Citation
Gods and heroes

Material Information

Title:
Gods and heroes or, The kingdom of Jupiter
Portion of title:
The kingdom of Jupiter
Creator:
Francillon, R. E ( Robert Edward ), 1841-1919
William Blackwood and Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Edinburgh
Publisher:
W. Blackwood
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xii, 292 p., [8] leaves of plates : ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Mythology, Classical -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Heroes -- Mythology -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Imprint also notes publisher's location in London.
General Note:
Includes 32 p. publisher's catalog.
Statement of Responsibility:
by R. E. Francillon.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
021470896 ( ALEPH )
02571206 ( OCLC )
AHE2797 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text


LETITIA HY UN Cr A 15 2 SEMAINE PPC AP = iret erie:





The Baldwin Library





GODS

AND HEROES











j

iil i

=e

il
|

————



“ He saw, to his amazement, that his master had Ass’s
ears.” —Page 42.



GODS AND HEROES

OR

THE KINGDOM OF JUPITER

BY

R E FRANCILLON

With Gight Ilustrations

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS
EDINBURGH AND LONDON
MDCCCXCII



TO
FRANCIS FELIX

FOR WHOM THIS BOOK WAS BEGUN



PREFACE.

HESE stories will, I trust, explain their own
purpose; but a few words touching their form
are due to critical readers.

It will be seen that the Mythology adopted
throughout is strictly of the old-fashioned kind
which goes to Ovid as its leading authority, and
ignores the difference between the gods of Greece
and the gods of Rome. I have deliberately followed
this plan because, while there is not the remotest

fear—quite the contrary—that young people, when



or if they become scholars, will not be duly initi-
ated into the mysteries of scientific and compara-
tive mythology, there is considerable danger that
the stories of the gods and heroes which have
saturated literature, and have become essential por-

tions of the thought and life of ages, may become



Vill PREFACE.

explained away only too thoroughly. It is easy
for my readers to acquire the science of the subject
hereafter; but where mythology is concerned, the
poetry must come before the prose, and it will be
a distinct loss for them if, under scientific teaching,
they have never been familiar with the ancient
stories as they were read by the makers of ltera-
ture in the pre-critical times. Without the my-
thology of the. Latin poets, modern literature in all
languages becomes almost a dead letter: hundreds
of allusions become pointless, and thousands of sub-
stances fade into shadows. Of the three mythol-
ogies, the Greek, the Roman, and the Poetic or
Conventional, I have selected the last, because—
among other reasons—

It is as useful, and as needful to be known, as
the others, on general grounds ;

It is more useful, and more needful, than the
others as a portion of literature and as an intel-
lectual influence ;

It is preferable as a means of exciting an in-
terest in the subject;

It is not in the remotest degree an obstacle to
more accurate knowledge, for which indeed it is an
almost indispensable preparation.

After these observations, there is no occasion to



PREFACE. ix

explain why I have made a point of employing
Latin names and Latin spelling.

Another point to which I should call attention
is the attempt to cover (within limits) the whole
ground, so that the reader may not be left in igno-
rance of any considerable tract of the realm of Jove.
The stories are not detached; they are brought, so
far as I have been able to bring them, into a single
saga, free from inconsistencies and contradictions.
Omissions owing to the necessarily prescribed lim-
its will, I think, always find a place to fall into.
Altogether, the lines of the volume diverge so
entirely from those of Kingsley, or Hawthorne, or
any other story-teller known to me, that I may feel
myself safe from the danger of fatal comparisons.
Of course this aim at a certain completeness has
implied the difficult task of selection among vari-
ants of the same story or incident. Sometimes I
have preferred the most interesting, sometimes the
version most consistent with the general plan. But
I have endeavoured, as a rule, to adopt the most
usual or familiar, as being most in accordance with
my original intention.

I need not, however, enumerate difficulties, which,
if they are overcome, need no apology ; and, if they
are not, deserve none. The greatest and most



xX PREFACE,

obvious, the strict observance of the “ Maxima
reverentia,” will, and must always remain, crucial.
In this; at least, I trust I have succeeded, in what-
ever else I may have failed. These stories were
begun for one who was very dear to me, and who
was their first and best critic; and I shall be glad
if what was begun, in hope, for him should be of

use to others.
REE.

Nore.—Quantity is marked in proper names

when necessary, at their first occurrence.



CONTENTS.

SATURN,
JUPITER AND JUNO—
PART I.—THE GODS AND THE GIANTS, . .
PART Il.—-THE FIRST MAN; OR, THE STORY OF
PROMETHEUS AND PANDORA, .
PARY II]—THE GREAT FLOOD ; OR, THE STORY OF
DEUCALION,
APOLLO—
PART I.—THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE,
PART II.—THE FLAYED PIPER ; OR, THE STORY OF
MARSYAS,
PART IIl.—TOO MUCH GOLD; OR, THE FIRST STORY
OF MIDAS, . : . . .
PART IV.—THE CRITIC; OR, THE SECOND STORY
OF MIDAS,
PART V.—SOME FLOWER STORIES—
I.—-THE LAUREL, .
IIl.—THE HYACINTH,
IIIl.—THE SUN-FLOWER,
IV.—THE NARCISSUS, .
PART VI.—PRESUMPTION ; OR, THE STORY OF
PHAETHON, . . ; : . .

PAGE

ll

18

24

28

33

40

44

47

50

53

58



xil CONTENTS.

DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION,
MINERVA ; OR, WISDOM,
VENUS—
PART I,—THE GOD OF FIRE, . . ; . .
PART IIl.—LOVE AND THE SOUL; OR, THE STORY
OF CUPID AND PSYCHE, .
MERCURY AND IRIS,
NEPTUNE,
HADES—
PART I.—THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD,
PART Il.—THE KINGDOM,
PART IIl.—ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE, .
PART IV.—THE MAN WHO NEVER DIED,
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS,
THE GOLDEN FLEECE,
A LOST SECRET, .
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS, .
THE HERO OF HEROES—
PART I.—THE ORACLE, .
PART II.—HIS FIRST LABOUR: THE LION, .
PART III.—HIS SECOND LABOUR: THE HYDRA,
PART IV.—HIS THIRD LABOUR: THE STAG,
PART V.—HIS FOURTH LABOUR: THE BOAR, .
PART VI.—HIS FIFTH LABOUR: THE AUGEAN STABLE,
PART VII.—MORE LABOURS: AND THE CATTLE OF
GERYON, . ; . .
PART VIII.—HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR: THE GARDEN
OF THE HESPERIDES, : :
PART IX.—HIS TWELFTH LABOUR: THE DESCENT
INTO HADES, . ‘ ; :
PART X.—THE CHOICE OF HERCULES,
PART XI.—THE TUNIC OF NESSUS,
THE APPLE OF DISCORD, : .

84
109
114

239
243
251
259
266

272
282









SATURN.

Ry NCE upon a time, the Sky married
‘| the Earth. The Sky’s name was



Ccelus, and the Earth’s was Terra.

one of these, the eldest, was called
Titan, and another was called Saturn.

Terra, their mother Earth, was very good and
kind; but their father, Coelus, was very unkind and
cruel. He hated bis own children, and shut them
all up underground, so that he might get rid of
them—all of them, that is to say, except Saturn,
whom he allowed to have his freedom. Saturn
grew up; and he thought of nothing but how to
set his brothers free. At last one day he went
to his mother, and asked her what he could do.
Terra had come to hate her husband for his

A



2 SATURN.

cruelty: so she gave Saturn all the iron she had
in her veins—(you know that iron comes from
what are called the Veins of the Earth)—and he
made a great scythe with it. With this scythe he
wounded and punished his father so terribly that
old Ccelus was never good for anything again—in
fact, we never hear of him any more, except when
we turn his name into Ccelum, which is the Latin
for “the sky,” as you know.

Saturn instantly let all his brothers out from
their underground prison. They were very erateful
to him: and Titan, the eldest, said, “You shall be
king of us all, and of all the world, if you will only
promise me one thing.” Saturn promised. “It is
this,” said Titan. “You know how our father
treated us; and how you treated him. Children
are plagues, and I don’t want you to have anything
to do with them. Therefore promise me to eat up
all your children, if you ever have any, as soon as
they are born. They'll be too young to mind, and
youll be safe from them. I think so much of this,
that if you don’t eat them up, every one, I'll take
the kingdom away from you. For I’m the eldest,
and I might keep it if I pleased instead of giving
it up to you.”

Saturn had no children then, and he gave the
promise. But some time afterwards he married
a goddess named Rhea, who was very good and
very beautiful. They, too, had a great many



SATURN. 3

children. But, alas! there was that terrible prom-
ise that poor Saturn had made to Titan. Saturn
could not break his word, so he ate every child as
soon as it was born. Of course Rhea was very
unhappy and miserable: it was worse, thought she,
than if he had only shut them underground. But
there was-the promise—and she did not know
what to do.

But she thought and thought, and at last she
hit on a plan. When her next child was born, she
hid it away, and when Saturn asked for it to eat it,
she gave him a big stone instead of the baby.
Saturn must have had good teeth, for he ate it
up, and only thought that the new baby’s bones
were uncommonly hard. The trick answered so
well that when the next child was born she did it
again,---and again she did it a third time. She
named the three children that she saved in this
way, Jupiter, Neptune, and Pluto.

Jupiter, the eldest, was a very fine strong child.
He made such a noise with his crying that his
mother Rhea was afraid Saturn would hear him.
So she sent him away to the island of Crete, where
he was brought up on goat’s milk; and she ordered
his nurses to make all the noise they could with
drums, trumpets, and cymbals all day and all night
long, so that nobody could hear him cry and so
find out that’ he was alive,

But unluckily her secret was found out by



4 SATURN.

Titan. Titan thought Saturn had been breaking
his word; so he made war on him, and very nearly
conquered him and took his kingdom from him.

Jupiter, however, heard the noise of the battle
through all the cymbals, trumpets, and drums. He
was only a year old, but so big and strong that he
rushed out of Crete, and fought a most desperate
battle against his uncles, the Titans, to save his
father, Saturn. The Titans were wonderful people.
All were giants; and one of them had a hundred
arms. ‘They threw mountains instead of stones.
But Jupiter conquered them at last, and set his
father free.

But somehow Saturn was very much afraid of
his son. I think I should have been afraid of you
if you had been such a wonderful baby. In some
way or other—I don’t know how—he tried to get
rid of Jupiter, and made himself so unpleasant that
Jupiter had to take his kingdom away from him,
and make himself king. That is how Jupiter
became king of all the gods and goddesses.

Saturn, when he lost his kingdom, went to Italy,
where a king named Janus received him very
kindly. Saturn and Janus became such friends
that Janus made him king with him; and Saturn
ruled go well that he made his people the happiest
in all the world. Everybody was perfectly good
and perfectly happy. Saturn’s reign on earth is
called the Golden Age. His wife, Ithea, was



SATURN. 5

with him, and was as good as he;—so he had
peace at last after all his troubles, which had no
doubt taught him to be wise.

The Greek name for Saturn means “Time”;
and Saturn is called the god of Time, who swallows
up all things and creatures. All creatures may be
called “the Children of Time.” And the kingdom
of Time, we may say, must always come to an end.
The whole story means a great deal more than
this; but this is enough to show you that it is not
nonsense, and means something. One of the planets
is called Saturn.

In pictures Saturn is always made an old man,
because Time is old; and he carries his scythe,
because Time mows everything away, just as a
mower does the grass; or like “The Reaper whose
name is Death.” Only Death, in the poem, is
kinder than Saturn or Time.













yy ‘4 the whole world, he made his two
K Fe :

A AS “(| brothers, Neptune and Pluto, kings

/ under him. He made Neptune god

(i HEN Jupiter became god and king of
difé

and king of the sea: Pluto he made
god and king of Hades. Hades was a world under-
ground, in the middle of the earth, where men and
women go and live when they die.

The next thing that Jupiter did was to marry
Juno. Their wedding was the grandest and most
wonderful that ever was seen. Invitations were
sent out to all the gods and nymphs. The nymphs
were a sort of fairies—some of them waited upon
the goddesses; some of them lived in rivers, brooks,











yy ‘4 the whole world, he made his two
K Fe :

A AS “(| brothers, Neptune and Pluto, kings

/ under him. He made Neptune god

(i HEN Jupiter became god and king of
difé

and king of the sea: Pluto he made
god and king of Hades. Hades was a world under-
ground, in the middle of the earth, where men and
women go and live when they die.

The next thing that Jupiter did was to marry
Juno. Their wedding was the grandest and most
wonderful that ever was seen. Invitations were
sent out to all the gods and nymphs. The nymphs
were a sort of fairies—some of them waited upon
the goddesses; some of them lived in rivers, brooks,



THE GODS AND THE GIANTS. 7

and trees. All of them came to the wedding, ex-
cept one nymph named Chélone.

She refused to come: and, besides that, she
laughed at the whole thing. When they told
her that Jupiter was going to marry Juno, she
laughed so loud that Jupiter himself could hear
her. I don’t know why she thought it so ridic-
ulous, but I can guess pretty well, I expect
she knew Juno’s bad temper better than Jupiter
did, and how Jupiter was just the sort of husband
to spoil any wife’s temper. But Jupiter was very
fond of Juno just then, and he did not like to
be laughed at on his wedding-day. So he had
Chelone turned into a tortoise, so that she might
never be able to laugh again. Nobody ever heard
a tortoise laugh, nor ever will.

Jupiter and Juno set up their palace in the sky,
just over the top of Mount Olympus, a high
mountain in the north of Greece. And very
goon, I am sorry to say, his quarrels with Juno
so that, after all, poor Chelone had been
right in not thinking much of the grand wedding.



began:

He always kept her for his Queen; but he cared for
a great many Titanesses and nymphs much more
than he did for her, and married more of them
than anybody can reckon, one after another. This
made Juno very angry, and they used to quarrel
terribly. But something was going to happen
which was almost as bad as quarrelling, and which



8 JUPITER AND JUNO.

must have made Jupiter envy the peace and com-
fort of old Saturn, who had become only an earthly
king.

The Titans made another war. And this time
they got the help of the Giants, who were more
terrible even than the Titans. They were im-
mense monsters, some almost as tall as the tallest
mountain, fearfully strong, and horribly ugly, with
hair miles long, and rough beards down to their
middle. One of them had fifty heads and a hun-
dred hands. Another had serpents instead of legs.
Others, called Cyclopes, had only one eye, which
was in the middle of their foreheads. But the
most terrible of all was a giant named Typhon.
He had a hundred heads, each like a dragon’s, and
darted flames from his mouth and eyes. A great
battle was fought between the gods and the giants.
The giants tried to get into the sky by piling
up the mountains one upon another. They used
oak-trees for clubs, and threw hills for stones.
They set whole forests on fire, and tossed them up
like torches to set fire to the sky. And at last
Typhon’s hundred fiery mouths set up a hundred
different yells and roars all at once, so loud and
horrible that Jupiter and all the gods ran away
into Egypt and hid themselves there in the shapes
of animals. Jupiter turned himself into a ram,
and Juno became a cow.

But, when their fright was over, the gods came



THE GODS AND THE GIANTS. on)

back into their own shapes, and fought another
battle, greater and more terrible than before. And,
this time, the gods won. Some of the giants were
crushed under mountains or drowned in the sea.
Some were taken prisoners: and of these some were
beaten to death and others were skinned alive.
Atlas, who was the tallest, was ordered to spend all
his days in holding up the sky on his shoulders,—
how it was held up before, I do not know. Some
of the Cyclopes were set to work in making thunder-
bolts for Jupiter. They became the blacksmiths of
the gods, and Mount A%tna, which is a volcano, was
one of their forges.

After this, the gods lived in peace: though
Jupiter and Juno never left off quarrelling a good
deal. Jupiter made most of his children gods and
voddesses, and they all lived together over Mount
Olympus, ruling the earth and the sky, and the
air, the sun, and the stars. You will read the
stories of all of them. They used to cat a de-
licious food called Ambrosia, and their wine was a
wonderful drink called Nectar. Hebe, the goddess
of Youth, mixed and poured out the Nectar, and
Ganymede was Jupiter’s own page and cup-bearer.
These gods and goddesses of the sky were a sort of
large family, with Jupiter and Juno for father and
mother. Of course Neptune with his gods of the
sea, and Pluto with his gods of Hades, were like
different families, and lived in their own places.



10 JUPITER AND JUNO.

Whenever it thunders, that is the voice of
Jupiter. One of the planets is named after him
— it is a beautiful large white star. In pictures,
he is a large strong man, with a thick brown
beard, looking like a king. He sits on a throne,
with lightning in his hand, and an eagle by his
side. Juno is a large beautiful woman, tall and
erand, looking like a queen, with a proud face and
splendid eyes. The peacock is her favourite bird,
just as Jupiter’s is the eagle.



aI

PART IIL—THE FIRST MAN; or, THE STORY
OF PROMETHEUS AND PANDORA.

NE of the Titans left two sons, Prometheus and
Epimetheus. Prometheus means Forethought,
and Epimetheus means Afterthought. Now Pro-
metheus was not big and strong like the other
Titans, but he was more clever and cunning than
al of them put together. And he said to himself,
“Well, the gods have shown themselves stronger
than we. We can’t conquer them by fighting, that’s
clear. But there are cleverer ways of winning than
by fighting, as they shall see.”

So Prometheus dug up a good-sized lump of clay,
more than six feet long, and nearly four feet round.
And now, said he to himself, “I only want just one
little spark of Heavenly Fire.”

Now the Heavenly Fire is only to be found in
the sky ; and Jupiter had ordered that no Titan was
ever to enter the sky again. But Prometheus was



12 JUPITER AND JUNO.

much too clever to find any difficulty about that.
The great goddess Minerva, who is the goddess of
Wisdom, happened to be on a visit to the earth just
then, so Prometheus called upon her and said—

“Great goddess, I am only a poor beaten Titan,
and I have never seen the sky. But my father and
my father’s father used to live there in the good
old times, and I should like, just once, to see the
inside of the beautiful blue place above the clouds
which was-once their home. Please, great goddess,
let me go in just once, and Pll promise to do no
harm.”

Now Minerva did not like to break the rule.
But she was very trusting and very good-natured,
because she was very wise ; and besides, Prometheus
looked such a poor little creature, so different from
all the other Titans and Giants, that she said—

“You certainly don’t look as if you could do
us any harm, even if you tried. Very well—you
shall have a look at the sky, and Pll show you
round.”

So she told Prometheus to follow her up Mount
Olympus; but she did not notice a little twig that
he carried in his hand: and if she had noticed it,
she would not have thought it mattered. Wise
people don’t notice all the little things that cunning
people do. Then she opened the golden gate of the
sky, and let him in. She was very kind, and showed
him everything. He went over the palace of the



THE FIRST MAN. 13

gods, and saw Jupiter’s great ivory throne, and his
eagle, and the brew-house where the nectar is made.
He looked at the places behind the clouds, where
they keep the rain and snow. Then they looked at
all the stars; and at last they came to the Stables
of the Sun. For you must know that the sun is a
great fiery car, drawn by four white horses from the
east to the west, and is put away in a stable during
the night-time, where the four horses eat wheat
made of gold.

“Now you have seen everything,” said Minerva ;
“and you must go.”

“Thank you,” said Prometheus. And he went
back to earth again. But just as he was leaving,
he touched one of the wheels of the sun with his
little twig, so that a spark came off upon the end.

The spark was still there when he got home.
He touched his lump of clay with the spark of
Heavenly Fire—and, lo and behold, the lump of
clay became a living man!

“There!” said Prometheus. “There’s Something
that will give the gods more trouble than anything
that ever was made !”

It was the First Man.

Jupiter very soon found out what Prometheus
had done, and was very vexed and annoyed. He
forgave Minerva, who was his favourite daughter,
but he said to the god of Fire: “Make something



14 JUPITER AND JUNO.

that will trouble the man even more than the man
will trouble me.”

So the god of Fire took another lump of clay,
and a great deal of Heavenly Flame, and made the
First Woman.

All the gods admired her very much, for she had
been made very nicely —better than the man.
Jupiter said to her, “My child, go to Prometheus
and give him my compliments, and tell him to
marry you.” The gods and goddesses thought it a
good idea, and all of them made her presents for
her wedding. One gave her beauty, another wit,
another fine clothes, and so on; but Jupiter only
gave her a little box, which was not to be opened
till her wedding-day.

Prometheus was sitting one day at his door,
, thinking how clever he was, when he saw, coming
down Olympus, the most beautiful creature he had
ever seen. As soon as she came close—
“Who are you?” he asked. “From where do
you come ?”
“My name is Pandora,” said she. “And I am
come from the skies to marry you.” :
“With all my heart,’ said Prometheus. “ You
will be a very nice wife, Iam sure. But—let me
Pandora means ‘ All Gifts, doesn’t it? What
have you got to give me, to keep house upon?”

see



“The gods have given me everything!” said



THE FIRST MAN. 15

Pandora. “I bring you Beauty, Wit, Love, Wisdom,
Health, Wealth, Virtue, Fine Clothes—in a word,
everything that you can wish for.”

“ And that little box——what have you in that?”
asked he.

“Oh, that’s only a little box that Jupiter gave
me—TI don’t know what’s in that, for it is not to
be opened till after we’re married. Perhaps it is
diamonds.”

“Who gave it you?” asked he.

“ Jupiter,” said Pandora.

“Oho!” thought the cunning Prometheus.
“Secret boxes from Jupiter are not to my fancy.
My dear,” he said to Pandora, “on second thoughts,
I don’t think I will marry you. But as you’ve had
so much trouble in coming, I'll send you to my
brother Epimetheus, and you shall marry him.
He'll do just as well.”

So Pandora went on to Epimetheus, and he
married her. But Prometheus had sent him a
private message not to open the box that had been
given by Jupiter. So it was put away, and every-
thing went on very well for a long time.

But, at last, Pandora happened to be alone in
the house; and she could not resist the temptation
to just take one little peep into the box to see
what was inside. Such a little box could not hold
any harm: and it might be the most beautiful



16 JUPITER AND JUNO.

present of all. Anyhow, she could do no harm
by lifting the lid; she could easily shut it up
again. She felt she was doing what would dis-
please Epimetheus, and was rather ashamed of her
curiosity, but—well, she did open the box. And
then—out there flew thousands and thousands of
creatures, like a swarm of wasps and flies, buzzing
and darting about with joy to be free. Out at
the window, and over the world they flew. Alas!
they were all the evil things that are in the world
to torment and hurt mankind. Those flies from
Pandora’s box were War, Pain, Grief, Anger, Sick- .
ness, Sorrow, Poverty, Death, Sin. What could
she do? She could not get them back into the box
again ; she could only scream and wring her hands.
Epimetheus heard her cries, and did all he could:
he shut down the lid, just in time to keep the
very last of the swarm from flying away. By good
luck, it was the only one worth keeping—a little
creature called Hope, who still lives in the box to
comfort us when the others are stinging us, and to
make us say, “There is good in everything—even
in the box of Pandora.”

But Jupiter, when he heard how Prometheus had
refused to marry Pandora, and had tried to outwit
him again, was very angry indeed. He sent down
one of the gods, who took Prometheus and carried
him to Mount Caucasus, and bound him to the





“ Yupiter sent down one of the gods, ... and bound him to the
highest and coldest peak with chains.’—Page 16.



THE FIRST MAN, 17

highest and coldest peak with chains. And a vul-
ture was sent to gnaw his heart for ever.

So cunning could not conquer the strength of the
gods after all.

I have something to say about this story, which
you may not quite understand now, but which you
will, some day, when you read it again. Think
how Man is made of dead common clay, but with
one spark of Heavenly Fire straight from the sky.
Think how Woman is made, with less clay, but with
more of the Heavenly Fire. Think of that “ After-
thought,” which saved Hope when there was noth-
ing else to be saved. And think of the Pain sent
to gnaw the heart of Prometheus, who used all his
cleverness to make himself great in wrong-doing.

You will be glad to hear that, a long time after-
wards, the greatest and best man in all Mythology
came and killed the vulture, and set Prometheus
free. You will read all about it in time. But I
want you to know and remember the man’s name
It was Hercules.



18



PART III.—THE GREAT FLOOD; or, THE
STORY OF DEUCALION.

press turned out to be quite right in

saying that men would give more trouble to
Jupiter than the Titans or the Giants, or anything
that had ever been made. As time went on, men
became more and more wicked every day.

Now there lived in Thessaly, on the banks of a
river, a man and his wife, named Deucalion and
Pyrrha. I think they must have been good people,
and not like all the other men and women in the
world. One day, Deucalion noticed that the water
in the river was rising very high. He did not think
much of it at the time, but the next day it was
higher, and the next higher still. At last the river
, burst its banks, and spread over the country, sweep-
ing away houses and drowning many people.

Deucalion and Pyrrha escaped out of their own



THE GREAT FLOOD. 19

house just in time, and went to the top of a moun-
tain. But, to their terror, the waters still kept on
spreading and rising, until all the plain of Thessaly
looked liked a sea, and the tops of the hills like
islands.

“The water will cover the hills soon,” said Deuca-
lion, “and then the mountains. What shall we do?”
Pyrrha thought for a moment, and then said—

“TI have heard that there is a very wise man on
the top of Mount Caucasus who knows everything.
Let us go to him, and perhaps he will tell us what
to do and what all this water means.”

So they went down the other side, and went on
and on till they reached the great Caucasian moun-
tains, which are the highest in all Europe, and are
always covered with snow. They climbed up to
the highest peak, and there they saw a man, chained
to the ice, with a vulture tearing and gnawing him.
It was Prometheus, who had made the first man.

Deucalion tried to drive the horrible bird away.
But Prometheus said—

“It is no use. You can do nothing for me. Not
even the Great Flood will drive this bird away, or
put me out of my pain.”

“Ah! the Great Flood!” cried Deucalion and
Pyrrha together. “We have left it behind us
we safe up here ?”



are

“You are safe nowhere,” said Prometheus,
“Soon the waters will break over the mountains



20 JUPITER AND JUNO.

round Thessaly and spread over the whole world.
They will rise and rise till not even this peak will
be seen. Jupiter is sending this flood to sweep
away from the face of the earth the wickedness of
man. Not one is to be saved. Even now, there is
nobody left alive but you two.”

Deucalion and Pyrrha looked: and, in the dis-
tance, they saw the waters coming on, and rising
above the hills.

“But perhaps,” said Prometheus, “Jupiter may
not wish to punish you. I cannot tell. But I will
tell you what to do—it may save you. Go down
the mountain till you come to a wood, and cut
down a tree.” Then he told them how to make a
boat—for nobody knew anything about boats in
those days. Then he bade them good-bye, and they
went down the hill sorrowfully, wishing they could
help Prometheus, and doubting if they could help
themselves.

They came to the wood, and made the boat—just
in time. The water rose; but their boat rose with
the water. At last even the highest peak of
Caucasus was covered, and they could see nothing





but the sky above them and the waters round.
Then the clouds gathered and burst, and the sky
and the sea became one great storm.

For nine days and nights their little boat was
tossed about by the winds and waves. But on the
tenth day, as if by magic, the sky cleared, the water



THE GREAT FLOOD. 21

went down, and their boat was left high and dry on
the top of a hill.

They knelt, and thanked Jupiter, and went down
the hill hand in hand—the only man and the only
woman in the whole world. They did not even
know where they were.

But presently they met, coming up the hill, a
form like a woman, only grander and more beauti-
ful. They were afraid. But at last they had cour-
age to ask— :

“Who are you? And where are we?”

“This hill is Mount Parnassus; and I am
Themis, the goddess of Justice,” said she. “I have
finished my work upon the earth, and am on my °
way home to the sky. I know your story. Live,
and be good, and be warned by what has happened
to all other men.”

“ But what is the use of our living?” they asked,
“and what is the use of this great world to us two ?
For we have no children to come after us when we
die.”

“What you say is just,” said the goddess of
Justice. “Jupiter will be pleased enough to give
this empty world to a wiser and better race of men.
But he will be quite as content without them. “In
short, you may have companions, if you want them,
and if you will teach them to be better and wiser
than the old ones. Only you must make them for
yourselves,”



22 JUPITER AND JUNO.

“But how can we make men?” asked they.

“T will tell you. Throw your grandmother’s
bones behind you without looking round.”

“Our grandmother’s bones? But how are we to
find them after this flood, or to know which are
hers ?”

“The gods,” said Themis, “tell people what to
do, but not how it is to be done.” And _ she
vanished into the air.

I think Themis was right. All of us are taught
what we ought to do; but we are usually left to
ask ourselves whether any particular thing is right
or wrong.

Deucalion and Pyrrha asked one another; but
neither knew what to say. The whole world, after
the Great Flood, was full of bones everywhere.
Which were their grandmother’s, and where? They
wandered about over half the world trying to find
them, but all in vain, till they thought they would
have to give it up in despair.

At last, however, Pyrrha said to Deucalion—

“Thaveathought. Weare all called the children
of Jupiter, you know, because he is called the
father of gods and men. And Jupiter and all the
gods are the children of Ccelus and Terra. Now,
if we are the children of Jupiter, and Jupiter is the
child of Terra, then Terra must be our grandmother.
And Terra is the Earth; so our grandmother is
the Earth, you see.”



THE GREAT FLOOD. 23

“But,” asked Deucalion, “ what about the
bones?”

“What are the bones of the Earth but the
stones?” said Pyrrha. “The stones must be our
Grandmother's Bones.”

“JT don’t think youve right,” said Deucalion.
“Tt’s much too easy a thing—only to throw a few
stones. But there’s no harm in trying.”

So they gathered two heaps of stones, one for
him and one for her, and threw the stones behind
them, over their shoulders, without turning round
—just as Themis had told them.

When they had thrown away all their stones,
they looked to see if anything had happened. And
lo! every stone thrown by Pyrrha had become a
woman, and every stone thrown by Deucalion had
become a man.

So they kept on throwing stones till the world
was full of men and women again. And Deucalion
and Pyrrha became their king and queen.









APOLLO.

PART IL—THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE,

@) UPITER once fell in love with a
beautiful Titaness named Latona.
This made Juno terribly angry: go
she sent a huge and horrible snake,
called Python, to hunt Latona all
over the world. And she went to Terra, and
made her swear not to give Latona a resting-place
or a hiding-place anywhere.

So poor Latona was hunted and driven about by
Python night and day. She also went to our
Grandmother Earth, and begged for a corner to rest
in or a cave to hide in. But old Terra said, “ No.
T have sworn to Juno that you shall have no rest
in me.”











APOLLO.

PART IL—THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE,

@) UPITER once fell in love with a
beautiful Titaness named Latona.
This made Juno terribly angry: go
she sent a huge and horrible snake,
called Python, to hunt Latona all
over the world. And she went to Terra, and
made her swear not to give Latona a resting-place
or a hiding-place anywhere.

So poor Latona was hunted and driven about by
Python night and day. She also went to our
Grandmother Earth, and begged for a corner to rest
in or a cave to hide in. But old Terra said, “ No.
T have sworn to Juno that you shall have no rest
in me.”





THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE. 25

At last, in her despair, she went to Neptune,
and prayed him to hide her in his waters, since
Farth had refused her. Neptune said, “I wish
I could, with all my heart; but what place is there,
in the sea or on the land, where you can hide from
the Queen of the Sky? But wait—there’s one
thing that nobody knows of but me. There is an
island under the sea; and this island is always
moving and wandering about, so that nobody can
gee it, or tell where it may chance to be, for it
is never in the same place two minutes together.
It isn’t sea, because it’s land; but it doesn’t belong
to Terra, because it’s under the sea, and has no
bottom. I'll tell you what Ill do for you. Tl
fix it where nobody can find it, and you'll be safe
there, because it’s neither earth nor sea.”

So Neptune anchored the floating island in a
part of the AZgean Sea. The island is called Delos ;
and it is there still, just where it was fixed by
Neptune for Latona.

Latona went and lived there, safe from Juno
and Python. After a time she had two children, a
son and a daughter. The son was named Apollo,
and the daughter Diana.

Both were beautiful, but Apollo was the most
beautiful boy ever born. He was a wonderful
child in every way. The very instant he was born
he made a bow and arrow, and went across the sea,
and found Python, and killed him. When he was



26 APOLLO.

four years old, he built one of the wonders of
the world —a great altar to the gods, made of
the horns of the goats that his sister Diana used
to hunt and shoot in the mountains. With two
such children to help her, Latona no longer felt
afraid of Juno. So she left Delos, and came, with
her two children, into a country of Asia Minor,
called Lydia.

Now there was a princess in Thebes named Niobe,
who had fourteen beautiful children—seven daugh-
ters and seven sons, She was very fond and proud
of them, and she did not like to hear people talking
about Latona’s wonderful children. “What signi-
fies a miserable couple of children, when I have
fourteen?” she used to say. “JZ don’t think much
of Latona;” and, in her jealousy, she never lost
a chance of insulting the mother of Apollo and
Diana.

Of course these insults came to Latona’s ears.
Apollo and Diana heard of them too; and they
resolved to punish the proud princess who insulted
and scorned their mother. I scarcely like to tell
you of how they punished Niobe, for I cannot think
of anything more cruel.

Each of them took a bow and seven arrows.
Apollo shot with his arrows all the seven sons
of Niobe. Diana shot six of Niobe’s seven daugh-
ters, leaving only one alive. “There!” said they ;



bo
~T

THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE.

“what signifies a miserable one child, when our
mother has two?”

When poor Niobe saw her children killed before
her she wept bitterly, and she could not stop her
tears. They flowed on and on, until she cried
herself into stone.

As for Apollo, he kept on erowing handsomer
and stronger until he became a god—the most
glorious of all the gods in the sky. Jupiter made
him the god of the Sun, and made his sister, Diana,
goddess of the Moon. He was also the god of all
beautiful and useful things: of music, painting,
poetry, medicine. Several names were given to
him. One of his names is “ Pheebus,” which means
bright and splendid like the sun. “Apollo” means
“the Destroyer”: people must guess for themselves
why he was called “ the Destroyer.”

In pictures and statues he is always made grace-
ful, beautiful, and young. He has no hair on
his face, but wears long waving hair. Sometimes
he carries a lyre—a sort of small harp—and some-
times a bow. Very often he wears a wreath of
laurel. You must take a great deal of notice of
Apollo or Pheebus, because he is the most famous
of all the gods next to Jupiter. It will help you
to know him if you think of him as always beauti-
ful, wise, and bright, but rather cruel and hard.



PART II—THE FLAYED PIPER; on,
THE STORY OF MARSYAS.

HE men who filled the earth after the Great
Flood were a great deal cleverer than people
are now. the alphabet—which is, perhaps, the most wonder-
ful thing in the world. And when he wanted to
build the city of Thebes, he got a great musician,
named Amphion, to play to the stones and trees,
so that they, by dancing to his tunes, built them-
selves into walls and houses without the help of
any masons or carpenters. At last men became go
wonderfully clever in everything, that a physician
named A‘sculapius, who was a son of Apollo, found
out how to bring back dead people to life again.
But when Jupiter heard that ARsculapius had
really made a dead man live, he was angry, and
rather frightened too. For he thought, “If men
know how to live for ever, they will become as



THE FLAYED PIPER. 29

ereat and as wise as the gods, and who knows what
will happen then?” So he ordered the Cyclopes
to make him a thunderbolt, and he threw it down
from heaven upon Aésculapius and killed him. No
other man knew the secret of Esculapius, and it
died with him.

But Apollo was very fond and proud of his son,
and was in a great rage with Jupiter for having killed
him. He could not punish Jupiter, but he took
his bow and arrows and shot all the Cyclopes who
had made the thunderbolt.

Then it was Jupiter's turn to be angry with
Apollo for killing his servants, who had only done
what they were told to do. He sentenced him to
be banished from the sky for nine years.

So Apollo left the sky and came down to the
earth, bringing with him nothing but his lyre.
You know that Mount Olympus, where the gods
live, is in Thessaly, so that Thessaly was the coun-
try in which Apollo found himself when he came
down from the sky. He did not know what to do
with himself for the nine years, so he went to a
king of Thessaly named Admétus, who received him
very kindly, and made him his shepherd. I don’t
think Admetus could have known who Apollo was,
or he would hardly have set the great god of the
Sun to look after his sheep for him.

So Apollo spent his time pleasantly enough in
watching the king’s sheep and in playing on his lyre.



30 APOLLO.

Now there was a very clever but very conceited
musician named Marsyas, who had invented the
flute, and who played on it better than anybody in
the world. One day Marsyas happened to be pass-
ing through Thessaly, when he saw a shepherd
sitting by a brook watching his sheep, and playing
to them very beautifully on a lyre. He went up
to the shepherd and said—

“You play very nicely, my man. But nobody
can do much with those harps and fiddles and
trumpery stringed things. You should learn the
flute; then you’d know what music means!”

“Indeed?” said Apollo. “Vm sorry, for your
sake, that your ears are so hard to please. As
for me, I don’t care for whistles and squeaking
machines.”

“ Ah!” said Marsyas, “that’s because you never
heard Me!”

“And you dare to tell me,” said Apollo, “ that
you put a wretched squeaking flute before the lyre,
which makes music for the gods in the sky ?”

“ And you dare to say,” said Marsyas, “that a
miserable twanging, tinkling lyre is better than a
flute? What an ignorant blockhead you must
be!”

At last their wrangling about their instruments
grew to quarrelling; and then Apollo said—

“ We shall never settle the question in this way.
We will go to the next village and give a concert.



THE FLAYED PIPER. 31

You shall play your flute and I will play my lyre,
and the people shall say which is the best—yours
or mine.”

“With all my heart,” said Marsyas. “I know
what they will say. But we must have a wager on
it. What shall it be?”

“We will bet our skins,” said Apollo. “If I
lose, you shall skin me; and if you lose, J will skin
you.”

« Aoreed,” said Marsyas.

So they went to the next village, and called the
people together to judge between the flute and the
lyre.

Marsyas played first. He played a little simple
tune on his flute so beautifully that everybody was
charmed. But Apollo then played the same tune
on his lyre, even more beautifully still.

Then Marsyas took his flute again and played
all sorts of difficult things—flourishes, runs, shakes,
everything you can think of—in the most amazing
manner, till the people thought they had never
heard anything so wonderful. And indeed never
had such flute-playing been heard.

But Apollo, instead of following him in the same
fashion, only played another simple tune—but
this time he sang while he played.

You can imagine how gloriously the god of Music
sang! You can fancy how much chance Marsyas
had of winning when Apollo’s voice was carrying



32 APOLLO.

the hearts of the people away. . . . “There,” said
Apollo, when he had finished, “beat that if you can
——and give me your skin!”

“Tt is not fair!” said Marsyas. “This is not a
singing match: the question is, Which is the best
instrument—the flute or the lyre?”

“ Tt ds fair,” said Apollo. “If you can sing while
you are playing the flute, then I have nothing to
say. But you can’t sing, you see, because you have
to use your lips and your breath in blowing into
those holes. Is not that instrument the best which
makes you sing best—Yes or No? And if I mustn’t
use my breath, you mustn’t use yours.”

You must judge for yourself which was right.
But the people decided for Apollo. And so Apollo,
having won the wager, took Marsyas and skinned
him, and hung his body on a tree.



33

PART ILL—l0O MUCH GOLD; or, THE FIRST
STORY OF MIDAS.

HERE were other beings besides men upon the
earth in those days. You ought to know

something about them now, because Apollo, while
he was banished from the sky, had a great deal to
do with them. These beings were called Nymphs,
Fauns, and Satyrs.

The Nymphs were a kind of beautiful she-
fairies.

Dryads were nymphs who lived in forests.

Hamadryads were nymphs who lived in trees.
Every tree has a Hamadryad, who lives in it, who
is born when it first grows, and who dies when it
dies. So that a Hamadryad is killed whenever a
tree is cut down,

Naiads were nymphs belonging to brooks and
rivers. Every stream has its Naiad.

Oreads were nymphs who lived upon hills and

Cc



34 APOLLO.

mountains. They used to attend upon Apollo’s
sister Diana, who went hunting every moonlight
night among the hills.

The Fauns and Satyrs were he-creatures, like
men, with the hind-legs of goats, short horns on
their foreheads, and long pointed ears. But there
was a difference between the Fauns and Satyrs.
The Fauns were handsome, gentle, innocent, and
rather foolish, The Satyrs were hideous, clumsy,
hairy monsters, with flat faces, little eyes, and
huge mouths, great gluttons, often drunk, and
sometimes mischievous: most of them were dull
and stupid, but many of them had plenty of sense
and knowledge. The Fauns and Satyrs lived
among the woods and hills, like the Dryads and
Oreads.

The king of all these Nymphs, Fauns, and
Satyrs was a god named Pan, who was himself
a very hideous satyr. He had nothing to do with
the gods of Olympus, but lived on the earth, chiefly
in a part of Greece called Arcadia. “Pan” is the
Greek for “all”—you may remember the same
word in the name of “ Pan-dora.” He was called
“Pan” because he was the god of “all” nature—
all the hills and mountains, all the woods and
forests, all the fields, rivers, and streams.

The ugliest, fattest, greediest, tipsiest, cleverest,
and wisest of all the satyrs was named Siltnus.
He was hardly ever sober, but he knew so much



TOO MUCH GOLD. 35

and understood the world so well, that one of the
gods, named Bacchus, made Silenus his chief ad-
viser and counsellor. You will hear more of
Bacchus later on. I will only tell you now that
he was not one of the great gods of Olympus, but
lived on the earth, like Pan. Only, while Pan was
the god of all wild, savage nature, Bacchus was the
god of nature as men make it: Bacchus taught
men to turn Pan’s wild woods into corn-fields and
eardens, to put bees into hives, and to make wine.
I think Silenus had an especially great deal to do
with the wine-making. You will often hear Bac-
chus called the god of wine, and so he was; but he
was a great deal more and better.

This has been a long beginning to my story ;
but if you will get it well into your head, you will
find it easy to remember, and will make a great
step in understanding mythology.

Now once upon a time Silenus got very drunk
indeed—more drunk even than usual. He was
travelling about with Bacchus, but had strayed
away by himself, and, when night came on, could
not find his way back into the road. He could
do nothing but blunder and stagger about in the
middle of the thick dark forest, stumbling and
sprawling over the roots of the trees, and knocking
his head against the branches. At last he gave a
tremendous tumble into a bush, and lay there, too



36 APOLLO.

drunk and too fat to pick himself up again. So he
went to sleep and snored terribly.

Presently some huntsmen passed by, and thought
they heard some wild beast roaring. You may
guess their surprise when they found this hideous
old satyr helplessly drunk and unable to move.
But they did not catch a satyr every day: so they
took him by the head and shoulders, and brought
him as a prize to the king.

This king was King Midas of Phrygia, which is
a country in Asia Minor. As soon as King Midas
saw the satyr, he guessed him to be Silenus, the
friend of Bacchus: so he did everything to make

him comfortable till his drunkenness should pass
" away. It passed away at last; and then King
Midas sent all round about to find where Bacchus
was, so that Silenus might go back to him. While
the search was being made, the king and the satyr
became great friends, and Silenus, keeping fairly
sober, gave Midas a great deal of good advice, and
taught him science and philosophy.

At last Bacchus was found; and Midas himself
brought Silenus back to him. Bacchus was ex-
ceedingly glad to see Silenus again, for he was
beginning to be afraid that he had lost him for
ever, “ Ask any gift you please,” he said to King
Midas, “and it shall be yours.”

“Grant me,” said Midas, “ that everything I touch
shall turn into gold.”



TOO MUCH GOLD. 37

Bacchus looked vexed and disappointed. But he
was bound by his promise, and said—

“Tt is a fool’s wish. But so be it. Everything
you touch shall turn to gold.”

Midas thanked Bacchus, said good-bye to Silenus
and went home. How rich he was going to be—
the richest king in the whole world! He opened his
palace door, and lo! the door became pure, solid
gold. He went from room to room, touching all the
furniture, till everything, bedsteads, tables, chairs,
all became gold. He got a ladder (which turned
into gold in his hands) and touched every brick
and stone in his palace, till his whole palace was
gold. His horses had golden saddles and golden
bridles. His cooks boiled water in golden kettles:
his servants swept away golden dust with golden
brooms.

When he sat down to dinner, his plate turned
to gold. He had become the richest man in the
world, thought he with joy and pride, as he helped
himself from the golden dish before him. But
suddenly his teeth jarred against something hard—
harder than bone. Had the cook put a flint into
the dish? Alas! it was nothing of the kind. His
very food, as soon as it touched his lips, turned to
solid gold!

His heart sank within him, while the meat be-
fore him mocked his hunger. Was the richest man



38 APOLLO.

in the world to starve? A horrible fear came upon
him. He poured out wine into a golden cup, and
tried to drink, and the wine turned into gold! He
sat in despair.

What was he to do? What was the use of
all this gold if he could not buy with it a crust of
bread or a draught of water? The poorest plough-
man was now a richer man than the king. He
could only wander about his golden palace till
his hunger became starvation, and his thirst a fever.
At last, in his despair, he set out and followed
after Bacchus again, to implore the god to take back
the gift of gold.

At last, when nearly starved to death, he found
him. “What!” said Bacchus, “are you not con-
tent yet? Do you want more gold still ?”

“Gold!” cried Midas, “I hate the horrible word !
IT am starving. Make me the poorest man in the
whole world. Silenus taught me much; but I
have learned for myself that a mountain of gold
is not the worth of a single drop of dew.”

“JT will take back my gift, then,” said Bacchus.
“But I will not give you another instead of it,
because all the gods of Olympus could not give you
anything better than this lesson. You may wash
away your folly in the first river you come to,
Good-bye
good thing because too much of it is a bad one.”



and only don’t think that gold is not a



TOO MUCIL GOLD. 39

Midas ran to the banks of the river Pactolus,
which ran hard by. He threw off his golden
clothes, and hurried barefoot over the sands of the



and the sand, wherever his naked feet touched
it, turned to gold. He plunged into the water, and
swam through to the other side. The Curse of the
Golden Touch left him, and he ate and drank, and
never hungered after gold again. He had learned
that the best thing one can do with too much gold
is to give it away as fast as one can.

The sand of the river Pactolus is said to have
gold in it to this day.

river



40

PART IV.—THE CRITIC; or, THE SECOND
STORY OF MIDAS.

NCE upon a time the god Pan fell in love with
a Naiad, or water-nymph, named Syrinx. She
was very beautiful, as all the nymphs were; but
Pan, as you know, was very ugly—so ugly that she
hated him, and was afraid of him, and would have
nothing to do with him. At last, to escape from
him, she turned herself into a reed.
~ But even then Pan did not lose his love for her.
He gathered the reed, and made it into a musical
instrument, which he called a Syrinx. We call it
a Pan-pipe, after the name of its inventor, and be-
cause upon this pipe Pan turned into music all his
sorrow for the loss of Syrinx, making her sing of
the love to which she would not listen while she
was alive.
I suppose that King Midas still kept up his
friendship for Silenus and the satyrs, for one day



THE CRITIC. 41

he was by when Pan was playing on his pipe of
reeds, and he was so delighted with the music that
he cried out, “ How beautiful! Apollo himself is
not so great a musician as Pan!”

You remember the story of Marsyas, and how
angry Apollo was when anybody’s music was put
before his own? I suppose that some ill-natured
satyr must have told him what King Midas had
gaid about him and Pan. Anyway, he was very
angry indeed. And Midas, the next time he looked
at himself in his mirror, saw that his ears had been
changed into those of an Ass.

This was to show him what sort of ears those
people must have who like the common music of
earth better than the music which the gods send
down to us from the sky. But, as yon may sup-
pose, it made Midas very miserable and ashamed.
“ All my people will think their king an Ass,” he
thought to himself, “and that would never do.”

So he made a very large cap to cover his ears,
and never took it off, so that nobody might see
what had happened to him. But one of his ser-
vants, who was very prying and curious, wondered
why the king should always wear that large cap,
and what it was that he could want to hide. He
watched and watched for a long time in vain.
But at last he hid himself in the king’s bed-
room; and when Midas undressed to go to bed,



49 * APOLLO.

he saw, to his amazement, that his master had Ass’s
ears. :

He was very frightened too, as well as amazed.
He could not bear to keep such a curious and sur-
prising secret about the king all to himself, for he
was a great gossip, like most people who pry into
other people’s affairs. But he thought to himself,
“Tf I tell about the king’s ears he will most cer-
tainly cut off my own! But I must tell somebody.
Whom shall I tell ?”

So, when he could bear the secret no longer, he
dug a hole into the ground, and whispered into it,
“King Midas has the Ears of an Ass!” Then,
having thus eased his mind, he filled up the hole
again, so that the secret might be buried in the
earth for ever.

But all the same, before a month had passed,
the secret about the king’s ears was known to all
the land. How could that be? The king still
wore his cap, and the servant had never dared to
speak about it to man, woman, or child. You will
never be able to guess how the secret got abroad
without being told.

It was in this way. Some reeds grew up out of
the place where the servant had made the hole,
and of course the reeds had heard what had been
whispered into the ground where their roots were.
And they were no more able to keep such a won-

<.



THE CRITIC. 43

derful secret to themselves than the servant had
been. Whenever the wind blew through them they
rustled, and their rustle said, “ King Midas has the
Fars of an Ass!” The wind heard the words of the
reeds, and carried the news through all the land,
wherever it blew, “ King Midas has the Ears of an
Ass!” And all the people heard the voice of the
wind, and gaid to one another, “ What a wonderful
thing —King Midas has the Ears of an Ass!”





44

PART V.—SOME FLOWER STORIES.

I.—THE LAUREL.

NE day, Apollo, while following his flock of
sheep, met a little boy playing with a bow
and arrows.

“That isn’t much of a bow you've got there,”
said Apollo.

“Tsn’'t it?” said the boy. “Perhaps not; but
all the same, I don’t believe you’ve got a better,
though youre so big and I’m so small.”

Now you know that Apollo never could bear to
be told that anybody could have anything, or do any-
thing, better than he. You remember how he treated
Marsyas and Midas for saying the same kind of
thing. So he took his own bow from his shoulder,
and showed it to the boy, and said, “ As you think
you know so much about bows and arrows, look at
that; perhaps you'll say that the bow which killed



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 45

the great serpent Python isn’t stronger than your
trumpery little toy.”

The boy took Apollo’s bow and tried to bend it:
but it was much too strong for him. “ But never
mind,” said he. “My little bow and arrows are
better than your big ones, all the same.”

Apollo was half angry and half amused. “ You
little blockhead! how do you make out that?”
asked he.

“Because,” said the boy, “your bow can kill
everybody else—but mine can conquer you. You
shall see.”

And so saying he let fly one of his arrows right
into Apollo’s heart. The arrow was so little that
Apollo felt nothing more than the prick of a pin:
he only laughed at the boy’s nonsense, and went ou
his way as if nothing had happened.

But Apollo would not have thought so little of
the matter if he had known that his heart had been
pricked by a magic arrow. The boy’s name was
Cupid: and you will read a good deal about him
both in this book and in others. Oddly enough,
though the boy was one of the gods of Olympus,
Apollo had never seen him before, and knew
nothing about him. Perhaps Cupid had not been
born when Apollo was banished from the sky.
However this may be, there is no doubt about what
Cupid’s arrows could do. If he shot into the



46 APOLLO.

hearts of two people at the same time with two of
his golden arrows, they loved each other, and were
happy. But if he shot only one heart, as he did
Apollo’s, that person was made to love somebody
who did not love him in return, and perhaps hated
him: so he became very miserable.

So it happened to Apollo. He became very
fond of a nymph named Daphne. But though he
was so great and glorious a god, and she only a
Naiad, she was only afraid of him and would have
nothing to do with him—because Cupid, out of
mischief, shot her heart with one of his leaden
arrows, which prevented love. Apollo prayed her
to like him; but she could not, and when she
saw him coming used to hide away at the bottom
of her river.

But one day she was rambling in a wood a
long way from her home. And, to her alarm, she
suddenly saw Apollo coming towards her. She
took to her heels and ran. She ran very fast
indeed; but her river was far away, and Apollo
kept gaining upon her—for nobody on the earth
or in the sky could run so fast as he. At last she
was so tired and so frightened that she could run
no longer, and was obliged to stand still.

“Rather than let Apollo touch me,” she said, “1
would be a Hamadryad, and never be able to run
again !”

She wished it so hard, that suddenly she felt her



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 47

feet take root in the earth. Then her arms turned
to branches, and her fingers to twigs, and her hair
to leaves. And when Apollo reached the spot, he
found nothing but a laurel bush growing where
Daphne had been. ,

That is why “Daphne” is the Greek for
“Laurel.” And for ever after Apollo loved the
bush into which Daphne had been turned. You
may know Apollo in pictures by his laurel wreath
as well as by his lyre and bow. .

It is a very ancient saying that “Love con-
quers all things.” And that is exactly what Cupid
meant by saying that his toy-bow was stronger
even than the bow which had killed Python,
and could conquer with ease even the god of
the Sun.

II.—_THE HYACINTH.

You remember that Apollo and Diana were born in
the island of Delos. The part of Delos where they
were born was a mountain called Cynthus ; and for
that reason Apollo was often called Cynthius, and
Diana, Cynthia. Bear this in mind, in order to
follow this story.

While Apollo was on earth, Amyelas, the King of
Sparta, engaged him to be the teacher of his son,



48 APOLLO.

This boy, named Hyacinthus, was so handsome and
so amiable that Apollo became exceedingly fond of
him; indeed, he could not bear to be away from his
pupil’s company.

But the west wind, whose name is Zéphyrus,
was also very fond of the boy, whose chief friend he
had been before Apollo came. He was afraid that
the son of Amyclas liked Apollo best; and this
thought filled him with jealousy. One day, as he
was blowing about the king’s garden, he saw Apollo
and the boy playing at quoits together. “ Quoits ”
are heavy rings made of iron: each player takes
one, and throws it with all his strength at a peg
fixed in the ground, and the one who throws his
quoit nearest to the peg wins the game. Zephyrus
was so angry and jealous to see the two friends
amusing themselves while he was blowing about all
alone, that he determined to be revenged upon both
of them.

First of all the boy threw his quoit, and came
very near to the peg indeed—so near that even
Apollo, who could do everything better than any-
body, thought he should find it very hard to
beat him. The peg was a great way off, so Apollo
took up the heaviest quoit, aimed perfectly straight,
and sent it flying like a thunderbolt through the
air. But Zephyrus, who was waiting, gave a great
blast, and blew Apollo’s quoit as it was flying, so
that it struck the boy, who fell to the ground.



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 49

It was a cruel thing altogether. Apollo thought
that he himself had struck his friend by aiming
badly: the boy thought the same, for neither could
tell it was Zephyrus,—nobody has ever seen the
wind.

So perished Hyacinthus: nor could Apollo do
anything to show his love and grief for his friend
except change him into a flower, which is called
Hyacinth to this day. It is said that, if you look,
you will find “Hya” written in Greek letters upon
every petal of the flower. Some people, however,
say that it is not “Hya” at all, but “ Ajai,” which
means “alas.” I don’t know which is true; but
if you will some day look at the petal of a
hyacinth through a microscope (the stronger the
better, I should say) you will find out for your-
self and be able to tell me.

Apollo seems to have been rather fond of turning
his friends into trees and flowers. There was
another friend of his named Cy¥parissus, who once,
by accident, killed one of Apollo’s favourite stags,
and was so sorry for what he had done, and pined
away so miserably, that the god, to put him out
of hig misery, changed him into a cypress - tree.
“Cypress” comes from Cy¥pirissus, as you will
easily see. And we still plant the cypress in
churchyards, because it is the tree of tears and
mourning that cannot be cured.

D



50 APOLLO.

IJI.—THE SUN-FLOWER.

THERE was a nymph named Clytié, who was so
beautiful that Apollo fell in love with her. She
was very proud and glad of being loved by the god
of the Sun, and loved him a great deal more than
he loved her. But she believed that his love was
as great as her own: and so she lived happily for
a long time.

But one day, Apollo happened to see a king’s
daughter, whose name was Leucdthdé. He thought
she was the most beautiful creature he had ever
seen: so he fell in love with her, and forgot Clytie
as much as if there was nobody but Leucothoe in
the world. Clytie, however, knew nothing of all
this, and only wondered why Apollo never came to
see her any more.

Now the king, whose name was Orchamus, kept
his daughter very strictly: and did not wish her to
have anything to do with Apollo. I suppose he was
afraid of Apollo’s loving her for a time, and then
leaving her to be miserable and unhappy, as hap-
pened to many nymphs and princesses in those
days besides Clytie. So when King Orchamus found
that Apollo was making love to Leucothoe, he shut
her up in his palace, and would not allow her to go
out or anybody else to go in.

But Apollo was much too clever to be beaten in



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 51

that way. He disguised himself as Leucothoe’s own
mother, and so came to see her whenever he pleased,
without anybody being anything the wiser. And so
everything went on just as he wished, if it had not
been for Clytie, whom he had treated just as King
Orchamus was afraid he would treat Leucothoe.

Clytie wondered why Apollo never came to see
her till she could bear it no longer; and she watched
him, to find out what was the reason of it all. She
watched till at last she saw somebody who looked
like a queen go into the palace of King Orcha-
mus. But she knew Apollo much too well to be
taken in by any disguise. She secretly followed
him into the palace, and found him making love
to Leucothoe.

In her misery and jealousy, she went straight to
King Orchamus, and told him what she had seen.
Perhaps she hoped that the king would send his
daughter away altogether, so that Apollo would then
come back to her. She could not possibly foresee
what would really happen. King Orchamus was
so enraged with his daughter for receiving Apollo’s
visits against his commands that he ordered
Leucothoe to be buried alive. Of course he could
not punish Apollo: because Apollo was a god, while
he was only a king.

Perhaps you will think that Apollo might have
managed to save Leucothoe from such a terrible
death as her father had ordered for her. As he did



52 APOLLO,

not, I suppose that King Orchamus had her buried
before anybody could tell the news—at any rate
she was dead when Apollo arrived at her grave.
All he could do for her was to show his love and
his sorrow by turning her into a tree from which
people take a sweet-smelling gum called myrrh.

As to Clytie, whose jealousy had caused the death
of the princess, he refused ever to speak to her or
look at her again: and he turned her into a sun-
flower, which has no perfume like the myzrh-tree
into which he had changed Leucothoe. But, in
spite of his scorn and of everything he could do to
her, Clytie loved him still: and though he would
not look at her, she still spends her whole time in
gazing up at him with her blossoms, which are her
eyes. People say that the blossoms of the sun-
flower always turn towards the sun—towards the
east when he is rising, towards the west when he
is setting, and straight up at noon, when he is in
the middle of the sky. Of course, like all other
blossoms, they close at night, when he is no longer
to be seen. As for the sun himself, I expect he has
forgotten both Clytie and Leucothoe long ago; and
sees no difference between them and any other trees
or flowers.



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 53

IV.—THE NARCISSUS.

Tuts story has nothing to do with Apollo: but
I may as well tell it among the other flower
stories.

There was a very beautiful nymph named Kcho,
who had never, in all her life, seen anybody hand-
somer than the god Pan. You have read that Pan
was the chief of all the Satyrs, and what hideous
monsters the Satyrs were. So, when Pan made
_love to her, she very naturally kept. him at a dis-
tance: and, as she supposed him to be no worse-
looking than the rest of the world, she made up
her mind to have nothing to do with love or love-
making, and was quite content to ramble about the
woods all alone.

But one day, to her surprise, she happened to
meet with a young man who was as different from
Pan as any creature could be. Instead of having a
goat’s legs and long hairy arms, he was as graceful
as Apollo himself: no horns grew out of his fore-
head, and his ears were not long, pointed, and
covered with hair, but just like Echo’s own. And
he was just as beautiful in face as he was graceful
in form. I doubt if Echo would have thought even
Apollo himself so beautiful.

The nymphs were rather shy, and Echo was the



54 APOLLO.

very shyest of them all. But she admired him so
much that she could not leave the spot, and at last
she even plucked up courage enough to ask him,
“What is the name of the most beautiful being in
the whole world ?”

«Whom do you mean?” asked he. “ Yourself ?
If you want to know your own name, you can tell
it better than I can.”

“No,” said Echo, “I don’t mean myself. I mean
you. What is your name?”

“My name is Narcissus,” said he. “ But as for
my being beautiful—that is absurd.”

“Narcissus!” repeated Echo to herself. “It is
a beautiful name. Which of the nymphs have you
come to meet here in these woods all alone? She
is lucky—whoever she may be.”

“JT have come to meet nobody,” said Narcissus.
«“But—am I really so beautiful? I have often
been told so by other girls, of course; but really
it is more than I can quite believe.”

« And you don’t care for any of those girls ?”

“Why, you see,” said Narcissus, “ when all the
girls one knows call one beautiful, there’s no reason
why I should care for one more than another.
They all seem alike when they are all always saying
just the same thing. Ah! I do wish I could see
myself, so that I could tell if it was really true.
I would marry the girl who could give me the wish
of my heart—to see myself as other people see me.



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 55

But as nobody can make me do that, why, I sup-
pose I shall get on very well without marrying
anybody at all.”

Looking-glasses had not been invented in those
days, so that Narcissus had really never scen even
so much of himself as his chin.

“What!” cried Echo, full of hope and joy; “if
I make you see your own face, you will marry
me 2”

“TI gaid so,’ said he. “And of course what I
say Tl do, I'll do.”

“ Then—come with me!”

Echo took him by the hand and led him to the
edge of a little lake in the middle of the wood, full
of clear water.

“Kneel down, Narcissus,” said she, “and bend
your eyes over the water-side. That lake is the
mirror where Diana comes every morning to dress
her hair, and in which, every night, the moon and
the stars behold themselves. Look into that water,
and see what manner of man you are!”

Narcissus kneeled down and looked into the lake.
And, better than in any common looking-glass, he
saw the reflected image of his own face—and he
looked, and looked, and could not take his eyes
away.

But Echo at last grew tired of waiting. “Have
you forgotten what you promised me?” asked she.



56 APOLLO,

« Are you content now? Do you see now that what
I told you is true?”

He lifted his eyes at last. “Oh, beautiful crea-
ture that Iam!” said he. “I am indeed the most
divine creature in the whole wide world. I love
myself madly. Go away. I want to be with my
beautiful image, with myself, all alone. I can’t
marry you. I shall never love anybody but myself
for the rest of my days.” And he kneeled down
and gazed at himself once more, while poor Echo
had to go weeping away.

Narcissus had spoken truly. He loved himself
and his own face so much that he could think of
nothing else: he spent all his days and nights by
the lake, and never took his eyes away. But un-
luckily his image, which was only a shadow in the
water, could not love him back again. And so he
pined away until he died. And when his friends
came to look for his body, they found nothing but
a flower, into which his soul had turned. So they
called it the Narcissus, and we call it so still. And
yet I don’t know that it is a particularly conceited
or selfish flower.

As for poor Echo, she pined away too. She
faded and faded until nothing was left of her but
her voice. There are many places where she can
even now be heard. And she still has the same



SOME FLOWER STORIES. 57

trick of saying to vain and foolish people whatever
they say to themselves, or whatever they would
like best to hear said to them. If you go where
Echo is, and call out loudly, “T am beautiful !”—
she will echo your very words.





PART VL—PRESUMPTION; or, THE STORY
OF PHAETHON.

HERE was a nymph named Cl¥méné, who had a
gon so handsome that he was called Phatthon,
which means, in Greek, “ Bright, radiant, shining,”
like the sun. When he grew up, the goddess
Venus was so charmed with him that she made
him the chief ruler of all her temples, and took
him into such high favour that all his friends
and companions were filled with envy.

One day, when Phaitthon was foolishly bragging
about his own beauty and greatness, and how much
he was put by a goddess above other men, one
of his companions, named Epiphus, answered him,
scornfully—

“Ah! you may boast and brag, but you are a
nobody after all! Jy father was Jupiter, as every-
body knows; but who was yours ?”



PRESUMPTION. 59

So Phaéthon went to his mother Clymene, and
said—

“Mother, they taunt me for not being the son
of a god; me, who am fit to be a god myself for
my grace and beauty. Who was my father? He
must at least have been some great king, to be
the father of such a son as I.”

“A king!” said Clymene. “Ay—and a



ereater than all kings! Tell them, from me, that
your father is Phoebus Apollo, the god of the
Sun!”

But when he went back and told his friends,
“My father is Phoebus Apollo, the god of the Sun,”
Epaphus and the others only scorned him and
laughed at him the more. “You've caught your
bragging from your mother,” said they. “ You're
her son, anyhow, whoever your father may be.”

When Clymene heard this, she felt terribly
offended. “Then I will prove my words,” said
she. “Go to the Palace of the Sun and _ enter
boldly. There you will see the Sun-god in all
his glory. Demand of him to declare you to be
his son openly before all the world, so that even
the sons of Jupiter shall hang their heads for
shame.”

If Apollo had been still banished upon earth, of
course Phaitthon could have found him very easily.
But the nine years of banishment were over now,
and the only way to find the god of the Sun



60 APOLLO.

was to seek him in his palace above the sky.
How Phatthon managed to get there I have never
heard; but I suppose his mother was able to
tell him the secret way. You may imagine the
glorious and wonderful place it was—the House
of the Sun, with the stars for the windows that
are lighted up at night, and the clouds for curtains,
and the blue sky for a garden, and the Zodiac for a
carriage-drive. The sun itself, as you have heard,
is the chariot of Apollo, drawn by four horses
of white fire, who feed on golden grain, and are
driven by the god himself round and round the
world. Phatthon entered boldly, as his mother
had told him, found Apollo in all his glory, and
said—

“My mother, Clymene, says that I am your
son. Is it true?”

“ Certainly,” said Apollo, “it is true.”

“Then give me a sign,” said Phaéthon, “ that all
may know and believe. Make me sure that I
am your son.”

“Tell them that Z say so,” said Apollo. “There
—don’t hinder me any more. My horses are har-
nessed: it is time for the sun to rise.”

“No,” said Phaéthon, “they will only say that
I brag and lie. Give me a sign for all the
world to see



a sign that only a father would
give to his own child.”
“Very well,” said Apollo, who was getting



PRESUMPTION. 61

impatient at being so hindered. “ Only tell me
what you want me to do, and it shall be
done.”

“You swear it—by Styx?” said Phaithon.

Now you must know that the Styx was a
river in Hades by which the gods swore; and that
an oath “by Styx” was as binding upon a god
as a plain promise is upon a gentleman.

“T swear it—by Styx!” said Apollo, rather
rashly, as you will see. But he was now in a
very great hurry indeed.

“Then,” said Phatthon, “let me drive the horses
of the Sun for one whole day !”

This put Apollo in terrible alarm, for he knew
very well that no hand, not even a god’s, can drive
the horses of the Sun but his own. But he had
sworn by Styx—the oath that cannot be broken.
All he could do was to keep the world waiting for
sunrise while he showed Phaéthon how to hold the
reins and the whip, and pointed out what course to
take, and warned him of the dangers of the road.
“But it’s all of no use. You'll never do it,” said
he. “Give it up, while there is yet time! You
know not what you do.”

“Oh, but I do, though,” said Phatthon. “I
know I can. There—I understand it all now,
without another word.” So saying, be sprang into
the chariot, seized the reins, and gave the four fiery



62 APOLLO,

horses four lashes that sent them flying like comets
through the air.

“Hold them in—hold them hard!” cried Apollo.
But Phaéthon was off, and too far off to hear.

Off indeed! and where? The world must have
been amazed that day to see the sun rise like a
rocket and go dashing about the sky, north, south,
east, west—anywhere, nowhere, everywhere! Well
the horses. knew that it was not Apollo, their
master, who plied the whip and held the reins.
They took their bits between their teeth, and—
bolted. They kicked a planet to bits (astronomers
know where the pieces are still): they broke holes
in the chariot which we can see, and call “sun-
spots,” to this day: it was as if chaos were come
again. At last, Phaéthon, whose own head was
reeling, saw to his horror that the horses, in their
mad rush, were getting nearer and nearer to the
earth itself—and what would happen then? If
the wheels touched the globe we live on, it would
be scorched to a cinder. Nearer, nearer, nearer it
came—till a last wild kick broke the traces, over-
turned the sun itself, and Phaéthon fell, and fell,
and fell, till he fell into the sea, and was drowned.
And then the horses trotted quietly home.

The story of Phaéthon is always taken as a warn-
ing against being conceited and self-willed. But



PRESUMPTION. 63

there are some curious things about it still to be
told. The Greeks fancied that the great desert of
Sahara, in Africa, is the place where the earth was
scorched by the sun’s chariot-wheel, and that the
African negroes were burned black in the same way,
and have never got white again. And the poplars
are Phaéthon’s sisters, who wept themselves for his
death into trees.







MEX > & GY fa goa & (o= ee) rt
SVS S ESE ESSE





ik Fr aS 8 = 4 WY fos S
ake @ we : ae
NY Cw; C nae Ne M ca 22) ey



@\y40U know that the fixed stars are
divided into groups, called constella-
tions. A name has been given to



every constellation ; and eacli is sup-
posed to be like the shape of some
creature or thing-——such as the Great Bear, the
Swan, the Cup, the Eagle, the Dragon, and so on.
Most of their names were given by the Greeks, who
fancied they could see in them the shapes after
which they were named. We have kept the old
names, and still paint the supposed figure of each
constellation on the celestial globe, which is the
image or map of the sky.

Now the grandest, brightest, and largest of all
the constellations is named Orion. It is supposed
to represent a giant, with a girdle and a sword,



DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION. 65

and is rather more like what is fancied than
most of the constellations are. You are now going
to read the story of Orion, and how he came to be
placed among the stars. You may notice, by the
way, that the planets, the sun, and the moon are
named after gods and goddesses; the fixed stars
after mortals who were raised to the skies.

There was once a man named Hyriéus, whose
wife died, and be loved her so much, and was so
overcome with grief that he vowed never to marry
again. But she left him no children. And when,
in course of time, he grew old, he sadly felt the
want of sons and daughters to make his old age
less hard and lonely.

One day it happened that Jupiter, Neptune, and
Mercury (who was one of the gods, and Jupiter’s
chief minister and messenger) were on a visit to
earth. The night fell, and they grew tired and
hungry. So they wandered on to find rest and
food; and, as luck would have it, they came to the
cottage of Hyrieus, and asked for shelter. Hyrieus
thought they were only three poor benighted trav-
ellers who had lost their way. But he was very
good and charitable, so he asked them in and gave
them the best fare he had—bread, roots, and wine—
he himself waiting upon them, and trying to make
them comfortable. He poured out a cup of wine,
and offered it first to Neptune. But Neptune, in-

E



66 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

stead of drinking it, rose from his seat and gave
the cup to Jupiter, like a subject to a king who
should be first served. You may not think there
was much to notice in this; but Hyrieus noticed
it, and then, looking intently upon the stranger to
whom Neptune had given the cup, he was struck
by a sudden religious awe that told him he was in
the presence of the king and father of gods and
men. He straightway fell on his knees and said—

“T am.poor and humble; but I have in my stall
one ox to plough my field. I will gladly offer him
up as a sacrifice for joy that Jupiter has thought
me worthy to give him bread and wine.”

2

“You are a good and pious man,” said Jupiter.
“Ask of us any gift you please, and it shall be yours.”

“My wife is dead,” said Hyrieus, “and I have
vowed never to marry again. But let me have a
child.”

“Take the ox,” said Jupiter, “and sacrifice him.”

So Hyrieus, being full of faith, sacrificed his ox,
and, at the bidding of Jupiter, buried the skin.
And from that skin, and out of the ground, there
grew a child, who was named Orion.

Orion grew and grew till he became a giant, of
wonderful strength and splendid beauty. He took
the most loving care of Hyrieus, and was the best
of sons to him. But when the old man died,
Orion went out into the world to seek his fortune.



DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION. 67

And the first service he found was that of Diana,
the sister of Apollo, and queen and goddess of the
Moon.

Diana, however, had a great deal to do besides
looking after the moon. She was three goddesses
in one



a goddess of the sky, a goddess of earth,
and a goddess of Hades besides. In heaven she
was called Luna, whose duty is to light the world
when Apollo is off duty. In Hades she was called
Hécaté, who, with her sceptre, rules the ghosts of
dead souls. And on earth her name is Diana, the
queen of forests and mountains, of wild animals
and hunters. She wears a crescent on her forehead
and a quiver at her back; her limbs are bare, and
she holds a bow, with which she shoots as well as
her brother Apollo. Just as he is called Pho-
bus, so she is often called Pheebe. She goes hunt-
ing all night among the hills and woods, attended
by the Nymphs and Oreads, of whom she is queen.
There are not so many stories about her as about
the other gods and goddesses, and yet she is really
the most interesting of them all, as you will see
some day.

This great strange goddess had sworn never to
love or marry—had sworn it by Styx, I suppose.
But Orion was so beautiful and so strong and so
great a hunter that she went ag near to loving him
as she ever did to loving any one. She had him
always with her, and could never bear him to leave



68 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

her. But Orion never thought of becoming the
husband of a goddess, and he fell in love with a
mortal princess, the daughter of Gnopion, King of
Chios, an island in the Aigean Sea.

When, however, he asked the king for his daugh-
ter, CEnopion was terribly frightened at the idea of
having a giant for his son-in-law. But he dared
not say “No.” He answered hin—

“My kingdom is overrun with terrible wild
beasts. I will give my daughter to the man who
kills them all.” He said this, feeling sure that
any man who tried to kill all the wild beasts in
Chios would himself be killed.

But Orion went out, and killed all the wild
beasts in no time, with his club and his sword.
Then Ginopion was still more afraid of him, and
said—

“You have won my daughter. But, before you
marry her, let us drink together, in honour of this
joyful day.”

Orion, thinking no harm, went with Gnopion
to the sea-shore, where they sat down and drank
together. But Ginopion (whose name means “ The
Wine-Drinker”) knew a great deal more about what
wine will do, and how to keep sober, than Orion.
So before long Orion fell asleep with the strong
Chian wine, which the king had invented; and
when Orion was sound asleep, Génopion put out
both his eyes.



DIANA; AND TIE STORY OF ORION. 69

The giant awoke to find himself blind, and did
not know what to do or which way to go. But at
last, in the midst of his despair, he heard the sound
of a blacksmith’s forge. Guided by the clang, he
reached the place, and prayed the blacksmith to
climb up on his shoulders, and so lend him his
eyes to guide him.

The blacksmith consented, and seated himself on
the giant’s shoulder. Then said Orion—

“Guide me to the place where I can see the first
sunbeam that rises at daybreak in the east over the
sea.”

Orion strode out, and the blacksmith guided
him, and at last they came to the place where the
earliest sunbeam first strikes wpon human eyes. It
struck upon Orion’s, and it gave him back his sight
again. Then, thanking the blacksmith, he plunged
into the sea to swim back to Diana.

Now Apollo had long noticed his sister’s affec-
tion for Orion, and was very much afraid for fear
she should break her vow against love and marriage.
To break an oath would be a horrible thing for a
goddess to do. While Orion was away, making
love and killing wild beasts in Chios, there was no
fear; but now he was coming back, there was no
knowing what might happen. So he thought of a
trick to get rid of Orion, and he said—

“My sister, some people say that you can



70 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

shoot as well as I can. Now, of course, that is
absurd.”

“Why absurd?” asked Diana. “I can shoot
quite as well as you.”

“ We will soon see that,” said Apollo. “Do you
see that little dark speck out there, in the sea? I
wager that you won’t hit it, and that T can.”

“We will see,’ said Diana. So she drew her
bow and shot her arrow at the little dark speck, that
seemed dancing on the waves miles and miles away.
To hit it seemed impossible. But Diana’s arrow
went true. The speck was hit—it sank, and rose
no more.

It was the head of Orion, who was swimming
back to Diana. She had been tricked into killing
him with an arrow from her own bow. All she
could do was to place him among the stars.

So her vow was kept; and from that time she
never allowed herself to be seen by a man. Women
may see her; but if men see her, they go mad or
die. There is a terrible story of a hunter named
Action, who once happened to catch a glimpse of
her as she was bathing in a pool. She instantly
turned him into a stag, so that his own dogs fell
upon him and killed him. And another time, when
she saw a shepherd named Endymion on Mount
Latmos, and could not help wishing to kiss him for



DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORTON, | 71

his beauty, she covered herself with clouds as she
stooped, and threw him into a deep sleep, so that
he might not see her face, or know that he had
been kissed by the moon. Only from that hour he
became a poet and a prophet, full of strange fan-
cies; and it is said that every man becomes a mad-
man or a poet who goes to sleep in the moonlight
on the top of a hill. Diana comes and kisses him
in his dreams,

.









SCY|NE day Jupiter had a very bad head-
# ache. He had never had one be-
fore, so he did not know what



it was or what to do One god
recommended one thing and another
proposed another, and Jupiter tried them all; but
the more things he tried the worse the headache
erew. At last he said—

“T can’t stand this any more. Vulcan, bring
your great sledge-hammer and split open my skull.
Kill or cure.”

Vulcan brought his sledge-hammer and split open
Jupiter’s skull with a single blow. And out there
came a fine, full-grown goddess, clad in complete
armour from head to foot, armed with a spear
and shield, and with beautiful large blue eyes.



MINERVA; OR, WISDOM. 73

She was Minerva (or, in Greek, Athéné), the
Wisdom that comes from Jupiter’s brain, and makes
it ache sometimes.

Minerva was wonderfully good as well as won-
derfully wise: not that there is much difference
between goodness and wisdom. She is the only
goddess, or god either, who never did a foolish, an
unkind, or a wrong thing. By the way, though, she
once took it into her head that she could play the
flute, and the gods laughed at her; but when she
looked into a brook and saw what ugly faces
she made when she played, she knew at once what
made the gods laugh, laughed at herself, threw the
flute away, and never played it again; so she was
even ,wise enough not to be vain, or to think she
could do well what she did badly.

The only bad thing about good people is that
there are so few good stories to tell of them. She
was Jupiter’s favourite daughter, and no wonder;
and she was the only one of all the gods and
goddesses whom he allowed to use his thunder. She
was the only one he could trust, I suppose. She
was rather too fond of fighting, considering that she
was a lady, but she was as good at her needle as
her sword. She was so good at spinning, that a
woman named Arachne, who was the best spinner
and seamstress in the world, hanged herself in
despair because she could not spin a web so neatly
and finely as Minerva. The goddess turned her



7A MINERVA; OR, WISDOM.

into a spider, who is still the finest spinner in
the world, next to Minerva alone.

Once the people of Attica wanted a name for
their capital, which they had just been building.
They asked the gods, and the gods in council de-
creed that the new city should be named by the god
who should give the most useful new present to
mankind. Neptune struck the earth with his tri-
dent, and out sprang the horse, and nobody thought
that his gift could be beaten. But Minerva planted
the olive, which is the plant of peace. So the gods
gave the honour of naming the new city to Minerva,
because the emblem of peace is better than the
horse, who is the emblem of war. The name she
gave was from her own—Athéne ; and the city is
called Athens to this day. The Athenians always
paid their chief worship to their goddess-godmother.

Minerva was very handsome, but rather manly-
looking for a goddess, and grave; her most famous
feature was her blue eyes. “The Blue-eyed Maid”
is one of her most usual titles in poetry. She
wore a large helmet with waving plumes; in one
hand she held a spear; on her left arm she car-
ried the shield on which was the head of the
Gorgon Medusa, with living snakes darting from it.
But sometimes she carried a distaff instead of a
spear. The olive was of course sacred to her, and
her favourite bird is the owl, who is always called
the Bird of Wisdom.









VENUS.

PART L—THE GOD OF FIRE.

OU may remember reading, at the end
of the story of “The Gods and the
Giants,” that the quarrels of Jupiter

Fa





and Juno never ceased to disturb
the peace of the sky where the gods
dwell, Juno’s temper was terrible, and so was her
jealousy, and her pride was beyond all bounds. On
the other hand, her character was without reproach,
while Jupiter was the worst husband in the whole
of heaven. To such a pitch did their quarrels at
last reach, that Juno went away to earth, vowing
never to see Jupiter again.

I suppose, however, that Jupiter loved Juno in
the depth of his heart, or else he was afraid of the









VENUS.

PART L—THE GOD OF FIRE.

OU may remember reading, at the end
of the story of “The Gods and the
Giants,” that the quarrels of Jupiter

Fa





and Juno never ceased to disturb
the peace of the sky where the gods
dwell, Juno’s temper was terrible, and so was her
jealousy, and her pride was beyond all bounds. On
the other hand, her character was without reproach,
while Jupiter was the worst husband in the whole
of heaven. To such a pitch did their quarrels at
last reach, that Juno went away to earth, vowing
never to see Jupiter again.

I suppose, however, that Jupiter loved Juno in
the depth of his heart, or else he was afraid of the



76 VENUS.

scandal that would follow upon a separation between
the King and Queen of Heaven. At any rate he
consulted his friends as to how the quarrel could
be made up, and was advised by one of them, King
Citheron of Plata, to have it announced that he
was about to make some other goddess his queen.
On hearing the news, back flew Juno in a rage to
the sky to stop the marriage, and finding that there
was no marriage to stop, consented to remain, and
to forgive her husband once more.

But to quarrel once always makes it easier and
easier to quarrel again, and harder and harder to
keep love or friendship alive. And before long
came another quarrel—the worst of all. Juno
scolded furiously, and Jupiter at last said—

“Enough. You shall destroy the peace of
heaven no longer. Out you shall go.”

“ All the better,” said Juno. “I will go back
to earth as I did before. And I am not going to
be tricked by your false stories a second time.”

“No,” said Jupiter ; “the happiness of the earth
is as dear to me as the happiness of the sky. You
shall neither go to earth nor stay in heaven.”

Taking a long golden chain, he fastened it round
her, under her shoulders. Then he sent for one of
the Cyclopes’ anvils, and fastened it to her feet.
Securing the other end of the chain to the key-
stone of the rainbow, he let her down, so that Juno
hung suspended in mid-air, neither upon the earth



THE GOD OF FIRE. [7

nor in the sky, while the anvil at her feet prevented
her from swinging and from climbing up again by
the chain.

It was a terrible position for Juno. Her anger
was still at full heat, and such a degradation, in
full sight of gods and men, was a heavy wound to
her pride, not to speak of the bodily pain which
she had helplessly to bear. But she scorned to
beg for pardon. So there she hung, plotting re-
venge, until night came—till Apollo was asleep
under the sea, and Diana was away hunting, and
Jupiter, making the most of his long-lost quiet, was
dozing upon his throne. Then Juno, who certainly
could not sleep with an anvil dragging at her legs
and a chain at her shoulders, heard a whisper from
above, “Hush! Don’t start—don’t scream; keep
quite still, and Tl soon draw your majesty up
again.”

Not that Juno had thought of starting or scream-
ing—she was much too dignified. Besides, the
whisper, though rather rough and hoarse, was very
pleasant to hear just then. For she recognised the
voice of Vulcan, her own son, and she knew that
he was going to help her.

So she kept quite quiet as she was bidden, and
presently she felt herself, anvil and all, being drawn
very slowly upwards, just as you may have seen a
heavy sack drawn up by a machine to a warehouse
window. It must have been rather painful being



78 VENUS.

dragged up while the anvil dragged her down; but
she found herself on firm sky at last, and sighed
with relief when Vulcan, whipping out his knife,
cut the cord at her feet, and let the anvil go thun-
dering down upon the earth below.

You can fancy what a clatter it made. People
started out of their sleep—not that that mattered.
But it did matter that Jupiter started out of his.
He sprang from his throne, and saw at once what
had happened. The next moment, with a tremen-
dous kick, he sent Vulcan flying after the anvil.

Vulcan fell and fell, spinning through space, till
he lost his senses, and then—

The anvil had fallen wpon the island of Lemnos,
and the islanders, rushing out of their houses to see
what the crash and clatter could be about, were
amazed to see what looked like a confused bundle
of legs and arms tumbling and whirling through
the air. As it came nearer, it seemed to be a
human figure. So the people made a sort of net-
work of their arms, to catch it and prevent its being
dashed to pieces.

And lucky it was for vues that they did. For
when he came to himself he found himself with
nothing worse the matter than one leg badly
broken.

God though he was, he always remained lame,
and he was naturally somewhat deformed. But



THE GOD OF FIRE. 79

neither lameness nor deformity prevented his hav-
ing amazing strength; and he was as clever as he
was strong. The people of Lemnos treated him
kindly, and he in return taught them to work in
metals. They built him a palace, and he set up
forges and furnaces, and made all sorts of useful and
curious things. He used to work at the forges himself,
blowing the fires and wielding the hammer. Among
the curious things he made were two mechanical
statues, which seemed alive, walked about with him,
and even helped him in his work. And at last
there came into his head a plan for getting called
back into heaven. So he shut himself up in his
smithy with his two mechanical workmen, and let
nobody know what he was doing there. Those
mechanical workmen were among the most useful
things he made, for he could trust them to help
him in his most secret work without understanding
it or being able to tell how it was done.

One day the gods up in heaven were excited by
the arrival of a splendid golden throne—a present
from the earth for Jupiter. How it came there
nobody knew. But there it was, and all agreed
that nothing so magnificent in its way had ever
been seen before even in the skies. Jupiter was
about to try how it felt to sit upon, when Juno,
Jealous even of that, went quickly before him and
seated herself.



80 VENUS.

“Ah! that is a comfortable throne!” she ex-
claimed. “There is nothing like gold to sit upon,
after all.”

Jupiter was annoyed with Juno’s behaviour, as
indeed he was with most things she did. As, how-
ever, he did not like to make another scene before
all the gods and goddesses, he waited patiently for
her to get up again. But she did not move.

At last—-“T think that is my throne,” he hinted,
in a tone. which seemed gentle, but which Juno
understood exceedingly well. Still she did not
move.

“Thrones are not meant to go to sleep upon,”
he said in a yet more meaning way.

And still she did not move.

“Get up!” he thundered at last, his patience
gone.

“J can’t!” was all she could say, as she made a.
vain effort to rise. “The throne is holding me with
its arms !”

And so it proved. Juno was held so tightly
by the throne that she could scarcely struggle.
It was very strange. And presently it became
stranger still. Neither the authority of Jupiter,
nor all the strength and skill of all Olympus
together, could loosen the clutch of the magic
throne.

« Ah!” gaid Mercury—who, you may remember,
was Jupiter’s chief messenger, and the quickest and



THE GOD OF FIRE. 81

cleverest of all the gods—¢if only Vulcan were
here! He understands these things.”

“And why is he not here?” asked: Jupiter,
sternly.

But nobody dared answer, though everybody
knew. However, Mercury took the hint, vanished
for an instant or two, and, while the gods were
vainly tugging at the arms of the. throne, reap-
peared, followed by a limping figure all black and
hot from the forge—in short, by Vulcan.

“What is the matter?” asked Vulcan, as inno-
cently as if he had nothing to do with it at all.
“Ah! Isee. A clever invention; but By the
way, I can’t afford another broken leg: so if I help
my mother this time———”

Seeing from the face of Jupiter that he had noth-
ing to fear, he pressed the tip of his grimy finger



upon a secret spring—the arms instantly opened,
and Juno was free. What they did with the throne
I cannot tell you; but you may be certain that no-
body ever sat on it again.

After that, Vulcan remained among the gods as
the god of Fire, and was the chief blacksmith of
nature. He opened vast forges in the middle of
the earth, where he made weapons and armour for
gods and heroes, and thunderbolts for J upiter. The
Cyclopes, the giants with one eye in the middle
of their foreheads, were his workmen. The chim-

F



82 VENUS.

neys of his furnaces are called volcanoes, of which
the chief is Mount Etna in the island of Sicily ;
and one can tell when some great work is going on
by the smoke and flame that bursts out of these.
Volcano, you will no doubt notice, is very nearly
the same word as Vulcan.

And so things went on quietly till one day a very
wonderful thing happened. Nobody has ever been
able to account for it or understand it; so I must
just tell you the story as it stands. One lovely
spring morning, when there was scarcely the softest
breeze to stir the sea, shining like a mirror in the
sun, a light amber-coloured froth that floated upon
the ripples was seen, by watchers upon the shore of
the island of Cyprus, to gather into a delicate rosy
cloud that presently began to tremble as if it were
trying to be alive. It still rested lightly upon the
water—so lightly that the breeze, soft and gentle as
it was, might have blown it away; but its delicate
trembling carried it upwards till at last it seemed
to breathe, then to take shape, and at last blossomed
if woman it was



into the most beautiful woman,
——that had ever been seen in the world, or even in
heaven. With wonderful grace she glided to the
shore; and poets have told how the zephyrs, or soft
west winds, guided her as she came, and the four
seasons received her on the shore. The people of
Cyprus could only wonder and worship ; and this



THE GOD OF FIRE. 83

was the birth of the great goddess Venus, the Queen
of Love, whom the Greeks called Aphrodite, which
means born of the Foam of the Sea.

And this wonderful goddess of Love and Beauty
Jupiter chose to give in marriage to Vulcan, the
deformed and limping god of Fire.



84

PART IL—LOVE AND THE SOUL; or, THE
STORY OF CUPID AND PSYCHE,

HE fact was, that Jupiter himself had fallen in
love with the beautiful new goddess. But
she would have nothing to say to him: and so,
just out of anger and revenge, he ordered her
to marry Vulcan, because he was ugly, deformed,
and always black with working at his forges.
Altogether it was an unlucky day when Venus
came into the sky. Her beauty turned the heads
of the gods, and filled the goddesses with envy
and jealousy. But all that mattered nothing to
her, for she had a magic zone, or girdle, called
“Cestus” in Latin: and whenever she put it
on she became so irresistibly charming that every-
body forgave her everything. Not only the gods,
but men also, became her lovers, her own favourite
among them all being Mars, the god of War—
a cruel and savage god, very unlike the rest,



Full Text




LETITIA HY UN Cr A 15 2 SEMAINE PPC AP = iret erie:


The Baldwin Library


GODS

AND HEROES








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“ He saw, to his amazement, that his master had Ass’s
ears.” —Page 42.
GODS AND HEROES

OR

THE KINGDOM OF JUPITER

BY

R E FRANCILLON

With Gight Ilustrations

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS
EDINBURGH AND LONDON
MDCCCXCII
TO
FRANCIS FELIX

FOR WHOM THIS BOOK WAS BEGUN
PREFACE.

HESE stories will, I trust, explain their own
purpose; but a few words touching their form
are due to critical readers.

It will be seen that the Mythology adopted
throughout is strictly of the old-fashioned kind
which goes to Ovid as its leading authority, and
ignores the difference between the gods of Greece
and the gods of Rome. I have deliberately followed
this plan because, while there is not the remotest

fear—quite the contrary—that young people, when



or if they become scholars, will not be duly initi-
ated into the mysteries of scientific and compara-
tive mythology, there is considerable danger that
the stories of the gods and heroes which have
saturated literature, and have become essential por-

tions of the thought and life of ages, may become
Vill PREFACE.

explained away only too thoroughly. It is easy
for my readers to acquire the science of the subject
hereafter; but where mythology is concerned, the
poetry must come before the prose, and it will be
a distinct loss for them if, under scientific teaching,
they have never been familiar with the ancient
stories as they were read by the makers of ltera-
ture in the pre-critical times. Without the my-
thology of the. Latin poets, modern literature in all
languages becomes almost a dead letter: hundreds
of allusions become pointless, and thousands of sub-
stances fade into shadows. Of the three mythol-
ogies, the Greek, the Roman, and the Poetic or
Conventional, I have selected the last, because—
among other reasons—

It is as useful, and as needful to be known, as
the others, on general grounds ;

It is more useful, and more needful, than the
others as a portion of literature and as an intel-
lectual influence ;

It is preferable as a means of exciting an in-
terest in the subject;

It is not in the remotest degree an obstacle to
more accurate knowledge, for which indeed it is an
almost indispensable preparation.

After these observations, there is no occasion to
PREFACE. ix

explain why I have made a point of employing
Latin names and Latin spelling.

Another point to which I should call attention
is the attempt to cover (within limits) the whole
ground, so that the reader may not be left in igno-
rance of any considerable tract of the realm of Jove.
The stories are not detached; they are brought, so
far as I have been able to bring them, into a single
saga, free from inconsistencies and contradictions.
Omissions owing to the necessarily prescribed lim-
its will, I think, always find a place to fall into.
Altogether, the lines of the volume diverge so
entirely from those of Kingsley, or Hawthorne, or
any other story-teller known to me, that I may feel
myself safe from the danger of fatal comparisons.
Of course this aim at a certain completeness has
implied the difficult task of selection among vari-
ants of the same story or incident. Sometimes I
have preferred the most interesting, sometimes the
version most consistent with the general plan. But
I have endeavoured, as a rule, to adopt the most
usual or familiar, as being most in accordance with
my original intention.

I need not, however, enumerate difficulties, which,
if they are overcome, need no apology ; and, if they
are not, deserve none. The greatest and most
xX PREFACE,

obvious, the strict observance of the “ Maxima
reverentia,” will, and must always remain, crucial.
In this; at least, I trust I have succeeded, in what-
ever else I may have failed. These stories were
begun for one who was very dear to me, and who
was their first and best critic; and I shall be glad
if what was begun, in hope, for him should be of

use to others.
REE.

Nore.—Quantity is marked in proper names

when necessary, at their first occurrence.
CONTENTS.

SATURN,
JUPITER AND JUNO—
PART I.—THE GODS AND THE GIANTS, . .
PART Il.—-THE FIRST MAN; OR, THE STORY OF
PROMETHEUS AND PANDORA, .
PARY II]—THE GREAT FLOOD ; OR, THE STORY OF
DEUCALION,
APOLLO—
PART I.—THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE,
PART II.—THE FLAYED PIPER ; OR, THE STORY OF
MARSYAS,
PART IIl.—TOO MUCH GOLD; OR, THE FIRST STORY
OF MIDAS, . : . . .
PART IV.—THE CRITIC; OR, THE SECOND STORY
OF MIDAS,
PART V.—SOME FLOWER STORIES—
I.—-THE LAUREL, .
IIl.—THE HYACINTH,
IIIl.—THE SUN-FLOWER,
IV.—THE NARCISSUS, .
PART VI.—PRESUMPTION ; OR, THE STORY OF
PHAETHON, . . ; : . .

PAGE

ll

18

24

28

33

40

44

47

50

53

58
xil CONTENTS.

DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION,
MINERVA ; OR, WISDOM,
VENUS—
PART I,—THE GOD OF FIRE, . . ; . .
PART IIl.—LOVE AND THE SOUL; OR, THE STORY
OF CUPID AND PSYCHE, .
MERCURY AND IRIS,
NEPTUNE,
HADES—
PART I.—THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD,
PART Il.—THE KINGDOM,
PART IIl.—ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE, .
PART IV.—THE MAN WHO NEVER DIED,
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS,
THE GOLDEN FLEECE,
A LOST SECRET, .
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS, .
THE HERO OF HEROES—
PART I.—THE ORACLE, .
PART II.—HIS FIRST LABOUR: THE LION, .
PART III.—HIS SECOND LABOUR: THE HYDRA,
PART IV.—HIS THIRD LABOUR: THE STAG,
PART V.—HIS FOURTH LABOUR: THE BOAR, .
PART VI.—HIS FIFTH LABOUR: THE AUGEAN STABLE,
PART VII.—MORE LABOURS: AND THE CATTLE OF
GERYON, . ; . .
PART VIII.—HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR: THE GARDEN
OF THE HESPERIDES, : :
PART IX.—HIS TWELFTH LABOUR: THE DESCENT
INTO HADES, . ‘ ; :
PART X.—THE CHOICE OF HERCULES,
PART XI.—THE TUNIC OF NESSUS,
THE APPLE OF DISCORD, : .

84
109
114

239
243
251
259
266

272
282






SATURN.

Ry NCE upon a time, the Sky married
‘| the Earth. The Sky’s name was



Ccelus, and the Earth’s was Terra.

one of these, the eldest, was called
Titan, and another was called Saturn.

Terra, their mother Earth, was very good and
kind; but their father, Coelus, was very unkind and
cruel. He hated bis own children, and shut them
all up underground, so that he might get rid of
them—all of them, that is to say, except Saturn,
whom he allowed to have his freedom. Saturn
grew up; and he thought of nothing but how to
set his brothers free. At last one day he went
to his mother, and asked her what he could do.
Terra had come to hate her husband for his

A
2 SATURN.

cruelty: so she gave Saturn all the iron she had
in her veins—(you know that iron comes from
what are called the Veins of the Earth)—and he
made a great scythe with it. With this scythe he
wounded and punished his father so terribly that
old Ccelus was never good for anything again—in
fact, we never hear of him any more, except when
we turn his name into Ccelum, which is the Latin
for “the sky,” as you know.

Saturn instantly let all his brothers out from
their underground prison. They were very erateful
to him: and Titan, the eldest, said, “You shall be
king of us all, and of all the world, if you will only
promise me one thing.” Saturn promised. “It is
this,” said Titan. “You know how our father
treated us; and how you treated him. Children
are plagues, and I don’t want you to have anything
to do with them. Therefore promise me to eat up
all your children, if you ever have any, as soon as
they are born. They'll be too young to mind, and
youll be safe from them. I think so much of this,
that if you don’t eat them up, every one, I'll take
the kingdom away from you. For I’m the eldest,
and I might keep it if I pleased instead of giving
it up to you.”

Saturn had no children then, and he gave the
promise. But some time afterwards he married
a goddess named Rhea, who was very good and
very beautiful. They, too, had a great many
SATURN. 3

children. But, alas! there was that terrible prom-
ise that poor Saturn had made to Titan. Saturn
could not break his word, so he ate every child as
soon as it was born. Of course Rhea was very
unhappy and miserable: it was worse, thought she,
than if he had only shut them underground. But
there was-the promise—and she did not know
what to do.

But she thought and thought, and at last she
hit on a plan. When her next child was born, she
hid it away, and when Saturn asked for it to eat it,
she gave him a big stone instead of the baby.
Saturn must have had good teeth, for he ate it
up, and only thought that the new baby’s bones
were uncommonly hard. The trick answered so
well that when the next child was born she did it
again,---and again she did it a third time. She
named the three children that she saved in this
way, Jupiter, Neptune, and Pluto.

Jupiter, the eldest, was a very fine strong child.
He made such a noise with his crying that his
mother Rhea was afraid Saturn would hear him.
So she sent him away to the island of Crete, where
he was brought up on goat’s milk; and she ordered
his nurses to make all the noise they could with
drums, trumpets, and cymbals all day and all night
long, so that nobody could hear him cry and so
find out that’ he was alive,

But unluckily her secret was found out by
4 SATURN.

Titan. Titan thought Saturn had been breaking
his word; so he made war on him, and very nearly
conquered him and took his kingdom from him.

Jupiter, however, heard the noise of the battle
through all the cymbals, trumpets, and drums. He
was only a year old, but so big and strong that he
rushed out of Crete, and fought a most desperate
battle against his uncles, the Titans, to save his
father, Saturn. The Titans were wonderful people.
All were giants; and one of them had a hundred
arms. ‘They threw mountains instead of stones.
But Jupiter conquered them at last, and set his
father free.

But somehow Saturn was very much afraid of
his son. I think I should have been afraid of you
if you had been such a wonderful baby. In some
way or other—I don’t know how—he tried to get
rid of Jupiter, and made himself so unpleasant that
Jupiter had to take his kingdom away from him,
and make himself king. That is how Jupiter
became king of all the gods and goddesses.

Saturn, when he lost his kingdom, went to Italy,
where a king named Janus received him very
kindly. Saturn and Janus became such friends
that Janus made him king with him; and Saturn
ruled go well that he made his people the happiest
in all the world. Everybody was perfectly good
and perfectly happy. Saturn’s reign on earth is
called the Golden Age. His wife, Ithea, was
SATURN. 5

with him, and was as good as he;—so he had
peace at last after all his troubles, which had no
doubt taught him to be wise.

The Greek name for Saturn means “Time”;
and Saturn is called the god of Time, who swallows
up all things and creatures. All creatures may be
called “the Children of Time.” And the kingdom
of Time, we may say, must always come to an end.
The whole story means a great deal more than
this; but this is enough to show you that it is not
nonsense, and means something. One of the planets
is called Saturn.

In pictures Saturn is always made an old man,
because Time is old; and he carries his scythe,
because Time mows everything away, just as a
mower does the grass; or like “The Reaper whose
name is Death.” Only Death, in the poem, is
kinder than Saturn or Time.










yy ‘4 the whole world, he made his two
K Fe :

A AS “(| brothers, Neptune and Pluto, kings

/ under him. He made Neptune god

(i HEN Jupiter became god and king of
difé

and king of the sea: Pluto he made
god and king of Hades. Hades was a world under-
ground, in the middle of the earth, where men and
women go and live when they die.

The next thing that Jupiter did was to marry
Juno. Their wedding was the grandest and most
wonderful that ever was seen. Invitations were
sent out to all the gods and nymphs. The nymphs
were a sort of fairies—some of them waited upon
the goddesses; some of them lived in rivers, brooks,
THE GODS AND THE GIANTS. 7

and trees. All of them came to the wedding, ex-
cept one nymph named Chélone.

She refused to come: and, besides that, she
laughed at the whole thing. When they told
her that Jupiter was going to marry Juno, she
laughed so loud that Jupiter himself could hear
her. I don’t know why she thought it so ridic-
ulous, but I can guess pretty well, I expect
she knew Juno’s bad temper better than Jupiter
did, and how Jupiter was just the sort of husband
to spoil any wife’s temper. But Jupiter was very
fond of Juno just then, and he did not like to
be laughed at on his wedding-day. So he had
Chelone turned into a tortoise, so that she might
never be able to laugh again. Nobody ever heard
a tortoise laugh, nor ever will.

Jupiter and Juno set up their palace in the sky,
just over the top of Mount Olympus, a high
mountain in the north of Greece. And very
goon, I am sorry to say, his quarrels with Juno
so that, after all, poor Chelone had been
right in not thinking much of the grand wedding.



began:

He always kept her for his Queen; but he cared for
a great many Titanesses and nymphs much more
than he did for her, and married more of them
than anybody can reckon, one after another. This
made Juno very angry, and they used to quarrel
terribly. But something was going to happen
which was almost as bad as quarrelling, and which
8 JUPITER AND JUNO.

must have made Jupiter envy the peace and com-
fort of old Saturn, who had become only an earthly
king.

The Titans made another war. And this time
they got the help of the Giants, who were more
terrible even than the Titans. They were im-
mense monsters, some almost as tall as the tallest
mountain, fearfully strong, and horribly ugly, with
hair miles long, and rough beards down to their
middle. One of them had fifty heads and a hun-
dred hands. Another had serpents instead of legs.
Others, called Cyclopes, had only one eye, which
was in the middle of their foreheads. But the
most terrible of all was a giant named Typhon.
He had a hundred heads, each like a dragon’s, and
darted flames from his mouth and eyes. A great
battle was fought between the gods and the giants.
The giants tried to get into the sky by piling
up the mountains one upon another. They used
oak-trees for clubs, and threw hills for stones.
They set whole forests on fire, and tossed them up
like torches to set fire to the sky. And at last
Typhon’s hundred fiery mouths set up a hundred
different yells and roars all at once, so loud and
horrible that Jupiter and all the gods ran away
into Egypt and hid themselves there in the shapes
of animals. Jupiter turned himself into a ram,
and Juno became a cow.

But, when their fright was over, the gods came
THE GODS AND THE GIANTS. on)

back into their own shapes, and fought another
battle, greater and more terrible than before. And,
this time, the gods won. Some of the giants were
crushed under mountains or drowned in the sea.
Some were taken prisoners: and of these some were
beaten to death and others were skinned alive.
Atlas, who was the tallest, was ordered to spend all
his days in holding up the sky on his shoulders,—
how it was held up before, I do not know. Some
of the Cyclopes were set to work in making thunder-
bolts for Jupiter. They became the blacksmiths of
the gods, and Mount A%tna, which is a volcano, was
one of their forges.

After this, the gods lived in peace: though
Jupiter and Juno never left off quarrelling a good
deal. Jupiter made most of his children gods and
voddesses, and they all lived together over Mount
Olympus, ruling the earth and the sky, and the
air, the sun, and the stars. You will read the
stories of all of them. They used to cat a de-
licious food called Ambrosia, and their wine was a
wonderful drink called Nectar. Hebe, the goddess
of Youth, mixed and poured out the Nectar, and
Ganymede was Jupiter’s own page and cup-bearer.
These gods and goddesses of the sky were a sort of
large family, with Jupiter and Juno for father and
mother. Of course Neptune with his gods of the
sea, and Pluto with his gods of Hades, were like
different families, and lived in their own places.
10 JUPITER AND JUNO.

Whenever it thunders, that is the voice of
Jupiter. One of the planets is named after him
— it is a beautiful large white star. In pictures,
he is a large strong man, with a thick brown
beard, looking like a king. He sits on a throne,
with lightning in his hand, and an eagle by his
side. Juno is a large beautiful woman, tall and
erand, looking like a queen, with a proud face and
splendid eyes. The peacock is her favourite bird,
just as Jupiter’s is the eagle.
aI

PART IIL—THE FIRST MAN; or, THE STORY
OF PROMETHEUS AND PANDORA.

NE of the Titans left two sons, Prometheus and
Epimetheus. Prometheus means Forethought,
and Epimetheus means Afterthought. Now Pro-
metheus was not big and strong like the other
Titans, but he was more clever and cunning than
al of them put together. And he said to himself,
“Well, the gods have shown themselves stronger
than we. We can’t conquer them by fighting, that’s
clear. But there are cleverer ways of winning than
by fighting, as they shall see.”

So Prometheus dug up a good-sized lump of clay,
more than six feet long, and nearly four feet round.
And now, said he to himself, “I only want just one
little spark of Heavenly Fire.”

Now the Heavenly Fire is only to be found in
the sky ; and Jupiter had ordered that no Titan was
ever to enter the sky again. But Prometheus was
12 JUPITER AND JUNO.

much too clever to find any difficulty about that.
The great goddess Minerva, who is the goddess of
Wisdom, happened to be on a visit to the earth just
then, so Prometheus called upon her and said—

“Great goddess, I am only a poor beaten Titan,
and I have never seen the sky. But my father and
my father’s father used to live there in the good
old times, and I should like, just once, to see the
inside of the beautiful blue place above the clouds
which was-once their home. Please, great goddess,
let me go in just once, and Pll promise to do no
harm.”

Now Minerva did not like to break the rule.
But she was very trusting and very good-natured,
because she was very wise ; and besides, Prometheus
looked such a poor little creature, so different from
all the other Titans and Giants, that she said—

“You certainly don’t look as if you could do
us any harm, even if you tried. Very well—you
shall have a look at the sky, and Pll show you
round.”

So she told Prometheus to follow her up Mount
Olympus; but she did not notice a little twig that
he carried in his hand: and if she had noticed it,
she would not have thought it mattered. Wise
people don’t notice all the little things that cunning
people do. Then she opened the golden gate of the
sky, and let him in. She was very kind, and showed
him everything. He went over the palace of the
THE FIRST MAN. 13

gods, and saw Jupiter’s great ivory throne, and his
eagle, and the brew-house where the nectar is made.
He looked at the places behind the clouds, where
they keep the rain and snow. Then they looked at
all the stars; and at last they came to the Stables
of the Sun. For you must know that the sun is a
great fiery car, drawn by four white horses from the
east to the west, and is put away in a stable during
the night-time, where the four horses eat wheat
made of gold.

“Now you have seen everything,” said Minerva ;
“and you must go.”

“Thank you,” said Prometheus. And he went
back to earth again. But just as he was leaving,
he touched one of the wheels of the sun with his
little twig, so that a spark came off upon the end.

The spark was still there when he got home.
He touched his lump of clay with the spark of
Heavenly Fire—and, lo and behold, the lump of
clay became a living man!

“There!” said Prometheus. “There’s Something
that will give the gods more trouble than anything
that ever was made !”

It was the First Man.

Jupiter very soon found out what Prometheus
had done, and was very vexed and annoyed. He
forgave Minerva, who was his favourite daughter,
but he said to the god of Fire: “Make something
14 JUPITER AND JUNO.

that will trouble the man even more than the man
will trouble me.”

So the god of Fire took another lump of clay,
and a great deal of Heavenly Flame, and made the
First Woman.

All the gods admired her very much, for she had
been made very nicely —better than the man.
Jupiter said to her, “My child, go to Prometheus
and give him my compliments, and tell him to
marry you.” The gods and goddesses thought it a
good idea, and all of them made her presents for
her wedding. One gave her beauty, another wit,
another fine clothes, and so on; but Jupiter only
gave her a little box, which was not to be opened
till her wedding-day.

Prometheus was sitting one day at his door,
, thinking how clever he was, when he saw, coming
down Olympus, the most beautiful creature he had
ever seen. As soon as she came close—
“Who are you?” he asked. “From where do
you come ?”
“My name is Pandora,” said she. “And I am
come from the skies to marry you.” :
“With all my heart,’ said Prometheus. “ You
will be a very nice wife, Iam sure. But—let me
Pandora means ‘ All Gifts, doesn’t it? What
have you got to give me, to keep house upon?”

see



“The gods have given me everything!” said
THE FIRST MAN. 15

Pandora. “I bring you Beauty, Wit, Love, Wisdom,
Health, Wealth, Virtue, Fine Clothes—in a word,
everything that you can wish for.”

“ And that little box——what have you in that?”
asked he.

“Oh, that’s only a little box that Jupiter gave
me—TI don’t know what’s in that, for it is not to
be opened till after we’re married. Perhaps it is
diamonds.”

“Who gave it you?” asked he.

“ Jupiter,” said Pandora.

“Oho!” thought the cunning Prometheus.
“Secret boxes from Jupiter are not to my fancy.
My dear,” he said to Pandora, “on second thoughts,
I don’t think I will marry you. But as you’ve had
so much trouble in coming, I'll send you to my
brother Epimetheus, and you shall marry him.
He'll do just as well.”

So Pandora went on to Epimetheus, and he
married her. But Prometheus had sent him a
private message not to open the box that had been
given by Jupiter. So it was put away, and every-
thing went on very well for a long time.

But, at last, Pandora happened to be alone in
the house; and she could not resist the temptation
to just take one little peep into the box to see
what was inside. Such a little box could not hold
any harm: and it might be the most beautiful
16 JUPITER AND JUNO.

present of all. Anyhow, she could do no harm
by lifting the lid; she could easily shut it up
again. She felt she was doing what would dis-
please Epimetheus, and was rather ashamed of her
curiosity, but—well, she did open the box. And
then—out there flew thousands and thousands of
creatures, like a swarm of wasps and flies, buzzing
and darting about with joy to be free. Out at
the window, and over the world they flew. Alas!
they were all the evil things that are in the world
to torment and hurt mankind. Those flies from
Pandora’s box were War, Pain, Grief, Anger, Sick- .
ness, Sorrow, Poverty, Death, Sin. What could
she do? She could not get them back into the box
again ; she could only scream and wring her hands.
Epimetheus heard her cries, and did all he could:
he shut down the lid, just in time to keep the
very last of the swarm from flying away. By good
luck, it was the only one worth keeping—a little
creature called Hope, who still lives in the box to
comfort us when the others are stinging us, and to
make us say, “There is good in everything—even
in the box of Pandora.”

But Jupiter, when he heard how Prometheus had
refused to marry Pandora, and had tried to outwit
him again, was very angry indeed. He sent down
one of the gods, who took Prometheus and carried
him to Mount Caucasus, and bound him to the


“ Yupiter sent down one of the gods, ... and bound him to the
highest and coldest peak with chains.’—Page 16.
THE FIRST MAN, 17

highest and coldest peak with chains. And a vul-
ture was sent to gnaw his heart for ever.

So cunning could not conquer the strength of the
gods after all.

I have something to say about this story, which
you may not quite understand now, but which you
will, some day, when you read it again. Think
how Man is made of dead common clay, but with
one spark of Heavenly Fire straight from the sky.
Think how Woman is made, with less clay, but with
more of the Heavenly Fire. Think of that “ After-
thought,” which saved Hope when there was noth-
ing else to be saved. And think of the Pain sent
to gnaw the heart of Prometheus, who used all his
cleverness to make himself great in wrong-doing.

You will be glad to hear that, a long time after-
wards, the greatest and best man in all Mythology
came and killed the vulture, and set Prometheus
free. You will read all about it in time. But I
want you to know and remember the man’s name
It was Hercules.
18



PART III.—THE GREAT FLOOD; or, THE
STORY OF DEUCALION.

press turned out to be quite right in

saying that men would give more trouble to
Jupiter than the Titans or the Giants, or anything
that had ever been made. As time went on, men
became more and more wicked every day.

Now there lived in Thessaly, on the banks of a
river, a man and his wife, named Deucalion and
Pyrrha. I think they must have been good people,
and not like all the other men and women in the
world. One day, Deucalion noticed that the water
in the river was rising very high. He did not think
much of it at the time, but the next day it was
higher, and the next higher still. At last the river
, burst its banks, and spread over the country, sweep-
ing away houses and drowning many people.

Deucalion and Pyrrha escaped out of their own
THE GREAT FLOOD. 19

house just in time, and went to the top of a moun-
tain. But, to their terror, the waters still kept on
spreading and rising, until all the plain of Thessaly
looked liked a sea, and the tops of the hills like
islands.

“The water will cover the hills soon,” said Deuca-
lion, “and then the mountains. What shall we do?”
Pyrrha thought for a moment, and then said—

“TI have heard that there is a very wise man on
the top of Mount Caucasus who knows everything.
Let us go to him, and perhaps he will tell us what
to do and what all this water means.”

So they went down the other side, and went on
and on till they reached the great Caucasian moun-
tains, which are the highest in all Europe, and are
always covered with snow. They climbed up to
the highest peak, and there they saw a man, chained
to the ice, with a vulture tearing and gnawing him.
It was Prometheus, who had made the first man.

Deucalion tried to drive the horrible bird away.
But Prometheus said—

“It is no use. You can do nothing for me. Not
even the Great Flood will drive this bird away, or
put me out of my pain.”

“Ah! the Great Flood!” cried Deucalion and
Pyrrha together. “We have left it behind us
we safe up here ?”



are

“You are safe nowhere,” said Prometheus,
“Soon the waters will break over the mountains
20 JUPITER AND JUNO.

round Thessaly and spread over the whole world.
They will rise and rise till not even this peak will
be seen. Jupiter is sending this flood to sweep
away from the face of the earth the wickedness of
man. Not one is to be saved. Even now, there is
nobody left alive but you two.”

Deucalion and Pyrrha looked: and, in the dis-
tance, they saw the waters coming on, and rising
above the hills.

“But perhaps,” said Prometheus, “Jupiter may
not wish to punish you. I cannot tell. But I will
tell you what to do—it may save you. Go down
the mountain till you come to a wood, and cut
down a tree.” Then he told them how to make a
boat—for nobody knew anything about boats in
those days. Then he bade them good-bye, and they
went down the hill sorrowfully, wishing they could
help Prometheus, and doubting if they could help
themselves.

They came to the wood, and made the boat—just
in time. The water rose; but their boat rose with
the water. At last even the highest peak of
Caucasus was covered, and they could see nothing





but the sky above them and the waters round.
Then the clouds gathered and burst, and the sky
and the sea became one great storm.

For nine days and nights their little boat was
tossed about by the winds and waves. But on the
tenth day, as if by magic, the sky cleared, the water
THE GREAT FLOOD. 21

went down, and their boat was left high and dry on
the top of a hill.

They knelt, and thanked Jupiter, and went down
the hill hand in hand—the only man and the only
woman in the whole world. They did not even
know where they were.

But presently they met, coming up the hill, a
form like a woman, only grander and more beauti-
ful. They were afraid. But at last they had cour-
age to ask— :

“Who are you? And where are we?”

“This hill is Mount Parnassus; and I am
Themis, the goddess of Justice,” said she. “I have
finished my work upon the earth, and am on my °
way home to the sky. I know your story. Live,
and be good, and be warned by what has happened
to all other men.”

“ But what is the use of our living?” they asked,
“and what is the use of this great world to us two ?
For we have no children to come after us when we
die.”

“What you say is just,” said the goddess of
Justice. “Jupiter will be pleased enough to give
this empty world to a wiser and better race of men.
But he will be quite as content without them. “In
short, you may have companions, if you want them,
and if you will teach them to be better and wiser
than the old ones. Only you must make them for
yourselves,”
22 JUPITER AND JUNO.

“But how can we make men?” asked they.

“T will tell you. Throw your grandmother’s
bones behind you without looking round.”

“Our grandmother’s bones? But how are we to
find them after this flood, or to know which are
hers ?”

“The gods,” said Themis, “tell people what to
do, but not how it is to be done.” And _ she
vanished into the air.

I think Themis was right. All of us are taught
what we ought to do; but we are usually left to
ask ourselves whether any particular thing is right
or wrong.

Deucalion and Pyrrha asked one another; but
neither knew what to say. The whole world, after
the Great Flood, was full of bones everywhere.
Which were their grandmother’s, and where? They
wandered about over half the world trying to find
them, but all in vain, till they thought they would
have to give it up in despair.

At last, however, Pyrrha said to Deucalion—

“Thaveathought. Weare all called the children
of Jupiter, you know, because he is called the
father of gods and men. And Jupiter and all the
gods are the children of Ccelus and Terra. Now,
if we are the children of Jupiter, and Jupiter is the
child of Terra, then Terra must be our grandmother.
And Terra is the Earth; so our grandmother is
the Earth, you see.”
THE GREAT FLOOD. 23

“But,” asked Deucalion, “ what about the
bones?”

“What are the bones of the Earth but the
stones?” said Pyrrha. “The stones must be our
Grandmother's Bones.”

“JT don’t think youve right,” said Deucalion.
“Tt’s much too easy a thing—only to throw a few
stones. But there’s no harm in trying.”

So they gathered two heaps of stones, one for
him and one for her, and threw the stones behind
them, over their shoulders, without turning round
—just as Themis had told them.

When they had thrown away all their stones,
they looked to see if anything had happened. And
lo! every stone thrown by Pyrrha had become a
woman, and every stone thrown by Deucalion had
become a man.

So they kept on throwing stones till the world
was full of men and women again. And Deucalion
and Pyrrha became their king and queen.






APOLLO.

PART IL—THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE,

@) UPITER once fell in love with a
beautiful Titaness named Latona.
This made Juno terribly angry: go
she sent a huge and horrible snake,
called Python, to hunt Latona all
over the world. And she went to Terra, and
made her swear not to give Latona a resting-place
or a hiding-place anywhere.

So poor Latona was hunted and driven about by
Python night and day. She also went to our
Grandmother Earth, and begged for a corner to rest
in or a cave to hide in. But old Terra said, “ No.
T have sworn to Juno that you shall have no rest
in me.”


THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE. 25

At last, in her despair, she went to Neptune,
and prayed him to hide her in his waters, since
Farth had refused her. Neptune said, “I wish
I could, with all my heart; but what place is there,
in the sea or on the land, where you can hide from
the Queen of the Sky? But wait—there’s one
thing that nobody knows of but me. There is an
island under the sea; and this island is always
moving and wandering about, so that nobody can
gee it, or tell where it may chance to be, for it
is never in the same place two minutes together.
It isn’t sea, because it’s land; but it doesn’t belong
to Terra, because it’s under the sea, and has no
bottom. I'll tell you what Ill do for you. Tl
fix it where nobody can find it, and you'll be safe
there, because it’s neither earth nor sea.”

So Neptune anchored the floating island in a
part of the AZgean Sea. The island is called Delos ;
and it is there still, just where it was fixed by
Neptune for Latona.

Latona went and lived there, safe from Juno
and Python. After a time she had two children, a
son and a daughter. The son was named Apollo,
and the daughter Diana.

Both were beautiful, but Apollo was the most
beautiful boy ever born. He was a wonderful
child in every way. The very instant he was born
he made a bow and arrow, and went across the sea,
and found Python, and killed him. When he was
26 APOLLO.

four years old, he built one of the wonders of
the world —a great altar to the gods, made of
the horns of the goats that his sister Diana used
to hunt and shoot in the mountains. With two
such children to help her, Latona no longer felt
afraid of Juno. So she left Delos, and came, with
her two children, into a country of Asia Minor,
called Lydia.

Now there was a princess in Thebes named Niobe,
who had fourteen beautiful children—seven daugh-
ters and seven sons, She was very fond and proud
of them, and she did not like to hear people talking
about Latona’s wonderful children. “What signi-
fies a miserable couple of children, when I have
fourteen?” she used to say. “JZ don’t think much
of Latona;” and, in her jealousy, she never lost
a chance of insulting the mother of Apollo and
Diana.

Of course these insults came to Latona’s ears.
Apollo and Diana heard of them too; and they
resolved to punish the proud princess who insulted
and scorned their mother. I scarcely like to tell
you of how they punished Niobe, for I cannot think
of anything more cruel.

Each of them took a bow and seven arrows.
Apollo shot with his arrows all the seven sons
of Niobe. Diana shot six of Niobe’s seven daugh-
ters, leaving only one alive. “There!” said they ;
bo
~T

THE STORIES OF LATONA AND NIOBE.

“what signifies a miserable one child, when our
mother has two?”

When poor Niobe saw her children killed before
her she wept bitterly, and she could not stop her
tears. They flowed on and on, until she cried
herself into stone.

As for Apollo, he kept on erowing handsomer
and stronger until he became a god—the most
glorious of all the gods in the sky. Jupiter made
him the god of the Sun, and made his sister, Diana,
goddess of the Moon. He was also the god of all
beautiful and useful things: of music, painting,
poetry, medicine. Several names were given to
him. One of his names is “ Pheebus,” which means
bright and splendid like the sun. “Apollo” means
“the Destroyer”: people must guess for themselves
why he was called “ the Destroyer.”

In pictures and statues he is always made grace-
ful, beautiful, and young. He has no hair on
his face, but wears long waving hair. Sometimes
he carries a lyre—a sort of small harp—and some-
times a bow. Very often he wears a wreath of
laurel. You must take a great deal of notice of
Apollo or Pheebus, because he is the most famous
of all the gods next to Jupiter. It will help you
to know him if you think of him as always beauti-
ful, wise, and bright, but rather cruel and hard.
PART II—THE FLAYED PIPER; on,
THE STORY OF MARSYAS.

HE men who filled the earth after the Great
Flood were a great deal cleverer than people
are now. the alphabet—which is, perhaps, the most wonder-
ful thing in the world. And when he wanted to
build the city of Thebes, he got a great musician,
named Amphion, to play to the stones and trees,
so that they, by dancing to his tunes, built them-
selves into walls and houses without the help of
any masons or carpenters. At last men became go
wonderfully clever in everything, that a physician
named A‘sculapius, who was a son of Apollo, found
out how to bring back dead people to life again.
But when Jupiter heard that ARsculapius had
really made a dead man live, he was angry, and
rather frightened too. For he thought, “If men
know how to live for ever, they will become as
THE FLAYED PIPER. 29

ereat and as wise as the gods, and who knows what
will happen then?” So he ordered the Cyclopes
to make him a thunderbolt, and he threw it down
from heaven upon Aésculapius and killed him. No
other man knew the secret of Esculapius, and it
died with him.

But Apollo was very fond and proud of his son,
and was in a great rage with Jupiter for having killed
him. He could not punish Jupiter, but he took
his bow and arrows and shot all the Cyclopes who
had made the thunderbolt.

Then it was Jupiter's turn to be angry with
Apollo for killing his servants, who had only done
what they were told to do. He sentenced him to
be banished from the sky for nine years.

So Apollo left the sky and came down to the
earth, bringing with him nothing but his lyre.
You know that Mount Olympus, where the gods
live, is in Thessaly, so that Thessaly was the coun-
try in which Apollo found himself when he came
down from the sky. He did not know what to do
with himself for the nine years, so he went to a
king of Thessaly named Admétus, who received him
very kindly, and made him his shepherd. I don’t
think Admetus could have known who Apollo was,
or he would hardly have set the great god of the
Sun to look after his sheep for him.

So Apollo spent his time pleasantly enough in
watching the king’s sheep and in playing on his lyre.
30 APOLLO.

Now there was a very clever but very conceited
musician named Marsyas, who had invented the
flute, and who played on it better than anybody in
the world. One day Marsyas happened to be pass-
ing through Thessaly, when he saw a shepherd
sitting by a brook watching his sheep, and playing
to them very beautifully on a lyre. He went up
to the shepherd and said—

“You play very nicely, my man. But nobody
can do much with those harps and fiddles and
trumpery stringed things. You should learn the
flute; then you’d know what music means!”

“Indeed?” said Apollo. “Vm sorry, for your
sake, that your ears are so hard to please. As
for me, I don’t care for whistles and squeaking
machines.”

“ Ah!” said Marsyas, “that’s because you never
heard Me!”

“And you dare to tell me,” said Apollo, “ that
you put a wretched squeaking flute before the lyre,
which makes music for the gods in the sky ?”

“ And you dare to say,” said Marsyas, “that a
miserable twanging, tinkling lyre is better than a
flute? What an ignorant blockhead you must
be!”

At last their wrangling about their instruments
grew to quarrelling; and then Apollo said—

“ We shall never settle the question in this way.
We will go to the next village and give a concert.
THE FLAYED PIPER. 31

You shall play your flute and I will play my lyre,
and the people shall say which is the best—yours
or mine.”

“With all my heart,” said Marsyas. “I know
what they will say. But we must have a wager on
it. What shall it be?”

“We will bet our skins,” said Apollo. “If I
lose, you shall skin me; and if you lose, J will skin
you.”

« Aoreed,” said Marsyas.

So they went to the next village, and called the
people together to judge between the flute and the
lyre.

Marsyas played first. He played a little simple
tune on his flute so beautifully that everybody was
charmed. But Apollo then played the same tune
on his lyre, even more beautifully still.

Then Marsyas took his flute again and played
all sorts of difficult things—flourishes, runs, shakes,
everything you can think of—in the most amazing
manner, till the people thought they had never
heard anything so wonderful. And indeed never
had such flute-playing been heard.

But Apollo, instead of following him in the same
fashion, only played another simple tune—but
this time he sang while he played.

You can imagine how gloriously the god of Music
sang! You can fancy how much chance Marsyas
had of winning when Apollo’s voice was carrying
32 APOLLO.

the hearts of the people away. . . . “There,” said
Apollo, when he had finished, “beat that if you can
——and give me your skin!”

“Tt is not fair!” said Marsyas. “This is not a
singing match: the question is, Which is the best
instrument—the flute or the lyre?”

“ Tt ds fair,” said Apollo. “If you can sing while
you are playing the flute, then I have nothing to
say. But you can’t sing, you see, because you have
to use your lips and your breath in blowing into
those holes. Is not that instrument the best which
makes you sing best—Yes or No? And if I mustn’t
use my breath, you mustn’t use yours.”

You must judge for yourself which was right.
But the people decided for Apollo. And so Apollo,
having won the wager, took Marsyas and skinned
him, and hung his body on a tree.
33

PART ILL—l0O MUCH GOLD; or, THE FIRST
STORY OF MIDAS.

HERE were other beings besides men upon the
earth in those days. You ought to know

something about them now, because Apollo, while
he was banished from the sky, had a great deal to
do with them. These beings were called Nymphs,
Fauns, and Satyrs.

The Nymphs were a kind of beautiful she-
fairies.

Dryads were nymphs who lived in forests.

Hamadryads were nymphs who lived in trees.
Every tree has a Hamadryad, who lives in it, who
is born when it first grows, and who dies when it
dies. So that a Hamadryad is killed whenever a
tree is cut down,

Naiads were nymphs belonging to brooks and
rivers. Every stream has its Naiad.

Oreads were nymphs who lived upon hills and

Cc
34 APOLLO.

mountains. They used to attend upon Apollo’s
sister Diana, who went hunting every moonlight
night among the hills.

The Fauns and Satyrs were he-creatures, like
men, with the hind-legs of goats, short horns on
their foreheads, and long pointed ears. But there
was a difference between the Fauns and Satyrs.
The Fauns were handsome, gentle, innocent, and
rather foolish, The Satyrs were hideous, clumsy,
hairy monsters, with flat faces, little eyes, and
huge mouths, great gluttons, often drunk, and
sometimes mischievous: most of them were dull
and stupid, but many of them had plenty of sense
and knowledge. The Fauns and Satyrs lived
among the woods and hills, like the Dryads and
Oreads.

The king of all these Nymphs, Fauns, and
Satyrs was a god named Pan, who was himself
a very hideous satyr. He had nothing to do with
the gods of Olympus, but lived on the earth, chiefly
in a part of Greece called Arcadia. “Pan” is the
Greek for “all”—you may remember the same
word in the name of “ Pan-dora.” He was called
“Pan” because he was the god of “all” nature—
all the hills and mountains, all the woods and
forests, all the fields, rivers, and streams.

The ugliest, fattest, greediest, tipsiest, cleverest,
and wisest of all the satyrs was named Siltnus.
He was hardly ever sober, but he knew so much
TOO MUCH GOLD. 35

and understood the world so well, that one of the
gods, named Bacchus, made Silenus his chief ad-
viser and counsellor. You will hear more of
Bacchus later on. I will only tell you now that
he was not one of the great gods of Olympus, but
lived on the earth, like Pan. Only, while Pan was
the god of all wild, savage nature, Bacchus was the
god of nature as men make it: Bacchus taught
men to turn Pan’s wild woods into corn-fields and
eardens, to put bees into hives, and to make wine.
I think Silenus had an especially great deal to do
with the wine-making. You will often hear Bac-
chus called the god of wine, and so he was; but he
was a great deal more and better.

This has been a long beginning to my story ;
but if you will get it well into your head, you will
find it easy to remember, and will make a great
step in understanding mythology.

Now once upon a time Silenus got very drunk
indeed—more drunk even than usual. He was
travelling about with Bacchus, but had strayed
away by himself, and, when night came on, could
not find his way back into the road. He could
do nothing but blunder and stagger about in the
middle of the thick dark forest, stumbling and
sprawling over the roots of the trees, and knocking
his head against the branches. At last he gave a
tremendous tumble into a bush, and lay there, too
36 APOLLO.

drunk and too fat to pick himself up again. So he
went to sleep and snored terribly.

Presently some huntsmen passed by, and thought
they heard some wild beast roaring. You may
guess their surprise when they found this hideous
old satyr helplessly drunk and unable to move.
But they did not catch a satyr every day: so they
took him by the head and shoulders, and brought
him as a prize to the king.

This king was King Midas of Phrygia, which is
a country in Asia Minor. As soon as King Midas
saw the satyr, he guessed him to be Silenus, the
friend of Bacchus: so he did everything to make

him comfortable till his drunkenness should pass
" away. It passed away at last; and then King
Midas sent all round about to find where Bacchus
was, so that Silenus might go back to him. While
the search was being made, the king and the satyr
became great friends, and Silenus, keeping fairly
sober, gave Midas a great deal of good advice, and
taught him science and philosophy.

At last Bacchus was found; and Midas himself
brought Silenus back to him. Bacchus was ex-
ceedingly glad to see Silenus again, for he was
beginning to be afraid that he had lost him for
ever, “ Ask any gift you please,” he said to King
Midas, “and it shall be yours.”

“Grant me,” said Midas, “ that everything I touch
shall turn into gold.”
TOO MUCH GOLD. 37

Bacchus looked vexed and disappointed. But he
was bound by his promise, and said—

“Tt is a fool’s wish. But so be it. Everything
you touch shall turn to gold.”

Midas thanked Bacchus, said good-bye to Silenus
and went home. How rich he was going to be—
the richest king in the whole world! He opened his
palace door, and lo! the door became pure, solid
gold. He went from room to room, touching all the
furniture, till everything, bedsteads, tables, chairs,
all became gold. He got a ladder (which turned
into gold in his hands) and touched every brick
and stone in his palace, till his whole palace was
gold. His horses had golden saddles and golden
bridles. His cooks boiled water in golden kettles:
his servants swept away golden dust with golden
brooms.

When he sat down to dinner, his plate turned
to gold. He had become the richest man in the
world, thought he with joy and pride, as he helped
himself from the golden dish before him. But
suddenly his teeth jarred against something hard—
harder than bone. Had the cook put a flint into
the dish? Alas! it was nothing of the kind. His
very food, as soon as it touched his lips, turned to
solid gold!

His heart sank within him, while the meat be-
fore him mocked his hunger. Was the richest man
38 APOLLO.

in the world to starve? A horrible fear came upon
him. He poured out wine into a golden cup, and
tried to drink, and the wine turned into gold! He
sat in despair.

What was he to do? What was the use of
all this gold if he could not buy with it a crust of
bread or a draught of water? The poorest plough-
man was now a richer man than the king. He
could only wander about his golden palace till
his hunger became starvation, and his thirst a fever.
At last, in his despair, he set out and followed
after Bacchus again, to implore the god to take back
the gift of gold.

At last, when nearly starved to death, he found
him. “What!” said Bacchus, “are you not con-
tent yet? Do you want more gold still ?”

“Gold!” cried Midas, “I hate the horrible word !
IT am starving. Make me the poorest man in the
whole world. Silenus taught me much; but I
have learned for myself that a mountain of gold
is not the worth of a single drop of dew.”

“JT will take back my gift, then,” said Bacchus.
“But I will not give you another instead of it,
because all the gods of Olympus could not give you
anything better than this lesson. You may wash
away your folly in the first river you come to,
Good-bye
good thing because too much of it is a bad one.”



and only don’t think that gold is not a
TOO MUCIL GOLD. 39

Midas ran to the banks of the river Pactolus,
which ran hard by. He threw off his golden
clothes, and hurried barefoot over the sands of the



and the sand, wherever his naked feet touched
it, turned to gold. He plunged into the water, and
swam through to the other side. The Curse of the
Golden Touch left him, and he ate and drank, and
never hungered after gold again. He had learned
that the best thing one can do with too much gold
is to give it away as fast as one can.

The sand of the river Pactolus is said to have
gold in it to this day.

river
40

PART IV.—THE CRITIC; or, THE SECOND
STORY OF MIDAS.

NCE upon a time the god Pan fell in love with
a Naiad, or water-nymph, named Syrinx. She
was very beautiful, as all the nymphs were; but
Pan, as you know, was very ugly—so ugly that she
hated him, and was afraid of him, and would have
nothing to do with him. At last, to escape from
him, she turned herself into a reed.
~ But even then Pan did not lose his love for her.
He gathered the reed, and made it into a musical
instrument, which he called a Syrinx. We call it
a Pan-pipe, after the name of its inventor, and be-
cause upon this pipe Pan turned into music all his
sorrow for the loss of Syrinx, making her sing of
the love to which she would not listen while she
was alive.
I suppose that King Midas still kept up his
friendship for Silenus and the satyrs, for one day
THE CRITIC. 41

he was by when Pan was playing on his pipe of
reeds, and he was so delighted with the music that
he cried out, “ How beautiful! Apollo himself is
not so great a musician as Pan!”

You remember the story of Marsyas, and how
angry Apollo was when anybody’s music was put
before his own? I suppose that some ill-natured
satyr must have told him what King Midas had
gaid about him and Pan. Anyway, he was very
angry indeed. And Midas, the next time he looked
at himself in his mirror, saw that his ears had been
changed into those of an Ass.

This was to show him what sort of ears those
people must have who like the common music of
earth better than the music which the gods send
down to us from the sky. But, as yon may sup-
pose, it made Midas very miserable and ashamed.
“ All my people will think their king an Ass,” he
thought to himself, “and that would never do.”

So he made a very large cap to cover his ears,
and never took it off, so that nobody might see
what had happened to him. But one of his ser-
vants, who was very prying and curious, wondered
why the king should always wear that large cap,
and what it was that he could want to hide. He
watched and watched for a long time in vain.
But at last he hid himself in the king’s bed-
room; and when Midas undressed to go to bed,
49 * APOLLO.

he saw, to his amazement, that his master had Ass’s
ears. :

He was very frightened too, as well as amazed.
He could not bear to keep such a curious and sur-
prising secret about the king all to himself, for he
was a great gossip, like most people who pry into
other people’s affairs. But he thought to himself,
“Tf I tell about the king’s ears he will most cer-
tainly cut off my own! But I must tell somebody.
Whom shall I tell ?”

So, when he could bear the secret no longer, he
dug a hole into the ground, and whispered into it,
“King Midas has the Ears of an Ass!” Then,
having thus eased his mind, he filled up the hole
again, so that the secret might be buried in the
earth for ever.

But all the same, before a month had passed,
the secret about the king’s ears was known to all
the land. How could that be? The king still
wore his cap, and the servant had never dared to
speak about it to man, woman, or child. You will
never be able to guess how the secret got abroad
without being told.

It was in this way. Some reeds grew up out of
the place where the servant had made the hole,
and of course the reeds had heard what had been
whispered into the ground where their roots were.
And they were no more able to keep such a won-

<.
THE CRITIC. 43

derful secret to themselves than the servant had
been. Whenever the wind blew through them they
rustled, and their rustle said, “ King Midas has the
Fars of an Ass!” The wind heard the words of the
reeds, and carried the news through all the land,
wherever it blew, “ King Midas has the Ears of an
Ass!” And all the people heard the voice of the
wind, and gaid to one another, “ What a wonderful
thing —King Midas has the Ears of an Ass!”


44

PART V.—SOME FLOWER STORIES.

I.—THE LAUREL.

NE day, Apollo, while following his flock of
sheep, met a little boy playing with a bow
and arrows.

“That isn’t much of a bow you've got there,”
said Apollo.

“Tsn’'t it?” said the boy. “Perhaps not; but
all the same, I don’t believe you’ve got a better,
though youre so big and I’m so small.”

Now you know that Apollo never could bear to
be told that anybody could have anything, or do any-
thing, better than he. You remember how he treated
Marsyas and Midas for saying the same kind of
thing. So he took his own bow from his shoulder,
and showed it to the boy, and said, “ As you think
you know so much about bows and arrows, look at
that; perhaps you'll say that the bow which killed
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 45

the great serpent Python isn’t stronger than your
trumpery little toy.”

The boy took Apollo’s bow and tried to bend it:
but it was much too strong for him. “ But never
mind,” said he. “My little bow and arrows are
better than your big ones, all the same.”

Apollo was half angry and half amused. “ You
little blockhead! how do you make out that?”
asked he.

“Because,” said the boy, “your bow can kill
everybody else—but mine can conquer you. You
shall see.”

And so saying he let fly one of his arrows right
into Apollo’s heart. The arrow was so little that
Apollo felt nothing more than the prick of a pin:
he only laughed at the boy’s nonsense, and went ou
his way as if nothing had happened.

But Apollo would not have thought so little of
the matter if he had known that his heart had been
pricked by a magic arrow. The boy’s name was
Cupid: and you will read a good deal about him
both in this book and in others. Oddly enough,
though the boy was one of the gods of Olympus,
Apollo had never seen him before, and knew
nothing about him. Perhaps Cupid had not been
born when Apollo was banished from the sky.
However this may be, there is no doubt about what
Cupid’s arrows could do. If he shot into the
46 APOLLO.

hearts of two people at the same time with two of
his golden arrows, they loved each other, and were
happy. But if he shot only one heart, as he did
Apollo’s, that person was made to love somebody
who did not love him in return, and perhaps hated
him: so he became very miserable.

So it happened to Apollo. He became very
fond of a nymph named Daphne. But though he
was so great and glorious a god, and she only a
Naiad, she was only afraid of him and would have
nothing to do with him—because Cupid, out of
mischief, shot her heart with one of his leaden
arrows, which prevented love. Apollo prayed her
to like him; but she could not, and when she
saw him coming used to hide away at the bottom
of her river.

But one day she was rambling in a wood a
long way from her home. And, to her alarm, she
suddenly saw Apollo coming towards her. She
took to her heels and ran. She ran very fast
indeed; but her river was far away, and Apollo
kept gaining upon her—for nobody on the earth
or in the sky could run so fast as he. At last she
was so tired and so frightened that she could run
no longer, and was obliged to stand still.

“Rather than let Apollo touch me,” she said, “1
would be a Hamadryad, and never be able to run
again !”

She wished it so hard, that suddenly she felt her
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 47

feet take root in the earth. Then her arms turned
to branches, and her fingers to twigs, and her hair
to leaves. And when Apollo reached the spot, he
found nothing but a laurel bush growing where
Daphne had been. ,

That is why “Daphne” is the Greek for
“Laurel.” And for ever after Apollo loved the
bush into which Daphne had been turned. You
may know Apollo in pictures by his laurel wreath
as well as by his lyre and bow. .

It is a very ancient saying that “Love con-
quers all things.” And that is exactly what Cupid
meant by saying that his toy-bow was stronger
even than the bow which had killed Python,
and could conquer with ease even the god of
the Sun.

II.—_THE HYACINTH.

You remember that Apollo and Diana were born in
the island of Delos. The part of Delos where they
were born was a mountain called Cynthus ; and for
that reason Apollo was often called Cynthius, and
Diana, Cynthia. Bear this in mind, in order to
follow this story.

While Apollo was on earth, Amyelas, the King of
Sparta, engaged him to be the teacher of his son,
48 APOLLO.

This boy, named Hyacinthus, was so handsome and
so amiable that Apollo became exceedingly fond of
him; indeed, he could not bear to be away from his
pupil’s company.

But the west wind, whose name is Zéphyrus,
was also very fond of the boy, whose chief friend he
had been before Apollo came. He was afraid that
the son of Amyclas liked Apollo best; and this
thought filled him with jealousy. One day, as he
was blowing about the king’s garden, he saw Apollo
and the boy playing at quoits together. “ Quoits ”
are heavy rings made of iron: each player takes
one, and throws it with all his strength at a peg
fixed in the ground, and the one who throws his
quoit nearest to the peg wins the game. Zephyrus
was so angry and jealous to see the two friends
amusing themselves while he was blowing about all
alone, that he determined to be revenged upon both
of them.

First of all the boy threw his quoit, and came
very near to the peg indeed—so near that even
Apollo, who could do everything better than any-
body, thought he should find it very hard to
beat him. The peg was a great way off, so Apollo
took up the heaviest quoit, aimed perfectly straight,
and sent it flying like a thunderbolt through the
air. But Zephyrus, who was waiting, gave a great
blast, and blew Apollo’s quoit as it was flying, so
that it struck the boy, who fell to the ground.
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 49

It was a cruel thing altogether. Apollo thought
that he himself had struck his friend by aiming
badly: the boy thought the same, for neither could
tell it was Zephyrus,—nobody has ever seen the
wind.

So perished Hyacinthus: nor could Apollo do
anything to show his love and grief for his friend
except change him into a flower, which is called
Hyacinth to this day. It is said that, if you look,
you will find “Hya” written in Greek letters upon
every petal of the flower. Some people, however,
say that it is not “Hya” at all, but “ Ajai,” which
means “alas.” I don’t know which is true; but
if you will some day look at the petal of a
hyacinth through a microscope (the stronger the
better, I should say) you will find out for your-
self and be able to tell me.

Apollo seems to have been rather fond of turning
his friends into trees and flowers. There was
another friend of his named Cy¥parissus, who once,
by accident, killed one of Apollo’s favourite stags,
and was so sorry for what he had done, and pined
away so miserably, that the god, to put him out
of hig misery, changed him into a cypress - tree.
“Cypress” comes from Cy¥pirissus, as you will
easily see. And we still plant the cypress in
churchyards, because it is the tree of tears and
mourning that cannot be cured.

D
50 APOLLO.

IJI.—THE SUN-FLOWER.

THERE was a nymph named Clytié, who was so
beautiful that Apollo fell in love with her. She
was very proud and glad of being loved by the god
of the Sun, and loved him a great deal more than
he loved her. But she believed that his love was
as great as her own: and so she lived happily for
a long time.

But one day, Apollo happened to see a king’s
daughter, whose name was Leucdthdé. He thought
she was the most beautiful creature he had ever
seen: so he fell in love with her, and forgot Clytie
as much as if there was nobody but Leucothoe in
the world. Clytie, however, knew nothing of all
this, and only wondered why Apollo never came to
see her any more.

Now the king, whose name was Orchamus, kept
his daughter very strictly: and did not wish her to
have anything to do with Apollo. I suppose he was
afraid of Apollo’s loving her for a time, and then
leaving her to be miserable and unhappy, as hap-
pened to many nymphs and princesses in those
days besides Clytie. So when King Orchamus found
that Apollo was making love to Leucothoe, he shut
her up in his palace, and would not allow her to go
out or anybody else to go in.

But Apollo was much too clever to be beaten in
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 51

that way. He disguised himself as Leucothoe’s own
mother, and so came to see her whenever he pleased,
without anybody being anything the wiser. And so
everything went on just as he wished, if it had not
been for Clytie, whom he had treated just as King
Orchamus was afraid he would treat Leucothoe.

Clytie wondered why Apollo never came to see
her till she could bear it no longer; and she watched
him, to find out what was the reason of it all. She
watched till at last she saw somebody who looked
like a queen go into the palace of King Orcha-
mus. But she knew Apollo much too well to be
taken in by any disguise. She secretly followed
him into the palace, and found him making love
to Leucothoe.

In her misery and jealousy, she went straight to
King Orchamus, and told him what she had seen.
Perhaps she hoped that the king would send his
daughter away altogether, so that Apollo would then
come back to her. She could not possibly foresee
what would really happen. King Orchamus was
so enraged with his daughter for receiving Apollo’s
visits against his commands that he ordered
Leucothoe to be buried alive. Of course he could
not punish Apollo: because Apollo was a god, while
he was only a king.

Perhaps you will think that Apollo might have
managed to save Leucothoe from such a terrible
death as her father had ordered for her. As he did
52 APOLLO,

not, I suppose that King Orchamus had her buried
before anybody could tell the news—at any rate
she was dead when Apollo arrived at her grave.
All he could do for her was to show his love and
his sorrow by turning her into a tree from which
people take a sweet-smelling gum called myrrh.

As to Clytie, whose jealousy had caused the death
of the princess, he refused ever to speak to her or
look at her again: and he turned her into a sun-
flower, which has no perfume like the myzrh-tree
into which he had changed Leucothoe. But, in
spite of his scorn and of everything he could do to
her, Clytie loved him still: and though he would
not look at her, she still spends her whole time in
gazing up at him with her blossoms, which are her
eyes. People say that the blossoms of the sun-
flower always turn towards the sun—towards the
east when he is rising, towards the west when he
is setting, and straight up at noon, when he is in
the middle of the sky. Of course, like all other
blossoms, they close at night, when he is no longer
to be seen. As for the sun himself, I expect he has
forgotten both Clytie and Leucothoe long ago; and
sees no difference between them and any other trees
or flowers.
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 53

IV.—THE NARCISSUS.

Tuts story has nothing to do with Apollo: but
I may as well tell it among the other flower
stories.

There was a very beautiful nymph named Kcho,
who had never, in all her life, seen anybody hand-
somer than the god Pan. You have read that Pan
was the chief of all the Satyrs, and what hideous
monsters the Satyrs were. So, when Pan made
_love to her, she very naturally kept. him at a dis-
tance: and, as she supposed him to be no worse-
looking than the rest of the world, she made up
her mind to have nothing to do with love or love-
making, and was quite content to ramble about the
woods all alone.

But one day, to her surprise, she happened to
meet with a young man who was as different from
Pan as any creature could be. Instead of having a
goat’s legs and long hairy arms, he was as graceful
as Apollo himself: no horns grew out of his fore-
head, and his ears were not long, pointed, and
covered with hair, but just like Echo’s own. And
he was just as beautiful in face as he was graceful
in form. I doubt if Echo would have thought even
Apollo himself so beautiful.

The nymphs were rather shy, and Echo was the
54 APOLLO.

very shyest of them all. But she admired him so
much that she could not leave the spot, and at last
she even plucked up courage enough to ask him,
“What is the name of the most beautiful being in
the whole world ?”

«Whom do you mean?” asked he. “ Yourself ?
If you want to know your own name, you can tell
it better than I can.”

“No,” said Echo, “I don’t mean myself. I mean
you. What is your name?”

“My name is Narcissus,” said he. “ But as for
my being beautiful—that is absurd.”

“Narcissus!” repeated Echo to herself. “It is
a beautiful name. Which of the nymphs have you
come to meet here in these woods all alone? She
is lucky—whoever she may be.”

“JT have come to meet nobody,” said Narcissus.
«“But—am I really so beautiful? I have often
been told so by other girls, of course; but really
it is more than I can quite believe.”

« And you don’t care for any of those girls ?”

“Why, you see,” said Narcissus, “ when all the
girls one knows call one beautiful, there’s no reason
why I should care for one more than another.
They all seem alike when they are all always saying
just the same thing. Ah! I do wish I could see
myself, so that I could tell if it was really true.
I would marry the girl who could give me the wish
of my heart—to see myself as other people see me.
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 55

But as nobody can make me do that, why, I sup-
pose I shall get on very well without marrying
anybody at all.”

Looking-glasses had not been invented in those
days, so that Narcissus had really never scen even
so much of himself as his chin.

“What!” cried Echo, full of hope and joy; “if
I make you see your own face, you will marry
me 2”

“TI gaid so,’ said he. “And of course what I
say Tl do, I'll do.”

“ Then—come with me!”

Echo took him by the hand and led him to the
edge of a little lake in the middle of the wood, full
of clear water.

“Kneel down, Narcissus,” said she, “and bend
your eyes over the water-side. That lake is the
mirror where Diana comes every morning to dress
her hair, and in which, every night, the moon and
the stars behold themselves. Look into that water,
and see what manner of man you are!”

Narcissus kneeled down and looked into the lake.
And, better than in any common looking-glass, he
saw the reflected image of his own face—and he
looked, and looked, and could not take his eyes
away.

But Echo at last grew tired of waiting. “Have
you forgotten what you promised me?” asked she.
56 APOLLO,

« Are you content now? Do you see now that what
I told you is true?”

He lifted his eyes at last. “Oh, beautiful crea-
ture that Iam!” said he. “I am indeed the most
divine creature in the whole wide world. I love
myself madly. Go away. I want to be with my
beautiful image, with myself, all alone. I can’t
marry you. I shall never love anybody but myself
for the rest of my days.” And he kneeled down
and gazed at himself once more, while poor Echo
had to go weeping away.

Narcissus had spoken truly. He loved himself
and his own face so much that he could think of
nothing else: he spent all his days and nights by
the lake, and never took his eyes away. But un-
luckily his image, which was only a shadow in the
water, could not love him back again. And so he
pined away until he died. And when his friends
came to look for his body, they found nothing but
a flower, into which his soul had turned. So they
called it the Narcissus, and we call it so still. And
yet I don’t know that it is a particularly conceited
or selfish flower.

As for poor Echo, she pined away too. She
faded and faded until nothing was left of her but
her voice. There are many places where she can
even now be heard. And she still has the same
SOME FLOWER STORIES. 57

trick of saying to vain and foolish people whatever
they say to themselves, or whatever they would
like best to hear said to them. If you go where
Echo is, and call out loudly, “T am beautiful !”—
she will echo your very words.


PART VL—PRESUMPTION; or, THE STORY
OF PHAETHON.

HERE was a nymph named Cl¥méné, who had a
gon so handsome that he was called Phatthon,
which means, in Greek, “ Bright, radiant, shining,”
like the sun. When he grew up, the goddess
Venus was so charmed with him that she made
him the chief ruler of all her temples, and took
him into such high favour that all his friends
and companions were filled with envy.

One day, when Phaitthon was foolishly bragging
about his own beauty and greatness, and how much
he was put by a goddess above other men, one
of his companions, named Epiphus, answered him,
scornfully—

“Ah! you may boast and brag, but you are a
nobody after all! Jy father was Jupiter, as every-
body knows; but who was yours ?”
PRESUMPTION. 59

So Phaéthon went to his mother Clymene, and
said—

“Mother, they taunt me for not being the son
of a god; me, who am fit to be a god myself for
my grace and beauty. Who was my father? He
must at least have been some great king, to be
the father of such a son as I.”

“A king!” said Clymene. “Ay—and a



ereater than all kings! Tell them, from me, that
your father is Phoebus Apollo, the god of the
Sun!”

But when he went back and told his friends,
“My father is Phoebus Apollo, the god of the Sun,”
Epaphus and the others only scorned him and
laughed at him the more. “You've caught your
bragging from your mother,” said they. “ You're
her son, anyhow, whoever your father may be.”

When Clymene heard this, she felt terribly
offended. “Then I will prove my words,” said
she. “Go to the Palace of the Sun and _ enter
boldly. There you will see the Sun-god in all
his glory. Demand of him to declare you to be
his son openly before all the world, so that even
the sons of Jupiter shall hang their heads for
shame.”

If Apollo had been still banished upon earth, of
course Phaitthon could have found him very easily.
But the nine years of banishment were over now,
and the only way to find the god of the Sun
60 APOLLO.

was to seek him in his palace above the sky.
How Phatthon managed to get there I have never
heard; but I suppose his mother was able to
tell him the secret way. You may imagine the
glorious and wonderful place it was—the House
of the Sun, with the stars for the windows that
are lighted up at night, and the clouds for curtains,
and the blue sky for a garden, and the Zodiac for a
carriage-drive. The sun itself, as you have heard,
is the chariot of Apollo, drawn by four horses
of white fire, who feed on golden grain, and are
driven by the god himself round and round the
world. Phatthon entered boldly, as his mother
had told him, found Apollo in all his glory, and
said—

“My mother, Clymene, says that I am your
son. Is it true?”

“ Certainly,” said Apollo, “it is true.”

“Then give me a sign,” said Phaéthon, “ that all
may know and believe. Make me sure that I
am your son.”

“Tell them that Z say so,” said Apollo. “There
—don’t hinder me any more. My horses are har-
nessed: it is time for the sun to rise.”

“No,” said Phaéthon, “they will only say that
I brag and lie. Give me a sign for all the
world to see



a sign that only a father would
give to his own child.”
“Very well,” said Apollo, who was getting
PRESUMPTION. 61

impatient at being so hindered. “ Only tell me
what you want me to do, and it shall be
done.”

“You swear it—by Styx?” said Phaithon.

Now you must know that the Styx was a
river in Hades by which the gods swore; and that
an oath “by Styx” was as binding upon a god
as a plain promise is upon a gentleman.

“T swear it—by Styx!” said Apollo, rather
rashly, as you will see. But he was now in a
very great hurry indeed.

“Then,” said Phatthon, “let me drive the horses
of the Sun for one whole day !”

This put Apollo in terrible alarm, for he knew
very well that no hand, not even a god’s, can drive
the horses of the Sun but his own. But he had
sworn by Styx—the oath that cannot be broken.
All he could do was to keep the world waiting for
sunrise while he showed Phaéthon how to hold the
reins and the whip, and pointed out what course to
take, and warned him of the dangers of the road.
“But it’s all of no use. You'll never do it,” said
he. “Give it up, while there is yet time! You
know not what you do.”

“Oh, but I do, though,” said Phatthon. “I
know I can. There—I understand it all now,
without another word.” So saying, be sprang into
the chariot, seized the reins, and gave the four fiery
62 APOLLO,

horses four lashes that sent them flying like comets
through the air.

“Hold them in—hold them hard!” cried Apollo.
But Phaéthon was off, and too far off to hear.

Off indeed! and where? The world must have
been amazed that day to see the sun rise like a
rocket and go dashing about the sky, north, south,
east, west—anywhere, nowhere, everywhere! Well
the horses. knew that it was not Apollo, their
master, who plied the whip and held the reins.
They took their bits between their teeth, and—
bolted. They kicked a planet to bits (astronomers
know where the pieces are still): they broke holes
in the chariot which we can see, and call “sun-
spots,” to this day: it was as if chaos were come
again. At last, Phaéthon, whose own head was
reeling, saw to his horror that the horses, in their
mad rush, were getting nearer and nearer to the
earth itself—and what would happen then? If
the wheels touched the globe we live on, it would
be scorched to a cinder. Nearer, nearer, nearer it
came—till a last wild kick broke the traces, over-
turned the sun itself, and Phaéthon fell, and fell,
and fell, till he fell into the sea, and was drowned.
And then the horses trotted quietly home.

The story of Phaéthon is always taken as a warn-
ing against being conceited and self-willed. But
PRESUMPTION. 63

there are some curious things about it still to be
told. The Greeks fancied that the great desert of
Sahara, in Africa, is the place where the earth was
scorched by the sun’s chariot-wheel, and that the
African negroes were burned black in the same way,
and have never got white again. And the poplars
are Phaéthon’s sisters, who wept themselves for his
death into trees.




MEX > & GY fa goa & (o= ee) rt
SVS S ESE ESSE





ik Fr aS 8 = 4 WY fos S
ake @ we : ae
NY Cw; C nae Ne M ca 22) ey



@\y40U know that the fixed stars are
divided into groups, called constella-
tions. A name has been given to



every constellation ; and eacli is sup-
posed to be like the shape of some
creature or thing-——such as the Great Bear, the
Swan, the Cup, the Eagle, the Dragon, and so on.
Most of their names were given by the Greeks, who
fancied they could see in them the shapes after
which they were named. We have kept the old
names, and still paint the supposed figure of each
constellation on the celestial globe, which is the
image or map of the sky.

Now the grandest, brightest, and largest of all
the constellations is named Orion. It is supposed
to represent a giant, with a girdle and a sword,
DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION. 65

and is rather more like what is fancied than
most of the constellations are. You are now going
to read the story of Orion, and how he came to be
placed among the stars. You may notice, by the
way, that the planets, the sun, and the moon are
named after gods and goddesses; the fixed stars
after mortals who were raised to the skies.

There was once a man named Hyriéus, whose
wife died, and be loved her so much, and was so
overcome with grief that he vowed never to marry
again. But she left him no children. And when,
in course of time, he grew old, he sadly felt the
want of sons and daughters to make his old age
less hard and lonely.

One day it happened that Jupiter, Neptune, and
Mercury (who was one of the gods, and Jupiter’s
chief minister and messenger) were on a visit to
earth. The night fell, and they grew tired and
hungry. So they wandered on to find rest and
food; and, as luck would have it, they came to the
cottage of Hyrieus, and asked for shelter. Hyrieus
thought they were only three poor benighted trav-
ellers who had lost their way. But he was very
good and charitable, so he asked them in and gave
them the best fare he had—bread, roots, and wine—
he himself waiting upon them, and trying to make
them comfortable. He poured out a cup of wine,
and offered it first to Neptune. But Neptune, in-

E
66 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

stead of drinking it, rose from his seat and gave
the cup to Jupiter, like a subject to a king who
should be first served. You may not think there
was much to notice in this; but Hyrieus noticed
it, and then, looking intently upon the stranger to
whom Neptune had given the cup, he was struck
by a sudden religious awe that told him he was in
the presence of the king and father of gods and
men. He straightway fell on his knees and said—

“T am.poor and humble; but I have in my stall
one ox to plough my field. I will gladly offer him
up as a sacrifice for joy that Jupiter has thought
me worthy to give him bread and wine.”

2

“You are a good and pious man,” said Jupiter.
“Ask of us any gift you please, and it shall be yours.”

“My wife is dead,” said Hyrieus, “and I have
vowed never to marry again. But let me have a
child.”

“Take the ox,” said Jupiter, “and sacrifice him.”

So Hyrieus, being full of faith, sacrificed his ox,
and, at the bidding of Jupiter, buried the skin.
And from that skin, and out of the ground, there
grew a child, who was named Orion.

Orion grew and grew till he became a giant, of
wonderful strength and splendid beauty. He took
the most loving care of Hyrieus, and was the best
of sons to him. But when the old man died,
Orion went out into the world to seek his fortune.
DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION. 67

And the first service he found was that of Diana,
the sister of Apollo, and queen and goddess of the
Moon.

Diana, however, had a great deal to do besides
looking after the moon. She was three goddesses
in one



a goddess of the sky, a goddess of earth,
and a goddess of Hades besides. In heaven she
was called Luna, whose duty is to light the world
when Apollo is off duty. In Hades she was called
Hécaté, who, with her sceptre, rules the ghosts of
dead souls. And on earth her name is Diana, the
queen of forests and mountains, of wild animals
and hunters. She wears a crescent on her forehead
and a quiver at her back; her limbs are bare, and
she holds a bow, with which she shoots as well as
her brother Apollo. Just as he is called Pho-
bus, so she is often called Pheebe. She goes hunt-
ing all night among the hills and woods, attended
by the Nymphs and Oreads, of whom she is queen.
There are not so many stories about her as about
the other gods and goddesses, and yet she is really
the most interesting of them all, as you will see
some day.

This great strange goddess had sworn never to
love or marry—had sworn it by Styx, I suppose.
But Orion was so beautiful and so strong and so
great a hunter that she went ag near to loving him
as she ever did to loving any one. She had him
always with her, and could never bear him to leave
68 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

her. But Orion never thought of becoming the
husband of a goddess, and he fell in love with a
mortal princess, the daughter of Gnopion, King of
Chios, an island in the Aigean Sea.

When, however, he asked the king for his daugh-
ter, CEnopion was terribly frightened at the idea of
having a giant for his son-in-law. But he dared
not say “No.” He answered hin—

“My kingdom is overrun with terrible wild
beasts. I will give my daughter to the man who
kills them all.” He said this, feeling sure that
any man who tried to kill all the wild beasts in
Chios would himself be killed.

But Orion went out, and killed all the wild
beasts in no time, with his club and his sword.
Then Ginopion was still more afraid of him, and
said—

“You have won my daughter. But, before you
marry her, let us drink together, in honour of this
joyful day.”

Orion, thinking no harm, went with Gnopion
to the sea-shore, where they sat down and drank
together. But Ginopion (whose name means “ The
Wine-Drinker”) knew a great deal more about what
wine will do, and how to keep sober, than Orion.
So before long Orion fell asleep with the strong
Chian wine, which the king had invented; and
when Orion was sound asleep, Génopion put out
both his eyes.
DIANA; AND TIE STORY OF ORION. 69

The giant awoke to find himself blind, and did
not know what to do or which way to go. But at
last, in the midst of his despair, he heard the sound
of a blacksmith’s forge. Guided by the clang, he
reached the place, and prayed the blacksmith to
climb up on his shoulders, and so lend him his
eyes to guide him.

The blacksmith consented, and seated himself on
the giant’s shoulder. Then said Orion—

“Guide me to the place where I can see the first
sunbeam that rises at daybreak in the east over the
sea.”

Orion strode out, and the blacksmith guided
him, and at last they came to the place where the
earliest sunbeam first strikes wpon human eyes. It
struck upon Orion’s, and it gave him back his sight
again. Then, thanking the blacksmith, he plunged
into the sea to swim back to Diana.

Now Apollo had long noticed his sister’s affec-
tion for Orion, and was very much afraid for fear
she should break her vow against love and marriage.
To break an oath would be a horrible thing for a
goddess to do. While Orion was away, making
love and killing wild beasts in Chios, there was no
fear; but now he was coming back, there was no
knowing what might happen. So he thought of a
trick to get rid of Orion, and he said—

“My sister, some people say that you can
70 DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORION.

shoot as well as I can. Now, of course, that is
absurd.”

“Why absurd?” asked Diana. “I can shoot
quite as well as you.”

“ We will soon see that,” said Apollo. “Do you
see that little dark speck out there, in the sea? I
wager that you won’t hit it, and that T can.”

“We will see,’ said Diana. So she drew her
bow and shot her arrow at the little dark speck, that
seemed dancing on the waves miles and miles away.
To hit it seemed impossible. But Diana’s arrow
went true. The speck was hit—it sank, and rose
no more.

It was the head of Orion, who was swimming
back to Diana. She had been tricked into killing
him with an arrow from her own bow. All she
could do was to place him among the stars.

So her vow was kept; and from that time she
never allowed herself to be seen by a man. Women
may see her; but if men see her, they go mad or
die. There is a terrible story of a hunter named
Action, who once happened to catch a glimpse of
her as she was bathing in a pool. She instantly
turned him into a stag, so that his own dogs fell
upon him and killed him. And another time, when
she saw a shepherd named Endymion on Mount
Latmos, and could not help wishing to kiss him for
DIANA; AND THE STORY OF ORTON, | 71

his beauty, she covered herself with clouds as she
stooped, and threw him into a deep sleep, so that
he might not see her face, or know that he had
been kissed by the moon. Only from that hour he
became a poet and a prophet, full of strange fan-
cies; and it is said that every man becomes a mad-
man or a poet who goes to sleep in the moonlight
on the top of a hill. Diana comes and kisses him
in his dreams,

.






SCY|NE day Jupiter had a very bad head-
# ache. He had never had one be-
fore, so he did not know what



it was or what to do One god
recommended one thing and another
proposed another, and Jupiter tried them all; but
the more things he tried the worse the headache
erew. At last he said—

“T can’t stand this any more. Vulcan, bring
your great sledge-hammer and split open my skull.
Kill or cure.”

Vulcan brought his sledge-hammer and split open
Jupiter’s skull with a single blow. And out there
came a fine, full-grown goddess, clad in complete
armour from head to foot, armed with a spear
and shield, and with beautiful large blue eyes.
MINERVA; OR, WISDOM. 73

She was Minerva (or, in Greek, Athéné), the
Wisdom that comes from Jupiter’s brain, and makes
it ache sometimes.

Minerva was wonderfully good as well as won-
derfully wise: not that there is much difference
between goodness and wisdom. She is the only
goddess, or god either, who never did a foolish, an
unkind, or a wrong thing. By the way, though, she
once took it into her head that she could play the
flute, and the gods laughed at her; but when she
looked into a brook and saw what ugly faces
she made when she played, she knew at once what
made the gods laugh, laughed at herself, threw the
flute away, and never played it again; so she was
even ,wise enough not to be vain, or to think she
could do well what she did badly.

The only bad thing about good people is that
there are so few good stories to tell of them. She
was Jupiter’s favourite daughter, and no wonder;
and she was the only one of all the gods and
goddesses whom he allowed to use his thunder. She
was the only one he could trust, I suppose. She
was rather too fond of fighting, considering that she
was a lady, but she was as good at her needle as
her sword. She was so good at spinning, that a
woman named Arachne, who was the best spinner
and seamstress in the world, hanged herself in
despair because she could not spin a web so neatly
and finely as Minerva. The goddess turned her
7A MINERVA; OR, WISDOM.

into a spider, who is still the finest spinner in
the world, next to Minerva alone.

Once the people of Attica wanted a name for
their capital, which they had just been building.
They asked the gods, and the gods in council de-
creed that the new city should be named by the god
who should give the most useful new present to
mankind. Neptune struck the earth with his tri-
dent, and out sprang the horse, and nobody thought
that his gift could be beaten. But Minerva planted
the olive, which is the plant of peace. So the gods
gave the honour of naming the new city to Minerva,
because the emblem of peace is better than the
horse, who is the emblem of war. The name she
gave was from her own—Athéne ; and the city is
called Athens to this day. The Athenians always
paid their chief worship to their goddess-godmother.

Minerva was very handsome, but rather manly-
looking for a goddess, and grave; her most famous
feature was her blue eyes. “The Blue-eyed Maid”
is one of her most usual titles in poetry. She
wore a large helmet with waving plumes; in one
hand she held a spear; on her left arm she car-
ried the shield on which was the head of the
Gorgon Medusa, with living snakes darting from it.
But sometimes she carried a distaff instead of a
spear. The olive was of course sacred to her, and
her favourite bird is the owl, who is always called
the Bird of Wisdom.






VENUS.

PART L—THE GOD OF FIRE.

OU may remember reading, at the end
of the story of “The Gods and the
Giants,” that the quarrels of Jupiter

Fa





and Juno never ceased to disturb
the peace of the sky where the gods
dwell, Juno’s temper was terrible, and so was her
jealousy, and her pride was beyond all bounds. On
the other hand, her character was without reproach,
while Jupiter was the worst husband in the whole
of heaven. To such a pitch did their quarrels at
last reach, that Juno went away to earth, vowing
never to see Jupiter again.

I suppose, however, that Jupiter loved Juno in
the depth of his heart, or else he was afraid of the
76 VENUS.

scandal that would follow upon a separation between
the King and Queen of Heaven. At any rate he
consulted his friends as to how the quarrel could
be made up, and was advised by one of them, King
Citheron of Plata, to have it announced that he
was about to make some other goddess his queen.
On hearing the news, back flew Juno in a rage to
the sky to stop the marriage, and finding that there
was no marriage to stop, consented to remain, and
to forgive her husband once more.

But to quarrel once always makes it easier and
easier to quarrel again, and harder and harder to
keep love or friendship alive. And before long
came another quarrel—the worst of all. Juno
scolded furiously, and Jupiter at last said—

“Enough. You shall destroy the peace of
heaven no longer. Out you shall go.”

“ All the better,” said Juno. “I will go back
to earth as I did before. And I am not going to
be tricked by your false stories a second time.”

“No,” said Jupiter ; “the happiness of the earth
is as dear to me as the happiness of the sky. You
shall neither go to earth nor stay in heaven.”

Taking a long golden chain, he fastened it round
her, under her shoulders. Then he sent for one of
the Cyclopes’ anvils, and fastened it to her feet.
Securing the other end of the chain to the key-
stone of the rainbow, he let her down, so that Juno
hung suspended in mid-air, neither upon the earth
THE GOD OF FIRE. [7

nor in the sky, while the anvil at her feet prevented
her from swinging and from climbing up again by
the chain.

It was a terrible position for Juno. Her anger
was still at full heat, and such a degradation, in
full sight of gods and men, was a heavy wound to
her pride, not to speak of the bodily pain which
she had helplessly to bear. But she scorned to
beg for pardon. So there she hung, plotting re-
venge, until night came—till Apollo was asleep
under the sea, and Diana was away hunting, and
Jupiter, making the most of his long-lost quiet, was
dozing upon his throne. Then Juno, who certainly
could not sleep with an anvil dragging at her legs
and a chain at her shoulders, heard a whisper from
above, “Hush! Don’t start—don’t scream; keep
quite still, and Tl soon draw your majesty up
again.”

Not that Juno had thought of starting or scream-
ing—she was much too dignified. Besides, the
whisper, though rather rough and hoarse, was very
pleasant to hear just then. For she recognised the
voice of Vulcan, her own son, and she knew that
he was going to help her.

So she kept quite quiet as she was bidden, and
presently she felt herself, anvil and all, being drawn
very slowly upwards, just as you may have seen a
heavy sack drawn up by a machine to a warehouse
window. It must have been rather painful being
78 VENUS.

dragged up while the anvil dragged her down; but
she found herself on firm sky at last, and sighed
with relief when Vulcan, whipping out his knife,
cut the cord at her feet, and let the anvil go thun-
dering down upon the earth below.

You can fancy what a clatter it made. People
started out of their sleep—not that that mattered.
But it did matter that Jupiter started out of his.
He sprang from his throne, and saw at once what
had happened. The next moment, with a tremen-
dous kick, he sent Vulcan flying after the anvil.

Vulcan fell and fell, spinning through space, till
he lost his senses, and then—

The anvil had fallen wpon the island of Lemnos,
and the islanders, rushing out of their houses to see
what the crash and clatter could be about, were
amazed to see what looked like a confused bundle
of legs and arms tumbling and whirling through
the air. As it came nearer, it seemed to be a
human figure. So the people made a sort of net-
work of their arms, to catch it and prevent its being
dashed to pieces.

And lucky it was for vues that they did. For
when he came to himself he found himself with
nothing worse the matter than one leg badly
broken.

God though he was, he always remained lame,
and he was naturally somewhat deformed. But
THE GOD OF FIRE. 79

neither lameness nor deformity prevented his hav-
ing amazing strength; and he was as clever as he
was strong. The people of Lemnos treated him
kindly, and he in return taught them to work in
metals. They built him a palace, and he set up
forges and furnaces, and made all sorts of useful and
curious things. He used to work at the forges himself,
blowing the fires and wielding the hammer. Among
the curious things he made were two mechanical
statues, which seemed alive, walked about with him,
and even helped him in his work. And at last
there came into his head a plan for getting called
back into heaven. So he shut himself up in his
smithy with his two mechanical workmen, and let
nobody know what he was doing there. Those
mechanical workmen were among the most useful
things he made, for he could trust them to help
him in his most secret work without understanding
it or being able to tell how it was done.

One day the gods up in heaven were excited by
the arrival of a splendid golden throne—a present
from the earth for Jupiter. How it came there
nobody knew. But there it was, and all agreed
that nothing so magnificent in its way had ever
been seen before even in the skies. Jupiter was
about to try how it felt to sit upon, when Juno,
Jealous even of that, went quickly before him and
seated herself.
80 VENUS.

“Ah! that is a comfortable throne!” she ex-
claimed. “There is nothing like gold to sit upon,
after all.”

Jupiter was annoyed with Juno’s behaviour, as
indeed he was with most things she did. As, how-
ever, he did not like to make another scene before
all the gods and goddesses, he waited patiently for
her to get up again. But she did not move.

At last—-“T think that is my throne,” he hinted,
in a tone. which seemed gentle, but which Juno
understood exceedingly well. Still she did not
move.

“Thrones are not meant to go to sleep upon,”
he said in a yet more meaning way.

And still she did not move.

“Get up!” he thundered at last, his patience
gone.

“J can’t!” was all she could say, as she made a.
vain effort to rise. “The throne is holding me with
its arms !”

And so it proved. Juno was held so tightly
by the throne that she could scarcely struggle.
It was very strange. And presently it became
stranger still. Neither the authority of Jupiter,
nor all the strength and skill of all Olympus
together, could loosen the clutch of the magic
throne.

« Ah!” gaid Mercury—who, you may remember,
was Jupiter’s chief messenger, and the quickest and
THE GOD OF FIRE. 81

cleverest of all the gods—¢if only Vulcan were
here! He understands these things.”

“And why is he not here?” asked: Jupiter,
sternly.

But nobody dared answer, though everybody
knew. However, Mercury took the hint, vanished
for an instant or two, and, while the gods were
vainly tugging at the arms of the. throne, reap-
peared, followed by a limping figure all black and
hot from the forge—in short, by Vulcan.

“What is the matter?” asked Vulcan, as inno-
cently as if he had nothing to do with it at all.
“Ah! Isee. A clever invention; but By the
way, I can’t afford another broken leg: so if I help
my mother this time———”

Seeing from the face of Jupiter that he had noth-
ing to fear, he pressed the tip of his grimy finger



upon a secret spring—the arms instantly opened,
and Juno was free. What they did with the throne
I cannot tell you; but you may be certain that no-
body ever sat on it again.

After that, Vulcan remained among the gods as
the god of Fire, and was the chief blacksmith of
nature. He opened vast forges in the middle of
the earth, where he made weapons and armour for
gods and heroes, and thunderbolts for J upiter. The
Cyclopes, the giants with one eye in the middle
of their foreheads, were his workmen. The chim-

F
82 VENUS.

neys of his furnaces are called volcanoes, of which
the chief is Mount Etna in the island of Sicily ;
and one can tell when some great work is going on
by the smoke and flame that bursts out of these.
Volcano, you will no doubt notice, is very nearly
the same word as Vulcan.

And so things went on quietly till one day a very
wonderful thing happened. Nobody has ever been
able to account for it or understand it; so I must
just tell you the story as it stands. One lovely
spring morning, when there was scarcely the softest
breeze to stir the sea, shining like a mirror in the
sun, a light amber-coloured froth that floated upon
the ripples was seen, by watchers upon the shore of
the island of Cyprus, to gather into a delicate rosy
cloud that presently began to tremble as if it were
trying to be alive. It still rested lightly upon the
water—so lightly that the breeze, soft and gentle as
it was, might have blown it away; but its delicate
trembling carried it upwards till at last it seemed
to breathe, then to take shape, and at last blossomed
if woman it was



into the most beautiful woman,
——that had ever been seen in the world, or even in
heaven. With wonderful grace she glided to the
shore; and poets have told how the zephyrs, or soft
west winds, guided her as she came, and the four
seasons received her on the shore. The people of
Cyprus could only wonder and worship ; and this
THE GOD OF FIRE. 83

was the birth of the great goddess Venus, the Queen
of Love, whom the Greeks called Aphrodite, which
means born of the Foam of the Sea.

And this wonderful goddess of Love and Beauty
Jupiter chose to give in marriage to Vulcan, the
deformed and limping god of Fire.
84

PART IL—LOVE AND THE SOUL; or, THE
STORY OF CUPID AND PSYCHE,

HE fact was, that Jupiter himself had fallen in
love with the beautiful new goddess. But
she would have nothing to say to him: and so,
just out of anger and revenge, he ordered her
to marry Vulcan, because he was ugly, deformed,
and always black with working at his forges.
Altogether it was an unlucky day when Venus
came into the sky. Her beauty turned the heads
of the gods, and filled the goddesses with envy
and jealousy. But all that mattered nothing to
her, for she had a magic zone, or girdle, called
“Cestus” in Latin: and whenever she put it
on she became so irresistibly charming that every-
body forgave her everything. Not only the gods,
but men also, became her lovers, her own favourite
among them all being Mars, the god of War—
a cruel and savage god, very unlike the rest,
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 85

delighting in battle and slaughter. Then, on
earth, she tried her best to make a very handsome
young prince named Adonis fall in love with
her. But he—strange to say



cared nothing
for her. The only thing he cared for in the
world was hunting: he scorned everything else,
Venus included. Still, in spite of his scorn for
her, she mourned for him miserably when he
was killed by a wild boar. She changed him
into the flower called Anemone, so that she might
still find him upon earth: though some people
say her grief was such that Death took pity on
her, and allowed him to come to life again for
six months at a time every year. This might
mean that Adonis is only another name for the
beauty of the earth, which comes to life for the
six months of spring and summer, and dies for
the six months of autumn and winter. For most
of these stories have some sort of meaning,

Venus had a child, named Cupid, which means
love. You must often have seen pictures and
statues of him



a very beautiful boy, with wings,
carrying a bow and arrows. They were magic
arrows, or if any man was pricked by one of
their points, he fell in love with the first woman
he saw: or a woman, in like manner, with the first
man. And as Cupid was exceedingly mischievous,
and fond of aiming his arrows at people for his own
86 VENUS.

amusement, the wrong women were always falling
in love with the wrong men, and the wrong men
with the wrong women: and so a great deal of
fresh trouble came into the world, as if there
had not been enough before, without the mis-
chievous tricks of Cupid. Sometimes he went about
blindfolded, shooting his arrows about at random:
and then, of course, the confusion was worse than
ever. It has been said that the bandage over
his eyes means that love is blind to faults. But
he does not always wear the bandage: and when
he does, I believe it is only when he does not choose
to see.

Now in a certain city there lived a king and
queen, who had three beautiful daughters. The
name of the youngest was Psyche, and she was
the most beautiful of all. So beautiful and so
charming was she that the people worshipped her
as a goddess, instead of Venus. This made Venus
very angry indeed, that a mortal girl should receive
the honour and worship due to the goddess of
Beauty. So, in her jealous wrath, she said to
Cupid—

“Do you see that girl yonder? I order you, as
your mother, to make her fall in love with the very
meanest of mankind—one so degraded that he
cannot find his equal in wretchedness throughout
the whole wide world.”

Psyche’s elder sisters were both married to
LOVE AND THE SOUL. ai

kings; but she herself was so marvellously beauti-
ful that no mere mortal dared to ask for her in
marriage. This distressed the king, her father,
greatly: for it was thought dishonourable for a
princess not to marry. So he consulted the oracle
of Apollo—an “oracle” being a place where a
god’s voice answered questions. And the voice
answered him thus :—

“On a cliff the maiden place :

Deck her as you deck the dead :
None that is of mortal race

Shall so fair a maiden wed.
But a being dread and dire,

Feared by earth, by heaven abhorred,
Breathing venom, sword, and fire—

He shall be the lady’s lord.”

This answer made the king more unhappy than
ever at the thought of having to give his favourite
daughter to be devoured by some terrible monster.
However, the oracle had to be obeyed, and the
whole city gave itself up to mourning for many
days. Then at last a funeral procession set out
to conduct the poor princess to her doom. Her
father and mother were distracted with grief, and
Psyche alone showed cheerfulness and courage,
doing all she could to comfort them, and to make
them resigned to the will of heaven. *

When the procession reached the highest peak
of a neighbouring mountain, it returned to the city,
and Psyche was left there all alone, Then her
88 VENUS.

courage left her, and she threw herself upon the
rock all trembling and weeping. But suddenly, in
the midst of her distress, she was gently lifted up
by the wind, and as gently let down upon the soft
turf of a secret valley in the very heart of the hill.

It was a very delightful place, and Psyche fell
pleasantly asleep. When she woke she saw a
grove, with a fountain of water as clear as crystal,
and near the fountain was a splendid palace, built
of gold, cedar, and ivory, and paved with precious
stones. Psyche approached it timidly, and presently
found courage to enter. The beauty of the cham-
bers lured her on and on, until at last she was
fairly bewildered with admiration. All the wealth
and beauty of the world seemed collected in this
wonderful palace, and all without a lock or a chain
to guard them.

Suddenly, in the midst of her wonder, she heard
a musical voice, saying—

“Lady, wonder not nor fear ;
All is thine thou findest here.
On yon couch let slumber bless thee,
Hands unseen shall bathe and dress thee,
Bring thee meat and pour thee wine—
Thine are we, and all is thine.”

She looked round, but saw nobody. However, she
saw the couch, and, being very tired with wander-
ing about the palace and seeing so many wonders,
lay down upon it and soon fell asleep. When
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 89

quite rested, she rose and took a bath, being waited
upon by invisible hands. Then she saw dishes of
all sorts of dainties, and cups of wine, carried ap-
parently without hands to a table, at which, being
by this time exceedingly hungry, she sat down and
made a delicious meal, attended by voices for ser-
vants. When she had finished eating, another voice
sang to an invisible harp, and this performance
was followed by a full chorus of such music as is
only heard in heaven. And so at last the darkness
of night came on.

Then she heard a voice, different from all the
rest, whisper close in her ear—

“T am your husband, Psyche, of whom the oracle
foretold. This my palace, with all its delight, is
yours, and I shall make you very happy. But you
must obey me in two things. You must never see
your father or your mother or your sisters again,
and you must never seek to see me at all. If you
promise this, I swear to you that no harm shall
befall your kindred, and that you shall be happy
for ever.”

The whisper was strangely sweet and gentle for
a terrible monster’s. Indeed, it was so loving and
so tender that she forgot even to tremble. It went
to her heart, and she could only whisper back—

“T promise you.”

Thenceforth Psyche lived in the palace, every
day bringing her fresh surprises and pleasures, the
90 VENUS.

voices keeping her company, and delighting her with
their marvellous music. And as soon as it became
too dark for her to see him, the lord of the palace,
her husband, came to her and stayed with her till
_ nearly daybreak, until at last she forgot everything
except how good he was to her, and how much she
had learned to love him. It did not even trouble
her that she had never seen him, for she thought
of nothing but pleasing him and obeying his com-
mands.

But one day Psyche’s sisters, having heard of her
fate, and having come all the way from their hus-
bands’ kingdoms to learn all about it, climbed to-
gether to the top of the mountain-peak to see if
they could find any traces of her. Finding none,
they wept and beat their breasts till the rocks
resounded with their cries. Nay, their lamentations
reached the palace itself; and Psyche, who loved
her sisters, ran, forgetful of her promise, to the foot
of the mountain, whence she saw them above mourn-
ing for her in an agony of woe,

The sight of their grief was too much for Psyche:
it seemed so cruel that her sisters should mourn for
her as dead while all the while she was alive and
happy. Surely the hushand who loved her so much
did not mean the promise to prevent her from put-
ting their hearts at ease. So she gave a command,
and forthwith the invisible hands lifted her sisters,
and carried them down safely into the secret valley.
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 91

Imagine their surprise! But imagine it still
more when their lost sister, after embracing them,
led them into her palace, showed them her treasures,
entertained them with invisible concerts, and feasted
them sumptuously.

“And the lord, your husband,” asked the eldest
sister at last, “what manner of man may he be?
And does he use you well and make you happy ? :

The sudden question took Psyche aback. It seemed
so strange to have to answer that she had never
seen the face of her husband—that she no more
knew what he was like than they. So, to avert
their curiosity, she said—

“He is an excellent husband and makes me very
happy indeed—a handsome young man, who has
not yet grown a beard: he spends his days in hunt-
ing among the mountains, or no doubt you would
have seen him. . . . But it is time for us to part,
my sisters, or it will be dark before you get home.”

So, loading them with jewels and golden orna-
ments, she embraced them, and, calling the invisible
hands, had them conveyed safely back to the top of
the mountain.

Whether the sisters had been honest in their
mourning for Psyche I cannot tell: though I think
they made more noise about it than people make
who really and truly grieve. Anyhow, they were
now filled with envy of Psyche’s wealth and hap-
piness.
92 VENUS.

“To think of my being married to a bald, miserly

?

old man,” said the eldest sister on their way home,
“while that minx has a handsome young husband
who squanders untold wealth upon her! And how
proud she has grown! Why, she spoke to us as if
we were her slaves.”

“And to think,” said the second sister, “of my
being married to a gouty cripple! You may take
things patiently, sister, and put up with her airs:
but not I. I propose that we hit on some plan to
take down her pride.”

So they hid the presents that Psyche had given
them, redoubled their cries and groans, told their
father and mother that Psyche had certainly been
devoured, and returned to their own kingdoms for
a while. But only for a while. Having arranged
a plan, they returned to the top of the mountain :
and in such a hurry were they to revisit Psyche that
they leapt into the valley and would have come
down with broken necks had not a passing breeze,
who recognised them as Psyche’s sisters, caught
them and made their fall easy. Psyche could not
help being glad to see them again, for she loved
them very dearly, and, in spite of her happiness,
hungered for news from home.

After she had entertained them as before—

“ By the way,” asked the eldest sister, “the lord,
your husband—what manner of man is he? You
told us; but T have forgotten,”
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 93

And so had poor Psyche forgotten what she had
told them. So she said, this time—

“He is a middle-aged man, with a big beard, and
a few grey hairs sprinkled here and there. He is
a merchant, and travels into distant countries, or
no doubt he would have been here to give you
welcome.”

“Oh, you poor innocent!” said the sister. “As
if he could be young and middle-aged, bearded and
beardless, a merchant and a hunter! It’s plain
you’ve never seen that husband of yours, and no
wonder he wouldn’t let you. For we have—we,
who spend our lives in watching over your inter-
ests,” she went on, squeezing out a hypocritical tear.
“Your husband is an enormous dragon, with many
folds and coils, a neck swollen with poison, and huge
gaping jaws. Think of the oracle, you poor, dear,
deluded girl. He is only feeding you up with
delicacies in order to eat you. Well—if you like
the prospect, we have done our duty. And when
you are eaten up, you won’t be able to say we didn’t
tell you so.”

Psyche was aghast with dismay. She trusted
her sisters: there was the oracle: and it was
certainly mysterious that her husband had never
allowed her to look upon him.

“Oh! what shall I do?” she cried.

“Do? Why, there’s only one thing to do. We
have thought it all out for you. Here is a lamp.
94 VENUS.

Light it, and hide it under a piece of tapestry.
When the monster sleeps, uncover the lamp, and
throw the light full upon him. Then take this
knife, which has been well sharpened, and sever his
head from his body. Thus the world will be freed
from a curse, and you will be saved.”

Thereupon they left her. And how shall Psyche’s
feelings bé described? Was it possible she was the
wife of a horrible dragon? Promise or no promise,
that she must know. So she hid the lighted lamp,
as directed. The night came, and her husband
with it. When he had fallen into a deep sleep,
Psyche, with naked feet, crept noiselessly across the
fluor, drew off the tapestry, and flooded the room
with light, and she saw—

A dragon? No—Cupid himself, asleep in all
his beauty, with folded wings, and his bow and
arrows by his side.

She hung over him in love and wonder. Alas !
a drop of oil from the lamp fell upon him, and
scalded his shoulder. He woke, cast a look of re-
proach and sorrow upon poor faithless Psyche, seized
his bow and arrows, spread his wings, and flew.
She, overwhelmed with penitence for her disobedi-
ence and distrust, and desperate at the thought
of losing him, clung with both hands to one of his
feet, and was thus carried through the window and
far away through the night till her strength failed
her and she fell fainting to the ground.






(aa







“ Psyche crept noiselessly across the floor, and saw Cupid himself,
asleep.” —Page 94.
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 95

When she came to her senses, she found herself
on the bank of a river, and, in her despair, threw
herself into the stream. But the river took pity on
her, and carried her into a bed of reeds, to whom
the god Pan was giving a music-lesson. Pan told
her how foolish she was to think she could mend
matters by killing herself, and advised patience
which was none the worse counsel for being easy to
preach and difficult to follow. However, he was
very kind, so she thanked him, and wandered out
into the world, hoping that she might meet Cupid
some day, and beg him to forgive her.

Meanwhile Cupid lay tossing and groaning in his
bed in his mother’s palace, for his scalded shoulder
gave him great pain. Venus wondered what could
possibly have happened, for all her questioning
could get nothing from him but moans. And may-
be she would never have known, had not a sea-gull
come to her with a whole budget of scandal: amoung
the rest, how Cupid was carrying on a love affair
with a mortal. And when the gull told her that
the girl’s name was said to be Psyche, the rage of
the goddess knew no bounds. She hurried to Cupid’s
bedside, and gave him such a scolding that he must
have forgotten the pain of the scald. Then she
went, still storming, to Juno, and demanded the
instant arrest and punishment of Psyche. From
Juno she went to Jupiter himself, who put Mercury
96 VENUS.

at her service. Mercury received from her a little
book in which was written the name and descrip-
tion of Psyche, and with this he went about the
world, proclaiming that whoever should seize a
certain princess of that name, an escaped handmaid
of Venus, should receive seven kisses from the
goddess herself for a reward.

Knowing nothing of all this, Psyche wandered
on and on till she saw a temple on the top of
a mountain. She thought it might be the dwelling
of Cupid, so she climbed up to it and found it
littered with sheaves of corn, bound and unbound,
scythes, sickles, and such things, all lying about in
confusion. Shocked at finding a temple in such a
state, she set to work to put everything in order.
She was in the middle of her work, when a beauti-
ful lady appeared before her, crowned with a wreath
of wheat cars, whom she knew to be Ceres, the
goddess of harvest.

“Who are you?” said the goddess graciously,
“who work so hard to put the floor of my house in
order ?”

“Psyche,” said she; “and I implore you, great
goddess, to grant me shelter for a few days. I will
serve you faithfully and well.”

But when the goddess heard the name of Psyche,
her face changed. “ Willingly would I shelter you,”
said she. “ But I dare not shelter one whom the
wrath of Venus is following through earth and
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 97

air. Begone! and be thankful that I do not keep
you as a prisoner. Not even I dare offend Venus.
My poor girl! I am sorry for you. But begone !”

Turned away by the kindest of all the goddesses,
Psyche wandered on and on till she came to another
temple in a gloomy valley, which proved to be the
temple of Juno, to whom Psyche, falling on her
knees before the altar, prayed for succour. But
Juno, appearing to her, said—

“ Willingly would I help you; but though I am
the Queen of Heaven, I must obey the law. Venus
claims you as her handmaid, and nobody may give
protection to a fugitive slave. Be thankful that I
do not deliver you to your mistress. I pity you;
but begone !”

So not even the greatest of all the goddesses
could help her against the vengeance of Venus.
Again she wandered on and on, helpless and de-
spairing, till one of the servants of Venus met her
and knew her. Seizing Psyche by the hair, she
dragged her into the presence of the terribly beauti-
ful goddess, who broke into a laugh of cruel triumph
when she found her rival in her power. Venus
delivered her over to the torturers, Anguish and
Sorrow. They, having scourged and tormented her,
brought her again before Venus, who flew at her
like a fury, as if she would tear her limb from limb.

“You ugly slave!” said Venus, as soon as she
recovered breath; “you want a lover, do you?

G
98 VENUS.

Well, perhaps you may get one if you know how
to drudge; you certainly won’t any other way. Tl
give you a trial.”

So she took wheat, barley, millet, poppy seed,
vetches, lentils, and beans, mixed them up together,
and said—

“ Sort out every seed into its proper heap before
evening. If you can do that, you shall not be
scourged again.”

Psyche sat down before her task in silent de-
spair, crushed in heart, and aching in every limb.
She could only pray that death would come to her
before nightfall ; for she could not bear the thought
of those cruel scourges. And so she sat motionless
until a little white ant, taking more pity on her
than Ceres or Juno, called together his whole tribe,
who sorted out the heap, grain by grain, into proper
parcels, in no time, and then ran away.

Judge of the surprise of Venus when she found
the work done. “Somebody has helped you!”
said she. But she could not order her to be
scourged, the work being done; so she threw her
a piece of coarse bread for supper, and had her shut
up in a wretched shed till day,

In the morning Venus came to her again. “Do
you see yonder sheep, with golden fleeces, wauder-
ing without a shepherd? Go and bring me a
piece of their wool, that you may escape another
scourging.”
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 99

Vsyche set out, not to get the wool, but to drown
herself in the river that ran along the meadow where
the sheep were feeding. She was about to leap into
the water, when one of the reeds spoke to her, and
said, murmuring—

“Pollute not these pure waters by thy death,
nor yet venture to approach yonder sheep during
the heat of the sun; for they are fierce and savage,
and they will slay thee with their horns. But
when they are resting towards evening, creep into
the meadow, and collect the wool that has clung
to the bushes.”

Thus Psyche brought to Venus a whole lapful of
golden wool. “Somebody has helped you!” again
said the goddess, angrily. But she had to keep her
word,

Still she could not bring herself to believe that
Psyche could have performed these tasks unaided.
She strongly suspected Cupid, though she kept him
closely shut up in his chamber, making believe that
his scalded shoulder still wanted careful nursing, for
fear lest he might come across Psyche. She was
quite sure he had never left his chamber for a
moment. Nevertheless she resolved to send Psyche
next time where not Love himself could follow or
help her.

“Do you see yonder mountain-peak ?” she said
to her next morning. “From that peak falls
a black fountain, as cold as ice. Take this urn,
100 VENUS.

fill it with the cold black water, and bring it to
me.” ;

Psyche started off at once for the mountain-peak,
meaning to throw herself from it, and so bring her
miseries to an end. But it was not so easy to reach
the top as she had hoped. The black fountain fell
headlong from the middle of a terrible rock into a
still more dark and terrible ravine, from which fierce
and horrible dragons stretched up their long necks
to guard the waters; and the roar of the water as
it fell was this—“ Begone, or perish !”

In the midst of her terror, an eagle came flying
overhead, and called out to her—

“Do not touch the water: this is the spring of
the Styx, that sacred and dreadful river by whom
the gods swear. Give me your urn.”

So, swooping down, he took the urn in his talons,
and flew with it through the gaping jaws of the
dragons so swiftly that they had not time to close
upon him, or to pierce him with their fiery tongues.
Thus he reached the water, filled the urn, and flew
back with it to Psyche, who brought it to Venus
just as she had been bidden.

Venus was more enraged than ever; but this
time she hid her anger with a smile. “I see there
is nothing too hard for you,” she said—* nothing.
So do me one little service before we make friends.
Nobody else could do it; but then one who is clever
enough to steal the waters of the Styx can do every-
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 101

thing. You see I have grown pale and thin with
anxiety about my poor boy. Go as quickly as you
can to the palace of King Pluto, and ask to see the
Lady Proserpine. When you see her, say to her,
‘Madam, Venus requests you to lend her a little
of your beauty till to-morrow morning” Here is
a casket to bring it in; and be quick with your
errand.”

Then indeed did Psyche give herself up for lost.
For she knew what you have read in the story of
the Gods and the Giants—that Pluto was the King
of Hades, that underground world of ghosts and
spirits where men and women go when they die.
And of this world of Hades the Lady Proserpine
was queen.

Thinking that the shortest way to the world
below was the best, she went to the top of a high
tower, meaning to hurl herself out of life headlong.
But the tower said :—

“Pause! for know that from the world where
you are going none ever return. There is only one
path by which you can reach Pluto’s palace and
come back again; and that path I will tell you.
Listen carefully to all I say. Near to the city of
Lacedeemon is a hill called Tenirus. In the hill is
hidden a cavern, which you must find; and from
this cavern a path, which no mortal has yet
trodden, runs straight into the hill. Take the
path, but provide yourself first with these things :
102 VENUS.

two pieces of barley-bread sopped in honey—one
in each hand—and two pieces of money in your
mouth. If anybody accosts you on the way, pass
him by in silence. Give nothing to anybody with
your hand. Show no pity. Help nobody. Taste
nothing but dry bread, and open not the box you
carry; for Venus knows you to be pitiful and help-
ful, and a little inquisitive as well, and will set
traps for you to fall into. Therefore, be wise, and
trust to nothing you see in the world of dreams
and shadows. If you follow my directions, you
may go and return in safety; if you fail in the
least of them, you are a lost soul.”

Psyche set off at once to the city of Lacedemon,
and, with a honey-sop in each hand and two silver
coins in her mouth, sought for the cavern in the
hill. She found it at last, and started along the
path, blacker than night, which wound downwards
into the heart of the earth. After she had travelled
many hours, the path became illuminated with a pale
twilight, by which she could just manage to see
—a strange sort of half-light, such as one never
sees above ground. It seemed to Psyche as if the
path would never end. At last she saw figures
approaching her in the distance; and these, as they
approached, proved to be a lame man driving a
lame ass laden with wood, which was slipping from
its cords.

“Lady,” said the lame man, “ you see I am weak
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 103

and helpless; help me to tie up my wood again so
that it may not fall.”

Psyche was just about to lay down her honey-
sops and help him, when she remembered the
tower's warning, and passed him by without a
word.

On she went until she came to the bank of a
broad river with water as black as ink; and just
where the path ran down to the water was a ferry-
boat, in which sat a very old man naked to the
waist, and holding an oar. Psyche stepped into
the boat, and the old man, in dead silence, pushed
off, and began to row heavily across the black and
sluggish stream. When the boat reached the mid-
dle, she looked down, and saw a skinny hand raise
itself slowly out of the water. Then she perceived
that the hand belonged to a corpse-like form floating
half under the black ooze, which, in a hollow voice,
thus besought her—

“Lady, for pity’s sake take me into your boas,

‘that I may reach the other side. Else must I float
here between life and death for ever.”

Psyche was about to bid the ferryman take the
poor half-dead creature into the boat, when she
remembered the tower’s warning against pity, and
let the body drift by.

Arrived at the other side, the ferryman held out
his hand for his fee. Psyche was about to take one
of the coins from her mouth, when she suddenly
104 VENUS.

remembered the tower's warning to give nothing to
anybody with her hand. So, bringing one of the
coins between her teeth, she dropped it into
the open palm of the ferryman, and went her
way.

A little farther on she came upon some old
women weaving.

“Lady,” said the eldest, “we are old, and it is
dark, and our eyes are dim, and we have much to
do before nightfall. Help us with our web, we
pray. you.”

Psyche was about to comply, when she remem-
bered the tower's warning against giving help, and
passed on.

Still on and on she went until she reached a
huge palace built of black marble, which she knew
at once to be the abode of Pluto and Proserpine.
But how was she to enter? For on the threshold
stood a monstrous dog, with three heads and six
flaming eyes, barking thunderously, and with hor-
tible yawning jaws. This was the dog Cerberus,
who never sleeps, and guards the palace of Pluto
night and day. There was only one chance of
passing him, and Psyche took it. She threw him
one of her honey sops, and ran past him while he
was swallowing it down.

In the hall beyond the threshold sat Proserpine,
Queen of Hades, and goddess of the Underworld,
dark and beautiful, and crowned with white poppies
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 105

and stars, with a two-pronged sceptre in her hand.
She received Psyche kindly, made her sit down on
a cushion beside her, and bade the attendants bring
meat, fruit, and wine. Psyche, hungry and thirsty
after her long journey, was about to eat, when she
remembered the tower’s warning, and refreshed her-
self with a little dry bread only. Then rising, she
said to Proserpine—

“Madam, Venus requests you to lend her a little
of your beauty till to-morrow morning, and here is
a casket for me to carry it in.”

“With pleasure,” said Proserpine, taking the
casket, opening it, breathing into it, closing it
again, and returning it to Psyche, who, having per-
formed her errand, departed reverently.

She got past Cerberus by throwing him her other
sop, and gave the ferryman her other piece of
money to row her back across the river. And so,
without further peril or adventure, she reached the
cavern in the hill, and the sunshine, and the broad
light of day, with the casketful of beauty safe in
her hand.

Then a great curiosity came upon her to know
what this beauty of the Underworld might be—
beauty so great that even Venus desired it to add
to her charms. At last Psyche’s curiosity grew so
strong that she could withstand it no longer, and
the tower’s last warning was forgotten. What
harm could a single glimpse do? .So, first timidly,
106 VENUS.

then more boldly, she raised the lid of the casket.
And from the casket into which Proserpine had
breathed there came forth a deep sleep, which fell
over Psyche, so that first she felt faint, then her
blood turned dull and cold, and the colour left her
cheeks, then her heart stopped, and then her breath,
—for the Sleep of Death had come upon her, and
she lay in the sunshine, pale and cold. For Death
is the beauty of Proserpine.

Cupid, wearied out of patience by being kept
prisoner in his chamber on account of a trifling
hurt that no longer pained him, and_ loving
his lost Psyche as much as ever, thought and
thought how he might escape from the tiresome
watchfulness of his mother. And it happened at
last that the nurse on duty threw open the window
for a moment to let in a breath of air. That
moment was enough for Cupid: spreading his
wings, he was through the window and away before
the nurse could tell him from a bird. His wings
had grown the stronger from their long rest, and
he revelled in the freedom of the sunshine and the
open air. Never had life felt so full of joy. Ah,
if he could only find Psyche, not his mother herself
should part them any more! And surely he would
find her, for what cannot Love find or do ?

He fled fast to the palace in the secret valley,
but she was not there. There was scarce a corner
LOVE AND THE SOUL. 107

of the world where he did not fly, in less time than
it would take the very swiftest of birds. And at
last—

He found her; and his wings lost their strength,
and his heart melted for sorrow when he saw her
stretched in the Sleep of Death upon the hillside—
beautiful still, but with the beauty of Proserpine.
The fatal casket lay open beside her, so he knew
what had befallen. “Alas!” he thought, “if I had
not flown from her in my anger she would not
have died.” He clasped her in his arms; he kissed
her lips with enough love to wake the dead, if such
a thing could be.

And such a thing could be—such a thing was!
For at the kiss of Love the Sleep of Death began
to slowly pass away. Back came the colour to her
lips and cheeks; her heart fluttered and beat; she
breathed; she opened her eyes. And then she
woke in his arms, glad and alive.

This is the story of Cupid and Psyche, of which
there is nothing more to tell except that Psyche’s
troubles had a very happy and glorious ending
indeed. For Jupiter, to make her a fitting wife
for Cupid, received her into heaven, and on her
avrival gave her with his own hands a goblet of
nectar to drink —the wine of the gods, which
makes all who taste of it immortal. Even Venus
became reconciled to her, and the wedding-feast
108 VENUS.

of Cupid and Psyche is one of the most fainous
festivals in the whole history of the skies.

I said a little way back that most of these
stories have some sort of meaning, and people have
found more meaning in the story of Psyche than
in most of them. “Psyche” is the Greek for
“soul,” and I have already told you that “Cupid”
means “love.” So the story may show how the
soul of man is loved by heaven; but how it has
to pass through many sufferings and trials, and at
last through death, before it reaches immortal hap-
piness.

“Psyche” also means “ butterfly,” and Psyche
herself, after she was received into heaven, always
appears in pictures with a butterfly’s wings. It
seems curious at first that the same word means
“soul” and “butterfly”; but it is not so curious
when one thinks a little of the story. Just as the
caterpillar that crawls on the earth seems to die
when it becomes a ‘chrysalis and then rises again
as a winged butterfly, so man, bound down to earth
like a caterpillar, seems to die, and then lives again,
only changed.

In some very old pictures you may see a butter-
fly flying out from between a man’s lips. That
means that he is dying, and that his “ Psyche,” his
“soul” or “ butterfly,’ is leaving him.






MERCURY AND IRIS.

aKRY often, in these stories, you have



met with Mercury, and have heard
that he was Jupiter’s chief messen-
ger. The office he held made him
so busy with all the affairs of heaven,
earth, and Hades, that there is scarcely a story with-
out Mercury in it; and it is therefore time to know
something more about him.

Now you must know that the people who, ages
ago, made these stories about the gods and goddesses
in whom they believed, thought that the earth
(which you know to be a globe) was a large island
surrounded by a boundless ocean. The sky—so

they imagined—was a solid dome, on which the sun,



moon, aud stars made their various journeys. Every
110 MERCURY AND IRIS.

morning Pheebus drove the chariot of the Sun forth
from the stable beyond the ocean in the East, across
the blue dome, till it sank beyond the western
ocean, and then passed underground back to the
eastern stable, so as to be ready to start again. The
Moon, that is to say, the chariot of Diana, also had
her proper course across the dome, and so had every
planet and star. And this dome, or sky, with all
its wonders, was supported on the shoulders of
Atlas, a gigantic Titan, condemned to this task
(some say) for having helped the giants in their
war against the gods.

This Atlas was a great king, and his kingdom
stretched westward till it touched the ocean which
surrounds the earth. And that is why this part of
the sea is called the Ocean of Atlas, or Atlantic
Ocean. The name of his kingdom was Mauritania,
now called Morocco, where he owned a thousand
flocks, and orchards with apples of gold. And he
had seven beautiful daughters, whose names were
Alcyéne, Asterdpe, Celeeno, Electra, Maia, Mérdpe,
and Taygéta. Six of these married gods; Mérope
alone married a mortal. After their death they
were honoured by being set as stars in the sky,
where you may often see the seven sisters clustered
together in a beautiful constellation called the
Pleiades. But it is very difficult to see Mérope,
because she married a mortal instead of a god,
and therefore shines dimly. If you can see
MERCURY AND IRIS. 111

more than six of the seven sisters you have good
eyes.

Of all the Pleiades Maia is the brightest, for she
was chosen by Jupiter. She had a son named
Mercury, and a promising child he must have been.
For on the very day he was born he stole the oxen
of King Admetus of Thessaly, although (as you may
remember) Apollo himself was then the king’s
herdsman. And Mercury not only stole the oxen,
but ran away with Apollo’s quiver of arrows. Proud
of this feat, he stole the zone of Venus, the sword
of Mars, and the hammer of Vulcan; and at last he
carried off the very sceptre of Jupiter. Instead of
punishing him, however, Jupiter was so delighted
with his cleverness and impudence that he made
Mercury his chief messenger and cup-bearer. He
also gave him a winged cap, wings for his heels, a
short sword, and a sceptre called caduceus—a rod
round which two living serpents coiled. The winged
cap was called pétdésus, and whenever he put it on
he became invisible; the wings for his heels were
called talavia, and made him able to fly faster than
lightning to any place he pleased. The caduceus
was a magic wand. It first belonged to Apollo,
who used to drive the flocks of King Admetus with
it. But when Mercury invented the lyre, he gave
the lyre to Apollo in exchange for the cuduceus.
The lyre became Apollo’s favourite instrument, and
Mercury used the caduceus to drive the flocks of
112 MERCURY AND IRIS.

dead souls to Hades, for that was one of his duties.
He could also send people to sleep with it, and
could bring back the dead to life by touching them
with its point. You will always know a picture or
statue of Mercury from his caduceus; and from the
wings on his cap and heels.

He needed to be quick, active, and clever, for he
had a great deal to do—so much that Jupiter re-
lieved him of the office of cup-bearer and gave it to
a young Phrygian shepherd, named Ganymede. This
is what Mercury had to do. He had to carry all
Jupiter’s messages, which, of course, obliged him to
be almost everywhere at once; he had to see that
the laws of the great council of the gods were pro-
perly carried out; to keep Jupiter’s secrets; to know
everything that was going on all over the world; to
conduct the souls of the dead to Hades—each one of
which things was enough, one would think, to take
up his whole time. However, he managed to do it all,
and a great deal more, and was not very particular
how. For it must be owned that Mercury, though
a god, was not above lying and cheating whenever
it suited his purpose. He was wonderfully eloquent,
and could make anybody believe anything. And he
was the patron, that is to say, the friend and protec-
tor, of merchants, travellers, orators, and thieves.



Juno also had a chief messenger—a goddess |

named Iris. The path of Iris from heaven to earth
MERCURY AND IRIS. 113

and back again is the rainbow; so whenever you
see a rainbow you may know that Ivis is bringing a
message down from Juno. Indeed “Iris” means
“ Rainbow.”

IT ought to tell you that the planet nearest to the
sun is called Mercury, and that Mercury is another
name for the metal quicksilver.



i






NEPTUNE.

=~ F you look back at the second of these

aoe 4 stories—that of Jupiter and Juno—




you will read that “when Jupiter
became god and king of the whole
world, he made his two brothers,
Neptune and Pluto, kings under him. He made
Neptune god and king of the sea: Pluto he made
god and king of Hades.” You will read the story
of Pluto presently. This is about Neptune, of
whom there is much less to say. You have already
read, in the story of Minerva, how Neptune con-
tended with the goddess of Wisdom for the honour
of naming the capital of Attica, and how he pro-
duced the first horse by striking the earth with his
tvident—that is to say, with his sceptre in the
shape of a fork with three prongs, by which he
NEPTUNE. 115

may always be known. You will remember that
the honour was given to Minerva, because she pro-
duced the olive, the emblem of peace, and therefore
better for mankind than the horse, the emblem
of war. This decision, however, did not satisfy Nep-
tune. So when the people of Argolis also built a
capital city, he disputed with Minerva for the hon-
our of naming that. Jupiter, however, settled the
matter by giving it a name which had nothing to
do with either god or goddess—that is to say, Tree-
zene—and by making Minerva its patroness and
Neptune its patron. But this did not please Nep-
tune either. He wanted to have some city or piece
of dry land all to himself, which was natural enough
for a god who had nothing of his own but the sea.
So he went to law with Apollo for the possession
of the isthmus of Corinth. The case was tried
before Briareus, the Cyclops with fifty heads and
a hundred hands, as judge. Briareus decided that
Neptune should have the isthmus, all except a cer-
tain headland, which was given to Apollo.

But Neptune was not even yet satisfied. What
was the sea and one little isthmus when Jupiter
had all earth and air and sky, and when Pluto had
the still greater world below? Then Jupiter ruled
over the immortal gods and living men and women,
and Pluto over all the dead; but Neptune had
neither gods nor men, dead or alive, for subjects—
only fishes and sea-monsters, creatures really not
116 NEPTUNE.

worth the ruling. It is true he had all sorts of
treasures cot from shipwrecks; but what is the
good of gold and jewels at the bottom of the sea ?
And he had many wonderful and beautiful things be-
longing to him by nature—pearls, and sea-weed, and
coral, and amber; but he had no use for them. At
any rate he was thoroughly discontented, and thought
Jupiter’s division of the universe exceedingly unfair.

It so happened that, while he was in this envious
state of mind, Juno was furious against Jupiter for
throwing Vulcan out of heaven, and Apollo was
seeking revenge for the death of Asculapius. So
these three—Neptune, Juno, and Apollo—made a
conspiracy against Jupiter. Their plot was to ex-
cite all the gods and goddesses to rebel against their
king, to take him by surprise, to imprison him for
ever, and to get—I do not know what they meant
to get by it; most likely, like all rebels, they did
not know that themselves. However, in one way
and another, by promises, and by working up all
sorts of grievances, they drew nearly every god and
goddess into their treason, of which Jupiter, im his
trust of them all, had not the faintest suspicion.
He went on ruling and feasting, little guessing that
his own wife, his own brother, and the whole of his
court, were secret traitors. Jiven Minerva, in‘spite
of her wisdom and her old quarrel with Neptune,
is said to have joined in the plot against her own
father, though this is hard to believe.
NEPTUNE. 117

The plotters made only one mistake—they forgot
that traitors must expect treachery. There was a
certain sea-nymph named Thetis, married to a mor-
tal, and she, having been admitted into the plot,
tried to think of some way of saving the king of
gods and men. But what could one sea-nymph do ?
If she went and told Jupiter, he would not believe
her; he would most likely only punish her for
lying and slander. So, in her trouble, she went for
advice to the giant Briareus, who had fifty heads to
think with instead of only one. Having thought
with them all, one after another, he said at last,
“Leave it to Me.”

At length the time came for carrying out the
plot. The conspirators held a great meeting, and,
having talked themselves into a great state of rage
against Jupiter, marched in a body into the council
chamber of Olympus, where they expected to find
him at that time of day sleeping upon his throne,
and at their mercy. And so indeed they did find
him. But, to their dismay, there sat beside him a
monstrous and terrible giant, with a hundred huge
hands and fifty yawning mouths, and a hundred
eyes wide awake and rolling. And so terrified were
they by the unexpected sight, that they stood rooted
to the spot by fear; and when Jupiter woke up and
saw how matters were, they could only confess their
treason and pray for pardon.

Thus Jupiter learned the lesson that a king must
118 NEPTUNE.

not venture to go to sleep, even on his throne,
unless he is guarded by at least a hundred faithful
hands, fifty shrewd brains, and a hundred vigilant
eyes, which cannot happen often, since a Briareus
is not to be found every day. But Jupiter thought
that the plotters, or at least their ringleaders, de-
served a lesson also. He thought it better to hush
up the conspiracy, and not to make another scandal
by punishing Juno. But he banished Apollo from
Olympus for nine years as a punishment for having
killed the Cyclopes, as you have read in the story of
Marsyas; and he condemned Neptune, by way of
hard labour, to build the walls of the famous city
of Troy. And so the great Olympian conspiracy
came to an end, and Jupiter remained more power-
ful than ever.

Neptune is chiefly known by his trident or three-
pronged sceptre, by means of which he causes
earthquakes, and can bring up islands from the
bottom of the sea. He had a great many sea-gods
and sea-goddesses under him, his queen-consort
being Amphitrite. There were Oceanus and Tethys,
the father and mother of all the Rivers; Triton, a
strange god, in shape half man and half fish, who
makes storms and calms by blowing a shell as if it
were a horn; Proteus, who foretells the future to
anybody who can find him on the sea-shore, catch
him, and chain him up so that he cannot change
NEPTUNE. 119

his shape and escape into the sea; Nereus, with his
long blue hair and beard. There were also the
Nereids, his fifty daughters, among whom was The-
tis; the Oceanides or sea-nymphs; and the Sirens
—mermaids who drew sailors to their island by
their wonderful singing, and then fell upon them
and devoured them. There were the Harpies also:
three horrible monsters, each with a woman’s face,
a vulture’s body, and feet and hands having sharp
claws for toes and fingers—these were the whirl-
winds. But it is impossible to make a list of the
wonders of the sea.








HADES.

PART L—THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD.

“ Not far from Enna’s walls there lies a lake,
Pergus by name: than which not Cayster’s stream
Ts fuller of the songs of gliding swans.

A woodland girds it with a veil of leaves
To shelter from the heat ; where the fresh soil
Bears purple flowers, and keeps perpetual spring.”

=O the poet Ovid describes the pleasant



place where the nymph Proserpine,
the beautiful daughter of Ceres,

As
Ne
goddess of the fruits of the earth,
was one day with her companions,
gathering violets and lilies. All were trying who
should gather the most, and were very happy and
merry. In her search for flowers, Proserpine
wandered out of sight of her companions, who
THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD. 121

went on gathering and singing and laughing: till
suddenly their merriment was stopped by a piercing .
scream for help; and then by another and another ;
till the cries grew fainter and fainter, and were at
last heard no more.

Where was Proserpine? They were sure it was
her cries they had heard: and, though they searched
through the whole wood, they could not find her
anywhere. All they could do was to go to Ceres,
and tell her that her daughter had disappeared, and
could not be found for all their seeking.

Ceres, who is the best and kindest of all the
goddesses, loved her daughter dearly, and was dis-
consolate at the news. Though always so busy
with seed-time and harvest, fields and orchards,
she set out to seek for her lost Proserpine; or
at least to find out what had become of her.
“Mother!” had been Proserpine’s last cry. Ceres
wandered, in her search, over the whole world—nay,
but all in
vain. She questioned gods, goddesses, nymphs,

she explored the very depths of the sea



fauns, and satyrs, men and women; but none could
give her any news of Proserpine. She never slept,
but set fire to the pine-trees on the top of Mount
/Etna to serve as torches, so that she might see
to search by night as well as by day. She forgot
to eat and drink, and, though the goddess of
Corn and Plenty, she would have perished of hunger
and thirst had not an old woman named Baubo,
122 HADES.

though ignorant who she was, taken pity on her,
and given her some hot porridge, which Ceres
drank eagerly—so eagerly that a boy who saw
her drinking jeered at her for a glutton. This
was too much for the goddess, in her despair,
to bear. She for once lost her temper, and threw
the rest of the hot porridge over the grinning boy,
whom it tured into a spotted lizard for laughing
at a stranger’s needs and an old woman’s charity.

At length, worn out and desperate, the poor
mother wandered back to Sicily, so changed that
nobody knew her. Nor could she say who she
was, for grief had made her dumb. In this state
she arrived at a place called Cyine, near to where
Proserpine had been lost. And here one day,
while locking at a pool (for she never ceased to
look everywhere) she saw her daughter’s girdle
lying at the bottom of the water. Then, giving
up her last spark of hope, she found her voice
again, and mourned aloud. Her grief was terrible
to hear and see. She cursed the earth, so that
it no longer brought forth corn: she broke the
ploughs: the seeds perished in the fields, and
the cattle in their stalls.

But one day Ceres, roaming along the banks of
the river Alpheus, plainly heard its waters say—

“We have seen Proserpine! She is unhappy;
but she is a great queen: she is the wife of Pluto,
the King of the Underworld,”
THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD. 123

Then Ceres knew that Proserpine had been
carried off by the great and dreadful god Pluto,
to whom, when Jupiter divided the world, had
been given Hades—the underground kingdom of
ghosts and of the souls of the dead: the greatest
kingdom of all. It was true—Pluto had seen
Proserpine while she was gathering flowers in
the wood, had snatched her up into his chariot
with black horses, and, in spite of her struggles
and cries for help, had driven off with her to
his underground palace through a cavern which he
opened with a touch of his two-pronged sceptre : the
cavern then filled up with water, and became the
lake of Cyane, at the bottom of which Ceres had
found the girdle. As soon as she could recover
her senses, Ceres flew up to heaven, threw herself
before Jupiter, and passionately demanded that her
daughter should be given back to her.

It was a difficult question for Jupiter to settle.
He pitied Ceres with all his heart, and wished to
help her. But high reasons of State made him
unwilling to offend Pluto: and then, who had
ever heard of anybody coming back from Hades ?
That would be against all the laws of gods and
men.

But there were three mysterious beings, of whom
I have not yet told you, called the Fates—three
sisters who rule over life and death, and whose
will even the gods of heaven, even Jupiter himself,
124 HADES,

must obey. Somewhere or other they sit and
spin with their distaffs the histories of nations
and the lives and deaths of men. Nothing can
happen without their leave; and nobody can
prevent from coming to pass whatever the Fates
decree. So Jupiter inquired of the Fates if it
was their will that Proserpine should return from
the kinedom of the grave.

“She may return,’ said they. “But not if she
has eaten or drunk in the kingdom of Pluto. If
she has tasted the food of death, then she may not
return,”

When Pluto received this message he was greatly
troubled; for, though he had carried off Proserpine
in that cruel way, he very deeply loved her, and
hoped that, if he could keep her with him, he
should at last conquer her sorrow and get her to
love him in return. He had made her his wife and
queen, and could not bear the thought of losing
her. He anxiously inquired of every ghost and
spirit in Hades if Queen Proserpine had tasted food,
if ever so little; but not one had seen her touch
even bread or water since she had been brought
below. It was Pluto’s turn to lose Proserpine.
Ceres was already rejoicing in the thought of seeing
her long-lost daughter. Proserpine was just about
to return to earth, when there stepped forth one of
Pluto’s courtiers, named Asculaphus, and accused
THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD. 125

Proserpine-of having tasted the juice of seven
pomegranate seeds. And the Fates knew that it
was true.

And Proserpine also knew it, and cried aloud for
sorrow that she should never see her mother again ;
and her cry turned the treacherous, tale-bearing
Asculaphus into a hooting owl. But this did not
undo the work of those seven fatal pomegranate
seeds. Even the Fates were filled with pity; even
the heart of Pluto was touched by the mother’s and
the daughter’s despair. The Fates could not change
their decree. But it was settled that, though
Proserpine must continue to be the wife of Pluto
and the Queen of Hades, she should be allowed to
spend six months out of every year on earth with
Ceres. And that is the reason of summer and
winter. It is summer when Ceres is happy with
her daughter, and makes the earth rejoice with
flowers and fruit and corn. It is winter when she
is left alone, and Proserpine goes back to Pluto
until next spring. Proserpine is the beauty and
joy of the earth, which seems to die in winter, but
only to come to life again. And she is the beauty
of death besides. You will remember what you
read in the story of Psyche about the beauty of
Proserpine.

It was Ceres who taught men to plough, harrow,
sow, and reap; and they were very grateful to her
126 HADES.

everywhere. The worship of Ceres, under many
names, was the chief part of the religion of ancient
times. You will know her, from pictures and
statues, as a noble and stately goddess, crowned
with a garland of corn, holding a lighted torch,
sometimes standing in a chariot drawn by flying
dragons. I have said she had many names, one
of the most famous being Démétér, which means
“Mother Earth”; and “Bona Dea,” that is to say,
“the Good Goddess,” was another.

Proserpine, as Queen of Hades, became a very
strange and mysterious goddess indeed. One of
her names is Hécité, and under that name she
rules over magic. She often wears a veil, and a
crown of stars; and, like Pluto, carries the sceptre
with two prongs, differing from Neptune’s trident,
which has three.

Pluto was a dark and gloomy god. No temples
were ever built to him, and only black animals were
sacrificed upon his altars. But he was just, although
pitiless and stern. He sits upon a throne of sul-
phur in his underground palace, from which flow
the four rivers of Hades—Cocytus, the river of
Lamentation ; Achéron, the river of Sorrow ; Lethé,
the river of Forgetfulness; and Phleeéthon, the
river of Fire. On his left hand sits Proserpine,
near to whom stand the Furies, three fiends with
snakes instead of hair; on his right stand the
THE KING AND QUEEN OF THE DEAD. 127

Fates spinning; at his feet lies the three-headed
dog, Cerberus; and the Harpies hover over him,
waiting for orders.

On the whole, it is not strange that Proserpine
should be glad when the time for her six months’
visit to her mother comes round.

cig
PART I.—THE KINGDOM.

. ADES,” the name of the kingdom of Pluto

and Proserpine, means “ Invisible,” because
it is unseen by living eyes. It is surrounded by
that river Styx by which the gods swore their
sacred oath, and which flows round and round it in
nine circles before springing up into the living world.
Even when the Styx rises out of the ground in the
land of Arcadia, it still remains a cold black river,
whose waters are poisonous to drink; but if any-
body was bold enough to bathe in them, and lucky
enough to come out alive, no weapon afterwards
would have the power to wound him. Some people
say that Thetis (the goddess who saved Jupiter from
the great plot) dipped her child Achilles into the
Styx as soon as he was born, head foremost, holding
him by the left heel between her finger and thumb.
But she forgot that her thumb and finger prevented
the water from touching his skin just where she
THE KINGDOM. 129

held him. And so, when he grew up, though no |
weapon could hurt him anywhere else, yet, when
he was hit by an arrow in the left heel, he died
of the wound.

When anybody died, his body was buried or
burned by his friends, and his soul left him and
went down to Hades, till it reached the banks of
the Styx. Here it waited for Charon’s ferry-boat,
about which you read in the story of Psyche. If
its friends had buried its body properly, they had
given it a small silver coin to pay the ferryman,
who took the money and at once rowed it across
the river. But if the soul had no money to pay
for its passage, it had to wait for a hundred years,
shivering and cold. Arrived on the other side, the
soul was taken before the three judges of Hades—
Minos, AXicus, and Rhadamanthus. All three had
been kings on earth, so famous for wisdom and
justice that, when they died, Pluto made them the
judges of the dead. These decided what was to be
done with the soul. If it had been virtuous during
its life upon earth, it was allowed to enter Elysium,
or the region of happiness; if it had been wicked, it
was condemned to the horrible prison of Tartirus,
there to be punished by torture.

Elysium, which is also called “ the Elysian fields,”
or “the Islands of the Blest,’ was a very delight-
ful place, like the most beautiful country in the
finest weather, never too hot or too cold, and full of

I
130 HADES.

sweet scents and sounds. There the souls of the
happy enjoyed for ever, without ever getting tired,
whatever had given them the most pleasure upon
earth—hunting, or war, or learning, or music, or
whatever it might be; only all their pleasures be-
came innocent and noble, and even if they fought,
it was all in friendship and without harm. Nothing
was quite real there: it was more like a beautiful
and happy dream, lasting for ever. Some of the
very best and greatest human souls were taken up
into Olympus and made “ Demi-gods,” that is to say
“ Half-gods;” but of course this was a very rare
honour. The dream of Elysium was thought to be
reward enough for the souls which, in their lives,
had done more good than evil.

Tartarus, the place of torment, was a very different
place, as I need not say. It was farther below the
earth than the earth is below the sky, and was
surrounded by three brazen walls, and by Phlegethon,
the river of Fire. The only entrance was through
a high tower, with gates which not even the gods
could open, and guarded by the three-headed dog
Cerberus, which never slept; and the air was three
times darker than the darkest midnight, lighted only
by the terrible flames of Phlegethon. The jailers
were Némésis and the Furies. Nemesis is the
great stern power who never allows the guilty to
escape from their just punishment, nor the good to
lose their just reward. If people are happier or
THE KINGDOM. 131

more fortunate than they deserve to be, she always,
either in this life or in Hades, gives them enough
misery at last, until they are just as happy or un-
happy as they deserve to be, and neither less nor
more; and if they seem less happy or less fortu-
nate than they deserve, she makes it up to them in
the end. She is often so strangely slow in coming,
that she has been called lame. But she always
comes at last; if she is slow, she is sure.

There was once a king of the island of Samos,
named Pdl¥crates, who was famous for his marvellous
good fortune. Nothing ever went wrong with him;
he did not seem able to fail in anything, even if
he tried; he knew neither misfortune nor sorrow.
Though only the prince of a little island, he became,
by one stroke of good luck after another, the most
powerful monarch of his time, so that the kings of
the greatest nations came to his court to do him
homage and admire his glory. Among these was
Amasis, King of Egypt, who was frightened at the
sight of such prosperity, and thought, “This is
surely more than any mortal deserves—Nemesis
must surely be near at hand!” So he advised
Polycrates to bring some misfortune upon himself,
to keep Nemesis away. At first Polycrates laughed
at such counsel; but, to remove the friendly fears
of Amasis, he threw into the sea a ring with a mag-
nificent seal, which he prized the most of all his
jewels, and the loss of which made him really un-
132 NADES.

happy—so you may guess how little unhappiness
he had ever known before. A few days afterwards,
however, while at dinner with Amasis, he happened
to cut open a large fish ; and behold, inside the fish
he found the ring, which thus came back to him
from the bottom of the sea. Instantly Amasis
rose from the table and hurried back to Egypt, ex-
claiming, “I. dare not have anything more to do
with so fortunate a man—-Nemesis must be at the

1?

door And he was right; and when she came,
she came indeed! From the hour when the ring
was found in the fish, all the prosperity of Polyc-
rates departed from him; he sank lower and lower ;
until at last he was treacherously captured by the
governor of one of his own cities, and put to a
shameful death by torture. You will often hear
people speak of “The Ring of Polycrates.”. When
they do, they mean (or ought to mean) that a life of
mixed joy and sorrow, such as most of us have, is
what most of us deserve ; and that this is the happiest
as well as the best for us in the long-run. It is
not good for us to know nothing of sorrow or pain.
And if we ever feel that we suffer unjustly—well,
Nemesis, the slow but the sure, will make it up to
us in the end.

However, I must go back to Tartarus, in spite of
its unpleasantness. I was speaking of the Furies,
who served under Nemesis as its jailers. These
were three creatures like women, with hissing and
THE KINGDOM. 133

writhing snakes instead of hair, holding a torch in
one hand, and a whip made of live scorpions in the
other. These whips were the whips of Conscience,
with which they scourged and stung the souls both
of the dead and the living. They were the chief
servants of Nemesis, because the stings of Con-
science are the most terrible of all her punishments.
The Furies were the most dreadful creatures in or
out of Hades. People had such awe and horror of
them that they dared not even name them. The
real name of the Furies was the “ Erinnyes,” which
means the desperate madness of those whom the
gods or fates have cursed. But people who wanted
to speak of them always called them the “ Eumen-
ides”’—that is to say, “ the Gracious Ladies ”—just
as timid people in Eneland used to say “the Good
Folk” instead of “the Fairies,” for fear of making
them angry by naming their real name.

The tortures of Tartarus were of all sorts and
kinds. Among the evil souls which suffered there,
the most famous were the three wicked kings, Ixion,
Sisyphus, and Tantalus. Ixion was tied by his arms
and legs to the spokes of a wheel, which whirled
round and round at full speed without ever giving
him one moment’s rest. Sisyphus had to carry up
to the top of a high and steep hill a huge stone,
which, as soon as he got it up, instantly rolled to
the bottom again, so that his labour had no end.
The torment of Tantalus was perhaps the worst of
134 HADES.

all. Maddened with hunger and thirst, he was
chained to a rock in such a manner that he could
not seize one of the delicious fruits that hung close
to his eyes, or one of the cups of cool and fragrant
drink which unseen hands put to his lips, and then,
just as he was about to taste, snatched away again.
Being “ tantalised” means being treated like Tan-
talus. Then there were the Danaides, or the forty-
nine daughters of King Danaus, who had all mur-
dered their husbands, and were condemned to fill
sieves with water, which of course ran out through
the holes as soon as they poured it in. There had
been fifty Danaides; but the fiftieth had taken no
part in her sisters’ crime. There was also the
wicked giant Tityus, who was so huge that his
body covered nine acres of ground, and whose
punishment was to be perpetually devoured by
vultures.

Souls not good enough for Elysium, but not bad
enough for Tartarus, were treated in another way.
Some were sent to wander about the world as
Lemures, or homeless ghosts; others were given
to drink of the waters of Lethe, the river of
Forgetfulness, which threw them into a dreamless
sleep for ever.
135

PART II.—ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE.

l PON the heights of Mount Helicon, by the

spring of water called Hippocrene, and upon
the peak of Parnassus, whence flows forth the
fountain of Castalia, dwelt the Muses —the nine
gracious goddesses whose gifts to men are music,
poetry, painting, eloquence, and all the pleasures of
the mind. The Muse who had the sweetest voice
was named Calliope; and she had a son named
Orpheus, who grew up to be the most wonderful
musician that ever was known. When he sang
and played, it was as if his mother’s voice were
singing to Apollo’s lyre, so that he charmed gods
as well as men.

But though he thus charmed all, he cared for
nothing in the whole world but his art, until he
met with a girl named Eurydice, with whom he
fell passionately in love, and who loved him with
her whole heart in return. They married, and for
136 HADES.

a long time were perfectly happy. But one un-
lucky day Eurydice, while running through some
long grass, was stung by a poisonous snake in the
foot; and she died.

To Orpheus it was like losing his own soul; and
it was indeed bitterly cruel to have lost Eurydice
in the midst of their happiness together. Nothing
could comfort him. He could only wander out
among the hills and streams with his lyre, lament-
ing Eurydice, and imploring her to come back to
hbn, in such heart-broken passionate music that
the very rivers and mountains and winds seemed
to find a voice, and to join with him in his cease-
less prayer of “ Eurydice! come back to me, even
from the grave.” And so for days and nights he
wandered, singing the same song to his lyre, with
all his heart and soul, till it seemed impossible
that Death itself should be deaf to such a
prayer.

At last a very strange thing befell. So desper-
ately sweet did his music grow that the earth
could bear it no longer, but opened; so that he
saw before him the black waters of the Styx,
and Charon’s boat filled with its freight of souls.
His wonderful music, made more wonderful still by
love and sorrow, had opened to him the very gate
of Hades, where Eurydice had gone. Hope rose in
his heart. Still playing, he stepped into the boat
and crossed the Styx, none hindering him, or even
ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE. 137

asking him for his fee. Minos, Afacus, and Whada-
manthus, the three stern judges of the dead, let
him pass unquestioned —even they forgot their
duty in the music of his voice and lyre. As he
played and sang there floated round him, drawn by
his music, thousands of souls like flocks of birds.
The sound of his lyre reached into Tartarus itself.
Cerberus crouched harmless ; the Furies felt a thrill
of pity; for one whole instant Tantalus forgot his
thirst, the wheel of Ixion ceased whirling, and the
stone of Sisyphus stopped rolling down-hill.

Thus Orpheus played his way into the very
presence of Pluto and Proserpine. Pluto pitied
him; but it was Proserpine who, no doubt re-
membering her own mother’s sorrows and wander-
ings, thought of a way to help him.

“You may have back your wife,” said she; “ but
on one condition. You have conquered Death; but
that is not enough. You must conquer even Love,
for her sake. Go back to earth, playing and sing-
ing as you came, and Eurydice shall follow behind
you. But if, until you pass the gate of Hades, you
turn your head to look at her; if you give even a
single elance behind you to see if she is there, then
you shall never see her again.”

You may think that Eurydice might have been
given to him back without any conditions. But
Hades was ruled by strict laws, which not even the
king and queen could break; and nobody could be
138 ' HADES,

allowed to conquer death without showing that he
could conquer temptation. Orpheus was overjoyed.
Singing a hymn of thanks, he went back the way
he came; and presently he could hear a faint sound
behind him, as if the whisper of a footfall were
keeping pace with him. Was it indeed Eurydice ?
He longed to look round and see; but he remem-
bered Proserpine’s condition, and he did not let his
eyes wander from the chink of daylight which
presently began to gleam before him. Ags he
came nearer and nearer to the upper world of
light, and life, and day, the footfall behind him
grew more and more distinct, until he knew it to
be Eurydice’s: it was as if a silent phantom were
gradually putting on its body again as it followed
him. If he could but once look round—not to
look was almost more than he could bear. But he
might listen; and now he heard her breathe, deeply
and gladly, as the breath of life came back to her.
His music was indeed bringing her back from the
grave |

At last he saw, full in sight, the sunlit hills of
the upper world. Forgetting that the gate of Hades
had not yet been passed, he, in his impatience,
turned round to clasp Eurydice to his heart—only
to see her change back again into a pale cold ghost,
which, with a wail of love and sorrow, faded away
for ever.
. aa See S
II A \ VIS
a — |



“ Orpheus turned round, only to see her change back again into a
pale cold ghost.”—Page 138.
ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE. 139

So Orpheus came back again from Hades heart-
broken and alone. Once more, doubly hopeless, and
hating himself for his own weakness, he wandered
among the mountains and forests with his lyre.
But while he was broken-hearted, his music be-
came more wonderful than ever; for had he not
seen with his eyes all the marvels of the under-
world? Lions and tigers followed him as he sang,
and became as gentle as lambs. The strongest oaks
bent down to listen



nay, even the very mountains
bowed their heads, and the swiftest rivers stood still
to hear. He sang of Love and Death and Sorrow,
and of all the mysteries of the world above, and of
the world below, so that men looked upon him as a
prophet, and came to him to learn wisdom.

But his own heart remained broken and dead
within him. He had no more love left to give to
any human being. The noblest and fairest women
in the land sought to win his love, but he was deaf
and blind to them all. So their love turned to
hate; and at last a number of them, enraged by
his coldness, fell upon him and slew him, and
threw his head into the river Hebrus. And, as his
head floated away, the dead lips were heard to
murmur—

“ Kurydice ! Eurydice !”
140

PART IV—THE MAN WHO NEVER DIED.

HERE was just one mortal who kept clear of

Hades altogether. But whether he was really

lucky in that or not, I must leave you to settle
when you have heard his story.

If you have ever seen the sun rise, you have
seen the wings of Aurora. Aurora is the dawn; and
as she opens her wings you see all their colours—
first pale-orey; then a delicate amber, which deepens
into saffron; then the tint of a pink-rose, which
grows fuller and fuller till it becomes crimson and
purple, which turns to gold when the chariot of
the Sun appears. It is she who throws open the
gates of the sky for Phcebus Apollo to start upon
his daily journey, just as it is Thetis who shuts
them, and brings the twilight, when his journey
is done.

Aurora is always glad and beautiful and young ;
THE MAN WHO NEVER DIED. 141

always full of hope, because she closes her splendid
wings and goes to sleep before the troubles of the
day begin; and her only work is to feed the flowers
with dew. But once upon a time she fell in love
with a mortal named Tithonus; and she promised
to grant him whatever boon he most desired.

I suppose almost everybody has tried to think of
what he would wish for if a goddess or fairy gave
him such a chance. Tithonus thought hard for a
minute, and then said—

“Great and beautiful goddess, my wish is that I
may never die, so that I may see you every morning
for ever.”

Now of course it was against all the laws of
Hades that a mortal should never die—unless, of
course, he was allowed to taste the Ambrosia, the
food of the gods, which was very seldom allowed.
How Aurora managed it, I cannot tell, because I
have never been told. But she kept her word some-
- how, and Tithonus got leave to live for ever.

And so long as he was young and strong, and
could get up early in the morning to look at the
colour of Aurora’s wings, that was all very well.
It did just as well as if he were to die in time, like
other men. But it happened at last that, while
Aurora remained as young as ever, Tithonus began
to get old. The promise of endless life did not,
prevent him from growing bald, and toothless, and
liable to catch cold if he went out into the keen
142 HADES.

morning air. By the time that he was a hundred
years old, he became tired of getting up to see the
sun rise day after day. At two hundred he felt
like a bundle of aches and pains, and he liked a
doze in the sun better than a thousand Auroras.
At three hundred he became tired of living, and
wanted to be able to creep into some quiet corner
of Hades, drink a cup of Lethe, and go to sleep and
think of nothing. But he could not; for though
racked with pain and weary of life, he could
not die!

He could only shrink and shrivel till, after many
hundreds of years, he was less than two inches long.
His skin turned dry and brown. His voice became
cracked, and thin, and shrill. He lost his senses,
and kept on chirping the same thing over and over
again. He never stirred from the warmth of the
chimney-corner, night or day. His legs grew as
thin as threads of cotton. He dwindled into a dry,
wooden-like insect.

In short, a Cricket.

And such he remains to this day. But Aurora
ig as young and as beautiful and as fresh as ever,
and has clean forgotten him; while he spends his
life in trying to be merry, and in chirping—

“Oh, how I want to die!”






THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

of Argos named Acrisius, to whom
it had been foretold that he would



This troubled him greatly. So
he built a high tower of brass, and imprisoned his
daughter Danaé in the very highest room. Having
furnished her with provisions and amusements to
last her all her life, he closed up all the entrances,
so that nobody could get into the tower, and set
guards all round it, so that nobody could even come
near it. He did all this so that she should never
marry and have a son who would grow up to kill
him.

You may imagine what sort of life Danae led,
shut up in the brazen tower. She was made com-
144 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

fortable enough, and had plenty to eat and drink,
and musical instruments, and pictures, and jewels,
and all such things; but she never, from year’s end
to year’s end, saw a face, except when she looked
into the looking-elass, nor heard a voice but when
she sang to herself—which she soon got tired of
doing. She could not even look out of the window,
because there were no windows to look from.
She lived by lamplight, and she knew that this
was to be her life for all the rest of her days.

So Acrisius felt safe and satisfied, and thought
he had baffled Fate very cleverly indeed. And
thts things went on for many years—what endless
years they must have been to the imprisoned prin-
cess |—till one day she heard a little chinking
noise, as if a gold coin had fallen upon the brazen
floor of her room. She did not, however, pay any
particular heed ; indeed she must by that time have
got used to all sorts of queer fancies. But pres-
ently she heard it again. And, looking down in
an idle way, sure enough she saw a couple of gold
coins lying on the floor.

That seemed rather odd, for whence could they
have come? Then a third coin joined the two others,
and, raising her eyes to the ceiling, she saw coin
after coin coming through a crack so small that
she had not known till now that it was there.
Faster and faster came the coins, till they became
a shower, and the heap of gold on the floor stood
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 145

higher than her head. Then the shower ceased,
and the crack was still so small that she could not
see whence the coins had fallen. As she stood
wondering, the heap began to stir itself; the gold
pieces melted into a single mass, which gradually
seemed to take life and form. At last, where the
gold had been, she saw the form of a man, but so
stately and royal, and so much grander and nobler
than any mere man could be, that she fell upon her
knees before him.

“T am Jupiter,” said he, raising her, “and I
have chosen you to be my earthly bride.”

So just that little crack in the ceiling, only just
big enough for a thin gold coin to squeeze through,
brought about what Acrisius had been at such
trouble to prevent. And in time the news came
to the king that a child had been heard crying
in the brazen tower. He broke his way in, hurried
up the staircase to the highest room, and there,
to his rage and terror, he found Danae with a child,
a boy, in her arms.

But he was determined not to let fate conquer
him. He could not very well have his daughter
and grandson put to death



at least openly. But
he had them carried out to sea and then turned
adrift in a sinall leaky boat, without sail, oars, or
rudder, so that they were certain to be drowned.
This having been done, Acrisius felt happy and
comfortable again.

K
146 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

Now there lived on the little island of Seriphus,
more than two hundred miles away, an honest
fisherman named Dictys. It is often rough weather
about there, and bad for fishing; but he was a
brave and skilful sailor, and the weather, in order
to keep him ashore, had to be very rough indeed.
You may think, therefore, how bad the weather
was when, for the first time in his life, he was
unable to cast his nets for many days and nights
together,—so many that he began to wonder what
in the world he should do to get food for his wife
and children. He used to lie awake listening to
the howling wind and roaring sea, and then, going
down to the beach, sought for food among the rocks
and pools, thinking himself lucky if he could find
a damaged crab, or a bunch of eatable sea-weed.

One morning while he was searching about with
a heavy heart, he, passing a jutting rock, came
suddenly upon a young and handsome woman, in
clothes all torn and drenched by the waves, sitting
with a baby in her lap, and forlornly rocking her-
self to and fro. Hard by were the broken tim-
bers of a boat, which had doubtless been blown
ashore by the wind. Dictys questioned her kindly,
but she could not or would not answer ; so, taking
her by the hand, he led her to his cottage, where
his wife, who was as good-hearted as he, made a
big fire of wreck-wood, and gave the mother and
child a share of what food they had left, though it
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 147

could ill be spared. From their famished looks he
judged that they must have been tossing about on
the waves for many days. But though the woman
thanked him gratefully, with tears in her eyes, she
did not tell him anything of her story except what
he could see for himself—that she had been lost
at sea.

“Perhaps she has lost her memory,” he said to
his wife, when their guests were sleeping, worn out
with all they had gone through. “What is to be
done? We do not even know who they are.”

“And look at their clothes!” said his wife.
“For all their being in rags, they might have been
made for a queen and a queen’s son. But whoever
they are,” she said with a sigh, “we can’t let them
perish of hunger and cold. I never saw such a
beautiful child—not even among our own.”

Dictys sighed still more deeply, for to be bur-
dened with two more mouths to feed in those bad
times was a serious thing, even though his heart
also bled for the misery of the mother and the
beauty of the boy. . . . “I have it, wife!” he
exclaimed at last. “As soon as they are rested,
and as I’ve nothing else to do, worse luck, I'll take
them to the king. He'll do something for them,
I’m sure. And if he doesn’t, why, we must do
what we can, that’s all, and hope for better times.”

So when the mother and child were quite rested
and refreshed, Dictys set off with them for the
148 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

kine’s palace, doing his best to cheer them by the
way. Seriphus is a very little island, not more
than a dozen miles round, so they had not to go
far, and fortunately they found the king at home.
The King of Seriphus at that time was Polydectes,
who, having heard the fisherman’s story, and being
struck with the beauty and high-born air both of
the woman -and of the child, kept them in his own
palace, treated them as guests whom he delighted
to honour, and was much too polite to ask questions.
The mother told nobody anything except that her
child’s name was Perseus, and that hers was Danae.

Perseus grew up into such splendid manhood that
for a lone time Polydectes was fond and proud of
him, and treated him as if he were his own son. He
was strong and handsome, brave, noble-minded, and
marvellously accomplished both in mind and body.
He was devoted to his mother; and he could never
do enough to show his gratitude to Dictys the fish-
erman, who had been kind to her in her need. But
his very virtues became his misfortune. Polydectes
gradually became jealous of him, for he could not
help seeing that the people of Seriphus loved and
honoured Perseus more than the king himself, and
he was afraid that they might rebel and make Per-
seus their king. Besides that, he wanted to have
Danae in his power, and without a protector, so
that he might marry her against her will. There-
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 149

fore he bethought him of a plot by which he could
get rid of Perseus for ever in a seemingly honour-
able way.

So one day he called the young man to him, and
gaid—

“ Perseus, I know how brave you are, and how
fond of all sorts of difficult adventures. Did you
ever hear of the Gorgons? Well, the Gorgons are
three terrible demon sisters who live in the middle
of Africa. Their bodies are covered with scales
like dragons, which no spear can pierce; their hands
are brazen claws; they have snakes instead of hair,
just like the Furies—I mean the Eumenides; and
they have teeth as long as the tusks of a wild
boar; and whoever looks upon them is turned to
stone. All three are dreadful; but the one who
is named Medusa is the most dreadful of all. Now
I have been thinking, as you are so fond of adven-
tures, you might go and cut off Medusa’s head. It
would be something to be proud of for the rest of
your days.”

Perseus was rather taken aback by such an
errand. In the first place, he did not know where
to find the Gorgons; in the second place, how was
he to kill a creature who would turn him into
stone by one glance of her eyes? But he was
much too brave to refuse, or even to think of re-
fusing. “TI will just bid my mother good-bye, and
then I will start at once,” said he. He did not
150 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

tell his mother what he had undertaken to do
for fear of alarming her; but he said good-bye to
her as cheerfully as if he were only going for a
night’s fishing with their friend the fisherman.
Then, having asked Dictys to take care of his
mother till he came back again, he lay down to get
a little sleep before starting.

He had a curious dream. He thought that Pluto,
Minerva, and Mercury came to his bedside, and that
each made him a parting present. Pluto gave
him a helmet, Minerva a shield, and Mercury a
pair of sandals, with little wings fastened to them,
and a curious weapon, of which the blade was
shaped like a scythe, and made of a single diamond.
But the dream was not so strange as what he found
when he woke. There, on his bed, actually lay the
helmet, the shield of polished steel, the winged
sandals, and the scythe-shaped dagger.

Well, somebody must have put them there.
Perhaps they were parting gifts from King Poly-
dectes. So first he put on the helmet; then he
placed the weapon in his belt; then he slung the
shield over his shoulders; last of all, he bound the
winged sandals on his feet, aud when the wings
spread themselves at his heels, and carried him
high up into the air, he began to think that the
visit of the gods must have been something more
than a dream.

He went up so high that the earth looked like
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 151

a large map spread out below him, on which the
island of Seriphus seemed but a mere speck in the
sea over which he was drifting southward. After
many hours of this strange sort of travel, he began
to descend, and came down upon his feet in the
middle of a hot sandy plain, where neither hill
nor tree nor water was to be seen. He could not
tell where he was. But he did not lose courage ;
and he set out across the desert, knowing that if
he kept straight on in one direction, he must reach
somewhere or other in time.

But not till nearly nightfall did he see, in the
far distance, a cluster of palm-trees—the sure sign
of water, which his long journey over the hot and
glaring sand, under the blazing sun, had made him
need sorely. Reaching the palm-trees at last, he
found, in the midst of the cluster, a wooden hut.
Wondering that anybody should live in such a
place, but hoping to find food and guidance, he
knocked boldly on the door with the hilt of his
sword, and was bidden, by a hoarse, cracked voice,
to come in.

He entered, and found three very old women
warming their hands at a few burning sticks, al-
though it was so hot in the desert that Perseus
could hardly bear the weight of his shield. Ag
he came in, the three crones turned their faces
towards him; and he saw that one of them had
only one eye and no teeth, that another had only
152 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

one tooth and no eye, and that the third had neither
teeth nor eyes.

“T am a traveller,” said Perseus, “and have lost
my way. Will you kindly tell me where I am?”

“Come in and show yourself,” said the crone who
had the eye, sharply. “I must see who you are
before I answer,” she added, though her one eye
was looking straight at him all the while.

“Here I am,” said Perseus, stepping into the
middle of the room. “I suppose you can see me
now.”

“It’s very strange—very strange!” said the old
woman. “Sisters, I hear a man’s voice, but I see
no man!”

“Nonsense, sister!” said the one who had the
tooth. “You can’t have put the eye in right.
Let me try.”

To the amazement of Perseus, the first old
woman took out her eye and passed it to the
second, who, after giving it a polish, put it into
her own face and looked round; but she also saw
nothing.

The two wrangled for a while as to whether there
was anything to be seen; and then the eye was
passed round to the third sister. But she also
failed to see Perseus, though the eye rolled in her
head, and glowed like a live coal.

And so they kept passing the eye round from
one to another, and yet nothing could they see.
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 153

At last Perseus, feeling terribly hot and tired, took
off Pluto’s helmet to cool himself, when suddenly—

(o2m

“There he is! I see him now!” exclaimed the
old woman who, at the moment, happened to be
using the eye.

Thus Perseus found out that his helmet made
him invisible when he put it on; and he had
already found out the use of his sandals. Perhaps
the other gifts would have their uses too.

He let the old women have a good look at him
each in turn, and then said—

“T am very hunery and thirsty and tired, and
don’t know where I am. Will you give me a little
food, and tell me who such kind ladies are, and
what this place is, and put me on the right road to
where I want to go?”

It was the one who happened to have the eye in
her head that always spoke.

“We will give you some food,” said she, “ for
you seem a very well-behaved young man. This
place is the great desert of Libya”—(which is what
we now call the desert of Sahara, in Africa)—* and
we are three sisters, called the Graiw. And where
do you want to go?”



“T want to visit the Gorgons, and particularly
Medusa,” said he. “Do you happen to know where
they are?”

“Of course we know, for they are our own kins-
women! But never, no, never, will we tell you
154 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

where they live, or the way to get there. Never will
we let so handsome a youth be turned into stone !”

“ Never!” croaked the old woman with the tooth.

“ Never!” mumbled the third.

Perseus did all he could to persuade them, but
they were so stubborn that he was only wasting
words. Meanwhile they laid out supper, which
they ate ina very strange way, each taking her
turn with the one tooth which they had among
them, and passing it round from one to the other,
just as they did with their only eye. This made
the meal rather long and slow, for they ate enor-
mously. After supper they put the eye and the
tooth into a little box while they took a nap, when
Perseus, watching his opportunity, snatched up the
box, put on his helmet, and cried out—

“Now tell me the way to Medusa, or else you
shall never see or eat again!”

The poor old Graize went down on their knees,
and implored him to give them back their only
tooth and their only eye. But he said—

“Tt is my turn to be stubborn. Tell me where
to find Medusa, and you shall have them back; but
not a minute before.”

“T suppose we must, then,” said the eldest, with
a sigh. “ Well, it won’t be our fault now, whatever
happens. And after all, it’s better that you should
be turned into stone than that we should be blind
and starved.”
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 15

Or

“ Much better,” her sisters groaned.

“Very well, then,” said the eldest Graia, “you
must go straight on, night and day, until you come
into the country of King Atlas, which is called
Mauritania. Near the king’s palace is a garden
where the trees bear golden apples, guarded by a
dragon. If the dragon does not devour you, you
must pass the garden gate, and go on, a long, long
way, till you come to a great lake where, if you
do not find the Gorgons, you will be a lucky
man.”

Perseus gave the old women back their tooth and
eye, which they received with joy, and thanking
them for their information, left the hut and travelled
on. After many days and nights, during which he
found it hard to find food, he came into a fertile
country wherein stood a stately palace, so high that
it seemed to touch the clouds. Hard by was a vast
garden enclosed by a high wall, and at the gate,
gure enough, sat a monstrous dragon with glaring
eyes. But Perseus, wearing his invisible helmet,
passed by safely, because unseen.

In time he came to the lake, where he took off
his helmet to quench his thirst. While he was
drinking, he was startled by the approach of what
sounded like a mighty rush of wind, and he had
but just time to put on his helmet again before he
saw, reflected in the lake, the flying form of the
terrible Medusa—the Gorgon whom he had vowed
156 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

to slay, and who, not seeing hin, sat down. beside
him with folded wings.

Well was it for Perseus that he remembered what
would happen to him if he looked at Medusa. And
yet how in the world was he to fight her without
looking at her? That was a puzzle indeed. Sud-
denly he bethought himself of Minerva’s shield,
which was polished like a mirror. He turned it
towards Medusa, and saw, not herself indeed, but
her reflection in the polished shield, which did just
as well.

She was indeed a monster—more terrible even
than he had expected. She was of gigantic size,
hideous and cruel in face, with the scales and
wings of a dragon, horrible claws, and hundreds of
writhing and hissing snakes on her head instead
of hair. No wonder that anybody who looked on
her was turned at once into stone. Perseus, wear-
ing his helmet, and guiding himself by his mirror,
from which he never moved his eyes, drew his dia-
mond blade, sprang upon the monster, gave one
stroke just between her chin and where her scales
began—and, in a single moment, her hideous head
was rolling on the sand. The snakes gave one last
hiss, and the deed was done.

Still keeping his eyes turned away, Perseus, by
using his mirror, found the head, which he slung
ott of his sight behind him. Scarcely had he done
this when he heard again the sound of wings, like


“ Perseus, wearing his helmet, and guiding himself by his mirror,
drew his diamond blade.” —Page 156.
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 157

a great wind—the sisters of Medusa, the other two
Gorgons, were flying over the lake like hurricanes
to take vengeance upon her slayer. They could not
see Perseus himself, because of his helmet; but
they saw their sister’s head at his back, and could
thus swoop down upon him. But Perseus, remem-
bering his winged sandals, sprang up into the air,
and off he flew, with the raging Gorgons after him.

It was a terrible race! Perseus would not throw
away the head, though it left such a track behind
him. For from one of the splashes of blood which
fell upon the earth sprang the giant Chrysaor,
armed with a golden sword; from another leaped
into life the winged horse Pegasus, who immedi-
ately darted off through the air and never stopped
until he alighted among the Muses upon Mount
Helicon; the smaller drops of blood as they fell
became countless serpents, and all manner of loath-
some crawling things. On and on Perseus flew, not
knowing whither, like one hunted in some horrible
dream, till his strength failed him, and he came
down to earth, swiftly and half fainting.

When he opened his eyes and raised himself
from the ground, he found himself in the most
beautiful garden he had ever seen, full of trees
laden with fruits of gold. But before him stood
a huge giant, so tall that his head was above the
clouds. The giant stooped till Perseus could see
his face, and said in a voice of thunder


158 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

“T am Atlas, King of Mauritania! How has a
miserable pigmy like you passed the dragon who
guards the gate of the garden of golden apples, and
entered in?”

“Then from you, as king of this land,” said
Perseus, “I claim shelter and protection in my
father’s name! For the avengers of blood are
following after me to kill me.”

“You are safe with me,” said Atlas. “ But who
is your father, that you claim shelter and protection
in his name ?”

“My name is Perseus,” said Perseus, proudly,
“and I am the son of Jupiter, the king of gods
and men!”

“Of Jupiter?” thundered Atlas. “'Then—pre-
pare to die!”

“You would kill a son of Jupiter?” asked
Perseus, amazed.

“Ay, and any son of Jupiter who comes in my
way! For hath it not been foretold that by a son
of Jupiter shall I be robbed of my golden apples ?
For what else are you here? Son of Jupiter, once
more, prepare to die!” And so saying, he lifted
his enormous arm, one blow of which would have
swept away ten thousand men as if they were a
swarm of flies.

Perseus gave himself up for lost, for he had no
more chance against Atlas than a beetle would
have against an elephant. However, like a brave
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 159

knight, he resolved to die fighting: he drew his
sword and grasped his shield—at least what he
meant to be his shield; for it chanced to be
Medusa’s head which he brought from behind his
shoulder and held up before the giant. Down
came the huge right arm of Atlas to crush him.
But even in death the head did its work. No
sooner were Medusa’s staring eyes turned upon the
giant than all in a moment his limbs stiffened, and
he became a vast mountain of stone, with its head
above the clouds. And there stands Mount Atlas
to this day.

Thankful for his wonderful escape, Perseus,
without taking a single golden apple, continued
his journey, no longer pursued by the Gorgons,
who had doubtless lost trace of him. Leaving
Mauritania, he recrossed the great Libyan desert,
and travelled on and on until he reached the coast
of Ethiopia, and entered a great city on the sea-
shore.

But though the place was evidently great and
rich, the whole air seemed full of sadness and
gloom. ‘The people went about silent and sighing,
and altogether so woe-begone that they had no
attention to spare for a stranger. When he reached
the king’s palace the signs of mourning were
deeper still: it was like entering a tomb, all was
so plunged in speechless sorrow,
160 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

“What is the matter?” asked Perseus at last,
seizing a passing servant by the arm, and com-
pelling him to listen. “Is it the death of the
king?”

“Ah, if it were only that!” said the man.
“But no; King Cepheus is alive and well. Alas,
and woe is me!” And so once more he fell to
wailing, and passed on.

Thus over and over again Perseus vainly sought
an answer, getting nothing but tears and groans.
And so, none heeding him, he went on till he reached
a chamber where sat the king himself in the midst
of his court; and here was the deepest mourning
of all.

“T perceive you are a stranger,” said King
Cepheus. “Pardon us if we have seemed inhos-
pitable and unlike the A®thiopians, the friends of
the gods; it is not our way. But,” he continued, the
tears flowing as he spoke, “if you knew, you would
understand.”

“Tet me know,” said Perseus, gently, for he was
filled with pity for the king’s tears.

“My daughter, the Princess Andréméda,” an-
swered the king, “is condemned to a_ horrible
death; I know not whether she is yet alive.”

“How,” asked Perseus, “can a king’s daughter
be condemned to death against her father’s will ?”

“No wonder it sounds strange,” answered
Cepheus; “but listen: Andromeda is my only
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 161

child. For some reason—I know not) what—the
gods have permitted the land to be ravaged by a
monster which came out of the sea, whose very
breath is a blight and a pestilence, and which
spares neither man, woman, nor child. Not one
of us is left without cause to mourn. Fearing the
destruction of all my people, I asked of the great
oracle of Ammon in what way the work of the
monster could be stayed. Alas! the oracle de-
clared that nothing would avail but delivering up
Andromeda herself to its fury to be devoured.
What could I do? Could I doom all my people
to lose all their children for the sake of my own ?
There was but one thing for a king, who is the
father of all his people, to do: and even now——-—”
But he could say no more.

“Oracle or no oracle,” cried Perseus, “it shall
not be while I am alive! Where is the princess?”

“She was chained at sunrise to a rock on the
sea-shore, there to wait for the monster. But where
she is now e



Perseus did not wait for another word, but, leav-
ing the palace, hurried along the shore, already half
covered by the rising tide, and helping himself over
the difficult places by the wings at his heels. At
last he came to what made his heart beat and
burn with pity and rage. Chained by her wrists
to a pillar of rock was the most beautiful of all
princesses, stripped naked, but for the long hair

lL
162 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

that fell over her shoulders, and for the rising waves,
which were already nearly waist-high. But what
struck Perseus most was her look of quiet courage
and noble pride—the look of one who was devoting
herself to a cruel death for her country’s sake, and
in order that others might be saved.

The whole heart of Perseus went out to her: he
vowed, if he. could not save her, to share her doom.
But before he could reach her side, a huge black
wave parted, and forth came the monster —a
creature like nothing else of land or sea, with a
bloated, shapeless body, studded with hungry, cruel
eyes, and hundreds of long, slimy limbs, twisting
and crawling, each with a yawning mouth, from
which streamed livid fire and horrible fumes.
Andromeda turned pale as the loathsome creature
came on with a slowness more dreadful than speed.
Perseus could not wait. Springing from the rock
with his wings, he threw himself, like lightning, full
upon the monster, and then began such a struggle
as had never been seen before. The creature twined
its limbs round Perseus, and tried to crush him.
As soon as Perseus tore himself from one, he was
clutched by another, while the pulpy mass seemed
proof against thrusts or blows.

Perseus felt his life passing from him; he put
all the strength left him into one last blow. It
fell only on the monster’s right shoulder. But that
was the one place where it could be pierced. The
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 163

coils relaxed, and Perseus, to his own amaze, saw
the monster floating, a shapeless corpse, upon the
waves.

Having released Andromeda, who had watched
the struggle in an agony of dread for what had
seemed the certain fate of her champion, he carried
her back through the air to her father’s palace ;
and I need not tell how the mourning turned into
wonder and joy !

“What can I do to show my gratitude?” asked
Cepheus of Perseus. “Ask of me whatever you
will, and it shall be yours, on the word of a
king !”

“Give me Andromeda to be my wife,” said
Perseus. “That is all I want in the world,”

“Gladly,” said Cepheus; but suddenly he became
grave. “I have promised on the word of a king,
which cannot be broken. But I must warn you
that you are not the first in the field. Andromeda
has long been claimed in marriage by the powerful
Prince Phineus; and he is not the man to lose what
he wants without giving trouble.”

“He never gave any trouble to the monster,”
said Perseus, thinking that Cepheus, though kind
and honourable, was rather a weak and timid
sort of king. So the marriage of Perseus and
Andromeda was settled, to the great joy of both;
and all the nobles were invited to a great festival
in honour of the wedding, and of the delivery of the
164 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

land. The Aithiopians were famous for their feasts,
—so much so that the gods themselves would often
leave the nectar and ambrosia of Olympus to be
guests at their tables.

Everything went on very happily, when in the
very midst of the banquet was heard the clash of
arms; and those who were nearest the door cried
out that Prince Phineus had come with an army
to carry off the bride.

“Do not be alarmed,” said Perseus. “ Only let
everybody shut his eyes until I bid him open them
again,”

Tt seemed an odd order; but Cepheus and all
his Court had such faith in Perseus that they
instantly obeyed him, and all shut their eyes.
Perseus, especially bidding Andromeda close hers,
drew forth Medusa’s head, turning the face towards
the door. And when, at his bidding, Cepheus and
the rest opened their eyes and looked, they saw
Phineus and his army all turned into statues of
stone.

After resting from his adventures at the Court
of King Cepheus, Perseus set sail with Andromeda,
in one of the king’s ships, for Seriphus, where they
arrived after a safe and pleasant voyage. He was
impatient to see his mother again, and to show King
Polydectes how well he had done his errand. On
reaching Seriphus, he left Andromeda in the ship,
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 165

while he went alone on shore to see how things had
gone while he had been away.

His way to the palace led him past the temple
of Minerva, at the gate of which he found great
confusion. Forcing his way through the crowd, he
entered, and was astonished to see his mother,
Danae, crouching in terror by the altar, with Dictys
the fisherman standing before her, and defending
her from King Polydectes and his guards, who were
crowding the temple. Clearing his way to the altar-
steps, Perseus heard hurriedly from Dictys what
was happening: how the king, taking advantage of
his absence, had been persecuting Danae to marry
him against her will, and had at last driven her
into the temple to make her his wife by force.
Dictys alone had come to her rescue; but what
could one man do against the king and all his
euards ?

«And now you have come,” sighed Dictys, “ you
will be slain too. See, they are coming on!”

“You sent me to slay Medusa, King Polydectes,”
cried Perseus. “See how well I have obeyed you!”

So saying, he held up the fatal head; and the
king and his guards forthwith became stone. Thus
was Polydectes destroyed by his own treachery.

The people desired to make Perseus king; but
he had a longing to pay a visit to the land of
Argos, where he had been born, but which he had
166 THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS.

never seen. So he made Dictys the fisherman King
of Seriphus, thinking that kindness, courage, and
faithfulness were the chief things to be looked for
in the choice of a ruler, and set sail for Argos with
his wife and mother.

Of course nobody there knew any of them; for
Perseus had left the country when a child in arms,
and Danae had spent her girlhood shut up in a
brazen tower. It so happened that, when they
reached land, the people of Larissa were celebrating
some solemn games in honour of their king, who
g, and so forth; and
Perseus, hearing the news, went round by way of

had just died——wrestling, racin

Larissa to take part in them.

Having shown himself best in every sport, he
joined in a game of quoits, in which, as always, he
found himself without a rival. Having outdone all
others, he thought he would outdo even himself;
and, taking up the heaviest quoit, he cast it so far
that it passed over the heads of the circle of spec-
tators, so that none could see where it fell—_—

Until they were startled by a cry which made
the people crowd to where an old man had fallen
from his seat, and now lay dead upon the ground.
The quoit had struck him on the head, and——

“Fly!” cried those who stood about Perseus.
“Tt is Acrisius, King of Argos, whom your unlucky
quoit has killed !”
THE ADVENTURES OF PERSEUS. 167

And thus came to pass what had been foretold
at the beginning—King Acrisius had been slain by
his daughter’s son.

As for Perseus, whose adventures were now at
an end, he refused the kingdom of Argos, which
had come to him in such an unfortunate manner,
and, travelling further into Greece, built a city and
made a kingdom for himself, which he called
Mycenz. Here, with Andromeda and Danae, he
lived in peace and happiness, ruling so well and
wisely that when he died he was made a demigod,
and admitted into Olympus. There are two con-
stellations which are still called Perseus and
Andromeda. The Gorgon’s head he consecrated
to Minerva, who fixed it in the middle of her
shield, where it still retained its power of turning
the enemies of the goddess of Wisdom into blocks
of stone.

I expect that one part of this story has reminded
you of how St George.of England rescued the Prin-
cess Sabra from the dragon. Well, there is this
great likeness among all good knights, that they
have the help of heaven, because they would be
equally good and brave whether they had such help
or no,






began to grow old, he left his king-
dom to his infant son, Jason. But



the throne was usurped by his uncle
PelYas, who forthwith consulted an
oracle as to what he should do to make himself
secure. The answer of the oracle was strange. It
was—* Fear nobody who cometh not with and
without a shoe.”

“There is nothing very alarming about that,”
thought Pelias; so, instead of having Jason killed,
as he had first thought of doing, he sent away the
child into Thessaly, a long way off, among the
people called Centaurs, hoping that he would never
hear of him again.

The Centaurs were a very singular race. They
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 169

were half man and half horse, as if a man’s body
down to the waist were set upon a horse’s shoulders.
Thus they had a horse’s four legs for running, and
a man’s head and arms for thinking and fighting:
they were famous archers, very learned, and very
brave. Their most famous chief was Chiron, who,
besides being their best archer, was also a great
philosopher and physician. Chiron, struck by
Jason’s quickness, became his teacher, so that the
young prince grew up skilled both in all manly
exercises and in every branch of human knowledge.

When he had become a man, the Centaur thought
it only right that he should know his birth and
parentage, and should have a chance of regaining
his father’s throne, since he was so fit to be a king.
But first he consulted the oracle, which gave to
Chiron as strange an answer as it had given to
Pelias—* Who seeks a crown shall wear the leo-
pard’s hide.”

So Jason, by Chiron’s counsel, went out hunting,
and, having killed a leopard, dressed himself in its
skin. Then he set out, on foot and alone, for
Toleos; and proceeded, without anything happen-
ing to him, until he reached a mountain-torrent,
so deep, so broad, and so strong, that the best
of swimmers could not hope to reach the other
side.

He was gazing at the torrent, wondering what
he should do, when a very old woman, bent and
170 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

lame, came hobbling by, and asked him why he
stared so sadly at the stream.

“Reason enough,” said he, “when that water is
keeping me from a kingdom.”

“Ts that all?” asked the old woman; “I can
soon put that right for you. J am going across my-
self; and I'll take you on my back with the greatest
pleasure in the world.”

Jason thought she was laughing at him. But
something about her—he could not tell what—made
him feel that she was no common old woman; and
even as he looked her back seemed to straighten it-
self and her figure to enlarge. No; she was certainly
not joking: her smile was only friendly and kind.
It might not be very dignified for a rightful king to
enter his kingdom dressed up in a leopard’s skin
and riding on the back of an old woman, and it did
not seem very safe, either. However, as there was
certainly nothing else to be done, he got upon the
back of the old woman, who at once stepped out into
the raging stream.

How strong the flood was he could tell from the
forest-trees which it had torn up by the roots and
was carrying away headlong. But while Jason’s
brain reeled with the whirl, the old woman re-
mained as steady as a rock, and strode through the
deepest and roughest places with ease. In a wonder-
fully short time Jason reached the other side, with
no worse mishap than the loss of his left shoe.
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 171

“Never mind that,” said the old woman. “The
river is bound to have something. You have only
given it a shoe; most people have to give it their
lives.”

“But what do you give it then?” asked Jason.

“Oh, the gods go toll-free,” said the old woman.
“T am Juno.” And before Jason had recovered
from his surprise, she was gone.

Jason continued his journey till he reached Iolcos,
where the oddity of a man dressed in nothing but a
leopard’s skin soon gathered a crowd round him.
The news of the sight spread about till it reached
the ears of Kine Pelias himself, who came out of
his palace to discover what was going on. But as
soon as he caught sight of the stranger in the
leopard-skin he started with dismay. There stood
aman with a shoe and without a shoe—just what
the oracle had warned him to fear!

Seeing that it was the king, Jason at once went
up to him, and said—

“JT am Jason, the son of A’son. Give up to me
this kingdom, which is rightfully mine!”

His boldness and his royal bearing had a great
effect upon the people, who hated Pelias, and were
glad to welcome back the rightful heir. They set
up a great shout for Jason, which alarmed Pelias
still more ; and many of them pressed forward with
drawn swords.

But Pelias, if he had not much courage, had
172 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

plenty of craft. And so he answered, after a
moment’s thought—

“Why, of course you shall have what is your
own. Do you think I want to rob you—to keep
what is not mine for a single day? I am only too
glad to welcome you, my dear nephew, home again.
I have been wondering what had become of you,
and not till after long searching did I give you up
for lost. I think you will find that I have taken
good care of your kingdom while you have been
away. I deserve some credit for having had all the
hard work, while you, no doubt, have been going
about and amusing yourself. I am very glad to see
you—indeed I am.”

Jason was rather surprised to find everything so
easy, and his uncle so friendly. Indeed he hardly
knew what to say.

“T am only eager to enter upon my duties,” said
he at last; “and I shall lock to you to help me to
govern well.”

“That is the right spirit,” said Pelias. “So I
will tell you the first of your duties; one that I
rejoice to give over to better and younger hands

”



than mine. It is difficult and even dangerous
“ All the better,” said Jason. “It will bring all
the more glory.”
“You are an admirable young man! Well, you
must know that many generations ago King Athamas
of Thebes married a princess of Cloudland, named
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 173

Néphéle, and had two children, Phryxus and Helle.
Nephele going mad, he divorced her, and married
the princess Ino, and had two children more. Ino
hated Nephele’s children, because they stood in the
way of her own. So, being a witch, she desolated
Thebes by a plague, and got a false oracle to de-
clare that the plague should never cease so long
as Phryxus and Helle were alive. Do you under-
stand ?”

“ Perfectly,” said Jason. “Except that I don’t see
what all this old family history has to do with me.”

“ Patience, and you will see,” said Pelias. “Just
as Phryxus and his sister Helle were about to be
sacrificed, a winged ram, with a fleece of pure gold,
came out of the sea, took the brother and sister on
his back, and flew away with them through the air.
Unluckily, while they were flying, Helle turned
giddy, tumbled off the ram’s back, and was drowned.
You have heard of the Hellespont, I suppose ?
Well, that is the part of the sea where Helle fell.
Phryxus, however, arrived safely at the Court of
JRétes, King of Colchis, beyond the great Black Sea,
where he sacrificed the ram to Jupiter, out of grati-
tude for his escape; but kept the golden fleece and
married the kine’s daughter. At last AZetes, want-
ing the fleece for himself, murdered Phryxus. There
—do you see your royal duty now ?”

“T cannot,” said Jason, “honestly say that I do.”

“What? Why, Phryxus was the son of Athamas,
174 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

who was the son of AKolus, who was the father of
Cretheus, who was the father of /A®son, who is the
father of you. It is as clear as day that Phryxus
was your own first cousin once removed. And what
duty can be clearer than avenging the murder of a
first cousin once removed? Especially when the
murderer has a fleece of pure gold waiting for some
brave man to-bring away. It is so clear a duty
that, if you decline it, I will undertake the adventure
myself, old as I am, rather than let the wrongs of
our royal house go unavenged.”

Now glory was Jason’s ruling passion. He
would have felt disgraced if he had declined any
adventure, however difficult it might be: and the
greater the danger, the greater the glory.

So he had it announced through Iolcos and
all the neighbouring countries that he had under-
taken the Adventure of the Golden Fleece, and
that all brave knights who desired to share in
its perils and glories would be welcome. The
effect of the proclamation was something wonderful.
Tolcos was speedily thronged with princes and
knights, the best and noblest of all Greece, eager
to take part in the expedition; so that Jason found
himself captain of a host the like of which for
birth and valour had never been seen—fifty chiefs,
and every one of them known to fame. It would
be too long to name them all. But I must men-
tion “the great twin brethren,” Castor and Pollux,
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 175

whom you know by more than name: and
Orpheus the minstrel, and that other great min-
strel, Amphion, whose music had built the walls
of Thebes: and Autolycus, the craftiest, and Nestor,
the wisest, of all mankind: and Herctiles, the son
of Jupiter, of whose deeds you will read hereafter :
and Méléiger, who has also a famous story of his
own: and Theseus of Athens, with whom you will
also meet again,—all these and all their comrades
were, like their captain, in the very flower of their
youth, strength, and valour. Atalanta, a princess
of Scyros, a great huntress, joined the expedition
disguised as a man: and A‘sculapius was its surgeon
and physician.

The next thing was to build a ship to carry
so large a company across the great and terrible
Black Sea, which the Greeks called the “ Euxine,”
or “ Friendly ’——giving it a good name just because
they were afraid to give it a bad one, lest it should
be angry. The ship was at last built, and called
the Argo.

The “ Argonauts,” as Jason and his company are
called—that is to say, the crew of the Argo—set
sail in great state and honour from a port of
Thessaly, crossed the Aigean Sea, passed through
the Dardanelles into the Sea of Marmora (as those
parts are now called), and then through the Helles-
pont, the strait where Helle had been drowned, into
the Black Sea.
176 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

From end to end of these dark and dangerous:
waters the good ship Argo sailed without mishap,
save the death of its pilot, Tiphys, soon after
starting. Erginus took his place at the helm. But
I cannot help thinking that there was another
reason for the good luck of the Argo. For once,
when a great storm arose and threatened shipwreck,
suddenly two flames of light were seen to play
round the heads of Castor and Pollux, and forth-
with the wind fell and the waves became caln.
You know that

“ Safe comes the ship to haven,
Through tempests and through gales,

If once the great Twin Brethren
Sit shining on the sails”:

and if this was the virtue of their spirits after
death, one may be certain that it was a good thing
to have Castor and Pollux on board during their
brave and blameless lives. Those two flames of
light are still often seen hovering about a ship
in stormy weather, and sailors still believe them
to be of good omen.

After a long voyage, the Argo arrived safely
at Ala, the capital of Colchis, where dwelt King
ZEetes, the same who had murdered Phryxus.
Colchis proved to be a rich and fertile country,
inhabited by a people curiously like the Gypsies,
with very dark complexions and black hair, dressed
in brightly coloured linen which they alone knew
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 177

how to weave and dye. They claimed to be de-
scended from a tribe of Egyptians who had
wandered thither ages ago; and they had many
other secrets which none but they and the Egyp-
tians knew.

Jason, at the head of his company, went before
King Afetes, and demanded from him the Golden
Fleece. Avetes received him in state, sitting upon
his throne; and, after hearing Jason’s demand,
answered—

“Far be it from me, a mere barbarian chieftain,
to refuse what is asked of me by so noble an
embassy of princes and heroes. I would even now
deliver up to you the Golden Fleece, were it in
my power. But how can I give it to you when
it is guarded, even from myself, by two fierce bulls
with brazen horns, which breathe forth flame, and
ave a match for armies? Before you can obtain
the fleece, you must first tame these bulls.”

Jason desired nothing better. So he and all
his comrades went into the field where the bulls
were, and endeavoured to bind them. But neither
he, with all his courage, nor the craft of Autolycus,
nor the might of Hercules, nor the courage, skill,
and strength of the whole company together, could
prevail against the bulls, who breathed fire, and
gored right and left with their brazen horns.
There was work for /Msculapius that day.

King Aietes had known very well how it would

M
178 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

be; but Jason, when night came, retired to the
chamber which had been assigned to him in despair.
Midnight found him still waking; when the door
opened, and there stood before him, holding a lamp,
a tall and beautiful woman, dark-skinned, black-
eyed, and with long black hair—beautiful, as I
have said, but terrible in her beauty.

“You have no cause for shame,” said she, in a
softer voice than he would have expected. “They
were enchanted bulls: and not ten times your
number would have fared better. This is a nation
of enchanters, whose king knows how to laugh you
Greeks and your boasted bravery to scorn. But I
am the greatest of all enchanters; and I will teach
you how to tame the bulls—if you will promise me
one thing.”

“Anything!” said Jason. “Only tell me who
you are, and what you require of me.”

“T am Medéa, the king’s daughter,” said she.
“And what I require is that you shall marry me
this night in the Temple of Hecate, the Queen of
Witches, and that you will swear before her altar
to be true and faithful to me for ever.”

“Gladly,” exclaimed Jason, who, to succeed in
his adventure, would have gladly sworn anything to
any one.

So he followed her to the Temple of Hecate, the
Witch-Queen, and there, with many strange and
dreadful rites, he married her, and swore to be true
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 179

and faithful to Medea for ever. Then she gave
him a magic herb, and said—

“This will tame the bulls.” And she also gave
him a sling and a stone, adding, “ Use this when
there is need.”

The next morning Jason went into the field
alone. As soon as the scent of the herb reached
the bulls’ nostrils they crouched at his feet; and
when Afetes, and his Court, and the Greek princes
with them, came forth, lo! there was Jason quietly
driving a plough drawn by the bulls, who were now
as tame as common oxen.

“ Some one has been betraying me,” thought the
king angrily. But he hid his anger, and said:
“You have done very well so far. I am sorry to
say, however, that the Golden Fleece has other
guards. Do you see these serpents’ teeth? You
must sow these in the furrow you have made with



your plough—and then the gods help you if

they can.”
g, sowed
the serpents’ teeth as if they were seeds of corn.

So Jason, having finished his ploughin

And then from that seed sprang up, in less than an
hour, a strange harvest



an army of giants, as many
as the stalks of wheat in a wide field, who rushed
upon Jason and the Greeks, and trampled them to
the ground.

And every one of them would have been slain
had not Jason bethought him of Medea’s sling and
180 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

stone. Aiming at the chief of the giants, he let
fly, and straightway the army vanished like the
phantoms of a dream.

The king began to be afraid, for he was coming
to an end of his spells. He felt sure he had been
betrayed, but could not guess the traitor. But
again he pretended friendship, and said : “ That, too,
was very well done. I see there is something in
you Greeks, after all. But it erieves me to the
heart to tell you that the most terrible guards of
the Golden Fleece still remain—a mighty dragon
that never sleeps, but watches the Fleece night and
day. If you can kill him—why then——”

“T can but try,” said Jason. So he and his
comrades were guided by winding paths to the foot
of a tree on which hung the Golden Fleece, splen-
did in the sun. But at the foot of the tree was a
dragon that could have devoured ten times as many,
armour and all, with one crunch of his jaws. And
he breathed forth such fiery pestilence that none
could come near.

Truly it seemed at last as if the adventure was ”
to be in vain.

But, at midnight, Medea came to Jason as before,
and gave him another herb, and said, “Take this—
and remember your vow.”

Jason was not thinking of the vow, but only of
the dragon. The next morning he set forth alone,
and having found his way to the tree, waved the
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“ Medea came to Fason as before, and gave him another
herb.” —Page 180.
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 181

herb before the monster. No sooner had the smell
of it reached its nostrils than its eyes began to
droop and close, and presently the ever-watchful
dragon was sleeping soundly. Instantly Jason
darted past him, snatched the Golden Fleece from
the tree, and hastening back to the palace, dis-
played it before the king’s astonished eyes.

“Seize the robber!” cried King fetes, to his
euards. But he had come to an end of his en-
chantments: Jason’s comrades rallied round their
captain with drawn swords, and made for the
shore.

The king raved and stormed. “Fetch Medea
to me,” he cried; “she shall raise such a tempest
as will sink the foreign pirates to the bottom of
the sea.” But even as he spoke, in ran one of
the slaves with the news—



“The Princess Medea—the Greeks are carrying
her away!”

“Medea — against her will? No!” cried the
king, who now knew who had betrayed him. “ There
is no power on earth that could make her captive,
or carry her away unless she chose to go. Absyr-
tus,” he said, turning to his son, “hasten after
those brigands, and bid your sister return, and I
will follow with my whole army to cut them off
from their ship and destroy them all.”

The news was true: Medea was so passionately
in love with Jason that she had forgotten her
182 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

father and her country, and was even now guiding
the Greeks back to where the great enchantress though she was, she was not
all-powerful, and she knew that her spells would be
in vain against her own people. And her father
and her brother knew this too.

Her ears were quick, however; and while the
Greeks were still far from the shore, she heard the
footsteps of Absyrtus swiftly tracking them; and
what was worse, she heard, further off, a tramp and
clash, which told her that the whole Colchian army
was in pursuit at full speed.

“ Hasten on,” she said to Jason. “I will wait
here.”

So, while he and the Greeks pressed forward, she
faced round and stood in the middle of the path
until Absyrtus came up with her. Before he could
utter a word, she plunged a dagger into her brother’s
heart, cut off his head and limbs, and then slowly
followed Jason, dropping a bleeding limb in the
path every few yards.

Things happened just as she intended. When
Kang Atetes, riding fast at the head of his horse-
men, saw his son’s head lying in the path before
him, he threw himself from his horse with a cry
of grief; and seeing what lay further along the
ground, forgot everything else, even the Golden
Fleece, in his sorrow. The cruel witch, Medea, had
foreseen that her father would never leave the
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 183

remains of his dead son ungathered and unburied
by the wayside, for the advancing horses to trample
and for the vultures to devour. King ®etes was
so long in seeking for the last limb that, by the
time it was found, Jason and the Greeks had
reached their ship and had set sail, and Medea
with them.

But the murder of Absyrtus seemed to cling like
a curse to the Argo, and to keep her from coming
home. Driven out of her course by storms and
contrary winds, she wandered into unknown oceans,
drifting even so far as the wild and desolate islands
of Britain, in the mysterious Northern Sea. The
Argonauts narrowly escaped being devoured, ship
and all, by the horrible sea-fiend Scylla, with twelve
feet, six hideous heads, each with three rows of
teeth, and a body made of barking dogs, who sits
upon a rock and watches for sailors. And, just
avoiding her jaws, they nearly fell into the whirl-
pool of Charybdis, another sea-fiend, so close to
Scylla that it was hardly possible to escape one
without being destroyed by the other. They passed
the island of the Sirens, of whom you read in the
story of Neptune, and would have fallen victims to
their singing had not Orpheus made such music on
his lyre that the Sirens ceased their own song to
listen, and let the ship pass by.

I do not know what Medea was doing all this
184 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

while. Perhaps she was powerful only on land;
perhaps she could do nothing without her magic
herbs ; perhaps her passion for Jason had made her
weak ; perhaps she felt some touch of remorse ; per-
haps her wicked witchcraft was of no effect in the
presence of Atsculapius, who, knowing more magic
even than she, used his knowledge for helping and
healing. But I do know that Jason was beginning
to suffer sorely because of the vow he had made of
his faith and life to Medea, and to feel that murder
and black magic, and a wife whom he dreaded and
did not love, were too high a price to pay even for
glory. He was not like Perseus, who had warred
against evil with the weapons of the gods: Jason
had sought only his own glory, and had gained it
by means hateful to gods and men.

But his comrades knew nothing of all this—to
them he was a hero of heroes, and they made the
wanderings of the Argo famous for something better
than narrow escapes from peril. They cleared the
sea of pirates—a work in which Castor and Pollux
especially distinguished themselves ; and they right-
ed many wrongs, and carried the knowledge of the
gods among far away barbarian tribes. And at last
they saw once more the coast of Greece; at last
they touched the land of Calydon, where the father
of Meleager, one of the Argonauts whom I have
already named, was king.

Now this Meleager had a charmed life. The
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 185

three Fates had been present at his birth—the first
had given him courage; the second, strength; but
the third had decreed that he should live only so
long as a log of wood, then burning upon the hearth,
should remain unconsumed. So his mother, Althea,
had forthwith snatched the brand from the burning,
and had kept it with care, because upon it depended
the life of her son. Meleager welcomed Jason and
his companions to Calydon; but they no sooner
landed than they heard evil news. The whole
country was being laid waste by a huge boar, which
not even armies could kill.

Here was another adventure for the Argonauts.
They proclaimed a great hunt, and tracked the boar,
through mountains and forests, to his very den. In
front of the hunters was Meleager; but next to him
came Atalanta



that famous huntress, swift-footed
as Diana, who had sailed with the Argonauts in the
disguise of a man, and had betrothed herself to
Meleager while they were homeward bound. Then
followed the rest, vying with each other which
should be foremost; and besides the Argonauts were
the princes and nobles of Calydon, led by the two
brothers of Althwa, who still kept the fatal fire-
brand secure.

They drove the boar to bay at last, and, after a
desperate struggle, Meleager gave it its death-blow.
All his companions rejoiced at his good fortune; but
when he gave the boar’s head, as a trophy, to Ata-
186 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

lanta, the two brothers of Althea stood forth and
said—

“Tt is not right to give such honour to a woman
—a woman who has no more right to it than we.
Such trophies are for men!”

So saying, they tried to seize it from her. But
Meleager, enraged at the insult to Atalanta, defended
her with his sword, and so unfortunately well that
both his uncles were slain.

Althea, watching from her window for the return
of the hunters, at last saw them pass mournfully,
bearing the bodies of her dead brothers. “Who
has done this?” she cried; and being told it was
Meleager, she cursed him, and, in her grief and pas-
sion, threw the fatal brand upon the hearth, where
it was caught by a flame. Meleager, though still
far off, was forthwith seized with scorching pains in
all his limbs. As the brand burned, so he burned
also, and when it was consumed, a flame seemed
to clutch his heart, and he fell dead in Atalanta’s
arms.

Althea, overwhelmed, when it was too late, with
horror at the result of her rage, slew herself with
her own hand. And such was the miserable ending
of the Hunt of Calydon.

The Argonauts, having now returned to Greece,
parted, and went each to his own home. Jason
drew the Argo on shore near Corinth, consecrating
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 187

it to Neptune, and leaving it there as a monument
of so famous a voyage. Then he returned to Lolcos,
bringing the Golden Fleece with him.

He was received with triumph and rejoicing, and
a great feast was prepared to welcome him home.
But, to his sorrow, he found his father Aison so en-
feebled by old age as not to be able to be present at
the festival.

“Do not trouble yourself about that,” said Medea.
“Let son only put himself in my hands, and he
shall be as young as you.”

Jason, knowing his wife’s power, consented. So
she drew all the blood out of /Mson’s veins, and
filled them with the juice of certain herbs; and he
came to the festival as young-looking and as vigor-
ous as his own son.

But Pelias, the usurper, who hated Jason, was get-
ting old too, and his daughters, when they saw what
had happened to AZson, besought Medea that she
would make their father also young and strong again.

“You need not come to me for that,” said she.
“You can do it for yourselves when I have shown
you how.”

So she killed an old ram, cut him up, and boiled
the pieces in a caldron into which she had secretly
thrown some herbs. When the water was cold, out
from the caldvon skipped a young lamb, and frisked
away.

The whole thing looked so easy that the daughters
188 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

of Pelias, that very night, prepared a caldron; and,
when the water boiled, killed their father, divided
him limb from limb, and threw in the pieces, just
as Medea had done with the ram. But nothing
happened, though they waited till the flesh had
boiled away from the bones.

They hastened to Medea to help them. But she
received them with scorn.

“ Murderesses!” she exclaimed, “and fools! It
is you who butchered Pelias; it is you who must
make him live again, if you can. His death is on
your bands; not on mine.”

Thus Jason was delivered from his enemy. But
the manner of his deliverance got about among the
people. They rose up against Medea and drove her
out of the city; and Jason had to follow her to
whom he had sold his soul for glory.

He had never loved her; and now his fear of her
was turning into hate, and the hate into loathing
and horror. All the wickednesses and cruelties she
had committed for his sake seemed to have become
his own, and to be so many curses upon him. And
even her magic had not prospered, seeing that it
had cost him the kingdom he might have gained by
fair means, and had driven him into exile. His
only comfort was in their two children, whom he
loved dearly; and at last he could bear life with
the terrible Medea no longer. He determined to
divorce her, to take the children away from such a
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. 189

mother, and to take another wife whom he could
love and who would not be a terror to him,
Such a wife he found in Creusa, a princess of
Corinth. But he was terribly mistaken if he
thought he could break the vow he had made to
Medea at the altar of Hecate the Witch-Queen.

Medea affected to be quite content with what
had been arranged. She sent Creusa a wedding-
dress, and had her children brought to her to bid
them farewell. The feast was at its height, and
Jason was rejoicing in his freedom, when a cold
cloud seemed to come over the guests; and there
stood Medea, dark and stern, leading her two chil-
dren by the hand.

“Traitor and perjurer!” she said to Jason, so
that all the guests could hear. “Is this your return
for the love I have given you; for the country I
left for you; for the sins I have done for you—
sins that you took the fruits of, but were too
cowardly to do? I have given you to the last
moment to prove your faith; and now the last
moment has gone. As you choose to be bound to
me no longer, my own hands shall destroy the last
links that bind you and me.”

So saying, like the tigress she was, she took up
the children and dashed them dead upon the floor.
At the same moment Creusa shrieked with the agony
of the poisoned robe that was clinging to her and
190 THE GOLDEN FLEECE.

destroying her. Jason rushed upon Medea with his
sword. But before he could reach her a chariot
drawn by flying dragons, none knew whence, had
borne her away, none knew whither, through the
air.

Jason, from that time, seemed haunted by the
Furies. He wandered aimlessly about the world,
unable to rest, until one day his eyes fell upon the
ship Argo, still reposing peacefully upon the shore.
One may imagine all the things the sight brought
to his mind—his old dreams of glory; the unholy
yow which had seemed to fulfil them; the weak-
ness and the unfaithfulness which had destroyed
them, and him, and others through him. Doubtless
he then saw in Medea not so much the cruel witch
as the evil of his own heart which had taken shape
and form, and had become a curse from which he
could not get free. “If I could only rest like
you!” he cried out, falling on his knees before the
ship with bowed head and clasped hands. And it
seemed as if the Argo heard her old captain’s
prayer. A yard dropped from the mainmast upon
his bowed head: and ship and captain lay at rest
together.






A LOST SECRET.

AINOS, the chief judge of the Court of
+\ the Dead in Hades, had been during
his life the King of Crete—that
large island where Jupiter had been
hidden from Saturn. Before the
reien of Minos the Cretans had been a number
of rude and savage tribes, brigands by land, and
pirates by sea. He, however, made a single nation
of them, civilised them, suppressed brigandage and
piracy, built cities, formed a regular army and navy,
and gave his people a code of wise and just laws
which never had to be changed.

When he, for his justice and his knowledge of
law, was made chief judge in Hades, he was suc-
ceeded in his kingdom of Crete by his son, Minos
the Second. He also was a great and powerful king.


192 A LOST SECRET.

He conquered many of the neighbouring islands,
adding them to his dominions, and made war upon
the Athenians, whom he defeated utterly. One of
his gons having been killed in that war, he took a
eruel revenge upon the vanquished enemy. He
laid a tribute upon the city of Athens; and the
tribute was that the Athenians should send him
every year seven boys and seven girls to be
devoured by a monster called the Minotaur



a
creature half man and half bull.

When this savage monster first appeared, Minos —
had been sorely puzzled what to do with such a
scourge. Nobody could kill it; and unless it was
regularly supplied with a full meal of boys and
girls, its fury became uncontrollable. It was partly
to keep the Minotaur quiet that he had exacted
that particular tribute from his enemies. But
neither were the Cretan children safe while the
Minotaur was at large.

One day, however, there came to the Court of
Minos a stranger who gave his name as Deedilus,
an Athenian, and announced himself as having fled
from his native city to escape a charge of murder.
He was accompanied by a young man, his son,
whom he called Icirus; and he asked for whatever
employment the king might choose to give him.

“What can you do?” asked Minos.

“Three things,” said Diedalus, “TI can split the
A LOST SECRET. 193

hardest rocks; I can make ships go without oars ;
and out of wood and metal I can make living men.”

“Prove your words,” said Minos; “ and if you do
these things I shall take both you and your son into
my service, and pay you well.”

Deedalus bowed, and obtained leave to set up a
forge, where he and Icarus were soon heard work-
ing all night and all day. If the listeners could
have looked in, they would have been surprised.
He was making nothing more wonderful than pieces
of iron, sharp at one end and thick at the other.
When he had made enough, he summoned the king
and his Court to see him split the biggest and hardest
rock they could find on the sea-shore.

They fixed upon a granite cliff Deedalus put
the sharp end of one of his pieces of iron into one
of the smallest cracks in the face of the cliff, and
hammered upon the blunt end till he had driven it
home. Then between this and the stone he drove in
another piece of iron ; and between these two a third ;
and so on, and so on, while the rock began to gape,
and then to split, until the upper portion parted it-
self from the lower, and thundered down into the sea.

The secret was simple enough. Deedalus had
simply invented the wedge, which can do much
greater things than that when it is skilfully used.
But the Cretans were amazed to see, as they thought,
one man knocking over a cliff with a common
hammer.

N
194 A LOST SECRET.

Then Deedalus set up a workshop by the shore,
with some long sheds, and a supply of hemp and
timber. Here also he worked day and night; and
at last called Minos and his Court to see a ship go
without oars.

The ship had a tall pole rising from the middle
of the deck. Dedalus and Icarus went on board,
and were seen pulling at some long ropes; and
presently the ship seemed to spread out wings like
a bird, and to skim over the water as fast as the
wind without the help of an oar.

Dedalus had invented sat/s. But the Cretans
were more amazed than before, never having thought
of such a simple thing for themselves.

Dedalus then went back to his forge; and what
he did there nobody could guess, for scarce a sound
was heard. After many days, however, he went to
the king’s palace, he and Icarus carrying a long
and heavy chest between them. The chest being
opened before Minos, Deedalus took out from it a
number of images, exquisitely wrought in wood,
bronze, ivory, silver, and gold—men and women;
fauns, nymphs, animals; creatures of all sorts and
kinds.

When Minos had looked at them and admired
them, Deedalus touched them one after another ;
and then, with a whirring noise, the images seemed
to live. The nymphs and satyrs joined hands, and
danced in a ring round a bronze Pan who piped to
A LOST SECRET. 195

them; a number of wooden young men boxed and
wrestled: in short—

In short, Deedalus had invented clock-work. But
the Cretans were more amazed than ever, and stood
staring, half delighted, half frightened, till he put
up the figures in their box again.

“You are the man for me!” exclaimed Minos.
“T said I would take you into my own service;
and I will. You shall make a cage for the
Minotaur !”

This was certainly not the reward which Dedalus
had looked for. However he said nothing, but
again shut himself up, this time with writing
materials, compasses, and rules. After a long
time he got a body of workmen together, and built
a Labyrinth



a mass of passages and windings so
contrived that nobody who was outside could find
the way in, and nobody who was once inside could
find the way out again. Nobody, that is to say,
unless he had the clue, which was of course to be
kept secret. The clue which Dedalus invented—
and a very good sort it was—was a long silken
thread, with one end fastened to the centre of the
Labyrinth, carried along all the windings to the
entrance. Anybody wishing to get in would have
to know this, and in which of the many entrances
(for there were hundreds of false ones) he must
look for the hidden end of the thread. Then all
he would have to do would be to wind up the


196 A LOST SECRET.

thread into a ball, following it as he wound, until
he reached the middle of the maze. And of course
there was another clue to lead him out again in
the same way. The middle of the Labyrinth was
a hall with many columns, and an opening in the
roof to let in light and air. This Labyrinth having
been finished, Deedalus enticed the Minotaur into
the central hall, locked him up there, and gave
Minos the key.

So the Cretan children were safe, and the mon-
ster had to be content with his fourteen young
Athenians every year.

Deedalus kept on doing work after work for
Minos, inventing one thing after another, until
the queen, who was a wicked woman, persuaded
Deedalus to help her in some piece of wickedness
which was discovered by the king. Whatever the
affair was, it was kept secret to prevent a Court
scandal. The kine’s anger fell upon Deedalus and
Icarus, both of whom he imprisoned in their own
Labyrinth—not, I suppose, in the same chamber
“with the Minotaur.

Indeed I am sure not; because if they had been
in the same chamber, Deedalus could have got out
by means of the clue. But there was no clue to
the chamber where he was imprisoned, and he had
built the Labyrinth so cleverly that he himself was
lost in its mazes.

Poor Icarus was in despair. But Dedalus only
A LOST SECRET. 197

sat down on the base of a column and thought
things over in his usual silent and quiet way.
After thinking for some days, until they were
nearly starved, he set Icarus wondering by doing
as follows, in order :—

First, with one of his wedges, he chipped off
pieces of stone from the columns.

Secondly, he, in the same way, broke the frag-
ments into pieces of nearly the same size, rounding
them roughly.

Thirdly, from a strip of his cloak he make a sling.

Fourthly, he watched the opening in the roof,
and whenever a bird passed overhead he discharged
a stone, and generally brought it down.

Fifthly, when he had got a sufficient number of
birds, he plucked out and sorted their wing-feathers.

Sixthly, he collected all the wax-candles in the
chamber, and melted them in a fire which he ob-
tained by some secret invention of his own.

Seventhly—but what he did seventhly Icarus
could not see.

At last, however, his mysterious work, whatever
it was, seemed done. There lay before him two
pairs of wings, beautifully made of wax and
feathers.

“T have long thought,” said Deedalus, “how to
invent a method of flying. I am glad of this im-
prisonment, which has obliged me to fix my whole
mind upon it without interruption.”
198 A LOST SECRET.

“You have found out how to fly,



and with wings
like those!” exclaimed Icarus in amaze.

“With those very wings. Why not? Science
always looks simple. What can look more simple
than a wedge, a sail, a clock-spring? Fasten those
wings on your shoulders with the wax, just as you
see me fasten these on mine. There. Now open
them; do you not feel as if you could reach the
clouds? Spread them—mount—tly !”

So saying, he soared up through the opening in
the roof, Icarus following him, and steered west-
ward, higher and higher through the air. It was
morning when they started; by noon they were
over the sea out of sight of land.

409

“Take care!” cried Dedalus. “Don’t fly too
high !”

But Icarus, revelling in all the delights of a
sea-gull—nay, of an eagle—soared higher and higher
towards the noontide sun. In vain Dedalus
called upon him to come lower. He only laughed
at his father for being timid and cautious, and
soared higher and higher still towards the blazing
sky.

Suddenly he felt his wings weakening—the wax
was melting in the heat of the sun. He tried to
spread them, so as to let himself down safely,
They hung soft and limp, and down he came head-
long into the sea.

“Tt’s quite clear that one must think of some-
A LOST SECRET, 199

thing stronger than wax,” thought Deedalus, as he
saw Icarus sink and drown. “ Well—lI’ve lost my
son, but I’ve gained a wrinkle.” Taking care to
fly as low as he could, he himself reached the
island of Sicily, where he set up another forge,
found another king to keep him going, and invented
so many wonderful things that to this very day
nobody knows what they were.

As for his flying-machine, nobody else has come
so near to one as even wax and feathers.






THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

JTHRA, a daughter of the King of
Troezéné, was the wife of a foreign
prince, and the mother of an only
child, a boy, whom they named
Théseus. While Theseus was still
an infant, his father said one day to Aithra—

“T am obliged to set off on a long and distant
journey, through countries infested by wild beasts
and robbers. If I should never return, take care
of our child, bring him up like a king’s son, and
send him to the city of Athens as soon as he grows
strong enough to lift that stone.”

/Ethra promised, and her husband left Troezene





never to return.

Having given up all hope of seeing her husband
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 201

again, Aithra devoted herself to obeying his last
commands. She gave Theseus the education of a
prince; and every day, from the time he left her
arms, she made him try to lift the stone. The
child grew up to be the handsomest, strongest, and
bravest youth in all the land, so that he had not a
rival of his own age in all manly sports and feats
of arms. But he could no more move the stone
than he could fly.

At last, however, the moment came when the
stone gave way a little. The next day he raised
it a trifle further, and so on until he lifted it bodily
from the ground, and rolled it away. Underneath
it he found a splendid sword, with a curiously
carved hilt, unlike any he had ever seen.

The time had therefore come for him to set out
for Athens, according to his father’s commands.
His mother implored him to go by sea, and not by
those perilous paths by which her husband had
never returned. But Theseus was only tempted
by the dangers; and so, taking the sword with him,
he set out for Athens overland.

After a long journey through a wild and difficult
country, he:reached a village, where he sought for
supper and a night’s lodging. But the place seemed
deserted, and it was only after a long search that
he discovered an old shepherd, of whom he asked
where a traveller might find food and shelter.

« Alas!” answered the shepherd, “there is not
202 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

ascrap of food left in the place, not a house left
unplundered. For Sciron has been here.”

“ And who is Sciron ?” asked Theseus.

“ Ah, you must be a stranger indeed! Sciron
is the chief of all the robbers. Do you see yonder
castle among the mountains? That is where he
lives, and thence he issues forth, when he wants
food for his: gluttony, to plunder and lay waste all
the country round. And he is as cruel and savage
as he is greedy. Not content with carrying off our
cattle and our stores of corn and wine, he seizes
men and women, and makes them wait upon him
while he feasts; and when the feast is over, he
amuses himself by throwing them from a high rock
into the sea.”

“Thank you,” said Theseus. “Then I will sup
with Sciron.” And off he started for the robber’s
castle, leaving the amazed shepherd to think him
a madman.

It was a long climb to the castle, which stood
on the peak of a high cliff looking down into the
sea. Theseus knocked upon the gate with the hilt
of his sword, and, when it was opened by a ferocious-
looking brigand, announced himself as a stranger
who requested hospitality.

“ You’ve come to the right place for that

1?

said
the brigand; grimly. “Come with me.”

Theseus followed him into the hall, where broth
was being brewed in caldrons, and a fat ox was
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 203

being roasted whole. The robbers were all about
——some preparing the feast, some already carousing,
some quarrelling over their plunder, some sprawling
about the floor. In the midst of all the steam and
din sat the chief, a huge and cruel-looking brute,
whom Theseus did not need to be told was Sciron.

“So you want hospitality, do you?” asked Sciron.
“Very well, as youre a traveller, and don’t know
the ways of the castle, you shall be let off easily.
Of course you'll have to be thrown from the cliff
after supper—that’s the rule. But instead of being
tortured, you shall only wash my feet for me and
wait on me at table. You look as if you under-
stood washing and how things ought to be served.
Now, then, get some hot water and begin,” he said,
thrusting out a pair of feet which looked as if they
had not been touched by water for years.

A grinning robber brought a bowl of hot water.
Theseus took it and threw it in the face of Sciron.
“ That wants washing, too,” said he.

Sciron rushed at him; but Theseus received him
at the point of his sword, and the two fought furi-
ously, while the robbers looked on enjoying the
game. Sciron was twice the size and weight of
Theseus ; but Theseus was the best swordsman in
all Greece, and presently had him down.

“There,” said he, pricking Sciron’s throat with his
sword, “you have had a lesson in manners. You
shall wash my feet and wait on me before you go
204 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS,

over the cliff after your victims. For I am not
going away to leave a brigand like you alive be-
hind me.”

Sciron, like all such bullies, was a coward at
heart, and his own men had no longer any respect
for him now that he had been worsted by a strip-
ling. Amid the laughter of the robbers, he had to
wash the feet of Theseus, and to serve him humbly
with meat and drink, and was finally punished for
his many cruel murders by being thrown into the
sea.

Having received the thanks of the country for
ridding it of such a scourge, Theseus travelled on
till he came to another village, where he thought
he would rest a little.

No sooner had he entered the place, however,
than he was surrounded by a number of armed
men, who gave him to understand that he was their
prisoner.

“Tg this the way you treat travellers in your
country ?” asked he.

“ Assuredly,” answered the captain of the troop.
“ You are in the country of King CercYon, and the
law is that no traveller may leave it until he has
wrestled with the king.”

“T ask for nothing better,’ said Theseus. “ What
happens to the traveller if he conquers Cercyon?”

“Then he may pass on.”

“But if Cercyon conquers him ?”
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

Lo
oO
or

“Then he is tortured till he dies.”

“It is strange,” said Theseus, “that I never heard
of such a law, or even of King Cercyon.”

“Not at all strange,” said the captain. “I don’t
see how you could have heard it, seeing that no
traveller has ever lived to tell the tale. Cercyon
has conquered and killed them all, as he will con-
quer and kill you.”

And when he saw Cercyon Theseus could well
believe it. The king was of immense height, with
broad shoulders, and muscles that stood out lke
globes of iron. He smiled savagely when he saw
Theseus, and stripped without a word. Thescus
stripped also, and the two were soon clasping each
other like a pair of fierce bears, or rather like a
bear and a man.

It was a tremendous strugele, with all the brute
strength on the side of Cercyon. But Theseus
knew a hundred turns and twists of which the
savage chieftain knew nothing; and at last, to the
amazement of all who witnessed the struggle, Cer-
cyon fell dead upon the ground with a broken spine.
Thenceforth every traveller might pass through that
country safely and without fear.

Theseus travelled on until he found himself be-
nighted in a wild country, through which he wan-
dered about until he reached a castle, where he
craved a night’s shelter. Here he was kindly
received, and told that the lord of the castle and
206 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

of the country round was one Procrustes, who
never turned a traveller from his door; nay, even
now there were two guests with him. And so it
proved. Procrustes entertained Theseus and the
other two travellers at supper pleasantly and
generously, and when it was time to retire for
the night, himself conducted them into a chamber,
where a bed, with nothing remarkable about it,
stood ready in a corner.

“That is the guest-bed,” said Procrustes ; “and I
hope it will fit you.”

“Fit us ?” asked Theseus, puzzled.

“Yes; it is the law of the country that if the
bed does not fit the traveller, the traveller must be
made to fit the bed. Do you try the bed first,”
he said to one of the guests, the tallest of the
three.

The traveller lay down, but found the bed rather
short, and had to draw up his knees a little. “Be
good enough to lie straight,” said Procrustes. He
did so, his feet appearing beyond the bottom. In-
stantly Procrustes, with a sharp hatchet, chopped
them off, one after another. “You'll fit nicely

?

now,” said he. “It’s your turn next,” he said to
the second traveller.

This one thought himself safe; for, being short,
his toes did not reach the bed’s end by a full two
inches. Procrustes gave a signal, and immediately

two strong attendants seized the unfortunate man,
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 207

one by the shoulders and the other by the legs, and
proceeded to pull him out to the proper length, de-
spite his yells of pain.

“Stretch him on the rack,” said Procrustes.
“ Now,” he said to Theseus, “it is your turn in the
game, and I hope, for your sake, you will give less
trouble than the rest of them.”

Theseus had been taken aback at first by these
extraordinary proceedings; but he now perceived
that he had fallen upon another of those brigand
chiefs who infested the country, and who re-
sembled ogres rather than mere cruel and blood-
thirsty savages.

So he drew his sword and closed with Pro-
crustes ; nor did he cease fighting till he had fitted
the robber to his own bed by making him a whole
head shorter. The robbers in the place, cowed by
the death of their chief, submitted to Theseus, who
went round the castle, and set at lberty hundreds
of maimed victims of the slain monster’s cruelty.

Having received such thanks as they could give
him, he journeyed on and on until at last he
reached Athens. What he was to do there he did
not know; but there was no need for him to ask.
Somehow the fame of his deeds had flown before
him,—how he had rid the country of Sciron and
Cercyon and Procrustes, and other wild beasts

and brigands, and he was received as befitted his
valour.
208 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

Now the King of Athens at that time was
Ageus; and the queen was no other than the
great and dreadful sorceress Medea, who had come
to Athens after the murder of her children, and had
married the king. Aigeus took a fancy to Theseus
from the young stranger’s first appearance in Athens,
gave him a high place at Court, and treated him as
if he had been his own son. But with Medea it
was different. She had a son of her own, and she
was filled with jealousy lest Aigeus should make
Theseus the heir to his throne. Moreover, she
envied and hated him for his courage and _ his
fame, in which he so far surpassed her own son
Medus; and she feared him too, for she failed to
bring him under her spells. So she plotted to
destroy him in such a way that his death should
never be brought home to her, just as she had made
the daughters of Pelias the seeming murderesses of
their own father.

She therefore pretended a great admiration for
Theseus, and got the king to hold a great festival
in his honour. It was arranged that Aigeus, during
the feast, should send him a golden cup filled with
wine, in which Medea secretly steeped one of her
deadliest poisons.

All went as she had planned. Aigeus sent the
poisoned goblet by one of the cup-bearers to Theseus,
who stood up to drink to the health of the king and
queen. But—
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 209

“Hold!” suddenly cried Aigeus, starting; “ what
sword is that at your side?”

Theseus put down the cup to answer—

“Jt is the sword with which I fought my way
to Athens. I wear it to-day as iy sword of
honour.”

“But how comes it at your side?”

Then Theseus told the story of how it had been
left by his unknown father under a stone at Troezene,
and how his mother’s name was Athra. Scarcely
had he finished when Adgeus, leaving his throne,
fell upon his neck, exclaiming—

“T was that father! You are my first-born son,
and the heir to my crown !”

The Athenians, who already looked upon Theseus
as their national hero, greeted their prince and
future king with shouts of joy; and when the first
excitement was over, Medea was seen no more.
Enraged at the failure of her plot, and fearing dis-
covery and vengeance, she vanished from Athens:
some said they had seen her borne by dragons
through the air. And this is the last of her.

Freed from her evil influence, the old love of
4égeus for Althra revived, and he could not make
enough of his and A®thra’s son. But Theseus did
not become idle, and became in all ways the cham-
pion and protector of his father’s people. It was
he who caught alive the famous wild bull of Mara-
thon, which had ravaged the country for years, and

0
210 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

sacrificed it to Minerva. He never spared himself,
and he never failed.

At last, however, drew nigh that evil hour of
Athens—that day in every year when the seven
youths and seven maidens had to be sent to King
Minos of Crete to be devoured by the Minotaur.
The rule was to choose the victims by lot: so that
none felt safe who had sons and daughters young
enough to suit the taste of the monster. The
seven girls were first chosen. But when it came
to drawing lots for the youths, Theseus said—

“You need draw only six this year. I will
myself be the seventh. It may be that I shall
find a way to deliver Athens from this tribute ;
if not, it is for a prince who cannot save his people
to perish with them.”

Aigeus was in despair. But no entreaties could
tum Theseus from his desperate resolve: neither
the prayers of his own father, nor those of all
the fathers and mothers in Athens, who would
have drawn the seventh lot rather than he who
was the pride and hope of the city should go
to certain destruction. The ship which bore the
yearly victims to Crete always carried black sails
in token of public mourning. Theseus, in order
to leave a little hope behind him, promised that,
if he came back alive, he would hoist a white sail
while returning, so that his safety might be seen
from afar, Then, in solemn procession, amid the
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 211

weeping of the crowd, the youths and maidens
embarked in the black-sailed ship, Theseus leading
them with the calmness of the only true courage—
that which can, in cold blood, face danger for the
sake of duty. None would have thought the worse
of him had he stayed behind: and if he perished
it would be as a mere victim, and without glory.
Nor was it as if he were encouraged by any
oracles, or helped by gifts from the gods. He
is the first hero who was both a mere man and
who never had any help but his own manfulness.
And for all these reasons I think that his voyage
to Crete is the finest story I have yet told.

When the ship reached Crete, the fourteen
victims were conducted to the Labyrinth, there
to be imprisoned until they should be given to the
Minotaur. As they passed before Minos and his
Court, the king’s youngest daughter, Ariadne, was
filled with pity and love for Theseus, and set her
thoughts to work how she might save him from his
doom. But how in the world was such a thing
to be done? None without the clue could either
enter or escape from the maze: and even were that
possible, it was not likely that the Minotaur would
let himself be balked of his prey.

But she watched and waited: she hovered round
the Labyrinth night after night, examining every
door: until at last she was rewarded by finding,
212 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

just within one of them, a little silken skein hidden
away in a dark corner. ‘The next night, having
procured a torch and a sword, she bravely entered
the door where the skein was, and, by winding up
the silk, followed the clue. Through one twisting
passage after another she wandered on and on,
up and down long flights of steps, sometimes
through great halls confused with columns, and
sometimes through tunnels in which it was scarcely
possible to stand. There seemed no end to the
way. At last, however, the end of the silken
thread told her that she had reached the inmost
hall: and there her torch showed a sight that froze
her with fear.

The victims had been delivered over to the
Minotaur. Crowded together in a corner of the
hall were six youths and seven girls: stamping
and tossing his horned head was the horrible
monster, furious with hunger and the sight of
human food. Between the Minotaur and_ his
despairing prey stood Theseus, facing the monster,
so that he, by being the first victim, might prolong
the lives of the others. He had no hope: he could
not even struggle, for his hands were bound behind
him with cords.

The sight of his courage gave back Ariadne
hers. She darted forward, and cut his bonds
with her sword. “Fly!” she cried: “ follow me—

!??

I have the clue But as soon as Theseus felt


“ The monster fell dead with a roan which echoed through the
Labyrinth.”—Page 213.
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 213

the touch of the steel he seized the sword from
her hand, and, instead of flying, set upon the
Minotaur with such fury that the monster bellowed
with rage, amazement, and pain.

It was the hardest fight Theseus had ever fought :
the wild bull of Marathon had been nothing to the
Minotaur, who fought with a bull’s strength and a
man’s skill and cunning. But the champion of
Athens prevailed at last: and the monster fell
dead with a groan which echoed through the
Labyrinth like the bellowing of thunder.

“Tt will wake the whole city!” cried Ariadne:
“follow me!” Theseus and his companions, scarce
knowing that they were saved, followed Ariadne,
who wound up the clue as she ran. When they
reached the entrance-gate, the alarm of their escape
had been given. Making straight for the shore,
they found their black-sailed ship, sped on board,
and, thanks to a kindly wind, were out at sea before
they could be pursued.

The wind carried them to the island of Naxos:
and here they remained, Theseus, Ariadne, and the
rest, till the breeze should blow towards Athens.
Such a breeze came in time; and then Theseus set
sail for home with his thirteen companions, leaving
Ariadne behind, to her great sorrow. Nor can
anything make me believe that he meant this for
a real parting, or that she thought so. One can
214 THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS.

think of many reasons why she should remain in
Naxos for a while: it is quite certain that her
powerful father Minos, who had already conquered
the Athenians, and shown, by a cruel vengeance,
how he hated them, would have attacked them
again with all his fleets and armies if he had heard
that they were giving shelter to a daughter who
had betrayed him. So, leaving Ariadne safe in
Naxos, Theseus returned to Athens as the saviour
of his city, and the slayer of the Minotaur.

Meanwhile his father, AZgeus, had been every
day and all day long looking out to sea from the
farthest point of the shore for the return from
Crete of the ship of mourning. He had but little
hope, but nobody can help having a little: nor did
he quite despair until one morning he saw on the
horizon a vessel which he felt sure was the one he
was watching for in such agony: of mind. Nearer
and nearer it came—alas! its sails were still as
black as when it was outward bound. Theseus
had forgotten to hoist the white sail which was
to be the sign of safety.

So AEgeus, giving up his son for lost, threw
himself into the sea and perished, just when
Theseus was within sight of home. And that sea
is called the gean, or the Sea of Aigeus, to this
day. And thus Theseus, to the joy of the people,
but with sorrow in his own heart, found himself

king.
THE CHAMPION OF ATHENS. 215

And the best of kings he made. The strength
of his rule was only equalled by its gentleness.
He made wise laws; he took care that all men
received justice ; he honoured the gods; he obtained
the respect and friendship of foreign nations; he
taught the Athenians to be free, and to govern
themselves, so that when he died they remained
as ereat a people as while he was alive.

He sent for his mother, A‘thra, and kept her in
all love and honour. I wish I could tell you that
he sent for Ariadne also. But he never had any
other wife: and she was lost to him. There is a
strange, mysterious story of how, when she was left
sorrowing in Naxos, the god Bacchus (of whom you
read in the First Story of Midas), the god of the
bounty of Nature and of the joy that men and
women find in her, comforted Ariadne, and made
her his bride, and raised her above the earth, giving
her a crown of seven stars, which is still to be seen
in the sky, and is called “ Ariadne’s Crown.”

And there is a yet stranger story of how Theseus,
after he was king, had the very wildest of all
adventures-—nothing less than an attempt to rescue
from Hades the goddess Proserpine, and other
imprisoned souls. But what happened to him
there, and how he escaped the punishment of his
daring, belongs to another story. It is as the hero
and champion of Athens that he is remembered:
and as such we will leave him.






THE HERO OF HEROES.

PART I.—THE ORACLE.

WeNSERSEUS and Andromeda had two
5 sons, Alceeus, King of Thebes, and
Electryon, King of Argos and My-
céne. Alczeus had a son named
Amphitryon, and Electryon had a
daughter named Alcmena. These two cousins,
Amphitryon and Alcmena, married; and Jupiter
resolved that they should have a son who should be
the greatest and most famous of men.

But Juno was in one of her jealous moods; and
she was especially jealous that such favour should
be shown to Alemena. Having considered how she
should spoil his plan, she came to Jupiter in seem-
ing good-humour, and said—


THE ORACLE. Q17

“T have a question to ask you. Of two first
cousins, which shall rule the other, and which shall
serve—the elder or the younger?”

“ Why, of course, the elder must rule the younger,”
answered Jupiter.

“You swear that— by the Styx?” asked
Juno.

“By the Styx,” Jupiter answered, wondering
what she could mean by what seemed so trifling a
question, and then thinking no more of the matter.
But Juno knew what she meant very well. Alcmena
had a brother, Sthénélus, who had married the
Princess Nicippe of Phrygia. And Juno said to
herself, “They also may have a son as well as
Alemena. Then the two boys would be first
cousins; and Jupiter has sworn that the first-born
shall rule the other. So if Nicippe has a son first,
Alemena’s son will have to serve him and obey
him: and then, O Jupiter, there will be a greater
man than Alemena’s son; for he who rules must
be greater than he who obeys.”

Now it is Juno herself who settles when children
shall come into the world. It was easy, therefore,
for her to manage so that Nicippe’s son should be
born two whole months before Alcmena’s. Jupiter
was enraged when, too late, he found what a trick
had been played upon him; but he had sworn by
the Styx —the oath which could not be broken.
Thus it became the will of heaven that the son
218 THE HERO OF HEROES.

of Alemena should be the servant of the son of
Nicippe.

The son of Nicippe was named Eurystheus: the
son of Alemena was named Herciles.

About the childhood of Eurystheus there was
nothing remarkable. But when Hercules and his
twin-brother, Iphicles, were only eight months old,
the whole palace of Amphitryon was alarmed by
the screams of Iphicles, which brought Alcmena
and the whole household running into the room
where the two children had been left alone. They
saw a strange sight indeed. Poor Iphicles was
found half dead with fright in a corner; and no
wonder, for Hercules was being attacked by two
huge serpents which were trying to crush him
to death in their coils. But so far from being
frightened, Hercules had got one of his baby hands
round the neck of each serpent right and left; and
so he quietly throttled them till they lay dead upon
the floor. And this at only eight months old!

His strength grew with him till it became a
marvel like that of Samson among the children of
Israel, and in bulk and stature also he towered over
all other men. Like many who are large and
strong, he was grave and somewhat silent, using,
when he spoke, but few words, not easily moved
either to action or to anger, but, when once roused,
then roused indeed. One seems to think of him as
of some great lion. As for training, he had the
THE ORACLE. 219

best that could be given him. Castor taught him
how to use the sword; Pollux, how to use his fists ;
Eurytus, the finest archer in the world, taught him
to shoot; Autdély¥cus, to ride and drive. Nor were
accomplishments forgotten; for Linus, the brother
and pupil of Orpheus, taught him to play the lyre,
and Eumolpus to sing. Finally, he was sent to
finish his education under Chiron, the Centaur, who
had taught Jason, and indeed nearly all the heroes
of that age.

At eighteen he was already famous for his
strength, his accomplishments, and his promise of a
great career. But he was far from perfect in other
ways. One finds nothing of the knightliness of his
great - grandfather Perseus, or of Theseus, in this
strong young giant full of pride and passion, feeling
himself already greater than the best of his fellow-
creatures, and locking upon the world as if it were
made for him alone. He would allow of no opposi-
tion to his least desire; he did not desire glory so
much as power. Good-tempered as he mostly was,
it was not safe to provoke him, as Linus, his music-
master, found, who had his own lyre broken upon
his head for presuming to correct his pupil a little
too sharply.

Hercules now began to think of adventures
worthy of his strength, and presently, as if to give
him one, a lion came forth from the forests of
Mount Citheron, and ravaged the lands of Thespius,
220 THE HERO OF HEROES.

a neighbouring king. To hunt and kill it unaided
was child’s-play to Hercules. And other services
he did to the country, of small account in his own
eyes but great in those of others; so that Creon,
who was then King of Thebes, gave him his daugh-
ter in marriage, and made him his viceroy.

But Nicippe’s son, Eurystheus, now King of
Argos and Mycene, remembered that he had a
right to his younger cousin’s services by the oath of
Jupiter. So Eurystheus sent a message to Hercules,
commanding him to come forthwith to Mycene, and
become the king’s servant there.

Hercules, as may well be supposed, haughtily
refused to obey this insolent order. Why should
he, the ruler of Thebes, already the most famous man
in all Greece, as well as the strongest, make a sort
of slave of himself to a kinsman whom he scorned ?
For Eurystheus was just a commonplace person,
with even less than common courage, who only
wanted to feed his own vanity by having in his
service such a man as Hercules to do whatever
he bade. “Hercules may be master of Greece; but
I am Master of Hercules,” was the sort of boast
that ran in his mind.

I have said it was not strange that Hercules
flatly refused to go to Mycenz at his cousin’s
bidding. But it was more than strange that, from
this moment, he began to fall into so strange a
state of mind that any one would think he was
THE ORACLE. 221

being haunted by the Furies, until he, the pride
of Thebes and the hope of Greece, became a danger-
ous madman, whom none dared approach for fear of
being slain. And all the time his strength still
increased; so that it seemed as if he had come into
the world to be a terror and a curse to mankind.

Many dreadful things he did in his madness.
And when at length the frenzy passed from him,
he was left in a more dreadful condition still. He
was in an agony of remorse for all the violence he
had done, and believed himself to be accursed and
an outcast from his fellow-men. Melancholy and
despairing, he fled from Thebes, and wandered out
alone among the forests and the mountains. And
thus he lived like a savage, hiding himself away
from the sight of men.

The time came when he thought he could bear life
no longer. He felt as if he were hunted by demons,
and with the scourges of Hades. In his last
despair he wandered to Delphi, in whose temple
Apollo’s oracle, or living voice, was heard; and
implored the gods to tell him what he should do.

And the voice of Apollo answered him and
said—

“O Hercules! those things were not sins which
you did in your madness. Your madness is not sin,
but the punishment for your real sin—the sin of
pride, and self-love, and defiance of the will of
Heaven. In rebelling against Eurystheus, you have
222 THE WERO OF HEROES.

rebelled against the gods, who decreed even before
your birth that he should rule and you should
serve. Is it not so, always? are not oftentimes the
good made subject to the wicked, the wise to the
foolish, the strong and valiant to the weak and
craven? This is the oracle—the gods give each
man his own different place and work: to you they
have appointed service—therefore Obey. Seek not
to know why this should be, nor question the justice
of the gods. Know your duty, and do it with your
might; and so you will be great enough; for no
man can do more than serve the gods with such
strength as they have given him.”

For long Hercules stood before the altar, doing
battle with his pride. Then, at last, he took the
road to Mycene. And as he went, each step be-
came quicker, his heart grew lighter, the shadow
left his soul, and his peace of mind returned.


bo
bo
w

PART IL—HIS FIRST LABOUR: THE LION.

ERCULES, being arrived at Mycenz, submitted
himself to Eurystheus, who, to tell the truth,
was a little alarmed at the sight of his cousin, and
suspicious of what such sudden submission might
mean. And he was all the more bewildered when
he saw the humility with which his kinsman ap-
proached him. Hercules could not do anything by
halves; and in Eurystheus he saw, not a mere in-
significant, timid, mean-minded man, but only the
master whom the gods had appointed to him.

“And now,” asked Hercules, in his impatience
to prove his obedience, “what do you order me
to do?”

One would think that Eurystheus would have
acted generously. So far from that, however, he
thought to himself, “I had better send him on the
most dangerous adventure I can think of. If he
succeeds, it will be the more glory for me to have
224 THE HERO OF HEROES.

such a man under my power; and besides, it will
prove whether this submission is real or sham.
And if he perishes—well, I shall be safe from
danger at his hands.” So he said—

“You have proved yourself a good lion-hunter.
Bring me the carcass of the Nemzan lion.”

Now the lion of the forest of Nemzea was far
more terrible than the lion of Mount Citheron.
However, Hercules set out at once for the forest,
glad that his first service was one of honour.

Eurystheus was quite relieved when he was gone ;
and, sending for skilled workmen, bade them make
for him a large brazen pot, big enough to hold him
comfortably, and with an opening just large enough
for him to get in and out by. For he thought to
himself, “If Hercules ever gets angry or rebellious,
I can creep into my brazen pot, and be safe there.”

Hercules was not long in finding the lion—the
largest, strongest, and fiercest ever seen in the
world. He let fly an arrow, but it scarcely pricked
the beast’s tough hide; then another, and another ;
but the lion minded them no more than if they
had been shot by a child from a toy bow. At last
one, however, pricked him sharply enough to enrage
him, and he came on with a rushand a roar. All
Hercules had time to do was to pull up a young
oak-tree by the roots, for a weapon to meet the
charge. The next moment the lion sprang. But
Hercules stood his ground, and so belaboured the
HIS FIRST LABOUR. 225

lion with his club that he fairly beat it back into its
den, into which he followed it. Then was there a
fearful wrestle between Hercules and the lion. But
Hercules prevailed, by getting his arms round the
lion and crushing its breath out of its body.

Throwing the corpse over his shoulders, and hold-
ing it by bringing the fore-legs round his neck, he
returned to Mycene. ‘Thus equipped, he himself
looked like some monstrous lion: and so terrified
was Eurystheus at the news that he crept into his
brass pot, and in this manner received Hercules,
to whom he talked through a speaking-tube in the
side.

“Go and kill the Hydra!” he called out.

So Hercules set out on his second labour: and
Eurystheus crept out of his pot again.

Pp
PART II.—HIS SECOND LABOUR:
, THE HYDRA.

OW the Hydra was more formidable than the
lion—nobody in his senses would dream of
attacking it with the least hope of succeeding. It
was a huge water-snake which lived in Lake Lerna,
whence it used to issue to seek for human food. It
had a hundred heads, and from each of its hundred
mouths darted a forked tongue of flame, dripping
with deadly poison.

I said that nobody in his senses would attack the
Hydra. But I was not quite right. There was just
one sense which would lead a man to attack any
evil, even without hope—of course I mean the
sense of Duty. And it was in that sense that
Hercules set forth for Lake Lerna. But he did not
go to work without ample forethought, and tak-
ing all the precautions he could think of. He
remembered the thickness and toughness of the
HIS SECOND LABOUR. 927

Nemean lion’s skin; so he had it made into a sort
of cloak, which served him for armour better than
brass or steel. He also made the young oak-tree
into a regular club, which thenceforth became his
favourite weapon. And instead of going alone, he
took with him his friend and kinsman Iolas, to act
as his squire. You may always know Hercules in
pictures and statues by his knotted club and his
lion-skin.

It was easy enough to find the Hydra—only too
easy. It had its nest in a foul stagnant swamp,
the air of which its breath turned to poison. Giving
Jolas his other arms to hold, Hercules attacked the
Hydra with his club alone, trusting to his lion-skin
to receive the strokes of the creature’s fangs. With
a tremendous blow he crushed one of the Hydra’s
hundred heads, leaving ninety-nine more to destroy
if he could hold out so long. That was bad enough
to think of—but, to his dismay, out of the crushed
head sprang two new living heads: and out of each
of these, when he beat them to pieces, sprang forth
two more. And so it was with every head the
Hydra had: so that, in truth, the more Hercules
destroyed it, the stronger it grew—its hundred
heads were rapidly becoming a thousand ; and the
.thousand would become ten thousand; and so on,
for ever.

Just as Hercules realised the hopelessness of the
228 THE HERO OF HEROES.

labour, and was finding it work enough to ward off
the innumerable fangs, a wretched crab crawled out
of the ooze and seized him by the foot, so that he
almost fainted with the sudden pain. It was too
cruel, in the midst of such a battle as that, to feel
himself at the mercy of the miserable vermin of
the slime.

However, he crushed the crab under his heel,
and, ceasing to multiply his enemies by killing
them, contented himself with defence, while he
thought what could possibly be done.

“No doubt those first hundred heads must all
have come from some one head,” thought he.
“They could not grow like that without a root; so
that if I could only destroy the root they would
cease to grow. That is my mistake: I am fighting
only with what I see, instead of going to the root
of things, and attacking the evil there.”

So he called out to Iolas to heat a piece of iron
red-hot ; and when this was ready, to stand by, and
to scorch with it the place of every head which the
club shattered. The plan answered wonderfully.
Hercules crushed head after head; Iolas applied
the red-hot iron; and so root after root was burned
up and perished. And at last they came to the
root of all the heads; and when this was reached
and burned, the monster sputtered and died, just
when Hercules felt that he, strong as he was, could
scarce have struck another blow.
HIS SECOND LABOUR. 229

Hercules cut open the Hydra, and dipped his
arrows in its gall, so that they should give deadly
wounds. Wearily he returned to Mycene, hoping
for a little rest. But Eurystheus had hidden him-
self in his brazen pot again, whence he cried out—

“Be off at once; and catch the stag of (noe

409

alive }

es
(YD

oe
PART IV.—HIS THIRD LABOUR: THE STAG,

HE stag of Cinoe was sacred to Diana; and no
wonder, for besides being so swift that no
horse or hound could follow it, it had brazen feet
and horns of pure gold. Of course this labour wag
not so dangerous as the others, but apparently
more utterly impossible.

Impossible as it was, however, Hercules had to
try. Had he been ordered to bring the stag to
Mycenz dead, he might perhaps hope to catch it
with an arrow; but his orders were to bring it
alive. So, having started it from its lair, he fol-
lowed it with his utmost speed and skill. At first
he tried to run it down; but the stag was not only
the swifter, but had as much endurance as_ he,
Then he tried to drive it to bay, but it always
managed to escape out of the seemingly most hope-
less corners. He tried to catch it asleep; but his
slightest and most distant movement startled it,
HIS THIRD LABOUR. 2931,

and off it raced again. All the arts of the deer-
stalker he put in practice, but all in vain. And
thus he hunted the stag of Cinoe, scarce resting
day and night for a whole year. It looked as if
he were to spend the rest of his life in pursuing
what was not to be caught by mortal man; and the
worst of it was that, while there was real use in
destroying wild beasts and monsters, like the lion
and the Hydra, his present labour, even if it suc-
ceeded, would be of no use at all.

Still it had to be attempted; and I suppose you
have guessed that he succeeded, and that it was in
some wonderful way. Well—he did succeed at
last, but it was not in a wonderful way at all. It
was just by not giving in. One of the two had
to give in, and it was not Hercules. One day he
managed to drive the stag into a trap and to seize
it by the horns.

As he was returning to Mycene, dragging the
stag, he met a tall and beautiful woman, dressed
for the chase, and carrying a bow and quiver. As
soon as her eyes fell upon the struggling stag she
frowned terribly.

“What mortal are you,” she asked, “ who have
dared to lay hands on my own stag, the stag sacred
to me, who am Diana? Loose it, and let it go.”

Hercules sighed. “I would do so gladly, great
goddess,” he answered ; “ but it ig not in my power.”

“Not in your power to open your hand?” she
232 THE HERO OF HEROES.

asked, in angry surprise. “We will soon see that,”
and she seized her stag by the other horn to pull it
away.

“Tt goes against me,” said Hercules, “to oppose
a goddess; but I have got to bring this stag to
Mycen, and neither gods nor men shall prevent
me, so long as I am alive.”

“Tam Diana,” she said again, “and I command
you to let the stag go.”

“And I,” said he, “am only Hercules, the ser-
vant of Eurystheus, and therefore I cannot let
it go.”

“Then I wish,” said Diana, “that any of the
gods had so faithful a servant as Eurystheus has!
So you are Hercules?” she said, her frown chang-
ing to a smile. “Then I give you the stag, for
the sake of the oracle of my brother Apollo. I
am only a goddess; you are a man who has con-
quered himself, and whom therefore even the gods
must obey.”

So saying, she vanished. And the stag no longer
struggled for freedom, but followed Hercules to
Mycenz as gently and lovingly as a tame fawn,
PART V.—HIS FOURTH LABOUR: THE BOAR.

HE chase of the stag with the golden horns had
taken so long that Eurystheus was beginning
to give Hercules up for lost; and he was not sorry,
for he was becoming more and more afraid of the
man who only lived to do his bidding. He could
not but think that his cousin must be playing some
deep and underhand game. So when Hercules
came back, with the stag following tamely at heel,
he hid himself again, and by way of welcome bade
Hercules capture and bring him, alive, a very dif
ferent sort of wild beast,—not a harmless stag, but
the great and fierce wild boar which had its den in
the mountains of Erymanthus, and ravaged the
country round.

Hercules was getting weary of these labours, to
which he saw no end. Not for a moment did he
think of disobeying, but he set out with a heavy
heart, and with some rising bitterness against his
234 THE IITERO OF IEROES.

taskmaster. His way to the mountains of Ery-
manthus lay through the country of the Centaurs,
and of his old teacher Chiron.

Here he halted at the dwelling of one of the
Centaurs, Pholus, who received him kindly. But
Hercules was feeling fairly worn out in spirit, and
Pholus failed to cheer him.

“What is the use of it all?” he complained.
“No doubt the gods are just, and ought to be
obeyed; but they are not kind. Why did they
send me into the world, and give me strength,
only to go about after wild beasts at the bidding
of a coward? Why did they give me passions,
only to have the trouble of keeping them down ?
If I had been like other men, as weak and as cold-
blooded as they are, I should have been happy,
and perhaps done some real good, and at any rate
lived my own life in my own way. It isn’t as if
I cared for glory, but I do want a little peace and
pleasure. Come, Pholus, let me have some wine:
T want it, and let it be in plenty

“Tam very sorry,” said Pholus. “I have no wine.”

“Why, what is that then?” asked Hercules,
pointing to a big barrel in the corner.

1?

“That is wine,” said Pholus; “but I can’t give
you any of it, because it is not my own. It belongs
to all the Centaurs; and as it is public property,
nobody may take any of it without the leave of
the whole tribe.”
HIS FOURTH LABOUR, 235

“Nonsense!” said Hercules. “ Wine I want, and
wine I'll have.”

So saying, he stove in the head of the cask with
a single blow of his fist, and, dipping and filling a
goblet, began to drink eagerly.

The wine soon began to warm his blood and
raise his heart. After the first cup or two the
cloud which had been falling over him rolled away,
and life again seemed worth living for its own
sake, and not only for duty’s. But he did not
stop at two cups, nor at three; nor even when it
began to mount into his brain, and to bring back
those wild instincts which he thought he had left
behind him in the Temple of Apollo.

Meanwhile the news had spread among the
Centaurs that Hercules was among them, and mak-
ing free with the public wine. The odour of the
broken cask brought a crowd of them at full gal-
lop, and disturbed Hercules in the midst of his
carouse.

“Do you call this hospitality, you savages?” he
shouted, stumbling out of the house, and laying
about him with his club freely among the crowd,
while Pholus vainly tried to prevent mischief.
Down went Centaur after Centaur, till those who
were uninjured galloped away panic-stricken, Pholus
himself being among the slain.

“To Chiron!” cried the Centaurs ; “he will know
how to deal with this madman.”
236 THE HERO OF HEROES.

They rode as hard as they could to Chiron’s
dwelling, Hercules, furious with wine and anger,
still pursuing. As they were outstripping him, he
let fly his arrows among them; and, as evil luck
would have it, at that very moment Chiron rode
out from his gate to see what was happening and
to quiet the disorder, and one of the arrows struck
him in the knee, and he fell.

Hercules became sober enough when he came up
and found his old friend and teacher writhing in.
terrible agony, for the arrow was one which he had
dipped in the deadly poison of the Hydra. He
could only look on with remorse. Chiron knew
him, and, when the agony passed away into death,
gave him a look of forgiveness. What the wise
Centaur’s last word to his favourite pupil was, I
know not; but I think it must have been some-
thing very like “ Let him that thinketh he standeth
take heed lest he fall.”

I will not try to think of what Hercules felt
when he watched the burial of the friends whom
he had slain in a fit of drunken passion, for no
cause. However, his duty lay still before him,
and it had become more clear. Never again would
he complain of his fate, or question the justice of
the gods, or think of the life which had been lent
to him as if it were his own.

In due time, after a long and dangerous journey
IS FOURTH LABOUR. 237

among the mountains, he came upon the den of the
great wild boar which he was to capture alive.
There was nothing to be done but to follow it as
he had followed the stag, watching for a chance of
trapping it unawares: and in the pursuit another
whole year passed away. Then, in the middle of
winter, there fell such a snow that the boar was
unable to leave its den. Hercules forced his way
through the snowed-up entrance, and tried to seize
the brute as he had seized the Neman lion. The
boar, however, rushed past him, and would have
escaped again had not the snow hindered his run-
ning, and at last exhausted him. Hercules, though
nearly exhausted himself, chose the right moment
for closing with him, and, after a long struggle,
bound him with a halter in such a manner that,
in spite of its efforts, he could drag it by main
strength down the mountain.

Once more Eurystheus had given Hercules up
for lost: and the snow prevented him from hearing
any news beforehand. So when, while he was
standing at the city gate, there suddenly appeared
before him, not only Hercules, all grim and rough
with his year’s hunting, but the largest and savagest
wild boar in the world, looking ready to devour
him, he was so terrified that he whisked like a
frightened mouse into his pot, and did not dare
come out again for seven days.
238 THE HERO OF HEROES.

As for Chiron the Centaur, he became a constel-
lation in heaven, where he is still to be seen. He
was the teacher of nearly all the heroes and demi-
gods: and after his death, there seems to have
been an end of them. There have been plenty of
brave men since; but not like Castor and Pollux,
Perseus, Theseus, and Hercules. Nor, since that
fatal day, does one hear of the Centaurs any more.
Thus did one passing fit of causeless anger, in-
stantly repented of, destroy these wisest and most
valiant creatures, and deprive the whole world of
more than it has ever regained during thousands of
years.

Hercules solemnly sacrificed the boar, and then
took a little rest, meditating on all that had be-
fallen. But his rest was not to be for long. For
there was Eurystheus in his pot, trying to think of
something that should keep him occupied for ever.

And—*TI have it!” he exclaimed at last, sum-
moning Hercules by a stroke on his pot’s brazen
side.
PART VL—HIS FIFTH LABOUR:
THE AUGEAN STABLE.

FFAHE next labour which Eurystheus laid upon
Hercules was to clean out a stable.

That does not sound very much after the others.
But then the stable was that of Augeas, King of
Elis, which was at once the largest and the dirtiest
in the whole world.

Augeas had a prodigious number of oxen and
goats, and the stable in which they were all kept
had never been cleaned. The result was a moun-
tain of filth and litter, which not even Hercules
could clear away in a lifetime—not, of course,
from want of strength, but from want of time.
Hercules beheld with disgust and dismay the loath-
some and degrading toil in which he was to spend
the rest of his days. The other labours had at least
been honourable, and befitting a prince: this would
have appalled a scavenger.
240 THE HERO OF HEROES.

“Tt is very good of such a hero as you,” said
Augeas, “to undertake to clean my stable. It
really does want cleaning, as you see: and it was
very kind of Eurystheus to think of it. You shall
not find me unerateful. I will give you one ox



and one goat in every ten—when the job is done.”

He could very safely promise this, because he
knew that the job could never be done.

“T am not serving for hire,” said Hercules.
“ Nevertheless it is only right that you should not
let your stable get into such a state as this, and
then get it put right for nothing. You want a
lesson: and you shall have it, too.”

Seeing that mere strength would be wasted in
such toil, Hercules went to work with his brain as
well. Through the land of Elis ran the river
Alpheus, that same Alpheus which had told Ceres
what had become of Proserpine. Hercules care-
fully studied the country; and having laid his
plans, dug a channel from near the source of the
river to one of the entrances of the stable. Then,
damming up the old channel, he let the stream run
into the new. The new course was purposely
made narrow, so that the current might be exceed-
ingly strong. When all was ready, he opened the
sluice at one entrance of the stable, so that the
water poured in a flood through the whole building,
and out at a gate on the other side. And it had
all been so managed that when the river had
HIS FIFTH LABOUR. 241

poured through, and was shut off again, all the
filth and litter had been carried away by the Al-
pheus underground, and the stable had been
washed clean, without a scrap of refuse to be found
anywhere. For the Alpheus, you must know, did
not run into the sea, ike other rivers. It disap-
peared down a deep chasm, then ran through a
natural tunnel under the sea, and rose again, far
away, in the island of Sicily, where it had brought
to Ceres the news from underground. Thus every-
thing thrown into it in Elis came up again in Sicily
—and the Sicilians must have been considerably
astonished at that extraordinary eruption of stable
litter. Perhaps it is that which, acting as manure,
has helped to make Sicily so fertile.

Hercules made a point of claiming his price.
But said Augeas



“Nonsense! A bargain is a bargain. You
undertook to clean my stable: and you have done
nothing of the kind. No work, no pay.”

“What can you mean?” asked Hercules.
“Surely I have cleaned your stable—you will not
find in it a broken straw.”

“No,” said Augeas. “It was the Alpheus did
that: not you.”

“ But it was I who used the Alpheus——”

“Yes; no doubt. But the impudence of expect-
ing me to pay a tenth of all my flocks and herds
for an idea so simple that I should have thought of

Q
242 THE HERO OF HEROES.

it myself, if you hadn’t, just by chance, happened
to think of it before me! You have not earned
your wages. You cleaned the stable by an unfair
trick : and it was the river cleaned it—not you.”
“Very well,” said Hercules, grimly. “If you
had paid me honestly, I would have given you
your goats and your oxen back again; for, as I
told you, I do not serve for reward. But now
I perceive that I have not quite cleaned your
stable. There is still one piece of dirt left in it
—and that is a cheating knave, Augeas by name.
So, as I cannot go back to Mycene till my work

”



is done
He was about to throw Augeas into the river, to
follow the rest of the litter: and about what after-
wards happened, different people tell different
things. I very strongly agree, however, with those
who tell that Hercules spared the life of Augeas
after having given him a lesson: for certainly he
was not worth the killing. And I am the more
sure of this because, after his death, Augeas was
honoured as hero—which surely would not have
happened if he had not learned to keep both his
stables and his promises clean before he died.
PART VIL—MORE LABOURS: AND THE
CATTLE OF GERYON.

URYSTHEUS was getting to his wits’ end
for work which should keep his cousin em-
ployed. He sent him to kill the man-eating birds
of Lake Stymphalus ; to catch, and bring to Mycene
alive, a wild bull which was devastating Crete; to
obtain for Eurystheus the famous mares which fed
on human flesh, and belonged to the Thracian King
Diomédes, who used to throw men and women alive
into their manger. In three years’ time Hercules
destroyed all the birds, and brought to Mycene
both the bull and the mares, to whom he had given
the body of their master.

These were the sixth, seventh, and eighth labours,
which had taken eight years. The ninth was of a
different kind. There lived in the country of Cap-
padocia, which is in Asia, a nation of women, with-
out any men among them. They were called the
244 THE HERO OF HEROES.

Amazons, and were famous for their skill in hunt-
ing, and for their fierceness and courage in war, con-
quering the neighbouring nations far and wide.
Their queen at this time was Hippol¥ta; and Eurys-
theus bade Hercules bring him Queen Hippolyta’s
girdle. Perhaps he thought that a strong man
would be ashamed to put out his strength against
a woman. If so, however, he reckoned wrongly.
Hercules had to do his work, whether man or woman
stood in the way; and he won the queen’s girdle in
fair fight, without harming the queen.

“TI must send Hercules to the very end of the
earth,” thought poor Eurystheus, who grew more
and more frightened by every new success of his
cousin. So he inquired diligently of every traveller
who came to Mycenze, and in time had the good luck
to hear of a suitable monster named Geryon, who
lived in a cave at Gades, now called Cadiz, on the
coast of Spain, very near indeed to what the Greeks
then thought to be the end of the world. Geryon,
so the travellers reported, had three bodies and three
heads, and kept large and valuable flocks and herds.
“That will be just the thing for Hercules!” thought
Eurystheus. So he called from his brazen pot—

“Go to Gades, and get me the cattle and the
sheep of Geryon.”

So Hercules set off for Spain by way of Egypt
and that great Libyan desert through which Perseus
had passed on his adventure against the Gorgons.
MORE LABOURS. 245

It was an unfortunate way to take, for there reigned
over Eeypt at that time King Busiris, who had
made a law that every foreigner entering the country
should be sacrificed to Jupiter. Hercules, knowing
nothing of this law, was taken by surprise as soon
as he landed, overpowered by numbers, bound in
iron chains, and laid upon the altar to be slain.
But scarcely had the sacrificing priest raised his
knife when Hercules burst the chains, and, being no
longer taken at disadvantage, made a sacrifice of
Busiris and his ministers, thus freeing the land of
Egypt from a foolish and cruel law.

Thence he passed into the great desert, and
travelled on until one day he reached a pile of
human skulls, nearly as big as a mountain. While
wondering at the sight, a shadow fell over him, and
a big voice said—

«Yes, you may well look at that! I have nearly
enough now.”

It was a giant, nearly as high as the heap of
skulls. “And who are you?” asked Hercules ;
“and what are these ?”

“T am Anteeus,” answered the giant; “and the
Sea is my father and the Earth is my mother. I
am collecting skulls in order to build a temple with
them upon my mother the Earth to my father the
Sea.”

“ And how,” asked Hercules, “have you managed
to get so many?”
246 THE HERO OF HEROES.

“By killing everybody I see, and adding his
skull to the heap—as I am going to add yours.”

So saying, he seized Hercules to make an end of
him. And amazed enough the giant was when he
himself was dashed to the ground with force enough
to break any ordinary bones.

Antzeus, however, though astonished, was not in
the least hurt; so that it was the turn of Hercules
‘to be surprised. Again they closed, and again
Hercules threw him, with still greater strength;
and they closed again.

And again and again Hercules threw him, but
every time with greater difficulty. The more he
was thrown, the stronger the giant became; he rose
from every fall fresher than before. Plainly, if this
went on, Antzus would be beaten until he became
stronger than Hercules, and would end by winning.

It seemed very strange that the more a man was
dashed to the ground the fresher and stronger he
should grow. But—

“T see!” thought Hercules to himself. “This
giant is the son of the Earth; so whenever he falls,
it is upon the bosom of his own mother, who
strengthens and refreshes her son. So I must take
another way.”

So thinking, he put out all his strength, and
again lifted Anteus in his arms. But this time he
did not dash him to the Earth; he held him in the
air, and crushed him to death between his hands,
MORE LABOURS. 947

After this he travelled on, without further adven-
ture, until he reached the far western end of the
Mediterranean Sea, which was thought to be the
end of the world. If you happen to look at a map
you will easily find the exact place—it is where
the south of Spain very nearly touches Africa.
When Hercules arrived there, Spain quite touched
Africa, so that one might walk from one into the
other. It is said that Hercules himself opened out
the narrow passage which lets the Mediterranean
Sea out into the great ocean, so that ships could
afterwards sail to Britain and all over the world.
That passage is now called the Strait of Gibraltar.
But the rock of Gibraltar in Spain, and the oppo-
site rock in Africa, between which the Strait flows,
are still often called the “ Pillars of Hercules.”

To get from there to Gades was no great dis-
tance; and to kill the monstrous ogre Geryon and
to seize his flocks and herds for Eurystheus was no
great feat after what he had already done. But to
drive such a number of sheep and cattle all the way
from Gades in Spain to Mycen in Greece was not
an easy matter. There was only one way of doing
so without being stopped somewhere by the sea,
and this, as a map will show at once, is by crossing
those two great mountain-ranges, the Pyrenees and
the Alps—and for one man to drive thousands of
sheep and thousands of horned cattle over such



mountains as those was the most tiresome and
248 THE HERO OF HEROES.

troublesome labour that Hercules had ever under-
gone,

He got as far as Italy without the loss of a
single sheep or cow, and was thinking that he saw
the end of his trouble. One morning, however,
having counted the cattle as usual, and having
gone some miles upon his day’s journey, he be-
came aware that there was something wrong. The
sheep began to bleat and the cattle to bellow in an
odd and excited way. And frequently, from behind
him, he heard an answering sound which at first he
took for an echo. But no, it could not be that, for
an echo would have repeated the bleating as well
as the bellowing, and what he heard behind hin
was the sound of bellowing only—precisely like
that of Geryon’s cows. He counted the herd
over again, and, though he was convinced that it
was all right at starting, he found a full dozen
missing.

Now a dozen was not much to lose out of
thousands. But he had been ordered to bring
back the whole herd, and he would have felt that
he would not have done his duty if he, by any
neglect or laziness of his own, lost even one lamb
by the way. So, following the distant sound, he,
with infinite labour, drove his cattle back across
the hills, league after league, till he reached a huge
black cavern, the mouth of which was strewn and
heaped with human bones, His cattle became
MORE LABOURS. 249

more excited and more restive, for the sound
he was following evidently came from within the
cave.

He was about to enter and search when a three-
headed ogre issued, whose three mouths, when he
opened them to speak, breathed smoke and flames.

“This is my cave,” said he, with all three mouths
at once; “and no man shall enter it but I.”

“T only want my cattle,” said Hercules. “ Bring
them out to me.”

“ Cattle 2?” asked the ogre. “There are no cattle
here. I swear it by the head of my mother.”

« And who was she,” asked Hercules, “ that her
head is an oath to swear by ?”

“T am Cacus, the son of the Gorgon Medusa,”

”

answered the ogre, “and I swear



But before he could finish his oath, there came
such a bellowing from within the cave that the
very cattle seemed as if they could not endure such
falsehood, and were proclaiming that Cacus lied.

“Tam sorry,’ said Hercules. “I am weary of
travelling, and of monsters, and of giants, and of
ogres, and of liars, and of thieves. I really do
not want to kill any more. You are not one of
my labours, and I have had enough trouble. Still,
if you had as many heads as the Hydra and as many
arms as Briareus, I should have to fight you rather
than lose one of the cattle I was bidden to bring.”

Cacus laughed. “Do you see those bones?” he
250 THE HERO OF HEROES.

asked. “They are all that is left of people who
have looked for what they have lost in my cave.”
“Then,” said Hercules, “either you shall add
mine to the heap, or I will add yours.”
And presently the bones of Cacus the Robber
were added to the heap, and Hercules, having got
his cattle back, at last reached Mycenz.

Eurystheus almost forgot to be frightened in his
joy at becoming the owner of such flocks and herds.
He listened with interest to the story of his cousin’s
travels, and, having heard it to an end, said—

“So you crossed the great Libyan desert until
you reached the ocean which surrounds the world ?
Why, then, you must have found the way to the
gardens of the Hesperides—the gardens of golden
fruit which the great sleepless dragon cuards, and
which our forefather Perseus saw when he turned
Atlas into stone. Did you also see those gardens ?”

“No,” said Hercules,

“Then,” said Eurystheus, “go and see them at
once. Go and bring me some of the Golden Apples
—as many as you can.”
251

PART VIII—HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR: THE
GARDEN OF THE HESPERIDES.

O Hercules, without being allowed any time for
rest, had to go back the whole way he had
come, without any certain knowledge of where the
golden-fruited gardens of the Hesperides were to
be found, except that it was somewhere in Africa.
Somebody must know, however, or else the gardens
would never have been heard of, for travellers
never told anything but the truth in those days.
He therefore diligently asked everybody he met
where the gardens were to be found, and, among
others, some nymphs whom he met on the banks
of the river Po, while he was passing through
Italy.
“We cannot tell you,” said they; “ but we know



who can—old Nereus, the sea-god, if you can only
get him to tell.”
“ And why should he not tell?” asked Hercules.
252 THE HERO OF HEROES.

“ Because he never will tell anybody anything,
unless he is obliged.”

“ And how is he to be obliged ?” asked Hercules
again,

“ He is bound to answer anybody who is stronger
than he.” :

“Well, I am pretty strong,” said Hercules,
modestly. “ Anyhow, I can but try.”

“Yes, you do look strong,” said the nymphs ;
“ but ” Here they broke into a laugh, as if



some sort of a joke were in their minds. “Well, if
you go to the Agean Sea, where King Ageus was
drowned, you'll be sure to find Nereus sleeping in
the sun somewhere along the shore.”

“ And how shall I know him when I see him ?”
asked Hercules.

“You will see a very, very old man, older than
anybody you ever saw, with bright blue hair, and a
very long white beard. He has fifty daughters, so
he often gets tired, and likes to sleep as much as
he can.”

Hercules thanked the nymphs, whom he still
heard laughing after he left them, and thought to
himself that it would not be much trouble to prove
himself stronger than a very old man who was al-
ways tired. So, having journeyed back again to
the Afgean Sea, he walked along the shore till, sure
enough, he saw, sound asleep in a sunny cove, a
man who looked a thousand years old, with a white
HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR. 253

beard reaching below his waist, and with hair as
blue as the sea.

“ Will you kindly tell me the way to the gardens
of the Hesperides?” asked Hercules, waking Nereus
by a gentle shake—though I expect one of Hercules’
shakes was not what most people would consider
gentle.

Instead of answering, Nereus tried to roll himself
into the sea, at the bottom of which was his home.
Hercules caught him by the leg and arm: when,
to his amazement, Nereus suddenly turned into a
vigorous young man, who wrestled with him stoutly
to get away.

Hercules got him down at last. “Now tell me
the way to the gardens of the Hesperides!” he
panted—for he was out of breath with the struggle.
But he found himself holding down, no longer a
man, but a huge and slippery seal, which all but
succeeded in plunging into the sea.

But he held on until the seal also was exhausted.
And then Hercules found out what had made the
nymphs laugh so. For when the seal was wearied
out it changed into a gigantic crab, the crab into
a crocodile, the crocodile into a mermaid, the mer-
maid into a sea-serpent, the sea-serpent into an
albatross, the albatross into an octopus, the octopus
into a mass of sea-weed, which was the hardest to
hold of all. But the sea-weed turned back into the
old man again, who said—
254 THE HERO OF HEROES.

“There — you have conquered me in all my
shapes ; I haven’t got any more. You may let me
go now, and I will answer you. You must go on
through Italy and Spain, and thence cross into Africa.
You will then be in the land of Mauritania. You
must still go south, following the sea-shore, till you
come to the giant Atlas, who supports the sky upon
his head, and so keeps it from falling. He ”—the
old sea-god’s voice was growing fainter and fainter
—‘“he will tell you all about the gardens of the
Hesperides. They’re close by—the gardens of the
Hesp e

And so, having finished his answer, Nereus



turned over and went comfortably to sleep again.

Once more Hercules set out upon the journey
which had seemed as if it would never even begin.
Once more he travelled through Italy and Spain,
and crossed into Africa over the strait which he
himself had made. And on and on he went,
always southward by the sea, till, full six hundred
miles from the Pillars of Hercules, he saw what he
knew must be the giant Atlas on whose head rested
the sky. There Atlas, King of Mauritania, had
stood ever since he had looked upon the head of
Medusa. And if you wonder how the sky was
held up before that time, you must ask Nereus,
if you can catch him—not me.

As you may suppose, the poor giant was terribly
HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR. 255

weary of having to hold up, night and day, year
after year, the whole weight of the sun, moon, and
stars. Even his strength is not able to keep stars
from falling now and then—sometimes on a clear
night you may see them tumbling down by scores,
so it is terrible to think of what would happen if he
took even a moment’s rest. The whole sky would
come crashing down, and the universe would be in
ruins. He was longing for the rest he dared not
take, and so, when Hercules said to him, “I am
seeking fruit from the gardens of the Hesperides,”
a crafty idea came into the giant’s mind.

“Ah!” said he, with a nod which shook down a
whole shower of stars. “There is no difficulty.
All you have to do is walk through the sea
towards the setting sun, till you get there. And
there’s nothing to prevent you from getting the
golden fruit but the dragon who guards the tree on
which it grows. The sea doesn’t come up higher
than my waist, even in the deepest part; and if
you can get past the dragon, my three daughters,
the Hesperides, will no doubt receive you with
the greatest surprise.”

For the first time Hercules felt dismayed. He
had no boat, nor the means of building one; he
could not swim further than his eyes could see.
As for wading through an ocean that would come
up to the waist of a giant as high as the skies, that
was absurd. And as to the dragon, he remembered
256 THE HERO OF HEROES.

that Perseus had only passed it by means of a
helmet which made its wearer invisible.

Atlas saw his perplexity.

“Ah, I forgot you were such a little fellow,”
said the giant. “Tl go and get you some of the
fruit myself. It isn’t many of my steps from here
to the garden, and the dragon knows me—and if he
didn’t, I could step over him. And he couldn’t
hurt me, seeing that I’ve been turned to stone.
But wait, though—-what on earth’s to become of
the sky while I’m gone?”

“Ym pretty strong,” said Hercules. “If I climb
up to the peak of the next mountain to you, I dare-
say I could hold the sky up while you’re away.”

Atlas smiled to himself, for this was just what
he had intended.

“Come up, then,” said he. So Hercules clambered
to the highest peak he could find, and Atlas, slowly
bending, gradually and carefully let down the sky
upon the head and shoulders of the hero. Then,
heaving a deep roar of relief, he strode into the sea.

It was surely the strangest plight in which a
mortal ever found himself—standing on a mountain-
peak, and, by the strength of his own shoulders,
keeping the skies from falling. He was answerable
for the safety of the whole world: the burden of
the entire universe was laid upon the shoulders of
one man. They were strong enough to bear it;
but it seemed like an eternity before Atlas returned.
Ne
i)
f
(y



“ Hercules seized the chance, and let the whole weight of the sky
fall upon the shoulders of Atlas once more.” —Page 257.
HIS ELEVENTH LABOUR. 257

A hundred times a minute Hercules felt as if he
must let all go, whatever happened; indeed he was
actually tempted to yield, for he was weary of these
endless labours; and it was only for mankind’s
sake, and not for his own, that he held on through
the agony of the crushing weight of the whole
universe.

But Atlas came at last, with three golden apples
in his hand.

“ Here they are!” he roared. “And now, good-
bye!”

“What!” exclaimed Hercules. “Are you not
coming back to your duty?”

“Am I a fool?” asked the giant. “Not I.
Keep the honour of holding up the skies yourself,
since you are so strong and willing. Never again
for me!”

“ At least, then,” said Hercules, “let me place my
lion’s skin between my shoulders and the sky, so
that the weight may be less painful to bear.”

Atlas could take no objection to that, so he put
his own shoulders under the dome of heaven to let
Hercules make himself as comfortable as the situa-
tion allowed. Hercules seized the chance, and let
the whole weight of the sky fall upon the shoulders
of Atlas once more. And there it still rests; and
thus Atlas failed in trying to shift his own proper
burden to another’s shoulders.

R
258 THE HERO OF HEROES.

“Only three apples?” exclaimed Eurystheus,
when Hercules returned. “You can’t have taken
much trouble, to get so little. Go to Hades, and
bring me Cerberus, the three-headed dog of Pluto!
.. . He will never do that!” he thought to him-
self. “To reach Hades, one must die!”
259

PART IX.—HIS TWELFTH LABOUR: THE
DESCENT INTO HADES.

DARESAY you have forgotten—for it is a long
way back—the name of Admétus, that King of
Phere in Thessaly, whom Apollo, when banished
from heaven, served as a shepherd for nine years.
Admetus did not know that it was a god whom he
had to keep his sheep; but he was so good and
kind a master that Apollo, revealing himself at the
end of his exile, bade him name any boon he desired,
and it should be granted.

There is no such difficult question in the world
to answer as that. Admetus answered, “ Grant that
I may never die.”

But that is the one thing which not even the
gods can grant to mortal men. ‘The very cause
of Apollo’s having been banished to earth was his
killing the Cyclops for forging the thunderbolt with
which Jupiter had killed Aisculapius for making
260 THE HERO OF HEROES.

dead men live again. Not even the Fates could
change that law even for the sake of Apollo. But
they said, “ Admetus shall live so long as he can
find somebody else to die instead of him whenever
his death-time comes,” which was all they could
allow,

After the return of Apollo to heaven, Admetus
lived on in great happiness and welfare. He was
one of the Argonauts; and he took part in the
hunting of the Calydonian boar. He had fallen in
love with Alcestis, the beautiful daughter of that
King Pelias of whom you read in the story of the
Golden Fleece, whose hand had been promised to
the man who should come for her in a chariot
drawn by a wild boar and a lion. This Admetus
did; and in this chariot he drove her back to his
own kingdom of Phere, where he made her his
queen. And there they lived in great love and
happiness for many years.

But the day came at last which had been
appointed to Admetus for his death-time. Then
Admetus, remembering the promise of the Fates,
and not able to bear losing the happiness of living,
thus besought his old father, Pheres—

“Father, you are already old and near to death ;
you have lived your life; it matters nothing to you
whether your old age lasts a year less or a year
more. What you now call life is only weariness
and pain. But I am still young and strong, with
HIS TWELFTH LABOUR. 261

the best part of my life still unlived, and my
children ungrown, and my kingdom to govern: I
beseech you to die for me, so that I also may live
to be as old and as wise as you.” .

But his father answered: “No, my son; life is
precious, even when one is old. The nearer we
approach the cold dark grave, the dearer grow the
sunshine and the living air. I will do anything
else for you, but not die.”

Then Admetus besought Cl¥yméne, his mother—

“Mother, you are old and weak, and a woman ;
I am young and strong, anda man. What is such
life as yours compared with mine? I beseech you
to die for me: let not a mother doom to death her
own child.”

But his mother answered: “No, my son; he who
loves his life as you love it, and fears death as you
fear it, is not one for whom even his mother ought
to die.”

Then Admetus besought all his friends and kins-
men; but all were deaf to him. For well the Fates
had known that their promise would be in vain.
But at last his dear and beautiful wife Alcestis
came to him, and said—

“J will die for you, and gladly! Ah, those Fates
do not know everything after all!”

Admetus, with all his selfishness, had never
thought of sacrificing his wife; and he was over-
come with horror. He prayed that Apollo’s gift
262 THE HERO OF IIEROES.

might be taken back; but the Fates are not to be
played fast and loose with in that way, and they
were angry perhaps at finding themselves baffled by
a mere loving woman. Alcestis had to die instead
of Admetus; and so she died, as she had said,
proudly and gladly.

Now that it was too late, her husband was
broken-hearted at having caused his wife’s death
for the sake of what had been but a selfish whim.
All he could do for her in return was honour her
love and devotion by a splendid funeral, to which
people came from far and near to cover her grave
with flowers.

Alcestis was buried, and the farewell hymn was
being sung, when there thrust his way, rather
roughly, through the crowded temple a stranger of
mighty build, carrying a club, and clad with a
lion’s skin, seemingly the worse for wine. Admetus
was too absorbed in his grief to notice this rude
intrusion; but some of the bystanders cried shame
on the stranger, and one of the priests came in his
way, and said sternly—

“Who are you that dare to trouble grief like
ours?”

“Who am I? Why, the servant of Eurystheus,
King of Argos and Mycene. Is this how you
receive strangers in your land? TI had heard that
Admetus of Phere is the most generous of kings,
and Alcestis the most gracious of queens; and here
HIS TWELFTH LABOUR. 263

I find you all like ghosts at a funcral. Where is
the king?”

“There stands the king,” said the priest, solemnly.
And then he told the stranger the story which many
a poet has told since—the story of how strong true
love is, and how foolish it is to measure life by the
number of its years.

Hercules—for he the stranger was—was sobered
in a moment. “It is a shame!” he exclaimed,
bringing down his club on the floor. “ Fates or no
fates, it shall not be! I am bound to Hades on
an errand for my own king, and I will not come
back unless I do a better one for yours.”

So, leaving them all offended at what they took
for a drunken boast, he dropped into the open grave:
the people only thinking that he had passed from
the temple somewhat suddenly. Hence he followed
the passage taken by the queen’s soul till he reached
the Styx; and hard work must poor old Charon
have had to row across such a weight as Hercules
instead of the ghosts to which he was accustomed.
On he went, finding his way as best he could with-
out a guide, until, chancing upon the black gate of
Tartarus, there growled in the middle of his path
the three-headed dog Cerberus, with flashing eyes
and flaming jaws.

Orpheus, you remember, had quieted Cerberus
with the music of his lute: Hercules, going to work
in other fashion, brought down his club upon one
264 THE HERO OF HEROES.

of the dog’s skulls in a way that bewildered the
other two. Then, seizing the monster by the throat,
and in spite of its furious struggles, he fairly dragged
it along with him by sheer strength, even into the
very presence of Pluto and Proserpine.

“And,” he cried, “god and goddess though you
are, I will brain this dog of yours upon the steps
of your throne unless you surrender to me the soul
of Alcestis, that I may deliver her from death, and
lead her back into life again.”

It was an unheard-of thing that a man should
thus take Hades by storm, and dictate terms to its
king and queen. But for that moment I verily be-
lieve that Hercules became more than man—nay,
more than Alcestis, because, while she had betaken
herself to Elysium for the love of one who was dear
to her, he had dared the torments of Tartarus out
of pity for strangers and hate of wrong. Nay, I
think it was truly this which had made his grip so
fast on the dog’s throat, and his club so heavy on
the dog’s three skulls; and this that made a mor-
tal stand as their master before even Pluto and
Proserpine.

“In the name of all the gods,” said Pluto, “ take
the woman, and begone.”

Then Alcestis appeared—a mere grey shade, the
touch of whose hand was but like a film of gossa-
mer. But as he dragged the less and less strug-
gling Cerberus with one hand, and led her with
HIS TWELFTH LABOUR. 265

the other, her shade took colour and formed, and
her fingers tightened upon his, until the living
Alcestis, more beautiful than before, stepped with
him out of her still open grave, and threw herself
into her husband’s arms.

Hercules did not wait for thanks; indeed, with
Cerberus still on his hands, his only thought was
to hurry back to Mycene. It is the strangest
picture one can think of



a man dragging along
the three-headed dog of Hades in the open light of
day. It was one long strain on his whole strength,
all day and all night long, for many nights and
days. But he reached Mycenz at last—and into
his brazen pot leaped Eurystheus in the twinkling
of an eye.

“T have brought him,” said Hercules. “Cerberus
is yours.” ,

“Then,” cried Eurystheus, as well as his terror
would let him, “ be off with you, Cerberus and all.
Never more be servant of mine; never let me see
your face or hear of you again.”

Thus Hercules, by obedient service, won his
freedom, and his great penance was fulfilled.
And the first use he made of freedom was to give
it to Cerberus, who straightway, with a terrible
howl, plunged into the earth and disappeared.
PART X.—THE CHOICE OF HERCULES.

y* at last Hercules was free, after twelve long
years of slavery, during which he had scarce
known a day’s pleasure or ease. It seemed too
good to be true.

His only trouble now was what to do with his
liberty. He was his own master, the whole world
was before him, and he was strong enough to do
whatever he pleased. And while thus thinking
what he should do with his life and strength, there
came to him in the middle of the night a vision as
of two women, real and yet unreal, bringing with
them a strange light of their own.

The first to speak was young and beautiful,
crowned with flowers, and with a voice as sweet as
her smile.

“ What folly is thinking!” said she. “You have
toiled enough; you have won the right to do what-
ever you like best for the rest of your days. No
THE CHOICE OF HERCULES. 267

more labour to serve another’s will or whim; no
more hateful tasks, one ending only for another to
begin; no more cold, hunger, thirst, strife with
monsters, and self-denial; and all for what? Why,
for nothing. My name is Pleasure. Choose me
for your soul, and you shall have Power, Glory,
Riches, Comfort, Delight—all your whole heart's
desire.”

The other shape wore no flowers: her lips did not
smile, and the light of her clear bright eyes was
cold; and her voice belonged to her eyes.

“Yet think,” said she, “ before you choose, be-
cause you must choose to-night once for all. Was
it Pleasure who helped you to rid the people of the
ravage of the Nemzan lion ? No, indeed: she
would have bidden you stay at home. Was it
Pleasure who stood by you as you struck off the
heads of the Hydra one by one? No, indeed!
Did Pleasure join with you in chasing the Ery-
manthine boar and the stag with the golden horns ?
Did she clean away the Augean stable? Did she
send you forth to free the world of the man-eating
birds of Lake Stymphalus, and the dreadful Cretan
bull, and the mares of King Diomedes, and the
Giant Anteus, and the Ogre Geryon, and Cacus the
Robber? Did Pleasure save Alcestis from death,
and break through the very gates of hell? No; it
was Obedience. And if obedience to a mere earthly
master has worked such wonders for the good of all
268 THE HERO OF HEROES,

mankind, how much more good will come of willing
obedience to Me?”

“And how, then, are you called?” asked Her-
cules, looking from one to the other,—from the
warm glowing smile of Pleasure to the grave eyes
of the form which had last spoken.

“Among men I am called Duty,” said she.

Hercules could not help sighing—for the more
he looked at Pleasure the more beautiful she grew ;
while the face of Duty seemed every moment to
become more stern and cold.

“It does seem hard,” said he, “to use my
freedom in only making a change of service. But
after all, what is the good of having more strength
than other men, except to help them? It’s true,
though I never thought of it before. And if Pleas-
ure won't help me to rid the world of the rest of
its monsters, and Duty will, why, there’s only one
thing for a man to do, and that’s to choose Duty,
and obey her, however hard she may be.”

Then he went to sleep with his mind made up,
and when he woke in the morning his choice woke
with him.

So Hercules, instead of being the servant of Eurys-
theus, became, of his own free will, the servant: of
all mankind. He made it his work to seek out
wrong, and never to rest until he had set it right :
he travelled about the world, carrying everywhere
THE CHOICE OF HERCULES. 269

with him the love of law and justice, and the wor-
ship of the gods, even into savage lands where such
things had never been known. Ogres and monsters
disappeared: it séemed as if his strength were
bringing back the Golden Age.

One day his wanderings brought him into the
heart of the great mountain-range called Caucasus,
a vast and dreadful region of snow-covered peaks
which no human foot had ever climbed. Never
had even he known a harder labour than to make
his way among these icy precipices, where every
step meant danger. Not a sign of life was to be
seen or heard, when suddenly he heard a terrible
cry like that of a giant in pain.

He looked round; but saw nothing but the silent
mountains. Then the cry came again, as if from
far above him; and, lifting his eyes to the highest
peak of all, he was sure that something moved there
like the flapping of great wings.

What could it be? What could be happening
upon the highest mountain-peak in the world? He
set himself to climb its sides, often so steep and
icy that he was over and over again on the point
of giving up in despair; and the higher he climbed
the louder and more full of agony became the cry.
At last, after many days of toil, he reached the
topmost peak whence the cry came, and there he
forgot hunger, cold, and weariness in wonder at
what he saw.
270 TUE HERO OF HEROES.

Bound to the rocks by huge chains, so that he
could not move a limb, lay what seemed a man,
bigger than Hercules himself, with every muscle
drawn and writhing in agony. And with good
reason, for a gigantic and horrible vulture had his
limbs in its talons and its beak in his heart, which
it was fiercely tearing.

The vulture was too busy at its cruel feast to see
Hercules. But its tortured victim cried—

“Depart, whoever you are: I am Prometheus
the Titan, who tried to conquer the strength of the
gods by cunning, and am thus punished for my sin
for ever.”

And then he sent forth another dreadful cry as
the vulture plunged its beak into his heart again,

Prometheus! Yes; it was nothing less than
Prometheus the Titan, who, when his race was
beaten in the great battle with the gods of Olym-
pus, had stolen fire from heaven, and made Maun,
and who was thus punished for having made what
gave the gods such trouble. But Hercules, though
he knew all this, and the story of Pandora besides,
exclaimed—

“Then, gods or no gods, sin or no sin, this shall
not be!”

And at the word he grasped the vulture by the
throat, and then followed a struggle beside which
even his battle with the hell-hound Cerberus had
THE CHOICE OF HERCULES 271

been as nothing. Jor it was no common vulture
of the mountains: it was the demon of Remorse,
whose beak had not left the heart of Prometheus
one moment for thousands and thousands of years.
But it was over at last, and the vulture lay stran-
gled at the feet of Hercules.

To free Prometheus from his chains was the work
of a moment, and the Titan rose and stretched his

free limbs with a heart at ease.

What passed between the Titan and the Mortal
is beyond my guessing, and I have never heard. I
only know that a mere Man had, by his strength
and his courage, saved one who was greater and
wiser than he from even Remorse and Despair. T
have thought of this story till it means too much
for me to say anything more. Only, if you have
forgotten the story of Prometheus and Pandora, I
should be glad if you will read it again.
bo
“I
bo

PART XL—THE TUNIC OF NESSUS.

ERCULES, passing through the land of Thes-

saly, fell deeply in love with the Princess

Idle, daughter of King Eurytus, whom her father, a

famous archer, had promised in marriage to the man
who should fly an arrow further than he.

This Hercules did with such ease that the king,
angry at being surpassed, refused to perform his
promise, so that Hercules went mad with rage and
sorrow. Ina sudden fury he slew Iphitus, a brother
of Jole, and his own friend and comrade, and then,
still more maddened by what he had done, wan-
dered away again to Delphi to ask Apollo’s oracle
once more what he should do.

But this time the voice of Apollo was silent. It
seemed as if, in spite of all he had done for men,
the gods had turned away their faces from him,
and had become deaf to his prayers, even to his
repentance—for he would have given his own life
THE TUNIC OF NESSUS. 273

if that would bring Iphitus to life again. Were
they angry because he had saved Prometheus from
their vengeance? Or were the labours of a life to
be lost for one moment of passion? Then were the
gods unjust, and Hercules, who abhorred injustice,
broke forth against the gods themselves.

“T will no longer serve such wretches!” he cried.
“Beings which bring man into the world only to
torment him, and to be a sport and a jest for them !
I will tear down their temples and destroy their
altars; I will side with the fallen Titans; I will
sooner bear the punishment of Prometheus for ever,
with none to save me, than serve monsters of injus-
tice, who allow man to sin and to suffer without
help, and then cast him away.”

But Apollo was as deaf to his curses as to his
prayers. So Hercules put forth his whole strength
against the temple, and no doubt would have left
it a ruin, when, from the clear sky there burst such
flames and thunders that the Titans themselves
would have been dismayed. And then spoke the
oracle at last—

“Ts this the free service you vowed when you
chose between Pleasure and Duty? It is the jus-
tice of the gods that you go back into slavery again
until you have learned how to be free.”

The thunder and the lightning ceased, and Her-
cules saw beside him a young man who looked like
a travelling merchant—at least for such he took
8


274 THE HERO OF HEROES.

him, until the stranger for one moment stood re-
vealed as the god Mercury, with winged heels and
cap, and bearing the rod round which two live ser-
pents twined. It was only for a moment; the next,
the god became the travelling merchant again.

“As we are to be fellow-travellers,’ said Mer-
cury, “I will tell you at once that I am under
orders from the Court of Olympus to take you to
market and sell you fora slave. Do you submit ?
Or do you wish to learn from me the strength of
heaven ?”

“JT wish I could learn its justice,” said Hercules.
“But I suppose I am too stupid to understand.
Everything is so dark and so strange.’ But what
does it all matter, after all? I would as soon be
a slave as anything else, now that I have lost Iole
and killed my friend.”

“That is not the right mood,” said Mercury. “ It
is better to rebel, as you did a minute ago, than to
think that nothing matters, as you do now. How-
ever, let us go.”

Mercury was always the most delightful and
amusing of companions; and he was very good-
natured also, and did his best to make the journey
cheerful. But, though he was the god of Eloquence,
and of Business besides, he could not persuade any-
body to become the purchaser of Hercules either by
auction or by private bargain. Nobody wanted a
slave who looked so certain to become his master’s
THE TUNIC OF NESSUS. 275

master. Besides, people had forgotten all his good
deeds, and only remembered that he had been a
dangerous madman. But in time they came to a
country in Asia called Lydia, which was then ruled
by a queen whose name was Omphiale. And she,
having seen Hercules, was brave enough to buy
him.

Of course Hercules expected that she would make
him outdo what he had done for Eurystheus; and
nothing would have pleased him better than to be
sent on the most impossible errands, so that, in toil
and danger, he might forget his murder of Iphitus
and hig love for Iole. Instead, however, of treating
him like the most glorious hero of his time, and
employing him on services of honour, she amused
herself by giving him a spindle and distaff, and
setting him to spin among her women, while she
robed herself in his lion-skin and tried to swing
his club in her delicate hands. And whenever he
was clumsy with the distaff, which was very often,
she would laugh at him, and strike him across the
face with her slipper.

For three long years Hercules sat and span
among Omphale’s handmaids; and then she, being
tired of her amusement and of his submission, set
him free, and gave him back his club and lion-skin.
They had been three wasted, unwholesome years,
and his strength had wasted with them; moreover,
his fame was being forgotten, and nothing seemed
276 THE HERO OF HEROES.

left for him to do. How long it seemed since he
had fought the Hydra and borne upon his shoulders
the weight of the sky—it was as if he had become
another and a feebler man.

While waiting to see what should happen, he
abode at the Court of King Tyndarus of Sparta, the
step-father of the great twin brethren, Castor and
Pollux, and of their sister Helen—the most beauti-
ful woman in the whole world; of whom you will
hear more some day. And it was while here that
he heard of the fame of another beautiful woman,
the Princess Deianira, daughter of King CEneus of
4Ktolia, whose hand was to be the prize of a great
wrestling-match to be held at Calydon. Hercules,
longing for some adventure to try his strength again,
betook himself thither; and, weakened though he
was, overthrew every one of his rivals with ease.
Then, after his marriage with Deianira, he set out
with her for the Court of King Ceyx of Trachinia,
where he intended to remain a while.

But when they reached the river Evenus, which
they had to cross on their way from Calydon to
Trachinia, the water was so swollen with heavy
rains that Hercules did not know how to bring his
wife over. As they stood wondering what they
should do without boat or bridge, there cantered up
a Centaur, who saw the plight they were in, and
said—
THE TUNIC OF NESSUS. O77

“Tam Nessus. If this fair lady will deign to
seat herself upon my back, I will swim over with
her quickly; and then I will come back for you
also.”

He spoke frankly and courteously ; so Hercules,
thinking no harm, lifted Deianira upon the back of
the Centaur, who plunged into the river, and soon
reached the other side. But on landing, instead of
performing his promise, he set off at a gallop; and
it was soon clear enough that he meant to run away
with Deianira, while Hercules stood helpless beyond
the river.

He was almost out of sight when Hercules let fly
an arrow, which had been dipped in the poison of
the Hydra, with such force and so true an aim that
it pierced the Centaur without touching Deianira.
Nessus fell to the earth, and, feeling himself dying,
said to her—

“T die for love of you; but I forgive you freely.
Take my tunic; for it is of magic power. If your
husband’s heart ever strays from you, bid him wear
it, and his love will return to you and never
wander again.”

So saying, he groaned and died; and Deianira,
having taken from him his blood-stained tunic,
waited there till Hercules, having found a ford
higher up the river, was able to rejoin her. And
so at last they reached the Court of King Ceyx, who
received them with all kindness and honour,
278 THE HERO OF HEROES.

Here they dwelt in great content; nor was there
any cause why they should not have spent all their
life to come in rest and peace, had not, by ill luck, a
great war broken out between King Ceyx and King
Eurytus of Thessaly. Hercules gained the victory
for his host; King Eurytus was slain; and then—
among the prisoners of war was the slain king’s
daughter, Iole; she on whose account Hercules had
killed Iphitus, and cursed the gods, and been a slave.

Yet, seeing her again, all thought of Deianira
passed away from him, and his love for Iole was
stronger even than at first; while he found that
her love had remained true to him and unchanged.
He could not part from her, and so he took her
with him to Mount Cita, where he was about to
sacrifice to Jupiter in honour of his victory.

The altar was prepared, and the sacrifice was
ready, when there arrived from Trachinia, the city
of King Ceyx, his servant Lichas, who knelt before
him, and said—

“The Princess Deianira, your loving wife, has
heard of this great sacrifice, and sends you by
me this tunic, which she prays you to wear for her
sake, that she may have some part in your thanks-
giving.”

But in truth it was of her husband’s Jove for
Tole that Deianira had heard ; and therefore she had
sent him the tunic of Nessus, which was to bring his
heart back to her again.
THE TUNIC OF NESSUS, 279

Little she guessed the cunning revenge of the
Centaur, who knew that the arrow of Hercules, in
piercing the tunic, had left upon it a drop of the
poison of the Hydra. Hercules put on the gift of
Deianira, and, accompanied only by Prince Philoc-
tetes of Melibcea, ascended Mount (Eta to celebrate
the sacrifice. But no sooner had he reached the
altar than the poison began to work, eating through
his skin into his flesh, even to his bones, so that his
agony was too great to bear.

He tried to tear off the fatal tunic, but the more
he tore at it the more it clung. At last the agony
began to gnaw his heart, and he despaired.

“ Would,” he cried, “that I had never been born!
My strength has been my curse. I have laboured
to clear the world of evil, and pain and sin are still
as strong as if the serpents had strangled me in my
cradle. The Hydra is dead, but its poison goes on
working, and open savage force is only changed
into fraud and guile. Happier is Eurystheus, whom
weakness and cowardice have kept from doing harm ;
wiser are they who choose peace and pleasure, who
sit with folded hands and let monsters and ogres
devour whomsoever else they will. As for me, I
have been a curse to those whom I have loved the
best, and leave more evil in the world than I found.
There is no use in strength, since it can be con-
quered by pain; nor in subduing others, when one
cannot master one’s own self; nor in duty without
280 THE HERO OF HEROES,

knowledge; nor in life, which is only blunder and
misery and toil and sin. The best thing is never
to have been born; and the next best thing is
to die.”

So he gave his bow and arrows to Philoctetes,
whom he swore to bury his ashes in the earth, and
never to reveal where they were laid. “For,” said
he, “I wish to sleep and forget and be forgotten.
I will not- that men shall pay me even so much
honour as a tomb.” Then he spread his lion-skin
over the altar, and laid himself upon it with his
club for a pillow, and bade Philoctetes set fire to
it, so that he might die, not of poison and treachery,
but like a man, and of his own free will, making
himself the sacrifice he had vowed.

Philoctetes mournfully obeyed. And thus miser-
ably perished Hercules, the greatest and last of the
heroes; for after him there came no more. Thus
died the strongest of men, in the belief that all
effort is useless, and that he had lived in vain.

But the gods knew better, for not once had they
been unjust in spite of seeming. They knew both
his strength and his weakness ; they saw the whole
man, often foolish and sinful and weak, often failing
and falling, but willing what was right, and loving
it even when he fell into wrong. They judged him
by his whole life, not by its wretched end, when he
was maddened by passion and tortured by pain,
THE TUNIC OF NESSUS. 281

The gods remembered how he had chosen between
Pleasure and Duty; how he had striven with Tar-
tarus for the life of Alcestis; how he had scaled
Caucasus because he had heard a ery of pain; how,
even when he cursed the gods at Delphi, it was
because he thought them unjust, and because he
loved justice and hated injustice with his whole soul
and being. He might hold his own service cheap ;
but not they, for, with the gods, effort cannot fail:
to fight is the same thing as to conquer. If
Hercules had cut off ninety-nine of the Hydra’s
heads, and been slain by the hundredth, men would
still have held him a hero. And so was it with
the gods. They had watched his long battle with
the Hydra of Life and Evil, and did not condemn
him because he was slain before the end.

And go, in the fire of the altar on Mount Cita,
his pains, his sins, his weaknesses, were purged
away. And even as he was the only mortal who
ever conquered Tartarus, so was he the only one
who ever received such reward. Instead of being
sent among the happy shades of the Elysian fields,
he was received into the glory of Olympus among
the gods themselves, there, with strength made pure
and perfect, to serve and help mankind for ever.






EVER was such a wedding-feast known
(| as that of Péleus and Thitis, And
no wonder, for Peleus was King of
Thessaly, and Thetis was a goddess
—the goddess who keeps the gates of
the West, and throws them open for the chariot of the
Sun to pass through when its day’s journey is done.





Not only all the neighbouring kings and queens
came to the feast, but the gods and goddesses be-
sides, bringing splendid presents to the bride and
bridegroom. Only one goddess was not there, be-
cause she had not been invited—and she had not
been invited for the best of all reasons. Her name
was Ate, which means Mischief; and wherever she



went she caused quarrelling and confusion. J upiter
had turned her out of heaven for setting even the
THE APPLE OF DISCORD. 283

gods by the ears, and ever since then she had been
wandering about the earth, making mischief, for
they would not have her even in Hades.

“So they won’t have Me at their feast!” she
said to herself, when she heard the sound of the
merriment to which she had not been bidden.
“Very well; they shall be sorry. I see a way to
make a bigger piece of mischief than ever was
known.”

So she took a golden apple, wrote some words
upon it, and, keeping herself out of sight, threw it
into the very middle of the feasters, just when they
were most merry.

Nobody saw where the apple came from; but of
course they supposed it had been thrown among
them for frolic, and one of the guests, taking it
up, read aloud the words written on it. The words
were—

“For THs Most BEAUTIFUL!”

—nothing more.

“What a handsome present somebody has sent
me!” said Juno, holding out her hand for the
apple.

“Sent you?” asked Diana. “ What an odd mis-
take, to be sure! Don’t you see it is for the most
beautiful 2 I will thank you to hand me what is
so clearly intended for Me.”
284 THE APPLE OF DISCORD.

“You seem to forget J am present,” said Vesta,
making a snatch at the apple.

“Not at all,” said Ceres; “ only J happen to be
here too. And who doubts that where I am there
is the most beautiful 2”

“Except where J am,” said Proserpine.

“What folly is all this!” said Minerva, the wise.
“Wisdom is the only true beauty ; and everybody
knows that I am the wisest of you all.”

“But it’s for the most beautiful!” said Venus.
“ The idea of its being for anybody but Me!”

Then every nymph and goddess present, and
even every woman, put in her claim, until from
claiming and disputing it grew to arguing and wrane-
ling and downright quarrelling: insults flew about,
until the merriment grew into an angry din, the like
of which had never been heard. But as it became
clear that it was impossible for everybody to be the
most beautiful, the claimants gradually settled down
into three parties—some taking the side of Venus,
others of Juno, others of Minerva,

“ We shall never settle it among ourselves,” said
one, when all were fairly out of breath with quar-
relling. “ Let the gods decide.”

For the gods had been silent all the while ; and
now they looked at one another in dismay at such
an appeal. Jupiter, in his heart, thought Venus
the most beautiful; but how could he dare decide
against either his wife Juno or his daughter Min-
THE APPLE OF DISCORD. 285

erva? Neptune hated Minerva on account of their
old quarrel; but it was awkward to choose between
his daughter Venus and his sister Juno, of whose
temper he, as well as Jupiter, stood in awe. Mars
was ready enough to vote for Venus; but then he
was afraid of a scandal. And so with all the gods
—not one was bold enough to decide on such a
terrible question as the beauty of three rival god-
desses who were ready to tear out each other’s eyes.
For Juno was looking like a thunder-cloud, and
Minerva like lightning, and Venus like a smiling
but treacherous sea.

“J have it,’ said Jupiter at last. “Men are
better judges of beauty than the gods are, who
never see anything but its perfection. King Priam
of Troy has a son named Paris, whose judgment as
a critic I would take even before my own. I pro-
pose that you, Juno, and you, Minerva, and you,
Venus, shall go together before Paris and submit
yourselves to his decision, whatever it may be.”

And so it was settled, for each of the three
goddesses was equally sure that, whoever the
judge might be, the golden apple was safe to be
hers. The quarrel came to an end, and the feast
ended pleasantly ; but Ate, who had been watching
and listening, laughed in her sleeve.

Troy, where King Priam reigned, was a great and
ancient city on the shore of Asia: it was a sacred
286 THE APPLE OF DISCORD.

city, whose walls had been built by Neptune, and
it possessed the Pallidium, the image of Minerva,
which kept it from all harm. Priam—who had
been the friend of Hercules—and his wife Hecuba
had many sons and daughters, all brave and noble
princes and beautiful princesses; and of his sons,
while the bravest and noblest was his first-born,
Hector, the handsomest and most amiable was
Paris, whom Jupiter had appointed to be the
judge of beauty.

Paris, unlike his brothers, cared nothing for affairs
of State, but lived as a shepherd upon Mount Ida
with his wife Ginone, a nymph of that mountain,
in perfect happiness and peace, loved and honoured
by the whole country round, which had given
him the name of “ Alexander,” which means “ The
Helper.” One would think that if anybody was
safe from the mischief of Ate, it was he.

But one day, while he was watching his flocks
and thinking of Cinone, there came to him what he
took for three beautiful women—the most beautiful
he had ever seen. Yet something told him they
were more than mere women, or even than Oreads,
before the tallest said—

“ There is debate in Olympus which is the most
beautiful of us three, and Jupiter has appointed you
to be the judge between us. I am Juno, the queen
of gods and men, and if you decide for me, I will
make you king of the whole world.”
THE APPLE OF DISCORD. 287

“ And J,” said the second, “am Minerva, and you
shall know everything in the whole universe if you
decide for me.”

“But I,” said the third, “am Venus, who can
give neither wisdom nor power; but if you decide
for me, I will give you the love of the most beauti-
ful woman that ever was or ever will be born.”

Paris looked from one to the other, wondering to
which he should award the golden apple, the prize
of beauty. He did not care for power: he would
be quite content to rule his sheep, and even that
was not always easy. Nor did he care for wisdom
or knowledge: he had enough for all his needs.
Nor ought he to have desired any love but Génone’s.
But then Venus was really the most beautiful of all
the goddesses—the very goddess of beauty; no mortal
could refuse anything she asked him, so great was
her charm. So he took the apple and placed it in
the hands of Venus without a word, while Juno and
Minerva departed in a state of wrath with Paris,
Venus, and each other, which made Ate laugh to
herself more than ever.

Now the most beautiful woman in the whole
world was Helen, step-daughter of King Tyndirus
of Sparta, and sister of Castor and Pollux: neither
before her nor after her has there been any to com-
pare with her for beauty. Thirty-one of the noblest
princes in Greece came to her father’s Court at the
288 THE APPLE OF DISCORD.

same time to seek her in marriage, so that Tyndarus
knew not what to do, seeing that, whomsoever he
chose for his son-in-law, he would make thirty
powerful enemies. The most famous among them
were Ulysses, King of the island of Ithaca ; Diomed,
King of &tolia; Ajax, King of SilXmis, the bravest
and strongest man in Greece; his brother Teucer ;
Philoctétes, the friend of Hercules ; and Ménélaus,
King of Sparta. At last, as there was no other
way of deciding among them, an entirely new idea
occurred to Ulysses—namely, that Helen should be
allowed to choose her own husband herself, and
that, before she chose, all the rival suitors should
make a great and solemn oath to approve her
choice, and to defend her and her husband against
all enemies thenceforth and for ever. This oath
they all took loyally and with one accord, and
Helen chose Menelaus, King of Sparta, who married
her with great rejoicing, and took her away to his
kingdom.

And all would have gone well but for that
wretched apple. For Venus was faithful to her
promise that the most beautiful of all women
should be the wife of Paris: and so Menelaus,
returning from a journey, found that a Trojan
prince had visited his Court during his absence,
and had gone away, taking Helen with him to
Troy. This Trojan prince was Paris, who, seeing
THE APPLE OF DISCORD. 289

Helen, had forgotten Cinone, and could think of
nothing but her whom Venus had given him.
Then, through all Greece and all the islands,
went forth the summons of King Menelaus, re-
minding the thirty princes of their great oath:
and each and all of them, and many more, came
to the gathering-place with all their ships and
all their men, to help Menelaus and to bring back
Helen. Such a host as gathered together at Aulis
had never been seen since the world began—there
were nearly twelve hundred ships and more than
a hundred thousand men: it was the first time that
all the Greeks joined together in one cause. There,
besides those who had come for their oath’s sake,
were Nestor, the old King of Pylos—so old that
he remembered Jason and the Golden Fleece, but,
at ninety years old, as ready for battle as the
youngest there; and Achilles, the son of Peleus
and Thetis, scarcely more than a boy, but fated to
outdo the deeds of the bravest of them all. The
kings and princes elected Agamemnon, King of
Mycene and Argos, and brother of Menelaus, to
be their general-in-chief; and he forthwith sent a
herald to Troy to demand the surrender of Helen.
But King Priam was indignant that these chiefs
of petty kingdoms should dare to threaten the
sacred city of Troy: and he replied to the demand
by a scornful challenge, and by sending out his
T
290 THE APPLE OF DISCORD.

summons also to his friends and allies. And it
was as well answered as that of Menelaus had been.
There came to his standard Rhesus, with a great
army from Thrace; and Sarpédon, the greatest king
in all Asia; and Memnon, King of thiopia, with
twenty thousand men—the hundred thousand
Greeks were not so many as the army of Priam.
Then Agamemnon gave the order to sail for Troy:
and Ate laughed aloud, for her apple had brought
upon mankind the First Great War.

And now I seem to be waking from a dream
which is fading away. The gods are becoming
shadows, vanishing farther and farther away from
man. I could tell you, if I would, the story of
how Troy was taken and burned after ten years of
fighting, and how Priam and his sons were slain ;
of the wonderful adventures of Ulysses by sea and
land before he returned home; of the deeds of
Achilles and Hector; of how the few Trojans
who escaped the slaughter followed Prince A®néas
into Italy, where he made a kingdom, and was
the forefather of Romitlus, who built the city of
Rome, which brings us from Mythology, the
stories of gods and heroes, into History, the
stories of men. All these things came from Ate’s
THE APPLE OF DISCORD. 291

apple: yes, even the history of Rome, and of
England, and of all the world.

You will read in the great poems of Homer
the story of the siege of Troy and the wanderings
of Ulysses; and in the ‘ Aneid’ of Virgil, to my
mind the very greatest of all poems, the whole
story of Atneas, But my stories end where the
great poets begin theirs. I seem, as I have said,
to have been dreaming a long dream: and before
I quite wake I see the gods growing fainter and
fainter, year by year and century by century, while
men and women believed in them less and less, until
—when they were wellnigh forgotten, or thought
of only as poets’ fables—there came a great loud cry
which made the whole world sigh and tremble :

“Pan IS Deap!”

men heard all Nature cry; and they knew it to
mean that the last of the gods was no more—that a
new time had come for the world. And that same
night a star rose into sight at Bethlehem, and stood
over the manger where a young Child lay.

And yet, gone and lost though the gods be, you
will be very blind indeed if you never catch a
glimpse of a Dryad in the woods or of an Oread on
the hil: if you never think of Hercules when
things seem against you and hard to understand :
if you do not see in Perseus the true knight that a
292 THE APPLE OF DISCORD.

true man should strive to be. What more shall I
say, before I lay down my pen? Only that these
stories are not nonsense—no, not one of them:
that the more one thinks of them the wiser they
are: and that I love them so much, and think
so much of what made me begin them, that I
cannot believe that I have come to the end.

THE END.

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'1252' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKB' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e25cd4af7a3a52f54101445e66f50ab4
9f4687a6a31a5eea7e897a9c24d5aa8f566f1ebc
'2011-12-17T04:27:27-05:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
757c52ca9729608e080046a62018e13d
6ee03fe94ebc666ff25513000ab2ed5f71bcdb12
'2011-12-17T04:09:26-05:00'
describe
'563' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4e7cdbf6e52a1ceadd6165e3a1ed1bb5
17d23a332fab01aeb867b2b61c0b1f6151bef67b
'2011-12-17T04:19:57-05:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKE' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f164cc65cd3e5bcc0405df69fd6dfa15
6945f90b4d5b05dfe493238a02cedae0ab2bd284
'2011-12-17T04:14:16-05:00'
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
5961990e98f0fac8ae074f2c97c0b503
3b59639ca2704311f8cfe1030863468c66af8345
'2011-12-17T04:24:03-05:00'
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
cedfedf4d535c3bddae6fd9235a8d701
671a07ee6b6368a1deaec1ee3d103bebcbd5018b
'2011-12-17T04:09:36-05:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
2cff2d9317e0288f8f781dd74c4ae697
2838ccd5db37f7583aff50cfd570277f914e8a8a
'2011-12-17T04:11:48-05:00'
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKI' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b84bba5fe666bac298a0155a1a2548a7
a69c5ccc90fbf2cfa95243cc59b059bafcb725b3
'2011-12-17T04:11:55-05:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ea9e103e4d78f14a7733074c26c720fa
ebdd0070e75e460f804dec3bc42c1e129194b128
'2011-12-17T04:23:38-05:00'
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
2fc82e131bd942b43ca9a1c2816ebd78
570eb94bf77d91bbe177a8edfefe330aab3bda74
'2011-12-17T04:19:56-05:00'
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKL' 'sip-files00023.txt'
4c4bbf74a221fbeab61b24d458fb2206
6060cb5888fde076b2fdf4df28d430d8064ead80
'2011-12-17T04:14:14-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1422' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2f70575d4e9a306c32087fe5bc7a901c
4f3e10dda4b6a224a6c5a6a48c07722a2d9c94b2
'2011-12-17T04:11:20-05:00'
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7b830904a00d046c26d5e8306e6bccee
0a6dbe16408acc621cec95c232187935b2ce404f
'2011-12-17T04:20:33-05:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6bcf865782ad9a86daf26d5843a5a7f7
c4a0c2ff6292e1bfd676730fc57c6d39f4ebf31e
'2011-12-17T04:11:28-05:00'
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
37d1cfa5f74ac1e01385b05221fddffd
cadafdd35eece9637b47ce90811a6bf797b812b4
'2011-12-17T04:11:19-05:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
a4efdb618e900b94596946f7bd557bcb
9c636e70ace54d7975abfdf79e795d701fd97e00
'2011-12-17T04:15:48-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKR' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8b401990ff4afa8c921712106767bc6b
06cb7f4d76b85fa1f4ed6b832822d41e3f97e9f4
'2011-12-17T04:13:42-05:00'
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e5f77fa8c57110f8e5fc336f72aca2c3
fedf9f3550553d82528d2719c3f4abcf25271e62
'2011-12-17T04:13:18-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
8d7dca04dd3b788b14c3257e5e8c1d5c
c3ddeff6247308ba4ec7245257179f93f574dd6a
'2011-12-17T04:10:05-05:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
5e44a70dc3934e1fc99f57db1e0b8cd4
980ecfa85ed9d9ed92f00d10c6d1981346f420d0
'2011-12-17T04:21:02-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
393006bf44a3fefc14028581c07ba4ea
6229e3b54fb76c658583024db48570e08c21a6d3
'2011-12-17T04:14:53-05:00'
describe
'163' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6eefaa2b4cad7e43ad2aedc1d8399e0b
229d57cd4ffd8251630ac871f8523bd35ad93e1b
'2011-12-17T04:13:10-05:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKX' 'sip-files00036.txt'
846ab782a1fbb806a4023b74fb4f672d
dda5640d21f060188a7aeb872a92ce51956f4cc1
'2011-12-17T04:17:06-05:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKY' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e2cb5a170f6a8a2af7d4c27e8b4ce769
9fb47db99131d41bbeb9f8bc84cd1476cbe609ac
'2011-12-17T04:14:56-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKKZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
57230ed1e1cee3509616153425be402b
6e9c134c6de3bddcd22e398eb131da4e10059fbb
'2011-12-17T04:10:59-05:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e810fcd5903d87e5510009b3da2311e7
de033deb010aea8abff68d3dd7fd969be38245e4
'2011-12-17T04:25:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1ce54c33edef3df81fd698e4a6bc3c70
6033f487d2d06be2f19edf340d63722a9474e7e8
'2011-12-17T04:14:49-05:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
beb44b2d5bffdc4aa3efbf32c7229b54
d00dda82fedce9ed5aa875a476dc2af5ac657993
'2011-12-17T04:15:12-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8d29dc5d598e6e5ba8c2bf17d1e66b47
dee30e2090bc306c661ab42b488a5fde61f330fa
'2011-12-17T04:15:55-05:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6ea10996f5d34dd0191bb62637475196
547b32a2773208357f5fc89deb8f172b48792102
'2011-12-17T04:09:16-05:00'
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLF' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f342d951a494627de99b8e1f2a61feba
47677377dcdb6e59af520e1bdd5fc6593d313b56
'2011-12-17T04:13:09-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9e09d74d8d8ed82a650a12177753a437
e8e7cf5aeb806e04d6143027f56b5679cc651e16
'2011-12-17T04:14:59-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
9ca42c8b336c6a0942eb4bd886197dac
b1970e3e3c060e000dece63896955d770c8fa601
'2011-12-17T04:19:38-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b4dfd21f205e9c5543c5d65500e898f9
ad9fc6d46a980fa71c2f85227fa8f5c099d56fb2
'2011-12-17T04:12:21-05:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
ae93c797ec84559525f70b6da46f326e
263a9daf90b3a13836caa002dbabd816b923554a
'2011-12-17T04:15:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLK' 'sip-files00049.txt'
9d4de2232f8347c167db3122c5b71cdb
cc25ce4832357acbe4def8e9ce389ff6317b8f90
'2011-12-17T04:23:22-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
23a6cb58d732d01cee175bdd12b275a4
a296af2a8ba4a341a2f57a628d1b82bb8939631d
'2011-12-17T04:19:06-05:00'
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f04719936615aaf3b500b7b0f93758aa
a51792191573370c12ffca65d6ec226c45b458ff
'2011-12-17T04:15:58-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
43d110084eabe6aac513c378965dfbaa
4e1ba437c9b6202850ad956f9cd9e8ae209602d3
'2011-12-17T04:13:58-05:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
9448125ad7c75a671bdebb82f12da6a3
e02ae16940abe12dd643c7e3130088956763f5f5
'2011-12-17T04:12:32-05:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
6e1bd0ff9f00d7e29c45c729b6a3cab9
5a5e27de11ea18dd5e8c70163898cda9cb9b5ef8
'2011-12-17T04:26:38-05:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e27ced5e1b43e28b172245140bcb7ede
1da4bfa2d24cb17471da2b7330f01294f0d37fbf
'2011-12-17T04:15:26-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8590a74d4e66ec932dc656273ede8ee0
e9a615191df98ac4410a172d8287cce9aeb9c19e
'2011-12-17T04:17:34-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLS' 'sip-files00057.txt'
daa4617ab29324032ed9bee8a2443f5f
a312dde7d995309cde0af8a061fe3b61be8fcddc
'2011-12-17T04:18:38-05:00'
describe
'609' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f0aaa87ac3405dff58e8cdd3a2824d00
a5435e84355c16a1e0f68a72c9024ca341891625
'2011-12-17T04:13:55-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
bf5ffe6cdc99b52cf06f65012a40424d
8163ff48f3ae79be4a5a2a6c7458eb0ff852326d
'2011-12-17T04:10:34-05:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a341375648044e04740807fb4cc342e1
b0ca26f0802406529d513e9815e0a4ac3b2d7b57
'2011-12-17T04:13:15-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLW' 'sip-files00061.txt'
b3210369d01c88c5b7f72c20a4dca4d2
48857023f1fb7c4d32e2e758c2e943073bfec5ac
'2011-12-17T04:09:58-05:00'
describe
'511' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLX' 'sip-files00062.txt'
81b7dd1ecb412072d846c5b4e5e21a12
8da38f8eab84201e7998f0b240a2ee4abe862990
'2011-12-17T04:10:31-05:00'
describe
'829' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLY' 'sip-files00063.txt'
efc4ed3e202fc5637e71b0a5fe9c85b3
a10051238c161e0a7d505f884f9c724a2559e1ae
'2011-12-17T04:22:14-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKLZ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bff122531f8202948cc117279fc6b4a8
7e79ce8cee17bdd050d045aad0ac1201df95daa2
'2011-12-17T04:10:16-05:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
46bf651bc7bc06ee44ddbb0aba98ba6b
75b885e93d17854e9b3e2a269f38c80f3c31f4a8
'2011-12-17T04:26:00-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c147fcf1d602bbb4f6bead1a3c4992c9
e26228f1d97010005d79045209c099cc07792c9c
'2011-12-17T04:14:43-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMC' 'sip-files00067.txt'
78f242c82214c3590d16ef3a949d2d35
8403157acc45e4af369d272b4c6b95a0188d9385
'2011-12-17T04:28:05-05:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMD' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d68a567e0feabf0225b8ad9ecac2f647
47eafe7f75aecf95322ad95cb3e8e16f0d8cb7b2
'2011-12-17T04:21:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKME' 'sip-files00069.txt'
31d8f13473b2712abcbff63007d24d3f
ff12696736c992bf191dffc750bbf8f24a3a12d5
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMF' 'sip-files00070.txt'
0a6233c8b55c0ceb9f082708efdeecb4
638f3b22915e39e995796985c5e36154d4231a38
'2011-12-17T04:13:52-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
5bea7aeb87b43f4d747889a8362355c8
a2bea8d7d92089f44a68d26a22bfa34be407b8f9
'2011-12-17T04:11:18-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
11743ac1a0e2d993e73a12e23b88ce5e
7316b01538e07402d2fb04505c7993e8f8a9295b
'2011-12-17T04:10:32-05:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMI' 'sip-files00073.txt'
4e8fefd9ae48676a917856b0d4a15fad
3ace7770c7b045cf572c4425e61355b822049e31
'2011-12-17T04:14:04-05:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMJ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
44c81b613343899dadd50b014580c34e
553fe889e1feb7e824c004122dcf9cda4e61176c
'2011-12-17T04:13:33-05:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMK' 'sip-files00075.txt'
5a662d996d905f28d6df522df6c584b7
96e9a5d8d5c08848d672c6721405c7610aa4c3d1
'2011-12-17T04:13:23-05:00'
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKML' 'sip-files00076.txt'
9bdb820601fa0c936f2be3bd092ecb24
5727e8e23ba4c9aa1e7d98560e216c0172c2956c
'2011-12-17T04:27:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMM' 'sip-files00077.txt'
438551dc8d18a83333d9e14f687b3b93
54891d192257efa58b26474210e4409c1618fa3e
'2011-12-17T04:19:42-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
50324d2deb6561221a7217833f222951
c5c32ac45add5048b3682296a7739711c5c43deb
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMO' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9eeaabc1f4276a966a1f5ce612aa7750
20ce44b9773fed152a166772a1ba050368fd0841
'2011-12-17T04:13:21-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMP' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c0aba7254d6f865ae74adf1f3bdd82b9
7976c12929af266be619d7bc7b1ff40664b58fee
'2011-12-17T04:11:08-05:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMQ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2ef2bf111d6d1b748df89a0eceeee347
1c830b026de9d5c2087af54df9dbac0bb5dcbefe
'2011-12-17T04:10:28-05:00'
describe
'445' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
3dd8799a36b1a777e1fcbe0fa723589b
ef95cd2bafdca5b00ff7b9ced461de8948f48c1a
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMS' 'sip-files00083.txt'
d49892fab3ebb4790e5a95600cfa54af
76eed9a71490100d4363d835cce5e4985cd8796c
'2011-12-17T04:14:57-05:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMT' 'sip-files00084.txt'
0c02122a3713e6b0633e5e964f9b67a6
26a090748e8f8b6cdc28f7678c8c7d5693fe5d24
'2011-12-17T04:17:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
2c655ccbcb880ba857e7207973b9bcf3
b15246224cda2e3ddc8d97bcee37b8707ee6aee9
'2011-12-17T04:20:18-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7203594ae0f3314de295600af72036fb
8da3f2d26def0271ddff2ad1fc2b670197f4c26f
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMW' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f5e1c9d4c4290f930de21202f17d3e6d
cdd93a9a786c18044a313856a045da7ee7ce28b6
'2011-12-17T04:13:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMX' 'sip-files00088.txt'
bd572d3dda0cb041f498217ce3bab88c
37208fee0cbed7fc4aca952e43984cd4e66e294e
'2011-12-17T04:13:34-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
733d1c3e105483232959cb5ccd7d178c
cf6db087d8f84f7eeba10fcc63ba6e028c04f95c
'2011-12-17T04:23:39-05:00'
describe
'483' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKMZ' 'sip-files00090.txt'
cd6e07b271043e1b51a418331e87b468
06296a171a56257d8e20683d45920c9d1f8f2809
'2011-12-17T04:12:51-05:00'
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
241e01425f60978a3b7fda13333ece93
2ec476b4c75933b43404da5b77066871a731d8dc
'2011-12-17T04:19:20-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNB' 'sip-files00092.txt'
cb415fd82c7afce43c8f27ec224179c2
c4417255482eaa6e019930e81f61c30fd67aafc8
'2011-12-17T04:18:32-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNC' 'sip-files00093.txt'
aa5cab69dfe248aa8911a9bd9bb9b7af
993f7f19e221f9d2efbea0f6fb7dbac38d200ca2
'2011-12-17T04:10:03-05:00'
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKND' 'sip-files00094.txt'
109931f52e2085ba94abbc757beffa3c
3cad9f6baa1a071676c4dfe2a019cc5870a2dee6
'2011-12-17T04:17:51-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
bfe38d44ea23e7b46829ebf02b4b60b2
c173ecf6b2dbabc9b9e7ca4f8ed3f63649bf0a34
'2011-12-17T04:19:23-05:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNF' 'sip-files00096.txt'
439dfd7b15ec76a28db9cf889ddb0ce2
235ceb32779767ed8332418fcb1e7e0795712f96
'2011-12-17T04:15:14-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNG' 'sip-files00097.txt'
8b7b242a032df5c872d40fcedb4baed4
f988a11e2289d1154e9fc0cb342e2b713fb46419
'2011-12-17T04:18:46-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
a825756e4689177ee67e7c4c9750b6a8
3b9fe4f7865fa009381395a99e537a7bb9bce094
'2011-12-17T04:09:43-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNI' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8ad59e5227c3b125c9f68f242d4baacd
3265a17e31e422dda07948e57e2599246b956cec
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNJ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
88192c937ae3bf878abd5dd627b9cb6a
431a4567c1c813f6a4cdeee5dcc31d1d4467bc8d
'2011-12-17T04:13:14-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNK' 'sip-files00101.txt'
0b18061e2e1d4dee89fde7ba1cd8c3e7
15c7164578aaa46953f261384b4770f680affd7e
'2011-12-17T04:11:37-05:00'
describe
'336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNL' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e73bd51181a3e00411ca2bbd97a0de9d
309de83829880e132c2f67a8473861692832a7d8
'2011-12-17T04:17:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a3828623edee3c50252e2c8827792ab1
fedba531d9149d5180f917ff19e6859dbbcdaac1
'2011-12-17T04:11:40-05:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
c75edf0f866abe04e780f68a6ba5a1c9
c92595a45527a25551a585708dbc431f1656645c
'2011-12-17T04:18:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNO' 'sip-files00105.txt'
1f59f978b26caa68162003e949db1c9b
fa4ae8d166cc993c02ffc86e55c1a5f684099e07
'2011-12-17T04:15:15-05:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNP' 'sip-files00106.txt'
7e1a3a73535334fb45e1e2bb9303273a
64b8f4c1fabfc8dee5e01cb7c2a4c4fa1da79090
'2011-12-17T04:16:19-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNQ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
871033d3f38af9397e5caf352ba5307e
b866d8f4509f23f1328c5c03004120abb44f74a8
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNR' 'sip-files00108.txt'
d4cd052820f76cd91e77eed5084c1f0a
0ac03d57a8515b15d14d28a562042e97a7d636d4
'2011-12-17T04:14:01-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
b5f2cea9b4fb5bed25a7a44cb0cc72f9
2f3dd70e1253b31e6484c874bed30baf5ea5e216
'2011-12-17T04:14:12-05:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNT' 'sip-files00110.txt'
19cde3112aad94cc8d98cf823512898e
9a2d5ca1b2478b35d7a2e8d60e614c2cc7905085
'2011-12-17T04:18:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
c740e995a9894d83025990bdb00a853c
b9927e4df71914a5717e35d556f73e40ce0eebb3
'2011-12-17T04:16:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNV' 'sip-files00112.txt'
ab20a5961fc1bbb5be5a7b5942b710d7
51ca387e84276cba373283c98210024e91c54a39
'2011-12-17T04:17:36-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNW' 'sip-files00113.txt'
0a53ebd8c27b6880fb0c559f483f8469
6827664410827b020a4472751d940cd2f91178a8
'2011-12-17T04:17:33-05:00'
describe
'208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNX' 'sip-files00114.txt'
9e82fb70dbff90c22c0cbd6221e81879
37af1ed91c283d27b139292f633ff7aa582a7d3d
'2011-12-17T04:23:45-05:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
22e64c63022b37e5f3253e5dfc1ee95f
d2709f6849587c0eabadd47412cbae234014a7fd
'2011-12-17T04:09:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKNZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
db1e133c645221dfe5c10ace5cee2056
841f87eb22b7cce3904049c666bbc958daa6f9a5
'2011-12-17T04:24:10-05:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
04814cba0163aa9fa2e8aaf0c595f76f
f11c5067f42ec032d00184c03f50d61093f2523e
'2011-12-17T04:13:06-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOB' 'sip-files00119.txt'
31d8b8355951179aa423c1e1e8837b6e
bfd99feda80afdc7385736340e6c1978581336ff
'2011-12-17T04:24:19-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
37079f710ad2c52689c9e38dd7b1f7ef
ece72d3d757e2e868ca80f992ec53e443500754d
'2011-12-17T04:26:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e44a1db5c9e1c41a5f12b70bd8c1a05a
ec503c8be60ff0b72f0bea491564b498ca525765
'2011-12-17T04:13:49-05:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4a0528dd9eff0b6be561c779e44eed14
0ddf513f7227f9fe7cad2b03655052290c207db9
'2011-12-17T04:19:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOF' 'sip-files00123.txt'
9537a8cdac2739d3f11c0ab9747e8f5f
e89e30e549a3e90bcbf9c49d790868328e7ecc49
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
1bf8145490e244db62ed3c13de163a96
b0a2cf45bcae89a0d69c8110d7fd1b7122c98caa
'2011-12-17T04:13:57-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOH' 'sip-files00125.txt'
17b7db87f8db5672134ea2b26b8bd038
1fdf8320e4b5ddf879227038b79c5c12c37f28e2
'2011-12-17T04:25:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOI' 'sip-files00126.txt'
845ee050cc094a799041494a7c144b77
277b4361baf2722f6e18ce58e9d1f073b3ff6995
'2011-12-17T04:15:57-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOJ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
32fe1ef3a2ebb84dd2aa3898eb5121ca
7ffd8161d3fe1d4d7a73b6b4ed84b05871cbf9c0
'2011-12-17T04:20:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
6ac3942a3e6808583028cbaa7a031347
34e958abb06283c685b1d0407b4ded3b2516d4c9
'2011-12-17T04:17:40-05:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
98adc4bece0c4a3311345e74efdf857e
ea269a4c2e2c49fc7b33e4daaab3103fa448abf4
'2011-12-17T04:16:01-05:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
4040a266cfe9d6e88ce4009096775452
4e516ad6e9657496817501dc61aa6f6fc640fcd3
'2011-12-17T04:14:47-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKON' 'sip-files00131.txt'
c5d99d1c1b3d58d114808eca6f48f2d2
681bb7b9c447f48adb166273f3d5459b0c7445c6
'2011-12-17T04:12:28-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOO' 'sip-files00132.txt'
e511b9cf681bb6b633f9c112642036cf
361a3cda3f7544886bdf3e045c8c5aa4d989c0a8
'2011-12-17T04:14:35-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOP' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c9f5ad066bf99d249771867ade44a84d
6399741ee9810f36f996b9f13d92689cffce41a9
describe
'337' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOQ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
0fc6cf318ac20611cbe6bc698c2e6ea7
ef9affe8c62c7a574897f1342a8d18f2e8af0a4c
'2011-12-17T04:09:56-05:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
85e5759cbee1e01af1e312ec66210f54
df95b4fdecea89693f24e937a34ab90a19d53de7
'2011-12-17T04:10:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOS' 'sip-files00136.txt'
3c165574e78581ab6192c0267e3dc845
d742e07cf4bc40bf3e8759a321c6d5ac87f27f92
'2011-12-17T04:17:45-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
397ff4953c038d8d00876b0f070786e3
6f85c10f6a59cb4f3e47f62d04d8b05953aa98a5
'2011-12-17T04:27:22-05:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2854ff713ffe27f45b003b68b1cf144c
bb87fe26e843fdced0898ded8f7d8ed1ea04664c
'2011-12-17T04:11:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOV' 'sip-files00139.txt'
c36aa3f4f0cf2d297d1d15345b15c844
f8a4e65fbbe72e912b1a6653dc10d7582bc3ed90
'2011-12-17T04:23:26-05:00'
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOW' 'sip-files00140.txt'
90c9884f40dd979757ac21174b1d3f66
1bb91b7422cc6583ec59bf0fd6617ccbbdbd83e9
'2011-12-17T04:17:53-05:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1b74503a13806a1b72ab9f80a85296ef
0a547dad4300f4933d1956a2bdc92ab00a4bca70
'2011-12-17T04:16:24-05:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
0c4e19d90f79fb90927c8b00cfd5820f
b2f6bac98a185470b896ab633a4d91ec0c288f6a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKOZ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
d3294230478e98e34e873ed008a2df60
36aa584e9b0b5064db97ced78863ff3ae0709644
'2011-12-17T04:10:24-05:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPA' 'sip-files00144.txt'
6ed9bf0c44c273bce6dbb9d266e2bb2c
8b796b8f433f405eb2b3080670571b569f03bf74
'2011-12-17T04:12:18-05:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
fd120c944cb4384b0dc094bed63c8ce5
860fed334fc950b272ff1daf0e0331887cf0759d
'2011-12-17T04:22:42-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPC' 'sip-files00146.txt'
399c3f288efe681e33c34b50b88bfdb1
197fbbd6f3f3caa43d58b2b9009fce11f910ea2c
'2011-12-17T04:20:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPD' 'sip-files00147.txt'
97ce8d7c02160b6f0c5daf2c053d8f15
9ce16ee8069e07a81e7e1a8cc85a142c7b6aefad
'2011-12-17T04:16:29-05:00'
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPE' 'sip-files00148.txt'
69284b1568a2ee802c98a2b8d1f6cd65
730a27ab04180ae7890deef0ed1d54e29465d9c7
'2011-12-17T04:21:03-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPF' 'sip-files00149.txt'
13dcf1fc8b07152fd52af82d7c2b9f54
47429c6148e7752edae7776e4ded97900eb41bbf
'2011-12-17T04:14:39-05:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
b01368f535662de7f73a4ea67c917b5e
0977781670dd8d1c82256964bac211191e9946b7
'2011-12-17T04:27:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPH' 'sip-files00151.txt'
26690acc7502664a9e655f4089caf801
796d1683e32a93f3b559abaf7133fd71d9efc3b8
'2011-12-17T04:15:56-05:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPI' 'sip-files00152.txt'
1347fbf323a96c91977bc7774c7bcb9d
9ead88e8610bf2825888eb690f1dd3b746b18918
'2011-12-17T04:17:03-05:00'
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPJ' 'sip-files00153.txt'
7004e47e9df43887c3c1078bfa086a6e
453709208f9aeb765622980488c49b1ba11dc3f3
'2011-12-17T04:16:48-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPK' 'sip-files00154.txt'
7c6931448aa3794f73caba8ab084be72
559ebc8634fb825d2a146e10f244a00e3dbe315c
'2011-12-17T04:17:59-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPL' 'sip-files00155.txt'
a17cc61c5bde3aad6c2f00c02377abd1
68bc1d5b07938263a0adc7e5230e8b7b0a7e9d91
'2011-12-17T04:13:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPM' 'sip-files00156.txt'
eff26f146fc79571a49368ec1431c47c
9e778a48b7f17a6158dce5d10524cd442e81b572
'2011-12-17T04:13:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPN' 'sip-files00157.txt'
de3d3d3a710741b9432234e7abe5c511
cc3f25bcc62d9a6f87ec947e8f3a20f0e3e0c146
'2011-12-17T04:15:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
899736837f247e532e1fbd7758b98030
36a04c07f069c42a5be5514db1996538a38b44ea
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPP' 'sip-files00159.txt'
d980c6e2bb072636a0aa25a8ab95f82f
c9e96012d048a385e6d2f27da93a6be8cb20e19b
'2011-12-17T04:22:04-05:00'
describe
'210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPQ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
a0ac2dc0011cc9ee990ccf78caa609df
46e8238904ace8802fe546dfb8cce20abe757ea3
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPR' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0f14a3f96b9218c88be9889a106f7bff
5b2f8daf3634fae887e51a92b20bb58a8bc12d41
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPS' 'sip-files00163.txt'
6c9cf5dc26feff13792e2d110fc5c6bf
7ee5b1ed90b88f42c72329a419b728d59a7c5b03
'2011-12-17T04:12:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPT' 'sip-files00164.txt'
7980cd30f203f1202ddbddce48ae0f09
70685450dc726cf501b260c637e4f685ef1fbf75
'2011-12-17T04:27:58-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPU' 'sip-files00165.txt'
3b3ee846c5c6f5506f01f10dd8e90c5d
d8e770b15db7d25cea7c80d2ac171ee00baa0eef
'2011-12-17T04:11:34-05:00'
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPV' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8aeb7edcb6da21ae3856739252a55109
c81876224a984806326e793af48c5a8730200bda
'2011-12-17T04:28:16-05:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPW' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4f529f72a2c57a6a5bde2601362ae54d
f78835965192dbaf75444e1faa9fb034bb5821ec
'2011-12-17T04:13:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPX' 'sip-files00168.txt'
72a99290a25394e97745833636210917
7d23fe53b63fe3a41e3f0ee5d6fa126ed93d8d10
'2011-12-17T04:11:45-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPY' 'sip-files00169.txt'
6f9c57b5cb7adf11536541a4557ca5c7
98ff29ee462c8087e58ad07ae562a29e74af68d4
'2011-12-17T04:19:31-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKPZ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
dd454e6315e1965c1d76fdf58e76e1a5
8847ea22409f6298c84756a39e29177d9bdb2e61
'2011-12-17T04:21:15-05:00'
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQA' 'sip-files00171.txt'
5bf2abecdfc5a2ce6f15f45c7c8df756
19e4d4dd6a0eb87bd25eaaa1d2dabf021574fd55
'2011-12-17T04:18:30-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQB' 'sip-files00172.txt'
5ed2efa5ae649cf18256b865bcb7c4f3
291fe42c055fb8fac8dd2eb80e94627a26c02584
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQC' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b14b4a836080c1cea5efd808c8a49be6
1ca02bbdd05c1e9ebf7159918684ba1c851f2649
'2011-12-17T04:16:55-05:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQD' 'sip-files00174.txt'
3c694c2a40b7d11f3830e1a0eade375f
8993e4e6a22f9c33c19a38f233394039dca1d463
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQE' 'sip-files00175.txt'
227e6112b0a1e4e9505f1ecf5d7ceca3
ff23f4955294256237b44bd65d66d89dc3d1cd50
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQF' 'sip-files00176.txt'
cc90f49aec3281c42bfddb236f61c512
aa0890f9c0a18851c833a47396dc6e55238025e7
'2011-12-17T04:13:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQG' 'sip-files00177.txt'
e2ffda5ecff7ab064f5d5f9427c94b12
716a243d405b94e4d2e64835b026603c6a7c602d
'2011-12-17T04:18:55-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
94ff0daf39da163cf2b1f93a93a29969
3803783833892697f60ef9cb0bf305fe6307e775
'2011-12-17T04:09:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQI' 'sip-files00179.txt'
106d57e4ab05d6d3f5327a29d7546e04
0e0f9b37d07391264cbe24ea9cfae83f12bf23d8
'2011-12-17T04:11:29-05:00'
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQJ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
596c1b267286f1325ed00009501bebf8
540c0703f01aaf67acfae941b26914b32a3b670a
describe
Invalid character
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQK' 'sip-files00182.txt'
dff6f9dfcd0155a2f9ea0fcbb4feda5f
46bd31d5fe2e43dd89349973b50351676b4bd111
'2011-12-17T04:15:52-05:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQL' 'sip-files00183.txt'
39df323a114d8e53309e92ab7ca532a4
9cc60d61006ac0c0f2eb196a7ad82a3f2f54ef8f
'2011-12-17T04:16:53-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQM' 'sip-files00184.txt'
6dfbac030c158ef4c9d963ef5a51f348
dd1f28e74a25d18e1a93104d657ed8e0db1715ff
'2011-12-17T04:13:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d3f51882c16edb760b91131ffa61cfa6
d57df5727d285fe613b1ebd66c4bdbd675ecfd3d
'2011-12-17T04:10:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQO' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b51ceef629e21c7148070dc5a8f38d72
17a4a68182987e0a34b7e5426c8456acaed37ac8
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQP' 'sip-files00187.txt'
dfce84237147d29fa8fb3e33e0515110
df32a8b8192981e59e46be9a41be6a55cacad86c
'2011-12-17T04:10:10-05:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQQ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
9f0066fbaac84d085ad71b0edc98a966
dd8e2438a2d1713e98a4e18f99ed016c82159d71
'2011-12-17T04:15:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQR' 'sip-files00189.txt'
eb0cd8ade01ea2eed6e6a3d89aa48453
1724bd0ce5586d703618bfff3ecad854bc38b163
'2011-12-17T04:25:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQS' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1236a90bbf4bf5d57e2224a115f51a12
a64f9cc3c99f73870d8506ff85cc76e1e773012d
'2011-12-17T04:19:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQT' 'sip-files00191.txt'
63344f5a4c049955e7ea5dc6cd90f88f
1834f0703e6b14fca944a554a2617c541be9e547
'2011-12-17T04:25:24-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQU' 'sip-files00192.txt'
7e0fedef2eb31f276255b5713f740be9
8e12b8a651ca1fec5477862f171737b3f1ef1498
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQV' 'sip-files00193.txt'
32b2740dffbc0b3b0c80d0fb4fb18ee8
89b6bd80b53b169856d36b4c3b01ea8fde8fa5df
'2011-12-17T04:19:36-05:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQW' 'sip-files00194.txt'
651215ae1677c576cd05187584738e11
47d818a6a12c8185171a3c5f757a079747e2d31e
'2011-12-17T04:16:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQX' 'sip-files00195.txt'
23f57925535215f737852c28cef9330c
0d70f72d6f2334370bee352fc6746d0aecbbd72a
'2011-12-17T04:16:07-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQY' 'sip-files00196.txt'
f34cdd38ea2d4e49ebe2d3150d9f041b
44fe80b833ea72adb1225446046eceb23ee79d20
'2011-12-17T04:24:47-05:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKQZ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
89daebcf026af97ebc75109054f07c28
81590940ee0bce6f066b229df5b29af61a83da01
'2011-12-17T04:15:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRA' 'sip-files00198.txt'
a2206c28e46af4f57639f09454a7e50b
c12995abca81f70d1507210648574cf17263435d
'2011-12-17T04:11:04-05:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRB' 'sip-files00199.txt'
2a3c98abadab690ac99e176b065de4d7
b2bb6754dda10118fe619949424f02e7870c811e
'2011-12-17T04:14:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRC' 'sip-files00200.txt'
8f0cf6fe2373b194e5f824c832468bc2
10dacd575d46e18671d8615eecaab56d9809793e
'2011-12-17T04:15:39-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRD' 'sip-files00201.txt'
60993ba96d7e8dec48e7af115eedad34
f8f381761c22d33c3e2f991feb3d6f45385f00bc
'2011-12-17T04:09:42-05:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRE' 'sip-files00202.txt'
437b4230b6a04a6b20ee8ec2d1b8c2af
578af73514a2af25bb49dd61cf9b7687d87673c2
'2011-12-17T04:22:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRF' 'sip-files00203.txt'
0617e262b1da706a1545ec282b1b25da
4bd52912e1ae9cb194281bee0c8666c662e1ea20
'2011-12-17T04:26:06-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRG' 'sip-files00204.txt'
0a07a1e5b7583e90f4836646c5987861
5d1d3f585b4bbe6d43871263c3a535fd57447139
'2011-12-17T04:11:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRH' 'sip-files00205.txt'
21b250e4b6f253194682478faa6536e0
8fc373b72fcfd5a048edbbe975dff97378a68f4a
'2011-12-17T04:22:06-05:00'
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
643846cf784c1a892aad5c3453097cb6
6772da9ab709411d138f7feb736c6c408d81d8e3
'2011-12-17T04:09:34-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRJ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
4dac65197713c9ebb76ebdddf969f3af
55df69f7d21c00bd6bbae1086cf1593bdc1d813b
'2011-12-17T04:15:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRK' 'sip-files00209.txt'
96d1f6366f7ae04fb06d50fb13d3a329
53d8b1fbdd8fc07a7f31cc9d742b6038fefebd07
'2011-12-17T04:12:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRL' 'sip-files00210.txt'
105f6de097df6516a1a2e96fad0abe80
5b0393a402cb787d01ef82eda34f724c349c1b2f
'2011-12-17T04:20:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRM' 'sip-files00211.txt'
55b5f56acac4fafcfcbfb49371cd011d
0fc9ddbf158a018cdeef0d9000c9187c36dfdf5b
'2011-12-17T04:12:39-05:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRN' 'sip-files00212.txt'
4df3d49975236e5b594449f1ca5b6a74
04409e06e66b7360209bdffe11d21a73f5298871
'2011-12-17T04:21:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRO' 'sip-files00213.txt'
f972a98147e625f7b9fdfb0216241ea5
fa26ac38376e3cbcea9bb0a6f9d39dd512489c16
'2011-12-17T04:17:39-05:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRP' 'sip-files00214.txt'
7e89d8811ae74ff05100cc2e31942d5b
8016618a934b9d48f315e2baac576f6efbc4241d
'2011-12-17T04:23:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRQ' 'sip-files00215.txt'
0ce4913888cb7e864f932eb0da90f121
29557c86b643c851b585032fb7d6e74565c6179a
'2011-12-17T04:12:27-05:00'
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRR' 'sip-files00216.txt'
3c8da57392a3163699bb633c522c47eb
98b838ceb0a7fcf2c8323873df66289a0186e0c4
'2011-12-17T04:13:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRS' 'sip-files00217.txt'
2177482dbef4ffa435949ddd642bdcdf
3902915c071e181f0243fc1cb534f5021a74d4b5
'2011-12-17T04:28:33-05:00'
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRT' 'sip-files00218.txt'
f07149912234e125cf96afcc6d047fe1
90fb9cbf0b90fbc857225c23797ec560557df055
'2011-12-17T04:18:04-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRU' 'sip-files00219.txt'
b2e99bfcfa485d4694a6568187c05e9f
392c2b9c0fbd310461158967372bde4d11c26822
'2011-12-17T04:15:08-05:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRV' 'sip-files00220.txt'
565743e643fb435f96bc55f6fae28aa7
66924b35e00667f130ea9846cc854ecde2d50cf0
'2011-12-17T04:23:54-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRW' 'sip-files00221.txt'
4c07e1b8ca10ec855558d5938cdee525
a765e8ba4087cf9f2cfa96630542dfdaafc7b4e7
'2011-12-17T04:16:32-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRX' 'sip-files00222.txt'
c8c052ad9632efa6e7b7a65f8d9d8abb
9c1a94e217b648549cee81dfd1d9b3dd807e9bdc
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRY' 'sip-files00223.txt'
ffa36a712b708d67d53c045affbb6b41
17dd773ba8febb53a9a87f38c322dc03dd42f857
'2011-12-17T04:24:14-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKRZ' 'sip-files00224.txt'
64036ea8e2f9f0adb5151cf2a7d20303
b7a33d6e77f7fb400419efe4e7c0fcd13ced5954
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSA' 'sip-files00225.txt'
e61dc79651348997231b99fc649403f0
f552bcac2010904f2d31075a96d834aa5dc8dfb6
'2011-12-17T04:13:31-05:00'
describe
'536' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSB' 'sip-files00226.txt'
116d43787042949b5e04321fd6fb5001
59261ae965899b74ab9fc92e6c609781a0b79bb4
'2011-12-17T04:09:27-05:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSC' 'sip-files00227.txt'
7463146a022197a997277968358a4872
c501d37ce207b0cef5f1b32c4bf5ae1e168575be
'2011-12-17T04:28:12-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSD' 'sip-files00228.txt'
ab6915dfb6e1ad3dc1c96d2a1aa5b313
92b777f2b2d9ebb0fdb5f05c31a7759b11a245f3
'2011-12-17T04:23:25-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSE' 'sip-files00229.txt'
b6e4052a33f9da965c82e77f231d83e4
880470dd7eded36d77ac931da8939532ff45b7b2
'2011-12-17T04:24:06-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSF' 'sip-files00230.txt'
bafc85c4ebab42b2ffc30ee799e37960
7fa51baab1a497d2f3ded3990887b78852fde3df
'2011-12-17T04:18:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSG' 'sip-files00231.txt'
bc24371cb315708f2c1bb24ee24bf432
20ab9e78b25a39ba54df019d6872d20c2be06188
'2011-12-17T04:11:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSH' 'sip-files00232.txt'
685759c0bf1eefb21501d933be3d19d5
ff25de911af7bc236a8ad6b1142b1d667b657eaa
'2011-12-17T04:25:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSI' 'sip-files00233.txt'
091f46a2c92cc3b07337c119380f51c1
9b03bc6f275a53edc4befaa9201f725ca610ec31
'2011-12-17T04:11:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSJ' 'sip-files00234.txt'
e1bd7ae460cbbb98d28e7bda30e974f2
a1b3c19921b1f50f14e65b3fcc8dce6f4974cd88
'2011-12-17T04:25:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSK' 'sip-files00235.txt'
134c4927ec03cab87d23dff6fd4991b8
8bcc7e822e839f24177794aae302eb4a55b31780
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSL' 'sip-files00236.txt'
0454c4cddab28c0a6eb1aa2af8e9f971
b50a597a0d85dff3105ae27b5ca533e29de3d0e0
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSM' 'sip-files00237.txt'
76f5947ddd9454e0f2a02b214ffc23be
9a25062d05fcbbc141dac424edf86abac34e9918
'2011-12-17T04:09:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSN' 'sip-files00238.txt'
889b807d594755b47a69861bcd12e481
010141d57fdd6a0c536abaef06b97c25585ca710
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSO' 'sip-files00239.txt'
9b40393a0e134fa859a9c6e24f56d85d
91cba3b560f366737c439b0860c842f37fa3dde2
'2011-12-17T04:14:08-05:00'
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSP' 'sip-files00241.txt'
cb552e9f25e4b4ff496bda1dbe315aa8
b5b954b5f4cac01ac3c540d1e7357b9f43ef7048
'2011-12-17T04:15:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSQ' 'sip-files00242.txt'
a1a0d021b139333ae4ea055e2eacbc14
b762857ed75cbae3381301cc56aff7a774279079
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSR' 'sip-files00243.txt'
8ab1ee661c45f5d448ffc71bbad1d41a
fac89efb7be6847d0ec3a32c413264515c4f38bd
'2011-12-17T04:24:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSS' 'sip-files00244.txt'
ce73fa54b96a4b0a2a23b906ac631405
629894ed4add50ec91fe525b62680c3dcd48fc86
'2011-12-17T04:20:44-05:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKST' 'sip-files00245.txt'
44f1434a1b5c940afadd7e8e375cde37
64805c3f9012c0a7bd29300f3feed425ac62b034
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSU' 'sip-files00246.txt'
0abf2cd8060d3b9be263a2a2692681b0
9c4a25270a3522c388dda4f81da1773cc6858c2f
'2011-12-17T04:10:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSV' 'sip-files00247.txt'
a3a6a8f50bfd2973ff1113074324e3df
d43417c6e70cdd9b5219b25c40847afa68bc8a85
'2011-12-17T04:25:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSW' 'sip-files00248.txt'
6998482364cf2ef558a7d9cb17280f04
fea58249888d02277185027d6f5881dea78e6c8e
'2011-12-17T04:27:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSX' 'sip-files00249.txt'
cfaa9e373b00b041715fdc6a3db6a61b
7459a7d34b92cab1b07fd4e39be35fcb56212750
'2011-12-17T04:18:23-05:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSY' 'sip-files00250.txt'
c1282f7b6d8d7c779d3ba56024c5959c
03db89664ff8ba0502a97ee2ab2b00a7c6acd14e
'2011-12-17T04:21:45-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKSZ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
27bf1fbbe4235668a216616b3d710a5a
6fd3c7d1a8cf05331eabc9f8f0de8e88a6fa8465
'2011-12-17T04:11:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTA' 'sip-files00252.txt'
344fd46491a73406eb2f3711151c2041
708cdfcf46cfc7c676cf6abd7f722f7fd0a16876
'2011-12-17T04:11:09-05:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTB' 'sip-files00253.txt'
14d5562906858197834804bc128747c8
b8bfbacdf9ea1e5cf4836997ff4762973597b8fd
'2011-12-17T04:10:25-05:00'
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTC' 'sip-files00254.txt'
dbeb019577ee20fafbbb983dca0f490b
7be943397761faa53029aec5f7e50f32b75e8d83
'2011-12-17T04:19:34-05:00'
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTD' 'sip-files00255.txt'
9ffb1162b2c01bfc2fd014280ca86380
7d7b5b2b89fe7fa56fff59174c03bd3a17d1acbd
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTE' 'sip-files00256.txt'
fc5df7457b1332b2fb97296de765e479
e7716eb6bc66260e121c6d501d78c418adf07f1b
'2011-12-17T04:20:28-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTF' 'sip-files00257.txt'
e0e8736b744a028d656fbcd5afe1a452
cb7ef12e995517e1eb2ea292e49dffb5c37e88b1
'2011-12-17T04:17:43-05:00'
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTG' 'sip-files00258.txt'
a64855dfb27901782ff3596dc0de3ef8
df987e525d6ede0b594da0ea1f24533b1cbd8cab
'2011-12-17T04:15:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTH' 'sip-files00259.txt'
f4738ac7b02c81f699442761cccd0e42
c7829de17a17569a9657c2c335396f2ddfb98162
'2011-12-17T04:15:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTI' 'sip-files00260.txt'
6adc0406a5655c46dd264e104ea06ff8
a6cd84e5280eef1a078fd9e6c6232ff16fa377b5
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTJ' 'sip-files00261.txt'
7020a8d8cec1f8094d734277d41137af
d9b9956e07971cc30267d7186d7e2f28e5b62563
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTK' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5637be0173a8537c29bab816cb9237e8
45f71dc1acd9aa0b650f84a84e43ddf5014fca2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTL' 'sip-files00263.txt'
c12e69c4a029e780e61dc6edb6840d5e
035a3d3d03e2acf1b21339e4aee32c7b6bf69352
'2011-12-17T04:12:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTM' 'sip-files00264.txt'
f496689725f87ed97e473ec2b7116778
b6a7184e3cb30b3b31271f844b0accc47dd928e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTN' 'sip-files00265.txt'
daaab03ab41e8f1548057d0702772b49
70263bc42e28e0baa2e946aad0cd1436218bfa0e
'2011-12-17T04:14:03-05:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTO' 'sip-files00266.txt'
f924b64b5c505957406cc5ec65ffc41d
8047c9b8955a6e6447c24f1aaec86a39ff979e0a
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTP' 'sip-files00267.txt'
7e439aa2f3400241420fc923bd1513fe
ac228a8875b5f95b5f6f2baa46558cc9338cd85b
'2011-12-17T04:23:34-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTQ' 'sip-files00268.txt'
be5bbe1a852526eacc7b48de59bd8a37
99a7cd01f4fe3419cb5f3384ffb3516f67241184
'2011-12-17T04:22:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTR' 'sip-files00269.txt'
a329722510c42402d87092b312040241
69aab4e2b026d0703005bacf1847a947e8c6bf9d
'2011-12-17T04:26:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTS' 'sip-files00270.txt'
1a27862d0cbeb57af0cdd867494c59e7
383ec492fcd7fd66a9c4b51342847c49fd7978ff
'2011-12-17T04:12:29-05:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTT' 'sip-files00271.txt'
6d83fb94ac920377d096254e59f728b2
8704b1c417df01f70abe9aa123f857fa39ab4336
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTU' 'sip-files00272.txt'
4200737d0b156184d41e19eb8dd53746
3741131c49c46e6c4ac40f303a82367acdec8783
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTV' 'sip-files00273.txt'
1a6cbbf54fca25358c187e5a047ec12e
099336f472fa2869760139078fa78303e4016ee9
'2011-12-17T04:22:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTW' 'sip-files00274.txt'
131e6b5665dc319102d04e5ec9d93b8c
821808951196662890af3d5c4c19fef5fb693e44
'2011-12-17T04:25:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTX' 'sip-files00275.txt'
bce190e83db45d70b4510863c581c900
9ac0724f5b7bfd322322506d2c41d9a71b232576
'2011-12-17T04:28:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTY' 'sip-files00276.txt'
7bd5a6065b54b332565c0184d13928e7
d00bf768da060c2e431678ebd5d9bc51c6731899
'2011-12-17T04:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKTZ' 'sip-files00277.txt'
5f3d1f18f5fbb52f3f2ec8674d249996
c8ba1884fc7b0b4659defce39587fb82eff9c98c
'2011-12-17T04:14:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUA' 'sip-files00278.txt'
73cb903b7fa113710be0620311277990
821db8be752c3516ce430b444d437e94dca7c304
'2011-12-17T04:11:39-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUB' 'sip-files00279.txt'
762debf7a9e64a8f3c945f308abe74c7
dd4cbe4c9cad34daf07bbe12ca2680bbf3c8f4d1
'2011-12-17T04:14:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUC' 'sip-files00280.txt'
70f23fc1e1d77da8838aae862aa3f5ac
c261f7ee6a9c05074d1f3adb00e8510b6d20fde0
'2011-12-17T04:15:00-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUD' 'sip-files00281.txt'
0bdfa1992077291263371c656c6fea0a
e61fb363d24360a494e90fa9dc547538a2a054f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUE' 'sip-files00282.txt'
999d895e35321e28f0d4d7ec1facbea2
daa39feba6a1d55599ff9bf99c4027858a6a6955
'2011-12-17T04:23:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUF' 'sip-files00283.txt'
6351fd2a30b7157ee0c91c8c987e5ecc
e9f2e8e19327beab560f429f34cb858ecd6d8956
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUG' 'sip-files00284.txt'
8502833fc58b178e76a0968cda96f515
76f9d8103def44f6a149ca3920addb40ba4042c7
'2011-12-17T04:24:44-05:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUH' 'sip-files00285.txt'
3e7bb8474107effcb3f4b052f5a0f6ec
cf8edb549f7693c3dada17e3e3c9038741410015
'2011-12-17T04:18:19-05:00'
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUI' 'sip-files00287.txt'
0ed2810fe99380c8dedb5945dd69f005
19ed6258678616239a443d5309af984292c29b77
describe
Invalid character
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUJ' 'sip-files00288.txt'
03ef7d23e7f4aed92b14e72e3e1eec98
5402202b5f8460b1ae0f9cf97c3c36477cd2e5e0
'2011-12-17T04:15:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUK' 'sip-files00289.txt'
8b3a99b946f747100d1fd94034ffd247
d9f2d56c579721d057b6b319571176164e2d13e5
'2011-12-17T04:14:00-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUL' 'sip-files00290.txt'
acdb480d6c6a25e48f20d6983b35c48d
830a556549f0d0b1e4a68a8c8b0dac036757f40e
'2011-12-17T04:23:32-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUM' 'sip-files00291.txt'
36abbb71f643c96bd27807bb00059fb7
194ae14463c417b536a5b5013272e236bc8090b3
'2011-12-17T04:18:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUN' 'sip-files00292.txt'
0bb923097326806583a7a6c2e013b4f5
0105b1e95509cdfc7c803e868dcf605f6defd67c
'2011-12-17T04:20:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUO' 'sip-files00293.txt'
fb32d0ba4cc680e78af005ca67223fc9
610e1283c59d2be5ad9faf712fa01301c01a3d03
'2011-12-17T04:16:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUP' 'sip-files00294.txt'
95084f9a4dc90d5cecb58981505a477c
bdc28eddcfc38ffd9c1b5d8c2bcf44338087e728
'2011-12-17T04:15:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUQ' 'sip-files00295.txt'
57f323f9cf359fd33337d6e7149d072b
0a6200fe34662951b99355a15a579ea97866a5b9
'2011-12-17T04:16:00-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUR' 'sip-files00296.txt'
7261c1608deac3a4aab622077b66683e
db136c52b63880271e50ded14a61fd260cd0d01f
'2011-12-17T04:14:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUS' 'sip-files00297.txt'
34b5f8bb8d3db0f771359af1c081637d
cfcc116654b15bb131e91e3ecc3f6d0598e9b1c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUT' 'sip-files00298.txt'
d43d183b57c879e2bdf729d93dcb8413
7c8213ccc6326a5bb4555ef2e20ebf23bf82bee1
'2011-12-17T04:12:04-05:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUU' 'sip-files00299.txt'
0a606f002695db251eeadf7530f082a0
7dae0905cea99520aa21a34172f0cff50df11dc3
'2011-12-17T04:18:34-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUV' 'sip-files00300.txt'
38b99e496be279648c206b55f629e9a4
c7aafe7c9bc5b4cfb512fa3871c143cf46fa921d
'2011-12-17T04:14:06-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUW' 'sip-files00301.txt'
34c3341b59985982324b2c058c95283f
95972fc62b51934fe935ab61fb68e07638169b67
'2011-12-17T04:14:58-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUX' 'sip-files00302.txt'
ac24f5fe194254d10ff093356f56db2f
0525eff118a8289807ee91955cb0ceeb3a5a6b99
'2011-12-17T04:15:21-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUY' 'sip-files00303.txt'
2d234c245c75052a9aa3a7f2344a6082
8897adb65fd6cf8e4beb67a71898750893d0b4d9
'2011-12-17T04:28:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKUZ' 'sip-files00304.txt'
96166e2e780c0c8d339207e22d5ab12e
133c724c84446c2d65a24fc97ece40cc1d67ff11
'2011-12-17T04:09:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVA' 'sip-files00305.txt'
8c19c41ebb7658f3129e18b7f1ea0bc7
274287f3ba0bfe9a9a3c385e57155cd8d1e92e39
'2011-12-17T04:24:59-05:00'
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVB' 'sip-files00306.txt'
31620ac74fdabe8b2a7fb4a63539402a
24bbb3b232fa1eb00afbcea67c31ee597adf16b2
'2011-12-17T04:09:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVC' 'sip-files00307.txt'
933435395f44faadd0d6ab4ba9562fe8
897a8754b7281a117dbaa72c9b4ede513f31e973
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVD' 'sip-files00308.txt'
26e97a29eb93a45f6f8077aecb889da8
b75de806a89d3e284f0fbe24bc3ffc510d5eaa17
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVE' 'sip-files00309.txt'
5a6c7bb724dba1d77269a735c9455b98
3eb34353672694d97b9a5f9865fc9fb5d742a202
'2011-12-17T04:14:42-05:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVF' 'sip-files00310.txt'
0c007afd6168b7a50f9df6b37a0db2bc
898a73e3e33d08cb982152c79bfa1acb312ad959
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVG' 'sip-files00311.txt'
08bc39800ac202be30624fa40623758b
afe97bf2e961c1a994cd98c7b304198787b1b3da
'2011-12-17T04:14:33-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVH' 'sip-files00312.txt'
be2f1e491717ab84fd35baf6e00bd7e3
bc679d57b39b2a3f91a43a2d55d75e79956adfb9
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVI' 'sip-files00313.txt'
42123bf8e3beba6a98734b63ac942fdc
be36f227762628fb9b013c7b749307610f167d57
'2011-12-17T04:16:38-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVJ' 'sip-files00314.txt'
c2890fe77ed72facc7933631b7ec8627
7f622d467e74d9c2bf3eee4c7ebc5cb911c243dc
'2011-12-17T04:11:46-05:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVK' 'sip-files00315.txt'
d1c501cc136891717df568a09b318b4f
4fd1c0848399ccc608efa3fe55bd249e465126e9
'2011-12-17T04:28:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVL' 'sip-files00316.txt'
8f3759ab3fb51252c98e1f411fddf448
4fec6739e4029df12c7b2965db3a02a30db36a0e
'2011-12-17T04:09:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVM' 'sip-files00317.txt'
b423e2ab8193750304c7460a8754c9c8
87e31400acce9e7434fc68f164094d5a71cd56a3
'2011-12-17T04:14:41-05:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVN' 'sip-files00318.txt'
0d0d7d79616f948a02065f6f58144e64
5d7a268ab04e6994818e73b753b927afc45068b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVO' 'sip-files00319.txt'
90d2070f084fd36345b44d6096c3481a
52e4fad6f1383fc6b209d7c6e180d38fce43a50a
'2011-12-17T04:11:13-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVP' 'sip-files00320.txt'
c663788a5799ca09000e0830dc01d540
41013e403432273e88e8717b799811c8c48d3e9e
'2011-12-17T04:10:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVQ' 'sip-files00321.txt'
a1a4a089da49cd75e6c32f6dc23bb21c
2e06d95e087a39f7b5eee8f318e0e8b8b32abbfb
'2011-12-17T04:22:18-05:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVR' 'sip-files00322.txt'
54cef6cdc8c24fe1e0db8a65aaf2a4fe
df324367dd5d40fc1d1a604c61b45a2a59ca8b94
describe
Invalid character
'467' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVS' 'sip-files00323.txt'
51337e6afcecf5eb9375c8cb7e14abb3
aab9217d30133199d44facdf3d61b47f9df9b1c9
'2011-12-17T04:23:17-05:00'
describe
'106' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVT' 'sip-files00324.txt'
76c4d46af2f69b9e51d547993f11aa2f
6fc671220d0df9248a44fc7c6c72730a3ca35b9a
'2011-12-17T04:14:31-05:00'
describe
'4045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVU' 'sip-files00325.txt'
5cee4c9619bb3bc7e2c21742276856c4
330b5bf3f1304b44a3dc9b5dab8f7b07995a9e90
describe
'2239' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVV' 'sip-files00326.txt'
9236574ac86dab7a2578e0b1212ccfc3
d559291851ff4720179e8efbfa21ada36ea61d6a
'2011-12-17T04:16:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3264' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVW' 'sip-files00327.txt'
0bcd631aea2f40793ad184ead977f9b2
f61abca5f6a394200a704f2fa36ffc9c12e53c05
'2011-12-17T04:10:04-05:00'
describe
'2918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVX' 'sip-files00328.txt'
7fb221879e7a85944bb2d24e1049e8fd
4dba18758fd42c78a851380bd66ec34c88a41a34
'2011-12-17T04:25:54-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3773' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVY' 'sip-files00329.txt'
cacc86d5ec5f89309e4e35945dced48b
5bcaafad339b44623401d45a88c899c38c917968
'2011-12-17T04:14:19-05:00'
describe
'3312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKVZ' 'sip-files00330.txt'
9c9ec89de082262d9fb77905d1a6d540
642f6ea223e34e773ba19b929b4d8b2fe0a626ed
describe
Invalid character
'3898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWA' 'sip-files00331.txt'
1103ef16615707d504fe9df0fa97be73
424bed475a6af0d1f92b12b50364475fb7675a26
'2011-12-17T04:19:01-05:00'
describe
'3183' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWB' 'sip-files00332.txt'
e368a617893a7d55426ffe959ebc8e1c
5e61e8445c1c5451b7f31ca02b02c9669a4570fa
'2011-12-17T04:10:47-05:00'
describe
'3476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWC' 'sip-files00333.txt'
d39037180fe3a31c698b6336d63862c9
3d89d79eaff82442a5e854389991132393e0f823
describe
Invalid character
'3289' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWD' 'sip-files00334.txt'
45d9d65ef741ea136ee921396077d932
6b91235f250357d61710537c38ee9f3fb812953a
'2011-12-17T04:10:55-05:00'
describe
'3382' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWE' 'sip-files00335.txt'
461a84138c6d3e3b60c2867459df1c3d
5b87d6445308c14a8e3c32770e62e5098bc9035b
'2011-12-17T04:15:05-05:00'
describe
'2934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWF' 'sip-files00336.txt'
d46910b984f113759228e1b0fe69b261
7fc89454f1e563dd230550ff5ee185b1b7e5e8f2
describe
'3089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWG' 'sip-files00337.txt'
c23691cfa40cdbf94b1e87b4a6735e5b
22211ff77349abeec715b2e6822444938b739044
'2011-12-17T04:12:37-05:00'
describe
'3893' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWH' 'sip-files00338.txt'
d737121da6cf2f5476a6c897d7c8953f
a4959747faabaed3897048e0f64a23cdb60b61df
describe
Invalid character
'3797' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWI' 'sip-files00339.txt'
3999ec44fe551ef2e49ea9cf0acb0098
ccace7be502f2958ca96219e2d71d64e2ccda8d1
describe
'3457' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWJ' 'sip-files00340.txt'
8f4dc9ab6025f379fbbcd1a0b2b1fab4
11279d7d5b644a1978e915499d64540f5f8da6ad
'2011-12-17T04:23:46-05:00'
describe
'3497' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWK' 'sip-files00341.txt'
bc5e6f1b5e4fe9a63cc18715376116a6
65c21977427bbb5646f29ccd9801327fc34515f2
'2011-12-17T04:14:20-05:00'
describe
'3214' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWL' 'sip-files00342.txt'
15ec4735e9d71c67658cb1479c42ed59
5262b3c7e51ec563995fec16fe90f81a8116867b
'2011-12-17T04:19:59-05:00'
describe
'3083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWM' 'sip-files00343.txt'
6fba3bfb3f6924e201deea8148d05031
377c476cbed7fc6c7c609830f2048cd81a23db59
describe
'3037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWN' 'sip-files00344.txt'
ce0bd272ca9d758582a589bbf64eedbf
b2f0090d5d5137b5dcec6f3d297472430ac09a51
describe
'3361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWO' 'sip-files00345.txt'
c4ce20551e907f70283944ab7e61f13e
f6519e42bb7bb033dc706771716d8e5356804f8b
describe
Invalid character
'3210' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWP' 'sip-files00346.txt'
27262c608201d492e78d096487dc7bc1
fe532d88700ace7d3b14f6aa210a5d92afc64b24
'2011-12-17T04:16:44-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWQ' 'sip-files00347.txt'
78061b293fbf22bf37c9d65ced14e614
f451de8bb03f0e1ea9f9e7890aaf668f3986ad7d
'2011-12-17T04:17:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3358' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWR' 'sip-files00348.txt'
bcdba95eb81cf23869e33718a381f55e
2d339f68dc1baaed5bea746ee0fa007eb5e08b47
'2011-12-17T04:17:11-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3260' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWS' 'sip-files00349.txt'
3453ab375101e2338751adfa9ddd3a43
5ee4d3aa19dd27e4fc38712403a13b84f61d2392
'2011-12-17T04:16:03-05:00'
describe
'3373' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWT' 'sip-files00350.txt'
5764e2773c76e5f6cf475b6162c20f59
068f3ac2916c711f5779758b8c6d8d004bc0e39c
'2011-12-17T04:14:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWU' 'sip-files00351.txt'
def6ac5713dc0056917b2ba0cf2a05f9
de3691c563d463f253e15cac09fc709357467225
'2011-12-17T04:18:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3165' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWV' 'sip-files00352.txt'
1da59f57d5b5da9147ed44ab771d12a4
287d625c5a38b4fc77840b4c09cd0d4357f25653
'2011-12-17T04:25:13-05:00'
describe
'3437' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWW' 'sip-files00353.txt'
05167c3b053c65b749a28582f7ddd8ce
179e1f35f86a2a5537b5a9753275d9c146fe931d
'2011-12-17T04:12:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWX' 'sip-files00354.txt'
edad887a6f058688c10b069ef7661432
77c999f440d9c00688fb0277627f6bfb6f9fbaf5
describe
Invalid character
'2220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWY' 'sip-files00355.txt'
f51b0cf23c3d218c0266c2c8c11ff582
f71c5c90e149e50fbe30f06ddb0c1e5d90458f21
'2011-12-17T04:23:56-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'432994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKWZ' 'sip-files00000.jp2'
4c59ec92328d8ea5c2b5a87192b645bc
8471229f4a2acc61c1e2395e82ed0297570e8fe2
'2011-12-17T04:22:24-05:00'
describe
'453090' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXA' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
831fe77601b1a62cce694b1703494578
795c69102445e5922c67d845901df8721cab3793
'2011-12-17T04:16:41-05:00'
describe
'33072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXB' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
1062d5a383f9a90cec93c3a3e616d67a
19c4cbdda5b620f67f3a5421f7f571a61f3bbfb0
'2011-12-17T04:14:29-05:00'
describe
'367082' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7af2f330a5958f0ea875f3cd77148038
6129a16f91b26dfc5aad20f7c96934f7580a422c
'2011-12-17T04:11:30-05:00'
describe
'128455' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
558b8834f60e35cd6ca8f7679e2636d2
4d1bb17393b5ff53f4dae71b4be02e6c93f54a36
'2011-12-17T04:26:24-05:00'
describe
'35075' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXE' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
937ca632fdabc486b32086275d3cd72f
f4989aaeaf886845f4ec7570caf84ccbbc2e0fec
'2011-12-17T04:13:37-05:00'
describe
'369870' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9d8f2814a5ada3ee0576c51d9dc033b5
3bb89ccb93cc916fd0f3fb0413ee56f0029c4332
'2011-12-17T04:23:11-05:00'
describe
'369838' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXG' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
78edc634c05e1191bc6af851830fe6ff
6180006aa791c5a252b932ce18327b829c7dacfb
describe
'369935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
f61b75d1c87c256455e687bcafb15ffa
7cdd0357e30e91901f8e583708bf003a36105d37
'2011-12-17T04:25:27-05:00'
describe
'227806' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXI' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6516afdefef07a2a4e4b4435917f8850
bb595b1601fc5a00d6820bcef4f00dbbec208e8c
'2011-12-17T04:15:53-05:00'
describe
'275557' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXJ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
e46b7ce00c5491cae9402721078ff35d
021ab5b8d62ebe8e16c149adae65c346c7d3e407
'2011-12-17T04:19:53-05:00'
describe
'369924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5d48626e62ac052064237bf3b83f726b
198773bacf61ab0b58f18830f1b0b3ed90a15b2b
describe
'369895' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXL' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f371bcbbcc57df3a1ad12c1f482215de
e0fef5f1259ed385c93740bffd102fc4445c3feb
'2011-12-17T04:21:08-05:00'
describe
'369920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXM' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
51be92bbd06d3663e6716cd8de99163e
3b8ecd1cfd9239f844d757e9ca114b60a38ab484
'2011-12-17T04:13:16-05:00'
describe
'344018' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
74aa956bc4da5e928a74fc8a9176626e
e137604173b8b1955655cc41bb7eb3b7dd3f9033
'2011-12-17T04:15:07-05:00'
describe
'369913' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXO' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
96f29d922f1b7299f92e440065cf7b94
18c5980b9a9deb7105c61b20607fdeb75ea42598
'2011-12-17T04:23:58-05:00'
describe
'353743' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
23af418115c8eb8e7093f0f13a95f383
796984f5edb3f97388639183c586c5f9900c909e
describe
'369937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXQ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
985c583ea2bde03cb1fc27419860404c
c8c87dce1d103ffceba722320aef039644f16763
describe
'369884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXR' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
30cda2d00cb29727c70ff8f0a3973e64
9c93be231a698ee215ed174e106a2dcb07d92e1f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d65c4c37a663ebf54beba1ab089e9111
6d6233022e1de91892dd3f6885b2d077bbf0e7bc
'2011-12-17T04:24:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9ac7bd3416cb838d4bd7ef1d4ea27130
8517f3a2b3f0be88223e2a6c435ce07828c0c7af
'2011-12-17T04:18:48-05:00'
describe
'237805' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
8d459caedc238e751b79bb161bede4f8
7d42dc96c7dd6291fda4a999620f08b160d73748
'2011-12-17T04:22:16-05:00'
describe
'369888' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXV' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7b955dea204ba721ce5163cd711f314f
8e5c6bebb8a9280a95ce386bcdf7617e1bbf12c2
describe
'369878' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXW' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
0b947151a8f8e3c82fc0ffc63e14b3ab
7ff9916947b8009d2c141cc178d3ba31fcd9439e
'2011-12-17T04:17:30-05:00'
describe
'369889' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
206e2da0f656ba88e760ee294f6e9621
6b4577c1e8e8ceb3925f1edfd58334d367cc2582
'2011-12-17T04:09:10-05:00'
describe
'369852' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXY' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
729d77c8f9ddc27bedbe61144b2b77ea
490d0daacafb2ce81c8b3a4b8ad6ea10c7844891
'2011-12-17T04:10:06-05:00'
describe
'369926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKXZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
dc9d4cc887bca2d446e39fbe58dfbbd1
86c8966d8ad02dd311f3015452193484ce4ea043
'2011-12-17T04:18:56-05:00'
describe
'369931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e210fe3c17be98fd2aa1658fae0af85c
85ea2704d3eddb41454bc2f4bfde8e87d7e549a0
'2011-12-17T04:16:51-05:00'
describe
'344683' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
42b9e47e0bafc7253f790a3d1e7c19c5
9fbbd8a4bc77d5522d1eda4a064a145e43dbdb3e
'2011-12-17T04:18:02-05:00'
describe
'369927' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYC' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
bec046ee677246c1bbb8f683f12b3442
73f2fc3ccc9659618bc28de8ef14f88be633be41
'2011-12-17T04:27:26-05:00'
describe
'369887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYD' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f0e5ccb3111ee2f4ecf879ac931a1cd1
df88487eb03ad838438c1860ddc7cd2737642020
'2011-12-17T04:17:24-05:00'
describe
'369885' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYE' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
9933edd755a15c4eff3632785448559e
1d3fd1682212e9db7370f2ee6888a56a78450f5d
'2011-12-17T04:21:05-05:00'
describe
'369910' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b01d95f3d5fec9353603c5d7e6a3e4b0
f235f3b69bab80794ea42700bd79fe85bae63a66
'2011-12-17T04:20:41-05:00'
describe
'369918' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYG' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
8fb7afa06fe2cdd43d03b18b9a5d6dc8
3f492eb308c0a911c904102442ed9a27ead5d6fc
'2011-12-17T04:16:30-05:00'
describe
'369868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYH' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
8c21220b400b64b2315c3451f6eea220
8bb6e5ea0e1de4cd5fe88cb55cdfee5b6419076c
'2011-12-17T04:14:10-05:00'
describe
'369875' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYI' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4ad14ca48e22d347f09808f11e89d419
694770178489bf3c91dbefc203585ea2ff63bad5
describe
'369871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYJ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
bbad87897e369bdda7a8941d72ad17f7
375920edf554da432e1fd908bea3588517922d62
describe
'355367' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
bb771f972536ea75a94bdb8309064f4c
3b9a10eb490b0e9c2b9f5d2bf170cdf6aaf43248
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
3c9818b1859f0f1e95eacf5d159b3214
27dd55d3b5dd485b717e3ab05010f7515bebae85
'2011-12-17T04:26:22-05:00'
describe
'369914' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5cc895669e97feb55d6585d08968b30c
36ceb14fca4581c288b59ad60b37ad9d553f7015
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
6ccf5ac9265cc053f9b7880095647b7c
409d9ec680cab8a084336c01cdbba9fe7df90a60
describe
'369842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
b8fe813a35781a74766c1fb6feca4c3d
b1ec82051eb62cb6de4acbaece453a0c9cd7b9a6
'2011-12-17T04:17:01-05:00'
describe
'369928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
19b1462c89cb5ea10102ca405a17b835
651d775aa6dbe0824d0f60fddb0785303c1e61f0
'2011-12-17T04:11:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYQ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
22426260e46cd4468ac8cfc72ec77d45
f36afda6d48a58895b8de8f9accd971353961ebd
'2011-12-17T04:21:34-05:00'
describe
'360580' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9807cee13780ebcb3506c0197c37fddd
6521bd8ece2e389e72a5790555b781b6c9274f8b
'2011-12-17T04:14:11-05:00'
describe
'369934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1ad9a7018ebea0304894fd807ba15e71
8f802b577b2573e8dd9ffeaa0b2272fa2c9553b5
'2011-12-17T04:10:27-05:00'
describe
'369809' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYT' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
edbddb5a0d7c67b990662abcc404cf32
adfe8826d02f9b11c7d7d2db307364ae89d9eb85
'2011-12-17T04:13:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYU' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
5f785b274801c7027d09bb1445215de6
30364d509fa9dc5777e66c14d56c0e97b99854ca
'2011-12-17T04:14:30-05:00'
describe
'369908' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYV' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9540dfa16bf23e03f64be8a3b8356685
1685850bcec90b9a63e22050a23492f8e9c4689e
'2011-12-17T04:27:07-05:00'
describe
'369900' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYW' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
0f6107a6e2c2015e1dedcc1962d0caef
1f055a6502b988169ed806bf9f0b74156578dc59
describe
'369899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
bc365e040b47f46e8c04e7ff0d65c58a
ae6a93ce1191014f2b81197b4974391c2d2d7480
'2011-12-17T04:18:10-05:00'
describe
'296739' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
dacac315052e02bc16ee35bd9ec2b635
743c65fe4aecaecd9e93dcc0833735a98cf495e9
'2011-12-17T04:24:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKYZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
df39f0050d1d039c36405617e51f223c
fc4e66ffd8776b39730903b90bbb305de1bf3dc4
'2011-12-17T04:11:03-05:00'
describe
'369891' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZA' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f22f8924349d082cff605b5e6c24fbce
53d39c1f62ff78ab1523856b3ae7fba18dd30769
'2011-12-17T04:17:04-05:00'
describe
'369938' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZB' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
21d189f3254b97704d9c58eb3608d9ca
1ae6d4f7c62513a7531542a5f2d5419fee919d1f
'2011-12-17T04:22:30-05:00'
describe
'269530' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5a22302d3152739be3e23429e980bde2
a6dab3bf6ecc977bbe1c8f40dfd9227e0e54f7bc
'2011-12-17T04:11:58-05:00'
describe
'369919' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZD' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
b4953fc5eecc9e1874a5184cf1494cc4
a17ad8b398645b7a0c42a9fc08f99e6b068008f1
'2011-12-17T04:14:26-05:00'
describe
'370179' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
7049dc300917e4a419cb7271b2ee44e6
3952d707349163ece1349de5fb45962a2aa4462f
'2011-12-17T04:09:33-05:00'
describe
'369909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0b1cf1f7f663fe1fbcf1bc8d3c567c95
41c8435f60044cf852f4d64bdb3439567f287445
'2011-12-17T04:11:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZG' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
1acbc218db75aa39901af0ca8e531aae
34048c7eeef028d902989c7bf081e680fce8bc2c
'2011-12-17T04:22:33-05:00'
describe
'369912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZH' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
50060e4fa664fb323d23f91272bace38
43ae3d079f46ac7688ce22d4a03587c4eda2d235
'2011-12-17T04:20:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZI' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
422220a8b6122f4d2a615e5043bbc702
0387506c8f3ed22721f7884701f8c05e1eadfd09
'2011-12-17T04:15:31-05:00'
describe
'369835' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZJ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
dca070e8d1da7e700c547df362edef9b
caf10bb4fa197008096d51b4a9034a326ddb5431
'2011-12-17T04:27:53-05:00'
describe
'369897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5330824d2663d75d5b89a43b6f34e6d3
f06dde725556b8be14307d94ac5636e4dfbc99d2
'2011-12-17T04:10:40-05:00'
describe
'369925' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
d12d0ecd0b7fe78f970c30d8219de8f9
2e49e2d67085090311e1beacd0fe28dcab38baec
'2011-12-17T04:10:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZM' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a3fb682f40d3b18778b29c5720fb534e
b7d2c083e5e8d8d6111e86ae185db25a3954e5a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZN' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
b7a9ace1302b1e17cf547cef9518708d
d7318c3d24c5272081e653f08115bf99225f73cc
'2011-12-17T04:10:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZO' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
9f362b001b26882856fc5dd9f299e5e0
fa057a35e9ed698d08602cc99e582e22b674488e
'2011-12-17T04:27:37-05:00'
describe
'369903' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
323e5421b439a2f6e923231bcc88d327
3820589a2d4b3bbbefd4006b303f365598f5605b
describe
'162268' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZQ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e2b221202c3269957f9b190f2bf4dcee
7dce5ca7117865303749a68492e5a224ff122f52
'2011-12-17T04:16:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZR' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
f13c0bd46338a9dfb2c0ff3411b4998c
8d0663410d6b570d8ff4abc9b3d65f6e14c0f0bf
'2011-12-17T04:18:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
26c1a0a299e97be7c5d6c1e4fec702d9
384ae4733f5f72ce8e383f59004ac922383a042c
'2011-12-17T04:22:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZT' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
56f167d7666e72ad00f688f9d2a13cff
8102e044218089df669035a8731eaa7f60d4b5d0
'2011-12-17T04:22:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZU' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
b6c3881d0f98bc7aa35dadc4360039a8
425d5ee13b8643213d90bfbe9d585a8e6855a21e
describe
'369930' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZV' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
695bca8d1979be77b0a5f07cb3cba110
f218c66bd8f22aa965ba8a707175013b3899544f
'2011-12-17T04:22:00-05:00'
describe
'265844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
e149e35116bcdedffd40ca274ccd37c0
a09ba7b94c5b7dffa84d858a8e31b07f88bab7aa
'2011-12-17T04:09:30-05:00'
describe
'369840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
a4488c32b515e81645f0b7e39f218573
f28ed9cc37947aa50a73779f9c71734457da6c69
'2011-12-17T04:10:01-05:00'
describe
'369901' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
224dd29b5c67f2ef43522fb59c0593dc
e98a807756693d88ae5214c036ad93ef9049a02d
'2011-12-17T04:26:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACKZZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a1dcecdf5ee4f040f4cc1b123910a06d
240a5cf8a9fe837376e04dbcf1e6071a55189f7f
describe
'369872' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAA' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
003ce011b205e87cd64ee17a9866674f
5b0b178fcd379209432310964ea022286e23f009
'2011-12-17T04:21:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
c8fbffaf0789cd6a53af1359dcdf0761
d8e5d669400cde8f0e3694f3ecaad22112425bce
'2011-12-17T04:26:27-05:00'
describe
'369867' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
4f02ffbcaa998401ca765a872f468cb6
bae1ea8f02878644902224391dffc0f10f3f9f70
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAD' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
05ac6df9362aadc535b3fc4990a8264f
699253dc912795efe9de5d3d3c2763482998fdcb
'2011-12-17T04:09:07-05:00'
describe
'263603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
8875bd35934868620ce9773a70039919
7e625db8e436314afcd2b44f0ab80778358f1c6d
'2011-12-17T04:15:11-05:00'
describe
'369933' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
4a53feea753170a9f4d2221ed7cb4495
8007172da6ff49fbd8df50ed847c5da7e0ff6c63
'2011-12-17T04:09:57-05:00'
describe
'369906' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAG' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
6fb375b38a7bc09b8070c865cb56c4c2
7c5caa1ed7f0d9c19fbda297948dbe97c46b5a44
describe
'369923' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAH' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6078064a383251f80a9900890ac7235f
ae695cf3f12bc7c72500ce78894b9f6d3cd4e463
describe
'369843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAI' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
75ae6bef5785e0cf0b1800060ae1f8a5
f5b98ffe05831ebd26f9415d8daa5d942b0fc3ba
'2011-12-17T04:22:20-05:00'
describe
'369710' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
434ae84c7f19d03a036c87c8e006b899
6b539631d3df902db4ccde260928e9c9ef2b603c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5037fd67f79ba87a2100d90ce919e1eb
80708d5aee372974f89421d44bf7030dc16137cd
'2011-12-17T04:09:48-05:00'
describe
'369917' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ec8e0e244d17c8d57be8fb52127c4621
d1aa37b3aae637f7aef2f5d4903323dc28c54464
'2011-12-17T04:27:44-05:00'
describe
'369929' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
39e2ddab91ebedcded36a0b792ae8830
1aad679f720febf4171e7913e9348040b430c393
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAN' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
6805d2d67cd959e955e5436f09f82d70
c98b3a29d2064efeb89d5cb1edd97d33e07f58aa
'2011-12-17T04:18:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
2843c9d7d4ef10856554bdda860804da
95c5ff127bcdf29f7cf24e9a38045a29a600413d
'2011-12-17T04:19:49-05:00'
describe
'369869' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4c1a09f934fe670401b7cc1b83ba9334
8de9e26964676e799c8be6fb9ada4c5d4f3c1a0e
'2011-12-17T04:28:10-05:00'
describe
'179966' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
c3300fce9beec0a1b69b0650f4209903
0a34067a675984b878ead0e10322cdd98a192e65
'2011-12-17T04:13:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
ac013c43ccbe431f046dd10cf5f1a0f1
4cc2573b4a8cdb5074215a2ec7d9a721bfb2646b
describe
'370201' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
fce326ef473e159239031c416430db11
37ef9b76d0b3c76f16a37af8f73a30fabe05ea62
'2011-12-17T04:16:09-05:00'
describe
'369921' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAT' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d72d2b5640242208aa2816838ce6f232
a6afba80e3432072059eaab56138abbe4cfbb393
'2011-12-17T04:13:48-05:00'
describe
'369922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAU' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
07c479e78d2fd07a9b9d6f1d5272591b
131347a1616a4dae8b8c7f6094b0e47fe25f6566
'2011-12-17T04:10:00-05:00'
describe
'369874' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAV' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
9adaa552c72c446ebd34cce722af543f
c6b67ca3ddee37d057f1a3be81cdaee97e8755bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAW' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
86e70fc9ed0ae1ececf7415eb2480147
9f97d0a144cb5c691111f391cccc492bfefc8a90
'2011-12-17T04:12:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAX' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
675fcfe8807f452309e010531a471472
e3083aa813e9ddbb9da13c676a36d9f90172c9b3
'2011-12-17T04:12:12-05:00'
describe
'369905' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
62f382155addc4e73c416fb174f68f63
a9ee9eefd4235a6b873e58c754c30d9cd5ab8948
'2011-12-17T04:23:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLAZ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
85620589e30309f2d7bb4e2d43b41133
d536aeec42efa174b08ce76f59b73ae88d31f566
'2011-12-17T04:13:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBA' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
fd82c400243270b7b6304130ec6925ac
199a6e31db7d481b4eb808861439c2306f9ecef6
'2011-12-17T04:11:11-05:00'
describe
'369848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBB' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ca3838967e9c5e99663cb8c1649c9fda
b528fbcc385366db8b3a012af02bb5a9a4d20c97
'2011-12-17T04:12:41-05:00'
describe
'369271' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBC' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
11aa52eefeba112acce60064ab838241
d563ee9a31a16b6f568114486c21fad797048202
'2011-12-17T04:25:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f9d15d8f02540a6cbb27e74aafc699b2
ab3c1586cf60b5c9535943870a17b070f1f8059d
describe
'369892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
7c99908d7e7b666361fb63b79daca688
6e36f90425ae6c00e8dad3a872d519fff18fe665
'2011-12-17T04:11:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5f81f0412514dab8a10b2a6801456dcb
6ce2dae0bd27a30e01acb30bee3fbb5f24e809f9
'2011-12-17T04:21:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
dc37db53869f731c33e486851132d780
08ef5476716cb2a05cfdbee39134c5bab8129810
'2011-12-17T04:26:52-05:00'
describe
'369916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
6bf36f4852591707fa8264cfcbaae748
c40e6d1eeed2970425119ecd1e51d77bde4c32ef
'2011-12-17T04:16:43-05:00'
describe
'369904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
ab13eccf83421d4d7352f457b188be8f
a443970600259b1bc0c23370b5affe87f10bcb38
'2011-12-17T04:20:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
c1b086dcb8f2d493ebbc5b9e63b26a55
55e548a5255c343cc310fc4d2d37595e99b847f7
'2011-12-17T04:23:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
dc8ca7a8f51b3907e04f6e81c7478aca
11aa0f3c12707de11ae5835fdf10cc714d37d58a
'2011-12-17T04:15:29-05:00'
describe
'369850' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
ad6c0e68a2ba6535e1c4e9a9559070d8
9028270b4671f4aba70863e7f8a9d005fcd0b87a
'2011-12-17T04:17:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e2a47067104f96f5bfab45d7648435b1
807c7a96501a18ef445036514921e222addbc9eb
'2011-12-17T04:24:34-05:00'
describe
'369902' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBN' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
5f1c6233d5302e11fbd8d1ebfca469fa
cf389cd3740ae6ca9ae97a0a4d7c3c89d390bc72
'2011-12-17T04:10:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
53b5e1135d46f475f19e18fc52c17a92
70c93e0572d6117fc2c226864b302e486446e966
'2011-12-17T04:22:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
e8d805b6a8c4f95caadb7f32fc19aa06
1dfe79d443663a14620a87bb6e527040ff2ba35d
'2011-12-17T04:16:13-05:00'
describe
'369861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBQ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
877fd24ace3ed519eabfd07df5b187fb
758e11233e0fce354b57fa368b6b204e9cdfeea5
'2011-12-17T04:15:02-05:00'
describe
'369854' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b34438a268ad69eb1f57e3e9ebe5bbf0
e225a169cf1908b14ef90f4d7335d54e36211990
'2011-12-17T04:18:50-05:00'
describe
'369883' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
483f9a7a229fb2c0bb73a5c368dcd491
09dd085586ccc0437d17e7bd4b525e3ae9f398b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b87e83b4c7fc508611b6522ad0d6d1a7
0fcae17fecdf5a62c0758166bcfba2b7071ffe64
'2011-12-17T04:19:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3c462b4c96f2fbe9febf78f8668c3379
e32fb11193ad374450569c17ed8f65caf0b4567a
'2011-12-17T04:14:07-05:00'
describe
'230586' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
f7dd4299319744b2dd44d4741fcea820
a2e1118c945aac59d879a8784da700cb4565d2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
b89571016f41adb8c3f0ca559b7034ab
2f6e1df0d69ad8301b7cf70e8924afd66f9bc771
'2011-12-17T04:12:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
88197a1372de41ee38e570936a0ab09c
dce15053b84a5f7236c61845a122caa8c293373a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBY' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ce7e1574bc281e95fe843751bd0c212d
22e0c8e18038ddf000bc9bb9e2beef805181096d
'2011-12-17T04:12:34-05:00'
describe
'369851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLBZ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
ac20939561f0ee87a40b8b43599b4e6b
d4dc871df870984f1176df37c381f09ad2284637
'2011-12-17T04:13:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCA' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
22768d019515ed5e7e426b10fb9ed858
c07296f32cbce460458439182938a8bbb74a36bc
'2011-12-17T04:23:06-05:00'
describe
'349538' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCB' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
449a0210c3a7b7e95b4e2f027c6fee6a
85fe0cd9b0f1bf2cd6a7515139178f98d673124c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCC' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
b6d7d60fcf6d4b7b7a440533a93bc138
ba3ea0925939f2b89f55df1cc9649dbfb87ab1a1
'2011-12-17T04:13:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
75d77ea8a654ecda27b4821d4784938d
4c8b42a1e1d470ac4883c44063774975e4b0d556
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
40fc56a0d398bb74bed8c1f599a5e368
404bab28e5cf1d914fa78dfcac2b2f0cfc185ccf
'2011-12-17T04:21:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
d28df02e7354b2944785e1bede58a68d
2a32a6f8fc5d213092af8f2df6834914e7d3660d
'2011-12-17T04:15:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8975ca4a14cd126684bd099988e54639
a91af7cf626af248bc81145f241a5d44485ca32b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCH' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
bf122386e43dcfdf6fe6c10fb204b5cf
21fae77dcb47f63640afa1a33d3ae8dbee3bd25d
'2011-12-17T04:12:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCI' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
3543d72a73e46ab9e7b354efb60bd112
521599cc941f36733fe40788be88e381ff80f4d6
'2011-12-17T04:27:21-05:00'
describe
'175486' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0795294b4c5de0bad2cce248926a8a7e
40c5f6e5f43feb17db1d7a4a481350991acfdd3c
describe
'369847' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCK' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
e82530c79678aa17734c89a003eb08a7
a175279d396b4d3ff89909fd3315646853cd6065
'2011-12-17T04:18:45-05:00'
describe
'369915' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
7bc7b8263b7cf0dfbdb31e0cdfd475be
3dbde9ad9d568d1ecdca406c55fd910913e665d5
'2011-12-17T04:11:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4efc0e13f6ea411cbb719a3d5a1f025c
ad7b7449196b0a465fc1107c5956109cc6477b6f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCN' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
186954088bc96cea19052179419ba171
04eec27645d5913c08821cbcf34c927f038122c0
'2011-12-17T04:14:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCO' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
328f63b67e3f0acd64aea8f42393ff76
d4db29de013b5aab7168748871d4cce60863d4c9
'2011-12-17T04:12:59-05:00'
describe
'369818' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
ad8abc8025a38292d22156f6bf61be49
5607c571467db0b2ac6dc8a2e20b12fa522182a1
'2011-12-17T04:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCQ' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9d81f392359a190558db9f2db0e99854
2ddac4b67340c00aa4c15eb660f0a8bfaf57886c
'2011-12-17T04:12:45-05:00'
describe
'369907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
11d415c2ab8b648c53d05f1619c5198e
faab2d2e97da5f31ff8f6ff30cfa12890e951ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
97f60f7259eef062abaa10647da82784
01b86de8ef16f080f616540d99990a3d78bcc757
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCT' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
14e2f2ad7740e37a857c49f99f2fd3f7
a45e45c48c37682e7006e477d327aad8d4a5bd58
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCU' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
ad8c9442403418ad781bbdad1ab8d7e5
6c088cb6536bfb4f669f390be10107dbbc2404ec
'2011-12-17T04:17:28-05:00'
describe
'369610' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCV' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
dd089e623344e6d75f1af447b39b1859
48d788dc07a8ebb69e4dad3c69aa8279315299da
'2011-12-17T04:17:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
ba268cb876ad84fb5e99f323d143e8f2
0af19a2495803a01ff726dc10ac1735f58d788b7
'2011-12-17T04:15:40-05:00'
describe
'369911' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
9f21b5e64e6ede4e63e8114e0d6c4b42
b0c2ddfa07e43c671dde14de4ab7aa466a07a86c
'2011-12-17T04:21:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCY' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
11ee30baed7c9b533a26cbb54df37d6c
6082f4964969a2d5b6bff1be21da45d5c59e384a
'2011-12-17T04:15:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLCZ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4cbef36f1f14ef96d27d0dec43672dac
1071689a967a9c1700484d742190d34033c9f70e
'2011-12-17T04:26:33-05:00'
describe
'369879' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDA' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
64f38d621f14860f125ab9f7420412f5
eea39e77448d56a760e80ccf03bbb3667f263c34
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
ae72f97925dba598f6464cf007efbdf2
c6d284d3d3f6f7f4b09beb51b34b69a6abfc5c79
'2011-12-17T04:25:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDC' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b21e5a1f19a2e9459aaceb424f405d36
bcbeb80d6a85493babbc329a73c184631fc40b8e
'2011-12-17T04:25:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDD' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
d13fd11ea91637e0f21c45c6dc332f6c
50607fdd7258ddc5d867645a5c7cbf027d41e599
'2011-12-17T04:13:56-05:00'
describe
'369846' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDE' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
070eb02dd481c83e65ba1df73346c504
ba12d63feef2210229a383596b0594abd95d86c3
'2011-12-17T04:23:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
5b09028c591bd2cb870f3f7e1f59eea7
5a9f77ed7003042ae22b841f27332b006b3e78ea
'2011-12-17T04:10:38-05:00'
describe
'369881' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
31ad92864623b699e33e6de9e3bf11de
7c302472744470086c06aedc8569a3f9cee71384
describe
'369882' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDH' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
064209ea7db55c4d008320663bfe907b
a139a98230a9f748bde11a57a8a70ea18cfb4a20
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDI' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
bdd84a118f51f5379df92cf0c58d27b7
eb0ed0229978a65f6c82b55acb887e7f0ba823aa
'2011-12-17T04:12:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDJ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
7e7ffe76a7123900ef0c7b670043bfb4
613745cccbf8a7405709d6018b0b85a31498c700
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDK' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
ed2ccd9ba45060536b79f831274c5f6a
7bab59898c9cc4eba4d74e829d49d5dd9675def5
'2011-12-17T04:20:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDL' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
ee8eeeb43e27df55892f8d9044dc37e0
8f02a7305d5077647450d1f2a146239789369f8f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
4c50e8686069d1c71ae6838a6c565d3d
97980576d7bc679360e865544e8b6a586f1df364
'2011-12-17T04:24:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDN' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
c0be9e6777db322e153bc06e632d0ff2
5fd3ce217fd72076e8ea6e667f0a09bd39b81ef2
'2011-12-17T04:15:45-05:00'
describe
'375702' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
4f53378269700d128a24192aaaa5f2f1
024a10ff9dc165d197fa7d78b7c55417d46575c2
'2011-12-17T04:21:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
6680a5742881bec9a607cfc6c6c07151
52b13964f86f1f84d350b6ecc02d918c3aae1bb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDQ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
395ecde58a3c44b2d3e66cc0c8271838
22e91fb758b0359362215130979528db9679e0cd
'2011-12-17T04:22:02-05:00'
describe
'369932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
565ee3cfd394ef9807fcbf47333f8c0c
2d6e51ba70b3c9651813a53d8d6bb201f71be1a4
'2011-12-17T04:23:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDS' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
25ea0ca35255705fbf3cda14d23dcefc
e0d54bb585e0fe2b91e2e086986baab58e81d1c8
'2011-12-17T04:18:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
1d19598733673f1604f47003b3dc2822
4997b01d4feefe1082da0e21ecac63d6ea078a32
describe
'369896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDU' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
36ab8c352c5caaaef6c35f45a034e56c
1340972324bed8f5a3c86a123ac377171b4f975e
'2011-12-17T04:13:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDV' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
81390cbc00eabb33729bb5f458dfa633
50bd1d890fcade2995917e41cccd1e77cfa8a169
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDW' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
9c6b4156728ca12f960b66dd61234244
4cf1ff816c26a234963a8c479d7e40c9fca0b9d7
'2011-12-17T04:15:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
9bd9414bd644c0feb25e1374d843ea2b
ff14958dca28c44615991a0b300a464d9df2023e
'2011-12-17T04:27:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDY' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
cf5e8acc8de8303fcfc68f59d868d731
a7dcfc0ca19b8b63b9a2ee5906af6366242606b9
'2011-12-17T04:10:56-05:00'
describe
'369890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLDZ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
1b541df4075582db1e783563cd8461cc
c58bc6479affac477b8317f68cd452a204e4fb0f
'2011-12-17T04:17:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEA' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
0d7e607798c3c4aff22b37998162dbf2
8d21c8c717c7c342b2c9cbe89b8a5080736c3f90
'2011-12-17T04:27:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEB' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
a023956c7f946e6437d731d00c16041b
1333fd7b03fd5288f3a67e1e9473863beb334f52
'2011-12-17T04:09:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEC' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
5d63a9be9eeb54a4faef276e081fbd10
070457677258a5f1907926bfbdf21239e5bd305e
'2011-12-17T04:11:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLED' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
4159b129e49fb32a5a43499afac82d52
b28ea2ca183c77677ab7aabdfdb81ff691ecd18d
'2011-12-17T04:11:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEE' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ae8d33e968167f5f2260044f92d5a61b
fd2444133b36f1423ac5f1be7c047a275712a06e
describe
'369862' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEF' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
9bc15da0464a96dfd44d7d6555497dba
93721a196aafb481ba1f5518d0b2441934ee690f
'2011-12-17T04:23:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEG' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
31b18b1c43b61a08cdce5bb5f3072432
065f1041fcf709df29a7ebc7ff55e235e511891d
'2011-12-17T04:20:19-05:00'
describe
'370162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEH' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
9c466e7ef67fb5788c2d254a29efdccc
b115b2ab2800fdef68948eeb9cee1fffec8cab73
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEI' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
d31cde7f75d4a4b24a6ec162c2478dfa
8e96a486f6bc7e55d6976a234e0a04e32282e8fb
'2011-12-17T04:20:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEJ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c00d3630f4c5c53368682d15770fdcd1
afb20c936e9715ea83f3412e20fd5a26c75cd26d
'2011-12-17T04:15:37-05:00'
describe
'369936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
d9157e1b8ab806c869a7db32b86473f0
4d0da8d8f608ab8b18cfbdaf63413a333412e2cc
'2011-12-17T04:10:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEL' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
3b33a3c2c83864f78ce19bffbebd280a
c137c930782793e31e0e739c4840a5807db7915f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEM' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
019111717a93b4ce82a3c98f4348dfb0
56f6667cff3cd9925bd9196e35f871da90b1cfc5
describe
'380290' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEN' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
5e99fea2d475d5887e1ba6670f17e11c
ea9bf64579299b7908e39643378e67da0dfac208
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEO' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
9085dc4732a13f8b3f0b58b613bfab1b
12aa3a4932d5e8c51a4a15c79f3e6d2fb9dd6006
'2011-12-17T04:28:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEP' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d23a87fbe3d3d818a0dc176f4adf585c
9f611056a842a2247042548300eaeed373cf559f
'2011-12-17T04:25:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
4248d8ac8a5fcf968843429301b9a9d5
02284cddfd09e19e39c4d948edb74115caf86af6
'2011-12-17T04:18:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLER' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
320dd1dd7ee0ffdd37048bdfff224ee8
b4b1e9cc3c05243a8520039a98009e89971a742f
'2011-12-17T04:09:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLES' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
e9e7f48f19b0b7b454430a91b7658517
2e29a46e978fcce81260f33a23fcd5886b9ba615
'2011-12-17T04:10:18-05:00'
describe
'369865' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLET' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
79d9d2bac89b1d02e056d9f63090e7f9
bece11762b69d400936f7ca98b790a861b5fa6c1
'2011-12-17T04:11:52-05:00'
describe
'369860' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEU' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
0ae89969f70ce4d3c798297e40f9f89d
fbb7d300255b394c1fed22e713571e6b1136b4f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEV' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
a707045ff2b96f6513914597c9f715ea
580e0502281d86b38dce52e0284568d256491597
'2011-12-17T04:28:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEW' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
21da8f681626251b2a73e053b26d6ebb
9cabbfa92a28190b6e6d0ad69f37f6291d3eb728
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEX' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
30cb257046c301b816412191dd5b283c
1c80a71cad84a937c99b53714d037b938feb32e7
'2011-12-17T04:17:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEY' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
3d3fb611dafc04d77e7167f25e809030
098915e52a0b74511fe5b41b9dd7216fb59be599
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLEZ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
7409b4f43c774952ac95e7effc4e4dbe
677c6cf89e154fa7ce5a625a104f7fa1fe2d1b63
'2011-12-17T04:22:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFA' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
d542c8e3d814d592c432328ca668eea5
51077cfd115695073dcc5e48c61b873e6f0f67e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFB' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
5ccd87744e46433f53d8becf4f62c11e
9e88517f1f4f0b0996dfff1b1209561a4a7c8604
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFC' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
45c5775baf6071fc74d1bef61d8eeaab
1abb36ffb8a0c44b30a38fda4b7f846a465273b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFD' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
7e6ccbdd724f4a3234b7cdf2c5709189
2efec4f12748bcdda8f4ffd2fdde7d255dabe0b0
'2011-12-17T04:09:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFE' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
bb5477303a3b629b407f47702797818a
b28edd8bdba0209c23f87a4013e4f78158e41a13
'2011-12-17T04:14:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFF' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
0e22907554cfa7b643561af59e4f64cb
53a582da41a21ed6b45e56c57b1154f5a82bb659
'2011-12-17T04:19:11-05:00'
describe
'309565' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFG' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
cb4f2fce7ae8be004ae822a09bb4a771
25dda4c015f577eb3b9d6104a397c93b9573b26c
'2011-12-17T04:11:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFH' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
57b99cbafd9219852fb9c0dc80f3e060
3439bbe06583b111c6fa74662addf437ccf7969a
'2011-12-17T04:12:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFI' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
64f6b8bc0bfc9f46b7d474a8cb4c5b64
588089ecb29b8037ed3db34f069c36a43d87b673
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFJ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
eafd1cb3a4e153a8e970365709e5e3b4
a694bbbc8a0128c48d385321c6834f333b090208
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFK' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
41ee4bb809e7e0c91662973caf61b961
ed19c5bde415c876429bda66c64f8adc25d904df
'2011-12-17T04:10:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFL' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
94b265d0b288086746c6034b7f0f6c71
a018a2ee6754e39aaa9318957fff6af30aff8359
'2011-12-17T04:23:44-05:00'
describe
'369898' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFM' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
3b2a86a0c54ebf852471f7a5ef070ccf
95ba4ac3ce6d163160b09dccbe56e07d90ae4dd3
'2011-12-17T04:22:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFN' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
66b5901cdd73dfef076f42eec2cb9067
d6ed9a02bf378bf7529b4a22ad31e8d92d3e32b9
describe
'369893' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFO' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
38a72ebe3d69c19b4f442d0710312e37
b2076e4122561108a703b5c17bf0a6df2a7fecb8
'2011-12-17T04:25:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFP' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
b56702127add0a071e93c826166c8830
5ade0c06bace8468fade620da1f511d1abc8baeb
describe
'369877' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFQ' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
d8014b341fece5b90ea299c1c17cd2b6
dcdf8d897c5302d25e5408d4c1c3ce33f03afe05
'2011-12-17T04:15:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFR' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
dd47cb45e343fbb740aeb4e865427704
a38a0a0ec42ee966397d0a75c5766d6628df23e3
'2011-12-17T04:25:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFS' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
d92c360815d440ffe7110517664d41a4
f61feb3cf7c490b7a71949534ed6e1a3e73cfec1
'2011-12-17T04:20:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFT' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
ba0ede3a345039ce27513d8fd1dda540
ce54e6c790a8d86f7f080ce3b32a8a3b3da70715
describe
'364269' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFU' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
3f9fa1c5ab661de106b277dbc523b44f
2b0fc35215f547e12f63f6db28fe0b79d1ab9313
'2011-12-17T04:14:15-05:00'
describe
'370122' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFV' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
0734b60b564e8595dd5b6ccf1f060f38
2666d356470d68584272fcca3934cbadf5f08653
'2011-12-17T04:11:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFW' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
96f58293436e1c56e31d68ade0ce0a75
c91969c0fe8b4e89d1cf2b8f7a072caa4b37db21
'2011-12-17T04:18:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFX' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
01af7200ed705b87932682ad161ff3b4
e4201e91717bfa50a590bf119ff7e44a02614a2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFY' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
5581830e7634287ad89927aa4d035146
493102460bb9d043103a0b65418d9533626c9b4a
'2011-12-17T04:18:39-05:00'
describe
'370140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLFZ' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
f99187d5f4224492ddfdbc0cf482f7d5
0a0bb10ffe9c937cf90e469ef97452da66c97897
'2011-12-17T04:23:48-05:00'
describe
'369837' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGA' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
04238911decc9d1f040cec87e10e37ef
cc24a0f98b6e6da4d8dc7613258faf882761f47f
describe
'370194' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGB' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
d80c7fbab13eeebe5527c95a43d3c4d3
c34d989e2c1848cb08d73c7c5bbadccc24c8e2bd
'2011-12-17T04:24:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGC' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
15478fa9795032cda814f2258ffd9ed5
8714ea65135ecae7f5db445deab27c5c6d486c5e
'2011-12-17T04:25:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGD' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
88e02c2f77bfe691dbd4da2cb8362f18
9f933f84835e3c74515b09aa360e2f86defd48d0
'2011-12-17T04:09:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGE' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
cfa06ed706503e5150e9c0f01e063ade
cb9917a6c32c08d0714cc260bef051e6079c703e
'2011-12-17T04:25:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGF' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
8d6bbe9ed968a591c142dee75f2aae13
7dc822bdf329c4bd81200866345a0ee02dfbf203
'2011-12-17T04:09:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGG' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
9a7c38e6e0535ddb81fc33f38ee0aeb1
01188ce008a6cc8af82c9586f212085d262a4f7f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
5dc4223d4f281d86d8abffe474fb0397
b7e596b909a00ac77538221c139e49b98ad8474e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGI' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
eb3681e00c15457cd4ca22d1d0df08db
e19d52ecebff1f23c728f7b8cd0dc7926576991d
'2011-12-17T04:14:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGJ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
9ded08fc450e3ca80e1b4471fd227e8b
cc52ec417ccc2deae0f0b94e1c1c014b9f7cf4c1
'2011-12-17T04:14:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGK' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
0d0eea5bf6d2a3c0ce9c96c9d2942115
23d0ce7f7bfd6a188e9c55bc879a7e1a59dc4a95
'2011-12-17T04:19:33-05:00'
describe
'198378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGL' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
9c7f58545aef939d47da466e9815cb7c
d897c29eb27c6faa57c6592bd7f68e698bbfd359
'2011-12-17T04:25:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGM' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
004a8fb4122ff95284ae0e07f4de017d
b680a5b9457abc2a494c97b447a2bdfd1ebb56b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGN' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
0041152292f41437cee9c4fde4594320
fabf377336d4e75bc1b386fbcfc20edc4ebbe0b7
'2011-12-17T04:12:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGO' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
a373b2a535eaa77b6fd435d89e2d3b28
aa985d64caf04b51b26b57ab9cb621712956d0d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGP' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
bc0b19ddd303794eacfefec099af56ec
4e372f28c1cdecb031dc41483a994f875934961e
'2011-12-17T04:09:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
3b5c96bff87552a1da30c2a537572f65
95b6a6114fcc8e35a45c4e2fee126bdfb49a8278
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGR' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
2cfed1f7fcf2b4f526f41d99c5e6580b
5d8554fb843905e953c559e32659631a960721c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGS' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
600accc6f2dd13c6ac76626ae50e7426
258a44545f123c3cf9114c628cc426305811f4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGT' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
26ba5f1e3e073f484a8add63095a0a25
1fa99d00a70da6d051dea87308c8133f6c673377
'2011-12-17T04:27:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGU' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
c9e7b7c28af905649dfc09810ad92415
2d1eec39be0bde1c3ab5108c06f224ae6ded3ac8
'2011-12-17T04:18:29-05:00'
describe
'370190' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGV' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
6299633d0074909e4e689e13833de4f0
6092e8997f6d141003622f3589b16b2c543e7637
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGW' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
872fc38c7e07825551258369043aa78c
1313c7b5b32d5a142d86c3130e345a4df9446710
'2011-12-17T04:20:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGX' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
d2f05ec4c2e6910b547374b4753cd87b
4694e33ef8a3892424c4a0e48a6b9dfda7225ce2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGY' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
358247e5bd0437f04ee94a4db0b2b981
6da7395d51f2ee5e52606fd8ada151c1f80ec3c5
describe
'370207' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLGZ' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
8aed375852092838e61ab5640df5f4fe
4a94bee95f2b4d0ad6a013b4ea549c1e71ace0a5
'2011-12-17T04:23:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHA' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
c6e7bd95ebdfccf2a7bfe0b2081ee295
9e4a0021bff2b2a9791ba3e8a2f500a23633ad73
'2011-12-17T04:20:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHB' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
b2ce9a2c88b6448fd3e34604e20da9b5
6cfaa7a9a686cb26cbc32fde9ec4448497b3e7e2
'2011-12-17T04:09:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHC' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
78721aff7899dc850dac0c3101fe093f
8765b9299fe15739e67634b6a6643796e7d6379a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHD' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
ee799c9a19df0b80578efe8794aa878e
027db0dfda1847d7ac92214b267c810ca83d5553
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHE' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
6fe0a7dff670d2cb28d18f8300631217
8a174d4dfea1bec298b6c5c951fcb13ded4579db
'2011-12-17T04:09:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHF' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
73299e581061f5f16b7bcbbbb9b74a14
635a9e782b249219b4f53ab907c9136942a57292
'2011-12-17T04:16:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHG' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
d95ebed82c4fd82b2ca189baf94493ce
fe89cfbe03914bd87652b1deff38d069279491de
describe
'370208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHH' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
46e285a3c9d473bd57b5fb746e211d54
cedd5a82fdf504b420310e38aa73a2ff937fb679
'2011-12-17T04:16:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHI' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
189177338cc024c78b40cfbf5376c1aa
bb56ecd994847800e429d505bad878860ae4c334
'2011-12-17T04:20:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHJ' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
8513bf4bcc41b9d36e332366429df0ff
d53b28e2416970a8126d07f1bf8505e8da3512d9
'2011-12-17T04:24:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHK' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
40e05a18b971a68cf01c01d911f7547d
9303d7ca1e56a2cbe6932938115b462625f0ac18
'2011-12-17T04:18:24-05:00'
describe
'370177' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHL' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
e96b4334d1d8be769411e546965bfc43
afe2a9799ac8affe7724cc6c57354c61393fe10d
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHM' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
ab00dc6fc6b95613ce7fb7bbd308b8cf
623a42a62f48645fca94654cca7ab43e4a5abc7d
'2011-12-17T04:21:37-05:00'
describe
'365368' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHN' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
f61b1757bebabc5fa9c7c5703e0b52f0
5d8772b34864bf82bbcf953e4722a4c1f6df49dd
'2011-12-17T04:26:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHO' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
b086dab8fc99213a1dcf035769b61d27
2f3354ba152483aa9549982dd74dee32c3691dab
describe
'195499' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHP' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
2ba1262cb7e55f078907384e2a3253e5
f095246788599367191ce2d1fb2486b97a303b79
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHQ' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
165c742c34f0151293c2e12af345f53a
0fe686572db170eb085aa1710f7052caa6635688
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHR' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
431a6399b31dd43d2cdbff170f978a58
67f373d550d0677f9162184c9243b45fea6d3aee
'2011-12-17T04:10:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHS' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
8e1ba63da3d17ebdb4a7ab163321afe2
550bc360183bc84eabdbd03f9ec579cc83e4e25f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHT' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
3040185bab4d35bc136f29494904e16a
5297df17b9b526c35990a2cde92b96656a10e58d
'2011-12-17T04:17:29-05:00'
describe
'369864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHU' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
041897b265e5030392864806e9a65616
a73d943d7bab1291ed7c8477328e5dfba7840309
'2011-12-17T04:20:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHV' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
d46cb416ee734da4bf95b26ca601fc0a
cffd2b0d8a34730970fe1228193ac279929656ba
'2011-12-17T04:27:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHW' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
1445d561aa5b119509b67e0f0ff964e4
1bd79f1a6ae723d6e6dbeddde9222b4a55dc8b89
'2011-12-17T04:20:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHX' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
337cbf0b9056118158c8d8a51168617d
dc3442638aee95cd933cffbab11db33672c29e9e
'2011-12-17T04:22:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHY' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
d22f0b2b8bcd825a684bac5fb6bb3809
e990500adf8e037c31d2b6f6069d5c9e35111ed7
'2011-12-17T04:27:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLHZ' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
31f8bc7e95da88ccb8e9346713710d44
5b25180e5e0e1676055fd34fc487983b3d691951
'2011-12-17T04:17:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIA' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
f3b068b9bbf03dc6d3535d461eaf17dc
651be76faeb02de15158af7389d58c3d39f1b5de
'2011-12-17T04:13:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIB' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
e672d20521a204210d9c5bf5d0139dd2
71bfbabda6a82fb2f87c349abf86c1658fc6dea2
'2011-12-17T04:19:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIC' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
ec9bcca988440f4c89db02aae0991ff5
72ef453becaa517afb462d5f73e5b5efe35fc5b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLID' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
4c253f0584393e0fb21d21e8766d2b99
53b9f6a82bcdd4ca8360d7c5c10c01fdfc545ed9
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIE' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
966f77330681b70360fff32900b41591
9182135cd11e3918a857e4699cc570d2403a5930
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIF' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
074ec5689788595fdfd46484308455a0
9a935ef268c602358cd2cbacb11fbc4b8c869373
'2011-12-17T04:13:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIG' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
26c0f9ba7b98be46bee756e753b41fdc
547a6dbd9b56ca758f5bc9ed8197ee51737adc02
'2011-12-17T04:23:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIH' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
2ddf8e31634adf3613a36e799dd3a735
95df0572a9631e1bb5aab254f22557b5a44505c7
'2011-12-17T04:21:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLII' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
b57d33393b88239a12107b5de01e9c3e
fb3cff32df89d9b3e00062caa48da7a413b393fa
'2011-12-17T04:18:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIJ' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
b2a47fbde65848fc8603616ae26eb7ba
e48aa5f142422129a50df2a567e2c3eef068068c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIK' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
d94ab432bab5d8bc6e3830fb3bee6b40
3b9d91ba1f8c6d5da4074de13d26e185ecdf5698
'2011-12-17T04:12:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIL' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
c8baac98d9f56b840dedb40da2bcdff3
9d83900e84172e68c03d74dbe01895c1f1da87e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIM' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
e8ff9ac62cae330d2ebe0aa818831146
1079f63eff9d51dc11c6ae92894666b86fee0b32
'2011-12-17T04:17:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIN' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
08410cab1930b3e7a8be606128d5e345
d49b4a20795c1b1dff001280124ced03fdde61d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIO' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
826729c094a47ebcf1bd06de273fd935
686af8265b28e75e65cc50cff16ed5845b68b7e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIP' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
ef757ae8d52a13424449023c96966dd6
d28973b93aa2f59b1bd5afe74d8902d7b3098797
'2011-12-17T04:26:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIQ' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
9c4d0dbc647d3714d4ffa829add63e7e
607af6089039eae8e75ad7f1ba9190fffa9cc10f
'2011-12-17T04:24:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIR' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
9c341eb1493740461615bcbad98ae35d
3d9567a236477300fab9dc6c17992068bee5fae0
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIS' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
6facfc15eea5699d1e7e5748c5fb98c7
adc86de685f9ea659c9c39fa836bf90395021131
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIT' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
d532ce3de2c17b7cbc57703dfc5d2b52
501fc76bffd912bf77a99d391d9de69b3726512e
'2011-12-17T04:19:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIU' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
2b70e481ee0ae4be8a9bfaefb377fc92
b5d243d008252a88bc66912b69f9936499accf1f
'2011-12-17T04:16:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIV' 'sip-files00321.jp2'
5b877a72e5aa678a0715fa8624a0067b
c2f75f2beb30b8b88c073416e0d02b30b81a37cf
'2011-12-17T04:13:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIW' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
7ae81e88489bcccea5963544dbb1e376
0fbbf09a09c80b66d62885d401c754f6f343f710
'2011-12-17T04:21:09-05:00'
describe
'190828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIX' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
77ee645c649aa986f0ae0d9e06d8f9fe
c6167cc739cef21279198295404216da2068803b
describe
'78378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIY' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
63b95d23a0a85367d383123e521d55e0
571a11d79c8a84417445f9c44ef9df93f8d1cc78
'2011-12-17T04:18:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLIZ' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
9e39ecb8193e48e91a76843f47f14b3c
0a78b1b7459eeee4bd2a59642993eef1d2824cd7
'2011-12-17T04:26:28-05:00'
describe
'369873' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJA' 'sip-files00326.jp2'
b116c98c427c99a2a45f3908d6553174
4ffbbb39dac1c01482c40c553a125a5d130930cc
'2011-12-17T04:17:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJB' 'sip-files00327.jp2'
0961911185c42f7b96aae9a0930ce52d
6cf293580f6d26b76cd6b76e08be3ba187492b35
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJC' 'sip-files00328.jp2'
78a311c489dc9bd158283eec37280465
aef44296a730cd015347aef49448a4bba6e24abf
describe
'369762' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJD' 'sip-files00329.jp2'
125d931a42d1f0eeb50d86d1a1ab2a74
80fdf0180a2d186fa93b730e1c10beed1cf9a4cc
'2011-12-17T04:12:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJE' 'sip-files00330.jp2'
57bbc0586879c4787026b1217f2d25ff
bed0367beb9f9f84d2c1cb42cc2d429ce569fa8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJF' 'sip-files00331.jp2'
16ad89eeee8fbe3814039a57ca052507
b270c4a279617e1b31d1cc770c02a7fbe8c44c75
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJG' 'sip-files00332.jp2'
e42e6915d24026c026c50cec6d79bc48
78c0e79ff2639f4cdbc66b29c4fd0a1d17625a4c
'2011-12-17T04:26:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJH' 'sip-files00333.jp2'
e3583eb03690d12fb488fefaa4f696ec
204db47fcff3da7ad4a9fef358518b983ef84a1b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJI' 'sip-files00334.jp2'
b871a7edae3e1a795b1c5e9941f23a6c
1b4a3d2eb733f9c1dfea7dc26c542f792638326b
describe
'369768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJJ' 'sip-files00335.jp2'
bfc90c0814b793a4a8688f5fa851afed
44f16a1d3538b76d5ebf0ca71ee936627557f371
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJK' 'sip-files00336.jp2'
52fdac59f8b65f0c62f2d8238131819e
924a17a99b616a2e6a712960e767da5e97bc7013
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJL' 'sip-files00337.jp2'
e137cd70ad90751aa6342b44d05035e4
a7a2789f04e2e226f4bfd09805b7db0f59db0da3
'2011-12-17T04:13:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJM' 'sip-files00338.jp2'
19398b14a3106d145b13e06febe1235b
2f7ea4e69907c5b565d544e1b14712467d78e14f
'2011-12-17T04:10:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJN' 'sip-files00339.jp2'
5c08fc0c5c47abcfd01fefd63e47a0fb
d530776a64b5bc763285833ef022b9d4a42ed273
'2011-12-17T04:10:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJO' 'sip-files00340.jp2'
f0b2387d05ccc87feeeefeaa16cda3ac
467ec8b0061e940e08a87b7d45097b77bf3d55ce
describe
'369858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJP' 'sip-files00341.jp2'
dce460f7dd96965f71000b2840b2af82
511eb3f52733f69177a5f666c0473c24db5c8ca6
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJQ' 'sip-files00342.jp2'
c5a02aaebeea3b30af5d47da82e99ffa
5f3b96f24848cc38106651e118b349d1120b0c59
'2011-12-17T04:19:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJR' 'sip-files00343.jp2'
10c5e56f60605a8d1f29e58bc81a00b0
d8ecb0bd3d03458b21b55b85015886f34b88f4c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJS' 'sip-files00344.jp2'
e8c7919a572a80b31a320a68c6c24b39
8836667325e35eba2a75fe6612dffc43d27ae90b
'2011-12-17T04:14:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJT' 'sip-files00345.jp2'
334634d2522c0ff4e59f97d6221facd6
eb90c8c784bcc4916f20ee9c9abd2a71ff8f19e6
'2011-12-17T04:21:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJU' 'sip-files00346.jp2'
22fa04e64af3628070c15da86460c724
e393f935aefc8c627527388b9524241e2ca3803d
'2011-12-17T04:12:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJV' 'sip-files00347.jp2'
538e3d44963d7dcd3c8feece47d75750
ebfb390a9ad1f089c2a889820e5917a29a8e3565
'2011-12-17T04:26:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJW' 'sip-files00348.jp2'
dea2abd4ea0e47e07eafa693da678db3
88b5ed2379d6c5e6315fbfe4b817dcde79926df4
'2011-12-17T04:19:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJX' 'sip-files00349.jp2'
d65827a102b792a9a683eb3af1aff4c1
4871cce5aa45dbc5055c4e20f6f56cd2983136a5
'2011-12-17T04:10:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJY' 'sip-files00350.jp2'
6295dc5658ae6d54ac8ac2717a7843b7
1497714367ef73a53352ccdf24f930b99c37ede8
'2011-12-17T04:24:11-05:00'
describe
'369857' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLJZ' 'sip-files00351.jp2'
911e136bdbccde2100ce2e0861729755
658ad5bda89488ce0899eea6c941cc84adfea001
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKA' 'sip-files00352.jp2'
3fe39c042ce04b377d8fc0043684b93d
d23377ad4e996a6373bb11ee166f706aaae3ff5f
'2011-12-17T04:20:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKB' 'sip-files00353.jp2'
a39cb3df26b6a51b1d2c1d454a6cacbd
f2af64d5af70892762bb223491d09a7c3e2917b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKC' 'sip-files00354.jp2'
90039d8a37862af20fba4edfc5878962
97a6d04056600cca9629ab78382b42c9dfddd492
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKD' 'sip-files00355.jp2'
37be4ee242c834d48ce0e79656e6e2c0
53631a925db017d31f20c9fc7017b0294005039e
describe
'435668' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKE' 'sip-files00358.jp2'
ff9e1ef8ef3720eaeece93969440b13c
4353eb6c2ee5244adc0313233a4e81f88c1546a4
'2011-12-17T04:23:29-05:00'
describe
'413949' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKF' 'sip-files00359.jp2'
d13f3b38955af430b924f3094ccf22b8
4f170b8a261ac9a746f960532d85b432b51edd4f
'2011-12-17T04:09:13-05:00'
describe
'135516' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKG' 'sip-files00360.jp2'
9feda04a50d6a336e8fedf29ebb36245
f0367c2f8bd480c443b91029e74e4ad3abb3258f
'2011-12-17T04:14:27-05:00'
describe
'10406924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKH' 'sip-files00000.tif'
52b43e2e8ab35eae273ddf3f04f9f1fe
d6e27623d290a265b6eaeb79a01f2bbf72936293
'2011-12-17T04:18:03-05:00'
describe
'10884256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKI' 'sip-files00001.tif'
793ef7467b2f0eff8af6a74525327fde
835c626d04b14f9f009cab3e8661f02b5cd41a5b
describe
'2967384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKJ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
a890325cdd25e8464d610e3091897c77
f226dc6fd20bdcc4e5fe48fe2e5e3e2f9d257cb6
'2011-12-17T04:22:54-05:00'
describe
'8834176' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
e6a99f415267001910cd80e457c88c8e
52f6438fe78c5fc314840fbf963edd72a4c2ddef
'2011-12-17T04:13:36-05:00'
describe
'2864868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKL' 'sip-files00008.tif'
993b3e263daf268583faa9cd77954716
bd29f96e9c0cb3b09749c646e8909b7a76ee1494
'2011-12-17T04:22:29-05:00'
describe
'2824996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
65ccc7941724ce516d59298699430fcb
188accf7f2de905393e3609ac8442cf51d16367c
'2011-12-17T04:26:31-05:00'
describe
'2969472' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKN' 'sip-files00012.tif'
55bbfdde4c951115c141eba93e641adc
355de00820469eeac1a8b0f61e3e5fd8dc330b08
'2011-12-17T04:15:20-05:00'
describe
'2970528' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
8d5618554fa8f9b6e6011231c459e946
1894bbb3364799f6e12df75d449e32558dc79c83
'2011-12-17T04:20:17-05:00'
describe
'2970924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
a85b5f72229c5509811c89fed24a531a
a6f5d9bdcbb4a71011d291c43cfc4d1cd172d0b3
'2011-12-17T04:24:05-05:00'
describe
'2968660' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9da2204c57239355e58a416f9e776cb7
a7535b6f5096e32558c83eeccd274a29987c2a80
'2011-12-17T04:10:11-05:00'
describe
'2968916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKR' 'sip-files00016.tif'
ca27810eb3d91edb703e4f7ffda4430d
53a1b66637aebc714a5b51a74c6ffb4640be3b67
describe
'2969952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
939bb2178b75591d83da981d7f6032e3
6b74e0245274461bf7e6a81f8c4325228cb91f07
'2011-12-17T04:18:52-05:00'
describe
'2970120' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKT' 'sip-files00018.tif'
779b9a23804f130acd7cde5987290d9a
bb5bddc779dd867a3d5b1e50952a23df0faeb9c0
describe
'2971040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
132571c579b9e7bd9f3a33e06227307e
2bd6bd0201c7ea04602591e1e94e62b237310c6b
describe
'2763744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
2bfa8f7e0544685ec3321c70c0b60757
17c09689a60fe63f19bda69fc4ff7d151b98bf47
'2011-12-17T04:20:55-05:00'
describe
'2971000' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKW' 'sip-files00021.tif'
4d55dd89308a535a0616583892b65b18
a6d9aefb4628a9447b4f25449358feba03a9c973
'2011-12-17T04:12:38-05:00'
describe
'2840476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7636f18b1ea207ffc7bb3e08d491c284
ba2cddb312b4a89ce44eb8e54158a1d8479c6535
describe
'2969964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKY' 'sip-files00023.tif'
dbba89b6b52718f3a91d9ccd6e5d7438
c39a382b6a7fef71e106a35662e8cf12d0f9ce80
describe
'2971060' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLKZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c13c83bd474701567c599929e4546477
51f5c28925bf7c56f82ac28e218afba5b2917cee
'2011-12-17T04:16:36-05:00'
describe
'2971024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
bf7938c217227535e5b1e1bb990917a1
88abe8769d35ef613e65020edf04e86426602e61
describe
'2970880' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e4f40d85dfe9a68a705250f42d10309f
cb8054b7ed59e8c33a7c610327c5d72c2a10558a
'2011-12-17T04:14:05-05:00'
describe
'2968588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6836d0547db66d04d3e6425ebdd61439
6513ca5b546876da8a6efac5939f5df67132d512
'2011-12-17T04:24:33-05:00'
describe
'2969596' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLD' 'sip-files00028.tif'
f18751c04a168f2cbc60232c8371e82d
c750431a3ce5752dc9ee5d530c5c3e366fcc62b6
'2011-12-17T04:12:55-05:00'
describe
'2971116' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLE' 'sip-files00029.tif'
952cae58e6ecc059e075ad2195f9d203
84f518d2d83b079edb228cf784a380885e6b3e1d
'2011-12-17T04:16:31-05:00'
describe
'2970920' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
39f2b31d15a8a3210bbbdd6756f6f1fb
3f78bc9db8d1339ad0752a79bd56e9a5c94e78b4
'2011-12-17T04:26:10-05:00'
describe
'2970760' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
938aee4795dfa77635ef8fa67bd36a3b
85e123b040125ab799c193df3c4e401e4385e326
describe
'2970656' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
2f905e8c74a3a9be5df700511541c422
613443b590844265be82de9be7f61805dff56743
'2011-12-17T04:21:50-05:00'
describe
'2971200' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLI' 'sip-files00033.tif'
7323ebf9730cdc8c724b9c29ec88756a
cb374c046cf815913806695ae88723dfa5058ab6
'2011-12-17T04:14:46-05:00'
describe
'8294480' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2f7fee9707264c5688f011ae5102ff11
39068c990ffe60ef0e4cc27405f23ec0f41f8689
'2011-12-17T04:18:53-05:00'
describe
'2969948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0d68ed8bf4a7c8353fb2a50e345c0f1f
91dbdccd5243d986674b3734c875756892d67653
'2011-12-17T04:19:35-05:00'
describe
'2969816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
fc6c3c56f7e7b43941734cd8da75f6bf
19e5a5fb2abc451818f3279591605bca911c1a43
describe
'2971008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
61a5f96e43ed5cbe1902b7993a59f960
af10034fb57f1f59f8ea1111b1bdc43059a9c8b1
'2011-12-17T04:16:26-05:00'
describe
'2970976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
7f94c987af2f0e2e24e22436d67959b5
65b5cefa50f9a3f54601a990e94c24bfc98aeb43
describe
'2970888' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
f7e19a19e9a76c1150276fa068d2fbbe
a3ef7a6408678ee9f16e9d133d1b4d7f24858019
'2011-12-17T04:15:23-05:00'
describe
'2971020' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLP' 'sip-files00041.tif'
519feaa17567babbba525b8b6cea7940
b03c32ff710690ea4c6a8af75aaf0bd1688b0295
'2011-12-17T04:12:50-05:00'
describe
'2970224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLQ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
36fff1b96d88feec00da225844234e14
325b580efe1c9538d4c76811c737cf907370c905
describe
'2970024' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c6cabd2150b5a9d8d68c549461854bea
1a8ee96343b90fe3671c94f504346edeb5265873
'2011-12-17T04:24:50-05:00'
describe
'2854560' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9b4ec6b7540953932c634fd1904a10f2
56880c32be561759e4a6b9a805381d1b4a30d96f
'2011-12-17T04:14:02-05:00'
describe
'2970912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLT' 'sip-files00045.tif'
43d21d840ed34328160b526eb7c2cf76
413538cb7b0f152abf43dfd204229885a43256bb
'2011-12-17T04:14:32-05:00'
describe
'2971016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1b6097800974630aef76431f9fe0f7a7
270fd2b1acd42d1544d5b173464a979bcf3e0b50
describe
'2969888' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLV' 'sip-files00047.tif'
bf1aaddcf1848445cdfdc8b4a21264c5
4307167c33d02da0a495bd04d0d7eeeaebcdd9fe
describe
'2971164' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLW' 'sip-files00048.tif'
b5ad0dad217bdd9a7e576e04ec57876b
d4dc2a58594912c3bffc93133ed69ac7f7841092
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
6e9c7ebcf26b729aed5c8f2ea548025a
d4e683dfea839131381163f7c8bbf4fac4fb0156
describe
'2971032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5632b29d92cd6ed8641a6f54fe920976
dca9e7391682dde2aa1f909aff0d002aeecfaa16
'2011-12-17T04:14:45-05:00'
describe
'2969448' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLLZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
1f202a0bd56ee5a63df9b2b77f88e9ef
311ac0aa802eb88dd0736932c899351b687fd767
'2011-12-17T04:13:40-05:00'
describe
'2969716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMA' 'sip-files00052.tif'
185d02ae0568cb8f32ee9aa8bf3c3421
5c1e2c3069eca1ca3b3c0d88ee44b487f7f144fb
'2011-12-17T04:12:26-05:00'
describe
'2970900' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
6f13fdaffc38c5ee750f1f5687464cb7
7cb87ece1c715f7f1a9a29ed3e168b8c352a4f3e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
7b93eeca7a58a026aeb8d9627ba0652b
6be75ac27ec30d1d420395ebc1b9163cad4f8aee
describe
'2971048' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMD' 'sip-files00055.tif'
6a9279159040d87b7590db083e7bc8ad
03a7f5770e56dc7c4a3dc3cda6620ab7e672dbc0
'2011-12-17T04:24:09-05:00'
describe
'2970964' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLME' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d818c084c6382b9173e8a20371143f6d
f30e9cc43d602b3877130b10074fe8d9e73476bd
'2011-12-17T04:25:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
2113b918633b7d56b24fd228ca96c2e8
016ff623780f6f9b847f464a7cefac9f779c2c42
'2011-12-17T04:28:03-05:00'
describe
'2968936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMG' 'sip-files00058.tif'
778b68455c4934159c72ac51f0306ea2
c1bb33d8351734355a80c1699475aa2fac9cb8ba
'2011-12-17T04:16:39-05:00'
describe
'2969836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMH' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c530f2c543f3508ebad2e1b433eac208
2a937f30c94b06565eeafc4aa93379efa51654b5
'2011-12-17T04:11:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMI' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b56183691eac6942318ea84f284166fd
cb88590f379bffd5e96d0d78fb92a5e6413317a1
describe
'2970936' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMJ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
9403c022a07fcbbf79302b1a1750cf15
fa4d068e86e50eeae3971b42f6d10ac0b6f2ab56
'2011-12-17T04:28:00-05:00'
describe
'2970932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMK' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2a3556b624fe90946ec583a388159e28
2efbbee2c602f6d53ed9af9fd9f6962a08521740
describe
'2969616' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLML' 'sip-files00063.tif'
ab0ba0fcbfbff60eac6868ee7a0c2259
772dbe040ef3e0775b7677326cb7f381bc06bf40
'2011-12-17T04:23:30-05:00'
describe
'2973124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMM' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2d284e7af292da4b2ee7ae08fc5c1d62
878bb0a7f2d8a5b4da1778496ba3ac947d1a039b
'2011-12-17T04:16:35-05:00'
describe
'2971012' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMN' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1426760854d718c105d9551ca16e84c2
652920e594397eb7427f1b3880d42393662e4a5a
describe
'2970632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMO' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7cca23fb36d7c0b1c648c2b033976c53
3da3b0297556458765ba6cb6dca92013eb5077da
'2011-12-17T04:18:26-05:00'
describe
'2971096' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7a5fc0d30114e1e638fd53f155fd1256
e55bbef517f80166b28069b4018bcf87644da879
'2011-12-17T04:15:10-05:00'
describe
'2970916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMQ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
94cfe55c955348c31606ccd195a4a697
f2ec60871c5507a82fc1dfb406a4b0db677cd021
'2011-12-17T04:21:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
b587f8d9ebdeae2865a40e9087bce211
0dd1bfe1327285fc3730c7b1cd103ccae86d0bbe
'2011-12-17T04:21:43-05:00'
describe
'2971092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
aac9e88a5e35f946be716268682face0
f1a49a8f6fc46f10c4d922ad5637b6c78cdca305
'2011-12-17T04:11:42-05:00'
describe
'2970408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMT' 'sip-files00071.tif'
6d4c5c8cfd83e27a3e861c1659379b07
fa4b0cb278fd0ccf508c4a5f50298b8b7b267fcd
describe
'2970484' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMU' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6f5e391c32e209f0672375cd5c3ed1db
514539a1aedbb80b8de74cff89d485674abb796a
'2011-12-17T04:18:42-05:00'
describe
'2970876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMV' 'sip-files00073.tif'
fc20ab40cdaefe97282c1861fa67495f
0783bad82cd381853b166bbbd0d90133fb31dfee
describe
'2970680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMW' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c25403fb84b67591077f4dfd30ea2a04
1e0a08d61c71d05efc67dfac5490481d25890ae9
describe
'2970812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMX' 'sip-files00075.tif'
3e27439a483273b61535745a07883c43
ab88208bcd7940640934484c4751d89e2a5bf99e
'2011-12-17T04:24:53-05:00'
describe
'2968224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
18b75d19d444dbb7be679395fca0093e
44691ce094f650a4fbc1602f68bdd63d8b85b203
'2011-12-17T04:20:30-05:00'
describe
'2969576' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLMZ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b114686135ee0c2bf4e3572219d0c800
3976c591833d543a0095d6aed72a6e4b6d7e2cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNA' 'sip-files00078.tif'
5a23e8394c5455cb19daa5e0647926e5
d946e83f9ce01f97201f7fdfbb2ca14278e1ac06
'2011-12-17T04:12:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNB' 'sip-files00079.tif'
b8f50889b924c8210d078f8db101c259
44625310cf4a9b6b8659323aef957faa16d747c2
'2011-12-17T04:16:52-05:00'
describe
'2970904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
c6edb6febbea0e7aa929c1e7d966013b
4adab3dbe86968af35d8ca07222141669b6d960d
describe
'2970892' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLND' 'sip-files00081.tif'
f41ac12637d440d4f359b4a37a2a6463
7121806e16b67adcac76635384d72d76b97bf9a2
'2011-12-17T04:24:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNE' 'sip-files00082.tif'
82ab34f979db9249afe8c1f758b61765
5ec606d6bf0cc219a128e9ee44ab731cc0232f95
describe
'2970184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
195bac40331c4dd51015931d5f0e8b8e
ff8d4158bba7e8ce426436ccdc4c32d3102f7943
'2011-12-17T04:12:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNG' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8c7665498cae457bd1bfc39107584903
b58ec5b2ac3521b49764b91b06258c21a5308f1e
'2011-12-17T04:25:38-05:00'
describe
'2970968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNH' 'sip-files00085.tif'
9c9db17ff32c14c07947ec28a316bcaf
8a2db16d979dd7d26532a86a92e341aeb84d3b2e
'2011-12-17T04:11:21-05:00'
describe
'2970836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNI' 'sip-files00086.tif'
eb2788c08aab16c5cd3b2f0fd2c7df7d
b95c4336b753d1ad6caa92a701ab05eb099a737a
'2011-12-17T04:09:24-05:00'
describe
'2971028' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNJ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4ec75fb52f3bdfbecc7ff5f85a3d6e1c
5b50efce9930fd621952cd9b7f9cb76478e349e5
'2011-12-17T04:21:26-05:00'
describe
'2970784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
89c41f3a7fbcf5018a889079e86ab09f
3c6d11e2a9ebcdde4d81488f8319843c8eea269c
'2011-12-17T04:09:49-05:00'
describe
'2970816' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7e56e9c8d81f6fa3c012249c0485b094
0987bb53c9b5e8d4c1463438552403cefb9bee96
'2011-12-17T04:15:25-05:00'
describe
'2968804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
e9a3d2034be55be12e41832926ad4c55
8238d0baf938d41501e801135567141429bbd024
describe
'2970148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNN' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1ca65764a68cb94be4b5255abcdaf312
992c01f7c6e816e20baa554fe70ae9919fd0e82d
'2011-12-17T04:12:09-05:00'
describe
'2971248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNO' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7bffa62815955a3f2b44ca99357fa32b
6b88131db5da2aa7efeeb2d18b9c9fa05f89f0ed
describe
'2971192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
894eee7fb12709ace3740f5f0a5bddb6
f8431576d30d0fb0f110352da0634a6761eca41f
'2011-12-17T04:13:30-05:00'
describe
'2970004' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNQ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
c95f0913a2c83094590ff0fe3fcd88b4
79f33e91dcdd1a8d1aee2c672ea23fde7b1a7c6a
describe
'2969784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNR' 'sip-files00095.tif'
72e89e8db081d080a2d4b4a4f83522d1
d5d64b70a73ea66ad09084bcf5838ae8c2a5fb94
'2011-12-17T04:09:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5c1c3d32beaa4bd6b7c74e82a8cd5163
0bcd7571618fb67900299eae2916ea657f6040e7
'2011-12-17T04:19:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNT' 'sip-files00097.tif'
2ea976a84162e28863edc9363c8efdf1
95409075a6f249bcc3a65a73a116fdcfe73c29a6
'2011-12-17T04:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNU' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f737f68071394915ac0ee1e52a867eb1
11bf8a294b437b1769e494059f18394c68bb6909
'2011-12-17T04:26:32-05:00'
describe
'2970768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNV' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4dcd0f8c5c50612d0f8c87bc52f8a07a
d23919e15910448b2ac9b6942fe97b9433abe393
describe
'2970856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNW' 'sip-files00100.tif'
8ee3a7f45b6177ee51afe672e5f507bb
332834bc73213ba8de3085ed85b0a41f782e3cf7
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNX' 'sip-files00101.tif'
0108cdd070b5e1966118e648764f7ba0
2bfd309d8999bbc16433d44b16fc09e323464a7b
describe
'2968332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
5144d116c3dc108c7102db79ee9300b5
bf19b454824d4e44965710c4fe96921d056b09a3
'2011-12-17T04:27:01-05:00'
describe
'2969884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLNZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
10ee4d6c2be34c96038e3cbaacbfdd66
4c6913d36042414196424ae1cd20ef3cfa274e45
describe
'2973108' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOA' 'sip-files00104.tif'
986516fb6b07ddcf2a3b9d953f9ba60b
30af20de689667f1bc49324c19c4669a95ff583a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOB' 'sip-files00105.tif'
0f6d2344020d8ffa36c6fcdc514818fb
2aa887dd1848e580a50a7156c1546d2181c23d92
'2011-12-17T04:24:16-05:00'
describe
'2970720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
1da2bc0fa68936b6cb358b1b08582a44
c96c6d63766220e8c9cf3c445ed9c39c951fdc2f
'2011-12-17T04:13:08-05:00'
describe
'2970440' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d205a9789b7b54bdabe6bc9373774c00
0f557de21d28f4222ecb36e5b399aa4add9ab64f
'2011-12-17T04:24:01-05:00'
describe
'2970948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOE' 'sip-files00108.tif'
1d5a5a52d7c83f681bcce33d5c0fc573
b4ee65453f383e06793b1a8b4544e1759cf98f97
describe
'2971052' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
58e06461554348e99e5ba49a2dc34fd1
8d9963dc2808f58a151636df4d2f444dbaae3cfb
'2011-12-17T04:23:36-05:00'
describe
'2971044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOG' 'sip-files00110.tif'
05ae297fa93e30d0fc23e4bdd9b29221
ba69aa248ea50513c8257620fc5e7bf38208cc88
'2011-12-17T04:18:18-05:00'
describe
'2970684' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOH' 'sip-files00111.tif'
793f997f6971924704a60b27c64e7c43
af59bffd0803e651e3071ecbb20cafe0aa54bbfe
'2011-12-17T04:18:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOI' 'sip-files00112.tif'
fe39cae300a5b705dae11240c6bc2e72
d367949211dc50907509181a65165621155b4e9e
describe
'2971384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOJ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
ed394a253df0e947d562615b7e36224e
e1932f71952e7ef8aabc685947382b487be7b926
'2011-12-17T04:16:12-05:00'
describe
'8883800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOK' 'sip-files00114.tif'
a005cbe1d4bd9774fde3e7ae56dd1136
690052e00095a0ab2fdccf1705c4b3c58a2559f3
'2011-12-17T04:18:51-05:00'
describe
'2971172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
bc7f13569644530ba8ef71e5d9cb81e5
aade3eb097ea15c0444b00c22ff6f0ae3813c164
'2011-12-17T04:26:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOM' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6ac5fd0520c56b4aa011b27ce134159c
6ac9cc87877c51cd76163b2fcceb12a25deb1928
describe
'2970952' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLON' 'sip-files00118.tif'
fef4ee28552947171abe249724a4927f
e17330048838a4c94c74c10e85bcc814dd79f985
'2011-12-17T04:12:00-05:00'
describe
'2970840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
5f8dde6d088e3aabf54e07f498e3641d
acab08f58807f544aee2321fd98fa9a5a3f2be33
'2011-12-17T04:12:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
4a7fb877061bde2cd8a898d9a14d1ee6
3a8dcb83eba4ead4a41a13c4e253f510fee54f4a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOQ' 'sip-files00121.tif'
9c8730ee6a05385683c3a62ec6468c42
263bca89a2c6139152030fca238203b700233cc4
'2011-12-17T04:22:11-05:00'
describe
'2970992' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9e618b3627263dba0b34367d61e0d2c9
846fa61660eb1a794f838fb009685641d74c91fe
'2011-12-17T04:14:48-05:00'
describe
'2970944' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOS' 'sip-files00123.tif'
0f56ddf5acdf49a604b62d34c2577ee7
e46cd13602e6351dd642d12a661937e7f3049970
'2011-12-17T04:26:50-05:00'
describe
'2970940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOT' 'sip-files00124.tif'
3062d947c648b5793d29952e3b829504
87f511847f9352215cf839f90f6fdb28d5d8a31f
'2011-12-17T04:19:55-05:00'
describe
'2970896' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOU' 'sip-files00125.tif'
bea4ed5d9ffa3699e8a8d93896c554e6
73b81d184e48f53a62153883631e86978474d7ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOV' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6db0e149fa45463e4c717d72b15135af
c923e60a5eefa3520bf877cec9858d188b853cfb
describe
'2970928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b5d4d25ed70790d97117a2e7dac52843
8082a5ab351b514539e26e805f8cbf32836691e7
'2011-12-17T04:11:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7e0a21380aed206a37e7a49163f461bc
a5354eac2348763cb1c4462c8aaa453dddf911b6
'2011-12-17T04:25:43-05:00'
describe
'2970848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
93ac3c0bc3cf07fb1f19fdac14743349
0321ed10fd4d121bb93b02d4cb9f29ba73e719d1
describe
'2970032' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLOZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
760143280cae19428102c4d4acb18aff
26006a041eb13f2ebdf10459eb77293bbbae0937
'2011-12-17T04:16:28-05:00'
describe
'2970868' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPA' 'sip-files00131.tif'
7b8f697ca70e32830351d52b74929327
25e2deb6ab7e89c18e2e6c38b37f8d9266694e1e
'2011-12-17T04:18:31-05:00'
describe
'2970956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPB' 'sip-files00132.tif'
6cd859c16005abc7bff231d8c1190832
efcb984be5271d49343bdc71830aeaa95c46f554
describe
'2970996' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
cc4f265a89a2dc257349528efa34d30a
410648a88eda4343eb5d5fd34fcb7bd0deb4d787
'2011-12-17T04:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPD' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c31b173d81054ffbbcad4d687a939c66
b3487214a35bb16303438992a0d158c11a5f0a48
'2011-12-17T04:09:08-05:00'
describe
'2970156' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPE' 'sip-files00135.tif'
aef2e5546accfde6437066baee34aadf
00ad53a9a79c720f87977271d6aadecb064ab66b
'2011-12-17T04:13:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPF' 'sip-files00136.tif'
6a2d0ce0e77225054be9ff54f59aca26
203df999b6f2ba37c78b84e72634227235270cf2
'2011-12-17T04:19:04-05:00'
describe
'2971004' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPG' 'sip-files00137.tif'
753a18661c13dd0bfc787076ddc7bfde
0a100512522963dd64ea0b4ed9849bb1c4e1c867
'2011-12-17T04:24:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPH' 'sip-files00138.tif'
b094d04460a060a1ddcf0aab2e404f4e
897ced0e047fbbbe599f36e3f9e6352ea5d9c4d5
describe
'2970712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
bcc06a7ffc85727b7c6e6e4d2d7fee6d
b88a79affbea80e436d435134de38fd4973e997a
describe
'2969208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPJ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
27a596e4a4ac18299f248115ee09b562
58444a6f2ff4ec9b04f7fd375b1eef1f3c2fad60
'2011-12-17T04:13:26-05:00'
describe
'2969984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPK' 'sip-files00141.tif'
613329ff9cf689ccd83491fb5369ed63
1e2344265a1c85acfb8248bd369719f8ff70c59d
'2011-12-17T04:26:21-05:00'
describe
'2971188' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPL' 'sip-files00142.tif'
aec1ef827ee05bd1fba7b413f97e9bc6
d26986d9ad0599b9b3c16b85c75083e5c556a5d4
describe
'2971036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPM' 'sip-files00143.tif'
a9d18cae3862cab4c165b5242f4da2a7
ec1fda0a079d10091d1bd2f77e9071541eb792f8
'2011-12-17T04:21:27-05:00'
describe
'2971084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPN' 'sip-files00144.tif'
5540a057cfac260ffbf6b60abab7cb3c
0327bf9a148a8addc5f6561358aef330d88926a2
'2011-12-17T04:16:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPO' 'sip-files00145.tif'
cda90ef335c0587094d9fc392ebab11d
a95efe67d63092493d18c7360ca7597a8fae7aaf
describe
'2971124' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
e896a58f3fd88a3619b11bb9414f4aca
11a5a0071afde105833cf3e9e4f78b5020cef047
describe
'2970844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPQ' 'sip-files00147.tif'
5cb1220974cce9e968d203ab29386129
3503b81500ba2c675fa79b359c0e0a4c8949943b
describe
'2968400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
5c03d017991f0437d3582e665ddc9c56
6170aa4b0c57a4534b6fbd98834d0f43f59410aa
'2011-12-17T04:09:28-05:00'
describe
'2969840' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
d3e14781987eedceaf4171535a1d9053
9daa43b47617557c8e3ec374cb8586cdb8a92248
'2011-12-17T04:25:52-05:00'
describe
'2971068' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
6526064832af1958fdc7db813fb50e27
35b6d24f80891ee1c55facfd5c9578a44d45dad5
'2011-12-17T04:16:37-05:00'
describe
'2971292' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPU' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f447d7dd4d3bea2f7e693381c5035f6d
cc3f4e99c4a0bb54bfaf722380649ba5362d19ac
'2011-12-17T04:10:50-05:00'
describe
'2971332' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPV' 'sip-files00152.tif'
9bdc7380b0bf80b3f703c8d3efeee09b
692f902788cd4407bab3c306f0e3bc4d42ebb909
'2011-12-17T04:26:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPW' 'sip-files00153.tif'
48a5d4c9f022763543cd723e5408d1ae
deff620119bcac82022179e10fc551b55fce1c96
'2011-12-17T04:10:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPX' 'sip-files00154.tif'
df7c38d42fc693aa1cfde6320c18e993
57e24e580a43d4cc50eccf36e760469da54d6e5d
describe
'2970504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPY' 'sip-files00155.tif'
26323c2acceed5309e44767c7edd5831
0624b673986fedaf4e1d1536b5973bd88a1c20dc
'2011-12-17T04:21:23-05:00'
describe
'2969856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLPZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
a959f1bcffcd2d1f4b343b7a23aea9a3
e5aa0f53a263abba9b0d9424cd96cb90b04a9220
'2011-12-17T04:14:37-05:00'
describe
'2970748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQA' 'sip-files00157.tif'
9371d9abc28488d014d893d06a7ad1bb
fe236147d9af20c95698c31cfbdd3566dd405027
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQB' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4b1ba59f0a05e0b2171857c02982c72f
f7f0ebdd050fc80caf065b7a148b6194af2d4739
'2011-12-17T04:22:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
9de9d0601c78f92659cf0c14419698d9
d6ae70aa3ea8f4f6c94f4497ca6d39020ada2337
'2011-12-17T04:26:14-05:00'
describe
'8891712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
8e8f6131ef72c9b4b6ba60d58613176f
36777c50fdd927c8e914e41258f19f5fa732d220
'2011-12-17T04:09:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQE' 'sip-files00162.tif'
afc2e965d7cc41f12271a775e67232a3
cb6d2a01da0803262bcb2bccf1da657a2b8876eb
'2011-12-17T04:10:19-05:00'
describe
'2969704' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQF' 'sip-files00163.tif'
48ced425cd565e1ac0f154cf7add1e9f
d200050b28bb8f98ff0fa325fcc53a2ddf15d3b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQG' 'sip-files00164.tif'
51bc00405a5ecadee157379ab8794a7d
4a992322606f7d6e6d8381f0f20b5489b46073a9
describe
'2970552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQH' 'sip-files00165.tif'
5f90ac32b1461488e3e6be49205f7819
a64cd737aa407606c5f140c4be4d7d9122151401
describe
'2970312' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQI' 'sip-files00166.tif'
e8a92c0b9eecda4d65fe53ac9b171bad
af345f6144ee705106ad8cfc2c2e7ea8ff2b2bb8
'2011-12-17T04:09:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQJ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
45416b368ce0e2cd994d49ee5bc7af63
98fb159880278756b911b2acd935373d3e396bcc
'2011-12-17T04:19:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQK' 'sip-files00168.tif'
37bb7b5b64c71dfa6fdadf44376e206e
0896cb17fe498d8573cdfc148deee73643f76ac8
describe
'2971104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQL' 'sip-files00169.tif'
11965058f531d1a5c3d64ae3af79f847
850abf5b1a0d25f49ae6c742bde9d969f984067f
'2011-12-17T04:10:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQM' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b1f5ce6659a69c51414c07e78f33e1e6
73619faed638d65c57766da61d3da01ce17aad5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQN' 'sip-files00171.tif'
02118bdf9f7fbd62970f807f97cf01cd
71022ee8c24ddde9f355533bc65b91eb4deff677
'2011-12-17T04:09:23-05:00'
describe
'2970828' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQO' 'sip-files00172.tif'
f8062b3647d46e422d8a94047598c1d3
6c24ac64e7dd59fca078df28b9545c132da57904
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
60e59e27f426bf2a04acbd96ecfd96b2
b00802e3916a33102a53da957c5dcd7c40b44863
'2011-12-17T04:10:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQQ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
59911cc50702db8c00d215bf8de6340f
66fa720903dbb163b8d67270b549ef0434232baa
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQR' 'sip-files00175.tif'
f0875d62967ef1127c75931aca7c29f8
9a6e059b6d5bdda391e97f781e5230f9a3e789eb
'2011-12-17T04:25:10-05:00'
describe
'2970800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
9e5b548aa57b7e3fd35e9de3cc947dc1
c7edb3f108e23a8dfde5260b08004fba42f37189
describe
'2970972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQT' 'sip-files00177.tif'
eccee77f561f9bf7aedddb5b516858b7
28c882ecfc2fa558aa80e50a2b474235d2ff4ec6
describe
'2970884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQU' 'sip-files00178.tif'
5493db55d049cc125002cae12bcbdb42
16750c7201afbc62528b089caba2f360a49c1799
'2011-12-17T04:28:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQV' 'sip-files00179.tif'
43c709276aa11c07857f35359f048267
c6b0b5814f6b170e8478f954581e05950fdeec95
'2011-12-17T04:16:49-05:00'
describe
'9039236' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQW' 'sip-files00180.tif'
033398c3b1d49321abad478ad9df8ed5
feb37b306104d24d3c4cc87b556fc638e20b891c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
51be957e24fbd5d79064234c5cf79661
9aba68befa4ef244e423b053985f96a192b6b851
'2011-12-17T04:28:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQY' 'sip-files00183.tif'
e01ddd99e82aee559134d46365ebfb18
d1b9d8e879a09c4f33afdbca0af98b79deb8bf92
'2011-12-17T04:19:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLQZ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
116bde904200381bbf8fe0787065a31a
cab2b209d034df43ba906d61caa81cf7deed360e
'2011-12-17T04:24:38-05:00'
describe
'2970772' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRA' 'sip-files00185.tif'
7046680b04eaca37af973a785f4166af
e010b2efed713b094eaee2fbe16e809d7d8cf651
describe
'2971140' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRB' 'sip-files00186.tif'
fd0986feceab07f10bd8a6d47eba3013
470c0b1633a0684839c541a9b6220d3f55d3dc65
'2011-12-17T04:20:15-05:00'
describe
'2971168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRC' 'sip-files00187.tif'
a791101424267886f5a1b0d4578bca19
1c78fbced966131b666bb6507306d762f122b0fc
'2011-12-17T04:21:21-05:00'
describe
'2971072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRD' 'sip-files00188.tif'
37fadacc16108bc2c6d9cfb695e2c263
ba3c19643df8ea69777f405a1b0ecec822a7e326
describe
'2970788' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
d6085f6c57efe8ad732cb08f84107abe
39a87b85332716b7a77a6eb108dedc37ae620597
'2011-12-17T04:12:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
4e4227f40a83eb4653e1121f610f621b
f66512f4a9ff2ad9a310329b5679e172dfcf2c88
'2011-12-17T04:16:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
b65ebf65c87b8630fc8a17522ae561fa
bd24a2f8f31d220069502db9c3f79c3a270bff07
describe
'2970444' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
db968576f45f8b698b61557468d288a9
a34c40ae0ed5228dec919d337a9038b6661b7ab6
describe
'2970064' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRI' 'sip-files00193.tif'
120b5d827066ebc72e733aa4a0d7a954
619790e5628d0f095a1af333174e55d532e1b8ab
'2011-12-17T04:27:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRJ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b5f2be87cc18fbeb71514eb37f20a820
32a73607458e3aee03dd1d8b8c4b680b86d42a5b
'2011-12-17T04:26:45-05:00'
describe
'2970984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
56488994bf7eb4b416b20422e902df65
35ef8ee4483c066975c008536670d971c0113798
'2011-12-17T04:11:44-05:00'
describe
'2970960' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRL' 'sip-files00196.tif'
44c2e648cec0525dae04f7cdde72af13
727c7e2220baaa9a44d2f4dc39439a10976ede45
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRM' 'sip-files00197.tif'
aad5440781dacad0b28355348a363a56
29bf08e3569e9381453d192e93c3bcf0a729f524
describe
'2971128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRN' 'sip-files00198.tif'
44acc68169e67261d6d82d54520c6f92
7dd2003797d7801f4277787a33d8f88b8eef9612
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRO' 'sip-files00199.tif'
3675b21dfb4b552ea76d3c001d10a1c6
315b5f5a030a95a6823436fe618f55f8c4b56576
'2011-12-17T04:12:35-05:00'
describe
'2973248' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRP' 'sip-files00200.tif'
fd0c5008b21ef6e73dcdfe82e7a14163
f60682de0229e31f52ea0e976460111a0354f917
'2011-12-17T04:26:26-05:00'
describe
'2970764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRQ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
3eb9a2baeb68d29bf86dd6de241bc1c5
ff91d0ff0263c9f464c93a9f01e64b5e2d096614
'2011-12-17T04:16:34-05:00'
describe
'2970980' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRR' 'sip-files00202.tif'
68492d8c82ff3c30da93c07506f4aaf8
92aac9e95e6b49c7a99cb324426925fbc0d9b43a
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRS' 'sip-files00203.tif'
8ce4f038a409a1b2b42e8cd47fae49d2
5d6210948b079753fcb21b3f5a277bebc621fd9c
'2011-12-17T04:09:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRT' 'sip-files00204.tif'
815e916d098cc6138521858e368e5688
3fc4d0a90d4c11a4bcb2678692e195faa47d8962
describe
'2971100' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRU' 'sip-files00205.tif'
7550275d25ce0460c80b2b3d816bd72b
93c17af004ce6e68b6ca8ac6b401b8389f367ffe
'2011-12-17T04:20:47-05:00'
describe
'9148976' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRV' 'sip-files00206.tif'
38645f80e18acd04c72bfb12079cb5ae
9c57464b2f2638881c99565d42846ca956c8aa48
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRW' 'sip-files00208.tif'
20e7cb780a008a7bb556f82e8fba2249
45974a070c4505f7725ae9cdeb0950c181558dd0
'2011-12-17T04:21:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRX' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d599fe561bdf45e26d9c9d1461c2065f
87bc494dfcc94372045d9e20ee718cf8009afd31
'2011-12-17T04:15:28-05:00'
describe
'2970908' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRY' 'sip-files00210.tif'
0a4e652d5d6590985ceb6dd7305939ba
fcae08f16b886c2be42db78b2d3ab773907645de
'2011-12-17T04:21:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLRZ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
d6fb69c4f16023787c71f1d9ec3edc84
c849171d4f6fd9c5954a1a77fc5743305f0c6842
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSA' 'sip-files00212.tif'
908915b087efeb71e14da0a3acc7b79b
7e7275e1102eb2c15f74142ea38283ce98ea1e3e
'2011-12-17T04:25:46-05:00'
describe
'2970792' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSB' 'sip-files00213.tif'
60c5bf6a1bd007034d41ec7d67f63564
654d4e1d4e8d34817454c4337aa16def6ef3fa98
'2011-12-17T04:13:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSC' 'sip-files00214.tif'
71c3a09c4f528b1a52962cc91acd16e8
096b510753ab8cd2793fbfb1df1cffdb75f47236
describe
'2970756' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSD' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6734a8939b1b2341a64d73c2c45286da
fdd2ba9cdbf39a06d46d793604f9dffb09683643
'2011-12-17T04:11:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSE' 'sip-files00216.tif'
6b25d6bc872a83d5d6295d5a3d275567
406435d9c61d09c0a8433a5f9abddbdefbdbfc78
'2011-12-17T04:19:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSF' 'sip-files00217.tif'
9cb51e1b85f132fe069ceec10ec98c4a
02cf716f3b572aecca6683bad6a941e635587bfd
'2011-12-17T04:17:58-05:00'
describe
'2970192' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSG' 'sip-files00218.tif'
72c83141365995a029aa80f8dcc03772
7e1bd5b1159b53bc29736b28ca17fb6895c442b4
describe
'2970716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSH' 'sip-files00219.tif'
e5e78efbfa7cfad6b845b52e491232f4
118b4063aeba17527a90f8fb63f85be7d3b94267
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSI' 'sip-files00220.tif'
08e46a23b8b18f33f914dc6c215727f1
318d25da2cd9318bc347d90ac33e92e5fab0eb96
'2011-12-17T04:21:39-05:00'
describe
'2970820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSJ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
a5ab4f4e45f982c0df748a4c82a310c1
919f0a16aad2c68966ffac7951692aa85bd5a54e
'2011-12-17T04:24:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSK' 'sip-files00222.tif'
7a51e0327f0e0d78d8883ebd029a0035
f1918f77af37e59102309edc383f137775d2b2b0
'2011-12-17T04:20:40-05:00'
describe
'2970872' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSL' 'sip-files00223.tif'
140af2304919171afa56b94e95f1db91
1350792b9615bee8f5ce441fd9cab71dcee65f4b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSM' 'sip-files00224.tif'
d1a7db82ab17ea7752db7e50e751cbe8
8071ac3c8c48d02525ba8100a93f0f83319771f4
'2011-12-17T04:25:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSN' 'sip-files00225.tif'
1462741505137f6474f1000499ab667d
e4a646cb0100f54907714286de850d6794beda04
'2011-12-17T04:14:21-05:00'
describe
'2968904' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSO' 'sip-files00226.tif'
b4c484481d19cb0ca6fb82544a2e565b
e67c5008dc21c34a7c3c25821588ce10161dc924
describe
'2970196' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSP' 'sip-files00227.tif'
3b5be7582cf58f5e8af4afe0dccbd7a9
ff3b54c4285c1404dcc754d4fb12c38285e3c981
'2011-12-17T04:13:28-05:00'
describe
'2971080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSQ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
ba84932f419d5726a62dd533ed66717a
360cccd5fc851f04c7d7494d4ad0f4de97718478
'2011-12-17T04:09:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSR' 'sip-files00229.tif'
50f2fe4d25b2df796daa62f63a797102
c6d8843a984e06e12efef92db17e39eba53abd50
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSS' 'sip-files00230.tif'
7a3fec8828f727efa8b5365931de3c24
9de5f04414aeefaead3a814d72c0c9dd718e12e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLST' 'sip-files00231.tif'
0767af3a643ecbc67ab29c00a55a8104
33205a6f172dbb239a28bfc13b56eac084448544
'2011-12-17T04:22:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSU' 'sip-files00232.tif'
a9281107cb4d332280adaaa7a25acb21
098ee8cad97a4003ddcd7f980901823238e41eb1
'2011-12-17T04:25:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSV' 'sip-files00233.tif'
5558d56f9151d11dc87d8fcc923358eb
536721a21459acade815cc9bf702420c5431ca3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSW' 'sip-files00234.tif'
f1db066fa53045871863a55a0b4aefad
3d0bc4168db9c1cd39c460426ef0e86d57eab3ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSX' 'sip-files00235.tif'
fca021ab2ac1087355ade3c200dd5da2
5f275a65ee23421bef8740a493cb846194b1c773
describe
'2971144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSY' 'sip-files00236.tif'
f1e7f97338bc62f65720d1ffb024c073
50304da612024f302c5bf89f6c4df3a3b1c27d36
'2011-12-17T04:25:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLSZ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
d535c1c66d94f7f44471e6cf62521d70
59fa72f993414697841486439ffe1b2e6d7996dd
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTA' 'sip-files00238.tif'
0fddff8a34f72cfaf5cf30593a5065bb
685445d026a09657ce17d7e93e7eda7e21a01bcd
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTB' 'sip-files00239.tif'
c1664395526ef1c81187701714293e4d
56e239d118c896f0b721c633525e683fc21de57e
'2011-12-17T04:22:12-05:00'
describe
'8763420' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTC' 'sip-files00241.tif'
34481ea4e3aa337327f25d9cccae7881
9ad4873808e564e7329cfba70313fdfb06ab9d25
'2011-12-17T04:24:25-05:00'
describe
'2973424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTD' 'sip-files00242.tif'
846380441502f891e9fe8db13ef58207
e024c2dfee5842beb195cb5f20aaa394ea9d177c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTE' 'sip-files00243.tif'
ea82ef004728d20a5207de7069016634
1ac250d796327306cad74a608466cacd91336a73
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTF' 'sip-files00244.tif'
b2b42cdc44c68e7ec378bc798dc0219e
410900cdcd3056db6786312a89eac9481f96e727
'2011-12-17T04:27:17-05:00'
describe
'2970104' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTG' 'sip-files00245.tif'
84852b545cdeb83266c4c324850208a6
6323288ad4cc92e25405e28e9a67dea40527539e
'2011-12-17T04:23:40-05:00'
describe
'2973228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTH' 'sip-files00246.tif'
07facccf6dc2ddea393235e4284f0f1a
1b6f9134fb0d1662ff8e3482822743b9f3e5ebf3
'2011-12-17T04:20:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTI' 'sip-files00247.tif'
42cfda9952a6bb58ec9cc015bd47e0e9
f6193d532f4f204330bd32e7a1ec7cfb2bab499c
'2011-12-17T04:22:41-05:00'
describe
'2973208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTJ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
8b85a48b6282930f0130ad314e730f08
925f285b13eadcc24d1e34f0b7631189fbbeffa0
'2011-12-17T04:12:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTK' 'sip-files00249.tif'
1530b2de630eabe29a813dcc25a246b1
0854626ecdfe70cdbc131873c085cf544b174ff7
describe
'2971064' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTL' 'sip-files00250.tif'
fb7f72c1efeaa0e3ffc5f464a4437c4b
ac8e5fba59e436ad93e805ff6a5cfc9c4953527d
describe
'2969932' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTM' 'sip-files00251.tif'
145e74e5706cedaa7806b92c0999ab89
2af9902642aa9a979d9e00dc2e943846f82b1bcc
'2011-12-17T04:20:07-05:00'
describe
'2969728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTN' 'sip-files00252.tif'
c58003d532a885c02f8e17c0f1f5222a
6418db9254f7bbff837fe8c48fa09e7a58c779c6
'2011-12-17T04:09:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTO' 'sip-files00253.tif'
454e9f276c00205f87023fbbe620d850
af0637bc975dfcb2db264dae5b26fd2c45f01734
'2011-12-17T04:23:10-05:00'
describe
'2969548' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTP' 'sip-files00254.tif'
708a0f01c3958b4c77ba1277f98af593
b43aaedfff8b9fd5e8a4d6c3a723ebc84abdb1a3
'2011-12-17T04:22:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTQ' 'sip-files00255.tif'
59b771b66644871735d8838daafc9399
4afdeb500a8d65343d4a4420eefb9077057a5140
'2011-12-17T04:09:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTR' 'sip-files00256.tif'
0c94374900103fe54b72ceaed227d9cb
0fb77d70c958250ba529dc13945a10dd582d26bc
'2011-12-17T04:21:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTS' 'sip-files00257.tif'
2a8356173ab94823a6ee354ff0684ff1
c113eba2e5a4313bedee183992542aa5e62f4d31
'2011-12-17T04:11:59-05:00'
describe
'2968404' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTT' 'sip-files00258.tif'
9c51bd179f62101f52ebfbab6ef621bb
270d7e7291defe3d940f183c3ab83600619b8c33
describe
'2969712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTU' 'sip-files00259.tif'
3c592474de6b796564344440020635b4
083abca38a7356d4fc272ed524c22ea3a8b95212
'2011-12-17T04:12:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTV' 'sip-files00260.tif'
829e772b2a8027f8ad81847ef337605e
2949f78d79580f1701048b66f4dc26424ecb8280
'2011-12-17T04:19:18-05:00'
describe
'2970288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTW' 'sip-files00261.tif'
df4236d35b5618486d3e06233823826b
2c3640667aafbe92e05ccf4e2712a638761f3b93
'2011-12-17T04:14:51-05:00'
describe
'2969848' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTX' 'sip-files00262.tif'
2b9a76cab9177031cbe24519b340baea
22914e4a8f78329c5656fbffc139aa6e42e1bd20
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTY' 'sip-files00263.tif'
8d83e2647e6497bd7a6babc41541a52e
46c1938ced0b7edf920a871674a5122352f75e46
'2011-12-17T04:26:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLTZ' 'sip-files00264.tif'
7910c1702b91113eedd9a0e5e40ba32d
88471f47570925075100f97ddfc42c46b9d59ad1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUA' 'sip-files00265.tif'
f3572800d63872421273c1fdeafcc92d
86e57e385bd82b42489f0ac670c2d1f570e999ef
'2011-12-17T04:17:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUB' 'sip-files00266.tif'
d86bb031900f8f041e3efefe49a206aa
1403acf82cacfe13f4bcda3440ac523a3a61fc83
'2011-12-17T04:23:09-05:00'
describe
'2969876' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUC' 'sip-files00267.tif'
bff470f133328280765959ba60c5778d
08afccdcbd077d029db591cb9c3f4a025cfdb71e
'2011-12-17T04:09:45-05:00'
describe
'2971844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUD' 'sip-files00268.tif'
c7491621c1110c32b7f0b1b2d0fe890e
55716f02a9a6cab82f9c6e16a9762be2f89cd14f
'2011-12-17T04:12:31-05:00'
describe
'2970988' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUE' 'sip-files00269.tif'
f72bf5d28738611252fec05b7e3984b5
b1b5b56b4f3920912916c333e81f3996a0afa942
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUF' 'sip-files00270.tif'
572f4139e2a1d99869d41cc9e9e703af
175625305669c9c9f8bb14fe3f99f3f0f39465ef
describe
'2970340' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUG' 'sip-files00271.tif'
1dd460d9e74d1fc5fbdff1143970b06b
c0cd6886cc356dee1e5bb4b50779af64f6cdcb6f
'2011-12-17T04:25:35-05:00'
describe
'2972016' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUH' 'sip-files00272.tif'
0d642aaa8c4acfe809c76238b42e6bb9
d7aa7bfba331279dae82ed853abc4524c8e733d0
'2011-12-17T04:15:30-05:00'
describe
'2971204' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUI' 'sip-files00273.tif'
a1faa2d437946d7212399e5378329470
2f588eeb955ea2e545165cc235f487b075fb22fd
'2011-12-17T04:10:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUJ' 'sip-files00274.tif'
a3c0373520ac8f1049648e3e8691882d
b61ece49841605980e32fea736b0bbc69c28ed51
'2011-12-17T04:10:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUK' 'sip-files00275.tif'
22de02d2f76338e33d02798a9a82ca20
49345e42330e47c93240b471361e836cc62eb9f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUL' 'sip-files00276.tif'
b6c29bed45d213202ffaa4747d78ab2f
321cc7d50f46382f8462a1f5c475a690f76c0e60
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUM' 'sip-files00277.tif'
64954f983fc7c9ce2783a9e2a6315a8a
a15a8a0f94f1d5ce061de4102dff0d071b6dbee0
'2011-12-17T04:28:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUN' 'sip-files00278.tif'
e7d12ce11c2e1225d3fa6a68a3285735
06053b5fdef167c192cd2a70e936aa3f23199679
describe
'2970144' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUO' 'sip-files00279.tif'
36d20c3d581248a4a326aa498a411d11
ece26d3e243867ea63fdbbef381c75393401ab95
'2011-12-17T04:12:52-05:00'
describe
'2971900' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUP' 'sip-files00280.tif'
bd874e0bbd6e0c6ca8b1b359f0f66d6f
7485bd82a791a4956ee881bdf8abab0de759ede0
'2011-12-17T04:26:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUQ' 'sip-files00281.tif'
d8cbfa356131aec8e0ded2fb4b308278
8231c6254e9640d74b98f36d515773dae2e8842f
'2011-12-17T04:26:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUR' 'sip-files00282.tif'
bdb486e0c930fa01cd8423d3a80f6a39
6b6ace39f9c075d18a5429eccb6e7216bea6c66b
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUS' 'sip-files00283.tif'
6135b01b8dec1f29b1153b9dfaa9b796
14369fff34b1f77f48d8c1612551eacee12a84c6
describe
'2973136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUT' 'sip-files00284.tif'
8903a5850a9fb7b4904455e619016c44
bab59571cfc6e7957e79de365c44956d5184c6d9
'2011-12-17T04:11:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUU' 'sip-files00285.tif'
a375edd69b9b9820ef2c229db368be68
f6aa31f2d9940ae11a1e97374d7fe696dad9d513
'2011-12-17T04:22:08-05:00'
describe
'8791748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUV' 'sip-files00287.tif'
a30a858b1359b324ec27849deca638c0
d7726496f09618cb79c22e225e3e9b672acf2944
'2011-12-17T04:15:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUW' 'sip-files00288.tif'
300cee4d78c4d45218d144bfca7e247f
4205df87f91a8b25de7e9cfa1e670b3b9e1c6e9e
describe
'2968300' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUX' 'sip-files00289.tif'
7602470b966ca726b1d584dbb72de17d
62e1863946ea6dee256ab9dd1cafbd3640406d78
describe
'2969696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUY' 'sip-files00290.tif'
44f531c892a48f107276d00d6c9ce756
4b5d3036b0803ccd2efdf1929fc71f7d80f61ac2
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLUZ' 'sip-files00291.tif'
7c9465af5861465f182fc5f7db57af93
5b72801f46665455693d4eb771f65a8d20b4c20b
'2011-12-17T04:18:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVA' 'sip-files00292.tif'
a1b21fee2d4e8a4b2a29277d8b333faa
97e70a593d72ffaca349ae756491ed73358f42ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVB' 'sip-files00293.tif'
1d2bf250c1543e5d873b8274f64e958c
bafa21793b9452fcdc2543ac361a50014d33dc9e
'2011-12-17T04:10:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVC' 'sip-files00294.tif'
8cd559a414e355a2f6d9fdd90e4fab24
22468d8893dc7a5899293623a0a4dd2bf4655641
'2011-12-17T04:15:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVD' 'sip-files00295.tif'
e0cd8265698e381aed8c38bc3fe63566
5c0daf140b28de8930fe13828af075c4bc465adc
'2011-12-17T04:11:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVE' 'sip-files00296.tif'
95f0cc9bb99e90ef6550541bc3786220
f576237b925ba6148d3c4d4178b72f753ee7eb81
'2011-12-17T04:18:00-05:00'
describe
'2969604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVF' 'sip-files00297.tif'
ee409571c3ff81fe556b784e8acbb4ab
da5eb013ef7033ce35bf0b7452e00fbaf5dac4d0
'2011-12-17T04:19:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVG' 'sip-files00298.tif'
2d0d3f2025649e3250ec7a8456a1bca9
8609768681d97a4499ea09d0d41da8c2d0d69f89
describe
'2970808' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVH' 'sip-files00299.tif'
da787ab51009e2a1ebd0f2085a212465
8300045302393e7d001df998b3daca2d7bf40ef1
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVI' 'sip-files00300.tif'
44fd66b2b87dad4726f39f4bcebd478a
f49dcfd6efa3bbbe1dfe8a375187a6e7e7385904
'2011-12-17T04:17:37-05:00'
describe
'2970732' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVJ' 'sip-files00301.tif'
c4941db28cf5918458c547d006bd56cc
2eda8e3ea61e6387bff4f5cbbe9bedd10541d1a8
'2011-12-17T04:22:36-05:00'
describe
'2969736' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVK' 'sip-files00302.tif'
4c5d4ea80c7d0b29631bde546c5c9046
2efe87a41996c463b4a706a33a94eddebcff86c3
'2011-12-17T04:22:39-05:00'
describe
'2969776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVL' 'sip-files00303.tif'
be40d0ccfeb623f3842069cc1df039d9
bbd399cf64b8e178b00a1200bdcaac3ff1be954c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVM' 'sip-files00304.tif'
b90ffa7653ac00dde2e8a0ad52114c4d
68f6920730c3934ba87f2eac4bc47d233814a11c
'2011-12-17T04:13:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVN' 'sip-files00305.tif'
1a0d1badc6ddee8283c6da7db4b58faf
1c34d8da6164f3651c14ff77c78cf85666678825
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVO' 'sip-files00306.tif'
3872e9e3487e79540b84afbc98c5d409
45b2416b4e2eef78a3aa6bf68dbbd24054197874
'2011-12-17T04:24:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVP' 'sip-files00307.tif'
4e1ebcfdc4f481546f02fde7eefb54db
dc6f1e8dc3a13c45a6e067d003131a2b74ff7743
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVQ' 'sip-files00308.tif'
54561a425e7a3a7188bb63c1f40b4921
6c665d950c01b4d548f0af89b3e3dcf2360e5bd2
'2011-12-17T04:15:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVR' 'sip-files00309.tif'
ed5af04aea27d85e3686e5ba4b1df341
0bcaa417df8b2954e4e838f6ab0e3965e8935d8f
'2011-12-17T04:16:59-05:00'
describe
'2971136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVS' 'sip-files00310.tif'
7ba9f34cb0a3c619b851724237c5aba9
c9ea19678e9fe62581a16d0d2768f70aa050eb23
'2011-12-17T04:25:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVT' 'sip-files00311.tif'
05493f646437e31965b150405d54b001
93f7f9cd79b64244813aa57b5656eaa37a55ea20
'2011-12-17T04:12:33-05:00'
describe
'2970588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVU' 'sip-files00312.tif'
28667c5154665a92621be9c231bbdaa6
64eada9f39f2f36db36a3eca0c7d77969b14a7ce
'2011-12-17T04:10:48-05:00'
describe
'2970320' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVV' 'sip-files00313.tif'
f1a6fd8e6f2eaf2f1e0d6cc8b1cd0722
80e79496b6f5eef4f82b9c1f0596cb3da1521a59
'2011-12-17T04:22:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVW' 'sip-files00314.tif'
b8f27b3e186ae0dee59f6eacdf82e4c9
90908c91699951e401eda682c5512c381e955458
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVX' 'sip-files00315.tif'
37fa8eaab6de9bfb6e3bce0cf2811023
91c1b3885134bdf06e4f41dff18ecb99f2a9e66f
'2011-12-17T04:20:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVY' 'sip-files00316.tif'
b60a5581ba54333966a8c12afd5fc182
993189bf6a99c4ee1229d05794f8f1d49d24a71c
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLVZ' 'sip-files00317.tif'
cb5d9ce6b974027efc6c10b989f31465
d73ce70e5a481deee528b077e679f9477ac8b317
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWA' 'sip-files00318.tif'
075a07a888ffa165bf183d830da35623
a281d0bbd91564a012316e8d46a565217ad5463f
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWB' 'sip-files00319.tif'
a04c9ee8deeda4124227c32c89f8a100
6ec49bfebcc4c51cb33c94a231a954721148ba45
describe
'2970824' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWC' 'sip-files00320.tif'
1ba171df8c1ce0214e31bc86862488fa
f8f3daf8bfe94a242d24316a6ec5c0296074ea76
describe
'2970620' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWD' 'sip-files00321.tif'
2b77c78dc231413cd3c70454ce027cec
e345dd7b48cd5ce256fd2737972c9dfaecf66a35
'2011-12-17T04:27:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWE' 'sip-files00322.tif'
56b3ecce3b330161565bdde5193c88c3
07e294f9ec9f2aec6a58a5d033700c7f87bf1920
describe
'2968356' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWF' 'sip-files00323.tif'
1e60b5fc05516fcafa6198a008ec2262
bae0c8ffacf90752b3baa260ca6cc5ebf674d294
describe
'2967924' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWG' 'sip-files00324.tif'
e584f46850d75e21ba8c09954bf90d9e
f920e3e42e554973389abf97d0db96a19ec642b4
'2011-12-17T04:28:29-05:00'
describe
'2972384' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWH' 'sip-files00325.tif'
cf12d278ab6e2401f3e5f961b058091c
6ce7eb49b4ea90cf68de95d60cc174918ba6d2e2
'2011-12-17T04:12:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWI' 'sip-files00326.tif'
a39e99462d2dfffed83a7d5b70e9d43b
4ee4d84c6126a70af26a380f8e921976210257d5
'2011-12-17T04:10:39-05:00'
describe
'2972656' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWJ' 'sip-files00327.tif'
a175bad4fdabd5d51d5963f721e88700
4eb16b0dcd586f12d95eaf4d13b3f1f606b7468a
describe
'2972184' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWK' 'sip-files00328.tif'
9ac7ec790839ef8e0e361c38f544e01a
fa16bb9944688d1b8d4d1b8e7e9aa9cdd4b9fe72
'2011-12-17T04:11:14-05:00'
describe
'2972504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWL' 'sip-files00329.tif'
b0a34824fb54cab1150aedcf141b2f64
23edaa1cbb63ee900e7f62d59f4ef1e0bb91ae04
describe
'2972412' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWM' 'sip-files00330.tif'
46a1a37df89f54592cf5a0a4d4d6e567
3d698372b0578e5b96990fc2dfbc9d2bfe3839fe
describe
'2972296' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWN' 'sip-files00331.tif'
02d6da573d834e5a1059a95cb595d5e3
1ab33849f144e4d0dab177ee98521cd278eac518
'2011-12-17T04:27:40-05:00'
describe
'2972244' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWO' 'sip-files00332.tif'
1d98bc3e12f45486968b99c56ec667e5
6e4895c7cd011a057f209de1eea003856cebd919
describe
'2972588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWP' 'sip-files00333.tif'
ac1b11f0bf5b833ba30be43330117377
b60c28838f112d60ee33a9fd78484c5838556a41
describe
'2972712' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWQ' 'sip-files00334.tif'
ac98d758879eea5482181d3da0d6f8c8
78975d7acfcccfc3d28b73c7c8ee5bae420f7534
'2011-12-17T04:09:35-05:00'
describe
'2972180' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWR' 'sip-files00335.tif'
482e75686a74e94edd0c5c8c3cc908d5
fcc87cef6e4b0ac67dcde85ce582fc172c656272
'2011-12-17T04:23:28-05:00'
describe
'2972056' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWS' 'sip-files00336.tif'
4650c7a452af87433d712511e020a2f7
98d420e48a1ca72d989ff97de3f9e8555997d135
describe
'2972680' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWT' 'sip-files00337.tif'
b5f950692c1c13b6d00a165695ac6aa4
bc5f7ea807015afecb7f9b67184e4a174e2fce98
'2011-12-17T04:11:51-05:00'
describe
'2972720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWU' 'sip-files00338.tif'
307363b6b016df696fd1cac77c13d177
4f2580361802e6d6c260a8e5cf37c77c9b774fad
describe
'2972744' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWV' 'sip-files00339.tif'
887cb9c85743c5ba1d5e122dd7f80287
b89b9cc427aaebd46743c2874554a9d13b0762c2
'2011-12-17T04:10:13-05:00'
describe
'2972212' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWW' 'sip-files00340.tif'
acdcc8f69f6cbf7453934719884256ec
ce4fc78c201ecc28394b9482f9ffb73f3e05ff68
describe
'2972148' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWX' 'sip-files00341.tif'
f0f05bcce2c99fe609b988120f2b1a1b
74ddab11ef23e29744cf714ee9dee15d06a02f7c
'2011-12-17T04:24:21-05:00'
describe
'2974424' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWY' 'sip-files00342.tif'
9cc9af2ea71fe4425491387d59aef131
c5c88b9bf795617edfeb4648c4576acd909e6eda
'2011-12-17T04:23:02-05:00'
describe
'2972172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLWZ' 'sip-files00343.tif'
df96721ff7b81d3d3d6f0d9c2d19063c
b360ad4d5f012e131cc1de5b9335baf0f4158aff
'2011-12-17T04:13:25-05:00'
describe
'2972136' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXA' 'sip-files00344.tif'
84e6a1c912178a28447aab719e324657
ef740fae815244ef8a37f6508f45f5d05512479e
describe
'2972040' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXB' 'sip-files00345.tif'
15d61c6ac811265ee590bd754f27c535
3d8a280951c82de4f067fbe7d305b19c92908749
'2011-12-17T04:19:19-05:00'
describe
'2972036' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXC' 'sip-files00346.tif'
b7f848289cfd36265a8383f99cd77a08
dd591f6478afdc475f66f755668501235fe4d2bf
'2011-12-17T04:15:01-05:00'
describe
'2972132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXD' 'sip-files00347.tif'
e6e97f7075bead4a52134d8f384a43a1
ed9b2928feacd06dc63f3621b087697183ab0eec
'2011-12-17T04:20:43-05:00'
describe
'2972072' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXE' 'sip-files00348.tif'
60fa59e1b39d1d00216ee49c0fd59f79
fabde6271c69f5fbd874d6fe05d666145074e633
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXF' 'sip-files00349.tif'
3909d7f8d71b36f5613d469071d14a0b
1b5fa930d90483fd2000584759122713b4095076
'2011-12-17T04:26:16-05:00'
describe
'2972008' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXG' 'sip-files00350.tif'
2b849bd4136cb29fbdc7b5f2d6fff29e
4806527890ab2433cfedd91159b170fd955e3fd4
describe
'2972152' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXH' 'sip-files00351.tif'
7c9cdc3ac92821cc6829ced5942aeb52
a9b5b9c334cf882542611743d69a03e53dd95145
'2011-12-17T04:26:04-05:00'
describe
'2971856' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXI' 'sip-files00352.tif'
b4edcae0f2021920da23e3ca29f5848d
9a52e37a4773b47b8ba794fee7f6c68fd1787eff
describe
'2971956' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXJ' 'sip-files00353.tif'
a808600d21a7089aa49a325b30debe72
be023d735b6c543d134a3d1aeab9eeaea7062341
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXK' 'sip-files00354.tif'
bb87adb53675081601925867bc0b078a
f7da65d5e6565468f468d1f7018e06f8402e784d
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXL' 'sip-files00355.tif'
5b8b9fe5133155b4c166e561094d7895
9107f2895016ac265d626a09a97aae8d78127a5a
describe
'10464392' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXM' 'sip-files00358.tif'
f8d2cb9d3028735a5f075bda3c9bc592
5e1cae74f7fd31729b76561635e23aa90d5b0eb7
'2011-12-17T04:27:49-05:00'
describe
'9946232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXN' 'sip-files00359.tif'
b05bb91fef3660885d82c13c78d3fa6d
1183ff94cc604043f3d61f727b71fe840d1fffe9
'2011-12-17T04:19:40-05:00'
describe
'3259408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXO' 'sip-files00360.tif'
5a98c0f26c6b2857b49d89372beeac75
9fa6c101f45e7665c848c784b64331c09a53c28e
'2011-12-17T04:09:50-05:00'
describe
'193570' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXP' 'sip-files00000.jpg'
46278aea35e5773fd75879e12d486209
56477a207168b875bb91272e579727d1e5da18da
describe
'96447' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXQ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
770a7e6b5060a6803c7744616db66cb6
dabe69360015effb3e157edb9ce8cc94a481f4af
describe
'11487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXR' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
d6ac4e3c6138419ea7e73397b9f4e15d
51129c79efbedaa10b0250e3cf3c31056517541e
'2011-12-17T04:19:28-05:00'
describe
'161663' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXS' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
cfb2d8a336e269b8a4b642669bc26c21
8027984f24bc0680ce373835eafbeff200538129
describe
'26083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXT' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
35ef28459f6a956b94e8453d505161e6
5bdf0cda17cbb9ba15d332e2de7e7dd6c4e35599
describe
'12101' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
adb7792f34d795ae3e2e3b315137ab60
76790f4d4972216172d0063f6f6d43d0d7861df6
describe
'68365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
3f1cc3a592c364ec0d90ad26ff6b2128
bd071ae98a16468049fbd8b87ad8330be63b5fd7
'2011-12-17T04:09:20-05:00'
describe
'95437' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
2adde10373a305dcd277f2f6630b75e3
83d65cc9b5b178c809148c89fdb889f5661a180d
describe
'104926' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4c1188a1e4e234995c3bdd519056a487
2eebd6b1a45c31396fb613bff79ae6fe17e2059c
'2011-12-17T04:12:44-05:00'
describe
'42172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXY' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ec5850f0918baa087b23e5887c12050e
1363618d0a60ea15ce12eee18bc036f1018b4be7
describe
'49516' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLXZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0f2215bd4d3c48a5c7cb3a25a2800c00
b854fb825c8a56c917a6f7bc7cae561f15528d99
'2011-12-17T04:27:09-05:00'
describe
'74774' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYA' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b6b10624c38dd1da41ab35e8949fd6a8
dc4fdd0a18be364ca9c2dce83635dc0239819a07
describe
'85282' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYB' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
85d2c6d0c2a5d158cfc3ce9f2a614033
fc81da98bb6d51f9a800c46e5c591383dba3cf23
'2011-12-17T04:14:55-05:00'
describe
'110471' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c2589f4c1c2d619410424fe695cb4ed8
4fcf141b26ce300c1d6c424dfbccbfe4e44dead8
'2011-12-17T04:24:24-05:00'
describe
'109123' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ac17e9922263ebac97ed882a5f8a1e6b
a47f8ab9476e93672963d86cec990cdf4bcb0231
'2011-12-17T04:10:43-05:00'
describe
'111308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYE' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
319f33a744ef0fdb10237f61f3ec02c0
85ea7075c4265f4ce4e1fff62d1fe89a0a3aacfd
describe
'77084' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
0e431eb56abb1489206bf2802f5b0ac6
60045536571688a9cd9be6fa125999b98535a97b
'2011-12-17T04:18:08-05:00'
describe
'83526' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYG' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
77ab2129744f7f2a9d63636c336e46d9
d0885f4278dbc9a8663d61d51387883e19ad729e
describe
'114146' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYH' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
454e3eab65574101c0eb1531cc196216
b67c242a70a5438cee72843e7f7b1c1ac6431250
describe
'109884' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
16d14e370acd7e38a8dea9a327130db0
a6e22a5dc769724c75a9fedf28672fdac5d3faee
'2011-12-17T04:20:27-05:00'
describe
'114441' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
532b22277c2a13e64b33f859dc34d740
48e8039c0f9cbab205e7ff04824a13231396ba35
'2011-12-17T04:13:24-05:00'
describe
'43697' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
574702fd0421dae66025ac02c1d03733
b281f16961104882539225e9f6683b893902141e
'2011-12-17T04:25:49-05:00'
describe
'75621' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8c07bcdd536c2eea6a49495e52811b1a
f650c7c2e9c70da3964f42c97afca17da56f1596
describe
'110943' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
12f0338f555793f7e5cbc8985abf42cb
edd8471e36f489265406fb9ed30cff927811c8c6
describe
'102959' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYN' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
543c90d9170d83bd81b91eeee9007237
f0250f832a080cf6f4950dd5eac69b32dbbca3e9
describe
'96821' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYO' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
831c5c80fbca8bd20842fe51b83c6fcf
878e49eee39a7193c68110f9f0c269344fba4b8d
describe
'97630' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
feee53917b9aefb7009f6a8f3f690a78
05722f61d84a1564e6fdb3c3a7b40de55a4d6ffd
describe
'112436' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
96437d76cf9358cb937645afc47c21a9
1375e5538806d7a9ff3f2f74e8714d8b19243db3
describe
'132365' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYR' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d428d33c059059a02f24c9189c70f2e7
630fa654386f03bcadd669c196fdec66be2f731a
'2011-12-17T04:23:37-05:00'
describe
'80745' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
8cc76f56fd51a634d958094cc3d1c756
288f4157a33f6bb22d8b106066e9a89178e9c56c
'2011-12-17T04:18:28-05:00'
describe
'70647' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
5584126503e2a5f671ff4c3305c1f006
e32a7a6f32dafe6e5221776e9b2b019b24984539
'2011-12-17T04:16:14-05:00'
describe
'104515' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3b3cd448d7d5654409b56c7167e89f35
25fb402f1524367f96ce6deabd26bc4c03f4bc10
'2011-12-17T04:12:07-05:00'
describe
'107556' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
6e1d5419cbabd1af347318d40105f3b6
30b1c819e80a8a652f8cfdd718cba57b918adc18
'2011-12-17T04:12:10-05:00'
describe
'98293' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYW' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
c7cf8df5b655614a3ea632a465f73c89
75343a27a3efc82bc281f92a0679950e3dab4303
'2011-12-17T04:20:36-05:00'
describe
'102999' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6afd854912c950deda52d95ffd8e70d7
5737d969e2bc523e654b8702f8e2e3292994cedd
describe
'77211' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYY' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
a029ead904c1613122b5d0d3a73bf7cd
3015e4aad68f4c43555408cfcb86a7297fa994ab
'2011-12-17T04:24:22-05:00'
describe
'79724' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLYZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c9d59d6e6c4cc8f7ad66d0a20489042c
33a034fe24ed92db9c7651101d7ddb3aecbde5ad
'2011-12-17T04:24:31-05:00'
describe
'112224' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZA' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
95fde938fceb6b5f405ec576d22dd82e
861073c1f4a11e74b4a89f1a6ee1cab2b805d8b7
describe
'104635' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b52ab24034cff9172ee9d786b5d68d5d
c0a683299f214a537af069bf952bd57aee227561
'2011-12-17T04:13:02-05:00'
describe
'103076' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
67423a16ab480534aa3e10bd7a05563f
dd0591fa02c44049df67e059ca5dc80fe69faa20
describe
'77110' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZD' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
8724f714783b422c216c0c7369cb1483
b80f4bd57447dbafb1e50f03e4d2007183db19e2
describe
'111890' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b3f7dcc2a3d7af07d87c4a8494e781ab
602cbcadccf9b06d81b7579767a1fe52b1810eab
'2011-12-17T04:25:19-05:00'
describe
'102353' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c154a643ac13603e055987f4ed153d02
2c8f18e7a38325a49994027e23d6a4e4b5189391
describe
'100677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
c97dc1e705f5ea3db92fa1137191ffc5
bb1b1b4a788a173b1d0f72a279aa106cd1883023
'2011-12-17T04:12:47-05:00'
describe
'66272' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
d2593eeab454c8f0febaff81a03bfab5
ca2e9f93827e958ee4f006a9b299d1613d3ad28e
describe
'65618' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZI' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
eb61db8ed6d3a136c3b8cfe28a295a9b
3e37c4a6aa7ee51df2a9ccb7a91dd9c6a1424303
'2011-12-17T04:28:06-05:00'
describe
'107029' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
30d2fb0c912a4aee836dcf344c8ba313
d9f9c1f2ab9c64d17fc3efccad7cf535c8e72127
describe
'109259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
840d0216e86a4b567f1addfd4257d048
4224fc545d57317db28648cf12b1063d3b03e85e
describe
'109482' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZL' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
08fb47c802868dc2dae2a322a915b41a
a99dd789bdb3abb868e3bc436e2ec9d0ed8c9d80
describe
'105178' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZM' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d409ca8cb56573422038491914fa3654
c090c78ec75f5477f9c830299b03ca71cfb03397
describe
'103947' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZN' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
81d4c1c5f9083db135e42cace4b3cce4
8a41f5c24586c14a6b2710ccdf8ed75c8d04c406
describe
'53187' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e4d2bb30bc35dedf54aa2e64ca568463
2ef4ff941de85ef89843000345fc036615eb6f6b
describe
'73514' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZP' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
8488ed56cda9c78478ee3fdaafcfa49f
d48247f9dbd90b461a20386433213b86fdf93519
describe
'107814' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5feba93a49d9f79594da3c79567510e8
be3d7aa89a88a9e95bab22c13c9fc58290cbc88c
'2011-12-17T04:12:01-05:00'
describe
'102605' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZR' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a84323df5dc342d2ae1c82974f4cf4cf
7cc7ca43c0c4098457462981f14af91b1ac10cfd
describe
'48151' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
93d99c422e91cac415520e24887be1a2
72f3d0cf333ae614d03aac9ef70518020fd72b96
describe
'64611' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
1aaed0a747505ff8cb84b087c4960c29
7d52009c4e4e2f04a5dc0ce1883a0b2a03ccf9f2
describe
'102173' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZU' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
f4c7b591289d883a94c295a364ad7ea9
59a7dec2c5d81d23bc842e128e8f021349a005bb
'2011-12-17T04:22:59-05:00'
describe
'105683' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
66b341f5dec5498961762694e87a3ff6
f7ef1f576296bceb164e14ae411d3d908efb8d8a
'2011-12-17T04:21:16-05:00'
describe
'89206' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZW' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
08b478265abe9c83abffd122c3e59f29
98f952331c73e694668e7a486994e8d9a0144aed
'2011-12-17T04:19:26-05:00'
describe
'111199' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
2194eb34f97d5635bc0d14e75446636c
4d8ca8fb8f89c0104907612cb1c749ff6c11b1b4
describe
'104612' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZY' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
328288689e12170443db579ada1a6b44
bb9fb9e693298282c98817d4770fc63ab33984ad
'2011-12-17T04:19:21-05:00'
describe
'100771' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACLZZ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
1ef36ddd5dbcc9bca8b24adfcb21d897
bd138e2fc00f8cc0a8aeb9eed0f721201b6f89e7
describe
'113162' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c7e0e53a05c45a505ba161ba330024c2
974902895362b4108b552976bc36c3d18821d6b3
'2011-12-17T04:20:13-05:00'
describe
'97562' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8520db9fdedc1f439e0aae55d2bcdfb2
657f115697aafc990db03ee271f66b4ac220a54b
'2011-12-17T04:11:26-05:00'
describe
'93804' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
1060c70353fa94b49e3ca88f6dccf9a6
e5bdd5449e113dbc98e44ffe152492e24e88bd59
'2011-12-17T04:15:32-05:00'
describe
'102915' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAD' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3780c7c640afad2b1b324cd21310afd0
0aa53ee5bd9c316fa799790552a181733ce96348
'2011-12-17T04:11:01-05:00'
describe
'92374' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAE' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5203ed2206ec7c90b0c8961561279670
5f02ce8f3ac4a83753383c86cbc2eaa20adaa442
'2011-12-17T04:23:03-05:00'
describe
'99987' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
205643e1ee86fc87a4831201bc7e7304
69e3ccfcd4d01b521e1b46d58c1dd2c3416dacc1
'2011-12-17T04:21:07-05:00'
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
1b2fdc608f9337ed5eec0717a603d201
fd7370a952c1306400ea318d808ce9f05a46a361
describe
'66681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
44a0093945fc7e99f98d20b40d7247a1
af6533829702324ec12527c4d009210642913624
describe
'100550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3815a019aac195d48665a9d78aa5bda5
cab0f8b232b242f7f94e621980e76ed98bd143a1
'2011-12-17T04:21:10-05:00'
describe
'99864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAJ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d92a8f491190527ab0b925a3e51d56cd
3b06c67db74ccb2b7fa2e929ec74288ee7095ee1
'2011-12-17T04:10:44-05:00'
describe
'97168' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
8e058a074e588337abc9e7ad9b99caca
74d5bb33ddce28fb4a358fb0104eed1115061cca
'2011-12-17T04:11:15-05:00'
describe
'105635' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
c3f288d52dbb55bc92dde5c7d66575bc
351b6bed2da367bee5eeb66469e191e366f18d80
describe
'45957' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAM' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2d7dfc77bfc6c6dde10f531678ed8cfd
8378a774316e3292ce7957e89a6801e67e136f6d
describe
'86865' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4e06537eb34e26de2666eed81d35171c
99b6e34040cb25b9b52b3d032aa60bf0e9255eea
'2011-12-17T04:20:51-05:00'
describe
'109216' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAO' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
233228f2c667f5ad7effb48aa2f2de8a
c61bf123542a9a634c615fb5dad3d060c8467cb9
describe
'107938' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
b4bd61028c167265985089d5ba1f605e
f67fd390786865259dd13c4ce1e897fb1c0f3889
'2011-12-17T04:24:51-05:00'
describe
'108707' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ca8ca668df14df8b6e1594a3529337ba
91207712f5fac567e702016ae5ae446942ca4abf
'2011-12-17T04:22:51-05:00'
describe
'104761' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
ffdb6f27be0c07b3196b2453fdc8f511
237d196b812a55035e81550a824a5c87d48c4923
'2011-12-17T04:10:23-05:00'
describe
'104063' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c1d6322a6b55f80eaeddc66abdb8343a
d8199b0a63277bc048804d7717754459c31cb724
describe
'98022' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAT' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f779f1c36b7f1ada13163e717797cc85
de7295e1199d205fc7ad446db6970d887eafff20
describe
'48138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
a33a10332a05f68a39e13af125c7c3cb
65a29dca027b139893af1c748fc537ef59998aec
describe
'84030' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c3db5ee979eb97dbb7aa5a6a63fb2d9b
89d9484b70bfa5b8c8aeee1a7674fa3d0f07a0bd
'2011-12-17T04:25:53-05:00'
describe
'113347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAW' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
93b089f08e75a31a193ccf7b22a5ec2d
39b4961ebbe902474bf65b8b3b24e4c3cf1c52ef
'2011-12-17T04:27:11-05:00'
describe
'115074' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
0c4e7d6ff98fc8d9d322438fe258c0a7
59022430fbf84e25c4024febf936d62bf0e3c596
'2011-12-17T04:17:44-05:00'
describe
'81334' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
56564b3e7c2b2d90ed62a8a727407e5d
d4b83381d5c7f57f0fd5f9a3e41b21d78c3cb6fc
'2011-12-17T04:10:21-05:00'
describe
'113809' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMAZ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
df8d49520bb4ef54582b4fc86cbebcc4
749f1939ea55e86fb56cf0740fe3636b90e13045
describe
'110259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1bde00e966c0106c7a3c09da75bf0d0c
a31604488ef85d27a24f827a4b199036e5526c55
'2011-12-17T04:22:46-05:00'
describe
'102218' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
eaa0e706396a83fbc30018ab0f3c8000
76843120102e9559abb97fafda5e12d88529c182
'2011-12-17T04:16:42-05:00'
describe
'107598' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
8c5f209a9b69489d759a2c068d7cf714
5873fc5c3db3cbe6d859a8c9decf302bafa44aaf
'2011-12-17T04:24:48-05:00'
describe
'95423' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
90f42150b32dad8f2b02faa5213e62f6
2de7a599721d5aee2478e8a172cb38f3d09309df
'2011-12-17T04:13:05-05:00'
describe
'101513' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBE' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
fd0b7e347ed88176244fbe7424b0e0d0
7fb8d2a505b525e2d06825054d2964776a403448
describe
'113979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
9d476b2ef9d8e8edabf76af7f38d1211
fa8c4e53822ec14ef51d2104f9149be0f49ae13f
'2011-12-17T04:11:54-05:00'
describe
'34782' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBG' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8c8fb2e3523b37e6efcd2532c4501e71
b30f5c016f9bb2aed7255e777ff5c3beb3b23f93
describe
'73907' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
ffd177f9ebe769854810a37ae72ca35a
4bbe6a40469e4e221e8cc5bc797a7247e976af62
'2011-12-17T04:23:00-05:00'
describe
'105991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
88c9a60b873b3d55497fb03ae9fae801
81dab993fc4d7fed89029a487029b13ab74385a1
'2011-12-17T04:25:33-05:00'
describe
'104897' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBJ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1997db55aee5291644aaf8d54f21c3d5
af5f4ca1223692ae35e9bcce389f48b7d2f33fc6
describe
'102474' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5f0cb742b785f60d9da07e602ac7e0b6
eab06349ebc3899a506947661eddb2e962972f5a
describe
'100800' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBL' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
fbf685d8d7df24a8d71eba1be665e819
ea747b868e0ae0ba0fff2ea03bd113e163075ae5
'2011-12-17T04:11:47-05:00'
describe
'105807' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
770bf262f6a9174160daa48716eb265c
b39eb808281a2233a487cb6a1a670c843cecb047
describe
'115037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e427f1ee891cb4ced7e63d782eb9637d
95b401a2bbba1a00e43344416095e79cefa9f984
describe
'107791' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBO' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e9225cf18f142eb20ac2645208420a05
c36a14b841358dccee298ab96a6f3da2033ec013
'2011-12-17T04:12:24-05:00'
describe
'106769' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f361854fafa4314d9a68d13f6e9627ec
30e62c35e8222cd875aac57564c72e8a6597b451
'2011-12-17T04:24:45-05:00'
describe
'106061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
2efcee45cb078f1ea7bcce69043a8e25
a041a26e10c62b05183f3fcc76e7ef78d4d76677
describe
'113706' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
df50271c05c8ad52ccfa173c3a269067
218614b768c2d739765b83baf44e54fff0df13a1
'2011-12-17T04:26:12-05:00'
describe
'152142' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
913aac8997b7f2b1894f81d3c5c9cc63
5fb62d39ee6752c7a9a801f33e7f4813fa0050e8
'2011-12-17T04:25:07-05:00'
describe
'113551' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBT' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
132cb9d46e0be7d7be8a1c2e7fd78b9c
d532b613fe7a2fe66a44ca3cdf674abedaa8d2b2
describe
'105768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
6e8f0593767c1483ae464bdff22ff3cd
4a7aa7bf4b5935942914bea45d593a4a4e210572
describe
'110410' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBV' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
3fce8aa4412a6b9405db57a5351d1600
9daa1d0da4a3f17edd2289a25c5404b93ee4c8d7
describe
'101132' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
572e1251f48d9ca6438ddf115579e274
cd5836a3f739ad09d360e3f2ce62340438bf818f
'2011-12-17T04:27:28-05:00'
describe
'105912' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
50910a9cd2cd4638ee34958d112b7f43
85448b19790539b23cb028751929ada6c79a1acc
'2011-12-17T04:12:36-05:00'
describe
'108149' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
93812e47f07c6a03ae92bc99769cc698
bf9e20b7fbcdf3f9721fc2d4f836989b4df1d641
describe
'107275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMBZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
96a19ee9772adf8a63b8c151af036976
0d2d3b5cecb5d7bf8cc2987fc877ad868472a989
'2011-12-17T04:15:59-05:00'
describe
'110350' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCA' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
7723b58b479fedb945f5db5626cd471b
6e45fea817751d4dca59908d539ce862193084a1
describe
'105220' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCB' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b40334d19cd9da97b3e9f4267aa2f05f
bbbf780bea75242ba49e97d3b21572c8b15dbf30
describe
'101256' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
6988cc91dbf18c55fc436a3636b0839f
e0fd62a06783b180bd3f3f45fbb9e6f83c7703f6
'2011-12-17T04:27:35-05:00'
describe
'109871' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
a92d76259d738990df0f0a4b8f528a4a
c3a84d44844402444c8b4a2fad64e9bffe37b336
'2011-12-17T04:16:04-05:00'
describe
'108415' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5b572aef705eca2d778252e46c172e9c
ced5c19cd9cb68ae842194ac34b1d12e6467fe73
describe
'104275' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9cad8f37bf531a68400dd5a2f1fb8b17
545292ac433764705972c9dd58154dc44c080d3e
describe
'100208' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCG' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
23e3608f3003cd79584556c71fc13c35
a1449bef3770e4bb70a49bf1c3c80307ae3b335c
describe
'86200' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4458c5b44ee3f809cb677715e0a2f6b9
ff46ecfc52cd3d7b6165b8af87d468c3534eae46
'2011-12-17T04:22:31-05:00'
describe
'113851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCI' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
15fc008232a0a274120d5c4c81f824b8
45c8a27e35de002b743b323ced7788f291d96303
'2011-12-17T04:15:43-05:00'
describe
'114242' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
1f5e4b2e1eec40516721de77c44ef767
b3252a14a2ac9295178712278350609ead889b59
'2011-12-17T04:11:12-05:00'
describe
'113438' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCK' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
c5b40cf9e2d7d6642bdf9b737c2a1341
4b2c5ac422a329ae6b48e0522b9f37cfc7a0c682
'2011-12-17T04:20:26-05:00'
describe
'40716' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0b6498cc432acc3e87fec3ff953fba07
379f79f7afe8ba9217b10f7154398627dc9a1174
'2011-12-17T04:16:27-05:00'
describe
'85995' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
dc9e286207847752f7907771523cce16
3a90bcef337810e421df120f253cb99b226e8e31
describe
'116400' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCN' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
09d9de06adc0ca4127d0f7c02fe0379e
f27e185aee5480a39703e74a3165fab04a22246a
describe
'119244' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
5e2635429ca4eaa231f3e2890fe95d78
7156e3f601cd153e1afc124c3a75be03c41db0f0
describe
'112189' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCP' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
0b8251cb82193d831bb6480d81fe9e0e
6a52496dac97ceba6601f2ca9dc49b262858cfc5
describe
'109378' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
9f72d8ae1f953e2079585021e42c074c
f011d0005ff2fe1ce3c4c8c468e25c294c333769
'2011-12-17T04:27:54-05:00'
describe
'60753' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCR' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
8b0bffef513c11e509d2997efe2d0698
0ff2faeff58215d719fa8c5b70298b07349258a1
describe
'82864' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCS' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c857b97a2dc86e7943cf95adb7060a3e
36c7d0a90bafc747889ea8732718c930b647a98f
describe
'115115' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCT' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
f6e31cdf967e82bcfa6d60980cdecdbb
8347e1d4e33a45e74a03ff5ce975718d8aee9969
describe
'108999' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
890e7b478fa24ba5c54b07a94d900fe7
9c3258d4ab7a1cd253a56899eb7ffdea27be4d41
describe
'112222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
eff992139b1bd3e41e158626ee6048c7
251523b02da64186fed90044f170a6d6f40e9f95
'2011-12-17T04:18:44-05:00'
describe
'105931' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d81be3581af035248e220559855c895d
f7cb0d71aa493b71eb2af2bc8ec6a60d71bbfbd5
'2011-12-17T04:20:46-05:00'
describe
'108432' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCX' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
4b8430385a6dbdf08723459b52b483f9
0110430ba5076a2c56f1dcec52dd3719fe85fd2d
describe
'105928' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
362fd882e186b508f31aa8444ba40160
ae053a1b3d248d3a0389007415d3c6a60b100968
describe
'33997' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMCZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
1f5cdbc5860f249d45e85464fcc5bde8
7dabb4758acd09c2405bd8f47f57536665622e78
'2011-12-17T04:11:32-05:00'
describe
'78753' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDA' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
c6f84c631710eb60c9d3919c8a2211ec
28b0651c233ac00aeb3b45e0c28b2b362312e9c8
'2011-12-17T04:15:27-05:00'
describe
'112681' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDB' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
5803ca75a09b696a684eb111837b693c
8c921bf92793e648d5af4e6848e484d6b367497d
'2011-12-17T04:23:19-05:00'
describe
'119504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDC' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5c39ed2b4271bedc9f7b00f6db5bbe49
9f267dd24275cc6c7d96184d01e208cc79e05d6e
'2011-12-17T04:09:39-05:00'
describe
'119033' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
06da337e61097eb7ca7b065c3ac159f8
36fa057cc692dce4c9621e695a219ef3642b5a1f
describe
'111574' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDE' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
7908ea8e2d32f447636ebb2a44b89746
633bc75ef33d7c78b978b8a87ee3f4b4cb26ff2b
'2011-12-17T04:28:14-05:00'
describe
'114500' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
1891a47cd09861066bf3a919b7804edd
df617dec030c7c4044140030dd2a21deffa6f8d0
describe
'95530' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDG' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
dfa17777bbe253053c725124d6e250d8
9ae875c2b3bd9f9ebe5df356be949c1e42bd768d
describe
'75504' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
e0762ff21d66384508018ed5cecb8e02
3d77e06b01f718b27784b5dcc914245b374efec5
'2011-12-17T04:20:24-05:00'
describe
'107820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
5993d4a7ba9a8068f46b5e7396ec3c78
44c115b4657a9ddb1a07a22b924e88178e567b29
'2011-12-17T04:20:03-05:00'
describe
'112766' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDJ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
b3068a56cc903cfbe06c623f398a43e0
a85130f016078f88f6e0ed7e4ce83474c835b65a
describe
'111585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDK' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
11d9ba9e1f2fc7ae2efe6cb043396c71
9e7793f1086f8d0f487f13c89387d6dcdfa90a40
describe
'166570' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDL' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
40e81ba411260e514ce043a3e6a858c4
ed212dfd0cda0aeadb45fa5b14334c1bb6e23681
describe
'100061' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
8ae5721d5b47f7980b17c0d85d042f69
9f68bfb0ab037b47d2bae7a0af8d8a703a82af0a
'2011-12-17T04:12:02-05:00'
describe
'69013' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDN' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
119f8562a5a400a82212b27ff26338ff
dcae422742d46d8ccd54359fe76c216cb2e09ec1
describe
'111534' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDO' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
97691487ba838523fd2ddf640e19e2ff
47c513fac226a592a6e072f038c9364e867ac83e
'2011-12-17T04:12:22-05:00'
describe
'94128' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
f5f1f12cd7c9d9ecf3b72d5df068ba45
f9ddae04619d7c78c40c2f8b663997aee8580f48
'2011-12-17T04:24:07-05:00'
describe
'86346' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
5a513b8ab9b069055891fae35a016462
50a50420a6ae23cc53a5a7bacef5f82e78b468d2
'2011-12-17T04:16:54-05:00'
describe
'112993' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
33017066d01c9ab9a8f6ad8c9270fe55
51ad6f7fa2ba7ac8e78db42e3363009b4f986850
describe
'107750' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDS' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
7c093a42ca673ee91f1fe3f296108de7
7a05bdbeac09d591b56a245f92dc4a29ebf3e56e
'2011-12-17T04:28:11-05:00'
describe
'117812' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDT' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d6d287cc9b0c82daf161c3b123b7251d
62bac23624e1d7f6b54d491b11536ec705fefba7
describe
'110780' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDU' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ff635eb8db725b81847ae96be77d7622
b061f934a3f371f1b535e055861468b2e75f348a
describe
'115784' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDV' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
f1612f6afe562909cbcd8c3b4a7d500e
866241db774f7b63d50e31c6068ea873e2b2ed74
'2011-12-17T04:17:25-05:00'
describe
'106379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
7dcba7c2194f51408f36d78e94fde4ea
af3be5ea34ee67732cf5a512f83869a0a338db06
describe
'110336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDX' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
48b0aedc1abf03c530927f517f057477
5660bd72239d686b1e31365bb11b7d1f015ed122
describe
'112250' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDY' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
08ab1ab65fbdfcf210ea22fbd719347a
119bc04ad359c5602934d01fd0306a5b305ad879
describe
'95745' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMDZ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
4ffd71bb513e4634cfcbaff1e1e247f4
5435ccb6e878940d91b571d32d3b5a3b164dc3a0
'2011-12-17T04:11:06-05:00'
describe
'100159' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEA' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
d48bac0c0300360d558d4e52c2000d8e
f9b17a8b8d09517be0df2c6b2eb917519fcf033c
'2011-12-17T04:21:47-05:00'
describe
'107045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEB' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
61966573077c9e40e38f471a3b5aad2a
9b7eca5452115d6e0aec2b5ad04232673b073a60
'2011-12-17T04:26:58-05:00'
describe
'111088' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
e8c2cde4ea7953fd01a004c96edb1157
28152d3b30825f1c39dd44e83856b7a13e40afea
'2011-12-17T04:18:11-05:00'
describe
'111552' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMED' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
7655aed048a76dbc1c07d4dcf1f77067
292154d5eebfe87adc684503190d4dbf26d86824
describe
'148339' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
22cdc9f07c1a13d75789a84684edc7c2
e78551db5ae7d9049639084e56c084a0029e9da0
describe
'114291' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
7000d21b1b6ff0baa0f0a0cdfd9e8a9f
531c83b9e5331c70164258fe082cb6ca818f6598
'2011-12-17T04:25:25-05:00'
describe
'96197' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEG' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
194507136401bfe073b42d2d06a48621
ae8ea74299c69424a998ab893339ebc09d1ea81d
'2011-12-17T04:19:16-05:00'
describe
'105940' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
2258e1762cd66200d63fce63875309ff
2a19ad575a43d4f86b8fdab347ddf6bd37caa18c
describe
'100515' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
cb2caa0b6ca8b91340981e976a1cafca
241d61d40138f09c91ddba338ce6461b5d3700b6
'2011-12-17T04:11:31-05:00'
describe
'110971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEJ' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
7caa140b9200cbc57192e981ca6f11d1
b541ebc1826986e28227e9de70404c0e97d2808c
describe
'117419' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEK' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
0bd9ee4d957929b763580d501f5717f1
d1a3132b12915ea4bf1d3dd97e6b1a1449a4cc35
describe
'106172' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEL' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
a005be54806b14d1340898248aa11df7
9fe894ed28440fd88365982ac18b95ec9a16f7c6
describe
'104080' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEM' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8aad4091dc90d18f1527db087c0a54ef
218653efdda4c6eb1cfb04c5206283d1b222ed32
'2011-12-17T04:23:15-05:00'
describe
'109044' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEN' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
729071a539aa73b4dbdffa055c8fbd4e
51d7992d74e029f98d1b6347ca71739b60b54575
'2011-12-17T04:25:14-05:00'
describe
'108959' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEO' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
78647a6b92b5fe9bbe0af4fe1d45f650
fbd825679bbc291ed5fb009b7fda6e60c7c88467
'2011-12-17T04:25:26-05:00'
describe
'94696' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEP' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
d9a8b2f68b1712c27a6ecc624bcac772
cf431387fae0fa4724c07f132bc6c8a94f8cfc8d
describe
'85139' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
d785c506c506bf58c1e7448651e23d46
5f4e7fadba950399d13d3e1284feb2b40fac5a5a
'2011-12-17T04:21:41-05:00'
describe
'109624' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMER' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
5cb6d96c3c8a5193a92b3191961490be
e1a90844347e3545cb683a7592444e8ce774b749
describe
'110937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMES' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
0053eebdfc472263f6b989687c282cae
c33997544d8ca020469d763f75a7a8c5ea7e567c
describe
'104771' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMET' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
1a12a8ffd4f0b1096b20dd43f858772d
778da7148b5cb34aa3c0d6eb770ea7cdc789e84d
'2011-12-17T04:27:10-05:00'
describe
'103843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEU' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
82395846502917bd73ec808b968c05b2
2b4f2c47f4a9980ff2626de46903f7d741924389
'2011-12-17T04:10:17-05:00'
describe
'116582' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEV' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
9887a90699938a3003f16f7bd8d7d2e1
c5edbb56992478a60088312bbb4053436ec3612e
describe
'116350' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEW' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
c36800c59c3f66dcb2ef9448e7b5e494
c7a05f933c9323361527d1cba9fb2443e1acde31
describe
'110381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEX' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
7795eb1774c247a2314ed774a8e86803
b0e4345e609dbfd4df97fc901fa655a48696555a
describe
'104381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEY' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
20617c2f874f0c84b0bcab06031aadb7
7e3a07d25c85e351ddc2da3a7c8a2b21d2882482
'2011-12-17T04:26:36-05:00'
describe
'108089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMEZ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
aa99077150ab593ebd8074aed4047826
386db808e94e77f12816289d732c24486ed331b9
describe
'107408' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFA' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
23cbe599596ceb9fb365b1011986f17b
76c49ee1aca1af9a8f8c12c8e64751375bcaa6d1
'2011-12-17T04:09:14-05:00'
describe
'101978' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFB' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
c6bd3047073438dc8bf142e795060ae4
816c72dc22b49c832e0a31f72039b12651fe87dc
describe
'108475' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFC' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
ff29f6fd32209a898f179046c1ffac5a
fcb18a4954bac7ac128318acab73857d9c730a2b
describe
'181537' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFD' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
f8106b410dc5ba9574fa38549d8dd81a
0f4552da4027d99280f295114307c48130c903fc
'2011-12-17T04:27:12-05:00'
describe
'103748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFE' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
be9920741564e0939c0e6c655914c5d4
e0f74af0d4d1246d19ebc0278e0869bdf70b3bb9
describe
'108103' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFF' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
eedd52afe7a67a365b2506e22e8ad60c
3243fd9578358b29495f9a6b6718ffc9ad3052eb
describe
'110117' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
e4c64668a4e174d2746e97a9b0bd4dd0
3d1aef11d4557cea56a65a078cc2112f334a89bf
'2011-12-17T04:22:44-05:00'
describe
'115619' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFH' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
7695c47a9198ec1af6d7e2a940e8b7b3
5abf673694c604cc85d983499e7cfbb692272419
describe
'114037' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFI' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
9c559dcf21997051c6080bac55ff5e7d
3206c9bfc33d55e0d34df6d71d050b5043422ca4
describe
'100381' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFJ' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
7fdb084db1b4cef5f0177d0a109d6d64
d9cd6132846f1db08b075a71e5f1348efce77d5b
'2011-12-17T04:16:33-05:00'
describe
'104832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFK' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
5e7484e77b2667505db4f4936a26db37
d3fc1debb2fbb182065d65734d3ff267ed381b80
describe
'109010' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFL' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
6033afa460f35e7e5c0ac1ecb64a441d
a4409194fb4e29ba3889685bf035b037eea274f8
describe
'105742' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFM' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
6dc9381cc91c68e920223e32908c7250
ec5ba965777b66b22a23352aa1ca2ad98133be1c
describe
'91476' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFN' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
c98ebee7ff5e91951ac01b63d52b146b
6c710c7119b067ec51d09ccf5b561cb6f8111aae
describe
'89466' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFO' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
3ed4ef00b3fe38102aa350d9ad994061
934392898aeccfeb1f5702d933e608d1b7e0ebfc
describe
'106207' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFP' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
61301957ae05527c5f932d5862fd07ed
1ee860c1ce3620defe34f9e7cde4ad0edd57a911
'2011-12-17T04:19:50-05:00'
describe
'115545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFQ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
b3feea7ce650e8529e4fb1eec873bea3
6651d34ef690987fca4ff31b3d4adc3529aaa533
describe
'107324' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFR' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
6e8f19a4b996a9d816034105d95ef7dc
2614082bad93cc5e1067b51bb402e266f4b7b963
describe
'107138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
a258d469f4a1309c6c2622a0ddba5708
b776bd1b2c76e8ca8baf4270aa5fea41749d9f42
describe
'105459' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFT' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
0147d20317dcfc3f471829a7307f0618
ca996958f341263566953cc6f8490a823f813a22
describe
'100773' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFU' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
6d62b6525c9063962e29a2cc9b56e314
471eb32681b051fd3f443877fbb9a17c0b13033a
'2011-12-17T04:10:09-05:00'
describe
'102687' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFV' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
be3a1be775f7a6725f3b6720968a777a
f43151fdc140bde0b46582c424f3ffd4e269433a
describe
'53654' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFW' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
a68d4e8700f34febab63a11059b1161f
5bace93fe5abf0bdb3a2a33322ac4cc1dac6f3f7
'2011-12-17T04:22:49-05:00'
describe
'83386' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFX' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
980b557a860dd829a20944479dc45ef1
8fff8966ddf285de950e320dc23e952ca8014cfc
describe
'112092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFY' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
79baa658745412a04fd4aa935b307271
cebd1d2da02b05c4ff9f75f7c8d75d5362fc2231
describe
'106119' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMFZ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
ff2e692250bab85d458d9ff97ff6042f
180018adea639a4121212855053833f21959196d
describe
'115889' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGA' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
8bcbd07cfcfaab36c7f3e2b4b6bbd14d
88776bc300fdef8a4df8d8f3cac8f714d37726e5
describe
'97222' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGB' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
ae76ae141ad3760f3a463cc7d8c78f62
03afd0f3fd7ba7616e76a54a6340ea53c781f22c
'2011-12-17T04:21:00-05:00'
describe
'108005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGC' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
131794f82d46dcbb57a327c3f12bb590
44318737494e0802e1bdcd0c17c632f5804286f5
describe
'104138' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGD' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
556c843eb99e52fb4409ea8eab54623c
c57bfa5c7fa0a5d6a96d95b9309d916f04661698
describe
'104861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGE' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
490305b7a988515a34347c69fe59cf42
e82bf16fb6b6629904ecafe3266a766c8d70eef4
describe
'111361' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGF' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
13b8bb9bdc733cf417783afb8abb0810
d650f02c14d53dc045db324f289d17b14d571461
describe
'108407' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGG' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
4a5fb973d7556f8ae60d8331cb3dd3ac
cdf4d907de584a02683127bd2e72c6f1056fbf48
describe
'109622' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGH' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
33c8842daceb2687b5711f83340288da
22f5bfd7da755daef8fb074dee27beffa23da5cd
describe
'110493' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGI' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
99fa7ada7390f168efb3c61a624f5382
edf5949b1a5b96bf02a25c77968cf552e8499458
describe
'109311' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGJ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
5351ae4f3e5dc17e53feb45d585185ab
b6540d87d36bea1396feeca302c679f9e7b97045
describe
'163839' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGK' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
edab1672e25c82ac9bce09cd5fd5dcbd
9902c21e64757332f102e18713add275ab4ae006
describe
'111858' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGL' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
5af4db3c5b395fbd8fa7d6adf68ffcf5
e0634240899886cef7ee7ec792b474e90e2d2946
'2011-12-17T04:15:22-05:00'
describe
'109778' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGM' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
5d31705da7b756edf69a156980fdb5e5
795c01b2a5315b11d2ea83390e98c60874d06aeb
describe
'113633' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGN' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
045a9470b19ce185009af36a816fde8b
4077cb715823dc38fde5537586ee83b0050af355
describe
'82532' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGO' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
b3a0dda940d95351da3044bb73770e17
7366b7beffb4d065e9d45fddc650a7f0ba53ce15
'2011-12-17T04:28:01-05:00'
describe
'107006' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGP' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
5271d2411892acfba50e72b966aeea2b
6ab6eede05ff91b06efb9a03e1946c466e7de283
'2011-12-17T04:16:18-05:00'
describe
'112369' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGQ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
2d486fbcc48d0f25c1f0e5aff82a2f28
37c0a006c6464059ba05ee621516c3661ca2afbc
describe
'113629' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGR' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
ed317715de05a6e26a4cc82ad6408363
3e86a5f453d810c4777192b2f967c589e829ff45
'2011-12-17T04:13:32-05:00'
describe
'112700' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGS' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
f89d3bf511cb2a9da6c95a22b11b8b0e
58e000d5d20a26bd412a45ed5e634a4637cad3d4
'2011-12-17T04:12:54-05:00'
describe
'111909' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGT' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
db6ae3820a42b99a0389794d76fc9720
650b1355754dc6a55ab75e63a7ee6d23141ca8af
describe
'78968' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGU' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
42fe99a56a5319b6accdeaa33944a687
d947fef1133b8c9262dafcf9aecd87b6dee77d4c
describe
'75734' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGV' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
ec79558b7831f3bb5e6b450467ae085a
6b056dec14a5e3e1f70cf0e5abcc8f66f1bf88f1
describe
'114389' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGW' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
88aea9044b6bb98a3805378f8c0bd0c3
a1800c011fd4fa5651a3d3e01d6c55521c273124
describe
'69278' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGX' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
3da55af3800f71f150e12350fd43baa0
78f7fb0edd2e79be0388c6e8e4de01a6a1b2230a
'2011-12-17T04:14:28-05:00'
describe
'72806' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGY' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
1195fa2501e3d688b39f40ee7113e930
eeadd163cca0d554f5306a08a559bb15b4e6c8fe
describe
'109531' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMGZ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
5d697ae704129137edc36e70b7e63c6b
d61a7f2f271aab6c2b7f9b33fcfb88839e5eff6a
describe
'112346' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHA' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
80f210d85c799344f8fdb3fac73547eb
9e5272170c11c06033909eb9337d440847fd1066
describe
'37133' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHB' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
c1a871e1e72874d7e18e296707966a4c
b267bc01a508c86c7f41c8e33fc18f1c5151a02a
describe
'75112' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHC' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
3ea3ddc8acc7cb3e286bbd43576df439
8d37f7e5a902f5719d26b49fb628047ab9246651
'2011-12-17T04:18:37-05:00'
describe
'108522' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHD' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
21b814e772d1eb4a6a53796c8ed3927c
2384c35c942c58243cf6f1b066c244dedfdd876e
'2011-12-17T04:19:22-05:00'
describe
'80832' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHE' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
0f6b372ccda0774266d83e8d988acb0c
981edf7d22ec576a5db1704ed69517adcf5eb88f
describe
'77625' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHF' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
491a56823c4db153c2eab4d141191cc6
e2c8a70687ccb18c265ecc835947f0f30f090a46
'2011-12-17T04:20:32-05:00'
describe
'106695' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHG' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
582a37c3c9c4045f0303a0d8914a4837
4e884dae23136661cc772ebedd4d77fba8db359a
describe
'104878' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHH' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
24c5930bc9b8f3c99d120895600994bb
bbf0c4a226bd4d45cbc4eaa7a44f2adae4c8d612
describe
'107495' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHI' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
3515ea8e5e3163ffe61b468dbf79a048
19baf153ec606f28e8e38b6be4e8fbb87080ed1d
describe
'109288' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHJ' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
96bc0bcdd6ab8ca858227f0d9f535d5e
b5aba1824d22c08cdb987a481d5c2e3b619612d4
describe
'80748' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHK' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
65f7ecd179d70f37242d7380a89b1f55
f088091f605a385e5ca961d893931981ba762aab
describe
'70764' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHL' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
6f2bc518ce431dbb9bf9ee6cab16dd14
3e25573b20ea1cea583d44892ad159814d69503f
'2011-12-17T04:27:24-05:00'
describe
'110335' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHM' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
f3106e34475f49c8795d91eaeb895f79
96b20da83f3335b3d94dd2530969b676e593a56c
describe
'105776' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHN' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
e67928c66fd56f6fcbddbc1ae73ebc27
876eb2f855e89ba3e8f7d59a8cabc4f5894abdc6
'2011-12-17T04:17:52-05:00'
describe
'92588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHO' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
f5115a6f14db6bc5614bd7a5d977bccb
a8f605d167c55be5ca7fe5a880694118c4184ade
describe
'74523' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHP' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
71dce98f50a639273f1bf90a9fa9496f
3c730792f613a0ab3a99b92bb8b725099092601e
describe
'115979' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHQ' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
557da6ca7c1e3fc66e9f75bf2bf29703
75c81eac14a4896c0dd66fcff63d7b1942877722
describe
'102077' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHR' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
55671689ff27dcdd96e9a9f8b292fc16
5a1dc066162a2d6ff8da7b4bbfe7b05b2555b885
describe
'107215' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHS' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
8a810bc7cd226d70903f33e8088fbabf
ae1c519724bfc16532c745edb83c807c502474cf
describe
'116398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHT' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
cdbfebf425e364e6aa0a187ac14f2531
325370fd8fc86e475a40c8c56607cac4ad7576b6
describe
'107939' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHU' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
4cb525b40fdc7b4c933beef8a10e5784
6482a4a942f0d43240529335c24c6289b2709793
describe
'104045' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHV' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
0da399641d6584ff9aba6253c9f685c0
72b75c9eb36e07f649f1dd94bdf01d622d890989
describe
'84820' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHW' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
521ecef35dd4aa55bb1ca6d595fa211c
00064e4f00b8bcb925f7de2c5d6030dd1fb27ee7
describe
'71541' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHX' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
98849759d1cbb08b2d7c10b9089c216b
bee2aace8137d92d3d9299391e2dc090966423a7
describe
'99774' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHY' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
2034a9c46046032975e0448627892d7e
7690a633c09b12a8658be96ddd14976bfa1f8695
describe
'107259' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMHZ' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
562af9e5e18c1135b502cb20941e663b
1c1e72ab5fb73b8855af95cadb4abcc653cce557
describe
'106071' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIA' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
424239524d1aa9e7b49ff55c8fa87fdf
7146171ee70dfbbb696429631b19fdc8be1eea48
describe
'112336' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIB' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
3068fc813a6f8ca9c6f988692da555ce
93da8136bec52442e2574600bf3f1e1d7d12014b
describe
'108550' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIC' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
cb4453a7dde701940e11da729f36f383
31ab78fbb1133193971350aaf389d16c95c844a1
describe
'160083' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMID' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
6eee6cf1a9f60cc032a124d986f3b30d
ffc77c5fae9d1c8cf11fec5ec18a230c77e9c6a3
'2011-12-17T04:25:20-05:00'
describe
'99899' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIE' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
9d1c901279d7b86ab8700bb1b5e7ca1f
d69f79cd049a101f2bd0f49e63e82b958b7b3c84
describe
'36527' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIF' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
2eb1253f5a245e64774ddf583c4bdd60
526b4cf60025c75e8cdf221b3876ff20c7332ae9
describe
'72636' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIG' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
2de9dd44de1551d1b7e75c95a12a34fa
98415016689de5278114d2381237ef11003df024
describe
'110391' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIH' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
7d01530ccf3644b39e0fa61670b3e15b
b9b0050006ceaa56cc5f9899f510a80c0603128c
describe
'102662' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMII' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
76d492b104cae64ca9d9b3316d4f06e0
66dc9626e8efebfd1bc511003b15abf941e741bd
describe
'105819' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIJ' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
49954f47fbb3492a56408225cae33143
fa455ed592b369e84b6f432f6b135c75b6474fd1
'2011-12-17T04:10:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIK' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
4f500cd80bc5bffdaea9cadfb0f2f06b
f51efe8701d650e931ada36af4af55356ac122ca
describe
'110579' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIL' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
194125072ad4d733cc9fd8a50d59f8eb
9e0b5f52a115fcc90672e02f6fbdec330d094b7f
describe
'96398' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIM' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
61d582485fa9bd6797083f22df77ae7b
8fa42ccef78c73186f47ae8cd29b6166b8bd68d4
describe
'70457' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIN' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
a683f2d4e913850b134398a6426dac9c
25eed47147072ea9c349c0cb92c897d6d400bd7f
'2011-12-17T04:28:30-05:00'
describe
'112844' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIO' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
2c66f96f12d1e905256a62dd16abd871
34b52967a42518ef31ba9357db4cfd640af1f29a
describe
'103346' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIP' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
89365235bf57c41acacd7514f138c03c
6d26d90bbdf78f14c89d95c6ddc794b84c8d7031
describe
'111632' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIQ' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
b9a70359becb68fa1766480a99382224
d5d0cf2d732ade20877fed3bfa596a89face4aed
describe
'101234' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIR' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
90100b0949f73b20cd4177217860727c
104bb4775532eaa6c97030c5f96c7c375ff3f50e
describe
'75154' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIS' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
0062b77e7ab5ab714b9324103ca9d4d8
5dde0a32cd0b9ec6976711c7bdb578cf9d4ddb3d
describe
'76935' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIT' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
410d844a2db7af6e8889f8d915d372ed
f4085d014c6521455f40e69011b322949316ddaf
describe
'113354' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIU' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
f67cf8b1b198f5d59ab650e19c58396b
94dce9a5cb667204cfe94e551cf9b2cee1d78a8b
describe
'108994' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIV' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
972733874c5487ec70e7d8d0dd8ef0e7
2309ef060fd326725ebbb518b7cd6cdafb22068c
describe
'112585' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIW' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
f0a85706a55f0a961925cdf32cdbf217
79d8e50fbad0d39209dcb25dbd3fa0d3d5c14d11
describe
'108547' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIX' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
66f2b16c42cc1e3b883827928d2ac6c1
7969990254b35b871c32e3527e22efd125313e68
'2011-12-17T04:16:45-05:00'
describe
'105677' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIY' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
df0e2a7a87e04b2df17c57187e32859d
7253dffc1fb38ad261fa4cfa81b8ae17ad161efe
describe
'111228' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMIZ' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
14a101159ef77b63797fad86bb187273
3b7927bb26e77a396a7e85561308d7646e4404c1
describe
'118042' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJA' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
2d1bd2821c5bf36912208ec5185fcc11
79cc433a8e7c4b17238e7870b8ce8af6bf4373ed
'2011-12-17T04:14:44-05:00'
describe
'109682' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJB' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
3867fdc15984144c94cc4dd9f5fea1e6
750158d630c7adfdff13f98a79846a635b13d7ed
describe
'102724' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJC' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
4bc6fe6343262cdbb7611f9f2126cff8
1ac1bec9e6816a26061ba22213a699bf63f92cfb
describe
'93728' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJD' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
a73c75a1c5249904ee99a25a6c63e84a
7fcfae1229510d996246f454c31c59e3ffd50105
'2011-12-17T04:14:52-05:00'
describe
'89417' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJE' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
2f6c5dda966afe15602a40c690377f8b
2402678398980c9b1f3382c5130332ff7f38838b
describe
'110768' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJF' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
b3916dcbccd890b04208187f063ae8b3
e03f49685c745c9ad68d31ee8e4414de883cfa66
describe
'109359' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJG' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
7877247c8bbdb16a0a34f399a34c1744
1bceef8a0829ccb628fe54132a280ddffa132784
describe
'110851' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJH' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
60853d651c8a32fe1e84484d27827235
ca730a83f2f68ad7e235304b9977f8044ccfe7b1
describe
'110092' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJI' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
a710bfa8d838f1e9abcc54e2b392a11d
1e1162ceebb17f31002205387303e84b0ea362a1
describe
'110089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJJ' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
283d293abf3c36a0f9da5ed362911e7c
d12e2a2bc50243823dd3fc84976f55f319ad0052
describe
'112099' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJK' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
573724f05a9446135b35b2a206be61b0
cc12cf928f2ffaa5172fdc5e7443b7f381e5b2dd
'2011-12-17T04:17:13-05:00'
describe
'100604' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJL' 'sip-files00321.jpg'
96936e240794e3fdbb1b4ac1275110dd
54ed4a3b25d1d99a200fe864875d52f21ac3fae6
describe
'105955' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJM' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
f6c9effc78fbf1c3187ea1a787f8de0c
57d433a32f9aa4c56a89bd5b1e933432b0a54999
describe
'36665' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJN' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
d181e8bce2008a943c137ec4282e1f3e
0da0658793a62ea970268d5773fb77bc78c91cf4
describe
'17971' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJO' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
302680c06737c451a4d43c8e56679bf6
478ea6b8461c7d15041df37139d80770fefc6182
describe
'171479' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJP' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
97113753a8eb60393746639ca26d1156
80e6f0f9d539bbcb4ae0cd8d36832bf6592e386b
'2011-12-17T04:21:59-05:00'
describe
'109089' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJQ' 'sip-files00326.jpg'
01e2ee1b39ebf7e9d144f886fc95e326
29bb27045f8ad6c28410d959b6366c92383f7655
'2011-12-17T04:22:15-05:00'
describe
'160029' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJR' 'sip-files00327.jpg'
be1dfda77b2d746f7f5e960eb19bf839
665c8a5e4815be6d7d1e969e2541a282b8d2b029
'2011-12-17T04:21:46-05:00'
describe
'143488' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJS' 'sip-files00328.jpg'
ead289002b93124825d1ab4df2c8ea0e
a2ede52ffb43744d33af30cdbaa64816ea438bb0
describe
'168113' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJT' 'sip-files00329.jpg'
fc11ecb1b9af1f1b01078d9531b8f377
30cd88f56199a7e0401eedb6e742c2bb2770762e
describe
'159529' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJU' 'sip-files00330.jpg'
4d3949e78aacf9652c6d1bb1dbc156b9
f3aabcd6095d1685ae6a5cbd17b8928c96f53c19
describe
'173603' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJV' 'sip-files00331.jpg'
d2814cf43e88d53847d7e5e8375947cc
028b5976d50cdc64273aa63b032a1d0f15ff0358
describe
'161418' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJW' 'sip-files00332.jpg'
0c1a50bf4af86b678d01ffb7798777d4
f76a1216351ca20763b6751850ecc37722c12309
describe
'160720' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJX' 'sip-files00333.jpg'
ca66516ebc6f429109ba721a02ddc8eb
a78b0e76fb3a64e2aa375e315cf0084b02195066
describe
'166237' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJY' 'sip-files00334.jpg'
a179cd6adef5930ba5ff15547cbd0982
809b85a70876b59e80de9914ed3ec2d72a6ce533
describe
'164688' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMJZ' 'sip-files00335.jpg'
7eef9b1d67e477ca87a2700c7afc306d
d16920cb2fcb24a9e750060156a0342b09ce6324
describe
'153887' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKA' 'sip-files00336.jpg'
78d82b3e436cfd72db4614c8a596ad38
446224da4531fef07a615c4cd907db8e77e2e6e3
describe
'158038' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKB' 'sip-files00337.jpg'
08ee2865043b30e8921eb50284502b61
dc95d3a000f42a767fc378ddfa9c8aa529395666
describe
'177425' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKC' 'sip-files00338.jpg'
4f117715fc2d97edf33f8b686d0e780e
ee1951a44f25a1d943dd35289a5c8121f59f38bd
describe
'173466' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKD' 'sip-files00339.jpg'
109b149bf2942d64dab9171f2f139efb
b63263ed015c1d7d853f455739e77538765a2593
describe
'163482' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKE' 'sip-files00340.jpg'
f75cf13b11c7d882ddbc157e7f005029
4fc16225bddf12ee8cceef478dd3687e5b343789
describe
'166583' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKF' 'sip-files00341.jpg'
c32b4d58236ddc50468f2e0a88272204
5bac6c3e990f6ec1cca02a3d0efbf4db4799d00c
describe
'162517' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKG' 'sip-files00342.jpg'
e32bca9db6e32974e4e6e979ac3eafd5
edac10c97b01aa899ca7cce8211af934743906d4
'2011-12-17T04:22:37-05:00'
describe
'154385' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKH' 'sip-files00343.jpg'
05d0ed11f56e50e76c5160b4a64edb5a
97ac2c6ecd748750aed08c158677d822e36a7501
describe
'156171' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKI' 'sip-files00344.jpg'
b8c0ab9bfe71b27b95d6d7d3ae5c0dd6
707ece38a294a8ab5299246c2d579192b2ea554a
describe
'159763' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKJ' 'sip-files00345.jpg'
b0af7bb8dc5298d45d7e0fac8881f048
e2ae235106a142b210ac6b46d45e95b73438fced
'2011-12-17T04:17:05-05:00'
describe
'158934' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKK' 'sip-files00346.jpg'
00020e08d5fc8d16e32d77c2a0f318c0
ef3fab042f8da08245b210f67619166d336513e8
describe
'159496' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKL' 'sip-files00347.jpg'
5b72572bda221ca206f096a30d165f71
c02eec63d166580ed5bc19bf66fcb7989cd78e9d
describe
'157803' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKM' 'sip-files00348.jpg'
ed7e42d6971bb81784b2b7eb8dab4b3d
cef6d3197b7be6a5ba2ab5c7bb58cc06075c82ea
'2011-12-17T04:21:19-05:00'
describe
'160746' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKN' 'sip-files00349.jpg'
af60c40f12533aea5e179442a5a5bb4c
a0a6c08e69017d7ebeba0ec8aadd163f2ef69e4a
describe
'157225' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKO' 'sip-files00350.jpg'
eab2c12da6664deb6792335bd94c6627
fe7fa3e16acd3388911f97709772d71f664253bd
describe
'167308' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKP' 'sip-files00351.jpg'
aa41aa8b41b828ab0f4e57dadbaacd7b
8fe388a7598452ec72ddd6c5ddbbcaa8f6e62739
describe
'150861' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKQ' 'sip-files00352.jpg'
d5541075b6b2d5156e399b051e34b755
b9de3792a4616aae7e155bf631421f538c4e8884
'2011-12-17T04:25:15-05:00'
describe
'162343' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKR' 'sip-files00353.jpg'
a81c7c6c231c0ac5720f85f6731b6969
577ad13b9b40e8cdcbb206991976a42124e8ccb2
describe
'142522' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKS' 'sip-files00354.jpg'
c86745298f9fba68ee7c9efea350f6d8
1755bb6fbb97157204c2225569be9f91fbadeea9
'2011-12-17T04:14:22-05:00'
describe
'112347' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKT' 'sip-files00355.jpg'
59306400b67ac0a98204408d81fe14e2
d77cccc75b2d6648621dbe96497538ccf7885f3b
describe
'104937' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKU' 'sip-files00358.jpg'
dc0e39ad8db9d06663b375455d9cd6c0
7aa7e46259fd576f3c465b554a9ed39dcc9e5309
describe
'105747' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKV' 'sip-files00359.jpg'
617d1b968a57a985a193fb8d7833cb7b
48917f747538628be9eae4dab9f81707f4f98551
'2011-12-17T04:18:14-05:00'
describe
'47529' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKW' 'sip-files00360.jpg'
f921d33a927096efc99be25a59cff068
f614c4129a06d45eca46cb82d3e685860890cf40
describe
'10771' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKX' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
10913aef28213a206fa0797452caa3ea
b31b7f5120ae71eb740c04b5413cf1a4e3488223
describe
'46086' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKY' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
ee9af6a8a25ed05a609019247d15928c
93db52d0c8bdb6651088f11c05b3c3e07d06a26b
describe
'18836' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMKZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
cd0e6c0683b6997ba0eb93eb007d0fd7
702125520ccd55a71a4c2cfec4858340d116174a
describe
'4588' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
a34b7863288c59cbc6afdcf8d568a98c
f1f170884a083c9b5212e985f4febfe512e4f0d8
describe
'3622' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLB' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
cc9589834983ff91166df73073114bfa
ee107314904d931c12497493d61a823c5d45ff05
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLC' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
4cc4e27a0ba6812de5d18cc84f98762a
22f78ec5a1e2931edde4e32263e77f83f4b7b13d
describe
'40739' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLD' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e436a746879a3f89e1c0d69fb5e8ae6c
d1786b39722294f5b0ae952816b57bf79ea047dc
'2011-12-17T04:20:00-05:00'
describe
'10426' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLE' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
2a2b598ee77b5c6ec59679d5d9815d1e
66d7e75cf9a19cdd30a95f7fb29bb457f18b39fc
'2011-12-17T04:13:17-05:00'
describe
'8638' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLF' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
06e029b19c43637c94a67c6e15e56a80
34311e5871c46140f9239ad553278defcef47415
describe
'2984' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLG' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
54f25533687715fd62882942bfc0e2dd
1fec711d3e25abdd3ba6d1ec31639c214953c475
describe
'3922' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
73b9edc5402a790238c8a8d08c21b94c
64731abdcf68b54c48da721f60ce91bafafb8b52
describe
'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLI' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
fdf32fd04e17e7a456cb554265130ddb
1e37a4d6fb89298878d7a9c134a5a203039745fd
describe
'23318' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b5388c4ce4c4053ba5b68ac7c3753d59
b2dd0063652886f208de332dc3dc48cc7d1c6883
describe
'5879' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
7d9330dcb1b658f17579b17db3345a61
a204fc81efc6720c4746ceab1afed1985005dccf
describe
'31254' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8c1f432efd10b9f1f3f69c483033893a
0deae7e430502c9ef5729e545a5450a53333bbca
describe
'8372' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
ad2306ebc9ac9ced18566f70c8879ca1
f583766f62dbc8967cc48da441874bf64f74e1c9
describe
'35487' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e13a4e0b9eddf64e2c49d60a8f87e399
533379aeade9e5e395d470c09ea4f40876eb0bbb
'2011-12-17T04:18:27-05:00'
describe
'8811' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
10a5f8665a90a4b00c361ecb24db2c54
813e6f917cf577d9c27fe10542ab0f6223e2b49d
'2011-12-17T04:21:28-05:00'
describe
'14102' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f2a9506c0f0fc14592c144c05dd9d3f4
e522fba229e9cc1ff2102d7e97be21631e9120a0
describe
'3916' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
88fa398178567bc3644227d32b078553
6d401dd0538ebbba7040d5f97d78307ba8d0d178
'2011-12-17T04:21:44-05:00'
describe
'17730' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
fb8f8dbad86854af9172fa8a04fcf7cb
a4d3c19a517a8db6beebc79be1d1d746a0afcc41
describe
'4582' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
5bcb85aa86349211ad0305702bed7c7f
0f4a3cf64f8cfb58bcbf23120a1d83ce7441ad14
describe
'26461' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
85bf7ec51b756a1c5c91d2e656104bac
7c6d0c960722de12814b94e633a6315d428f5aa4
describe
'6644' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
37ae07892d1efa9f0700834c20807c1c
aad41caf66a64c0341988ad95eb37fed477532b9
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7053dcc9e79ed151b42627ad24fa0ae3
587be20c9f49d4074327a38acbaac7699797a0e1
describe
'7005' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
fe56781a9626c129822791419aa3fd1d
be03e9239212c0aa41b1879896feefe9e1f1f9fb
describe
'37219' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
e54310a9c515538b740c991f3fdc5250
b23dfe22a126c85d61fb74127b15ebe0c7b26101
describe
'9130' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
db45d16df33268c525f6da71a18e9656
5e29a48a11a1f5573fd7dcc761f2f95fc6abe9fc
describe
'36183' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMLZ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b1e74706f04c3239876992b3d0051538
eff58e70b079a911ca4675f56080b8aaf17245a4
'2011-12-17T04:09:59-05:00'
describe
'10133' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
499fcf20f75ce19f29167bddbd66c48d
3a7f8a046783083b9d53febd40cf0b0724be80da
describe
'36393' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
7616beb2aaedad02bd0d3b054035840c
b49b65564340883a10440a57f3fb82c3f6666f7b
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
8a02bd731758b6798cc8c5dd913997bd
633f24b4a3d42d796c2f489bb67534a93d8e08ee
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
bfd5023aceff38158e5145838f398e1a
d1e8c511b812a048abbfbbcc653f49204ecfcfe2
describe
'6883' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMME' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
525c1f0bcf93662ab1ba158cb7e60017
a453e238ae118af7b640ef636ee4bdb1ea917ee8
describe
'25725' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
79f66490ce17a125a5c40edd18a5d04e
3daa5114bad1ad22bb10c9c5e2ef55198c74c39f
'2011-12-17T04:11:17-05:00'
describe
'6323' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
657d9890905f3fec537cb07dc9aaa498
342aab7081f41b27ff2425cf1627d2d9a5b235cb
'2011-12-17T04:15:24-05:00'
describe
'37972' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d449d095cc62531d079081ba71ea7d03
3e9f03b6b743762b55358496596a43dba80e2467
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
675c7b20f2a1795df059466d575b0b75
473089d4a2b0564858c41fec867e28be336506f7
describe
'37060' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
839df4b10afdaf922c7ce6f45c00defc
a8d43cdf7ab4f6ea0574e8b50f6c7d70aa2b8a1f
describe
'9019' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
5a4a0a5bb4064a5760e7a64816b185e9
c57c7a759fbe7074e2fc16acf7cf9026d9b9ca40
'2011-12-17T04:20:09-05:00'
describe
'37110' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMML' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
401b6bff0491f9840fa19cdf32b00b62
61d1c93c91896fedcedae2ebe8c21372db94de52
'2011-12-17T04:15:33-05:00'
describe
'9232' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
7d443802f56f7da34d5b0d0a597990e8
5db75909f4d5163f7841fcbb97e5076c539ba224
describe
'14566' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
adc7ba3e77f445bb3caad8f81b1f7ddd
331be6b14140741919d1f12432c1ff772e45e9c5
describe
'3842' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
15b748bddacfb8b38dab8c235a368243
35bb499639e505c50b81ee0eb66254d16e0dce5c
describe
'24991' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
328e64fa2b603d53126b67481312a330
c6de9070d00fcf76666d1909f2783d2f703ad397
describe
'6379' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
7fdfaeb9d9938427547402b3bd2a0619
3f260fa2d97ced2cf2eb3c0a40d43cacb370140c
'2011-12-17T04:18:09-05:00'
describe
'36656' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
10b9b95ae0ffcdbe71940c5754e83d49
fdc6590a7f789ffb4b6a20b49dee6096cd7f4050
describe
'8843' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
7dcb0ed5e3164c0ce19281b308a74a1a
362012b435ab47a7a0b57d7665218618c4c91185
describe
'33894' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
142962df7013ce462157c061de333c2f
bed120cdaec212e3eefe8ac57b2c57b4981666fc
'2011-12-17T04:25:06-05:00'
describe
'8645' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0724ad3915522eb9032fe8445bff45fd
b39f58d51768b982e438cc1a3d450637d5bca1a6
describe
'31640' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4e7d17660b9cb2aa56d11156dd5b04c4
83ea625370f1b67b3b8c23d9702a890c17c83e71
'2011-12-17T04:28:04-05:00'
describe
'8545' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
e99925db8f28fc86c4adb0232d598394
c3e91eaa40ff38c9588adfbaa32d28f20eb49a12
'2011-12-17T04:19:41-05:00'
describe
'32555' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
05aa45362d7e319d413df27ea750403b
d25bfe72b851f2bd572347c4af9209870642d858
'2011-12-17T04:20:31-05:00'
describe
'8501' 'info:fdaE20080602_AAAAFIfileF20080603_AACMMY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
a64174335a5137c56a2f759b2c2740d8
184eb94828e593248d33e12b43c4534a51765997
describe
'