Citation
A dog of Flanders

Material Information

Title:
A dog of Flanders a Christmas story
Creator:
Ouida, 1839-1908
Nims & Knight ( Publisher )
Boston Photogravure Co
Place of Publication:
Troy N.Y
Publisher:
Nims and Knight
Manufacturer:
Illustrated and printed by the Boston Photogravure Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1891
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 94 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Poverty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Intergenerational relations -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Accidents -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Flanders (Belgium) ( lcsh )
Christmas stories -- 1892 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Christmas stories ( lcsh )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- Troy
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
In the 19th century, a boy named Nello becomes an orphan at the age of two when his mother dies in the Ardennes.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Louisa De la Ramé ("Ouida") ; illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026897806 ( ALEPH )
ALH5660 ( NOTIS )
04328540 ( OCLC )
06033371 ( LCCN )

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Full Text










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A DOG OF FLANDERS

A Christmas Story

BY

LOUISA DE LA RAME
(‘ OUIDA ”)

ILLUSTRATED

TROY, N.Y.
NIMS AND KNIGHT
1892



CopyRIGuT, 1891,

By NIMS AND KNIGIIT.

ILLUSTRATED AND PRINTED

sy THE Boston PHoTrograveanE Co,





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
The Descent from the Cross. [After Kubens.]... /vontisprece
Headpiece to List of Ilustrations. ..............55550065 \
Tailpiece to List of Illustrations .... 2... 0.0.50... 00-20. vii
To ee ee ee a ee I

“A Flemish village... with long lines of poplars and of
alders on the edge of the great canal which ran through

Dees a we ee een soe es See deere ae eere See 2
“Tn the centre of the village stood a windmill” .........-- 3
“The cathedral spire of Antwerp rising beyond the great

green plain)... cee cee eee ete tenes 4
“Jehan Daas, who in his time had been a soldier” ........ 5
“A dog of Flanders— large of head and limb, with wolf-

like ears that stood erect” «0.0.0... 0-02. e ee eee eee eee 6
“ A sullen, ill-living, brutal Brabantois”..........-2-.--005 8
“The Brabantois had paused to drink beer himself at every

wayside house? oo... ce eee ee eens 9
“Cursed him fiercely in farewell... and pushed the cart

lazily along the road uphill? 2.2... 6... eee ee eee 11
“Kneeled in the grass of the ditch and surveyed the dog

with kindly eyes of pity 0.6... occ eee eee eee ee 14
“Efe had a corner of the hut, with a heap of dry grass for

Wise de igh ae en eres eae aR ee Se ea 16
But it was becoming hard work for the old man”.......+ 18



vl LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

“Free to play with his fellow-dogs”......... eis



“So paralyzed with rheumatism that it was impossible for
hum to:so/out”? bone cee Se ee :
“Some figure coming athwart the fields made picturesque
by a gleaner’s bundle or a woodman’s fagot ”..........
“The cumbrous vessels drifting by” ........... 00. 000005
“And then sometimes in the streets of Antwerp, some house-
wife would bring them a handful of bread” ...........
Rubens ........ gaan Paces tieeeg penal taceon tt Se aa tye ee
“Old piles of stones, dark and ancient and majestic, stand-

ing in crooked courts”... 2... 0... eee eee ee rae



“The small tumbledown gray church opposite the red wind-

TONS es ese oe ray Pate cate ase ck ec
“Nello would sit silent and dreaming, nat caring to play”...
“ Going on his ways through the old city”. ... 0. ee
ALGIS: ois O4e-tus Ga Ria Pee cae eatemsaege Bese eceseyesne ets
Baas Cogez, “a good man, but somewhat stern”. .........
“ Sitting amidst the hay, with the great tawny head of Pa-

trasche on her lap” .........-.. cece ee eee eee eee :
The Millers Wile. Gectaiette aati ee eter te eas eS
“ She ran to him and held him close”...............005.
“Went home by themselves to the littl: dark hut and the

meal of black bread” 2.0.0.6... cc cece eee eee ere
“ All the spring and summer and autumn Nello had been at

work upon the treasure” 2.2... eee ee eee eee
“My poor Patrasche, we shall soon lie quiet together, you

AMG LY esterase setage ouerie tv eee oooh an es aeekst eg ee ea
“They mourned him passionately’... 00... 0. eee eee
“The boy and the dog went on again wearily” 2.2.0.0...
“The boy mechanically turned the case to the light” ......
“Nello had gone to face starvation and misery alone’”.....
“The housewife sat with calm contented face at the spinning-

Wheele) i ciocag iter ee yaar Se eeeitiys o ee ison oa
“The scent was lost and again recovered a hundred times

Or MOVE”? wk. eee eee Mea RTE fhanesaed deeee Panes

20



*

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. Vil

PAGE
“Some group went homeward with lanterns, chanting drink-

INE SONGS? LL eee eee cence ner e ee eae 86
“Tle is gone to the things that he loved”.............00. 87
“Suddenly through the darkness a great white radiance

streamed) ois. he ee Po ers oe wee ede s 90

TAMPICO Fe cata ces teins tee ew eae st eras a Wh eae 94







A DOG OF FLANDERS:

A STORY OF NOEL.

BELLO and Patrasche were left
all alone in the world.

They were friends in a
friendship closer than brother-
hood. Nello was a little Ar-
dennois; Patrasche was a big
Fleming. They were both of
the same age by length of
years, yet one was still young,
and the other was already old.
They had dwelt together al-
most all their days: both were
orphaned and destitute, and owed their
lives to the same hand. It had been
the beginning of the tie between them,
their first bond of sympathy; and it had
strengthened day by day, and had grown
with their growth, firm and indissoluble,
until they loved one another very greatly.



2 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

Their home was a little hut on the
edge of a little village —a Flemish village
a league from Antwerp, sect amidst flat
breadths of pasture and corn-lands, with
long lines of poplars and of alders bend-
ing in the breeze on the edge of the great





canal which ran through it. It had about
a score of houses and homesteads, with
shutters of bright green or sky-blue, and
roofs rose-red or black and white, and
walls whitewashed until they shone in the
sun like snow. In the centre of the vil-
lage stood a windmill, placed on a little
moss-grown slope: it was a landmark to
all the level country round. It had once



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 3
been painted scarlet, sails and all, but that
had been in its infancy, half a century or
more earlier, when it
had ground wheat for
the soldiers of Napo-
leon; and it was now
a ruddy brown, tanned
by wind and weather.
It went queerly by fits
and starts, as though
rheumatic and stiff in
the joints from age,
but it served the whole



neighborhood, which
would have thought it almost as impious
to carry grain elsewhere as to attend any
other religious service than the mass that
was performed at the altar of the little
old gray church, with its conical steeple,
which stood opposite to it, and whose
single bell rang morning, noon and night
with that strange, subdued, hollow sad-
ness which every bell that hangs in the
Low Countries seems to gain as an inte-
gral part of its melody.



4 , aA DOG OF FLANDERS.

Within sound of the little melancholy
clock, almost from their birth upward, they
had dwelt together, Nello and Patrasche,
in the little hut on the edge of the village,
with the cathedral spire of Antwerp rising
in the northeast, beyond the great green
plain of seeding grass and spreading corn



that stretched away from them like a tide-
less, changeless sea. It was the hut of a
very old man, of a very poor man — of old
Jehan Daas, who in his time had been a
soldier, and who remembered the wars
that had trampled the country as oxen
tread down the furrows, and who had
brought from his service nothing except
a wound, which had made him a cripple.

When old Jehan Daas had reached his
full eighty, his daughter had died in the



A DOG OF FLANDERS, 5

Ardennes, hard by Stavelot, and had left
him in legacy her two-year old son, The
old man could ill contrive to support him-
self, but he took up the addli-
tional burden uncomplainingly,
and it soon became welcome
and precious to him. Little
Nello —which was but a pet
diminutive for Nicolas— throve
with him, and the old man
and the little child lived in the poor little
hut contentedly.



It was a very humble little mud-hut
indeed, but it was clean and white as a
sea-shell, and stood in a small plot of
garden-ground that yielded beans and
herbs and pumpkins. ‘They were very
poor, terribly poor—many a day they
had nothing at all to eat. They never
by any chance had enough: to have had
enough to eat would have been to have
reached paradise at once. But the old
man was very gentle and good to the boy,
and the boy was a beautiful, innocent,
truthful, tender-natured creature; and they



6 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

were happy on a crust and a few leaves
of cabbage, and asked no more of earth
or Heaven; save indeed that Patrasche
should be always with them, since without
Patrasche, where would they have been?

For Patrasche was their alpha and
omega; their treasury and granary; their
store of gold and wand of wealth; their
bread-winner and minister; their only
friend and comforter. Patrasche dead or
gone from them, they must have laid
themselves down and died likewise. Pa-
trasche was body, brains, hands, head and
feet to both of them: Patrasche was their
very life, their very soul. For
Jehan Daas was old and a crip-
ple, and Nello was but a child;
and Patrasche was their dog.

A dog of Flanders — yellow
of hide, large of head and limb,
with wolflike ears that stood
erect, and legs bowed and feet
widened in the muscular development
wrought in his breed by many genera-
tions of hard service. Patrasche came of





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 7

a race which had toiled hard and cruelly
from sire to son in Flanders many a cen-
tury — slaves of slaves, dogs of the people,
beasts of the shafts and the harness, crea-
tures that lived straining their sinews in
the gall of the cart, and died breaking
their hearts on the flints of the strects.

Patrasche had been born of parents who
had labored hard all their days over the
sharp-set stones of the various cities and
the long, shadowless, weary roads of the
two Flanders and of Brabant. He had
been born to no other heritage than those
of pain and of toil. He had been fed on
curses and baptized with blows. Why
not? It was a Christian country, and
Patrasche was but a dog. Before he was
fully grown he had known the bitter gall
of the cart and the collar. Before he had
entered his thirteenth month he had _ be-
come the property of a hardware dealer,
who was accustomed to wander over the
land north and south, from the blue sea to
the green mountains. They sold him for
a small price because he was so young.



8 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

This man was a drunkard and a brute.
The life of Patrasche was a life of hell.
To deal the tortures of hell on the animal
creation is a way which the Christians
have of showing their belief in it. His
purchaser was a sullen, ill-living, brutal
Brabantois, who heaped his
cart full with pots and pans
and flagons and_ buckets,
and other wares of crock-
ery and brass and tin, and
left Patrasche to draw the



load as best he might, whilst
he himself lounged idly by
the side in fat and sluggish ease, smoking
his black pipe and stopping at every wine-
shop or café on the road.

Happily for Patrasche



or unhappily
—he was very strong: he came of an
iron race, long born and bred to such
cruel travail; so that he did not die, but
managed to drag on a wretched existence
under the brutal burdens, the scarifying
lashes, the hunger, the thirst, the blows,
the curses and the exhaustion which are



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 9

the only wages with which the Flemings
repay the most patient and laborious of all
their four-footed victims. One day, after
two years of this long and deadly agony,
Patrasche was going
on as usual along one
of the straight, dusty,
unlovely roads that
lead to the city of
Rubens. It was full
midsummer, and very
warm. His cart was
very heavy, piled high
with goods in metal
and in earthenware.
His owner sauntered
on without noticing
him otherwise than
by the crack of the
whip as it curled round his quivering loins.
The Brabantois had paused to drink beer
himself at every wayside house, but he had
forbidden Patrasche to stop a moment for
a draught from the canal. Going along
thus, in the full sun, on a scorching high-





Io A DOG OF FLANDERS.

way, having eaten nothing for twenty-four
hours, and, which was far worse to him,
not having tasted water for nearly twelve,
being blind with dust, sore with blows and
stupefied with the merciless weight which
dragged upon his loins, Patrasche, for once,
staggered and foamed a little at the mouth,
and fell.

He fell in the middle of the white,
dusty road, in the full glare of the sun:
he was sick unto death, and motionless.
His master gave him the only medicine
kicks and oaths and
blows with a cudgel of oak, which had
been often the only food and drink, the
only wage and reward, ever offered to
him. But Patrasche was beyond the
reach of any torture or of any curses,
Patrasche lay, dead to all appearances,

in his pharmacy



down in the white powder of the summer
dust. After a while, finding it useless to
assail his ribs with punishment and_ his
zars with maledictions, the Brabantois —
deeming life gone in him, or going so
nearly that his carcass was forever use-



A DOG OF FLANDERS. Il

less, unless indeed some one should strip
it of the skin for gloves—cursed him



fiercely in farewell, struck off the leathern
bands of the harness, kicked his body
heavily aside into the grass, and, groaning



12 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

and muttering in savage wrath, pushed
the cart lazily along the road up hill, and
left the dying dog there for the ants to
sting and for the crows to pick.

It was the last day before Kermesse,
away at Louvain, and the Brabantois was
in haste to reach the fair and get a good
place for his truck of brass wares. He
was in fierce wrath, because Patrasche
had been a strong and much-enduring
animal, and because he himself had now
the hard task of pushing his charette
all the way to Louvain. But to stay to
look after Patrasche never entered his
thoughts: the beast was dying and use-
less, and he would steal, to replace him,
the first large dog that he found wan-
dering alone out of sight of its master.
Patrasche had cost him nothing, or next to
nothing, and for two long, cruel years he
had made him toil ceaselessly in his ser-
vice from sunrise to sunset, through sum-
mer and winter, in fair weather and foul.

He had got a fair use and a good profit
out of Patrasche: being human, he was



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 13

wise, and left the dog to draw his last
breath alone in the ditch, and have his
bloodshot eyes plucked out as they might
be by the birds, whilst he himself went on
his way to beg and to steal, to eat and
to drink, to dance and to sing, in the
mirth at Louvain. A dying dog, a dog
of the cart — why should he waste hours
over its agonies at peril of losing a hand-
ful of copper coins, at peril of a shout of
laughter ?

Patrasche lay there, flung in the grass-
green ditch. It was a busy road that day,
and hundreds of people, on foot and on
mules, in wagons or in carts, went by,
tramping quickly and joyously on to Lou-
vain. Some saw him, most did not even
look: all passed on. A dead dog more
or less —it was- nothing in Brabant: it
would be nothing anywhere in the world.

After a time, amongst the holiday-
makers, there came a little old mah who
was bent and lame, and very feeble.
He was in no guise for feasting: he was
very poorly and miserably clad, and he



14 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

dragged his silent way slowly through the
dust amongst the pleasure-seekers. He
looked at Patrasche, paused, wondered,
turned aside, then kneeled down in the
rank grass and weeds of the ditch, and
surveyed the dog with kindly eyes of pity.



There was with him a little rosy, fair-
haired, dark-eyed child of a few years old,
who pattered in amidst the bushes, that
were for him breast-high, and stood gazing
with a pretty seriousness upon the poor
great, quiet beast.

Thus it was that these two first met —
the little Nello and the big Patrasche.



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 15

The upshot of that day was, that old
Jehan Daas, with much laborious effort,
drew the sufferer homeward to his own
little hut, which was a stone’s throw off
amidst the fields, and there tended him
with so much care that the sickness, which
had been a brain-seizure, brought on by
heat and thirst and exhaustion, with time
and shade and rest passed away, and
health and strength returned, and Pa-
trasche staggered up again upon his four
stout, tawny legs.

Now for many weeks he had been use-
less, powerless, sore, near to death; but
all this time he had heard no rough word,
had felt no harsh touch, but only the pity-
ing murmurs of the little child’s voice and
the soothing caress of the old man’s hand.

In his sickness they too had grown to
care for him, this lonely old man and the
little happy child. He had a corner of
the hut, with a heap of dry grass for his
bed; and they had learned to listen
eagerly for his breathing in the dark
night, to tell them that he lived; and



16 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

when he first was well enough to essay
a loud, hollow, broken bay, they laughed
aloud, and almost wept together for joy
at such a sign of his sure restoration;
and little Nello, in delighted glee, hung







round his rugged neck with chains of
marguerites, and kissed him with fresh
and ruddy lips.

So then, when Patrasche arose, himself
again, strong, big, gaunt, powerful, his
great wistful eyes had a gentle astonish-
ment in them that there were no curses
to rouse him and no blows to drive him ;



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 17

and his heart awakened to a mighty love,
which never wavered once in its fidelity
whilst life abode with him.

But Patrasche, being a dog, was grate-
ful. Patrasche lay pondering long with
grave, tender, musing brown eyes, watch-
ing the movements of his friends,

Now, the old soldier, Jehan Daas, could
do nothing for his living but limp about
a little with a small cart, with which he
carried daily the milk-cans of those hap-
pier neighbors who owned cattle away into
the town of Antwerp. The villagers gave
him the employment a little out of charity
—more because it suited them well to
send their milk into the town by so hon-
est a carrier, and bide at home themselves
to look after their gardens, their cows,
their poultry or their little fields. But it
was becoming hard work for the old man.
He was eighty-three, and Antwerp was a
good league off, or more.

Patrasche watched the milk-cans come
and go that one day when he had got
well and was lying in the sun with the



18 A DOG OF FLANDERS,

wreath of marguerites round his tawny
neck,

The next morning, Patrasche, before the
old man had touched the cart, arose and
walked to it and placed himself betwixt




—

fy a, :
UA A.
if,
et EM

its handles, and testified as plainly as
dumb show could do his desire and his
ability to work in return for the bread
of charity that he had eaten. Jehan Daas
resisted long, for the old man was one
of those who thought it a foul shame to
bind dogs to labor for which Nature never



A DOG OF FLANDERS, 19

formed them. But Patrasche would not
be gainsaid: finding they did not harness
him, he tried to draw the cart onward with
his teeth.

At length Jehan Daas gave Way, van-
quished by the persistence and the grati-
tude of this creature whom he had suc-
cored. He fashioned his cart so. that
Patrasche could run in it, and this he
did every morning of his life thencefor-
ward.

When the winter came, Jehan Daas
thanked the blessed fortune that had
brought him to the dying dog in the
ditch that fair-day of Louvain; for he
was very old, and he grew feebler with
each year, and he would ill have known
how to pull his load of milk-cans over the
snows and through the deep ruts in the
mud if it had not been for the strength
and the industry of the animal he had
befriended. As for Patrasche, it seemed
heaven to him. After the frightful bur-
dens that his old master had compelled
him to. strain under, at the call of the



20 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

whip at every step, it seemed nothing to
him but amusement to step out with this
little light green cart, with its bright brass
cans, by the side of the gentle old man
who always paid him with a tender caress
and with a kindly word. Besides, his work



was over by three or four in the day, and
after that time he was free to do as he
would —to stretch himself, to sleep in
the sun, to wander in the fields, to romp
with the young child or to play with his
fellow-dogs. Patrasche was very happy.
Fortunately for his peace, his former
owner was killed in a drunken brawl at



A DOG OF FLANDERS, 21

the kermesse of Mechlin, and so sought
not after him nor disturbed him in his
new and well-loved home.

A few years later, old Jehan Daas, who
had always been a cripple, became so par-



alyzed with rheumatism that it was impos-
sible for him ‘to go out with the cart any
more. Then little Nello, being now grown
to his sixth year of age, and knowing the
town well from having accompanied his
grandfather so many times, took his place



22 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

beside the cart, and sold the milk and re-
ceived the coins in exchange, and brought
them back to their respective owners with
a pretty grace and seriousness which
charmed all who beheld him.

The little Ardennois was a_ beautiful
child, with dark, grave, tender eyes, and
a lovely bloom upon his face, and fair
locks that clustered to his throat; and
many an artist sketched the group as it
went by him —the green cart with the
brass flagons of Teniers and Mieris and
Van Tal, and the great, tawny-colored,
massive dog, with his belled harness that
chimed cheerily as he went, and the small
figure that ran beside him, which had little
white feet in great wooden shoes, and a
soft, grave, innocent, happy face like the
little fair children of Rubens.

Nello and Patrasche did the work so
well and so joyfully together that Jehan
Daas himself, when the summer came and
he was better again, had no need to stir
out, but could sit in the doorway in the
sun and see them go forth through the



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 23

garden wicket, and then doze and dream
and pray a little, and then awake again as
the clock tolled three, and watch for their
return. And on their return Patrasche
would shake himself free of his harness
with a bay of glee, and Nello would re-
count with pride the doings of the day ;

and they would all go in together to their
meal of rye bread and milk or soup, and
would see the shadows lengthen over the
great plain, and see the twilight veil the
fair cathedral spire; and in lie down
together to sleep peacefully while the old
man said a prayer.

So the days and the years went on,
and the lives of Nello and Patrasche
were happy, innocent and healthful.

In the spring and summer especially
were they glad. Flanders is not a lovely
land, and around the burgh of Rubens it
is perhaps least lovely a all. Corn and
colza, pasture and plough, succeed each
other on the characterless plain in weary-
ing repetition, and, save by some gaunt
gray tower, with its peal of pathetic bells,



24 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

or some figure coming athwart the fields,
made picturesque by a gleaner’s bundle or
a woodman’s fagot, there is no change, no
variety, no beauty any-
where; and he who has
dwelt upon the moun-
tains or amidst the for-
ests feels oppressed as
by imprisonment with
the tedium and the
endlessness of that
vast and dreary level.
But it is green and
very fertile, and it has
wide horizons that have
a certain charm of their own even in their
dulness and monotony; and amongst the
rushes by the water-side the flowers grow,
and the trees rise tall and fresh where the
barges glide with their great hulks black
against the sun, and their little green bar-
rels and vari-colored flags gay against the
leaves. Anyway, there is greenery and
breadth of space enough to be as good
as beauty to a child and a dog; and these





A DOG OF FLANDERS, 25

two asked no better, when their work was
done, than to lie buried in the lush grasses
on the sid& of the canal, and watch the
cumbrous vessels drift-
ing by and bringing
the crisp salt smell
of the sea amongst
the blossoming scents
of the country sum-
mer,

True, in the winter
it was harder, and
they had to rise in the darkness and the
bitter cold, and they had seldom as much
as they could have eaten any day, and
the hut was scarce better than a shed
when the nights were cold, although it
looked so pretty in warm weather, buried
in a great kindly-clambering vine, that
never bore fruit, indeed, but which coy.
ered it with luxuriant green tracery all
through the months of blossom and har-
vest. In winter the winds found many
holes in the walls of the poor little hut,
and the vine was black and leafless, and





ae

26 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the bare lands looked very bleak and
drear without, and sometimes within the
floor was flooded and then frozen. In
winter it was hard, and the snow numbed
the little white limbs of Nello, and the
icicles cut the brave, untiring feet of
Patrasche.

But even then they were never heard
to lament, either of them. The child’s
wooden shoes and the dog’s four legs
would trot manfully together over the
frozen fields to the chime of the bells on
the harness; and then sometimes, in the
streets of Antwerp, some housewife would
bring them a bowl of soup and a hand-
ful of bread, or some kindly trader would
throw some billets of fuel into the little
cart as it went homeward, or some woman
in their own village would bid them keep
some share of the milk they carried for
their own food; and then they would run
over the white lands, through the early
darkness, bright and happy, and burst with
a shout of joy into their home.

So, on the whole, it was well with them,



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 27

very well; and Patrasche, meeting on the
highway or in the public streets the many
dogs who toiled from daybreak into night-
fall, paid only with blows and curses, and















loosened from the shafts with a kick to
starve and freeze as best they might, —
Patrasche in his heart was very grateful to
his fate, and thought it the fairest and the
kindhiest the world could hold. Though



28 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

he was often very hungry indeed when he
lay down at night; though he had to work
in the heats of summer noons and the
rasping chills of winter dawns; though
his feet were often tender with wounds
from the sharp edges of the jagged pave-
ment; though he had to perform tasks be-
yond his strength and against his nature,
—yet he was grateful and content: he did
his duty with each day, and the eyes that
he loved smiled down on him. It was
sufficient for Patrasche.

There was only one thing which caused
Patrasche any uneasiness in his life, and
it was this. Antwerp, as all the world
knows, is full at every turn of old piles
of stones, dark and ancient and majestic,
standing in crooked courts, jammed against
gateways and taverns, rising by the water's
edge, with bells ringing above them in the
air, and ever and again out of their arched
doors a swell of music pealing. There
they remain, the grand old sanctuaries of
the past, shut in amidst the squalor, the
hurry, the crowds, the unloveliness and the



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 29

commerce

of the modern world, and all

day long the clouds drift and the birds

circle and the winds sigh
around be-
neath the earth at their
feet there sleeps — Ruv-
BENS,

them, and



And the

greatness of
the mighty Master still
rests upon Antwerp, and
wherever we turn in its
narrow streets his glory
lies therein, so that all
mean things are thereby









4



He
ta
LA No



transfigured ; and as we pace slowly through
the winding ways, and‘by the edge of the
stagnant water, and through the noisome





30 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

courts, his spirit abides with us, and the
heroic beauty of his visions is about us,
and the stones that once felt his footsteps
and bore his shadow seem to arise and
speak of him with living voices. For the
city which is the tomb of Rubens still lives
to us through him, and him alone.

It is so quiet there by that great white
sepulchre —so quiet, save only when the
organ peals and the choir cries aloud the
Salve Regina or the Kyrie Eleison. Sure
no artist ever had a greater gravestone
than that pure marble sanctuary gives to
him in the heart of his birthplace in the
chancel of St. Jacques.

Without Rubens, what were Antwerp?
A dirty, dusky, bustling mart which no
man would ever care to look upon save
the traders who do business on its wharves.
With Rubens, to the whole world of men
it is a sacred name, a sacred soil,a Bethle-
hem where a god of Art saw light, a Gol-
gotha where a god of Art hes dead.

O nations! closely should you treasure
your great men, for by them alone will



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 31

the future know of you. Flanders in her
generations has been wise. In his life she
glorified this greatest of her sons, and in
his death she magnifies his name. But
her wisdom is very rare.

Now, the trouble of Patrasche was this.
Into these great, sad piles of stones, that
reared their melancholy majesty above the
crowded roofs, the child Nello would many
and many a time enter, and disappear
through their dark, arched portals, whilst
Patrasche, left without upon the pavement,
would wearily and vainly ponder on what
could be the charm which thus allured from
him his inseparable and beloved companion.
Once or twice he did essay to see for him-
self, clattering up the steps with his milk-
cart behind him; but thereon he had been
always sent back again summarily by a tall
custodian in black clothes and silver chains
of office; and fearful of bringing his little
master into trouble, he desisted, and re-
mained couched patiently before the
churches until such time as the boy re-
appeared, It was not the fact of his going



mM





32 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

into them which disturbed Patrasche: he
knew that people went to church: all the
village went to the small, tumbledown, gray
pile opposite the red windmill. What
troubled him was that little Nello always
looked strangely when he came out,
always very flushed or very pale; and
whenever he returned home after such

x visitations would sit silent and dream-

Ing,

not caring to play, but
gazing out at the evening
skies beyond the line of the
canal, very subdued and
almost sad.

What was it? wondered Patrasche. He
thought it could not be good or natural
for the little lad to be so grave, and in his
dumb fashion he tried all he could to keep
Nello by him in the sunny fields or in the
busy market-place. But to the churches
Nello would go: most often of all would
he go to the great cathedral; and Patrasche,
left without on the stones by the iron frag-
ments of Quentin Matsys’ gate, would
stretch himself and yawn and sigh, -and



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 33

even howl now and then, all in vain, until
the doors closed, and the child perforce
came forth again, and winding his arms
about the dog’s neck would kiss him on his



broad, tawny-colored forehead, and murmur
always the same words: “If I could only
see them, Patrasche!— if I could only see
them!”

What were they? pondered Patrasche,



34 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

looking up with large, wistful, sympathetic
eycs.

One day, when the custodian was out of
the way and the doors left ajar, he got in
for a moment after his little friend and saw.
“ They” were two great covered pictures _
on either side of the choir.

Nello was kneeling, rapt as in an ecstasy,
before the altar-picture of the Assumption,
and when he noticed Patrasche, and rose
and drew the dog gently out into the air,
his face was wet with tears, and he looked
up at the veiled places as he passed them,
and murmured to his companion, “ It is so
terrible not to see them, Patrasche, just
because one is poor and cannot pay! He
never meant that the poor should not see
them when he painted them, I am sure.
He would have had us see them any day,
every day: that lamsure. And they keep
them shrouded there—shrouded in the
dark, the beautiful things!—and_ they
never feel the light, and no eyes look on
them, unless rich people come and pay. If
I could only see them, I would be content
to die.”





a DOCG OF FLANDERS, 35

But he could not see them, and Patrasche
could not help him, for to gain the silver
piece that the church exacts as the price
for looking on the glories of the Elevation
of the Cross and the Descent of the Cross
was a thing as utterly beyond the powers
of either of them as it would have been to
scale the heights of the cathedral spire.
They had never so much as a sou to
spare: if they cleared enough to get a
little wood for the stove, a little broth for
the pot, it was the utmost they could do.
And yet the heart of the child was set in
sore and endless longing upon beholding
the greatness of the two veiled Rubens.

The whole soul of the little Ardennois
thrilled and stirred with an absorbing pas-
sion for Art. Going on his ways through
the old city in the early days before the
sun or the people had risen, Nello, who
looked only a little peasant-boy, with a
great dog drawing milk to sell from door
to door, was in a heaven of dreams whereof
Rubens was the god. Nello, cold and hun-
gry, with stockingless feet in wooden shoes,



36 A DOG OF FLANDERS.





and the winter winds blowing amongst his
curls and lifting his poor thin garments,
was in a rapture of meditation, wherein
all that he saw was the beautiful fair face



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 37

of the Mary of the Assumption, with the
waves of her golden hair lying upon her
shoulders, and the light of an eternal
sun shining down upon her brow. Nello,
reared in poverty, and buffeted by fortune,
and untaught in letters, and unheeded by
men, had the compensation or the curse
which is called Genius.

No one knew it. He as little as any.
No one knew it. Only indeed Patrasche,
who, being with him always, saw him
draw with chalk upon the stones any and
every thing that grew or breathed, heard
him on his little bed of hay murmur all
manner of timid, pathetic prayers to the
spirit of the great Master; watched his
gaze darken and his face radiate at the
evening glow of sunset or the rosy rising
of the dawn; and felt many and many a
time the tears of a strange, nameless pain
and joy, mingled together, fall hotly from
the bright young eyes upon his own
wrinkled, yellow forehead.

‘““T should go to my grave quite con-
tent if I thought, Nello, that when thou



38 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

growest a man thou couldst own this hut
and the little plot of ground, and labor
for thyself, and be called Baas by thy
neighbors,” said the old man Jehan many
an hour from his bed. For to own a bit
of soil, and to be called Baas — master —
by the hamlet round, is to have achieved
the highest ideal of a Flemish peasant;
and the old soldier, who had wandered
over all the earth in his youth, and had
brought nothing back, deemed in his old
age that to live and die on one spot in
contented humility was the fairest fate he
could desire for his darling. But Nello
said nothing.

The same leaven was working in him
that in other times begat Rubens and
Jordaens and the Van Eycks, and _ all
their wondrous tribe, and in times more
recent begat in the green country of the
Ardennes, where the Meuse washes the
old walls of Dijon, the great artist of
the Patroclus, whose genius is too near
us for us aright to measure its divinity.

Nello dreamed of other things in the



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 39

future than of tilling the little rood of
earth, and living under the wattle roof,
and being called Baas by neighbors a
little poorer or a little less poor than
himself. The cathedral spire, where it
rose beyond the fields in the ruddy even-
ing skies or in the dim, gray, misty morn-
ings, said other things to him than this.
But these he told only to Patrasche, whis-
pering, childlike, his fancies in the dog’s
ear when they went together at their
work through the fogs of the daybreak,
or lay together at their rest amongst the
rustling rushes by the water’s side.

For such dreams are not easily shaped
into speech to awake the slow sympathies
of human auditors; and they would only
have sorely perplexed and troubled the
poor old man bedridden in his corner,
who, for his part, whenever he had trod-
den the streets of Antwerp, had thought
the daub of blue and red that they called
a Madonna, on the walls of the wine-shop
where he drank his sou's worth of black
beer, quite as good as any of the famous



40 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

altar-pieces for which the stranger folk
traveled far and wide into Flanders from
every land on which the good sun shone.

There was only one other beside Pa-
trasche to whom Nello could talk at all of
his daring fantasies. This
other was little Alois, who
lived at the old red mill on
the grassy mound, and whose
father, the miller, was the
best-to-do husbandman in all
the village. Little Alois was
only a pretty baby with soft
round, rosy features, made lovely by those
sweet dark eyes that the Spanish rule has
left in so many a Flemish face, in testi-
mony of the Alvan dominion, as Spanish
art has left broadsown throughout the
country majestic palaces and stately courts,
gilded house-fronts and sculptured lintels
—histories in blazonry and poems in
stone.

Little Alois was often with Nello and
Patrasche. They played in the fields, they
ran in the snow, they gathered the daisies





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 4!

and_bilberries, they went up to the old
gray church together, and they often sat
together by the broad wood-fire in the mill-
house. Little Alois, indeed, was the rich-
est child in the hamlet. She had neither
brother nor sister; her blue serge dress
had never a hole in it; at kermesse she
had as many gilded nuts and Agni Dei in
sugar as her hands could hold; and when
she went up for her first communion her
flaxen curls were covered with a cap of
richest Mechlin lace, which had been her
mother’s and her grandmother's before it
came to her. Men spoke already, though
she had but twelve years, of the
good wife she would be for their
sons to woo and win; but she
herself was a little gay, simple
child, in nowise conscious of
her heritage, and she loved no
playfellows so well as Jehan
Daas’ grandson and his dog.
One day her father, Baas Cogez, a good
man, but somewhat stern, came on a pretty
group in the long meadow behind the mill,





42 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

where the aftermath had that day been
cut. It was his little daughter sitting
amidst the hay, with the great tawny head
of Patrasche on her lap, and many wreaths



of poppies and blue cornflowers round
them both: on a clean smooth slab of
pine wood the boy Nello drew their like-
ness with a stick of charcoal.

The miller stood and looked at the
portrait with tears in his eyes, it was so



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 43

strangely like, and he loved his only child
closely and well. Then he roughly chid
the little girl for idling there whilst her
mother needed her wan. and sent her
indoors crying and afraid: then, turning,
he snatched the wood from Nello’s hance.
“Dost do much of such folly?” he asked,
but there was a tremble in his voice.

Nello colored and hung his head. “I
draw everything I see,” he murmured.

The miller was silent: then he stretched
his hand out with a franc in it. “It is
folly, as I say, and evil waste of time:
nevertheless, it is like Alois, and will
please the house-mother: Take this sil-
ver bit for it and leave it for me.”

_The color died out of the face of the
young Ardennois: he lifted his head and
put his hands behind his back. « Keep
your money and the portrait both, Baas
Cogez,” he said simply. “You have becn
Gee good to me.” Then he called Pa-
trasche to him, and walked away across
the fields.

“T could have seen them with that



44 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

franc,’ he murmured to Patrasche, “but
I could not sell her picture—not even
for them.”

Baas Cogez went into his mill-house
sore troubled in his mind. “That lad
must not be so much with Alois,” he said
to his wife that night. “Trouble may
come of it hereafter: he is fifteen now,
and she is twelve; and the boy is comely
of face and form.”

“And he is a good lad and
a loyal,” said the housewife,
feasting her eyes on the piece
of pine wood where it was
throned above the chimney
with a cuckoo clock in oak
and a Calvary in wax.

“Vea, I do not gainsay that,” said the
miller, draining his pewter flagon.

“Then, if what you think of were ever
to come to pass,” said the wife, hesitat-
ingly, “would it matter so much? She
will have enough for both, and one can-
not be better than happy.”

“Vou are a woman, and therefore a





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 45

fool,” said the miller harshly, striking his
pipe on the table. “The lad is naught
but a beggar, and, with these painter’s
fancies, worse than a beggar. Have a
care that they are not together in the
future, or I will send the child to the
surer keeping of the nuns of the Sacred
Heart.” ;

The poor mother was terrified, and
promised humbly to do his will. Not
that she could bring herself altogether to
separate the child from her favorite play-
mate, nor did the miller even desire that
extreme of cruelty to a young lad who
was guilty of nothing except poverty. But
there were many ways in which little Alois
was kept away from her chosen compan-
ion; and Nello being a boy proud and
quiet and sensitive, was quickly wounded,
and ceased to turn his own steps and
those of Patrasche, as he had been used
to do with every moment of leisure, to
the old red mill upon the slope. What
his offence was he did not know: he sup-
posed he had in some manner angered



46 -l DOG OF FLANDERS.

Baas Cogez by taking the portrait of Alois
in the meadow; and when the child who
loved him would run to him and nestle
her hand in his, he would smile at her
very sadly and say with a tender concern
for her before himself, “ Nay, Alois, do not
anger your father. He thinks that I make
you idle, dear, and he is not pleased that
you should be with me. He is a good
man and loves you well: we will not
anger him, Alois,”

But it was with a sad heart that he said
it, and the earth did not look so bright to
him as it had used to do when he went
out at sunrise under the poplars down the
straight roads with Patrasche. The old
red mill had been a landmark to him, and
he had been used to pause by it, going
and coming, for a cheery greeting with its
people as her little flaxen head rose above
the low mill-wicket, and her little rosy
hands had held out a bone or a crust to
Patrasche. Now the dog looked wistfully
at a closed door, and the boy went on
without pausing, with a pang at his heart,



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 47

and the child sat within, with tears drop-
ping slowly on the knitting to which she
was set, on her little stool by the stove;
and Baas Cogez, working among his sacks
and his mill-gear, would harden his will
and say to himself, “It is best so. The
lad is all but a beggar, and full of idle,
dreaming fooleries. Who knows what
mischief might not come of it in the fut-
ure?” So he was wise in his generation,
and would not have the door unbarred,
except upon rare and formal occasions,
which seemed to have neither warmth nor
mirth in them to the two children, who
had been accustomed so long to a daily
gleeful, careless, happy interchange of
greeting, speech and pastime, with no
other watcher of their sports or auditor of
their fancies than Patrasche, sagely shak-
ing the brazen bells of his collar and
responding with all a dog’s swift sym-
pathies to their every change of mood.
All this while the little panel of pine
wood remained over the chimney in the
mill-kitchen with the cuckoo clock and



48 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the waxen Calvary, and sometimes it
seemed to Nello a little hard that whilst
his gift was accepted he himself should
be denied.

But he did not complain: it was his
habit to be quiet: old Jehan Daas had
said ever to him, “ We are poor: we must
take what God sends—the ill with the
good: the poor cannot choose.”

To which the boy had always listened
in silence, being reverent of his old grand-
father; but nevertheless a certain vague,
sweet hope, such as beguiles the children
of genius, had whispered in his heart,
“Yet the poor do choose sometimes —
choose to be great, so that men cannot
say them nay.” And he thought so still
in his innocence; and one day, when the
little Alois, finding him by chance alone
amongst the corn-fields by the canal, ran
to him and held him close, and sobbed
piteously because the morrow would be
her saint’s day, and for the first time in
all her life her parents had failed to bid
him to the little supper and romp in the



aA DOG OF FLANDERS. , AQ

great barns with which her feast-day was
always celebrated, Nello had kissed her
and murmured to her in firm faith, “It



shall be different one day, Alois. One
day that little bit of pine wood that your
father has of mine shall be worth. its



te) A DOG OF FLANDERS.

weight in silver; and he will not shut
the door against me then. Only love me
always, dear little Alois, only love me
always, and I will be great.”

“And if I do not love you?” the pretty
child asked, pouting a little through her
tears, and moved by the instinctive coquet-
ries of her sex.

Nello’s eyes left her face and wandered
to the distance, where in the red and gold
of the Flemish night the cathedral spire
rose. There was a smile on his face so
sweet and yet so sad that little Alois was
awed by it. “I will be great still,” he
said under his breath — “great still, or
die, Alois.”

“You do not love me,” said the little
spoilt child, pushing him away; but the
boy shook his head and smiled, and went
on his way through the tall yellow corn,
seeing as in a vision some day in a fair
future when he should come into that old
familiar land and ask Alois of her people,
and be not refused or denied, but received
in honor, whilst the village folk should



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 51

throng to look upon him and say in one
another’s ears, “ Dost see him? He 1s a
king among men, for he is a great artist
and the world speaks his name; and yet
he was only our poor little Nello, who
was a beggar, as one may say, and only
got his bread by the help of his dog.”
And he thought how he would fold his
grandsire in furs and purples, and por-
tray him as the old man is portrayed in
the Family in the chapel of St. Jacques;
and of how he would hang the throat
of Patrasche with a collar of gold, and
place him on his right hand, and say to
the people, “ This was once my only
friend;” and of how he would build him-
self a great white marble palace, and make
to himself luxuriant gardens of pleasure,
on the slope looking outward to where
the cathedral spire rose, and not dwell in
it himself, but summon to it, as to a home,
all men young and poor and friendless,
but of the will to do mighty things; and
of how he would say to them always, if
they sought to bless his name, “ Nay, do



52 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

not thank me —thank Rubens. Without
him, what should I have been?” And
these dreams, beautiful, impossible, inno-
cent, free of all selfishness, full of heroical

i







worship, were so closely about him as he
went that he was happy — happy even on
this sad anniversary of Alois’ saint’s day,
when he and Patrasche went home by
themselves to the little dark hut and the



a DOG OF FLANDERS. 53

meal of black bread, whilst in the mili-
house all the children of the village sang
and laughed, and ate the big round exe
of Dijon and the almond gingerbread of
Brabant, and danced in the great barn to
the light of the stars and the music of
flute and fiddle

“ Never mind, Patrasche,? he said, with
his arms round the dog’s neck as they
both sat in the door of the hut, where
the sounds of the mirth at the mill came

down to them on the night air—* never
mind. It shall all be changed by and
by.”

He believed in the future: Patrasche,
of more experience and of more philoso-
phy, thought that the loss of the mill
supper in the present was ill compensated
by dreams of milk and honey in some
vague hereafter. And Patrasche growled
whenever he passed by Baas Cogez.

“This is Alois’ name-day, is it not?”
said the old man Daas that night from
the corner where he was stretched upon
his bed of sacking.



54 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

The boy gave a gesture of assent: he
wished that the old man’s memory had
erred a little, instead of keeping such sure
account.

‘And why not there?” his grandfather
pursued, “Thou hast never missed a
year before, Nello.”

“Thou art too sick to leave,” murmured
the lad, bending his handsome young head
over the bed.

“Tut! tut! Mother Nulette would have
come and sat with me, as she does scores
of times. What is the cause, Nello?” the
old man persisted. “Thou surely hast
not had ill words with the little one?”

“ Nay, grandfather —never,” said the boy
quickly, with a hot color in his bent face.
“Simply and truly, Baas Cogez did not
have me asked this year. He has taken
some whim against me.”

“ But thou hast done nothing wrong?”

“That I know — nothing. I took the
portrait of Alois on a piece of pine: that
is all.”

“Ah!” The old man was silent: the



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 55

truth suggested itself to him with the
boy's innocent answer. He was tied to a
bed of dried leaves in the corner of a
wattle hut, but he had not wholly for-
gotten what the ways of the world were
like, .

He drew Nello’s fair head fondly to his
breast with a tenderer gesture. “ Thou
art very poor, my child,” he said with a
quiver the more in his aged, trembling
voice —“so poor! It is very hard for
thee.”

“Nay, I am rich,” murmured Nello
and in his innocence he thought so —
rich with the imperishable powers that
are mightier than the might of kings.
And he went and stood the door of
the hut in the quiet autumn night, and
watched the stars troop by and the tall
poplars bend and shiver in the wind. All
the casements of the mill-house were
lighted, and every now and then the notes
of the flute came to him. The tears fell
down his cheeks, for he was but a child,
yet he smiled, for he said to himself, “ In



56 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the future!” He stayed there until all
was quite still and dark, then he and
Patrasche went within and slept together,
long and deeply, side by side.

Now he had a secret which only Pa-
trasche. knew. There was a little out-
house to the hut, which no one entered
but himself —a dreary place, but with
abundant clear light from the north.
Here he had fashioned himself rudely
an easel in rough lumber, and here, on
a great gray sea of stretched paper, he
had given shape to one of the innumer-
able fancies which possessed his. brain.
No one had ever taught him anything ;
colors he had no means to buy; he had
gone without bread many a time to pro-
cure even the few rude vehicles that he
had here; and it was only in black or
white that he could fashion the things
he saw. This great figure which he had
drawn here in chalk was only an old man
sitting on a fallen tree only that. He
had seen old Michel the woodman sitting
so at evening many a time. He had never





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 57

had a soul to tell him of outline or per-
spective, of anatomy or of shadow, and yet
he had given all the weary, worn out age,
all the sad, quiet patience, all the rugged,
careworn pathos of his original, and given
them so that the old, lonely figure was a
poem, sitting there, meditative and alone.
on the dead tree, with the darkness of the
descending night behind him.

It was rude, of course, in a way, and
had many faults, no doubt: and yet it was
real, true in Nature, true in Art, and very
mournful, and in a manner beautiful.

Patrasche had lain quiet countless hours
watching its gradual creation after the la-
bor of each day was done, and he knew
that Nello had a hope —vain and wild,
perhaps, but strongly cherished — of send-
ing this great drawing to compete for a
prize of two hundred francs a year, which
it was announced in Antwerp would be
open to every lad of talent, scholar or
peasant, under eighteen, who would at-
tempt to win it with some unaided work
of chalk or pencil. Three of the fore-



58 dA DOG OF FLANDERS.

most artists in the town of Rubens were
to be the judges and elect the victor’
according to his merits.

All the spring and sum-
mer and autumn Nello had
been at work upon. this
treasure, which, if trium-
phant, would build him
his first step toward in-
dependence and the mys-
teries of the art which he
blindly, ignorantly, and yet
passionately adored.

He said nothing to any one: his grand-
father would not have understood, and little
Alois was lost to him. Only to Patrasche
he told all, and whispered, “ Rubens would
give it me, I think, if he knew.”

Patrasche thought so too, for he knew
that Rubens had loved dogs or he had
never painted them with such exquisite
fidelity ; and men who loved dogs were, as
Patrasche knew, always pitiful.

The drawings were to go in on the first
day of December, and the decision be given





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 59

on the twenty-fourth, so that he who should
win might rejoice with all his people at the
Christmas season.

In the twilight of a bitter wintry day,
and with a beating heart, now quick with
hope, now faint with fear, Nello placed the
great picture on his little, green milk-cart,
and took it, with the help of Patrasche,
into the town, and there left it, as enjoined,
at the doors of a public building,

“Perhaps it is worth nothing at all.
How can I tell?” he thought, with the
heart-sickness of a great timidity. Now
that he had left it there, it seemed to him
so hazardous, so vain, so foolish, to dream
that he, a little lad with bare feet, who
barely knew his letters, could do anything
at which great painters, real artists, could
ever deign to look. Vet he took heart as
he went by the cathedral: the lordly form
of Rubens seemed to rise from the fog and
the darkness, and to loom in its magnifi-
cence before him, whilst the lips, with their
kindly smile, seemed to him to murmur,
“ Nay, have courage! It was not by a weak



60 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

heart and by faint fears that I wrote my
name for all time upon Antw erp.

Nello ran home through the cold night,
comforted. He had doe his best: the
rest must be as God willed, he thought, in
that innocent, unquestioning faith which
had been taught him in the little gray
chapel amongst the willows and the poplar
trees.

The winter was very sharp already.
That night, after they reached the hut,
snow fell: and fell for v ery many days after
that, so that the paths and the divisions in
the fields were all obliterated, and all the
smaller streams were frozen over, and the
cold was intense upon the plains. Then,
indeed, it became hard work to go round
for the milk while the world was all dark,
and carry it through the darkness to the
silent town. eee work, especially for
Patrasche, for the passage of the years,
that were only bringing Nello a stronger
youth, were bringing him old age, and his
joints were stiff, ae his bones ached often,
But he would never give up his share of



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 61

the labor. Nello would fain have spared
him and drawn the cart himself, but Pa-
trasche would not allow it. All he would
ever permit or accept was the help of a
thrust from behind to the truck, as it lum-
bered along through the ice-ruts. Patrasche
had lived in harness, and he was proud of
it. He suffered a great deal sometimes
from frost, and the terrible roads, and the
rheumatic pains cf his limbs, but he, only
drew his breath hard and bent his stout
neck, and trod onward with steady pa-
tience.

“Rest thee at home, Patrasche —it is
time thou didst rest — and I can quite well
push in the cart by myself,” urged Nello
many a morning; but Patrasche, who un-
derstood him aright, would no more have
consented to stay at home than a veteran
solcier to shirk when the charge was sound-



ing; and every day he would rise and place
himself in his shafts, and plod along over
the snow through the fields that his four
round feet had left their print upon so
many, many years.



62 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

“One must never rest till one dies,”
thought Patrasche; and sometimes itseemed
to him that that time of rest for him was
not very far off. His sight was less clear
than it had been, and it gave him pain
to rise after the night’s sleep, though he
would never lie a moment in his straw
when once the bell of the chapel tolling
five let him know that the daybreak of
labor had begun.

“My poor Patrasche, we shall soon lie
quiet together, you and I,” said old Jehan
Daas, stretching out to stroke the head of
Patrasche with the old, withered hand which
had always shared with him its one poor
crust of bread; and the hearts of the old
man and the old dog ached together with
one thought: When they were gone, who
would care for their darling?

One afternoon, as they came back from
Antwerp over the snow, which had become
hard and smooth as marble over all the
Flemish plains, they found dropped in the
road a pretty little puppet, a tambourine-
player, all scarlet and goid, about six



Ad DOG OF FLANDERS. 63

inches high, and, unlike greater person-
ages when Fortune lets them drop, quite
unspoiled and unhurt by its fall. It was
a pretty toy. Nello tried to find its owner,



and, failing, thought that it was just the
thing to please Alois.

It was quite night when he passed the
mill-house: he knew the little window
of her room. It could be no harm,-he



64 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

thought, if he gave her his little piece of
treasure-trove, they had been play-fellows
so long. There was a shed with a sloping
roof beneath her casement: he climbed it
and tapped softly at the lattice: there was
a little ight within. The child opened it
and looked out, half frightened.

Nello put the tambourine-player into
her hands. ‘“ Here is a doll I found in
the snow, Alois. Take it,” he whispered
—*“take it, and God bless thee, dear!”

He slid down from the shed-roof before
she had time to thank him, and ran off
through the darkness.

That night there was a fire at the mill.
Out-buildings and much corn were de-
stroyed, although the mill itself and the
dwelling-house were unharmed. All the
village was out in terror, and engines
came tearing through the snow from
Antwerp. The miller was insured, and
would lose nothing: nevertheless, he was
in furious wrath, and declared aloud that
the fire was due to no accident, but to
some foul intent.



4A DOG OF FLANDERS. 65

Nello, awakened from his sleep, ran to
help with the rest: Baas Cogez thrust him
angrily aside. “Thou wert loitering here
after dark,” he said roughly. “I believe,
on my soul, that thou dost know more of
the fire than any one.”

Nello heard him in silence, stupefied,
not supposing that any one could say
such things except in jest, and not com-
prehending how any one could pass a jest
at such a time.

Nevertheless, the miller said the brutal
thing openly to many of his neighbors
in the day that followed; and though no
serious charge was ever pesienied against
the lad, it got bruited about that Nello
had been seen in the mill-yard after dark
on some unspoken errand, and that he
bore Baas Cogez a grudge for forbidding
his intercourse with little Alois; and so
the hamlet, which followed the sayings of
its richest landowner servilely, and whose
families all hoped to secure the riches of
Alois in some future time for their sons,
took the hint to give grave looks and cold



66 -l DOG OF FLANDERS.

words to old Jehan Daas’ grandson. No
one said anything to him openly, but all
the village agreed, together to humor the
miller’s prejudice, and at the cottages and
farms where Nello and Patrasche called
every morning for the milk for Antwe erp,
downcast Sances and brief phrases re-
placed to them the broad smiles and
cheerful greetings to which they had been
always used. No one really credited the
miller’s absurd suspicion, nor the outra-
geous accusations born of them, but the
people were all very poor and very igno-
rant, and the one rich man of the place
had pronounced against him. Nello, in
his innocence and his friendlessness, had
no strength to stem the popular tide.

“Thou art very cruel to the lad,” the
miller’s wife dared to say, weeping, to her
lord. ‘Sure he is an innocent lad and a
faithful, and would never dream of any
such wickedness, however sore his heart
might be.”

But Baas Cogez being an obstinate man,
having once said a thing held to it dog-



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 67

gedly, though in his innermost soul he
knew well the injustice that he was com-
mitting.

Meanwhile, Nello endured the injury
done against him with a certain proud
patience that disdained to complain: he
only gave way a little when he was quite
alone with old Patrasche. Besides, he
thought, “ If it should win! They will be
sorry then, perhaps.”

Still, to a boy not quite sixteen, and
who had dwelt in one little world «all
his short life, and in his childhood had
been caressed and applauded on all sides,
it was a hard trial to have the whole of
that little world turn against him for
naught. Especially hard in that bleak,
snow-bound, famine-stricken winter-time,
when the only light and warmth there
could be found abode beside the village
hearths ard in the kindly greetings of
neighbors. In the winter-time all drew
nearer to each other, all to all, except to
Nello and Patrasche, with whom none
now would have anything to do, and who



68 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

were left to fare as they might with the
old paralyzed, bedridden man in the little
cabin, whose fire was often low, and whose
board was often without bread, for there
was a buyer from Antwerp who had taken
to drive his mule in of a day for the milk
of the various dairies, and there were only
three or four of the people who had re-
fused his terms of purchase and remained
faithful to the little green cart. So that
the burden which Patrasche drew had
become very light, and the centime-pieces
in Nello’s pouch had become, alas! very
small likewise.

The dog would stop, as usual, at all the
familiar gates which were now closed to
him, and look up at them with wistful,
mute appeal; and it cost the neighbors a
pang to shut their doors and their hearts,
and let Patrasche draw his cart on again,
empty. Nevertheless, they did it, for they
desired to please Baas Cogez.

Noél was close at hand.

The weather was very wild and cold.
The snow was six feet deep, and the ice



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 69

was firm enough to bear oxen and men
upon it everywhere. At this season the
little village was always gay and cheerful.
At the poorest dwelling there were possets
and cakes, joking and dancing, sugared
saints and gilded Jésus. The merry
Flemish bells jingled everywhere on the
horses; everywhere within doors some
well-filled soup-pot sang and smoked over
the stove; and everywhere over the snow
without laughing maidens pattered in
bright kerchiefs and stout kirtles, going
to and from the mass. Only in the little
hut it was very dark and very cold.

Nello and Patrasche were left utterly
alone, for one night in the week before
the Christmas Day, Death entered there,
and took away from life for ever old Jehan
Daas, who had never known of life aught
save its poverty and its pains. He had
long been half dead, incapable of any
movement except a feeble gesture, and
powerless for anything beyond a gentle
word; and yet his loss fell on them both
with a great horror in it: they mourned



JO 4A DOG OF FLANDERS,

him passionately. He had passed away
from them in his sleep, and when in the
gray dawn they learned their bereavement,
unutterable solitude and desolation seemed



to close around them. He had long been
only a poor, feeble, paralyzed old man,
who could not raise a hand in their de-
fence, but he had loved them well: his
smile had always welcomed their return,
They mourned for him unceasingly, refus-



A DOC OF FLANDERS. 71

ing to be comforted, as in the white
winter day they followed the deal shell
that held his body to the nameless grave
by the little gray church. They were his
only mourners, these two whom he had
left friendless upon earth — the young
boy and the old dog. “Surely, he will
relent now and let the poor lad come
hither?” thought the miller’s wife, glanc-
ing at her husband where he smoked by
the hearth.

Baas Cogez knew her thought, but he
hardened his heart, and would not un-
bar his door as the little, humble funeral
went by. “The boy is a beggar,” he
said to himself: “he shall not be about
Alois.”

The woman dared not say anything
aloud, but when the grave was closed and
the mourners had gone, she put a wreath
of immortelles into Alois’ hands and bade
her go and lay it reverently on the dark,
unmarked mound where the snow was
displaced.

Nello and Patrasche went home with





72 ad DOG OF FLANDERS.

broken hearts. But even of that poor,
melancholy, cheerless home they were
denied the consolation. There was a
month's rent over-due for their little
home, and when Nello had paid the last
sad service to the dead he had not a coin
left. He went and begged grace of the
owner of the hut, a cobbler who went
every Sunday night to drink his pint of
wine and smoke “with Baas Cogez. The
cobbler would grant no mercy. He was
a harsh, miserly man, and loved money.
He claimed in default of his rent every
stick and stone, every pot and pan, in the
hut, and bade Nello and Patrasche be out
of it on the morrow.

Now, the cabin was lowly enough, and
in some sense miserable enough, and yet
their hearts clove to it with a great affec-
tion. They had been so happy t there, and
in the summer, with its clambering vine
and its flowering beans, it was so pretty
and bright in ie midst of the sun- lighted
fields! Their life in it had been full of
labor and privation, and yet they had been



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 73

so well content, so gay of heart, running
together to meet the old man’s never failing
smile of welcome!

All night long the boy and the dog sat
by the fick: hearth in the darkness,
drawn close together for warmth and sor-
row. Their bodies were insensible to the
cold, but their hearts seemed frozen in

them.
' When the morning broke over the
white, chill earth it was the morning of
Christmas Eve. With a shudder, Nello
clasped close to him his only friend, while
his tears fell hot and fast on the dog’s
frank forehead. “Let us 20, Patiasche
— dear, dear Patrasche,” he murmured.
“We will not wait to be kicked out: let
uS go.”

Pause had no will but his, and they
went sadly, side by side, out from the little
place which was so dear to them both, and
in which every humble, homely thing was
to them precious and beloved. Pee etic
drooped his head wearily as he passed by
his own green cart: it was no longer his



74. A DOG OF FLANDERS.

—it had to go with the rest to pay the
rent, and his brass harness lay idle and
glittering on the snow. The dog could
have lain down beside it and died for very
heart-sickness as he went, but whilst the
lad lived and needed him Patrasche would
not yield and give way.

They took the old accustomed road into
Antwerp. The day had yet scarce more
than dawned, most of the shutters were
still closed, but some of the villagers were
about. They took no notice whilst the
dog and the boy passed by them. At one
door Nello paused and looked wistfully
within: his grandfather had done many a
kindly turn in neighbor’s service to the
people who dwelt there.

“Would you give Patrasche a crust?”
he said, timidly. “ He is old, and he has
had nothing since last forenoon.”

The woman shut the door hastily, mur-
muring some vague saying about wheat
and rye being very dear that season. The
boy and the dog went on again wearily :
they asked no more.



A DOG OF FLANDERS.

Rr

7

By slow and painful ways they reached
Antwerp as the chimes tolled ten.

“If I had anything about me I could
sell to get him bread!” thought Nello,
but he had nothing except the wisp of



linen and serge that covered him, and his
pair of wooden shoes.

Patrasche understood, and nestled his
nose into the lad’s hand, as. though to
pray him not to be disquieted for any woe
or want of his.

The winner of the drawing-prize was
to be proclaimed at noon, and to the pub-



76 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

lic building where he had left his treasure
Nello made his way. On the steps and
in the entrance-hall there was a crowd of
youths — some of his age, some older, all
with parents or relatives or friends. His
heart was sick with fear as he went
amongst them, holding Patrasche close to
him. The great bells of the city clashed
out the hour of. noon with brazen clamor.
The doors of the inner hall were opened ;
the eager, panting throng rushed in: it
was known that the selected picture would
be raised above the rest upon a wooden
dais.

A mist obscured Nello’s sight, his head
swam, his limbs almost failed him. When
his vision cleared he saw the drawing
raised on high: it was not his own! A
slow, sonorous voice was proclaiming
aloud that victory had been adjudged to
Stephan Kiesslinger, born in the burgh
of Antwerp, son of a wharfinger in that
town.

When Nello recovered his conscious-
ness he was lying on the stones without,



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 77

and Patrasche was trying with every art
he knew to call him back to life. In the
distance a throng of the youths of Ant-
werp were shouting around their suc-
cessful comrade, and escorting him with
acclamations to his home upon the quay.

The boy staggered-to his feet and
drew the dog into his embrace. “It is
all over, dear Patrasche,’ he murmured —
“all over!”

He rallied himself as best he could, for
he was weak from fasting, and retraced
his steps to the village. Patrasche paced
by his side with his head drooping and
his old limbs feeble from hunger and
sorrow.

The snow was falling fast: a keen hur-
ricane blew from the north: it was bitter
as death on the plains. It took them
long to traverse the familiar path, and the
bells were sounding four of the clock as
they approached the hamlet. Suddenly
Patrasche paused, arrested by a scent in
the snow, scratched, whined, and drew
out with his teeth a small case of brown



78 dA DOG OF FLANDERS.

leather. He held it up to Nello in the
darkness. Where they were there stood
a little Calvary, and a lamp
burned dully under the cross:
the boy mechanically turned
the case to the light: on it
was the name of Baas Cogez,
and within it were notes for
two thousand francs.
The sight roused the lad
a little from his stupor. He
«thrust it in his shirt, and
stroked Patrasche and
drew him onward.
The dog looked up
wistfully in his
face,
Nello made




















.S








straight for the
* mill-house. and
went to
=: the house-
door and
struck on its panels. The millers wife
opened it weeping, with little Alois cling-





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 79

ing close to her skirts. “Is jt the ee, thou
poor lad?” she said kindly through her
tears. ‘Get thee gone ere the Baas see
thee. We are in sore trouble to. night,
He is out seeking for a power of money
that he has let fall riding homeward, and
in this snow he never will find it; and God
knows it will go nigh to ruin us. It is
Heaven’s own judgment for the things we
have done to thee.

Nello put the notecase in her hand
and called Patrasche within the house.
“ Patrasche found the money to-night,”
he said quick ly. “Tell Baas Ca 30:
I think he will not de eny the dog shelter
and food in his old age. Keep him from
pursuing me, and I pray of you to be
good to him.”

Ere either woman or dog knew what
he meant he had stooped and kissed Pa-
trasche: then closed the door hurriedly,
and disappeared in the gloom of the fast-
falling night.

The woman and the child stood speech-
less with joy and fear: Patrasche vainly



80 4A DOG OF FLANDERS.

spent the fury of his anguish against the
ivon-bound oak of the barred house-door.
They did not dare unbar the door and
let him forth: they tried all they could
to solace him. They brought him sweet
cakes and juicy meats: they tempted him
with the best they had; they tried to lure
him to abide by the warmth of the hearth;
but it was of no avail. Patrasche refused
to be comforted or to stir from the barred
portal.

It was six o’clock when from an oppo-
site entrance the miller at last came, jaded
and broken, into his wife’s presence. “ It
is lost for ever,” he said with an ashen
cheek and a quiver in his stern voice.
“We have looked with lanterns every-
where: it is gone—the little maiden’s
portion and all!”

His wife put the money into his hand,
and told him how it had come to her.
The strong man sank trembling into a
seat and covered his face, ashamed and
almost afraid. “I have been cruel to the
lad,” he muttered at length: “I deserved
not to have good at his hands.”



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 81

Little Alois, taking courage, crept close
to her father and nestled against him her
fair curly head. “Nello may come here
again, father?” she whispered. “He may
come to-morrow as he used to do?”

The miller pressed her in his arms:
his hard, sun-burned face was very pale
and his mouth trembled, « Surely, surely,”
he answered his child. “He Shall bide
here on Christmas Day, and any other
day he will. God helping me, I will
make amends to the boy—I will make
amends.” -

Little Alois kissed him in gratitude and
joy, then slid from his knees and ran to
where the dog kept watch by the door.
“And to-night I may feast Patrasche?”
she cried in a child’s thoughtless glee.

Her father bent his head gravely :
“Ay, ay: let the dog have the best;” for
the stern old man was moved and shaken
to his heart’s depths.

It was Christmas Eve, and the mill-
house was filled with oak logs and squares
of turf, with cream and honey, with meat



82 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

and bread, and the rafters were hung with
wreaths of evergreen, and the Calvary and
the cuckoo clock looked out from a mass
of holly. There were little paper lanterns
too for Alois, and toys of various fashions
and sweetmeats in bright-pictured papers.
There were light and warmth and abun-
dance everywhere, and the child would
fain have made.the dog a guest honored
and feasted.

But Patrasche would neither
lie in the warmth nor share in
the cheer. Famished he was,
and very cold, but without Nello
he would partake neither of
comfort nor food. Against all
temptation he was proof, and
close against the door he leaned
always, watching only for a
means of escape.

“He wants the lad,” said
Baas Cogez. “Good dog!
good dog! Iwill go over to the lad the
first thing at day-dawn.” For no one but
Patrasche knew that Nello had left the





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 83

hut, and no one but Patrasche divined
that Nello had gone to face starvation
and misery alone.

The mill-kitchen was very warm; great
logs crackled and flamed on the hearth ;



neighbors came in for a glass of wine and
a slice of the fat goose baking for supper.
Alois, gleeful and sure of her playmate
back on the morrow, bounded and sang
and tossed back her yellow hair. Baas
Cogez, in the fulness of his heart, smiled
on her through moistened eyes, and spoke



84 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

of the way in which he would befriend her
favorite companion; the house-mother sat
with calm, contented face at the spinning-
wheel; the cuckoo in the clock chirped
ad hours. Amidst it all Patrasche
was bidden with a thousand words of wel-
come to tarry there a cherished guest.
But neither peace nor plenty could allure
him where Nello was not.

When the supper smoked on the board,
and the voices were loudest and gladdest,
and the Christ-child brought Spiced gifts.
to Alois, Patrasche, w atching ays an
occasion, glided out when the door was
unlatched by a careless new-comer, and as
swiftly as his weak and tired limbs would
bear him sped over the snow in the bitter,
black night. He had oniy one thought —
to follow Nello. A human friend might
have paused for the pleasant meal, the
cherry warmth, the cozy slumber; but that
was not the friendship of Patrasche. He
remembered a bygone time, when an old
man and a little child had found him sick
unto death in the wayside ditch.

af



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 85

Snow had fallen freshly all the evening
long; it was now nearly ten; the trail of
the boy’s footsteps was almost obliterated.
It took Patrasche long to discover any
scent. When at last he found it, it was
lost again quickly, and
lost and recovered, and
again lost and again
recovered, a hundred
times or more.

The night was very
wild. The lamps un-
der the wayside crosses
were blown out; the
roads were sheets of
ice; the impenetrable darkness hid every
trace of habitations; there was no living
thing abroad. All the cattle were housed,
and in all the huts and homesteads men
and women rejoiced and feasted. There
was only Patrasche out in the cruel cold
—old and famished and full of pain, but
with the strength and the patience of a
great love to sustain him in his search.

The trail of Nello’s steps, faint and ob-





86 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

scure as it was under the new snow, went
straightly along the accustomed tracks into
Antwerp. It was past midnight when Pa-
trasche traced it over the boundaries of
the town and into the narrow, tortuous,
gloomy streets. It was all quite dark in
the town, save where some light gleamed
ruddily through the crevices
of -house-shutters, or some
group went homeward with
lanterns chanting drinking-
songs. ‘The streets were all
white with ice: the high
walls and roofs loomed black
against them. There was
scarce a sound save the riot of the winds
down the passages as they tossed the
creaking signs and shook the tall Jamp-
irons,

So many passers-by had trodden through
and through the snow, so many diverse
paths had crossed and recrossed each
other, that the dog had a hard task to
retain any hold on the track he followed.
But he kept on his way, though the cold





A DOG OF FLANDERS. 87

pierced him to the bone, and the jagged
ice cut his feet, and the hunger in his
body gnawed like a rat's teeth. He kept
on his way, a poor, gaunt, shivering thing,



and by long patience traced the steps he
loved into the very heart of the burgh and
up to the steps of the great cathedral.
‘He is gone to the things that he
loved,” thought Patrasche: he could not



88 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

understand, but he was full of sorrow and
of pity for the art-passion that to him was
so incomprehensible and yet so sacred.

The portals of the cathedral were un-
closed after the midnight mass. Some
heedlessness in the custodians, too eager
to go home and feast or sleep, or too
drowsy to know whether they turned the
keys aright, had left one of the doors
unlocked. By that accident the footfalls
Patrasche sought had passed through into
the building, leaving the white marks of
snow upon the dark stone floor. By that
slender white thread, frozen as it fell, he
was guided through the intense silence,
through the immensity of the vaulted
space — guided straight to the gates of
the chancel, and, stretched there upon the
stones, he found Nello. He crept up and
touched the face of the boy. “Didst thou
dream that I should be faithless and for-
sake thee? I,—a dog?” said that mute
caress,

The lad raised himself with a low cry
and clasped him close. “Let us lie down



A DOG OF FLANDERS. 89

and die together,” he murmured. “Men
have no need of us, and we are all alone.”

In answer, Patrasche crept closer yet,
and laid his head upon the young boy’s
breast. The great tears stood in his
brown, sad eyes: not for himself —for
himself he was happy.

They lay close together in the piercing
cold. The blasts that blew over the Flem-
ish dikes from the northern seas were like
waves of ice, which froze every living thing
they touched. The interior of the immense
vault of stone in which they were was even
more bitterly chill than the snow-covered
plains without. Now and then a_ bat
moved in the shadows— now and _ then
a gleam of light came on the ranks of
carven figures. Under the Rubens they
lay together quite still, and soothed almost
into a dreaming slumber by the numb-
ing narcotic of the cold. Together they
dreamed of the old glad days when they
had chased each other through the flower-
ing grasses of the summer meadows, or sat
hidden in the tall bulrushes by the water’s



go A DOG OF FLANDERS.

side, watching the boats go seaward in the
sun.

Suddenly through the darkness a great
white radiance streamed through the vast-
ness of the aisles; the moon, that was at
her height, had broken
through the clouds, the
snow had ceased to fall,
the light reflected from
the snow without was
clear as the light of dawn.
It fell through the arches
full upon the two pictures
above, from which the boy
on his entrance had flung
back the veil: the Eleva-
tion and the Descent of the Cross were
for one instant visible.

Nello rose to his feet and stretched his
arms to them: the tears of a passionate
ecstasy glistened on the paleness of his
face. “I have seen them at last!” he cried
aloud. “O God, it is enough!”

His limbs failed under him, and he sank
upon his knees, still gazing upward at the





A DOG OF FLANDERS. gt

majesty that he adored. For a few brief
moments the light illumined the divine
visions that had been denied to him so
long —light clear and sweet and strong
as though it streamed from the throne of
Heaven. Then suddenly it passed away:
once more a great darkness covered the
face of Christ.

The arms of the boy drew close again
the body of the dog. “ We shall see His
face — there,” he murmured; “and He will
not part us, I think.”

On the morrow, by the chancel of the
cathedral, the people of Antwerp found
them both. They were both dead: the
cold of the night had frozen into stillness
alike the young life and the old. When
the Christmas morning broke and the
priests came to the temple, they saw them
lying thus on the stones together. Above,
the veils were drawn back from the great
visions of Rubens, and the fresh rays of
the sunrise touched the thorn-crowned
head of the Christ.

As the day grew on there came an old,



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'3984368' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALER' 'sip-files00018.tif'
a3f94ff8ef5813ee1ac05db93545a695
8752e025b0d2e1e262c983496f5c2230f198589b
'2011-12-05T17:09:45-05:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALES' 'sip-files00018.txt'
5089d9cc691b7144a455d3b9aac38abd
f3844ca813c50d732df27b762392e904a8c9753e
'2011-12-05T17:11:54-05:00'
describe
'4205' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALET' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2a70ebcebb5d3681cc54bcba3bae384e
aec35dd8bb415ffc1c73db1303bb858a5faa0326
describe
'496571' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b07c9f85b4d691da12aa7b267a4da04e
a08dd69af088f3537425a28a4b9ff4c05bbd0f96
'2011-12-05T17:09:11-05:00'
describe
'67674' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
507c1d9612b34e34474cb9c509daa059
76e66bbf8d143d638627e6c6764a50cd4fd8f8c0
'2011-12-05T17:09:20-05:00'
describe
'18724' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b958588617dd1f5eb3029c4c481a0418
0f250034ba66e7edbfb41a7414aa079e930f8266
'2011-12-05T17:10:34-05:00'
describe
'3984392' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0c7a7e1008022eb37fe62596464e2d53
ef7d41c3ed04dee07ee61143694687f696a0a10d
'2011-12-05T17:10:45-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
77278ff04fb97007918d9e2ad9e1ffe8
a35a6fbe5319dbadee7310bd9bb1806ae1a7bf78
describe
'496731' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
2b21ce6ac61646fb0c6c0b7a25333af7
bda17b24cb3167608f78cd1f2d1e7a43bb6eae68
'2011-12-05T17:09:50-05:00'
describe
'4563' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
1578a7de08d5ced9bac281aa343e2839
f4d757b30b7cf2c52d6c950cb5f9aea18384e904
describe
'61154' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4ce4a98e39951819a9d929eecf0034e6
49200bac023df5b27eb7833a176f4261c55d1bb5
describe
'17298' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ba0a401eefd808f59496bdc8c25e7b85
243592ffa0fa80ff25608a14d77eae183761dbb0
'2011-12-05T17:10:12-05:00'
describe
'3984228' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2d9328b33c57d9afcf4203cc0e5f9f90
a6093dfd2a8f69f8f17c2b9a45e8adf4078e8153
'2011-12-05T17:10:22-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
5787c40a4a10fc7079177e25aa91d4ee
48c42ecaa1a4e9fa06c3cde1278c178ece201719
'2011-12-05T17:11:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4103' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
354437f85589c0949d83929834df3906
04b21d5ad5620be2f997e1791357d52746b5abb2
describe
'496707' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
72099e85c82c63b9345419c9c0d6c184
f6ba494a47d59509a15b502c7fb1057550f6f328
'2011-12-05T17:11:14-05:00'
describe
'65682' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
65ccf0d500e2da029b44b44698469e14
506bfe0549b3880ee6f537c0efdceaabe2b00f53
'2011-12-05T17:09:51-05:00'
describe
'18871' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
59892e7d222ea81f0b210979390c4420
652da9655fc7c9cb023293948a7ab24678485921
describe
'3984464' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8c274c56cbb83124f5f2fe6bb9d9c236
bb2020a02cf57b38a556bdbbb60248fc62940d80
'2011-12-05T17:09:39-05:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f5e8dda2e612bb1571c3cb99c664bb9a
24c34971501c6ef7f628ad98bfba19787274b636
describe
'4509' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
a16904c7cc81116df361fb03fa770d59
9934a270c6178e6fbd2bf6f9db6e0f1fe721b12d
'2011-12-05T17:09:58-05:00'
describe
'496716' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d2309f4088abd8e053c92562f59558ac
2a16561f592efa8cbbe16f915a744ac3e3c7d2e8
'2011-12-05T17:11:56-05:00'
describe
'66267' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
95cddd4d4a8a00b2fd46e52b5dede0e2
cbb0bf5587940d4a32ed094eb1d6f50b792531f3
'2011-12-05T17:09:19-05:00'
describe
'18894' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
30036059055a282b70c76ff170ff40de
b979f6af368422d1bb781fd9720b0cf6cd134a7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
bcb49c0faf7bf223bebbb3c982a02570
98ba20956b06df8c01e21f4ddff1dc1411c55c38
'2011-12-05T17:10:50-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
bb7c4e9084c4a461abb6588090aee78f
31c1ca2d61cac7a74f42f57abd3b00144adcc492
'2011-12-05T17:09:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
c602789c337d286ecde390a5076db4a6
6b3502901e8f7b4df890c58aab4886ab0f81e48d
'2011-12-05T17:09:24-05:00'
describe
'496748' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7c7281703d311f008d50a8e15fc29870
2c8c005c639b243eb26bd88f27f69cfd3188f5cb
describe
'67481' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
eac1f2ab684a99809cf1cd93a52cffff
3429079e50fd92f63f7bd76844e84c04b5fa848e
'2011-12-05T17:10:35-05:00'
describe
'19627' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFU' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b6ca327a3fde4c89255ac216cbdd93b5
d171a0d6313df73fe885d259d68a9616b64d7252
'2011-12-05T17:11:05-05:00'
describe
'3984524' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFV' 'sip-files00023.tif'
56930d2f069daf5f1f382158acd13235
9c660a269659c58d079895005a256beddf69f25f
'2011-12-05T17:11:15-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFW' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8a0d5e1e58277b604a8c5bc9d700b110
335624ee10dbe8389ed4186b8ce279ece1cd1635
'2011-12-05T17:11:12-05:00'
describe
'496649' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
8aa381ee7c85ab60997ade44131cc555
934d8b0e70d613a9dd86f95400f7a81663bb521b
describe
'4729' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
6202f391e36e7a316bb7274af7030c85
881ea21046dacdc6cab66ee17a49f324f0793153
'2011-12-05T17:10:38-05:00'
describe
'64589' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d26e89b767f675628c9f0b2a8532d6a8
9995c0b8a7fdc3835482ba9a83a9abfdd4dc2a05
'2011-12-05T17:10:00-05:00'
describe
'18934' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
5de437fbbe674619cd6098120812ed02
21e57fa784342cf32a30578e9bb1ea3dfdbcf0be
describe
'3984504' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
eef977ede5fb1859b86fda57ee6fad00
bb1386fe74d1108251b3f1a2184a14a9760946f8
'2011-12-05T17:11:35-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGC' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6b57c31cdda0ee0fd1a52d5d6c83faa5
22b970ece8e343343b634ede7768f733b4e1644e
describe
Invalid character
'4486' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGD' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
62da3755c96234202a15758f4392cfc5
f7827f579d70c7c751ebc9c249dda3b6ea6a07eb
describe
'496655' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGE' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3d201ae99a59e546a1e93806f356fa0c
513643556c07fe4a6796d3820df137e70d9388be
'2011-12-05T17:11:43-05:00'
describe
'77292' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGF' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
cc0450cf819af3923ccb6df6ac37c52e
12cef6ee3d55ab557f5d85a088f7d929ea27c3c7
describe
'21018' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGG' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
95e4d338eb309f54ff93b56f35840f10
900007223dfab1166036f5fc2215ac8dc58a5122
'2011-12-05T17:11:38-05:00'
describe
'3984868' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGH' 'sip-files00025.tif'
301fbbc38c7380515d82117435db7bd6
a632306874ef643a7b19f49c52dfc721e79d0c2d
'2011-12-05T17:11:22-05:00'
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGI' 'sip-files00025.txt'
31695be54e56bb6f046aa54f1c20647f
0ba13ca4cf191b0bc3c289c2f5be1060fa09009b
'2011-12-05T17:09:22-05:00'
describe
'5152' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c150ef5fd342cc48563681a0a88f6f4a
63bdc8c9f5ed175befa2e0203b9d3021e1ac7f41
'2011-12-05T17:10:07-05:00'
describe
'496550' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
bccf44685d0a82951d6eddceb4246ac4
647a54a70bcafcc76da035407949d24de6110569
describe
'66090' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGL' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
aecbea85fdbfb2d8476deb2915bb676b
97c1bde386a472534c6a4f01744b08f82c89fd45
'2011-12-05T17:09:44-05:00'
describe
'18890' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
fbc489f9ee1336134df762907f39b6ff
7f4f42b6fd7332c2044c764e1f2668ea919cfa13
'2011-12-05T17:09:18-05:00'
describe
'3984316' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2614b9ab782d3d770472d1864755be10
0df67a7092cdfea0fb86a08ff8c5d92c5379fddf
'2011-12-05T17:10:19-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
2320eed3cdfbc520ee3c8a4e55482c6e
3e01de3e4f2f189221131b227abaa81e919e65e6
describe
'4408' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3e0bb4691b9561f037ab61365499ee34
839f4c6ab03b9e773a47434896c052e03f173751
'2011-12-05T17:10:11-05:00'
describe
'496766' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
a04c7de930d7eb715cc98d43b880ac96
d6de97160b9a667e89345e40af424fd7fe0b98e1
'2011-12-05T17:09:41-05:00'
describe
'64387' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6802ce4e79f98dad22919511cf6da951
550cd630bef1b236cc0d4c760630083b081296b7
'2011-12-05T17:10:16-05:00'
describe
'16643' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
05078027a3652ef370fa203caa761128
8b7f50dea87cbc9b17eda369c48fa89c6b53de12
describe
'3984668' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f7a50ada9c402296ba684ae51d6cbec9
966972b3c9310ae90abea7022f6d1e60f633a6c0
'2011-12-05T17:11:01-05:00'
describe
'360' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
d7db646fa278e56a171acfec0a29e3c3
fe6085d94bceeaacb97ef12e963285844773a100
'2011-12-05T17:11:20-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'496653' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
84b4d2f4123724f10fa66d7b72261265
01765fe784f4f0740adfee33469cd872444fbeed
'2011-12-05T17:10:51-05:00'
describe
'4168' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
51fa6200bbef31e267e1bc019ba2c44b
d7ac68c51dcdc0f347254a1005a8a75fbabddada
describe
'66146' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c1f2a8767d908377c31e0566bd954735
bd25cf5dd0ed3375f5de1a6b17a250d1bc2a6798
'2011-12-05T17:11:21-05:00'
describe
'19399' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b8aa7c1a984751a28cda42a8144d45e3
80198488ceee2799ee21721dc658cf822792b0cd
describe
'3984408' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
75702f38890a31a20270175849d6885e
ca58b0ec18e6b47a41a22e8602d07814707e703a
'2011-12-05T17:11:46-05:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHA' 'sip-files00028.txt'
edb79dc9887c65a62a0755cff964b147
2827a11f842d6160dc262a81f7d0d2eef0adefa4
'2011-12-05T17:10:09-05:00'
describe
'4434' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHB' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
ecb93596e46bdb3c75ca82efdd309e29
4133902db045a4268afac1a401cda14f40c1c2a1
'2011-12-05T17:09:07-05:00'
describe
'496760' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
3cb8fc966c6e76b577814ff523713261
e3c1099caaad063b28da17c81a2b47ab193ccdc9
describe
'65301' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
60eb8dd65b39621309fa3d8525ccd0ee
8bc5491c4bf0054760446987851b9d94fad65ccb
'2011-12-05T17:11:02-05:00'
describe
'19310' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
b3e3c8c9d21811b8a50becc83f35d815
7ec9be8faef26b9ccaf9c0c8e30b004112bbcba0
describe
'3984412' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
e3f2d0992147b7470b785314fcfdf47e
c9a823478e0de4d0fe5f84bdcd5726ffd3842077
'2011-12-05T17:09:29-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHG' 'sip-files00029.txt'
6a2abb42d367d7a67af953ecf2ae871d
4ff8e283b4795a5c73e8f29a628d76b72d0f50af
'2011-12-05T17:11:58-05:00'
describe
'4426' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
e788ae7063a9f33a4d8a19075a76947b
1daa071dfd205f5b1b79a83f47866f2ccc5f86c6
'2011-12-05T17:11:41-05:00'
describe
'496764' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHI' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
318d0fbd33f4769ebc96d9cd2f9ad6ed
4b6454d7640d1d8f563ff9e9421a05f10856cd34
'2011-12-05T17:10:23-05:00'
describe
'63479' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3d3823aa78c2707e56c0d61173294be1
e87cf7395a17a5a92acd1a7076e3a2584fe62a9c
describe
'17134' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHK' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
85a90a049a6dd4a437717b9f5341212a
2785f1d743d52e56291046ad809d38c307528fee
'2011-12-05T17:11:39-05:00'
describe
'3984376' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHL' 'sip-files00030.tif'
2e0239b2ba87556c0220da0ff7e81bf9
41f018cd77db77fea32e03eee5b5dc0f2de64ead
'2011-12-05T17:09:43-05:00'
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
14a18e922bcfd965d4da188809bfa53e
401f23dd683d2500833f6c8a355ef757ee2ea9c4
describe
'4332' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHN' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
3741270aa8634513a92509899fca7210
257ee56b69200778651112b6f10e975eab549a97
describe
'496761' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
b6573f53785c05b9233121d897d0c05f
f1a57d9d299abfe9a6e8011af3e453b300161954
describe
'65505' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHP' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
058a0d8a5874c1009d0f45f53b1bc079
fff03a442fc852bc84cb01f561807d10ee912997
describe
'19183' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7d0dbe3a6024e40b1076aa90e8c99f4d
102649c268adf8707727bd22536263be1a4ee55a
'2011-12-05T17:11:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHR' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e268dc9c55c4c6314deb3b2e73922a31
8506e20e029605f93913a2c759d7704942a8c0a4
'2011-12-05T17:11:36-05:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHS' 'sip-files00031.txt'
036b690c74cb4f13efff26f21d6efda2
204ce6548d04968fc8b6de0a389dc146fd9e55c2
describe
'496724' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHT' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
9e6a5459faab2bc7caaee0246370d3fa
cd69dc7b02469a17da9335bc4b284542008167ea
'2011-12-05T17:10:27-05:00'
describe
'4485' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6e0b97bb473eec3768806def3fc04956
e0ff7f8fe5df1c1b826cc7b7c3bbe6f7ac1354bf
'2011-12-05T17:10:37-05:00'
describe
'64614' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
b2f0a0014ffd7331fc913cb76c4ef8b6
d63115233af233f051f3cfd70acf87fa75b13502
describe
'17323' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d69d080ba76f3ebea5cdd0be5a453eb4
2ff8b0b11afa2dae79a47df38e2f720d91f9bedc
'2011-12-05T17:11:03-05:00'
describe
'3984416' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d18d7bc173fb64b5490cd96f8da4df42
54e2f628894b5161a155ba615af9ed80eef30554
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
4286c964700eb75b46be82d6ed0eebff
1e778f387abc06736f3c98277c59e2acafa907f0
describe
'4221' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
8036fdd2640d9ed45d63a32abef4afe6
dd625a49da54759a84649dc540667413474dd530
'2011-12-05T17:09:31-05:00'
describe
'496690' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
f121b51359e7cf3fddddb2a78477ddaf
1434bdfd8c979dc8d89fe137cc9ccf0aaa84cc46
describe
'64686' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ccef062c91c500ced8ca99d8eefda1ee
56e0ff1de4eeb465f9ac62d28a7b3fe10363c97d
'2011-12-05T17:09:56-05:00'
describe
'18652' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
f3cd3f454557cfd088cbb87c9e59fbb5
498e0f619022e3eb14c454bc912eb720bfd424ec
describe
'3984264' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALID' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ec40381c406441c8d480fe6b36c1c6fa
777143bbde81eba4aa26a996ea14641ae8e8d0e8
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
97cf400ee4372d2db81e6d9b090a12ba
9c521722b2e982050160866466531c01c1379fdf
describe
'4458' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8bb7e00c028b9616e002eeed660a2401
0fdcd41ee5a8b1928e95f6c8b56581403218c689
'2011-12-05T17:11:04-05:00'
describe
'496720' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
4a69f72cfe8a0c6822f3d2a7e6aa463c
7a7c9103024ba40484d0faf8eb9e6c6dcd5d8b4b
'2011-12-05T17:11:18-05:00'
describe
'59414' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
08c6b3b755f3012847473cc694c5d1c6
4088fadd89d1ecfffb3a4f0a397fbcf85b62cc93
'2011-12-05T17:11:57-05:00'
describe
'16371' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALII' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d2d0258f1d6d22afe7e1bf3cc4a613ca
5547b5af128bd681ee41b0b1bef1a50add057656
describe
'3984428' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
10a40164402f921f289c001b87637917
5b4567cb2f844a6a6c835640211a07ff82e5933d
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIK' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ef78bd93ee5d6d69c5e91d0739923b3f
36f36704f2a9fcf6c4b039ec7dc8108d1ec83ce7
describe
'4131' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIL' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8c508ac0cfe53f7129746c891e1b9433
50cc8717e6e8b9b675821e7c474e8e483ce18c95
describe
'496745' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIM' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
3fc0458c05c08037f4b5e6b9115399fc
0af28e692616b325c69f4cda7a74c33c7951a775
describe
'63340' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIN' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
3e1623746f1242cc364544684e21fc86
4995f5c0ca6cb7a07d1d5c1814eef00e9edb8ca2
'2011-12-05T17:11:55-05:00'
describe
'18732' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIO' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
1d94e9f2b8873bbbb1e136819d6855cf
1534c11743f889b0fb374cb2a98ddee2fe93bd5b
describe
'3984448' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIP' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5aa662d00f067fea19e8e3ef62cc6aab
88c1998de6d8a80f410db97450b94cddc55bd5ec
'2011-12-05T17:11:53-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9dfe9e66fbfc6e27aa055408d4099e91
d5feac01944d1b7d7e960d7f9c72866994d0449f
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
8948cd849cfe6188ee7250b5584972c2
dfc654cc17fa0bb263c7f4989c6538e949c3a79e
describe
'4650' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIS' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
87d66bf104a01690d42e322b8478f5e4
fc39a0a4caadfabb43f3b4ecfacb73b6d1b57ff9
describe
'65819' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIT' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1ceedcdbf214783a41b5a48f0b90c874
29e9f507dfa937b802718cea48ead1727a25cc00
'2011-12-05T17:11:16-05:00'
describe
'18254' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
23b986038889781fbb37eb59c4d23226
6ffe18819a087d733d6e78fb1f0b0080b0f98dfb
describe
'3984656' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
811a7f8897571a12e58dcbb94d0cb65e
06756e8c653b8edcbf156e8c824fb2958eaae75b
'2011-12-05T17:10:57-05:00'
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6bf6a228f7ca81aef70f961ba932d62c
ae12e7e14804791e32cbadf469617ec268b1502c
describe
Invalid character
'4621' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
bae03004ce4708a150b042ff93cd4b39
3776903385958eb8480546fbf2fe22c75a5264c4
'2011-12-05T17:11:29-05:00'
describe
'496688' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3a917b31d53152d41c38743d123674a9
78ffa8f8e9b6dbc1dd5847708a39d2bfbc2240c6
describe
'69759' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
fc2a018e6acbbda2f827ab3fed0fd173
2017865ef38e778b501dc4cc9da59e6fad929bcb
describe
'18472' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJA' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3824f6d394f6004ca604956aa23aefc4
f6de20be3c7f6c8bda97be1932fa1273c6ab98b7
describe
'3984756' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
83bf697d43dc2cd3ef91ef7ad30b2afc
40563590505d0c9b75da16ff00d0c6aa672f4034
'2011-12-05T17:11:33-05:00'
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJC' 'sip-files00037.txt'
6e6cce1b1b531b0f1567537913373cde
673c1b5527f8ad8b6d503192d28c43f3a27e93f9
describe
'4632' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJD' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
4c6f1faac310f63ddbba44cf831eb72d
f312ca5035f1205c4b28fad3d46db5b3796c5de9
'2011-12-05T17:09:54-05:00'
describe
'496678' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d154a109d458f019043e658e8fd28a36
e55bae9c8473a18cd11dc67ae115b879b3de8c50
describe
'65533' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJF' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0a63f84581ae8628b8564562a22ad295
bcc19ececa385c22fc834e60935da0ad53a5a96c
'2011-12-05T17:09:47-05:00'
describe
'19265' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
dc7eca6847c81c1361687cec259c8b98
b9d1a7c1b1113985ae004eabc6360eded0d69ddc
describe
'3984360' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
90775405a95f4506c68806b464e33f7d
6921cf54176e2f7631756e3c230912311945a409
'2011-12-05T17:09:40-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
33bc18c6d716478f288c8a02a4bee5d5
0e0ae3423b4f3ba73db0c3c136bb54ff8f562699
describe
'4569' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e12b95f0d707244eaef8fc88ddf0e373
d390db92d9b7c92cd829cb26d4ab325be78a0804
'2011-12-05T17:11:30-05:00'
describe
'496756' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
7d953d671f36726b0d5cd17522d5209e
457b52d9feea82500c63a92bef78c2b297eb22d1
describe
'65912' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c86ae5a319169bf5c1b0f88cede809a0
bba6872813a63eef20a928983bcba36818b7555c
describe
'19242' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
49883a581e3587ddc01289d00c2b3e7f
0bd6e86be8a62a35a8c1d5a526f1fa4e43fe7ea5
'2011-12-05T17:11:32-05:00'
describe
'3984452' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
1633bf11d4a8acfcb1348ea39c35910b
863dc9a1dc21f5af0cb2fbd4ece4c21664a63cc6
'2011-12-05T17:09:05-05:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
40a34129a360406aaa0f4a546a9da90f
39139ac49ba92ec340f5fdd886ef8f35664cb2fe
describe
'496606' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ce45702b15fd810d622f0e286031f350
9e18f006268d412742b1185e7a79f7973e8404dc
describe
'4635' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
8346b3e84ecb7455a04e0750603a2134
731756f8ddcc307001fd476d420d516159f4f2d5
describe
'101029' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
038392b6d1354607fb84689b71a83b06
a07aff33736611545d60e5e67b6808c91fc7ff85
'2011-12-05T17:09:57-05:00'
describe
'25396' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
a96a15e592061e0bba968d0623bff15d
57aa902818d2fc7f1903dd4c3c7a2587d15bd59b
describe
'3994576' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
58e103639a21bf5dee4b3e587ed7791e
1be05008f1273d19d468a25db591b8835d1276e0
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
3127d8399ca552aa17c2fe2faa737bf6
4bff5faab014f0e84ab831a50775cbcaa688d2a6
describe
'5732' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f0c68a4c035eb3c49a161fefd6e06bce
80982bb008685a2912958f57040ad5c30c270b8d
'2011-12-05T17:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b5e52cda09963cf8319cdeba809e8a94
61270cef4e48384c2d6c2ae274e543b265c33c0f
'2011-12-05T17:09:49-05:00'
describe
'69973' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
3db2d5519a70d1afe45028688ba130e3
6aa71d876b3cb763fff3e561c412d5861b1fdca1
describe
'19373' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
0af038d95393c96800f3eb311d8254e1
d45e22228b04453df21abc9f347adc0d195e606a
'2011-12-05T17:09:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
c135d9c925b3463833d8f2da8742d61b
79f82c4ec472413621f2f8fca999806f5cfff6cc
'2011-12-05T17:11:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKA' 'sip-files00041.txt'
9c4fde73950399fce706d40dfd5f09f6
7639e162a223b0616b0926e9e53de28f1c709fad
describe
Invalid character
'4536' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKB' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
662998210602776c083ae62ccb4fb6e5
d7d5e6c0ae99bcdc9eecef6163656de03eadee44
describe
'496682' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKC' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
792c5a6c1cda28dde07ae7d798a2b84b
17c245e69dbe5cc797903488e6645c3bf1234de0
describe
'63755' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKD' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
b16b068a96b97cc802ebe630e2ef6af0
c62203546433c844da55adbf6fd80e798ed5fc43
'2011-12-05T17:11:49-05:00'
describe
'18466' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fb00ce631a78418bb252561432ea1bcf
71f9e4eac21204764729eacc9629d93270451a6e
'2011-12-05T17:11:34-05:00'
describe
'3984328' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
a78b37188c372504d9316120b6f78e5a
1cf14720404b1032612ca92960e8465b3ff204b1
'2011-12-05T17:11:13-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5c26866a27d8e1e2d90acf2a008c33a1
8bd33696d38670489e8a922d332aa95816c96a57
describe
'4480' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c1832126bfbfaba79b5421515259a9fb
67c0928b3babee8d5cffd8bf16bcdf69db70483d
'2011-12-05T17:09:46-05:00'
describe
'496762' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c957a91f2e84758060fffcd97b5431be
7d6e828b1eddaa3555f91a9c5c7d4ccad8e912ce
'2011-12-05T17:11:11-05:00'
describe
'70845' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ee4a0c4d42a5548b536bf9d821e1b65b
c1abf0e61e927b1e5eca8854f34bf852a2719583
describe
'18138' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
73b821007b5b453ecf1fac2dbe36cfc5
161a6e07420992b41f31764f4b6bad151bbd0257
describe
'3984616' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e90df63f366a6a38f41d6f425bc35093
5c5e95c0d52b9abbce50d453008469ceb90e249c
'2011-12-05T17:11:37-05:00'
describe
'587' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
1b842cc3d7b5e56d4aca8b3ee0747e7d
02942a62b2efa7c7e6ecce251cba4ef72225554c
'2011-12-05T17:10:58-05:00'
describe
'496713' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKN' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
cd216d8108c15469eee4c8ac4a2276f0
6f564b4491655c112a6fef2c870391e5dcb8a852
describe
'4533' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f9f421b9fbf7e2de82dd7c94c132e601
4ec52ea3d53bbac37892f95ec72da2b7986445a6
describe
'66552' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d48d30e88d21a2d0614de340ec0faa68
3f4cbd59c107bde87a2f539256b8392c1c23ed0f
'2011-12-05T17:11:31-05:00'
describe
'19197' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
4ddc019223224c5d3d12c14e0237cc30
e3fbb17d1d40aba069803464dfe0da3f95551baa
'2011-12-05T17:10:24-05:00'
describe
'3984292' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e16330ac40c31475e5ae2d9f4bc2dd26
214a5b5a84b7efb84c59f4a07044fdb2f7efc177
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
504fb6efa7da918e5e3ebbc942f40127
4543ae2efe70219d5b7c91946626fde33946ec6f
describe
'4488' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
8fd5f75185b08097c15bfffe98c35637
a70d8a84ebc7a0d9a3e629041efa2de5281bd9aa
describe
'496715' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKU' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
abf801005d2fcb66382071d5d41e7a2e
173dccb0443cba8859acd01871d804afe520ab81
describe
'64943' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
23ce0ca17159ca26113c121e0544ee72
ed60acdb3b2500e73e7a92b80615adc05778ae34
'2011-12-05T17:09:28-05:00'
describe
'17563' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ef2b3d48db2ff69dcc38e97aace64c77
d81d4c24370f2e6439f76a77454915adf3df45f0
describe
'3984488' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
2033823284d9baa4adec66bc81c2b453
b5d97066d326501b54978b9083f29f64349a30dd
'2011-12-05T17:10:55-05:00'
describe
'771' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a2ec0a1499dd81b5ecedc3c97846dd99
11c4b0b1c7b467e909711959071fe4db2e90e003
describe
Invalid character
'4378' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c795aff0d9e3f9936e45eb00a3737f0d
064b3c53ffa4b6066617f23bab06dc894dbbe8d9
describe
'496723' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
52b53f7fc2bcf8d6a6435880db2e02d2
c2c8f55bf3819c11aa571a7060f92e9354c9ff4f
describe
'65869' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6042561fdc54589bf1c93ec3e1439824
af225db028acbefbc82297e9d351d3ff8b4d068a
describe
'18898' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLC' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
025d8c0a780c03b927eb049252092841
24311c53fb6414bceea261cb043ef39e1f9a1d35
describe
'3984248' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLD' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b450896323063c21cb336b566a1731db
a9d2278c5010b201211fee088bcca1f3adb0a466
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLE' 'sip-files00046.txt'
e89b07f458c993b28526e92b6e799dce
b4573601513ec5d9b3d21550598e8e043c89f534
'2011-12-05T17:12:00-05:00'
describe
'4567' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLF' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
23eee342bdfbc0a1d578804f42b10c93
a6778f18a289201df2c2c5bd88b70ed2ce001941
describe
'496683' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLG' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
843da34cade165aa70569b733cbd9f91
3efe8adeeb4888d85eff21389a99c667d1515b0a
describe
'68580' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLH' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
0b66066d165b4aca7f0d2985e7ef6e12
43f51b23d54bc02ff80ec1e8645d0a389535f00a
describe
'19442' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
f848ee3f4fc0ca279e8925cb2690fa33
3b7802c011d0c454f4b624ba1e9dc102a6be2072
describe
'3984300' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
1a7057a7d67a50a01376383d325c400c
4bc43b847ca0d0e7eae84ce31d51c6997858e863
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e4e72fba36499668d2db8b5b3f61ce43
6aefdf974b6ecf07534b039113e538994d13ec88
describe
'497034' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
18844c24d4ab2716d288c3b1489bfae6
3fcd172e8d1e0a9881bdc99cae1464497f39d8cb
'2011-12-05T17:09:48-05:00'
describe
'4585' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLM' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
21236abbb87ce8c116857481ed6ec9b7
90ef083aefa6631b399c12311ce1f9b8642510ad
'2011-12-05T17:09:35-05:00'
describe
'81900' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e2027de7bb33f945a83a4e1f47bb2068
beb09768a08a8428e3b3dbb869c0cca70f44af0e
describe
'22501' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
bbcb16103dd784e466e5767940762748
248b210c15ba0dff71c0abe6cbb1077d7004f98f
'2011-12-05T17:09:38-05:00'
describe
'3996652' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f08e146370c9562c1228fcd7dfd2766d
6dbd4427e845ecf439504a2d26e6f12f569f49a7
'2011-12-05T17:09:26-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
31bde357b686f2a28aa75ad41955def7
61ade23358673c8cf59ff599689107a73d997e2d
describe
'5327' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLR' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
19bcbfee43e632472193ac0914662215
76b18e0cb911e004e101305fc48160ec9b922cb9
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLS' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4d653359f474728cc4422f9914c2425e
aa4dc1af437ece75d687cc50a2abdb282958fd82
describe
'59401' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLT' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7fc864cf066eca575dc04b29a8af5bf1
2cc70a10b5afe02d7990fb19768b171ee7d1c91c
describe
'15955' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLU' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
42caf1b29247e297e667566601554de9
cb9982c7760a7187e4b5e4e15eb54d66e427d774
'2011-12-05T17:09:14-05:00'
describe
'3984468' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLV' 'sip-files00049.tif'
2b5bbdd008853282913a731b72b0b943
db7111313b891bfac56d902a61531e5440b69c68
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLW' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2955d17934247d441aa3081232f53554
2d8765649df7db33278dc392ea6bd2eea359e7fb
describe
'4089' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLX' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
0e255b8125a9923967b545f75e6a5cfa
62f9bf416acc02ea6a21b39d851adaf2661e0336
describe
'496750' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
0e06f39e1d538a4ebecf9a8d9a473a56
b0f90a4cf688a819fd9cb0f5af817817c61271ec
describe
'65459' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
07201ad7b611cb067e7b1e7b0b1deedf
ddbb2827e28ca7e15d20b4dbfc05941e2230bbb3
describe
'19132' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMA' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
757b94bfb3bbe1b70d86cc67cee5d749
4056e1396605930ae5e18d2f13ed9c73f1b68329
'2011-12-05T17:11:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ae81024ab650311315790e605a971c20
d1d35fd7795624d5559cbb72b403ccae04c0da05
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
89b88ee59f9ebd95d94a6a147168bb89
27515fe8eccea4407ef7215342b1330bed00a1ae
describe
'4716' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMD' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
0142c8f9f65d89e793d281f1b91ddb49
0aeaa2f1f3321e052a749dc8d64cfefbded987c4
describe
'496684' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALME' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9ed63256c6bdfeb64c2005b68dfa0acb
e6f72bda9367ad003e87f393457c97a557e1e213
describe
'69192' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMF' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a9f788e8325e280c88ea7650e43418c5
27ffb7c1261257e2f50c2bdaac2e2683648081ca
describe
'19848' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
860760bd63a89ae07aad65abf21ec5f3
18b3e31a06e1f68c2ac99152b07735d810cf1dcf
'2011-12-05T17:12:02-05:00'
describe
'3984480' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
204eab202d2f107275094d53c9cff938
ffe12ca8954dde2df8edd4dae48efdcd2018b73c
'2011-12-05T17:09:30-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
d0240de8a23713b817d9fe8ab7c76c3e
12845e798826955e9fc3be93de2223a6e8ec53ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
cee5c107d1899897e6d1dc81a244446e
ae262235c746cd1ff65f670d200ea5bfb822f327
describe
'4689' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
59131119a1b3f21a2a9f50936f2c4d8c
08be1bd34636494df807cf005ac7319307a094ec
'2011-12-05T17:10:43-05:00'
describe
'66081' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALML' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
b414dfa0859a8389a6def7bef3250c2e
bcbbe664bc5fef29849a5f45b31a21e77c2256e2
describe
'16733' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMM' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
7ccb9f3902f38dcb9bfde7e8d7cfbfa4
f640ab3e2734341078bacee25301d4dd3e3fdf33
describe
'3984680' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
71ce19c5bd1af6d79a8838a422d8e4eb
f1a7938b534416b94cf4a372fd5e4752d1949624
'2011-12-05T17:10:04-05:00'
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMO' 'sip-files00052.txt'
dfbbcf1f266d575003b45d3609ec27a1
7dbe24cdb81677f99c44303fdba0c6321427d641
describe
Invalid character
'4281' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMP' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d7d3945a07efb397538f1e1deb669f7a
76c7fb0fa76e520e767ecf259212a50d2c1cf8a0
'2011-12-05T17:10:39-05:00'
describe
'496665' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1c4f830c13d666694b0fc9a37c80ceac
e27fc3a40a785c9adeaac63d785f508c78f79c1a
describe
'66457' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMR' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7dd8fbce56866c16c9995cb0bc6ed8c6
964875fafa2384f786c5142635ae14919192054c
describe
'19214' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
438fcc25122bfa1af54a7ec38d5bfb35
73a55b75b18ea89651dcdb0cce85a38682ce59df
describe
'3984460' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
052898ef8c69c2397ebe281ea4203781
ed89650cc3fab4e1a78900a01c71c1a20dce045b
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
e4d03f71f20c24eadef36d8510d6d030
a3e66f734fa8b5bc6cd1632b3e613633ac44aa90
describe
'4616' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
26b3c03e4e89da681c6a2c04e54924f5
74a50f213ea1429248c371bfab5fcec6bf0f3f64
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
5fac514667d50fb6774bf5e7d4c6c6e6
99fef5ef926193c6b72e988a09e547498621a615
'2011-12-05T17:11:40-05:00'
describe
'66019' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4632e5a8a0c3e9e1531516658fbd61b2
fa4c8c97245fe7e3b0b225cdeb97fbc7ad6c814b
describe
'19853' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMY' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
481f490973ff40160b8bbc00cf92ea9a
3e8050683869cc208b6ff1a41ff225d60a5d8fd9
describe
'3984508' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
c79a1b078cd97cf54bcc51b3020b7226
652cf8a811afccf5882cb8a9df4df1e13412ea2a
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNA' 'sip-files00054.txt'
118b7d916221de4e58a6b7ed63b1a459
6a58b648c4616292f908f4d1fb89bc45b7e3b6b6
describe
'4453' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNB' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
5ac2d153635cedd2e2daf39fb416ad71
2b2bdbd3f7d5bbf5fff009ae2b8cddeb7143874e
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8758751f3fed7e9a255094038730e7ad
10bf3f8f7424b539ce4eb37fe508c44d02c9b82e
describe
'68964' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALND' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c3aab5e7b32604c8ed4858633d7659ee
b473d7e0347acbe631a4791760608c19bbf56f83
describe
'20014' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a71901bec367778b1b16937995fad09d
62d18bf5f0f99853c815dd6deb97053947e761a2
describe
'3984512' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
1b32dc4f3feec6ef831d48feab4dae5e
1f9dfe35e107738a05f8c0e91610b59b50e74aab
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNG' 'sip-files00055.txt'
25cb02b4c428bf3459c3bd8291e5ede1
e163f2a9dbf3642f5f189d6e4abf8f89c8b9a067
describe
'496694' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
4cafe82b5b61f73400ddc667bf4b8051
71ec6914803a1883817647535d575af2abd901f3
describe
'4602' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNI' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
27219f216c660854a9865f7c24a57c8c
5ef5a0030152f488a6072d3a92b08b6338af73d4
'2011-12-05T17:12:07-05:00'
describe
'68324' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
329cd9b5cb0d9169abbd510e2680b05b
e151edecb30920e2f998fe336bf34a1967158c46
describe
'19803' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNK' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f23b0b64ac3594ee51a1b4872a406bd9
b20e90d80c81dc4153fa50e317d9019568407581
describe
'3984716' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
fd6dfb2a76e50c74e4e063d95e9d931c
3855b4e500fe6b374028df5f47888739ffbcfb50
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNM' 'sip-files00056.txt'
099213e0a984fafe1a62ffd91ac228ba
905493178d736d5e95a6bad5f431c8b6f08622ba
describe
'4674' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNN' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
6b84b7ce9e9b20a26276d4dcfd84f8a2
5af4244be53cb733d38d78350c073fa9fc3457dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
8b61a3f33595321d5bb80fa43c774ddc
e9f7b2b8c77ae640dcb2b9ce01972802e3354fd8
describe
'71514' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNP' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d26e2611f58c8b5cdf3c1cfc6cda3f01
fded7f2827c14827fba4231d78bcc1cde8d27b21
describe
'20350' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c3a26dee1ad8fd0a626bc66b7d9ebd84
44348cc68bf0301fd0203b26f4f3e83e45d324cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNR' 'sip-files00057.tif'
999b2ceb5c0e462ab0535473e17f29c3
d93aee4e94431bcfcb4046b30a706249db808d77
'2011-12-05T17:11:25-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNS' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4cf4ec41049ed7494143bd10ce1b2c4f
40b2a0baed0fac24b91a7ce37b8807f3c17e70ed
'2011-12-05T17:10:06-05:00'
describe
'4753' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNT' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f5d58d6d1817716fc7f30a67c5d3d10d
5a030c3ffaa2b84a01c63eae83c674aa5e1a507c
describe
'496583' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNU' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
69d3234049539488865bb428cb5d16e6
095d68258d9e8df4b256222734a7335c7fb0dfee
describe
'66569' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNV' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e73c8a2d0af2967e9e4f25d0dd39ca07
f3e8da0b6d58063c891d053e0bddec948289ac60
describe
'17805' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
72bb3f3db5adba19d2b53c744805d9e4
dcb9b9a69d1e2e2bb591c5a2ac816518b3596685
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
481404c13e7fe1a69cf9fae0a9c0d844
b9b6191b7d0c14b0d08bbe72fa05ea1fadebfa18
'2011-12-05T17:12:03-05:00'
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
d7c7ef8eac4c78ad2c83e913a3874a26
5fec3c1d940665e7d6d6617c9621a6b01ec2b475
describe
'4360' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
133593d82f5b10f4ba9f7100576a0d2d
cd223082eb45424f77ca4189fbc998b5fef1e991
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
af893d877d0925528471001bf6ed3f23
c27f1a389ef1c07c943fc5d8b0559f0a9faf71d8
describe
'65573' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
bb8a9cc36cc74b2b8ddefd224d6255cd
490f7be624ae6c041fa73ec36ed77e7374874326
describe
'19138' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3272f30f8005fb610023ebbeecdc0c7f
29281d4a3639ca6f034bc601c2208cf68360ef0c
'2011-12-05T17:11:28-05:00'
describe
'3984476' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0015e060734a06fefd6e3365b7cc858b
964ee34e2baf77a83c32e3f46bc220f672f1e27f
'2011-12-05T17:10:15-05:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d79ab3db77a2bbe14edc5760d7b4dd20
684d10770619a00abdc85cfd18d67f94e2890e86
'2011-12-05T17:11:06-05:00'
describe
'496755' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
30dd5f793742b991bfd31d500b49e3c7
a387325799e513129007cbdc104cf78fa81cf529
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
6d583e577309649528c9b30460c9ba1f
c09464d851df7cefd4127b4d311e272a357967b4
'2011-12-05T17:10:32-05:00'
describe
'61709' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
58dc6df0e4c704002e7db50d246c3213
be4e8be749c8653402de7f77eb381f3ec240374d
'2011-12-05T17:10:28-05:00'
describe
'18345' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
46ca8b7608d12a4ce2ade0cb5baa8bd1
c1b8523fd63d14192a8bbd6ac7e6359dbffb2329
describe
'3984612' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9162c293ab863349a84db535f923a7ad
90f1970be19302fd920d044bd5cd0b4aa46bb0a2
'2011-12-05T17:09:08-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
0edbe2425742c336d58a458e71f42850
bf0cb54ac15152f024a4b9c410d44a6dd57332b4
describe
Invalid character
'4489' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOL' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
9b95e1658c31c940a81d00fc830247d7
981756fc9c5e8f40cfa5e77fae75fc60c34f1987
describe
'496768' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOM' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
65af70bc9accb0e561aa43b1bc6d7a81
040a07b3dc9bc48a513c05de945ae58da505479c
describe
'65547' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALON' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
34e05fa25bc92ec83a06592fca91e3d2
f64521e70bf61958fc819397ec158db172a46db3
'2011-12-05T17:12:08-05:00'
describe
'19352' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOO' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
f9328e90334dd52f662d7da44bde185d
fbdbf35a54852cf4d1ffa75ab6236e420cc0b20e
'2011-12-05T17:10:26-05:00'
describe
'3984516' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e0aa73442a953b642135958466e402c4
6965353d1d304bd4f0e49378a3536bc0a09b100c
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
372af2991d41347e17062981e1a47779
015315e8348f4f5463b5f0f9995656395a4e8033
'2011-12-05T17:11:17-05:00'
describe
'4540' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOR' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
32793cfd27766fe9683d46b06dd3ecb8
8d1ca6dd07290a9174ad4d48920c77a88f3c1ae4
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOS' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
d1bb87259e7d88db350018a82320adf9
f8a21b13a37260c886e84a8676b75b9fed6c8a1a
describe
'67654' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOT' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
4cdceef00549b9920b455aafd3324c96
b8774bad12e49183e710d735fbe7dba22a883596
describe
'19632' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOU' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
f25a7e761c80d77cb5a62609ae89e260
17ab750b34b55b1a4af7c1806436c0e3daf5a484
describe
'3984592' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
a36ff8e3b2487cac4270b733220d324e
bd6780d35a6ad4ab2c40344fc179c7edd6e61623
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOW' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8b02282b6b38653d8f0402c6112aa964
77c939ad51ed0b71185e8967202b08f735e95ab0
describe
'4584' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOX' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
17355bcac262f96adb070669057a4662
e94a3ba0e635410b80c5e6bfcd49d31485d3482b
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
e7d5e91de73293a9e582e6f032fdcc22
027e3a94746ef7e4822ca20d74509cf4e34f98d6
'2011-12-05T17:11:44-05:00'
describe
'68162' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7ffbc99c163e91ed1f53d4cd048fd344
e828bd6bcb1265247126e7b02f84b714b8ff432c
'2011-12-05T17:10:49-05:00'
describe
'19837' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
1b948375c06e415611c8638374f3446c
0d7330da38f9180dd33ecdbab824311daed94a9e
'2011-12-05T17:11:59-05:00'
describe
'3984564' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
e7910b58a61ae7e103faed0bef81d067
8e058d69ba7829db007b350bc7c23d5c685748dd
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e4479787e088869b61d689fb20a736d8
b264728dda8287467c35b003c65ca233493968b0
describe
'496735' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1dc0ab7320c2cba6f1b2e4d79eff28bf
40c7f00a02badc648aafe3b90238cdd1cdd5045b
describe
'4665' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7bb808b00f219adda9df4adf21f91ccb
4227ac6205a1a407ae4c09a34946fe136f2aa475
describe
'66786' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
57c2a5df506dc132ab35c9e616e1b96f
a1589b94eec1c566aabbf5a2379ed681f33b6435
describe
'19659' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
742efa82fd377e1db2ea7e313eed8607
fbf2602b01096b0240a899f25b5ed76901d1cea1
describe
'3984640' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
fb8297cbe3e60e2e374d7c0d1042445d
c573ee0baeb9d846b15c5ccb230cf54b572ca569
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9ecea82bc4f09cd1fcda4e2bd8a2268f
1766686cbae00d7d34460ffa1d61acf4d87aec29
'2011-12-05T17:09:15-05:00'
describe
'4518' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8edfcd8319af7505b1069fa42285dc03
1269dc22c18a9a1fb2099f414bd61bd9362a3925
describe
'496728' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
423a017391b20ac1c1dcc7061b4533e4
0f13a8dbbb0657d250b0e290476f981140dec939
describe
'66234' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
2834f1acbc25c48e5636e492b7a67049
c3476ab581709bba5f733101793a0e879074e731
describe
'16664' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPM' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f89d83e078f12162b706483510deb3ac
ed3f7301ec6b65ad416c87e8d2b5cc13e59bfe76
describe
'3993980' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPN' 'sip-files00065.tif'
ca1468ed92408a1ce11ccb7de7ba5eb8
93e3215fce2af4e7691b950bb42e5c413a358982
describe
'359' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPO' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0f24c7a9526fcb4b6a9c4ddcdb9cdebc
dc70a680c63a7acff3321c8c82e643387887346b
describe
'4151' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPP' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
950b4ed0db07937dd7e4d5d57422717c
05c243a1d00a08114b71c8f7c5d1ba5029b947d1
describe
'496663' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
74d488b3670d341e8b9521e86bd3a980
28a62d36608ebe1e5b7e233146572aeccf5b785c
describe
'62622' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPR' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
5a9f61a4a1e4af76f7ef8a620338d7be
ac5aef0e220dc35124dd7a455d9965cda24d4dc2
describe
'18500' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
decca588f45ca7175529f14bfbce7cad
2fb788bf1716d47c0f6f7e3cc5a306dcbc45dbb8
describe
'3984216' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
41fb679dd8351ac1561b735ef641c26c
18506b02751237399d593cad7067d9c21e3f5197
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2a0d105f840d646e989b29e656fc9f85
ca3fbf739e315ac55fb5ef56be3029a88007d472
describe
'4455' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b08728849ce6444bd99b85b37afbb0d2
2e978d30ad430b2a507de52166bf4a2ff3e6c30a
describe
'496919' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
9abc64d064d5489aaa8514cdb3587065
65db754c211194cfa2f3e60ed60231f7a3cbe025
describe
'67148' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5fdb5837362565fc6fff5c6ee8d64020
463c99756e3ad5dc2fa1404cd5af87e6950b1fa9
'2011-12-05T17:10:53-05:00'
describe
'19605' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
76038fbd7403d01df8818b3e0e38dbf3
5f0527f7e959e77996e79137093cadebdbdd49cb
describe
'3986264' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7625764fe6f5262054f57175e78527ba
21fc59402dd18b0f64c35c42c406bf653e6f1edb
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQA' 'sip-files00067.txt'
77f8b2946a5595dda5e150b0faab2442
774bd4b3a31f9e1f3f3d22d84b2c34574dc4ce72
describe
'496642' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c429b217105f7582534d298efc976ae3
17cdedbf2fa2c819943bb6ef83b1c3036693c30a
describe
'4698' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
392f14e39fbbd6198429b955c25c8513
ff16aeb49e1387ae3070203b1414be2e74760003
describe
'71344' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQD' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3e1df6686c03f326c474bd814f7cedc5
cd1f578f88b90b9e970342906c66eb1bc5e934df
describe
'18139' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
76ca60fa11a1dc060a10a9fec4c4a20a
97006dcfc91dc6e723ff1f4c60bf34ec59ffcab4
describe
'3984572' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
486e1dc2b69d13c54819c5e935534136
b92c5b2866eec08c4ccaa85ac951364855c0baef
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4f8e1bf8c6e019bc1e0c7f590aafa66f
9645beb840f2d398d1e703f2c4b888d5e91aead6
describe
'4469' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d2f1c4438137038ffdf81bccafa7b1d5
5992ed7b78eb0cf403704bd7f7e384b6daebc3e8
describe
'496703' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f1c02408beecdea55f68d41db9190ad0
e677d4225ea88fbfd5c789cad9505605d241e187
describe
'62638' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
fd25800b74391973864dd6b1e3ff7fbe
caa88df26595a59f377441cb45232bb7ef5b2816
'2011-12-05T17:10:01-05:00'
describe
'18719' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
8cfa4f3cc29e788428c8be9efa31fee6
671ca20eb08dde5cc9704c00f401809aed975ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
77c78340ce46757b5fcd69e959962ebb
ce44183f8a08bb14c29567004f342302866206cc
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a26a388083447f22bc3a1c71711d7dfd
bea0855ec529f06f64625fd61d78eed77bf583e1
describe
'4515' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
13b77ade4c7767e9d19acfd8f9ccce79
85964776f7494848554e0f8569e46cd905395da0
describe
'496660' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
3f143175ce69e4ac8e4ff69596294199
3ffaa4a693631a7c067dd90945854b2fd4987643
describe
'57304' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f756a455c5a27579019c1e64d7d90cf9
e7d3bb6635531bfb18d1ff540faaa8f36cfce1ec
describe
'16675' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d95adfcd77bdc53c90b519776f3f7189
f6cddea61bfd25b611e46b30c8f967a147751450
describe
'3984172' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
3d266793ac7d82f6050e22df643502a2
9b59a1cf0122e5a6199718971c3f90eb4c82099b
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQS' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7143c1303a655f2b5a06f4f844b7bf32
1ef19fd83e7e9264b638316bd11628bda849cd81
describe
'4135' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
343d25698816b75dcac49ccde97121be
4704c34d6694c4dc6420d1282e64922b8dfba31a
describe
'496689' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3f25b2b8891c095f500225585a1b972b
71a3da01729f6f2d316e9ef42ec1b6c2cda86f19
describe
'60963' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e836c2b337c3cc7d904d810eead2af05
69e407ba05f5a092cfc9ecb0a89b402778fa080a
describe
'17996' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQW' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a09be8cb3b3387cbfc5853f26500f349
94f8c77d5c2aa415dcf18f177c03d6859bb7ea64
describe
'3984312' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQX' 'sip-files00071.tif'
74910a327b51335a2bf1c8d6008c1abc
4b6667f028472ad9ae1413c5598b5b8c0767a336
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
7184b170246ee3d20d52a1ab1e37d6de
f5f3c875994e0026ba73cc0fba972f2cb9c4d8e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
0d3560f765d0659f875987e408743aa0
c84ff68e63f766a2468c5bb48693756d7edfcded
describe
'4322' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9fb6dd813e2d6c4d124d9faff11c9334
d2c50c33e3daac76de6aaabce0453389d5840e98
describe
'63507' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5e9c6de76010da92f9eee04b27f25de5
0c0d136ffef3a8aa2a1570f3884a00f70c650e4e
'2011-12-05T17:09:04-05:00'
describe
'18747' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRC' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
57ac9f761159a7d4a87903c60cf888fa
1b4232520a883d5b413e62ff41dfde8c259b1f9b
describe
'3984296' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRD' 'sip-files00072.tif'
e56c23eac66d30a813a8d50a7d546ef3
212a6e570ddbd581eb5386c8a4639a68c8f4d2a0
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRE' 'sip-files00072.txt'
915537603dd4145d9709c3f95cf61edf
97b69f72e1af3f2076455ba29b0d64e32d95ea86
describe
'4291' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
8477d731b51d70edaa4f823445cec22f
30ff9bf758baf86db218d06edef79b57a7b25d95
describe
'496743' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRG' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
daf662ffec75c13cb7177527d41d3c22
c01bed8a6ea9ef94d7b14d72db65d4b806c25ab8
describe
'65892' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRH' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ad3d24b9995bccb9e1bab22e35dd3b94
6ac36683feb8f7bbbe42b732fc0a509251e9a7ab
describe
'19157' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRI' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
c4081b0ef2803b5e3cc5e3989b382b71
7247b5affc35ccc57f8a31d1e78150688341429c
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e524bfce81f84ccbc825259626723661
d78c1c6bf8b6728416b950f72b674c2563823545
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRK' 'sip-files00073.txt'
3b6901cada9d97649c2a8836101fa5b0
8b9184983bc69d27800a645151cf63b5c4141565
describe
'4397' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRL' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
015fbd04300616144d1d92d12f07d380
9295e5b898de6404714f44b46c99f1d9bb96c58e
describe
'496752' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRM' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d2bde031b0ad7a9eab19fbc20f68cf62
ce3612209fee0ecab7dc676d9aff65e758c28e59
describe
'69934' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c26aa8972569deac83ec4da2f9fe32be
d317e31c3a28c20ecd84ff09f780ccefcb946d71
describe
'19387' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
34c14d90b225b8538f73d1471ec95ef1
509015dbf1845651d1078037f37c8d0d27c16446
describe
'3984556' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
2e0a0ea367d8f72abfdc412f14bb5894
2ed1a5d6b4dee937ed4eda676f8f2f74131b3d23
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e9f201bca6c457609127751d541f1ace
21c9a3a908249f27962755c26a124c0e4a141eba
'2011-12-05T17:11:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4700' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
dde8b27442d0408c181569695cb462ae
b412ef89868d217414098fe62b2988635a5e1841
describe
'496657' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
dfb9deeffbf7f7dc344716ab79e3a8dc
d11c33fb5ee6768212c0dda06a5b51f39fdf3fb5
describe
'67408' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
9a9341177d98cf38f617a5ee1d8c4b13
adc33055653a776b80dcd066112b68f62b46dc46
describe
'19246' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRU' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
c550bfe8d7a8f936ff4f0dc764ebff91
7546d2a58512a24dad2a3cf5c49d118fb4f68de2
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRV' 'sip-files00075.tif'
dfa14afe65f99a7bfdca4b1565a16660
962943acb2cd2c90b41f8c6cb31525b41145e22a
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRW' 'sip-files00075.txt'
3f4fee41b1f708765bba6efde16bc8a5
e9fb1cb74841fb49374393d34679c4d23ecb7b88
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c98e7ff8f27c48cb22ee7b115654160b
48a671a920abbea62af56f51c37e0ede880320cf
describe
'4524' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
86ce1548a37dbd29cade1689c309a5ca
b43234217f51f8a3462293c457aa49d79914aab0
describe
'65357' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
eb9fadaafdee92da42d58494a7b58cbc
f788d6d52d96883417e133d36f7b5d3cdcdf8574
describe
'19024' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSA' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
c98f8bc272e753c160edf9c83bfb8f5e
d14411026c56e362faa0212cf4bd1c947aba2a7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
bfce7d6f435edc6691feb63bbb738dda
4b1bef146104dc5de9847313e704ecf9f36c995b
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSC' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0a7a3571d84fb2105fb1cf4dc8092f4f
a532d677b06c4b3b7b2ca438c3432e44ab153d9a
describe
'4490' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b358192fb2754ba9734ffcba95eee1fa
d37b491a936087cf1719234be193420abc253763
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSE' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
2da8bef106363d056a995afb2ef43a5d
eb5fd3ef67efe7fe850593f7b7b76c0557af5b32
describe
'63890' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSF' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
9a364f56089cd2a06102886c47ba2e34
f02908ac0ff5b01abf5b148b72fa24f55163d439
describe
'18730' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
2a7e7ec47072048cd4404a562d14b874
25179c61d6ceae02d469a03714912838e58009d0
describe
'3984252' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7f1c1c3212db91e2d2615a579263095c
5dcc9aac1992a47372c9ef1efb5e6dfc9aca3596
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
36e7cd259a4e98805c77d03ed67db241
a482875c75d510420178803542d0e1a268fa0a8a
describe
'4336' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
26ab27c41b63f4e2ad2b6e11576d6e18
1fbf0cccdf962dc392ad2aada8b6f8f56076f022
describe
'496712' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c9e4cf3a3351b97d35576270db7ec63b
52638034049339eb1624677e8e11c63c99bc3206
describe
'65727' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b2868805dad2f2a652b4655235bafc87
37b2fca199e8958ae7a0333aee3173d873418d73
describe
'18884' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSM' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ccfe0ae8b6e53c653df4d238f6c7b135
afe72b2e44394fcf6f4abb666ccbefcefe4dd9df
describe
'3984356' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSN' 'sip-files00078.tif'
b2a64e990870ab6c31900a10af33061d
599750736039089b3667ba51d3477c0430e8d969
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSO' 'sip-files00078.txt'
9ba46f1ac841f3c28f9b2a981e5e7e05
0becc65e3a093363c833bfa236c74bdff40b562c
describe
'4422' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSP' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
7fe2f05c03987861037f9a26faeecc7c
e616b4781ba731b9298fee139c385b5adafa4dab
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5bf8ed850a96892d1d1898abd477fe61
2087adeb8144b53ec0e81d369d868f534a5db5c1
describe
'51571' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSR' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ec3495aa73a37d9741ca411e180acf70
bce0f1fd89f4b97cfc8ffe8e8b9b68d4916adaa0
describe
'13731' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
819719dd93fa599c7be38c2c2076af53
db915b83ed186b6a3ad2a55b70fc7a876fb2384e
describe
'3983896' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALST' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1ce35fa6fdee2da6c8eb0613c931daad
e307635d5df675dc152439a44c936deb4ef6834f
describe
'479' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4958b407b96ebcd494270081ab5d08a8
8bf8f6813a848ce46556e561135d8b839bd7cebb
describe
Invalid character
'496705' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
e47585fca1fc26235964aae87370e4ef
f28a39c4254d96540257fcd5229206b10da796d9
describe
'3691' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSW' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
8618437eacaa692d4ba1db23e2814a2c
2710aeefe2c1319707ee19023d67c5690f0eca06
describe
'62746' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
409eb3d6a1a0cd75c848dfcae7cc45c0
373c8174b8a2a17b164f522c1bfbf13ecb16da0e
describe
'18184' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
4f57efca9eb0b8d6114c334744a1fdea
50d12a07768133b29081046ca44ccfeb9b258866
'2011-12-05T17:11:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
43eb5c9adde5a94ab7514426a960771f
ba73c4966dd2363f395a5580a2dc69b2a8af5ee7
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
77a80b21a25b35652872341f471b07b0
3f70e9dc785cd8df5587796272556a0875687a11
describe
'4298' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTB' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
16f1a82ca6456602e21da792a1bba3c8
496526374d4220a7e9e2badf6ad79b241c74660f
describe
'496698' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
cf4efcc29c6bd40e053ad5ba2203997c
83c6f0c0e6167455154c205773975fc313f4b9a7
describe
'67751' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTD' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9bce1eee14e6c2f82d474e07be4d1c2a
6ec8f9a13a2e904291202eff2d5705392265bdf3
describe
'19847' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTE' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e937a0fb164db83cd5053b950f177d3f
29ad2d22cb09840e3e01a76cf191c09ffebabe85
describe
'3984560' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTF' 'sip-files00081.tif'
04226603db6f35cf053a603622448dc4
fcca6e60a2a58f9b5c6a6d23807d71e6f0113210
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTG' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3825f26a5404b467c7aebf964ee84a5f
63a8f409dd0678d1f0dfd8e4bf7cdb4ede50c4e5
describe
'4697' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTH' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
acdd17c181929e039d8901cffd0e676c
4e277148d7976da21e765093b2fdfe5878aeb5ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTI' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2157db842997dee8139e0aa9a88de4f7
133121a661b1d99332118eb07b50917ea397bdb0
describe
'64581' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
5c786126ad1dc5c089378b8f81618e12
9a5fd16206d2b09ca3773dfd25bc2f7028c1dd33
describe
'18847' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTK' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
346abe30f76b4e8437a8fe587a439037
5cfa2c678731ab7d1a9d33bb3351eadb2a4b0fe7
describe
'3984324' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTL' 'sip-files00082.tif'
1e1147e776abcafe1c7c6cd72b9afc8d
0c4362360c9a4f0250fd294711bdb6d2e6610037
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTM' 'sip-files00082.txt'
5a7919bbd66cdc3c120edf4b3111f4b5
f8399031b280a717b9dfc03324ffcb2cc371c199
describe
'4406' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
f8eba51dcf361ed664a5058e1f4569a8
9f7c08b91000cf1544a4cf269718572a38919c2e
'2011-12-05T17:10:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
64caef5e564b2a56bd9155b720ee3e78
26911c45818dc32640480c8d14812930fb48e908
describe
'64209' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
168fe4c28ede813a981d742f0941f67a
3c506fa64d151b8fab45878bfe98db88295f0aee
describe
'19083' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
09a8975634f9aa95ddf773d0ce5430cd
20f34db92432051bfbb2cc464e49b6c56300e5de
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTR' 'sip-files00083.tif'
267c2619e8704cc516940f4c0854d788
ef30c5e669e1971b86d7511bdafc393823b210a3
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTS' 'sip-files00083.txt'
0922a593d0d2c5f82c2774132237dc3f
03e77319ac8a3447a15e7eb322ad5447f806b57b
describe
'496668' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTT' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e053125df61afc782f2183a5aa3033c8
d59394eaf60886fedc7cd20441c65d3499696e0f
describe
'4740' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
ce910f838db12fc491d49a6c6b4af0ea
ff121c319e1e16ad9146c5f1027ea773de255b99
describe
'65376' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTV' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b6592352f795d214588dbbca33296e2a
6bd868f918c6927582c2e46f9b99606c16ca0a6d
describe
'19084' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e76ed8b17eff70d65836a202c23dd33c
454bca3c898567ece3f3b8e5f9ee4bc5a2824307
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTX' 'sip-files00084.tif'
66a855a53e19e5aaab290f04205c7dde
c9e4d922f432860800f5ad5e83117d97fbd2b2f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTY' 'sip-files00084.txt'
49862b4c40693dd73acb51e7f2be6810
1dff64ba3b65a4244683f400beeb2c1899e967f9
describe
'4457' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
0f78e50cd495b4edb1c50396ab769fc3
90595a545ad97d793dc2aa9d8a29846782187cb9
describe
'496695' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a05124a6f1f80e5b81134eb09f837b44
881ca0dc47fd74a9fa185a747e73b65ed7f5dcae
describe
'68870' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
3f6fc57102f16ff3a6eebc093d392203
18e30b814f027ff2a652ba38a98b7d090420d414
describe
'19957' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUC' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
de2eb394508578e6d58db2ffb7c76f45
382fcf857203f5dbea80e95419c6b0be244fa50a
describe
'3984628' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUD' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9d9bd2cc833567630a51d71147028abc
236d64609e98fc44c003e037149592e262c84f8c
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUE' 'sip-files00085.txt'
cb9d923c5ee82d02f25b9c5eb92e8ea4
407b0ab5a3a96a84c05888c514b1e66bd8c88d32
describe
'4583' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
92209e93d7dc8f52ec00ec5ba09bcf95
bfe368da82289991bf13a09b36fad8c5fdb11a7c
describe
'496699' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a00b2cbcc3a207213712d7a5624e2966
7ff67b9853e7b58d34ac3f7929adc6c31037c3b4
describe
'71100' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
0378aad0ee9fbf5888c365656e54113a
58cc9e219c27e2cb1e5cb9ffec408044c934c727
describe
'18297' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
454e24d1273a2f87e3c445a4fd4c8bf2
f1250fa662cb235d7d6b84857dbc448d7429fb67
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ecf9561d8b8c062ea6330baeb7a77307
3a937facfed314d1a86688989c63c287c337098a
describe
'462' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUK' 'sip-files00086.txt'
813d87235961bed7f38de36ce7b549fd
a6c6459d5b3ff636607f0dba1543153e3607c6a8
describe
'4479' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUL' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
09eea2c21b2bc6b18f04be6d5ede6eca
aca2da90e5356971491e8d62d6f69c6ec7fc645f
describe
'496691' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUM' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
67edaa035cda4223e3b39d869ad4577c
dc3651bb57507519d679bce39b8cbca5afee3d1b
describe
'60501' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUN' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a5d51f8549d7bc00684ce9b9930a80b7
2d1e0c30c85e007aad64e9e5933ffddbc6865345
describe
'17695' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUO' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c91c0473b3a087818e28f0e07ba00235
d03bc0759d69f0901428f135ea63abeada003cf5
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUP' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8425da9e086b46382ebeedf3f023516c
8884782122a517e253eec2b76960452d5f90c77f
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
831bfe6cf7426131e56a63660bea54fd
b37bc9f662b17b551c3c37a4e668dc88f91c179a
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
adc549e5b14e041329e1d0e066aaa13c
5dd5c054ff5d92c3597d7cea8194a45b1d4dc8f8
describe
'4260' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUS' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
f60795842becb68926187604aa976ce7
834ce885fabf3d9128af5473c00533575eeb966a
describe
'67952' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUT' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
69027035952693547fce658fc57ed255
3fb18dd34bebd0885f514470b844411c679d0646
describe
'19959' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUU' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
42e074dcbb49c726c8463740a1bcd494
bc5d4c01553dfbc34ef79c9b216654ed1c0f85f9
describe
'3984652' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
dea1fd9e95b7c94542d081bfd04bdbb1
519d1f071f4a3f7c853185ae1c20dfae31ba7506
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUW' 'sip-files00088.txt'
b2cfd6a2f2652d08e6c0947023c39b90
a2b3a38362a90efbc036506a8524152a1b2003bb
'2011-12-05T17:10:25-05:00'
describe
'4645' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUX' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
1b8c8cbba502177b4fd126d410d5b6c1
233947ac801cc9664b3f65f233f3659f6be89a10
describe
'496741' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7292074148621008ce3eee585edb2dfc
775bc02ba35856d5ab21d5028bd68dafecb464cd
describe
'64335' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
44f351dc7cb8d393850dfc7a42a5dcbb
9f06162b70e5db829f8078beb15871d575037f77
describe
'19049' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVA' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e736ff1916afdbb1d2f09adbea02c285
a13f2e3a6a4c6922256e9dba2c7abfc7a0cfd2d2
describe
'3984604' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
0667a8bf97a89ce07b05ebe1d1d31f13
e4f9cb683a01dcebd3737300327761ee5beb87cf
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVC' 'sip-files00089.txt'
d3d8b67a9b7e5e856463f25c4103ec96
0ab8350945932300846d76e61fa35c579393433c
describe
'4587' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVD' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
c567641e627661ce233da4236f88a4b5
b8cb6bb8c65a3f418ac1fd537255043c79b109fc
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
a931644c271be88704f3673fdbf449c5
52db5d6a1a7bca14f05d9fe45d1cac15c9c5803c
describe
'63497' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVF' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
194a622ef50321f24a3fde6ec3c5fc87
4f60d549d593905b6c4daa376ec011026548db2d
describe
'18419' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVG' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
1fe19289c128198f9c27f808d7fe869e
0027beca7a3e09566a2b0a1b2b46531fb79537b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVH' 'sip-files00090.tif'
4a19cb6729bb2b29a3b5002fe28f7090
472cd1d878e73c201f7d85b25ec39b86d1bfafdd
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVI' 'sip-files00090.txt'
8071d4688e710e1ea219feb6d767425b
74d333a4b053042ef0024a935af6af54817ac678
describe
'4432' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b55a297659d0184b865962fb74e6651a
3dc44fd4b344aae43c1b008fc7a09c38922bc5d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVK' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b358017763226885ff82926bfe317f84
47c4b1278099858176c8e6924139a20f75b8a293
describe
'48257' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVL' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
99bd05fa37ac3834acff2c83bdcd67c6
5c32893ab9c06934734e8bd66c588101fb962316
describe
'13457' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVM' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
33647d26520e6b99535fc33450d592ac
0c4b6087e8fad137a249ed7ae4eb92c17d914c26
describe
'3983852' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVN' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1186a5c9071f55f768e0be6091dc0c3b
66e373b62e04f20ae0495d82bf9e1d50de884290
'2011-12-05T17:10:46-05:00'
describe
'591' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVO' 'sip-files00091.txt'
fc0fc4a9c32df0633a5821c1ee56b7fd
5a9eb2395560fbf0159d3644b9fd74633de2eeb3
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
abc0a9b8b6db7e29339545e02a957741
3e8d6b87532fb4544d7104012d4b777c2c490dee
describe
'3485' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
69b6b26003023b3ffc8f08014b71cde9
94ad41789f1aee2177363c91907b72a328fe7b66
describe
'64106' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVR' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
5d9f2844016afad0246cb0848f25d36c
3a099f0e8b0adf8326e23cc140493bd6c44b9e47
describe
'18939' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
25f89dff21af8a3dc69e391a1797af55
aa5729cc6283526f1ee272934d3523bdf7244851
describe
'3984440' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
2fde74a65fc93b0f75af36b0e94c8ee4
2a6be543b57467151140610f2dc55c42067ea9e8
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
3bc2091d6559cfa0724da963f46dee40
ab045ce71239eaa9977d13c939e93383a01f2e64
describe
'4507' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b6fd42fde808b6d7b0465bb1f8e06bbe
4f911cbd6898232e586fbf7fdf381a3541747fd0
describe
'496763' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
0fd1cb4c46cfa4ccb4362a1b31b6134c
b313b5e90d7debb5100d053b21d06921775567e3
describe
'63011' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c0c78e174751cbefdbf70c63df8919f6
005e6bbee4d09d35bf04637db7fc6b2fc8fe1b9b
'2011-12-05T17:10:40-05:00'
describe
'18715' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
7f7cecb6ef6f2a2915faeb8754847bff
a53c377986b4e05ccdb3c8db966a66c0e81af085
describe
'3984528' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
81ce6b508b903dabec8b7d5b341ac440
9acb702438ed100ecfc19f8ea25b38b3dc1164b2
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
4ec35b1eea215c3befd23d39d8b1002d
23b24887bac48532a0e06a783043254115279908
describe
'4561' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
90c5b31c7d7919c38fa9ee9691789684
837397f644c408a1eaa39e1df7753e2ebf636820
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b8648643cfb78b8a8937f5118fd88f63
be415937f3d8fcdc5b16e4f8880957c22c5a26c9
describe
'82201' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
74c33397d28a79241d7f32e3df2eb21a
65af4d91be83e28c9879a49853a8b5825cd02ca4
describe
'21927' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWE' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e3e896f3b9e2e40a6e77e6060922daf9
f4dc124e34d90d2d0c65fb1ac838946e96270434
describe
'3985356' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWF' 'sip-files00094.tif'
de09173f9afaaf77464fd385643d6f01
0f9d5a8b23ff50dfd26ea258d286d7adbdb13f5a
'2011-12-05T17:10:08-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
e6a7bc0729f02274c12dbf1a6c5764df
e02ae667f053d3e4068d9eb15b1a1fd9977e2ddb
describe
Invalid character
'5555' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWH' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
1410793634da2d76ab2020f16e173d0a
fd63c113ed7bffa7fe554a77eb1633d087899594
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWI' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
858211b345ab1b56c724be39178fde89
0b8fcd86ba8d373931aa9063361b3a3a847fe34a
describe
'62683' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
13e40acd4da67715bee2dca1a015465d
15fc242a49fe71162444dd28623216b43e43cbb7
describe
'18299' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
6ccea6d35ea024b985be3c90588e3190
9060d275deabf19c6edf5105618d4ad2b732770f
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
9c7004c6511bbf177742227a4ca610e5
fa38579c31b21220f164703f79f60f10a0d4243a
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
596f3551f5452f7180f9835f14fbe50b
6e71d29a0a14724077b53b5e498498c54c060ce3
describe
'496765' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d19ec830c970e7f2c7e27be033d7d078
cbd12b6b4f63f6ebe66cacc70a7a10526c9caf21
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWO' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
297ef4c82a80dfa988b660ca4048b1dc
cf94d59d739bc43908745f3cd71f8e4789b095e8
describe
'68278' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a29ccb6307d7159141eeed3867d6b0fa
596a263b0c77701bc3e5f393ee723e47f1b40370
describe
'20270' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
1ec4af2f442e8a245a8e182c3cfa6896
19d46be8355d9ecf693140ae193ec43111c3491f
describe
'3984832' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
980da81af3c7671abd94b8ddceb14368
71e20c21a2a8bd1c0a4c8e6c7d606540ffb2187f
'2011-12-05T17:12:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
7c271fd9b333c23d39dbcfe5eea7db7d
152c80f7585cb7cc40299b46d4ef36a40a9e7c84
describe
'4848' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
66e73ad4dcf79f20200cbea2cd19faa3
e76ebb378defdfca7d85c0dc7c55b884d7ebef1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
86a46d9da4017c3fb239513ee780afa1
840eed42c8518a5e02faac3b5ae29645c7b2851b
describe
'67490' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
e6c21cab573591d17c64c3fb911b5d92
0d52c0ee2c1ab54b22152ca62db2bdc283392036
describe
'19710' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
76a460d445872f99e8d9e59a2e3b9fc6
677de63fc7ce22aa5730095c3a73bb30bbca5803
describe
'3984720' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWX' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0f52da0b6e961e0e27e8cfe08248d233
a160caa07961c396b1f272f683607cab5b62dc18
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
c12e5b5866f1faf2414bf8d3bb5124d0
aaf8ac9284c6f81ba5290c04e44ecbff84a75e5a
describe
'4728' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
2e3aea0fc57ba6063b30766319c32bea
5bdd8be28af124e5abf61825aabb566451fd021a
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
7cc880276b81654ee3b68a5f7230497e
4c09e8f14f6bb2ca6feb2a418e3bcdc681df3eef
describe
'72780' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXB' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
7abfee9853c73f8a1d83953034d4d773
8fe5e24e135506f93b8ba900b2cc3d419def22f2
describe
'20257' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXC' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
2a025aac4bc6ef1d52d1cecb738c9e51
1db819fee802d8e72837dfcdbba68a04af104377
describe
'3984688' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXD' 'sip-files00098.tif'
3a7e433676739df27e2c36ccf2c4fbb2
f76f5133a118ce9b84f205e00bf28b9ebb410deb
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXE' 'sip-files00098.txt'
d0bcc04262728ffa3c268f3c51683515
4a3e9f754539bae54f09fa29fbc2a026b0b14b30
describe
Invalid character
'4755' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f1bfc6ff8890bbeceea51733fa461f0a
9006fd7f81160f585c810c3504be86fea179d1ba
describe
'496717' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXG' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b6c7a8cc0e1b1b48faf51924a4f42ab2
02ac037808875c427c4f10c04d9967624618cd4d
describe
'64495' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXH' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b72ddde0fdebe7d33181aef658a515c3
79e223f181dbe76c14fae58f0d54d2faa67022dd
describe
'17024' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXI' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
2e7c3dfe9e115062589946ea58630c57
c887edffff34bb3c89c2fb3a22a2b5ba05d19df4
describe
'3984544' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
9d3a5f83244d788d77dfa428b468f60f
08e6c2bffb945317a5b92a6b02f9d6e4605c26eb
describe
'517' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXK' 'sip-files00099.txt'
27c415eb0ffb55c0614d2fddda9fe6f3
5ea1a3b8c84bd5ff61e8bf6f5d422a8ed070c6ca
describe
'496757' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXL' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
5e2697cac2baded698a9722ab8d63ad3
b9c9bf765843f4c0a9e4530aa63ff108fc0fcda8
describe
'4216' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXM' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
9a14db024805bee94c09bff3f0d1659f
9a8e4fea56d932616415912e3073863ef4c9bbe5
describe
'69863' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXN' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b2378a226620fbca95112cb2ba399d8e
2c9d77ec0baa34ba9882f07b1b77ab69fce6a253
describe
'20080' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
27f5c2e684d379b634207b5a47c8db21
39ee35c5ef0363f44daad483cf96e0e75b62ed2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXP' 'sip-files00100.tif'
84b9916dcc177aeee24dcfe6ce5349b3
61e75d0ab0f2aff3212fd9e18ff13a6ef114c244
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
5e3e9f8b152fc45e6438e92cd1635ffd
e6ddbcfbe31dbc16846bb4ecbbf89c52f45bd8ef
describe
'4782' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXR' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
48dd84df8c40dae7edee97ca7f03886e
8d1b07a51365fe9c72ef5fcd1da5d6dbb2176a11
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
277830e49a8c7bd5e455a958183a1206
3affd54320019a76c193fcbcc3b4fe3547192873
describe
'70794' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXT' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
7f621f6e39664f78855c042568dc9a8f
93513f797fbc52d8bbe08e88c5c35029f49ee701
describe
'19732' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXU' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c2922cf04d2b184c5e0d6cddcb1f34e6
9ed9170c71b5a3f77151a7abdd40f399186e0f00
describe
'3984648' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
8a5895ec2f23fb4bd8b27792bef298a8
f218c950d561e6b79dcbd79121122a95638e0f8c
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
7100210dacc5e6a8d277ee5832270147
3d10608ee71d9320fc611ea8235b5a5729b69a86
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXX' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
dbf38340584cf8babb9669270e4287c9
393f8ee03b3991d48571b82fa2c92f6d729c2abc
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ea5517750e6968272ae0324eb87080df
95f6370ffe521ff761e6c553b5cc7dc62fd42386
describe
'68175' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
927d7ddae9a32c053ef3a54738552f77
8969ec31e409733e65c2abe1c032656fe4591078
describe
'19284' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d53ddbd96d826e3b1b89c433bb0ff8ac
efaa6ecf04a96f7cd1a480650dc6ce3cf80970ea
describe
'3984436' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
55b269aacc70792b70d0f95f6a6b74f1
563e7ba721b4ba2feadc23fc4ebad8f28e03b22f
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
8dfcced3796c928803d1e216c591e9c4
f61859299745fe548a0cf5969a63be971890a1ad
describe
'4651' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
60fa315de19d4a19d4f42e444668d656
6db94b59a95c4e13394375379e5289d551e6aa0b
'2011-12-05T17:10:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
85c5dfd9e9ce9e63ee6be9d585125542
f532f96af180c584b645a314c668ef1c578ba25b
describe
'62642' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7b25fa55c37c5be04cbdc6f3b40c4e5b
24195cae2d9d9bd26bc55bb6e1754fcdffe29d02
describe
'16104' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYG' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
eba133eef4ff72825f8775907c5f57a1
d44f829341f3aef81e4739b7c361df1c85fc43f6
describe
'3984224' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYH' 'sip-files00103.tif'
c121b3619e264a38a1322ec7c3630c16
1259f79d45fffb9fd93f8a3aeee1afde90a53223
describe
'438' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYI' 'sip-files00103.txt'
2d0495a9f8b0fd77f85c52f265a2c9b1
1121737f28a16a34cd14505db25d79400d80a3bf
describe
'496674' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e4ec81a8d08855f7860a00347963daa2
ba282b10874e951e6b734bb9b74fdd3676ee8d5f
describe
'4029' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
43d067257785440285f759f7a5793fe7
f7889978bb117b22010f7c18cb0c30163fa549e4
describe
'65553' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYL' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
58fa77a576f842521fcdc5c656ba2075
e81fc9c0c7f3da8c0f6ed5eece4e41c375d550b0
describe
'19256' 'info:fdaE20080429_AAABPOfileF20080430_AAALYM' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
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'2013-12-18T17:56:56-05:00'
xml resolution









The Baldwin Library

University

Ka oss
a Gin

Lo OR Le

LEZ.




IB

SS — RE

CRO.

THI,

SCENT FROM

DD.
A DOG OF FLANDERS

A Christmas Story

BY

LOUISA DE LA RAME
(‘ OUIDA ”)

ILLUSTRATED

TROY, N.Y.
NIMS AND KNIGHT
1892
CopyRIGuT, 1891,

By NIMS AND KNIGIIT.

ILLUSTRATED AND PRINTED

sy THE Boston PHoTrograveanE Co,


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE
The Descent from the Cross. [After Kubens.]... /vontisprece
Headpiece to List of Ilustrations. ..............55550065 \
Tailpiece to List of Illustrations .... 2... 0.0.50... 00-20. vii
To ee ee ee a ee I

“A Flemish village... with long lines of poplars and of
alders on the edge of the great canal which ran through

Dees a we ee een soe es See deere ae eere See 2
“Tn the centre of the village stood a windmill” .........-- 3
“The cathedral spire of Antwerp rising beyond the great

green plain)... cee cee eee ete tenes 4
“Jehan Daas, who in his time had been a soldier” ........ 5
“A dog of Flanders— large of head and limb, with wolf-

like ears that stood erect” «0.0.0... 0-02. e ee eee eee eee 6
“ A sullen, ill-living, brutal Brabantois”..........-2-.--005 8
“The Brabantois had paused to drink beer himself at every

wayside house? oo... ce eee ee eens 9
“Cursed him fiercely in farewell... and pushed the cart

lazily along the road uphill? 2.2... 6... eee ee eee 11
“Kneeled in the grass of the ditch and surveyed the dog

with kindly eyes of pity 0.6... occ eee eee eee ee 14
“Efe had a corner of the hut, with a heap of dry grass for

Wise de igh ae en eres eae aR ee Se ea 16
But it was becoming hard work for the old man”.......+ 18
vl LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

“Free to play with his fellow-dogs”......... eis



“So paralyzed with rheumatism that it was impossible for
hum to:so/out”? bone cee Se ee :
“Some figure coming athwart the fields made picturesque
by a gleaner’s bundle or a woodman’s fagot ”..........
“The cumbrous vessels drifting by” ........... 00. 000005
“And then sometimes in the streets of Antwerp, some house-
wife would bring them a handful of bread” ...........
Rubens ........ gaan Paces tieeeg penal taceon tt Se aa tye ee
“Old piles of stones, dark and ancient and majestic, stand-

ing in crooked courts”... 2... 0... eee eee ee rae



“The small tumbledown gray church opposite the red wind-

TONS es ese oe ray Pate cate ase ck ec
“Nello would sit silent and dreaming, nat caring to play”...
“ Going on his ways through the old city”. ... 0. ee
ALGIS: ois O4e-tus Ga Ria Pee cae eatemsaege Bese eceseyesne ets
Baas Cogez, “a good man, but somewhat stern”. .........
“ Sitting amidst the hay, with the great tawny head of Pa-

trasche on her lap” .........-.. cece ee eee eee eee :
The Millers Wile. Gectaiette aati ee eter te eas eS
“ She ran to him and held him close”...............005.
“Went home by themselves to the littl: dark hut and the

meal of black bread” 2.0.0.6... cc cece eee eee ere
“ All the spring and summer and autumn Nello had been at

work upon the treasure” 2.2... eee ee eee eee
“My poor Patrasche, we shall soon lie quiet together, you

AMG LY esterase setage ouerie tv eee oooh an es aeekst eg ee ea
“They mourned him passionately’... 00... 0. eee eee
“The boy and the dog went on again wearily” 2.2.0.0...
“The boy mechanically turned the case to the light” ......
“Nello had gone to face starvation and misery alone’”.....
“The housewife sat with calm contented face at the spinning-

Wheele) i ciocag iter ee yaar Se eeeitiys o ee ison oa
“The scent was lost and again recovered a hundred times

Or MOVE”? wk. eee eee Mea RTE fhanesaed deeee Panes

20
*

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. Vil

PAGE
“Some group went homeward with lanterns, chanting drink-

INE SONGS? LL eee eee cence ner e ee eae 86
“Tle is gone to the things that he loved”.............00. 87
“Suddenly through the darkness a great white radiance

streamed) ois. he ee Po ers oe wee ede s 90

TAMPICO Fe cata ces teins tee ew eae st eras a Wh eae 94




A DOG OF FLANDERS:

A STORY OF NOEL.

BELLO and Patrasche were left
all alone in the world.

They were friends in a
friendship closer than brother-
hood. Nello was a little Ar-
dennois; Patrasche was a big
Fleming. They were both of
the same age by length of
years, yet one was still young,
and the other was already old.
They had dwelt together al-
most all their days: both were
orphaned and destitute, and owed their
lives to the same hand. It had been
the beginning of the tie between them,
their first bond of sympathy; and it had
strengthened day by day, and had grown
with their growth, firm and indissoluble,
until they loved one another very greatly.
2 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

Their home was a little hut on the
edge of a little village —a Flemish village
a league from Antwerp, sect amidst flat
breadths of pasture and corn-lands, with
long lines of poplars and of alders bend-
ing in the breeze on the edge of the great





canal which ran through it. It had about
a score of houses and homesteads, with
shutters of bright green or sky-blue, and
roofs rose-red or black and white, and
walls whitewashed until they shone in the
sun like snow. In the centre of the vil-
lage stood a windmill, placed on a little
moss-grown slope: it was a landmark to
all the level country round. It had once
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 3
been painted scarlet, sails and all, but that
had been in its infancy, half a century or
more earlier, when it
had ground wheat for
the soldiers of Napo-
leon; and it was now
a ruddy brown, tanned
by wind and weather.
It went queerly by fits
and starts, as though
rheumatic and stiff in
the joints from age,
but it served the whole



neighborhood, which
would have thought it almost as impious
to carry grain elsewhere as to attend any
other religious service than the mass that
was performed at the altar of the little
old gray church, with its conical steeple,
which stood opposite to it, and whose
single bell rang morning, noon and night
with that strange, subdued, hollow sad-
ness which every bell that hangs in the
Low Countries seems to gain as an inte-
gral part of its melody.
4 , aA DOG OF FLANDERS.

Within sound of the little melancholy
clock, almost from their birth upward, they
had dwelt together, Nello and Patrasche,
in the little hut on the edge of the village,
with the cathedral spire of Antwerp rising
in the northeast, beyond the great green
plain of seeding grass and spreading corn



that stretched away from them like a tide-
less, changeless sea. It was the hut of a
very old man, of a very poor man — of old
Jehan Daas, who in his time had been a
soldier, and who remembered the wars
that had trampled the country as oxen
tread down the furrows, and who had
brought from his service nothing except
a wound, which had made him a cripple.

When old Jehan Daas had reached his
full eighty, his daughter had died in the
A DOG OF FLANDERS, 5

Ardennes, hard by Stavelot, and had left
him in legacy her two-year old son, The
old man could ill contrive to support him-
self, but he took up the addli-
tional burden uncomplainingly,
and it soon became welcome
and precious to him. Little
Nello —which was but a pet
diminutive for Nicolas— throve
with him, and the old man
and the little child lived in the poor little
hut contentedly.



It was a very humble little mud-hut
indeed, but it was clean and white as a
sea-shell, and stood in a small plot of
garden-ground that yielded beans and
herbs and pumpkins. ‘They were very
poor, terribly poor—many a day they
had nothing at all to eat. They never
by any chance had enough: to have had
enough to eat would have been to have
reached paradise at once. But the old
man was very gentle and good to the boy,
and the boy was a beautiful, innocent,
truthful, tender-natured creature; and they
6 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

were happy on a crust and a few leaves
of cabbage, and asked no more of earth
or Heaven; save indeed that Patrasche
should be always with them, since without
Patrasche, where would they have been?

For Patrasche was their alpha and
omega; their treasury and granary; their
store of gold and wand of wealth; their
bread-winner and minister; their only
friend and comforter. Patrasche dead or
gone from them, they must have laid
themselves down and died likewise. Pa-
trasche was body, brains, hands, head and
feet to both of them: Patrasche was their
very life, their very soul. For
Jehan Daas was old and a crip-
ple, and Nello was but a child;
and Patrasche was their dog.

A dog of Flanders — yellow
of hide, large of head and limb,
with wolflike ears that stood
erect, and legs bowed and feet
widened in the muscular development
wrought in his breed by many genera-
tions of hard service. Patrasche came of


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 7

a race which had toiled hard and cruelly
from sire to son in Flanders many a cen-
tury — slaves of slaves, dogs of the people,
beasts of the shafts and the harness, crea-
tures that lived straining their sinews in
the gall of the cart, and died breaking
their hearts on the flints of the strects.

Patrasche had been born of parents who
had labored hard all their days over the
sharp-set stones of the various cities and
the long, shadowless, weary roads of the
two Flanders and of Brabant. He had
been born to no other heritage than those
of pain and of toil. He had been fed on
curses and baptized with blows. Why
not? It was a Christian country, and
Patrasche was but a dog. Before he was
fully grown he had known the bitter gall
of the cart and the collar. Before he had
entered his thirteenth month he had _ be-
come the property of a hardware dealer,
who was accustomed to wander over the
land north and south, from the blue sea to
the green mountains. They sold him for
a small price because he was so young.
8 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

This man was a drunkard and a brute.
The life of Patrasche was a life of hell.
To deal the tortures of hell on the animal
creation is a way which the Christians
have of showing their belief in it. His
purchaser was a sullen, ill-living, brutal
Brabantois, who heaped his
cart full with pots and pans
and flagons and_ buckets,
and other wares of crock-
ery and brass and tin, and
left Patrasche to draw the



load as best he might, whilst
he himself lounged idly by
the side in fat and sluggish ease, smoking
his black pipe and stopping at every wine-
shop or café on the road.

Happily for Patrasche



or unhappily
—he was very strong: he came of an
iron race, long born and bred to such
cruel travail; so that he did not die, but
managed to drag on a wretched existence
under the brutal burdens, the scarifying
lashes, the hunger, the thirst, the blows,
the curses and the exhaustion which are
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 9

the only wages with which the Flemings
repay the most patient and laborious of all
their four-footed victims. One day, after
two years of this long and deadly agony,
Patrasche was going
on as usual along one
of the straight, dusty,
unlovely roads that
lead to the city of
Rubens. It was full
midsummer, and very
warm. His cart was
very heavy, piled high
with goods in metal
and in earthenware.
His owner sauntered
on without noticing
him otherwise than
by the crack of the
whip as it curled round his quivering loins.
The Brabantois had paused to drink beer
himself at every wayside house, but he had
forbidden Patrasche to stop a moment for
a draught from the canal. Going along
thus, in the full sun, on a scorching high-


Io A DOG OF FLANDERS.

way, having eaten nothing for twenty-four
hours, and, which was far worse to him,
not having tasted water for nearly twelve,
being blind with dust, sore with blows and
stupefied with the merciless weight which
dragged upon his loins, Patrasche, for once,
staggered and foamed a little at the mouth,
and fell.

He fell in the middle of the white,
dusty road, in the full glare of the sun:
he was sick unto death, and motionless.
His master gave him the only medicine
kicks and oaths and
blows with a cudgel of oak, which had
been often the only food and drink, the
only wage and reward, ever offered to
him. But Patrasche was beyond the
reach of any torture or of any curses,
Patrasche lay, dead to all appearances,

in his pharmacy



down in the white powder of the summer
dust. After a while, finding it useless to
assail his ribs with punishment and_ his
zars with maledictions, the Brabantois —
deeming life gone in him, or going so
nearly that his carcass was forever use-
A DOG OF FLANDERS. Il

less, unless indeed some one should strip
it of the skin for gloves—cursed him



fiercely in farewell, struck off the leathern
bands of the harness, kicked his body
heavily aside into the grass, and, groaning
12 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

and muttering in savage wrath, pushed
the cart lazily along the road up hill, and
left the dying dog there for the ants to
sting and for the crows to pick.

It was the last day before Kermesse,
away at Louvain, and the Brabantois was
in haste to reach the fair and get a good
place for his truck of brass wares. He
was in fierce wrath, because Patrasche
had been a strong and much-enduring
animal, and because he himself had now
the hard task of pushing his charette
all the way to Louvain. But to stay to
look after Patrasche never entered his
thoughts: the beast was dying and use-
less, and he would steal, to replace him,
the first large dog that he found wan-
dering alone out of sight of its master.
Patrasche had cost him nothing, or next to
nothing, and for two long, cruel years he
had made him toil ceaselessly in his ser-
vice from sunrise to sunset, through sum-
mer and winter, in fair weather and foul.

He had got a fair use and a good profit
out of Patrasche: being human, he was
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 13

wise, and left the dog to draw his last
breath alone in the ditch, and have his
bloodshot eyes plucked out as they might
be by the birds, whilst he himself went on
his way to beg and to steal, to eat and
to drink, to dance and to sing, in the
mirth at Louvain. A dying dog, a dog
of the cart — why should he waste hours
over its agonies at peril of losing a hand-
ful of copper coins, at peril of a shout of
laughter ?

Patrasche lay there, flung in the grass-
green ditch. It was a busy road that day,
and hundreds of people, on foot and on
mules, in wagons or in carts, went by,
tramping quickly and joyously on to Lou-
vain. Some saw him, most did not even
look: all passed on. A dead dog more
or less —it was- nothing in Brabant: it
would be nothing anywhere in the world.

After a time, amongst the holiday-
makers, there came a little old mah who
was bent and lame, and very feeble.
He was in no guise for feasting: he was
very poorly and miserably clad, and he
14 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

dragged his silent way slowly through the
dust amongst the pleasure-seekers. He
looked at Patrasche, paused, wondered,
turned aside, then kneeled down in the
rank grass and weeds of the ditch, and
surveyed the dog with kindly eyes of pity.



There was with him a little rosy, fair-
haired, dark-eyed child of a few years old,
who pattered in amidst the bushes, that
were for him breast-high, and stood gazing
with a pretty seriousness upon the poor
great, quiet beast.

Thus it was that these two first met —
the little Nello and the big Patrasche.
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 15

The upshot of that day was, that old
Jehan Daas, with much laborious effort,
drew the sufferer homeward to his own
little hut, which was a stone’s throw off
amidst the fields, and there tended him
with so much care that the sickness, which
had been a brain-seizure, brought on by
heat and thirst and exhaustion, with time
and shade and rest passed away, and
health and strength returned, and Pa-
trasche staggered up again upon his four
stout, tawny legs.

Now for many weeks he had been use-
less, powerless, sore, near to death; but
all this time he had heard no rough word,
had felt no harsh touch, but only the pity-
ing murmurs of the little child’s voice and
the soothing caress of the old man’s hand.

In his sickness they too had grown to
care for him, this lonely old man and the
little happy child. He had a corner of
the hut, with a heap of dry grass for his
bed; and they had learned to listen
eagerly for his breathing in the dark
night, to tell them that he lived; and
16 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

when he first was well enough to essay
a loud, hollow, broken bay, they laughed
aloud, and almost wept together for joy
at such a sign of his sure restoration;
and little Nello, in delighted glee, hung







round his rugged neck with chains of
marguerites, and kissed him with fresh
and ruddy lips.

So then, when Patrasche arose, himself
again, strong, big, gaunt, powerful, his
great wistful eyes had a gentle astonish-
ment in them that there were no curses
to rouse him and no blows to drive him ;
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 17

and his heart awakened to a mighty love,
which never wavered once in its fidelity
whilst life abode with him.

But Patrasche, being a dog, was grate-
ful. Patrasche lay pondering long with
grave, tender, musing brown eyes, watch-
ing the movements of his friends,

Now, the old soldier, Jehan Daas, could
do nothing for his living but limp about
a little with a small cart, with which he
carried daily the milk-cans of those hap-
pier neighbors who owned cattle away into
the town of Antwerp. The villagers gave
him the employment a little out of charity
—more because it suited them well to
send their milk into the town by so hon-
est a carrier, and bide at home themselves
to look after their gardens, their cows,
their poultry or their little fields. But it
was becoming hard work for the old man.
He was eighty-three, and Antwerp was a
good league off, or more.

Patrasche watched the milk-cans come
and go that one day when he had got
well and was lying in the sun with the
18 A DOG OF FLANDERS,

wreath of marguerites round his tawny
neck,

The next morning, Patrasche, before the
old man had touched the cart, arose and
walked to it and placed himself betwixt




—

fy a, :
UA A.
if,
et EM

its handles, and testified as plainly as
dumb show could do his desire and his
ability to work in return for the bread
of charity that he had eaten. Jehan Daas
resisted long, for the old man was one
of those who thought it a foul shame to
bind dogs to labor for which Nature never
A DOG OF FLANDERS, 19

formed them. But Patrasche would not
be gainsaid: finding they did not harness
him, he tried to draw the cart onward with
his teeth.

At length Jehan Daas gave Way, van-
quished by the persistence and the grati-
tude of this creature whom he had suc-
cored. He fashioned his cart so. that
Patrasche could run in it, and this he
did every morning of his life thencefor-
ward.

When the winter came, Jehan Daas
thanked the blessed fortune that had
brought him to the dying dog in the
ditch that fair-day of Louvain; for he
was very old, and he grew feebler with
each year, and he would ill have known
how to pull his load of milk-cans over the
snows and through the deep ruts in the
mud if it had not been for the strength
and the industry of the animal he had
befriended. As for Patrasche, it seemed
heaven to him. After the frightful bur-
dens that his old master had compelled
him to. strain under, at the call of the
20 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

whip at every step, it seemed nothing to
him but amusement to step out with this
little light green cart, with its bright brass
cans, by the side of the gentle old man
who always paid him with a tender caress
and with a kindly word. Besides, his work



was over by three or four in the day, and
after that time he was free to do as he
would —to stretch himself, to sleep in
the sun, to wander in the fields, to romp
with the young child or to play with his
fellow-dogs. Patrasche was very happy.
Fortunately for his peace, his former
owner was killed in a drunken brawl at
A DOG OF FLANDERS, 21

the kermesse of Mechlin, and so sought
not after him nor disturbed him in his
new and well-loved home.

A few years later, old Jehan Daas, who
had always been a cripple, became so par-



alyzed with rheumatism that it was impos-
sible for him ‘to go out with the cart any
more. Then little Nello, being now grown
to his sixth year of age, and knowing the
town well from having accompanied his
grandfather so many times, took his place
22 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

beside the cart, and sold the milk and re-
ceived the coins in exchange, and brought
them back to their respective owners with
a pretty grace and seriousness which
charmed all who beheld him.

The little Ardennois was a_ beautiful
child, with dark, grave, tender eyes, and
a lovely bloom upon his face, and fair
locks that clustered to his throat; and
many an artist sketched the group as it
went by him —the green cart with the
brass flagons of Teniers and Mieris and
Van Tal, and the great, tawny-colored,
massive dog, with his belled harness that
chimed cheerily as he went, and the small
figure that ran beside him, which had little
white feet in great wooden shoes, and a
soft, grave, innocent, happy face like the
little fair children of Rubens.

Nello and Patrasche did the work so
well and so joyfully together that Jehan
Daas himself, when the summer came and
he was better again, had no need to stir
out, but could sit in the doorway in the
sun and see them go forth through the
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 23

garden wicket, and then doze and dream
and pray a little, and then awake again as
the clock tolled three, and watch for their
return. And on their return Patrasche
would shake himself free of his harness
with a bay of glee, and Nello would re-
count with pride the doings of the day ;

and they would all go in together to their
meal of rye bread and milk or soup, and
would see the shadows lengthen over the
great plain, and see the twilight veil the
fair cathedral spire; and in lie down
together to sleep peacefully while the old
man said a prayer.

So the days and the years went on,
and the lives of Nello and Patrasche
were happy, innocent and healthful.

In the spring and summer especially
were they glad. Flanders is not a lovely
land, and around the burgh of Rubens it
is perhaps least lovely a all. Corn and
colza, pasture and plough, succeed each
other on the characterless plain in weary-
ing repetition, and, save by some gaunt
gray tower, with its peal of pathetic bells,
24 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

or some figure coming athwart the fields,
made picturesque by a gleaner’s bundle or
a woodman’s fagot, there is no change, no
variety, no beauty any-
where; and he who has
dwelt upon the moun-
tains or amidst the for-
ests feels oppressed as
by imprisonment with
the tedium and the
endlessness of that
vast and dreary level.
But it is green and
very fertile, and it has
wide horizons that have
a certain charm of their own even in their
dulness and monotony; and amongst the
rushes by the water-side the flowers grow,
and the trees rise tall and fresh where the
barges glide with their great hulks black
against the sun, and their little green bar-
rels and vari-colored flags gay against the
leaves. Anyway, there is greenery and
breadth of space enough to be as good
as beauty to a child and a dog; and these


A DOG OF FLANDERS, 25

two asked no better, when their work was
done, than to lie buried in the lush grasses
on the sid& of the canal, and watch the
cumbrous vessels drift-
ing by and bringing
the crisp salt smell
of the sea amongst
the blossoming scents
of the country sum-
mer,

True, in the winter
it was harder, and
they had to rise in the darkness and the
bitter cold, and they had seldom as much
as they could have eaten any day, and
the hut was scarce better than a shed
when the nights were cold, although it
looked so pretty in warm weather, buried
in a great kindly-clambering vine, that
never bore fruit, indeed, but which coy.
ered it with luxuriant green tracery all
through the months of blossom and har-
vest. In winter the winds found many
holes in the walls of the poor little hut,
and the vine was black and leafless, and


ae

26 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the bare lands looked very bleak and
drear without, and sometimes within the
floor was flooded and then frozen. In
winter it was hard, and the snow numbed
the little white limbs of Nello, and the
icicles cut the brave, untiring feet of
Patrasche.

But even then they were never heard
to lament, either of them. The child’s
wooden shoes and the dog’s four legs
would trot manfully together over the
frozen fields to the chime of the bells on
the harness; and then sometimes, in the
streets of Antwerp, some housewife would
bring them a bowl of soup and a hand-
ful of bread, or some kindly trader would
throw some billets of fuel into the little
cart as it went homeward, or some woman
in their own village would bid them keep
some share of the milk they carried for
their own food; and then they would run
over the white lands, through the early
darkness, bright and happy, and burst with
a shout of joy into their home.

So, on the whole, it was well with them,
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 27

very well; and Patrasche, meeting on the
highway or in the public streets the many
dogs who toiled from daybreak into night-
fall, paid only with blows and curses, and















loosened from the shafts with a kick to
starve and freeze as best they might, —
Patrasche in his heart was very grateful to
his fate, and thought it the fairest and the
kindhiest the world could hold. Though
28 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

he was often very hungry indeed when he
lay down at night; though he had to work
in the heats of summer noons and the
rasping chills of winter dawns; though
his feet were often tender with wounds
from the sharp edges of the jagged pave-
ment; though he had to perform tasks be-
yond his strength and against his nature,
—yet he was grateful and content: he did
his duty with each day, and the eyes that
he loved smiled down on him. It was
sufficient for Patrasche.

There was only one thing which caused
Patrasche any uneasiness in his life, and
it was this. Antwerp, as all the world
knows, is full at every turn of old piles
of stones, dark and ancient and majestic,
standing in crooked courts, jammed against
gateways and taverns, rising by the water's
edge, with bells ringing above them in the
air, and ever and again out of their arched
doors a swell of music pealing. There
they remain, the grand old sanctuaries of
the past, shut in amidst the squalor, the
hurry, the crowds, the unloveliness and the
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 29

commerce

of the modern world, and all

day long the clouds drift and the birds

circle and the winds sigh
around be-
neath the earth at their
feet there sleeps — Ruv-
BENS,

them, and



And the

greatness of
the mighty Master still
rests upon Antwerp, and
wherever we turn in its
narrow streets his glory
lies therein, so that all
mean things are thereby









4



He
ta
LA No



transfigured ; and as we pace slowly through
the winding ways, and‘by the edge of the
stagnant water, and through the noisome


30 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

courts, his spirit abides with us, and the
heroic beauty of his visions is about us,
and the stones that once felt his footsteps
and bore his shadow seem to arise and
speak of him with living voices. For the
city which is the tomb of Rubens still lives
to us through him, and him alone.

It is so quiet there by that great white
sepulchre —so quiet, save only when the
organ peals and the choir cries aloud the
Salve Regina or the Kyrie Eleison. Sure
no artist ever had a greater gravestone
than that pure marble sanctuary gives to
him in the heart of his birthplace in the
chancel of St. Jacques.

Without Rubens, what were Antwerp?
A dirty, dusky, bustling mart which no
man would ever care to look upon save
the traders who do business on its wharves.
With Rubens, to the whole world of men
it is a sacred name, a sacred soil,a Bethle-
hem where a god of Art saw light, a Gol-
gotha where a god of Art hes dead.

O nations! closely should you treasure
your great men, for by them alone will
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 31

the future know of you. Flanders in her
generations has been wise. In his life she
glorified this greatest of her sons, and in
his death she magnifies his name. But
her wisdom is very rare.

Now, the trouble of Patrasche was this.
Into these great, sad piles of stones, that
reared their melancholy majesty above the
crowded roofs, the child Nello would many
and many a time enter, and disappear
through their dark, arched portals, whilst
Patrasche, left without upon the pavement,
would wearily and vainly ponder on what
could be the charm which thus allured from
him his inseparable and beloved companion.
Once or twice he did essay to see for him-
self, clattering up the steps with his milk-
cart behind him; but thereon he had been
always sent back again summarily by a tall
custodian in black clothes and silver chains
of office; and fearful of bringing his little
master into trouble, he desisted, and re-
mained couched patiently before the
churches until such time as the boy re-
appeared, It was not the fact of his going
mM





32 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

into them which disturbed Patrasche: he
knew that people went to church: all the
village went to the small, tumbledown, gray
pile opposite the red windmill. What
troubled him was that little Nello always
looked strangely when he came out,
always very flushed or very pale; and
whenever he returned home after such

x visitations would sit silent and dream-

Ing,

not caring to play, but
gazing out at the evening
skies beyond the line of the
canal, very subdued and
almost sad.

What was it? wondered Patrasche. He
thought it could not be good or natural
for the little lad to be so grave, and in his
dumb fashion he tried all he could to keep
Nello by him in the sunny fields or in the
busy market-place. But to the churches
Nello would go: most often of all would
he go to the great cathedral; and Patrasche,
left without on the stones by the iron frag-
ments of Quentin Matsys’ gate, would
stretch himself and yawn and sigh, -and
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 33

even howl now and then, all in vain, until
the doors closed, and the child perforce
came forth again, and winding his arms
about the dog’s neck would kiss him on his



broad, tawny-colored forehead, and murmur
always the same words: “If I could only
see them, Patrasche!— if I could only see
them!”

What were they? pondered Patrasche,
34 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

looking up with large, wistful, sympathetic
eycs.

One day, when the custodian was out of
the way and the doors left ajar, he got in
for a moment after his little friend and saw.
“ They” were two great covered pictures _
on either side of the choir.

Nello was kneeling, rapt as in an ecstasy,
before the altar-picture of the Assumption,
and when he noticed Patrasche, and rose
and drew the dog gently out into the air,
his face was wet with tears, and he looked
up at the veiled places as he passed them,
and murmured to his companion, “ It is so
terrible not to see them, Patrasche, just
because one is poor and cannot pay! He
never meant that the poor should not see
them when he painted them, I am sure.
He would have had us see them any day,
every day: that lamsure. And they keep
them shrouded there—shrouded in the
dark, the beautiful things!—and_ they
never feel the light, and no eyes look on
them, unless rich people come and pay. If
I could only see them, I would be content
to die.”


a DOCG OF FLANDERS, 35

But he could not see them, and Patrasche
could not help him, for to gain the silver
piece that the church exacts as the price
for looking on the glories of the Elevation
of the Cross and the Descent of the Cross
was a thing as utterly beyond the powers
of either of them as it would have been to
scale the heights of the cathedral spire.
They had never so much as a sou to
spare: if they cleared enough to get a
little wood for the stove, a little broth for
the pot, it was the utmost they could do.
And yet the heart of the child was set in
sore and endless longing upon beholding
the greatness of the two veiled Rubens.

The whole soul of the little Ardennois
thrilled and stirred with an absorbing pas-
sion for Art. Going on his ways through
the old city in the early days before the
sun or the people had risen, Nello, who
looked only a little peasant-boy, with a
great dog drawing milk to sell from door
to door, was in a heaven of dreams whereof
Rubens was the god. Nello, cold and hun-
gry, with stockingless feet in wooden shoes,
36 A DOG OF FLANDERS.





and the winter winds blowing amongst his
curls and lifting his poor thin garments,
was in a rapture of meditation, wherein
all that he saw was the beautiful fair face
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 37

of the Mary of the Assumption, with the
waves of her golden hair lying upon her
shoulders, and the light of an eternal
sun shining down upon her brow. Nello,
reared in poverty, and buffeted by fortune,
and untaught in letters, and unheeded by
men, had the compensation or the curse
which is called Genius.

No one knew it. He as little as any.
No one knew it. Only indeed Patrasche,
who, being with him always, saw him
draw with chalk upon the stones any and
every thing that grew or breathed, heard
him on his little bed of hay murmur all
manner of timid, pathetic prayers to the
spirit of the great Master; watched his
gaze darken and his face radiate at the
evening glow of sunset or the rosy rising
of the dawn; and felt many and many a
time the tears of a strange, nameless pain
and joy, mingled together, fall hotly from
the bright young eyes upon his own
wrinkled, yellow forehead.

‘““T should go to my grave quite con-
tent if I thought, Nello, that when thou
38 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

growest a man thou couldst own this hut
and the little plot of ground, and labor
for thyself, and be called Baas by thy
neighbors,” said the old man Jehan many
an hour from his bed. For to own a bit
of soil, and to be called Baas — master —
by the hamlet round, is to have achieved
the highest ideal of a Flemish peasant;
and the old soldier, who had wandered
over all the earth in his youth, and had
brought nothing back, deemed in his old
age that to live and die on one spot in
contented humility was the fairest fate he
could desire for his darling. But Nello
said nothing.

The same leaven was working in him
that in other times begat Rubens and
Jordaens and the Van Eycks, and _ all
their wondrous tribe, and in times more
recent begat in the green country of the
Ardennes, where the Meuse washes the
old walls of Dijon, the great artist of
the Patroclus, whose genius is too near
us for us aright to measure its divinity.

Nello dreamed of other things in the
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 39

future than of tilling the little rood of
earth, and living under the wattle roof,
and being called Baas by neighbors a
little poorer or a little less poor than
himself. The cathedral spire, where it
rose beyond the fields in the ruddy even-
ing skies or in the dim, gray, misty morn-
ings, said other things to him than this.
But these he told only to Patrasche, whis-
pering, childlike, his fancies in the dog’s
ear when they went together at their
work through the fogs of the daybreak,
or lay together at their rest amongst the
rustling rushes by the water’s side.

For such dreams are not easily shaped
into speech to awake the slow sympathies
of human auditors; and they would only
have sorely perplexed and troubled the
poor old man bedridden in his corner,
who, for his part, whenever he had trod-
den the streets of Antwerp, had thought
the daub of blue and red that they called
a Madonna, on the walls of the wine-shop
where he drank his sou's worth of black
beer, quite as good as any of the famous
40 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

altar-pieces for which the stranger folk
traveled far and wide into Flanders from
every land on which the good sun shone.

There was only one other beside Pa-
trasche to whom Nello could talk at all of
his daring fantasies. This
other was little Alois, who
lived at the old red mill on
the grassy mound, and whose
father, the miller, was the
best-to-do husbandman in all
the village. Little Alois was
only a pretty baby with soft
round, rosy features, made lovely by those
sweet dark eyes that the Spanish rule has
left in so many a Flemish face, in testi-
mony of the Alvan dominion, as Spanish
art has left broadsown throughout the
country majestic palaces and stately courts,
gilded house-fronts and sculptured lintels
—histories in blazonry and poems in
stone.

Little Alois was often with Nello and
Patrasche. They played in the fields, they
ran in the snow, they gathered the daisies


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 4!

and_bilberries, they went up to the old
gray church together, and they often sat
together by the broad wood-fire in the mill-
house. Little Alois, indeed, was the rich-
est child in the hamlet. She had neither
brother nor sister; her blue serge dress
had never a hole in it; at kermesse she
had as many gilded nuts and Agni Dei in
sugar as her hands could hold; and when
she went up for her first communion her
flaxen curls were covered with a cap of
richest Mechlin lace, which had been her
mother’s and her grandmother's before it
came to her. Men spoke already, though
she had but twelve years, of the
good wife she would be for their
sons to woo and win; but she
herself was a little gay, simple
child, in nowise conscious of
her heritage, and she loved no
playfellows so well as Jehan
Daas’ grandson and his dog.
One day her father, Baas Cogez, a good
man, but somewhat stern, came on a pretty
group in the long meadow behind the mill,


42 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

where the aftermath had that day been
cut. It was his little daughter sitting
amidst the hay, with the great tawny head
of Patrasche on her lap, and many wreaths



of poppies and blue cornflowers round
them both: on a clean smooth slab of
pine wood the boy Nello drew their like-
ness with a stick of charcoal.

The miller stood and looked at the
portrait with tears in his eyes, it was so
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 43

strangely like, and he loved his only child
closely and well. Then he roughly chid
the little girl for idling there whilst her
mother needed her wan. and sent her
indoors crying and afraid: then, turning,
he snatched the wood from Nello’s hance.
“Dost do much of such folly?” he asked,
but there was a tremble in his voice.

Nello colored and hung his head. “I
draw everything I see,” he murmured.

The miller was silent: then he stretched
his hand out with a franc in it. “It is
folly, as I say, and evil waste of time:
nevertheless, it is like Alois, and will
please the house-mother: Take this sil-
ver bit for it and leave it for me.”

_The color died out of the face of the
young Ardennois: he lifted his head and
put his hands behind his back. « Keep
your money and the portrait both, Baas
Cogez,” he said simply. “You have becn
Gee good to me.” Then he called Pa-
trasche to him, and walked away across
the fields.

“T could have seen them with that
44 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

franc,’ he murmured to Patrasche, “but
I could not sell her picture—not even
for them.”

Baas Cogez went into his mill-house
sore troubled in his mind. “That lad
must not be so much with Alois,” he said
to his wife that night. “Trouble may
come of it hereafter: he is fifteen now,
and she is twelve; and the boy is comely
of face and form.”

“And he is a good lad and
a loyal,” said the housewife,
feasting her eyes on the piece
of pine wood where it was
throned above the chimney
with a cuckoo clock in oak
and a Calvary in wax.

“Vea, I do not gainsay that,” said the
miller, draining his pewter flagon.

“Then, if what you think of were ever
to come to pass,” said the wife, hesitat-
ingly, “would it matter so much? She
will have enough for both, and one can-
not be better than happy.”

“Vou are a woman, and therefore a


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 45

fool,” said the miller harshly, striking his
pipe on the table. “The lad is naught
but a beggar, and, with these painter’s
fancies, worse than a beggar. Have a
care that they are not together in the
future, or I will send the child to the
surer keeping of the nuns of the Sacred
Heart.” ;

The poor mother was terrified, and
promised humbly to do his will. Not
that she could bring herself altogether to
separate the child from her favorite play-
mate, nor did the miller even desire that
extreme of cruelty to a young lad who
was guilty of nothing except poverty. But
there were many ways in which little Alois
was kept away from her chosen compan-
ion; and Nello being a boy proud and
quiet and sensitive, was quickly wounded,
and ceased to turn his own steps and
those of Patrasche, as he had been used
to do with every moment of leisure, to
the old red mill upon the slope. What
his offence was he did not know: he sup-
posed he had in some manner angered
46 -l DOG OF FLANDERS.

Baas Cogez by taking the portrait of Alois
in the meadow; and when the child who
loved him would run to him and nestle
her hand in his, he would smile at her
very sadly and say with a tender concern
for her before himself, “ Nay, Alois, do not
anger your father. He thinks that I make
you idle, dear, and he is not pleased that
you should be with me. He is a good
man and loves you well: we will not
anger him, Alois,”

But it was with a sad heart that he said
it, and the earth did not look so bright to
him as it had used to do when he went
out at sunrise under the poplars down the
straight roads with Patrasche. The old
red mill had been a landmark to him, and
he had been used to pause by it, going
and coming, for a cheery greeting with its
people as her little flaxen head rose above
the low mill-wicket, and her little rosy
hands had held out a bone or a crust to
Patrasche. Now the dog looked wistfully
at a closed door, and the boy went on
without pausing, with a pang at his heart,
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 47

and the child sat within, with tears drop-
ping slowly on the knitting to which she
was set, on her little stool by the stove;
and Baas Cogez, working among his sacks
and his mill-gear, would harden his will
and say to himself, “It is best so. The
lad is all but a beggar, and full of idle,
dreaming fooleries. Who knows what
mischief might not come of it in the fut-
ure?” So he was wise in his generation,
and would not have the door unbarred,
except upon rare and formal occasions,
which seemed to have neither warmth nor
mirth in them to the two children, who
had been accustomed so long to a daily
gleeful, careless, happy interchange of
greeting, speech and pastime, with no
other watcher of their sports or auditor of
their fancies than Patrasche, sagely shak-
ing the brazen bells of his collar and
responding with all a dog’s swift sym-
pathies to their every change of mood.
All this while the little panel of pine
wood remained over the chimney in the
mill-kitchen with the cuckoo clock and
48 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the waxen Calvary, and sometimes it
seemed to Nello a little hard that whilst
his gift was accepted he himself should
be denied.

But he did not complain: it was his
habit to be quiet: old Jehan Daas had
said ever to him, “ We are poor: we must
take what God sends—the ill with the
good: the poor cannot choose.”

To which the boy had always listened
in silence, being reverent of his old grand-
father; but nevertheless a certain vague,
sweet hope, such as beguiles the children
of genius, had whispered in his heart,
“Yet the poor do choose sometimes —
choose to be great, so that men cannot
say them nay.” And he thought so still
in his innocence; and one day, when the
little Alois, finding him by chance alone
amongst the corn-fields by the canal, ran
to him and held him close, and sobbed
piteously because the morrow would be
her saint’s day, and for the first time in
all her life her parents had failed to bid
him to the little supper and romp in the
aA DOG OF FLANDERS. , AQ

great barns with which her feast-day was
always celebrated, Nello had kissed her
and murmured to her in firm faith, “It



shall be different one day, Alois. One
day that little bit of pine wood that your
father has of mine shall be worth. its
te) A DOG OF FLANDERS.

weight in silver; and he will not shut
the door against me then. Only love me
always, dear little Alois, only love me
always, and I will be great.”

“And if I do not love you?” the pretty
child asked, pouting a little through her
tears, and moved by the instinctive coquet-
ries of her sex.

Nello’s eyes left her face and wandered
to the distance, where in the red and gold
of the Flemish night the cathedral spire
rose. There was a smile on his face so
sweet and yet so sad that little Alois was
awed by it. “I will be great still,” he
said under his breath — “great still, or
die, Alois.”

“You do not love me,” said the little
spoilt child, pushing him away; but the
boy shook his head and smiled, and went
on his way through the tall yellow corn,
seeing as in a vision some day in a fair
future when he should come into that old
familiar land and ask Alois of her people,
and be not refused or denied, but received
in honor, whilst the village folk should
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 51

throng to look upon him and say in one
another’s ears, “ Dost see him? He 1s a
king among men, for he is a great artist
and the world speaks his name; and yet
he was only our poor little Nello, who
was a beggar, as one may say, and only
got his bread by the help of his dog.”
And he thought how he would fold his
grandsire in furs and purples, and por-
tray him as the old man is portrayed in
the Family in the chapel of St. Jacques;
and of how he would hang the throat
of Patrasche with a collar of gold, and
place him on his right hand, and say to
the people, “ This was once my only
friend;” and of how he would build him-
self a great white marble palace, and make
to himself luxuriant gardens of pleasure,
on the slope looking outward to where
the cathedral spire rose, and not dwell in
it himself, but summon to it, as to a home,
all men young and poor and friendless,
but of the will to do mighty things; and
of how he would say to them always, if
they sought to bless his name, “ Nay, do
52 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

not thank me —thank Rubens. Without
him, what should I have been?” And
these dreams, beautiful, impossible, inno-
cent, free of all selfishness, full of heroical

i







worship, were so closely about him as he
went that he was happy — happy even on
this sad anniversary of Alois’ saint’s day,
when he and Patrasche went home by
themselves to the little dark hut and the
a DOG OF FLANDERS. 53

meal of black bread, whilst in the mili-
house all the children of the village sang
and laughed, and ate the big round exe
of Dijon and the almond gingerbread of
Brabant, and danced in the great barn to
the light of the stars and the music of
flute and fiddle

“ Never mind, Patrasche,? he said, with
his arms round the dog’s neck as they
both sat in the door of the hut, where
the sounds of the mirth at the mill came

down to them on the night air—* never
mind. It shall all be changed by and
by.”

He believed in the future: Patrasche,
of more experience and of more philoso-
phy, thought that the loss of the mill
supper in the present was ill compensated
by dreams of milk and honey in some
vague hereafter. And Patrasche growled
whenever he passed by Baas Cogez.

“This is Alois’ name-day, is it not?”
said the old man Daas that night from
the corner where he was stretched upon
his bed of sacking.
54 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

The boy gave a gesture of assent: he
wished that the old man’s memory had
erred a little, instead of keeping such sure
account.

‘And why not there?” his grandfather
pursued, “Thou hast never missed a
year before, Nello.”

“Thou art too sick to leave,” murmured
the lad, bending his handsome young head
over the bed.

“Tut! tut! Mother Nulette would have
come and sat with me, as she does scores
of times. What is the cause, Nello?” the
old man persisted. “Thou surely hast
not had ill words with the little one?”

“ Nay, grandfather —never,” said the boy
quickly, with a hot color in his bent face.
“Simply and truly, Baas Cogez did not
have me asked this year. He has taken
some whim against me.”

“ But thou hast done nothing wrong?”

“That I know — nothing. I took the
portrait of Alois on a piece of pine: that
is all.”

“Ah!” The old man was silent: the
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 55

truth suggested itself to him with the
boy's innocent answer. He was tied to a
bed of dried leaves in the corner of a
wattle hut, but he had not wholly for-
gotten what the ways of the world were
like, .

He drew Nello’s fair head fondly to his
breast with a tenderer gesture. “ Thou
art very poor, my child,” he said with a
quiver the more in his aged, trembling
voice —“so poor! It is very hard for
thee.”

“Nay, I am rich,” murmured Nello
and in his innocence he thought so —
rich with the imperishable powers that
are mightier than the might of kings.
And he went and stood the door of
the hut in the quiet autumn night, and
watched the stars troop by and the tall
poplars bend and shiver in the wind. All
the casements of the mill-house were
lighted, and every now and then the notes
of the flute came to him. The tears fell
down his cheeks, for he was but a child,
yet he smiled, for he said to himself, “ In
56 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the future!” He stayed there until all
was quite still and dark, then he and
Patrasche went within and slept together,
long and deeply, side by side.

Now he had a secret which only Pa-
trasche. knew. There was a little out-
house to the hut, which no one entered
but himself —a dreary place, but with
abundant clear light from the north.
Here he had fashioned himself rudely
an easel in rough lumber, and here, on
a great gray sea of stretched paper, he
had given shape to one of the innumer-
able fancies which possessed his. brain.
No one had ever taught him anything ;
colors he had no means to buy; he had
gone without bread many a time to pro-
cure even the few rude vehicles that he
had here; and it was only in black or
white that he could fashion the things
he saw. This great figure which he had
drawn here in chalk was only an old man
sitting on a fallen tree only that. He
had seen old Michel the woodman sitting
so at evening many a time. He had never


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 57

had a soul to tell him of outline or per-
spective, of anatomy or of shadow, and yet
he had given all the weary, worn out age,
all the sad, quiet patience, all the rugged,
careworn pathos of his original, and given
them so that the old, lonely figure was a
poem, sitting there, meditative and alone.
on the dead tree, with the darkness of the
descending night behind him.

It was rude, of course, in a way, and
had many faults, no doubt: and yet it was
real, true in Nature, true in Art, and very
mournful, and in a manner beautiful.

Patrasche had lain quiet countless hours
watching its gradual creation after the la-
bor of each day was done, and he knew
that Nello had a hope —vain and wild,
perhaps, but strongly cherished — of send-
ing this great drawing to compete for a
prize of two hundred francs a year, which
it was announced in Antwerp would be
open to every lad of talent, scholar or
peasant, under eighteen, who would at-
tempt to win it with some unaided work
of chalk or pencil. Three of the fore-
58 dA DOG OF FLANDERS.

most artists in the town of Rubens were
to be the judges and elect the victor’
according to his merits.

All the spring and sum-
mer and autumn Nello had
been at work upon. this
treasure, which, if trium-
phant, would build him
his first step toward in-
dependence and the mys-
teries of the art which he
blindly, ignorantly, and yet
passionately adored.

He said nothing to any one: his grand-
father would not have understood, and little
Alois was lost to him. Only to Patrasche
he told all, and whispered, “ Rubens would
give it me, I think, if he knew.”

Patrasche thought so too, for he knew
that Rubens had loved dogs or he had
never painted them with such exquisite
fidelity ; and men who loved dogs were, as
Patrasche knew, always pitiful.

The drawings were to go in on the first
day of December, and the decision be given


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 59

on the twenty-fourth, so that he who should
win might rejoice with all his people at the
Christmas season.

In the twilight of a bitter wintry day,
and with a beating heart, now quick with
hope, now faint with fear, Nello placed the
great picture on his little, green milk-cart,
and took it, with the help of Patrasche,
into the town, and there left it, as enjoined,
at the doors of a public building,

“Perhaps it is worth nothing at all.
How can I tell?” he thought, with the
heart-sickness of a great timidity. Now
that he had left it there, it seemed to him
so hazardous, so vain, so foolish, to dream
that he, a little lad with bare feet, who
barely knew his letters, could do anything
at which great painters, real artists, could
ever deign to look. Vet he took heart as
he went by the cathedral: the lordly form
of Rubens seemed to rise from the fog and
the darkness, and to loom in its magnifi-
cence before him, whilst the lips, with their
kindly smile, seemed to him to murmur,
“ Nay, have courage! It was not by a weak
60 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

heart and by faint fears that I wrote my
name for all time upon Antw erp.

Nello ran home through the cold night,
comforted. He had doe his best: the
rest must be as God willed, he thought, in
that innocent, unquestioning faith which
had been taught him in the little gray
chapel amongst the willows and the poplar
trees.

The winter was very sharp already.
That night, after they reached the hut,
snow fell: and fell for v ery many days after
that, so that the paths and the divisions in
the fields were all obliterated, and all the
smaller streams were frozen over, and the
cold was intense upon the plains. Then,
indeed, it became hard work to go round
for the milk while the world was all dark,
and carry it through the darkness to the
silent town. eee work, especially for
Patrasche, for the passage of the years,
that were only bringing Nello a stronger
youth, were bringing him old age, and his
joints were stiff, ae his bones ached often,
But he would never give up his share of
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 61

the labor. Nello would fain have spared
him and drawn the cart himself, but Pa-
trasche would not allow it. All he would
ever permit or accept was the help of a
thrust from behind to the truck, as it lum-
bered along through the ice-ruts. Patrasche
had lived in harness, and he was proud of
it. He suffered a great deal sometimes
from frost, and the terrible roads, and the
rheumatic pains cf his limbs, but he, only
drew his breath hard and bent his stout
neck, and trod onward with steady pa-
tience.

“Rest thee at home, Patrasche —it is
time thou didst rest — and I can quite well
push in the cart by myself,” urged Nello
many a morning; but Patrasche, who un-
derstood him aright, would no more have
consented to stay at home than a veteran
solcier to shirk when the charge was sound-



ing; and every day he would rise and place
himself in his shafts, and plod along over
the snow through the fields that his four
round feet had left their print upon so
many, many years.
62 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

“One must never rest till one dies,”
thought Patrasche; and sometimes itseemed
to him that that time of rest for him was
not very far off. His sight was less clear
than it had been, and it gave him pain
to rise after the night’s sleep, though he
would never lie a moment in his straw
when once the bell of the chapel tolling
five let him know that the daybreak of
labor had begun.

“My poor Patrasche, we shall soon lie
quiet together, you and I,” said old Jehan
Daas, stretching out to stroke the head of
Patrasche with the old, withered hand which
had always shared with him its one poor
crust of bread; and the hearts of the old
man and the old dog ached together with
one thought: When they were gone, who
would care for their darling?

One afternoon, as they came back from
Antwerp over the snow, which had become
hard and smooth as marble over all the
Flemish plains, they found dropped in the
road a pretty little puppet, a tambourine-
player, all scarlet and goid, about six
Ad DOG OF FLANDERS. 63

inches high, and, unlike greater person-
ages when Fortune lets them drop, quite
unspoiled and unhurt by its fall. It was
a pretty toy. Nello tried to find its owner,



and, failing, thought that it was just the
thing to please Alois.

It was quite night when he passed the
mill-house: he knew the little window
of her room. It could be no harm,-he
64 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

thought, if he gave her his little piece of
treasure-trove, they had been play-fellows
so long. There was a shed with a sloping
roof beneath her casement: he climbed it
and tapped softly at the lattice: there was
a little ight within. The child opened it
and looked out, half frightened.

Nello put the tambourine-player into
her hands. ‘“ Here is a doll I found in
the snow, Alois. Take it,” he whispered
—*“take it, and God bless thee, dear!”

He slid down from the shed-roof before
she had time to thank him, and ran off
through the darkness.

That night there was a fire at the mill.
Out-buildings and much corn were de-
stroyed, although the mill itself and the
dwelling-house were unharmed. All the
village was out in terror, and engines
came tearing through the snow from
Antwerp. The miller was insured, and
would lose nothing: nevertheless, he was
in furious wrath, and declared aloud that
the fire was due to no accident, but to
some foul intent.
4A DOG OF FLANDERS. 65

Nello, awakened from his sleep, ran to
help with the rest: Baas Cogez thrust him
angrily aside. “Thou wert loitering here
after dark,” he said roughly. “I believe,
on my soul, that thou dost know more of
the fire than any one.”

Nello heard him in silence, stupefied,
not supposing that any one could say
such things except in jest, and not com-
prehending how any one could pass a jest
at such a time.

Nevertheless, the miller said the brutal
thing openly to many of his neighbors
in the day that followed; and though no
serious charge was ever pesienied against
the lad, it got bruited about that Nello
had been seen in the mill-yard after dark
on some unspoken errand, and that he
bore Baas Cogez a grudge for forbidding
his intercourse with little Alois; and so
the hamlet, which followed the sayings of
its richest landowner servilely, and whose
families all hoped to secure the riches of
Alois in some future time for their sons,
took the hint to give grave looks and cold
66 -l DOG OF FLANDERS.

words to old Jehan Daas’ grandson. No
one said anything to him openly, but all
the village agreed, together to humor the
miller’s prejudice, and at the cottages and
farms where Nello and Patrasche called
every morning for the milk for Antwe erp,
downcast Sances and brief phrases re-
placed to them the broad smiles and
cheerful greetings to which they had been
always used. No one really credited the
miller’s absurd suspicion, nor the outra-
geous accusations born of them, but the
people were all very poor and very igno-
rant, and the one rich man of the place
had pronounced against him. Nello, in
his innocence and his friendlessness, had
no strength to stem the popular tide.

“Thou art very cruel to the lad,” the
miller’s wife dared to say, weeping, to her
lord. ‘Sure he is an innocent lad and a
faithful, and would never dream of any
such wickedness, however sore his heart
might be.”

But Baas Cogez being an obstinate man,
having once said a thing held to it dog-
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 67

gedly, though in his innermost soul he
knew well the injustice that he was com-
mitting.

Meanwhile, Nello endured the injury
done against him with a certain proud
patience that disdained to complain: he
only gave way a little when he was quite
alone with old Patrasche. Besides, he
thought, “ If it should win! They will be
sorry then, perhaps.”

Still, to a boy not quite sixteen, and
who had dwelt in one little world «all
his short life, and in his childhood had
been caressed and applauded on all sides,
it was a hard trial to have the whole of
that little world turn against him for
naught. Especially hard in that bleak,
snow-bound, famine-stricken winter-time,
when the only light and warmth there
could be found abode beside the village
hearths ard in the kindly greetings of
neighbors. In the winter-time all drew
nearer to each other, all to all, except to
Nello and Patrasche, with whom none
now would have anything to do, and who
68 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

were left to fare as they might with the
old paralyzed, bedridden man in the little
cabin, whose fire was often low, and whose
board was often without bread, for there
was a buyer from Antwerp who had taken
to drive his mule in of a day for the milk
of the various dairies, and there were only
three or four of the people who had re-
fused his terms of purchase and remained
faithful to the little green cart. So that
the burden which Patrasche drew had
become very light, and the centime-pieces
in Nello’s pouch had become, alas! very
small likewise.

The dog would stop, as usual, at all the
familiar gates which were now closed to
him, and look up at them with wistful,
mute appeal; and it cost the neighbors a
pang to shut their doors and their hearts,
and let Patrasche draw his cart on again,
empty. Nevertheless, they did it, for they
desired to please Baas Cogez.

Noél was close at hand.

The weather was very wild and cold.
The snow was six feet deep, and the ice
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 69

was firm enough to bear oxen and men
upon it everywhere. At this season the
little village was always gay and cheerful.
At the poorest dwelling there were possets
and cakes, joking and dancing, sugared
saints and gilded Jésus. The merry
Flemish bells jingled everywhere on the
horses; everywhere within doors some
well-filled soup-pot sang and smoked over
the stove; and everywhere over the snow
without laughing maidens pattered in
bright kerchiefs and stout kirtles, going
to and from the mass. Only in the little
hut it was very dark and very cold.

Nello and Patrasche were left utterly
alone, for one night in the week before
the Christmas Day, Death entered there,
and took away from life for ever old Jehan
Daas, who had never known of life aught
save its poverty and its pains. He had
long been half dead, incapable of any
movement except a feeble gesture, and
powerless for anything beyond a gentle
word; and yet his loss fell on them both
with a great horror in it: they mourned
JO 4A DOG OF FLANDERS,

him passionately. He had passed away
from them in his sleep, and when in the
gray dawn they learned their bereavement,
unutterable solitude and desolation seemed



to close around them. He had long been
only a poor, feeble, paralyzed old man,
who could not raise a hand in their de-
fence, but he had loved them well: his
smile had always welcomed their return,
They mourned for him unceasingly, refus-
A DOC OF FLANDERS. 71

ing to be comforted, as in the white
winter day they followed the deal shell
that held his body to the nameless grave
by the little gray church. They were his
only mourners, these two whom he had
left friendless upon earth — the young
boy and the old dog. “Surely, he will
relent now and let the poor lad come
hither?” thought the miller’s wife, glanc-
ing at her husband where he smoked by
the hearth.

Baas Cogez knew her thought, but he
hardened his heart, and would not un-
bar his door as the little, humble funeral
went by. “The boy is a beggar,” he
said to himself: “he shall not be about
Alois.”

The woman dared not say anything
aloud, but when the grave was closed and
the mourners had gone, she put a wreath
of immortelles into Alois’ hands and bade
her go and lay it reverently on the dark,
unmarked mound where the snow was
displaced.

Nello and Patrasche went home with


72 ad DOG OF FLANDERS.

broken hearts. But even of that poor,
melancholy, cheerless home they were
denied the consolation. There was a
month's rent over-due for their little
home, and when Nello had paid the last
sad service to the dead he had not a coin
left. He went and begged grace of the
owner of the hut, a cobbler who went
every Sunday night to drink his pint of
wine and smoke “with Baas Cogez. The
cobbler would grant no mercy. He was
a harsh, miserly man, and loved money.
He claimed in default of his rent every
stick and stone, every pot and pan, in the
hut, and bade Nello and Patrasche be out
of it on the morrow.

Now, the cabin was lowly enough, and
in some sense miserable enough, and yet
their hearts clove to it with a great affec-
tion. They had been so happy t there, and
in the summer, with its clambering vine
and its flowering beans, it was so pretty
and bright in ie midst of the sun- lighted
fields! Their life in it had been full of
labor and privation, and yet they had been
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 73

so well content, so gay of heart, running
together to meet the old man’s never failing
smile of welcome!

All night long the boy and the dog sat
by the fick: hearth in the darkness,
drawn close together for warmth and sor-
row. Their bodies were insensible to the
cold, but their hearts seemed frozen in

them.
' When the morning broke over the
white, chill earth it was the morning of
Christmas Eve. With a shudder, Nello
clasped close to him his only friend, while
his tears fell hot and fast on the dog’s
frank forehead. “Let us 20, Patiasche
— dear, dear Patrasche,” he murmured.
“We will not wait to be kicked out: let
uS go.”

Pause had no will but his, and they
went sadly, side by side, out from the little
place which was so dear to them both, and
in which every humble, homely thing was
to them precious and beloved. Pee etic
drooped his head wearily as he passed by
his own green cart: it was no longer his
74. A DOG OF FLANDERS.

—it had to go with the rest to pay the
rent, and his brass harness lay idle and
glittering on the snow. The dog could
have lain down beside it and died for very
heart-sickness as he went, but whilst the
lad lived and needed him Patrasche would
not yield and give way.

They took the old accustomed road into
Antwerp. The day had yet scarce more
than dawned, most of the shutters were
still closed, but some of the villagers were
about. They took no notice whilst the
dog and the boy passed by them. At one
door Nello paused and looked wistfully
within: his grandfather had done many a
kindly turn in neighbor’s service to the
people who dwelt there.

“Would you give Patrasche a crust?”
he said, timidly. “ He is old, and he has
had nothing since last forenoon.”

The woman shut the door hastily, mur-
muring some vague saying about wheat
and rye being very dear that season. The
boy and the dog went on again wearily :
they asked no more.
A DOG OF FLANDERS.

Rr

7

By slow and painful ways they reached
Antwerp as the chimes tolled ten.

“If I had anything about me I could
sell to get him bread!” thought Nello,
but he had nothing except the wisp of



linen and serge that covered him, and his
pair of wooden shoes.

Patrasche understood, and nestled his
nose into the lad’s hand, as. though to
pray him not to be disquieted for any woe
or want of his.

The winner of the drawing-prize was
to be proclaimed at noon, and to the pub-
76 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

lic building where he had left his treasure
Nello made his way. On the steps and
in the entrance-hall there was a crowd of
youths — some of his age, some older, all
with parents or relatives or friends. His
heart was sick with fear as he went
amongst them, holding Patrasche close to
him. The great bells of the city clashed
out the hour of. noon with brazen clamor.
The doors of the inner hall were opened ;
the eager, panting throng rushed in: it
was known that the selected picture would
be raised above the rest upon a wooden
dais.

A mist obscured Nello’s sight, his head
swam, his limbs almost failed him. When
his vision cleared he saw the drawing
raised on high: it was not his own! A
slow, sonorous voice was proclaiming
aloud that victory had been adjudged to
Stephan Kiesslinger, born in the burgh
of Antwerp, son of a wharfinger in that
town.

When Nello recovered his conscious-
ness he was lying on the stones without,
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 77

and Patrasche was trying with every art
he knew to call him back to life. In the
distance a throng of the youths of Ant-
werp were shouting around their suc-
cessful comrade, and escorting him with
acclamations to his home upon the quay.

The boy staggered-to his feet and
drew the dog into his embrace. “It is
all over, dear Patrasche,’ he murmured —
“all over!”

He rallied himself as best he could, for
he was weak from fasting, and retraced
his steps to the village. Patrasche paced
by his side with his head drooping and
his old limbs feeble from hunger and
sorrow.

The snow was falling fast: a keen hur-
ricane blew from the north: it was bitter
as death on the plains. It took them
long to traverse the familiar path, and the
bells were sounding four of the clock as
they approached the hamlet. Suddenly
Patrasche paused, arrested by a scent in
the snow, scratched, whined, and drew
out with his teeth a small case of brown
78 dA DOG OF FLANDERS.

leather. He held it up to Nello in the
darkness. Where they were there stood
a little Calvary, and a lamp
burned dully under the cross:
the boy mechanically turned
the case to the light: on it
was the name of Baas Cogez,
and within it were notes for
two thousand francs.
The sight roused the lad
a little from his stupor. He
«thrust it in his shirt, and
stroked Patrasche and
drew him onward.
The dog looked up
wistfully in his
face,
Nello made




















.S








straight for the
* mill-house. and
went to
=: the house-
door and
struck on its panels. The millers wife
opened it weeping, with little Alois cling-


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 79

ing close to her skirts. “Is jt the ee, thou
poor lad?” she said kindly through her
tears. ‘Get thee gone ere the Baas see
thee. We are in sore trouble to. night,
He is out seeking for a power of money
that he has let fall riding homeward, and
in this snow he never will find it; and God
knows it will go nigh to ruin us. It is
Heaven’s own judgment for the things we
have done to thee.

Nello put the notecase in her hand
and called Patrasche within the house.
“ Patrasche found the money to-night,”
he said quick ly. “Tell Baas Ca 30:
I think he will not de eny the dog shelter
and food in his old age. Keep him from
pursuing me, and I pray of you to be
good to him.”

Ere either woman or dog knew what
he meant he had stooped and kissed Pa-
trasche: then closed the door hurriedly,
and disappeared in the gloom of the fast-
falling night.

The woman and the child stood speech-
less with joy and fear: Patrasche vainly
80 4A DOG OF FLANDERS.

spent the fury of his anguish against the
ivon-bound oak of the barred house-door.
They did not dare unbar the door and
let him forth: they tried all they could
to solace him. They brought him sweet
cakes and juicy meats: they tempted him
with the best they had; they tried to lure
him to abide by the warmth of the hearth;
but it was of no avail. Patrasche refused
to be comforted or to stir from the barred
portal.

It was six o’clock when from an oppo-
site entrance the miller at last came, jaded
and broken, into his wife’s presence. “ It
is lost for ever,” he said with an ashen
cheek and a quiver in his stern voice.
“We have looked with lanterns every-
where: it is gone—the little maiden’s
portion and all!”

His wife put the money into his hand,
and told him how it had come to her.
The strong man sank trembling into a
seat and covered his face, ashamed and
almost afraid. “I have been cruel to the
lad,” he muttered at length: “I deserved
not to have good at his hands.”
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 81

Little Alois, taking courage, crept close
to her father and nestled against him her
fair curly head. “Nello may come here
again, father?” she whispered. “He may
come to-morrow as he used to do?”

The miller pressed her in his arms:
his hard, sun-burned face was very pale
and his mouth trembled, « Surely, surely,”
he answered his child. “He Shall bide
here on Christmas Day, and any other
day he will. God helping me, I will
make amends to the boy—I will make
amends.” -

Little Alois kissed him in gratitude and
joy, then slid from his knees and ran to
where the dog kept watch by the door.
“And to-night I may feast Patrasche?”
she cried in a child’s thoughtless glee.

Her father bent his head gravely :
“Ay, ay: let the dog have the best;” for
the stern old man was moved and shaken
to his heart’s depths.

It was Christmas Eve, and the mill-
house was filled with oak logs and squares
of turf, with cream and honey, with meat
82 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

and bread, and the rafters were hung with
wreaths of evergreen, and the Calvary and
the cuckoo clock looked out from a mass
of holly. There were little paper lanterns
too for Alois, and toys of various fashions
and sweetmeats in bright-pictured papers.
There were light and warmth and abun-
dance everywhere, and the child would
fain have made.the dog a guest honored
and feasted.

But Patrasche would neither
lie in the warmth nor share in
the cheer. Famished he was,
and very cold, but without Nello
he would partake neither of
comfort nor food. Against all
temptation he was proof, and
close against the door he leaned
always, watching only for a
means of escape.

“He wants the lad,” said
Baas Cogez. “Good dog!
good dog! Iwill go over to the lad the
first thing at day-dawn.” For no one but
Patrasche knew that Nello had left the


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 83

hut, and no one but Patrasche divined
that Nello had gone to face starvation
and misery alone.

The mill-kitchen was very warm; great
logs crackled and flamed on the hearth ;



neighbors came in for a glass of wine and
a slice of the fat goose baking for supper.
Alois, gleeful and sure of her playmate
back on the morrow, bounded and sang
and tossed back her yellow hair. Baas
Cogez, in the fulness of his heart, smiled
on her through moistened eyes, and spoke
84 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

of the way in which he would befriend her
favorite companion; the house-mother sat
with calm, contented face at the spinning-
wheel; the cuckoo in the clock chirped
ad hours. Amidst it all Patrasche
was bidden with a thousand words of wel-
come to tarry there a cherished guest.
But neither peace nor plenty could allure
him where Nello was not.

When the supper smoked on the board,
and the voices were loudest and gladdest,
and the Christ-child brought Spiced gifts.
to Alois, Patrasche, w atching ays an
occasion, glided out when the door was
unlatched by a careless new-comer, and as
swiftly as his weak and tired limbs would
bear him sped over the snow in the bitter,
black night. He had oniy one thought —
to follow Nello. A human friend might
have paused for the pleasant meal, the
cherry warmth, the cozy slumber; but that
was not the friendship of Patrasche. He
remembered a bygone time, when an old
man and a little child had found him sick
unto death in the wayside ditch.

af
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 85

Snow had fallen freshly all the evening
long; it was now nearly ten; the trail of
the boy’s footsteps was almost obliterated.
It took Patrasche long to discover any
scent. When at last he found it, it was
lost again quickly, and
lost and recovered, and
again lost and again
recovered, a hundred
times or more.

The night was very
wild. The lamps un-
der the wayside crosses
were blown out; the
roads were sheets of
ice; the impenetrable darkness hid every
trace of habitations; there was no living
thing abroad. All the cattle were housed,
and in all the huts and homesteads men
and women rejoiced and feasted. There
was only Patrasche out in the cruel cold
—old and famished and full of pain, but
with the strength and the patience of a
great love to sustain him in his search.

The trail of Nello’s steps, faint and ob-


86 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

scure as it was under the new snow, went
straightly along the accustomed tracks into
Antwerp. It was past midnight when Pa-
trasche traced it over the boundaries of
the town and into the narrow, tortuous,
gloomy streets. It was all quite dark in
the town, save where some light gleamed
ruddily through the crevices
of -house-shutters, or some
group went homeward with
lanterns chanting drinking-
songs. ‘The streets were all
white with ice: the high
walls and roofs loomed black
against them. There was
scarce a sound save the riot of the winds
down the passages as they tossed the
creaking signs and shook the tall Jamp-
irons,

So many passers-by had trodden through
and through the snow, so many diverse
paths had crossed and recrossed each
other, that the dog had a hard task to
retain any hold on the track he followed.
But he kept on his way, though the cold


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 87

pierced him to the bone, and the jagged
ice cut his feet, and the hunger in his
body gnawed like a rat's teeth. He kept
on his way, a poor, gaunt, shivering thing,



and by long patience traced the steps he
loved into the very heart of the burgh and
up to the steps of the great cathedral.
‘He is gone to the things that he
loved,” thought Patrasche: he could not
88 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

understand, but he was full of sorrow and
of pity for the art-passion that to him was
so incomprehensible and yet so sacred.

The portals of the cathedral were un-
closed after the midnight mass. Some
heedlessness in the custodians, too eager
to go home and feast or sleep, or too
drowsy to know whether they turned the
keys aright, had left one of the doors
unlocked. By that accident the footfalls
Patrasche sought had passed through into
the building, leaving the white marks of
snow upon the dark stone floor. By that
slender white thread, frozen as it fell, he
was guided through the intense silence,
through the immensity of the vaulted
space — guided straight to the gates of
the chancel, and, stretched there upon the
stones, he found Nello. He crept up and
touched the face of the boy. “Didst thou
dream that I should be faithless and for-
sake thee? I,—a dog?” said that mute
caress,

The lad raised himself with a low cry
and clasped him close. “Let us lie down
A DOG OF FLANDERS. 89

and die together,” he murmured. “Men
have no need of us, and we are all alone.”

In answer, Patrasche crept closer yet,
and laid his head upon the young boy’s
breast. The great tears stood in his
brown, sad eyes: not for himself —for
himself he was happy.

They lay close together in the piercing
cold. The blasts that blew over the Flem-
ish dikes from the northern seas were like
waves of ice, which froze every living thing
they touched. The interior of the immense
vault of stone in which they were was even
more bitterly chill than the snow-covered
plains without. Now and then a_ bat
moved in the shadows— now and _ then
a gleam of light came on the ranks of
carven figures. Under the Rubens they
lay together quite still, and soothed almost
into a dreaming slumber by the numb-
ing narcotic of the cold. Together they
dreamed of the old glad days when they
had chased each other through the flower-
ing grasses of the summer meadows, or sat
hidden in the tall bulrushes by the water’s
go A DOG OF FLANDERS.

side, watching the boats go seaward in the
sun.

Suddenly through the darkness a great
white radiance streamed through the vast-
ness of the aisles; the moon, that was at
her height, had broken
through the clouds, the
snow had ceased to fall,
the light reflected from
the snow without was
clear as the light of dawn.
It fell through the arches
full upon the two pictures
above, from which the boy
on his entrance had flung
back the veil: the Eleva-
tion and the Descent of the Cross were
for one instant visible.

Nello rose to his feet and stretched his
arms to them: the tears of a passionate
ecstasy glistened on the paleness of his
face. “I have seen them at last!” he cried
aloud. “O God, it is enough!”

His limbs failed under him, and he sank
upon his knees, still gazing upward at the


A DOG OF FLANDERS. gt

majesty that he adored. For a few brief
moments the light illumined the divine
visions that had been denied to him so
long —light clear and sweet and strong
as though it streamed from the throne of
Heaven. Then suddenly it passed away:
once more a great darkness covered the
face of Christ.

The arms of the boy drew close again
the body of the dog. “ We shall see His
face — there,” he murmured; “and He will
not part us, I think.”

On the morrow, by the chancel of the
cathedral, the people of Antwerp found
them both. They were both dead: the
cold of the night had frozen into stillness
alike the young life and the old. When
the Christmas morning broke and the
priests came to the temple, they saw them
lying thus on the stones together. Above,
the veils were drawn back from the great
visions of Rubens, and the fresh rays of
the sunrise touched the thorn-crowned
head of the Christ.

As the day grew on there came an old,
g2 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

hard-featured- man who wept as women
weep. “I was cruel to the lad,’ he
muttered, “and now I would have made
amends — yea, to the half of my substance
—and he should have been to me as a
son.”

There came also, as the day grew apace,
a painter who had fame in the world, and
who was liberal of hand and of spirit. “I
seek one who should have had the prize
yesterday had worth won,” he said to the
people — “a boy of rare promise and gen-
ius. An old wood-cutter on a fallen tree
at eventide — that was all his theme. But
there was greatness for the future in it,
I would fain find him, and take him with
me and teach him Art.”

And a little child with curling fair hair,
sobbing bitterly as she clung to her father’s
arm, cried aloud, “Oh, Nello, come! We
have all ready for thee. The Christ-child’s
hands are full of gifts, and the old piper
will play for us; and the mother says thou
shalt stay by the hearth and burn nuts
with us all the Noél week long—yes,


A DOG OF FLANDERS. 93.

even to the Feast of the Kings! And
Patrasche will be so happy! Oh, Nello,
wake and come!”

But the young pale face, turned upward
to the light of the great Rubens with a
smile upon its mouth, answered them all,
“Tt is too late.”

For the sweet, sonorous bells went ring-
ing through the frost, and the sunlight
shone upon the plains of snow, and the
populace trooped gay and glad through
the streets, but Nello and Patrasche no
more asked charity at their hands. All
they needed now Antwerp gave unbidden.

Death had been more pitiful to them
than longer life would have been. It had
taken the one in the loyalty of love, and
the other in the innocence of faith, from a
world which for love has no recompense
and for faith no fulfilment.

All their lives they had been together,
and in their deaths they were not divided;
for when they were found the arms of the
boy were folded too closely around the
dog to be severed without violence, and
94 A DOG OF FLANDERS.

the people of their little village, contrite
and ashamed, implored a special grace for
them, and, making them one grave, laid
them to rest there side by side — for ever!





































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