Citation
Happy hours in the little peoples' world

Material Information

Title:
Happy hours in the little peoples' world new and old jingles and stories : prettily pictured
Creator:
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
J.A. & R.A. Reid (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Providence R.I
Publisher:
J.A. & R.A. Reid
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 35 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Rhode Island -- Providence
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations by Kate Greenaway and others.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in red.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026621573 ( ALEPH )
ALG3652 ( NOTIS )
191100929 ( OCLC )

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OUR DARLING BOY.





IN THE |



afer and + Old + dingles end Storicss:

--PRETH LY « Picture.



. | Be alee Re oy A R. REID. « PUBLISHERS.

THE REID JUVENILE PRES



Sa





RONDEAU.

Ou, happy hours, when all the day

Is spent in jollity and play,
With hoops or ball, with bow or gun,
To bat or shoot, or swiftly run,

And find each moment bright and gay

Oh, what care we if skies be gray,
When in the house we can array
Our dolls or with the cat have 1un?

Oh, happy hours |

With us December, March or May, .
Are all as one long holiday ;
And when all other sports are done,
Welcome, dear book, that once begun
Will make us glad with what you say,
Oh, Happy “Hours!”



Copyricut, By J. A. & R. A. Ruin.
1891.



























~

BSS
Ns



LITTLE FRITZ. — :






at

ae al

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

Wet the Sea-Shore,

Have you all been to the sea-shore?

Berty and Alice are stopping at the hotel on the hill. It is chil-
dren’s hour cn the shore, and the nurses have settled themselves
comfortably in the shade of the pavilion with the babies in their
carriages, to watch the bathers. Do you know what the bathers mean?
At this hour the nurses and children undress and put on some pretty
flannel robes. They then run out of the bathing houses into the
water. The waves come in and roll over them, and they dance and
splash, and scream and laugh, and plunge into the water. Berty and
Alice have had their dip this morning, and have become good friends
in the surf. They have now started to take ‘‘ Dolly” riding. Berty
has brought his hoop along to roll. It is such fun to see your foot-
prints in the sand, to make houses, and pick the pretty shells, the
mosses and wild flowers that grows close to the rocks. You would
never tire of it, know. Even children who quarrel over playthings,
become friends in tossing up, digging and building in the sand. Per-
haps it is because the next day all they have done the day before is
washed away by the great changing waves of the sea, Thus they
have all the pleasure over again, ever and ever new.















































































































































































































































































































KA AN















































































Lazy Sack.

Jack and Charlie are neighbor boys. Jack has always been a
lazy boy. He gets up late in the morning, and likes to play until the
last moment after the bell rings. Charlie is up early in the morning,
cuts wood, and helps to get breakfast. Yet he is always the first in
his place; studies his lessons in the evening, and knows what to do
for his teacher. Now he is preparing his arithmetic, while poor,
lazy Jack is trying to copy from him. It will not do him any good,
as when the teacher comes and qvestions Jack, she will find out
that te does not knov what he has written, and so he will be in a
state than if he had not copied from Charlie. It is a sad
\% boys or girls to deceive themselves, and then try to de-
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AT THE SEA-SHORE,
Phe Noung Lrtiot.

How happy these dear little childrenare. This brother is an artist.
Do you know what it means to be an artist? It is to be able to creatc
on paper or canvas a picture of what we see or imagine, so that others
may see it as we do. You see here he has drawn a figure of a man,
and he is now busy with his brush, making another picture. See how
pleased he is, and how quietly his little brother and sister wait to see it.
He may yet be a great painter, and paint a large picture that will be
known all over the world.





































































































































































































































Tue Younc Artist.







HOURS IN

























THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.







he!
ws

Dogo. |

-HERE we see man’s loving and faithful companion, the dog.
Many of you have had a pet dog and know how fond he was of his
master; how he watched at the door for your return from school ;
how he pranced and danced and almost laughed when he knew you
were going to take him for a walk; and how, when you were sick
and the doctor came and mamma looked sadly, and spoke softly and
low, your dog lay at the bed-room door and waited till he could creep
in and lick your hand as it hung over the bedside, then crouched
low upon the floor, only too pleased to be allowed to be near his
master. When you were getting better what delight he showed as
you sat up in the easy chair! And on the first day you were able to
walk what capers of jcy!

The tall dog in the picture is a stag-hound, a very noble and
wise animal. that comes from Scotland. Sir Walter Scott, a great
man whose stories you will like when you are a little older, owned
one of these dogs, which he called Maida. Wherever he went the
dog went with him, and they loved each other dearly. When Maida
died of old age, Sir Walter wept bitterly, and said he had lost one of
his best friends. He buried her in his garden and raised a tomb-
stone to her memory. Then the great poet, Lord Byron, had a well-
. loved dog and wrote a beautiful poem in memory of him.

The centre dog in the picture is a fox hound; the squires and
lords of England keep great kennels of these hounds, and in



autumn when the poor hungry fox comes out to hunt for food, and
perhaps to rob the farmer's hen roosts, the master of the hounds gets
up a fox hunt and the men, and often ladies, too, ride fine horses,
galloping over the fields, jumping fences, till the hounds with their
fine noses scent the fox and run him to earth—that js, to his hole
in the ground,— when the huntsman cuts off the fox’s tail, or brush,
as they call it, and presents it to the best and fastest rider, the horse-
man who is first in at the death. Then the dogs tear the fox to
pieces. This is very cruel sport; don’t you think so, too?

The odd, short legged, very long dog at the left of the picture, is
also an English dog, called a beagle, and is used for hunting rabbits.
All this hunting seems very cruel, but perhaps these little creatures
who eat the corn and cabbages would get too plentiful and trouble-
some were they not destroyed in some way.

The two other dogs are a pointer and a setter, both dogs used
for hunting birds.

The pointer, when he scents a bird, stands very stifHy in one
spot, with his nose pointed at the game, and his tail stands out rigidly.
When the hunter fires, and the bird falls, the dog runs and brings
it to him in his mouth. Sometimes it is difficult to keep the dog
from tearing or eating the bird, so the trainer teaches him by making
him bring to him a worsted ball all filled with needles which he has
to hold very tenderly, or they will prick his mouth. he

‘































Coaching.

WE must get out of the way, for this coach is coming right at us, and
these lively horses will trample on us. It looks as if the smart young man
who is driving four-in-hand, were paying more attention to the handsome
girl beside-him than to his horses. He must look out, or they will surely
run over some one. How the glasses of the lanterns shine! See, the man
on horseback turns to look at the fine team, or at the ladies.

It may be he is looking to see if the horses run over us. We are all in
the Park; and surely we all wish we were in this coach, too, to go rattling
along past all the nags and cart horses; to have the dogs bark at our horses’

’ heels; and at last, as the sun goes down, to reach home and find a splendid
dinner awaiting us. We should sleep soundly after that, and awake the next
metning so bright and fresh that our lessons would seem as good as play,
f and our teachers the kindest of friends. Well, let us make believe we are
> po ~ the coach, and see what will happen.









M&ho is She.

Is not this a beautiful picture of a dear little girl,
with her smiling face and lovely flowers? I wonder
of what it makes you think? It brings to my mind
a poem I used to know when I wasachild. Perhaps
you will learn it and will remember the lesson it
teaches. I will write it for you:

There is a little maiden—
Who is she! Do you know?
Who always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird’s ;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lightsome words.

The loveliest of blossoms
Spring where her light foot treads,
And most delicious odors
‘She all around her sheds.

Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun;

And she is sought and cherished
And loved by every one:

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low,

Who is this little maiden? 3
Does anybody know?

You surely must have met her—
‘You certainly can guess ;

What! Must I introduce her?
Her name is Cheerfulness.






2
i “ed ARLY to bed and early to rise, :
: Makes little men healthy, wealthy, i
F and wise. i

SEAEHPRUAUAURULENENMOEURUTTUNERUAUTEAOREORE DER







HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



cause was right. The best of all is that in the end they won the fight, and
we are now the United States, instead of English Colonies. We are all
glad of it. are we not? No matter how much we may love dear old Eng-
land, we are glad to have the Fourth of July come; and it would not have
been a great day at all if it had not been for brave men such as this in the

picture.



Turse Minute Men are watching for some of the king’s soldiers. They
want to fight them, or rather they are ready to defend themselves against the
king’s men. Are they not a determined, strong, honest lot of men? Per-
haps this is just before the battle of Bunker Hill. See, one of the men is
talking about the enemy while motioning with his hand towards them.

They were noble men; and when you are older you will read more
about them, and think them some of the bravest men that ever lived.

Do you notice that the one nearest you, resting on his gun, has his coat
off? Ze will ficht, when the time comes, you may be sure. See how his
eyebrows are drawn together, and how determinedly his mouth is closed.
There is his powder-horn slung at his side. It will not be so full of powder
an hour after this, but the whole sky will be full of smoke, and the air strong
with the smell of the powder. The men’s faces will be black with smoke,
and some of them bloody from bullet wounds or sword cuts. But they will
conquer and sing Yankee Doodle!















Peruars the first thing you will notice in this picture is the man’s
three-cornered hat, and then his strange coat, and that he is pouring some-
thing out ofa horn. You may have seen somebody like him among the
‘* Continentals ”'on Parade Day, but none of the ‘ Continentals ” you have
seen looked so earnest, surely. What is he pouring out of the horn? It is
gunpowder. The gun in his hand is called a flint-lock. If you look
sharply right there by the lower side of the small end of the powder-horn,
you will see the flint, which is a kind of very hard stone of a brownish
color, cut nearly square and rather thin. Then right under the end of the
powder-horn on the further side of the gun, you may see a curved piece of
iron. That is the cover to what is called the pan. The man fills the pan
with powder and puts down the cover. Then he pulls the trigger, and
the flint goes down with a snap and makes a spark by striking the cover of
the pan. The spark lights the powder, and dang! goes the gun.

But what man zs this? Over a hundred years ago, when your Papa’s
great-grandfather sang ‘‘ God Save the King,” instead of ** Yankee Doo-
dle,” the people did not like the king. They would have loved him if he
had been good to them. But he made it very hard for them, so they said
they would not have him for a king any more, unless he behaved himself,
and that they would make laws for themselves. The king was very angry,
of course, and sent lots of soldiers over the ocean with guns and cannon,
and swords and drums, and bright uniforms. And he said he would kill
all those who would not obey him. Then the people of this country
became soldiers, too, and about twelve thousand of them in Massachusetts
promised to go wherever they were needed at a minute’s warning ; so they
.were called AZimute Men. This man before you is one of them. They
were so earnest in those days that deacons of churches, and even clergy-



men, became captains of companies and fought bravelw. because their



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.













































EEA

7 yy







2 Sudden Shower

PretTTy Miss Pheebe went
to market to get vegetables for
the cook. She put on her Gains-
borough hat, because. to tell the
truth, it made her quite bewitch-
ing. And then, her golden hair
was so beautiful under its broad,
black brim! It looked a little like
a shower before she started. but
she felt certain it would clear up,
so she took her parasol and not
her umbrella, because — though
she would not tell you so — her
parasol looked much prettier with
her big hat and nice dress than
the blue gingham umbrella, which
was the only one which had
not Deen borrowed by the neigh-
bors. She got to market safely
and about half way back, that is,
as far as the Widow Greene’s
door, when a few big drops came
pattering down. She looked up
(and oh how prettily she looked
up!) and sure enough there
was a big black cloud as full of
rain as a meadow is of grass.
She did not hurry. No, nice
young women who wear Gains-
borough hats mzs¢ not hurry.
The hats come off if you hurry
much. You must be dignified if
you wear a Gainborough hat!
She calmly set the basket down
and slowly opened the parasol.
Perhaps she knew what a charm-
ing picture she made, and per-
haps there was an artist in the
next house whom she knew
wished to make a picture of her ,
looking up just that way. At
any rate, the artist who painted
the picture from which this was
engraved, has been good to us
by showing us Pheebe in just the
attitude we likebest. Weshould
be glad that the shower came
suddenly, and that Phoebe wore
her Gainsborough hat.













Care Qe
he Christmas mong,
She is always doing something to make the

She

likes few things as well as to take her guitar and play
some pretty tune for them to sing. Each night before

Ir is Christmas time. Mistletoe and holly has
been gathered and put in the ginger jar by the lounge,
and now Mamma has taken her guitar and is playing
an accompaniment to the Christmas song little Mollie
and Edna are singing so well. Mamma is humming the
tune also. They are very good and sweet little girls, who
love music as well as ball and dolls, and who love
Mamma best of all.

Mamma is one of the very best Mammas that ever

lived.
whole day useful and pleasant to the children.

they go to bed they sing something. Then they
crawl into Papa’s lap and listen to a short story.
After that they fall right to sleep loving everybody.
That is a very pleasant way to live. How much bet
ter it is than to be scolded and sent to bed crying.





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Au! “Away we Go.”

~The Loboggan Slide.

Ah, Away we go.
Bat O, The Return is Slow.

Many boys and girls have been to Canada and seen the great tobog-
gan slides, down which men and women on a kind of sled shoot like light-
ning. Every one seems to enjoy it greatly, but perhaps the children have
most pleasure when mother or aunty wraps them in their warm suits made
of heavy blankets. They send little Chris out into the crisp air of the
December day, telling him to take good care of sister Flossie while tobog-
ganing. The toboggan, which was first used in Canada, is quite unlike the
sleds your papa and big brothers went coasting on when they were boys.
It has no runners, as you see in the pictures, but is made of thin, hard wood,
broad and flat, with a curled-up end. It is strongly braced by short ribs of
wood. The great fun is, after the snow thaws in the day and freezes hard
at night, to take the toboggan to the top of a high hill, and then, when
Flossie is seated in front with ter feet tightly braced against the rod, and
Chris sitting sideways behind her with one foot out to steer with, to givea
push, and then go flying through the air down the hill as swiftly as an ava-
lanche descends a mountain side.

Flossie holds her breath and is almost afraid, but her eyes dance and
sparkle, and the cold wind reddens her cheeks. She can trust brother Chris i
and they reach the end of the hill in safety. But all pleasure has a corre.
sponding pain, and in the companion picture you can see Flossie and Chris
trudging slowly up the slippery hill dragging their toboggan behind them.
But oh, the return zs slow, and one wonders if the fun is worth the trouble.
Let us hope they will not stay out so late that the muffins for tea will be
cold.

JEANNETTE had been a good little girl for a whole week, and mamma had
told her if she would be good for so long she would take her with dear papa
in a nice boat and go up the beautiful river to watch papa fish. Now Jean-
nette liked nothing better;*so one bright summer morning nurse put on
her pretty white dress and pink sash, and tied a pink ribbon jn her brown
hair, and they started, that is, after mamma had put ona dress almost too
nice to go fishing in, and papa had got out his fish lines an pole. They
did not row far, but it seemed a long way to Jeannette, and oh, how beauti-
ful the green trees were, and how they bent down to look at themselves in
the shining water! The swallows skimmed over the surface, and the dragon
flies went by the boat like little necdles of green and blue fire. Jean-
nette saw them all; and she saw beautiful white water lilies, too, which
smelled deliciously. How happy she was when papa caught a fish and let
her put the dear little thing in a tub which they had brought. About one
o’clock they had a lunch under the shady trees, and Jeannette knew she was
never so happy in her life before, she thought she would always be very
good indeed, if such pleasant fishing parties were to be had for it. She went
home rather tired, but she had the most beautiful dreams of long winding
rivers that were as blue as the sky and as clear as glass; and in them she
could see gold fish and silver fish, and bright red fish swimming about.
They were so gentle they would let her take them in her. hands, for they
knew she would not hurt them.

Papa and mamma, after Jeannette was asleep, smiled, and said to each
other, ‘what a dear well-behaved little girl our Jeannette is! We must
take her to the Zodlogical Gardens next week to see the lions and tigers and
the funny giraffes.” Then they went and kissed her while she slept.



Bur Ol “Tug Retcern ts Stow.





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.































FISHING FOR MINNOWS.







Getting Dressed.

SISTER says I am a big boy now, and
I ought to be able to dress myself, but oh,
dear! the buttons are so small they slip out
_ of my fingers, and the button-holes are so
‘tight I can’t do anything with them. I wish
mamma would put on big buttons and make
the button-holes ever so much larger. Then
it is so hard to tie a good bow around my
neck. I have learned to make a double
knot, but I always tie it too tight, so that
there are small loops and great long ends,
or else too loose so that it slips out in a little
while. It is ever so much easier, too, to
have sister comb my hair than to do it myself, and it all takes so long
when Iam hungry for my breakfast. But I suppose I must learn
sometime, and I might as well begin now. Sister tells me to begin
with one thing at a time and do that until I learn how, and then
do the next, so 1 combed my hair myself this morning. Don’t you
think it looks so?



Brownie Race,

Tus little boy has a beautiful home and a dear, good father
and mother.





Tittle Beosie.

Lirtie Bzssiz is
the delight of the
household. Mamma
cares for her, papa
hugs her, grandma
kisses her, grandpa
pets her and all love
her dearly. A real
little sunbeam she is,
shining all the day,
keeping their hearts
warm. In her high
chair she smiles all
the while she eats her
bread and milk.

Many are the happy
hours grandpa spends with her, listening to her childish prattle.

‘What makes your eyes so bright, to-day, my little girl?”
asked her mother. Slowly, as if thinking, Bessie answers, ‘‘ I dess
it’s ‘tause I haven’t had ’em in very long, mamma, dear.”

Aw a B)
@he Pet Plant.
SOME years ago Oscar’s parents came from the cold land of Nor-
way to seek their fortunes in a new country. Soon the father sickened



ASSESS

LitTLe BEssinz.

and everything to make him happy.
His uncle, who is very fond of Charlie,
for that is his name, and has no chil-
dren of his own, gave him on his birth-
day a pony and cart, with which he
is often taken to ride with his nurse.
Every wish is gratified, but still he
frowns and frets.

One morning he threw his china
plate down and broke it in pieces.
His mother brought a strong one from
the kitchen, on which to eat his break-
fast, and when he went to bed at
night she told him about some children
she knew who were sweet tempered
all day long, and who were never
cross or did naughty things. She said
she was afraid she could not call him her
own dear Charlie any more, and read
to him from a nice story book about
Frownie face:

Now Frownie-face is a wicked sprite,

Who loves to pout and fret,

Who says the summers are ‘* too hot,”

The winters are ‘‘ too wet.”




A Saitor SEwine.



He has toys almost without number, and nice clothes













































































































There’s not a thing that suits his mood,
He pines for something more,

And claps his hands when children fight,

And pout and slam the door.



FROWNIE FAce.

beautiful flowers, touched
her tired heart. ‘‘ God zs
‘Our Father,’” she said,
‘© and He will care for us,”
and new purposes came to
help her.

For his dear mother’s sake,
Oscar waters the pet plant
each day.

Ze Sailor Sewing.

Here is a sailor boy sewing, with his box of
thread by his side. His mother, when she made his
pinafores, did not think he would leave the snug
farm among the mountains to live on the sea, among
hills of water that are always moving. Now he has
to sew for himself, when he tears his trousers or
loses a button, or wants anything made.

Perhaps his mother is thinking about him now,
and wondering if he is safe; and it may be he is
thinking of her, and of how much better she would
sew this very thing he is at work upon. But he
loves the sea better than the land, and would not be
happy off it. Somebody’s boys must be sailors, be-
cause if there were none we could not have spices
and parrots, elephants and monkeys, nor French
dolls brought tous. Mamma could not have her tea
nor papa his coffee if some boys did not love the sea
and ships. But it is very lonesome and terrible
upon the ocean when it storms; and we should
honor the brave boys and men who dare cross the
great waves where there are no paths.

as + 5 ° ?

sion School.



and died, and the struggle with poverty
and want was hard for the mother.
Morning and evening, rainy or fair,
Oscar sold daily papers at the ferries
or along the streets, and his manly
ways brought him many a friend.

A. kind lady invited him to the Mis-
Regularly he went, and
sang the hymns with a clear, strong
voice. His little sister, of whom he
was very fond, often took the prizes
for good lessons.

_At Easter they were given a plant
with lovely blossoms. How bright,
Lena thought, this will make our home
down inthe narrow alley. Their hearts
were light and gay, echoing the joy-
ous music of Easter time, as they burst
into their mother’s dark bed-room,
where she lay so sad and wearied.
The joy of her children, the «* He is
Risen,” in the song they sang, and the

Fa



HAPPY HOURS IN THE

LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



The Birot Walk.

GoLpEN sunshine, lend thy glory,
West-wind, wave the trees above,
Lark and thrush, sing out your story

Teach my child your Maker’s love.

Baby, darling, look around thee,

See the cloudlets floating by,
See the pleasures which surround thee
_ In the sunny earth and sky.

Watch the swallows swiftly flying,
See the wild flowers brightly gay,
Hear the echo faintly dying,
As the lark pours forth his lay.

He who decked the earth with flowers
Keéps and guards my tender child

Safely through the summer hours,

_ And when storms are raging wild.



i

| |
| |
\











Fas

=





Le

A

‘Summer Song.



In the happy summer days,

_ When the barley bows its golden head,

The birds pour forth their gladsome lays,
And roses blossom white and red.

"Tis then from every shady nook
We hear the sound of life and glee, |
And flowers grow where e’er we look,
While welcome shadow gives each tree.

Sheltered by the thicket shade,
There we sit, we boys and girls,

A storm of summer snow is made
By roses falling on oir curls.

- The crickets chrip their roundelays
Amongst the grass at early morn.
How happy are the summer days
When gaily waves the golden corn.



THe SEAMSTRESS.

Lhe Seamatreos.

‘‘ Tris dress must be done, for it is Lillian’s graduating day to-
morrow,” said Fanny, so she sat down to hem the fleecy muslin.
‘©T wish I could have stayed in the class. I know I studied as hard
as the other girls did. It would be so nice to hear Dr. Marsh’s
encouraging words, as he gave us our diplomas.”

Fanny’s father had died suddenly, and left his family without
means. The mother was a brave woman, and so set about to keep
her home. Fanny at once said, ‘I shall help you, mother.” She
had quietly held to her purpose, but this evening, as the candle-light |
shone on her work, thoughts came to her of her school days, now at
an end, and also the joy of her companions, and she was sad. On
and on she stitched, and grew braver with the struggle.

‘It will not make things better to complain. I am so glad
mother can keep the old home, and it will be easier by and by.
Johnnie shall keep on with his school, and I’ll study what I can to
keep up with him. To be a seamstress is not the easiest thing.
Many girls do not make enough to be comfortable, Aunt Mary says,
and she has had much experience, and helped many times those in
need. But I'll do my very best. God will help. He never forsakes
us, mamma often says.”

The brave, patient girl toiled on, and did as she promised. In_
time she came to be very expert with her needle, and became an

intelligent, useful woman.





i
|

a
;
i




























Ring the bells—ring!
Hip, hurrah for the King!
The dunce fell into the pool, oh!
The dunce was going to school,



oh!
The groom and the cook,
, Tes Fished him out with a hook,
x" And he piped his eye like a fool,

oh!





Bs I was walking up the street,



The steeple bells were ringing 5
As I sat down at Mary’s feet,

The sweet, sweet birds were












Three tabbies took out their cats to tea,

As well-behaved tabbies as well could be:

Each sat in a chair that each preferred,

They mewed for their milk, and they sipped and
purred.

Now tell me this (as these cats you’ ve seen thesn}—

How many lives had these cats between them ?

_ singing.




As I walked far into the world,




I met a little Fairy;
She plucked this flower, and as it’s
sweet

I’ve brought it home for Mary.


























Little baby, if I threw

This fair blossom down to you,
Would you catch it as you stand,
Holding up each tiny hand,
Looking out of those gray eyes,
Where such deep, deep wonder lies.























te ese

ALBodweh. Dat










SNORT TO a

SER OO OO
OS Mo



; 2 al re




















The boat sails away, like a bird on the wing,
And the little boys dance on the sands in a ring,
The wind may fall, or the wind may rise,—

You are foolish to go; you will stay if you ’re wise.
FE ace ee were Oe eee
SEUSS Siac alcs Ss

pa

DN n Se
4 a s Pic Spee

Ze.

KO

OX LY
we LK

SSO por ee th








































Sr tin aes eee ot ee
roe 5 Hehe,
FS CPEPINPUM I Gr od


















t







lisa



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ture GRINNING PIG AND THE THIEVING DoGs.— WovuLD-BE THIEVES.



a

whe Grinning P

Joun CLEAVER, the butcher, had gone to dinner,
and thinking everybody honest, had left a fine pig’s
head on his meat block. But Jock and Sly, two dogs
of the neighborhood, had been watching him, and the
moment he left, Jock stole in, followed at a safe distance
by Sly. ‘Naughty dog! He thought to steal the grin-
ning pig’s head and have a great feast behind the wood-
shed. You may see in the second picture how nearly
he came to being severely punished, as he deserved.
Little Billy Pringle, who did errands for the butcher,
happened to come in the back door just as Jock had

2ig and the achieving :



eG

OGs.

got the pig’s head by the ear, and seizing a steel, with
which Mr. Cleaver sharpened his knives, he threw it
fiercely at the dog, and very nearly stuck it into Jock’s
back. Away he went and ahead of fiim, as fast as
legs would carry him, went Sly.

If Jock had not been well fed no one could blame
him, but Jock’s master always gave him the very nicest
bones left from dinncr; so no one would have felt sorry
if the steel had hit Jock as little Billy meant it to do.
We can never be sure our naughtiness will not be

found out.













































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE GRINNING PIG AND THE THIEyING Docs,—A Narrow Escarm



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.







Mamma’s THisses.

‘¢ A «iss when I awake inthe morn-
ing,
A kiss when I go to bed,
A kiss when I burn my fingers,
A kiss when I thump my head.

“(A kiss when my bath is over,
A kiss when my bath begias ;
My mamma is full of kisses,
As full as nurse is full of pins.

“A kiss when I play with my rattle
A kiss when I pull her hair;

She covered me over with kisses,
The day I fell down stairs.

‘“A kiss when I give her trouble,
A kiss when I give her joy;
There’s nothing like mamma’s kisses
To her own little baby boy.”



What do you see in this picture, and what does it say to you?
Listen :

This is what I think I see in it.

‘¢ Kind hearts are the gardens,

Kind thoughts are the roots,

4 Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits.

‘* Love is the sweet sunshine
That warms into life,
For only in darkness

Grow hatred and strife.”

| Fieoson aime,

Two little forms at the table,
Heads bending low o’er their books,
Working as hard as they’re able —
So mamma.thinks whenever she looks.
But Frankie, who ought to be writing
Is whisp’ring of soldiers and war,
And, teaching May all about fighting,
Draws battles that take place afar.

Not one word does May miss, ’tis pleasanter far
Than the history she has in her book,

And Frank, quite delighted, continues to draw,
Thus neither see mother’s last look.

But alas, the slate falls with a rattle —
A pause -- Then mamma’s voice rings clear,

‘* May, have you learnt the date of that battle?
Frank, just bring your exercise here.”



Dimples Kitty.

‘*O my dear, dear kitty, don’t you want to play, go under the
flag with us?” And over the chairs two little girls hung their
mamma’s striped shawl, and called it a flag.

Down the street was a real, true flag, with stars and stripes.
Dot and Dimple had watched it as it swung in the breeze, waving
back and forth. The horses used to stop under‘it, while the men
who rode would cheer. The little boys played soldier, and marched
to and fro, and hurrahed for the men whose names were on it in big
black letters. ;

Kitty played with glee, and seemed pleased to show how fond
she was of the shawl flag. Pretty soon it fell down, and when the
setting sun shone across the carpet, kitty was fast asleep in its folds.

Pretty soon papa came home, and Dimple brought her pet and
told him how £* pat-wotic” kitty was. She was sure about it, for she
‘*hoo-wad ” when they played.

In the morning kitty crept up stairs and waked Dimple with a
‘purr, purr,” which meant, ‘‘Good morning,” and then ‘snuggled
into the little girl’s arms.



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HERE is a boy Turk with a turkey—a real gobbler. In Turkey they do not have
Thanksgiving Day, but they like roast turkey quite as well as we do in New England.
Sv this young Turk has not been to buy his Thanksgiving dinner, but probably he has

come from some farm outside the town where his master raises fowls for market. See
how strangely the cloth is wrapped about his head. There are yards and yards of it,
as you would find if you unwound it. When twisted into this shape it is called a tur-
ban. These two Turkeys are in the wonderful city of Cairo, in Egypt. You will
notice the crowd of people, all in strange costumes, in the street behind our young
man, If you could see the real scene, you would find it glowing with beautiful ‘colors
and brilliant with sunlight, The young Turk stands a little proudly, as if he knew























how well he looked with his embroidered clothing. He wants to sell his turkey, but
he looks as if he would feel insulted if you asked him to do so.

Never mind. We need not go to Egypt for our turkeys. We have them at
home quite as sweet and juicy, and with voices just as powerful as any in the world.
Don’t you like to clap your hands at them to make them say gobble, gobble? But you
would haye to look a long time to find here at home a young man so picturesquely
dressed. Our ready-made clothing shops would make quite another person of him.
I’m sure we all like him as he is, better then we should if he had a nice black coat, stiff
collar, and trousers. Let us hope he will sell his fine turkey for a good price and go
home to the farm among the palm trees feeling that he has made a good trade.





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



EE,
°













A Woyage Around the iMorld.

THEsE Kittens seem very anxious to learn about the world they
live in. The two on the table are studying the maps, and I guess
they are trying to. measure distance with the compass. The others
are braver, and venture to make a voyage around the world instead
of studying about it on the map. So they climb up the slippery
globe, and it turns around as fast as they climb, and they go round
and round it, having lots of fun, while the old mother cat looks on
and feels proud to think her kitties are such good scholars. If you
children study the globe and maps I think you will learn more about
the world than the kittens do, and perhaps when you are men and
women you can make a real voyage around the world.

Hittle Boy Blue.

eo







Littiz Boy Blue
Has lost his horn,

But he’s as sleepy as ever,
The pretty, wee bairn.

. His sheep have wondered

So far to-day,

That here in the woods
All night they must stray.

Not a care or trouble,
Not a fear has he,

As he lies on his mossy bed,
Peacefully.

A little white lambkin
Lies.on his breast.

"Tis a right pretty picture
Of perfect rest !















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A YOYAGE AROUND THE ©WORLD.

snow Storm.



Horses in a



In some of our Western States they have snow storms of great
severity, called blizzards. With the snow comes intense cold, so that
the cow-boys who care for the cattle, and the cattle themselves, often
perish. ‘The snow comes with such blinding fierceness that the horse
and rider, or the cattle, lose their way and become suffocated and
frozen. Did you ever look at a flake of snow through a microscope
or even a strong reading-glass? Do you remember how beautiful it
was with its wonderful star-shaped crystals? It would not seem that
such a tiny, beautiful thing could be so terrible when it became’ one
of many. But you know how the great waves knock vessels to
pieces, and that even the very biggest wave is made up of tiny drops,
as innocent as a dew drop. When we all join together to do any-
thing it will be done, just as all the tiny, brittle flakes together can
kill men and horses and carry away houses in snow glides.

The picture before us represents such a storm. See how the
snow blows in sheets, and how the poor horses are almost wild with
fear and cold. One is already down and the snow will soon cover
him. The others are huddling together to try to keep warm. It is
a distressing picture, surely. There is little chance that they survive
if the storm continues; but let us hope it will not last long. |

It is fun for you that live in the Eastern States to dig your way
through drifts or face the driving snow, but you would not find it so
if you were where these horses are. You'd be very glad indeed to
stay in the house, crawl to the fire as pussy does, and toast your
toes while popping corn or roasting apples.







HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



HORSES IN A SNOW_STORM.



ae

2

aes

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CONVALESCENCE.

an

i

tes

:

































































































































































































Dip you ever see a girl dressed as this one is? Not at Grand-
pa’s farm in Connecticut, or Uncle John’s in Vermont, surely. See
the folded handkerchief on her head; the shawl over her shoulders;
the embroidered apron, and big-sleeved waist. Where do you think
she lives? She lives in that beautiful land where the skies are so
blue, and the people so handsome; where the hand-organ men and
the harp players that you see about the streets live when they are at
home. She lives in Italy, sunny Italy. The most beautiful pictures
that were ever painted were done by Italians, and some of the
grandest poems and sweetest songs were made by the people who
lived where this girl does. You will sometime know what an inter-
esting place it is, and how wonderful the people are.

This girl has not painted pictures or made poems. She has
sung songs, of course. But her wish now is to gather enough of the
corn flowers to make a pretty bouquet to give a handsome young
man she is fond of, when he comes to-night to play the guitar for her.
Don’t you wish you too could run in the tall wheat and pluck the
corn flowers?



Spinning.

Drp you ever see a truly spinning-wheel? Before men learned
to make machines that would twist the wool or flax into threads, the
women used to have to do it in their homes. Every year they used
lo spin large quantities of it, then weave it into cloth. After that, in
the country places,
a traveling tailor
used to come to the
house and cut out
all the clothing for
the men and boys.
It was a rather tire-
some way to do, but
stilla very beautiful
one. And _ they
made some very
good cloth, too. But
think how funny it
would seem to have
to wait for Mamma
to make cloth be-
fore youcould have
a new jacket and
new trousers. It
was not many years
ago that it was
done. Now itis so
easy to go toacloth-
ing shop and jump
right into a nice
new suit whenever
you have to have
one.

Well, look atthe
picture. How
gracefully the
young woman
stands. Hername
is Nancy. There
is a blazing fire in
the fire-place. The
tea kettle is singing

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Corn FLowERs.



























































































































































































































SPINNING.

and pussy is purring. Do you see the chimney seat, and the old-
fashioned mirror over the mantel? How pleasant it would be to
sit on the hearth and feel the fire with pussy! We'd roast ~hestnuts
and eat apples, would we not? Or perhaps you’d rather pop corn.
All the time we’d hear the whirr of the spinning-wheel and the sweet
song Miss Nancy would sing.

Convalescence. }

WHEN one has been sick and begins to get well again itis called
convalescing.

' Kate’s Mother had been very sick indeed, so that she did not
leave her bed for weeks. All that time Kate was anxious about her,
and she used to ask every day how soon she would be able to walk
again. Atlast Mamma was so much better that the Doctor told Papa
that she ought to go to the seaside where she could get the health-
giving ocean breezes. You may imagine how giad Kate was that
day. She fairly danced for joy. She was happy for Mamma’s sake
at first, but afterward she remembered what jolly times she and
Harry would have in the sand of the beach, and wading.

Her father hired a fine. house right at the ocean’s edge so tha!
they saw vessels pass every day and could get all the sea air there
was tobe had. There, by the west window, sat Mamma, day after
day, very weak indeed, yet gaining strength slowly. And there sat
Kate very often, reading a nice story or sweet poem to her mother,
for Kate would willingly leave Harry and the beach if it gave
Mamma even a moment’s pleasure. She was acomfort to her Mother
all that Summer, and in the Autumn when they went back to town
Mamma declared that there never was a better girl than her darling
Kate.



HAPPY HOURS IN THE


























‘* Now listen, Theo, while I whisper a secret to you, right in your
ear. Itis not for your dog Spot to hear, although he does look so
bright and inquisitive, with his sharp nose raised, and his ears cocked
as though he were determined to hear every single word I say.”

That is what little Mabel is saying to her brother Theo, as she
sits beside him on the sofa in papa’s library, and puts her arm around
his neck, and places her ruby lips close to his ear. What zs the
secret? Do you wonder? Theo looks anxious. It does not seem
that the wonderful tale is affording him a great deal of pleasure, and
I don’t think that Spot would be at all pleased either if he knew, for
no longer is he to rule supreme, the only household pet. No, indeed,
Spot, there is a rival for you in Mabel’s affections! She never did
care quite as much for you as Theo does. You were hs dog. Theo’s
uncle bought you for him when you were a wee, soft puppy. But
now you are spoiled, so that you think nothing is good enough for
you, and you chase all the poor pussy cats, who never did harm,
away from the garden, and will not let even one sun herself on the
old stone wall that divides the gardenand road. Ah, Spot, you have
become a very tyrant, but like all tyrants your day will pass.

Mabel is whispering to Theo that the expressman will soon
bring to her as a present from uncle John, a big box which holds a
lovely, soft, white, long-haired mother pussy, an angora, and her two
little baby kittens. How happy and pleased is Mabel, and she is
begging little Theo to promise her that Spot shall be whipped and
shut in the dark room if he dares to chase or hurt the pretty
creatures,

LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.



2 Snarl.

Berry is just up, and grandma is trying to get the kinks and
snarls out of her pretty flaxen hair. Grandma is gentle, but the
kinks do not come out easily, and Betty looks a little as if she were
ready to snarl some too. Perhaps grandma was wise to give her the
nice apple beforehand. It will make Betty more patient.

Just see what knotty hands and wrinkled face dear old grandma
has. She has lived seventy years, and combed a great many snarly
heads and washed a great many soiled faces and frocks just as het
mother did for her years and years ago. Besides she has kept the
house in order; seen that breakfast, dinner, and supper were ready
when all were hungry; and noticed if any little toes or heels had
poked holes through socks or shoes, All those things, and many
more, have made grandma’s hands look bony and wrinkled. But
they are beautiful hands, and are quite as gentle as the soft pink ones
of little Betty. Grandma has two rings. Do you see them? Grandpa,
who is dead, gave them to her when she was a lovely girl. How
long ago itseems! She will never take them off her fingers, for she
loved him and he wanted her to always wear them. When grand-
ma’s comb, or mamma’s, or nurse’s pulls your hair, you will think,
will you not? that she does not mean to hurt you, only the dear hair
is so tangled and snarled.





“The WEorning Call.

How demure little Miss Sarah Muffet is! One would think
she never soiled a pinafore or romped on the lawn in her life.
Even Willie, on whose mother her mother is calling, cannot
make her give up her prim ways. Perhaps Willie has told her
that he will give her the nice red apple if she will only play with
him. It looks a little as if Willie were going to give her a
brotherly kiss, and Miss Sarah were trying to make him believe
sb-‘did not want him to. We all can see by her mild eyes and
_ysebud mouth that she really would not object, but she fears her
‘bonnet may be put awry or her gown rumpled. How very prim
she is! But then she is making a truly call, and has so nice a
muff.

Willie is quite a swell, surely, with his ruffled collar, velvet
jacket and striped stockings. Do you wonder what nice mor-
sels there are covered by the bowl and cup on the shelf. It is
certainly not jam, but nobody should be surprised to see Willie’s
mother take sponge cake from under the bowl, and perhaps
mild cheese from under the cup, and give each of them a big
piece of the one and a small piece of the other.

Probably after the cake and cheese, demure Sarah will be
more informal and play with amiable Willie as she should.

as



x



ar

a

[LNvecep it is true, it is perfectly true,
= -

Believe me, indeed, Pm playing no tricks;
An old man and his dog live up in the moon

And he’s cross as a bundle of sticks.







1 f

Pussy WHITE.





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.



Tue Morninc CALt,

Pussy White

Pussy WHITE was an English kitten. She had had a good
mother who had brought her up well. So she had the habit of tak-
ing care not to soil her white fur. She ate her milk quite properly,
and was fond of sleeping on a soft cushion.

Her little mistress belonged to a Band of Hope, and had taken
the pledge to drink nothing that would in-tox-i-cate. One of her little.
friends used to tease her about it, but she was firm, and would not:
touch anything of the kind. She had talks with Pussy White about:
it, and she took the pledge too.

Fannie went to her Uncle William’s to spend the day, and car+
ried kitty. Cousin Bertie was a roguish boy and liked to tease as
well. He thought he would see if pussy would keep her pledge, so
poured a little brandy from Grandpa’s bottle into her saucer of milk.

You should have seen Pussy White draw back, and shake her
whiskers and sneeze, as much as to say, ‘Oh no, I shall not da
what you wish me to do, you bad boy.”

Would you have done as kitty did?



ECLDEN LOUD ECO ESM ER ECE OSSRCERENTLLTLETIIST



ERESEROEUNESDSOISTASERRERRCKEO ORD TOSEIAG! HARUOUOBSCACEDEOUDEOOOUESS

Ortiz children, love each other.
Never give another pain,

If your brother speak in anger,
Answer not in wrath again.

AUUSECEACUEMURACHERSESAAEAOSAUNUADADAPOESUDALEGDOR NORE P CS

LA KERN KOGLGRNOPSLURDALS SERANLAMBGHONECLENEDZ 009010120111)

Fi





Bumble-Bee.

BumBLE-BEE superbly dressed,
In velvet, jet, and gold,

Sailed along in eager quest,
And hummed a ballad bold.

Morning-Glory clinging tight
To friendly spires of grass,

Blushing in the early light,
Looked out to see him pass.

Nectar pure as crystal lay

Te



In her ruby cup;

“iy

Bee was very glad to stay,

yi
y

Just to drink it up.

Ms 7);

«¢ Fairest of the flowers,” said he,

SS «’ Twas a precious boon ;

May you still a Glory be,
Morning, night and noon.”

yy 3

@chool is Over.

-
.



SCHOOL is over,
Oh, what fun,

Lessons finished

y

Play begun,
Who'll run fastest,
‘You or [?
Who'll laugh loudest,
Let us try.

Christmas Iorning.

Yes, Christmas Morning, and Santa
Claus did not forget this little boy. See the
pleasure beaming from his face. His eyes are
bright because of the presents Santa Claus has
brought to him sometime while he was sleep-
ing. This is the way Santa Claus has been
going on his rounds of love and kindness for
many, many years, brightening the lives of
little ones and causing mothers and fathers
to join with the children in their joy and hap-
piness, at the time when Old Santa calls.
Each Christmas Morning it is found that Santa
Claus has visited hundreds and thousands ot
children’s homes which he had not found be-
fore, because more mothers and fathers get to
watching for him, and because they wel-
come the happy Christmas Mornings he brings
to us all.

_ joy them. But to-morrow what a good time they will have.



CHRISTMAS MORNING.

Christmas divening.

So Suezpy Not even the new book can keep Edith from
dozing, and as for Jane and Susie, they do not care to think of their
presents. They arose so early to dive into their loaded stockings,
and raced about so much before the Christmas tree was ready, that
when the gifts had been distributed they were almost too tired to en-
Susie
will get out her various dolls, given her by her different aunts and
uncles, her big Noah’s ark and dozen picture books, while Jane
with all her things, sits by to enjoy them. Johnny had a great,
black rocking-horse, a real war-horse, he says, and he has promised
to let Edith ride it if she wishes, for Johnny likes Edith best of all.
It may be that Susie and Jane feel a little hurt because he has not
asked them to ride, but they are so well-bred that they would think
it rude to speak of it. :

But now it is almost bed-time, and we will leave them to sleep
and dream of all the delightful day.



CHRISTMAS EVENING. _























































































































































































































































































OBJECT TEACHING.





i ere

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PHEOPLE’S WORLD.





























































































































































































o

ahe

Mamma, thinking it time Anna had her portrait painted, because

Kirst Photograph.

now her hair is a beautiful golden color which will grow darker, and
because her manners are so pretty and childish, has taken her to an
artist's studic, as the room is called where artists work. The artist
found that Anna could not keep still long enough at a time for him
to see just how she looked; so he is going to photograph her and
paint part of his picture from the photograph. Anna will not have
to stand still long, for now-a-days photographs are taken quicker
than you can wink.

How prettily little Anna stands! She has on her best pink dress
with eider-down trimming, her very freshest silk stockings, and

.shiny slippers. Surely the artist ought to make a lovely picture of



Anna.

Just notice what a nice room the artist has. Do you see the



‘lands than any ten sparrows that ever lived before.





canvasses turned like naughty boys with their faces
to the wall? They are there behind the footstool.
On them are, perhaps, faces of other little girls
and boys who have already teen painted. Behind
Anna on the wall is a picture of some funny storks
painted by a queer man away off in Japan. You
may see a part of a cabinet, too, with a portfolio
of drawings under it, and an old, dark-green boitle















with a fan behind it on top. But who i: that look-

It
is Anna’s mother, who has just told her to stand







ing in at the door at the head of the staircase?



































































































very still.





































There are little girls and boys, as weil as men

























and women, who earn money with which to buy













food by keeping still hours at a time for artists to





















paint from them. They are called modils, and



have to earn money because they have no father









or mother, perhaps, who can buy bread for them.







Artists are very kind to models and do not let “Leni
become too tired.













Anna’s portrait will hang in the dining-room |
some day for all the family to look at. Then Anna
will be glad she kept as still as she did.
















Ou, here’s a pretty how-de-do! What. clatter
There
are Mr. and Mrs. Cock Sparrow looking with the





















and chirping are here among the roses.

most evident admiration at the little chick-sparrows
in the nest they builded in the old flower-pot some
Did they
Oh, yes, many a time,
but ¢Aese are their very cwn, that they have hoped
for for a long time, and talked about riany a moon-

dear girl hung on the wall for them.
never see chicks before?

light night when every body else was asleep, or
At last they have
They cou.d not be

at some reasonable occupation.
them. How grand they feel.
prouder if they were the Pope, or the President of
these United States. Such deautzful chicks, they
think.

but Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow know they are born to

We may think they seem stupid and foolish,

rule the sparrow tribe, and to keep more robins from the farmer’s
«¢ Such bright
eyes,” they say, ‘‘and such a knowing look!” Then Mr. Sparrow
adds, as if he had somehow forgotten the most important things:

‘¢ Such sharp bills and such sweet voices !”

And so they chatter on from day to day, bringing meanwhile
bits of bread or choice fat worms and highly flavored flies to give
strength to the youngsters. And one day, oh, sad day for Papa
and Mamma Sparrow, their wings spread and— away they fly!
They'll see the world for themselves; they too will find some nice
‘Then Mr.
and Mrs. Sparrow will look at the rose bush and wish their chil-
dren were like it, for they say: ‘* Tha’s what comes of having
wings!”

flower-pot, and hunt up some chicks of their own.



S WORLD.

y

N THE LITTLE PEOPLE

HAPPY HOURS I



















































































THE SPARROW'S ‘NEST



LD

R

WO!

S

EOPLE’

p

TTLE

ee

THE LI

I

PY HOURS

HAP



















































































































































































































































































































































































Tkitty’s Play.

Tus lady is very tall and stately. She wears,
with a great deal of pride, a glossy silk dress.
It has a long train. She has been looking for her
little pet Kitty. The Kitty is full of play, and
thinks it great fun to run after the sweeping train.
Her sharp claws are stuck in the shining. silk.
Her mistress turns with delight, and smiles at her
frolic. Kitty’s claws are not strong enough to tear
the silk. Without chiding, the lady lets her play
as she slowly moves with grace over the floor. It
is well to enjoy the pleasures of others, even if it
be only a wee bit of a kitten.



The Intruders.

Tus fawns and deer do not know it is the
day before Christmas. Nobody has told them
about it, nor even suggested that they should hang
up their stockings for St. Nicholas to fill. And
in the park there is no calendar, except that of the
singing of birds and blossoming of fowers in Spring ;
the fullness of green and the heat in Summer; the
ripening of fruit and dropping of leaves in Autumn,
and the bare branches, cold winds and snow
covered ground in Winter. So these pretty creatures
do not understand why these men have come into
the park to cut Christmas trees. They will catch
at any rate and if the intruders come nearer, away
they will go almost as swiftly and lightly as the
birds, or the snow flakes that were so lightly driven
by the wind through the trees.

But the two men are there fer peaceable reasons,
surely. ;

Little do the pretty fawns know what the chil-
dren will see,—the tree all gleaming with lighted
tapers, and glittering with tinsel and toys. If they
knew how happy the children will be, they would
be quite willing to have their peace disturbed and
welcome the intruders.





































Preparing the @hristmas Dinner.

Now comes the happiest time of the year for the children, when Santa
Claus comes down the chimney to put all sorts of pretty things, long-wished
for, perhaps, into the children’s stockings. And good and tender Mamma
gives orders to make ready for the Christmas dinner, where everything must
be of the best, and where everything surely tastes the best of anything we
eat the year through. In this picture kind Mrs. Martin, as you see, is allow-
ing her children, Herbert and pretty Susie, with her doll in her arms, to help
make the delicious plum-pudding which at the close of the great feast of good
things will be brought in by black Nora, all ablaze with the brandy poured
over it and lighted, looking like a mound of fre or a volcano during an
eruption. Dainty little baby May has the spoon in hef hand to stir in the
sugar, and Mamma has cut up the suet into little bits. Herbert feels as if he
were a very big boy, for he has sifted the flour aid helped Susie stone the
And now they can tell dear Papa, and big brother Ned, that they
Will it not taste

raisins.

have helped to make the CHRISTMAS PUDDING!





















































HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLW’



S WORLD.



A bird of prey, seeing the child, seized it.in its beak and carried it
away ; but hearing the sound of the sportsman’s gun, the bird let the child
fali, its clothes caught in the branches of a high tree, and there it hung, cry-

- ing till the forester came by.

The mother, on awakening and missing her child, rushed away in great
agony to find it. So that the poor little thing would have been left alone in
the world to die had not the sportsman made his appearance.

‘* Poor little creature !”’ he said to himself as he climbéd up the tree and
brought the child down. ‘‘ I will take it home with me, and it shall be brougut
up with my own little Lena.”

He kept his word, and the little foundling grew up with the forester’s
little daughter, till they loved each other so dearly that they were always un-
happy when separated, even for a short time. The forester had named the
child ‘* Birdie,” because she had been carried away by the bird; and Lena
and Birdie were for several years happy little children together. ;

But the forester had an old cook, who was not fond of children, and she
wanted to get rid of Birdie, who she thought was an intruder.

One evening Lena saw the woman take two buckets to the well, and
carry them backwards and forwards more than twenty times. ‘+ What are .
you going to do with all that water?” asked the child.

j i =
| We
|

,
i

\
ip

PREPARING THE CHRISTMAS DINNER.

better to them than ever when they know of the loving hands that helped to
make the sweet concoction. :

See, on the table lies the big turkey that soon will be roasted, crisp and
brown.

Out of doors it is cold and snowing fast. The frost hangs in queer
festoons from the window-frames. But indoors there are warm and loving
hearts. Surely Mamma in her own happiness will not forget some of the
poor little children and their Mammas who have no money for their
Christmas Dinner.





rdie and Her Briend.

A FORESTER went out one day shooting; he had not gone far into the
wood, when he heard, as he thought, the cry of a child. He turned his
steps instantly towards the sound, and at length came to a high tree, on one
of the branches of which sat a little child. A mother, someshort time be-
fore, had seated hersclf under the tree with th> child in her lap, and fallen

os

asleep.



‘““Tf you will promise not to say a word, I will tell you,” zeplied the
woman.

‘¢ J will never tell any one,” she said.

. “Oh, very well, then, look here. To-morrow morning, early, I mean
to put all this water into a kettle on the fire, and when it boils I-shall throw
Birdie in and cook her for dinner.”

Away went poor Lena, in great distress, to find Birdie.
never forsake me, I will never forsake you,” said Lena.

‘¢ Then,” said Birdie, ‘‘ I will never, never leave you, Lena.”

‘Well, then,” she replied, ‘* I am going away, and you must go with
me, for old cook says she will get up early to-morrow morning, and boil a
lot of water to cook you in, while my father is outhunting. If you stay with
me, I can save you. So you must never leave me.”

‘© No, never, never,” said Birdie.

So the children lay awake till dawn, and then they got up and ran away
so quickly, that by the time the wicked old witch got up to prepare the water,
they were far out of her reach.

She lit her fire, and as soon as the water boiled went into the sleeping.

“Tf you will





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

| creer sees SSD SE CEC CIS SS ATE SS TS

room to fetch poor little Birdie and throw her in. But when she came to
the bed and found it empty, she was very much frightened to find both the
children gone, and said to herself, ‘* What will the forester say, when he
comes home, if the children are not here? I must go down stairs as fast as
Ic:n and send some one to catch them.” Down she went, and sent three of
the farm servants to run after the children and bring them back.

The children, who were sitting among the trees in the wood, saw them
coming from a distance. ‘I will never forsake you, Birdie,” said Lena,
quickly. ** Will you forsake me?”

‘¢ Never, never ! ” «was the reply.

‘¢ Then,” cried Lena, ‘‘ you shall be turned into a rose bush, and I will
be one of the roses.” ,

The three servants came up to the place where the old witch had told
them to look; but nothing was to be seen but a rose tree and a rose.
‘«* There are no children here,” they said. So they went back and told the
cook that they had found only roses and bushes, but not a sign of the children.

The old woman scolded them well when they told her this, and said,
“You stupid fools, you should have cut off the stem of the rose bush, and
plucked one of the roses and brought them home with you as quick as pos-
sible. You must just go again a .

second time.” - : . sm
: , nu ; in
changed herselfand Birdie so quickly, i
that when the three servants arrived ff

Lena saw them coming, and she ; | i
| : |
at the spot to which the old woman | |
had sent them, they found only a JR !
little church with a steeple — Birdie i
was the church and Lena the steeple.

Then the men said one to another,
‘* What was the use of our coming .
here? We may as well go home.”

But how the old woman did scold.
“You fools!” she said, ‘* you should
have brought the church and the
steeple here. However, I will go
myself this time.” So the wicked
old woman started off to find the
children, taking the three servants
with her.

When they saw the three servants
coming in the distance, and the old
woman waduling behind, Lena said,
‘¢ Birdie, we will never forsake each
other.”

‘“¢ No, no! never, never!” replied
the little foundling.

‘¢ Then you shall be changed into
a pond, and I will be a duck swim-
ming upon it.”

The old woman drew near, and as
soon as she saw the pond she laid
herself down by it, and, leaning over,
intended to drink it all up. But the
duck was too quick for her. She
seized the head of the old woman
with her beak, and drew it under
water, and held it there till the old
witch was drowned.

Then the two children resumed
their proper shape, went home with
the three servants, all of them happy
and delighted to think that they had
got rid of such a wicked old woman.
The forester was full of joy in his
home with the children near the
wood; and if they are not dead they
all live there still.

TEDpY’Ss

“Bhe Molt and the FOX.

A WOLF once made friends with a fox, and kept him always by him, so
that whatever the wolf wanted, the fox was obliged to do, because he was
the weakest and could not therefore, be master: It happened, one day, that
they were both passing through a wood, and the wolf said, ‘* Red fox, find
me something to eat, or I shall eat you.”

*¢ Well,” replied the fox, ‘1 knowa farm-yard near, in which there are
two young lambs; if you like I will go and fetch one.” The wolf was quite
agreeable, so the fox went to the field, stole the lamb, and brought it to the
wolf; he then returned to find something for himself.

The wolf soon ate up the lamb, but he was not satisfied, and began to
long so much for the other lamb, that he went to fetch it himself. But he
managed so awkwardly that the mother of the lamb saw him, and began to
cry and bleat fearfully ; and the farmer came running out to see what was
the matter. The wolf got so terribly beaten that he ran limping and howl-
ing back to the fox. ‘‘ You have led me into a pretty mess,” he said. ‘I



wanted the other lamb, and because I went to fetch it, the farmer has nearly
killed me.”

‘© Why are you such a glutton, then?” replied the fox.

Another day as they were in a field, the greedy wolf exclaimed, ‘* Red
fox, if you don’t find me something to eat, I shall eat you up.”

‘Oh! I can get you some pancakes, if you like,” he said: ‘* for I know
a farmhouse where the wife is frying them now,”

So they went on together, and the fox sneaked into the house, sniffed,
and smelt about for some time, till he at last found out where the dish stood.
Then he dragged six pancakes from it, and brought them to the wolf.

«¢ Now you have something to eat,” said the fox, and went away to find
his own dinner.

The wolf, however, swallowed the pancakes in the twinkling of an eye,
and said to himself, ‘‘ They taste so good I must have some more.” So
he went into the farm kitchen, and, while pulling down the pancakes, up-
set the dish and broke it in pieces.

The farmer’s wife heard the crash, and came rushing in; but when she
saw the wolf, she called loudly for the farm servants, who came rushing
in, and beat him with whatever they could lay their hands on, so that he
ran back to the fox in the wood with
two lame legs, howling terribly.

‘¢ Tow could you serve me such a
dirty trick?” he said. ‘* The farmer
neazly caught me; and he has given
me such a thrashing.”

‘¢ Well then,” said the fox, ‘ you
should not be such a glutton.”

Another day, when the wolf and
fox were out together, and the wolf
was limping with fatigue, he said,
‘* Red fox, find me something to eat,
or I shall eat you.”

The fox replied, ‘*] know a man
who has been slaughtering cattle to-
day ; and there is a quantity of salted
meat lying ina tub in the cellar. I
can fetch some of that.”

‘¢ No,” said the wolf; ‘‘ let me go
with you this time. You can help
me if] cannot run away fast enough.”

replied Reynard, anu showed him
on the way many of his tricks; and
at last they reached. the cellar safely.

There was meat in abundance.
The wolf made himself quite at home,
and said, ** There will be time to
stop when I hear any sound.”

The fox also enjoyed himself; but
he kept looking round now and then ;
and ran often to the hole through
which they had entered to try if it
was still large enough for his body to
slip through.

‘¢ Dear fox,” said the wolf, ‘* why
are you running about and jumping
here and theie so constantly?”

‘¢T must see if any one is coming,”
replied the cunning animal, ‘¢and I
advise you not to eat too much.”

The wolf replied, ‘I am not
going away from here till the tub ts
empty.”

At this moment in came the farmer,
who had heard the fox jumping
about in the cellar. The fox no
sooner saw hir than with a spring
he was through the hole. The wolf
made an attempt to follow him; but
he had ea:en so much, and was so
fat that he stuck fast. ‘Lhe farmer
on seeing this fetched a cudgel and killed him on the spot. The fox ran home
to his den full of joy that he was at last set free from the old glutton’s company.

HuuseE.

Beddy’s House.

Trppy has been given the dominoes with which to amuse him-
self for a little while. :

With care he places one block upon another, and now tries to put
one on the top. If he can hold his little plump hand steady enough
he will succeed. ;

Some day Teddy will grow to be aman. He will build a real
house for himself, called character. Each act, each habit, each
thought, will be like a block, and all to be put together with care.
If this is done he will become a noble man.

“You may come for aught I care,”













_ he Black 3 agile.

Tue beak of the eagle is hooked, and ends in a sharp point bent
downwards. Its feet are strong and armed with iilons or claws.
This bird has a wonderful power of sight, and is said-to be able to
look at the unclouded sun.

Eagles are remark-
able for the nobleness
of their bearing, and
for their daring cour-
age. They have power-
fal limbs, are fond of
flesh, and will attack
animals of quite a large
size. It is only when
pressed by hunger that
they attack: small birds.

They build their nest
on the flat surface of
some rock, or on a
platform of some high
hill. The size of the
nest is large, and every
year it is made larger,
for these birds do not
like to change their
homes. The nest is
often made of large
pieces of wood, that
shows how great must have been the sitengah of the birds that could
carry them. The pieces are so placed as not to yield easily to the
wind, and they support boughs, forming a solid sort of hollow,

called an eyrie.

It takes about thirty days for the eagle to hatch her eggs, and
during this time the male hunts for food, and brings it to feed his
mate. Eagles live on wild mountains, aod often build their nests on
the highest cliffs.

(he Golden Eagle.

SEE the golden eagle. What a large, strong bird! .
claws it can seize on-its prey, and lift it high into the air.

The nest of the eagle,
made of twigs and sticks,
is sometimes found on. the
ledge of a steep rock, and
sometimes on the branches
of a very tall tree. The
eggs are grayish-white in
color.

The eagle is so strong
that he can carry off lambs
andevensheep. He takes
them to his nest as food
for his young. The goiden
eagle is found in many
parts of Europe and Amer-
ica.

Once I saw a tame eagle
borne on a platform in a
procession of soldicrs. He
had been with them in five
or six battles, and they
prized him very much. He
lived to a good old age,
The eagle is the emblem of the





With its



eek
oe ee
much petted and well cared for.
United States.

Popping Gorn.
It is nearly bed time, but Mamma allows little Guss and Gertie
to sit by the blazing fire awhile to pop corn. Guss has been shelling
it into a plate, and Gertie, for her share of the pleasant labor, holds
the popper to the fire and shakes it gently all the time lest the corn
burns before it pops, which would besadindeed. How eagerly they
watch for the first white that hogs out ofits nest. Isn’t it strange
how such a big thing can keep in such a little place so long.
It is a little as if some pretty white bird had been squeezed into
a hard little cage and tightly sealed. There the little bird waits and

ee” ae



PorpinG Corn.

waits, longing for some dear girl or boy to know that she is there,
and only waiting for her cage to be burned enough for her to break
through and fly out. And does it not remind you of the story in
your fairy book which tells of a beautiful princess who was turned by
some wicked fairy into something not at all handsome, and how she
waited there until one day along came a handsome prince who kissed
the ugly thing, and behcld, out jumped the lovely princess, and they
lived happy together ever after. Is not the corn like the locked-up
princess, and the one who pops it like the prince, and the fire like
his kiss? Only in the case of the corn, it is eaten, and sometimes
the corn-princess and the little prince do not live happily together,
especially if the prince eats too much.
We will hope that Guss and Gertie will not eat too much, bu’
will have a most delightful sleep after it, they are such gocd
children.

WMashington’s Bed-Chamber.

Tuts is the room and the bed in which General Washington
slept, you know, who could not tell a lie when he was a boy, and
who was afterwards said to be ‘the first in war, the first in peace,
and the first in the hearts of his countrymen.” Many times he has
laid a tired head, weary with the business of governing this country,
upon those pillows. It is a pleasant and beautiful room but none too

Bs St pleasant to rest so great and good a
47 man. Ifyou ever go to Mt. Vernon,


























































































































































the lovely home of Washington,
you may see this room, for it is
religiously kept as when he left it.





oe HAPPY HOURS
Which Hoved

‘+ T Love you, mother,” said little John;
Then, forgetting his work, his hat went on,
And he was off to,the garden swing,

And left her the water and wood to bring.




Icat ?



“To-day I'll help you all I can;

“‘ T love you, mother,” said rosy Nell:

“ T love you better than tongue can tell.”
Then she teased and pouted full half the day,
Till her mother rejoiced when she went to play.

Busy and happy all day was she.

““T love you, mother,” again they said,
Three little children going to bed,
How do you think that mother guessed
Which of them really loved her best?



Preparing for the @harade.

Wuar fun they are having! The garret has been ransacked,
and grandpa’s hat and coat, and great-grandma’s. old bonnet and
shawl got out; the first for Harry, and the others for Madge. See
how sedately Madge carries the umbrella and basket. She knows
how ladies should walk. Frank, over there by the crib, has got on
his brother John’s fur trimmed coat, and a big felt hat. Heis a great
man now! You see the stylish moustache he has marked on his
upper lip. The handglass has just shown him that he is really very
impressive. Perhaps he will some day be a real actor, after study-
ing very hard and reading a great deal. But now it is only fun, and
the chances are that his serious face will be one broad grin by the
time he goes into the long drawing room, where all the guests await

the beginning of the charade. Little Alice seems to be ready to be

a lovely fairy with her brother's stick for a wand. Soon it will be |

over, and tired heads will be laid on the pillows only to be filled with
dreams of charades all night.

IN “LHE LITTLE

*‘ T love you, mother,” said little Fan:

How glad I am there’s no school to-day!”
So she rocked the babe till asleep it lay.

Then, stepping softly, she fetched the broom,
And swept the floor and tidied the room;

Helpful and happy as child could be.

PEOPLE’S WORLD.



Lhe Ugly Duckling.

In a sunny spot stood an old country house, encircled by canals.
Between the wall and the water’s edge there grew hr ge burdock-leaves, that
had shot up to such a height that a little child might aave stood upright under
the tallest of them; and this spot was as wild as though it had been situated
in the depths of a wood. In this snug retirement a duck was sitting on her
nest to hatch her young ; but she began to think it a wearisome task, as the
little ones seemed very backward in making their appearance ; besides, she
had few visitors, for the other ducks preferred swimming about in the canals,
instead of being at the trouble of climbing up the slope, and then sitting
under a burdock-leaf to gossip with her.

At length one egg cracked, and then another. ‘* Peep! peep!” cricd
they, as each yolk became a live thing, and popped out its head.

“‘ Quack! quack!” said the mother; and they tried to cackle like her,
while they looked all about them under the green leaves; and she allowed
them to look to their hearts’ content, because green is good for the eyes.

‘‘How large the world is, to be sure!” said the young ones. And truly
enough, they had rather more room than when they were still in the egg-
shell. ;

‘© Do you fancy this is the whole world?” cried the mother. ‘+ Why,

it reaches far away beyond the other side of the garden, down to the parson’s

field; though I never went to such a distance as that! But are you all there?”

continued she, rising. ‘‘ No, faith! you are not; for there still lies the largest
egg. I wonder how long this business is to last—I really begin to grow
quite tired of it!” And she sat down once more.

«* Well, how are you getting on?” inquired an old duck, who came to
pay her a visit.

“This egg takes a deal of hatching,” answered the sitting duck. ‘it
won't break. But just look at the others; are they not the prettiest duck-
lingsever seen? They are the image of their father, who, bye-the-bye, does
not trouble himself to come and see me.”

« Let me look at the egg that won’t break,” quoth the old duck. “Take
my word for it, it must be a guinea-fowl’s egg. I was once deceived in the
same way, and I bestowed a deal of care and anxiety on the youngsters, for
they are afraid of water. I could not make them take to it. I stormed and
raved, but it was of no use. Let’s see the egg. Sure enough, it is a guinea-
fowl’s egg. Leave it alone, and set about teaching the other children to
swim.”

‘« T’ll just sit upon it a bit longer,” said the duck; ‘for, since I have sat

-so long, a few days more won’t make much odds.”









- at ash © fe ae ua | o>?

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

eS ae



Turre Grew HuGe Burpock LEAVES.

‘¢ Please yourself,” said the old duck, as she went away.

At length the large egg cracked.

‘Peep! peep! peep!” squeaked the
youngster as he crept out. How big and ugly he was, tobe sure! The duck
looked at him, saying, ‘‘ Really, this is a most enormous duckling! None
of the others are like him. I wonder whether he is a guinea-chick after all?
Well, we shall soon see when we get down to the water, for-in he shall go,
though I push him in myself.”

On the following morning the weather was most delightful, and the sun
The mother duck took

Splash into the water she went.

was shining brightly on the green burdock-leaves.
her young brood down to the canal.
“Quack! quack!” cried she, and forthwith one duckling after another
jumped.
rose to the surface again, and swam about so nicely, just as if their legs pad-
dled them about of their own accord; and they had all taken to the water,
even the ugly grey-coated youngster swam about with the rest.

‘¢ Nay, he is no guinea-chick,” said she: ‘‘only look how capitally he
uses his legs, and how steady he keeps himself — he’s every inch my own
child! And really he’s very pretty when one comes to look at him atten-
tively. Quack ! quack!” added she; ** now, come along, and I'll take you
into high society, and introduce you to the duck-yard; but mind you keep
close to me, that nobody may tread upon you; and above all, beware of the
cat.”

They now reached the farm-yard, where there was a great hubbub.
Two families were fighting for an eel’s head, which, in the end, was carried
off by the cat.

*« See, children, that’s the way with the world! ” remarked the mother
of the ducklings, licking her beak, for she would have been very glad to have
had the eel’s head for herself. ‘* Now move on!” said she, ‘‘ and mind you
cackle properly, and bow your head before that old duck yonder: she is the
noblest born of them all, and is of Spanish descent, and that’s why she is so
dignified ; and, look! she has a red rag tied to her leg, which is the greatest
mark of distinction that can be bestowed upon a duck, as it shows an anxiety
not to lose her, and that she should be recognized by both man and beast.
Now cackle —and don’t turn in your toes: a well-bred duckling spreads his
feet wide apart, like papa and mamma, in this sort of way. Now bend your
neck and say ‘ Quack!” .

The ducklings did as they were bid; but the other ducks, after looking -

at them, only said aloud, ‘* Now look! here comes another set, as if we were
not quite numerous enough already. And, bless me! what a queer-looking
chap one of the ducklings is, to be sure! We can’t put up with him!” And
one of the throng darted forward and bit him in the neck.

‘‘ Leave him alone,” said the mother; ‘the did no harm to any one.”

‘* No, but he is too big and uncouth,” said the biting duck, ‘‘ and there-
fore he wants a thrashing.”

‘‘Mamma has a sweet little family,” said the old duck with the rag
about her leg: ‘‘ they are all pretty except one, who is rather ill-favoured. I
wish mamma could polish him a bit.”

The water closed over their heads for a moment; but they soon |

-¢©7’m afraid that will be impossible, your grace,” said the mother of the
ducklings. ‘‘Tt’s true he is not pretty, but he has a very good disposition,
and swims as well or perhaps better than all the others put together. How-
ever, he may grow prettier, and perhaps become smaller: he remained too
long in the egg-shell, and therefore his figure is not properly fo.med.” And
with this she smoothed down the ruffled feathers of his neck, adding, ‘‘ At all
events, as he is a male duck it won’t matter so much. I think he’ll prove

strong, and be able to fight his way through the world.”

‘© The other ducklings are elegant little creatures,” said the old duck.

‘Now, make yourself at home; and if you should happen to find an eel’s
head, you can bring it to me.”

And so the family made themselves comfortable.

But the poor duckling who had been the last to creep out of his egg-
shell, and looked so ugly, was bitten, and pushed about, and made game of,
not only by the ducks, but by the hens. They all declared he was much too
big; anda guinea-fowl who fancied himself at least an emperor, because he
had come into the world with spurs, now pufled himself up like a vessel in
full sail, and flew at the duckling, and blustered till his head turned com-
pletely red, so that the poor little thing did not know where he could walk
or stand, and was quite grieved at being so ugly that the whole farm-yard
scouted him.

Nor did matters mend the next day, or the following ones, but rather
grew worse and worse. The poor duckling was hunted down by everybody.
Even his sisters were so unkind to him, that they were continually saying,

‘‘] wish the cat would run away with you, you ugly creature ” while his

mother added, ‘* I wish you had never been born!” And the ducks pecked |

at him, the hens struck him, and the girl who fed the poultry used to kick him.

So he ran away and flew over the palings. The little birds in the
bushes were startled, and took wing. ‘‘ That is because I am so ugly,”
thought the duckling, as he closed his eyes in despair; but presently he
roused up again, and ran on farther till he came to a large marsh inhabited by
wild ducks. Here he spent the whole night, and tired and sorrowful enough
he was. ,

On the following morning, when the wild ducks rose and saw their new
comiade, they said, ‘‘ What sort of a creature are you?” Upon which the
duckling greeted them all round as civilly as he knew how.

‘You are remarkably ugly,” observed the ducks; ‘ but we don’t care
about that so long as you don’t want to marry into our family.” Poor forlorn
little creature! he had truly no such thoughts in his head; all he wanted was
to obtain leave to lie among the rushes and to drink a little of the marsh-
water. a

He remained there for two whole days, at the end of which there came
two wild geese, or, more properly speaking, goslings, who were only just

out of the egg-shell, and consequently were very pett.





‘ Ler’s SEE THE Ece.”

a





ed her ree eee oa.

HAPPY



_ “Tsay, friend,” quoth they, ‘‘ you are so ugly that we should have no
objection to take you with us for a traveling companion. ‘In the neighbor-
ing marsh there dwell some sweetly pretty female geese, all of them
unmarried, and who cackle most charmingly. Perhaps you may have a
chance to pick up a wife amongst them, ugly as you are.”

Pop! pop! sounded through the air, and the two wild goslings fell dead
amongst the rushes, while the water turned as red as blood. Pop! pop!
again echoed around, and whole flocks of wild geese flew up from the rushes.
Again and again the ‘same alarming noise was. heard. It was a shooting
party, and the sportsmen surrounded the whole marsh, while others had

climbed into the branches of the trees that overshadowed the rushes. A blue

mist rose in clouds and mingled with the green leaves, and sailed far away

across the water; a pack of dogs next flounced into the marsh. fplash.
splash ! they went, while the reeds and rushes bent beneath them on all sides.
What a fright they occasioned the poor duckling! He turned away his head

to hide it under his wing, when, lo! a tremendous-looking dog, with his

“tongue lolling out and his eyes glaring fearfully, stood right before him,

opening -his jaws and showing his sharp teeth, as though he would gobble up
the poor duckling at a moythful !—but splash ! splash! on he went without
touching him. ;
‘“« Thank goodness,” sighed the duckling ‘* I am so ugly that even a dog
won’t bite me.”
And he lay quite still, while the shot rattled through the rushes, and pop

after pop echoed through the air.



© How Bic anp Ucity Hr Was, To BE SuRE.”’

Tt was not till late in the day that all became quiet, but the poor young-
ster did not yet venture to rise, but waited several hours before he looked about
him, and then hastened out of the marsh as fast as he could go. He ran
across fields and meadows, till there arose such a storm that he could scarcely
get on at all.

Towards evening he reached a wretched little cottage that was in such
a tumble-down condition, that if it remained standing at all, it could only be
from not yet having made up its mind on which side it should fall first. The

tempest was now raging to such a height, that the duckling was forced to sit

down to stem the wind, when he perceived that the door hung so loosely on ©

one of its hinges, that he could slip into the room through the crack, which
he accordingly did.

_ The inmates of the cottage were a woman, a tom-cat, and a hen. The
tom-cat, whom she called her darling, could raise his back and purr, and he
could even throw out sparks, provided he were stroked against the grain.
The hen had small, short legs, for which reason she was called Ilenny
Shortlegs. She laid good eggs, and her mistress loved her as if she had
been her own child.

Next morning they perceived the little stranger, when the tom-cat began
to purr, and the hen to cluck.

‘© What’s that?” said the woman, looking round. ‘Not seeing very dis-
tinctly, she mistook the duckling for a fat duck that had lost its way. “Why,

HOURS IN THE LITTLE

PEOPLE’S 1VORLD.



FLuNG Tue Toncs ar Him.

this is quite a prize!” added she: ‘+ 1 cannow get duck’s eggs, unless, indeed
it bea male. We must wait a bit and see.”

So the duckling was kept on trial for three weeks; but no eggs were
forthcoming. The tom-cat and the hen were the master and mistress of tho
house, and always said ‘‘ We and the world,” for they fancied themsclves to
be the half— and by far the best half, too— of the whole universe. The duck-
ling thought there might be two opinions on this point; but the hen would
not admit of any such doubts.

‘Can you lay eggs?” asked she.

‘“¢ No.”

‘Then have the goodness to hold your tongue.”

And the tom-cat inquired, ‘‘Can you raise your back, or purr, or throw
out sparks?”

LOIN Side ome

‘¢ Then you have no business to have any opinion at all when rationa!
people are talking.”

The duckling sat in a corner, very much out of spirits, when in came
the fresh air and sunshine, which gave him such a strange longing to swim
on the water that he could not help saying so to the hen.

“ What's this whim?” said she. ‘That comes of being idle. If you
could cither lay eggs or purr, you would not indulge in such fancies.”

‘‘ But it is so delightful to swim about on the water!” the duckling
observed, ‘‘ and to feel it close over one’s head when one dives down to the
bottom.”

‘A great pleasure indeed!” quoth the hen. ‘You must be crazy,
surely. Only ask the cat — for he is the wises.: creature I know — how he
would like to swim on the water, or to dive under it. To say nothing of

myself, just asi. our old mistress, who is wiser than anybody else in the

‘ world, whether sne’d relish swimming and fecling-the waters close obove her

head.”

“ You can’t understand me,” said the duckling,

‘¢ We can’t understand you! I should like to know who could. You
don’t suppose you are wiser than the tom-cat and our mistress——-to say
nothing of myself? Don’t take these idle fancies into your head, child. I
say disagreeable things, which is a mark of truc friendship. Now, look to it,
and mind that you either lay eggs, or Jearn to purr and emit sparks.”

“T think I’ take my chance, and go abroad into the wide world,” said
the duckling.

*¢Do,” said the hen.

And the duckling went forth, and swam on the water, and dived
beneath its surface; but he was slighted by all the other animals, on account
of his ugliness.

Autumn had now set in. The leaves of the forest had turned first
yellow, and then brown; and the wind caught them, and made them dance
about. It began to be very cold, and the clouds looked heavy with hail and
flakes of snow ; while the raven sat on a hedge, crying ‘* Caw! caw!” from
sheer cold; and one began to shiver, if one mercly thought about it. One

evening, just as the sun was settiag, there came a whole flock of beautiful





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



large birds from a grove. The duckling had never seen any so lovely before.
They were dazzlingly white, with long, graceful necks: they were swans.
They uttered a peculiar cry, and then spread their magnificent wings, and
awzy they flew from the cold country to warmer lands across the open sea.
They rose so high that the ugly duckling felt a strange sensation come over
him. He turned round and round in the water like a wheel, stretched his
neck up into the air towards them, and uttered so loud and strange a cry,
that he was frightened at it himself. Oh! never could he again forget those
beautiful, happy birds; and when they were quite out of sight, he dived
down to the bottom of the water, and when he once more rose to the surface,
he was half beside himself. He knew not how those birds were called, nor
whither they weve bound; but he felt an affection for them, such as he had
never yet experieaced for any living creature. Nor did he even presume to
envy them; for how could it ever have entered his head to wish himself
endowed with their loveliness. le would have been glad enough if the
ducks had merely suffered him to remain among them — poor ugly animal

that he was!



THERE'S A NEw ONE.

And winter proved so very, very cold. The duckling was optiged to
keep swimming about, for fear the water shculd freeze entirely ; but every
night the hole in which he swam grew smaller and yet smaller. It now
froze so hard that the surface of the ice cracked again; yet the duckling still
paddled about, to prevent the hole from closing up. At last he was so
exhausted that he lay insensible, ana became ice-bourd. =

Early next morning a peasant ca ne by, and seeing what had taken place,
broke the ice to pieces with his woolen shoe, and carried the duckling home
to his wife; so the little creature was revived once more.

The children wished to play with him; but the duckling thought they
intended to hurt him, and in his fright he ylunged right into a bowl of ‘milk,
that was spirted all over the room. The woman clapped her hands, which
only frightened him still more, and drove him first into the butter-tub, then
down into the meal-tub, and out again. What a scene then ensued! The
woman screamed, and flung the torgs at him; the children tumbled over
each other in their endeavors to catch .he duckling, and laughed and shrieked.
Fortunately the door stood open, and re slipped through, and then over the
fagots into the newly-fallen snow, where he lay quite exhausted.

But it would be too painful to tei. of all the privations and misery that
the duckling endured during the severe weather. He was lying in a marsh,
among the reeds, when the sun agaiu began to shine. The larks were

singing, and the spring had set in in all its beauty.

The duckling now felt able to flap his wings. They rustled much louder

than before, and bore him away most sturdily ; and before he was well aware
of it he found himself in a large garden, where the apple-trees were in full
blossom, and the fragrant elder was steeping its long, drooping branches in
she waters of a winding canal. Three magnificent white swans now emerged

from the thicket before him; they flapped their wings, and then swam lightly
on the surface of the water.

‘I will fly towards those royal birds — and they will strike me dead for
daring to approach them, so ugly as] am! But it matters not. Better far
to be killed by them than to be pecked at by the ducks, beaten by the hens,
pushed about by the girl who feeds the poultry, and to suffer want in the
winter.” And he flew into the water, and swam towards those splendid
swans, who rushed to meet him with rustling wings the moment they saw
him. ‘ Do but kill me!” said the poor animal, as he bent his head down to
the surface of the water and awaited his doom. But what did he see in the
clear stream? Why, his own image, which was no longer that of a heavy-
looking dark grey bird, ugly and ill-favored, but of a beautiful swan!

It matters not being born in a duck-yard, when one is hatched from a
swan’s egg |

Some little children now came into the garden, and threw bread-crumbs
and corn into the water; and the youngest cried, ‘‘ There is a new one!”
The other children clapped their hands, and flew to their father and mother,
and they all said, ‘‘ The new cne is the prettiest.”

He then felt quite ashamed, and hid his head under his wing. He was

more than happy, yet none the prouder, for a good heart is never proud.

He remembered how he had been pursued and made game of; and now he °

heard everybody say he was the most beautiful of all the beautiful birds.
He flapped his wings and raised his slender neck, as he cried in the fullness
of his heart, «I never dreamed of such happiness when I was an Ugly
Duckling.”

Host in. the Woods,

Lost, but not very far from home after all. Not so far but that pussy
knows the way back and will lead Iittle Emily back when she gets ready to
go. To Emily it seems a long, long ways; but she is not afraid, only tired
and glad to rest her little legs and put her back against the trunk of the big
tree. Pussy is tired too, for Emily has made her chase the ball very often,
and she ha; been hunting grassho,pers and butterflies whenever Emily
would let her. She is so tired now that she does not care to catch the but
terflies which are so near to her. She contents herself with turning her
pretty head and iazily looking at them.

Emily has chosen a very pleasant place for her rest. How the flowers
spring up on every side, and what a delightful breeze comes stealing through
the bushes to play with. Emily’s brown hair and kiss her rosy cheeks.

- Emily is a very good little girl, She did not run away from home.
She only tossed the ball a little further, and a little further yet, till before
she knew it she was out of sight of her house. Her mother will not scold
her; she will only tell her to be more careful another time. There is noth-
ing in these woods to hurt her. At most some prettily spotted fawn may
peep through the leaves and then run away to tell his mother how pretty
Emily is. He will leave her there under the tree in the sun, knowing that
long before dark she will have followed pussy home. ,

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HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORL





































































































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«Nfending the Umbrella.

EVERYTHING wears.out. Even our best dolls wz// break their noses
and legs or get the pretty pink rubbed off their cheeks, and the sturdy
rocking-horses that seem made to last forever, one day, at a most unexpected
moment, kick a little too hard, and awa; goes Tom, Dick, or Harry, and the
norse has to be sent to the mender. When such things break, how can we
expect umbrellas to last, umbrellas that are borrowed by neighbors so often,
turned inside out by frisky winds, and left by negligent boys and girls where

mice or moths caneat them. Yes, they wear out and must be mended. In

the picture you sce a good man who has seen that it is about to rain and has

gotten out the old blue gingham that has been used by every one in and out
of the family for years until it needs a deal of fixing to make it keep water
offone. Itisa bad job; so he has taken his tools, after lighting a comfort-
ing pipe, to the settle by the fire-place. He will make it as easy as pos-
sible, and perhaps, dear man that he is, he will spend so much time over it
that the shower will have come and gone before the umbrella can be used.
But never mind, it has been a good job for a rainy day, and is all ready for
the girls to take to school wren the next storm comes. Perhaps you may dis-
cover that the man is a shoemaker, and that he has taken the umbrella into
the shop. The artist leaves us a little in doubt, does he not?

The man who first carried an umbrella in England — it was a red one —
was laughed at, but he persevered, and now, as the triolet says,

‘* Who cares for the rain

If umbrellas are good?

It may beat on the pane:
Who cares for the rain?

It mav sweep o’er the plain
Or drench the dark wood:

Who cares for the rain
If umbrellas are good?”

he Signal Service.

Wear do you suppose all those queer things are on the top of this
building? Did you say weather-vanes? You are right: they are weather-
vanes and pans for collecting water to show how much rain falls, and a kind
of whirligig thing for telling how fast the wind travels, how many miles an
hour it flies, and how strangely it changes its path, now going east, now
west, now southeast or north, or any other way it pleases. ‘+ The wird
bloweth where it listeth,’” and these vanes and other things are connected
with the rcoms in the building below; and in the rooms are men who spend
all their time in watching them and keeping record of just when and how
they change. There are three hundred and sixty-seven of these stations in

the United Sta’es, and they all telegraph every day to this building to tell
the man there just how the wind and rain, and heat and cold are at their



Mgnpinc tig UMBReLLA.

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD. wo





























THE SIGNAL OFFICE.

station, and there are telegrams coming from other places, in Canada, New-
foundland, and the West Indies, making similar reports. But why? What
good does it do the men to know?

Once, not many years ago, men did no know when storms were coming,
or when waves of heat or cold were on the way to them, and many crops
were injured because the farmers were not ready for the storm, and many
brave sailors perished because they could not know when to put their vessels
into safe harbors. But now the telegraph tells the men in this house when
a storm is coming, and the men send the news immediately to every city
in the country, and to all the places by the sea, and at these places they put
up different flags, each fag meaning a particular kind of wind or storm, so
that the people can cover their grain, or get in their hay, or keep their ves-
sels safe. By that means much precious food is saved and many men kept
from death. Is not that a wonderful and noble thing to do? You may see
one of these ‘* weather reports” in Papa’s paper any day.

This house is in Washington, where the President lives, and though it
is not so handsome a building as the White House or the Capitol, is quite
as useful in its way.

Wt Tome in the Moods.

Yes, the mother doe and her two pretty fawns are
very much at home among these shining green leaves which
dance in the sunlight and make a kind of music that all the
deer love. See how the doe’s soft eyes look into the green-
ness. She docs not suspect that we are looking at her.
They have all come down to the pool to drink and eat the
juicy grass that grows there. In the pool are lily-pads and
arrow-wecd, and you may see one yellow lily just opening
its petals under the tall grass in which the dragon-flies flit
to and fro. Such a lovely piace as this must be full of birds,
and their singing. Let us hope that no hunter with his
cruel gun may find this peaceful spot and kill the beautiful
doe and fawns. Ilow much better they look in their home
than in the wire-enclosed yards of city parks. Do you not
think they often wish to be back among the tall trees and
sheltering bushes? And when night comes how they must
long to get away from all harsh city noises to the silent
dimness of the forest. When we see them in the parks we
must not tease them, but speak gently, because they are
very timid and homesick.

But it is pleasant to look into their real home, as we
do here, without disturbing them in the least.











HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

Aes
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Veet
By suf
ath

AT HOME IN THE WOODS.






































HAPPY



HOURS IN THE LITTLE



Hive Hittle @hickeno.

Sarp the first little chicken,
With a queer little squirm,
“Oh, wish I could find
A fat little worm!”

Said the next tittle chicken,
With an odd little shrug,
*¢ Oh, I wish I could find
A fat little bug!”’

Said the third little chicken,
With a sharp little squeal,

“ Oh, I wish I could find
Some nice, yellow meal!”

Said the fourth little chicken, ¥
With a small sigh of grief,
“Oh, I wish I could find
A green little leaf!’’

Said the fifth little chicken,
With a faint little moan,
“ Oh, I wish I could find
A wee gravel stone!”’

** Now see here,’’ said the mother,
From the green garden patch,
“Tf you want any breakfast,
You just come and scratch.”

‘THE MoRNING LIGHT.”

“The Morning Eight.”
oe oa eae

CHILDREN are sometimes compared to the morning light because
they are bright and young and full of joy.

These children are no doubt the pet of some household. They
are some mother’s darlings, who carefully watches over them and
tends their wants. When night comes and the darkness shuts their
blue eyes in sleep she tucks them in their bed and prays for them.

Cut into the wide world she knows they will have to go some-
time, and she feels sad as she thinks of the hard things they may
have to meet without a mother’s care and love about them,

A good mother, such as you have, never can forget her children
but will love and pray for them so long as she lives:

‘¢ For the little ones so dear,

Oft reposing on your breast .
Never in the coming years,

Though they seek for it with tears,
Will they find so sweet a rest.

Feet like those may go astray
Bruised and bleeding by the way,

fre they reach the mansion blest!
Pray, mother, pray !”.



Phe Boy at the Whee,
The sea! the sea! the open seal! “T’m on the sea!

The blue, the fresh, the ever free!
Without a mark, without a bound;

It runneth the earth’s wide regions round; And silence whereso’er I go!

It plays with clouds; it mocks the skies, If a storm should come and awake the deep,
Or like a cradled creature lies, What matter! I shall ride and sleep.

é I'm on the sea!
Tam where I would ever be;
With the blue above, and the blue below,

‘"Y never was on the dull, tame shore,
But I loved the great sea more and more,
And backward flew to her billowy breast,
Like a bird that seeketh its mother’s nest}
And a mother she was, and is to me; 1
For I was born on the open sea!” os





he Silonder WMorld.

HAveE you ever looked up some bright night into the sky, and
have you wondered what the golden specks which seem to come out
one by one, are? How like diamonds they sparkle.

Are they worlds like this one of ours, and do men and women
live there, are questions that many people ask.

The stars are a long, long way off, perser” who look througha
glass called a telescope tell us that some of these stars are suns to
other worlds, as our bright sun is to our world.

The ray of sunlight which shone in your room this morning had
to travel a long, long way too. How many miles do you think it came.
Ninety-five million miles, just think of that! While youslept, this bit
of sunlight was coming as fast as it could to welcome you when

)

you woke.

There is a study called astronomy which tells about the wonders
of the starry world above us. Mary has begun to learn it, and she
is now looking for the Milky Way, and Venus, the beautiful evening

star. Have you ever seen them?

God made the sun, moon and stars, and all things, and cares for
them by his great power.



Tue WoNDRR WORLD.



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.





Santa Claus.

Ts there one of you who has not had a dream of Santa Claus, in his fur coat,
and with his streaming white beard, drawn swiftly throughthesky; with his
four Reindeer prancing with keen enjoyment? You have dreamed of him, but per-
haps he did not look to you as he did to the artist who made this picture. In this
picture, Time, who is made like a very o/d man —as he certainly is— with great
wings and a scythe and hour glass stands in the belfry of the church and rings the
chimes for the hour which makes Christmas. Time knows, for he has watched
the sand in his hour-glass run for years and years. Santa Claus heard the first
stroke of the bell and whistling to his Reindeer away they flew, his sleigh loaded
with presents for all good little boys and girls, and for some naughty ones, too.
Santa Claus loves above everything else to make children happy by giving them
what they want most; so we should help him by telling him what we want. But
if he does not give it us we must not be cross and say unkind things about him.

Sometimes he knows better than we what we ought to have; and sometimes
the very thing we want is needed more by somebody else. Not one of you will
forget Santa Claus, for he has certainly been very kind to you in the past.

Oh Christmas is most jolly,

With mistletoe and holly.
SING HEIGH HO!

Who comes here every year?
@ld Santa Claus so dear.
SING HEIGH HO!

And we will love him so
He’ll follow where we go;
SING HEIGH Ho!

And bring sweet things and toys
Te all good girls and boys.
SING HEIGH Ho!





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD. | a ‘



is for the Antelope,
an A species of Deer,

Tt bounds away swiftly
When danger is near.





7% is for the Beaver,
5 Forthriftthey’re renowned, 3
" By the banks of the river Bad
Their dams may be found.



rN is for the Camel

— , With a hump on its back, CG
Tis the ship of the desert
Marching o’er its hot track.



We is for the Deer,
y Of kinds there’s a score, { §
’ There’s the Red Deer and Roe- “*
buck,
And a great many more.



â„¢ is for the Elephant,
| With its wonderful size, Qe
i—@ How useful its trunk,
And how small are its eyes.

Bis for the fox, |
He’s both cunning and sly,

When he visits the hen roost,
The poor biddies fly.





4 is for the Giraffe,

g He's so wonderfully tall, 9
" He eats from the tree tops,

And. sees above all.



r"@ is for the horse,













- "y is for the Newt,





So faithful and true,



Ba ol He’s the friend of mankind Ea

The wide world through.

is for the Ibex, , _

On the mountains so steep, |

whit "Tis there that you find him,

With his bold flying leap.

is for the Jackal, : i

"Tis a dreadful sight
To see them in packs,

As they prowl in the night.

7 is for the Kangaroo,

\ A creature most queer, FA
® When running at high leap,“
With his tail he will steer.



is for the Leopard,
With rich, spotted hair,

“Tis a fierce, savage creature

Should you pass near its lair.

mis for the Moose,

In the far north’tis seen,

iV dhe Tis hunted by sportsmen

When the north winds are ~
keen.

A Tis scarcely animal or bird,
' But some like frogs and fishes
I think I have heard.



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



is for the Ox, .
— Slow, steady, and strong, QO
When yoked to the plough _

He pulls all day long.

is for the Porcupine,
With his quills so queer,
i It becomes a prickly ball,
When its foes are near.



(%, is for the Quagga,

. p From Africa far away,

“® Tis striped like the Zebra,
And when tamed will obey.



ww is for the Rabbit,
rm With pink eyes so mild, r
“ Their white, brown or black
coats |
Are loved by each child.

CY is for the Squirrel
S That lives in the trees, S
And gathers the sweet nuts
- With greatest of ease.



is for the Tiger,
Which the natives all fear T,

When he roars in the jungle,
_ And is known to be near.



is for the Unicorn

Which never was seen, ul
Except on Coat of Arms

Of the good British Queen.

7 is for the Viper |

Which runs on the round. VJ
"Tis one of the snake kind,

The most deadly one found.



cE Y is for the Wolf
Which is given to W
prowling,
As the woods they range
through
They’re constantly howling.



is for Xiphias,

Of the swordfish kind, X
He’s a dangerous monster

As the sailor can find.



is for the Yak,
Some like horse, ox, and Vy
sheep,
With many good traits,
He’s useful to keep.



Va is for the Zebra

# , With a striped glossy coat,
! A swift-footed fellow,

And a creature of note,



) in all the animal kingdom



There’s no creature so sweet

WY As the dear little girl and boy
Who play at our feet.





|



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.
eee T SA e A SSP st SSS,



Barn-Yard Folk.

How haughtily that tall cock holds his head. Is hea prince
or a cardinal? Oh, no, he has just crowed, that’s all; but he thinks
his crow the most musical and noticeable performance of the whole
day. He practiced his crow two hours before day-break, and then
at sun-rise he felt he had it perfected, and let off the whole force of
it, as if he had performed a very creditable service to us all. He is
terribly proud. But let him crow a few more mornings, then his
pride will have a fall, and this head that he now holds so high above
all hens and lesser cocks, will be lying in the grass by the. chopping
block, while his body will be hung in the town market, for every
boarding-houskeeper to stick her thumbs into, and say, «A tough
old cock,’ and lay him aside with disdain.

Just see how the tall cock has taught the little one, by example,
to be just as conceited, and hold his head as high as he can. No-

body wants to eat you, little cock; you need not fear. How meekly

the poor hen walks by their side. She dare not hold up her head,
yet what a useful creature she is. How could we make sponge cake
without the eggs she lays? But surely the cocks are handsome fel-
lows though they are vain.

: The Merveo.

How do the muscles know when to move? You have all seen
the telegraph wires, by which messages are sent from one town to
another, all over the country.

You are too young to understand how this is done, but you each
have something inside of you, by which you are sending messages
almost every minute while you are awake.

We will try to learn a little about its wonderful way of working.
In your head is your brain. It is the part of you which thinks.

As you would be very badly off if you could not think, the brain
is your most precious part, and you have a strong box made of bone P
to keep it in. ; .

We will call the brain the central telegraph office. Little white
cords, called nerves, connect the brain with the rest of the body.

A large cord, called the spinal cord, lies safely ina bony case
made by the spine, and many nerves branch off from this.

If you put your fingers on a hot stove, in an instant a message
goes on the nerve telegraph to the brain. It tells that wise thinking
part that your finger will burn if it stays on the stove.

In another instant, the brain sends back a message to the mus-

cles that move that finger, saying: ‘‘ Contract quickly, bend the joint,

and take that poor finger away, so that it will not be burned.”

You can hardly believe that there was time for all this sending of
messages ; for as soon as you felt the hot stove you pulled your fin-
ger away. But you really could not have pulled it away unless the
brain had sent word to the muscles to do it.

Now you know what we mean when we say, ‘‘As quick as
thought.” — Surely nothing could be quicker.

You see that the brain has a great deal of work to do, for it has
to send so many orders.

There are some muscles which are moving quietly and steadily
all the time, though we take no notice of the motion.

You do not have to think about breathing, and yet the muscles
work all the time moving your chest.

If we had to think about it every time we breathed, we should
have no time to think of any thing else.

There is one part of the brain that takes care of such work for us.
It sends the messages about breathing, and keeps the breathing mus-
cles and many other muscles faithfully at work. It does all this with-
out our needing to know or think about it at all.

Do you begin to see that your body is a busy work-shop, where
many kinds of work are being done all day and all night?

Although we lie still and sleep in the night, the breathing must
goon, and so must the work of those other organs that never stop
until we die.

The little white nerve-threads lie smoothly side by side, making
small white cords. Each kind of message goes on its own
thread, so that the messages need never get mixed or confused.

These nerves are very delicate little messengers. They do all the
feeling for the whole body, and by means of them we have many pains
and many pleasures.

If there was no nervein your tooth it could not ache. But if there
were no nerves in your mouth and tongue, you could not taste your
food.

If there were no nerves in your hands, you might cut them and
feel no pain. But you could not feel your mother’s soft, warm hand,
as she laid it on yours.

One of your first duties is the care of yourselves.

Children may say: ‘* My father and mother take care of me.”
But even while you are young, there are some ways in which no one
can take care of you but yourselves. The older you grow, the more
this care will belong to you, and to no one else.

Think of the work all the parts of the body do for us, and how
they help us to be well and happy. Certainly the least we can dois

to take care of them and keep them in good order.





As one part of the brain has to take care of all the rest of the
body, and keep every organ at work, of course it can never go to
sleep itself. If it did, the heart would stop pumping, the lungs
would leave off breathing, all other work would stop, and the body

would be dead.
But here is another part of the brain which does the thinking

and this part needs rest.
When you are asleep you are not thinking, but you are breathing,

and other work of the body is going on.

If the thinking part of the brain does not have good quiet sleep,
it will soon wear out. A worn-out brain is not easy to repair.

If well cared for, your brain will do the best of work for you for
seventy or eighty years without complaining.
They

get tired out if we do one thing too long at a time; they are rested by

The nerves are easily tired out, and they need much rest.

a change of work.
Think of the wonderful work the brain is all the time doing for

you! '
You ought to give it the best of food to keep it in good working

order. Any drink that contains alcohol is not a food to make one
strong; but is a poison to hurt, and at last to kill.

It injures the brain and nerves so that they can not work well,
and send their messages properly. That is why the drunkard does
not know what he is about.

Newspapers often tell us about people setting houses on fire ;
about men who forgot to turn the switch, and so wrecked a railroad
train; about men who lay down on the railroad track and were run
over by the cars.

Oiten these stories end with: ‘* The person had been drinking.”
When the nerves are put to sleep by alcohol, people become careless
and do not do their work faithfully ; sometimes, they cannot even tell
the difference between a railroad track and a place of safety. The
brain receives no message, or the wrong one, and the person does not

know what he is doing.
You may say that all men who drink liquor do not do such tern-

ble things.
That is true.
- But even a little makes the head ache, and hurts the brain and nerves.

A little alcohol is not so bad as a great deal.

A body kept pure and strong is of great service to its owner.
There are people who are not drunkards, but who often drink a little
liquor. By this means they slowly poison their bodies.

When sickness comes upon them they are less able to bear it,
and less likely to get well again than those who have never injured
their bodies with alcohol.

When a sick or wounded man is brought into a hospital, one of
the first questions asked him by the doctor is: ‘“‘ Do you drink?”

If he answers ‘‘ Yes!” the next questions are, ‘‘ What do you
drink?” and ‘* How much?” ait

The answers he gives to these questions show the doctor what
chance the man has of getting well.

A man who never drinks liquor will get well, where a drinking
man would surely die.

Why does any one wish to use tobacco?

Because many men say that it helps them and makes them feel

better.
Shall I tell you how it makes you feel better?

If a man is cold, the-tobacco deadens his nerves so that he does
not feel the cold, and does not take the pains to make himself warmer.

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



If a man is tired, or in trouble, tobacco will not really rest him
or help him out of his trouble.

It only puts his nerves to sleep and helps him think that he is
not tired, and that he does not need to overcome his troubles.

It puts his nerves to sleep very much as alcohol does, and helps
him to be contented with what ought not to content him.

A boy who smokes or chews tobacco, is not so good a scholar
as if he did not use the poison. He can not remember his lessons
so well.

Usually, too, he is not so polite, nor so good a boy as he other-
wise would be.—Chila’s Health Primer.



Whe Partridge Family.

THE partridge has taken her brood of six little ones to a quiet
She is afraid of the
sportsman’s gun, which she heard not long ago, but she tries not to
What a kind
mother! see, she has found a fat caterpillar and instead of swal-

spot among the grass and underbrush to feed.
frighten her, children by showing that she fears.

lowing it herself, she unselfishly lays it down for the little fellows
treat. If it were not for the sportsman’s gun what days of delight
she would have roaming about the woods and along the roads, teach-
ing her brood the woodcraft that all well-bred partridges should
know. They are beautiful birds and deserve to be happy.











he

Butterfly and the Grasshopper.

‘‘PretTty Butterfly, stay!
Come down here and play,”
A Grasshopper said,

As he lifted his head.

‘¢Oh, no! and oh, no!

Daddy Grasshopper, go!

Once you weren’t so polite,

But said ‘ Out of my sight,

You base, ugly fright !’”
“Ohno! andoh,no! —

T never said so,”

The Grasshopper cried :

‘¢T’d sooner have died
Than been half so rude,

You misunderstood.”
‘“©Oh, no! I did not;
*T was near to this spot:
The offence, while I live,
I cannot forgive.”
“ When and where such disdain,
Such conduct improper,
Was shown by this Hopper.”
‘«T then was a worm:
*Tis a fact I affirm,”
The Butterfly said,
With a toss of her head,
‘‘In my humble condition,
Your bad disposition,
Made you spurn me as mean,
And not fit to be seen.
In my day of small things
You dreamed not that wings
Might one day be mine,—
Wings handsome and fine,
That help me soar up
To the rose’s full cup,
And taste of each flower
In garden and bower.
This moral now take
For your own better sake ;
Insult not the low;
Some day they may grow
To seem and to do
Much better than you.
Remember, and so, ;
Daddy Grasshopper, go!





”



The Star Spangled Banner.

Here is the dear old flag we love
so well. See how proudly it waves.
3} Can you tell how many stars should
\. be onits blue field? Itis called some-
i} times the ‘flag of the free,” and some-
times the ‘‘ Star-Spangled Banner.”

Do you know the origin of the
song which we love to sing, called the
«« Star-Spangled Banner?”

In the year 1814, in the war with
England, some British troops took

? the city of Washington and burned
Ss the Capitol and the President’s house.
A few weeks later they tried to take Baltimore, a city not far distant,
by bombarding Fort Henry. An American gentleman, by flag of
truce, came to the city to see about some laws regarding exchange
of prisoners. On account of the attack he was kept on board the
admiral’s vessel. : ; ‘

All day, while the shots and shells were flying thick and fast,
he watched the flag of his country. And at night he thought about
it. Would it be pulled down by the enemy? In the morning he



-HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

looked with longing eyes and anxious heart, and rejoiced to see it
still floating. :

His name was Francis S. Key, and he afterward wrote the song
entitled the ‘* Star-Spangled Banner,” whose chorus is:

“Tis the Star-Spangled Banner,
Oh, long may it wave,
_ O’er the land of the free,
And the home of the brave.”

& Race of Lartar Women.

“oO

How they go! what a dust those hoofs kick up! They are
almost at the goal, and the one who is a little ahead looks already as
if she were saying, I told you so! while the other clutches her whip
and looks not at all happy.

But what sort of women are these with strange costumes and
shoes whose toes turnup? They are Tartars, and if you will get out
your atlas and turn to the map of Asia you will find a place called
Tartary where they live. They are wild and fierce, but very intelli-
gent. The chances are that whoever wins this race will be well
scolded by the other, for they are not very polite or good-natured
people, and very much dislike being beaten at anything.

Do-you notice in this picture how the women sit in their saddles?
They have no riding habits, and they do not sit sideways after the
fashion of the ladies ‘you have seen riding in the parks. They sit
just as men do, and ride just as well.
in the saddle, do they not? |

Do you notice the strange mark on the nearer horse? It looks
like a big O with an N in it, with a mark across the N. That is
what is called a brand. They take a red-hotiron and burn the mark
with it. It is rather a cruel way for the master of the horse to put
his name on him. Do you think it would be better to paint the
name? But the paint would wear off with the hair, when the mark
is burned in it always stays.

They look very much at home

None of us would like to have our
names burned into our arms or legs or cheeks, surely, luckily we
need not, for we have our names told to us, and we can tell them to
others.

What a lively race this is? Do you think the horse that is now
ahead will really beat?

The Millage Doctor's Christmas Gall.

Tue good doctor had just seated himself to dine on roast duck
and all the other dainties of his Christmas dinner when there came a
pounding at the door, and a summons to visit little Jack Horner
away at the other end of the village. The doctor knows thatit is likely

little Jack has eaten too much Christmas pie, which has made him ill

of course; but the doctor can not stop for that. It may be a danger-
ous illness, and he has devoted his life to the saving of others as far
asmay be. It is snowing heavily, the wind drives the snow fiercely,
but he must go, so looking once more, a little sadly perhaps, at the
steaming duck, he puts on his thick coat, has Dolly saddled, and
starts out to face the wind and plunge through the drifts.

Who can but admire the good doctors who so bravely face not
only storms but every manner of dreadful disease to make suffering —
lighter? a:

Let us hope that little Jack will never eat too: much again, to
cause so much trouble, and let us hope also, that the ducks may
still be hot when the doctor reaches home, to taste all the better be-
cause he has done his duty and made Jack happy again.





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a = z = SSS

THE VILLAGE DOCTOR’S CHRISTMAS CALL.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A Prospective Feast.

I Prospective

Tuis is little Erik, and he is six years old. The
man who made the picture took pains to put the name
-and the age up there in the corner, What a pleasant,
sweet-mannered boy he is, with his clean apron and
neatly brushed brown hair. His eyes are brown, too.
Every one must like Erik, he has so pleasant a smile
and sits there so quietly for the artist to paint his
portrait.

The artist said: “Let’s make believe, Erik, that
you're going to have a feast of apples. Il put a nice
knife here on the table, and you can hold one of the
prettiest apples in your hand.” Erik throught he should

like to sit so, because it was almost like a joke, to



make people believe he was only a boy in a picture,
and not a “really and truly” person; and besides he
knew he should have the nice apples when the artist
was through with them. Surely it makes a better
picture than it would if the artist had set little Erik
up as if he were a doll with wooden arms and legs,
against a door or chair-back. It would not be
pleasant to always see Erik in one’s parlor, or in a
book, if he looked like a stiff doll. Now he will alway-
give you pleasure, and almost wish you could hav.
your portraits painted in the same way; or perhaps you
had rather be eating the apples.



























































































(Gasmeiseer tern SEE CD Eero




-— ean
Vs ~ Af hia Me 4 r
PA WS (inna ff (vu 42 Ui

al

‘© Oven the ice so smooth and bright,
How we skim along!
This is one of the merriest sports
Which to hardy boys belong.
Hurrah! Hurrah! for the ice and snow,
Our blood is warm and fresh, you know.

‘HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.





me

He Merry Day on the kee.

‘¢ The ice is as strong as strong can be,
And what have we to fear?
It looks like a solid crystal lake
So beautifully clear.
Hurrah! Hurrah! though winter it is,
There’s nothing in summer so fair as this.”









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Wuar a splendid building! See how it spreads itself over the land.
{t must be proud of its grandeur, and surely it has a right to be. The
great George Washington laid the southeast corner-stone of it when he was
President, in 1793, for he knew that the country must have a building big
enough to hold all the senators and representatives of the states when the
assembled to make the country’s laws. But it was not used by them till
1814, because the architects. quarrelled, although they were old enough to
know better, much as school boys do. Quarrelling takes time and causes

The Capitol at Washington.



much trouble. The building was not complete even then, and afterwards
still other architects had charge of it; in fact it was not till over fifty years
after that it was finished. In 1814, when the British troops invaded the
city of Washington, they thought it a very clever thing to burn the buildings
belonging to the government. So up the hill, on which the capitol is built,
they marched and fired shots through the windows; then a whole regiment,
with Admiral Cochburn at the head, marched into the hall of the House
of Representatives insolently playing the tune of the ‘‘ British Gren-







father has money enough to





adiers.” The admiral. seated himself in the chair of the speaker of the
house, surrounded by his troops. He asked them if the building should be
burned. They all said yes, so they took valuable books and papers from the
library, pictures from the walls, and tore down: board partitions and with
them made a big bonfire. Then after firing rockets they marched out to let
the building burn and to start other fires. But only the inside of the capitol
was destroyed. The walls remained. It was rebuilded better than it was
built, until now it is one of the wonderful buildings of the world.

It has an enormous dome and many other fine things which you will be
glad to read of when you are older. AJ that is necessary for you to remem-
ber is that George Washington laid the corner stone, and that in it are made
the laws of the country by the men who are sent by the people in each state,
instead of going themselves, for you see the building could not hold @// the
people of the country, and even if it could, it would take forever to hear

them all,
George ‘Washington.

EVERYBODY recognizes the portrait of Washing-
ton, he has so marked a face, and his pictures are so
scattered everywhere. And everybody knows what a
great and good man he was, because he did so much
for our country, of which he
is called the father, and has
Heen talked about so often.
He was born on the 22d of
February, 1732,inthe County
of Westmoreland, Virginia.
His boyhood was very much
like that of every man whose

give him society, although
his father died when he was
Fortu-

mother was a

but ten years old._
nately, his
woman both good and wise,
so she took upon herself the
education of George. Her
own learning, perhaps, was
not very wide, but what she

had learned she knew thor-



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.

eS ee ee
was so much thought of that he was entrusted with
a very important commission, to carry a letter to the
French, who were then making a. line of forts from
Canada to Louisiana, and taking too many liberties with
King George’s land, for it was. King George’s in those
The French would
not stop, however, so King George fought them, that

days, and not our United States.

“is, he made his American subjects fight them, and our

George distinguished himself by good judgment and

courage in the fight with them. But the king became

very hard upon the American colonists, by heavy tax-

ation, and the colonists decided not to bear with him

longer. Washington took sides against the king,
and was elected a member
of the first Congress, which
assembled in Philadelphia in
1774, and afterwards when

the - Colonists found they
must fight the king, and an
army was raised, George
Washington was appointed
to the high position of Com-
mander-in-chief of the Con-
tinental Army.

That was in 1775. He
foughtsowell, was so firm,and
showed suchremarkable judg-
ment, that after the colonists
had whipped the king, and
established a glorious govern-
ment of their own, Wash-

ington was chosen by every-

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

oughly. She taught him
nothing but the English language and mathematics.

, He must have known considerable of the latter, for
he was qualified to be a land surveyor. In 1746 he
wanted to go to sea very much, to become a midshipman
of the navy, but his good mother did not think it the
best thing for him, so he stayed at home, and learned
so fast and did so well that by the time he was 19 years
old he had made quite a reputation for himself, and
was afterwards nominated to be one of the adjutants-
general of Virginia. He made a voyage to the Bar-
badoes; that was about all his travel. But in 1753 he

body to be the President, in
1789. You see he was nota very brilliant man, not a
fine talker, indeed, he was often embarrassed and, per-
haps, bashful in company, but he was an earnest man,
and what he did know he knew thoroughly, which is
the very best thing. Hewas strong and courageous, was
very calm in the face of danger, and though of a pas-
sionate nature, he could control himself perfectly. Just
such a man as that was needed, you see, and we are fortu-
nate in having so good and so wise a man to be the first
ruler of our country.
owed his mother, as so many other great men have





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

a a

done. The lesson to be learned from his life is that
goodness and wisdom are better and more powerful
than brilliancy of wit and a showy disposition.
Washington was tall and very majestic in appear-
ance, and above all an intellectual man, not one whose
emotions were keen. His country honors him as it
should, and on the 22d of February in every year it

celebrates, with loving remembrance, his birthday.



abraham Wincoln.

No man who ever did anything for our country is
so much loved and revered as he whose portrait is
before us. In 1809 he was born in Kentucky, and his
father and mother were not
Ken-
tucky at that time was a
wild
plentiful, schools were not,
so that the boy Abraham

had very small chance in-

extraordinary people.

region; bears were

deed to. get an education, but
he made the very most of
such chance as he did have,
and that
great deal.

means a very.
But he had an
instinct for learning and
used to write out his recol-
lections of his studies and
of what he saw; by that
means he learned more rap-
idly and fixed all he learned
in his mind. And it gave
him practice in penmanship, so that by the time he
was nineteen years old he had acquired a remarkably
good and serviceable hand-writing. And he soon showed
considerable business. capacity so that he was trusted
with a cargo of farm produce which he took to New
Orleans and sold. He had by this time grown to the re-
markable height of six feet four inches, and he was
_normously strong, so that when his father removed to
Macon, Illinois, he helped him clear the land, build his
log homeand split big walnut logs into fence rails. When
his father was well settled, he left him and hired himself



ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

toa man named Offutt, who was building a flat boat to go
to New Orleans on a trading voyage. He went with
Offutt to New Orleans and returned with him to Salem,
where Offutt opened a variety store. Lincoln accom.
plished little at this, but he continued his reading and
studies, (do not forget that), especially English gram-
mar and surveying. Soon after he was made post-
master of New Salem and was that for several years.
From that he became a politician, a member of the
legislature, then the sixteenth President of the United
States.
United States! Think of it! And not only President,
but the noblest man that has ever governed our country.

From splitting rails to being President of the

A man of deep religious feeling, a man calm and cour-
ageous in the face of dan-
ger, and wise always. He was
President during the great
Civil War, which you will
know about sometime, and
that meant at the most terri-
ble moment of our history,
and by his great power and
goodness, thousands of poor
black men and women and
children who had been living
as slaves, whipped and half-
starved, were set at liberty
and became citizens, like all
of us, of these United States.
And because he did that glo-
rious deed, that most beauti-



ful and humane act, he was
assassinated, shot with a pis-
tol while witnessing a play in a theatre. Was that’
not terrible and barbarous? He died on the 15th of
April, 1865, and will always be remembered and
reverenced as one of the best and greatest men that
have ever lived. You will be glad to have a portrait

of him where you may see it at any time.

Worx while you work, play while you play,
This is the way to be cheerful and gay.
All that you do, do with your might,

Things done by halves are never done rignt.













HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

The Hittle Grandmother.



‘We have the sweetest little girl
That ever you did see,
As bright, as happy, and as fair,
As ever she can be.

‘¢ Her eyes are black as any crow’s,
And always full of fun,
And sparkle so with love and joy,
Your heart is fairly won.

‘+ Her lips are like the cherry ripe,
And taste to us more sweet,
And the pure rapture of a kiss
Is as when brooklets meet.

¢¢ Her hair is like a bunch of wheat
Kissed by the morning sun,

_ Just as the god of day begins
His golden race to run.

s¢ Her voice is to our listening ears
As music soft and sweet,
The echo of whose gentle tones
Is touched by little feet.

‘s Her ways are cute and roguish, too,
And take the heart by storm,
While all the fountains of her life

Are pure and sweet and warm.

¢s Our Father! Keep this treasure dear
Beneath Thy sheltering wing,
And let her little hands unto
The Rock of Ages cling.”



Squirrels,

Out of the woods they came
into the village street. It was
such fun to hop from limb to limb
and to seek one still sweeter nut
than the last, that before they
knew it they were far from their
holes in the trees of the wood.
But they didn’t much care; they
were not tired. They crooked
their- bushy tails and winked at
each other with their bright eyes,
and said, ‘‘This is surely a
pretty joke!” Then they
laughed in this quiet way and
hopped towards home. They
arrived just after sunset. They
thought that every other squirrel
in the wood would laugh at them
for going so far, but they had not
even been missed; for the other
squirrels were wise and attended
to their own business of laying
by a large store of nuts and
acorns, to eat during the bitter
cold and snow of winter.

You have seen squirrels in
cages, have you not? They even
then must keep on hopping and
leaping, so men make things like
wire barrels for them to run in.
When they leap it makes the
wire barrel whirl round, and the















































squirrel thinks he is going a long ways, but, poor fellow, he is just
where he was before — shut up.

The squirrels in the picture are gray. They are lively fellows,
and are so sweet and tender that they will probably be made into a
stew before long. Let us hope not. It is so much better to live
among the clean, green leaves, than it is to be boiled in a pot and
stirred with a long handled spoon, besides it cannot be very nice to
be in so mixed a company as the potato and salt and pepper — pepper
think of it! —surely. No, let us have green trees and cool woods,

‘instead of the cook’s fire and a deluge of pepper and salt.

































































WEid-Wiinter.

How it snows! Thicker and faster as the day closes.

So thick
that it seems as if the very trees will be covered. Itis cold, too.
Even the sparrows are ready to seek shelter, and you know how brave
they are generally, for you have seen them hopping about the streets
many a time when all ordinary people were indoors by the fire.
What a racket they make in their little tent of boughs. They are
sure to fight, for they are very quarrelsome little things. They hate
to see one of their brothers with a hice big crumb, so straightway fly
at him and try to snatch it away, which is very rude, indeed, and can
only be excused because they do not know any better.

Mid-winter! Sleighing parties, coasting, skating, snow-balling,
charades, long hours with books by the crackling fires. Mid-winter !
To some, hunger, shivering in miserable houses, with no fuel and
few clothes. To such, Mid-winter is a terror, but to all of you, who
should not forget these others in your enjoyment, it is a time of
laughter, fun, and healthy exercise.

This is rather a dreary picture. Sparrows are more enjoyable
when the sun is bright and warm. They like the sun better, too.
‘© Who killed cock sparrow?”





~~



' HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

whe Eright

Ou, naughty, naughty grandpa!
to tease little Karl so! Karl turns
to his mother, for he knows she will
protect him from the great goose,
whose big orange-colored bill seems
much too near his arm.

Karl was visiting his grandpa,
and grandma had ordered the old
goose killed for dinner. It was
brought in and put upon the
table, when little Karl got up by
his mother to look at it. Grandpa,
who loves a joke, took up the goose
and made its neck move and its
wings flap, and he hissed through
his teeth, as geese will, till poor Karl
began to think the goose alive after
all. Then mamma smiled and
grandpa laughed long and loudly ;
but he gave Karl a penny to buy
candy with to pay for his fright.
Probably Karl will notjump another
time, but some of us have jumped
at smaller things than that. Karl
is a dear little boy, just as full of
fun as grandpa. They have very
lively times together. Sometimes
itis hard to tell which is the younger,
grandpa or Karl. Karl has a rock-
ing-horse, a trumpet, a brightsword,
a cup and ball, and a small red
horse on four wheels. He likes his





THE FRIGHT.

trumpet and red horse best. Grandpa threatens to buy him a drum,
but mamma says if he does she will never bring Karl to see him
again. That frightens grandpa, and probably the drum will still
stay in the shop window where grandpa first saw it.

Perhaps what Karl likes best is to ride grandpa’s old white
horse, Dick, to the watering trough.

He does it nearly every day.

Be the matter what it may,
Always speak the truth.

If at work, or if at play,
Always speak the truth.

Never Hell a Hie.

Never tell a lie, my boy, Now, as in the coming years,
Always speak the truth. Always speak the truth.
If your life you would enjoy, Save your heart from bitter tears,

Always speak the truth. Always speak the truth.



Tue Ticress AND HER YOUNG.

Never from this rule depart,
Always speak the truth.
Fix it deeply in your heart,
Always speak the truth.



Lhe Higressand Her Poung.

WueEn you look at this picture per-
haps you will say, Oh, see this pretty
cat and her kittens. It does look like
a cat, and belongs to the same family,
but is many times larger and very
fierce. It is a tigress and.her little
ones. Do you notice the beautiful
stripes on their bodies? They are a
bright orange andblack. They seem

to be having a good time playing to-

gether. One of the little ones, you
sce, is perched on its mother’s back,
another is washing her face, while
the mother is washing the third, doing
just what you have often seen a cat
do with her kittens. They look very
innocent and pretty. Although the
tigress looks so kind while playing
with her little ones, if any one were
to pass near her she would spring upon
him, kill him, and then she and the
little ones would devour him. The
tiger hides by the side of water for ani-
mals as they come to drink. It may
be tamed when it is young, but cannot
be trusted when it becomes older.

J

al














Baie

Lease Ree eS ea

SEEN

eae vasae

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



















































































Going Skating.

Wuart a kind and pretty girl Miss Mabel is! Lucy and Nellie
and little Joe all went off coasting, and though Gyp stood on his hind
feet and begged in the proper way, they would not take him, for they
said he’d only be right in the way and they did not want to be
bothered. But Miss Mabel thought it too bad that Gyp should not
enjoy the bright, beautiful day, so she put on her jacket and fur cap
and muff, took her skates and dear Gyp and started for the pond. It
may be that in her very heart she expected to meet Arthur Lane
there, but nobody will blame her for that. At any rate she did meet
him there, and he politely put on her skates for her, and tried to
teach her to skate backwards. At sunset he took off her skates and
walked home with her. What a delightful afternoon it had been,
not only for Mabel and Arthur, but for Gyp.

He, silly little dog that he is, ran about, slipping on the ice,
barking most of the time, and chasing the skaters as they went glid-
ing by. Some boys had built a fire in the ice, and that greatly inter-
ested Gyp. He went to it and sniffed the heat with evident enjoy-
ment. Mabel thought that Lucy and Nellie and little Joe acted very
much ashamed of themselves when they found that she had taken

Gyp.



ihe Happy Families.

HERE are two very happy families, ona it were
hard to say which is the happier. Here are Ned and
Anne, and baby Alice with Mamma and Nurse. They
have just had their breakfast, and good Mamma thought
it would please them, as it certainly does, to have Nel
lie, the pug, and her three babies come into the dining:
room and eat their milk. How interested everybody is,

even the tiny puppies, who think milk the very nicest

thing in the whole world. Bye and bye they will find

that candy and nuts are a little better, but, dear things,

they are so very innocent and unaccustomed to the good
things of the world that milk eaten with mamma’s
tongue in the same dish is the height of delight to
them. One little fellow seem to need a guide to show
him the way to the dish. He hears the small tongue?
go lap-lap and he would be very glad to get a taste too
but he is uncertain on his legs as yet. | Anne will have
to pick him up and put his black nose in the milk. We
could all be happy in such a sunny and beautiful room,
one would think.

What comfortable lives pet dogs have! Always
fondled and loved, given nice soft beds to lie on, and
just as delicate food as any little boy or girl ever had,
with no care or trouble except being trodden on once in
a while. But we all have that. Do you like pugs ‘as
well as skye terriers or stag-hounds? They are very well--
behaved and knowing creatures, and you would become
very fond of one if you had him. There are many —
pretty things in this room which you can find for your-

selves, but do not fail to see the beautiful hencock

feathers and flowers.





















































































































































































































































































































By















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THE HAPPY FAMILIES.





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



































































































































he Rishermen.

Loox at these hardy fishermen. They are home from a long
pull with the waves. They have had a stormy time at sea. The
winds have blown and the waters have dashed over their boats, but
they have come back safely. They seem now to be looking for an-
other schooner, which went out with them, but has got behind in the
fog of the night. -

I think they have been to catch cod and mackerel along the At-
lantic coast, or off the Bank of Newfoundland. It could not be in
the cold waters of Iceland, for they are not clad warmly enough.

My friend, who has spent some months on this barren island, tells
that the waters about it are full of excellent fish. Fishing sloops
from England, France, and Belgium go to the south and west coasts
of this cold land each year. Nearly one-half the men who live on
the island come to help them get the rich harvest of the seas, as they
call it. These men travel many miles in the midst of winter, while
the storm howls and the pale sun scarcely drives away the dark-
ness.

From February to June they work hard at their nets and lines.
They sleep in damp and narrow huts, and eat very poor food, mostly the

heads of the codfish, which cannot be sold, and sour curds or ** skier.”

The salmon of Iceland is put in cans and sold in the English
market. Do you ever think how many hardships the men who go
in ships on the sea have to endure, and that many of them lose their
lives and never come home to their families?

Once a fisherman used to go out in his little boat every morning
to catch fish, as a man goes to his business. His cottage was down
by the shore. His children could stand by the window and look out
on the blue water. They used to like to see the sun rise and make the
sea look like gold, or the moon come up, when there would be a sil-
ver road across the water.

Sometimes the sea tumbled and tossed, and the mother would be
afraid, and would pin a shawl up to the window so that her children
should not see the angry waves.

The kind-hearted fisherman knew his wife would be anxious lest
his little boat might be overturned sometime, and so he used to put
up a bright red sail. When the boats came in this could always
be seen, and the children would cry out, ‘the red sail, the red sail!”
And then the mother knew that the father of her darlings was safe.

a












2 © © @®@







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SIMONTON'S.,

ROCKLAND, MAINE.






















DRY « GOODS.

a







Cloaks, Carpets, Curtains,

and Feathers.’











Full Text



Library

Universi
of

Florida

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The Bald

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OUR DARLING BOY.


IN THE |



afer and + Old + dingles end Storicss:

--PRETH LY « Picture.



. | Be alee Re oy A R. REID. « PUBLISHERS.

THE REID JUVENILE PRES
Sa





RONDEAU.

Ou, happy hours, when all the day

Is spent in jollity and play,
With hoops or ball, with bow or gun,
To bat or shoot, or swiftly run,

And find each moment bright and gay

Oh, what care we if skies be gray,
When in the house we can array
Our dolls or with the cat have 1un?

Oh, happy hours |

With us December, March or May, .
Are all as one long holiday ;
And when all other sports are done,
Welcome, dear book, that once begun
Will make us glad with what you say,
Oh, Happy “Hours!”



Copyricut, By J. A. & R. A. Ruin.
1891.
























~

BSS
Ns



LITTLE FRITZ. — :



at

ae al

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

Wet the Sea-Shore,

Have you all been to the sea-shore?

Berty and Alice are stopping at the hotel on the hill. It is chil-
dren’s hour cn the shore, and the nurses have settled themselves
comfortably in the shade of the pavilion with the babies in their
carriages, to watch the bathers. Do you know what the bathers mean?
At this hour the nurses and children undress and put on some pretty
flannel robes. They then run out of the bathing houses into the
water. The waves come in and roll over them, and they dance and
splash, and scream and laugh, and plunge into the water. Berty and
Alice have had their dip this morning, and have become good friends
in the surf. They have now started to take ‘‘ Dolly” riding. Berty
has brought his hoop along to roll. It is such fun to see your foot-
prints in the sand, to make houses, and pick the pretty shells, the
mosses and wild flowers that grows close to the rocks. You would
never tire of it, know. Even children who quarrel over playthings,
become friends in tossing up, digging and building in the sand. Per-
haps it is because the next day all they have done the day before is
washed away by the great changing waves of the sea, Thus they
have all the pleasure over again, ever and ever new.















































































































































































































































































































KA AN















































































Lazy Sack.

Jack and Charlie are neighbor boys. Jack has always been a
lazy boy. He gets up late in the morning, and likes to play until the
last moment after the bell rings. Charlie is up early in the morning,
cuts wood, and helps to get breakfast. Yet he is always the first in
his place; studies his lessons in the evening, and knows what to do
for his teacher. Now he is preparing his arithmetic, while poor,
lazy Jack is trying to copy from him. It will not do him any good,
as when the teacher comes and qvestions Jack, she will find out
that te does not knov what he has written, and so he will be in a
state than if he had not copied from Charlie. It is a sad
\% boys or girls to deceive themselves, and then try to de-
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































AT THE SEA-SHORE,
Phe Noung Lrtiot.

How happy these dear little childrenare. This brother is an artist.
Do you know what it means to be an artist? It is to be able to creatc
on paper or canvas a picture of what we see or imagine, so that others
may see it as we do. You see here he has drawn a figure of a man,
and he is now busy with his brush, making another picture. See how
pleased he is, and how quietly his little brother and sister wait to see it.
He may yet be a great painter, and paint a large picture that will be
known all over the world.





































































































































































































































Tue Younc Artist.




HOURS IN

























THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.







he!
ws

Dogo. |

-HERE we see man’s loving and faithful companion, the dog.
Many of you have had a pet dog and know how fond he was of his
master; how he watched at the door for your return from school ;
how he pranced and danced and almost laughed when he knew you
were going to take him for a walk; and how, when you were sick
and the doctor came and mamma looked sadly, and spoke softly and
low, your dog lay at the bed-room door and waited till he could creep
in and lick your hand as it hung over the bedside, then crouched
low upon the floor, only too pleased to be allowed to be near his
master. When you were getting better what delight he showed as
you sat up in the easy chair! And on the first day you were able to
walk what capers of jcy!

The tall dog in the picture is a stag-hound, a very noble and
wise animal. that comes from Scotland. Sir Walter Scott, a great
man whose stories you will like when you are a little older, owned
one of these dogs, which he called Maida. Wherever he went the
dog went with him, and they loved each other dearly. When Maida
died of old age, Sir Walter wept bitterly, and said he had lost one of
his best friends. He buried her in his garden and raised a tomb-
stone to her memory. Then the great poet, Lord Byron, had a well-
. loved dog and wrote a beautiful poem in memory of him.

The centre dog in the picture is a fox hound; the squires and
lords of England keep great kennels of these hounds, and in



autumn when the poor hungry fox comes out to hunt for food, and
perhaps to rob the farmer's hen roosts, the master of the hounds gets
up a fox hunt and the men, and often ladies, too, ride fine horses,
galloping over the fields, jumping fences, till the hounds with their
fine noses scent the fox and run him to earth—that js, to his hole
in the ground,— when the huntsman cuts off the fox’s tail, or brush,
as they call it, and presents it to the best and fastest rider, the horse-
man who is first in at the death. Then the dogs tear the fox to
pieces. This is very cruel sport; don’t you think so, too?

The odd, short legged, very long dog at the left of the picture, is
also an English dog, called a beagle, and is used for hunting rabbits.
All this hunting seems very cruel, but perhaps these little creatures
who eat the corn and cabbages would get too plentiful and trouble-
some were they not destroyed in some way.

The two other dogs are a pointer and a setter, both dogs used
for hunting birds.

The pointer, when he scents a bird, stands very stifHy in one
spot, with his nose pointed at the game, and his tail stands out rigidly.
When the hunter fires, and the bird falls, the dog runs and brings
it to him in his mouth. Sometimes it is difficult to keep the dog
from tearing or eating the bird, so the trainer teaches him by making
him bring to him a worsted ball all filled with needles which he has
to hold very tenderly, or they will prick his mouth. he

‘




























Coaching.

WE must get out of the way, for this coach is coming right at us, and
these lively horses will trample on us. It looks as if the smart young man
who is driving four-in-hand, were paying more attention to the handsome
girl beside-him than to his horses. He must look out, or they will surely
run over some one. How the glasses of the lanterns shine! See, the man
on horseback turns to look at the fine team, or at the ladies.

It may be he is looking to see if the horses run over us. We are all in
the Park; and surely we all wish we were in this coach, too, to go rattling
along past all the nags and cart horses; to have the dogs bark at our horses’

’ heels; and at last, as the sun goes down, to reach home and find a splendid
dinner awaiting us. We should sleep soundly after that, and awake the next
metning so bright and fresh that our lessons would seem as good as play,
f and our teachers the kindest of friends. Well, let us make believe we are
> po ~ the coach, and see what will happen.









M&ho is She.

Is not this a beautiful picture of a dear little girl,
with her smiling face and lovely flowers? I wonder
of what it makes you think? It brings to my mind
a poem I used to know when I wasachild. Perhaps
you will learn it and will remember the lesson it
teaches. I will write it for you:

There is a little maiden—
Who is she! Do you know?
Who always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird’s ;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lightsome words.

The loveliest of blossoms
Spring where her light foot treads,
And most delicious odors
‘She all around her sheds.

Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun;

And she is sought and cherished
And loved by every one:

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low,

Who is this little maiden? 3
Does anybody know?

You surely must have met her—
‘You certainly can guess ;

What! Must I introduce her?
Her name is Cheerfulness.






2
i “ed ARLY to bed and early to rise, :
: Makes little men healthy, wealthy, i
F and wise. i

SEAEHPRUAUAURULENENMOEURUTTUNERUAUTEAOREORE DER




HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



cause was right. The best of all is that in the end they won the fight, and
we are now the United States, instead of English Colonies. We are all
glad of it. are we not? No matter how much we may love dear old Eng-
land, we are glad to have the Fourth of July come; and it would not have
been a great day at all if it had not been for brave men such as this in the

picture.



Turse Minute Men are watching for some of the king’s soldiers. They
want to fight them, or rather they are ready to defend themselves against the
king’s men. Are they not a determined, strong, honest lot of men? Per-
haps this is just before the battle of Bunker Hill. See, one of the men is
talking about the enemy while motioning with his hand towards them.

They were noble men; and when you are older you will read more
about them, and think them some of the bravest men that ever lived.

Do you notice that the one nearest you, resting on his gun, has his coat
off? Ze will ficht, when the time comes, you may be sure. See how his
eyebrows are drawn together, and how determinedly his mouth is closed.
There is his powder-horn slung at his side. It will not be so full of powder
an hour after this, but the whole sky will be full of smoke, and the air strong
with the smell of the powder. The men’s faces will be black with smoke,
and some of them bloody from bullet wounds or sword cuts. But they will
conquer and sing Yankee Doodle!















Peruars the first thing you will notice in this picture is the man’s
three-cornered hat, and then his strange coat, and that he is pouring some-
thing out ofa horn. You may have seen somebody like him among the
‘* Continentals ”'on Parade Day, but none of the ‘ Continentals ” you have
seen looked so earnest, surely. What is he pouring out of the horn? It is
gunpowder. The gun in his hand is called a flint-lock. If you look
sharply right there by the lower side of the small end of the powder-horn,
you will see the flint, which is a kind of very hard stone of a brownish
color, cut nearly square and rather thin. Then right under the end of the
powder-horn on the further side of the gun, you may see a curved piece of
iron. That is the cover to what is called the pan. The man fills the pan
with powder and puts down the cover. Then he pulls the trigger, and
the flint goes down with a snap and makes a spark by striking the cover of
the pan. The spark lights the powder, and dang! goes the gun.

But what man zs this? Over a hundred years ago, when your Papa’s
great-grandfather sang ‘‘ God Save the King,” instead of ** Yankee Doo-
dle,” the people did not like the king. They would have loved him if he
had been good to them. But he made it very hard for them, so they said
they would not have him for a king any more, unless he behaved himself,
and that they would make laws for themselves. The king was very angry,
of course, and sent lots of soldiers over the ocean with guns and cannon,
and swords and drums, and bright uniforms. And he said he would kill
all those who would not obey him. Then the people of this country
became soldiers, too, and about twelve thousand of them in Massachusetts
promised to go wherever they were needed at a minute’s warning ; so they
.were called AZimute Men. This man before you is one of them. They
were so earnest in those days that deacons of churches, and even clergy-



men, became captains of companies and fought bravelw. because their
HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.













































EEA

7 yy







2 Sudden Shower

PretTTy Miss Pheebe went
to market to get vegetables for
the cook. She put on her Gains-
borough hat, because. to tell the
truth, it made her quite bewitch-
ing. And then, her golden hair
was so beautiful under its broad,
black brim! It looked a little like
a shower before she started. but
she felt certain it would clear up,
so she took her parasol and not
her umbrella, because — though
she would not tell you so — her
parasol looked much prettier with
her big hat and nice dress than
the blue gingham umbrella, which
was the only one which had
not Deen borrowed by the neigh-
bors. She got to market safely
and about half way back, that is,
as far as the Widow Greene’s
door, when a few big drops came
pattering down. She looked up
(and oh how prettily she looked
up!) and sure enough there
was a big black cloud as full of
rain as a meadow is of grass.
She did not hurry. No, nice
young women who wear Gains-
borough hats mzs¢ not hurry.
The hats come off if you hurry
much. You must be dignified if
you wear a Gainborough hat!
She calmly set the basket down
and slowly opened the parasol.
Perhaps she knew what a charm-
ing picture she made, and per-
haps there was an artist in the
next house whom she knew
wished to make a picture of her ,
looking up just that way. At
any rate, the artist who painted
the picture from which this was
engraved, has been good to us
by showing us Pheebe in just the
attitude we likebest. Weshould
be glad that the shower came
suddenly, and that Phoebe wore
her Gainsborough hat.













Care Qe
he Christmas mong,
She is always doing something to make the

She

likes few things as well as to take her guitar and play
some pretty tune for them to sing. Each night before

Ir is Christmas time. Mistletoe and holly has
been gathered and put in the ginger jar by the lounge,
and now Mamma has taken her guitar and is playing
an accompaniment to the Christmas song little Mollie
and Edna are singing so well. Mamma is humming the
tune also. They are very good and sweet little girls, who
love music as well as ball and dolls, and who love
Mamma best of all.

Mamma is one of the very best Mammas that ever

lived.
whole day useful and pleasant to the children.

they go to bed they sing something. Then they
crawl into Papa’s lap and listen to a short story.
After that they fall right to sleep loving everybody.
That is a very pleasant way to live. How much bet
ter it is than to be scolded and sent to bed crying.


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Au! “Away we Go.”

~The Loboggan Slide.

Ah, Away we go.
Bat O, The Return is Slow.

Many boys and girls have been to Canada and seen the great tobog-
gan slides, down which men and women on a kind of sled shoot like light-
ning. Every one seems to enjoy it greatly, but perhaps the children have
most pleasure when mother or aunty wraps them in their warm suits made
of heavy blankets. They send little Chris out into the crisp air of the
December day, telling him to take good care of sister Flossie while tobog-
ganing. The toboggan, which was first used in Canada, is quite unlike the
sleds your papa and big brothers went coasting on when they were boys.
It has no runners, as you see in the pictures, but is made of thin, hard wood,
broad and flat, with a curled-up end. It is strongly braced by short ribs of
wood. The great fun is, after the snow thaws in the day and freezes hard
at night, to take the toboggan to the top of a high hill, and then, when
Flossie is seated in front with ter feet tightly braced against the rod, and
Chris sitting sideways behind her with one foot out to steer with, to givea
push, and then go flying through the air down the hill as swiftly as an ava-
lanche descends a mountain side.

Flossie holds her breath and is almost afraid, but her eyes dance and
sparkle, and the cold wind reddens her cheeks. She can trust brother Chris i
and they reach the end of the hill in safety. But all pleasure has a corre.
sponding pain, and in the companion picture you can see Flossie and Chris
trudging slowly up the slippery hill dragging their toboggan behind them.
But oh, the return zs slow, and one wonders if the fun is worth the trouble.
Let us hope they will not stay out so late that the muffins for tea will be
cold.

JEANNETTE had been a good little girl for a whole week, and mamma had
told her if she would be good for so long she would take her with dear papa
in a nice boat and go up the beautiful river to watch papa fish. Now Jean-
nette liked nothing better;*so one bright summer morning nurse put on
her pretty white dress and pink sash, and tied a pink ribbon jn her brown
hair, and they started, that is, after mamma had put ona dress almost too
nice to go fishing in, and papa had got out his fish lines an pole. They
did not row far, but it seemed a long way to Jeannette, and oh, how beauti-
ful the green trees were, and how they bent down to look at themselves in
the shining water! The swallows skimmed over the surface, and the dragon
flies went by the boat like little necdles of green and blue fire. Jean-
nette saw them all; and she saw beautiful white water lilies, too, which
smelled deliciously. How happy she was when papa caught a fish and let
her put the dear little thing in a tub which they had brought. About one
o’clock they had a lunch under the shady trees, and Jeannette knew she was
never so happy in her life before, she thought she would always be very
good indeed, if such pleasant fishing parties were to be had for it. She went
home rather tired, but she had the most beautiful dreams of long winding
rivers that were as blue as the sky and as clear as glass; and in them she
could see gold fish and silver fish, and bright red fish swimming about.
They were so gentle they would let her take them in her. hands, for they
knew she would not hurt them.

Papa and mamma, after Jeannette was asleep, smiled, and said to each
other, ‘what a dear well-behaved little girl our Jeannette is! We must
take her to the Zodlogical Gardens next week to see the lions and tigers and
the funny giraffes.” Then they went and kissed her while she slept.



Bur Ol “Tug Retcern ts Stow.


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.































FISHING FOR MINNOWS.




Getting Dressed.

SISTER says I am a big boy now, and
I ought to be able to dress myself, but oh,
dear! the buttons are so small they slip out
_ of my fingers, and the button-holes are so
‘tight I can’t do anything with them. I wish
mamma would put on big buttons and make
the button-holes ever so much larger. Then
it is so hard to tie a good bow around my
neck. I have learned to make a double
knot, but I always tie it too tight, so that
there are small loops and great long ends,
or else too loose so that it slips out in a little
while. It is ever so much easier, too, to
have sister comb my hair than to do it myself, and it all takes so long
when Iam hungry for my breakfast. But I suppose I must learn
sometime, and I might as well begin now. Sister tells me to begin
with one thing at a time and do that until I learn how, and then
do the next, so 1 combed my hair myself this morning. Don’t you
think it looks so?



Brownie Race,

Tus little boy has a beautiful home and a dear, good father
and mother.





Tittle Beosie.

Lirtie Bzssiz is
the delight of the
household. Mamma
cares for her, papa
hugs her, grandma
kisses her, grandpa
pets her and all love
her dearly. A real
little sunbeam she is,
shining all the day,
keeping their hearts
warm. In her high
chair she smiles all
the while she eats her
bread and milk.

Many are the happy
hours grandpa spends with her, listening to her childish prattle.

‘What makes your eyes so bright, to-day, my little girl?”
asked her mother. Slowly, as if thinking, Bessie answers, ‘‘ I dess
it’s ‘tause I haven’t had ’em in very long, mamma, dear.”

Aw a B)
@he Pet Plant.
SOME years ago Oscar’s parents came from the cold land of Nor-
way to seek their fortunes in a new country. Soon the father sickened



ASSESS

LitTLe BEssinz.

and everything to make him happy.
His uncle, who is very fond of Charlie,
for that is his name, and has no chil-
dren of his own, gave him on his birth-
day a pony and cart, with which he
is often taken to ride with his nurse.
Every wish is gratified, but still he
frowns and frets.

One morning he threw his china
plate down and broke it in pieces.
His mother brought a strong one from
the kitchen, on which to eat his break-
fast, and when he went to bed at
night she told him about some children
she knew who were sweet tempered
all day long, and who were never
cross or did naughty things. She said
she was afraid she could not call him her
own dear Charlie any more, and read
to him from a nice story book about
Frownie face:

Now Frownie-face is a wicked sprite,

Who loves to pout and fret,

Who says the summers are ‘* too hot,”

The winters are ‘‘ too wet.”




A Saitor SEwine.



He has toys almost without number, and nice clothes













































































































There’s not a thing that suits his mood,
He pines for something more,

And claps his hands when children fight,

And pout and slam the door.



FROWNIE FAce.

beautiful flowers, touched
her tired heart. ‘‘ God zs
‘Our Father,’” she said,
‘© and He will care for us,”
and new purposes came to
help her.

For his dear mother’s sake,
Oscar waters the pet plant
each day.

Ze Sailor Sewing.

Here is a sailor boy sewing, with his box of
thread by his side. His mother, when she made his
pinafores, did not think he would leave the snug
farm among the mountains to live on the sea, among
hills of water that are always moving. Now he has
to sew for himself, when he tears his trousers or
loses a button, or wants anything made.

Perhaps his mother is thinking about him now,
and wondering if he is safe; and it may be he is
thinking of her, and of how much better she would
sew this very thing he is at work upon. But he
loves the sea better than the land, and would not be
happy off it. Somebody’s boys must be sailors, be-
cause if there were none we could not have spices
and parrots, elephants and monkeys, nor French
dolls brought tous. Mamma could not have her tea
nor papa his coffee if some boys did not love the sea
and ships. But it is very lonesome and terrible
upon the ocean when it storms; and we should
honor the brave boys and men who dare cross the
great waves where there are no paths.

as + 5 ° ?

sion School.



and died, and the struggle with poverty
and want was hard for the mother.
Morning and evening, rainy or fair,
Oscar sold daily papers at the ferries
or along the streets, and his manly
ways brought him many a friend.

A. kind lady invited him to the Mis-
Regularly he went, and
sang the hymns with a clear, strong
voice. His little sister, of whom he
was very fond, often took the prizes
for good lessons.

_At Easter they were given a plant
with lovely blossoms. How bright,
Lena thought, this will make our home
down inthe narrow alley. Their hearts
were light and gay, echoing the joy-
ous music of Easter time, as they burst
into their mother’s dark bed-room,
where she lay so sad and wearied.
The joy of her children, the «* He is
Risen,” in the song they sang, and the

Fa
HAPPY HOURS IN THE

LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



The Birot Walk.

GoLpEN sunshine, lend thy glory,
West-wind, wave the trees above,
Lark and thrush, sing out your story

Teach my child your Maker’s love.

Baby, darling, look around thee,

See the cloudlets floating by,
See the pleasures which surround thee
_ In the sunny earth and sky.

Watch the swallows swiftly flying,
See the wild flowers brightly gay,
Hear the echo faintly dying,
As the lark pours forth his lay.

He who decked the earth with flowers
Keéps and guards my tender child

Safely through the summer hours,

_ And when storms are raging wild.



i

| |
| |
\











Fas

=





Le

A

‘Summer Song.



In the happy summer days,

_ When the barley bows its golden head,

The birds pour forth their gladsome lays,
And roses blossom white and red.

"Tis then from every shady nook
We hear the sound of life and glee, |
And flowers grow where e’er we look,
While welcome shadow gives each tree.

Sheltered by the thicket shade,
There we sit, we boys and girls,

A storm of summer snow is made
By roses falling on oir curls.

- The crickets chrip their roundelays
Amongst the grass at early morn.
How happy are the summer days
When gaily waves the golden corn.



THe SEAMSTRESS.

Lhe Seamatreos.

‘‘ Tris dress must be done, for it is Lillian’s graduating day to-
morrow,” said Fanny, so she sat down to hem the fleecy muslin.
‘©T wish I could have stayed in the class. I know I studied as hard
as the other girls did. It would be so nice to hear Dr. Marsh’s
encouraging words, as he gave us our diplomas.”

Fanny’s father had died suddenly, and left his family without
means. The mother was a brave woman, and so set about to keep
her home. Fanny at once said, ‘I shall help you, mother.” She
had quietly held to her purpose, but this evening, as the candle-light |
shone on her work, thoughts came to her of her school days, now at
an end, and also the joy of her companions, and she was sad. On
and on she stitched, and grew braver with the struggle.

‘It will not make things better to complain. I am so glad
mother can keep the old home, and it will be easier by and by.
Johnnie shall keep on with his school, and I’ll study what I can to
keep up with him. To be a seamstress is not the easiest thing.
Many girls do not make enough to be comfortable, Aunt Mary says,
and she has had much experience, and helped many times those in
need. But I'll do my very best. God will help. He never forsakes
us, mamma often says.”

The brave, patient girl toiled on, and did as she promised. In_
time she came to be very expert with her needle, and became an

intelligent, useful woman.


i
|

a
;
i




























Ring the bells—ring!
Hip, hurrah for the King!
The dunce fell into the pool, oh!
The dunce was going to school,



oh!
The groom and the cook,
, Tes Fished him out with a hook,
x" And he piped his eye like a fool,

oh!





Bs I was walking up the street,



The steeple bells were ringing 5
As I sat down at Mary’s feet,

The sweet, sweet birds were












Three tabbies took out their cats to tea,

As well-behaved tabbies as well could be:

Each sat in a chair that each preferred,

They mewed for their milk, and they sipped and
purred.

Now tell me this (as these cats you’ ve seen thesn}—

How many lives had these cats between them ?

_ singing.




As I walked far into the world,




I met a little Fairy;
She plucked this flower, and as it’s
sweet

I’ve brought it home for Mary.


























Little baby, if I threw

This fair blossom down to you,
Would you catch it as you stand,
Holding up each tiny hand,
Looking out of those gray eyes,
Where such deep, deep wonder lies.























te ese

ALBodweh. Dat










SNORT TO a

SER OO OO
OS Mo



; 2 al re




















The boat sails away, like a bird on the wing,
And the little boys dance on the sands in a ring,
The wind may fall, or the wind may rise,—

You are foolish to go; you will stay if you ’re wise.
FE ace ee were Oe eee
SEUSS Siac alcs Ss

pa

DN n Se
4 a s Pic Spee

Ze.

KO

OX LY
we LK

SSO por ee th








































Sr tin aes eee ot ee
roe 5 Hehe,
FS CPEPINPUM I Gr od


















t







lisa
HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Ture GRINNING PIG AND THE THIEVING DoGs.— WovuLD-BE THIEVES.



a

whe Grinning P

Joun CLEAVER, the butcher, had gone to dinner,
and thinking everybody honest, had left a fine pig’s
head on his meat block. But Jock and Sly, two dogs
of the neighborhood, had been watching him, and the
moment he left, Jock stole in, followed at a safe distance
by Sly. ‘Naughty dog! He thought to steal the grin-
ning pig’s head and have a great feast behind the wood-
shed. You may see in the second picture how nearly
he came to being severely punished, as he deserved.
Little Billy Pringle, who did errands for the butcher,
happened to come in the back door just as Jock had

2ig and the achieving :



eG

OGs.

got the pig’s head by the ear, and seizing a steel, with
which Mr. Cleaver sharpened his knives, he threw it
fiercely at the dog, and very nearly stuck it into Jock’s
back. Away he went and ahead of fiim, as fast as
legs would carry him, went Sly.

If Jock had not been well fed no one could blame
him, but Jock’s master always gave him the very nicest
bones left from dinncr; so no one would have felt sorry
if the steel had hit Jock as little Billy meant it to do.
We can never be sure our naughtiness will not be

found out.













































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE GRINNING PIG AND THE THIEyING Docs,—A Narrow Escarm
HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.







Mamma’s THisses.

‘¢ A «iss when I awake inthe morn-
ing,
A kiss when I go to bed,
A kiss when I burn my fingers,
A kiss when I thump my head.

“(A kiss when my bath is over,
A kiss when my bath begias ;
My mamma is full of kisses,
As full as nurse is full of pins.

“A kiss when I play with my rattle
A kiss when I pull her hair;

She covered me over with kisses,
The day I fell down stairs.

‘“A kiss when I give her trouble,
A kiss when I give her joy;
There’s nothing like mamma’s kisses
To her own little baby boy.”



What do you see in this picture, and what does it say to you?
Listen :

This is what I think I see in it.

‘¢ Kind hearts are the gardens,

Kind thoughts are the roots,

4 Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits.

‘* Love is the sweet sunshine
That warms into life,
For only in darkness

Grow hatred and strife.”

| Fieoson aime,

Two little forms at the table,
Heads bending low o’er their books,
Working as hard as they’re able —
So mamma.thinks whenever she looks.
But Frankie, who ought to be writing
Is whisp’ring of soldiers and war,
And, teaching May all about fighting,
Draws battles that take place afar.

Not one word does May miss, ’tis pleasanter far
Than the history she has in her book,

And Frank, quite delighted, continues to draw,
Thus neither see mother’s last look.

But alas, the slate falls with a rattle —
A pause -- Then mamma’s voice rings clear,

‘* May, have you learnt the date of that battle?
Frank, just bring your exercise here.”



Dimples Kitty.

‘*O my dear, dear kitty, don’t you want to play, go under the
flag with us?” And over the chairs two little girls hung their
mamma’s striped shawl, and called it a flag.

Down the street was a real, true flag, with stars and stripes.
Dot and Dimple had watched it as it swung in the breeze, waving
back and forth. The horses used to stop under‘it, while the men
who rode would cheer. The little boys played soldier, and marched
to and fro, and hurrahed for the men whose names were on it in big
black letters. ;

Kitty played with glee, and seemed pleased to show how fond
she was of the shawl flag. Pretty soon it fell down, and when the
setting sun shone across the carpet, kitty was fast asleep in its folds.

Pretty soon papa came home, and Dimple brought her pet and
told him how £* pat-wotic” kitty was. She was sure about it, for she
‘*hoo-wad ” when they played.

In the morning kitty crept up stairs and waked Dimple with a
‘purr, purr,” which meant, ‘‘Good morning,” and then ‘snuggled
into the little girl’s arms.
HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































HERE is a boy Turk with a turkey—a real gobbler. In Turkey they do not have
Thanksgiving Day, but they like roast turkey quite as well as we do in New England.
Sv this young Turk has not been to buy his Thanksgiving dinner, but probably he has

come from some farm outside the town where his master raises fowls for market. See
how strangely the cloth is wrapped about his head. There are yards and yards of it,
as you would find if you unwound it. When twisted into this shape it is called a tur-
ban. These two Turkeys are in the wonderful city of Cairo, in Egypt. You will
notice the crowd of people, all in strange costumes, in the street behind our young
man, If you could see the real scene, you would find it glowing with beautiful ‘colors
and brilliant with sunlight, The young Turk stands a little proudly, as if he knew























how well he looked with his embroidered clothing. He wants to sell his turkey, but
he looks as if he would feel insulted if you asked him to do so.

Never mind. We need not go to Egypt for our turkeys. We have them at
home quite as sweet and juicy, and with voices just as powerful as any in the world.
Don’t you like to clap your hands at them to make them say gobble, gobble? But you
would haye to look a long time to find here at home a young man so picturesquely
dressed. Our ready-made clothing shops would make quite another person of him.
I’m sure we all like him as he is, better then we should if he had a nice black coat, stiff
collar, and trousers. Let us hope he will sell his fine turkey for a good price and go
home to the farm among the palm trees feeling that he has made a good trade.


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



EE,
°













A Woyage Around the iMorld.

THEsE Kittens seem very anxious to learn about the world they
live in. The two on the table are studying the maps, and I guess
they are trying to. measure distance with the compass. The others
are braver, and venture to make a voyage around the world instead
of studying about it on the map. So they climb up the slippery
globe, and it turns around as fast as they climb, and they go round
and round it, having lots of fun, while the old mother cat looks on
and feels proud to think her kitties are such good scholars. If you
children study the globe and maps I think you will learn more about
the world than the kittens do, and perhaps when you are men and
women you can make a real voyage around the world.

Hittle Boy Blue.

eo







Littiz Boy Blue
Has lost his horn,

But he’s as sleepy as ever,
The pretty, wee bairn.

. His sheep have wondered

So far to-day,

That here in the woods
All night they must stray.

Not a care or trouble,
Not a fear has he,

As he lies on his mossy bed,
Peacefully.

A little white lambkin
Lies.on his breast.

"Tis a right pretty picture
Of perfect rest !















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A YOYAGE AROUND THE ©WORLD.

snow Storm.



Horses in a



In some of our Western States they have snow storms of great
severity, called blizzards. With the snow comes intense cold, so that
the cow-boys who care for the cattle, and the cattle themselves, often
perish. ‘The snow comes with such blinding fierceness that the horse
and rider, or the cattle, lose their way and become suffocated and
frozen. Did you ever look at a flake of snow through a microscope
or even a strong reading-glass? Do you remember how beautiful it
was with its wonderful star-shaped crystals? It would not seem that
such a tiny, beautiful thing could be so terrible when it became’ one
of many. But you know how the great waves knock vessels to
pieces, and that even the very biggest wave is made up of tiny drops,
as innocent as a dew drop. When we all join together to do any-
thing it will be done, just as all the tiny, brittle flakes together can
kill men and horses and carry away houses in snow glides.

The picture before us represents such a storm. See how the
snow blows in sheets, and how the poor horses are almost wild with
fear and cold. One is already down and the snow will soon cover
him. The others are huddling together to try to keep warm. It is
a distressing picture, surely. There is little chance that they survive
if the storm continues; but let us hope it will not last long. |

It is fun for you that live in the Eastern States to dig your way
through drifts or face the driving snow, but you would not find it so
if you were where these horses are. You'd be very glad indeed to
stay in the house, crawl to the fire as pussy does, and toast your
toes while popping corn or roasting apples.




HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



HORSES IN A SNOW_STORM.
ae

2

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CONVALESCENCE.

an

i

tes

:






























































































































































































Dip you ever see a girl dressed as this one is? Not at Grand-
pa’s farm in Connecticut, or Uncle John’s in Vermont, surely. See
the folded handkerchief on her head; the shawl over her shoulders;
the embroidered apron, and big-sleeved waist. Where do you think
she lives? She lives in that beautiful land where the skies are so
blue, and the people so handsome; where the hand-organ men and
the harp players that you see about the streets live when they are at
home. She lives in Italy, sunny Italy. The most beautiful pictures
that were ever painted were done by Italians, and some of the
grandest poems and sweetest songs were made by the people who
lived where this girl does. You will sometime know what an inter-
esting place it is, and how wonderful the people are.

This girl has not painted pictures or made poems. She has
sung songs, of course. But her wish now is to gather enough of the
corn flowers to make a pretty bouquet to give a handsome young
man she is fond of, when he comes to-night to play the guitar for her.
Don’t you wish you too could run in the tall wheat and pluck the
corn flowers?



Spinning.

Drp you ever see a truly spinning-wheel? Before men learned
to make machines that would twist the wool or flax into threads, the
women used to have to do it in their homes. Every year they used
lo spin large quantities of it, then weave it into cloth. After that, in
the country places,
a traveling tailor
used to come to the
house and cut out
all the clothing for
the men and boys.
It was a rather tire-
some way to do, but
stilla very beautiful
one. And _ they
made some very
good cloth, too. But
think how funny it
would seem to have
to wait for Mamma
to make cloth be-
fore youcould have
a new jacket and
new trousers. It
was not many years
ago that it was
done. Now itis so
easy to go toacloth-
ing shop and jump
right into a nice
new suit whenever
you have to have
one.

Well, look atthe
picture. How
gracefully the
young woman
stands. Hername
is Nancy. There
is a blazing fire in
the fire-place. The
tea kettle is singing

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Corn FLowERs.



























































































































































































































SPINNING.

and pussy is purring. Do you see the chimney seat, and the old-
fashioned mirror over the mantel? How pleasant it would be to
sit on the hearth and feel the fire with pussy! We'd roast ~hestnuts
and eat apples, would we not? Or perhaps you’d rather pop corn.
All the time we’d hear the whirr of the spinning-wheel and the sweet
song Miss Nancy would sing.

Convalescence. }

WHEN one has been sick and begins to get well again itis called
convalescing.

' Kate’s Mother had been very sick indeed, so that she did not
leave her bed for weeks. All that time Kate was anxious about her,
and she used to ask every day how soon she would be able to walk
again. Atlast Mamma was so much better that the Doctor told Papa
that she ought to go to the seaside where she could get the health-
giving ocean breezes. You may imagine how giad Kate was that
day. She fairly danced for joy. She was happy for Mamma’s sake
at first, but afterward she remembered what jolly times she and
Harry would have in the sand of the beach, and wading.

Her father hired a fine. house right at the ocean’s edge so tha!
they saw vessels pass every day and could get all the sea air there
was tobe had. There, by the west window, sat Mamma, day after
day, very weak indeed, yet gaining strength slowly. And there sat
Kate very often, reading a nice story or sweet poem to her mother,
for Kate would willingly leave Harry and the beach if it gave
Mamma even a moment’s pleasure. She was acomfort to her Mother
all that Summer, and in the Autumn when they went back to town
Mamma declared that there never was a better girl than her darling
Kate.
HAPPY HOURS IN THE


























‘* Now listen, Theo, while I whisper a secret to you, right in your
ear. Itis not for your dog Spot to hear, although he does look so
bright and inquisitive, with his sharp nose raised, and his ears cocked
as though he were determined to hear every single word I say.”

That is what little Mabel is saying to her brother Theo, as she
sits beside him on the sofa in papa’s library, and puts her arm around
his neck, and places her ruby lips close to his ear. What zs the
secret? Do you wonder? Theo looks anxious. It does not seem
that the wonderful tale is affording him a great deal of pleasure, and
I don’t think that Spot would be at all pleased either if he knew, for
no longer is he to rule supreme, the only household pet. No, indeed,
Spot, there is a rival for you in Mabel’s affections! She never did
care quite as much for you as Theo does. You were hs dog. Theo’s
uncle bought you for him when you were a wee, soft puppy. But
now you are spoiled, so that you think nothing is good enough for
you, and you chase all the poor pussy cats, who never did harm,
away from the garden, and will not let even one sun herself on the
old stone wall that divides the gardenand road. Ah, Spot, you have
become a very tyrant, but like all tyrants your day will pass.

Mabel is whispering to Theo that the expressman will soon
bring to her as a present from uncle John, a big box which holds a
lovely, soft, white, long-haired mother pussy, an angora, and her two
little baby kittens. How happy and pleased is Mabel, and she is
begging little Theo to promise her that Spot shall be whipped and
shut in the dark room if he dares to chase or hurt the pretty
creatures,

LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.



2 Snarl.

Berry is just up, and grandma is trying to get the kinks and
snarls out of her pretty flaxen hair. Grandma is gentle, but the
kinks do not come out easily, and Betty looks a little as if she were
ready to snarl some too. Perhaps grandma was wise to give her the
nice apple beforehand. It will make Betty more patient.

Just see what knotty hands and wrinkled face dear old grandma
has. She has lived seventy years, and combed a great many snarly
heads and washed a great many soiled faces and frocks just as het
mother did for her years and years ago. Besides she has kept the
house in order; seen that breakfast, dinner, and supper were ready
when all were hungry; and noticed if any little toes or heels had
poked holes through socks or shoes, All those things, and many
more, have made grandma’s hands look bony and wrinkled. But
they are beautiful hands, and are quite as gentle as the soft pink ones
of little Betty. Grandma has two rings. Do you see them? Grandpa,
who is dead, gave them to her when she was a lovely girl. How
long ago itseems! She will never take them off her fingers, for she
loved him and he wanted her to always wear them. When grand-
ma’s comb, or mamma’s, or nurse’s pulls your hair, you will think,
will you not? that she does not mean to hurt you, only the dear hair
is so tangled and snarled.


“The WEorning Call.

How demure little Miss Sarah Muffet is! One would think
she never soiled a pinafore or romped on the lawn in her life.
Even Willie, on whose mother her mother is calling, cannot
make her give up her prim ways. Perhaps Willie has told her
that he will give her the nice red apple if she will only play with
him. It looks a little as if Willie were going to give her a
brotherly kiss, and Miss Sarah were trying to make him believe
sb-‘did not want him to. We all can see by her mild eyes and
_ysebud mouth that she really would not object, but she fears her
‘bonnet may be put awry or her gown rumpled. How very prim
she is! But then she is making a truly call, and has so nice a
muff.

Willie is quite a swell, surely, with his ruffled collar, velvet
jacket and striped stockings. Do you wonder what nice mor-
sels there are covered by the bowl and cup on the shelf. It is
certainly not jam, but nobody should be surprised to see Willie’s
mother take sponge cake from under the bowl, and perhaps
mild cheese from under the cup, and give each of them a big
piece of the one and a small piece of the other.

Probably after the cake and cheese, demure Sarah will be
more informal and play with amiable Willie as she should.

as



x



ar

a

[LNvecep it is true, it is perfectly true,
= -

Believe me, indeed, Pm playing no tricks;
An old man and his dog live up in the moon

And he’s cross as a bundle of sticks.







1 f

Pussy WHITE.





HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.



Tue Morninc CALt,

Pussy White

Pussy WHITE was an English kitten. She had had a good
mother who had brought her up well. So she had the habit of tak-
ing care not to soil her white fur. She ate her milk quite properly,
and was fond of sleeping on a soft cushion.

Her little mistress belonged to a Band of Hope, and had taken
the pledge to drink nothing that would in-tox-i-cate. One of her little.
friends used to tease her about it, but she was firm, and would not:
touch anything of the kind. She had talks with Pussy White about:
it, and she took the pledge too.

Fannie went to her Uncle William’s to spend the day, and car+
ried kitty. Cousin Bertie was a roguish boy and liked to tease as
well. He thought he would see if pussy would keep her pledge, so
poured a little brandy from Grandpa’s bottle into her saucer of milk.

You should have seen Pussy White draw back, and shake her
whiskers and sneeze, as much as to say, ‘Oh no, I shall not da
what you wish me to do, you bad boy.”

Would you have done as kitty did?



ECLDEN LOUD ECO ESM ER ECE OSSRCERENTLLTLETIIST



ERESEROEUNESDSOISTASERRERRCKEO ORD TOSEIAG! HARUOUOBSCACEDEOUDEOOOUESS

Ortiz children, love each other.
Never give another pain,

If your brother speak in anger,
Answer not in wrath again.

AUUSECEACUEMURACHERSESAAEAOSAUNUADADAPOESUDALEGDOR NORE P CS

LA KERN KOGLGRNOPSLURDALS SERANLAMBGHONECLENEDZ 009010120111)

Fi


Bumble-Bee.

BumBLE-BEE superbly dressed,
In velvet, jet, and gold,

Sailed along in eager quest,
And hummed a ballad bold.

Morning-Glory clinging tight
To friendly spires of grass,

Blushing in the early light,
Looked out to see him pass.

Nectar pure as crystal lay

Te



In her ruby cup;

“iy

Bee was very glad to stay,

yi
y

Just to drink it up.

Ms 7);

«¢ Fairest of the flowers,” said he,

SS «’ Twas a precious boon ;

May you still a Glory be,
Morning, night and noon.”

yy 3

@chool is Over.

-
.



SCHOOL is over,
Oh, what fun,

Lessons finished

y

Play begun,
Who'll run fastest,
‘You or [?
Who'll laugh loudest,
Let us try.

Christmas Iorning.

Yes, Christmas Morning, and Santa
Claus did not forget this little boy. See the
pleasure beaming from his face. His eyes are
bright because of the presents Santa Claus has
brought to him sometime while he was sleep-
ing. This is the way Santa Claus has been
going on his rounds of love and kindness for
many, many years, brightening the lives of
little ones and causing mothers and fathers
to join with the children in their joy and hap-
piness, at the time when Old Santa calls.
Each Christmas Morning it is found that Santa
Claus has visited hundreds and thousands ot
children’s homes which he had not found be-
fore, because more mothers and fathers get to
watching for him, and because they wel-
come the happy Christmas Mornings he brings
to us all.

_ joy them. But to-morrow what a good time they will have.



CHRISTMAS MORNING.

Christmas divening.

So Suezpy Not even the new book can keep Edith from
dozing, and as for Jane and Susie, they do not care to think of their
presents. They arose so early to dive into their loaded stockings,
and raced about so much before the Christmas tree was ready, that
when the gifts had been distributed they were almost too tired to en-
Susie
will get out her various dolls, given her by her different aunts and
uncles, her big Noah’s ark and dozen picture books, while Jane
with all her things, sits by to enjoy them. Johnny had a great,
black rocking-horse, a real war-horse, he says, and he has promised
to let Edith ride it if she wishes, for Johnny likes Edith best of all.
It may be that Susie and Jane feel a little hurt because he has not
asked them to ride, but they are so well-bred that they would think
it rude to speak of it. :

But now it is almost bed-time, and we will leave them to sleep
and dream of all the delightful day.



CHRISTMAS EVENING. _




















































































































































































































































































OBJECT TEACHING.


i ere

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PHEOPLE’S WORLD.





























































































































































































o

ahe

Mamma, thinking it time Anna had her portrait painted, because

Kirst Photograph.

now her hair is a beautiful golden color which will grow darker, and
because her manners are so pretty and childish, has taken her to an
artist's studic, as the room is called where artists work. The artist
found that Anna could not keep still long enough at a time for him
to see just how she looked; so he is going to photograph her and
paint part of his picture from the photograph. Anna will not have
to stand still long, for now-a-days photographs are taken quicker
than you can wink.

How prettily little Anna stands! She has on her best pink dress
with eider-down trimming, her very freshest silk stockings, and

.shiny slippers. Surely the artist ought to make a lovely picture of



Anna.

Just notice what a nice room the artist has. Do you see the



‘lands than any ten sparrows that ever lived before.





canvasses turned like naughty boys with their faces
to the wall? They are there behind the footstool.
On them are, perhaps, faces of other little girls
and boys who have already teen painted. Behind
Anna on the wall is a picture of some funny storks
painted by a queer man away off in Japan. You
may see a part of a cabinet, too, with a portfolio
of drawings under it, and an old, dark-green boitle















with a fan behind it on top. But who i: that look-

It
is Anna’s mother, who has just told her to stand







ing in at the door at the head of the staircase?



































































































very still.





































There are little girls and boys, as weil as men

























and women, who earn money with which to buy













food by keeping still hours at a time for artists to





















paint from them. They are called modils, and



have to earn money because they have no father









or mother, perhaps, who can buy bread for them.







Artists are very kind to models and do not let “Leni
become too tired.













Anna’s portrait will hang in the dining-room |
some day for all the family to look at. Then Anna
will be glad she kept as still as she did.
















Ou, here’s a pretty how-de-do! What. clatter
There
are Mr. and Mrs. Cock Sparrow looking with the





















and chirping are here among the roses.

most evident admiration at the little chick-sparrows
in the nest they builded in the old flower-pot some
Did they
Oh, yes, many a time,
but ¢Aese are their very cwn, that they have hoped
for for a long time, and talked about riany a moon-

dear girl hung on the wall for them.
never see chicks before?

light night when every body else was asleep, or
At last they have
They cou.d not be

at some reasonable occupation.
them. How grand they feel.
prouder if they were the Pope, or the President of
these United States. Such deautzful chicks, they
think.

but Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow know they are born to

We may think they seem stupid and foolish,

rule the sparrow tribe, and to keep more robins from the farmer’s
«¢ Such bright
eyes,” they say, ‘‘and such a knowing look!” Then Mr. Sparrow
adds, as if he had somehow forgotten the most important things:

‘¢ Such sharp bills and such sweet voices !”

And so they chatter on from day to day, bringing meanwhile
bits of bread or choice fat worms and highly flavored flies to give
strength to the youngsters. And one day, oh, sad day for Papa
and Mamma Sparrow, their wings spread and— away they fly!
They'll see the world for themselves; they too will find some nice
‘Then Mr.
and Mrs. Sparrow will look at the rose bush and wish their chil-
dren were like it, for they say: ‘* Tha’s what comes of having
wings!”

flower-pot, and hunt up some chicks of their own.
S WORLD.

y

N THE LITTLE PEOPLE

HAPPY HOURS I



















































































THE SPARROW'S ‘NEST
LD

R

WO!

S

EOPLE’

p

TTLE

ee

THE LI

I

PY HOURS

HAP
















































































































































































































































































































































































Tkitty’s Play.

Tus lady is very tall and stately. She wears,
with a great deal of pride, a glossy silk dress.
It has a long train. She has been looking for her
little pet Kitty. The Kitty is full of play, and
thinks it great fun to run after the sweeping train.
Her sharp claws are stuck in the shining. silk.
Her mistress turns with delight, and smiles at her
frolic. Kitty’s claws are not strong enough to tear
the silk. Without chiding, the lady lets her play
as she slowly moves with grace over the floor. It
is well to enjoy the pleasures of others, even if it
be only a wee bit of a kitten.



The Intruders.

Tus fawns and deer do not know it is the
day before Christmas. Nobody has told them
about it, nor even suggested that they should hang
up their stockings for St. Nicholas to fill. And
in the park there is no calendar, except that of the
singing of birds and blossoming of fowers in Spring ;
the fullness of green and the heat in Summer; the
ripening of fruit and dropping of leaves in Autumn,
and the bare branches, cold winds and snow
covered ground in Winter. So these pretty creatures
do not understand why these men have come into
the park to cut Christmas trees. They will catch
at any rate and if the intruders come nearer, away
they will go almost as swiftly and lightly as the
birds, or the snow flakes that were so lightly driven
by the wind through the trees.

But the two men are there fer peaceable reasons,
surely. ;

Little do the pretty fawns know what the chil-
dren will see,—the tree all gleaming with lighted
tapers, and glittering with tinsel and toys. If they
knew how happy the children will be, they would
be quite willing to have their peace disturbed and
welcome the intruders.


































Preparing the @hristmas Dinner.

Now comes the happiest time of the year for the children, when Santa
Claus comes down the chimney to put all sorts of pretty things, long-wished
for, perhaps, into the children’s stockings. And good and tender Mamma
gives orders to make ready for the Christmas dinner, where everything must
be of the best, and where everything surely tastes the best of anything we
eat the year through. In this picture kind Mrs. Martin, as you see, is allow-
ing her children, Herbert and pretty Susie, with her doll in her arms, to help
make the delicious plum-pudding which at the close of the great feast of good
things will be brought in by black Nora, all ablaze with the brandy poured
over it and lighted, looking like a mound of fre or a volcano during an
eruption. Dainty little baby May has the spoon in hef hand to stir in the
sugar, and Mamma has cut up the suet into little bits. Herbert feels as if he
were a very big boy, for he has sifted the flour aid helped Susie stone the
And now they can tell dear Papa, and big brother Ned, that they
Will it not taste

raisins.

have helped to make the CHRISTMAS PUDDING!





















































HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLW’



S WORLD.



A bird of prey, seeing the child, seized it.in its beak and carried it
away ; but hearing the sound of the sportsman’s gun, the bird let the child
fali, its clothes caught in the branches of a high tree, and there it hung, cry-

- ing till the forester came by.

The mother, on awakening and missing her child, rushed away in great
agony to find it. So that the poor little thing would have been left alone in
the world to die had not the sportsman made his appearance.

‘* Poor little creature !”’ he said to himself as he climbéd up the tree and
brought the child down. ‘‘ I will take it home with me, and it shall be brougut
up with my own little Lena.”

He kept his word, and the little foundling grew up with the forester’s
little daughter, till they loved each other so dearly that they were always un-
happy when separated, even for a short time. The forester had named the
child ‘* Birdie,” because she had been carried away by the bird; and Lena
and Birdie were for several years happy little children together. ;

But the forester had an old cook, who was not fond of children, and she
wanted to get rid of Birdie, who she thought was an intruder.

One evening Lena saw the woman take two buckets to the well, and
carry them backwards and forwards more than twenty times. ‘+ What are .
you going to do with all that water?” asked the child.

j i =
| We
|

,
i

\
ip

PREPARING THE CHRISTMAS DINNER.

better to them than ever when they know of the loving hands that helped to
make the sweet concoction. :

See, on the table lies the big turkey that soon will be roasted, crisp and
brown.

Out of doors it is cold and snowing fast. The frost hangs in queer
festoons from the window-frames. But indoors there are warm and loving
hearts. Surely Mamma in her own happiness will not forget some of the
poor little children and their Mammas who have no money for their
Christmas Dinner.





rdie and Her Briend.

A FORESTER went out one day shooting; he had not gone far into the
wood, when he heard, as he thought, the cry of a child. He turned his
steps instantly towards the sound, and at length came to a high tree, on one
of the branches of which sat a little child. A mother, someshort time be-
fore, had seated hersclf under the tree with th> child in her lap, and fallen

os

asleep.



‘““Tf you will promise not to say a word, I will tell you,” zeplied the
woman.

‘¢ J will never tell any one,” she said.

. “Oh, very well, then, look here. To-morrow morning, early, I mean
to put all this water into a kettle on the fire, and when it boils I-shall throw
Birdie in and cook her for dinner.”

Away went poor Lena, in great distress, to find Birdie.
never forsake me, I will never forsake you,” said Lena.

‘¢ Then,” said Birdie, ‘‘ I will never, never leave you, Lena.”

‘Well, then,” she replied, ‘* I am going away, and you must go with
me, for old cook says she will get up early to-morrow morning, and boil a
lot of water to cook you in, while my father is outhunting. If you stay with
me, I can save you. So you must never leave me.”

‘© No, never, never,” said Birdie.

So the children lay awake till dawn, and then they got up and ran away
so quickly, that by the time the wicked old witch got up to prepare the water,
they were far out of her reach.

She lit her fire, and as soon as the water boiled went into the sleeping.

“Tf you will


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

| creer sees SSD SE CEC CIS SS ATE SS TS

room to fetch poor little Birdie and throw her in. But when she came to
the bed and found it empty, she was very much frightened to find both the
children gone, and said to herself, ‘* What will the forester say, when he
comes home, if the children are not here? I must go down stairs as fast as
Ic:n and send some one to catch them.” Down she went, and sent three of
the farm servants to run after the children and bring them back.

The children, who were sitting among the trees in the wood, saw them
coming from a distance. ‘I will never forsake you, Birdie,” said Lena,
quickly. ** Will you forsake me?”

‘¢ Never, never ! ” «was the reply.

‘¢ Then,” cried Lena, ‘‘ you shall be turned into a rose bush, and I will
be one of the roses.” ,

The three servants came up to the place where the old witch had told
them to look; but nothing was to be seen but a rose tree and a rose.
‘«* There are no children here,” they said. So they went back and told the
cook that they had found only roses and bushes, but not a sign of the children.

The old woman scolded them well when they told her this, and said,
“You stupid fools, you should have cut off the stem of the rose bush, and
plucked one of the roses and brought them home with you as quick as pos-
sible. You must just go again a .

second time.” - : . sm
: , nu ; in
changed herselfand Birdie so quickly, i
that when the three servants arrived ff

Lena saw them coming, and she ; | i
| : |
at the spot to which the old woman | |
had sent them, they found only a JR !
little church with a steeple — Birdie i
was the church and Lena the steeple.

Then the men said one to another,
‘* What was the use of our coming .
here? We may as well go home.”

But how the old woman did scold.
“You fools!” she said, ‘* you should
have brought the church and the
steeple here. However, I will go
myself this time.” So the wicked
old woman started off to find the
children, taking the three servants
with her.

When they saw the three servants
coming in the distance, and the old
woman waduling behind, Lena said,
‘¢ Birdie, we will never forsake each
other.”

‘“¢ No, no! never, never!” replied
the little foundling.

‘¢ Then you shall be changed into
a pond, and I will be a duck swim-
ming upon it.”

The old woman drew near, and as
soon as she saw the pond she laid
herself down by it, and, leaning over,
intended to drink it all up. But the
duck was too quick for her. She
seized the head of the old woman
with her beak, and drew it under
water, and held it there till the old
witch was drowned.

Then the two children resumed
their proper shape, went home with
the three servants, all of them happy
and delighted to think that they had
got rid of such a wicked old woman.
The forester was full of joy in his
home with the children near the
wood; and if they are not dead they
all live there still.

TEDpY’Ss

“Bhe Molt and the FOX.

A WOLF once made friends with a fox, and kept him always by him, so
that whatever the wolf wanted, the fox was obliged to do, because he was
the weakest and could not therefore, be master: It happened, one day, that
they were both passing through a wood, and the wolf said, ‘* Red fox, find
me something to eat, or I shall eat you.”

*¢ Well,” replied the fox, ‘1 knowa farm-yard near, in which there are
two young lambs; if you like I will go and fetch one.” The wolf was quite
agreeable, so the fox went to the field, stole the lamb, and brought it to the
wolf; he then returned to find something for himself.

The wolf soon ate up the lamb, but he was not satisfied, and began to
long so much for the other lamb, that he went to fetch it himself. But he
managed so awkwardly that the mother of the lamb saw him, and began to
cry and bleat fearfully ; and the farmer came running out to see what was
the matter. The wolf got so terribly beaten that he ran limping and howl-
ing back to the fox. ‘‘ You have led me into a pretty mess,” he said. ‘I



wanted the other lamb, and because I went to fetch it, the farmer has nearly
killed me.”

‘© Why are you such a glutton, then?” replied the fox.

Another day as they were in a field, the greedy wolf exclaimed, ‘* Red
fox, if you don’t find me something to eat, I shall eat you up.”

‘Oh! I can get you some pancakes, if you like,” he said: ‘* for I know
a farmhouse where the wife is frying them now,”

So they went on together, and the fox sneaked into the house, sniffed,
and smelt about for some time, till he at last found out where the dish stood.
Then he dragged six pancakes from it, and brought them to the wolf.

«¢ Now you have something to eat,” said the fox, and went away to find
his own dinner.

The wolf, however, swallowed the pancakes in the twinkling of an eye,
and said to himself, ‘‘ They taste so good I must have some more.” So
he went into the farm kitchen, and, while pulling down the pancakes, up-
set the dish and broke it in pieces.

The farmer’s wife heard the crash, and came rushing in; but when she
saw the wolf, she called loudly for the farm servants, who came rushing
in, and beat him with whatever they could lay their hands on, so that he
ran back to the fox in the wood with
two lame legs, howling terribly.

‘¢ Tow could you serve me such a
dirty trick?” he said. ‘* The farmer
neazly caught me; and he has given
me such a thrashing.”

‘¢ Well then,” said the fox, ‘ you
should not be such a glutton.”

Another day, when the wolf and
fox were out together, and the wolf
was limping with fatigue, he said,
‘* Red fox, find me something to eat,
or I shall eat you.”

The fox replied, ‘*] know a man
who has been slaughtering cattle to-
day ; and there is a quantity of salted
meat lying ina tub in the cellar. I
can fetch some of that.”

‘¢ No,” said the wolf; ‘‘ let me go
with you this time. You can help
me if] cannot run away fast enough.”

replied Reynard, anu showed him
on the way many of his tricks; and
at last they reached. the cellar safely.

There was meat in abundance.
The wolf made himself quite at home,
and said, ** There will be time to
stop when I hear any sound.”

The fox also enjoyed himself; but
he kept looking round now and then ;
and ran often to the hole through
which they had entered to try if it
was still large enough for his body to
slip through.

‘¢ Dear fox,” said the wolf, ‘* why
are you running about and jumping
here and theie so constantly?”

‘¢T must see if any one is coming,”
replied the cunning animal, ‘¢and I
advise you not to eat too much.”

The wolf replied, ‘I am not
going away from here till the tub ts
empty.”

At this moment in came the farmer,
who had heard the fox jumping
about in the cellar. The fox no
sooner saw hir than with a spring
he was through the hole. The wolf
made an attempt to follow him; but
he had ea:en so much, and was so
fat that he stuck fast. ‘Lhe farmer
on seeing this fetched a cudgel and killed him on the spot. The fox ran home
to his den full of joy that he was at last set free from the old glutton’s company.

HuuseE.

Beddy’s House.

Trppy has been given the dominoes with which to amuse him-
self for a little while. :

With care he places one block upon another, and now tries to put
one on the top. If he can hold his little plump hand steady enough
he will succeed. ;

Some day Teddy will grow to be aman. He will build a real
house for himself, called character. Each act, each habit, each
thought, will be like a block, and all to be put together with care.
If this is done he will become a noble man.

“You may come for aught I care,”










_ he Black 3 agile.

Tue beak of the eagle is hooked, and ends in a sharp point bent
downwards. Its feet are strong and armed with iilons or claws.
This bird has a wonderful power of sight, and is said-to be able to
look at the unclouded sun.

Eagles are remark-
able for the nobleness
of their bearing, and
for their daring cour-
age. They have power-
fal limbs, are fond of
flesh, and will attack
animals of quite a large
size. It is only when
pressed by hunger that
they attack: small birds.

They build their nest
on the flat surface of
some rock, or on a
platform of some high
hill. The size of the
nest is large, and every
year it is made larger,
for these birds do not
like to change their
homes. The nest is
often made of large
pieces of wood, that
shows how great must have been the sitengah of the birds that could
carry them. The pieces are so placed as not to yield easily to the
wind, and they support boughs, forming a solid sort of hollow,

called an eyrie.

It takes about thirty days for the eagle to hatch her eggs, and
during this time the male hunts for food, and brings it to feed his
mate. Eagles live on wild mountains, aod often build their nests on
the highest cliffs.

(he Golden Eagle.

SEE the golden eagle. What a large, strong bird! .
claws it can seize on-its prey, and lift it high into the air.

The nest of the eagle,
made of twigs and sticks,
is sometimes found on. the
ledge of a steep rock, and
sometimes on the branches
of a very tall tree. The
eggs are grayish-white in
color.

The eagle is so strong
that he can carry off lambs
andevensheep. He takes
them to his nest as food
for his young. The goiden
eagle is found in many
parts of Europe and Amer-
ica.

Once I saw a tame eagle
borne on a platform in a
procession of soldicrs. He
had been with them in five
or six battles, and they
prized him very much. He
lived to a good old age,
The eagle is the emblem of the





With its



eek
oe ee
much petted and well cared for.
United States.

Popping Gorn.
It is nearly bed time, but Mamma allows little Guss and Gertie
to sit by the blazing fire awhile to pop corn. Guss has been shelling
it into a plate, and Gertie, for her share of the pleasant labor, holds
the popper to the fire and shakes it gently all the time lest the corn
burns before it pops, which would besadindeed. How eagerly they
watch for the first white that hogs out ofits nest. Isn’t it strange
how such a big thing can keep in such a little place so long.
It is a little as if some pretty white bird had been squeezed into
a hard little cage and tightly sealed. There the little bird waits and

ee” ae



PorpinG Corn.

waits, longing for some dear girl or boy to know that she is there,
and only waiting for her cage to be burned enough for her to break
through and fly out. And does it not remind you of the story in
your fairy book which tells of a beautiful princess who was turned by
some wicked fairy into something not at all handsome, and how she
waited there until one day along came a handsome prince who kissed
the ugly thing, and behcld, out jumped the lovely princess, and they
lived happy together ever after. Is not the corn like the locked-up
princess, and the one who pops it like the prince, and the fire like
his kiss? Only in the case of the corn, it is eaten, and sometimes
the corn-princess and the little prince do not live happily together,
especially if the prince eats too much.
We will hope that Guss and Gertie will not eat too much, bu’
will have a most delightful sleep after it, they are such gocd
children.

WMashington’s Bed-Chamber.

Tuts is the room and the bed in which General Washington
slept, you know, who could not tell a lie when he was a boy, and
who was afterwards said to be ‘the first in war, the first in peace,
and the first in the hearts of his countrymen.” Many times he has
laid a tired head, weary with the business of governing this country,
upon those pillows. It is a pleasant and beautiful room but none too

Bs St pleasant to rest so great and good a
47 man. Ifyou ever go to Mt. Vernon,


























































































































































the lovely home of Washington,
you may see this room, for it is
religiously kept as when he left it.


oe HAPPY HOURS
Which Hoved

‘+ T Love you, mother,” said little John;
Then, forgetting his work, his hat went on,
And he was off to,the garden swing,

And left her the water and wood to bring.




Icat ?



“To-day I'll help you all I can;

“‘ T love you, mother,” said rosy Nell:

“ T love you better than tongue can tell.”
Then she teased and pouted full half the day,
Till her mother rejoiced when she went to play.

Busy and happy all day was she.

““T love you, mother,” again they said,
Three little children going to bed,
How do you think that mother guessed
Which of them really loved her best?



Preparing for the @harade.

Wuar fun they are having! The garret has been ransacked,
and grandpa’s hat and coat, and great-grandma’s. old bonnet and
shawl got out; the first for Harry, and the others for Madge. See
how sedately Madge carries the umbrella and basket. She knows
how ladies should walk. Frank, over there by the crib, has got on
his brother John’s fur trimmed coat, and a big felt hat. Heis a great
man now! You see the stylish moustache he has marked on his
upper lip. The handglass has just shown him that he is really very
impressive. Perhaps he will some day be a real actor, after study-
ing very hard and reading a great deal. But now it is only fun, and
the chances are that his serious face will be one broad grin by the
time he goes into the long drawing room, where all the guests await

the beginning of the charade. Little Alice seems to be ready to be

a lovely fairy with her brother's stick for a wand. Soon it will be |

over, and tired heads will be laid on the pillows only to be filled with
dreams of charades all night.

IN “LHE LITTLE

*‘ T love you, mother,” said little Fan:

How glad I am there’s no school to-day!”
So she rocked the babe till asleep it lay.

Then, stepping softly, she fetched the broom,
And swept the floor and tidied the room;

Helpful and happy as child could be.

PEOPLE’S WORLD.



Lhe Ugly Duckling.

In a sunny spot stood an old country house, encircled by canals.
Between the wall and the water’s edge there grew hr ge burdock-leaves, that
had shot up to such a height that a little child might aave stood upright under
the tallest of them; and this spot was as wild as though it had been situated
in the depths of a wood. In this snug retirement a duck was sitting on her
nest to hatch her young ; but she began to think it a wearisome task, as the
little ones seemed very backward in making their appearance ; besides, she
had few visitors, for the other ducks preferred swimming about in the canals,
instead of being at the trouble of climbing up the slope, and then sitting
under a burdock-leaf to gossip with her.

At length one egg cracked, and then another. ‘* Peep! peep!” cricd
they, as each yolk became a live thing, and popped out its head.

“‘ Quack! quack!” said the mother; and they tried to cackle like her,
while they looked all about them under the green leaves; and she allowed
them to look to their hearts’ content, because green is good for the eyes.

‘‘How large the world is, to be sure!” said the young ones. And truly
enough, they had rather more room than when they were still in the egg-
shell. ;

‘© Do you fancy this is the whole world?” cried the mother. ‘+ Why,

it reaches far away beyond the other side of the garden, down to the parson’s

field; though I never went to such a distance as that! But are you all there?”

continued she, rising. ‘‘ No, faith! you are not; for there still lies the largest
egg. I wonder how long this business is to last—I really begin to grow
quite tired of it!” And she sat down once more.

«* Well, how are you getting on?” inquired an old duck, who came to
pay her a visit.

“This egg takes a deal of hatching,” answered the sitting duck. ‘it
won't break. But just look at the others; are they not the prettiest duck-
lingsever seen? They are the image of their father, who, bye-the-bye, does
not trouble himself to come and see me.”

« Let me look at the egg that won’t break,” quoth the old duck. “Take
my word for it, it must be a guinea-fowl’s egg. I was once deceived in the
same way, and I bestowed a deal of care and anxiety on the youngsters, for
they are afraid of water. I could not make them take to it. I stormed and
raved, but it was of no use. Let’s see the egg. Sure enough, it is a guinea-
fowl’s egg. Leave it alone, and set about teaching the other children to
swim.”

‘« T’ll just sit upon it a bit longer,” said the duck; ‘for, since I have sat

-so long, a few days more won’t make much odds.”






- at ash © fe ae ua | o>?

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

eS ae



Turre Grew HuGe Burpock LEAVES.

‘¢ Please yourself,” said the old duck, as she went away.

At length the large egg cracked.

‘Peep! peep! peep!” squeaked the
youngster as he crept out. How big and ugly he was, tobe sure! The duck
looked at him, saying, ‘‘ Really, this is a most enormous duckling! None
of the others are like him. I wonder whether he is a guinea-chick after all?
Well, we shall soon see when we get down to the water, for-in he shall go,
though I push him in myself.”

On the following morning the weather was most delightful, and the sun
The mother duck took

Splash into the water she went.

was shining brightly on the green burdock-leaves.
her young brood down to the canal.
“Quack! quack!” cried she, and forthwith one duckling after another
jumped.
rose to the surface again, and swam about so nicely, just as if their legs pad-
dled them about of their own accord; and they had all taken to the water,
even the ugly grey-coated youngster swam about with the rest.

‘¢ Nay, he is no guinea-chick,” said she: ‘‘only look how capitally he
uses his legs, and how steady he keeps himself — he’s every inch my own
child! And really he’s very pretty when one comes to look at him atten-
tively. Quack ! quack!” added she; ** now, come along, and I'll take you
into high society, and introduce you to the duck-yard; but mind you keep
close to me, that nobody may tread upon you; and above all, beware of the
cat.”

They now reached the farm-yard, where there was a great hubbub.
Two families were fighting for an eel’s head, which, in the end, was carried
off by the cat.

*« See, children, that’s the way with the world! ” remarked the mother
of the ducklings, licking her beak, for she would have been very glad to have
had the eel’s head for herself. ‘* Now move on!” said she, ‘‘ and mind you
cackle properly, and bow your head before that old duck yonder: she is the
noblest born of them all, and is of Spanish descent, and that’s why she is so
dignified ; and, look! she has a red rag tied to her leg, which is the greatest
mark of distinction that can be bestowed upon a duck, as it shows an anxiety
not to lose her, and that she should be recognized by both man and beast.
Now cackle —and don’t turn in your toes: a well-bred duckling spreads his
feet wide apart, like papa and mamma, in this sort of way. Now bend your
neck and say ‘ Quack!” .

The ducklings did as they were bid; but the other ducks, after looking -

at them, only said aloud, ‘* Now look! here comes another set, as if we were
not quite numerous enough already. And, bless me! what a queer-looking
chap one of the ducklings is, to be sure! We can’t put up with him!” And
one of the throng darted forward and bit him in the neck.

‘‘ Leave him alone,” said the mother; ‘the did no harm to any one.”

‘* No, but he is too big and uncouth,” said the biting duck, ‘‘ and there-
fore he wants a thrashing.”

‘‘Mamma has a sweet little family,” said the old duck with the rag
about her leg: ‘‘ they are all pretty except one, who is rather ill-favoured. I
wish mamma could polish him a bit.”

The water closed over their heads for a moment; but they soon |

-¢©7’m afraid that will be impossible, your grace,” said the mother of the
ducklings. ‘‘Tt’s true he is not pretty, but he has a very good disposition,
and swims as well or perhaps better than all the others put together. How-
ever, he may grow prettier, and perhaps become smaller: he remained too
long in the egg-shell, and therefore his figure is not properly fo.med.” And
with this she smoothed down the ruffled feathers of his neck, adding, ‘‘ At all
events, as he is a male duck it won’t matter so much. I think he’ll prove

strong, and be able to fight his way through the world.”

‘© The other ducklings are elegant little creatures,” said the old duck.

‘Now, make yourself at home; and if you should happen to find an eel’s
head, you can bring it to me.”

And so the family made themselves comfortable.

But the poor duckling who had been the last to creep out of his egg-
shell, and looked so ugly, was bitten, and pushed about, and made game of,
not only by the ducks, but by the hens. They all declared he was much too
big; anda guinea-fowl who fancied himself at least an emperor, because he
had come into the world with spurs, now pufled himself up like a vessel in
full sail, and flew at the duckling, and blustered till his head turned com-
pletely red, so that the poor little thing did not know where he could walk
or stand, and was quite grieved at being so ugly that the whole farm-yard
scouted him.

Nor did matters mend the next day, or the following ones, but rather
grew worse and worse. The poor duckling was hunted down by everybody.
Even his sisters were so unkind to him, that they were continually saying,

‘‘] wish the cat would run away with you, you ugly creature ” while his

mother added, ‘* I wish you had never been born!” And the ducks pecked |

at him, the hens struck him, and the girl who fed the poultry used to kick him.

So he ran away and flew over the palings. The little birds in the
bushes were startled, and took wing. ‘‘ That is because I am so ugly,”
thought the duckling, as he closed his eyes in despair; but presently he
roused up again, and ran on farther till he came to a large marsh inhabited by
wild ducks. Here he spent the whole night, and tired and sorrowful enough
he was. ,

On the following morning, when the wild ducks rose and saw their new
comiade, they said, ‘‘ What sort of a creature are you?” Upon which the
duckling greeted them all round as civilly as he knew how.

‘You are remarkably ugly,” observed the ducks; ‘ but we don’t care
about that so long as you don’t want to marry into our family.” Poor forlorn
little creature! he had truly no such thoughts in his head; all he wanted was
to obtain leave to lie among the rushes and to drink a little of the marsh-
water. a

He remained there for two whole days, at the end of which there came
two wild geese, or, more properly speaking, goslings, who were only just

out of the egg-shell, and consequently were very pett.





‘ Ler’s SEE THE Ece.”

a


ed her ree eee oa.

HAPPY



_ “Tsay, friend,” quoth they, ‘‘ you are so ugly that we should have no
objection to take you with us for a traveling companion. ‘In the neighbor-
ing marsh there dwell some sweetly pretty female geese, all of them
unmarried, and who cackle most charmingly. Perhaps you may have a
chance to pick up a wife amongst them, ugly as you are.”

Pop! pop! sounded through the air, and the two wild goslings fell dead
amongst the rushes, while the water turned as red as blood. Pop! pop!
again echoed around, and whole flocks of wild geese flew up from the rushes.
Again and again the ‘same alarming noise was. heard. It was a shooting
party, and the sportsmen surrounded the whole marsh, while others had

climbed into the branches of the trees that overshadowed the rushes. A blue

mist rose in clouds and mingled with the green leaves, and sailed far away

across the water; a pack of dogs next flounced into the marsh. fplash.
splash ! they went, while the reeds and rushes bent beneath them on all sides.
What a fright they occasioned the poor duckling! He turned away his head

to hide it under his wing, when, lo! a tremendous-looking dog, with his

“tongue lolling out and his eyes glaring fearfully, stood right before him,

opening -his jaws and showing his sharp teeth, as though he would gobble up
the poor duckling at a moythful !—but splash ! splash! on he went without
touching him. ;
‘“« Thank goodness,” sighed the duckling ‘* I am so ugly that even a dog
won’t bite me.”
And he lay quite still, while the shot rattled through the rushes, and pop

after pop echoed through the air.



© How Bic anp Ucity Hr Was, To BE SuRE.”’

Tt was not till late in the day that all became quiet, but the poor young-
ster did not yet venture to rise, but waited several hours before he looked about
him, and then hastened out of the marsh as fast as he could go. He ran
across fields and meadows, till there arose such a storm that he could scarcely
get on at all.

Towards evening he reached a wretched little cottage that was in such
a tumble-down condition, that if it remained standing at all, it could only be
from not yet having made up its mind on which side it should fall first. The

tempest was now raging to such a height, that the duckling was forced to sit

down to stem the wind, when he perceived that the door hung so loosely on ©

one of its hinges, that he could slip into the room through the crack, which
he accordingly did.

_ The inmates of the cottage were a woman, a tom-cat, and a hen. The
tom-cat, whom she called her darling, could raise his back and purr, and he
could even throw out sparks, provided he were stroked against the grain.
The hen had small, short legs, for which reason she was called Ilenny
Shortlegs. She laid good eggs, and her mistress loved her as if she had
been her own child.

Next morning they perceived the little stranger, when the tom-cat began
to purr, and the hen to cluck.

‘© What’s that?” said the woman, looking round. ‘Not seeing very dis-
tinctly, she mistook the duckling for a fat duck that had lost its way. “Why,

HOURS IN THE LITTLE

PEOPLE’S 1VORLD.



FLuNG Tue Toncs ar Him.

this is quite a prize!” added she: ‘+ 1 cannow get duck’s eggs, unless, indeed
it bea male. We must wait a bit and see.”

So the duckling was kept on trial for three weeks; but no eggs were
forthcoming. The tom-cat and the hen were the master and mistress of tho
house, and always said ‘‘ We and the world,” for they fancied themsclves to
be the half— and by far the best half, too— of the whole universe. The duck-
ling thought there might be two opinions on this point; but the hen would
not admit of any such doubts.

‘Can you lay eggs?” asked she.

‘“¢ No.”

‘Then have the goodness to hold your tongue.”

And the tom-cat inquired, ‘‘Can you raise your back, or purr, or throw
out sparks?”

LOIN Side ome

‘¢ Then you have no business to have any opinion at all when rationa!
people are talking.”

The duckling sat in a corner, very much out of spirits, when in came
the fresh air and sunshine, which gave him such a strange longing to swim
on the water that he could not help saying so to the hen.

“ What's this whim?” said she. ‘That comes of being idle. If you
could cither lay eggs or purr, you would not indulge in such fancies.”

‘‘ But it is so delightful to swim about on the water!” the duckling
observed, ‘‘ and to feel it close over one’s head when one dives down to the
bottom.”

‘A great pleasure indeed!” quoth the hen. ‘You must be crazy,
surely. Only ask the cat — for he is the wises.: creature I know — how he
would like to swim on the water, or to dive under it. To say nothing of

myself, just asi. our old mistress, who is wiser than anybody else in the

‘ world, whether sne’d relish swimming and fecling-the waters close obove her

head.”

“ You can’t understand me,” said the duckling,

‘¢ We can’t understand you! I should like to know who could. You
don’t suppose you are wiser than the tom-cat and our mistress——-to say
nothing of myself? Don’t take these idle fancies into your head, child. I
say disagreeable things, which is a mark of truc friendship. Now, look to it,
and mind that you either lay eggs, or Jearn to purr and emit sparks.”

“T think I’ take my chance, and go abroad into the wide world,” said
the duckling.

*¢Do,” said the hen.

And the duckling went forth, and swam on the water, and dived
beneath its surface; but he was slighted by all the other animals, on account
of his ugliness.

Autumn had now set in. The leaves of the forest had turned first
yellow, and then brown; and the wind caught them, and made them dance
about. It began to be very cold, and the clouds looked heavy with hail and
flakes of snow ; while the raven sat on a hedge, crying ‘* Caw! caw!” from
sheer cold; and one began to shiver, if one mercly thought about it. One

evening, just as the sun was settiag, there came a whole flock of beautiful


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



large birds from a grove. The duckling had never seen any so lovely before.
They were dazzlingly white, with long, graceful necks: they were swans.
They uttered a peculiar cry, and then spread their magnificent wings, and
awzy they flew from the cold country to warmer lands across the open sea.
They rose so high that the ugly duckling felt a strange sensation come over
him. He turned round and round in the water like a wheel, stretched his
neck up into the air towards them, and uttered so loud and strange a cry,
that he was frightened at it himself. Oh! never could he again forget those
beautiful, happy birds; and when they were quite out of sight, he dived
down to the bottom of the water, and when he once more rose to the surface,
he was half beside himself. He knew not how those birds were called, nor
whither they weve bound; but he felt an affection for them, such as he had
never yet experieaced for any living creature. Nor did he even presume to
envy them; for how could it ever have entered his head to wish himself
endowed with their loveliness. le would have been glad enough if the
ducks had merely suffered him to remain among them — poor ugly animal

that he was!



THERE'S A NEw ONE.

And winter proved so very, very cold. The duckling was optiged to
keep swimming about, for fear the water shculd freeze entirely ; but every
night the hole in which he swam grew smaller and yet smaller. It now
froze so hard that the surface of the ice cracked again; yet the duckling still
paddled about, to prevent the hole from closing up. At last he was so
exhausted that he lay insensible, ana became ice-bourd. =

Early next morning a peasant ca ne by, and seeing what had taken place,
broke the ice to pieces with his woolen shoe, and carried the duckling home
to his wife; so the little creature was revived once more.

The children wished to play with him; but the duckling thought they
intended to hurt him, and in his fright he ylunged right into a bowl of ‘milk,
that was spirted all over the room. The woman clapped her hands, which
only frightened him still more, and drove him first into the butter-tub, then
down into the meal-tub, and out again. What a scene then ensued! The
woman screamed, and flung the torgs at him; the children tumbled over
each other in their endeavors to catch .he duckling, and laughed and shrieked.
Fortunately the door stood open, and re slipped through, and then over the
fagots into the newly-fallen snow, where he lay quite exhausted.

But it would be too painful to tei. of all the privations and misery that
the duckling endured during the severe weather. He was lying in a marsh,
among the reeds, when the sun agaiu began to shine. The larks were

singing, and the spring had set in in all its beauty.

The duckling now felt able to flap his wings. They rustled much louder

than before, and bore him away most sturdily ; and before he was well aware
of it he found himself in a large garden, where the apple-trees were in full
blossom, and the fragrant elder was steeping its long, drooping branches in
she waters of a winding canal. Three magnificent white swans now emerged

from the thicket before him; they flapped their wings, and then swam lightly
on the surface of the water.

‘I will fly towards those royal birds — and they will strike me dead for
daring to approach them, so ugly as] am! But it matters not. Better far
to be killed by them than to be pecked at by the ducks, beaten by the hens,
pushed about by the girl who feeds the poultry, and to suffer want in the
winter.” And he flew into the water, and swam towards those splendid
swans, who rushed to meet him with rustling wings the moment they saw
him. ‘ Do but kill me!” said the poor animal, as he bent his head down to
the surface of the water and awaited his doom. But what did he see in the
clear stream? Why, his own image, which was no longer that of a heavy-
looking dark grey bird, ugly and ill-favored, but of a beautiful swan!

It matters not being born in a duck-yard, when one is hatched from a
swan’s egg |

Some little children now came into the garden, and threw bread-crumbs
and corn into the water; and the youngest cried, ‘‘ There is a new one!”
The other children clapped their hands, and flew to their father and mother,
and they all said, ‘‘ The new cne is the prettiest.”

He then felt quite ashamed, and hid his head under his wing. He was

more than happy, yet none the prouder, for a good heart is never proud.

He remembered how he had been pursued and made game of; and now he °

heard everybody say he was the most beautiful of all the beautiful birds.
He flapped his wings and raised his slender neck, as he cried in the fullness
of his heart, «I never dreamed of such happiness when I was an Ugly
Duckling.”

Host in. the Woods,

Lost, but not very far from home after all. Not so far but that pussy
knows the way back and will lead Iittle Emily back when she gets ready to
go. To Emily it seems a long, long ways; but she is not afraid, only tired
and glad to rest her little legs and put her back against the trunk of the big
tree. Pussy is tired too, for Emily has made her chase the ball very often,
and she ha; been hunting grassho,pers and butterflies whenever Emily
would let her. She is so tired now that she does not care to catch the but
terflies which are so near to her. She contents herself with turning her
pretty head and iazily looking at them.

Emily has chosen a very pleasant place for her rest. How the flowers
spring up on every side, and what a delightful breeze comes stealing through
the bushes to play with. Emily’s brown hair and kiss her rosy cheeks.

- Emily is a very good little girl, She did not run away from home.
She only tossed the ball a little further, and a little further yet, till before
she knew it she was out of sight of her house. Her mother will not scold
her; she will only tell her to be more careful another time. There is noth-
ing in these woods to hurt her. At most some prettily spotted fawn may
peep through the leaves and then run away to tell his mother how pretty
Emily is. He will leave her there under the tree in the sun, knowing that
long before dark she will have followed pussy home. ,

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HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORL





































































































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«Nfending the Umbrella.

EVERYTHING wears.out. Even our best dolls wz// break their noses
and legs or get the pretty pink rubbed off their cheeks, and the sturdy
rocking-horses that seem made to last forever, one day, at a most unexpected
moment, kick a little too hard, and awa; goes Tom, Dick, or Harry, and the
norse has to be sent to the mender. When such things break, how can we
expect umbrellas to last, umbrellas that are borrowed by neighbors so often,
turned inside out by frisky winds, and left by negligent boys and girls where

mice or moths caneat them. Yes, they wear out and must be mended. In

the picture you sce a good man who has seen that it is about to rain and has

gotten out the old blue gingham that has been used by every one in and out
of the family for years until it needs a deal of fixing to make it keep water
offone. Itisa bad job; so he has taken his tools, after lighting a comfort-
ing pipe, to the settle by the fire-place. He will make it as easy as pos-
sible, and perhaps, dear man that he is, he will spend so much time over it
that the shower will have come and gone before the umbrella can be used.
But never mind, it has been a good job for a rainy day, and is all ready for
the girls to take to school wren the next storm comes. Perhaps you may dis-
cover that the man is a shoemaker, and that he has taken the umbrella into
the shop. The artist leaves us a little in doubt, does he not?

The man who first carried an umbrella in England — it was a red one —
was laughed at, but he persevered, and now, as the triolet says,

‘* Who cares for the rain

If umbrellas are good?

It may beat on the pane:
Who cares for the rain?

It mav sweep o’er the plain
Or drench the dark wood:

Who cares for the rain
If umbrellas are good?”

he Signal Service.

Wear do you suppose all those queer things are on the top of this
building? Did you say weather-vanes? You are right: they are weather-
vanes and pans for collecting water to show how much rain falls, and a kind
of whirligig thing for telling how fast the wind travels, how many miles an
hour it flies, and how strangely it changes its path, now going east, now
west, now southeast or north, or any other way it pleases. ‘+ The wird
bloweth where it listeth,’” and these vanes and other things are connected
with the rcoms in the building below; and in the rooms are men who spend
all their time in watching them and keeping record of just when and how
they change. There are three hundred and sixty-seven of these stations in

the United Sta’es, and they all telegraph every day to this building to tell
the man there just how the wind and rain, and heat and cold are at their



Mgnpinc tig UMBReLLA.

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD. wo





























THE SIGNAL OFFICE.

station, and there are telegrams coming from other places, in Canada, New-
foundland, and the West Indies, making similar reports. But why? What
good does it do the men to know?

Once, not many years ago, men did no know when storms were coming,
or when waves of heat or cold were on the way to them, and many crops
were injured because the farmers were not ready for the storm, and many
brave sailors perished because they could not know when to put their vessels
into safe harbors. But now the telegraph tells the men in this house when
a storm is coming, and the men send the news immediately to every city
in the country, and to all the places by the sea, and at these places they put
up different flags, each fag meaning a particular kind of wind or storm, so
that the people can cover their grain, or get in their hay, or keep their ves-
sels safe. By that means much precious food is saved and many men kept
from death. Is not that a wonderful and noble thing to do? You may see
one of these ‘* weather reports” in Papa’s paper any day.

This house is in Washington, where the President lives, and though it
is not so handsome a building as the White House or the Capitol, is quite
as useful in its way.

Wt Tome in the Moods.

Yes, the mother doe and her two pretty fawns are
very much at home among these shining green leaves which
dance in the sunlight and make a kind of music that all the
deer love. See how the doe’s soft eyes look into the green-
ness. She docs not suspect that we are looking at her.
They have all come down to the pool to drink and eat the
juicy grass that grows there. In the pool are lily-pads and
arrow-wecd, and you may see one yellow lily just opening
its petals under the tall grass in which the dragon-flies flit
to and fro. Such a lovely piace as this must be full of birds,
and their singing. Let us hope that no hunter with his
cruel gun may find this peaceful spot and kill the beautiful
doe and fawns. Ilow much better they look in their home
than in the wire-enclosed yards of city parks. Do you not
think they often wish to be back among the tall trees and
sheltering bushes? And when night comes how they must
long to get away from all harsh city noises to the silent
dimness of the forest. When we see them in the parks we
must not tease them, but speak gently, because they are
very timid and homesick.

But it is pleasant to look into their real home, as we
do here, without disturbing them in the least.








HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

Aes
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a Baia



Veet
By suf
ath

AT HOME IN THE WOODS.



































HAPPY



HOURS IN THE LITTLE



Hive Hittle @hickeno.

Sarp the first little chicken,
With a queer little squirm,
“Oh, wish I could find
A fat little worm!”

Said the next tittle chicken,
With an odd little shrug,
*¢ Oh, I wish I could find
A fat little bug!”’

Said the third little chicken,
With a sharp little squeal,

“ Oh, I wish I could find
Some nice, yellow meal!”

Said the fourth little chicken, ¥
With a small sigh of grief,
“Oh, I wish I could find
A green little leaf!’’

Said the fifth little chicken,
With a faint little moan,
“ Oh, I wish I could find
A wee gravel stone!”’

** Now see here,’’ said the mother,
From the green garden patch,
“Tf you want any breakfast,
You just come and scratch.”

‘THE MoRNING LIGHT.”

“The Morning Eight.”
oe oa eae

CHILDREN are sometimes compared to the morning light because
they are bright and young and full of joy.

These children are no doubt the pet of some household. They
are some mother’s darlings, who carefully watches over them and
tends their wants. When night comes and the darkness shuts their
blue eyes in sleep she tucks them in their bed and prays for them.

Cut into the wide world she knows they will have to go some-
time, and she feels sad as she thinks of the hard things they may
have to meet without a mother’s care and love about them,

A good mother, such as you have, never can forget her children
but will love and pray for them so long as she lives:

‘¢ For the little ones so dear,

Oft reposing on your breast .
Never in the coming years,

Though they seek for it with tears,
Will they find so sweet a rest.

Feet like those may go astray
Bruised and bleeding by the way,

fre they reach the mansion blest!
Pray, mother, pray !”.



Phe Boy at the Whee,
The sea! the sea! the open seal! “T’m on the sea!

The blue, the fresh, the ever free!
Without a mark, without a bound;

It runneth the earth’s wide regions round; And silence whereso’er I go!

It plays with clouds; it mocks the skies, If a storm should come and awake the deep,
Or like a cradled creature lies, What matter! I shall ride and sleep.

é I'm on the sea!
Tam where I would ever be;
With the blue above, and the blue below,

‘"Y never was on the dull, tame shore,
But I loved the great sea more and more,
And backward flew to her billowy breast,
Like a bird that seeketh its mother’s nest}
And a mother she was, and is to me; 1
For I was born on the open sea!” os


he Silonder WMorld.

HAveE you ever looked up some bright night into the sky, and
have you wondered what the golden specks which seem to come out
one by one, are? How like diamonds they sparkle.

Are they worlds like this one of ours, and do men and women
live there, are questions that many people ask.

The stars are a long, long way off, perser” who look througha
glass called a telescope tell us that some of these stars are suns to
other worlds, as our bright sun is to our world.

The ray of sunlight which shone in your room this morning had
to travel a long, long way too. How many miles do you think it came.
Ninety-five million miles, just think of that! While youslept, this bit
of sunlight was coming as fast as it could to welcome you when

)

you woke.

There is a study called astronomy which tells about the wonders
of the starry world above us. Mary has begun to learn it, and she
is now looking for the Milky Way, and Venus, the beautiful evening

star. Have you ever seen them?

God made the sun, moon and stars, and all things, and cares for
them by his great power.



Tue WoNDRR WORLD.



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.





Santa Claus.

Ts there one of you who has not had a dream of Santa Claus, in his fur coat,
and with his streaming white beard, drawn swiftly throughthesky; with his
four Reindeer prancing with keen enjoyment? You have dreamed of him, but per-
haps he did not look to you as he did to the artist who made this picture. In this
picture, Time, who is made like a very o/d man —as he certainly is— with great
wings and a scythe and hour glass stands in the belfry of the church and rings the
chimes for the hour which makes Christmas. Time knows, for he has watched
the sand in his hour-glass run for years and years. Santa Claus heard the first
stroke of the bell and whistling to his Reindeer away they flew, his sleigh loaded
with presents for all good little boys and girls, and for some naughty ones, too.
Santa Claus loves above everything else to make children happy by giving them
what they want most; so we should help him by telling him what we want. But
if he does not give it us we must not be cross and say unkind things about him.

Sometimes he knows better than we what we ought to have; and sometimes
the very thing we want is needed more by somebody else. Not one of you will
forget Santa Claus, for he has certainly been very kind to you in the past.

Oh Christmas is most jolly,

With mistletoe and holly.
SING HEIGH HO!

Who comes here every year?
@ld Santa Claus so dear.
SING HEIGH HO!

And we will love him so
He’ll follow where we go;
SING HEIGH Ho!

And bring sweet things and toys
Te all good girls and boys.
SING HEIGH Ho!


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD. | a ‘



is for the Antelope,
an A species of Deer,

Tt bounds away swiftly
When danger is near.





7% is for the Beaver,
5 Forthriftthey’re renowned, 3
" By the banks of the river Bad
Their dams may be found.



rN is for the Camel

— , With a hump on its back, CG
Tis the ship of the desert
Marching o’er its hot track.



We is for the Deer,
y Of kinds there’s a score, { §
’ There’s the Red Deer and Roe- “*
buck,
And a great many more.



â„¢ is for the Elephant,
| With its wonderful size, Qe
i—@ How useful its trunk,
And how small are its eyes.

Bis for the fox, |
He’s both cunning and sly,

When he visits the hen roost,
The poor biddies fly.





4 is for the Giraffe,

g He's so wonderfully tall, 9
" He eats from the tree tops,

And. sees above all.



r"@ is for the horse,













- "y is for the Newt,





So faithful and true,



Ba ol He’s the friend of mankind Ea

The wide world through.

is for the Ibex, , _

On the mountains so steep, |

whit "Tis there that you find him,

With his bold flying leap.

is for the Jackal, : i

"Tis a dreadful sight
To see them in packs,

As they prowl in the night.

7 is for the Kangaroo,

\ A creature most queer, FA
® When running at high leap,“
With his tail he will steer.



is for the Leopard,
With rich, spotted hair,

“Tis a fierce, savage creature

Should you pass near its lair.

mis for the Moose,

In the far north’tis seen,

iV dhe Tis hunted by sportsmen

When the north winds are ~
keen.

A Tis scarcely animal or bird,
' But some like frogs and fishes
I think I have heard.
HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



is for the Ox, .
— Slow, steady, and strong, QO
When yoked to the plough _

He pulls all day long.

is for the Porcupine,
With his quills so queer,
i It becomes a prickly ball,
When its foes are near.



(%, is for the Quagga,

. p From Africa far away,

“® Tis striped like the Zebra,
And when tamed will obey.



ww is for the Rabbit,
rm With pink eyes so mild, r
“ Their white, brown or black
coats |
Are loved by each child.

CY is for the Squirrel
S That lives in the trees, S
And gathers the sweet nuts
- With greatest of ease.



is for the Tiger,
Which the natives all fear T,

When he roars in the jungle,
_ And is known to be near.



is for the Unicorn

Which never was seen, ul
Except on Coat of Arms

Of the good British Queen.

7 is for the Viper |

Which runs on the round. VJ
"Tis one of the snake kind,

The most deadly one found.



cE Y is for the Wolf
Which is given to W
prowling,
As the woods they range
through
They’re constantly howling.



is for Xiphias,

Of the swordfish kind, X
He’s a dangerous monster

As the sailor can find.



is for the Yak,
Some like horse, ox, and Vy
sheep,
With many good traits,
He’s useful to keep.



Va is for the Zebra

# , With a striped glossy coat,
! A swift-footed fellow,

And a creature of note,



) in all the animal kingdom



There’s no creature so sweet

WY As the dear little girl and boy
Who play at our feet.


|



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.
eee T SA e A SSP st SSS,



Barn-Yard Folk.

How haughtily that tall cock holds his head. Is hea prince
or a cardinal? Oh, no, he has just crowed, that’s all; but he thinks
his crow the most musical and noticeable performance of the whole
day. He practiced his crow two hours before day-break, and then
at sun-rise he felt he had it perfected, and let off the whole force of
it, as if he had performed a very creditable service to us all. He is
terribly proud. But let him crow a few more mornings, then his
pride will have a fall, and this head that he now holds so high above
all hens and lesser cocks, will be lying in the grass by the. chopping
block, while his body will be hung in the town market, for every
boarding-houskeeper to stick her thumbs into, and say, «A tough
old cock,’ and lay him aside with disdain.

Just see how the tall cock has taught the little one, by example,
to be just as conceited, and hold his head as high as he can. No-

body wants to eat you, little cock; you need not fear. How meekly

the poor hen walks by their side. She dare not hold up her head,
yet what a useful creature she is. How could we make sponge cake
without the eggs she lays? But surely the cocks are handsome fel-
lows though they are vain.

: The Merveo.

How do the muscles know when to move? You have all seen
the telegraph wires, by which messages are sent from one town to
another, all over the country.

You are too young to understand how this is done, but you each
have something inside of you, by which you are sending messages
almost every minute while you are awake.

We will try to learn a little about its wonderful way of working.
In your head is your brain. It is the part of you which thinks.

As you would be very badly off if you could not think, the brain
is your most precious part, and you have a strong box made of bone P
to keep it in. ; .

We will call the brain the central telegraph office. Little white
cords, called nerves, connect the brain with the rest of the body.

A large cord, called the spinal cord, lies safely ina bony case
made by the spine, and many nerves branch off from this.

If you put your fingers on a hot stove, in an instant a message
goes on the nerve telegraph to the brain. It tells that wise thinking
part that your finger will burn if it stays on the stove.

In another instant, the brain sends back a message to the mus-

cles that move that finger, saying: ‘‘ Contract quickly, bend the joint,

and take that poor finger away, so that it will not be burned.”

You can hardly believe that there was time for all this sending of
messages ; for as soon as you felt the hot stove you pulled your fin-
ger away. But you really could not have pulled it away unless the
brain had sent word to the muscles to do it.

Now you know what we mean when we say, ‘‘As quick as
thought.” — Surely nothing could be quicker.

You see that the brain has a great deal of work to do, for it has
to send so many orders.

There are some muscles which are moving quietly and steadily
all the time, though we take no notice of the motion.

You do not have to think about breathing, and yet the muscles
work all the time moving your chest.

If we had to think about it every time we breathed, we should
have no time to think of any thing else.

There is one part of the brain that takes care of such work for us.
It sends the messages about breathing, and keeps the breathing mus-
cles and many other muscles faithfully at work. It does all this with-
out our needing to know or think about it at all.

Do you begin to see that your body is a busy work-shop, where
many kinds of work are being done all day and all night?

Although we lie still and sleep in the night, the breathing must
goon, and so must the work of those other organs that never stop
until we die.

The little white nerve-threads lie smoothly side by side, making
small white cords. Each kind of message goes on its own
thread, so that the messages need never get mixed or confused.

These nerves are very delicate little messengers. They do all the
feeling for the whole body, and by means of them we have many pains
and many pleasures.

If there was no nervein your tooth it could not ache. But if there
were no nerves in your mouth and tongue, you could not taste your
food.

If there were no nerves in your hands, you might cut them and
feel no pain. But you could not feel your mother’s soft, warm hand,
as she laid it on yours.

One of your first duties is the care of yourselves.

Children may say: ‘* My father and mother take care of me.”
But even while you are young, there are some ways in which no one
can take care of you but yourselves. The older you grow, the more
this care will belong to you, and to no one else.

Think of the work all the parts of the body do for us, and how
they help us to be well and happy. Certainly the least we can dois

to take care of them and keep them in good order.


As one part of the brain has to take care of all the rest of the
body, and keep every organ at work, of course it can never go to
sleep itself. If it did, the heart would stop pumping, the lungs
would leave off breathing, all other work would stop, and the body

would be dead.
But here is another part of the brain which does the thinking

and this part needs rest.
When you are asleep you are not thinking, but you are breathing,

and other work of the body is going on.

If the thinking part of the brain does not have good quiet sleep,
it will soon wear out. A worn-out brain is not easy to repair.

If well cared for, your brain will do the best of work for you for
seventy or eighty years without complaining.
They

get tired out if we do one thing too long at a time; they are rested by

The nerves are easily tired out, and they need much rest.

a change of work.
Think of the wonderful work the brain is all the time doing for

you! '
You ought to give it the best of food to keep it in good working

order. Any drink that contains alcohol is not a food to make one
strong; but is a poison to hurt, and at last to kill.

It injures the brain and nerves so that they can not work well,
and send their messages properly. That is why the drunkard does
not know what he is about.

Newspapers often tell us about people setting houses on fire ;
about men who forgot to turn the switch, and so wrecked a railroad
train; about men who lay down on the railroad track and were run
over by the cars.

Oiten these stories end with: ‘* The person had been drinking.”
When the nerves are put to sleep by alcohol, people become careless
and do not do their work faithfully ; sometimes, they cannot even tell
the difference between a railroad track and a place of safety. The
brain receives no message, or the wrong one, and the person does not

know what he is doing.
You may say that all men who drink liquor do not do such tern-

ble things.
That is true.
- But even a little makes the head ache, and hurts the brain and nerves.

A little alcohol is not so bad as a great deal.

A body kept pure and strong is of great service to its owner.
There are people who are not drunkards, but who often drink a little
liquor. By this means they slowly poison their bodies.

When sickness comes upon them they are less able to bear it,
and less likely to get well again than those who have never injured
their bodies with alcohol.

When a sick or wounded man is brought into a hospital, one of
the first questions asked him by the doctor is: ‘“‘ Do you drink?”

If he answers ‘‘ Yes!” the next questions are, ‘‘ What do you
drink?” and ‘* How much?” ait

The answers he gives to these questions show the doctor what
chance the man has of getting well.

A man who never drinks liquor will get well, where a drinking
man would surely die.

Why does any one wish to use tobacco?

Because many men say that it helps them and makes them feel

better.
Shall I tell you how it makes you feel better?

If a man is cold, the-tobacco deadens his nerves so that he does
not feel the cold, and does not take the pains to make himself warmer.

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



If a man is tired, or in trouble, tobacco will not really rest him
or help him out of his trouble.

It only puts his nerves to sleep and helps him think that he is
not tired, and that he does not need to overcome his troubles.

It puts his nerves to sleep very much as alcohol does, and helps
him to be contented with what ought not to content him.

A boy who smokes or chews tobacco, is not so good a scholar
as if he did not use the poison. He can not remember his lessons
so well.

Usually, too, he is not so polite, nor so good a boy as he other-
wise would be.—Chila’s Health Primer.



Whe Partridge Family.

THE partridge has taken her brood of six little ones to a quiet
She is afraid of the
sportsman’s gun, which she heard not long ago, but she tries not to
What a kind
mother! see, she has found a fat caterpillar and instead of swal-

spot among the grass and underbrush to feed.
frighten her, children by showing that she fears.

lowing it herself, she unselfishly lays it down for the little fellows
treat. If it were not for the sportsman’s gun what days of delight
she would have roaming about the woods and along the roads, teach-
ing her brood the woodcraft that all well-bred partridges should
know. They are beautiful birds and deserve to be happy.








he

Butterfly and the Grasshopper.

‘‘PretTty Butterfly, stay!
Come down here and play,”
A Grasshopper said,

As he lifted his head.

‘¢Oh, no! and oh, no!

Daddy Grasshopper, go!

Once you weren’t so polite,

But said ‘ Out of my sight,

You base, ugly fright !’”
“Ohno! andoh,no! —

T never said so,”

The Grasshopper cried :

‘¢T’d sooner have died
Than been half so rude,

You misunderstood.”
‘“©Oh, no! I did not;
*T was near to this spot:
The offence, while I live,
I cannot forgive.”
“ When and where such disdain,
Such conduct improper,
Was shown by this Hopper.”
‘«T then was a worm:
*Tis a fact I affirm,”
The Butterfly said,
With a toss of her head,
‘‘In my humble condition,
Your bad disposition,
Made you spurn me as mean,
And not fit to be seen.
In my day of small things
You dreamed not that wings
Might one day be mine,—
Wings handsome and fine,
That help me soar up
To the rose’s full cup,
And taste of each flower
In garden and bower.
This moral now take
For your own better sake ;
Insult not the low;
Some day they may grow
To seem and to do
Much better than you.
Remember, and so, ;
Daddy Grasshopper, go!





”



The Star Spangled Banner.

Here is the dear old flag we love
so well. See how proudly it waves.
3} Can you tell how many stars should
\. be onits blue field? Itis called some-
i} times the ‘flag of the free,” and some-
times the ‘‘ Star-Spangled Banner.”

Do you know the origin of the
song which we love to sing, called the
«« Star-Spangled Banner?”

In the year 1814, in the war with
England, some British troops took

? the city of Washington and burned
Ss the Capitol and the President’s house.
A few weeks later they tried to take Baltimore, a city not far distant,
by bombarding Fort Henry. An American gentleman, by flag of
truce, came to the city to see about some laws regarding exchange
of prisoners. On account of the attack he was kept on board the
admiral’s vessel. : ; ‘

All day, while the shots and shells were flying thick and fast,
he watched the flag of his country. And at night he thought about
it. Would it be pulled down by the enemy? In the morning he



-HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

looked with longing eyes and anxious heart, and rejoiced to see it
still floating. :

His name was Francis S. Key, and he afterward wrote the song
entitled the ‘* Star-Spangled Banner,” whose chorus is:

“Tis the Star-Spangled Banner,
Oh, long may it wave,
_ O’er the land of the free,
And the home of the brave.”

& Race of Lartar Women.

“oO

How they go! what a dust those hoofs kick up! They are
almost at the goal, and the one who is a little ahead looks already as
if she were saying, I told you so! while the other clutches her whip
and looks not at all happy.

But what sort of women are these with strange costumes and
shoes whose toes turnup? They are Tartars, and if you will get out
your atlas and turn to the map of Asia you will find a place called
Tartary where they live. They are wild and fierce, but very intelli-
gent. The chances are that whoever wins this race will be well
scolded by the other, for they are not very polite or good-natured
people, and very much dislike being beaten at anything.

Do-you notice in this picture how the women sit in their saddles?
They have no riding habits, and they do not sit sideways after the
fashion of the ladies ‘you have seen riding in the parks. They sit
just as men do, and ride just as well.
in the saddle, do they not? |

Do you notice the strange mark on the nearer horse? It looks
like a big O with an N in it, with a mark across the N. That is
what is called a brand. They take a red-hotiron and burn the mark
with it. It is rather a cruel way for the master of the horse to put
his name on him. Do you think it would be better to paint the
name? But the paint would wear off with the hair, when the mark
is burned in it always stays.

They look very much at home

None of us would like to have our
names burned into our arms or legs or cheeks, surely, luckily we
need not, for we have our names told to us, and we can tell them to
others.

What a lively race this is? Do you think the horse that is now
ahead will really beat?

The Millage Doctor's Christmas Gall.

Tue good doctor had just seated himself to dine on roast duck
and all the other dainties of his Christmas dinner when there came a
pounding at the door, and a summons to visit little Jack Horner
away at the other end of the village. The doctor knows thatit is likely

little Jack has eaten too much Christmas pie, which has made him ill

of course; but the doctor can not stop for that. It may be a danger-
ous illness, and he has devoted his life to the saving of others as far
asmay be. It is snowing heavily, the wind drives the snow fiercely,
but he must go, so looking once more, a little sadly perhaps, at the
steaming duck, he puts on his thick coat, has Dolly saddled, and
starts out to face the wind and plunge through the drifts.

Who can but admire the good doctors who so bravely face not
only storms but every manner of dreadful disease to make suffering —
lighter? a:

Let us hope that little Jack will never eat too: much again, to
cause so much trouble, and let us hope also, that the ducks may
still be hot when the doctor reaches home, to taste all the better be-
cause he has done his duty and made Jack happy again.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a = z = SSS

THE VILLAGE DOCTOR’S CHRISTMAS CALL.






























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A Prospective Feast.

I Prospective

Tuis is little Erik, and he is six years old. The
man who made the picture took pains to put the name
-and the age up there in the corner, What a pleasant,
sweet-mannered boy he is, with his clean apron and
neatly brushed brown hair. His eyes are brown, too.
Every one must like Erik, he has so pleasant a smile
and sits there so quietly for the artist to paint his
portrait.

The artist said: “Let’s make believe, Erik, that
you're going to have a feast of apples. Il put a nice
knife here on the table, and you can hold one of the
prettiest apples in your hand.” Erik throught he should

like to sit so, because it was almost like a joke, to



make people believe he was only a boy in a picture,
and not a “really and truly” person; and besides he
knew he should have the nice apples when the artist
was through with them. Surely it makes a better
picture than it would if the artist had set little Erik
up as if he were a doll with wooden arms and legs,
against a door or chair-back. It would not be
pleasant to always see Erik in one’s parlor, or in a
book, if he looked like a stiff doll. Now he will alway-
give you pleasure, and almost wish you could hav.
your portraits painted in the same way; or perhaps you
had rather be eating the apples.
























































































(Gasmeiseer tern SEE CD Eero




-— ean
Vs ~ Af hia Me 4 r
PA WS (inna ff (vu 42 Ui

al

‘© Oven the ice so smooth and bright,
How we skim along!
This is one of the merriest sports
Which to hardy boys belong.
Hurrah! Hurrah! for the ice and snow,
Our blood is warm and fresh, you know.

‘HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.





me

He Merry Day on the kee.

‘¢ The ice is as strong as strong can be,
And what have we to fear?
It looks like a solid crystal lake
So beautifully clear.
Hurrah! Hurrah! though winter it is,
There’s nothing in summer so fair as this.”









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Wuar a splendid building! See how it spreads itself over the land.
{t must be proud of its grandeur, and surely it has a right to be. The
great George Washington laid the southeast corner-stone of it when he was
President, in 1793, for he knew that the country must have a building big
enough to hold all the senators and representatives of the states when the
assembled to make the country’s laws. But it was not used by them till
1814, because the architects. quarrelled, although they were old enough to
know better, much as school boys do. Quarrelling takes time and causes

The Capitol at Washington.



much trouble. The building was not complete even then, and afterwards
still other architects had charge of it; in fact it was not till over fifty years
after that it was finished. In 1814, when the British troops invaded the
city of Washington, they thought it a very clever thing to burn the buildings
belonging to the government. So up the hill, on which the capitol is built,
they marched and fired shots through the windows; then a whole regiment,
with Admiral Cochburn at the head, marched into the hall of the House
of Representatives insolently playing the tune of the ‘‘ British Gren-




father has money enough to





adiers.” The admiral. seated himself in the chair of the speaker of the
house, surrounded by his troops. He asked them if the building should be
burned. They all said yes, so they took valuable books and papers from the
library, pictures from the walls, and tore down: board partitions and with
them made a big bonfire. Then after firing rockets they marched out to let
the building burn and to start other fires. But only the inside of the capitol
was destroyed. The walls remained. It was rebuilded better than it was
built, until now it is one of the wonderful buildings of the world.

It has an enormous dome and many other fine things which you will be
glad to read of when you are older. AJ that is necessary for you to remem-
ber is that George Washington laid the corner stone, and that in it are made
the laws of the country by the men who are sent by the people in each state,
instead of going themselves, for you see the building could not hold @// the
people of the country, and even if it could, it would take forever to hear

them all,
George ‘Washington.

EVERYBODY recognizes the portrait of Washing-
ton, he has so marked a face, and his pictures are so
scattered everywhere. And everybody knows what a
great and good man he was, because he did so much
for our country, of which he
is called the father, and has
Heen talked about so often.
He was born on the 22d of
February, 1732,inthe County
of Westmoreland, Virginia.
His boyhood was very much
like that of every man whose

give him society, although
his father died when he was
Fortu-

mother was a

but ten years old._
nately, his
woman both good and wise,
so she took upon herself the
education of George. Her
own learning, perhaps, was
not very wide, but what she

had learned she knew thor-



HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE'S WORLD.

eS ee ee
was so much thought of that he was entrusted with
a very important commission, to carry a letter to the
French, who were then making a. line of forts from
Canada to Louisiana, and taking too many liberties with
King George’s land, for it was. King George’s in those
The French would
not stop, however, so King George fought them, that

days, and not our United States.

“is, he made his American subjects fight them, and our

George distinguished himself by good judgment and

courage in the fight with them. But the king became

very hard upon the American colonists, by heavy tax-

ation, and the colonists decided not to bear with him

longer. Washington took sides against the king,
and was elected a member
of the first Congress, which
assembled in Philadelphia in
1774, and afterwards when

the - Colonists found they
must fight the king, and an
army was raised, George
Washington was appointed
to the high position of Com-
mander-in-chief of the Con-
tinental Army.

That was in 1775. He
foughtsowell, was so firm,and
showed suchremarkable judg-
ment, that after the colonists
had whipped the king, and
established a glorious govern-
ment of their own, Wash-

ington was chosen by every-

GEORGE WASHINGTON.

oughly. She taught him
nothing but the English language and mathematics.

, He must have known considerable of the latter, for
he was qualified to be a land surveyor. In 1746 he
wanted to go to sea very much, to become a midshipman
of the navy, but his good mother did not think it the
best thing for him, so he stayed at home, and learned
so fast and did so well that by the time he was 19 years
old he had made quite a reputation for himself, and
was afterwards nominated to be one of the adjutants-
general of Virginia. He made a voyage to the Bar-
badoes; that was about all his travel. But in 1753 he

body to be the President, in
1789. You see he was nota very brilliant man, not a
fine talker, indeed, he was often embarrassed and, per-
haps, bashful in company, but he was an earnest man,
and what he did know he knew thoroughly, which is
the very best thing. Hewas strong and courageous, was
very calm in the face of danger, and though of a pas-
sionate nature, he could control himself perfectly. Just
such a man as that was needed, you see, and we are fortu-
nate in having so good and so wise a man to be the first
ruler of our country.
owed his mother, as so many other great men have


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

a a

done. The lesson to be learned from his life is that
goodness and wisdom are better and more powerful
than brilliancy of wit and a showy disposition.
Washington was tall and very majestic in appear-
ance, and above all an intellectual man, not one whose
emotions were keen. His country honors him as it
should, and on the 22d of February in every year it

celebrates, with loving remembrance, his birthday.



abraham Wincoln.

No man who ever did anything for our country is
so much loved and revered as he whose portrait is
before us. In 1809 he was born in Kentucky, and his
father and mother were not
Ken-
tucky at that time was a
wild
plentiful, schools were not,
so that the boy Abraham

had very small chance in-

extraordinary people.

region; bears were

deed to. get an education, but
he made the very most of
such chance as he did have,
and that
great deal.

means a very.
But he had an
instinct for learning and
used to write out his recol-
lections of his studies and
of what he saw; by that
means he learned more rap-
idly and fixed all he learned
in his mind. And it gave
him practice in penmanship, so that by the time he
was nineteen years old he had acquired a remarkably
good and serviceable hand-writing. And he soon showed
considerable business. capacity so that he was trusted
with a cargo of farm produce which he took to New
Orleans and sold. He had by this time grown to the re-
markable height of six feet four inches, and he was
_normously strong, so that when his father removed to
Macon, Illinois, he helped him clear the land, build his
log homeand split big walnut logs into fence rails. When
his father was well settled, he left him and hired himself



ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

toa man named Offutt, who was building a flat boat to go
to New Orleans on a trading voyage. He went with
Offutt to New Orleans and returned with him to Salem,
where Offutt opened a variety store. Lincoln accom.
plished little at this, but he continued his reading and
studies, (do not forget that), especially English gram-
mar and surveying. Soon after he was made post-
master of New Salem and was that for several years.
From that he became a politician, a member of the
legislature, then the sixteenth President of the United
States.
United States! Think of it! And not only President,
but the noblest man that has ever governed our country.

From splitting rails to being President of the

A man of deep religious feeling, a man calm and cour-
ageous in the face of dan-
ger, and wise always. He was
President during the great
Civil War, which you will
know about sometime, and
that meant at the most terri-
ble moment of our history,
and by his great power and
goodness, thousands of poor
black men and women and
children who had been living
as slaves, whipped and half-
starved, were set at liberty
and became citizens, like all
of us, of these United States.
And because he did that glo-
rious deed, that most beauti-



ful and humane act, he was
assassinated, shot with a pis-
tol while witnessing a play in a theatre. Was that’
not terrible and barbarous? He died on the 15th of
April, 1865, and will always be remembered and
reverenced as one of the best and greatest men that
have ever lived. You will be glad to have a portrait

of him where you may see it at any time.

Worx while you work, play while you play,
This is the way to be cheerful and gay.
All that you do, do with your might,

Things done by halves are never done rignt.










HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

The Hittle Grandmother.



‘We have the sweetest little girl
That ever you did see,
As bright, as happy, and as fair,
As ever she can be.

‘¢ Her eyes are black as any crow’s,
And always full of fun,
And sparkle so with love and joy,
Your heart is fairly won.

‘+ Her lips are like the cherry ripe,
And taste to us more sweet,
And the pure rapture of a kiss
Is as when brooklets meet.

¢¢ Her hair is like a bunch of wheat
Kissed by the morning sun,

_ Just as the god of day begins
His golden race to run.

s¢ Her voice is to our listening ears
As music soft and sweet,
The echo of whose gentle tones
Is touched by little feet.

‘s Her ways are cute and roguish, too,
And take the heart by storm,
While all the fountains of her life

Are pure and sweet and warm.

¢s Our Father! Keep this treasure dear
Beneath Thy sheltering wing,
And let her little hands unto
The Rock of Ages cling.”



Squirrels,

Out of the woods they came
into the village street. It was
such fun to hop from limb to limb
and to seek one still sweeter nut
than the last, that before they
knew it they were far from their
holes in the trees of the wood.
But they didn’t much care; they
were not tired. They crooked
their- bushy tails and winked at
each other with their bright eyes,
and said, ‘‘This is surely a
pretty joke!” Then they
laughed in this quiet way and
hopped towards home. They
arrived just after sunset. They
thought that every other squirrel
in the wood would laugh at them
for going so far, but they had not
even been missed; for the other
squirrels were wise and attended
to their own business of laying
by a large store of nuts and
acorns, to eat during the bitter
cold and snow of winter.

You have seen squirrels in
cages, have you not? They even
then must keep on hopping and
leaping, so men make things like
wire barrels for them to run in.
When they leap it makes the
wire barrel whirl round, and the















































squirrel thinks he is going a long ways, but, poor fellow, he is just
where he was before — shut up.

The squirrels in the picture are gray. They are lively fellows,
and are so sweet and tender that they will probably be made into a
stew before long. Let us hope not. It is so much better to live
among the clean, green leaves, than it is to be boiled in a pot and
stirred with a long handled spoon, besides it cannot be very nice to
be in so mixed a company as the potato and salt and pepper — pepper
think of it! —surely. No, let us have green trees and cool woods,

‘instead of the cook’s fire and a deluge of pepper and salt.

































































WEid-Wiinter.

How it snows! Thicker and faster as the day closes.

So thick
that it seems as if the very trees will be covered. Itis cold, too.
Even the sparrows are ready to seek shelter, and you know how brave
they are generally, for you have seen them hopping about the streets
many a time when all ordinary people were indoors by the fire.
What a racket they make in their little tent of boughs. They are
sure to fight, for they are very quarrelsome little things. They hate
to see one of their brothers with a hice big crumb, so straightway fly
at him and try to snatch it away, which is very rude, indeed, and can
only be excused because they do not know any better.

Mid-winter! Sleighing parties, coasting, skating, snow-balling,
charades, long hours with books by the crackling fires. Mid-winter !
To some, hunger, shivering in miserable houses, with no fuel and
few clothes. To such, Mid-winter is a terror, but to all of you, who
should not forget these others in your enjoyment, it is a time of
laughter, fun, and healthy exercise.

This is rather a dreary picture. Sparrows are more enjoyable
when the sun is bright and warm. They like the sun better, too.
‘© Who killed cock sparrow?”


~~



' HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.

whe Eright

Ou, naughty, naughty grandpa!
to tease little Karl so! Karl turns
to his mother, for he knows she will
protect him from the great goose,
whose big orange-colored bill seems
much too near his arm.

Karl was visiting his grandpa,
and grandma had ordered the old
goose killed for dinner. It was
brought in and put upon the
table, when little Karl got up by
his mother to look at it. Grandpa,
who loves a joke, took up the goose
and made its neck move and its
wings flap, and he hissed through
his teeth, as geese will, till poor Karl
began to think the goose alive after
all. Then mamma smiled and
grandpa laughed long and loudly ;
but he gave Karl a penny to buy
candy with to pay for his fright.
Probably Karl will notjump another
time, but some of us have jumped
at smaller things than that. Karl
is a dear little boy, just as full of
fun as grandpa. They have very
lively times together. Sometimes
itis hard to tell which is the younger,
grandpa or Karl. Karl has a rock-
ing-horse, a trumpet, a brightsword,
a cup and ball, and a small red
horse on four wheels. He likes his





THE FRIGHT.

trumpet and red horse best. Grandpa threatens to buy him a drum,
but mamma says if he does she will never bring Karl to see him
again. That frightens grandpa, and probably the drum will still
stay in the shop window where grandpa first saw it.

Perhaps what Karl likes best is to ride grandpa’s old white
horse, Dick, to the watering trough.

He does it nearly every day.

Be the matter what it may,
Always speak the truth.

If at work, or if at play,
Always speak the truth.

Never Hell a Hie.

Never tell a lie, my boy, Now, as in the coming years,
Always speak the truth. Always speak the truth.
If your life you would enjoy, Save your heart from bitter tears,

Always speak the truth. Always speak the truth.



Tue Ticress AND HER YOUNG.

Never from this rule depart,
Always speak the truth.
Fix it deeply in your heart,
Always speak the truth.



Lhe Higressand Her Poung.

WueEn you look at this picture per-
haps you will say, Oh, see this pretty
cat and her kittens. It does look like
a cat, and belongs to the same family,
but is many times larger and very
fierce. It is a tigress and.her little
ones. Do you notice the beautiful
stripes on their bodies? They are a
bright orange andblack. They seem

to be having a good time playing to-

gether. One of the little ones, you
sce, is perched on its mother’s back,
another is washing her face, while
the mother is washing the third, doing
just what you have often seen a cat
do with her kittens. They look very
innocent and pretty. Although the
tigress looks so kind while playing
with her little ones, if any one were
to pass near her she would spring upon
him, kill him, and then she and the
little ones would devour him. The
tiger hides by the side of water for ani-
mals as they come to drink. It may
be tamed when it is young, but cannot
be trusted when it becomes older.

J

al











Baie

Lease Ree eS ea

SEEN

eae vasae

HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



















































































Going Skating.

Wuart a kind and pretty girl Miss Mabel is! Lucy and Nellie
and little Joe all went off coasting, and though Gyp stood on his hind
feet and begged in the proper way, they would not take him, for they
said he’d only be right in the way and they did not want to be
bothered. But Miss Mabel thought it too bad that Gyp should not
enjoy the bright, beautiful day, so she put on her jacket and fur cap
and muff, took her skates and dear Gyp and started for the pond. It
may be that in her very heart she expected to meet Arthur Lane
there, but nobody will blame her for that. At any rate she did meet
him there, and he politely put on her skates for her, and tried to
teach her to skate backwards. At sunset he took off her skates and
walked home with her. What a delightful afternoon it had been,
not only for Mabel and Arthur, but for Gyp.

He, silly little dog that he is, ran about, slipping on the ice,
barking most of the time, and chasing the skaters as they went glid-
ing by. Some boys had built a fire in the ice, and that greatly inter-
ested Gyp. He went to it and sniffed the heat with evident enjoy-
ment. Mabel thought that Lucy and Nellie and little Joe acted very
much ashamed of themselves when they found that she had taken

Gyp.



ihe Happy Families.

HERE are two very happy families, ona it were
hard to say which is the happier. Here are Ned and
Anne, and baby Alice with Mamma and Nurse. They
have just had their breakfast, and good Mamma thought
it would please them, as it certainly does, to have Nel
lie, the pug, and her three babies come into the dining:
room and eat their milk. How interested everybody is,

even the tiny puppies, who think milk the very nicest

thing in the whole world. Bye and bye they will find

that candy and nuts are a little better, but, dear things,

they are so very innocent and unaccustomed to the good
things of the world that milk eaten with mamma’s
tongue in the same dish is the height of delight to
them. One little fellow seem to need a guide to show
him the way to the dish. He hears the small tongue?
go lap-lap and he would be very glad to get a taste too
but he is uncertain on his legs as yet. | Anne will have
to pick him up and put his black nose in the milk. We
could all be happy in such a sunny and beautiful room,
one would think.

What comfortable lives pet dogs have! Always
fondled and loved, given nice soft beds to lie on, and
just as delicate food as any little boy or girl ever had,
with no care or trouble except being trodden on once in
a while. But we all have that. Do you like pugs ‘as
well as skye terriers or stag-hounds? They are very well--
behaved and knowing creatures, and you would become
very fond of one if you had him. There are many —
pretty things in this room which you can find for your-

selves, but do not fail to see the beautiful hencock

feathers and flowers.


















































































































































































































































































































By















‘S WORL











































































































































































(
es
Ay
O
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Oy
m
1]
=
=
ae
aa
an
al
us
u)
m4
=
©
am
oo
Ay
Ay
<
an













































































































































































THE HAPPY FAMILIES.


HAPPY HOURS IN THE LITTLE PEOPLE’S WORLD.



































































































































he Rishermen.

Loox at these hardy fishermen. They are home from a long
pull with the waves. They have had a stormy time at sea. The
winds have blown and the waters have dashed over their boats, but
they have come back safely. They seem now to be looking for an-
other schooner, which went out with them, but has got behind in the
fog of the night. -

I think they have been to catch cod and mackerel along the At-
lantic coast, or off the Bank of Newfoundland. It could not be in
the cold waters of Iceland, for they are not clad warmly enough.

My friend, who has spent some months on this barren island, tells
that the waters about it are full of excellent fish. Fishing sloops
from England, France, and Belgium go to the south and west coasts
of this cold land each year. Nearly one-half the men who live on
the island come to help them get the rich harvest of the seas, as they
call it. These men travel many miles in the midst of winter, while
the storm howls and the pale sun scarcely drives away the dark-
ness.

From February to June they work hard at their nets and lines.
They sleep in damp and narrow huts, and eat very poor food, mostly the

heads of the codfish, which cannot be sold, and sour curds or ** skier.”

The salmon of Iceland is put in cans and sold in the English
market. Do you ever think how many hardships the men who go
in ships on the sea have to endure, and that many of them lose their
lives and never come home to their families?

Once a fisherman used to go out in his little boat every morning
to catch fish, as a man goes to his business. His cottage was down
by the shore. His children could stand by the window and look out
on the blue water. They used to like to see the sun rise and make the
sea look like gold, or the moon come up, when there would be a sil-
ver road across the water.

Sometimes the sea tumbled and tossed, and the mother would be
afraid, and would pin a shawl up to the window so that her children
should not see the angry waves.

The kind-hearted fisherman knew his wife would be anxious lest
his little boat might be overturned sometime, and so he used to put
up a bright red sail. When the boats came in this could always
be seen, and the children would cry out, ‘the red sail, the red sail!”
And then the mother knew that the father of her darlings was safe.

a






2 © © @®@







er

SIMONTON'S.,

ROCKLAND, MAINE.






















DRY « GOODS.

a







Cloaks, Carpets, Curtains,

and Feathers.’











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WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
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Invalid character
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describe
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'2011-12-07T05:30:18-05:00'
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'2011-12-07T05:30:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
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'2011-12-07T05:29:18-05:00'
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describe
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'2011-12-07T05:28:51-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-07T05:29:57-05:00'
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'2011-12-07T05:28:57-05:00'
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describe
Invalid character
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60f3d9dd3cabeed43bc609bc3e99343d
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describe
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describe
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'2011-12-07T05:29:17-05:00'
describe
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0421519a01eefd5c0528bf0fd6d6d59d
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'2011-12-07T05:29:55-05:00'
describe
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0c031b3653f7b869c10c894f46444011
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describe
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'2011-12-07T05:29:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9643' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
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'2011-12-07T05:29:05-05:00'
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'2011-12-07T05:30:29-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-07T05:28:33-05:00'
describe
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'2011-12-07T05:28:43-05:00'
describe
'12111432' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOI' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2f36be7b972a7609b1cbaafcd5731a1a
3bcdff528815e10f1ea8203018ede4d49e03b11b
'2011-12-07T05:28:58-05:00'
describe
'6337' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
3640b54c190e0e61d56d7d3b1016d9c7
fe5b5e00c8d84eabb7edd1d95b542fc4096ea12c
'2011-12-07T05:29:54-05:00'
describe
'11210' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOK' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d453dc4790dc2219bf81ba81a852fc73
41c56f552b5a6e563de1e93acc8f8f12b9d9036c
'2011-12-07T05:29:21-05:00'
describe
'1510873' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
11ffcc581dc3e0270ec4c4404e39a1d0
144bb56d3987b148bebae353fe296f515e728e0d
'2011-12-07T05:30:13-05:00'
describe
'224864' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b27b3b02f636141a6093c3c94992e40f
798a1c810faab1b668b8ca5c85cc35547483a92c
'2011-12-07T05:28:47-05:00'
describe
'52771' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFON' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
be5ddf5c62ffb94b1e88eb20452e5502
4bb311e2c46688c076c8841da1783dda7f470912
'2011-12-07T05:28:45-05:00'
describe
'12111408' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b05fa3dc4bb2b5193a8c42f9b5b6b55a
f2c7ddc30fe1b7e28a603b5be4e959b5af4b2dd3
'2011-12-07T05:30:09-05:00'
describe
'2710' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOP' 'sip-files00015.txt'
91a3b25ff31439050757c3227c1a6f4d
2f6b5a2e64efe784a8307ff8c8d42a9498a30968
'2011-12-07T05:29:16-05:00'
describe
'11935' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ad5d536d0396336f43637470072bada5
53766f6edaffb36570cd255bc2e561e684c4bd79
describe
'1510861' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9eb7618eda6781186187a7020ef8c3f8
f16741302c64f2e5aff976f8388c0ff60a6105a5
'2011-12-07T05:30:03-05:00'
describe
'229577' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0a2bb5806216e8f4200487fdfc9280ef
dc6622af9b8b685ec406eb7bedfccde286d94e0f
'2011-12-07T05:29:33-05:00'
describe
'52419' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
5bea25623a226985c0acefc78faa1ef9
8fc2da517deb107f9765e5db32ca53eb251c9a9c
'2011-12-07T05:29:28-05:00'
describe
'12110784' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
9f7ec4c82ad1d8cade8373d2d980c652
9fa0437732bed6ea6729e165cb8d5762f9bb4a69
'2011-12-07T05:30:04-05:00'
describe
'11858' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d86ab43b6e84c58881c3d94058e71976
4ec37f869d619f8052ee5edd5c826bb9bb06e7e2
describe
'1510864' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e4074829dcfb17bdc55ac2c6309b5271
ec4d55d4187f68b0860bb1284bfdc51136a57526
'2011-12-07T05:30:23-05:00'
describe
'221014' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOX' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d3b27fd643777c4f36be56257f7bda4a
7d4cfe95fced896cbcfdb044fc74696e4d020a6b
describe
'52137' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4a67a65527fb44c101358415e5615a19
9103718031bba3c0fd27ceb2852d7a44633f69c5
describe
'12110852' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b5d6b3fb3b57122d0573fce768c0abe7
e7de19e4bb5e6130330c904b1faf3753c826e295
'2011-12-07T05:29:32-05:00'
describe
'5972' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPA' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3414316599c3c4ea66c5af4088924944
31754039a1fe49988bc59d066825b31dae5b0fce
describe
Invalid character
'11511' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
3e5594f50c6f200cabe37ef3da374a96
dd84646624d1aa1f52ca21d7217d636f519a6d83
'2011-12-07T05:29:47-05:00'
describe
'1510781' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPC' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f0d56ee3762465784cf51d5ffd8af451
bc70ca2c2ca1e7af1794b0480e02b76b42ea6b4c
'2011-12-07T05:29:30-05:00'
describe
'229989' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPD' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
aa05ce7eb66b0079c67eed8aa25eb7d3
c5c0c4c1516879b552d521f507972ed6f316033f
'2011-12-07T05:29:48-05:00'
describe
'53034' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPE' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
22bc7ff73de097a1879142fe3ffa989b
70cf41d8d41601e035181abc0c550949d3f60c77
describe
'12111356' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
50f3da38187e3f2f4ccfe6cf8514401d
974e2465babd6927fe47304a4394539f57debbb0
describe
'320' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPG' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b73bef0b9587fbb4dc9f6117ac10fafc
1d20d05e2c03aaf29d8ad97e0f8fc6b2e9489133
'2011-12-07T05:28:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11945' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPH' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
23de7a6f5102a64518db8ad7e70f9b99
70d1ce0c985047cfd9a23ee285d922310811f45e
'2011-12-07T05:28:50-05:00'
describe
'1529301' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPI' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b73d98fc7b4fb616eabcd4bfdc4aa8bf
03bb1bf60735646d92f7add7e8c59ff58bc7dd24
'2011-12-07T05:29:29-05:00'
describe
'204231' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
299261fd0608f4d48c89baf69ce2a05e
2d553d9d705929d08f46979cb2c7c3cc152b5aff
'2011-12-07T05:30:07-05:00'
describe
'49213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
680e6ec206d658f5ee95b5703e2bdaab
a8ba96bd08b9b1ba895428fc3f4f8fbda93244f7
'2011-12-07T05:29:02-05:00'
describe
'12259256' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
4b9c75663b932edbab60d4d24b19dc51
ca6b31c68f540d68a2d5802f1cc2145a3a109eab
describe
'6734' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
27eb50cdb1b451a0dea6e59c5a613d6d
a552d638d5f691622fa9bc59c7302214273f9c91
'2011-12-07T05:30:28-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11520' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
88ce88b0ea5eec0f49f173539259b9e1
a60447c4569d0725f268dad78f9807cbf0527b47
describe
'1495095' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bf527bb19256cfffdb62b568d19c6664
a7bc58dcce636e7703a793ff59a46d0a0c12292f
describe
'153516' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
e16212ba66f99c0b2acd18f42c5b3024
4c1a7aa281563c9e0fabf5bbb329f98c73fba0ad
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
07073ab08d4e04b5fa9a543c3e3aaf0a
394f6bc83c5eafde0e1787d546259843516af2b0
'2011-12-07T05:29:59-05:00'
describe
'11983872' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
5e92b2f5c872cf9586655fb250bb8e2c
7cf387aea117df2aade81b9540eb1136b148f104
'2011-12-07T05:29:41-05:00'
describe
'2898' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
76af9ea87f3b64709486015389c08345
ae37412a0bd5027369a9cf85eef90a4f1657aad2
describe
Invalid character
'8979' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5e0dd98476b6e4f6c0f6a015fac796b3
f524eb38a8c3b83a68e23032708e5e54c2af07af
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
5f737b614420ccc02f8820c1e45fa237
1f7f1b58e02a52c31103a0411e25f74d2538b572
describe
'159224' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
27a08b74b26bc96599c8505e43194210
8e1f22fe6c7c1cc6561bd66500dfa1ade449421b
describe
'41622' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
44a5377f08d7a4a20693ec43fe5d6a23
994dcc79c766637a9b0e4c85b069d9a3a7edf08b
describe
'12111084' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8ee836dccac8653b79587c31fb7f9789
53fe067a56ca1f6134b01bd27c4acf1410716b77
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
6da44367ee575b923e8e1747bd1bd6b5
4f80161da9836caca54b1f7fd5237d95fffcc22b
'2011-12-07T05:30:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10110' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
b052ef86e46b18af62607185879f4e03
23e8bd681b9f433dc5448692edffffe29e31342e
'2011-12-07T05:29:50-05:00'
describe
'1510799' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
a402d1d07845dd48ea45a1e65b4c7cb3
5bd4b26a15309ee61cfdae9037f27cba6b46d0cf
describe
'178950' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
55773bb238c74f354ad9dfa97a677598
badab3de8587d9b426fad397a8382ef3487a706a
describe
'44409' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQC' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
9a9069219aebe0c0d56ac246c379a529
ea63ae522f48704c4963cdce8a6f28ac03955104
'2011-12-07T05:29:13-05:00'
describe
'12110524' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQD' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c8d113573ba651a19655489645f07d22
cbc2f284d8f85f66f535452e9f2f67db64ef1e93
'2011-12-07T05:30:25-05:00'
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQE' 'sip-files00022.txt'
125de1f33cdbeb34d3356450923a473d
7cd5733dafc15bf0d40065aed5f207cf1272304c
describe
Invalid character
'9767' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQF' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ef75f77419588b3a6f131fe5dc6e960f
336b5a05635c6628e5a3b06d8122ca545210e323
'2011-12-07T05:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1510865' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQG' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7b7fc5ba46848a75796f554c703c6400
8210ab84f0b98fe2f62fa1d724556bd48b0e5cda
'2011-12-07T05:29:14-05:00'
describe
'176704' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQH' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c61b6d050b0aedad16d8f357ddedd97c
69b6e23326a8bfa73cf5ac0588cb1a5a315efa04
'2011-12-07T05:29:26-05:00'
describe
'41635' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQI' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
49dfd7dccd1eab8cdd55657ba544b35a
58b5de61deb6631112d02c5b2420f2c8d42d921a
'2011-12-07T05:29:40-05:00'
describe
'12110632' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9d87ae10fd47d6904f9c6efc15665559
a5842230c443ea0d0125f23990e591f53b506531
'2011-12-07T05:30:33-05:00'
describe
'3807' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQK' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d879fb39ba06726ba21c2f4a05238752
3a4c9c51adfeabdca289c1dbf3fa58cf13c5210a
describe
'10152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQL' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
990c5298685fe30e76b6969ae913d7e4
08ce6f5357ad1c2d2d32f752203a2e26978c3d04
'2011-12-07T05:29:46-05:00'
describe
'1523125' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQM' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
eaf023148508d3c6533a8ecde3165bf7
a7d8933fa9cb53acdee274724ee7c7e5a08d22e1
describe
'193083' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQN' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0202fbe10a86bfcbd3d33c7969022d8f
87d7f71e014d3025e8286d0c9f2fb0df7a7328cf
'2011-12-07T05:29:56-05:00'
describe
'43275' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
c93d22d1bac7cb6d0c34e5da53971b6a
9b6b00de83227cf64a1f3caa207bc399d3ed1e34
'2011-12-07T05:30:00-05:00'
describe
'12207848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1bfd45214e6eef5b3ad68f5eeef7572f
d9fbaf8800d5caf941bbc73af2fa09d0436a6c47
'2011-12-07T05:30:15-05:00'
describe
'1730' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
792295287ea502e49d351d810e526172
48bc4d431a5cff461535e58d8b62fce3efa8f56f
describe
'9726' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6a415276f1461dcbb0d4119487569f15
a657c2223e7b020eca91f0f7cd320230d13e501d
describe
'1510862' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c63e827b5a68157b7d55206975367335
be96356853442232cdc7d98284b87e98b58c1c21
describe
'218685' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3d62d594e6c7a0b14ec42f3986c53055
89863ba712ce0f1e1176ddce1dbf86f9b196942f
'2011-12-07T05:29:10-05:00'
describe
'51549' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQU' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
38c6bffbba0ec4d91b4c8e468cf83f4c
be1694ee2403e1dca8f827dc6fcf8842cc15e067
describe
'12111292' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQV' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d0421293c2292000e0f5a32cd8b175ae
f1abcaf01a757c6d3a77711e8d16817003f860b6
'2011-12-07T05:29:19-05:00'
describe
'3525' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
4ca15b3fb8237d0b84b7df4ff3eebcc2
60443e3699978e176d94bce7f187fe662b96ef50
describe
Invalid character
'11612' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e63d3cc67e657446d41f97e4fd72163e
b9a1a872004810982e2523f694fe953dc53f0b33
describe
'1510814' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a112fb2ba6e85ccf9dacdd34ccffb9cc
86bc27a42af9bbe796b68968ad06798d827bc2e4
describe
'228788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
aaaa7a7f2ce501a651f49bd9a9487518
948ec21455fc28d50e3af2ffb3eafc5970aed6aa
describe
'51554' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRA' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
726b68430cbb302633a43fbe6b13ed5c
7683d4e29366855b2bb7cce986db4f038b3d6f54
describe
'12110416' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRB' 'sip-files00026.tif'
cc753f36bbdf22eb90a78cfcf26e17cf
92140351e409b15fefe072a13381811cad022588
'2011-12-07T05:30:08-05:00'
describe
'383' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRC' 'sip-files00026.txt'
07f3daefb382a30403093fca2090c764
812ca57e864870ce7808e3781f7a07bab2b5e5a3
'2011-12-07T05:28:59-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11539' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRD' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
ee19d3f978a144e5822be6f464c987ae
182f7107341bae60f6dec64d1f6bd76a760ef13d
'2011-12-07T05:30:02-05:00'
describe
'1510829' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e4d97f5f00ee0c4b5eababe5252352ec
e58d0dc8ea8f8f971769213ca77328a5de1b5716
describe
'242849' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
010ff7f8af68d0f96fe70f02efd9d09c
1660d2535714a0437fba2587cebdda8a45f4f0d8
describe
'55869' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRG' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
78e8a4f268446796d3b78e77326387e6
e15df9c873ee0c63e65d5c045d3b94692fa74d34
describe
'12110624' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e36e6f1b9aff898fb8573fbb56cad85f
baacae307b5ce9177354a36dadae76df56376729
describe
'70' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
a10b05efc46df011509d38df27cd1270
56c2586ccb05cc9a02775e5db327d64a0f80494e
describe
'12483' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
63bb3ef9611ac48755e1f66cbe66820b
35161e72892909fd3b0defa1f62cffca6932c446
describe
'1510838' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRK' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7c0d828d3aebafff32173bea17fd3daf
23599d6e20a11c02193bd86dbf5f378368e043cd
describe
'204221' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
69f563273a6c19816a08b1f8e2b404ee
a7f16d34f71b1f37ccca1f52c1f3f1a2a343211d
describe
'47935' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
468f2916aed006418e000b0a657e7563
664f60ec1f6c4fee4794181bbc44baaad8f2ac47
describe
'12110532' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1eaa48b3d6199ebb4fafa330051a80cd
cfcb6fbfa19586990620244631941982106927af
'2011-12-07T05:28:56-05:00'
describe
'5651' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
40bef268c00d39965e21b5ed5761b74f
cd8c36c2fc7859ec072a80923f0d47d3cdf36803
describe
'10751' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
8768b37dfc77f8d00dd98cd14775f8c2
0c35b1e40b32e5491097656211971dd2eb7bb6cd
describe
'1510874' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
83ef3d52528683268edd0e2edc714b0f
aa2edfb1325410f2a6d0d58121a86d6a69990954
describe
'215362' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
fa0071c785c916fec8b776ca566a1cb4
994cfebf6184c14c6463e93fd131e4ceb3f757cc
describe
'50618' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRS' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ad39eb7ff6e969bff20f37805ec4d983
05039d77643672f4f5bc37248619a5545af47c26
describe
'12111116' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRT' 'sip-files00029.tif'
9e94d786a331ee5f90cacd2dfd134ff7
3691724949113a26d22e7277ae6ad17d1baac6cc
'2011-12-07T05:30:06-05:00'
describe
'4801' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRU' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d409d850b3184ad05fdada492c7622a0
5f8d1960060789e577c553cc964acc0a60ae47d1
'2011-12-07T05:29:03-05:00'
describe
'11523' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRV' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
14132bacbebecb7e298e2e2a598df347
2de03f1f98bc8de0011f0d071445f005e9c73016
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRW' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
1be2e89f65e620af69fcc9fe2016d61b
950dccc71e509c98ce874612dd4efd13aac47e7f
describe
'207488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRX' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
db1ae600446c4e0c213a1cb412e04e52
522d68041280afd3b9374b656a021ba00ec4ea24
describe
'49955' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ce9ee0a8fb393cf169c55d310f6ab824
048f025bca539040cd73cf9fba07e3af3d88af5b
'2011-12-07T05:28:54-05:00'
describe
'12111060' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0482434f1dd8c2709bce9b21b4e1e89e
848bda6022b03a6337323df355c1098a87cdca2a
describe
'4787' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ccabe469233d35ad5b5cdd05756699e7
0ea113b3a165d3353777f9e8af9b03d0fafa9b72
describe
'11257' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
c07c13018183a1de20c0a7f832eda781
2a3d8dc8ca31737158a27bcdc84a6538a0e3229a
describe
'1510663' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
816dec12f04e653487218ed2644ab91f
b4db39185be66fea52cfa7373e756e9e701a2e3e
describe
'196095' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e1fb37fb0da99b7e078d8c5944e4db4a
2765eadb33ca36c60a66c28f81e89050c9b62948
describe
'47959' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
3dd390f3966d9100dd3522c955b56f93
eb811cd297d6fdbe8de4c500f661423c147cdd11
describe
'12110844' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
f033d77f9cdb7b971ec5e455814a0d07
291f55fd642317644a42cc6528690b926643cc21
'2011-12-07T05:28:46-05:00'
describe
'3341' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c779d3dbc0cbca2d3fa4b29951dd593f
1eab6afd6f71627ce3a1772747abd885dd0ff6ef
describe
Invalid character
'11160' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
f543f7b5b3072e31b27c54d6fba68716
5dd027bb24f1cc235bbb198835d1c8632a7f95c0
'2011-12-07T05:29:43-05:00'
describe
'1544602' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
5a6c45a4db1da006f3d795f7fa56a0db
2c629e680bdde9e6048bb96878e40d548fa64c54
describe
'266430' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
293af4be389c60901fb86c4c173bbffe
83a1cabea99e0c8824d85ba0f4f399b550668ac2
describe
'61907' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
cfe8bc6b75bf4ca12e82530dc7b5edcc
40f8b284677191a1b2e6a2ae3d1ded214733b4bf
'2011-12-07T05:29:06-05:00'
describe
'12381592' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c69e08ff4c155f835de1578b532dda17
aeb9d3efd5752eeb5c814f5a972579a2a7d531f2
describe
'409' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSM' 'sip-files00032.txt'
15cb669f401deac556958db76a88b117
3a136fa51344099a226eb415a2acab0676912ec2
describe
Invalid character
'13380' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSN' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
1ccb80bb4372418da6d306dbd9c665a6
4bdd4aacd31a14777ecbb79eb62ec4e13f5624ee
describe
'1510577' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d297a6b821e3d4f020a1d59735664bc6
b92c8b6459bdfc32cbfc663a0fc38a76247ab396
'2011-12-07T05:30:17-05:00'
describe
'205657' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSP' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3a30587f925ca30e91845a85a481f5c3
c76697f739294b663c86b3854f97aaf62e665ff2
describe
'49939' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
795d72a29c43a634a771a74f6d02cc8b
f5c7348ec2d3824243ae0e64d094e60671629101
describe
'12110760' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b0b34efbe5412ea27eec45ab6818c3ba
b8a686b3f7c70e929e46ed82733d199c0b9cc869
describe
'4681' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
4053f8d905007419d23e3e92c0fa4ac8
60260f68710429825a04bbb74015685d87ad0178
describe
Invalid character
'10883' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFST' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1795e8691776b46a138284d469c0d156
a4ba925a12c3e6a7f53c4d97cecf2b9c8aa918c6
describe
'1510837' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
045c191d22552ba0609d2a50da7e683a
a0c29cbd236c9ad4459b8c70b3ef75d26add1a10
'2011-12-07T05:30:01-05:00'
describe
'189495' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
b786b2bb3f3f749a9d3c8acbb9733227
af166a8372bb7e3b5f4cfe875b8df37caec53f3b
describe
'43860' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSW' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f86aa7c001c186dd01c331c3dd455aef
fd95845a3ae2b10428b1d4b2868f7c6a8fc1a974
'2011-12-07T05:28:32-05:00'
describe
'12110640' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSX' 'sip-files00034.tif'
202c0fc33adcd0b139dc4e7ae6ce7a5c
70571641b49b121b7ffc6e48d16009927d3db764
describe
'75' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
5c16de89d4f81c88a56d7fdfa5fcf713
22e2c0c9b767a6c8100a9559add9ea292173b9d2
describe
'9952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
f8c141a48b70ea4c9ecae303c0abeeff
6adf72ec51d29049ab06f0b74fc1e073b28080a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTA' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c4dd255ef366a2b25bf70e886af9d1be
e6ac8a0c65eb03d22e807aa37c5a375b8d690449
describe
'263699' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTB' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
70b8f4a09884af58197a83ef1b2bd5d5
6028511c43af84c33a69868a116e84afd4a6079c
describe
'60593' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7c00871c2ef576b81ec95a80a69f34d0
6563ad6297bbaa48645860d3259c8f617d540ca1
describe
'12112988' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
741055e8ad103e3941068283a28a5cb6
41746d073bec60250560e571707b6f9e96ae5b81
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ef58ab5dfab7c5b42f91527633fd1180
ac71102b1716952b7ec87187bba0f6eee8bdc60d
describe
Invalid character
'13424' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
56f94bd241b054cb87e4826f178fe5d2
479f285168cc9e52f65926b8fa6fc1d5f8866bf1
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b96e63cb4aa115e8f4c60f49d04e8306
8787f11e3e59f4b03add153dbac91d6354794b52
'2011-12-07T05:29:20-05:00'
describe
'202940' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3e7abd497c41327cca33bac2accbcad3
7c9d20aac5b980ce8fd4f2628e35930bee85b475
describe
'47494' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d9d38b5d34914f1fbccd4ad2defebeb6
290e0dcdda406a7af8e16ab09ee5b4378fd9aa1b
describe
'12110432' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c43b247070e61b0519b3238d85da6846
fc9176a82f315059a5a1181ca65b3bf126544fd9
'2011-12-07T05:30:16-05:00'
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c622a6727a4d025455a06b273c1d32cf
6fba67c93abec296f16d5c89a5da71a35deb87d8
describe
'10904' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
1cc28bf9a0abb8f1b90f6dc9d713a911
2cb03fe5124aa2e4043342e50e31cb98007fb44e
describe
'1510826' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
b18482f78042ce0ebaf2af5da851dfe4
95dc8a6725552e021c74ec3b60929ec70c23330a
describe
'191116' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
16a8a5eb2db3fddeb66bd7babf380f63
7751cab66b5f80bb8e2790b2e36bef5dbd2d0d8f
describe
'45946' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTO' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
6f9855b6029c379935878518605c2cd9
8de09ef9d3155194187a2238067309a01ddc0ea1
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
96cec28951dc1647635ded31d82c4a45
af8d9260c66b96a6fcd631731321bc33600e43a5
describe
'4693' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d09386a0e0322d56a86bab0aee010246
95585d6ec21bd403ff2258ceb961aaef6750efc0
describe
'10327' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTR' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
cfe3595d2f556cce9f0dcbb225ff9287
f8e7775fe3716d90507e00274f579f7103f91137
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
acec1e2e5bd15ac2570de78374574101
00af99b78c9f1afe6c185d8c40db9a94cc10faaa
describe
'213351' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
191ef4a58028ed42f582bb796d34c060
94e0ba8d99a64a94c414c879e0616e498eb45958
describe
'50917' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
485ee126ed0b9d283cabc323c65eb35a
18e8e30349cfe17eb733695966726849bc6fa240
describe
'12110588' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f522a77f2295ec4cedd6a417859bf5a3
dfb3765c25b229c8300292c0d49a8b9d6f556c3c
describe
'10317' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
da662478040a6c1c56d98efb60829270
aaee1eb864219bb19ea84865ad3dea798e643bfb
describe
Invalid character
'11071' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
6655dcfc3b0518a134402d9d6d8845f4
7ef028b27d264b1e139a54fad80586e783d1f16a
describe
'1510669' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
8aa14ec535c01534c9347c1f470dddda
598beb2813eb974855146b01d66f6e24624bda0d
describe
'215988' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
44037045d2da8e94360a5c0bbd23ebc3
58ffd9f5be0e42d1fd5f4358fe98a77f3eefbcd6
describe
'51929' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUA' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7d3392c06bb5079d21d391c8de4344c9
23462d4b347c816d28918b48b225f23d0f88321d
describe
'12111540' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUB' 'sip-files00039.tif'
6762b0ce85987d344e69748de164b7b0
38d59c7050da2efbfb2eee7706dd57ac6540f35d
describe
'5786' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUC' 'sip-files00039.txt'
63ae4030dee5084de074220edf5e626e
62d48c74ac5149ac35e8626279c676a0589491d2
describe
Invalid character
'11597' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUD' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
793a01ae9d013ff304d4df8c42f05fe0
3de7d9a2cdb79a1d3eea1dfcc2b66f7ce67b5a8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUE' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
867ee4ab80c5a5ab12188bffcd29dcef
fb06f4d8fa913396198acd99b27de3e3c5de92c0
describe
'179465' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUF' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
9ae113e26ba947ae601d82cc13e9662d
195c7452e32ddabaa97d66b71ad6ec8199eda84f
describe
'44545' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
05f23babbf17edadaaf8b08ea0a989d5
f89560f66302d833853382fdd9cadcafa2bee84a
describe
'12110636' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
896271327348d6cfee88ec914b9ce4d7
8a6a7448de82bd8c4b69bf89e1d7e7a3deab8223
describe
'4944' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9bba8fc95eb8be216e79b125406a7d3a
dce743f6d9ee3b233cea610494ecc112301aa5ed
describe
Invalid character
'10124' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8feb10652dfb3588ce9efa08ec84efb7
4a58b92d4e7fcb1ce0f0947f1ff94d71b6222413
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ecc1e183e55e3320dc7742b6b8c963bc
fb16d28937a6933840e273c606a082ac33905a5c
describe
'188815' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
8dceaabced37182191bf4d92a7668999
9fa87a1b96b592cbc1920096680de3240a315b17
describe
'45248' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
b441f6bfefb1f26b5d77e70a3a706a21
f9f34728214bf9dcc734162a6071694b5fb492ef
describe
'12110388' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUN' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1e5343681d1f1a0eccf4c9765b602770
b76fd66e248d4268dc788da44392409db05a69cf
'2011-12-07T05:29:44-05:00'
describe
'6426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e0ba0fa007c7ea91d933c3fb625b0548
222125e6aea131a017fef22175f859a5cfb7134b
describe
'10299' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
eec9ec169649a1533fbaad46db6a305c
08c0512ae7f16093da120f158c3f7ca83d4d8764
describe
'1510871' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
635c340de002344b88fa631f8513ae83
8b7eae01600c24bd548db9ba0b0b18445879a9c3
describe
'162191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6c3744c9f8b67a7ce6d88b30f7c3a919
88733fb1cfd3e2291fee4d36e76886d5626c9b83
describe
'40680' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
d760f765ebacc4936d39b420706ef724
8a573bfc30e44b8f7a28a4e53c8d89cb020ed132
describe
'12109684' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
af3ce14661f9e2d73f0a65765ea8b2f3
cb0076e324143ab42ee4ed40ec7e41d319c684c5
describe
'6423' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
6f786397b1ea5146901710958b4ef276
bff1ce2ebf5bbbaeb31e5e036827e56a4e33a7d5
describe
Invalid character
'9289' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
7d34f03d27cd9bc6052d73c41952e1c3
229404eb5f408da640a5b516477007098fcd086c
'2011-12-07T05:30:20-05:00'
describe
'1510811' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
12f1c64b2b811126cd2c72cea7bb7ea9
0a55c8acf280ba74cced5317d5f553c57df57838
describe
'182103' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
72dfa1ffb496be28351422e38a04fc67
5b0903a7e1f426054084779e53739d102625d974
describe
'44507' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
403dafafe386084abda7f7e2dfa59dd2
56e39026a262160444a1ce366e3e8120f630fe89
describe
'12110832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
7166d848466452d85dabde108dedb805
31d4831649575689a5ca0c672f54ae3c093d9440
'2011-12-07T05:28:31-05:00'
describe
'6927' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVA' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8c14a8449ee27d429f87a3de929a8498
2813a943b553395cd07a0644371c3718aa0a4684
describe
Invalid character
'10309' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3a0c3c4a6509514a6b73482e67af0828
f640275e7cf859ac45f3c33bab20006136549544
'2011-12-07T05:30:19-05:00'
describe
'1510813' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
97d0fa21d72e0537cada22a8158a1a7b
ee6ef1d2ea1b26017ede5e1a8ecc8c1975edd799
'2011-12-07T05:29:09-05:00'
describe
'275349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
f3aabd43348ea040064b669c7a2a52cc
7feeb824b2b10e0fe43c78adce1dd8fd0027f0aa
describe
'61885' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVE' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
39fc5ca36952368541cd233d2ca760fa
7e69177a19eb42363a4d2478ff59fbfdcda849ca
describe
'12111496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
bf791f399e9d14fcdb805d43844edb8d
1a33ebdc746359dc420aa38cf3efa7c72c217fb3
'2011-12-07T05:28:42-05:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVG' 'sip-files00044.txt'
e3fbece05c1c24cbdc172256c60a1ee6
1b0d818f9dc256d540b8d5661817c338a9eddc60
describe
Invalid character
'13361' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
01a2ffd4d44707559f6b1c48ed98ff00
7d31f9931603de45921e76d2f2ab37db770007f5
describe
'1510627' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVI' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
9eb5444437a47aa41f3f080cc843d7b3
02530f5bc4c086cbb74ed0a28ea15031965e8809
describe
'215460' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
b0f8c119a3ed151188d945559bacd858
24503b7d3f7d76ecedb8247cace1a132abdc77b7
describe
'51161' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
539394235fe1633bf8a38405b1db8a42
cec46711b0fc10f225dc089717f6282f2e88f97d
describe
'12110804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVL' 'sip-files00045.tif'
89578cdb1387f070351951200e1fab7c
f1a0c15b3da64c80bd1ab60e51db0ceeb193b4d5
describe
'6325' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVM' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d6ed2395e02b4bfc636bbebb3f4a3795
dd2abf0bc39c39a7231f577aa5d05a75b2c946a8
describe
Invalid character
'11300' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVN' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f12db462644a53b743b4db3b3e327a0e
f672e935cda792d30a95873fdb3d2b5e0f75567b
describe
'1510725' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4dfec46be7a0f641c960d550f85ead1f
d7c962c7e6bd955c2f8c852ea2b7e1c9ec16fbd3
describe
'202469' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
95dd786a220e786bb50e72a7c4e8510b
3151525667fbab9309d6fe26305ce6b37c9b9a24
describe
'45183' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e87fcc954fcfe44d250327c7474f7eda
1e292492333c00c2ffb96daf600a2cddffc431c6
describe
'12110736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
4db72eb0075d5b0e0ca72de457cbf4a4
ca34125dd6910332c4496c3ecdc65e9223b36bc4
describe
'384' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVS' 'sip-files00046.txt'
58aea27f868680af26af523ed689ca58
139c1fb910158f4fbcf56f11d9595d1fbef4cd29
describe
Invalid character
'9861' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVT' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c868416c8ec6a69775c42dd90b464d57
edae1de4690c54405d1cbb6b7cabd31f15b72298
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
a1426d7275bdb8ce3170cd07d40f0220
e4fa0e00bbfa66fedb50bfd592004f7389f4a619
describe
'182547' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f063d6e6f5f3ad6fe8acc1e5d9d2ad87
a0589d15a790b7d2df88c64f122aa9273798b32d
describe
'43647' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
c3e9c617ecdcd69388b93480e1505b5b
89792016885ae52e85d66df669e82671b50faa56
'2011-12-07T05:28:55-05:00'
describe
'12110628' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a0fb8033c7468040dce852fe6e546cb1
47947ea7ae94a66d100158b6686ca813c50d95c0
describe
'3550' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2abeb6d428b942e88fa3b920f3009e19
a9b82670d59b7946148c52451b0d5d6cec43b7a3
describe
Invalid character
'10194' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
ebb443ed30f37356ad476095814a5c95
7e7cb352922ed0b06f3ea00163104f92a8312ddd
'2011-12-07T05:28:39-05:00'
describe
'1510809' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
72250b0a9abd021733f9d2d98b650765
6b947f0ee70f0bb9216cab3b604e2617437c1f57
describe
'176823' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
320891a667b9b010b65c1891755270de
fdbde4dff43f63842037ba4170b4a907229e9fd1
describe
'43425' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWC' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ddd89b7b180642482dfd08ae0c45d0d1
74c995107e8034819686601d0d61f7bdbc615b94
describe
'12111028' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWD' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7c45e9b53390835d0f517ad28ab88c3f
24418b9809fd99b714d92804047de10ca19e1ccd
describe
'5898' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b0a52feab650289e26958feae4aaa69f
cafff0c3de842100acb459d5c7f7b1958e75bff8
describe
'10187' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
959668ba669487de73fd737aed8c18f6
d24c9897970b2160d08838193f0fbbe4bd6bdc79
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
3711214bdee1135e97b6eaed06eb93e4
0f33ce5c94627d4e8bea000fab9265f7470deab1
describe
'112288' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWH' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8264dc0fbb3483241894b047ebac1e45
a6221ac9ec7a1d4c128b1e0a7363b306d09c5a56
describe
'32011' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWI' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ecb3a7dce889f2057858e4610c433888
ec946db216144633dd1998a52fe3e4edde7fcd33
describe
'12111104' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
03e44c86fdd1f8ff3dfb84aed309f4b4
8e375c7e652038c46e1b54cf847e579c943a4d4c
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWK' 'sip-files00049.txt'
47b3824c85b600a25b52be03f781c2e6
8f2169843291c3e35dd10d92ac7c030ac2eb2c04
describe
Invalid character
'8730' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWL' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2e1ed7dbd9481e2f9c6a4f5187f69c2d
043f8984a7ae8014146be7321b0f7b23176bd247
describe
'1510858' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWM' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
0478d69c5f3f7015376e4d2ee9bc31ed
0529bf11efc9378edaec340ef3b62c5228764499
describe
'98304' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWN' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f869887a44fcf03e09b8c6a500d18279
c28c228855dea0d5d56643093d9ab0ca509cd809
describe
'28653' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
87ca91aefe7c09deb5c2a058fae1b1ab
569628fce6d8e5379e4f09efcbccc7d847077a54
describe
'12110740' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0dff5a32093fcd5676d00fea4c5e7b43
eefa6b1b12b62b9967df965cf48788c143b257bb
'2011-12-07T05:30:21-05:00'
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
0618dce5b303eac16bee6e0ecda36601
d6c16967f51fb4502b2f9d62c99b3e3ea4e8877b
describe
'8182' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
545677f89a6f41fead563c6b26785bc0
94a5f9b252e778d92b590f1f70485564109cd52c
describe
'1510847' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
68a37dd25417fe374da5cb1f1c502df7
b01e42fe2457e0da17f49f6739a49ff7b18dd762
describe
'180610' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
eb5eea4f4df7fb69a10c2ffd6e355792
78671bda6641fd82cbe89b11fb599adc499fb667
describe
'43335' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
eb5388a7a069058975fecc435e18862e
71286e1c75513f45f0bbe04607c9c3b019dcdca6
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
64f15808481be3575263f567bee2062d
0455a721c6ca884792cf362e41e32ae343ad9826
describe
'5193' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
0c2036ea1b7ffae13565b07aca24b3c2
af89a98bb5827d185bf65acb8dabe7255921400d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
fa1fbe29c55737b8b9879aa8b2a0f081
00a6cd6ab3e59a65c6349e780977362ddc85e5b0
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
120a5adfe8789b7c0c3844b0d366c54d
ac6c031e9b297c74609d683cdacec568ab2df566
describe
'162064' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
5a1e36cff45d8aaf517352ec6fceb789
03f0e5ba2e9739d364383c9dca1a852235cc9a62
describe
'41736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXA' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
83a80e14d4811642da5a36826fef9dd9
8b71d1ff8b8b46a387a107dbdf7d94ba53f9c5e2
'2011-12-07T05:29:22-05:00'
describe
'12110696' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXB' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7f2f3beab9feb3a24e77614d356c28c9
ef63add12850ee5ac67708351ed28f205c4181e2
describe
'4673' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
b880ea54d4034364b7e510e5a4e4f0ae
d5ed3286b3e49619a5deb9c08ec0a265a2934989
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXD' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
0aff942b9ce0206a52a5d16b56c48eec
a2375a5621e481e380d6acf1141111f0eb278ad9
describe
'1510852' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
bba0178c7439910e953075704d8f3d8a
74b862bfea604349a3a6e4b93aca2bd989799f6d
describe
'169411' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8480fdde3eb0a32aa8fba827ad642e11
73846cbf776ed18344b30cc84dd94e821f686360
describe
'41931' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXG' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
78d45ec32f6d4e0e77ec24eeff8c504f
a5d8b7887d7e3c9913ceb2711cddd7a3e2ea089e
describe
'12110180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXH' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5a6890aa623f2aaf3a3e21120a17aba5
3815ca05bdfa6d968ff482a5b69bace7e6eeb562
describe
'6159' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXI' 'sip-files00053.txt'
942a8aa3fbdab28f4b5cde35942cfd79
bab2c5f66528d9fcb74b15a1c8ac8a842c46cedb
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b84581c6eaebdd7057af8488e1425bc2
763bb944aac021d89030bf72aa88cad48cc8416c
describe
'1510790' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXK' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8be53aa55e3b9a8b9e0b7cd4bffde296
236293d189008977c717c5d87f72d77a624dcdd2
describe
'230233' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXL' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
f232f76cfba7b6b6a7a158744bec5ad7
e8bf7fc461b567cc8a057dd8c3c64c94c2c790ed
describe
'54010' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
4f75505fe54e62858b70cbdd291cdd3b
95e87ea8bed4fc16a24385a5336e7dd80f077203
describe
'12110036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b800bbe916e0184819fcf66af3baa2bf
183327896d63aaf9cd83b4ffed633c8456c7a983
'2011-12-07T05:29:08-05:00'
describe
'265' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
75cb350a5fc21a4c45b52431d2ea701e
8dd59c89ec4bc887396c970f7ec90324c43c5f00
describe
Invalid character
'12056' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
f4a2f2456f17be254c1ab26e4e87cd9c
d84dc10e68b8e07ebfc6728f60b2122a0d521ca2
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
6bd941446e155700c4ae4d0a205b18ee
339eaa43ac3af57277fc2e713660396f868aa328
describe
'214096' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c6bcd04c186f8f2feb0ef737649c55c5
80cbee69c0594838448db026bf1b7083c308063b
describe
'51202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fdd6cb20013610bf5a5791998fd11873
3261c0ad3b8fa229bdd9e6003b34f0ce19d4dbc4
describe
'12110484' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
a83ad7cc19a9ec3786c77a0d90ed3fe9
fb23a1c5086ac809e18e3be467059b74ae0ac395
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXU' 'sip-files00055.txt'
656aaa0f7a770f365fc8aa5aed7cbce1
db733742fb1efe962fb43e9b9eafba462bda9c3b
describe
Invalid character
'11402' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXV' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b0baae4fdbf881eca746e6e090a81559
b0f3c7b8faa14f088d6880b4d26213fdfc47efa1
describe
'1511291' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXW' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
7b12ecf6e6dfec71963ff6f1b4c76ccd
1d41d3cf69c9ea39117e25d854639d0cbb56d151
describe
'176961' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXX' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e0dd065defc08bf08234b5eb9a84eff3
d1ddee827c062caafb8d94ed2643245ad04d3a95
describe
'43554' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0278f84dcd6ffb3f22238901f55134fc
3c148ea440bdff019e9f930806d57606019e5c8a
describe
'12114936' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1342ee86b38c83009c74a733375ce2c7
bccdc9d4c0077d1f81fcda592c9b5b96ffdebdf4
describe
'2307' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
919ccc8ecd7376aac2fde365b2d4443c
bef544bce0e213fbe179e69d0eb53428edc55f42
'2011-12-07T05:28:34-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10506' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
855b883bc42bade2b25a9a624678a001
24521169f61980709db082a722239c323ef30790
describe
'1510868' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
aa00f377cdda0be7bf244825dbce2af6
348cf36d67b870a415d2e342bd581b5ed5361344
describe
'195330' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
1d62c282dae540eb4ed2eba3d2aa0e2b
3bd2ac0acae720ac27f30213ce0513a826a6b1af
describe
'50943' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
944bb3cf034eee96010aa751959c0c95
3ae4a98beccc9e319d471dbc96ac04d703d8828d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
11b04d902a797cade0e87397dabee0f2
6624b6347862c3a675d3be20845ebb7b53f37285
describe
'5089' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
25f3152222f8583d4bd54544e1efd45d
4dbe58e0b82202cac30d2cd111f1c2698059c754
describe
'11053' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
25c90d027b883b35fa1c6f8b94b4c56d
6ca6ea0205442b1cccba60e155465db46c85ff73
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
ffcad43a54a3ca8f408ad1108b13dbeb
82b693e4cb9ee1d404e0a39b8fe5246e03eabf90
describe
'178059' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1f065a90b5afea40ee79629963649eb8
6bcd9d79ad6ada67675aff1484d5ffa3f04e7a2c
describe
'48620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYK' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f4a41c217e85905c6b3bc8089498dd78
390bd01e2083a0ab85867fda336c749437e9a1e9
describe
'12110952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYL' 'sip-files00058.tif'
76aa1a9a8a0acf5d0d7bb3435634a03a
577f22e2e5dfa47ca8bedf5c4203cf3e2198ab67
describe
'4291' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYM' 'sip-files00058.txt'
96557bd8f89ebf53af9395cd38667310
ccc22cb94f2902191ad3738c3a2af348fe0ccae7
describe
Invalid character
'10769' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYN' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
d08a077508c173695be6ba235bed9b9c
d8cc0e1baa1e43ec72b755958253d5f5c3eb34d3
describe
'1510766' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
e719383513486c7794852e03e3ad5ad9
f7d06a3249e29297a722ac6244ef9d423383ab1a
describe
'192709' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYP' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f5bc01d30d4413050c2364aca87b893a
4fc8684cf030897eea266bc1c70899d8b386a6bf
describe
'46280' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a1e99346f8a8c4718dc04f83b14f3d47
8d5ec271cdf41611c1a60d5efdb55aa3b5fb7b4f
describe
'12111120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYR' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9601ab25919059520f58b9903f1a9b7e
30f832303e6f89e1334eb56cab6b24859aaa9f8f
'2011-12-07T05:29:07-05:00'
describe
'4040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYS' 'sip-files00059.txt'
414bd83e1075d1d413e011ad201cb281
8c28176615581b36835f9dc484fa655c717170ac
describe
'10452' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYT' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
d584c64e103368bddfcf05fa0398ce78
bdbc156f196a5b606564fcf30b695d624de342fe
describe
'1510872' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYU' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
e09685953c67c7832c3573776a7d5054
7331579060df7cc63543d7863536b8a8b09de184
describe
'221252' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYV' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
986398a867224040dcd783b640dc6951
a10ca22d0c296774fdb48ed0808b540b708fe6e6
describe
'53162' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYW' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
cff41be39ce677338bfb3e06fb8b0fca
cf6eb109127f0694730766be9c215896cd300ee5
describe
'12111876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYX' 'sip-files00060.tif'
669ec3a125812056bf0b3e07990b08c3
ab7819c9ca9f33424b3f085f4a917aa01d2f3205
'2011-12-07T05:28:35-05:00'
describe
'3305' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYY' 'sip-files00060.txt'
a1a609784fd93335b4931b1b91199a2d
52cf7b2a0ff8d2ea36a81db7e4c60964f2e9d404
describe
'12047' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
6a7eae8010c92e114e91582f9a6d31a8
1786fbcab92b88d6205476c2f5005b854f878e1f
describe
'1510870' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZA' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
35ba8748cdb160d0c275ec94105aa49f
73b4ba87410d1f81d29c800a086dd2f7afd74a3c
describe
'166265' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZB' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
62515ca781cccad9670df1dcfb87dd51
1ec5c104ed630e5a76094d7012c03485c9b09fc2
describe
'44329' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZC' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
48633943726cd3d8433e30e9cd5d4ddf
d6a207a8bdb6caff9a2e67beacad7adeea6e0a73
describe
'12110872' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZD' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c3f0768192a32ed33d31f5bb3f0f2b0a
f5323ab6108d8b5673027ee3f784a210b032ca98
describe
'3133' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
93d4ab9a151821aaab5d5b2c650e4234
df9d38c3179d1eba299cd9f159131d3ac8ccd395
describe
'10290' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZF' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
bfb78ef0dc627c6adadf225855e84efc
948afcd4e6e2bec9b509e7cd343e7da6bb3880a4
describe
'1510742' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a8b73923d9ec960d0a02ef623e87945b
a1a9aab0a7607a1c71fc53bdfe4ffd3a73070283
describe
'244585' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZH' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
660fda4f74144c539fa4de35fe2a4bcd
20df67972fb2d1de6151692b99b7c7b9b1267a8c
describe
'57226' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a0a2e79fea3c39f3af876019c99cde45
4f9deb4866c604ba1650c895bd008d2e5ae172ea
describe
'12112124' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5fc4a67cca317fee26bcc42d83c3851b
b791a8945b62f2763a5dfe0891e9b8dd726ea7a8
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c7c7ef895a2ca135e39da1f5d99c917b
94b66ea96b2da7b92b499bb8c771251ad15d6596
describe
Invalid character
'12819' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
7df2a4f5a59d1e92df0712a79f174a60
3f813b7b9bbc1172c42035e7593bb54652fe4555
describe
'1510804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
ee7dbdb86606656eee02bad951d160d1
44964679b6676d14a57604afbd81d8bf8ad2ef3d
describe
'238084' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZN' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
f475f5d1fbfc1f8fd58ddfce48d5bd82
4e0ca593422fada0ec69363b00a01f7b780c4d20
describe
'56753' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZO' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2fa9e86f3d61883db71db74156bea50a
cb02d8df184b385ae4fcb327128389f6f6354fe8
describe
'12112120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZP' 'sip-files00063.tif'
0ad6e16935c1f9974e872d15699568ed
425595047997b12b4be4b4e7fef983fe80e1a73d
describe
'2526' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
d577ff86306bdef5dd1b470dd53fdf7a
88d970148a7380e4b6494168e382af7023bdb75b
describe
'12807' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZR' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
2e1fbd8b876eb3a7b51fb9e4b8dc68a2
fba277a8a279bf42c89c24a531ee56a144ddb474
describe
'1587802' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
791b9b7c5f3c4d99659b5da96c391c26
b629e9e63406af0854a4d11e869d87f972339ffc
describe
'70117' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9c5a409fe29a05bfcf3e8693b6201c5d
15e0df7dbf77ab105bdc24b43dafdaf43e873da8
describe
'14602' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a669011fe1b41b43f1990ec4cc40b0d9
8e8b4cdd067cec37b22a2569690a3832b3735f4a
describe
'38124848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2b22deb78bb8aa4fb4b581ca1073a4a4
d618e54f673f3b77c807fde269e95cfcdc087444
'2011-12-07T05:28:37-05:00'
describe
'3783' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZW' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
18f034a1960cf0f5bce829cb4f75fa41
25ef1cd4874c94020b7ca4523bd09b4376bec177
describe
'1585491' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZX' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7428a8d6a157242886aa8fec94008075
b9e0bd3c1477fced830fb34c988a26228550f45d
describe
'95565' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZY' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c24c2b419d839bf0420d64352773dddb
e288b461f1b50cd16ebbcd4c59829bfefb1146d0
describe
'24026' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
017f3c30b8562ace78597e7642cd9478
409b845421080be2bd0e50aa2c6698127aeb323b
describe
'38071364' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
63309320c1f9c0daa71b892a4ff79a56
145025c1433e24a809c7932b0803364f374d4d96
'2011-12-07T05:30:12-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'6493' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
d1105ae855127545d4f7cbb30d62be45
4c4bbb2295de0bfa7d4e0665138e56ccdc3720c0
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAD' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b4e452e9c76bb193fdf4f9a49d7d6b70
335abd37221f1a3efb3f1915cfadbc55888ba74a
describe
'87494' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAE' 'sip-filesUF00081198_00001.mets'
bcd591711638b7171c31785ef75eaa76
e9f101f642b4ae2087392fbfa307dfca345dc62b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-09T17:18:05-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'116241' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABANfileF20080504_AABGAH' 'sip-filesUF00081198_00001.xml'
39da756a8e5156e805533bc969b1f0fc
2e22c89bc69278f8244e91827d53d41d1887e251
describe
'2013-12-09T17:18:04-05:00'
xml resolution