuaded that the
rich and powerful seek the society of persons in an
inferior station only for the sake of surrounding
themselves with flatterers, and that every flatterer
must applaud alike all the actions of his patron,
whether good or bad. On the other hand, they
avoided, with equal care, too intimate an acquaint-
ance with the lower class, who are ordinarily jealous,
calumniating, and gross. They thus acquired, with
some, the character of being timid, and with others,
of pride; but their reserve was accompanied with so
much obliging politeness, above all towards the un-
fortunate and the unhappy, that they insensibly
acquired the respect of the rich and the confidence
of the poor.

After service, some kind office was often required
at their hands by their poor neighbors.

Sometimes a person troubled in mind sought their
advice; sometimes a child begged them to visit its
sick mother, in one of the adjoining hamlets. They
always took with them a few remedies for the ordi-
nary diseases of the country, which they administered
in that soothing manner which stamps a value upon



76 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

the smallest favors. Above all, they met with singu-
lar success in administering to the disorders of the
mind, so intolerable in solitude, and under the infirm-
Pee a ities of a weakened
, frame. Madame de
la Tour spoke with
such sublime con-
fidence of the Divin-
ity, that the sick,
while listening to
her, almost believed
Him present.
Virginia often re-












EY,
jrayer "ees



turned home with her eyes full of tears, and her heart
overflowing with delight, at having had an opportu-
nity of doing good; for to her generally was con-
fided the task of preparing and administering the
medicines, —a task which she fulfilled with angelic
sweetness.









PAUL AND VIRGINIA DANCING.





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 77

After these visits of charity, they sometimes ex-
tended their walk by the Sloping Mountain, till they
reached my dwelling, where I used to prepare dinner
for them on the banks of the little rivulet which
glides near my cottage. I procured for these occa-
sions a few bottles of old wine, in order to heighten
the relish of our Oriental repast by the more genial
productions of Europe. At other times we met on
the seashore, at the mouth of some little river, or
rather mere brook. We brought from home the
provisions furnished us by our gardens, to which we
added those supplied us by the sea in abunda:i
variety.

We caught on these shores the mullet, the roach,
and the sea-urchin, lobsters, shrimps, crabs, oysters,
and all other kinds of shell-fish. In this way we often
enjoyed the most tranquil pleasures in situations the
most terrific. Sometimes, seated upon a rock under
the shade of the velvet sun-flower tree, we saw the
enormous waves of the Indian Ocean break beneath
our feet with a tremendous noise. Paul, who could
swim like a fish, would advance on the reefs to meet
the coming billows; then, at their near approach,
would run back to the beach, closely pursued by the
foaming breakers, which threw themselves, with a
roaring noise, far on the sands. But Virginia, at
this sight, uttered piercing cries, and said that such
sports frightened her too much.

Other amusements were not wanting on these
festive occasions. Our repasts were generally fol-
lowed by the songs and dances of the two young
people. Virginia sang the happiness of pastoral life,



78 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

and the misery of those who were impelled by avarice
to cross the raging ocean, rather than cultivate the
earth, and enjoy its bounties in peace. Sometimes



ATS i netgatisire hee

she performed a pantomime with Paul, after the man-
ner of the negroes.

The first language of man is pantomime: it is
known to all nations, and is so natural and expres-
sive, that the children of the European inhabitants
catch it with facility from the negroes. Virginia,
recalling, from among the histories which her mother
had read to her, those which had affected her most,







PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 79

represented the principal events in them with beauti-
ful simplicity. Sometimes at the sound of Domingo’s
tamtam she appeared upon the greensward, bearing
a pitcher upon her head, and advanced with a timid
step towards the source of a neighboring fountain, to
draw water. Domingo and Mary, personating the
shepherds of Midian, forbade her to approach, and
repulsed her sternly. Upon this Paul flew to her
succor, beat away the shepherds, filled Virginia’s
pitcher, and placing it upon her head, bound her
brows at the same time with a wreath of the red
flowers of the Madagascar periwinkle, which served
to heighten the delicacy of her complexion. Then,
joining in their sports, I took upon myself the part
of Raguel, and bestowed upon Paul my daughter
Zephora in marriage.

Another time Virginia would represent the unhappy
Ruth, returning poor and widowed with her mother-
in-law, who, after so prolonged an absence, found
herself as unknown as in a foreign land. Domingo
and Mary personated the reapers. The supposed
daughter of Naomi followed their steps, gleaning
here and there a few ears of corn.

When interrogated by Paul,—a part which he
performed with the gravity of a patriarch, — she
answered his questions with a faltering voice. He
then, touched with compassion, granted an asylum
to innocence, and hospitality to misfortune. He
filled her lap with plenty; and, leading her towards
us as before the elders of the city, declared his pur-
pose to take her in marriage. At this scene, Madame
de la Tour, recalling the desolate situation in which



80 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

she had been left by her relations, her widowhood,
and the kind reception she had met with from
Margaret, succeeded now by the soothing hope of a
happy union between their children, could not for-
bear weeping; and these mixed recollections of good
and evil caused us all to unite with her in shedding
tears of sorrow and of joy.

These dramas were performed with such an air of
reality, that you might have fancied yourself trans-
ported to the plains of Syria or of Palestine. We
were not unfurnished with decorations, lights, or an
orchestra, suitable to the representation. The scene
was generally placed in an open space of the forest,
the diverging paths from which formed around us
numerous arcades of foliage, under which we were
sheltered from the heat all the middle of the day;
but when the sun descended towards the horizon, its
rays, broken by the trunks of the trees, darted amongst
the shadows of the forest in long lines of light, pro-
ducing the most magnificent effect. Sometimes its
broad disk appeared at the end of an avenue, lighting
it up with insufferable brightness. The foliage of the
trees, illuminated from beneath by its saffron beams,
glowed with the lustre of the topaz and the emerald.
Their brown and mossy trunks appeared transformed
into columns of antique bronze; and the birds which
had retired in silence to their leafy shades to pass the
night, surprised to see the radiance of a second
morning, hailed the star of day all together with
innumerable carols.

Night often overtook us during these rural enter-
tainments ; but the purity of the air, and the warmth





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 81

of the climate, admitted of our sleeping in the
woods, without incurring any danger by exposure to
the weather, and no less secure from the molestation
of robbers. On our return the following day to our
respective habitations, we found them in exactly the
same state in which they had been left. In this
island, then unsophisticated by the pursuits of com-
merce, such were the honesty and primitive manners
of the population, that the doors of many houses
were without a key, and even a lock itself was an
object of curiosity to not a few of the native inhab-
itants.

There were, however, some days in the year cele-
brated by Paul and Virginia in a more peculiar man-
ner: these were the birthdays of their mothers.
Virginia never failed the day before to prepare some
wheaten cakes, which she distributed among a few
poor white families, born in the island, who had
never eaten European bread. These unfortunate
people, uncared for by the blacks, were reduced to
live on tapioca in the woods; and as they had neither
the insensibility which is the result of slavery, nor
the fortitude which springs from a liberal education,
to enable them to support their poverty, their situa-
tion was deplorable.

These cakes were all that Virginia had it in her
power to give away; but she conferred the gift in so
delicate a manner as to add tenfold to its value. In
the first place, Paul was commissioned to take the
cakes himself to these families, and get their promise
to come and spend the next day at Madame de la
Tour’s. Accordingly, mothers of families, with two



82 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

or three thin, yellow, miserable-looking daughters,
so timid that they dared not look up, made their
appearance. Virginia soon put them at their ease:
she waited upon them with refreshments, the excel-
lence of which she endeavored to heighten by relat-
ing some particular circumstance which, in her own
estimation, vastly improved them. One beverage
had been prepared by Margaret; another, by her
mother: her brother himself had climbed some
lofty tree for the very fruit she was presenting. She
would then get Paul to dance with them, nor would
she leave them till she saw that they were happy.
She wished them to partake of the joy of her own
family. ‘‘It is only,” she said, ‘‘ by promoting the
happiness of others that we can secure our own.”

When they left, she generally presented them with
some little article they seemed to fancy, enforcing
their acceptance of it by some delicate pretext, that
she might not appear to know they were in want. If
she remarked that their clothes were much tattered,
she obtained her mother’s permission to give them
some of her own, and then sent Paul to leave them
secretly at their cottage doors. She thus followed
the divine precept, — concealing the benefactor, and
revealing only the benefit.

You Europeans, whose minds are imbued from
infancy with prejudices at variance with happiness,
cannot imagine all the instruction and pleasure to be
derived from nature. Your souls, confined to a small
sphere of intelligence, soon reach the limit of its
artificial enjoyments; but nature and the heart are
inexhaustible. Paul and Virginia had neither clock,



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 83

nor almanac, nor books of chronology, history, or
philosophy. The periods of their lives were regu-
lated by those of the operations of nature, and their
familiar conversation had a constant reference to the
changes of the seasons. They knew the time of day
by the shadows of the trees; the seasons, by the
times when those trees bore flowers or fruit; and
the years, by the number of their harvests. These
soothing images diffused an inexpressible charm over
their conversation. ‘It is time to dine,” said Vir-
ginia, ‘‘ the shadows of the plantain-trees are at their
roots;” or, ‘‘ Night approaches; the tamarinds are
closing their leaves.” ‘* When will you come and
see us?” inquired some of her companions in the
neighborhood. ‘*At the time of the sugar-canes,”
answered Virginia. ‘Your visit will be then still
more delightful,” resumed her young acquaintances.
When she was asked what was her own age, and that
of Paul, — ‘‘ My brother,” said she, ‘is as old as the
great cocoa-tree of the fountain; and I amas old as
the little one: the mangoes have borne fruit twelve
times, and the orange-trees have flowered four and
twenty times, since I came into the world.”

Their lives seemed linked to that of the trees, like
those of Fauns or Dryads. They knew no other
historical epochs than those of the lives of their
mothers, no other chronology than that of their
orchards, and no other philosophy than that of
doing good, and resigning themselves to the will
of Heaven.

What need, indeed, had these young people of
riches or learning such as ours? Even their necessi-



84 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ties and their ignorance increased their happiness.
No day passed in which they were not of some ser-
vice to one another, or in which they did not mutually
impart some instruction. Yes, instruction; for if
errors mingled with it, they were, at least, not of a
dangerous character. A pure-minded being has
none of that description to fear. Thus grew these
children of nature. No care had troubled. their
peace, no intemperance had corrupted their blood,
no misplaced passion had depraved their hearts.
Love, innocence, and piety possessed their souls;
and those intellectual graces were unfolding daily in
their features, their attitudes, and their movements.
Still in the morning of life, they had all its blooming
freshness; and surely such in the Garden of Eden
appeared our first parents, when, coming from the
hands of God, they first saw and approached each.
other, and conversed together, like brother and sis-
ter. Virginia was gentle, modest, and’ confiding as
Eve; and Paul, like Adam, united the stature of man-
hood with the simplicity of a child.

Sometimes, if alone with Virginia, he has a thou-
sand times told me, he used to say to her, on his
return from labor, — ‘*‘ When I am wearied, the sight
of you refreshes me. If from the summit of the
mountain I perceive you below in the valley, you
appear to me in the midst of our orchard like a
blooming rosebud. If you go towards our mother’s
house, the partridge, when it runs to meet its young,
has a shape less beautiful, and a step less light.
When I lose sight of you through the trees, I have
no need to see you in order to find you again.



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 85

Something of you, I know not how, remains for me
in the air through which you have passed, — on the
grass whereon you have been seated.

““When I come near you, you delight all my
senses. The azure of the sky is less charming than
the blue of your eyes, and the song of the amadavid
bird less soft than the sound of your voice. If I
only touch you with the tip of my finger, my whole
frame trembles with pleasure. Do-you remember the
day when we crossed over the great stones of the
river of the Three Breasts? I was very tired before
we reached the bank: but as soon as I had taken
you in my arms, I seemed to have wings like a bird.
Tell me by what charm you have thus enchanted
me? Is it by your wisdom?— Our mothers have
more than either of us. Is it by your caresses? —
They embrace me much oftener than you. I think it
must be by your goodness. I shall never forget how
you walked barefooted to the Black River, to ask
pardon for the poor runaway slave. Here, my be-
loved, take this flowering branch of a lemon-tree,
which I have gathered in the forest: you will let it
remain at night near your bed. Eat this honeycomb
too which I have taken for you from the top of a
rock. But first lean on my bosom, and I shall be
refreshed.”

Virginia would answer him, — ‘ Oh, my dear
brother, the rays of the sun in the morning on the tops
of the rocks give me less joy than the sight of you. I
love my mother, — I love yours; but when they call
you their son, I love them a thousand times more.
When they caress you, I feel it more sensibly than



86 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

when J am caressed myself. You ask me what makes
you love me. Why, all creatures that are brought up
together love one another. Lookat our birds: reared
up in the same nests,
they love each other
as we do; they are
always together like
us. Hark! how they
call and answer from
one tree to another!

“So when the
echoes bring to my
ears the air which
you play on your flute
on the top of the
mountain, I repeat
the words at the bot-
tom of the valley.
You are dear to me
more especially since
the day when you
wanted to fight the
master of the slave
for me. Since that
time how often have
I said to myself,
«Ah, my brother has

a good heart; but for him I should have died of

terror.’ I pray to God every day for my mother and
- for yours; for you, and for our poor servants: but

when I pronounce your name, my devotion seems to

increase ;—1 ask so earnestly of God that no harm





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 87

may befall you! Why do you go so far, and climb
so high, to seek fruits and flowers for me? Have
we not enough in our garden already? How much
you are fatigued, — you look so warm!”—and with
her little white handkerchief she would wipe the
damps from his face, and then imprint a tender
kiss on his forehead.

For some time past, however, Virginia had felt her
heart agitated by new sensations. Her beautiful
blue eyes lost their lustre, her cheek its freshness,
and her frame was overpowered with a universal
languor. Serenity no longer sat upon her brow, nor
smiles played upon her lips. She would become all
at once gay without cause for joy, and melancholy
without any subject for grief. She fled her innocent
amusements, her gentle toils, and even the society of
her beloved family ; wandering about the most unfre-
quented parts of the plantations, and seeking every-
where the rest which she could nowhere find.

Sometimes, at the sight of Paul, she advanced sport-
ively to meet him; but, when about to accost him,
was overcome by asudden confusion ; her pale cheeks
were covered with blushes, and her eyes no longer
dared to meet those of her brother. Paul said to
her, —‘* The rocks are covered with verdure, our
birds begin to sing when you approach, everything
around you is gay, and you only are unhappy.” He
then endeavored to soothe her by his embraces ; but
she turned away her head, and fled, trembling,
towards her mother. The caresses of her brother
excited too much emotion in her agitated heart, and
she sought in the arms of her mother, refuge from



88 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

herself. Paul, unused to the secret windings of the
female heart, vexed himself in vain in endeavoring
to comprehend the meaning of these new and strange
caprices. Misfortunes seldom come alone, and a
serious calamity now impended over these families.

One of those summers which sometimes desolate
the countries situated between the tropics, now be-
gan to spread its ravages over this island. It was
near the end of December, when the sun, in Capri-
corn, darts over the Mauritius, during the space of
three weeks, its vertical fires.

The south-east wind, which prevails throughout
almost the whole year, no longer blew. Vast col-
umns of dust arose from the highways, and hung
suspended in the air; the ground was everywhere
broken into clefts; the grass was burnt up; hot ex-
halations issued from the sides of the mountains, and
their rivulets, for the most part, became dry. No
refreshing cloud ever arose from the sea: fiery vapors
only, during the day, ascended from the plains, and
appeared, at sunset, like the reflection of a vast con-
flagration. Night brought no coolness to the heated
atmosphere; and the red moon, rising in the misty
horizon, appeared of supernatural magnitude. The
drooping cattle, on the sides of the hills, stretching
out their necks towards heaven, and panting for
breath, made the valleys re-echo with their melan-
choly lowings: even the Caffre by whom they were
led threw himself upon the earth, in search of some
cooling moisture: but his hopes were vain; the
scorching sun had penetrated the whole soil, and the
stifing atmosphere everywhere resounded with the







VIRGINIA ESCAPING FROM PAUL.



PAUL AND VIRGINIA, 89

buzzing noise of insects, seeking to allay their thirst
with the blood of men and of animals.

During this sultry season, Virginia’s restlessness
and disquietude were much increased. One night
in particular, being unable to sleep, she arose from
her bed, sat down, and returned to rest again; but
could find in no attitude either slumber or repose.
At length she bent her way, by the light of the moon,
towards her fountain, and gazed at its spring, which,
notwithstanding the drought, still trickled in silver
threads down the brown sides of the rock. She flung
herself into the basin: its coolness reanimated her
spirits, and a thousand soothing remembrances came
to her mind. She recollected that in her infancy her
mother and Margaret had amused themselves by
bathing her with Paul in this very spot; that he
afterwards, reserving this bath for her sole use, had
hollowed out its bed, covered the bottom with
sand, and sown aromatic herbs around its borders.
She saw in the water, upon her naked arms and
bosom, the reflection of the two cocoa-trees which
were planted at her own and her brother’s birth, and
which interwove above her head their green branches
and young fruit. She thought of Paul’s friendship,
sweeter than the odor of the blossoms, purer than
the waters of the fountain, stronger than the inter-
twining palm-trees, and she sighed. Reflecting on
the hour of the night, and the profound solitude, her
imagination became disturbed. Suddenly she flew,
affrighted, from those dangerous shades, and those
waters which seemed to her hotter than the tropical
sunbeam, and ran to her mother for refuge. More



go PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

than once, wishing to reveal her sufferings, she
pressed her mother’s hand within her own; more than
once she was ready to pronounce the name of Paul:
but her oppressed heart left her lips no power of
utterance, and, leaning her head on her mother’s
bosom, she bathed it with her tears. f

Madame de la Tour, though she easily discerned
the source of her daughter’s uneasiness, did not
think proper to speak to her on the subject. <‘ My
dear child,” said she, ‘‘ offer up your supplications to
God, who disposes at His will of health and of life.
He subjects you to trial now, in order to recompense
you hereafter. Remember that we are only placed
upon earth for the exercise of virtue.”

The excessive heat in the mean time raised vast
masses of vapor from the ocean, which hung over
the island like an immense parasol, and gathered
round the summits of the mountains. Long flakes
of fire issued from time to time from these mist-
embosomed peaks. The most awful thunder soon
after re-echoed through the woods, the plains, and
the valleys: the rains fell from the skies in cataracts ;
foaming torrents rushed down the sides of this moun-
tain; the bottom of the valley became a sea, and the
elevated platform on which the cottages were built,
alittle island. The accumulated waters, having no
other outlet, rushed with violence through the narrow
gorge which leads into the valley, tossing and roar-
ing, and bearing along with them a mingled wreck
of soil, trees, and rocks.

The trembling families meantime addressed their
prayers to God all together in the cottage of Madame



Full Text






































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Bernardin de Saint-Pierre
PAUL AND VIRGINIA

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

MAURICE LELOIR



NEW YORK: 46 East 14TH STREET.
THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO.

BOSTON: 100 PurcHaAsE STREET.




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Love of Nature, that strong feeling of enthusiasm
which leads to a profound admiration of the whole
works of creation, belongs, it may be presumed, to
a certain peculiarity of organization, and has, no
doubt, existed in different individuals from the be-
ginning of the world. The old poets and philoso-
phers, romance-writers and troubadours, had all
looked upon Nature with observing and admiring
eyes. They have most of them given incidentally
charming pictures of Spring, of the setting sun, of
particular spots, and of favorite flowers.

There are few writers of note, of any country or
of any age, from whom quotations might not be made

I
2 MEMOIR OF

in proof of the love with which they regarded Nature.
And this remark applies as much to religious and
philosophic writers as to poets, — equally to Plato,
_ St. Francois de Sales, Bacon, and Fénelon, as to
Shakespeare, Racine, Calderon, or Burns; for from
no really philosophic or religious doctrine can the
love of the works of Nature be excluded.

But before the days of Jean Jacques Rousseau,
Buffon, and Bernardin de St. Pierre, this love of
Nature had not been expressed in all its intensity.
Until their day, it had not been written on exclu-
sively. The lovers of Nature were not, till then, as
they may perhaps since be considered, a sect apart.
Though perfectly sincere in all the adorations they
offered, they were less entirely, and certainly less
diligently and constantly, her adorers.

It is the great praise of Bernardin de St. Pierre,
that coming immediately after Rousseau and Buffon,
and being one of the most proficient writers of the-
same school, he was in no degree their imitator, but
perfectly original and new. He intuitively perceived
the immensity of the subject he intended to explore,
and has told us that no day of his life passed with-
out his collecting some valuable materials for his
writings. In the divine works of Nature he dili-
gently sought to discover her laws. It was his early
intention not to begin to write until he had ceased to
observe; but he found observation endless, and that
he was ‘‘ like a child, who with a shell digs a hole in
the sand to receive the waters of the ocean.” He
elsewhere humbly says, that not only the general
history of Nature, but even that of the smallest
BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 3

plant, was far beyond his ability. Before, however,
speaking further of him as an author, it will be
necessary to recapitulate the chief events of his
life. .
Henri-Jacques Bernardin de St. Pierre was born at
Havre in 1737. He always considered himself de-
scended from that Eustache de St. Pierre, who is
said by Froissart (and I believe by Froissart only)
to have so generously offered himself as a victim to
appease the wrath of Edward the Third against
Calais. He, with his companions in virtue, it is also
said, was saved by the intercession of Queen Phil-
ippa. In one of his smaller works, Bernardin asserts
this descent, and it was certainly one of which he
might be proud. Many anecdotes are related of his
childhood, indicative of the youthful author, — of his
strong love of Nature, and his humanity to animals.
That ‘‘the child is father of the man” has been
seldom more strongly illustrated. There is a story
of a cat, which, when related by him many years
afterwards to Rousseau, caused that philosopher to
shed tears. At eight years of age he took the
greatest pleasure in the regular culture of his garden,
and possibly then stored up some of the ideas which
afterwards appeared in the ‘‘ Fraisier.” His sym-
pathy with all living things was extreme. In ‘ Paul
and Virginia” he praises, with evident satisfaction,
their meal of milk and eggs, which had not cost any
animal its life. It has been remarked, and possibly
with truth, that every tenderly disposed heart,
deeply imbued with a love of Nature, is at times
somewhat Braminical. St. Pierre’s certainly was.
4 MEMOIR OF

When quite young, he advanced with a clinched
fist towards a carter who was ill-treating a horse.
And when taken for the first time, by his father, to
Rouen, having the towers of the cathedral pointed
out to him, he exclaimed, ‘‘ My God! how high they
fly!” Every one present naturally laughed. Ber-
nardin had only noticed the flight of some swallows
who had built their nests there. He thus early re-
vealed those instincts which afterwards became the
guidance of his life, the strength of which possibly
occasioned his too great indifference to all monu-
ments of art. The love of study and of solitude
were also characteristics of his childhood. His tem-
per is said to have been moody, impetuous, and in-
tractable. Whether this faulty temper may not have
been produced or rendered worse by mismanage-
ment, cannot now be ascertained. It undoubtedly
became, afterwards, to St. Pierre, a fruitful source of
misfortune and of woe.

The reading of voyages was with him, even in
childhood, almost a passion. At twelve years of age,
his whole soul was occupied by Robinson Crusoe and
his island. His.romantic love of adventure seeming
to his parents to announce a predilection in favor of
the sea, he was sent by them with one of his uncles
to Martinique. But St. Pierre had- not sufficiently
practised the virtue of obedience to submit, as was
necessary, to the discipline of a ship. He was after-
wards placed with the Jesuits at Caen, with whom he
made immense progress in his studies. But, it is to
be feared, he did not conform too well to the regula-
tions of the college, for he conceived, from that time,
BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 5

the greatest detestation for places of public educa-
tion. And this aversion he has frequently testified
in his writings. While devoted to his books of
travels, he in turn anticipated being a Jesuit, a mis-
sionary, ora martyr: but his family at length suc-
ceeded in establishing him at Rouen, where he
completed his studies with brilliant success in 1757.
He soon after obtained a commission as an engineer,
with a salary of a hundred louis. In this capacity he
was sent (1760) to Diisseldorf, under the command
of Count St. Germain. This was a career in which
he might have acquired both honor and fortune ; but,
most unhappily for St. Pierre, he looked upon the
useful and necessary etiquettes of life as so many
unworthy prejudices. Instead of conforming to them,
he sought to trample on them. In addition, he
evinced some disposition to rebel against his com-
mander, and was unsocial with his equals. It is not
therefore, to be wondered at, that at this unfortunate
period of his existence he made himself enemies; or
that, notwithstanding his great talents, or the cool-
ness he had exhibited in moments of danger, he
should have been sent back to France. Unwelcome,
under these circumstances, to his family, he was ill
received by all.

It is a lesson yet Zo de learned, that genius gives no
charter for the indulgence of error, —a truth yet Zo be
remembered, that only a small portion of the world
will look with leniency on the failings of the highly
gifted ; and that, from themselves, the consequences
of their own actions can never be averted. It is yet,
alas ! zo de added to the convictions of the ardent in
6 MEMOIR OF

mind, that no degree of excellence in science or lit-
erature, not even the immortality of a name, can
exempt its possessor from obedience to moral disci-
pline, or give him happiness, unless ‘‘ temper’s
image” be stamped on his daily words and actions.
St, Pierre’s life was sadly embittered by his own con-
duct. The adventurous life he led after his return
from Diisseldorf, some of the circumstances of which
exhibited him in an unfavorable light to others,
tended, perhaps, to tinge his imagination with that
wild and tender melancholy so prevalent in his writ-
ings. A prize in the lottery had just doubled his
very slender means of existence, when he obtained
the appointment of geographical engineer, and was
sent to Malta. The Knights of the Order were at
this time expecting to be attacked by the Turks.
Having already been in the service, it was singular
that St. Pierre should have had the imprudence to

sail without his commission. He thus subjected.

himself to a thousand disagreeables, for the officers
would not recognize him as one of themselves. The
effects of their neglect on his mind were tremendous :
his reason for a time seemed almost disturbed by the
mortifications he suffered. After receiving an insuffi-
cient indemnity for the expenses of his voyage,
St. Pierre returned to France, there to endure fresh
misfortunes.

Not being able to obtain any assistance from the
ministry or his family, he resolved on giving lessons
in the mathematics. But St. Pierre was less adapted
than most others for succeeding in the apparently
easy, but really ingenious and difficult, art of teach-




BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 7

ing. When education is better understood, it will
be more generally acknowledged, that, to impart
instruction with success, a teacher must possess
deeper intelligence than is implied by the profound-
est skill in any one branch of science or of art. All
minds, even to the youngest, require, while being
taught, the utmost compliance and consideration ;
and these qualities can scarcely be properly exercised
without a true knowledge of the human heart, united
to much practical patience. St. Pierre, at this period
of his life, certainly did not possess them. It is
probable that Rousseau, when he attempted in his
youth to give lessons in music, not knowing any-
thing whatever of music, was scarcely less fitted for
the task of instruction than St. Pierre with all his
mathematical knowledge. The pressure of poverty
drove him to Holland. He was well received at’
Amsterdam by a French refugee named Mustel, who
edited a popular journal there, and who procured him
employment, with handsome remuneration. St.
Pierre did not, however, remain long satisfied with
this quiet mode of existence. Allured by the en-
couraging reception given by Catherine II. to foreign-
ers, he set out for St. Petersburg. Here, until he
obtained the protection of the Maréchal de Munich
and the friendship of Duval, he had again to contend
with poverty. The latter generously opened to him
his purse, and by the Maréchal he was: introduced to
Villebois, the Grand Master of Artillery, and by him
presented to the Empress. St. Pierre was so hand-
some, that by some of his friends it was supposed —
perhaps too, hoped, — that he would supersede
8 MEMOIR OF

Orloff in the favor of Catherine. But more honor-
able illusions, though they were but illusions, occu-
pied his own mind. He neither sought nor wished
to captivate the Empress. His ambition was to
establish a republic on the shores of the lake Aral,
of which, in imitation of Plato or Rousseau, he was
to be the legislator. Pre-occupied with the reforma-
tion of despotism, he did not sufficiently look into
his own heart, or seek to avoid a repetition of the
same errors that had already changed friends into
enemies, and been such a terrible barrier to his suc-
cess in life. His mind was already morbid, and in
fancying that others did not understand him, he for-
got that he did not understand others. The Em-
press, with the rank of captain, bestowed on him a
grant of 1,500 francs; but when General Dubosquet
proposed to take him with him to examine the mili-
tary position of Finland, his only anxiety seemed to
be to return to France: still he went to Finland;
and his own notes of his occupations and experi-
ments on that expedition prove that he gave himself
up in all diligence to considerations of attack and
defence. He, who loved Nature so intently, seems
only to have seen in the extensive and majestic
forests of the North a theatre of war. In this in-
stance, he appears to have stifled every emotion of
admiration, and to have beheld alike cities and coun-
tries in his character of military surveyor.

On his return to St. Petersburg, he found his pro-
tector, Villebois, disgraced. St. Pierre then resolved
on espousing the cause of the Poles. He went into
Poland with a high reputation, —that of having




BERNARKRDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 9

refused the favors of despotism, to aid the cause of
liberty. But it was his private life, rather than his
public career, that was affected by his residence in
Poland. The Princess Mary fell in love with him,
and, forgetful of all considerations, quitted her family
to reside with him. Yielding, however, at length,
to the entreaties of her mother, she returned to her
home. St. Pierre, filled with regret, resorted to
Vienna; but, unable to support the sadness which
oppressed him, and imagining that sadness to be
shared by the Princess, he soon went back to Poland.
His return was still more sad than his departure, for
he found himself regarded by her who had once loved
him as an intruder. It is to this attachment he
alludes so touchingly in one of his letters. ‘* Adieu!
friends dearer than the treasures of India! Adieu!
forests of the North, that I shall never see again ! —
tender friendship, and the still dearer sentiment
which surpassed it!— days of intoxication and of
happiness, adieu! adieu! We live but for a day, to
die during a whole life!”

This letter appears to one of St. Pierre’s most par-
tial biographers as if steeped in tears ; and he speaks
of his romantic and unfortunate adventure in Poland
as the ideal of a poet's love.

‘To be,” says M. Sainte-Beuve, ‘a great poet,
and loved before he had thought of glory! To ex-
hale the first perfume of a soul of genius, believing
himself only a lover! To reveal himself, for the first
time, entirely, but in mystery !.”

In his enthusiasm, M. Sainte-Beuve loses sight of
the melancholy sequel, which must have left so sad a
Io MEMOLR OF

remembrance in St. Pierre’s own mind. His suffer-
ing from this circumstance may perhaps have con-
duced to his making Virginia so good and true, and
so incapable of giving pain.

In 1766 he returned to Havre; but his relations
were by this time dead or dispersed, and after six
years of exile, he found himself once more in his own
country, without employment, and destitute of pecu-
niary resources.

The Baron de Breteuil at length obtained for him
a commission as engineer to the Isle of France,
whence he returned in 1771. In this interval his
heart and imagination doubtless received the germs
of his immortal works. Many of the events, indeed,
of the ‘‘ Voyage a He de France,” are to be found
modified by imagined circumstances in ‘“‘ Paul and
Virginia.” He returned to Paris poor in purse, but
rich in observations and mental resources, and
resolved to devote himself to literature. By the
Baron de Breteuil he was recommended to D’Alem-
bert, who procured a publisher for his ‘‘ Voyage,”
and also introduced him to Mlle. de l’Espinasse.
But no one, in spite of his great beauty, was so ill
calculated to shine or please in society as St. Pierre.
His manners were timid and embarrassed, and, unless
to those with whom he was very intimate, he scarcely
appeared intelligent.

It is sad to think that misunderstanding should
prevail to such an extent, and heart so seldom really
speak to heart, in the ‘intercourse of the world, that
the most humane may appear cruel, and the sympa-
thizing indifferent. Judging of Mlle. de l’Espinasse


BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. Il

from her letters, and the testimony of her contem-
poraries, it seems quite impossible that she could
have given pain to any one, more particularly toa
man possessing St. Pierre’s extraordinary talent and
profound sensibility. Both she and D’Alembert
were capable of appreciating him; but the society in
which they moved laughed at his timidity, and the
tone of raillery in which they often indulged was not
understood by him. It is certain that he withdrew
from their circle with wounded and mortified feelings,
and, in spite of an explanatory letter from D’Alem-
bert, did not return to it. The inflicters of all
this pain, in the meantime, were possibly as un-
conscious of the meaning attached to their words
as were the birds of old of the augury drawn from
their flight.

St. Pierre, in his ‘‘ Préambule de l’Arcadie,” has
pathetically and eloquently described the deplorable
state of his health and feelings, after frequent hu-
miliating disputes and disappointments had driven
him from society; or rather, when, like Rousseau, he
was ‘‘ self-banished ” fromit. ‘*I was struck,” he says,
‘with an extraordinary malady. Streams of fire,
like lightning, flashed before my eyes: every object
appeared to me double or in motion: like CEdipus,
Isawtwo suns... In the finest day of summer, I
could not cross the Seine in a boat without experi-
encing intolerable anxiety. If, in a public garden, I
merely passed by a piece of water, I suffered from
spasms and a feeling of horror. I could not cross a
garden in which many people were collected: if they
looked at me, I immediately imagined they were




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I2 MEMOIR OF

speaking ill of me.” It was during this state of suf-
fering that he devoted himself with ardor to collect-
ing and making use of materials for that work which
was to give glory to his name.

It was only by perseverance, and disregarding
many rough and discouraging receptions, that he
succeeded in making acquaintance with Rousseau,
whom he so much resembled. St. Pierre devoted
himself to his society with enthusiasm, visiting him
frequently and constantly, till Rousseau departed
for Ermenonville. It is not unworthy of remark that
both these men, such enthusiastic admirers of Nature
and the natural in all things, should have possessed
factitious rather than practical virtue, and a wisdom
wholly unfitted for the world. St. Pierreasked Rous-
seau, in one of their frequent rambles, if, in delineat-
ing St. Preux, he had not intended to represent him-
self. ‘‘No,” replied Rousseau, ‘‘St. Preux is not
what I have been, but what I wished to be.” St.
Pierre would most likely have given the same answer
had a similar question been put to him with regard
to the Colonel in ‘‘ Paul and Virginia.” This, at least,
appears the sort of old age he loved to contemplate
and wished to realize.

For six years he worked at his ‘‘ Etudes,” and
with some difficulty found a publisher for them. M.
Didot, a celebrated typographer, whose daughter St.
Pierre afterwards married, consented to print a man-
uscript which had been declined by many others.
He was well rewarded for the undertaking. The
success of the ‘‘ Etudes de la Nature” surpassed the
most sanguine expectation, even of the author. Four
BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 13

years after its publication, St. Pierre gave to the
world ‘* Paul and Virginia,” which had for some time
been lying in his portfolio. He had tried its effect,
in manuscript, on persons of different characters and
pursuits. They had given it no applause, but all had
shed tears at its perusal; and perhaps few works of
a decidedly romantic character have ever been so gen-
erally read, or so much approved. Among the great
names whose admiration of it is on record, may be
mentioned Napoleon and Humboldt.

In 1789 he published ‘‘ Les Vceux d’un Solitaire”
and “La Suite des Veeux.” By the A/onzteur of the
day these works were compared to the celebrated
pamphlet of Siéyes, ‘* Qu’est-ce que le tiers état?”
which then absorbed all the public favor. In 1791
‘* La Chaumiére Indienne” was published ; and in the
following year, about thirteen days before the cele-
brated roth of August, Louis XVI. appointed St.
Pierre Superintendent of the ‘‘ Jardin des Plantes.”
Soon afterwards the King, on seeing him, compli-
mented him on his writings, and told him he was
happy to have found a worthy successor to Buffon.

Although deficient in exact knowledge of the sci-
ences, and knowing little of the world, St. Pierre
was, by his simplicity and the retirement in which he
lived, well suited, at that epoch, to the situation.
About this time, and when in his fifty-seventh year,
he married Mlle. Didot.

In 1795 he became a member of the French
Academy, and, as was just, after his acceptance of
this honor, he wrote no more against literary socie-
ties. On the suppression of his place. he retired to
14 MEMOIR OF

Essonne. It is delightful to follow him there, and
to contemplate his quiet existence. His days flowed
on peaceably, occupied in the publication of ‘‘ Les
Harmonies de la Nature,” the republication of his
earlier works, and the composition of some lesser
pieces. He himself affectingly regrets an interrup-
tion to these occupations. On being appointed In-
structor to the Normal School, he says, ‘“‘I am
obliged to hang my harp on the willows of my river,
and to accept an employment useful to my family and
my country. Jam afflicted at having to suspend an
occupation which has given me so much happiness.”

He enjoyed, in his old age, a degree of opulence,
which, as much as glory, had perhaps been the ob-
ject of his ambition. In any case, it is gratifying to
reflect, that after a life so full of chance and change,
he was, in his latter years, surrounded by much that
should accompany old age. His day of storms and
tempests was closed by an evening of repose and
beauty.

Amid many other blessings, the elasticity of his
mind was preserved to the last, He died at Eragny
sur l’Oise, on the 21st of January, 1814. The stir-
ring events which then occupied France, or rather
the whole world, caused his death to be little noticed
atthe time. The Academy did not, however, neglect
to give him the honors due to its members. Mons.
Parseval Grand Maison pronounced a deserved
eulogium on his talents, and Mons. Aignan, also, the
customary tribute, taking his seat as his successor.

Having himself contracted the habit of confiding
his griefs and sorrows to the public, the sanctuary of




BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 15

his private life was open alike to the discussion of
friends and enemies. The biographer who wishes to
be exact, and yet set down naught in malice, is forced
to the contemplation of his errors. The secret of
many of these, as well as of his miseries, seems
revealed by himself in this sentence:

‘*T experience more pain from a single thorn than
pleasure from a thousand roses.” And elsewhere,
‘« The best society seems to me bad, if I find in it
one troublesome, wicked, slanderous, envious, or per-
fidious person.” Now, taking into consideration that
St. Pierre sometimes imagined persons who were
really good to be deserving of these strong and very
contumelious epithets, it would have been difficult
indeed to find a society in which he could have been
happy. He was, therefore, wise in secking retire-
ment, and indulging in solitude. His mistakes, —
for they were mistakes, — arose from a too quick
perception of evil, united to an exquisite and diffuse
sensibility. When he felt wounded by a thorn, he
forgot the beauty and perfume of the rose to which
it belonged, and from which, perhaps, it could not be
separated. And he was exposed (as often happens)
to the very description of trials that were least in
harmony with his defects. “Few dispositions could
have run a career like his, and have remained un-
scathed. But one less tender than his own would
have been less soured by it. For many years he
bore about with him the consciousness of unacknowl-
edged talent. The world cannot be blamed for not
appreciating that which had never been revealed.
But we know not what the jostling and elbowing of
16 MEMOIR OF

that world, in the meantime, may have been to him
—how often he may have felt himself unworthily
treated, or how far that treatment may have preyed
upon and corroded his heart. Who shall say that
with this consciousness there did not mingle a quick
and instinctive perception of the hidden motives of
action — that he did not sometimes detect, where
others might have been blinded, the undershuffling
of the hands in the by-play of the world?

Through all his writings, and throughout his cor-
respondence, there are beautiful proofs of the tender-
ness of his feelings, —the most essential quality,
perhaps, in any writer. It is at least one that, if not
possessed, can never be attained. The familiarity
of his imagination with natural objects, when he was
living far removed from them, is remarkable, and
often affecting.

He returned to this country, so fondly loved and
deeply cherished in absence, to experience only
trouble and difficulty. Away from it, he had yearned
to behold it, —to fold it, as it were, once more to his
bosom. He returned to feel as if neglected by it,
and all his rapturous emotions were changed to bit-
terness and gall. His hopes had proved delusions
—his expectations, mockeries. Oh! who but must
look with charity and mercy on all discontent and
irritation consequent on such a depth of disappoint-
ment —on what must have then appeared to him
such unmitigable woe! Under the influence of these
saddened feelings, his thoughts flew back to the
island he had left, to place all beauty, as well as all
happiness, there!




BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 17

One great proof that he did beautify the distant
may be found in the contrast of some of the descrip-
tions in the ‘*‘ Voyage a I’Ile de France,” and those
in ‘‘Paul and Virginia.” That spot which, when
peopled by the cherished creatures of his imagination,
he described as an enchanting and delightful Eden,
he had previously spoken of as a ‘‘ rugged country,
covered with rocks,” — ‘‘a land of Cyclops blackened
by fire.” Truth, probably, lies between the two
representations ; the sadness of exile having dark-
ened the one, and the exuberance of his imagination
embellished the other.

St. Pierre’s merit as an author has been too long
and too universally acknowledged to make it needful
that it should be dwelt on here. A careful review of
the circumstances of his life induces the belief that
his writings grew (if it may be permitted so to
speak) out of his life. In his most imaginative pas-
sages, to whatever height his fancy soared, the
starting-point seems ever from a fact. The past
appears to have been always spread out before him
when he wrote, like a beautiful landscape, on which
his eye rested with complacency, and from which his
mind transferred and idealized some objects without
a servile imitation of any. When at Berlin, he had
had it in his power to marry Virginia Tanbenheim ;
and in Russia, Mlle. de la Tour, the niece of General
Dubosquet, would have accepted his hand. He was
too poor to marry either. A grateful recollection
caused him to bestow the names of the two on his
most beloved creation. Paul was the name of a friar
with whom he had associated in his childhood, and
18 MEMOIR OF

whose life he wished to imitate. How little had the
owners of these names anticipated that they were to
become the baptismal appellations of half a genera-
tion in France, and to be re-echoed through the
world to the end of time!

In ‘Paul and Virginia” he was supremely fortu-
nate in his subject. It was an entirely new creation,
uninspired by any previous work, but which gave
birth to many others, having furnished the plot to
six theatrical pieces. It was a subject to which the
author could bring all his excellences as a writer and
a man; while his deficiencies and defects were neces-
sarily excluded. In no manner could he incorporate
politics, science, or misapprehension of persons,
while his sensibility, morals, and wonderful talent for
description, were in perfect accordance with, and
ornaments to it. Lemontey and Sainte-Beuve both
consider success to have been inseparable from the
happy selection of a story so entirely in harmony
with the character of the author; and that the most
successful writers might envy him so fortunate a
choice. Bonaparte was in the habit of saying, when-
ever he saw St. Pierre, ‘¢M. Bernardin, when do you
mean to give us more Pauls and Virginias, and Indian
Cottages? You ought to give us some every six
months.” ;

The ‘ Indian Cottage,” if not quite equal in inter-
est to ‘‘ Paul and Virginia,” is still a charming pro-
duction, and does great honor to the genius of its
author. It abounds in antique and Eastern gems of
thought. Striking and excellent comparisons are
scattered through its pages; and it is delightful to


BERNARDIN DE SAINT-PIERRE. 19

reflect that the following beautiful and solemn answer
of the Paria was, with St. Pierre, the result of his
own experience: ‘‘ Misfortune resembles the Black
Mountain of Bember, situated at the extremity of the
burning kingdom of Lahore; while you are climbing
it, you only see before you barren rocks; but when
you have reached its summit, you see heaven above
your head, and at your feet the kingdom of Cache-
mere.”

When this passage was written, the rugged and
sterile rock had been climbed by its gifted author.
He had reached the summit, — his genius had been
rewarded, and he himself saw the heaven he wished
to point out to others.

For the facts contained in this brief Memoir the
. writer is indebted to St. Pierre’s own works, to the
‘« Biographie Universelle,” to the ‘¢ Essai sur la Vie
et les Ouvrages de Bernardin de St. Pierre,” by M.
Aimé Martin, and to the very excellent and interest-
ing ‘* Notice Historique et Littéraire ” of M. Sainte-
Bewve.







PREBAGE

I PROJECTED a very grand design in this little book.
I undertook to describe in it a soil and a vegetation
different from those in Europe. Our poets have long
enough placed their lovers on the borders of streams,
in meadows, and beneath leafy beech-trees. I have
chosen to seat them by the margin of the sea, at the
foot of the rocks, beneath the shade of cocoanut-
trees, banana-trees, and flowering lemon-trees. A
Theocritus and a Virgil are only needed in the other
hemisphere to give us scenes at least as interesting
as those in our own land. I am aware that travellers
of fine taste have given us charming descriptions of
many islands of the southern seas; but the manners
of their inhabitants, and still more those of the
Europeans who land there, spoil the landscape. I
wished to unite with the beauties of Nature in the
tropics, the moral beauty of a little community. I
purposed also to bring out many grand truths, and
this amongst others: that our happiness consists in
living according to the dictates of Nature and Virtue.

2i
22 PREFACE.

Nevertheless there has been no need for me to go to
fiction for my description of such happy families. I
can assert that those of whom I write actually ex-
isted; and that their history is true in its principal
incidents. This has been certified by many residents
known to me in the Isle of France. I have only
filled in some unimportant details, but which being
personal to myself have still the stamp of reality.
When several years ago | drew out a very imperfect
sketch of this kind of pastoral,.I requested a lady
well known in society, and several grave signiors who
lived far away from the great world, to come and hear
it read, so that I might estimate the effect the tale
would produce upon readers of such completely op-
posite characters. I had the satisfaction to see them
shed tears. This was the only criticism I could ob-
tain from them, and that was all I desired to know.
But as a great vice often follows a little talent, this
success inspired me with the conceit to call my work
the “* Picture of Nature.” Fortunately I recollected
how great a stranger I was to Nature, even in my-
native land, and in countries wherein I had merely
seen her productions ex voyageur, how rich, how
varied, beautiful, wonderful, and mysterious she is;
and how devoid I was of talent, taste, and mode of
expression to appreciate and to describe her! I
drew back into my shell again. Thus it happens that
I have included this feeble attempt under the name
and in the set of my Studies of Nature, which the
public have received so kindly; so that this title,
while recalling my incapacity, will always be a
memorial of their indulgence.




“PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

SITUATE on the eastern side of the mountain which
rises above Port Louis, in the Mauritius, upon a piece
of land bearing the marks of former cultivation, are
seen the ruins of two small cottages. These ruins
are not far from the centre of a valley, formed by
immense rocks, and which opens only towards the
north. On the left rises the mountain called the
Height of Discovery, whence the eye marks the dis-
tant sail when it first touches the verge of the hori-
zon, and whence the signal is given when a vessel
approaches the island. At the foot of this mountain
stands the town of Port Louis. On the right is
formed the road which stretches from Port Louis to
the Shaddock Grove, where the church bearing that

23
24 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

name lifts its head, surrounded by its avenues of
bamboo, in the middle of a spacious plain; and the
prospect terminates in a forest extending to the far-
thest bounds of the island. The front view presents
the bay, denominated the Bay of the Tomb: a little
on the right is seen the Cape of Misfortune; and
beyond rolls the expanded ocean, on the surface of
which appear a few uninhabited islands; and, among
others, the Point of Endeavor, which resembles a
bastion built upon the flood.

At the entrance of the valley which presents these
various objects, the echoes of the mountain inces-
santly repeat the hollow murmurs of the winds that
shake the neighboring forests, and the tumultuous
dashing of the waves which break at a distance upon
the cliffs; but near the ruined cottages all is calm
and still, and the only objects which there meet the
eye are rude steep rocks, that rise like a surrounding
rampart. Large clumps of trees grow at their base,
on their rifted sides, and even on their majestic tops,
where the clouds seem to repose. The showers,
which their bold points attract, often paint the vivid
colors of the rainbow on their green and brown
declivities, and swell the sources. of the little river
which flows at their feet, called the river of Fan-
Palms. Within this enclosure reigns the most pro-
found silence. The waters, the air, all the elements
are at peace. Scarcely does the echo repeat the
whispers of the palm-trees, spreading their broad
leaves, the long points of which are gently agitated
by the winds. A soft light illumines the bottom of
this deep valley, on which the sun shines only at






PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 25

noon. But, even at break of day, the rays of light
are thrown on the surrounding rocks; and their
sharp peaks, rising above the shadows of the moun-
tain, appear like tints of gold and purple gleaming
upon the azure sky.

To this scene I loved to resort, as I could here
enjoy at once the richness of an unbounded land-
scape, and the charm of uninterrupted solitude. One
day, when I was seated at the foot of the cottages,
and contemplating their ruins, a man, advanced in
years, passed near the spot. He was dressed in the
ancient garb of the island, his feet were bare, and he
leaned upon a staff of ebony: his hair was white,
and the expression of his countenance was dignified
and interesting. I bowed to him with respect; he
returned the salutation; and, after looking at me
with some earnestness, came and placed himself upon
the hillock on which I was seated. Encouraged by
this mark of confidence, I thus addressed him: —
‘‘ Father, can you tell me to whom those cottages
once belonged?” — « My son,” replied the old man,
‘those heaps of rubbish, and that untilled land,
were, twenty years ago, the property of two families,
who then found happiness in this solitude. ‘Their
history is affecting; but what European, pursuing his
way to the Indies, will pause one moment to interest
himself in the fate of a few obscure individuals?
What European can picture happiness to his imagina-
tion amidst poverty and neglect? The curiosity of
mankind is only attracted by the history of the
great, and yet from that knowledge little use can be
derived.” — « Father,” I rejoined, ‘‘ from your man-
26 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ner and your observations, I perceive that you have
acquired much experience of human life. If you
have leisure, relate to me, I beseech you, the history
of the ancient inhabitants: of this desert; and be
assured, that even the men who are most perverted
by the prejudices of the world find a soothing pleas-
ure in contemplating that happiness which belongs
to simplicity and virtue.” The old man, after a short
silence, during which he leaned his face upon his
hands, as if he were trying to recall the images of
the past, thus began his narration: —

Monsieur de la Tour, a young man, who was a na-
tive of Normandy, after having in vain solicited a
commission in the French army, or some support
from his own family, at length determined to seek his
fortune in this island, where he arrived in 1726. He
brought hither a young woman whom he loved ten-
derly, and by whom he was no less tenderly
beloved. She belonged to a rich and ancient
family of the same province; but he had married her
secretly and without fortune, and in opposition to the
will of her relations, who refused their consent be-
cause he was found guilty of being descended from
parents who had no claims to nobility. Monsieur
de la Tour, leaving his wife at Port Louis, embarked
for Madagascar, in order to purchase a few slaves, to
assist him in forming a plantation in this island. He
landed at Madagascar during that unhealthy season
which commences about the middle of October; and
soon after his arrival died of the pestilential fever
which prevails in that island six months of the year,
and which will forever baffle the attempts of the




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 27

European nations to form establishments on that
fatal soil. His effects were seized upon by the
rapacity of strangers, as commonly happens to per-
sons dying in foreign parts; and

his wife, who was pregnant,
found herself a widow in a
country where she had
neither credit nor ac-
quaintance, and no
earthly possession,

or rather sup-
port, but one
negro woman.
Too delicate
to solicit pro-










tection or relief from any one else after the death of
him whom alone she loved, misfortune armed her
with courage, and she resolved to cultivate, with her
slave, a little spot of ground, and procure for
28 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

herself the means of subsistence. Desert as was
the island, and the ground left to the choice of
the settler, she avoided those spots which were
most fertile and most favorable to commerce:
seeking some nook of the mountain, some secret
asylum where she might live solitary and unknown,
she bent her way from the town towards these
rocks, where she might conceal herself from obser-
vation. All sensitive and suffering creatures, from
a sort of common instinct, fly for refuge amidst
their pains to haunts the most wild and desolate; as
if rocks could form a rampart against misfortune —
as if the calm of nature could hush the tumults of
the soul. That Providence, which lends its support
when we ask but the supply of our necessary wants,
had a blessing in reserve for Madame de la Tour,
which neither riches nor greatness can purchase: —
this blessing was a friend.

The spot to which Madame de la Tour fled had
already been inhabited for a year by a young woman
of a lively, good-natured, and affectionate disposi-
tion. Margaret (for that was her name) was born in
Brittany of a family of peasants, by whom she was
cherished and beloved, and with whom she might
have passed through life in simple rustic happiness,
if, misled by the weakness of a tender heart, she had
not listened to the passion of a gentleman in the
neighborhood, who promised her marriage. He soon
abandoned her, and adding inhumanity to seduction,
refused to insure a provision for the child of which
she was pregnant. Margaret then determined to
leave forever her native village, and retire, where her
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 29

fault might be concealed, to some colony distant from
that country where she had lost the only portion of
a poor peasant girl—her reputation. With some



borrowed money she purchased an old negro slave,
with whom she cultivated a little corner of this dis-
trict.

Madame de la Tour, followed by her negro woman,
came to this spot, where she found Margaret en-
gaged in suckling her child. Soothed and charmed
by the sight of a person in a situation somewhat
30 PAUL AND VIRGINIA,

similar to her own, Madame de la Tour related, in a
few words, her past condition and her present
wants. Margaret was deeply affected by the recital;
and, more anxious to merit confidence than to create
esteem, she confessed, without disguise, the errors
of which she had been guilty. <‘‘ As for me,” said
she, ‘‘I deserve my fate; but you, Madam!— you!
at once virtuous and unhappy” — and, sobbing, she
offered Madame de la Tour both her hut and her
friendship. That lady, affected by this tender recep-
tion, pressed her in her arms, and exclaimed, ‘‘ Ah!
surely Heaven has put an end to my misfortunes,
since it inspires you, to whom I am a stranger, with
more goodness towards me than I have ever experi-
enced from my own relations!”

I was acquainted with Margaret; and, although
my habitation is a league and a half from hence, in
the woods behind that sloping mountain, I ‘consid-
ered myself as her neighbor. In the cities of
Europe, a street, even a simple wall, frequently pre-
vents members of the same family from meeting for
years ; but in new colonies we consider those persons
as neighbors from whom we are divided only by
woods and mountains; and above all, at that period,
when this island had little intercourse with the
Indies, vicinity alone gave a claim to friendship, and
hospitality toward strangers seemed less a duty than
a pleasure. No sooner was I informed that Margaret
had found a companion than I hastened to her, in
the hope of being useful to my neighbor and her
guest. I found Madame de la Tour possessed of all
those melancholy graces which, by blending sympa-




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 31

thy with admiration, give to beauty additional power.
Her countenance was interesting, expressive at once
of dignity and dejection. She appeared to be in the
last stage of her pregnancy. I told the two friends
that, for the future interests of their children, and to
prevent the intrusion of any other settler, they had
better divide between them the property of this wild,
sequestered valley, which is nearly twenty acres in
extent. They confided that task to me, and I
marked out two equal portions of land. One in-
cluded the higher part of this enclosure, from the
cloudy pinnacle of that rock, whence springs the
river of Fan-Palms, to that precipitous cleft which
you see on the summit of the mountain, and which,
from its resemblance in form to the battlement of a
fortress, is called the Embrasure. It is difficult to
find a path along this wild portion of the enclosure,
the soil of which is encumbered with fragments of
tock, or worn into channels formed by torrents ; yet
it produces noble trees and innumerable springs and
rivulets. The other portion of land comprised the
plain extending along the banks of the river of Fan-
Palms, to the opening where we are now seated,
whence the river takes its course between those two
hills, until it falls into the sea. You may still trace
the vestiges of some meadow land; and this part of
the common is less rugged, but not more valuable,
than the other; since in the rainy season it becomes
marshy, and in dry weather is so hard and unyielding
that it will almost resist the stroke of the pickaxe.
When I had thus divided the property, I persuaded
my neighbors te draw lots for their respective posses-












32 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

sions. The higher portion of land, containing the
source of the river of Fan-Palms, became the prop-
erty of Madame de la Tour; the lower, comprising
the plain on the banks of the river, was allotted to
Margaret; and each seemed satisfied with her share.
They entreated me to place their habitations to-
gether, that they might at all times enjoy the sooth-
ing intercourse of friendship and the consolation of
mutual kind offices. Margaret’s cottage was situated
near the centre of the valley, and just on the boun-
dary of her own plantation. Close to that spot I
built another cottage for the residence of Madame
de la Tour; and thus the two friends, while they
possessed all the advantages of neighborhood, lived
on their own property. I myself cut palisades from
the mountain, and brought leaves

of fan-palms from the seashore,
in order to construct those

two cottages, of which you
can now discern neither





the entrance nor the roof. Yet, alas! there still remain
but too many traces for my remembrance! Time,




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 33

which so rapidly destroys the proud monuments of
empires, seems in this desert to spare those of friend-
ship, as if to perpetuate my regrets to the last hour
of my existence.

As soon as the second cottage was finished,
Madame de la Tour was delivered of a girl. I had
been the godfather of Margaret’s child, who was
christened by the name of Paul. Madame de la
Tour desired me to perform the same office for her
child also, together with her friend, who gave her the
name of Virginia. ‘‘She will be virtuous,” cried
Margaret, ‘‘and she will be happy. I have only
known misfortune by wandering from virtue.”

About the time Madame de la Tour recovered,
these two little estates had already begun to yield
some produce, perhaps in a small degree owing to
the care which I occasionally bestowed on their im-
provement, but far more to the indefatigable labors
of the two slaves. Margaret’s slave, who was called
Domingo, was still healthy and robust, though
advanced in years: he possessed some knowledge,
and a good natural understanding. He cultivated
indiscriminately, on both plantations, the spots of
ground that seemed most fertile, and sowed whatever
grain he thought most congenial to each particular
soil. Where the ground was poor, he strewed
maize; where it was most fruitful, he planted wheat ;
and rice in such spots as were marshy. He threw
the seeds of gourds and cucumbers at the foot of the
rocks, which they loved to climb, and decorate with
their luxuriant foliage. In dry spots he cultivated
the sweet potato; the cotton-tree flourished upon the






4
|
|
1
;
|

34 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

heights, and the sugar-cane grew in the clayey soil.
He reared some plants of coffee on the hills, where
the grain, although small, is excellent. His plantain-
trees, which spread their grateful shade on the banks
of the river, and encircled the cottages, yielded fruit
throughout the year. And, lastly, Domingo, to
soothe his cares, cultivated a few plants of tobacco.
Sometimes he was employed in cutting wood for
firing from the mountain, sometimes in hewing pieces
of rock within the enclosure, in order to level the
paths. The zeal which inspired him enabled him to
perform all these labors with intelligence and activity.
He was much attached to Margaret, and not less to
Madame de la Tour, whose negro woman, Mary, he
had married on the birth of Virginia; and he was
passionately fond of his wife. Mary was born at
Madagascar, and had there acquired the knowledge
of some useful arts. She could weave baskets, and
a sort of stuff, with long grass that grows in the
woods. She was active, cleanly, and, above all,
faithful. It was her care to prepare their meals, to
rear the poultry, and go sometimes to Port Louis,
to sell the superfluous produce of these little planta-
tions, which was not, however, very considerable. If
you add to the personages already mentioned two
goats, which were brought up with the children, and
a great dog, which kept watch at night, you will have
a complete idea of the household, as well as of the
productions, of these two little farms.

Madame de la Tour and her triend were constantly
employed in spinning cotton for the use of their
families. Destitute of everything which their own








PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 35

industry could not supply, at home they went bare-
footed: shoes were a convenience reserved for Sun-

day, on which day, at an early hour, they attended
mass at the church of the Shaddock. Grove, which
you see yonder. That church was more distant from



their homes than Port Louis; but they seldom vis-
ited the town, lest they should be treated with con-
tempt on account of their dress, which consisted
simply of the coarse blue linen of Bengal, usually
worn by slaves. But is there in that external defer-
ence which fortune commands, a compensation for
domestic happiness ? If these interesting women had
something to suffer from the world, their homes on
that very account became more dear to them. No
sooner did Mary and Domingo, from this elevated
spot, perceive their mistresses on the road of the
Shaddock Grove, than they flew to the foot of the
36 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

mountain in order to help them to ascend. They
discerned in the looks of their domestics the joy
which their return excited. They found in their re-
treat neatness, independence, all the blessings which
are the recompense of toil, and they received the
zealous services which spring from affection. United
by the tie of similar wants and the sympathy of sim-
ilar misfortunes, they gave each other the tender
names of companion, friend, sister. They had but
one will, one interest, one table. All their posses-
sions were in common. And if sometimes a passion
more ardent than friendship awakened in their hearts
the pang of unavailing anguish, a pure religion,
united with chaste manners, drew their affections
towards another life: as the trembling flame rises
towards heaven, when it no longer finds any aliment
on earth.

The duties of maternity became a source of addi-
tional happiness to these affectionate mothers, whose
mutual friendship gained new strength at the sight of
their children, equally the offspring of an ill-fated
attachment. They delighted in washing their in-
infants together in the same bath, in putting them to
rest in the same cradle, and in changing the mater-
nal bosom at which they received nourishment.
«My friend,” cried Madame de la Tour, ‘‘ we shall
each of us have two children, and each of our chil-
dren will have two mothers.” As two buds which
remain on different trees of the same kind, after the
tempest has broken all their branches, produce more
delicious fruit, if each, separated from the maternal
stem, be grafted on the neighboring tree; so these










THE CHILDREN’S BATH.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 37

two infants, deprived of all their other relations,
when thus exchanged for nourishment by those who
had given them birth, imbibed feelings of affection
still more tender than those of son and daughter,
brother and sister. While they were yet in their
cradles, their mothers talked of their marriage.
They soothed their own cares by looking forward to
the future happiness of their children; but this con-
templation often drew forth their tears. The mis-
fortunes of one mother had arisen from having
neglected marriage; those of the other from having
submitted to its laws: one had suffered by aiming to
rise above her condition, the other by descending
from her rank. But they found consolation in reflect-
ing that their more fortunate children, far from the
cruel prejudices of Europe, would enjoy at once the
pleasures of love and the blessings of equality.
Rarely, indeed, has such an attachment been seen
as that which the two children already testified for
each other. If Paul complained of anything, his
mother pointed to Virginia; at her sight he smiled,
and was appeased. If any accident befel Virginia,
the cries of Paul gave notice of the disaster; but
the dear little creature would suppress her complaints
if she found that he was unhappy, When I came
hither, I usually found them quite naked, as is the
custom of the country, tottering in their walk, and
holding each other by the hands, and under the arms,
as we see represented the constellation of The Twins.
At night these infants often refused to be separated,
and were found lying in the same cradle, their cheeks,
their bosoms pressed close together, their hands
38 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

thrown round each other's neck, and sleeping, locked
in one another’s arms.

When they began to speak, the first names they
learned to give each other were those of brother and
sister, and childhood knows no softer appellation.



Their education, by directing them ever to consider
each other’s wants, tended greatly to increase their
affection. Inashort time, all the household econ-
omy, the care of preparing their rural repasts, be-
came the task of Virginia, whose labors were always
crowned with the praises and kisses of her brother.
As for Paul, always in motion, he dug the garden with
Domingo, or followed him with a little hatchet into
the woods; and if, in his rambles, he espied a beau-
tiful flower, any delicious fruit, or a nest of birds,
even at the top of a tree, he would climb up, and
bring the spoil to his sister. When you met one of
these children, you might be sure the other was not
far off.




PAUL. AND VIRGINIA. ‘39

One day, as I was coming down that mountain, I
saw Virginia at the end of the garden, running
towards the house with her petticoat thrown over
her head in order to screen herself from a shower of
rain.

At a distance, I thought she was alone; but as I
hastened towards her in order to help her on, I per-



ceived that she held Paul by the arm, almost entirely
enveloped in the same canopy, and both were laugh-
ing heartily at their being sheltered together under
an umbrella of their own invention. These two
charming faces, in the middle of the swelling petti-
coat, recalled to my mind the children of Leda, en-
closed in the same shell.
40 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Their sole study was how they could please and
assist one another; for of all other things they were
ignorant, and indeed could neither read nor write.
They were never disturbed by inquiries about past
times, nor did their curiosity extend beyond the
bounds of their mountain. They believed the world
ended at the shores of their own island, and all their
ideas and all their affections were confined within its
limits. Their mutual tenderness, and that of their
mothers, employed all the energies of their minds.

Their tears had never been called forth by tedious
application to useless sciences. Their minds had
never been wearied by lessons of morality, super-
fluous to bosoms unconscious of ill. They had
never been taught not to steal, because everything
with them was in common; or not to be intemperate,
because their simple food was left to their own dis-
cretion; or not to lie, because they had nothing to
conceal. Their young imaginations had never been
terrified by the idea that God has punishments in
store for ungrateful children, since, with them, filial
affection arose naturally from maternal tenderness.
All they had been taught of religion was to love it;
and if they did not offer up long prayers in the
church, wherever they were, —in the house, in the
fields, in the woods, they raised towards heaven their
innocent hands, and hearts purified by virtuous affec-
tions. All their early childhood passed thus, like a
beautiful dawn, the prelude of a bright day. Already
they assisted their mothers in the duties of the
household. As soon as the crowing of the wakeful
cock announced the first beam of the morning,




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 41

Virginia arose, and hastened to draw water from a
neighboring spring; then returning to the house, she
prepared the breakfast. When the rising sun gilded
the points of the rocks which overhang the enclosure
in which they lived, Margaret and her child repaired
to the dwelling of Madame de la Tour, where they
offered up their morning prayer together. This
sacrifice of thanksgiving always preceded their first
repast, which they often took before the door of the
cottage, seated upon the grass, under a canopy of
plantain: and while the branches of that delicious
tree afforded a grateful shade, its fruit furnished a
substantial food ready prepared for them by nature;
and its long glossy leaves, spread upon the table,
supplied the place of linen. Plentiful and whole-
some nourishment gave early growth and vigor to
the persons of these children, and their countenances
expressed the purity and the peace of their souls.
At twelve years of age the figure of Virginia was in
some degree formed: a profusion of light hair shaded
her face, to which her blue eyes and coral lips gave
the most charming brilliancy. Her eyes sparkled
with vivacity when she spoke; but when she was
silent they were habitually turned upwards, with an
expression of extreme sensibility, or rather of tender
melancholy. The figure of Paul began already to
display the graces of youthful beauty. He was taller
than Virginia: his skin was of a darker tint; his
nose more aquiline; and his black eyes would have
been too piercing, if the long eyelashes, by which
they were shaded, had not imparted to them an ex-
pression of softness. He was constantly in motion,
42 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

except when his sister appeared, and then, seated by
her side, he became still, Their meals often passed
without a word being spoken; and from their silence,
the simple elegance
of their attitudes,
and the beauty of
their naked feet,
you might have
fancied you beheld
an antique group of
white marble,repre-
senting some of the
children of Niobe,
but for the glances
of their eyes, which
3,were constantly
- seeking. to meet,
* and their mutual
soft and tender
smiles, which sug-
gested rather the
idea of happy celes-
tial spirits, whose
nature is love, and
who are not obliged to have recourse to words for
the expression of their feelings.

In the mean time Madame de la Tour, perceiving
every day some unfolding grace, some new beauty, in
her daughter, felt her maternal anxiety increase with
her tenderness. She often said to me, ‘‘ If I were
to die, what will become of Virginia without for-
tune?”


PAUL AND VIRGINIA, 43

Madame de la Tour had an aunt in France, who
was a woman of quality, rich, old, and a complete
devotee. She had behaved with so much cruelty
towards her niece upon her marriage, that Madame
de la Tour had determined no extremity of distress
should ever compel her to have recourse to her hard-
hearted relation. But when she became a mother,
the pride of resentment was overcome by the stronger
feelings of maternal tenderness. She wrote to her
aunt, informing her of the sudden death of her hus-
band, the birth of her daughter, and the difficulties
in which she was involved, burthened as she was with
an infant and without means of support. She
received no answer; but, notwithstanding the high
spirit natural to her character, she no longer feared
exposing herself to mortification; and although she
knew her aunt would never pardon her for having
married a man who was not of noble birth, however
estimable, she continued to write to her, with the
hope of awakening her compassion for Virginia.
Many years, however, passed without receiving any
token of her remembrance.

At length, in 1738, three years after the arrival of
Monsieur de la Bourdonnais in this island, Madame
de la Tour was informed that the Governor had a let-
ler to give her from her aunt. She flew to Port
Louis: maternal joy raised her mind above all trifling
considerations, and she was careless on this occasion
of appearing in her homely attire. Monsieur de la
Bourdonnais gave her a letter from her aunt, in
which she informed her that she deserved: her fate
for marrying an adventurer and a libertine; that the
"44 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

passions brought with them their own punishment;
that the premature death of her husband was a just
visitation from heaven; that she had done well in
going toa distant island, rather than dishonor her
family by remaining in France; and that, after all,
in the colony where she had taken refuge, none but
the idle failed to grow rich. Having thus censured
her niece, she concluded by eulogizing herself. To
avoid, she said, the almost inevitable evils of mar-
riage, she had determined to remain single. In fact,
as she was of a very ambitious disposition, she had
resolved to marry none but a man of high rank; but
although she was very rich, her fortune was not
found a sufficient bribe, even at court, to counterbal-
ance the malignant dispositions of her mind, and the
disagreeable qualities of her person.

After mature deliberation, she added, in a post-
script, that she had strongly recommended her niece
to Monsieur de la Bourdonnais. This she had indeed
done, but in a manner of late too common, which
renders a patron perhaps even more to be feared than
a declared enemy; for, in order to justify herself for
her harshness, she had cruelly slandered her niece,
while she affected to pity her misfortunes.

Madame de la Tour, whom no unprejudiced person
could have seen without feelings of sympathy and
respect, was received with the utmost coolness
by Monsieur de la Bourdonnais, biassed as he was
against her. When she painted to him her own sit-
uation, and that of her child, he replied in abrupt
sentences, ‘‘ We will see what can be done; there are
so many to relieve; all in good time. Why did you


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 45

displease your aunt? You have been much to
blame.”

Madame de la Tour returned to her cottage, her
heart torn with grief, and filled with all the bitter-
ness of disappointment. When she arrived, she
threw her aunt’s letter on the table, and exclaimed
to her friend, ‘‘ There is the fruit of eleven years of



SSAaB

patient expectation!” Madame de la Tour being
the only person in the little circle who could read, she
again took up the letter, and read it aloud. Scarcely
had she finished, when Margaret exclaimed, ‘* What
have we to do with your relations ?. Has God then for-
saken us? He only is our father. Have we not hith-
erto been happy ? Whythenthis regret ? You have
no courage.” Seeing Madame de la Tour in tears,
46 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

she threw herself upon her neck, and pressing her in
her arms, ‘‘ My dear friend!” cried she, ‘‘my dear
friend!” — but her emotion choked her utterance.
At this sight Virginia burst into tears, and pressed
her mother’s and Margaret’s hands alternately to her
lips and heart; while Paul, his eyes inflamed with
anger, cried, clasped his hands together, and stamped
with his foot, not knowing whom to blame for this
scene of misery. The noise soon brought Domingo
and Mary to the spot, and the little habitation re-
sounded with cries of distress, — ‘‘ Ah, Madame! My
good mistress! My dear mother! Do not weep!”
These tender proofs of affection at length dispelled the
grief of Madame de la Tour. She took Paul and Vir-
ginia in her arms, and, embracing them, said, ‘‘ You
are the cause of my affliction, my children, but you
are also my only source of delight! Yes, my dear chil-
dren, misfortune has reached me, but only from a dis-
tance: here, I am surrounded with happiness.” Paul
and Virginia did not understand this reflection; but,
when they saw that she was calm, they smiled, and
continued to caress her. Tranquillity was thus re-
stored in this happy family, and all that had passed
was but asa storm in the midst of fine weather, which —
disturbs the serenity of the atmosphere but fora short
time, and then passes away.

The amiable disposition of these children unfolded
itself daily. One Sunday, at daybreak, their mothers
having gone to mass at.the church of the Shaddock
Grove, the children perceived a negro woman be-
neath the plantains which surrounded their habita-
tion. She appeared almost wasted to a skeleton,


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 47

and had no other garment than a piece of coarse
cloth thrown around her. She threw herself at the
feet of Virginia, who was preparing the family break-
fast, and said, ‘My good young lady, have pity on
a poor runaway slave. For a whole month I have
wandered among these mountains, half dead with
hunger, and often pursued by the hunters and their
dogs. I fled from my master, a rich planter of the
Black River, who has used me as you see;” and she
showed her body marked with scars from the lashes
she had received. She added, ‘I was going to
drown myself; but hearing you lived here, I said
to myself, Since there are still some good white
people in this country, I need not die yet.” Vir-
ginia answered with emotion, ‘‘ Take courage, unfor-
tunate creature! here is something to eat;” and she
gave her the breakfast she had been preparing, which
the slave in a few minutes devoured. When her
hunger was appeased, Virginia said to her, ‘* Poor
woman! I should like to go and ask forgiveness for
you of your master. Surely the sight of you will
touch him with pity. Will you show me the way ?”
“Angel of heaven!” answered the poor negro-
woman, ‘‘I will follow you where you please.” Vir-
ginia called her brother, and begged him to accom-
pany her. The slave led the way, by winding and
difficult paths through the woods, over mountains,
which they climbed with difficulty, and across rivers,
through which they were obliged to wade. At
length, about the middle of the day, they reached
the foot of a steep descent upon the borders of the
Black River. There they perceived a well-built
48 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

house surrounded by extensive plantations, and a
number of slaves employed in their various labors.
Their master was walking among them with a pipe in
his mouth, and a switch in his hand. He was a tall,
thin man, of a brown complexion; his eyes were



af
A ated

sunk in his head, and his dark eyebrows were joined
in one. Virginia, holding Paul by the hand, drew
near, and with much emotion begged him for the love
of God, to pardon his poor slave, who stood trembling
a few paces behind. The planter at first paid little
attention to the children, who, he saw, were meanly

dressed. But when he observed the elegance of




SLAVE PARDONED

THE




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 49

Virginia’s form, and the profusion of her beautiful
light tresses, which had escaped from beneath her
blue cap; when he heard the soft tone of her voice,
which trembled, as well as her whole frame, while she
implored his compassion; he took the pipe from his
mouth, and lifting up his stick, swore, with a terrible
oath, that he pardoned his slave, not for the love of
Heaven, but of her who asked his forgiveness. Vir-
ginia made a sign to the slave to approach her mas-
ter; and instantly sprang away, followed by Paul.
They climbed up the steep they had descended;
and having gained the summit, seated themselves at
the foot of a tree, overcome with fatigue, hunger, and
thirst. They had left their home fasting, and had
walked five leagues since sunrise. Paul said to Vir-
ginia, ‘‘ My dear sister, it is past noon, and I am sure
you are thirsty and hungry: we shall find no dinner
here; let us go down the mountain again, and ask
the master of the poor slave for some food.” — ‘* Oh,
no,” answered Virginia, ‘‘ he frightens me too much.
Remember what Mamma sometimes says, ‘The
bread of the wicked is like stones in the mouth.’ ” —
** What shall we do then ?” said Paul; ‘‘ these trees
produce no fruit fit to eat; and I shall not be able to
find even a tamarind or a lemon to refresh you.” —
‘* God will take care of us,” replied Virginia; ‘‘ He
listens to the cry even of the little birds when they
ask Him for food.” Scarcely had she pronounced
these words when they heard the noise of water fall-
ing from a neighboring rock. They ran thither, and
having quenched their thirst at this crystal spring,
they gathered and ate a few cresses which grew on
50 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

the border of the stream. Soon afterwards, while
they were wandering backwards and forwards in
search of more solid nourishment, Virginia per-
ceived in the thickest part of the forest, a young
palm-tree. The kind of cabbage which is found at |
the top of the palm, infolded within its leaves, is
well adapted for food; but although the stalk of the
tree is not thicker than a man’s leg, it grows to
above sixty feet in height. The wood of the tree,
indeed, is composed only of very fine filaments ; but
the bark is so hard that it turns the edge of the
hatchet, and Paul was not furnished even with a
knife. Atlength he thought of setting fire to the
palm-tree; but a new difficulty occurred: he had no
steel with which to strike fire; and although the
whole island is covered with rocks, I do not believe
it is possible to find a single flint. Necessity, how-
ever, is fertile in expedients, and the most useful in-
ventions have arisen from men placed in the most
destitute situations.

Paul determined to kindle a fire in the manner of
the negroes. With the sharp end of a stone he made
a small hole in the branch of a tree that was quite
dry, and which he held between his feet; he then,
with the edge of the same stone, brought to a point
another dry branch of a different sort of wood, and
afterwards, placing the piece of pointed wood in the
small hole of the branch which he held with his feet,
and turning it rapidly between his hands, in a few
minutes smoke and sparks of fire issued from the
point of contact. Paul then heaped together dried
grass and branches, and set fire to the foot of the
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 51

palm-tree, which soon fell to the ground with a
tremendous crash. The fire was further useful to
him in stripping off the long, thick, and pointed
leaves, within which the cabbage was enclosed.

Having thus succeeded in obtaining this fruit, they
ate part of it raw, and part dressed upon the ashes,
which they found equally palatable. They made this
frugal repast with delight, from the remembrance of
the benevolent action they had performed in the
morning: yet their joy was embittered by the
thoughts of the uneasiness which their long absence
from home would occasion their mothers.

Virginia often recurred to this subject: but Paul,
who felt his strength renewed by their meal, assured
her, that it would not be long before they reached
home, and, by the assurance of their safety, tranquil-
lized the minds of their parents.

After dinner they were much embarrassed by the
recollection that they had now no guide, and that
they were ignorant of the way. Paul, whose spirit
was not subdued by difficulties, said to Virginia, —
‘*The sun shines full upon our huts at noon: we
must pass, as we did this morning, over that moun-
tain with its three points, which you see yonder.
Come, let us be moving.” This mountain was that
of the Three Breasts, so called from the form of its
three peaks. They then descended the steep bank
of the Black River, on the northern side; and
arrived, after an hour’s walk, on the banks of a large
river, which stopped their further progress. This
large portion of the island, covered as it is with for-
ests, is even now so little known, that many of its
52 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

rivers and mountains have not yet received a name.
The stream, on the banks of which Paul and Virginia
were now standing, rolls foaming over a bed of rocks.
The noise of the water frightened Virginia, and she
was afraid to wade through the current: Paul there-
fore took her up in his arms, and went thus loaded
over the slippery rocks which formed the bed of the
river, careless of the tumultuous noise of its waters.
““Do not be afraid,” cried he to Virginia, ‘‘I feel
very strong with you. If that planter at the Black
River had refused you the pardon of his slave, I
would have fought with him.” — ‘‘ What!” answered
Virginia, ‘‘with that great wicked man! To what
have I exposed you! Gracious heaven! How diffi-
cult it is to do good! and yet it is so easy to do
wrong.”

When Paul had crossed the river, he wished to
continue the journey carrying his sister; and he flat-
tered himself that he could ascend in that way the
mountain of the Three Breasts, which was still at
the distance of half a league; but his strength soon
failed, and he was obliged to set down his burthen,
and to rest himself by her side. Virginia then said
to him, — ‘‘ My dear brother, the sun is going down ;
you have still some strength left, but mine has quite
failed: do leave me here, and return home alone to
ease the fears of our mothers.” — ‘‘Oh, no,” said
Paul, ‘*I will not leave you. If night overtakes us
in this wood, I will light a fire, and bring down
another palm-tree: you shall eat the cabbage, and I
will form a covering of the leaves to shelter you.”
In the mean time, Virginia being a little rested, she




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 53

gathered from the trunk of an old tree, which over-
hung the bank of the river, some long leaves of the
plant called hart’s tongue, which grew near its root.
Of these leaves she made a
sort of buskin, with which
she covered her feet, that were
bleeding from the sharpness
of the stony paths; for, in her
eager desire to do good, she
had forgotten to
put on her shoes.
Feeling her feet
cooled by the
freshness of the
‘ leaves, she broke
off a branch of
bamboo, and
continued her
walk, leaning
with one hand
on the staff, and
with the other
on Paul.

They walked on
in this manner
slowly through
the woods ; but from the height of the trees, and the
thickness of their foliage, they soon lost sight of
the mountain of the Three Breasts, by which they
had hitherto directed their course, and also of the
sun, which was now setting. At length they wan-
dered, without perceiving it, from the beaten path in




54 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

which they had hitherto walked, and found them-
selves in a labyrinth of trees, underwood, and rocks,
whence there appeared to be no outlet. Paul made
Virginia sit down, while he ran backwards and for-
wards, half frantic, in search of a path which might lead
them out of this thick wood; but he fatigued himself
to no purpose. He then climbed to the top of a lofty
tree, whence he hoped at least to perceive the moun-
tain of the Three Breasts: but he could discern
nothing around him but the tops of trees, some of
which were gilded with the last beams of the setting
sun. Already the shadows of the mountains were
spreading over the forests in the valleys. The wind
lulled, as is usually the case at sunset.

The most profound silence reigned in those awful
solitudes, which was only interrupted by the cry of
the deer, who came to their lairs in that unfrequented
spot. Paul, in the hope that some hunter would hear
his voice, called out as loud as he was able, —
“«Come, come to the help of Virginia!” But the
echoes of the forest alone answered his call, and
repeatea again and again — ‘‘ Virginia — Virginia!”

Paul at length descended from the tree, overcome
with fatigue and vexation. He looked around in
order to make some arrangement for passing the
night in that desert; but he could find neither foun-
tain nor palm-tree, nor even a branch of dry wood fit
for kindling a fire. He was then impressed, by expe-
rience, with the sense of his own weakness, and
began to weep. Virginia said to him, — ‘‘ Do not
weep, my dear brother, or I shall be overwhelmed
with grief. I am the cause of all your sorrow, and


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 55

of all that our mothers are suffering at this moment.
I find we ought to do nothing, not even good, with-
out consulting our parents. Oh, I have been very
imprudent !”— and she began to shed tears. ‘‘ Let
us pray to God, my dear brother,” she again said,
‘cand He will hear us.” They had scarcely finished
their prayer, when they heard the barking of a dog.
‘It must be the dog of some hunter,” said Paul,



“‘who comes here at night, to lie in wait for the
deer.” Soon after, the dog began barking again
with increased violence. ‘‘Surely,” said Virginia,
‘it is Fidéle, our own dog: yes, —now I know his
bark. Are we then so near home?—at the foot of
our own mountain?” A moment after, Fidéle was at
their feet, barking, howling, moaning, and devouring
them with his caresses. Before they could recover
from their surprise, they saw Domingo running
towards them. At the sight of the good old negro,
56 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

who wept for joy, they began to weep too, but had —
not the power to utter a syllable. When Domingo
had recovered himself a little, — ‘* Oh, my dear chil-
dren,” said he, ‘‘ how miserable have you made your
mothers! How astonished they were, when they
returned with me from mass, on not finding you at
home. Mary, who was at work a little distance,
could not tell us where you were gone.

‘‘T ran backwards and forwards in the plantation,
not knowing where to look for you. At last I took
some of your old clothes, and showing them to
Fidéle, the poor animal, as if he understood me,
immediately began to scent your path ; and conducted
me, wagging his tail all the while, to the Black River.
I there saw a planter, who told me you had brought
back a Maroon negro-woman, his slave, and that he
had pardoned her at your request. But what a par-
don! he showed her to me with her feet chained to a
block of wood, and an iron collar with three hooks
fastened round her neck! After that, Fidéle, still on
the scent, led me up the steep bank of the Black
River, where he again stopped, and barked with all
his might. This was on the brink of a spring, near
which was a fallen palm-tree, and a fire, still smok-
ing. At last he led me to this very spot. We are
now at the foot of the mountain of the Three
Breasts, and still four good leagues from home.
Come, eat, and recover your strength.” Domingo
then presented them with a cake, some fruit, and a
large gourd, full of a beverage composed of wine,
water, lemon-juice, sugar, and nutmeg, which their
mothers had prepared to invigorate and refresh them.




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 57

Virginia sighed at the recollection of the poor slave,
and at the uneasiness they had given their mothers.
She repeated several times —
“¢ Oh, how difficult it is to do
good!”

While she and Paul were
taking refreshment, it be-
ing already night, Domingo
kindled a fire; and having








found among the rocks a particular kind of twisted
wood, called Jo7s de rounde, which burns when
quite green, and throws out a great blaze, he made
a torch of it, which he lighted. But when they
prepared to continue their journey, a new difficulty
occurred; Paul and Virginia could no longer walk,
58 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

their feet being violently swollen and inflamed.
Domingo knew not what to do; whether to leave
them, and go in search of help, or remain and pass
the night with them on that spot. ‘ There was a
time,” said he, ‘‘when I could carry you both
together in my arms. But now you are grown big,
and I am grown old.” While he was in this per-
plexity, a troop of Maroon negroes appeared at a
short distance from them. The chief of the band,
approaching Paul and Virginia, said to them, —
“Good little white people, do not be afraid. We
saw you pass this morning with a negro-woman of the
Black River. You went to ask pardon for her of her
wicked master: and we in return for this, will carry
you home upon our shoulders.” He then made a
sign, and four of the strongest negroes immediately
formed a sort of litter with the branches of trees and
lianas, and having seated Paul and Virginia on it, car-
ried them upon their shoulders. Domingo marched
in front with his lighted torch, and they proceeded
amidst the rejoicings of the whole troop, who over-
whelmed them with their benedictions. Virginia,
affected by this scene, said to Paul, with emotion, —
*‘Oh, my dear brother! God never leaves a good
action unrewarded.”

It was midnight when they arrived at the foot of
their mountain, on the ridges of which several fires
were lighted. As soon as they began to ascend, they
heard voices exclaiming, — ‘‘ Is it you, my children?”
They answered immediately, and the negroes also,
«Yes, yes, itis.” A moment after they could dis-
tinguish their mothers and Mary coming towards


;
i
‘





PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 59

them with lighted sticks in their hands. ‘* Unhappy
children,” cried Madame de la Tour, ‘‘ where have



you been? What agonies you have made us suffer!”
— ‘We have been,” said Virginia, ‘‘to the Black
River, where we went to ask pardon for a poor
Maroon slave, to whom I gave our breakfast this
60 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

morning, because she seemed dying of hunger; and
these Maroon negroes have brought us home.”
Madame de la Tour embraced her daughter, without
being able to speak; and Virginia, who felt her face
wet with her mother’s tears, exclaimed, — ‘‘ Now I
am‘ repaid for all the hardships I have suffered.”
Margaret, in a transport of delight, pressed Paul in
her arms, exclaiming, —‘‘ And you also, my dear
child! you have done a good action.” When they
reached the cottages with their children, they enter-
tained all the negroes with a plentiful repast, after
which the latter returned to their woods, praying
Heaven to shower down every description of blessing
on those good white people.

Every day was to these families a day of happi-
ness and of tranquillity. Neither ambition nor envy
disturbed their repose. They did not seek to obtain
a useless reputation out of doors, which may be pro-
cured by artifice, and lost by calumny ; but were con-
tented to be the sole witnesses and judges of their
own actions. In this island, where, as is the case
in most colonies, scandal forms the principal topic of
conversation, their virtues, and even their names,
were unknown. The passer-by on the road to the
Shaddock Grove, indeed, would sometimes ask the
inhabitants of the plain, who lived in the cottages
up there ? and was always told, even by those who
did not know them, ‘‘ They are good people.” The
modest violet thus, concealed in thorny places, sheds
all unseen its delightful fragrance around.

Slander, which, under an appearance of justice,
naturally inclines the heart to falsehood or to hatred,


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 61

was entirely banished from their conversation; for it
is impossible not to hate men if we believe them to
be wicked, or to live with the wicked without con-
cealing that hatred under a false pretence of good
feeling. Slander thus puts us ill at ease with others
and with ourselves. In this little circle, therefore,
the conduct of individuals was not discussed, but the
best manner of doing good to all; and although they
had but little in their power, their unceasing good-
will and kindness of heart made them constantly
ready to do what they could for others. Solitude, far
from having blunted these benevolent feelings, had
rendered their dispositions even more kindly. Al-
though the petty scandals of the day furnished no
subject of conversation to them, yet the contempla-
tion of nature filled their minds with enthusiastic
delight. They adored the bounty of that Providence,
which, by their instrumentality, had spread abun-
dance and beauty amid these barren rocks, and had
enabled them to enjoy those pure and simple pleas-
ures, which are ever grateful and ever new.

Paul, at twelve years of age, was stronger and
more intelligent than most European youths are at
fifteen; and the plantations, which Domingo merely
cultivated, were all embellished by him. He would
go with the old negro into the neighboring woods,
where he would root up the young plants of lemon,
orange, and tamarind trees, the round heads of
which are of so fresh a green, together with date-
palm trees, which produce fruit filled with a sweet
cream, possessing the fine perfume of the orange
flower. These trees, which had already attained to
62 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

a considerable size, he planted round their little en-
closure. He had also sown the seeds of many trees
which the second year bear flowers or fruit; such as
the agathis, encircled with long clusters of white
flowers, which hang from it like the crystal pendants
of a chandelier; the Persian lilac, which lifts high in
air its gray flax-colored branches; the papaw-tree,
the branchless trunk of which forms a column
studded with green melons, surmounted by a capital
of broad leaves similar to those of the fig-tree.

The seeds and kernels of the gum-tree, terminalia,
mango, alligator pear, the guava, the bread-fruit
tree, and the narrow-leaved rose-apple, were also
planted by him with profusion ; and the greater num-
ber of these trees already afforded their young culti-
vator both shade and fruit. His industrious hands
diffused the riches of nature over even the most bar-
ren parts of the plantation. Several species of aloes,
the Indian fig, adorned with yellow flowers spotted
with red, and the thorny torch-thistle, grew upon the
dark summits of the rocks, and seemed to aim at
reaching the long lianas, which, laden with blue or
scarlet flowers, hung scattered over the steepest
parts of the mountain.

I loved to trace the ingenuity he had exercised in
the arrangement of these trees. He had so disposed
them that the whole could be seen at a single glance.
In the middle of the holluw he had planted shrubs
of the lowest growth; behind grew the more lofty
sorts; then trees of the ordinary height ; and beyond
and above all, the venerable and lofty groves which
border the circumference. Thns this extensive on




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 63

closure appeared, from its centre, like a verdant
amphitheatre decorated with fruits and flowers,
containing a variety of vegetables, some strips of
meadow-land, and fields of rice and corn. But, in
arranging these vegetable productions to his own
taste, he wandered not too far from the designs of
Nature. Guided by her suggestions, he had thrown
upon the elevated spots such seeds as the winds
would scatter about, and near the borders of the
springs those which float upon the water. Every
plant thus grew in its proper soil, and every spot
seemed decorated by Nature’s own hand. The
streams which fell from the summits of the rocks
formed in some parts of the valley sparkling cas-
cades, and in others were spread into broad mirrors,
in which were reflected, set in verdure, the flower-
ing trees, the overhanging rocks, and the azure
heavens.

Notwithstanding the great irregularity of the
ground, these plantations were, for the most part,
easy of access. We had, indeed, all given him our
advice and assistance, in order to accomplish this
end.

He had conducted one path entirely round the
valley, and various branches from it led from the
circumference to the centre. He had drawn some
advantage from the most rugged spots, and had
blended, in harmonious union, level walks with the
inequalities of the soil, and trees which grow wild
with the cultivated varieties.

With that immense quantity of large pebbles which
now block up these paths, and which are scattered
64 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

over most of the ground of this island, he formed
pyramidal heaps here and there, at the base of which
he laid mould, and planted rose-bushes, the Barba-
does flower-fence, and other shrubs, which love to.
climb the rocks.

Ina short time the dark and shapeless heaps of
‘ stones he had constructed were covered with verdure,
or with the glowing tints of the most beautiful flow-
ers. Hollow recesses on the borders of the streams,
shaded by the overhanging boughs of aged trees,
formed rural grottos, impervious to the rays of the sun,
in which you might enjoya refreshing coolness during
the mid-day heats. One path led to a clump of for-
est trees, in the centre of which, sheltered from the
wind, you found a fruit-tree, Jaden with produce.
Here was a corn-field; there, an orchard: from one
avenue you had a view of the cottages ; from another,
of the inaccessible summit of the mountain. Beneath
one tufted bower of gum-trees, interwoven with
lianas, no object whatever could be perceived: while
the point of the adjoining rock, jutting out from the
mountain, commanded a view of the whole enclo-
sure, and of the distant ocean, where, occasionally,
we could discern the distant sail, arriving from
Europe, or bound thither. 4

On this rock the two families frequently met in the
evening, and enjoyed in silence the freshness of the
flowers, the gentle murmurs of the fountains, and
the last blended harmonies of light and shade.

Nothing could be more charming than the names
which were bestowed upon some of the delightful
retreats of this labyrinth. The rock of which I have




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 65

feen speaking, whence they could discern my ap-
proach at a considerable distance, was called the
Discovery of Friendship. Paul and Virginia had
amused them-
selves by plant-
inga bamboo on

oy .
al that spot; and
aw whenever they






saw me coming,
they hoisted a little white handkerchief
by way of signal of my approach, as they
had seen a flag hoisted on the neighbor-
ing mountain on the sight of a vessel at
sea. The idea struck me of
», engraving an inscription on
the stalk of this reed; for I
never, in the course of my
travels, experienced anything
like the pleasure in seeing a
statue or other monument of
ancient art, as in reading a
well-written inscription. It
seems to me as if a human
voice issued from the stone,
and making itself heard after
the lapse of ages, addressed
man in the midst of a desert,
to tell him that he is not alone, and that other men,
on that very spot, had felt, and thought, and suffered
like himself.

If the inscription belongs to an ancient nation,
which no longer exists, it leads the soul through


66 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

infinite space, and strengthens the consciousness of
its immortality, by demonstrating that a thought has
survived the ruins of an empire.
I inscribed then, on the little staff of Paul and
Virginia’s flag, the following lines of Horace: —
: ... fratres Helena, lucida sidera,

Ventorumque regat pater,
Obstrictis aliis, praeter Iapiga.

‘May the brothers of Helen, bright stars like you, and
the Father of the winds, guide you; and may
you feel only the breath of the zephyr.”

There was a gum-tree, under the shade of which
Paul was accustomed to sit to contemplate the sea
when agitated by storms.

On the bark of this tree I engraved the following
line from Virgil : —

Fortunatus et ille, Deos qui novit agrestes.
“Happy art thou, my son, in knowing only the
pastoral divinities.”

And over the door of Madame de la Tour's cot-
tage, where the families so frequently met, I placed
this line : —

At secura quies, et nescia fallere vita.

“Here dwell a calm conscience, and a life that knows
not deceit.”

But Virginia did not approve of my Latin: she
said that what I had placed at the foot of her flag-
staff was too long and learned.

‘*T should have liked better,” added she, ‘to have
seen inscribed, EVER AGITATED, YET CONSTANT.” —




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 67

«« Such a motto,” I answered, ‘‘ would have been still
more applicable to virtue.” My reflection made her
blush.

The delicacy of sentiment of these happy families
was manifested in everything around them. They
gave the tenderest names to objects in appearance the
most indifferent.

A border of orange, plantain, and rose-apple trees,
planted round a green-sward where Paul and Vir-
ginia sometimes danced, received the name of Con-
cord. An old tree, beneath the shade of which
Madame de la Tour and Margaret used to recount
their misfortunes, was called The Burial-place of
Tears. They bestowed the names of Brittany and
Normandy on two little plots of ground, where they
had sown corn, strawberries, and pease.

Domingo and Mary, wishing, in imitation of their
mistresses, to recall to mind Angola and Foulle-
pointe, the places of their birth in Africa, gave those
names to the little fields where the grass was sown
with which they wove their baskets, and where they
had planted a calabash-tree.

Thus, by cultivating the productions of their re-
spective climates, these exiled families cherished the
dear illusions which bind us to our native country,
and softened their regrets in a foreign land. Alas!
I have seen these trees, these fountains, these heaps
of stones, which are now so completely overthrown
—which now, like the desolated plains of Greece,
present nothing but masses of ruin and affecting re-
membrances, all but called into life by the many
charming appellations thus bestowed upon them!
68 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

But perhaps the most delightful spot of this enclo-
sure was that called Virginia’s Resting-place. At the
foot of the rock
which bore the
name of The Dis-
covery of Friend-
‘ship is a small
“ crevice, whence
issues a foun-
tain, forming,
_hear its source,
a little spot of marshy
soil in the middle of a
field of rich grass.

At the time of Paul’s
birth I had made Mar-
garet a present of an
Indian cocoa which
had been given me,
and which she planted
on the border of this
fenny ground, in order
that the tree might one
day serve to mark the
epoch .of her son’s
birth. Madame de la Tour planted another cocoa,
with the same view, at the birth of Virginia. These
nuts produced two cocoa-trees, which formed the
only records of the two families : one was called Paul’s
tree, the other, Virginia’s. Their growth was in the
same proportion as that of the two young persons,
not exactly equal; but they rose, at the end of twelve



PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 69

years, above the roofs of the cottages. Already their
tender stalks were interwoven, and clusters of young
cocoas hung from them over the basin of the foun-
tain. With the exception of these two trees, this
nook of the rock was left as it had been decorated by
nature.

On its embrowned and moist sides broad plants of
maiden-hair glistened with their green and dark stars ;
and tufts of wave-leaved hart’s-tongue, suspended
like long ribands of purpled green, floated on the
wind. Near this grew a chain of the Madagascar
periwinkle, the flowers of which resembled the red
gillyflower ; and the long-podded capsicum, the seed-
vessels of which are of the color of blood, and more
resplendent than coral. Near them, the herb balm,
with its heart-shaped leaves, and the sweet basil,
which has the odor of the clove, exhaled the most
delicious perfumes. From the precipitous side of
the mountain hung the graceful lianas, like floating
draperies, forming magnificent canopies of verdure on
the face of the rocks. The sea-birds, allured by the
stillness of these retreats, resorted here to pass the
night.

At the hour of sunset we could perceive the cur-
lew and the stint skimming along the seashore; the
frigate-bird poised high in air; and the white bird of
the tropic, which abandons, with the star of day, the
solitudes of the Indian Ocean. Virginia took pleas-
ure in resting herself upon the border of this foun-
tain, decorated with wild and sublime magnificence.
She often went thither to wash the linen of the fam-
ily beneath the shade of the two cocoa-trees, and
7° PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

thither too she sometimes led her goats to graze.
While she was making cheeses of their milk, she
loved to see them browse on the maiden-hair fern
which clothed the steep sides of the rock, and hung
suspended by one of its cornices, as on a pedestal.
Paul, observing that Virginia was fond of this spot,
brought thither, from the neighboring forest, a great
variety of birds’ nests. The old birds, following
their young, soon established themselves in this new
colony. Virginia, atstated times, distributed amongst
them grains of rice, millet, and maize. As soon as
she appeared, the whistling blackbird, the amadavid
bird, whose note is so soft, the cardinal, with its
flame-colored plumage, forsook their bushes ; the par-
roquet, green as an emerald, descended from the
neighboring fan-palms ; the partridge ran along the
grass: all advanced promiscuously towards her, like
a brood of chickens: and she and Paul found an
exhaustless source of amusement in observing their
sports, their repasts, and their loves.

Amiable children ! thus passed your earlier days in
innocence, and in obeying the impulses of kindness.
How many times, on this very spot, have your
mothers, pressing you in their arms, blessed Heaven
for the consolations your unfolding virtues prepared
for their declining years, while they at the same time
enjoyed the satisfaction of seeing you begin life
under the happiest auspices! How many times, be-
neath the shade of those rocks, have I partaken with
them of your rural repasts, which never cost any
animal its life! Gourds full of milk, fresh eggs,
cakes of rice served up on plantain leaves, with bas-


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 71

kets of mangoes, oranges, dates, pomegranates, pine-
apples, furnished a wholesome repast, the most
agreeable to the
eye, as well as
delicious to the
taste, that can
possibly be im-
agined.

Like the re-
past, the con-
versation was
mild, and free
from everything
having a tenden-
cy to do harm.
Paul often talked
of the labors of
the day and of
the morrow. He
was continually
planning some-
thing for the accommodation of their little society.
Here he discovered that the paths were rugged, there
that the seats were uncomfortable: sometimes the
young arbors did not afford sufficient shade, and
Virginia might be better pleased elsewhere.

During the rainy season the two families met
together in the cottage, and employed themselves in
weaving mats of grass, and baskets of bamboo.
Rakes, spades, and hatchets were ranged along the
walls in the most perfect order; and near these in-
struments of agriculture were heaped its products —


72 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

bags of rice, sheaves of corn, and baskets of plan-
tains. Some degree of luxury usually accompanies
abundance; and Vir-
ginia was taught by
her mother and Mar- 4
garet to prepare sher-
betand cordials from
the juice ofthesugar-









cane, the lemon, and the
citron.

When night came, they all supped together by.the
light of a lamp; after which Madame de la Tour
or Margaret related some story of travellers be-
nighted in those woods of Europe that are still in-
fested by banditti; or told a dismal tale of some
shipwrecked vessel, thrown by the tempest upon the
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 73

rocks of a desert island. To these recitals the .chil-
dren listened with eager attention, and earnestly
hoped that Heaven would one day grant them the
joy of performing the rites of hospitality towards
such unfortunate persons.

When the time for repose arrived, the two families
separated and retired for the night, eager to meet
again the following morning. Sometimes they were
lulled to repose by the beating of the rains, which
fell in torrents upon the roofs of their cottages, and
sometimes by the hollow winds, which brought to
their ear the distant roar of the waves breaking upon
the shore. They blessed God for their own safety,
the feeling of which was brought home more forcibly
to their minds by the sound of remote danger.

Madame de la Tour occasionally read aloud some
affecting history of the Old or New Testament. Her
auditors reasoned but little upon these sacred volumes,
for their theology centred in a feeling of devotion
towards the Supreme Being, like that of nature; and
their morality was an active principal, like that of the
Gospel. These families had no particular days de-
voted to pleasure, and others to sadness.

Every day was to them a holiday, and all that sur-
rounded them one holy temple, in which they ever
adored the Infinite Intelligence, the Almighty God,
the friend of human kind. A feeling of confidence
in His supreme power filled their minds with con-
solation for the past, with fortitude under present
trials, and with hope in the future. Compelled by
misfortune to return almost to a state of nature, these
excellent women had thus developed in their own and
74 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

their children’s bosoms the feelings most natural to
the human mind, and its best support under affliction.

But as clouds sometimes arise, and cast a gloom
over the best regulated tempers, so whenever any
member of this little society appeared to be laboring



under dejection, the rest assembled around, and en-
deavored to banish her painful thoughts by amusing
the mind ‘rather than by grave arguments against
them. Each performed this kind office in their
own appropriate manner: Margaret, by her gayety;
Madame de la Tour, by the gentle consolations of
religion; Virginia, by her tender caresses; Paul, by
his frank and engaging cordiality. Even Mary and
Domingo hastened to offer their succor, and to weep
with those that wept. Thus do weak plants inter-






PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 75

weave themselves with each other, in order to with-
stand the fury of the tempest.

During the fine season, they went every Sunday to
the church of the Shaddock Grove, the steeple of
which you see yonder upon the plain. Many wealthy
members of the congregation, who came to church
in palanquins, sought the acquaintance of these
united families, and invited them to parties of pleas-
ure. But they always repelled these overtures with
respectful politeness, as they were persuaded that the
rich and powerful seek the society of persons in an
inferior station only for the sake of surrounding
themselves with flatterers, and that every flatterer
must applaud alike all the actions of his patron,
whether good or bad. On the other hand, they
avoided, with equal care, too intimate an acquaint-
ance with the lower class, who are ordinarily jealous,
calumniating, and gross. They thus acquired, with
some, the character of being timid, and with others,
of pride; but their reserve was accompanied with so
much obliging politeness, above all towards the un-
fortunate and the unhappy, that they insensibly
acquired the respect of the rich and the confidence
of the poor.

After service, some kind office was often required
at their hands by their poor neighbors.

Sometimes a person troubled in mind sought their
advice; sometimes a child begged them to visit its
sick mother, in one of the adjoining hamlets. They
always took with them a few remedies for the ordi-
nary diseases of the country, which they administered
in that soothing manner which stamps a value upon
76 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

the smallest favors. Above all, they met with singu-
lar success in administering to the disorders of the
mind, so intolerable in solitude, and under the infirm-
Pee a ities of a weakened
, frame. Madame de
la Tour spoke with
such sublime con-
fidence of the Divin-
ity, that the sick,
while listening to
her, almost believed
Him present.
Virginia often re-












EY,
jrayer "ees



turned home with her eyes full of tears, and her heart
overflowing with delight, at having had an opportu-
nity of doing good; for to her generally was con-
fided the task of preparing and administering the
medicines, —a task which she fulfilled with angelic
sweetness.






PAUL AND VIRGINIA DANCING.


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 77

After these visits of charity, they sometimes ex-
tended their walk by the Sloping Mountain, till they
reached my dwelling, where I used to prepare dinner
for them on the banks of the little rivulet which
glides near my cottage. I procured for these occa-
sions a few bottles of old wine, in order to heighten
the relish of our Oriental repast by the more genial
productions of Europe. At other times we met on
the seashore, at the mouth of some little river, or
rather mere brook. We brought from home the
provisions furnished us by our gardens, to which we
added those supplied us by the sea in abunda:i
variety.

We caught on these shores the mullet, the roach,
and the sea-urchin, lobsters, shrimps, crabs, oysters,
and all other kinds of shell-fish. In this way we often
enjoyed the most tranquil pleasures in situations the
most terrific. Sometimes, seated upon a rock under
the shade of the velvet sun-flower tree, we saw the
enormous waves of the Indian Ocean break beneath
our feet with a tremendous noise. Paul, who could
swim like a fish, would advance on the reefs to meet
the coming billows; then, at their near approach,
would run back to the beach, closely pursued by the
foaming breakers, which threw themselves, with a
roaring noise, far on the sands. But Virginia, at
this sight, uttered piercing cries, and said that such
sports frightened her too much.

Other amusements were not wanting on these
festive occasions. Our repasts were generally fol-
lowed by the songs and dances of the two young
people. Virginia sang the happiness of pastoral life,
78 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

and the misery of those who were impelled by avarice
to cross the raging ocean, rather than cultivate the
earth, and enjoy its bounties in peace. Sometimes



ATS i netgatisire hee

she performed a pantomime with Paul, after the man-
ner of the negroes.

The first language of man is pantomime: it is
known to all nations, and is so natural and expres-
sive, that the children of the European inhabitants
catch it with facility from the negroes. Virginia,
recalling, from among the histories which her mother
had read to her, those which had affected her most,




PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 79

represented the principal events in them with beauti-
ful simplicity. Sometimes at the sound of Domingo’s
tamtam she appeared upon the greensward, bearing
a pitcher upon her head, and advanced with a timid
step towards the source of a neighboring fountain, to
draw water. Domingo and Mary, personating the
shepherds of Midian, forbade her to approach, and
repulsed her sternly. Upon this Paul flew to her
succor, beat away the shepherds, filled Virginia’s
pitcher, and placing it upon her head, bound her
brows at the same time with a wreath of the red
flowers of the Madagascar periwinkle, which served
to heighten the delicacy of her complexion. Then,
joining in their sports, I took upon myself the part
of Raguel, and bestowed upon Paul my daughter
Zephora in marriage.

Another time Virginia would represent the unhappy
Ruth, returning poor and widowed with her mother-
in-law, who, after so prolonged an absence, found
herself as unknown as in a foreign land. Domingo
and Mary personated the reapers. The supposed
daughter of Naomi followed their steps, gleaning
here and there a few ears of corn.

When interrogated by Paul,—a part which he
performed with the gravity of a patriarch, — she
answered his questions with a faltering voice. He
then, touched with compassion, granted an asylum
to innocence, and hospitality to misfortune. He
filled her lap with plenty; and, leading her towards
us as before the elders of the city, declared his pur-
pose to take her in marriage. At this scene, Madame
de la Tour, recalling the desolate situation in which
80 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

she had been left by her relations, her widowhood,
and the kind reception she had met with from
Margaret, succeeded now by the soothing hope of a
happy union between their children, could not for-
bear weeping; and these mixed recollections of good
and evil caused us all to unite with her in shedding
tears of sorrow and of joy.

These dramas were performed with such an air of
reality, that you might have fancied yourself trans-
ported to the plains of Syria or of Palestine. We
were not unfurnished with decorations, lights, or an
orchestra, suitable to the representation. The scene
was generally placed in an open space of the forest,
the diverging paths from which formed around us
numerous arcades of foliage, under which we were
sheltered from the heat all the middle of the day;
but when the sun descended towards the horizon, its
rays, broken by the trunks of the trees, darted amongst
the shadows of the forest in long lines of light, pro-
ducing the most magnificent effect. Sometimes its
broad disk appeared at the end of an avenue, lighting
it up with insufferable brightness. The foliage of the
trees, illuminated from beneath by its saffron beams,
glowed with the lustre of the topaz and the emerald.
Their brown and mossy trunks appeared transformed
into columns of antique bronze; and the birds which
had retired in silence to their leafy shades to pass the
night, surprised to see the radiance of a second
morning, hailed the star of day all together with
innumerable carols.

Night often overtook us during these rural enter-
tainments ; but the purity of the air, and the warmth


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 81

of the climate, admitted of our sleeping in the
woods, without incurring any danger by exposure to
the weather, and no less secure from the molestation
of robbers. On our return the following day to our
respective habitations, we found them in exactly the
same state in which they had been left. In this
island, then unsophisticated by the pursuits of com-
merce, such were the honesty and primitive manners
of the population, that the doors of many houses
were without a key, and even a lock itself was an
object of curiosity to not a few of the native inhab-
itants.

There were, however, some days in the year cele-
brated by Paul and Virginia in a more peculiar man-
ner: these were the birthdays of their mothers.
Virginia never failed the day before to prepare some
wheaten cakes, which she distributed among a few
poor white families, born in the island, who had
never eaten European bread. These unfortunate
people, uncared for by the blacks, were reduced to
live on tapioca in the woods; and as they had neither
the insensibility which is the result of slavery, nor
the fortitude which springs from a liberal education,
to enable them to support their poverty, their situa-
tion was deplorable.

These cakes were all that Virginia had it in her
power to give away; but she conferred the gift in so
delicate a manner as to add tenfold to its value. In
the first place, Paul was commissioned to take the
cakes himself to these families, and get their promise
to come and spend the next day at Madame de la
Tour’s. Accordingly, mothers of families, with two
82 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

or three thin, yellow, miserable-looking daughters,
so timid that they dared not look up, made their
appearance. Virginia soon put them at their ease:
she waited upon them with refreshments, the excel-
lence of which she endeavored to heighten by relat-
ing some particular circumstance which, in her own
estimation, vastly improved them. One beverage
had been prepared by Margaret; another, by her
mother: her brother himself had climbed some
lofty tree for the very fruit she was presenting. She
would then get Paul to dance with them, nor would
she leave them till she saw that they were happy.
She wished them to partake of the joy of her own
family. ‘‘It is only,” she said, ‘‘ by promoting the
happiness of others that we can secure our own.”

When they left, she generally presented them with
some little article they seemed to fancy, enforcing
their acceptance of it by some delicate pretext, that
she might not appear to know they were in want. If
she remarked that their clothes were much tattered,
she obtained her mother’s permission to give them
some of her own, and then sent Paul to leave them
secretly at their cottage doors. She thus followed
the divine precept, — concealing the benefactor, and
revealing only the benefit.

You Europeans, whose minds are imbued from
infancy with prejudices at variance with happiness,
cannot imagine all the instruction and pleasure to be
derived from nature. Your souls, confined to a small
sphere of intelligence, soon reach the limit of its
artificial enjoyments; but nature and the heart are
inexhaustible. Paul and Virginia had neither clock,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 83

nor almanac, nor books of chronology, history, or
philosophy. The periods of their lives were regu-
lated by those of the operations of nature, and their
familiar conversation had a constant reference to the
changes of the seasons. They knew the time of day
by the shadows of the trees; the seasons, by the
times when those trees bore flowers or fruit; and
the years, by the number of their harvests. These
soothing images diffused an inexpressible charm over
their conversation. ‘It is time to dine,” said Vir-
ginia, ‘‘ the shadows of the plantain-trees are at their
roots;” or, ‘‘ Night approaches; the tamarinds are
closing their leaves.” ‘* When will you come and
see us?” inquired some of her companions in the
neighborhood. ‘*At the time of the sugar-canes,”
answered Virginia. ‘Your visit will be then still
more delightful,” resumed her young acquaintances.
When she was asked what was her own age, and that
of Paul, — ‘‘ My brother,” said she, ‘is as old as the
great cocoa-tree of the fountain; and I amas old as
the little one: the mangoes have borne fruit twelve
times, and the orange-trees have flowered four and
twenty times, since I came into the world.”

Their lives seemed linked to that of the trees, like
those of Fauns or Dryads. They knew no other
historical epochs than those of the lives of their
mothers, no other chronology than that of their
orchards, and no other philosophy than that of
doing good, and resigning themselves to the will
of Heaven.

What need, indeed, had these young people of
riches or learning such as ours? Even their necessi-
84 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ties and their ignorance increased their happiness.
No day passed in which they were not of some ser-
vice to one another, or in which they did not mutually
impart some instruction. Yes, instruction; for if
errors mingled with it, they were, at least, not of a
dangerous character. A pure-minded being has
none of that description to fear. Thus grew these
children of nature. No care had troubled. their
peace, no intemperance had corrupted their blood,
no misplaced passion had depraved their hearts.
Love, innocence, and piety possessed their souls;
and those intellectual graces were unfolding daily in
their features, their attitudes, and their movements.
Still in the morning of life, they had all its blooming
freshness; and surely such in the Garden of Eden
appeared our first parents, when, coming from the
hands of God, they first saw and approached each.
other, and conversed together, like brother and sis-
ter. Virginia was gentle, modest, and’ confiding as
Eve; and Paul, like Adam, united the stature of man-
hood with the simplicity of a child.

Sometimes, if alone with Virginia, he has a thou-
sand times told me, he used to say to her, on his
return from labor, — ‘*‘ When I am wearied, the sight
of you refreshes me. If from the summit of the
mountain I perceive you below in the valley, you
appear to me in the midst of our orchard like a
blooming rosebud. If you go towards our mother’s
house, the partridge, when it runs to meet its young,
has a shape less beautiful, and a step less light.
When I lose sight of you through the trees, I have
no need to see you in order to find you again.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 85

Something of you, I know not how, remains for me
in the air through which you have passed, — on the
grass whereon you have been seated.

““When I come near you, you delight all my
senses. The azure of the sky is less charming than
the blue of your eyes, and the song of the amadavid
bird less soft than the sound of your voice. If I
only touch you with the tip of my finger, my whole
frame trembles with pleasure. Do-you remember the
day when we crossed over the great stones of the
river of the Three Breasts? I was very tired before
we reached the bank: but as soon as I had taken
you in my arms, I seemed to have wings like a bird.
Tell me by what charm you have thus enchanted
me? Is it by your wisdom?— Our mothers have
more than either of us. Is it by your caresses? —
They embrace me much oftener than you. I think it
must be by your goodness. I shall never forget how
you walked barefooted to the Black River, to ask
pardon for the poor runaway slave. Here, my be-
loved, take this flowering branch of a lemon-tree,
which I have gathered in the forest: you will let it
remain at night near your bed. Eat this honeycomb
too which I have taken for you from the top of a
rock. But first lean on my bosom, and I shall be
refreshed.”

Virginia would answer him, — ‘ Oh, my dear
brother, the rays of the sun in the morning on the tops
of the rocks give me less joy than the sight of you. I
love my mother, — I love yours; but when they call
you their son, I love them a thousand times more.
When they caress you, I feel it more sensibly than
86 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

when J am caressed myself. You ask me what makes
you love me. Why, all creatures that are brought up
together love one another. Lookat our birds: reared
up in the same nests,
they love each other
as we do; they are
always together like
us. Hark! how they
call and answer from
one tree to another!

“So when the
echoes bring to my
ears the air which
you play on your flute
on the top of the
mountain, I repeat
the words at the bot-
tom of the valley.
You are dear to me
more especially since
the day when you
wanted to fight the
master of the slave
for me. Since that
time how often have
I said to myself,
«Ah, my brother has

a good heart; but for him I should have died of

terror.’ I pray to God every day for my mother and
- for yours; for you, and for our poor servants: but

when I pronounce your name, my devotion seems to

increase ;—1 ask so earnestly of God that no harm


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 87

may befall you! Why do you go so far, and climb
so high, to seek fruits and flowers for me? Have
we not enough in our garden already? How much
you are fatigued, — you look so warm!”—and with
her little white handkerchief she would wipe the
damps from his face, and then imprint a tender
kiss on his forehead.

For some time past, however, Virginia had felt her
heart agitated by new sensations. Her beautiful
blue eyes lost their lustre, her cheek its freshness,
and her frame was overpowered with a universal
languor. Serenity no longer sat upon her brow, nor
smiles played upon her lips. She would become all
at once gay without cause for joy, and melancholy
without any subject for grief. She fled her innocent
amusements, her gentle toils, and even the society of
her beloved family ; wandering about the most unfre-
quented parts of the plantations, and seeking every-
where the rest which she could nowhere find.

Sometimes, at the sight of Paul, she advanced sport-
ively to meet him; but, when about to accost him,
was overcome by asudden confusion ; her pale cheeks
were covered with blushes, and her eyes no longer
dared to meet those of her brother. Paul said to
her, —‘* The rocks are covered with verdure, our
birds begin to sing when you approach, everything
around you is gay, and you only are unhappy.” He
then endeavored to soothe her by his embraces ; but
she turned away her head, and fled, trembling,
towards her mother. The caresses of her brother
excited too much emotion in her agitated heart, and
she sought in the arms of her mother, refuge from
88 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

herself. Paul, unused to the secret windings of the
female heart, vexed himself in vain in endeavoring
to comprehend the meaning of these new and strange
caprices. Misfortunes seldom come alone, and a
serious calamity now impended over these families.

One of those summers which sometimes desolate
the countries situated between the tropics, now be-
gan to spread its ravages over this island. It was
near the end of December, when the sun, in Capri-
corn, darts over the Mauritius, during the space of
three weeks, its vertical fires.

The south-east wind, which prevails throughout
almost the whole year, no longer blew. Vast col-
umns of dust arose from the highways, and hung
suspended in the air; the ground was everywhere
broken into clefts; the grass was burnt up; hot ex-
halations issued from the sides of the mountains, and
their rivulets, for the most part, became dry. No
refreshing cloud ever arose from the sea: fiery vapors
only, during the day, ascended from the plains, and
appeared, at sunset, like the reflection of a vast con-
flagration. Night brought no coolness to the heated
atmosphere; and the red moon, rising in the misty
horizon, appeared of supernatural magnitude. The
drooping cattle, on the sides of the hills, stretching
out their necks towards heaven, and panting for
breath, made the valleys re-echo with their melan-
choly lowings: even the Caffre by whom they were
led threw himself upon the earth, in search of some
cooling moisture: but his hopes were vain; the
scorching sun had penetrated the whole soil, and the
stifing atmosphere everywhere resounded with the




VIRGINIA ESCAPING FROM PAUL.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA, 89

buzzing noise of insects, seeking to allay their thirst
with the blood of men and of animals.

During this sultry season, Virginia’s restlessness
and disquietude were much increased. One night
in particular, being unable to sleep, she arose from
her bed, sat down, and returned to rest again; but
could find in no attitude either slumber or repose.
At length she bent her way, by the light of the moon,
towards her fountain, and gazed at its spring, which,
notwithstanding the drought, still trickled in silver
threads down the brown sides of the rock. She flung
herself into the basin: its coolness reanimated her
spirits, and a thousand soothing remembrances came
to her mind. She recollected that in her infancy her
mother and Margaret had amused themselves by
bathing her with Paul in this very spot; that he
afterwards, reserving this bath for her sole use, had
hollowed out its bed, covered the bottom with
sand, and sown aromatic herbs around its borders.
She saw in the water, upon her naked arms and
bosom, the reflection of the two cocoa-trees which
were planted at her own and her brother’s birth, and
which interwove above her head their green branches
and young fruit. She thought of Paul’s friendship,
sweeter than the odor of the blossoms, purer than
the waters of the fountain, stronger than the inter-
twining palm-trees, and she sighed. Reflecting on
the hour of the night, and the profound solitude, her
imagination became disturbed. Suddenly she flew,
affrighted, from those dangerous shades, and those
waters which seemed to her hotter than the tropical
sunbeam, and ran to her mother for refuge. More
go PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

than once, wishing to reveal her sufferings, she
pressed her mother’s hand within her own; more than
once she was ready to pronounce the name of Paul:
but her oppressed heart left her lips no power of
utterance, and, leaning her head on her mother’s
bosom, she bathed it with her tears. f

Madame de la Tour, though she easily discerned
the source of her daughter’s uneasiness, did not
think proper to speak to her on the subject. <‘ My
dear child,” said she, ‘‘ offer up your supplications to
God, who disposes at His will of health and of life.
He subjects you to trial now, in order to recompense
you hereafter. Remember that we are only placed
upon earth for the exercise of virtue.”

The excessive heat in the mean time raised vast
masses of vapor from the ocean, which hung over
the island like an immense parasol, and gathered
round the summits of the mountains. Long flakes
of fire issued from time to time from these mist-
embosomed peaks. The most awful thunder soon
after re-echoed through the woods, the plains, and
the valleys: the rains fell from the skies in cataracts ;
foaming torrents rushed down the sides of this moun-
tain; the bottom of the valley became a sea, and the
elevated platform on which the cottages were built,
alittle island. The accumulated waters, having no
other outlet, rushed with violence through the narrow
gorge which leads into the valley, tossing and roar-
ing, and bearing along with them a mingled wreck
of soil, trees, and rocks.

The trembling families meantime addressed their
prayers to God all together in the cottage of Madame
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. OI

de la Tour, the roof of which cracked fearfully from
the force of the winds. So incessant and vivid were
the lightnings, that although the doors and window-
shutters were securely fastened, every object without
could be distinctly seen through the joints in the
wood-work! Paul, followed by Domingo, went with
intrepidity from one cottage to another, notwith-
standing the fury of the tempest; here supporting a
partition with a buttress, there driving in a stake;
and only returning to the family to calm their fears,
by the expression of a hope that the storm was passing
away. Accordingly, in the evening the rains ceased,
the trade-winds of the south-east pursued their or-
dinary course, the tempestuous clouds were driven
away to the northward, and the setting sun appeared
in the horizon.

Virginia’s first wish was to visit the spot called her
Resting-place. Paul approached her with a timid air,
and offered her the assistance of hisarm: she accepted
it with a smile, and they left the cottage together.
The air was clear and fresh: white vapors arose from
the ridges of the mountain, which was furrowed here
and there by the courses of torrents, marked in foam,
and now beginning to dry up onall sides. As for
the garden, it was completely torn to pieces by deep
water-courses, the roots of most of the fruit trees
were laid bare, and vast heaps of sand covered the
borders of the meadows, and had choked up Vir-
ginia’s bath. The two cocoa-trees, however, were
still erect, and still retained their freshness: but they
were no longer surrounded by turf, or arbors, or
birds, except a few amadavid birds, which, upon the
92 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

points of the neighboring rocks, were lamenting, in
plaintive notes, the loss of their young.

At the sight of this general desolation, Virginia
exclaimed to Paul, ‘‘ You brought birds hither, and
the hurricane has killed them. You planted this
garden, and it is nowdestroyed. Everything then
upon earth perishes, and it is only Heaven that is not
subject to change.” — ‘‘ Why,” answered Paul, ‘ can-
not Igive you something that belongs to Heaven?
but I have nothing of my own, even upon the earth.”
Virginia with a blush replied, ‘‘ You have the picture
of Saint Paul.”

As soon as she had uttered the words, he flew in
quest of it to his mother’s cottage. This picture was
a miniature of Paul the Hermit, which Margaret,
who viewed it with feelings of great devotion, had
worn at her neck while a girl, and which, after she
became a mother, she had placed round her child’s.
It had even happened, that being, while pregnant,
abandoned by all the world, and continually occupied
in contemplating the image of this benevolent recluse,
her offspring had contracted some resemblance to
this revered object. She therefore bestowed upon
him the name of Paul, giving him for his patron a
saint who had passed his life far from mankind, by
whom he had been first deceived, and then forsaken.
Virginia, on receiving this little present from the
hands of Paul, said to him, with emotion, —‘* My
dear brother, I will never part with this while I live;
nor will I ever forget that you have given me the
only thing you have in the world.” At this tone of
friendship, —this unhoped-for return of familiarity
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 93

and tenderness, Paul attempted to embrace her, but,
light as a bird, she escaped him, and fled away,
leaving him astonished, and unable to account for
conduct so extraordinary.

Meanwhile Margaret said to Madame de la Tour,
— ‘Why do we not unite our children by marriage?



They have a strong
attachment for each
other, and though
my son hardly un-
derstands the real
nature of his feel-
ings, yet great care
and _watchfulness
will be necessary.
Under such circum-
stances it will be as
well not to leave
them too much to-
gether.” Madame
de la Tour replied,
—‘*They are too
young and too poor.
What grief would it occasion us to see Virginia
bring into the world unfortunate children whom
she would not perhaps have sufficient strength te
94 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

rear! Your negro, Domingo, is almost too old
to labor; Mary is infirm. As for myself, my
dear friend, at the end of fifteen years I find my
strength greatly decreased; the feebleness of age
advances rapidly in hot climates, and, above all,
under the pressure of misfortune. Paul is our only
hope: let us wait till he comes to maturity, and his
increased strength enables him to support us by his
labor: at present you well know that we have only
sufficient to supply the wants of the day: but were
we to send Paul for a short time to the Indies, he
might acquire, by commerce, the means of purchas-
ing some slaves; and at his return we could unite
him to Virginia; for ] am persuaded no one on earth
would render her so happy as your son. We will
consult our neighbor on this subject.”

They accordingly asked my advice, which was in
accordance with Madame de la Tour’s opinion.
‘¢ The Indian seas,” I observed to them, ‘‘are calm,
and, in choosing a favorable time of the year, the
voyage out is seldom longer than six weeks; and
the same time may be allowed for the return home.
We will furnish Paul with a little venture from my
neighborhood, where he is much beloved. If we
were only to supply him with some raw cotton, of
which we make no use for want of mills to work it,
some ebony, which is here so common that it serves
us for firing, and some rosin, which is found in our
woods, he would be able to sell those articles, though
useless here, to good advantage in the Indies.” I
took upon myself to obtain permission from Mon-
sieur de la Bourdonnais to undertake this voyage;
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 95

and I determined previousiy to mention the affair to
Paul. But what was my surprise, when this young
man said to me, with a degree of good sense above
his age, ‘‘ And why do you wish me to leave my fam-
ily for this precarious pursuit of Fortune? Is there
any commerce in the world more advantageous than
the culture of the ground, which yields sometimes
fifty or a hundred fold? If we wish to engage in
commerce, can we not do so by carrying our super-
fluities to the town, without my wandering to the
Indies? Our mothers tell me that Domingo is old
and feeble; but I am young, and gather strength
every day. If any accident should happen during
my absence, above all to Virginia, who already suf-
fers—Oh, no, no!—I cannot resolve to leave
them.”

So decided an answer threw me into great perplex-
ity, for Madame de la Tour had not concealed from
me the cause of Virginia’s illness and want of spirits,
and her desire of separating these young people till
they were a few years older. I took care, however,
not to drop anything which could lead Paul to suspect
the existence of these motives.

About this period a ship from France brought
Madame de la Tour a letter from her aunt. The
fear of death, without which hearts as insensible as
hers would never feel, had alarmed her into compas-
sion. When she wrote, she was recovering from a
dangerous illness, which had, however, left her in-
curably languid and weak. She desired her niece to
return to France; or, if her health forbade her to
undertake so long a voyage, she begged her to send
96 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Virginia, on whom she promised to bestow a good
education, to procure for her a splendid marriage,
and to leave her heiress of her whole fortune. She
concluded by enjoining strict obedience to her will, in
gratitude, she said, for her great kindness.

At the perusal of this letter general consternation
spread itself through the whole assembled party.
Domingo and Mary began to weep. Paul, motion-
less with surprise, appeared almost ready to burst
with indignation; while Virginia, fixing her eyes
anxiously upon her mother, had not power to utter a
single word. ‘And can you now leave us?” cried
Margaret to Madame de la Tour. ‘No, my dear
friend, no, my beloved children,” replied Madame
de la Tour; ‘‘I will never leave you. I have lived
with you, and with you I will die. I have known no
happiness but in your affection. If my health be de-
ranged, my past misfortunes are the cause. My heart
has been deeply wounded by the cruelty of my rela-
tions, and by the loss of my beloved husband. But
I have since found more consolation and more real
happiness with you, in these humble huts, than all
the wealth of my family could now lead me to expect
in my own country.”

At this soothing language every eye overflowed
with tears of delight. Paul, pressing Madame de la
Tour in his arms, exclaimed, ‘‘ Neither will I leave
you! I will not go to the Indies. We will all labor
for you, dear mamma; and you shall never feel any
want with us.” But of the whole society, the person
who displayed the least transport, and who probably
felt the most, was Virginia; and, during the remain-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 97

der of the day, the gentle gayety which flowed from
her heart, and proved that her peace of mind was
restored, completed the general satisfaction.

At sunrise the next day, just as they had concluded
offering up, as usual, their morning prayer before
breakfast, Domingo came to inform them that a gen-
tleman on horseback, followed by two slaves, was
coming towards the plantation. It was Monsieur de
la Bourdonnais. He entered the cottage, where he
found the family at breakfast. Virginia had prepared,
according to the custom of the country, coffee, and
rice boiled in water. To these she had added hot
yams and fresh plantains. The leaves of the plan-
tain-tree supplied the want of table-linen; and cala-
bash shells, split in two, served for cups. The
Governor exhibited, at first, some astonishment at
the homeliness of the dwelling: then, addressing
himself to Madame de la Tour, he observed, that
although public affairs drew his attention too much
from the concerns of individuals, she had many claims
on his good offices. ‘* You have an aunt at Paris,
madame,” he added, ‘‘a woman of quality, and im-
mensely rich, who expects that you will hasten to see
her, and who means to bestow upon you her whole
fortune.” Madame de la Tour replied, that the state
of her health would not permit her to undertake so
long a voyage.

‘* At least,” resumed Monsieur de la Bourdonnais,
‘you cannot, without injustice, deprive this amiable
young lady, your daughter, of so noble an inherit-
ance. I will not conceal from you, that your aunt
has made use of her influence to secure your daugh-
98 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ter being sent to her; and that I have received official
letters, in which I am ordered to exert my authority,
if necessary, to that effect. But as I only wish to
employ my power for the purpose of rendering the
inhabitants of this country happy, I expect from your
good sense the voluntary sacrifice of a few years,
upon which your daughter’s establishment in the
world, and the welfare of your whole life, depend.
Wherefore do we come to these islands? Is it not to
acquire a fortune? And will it not be more agreeable
to return, and find it in your own country?”

He then took a large bag of piastres from one of
his slaves, and placed it upon the table. ‘‘ This
sum,” he continued, ‘‘is allotted by your aunt to
defray the outlay necessary for the equipment of the
young Jady for her voyage.” Gently reproaching
Madame de la Tour for not having had recourse to
him in her difficulties, he extolled at the same time
her noble fortitude. Upon this Paul said to the Gov-
ernor, ‘‘ My mother did apply to you, sir, and you
received her ill."—‘*Have you another child, ma-
dame?” said Monsieur de la Bourdonnais to Madame
dela Tour. ‘‘No, sir,” she replied; ‘‘ this is the
son of my friend; but he and Virginia are equally
dear to us, and we mutually consider them both as
our own children.” — ‘* Young man,” said the Gow
ernor to Paul, ‘‘ when you have acquired a little more
experience of the world, you will know that it is the
misfortune of people in place to be deceived, and to
bestow, in consequence, upon intriguing vice that
which they would wish to give to modest merit.”

Monsieur de la Bourdonnais, at the request of
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 99

Madame de la Tour, placed himself next to her at
table, and breakfasted, after the manner of the Creoles,
upon coffee, mixed with rice boiled in water. He
was delighted with the order and cleanliness which
prevailed in the little cottage, the harmony of the
two interesting families, and the zeal of their old
servants. ‘‘ Here,” he exclaimed, ‘‘I discern only
wooden furniture, but find serene countenances and
hearts of gold.” Paul, enchanted with the affability
of the Governor, said to him, —‘*I wish to be your
friend; for you are a good man.” Monsieur de la
Bourdonnais received with pleasure this insular com-
pliment, and, taking Paul by the hand, assured him
that he might rely upon his friendship.

After breakfast he took Madame de la Tour aside,
and informed her that an opportunity would soon
offer itself of sending her daughter to France, in a
ship which was going to sail in a short time; that he
would put her under the charge of a lady, one of the
passengers, who was a relation of his own; and that
she must not think of renouncing an immense for-
tune on account of the pain of being separated from
her daughter for a brief interval. «Your aunt,” he
added, ‘* cannot live more than two years; of this I
am assured by her friends. Think of it seriously.
Fortune does not visit us every day. Consult your
friends. Iam sure that every person of good sense
will be of my opinion.” She answered, ‘“that, as
she desired no other happiness henceforth in the
‘world than in promoting that of her daughter, she
hoped to be allowed to leave her departure for France
entirely to her own inclination.”
100 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Madame de la Tour was not sorry to find an oppor-
tunity of separating Paul and Virginia for a short
time, and provide, by this means, for their mutual
felicity at a future period. She took her daughter
aside, and said to her, —‘‘ My dear child, our ser-
vants are now old. Paul is still very young; Mar-
garet is advanced in years, and J am already infirm.
If I should die, what would become of you, without
fortune, in the midst of these deserts? You would
then be left alone, without any person who could
afford you much assistance, and would be obliged to
labor without ceasing, as a hired servant, in order to
support your wretched existence. This idea over-
comes me withsorrow.” Virginia answered, —‘‘ God
has appointed us to labor, and to bless Him every
day. Up to this time He has never forsaken us, and
He never will forsake usintime to come. His provi-
dence watches most especially over the unfortunate.
You have told me this very often, my dear mother!
I cannot resolve to leave you.” Madame de la Tour
replied, with much emotion, — ‘‘ I have no other aim
than to render you happy, and to marry you one day
to Paul, who is not really your brother. Remember,
then, that his fortune depends upon you.”

A young girl who is in love believes that every one
else is ignorant of her passion: she throws over her
eyes the veil with which she covers the feelings of her
heart: but when it is once lifted by a friendly hand,
the hidden sorrows of her attachment escape as
through a newly-opened barrier, and the sweet out-
pourings of unrestrained confidence succeed to her
former mystery and reserve. Virginia, deeply af-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. Io1

fected by this new proof of her mother’s tenderness,
related to her the cruel struggles she had undergone,
of which Heaven alone had been witness: she saw,
she said, the hand of Providence in the assistance of
an affectionate mother, who approved of her attach-
ment, and would guide her by her counsels; and as
she was now strengthened by such support, every
consideration led her to remain with her mother,
without anxiety for the present, and without appre-
hension for the future. Madame de la Tour, perceiv-
ing that this confidential conversation had produced
an effect altogether different from that which she
expected, said, —‘‘ My dear child, I do not wish to
constrain you: think over it at leisure, but conceal
your affection from Paul. It is better not to leta
man know that the heart of his mistress is gained.”
Virginia and her mother were sitting together by
themselves the same evening, when.a tall man, dressed
in a blue cassock, entered their cottage. He was a
missionary priest, and the confessor of Madame de
la Tour and her daughter, who had now been sent to
them by the Governor. ‘My children,” he ex-
claimed as he entered, ‘‘ God be praised! you are now
rich. You can now attend to the kind suggestions
of your benevolent hearts, and do good to the poor.
I know what Monsieur de la Bourdonnais has said to
you, and what you have said in reply. Your health,
dear madam, obliges you to remain here; but you,
young lady, are without excuse. We must obey the
direction of Providence; and we must also obey our
aged relations, even when they are unjust. A sacri-
fice is required of you; but it is the will of God.
102 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.’

Our Lord devoted Himself for you; and you, in imi-
tation of His example, must give up something for
the welfare of your family. Your voyage to France



will end happily. You will surely consent to go, my
dear young lady.”

Virginia, with downcast eyes, answered, trembling,
— ‘If it is the command of God, I will not presume
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 103

to oppose it. Let the will of God be done!” As
she uttered these words she wept.

The priest went away, in order to inform the Gov-
ernor of the success of his mission. In the mean
time Madame de la Tour sent Domingo to request
me to come to her, that she might consult me
respecting Virginia’s departure. I was not at all of
opinion that she ought to go. I consider it asa fixed
principle of happiness, that we ought to prefer the
advantages of nature to those of fortune, and never
go in search of that at a distance which we may find
at home —in our own bosoms. But what could be
expected from my advice, in opposition to the illu-
sions of a splendid fortune?—or from my simple
reasoning, when in competition with the prejudices
of the world, and an authority held sacred by
Madame de la Tour? This lady, indeed, had only
consulted me out of politeness; she had ceased to
deliberate since she had heard the decision of her
confessor. Margaret herself, who, notwithstanding
the advantages she expected for her son from the
possession of Virginia’s fortune, had hitherto opposed
her departure, made no further objections. As for
Paul, in ignorance of what had been determined, but
alarmed at the secret conversations which Virginia
had been holding with her mother, he abandoned
himself to melancholy. ‘* They are plotting some-
thing against me,” cried he, ‘ for they conceal every-
thing from me.”

A report having in the mean time been spread in
the island that fortune had visited these rocks, mer-
chants of every description were seen climbing their
104 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

steep ascent. Now, for the first time, were seen dis-
played in these humble huts the richest stuffs of
India; the fine dimity of Gondelore; the handker-
chiefs of Pellicate and Masulipatan; the plain,
striped, and embroidered muslins of Dacca, so beau-
tifully transparent; the delicately white cottons of
Surat, and linens of all colors. They also brought
with them the gorgeous silks of China; satin dam-
asks, some white, and others grass-green and bright
red; pink taffetas, with a profusion of satins and
gauze of Tonquin, both plain and decorated with
flowers; soft pekins, downy as cloth; with white
and yellow nankeens, and the calicoes of Mada-
gascar.

Madame de la Tour wished her daughter to pur-
chase whatever she liked; she only examined the
goods, and inquired the price, to take care that the
dealers did not cheat her. Virginia made choice of
everything she thought would be useful or agreeable
to her mother, or to Margaret and her son. ‘‘ This,”
said she, ‘‘ will be wanted for furnishing the cottage,
and that will be very useful to Mary and Domingo.”
In short, the bag of piastres was almost emptied
before she even began to consider her own wants ;
and she was obliged to receive back for her own use
a share of the presents which she had distributed
among the family circle.

Paul, overcome with sorrow at the sight of these
gifts of fortune, which he felt were a presage of Vir-
ginia’s departure, came a few days after to my dwell-
ing. With an air of deep despondengy he said to
me, —‘‘My sister is going away; she is already


VIRGINIA DRESSED.






PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 105

making preparations for her voyage. I conjure you
to come and exert your influence over her mother
and mine in order to detain her here.” I could not
refuse the young man’s solicitations, although well
convinced that my representations would be un-
availing.

Virginia had ever appeared to me charming when
clad in the coarse cloth of Bengal, with a red hand-
kerchief tied round her head: you may therefore
imagine how much her beauty was increased when
she was attired in the graceful and elegant costume
worn by the ladies of this country! She had on a
white muslin dress, lined with pink taffeta. Her
somewhat tall and slender figure was shown to advan-
tage in her new attire, and the simple arrangement
of her hair accorded admirably with the form of her
head. Her fine blue eyes were filled with an expres-
sion of melancholy; and the struggles of passion,
with which her heart was agitated, imparted a flush
to her cheek, and to her voice a tone of deep emo-
tion. The contrast between her pensive look and
her gay habiliments rendered her more interesting
than ever, nor was it possible to see or hear her un-
moved.

Paul became more and more melancholy; and
at length Margaret, distressed at the situation of her
son, took him aside, and said to him, — ‘‘ Why, my
dear child, will you cherish vain hopes, which will
only render your disappointment more bitter? It is
time for me to make known to you the secret of your
life and of mine. Mademoiselle de la Tour belongs,
by her mother’s side, to a rich and noble family,
106 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

while you are but the son of a poor peasant girl;
and what is worse, you are illegitimate.”

Paul, who had never heard this last expression
before, inquired with eagerness its meaning. His
mother replied, — «I was not married to your father.
When I was a girl, seduced by love, I was guilty of a
weakness of which you are the offspring. The con-
sequence of my fault is, that you are deprived of the
protection of a father’s family, and by my flight from
home you have also lost that of your mother’s.
Unfortunate child! you have no relation in the world
but me!”—and she shed a flood of tears. Paul,
pressing her in his arms, exclaimed, ‘Oh, my dear
mother! since I have no relation in the world but
you, J will love you all the more. But what a secret
have you just disclosed tome! I now see the reason
why Mademoiselle de la Tour has estranged herself
so much from me for the last two months, and why
she has determined to goto France. Ah! I perceive
too well that she despises me!”

The hour of supper being arrived, we gathered
round the table: but the different sensations with
which we were agitated left us little inclination to
eat, and the meal, if such it may be called, passed in
silence. Virginia was the first to rise; she went out
and seated herself on the very spot where we now
are. Paul hastened after her, and sat down by her
side. Both of them, for some time, kept a profound
silence. It was one of those delicious nights which
are so common between the tropics, and to the beauty
of which no pencil can do justice. The moon ap-
peared in the midst of the firmament, surrounded by
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 107

a curtain of clouds, which was gradually unfolded
by her beams. Her light insensibly spread itself
over the mountains of the island, and their distant
peaks glistened with a silvery green. The winds
were perfectly still. We heard among the woods, at
the bottom of the valleys, and on the summits of the
rocks, the piping cries and the soft notes of the birds,
wantoning in their nests, and rejoicing in the bright-
ness of the night and the serenity of the atmosphere.
The hum of insects was heard in the grass. The
stars sparkled in the heavens, and their lucid orbs
were reflected, in trembling sparkles, from the tran-
quil bosom of the ocean. Virginia’s eyes wandered
distractedly over its vast and gloomy horizon, distin-
guishable from the shore of the island only by the
red fires in the fishing-boats. She perceived at the
entrance of the harbor a light and a shadow: these
were the watchlight and the hull of the vessel in
which she was to embark for Europe, and which, all
ready for sea, lay at anchor, waiting for a breeze.
Affected at this sight, she turned away her head, in
order to hide her tears from Paul.

Madame de la Tour, Margaret, and I, were seated
at alittle distance beneath the plantain-trees; and
owing to the stillness of the night we distinctly
heard their conversation, which I have not forgotten.

Paul said to her, — ‘‘ You are going away from us,
they tell me, in three days. You do not fear then to
encounter the dangers of the sea, at the sight of
which you are so much terrified? ””— ‘‘I must perform
my duty,” answered Virginia, ‘‘by obeying my
parent.” — ** You leave us,” resumed Paul, ‘‘ for a dis-
108 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

tant relation, whom you have never seen.”— ‘Alas !”
cried Virginia, ‘‘I would have remained here my
whole life, but my mother would not have it so. My
confessor, too, told me it was the will of God that



I should go, and that life was a scene of trials!
—and oh! this is indeed a severe one.”

‘* What!” exclaimed Paul, ‘‘you could find so
many reasons for going, and not one for remaining
here! Ah! there is one reason for your departure
that you have not mentioned. Riches have great
attractions. You will soon find in the new world to
which you are going, another, to whom you will give
the name of brother, which you bestow. on me no
more. You will choose that brother from amongst
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 10g

persons who are worthy of you by their birth, and by
a fortune which I have not to offer. But where can
you go to be happier? On what shore will you land,
and find it dearer to you than the spot which gave
you birth? —and where will you form around you a
society more delightful to you than this, by which
you are so much beloved? How will you bear to live
without your mother’s caresses, to which you are so
accustomed? What will become of her, already
advanced in years, when she no longer sees you at
her side at table, in the house, in the walks, where
she used to lean upon you? What will become of
my mother, who loves you with the same affection?
What shall I say to comfort them when I see them
weeping for your absence? Cruel Virginia! I say
nothing to you of myself; but what will become of
me, when in the morning I shall no more see you;
when the evening will come, and not reunite us? —
when I shall gaze on these two palm-trees, planted
at our birth, and so long the witnesses of our mutual
friendship? Ah! since your lot is changed, — since
you seek in a far country other possessions than the
fruits of my labor, let me go with you in the vessel in
which you are about to embark. JI will sustain your
spirits in the midst of those tempests which terrify
you so much, even on shore. I will lay my head upon
your bosom: I will warm your heart upon my own;
and in France, where you are going in search of for-
tune and of grandeur, I will wait upon you as your
slave. Happy only in your happiness, you will find
me in those palaces where I shall see you receiving
the homage and adoration of all, rich and noble
110 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

enough to make you the greatest of all sacrifices, by
dying at your feet.”

The violence of his emotions stopped his utter-
ance, and we then heard Virginia, who, in a voice
broken by sobs, uttered these words, — ‘It is for you
that I go, — for you, whom I see tired to death every
day by the labor of sustaining two helpless families.
If I have accepted this opportunity of becoming rich,
itis only to return a thousandfold the good which
you have done us. Can any fortune be equal to your
friendship? Why do you talk about your birth?
Ah! if it were possible for me still to have a brother,
should I make choice of any other than you? Oh,
Paul! Paul! you are far dearer to me than a brother;
how much has it cost me to repulse you from me!
Help me to tear myself from what I value more than
existence till Heaven shall bless our union. But I
will stay or go, —I will live or die; dispose of me as
you will. Unhappy that Iam! I could have repelled
your caresses, but I cannot support your affliction.”

At these words Paul seized her in his arms, and,
holding her pressed close to his bosom, cried, in a
piercing tone, — ‘I will go with her, — nothing shall
ever part us.” We all ran towards him; and Ma-
dame de la Tour said to him, — ‘‘ My son, if you go,
what will become of us?”

He, trembling, repeated after her the words, —
‘*My son!—myson! You my mother!” cried he;
‘you, who would separate the brother from the sis-
ter! We have both been nourished at your bosom;
we have both been reared upon your knees; we have
learnt of you to love one another; we have said soa
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. IIl

thousand times; and now you would separate her
from me!— you would send her to Europe, that in-
hospitable country which refused you an asylum, and
to relations, by whom you yourself were abandoned.
You will tell me that I have no right over her, and
that she is not my sister. She is everything to me;
— my riches, my birth, my family, —all that I have!
I know no other. We have had but one roof, — one
cradle, —and we will have but one grave! If she
goes, I will follow her. The Governor will prevent
me! Will he prevent me from flinging myself into
the sea? — will he prevent me from following her by
swimming? The sea cannot be more fatal to me
than the land. Since I cannot live with her, at least
I will die before her eyes, far from you. Inhuman
mother!— woman without compassion!—may the
ocean, to which you trust her, restore her to you no
more! May the waves, rolling back our bodies amid
the shingles of this beach, give you, in the loss of
your two children, an eternal subject of remorse!”

At these words I seized him in my arms, for despair
had deprived him of reason. His eyes sparkled with
fire; the perspiration fell in great drops from his face ;
his knees trembled, and | felt his heart beat violently
against his burning bosom.

Virginia, alarmed, said to him, —‘‘ Oh, my dear
Paul, I call to witness the pleasures of our early age,
your griefs and my own, and everything that can for-
ever bind two unfortunate beings to each other, that
if I remain at home, I will live but for you; that if I
go, I will one day return to be yours. I call you all
to witness ;— you who have reared me from my in-


112 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

fancy, who dispose of my life, and who see my tears.
I swear by that Heaven which hears me, by the sea
which I am going to pass, by the air I breathe, and
which I never sullied by a falsehood.”



As the sun softens and precipitates an icy rock
from the summit of one of the Apennines, so the
impetuous passions of the young man were subdued
by the voice of her he loved. He bent his head, and
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 113

a torrent of tears fell from his eyes. His mother,
mingling her tears with his, held him in her arms,
but was unable to speak. Madame de la Tour, half
distracted, said to me, — ‘‘I can bear this no longer.
My heart is quite broken. This unfortunate voyage
shall not take place. Do take my son home with
you. Not one of us has had any rest the whole
week.”

I said to Paul, ‘‘ My dear friend, your sister shall
remain here. To-morrow we will talk to the Gov-
ernor about it: leave your family to take some rest,
and come and pass the night with me. It is late;
it is midnight; the Southern Cross is just above the
horizon.”

He suffered himself to be led away in silence; and,
after a night of great agitation, he arose at break of
day, and returned home.

‘* But why should I continue any longer to you the
recital of this history? There is but one aspect of
human existence which we can ever contemplate with
pleasure. Like the globe upon which we revolve, the
fleeting course of our life is but a day: and if one
part of that day be visited by light, the other is
thrown into darkness.”

‘My father,” I answered, ‘finish, I conjure you,
the history which you have begun in a manner so in-
teresting. If the images of happiness are the most
pleasing, those of misfortune are more instructive.
Tell me what became of the unhappy young man.”

The first object beheld by Paul in his way home was
the negro woman, Mary, who, mounted on a rock,
was earnestly looking tewards the sea. As soon as
a

I14 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

he perceived her, he called to her from a distance, —
‘“Where is Virginia?” Mary turned her head
towards her young master, and began to weep.
Paul, distracted, retracing his steps, ran to the har-
bor. He was there informed that Virginia had em-
barked at break of day, and that the vessel had
immediately set sail, and was now out of sight. He
instantly returned to the plantation, which he crossed
without uttering a word.

Quite perpendicular as appears the wall of rocks
behind us, those green platforms which separate their
summits are so many stages, by means of which you
may reach, through some difficult paths, that cone of
sloping and inaccessible rocks which is called The
Thumb. At the foot of that cone is an extended
slope of ground, covered with lofty trees, and so
steep and elevated that it looks like a forest in the
air, surrounded by tremendous precipices. The
clouds, which are constantly attracted round‘ the
summit of The Thumb, supply innumerable rivulets,
which fall to so great a depth in the valley situated
on the other side of the mountain, that from this
elevated point the sound of their cataracts cannot be
heard. From that spot you can discern a considera-
ble part of the island, diversified by precipices and
mountain peaks, and, amongst others, Peter-Booth
and the Three Breasts, with their valleys full
of woods. You also command an extensive view
of the ocean, and can even perceive the Isle of
Bourbon, forty leagues to the westward. From the
summit of that stupendous pile of rocks Paul caught
sight of the vessel which was bearing away Virginia,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 115

and which now, ten leagues out at sea, appeared like
a black spot in the midst of the ocean. He remained
a great part of the day with his eyes fixed upon this
object: when it had disappeared, he still fancied he
beheld it; and when, at length, the traces which
clung to his imagination were lost in the mists of the
horizon, he seated himself on that wild point, forever
beaten by the winds, which never cease to agitate the
tops of the cabbage and gum trees, and the hoarse
and moaning murmurs of which, similar to the dis-
tant sound of organs, inspire a profound melancholy.
On this spot I found him, his head reclined on the
rock, and his eyes fixed upon the ground. I had
followed him from the earliest dawn, and, after much
importunity, I prevailed on him to descend from the
heights, and return to his family. I went home with
him, where the first impulse of his mind, on seeing
Madame de la Tour, was to reproach her bitterly for
having deceived him. She told us that a favorable
wind having sprung up at three o’clock in the morn-
ing, and the vessel being ready to sail, the Governor,
attended by some of his staff and the missionary,
had come with a palanquin to fetch her daughter ;
and that, notwithstanding Virginia’s objections, her
own tears and entreaties, and the lamentations of
Margaret, everybody exclaiming all the time that it
was for the general welfare, they had carried her
away almost dying. ‘‘At least,” cried Paul, ‘‘if I
had bid her farewell, I should now be more calm. I
would have said to her, —‘ Virginia, if, during the
time we have lived together, one word may .have
escaped me which has offended you, before you leave
116 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

me forever, tell me that you forgive me’ I would
have said to her, — ‘Since I am destined to see you
no more, farewell, my dear Virginia, farewell! Live
far from me, contented and happy!’ When he saw
that his mother and Madame de la Tour were weep-
ing, — ‘“‘ You must now,” said he, ‘‘ seek some other
hand to wipe away your tears;” and then, rushing
out of the house, and groaning aloud, he wandered
up and down the plantation He hovered in partic-
ular about all those spots which had once been most
endeared to Virginia. He said to the goats and their
little ones, which followed him bleating, ‘‘ What do
you want of me? You will see with me no more her
who used to feed you with her own hand.” He
went to the bower called Virginia’s Resting-place,
and, as the birds flew around him, exclaimed, ‘‘ Poor
birds! you will fly no more to meet her who cher-
ished you!” — and observing Fidéle running back-
wards and forwards in search of her, he heaved a
deep sigh, and cried, —‘* Ah! you will never find
her again.” At length he went and seated himself
upon the rock where he had conversed with her the
preceding evening; and at the sight of the ocean,
upon which he had seen the vessel disappear which
had borne her away, his heart overflowed with
anguish, and he wept bitterly.

We continually watched his movements, appre-
hensive of some fatal consequence from the violent
agitation of his mind. His mother and Madame
de la Tour conjured him, in the most tender manner,
not to increase their affliction by his despair. At
length the latter soothed his mind by lavishing upon
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. EF.

him epithets calculated to awaken his hope, — calling
him her son, her dear son, her son-in-law, whom she
destined for her daughter. She persuaded him to
return home, and to takesome food. He seated him-
self next to the place which used to be occupied by
the companion of his childhood; and, as if she had
still been present, he spoke to her, and made as
though he would offer her whatever he knew was
most agreeable to her taste: then, starting from this
dream of fancy, he began to weep. For some days
he employed himself in gathering together everything
which had belonged to Virginia, — the last nosegays
she had worn, the cocoa-shell from which she used
to drink; and after kissing a thousand times these
relics of his beloved, to him the most precious treas-
ures which the world contained, he hid them in his
bosom. Amber does not shed so sweet a perfume as
the veriest trifles touched by those we love. At
length, perceiving that the indulgence of his grief
increased that of his mother and Madame de la Tour,
and that the wants of the family demanded continual
labor, he began, with the assistance of Domingo, to
repair the damage done to the garden. But soon
after, this young man, hitherto indifferent as a Creole
to everything that was passing in the world, begged ~
of me to teach him to read and write, in order that
he might correspond with Virginia. He afterwards
wished to obtain a knowledge of geography, that he
might form some idea of the country where she
would disembark; and of history, that he might
know something of the manners of the society in
which she would be placed. The powerful senti-
118 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ment of love, which directed his present studies, had
already instructed him in agriculture, and in the art
of laying out grounds with advantage and beauty.



It must be admitted, that to the fond dreams of this
restless and ardent passion mankind are indebted for
most of the arts and sciences, while its disappoint-
ments have given birth to philosophy, which teaches
us to bear up under misfortune. Love, thus the
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 119

general link of all beings, becomes the great spring
of society, by inciting us to knowledge as well as to
pleasure.

Paul found little satisfaction in the study of geog-
yvaphy, which, instead of describing the natural his-
tory of each country, gave only a view of its political
tlivisions and boundaries. History, and especially
modern history, interested him little more. He there
saw only general and periodical evils, the causes of
wnich he could not discover; wars without either
motive or reason; uninteresting intrigues; with
nations destitute of principle, and princes void of
humanity. To this branch of reading he preferred
romances, which, being chiefly occupied by the pri-



vate feelings and concerns of men, sometimes repre-
sented situations similar to his own. Thus, no book
gave him so much pleasure as Telemachus, from the
pictures it draws of pastoral life, and of the passions
which are most natural to the human breast. He
read aloud to his mother and Madame de la Tour
120 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

those parts which affected him most sensibly; but
sometimes, touched by the most tender remem-
brances, his emotion would choke his utterance, and
his eyes be filled with tears. He fancied he had
found in Virginia the dignity and wisdom of Antiope,
united to the misfortunes and the tenderness of
Eucharis. With very different sensations he perused
our fashionable novels, filled with licentious morals
and maxims. And when he was informed that these
works drew a tolerably faithful picture of European
society, he trembled, and not without some appear-
ance of reason, lest Virginia should become corrupted
by it, and forget him.

More than a year and a half, indeed, passed away
before Madame de la Tour received any tidings of
her aunt or her daughter. During that period she
only accidentally heard that Virginia had safely ar-
rived in France. At length, however, a vessel which
stopped here in its way to the Indies brought a
packet to Madame de la Tour, and a letter written
by Virginia’s own hand. Although this amiable and
considerate girl had written in a guarded manner,
that she might not wound her mother’s feelings, it
appeared evident enough that she was unhappy.
The letter painted so naturally her situation and her
character, that I have retained it almost word for
word.

““My DEAR AND BELoveD MoTHER,—I have already
sent you several letters, written by my own hand, but hav-
ing received no answer, I am afraid they have not reached
you. I have better hopes for this, from the means I have
now gained of sending you tidings of myself, and of hear-
ing from you.
PAUL AND VIRGINTA. 121

‘‘T have shed many tears since our separation. I who
never used to weep, but for the misfortunes of others!
My aunt was much astonished, when, having, upon my ar-
rival, inquired what accomplishments I possessed, I told
her that I could neither read nor write. She asked me
what then I had learnt, since I came into the world ; and
when I answered that I had been taught to take care of
the household affairs, and to obey your will, she told me,
that I had received the education of a servant. The next
day she placed me as a boarder in a great abbey near
Paris, where I have masters of all kinds, who teach me,
among other things, history, geography, grammar, mathe-
matics, and riding on horseback. But I have so little
capacity for all these sciences, that I fear I shall make but
small progress with my masters. I feel that I am a very
poor creature, with very little ability to learn what they
teach. My aunt’s kindness, however, does not decrease.
She gives me new dresses every season; and she has placed
two waiting women with me, who are dressed like fine
ladies. She has made me take the title of countess; but
has obliged me to renounce the name of La Tour, which
is as dear to me as it is to you, from all you have told me
of the sufferings my father endured in order to marry you.
She has given me in place of your name that of your
family, which is also dear to me, because it was your
name when a girl. Seeing myself in so splendid a situa-
tion, I implored her to let me send you something to as-
sist you. But how shall I repeat her answer! Yet you
have desired me always to tell you the truth. She told
me, then, that a little would be of no use to you, and that
a great deal would only encumber you in the simple life
you led. As you know I could not write, I endeavored,
upon my arrival, to send you tidings of myself by another
band; but, finding no person here in whom I could place
confidence, I applied night and day to learn to read and
write; and Heaven, who saw my motive for learning, no
doubt assisted my endeavors, for I succeeded in both in a
short time. I entrusted my first letters to some of the
ladies here, who, I have reason to think, carried them to
my aunt. This time I have recourse to a boarder, who is
my friend. I send you her direction, by means of which I
shall receive your answer. My aunt has forbid my hold-
122 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

ing any correspondence whatever with anyone, lest, she
says, it should occasion an obstacle to the great views she
has for my advantage. No person is allowed to see me at
the grate but eres and an old nobleman, one of her
friends, who, she says, is much pleased with me. I am
sure I am not at all so with him, nor should I, even if it
were possible for me to be pleased with any one at
present.

“ sous at my disposal. They say I might make an improper
use of money. Even my clothes belong to my femmes de
chambre, who quarrel about them before I have left them
off. In the midst of riches, I am poorer than when I
lived with you; for I have nothing to give away. When
I found that the great accomplishments they taught me
would not procure me the power of doing the smallest
good, I had recourse to my needle, of which happily you
had taught me the use. I send several pairs of stockings
of my own making for you and my mamma Margaret, a
cap for Domingo, and one of my red handkerchiefs for
Mary. I also send with this packet some kernels, and
seeds of various kinds of fruits which I gathered in the
abbey park during my hours of recreation. I have also
sent a few seeds of violets, daisies, buttercups, poppies,
and scabious, which I picked up in the fields. There are
much more beautiful flowers in the meadows of this coun-
try than in ours, but nobody cares for them. I am sure
that you and my mamma Margaret will be better pleased
with this bag of seeds, than you were with the bag of
plastres, which was the cause of our separation and of my
tears. It will give me great delight if you should one day
see apple-trees growing by the side of our plantains, and
elms blending their foliage with that of our cocoa-trees.
You will fancy yourself in Normandy, which you love so
much,

‘““You desired me to relate to you my joys and my
griefs. I have no joys far from you. As for my griefs, I
endeavor to soothe them by reflecting that I am in the
situation in which it was the will of God that you should
place me. But my greatest affliction is, that no one here
speaks to me of you, and that I cannot speak of you to
any one. My femmes de chambre, oy rather those of my
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 123

aunt, for they belong more to her than to me, told me the
other day, when I wished to turn the conversation upon
the objects most dear to me: ‘Remember, mademoiselle,
that you are a French woman, and must forget that land
of savages.’ Ah! sooner will I forget myself, than forget
the spot on which I was born and where you dwell! It is
this country which is to me a land of savages, for I live
alone, having no one to whom I can impart those feelings
of tenderness for you which I shall bear with me to the
grave. Jam,

“©My dearest and beloved Mother,
“Your affectionate and dutiful Daughter,
‘*VIRGINIE DE LA Tour.

“‘T recommend to your goodness Mary and Domingo,
who took so much care of my infancy: caress Fidele for
me, who found me in the wood.’’

Paul was astonished that Virginia had not said one
word of him, —she, who had not forgotten even the
house-dog. But he was not aware that, however
long a woman’s letter may be, she never fails to leave
her dearest sentiments for the end.

In a postscript Virginia particularly recommended
to Paul’s attention two kinds of seed — those of the
violet andthescabious: She gave him some instruc-
tions upon the natural characters of these flowers,
and the spots most proper for theircultivation. ‘‘ The
violet,” she said, ‘‘ produces a little flower of a dark
purple color, which delights to conceal itself beneath
the bushes; but it 1s soon discovered by its wide-
spreading perfume.” She desired that these seeds
might be sown by the border of the fountain, at the
foot of her cocoa-tree, ‘‘ The scabious,” she added,
‘* produces a beautiful flower of a pale blue, and a
124 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

black ground spotted with white. You might fancy
it was in mourning; and for this reason it is also
called the widow's flower. It grows best in bleak
spots, beaten by the winds.” She begged him to
sow this upon the rock where she had spoken to him
at night for the last time, and that, in remembrance
of her, he would henceforth give it the name of the
Rock of Adieus.

She had put these seeds into a little purse, the
tissue of which was exceedingly simple; but which
appeared above all price to Paul, when he saw on it a
Panda V entwined together, and knew that the beau-
tiful hair which formed the cipher was the hair of
Virginia.

The whole family listened with tears to the reading
of the letter of this amiable and virtuous girl. Her
mother answered it in the name of the little society,
desiring her to remain or return as she thought
proper ; and assuring her, that happiness had left their
dwelling since her departure, and that, for herself,
she was inconsolable.

Paul also sent her a very long letter, in which he
assured her that he would arrange the garden in a
manner agreeable to her taste, and’ mingle together
in it the plants of Europe with those of Africa, as
she had blended their initials together in her work.
He sent her some fruit from the cocoa-trees of the
fountain, now arrived at maturity; telling her, that
he would not add any of the other productions of the
island, that the desire of seeing them again might
hasten her return. He conjured her to comply as
soon as possible with the ardent wishes of her family,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 125

and above all, with his own, since he could never here-
after taste happiness away from her.

Paul sowed witha careful hand the European seeds,
particularly the violet and scabious, the flowers of
which seemed to bear some analogy to the character
and present situation of Virginia, by whom they had
been so especially recommended; but either they
were dried up in the voyage, or the climate of this
part of the world is unfavorable to their growth, for
a very small number of them even came up, and not
one arrived at full perfection.

In the mean time, envy, which ever comes to em-
bitter human happiness, particularly in the French
colonies, spread some reports in the island which gave
Paul much uneasiness. The passengers in the vessel
which brought Virginia’s letter asserted that she was
upon the point of being married, and named the
nobleman of the court to whom she was engaged.
Some even went so far as to declare that the union

had already taken place, and that they themselves
had witnessed the ceremony. Paul at first despised
the report, brought by a merchant vessel, as he knew
that they often spread erroneous intelligence in their
passage; but some of the inhabitants of the island,
with malignant pity, affecting to bewail the event, he
was soon led to attach some degree of belief to this
cruel intelligence. Besides, in some of the novels he
had lately read, he had seen that perfidy was treated
as a subject of pleasantry; and knowing that these
books contained pretty faithful representations of
European manners, he feared that the heart of Vir-
ginia was corrupted, and had forgotton its former
126 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

engagements. Thus his new acquirements had
already only served to render him more miserable;
and his apprehensions were much increased by the
circumstance, that though several ships touched here
from Europe within the six months immediately fol-
lowing the arrival of her letter, not one of them
brought any tidings of Virginia.

This unfortunate young man, with a heart torn by
the most cruel agitation, often came to visit me, in
the hope of confirming or banishing his uneasiness,
by my experience of the world.

I live, as I have already told you, a league and a
half from this point, upon the banks of a little river
which glides along the Sloping Mountain: there I
lead a solitary life, without wife, children, or slaves.

After having enjoyed, and lost, the rare felicity of
living with a congenial mind, the state of life which
appears the least wretched is doubtless that of soli-
tude. Every man who has much cause of complaint
against his fellow-creatures seeks to be alone. It is
also remarkable that all those nations which have
been brought to wretchedness by their opinions,
their manners, or their forms of government, have
produced ‘numerous classes of citizens altogether
devoted to solitude and celibacy. Such were the
Egyptians in their decline, and the Greeks of the
Lower Empire ; and such in our days are the Indians,
the Chinese, the modern Greeks, the Italians, and
the greater part of the eastern and southern nations
of Europe. Solitude, by removing men from the
miseries which follow in the train of social inter-
course, brings them in some degree back to the un-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 127

sophisticated enjoyment of nature. In the midst of
modern society, broken up by innumerable pre-
judices, the mind is in a constant turmoil of agitation.
It is incessantly revolving in itself a thousand tumult-
uous and contradictory opinions, by which the mem-
bers of an ambitious and miserable circle seek to
raise themselves above each other. But in solitude
the soul lays aside the morbid illusions which
trouble her, and resumes the pure consciousness of
herself, of nature, and of its Author, as the muddy
water of a torrent which has ravaged the plains,
coming to rest, and diffusing itself over some low
grounds out of its course, deposits there the slime it
has taken up, and, resuming its wonted transparency,
reflects, with its own shores, the verdure of the earth
and the light of heaven. Thus does solitude recruit
the powers of the body as well as those of the mind.
It is among hermits that are found the men who
carry human existence to its extreme limits: such
are the Bramins of India. In brief, I consider soli-
tude so necessary to happiness, even in the world
itself, that it appears to me impossible to derive last-
ing pleasure from any pursuit whatever, or to regulate
our conduct by any stable principle, if we do not
create for ourselves a mental void, whence our own
views rarely emerge, and into which the opinions of
others never enter. I do not mean to say that man
ought to live absolutely alone: he is connected by
his necessities with all mankind; his labors are due
to man; and he owes something, too, to the rest of
nature. But as God has given to each of us organs
perfectly adapted to the elements of the globe on
128 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

which we live, — feet for the soil, lungs for the air,
eyes for the light, without the power of changing the
use of any of these faculties, —He has reserved for
Himself, as the Author of life, that which is its chief
organ, the heart. I thus pass my days far from man-
kind, whom I wish to serve, and by whom I have
been persecuted. After having travelled over many
countries of Europe, and some parts of America and
Africa, I at length pitched my tent in this thinly-
peopled island, allured by its mild climate and its
solitudes.

A cottage which I built in the woods, at the foot
of a tree, a little field which I cleared with my own
hands, a river which glides before my door, suffice
for my: wants and for my pleasures. I blend with
these enjoyments the perusal of some chosen books,
which teach me to become better. They make that
world, which I have abandoned, still contribute
something to my happiness. They lay before me
pictures of those passions which render its inhab-
itants so miserable; and in the comparison I am
thus led to make between their lot and my own, I
feel a kind of negative enjoyment. Like a man
saved from shipwreck and thrown upon a rock, I
contemplate, from my solitude, the storms which rage
through the rest of the world; and my repose seems
more profound from the distant sound of the tempest.
As men have ceased to fall in my way, I no longer
‘view them with aversion: I only pity them. If I
sometimes fall in with an unfortunate being, I try
to help him by my counsels, as a passer-by on the
brink of a torrent extends his hand to save a wretch
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 129

from drowning. ButI have hardly ever found any
but the innocent attentive to my voice. Nature calls
the majority of men to her in vain. Each of them
forms an image of her for himself, and invests her
with his own passions. He pursues during the
whole of his life this vain phantom, which leads him
astray; and he afterwards complains to Heaven of
the misfortunes which he has thus created for him-
self. Among the many children of misfortune whom
I have endeavored to lead back to the enjoyments of
nature, I have not found one but was intoxicated
with his own miseries. They have listened to me at
first with attention, in the hope that I could teach
them how to acquire glory or fortune; but when they
found that I only wished to instruct them how to
dispense with these chimeras, their attention has
been converted into pity, because I did not prize
their miserable happiness. They blamed my solitary
life: they alleged that they alone were useful to men,
and they endeavored to draw me into their vortex.
But if I communicate with all, I lay myself open to
none. It is often sufficient for me to serve as a les-
son to myself. In my present tranquillity, I pass in
review the agitating pursuits of my past life, to
which I formerly attached so much value, — patron-
age, fortune, reputation, pleasure, and the opinions
which are ever at strife over all the earth. I com-
pare the men whom I have seen disputing furiously
over these vanities, and who are no more, to the tiny
waves of my rivulet, which break in foam against
its rocky bed, and disappear, never to return. As
for me, I suffer myself to float calmly down the
130 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

stream of time to the shoreless ocean of futurity;
while, in the contemplation of the present harmony
of nature, I elevate my soul towards its supreme
Author, and hope for a more happy lot in another
state of existence.

Although you cannot descry from my hermitage, sit-
uated in the midst of a forest, that immense variety of
objects which this elevated spot presents, the grounds
are disposed with peculiar beauty, at least to one
who, like me, prefers the seclusion of a home scene
to great and extensive prospects. The river which
glides before my door passes in a straight line across
the woods, looking like a long canal shaded by all
kinds of trees. Among them are the gum-tree, the
ebony-tree, and that which is here called dozs de
pomme, with olive and cinnamon-wood trees; while
in some parts the cabbage-palm trees raise their
naked stems more than a hundred feet high, their
summits crowned with a cluster of leaves, and tower-
ing above the woods like one forest piled upon
another. Lianas, of various foliage, intertwining
themselves among the trees, form, here, arcades of
foliage, there, long canopies of verdure. Most of
these trees shed aromatic odors so powerful, that the
garments of a traveller, who has passed through the
forest, often retain for hours the most delicious fra-
grance. Inthe season when they produce their lavish
blossoms, they appear as if half-covered with snow.
Towards the end of summer, various kinds of foreign
birds hasten, impelled by some inexplicable instinct,
from unknown regions on the other side of immense
oceans, to feed upon the grain and other vegetable
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 131

productions of the island ; and the brilliancy of their plu-
mage forms a striking contrast to the more sombre tints
of the foliage, embrowned by the sun. Among these
are various kinds of parroquets, and the blue pigeon,
called here the pigeon of Holland. Monkeys, the
domestic inhabitants of our forests, sport upon the
dark branches of the trees, from which they are easily
distinguished by their gray and greenish skin, and their
black visages. Some hang, suspended by the tail,
and swing themselves in air; others leap from branch
to branch, bearing their young in their arms. The
murderous gun has never affrighted these peaceful
children of nature. You hear nothing but sounds of
joy, —the warblings and unknown notes of birds
from the countries of the south, repeated from a dis-
tance by the echoes of the forest. The river, which
pours, in foaming eddies, over a bed of rocks,
through the midst of the woods, reflects here ana
there upon its limpid waters their venerable masses
of verdure and of shade, along with the sports ot
their happy inhabitants. About a thousand paces
from thence it forms several cascades, clear as crystal
in their fall, but broken at the bottom into frothy
surges. Innumerable confused sounds issue from
these watery tumults, which, borne by the winds
across the forest, now sink in distance, now all at
once swell out, booming on the ear like the bells ot
a cathedral. The air, kept ever in motion by.the run-
ning water, preserves upon the banks of the river,
amid all the summer heats, a freshness and verdure
rarely found in this island, even on the summits ot
the mountains.
132 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

At some distance from this place is a rock, placed
far enough from the cascade to prevent the ear from
being deafened with the noise of its waters, and suffi-
ciently near for the enjoyment of seeing it, of feeling
its coolness and hearing its gentle murmurs. Thither,
amidst the heats of summer, Madame de la Tour,
Margaret, Virginia, Paul, and myself, sometimes
repaired, to dine beneath the shadow of this rock.
Virginia, who always, in her most ordinary actions,
was mindful of the good of others, never ate of any
fruit in the fields without planting the seed or kernel
in the ground. ‘'From this,” said she, ‘trees will
come, which will yield their fruit to some traveller,
or at least to some bird.” One day, having eaten of
the papaw fruit at the foot of that rock, she planted
the seeds on the spot. Soon after, several papaw-
trees sprang up, among which was one with female
blossoms, that is to say, a fruit-bearing tree. This
tree, at the time of Virginia’s departure, was scarcely
as high as her knee; but, as it is a plant of rapid
growth, in the course of two years it had gained the
height of twenty feet, and the upper part of its stem
was encircled by several rows of ripe fruit. Paul,
wandering accidentally to the spot, was struck with
delight at seeing this lofty tree, which had been
planted by his beloved; but the emotion was tran-
sient, and instantly gave place to a deep melancholy
at this evidence of her long absence. The objects
which are habitually before us do not bring to our
minds an adequate idea of the rapidity of life; they
decline insensibly with ourselves: but it is those we
behold again, after having for some years lost sight
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 133

of them, that most powerfully impress us with a feel-
ing of the swiftness with which the tide of life flows
on. Paul was no less overwhelmed and affected at
the sight of this great papaw-tree, loaded with fruit,
than is the traveller when, after a long absence from
his own country, he finds his contemporaries no
more, but their children, whom he left at the breast,
themselves now become fathers of families. Paul
sometimes thought of cutting down the tree, which
recalled too sensibly the distracting remembrance
of Virginia’s prolonged absence. At other times,
contemplating it as a monument of her benevolence,
he kissed its trunk, and apostrophized it in terms of
the most passionate regret. Indeed, I have myself
gazed upon it with more emotion and more venera-
tion than upon the triumphal arches of Rome.
May nature, which every day destroys the monu-
ments of kingly ambition, multiply in our forests
those which testify the beneficence of a poor young
girl!

At the foot of this papaw-tree I was always sure to
meet with Paul when he came into our neighborhood.
One day I found him there absorbed in melancholy,
and a conversation took place between us, which I
will relate to you, if I do not weary you too much by
my long digressions: they are perhaps pardonable
to my age and to my last friendships. I will relate
it to you in the form of a dialogue, that you may
form some idea of the natural good sense of this
young man. You will easily distinguish the
speakers from the character of his questions and of
my answers.
134 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

PAUL.

““T am very unhappy. Mademoiselle de la Tour
has now been gone two years and eight months, and
we have heard
no tidings of
her for eight
months and a
half. She is
rich, and I am
poor: she has
forgotten me. I
have a_ great
mind to follow
her. I will go
to France; I
will serve the %
king ; I will*
make my for-
tune; and then
Mademoiselle de
la Tour’s aunt
will bestow her niece upon me when I shall have be-
come a great lord.”



THE OLD MAN.

‘« But, my dear friend, have not you told me that
you are not of noble birth?”

PAUL.

‘‘My mother has told me so; but, as for myself,
I know not what noble birth means. 1 never per-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 135

ceived that I had less than others, or that others had
more than I.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘Obscure birth, in France, shuts every door of
access to great employments; nor can you even be
received among any distinguished body of men, if
you labor under this disadvantage.”

PAUL.

“You have often told me that it was one source of
the greatness of France that her humblest subject
might attain the highest honors; and you have cited
to me many instances of celebrated men, who, born
in a mean condition, had conferred honor upon their
country. It was your wish, then, by concealing the
truth, to stimulate my ardor? ”

THE OLD MAN

“* Never, my son, would I lower it. I told you the
truth with regard to the past; but now everything
has undergone a great change. Everything in France
is now to be obtained by interest alone; every place
and employment is now become as it were the patri-
mony of a small number of families, or is divided
among public bodies. The king is a sun, and the
nobles and great corporate bodies surround him like
so many clouds: it is almost impossible for any of
his rays to reach you. Formerly, under less exclu-
sive administrations, such phenomena have been
136 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

seen. Then talents and merit showed themselves
everywhere, as newly cleared lands are always loaded
with abundance. But great kings, who can really
form a just estimate of men, and choose them with
judgment, are rare. The ordinary race of monarchs
allow themselves to be guided by the nobles and
people who surround them.”

PAUL.

“¢ But perhaps I shall find one of these nobles to
protect me.” :

THE OLD MAN.

‘‘To gain the protection of the great, you must
lend yourself to their ambition, and administer to
their pleasures. You would never succeed; for, in
addition to your obscure birth, you have too much
integrity.”

PAUL.

‘‘But I will perform such courageous actions, I
will be so faithful to my word, so exact in the per-
formance of my duties, so zealous and so constant in
my friendships, that I will render myself worthy to be
adopted by some one of them. In the ancient his-
tories you have made me read, J have seen many
examples of such adoptions.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘‘Oh, my young friend! among the Greeks and
Romans, even in their decline, the nobles had some
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 137

respect for virtue: but out of all the immense num-
ber of men, sprung from the mass of the people, in
France, who have signalized themselves in every pos-
sible manner, I do not recollect a single instance of
one being adopted by any great family. If it were
not for our kings, virtue, in our country, would be
eternally condemned as plebeian. As I said before,
the monarch sometimes, when he perceives it, ren-
ders to it due honor; but in the present day, the
distinctions which should be bestowed on merit are
generally to be obtained by money alone.”

PAUL.

‘If I cannot find a nobleman to adopt me, I will
seek to please some public body. I will espouse its
interests and its opinions: I will make myself be-
loved by it.”

THE OLD MAN.
“You will act then like other men? — you will
renounce your conscience to obtain a fortune?”
PAUL.

“‘Oh no! I will never lend myself to anything but
the truth.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘(Instead of making yourself beloved, you would
become an object of dislike. Besides, public bodies
have never taken much interest in the discovery of
138 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

truth. All opinions are nearly alike to ambitious
men, provided only that they themselves can gain
their ends.”

PAUL.

‘‘How unfortunate I am! Everything bars my
progress. Iam condemned to pass my life in ignoble
toil, far from Virginia!” As he
said this, he sighed deeply.








THE OLD MAN.

‘* Let God be your patron, and
mankind the public body you
would serve. Be constantly
attached to them both.
Families, corporations,
nations and kings, have,
all of them, their preju-
dices and their
passions; it is
oftennecessary
to serve them
by the practice
of vice: God
and mankind
at large require
only the exer-
cise of the vir-
tues.

‘*But why do you wish to be distinguished from
other men? It is hardly a natural sentiment, for, if
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 139

all men possessed it, every one would be at constant
strife with his neighbor. Be satisfied with fulfilling
your duty in the station in which Providence has
placed you: be grateful for your lot, which permits
you to enjoy the blessing of a quiet conscience, and
which does not compel you, like the great, to let your
happiness rest on the opinion of the little, or, like
the little, to cringe to the great, in order to obtain the
means of existence. You are now placed in a coun-
try and a condition in which you are not reduced to
deceive or to flatter any one, or to debase yourself,
as the greater part of those who seek their fortune in
Europe are obliged to do; in which the exercise of
no virtue is forbidden you; in which you may be,
with impunity, good, sincere, well informed, patient,
temperate, chaste, indulgent to others’ faults, pious,
and no shaft of ridicule be aimed at you to destroy
your wisdom, as yet only in its bud. Heaven has
given you liberty, health, a good conscience, and
friends: kings themselves, whose favor you desire,
are not so happy.”

PAUL.

“Ah! I want only to have Virginia with me: with-
out her I have nothing, —with her, I should possess
all my desire. She alone is to me birth, glory, and
fortune. But, since her relation will only give her to
some one with a great name, I will study. By the aid
of study and of books, learning and celebrity are to be
attained. I will become a man of science: I will ren-
der my knowledge useful to the service of my coun-
I4o PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

try, without injuring any one, or owning dependence
on any one. I will become celebrated, and my glory
shall be achieved only by myself.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘My son, talents are a gift yet more rare than
either birth or riches, and undoubtedly they are a -
greater good than either, since they can never be
taken away from us, and that they obtain for us
everywhere public esteem. But they may be said to
be worth all that they cost us. They are seldom
acquired but by every species of privation, by the
possession of exquisite sensibility, which often pro-
duces inward unhappiness, and which exposes us
without to the malice and persecutions of our con-
temporaries. The lawyer envies not, in France, the
glory of the soldier, nor does the soldier envy that
of the naval ‘officer; but they will all oppose you,
and bar your progress to distinction, because your
assumption of superior ability will wound the self-
love of them all. You say that you will do good to
men; but recollect, that he who makes the earth
produce a single ear of corn more, renders them a
greater service than he who writes a book.”

PAUL:

‘Oh! she, then, who planted this papaw-tree, has
made a more useful and more grateful present to the
inhabitants of these forests than if she had given
them a whole library.” So saying, he threw his arms
round the tree, and kissed it with transport.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. I4l

THE OLD MAN.

“¢ The best of books, — that which preaches noth-
ing but equality, brotherly love, charity, and peace,
—the Gospel, has
served as a pretext,
during many centu-
ries, for Europeans
to let loose all their
fury. How many
tyrannies, both pub-
lic and private, are
still practised in its
name on the face of
the earth! After this,
who will dare to flat-
ter himself that any-
thing he can write,
will be of service to
his fellow-men? Re-
member the fate of
most of the philos-
ophers who have
preached to them wisdom. Homer, who clothed
it in such noble verse, asked for alms all his life.
Socrates, whose conversation and example gave such
admirable lessons to the Athenians, was sentenced
by them to be poisoned. ° His sublime disciple, Plato,
was delivered over to slavery by the order of the
very prince who protected him; and, before them,
Pythagoras, whose humanity extended even to ani-
mals, was burned alive by the Crotoniates. What


142 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

do I say ?>— many even of these illustrious names
have descended to us disfigured by some traits of
satire by which they became characterized, human
ingratitude taking pleasure in thus recognizing them ;
and if, in the crowd, the glory of some names is come
down: to us without spot or blemish, we shall find that
they who have borne them have lived far from the
society of their contemporaries; like those statues
which are found entire beneath the soil in Greece
and Italy, and which, by being hidden in the bosom
of the earth, have escaped, uninjured, from the fury
of the barbarians.

“You see, then, that to acquire the glory which a
turbulent literary career can give you, you must not
only be virtuous, but ready, if necessary, to sacrifice
life itself. But, after all, do not fancy that the great
in France trouble themselves about such glory as
this. Little do they care for literary men, whose
knowledge brings them neither honors, nor power,
nor even admission at court. Persecution, it is true,
is rarely practised in this age, because it is habitually
indifferent to everything except wealth and luxury;
but knowledge and virtue no longer lead to distinc-
tion, since everything in the state is to be purchased
with money. Formerly, men of letters were certain
of reward by some place in the church, the magis-
tracy, or the administration: now, they are consid-
ered good for nothing but to write books. But this
fruit of their minds, little valued by the world at
large, is still worthy of its celestial origin. For these
books is reserved the privilege of shedding lustre on
obscure virtue, of consoling the unhappy, of enlight-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 143

ening nations, and of telling the truth even to kings.
This is, unquestionably, the most august commission
with which Heaven can honor a mortal upon this
earth. Where is the author who would not be con-
soled for the injustice or contempt of those who are
the dispensers of the ordinary gifts of fortune, when
he reflects that his work may pass from age to age,
from nation to nation, opposing a barrier to error and
to tyranny; and that, from amidst the obscurity in
which he has lived, there will shine forth a glory
which will efface that of the common herd of mon-
archs, the monuments of whose deeds perish in
oblivion, notwithstanding the flatterers who erect and
magnify them ?”

PAUL.

**Ah! Iam only covetous of glory to bestow it on
Virginia, and render her dear to the whole world.
But can you, who know so much, tell me whether
we shall ever be married? I should like to be a very
learned man, if only for the sake of knowing what
will come to pass.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘“Who would live, my son, if the future were
revealed to him ?—when a single anticipated mis-
fortune gives us so much useless uneasiness — when
the foreknowledge of one certain calamity is enough
to embitter every day that precedes it! It is better
not to pry too curiously, even into the things which
surround us. Heaven, which has given us the power
144 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

of reflection to foresee our necessities, gave us also

those very necessities to set limits to its exercise.”
PAUL.

“‘You.tell me that with money people in Europe
acquire dignities and honors. I will go, then, to
enrich myself in Bengal, and afterwards proceed to
Paris, and marry Virginia. I will embark at once.”

THE OLD MAN.

“What! would you leave her mother and yours ?”

PAUL.

«‘Why, you yourself have advised my going to the
Indies.”

THE OLD MAN.

“Virginia was then here; but you are now the
only means of support both of her mother and of
your own.”

PAUL.

‘Virginia will assist them, by means of her rich
relation.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘‘The rich care little for those from whom no
honor is reflected upon themselves in the world.
Many of them have relations much more to be pitied
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 145

than Madame de la Tour, who, for want of their
assistance, sacrifice their liberty for bread, and pass
their lives immured within the walls of a convent.”

PAUL.

‘““Oh, what a country is Europe! Virginia must
come back here. What need has she of a rich rela-
tion? She was so happy in these huts; she looked
so beautiful and so well dressed with a red handker-
chief or a few flowers round her head! Return,
Virginia! leave your sumptuous mansions and your
grandeur, and come back to these rocks—to the
shade of these woods and of our cocoa-trees. Alas!
you are perhaps even now unhappy!” —and he
began to shed tears. “*My father,” continued he,
‘hide nothing from me: if you cannot tell me
whether I shall marry Virginia, tell me at least if
she loves me still, surrounded as she is by noblemen
who speak to the king, and who go to see her.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘‘Oh, my dear friend! I am sure, for many reasons,
that she loves you; but above all, because she is
virtuous.” At these words he threw himself on my
neck in a transport of joy.

PAUL.

‘“‘But do you think that the women of Europe are
false, as they are represented in the comedies and
books which you have lent me ?”
146 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

THE OLD MAN.

‘“*Women are false in those countries where men
are tyrants. Violence always engenders a disposi-
tion to deceive.”

PAUL.

‘‘In what way can men tyrannize over women ?”

THE OLD MAN.

‘In giving them in marriage without consulting
their inclinations: —in uniting a young girl to an
old man, or a woman of sensibility to a frigid and
indifferent husband.”

PAUL.

““Why not join together those who are suited to
each other, —the young to the young, and lovers
to those they love?”

THE OLD MAN.

‘« Because few young men in France have property
enough to support them when they are married, and
cannot acquire it till the greater part of their life is
passed. While young, they seduce the wives of
others, and when they are old, they cannot secure
the affections of their own. At first, they them-
selves are deceivers; and afterwards, they are de-
ceived in their turn. This is one of the re-actions of
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 147

that eternal justice by which the world is governed :
an excess on one side is sure to be balanced by one
on the other. Thus, the greater part of Europeans



pass their lives in this twofold irregularity, which
increases everywhere, in the same proportion that
wealth is accumulated in the hands of a few individ-
uals. Society is like a garden, where shrubs cannot
grow if they are overshadowed by lofty trees: but
there is this wide difference between them, — that the
beauty of a garden may result from the admixture of
a small number of forest trees, while the prosperity
of a state depends on the multitude and equality of
its citizens, and not on a small number of very rich
men.”

PAUL.

‘«But where is the necessity for being rich in order
to marry? 2
148 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

THE OLD MAN.

“In order to pass through life in abundance, with-
out being obliged to work.”

PAUL.

‘*But why not work? I am sure I work hard
enough.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘¢In Europe, working with your hands is con-
sidered a degradation: it is compared to the labor
performed by a machine. The occupation of culti-
vating the earth is the most despised of all. Even
an artisan is held in more estimation than a peas-
ant.”

PAUL.

«*What! do you mean to say that the art which
furnishes food for mankind is despised in Europe?
I hardly understand you.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘Oh! it is impossible for a person educated ac-
cording to nature to form an idea of the depraved
state of society. It is easy to form a precise notion
of order, but not of disorder. Beauty, virtue, happi-
ness, have all their defined proportions: deformity,
vice, and misery have none.”
PAUL AND VIRGINIA, 149

PAUL.

‘The rich then are always very happy! They
meet with no obstacles to the fulfilment of their
wishes, and they can lavish happiness on those
whom they love.”

THE OLD MAN.

‘Far from it, my son! They are, for the most
part, satiated with pleasure, for this very reason —
that it costs them no trouble. Have you never your.
self experienced how much the pleasure of repose is
increased by fatigue; that of eating, by hunger; ot
that of drinking, by thirst? The pleasure also of lov-
ing and being beloved is only to be acquired by innu-
merable privations and sacrifices. Wealth, by antici.
pating all their necessities, deprives its possessors ol
all these pleasures. To this evmuz, consequent upon
satiety, may also be added the pride which springs
from their opulence, and which is wounded by the
most trifling privation, when the greatest enjoyments
have ceased to charm. The perfume of a thousand
roses gives pleasure but for a moment; but the pain
- occasioned bya single thorn endures long after the
infliction of the wound. A single evil in the midst
of their pleasures is to the rich like a thorn among
flowers ; to the poor, on the contrary, one pleasure
amidst all their troubles is a flower among a wilder-
ness of thorns; they have a most lively enjoyment of
it. The effect of everything is increased by contrast ;
nature has balanced all things. Which condition,
after all, do you consider preferable,—to have


150 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

scarcely anything to hope and everything to fear, or
to have everything to hope and nothing to fear?
The former condition is that of the rich, the latter
that of the poor. But either of these extremes is
with difficulty supported by man, whose happiness
consists in a middle station of life, in union with
virtue.”

PAUL.

‘« What do you understand by virtue?”

THE OLD MAN.

‘©To you, my son, who support your family by .
your labor, it need hardly be defined. Virtue con-
sists in endeavoring to do all the good we can to
others, with an ultimate intention of pleasing God
alone.”

PAUL.

«Qh! how virtuous, then, is Virginia! Virtue led
her to seek for riches, that she might practise benev-
olence. Virtue induced her to quit this island, and
virtue will bring her back to it.”

The idea of her speedy return firing the imagina-
tion of this young man, all his anxieties suddenly
vanished. Virginia, he was persuaded, had not writ-
ten, because she would soon arrive. It took so little
time to come from Europe with a fair wind! Then
he enumerated the vessels which had made this pas-
sage of four thousand five hundred leagues in less than
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. I51

three months; and perhaps the vessel in which Vir-
ginia had embarked might not be more than two.
Shipbuilders were now so ingenious, and sailors were



so expert! He then talked to me of the arrange-
ments he intended to make for her reception, of the
new house he would build for her, and of the pleas-
ures and surprises which he would contrive for her
every day, when she was his wife. His wife! The
idea filled him with ecstasy. ‘‘At least, my dear
father,” said he, *‘ you shall then do no more work
than you please. As Virginia will be rich, we shall
152 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

have plenty of negroes, and they shall work for you.
You shall always live with us, and have no other
care than to amuse yourself and be happy ;”—and,
his heart throbbing with joy, he flew to communicate
these exquisite anticipations to his family.

In a short time, however, these enchanting hopes
were succeeded by the most cruel apprehensions. It
is always the effect of violent passions to throw the
soul into opposite extremes. Paul returned the next
day to my dwelling, overwhelmed with melancholy,
and said to me,— ‘‘I hear nothing from Virginia.
Had she left Europe, she would have written me word
of her departure. Ah! the reports which I have heard
concerning her are but too well founded. Her aunt
has married her to some great lord. She, like others,
has been undone by the love of riches. In those
books which paint women so well, virtue is treated
but as a subject of romance. If Virginia had been
virtuous, she would never have forsaken her mother
and me. I do nothing but think of her, and she has
forgotten me. I am wretched, and she is diverting
herself. The thought distracts me: I cannot bear
myself! Would to Heaven that war were declared
in India! I would go there and die.”

““My son,” I answered, ‘‘that courage which
prompts us on to court death is but the courage of
a moment, and is often excited only by the vain
applause of men, or by the hope of posthumous
renown. There is another description of courage,
rarer and more necessary, which enables us to sup-
port, without witness and without applause, the vex-
ations of life: this virtue is patience. Relying for
PAUL -AND VIRGINIA. 153

support, not upon the opinions of others, or upon the
impulse of the passions, but upon the will of God,
patience is the courage of virtue.”

“Ah!” cried he, “I am then without virtue!
Everything overwhelms me and drives me to de-
spair.” —‘* Equal, constant, and invariable virtue,”
I replied, << belongs not to man. In the midst of the
many passions which agitate us, our reason is disor-
dered and obscured: but there is an ever-burning
lamp at which we can rekindle its flame; and that
is, literature.

‘« Literature, my dear son, is the gift of Heaven, —
a ray of that wisdom by which the universe is gov-
erned, and which man, inspired by a celestial intelli-
gence, has drawn down to earth. Like the rays of
the sun, it enlightens us, it rejoices us, it warms us
with a heavenly flame, and seems, in some sort like
the element of fire, to bend all nature to our use.
By its means we are enabled to bring around us all
things, all places, all men, and all times. It assists
us to regulate our manners and our life. By its aid,
too, our passions are calmed, vice is suppressed, and
virtue encouraged by the memorable examples of
great and good men which it has handed down to us,
and whose time-honored images it ever brings before
our eyes. Literature is a daughter of Heaven, who
has descended upon earth to soften and to charm
away all the evils of the human race. The greatest
writers have ever appeared in the worst times, —in
times in which society can hardly be held together, —
the times of barbarism and every species of depravity.
My son, literature has consoled an infinite number of
rsa PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

men more unhappy than yourself: Xenophon, ban-
ished from his country after having saved to her ten
thousand of her sons; Scipio Africanus, wearied to
death by the calumnies of the Romans; Lucullus,
tormented by their cabals; and Catinat, by the in-
gratitude of a court. The Greeks, with their never-
failing ingenuity, assigned to each of the Muses a
portion of the great circle of human intelligence for
her especial superintendence ; we ought, in the same
manner, to give up to them the regulation of our pas-
sions, to bring them under proper restraint. Litera~
ture, in this imaginative guise, would thus fulfil, in
relation to the powers of the soul, the same functions
as the Hours, who yoked and conducted the chariot
of the Sun.

‘“‘Have recourse to your books, then, my son.
The wise men who have written before our days are
travellers who have preceded us in the paths of mis-
fortune, and who stretch out a friendly hand towards
us, and invite us to join their society, when we are
abandoned by everything else. A good book is a
good friend.”

“Ah!” cried Paul, ‘‘I stood in no need of books
when Virginia was here, and she had studied as little
as myself: but when she looked at me and called me
her friend, I could not feel unhappy.”

‘‘Undoubtedly,” said I, ‘‘ there is no friend so
agreeable as a mistress by whom we are beloved.
There is, moreover, in woman a liveliness and gayety
which powerfully tend to dissipate the melancholy
feelings of man: her presence drives away the dark
phantoms of imagination produced by over-reflection.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 155

Upon her countenance sit soft attraction and tender
confidence. What joy is not heightened when it is
‘shared by her? What brow is not unbent by her
smiles? What anger can resist her tears? Vir-
ginia will return with more philosophy than you, and
will be quite surprised to find the garden so unfin-
ished ; —she who could think of its embellishments
in spite of all the persecutions of her aunt, and when
far from her mother and from you.”

The idea of Virginia’s speedy return reanimated
the drooping spirits of her lover, and he resumed his
rural occupations, happy amidst his toils, in the re-
flection that they would soon find a termination so
dear to the wishes of his heart.

One morning, at break of day (it was the 24th De-
cember, 1744), Paul when he arose perceived a white
flag hoisted upon the Mountain of Discovery. This
flag he knew to be the signal of a vessel descried at
sea. He instantly flew to the town to learn if this
vessel brought any tidings of Virginia, and waited
there till the return of the pilot, who was gone, ac-
cording to custom, to board the ship. The pilot did
not return till the evening, when he brought the Gov-
ernor information that the signalled vessel was the
Saint-Geran, of seven hundred tons burthen, and
commanded by a captain of the name of Aubin;
that she was now four leagues out at sea, but would
probably anchor at Port Louis the following after-
noon, if the wind became fair: at present there was
acalm. The pilot then handed to the Governor a
number of letters which the Saint-Geran had brought
from France, among which was one addressed to
156 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Madame de la Tour, in the handwriting of Virginia.
Paul seized upon the letter, kissed it with transport,
and, placing it in his bosom, flew to the plantation.
No sooner did he perceive from a distance the family,
who were awaiting his return upon the Rock of
Adieus, than he waved the letter aloft in the air,
without being able to utter a word. No sooner was
the seal broken, than they all crowded round Ma-
dame de la Tour, to hear the letter read. Virginia in-
formed her mother that she had experienced much ill-
usage from her aunt, who, after having in vain urged
her to a marriage against her inclinations, had disin-
herited her, and had sent her back at a time when
she would probably reach the Mauritius during the
hurricane season. In vain, she added, had she en-
deavored to soften her aunt, by representing what
she owed to her mother, and to her early habits:
she was treated as a romantic girl, whose head had
been turned by novels. She could now only think of
the joy of again seeing and embracing her beloved
family, and would have gratified her ardent desire
at once by landing in the pilot’s boat, if the captain
had allowed her; but that he had objected, on ac-
count of the distance, and of a heavy swell, which,
notwithstanding the calm, reigned in the open
sea. ‘

As soon as the letter was finished, the whole of
the family, transported with joy, repeatedly exclaimed,
‘‘ Virginia is arrived!” and mistresses and servants
embraced each other. Madame de la Tour said to
Paul, — ‘‘ My son, go and’inform our neighbor of
Virginia's arrival.” Domingo immediately lighted a
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 157

torch of bots de ronde, and he and Paul bent their
way towards my dwelling.

It was about ten o’clock at night, and I was just
going to extinguish my lamp and retire to rest, when
I perceived through the pali-
sades round my cottage a
light in the woods. Soon
after, I heard the voice of
Paul calling me. 1 instantly
arose, and had hardly dressed
myself, when Paul, almost
beside himself, and panting
for breath, sprang on my
neck, crying— ‘‘ Comealong,
come along! Virginia is
arrived. Let us go to the
port: the vessel will anchor
at break of day.”

Scarcely had he uttered
the words, when we set off.
As we were passing through
the woods of the Sloping
Mountain, and were already
on the road which leads from
the Shaddock Grove to the
port, I heard some one walk-
ing behind us. It proved to
be a negro, and he was ad-
vancing with hasty steps. When he had reached
us, I asked him whence he came, and whither
he was going with such expedition. He answered,
— ‘‘I come from that part of the island called Golden


158 PAUL AND VIRGINIA,

Dust; and am sent to the port, to inform the Gov-
ernor that a ship from France has anchored under
the Isle of Amber. She is firing guns of distress,
for the sea is very rough.” Having said this, the
man left us, and pursued his journey without any
further delay.

I then said to Paul, —‘‘Let us go towards the
quarter of the Golden Dust, and meet Virginia there.
It is not more than three leagues from hence.” We
accordingly bent our course towards the northern
part of the island. The heat was suffocating. The
moon had risen, and was surrounded by three large
black circles. A frightful darkness shrouded the sky ;
but the frequent flashes of lightning discovered to us
long rows ofthick and gloomy clouds, hanging very
low, and heaped together over the centre of the
island, being driven in with great rapidity from the
ocean, although not a breath of air was perceptible
upon the land. As we walked along, we thought we
heard peals of thunder; but on listening more atten-
tively, we perceived that it was the sound of cannon
at a distance, repeated by the echoes. These omin-
ous sounds, joined to the tempestuous aspect of the
heavens, made me shudder. I had little doubt of
their being signals of distress from a ship in danger.
In about half an hour the firing ceased, and I found
the silence still more appalling than the dismal
sounds which had preceded it.

We hastened on without uttering a word, or daring
to communicate to each other our mutual apprehen-
sions. At midnight, by great exertion, we arrived

at the seashore, in that part of the island called
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 159

Golden Dust. The billows were breaking against
the beach with a horrible noise, covering the rocks
and the strand with foam of a dazzling whiteness,
blended with sparks of fire. By these phosphoric
gleams we distinguished, notwithstanding the dark-
ness, a number of fishing canoes, drawn up high
upon the beach.

At the entrance of a wood, a short distance from
us, we saw a fire, round which a party of the inhabit-
ants was assembled. We repaired thither, in order
to rest ourselves till the morning. While we were
seated near this fire, one of the standers-by related,
that late in the afternoon he had seen a vessel in the
open sea, driven towards the island by the currents ;
that the night had hidden it from his view; and that
two hours after sunset he had heard the firing of
signal-guns of distress, but that the surf was so high
that it was impossible to launch a boat to go off to
her; that a short time after, he thought he perceived
the glimmering of the watch-lights on board the
vessel, which he feared, by its having approached so
near the coast, had steered between the main land
and the little island of Amber, mistaking the latter
for the Point of Endeavor, near which vessels pass
in order to gain Port Louis; and that, if this were
the casg, which, however, he would not take upon
himself to be certain of, the ship, he thought, was in
very great danger. Another islander then informed
us, that he had frequently crossed the channel which
separates the Isle of Amber from the coast, and had
sounded it; that the anchorage was very good, and
that the ship would there lie as safely as in the best
160 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

harbor. ‘¢I would stake all I am worth upon it,”
said he, ‘‘and if I were on board, I should sleep as
sound as on shore.” A third bystander declared
that it was impossible for the ship to enter that
channel, which was scarcely navigable for a boat.
He was certain, he said, that he had seen the vessel
at anchor beyond the Isle of Amber; so that, if the
wind arose in the morning, she could either put
to sea or gain the harbor. Other inhabitants gave
different opinions upon this subject, which they con-
tinued to discuss in the usual desultory manner of
the indolent creoles. Paul and I observed a pro-
found silence. We remained on this spot till break
of day, but the weather was too hazy to admit of our
distinguishing any object at sea, everything being
covered with fog. All we could descry to seaward
was a dark cloud, which they told us was the Isle of
Amber, at the distance of a quarter of a league from
the coast. Onthis gloomy day we could only discern
the point of land on which we were standing, and the
peaks of some inland mountains which started out
occasionally from the midst of the clouds that hung
around them.

At about seven in the morning we heard the sound
of drums in the woods: it announced the approach
of the Governor, Monsieur de la Bourdonnais, who
soon after arrived on horseback, at the head ofa
detachment of soldiers armed with muskets, and a
crowd of islanders and negroes. He drew up his
soldiers upon the beach, and ordered them to make
a general discharge. This was no sooner done, than
we perceived a glimmering light upon the water,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 161

which was instantly followed by the report of a can-
non. We judged that the ship was at no great dis-
tance, and all ran towards that part whence the light
and sound proceeded. We now discerned through
the fog the hull and

yards of a large

vessel. We were
so near to her

that, notwith-
standing the








tumult of the waves, we could distinctly hear the
whistle of the boatswain and the shouts of the sailors,
who cried out three times, VIVE LE ROI! this being
the cry of the French in extreme danger, as well as in
exuberant joy ; —as though they wished to call their
162 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

prince to their aid, or to testify to him that they are
prepared to lay down their lives in his service.

As soon as the Saint-Geran perceived that we were
near enough to render her assistance, she continued
to fire guns regularly at intervals of three minutes.
Monsieur de la Bourdonnais caused great fires to be
lighted at certain distances upon thestrand, and sent
to all the inhabitants of the neighborhood in search
of provisions, planks, cables, and empty barrels. A
number of people soon arrived, accompanied by their
negroes loaded with provisions and cordage, which
they had brought from the plantations of Golden Dust,
from the district of La Flaque, and from the river of
the Rampart. One of the most aged of these planters,
approaching the Governor, said to him, —‘* We have
heard all night hollow noises in the mountain; inthe
woods, the leaves of the trees are shaken, although
there is no wind; the sea-birds seek refuge upon the
land: it is certain that all these signs announce a
hurricane.” ‘‘ Well, my friends,” answered the Gov-
ernor, ‘‘we are prepared for it, and no doubt the
vessel is also.”

Everything, indeed, presaged the near approach of
the hurricane. The centre of the clouds in the zenith
was of a dismal black, while their skirts were tinged
with a copper-colored hue. The air resounded with
the cries of tropic-birds, petrels, frigate-birds and in-
numerable other sea-fowl which, notwithstanding the
obscurity of the atmosphere, were seen coming from
every point of the horizon to seek for shelter in the
island. .

Towards nine in the morning we heard in the direc-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 163

tion of the ocean the most terrific noise, like the
sound of thunder mingled with that of torrents rush-
ing down the steeps of lofty mountains. A general
cry was heard of, ‘* There is the hurricane!” —and the
next moment a frightful gust of wind dispelled the fog
which covered the Isle of Amber and its channel.



The Saint-Geran then presented herself to our view,
her deck crowded with people, her yards and top-
masts lowered down, and her flag half-mast high,
moored by four cables at her bow and one at her
stern. She hadanchored between the Isle of Amber
and the mainland, inside the chain of reefs which
encircles the island, and which she had passed through
ina place where no vessel had ever passed before.
164 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

She presented her head to the waves that rolled in
from the open sea, and as each billow rushed into
the narrow strait where she lay, her bow lifted to such
a degree as to show her keel; and at the same
moment her stern, plunging into the water, disap-
peared. altogether from our sight, as if it were swal-
lowed up by the surges. In this position, driven by
the winds and waves towards the shore, it was equally
impossible for her to return by the passage through
which she had made her way; or, by cutting her
cables, to strand herself upon the beach, from which
she was separated by sandbanks and reefs of rocks.
Every billow which broke upon the coast advanced
roaring to the bottom of the bay, throwing up heaps
of shingle to the distance of fifty feet upon the land;
then, rushing back, laid bare its sandy bed, from
which it rolled immense stones, with a hoarse and
dismal noise. The sea, swelled by the violence of
the wind, rose higher every moment; and the whole
channel between this island and the Isle of Amber
was soon one vast sheet of white foam, full of yawn-
ing pits of black and deep billows. Heaps of this
foam, more than six feet high, were piled up at the
bottom of the bay; and the winds which swept its
surface carried masses of it over the steep sea-bank,
scattering it upon the land to the distance of half a
league. These innumerable white flakes, driven hori-
zontally even to the very foot of the mountains, looked
like snow issuing from the bosom of the ocean. The
appearance of the horizon portended a lasting tem-
pest: the sky and the water seemed blended together.
Thick masses of clouds, of a frightful form, swept




VIRGINIA ON BOARD THE SHIP.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 165

across the zenith with the swiftness of birds, while
others appeared motionless as rocks. Nota single
spot of blue sky could be discerned in the whole
firmament; and a pale yellow gleam only lightened
up all the objects of the earth, the sea, and the
skies.

From the violent rolling of the ship, what we ail
dreaded happened at last. The cables which held
her bow were torn away; she then swung to a single
hawser, and was instantly dashed upon the rocks, at
the distance of half a cable’s length from the shore.
A general cry of horror issued from the spectators.
Paul rushed forward to throw himself into the sea,
when, seizing him by the arm:

‘My son,” I exclaimed, ‘‘ would you perish?” —
‘« Let me go to save her,” he cried, “ or let me die!”

Seeing that despair had deprived him of reason,
Domingo and I, in order to preserve him, fastened a
long cord round his waist, and held it fast by the end.
Paul then precipitated himself towards the Saint-
Geran, now swimming, and now walking upon the
rocks. Sometimes he had hopes of reaching the
vessel, which the sea, by the reflux of its waves, had
left almost dry, so that you could have walked round
it on foot; but suddenly the billows, returning with
fresh fury, shrowded it beneath mountains of water,
which then lifted it upright upon its keel. The break-
ers at the same moment threw the unfortunate Paul
far upon the beach, his legs bathed in blood, his
bosom wounded, and himself half dead. The
moment he had recovered the use of his senses, he
arose, and returned with new ardor towards the
166 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

vessel, the parts of which now yawned asunder from
the violent strokes of the billows. The crew then,
despairing of their safety, threw themselves in crowds
into the seaupon yards, planks, hencoops, tables, and
barrels. At this moment we beheld an object which
wrung our hearts with grief and pity: a young lady
appeared in the stern-gallery of the Saint-Geran,
stretching out her arms towards him who was making
so many efforts to join her. It was Virginia. She
had discovered her lover by his intrepidity. The
sight of this amiable girl, exposed to such horrible
danger, filled us with unutterable despair. As for
Virginia, witha firm and dignified mien, she waved
her hand, as if bidding us an eternal farewell. All
the sailors had flung themselves into the sea, except
one, who still remained upon the deck, and who was
naked, and strong as Hercules.

This man approached Virginia with respect, and
kneeling at her feet, attempted to force her to throw
off her clothes ; but she repulsed him with modesty,
and turned away her head. Then were heard re-
doubled cries from the spectators, ‘‘ Save her! —
save her !— do not leave her!” But at that moment
a mountain billow, of enormous magnitude, ingulfed
itself between the Isle of Amber and the coast, and
menaced the shattered vessel, towards which it rolled
bellowing, with its black sides and foaming head.

At this terrible sight the sailor flung himself into
the sea, and Virginia, seeing death inevitable, crossed
her hands upon her breast, and, raising upwards her
serene and beauteous eyes, seemed an angel prepared
to take her flight to heaven.
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 167

Oh. day of horror! Alas! everything was swal-
lowed up by the relentless billows. The surge threw
some of the spectators, whom an im-
pulse of humanity had prompted to
advance towards Virginia, far upon
the beach, and also the sailor who
had endeavored to save her life. This
man, who had escaped from almost
certain death, kneeling on
the sand, exclaimed, —









“Oh my God! Thou hast saved my life, but I would
have given it willingly for that excellent young lady,
who persevered in not undressing herself as I had
done.”
168 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

Domingo and I drew the unfortunate Paul to the
shore. He was senseless, and blood was flowing
from his mouth and ears. The
Governor ordered him to be put
into the hands of a surgeon, while
we, on our part, wandered along
the beach, in hopes that the sea
would throw up the corpse of Vir-
ginia. But the wind having sud- -









denly changed, as it frequently happens during
hurricanes, our search was in vain; and we had the
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 169

grief of thinking that we should not be able to
bestow on this sweet and unfortunate girl the last
sad duties. We retired from the spot overwhelmed
with dismay, and our minds wholly occupied by
one cruel loss, although numbers had perished in
the wreck. Some of the spectators seemed tempted,
from the fatal destiny of this virtuous girl, to doubt
the existence of Providence; for there are in life such
terrible, such unmerited evils, that even the Oe of
the wise is sometimes shaken.

In the meantime, Paul, who began to recover his
senses, was taken toa house in the neighborhood,
till he was in a fit state to be removed to his own
home. Thither I bent my way with Domingo, to
discharge the melancholy duty of preparing Virginia’s
mother and her friend for the disastrous event which
had happened. When we had reached the entrance
of the valley of the river of Fan-Palms, some negroes
informed us that the sea had thrown up many pieces
of the wreck in the opposite bay. We descended
towards it; and one of the first objects which struck
my sight upon the beach was the corpse of Virginia.
The body was half covered with sand, and preserved
the attitude in which we had seen her perish. Her
features were not sensibly changed; her eyes were
closed, and her countenance was still serene ; but the
pale purple hues of death were blended on her cheek
with the blush of virgin modesty. One of her
hands was placed upon her clothes; and the other,
which she held on her heart, was fast closed, and so
stiffened that it was with difficulty 1 took from its
grasp a small box. How great was my emotion,
170 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

when I saw it contained the picture of Paul, which
she had promised him never to part with while she
lived !

At the sight of this last mark of the fidelity and
tenderness of the unfortunate girl, I wept bitterly.
As for Domingo, he beat his breast, and pierced the
air with his shrieks. With heavy hearts we then
carried the body of Virginia to a fisherman’s hut, and
gave it in charge to some poor Malabar women, who
carefully washed away the sand.

While they were employed in this melancholy
office, we ascended the hill with trembling steps to
the plantation. We found Madame de la Tour and
Margaret at prayer, hourly expecting to have tidings
from the ship. As soon as Madame de la Tour saw
me coming, she eagerly cried, —‘* Where is my
daughter—my dear daughter—my child?” My
silence and my tears apprised her of her misfortune.
She was instantly seized with a convulsive stopping
of the breath and agonizing pains, and her voice was
only heard in sighs and groans. Margaret cried, —
‘* Where is my son? I do not see my son!” —and
fainted.

We ran to her assistance. In a short time she
recovered, and being assured that Paul was safe, and
under the care of the Governor, she thought of noth-
ing but of succoring her friend, who recovered from
one fainting fit only to fall into another. Madame
de la Tour passed the whole night in these cruel
sufferings, and I became convinced that there was no
sorrow like that of a mother.

When she recovered her senses, she cast a fixed,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 171

unconscious look towards heaven. In vain her friend
and myself pressed her hands in ours: in vain we
called upon her by the most tender names; she
appeared wholly insensible to these testimonials of
ouf affection, and no sound issued from her oppressed
bosom but deep and hollow moans.

During the morning, Paul was carried home in a
palanquin. He had now recovered the use of his rea-
son, but was unable to utter a word. His interview
with his mother and Madame de la Tour, which I had
dreaded, produced a better effect than all my cares.
A ray of consolation gleamed on the countenance of
the two unfortunate mothers. They pressed close
to him, clasped him in their arms, and kissed him:
their tears, which excess of anguish had till now
dried up at the source, began to flow.

Paul mixed his tears with theirs; and nature hav-
ing thus found relief, a long stupor succeeded the
convulsive pangs they had suffered, and afforded
them a lethargic repose, which was, in truth, like
that of death.

Monsieur de la Bourdonnais sent to apprise me
secretly that the corpse of Virginia had been borne
to the town by his order, from whence it was to be
transferred to the church of the Shaddock Grove.
I immediately went down to Port Louis, where I
found a multitude assembled from all parts of the
island, in order to be present at the funeral solem-
nity, as if the isle had lost that which was nearest
and dearest to it. The vessels in the harbor had
their yards crossed, their flags half-mast, and fired
guns at long intervals.
172 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

A body of grenadiers led the funeral procession,
with their muskets reversed, their muffled drums send-
ing forth slow and dismal sounds. Dejection was
depicted in the countenances of these warriors, who
had so often braved death in battle without changing
color.

Eight young ladies of considerable families of the
island, dressed in white, and bearing palm branches
in their hands, carried the corpse of their amiable
companion, which was covered with flowers.

They were followed by a chorus of children, chant-
ing hymns, and by the Governor, his field officers, all
the principal inhabitants of the island, and an im-
mense crowd of people.

This imposing funeral solemnity had been ordered
by the administration of the country, which was
desirous of doing honor to the virtues of Virginia.
But when the mournful procession arrived at the foot
of this mountain, within sight of those cottages of
which she had so long been an inmate and an orna-
ment, diffusing happiness all around them, and which
her loss had now filled with despair, the funeral
pomp was interrupted, the hymns and anthem
ceased, and the whole plain resounded with sighs
and lamentations. Numbers of young girls ran from
the neighboring plantations, to touch the coffin of
Virginia with their handkerchiefs, and, with chaplets
and crowns of flowers, invoking her as a saint.
Mothers asked of Heaven a child like Virginia;
lovers, a heart as faithful; the poor, as tender a
friend; and the slaves, as kind a mistress.

When the procession had reached the place of
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 173

interment, some negresses of Madagascar and
Caffres of Mozambique placed a number of baskets
of fruit around the corpse and hung pieces of stuff
upon the adjoining trees, according to the custom of



their several countries. Some Indian women from
Bengal, also, and from the coast of Malabar, brought
cages full of small birds, which they set at liberty
upon her coffin. Thus deeply did the loss of this
amiable being affect the natives of different countries,
174. : PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

and thus was the ritual of various religions performed
over the tomb of unfortunate virtue.

It became necessary to place guards round her
grave, and to employ gentle force in removing some
of the daughters of the neighboring villagers, who



endeavored to throw themselves into it, saying, that
they had no longer any consolation to hope for in
this world, and that nothing remained for them but
to die with their benefactress.

On the western side of the church of the Shaddock
Grove is a small copse of bamboos, where, in return-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 175

ing from mass with her mother and Margaret, Virginia
loved to rest herself, seated by the side of him whom
she then called her brother. This was the spot
selected for her interment.

At his return from the funeral solemnity, Monsieur
de la Bourdonnais came up here, followed by part of
his numerous retinue. He offered Madame de la
Tour and her friend all the assistance it was in his
power to bestow. After briefly expressing his indig-
nation at the conduct of her unnatural aunt, he
advanced to Paul, and said everything which he
thought most likely to soothe and console him. —
‘‘ Heaven is my witness,” said he, ‘‘that I wish to
insure your happiness, and that of your family. My
dear friend, you must go to France: I will obtain a
commission for you, and during your absence I will
take the same care of your mother as if she were my
own.” He then offered him-his hand; but Paul drew
away, and turned his head aside, unable to bear his
sight.

I remained for some time at the plantation of my
unfortunate friends, that I might render to them and
Paul those offices of friendship that were in my
power, and which might alleviate, though they
could not heal, the wounds of calamity. At the
end of three weeks Paul was able to walk; but his
mind seemed to droop in proportion as his body
gathered strength. He was insensible to every-
thing; his look was vacant; and when asked a
question, he made no reply. Madame de la Tour,
who was dying, said to him often, — ‘‘ My son, while
I look at you, I think I see my dear Virginia.” At
176 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

the name of Virginia he shuddered, and hastened
away from her, notwithstanding the entreaties of
his mother, who begged him to come back to her
friend. He used to go alone into the garden, and
seat himself at the foot of Virginia’s cocoa-tree, with
his eyes fixed upon the fountain. The Governor’s
surgeon, who had shown the most humane attention
to Paul and the whole family, told us that, in order
to cure the deep melancholy which had taken pos-
session of his mind, we must allow him to do what-
ever he pleased, without contradiction: this, he said,
afforded the only chance of overcoming the silence
in which he persevered.

I resolved to follow this advice. The first use
which Paul made of his returning strength was to ab-
sent himself from the plantation. Being determined
not to lose sight of him, I set out immediately, and
desired Domingo to take some provisions and accom-
pany us. The young man’s strength and spirits
seemed renewed as he descended the mountain. He
first took the road to the Shaddock Grove; and
when he was near the church in the Alley of Bamboos,
he walked directly to the spot where he saw some
earth fresh turned up: kneeling down there, and
raising his eyes to heaven, he offered up a long
prayer. This appeared to me a favorable symptom
of the return of his reason; since this mark of confi-
dence in the Supreme Being showed that his mind
was beginning to resume its natural functions. Do-
mingo’ and I, following his example, fell upon our
knees, and mingled our prayers with his. When he
arose, he bent his way, paying little attention to us,
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 177

towards the northern part of the island. As I knew
that he was not only ignorant of the spot where the
body of Virginia had been deposited, but even of the
fact that it had been recovered from the waves, I asked
him why he had offered up his prayer at the foot of
those bamboos. He answered, — ‘We have been
there so often.”

He continued his course until we reached the bor-
ders of the forest, when night came on. I set him
the example of taking some nourishment, and pre-
vailed on him to do the same; and we slept upon the
grass at the foot ofa tree. The next dayI thought
he seemed disposed to retrace his steps; for, after
having gazed a considerable time from the plain upon
the church of the Shaddock Grove, with its long
avenues of bamboos, he made a movement as if to
return home: but suddenly plunging into the forest,
he directed his course towards the north. I guessed
what was his design, and I endeavored, but in vain,
to dissuade him from it. About noon we arrived at
the quarter of Golden Dust. He rushed down to the
seashore, opposite to the spot where the Saint-Geran
had been wrecked. At the sight of the Isle of Amber,
and its channel, then smooth as a mirror, he ex-
claimed, —‘‘ Virginia! oh, my dear Virginia!” and
fell senseless. Domingo and I carried him into the
woods, where we had some difficulty in recovering
him. As soon as he regained his senses, he wished
to return to the seashore; but we conjured him not
to renew his own anguish and ours by such cruel
remembrances, and he took another direction. Dur-
ing a whole week he sought every spot where he had


178 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

once wandered with the companion of his childhood.
He traced the path by which she had gone to inter-
cede for the slave of the Black River. He gazed
again upon the banks of the river of the Three
Breasts, where she had rested herself when unable to
walk farther, and upon that part of the wood where
they had lost their way. All the haunts, which re-
called to his memory the anxieties, the sports, the
repasts, the benevolence of her he loved, —the river
of the Sloping Mountain, my house, the neighboring
cascade, the papaw-tree she had planted, the grassy
fields in which she loved to run, the openings of the
forest where she used to sing, all in succession called
forth his tears; and those very echoes which had so
often resounded with their mutual shouts of joy, now
repeated only these accents of despair, — ‘‘ Virginia!
oh, my dear Virginia!”

During this savage and wandering life his eyes be-
came sunk and hollow, his skin assumed a yellow
tint, and his health rapidly declined. Convinced
that our present sufferings are rendered more acute
by the bitter recollection of bygone pleasures, and
that the passions gather strength in solitude, I re-
solved to remove my unfortunate friend from those
scenes which recalled the remembrance of his loss,
and to lead him to a more busy part of the island.
With this view, I conducted him to the inhabited
part of the elevated quarter of Williams, which he
had never visited, and where the busy pursuits of
agriculture and commerce ever occasioned much
bustle and variety. Numbers of carpenters were em-
ployed in hewing down and squaring trees, while
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 179

others were sawing them into planks; carriages were
continually passing and repassing on the roads; nu-
merous herds of oxen and troops of horses were feed-
ing on those widespread meadows, and the whole
country was dotted with the dwellings of man. On
some spots the elevation of the soil permitted the
culture of many of the plants of Europe: the yellow
ears of ripe corn waved upon the plains; strawberry
plants grew in the openings of the woods, and the



roads were bordered by hedges of rose-trees. The
freshness of the air, too, giving tension to the nerves,
was favorable to the health of Europeans. From
those heights, situated near the middle of the island,
and surrounded by extensive forests, neither the sea,
nor Port Louis, nor the church of the Shaddock
Grove, nor any other object associated with the re-
membrance of Virginia could be discerned. Even
the mountains, which present various shapes on the
side of Port Louis, appear from hence like a long
180 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

promontory, in a straight and perpendicular line,
from which arise lofty pyramids of rock, whose sum-
mits are enveloped in the clouds.

Conducting Paul to these scenes, I kept him con-
tinually in action, walking with him in rain and sun-
shine, by night and by day. I sometimes wandered
with him into the depths of the forests, or led him
over untilled grounds, hoping that change of scene
and fatigue might divert his mind from its gloomy
meditations. But the soul of a lover finds everywhere
the traces of the beloved object. Night and day, the
calm of solitude and the tumult of crowds, are to him
the same: time itself, which casts the shade of ob-
livion over so many other remembrances, in vain
would tear that tender and sacred recollection from
the heart. The needle, when touched by the lode-
stone, however it may have been moved from its po-
sition, is no sooner left to repose, than it turns to
the pole of its attraction. So, when I inquired of
Paul, as we wandered amidst the plains of Wil-
liams, — ‘‘ Where shall we now go?” he pointed to the
north, and said, ‘‘ Yonder are our mountains; let us
return home.” d

I now saw that all the means I took to divert him
from his melancholy were fruitless, and that no re-
source was left but an attempt to combat his passion
by the arguments which reason suggested. I an-
swered him, —‘‘ Yes, there are the mountains where
once dwelt your beloved Virginia; and here is the
picture you gave her, and which she held, when dy-
ing, to her heart; that heart, which even in its last
moments only beat for you,” I then presented to
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 181

Paul the little portrait which he had given to Virginia
on the borders of the cocoa-tree fountain. At this
sight a gloomy joy overspread his countenance. He
eagerly seized the picture with his feeble hands, and
held it to his lips. His oppressed bosom seemed
ready to burst with emo-
tion, and his eyes were
filled with tears which had
no power to flow.

“* My son,” said I, ‘‘ lis-
ten to one who is your
friend, who was the friend
of Virginia, and who, in
the bloom of your hopes,
has often endeavored to
fortify your mind against
the unforeseen accidents
of life. What do you
deplore with so much bit-
terness? Is it your own
misfortunes, or those of
Virginia, which affect you
so deeply?

‘* Your own misfortunes are indeed severe. You
have lost the most amiable of girls, who would have
grown up to womanhood a pattern to her sex; one
who sacrificed her own interests to yours, who pre-
ferred you to all that fortune could bestow, and con-
sidered you as the only recompense worthy of her
virtues. But might not this very object, from whom
you expected the purest happiness, have proved to
you a source of the most cruel distress? She had re-


182 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

turned poor and disinherited : all you could henceforth
have partaken with her was your labor. Rendered
more delicate by her education, and more coura-
geous by her misfortunes, you might have beheld her
every day sinking beneath her efforts to share and
lighten your fatigues. Had she brought you children,
they would only have served to increase her anxieties
and your own, from the difficulty of sustaining at
once your aged parents and your infant family.

‘Very likely you will tell me that the Governor
would have helped you; but how do you know that
in a colony whose Governors are so frequently
changed, you would have had others like Monsieur
de la Bourdonnais? — that one might not have been
sent destitute of good feeling and of morality? —
that your young wife, in order to procure some
miserable pittance, might not have been obliged to
seek his favor? Had she been weak, you would
have been to be pitied; and if she had remained
virtuous, you would have continued poor; forced
even to consider yourself fortunate if, on account of
the beauty and virtue of your wife, you had not to
endure persecution from those who had promised
you protection.

“Jt would still have remained to vou, you may say,
to have enjoyed a pleasure independent of fortune,
—that of protecting a beloved being, who, in propor-
tion to her own helplessness, had more attached her-
self to you. You may fancy that your pains and
sufferings would have served to endear you to each
other, and that your passion would have gathered
strength from your mutual misfortunes. Undoubtedly
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 183

virtuous love does find consolation even in such
melancholy retrospects. But Virginia is no more;
yet those persons still live, whom, next to yourself,
she held most dear; her mother, and your own; your
inconsolable affliction is bringing them both to the
grave. Place your happiness, as she did hers, in
affording them succor. My son! beneficence is the
happiness of the virtuous; there is no other greater
or more certain enjoyment on the earth. Schemes
of pleasure, repose, luxuries, wealth, and glory are
not suited to man, weak, wandering, and transitory
as he is. See how rapidly one step towards the
acquisition of fortune has precipitated us all to the
lowest abyss of misery! You were opposed to it, it
is true; but who would not have thought that Vir-
ginia’s voyage would terminate in her happiness and
your own? An invitation from a rich and aged rela-
tion, the advice of a wise Governor, the approbation
of the whole colony, and the well-advised authority
of her confessor, decided the lot of Virginia. Thus
do we run to our ruin, deceived even by the prudence
.of those who watch over us. It would be better, no
doubt, not to believe them, nor even to listen to the
voice or lean on the hopes of a deceitful world. But
all men,—those you see occupied in these plains,
those who go abroad to seek their fortunes, and those
in Europe who enjoy repose from the labors of
others, are liable to reverses: not one is secure from
losing, at some period, all that he most values, —
greatness, wealth, wife, children, and friends. Most
of these would have their sorrow increased by the
remembrance of their own imprudence. But you
184 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

have nothing with which you can reproach yourself.
You have been faithful in your love. In the bloom
of youth, by not departing from the dictates of nature,
you evinced the wisdom of a sage. Your views were
just, because they were pure, simple, and disinter-
ested. You had, besides, on Virginia, sacred claims
which nothing could countervail. You have lost her;
but it is neither your own imprudence, nor your
avarice, nor your false wisdom which has occasioned
this misfortune, but the will of God, who has em-
ployed the passions of others to snatch from you the
object of your love; God, from whom you derive
everything, who knows what is most fitting for you,
and whose wisdom has not left you any cause for the
repentance and despair which succeed the calamities
that are brought upon us by oureslves.

‘¢Vainly, in your misfortunes, do you say to your-
self, ‘I have not deserved them.’ Is it then the
calamity of Virginia— her death, and her present
condition, that you deplore? She has undergone the
fate allotted to all,—to high birth, to beauty, and
even to empires themselves. The life of man, with
all his projects, may be compared to a tower, at
whose summit is death. When your Virginia was
born, she was condemned to die: happily for herself,
she is released from life before losing her mother, or
yours, or you; saved, thus, from undergoing pangs
worse than those of death itself.

«‘Learn then, my son, that death is a benefit to all
men: it is the night of that restless day we call by
the name of life.

‘‘ The diseases, the griefs, the vexations, and the


PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 185

fears, which perpetually imbitter our life as long as
we possess it, molest us no more in the sleep of death.
If you inquire into the history of those men who
appear to have been the happiest, you will find that
they have bought their apparent felicity very dear:
public consideration, perhaps, by domestic evils; for-
tune, by the loss of health; the rare happiness of be-
ing beloved, by continual sacrifices ; and often, at the
expiration of a life devoted to the good of others,
they see themselves surrounded only by false friends
and ungrateful relations. But Virginia was happy to
her very last moment. When with us, she was happy
in partaking of the gifts of nature; when far from us,
she found enjoyment in the practice of virtue; and
even at the terrible moment in which we saw her
perish, she still had cause for self-gratulation. For,
whether she cast her eyes on the assembled colony,
made miserable by her expected loss, or on you, my
son, who, with so much intrepidity, were endeavor-
ing to save her, she must have seen how dear she was
to all. Her mind was fortified against the future by
the remembrance of her innocent life; and at that
moment she received the reward which Heaven re-
serves for virtue,—a courage superior to danger.
She met death with a serene countenance.

**Myson! God gives all the trials of life to virtue,
in order to show that virtue alone can support them,
and even find in them happiness and glory. When
He designs for it an illustrious reputation, He ex-
hibits it on a wide theatre, and contending with
death. Then does the courage of virtue shine forth
as an example, and the misfortunes to which it has
186 PAUL AND VIRGINTA.

been exposed receive forever, from posterity, the trib-
ute of their tears. This is the immortal monument
reserved for virtue in a world where everything else
passes away, and where the names, even of the
greater number of kings themselves, are soon buried
in eternal oblivion.

‘*Meanwhile, Virginia still exists. My son, you
see that everything changes on this earth, but that
nothing is ever lost. No art of man can annihilate
the smallest particle of matter: can, then, that which
has possessed reason, sensibility, affection, virtue,
and religion be supposed capable of destruction,
when the very elements with which it is clothed are
imperishable? Ah! however happy Virginia may
have been with us, she is now much more so.

“There is a God, my son: it is unnecessary for
me to prove it to you, for the voice of all nature
loudly proclaims it. The wickedness of mankind
leads them to deny the existence of a Being whose
justice they fear. But your mind is fully convinced
of His existence, while His works are ever before
your eyes. Do you then believe that He would leave
Virginia without recompense? Do you think that
the same Power which enclosed her noble soul in a
form so beautiful, — so like an emanation from itself,
could not have saved her from the waves ?—that He
who has ordained the happiness of man here, by laws
unknown to you, cannot prepare a still higher degree
of felicity for Virginia by other laws, of which you are
equally ignorant? Before we were born into this
world, could we, do you imagine, even if we were
capable of thinking at all, have formed any idea of
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 187

our existence here? And now that we are in the
midst of this gloomy and transitory life, can we fore-
see what is beyond the tomb, or in what manner we
shall be emancipated from it? Does God, like man,
need this little globe, the earth, as a theatre for the
display of His intelligence and His goodness? —and
can He only dispose of human life in the territory of
death? There is not, in the entire ocean, a single
drop of water which is not peopled with living beings
appertaining to man: and does there exist nothing
for him in the heavens above his head? What! is
there no supreme intelligence, no divine goodness,
except on this little spot where we are placed? In
those innumerable glowing fires, —in those infinite
fields of light which surround them, and which nei-
ther storms nor darkness can extinguish, is there
nothing but empty space and an eternal void? If we,
weak and ignorant as we are, might dare to assign
limits to that Power from whom we have received
everything, we might possibly imagine that we were
placed on the very confines of His empire, where life
is perpetually struggling with death, and innocence
forever in danger from the power of tyranny!

«« Somewhere, then, without doubt, there is another
world where virtue will receive its reward. Virginia
is now happy. Ah! if from the abode of angels she
could hold communication with you, she would tell
you, as she did when she bade you her last adieus, —
‘O Paul! life is but a scene of trial. I have been
obedient to the laws of nature, love, and virtue. I
crossed the seas to obey the will of my relations;
I sacrificed wealth in order to keep my faith; and
188 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

I preferred the loss of life to disobeying the dictates
of modesty. Heaven found that I had fulfilled my
duties, and has snatched me forever from all the
miseries I might have endured myself, and all I
might have felt for the miseries of others. I am
placed far above the reach of all human evils, and
you pity me! Iam become pure and unchangeable
as a particle of light, and you would recall me to the
darkness of human life! O Paul! O my beloved
friend! recollect those days of happiness, when in
the morning we felt the delightful sensations excited
by the unfolding beauties of nature; when we seemed
to rise with the sun to the peaks of those rocks, and
then to spread with his rays over the bosom of the
forests. We experienced a delight, the cause of which
we could not comprehend. In the innocence of our
desires, we wished to be all sight, to enjoy the rich
colors of the early dawn; all smell, to taste a thou-
sand perfumes at once; all hearing, to listen to the
singing of our birds; and all heart, to be capable of
gratitude for these mingled blessings. Now, at the
source of the beauty whence flows all that is delight-
ful upon earth, my soul intuitively sees, tastes, hears,
touches what before it could only be made sensible
of through the medium of our weak organs. Ah!
what language can describe these shores of eternal
bliss, which I inhabit forever! All that infinite
power and heavenly goodness could create to con-
sole the unhappy ; all that the friendship of number-
less beings exulting in the same felicity can impart,
we enjoy in unmixed perfection. Support, then, the
trial which is now allotted to you, that you may
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 189

heighten the happiness of your Virginia by love
which will know no termination, — by a union which
will be eternal. There I will calm your regrets, I
will wipe away your tears. Oh, my beloved friend!
my youthful husband! raise your thoughts towards the
infinite, to enable you to support the evils of a
moment.’”

My own emotion choked my utterance. Paul,
looking at me steadfastly, cried, —‘‘ She is no more!
she is no more!” and a long fainting fit succeeded
these words of woe.

When restored to himself, he said, ‘‘Since death
is a good, and since Virginia is happy, I will die too,
and be united to Virginia.” Thus the motives of
consolation I had offered only served to nourish his
despair. I was in the situation of a man attempt-
ing to save a friend who is sinking in the midst of a
flood, and who obstinately refuses to swim. Sorrow
had completely overwhelmed his soul. Alas! the
trials of early years prepare man for the afflictions of
after-life ; but Paul had never experienced any.

I took him back to his own dwelling, where I
found his mother and Madame de la Tour in a state
of increased languor and exhaustion, but Margaret
seemed to droop the most. Lively characters, upon
whom petty troubles have but little effect, sink the
soonest under great calamities.

“‘O my good friend,” said Margaret, ‘‘I thought
last night I saw Virginia, dressed in white, in the
midst of groves and delicious gardens. She said to
me, ‘I enjoy the most perfect happiness ;’ and then
approaching Paul with a smiling air, she bore him
190 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

away.with her. While I was struggling to retain
my son, I felt that I myself too was quitting the
earth, and that I followed with inexpressible delight.
I then wished to bid my friend farewell, when I saw
that she was hastening after me, accompanied by
Mary and Domingo. But the strangest circumstance
remains yet to be told: Madame de la Tour has this
very night had a dream exactly like mine in every
possible respect.”

‘‘My dear friend,” I replied, ‘‘ nothing, I firmly
believe, happens in this world without the permis-
sion of God. Future events, too, are sometimes
revealed in dreams.”

Madame de la Tour then related to me her dream,
which was exactly the same as Margaret’s in every
particular ; and as I had never observed in either of
these ladies any propensity to superstition, I was
struck with the singular coincidence of their dreams,
and I felt convinced that they would soon be realized.
The belief that future events are sometimes revealed
to us during sleep, is one that is widely diffused
among the nations of the earth. The greatest men
of antiquity have had faith in it, among whom may
be mentioned Alexander the Great, Julius Ceesar, the
Scipios, the two Catos, and Brutus, none of whom
were weak-minded persons.

Both the Old and the New Testament furnish us
with numerous instances of dreams that came to
pass. As for myself, I need only, on this subject,
appeal to my own experience, as I have more than
once had good reason to believe that superior
intelligences, who interest themselves in our wel-
PAUL AND VIRGINIA I9QI

fare, communicate with us in these visions of the
night.

Things which surpass the light of human reason
cannot be proved by arguments derived from that
reason; but still, if the mind of man is an image of
that of God, since man can make known his will t
the ends of the earth by secret missives, may not the
Supreme Intelligence which governs the universe
employ similar means to attain a like end? One
friend consoles another by a letter, which, after pass-
ing through many kingdoms, and being in the hands
of various individuals at enmity with each other,
brings at last joy and hope to the breast of a single
human being. May not in like manner the Sov-
ereign Protector of innocence come, in some secret
way, to the help of a virtuous soul, which puts its
trust in Him alone? Has He occasion to employ
visible means to effect His purpose in this, whose
ways are hidden in all His ordinary works?

Why should we doubt the evidence of dreams? for
what is our life, occupied as it is with vain and fleet-
ing imaginations,other than a prolonged vision of the
night?

Whatever may be thought of this in general, on the
present occasion the dreams of my friends were soon
realized. Paul expired two months after the death of
his Virginia, whose name dwelt on his lips in his ex-
piring moments.

About a week after the death of her son, Margaret
saw her last hour approach with that serenity which
virtue only can feel. She bade Madame de la Tour
a most tender farewell, ‘‘in the certain hope,” she
192 PAUL AND VIRGINIA.

said, ‘‘of a delightful and eternal reunion. Death
is the greatest of blessings to us,” added she, ‘‘ and
we ought to desire it. If life be a punishment, we
should wish for its termination; if it be a trial, we
should be thankful that it is short.”

The Governor took care of Domingo and Mary,
who were no longer able to labor, and who survived
their mistresses but a short time.

As for poor Fidéle, he pined to death soon after he
had lost his master.

I afforded an asylum in my dwelling to Madame de
la Tour, who bore up under her calamities with in-
credible elevation of mind. She had endeavored to
console Paul and Margaret till their last moments,
as if she herself had no misfortunes of her own to
bear. When they were no more, she used to talk
to me every day of them as of beloved friends, who
were still living near her. She survived them, how-
ever, but one month. Far from reproaching her aunt
for the afflictions she had caused, her benign spirit
prayed to God to pardon her, and to appease that
remorse which we heard began to torment her as soon
as she had sent Virginia away with so much inhuman-
ity.

Conscience, that certain punishment of the guilty,
visited with all its terrors the mind of this unnatural
relation. So great was her torment, that life and
death became equally insupportable to her. Some-
times she reproached herself with the untimely fate
of her lovely niece, and with the death of her mother
which had immediately followed it. At other times
she congratulated herself for having repulsed far from
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 193

her two wretched creatures, who, she said, had both
dishonored their family by their grovelling inclina-
tions. Sometimes, at the sight of the many miser-
able objects with which Paris abounds, she would fly
into a rage and exclaim, —‘‘ Why are not these idle



people sent off to the colonies?” As for the notions
of humanity, virtue, and religion adopted by all na-
tions, she said, they were only the inventions of their
rulers, to serve political purposes. Then, flying all
at once to the other extreme, she abandoned herself
to superstitious terrors, which filled her with mortal
fears. She would then give abundant alms to the
194 PAUL AND VIRGINIA,

wealthy ecclesiastics who governed her, beseeching
them to appease the wrath of God by the sacrifice of
her fortune, —as if the offering to Him of the wealth
she had withheld from the miserable could please her
Heavenly Father! In her imagination she often be-
held fields of fire, with burning mountains, wherein



hideous spectres wandered about, loudly calling on
her by name. She threw herself at her confessor’s
feet, imagining every description of agony and tor-
ture; for Heaven —just Heaven — always sends to
the crue] the most frightful views of religion and a
future state.

Atheist, thus, and fanatic in turn, holding both life
and death in equal horror, she lived on for several
years. But what completed the torments of her
‘PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 195

miserable existence, was that very object to which
she had sacrificed every natural affection. She was
deeply annoyed at perceiving that her fortune must
go, at her death, to relations whom she hated, and
she determined to alienate as much of it as she could.
They, however, taking advantage of her frequent
attacks of low spirits, caused her to be secluded as a
lunatic, and her affairs to be put into the hands of
trustees. Her wealth, thus, completed her ruin; and
as the possession of it had hardened her own heart,
so did its anticipation corrupt the hearts of those who
coveted it from her. At length she died; and, to
crown her misery, she retained reason enough at last
to be sensible that she was plundered and despised
by the very persons whose opinions had been her
rule of conduct during her whole life.

On the same spot and at the foot of the same shrubs
as his Virginia, was deposited the body of Paul; and
round about them lie the remains of their tender
mothers and their faithful servants. No marble
marks the spot of their humble graves, — no inscrip-
tion records their virtues; but their memory is en-
graven upon the hearts of those whom they have
befriended, in indelible characters. Their spirits
have no need of the pomp which they shunned dur-
ing their life; but if they still take an interest in
what passes upon earth, they no doubt love to wander
beneath the roofs of these humble dwellings, inhab-
ited by industrious virtue, to console poverty discon-
tented with its lot, to cherish in the hearts of lovers
the sacred flame of fidelity, and to inspire a taste for
196 PAUL AND VIRGINIA,

the blessings of nature, a love of honest labor, and
a dread of the allurements of riches.

The voice of the people, which is often silent with
regard to the monuments raised to kings, has given
to some parts of this island names which will immor-
talize the loss of Virginia. Near the Isle of Amber,
in the midst of sand-banks, is a spot called The Pass
of the Saint-Geran, from the name of the vessel which
was there lost.

The extremity of that point of land which you see
yonder, three leagues off, half-covered with water,
and which the Saint-Geran could not double the night
before the hurricane, is called The Cape of Misfor-
tune; and before us, at the end of the valley, is the
Bay of the Tomb, where Virginia was found buried in
the sand; as if the waves had sought to restore her
corpse to her family, that they might render it the last
sad duties on those shores where so many years of
her innocent life had been passed.

Joined thus in death, ye faithful lovers, who were
so tenderly united! unfortunate mothers! beloved
family! these woods which sheltered you with their
foliage, — these fountains which flowed for you, —
these hillsides upon which you reposed, still deplore
your loss! No one has since presumed to cultivate
that desolate spot of land, or to rebuild those
humble cottages. Your goats are become wild ;
your orchards are destroyed; your birds are all fled,
and nothing is heard but the cry of the sparrowhawk,
as it skims in quest of prey around this rocky basin.

As for myself, since I have ceased to behold you, I
PAUL AND VIRGINIA. 197

have felt friendless and alone, like a father bereft $f
his children, or a traveller who wanders by himself
over the face of the earth.

Ending with these words, the good old man retired,
bathed in tears; and my own, too, had flowed more
than once during this melancholy recital.













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describe
'413631' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODO' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
71c843151de03cca5259aa47c8052445
f891a0d71252a60a61d2e44fc3e25f8a79d3cbde
describe
'134716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a5cc5dfd263aaea9ab856ef5ad35cba9
cbbf305a3b02888e85ddd9ff5eac29fc2a3e0bd4
'2011-12-11T05:11:04-05:00'
describe
'33603' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
36dddbb6fd0cf7fddbf67ce678aa8b70
4522d89c5cf9970ec47adb77a4c752956d39dee1
'2011-12-11T05:12:04-05:00'
describe
'9934344' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
803992ea073b408e09b9e6c8bd96f8d2
d422e8f73b02209129645fd04d0259476132c659
'2011-12-11T05:13:31-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'761' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
1db9cbdbde093284f83dc5ebb5eba8e6
3aadf1e52a121ffeee4560f96f3b8a70294f45c4
'2011-12-11T05:13:09-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8477' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
9aabcad2cb68645d1f7915bb0ae21604
50a2b58bd333e73f70911b33d7adc9b5f5cb5ea9
'2011-12-11T05:11:22-05:00'
describe
'423976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c7b9bcfceb6aebad20953e8ede9efeb8
9703b8c0307b907119a2862b11a3f835b3e21f70
'2011-12-11T05:10:53-05:00'
describe
'134430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a5b52acf10ed71be05e0a94ccbc7f64d
fdc675f86c91448427c0775ae58147cb26730631
'2011-12-11T05:14:49-05:00'
describe
'34738' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODW' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c3c0771494a68cd2120df6c0c89dcf7a
89f05a1d3eac060fe820f3a66b94bfeacde0743a
'2011-12-11T05:12:13-05:00'
describe
'10183642' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
9b25ef76a5b39539599855d3ee484ead
fb895d831db477084da62a2b8a46a815f91ff131
'2011-12-11T05:13:58-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODY' 'sip-files00011.txt'
69ba40cd66497be1fbd83d6aa4cf2f1d
244ebb3584ce53d1c44088a11552dcda313cf336
'2011-12-11T05:10:09-05:00'
describe
'7779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABODZ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
65e0662e3eb073a452a057c7743a78dc
9b45524d1359a4edd673ea83743ffe6677f3b0a1
'2011-12-11T05:10:34-05:00'
describe
'405142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEA' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
4be8cc6b8779a81370a455a32cc506b4
121fe27c4b94c782ca4b3e35cd43921ae7dc9510
'2011-12-11T05:11:05-05:00'
describe
'143498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEB' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
1242edd09410482808ca4a220e7e3632
32001aecd436ec2b5a6640e4f852d4046d9496ba
'2011-12-11T05:13:33-05:00'
describe
'37398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEC' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
900a00016287a1452b974910bd2db45e
b144689bc6de4593bb36a5a5a85d4726e3937710
'2011-12-11T05:13:45-05:00'
describe
'9730158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOED' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f78e459d55c88d69117b3cde92d2a675
265d5b97d7885f80a0e1297f20857ae0e2244c15
'2011-12-11T05:13:48-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEE' 'sip-files00012.txt'
07595a5fefdedc8fee9984f12d9f9411
68351906936df323d5c4071fd52be499d571c1f3
'2011-12-11T05:14:55-05:00'
describe
'8782' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEF' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a315ee2d72b0397e0958d84b37604442
97919d2f9626e28b8870b626c89fecea53696b79
'2011-12-11T05:10:40-05:00'
describe
'418836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
5fae5272035cc64e919ebfdb9f59b606
ee70a7b79b17ec5ee14188f7b578646b296c1676
'2011-12-11T05:13:55-05:00'
describe
'142029' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
247854165b767912b7067c305dff0c9d
0b169d70f70fe86a624bc00f2fa56f26cc3ec6ef
'2011-12-11T05:12:49-05:00'
describe
'36870' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
aedf90fdf4cf9b769c18fd7ad1a5d520
cda124600d6beca4a8597bad34f77b20a3265646
'2011-12-11T05:13:35-05:00'
describe
'10072308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a26fc75b892cc55c80d313979397f8b3
9dd5f5b3d9c4b945986fdfac13e715d092c995d3
'2011-12-11T05:10:08-05:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7a4d792d0ebbeb7fc1e8bf27f6fc700e
23156176a5bab702c819be0cb493ddd70a63042f
'2011-12-11T05:12:29-05:00'
describe
'8145' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3c9d148fca7ba4c1d3c1397ed0fc6a0b
eb63edef88e72f26476185760be9053e9709fcf5
describe
'402089' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
bd3675ca2d808306f3e0ff2d167f4211
883b5a4298c436a84f76e2a7d0173f8e909314b1
'2011-12-11T05:13:59-05:00'
describe
'141845' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4b8eab8d591a621ff41a77a1cc4d1f88
c999c765d6e6d683103a60a982c0a427bccec71a
describe
'37055' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c23cc64cf6b9cbd7579a300f940749ca
5fdefca063bbc84e60ec1beda22548f6afed6c93
'2011-12-11T05:10:36-05:00'
describe
'9658118' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2019c1664123b4fffc58e01af37c5c00
a697a60f4b7d549cbcda810a467f4ac1cab6abd5
'2011-12-11T05:13:43-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1752' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEQ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
45beae636dbee3e6e692c06c3ae32ebd
97fcb71cbcb7e904e8ad0a9625e4240be476c833
describe
'8851' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOER' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
50af4324a97a5caddd54eba57c0915a3
faec0aa9684204a5dd739c3256b041222d8a26f8
'2011-12-11T05:12:36-05:00'
describe
'403309' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOES' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
4a44f16cf7475fb6efd9f4007c8cef38
357990e26d5794b028224f65467a958c8954759b
'2011-12-11T05:11:09-05:00'
describe
'154050' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOET' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
e6ff2845f3fa5403f6827c0340d1c201
428a1635ea95ca18b8b2a8f340db20eb5f368fd6
'2011-12-11T05:13:08-05:00'
describe
'41242' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f814e72f7431db74ea53e71e98016b75
fb9c72eae12b3a5e55a2b6094583b255a2c50f24
'2011-12-11T05:10:27-05:00'
describe
'9690570' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0ab5a0ede97c743da4fc1f1fa943fdde
bda43aa3df119e6b3be8be732ae7d67d296114fe
'2011-12-11T05:11:13-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4e4d5c90469a4df56289b35fd08d3325
055dd36ae17b83a19060b77d87df41ca474e1ab2
'2011-12-11T05:11:40-05:00'
describe
'9743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
7d34baebff8c1c86b65b6db30ec817a0
d1c41c5556082f405d5407cf81bdfbcd9ba6175e
'2011-12-11T05:14:37-05:00'
describe
'411946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e9057b680c18e32c62d9f24fa08423be
541fd62f65d14900d032f7a1605b97d07d93597f
'2011-12-11T05:11:18-05:00'
describe
'149475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOEZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
78ce03987a35d5b2bcd4dea6cdfe4de6
bcacc49869c4f73a03c3baf6ecb2de0b79675e5b
'2011-12-11T05:12:40-05:00'
describe
'39364' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFA' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
23edbc70e1f21edf71bcd08e9f8ac66a
1f474ea4500c77260e3d348f3ff2918d8d07eb27
'2011-12-11T05:14:51-05:00'
describe
'9896502' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c82b693a54a02bcef44760f15044f1c9
8380769fba1383a786ae9598dc1c55ba9fe2a5ab
'2011-12-11T05:10:26-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1705' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFC' 'sip-files00016.txt'
244bf8f3ffe74d5fdf15c3e5cd246b23
f381323ac640bf88b74572f1e464527bfcd867c8
'2011-12-11T05:14:33-05:00'
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFD' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7153555aef0d77e848c7b36403438817
380537f9d099fc860af40e2e0623d82c810d6092
'2011-12-11T05:12:53-05:00'
describe
'403436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFE' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1f8eaf6227fc65179e6c7771dc0a31b2
66e0ede5cfb661c7d1218a5dc95131a1332710ee
'2011-12-11T05:11:48-05:00'
describe
'132081' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
312f8d0b019a69bb46d9bc7f6033e65a
57cd9ee03177681b76d98d36d4c7286b8d6584e7
describe
'35848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
a2430272d693e0cb3b7535db8e1d53e0
b309a0c985af94b38f1f3352c853ea1c57aa4cb9
'2011-12-11T05:11:57-05:00'
describe
'9690242' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
e1c402109abb077794d38a7d62f68b91
70e2c8119321b5d0277afad5bd7f9c5b1f3858d0
'2011-12-11T05:14:18-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1694' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
816db0a33b0af9ab6a361589f16ac4ca
84a7aa0640057420256b8b7542d39b7179840494
'2011-12-11T05:12:17-05:00'
describe
'8607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
6ae843fdf3054b9285cc4499e6adeb0e
c1382594ba2768693ce50b5450884a47b8e592be
'2011-12-11T05:11:38-05:00'
describe
'394406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
eb7e27f8de2cf01e6d25eb6ff2aaec46
d42c96dec5a1bd4abe0ba5d0817552f8622a9d0f
'2011-12-11T05:12:55-05:00'
describe
'137094' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5172a50dc7ac74fa5dc7ecd9072bb6f9
68e460bd4c42841915b1132097e340aa7a9c1da5
'2011-12-11T05:14:40-05:00'
describe
'35492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c1abc93096ac82885411880da0b0cadb
9af601113900da501c33a4c5ca4486e1ff7d5ada
'2011-12-11T05:14:59-05:00'
describe
'9475574' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1d117b881f5ce9c93a318583466da1f1
b0ea87bd3017066c48ff50010618d87e2156da22
'2011-12-11T05:13:24-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1691' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
55b487e8d823584929d5e7496789b1f4
aa302ee119df217c838b29f7b9d1eb070217870b
'2011-12-11T05:14:14-05:00'
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
d6049650509ea8c5d45d2f9b1da1eb51
5736f6d823f0e4811c70adeaf560d28b965f43b3
describe
'410186' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
7342ebd6adb12426aee4d023e065f50c
06ace8bb939659bb4aa74e79b0d8d3c66b97e9d3
describe
'133669' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
07885b53f38131d1976c239fccdf3bf5
0d001ad33b9e471b3dffcdbf75325f7ccd3e7438
'2011-12-11T05:14:16-05:00'
describe
'34991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFS' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5442d57884f35ab6a789360d1d26fa4c
d19f963f325e08a37f8fe3e1f3394a8fbb20b031
'2011-12-11T05:13:29-05:00'
describe
'9854982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFT' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b3d3263dce54df1de38cb31e853bf8f2
6101c6af98bce6deffd9f13a3c74ba4b0452ca78
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFU' 'sip-files00019.txt'
bca44d09b36eb42608120c04e66a9d0b
a7c914901d87f71c44d3ff2a8b0a8ec38bf73e7b
'2011-12-11T05:13:57-05:00'
describe
'8297' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFV' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
741e48e76da9515d53ba32e87b94d719
7b73552ee75ff9f10b2f774da24f6d715dbbc8b8
describe
'397422' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFW' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
2220aceffc99eaad18bef713f41b0952
a34213fa497be02982deabaeb15f00b199bf82f0
describe
'135565' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFX' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
6bdbd432e6305dbf8d3cd2d8990f413d
89a57c7e4c5bbdbf3b0bca45f6aa594662250744
'2011-12-11T05:12:54-05:00'
describe
'35355' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFY' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1c5441d2bd2711fea2cc8819e80cc932
1f2d0df6eaf4b35cad701a891d5a19ded8a79aa8
'2011-12-11T05:13:49-05:00'
describe
'9545904' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOFZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
333f75c5803ee496a55aa3587d4b04b9
bab19f2f3e349f3d8189a1ca93628049095412ad
'2011-12-11T05:12:33-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1715' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
c2dddd881f974d7cfceabdc1a1ec4373
f973445a0c3f383f3f1eab3b8c8e21ca76237f2a
'2011-12-11T05:14:25-05:00'
describe
'8600' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGB' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
96aff52cad8d5a321e846340fd39a167
bb3758fec84b468fae8f2d58a347fecfe138599c
'2011-12-11T05:13:42-05:00'
describe
'417173' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGC' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
a0428e7257554d2f7ccf1c3d2da712df
030da5c27675b939d4c8e3e11b8c73e593cddd69
'2011-12-11T05:14:47-05:00'
describe
'142087' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
029378ee9ff5de3d891dd637a6526f53
9800074d86b12cdc04cc64371f77dd7ac366e1eb
'2011-12-11T05:12:22-05:00'
describe
'36877' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGE' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3398e76bccfd65bf0b50bd5e767d6057
7276f26a131362c0fbea858595e448010a484969
'2011-12-11T05:13:11-05:00'
describe
'10020102' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
088b443ce468a4da37c42710af04bbe5
0654730ea675a826c294d361c00141bab09299b3
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGG' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e776d8f8e685691a3aa35567c8359211
53ec84a8309ad97e65c0bd73b3882d763c524364
'2011-12-11T05:11:25-05:00'
describe
'8467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGH' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b96a346a583f55ebef13b2e88b2bb142
ebd6cbc8dfeead18da9927ae839c5ef0faa3ac2d
'2011-12-11T05:14:54-05:00'
describe
'404866' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGI' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d65f075ead45335c9a80c01165f17345
5a2b73b827b6e04760bd8c458a552cd53776da47
describe
'146156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGJ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
53ec276a6e47db9d71f7f699b3ae731e
b2123b11e0718adc577c13b504874e0769809346
'2011-12-11T05:13:06-05:00'
describe
'37898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
78f67c47464c7ec725cf6873fa01ac25
1fdd4ad0043b491840f8addf5489e6801ae0e02e
describe
'9731498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
47516ab6e09978da376705ff10414e0d
c44ab18dc643b3fd730795177b790f64bf4615c4
'2011-12-11T05:12:02-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
7a0d29bee976470225aa00fcc35a1ba8
c0bc30afd8c36835fab449a8cc651370fed714f5
'2011-12-11T05:10:15-05:00'
describe
'8844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGN' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
9d319e33511df4775a5a0440d258ee2c
dc1a0f5f3dbb272d68c8334f2f4f9abe27bf6c9a
'2011-12-11T05:13:26-05:00'
describe
'408580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
cb0df5e196d13fe4f4904bfdfa16e1dc
f0d3bfd1eed9fd83b9ed2408cd5c440c2b90a95a
'2011-12-11T05:11:06-05:00'
describe
'154821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
04f8fb98e419d4b904bae242015847ef
7dc5d6da4923959b97dae89cf82a495eb7ba94a6
describe
'39505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
dd646dec12ca4c515cb1211343c45458
f21fd0d759d2e01501be4e0871ffc69ed4011819
describe
'9813918' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
effc647668454d97379d3b49f112f35d
df7f88a0ba10db291f41fb250af7ad572b506106
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
00c1e3dbe4716e68d3856ecbd35d8e2f
f6f636317d81149b4fdcd895a432315c57dbe976
'2011-12-11T05:13:41-05:00'
describe
'9177' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
5d52e297de7692b3d666dda50fe9a04e
df8de86816a07d0c3f2ce7d06d8d4992a215efbf
'2011-12-11T05:10:50-05:00'
describe
'398164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
7fc404372d983f824d7f84f42d0282ec
d65985a46ebf49be2caf33712ab9157309bda4a1
'2011-12-11T05:13:22-05:00'
describe
'144276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9cc5857f089ac1b93e1190a0bd757a9e
37e432351e9ee5845946b776acec2946b52c55ff
'2011-12-11T05:13:53-05:00'
describe
'37512' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
51dd5d6b4784610a102df2a9fcbc5a9a
382ecaaa6228a2bf7f6367295348eefe5b077271
'2011-12-11T05:11:54-05:00'
describe
'9566430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGX' 'sip-files00024.tif'
8bbc0133e7ab125972b7e8793fc97cb1
90be964884a45607c8acc43980b8e334f462e53e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1723' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGY' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b33713429b82702c28a8003fe42eea18
d97a68407c007552d3acfab3cc517605d149a9de
'2011-12-11T05:13:00-05:00'
describe
'8858' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOGZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b5145916f416a58878f4796808c6b037
abd84ae2783d8b290d39ec881b79ed52085dd022
'2011-12-11T05:14:32-05:00'
describe
'396472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHA' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4bc34f6eae4134180fd05507ebde9a11
ec377a110e2d01543b0abfbae6abb514af6076d5
describe
'126045' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c880f849e7abdc8f706e5f6b5ee167ad
5bddca0f991624c8d78541e201f45d5e09483017
describe
'33701' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
32eb623a0de79c9f49c874046637da6f
3f7df9b907eff56d3fd5fb8d88ccc120fbc66865
'2011-12-11T05:11:56-05:00'
describe
'9525022' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
5b9da49b1a82f6aa42262c19aa8faafa
2784a4bf2b8fc871f099607a34ba3950947b3618
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1622' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
192075d82a7b838de18e0b16042dbc49
20fd0d9bd537cef14e2facd07eceaeb0be8547e0
'2011-12-11T05:14:21-05:00'
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
170cd695d0d7b1d3c673be86ab484ebb
30592331485f3b3accc903b732f15628659856de
describe
'406519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4eaecff2c3f4a2abf76c7a86b2816046
4b7befa8a0cd9052f8ba1d4df9814938713b12cb
'2011-12-11T05:12:00-05:00'
describe
'143142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
5d8a3c495ab0292ea844162cc5ba94fe
8d3e6a2d41100699aee9c968bec02bc4ab55336b
'2011-12-11T05:13:14-05:00'
describe
'38028' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHI' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
f194b59325509939cf6cfb50c56eba01
894cb61d96dd92ee051785fd3e91a97b87cbf13a
'2011-12-11T05:13:30-05:00'
describe
'9765880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHJ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f43d77bd2dbb60e9f528464d128e4ade
1f0a84f0594138bb0524ded8f4a9810de1100064
'2011-12-11T05:12:47-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1706' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHK' 'sip-files00026.txt'
4512d5943e764758b51679f9215f3490
3648a2b7144ce52de92f3ba3ba1d7443fd0ed004
describe
'8853' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHL' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
71bd4a3eab943b34c2beb12cec24c75b
4487035fb049a0b21b3b528ec7deb00877800f86
'2011-12-11T05:10:24-05:00'
describe
'401698' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHM' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bd0646d63f7bbac4851e64fe25233c2a
05baaca06900a31e212897229fe24b6851868a5b
'2011-12-11T05:13:47-05:00'
describe
'137361' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHN' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4aa3e6d44d57a49c955ee9951f9b530f
24f9717a74fe5a409cfb18c1531f265df35ad175
describe
'36156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f478a32d31ec505af81d50e25c1f522e
f0503c12098a02b76b0ce7d686128e8cbc7fb496
'2011-12-11T05:10:45-05:00'
describe
'9648882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
ad987fc8a6ebceaec0726e71b9a77881
9612a6ce180c69cc48f4da16a5a1571a9e5d414b
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1661' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2f1294c096ea5a92702855190114e647
6768954830e353568bcc22d930974353448ae16d
'2011-12-11T05:12:23-05:00'
describe
'8821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
095072eeb0026212c666e888518637ea
9478f934c61abb63d2ba90c4ef7b60eecfefecff
describe
'406576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7ecff99a309bc619d3bdd82251b3c78c
e251a934751950bbaca7c7ac0b2b66ea615ee698
'2011-12-11T05:13:15-05:00'
describe
'112090' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHT' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
cb8918b40e5c55bcfd1bd31439c3749c
d6b7af06a85a28e6a0c81882cd1c72521ecf43ea
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
dc18644ee071cb1974aeb5cf8abc75ce
511571697b5fbd658db0e4d8a8894e3f2158d36a
'2011-12-11T05:11:46-05:00'
describe
'9764852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6e6678fc370ed479f9d0d1a54b042574
76050df7ba51af706c2602ba6be3f4337f5bb77f
'2011-12-11T05:11:42-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f0bbd31961e173a79127cdc376a11f4a
25288020b14cdb0f5b5003e1c416eb4c4d747f96
describe
'6943' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
4da36012ca25da07c24448d830bb959c
7d6b9756ba036543db5b50817d5f5fc3517fffe5
'2011-12-11T05:14:43-05:00'
describe
'417169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
259c6e1fba83f51cdc551e5d7a3e3d26
e38cda8e218c25a83ff1e66a574a92c81a2e67c1
'2011-12-11T05:12:45-05:00'
describe
'62151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOHZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
c4cc7185160aa1c119eba7cb84f52e59
a42ef730a9f35599b1313f70f561c319deec7b23
describe
'14642' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
259fcdeaaf2bd5980c5dfc7bc44ff00f
f250cff36814326019abfbd7b9ab1fedf556f16a
'2011-12-11T05:14:52-05:00'
describe
'10017734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e393d17b158791f322ef2db8815527e7
3e6787e4f932640dab8e7d86be3435f7f7cbb4c2
'2011-12-11T05:10:56-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'3636' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIC' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
6d9ee1b590d4a18ef80d0f38fb5bdc2c
aa313a0cf1f316dfded08f47de6471d435cfff63
'2011-12-11T05:11:02-05:00'
describe
'402912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOID' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
3f078ee3eb2af62c2480873f30a1a478
56fbefeded6118934506bbc09ce3a2d3f70eb898
'2011-12-11T05:10:39-05:00'
describe
'133107' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
834e8ce0682ffbb4c62b30cf358cc318
78b363fbf5d93f92cb1728140539bcb4ea0f74ac
'2011-12-11T05:10:18-05:00'
describe
'34086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIF' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d9bad55bad11fb5654b41bf083dc31d1
1092e44c4803cdd9d8bd0447d5b5bb43f3c47dfd
'2011-12-11T05:14:12-05:00'
describe
'9683376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIG' 'sip-files00030.tif'
72df279823ff1649e0816b7a0c04eb5e
3c5c73d9c67eb7ef1cecead0f9f1bb353690d436
'2011-12-11T05:12:01-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIH' 'sip-files00030.txt'
7e04bf9305c48dc921219c55eeb96483
3e026739d2b6c4264a73d6de1fca2868d8d22ada
'2011-12-11T05:11:07-05:00'
describe
'8314' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOII' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7a08c73200f3febd104d88fe26587bec
ab573e5c8b0f9c3e6b3102739e54cdf286e03aa5
describe
'391287' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIJ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e5c72111ade2be3c5b7a3f370f8dc9f0
f7aa40beb21fcc2b3e18ca60e56117b409fd7765
describe
'139774' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIK' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6486fac17996912ebdd768189e852e47
c21a16def7697d97fc371765d70fb5985ee0a860
'2011-12-11T05:10:19-05:00'
describe
'35913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
101e0ef19f0b8324a895d0bb3ae489bb
239b936eb227cebe5746c022f8026544f38df667
'2011-12-11T05:12:14-05:00'
describe
'9401218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
2e11f47da182743355e135301c0e17cf
7ff8fbd0081238c09255b0d002ea9ac47598f734
'2011-12-11T05:14:13-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1698' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIN' 'sip-files00031.txt'
446992007b8bb7101ea6387007697a5c
a890a8e99c2cfd15876d13364a765bdcc8d57d88
'2011-12-11T05:13:39-05:00'
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1310e531aac75e6fa571c1bb0b799721
cfe5979fca4c9299d3392e9386240d48d841443b
'2011-12-11T05:11:44-05:00'
describe
'416704' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
3cca9c5c398c3d5297926a3191a765d6
dd4d81cadac48c302cfd1134544152966544600f
'2011-12-11T05:10:06-05:00'
describe
'145848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
44fb5e79a624e2b6338ac94a76c698e7
04ce93d6a47800ba8fd2f9e8659fa00d883b2830
'2011-12-11T05:11:01-05:00'
describe
'35862' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
451d5cbde5d25cdac78c35ca82b9161b
8513e975dc106df0adccd69eff28128b17b6f251
describe
'10013268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
441b6c6fbe98766978e6302dfb5dbc7b
8aaf46deaf0d767f20f318e8e9d250b89fd4037b
'2011-12-11T05:14:35-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIT' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fbb69898379caed3c2fe9753e7266795
74a9f4d90ceaa491f49ab10f2372c3eecd7fcbf1
describe
Invalid character
'8459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIU' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
20f2cf16489d7c6c8f9904e3695522c0
f8b7b1f07de0783c40b6702480b2cfcd25baf6a6
'2011-12-11T05:14:22-05:00'
describe
'406856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
f5a5cbd7ea007aaff85f01cd2c5c0059
06984ca98405a789df7cc8bd71915e3983868310
'2011-12-11T05:13:46-05:00'
describe
'145663' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
b4990ef0024360f4fdb8e80d3a7f1052
535d70902e006a3da23e6e61f3ad36ae4102ceb7
'2011-12-11T05:10:32-05:00'
describe
'38861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
3637711aa51d237312b3be00cc165563
c34363df7aa8de7a3d834478d9f5a7297a91adc9
'2011-12-11T05:14:30-05:00'
describe
'9772770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
15575218330d7679b2f9c91b6e1b6327
c5a2fd974e2e04c564a719162e3022137b8208b8
'2011-12-11T05:13:02-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1697' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOIZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
0a574c32f25c3261a1d31dbcb46befb1
7dd65f31b3f686654f463d4e5bd5f8774eaef396
describe
'9060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1092473eca7548e385a70f63435d40ba
e7113ae96f9299166cc2e81ac2ebe8d8868f4485
describe
'416784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
d4bc92853cc7d73b501aea22c7b689fb
8a011b5c3718acff73e825faa9ba40724fd6bbd7
describe
'147953' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
7b82a4296e535eaaa151e9926228e811
f552e28677578f803ba098e7743e72a9de092a2b
describe
'38284' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f7fec45e77316fd09a5946cbdbde7dda
eddcd8308efceb0ab6eaa66382da753b2d0dbf5f
'2011-12-11T05:14:46-05:00'
describe
'10013280' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJE' 'sip-files00034.tif'
01ee78097c569c53e00e5882414a9679
5060a90c1f1289f41bea2a2ed8be05a0ec7f7dba
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
aad1a71b545da1dd0f871f78c18c0562
d294f3b24328655c4fbf0e4d4df6ec9562606b8d
'2011-12-11T05:13:34-05:00'
describe
'8831' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
c2bbd6bfcf8cda8832875b114ae36633
eee33bfc9115e47fc3d7dffd11bf0873ff94ed02
'2011-12-11T05:14:50-05:00'
describe
'399995' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
17c9661bff0d18f8df0f8a1baef20245
db92031dd6ca5cc0ed94373484da5d3bb4c6ea45
'2011-12-11T05:14:42-05:00'
describe
'135259' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
1308f43c6b60d79eccc319f663f2f8c8
7b44c3764f8c8eb8aa9602614892bcd89a96eb42
describe
'35535' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
88541bb878e00ca2ac65bd1e10526cf0
e2be01e23be689f0db91f07fd7a09bb53fbd7d97
describe
'9607610' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
bab3e3a84b2043b6f1451e305a6a3f59
4f920cc89e7610633526146cd2504c039624b2d8
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f4fa4633758e8aef37bd6805ea404336
67794053f35e59c6c26068b1f8c1acc07d803392
describe
'8518' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
dcd4e5ec3a3a035dadc3a89d06a413b5
13dfaf8c88482f0cae047e394e489713f85ead8c
'2011-12-11T05:11:32-05:00'
describe
'416636' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
6bd6bd5533d009f71d4e60c97bcf4141
e622bd981bdf2719baa27781653e8c59d7e4e246
describe
'145151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d40337f07580beee330d2baba8b0cd1c
ceb80665ee29d1530cd714fb304eab7d06ba4791
describe
'35815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJP' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9d75f02f00c883148d08145c7d030fe0
b3f9d870e51990dec831b32cc6e5b5d0a4c9ac43
describe
'10013300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJQ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f76bc4bf2b0de10ab6454727b5c4bb9a
5cb092a564dcf6cae9d8eb831402ec16573dde48
'2011-12-11T05:11:28-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJR' 'sip-files00036.txt'
d6f7ee5298fe4d9f1a3d08472fc8fb50
973876c91950773d971928273380db11594c1b05
describe
Invalid character
'8482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJS' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
59cfcf918ded636777e13042e95e9728
1aea3f74050b7e4d949b7fe4afe7164c0312c304
'2011-12-11T05:14:19-05:00'
describe
'413693' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJT' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
6fe090c4d0ede9480d427d267cc0a82e
6eb60f1f2978a581c3ee24ed2e21c8ca29ce83b8
describe
'145266' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJU' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
96e02dc7e82012b16ea450143df6fd23
c1d94b823b5deac2233a719482c85e861218456c
describe
'37560' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
db7e76e6494970b50588c35fd967c5d6
a5b2c96229d4788cbc6b134ecedeb76fe89b321b
'2011-12-11T05:13:07-05:00'
describe
'9937546' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b558696174f8425883ce49b5648a87c1
27bcfdf9495b585960c68b74a3d98b80f7e4f80b
'2011-12-11T05:12:59-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1664' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
3e1c85724b9b319951dff2714e8c631c
f6ac37297d7664792d271c45a909455ab2007d4c
describe
'8492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3cbc432e110ac7455f294fd182614f16
d8c446818bff0d1636cc2063f91697c10bd4fea6
'2011-12-11T05:11:10-05:00'
describe
'417124' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOJZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
679ec6070b475ba22e1b584a3492b1cd
86598dfd02aa7be4b66249662b909dbc31a56ff5
'2011-12-11T05:11:59-05:00'
describe
'139981' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f1d78a17c4ebece8e3cb70ad7e91bf38
759605f2f5ac01c81e6d329cdc99cedbfc1039e4
describe
'33854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
265ded13f70be25b7bb79e7aa549eaa5
5faee105eddc220bb381abbe176b79082128450c
describe
'10020158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ed15add450c6caf296a0aa5e0c49bcb3
bf5e3fc0434f3cc07c59b896ab77dc9f9922d210
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'573' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
4aea3df72777cd3f670fcf9cf059571a
38456fd4245e360b7407268104d404fd33e9f6ae
describe
'8179' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
973d1d853d288c6f0ca2ef9b0b717e91
37bb8e360287ebafcfd278de9d24c6f26c48fbb7
describe
'408584' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
fdcb61d3f2452860b55553834f693eba
271ee2aa2873041b68af5eaf7652299afe972a0d
describe
'148123' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1259aaea2b08a96a76d6a94defdc89bc
a303d82ffe23a7f3f2822d7bdb99e2f76cf80d13
describe
'39485' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKH' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
11ee038721fdcc817d1c732f80eaa1c6
069f2b638e968273675dd6fc5a46b31a50d07a60
'2011-12-11T05:12:46-05:00'
describe
'9814030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKI' 'sip-files00039.tif'
296ff149cf42584d73eec9bfd6e57ec9
ef3a23d5674a2af6b7d49ea248acbed4ff40e2ee
'2011-12-11T05:12:21-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1678' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
44b379fe4413eac10b689b2a41ba4d49
88369751b671b5230e20acdeaf5967ccaec1145f
'2011-12-11T05:14:41-05:00'
describe
'9277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKK' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f01ff3263c770d67ec3dfa30895045b8
b5682b5688c4d051ea45e5c515cb733f82209b4f
'2011-12-11T05:12:35-05:00'
describe
'417164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ed8cd321397c79dde3b1845f1cf178fa
1722c15aa3688b5d7d7e6f966aff4ced05ea865b
'2011-12-11T05:14:11-05:00'
describe
'146159' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKM' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c090701e7a4ab1a5636b1cbc672f363c
10f9515834f2cd49666d4cae910a8904d44c551f
'2011-12-11T05:14:06-05:00'
describe
'37707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1f81311ea1eee48d0e32d8d62be7e31c
1fbc5cb49e8e86a8c110eaf0e5d3072ec354e9fc
describe
'10019982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
2bdb959f1c21d28f695c1f2f0d8de8aa
8712c377bc626d8efad87a96b5b339d989190ffb
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
6cbb7e4d1710743134e3528342d4f2b9
2aec8c39f5aeaa001f97df1766a10d47336c6ade
describe
'8512' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a1c670694811e223f675fa2ee2fc81c2
8ca38e2c7dcb5e80be84f406628ea93d35544711
'2011-12-11T05:12:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b93d24d27f4040bc927fcba6e579379c
83884a8aaf02d14dc27ab66ee07be75e49305583
describe
'134410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
56ae49d0b6d609df4fa8b5a61b4ff1cf
9f3a221795ddc69a23d7c69ee6c27d830cd9b88e
describe
'34713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKT' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
213b2868c88dc35169fefc66e3550bfd
f9862b58f7e8b5f1039effa4cbadcdd4c03c14b3
'2011-12-11T05:10:58-05:00'
describe
'10020082' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d615cf0bf716a6d249c64c11f67474c7
e5acb38c5c99d287fbc56eb8df50b57183d0edc0
'2011-12-11T05:11:29-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKV' 'sip-files00041.txt'
382752d0b52552bf85085e05ce0f78c9
42514a6a71c848a01bca9e5894d7e4f12fc2baee
describe
'8270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKW' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
14097b638fb59fc324c657e1165c96db
d7a220a7e0011613b369b27ce1e211189cff7e63
'2011-12-11T05:10:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKX' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b9614f1b329433aff15cb583256b67fd
2e6269e9f19375431e2a850ded865c2638dc7c4d
describe
'131533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
edc0eb587e36558662c69f77a3a5992b
4bf548d01eed35079fec7b0c47e094ffec6907e5
'2011-12-11T05:13:36-05:00'
describe
'34830' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
d2359fe43581be2804bdc8c3bcd6767f
7ab889c1a977bb567cc2147b8be0d6802474a3f8
'2011-12-11T05:10:20-05:00'
describe
'10019818' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
29aa86238d78333bc64e59bf744e8c72
6ff822b975f86a05c2ea7b84088d7f405c496d1f
'2011-12-11T05:13:10-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6275205e36bff964c1f7c1ddbfe2a38d
0ac2d87169140f7c62de12d903886b0e42fd6c6a
'2011-12-11T05:13:54-05:00'
describe
'7991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
9f3dff22dbd573c91a2e51722984f694
a4b1d64bf9dba2707f5b246c2c01a70c0f4b4d1a
describe
'417171' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
114930bc9fa2d48433a424f11a0a6803
403a6ff15980fe6efead547c3e63448bfc6d7b6c
'2011-12-11T05:11:03-05:00'
describe
'139103' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
271877751c3dc92e98af8338ddb34726
725acd6726787f90627b3cac7ad78ec84d04edc4
'2011-12-11T05:14:57-05:00'
describe
'36303' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
edc7c60d42c4b1d62229039c01c05ed2
e26ca086545f8738e4d64b4ebd910164d369a827
describe
'10019958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
78a088c3983d0365300b3c96a1c52f5a
4123b092728b690a00d7e436732a8e6c56c667ea
'2011-12-11T05:10:59-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
f82b08116a8ca16d973eef3e9bda9e0e
120f7f0c734cc90e64292b5abf81abdf71c9e1a5
describe
'8126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
26fb05704559f36ace4042ee2d7f3efe
993049e9d46ca6c02ff3f70cb08f35daa05f8fbe
describe
'417142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
e55d6a8d8dcae8d9fa5012134ffad867
bbfb0171c7fad6e92b0a3544bd2a6f0c43282c74
'2011-12-11T05:10:13-05:00'
describe
'128095' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4f2acaecbb7a5458b02b0e73d7016428
bb943877f6ecbed1cb6f78f07cf0cf28dc08d484
describe
'32333' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLL' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
74987b4847751c62da3f1290000985c2
4c893c42765f7d8f74ab09d9bf66f32a6e672fa0
'2011-12-11T05:10:14-05:00'
describe
'10020070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
587a28b068295cc5bfae60d2c9b9a016
8231dd5b65f2f9348f1478f277153fbc4326cd70
'2011-12-11T05:13:44-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLN' 'sip-files00044.txt'
46140d0affc97eeb7a8c6276c9449d89
6e6bd0da9e914667e4008495bcaacd202d68371c
describe
'8039' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLO' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
5e01a43d47b6c39aeb27978cfb609312
3c977ce4e72e213881f21a4171905901943a230b
'2011-12-11T05:12:20-05:00'
describe
'420569' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
b7e0bcbf4977c55cbc561014df355b5b
cd5e499cc63dd9ce366e84d2cca7a871237898f8
describe
'138977' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
509bbefb99e8259fcb858bd5620fbb42
4ad755bcf13a74791aaf4c10aa7879c428eb2367
'2011-12-11T05:10:29-05:00'
describe
'35522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2f60305e05793c059358cc48c68cf2a8
19d6d0f119003e6992d2d0b4bda59ed1c2386132
describe
'10102322' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLS' 'sip-files00045.tif'
76118d16850d5d369d32d7c805dcbef8
cf17683d19c33e324ee65e3469e520143b283551
'2011-12-11T05:14:44-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1683' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
eb814aa95df81e4c992e70bbb96d49dd
0b4cb4cd5662e18a1aec0f571ed56db5a00c595d
'2011-12-11T05:10:17-05:00'
describe
'7983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLU' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bbcf3524757037bcdde9e41b58120e9e
e928cf181801bd6c8c81ae477a5c1ff4f7d765f5
'2011-12-11T05:10:47-05:00'
describe
'408527' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
1a4b589ea9b07ecb070c32ee810618d6
dc7a3209df4219d5096ef22035dbc6fe1675e06c
describe
'131368' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
0d3b552c5ed10538f0e32c9a1e99d1b9
4d51e5d416c88803b7ec3a442ac2a8f6044ef6de
describe
'30308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6ee99e08af2d21e7b9d27de18645c17a
f6e09d556e7b4784d13f179d7b8eab9fc6749786
describe
'9814126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
bfd4edcc387480bb0ce6e65a3018fa1c
fc448e20ae735dad09778ff4114e8c76fc753876
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'154' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
db3462b1d179097264f66ce8b2e628e5
2016d73df3afe96dc297cec20413654405829590
'2011-12-11T05:13:25-05:00'
describe
'7516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bab7c52120d1c847f188a49ec1fc2bf3
c4593043c66a44f456b6104b045e66f70cbd4ee6
describe
'408453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
07d027e60f2db0de327d5621e92beddd
f0fcb684a7ec974e35a1756f2fc31483a4fef5a1
describe
'133223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
4f7f835e7a87e008f65f60c30fbb96d4
f30f4621bd1914a24cfd5f562c293eb9a03e5479
describe
'35477' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
e01cfc89ebe9f4874a5adfaf3dfe0f1f
efb2f33a5b8080de32cd9fbe714f5fab380780a2
'2011-12-11T05:14:07-05:00'
describe
'9813562' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOME' 'sip-files00048.tif'
86aeedba9319a94a0ad173739ea106eb
7473c71ded4b9836affb50fb8d6846ff6642635b
'2011-12-11T05:13:05-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1712' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
da45d63c4685b4467ef67c865ae45eb4
d08f60d33aaa9d5ef1bba6534f708a7d90ccd107
'2011-12-11T05:10:23-05:00'
describe
'8225' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
f674c48161e780dba389a6d64bdcb999
7bf00b4b1669c278fa8138f7af4d6ba37018b369
'2011-12-11T05:12:27-05:00'
describe
'406863' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2acb403e0d056e6d4b35642e17ac7537
325fd65739216401292bb2d19b2fc66a6e8a858a
'2011-12-11T05:12:28-05:00'
describe
'139348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c05baa14b62beecd6e23a91d71eb82d4
ee9e7fa7b5335440e267582003b7614aa31597ff
describe
'35046' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
297d2de79cbfb2cd09ba4ff3f37b023f
07a2421458e79175a1008da83ee9cf9830bebb50
'2011-12-11T05:11:00-05:00'
describe
'9772478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c26a7bb341020a1a1151a3c8fc03e26a
621f9b8dfe5237d0e851fb1f92fbd03049aa940b
'2011-12-11T05:14:20-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOML' 'sip-files00049.txt'
31ad5d5b7934fc4ac42d12fa7609b68d
e5db042e2425f6e53a98cc8ae1045e47d8f3ec3c
'2011-12-11T05:11:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8336' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMM' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
19138b3823a7d14ccaf1eb49090018dd
5bf572c0b762adf0e2ccc86aef9a9272927ec4ef
'2011-12-11T05:12:58-05:00'
describe
'420594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
0093e4318859b85eaf3a45344ed4ff79
73f1e921818e96abe89b1832c1cfe6380213759a
describe
'126244' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMO' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e6134b9853aec03de4bf3c6d323742cf
5647a9284a89d95fe00b3227f2a7e790d0b2a592
describe
'31504' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMP' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6ced852627c7f2334ece7987db65ea24
7d9c83b6e5e80d3f054eec6b5bcc7056252d6914
'2011-12-11T05:10:42-05:00'
describe
'10102206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0b320eec2b23dde70b6088ae30e32ee9
f4dd018b6401f3c733ae3561d2ae51814756ebc1
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'782' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMR' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6a80b465cf7f643ac1428f8f68c71d5d
15292769c2419908bca2e9437d3d032491f7346f
'2011-12-11T05:10:12-05:00'
describe
'7523' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMS' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
36f6d3cca9b52c7dde88d76eabf8c393
7401ad2682a6570c476d6058325cb9c144f06e4b
describe
'413721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMT' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5348b78a107549c7d57e438dcb1ef9a8
bc1adb357e8995bd4dd044953ed1fa8944e05cb8
describe
'142118' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
19a619d78649b05cdce751d6cec9038a
e9f30bc390c19621439005b5d9d0df1921931643
describe
'38095' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
c4cca619627000f8be82d54a57dd7eb7
4a4a9e5af508567d71cea7cad5ef2e11227a563d
describe
'9937682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ddac12ec0df44c26a90a936c2d27f1c3
fb7fcd2ca30e09a9c302a0a1937a1191e59701e3
'2011-12-11T05:10:16-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1726' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9e52ca89bfe855a012fe74b5f181c0af
758fb1cb2e70faa71a723bb7781978c3008db4e1
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
c077f33580b6d0c8b48934b00e83136e
2a5456aac10ac96529264de704241fcd2df68576
'2011-12-11T05:14:36-05:00'
describe
'420580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
51c46061dfd93566ee23f4aa299d2111
d27207adb72d9573b15027289991efd05ba76b96
describe
'140273' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a9caf6fe09e31bb57ae8e73a2de5f2ee
b4d7bee1ac1e024402e6f5d3d0babc7c27b81ac5
describe
'36554' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
935e025e53b873d3229dc734bdec2be7
601bd5e706647c724d4d747348fd2f8c0eec8677
describe
'10102430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
5cfd183f6d43282ae6d38bac4eee0413
0f05c7a9be42815a932098641865dc223629ac01
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOND' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f8863fe6646304363c58c5a7dfa67d0e
b451691c61de78175129bc39ca7abc1f115bef72
'2011-12-11T05:14:31-05:00'
describe
'8258' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6e19744cad3e857d950b97f9250b505c
c26aeacdcad7becb957a11c8b950047ec116c3f3
describe
'418894' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
3ceab9ec4b7a2042cfe1e604fcdb6dca
b29b63ac66be0f40aae18ebbd88874c29eb5636c
describe
'126005' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
29ad8833c8c0635ab3e9dc2ef36f9bf1
e6847f25c19e467a3c3815352c9008c1ed60ae00
describe
'32109' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
41af4f6c84a927defeee9c9ae46700f0
6f25f20e848c3dad00f8c9af2082a37c01ff4eea
'2011-12-11T05:13:12-05:00'
describe
'10061122' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
861ee7dbf7f3fcda14f6d813b5ffa4a8
9cc220ce8b5a285ad5b3def4d6008bfda81aaa7b
'2011-12-11T05:11:33-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONJ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1ff56aa0f49ede3f608f37a84db687f4
a1af6b57b1ad8ba8031c4efb08bb28a986975713
describe
'7671' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4c739bda6a14e8325b64e98d39c3f653
001acbaf6142a553a45131ef9f05ad92c56627cf
'2011-12-11T05:11:20-05:00'
describe
'420324' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a4d1d8d2dcd6dfb5751d5497e63f4afc
467fd125797b4a2619b6a454bab21997935ac1d4
'2011-12-11T05:13:50-05:00'
describe
'145478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
6b4909050d14bf3ba840c6bdbe0033da
962308a369e68024f60ed02874e868e9a9020909
'2011-12-11T05:10:33-05:00'
describe
'37129' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONN' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
f21e5f6b97a3ba74fb1e2580aecffd1b
9fe40990a5b93bf216069e97681b05801c730026
'2011-12-11T05:13:40-05:00'
describe
'10095580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONO' 'sip-files00054.tif'
85d53a510ded4d1eb27bfeaf672d410d
1231c5640bde364d36acd9158317c0845cc12537
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
aa5b51e30ce7070d5b919d0e1941ce77
7b3c6140e6e48a627e0896960c652e0b5332cdb7
'2011-12-11T05:11:23-05:00'
describe
'8432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
b0e28f4e409f76203a46e6e0c8c0afb8
7669246dc80985063bbed761fa53d90f343577f6
describe
'413653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8e6daf3a1d43c344fb2bb36a28acd2a3
9ac4f62676326647dc4bf5c7704c9c4e4ecaeee2
'2011-12-11T05:12:52-05:00'
describe
'145380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONS' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
465d65fc92b670e0c2ba9980bfcd0b19
91f6bc0bfd5f85415c0d44cb01431398970744d2
describe
'37369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
6696f12fd91a2b6a7ea45ce411900252
405e1b45fdb1d668f724d636bb8c7fb0bacb41d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
297bd132feb17455b02bab29cef80f4a
c56760844e000cc3d968717794d6f379e0cc6d1f
'2011-12-11T05:11:47-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1689' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
c5af5efff6e29f6a0655dccaa20bad0b
d5b582205f6ffef4da6b30611f239c6e2622cc96
describe
'8369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
7067a1f100b2e278da324cf693e31db3
a1ebeffd4837954e1bf46555120c2b3a79aa2ea3
'2011-12-11T05:11:43-05:00'
describe
'420545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6ec34c16f951da124942a823715b1334
154b37c9ed8f8363f05d207708cb0da71fa79b01
describe
'133677' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
23b92a992a026c43b06290087945c821
de332a5b364d85c3b6c0fa9f9af6507dd33e9388
describe
'33565' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABONZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
4ce37c798c020cd3d1a272bdb3f4f889
9d688f5df8d4d6a5919d848a36f055b64c492956
describe
'10102590' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOA' 'sip-files00056.tif'
f6f9608f9dcc11ae0099954e258cac06
17c36612076941b9dc71a5947a544734c0d51814
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'781' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOB' 'sip-files00056.txt'
98fc1c228b3a867780e1fa923b8d4138
651dc3b1b5c143d2917a36d5e61c1252635f8775
describe
'8004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOC' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
113b6b341696ffd450ef8bf86174e457
95d8e7b961aa29867788333be7836973c695593c
describe
'419133' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOD' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0fe0ec92e9965e312a4bef6bd36788f9
e088ab5e70a06e1956aa180260cebb55bea1478b
'2011-12-11T05:12:24-05:00'
describe
'152689' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOE' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3a644ef93a17ed056e6ff59e5858a2e7
8e1f79e0947f32849aafd9ad3d956b6ff9dee6ef
'2011-12-11T05:13:32-05:00'
describe
'39594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
acd83bb59723cc6276eca94f6d3565f8
3926c83930348e0378de407ed6a104302687c841
describe
'10067960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
eed26374239b61cc3a99604dd5f759aa
9545d6dd9aeb448bb7401be69deb7a1ce1cf14ec
'2011-12-11T05:10:11-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
58387a03170d0af2ca81b3b01486f55d
7f41e01a0bf73c981ce6a0af1e9fc5954a467634
'2011-12-11T05:11:34-05:00'
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
626cc43b0523e3c5b8c5f5653581f233
5d47606cc70bd598c449324a4983d61729635728
'2011-12-11T05:14:01-05:00'
describe
'420546' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f9402764a48c1262a6ff42382f5e793e
dcb818acae59d933ff80e560db86f04acca49ba8
describe
'150913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
71985a73d376459c5db9e2e26c2884f0
0643a04170e1c4d76c1308163209317dac76e610
describe
'38346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6caa06f8545c1244006ad3b1796c0baa
f47b73894b9f57e7a18e43d37cca70bd823ad79c
describe
'10102602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b0a03473946b5a1a4aeb5999e9ff86f5
fe058b5c6027a28dbb986ca45a7b9bbccd40f619
'2011-12-11T05:11:21-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOON' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a80f5b504465c564c8236c27eb4035e9
ffc576ac37213b36fc90309d76feeffbd67c9762
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
01478b168af64c6526a5fc32888e2e86
fb0928a5a178a90280d57d1b4bcf9c62281a421e
'2011-12-11T05:12:32-05:00'
describe
'410011' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a2c6aa2019ef955b6f59366c58059cad
6cf5f1de6e39b19ca538275dc4de8a9167097483
describe
'118918' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
6afdceb5ed27490b5c4dc09b54828349
ffff0e124957b6ae684f1b8df8c6763581899f90
'2011-12-11T05:10:41-05:00'
describe
'30231' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOR' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
87321b90a81607c0c2e05e64842c2631
e72869e8bbb8711bf0806d9c92bfa611d1d39f0e
'2011-12-11T05:14:17-05:00'
describe
'9849076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
844d0dc5f2ef51ef785f813ee4dd371f
135ea8d83712eee5475b4aa6d8f23847c61c60ac
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'722' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOT' 'sip-files00059.txt'
c678872dd0fdf795b48d70c0473447b8
96675a6f3b9b6aef76b6c43b05d5ec0c2cc30c46
'2011-12-11T05:11:08-05:00'
describe
'7465' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOU' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
797e8c6a0a0c07c6025c8c3d8045f41c
e0b07c595f578689eb81379a3c799a0e8f62b5ee
describe
'394650' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
1195cf185ea02e50993ecc7b50a77fbc
306dea0bf1ff5d7e24b91e60b2c75ffd92b4129b
describe
'131133' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9519fbc061209867f9ef680aa6bf62d5
32cb4ee3240cf7dd3efadfa9ab25541a4d8453dd
describe
'29294' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOX' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8346d97d750ee53cd928f0145d9bc6f0
802d11f38eeab34d222ab213584f20f48288f356
'2011-12-11T05:12:05-05:00'
describe
'9483894' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
dd658ffe5e095ae4bd59177f2fdbc656
4d706037cd63b47c25582dce2a588b835ab3bd39
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6cb86637b1d18660a8f8131796d769bf
06060831dc634a4800a1c8fa9d8aaa54752dfbc6
'2011-12-11T05:12:48-05:00'
describe
'7670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
d782396d7c92361933f4912a5f68b03a
6ee18beb6eee25ff81e84c257bf2da886f160208
describe
'403432' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPB' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
49ad92272d2f9f94bc7bcdc79fe8284c
c5875f00ed4f3e2cbeca672bee842ab80e1896b4
describe
'136308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPC' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
680a9dbef7f3aae12e25ed07d0df7d96
aa5b67cbeb05839e8b512c920dfbbe2a2ddc8401
describe
'35516' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f361d11d3544b2f7ace8f8f8ec0ce1cc
e733faead1347e87964b2b1bb156fc3e92cfacc4
describe
'9690010' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
54cb30b485500e2e3f0c0306d376dee4
0e3c4f551de9cf9044029becb2852b519734e220
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c162ef15d132ccb7dd9e68c060d9be72
8327d685c05ef41b0702d57616e19127c568acb6
describe
'8569' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
377a0355fe8b5de88ad254e67c069cd0
066fb3e4985cffd31fe5b44e67ba86d6b5970f6f
'2011-12-11T05:11:51-05:00'
describe
'406798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9ac7bc300f6c91c279d6bb929efc5e64
17ff74abb08c095ba9bdc77b903e8dfac937382c
describe
'136036' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b12f76425e6d448b8ac372af1470f869
67cea9269b0bc1518af5157bcf5369b7fc371a5c
describe
'36072' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
7a80b45a386fb0cd6ca4c22f67ce1a6a
336285d8f8a195d9db9a2d145a24e308a1a0e02f
'2011-12-11T05:11:27-05:00'
describe
'9772590' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
97a3a0261ad8bea50f97390db1de305f
f6e459cfb40dacfc2baf067d0f65846e5d545d26
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
0aca2eb2b66f413d3c55df8925dd2895
583f04c9b76a2084f053b3e363658ad2881d1536
describe
'8457' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
bc741c559efbc2e973d70f8eb48255b0
90bb575ed0ef9658fccb5a1609f1dbecfdabe8b3
describe
'404766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPN' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ca6312f659daeca5c7d0d02a38f0eff8
b6b5b6e81b50a14229d3b857dc6e75e050cc9afc
describe
'130619' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4ba28c808e1de59b0980285beb16b61f
aaf231b7f03fca070c4d4d9fd6ddf724c47923a0
describe
'34941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
cee0489798c3c62e0b8774d8b6464b2a
660e74cef57a88ba45d78508c103fbee25310ac1
describe
'9731398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
deae499ffc830ec045606d228e5b98c6
16752c421a8db8e99b634ae1491b8d157cdbd05b
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f654583f71e7254600524d0bbed1a692
4d84321ea5480dcc9e6d71957dd1eedcc8547042
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
f034a871d9327d5e17d194d432fbe389
46cc2fd8a0bfb17205f317cfbec6c0247d141c77
describe
'406829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
4231f75525395153bed0bfc44584d365
076c548f35c5fcae9366ac1ea834364edef75c4c
describe
'138270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e2cc6ec6de2b2731b53e8c2d14ef82a4
aee13461d4aebcec8b0bb6fbac8a79808ba10a9a
'2011-12-11T05:14:09-05:00'
describe
'35853' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
973c51ea061ffe732c760065ec3d9950
2dff21e9b384e7fd2e797cc5054309b7aa006b96
describe
'9772470' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
4aa629704b39158cb6697838a3ed0580
ec20966e576c1c890e7510f849d56ecd3c4b061f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
9be00a1232c70f227a3fd4df5fc0e18f
a6c507d449a5d9732ea726670c5caed92bd9a528
describe
'8376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPY' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
381d9b5807cab4243f18dacb3550d51a
0a18fb78d945f56d4e58ccaf5031dab882455e99
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ad6909fee643ed7473844a38ae11db05
b04bc0487ced8468a076d54331f5396282b9f0ca
describe
'138026' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQA' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d65ff77597bfdfe500e83d2b4c27a333
0329f485a6c2a883ea0758c51b40db6ea7225ea3
describe
'33986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQB' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
802128a41aa27a540be50697a8afdf92
efc7d0215a8030184f8e517950b63cbc53bcfe1d
describe
'9855038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQC' 'sip-files00066.tif'
503f43d7e46b3f98b504d91e69bbb17a
eb8fc81bab6f7f970d0c3df7f7ed2b37e5cedade
'2011-12-11T05:11:24-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1675' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQD' 'sip-files00066.txt'
71369e9c2cbd73d2df321c66d61616ae
3ae7924cf60894558746d832ae7d8de126c0a6f5
describe
'8187' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQE' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
6b8ff403b95543224a53ad794812adfc
fa1541560c0da086b6d66562cca311300c520211
describe
'401664' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQF' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9ce28039c76be5415c77033b5ed5756c
3bb2747418a42bbeb639b10879e0382bda36b9f9
describe
'155882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQG' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
4b537c6697964aaae8a1eb707fc36dc9
382caca0f1b798c40a6785487d1d1cc23c06e805
'2011-12-11T05:11:19-05:00'
describe
'40227' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
0451b67f977564f7f6997c4a85a979cc
1821a5333e13c4c67d97f10979c52521eceaefd6
describe
'9648970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b351abcb379e15814b2ac826f09d6b90
a5c21122c41a5823a857ead71c909117e8d90510
'2011-12-11T05:14:39-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
ca20eb3c9868dfa0ed8861d63cefb51a
4f65259ae30dc0f28258e32f835fd1c295715654
describe
'9042' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ccae6ad102df8d4ebf730884736974e7
8d80c0f816a05401cd0ade7a536908521ef14c21
describe
'420423' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
5f2e0b50c0f202fe37a840972e24bbb6
a455d94dbef8975927ff8944158cc1e74b50bd01
describe
'128223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
90b32511f614391ecd816ea4dc49d7e1
e60af1ec832304444e3ad1e3d7c65b254f12ba07
describe
'30983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
7ef9cedd351a409a026bb1e6568b557a
5b9bcdcad17204b07d9fb62b0bbfd1a0b14cb88f
describe
'10102198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a1731a6bfce7ed746834e0bd04b3c81e
13c234478aea5dba5438999452972cdf76ca9be3
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'992' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fede39101574948bda83b177e443b981
304f9986ce3e397ea36fb9f352886e04dd26cf3a
describe
'7288' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
de04175281e9929abc15e6ad4ea21d35
538a014c767835b3ec749156871ac198dc44d33a
'2011-12-11T05:10:57-05:00'
describe
'420560' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQR' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
9c57db588db635d9433d32f8b2fb20d7
c4f874112203f469edadef9264fe527eeea9e8fc
'2011-12-11T05:12:41-05:00'
describe
'146137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
77b04a208f777d5472a729eb2e462498
91363b3c9adf7e48edf23e8fa22a82a0c776e9f8
'2011-12-11T05:12:56-05:00'
describe
'37819' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
f6de0764ce06ebf3c7ded79693301b0c
0f3993cc2f2459746be7b0de3738c5a5da3b90e8
describe
'10102710' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a09fd689255b9fddb4b5bdc3a1d4cabf
12f1394e61c3db33814a81d44e61aa14a0f0105b
'2011-12-11T05:14:02-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
13a0f11fde99bd0fa2087d0831248d9c
0632c9fee39050fba375949511d4529d9fadf5a7
'2011-12-11T05:12:18-05:00'
describe
'8589' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
1202df3b79d7963f433a96e09ab9c2a1
7ae394284c21e2f7de6c84224acfa13c92e6cb97
'2011-12-11T05:14:45-05:00'
describe
'420603' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQX' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
1a4edb0d91b3454870185c9ff042e73f
3600d53338b5419f3084ad87c49b33f77d5489e7
describe
'142652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQY' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
e4d1b06eed63e8822f3ad9dcd3ce2a34
779ccc113370589dcd539a2dbdbac5d76dc306f1
'2011-12-11T05:11:37-05:00'
describe
'34376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
233b62b9d4528c601b558222269a40ce
f323320bb4f3aa1bab903577248615fc082fb447
describe
'10102850' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORA' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2a8479a7bbaa58db7931c08219a56698
407a1e95537bea9791bf88fbe3156c8477cfd0fd
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'715' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
13732436094c48542323a70c487a41a1
e16d93f6a19d402e7519a74533ff84940c2862ab
describe
'8296' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORC' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
8cdd0e5d707c964ee1f45a18fe890c66
0893dfdca7476a971b73f9fd7ee3b8157b1ca96f
describe
'420548' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORD' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a0e4f06553f6a0b8dc6f5915b88d1c99
b9dd5db0132b4921b14eb6afccbc599d5a869fda
describe
'134702' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORE' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
bfc1d599651e4f2a5c47ec170647cd80
8350cd49f0cfc8a1eb6a3ab8b783467ee246b579
'2011-12-11T05:11:41-05:00'
describe
'34634' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORF' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1ab479e03d57f373ad08f6eee9cb3bc6
aa29649e349793c747645f58785f5229645e92f4
describe
'10102410' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORG' 'sip-files00071.tif'
2f47648375068533d56890cc2e108460
b795575a348efd110e40f5d189b832a595ba3809
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1645' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORH' 'sip-files00071.txt'
79d7d2d7bab67cca5cafa238fe1742f3
e1f30c36ed93b89231ac30d0c43bb3db843dbf8a
describe
'8115' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
142c47806fa0cb5ab923fd1bd22bc7b4
e85c2aca1736d664450970ca5b6322767e8466c7
'2011-12-11T05:12:19-05:00'
describe
'420361' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORJ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
7ae31f21c1029761f5fe6f013e7afebc
a0be172c1b03cd64264ee2ae15b4d9d892013629
describe
'150578' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORK' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
d2d043616a2888156918f7eee42efa3f
513655ffd00bcce46f78221cb4ae1b7c5ec9ad0b
describe
'34387' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
7f8838c78e286ddb68f851cc0baac9ee
24366bb7231192c5860af81f1a9c7dc9a76e4af5
describe
'10102474' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
838d782fcd0d515f3fc13b8440edafe4
fe1f1f80e51a373b25b9fb5265a1718c43c8a347
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'391' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
f93df593c3dfdc22378415374ee1758e
4a8cea2ada22c5c7b68d37df6ef21509a12cb7eb
describe
Invalid character
'8135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
8cc24bfae5d2a6765dc975037506e460
148c306ebd432ab55a2f268ec7e91e100de869dc
describe
'418259' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f87d0519bf9f8be0404aa07763d17589
321992fe67892084989bf6fa575294575fea33d7
describe
'144150' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
6412cae10ed1a47c00337ae841d4014f
38d8f92f7fdb789530922a5cf2414d6db9f78c40
describe
'37323' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
7f5ce320ae2b9af6210ebfb7a2d0681f
d1835f0f6a2403b9c4edd06e498380e95506b0d8
describe
'10046264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e8bdc7be7d8717716baa95e54990ccd2
17b70afc436586c951da42822c0efc9e1a3a13bc
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
9a57656e3754183668fc152e98bb5f81
3553a9b93e8ddfc65870dbe5082cd11dff580641
'2011-12-11T05:10:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
fca52f7f8f33cf08d14bce1332bb39c0
b727d911adedadb789d97cf408fae46ca760f037
describe
'420582' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
7797e9332f96af32e52d69fab1547712
eb5a12101429f047e87da595c615409ef4e521cb
describe
'145480' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
3edbd205d509029708a44d663a7536f1
40822ceda55eebdb162205da4ad45587fbf7e3d5
'2011-12-11T05:14:10-05:00'
describe
'37169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
88c7627f81c8211d0b87b95262838c07
f8a6cae64f9e66ed4ddd3147f3dcb0cf17d4e4bd
describe
'10102662' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
59c02dfcebd0285aa3e325448d962d12
77170167fe5135924dc0763743e733b85d359275
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1763' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABORZ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
5d2fce53ccea88d0419386ef097dbfa1
26a6a1d74e904a3525c16b351acd3a3f9dd57e2d
describe
'8637' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSA' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2512ce77d64b8f2810e9230480e498c3
7d197efbf584e39a44f0a692e4fc246dde312a25
describe
'420571' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSB' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
bb537df8699d2a34f319eefc21f1c2be
50fa6fc523aa4028f0abc4f93940500eb5b93364
describe
'151674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
837734b51b3c64e79e8e7540bceecae9
c6218dd0561e461e5c20288d893bb99e6e24ee09
'2011-12-11T05:14:04-05:00'
describe
'39523' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
55143f393b04a43e3b8aec42196ae643
7ca34a43df8fc5746c6e24c4c4998caef49ef7d9
'2011-12-11T05:10:37-05:00'
describe
'10102822' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0871dac98fc0e983da107ed04de7acfe
94a095929624cf84110e6435149981c841259140
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
47be92994651de4e91ba209a99e9832d
c45d6a50ec25ba3a1e0b41a76aa27b9da20b7ff3
describe
'9021' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0204786bcff60ed4331fcc223a96f66a
0b7656ba13bc5516b4f54826771871bb45a79cfd
describe
'413697' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
2f0a445bf38381006b909a37147e16d9
0646d6379e541c66a5929755018e9d72026d40b0
describe
'134872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d21b56a4d8fdc9a6c730530834d5603b
8ce744845b8c69af41ecd16dd8e1287cbd1dbed6
describe
'35528' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b0ec99577979212e2d74c910af3c4a01
188ddbea7e1e53d7b2c968115eab204171f702c2
'2011-12-11T05:13:27-05:00'
describe
'9937362' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSK' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8157ef959eac34cc9be18bcf550bc542
6b239057857ea86892c9a23134a8a66ddd09bfe8
'2011-12-11T05:10:38-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSL' 'sip-files00076.txt'
c921054115568be03176aad0269f8458
2d94ee3385ba730cf8dc81f070903c36f214b2a1
describe
'8188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSM' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
adf381613ab84c7d04227fa0dcc214cd
6b26b9273090d5311043d43ddd456a0fd50cc3eb
describe
'406775' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSN' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
203615073850371cbf1709b578295087
3cfcd0be5ddcf86be0150ecf6f2ca5b69954a3a2
'2011-12-11T05:10:22-05:00'
describe
'133137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
5d4ac05eb5e3249afc2283a5af27b916
9b5b10f98f6db55f9e152ef5d5c8a457a1ad875e
'2011-12-11T05:12:42-05:00'
describe
'33888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f8c32c5ebaf67d3b4b699ad4da8194fd
3d273bd2a3d4d665d623c7b79d1dc66d30ef3030
describe
'9772206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
5d851690dbcd1d121254be48ef83d255
c524a38d6211ab7e570a42fb6b1ba2f55a8235f9
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
725c620edd411632cf1105c2feed85fa
46197aa6439bcdf83eebe6038b219ad4cd941ff5
'2011-12-11T05:14:29-05:00'
describe
'8023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
9f8dabc71212f6f5f8ff638f5671df45
831f785980a17f80a61d8dc602f2429b91a41480
describe
'420551' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOST' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6a6490a8d870b35dfa82e518aa1f3b71
6f967262c7bff9c523cbfbd976f140bee4a98d5d
describe
'127170' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
be1ab5d8976ebbfafa07eb5f0f2c0bf7
0fd3b545a869430710cd7bf04b5e3865336ba05c
'2011-12-11T05:12:15-05:00'
describe
'32084' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
5eee967afa2abdeb016af8165fabc6e5
c3f7711b25dc7b47b9007d06db1e4521fad9b186
describe
'10102258' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
7a10c156f169aa23229b18b7fc9f6f20
46e26eb803a9d928afad460bbcca7de63fd742d9
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
038877be367c26460bc9718c294d2588
4fec33469cbdf0cc3ed17535990cc5b2f4df7822
describe
Invalid character
'7789' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
90cd2f71853c9fb34d44ed5ddac199a7
df4ec5fd7adda16400cf7be2ee33602f09eb7f86
describe
'420605' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
a5d5ae2a90733b1d4f55299d19037870
334bddd0e389b9fcccddc45c98d05db98f0ee3d4
'2011-12-11T05:10:10-05:00'
describe
'117743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6ce1f6a331eefc3cfd0be288b5344c9f
039839f9704c77a3cc64b1068b642c1b25e12b0f
describe
'29821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
eb89fe7ea5fc7d0a3a3bf02a933528a0
cf17f4f0e1b3f9083d79c7d7d8d98843569f1e68
'2011-12-11T05:12:09-05:00'
describe
'10102046' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
64064e0421bba19be016dbf8d1ed9919
d857357bb989338a3892dd8807f989d5314121ca
'2011-12-11T05:12:07-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
fe284fff571ade611ea436deec5a06be
c51be0f89a64c17042f64c142090bec6965fec60
'2011-12-11T05:12:38-05:00'
describe
'7277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
42004e86139cda6a0faef526f28053d7
84976a73004fd0624a718ff1fadc14c9ec5677aa
describe
'420606' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
81cfc8758238d0d1197a9e1882572e42
fddd3d0720370aa4b43ed746eae159880332d5fc
describe
'133184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
bff5d88c702f7b66b08425a003d02cca
89f1b2e256d63e3670613cd8bc49ad4d7a918e11
'2011-12-11T05:14:28-05:00'
describe
'33896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
e2de564652e8a461880576d6271aa974
5a0d6a3ea8a654c0109b2f2d3d344ad7c2b7e2b8
describe
'10102298' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
51fb840e17c829a8fc4fc35eec9c3bee
845da96b291281b83d21dbe5de755acd755bb745
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1614' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
a112e0e5f5be0e55b65315ada8d0306b
ad221af4928fce9bad6cd76e925b67edf4493197
describe
'8196' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTK' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
0a5cd62dbb016917ee2b4f4b0c2f7b10
6afa99285e59b8b3f06384988ac42b0ae7c82797
'2011-12-11T05:13:19-05:00'
describe
'420591' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTL' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
82f44976d46d5d1420405e796192410f
c4e886655c4272c1d3e6325127ac57fabd713cd3
describe
'145326' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTM' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
42c21465bff84923f371c99309d2e3e5
c8132691bf94067b9b57ee83536a1ce9be459918
'2011-12-11T05:14:34-05:00'
describe
'35026' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTN' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
6b8cd34c8862ec676e69cc09e446ace7
a99b7b0cd2b9162184d34ecc6fed3497acba1169
'2011-12-11T05:12:31-05:00'
describe
'10102482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
a245479a2e7ded54d21c354ad29dcfde
fc47e864f4e45483fbbef00ead16048d09d0d596
'2011-12-11T05:10:46-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1696' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTP' 'sip-files00081.txt'
6128c9eb0633e3eb2ea490b4962d19e5
94243fe66adcb20c8ab1c74fa20f2a3ad055d011
describe
'8077' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
234a0bc1d92cb79194d2cf9b609d819e
c84488c2b8e083fd6571ccafb9ed528717701a09
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTR' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
8d8fb71ad8e55742de05751237731824
b9b891587f50be5476c8654df026c39737a433b8
describe
'133659' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTS' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
23a6141255cd64f6bca8def92a0e6eef
763537b0e33c8588acfa7be43fc47670e54b6381
describe
'33313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
0e9179b4b7237a290ffa748e585cb5c1
1df285f5a66cbbf82b75711a48f7a6b0aaad5c83
describe
'10101958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
43b9b6ac5c17e0fd7552895b0fc6f899
b35fb69b1c2ed51183479dd89df7ae90bf097bed
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
a5b6e147ed352aa7fb7eb2a34b7b4444
81b47b0a7dffc50791194ad4e38b588e406206b8
describe
'7439' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
48253fde1438140c791f8c31008f1e0f
5e6c1881fd665b45acbdb9a91eb6da0a3fef505f
describe
'426038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
bc27e4ee90d0109861c77ad2251fc515
c309c1b7f870d84f313023201709f4723e99e93b
describe
'148956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
986617a48b84ffd70e183b03e4031eef
df3cd4e410a43a31dc4c415d6a35c93b1614e073
'2011-12-11T05:13:23-05:00'
describe
'37438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
413e572054054108f9a3e2704ba6d9d3
73ecccb0614d797bf6a596465b42bcb7b92bbf4f
describe
'10234340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
bb62a58293beab3c3ab486209c67f28a
e3b86a9e8e1fc83b96813efd8a1898b141ba3247
'2011-12-11T05:13:13-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
37794f6ddb978769b3cbd8de6fd7860a
c760c61cce4bae5de0ec0e328c6a8a8d2efd06a4
describe
'8182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUC' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
d1f60301603d18d1a737a744c5d1458a
9949f29a42967518c7e1dd070e5a9eace311c7f6
'2011-12-11T05:13:21-05:00'
describe
'420610' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUD' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ecc1b48b7cedab40ea2d0dcf2c1ad2a4
0f70eabe616609e8340da94a18cb3216b20c4b98
'2011-12-11T05:10:28-05:00'
describe
'143122' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUE' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
080c0f6c6730e30cd468d96844c4c704
3991febf02cac2a1c01f487d7c2d722ce77a5575
describe
'34355' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
8cd7024a865fdfdb97a74b776ddd711d
4f896347abccfcf6b27cfddec7274cc6724643fe
'2011-12-11T05:12:30-05:00'
describe
'10102338' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUG' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d409ace97ddba89e26c2251623212b9b
62bbca04075eee6f8d1941639e5814cc068956c2
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
b2e2888fa1f1ecae2fc704305d3f82d7
0214541b400646ac0c981aab0fcc4fd935d51f95
'2011-12-11T05:13:18-05:00'
describe
'7869' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUI' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
36c670d42b6b9f29f8d16961ca12430f
4337de99d0e224894a0e9dd247f54b99fd23baec
'2011-12-11T05:11:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
2dafe3159f558146e500d1c8c6cfd53c
8f4d0c92710ad17e7e177ba7ae2d478ae6ecbc75
describe
'146610' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUK' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
878e0665f24e603d0aac1054575881d7
8a511978c8a6f2a1017e42ab518a529eff89728e
describe
'35409' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
dcd23c270e640052558467ce22c071a1
d739a29de157643446193a406f7e1955f8415349
describe
'10102890' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7d25c039589a8d8798a4918bb9de8736
bfc608bc2f33c1e1ea91e92c699d7f3a28198407
'2011-12-11T05:10:21-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'562' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4ce8326ccf3762ba4f6de006fa25b8f5
74194af7cce017178306f6a8e69783b0f0d9fb30
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
94559879abd85da2c375dd801eabed98
d6a8371ca81d2cc800445ac0459a71e3adde733b
describe
'420554' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
d8978f88dbdc4d46ed15a754fbb8e18b
53da95a663f3800b1ef0a27e8536a8cea924a8e6
describe
'140631' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
4b9b2a0508891701dbd7972fda0ddb74
576a55b266db087cabacb8dda0bef0d6b0e3a622
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
0547de23daf56e20fc623bbef8a93e6c
f2e00e384d1ed585d2aaf22a9fc39024f1070f46
'2011-12-11T05:12:26-05:00'
describe
'10102378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
22a9c6614f851175a5965fb61eba1e66
d9234acc609c07f994220b1449531ce30cb1ba7f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1710' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
81ce980ffafb577bb1dafc665dd7b8fc
c00326873fb80652d79b3da25d76038a493c3b9a
describe
'8041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8ba17a2aae8f0db3736d053c275a52d3
bcc52daa69557bc4292e6afaf58ad6ff3e5ecbf5
describe
'420584' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
813f1f7d94c1c13f0416efaf3120d9bd
8857ea18ffacf561a6294d7209afdd243e7595d3
describe
'130126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
96527d481f8dcf1b54885656617cbdb8
26bfefde7199980c8b335c8b97ec47149d045862
describe
'32200' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUX' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9bf4cd331598d27108e52bceaf59d587
8c74520684087e5674aa87732ad8c58463b04560
describe
'10102506' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUY' 'sip-files00087.tif'
04311912c3c0dc8ab0d41f50b4305fe0
fc038fcea18309de51b8bd74937099110b54b4e3
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'841' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
2533ec81f20fd03a0b281a7a825f44da
76f31a69393e180754bbb6962b1ed968292d3237
describe
'7987' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVA' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
094b10cff5d1a73df6bfa1829ccd9dba
6db6fc9bc851bbcfb76c61df3b39200a2cda1723
describe
'420419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVB' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
3860eeaffe3a0a20f1fa6a62ce50a987
319d25ef2335fb66b09af1df8fd713e6f3d1a2b3
'2011-12-11T05:12:39-05:00'
describe
'141182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b28ea0c43f48ccaf30cbad5362e140a3
2f464976149a36ceea203939cca26db5be9d4405
describe
'35137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
34fa6bb830a9fb4ff5563f4b7530b690
c357fbf0c297cb2ba35bc54655c11d71187fda62
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
03f89e1fa135a1bc8ebf322e78a7f177
35dfe606571133ab907c1ab547bfcd7cd9026342
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
d25b513a0912a9a9429ff84305b9fdb5
ad64b6ed88ebdf79bf37a74b0b91db6ec65a9221
describe
'8013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e83fe7dc7fccfcfc8628d46ea27aa258
9b77c9d07a14f6def9ffde28b74195db203fd301
describe
'420541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
5c178438c2d49fb786df76066c0888c6
e845d2bcc65adb2b19023dbe15cae1b39cf1a333
'2011-12-11T05:14:24-05:00'
describe
'149738' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
de6712644b03e8bee000e14642f6f440
b44136debe45c12af88b014e531912b0221db0f4
describe
'34966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f2e6258792fab04179c1c84764021a39
f16b20f8b79926989f8f7f9015d30fbcd4ca88cc
describe
'10102342' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
79471a5193187bf5b439d4043086cce0
5b6323ca8618318602670aa11cee5c24014906b8
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'783' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
47c522e7b8812d0bed7a97a07df17102
7870a74f692988705169f22649c93e78fedd8e6a
describe
'7948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVM' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
4a2fc904ae3159fd7f6f3d59fa7a7e09
b98e701f21d4b72139da18d975bf523644f1883d
describe
'420609' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVN' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
dfb69084e1a4fd99e463f5499209e4fc
033609896bbe917e8a82f6d4c9d962bf7d50a3e4
describe
'145144' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5919316c4643f7d017b1f88f8f78c1dd
bbb2656abc870aad57eefdb6b9e3691df07159b6
'2011-12-11T05:11:14-05:00'
describe
'31727' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVP' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
a8282ebbed5f628fa7e572363b0eb9a8
d242d819a6b80347b0044e6e44059210be81f463
describe
'10102362' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
660c6dd737f8e828bba7b982f3d8cb3b
0a2b26c4b523a2ba0002b8275bc9d0e34c560413
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'155' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVR' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ecd548861ae0c33d93f51ff0e77269b4
7ef7dcb83c1cd28a355d178a82d3776433dc0d4c
describe
'7459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVS' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
c73dd5e951a4c6026703f5b5e7ce1337
c046bcee78388a4444a225e7ad696371c82e18a7
'2011-12-11T05:14:27-05:00'
describe
'420588' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b2f7855d231cbfb29fedc94bcb71a96f
5d78a50cd9c18842b524ea3bc2750d27f6930575
'2011-12-11T05:14:48-05:00'
describe
'141249' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0e196e1c15ec1ba995a33930387e24d1
0619d254672ba8bc95d6b9df131beac08285caf4
describe
'35615' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8917bc80a0a7f8a7351abae73e243e3b
cf511de36865c76f621f3ea5835370c41da7173b
describe
'10102350' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVW' 'sip-files00092.tif'
eb3f2b09da09c3be9510ad87e3d1ead8
6c1f113102153d95b56826d7670c91c201804613
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1650' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVX' 'sip-files00092.txt'
81396e4abb90b00ce904d97654169ceb
261f8dbe312959f311014f0153e1dab26de6e781
describe
'8137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVY' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
72a2d2b6a7d5f3a841b54a90512ee324
864150b3b733fc7e3e7af9e2a01ae70b993b3d79
describe
'427466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9baa0b9d7f92726e92d6c750419776c6
2a88b326978874744852567b09970fb3b32530e5
'2011-12-11T05:10:44-05:00'
describe
'140947' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWA' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ecf0dd5b992e25ffbe344c6e66528daf
a456c44b47d6f0271fc6392eddddf9994f5ab306
describe
'34185' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWB' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
095bc51a347e6f1a3969aba1a3fe47bc
7a1a290d174e82c9ad824e10e5f90b7a5045a909
describe
'10267438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWC' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d98fe5e18f7e95d008fe38f90c57d81a
c6c95f4dc645c2fa8625b6e701adbecd5f7a3c8e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'805' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWD' 'sip-files00093.txt'
d5dd16e16778cb82346cf135cfb7e395
322a691783b072791a294281ab1efc0808c746c7
describe
Invalid character
'7985' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWE' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
392e4a5ccf8d08b197ab4c1af2c65552
6355ffc9446faf1f0d34b54d86168dcf16eb76ff
'2011-12-11T05:14:38-05:00'
describe
'420590' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWF' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
65a9e7e807fa80163138bb4900e2aad5
43bdb3869503b75ad8f8f39699dac48f9bd01d19
describe
'142367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWG' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
2d11628439248519095700488a3a596f
eb02cd83ec136530812b7b55dd3e9cd63bcbfda3
'2011-12-11T05:10:25-05:00'
describe
'36656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWH' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d97305538baa30918b565dd6b2c8da06
09567bba6ee17e22a20df2f43174319c15a8cc7f
'2011-12-11T05:11:26-05:00'
describe
'10102618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWI' 'sip-files00094.tif'
392a70bb156347ea2ceb70773f526186
525218c0c16743abb4b8fe73be159e2c79a1f7ed
'2011-12-11T05:11:39-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
fe9df2ca548fee3543d93db835822aa5
4d3ad3b79cec17feaa3c87c45650b89bd17375cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWK' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
8d93e89b2df782edea9595a357006204
369b4ff5e920ea9b1f766b1660a4cabac9c9acf0
describe
'420400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWL' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a35117fbb3a88d387796db6a14bed055
1e9428ab190a7ae7f84635625f9779dea224c0b9
describe
'135017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
40a5b1776cafcc8652d1559eb6e21989
2aa723a553701c5e11b64cf5daf62ef5475d720b
describe
'34187' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
cafa1d010f55f64f8140f12f93c950b4
5f478a4785a0e755ab1333a1f47a5d351133bf58
'2011-12-11T05:13:01-05:00'
describe
'10102158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
bbcf2d88bd781f4151d5ff8395d2f9fc
e9ed07144e892b6da7258cfbeb1e08299393c6d9
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1677' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
47bd358a0eb316388752fbf47a39131b
ebf3f626710c4c54276c8062b17baf9527e87b07
describe
'7862' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
e375ac40bee2a81204fb41a2e0f160f6
a577e59b33dff02d72ade900729c53f972b9593c
describe
'417128' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
937cdb1a0692efeeccf70e53ede33ae9
bbcf091609b2f8f3d2f7b95f4d90e3eefe9b023e
describe
'131519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
39af3f0750eea53fb4aecc6eb7d2f5af
42924e1a5885103ebb8dfe2afbb630aa43957139
describe
'33639' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b84391e8dec552f1750fac7449bf4af5
c287e7d166b645197a501fa84f36acdb5c35c870
describe
'10019650' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9f9455a07f01ab6c640077b108e4b467
4a649408aeebe9b6dd33106d968d4bfc187b4873
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1662' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
34ec87f69abd8e3fd61b0d6291fba4a1
f249b0e1a0333754735ca6a692ccb1df75d488e3
describe
'7739' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
1f4f4d5ede9fc759f22196587d6601bf
cf9b4efc317d97dcc7b859b7dac4d4747880a180
'2011-12-11T05:13:17-05:00'
describe
'417126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
03b4da2dbcbe70fe09cb7d54f6c0feb4
c75b4eb022ac8bffe991f8472fbe209ce722255c
describe
'140341' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
3dfb541ec25ae8ec1c42e25b85c58718
1f0841cab0420ef378a3b0ff4d7cfd9ae082ece6
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
cac5d66afa237d8066e52a65a9e5c260
7ab808e22ccb75b70d0a56c4b71d22ae3f0a93ea
describe
'10019798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXA' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8f6510c7b970ac3c424c2b8e42f20239
33882b7967cdad8693fa1ca5952a292b89bd4358
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXB' 'sip-files00097.txt'
7dcd242b6411335c4b1005cf3edaa33e
00f3bc7c6d23f21fbb9432100f8cbd3257a3d6b1
'2011-12-11T05:14:08-05:00'
describe
'7829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXC' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
4532aa0c6050575ae5eacb14572e3f51
06b920edb3aba52b0d10b10422ef0427292a5f8b
describe
'417024' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
df5f1dd3a8a32fa810e6360767dfa1e3
317fa58d28cb05b799181af529916a9f7b333733
describe
'131225' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXE' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
f05c3da2fcb5b938c55d016723bccbf0
e9c8d50ecf769c063f587d9c8860fa4afe340701
describe
'33645' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7ca972edea8115cd66921fbe4e166c2d
ccdcbeccbffcc99033f01cc6f870d25e11238777
describe
'10019746' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f8140246fb9a33d0bb2bb4610219eb00
30d7122f19dcf98d48162182884c0c9d295edecd
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
de40e365d681e31d977a4dae89788b98
23fa5221008e6932a6b1c32e82d79301e5af20bb
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
70e56c83e0011c37e790658baaf35993
cc763e2efb9318b86fb4d75e03fc564dd24ebf46
'2011-12-11T05:10:49-05:00'
describe
'417158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
52fcfb6867af7b067ff148a78ddb8d7e
f5a18bb9e8ee5d1c966dd9f5e5e09af445241ffd
describe
'141129' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
0b5a67d4cc821cac2615bb8a997c1135
778a4413801786b36c0430b44f16c18a5b0ddc2b
describe
'35618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
195eee844827e7aae52c8688864ac7ff
6b387043eae3b9fa61cb4c6254c81910a1c1b017
describe
'10019802' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
1004d2c3ce74d44a47e762e68b61a13c
59b47dab2643c0b56658cfa30a5ca1fe9deea813
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
4e228d4174ee784da310a49db68a2273
7c1402c26ca1d6be375632a8fe42d9894dd42606
describe
'7688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
fc0624b5d9270803ad42c902d2cd1088
4a2c8681467006f7a793a33cbb8a9e873e72e6db
'2011-12-11T05:14:03-05:00'
describe
'417177' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
9d3f8142cd59bcac7a9e032fe86336ed
c1311c4948787335365cbd8d42c51d66506503f6
describe
'135529' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
536acd8df129c28ea5077ccd4658abda
86219a3f44b3f492b2daef8cf932fc0550d7db82
describe
'34020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXR' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
49b9c2415ff53246da7bc4c40aed3f9b
ff39fefd139d818159a7107649c42ce8f5c773e2
describe
'10019734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXS' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d3aaf809fd0ac1a5835b4ad70dbad7d7
ea8a95138180f4068989e2b07471d0671b22a3eb
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
a72565fa956f3a16546bf6fd4a81b79a
819de5cd34a5a3f7fd585e07926747ae577ba73f
describe
Invalid character
'7681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXU' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
ff2b5a02e3a4f5e13a409b3cebb59518
f23e0679b27726c9b8ad7e54dcd99db7f6fa91eb
describe
'417157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXV' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
15a5caeee8f7f70e81b444c1dd7eb149
c2ebec412daf2a4eb5da9eb40cc64e491c0044e9
describe
'144800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXW' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
5ac46d4410a89a8b2bed43727eca8daa
98dee658f798e77a6adb01e50ad9294b603d71b7
describe
'35264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
09f47141a3c854f34d6ebc577d0cd4ed
86abca904c59aaca75c0e4bd14edcade015e25f5
'2011-12-11T05:11:55-05:00'
describe
'10019878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
4084c90fc9f18b02d8b5a65bec4af652
35fc3122453df2a7356a8d0f2005ac6412ac09ce
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
61ada1b8909b9e41cf9fec51a5b50332
9aa2e92f72e87b716883d49e72b9409e1eeb25a8
describe
Invalid character
'7949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ab27d41ea64f58ad04d59ae075ffb383
4a8a2ab694aa785fdf8118a53a480f4b0fb020c9
describe
'417176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
c45243e447bfe8928bce52a2a480878e
e3dabc37b17b7f0857cd41aef02ee86eeeb53688
describe
'147787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f6a6d12a293198536a75a637f81b390d
0064e99faf99b18940bf74640de5dd5ee262a51a
describe
'37252' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYD' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d9a9db84c05bcaa6c99f3897167eacc1
12527078a6625d982ade2f4e930ae57ef5f86b78
describe
'10019974' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYE' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d60d700e6ea77b003300d63a752b051e
2bfef0b522831f17669ecc4a13686eb280deb90e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1667' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
24cde81fd471962261d0bc699612800e
e62f9ce0988ee474753a023e6099078840b13555
describe
'8276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
9d6e939d534a8362d5b02eb2315179fd
1f3fb85fbddacfcfa06a1e646dd5cc2bdeb6b44e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYH' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
dcc4ab566c85d61b2147c97f0caa0f11
73e2db8c0c4bc8f468af0021fafc10006e41e82e
describe
'144852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
ad30d98d2c6a75a8d5b3b4e893521c6c
709b59c4c75a4379a27cd326120b6f7a3a44f833
describe
'36403' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
7e5a78d41b10a84ea5e63fd7d009f2db
bea7e5878e0b971c99bde4ab1677e116b18fd105
describe
'10019770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYK' 'sip-files00103.tif'
90c91b9268643cc828a0056f0a2cdedc
bcaaa12b8cde674a208abacc7eda0c65de4fc85c
'2011-12-11T05:10:48-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1693' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
51e2a70a2fb28c7a218788a4163b5f0c
83a42e8faebc5622ff2d4280932ff1a4c89d08d0
describe
'7831' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
a549123d4e8754dc72a533d486342ef4
2d37270f634044d24461195dc9b742a8d156ec00
describe
'417117' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYN' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
37e5bff7599efe33bacca74510b9c312
bb23951fc8c65a2d4b1851e1aa5e411d79173288
'2011-12-11T05:13:04-05:00'
describe
'141121' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
249cd6cd1525c9a11450cdfd4f8623a8
0dd90bf9e2c2ceba97780a6ac69b8a374fc19017
'2011-12-11T05:13:03-05:00'
describe
'30758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYP' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
bdcae8b9bd56013226d6d9785489e990
2225bc07950b58a178cb7c788531d6b88c44c134
describe
'10020106' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e24e32a33b63b8a87562d02da0eae2f8
fb265e510a3323253191ae6a125957b97f39cc61
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'115' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYR' 'sip-files00104.txt'
58c38f1243e8832e3cec7a7972ebe3f5
adbf3348052877b2e8620b57dcc9684fcd952a9d
describe
Invalid character
'7436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYS' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
62715f831704653f537e75f07f1e51df
874afa8dee1f09f8a49747ba982b1fca58cbcec2
describe
'417093' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYT' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
bb2fd76a206c9352df8c87932e1ad798
f219a54308e364169ab9fb970ca94223b1a8a37f
describe
'140027' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYU' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
508046aebbdff6f2c5f1dd9d7de85ed8
f8cf168a7361434fe877c0e820b06961713a9938
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d86c0ed02dbfdcaa5957a3672c163f2a
ca93b4a773d0d1e516797f980dd045bd25b45b50
describe
'10019682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ce43035c501c3fb4d47931afd6426309
41c16540267499a00256027585d335f13402fb88
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
365b84358527f77f78caef61fa4a238b
b5bb966fddd4571e0dbe9177f53f343da9035b7e
describe
'7646' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
d34448049b034cc530d6aecb993d5c7a
27f8cc4b94ce2b4aa6885cf45c16907defda4002
describe
'417004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOYZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
ac59607d6738e62f4f3206bdad0160c4
d4661fdc36105af160ddd2f8d67b3d1d2ff3a213
'2011-12-11T05:13:52-05:00'
describe
'134146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c0f66252f479bbba3b35915449be4646
a928d1327650ad1bdee2cbaf088054f0bf039796
describe
'34313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
5bc6b0abdd6a68e55986f69873331de0
0d81856dfaa8616d63eb70875ac5c6d2d52e520b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
3259283d5926ebcc77550b5f2e60b3cf
0e2f263c3b8594cd2aae63dd3da44fbbbd0684fd
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1671' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
11178234295dc2d970f41ea5735b7a08
fe1d3bdb1f11a8fe587d4645a64d8b4c83f467dd
describe
'7771' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
ccaed8aa947388ee5a43f2fdf1a264bf
fc5bf8412a2adea428d3648b512d658f8f606cca
describe
'417136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
16bf84b9b2e83544ef060e458f4cf87d
e7ed4dad1b80fad74082b6b9f9345e7e3a01670e
describe
'143442' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
aa0fd1bba5bed88013efdb513195705b
2004a02bc7ff4662cb6e85ba833b6937791d6acc
describe
'37004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZH' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
b5e35484b4d551560702dcdab13475a6
fd191d9724797f6cdb915d45122a1e49e16e2794
describe
'10019862' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZI' 'sip-files00108.tif'
39a53660816836aabd87e079e8154063
c8446b8d929e72cc5459c5da0b41a8c8d0fdc5c0
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d44d37c5a7f0114d769838f9be31360f
048692b16951d7bd925f1904e4ed67053dfa4360
describe
'8063' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZK' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
2e9a9fcde5ea2e740bb7a1fc63889494
0689dce4e23dc52c3ea112aa264f8e0be062dede
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ed34d8c5356eda5284655f9541d2889e
8f2404e100b47d08474cb3565a6f5a0381b0e928
describe
'144452' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
946dfaf4a3cd7d178cc1ed29283a3be4
a92011bd7cdc0705645fa98d8b9c23607c2ab042
describe
'35842' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
fa049dd673646f24336d0307994b02e8
de28c67927a4d5a05a1daed5cf2260b639421d22
describe
'10019718' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
ff308621dfc5a7fc9ffebf74c5ff1679
3677542976761456ae6bc07edd241778699506bb
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
bef01c6560b6c2056836243e2cd3174c
598bdb08e807c109eee96c24a9452719af327803
describe
'7856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
d51c2f7c3dbc0cc217b916ff56821f98
70fa600f196ea3877d790750c7fd78fd4fc206b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZR' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
9a8cfd5a0e7a5685802d712412efe9ca
36f8eabe96690e9944d391929a736f11b6ee30b9
describe
'143641' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZS' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
901a92e97f93d5a21cd113b24806ffe4
598b5a233e2468a921d4d595f06ff6a6f3c374e0
'2011-12-11T05:13:56-05:00'
describe
'34782' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZT' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
78bd6ac3db1a0524407aafb4b337610d
f197be9b914e5feed62e8d7019889db8c68394d3
describe
'10020042' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZU' 'sip-files00110.tif'
945dbd03591e5bf75db0911f3331ad92
4676e5964a6f6c320bf71b1a6dcf6b0f6a2e15c5
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZV' 'sip-files00110.txt'
75de41bfaa2b9297e11e0d36d2b6c0d7
27af045f1c83d1bf14c9e9d3e0d446705997e164
describe
Invalid character
'8070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZW' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
69e2ad60de3ee529e8d141353eb9ac74
c2427b458404377825f3a33578331b8bb33c76b2
describe
'417081' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZX' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
d5ff3ded2d1f8f4efce54524bbc7ec54
f1c4826b05d15691a7ef657dee20846c7871e188
describe
'154135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZY' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
d173e59f7633ee265a74d7e48586d697
571a924a542a796d8edc9b10167419f0658dd1ae
describe
'40277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABOZZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
4cd4e5c4615893bceb862158b6b0f265
758377726f7e932cdada043a49e5993b4262cc16
describe
'10020466' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
740d4a652989b8fdd383fc0d09d52552
58d3285d4ffa5a02c23a08acc54c8bd027397676
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
08b5108f6de73670f9518f4dfe15389f
2064568404846d82d9221a97a4a5c774fa5d6835
describe
'8802' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAC' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
f958edf7fccaab4b32aa3b07e7474192
a30a5f97082ea01c08496956e65903d616de93a2
describe
'421498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
ca4bf8b6bae049bda57888bfa9417bfb
a053cb73a1a8be25bf936851cf7e236ca0825b55
'2011-12-11T05:11:52-05:00'
describe
'142337' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAE' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
94422e33e4ae9ecd13ba23cef940fc76
92b59d28bd1858cf204324bc9dafef2042445596
'2011-12-11T05:11:12-05:00'
describe
'37142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAF' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
df704e847958915ce18b612d768f5678
7df04639b1b280085892e6277bf476d0df66bacb
describe
'10124906' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAG' 'sip-files00112.tif'
716de9b172c7fd8b47ab74e02dd00364
0c8038989752c8c6507e583fb86feef3d339e0cb
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAH' 'sip-files00112.txt'
90c9679c6f16956595e3f774eae326fb
215621a2c4a23b73717813f64ae10a037d8307e4
'2011-12-11T05:13:37-05:00'
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAI' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
bc0f516aba306b0102f2cb4342335522
968900da38a2458b0f608460fca799ab81a82b2a
describe
'417148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAJ' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1eec9641c1a4878ccc2c960194dce4fe
66afbf8ab764832a74de610267215288739f605d
describe
'132864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAK' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
c7e5105c3b2ff6f7dd9d2437990810d0
9f91e495f7b8644866a867060556c8e8a374f611
describe
'34427' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAL' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
63e76d336d0cd765e99c17ff68b4720f
8984a477c148494f19a327256d8813a747024037
describe
'10019918' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAM' 'sip-files00113.tif'
c68a4835cd47528eefe2e3de0a49e28f
3cfbabacfe6188877ed927fec25f211947e4e552
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAN' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6aec72c67a09da777a7460717940c083
18e295a55385604a12eaedb441377a8b0cd333e4
describe
'7713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAO' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3987f9bfbded0e4e150434f25ac156c6
c0162fa0babfc9602b260f23ae9e242f58f13316
describe
'417042' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAP' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
8b90a70f187926e6c5c2204b6a31eeae
23dc0c912df24e75538e4863da9fbb6f02a5cf59
describe
'134649' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAQ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
945dbf82312998782c115c454fba530b
47d89abbc28f93e78ed4c92ba8e0cd18902e1dbb
describe
'34206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAR' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
569e752f4c09fa19b606214c46c3c3f0
7240819bc5372bf4250def9ef0f40ef98c128878
'2011-12-11T05:13:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAS' 'sip-files00114.tif'
98e0dc88932d2ca04550dc108678ca00
e54ff868c0a112f7d595452a63ef1817f1194f52
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAT' 'sip-files00114.txt'
3db926497b3a64d998e65035d3a04541
160a9047fba11a75e019834359a66316c06a8963
describe
'7704' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAU' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
5e0e8b1650fb9a398e9862d94c6f3b99
423d3307d46141e4b2efd66ded9e97ca7a574f54
describe
'417168' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAV' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
322ebcdc79cd434d731f9ead4396f386
a1898b4064f91c67f524bfd71408da994ddacd1f
describe
'141996' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAW' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
76a65115cbdb7956a4ceb174fb89086f
e88ede2291fbb85ca87a9d2a1683488c2aa2e07f
describe
'35879' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAX' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
6a33997dc0c87188f4f8dd646760954d
26f4c36105e06dce0fc03e99cbd0cafdd9994dcf
describe
'10019866' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAY' 'sip-files00115.tif'
1c62f3cc1d0729226ba77e723fb7e41c
20493b7eddb1b84b814f7bb79673f12e5530f727
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPAZ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
3770d849b7677788a06dadbf403e6200
d0b355443b82f02ba8e3144132b095fe13015bd7
describe
'7854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBA' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
ecff9fb95fdf3f19566f2a2ca9378b1d
b4bb1e15933caf8de680b3175a4836a5c146f9f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBB' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
87d33c5a93ce914ad874fac6f81f9fc2
48cff4d30ec31087ba8a39bf9f4072c1e707139b
describe
'137910' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBC' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
2f473e03e0b3d76c879b83b12162a549
ccf7be5fa39fd1187ba37dc532d05a50f92bced1
describe
'35055' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBD' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
47843253fd0734cc584fb0029c098f80
00d397afe711b3b284cc7eca2ba20c4c8b927067
describe
'10019838' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBE' 'sip-files00116.tif'
dc4b5af02c764ddd227969239edc630e
52c973430d03ba9f1dbd332c1d74bed9ef0fb873
'2011-12-11T05:12:16-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBF' 'sip-files00116.txt'
fc40ba26658ee8251abc9c41597a90be
1de0435803e4d3b982c3d4b41b845cff372cfab1
describe
'7827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBG' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2a9d659c175059b8b2b68beeeb53623e
1e206c514a937d5ec7274cee8cab0d149eed9470
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
d94f2a6512fa99a271053d0e3929e536
e7515f1154b2d1652bae9e02a5258d03cc323bf9
describe
'142557' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e0e1203fb3d844d2eee5a70049865ba1
f7c45d058b67e380064c4536bd9e3a4b62b59563
describe
'36093' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
bb35ffa6132824e6b0483dc4d8be9573
c1133c488245cea7323ec42494032b10450c5c53
describe
'10019890' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
e8703505ac5368a048b1a0d9e366e5ab
b728422570b6c01eedcbaed18fb64d5d720b28a8
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBL' 'sip-files00117.txt'
2452c1c7bd5f78c276c84678bda12355
475e10a980af972a5c2a0ed303e0595b72023fa3
describe
'7942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
21a3f349d1744a4fce22b08715312899
da95deeb97e2572bd89f48026f693b3c9c354784
describe
'417156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
6262484e0976c7b6fe70cf7e6d6957b5
feb2367866a2bf606486f0dc86516884a5082846
describe
'137378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c21d511978aff7cd10c97c7369f45422
1a8b8acb08d3520d1fbc57983652da1e4df28e1d
describe
'34817' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2a5f3307f9031930e7e52365ef440083
7b552b2128c2c7c71ad91057e4330e7fbd518b49
'2011-12-11T05:11:30-05:00'
describe
'10019826' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
5c24b2d86474bfeb9ab7673f9209deed
210456219a2fb9243497c8fb0c8d370eb32e6c99
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ccb789101e70bf7b12e2d2f0be8583f5
f92d3d7851d6e1584887f310ea440ed15ecb8e8a
describe
'7668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
62bd8dc7ddf143d57fcd936547472577
5a4a4e93001bb6bb2305b93951ab7093d1b02e9e
'2011-12-11T05:11:16-05:00'
describe
'417138' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
18a1ce1bb0a741412e317ef8a19a5d37
d89c177b08a407ccabdaafd6ae3b697f312fccf1
describe
'144438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
3168336ec8b0a350b4c6db8809be39f4
eed0e77d07091e63063003a5cb87d83033bf5b12
describe
'32744' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
efa4b7debbcc01f8968a73c1dd72cb8a
ce224c066ec501fa6691f891433a6a105c334f51
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBW' 'sip-files00119.tif'
8646bed0b8fe8ca0c1e5ac2b7474f9ff
c0c92e5099f4dd3f228534b74987af705c6eef8d
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'435' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBX' 'sip-files00119.txt'
004984620a48a30a98c58978fe00df3d
2285ea68144cbcb5f0cf9969504c6b9a9fa698fa
describe
'7590' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBY' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
de69c4927be28a3585c8fcc7299b7b5f
40fa8be4e1bd7280ced3bebc74e3bb5ecfd76327
describe
'425685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
688b790fc3da01a0ae2a8405a1e167a9
f92d779834a085e6ce07ff6e76635f77f71f653c
describe
'138660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCA' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c0f930e3cf75b479556ae60a28efbc06
b7dcad96d8e46ae633c27429fb29b40b26d58978
describe
'34554' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCB' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
98ddcd0b313aa60dd718799ae2fa28a6
07dd1e9a18f991459ce9ac386bdb79cf2c15bb19
describe
'10225930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCC' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2970616bc2643cf5483884d7e5f99c6a
4ec72b56c4646c47fa60bee67dcba2853ecb0b3b
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCD' 'sip-files00120.txt'
f8e410bb439a22ee08012e41a7fbd5a0
dd36d4a65f91f5f1fda80cd9682d246e0c5e01ff
describe
'7686' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCE' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b8bbf0a0537213a8d978459cef3f7b89
8133ec2f613e3eba854b8d4063797a0959064de5
describe
'417163' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCF' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a6c0e8b475f6db9569ad95a78e2c602c
65c3818002dcd8f0db86061acb2fd55071fe3423
describe
'143631' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCG' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
e22d03d36afcbff5a6d940b52ee0423e
fbc10e9643e7e6ecceefa71c60586695c3671cd6
describe
'36827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCH' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
e8bf48e8114063fbb482556e62c597a2
fb6736dbd4d5e969257b08cff95020c401163b80
describe
'10019966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCI' 'sip-files00121.tif'
153e69f5c7964d3031973336ebc46e2a
8443ad53b157fc23e7df79fcdc6b4f7ca7ca71fa
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
6a8a88a43b9d163e41384de26fa74a14
9abc3db12018bee2145071782db4ef3a22c68191
describe
'8054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCK' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
c9102f3f500ab0e522dc7bacebd15e69
aaa20e431eb94db306eaf873060aa1c131a757db
describe
'417009' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCL' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
cd176239ec86d0000a110beccbf504d0
d12f8e3eb976dc7405a434182c52b3025190d024
describe
'137966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCM' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
6069b6d85e7603cf966cc67ca43354d3
a0b73ff14e0fef4b2155bb1586807ebdac4792be
describe
'29898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCN' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
cd11786bbc6801f7ab925e8ee104ad4b
bdb4320e6c07598fa2a90a741d2d459f4c1ab8fa
describe
'10019870' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCO' 'sip-files00122.tif'
951d916b7897437fd3b6e5de5db482ff
2a1ac525de031ed4d3f6097c422ccaa95dbea2a8
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'163' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCP' 'sip-files00122.txt'
15b9d9c4790647864115fb68e5925064
665dd176521b484e23c30970a1c4a4e7139f382c
describe
'6939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
bfd21c7d81994404992ef85759ec8fff
4080e5f1a38a3b2b554e0bd0ed0181900d364dfa
describe
'417110' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c7e40216992ca64f1324bd9616da119b
6b420e0f1f812d3f55e12740bf03833785b0d374
describe
'138257' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
9c25c5f08dcdf961a28eb6e24a72ea5f
7debd76b2ff9e86a830cee7243285b73022930e8
describe
'34538' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCT' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
aa5ab1940f804a8b1bf50be9c8a10e87
49e75dc65e16ff7725c56c6bea0bfc652ae95e96
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCU' 'sip-files00124.tif'
2991fa2e33ac4527fe5f5dcbfa79e139
5ddaa003ac239becc1976524a4460d0dd35f7337
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCV' 'sip-files00124.txt'
93c83b02ec8add8919298e84357eecf8
db9437e992f89f26086e5199f9cd320a14a42138
'2011-12-11T05:11:35-05:00'
describe
'7935' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCW' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
9652765dc87f6aad250976be93f5851f
67578bd9871b1574e54f623dc8d2c5c2c3c79906
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCX' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3ec44f7d9efc4d394fac1c88857fc91a
c89c5712a1540e02d02ad330ee145d6d723db9f2
describe
'138639' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCY' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
102fd0fa08a2b899cfbaf159d43bf330
7fdbd36508d58a9d7cd1f56af0538f84e56a22e6
describe
'35396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
eef952063e678613c808fa45d5962d40
e7b8ecd1fc6a5a2e22e2156876c6268ff1745b66
describe
'10019910' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f205f97c65f51cea8c7ad65c41f4d5ce
520fc14eea4a204c3b02da1fc3c3da7b9dd46e95
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
07ecd1479575ed5af89d79db22cde541
bce53b5b143e90670262c335ef47be7cec9e0008
describe
'8022' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ccb73e6d5f4a620cc44427fd087912e7
919f4491ce794f51cb75ebc16cd622924e916e2a
describe
'416998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f7ca3608f2ef348061219e787ed6f705
1553d5f4c4e2c4e8d6838a62b3e0bac5309555ac
describe
'147713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
9913bc80b314fc160404fdd627d6c773
04c67e509d00526b64bf2b4fe4f7f03fda3c6877
describe
'36545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9b32ec51c89329271fa3bf96e53d3d7a
9c20c508e2017ab9ff77292b9fa95a439d603500
describe
'10019994' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
37d44263ca4892ebd27f749d48822848
3b653fe25f5123da8e01e259f8def2e7a4b3dda7
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
76c628e38b87efecd60138cd5164a9ff
a036a626f10ee840e5f0b4230b008e4d7454f6c4
describe
'8185' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e7cf898752d2a7268fa96f6fa5434231
eff24bf733a35bb7ae0c524b363cf93d95428b19
describe
'416938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
6e535c65353367d859280ddeb8048224
c16ced029152a5158a75f03f792b778b09132a96
describe
'144431' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f048c7f6a9957c8f66ddd156336db98b
d50f4980b8bb6a5d650a0492eef076983454ec85
describe
'34404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
af8ff30c9830036797f200ed3f05960c
482e830fd5c2f4fc89d31f2540963a32a1e5effa
describe
'10020146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
56f6a78b0f109f544841371c5e65b914
6deeb5a89e5eb261e81fc0b5d46141723ad7a65d
'2011-12-11T05:13:20-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'743' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
7b933bc9a751303aa8bf5553600f5c19
b61d74727a6662ef1a0f051c101ae64d2584792b
describe
'7834' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
d2d45d83d583a6ddd2ed16a4fde98df9
6c55aee1ad45341e704b0e0ceefcbffda265d710
describe
'417017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
6e48a7cc75c46fa438a344ce2e7b1777
3af5bd8077ec277f5e4d53b3931cb29582546ddc
'2011-12-11T05:14:05-05:00'
describe
'144969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e07a6c0a62136214fd576b9ed59c624f
1e8ae581a2068ae56dc3d304e497175e902f18ac
describe
'36736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDR' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
425bba71c0c7af4a7ad86296a0154f94
12d96890c12d9d64a41dd5d0a1b30836bec6d58b
describe
'10020114' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
9cd217c02f236df127147cc7443a8d21
cd95ef35d6d208034e39c2716b929fc7d4170ba5
'2011-12-11T05:10:51-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDT' 'sip-files00128.txt'
191e28bf1bf700de12b36e5e7883fc9b
f98c2c72bd267b8de40f9c878ca50dcfec4dec78
describe
'8250' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDU' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
c593766b459a5fb4826b242d00441823
1f1f7fe1e2fed518ae1a499e41a2ce26941c042b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
df549556534a75f0b8b4d6c9b8e38896
eface92e2d170a831714edc009fcd7596754b078
describe
'149748' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDW' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f512c1f892e7d711f6140399b051266c
6dc8afeaa24110caf4a4fccbde8126ad46caea26
describe
'38198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c8d1db320b68087acb1ff6580bcdfc4c
a18cb5cffbf0d6a24ca01d88b592a9f927c71167
describe
'10020254' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
fb13c4a1af27ea9dd120a6c67dd7a08b
15f0acf18c01f6afc8e0749fe369c31014de5066
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
64333e985c910132c8819bf79c229ea3
0fbfc690dfb3cfd1a1d18cb24e5cfe03a81e2394
describe
'8472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEA' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
ee83c0e33869fa51aea44149f035afeb
2f270f0f90d9d805c8935a3fc38c2898fba9e4ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEB' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
747a4833f44acf11448ed87aa68cc745
7ab2ce0af573fb600eb6aaf79de2b9baada8c5a9
describe
'148135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEC' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
8525347e7025b6f063fa511bb9acb169
1e496e12b80c1a13b516925cad924ee7de5e4448
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPED' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
f6457aac0e70ecbe2e66ca1f7e75ba82
2a66571dcb26e234f58cb5c315daed3eb58737a9
describe
'10019938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEE' 'sip-files00130.tif'
eac64d274781708ee7e8017604a60dbd
fac3a4c823b97c2cfc8c478762bd154a57c391ac
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1718' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEF' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e723e5a409ff9743cf64d6d1b439e4d3
c4e2800ab1ab518ebb0bfebe3ed32b05d8f94928
describe
'8125' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEG' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
23384e1ed78cd13a89a518f3253be028
ceeeaa6f392422e1a96d48e97aaf26532f4ad23a
describe
'416999' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEH' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
1efb63a94d0461fbcc2c5bf0c21288c6
a5d99fb7c79d2cca3dd1303a6c384b0c19f6c256
describe
'147855' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEI' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
20d35b50bd327ff556836b407e479ebb
d998c457d59dd756322d5a2423d924f858ac27db
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
db9f8dac5038d257f50b81b113e6538f
0b1f02ffab3b8ef69adb4c891b641d1cb436e7f4
describe
'10020326' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
4b20c69f4a6d6f9239c76ed823b606fd
23247d0e9701520e446a52c5f1613a694ddecc77
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
53a68df07b3b88e5ac57bb193c1fa858
c376097b2e9dbeedef2c729cb1333abd393a1cf9
describe
'8218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
0d0ee4750c5da10821532bdaaca7dcb6
61e01913719b1faaf6950f7f536b70dc7017697b
describe
'416962' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
679a3402c119bff410137e77d92c5b1e
1089bd3a12f3103504b6145373f54e168383b4df
describe
'132787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
f218bb58ee847868eefa4653c072d0ec
7f193e111e89686824c344b340608fb865a3b6f5
describe
'33013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
12843c308f4a2e3e90b3ffeac0fb0473
8d18b8b2c663a418ebab04db6a87ec0dd61273f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEQ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ba1b153c23625d5e71e6d0709512579c
2dabf8157f3646d25f04b52bfc11c100f076bc3d
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPER' 'sip-files00132.txt'
50a21fdcbb7adcf103a414cc682374ec
2f14b485c0e88742d7bdb041cb33409357ca7d7f
describe
'7549' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPES' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b111f7a12b45007c388f22ee3e3b9f11
11bebf4c958d676f801e3c0048b1762373902e62
describe
'417144' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPET' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
62a0c471751f0f545549b822d29a4a40
6d42f147263a9c2b934454b8a93cc3cdea2a8726
describe
'138798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
0437f79b982098dbc6be35ae35c8e198
ec1028ea613ccd349cb57f42c31ea400cd54ca7f
describe
'34948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEV' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
930ddc47982c2198d9654779172591ae
1dbec8e6385ac85588f736e7b07f8c483ee3de66
describe
'10019778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEW' 'sip-files00133.tif'
57d94bbe3e9250444e44529d5070a218
f561965ae270531e46c4856e156d96fccb22e759
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEX' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c48dc2528dd1eb0c993b6bc28cdaaca3
306f26ca964e12e17120e3385919eb1c134d0d81
describe
'7952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEY' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
fd44fd56bf16547b983ddc934af769b4
118f1417cba4a1e059e5f27c5c5153eb71997c71
describe
'417089' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPEZ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
258f989825c9092531059c45f01e7647
7f457a08e689e364f1672f92d8e5d2d68fabc1a2
describe
'148637' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFA' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
7c533ed85e0f8877c5e67fff8fbe1c62
3bb1f00bdb7b2769c17c636ba17ec2a10f78a3ee
describe
'36925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFB' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
d804fbcce0d87c9ddc527f4c4869dc91
748186ce78370fa0a70e6cf610c892e2084f36ed
describe
'10019850' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFC' 'sip-files00134.tif'
18cda94d5604c0d61c39c8df742d0b3e
5f6b8512138dc48d8cffc74120abd0ffd780b0a1
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFD' 'sip-files00134.txt'
2d1e14253311855c31a65372b7fa547c
5ea9a6d8c3cbb395f23bd4551fd0997d1d3f5044
describe
'8169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
36212a43ffc136ebd2c0406befefcd90
39a63748d8b01aeb0dc9abece9f25c386c062fa8
describe
'417076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFF' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
41567e712471f35719cd6ad153a4326e
a2de2595ecf3e710da3e270e0f573b245a966c86
describe
'142580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
091f1f2a0f0048cf9ae34415843b12b0
141adcbdd098d534c49419f8140fc234f7b63503
describe
'35456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFH' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
28340cb0c9633b0493ec68024f2034aa
8db55ae5ad5aa02ca28c49bd09caf530dbe5b721
describe
'10019702' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFI' 'sip-files00135.tif'
efa00a9814937e4eb39eded79d759687
47461b8948f884668cc5d8ef312c60996b540da4
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
104df4a66bcc6ad2d8af26678997c9d5
c38bddc0116cc1d64f6dd626add968e8274a8e09
describe
'7774' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFK' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
9c1b28b763633fe2ed4f5d934c45a3a9
8245dd0f52d2529aea84574b57ff809badfee389
describe
'417140' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFL' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
bf3cd702f0989920388ca7d10e88d44c
2b18a9efd6f82d63771c49d7163f6f348b2e38f0
describe
'146414' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFM' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
1038666a48005f2b6166e533bc925675
81df8ba6d5d03f1cab68a1d26cdb3ff00c326458
describe
'37001' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFN' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
053790cb3df8d4a5486d3b08da7f2ac9
a7d43c6f64ec6bab237d0c29d60860aa82186ed0
describe
'10019942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFO' 'sip-files00136.tif'
5ae852c87dcdfb0c0280c1fb5933b175
72769b67124fba077cbbb533603102b7c2732042
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFP' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ef65333a657393461647aa3d5d859ffe
5aa8f1918c479dd084b45cd8bc897208bc06a3e2
describe
'8046' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFQ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fde6d3ec8b6a2fa547170ab0d7540ab1
806a6a412c5973c112dacf070d48484170e870f0
describe
'416961' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFR' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
4d484bc186035ee40d11f06c34c2a0ef
e9cce32bb8f98a43041acf6250c3c14ac0665d6f
describe
'155915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFS' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
38dc62f344939d3e8b84a06266a8feb7
619f8ed5a7739331212ef9e902dad39a75efb6e8
describe
'36613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
8d94ba9abb2af299a14968159e14cd98
41886cdd297e5d16f1326f90709efa2d508d334b
describe
'10020498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
dcdbad5bef820c5433ea4a71936c61b9
71455f07221bfdb9d90a9705409357fed92cf3a4
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'514' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
7c6312b3b5e511f8448655b7d1bcaf22
4ab9565be907eb7d94f100323cc3fa49d4286165
describe
'8662' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
9f2b915b6f267907641b14417a33ffe5
dc8bc29a57b04fae1eccff947220327b7e809094
describe
'417036' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
880cef5cefa09db48ddff1d9e8e992f0
a1897bcbdf2097f065e669d85656d93dad51723c
describe
'132227' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
563ba5c42ff11418019cc4d0212a961b
ae3dfac94307b3a1106e2c6900c19ff36a562231
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPFZ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
1c0ebb6fac96cf14232eb68d39e7a97d
8c61acedc9a163982a24a01909ede28536e8bd96
describe
'10019774' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGA' 'sip-files00138.tif'
4b59b1ff41f7d5723cd3a57747f401e4
cdeb15e77f161a40b5de02cf37bc7d224aa9e77f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGB' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c89189fba859b692c3b7192396bf90db
f261d953eceb787a71c98b31bd55d75dcfd6af37
describe
'7360' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
ac339b9fbf92e9567e7d6a93a7e83d2f
abe14dd2584972592274661777b3f981d33f3e65
'2011-12-11T05:13:38-05:00'
describe
'417072' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
872eb664dcd0ddfed119aa29453f93f7
fab69bb147e2c6d85c916604d7d6b2767b34a66e
describe
'130290' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
c20dc9064678714dd75b4611b1b1f171
6c9d20eb356177484e80768898ced33556f9b83d
describe
'32833' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGF' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
a1b54cba0a5157b33cd2b7827788d8c4
df4557da7b46f953e5c3290059384ef04f0544b1
describe
'10019662' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
98d1d2b074722937a91bcbc06a83b841
9c80ef0a6db1ec3317c3ebda3ae2a386d347e5d7
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGH' 'sip-files00139.txt'
fabc519b24baafe23c28288c13908b34
2dcc2c09fc24b8fc72c321911888cf0b4a92891a
describe
'7347' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGI' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
b33d5b57b49021486e907b930ebde768
740cd1409e84a310a886316f2c4fecbb65419372
describe
'417119' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
788dc53e43867d49ed130ee43199eec3
df6adc76b33a697338e7e70beb6524febe696ccc
describe
'148937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
58de67a15eb6388ab6d5492437cf6714
ea4e28031f73d37bb4e420c033f2c50b2d0e4832
describe
'35726' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGL' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
cea9c23292fd46ff6d31828b2d006a4f
83a795bbe049762af10e083993a181678e768b64
describe
'10019990' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGM' 'sip-files00140.tif'
5bed6ac92c9a51bb303087f87349f2c5
ab450683c5d4da74a81261329477eecae107c9dd
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'2453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGN' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f39ffd2fb611aa78eb0ce641e336cc96
6ab8b1668353d1a8a7899b0de34fe8cbbf8fdddc
describe
'8061' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGO' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
c64d9e4ed35fe83c1fcc9ef67535bfd7
b59dcb720eb3b65812369f425286c1bfe64d1c69
describe
'417116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGP' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
01ed57d00fff1ebdeb1712d2b98b4d69
ee17d9551cfee3f65ebd406b10cf543bed204ed4
describe
'149264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGQ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
38ca91b2eb094c479b2029212ca9d2fb
79231b7ebe6a0c6af24b05c7a25a1b4d39171e7a
describe
'35320' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGR' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
016c1d76f5a6b0e762df8fa7f7547122
dcb031b74bb3f30ec282fab3e531b1914c7f1771
describe
'10020026' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGS' 'sip-files00141.tif'
17c373cc841e8aede6f379996b816919
2edf0eb07b98810561d9a926d7d2e52d5b716a91
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'2329' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGT' 'sip-files00141.txt'
25e292cb826d504f765fda94be10233a
f88f4b2471d331175b2e49a3c8918582fe0ee758
describe
'8114' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGU' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
4de46c7d5aec4841f761a56a6ed02fe1
98400e471ad8e3464b0f01762ef772438beaba06
describe
'416940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGV' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
a37fdf28283a311e14b5799ef19aa3ac
9ef8ca6e9c99ee42ba095241f86044c02f21778f
describe
'126408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGW' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
0e9377d235e920d837d4ab6259b0ab25
bfda8f2bdc27e2ca4b0176cc97918fd2b3e799a0
describe
'31880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGX' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
4bb8eee6c58227c5444e2599aaa53cdb
aa136b4fd29e99a052111b926bb9af6326c3394b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGY' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a2903de9a303ae80156c38584ae2326d
1b36331ed840ab650d581625140d017f18d131d2
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPGZ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
e76ae12b5183529cf70e8ba5075e95b1
211709df0da4be5968ac698aad6d1f3fb486f156
'2011-12-11T05:10:52-05:00'
describe
'7438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHA' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
7f582302d3964604ffccfe84c0150e75
079879eaf0bf5cfad6949addc60464f36c5ca453
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHB' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
82c5660fa0193375c7f4c2970f735b34
50aabdb3955f54c2581c98e314ea41c32e7bd1f0
describe
'141781' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHC' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
c1cf482e6e9adab2401f312600cc98f5
bc0e8b767ccce36462be91a4ad3a78657be03386
describe
'35581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHD' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
773d286c570ee2870a6bfefc047ba16f
a694b1e1398ac0ac72e7a63a1333dbb3229fcec6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
7ace7d2ba9088c5db848bde3cf838978
bf627d5738456854d55b1140adfdc474f0876186
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
503838bbec91c3ef27a3b6e05eafdcde
77cfdc6d1173ae4727ed084ba476c512628daa97
describe
'7772' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHG' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
69f3d50c9fe86be9ab5aac9cf7b29cc7
322ec92dd998dce4ad3f2fe220ff2b789119b84f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
bd22877406535aa3422f373b3c74a339
7008cf94f2c4c7392aac4c5c938b6ff711412032
describe
'143511' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
4771869efc85f1f185fc2a14e3efccd1
a0b1052a4390e70b623eea165ae8d35e04e1e233
describe
'35751' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHJ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
2fe89aba0ab57377c961d9afc2822116
0fbdc2881433012e5f710d30940e738b65179e33
describe
'10019654' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHK' 'sip-files00144.tif'
36ad50992d1adb2ee888bf2f0d7ff3e4
82434ace3ceffc7a32ef0c06c9fb32f89344197a
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHL' 'sip-files00144.txt'
68fcb9defd8811eb380c302cb7c9d5a8
4aea387aa4a486dde477e42400bf202f4481b27c
describe
'7883' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHM' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
049ab410fd68bf95b47646daf93f5a99
ad7b90259a6f7dcbf4b5ed3293375379ddb6e891
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHN' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
442c86921386afb2485639e0ee55e1e8
b55a205ef7294f25d614e82176373d82c6a27506
describe
'149506' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHO' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
ec83dde6819fd8efc2f41093bafd176e
0aa77fc90a34110053d94c6bd67920b42b69bd74
describe
'36607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
56e64c2b89eb8fe1218ce3371ba29aa1
5064f67c8f51aeabfd38d34f12e725c10d416543
describe
'10019690' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHQ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
98057a4d07ae82b76059e7b26b85b523
17a41d67ac7dc08f947817e8a99fc37a07137f72
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHR' 'sip-files00145.txt'
2b278a067c6c3e718b0a2ea164f8adba
738a150de4fedaae89625fc7ee797077690cb43f
describe
'7917' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHS' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
28c1f075907936d08fe5c9ff7814dfe7
b6dfc494ceb346c52bb2952b603e83f44ad4aa91
describe
'425736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bb921547b33ecbdcd58f94a740e6e454
58b698502cfc66d924be28326c27d69d2a825310
describe
'143609' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHU' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
68b45587f32c8b46883b6231f4af8fef
6caa407802ed659fd6e49e999f6ddedd46913ca4
describe
'36198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHV' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
842e40a14271b179af8ecb84f3bb35a2
611a11cd450558f0d7ba69d10e6a76c27d0a6d15
describe
'10225878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHW' 'sip-files00146.tif'
7e01b885c24664c3be3118a1b9b8300e
26b9cc463d31f7961f01c67eeaec6262993207ad
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHX' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b7103b846ecad3ddcb1a581d27c2ea1d
1b92cddc762eee68ea5c47992b89328fb9fb60cc
describe
'7785' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHY' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
db166af68b8b23be637352a28f2de3e3
c4fbbad2b8a182dcdf1fca7e1e4309238ec70e56
describe
'417083' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPHZ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
8b1f44e2869e5b920bc2ca873b40730d
26abdd06bbf5d15f2a8647911eb5d5c09a1d1fe6
describe
'135997' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIA' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
e42f990099aa27fe25813b756fd30a8e
2c47191f3dee9d31b5e1347993cc4bcbdaa0ac57
describe
'33683' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIB' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
8224fb148d21ae59b9d6a4ae9ba4df93
65187f5b7973939df3d8c3b787bc47135655c012
describe
'10019602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIC' 'sip-files00147.tif'
45561443afad4728220ffdb3946540e3
5fce9f9037c7bc256bbbcc1dc7ece3018d7a66eb
'2011-12-11T05:12:06-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1654' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPID' 'sip-files00147.txt'
981f9cd8af4998cca109bf7cbc5b1b20
0230687e8a9b827424f5aefda58f357e81c6c4b6
describe
'7807' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIE' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
5f780537875a04d36002193d32a7ac55
480d6691e70b1a3f120e0f24a05f55574242db63
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIF' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
31e4566e4e1752c915c243d080e97960
d211ce9216f8ecfe8dc53aa410ed4ae9737b4491
describe
'139519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIG' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3e06292c3d8ec11f721da42b5e804a53
5cf1873224286dcf39f1cd141e2590fa0b1b8bef
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
eb8077917b53a1cf73744f18be858952
5c9f6e39aab3718e29ddeb0e8973d08abfa31203
describe
'10019786' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPII' 'sip-files00148.tif'
54aecddb2d05c4db9305871fac3cb153
904408486b78e4ec5cc3b3dc84cb2cf5433a5524
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6bdb5d58d7bb5d679b4e364986b6d21a
d5ad62bb5556fa293989d541b599cdf893cd67a2
describe
'7919' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIK' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
3a7b718101fa291bda83a6ad3f6f8263
2af07b5abdceca43c3527b9b139e404f1581a127
describe
'417151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
10f63275914547617189e36d74e370bc
ec43eb35834e56a22576d437f05e546032bc36eb
describe
'141379' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIM' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
a9693be83e141c6a40ee7a985a2ff91f
bfad8cb2a792a864746687d5faf3351461529e30
describe
'35221' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIN' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
26ce82344b81b13979d3d73a3238e6e4
11b4083389661a88d3de6baea52b8391365a9856
describe
'10019766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIO' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a28c10b2b888fe4d977162e4ae3afabd
ca2745efb535dfdba867a49104ee4a190661757d
'2011-12-11T05:12:57-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIP' 'sip-files00149.txt'
c2e117d4eb9abd7c23d8e3f0fda9e804
7cf6675fba6b9e379bdf9e9bf964e96ab2845afd
describe
'7971' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIQ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
0258cf746a20b2372f11f40f037d1fb6
5b5a4c6442bcbb35e93cdab12bf31981929c33e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIR' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6c70fed6b60ff17219dd57a6a67c10a4
2b512e5c75f854650f81b31c328011d3c91bdfba
describe
'136809' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIS' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
1010027df3e232da27329f7d8119963e
2d9cd1ea1f5a771569295e7b69c865f278cdc74c
describe
'34017' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIT' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
b16eddf39aad99a1b94e8ce486dfe97a
7e9b302f8863aa93917eb7e796daaf7a356edd5f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIU' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d88912144fc91d026ee0dd84088de6ac
d42eda85d143afccb25d9c3814698603bab84b89
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIV' 'sip-files00150.txt'
ac67d5e8da698268bd9012807c0c3e7a
931d7e87ad62e14ed742da6dae8251a90053c933
describe
'7762' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIW' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
d6c0cd41749c7dff4dbeb3d7eb8c10f1
9bcbc4277b66c5c077ab4334f0e427dd8fa4a8a9
describe
'417172' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
639cb3cc3c1b858869ab79a7244f7be5
b2d44b0f90f573ca112800a4f2b2ab7b521800b8
describe
'145263' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIY' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
1252ae32e7af32855a0677dc353eea14
8b0bd31aef202f0ed79badba39a66c2bfd9420de
describe
'36438' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPIZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
a2898847d1fbce9f1db79744f9aa0350
aaa9aa43b43b5ba2e3d4192ba727613588af207b
describe
'10019934' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
bfa7a9de09a6db095964a821343984a6
d0e30a8e98ee4e646f39a30042aff5f55ce9d083
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1789' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJB' 'sip-files00151.txt'
ca7e2d50006dbbde23dd97d371b5878b
e4ae285fd0b20a2fd2eac6583671fa2eccd42816
describe
'7932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
2357cf1164fdca9327b19bee8a4bcd5e
7431f58bb23649e73a0d27adcf4fc2c6afaf3325
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJD' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
c92079865177ac2d5023d3ce2adaf30a
28fe0126b2c8fd3f0840ddd36eca5be6afd2c422
describe
'136331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
42d2cc59899ad297ae82898c2e7f3e41
050eeb4252bbc64eb8c971ad004636df3813764e
describe
'33738' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJF' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
65e7ae2a2981c72df19566946af828ff
f1ff758c52486249dba3f3b57c7d12151ac2f891
describe
'10019758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJG' 'sip-files00152.tif'
11124110834ca4c011479249238eb705
76e14858cf6042ae1357d04480ba3ee7dff4e6d2
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJH' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ac8507e1eea87df24c41c677e9cfb6e6
0cebccc37702f7c0d584bcd5faa50f4dfce4fd8d
'2011-12-11T05:14:00-05:00'
describe
'7849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJI' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
07ce3f4165eff036310cedcef8678cf2
9f6e3667a938b83d27ebd44593949d0f4d1ce38b
describe
'417152' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJJ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
38441d6c6b51aaf6af9ac5a85d6a4f9e
f54cd746f60810232d42369198c3614354f98e86
describe
'131808' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
9759cf21ceb68bb517f6e0fee3c35e7d
43554cbc2636fdaf1bb087f5ed749707e592e90b
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJL' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
ec60c97365491558b593660e41485549
bcd84c59ee4ee4a01f88b4896706a7efc9d3973c
describe
'10019842' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
21dc7752144feed1ef31b3f7c5b9d76e
544d8df5bba1d755f9a381a333cbba2b1e1488ca
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
cc70929577538004c57019d93fdfe063
682606e3708b21a13b7b4ec3872e88212ff81cf4
describe
'7445' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJO' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
e61c2b84abd114d5a53f501a22dffc7d
a6bc4d759ac19c7a038cdd5e6c23b98e06b0a72c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
e73ef33126b444c42a212b83c6c677c8
9579e86035fe95124a93913c5994f27e7b30c64d
describe
'128447' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJQ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
ba3c4c17817cbb7acfc9a12eb7b62454
a7ddd80c0bac381c5ab3b3f81ad58575d837d819
describe
'31469' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJR' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
6f3dbafce1175c89e8f0c8b6c247ef62
5ea07cb8a0e2bdd46f327c1a000d5610c713cd22
describe
'10019606' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJS' 'sip-files00154.tif'
d7a822023ef50e61d8bc3cb3c81e71cd
7082b42a88a881630ea4a5f2a1824e9d9d826421
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJT' 'sip-files00154.txt'
43e08015942e3d29485379ab19008a63
712849f13690256da85335aca794fef539e92fcc
describe
'7100' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJU' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
da977c0b13755aa01a2fd76844c8b2b6
50ae39453f681fe5d161b1cd1907cb922102458b
describe
'417174' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
8760318d8ff6aa98beee13b58ea059a3
ac208f4badf27dfbc5362dfd21e6b4dc2a2961d2
describe
'119153' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJW' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
fb5cdb7ec0d2d03cfedc5a75c15638e6
f1d01a14f7821e14ccac82fa82d17f5c998909b2
describe
'29660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJX' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
1f134df0641cfc376a04eb70766fae94
4b3a0bf6cfc331772ef9a0c449f471b5c54b41c6
describe
'10019634' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJY' 'sip-files00155.tif'
fe50365d64fa75872bbab6862a4bab04
6495be6bee1b0dc38edf2e4b01428ee38c68778d
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPJZ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
5dc1db5e460349a75baa369e9cddfa24
4ba3cb57e003ae94cc94ba0a9400d10d11262994
describe
'7004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKA' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
6bfe3afda19f16de97379ddb8c46d445
679069da72b531ae3ec7062fbcedf008fad3e7d5
describe
'417162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKB' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
a50a7c0ab6a7c86cf788c41d40bc2cee
e9046ec76a3c4daaa26c962b059e5f9ec64ec124
describe
'118044' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKC' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
0cfd089d240a4c243a2d358cba1cb425
44bde992adab8c635f6278cec350f25c3a52d508
describe
'28891' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKD' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
f838b5ec37835cf5d849c3ae3ad5434e
bea17939611c90a7be085a95ca80afa39620aa8e
describe
'10019554' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKE' 'sip-files00156.tif'
38a2ed4142c3badc3989bcadff9d6b13
b19b21d138c300128a3d5643a5861e89f2f9aa15
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKF' 'sip-files00156.txt'
a97261b39a737fd00656a75445b01072
0981b2006db02bc401b7dd2fb74f588c78709677
describe
'6853' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
0e799d5f18cc0fd8fdece41772ddcb91
5f2a0a0a21fa72959f56f88456bbcf8ea13212bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d8a42a5958402fd67d4ef0c0d0abbbc0
e4e32b513e9144f1366a475101603634029f1ad3
describe
'123116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
4b5259df5b1a73ef55e80845393525a2
9b03d23425f16d9858de96352a8930b3d7b47073
describe
'29882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKJ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
8ae8a243233471594c54b68619ebe6e4
62b1685f8b2b7d00309f7776b8fcd46139ed7305
describe
'10019706' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKK' 'sip-files00157.tif'
629aa4517129afd5b27093d8c0055d52
f0ed645cea354f929eefe52694775449b83f5f61
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'960' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKL' 'sip-files00157.txt'
4b600610b8d334154b0545ff5e5d2bc3
6d99ea3d0b52160a1e2bc1b2667bce6785d24894
describe
'7376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
ca1365804c332095051b08722a2c14f3
4fec4576f71e93fe44a0eea0f216c66e16bbbf7e
describe
'417103' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
544ec6bb6dbc63c528b5e7817c96f0ac
545be99bf0a217bd057fbaf976405b3cb614df03
describe
'138498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKO' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
71fad4551cc4b52c5d775e41f7625235
31ed06a96fe3087b30e60ca6935db298a233f47f
describe
'35130' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
199d24432dbe441d3853748e8631ff83
f51e826541c3d48b0b12c4534cfa01972434148d
describe
'10019646' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKQ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
23f8deee0ea10225dd34dfaeee1e652d
f6afd64a208bfef15580522c11caf666a67537b7
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f8ac9428e79291432bd656927eeaa525
8613bdf7c2750e9f8aa2d4a2c5558492aa784326
describe
'7676' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
417a276937db84a34d6da52129852b68
1ef61d9f697d0abb305c7666f271a8c22d717fb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
46d86f2ae975578937dbfec975855d7c
4871737260412102565de60558e7ce0e732411ca
describe
'129663' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKU' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
cf11b84ba62024be7d0bcfff3a93761c
90f99718f295e8afb5f8df1b97793ca60b5d2345
describe
'32545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKV' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
622063ab1a87ef1e70b637c1484b0b80
4aa072c4422f616122e257ab0e1a9180a7e7bcfe
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
8b508e943c741cde7d9c6b4fec6e8b22
724297b0a4643305cbec14b59e11209acac5888d
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
16691897be78ae46164d566e9488c309
7517859dd9eda148c306ddd5dadc70c3993907bd
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
62b5dbf82b292f053f05fd199dae227e
52b8c7a528ef8a806e8455aa43dd7b7384c22a33
describe
'417139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPKZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
70044515e6e80f94eb7a02685e721933
fb92683f63998a4e7b4520161a0464bdfa47377b
describe
'133972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
7044eb21672716487f157c1cf4c39b95
b22b68ec3d0bb0b0d52a339591ed7210d4dc00ef
describe
'33064' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLB' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
9572611820851a9bf951172442bfa328
411f50bb27a4bd26a7f780aa1589a67004925939
describe
'10019998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLC' 'sip-files00160.tif'
45a0eda36d65b542876c366c77bbb659
cd36db84e67f93004fe5b8591c213233a8ec8e81
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLD' 'sip-files00160.txt'
2d3cddc8936bdd04bf37a8c2388f4351
54ff13a36c1519831284f682562c7561104beacd
describe
'7758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLE' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
c2bb2210863013c7858a2f14e097f291
ab07fa4b99284dd3a22fbe3158ccb5db9cc084ee
'2011-12-11T05:12:12-05:00'
describe
'417109' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLF' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e0aa4dd6308968f0a79b9afbf3d97fa5
00fb6f7f1e1134584a8ad7f63e8b1b58357ba31e
describe
'155149' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLG' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
cd258b8072887ea627f2c8fb89bd58e1
ffc9f38479e645c126012bcfe404f2acfc41b1e0
describe
'39089' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
3de8c04026fb7b590845440a086baddc
e263d1428584ff03447f71abda2ffdff44508c8d
describe
'10020270' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
92cfb803a1be0c609de92caf617e3c96
54cf0f058bad7f91767594152bfd358af05f4a91
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1719' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
bd8659bfb5c75923c7740c4eaf1166c0
dc28f67617c7834e6717565e9b52d12ae3eb092d
describe
'8602' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
4c43034cdafb2c6fe6af644e3b873212
34e63b077af24969ad72c6447f995052f645fde2
describe
'416941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
c007ce7dc1beecf7ed35af10cacc23e6
9976c18de7dc7dafb62a8905f4fc330442adf718
describe
'141096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
01aa4c245c28077d44c8594375561686
adc3e079047f384521164427dba8e01fd564d4f2
describe
'34898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLN' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
53188e87f8a3caa3482aa277872386a3
0188f08f843d3973b0c3393d28832fa3a7e1d76a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLO' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2c9f50e4d5921b4c692cc397898243cb
91dec384206784370c50af63823c51373668c503
'2011-12-11T05:10:07-05:00'
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLP' 'sip-files00162.txt'
8036f88b12dc5e560fd1afac779ab1c5
a0f42ef78ab45076c33b3f219b1e3f45be042f04
describe
'7748' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLQ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
76dd47a2ec1b7460a72124c2d32b6960
b232315b5082633dd340e9c027f8616cdc9fbc26
describe
'417175' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLR' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
7de184b39fe6f4d5d6f4aa2d80a7acb9
4e0dff008f3ca21c9e24e44b076367dc6b33fcb3
describe
'101956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLS' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9ea53cc7f493a5511671862edb204fa8
165d5f041d7192af3e0df6dc0be381a949b444be
describe
'24357' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
cc35566f559c68a8a7bea3b40ced0313
d4364d9db4316602b3f9e17668715051a3e0f2ba
describe
'10019158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLU' 'sip-files00163.tif'
1e5b82dbe466ea15d9da79db90a69390
033c56d1357c51e07e217f840e0c6c0b00df1c6e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLV' 'sip-files00163.txt'
5218b811834b1a8daf13b9059bab9bf8
a7824cfdf150f418eac8b7162610911bd2030a40
describe
'6219' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLW' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a3a32ea0e8d4d7a7765062798ff93ac8
38b0a219ac246a541511e90df6eebfb3ace93afb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLX' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a98af5ad70a0b8726613e1596fd6378d
9b958982244eefc6a0129f8993f43795f45ed892
describe
'119071' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
726a2daba088d00b82719ae9f8c81f96
69497e269db6fc660bab81730b1a0e2d076825a3
'2011-12-11T05:12:51-05:00'
describe
'29527' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPLZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
0723f62243cf9611ddd6527d420a266f
e9ce371ef34d41bbd41346ac52589c8cc60a3b4c
describe
'10019586' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMA' 'sip-files00164.tif'
d6f6e108e0cd5fb6010eb2e3eeb00546
915c8707c33b74b856068f055c5bc3b3738ca431
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMB' 'sip-files00164.txt'
6ec65e2db62a4ad18b4d81fd457416ec
7f5a05cbb169af2a67f9dc5b65ff7db0c83ea1eb
describe
'7000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
7fdbd340f8f86bccaee02ba04cf83eb6
d7217ed7059ac98604eb0eb1ea363f46ddb426ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMD' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
14816ff4c802196b8b57b701b9ad8008
672ca680bfafd9366289b5354beafee66cb0a810
describe
'110349' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPME' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
896e0e2465c7d0360a078e711b890952
2bab198447c82c65baf85c7dc3ee2472b0acc43a
describe
'27278' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
d1725788a321310e97ff383d15398e69
b2ffbf7e2d26274c21c2f0829f0b7adab9513b75
describe
'10019266' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
962228ef7e7c7c6de6424a441190f7cc
5b35663284a8dc330bae1be85f639f3ea836ed16
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
889cb1dc9c97eee61cf2aaf508dd2253
a29ad2ac1accf5fbd7da981290b956757a268846
describe
'6685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9c9b86daa389a3a2b6af13540a5319d9
83c1073098fee2d8dc98a887ab42b7e407c9255d
describe
'417127' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
e92383341a2aefc76fc38f9f5c4180f8
933b2fcad1639515d332741aa5379ca7e944b017
describe
'114367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
9d51a65ebc408a9eafdb4f3658f5f6a1
23148c1c51668a65d6457351499ec5b53e7c8e00
describe
'27822' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPML' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
6136606454785b77cdac95f9ee0a92c3
6b48a706d601bbcf8a480672c589950692fffad0
describe
'10019598' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMM' 'sip-files00166.tif'
7b4a4f5b74d38a785096c305145cb5ee
00588b3bf04423461b53c4aaf93175fb1327b088
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMN' 'sip-files00166.txt'
fb9d487608fc4633335af5f0dbd4707f
6581d883db220ac162d5a8aeaedc71fb61a48bd4
describe
'6787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMO' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
e27344c2b92882c0cfcbb13d2b4d9ab4
1a913399342d99fe4ea1568733bab92f64e1e824
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMP' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
036ccef8944e71a2a16ba34357946d2c
2753d0540230c2b9d9e3f2e69bfaf548c57aa9ae
describe
'105978' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
22b714a0cafbf7a0a99a4ea2e98e52d3
b03977ae7e4145010613d3442e4b553c078511ed
describe
'25139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMR' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
bc6b5d7c2e541733cd7650a16c18b3a8
7c9cbc2cab728483c2ae46a8606b432ba1e23ecd
describe
'10019346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMS' 'sip-files00167.tif'
bbaf6de244ea5fca0f4c893a075a3c93
6edbabb396c7ba048d202df0d9d9e9f22c505b4a
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMT' 'sip-files00167.txt'
116b5fd4b81dbe3aed489f97ec6ca410
1215f873f642bab41cb2ef76db6cd4c93149f50a
describe
'6333' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMU' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
204a65d6f5f9493344d8750c3b01e623
029d72350196aac32237541569a561e72c1d3de5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMV' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4611e204f9b51ae719cba69d0290eae1
44a5fbbca7f9ea1b939ea527da247f110bf29c82
describe
'131787' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMW' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
daee31be7b71a39fc76180a9a1310d27
f8bcd58e407fb95ae9c86686858aebcdc2818618
describe
'32827' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMX' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
5afa7230d8d50023cc0c2d5c267b27af
4e4b0019b6395eab1b35a3a2e52afea68f28b16f
describe
'10019534' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMY' 'sip-files00168.tif'
aac54c6137c3396dbd3c0ad1d5b016fd
ad17794a2ea8763c463f210702149db44390a349
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPMZ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
4776d0c8a25cd62877aa82dda5a3c6a0
9929bf87c87cd8a76e0a35509e72ceefe5ee9295
describe
'7282' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNA' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
5580304b98e1a6f7c9b4940ffdb8aabf
fedb0c838b6631a014cd3519a7c13e48aa5b1280
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNB' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
3ac4fd35be0c84df039424cf65806a95
59df93f3f475e8b138162355c0d25bced4b0d57f
describe
'132497' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNC' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
e3f767cf0bde7afc3a2a8950c5b88a81
112bf9634be388ef4aa7976421c333313ac76eec
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPND' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
6cfe0da3afe8926340268836b2fe8149
d4bf4d08e59d99b70935c9afe4f17643e18e4333
describe
'10019482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNE' 'sip-files00169.tif'
30cda6934eb6d263c15cde4a7971cfa8
c236ff6fc04194357690a1d1ab6ea0423bbd4da5
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNF' 'sip-files00169.txt'
57227885dd4147bc3442be81d75b833d
af7b1d1e1f11640024040243ae43aef6bf15d6c3
describe
'7367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNG' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
9132206dec3dc87045c0b6d65ce6ddaf
dd8fedd9db23c37cf64463ef82b0c17b1218d420
describe
'416895' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNH' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
6fee07000b35e45a69efacae2b894b14
9794e737174d38c235a202563682a25e9b1d0d33
describe
'124908' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNI' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
97449165c324e146191850978c76f11e
193be23fa11ceb1fcea82346dabb71da7d52cfd0
describe
'29675' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNJ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
f0734bdfb642ce03eaa78d1177ec8111
aa9444f60ae4a0a6b5eccefd4782a3f5a066defb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNK' 'sip-files00170.tif'
9c3f3a7029ff6aabffc61c454c8a53b4
253001e6c0c34ae1089cf981ad7d2979dfddf054
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNL' 'sip-files00170.txt'
3487986c3078566603ae55d4fa7b290d
453ffc38f2a8d0073e8c6999f1d1e681761f5d70
describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNM' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
4d5f5a54bb7fa42422573b62c9ecab22
4f7c15891b88f6a16dd5bb271a81c8b9159f4bdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNN' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
7e1f1529b2b1e8c8d3888055adf6657e
c1fdd07ca0dc663fa80cd4ad6398f5a5b161a5c0
describe
'148245' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNO' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
0557cd610e3c493cec6189618b794f00
da8a0cfd1341c8c28fe647a3f7f5d60ddf7cdf5d
describe
'37417' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
49997e7e6a64b61371717595adb0c334
3243762a3b2bc334e82e18c0ee852d3acb3040b6
describe
'10020166' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNQ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e394d7b29ff85a0d4327471c29021808
e31eb64e692649af358d5031c7ac918efe10e9a3
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1669' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNR' 'sip-files00171.txt'
4ea3f8a231f7596728ddd49fec03b25b
fa054867fa5c600965f3cd6c4c6a3dd7999b3913
describe
'8440' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNS' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
79f41fff8f2b57fdb84f59398425b5ef
22adf19603ac560a6572b9b86eceae27d27d7264
describe
'417165' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNT' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f90e428e3859c2f1b4846e7f3fc6c262
a114b858c2093cb5a1d68db7e694a634460f6091
describe
'144667' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
462acbc143e33ec529a79417b8f0e58a
098e1a3eae935b22cbd330d70339fab5d9dd9754
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNV' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
7b5eba4acb7ca9b46a3eaaf4956b2d5b
160746ee7b084fcb860e719344ee0c90171fbb1b
describe
'10020038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNW' 'sip-files00172.tif'
9c2d1bc147c491bf57aa72a4a99dfa3e
38dcb65b6491650b7c6035c7b52aef993a6569c3
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1702' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNX' 'sip-files00172.txt'
4aa1a59bf0629b6c1d0f69fb3d18fd9d
9f8284f2005b10a382732f351f42674c06d2d7aa
describe
'8174' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNY' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
eb21ed4fc9208c64934bc5d980045eef
73ac0e18634cede089f63a6bf339ac3ad2f68aff
describe
'417133' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPNZ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
c8bdc4b2fa52510e447e40af3868628d
b1bef85d73735047e6b00528a04bb637dc633e24
describe
'139358' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOA' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
4bb3ac022732f007a5f34cc4b313fde9
4ad1ddb71169ed2e1516adc2efd44c2902a45f98
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOB' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
5da39e0590e1276749b0be68c74715db
b4c6d3baf7924835baf995c409d3cc5a31cf5131
describe
'10019594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOC' 'sip-files00173.tif'
c7d67d77a54b75719afc2a892a12238f
4c9b1181d660fccc640c7149bf0f6aa9b27a0bfe
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOD' 'sip-files00173.txt'
1ba9212ea282e9b691a2195d526c9d03
df9c4a1ca55d38b405d400f525d882fbe70e159d
'2011-12-11T05:14:15-05:00'
describe
'7744' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOE' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
232161c445f60b417702e387b37b978b
7179307d1d46077d519394c1b45a6ff84ebd9ddf
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOF' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
dc2e8f3a788e167abbf213105982549d
1526edf2b67217805e128c673e11a4beb98745fe
describe
'146931' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOG' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
2287f676bb0440326c65ba819f5e5516
9ee0578ae6358f5b2e00d65911dd1cdb19fa724e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOH' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
bbdbc31b3b709637a8241edb98cf109c
1443f5a679f3444d42718c3b6cdc85c8d8507484
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ea3c551d8536f1ef218cf6a288059734
69e2d257960356dd9a12815b1324becc9e7815a8
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOJ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3c3274f6a1df5b25f372d394ec4122ac
7e765ea84afa0a043fed071ec722f69f35138384
describe
'8067' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOK' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
15fed0c8e9a5cc27d351ea1b427ca46c
3973c5d6e3b0b591528078fe448dafaf6bd380f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOL' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
91febb72bd293edb2f607375d9e3d227
9ec68089715c718942fbaf38226df11e850f6c46
describe
'152533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOM' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
0af31aff35d3097ccfa53356758c60f0
50a10eabda5b4cab39b02548634a33a17ac4d2d5
describe
'36519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPON' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
ebd202743d0583b07c325f24dc44e913
eee1482216839311fe17a79703b26c2f946503cc
describe
'10019914' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOO' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4e9c36f3cf20ac147dbae90965b1520c
17205c5b009fc0fdc32bd3b1d4f4dce95669a99f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1663' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOP' 'sip-files00175.txt'
d44e97adea9a65a6ee2793bb74a1a525
9812900814149f9c7a9ea467c4f381b4e0575dc1
describe
'8030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOQ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
85c5c267c1b6920a57d5ef5c67a86d25
c8735f4754c706cff0bac70656d331b0fbe7c388
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOR' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
8759646c8db4ff8a37eafde5db2c2018
97740ab229d0f53d186c343750e5dba41a744242
describe
'144086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOS' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
9828e46afde58c3dff39f25cad65134f
5ce3057a5d3c8959576e209a1665c910b8346f79
describe
'34650' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOT' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
0d20699731bfe289d0266fe33bf92784
1b69bbbc49755400b57b1fec2d4c06904b27cbed
describe
'10020010' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOU' 'sip-files00176.tif'
74ba24f4d14f358ec0efa7cdeded2475
8a18fa4c7760b749cf8e7b6e1613911739e4571e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOV' 'sip-files00176.txt'
be8ae757b43ac244867c52bca2d2cffd
a86d489b8af1d83f3ca6ff5d2662a2183b8dff69
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOW' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
adeec7efa7a143bbcd5b7dc7defd5fca
e09469a2ccc1694e7ccd203a0874650c80981026
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOX' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
057d6f8247c37f72d353cdb4917d8580
a8632d30d2bdd8b9fa0ca4e4814dbfec5f29531b
describe
'156949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOY' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
c1e6df735a99faf7c068c7b17e34a511
413f02e29aac307d8ba314ed5f4933a7345b16b5
describe
'39388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPOZ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
a7df4894743e0b06a0300ad053a79ea6
116c92fda20e0ad6704ba993ba599a69870ae38f
describe
'10020250' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPA' 'sip-files00177.tif'
0d6118d67b46542cbb5c51ea3539cab5
e052341d33268867a148f7ea48b3eee80671af8d
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPB' 'sip-files00177.txt'
879a5a3388914221ff148cc73ec73d6d
126312f1cb9cd533b9da4545790e12bf76976f2f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
4967c92edeffaf20ffce48378b1fe6b1
45fd7ff00a0ff35e33ca6c8afe891ca12c9171ba
describe
'417104' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPD' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
475995fe4cdf06a32015ace828eab66a
d77959bc5271d1d4215dedc74ce9755c0771b1ba
describe
'153247' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPE' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
cbcd718a4eca367ec06c6e9f1cf20271
1371a2f234f2f7d5337c9a8bc3831a7452705d90
describe
'38633' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
25f063e2a1fc6cfd152e988991fa395a
8b088432c46b1be6ff96e76f3527741afd8df741
describe
'10020126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b728a68bd04cb52ed19e5a954632b6fd
e5296feb11c52e8ecaa5a1d7742c21cd69943919
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1714' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
041fdedfb6fca6c1afa188084fdb5bd9
abf2334db4a54170f562a5d584b117a870c28822
describe
'8586' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
2d8e87adcfb963b17d5a1960375c2be2
207eb01e1c693d344b6f66860d3e8aa1237978ef
describe
'417153' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
4f0b062c96e4e51e218c66cefad42d2d
8a15f49a60c294b1cdbb4f9a3239111b0925a980
describe
'134202' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
028fd286d4863e9aa152b3f683cf2b2a
568d22440425a183d7e8587ff53bc81f619b8e9d
describe
'34749' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
4f3cf0e601293599576e831a2f0f1e08
39f330d474040628147b245a9fc650f2742188ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
83dd070399915ffcd2979df568e97df7
a6230734d5a19985ab0e2b7f2d3e93079b1ab4ee
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
ffa136409b29b48b960a0bc96ac3b73a
89631b355eed52cd4adca2030ebe9a0e3a10c4d7
describe
'7766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
bb4010a0d00e32259ef179e733ea8f0a
75905b492a3d849baa4263128c65201b2c110519
describe
'416902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
7a94b9ad2bc8aae5a4307bda2d8297bd
3bec0c9dc3ef212f23105ffb30b6f08ca5bf246a
describe
'140147' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
203d11f19df910bc162ce4d505f57284
a4bf683d641f94490b9fe75bf34f961b3a9c56d7
describe
'33366' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPR' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a945139cb08c305d35a48c2478ee3d6b
d5c21feed39a2f0b0326cde72a655b5a35f67060
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPS' 'sip-files00180.tif'
7f4c19fb281df31c77ec91500b6da3da
24c2457720a46efb5b1cc1e2d75e65d6445ab04f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'748' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPT' 'sip-files00180.txt'
6bcd57e5c8d55df6e5a380d8476dba80
eabd9c331b599319e2a5eff30eccd50565982c41
describe
'7882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPU' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
656a3e09da571fb02ceeac537dd8057d
5789c8358d12fa25f99680850f1db9175538bd94
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
6e60281ad26b287e0b94016ec4c3574d
3d12c910c342d4a0e843d5163d2ebc03a553457e
describe
'141829' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPW' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
a32e5bf7429ec624ccf3dea6ab7e9726
883b7b4617fa458154c73a0b639ffbb60b132a6b
describe
'35812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPX' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
14d6e2cc8c4f200e430e28240a9248b4
1c876d55ac82357abe2807cab9392deaa64d725a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPY' 'sip-files00181.tif'
162708047323198dfead2c90ad294c6f
e0f620844a0270c1af366b7df3231d0c80102a25
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPPZ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
2877fe0bac4b3a67feb9c80691bc83ee
c610024e4c79347d0cb2b4259b14c2a99aa87ac1
describe
'7999' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQA' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
2d44af97c8e291c3efeb7dc22abbc75a
b4e508475f354ef98cc206338144f999fe13d4d9
describe
'417019' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQB' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
41f3fc13cf80ab47ac01219108be60da
7f67043330ec58df34198819ce6112c28750718b
describe
'142687' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQC' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
50a5fd9c984699e8976ff99352d7a828
a7a6f0ff78479fd2ed796fc9676ff09d15a6d1a4
describe
'34572' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQD' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
d3b7abdb45356c2219c8babbbe08550b
b1f0855e3ac0fada4c965b9390243e545ba97e14
describe
'10020090' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQE' 'sip-files00182.tif'
fb53d98e93ff7e6dcb2a6513d573f2bb
1d8c16723a8985795a5253dcedb2a3d07e746df2
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'879' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQF' 'sip-files00182.txt'
6477ec49ca9251d09477f71619ac3f0b
92adad4e56fad8143479f254810b99185e3b0411
describe
'8065' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQG' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
930c07bb62aa739fa6617e2f3a37c520
4427b56ff3a2937239e5da8ad2982a002fc5a47f
describe
'417114' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
927b407003519638c9df43b4e2072361
e710a57fccee06ed956fbf36be86fcd883b5a970
describe
'149234' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
90cc07e9ae6fd10cd959495482d469c1
88116e82879fe3b4f4b22be56c3a36998a4ca63e
describe
'37482' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQJ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
64a06071712e3950bcbe3498b40fa492
2c48faa2088146cb8d5c0e69b2a4fdf429ab8982
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQK' 'sip-files00183.tif'
eeea893954bce72856ac0939beaa2795
2aa65e41c7810db58ef9858993604c130e93d129
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQL' 'sip-files00183.txt'
2c3f9886c5cdf4dcfe03ec95309650f6
36da914d24513634fb42c7662ae16652af1d486b
describe
'8278' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQM' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
bd2431f98c2c88b82d843fa1471b47ec
9566d1ef1e4382b8dc959f5d80f4a4dcb27bc25b
describe
'417049' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQN' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
6065978097ab257d914f9aa0e05c2420
3461893009dff33a71c8802cddde27d403946360
describe
'137673' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQO' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
0c22bd03229b0f4c9f083f76ec6b2466
2640bf2e8ddd40c091f442368a60cfca1512dcec
describe
'30406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
387a397cea8679b10a97bd6da86ca8b7
8131e8a05ba4102c584aa023c6bb48c00e15c26b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQQ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
5752ba55aca7f0f2d51db2bf399f437d
6803d276529d7973bb88c9827a0844be0330c7bf
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQR' 'sip-files00184.txt'
314f03db7a1b780fc7af55725bbe05ae
11687831a13da25b9379ab9165864d221e8f4930
describe
Invalid character
'6914' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQS' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
52a159d183c5f9e44fe35a63ca2766b4
506c218ebcac118ba938217702f82aa865d77d8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
3c4cd4ee884d4102fc1c2d3ad3fb26f2
8f0c44747100f620fe04989db2376f88fd2f060a
describe
'143335' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
b2df28063c7acab071a07ddf16861205
1e7778db1d4fa195fec176aae33358275afd83f9
describe
'35594' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
8f03fc8c864d052d95994d9791808628
14b5a30f32e618f53909decd8f91a2b320846c08
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQW' 'sip-files00186.tif'
e07ec724fbb08a9c057f84527b953fa7
4335c99652b46e69103defda86cad349fa68e8b7
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQX' 'sip-files00186.txt'
9d694d2b5531f5a4cfa4a0dbcc3b7f18
97bd1b261d6d555cc9c8e0b4bc4bc29b0a1338bf
describe
'8085' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQY' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
10e1d483a89d2c26ce5c52f5f3ad351a
06565f0ac8fad4ed2702686c686af5e13cae37a1
describe
'417170' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPQZ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
f3db951ea9cfc2377be08477ebc9d195
0065c65edd96bb02db2abfa30041b4add009b455
describe
'157204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
acfef1d8de71e0d0aa8182af1a697b60
38b6d191da03bec1abb54270d37608c3defdeecb
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRB' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
eb0a53acf9283c511126fadc0f6f3228
baba15eeb693b3f870f33f8d71534cb0016fe841
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ac12de2d5c39d8d0d229b851861983a2
2f79851ca9398af008912afbe2eed3d383b41b03
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRD' 'sip-files00187.txt'
45e48a5bd3e4d5fbea07796873a8e01f
727700753937b38fb8abd8fb18460730f9185212
describe
'8286' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRE' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
612b8eb204eda1af1099f6f6e060cd2f
77ef88af15cf825fa2d2ebed07b96e08f67960b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
90798a86238552a50e89abc38d9731d3
9dfd431870b826c8eb8aaa873e8d3fa3d33f2db4
describe
'151472' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
1665d445aa72b0b1cf5c0e31203b2737
a99c4ac72daf5fd64f33c388b44cc3c1947fa3cd
describe
'35672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
818ece981bf0b3667208c30b114d0287
75d89b72f697f55c84ad115c5c1d04a86f5d4b94
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRI' 'sip-files00188.tif'
abaf56554823818d4c184abcf998f547
cc49fa29e8e2aa7ad5e144c9c2e5fa09edf749dd
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRJ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
a1681ade0278e0a1b96179b250659e5c
0f8ac9e3dee33847576e73c35b5786bda2719f4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRK' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
5e9db1e8d8fbf74d1c999c8a3e6f9ca3
a3d2821a00bcb3bf5ed77450e5409ab0b1abb202
describe
'417141' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRL' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
ae5bbcaceee6ba3189c3c569180f16dc
f9bf4339f60f9cc4c01f35a361380674b698e43b
describe
'150055' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
e9beb32c83180f3dd14b638d8c4acafa
5244e37122e0cbc2a64d1fef56c65ffe03d62c68
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRN' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
85866ad44d71a472064539c93ec2c79a
ecac0b57d45099d8916e96117e02cd399d63f09f
describe
'10020406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
bac230c81b821876ac13e86ed199ce8b
2789888b8a5c8aec884095656ab6c490bbb5b843
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRP' 'sip-files00189.txt'
7229f5237f41afab49cb6c2845df493b
a5c9588cda4d9e1614015f26d2dd195de749eb3b
describe
'8679' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRQ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
81f9341844666ea08a3a1111e492a1a4
135aa1aa04aadce0f6bb272b77902d64f9d22230
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRR' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
4a6331851cc4d7abde87d08f2ca8b444
d81c1c85af0d0044cdb3bc78b9696477c279338e
describe
'142376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRS' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
5d25f2a3155662e41e584a64336758ab
ccafbea14e688ab6f0022a3680c6e1927ed34591
describe
'36597' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRT' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
13e4bd32e88e6206f56355ed04d28c17
7202907a88fc89e51ed1c4d2a39825d00460e51b
describe
'10019986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRU' 'sip-files00190.tif'
38f0d98cd3cf290a97cedc45a1ac5943
286117a0bc7e421f9694ce4ce6ae474b62aaf619
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRV' 'sip-files00190.txt'
c03ea687ed0b7ddcc24bb2a6bfe2f34b
b56b9fe7c52eb08b4305ca5497511030698a0d1f
describe
'8106' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRW' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
2d811a59a23adb6ffe1c08b9e2f3a2ef
bb1b603fe70f2c81d1ae8f8e30bf809a02fc128a
describe
'416975' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRX' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
b4f58edd188a584ba8c1e792211ea10f
ff135b6f29598128c7012ea6154055126fd4b9f2
describe
'132653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRY' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
71df892591d8b248cfbab7759cbbd23c
ff634ea2b05395593db5784898a0be332918e4ae
describe
'33814' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPRZ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
a7484048244be4ea53beb37163f85d4c
c5dd8faa7a374b7b707aed55c38b2f402eb2a736
describe
'10019754' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSA' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b5c82f0f762186fdf2666a4df8d83094
5a392ad6f07fe623954fda92dea2bb5ba18cea1a
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSB' 'sip-files00191.txt'
50db5226cb805f10c31fc269a4b6ba1b
24f255270e7788a1c834ab2cdba8799a727fe386
describe
'7473' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSC' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
9689df01f3f6e905da63c1fa343cff06
73b275db34fd10d1e53fde242670c66ab9b27e86
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSD' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
059a1d1566af8625eceffc1698f895ce
348218ce079523a7fddfae40c18f383bbdf80ea2
describe
'142815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSE' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4886ab191464b75b4193cab56d7234ae
50936764c88ae6f07be0e82512ec72815558ae1d
describe
'35540' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSF' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
809b0c3565b05047303a7f50774dbe15
4965bdbe782cd7c30197d377df74f947abeeca7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSG' 'sip-files00192.tif'
66b5ce0270f89227190e4e99b54a2521
b163a7c7044bfc5e03f32505eda39cbb8b0c1645
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSH' 'sip-files00192.txt'
1de76dfc8fcc33eaeb29962e6d8e8f92
bc27645021a4faf30befc9fecb88847de63bfebf
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSI' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
e663f0cf27b5086c56d109ffc3873820
b9e914d5f3698230f4e9b5ae79fb865458e15447
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSJ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
163a5677a4712d46655f931ae1b6ddcf
90d914d579faaecbab0e4a2af3c93c35e2e4fd3e
describe
'143539' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSK' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
9600ac46966fd2367a1b0ceb81340527
0c315bc942ce48cf22643352d15b06581d86c449
describe
'36237' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSL' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
c0c0bc0aa1b6a73fd2fe04490a5bcc08
d8a88fdfd3e8deef64ce2c699b776ddf9c1cfcb2
describe
'10020018' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSM' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b460169bf58fff476992dd40fd435044
c61154c1073a63e476c595bd5e916559b6b3d9ca
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1619' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSN' 'sip-files00193.txt'
3cf04b9c36c0daa3e1cd787cb706c972
ed46a56ffa05af061d1f1ee0d7763edacd818c11
describe
'8305' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSO' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
3d7e2feabf994f2fdd4f15369fcf47ed
ab2822e8adb6e8a71335cadf055845aa5f281204
describe
'417035' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSP' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
e33a59cd84ab3d0aca08f24fb50125a4
197a0922423024828507745ec085f4fbd62ebc96
describe
'151131' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSQ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
ac67e037146cff55de8e147aaae84a9b
cca3bdff6de11e98deec193a116bd25caec3d952
describe
'36149' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSR' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
7579320ea1724b08152d5b1abf76cfce
60cefbaa04578bf662521355fb9af640d8ad6e69
describe
'10020418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSS' 'sip-files00194.tif'
74ae8a0490e2495304fccc82e3760ce3
dda25dfdc249c1636e573f87d7e04882513677ff
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPST' 'sip-files00194.txt'
229f38b8036dac237694715c6df0f309
77ac4facc4c36db7ed440a4ca03e0e8d2576a92c
describe
'8489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSU' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
df924f2b6cd0291c30475d59b5631cff
ea7db425cc066b870011a8f922c0c5a4622816bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSV' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
95481c3e49ccf9ebb6ad901fc42678a4
2e6b985eccc9cda54a577542ac8e68e20125317d
describe
'147786' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSW' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
045f4a65774027c708f77a0206c2cfb0
71700dbb5faec6c6dd191552b5ae38f1dd6ace76
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSX' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
946ce9db0243203699965ce38055950e
2a780930d102d6aec5175ab54e0c062179397803
describe
'10020514' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSY' 'sip-files00195.tif'
773d39de1e3522b73a251d8781aadecf
bea40692130d8f8c1e70ae97e47ec4aa9b647036
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPSZ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
7131fc1e668a37e15624519e1e046319
a104c1cb23cdc72f995c9989a2acc443cc5b8015
describe
'8520' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTA' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
bcd11ebf3ec6c89a3011f7dae3d3531d
08a2006454663a5311deb3264a891b28bbe8e836
describe
'417070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTB' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
f0c3029e409318e5f0969de34cb46ae4
d25652e8a91f115e6660068b2c5241b51cfba1c4
describe
'142436' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTC' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
a07ef778c0810eae4338ffba4ae2352c
0fc45c56c9e565d1dedf9f3967f9c75b5ce57838
describe
'36580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTD' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
5cc7fcd360748faf27644703614601ea
9203caf141633a323959a035415636cec3bea7f5
describe
'10020074' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTE' 'sip-files00196.tif'
0579994c0b3cbe325c0130d2af6dd1f8
a52cfa3941fc070d8fe4a9acee6c50b88eb608c6
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTF' 'sip-files00196.txt'
ebb38ed411a2153cef940750a7ef835a
3cd26fb5c592d00c03a42b653fefaa8ae7df7ac6
describe
'8207' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTG' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
09554dbc2385da8af3269b869de29038
a17d43a2d9a6ac1a05875163d1027dccc01ce424
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTH' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
e1036e99779e58a29577cd6c2cd368ef
1960d7e69cf2d5cdda3fbf6ee6be4b551c54dc2f
describe
'138041' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTI' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
214d1231ea3fdc772ca454cdb23322a2
44ef948f3fb2dbe22e056aedd0df7eff858c19d1
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTJ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
8d9736313bb17892f1ff556ebdfff90a
b18f8f5dbecc06cd72eb6ed6f8208dc56155bd77
describe
'10019678' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTK' 'sip-files00197.tif'
f538ba6cf6c0f000e9c68610055b0914
d07f6dc92ccc0d7f4d96939f298b4f3df6eb6b8e
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
c117eafc7299d1547ea79b9866472b2d
5a36f20f151b676f2be4f2b9c4609256517d2e18
describe
'7587' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTM' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
8ba6b65868dc989509990a429ff97857
ebae0e6f6d29e4668450e6493ceb88b0efecb744
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTN' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
08373f80a36ac78221343fcc8eecef9b
8f618e9e28d29b686a21cdceddc9d13ecaeec01e
describe
'138239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTO' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
e486d8223deb0dfad5480135e26b5b97
c4e63a1f7aa530f8df098cee62bd9eb13d7cbd9d
describe
'34546' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTP' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
cde1dd9b301ed7a2cb1ffddbb1f5d8af
b44395fa7ba9cdc5ca0e9e2d57aa6bfc863482f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTQ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
feb58e894007367d74c0e4ba7c44e476
3327107ce6d8f91df1a05f630d67538ce9d696f1
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTR' 'sip-files00198.txt'
5ba238af443f85f6c0614c2ad80eb819
60a11e22012ba9afa65141c6c7a0746816b97f27
describe
'7839' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTS' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
a4d3c8d3616743d4b0dc04d372d374e0
82051124de081a9a9d845f73df3addefcd596e8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTT' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
acf7acb0a8beb54b59e63f11c54ad8ad
eb1481c5242942e68ac584daa2874092d3b84cac
describe
'143143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTU' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
87e20c9f52858b855748ffa3a5d616ab
eb0fbbb378b42ef4c651045711614e5dcee07715
describe
'36369' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTV' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
3ef38463677322b5eaa2c45622bb242e
b7c37dc7a75e94b58d4fccf5db8a192b20f89f62
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTW' 'sip-files00199.tif'
4b6ed1ac57d09237ad51591a85c405da
ac1b6fe0b1e4f37c93c6f8a829aa8eab6c573961
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTX' 'sip-files00199.txt'
c7c092f4da150827b4e25e72c3953126
e4369e7f5df97c97c11dc59d80e97bf7802fa9d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTY' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
fd43dda7bffb77084c126e14f65dd619
b214d221fb0cd6eb50d423045a0f0dd06a649b5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPTZ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
11565892eb3cbb689363dd8a917fd198
c13e845847ce45e32726f368c79251d05151631c
describe
'137974' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUA' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
887fc8c5303de12d768350e1cfb819df
43d39c42a587fee5d9e7ce490164215e4e8de31d
describe
'33990' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUB' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
2733cc5f0e7990af3517afcbb98549af
c2f7fc601eb5d495f68842861a45560524cedd63
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUC' 'sip-files00200.tif'
d8b3bac88e31393cba3a7ba037fc4dab
d8efca1f400ad9e68794af3e51154b0c859e5fcb
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUD' 'sip-files00200.txt'
3de3d38d25fa13c5170d3206c625506b
ed8bce2d6d41f209e1f00377bb3125a328660306
describe
'7964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUE' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
b6fe381de5e53af3d5116a8cf0ffdac8
ea816e9f946ec24d675fe32f44278b818b080e6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUF' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
182918bc9d94a8949ea7961ea1e5057d
795ed2e99aa5a5fcc34c191da72a6a4c1793535c
describe
'141251' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUG' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
638474c60999b7a00e1341280c29a795
a8775e10423405c9387b9113965877bcd49d084d
describe
'35463' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUH' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
f02dbf3e63e82fa17ec45c635c77b77c
1fd4516cad4ee6dec0e502fcdae3135e71caf94b
describe
'10019814' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUI' 'sip-files00201.tif'
d066d5751a773bd5b95f9a1beaccee4a
b3928b85eba29e249f98d982598d11476ee0b744
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUJ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
feb3986df80b39a81f5fd10e1e7e8334
ea34073b5bc6badd6a3b2a5e4c28916ec028c730
describe
'7811' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUK' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
12118dceeb6cbc1c1968719f371358fd
2f26f89020c942c1b57ae29470fdccd601c22fc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUL' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
f87381fa6aa345fe74c8b63c009b8a5f
95bc58c9e9c860c1d237bc7f27959b59c062a6e1
describe
'134820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUM' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
d30e3ab9de968fe87de014dc5bfadf62
ee32ac8919b56306efc3ee217648e55fd9f89053
describe
'33700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
125f97883230eae3f7d4317daeba5534
65e962b51c6788732ad8800084251fbee6b0c22d
describe
'10019930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
431012fd08f5c74175479f00c55e6529
767e797220d1320effc261521a6a9f99611db423
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
2cf7ca2ad85cc8ceb09668adf5685d16
00202a2f1257e9fdfb3e8dffaed9879b89bb089c
describe
'7921' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUQ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
58705f65b4a59cf501f567d07c85ec1b
d1bf8b80e07a26c06f05b516d8a7869c06b7d518
describe
'417069' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
eb9adbbad30345fff5622b170ca97533
bbe09b9a69fa152e593c0ee48cb8d2839aa09e1d
describe
'151561' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUS' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
4da9f07b6213e87a3398149a48455a1a
9daa904c4c508e9805c23758c73be545ad2fe8e9
describe
'37949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUT' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
88cc51a85ee4d6fbfd28bb89a3379a82
63d1231a1ee9c88445c84b8e02355bef7c88b45c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUU' 'sip-files00203.tif'
1f83b629eb28fc978f5df8183d162606
9909e88669b01102a3d4fb71645a7148473bd54f
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUV' 'sip-files00203.txt'
8c5481b5e7e128a60ddad7ebfc483df9
7fda3bacfdaec08ad3ccadee03c28c905d74476f
describe
'8413' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUW' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
0445d8e3aca424ec72c2da7c3ef70466
fb0757197935828ca6c0d88f6d94f7b9b93374a2
describe
'417107' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUX' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
b67c4b20b608ed71f897f0de93254845
91bfc8e6de16f741ef97fa1d7717aaf62dcd1cc9
describe
'145459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUY' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
cded2b21f50b5d1baa7c099623c22de4
513474efca8417f7657f3479a798519b8ab0e274
describe
'35729' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPUZ' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
9f058b21c8621cebf2062d3e25870b4c
9395691b300dc16e996bb7826e902a45dc4f7b0e
describe
'10019722' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVA' 'sip-files00204.tif'
736fbeb04f3591531f5c47e2e49a5a03
25538998228db9b60ea4953c620c0d89a2af5c08
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVB' 'sip-files00204.txt'
4020f86443da969ead3291e4bbc71dae
7ccf09c5cb63c8a565d6628374145b4da8de36cb
describe
'7824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVC' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
eb799b7a0f8b0874ddb48d66b8b1d4dd
8f85b48b5826bbdfb2aa3a84dbd7f5bf7dd733c5
describe
'417091' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVD' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
42df2b9683fa6639b9b4b98f06e64f69
39d14fe8a0b611cca18e494aa5a7545bd3062a01
describe
'142886' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
6250af05efebf814ba1b6a0319adf42e
5b0a30172277439cc3abc3905b4e4a442bd39389
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
34fc69f365bc9a00f6837d7fb8619b31
d792ed9a5f4118377aa17cf7e1898611aeaabc67
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVG' 'sip-files00205.tif'
0f055fa10a866810299f55da24495294
bae9f36b6e364561af788987e9438f3141353cfc
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1676' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
23e8cd98d495f8b970c10a1f9e182a0e
29093c679a1376559ad4571538e7a5abbcfb939c
describe
'8152' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVI' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
ad7ad29395a0e10e5b0b13be80b0a2eb
615f95500f471e32820b082ba7839187c3885966
describe
'417150' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVJ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
8abc8c8935341d5005d0a4299b58f55f
0db106f2e774ccd4d9130095fab2903eeb42187a
describe
'145779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVK' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
9d829414e548260381e00501ef509e29
f7b0e6c2fda5a94cf068edbeb46c4202b491d40b
describe
'36059' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVL' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
eb223a6f5f5313a4bc00d0e5a2ee095b
9c0a63eb66ec664f46e5bbac7c5f5cd5540affbc
describe
'10019950' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVM' 'sip-files00206.tif'
17a2bd3b180b0f72b4e530c085e9b77e
c726e8a0b31bbf98b4a104728854af775dbf63f4
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1730' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVN' 'sip-files00206.txt'
efa67269a7ed9b2024554ade2c4bf5bd
2a555500fd5cc7a31b8d3b48d378c34d5347c0ed
describe
'8081' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVO' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
c020e45efd2f05b6ebd3f32461a03fc3
b6301eddacf6fba4d808bd0e8c890f1168643438
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVP' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
526984368064b3fc2a18a5e924af3a81
99a062a2928cc6792f6b00b4e6dc4a13edd46dfa
describe
'138272' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVQ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
5e80b16a21dceafae9c014ec812cf770
7d9ea37aa165bd59fb349baabfaa3bb4da934dbd
describe
'34133' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVR' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
932c59ceda57b8c318f97b1f12790ed5
7ec9865123717627a3df078bdd963b98e169ad48
describe
'10019714' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVS' 'sip-files00207.tif'
86194723eb049e7462acf7dcded654b0
fe388cdd797745fced3ecbe330d1417877da3ba9
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVT' 'sip-files00207.txt'
bc3cd320e9e0ac8457f6ec664a0d8060
cb55a4462d69806b31166553ec4f65add39e9521
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVU' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
fc7e6965ff40d9754d0366fd97c91bc2
f24a88d09b194ff861baa784e8b5676a0de7cd68
describe
'417149' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVV' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
4c0c42c04cffab48fbd706438d71c8f5
10251098f9547eb83fdfade15105dc02b68d2ae3
describe
'147599' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVW' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
d38bdbc3eeae00c495cf600c6e4d1d90
8c3c63a48d719acd7e4bebe4698ce139d2654443
describe
'36795' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVX' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
4bfb3715292af723f9e73a399e0c21e2
a5b0651775259a499f6600f47e323142d5263ae0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVY' 'sip-files00208.tif'
6c8515b726fb29f22ae9019a2961ebe5
56099ac36ee26a2d8ecd120fda5b5c8e059e1afa
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPVZ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
58ff5c54cc3883aa000faecdd0297ada
ba2f567cae0eda23c31d3a0958b4446056afd03f
describe
'8136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWA' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
290e528a2fc6eba287883944b12c5ab6
738c555c719bf326a250431ff7058c6772dedb5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWB' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
86c29942fac7ad1668227998cd0da8a2
cd649abc835340694bec2f0305f18619ac5a1dd4
describe
'149545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWC' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
958f6d7dccc787a345b898d148ff7df5
a28f800a7215791bc0884a3e86827bca618482f8
describe
'36784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWD' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
04efc12386f64f54dd625ea638857a47
393a823cf1248669cf93af2e4ba609eded3fbad5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWE' 'sip-files00209.tif'
8d7abf0849d9392cdfee717af20563a2
7c51fccb1cb002ed9c0b26d5a80b996bcd47eaf0
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWF' 'sip-files00209.txt'
783dfdbccb42dad7f66612b28da41e2e
8e710339bc348e8aece1550c6ce334096327fe48
describe
'8058' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWG' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
07866f07824cfb8db53c0c5588e31907
d8262f4bffcc66eb1f6e67b55716ecbe14dff701
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWH' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
1a18f4e26202c662210752ca5fb49127
87e6c3e916d9d1a9d91206de8305bdb94afc9bf5
describe
'142524' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWI' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
938c8f663da9c674a49c6929ed16a87e
61922b578dceefd3ce84c783b946b8f2b20450fb
describe
'36386' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWJ' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
99184b00bd660e24a1710a8ff124350a
8553e545bbf904b23935b924ddf0fbfc5c8ed488
describe
'10020050' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWK' 'sip-files00210.tif'
eaa27817bf708770fb4d0c2b3532c92f
e6e3861d4a66e2618b1e4ec98192a20dc7d682f5
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWL' 'sip-files00210.txt'
f8fb83fa062d74e12d64b18643282355
eff4359ea7035bfe60ce07b86ffbc13ed9730e3e
describe
'8098' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWM' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
b7103d595b87ee49993a03116704447e
b92b3bc4780d977c8fba11a9a6139c93c34969e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWN' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
ec9bdc63a34333a807188eb6ecc806de
f175c33373a812f3b7b9cd6696cf2c3ff26e8954
describe
'146502' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWO' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
a08a122a9e46ec5797f2cfad127b9c9c
6dc0d1101505646cab51b66bc12bc096eebd2f8d
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
a00fb0f59f559937e799fa73a0cbb300
e81d511210fcaac92395309c3654781eefd12797
describe
'10020194' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
8d553f857b0374ad3e970e0347da5963
137cca71a44ccfc1ed81f87ab620b621e90c52c1
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
820046ea79d61181fac3b3c17a90ea3c
05524233c5cd46c66730ddaa1cb115cde9fecda2
describe
'8486' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
cc4b8cef0fa88209b68f3eb203bbdbec
cafe6a752748d165e0e5ef9d1b429d37559ba7b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
e54d6fe32c1eecd42391c788baef0ef2
6f80194978c86d4cf1dfdd2f64a6d5676b02b98b
describe
'143331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
149a790843489c7d693735b31debafe6
d986fbe3acc8716e3f9bd6aabeb119482349ba3f
describe
'36522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWV' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
67ea25986ea82b83fd06f8d4c635d141
73166491c63fcadec929b2fbd160e628483a11c6
describe
'10020218' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWW' 'sip-files00212.tif'
640d2b73ef64595f33e522d86c58d2b5
a20d710c054b92dd42e6eebb0c325dbe522c9806
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWX' 'sip-files00212.txt'
a5740b50967e05d807c2d9c23a9dab85
e8a0b48d96c8b97783a6849889cf76508f215841
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWY' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
d3d1a101b0cd741380aa612a49d152eb
8d777e84ec9825a83b57615aff35c6e51c59488f
describe
'417159' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPWZ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
70ea73e18516574bab0e8d54690d7b98
3b49c48198ba105e85c38c97c34a285a285b0c64
describe
'153177' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXA' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
590b72a83feb77cbab6a3a469a29a75b
2ecb2bb9a4766fb76602aab6afa74b802dbdc1b9
describe
'38624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXB' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
bc64cda1410209c7c87581d45c8e0e99
653a0ad1a3b6f15d17469b985fbe8615151fdf4f
describe
'10020382' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXC' 'sip-files00213.tif'
d0781c2898a4f00a1b73b9153fa33121
765d7877a0e320064faba516f53a773ba45c22d1
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXD' 'sip-files00213.txt'
f568534d05a88ce777fa8147bc4fe20f
71b12a47aa30f2d1ac7665c3837b51a4b7ea8a92
describe
'8550' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXE' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
0fde294862e4bfcec62cdfdc41a689c9
81c8b4296fd56f32b94ec9dcd3332191ec842202
describe
'417023' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXF' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
f9e330dc36b04545522bdf5d7224ae0a
3d725778c7c3eb109835f38df7c9e69a3ae625ef
describe
'147136' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXG' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
f34021e22ac948f82ea4bd7874af9f96
bb9667e74767e3d6a0c269a63764a85fcf7979a2
describe
'34695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXH' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
c541e9166f3cb966182a1e58448f2738
4a512abc695bbdb11572cad2f03d716a261d9190
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXI' 'sip-files00214.tif'
1c71a3629d7e2e3d38d4f1000ab5c7ee
2b313632a8b80c55a95a43a4a8c5cc95e2eb409c
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXJ' 'sip-files00214.txt'
fa61372bd11fbb8f16d963c2a5fd343d
89a75a7622a9383d209be970002927ac324cee92
describe
Invalid character
'8116' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXK' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
58aee00c7d698f62177d4c6f9c373da7
bbaa09a5a5f2d66a07aa694c9d36f9fcc7e000ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXL' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
dd8057e2bdbd3c084c9e27ed835679f5
29ae9cbbffb37dbee78af86f561437c3c4dd81e3
describe
'139565' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXM' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
ab163d920f470af55119758a7140e32c
8896f0dd00b903e9149edb73f6659e012d55946d
describe
'32943' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXN' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
dd5899041095e95a25d94c77a5b66626
9d37495930d4df462cdc071774dc793e154e5a26
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXO' 'sip-files00215.tif'
712571d1e91f4b3ed3429186f8c97610
e97bcc45dbbd3e7b19fff1c76ed7fd84126b0bea
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'813' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXP' 'sip-files00215.txt'
868c383abc7a6fe4ecec99cc33cad935
a1cc0360a700909a628b4db20743acb989ceea34
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXQ' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
c05278d25e6f01510a639cc3fb4791a3
61eeca5b7255567e7ffe0ef08730300877e1681a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXR' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b00e3d9df34cfdf4c7e24ffca677e8f6
2f9ef68dc0813560fb32840f2bd38b98a8c5025a
describe
'144067' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXS' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
76df49a538a5aad33daeaad8f8d4c843
ee73c3bb4196cd1ac8fe11aacacbe076ff56dac9
describe
'36352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXT' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
91719ea9458b2cc030cbd0a96b06a25a
0805e56bad37f01a7a7837083ebbe631efb9578f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXU' 'sip-files00216.tif'
02872d6c7528958a13754d8b4f4092aa
14a6102681da1428dccb9912d0ac2576e8519d6c
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXV' 'sip-files00216.txt'
8a130c4765766275d924bb3e5f61915d
47d85a5038a760b3786eb7a1e5e1cface1d1afe4
describe
'7823' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXW' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
78ac8780ca477c715f6fa569b42fd79d
8da2d5b3ba438044d331ac3558aa7db5360935cb
describe
'417030' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXX' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
49ca7017816d851032b47885cee9fb2b
13e46f256ff89235a888a3bafed2103b90c4c3fa
describe
'142453' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXY' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
874f4a2542fcfb9633d55383061e6258
5f51e47df86eaad2afff6e6c8ecbb47422000fdc
describe
'35587' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPXZ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
759a57bb13e7fb38f43b0f367e7a7813
0dc08bd1968c2db43caf4d4445f67445eeec2e91
describe
'10019962' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYA' 'sip-files00217.tif'
04f79262481be3c28ab40bbfc2a9b5da
68ee046760b6e47434c06daf6a9fd90fdd5d9f38
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'1653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYB' 'sip-files00217.txt'
60b87399950607602729719a9d26df1c
d5f660a7ea49719a66f4ef601e42216ce09e1c00
describe
'7970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYC' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
cfa6c9b3a783f6384e3d2beeceb94678
5c1580207dc182a3347b77f2fa0f0a04bb83f66d
describe
'422232' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYD' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
0f9e958942e186b69dbc354163b5264f
ede4726fcc00aaab99ee1c1490d99fd9987a2776
describe
'100110' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYE' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
11fd50b820106f0973b3c21ff2a1b0ad
58be40545fd9c6f6c05d78ee40ac62d77de8d8d5
describe
'21968' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYF' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
3b914687803462c7e1583d376d1428ea
4fdb61205e777af81d5ba092641da13a04349cc0
describe
'10142378' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYG' 'sip-files00218.tif'
696bebc480a68233b2beb250f790b086
e639f8761890dde4ca8ec99283a4bb882e3abd6b
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'358' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYH' 'sip-files00218.txt'
35689619f4982e0b5df1cd2db879ab67
f514e1f99575953a2a44d10f555f7340035332d7
describe
'5288' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYI' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
c7fdd8aaae9c6b5fd57a46fe4b236435
7b0b57993f695ff30082f1d651478ddbfba2790a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYJ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
3861596f0758d7c290d9793398c0fd70
98e9e365ffce90541308b0a8252780ae6c87a53b
describe
'74406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYK' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
9d2cc24dc458f18e898d2785d8253831
41cf2361cf5d88f8996394e35a36b97071e0b242
describe
'15818' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYL' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
ab9c500f17adda5cfd9ff11eec70d11e
ad2d232a9b76d745328bf83146056bce4ca922bc
describe
'10017854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYM' 'sip-files00219.tif'
e316b16c282de005853f7f30c2069ac0
a3efd403ff489f5a90429d7cfd7e4522672ab716
describe
Type mismatch for tag 700; expecting 1, saw 7
Type mismatch for tag
Type mismatch for tag
'3791' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYN' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
4fe210dba5ea78e1070de1de79895d62
52e96298046313f1645bf6828f65465bd5792d22
describe
'482171' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYO' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
9129ca22142e62757708309a0103f8bd
83189c26e6b19875ef78069980818c3a96b8e994
describe
'70333' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYP' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
13e3ddfcbb5f41d9ae2530957fb6ee33
c43ccafe084baa88e34ff5215b5ce545013826ff
describe
'15118' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYQ' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
7fddf47ff00b73ef2f10040e9afcd260
49a64d398e6374815e570005bc21df607d5cc2a9
describe
'11580128' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYR' 'sip-files00222.tif'
00d529eda011ef98ea79b233ebd9219b
8ec21f8c0157b0b7b950a17b59b972d15fbe6b84
describe
'3696' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYS' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
b2faa74871cdb92e4af7047d603cd554
b3799ce6e4012b4c13451a4c5b01c249f185fe80
describe
'474345' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYT' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
8868ad15e7dfe134e14e55faecdf45c0
8585a4f79d79738790e0c47a1f3988fc5627e093
describe
'146123' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYU' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
73cbdb1709ef74cbd8c971a0d7d26f03
37dc7230ef34a667a5517d2b6065b709a47d91c6
describe
'26300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
56a8ed99da77e2a4c6263b5b2d394b54
934f5d06dd2c60ff5ab077e7c870adaba3dbdf4f
describe
'11391916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
80b79cee989026155f466be16941d485
fd74535d54942718f27cfb77342c112ca6ee2e4d
describe
'6318' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYX' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
43a52b7acd0227b8fbcaafd3c652ac2a
169c2b8225fe73d3ca01901332ab6e54e9e4b1ea
describe
'132190' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYY' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
d2eb9fbbb4cb68caadd1083b9a69cbd8
f7958f0674718edb18874521c96d38f63ac7f98e
describe
'65974' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPYZ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
3cb01a3ff2b72a0fe3e8c4fd4f3a13f4
cab59be101133e6fbf72bbb6648dc647f6f49093
describe
'16986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZA' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
9db195a70daccc11a5e43f45240c62ed
83854e12facab077a32f473c221065c666503b75
describe
'3183300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZB' 'sip-files00224.tif'
d4426162949f16d4aa40a14144164c9d
e9ddc9bb6bdb73c0c5c9496a7ffc058660c889dd
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZC' 'sip-files00224.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'6015' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZD' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
61cbf0a7905c23ec1e9e2547a8917663
80713a9a834170c52434d9fceefdcdb9b9256914
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZE' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
516166f9b050823df433aa6e12a7da81
beefdda817331e61900ad6adc7b0c841e70720e3
describe
'289535' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZF' 'sip-filesUF00081246_00001.mets'
feb8cb8d34e25551f4f468d5db85fbe6
1a49dbe5bec0a0425f7b8284bc7aad29b6f4e445
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T12:18:26-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'393481' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABZfileF20080512_AABPZI' 'sip-filesUF00081246_00001.xml'
28eeccbf78c0c0ee135ca875f26188f7
be75da308ae4dc60e694c8fe1534363b704135a1
describe
'2013-12-18T12:18:29-05:00'
xml resolution