Citation
Marjorie and her papa

Material Information

Title:
Marjorie and her papa : how they wrote a story and made pictures for it
Creator:
Fletcher, Robert Howe, 1850-1936 ( Author, Primary )
Birch, Reginald Bathurst, 1856-1943 ( Illustrator )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Century Co.
Manufacturer:
De Vinne Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
66 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Storytelling -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Play -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1891 ( local )
Baldwin -- 1891
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Robert Howe Fletcher ; illustrated by R.B. Birch from designs by the author.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026622436 ( ALEPH )
ALG3688 ( NOTIS )
191092003 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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MARJORNIE AND HER PAPA

HOW THEY WRODE A: STORY
AND MADE PICTURES FOR IT

BY

ROBERT HOV BRIE C bik
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ILLUSTRATED BY R. B. BIRCH
FROM DESIGNS BY THE AUTHOR



NEW YORK
THES CENTURY EO:
1891









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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA

Cuapter |
HOW THE STORY WAS WRITTEN

Maryjorte is three years and six months old, and
I am her papa—
“But you will have to say how old you are, too,
Jacks
“ Now wait a moment, Marjorie, or we shall have
this all mixed up. You must let me do the talking.”
“Well, all right, go on. Only I want to talk just
sometimes, don’t I? You are sixty-twenty years
old, ain't you?”
“No, I am thirty years old
Well, as I said, 1 am Marjorie’s papa. Marjorie

always calls me “ Jack,” and if the old lady across
3

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4 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

the way does think it very strange that a little girl
should call her papa by his first name, we do not.
Because, you see, Marjorie has always heard her
mama call me “ Jack,” and that was the first word
she said when she was a tiny baby. When she
said it, her mama picked her up and kissed her
again and again because it sounded “so cunning!”
4 Well, one day, not very long ago, Marjorie and |
were looking at one of her books which was all
about a little girl’s tea-party.

“Why, says Marjorie, “I have a tea-party ‘most
every day.”

“Yes,” I said, “I know that you do.”

“Well,” said Marjorie, her eyes filling with tears,
“nobody never made a book about my tea-party !”

“T would not cry about it, if they have not,” said I.

“J ain't, said Marjorie, winking very hard.

“You must not say, ‘I ain't, Marjorie,” said her
mama, “you must say, ‘I am not.’”

“JT am not, said Marjorie. Then after a while
she said, “ How do they make books, Jack ?”

“People write them,” I replied.

“Do they?” said she. “With a pencil?”

“Well, yes,’ I said, “with a pencil, or pen and

ink.”









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‘LET ’S, ME AND YOU, WRITE A TEA-PARTY BOOK, JACK.”







6 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Oh-h-h! TI tell you!” cried Marjorie, clasping
her hands and opening her eyes very wide.

“Well,” I said, “ what is it 2”

“We have a pen and ink,” said Marjorie, in a
whisper. ‘Let's, me and you, write a tea-party
book, Jack.”

“Very well,’ I said, “we will do it, and have it
published?’

“ And—and— we will make some pictures for it,”
said Marjorie, leaning back and looking at me.

‘OF course said

“ Hey!” shouted Marjorie, jumping down from my
lap and dashing away, “I'll go and get my pencil
right now.”

And that is how Marjorie and I came to write
this story.









\
I





Cuapter II

THE TEA-PARTY

“ Jack,’ said Marjorie, “ 1am going to have a tea-
party. Will you come?”

“T shall be delighted,” I said. “Is this the one
that is to be put in the book ?”

“Oh!” said Marjorie. “Oh, I never thought of
that! Why, of course. Mama, we are going to have
a tea-party—may I? And oh, mama, we are going
to put it in the book!”







3 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“That will be nice,” said Marjorie’s mama.

“Ffave you got anything for a tea-party?” asked
Marjorie, anxiously.

“Well, I am afraid that I have not, Marjorie,
but I will see,” said mama, going into the next
room. For you must know that just then we were
living in a hotel and had no pantry nor kitchen to
go to.

‘“ Here is only one piece of candy and an apple,’
said mama.

“Ts that all?” said Marjorie. “ But you have got
some sugar, aint you?—TI mean, aren't you?”

“«Havent you, said mama.

“1 meant, ‘have n't you,” said Marjorie.

“Yes, said mama, “I have some sugar, so we can
have tea, at any rate.”

“Well, Ill tell you what we will do,’ said Mar-
jorie. “I will take some of my blocks and play that
they was cakes and things.”

“Why, certainly,” said mama; “that is what we
will do. And now get your little table.”

“ All right,” said Marjorie, dragging the table out
from the corner. “And now the table-cloth.”

“There is a clean towel on the rack in the other
room,” said mama.











MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 9

“There!” said Marjorie, spreading the towel on
the table *@h my! she cried. “Whe table 1¢
too—too fat for this table-cloth.”

“T think there 1s a larger one in there,” said mama.
“Now, Jack, what are you laughing at?”

“This one will do,” said Marjorie. “Now will
you get me my tea-set? Thank you, mama. Now
we must wash them first. There’s the cups. Jack,
you must help, too. There ’s the saucers and the
plates; and the milk-pitcher; and the teapot. Let
me fill them. There, now it is ready. Ding-a-ling-a-
ling! Oh, wait. I did n't ask Frankie.”

Frankie is Marjorie’s dearest friend. She is a
little girl, though her name is like a boy's name.
And not so very little, either, for she is fourteen
years old. Her mama has rooms just across the
hall from us, and so it was not long before Marjorie
came back holding Frankie's hand.

“ Now,” she said, “the tea-party is all ready.”

So we all sat down to the tea-party.

“ Now pour out the tea,” said mama.

“Tt does not look very strong,” said I.

“Well,” cried Marjorie, eagerly, “you know it
is only water, Jack, but then you must play that it is
Gealtea:





Rais eee ee ea FRAN Pais ahs CO eee ey ee oes





IO MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Why, of course, said mama. “Jack is very
stupid.”
“Well, but, mama,: said Marjorie, “he did nt
know. Will you un-peel the apple, Jack?”
“Certainlys 1 cara!
“We will play that it is
pudding,” said Marjorie.
“T think it is delicious,’
said Frankie. “And this
chicken-salad is very nice.”
“Tsit not?” said mama.
“And this ice-cream, too.
Marjorie, you must hand
around the ice-cream.”
S\Wihy, itis avery, mich.
said I, as Marjorie gave
us each an alphabet block.
“You have avery good cook, Miss Lang-a-lang.”
“My name is Miss Johnson,’ said Marjorie.
“Oh, excuse me!” I said. ‘“ Look out, Miss John-
son, or you will upset the milk-pitcher.”
For Marjorie was reaching across the table for
the plate with the one piece of candy on it.
“Oh, my!” said Marjorie. And then, looking at
the candy and then at her mother, she said, “ Mama,







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12 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

will you have some candy? There is not very much
here, I guess.’

“ No, thank you, dear,” said mama. “I don't care
to have any.

“ Frankie,’ said Marjorie, “do you want some ?”

“Qh, no,” said Frankie, “I have eaten so much
already. I could not possibly eat any more.”

“ Jack,” said Marjorie, “ will you have some?”

‘“Vhank you, 1 caid) = lbelicve | will Pam very,
fond of candy.”

So I took the only piece that there was.

Then Marjorie put the empty plate down very
bravely and looked at her mama with her eyes full
of tears.

“Qh, Jack,” said that lady, “how can you?”

“Why, I don’t want it a//, sweetheart, I said.

“You can have it all, if you want to,’ said Mar-
jorie, with her little back very straight.

“Come, now,’ I said, “you are such a polite little
lady, I will have to make you a present.”

And with that I took out of my pocket a big box
of candy.

“Oh, mama, just look what Jack ’s got!” cried
Marjorie, clapping her hands and laughing through

her tears.

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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 13

“Well, well!” said mama.

“My gracious!” said Frankie, “he is a regular
fairy.”

“No, Frankie,” said Marjorie, shaking her head,
“fairies don’t wear coats and trousers.”

“Soldier fairies do,” said Frankie.

“ Do they, Jack?” said Marjorie.

“Yes, soldier fairies do,” I said.

“ Now we all can have some candy,” said mama.

eves said) Marjoric, opening the box, “now we
all can have some candy.”

And so we all had candy.

“Now, Miss Johnson,” said I, “ will you please
excuse me? I have some writing to do.”

“J think I must go, too,’ said Frankie. “It has
been a lovely tea-party. I hope you will have
another one soon.”

“T have enjoyed it ever so much,” said mama.

A little while afterward Marjorie, having finished
what sugar there was left in the sugar-bowl, brought
her chair to my side, and sitting down began to think.

“What is it, little woman 2” said I.

“ Jack,’ she said, “do you think that was a nice
enough tea-party to go in the book 2”

“Of course it was,” I said.

2







I4 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

~“ Well, but you know,” said Marjorie, “ they had

really truly cake and—and things, in that other one,
and ours was only blocks.” |

“Yes,” I said, “I know. But any one could have
a tea-party with real cakes. Ours was much nicer
because we made-believe.”

“Yes,” said Marjorie. “And then we did have a
whole box of candy.”

“Yes, I replied, “we did indeed.”

“All right,” said Marjorie; “then we will put it
in the book. Will you make a picture for it?”

OV ess card =i walle

And here is the picture on page 11.





eae







Gaaprer VE
MARJORIE DRAWS A PICTURE

“Ait my books has got potry in them, Jack,”
said Marjorie, a day or two after the tea-party. “ Has
the book we are making got any po'try in it?”

“woultty? 1 said: | \Vhat, chickens: |

“ No-o-o!” said Marjorie, laughing. “ Po'try, don't
you know? Like ‘I want to be a angel.”

2 Oh ol cad. poctyy.

Wes. cad. Marjornce “pot. Will you make
some for my book?”

“Well,” I said, “I will try. Bring mea pencil and
a piece of paper. There; now let me think.’

“Have you thinked yet?” asked Marjorie, after
looking at me anxiously for a little while.

“No,” I said; “it takes a long time to make poetry.
You go and play, and I will call you when it 1s
ready.

15







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16 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Ill make a picture for the book,” said Marjorie.
eohallere:

“Yes, I said; “you make a picture.”

“ All right,” said Marjorie.

Marjorie made her picture before | made my

poetry.

“Ts it lovely ?” she said, as she showed it to me.

“ Yes,’ I said, “very. Now the poetry is all ready.
It is about:

“THE LITTER GIRL WHO PLAYED SHE
WAS ARISE:

‘ONE night a small girl came
down to the rocks
By the side of the great, big
Sea;

And she pulled off her shoes,
and she pulled off her
socks,

And waded in up to her
knee.



“An old crab wondered with
all his might
What the little girl’s game
could be,







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18 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

And why she was out so late at night;
So he climbed up thé rocks to see.

‘Said the girl, ‘I ’ma fish in the big, salt sea,
I’m a fish and I live in the water !’

‘That ’s odd,’ thought the crab, ‘as odd as can be!
I am sure it is Mrs. Brown’s daughter ! ’

‘Then the girl jumped around and tried to behave
Just as the fishes do,
When suddenly up came a great big wave
And soaked her through and through.

“The old crab laughed and laughed, till he cried,
As the girl ran dripping away ;
He laughed till he got a stitch in his side,
Which served him right, I must say.”

Marjorie sat thinking for a little while, and then
she said, “ But the little girl was not really a fish,
was she, Jack ?” .

“Oh, no,’ I said; “she only played she was a
fish.”

“T think she was a very silly little girl to play she
was a fish and get all wet.” Then, after thinking
about it a little longer, Marjorie said, “Jack, won't
you take me out to the beach to-morrow.”

“T will see about it,” I said.



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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 19

“But, Jack, I think you might,” said Marjorie.
“T want to go such lots.”

“JT won't promise,” I said, “ because maybe I can’t
keep my promise.” ,

“Do genelum always keep their promise?” said
Marjorie.

“Yes, [ said. “and ladies too.-

“And little girls?” said Marjorie.

“Yes, I replied, “if they are good little girls. I
once knew a little -girl who promised ‘her mama
that she would not go in the street. And she went
in the street. I did not think she was a good little
eit atalle

“Yes, I know,” said Marjorie; “but next time |
wont.”

















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Cuapter IV
ON THE SEA BEACH

Next day we all went to the beach in a sail-boat.
And Marjorie ran after the waves and the waves
ran after Marjorie. Then at noon we sat down on
the sand in the shade of some rocks and ate our
luncheon.

“We shall have to wait till the tide goes out
before we can gather any shells,” I said.

“Why?” said Marjorie. “Doesn't the tide like -
you to have them ?”

Frankie laughed at that, but Marjorie did not
see anything to laugh at. Then after a while Frank
and Marjorie went away by themselves and gathered
a great many lovely shells—three handkerchiefs full.
And when they came back Frankie was laughing
again because Marjorie wished to know where the
tide had gone.

















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

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“And could you tell her, Miss Frank?” [ in-

quired.
“Well,” said Frankie, “I know that the moon has

something to do with the tide.”
“Where does the tide go to, Jack ?” said Marjorie.

en een ee ae





MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
“Why, “said Feit is this way:

‘WHERE does the tide go when it goes out?
The Man in the Moon knows pretty well.
In fact, he knows beyond a doubt—
: But the Man in the Moon won’t tell.

‘‘ Now when it goes, on tiptoe we
Will search the sands for a lovely shell.
The Man in the Moon will see us, maybe—
But the Man in the Moon won't tell.”





23









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CuarrerR V
MARJORIE’S STORY

pon T think you want to tell me a story,
do you, Jack?” said Marjorie.

It was Marjorie’s bedtime, and
sometimes, as a great treat, I would
tell her a story after her mama had
tucked her in her crib. So I said,
“es, and told her a little tory
Then Marjorie said she would tell
me a story.

“ Now,” she said, “you listen, and don’t you go to
sleep. Are you listening?”

“Yes, I said; “I am listening.”

“Well-l-l,” began Marjorie, “er, a, once upon a
time there was a, there was a,a —a little boy. And
er, a, A—BEAR ate him up!”

“My!” I said. “How dreadful!”

24





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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 25

“Yes, said Marjorie; “and, and, then he fell off
a house and broke both his legs!”

“Dear me!” said I: “that was very shocking.”

“Yes,” said Marjorie; “and then he broke both
his arms!”

“Oh!” said I. “What did they do with him ?”

“Well,” replied Marjorie, shaking her head, “I
don’t know what they did with him, but I guess they
threw him away; ‘cause he ain't any more use then,
you know.”

“No,” I said; “I should think not. I don't think
little boys are of much use, anyhow.”

“Some boys are,” said Marjorie.

“Well, maybe some are,” I said. “Now I will tell
you a story, and it is about.a little boy that was not
of any use at all. Only, they did not throw him
away, they made a bird out of him. Then after that
you must go to sleep, and to-morrow we will put
both of our stories in the book, and draw pictures
for them.”

“Yes; but, Jack,” said Marjorie, “I can’t draw a
picture of a bear. Don’t you know, I tried the other
day, and you said it looked like a turnip ?”

Did ee lasked.

“Yes, you did,” said Marjorie.

3











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26 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Well,” I said, “I will draw it for you.”
“No, said Marjorie, “I will tell you what let ’s



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do. Let’s put in the picture I drawed of the torch-
light procession. Won't that do?”







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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 27

“Well,” I replied, “I don’t know that bears ever
have torchlight processions, but I do not think that
matters. We can write to the publishers and tell
them all about it.”

“Yes,’ said Marjorie. “You write and tell them
that I don’t know how to make a bear. And now

tell me about the little boy.”
eT hisas

THE STORRS] OF A] LITLE BOY WHO.WAS
TURNED INGO” A BIRD:

Mm, NCE there was a little boy,
And, for no reason why,

From the day of his birth, nothing else on
} earth

Did he do but whine and cry.









‘He cried so very, very much
That no one would go near him;
The people said, ‘It beat the Dutch !
Why, the Man in the Moon could hear him !’

‘This boy’s home was on the beach
Where the sea-gull’s scream is heard,
And if there ’s a bird knows how to screech,
The sea-gull is that bird.













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28 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“They scream their best when the winds blow high
And the sky grows dark and hazy;
But let that boy begin to cry,
And he’d drive the sea-gulls crazy.

d



“Until, at last, they said, ‘Oh, joy!
We must be very dull,
This child ’s no use at all as a boy,
But he ’d make a splendid gull!’

‘So off they flew and told the king:
They told him not to doubt it;
That this boy’s scream beat everything !
That ’s all there was about it.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 29









“The king he saddled his best curlew ;
He flew down the wind like mad!
(I think ’t was a funny horse, don’t you?
"T’ was the only kind he had.)

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30 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

‘And when he heard that little boy yell
He thought his ears would split,
And so he turned him into a gull,
And nobody cared a bit.”

“T think his mama must have cared,” said Marjo-
rie's mama.

“Yes, Jack,” said Marjorie; “I guess his mama
cared:

“Well,” I said, “perhaps his mama cared.”

“And I think that after a while his mama went
and told the ‘King of the Gulls’ that her little boy
would be good now and not cry any more, and
that then she persuaded the king to change him
back again into a little boy,” said Marjorie’s mama.

“Did she, Jack?” asked Marjorie.

“Well,” I said, “come to think of it, I don’t know
but she did.”





—

Cuarter VI
THE RED DOLLY

ERE 1s my Red Dolly, Jack,’ said
Marjorie; “won't you put her in the
book ?”

“Oly yes, cettainly, cad |
“ Although there is not much of her
to put in. She looks like the little
boy in your story, who fell from the house and
broke both of his arms and legs, and as if the
bear had almost eaten her up, but had not quite
finished her.”

“T don't care,” said Marjorie, pouting, “she is
very nice, and I love her, I do.”

“Well, I did not mean to say anything unkind
about her, Sweetheart,” I said. “I have no doubt she

is very nice. So if you will ask her to sit up in the
31















See IRE RS. ee et eR ee oe cesta 8: 3 at eas









32 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

chair there, and tell her not to move while she
is having her picture taken, I will see what I
Can Go.

“Oh, she won't move, Jack,” said Marjorie, eagerly.
“Jack, she is just the bestest
dolly you ever saw!”

(There, Il card: finishing:
the picture; “de vou like
that?”

“ Yes,’ said Marjorie; “that
is lovely. Now let me draw
her, There! Is nt that love:
ly, too? Now, write some
potry about her, Jack,—

aes wont you, please?”

“Well, let me see. I don't know anything that
rhymes with dolly, except Polly. Her name is not
Polly, is it?” said I.

“No, said Marjorie; “her name is not Polly;
it is Red Dolly. ‘Cause, don’t you know, she had
on a red dress when you bought her for me?”

“Oh, yes,’ I said; “of course, | ought to remem-

ber. Well, here is a ballad:







\
|







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 33
(TO HE RED DOE.

‘ Dotty dear, last year, when you were new,
You were quite pretty, that is true;
Though now you look so queerly.
Your cheeks were red, and your eyes were blue,
You ’d arms and legs, and feet you had, too.
There were few in the city so pretty as you,
Dolly dear, last year, when you were new;
And Marjorie loved you dearly.
But now your cheek’s no longer red ;
Your arm is broken, so ’s your head; ©
You ’re blind, and bald, and deaf, and lame ;
You 're—But Marjorie loves you just the same,
Dolly dear.”

he

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Jes















Cuarter VII

HOW MARJORIE WON THE
WHITE SEA-BIRD




3HE night after we took the Red Dolly's
picture, there was a party in the hotel,
and Marjorie’s mama said that she
might go into the parlor and look on,
- for a little while. So Marjorie was
= dressed in her prettiest frock, and

went with her mama, and watched the
people dancing. Then she said that she wished
to dance, too. I asked her if she would dance with
me, but she said no, she wished to dance with Lieu-
tenant Smith. Lieutenant Smith is an army officer
who knows Marjorie very well. So I told him to
ask her. But then Marjorie would not dance
with him because, she said, I had told him to ask
her, and that was not the way people did, at all.

34





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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, BEE

Then Mr. Smith laughed, and said that next time
he would ask her without being told. So he walked
once round the room, and when he came to Mar-
jorie again, he said:

“Miss Marjorie, may I have the pleasure of this
waltz with you?”

And Marjorie said “Yes,” and got up and
danced with him.

But when he brought her back to her seat,
Marjorie did not look at all pleased.

Then the Lieutenant said: “What is the matter,
Miss Marjorie? Have I done anything you don't
like?” 7

“Yes, said Marjorie, pouting. “All the ladies
and genelum walk round after they dance. And
you did nt.”

“Oh, I beg pardon; I forgot,’ said the Lieuten-
ant, laughing once more. “Won't you walk around
with me now?”

So they walked around the room.

Now Marjorie was a little girl, and Mr. Smith
was quite tall, so that he had to lean over when she
took his arm. But being one of those young gentle-
men who like to make fun, he pretended to have to
lean over very far indeed, so that people smiled.





















MARJORIE WALTZES WITH LIEUTENANT SMITH.



|







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 37

“And once he made believe to trip over a pin that
was lying on the carpet, which made some ladies
laugh. Now Marjorie does not like to be laughed
at, and when she came back to her seat I saw that
there were tears in her eyes.

“Say ‘Thank you’ to Mr. Smith, Marjorie,” said
her mama.

So Marjorie said “Thank you,” but so low that
no one heard it.

“T think, Mr. Smith,” said Marjorie’s mama,
smiling, “that it is getting near my little girl's
sleepy time. Come, Marjorie, say ‘Good-night, and
let us go to bed.”

Now I fancy that Marjorie may have believed
that she was being punished for not behaving
prettily, while all the time she thought it was
Lieutenant Smith who had not acted nicely. Then
she did not wish to leave the party and go to
bed. And she really was tired and sleepy, and,
although we did not know it, she was not very
well. At any rate, Marjorie began to cry in good
earnest.

So then I took the little girl up in my arms,

- and said, “I'll tell you what we will do, dear. You

come with me, and I will take you home. And
4









38 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

then I will tell you what Sergeant Quickstep found
to-day, over at the lighthouse.”

Marjorie did not stop crying until she was all
ready for the night. And she had to laugh because
I was so very awkward about putting her to bed;
but at last she was safely tucked into her crib.

Then the tears came again, and she said, “Jack,

« I don't like the way Mr. Smith did, a bit.”

“But, Marjorie,’ I said, “was it worth while to cry
about it?) Mr. Smith was only playing. You area
little girl, and you must not expect gentlemen to treat
you as if you were a grown-up lady.”

“But, said Marjorie, “ you always say I must be
a lady.”

“Yes, sweetheart, but while you are little I want
you to beachild lady. Then when you get to be as
big as mama and wear long dresses, the gentlemen
will behave toward you as they do toward other
ladies. So now,” I said, “what do you think it was
that Sergeant Quickstep found to-day over at the
lighthouse ?” |

“T don’t know,’ said Marjorie.

“Well,” I said, “he found a lovely white sea-bird.
The lighthouse-keeper told him that it flew so hard
against the lantern last night, that it was killed, poor

















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 39

thing! The sergeant gave it tome. And I thought
that its skin would make a fine collar for my coat;
then I thought it would make a beautiful muff for a
little girl. Now I will tell you what I will do. I
will get a pillow and lay my head down on it, here,
and you lay your head down on your pillow, and
the one who first goes to sleep gets the bird.”

Marjorie laughed, and said, “ All right.”

So I brought the pillow, and we laid our heads
down and shut our eyes very tight. Pretty soon [|
opened one eye and looked at Marjorie, and I found
that Marjorie had opened one eye and was looking
at me. So we both laughed and shut our eyes again.
Then, after a while, I opened one eye and looked at
Marjorie. But she did not open her eye this time,
because she was asleep.

And so Marjorie won the white sea-bird.











Cuapter VIII
MARJORIE HAS THE SCARLET FEVER

Marjorie has been having the scarlet fever.
She wants that to go in Our Book, so there it is.

The day after the party, Marjorie was cross and
fretful. The old lady who lives next door said that
it was badness, and that she ought to be punished.
But grown people do not know everything. So,
instead of punishing her, Marjorie’s mama _ held
her in her arms and rocked her and sang to her.
After a while we found that. Marjorie was ill, and
so we sent for the doctor, and he said she had
scarlet fever.

Well, then they would not let any one come into
the room lest some other little girl should get it.
And Marjorie’s mama and papa nursed her for six
weeks, and she had to take a great deal of medicine. |
We always used to taste it first, to see whether it was

° . . . ° . |
nice or not; and if it was not nice, Marjorie got a
40









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. AI

present for taking it. One of the presents was a cap
for the Red Dolly, a cap which covered her head,

so that you could not see where it was broken.



THE DOCTOR PRESCRIBES FOR THE LADY DOLLY.

Marjorie was afraid that the Red Dolly would
take the scarlet fever; but I think she must have
had it.
We played that the Lady Dolly took it. The
."



















MARJORIE GETTING BETTER,

Lady Dolly wears fine clothes and moves her eyes
and cries. When the doctor came, Marjorie con-







| MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 43
|
\

, sulted him about the Lady Dolly, and he said that
a little medicine would not hurt her. And so, every
time that Marjorie took medicine, the Lady Dolly
had to take some, too; and when it was horrid she
rolled up her eyes and cried. But she did not get
any present.

| When Marjorie grew better, I told her so many
stories and drew so many pictures, we could not
begin to get them all in Our Book.

‘Yes suit, jack, « said Marjorie, “I think you
| might put ‘Strange Land’ in, and—and the ‘Little
| | Girl Who Lost Her Hat.” 3

“Well, I am sure I could not put in the story of
i the hat, Manorie, because | d have fo make 4
noise like the chickens, and the cows, and the
| _ birds, and all the other things that the little girl
met, and I cannot do that with pen and ink, you

| know.”

| “Can't you draw the way they went, with a pen-

| cil?” suggested Marjorie.

| “No, I am afraid not,” I said.

| “But,” said Marjorie, “you can tell about the lit-

tle boy, and the old chair with a break in the seat, -
cant you?”

“Oh! yes,” I replied:

















44 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

‘Now listen to me well, and I will try to tell
Of a chair that was a sham,
Of a shelf that was tall, a boy that was small,
. And a pot of blackberry jam.

“Of course the boy with care climbed upon the chair,
His hand just reached to the shelf;

When suddenly his feet went right through the seat,
Then the boy fell through himself.

“Then the shelf so tall came down with a fall
On the chair that was a sham;
And there they all lay, in a mixed-up way,
Spread over with blackberry jam.”

“Tam not sure,” I said, “that I like that word
‘sham, because I do not think that all the little boys
and girls will know what it means. But then I
cannot think of any better word to rhyme with

>”

‘jam.

“Well,” said Marjorie, “I guess they can ask their
papas. |

“Ves,” I said, “of course. Or their mamas, or
somebody.”

“ Now,” said Marjorie, “tell about the people who
lived in their hats.”
“Well, when I was a little girl—”













lod
b
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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 45

“Why, Jack,” said Marjorie, opening: her eyes
very wide, “you never was a little gil.

“I mean when your mother was a little oie |
said, “ever so many years ago—”

“Now, Jack!” said Marjorie’s mama.

“ They used to wear big straw hats, and they called
them ‘flats.’ And now the rooms that people live
in they call ‘flats. So that is where the funny part
of this poetry comes in:







“There was a lady lived in a flat.
Just think.of that!
She laughed so much she grew quite fat.
Just think of that!











46

MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.











t



“ Though her husband was thin
He could not get in,

So he went and kept house in his hat.
Think of that!”









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 47

o Now, “A.B © said Marjorie.
“Very well,” I said: .

“When little girls say their A, B, C’s,
They must be careful not td sneeze,
For if they do, as sure as fate,
They ’Il never be able to say them straight.”

“And now,” said Marjorie, leaning back in her
big chair, “just tell about ‘Strange Land,’ please,
Jack; and that will be truly all.”

So I told her this story:

THE LOST CHILD IN A STRANGE LAND.

Once upon a time a little girl found herself walk-
ing along a road in the country. She did not know
where she came from, or where she was Cone it
was Just as if she had been asleep, and had waked up
in this Strange Land. But she did not feel frightened
or unhappy. She walked along looking at the big
trees and bushes, and wondering what they were
made of, and how all the little leaves were fastened
on to them; and she pulled one off to see. Then
she saw the sky, and thought that it was very pretty,
and that she would like to look at it closer. A long,















48 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

long way off she saw where the sky touched the
earth, and she made up her mind to walk there and
put her hand on it, and see if it was as soft and
smooth as it looked.

But before she came much nearer to where the
sky touched the earth, the sun, that big, bright ball
which had been over her head all day, began com-
ing down to the same place. The little girl thought
that it was coming down to meet her, and she hur-
ried as fast as she could, so as to be there in time.
But while she was still ever so far off, the sun got
down very near to the earth, and suddenly dropped
out of sight.

Then the little girl stopped running, because she
saw that there must be a big hole between the edge
of the earth and where the sky was, into which the
sun had dropped; and she was afraid that, as it was
getting very dark, she might fall into it, too, and
tumble down on top of the sun. Pretty soon the
stars began to shine. The child was very sorry to
see the stars, because she was sure that the sun must
have fallen down so hard as to break into little
pieces which had splashed all over the sky. She
was very sorry for the sun. At the same time she
thought that perhaps she would better not go any







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 49

nearer the end of the earth, just then. So she sat
down to see what would happen next.

While she was waiting, a woman came along,
and said, “ Why, here is a child. I was looking for
a little girl, Are you anybody’s little girl?”

The child said she did n’t think so.

“ How lucky that is!” said the woman. “I will
call you Katie, and take you home with me.”

So the child went home with her, and the woman
gave her a bow! of hot bread-and-milk, and then un-
dressed her and put her to bed. While Katie was
lying there, very happy, she began thinking about
all that she had seen that day. And by and by she
asked the woman if that beautiful sun was really all
broken into little bits.

“Why,” said the woman, “what on earth is the
child talking about 2”

So Katie tried to tell her.

But the woman said crossly, “Goodness me!
Katie, you must not ask so many questions. Little
children should be seen and not heard.”

Now, Katie wanted to know very much indeed
about this sun, and the sky, and the trees. She was
sorry that in this Strange Land children must not

ask questions. But she was a good little girl, and
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50 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

tried to do whatever this.woman, who seemed to
know everything, bade her.- And so she asked no
more questions, but lay there thinking it all out for
herself; but before she could quite make up her
‘mind about it she fell asleep.

Katie must have taken cold during the day while
she was running to the end of the earth, because in
the night she began to cough. The woman, by this
time, had put out the light and was in bed with her,
fast asleep. Katie's coughing woke her up, and that
made her very cross indeed, and she said:

“Oh, dear me! If I had known how much
trouble this child was going to be, I don’t think I
should have brought her home.!” |

Katie was very sorry to hear the woman say
that, and she cried a little to think that she was not
wanted, and she wished she could go away. But
crying only made her cough more than ever.

Then the woman said: “If you don’t stop
coughing I ‘ll shake you! Do you suppose that I
am going to have you keep me awake all night with
your coughing? Stop it, I say!”

“But I can't help it,” said Katie.

“Don't tell me you can’t help it,” said the woman.
“T know better. You can if you try.”

















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 51

“I really don't believe I can,” said Katie to her-
self. “But she says she.knows.” And remembering.
that the woman had told her only a little while ago
that children should be seen and not heard, she made
up her mind to try very hard to stop the next cough.
Pretty soon she felt it coming, and she held her
breath. Then she began to get hot all over, and
there was a ringing in her ears, and her eyes started
out, until, at last, she thought she would surely have
to cough and be punished, or burst.

Tien, suddenly, it seemed to Katie as if she Had
broken into ever so many little stars, as the sun had
done. The next moment the child found herself
walking along the road in the country just as on the
day before, only it was morning now. The sky was
soft and blue, and the grass was soft and green, and
the dewdrops sparkled on the flowers, and pretty
soon the glorious sun itself came up in the sky the
other side from where it had gone down the night
before. ‘The child was so glad to see the sun and
the flowers that she began to sing with the birds.

While she was singing, there came by a lady,
dressed so prettily that she looked like a walking
flower. :

“Oh,” cried the lady, stopping as she saw the













52 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

child, “oo sweet ‘ittle tootsey wootsey! Oo must
tum right home with me, and be my ‘ittle tweet dirl.”

Now, the child had never heard any one talk in
that way before, but she liked this pretty lady, and
took her hand; and together they walked down the
road to where there was a lovely house. But before
they came to the house, a big red thing, with four
legs and a tail and a head with two sharp sticks on
it, looked over a fence and bellowed at them.

This frightened the child, so that she hid her
face in the lady’s dress.

“Why,” said the lady, “you silly ‘ittle goosey
poosey! That is only a cow.”

“Qh,” said the child. But, nevertheless, she kept
on the other side of her friend until they had passed
the big thing with its mouth working so, and with the
sharp sticks on its head

Then they walked on a little farther. Suddenly
the lady gave such a shriek that the child jumped
nearly out of her shoes.

“Oh, what is the matter?” she cried, clinging
once more to the lady’s dress.

“Vherel there! Womb: you. see ite sande the
lady, pointing with her parasol to the road in front

of her,













MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 53

For a long time the child could not see anything.
At last a tiny gray creature, about as big as a spool
of thread, came running along the road. As it drew
near them the little girl was going to pick it up.
But the lady gave another scream and jumped upon
a log, pulling the child after her.

“What is it?” whispered the child. She was not
scared, as she had been at the cow, but she did not
understand.

“Shh!” cried the lady; “it is a mouse!”

“Oh,” said the child again.

“Shoo!” cried the lady, shaking her skirts at the
mouse.

Then the mouse sat up on its hind legs and
slowly winked one eye at the little girl. After which
it turned around and ran away as fast as it could.

When they came to the house, the lady took the
child to her husband, who seemed very glad.

“Well, this is really a nice girl,” he said. “Now
the first thing to be done,” he continued, “is to begin
her education. One cannot begin a child’s educa-

tion too early. Tell me, little girl, what is the. ~

meaning of Pachyderm ?”
~“T don’t know,” said the child.

“Ah,” said the man, “I am sorry to hear that.”
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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 55

“But no one ever told me,” said the child.

“Then you should have asked,” replied the
man. “What is your tongue for if it is not to
ask questions?”

“But I was told —,” said the little girl,

“Don’t interrupt me,’ said the man. “Now, here
is a list of examination questions which I have pre-
pared for the Primary Grade, and here are the text-
books from which the information can be derived.
Get a pencil and paper, and go to work. ‘How
doth the little busy bee!’ Go to work, little child,
go to work.”

So the child went to work. But just as she got
to “303. Define the analogy between metacarpus
and habeas-corpus, her head began to feel very
queer. Then everything whirled round and round
like tops. The next minute she found herself on the
road in the country once more.

Now the child was very glad to see the sky, and
the trees, and the birds again. She thought that it
would be very nice if the big people in Strange
Land would leave her alone out there with the birds,
and not take her to their houses any more. But
when the sun began to go down she grew very
hungry, and was too tired to run to the end of the

ce









56 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

earth to meet it. And when at last she came to a
house, she stood at the front gate and looked in. |
At that moment a woman came hurrying out to
her, and, picking her up in her arms, hugged and
kissed her, and said:
“You precious thing, you! I knew you ’d come
to see me to-day. Come in!”
The child was glad to hear that, and when the |
|





woman took her into the house, and bathed her, and
gave her a nice warm supper, she was very happy.
After supper the woman took her in her lap, and
sang to her, and told her stories. “There was an old
lady in the room, who was the woman’s mother.
And she kept saying all the time to the woman,
“My dear, you are spoiling that child.”

But the woman only laughed, and went on tell-
ing. the child stories. Now, some of these stories
the little girl did not like, although she was too
polite to say so. They were about a Rag-man who
carried little children away in his bag, and Ghosts
who scared little children in the dark, and Giants
who ate little children up. Now, of course, the
grown people in Strange Land only make-believe
that there are ghosts and giants. They know that
there are no such things, and that nobody hurts





















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 57

little children. But the little girl had seen so many
curious things that she believed that what the woman
told her was all true. So when they put her to bed,
and took away the light, and left -her alone, she was
very much frightened. Pretty soon she heard a
scratching noise at the foot of her bed. This scared
her so that she called out very loud. Then the
woman came in, and the child told her what she had
heard.

“Why,” said the woman, “it is only a mouse.”

“Oh, make it go away,” said the little girl.

“Afraid of a mouse!” said the woman, laughing.
“ A little, tiny mouse! Why, that would never hurt
you.

Then the little girl did not know what to think.
So she asked if she could not have a light in the
room.

At this the old lady spoke up, and said, “ No,
no. Little girls must learn to sleep in the dark.
My mother made me sleep in the dark, and I made
my daughter do the same. There is nothing to be
afraid of.”

“But I want to see that there is nothing to be

afraid of,” said the child.
“No, no,” said the old lady. “Shut your eyes

.













58 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

tight, and go to sleep; then you won't know whether
it is light or dark.”

Now, although the little girl shut her eyes very

tight, she could not go to sleep. So, when they left
her alone again and shut the door, she covered up
her head in the bedclothes, and trembled so hard
that the bed shook and scared the little mouse half
out of his senses. The child kept thinking of all
the dreadful stories the woman had told her about
the Rag-man, the Giant, and the rest of them, until
she was so frightened that she cried. Then sud-
denly she heard a gentle voice, and then —

Why, then the little girl woke up. Woke up
truly ; for she had been only dreaming about the
Strange Land all this time, while she was really in
her little crib at home. And the night-lamp was
burning low, and her own mama was leaning over
her.

“T think,” said Marjorie’s mama, “that the little
girl must have been eating too many nuts and
candies.

“ Had she, Jack?” said Marjorie.

“T don’t know,” I said, “ but I should n’t wonder.”











ROA MNT









Cuarter IX
WE GO CAMPING

On the day Marjorie got well, we all went to
the country and lived in a tent. That is, we had a
tent for the bedroom, and another tent for the
dining-room and kitchen, and all out-of-doors for a
parlor. When we had dinner, Marjorie could spill
the milk all over the grass if she wanted to; and
that was fun. ‘And she slept in a hammock, in-
stead of a bed; and that was fun. And one day
she almost saw a snake, so she said. Then the
birds would come, in the early morning, and sing to
us until we got up. Marjorie’s mama said that it
would be very funny if the robin-redbreasts should
come into the tent some morning before we woke
and, seeing us lying there, should cover us with
leaves, as they did the “ Babes in the Wood.”

“That did happen once,” said I “a long time ago.
The robins found a little girl, named Amaryllis,
asleep by a spring, and ie thought she was dead,
and covered her up with leaves.”

“Then could n't she get up?” said Megeie

60









‘Oh, yes,” I said. “When she woke up, she
laughed at the robins. ‘A friend of the birds, named
Robert Herrick, heard about it afterwards; I don't
know whether it was the robins or the little girl who
told him. At all events, he put it all in a book.
I will tell you about it to-night, if you like.”

So that night, while Marjorie rocked herself in
the hammock, I told her Robert Herrick’s story of
Amaryllis and the robins. And she liked it so well
that she said it must go into our book, too.

“And, Jack,” said she, “we must make some

pictures for it.”
6











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CHArrer X
THE SERENADE

\ WuHeN we became tired of living in a tent, we
went back to the city. We were all glad to get
home. Marjorie was so glad that, when her mama

| put her to bed in her own little crib that night, she

could not go to sleep, but wanted to sing.

So then I said that we would have a little con-
cert to celebrate our coming home, and we would
put that in to end The Book.

And this is what we sang:

A SERENADE—7o my Uittle girl.

Goop-NiGutT, Sweetheart,
The sun has gone to rest;
ebhe evening-star, the night-lamp of the world,
Burns dimly in the west;
Tired day has closed its eyelids
On the blueness of its skies;
Do thou, Sweetheart, close thy lids

On the blueness of thy eyes.
65

—







66 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

!



The little birdies’ heads have sought their wings,
Each little flower has closed its petals bright;
Do thou, Sweetheart, let thy dear head,

With all its little rings of golden hair,

Sink down upon thy pillow white,

Whilst low I whisper in thy ear,

Good-night, Sweetheart, good-night.

THE END.


































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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA



HOW THEY WROTE A STORY
AND MADE PICTURES FOR IT



BY
ROBERT HOWE FLETCHER


ILLUSTRATED BY R. B. BIRCH
FROM DESIGNS BY THE AUTHOR


NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1891








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


But, Jack, I think you might," said Marjorie.
"I want to go such lots."
I won't promise," I said, "because maybe I can't
keep my promise."
Do genelum always keep their promise?" said
Marjorie.
Yes," I said, and ladies too."
And little girls'?" said Marjorie.
Yes," I replied, "if they are good little girls. I
once knew a little .girl who promised her mama
that she would not go in the street. And she went
in the street. I did not think she was a good little
girl, at all."
"Yes, I know," said Marjorie; "but next time I
won't."














CHAPTER VIII


MARJORIE HAS THE SCARLET FEVER

MARJORIE has been having the scarlet fever.
She wants that to go in Our Book, so there it is.
The day after the party, Marjorie was cross and
fretful. The old lady who lives next door said that
it was badness, and that she ought to be punished.
But grown people do not know everything. So,
instead of punishing her, Marjorie's mama held
her in her arms and rocked her and sang to her.
After a while we found that.Marjorie was ill, and
so we sent for the doctor, and he said she had
scarlet fever.
Well, then they would not let any one come into
the room lest some other little girl should get it.
And Marjorie's mama and papa nursed her for six
weeks, and she had to take a great deal of medicine.
We always "used to taste it first, to see whether it was
nice or not; and if it was not nice, Marjorie got a










MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"I really don't believe I" can," said Katie to her-
self. But she says she.knows." And remembering
that the woman had told h'er only a little while ago
that children should be seen and ndt heard, she made
up her mind to try very hard to stop the next cough.
Pretty soon she felt it coming, and she held her
breath.' Then she began to get hot all over, and
there was a ringing in her ears, and her eyes started
out, until, at last, she thought she would surely have
to cough and be punished, or burst.
Then, suddenly, it seemed to Katie as if she had
broken into ever so many little stars, as the sun had
done. The next moment the child found herself
walking along the road in the country just as on the
day before, only it was morning now. The sky was
soft and blue, and the grass was soft and green, and
the dewdrops sparkled on the flowers, and pretty
soon the glorious sun itself came up in the sky the
other side from where it had gone down the night
before. The child was so glad to see the sun and
the flowers that she began to sing with the birds.
While she was singing, there came by a lady,
dressed so prettily that she looked like a walking
flower.
"Oh," cried the lady, stopping as she saw the







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


For a long time the child could not see anything.
At last a tiny gray creature, about as big as a spool
of thread, came running along the road. As it drew
near them the little girl was going to pick it up.
But the lady gave another scream and jumped upon
a log, pulling the child after her.
What is it?" whispered the child. She was not
scared, as she had been at the cow, but she did not
understand.
S'h'h!" cried the lady; "it is a mouse!"
Oh," said the child again.
"Shoo!" cried the lady, shaking her skirts at the
mouse.
Then the mouse sat up on its hind legs'and
slowly winked one eye at the little girl. After which
it turned around and ran away as fast as it could.
When they came to the house, the lady took the
child to her husband, who seemed very glad.
"Well, this is really a nice girl," he said. "Now
the first thing to be done," he continued, "is to begin
her education. One cannot begin a child's educa-
tion too early. Tell me, little girl, what is the
meaning of Pachyderm ?"
I don't know," said the child.
"Ah," said the man, I am sorry to hear that."







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Now, 'A, B, C,'" said Marjorie.
Very well," I said:

When little girls say their A, B, C's,
They must be careful not td sneeze,
For if they do, as sure as fate,
They '11 never be able to say them straight."

"And now," said Marjorie, leaning back in her
big chair, "just tell about 'Strange Land,' please,
Jack; and that will be truly all."
So I told her this story:

THE LOST CHILD IN A STRANGE LAND.

ONCE upon a time a little girl found herself walk-
ing along a road in the country. She did not know
where she came from, or where she was going. It
was just as if she had been asleep, and had waked up
in this Strange Land. But she did not feel frightened
or unhappy. She walked along looking at the big
trees and bushes, and wondering what they were
made of, and how all the little leaves were fastened
on to them; and she pulled one off to see. Then
she saw the sky, and thought that it was very pretty,
and that she would like to look at it closer. A long,








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Now listen to me well, and I will try to tell
Of a chair that was a sham,
Of a shelf that was tall, a boy that was small,
And a pot of blackberry jam.

Of course the boy with care climbed upon the chair,
His hand just reached to the shelf;
When .suddenly his feet went right through the seat,
Then the boy fell through himself.

Then the shelf so tall came down with a fall
On the chair that was a sham;
And there they all lay, in a mixed-up way,
Spread over with blackberry jam."

I am not sure," I said, that I like that word
'sham,' because I do not think that all the little boys
and girls will know what it means. But then I
cannot think of any better word to rhyme with
'jam.'
"Well," said Marjorie, "I guess they can ask their
papas.
"Yes," I said, "of course. Or their mamas, or
somebody."
Now," said Marjorie, tell about the people who
lived in their hats."
"Well, when I was a little girl-"







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


long way off she saw where the sky touched the
earth, and she rnade up her mind to walk there and
put her hand on it, and see if it was as soft and
smooth as it looked.
But before she came much nearer to where the
sky touched the earth, the sun, that big, bright ball
which had been over her head all day, began com-
ing down to the same place. The little girl thought
that it was coming down to meet her, and she hur-
ried as fast as she could, so as to be there in time.
But while she was still ever so far off, the sun got
down very near to the earth, and suddenly dropped
out of sight.
Then the little girl stopped running, because she
saw that there must be a big hole between the edge
of the earth and where the sky was, into which the
sun had dropped; and she was afraid that, as it was
getting very dark, she might fall into it, too, and
tumble down on top of the sun. Pretty soon the
stars began to shine. The child was very sorry to
see the stars, because she was sure that the sun must
have fallen down so hard as to break into little
pieces which had splashed all over the sky. She
was very sorry for the sun. At the same time she
thought that perhaps she would better not go any



















































































"LITTLE GIRL, WHAT IS THE MEANING OF PACHYDERM? "


r


-c~---
---











CHAPTER IX


WE GO CAMPING

ON the day Marjorie got well, we all went to
the country and lived in a tent. That is, we had a
tent for the bedroom, and another tent for the
dining-room and kitchen, and all out-of-doors for a
parlor. When we had dinner, Marjorie could spill
the milk all over the grass if she wanted to; and
that was fun. And she slept in a hammock, in-
stead of a bed; and that was fun. And one day
she almost saw a snake, so she said. Then the
birds would come, in the early morning, and sing to
us until we got up. Marjorie's mama said that it
would be very funny if the robin-redbreasts should
come into the tent some morning before we woke
and, seeing us lying there, should cover us with
leaves, as they did the Babes in the Wood."
"That did happen once," said I "a long time ago.
The robins found a little girl, named Amaryllis,
asleep by a spring, and they thought she was dead,
and covered her up with leaves."
"Then could n't she get up ?" said Marjorie.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"And when he heard that little.boy yell
He thought his ears would split,
And so he turned him into a gull,
And nobody cared a bit."


I think his mama must have cared," said Marjo-
rie's mama.
"Yes, Jack," said Marjorie; I guess his mama
cared."
"Well," I said, "perhaps his mama cared."
"And I think that after a while his mama went
and told the 'King of the Gulls' that her little boy
would be good now and not cry any more, and
that then she persuaded the king to change him
back again into a little boy," said Marjorie's mama.
Did she, Jack ?" asked Marjorie.
Well," I said, come to think of it, I don't know
but she did."







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


" Well," I said, I will draw it for you."
" No," said Marjorie, I will tell you what let 's


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do. Let's put in the picture I drawed of the torch-
light procession. Won't that do ?"







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 55
"But no one ever told me," said the child.
"Then you should have asked," replied the
man. "What is your tongue for if it is not to
ask questions?"
But I was told-," said the little girl.
Don't interrupt me," said the man. Now, here
Sis a list of examination questions which I have pre-
pared for the Primary Grade, and here are the text-
books from which the information can be derived.
Get a pencil and paper, and go to work. How
doth the little busy bee!' Go to work, little child,
go to work."
So the child went to work. But just as she got
to "303. Define the analogy between metacarpus
and kabeas-corpus," her head began to feel very
queer. Then everything whirled round and round
like tops. The next minute she found herself on the
road in the country once more.
Now the child was very glad to see the sky, and
the trees, and the birds again. She thought that it
would be very nice if the big people in Strange
Land would leave her alone out there with the birds,
and not take her to their houses any more. But
when the sun began to go down she grew very
hungry, and was too tired to run to the end of the







50 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
tried to do whatever this. woman, who seemed to
know everything, bade her.- And so she asked no
more questions, but lay there thinking it all out for
herself; but before she could quite make up her
mind about it she fell asleep.
Katie must have taken cold during the day while
she was running to the end of the earth, because in
the night she began to cough. The woman, by this
time, had put out the light and was in bed with her,
fast asleep. Katie's coughing woke her up, and that
made her very cross indeed, and she said:
"Oh, dear me! If I had known how much
trouble this child was going to be, I don't think I
should have brought her home.!"
Katie was very sorry to hear the woman say
that, and she cried a little to think that she was not
wanted, and she wished she could go away. But
crying only made her cough more than ever.
Then the woman said: "If you don't stop
coughing I '11 shake you! Do you suppose that I
am going to have you keep me awake all night with
your coughing? Stop it, I say!"
But I can't help it," said Katie.
Don't tell me you can't help it," said the woman.
"I know better. You can if you try."

















































1/-









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


The little birdies' heads have sought their wings,
Each little flower has closed its petals bright;
Do thou, Sweetheart, let thy dear head,
With all its little rings of golden hair,
Sink down upon thy pillow white,
Whilst low I whisper in thy ear,
Good-night, Sweetheart, good-night.


THE END.

















































Copyright, 1890, 1891, by THE CENTURY CO.



All rights reserved.


THE DEVINNE PRESS


II ,I-~*---- ~ -

















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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


earth to meet it. And when at last she came to a
house, she stood at the front gate and looked in.
At that moment a woman came hurrying out to
her, and, picking her up in her arms, hugged and
kissed her, and said:
You precious thing, you! I knew you 'd come
to see me to-day. Come in!"
The child was glad to hear that, and when the
woman took her into the house, and bathed her, and
gave her a nice warm supper, she was very happy.
After supper the woman took her in her lap, and
sang to her, and told her stories. There was an old
lady in the room, who was the woman's mother.
And she kept saying all the time to the woman,
" My dear, you are spoiling that child."
But the woman only laughed, and went on tell-
ing, the child stories. Now, some of these stories
the little girl did not like, although she was too
polite to say so. They were about a Rag-man who
carried little children away in his bag, and Ghosts
who scared little children in the dark, and Giants
who ate little children up. Now, of course, the
grown people in Strange Land only make-believe
that there are ghosts and giants. They know that
there are no such things, and that nobody hurts























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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


child, "oo sweet littlee tootsey wootsey! Oo must
tur right home with me, and be my littlee tweet dirl."
Now, the child had never heard any one talk in
that way before, but she liked this pretty lady, and
took her hand; and together they walked down the
road to where there was a lovely house. But before
they came to the house, a big red thing, with four
legs and a tail and a head with two sharp sticks on
it, looked over a fence and bellowed at them.
This frightened the child, so that she hid her
face in the lady's dress.
"Why," said the lady, "you silly littlee goosey
poosey! That is only a cow."
Oh," said the child. But, nevertheless, she kept
on the other side of her friend until they had passed
the big thing with its mouth working so, and with the
sharp sticks on its head
Then they walked on a little farther. Suddenly
the lady gave such a shriek that the child jumped
nearly out of her shoes.
"Oh, what is the matter?" she cried, clinging
once more to the lady's dress.
"There! there! Don't you see it?" said the
lady, pointing with her parasol to the road in front
of her.







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Then Mr. Smith laughed, and said that next time
he would ask her without being told. So he walked
once round the room, and when he came to Mar-
jorie again, he said:
Miss Marjorie, may I have the pleasure of this
waltz with you ?"
And Marjorie said Yes," and got up and
danced with him.
But when he brought her back to her seat,
Marjorie did not look at all pleased.
Then the Lieutenant said: "What is the matter,
Miss Marjorie? Have-I done anything you don't
like ?"
"Yes," said Marjorie, pouting. "All the ladies
and genelum walk round after they dance. And
you did n't."
Oh, I beg pardon; I forgot," said the Lieuten-
ant, laughing once more. "Won't you walk around
with me now?"
So they walked around the room.
Now Marjorie was a little girl, and Mr. Smith
was quite tall, so that he had to lean over when she
took his arm. But being one of those young gentle-
men who like to make fun, he pretended to have to
lean over very far indeed, so that people smiled.












































































"LET 'S, ME AND YOU, WRITE A TEA-PARTY BOOK, JACK."



I*








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


I '11 make a picture for the book," said Marjorie.
"Shall I ?"
"Yes," I said; "you make a picture."
"All right," said Marjorie.
Marjorie made her picture before I made my
poetry.
Is it lovely?" she said, as she showed it to me.
Yes," I said, "very. Now the poetry is all ready.
It is about:



"THE LITTLE GIRL WHO PLAYED SHE
WAS A FISH.

ONE night a small girl came
down to the rocks
SBy the side of the great, big
sea
And she pulled off her shoes,
and she pulled off her
socks,
And waded in up to her
knee.

An old crab wondered with
all his might
What the little girl's game
could be,







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


chair there, and tell her not to move while she
is having her picture taken, I will see what I
can do."
Oh, she won't move, Jack," said Marjorie, eagerly.
Jack, she is just the bestest
dolly you ever saw! "
"There," I said, finishing
the picture; "do you like
that ?
Yes," said Marjorie; "that
o is lovely. Now let me draw
her. There! Is n't that love-
ly, too? Now, write some
po'try about her, Jack,-
won't you, please?"
SWell, let me see. I don't know anything that
rhymes with dolly, except Polly. Her name is not
Polly, is it?" said I.
"No," said Marjorie; "her name is not Polly;
it is Red Dolly. 'Cause, don't you know, she had
on a red dress when you bought her for me?"
Oh, yes," I said; of course, I ought to remem-
ber. Well, here is a ballad:













CHAPTER X

THE SERENADE

WHEN we became tired of living in a tent, we
went back to the city. We were all glad to get
home. Marjorie was so glad that, when her mama
put her to bed in her own little crib that night, she
could not go to sleep, but wanted to sing.
So then I said that we would have a little con-
cert to celebrate our coming home, and we would
put that in to end The Book.
And this is what we sang:


A SERENADE--To my little girl.

GOOD-NIGHT, Sweetheart,
The sun has gone to rest;
The evening-star, the night-lamp of the world,
Burns dimly in the west;
Tired day has closed its eyelids
On the blueness of its skies;
Do thou, Sweetheart, close thy lids
On the blueness of thy eyes.
65







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well, well!" said mama.
My gracious !" said Frankie, "he is a regular
fairy."
No, Frankie," said Marjorie, shaking her head,
"fairies don't wear coats and trousers."
Soldier fairies do," said Frankie.
"Do they, Jack?" said Marjorie.
Yes, soldier fairies do," I said.
Now we all can have some candy," said mama.
Yes," said Marjorie, opening the box, now we
all can have some candy."
And so we all had candy.
"Now, Miss Johnson," said I, "will you please
excuse me? I have some writing to do."
I think I must go, too," said Frankie. It has
been a lovely tea-party. I hope you will have
another one soon."
I have enjoyed it ever so much," said mama.
A little while afterward Marjorie, having finished
what sugar there was left in the sugar-bowl, brought
her chair to my side, and sitting down began to think.
What is it, little woman ?" said I.
"Jack," she said, "do you think that was a nice
enough tea-party to go in the book?"
"Of course it was," I said.
2
















CHAPTER VI


THE RED DOLLY

S ERE is my Red Dolly, Jack," said
SMarjorie; "won't you put her in the
S book?"
Oh, yes, certainly," said I.
"Although there is not much of her
to put in. She looks like the little
boy in your story, who fell from the house and
broke both of his arms and legs, and as if the
bear had almost eaten her up, but had not quite
finished her."
I don't care," said Marjorie, pouting, "she is
very nice, and I love her, I do."
"Well, I did not mean to say anything unkind
about her, Sweetheart," I said. I have no doubt she
is very nice. So if you will ask her to sit up in the








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


the way does think it very strange that a little girl
should call her papa by his first name, we do not.
Because, you see, Marjorie has always heard her
mama call me "Jack," and that was the first word
she said when she was a tiny baby. When she
said it, her mama picked her up and kissed her
again and again because it sounded "so cunning!"
,4 Well, one day, not very long ago, Marjorie and I
were looking at one of her books which was all
about a little girl's tea-party.
"Why," says Marjorie, "I have a tea-party 'most
every day."
Yes," I said, I know that you do."
Well," said Marjorie, her eyes filling with tears,
"nobody never made a book about my tea-party!"
I would not cry about it, if they have not," said I.
I ain't," said Marjorie, winking very hard.
"You must not say, 'I ain't,' Marjorie," said her
mama, "you must say, 'I am not.'"
I am not," said Marjorie. Then after a while
she said, How do they make books, Jack?"
"People write them," I replied.
Do they ?" said she. "With a pencil ?"
Well, yes," I said, with a pencil, or pen and
ink."








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well," I replied, I don't know that bears ever
have torchlight processions, but I do not think that
matters. We can write to the publishers and tell
them all about it."
Yes," said Marjorie. "You write and tell them
that I don't know how to make a bear. And now
tell me about the little boy."
This is


"THE STORY OF A LITTLE BOY WHO WAS
TURNED INTO A BIRD.

NCE there was a little boy,
SAnd, for no reason why,
From the day of his birth, nothing else on
earth
Did he do but whine and cry.

He cried so very, very much
That no one would go near him;
The people said, 'It beat the Dutch I
Why, the Man in the Moon could hear him!'

"This boy's home was on the beach
Where the sea-gull's scream is heard,
And if there 's a bird knows how to screech,
The sea-gull is that bird.















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA




CHAPTER I

HOW THE STORY WAS WRITTEN

MARJORIE is three years and six months old, and
I am her papa-
But you will have to say how old you are, too,
Jack."
"Now wait a moment, Marjorie, or we shall have
this all mixed up. You must let me do the talking."
"Well, all right, go on. Only I want to talk just
sometimes, don't I ? You are sixty-twenty years
old, ain't you ?"
"No, I am thirty years old."
Well, as I said, I am Marjorie's papa. Marjorie
always calls me "Jack," and if the old lady across
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CHAPTER III

MARJORIE DRAWS A PICTURE

"ALL my books has got po'try in them, Jack,"
said Marjorie, a day or two after the tea-party. Has
the book we are making got any po'try in it?"
Poultry ?" I said. What, chickens ?"
"No-o-o!" said Marjorie, laughing. Po'try, don't
you know ? Like 'I want to be a angel.'"
"Oh," I said, poetry."
"Yes," said Marjorie, "po'try. Will you make
some for my book?"
Well," I said, "I will try. Bring me a pencil and
a piece of paper. There; now let me think."
"Have you thinked yet?" asked Marjorie, after
looking at me anxiously for a little while.
No," I said; "it takes a long time to make poetry.
You go and play, and I will call you when it is
ready."







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


will you have some candy ? There is not very much
here, I guess."
No, thank you, dear," said mama. I don't care
to have any."
Frankie," said Marjorie, "do you want some?"
Oh, no," said Frankie, I have eaten so much
already. I could not possibly eat any more."
"Jack," said Marjorie, "will you have some?"
Thank you," I said, I believe I will. I am very
fond of candy."
So I took the only piece that there was.
Then Marjorie put the empty plate down very
bravely and looked at her mama with her eyes full
of tears.
Oh, Jack," said that lady, how can you ?"
"Why, I don't want it all, sweetheart," I said.
"You can have it all, if you wafit to," said Mar-
jorie, with her little back very straight.
Come, now," I said, you are such a polite little
lady, I will have to make you a present."
And with that I took out of my pocket a big box
of candy.
"Oh, mama, just look what Jack 's got!" cried
Marjorie, clapping her hands and laughing through
her tears.




____








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Yes," said Marjorie; and, and, then he fell off
a house and broke both his legs!"
Dear me! said I; that was very shocking."
Yes," said Marjorie; and then he broke both
his arms!"
Oh!" said I. "What did they do with him?"
"Well," replied Marjorie, shaking her head, I
don't know what they did with him, but I guess they
threw him away; 'cause he ain't any more use then,
you know."
No," I said; I should think not. I don't think
little boys are of much use, anyhow."
Some boys are," said Marjorie.
Well, maybe some are," I said. Now I will tell
you a story, and it is about.a little boy that was not
of any use at all. Only, they did not throw him
away, they made a bird out of him. Then after that
you must go to sleep, and to-morrow we will put
both of our stories in the book, and draw pictures
for them."
Yes; but, Jack," said Marjorie, I can't draw a
picture of a bear. Don't you know, I tried the other
day, and you said it looked like a turnip?"
Did I ?" I asked.
"Yes, you did," said Marjorie.
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MARJORNIE AND HER PAPA

HOW THEY WRODE A: STORY
AND MADE PICTURES FOR IT

BY

ROBERT HOV BRIE C bik
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ILLUSTRATED BY R. B. BIRCH
FROM DESIGNS BY THE AUTHOR



NEW YORK
THES CENTURY EO:
1891






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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA

Cuapter |
HOW THE STORY WAS WRITTEN

Maryjorte is three years and six months old, and
I am her papa—
“But you will have to say how old you are, too,
Jacks
“ Now wait a moment, Marjorie, or we shall have
this all mixed up. You must let me do the talking.”
“Well, all right, go on. Only I want to talk just
sometimes, don’t I? You are sixty-twenty years
old, ain't you?”
“No, I am thirty years old
Well, as I said, 1 am Marjorie’s papa. Marjorie

always calls me “ Jack,” and if the old lady across
3

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4 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

the way does think it very strange that a little girl
should call her papa by his first name, we do not.
Because, you see, Marjorie has always heard her
mama call me “ Jack,” and that was the first word
she said when she was a tiny baby. When she
said it, her mama picked her up and kissed her
again and again because it sounded “so cunning!”
4 Well, one day, not very long ago, Marjorie and |
were looking at one of her books which was all
about a little girl’s tea-party.

“Why, says Marjorie, “I have a tea-party ‘most
every day.”

“Yes,” I said, “I know that you do.”

“Well,” said Marjorie, her eyes filling with tears,
“nobody never made a book about my tea-party !”

“T would not cry about it, if they have not,” said I.

“J ain't, said Marjorie, winking very hard.

“You must not say, ‘I ain't, Marjorie,” said her
mama, “you must say, ‘I am not.’”

“JT am not, said Marjorie. Then after a while
she said, “ How do they make books, Jack ?”

“People write them,” I replied.

“Do they?” said she. “With a pencil?”

“Well, yes,’ I said, “with a pencil, or pen and

ink.”






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‘LET ’S, ME AND YOU, WRITE A TEA-PARTY BOOK, JACK.”




6 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Oh-h-h! TI tell you!” cried Marjorie, clasping
her hands and opening her eyes very wide.

“Well,” I said, “ what is it 2”

“We have a pen and ink,” said Marjorie, in a
whisper. ‘Let's, me and you, write a tea-party
book, Jack.”

“Very well,’ I said, “we will do it, and have it
published?’

“ And—and— we will make some pictures for it,”
said Marjorie, leaning back and looking at me.

‘OF course said

“ Hey!” shouted Marjorie, jumping down from my
lap and dashing away, “I'll go and get my pencil
right now.”

And that is how Marjorie and I came to write
this story.









\
I


Cuapter II

THE TEA-PARTY

“ Jack,’ said Marjorie, “ 1am going to have a tea-
party. Will you come?”

“T shall be delighted,” I said. “Is this the one
that is to be put in the book ?”

“Oh!” said Marjorie. “Oh, I never thought of
that! Why, of course. Mama, we are going to have
a tea-party—may I? And oh, mama, we are going
to put it in the book!”




3 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“That will be nice,” said Marjorie’s mama.

“Ffave you got anything for a tea-party?” asked
Marjorie, anxiously.

“Well, I am afraid that I have not, Marjorie,
but I will see,” said mama, going into the next
room. For you must know that just then we were
living in a hotel and had no pantry nor kitchen to
go to.

‘“ Here is only one piece of candy and an apple,’
said mama.

“Ts that all?” said Marjorie. “ But you have got
some sugar, aint you?—TI mean, aren't you?”

“«Havent you, said mama.

“1 meant, ‘have n't you,” said Marjorie.

“Yes, said mama, “I have some sugar, so we can
have tea, at any rate.”

“Well, Ill tell you what we will do,’ said Mar-
jorie. “I will take some of my blocks and play that
they was cakes and things.”

“Why, certainly,” said mama; “that is what we
will do. And now get your little table.”

“ All right,” said Marjorie, dragging the table out
from the corner. “And now the table-cloth.”

“There is a clean towel on the rack in the other
room,” said mama.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 9

“There!” said Marjorie, spreading the towel on
the table *@h my! she cried. “Whe table 1¢
too—too fat for this table-cloth.”

“T think there 1s a larger one in there,” said mama.
“Now, Jack, what are you laughing at?”

“This one will do,” said Marjorie. “Now will
you get me my tea-set? Thank you, mama. Now
we must wash them first. There’s the cups. Jack,
you must help, too. There ’s the saucers and the
plates; and the milk-pitcher; and the teapot. Let
me fill them. There, now it is ready. Ding-a-ling-a-
ling! Oh, wait. I did n't ask Frankie.”

Frankie is Marjorie’s dearest friend. She is a
little girl, though her name is like a boy's name.
And not so very little, either, for she is fourteen
years old. Her mama has rooms just across the
hall from us, and so it was not long before Marjorie
came back holding Frankie's hand.

“ Now,” she said, “the tea-party is all ready.”

So we all sat down to the tea-party.

“ Now pour out the tea,” said mama.

“Tt does not look very strong,” said I.

“Well,” cried Marjorie, eagerly, “you know it
is only water, Jack, but then you must play that it is
Gealtea:


Rais eee ee ea FRAN Pais ahs CO eee ey ee oes





IO MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Why, of course, said mama. “Jack is very
stupid.”
“Well, but, mama,: said Marjorie, “he did nt
know. Will you un-peel the apple, Jack?”
“Certainlys 1 cara!
“We will play that it is
pudding,” said Marjorie.
“T think it is delicious,’
said Frankie. “And this
chicken-salad is very nice.”
“Tsit not?” said mama.
“And this ice-cream, too.
Marjorie, you must hand
around the ice-cream.”
S\Wihy, itis avery, mich.
said I, as Marjorie gave
us each an alphabet block.
“You have avery good cook, Miss Lang-a-lang.”
“My name is Miss Johnson,’ said Marjorie.
“Oh, excuse me!” I said. ‘“ Look out, Miss John-
son, or you will upset the milk-pitcher.”
For Marjorie was reaching across the table for
the plate with the one piece of candy on it.
“Oh, my!” said Marjorie. And then, looking at
the candy and then at her mother, she said, “ Mama,




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12 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

will you have some candy? There is not very much
here, I guess.’

“ No, thank you, dear,” said mama. “I don't care
to have any.

“ Frankie,’ said Marjorie, “do you want some ?”

“Qh, no,” said Frankie, “I have eaten so much
already. I could not possibly eat any more.”

“ Jack,” said Marjorie, “ will you have some?”

‘“Vhank you, 1 caid) = lbelicve | will Pam very,
fond of candy.”

So I took the only piece that there was.

Then Marjorie put the empty plate down very
bravely and looked at her mama with her eyes full
of tears.

“Qh, Jack,” said that lady, “how can you?”

“Why, I don’t want it a//, sweetheart, I said.

“You can have it all, if you want to,’ said Mar-
jorie, with her little back very straight.

“Come, now,’ I said, “you are such a polite little
lady, I will have to make you a present.”

And with that I took out of my pocket a big box
of candy.

“Oh, mama, just look what Jack ’s got!” cried
Marjorie, clapping her hands and laughing through

her tears.

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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 13

“Well, well!” said mama.

“My gracious!” said Frankie, “he is a regular
fairy.”

“No, Frankie,” said Marjorie, shaking her head,
“fairies don’t wear coats and trousers.”

“Soldier fairies do,” said Frankie.

“ Do they, Jack?” said Marjorie.

“Yes, soldier fairies do,” I said.

“ Now we all can have some candy,” said mama.

eves said) Marjoric, opening the box, “now we
all can have some candy.”

And so we all had candy.

“Now, Miss Johnson,” said I, “ will you please
excuse me? I have some writing to do.”

“J think I must go, too,’ said Frankie. “It has
been a lovely tea-party. I hope you will have
another one soon.”

“T have enjoyed it ever so much,” said mama.

A little while afterward Marjorie, having finished
what sugar there was left in the sugar-bowl, brought
her chair to my side, and sitting down began to think.

“What is it, little woman 2” said I.

“ Jack,’ she said, “do you think that was a nice
enough tea-party to go in the book 2”

“Of course it was,” I said.

2




I4 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

~“ Well, but you know,” said Marjorie, “ they had

really truly cake and—and things, in that other one,
and ours was only blocks.” |

“Yes,” I said, “I know. But any one could have
a tea-party with real cakes. Ours was much nicer
because we made-believe.”

“Yes,” said Marjorie. “And then we did have a
whole box of candy.”

“Yes, I replied, “we did indeed.”

“All right,” said Marjorie; “then we will put it
in the book. Will you make a picture for it?”

OV ess card =i walle

And here is the picture on page 11.





eae




Gaaprer VE
MARJORIE DRAWS A PICTURE

“Ait my books has got potry in them, Jack,”
said Marjorie, a day or two after the tea-party. “ Has
the book we are making got any po'try in it?”

“woultty? 1 said: | \Vhat, chickens: |

“ No-o-o!” said Marjorie, laughing. “ Po'try, don't
you know? Like ‘I want to be a angel.”

2 Oh ol cad. poctyy.

Wes. cad. Marjornce “pot. Will you make
some for my book?”

“Well,” I said, “I will try. Bring mea pencil and
a piece of paper. There; now let me think.’

“Have you thinked yet?” asked Marjorie, after
looking at me anxiously for a little while.

“No,” I said; “it takes a long time to make poetry.
You go and play, and I will call you when it 1s
ready.

15




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16 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Ill make a picture for the book,” said Marjorie.
eohallere:

“Yes, I said; “you make a picture.”

“ All right,” said Marjorie.

Marjorie made her picture before | made my

poetry.

“Ts it lovely ?” she said, as she showed it to me.

“ Yes,’ I said, “very. Now the poetry is all ready.
It is about:

“THE LITTER GIRL WHO PLAYED SHE
WAS ARISE:

‘ONE night a small girl came
down to the rocks
By the side of the great, big
Sea;

And she pulled off her shoes,
and she pulled off her
socks,

And waded in up to her
knee.



“An old crab wondered with
all his might
What the little girl’s game
could be,







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18 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

And why she was out so late at night;
So he climbed up thé rocks to see.

‘Said the girl, ‘I ’ma fish in the big, salt sea,
I’m a fish and I live in the water !’

‘That ’s odd,’ thought the crab, ‘as odd as can be!
I am sure it is Mrs. Brown’s daughter ! ’

‘Then the girl jumped around and tried to behave
Just as the fishes do,
When suddenly up came a great big wave
And soaked her through and through.

“The old crab laughed and laughed, till he cried,
As the girl ran dripping away ;
He laughed till he got a stitch in his side,
Which served him right, I must say.”

Marjorie sat thinking for a little while, and then
she said, “ But the little girl was not really a fish,
was she, Jack ?” .

“Oh, no,’ I said; “she only played she was a
fish.”

“T think she was a very silly little girl to play she
was a fish and get all wet.” Then, after thinking
about it a little longer, Marjorie said, “Jack, won't
you take me out to the beach to-morrow.”

“T will see about it,” I said.



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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 19

“But, Jack, I think you might,” said Marjorie.
“T want to go such lots.”

“JT won't promise,” I said, “ because maybe I can’t
keep my promise.” ,

“Do genelum always keep their promise?” said
Marjorie.

“Yes, [ said. “and ladies too.-

“And little girls?” said Marjorie.

“Yes, I replied, “if they are good little girls. I
once knew a little -girl who promised ‘her mama
that she would not go in the street. And she went
in the street. I did not think she was a good little
eit atalle

“Yes, I know,” said Marjorie; “but next time |
wont.”














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Cuapter IV
ON THE SEA BEACH

Next day we all went to the beach in a sail-boat.
And Marjorie ran after the waves and the waves
ran after Marjorie. Then at noon we sat down on
the sand in the shade of some rocks and ate our
luncheon.

“We shall have to wait till the tide goes out
before we can gather any shells,” I said.

“Why?” said Marjorie. “Doesn't the tide like -
you to have them ?”

Frankie laughed at that, but Marjorie did not
see anything to laugh at. Then after a while Frank
and Marjorie went away by themselves and gathered
a great many lovely shells—three handkerchiefs full.
And when they came back Frankie was laughing
again because Marjorie wished to know where the
tide had gone.














MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

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“And could you tell her, Miss Frank?” [ in-

quired.
“Well,” said Frankie, “I know that the moon has

something to do with the tide.”
“Where does the tide go to, Jack ?” said Marjorie.

en een ee ae


MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
“Why, “said Feit is this way:

‘WHERE does the tide go when it goes out?
The Man in the Moon knows pretty well.
In fact, he knows beyond a doubt—
: But the Man in the Moon won’t tell.

‘‘ Now when it goes, on tiptoe we
Will search the sands for a lovely shell.
The Man in the Moon will see us, maybe—
But the Man in the Moon won't tell.”





23









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CuarrerR V
MARJORIE’S STORY

pon T think you want to tell me a story,
do you, Jack?” said Marjorie.

It was Marjorie’s bedtime, and
sometimes, as a great treat, I would
tell her a story after her mama had
tucked her in her crib. So I said,
“es, and told her a little tory
Then Marjorie said she would tell
me a story.

“ Now,” she said, “you listen, and don’t you go to
sleep. Are you listening?”

“Yes, I said; “I am listening.”

“Well-l-l,” began Marjorie, “er, a, once upon a
time there was a, there was a,a —a little boy. And
er, a, A—BEAR ate him up!”

“My!” I said. “How dreadful!”

24





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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 25

“Yes, said Marjorie; “and, and, then he fell off
a house and broke both his legs!”

“Dear me!” said I: “that was very shocking.”

“Yes,” said Marjorie; “and then he broke both
his arms!”

“Oh!” said I. “What did they do with him ?”

“Well,” replied Marjorie, shaking her head, “I
don’t know what they did with him, but I guess they
threw him away; ‘cause he ain't any more use then,
you know.”

“No,” I said; “I should think not. I don't think
little boys are of much use, anyhow.”

“Some boys are,” said Marjorie.

“Well, maybe some are,” I said. “Now I will tell
you a story, and it is about.a little boy that was not
of any use at all. Only, they did not throw him
away, they made a bird out of him. Then after that
you must go to sleep, and to-morrow we will put
both of our stories in the book, and draw pictures
for them.”

“Yes; but, Jack,” said Marjorie, “I can’t draw a
picture of a bear. Don’t you know, I tried the other
day, and you said it looked like a turnip ?”

Did ee lasked.

“Yes, you did,” said Marjorie.

3








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26 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“Well,” I said, “I will draw it for you.”
“No, said Marjorie, “I will tell you what let ’s



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do. Let’s put in the picture I drawed of the torch-
light procession. Won't that do?”







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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 27

“Well,” I replied, “I don’t know that bears ever
have torchlight processions, but I do not think that
matters. We can write to the publishers and tell
them all about it.”

“Yes,’ said Marjorie. “You write and tell them
that I don’t know how to make a bear. And now

tell me about the little boy.”
eT hisas

THE STORRS] OF A] LITLE BOY WHO.WAS
TURNED INGO” A BIRD:

Mm, NCE there was a little boy,
And, for no reason why,

From the day of his birth, nothing else on
} earth

Did he do but whine and cry.









‘He cried so very, very much
That no one would go near him;
The people said, ‘It beat the Dutch !
Why, the Man in the Moon could hear him !’

‘This boy’s home was on the beach
Where the sea-gull’s scream is heard,
And if there ’s a bird knows how to screech,
The sea-gull is that bird.










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28 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

“They scream their best when the winds blow high
And the sky grows dark and hazy;
But let that boy begin to cry,
And he’d drive the sea-gulls crazy.

d



“Until, at last, they said, ‘Oh, joy!
We must be very dull,
This child ’s no use at all as a boy,
But he ’d make a splendid gull!’

‘So off they flew and told the king:
They told him not to doubt it;
That this boy’s scream beat everything !
That ’s all there was about it.






MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 29









“The king he saddled his best curlew ;
He flew down the wind like mad!
(I think ’t was a funny horse, don’t you?
"T’ was the only kind he had.)

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30 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

‘And when he heard that little boy yell
He thought his ears would split,
And so he turned him into a gull,
And nobody cared a bit.”

“T think his mama must have cared,” said Marjo-
rie's mama.

“Yes, Jack,” said Marjorie; “I guess his mama
cared:

“Well,” I said, “perhaps his mama cared.”

“And I think that after a while his mama went
and told the ‘King of the Gulls’ that her little boy
would be good now and not cry any more, and
that then she persuaded the king to change him
back again into a little boy,” said Marjorie’s mama.

“Did she, Jack?” asked Marjorie.

“Well,” I said, “come to think of it, I don’t know
but she did.”


—

Cuarter VI
THE RED DOLLY

ERE 1s my Red Dolly, Jack,’ said
Marjorie; “won't you put her in the
book ?”

“Oly yes, cettainly, cad |
“ Although there is not much of her
to put in. She looks like the little
boy in your story, who fell from the house and
broke both of his arms and legs, and as if the
bear had almost eaten her up, but had not quite
finished her.”

“T don't care,” said Marjorie, pouting, “she is
very nice, and I love her, I do.”

“Well, I did not mean to say anything unkind
about her, Sweetheart,” I said. “I have no doubt she

is very nice. So if you will ask her to sit up in the
31












See IRE RS. ee et eR ee oe cesta 8: 3 at eas









32 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

chair there, and tell her not to move while she
is having her picture taken, I will see what I
Can Go.

“Oh, she won't move, Jack,” said Marjorie, eagerly.
“Jack, she is just the bestest
dolly you ever saw!”

(There, Il card: finishing:
the picture; “de vou like
that?”

“ Yes,’ said Marjorie; “that
is lovely. Now let me draw
her, There! Is nt that love:
ly, too? Now, write some
potry about her, Jack,—

aes wont you, please?”

“Well, let me see. I don't know anything that
rhymes with dolly, except Polly. Her name is not
Polly, is it?” said I.

“No, said Marjorie; “her name is not Polly;
it is Red Dolly. ‘Cause, don’t you know, she had
on a red dress when you bought her for me?”

“Oh, yes,’ I said; “of course, | ought to remem-

ber. Well, here is a ballad:







\
|




MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 33
(TO HE RED DOE.

‘ Dotty dear, last year, when you were new,
You were quite pretty, that is true;
Though now you look so queerly.
Your cheeks were red, and your eyes were blue,
You ’d arms and legs, and feet you had, too.
There were few in the city so pretty as you,
Dolly dear, last year, when you were new;
And Marjorie loved you dearly.
But now your cheek’s no longer red ;
Your arm is broken, so ’s your head; ©
You ’re blind, and bald, and deaf, and lame ;
You 're—But Marjorie loves you just the same,
Dolly dear.”

he

ED

as prown By
Jes












Cuarter VII

HOW MARJORIE WON THE
WHITE SEA-BIRD




3HE night after we took the Red Dolly's
picture, there was a party in the hotel,
and Marjorie’s mama said that she
might go into the parlor and look on,
- for a little while. So Marjorie was
= dressed in her prettiest frock, and

went with her mama, and watched the
people dancing. Then she said that she wished
to dance, too. I asked her if she would dance with
me, but she said no, she wished to dance with Lieu-
tenant Smith. Lieutenant Smith is an army officer
who knows Marjorie very well. So I told him to
ask her. But then Marjorie would not dance
with him because, she said, I had told him to ask
her, and that was not the way people did, at all.

34





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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, BEE

Then Mr. Smith laughed, and said that next time
he would ask her without being told. So he walked
once round the room, and when he came to Mar-
jorie again, he said:

“Miss Marjorie, may I have the pleasure of this
waltz with you?”

And Marjorie said “Yes,” and got up and
danced with him.

But when he brought her back to her seat,
Marjorie did not look at all pleased.

Then the Lieutenant said: “What is the matter,
Miss Marjorie? Have I done anything you don't
like?” 7

“Yes, said Marjorie, pouting. “All the ladies
and genelum walk round after they dance. And
you did nt.”

“Oh, I beg pardon; I forgot,’ said the Lieuten-
ant, laughing once more. “Won't you walk around
with me now?”

So they walked around the room.

Now Marjorie was a little girl, and Mr. Smith
was quite tall, so that he had to lean over when she
took his arm. But being one of those young gentle-
men who like to make fun, he pretended to have to
lean over very far indeed, so that people smiled.


















MARJORIE WALTZES WITH LIEUTENANT SMITH.



|




MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 37

“And once he made believe to trip over a pin that
was lying on the carpet, which made some ladies
laugh. Now Marjorie does not like to be laughed
at, and when she came back to her seat I saw that
there were tears in her eyes.

“Say ‘Thank you’ to Mr. Smith, Marjorie,” said
her mama.

So Marjorie said “Thank you,” but so low that
no one heard it.

“T think, Mr. Smith,” said Marjorie’s mama,
smiling, “that it is getting near my little girl's
sleepy time. Come, Marjorie, say ‘Good-night, and
let us go to bed.”

Now I fancy that Marjorie may have believed
that she was being punished for not behaving
prettily, while all the time she thought it was
Lieutenant Smith who had not acted nicely. Then
she did not wish to leave the party and go to
bed. And she really was tired and sleepy, and,
although we did not know it, she was not very
well. At any rate, Marjorie began to cry in good
earnest.

So then I took the little girl up in my arms,

- and said, “I'll tell you what we will do, dear. You

come with me, and I will take you home. And
4






38 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

then I will tell you what Sergeant Quickstep found
to-day, over at the lighthouse.”

Marjorie did not stop crying until she was all
ready for the night. And she had to laugh because
I was so very awkward about putting her to bed;
but at last she was safely tucked into her crib.

Then the tears came again, and she said, “Jack,

« I don't like the way Mr. Smith did, a bit.”

“But, Marjorie,’ I said, “was it worth while to cry
about it?) Mr. Smith was only playing. You area
little girl, and you must not expect gentlemen to treat
you as if you were a grown-up lady.”

“But, said Marjorie, “ you always say I must be
a lady.”

“Yes, sweetheart, but while you are little I want
you to beachild lady. Then when you get to be as
big as mama and wear long dresses, the gentlemen
will behave toward you as they do toward other
ladies. So now,” I said, “what do you think it was
that Sergeant Quickstep found to-day over at the
lighthouse ?” |

“T don’t know,’ said Marjorie.

“Well,” I said, “he found a lovely white sea-bird.
The lighthouse-keeper told him that it flew so hard
against the lantern last night, that it was killed, poor














MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 39

thing! The sergeant gave it tome. And I thought
that its skin would make a fine collar for my coat;
then I thought it would make a beautiful muff for a
little girl. Now I will tell you what I will do. I
will get a pillow and lay my head down on it, here,
and you lay your head down on your pillow, and
the one who first goes to sleep gets the bird.”

Marjorie laughed, and said, “ All right.”

So I brought the pillow, and we laid our heads
down and shut our eyes very tight. Pretty soon [|
opened one eye and looked at Marjorie, and I found
that Marjorie had opened one eye and was looking
at me. So we both laughed and shut our eyes again.
Then, after a while, I opened one eye and looked at
Marjorie. But she did not open her eye this time,
because she was asleep.

And so Marjorie won the white sea-bird.








Cuapter VIII
MARJORIE HAS THE SCARLET FEVER

Marjorie has been having the scarlet fever.
She wants that to go in Our Book, so there it is.

The day after the party, Marjorie was cross and
fretful. The old lady who lives next door said that
it was badness, and that she ought to be punished.
But grown people do not know everything. So,
instead of punishing her, Marjorie’s mama _ held
her in her arms and rocked her and sang to her.
After a while we found that. Marjorie was ill, and
so we sent for the doctor, and he said she had
scarlet fever.

Well, then they would not let any one come into
the room lest some other little girl should get it.
And Marjorie’s mama and papa nursed her for six
weeks, and she had to take a great deal of medicine. |
We always used to taste it first, to see whether it was

° . . . ° . |
nice or not; and if it was not nice, Marjorie got a
40






MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. AI

present for taking it. One of the presents was a cap
for the Red Dolly, a cap which covered her head,

so that you could not see where it was broken.



THE DOCTOR PRESCRIBES FOR THE LADY DOLLY.

Marjorie was afraid that the Red Dolly would
take the scarlet fever; but I think she must have
had it.
We played that the Lady Dolly took it. The
."
















MARJORIE GETTING BETTER,

Lady Dolly wears fine clothes and moves her eyes
and cries. When the doctor came, Marjorie con-




| MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 43
|
\

, sulted him about the Lady Dolly, and he said that
a little medicine would not hurt her. And so, every
time that Marjorie took medicine, the Lady Dolly
had to take some, too; and when it was horrid she
rolled up her eyes and cried. But she did not get
any present.

| When Marjorie grew better, I told her so many
stories and drew so many pictures, we could not
begin to get them all in Our Book.

‘Yes suit, jack, « said Marjorie, “I think you
| might put ‘Strange Land’ in, and—and the ‘Little
| | Girl Who Lost Her Hat.” 3

“Well, I am sure I could not put in the story of
i the hat, Manorie, because | d have fo make 4
noise like the chickens, and the cows, and the
| _ birds, and all the other things that the little girl
met, and I cannot do that with pen and ink, you

| know.”

| “Can't you draw the way they went, with a pen-

| cil?” suggested Marjorie.

| “No, I am afraid not,” I said.

| “But,” said Marjorie, “you can tell about the lit-

tle boy, and the old chair with a break in the seat, -
cant you?”

“Oh! yes,” I replied:














44 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

‘Now listen to me well, and I will try to tell
Of a chair that was a sham,
Of a shelf that was tall, a boy that was small,
. And a pot of blackberry jam.

“Of course the boy with care climbed upon the chair,
His hand just reached to the shelf;

When suddenly his feet went right through the seat,
Then the boy fell through himself.

“Then the shelf so tall came down with a fall
On the chair that was a sham;
And there they all lay, in a mixed-up way,
Spread over with blackberry jam.”

“Tam not sure,” I said, “that I like that word
‘sham, because I do not think that all the little boys
and girls will know what it means. But then I
cannot think of any better word to rhyme with

>”

‘jam.

“Well,” said Marjorie, “I guess they can ask their
papas. |

“Ves,” I said, “of course. Or their mamas, or
somebody.”

“ Now,” said Marjorie, “tell about the people who
lived in their hats.”
“Well, when I was a little girl—”










lod
b
g

MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 45

“Why, Jack,” said Marjorie, opening: her eyes
very wide, “you never was a little gil.

“I mean when your mother was a little oie |
said, “ever so many years ago—”

“Now, Jack!” said Marjorie’s mama.

“ They used to wear big straw hats, and they called
them ‘flats.’ And now the rooms that people live
in they call ‘flats. So that is where the funny part
of this poetry comes in:







“There was a lady lived in a flat.
Just think.of that!
She laughed so much she grew quite fat.
Just think of that!








46

MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.











t



“ Though her husband was thin
He could not get in,

So he went and kept house in his hat.
Think of that!”






MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 47

o Now, “A.B © said Marjorie.
“Very well,” I said: .

“When little girls say their A, B, C’s,
They must be careful not td sneeze,
For if they do, as sure as fate,
They ’Il never be able to say them straight.”

“And now,” said Marjorie, leaning back in her
big chair, “just tell about ‘Strange Land,’ please,
Jack; and that will be truly all.”

So I told her this story:

THE LOST CHILD IN A STRANGE LAND.

Once upon a time a little girl found herself walk-
ing along a road in the country. She did not know
where she came from, or where she was Cone it
was Just as if she had been asleep, and had waked up
in this Strange Land. But she did not feel frightened
or unhappy. She walked along looking at the big
trees and bushes, and wondering what they were
made of, and how all the little leaves were fastened
on to them; and she pulled one off to see. Then
she saw the sky, and thought that it was very pretty,
and that she would like to look at it closer. A long,












48 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

long way off she saw where the sky touched the
earth, and she made up her mind to walk there and
put her hand on it, and see if it was as soft and
smooth as it looked.

But before she came much nearer to where the
sky touched the earth, the sun, that big, bright ball
which had been over her head all day, began com-
ing down to the same place. The little girl thought
that it was coming down to meet her, and she hur-
ried as fast as she could, so as to be there in time.
But while she was still ever so far off, the sun got
down very near to the earth, and suddenly dropped
out of sight.

Then the little girl stopped running, because she
saw that there must be a big hole between the edge
of the earth and where the sky was, into which the
sun had dropped; and she was afraid that, as it was
getting very dark, she might fall into it, too, and
tumble down on top of the sun. Pretty soon the
stars began to shine. The child was very sorry to
see the stars, because she was sure that the sun must
have fallen down so hard as to break into little
pieces which had splashed all over the sky. She
was very sorry for the sun. At the same time she
thought that perhaps she would better not go any




MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 49

nearer the end of the earth, just then. So she sat
down to see what would happen next.

While she was waiting, a woman came along,
and said, “ Why, here is a child. I was looking for
a little girl, Are you anybody’s little girl?”

The child said she did n’t think so.

“ How lucky that is!” said the woman. “I will
call you Katie, and take you home with me.”

So the child went home with her, and the woman
gave her a bow! of hot bread-and-milk, and then un-
dressed her and put her to bed. While Katie was
lying there, very happy, she began thinking about
all that she had seen that day. And by and by she
asked the woman if that beautiful sun was really all
broken into little bits.

“Why,” said the woman, “what on earth is the
child talking about 2”

So Katie tried to tell her.

But the woman said crossly, “Goodness me!
Katie, you must not ask so many questions. Little
children should be seen and not heard.”

Now, Katie wanted to know very much indeed
about this sun, and the sky, and the trees. She was
sorry that in this Strange Land children must not

ask questions. But she was a good little girl, and
5

ee et



ae nS opens




. ia et —y
ite nd asa pee pe eS



50 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

tried to do whatever this.woman, who seemed to
know everything, bade her.- And so she asked no
more questions, but lay there thinking it all out for
herself; but before she could quite make up her
‘mind about it she fell asleep.

Katie must have taken cold during the day while
she was running to the end of the earth, because in
the night she began to cough. The woman, by this
time, had put out the light and was in bed with her,
fast asleep. Katie's coughing woke her up, and that
made her very cross indeed, and she said:

“Oh, dear me! If I had known how much
trouble this child was going to be, I don’t think I
should have brought her home.!” |

Katie was very sorry to hear the woman say
that, and she cried a little to think that she was not
wanted, and she wished she could go away. But
crying only made her cough more than ever.

Then the woman said: “If you don’t stop
coughing I ‘ll shake you! Do you suppose that I
am going to have you keep me awake all night with
your coughing? Stop it, I say!”

“But I can't help it,” said Katie.

“Don't tell me you can’t help it,” said the woman.
“T know better. You can if you try.”














MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 51

“I really don't believe I can,” said Katie to her-
self. “But she says she.knows.” And remembering.
that the woman had told her only a little while ago
that children should be seen and not heard, she made
up her mind to try very hard to stop the next cough.
Pretty soon she felt it coming, and she held her
breath. Then she began to get hot all over, and
there was a ringing in her ears, and her eyes started
out, until, at last, she thought she would surely have
to cough and be punished, or burst.

Tien, suddenly, it seemed to Katie as if she Had
broken into ever so many little stars, as the sun had
done. The next moment the child found herself
walking along the road in the country just as on the
day before, only it was morning now. The sky was
soft and blue, and the grass was soft and green, and
the dewdrops sparkled on the flowers, and pretty
soon the glorious sun itself came up in the sky the
other side from where it had gone down the night
before. ‘The child was so glad to see the sun and
the flowers that she began to sing with the birds.

While she was singing, there came by a lady,
dressed so prettily that she looked like a walking
flower. :

“Oh,” cried the lady, stopping as she saw the










52 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

child, “oo sweet ‘ittle tootsey wootsey! Oo must
tum right home with me, and be my ‘ittle tweet dirl.”

Now, the child had never heard any one talk in
that way before, but she liked this pretty lady, and
took her hand; and together they walked down the
road to where there was a lovely house. But before
they came to the house, a big red thing, with four
legs and a tail and a head with two sharp sticks on
it, looked over a fence and bellowed at them.

This frightened the child, so that she hid her
face in the lady’s dress.

“Why,” said the lady, “you silly ‘ittle goosey
poosey! That is only a cow.”

“Qh,” said the child. But, nevertheless, she kept
on the other side of her friend until they had passed
the big thing with its mouth working so, and with the
sharp sticks on its head

Then they walked on a little farther. Suddenly
the lady gave such a shriek that the child jumped
nearly out of her shoes.

“Oh, what is the matter?” she cried, clinging
once more to the lady’s dress.

“Vherel there! Womb: you. see ite sande the
lady, pointing with her parasol to the road in front

of her,










MARJORIE AND HER PAPA, 53

For a long time the child could not see anything.
At last a tiny gray creature, about as big as a spool
of thread, came running along the road. As it drew
near them the little girl was going to pick it up.
But the lady gave another scream and jumped upon
a log, pulling the child after her.

“What is it?” whispered the child. She was not
scared, as she had been at the cow, but she did not
understand.

“Shh!” cried the lady; “it is a mouse!”

“Oh,” said the child again.

“Shoo!” cried the lady, shaking her skirts at the
mouse.

Then the mouse sat up on its hind legs and
slowly winked one eye at the little girl. After which
it turned around and ran away as fast as it could.

When they came to the house, the lady took the
child to her husband, who seemed very glad.

“Well, this is really a nice girl,” he said. “Now
the first thing to be done,” he continued, “is to begin
her education. One cannot begin a child’s educa-

tion too early. Tell me, little girl, what is the. ~

meaning of Pachyderm ?”
~“T don’t know,” said the child.

“Ah,” said the man, “I am sorry to hear that.”
5.



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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 55

“But no one ever told me,” said the child.

“Then you should have asked,” replied the
man. “What is your tongue for if it is not to
ask questions?”

“But I was told —,” said the little girl,

“Don’t interrupt me,’ said the man. “Now, here
is a list of examination questions which I have pre-
pared for the Primary Grade, and here are the text-
books from which the information can be derived.
Get a pencil and paper, and go to work. ‘How
doth the little busy bee!’ Go to work, little child,
go to work.”

So the child went to work. But just as she got
to “303. Define the analogy between metacarpus
and habeas-corpus, her head began to feel very
queer. Then everything whirled round and round
like tops. The next minute she found herself on the
road in the country once more.

Now the child was very glad to see the sky, and
the trees, and the birds again. She thought that it
would be very nice if the big people in Strange
Land would leave her alone out there with the birds,
and not take her to their houses any more. But
when the sun began to go down she grew very
hungry, and was too tired to run to the end of the

ce






56 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

earth to meet it. And when at last she came to a
house, she stood at the front gate and looked in. |
At that moment a woman came hurrying out to
her, and, picking her up in her arms, hugged and
kissed her, and said:
“You precious thing, you! I knew you ’d come
to see me to-day. Come in!”
The child was glad to hear that, and when the |
|





woman took her into the house, and bathed her, and
gave her a nice warm supper, she was very happy.
After supper the woman took her in her lap, and
sang to her, and told her stories. “There was an old
lady in the room, who was the woman’s mother.
And she kept saying all the time to the woman,
“My dear, you are spoiling that child.”

But the woman only laughed, and went on tell-
ing. the child stories. Now, some of these stories
the little girl did not like, although she was too
polite to say so. They were about a Rag-man who
carried little children away in his bag, and Ghosts
who scared little children in the dark, and Giants
who ate little children up. Now, of course, the
grown people in Strange Land only make-believe
that there are ghosts and giants. They know that
there are no such things, and that nobody hurts


















MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 57

little children. But the little girl had seen so many
curious things that she believed that what the woman
told her was all true. So when they put her to bed,
and took away the light, and left -her alone, she was
very much frightened. Pretty soon she heard a
scratching noise at the foot of her bed. This scared
her so that she called out very loud. Then the
woman came in, and the child told her what she had
heard.

“Why,” said the woman, “it is only a mouse.”

“Oh, make it go away,” said the little girl.

“Afraid of a mouse!” said the woman, laughing.
“ A little, tiny mouse! Why, that would never hurt
you.

Then the little girl did not know what to think.
So she asked if she could not have a light in the
room.

At this the old lady spoke up, and said, “ No,
no. Little girls must learn to sleep in the dark.
My mother made me sleep in the dark, and I made
my daughter do the same. There is nothing to be
afraid of.”

“But I want to see that there is nothing to be

afraid of,” said the child.
“No, no,” said the old lady. “Shut your eyes

.










58 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.

tight, and go to sleep; then you won't know whether
it is light or dark.”

Now, although the little girl shut her eyes very

tight, she could not go to sleep. So, when they left
her alone again and shut the door, she covered up
her head in the bedclothes, and trembled so hard
that the bed shook and scared the little mouse half
out of his senses. The child kept thinking of all
the dreadful stories the woman had told her about
the Rag-man, the Giant, and the rest of them, until
she was so frightened that she cried. Then sud-
denly she heard a gentle voice, and then —

Why, then the little girl woke up. Woke up
truly ; for she had been only dreaming about the
Strange Land all this time, while she was really in
her little crib at home. And the night-lamp was
burning low, and her own mama was leaning over
her.

“T think,” said Marjorie’s mama, “that the little
girl must have been eating too many nuts and
candies.

“ Had she, Jack?” said Marjorie.

“T don’t know,” I said, “ but I should n’t wonder.”








ROA MNT






Cuarter IX
WE GO CAMPING

On the day Marjorie got well, we all went to
the country and lived in a tent. That is, we had a
tent for the bedroom, and another tent for the
dining-room and kitchen, and all out-of-doors for a
parlor. When we had dinner, Marjorie could spill
the milk all over the grass if she wanted to; and
that was fun. ‘And she slept in a hammock, in-
stead of a bed; and that was fun. And one day
she almost saw a snake, so she said. Then the
birds would come, in the early morning, and sing to
us until we got up. Marjorie’s mama said that it
would be very funny if the robin-redbreasts should
come into the tent some morning before we woke
and, seeing us lying there, should cover us with
leaves, as they did the “ Babes in the Wood.”

“That did happen once,” said I “a long time ago.
The robins found a little girl, named Amaryllis,
asleep by a spring, and ie thought she was dead,
and covered her up with leaves.”

“Then could n't she get up?” said Megeie

60






‘Oh, yes,” I said. “When she woke up, she
laughed at the robins. ‘A friend of the birds, named
Robert Herrick, heard about it afterwards; I don't
know whether it was the robins or the little girl who
told him. At all events, he put it all in a book.
I will tell you about it to-night, if you like.”

So that night, while Marjorie rocked herself in
the hammock, I told her Robert Herrick’s story of
Amaryllis and the robins. And she liked it so well
that she said it must go into our book, too.

“And, Jack,” said she, “we must make some

pictures for it.”
6








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CHArrer X
THE SERENADE

\ WuHeN we became tired of living in a tent, we
went back to the city. We were all glad to get
home. Marjorie was so glad that, when her mama

| put her to bed in her own little crib that night, she

could not go to sleep, but wanted to sing.

So then I said that we would have a little con-
cert to celebrate our coming home, and we would
put that in to end The Book.

And this is what we sang:

A SERENADE—7o my Uittle girl.

Goop-NiGutT, Sweetheart,
The sun has gone to rest;
ebhe evening-star, the night-lamp of the world,
Burns dimly in the west;
Tired day has closed its eyelids
On the blueness of its skies;
Do thou, Sweetheart, close thy lids

On the blueness of thy eyes.
65

—




66 MARJORIE AND HER PAPA,

!



The little birdies’ heads have sought their wings,
Each little flower has closed its petals bright;
Do thou, Sweetheart, let thy dear head,

With all its little rings of golden hair,

Sink down upon thy pillow white,

Whilst low I whisper in thy ear,

Good-night, Sweetheart, good-night.

THE END.

























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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.
A. /,


SY' --


Oh, yes," I said. "When she woke up, she
laughed at the robins. A friend of the birds, named
Robert Herrick, heard about it afterwards; I don't
know whether it was the robins or the little girl who
told him. At all events, he put it all in a book.
I will tell you about it to-night, if you like."
So that night, while Marjorie rocked herself in
the hammock, I told her Robert Herrick's story of
Amaryllis and the robins. And she liked it so well
that she said it must go into our book, too.
"And, Jack," said she, "we must make some
pictures for it."
6


q







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


little children. But the little girl had seen so many
curious things that she believed that what the woman
told her was all true. So when they put her to bed,
and took away the light, and left -her alone, she was
very much frightened. Pretty soon she heard a
scratching noise at the foot of her bed. This scared
her so that she called out very loud. Then the
woman came in, and the child told her what she had
heard.
"Why," said the woman, "it is only a mouse."
Oh, make it go away," said the little girl.
"Afraid of a mouse!" said the woman, laughing.
"A little, tiny mouse! Why, that would never hurt
you.
Then the little girl did not know what to think.
So she asked if she could not have a light in the
room.
At this the old lady spoke up, and said, No,
no. Little girls must learn to sleep in the dark.
My mother made me sleep in the dark, and I made
my daughter do the same. There is nothing to be
afraid of."
But I want to see that there is nothing to be
afraid of," said the child.
"No, no," said the old lady. "Shut your eyes








a C


Ra








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"They scream their best when the winds blow high,
And the sky grows dark and hazy;
But let that boy begin to cry,
And he'd drive the sea-gulls crazy.



















"Until, at last, they said, 'Oh, joy !
We must be very dull,
This child 's no use at all as a boy,
But he 'd make a splendid gull!'


"So off they flew and told the king:
They told him not to doubt it;
That this boy's scream beat everything I
That's all there was about it.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"There!" said Marjorie, spreading the towel on
the table. "Oh, my!" she cried. "The table is
too-too fat for this table-cloth."
I think there is a larger one in there," said mama.
"Now, Jack, what are you laughing at?"
"This one will do," said Marjorie. Now will
you get me my tea-set? Thank you, mama. Now
we must wash them first. There 's the cups. Jack,
you must help, too. There 's the saucers and the
plates; and the milk-pitcher; and the teapot. Let
me fill them. There, now it is ready. Ding-a-ling-a-
ling! Oh, wait. I did n't ask Frankie."
Frankie is Marjorie's dearest friend. She is a
little girl, though her name is like a boy's name.
And not so very little, either, for she is fourteen
years old. Her mama has rooms just across the
hall from us, and so it was not long before Marjorie
came back holding Frankie's hand.
Now," she said, the tea-party is all ready."
So we all sat down to the tea-party.
Now pour out the tea," said mama.
It does not look very strong," said I.
"Well," cried Marjorie, eagerly, "you know it
is only water, Jack, but then you must play that it is
real tea."








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Why, of course," said mama. "Jack is very
stupid."
"Well, but, mama," said Marjorie, "he did n't
know. Will you un-peel the apple, Jack?"
Certainly," I said.
( We will play that it is
pudding," said Marjorie.
I think it is delicious,"
said Frankie. "And this
chicken-salad is very nice."
Sn Is it not?" said mama.
"And this ice-cream, too.
.-2 ~ Marjorie, you must hand
around the ice-cream."
S"Why, it is very rich,"
Said I, as Marjorie gave
us each an alphabet block.
"You have a very good cook, Miss Lang-a-lang."
My name is Miss Johnson," said Marjorie.
Oh, excuse me !" I said. Look out, Miss John-
son, or you will upset the milk-pitcher."
For Marjorie was reaching across the table for
the plate with the one piece of candy on it.
Oh, my !" said Marjorie. And then, looking at
the candy and then at her mother, she said, Mama,








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


suited him about the Lady Dolly, and he said that
a little medicine would not hurt her. And so, every
time that Marjorie took medicine, the Lady Dolly
had to take some, too; and when it was horrid she
rolled up her eyes and cried. But she did not get
any present.
When Marjorie grew better, I told her so many
stories and drew so many pictures, we could not
begin to get them all in Our Book.
"Yes, but, Jack," said Marjorie, "I think you
might put 'Strange Land' in, and-and the 'Little
Girl Who Lost Her Hat."'
Well, I am sure I could not put in the story of
the hat, Marjorie, because I 'd have to make a
noise like the chickens, and the cows, and the
birds, and all the other things that the little girl
met, and I cannot do that with pen and ink, you
know."
Can't you draw the way they went, with a pen-
cil?" suggested Marjorie.
No, I am afraid not," I said.
But," said Marjorie, you can tell about the lit-
tle boy, and the old chair with a break in the seat,
can't you ?"
Oh! yes," I replied:




xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080503_AAABAL' PACKAGE 'UF00081193_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-05-04T05:22:51-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:10:05-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298221; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-18T17:42:39-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '892806' DFID 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEMW' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00000.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 386bd647a273125cdf09accf9eea6885
'SHA-1' 73ab562716bb4e748f11239f3179c03ad72f8e2c
EVENT '2011-12-07T06:13:07-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'128709' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEMX' 'sip-files00000.jpg'
f69fc79cd20a2d2a491e88a1bfc6c885
801e0e67450d90f43bf6ef7d6039ff14db24451a
'2011-12-07T06:13:18-05:00'
describe
'6602' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEMY' 'sip-files00000.pro'
6e54392ed8f9dd43af5668b9905eac18
b51329593b209b2b8c69eb4f9efd53a6602ea5a7
'2011-12-07T06:11:35-05:00'
describe
'29363' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
75b92f76cedadd214ffe49ebb33a48b3
cf312fabfbdcb36fde7f985884c92db63defd38d
'2011-12-07T06:12:01-05:00'
describe
'21448176' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENA' 'sip-files00000.tif'
82c24338b95f0d9dd7616d0b8189422b
0b592cfc2db9b108d9fd01e4ca81ca6bcf992771
'2011-12-07T06:12:08-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENB' 'sip-files00000.txt'
daf39a49124dc4688e46d29eb8eb4702
62ee359716e79155e45f4cb95acc2d6056eed8e8
'2011-12-07T06:13:13-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENC' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
0212188db043e9edc6fe9db9cbf640b3
237e89d30085ea534f903162f6968f68309557d0
'2011-12-07T06:12:23-05:00'
describe
'934879' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEND' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
96fa4e4564e3ee205f76891f4ac9176e
ea6b3c857395b8c712780264b44c61cf0aa9e6c9
'2011-12-07T06:11:56-05:00'
describe
'47347' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENE' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
68dd095d0916876122f5416266897809
247c44843f17bb4e045bed8453863425bdba3477
'2011-12-07T06:11:38-05:00'
describe
'10731' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENF' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
aefe2c3d4c760533669c3a2a35bbac49
da0f6e2e0fd23274912db9b5d84024bfa0609f61
'2011-12-07T06:11:27-05:00'
describe
'22454540' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENG' 'sip-files00001.tif'
27c64829c57975454f03222a9bbc66b8
7a7d893804629fe7ee8cf32d61a9b79d6bd0d7a2
'2011-12-07T06:13:26-05:00'
describe
'3079' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENH' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
edb0cbf72c7d5c3640c2e938e5b6f45b
cf57457e4d532febf50e8d651c9b1d68d7526a28
describe
'859750' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENI' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
d2764dd9f23e848e6cb26a18d7fe29e5
6071429bd3aa46ad69ccdd7635d0731967716142
'2011-12-07T06:11:55-05:00'
describe
'14002' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
f9cb9ebbae4b00a33757ef75ab68eeba
fac3aba93fb158b0f3437f6eafd3eee28512c7a9
'2011-12-07T06:11:59-05:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
cb1be5cc83921e40128d333e11218463
617b20e4a066e34d9e190b095517d15a0b7a2b04
'2011-12-07T06:11:54-05:00'
describe
'4090' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENL' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
5fb0ee7c3c93ac76be00089a08284d53
68e135a3664ba952bf55eb194cad7e431d494bfe
'2011-12-07T06:13:06-05:00'
describe
'6895712' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENM' 'sip-files00003.tif'
0400b177e5c7cb3663c2d6290d6cddaf
38d0e722914cd2b5d50171a3f5b901778a5c4683
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENN' 'sip-files00003.txt'
6f53f335c6c117851f8ac8a5b39de023
43e27c73ef3058908dada538c966007917c0564d
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENO' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
f486b78e6b439f16230357a1887799ea
28693451de1abc119e6faddd4b088c73828ee786
'2011-12-07T06:12:47-05:00'
describe
'859751' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENP' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
39aee7598b40c7e3dc87076917c54886
bc042d86a733f2104e8117e33ac5bedec13f4a35
'2011-12-07T06:11:29-05:00'
describe
'30786' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENQ' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
4fcdf7d0b0dfdd8f896ec60d4044c76b
3a21ffcb0f5263770940760e627ee047ce94a634
'2011-12-07T06:11:33-05:00'
describe
'5230' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENR' 'sip-files00006.pro'
90137f123da88e822e8c5479b902ff25
2ab7f2994ad5e115741755026dc83e938d17d5b4
'2011-12-07T06:13:03-05:00'
describe
'9167' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
43b9a3a8e55a860c74a8048a690e0d0b
d756b6fb70e40c6113eec710595c5187914c7a32
'2011-12-07T06:12:09-05:00'
describe
'6896876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
d253305297a1c5d699799e4f0bbec798
2dc71a538a7ae3df894a46e436d0781812773a8b
'2011-12-07T06:12:38-05:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENU' 'sip-files00006.txt'
8ae8ef9ee75f35f76b7fa4adb9d2ce99
49401f0a41c4bb1f8690792d64e75a6e4d339a89
'2011-12-07T06:13:23-05:00'
describe
'2838' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
2f32417d9325c5105a373233b7e4c9f2
246cc701a394eb872f1a42a5bc0fb5ab8f038e9b
'2011-12-07T06:12:29-05:00'
describe
'859744' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENW' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0cf2229e3e9c47db65e3f94c143b7eb4
300034995b91a642b80b0b0fd0c53416cbf45a56
'2011-12-07T06:12:26-05:00'
describe
'12099' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENX' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c59d60ed237d53a71ecd6eba47c8aad8
d59c8f58b03ef1770de26b6c0cd42b598eb2c9c9
'2011-12-07T06:11:58-05:00'
describe
'3036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENY' 'sip-files00007.pro'
96a2bfa635e3e5bdf807fb591e38369f
0a4d2fa2d4bb76120406e83bf7bfd8d117d8724b
'2011-12-07T06:12:10-05:00'
describe
'3535' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABENZ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
461f985cd2e47742a1e3507792b7cc53
e760e9a33a14aa72b6b47504d09c64c49a612a63
'2011-12-07T06:11:36-05:00'
describe
'6895596' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOA' 'sip-files00007.tif'
8499dc1b006c4ed6823fa1d1ba369d28
293bdab4158f2b5ede234a94d8ccf51ee1814c52
'2011-12-07T06:11:42-05:00'
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOB' 'sip-files00007.txt'
bfc6cae258d63f337863a9d70cb0e1e4
66ec2b1bbe541ae475c8f07ab582afccf98d887c
'2011-12-07T06:12:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOC' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
9186e4aa0e8552160fdc2e830d6c972d
0e271df79117e7923785dba0b96caa907f307e7e
'2011-12-07T06:12:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOD' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
1cf1b44ca07eebbbf3024da8ac3cff5b
4d04cd4d15180bc921a1fcbf35c99cc27dff1c44
'2011-12-07T06:12:49-05:00'
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOE' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
44d5a966ee968a6dc5c12e22f0a46cca
554bd70a1cfd383181c6a46ff3491626ba4e79d5
'2011-12-07T06:13:19-05:00'
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a6d38fafebb97bde08f2b092d037e5a9
1a9b971475587bfdb6c20d6c507422434a27e36b
describe
'11481' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
bc88b95c741f6b9fe79d7ee51a7163a9
70df49959b208cb2a195cd91a1bc8ded932b68b0
'2011-12-07T06:11:53-05:00'
describe
'6897556' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f037ba5657e2ef68555926cdf26ef3cc
0dbc969afb4efe53ad5133dafb11e03d6bd213e6
'2011-12-07T06:11:41-05:00'
describe
'27' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOI' 'sip-files00008.txt'
322a3393a71490fb78d7c0915c5964a2
3571f0cca305a56e35e96e169824ea09463f1cf2
'2011-12-07T06:11:45-05:00'
describe
'3360' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
8405c8a36ee328b611318bf27cbfa571
f29cb7e6a73122fe5a51ca987b80d0576720a422
'2011-12-07T06:12:14-05:00'
describe
'859742' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e25f3c2b74097baa10cb9c5956661da8
34399d5253dd828a429dc887759c81c3f8ff68f6
'2011-12-07T06:13:29-05:00'
describe
'34854' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4c1d9590db97aaeee0d747005b36bd7e
09fb0decc0712774d91b87465452992926ed95ba
describe
'9991' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOM' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
ea67d26186504cde1d00ee75146f550a
b7f1bbcd7a799c7d019e58ba07dd596bb05bf4aa
'2011-12-07T06:12:50-05:00'
describe
'6897100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEON' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f423c0c425a5154ea62c2498e96ad200
94b53465cf39d555a51d2c5532b116c5db4bc2f0
'2011-12-07T06:11:28-05:00'
describe
'2943' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOO' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6ebb34a7ee9a75a783099bbeb63dad0d
4d78c65af099cbc75fc1969972c2509a8e129030
'2011-12-07T06:12:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOP' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
6b8e4536789d9bbd4fe2a2939e57cc87
3f44e9ceae42577270140c8e72d44253e38c06b6
'2011-12-07T06:12:20-05:00'
describe
'47717' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
ce175b2fbeadd6599589e05fe1d2305d
3f889b031b78e101d314daec14675966b75303f3
'2011-12-07T06:12:19-05:00'
describe
'14046' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOR' 'sip-files00010.pro'
de9d09d3f24be623e78b84e42e038972
1db922a70fb15efb895a5487bb300101b07fb7e0
describe
'14532' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOS' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
1edb13ae56710d4cfc11f76bbd9f4274
f630248b5602a2e7236dde3cce3fef0f2081b8ff
describe
'6897868' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOT' 'sip-files00010.tif'
8a71b0d75c90c9b12c50516a3ecab48d
3d48533307f14574994099b41176f47256b47bf2
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOU' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c135162a09aef0787ddc742bd39c82aa
3d37738a9d9ac7b40c8954bc00af7e220c64bf8b
describe
'4196' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOV' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
20ea2abc30bb1eb1690bc5ad73e8e841
038c071ae165a38a794c945fe8b3d6e2815d7d21
'2011-12-07T06:12:57-05:00'
describe
'859734' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOW' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
fd4f4a2699a3654f1ef51af9bb1866de
ce16e126483ed707b5d23a743e0a06bae2cdce77
'2011-12-07T06:13:08-05:00'
describe
'84620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOX' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
a10576c05a85dd5391ae06cd9307b6b6
0a6207c0358be792a31ccabf4bc30995744c028e
'2011-12-07T06:13:02-05:00'
describe
'29306' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOY' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2a69a45837aca606fe71e3ef074ccbf4
9e11288814650ce1b4ede41d0be4bb6bcae20ec7
'2011-12-07T06:13:16-05:00'
describe
'24581' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
3b580eff2c9b2b176e57ee30985efcf6
d1f62dad5dec4dcab73ae1388617dea4473e06fd
describe
'6899368' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e7f379f8db8b1062c7f1bfafb9f84a86
96373d80a231bcdf22b5147147b912d2f40dca84
'2011-12-07T06:12:03-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPB' 'sip-files00011.txt'
4748c45cd33ffe2b2656d50682d70311
50ac985b07dc89149c6af61f51221f4dec5ff61d
'2011-12-07T06:13:12-05:00'
describe
'6177' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPC' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f13bb0ff16a510c2ec143c29179724f4
0c68fd283a3f8c7e4e7bf6aa44aa0fba4a91d5a9
'2011-12-07T06:12:25-05:00'
describe
'859714' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPD' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d3ce3a1e0217e5733bd41825c487db58
f3c60bb77dcb5dbff47c16f6f1b328b9b494b43d
'2011-12-07T06:12:27-05:00'
describe
'51976' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPE' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e618638f1959c99093d264076f4318c7
a218bac205ca093b865d2287f4793d767f90979f
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPF' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5ec028cecb59c35c422126ddb358dcfe
598c3152819e2e7a2bdf1319f6fc9ff32f8e0f3e
describe
'14877' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPG' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
343423d906b23b4a6a8bb454478f9d78
e2b904f8539a82df4eacff9a2d664ca61b011537
describe
'6898168' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
5f42d521a8a9bda4c4fc2321f73e429a
4bcf8f0f2fb31f7be9961433e2fd1c2ee97d812e
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPI' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e601978de6fd949bb373777f64d33f68
60a0b2f920b9d2926ccfcba34682501f36036054
'2011-12-07T06:13:11-05:00'
describe
'4100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
1cf61ef2f43aef3fb13db8c56fb2a11b
4bfe102a8e801f0a5533253dc703e4f31a60aced
'2011-12-07T06:12:07-05:00'
describe
'859726' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPK' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
95fcfd6c60df4b5ca8111ed6a5575d5a
ace634c4cbb6abadc8c8a3ed796dd2cf947707a2
'2011-12-07T06:12:46-05:00'
describe
'54301' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5ba1667ea8a9a67e7a090e0b4c880980
bda91e1243c0b5fc3d67ab33e17e4ceeeb858e62
'2011-12-07T06:13:14-05:00'
describe
'15891' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9a87abdebbc97a207137be110b7e22f3
d0ffe08cf35215b19528eaaadaa0788608146176
'2011-12-07T06:12:44-05:00'
describe
'15599' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPN' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
784dce9fbf099d6a998b6f814a1ed4bb
24107c6610f67beebb49f5d9d8fd56b75f352305
'2011-12-07T06:12:16-05:00'
describe
'6897856' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
81fdfef4dcbb40db9d46c933841cbd10
f6772fad88d936ebc51b5a2816806dcff45660ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b5c3df1cdbddc713df34651ac79f29a2
c02b06fa8ce2cf12d38164c61d54d6cb3c9a6b31
describe
'4118' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b55af7761d40e26c10d2c5a599c0b8e2
b412d999ae59e1755198ee3eb7775bc19dc22c23
'2011-12-07T06:11:32-05:00'
describe
'859728' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
086d98fb9a896beaa71a7a6b4bab9794
9c8a8ec3e76c17f4f84e278b3c8e84080af40df4
'2011-12-07T06:12:17-05:00'
describe
'59357' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7f13ab399024b8ef4e2cee9b7a7cbbdb
491331f8db385d22996ae8fd044fb05017e76d85
describe
'9575' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0fac745572aad4d594d9f939772bc3c3
85d98d670113b17bf3b544d1d66a22f245b1f941
'2011-12-07T06:12:45-05:00'
describe
'16933' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
517df64e0bb1ed9394c7af0e44476029
2e746d95cafeb3e0133d5de57ed792dd9d6edeb1
'2011-12-07T06:12:59-05:00'
describe
'6898580' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
cfa92af8e58d7dd4a7272e0cfbd85894
85c0b5dd9dd5604050640f7b5293b0a772b16da6
'2011-12-07T06:12:11-05:00'
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
3a180918e06543fe6043eb774c8479c4
064ae7ad19f03fd7ea8d84596c12ded60ce0f9a2
'2011-12-07T06:11:44-05:00'
describe
'4681' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
fc0a3c69d3d4577fab43457bb33b0d5a
394a62136865f4145f2c46b02ebcdb5ec25a6b30
describe
'859738' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2249ca632f7c2eebf9c5b4b627c29436
a83c006cde8603c02e38808be825f866678ccd24
describe
'79866' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
cd1048a98c1546d7bab4aa331d3e2b17
da36480377e63c229b5f5f9706f88833896bd84f
'2011-12-07T06:11:43-05:00'
describe
'27258' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
ecd625745a4f0b914dc8a7ec1010bc20
40078701857566f11033d1b0cc4188f5ef6fb0cd
describe
'23883' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
abcfe1662857136f27853196314252ae
3355c82a6c5384781a1d25e3e272363d701ce42b
describe
'6899236' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
1b1d9f9bebec1b1a45cfd11ab006e599
8af21bb08ef9b22cdc3f739c065bc5b8a62ce178
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
03f58bd36d6bd3e3e1074580f9706bfb
89f1c1cd31fb8ae4de71874129ced8a7803e8153
describe
'6154' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
9ebbc948af789d2e03f93ea9c33399e7
2399c7bd3517463982ea09c680230fd2c0dd46e7
describe
'859746' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d4ef785a21cd76d1f941e8361fc4cf0e
448665238a9dc3e1d7dc3ea6f8b38f79eae359a8
describe
'87436' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
df26deafd6e45867364200ba9a466a16
00d257c90ebf8f70b3be9c968436195811ce94aa
describe
'30144' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
b88e6421d84c3fb3ac79ca676210aca8
fd2f07d6d8db584b1b1cf50d554370f8804cd69c
'2011-12-07T06:11:40-05:00'
describe
'25553' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
dbe9572668e265f700a834121809d40c
aa6e26e753aba2e7b176a58706d7ac62a203a821
'2011-12-07T06:13:04-05:00'
describe
'6899484' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
027cad9b45e8a3026773c767809f1ac3
5165e5f4888df7c308559a441c676e20f9d21311
'2011-12-07T06:13:22-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
1d00c76964e0aea5febb9bc4f57f01d7
9088f89d5e6742cf24df99ef1a48863bcf910bee
describe
'6057' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
53e3f30d673c381af3fa4b79da323d93
78f3be01b129550ee62673d1ba7448eb2de9d6c5
describe
'859741' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
9f47df14dc17919901df4cf692e35bf7
27638a2cfd28e4998b8435e0bc3d484f98c3a4e5
'2011-12-07T06:12:58-05:00'
describe
'80800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
772d917bf47d20b21b1f9889c4e99e6d
d65d1b044aed1c218eb173f895e3cb9ece55d5ee
'2011-12-07T06:12:52-05:00'
describe
'23687' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e24de756e4d9317518e6b712734f685e
1a254f5fbb93a17247471153760e64fbd1c4cecc
'2011-12-07T06:12:31-05:00'
describe
'23533' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4be1d532c842cbb3893e86b9a3a94125
4c7ce2bb4849d9c0e87db841894cfaeb83b4a5af
describe
'6899340' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
5031933ea944b4d3059d2e27f7d4c871
075bc72a482bf1c891fcba6daf548648b15d153c
'2011-12-07T06:11:37-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
f33c428616fc355667c4b5742eda93bd
577dc92a61ddf22fb3faa727de5a3ad01b834d6d
'2011-12-07T06:12:51-05:00'
describe
'5987' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
270b1d143315deb0eabca8d3241e162d
944ce2fc38e7412e163da898f6421a86bd45d626
'2011-12-07T06:12:43-05:00'
describe
'859723' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQT' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e572b30d902ad72df0864152f2b30eca
9bb4cb2d111964d68887c196aee405e602558a78
'2011-12-07T06:13:28-05:00'
describe
'47831' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6f4225db34f74e34a4f69be5f5e12c0c
fd82b5bf575ad1115589e77cabb9d922711131b1
describe
'12974' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
85c5eeb517d1f9586d8f6027f4fedfca
fc45f413613e661cbfe68e61e292d2823ea4aaf2
describe
'6890960' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
58985f73c72ab474a59856b1b6b67cdf
61c91597e748c4c29ed72725c46503dcfd47526c
'2011-12-07T06:12:33-05:00'
describe
'3457' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
87fcd8269cf9612e0a6cb99b050d9cb5
0cd92feba786c6e39d4f9ef3a9c1e897b37180f0
describe
'859706' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
bf431c4702abacc6f60c869f6f886073
aaeff10cd971e83ddffdc0053ba4d14b7f3a79a7
describe
'79688' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
24b45c4e50d63e0b91c199f312b80c69
74d06aa998f97092460076193fcffad50158e76d
'2011-12-07T06:12:15-05:00'
describe
'26608' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
851b0fa1b0512c1c7b10e97827cc8556
a4687776677ff6259fb856727290f6edb41d4d1f
'2011-12-07T06:13:24-05:00'
describe
'23257' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
76a1776a50cd639becd571e2d07fcbd3
6e3971a91e75a01c21ae0b21a35eb8a3ade8408b
'2011-12-07T06:11:47-05:00'
describe
'6899108' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c92470cf7b5e114eed2190fa2a2cb6c2
6348781bb5bc33f2c69d0f9090cd6207516712e7
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
28fbe01265d3a4cd49542a700c2245c1
bd2a3aedc88d27e9a08ab01a671bae49338268c3
'2011-12-07T06:13:01-05:00'
describe
'5795' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
58f2517b0b1df2addfdb14d9c6cdd711
96f1ce32a14184e0c6af0cf95c720c5d97363279
describe
'859557' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
321c84c7f4980471d36f18ecb61b40cd
c828646d6d48cdf05956711048e41b4dcbd0c78a
describe
'77939' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d0120ed75ebd65a7e53939974d7f004e
a39d88dd9d100c13f52259f5df76850c85ba8cbf
'2011-12-07T06:13:20-05:00'
describe
'26780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
19b3e76c0437a5df5bec0b8e81d23561
c6e8428282944f9791e366a21f65a08cfde7dc78
describe
'22605' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4a13621a57290ee2d4d73cd4c530c60c
2d0ce07699ac157a54adb28675b0c24f96d167d3
describe
'6899040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d3ca88cf6067bce00722b05e93a9d0e2
1c3e57b9a30490241a5f7d5b9ab29847556b7583
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
7c74fc54d1c90461b69de3f541de04c0
4012797485052043a0a71b1412b95af530d38e97
describe
'5625' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a8c94ed43b263505ac9bf5ff0d1ff847
cdc1d06bcf6aff0eafd39726551f9a6e8097524e
'2011-12-07T06:12:12-05:00'
describe
'859550' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
23d69e0b52665eb967bb56a70f9397c6
30fbec9bdb3954eba6f7412d07a80f2bf1d54280
'2011-12-07T06:12:56-05:00'
describe
'47590' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
87960341d8b6196a4d1d6b04a8e7dd2e
0b07702bd8d8bd5755ee4e9b2ac016bf4a06fd48
describe
'14430' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d8551c70c0e3dd1c1da7faeddce3db1f
b8cdd6f42dfae0497a532426ce3bd3bd0862d262
describe
'14272' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
912eedbdc811a5b9af02ccaab0896d48
f68fd573c76bd71441fc95a4ed8350f02a380677
describe
'6897488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
63a651017a0a5403a2bf95e8d2a75ecf
a7d104622fc0e6d536d9a1440c90e828cbd61358
'2011-12-07T06:12:42-05:00'
describe
'580' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
eca4776591a4d6ba4893720c557703d6
cb44f9e6ef9af0e981e76cd14eebd4ca22b56698
'2011-12-07T06:11:51-05:00'
describe
'3628' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
f424a3d1730dcfe3dec283a1e64d45a6
dbae7a2727cc4a7958e3ea691bb1557919597820
describe
'859581' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
13f9a4193678acbb084bd71178e54e08
4068719ab25df4ca84115f253de0bb6430007a1a
describe
'58579' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c88cb69fc344940c659bcfca7013e1ad
b85c188319772a0dab4cf1727dd18827ab348fb3
describe
'18699' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
9e5c890e3aa5a6a351f2f3667ffd6405
72dbfde7b0c96f970e489d97a4a297b53a8db6e0
describe
'17158' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
909319ea9a6038271ee16b731edf6bd5
36dc3a05a674d6d9fdab21949ce72c022a38d881
describe
'6898076' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
8e2d8e1d9b8d1fa75c4c9d7693d16ddc
dcf06b5f09c23c0c0db78513ae61486b658e77be
'2011-12-07T06:12:30-05:00'
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1a9b56b0a736e2420253de6965cf2810
3b1875be49599e3bb2f357dc8f4831ff859287dd
'2011-12-07T06:12:28-05:00'
describe
'4349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABERZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ca5e178b09e51e23948e110aaf561f7f
95da928a14858e60b0b9e287c93633ece9f165a5
'2011-12-07T06:11:46-05:00'
describe
'859687' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a8b07bcd54431b9f520ca748eb4f02a0
8e2d26da216327ea76660c1125e333a3eeb11133
describe
'58054' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
9c44146f0d0f563b958e2827c706efa1
e1ad659cd0157c49680247725d0e9ada2fc60f21
describe
'16881' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d25def7720aa27ff8558c8ea1bfc839d
2f880d18d9e9a6223c5a41ff141b453e5ee7fb01
'2011-12-07T06:12:05-05:00'
describe
'16870' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
eeaf2063cb030290ec8801b366cab961
ea7a44ae4df3920d3508b25fb7ec7b72ea9653c4
describe
'6898524' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
945a9ad1461877bd614bf62e7bfb4779
624513ace525a515e56aa1a088d7f04a3bb759cb
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
2c336bc3bf5eb6921f946213cc8313a8
27d61f1bf5f2ebecba28fa998554bca7735c2a15
describe
'4851' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f9552ceb45af5188f943ddce9cc9d138
7e2fa4ac852db1a802a0bf599dbe6da19d9c8ad0
describe
'870326' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
ed7835cc4c7cb5cc252332cbecd5aac1
a264f88aae22360d88106dd23049272bf6c21d1d
describe
'36945' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
c432b44d61be74396586370854ef033a
fb07c9719e962655e81e92da98836fb70f87c11f
describe
'3775' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
851090351d5def252de52057b8ef81ca
da35253b72efad759221adff64d87005a118b727
'2011-12-07T06:13:27-05:00'
describe
'10921' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
5090a4e7171f350f612f8ba8ed6b158d
1552529a7644a83d3dca343e2c9621c28b917930
describe
'6982780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
88d098a20b14dfebf9145ed46f07b711
7bdbe68edbc01d1f046736b11691e3f3e87cf856
describe
'190' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
967b26298bfd20fbb4fbb1a9f89e143c
50995038e91b7364aecd40e8e0df632f09f39f8e
describe
'2965' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b01d66ab233d8b9cde4d7be44513cea1
9afc9a63292b4fc6dd05425647c56fedc1c8a35e
describe
'859681' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
895fe72b48855ad03bdc2cc115355966
676ed53f79b24ce2f9443dacd5da5b39cbf5273e
'2011-12-07T06:12:00-05:00'
describe
'68670' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
438d914c9274e5400518769e6a18d293
905abf0c016ccd04cd33be7080113cb37c559c3b
'2011-12-07T06:11:39-05:00'
describe
'26619' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
bdd5ebad1ddd3b9ab84e3f1b7cc6ce13
fd1c1ebe50c87de6f01bcc38a0382296844614d8
describe
'20226' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e9e4dcc2354e4110645fe79e659f688f
ef522379162b57095c58e105dbe5ec76003cd96a
describe
'6898808' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
afa7b9cb1e52e9f37a7a81effb52c9f7
cdc76ceacf721db4b03f4d9c06c25bdba0376ec5
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEST' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1dbec2829f1eebc8b847cdc7e0e53044
c8ec112046ce80db14a3eee319e22acca13a836a
'2011-12-07T06:12:54-05:00'
describe
'5189' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e1b12a06f94c73515cd6d5d53708f746
f174c61dc41452336790be7d35d59d427b73e32e
'2011-12-07T06:13:10-05:00'
describe
'859641' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a35ba88c9fdfdfd74be89d6a6365d49c
56d5d5e18b984a7ad82750612db885e26b552279
'2011-12-07T06:13:17-05:00'
describe
'58055' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
4299ff517d3c5c0318a9a54421bd82c8
6a60ac9f07cbff2152e720e9533a1f9feb9c3ee9
describe
'15251' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
00315e2e0ddda7adbd969f123ba588b9
8851725d62060ff089d05b75a3d778f0f0412503
describe
'17163' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
2357a558ee340a9e3259d35f995abfc7
7fbb271a195f3028aa222c766e7e14e3b5db4c30
'2011-12-07T06:13:09-05:00'
describe
'6898496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABESZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
0b6af2e8f41848cead3cbb9d6830f838
1734b9f99d3c9be95cf042d5111e4b2fd866c24b
'2011-12-07T06:12:04-05:00'
describe
'614' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
7b97627f8b89af10a6ddeb061328567d
07cd861d033ed561807b631796eddeeda4b50a22
describe
'4817' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
2a7cc2e1ca4215ed9f14341e79cf751f
e2d24aedb123655471c6db0e3cc28172d573b01b
describe
'859680' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d829740ec3f425199c79378098f53a45
7cf53e33da90d8b3bd8d0048be356339adedf972
describe
'40203' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
c6fbd3e9abf85e1fca3667146a328f66
cde107e87dc361e1eab9b6a94ec462ebada651af
describe
'548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7bd083a176a2bea06d4b94954c5c3f77
c712809c6d42e0a862a453b7b07d67c85986cd18
'2011-12-07T06:12:02-05:00'
describe
'10765' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
44bbb519983d12e473714dabb7d60ce6
a616c6624e9cf813e139674ec42282ec7db4166f
describe
'6897188' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
430a15fa2f47bb3e2bc440ff1dd1043a
aa191fb6c54284df1874cc960a777d064fbe6e28
describe
'45' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
85b1dc2b938d03abb8490d005da7d696
c4e80dfa45437990a290efdf197693d3944b88f4
describe
'3041' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
8d9bd9b05250341d7d7a1bfe5662c4e0
fc8a5830c22a33c33b0008e004816875f3cc0b3d
describe
'859621' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
67166cf4d5d0fb1b35e6fb12d62a5a80
ffdbb7e6056f7b98ec03ca672226277fc80ba7e6
'2011-12-07T06:11:52-05:00'
describe
'59367' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c6f6be8b2b9bc90d57910aca73534deb
1824deadb9cb229dd737cc0aa690f53f0d0a3321
'2011-12-07T06:13:00-05:00'
describe
'18632' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
3edc6c9527f010d2d7fab820e82d4d6f
246b49aa63b3083d05138f85d5289d09cbedc516
'2011-12-07T06:12:53-05:00'
describe
'17841' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
d342c8472c3b1b5fd716651cefffa517
02f71cd5d38c9fded78f51fc3b63dfc7b73a3ce3
describe
'6898096' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
2de1ae6446b2c6fbbfd4e7cbadcc0355
ed50b697685dee77e6165466d0e6b9467c8a62ef
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
550c145e682c552916b34ab16e8d0954
87f538077e72b0607d4c46a6e199764cd66b3145
describe
'4576' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c60223088a6835047bae01e072ed0af5
2ccbff4af5981e5ed7e13c42e6cc7d585ec78c07
'2011-12-07T06:11:57-05:00'
describe
'859475' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
66c2bb96affa26615716011b5789c2ce
d0b02e361650397f4a43cd616d667d1e1a4d2983
describe
'60537' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5a68627556711d7297fb8911a832b2c0
545f3ca5bf4d4f7c37413c8f504e121a4445af31
'2011-12-07T06:12:35-05:00'
describe
'6686' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
06a1f0ec58ab4a638106a03e7346592c
b91912addfe031cd2d9bdcdebd6bcf954051cecd
describe
'16691' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
07ccde223f90e017c5c968844943ef76
792bb706085c066adc8ce10bc18236dc1b536824
'2011-12-07T06:12:41-05:00'
describe
'6898236' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
506d7023ff69dde27f51a1213fa8ddee
05f9930b2f08f72e054601f20f649e61c972a348
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d331ec1fc12ecc59b1f9dee4a0659590
e521d74b808ecebcab33bba582a8f510afc9ffeb
describe
'4469' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
0e6a0706fe8ea39c9d4dd105bbd30f56
5748e05b34ea0ba6adba847e34e2f3d3de6a8a26
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
6f4a180f59149273ec18df27df8428bf
ac40f6e18652096d20ca76b87b0bd4ae8a9c7233
describe
'37801' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
9ae4bda101b397400624eada1855723a
2267cbac6708423bec435029c12550db1b9cfd60
describe
'10630' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABETZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
fb51e465caa2febebcb58737c0186273
a71464b6068df8457e283dfd1979936c1bfd1ab1
'2011-12-07T06:12:18-05:00'
describe
'11121' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
dfc25a97c0bac8f51081b1e01483342d
bd2effdc8bc8fa540c375ab615bfbbd702ed6e71
describe
'6897036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
83ec3ce09b870459e91cc8789624ff21
487f2d7d43edd5581366cd3aef8978699b8b86b6
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f25c34d1dcd7119bd5987e44adbe9c0c
1c593cdf4c9144988af719e42c65d247c90edccc
describe
'3039' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
630a7448bd4c35e07c6397ab77f1147d
d521a67297545dc826db2e7931b621e22bcce80c
describe
'859749' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ede6cf4b23670251b857db1ff818c324
15e956b3b430776ee745697cce0989bda3a8b72f
describe
'56181' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e7f3b2b53a2a3e4b74453306829ab810
913555b48000a64dd1eefa1a02c3d7cb5057b89d
describe
'16210' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
289bb2342b017bd19e2efeadcb5ef486
877f866d71a1b372924f802085ee2e27efd0d5b7
describe
'16697' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
d38a834d5d5c4220d39578c6b2e05172
c5f13625bb00a54c821748648e1cb603c994a2e0
describe
'6898180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
bd5c19522e8ca21e1952b24b3bd3f895
84de882204bcfb5308dd0168588a993559bdca1d
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
d85fb893cd9d9549e6c8676ee29857e0
aba9f92aa9cac038f04484da7f43ebcb2763534c
'2011-12-07T06:11:49-05:00'
describe
'4315' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9e13e39ece419c93526a9497cef92d24
8a6db2789c794705d743612b4409a411cea32b8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
8a5b9df48ceb72b26916ac14024706a5
25b56263300da9d3ebba2f399d3377b0408e19d1
describe
'83436' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
f22a25d188db39e0d740c6b99ca9923d
c11cc86e24915cef4000bfac9dda2e9dca7de92b
describe
'28213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
521ad3c2c6e8bac7a67a7f8bc0c505bd
e0ad84ef68c0728864fac94d69cd6d73fd5f17f0
describe
'25035' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e8f01ce664bf2193e43f3ca7b888629e
753648208ff3e6ccf714e8002bab46a247910663
describe
'6899788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
7ac3fdf59f0f6a4b7720f052aae4e91b
be54f9a9710be91eefb54bdab8027dff95ce1ba6
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
177cd870659f97c79f6d584fa11f0e32
7b2260684ed1d13bdd084c4689bd9a51452fe156
describe
'6511' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e461078930f3b600fbc8f8c5fa255eab
6403ced6ef13bc87c41a0e826e8fc55f7cee6432
describe
'859636' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
449471404a3b707d7a9b417ee14e7406
b0d977c48a4ae243273da696c31b7f5894148750
'2011-12-07T06:11:34-05:00'
describe
'50162' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
09c7533e0dcce98968549464c3001736
e4e50dbf839e454d64bbfe196d96722720501753
describe
'6472' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
904dce8e9a69487af65c358d594d60a0
0189b12d7d9be2b6ce3dc9f4f11e570d53b15a94
describe
'14281' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUV' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
9db93be275c8939f910805e779306b51
c6765570c60e49079b57aa9f414a49640d8f6bc0
'2011-12-07T06:12:39-05:00'
describe
'6897952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f4fc85d765b8cd2b035473548d28a465
68bfa68d2773190eb9dfe48a94b741114e00f44f
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
072f0a6d5a778dc6fb3ebb9d4bf10123
21080ae33c4cfb0d16298bdc854e8dc1bc75204a
describe
'4129' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
28df429e347ba6ff83e37f88984582ef
7b0e92affc6cc63444318731763056696f87669b
describe
'859737' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b23d24eae5c7b666edbeb08e65f40a68
bbae8e9052816739fce89411c1c26d5dc2fdce97
describe
'65544' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d3f6394667408f1cda4d920df42dfc27
d54b05f160324324b1e722aca4ed15a493084dda
'2011-12-07T06:12:21-05:00'
describe
'21510' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
a702c8bffa2fafb217e6ac7fdd04f365
5712f0c2573e12a18aed3142772ce9de93979983
describe
'18584' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
2529b8704f5c5dc57dfd34daf849b815
5ec6659221d4cf15b6f5c901d712e42094671653
describe
'6898540' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
48a56026bed23f17f41ea4d51931c3ec
8b1f12ebfa02961b33b2a344cc6b98cce0b85c29
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
f1c905a60985478482b76849125f1415
313b3dc9d8575b878892caa122f5aafb46436b43
describe
'5118' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
a5e1a4990aa832f4660cab2dede8293f
07d88823600f16100c68d800ee3659bbfd99cc2c
'2011-12-07T06:12:34-05:00'
describe
'859702' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5f52f5d18bac86192f8b4bc61190343d
509227832df4e1b4bd727050235485d31f68b530
describe
'47487' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7a43e8380957ad492823d84d84d24fa1
e9f6d3a8c676c8d71bfe6009e0e515b2f49fe651
'2011-12-07T06:12:24-05:00'
describe
'12035' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b22e7f280a282c556522d2ce3aa65088
179db9da1b3b4b18cd59a6bc77084cba2caac62c
describe
'13470' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
c3d16624d41a75477759c4edb8bc243e
c11bbccac60a888ab8c260af240e5b0479d78090
describe
'6897672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
9a5d64405a73b8c8ca6bcff2af821d9d
5a089688a62a4642a2e45a4c4291d99bbb900c17
'2011-12-07T06:12:22-05:00'
describe
'529' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
bf301e029ad7c657a9dfe0258736b22e
0e6098ae721ef5a31c0f532bc99b6144110dad94
describe
'3747' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
7bcaa4222508c45fc972bd9882b9a0a1
b2c07b0672c543d1385b32c01008483b75f8a59d
describe
'859490' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
21fdf65510b528efac677d07cc89e33e
a6d438a56e947f6eafe903a0f0b97d5900bf8ffb
describe
'52368' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
0b6db018e587722e92280923d34bfbfb
901a2a66541918a8bbe00500fc625d5a6e6a9c9e
'2011-12-07T06:11:50-05:00'
describe
'5301' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
4bbaefe0cc7c22107390b20e1c08ee8d
35e248028f8c711325f4eb3d5a8dd82655099c22
describe
'15561' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
8108f2c0c78a1e931e68930619aba742
a1e88b80c7b3a5b38da39bff982da78954e9626a
describe
'6898560' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
56aed55d6b86c9dcac78145f3a74438e
e8a72b69a5936b76d587b4fda9e4d6da7c5a8aa4
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
7ffa442559440ef6eadaff5ef79aa62a
d287f9742e8e48319f039c289f8a7350102e799b
describe
Invalid character
'4665' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVT' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
ca57566e024569d1864446ced90fe46d
fb03fbb9e719384fc41a9d3feb60cb8c90d297d3
describe
'859588' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c07fcd6136430fb74313634521e2ad52
69945babb42a96de914ae25ca7a0162399931092
describe
'53800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
17a298eb0e928dce315072931c7156ab
4cb1f53d7874cf5e4dc2017dc8aca228e9d5b5ed
describe
'17648' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
adbdf7c05ec6861a03f903ca0829678e
2e337486b5f2039a38343d80b76314a9723870bf
describe
'15904' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d6ca5f9721c9d05ce748a36c9395687b
1aae883ef4efa7ef2f92685eed00ce268a12af7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
a03457527b14782acf1983e2b92bfa49
70da66d86c9631cd52a35d03d3d3e15743946e10
describe
'737' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
65f6b93a398862853d884e4cbea48bc1
98a53331095307334484a5671ce5874d69c92b43
describe
'4226' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
38f576303f94b22f64c25ee03a440165
a70a27a46dfa073327f7a290c24bc4d475f2617e
describe
'859580' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
72f4237795a6297b3fbfecd8a25e9c95
a077f0abd5eb9920d7ca18a3fcd7b7bd6d3277dc
describe
'52754' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0318f256c9a896b4bc4035b4d79e46d0
ec48f78c43d751739962ec9d6bd277c833c65d20
'2011-12-07T06:11:31-05:00'
describe
'16251' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0a77dcdcbc8f821e703fa1e5b35e2809
c67ff51294699279a2a328500a5b42901bfc9043
describe
'16308' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d0ae35289fd0a998f3e8559d1459455f
9c1f0d6225f492a661aa7660b35dbaa68588ecb9
describe
'6898056' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
6c8c8855902d35d6534cd45cb80685ff
f602c9afda9200e83425914b309cd54079731db4
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2623a1bffbd6b28e401c803f9c9442d2
8318d4a9826075243361a5c9c88cb7f47fdd58e0
describe
'4202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
29ffb0c29ecfec94f6d1675df94c5ecc
509d8cb8897676d2bb22c0a854e56afaa6ef4ed4
describe
'859740' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWI' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f5ec9309e14c7fde77912e36ef01c7a1
c1e6c2edda6dd916a4c3df4b9c3c83120f9fc5fd
describe
'75910' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3aba62fd7f3899d85b6e577bde6e108d
615edceecadc245a776b8b14d125d5a50e90ae0b
describe
'21342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
08838d9bcaccce2014f54004beb7f8ee
e318621f1d9e12046d8c6fcf4dcc30d7c8ca6142
describe
'22437' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ffcb8f47dc014dcd20abb7727a1a493a
e04681921b0250ed550bdf5726ee252e2d5647ba
'2011-12-07T06:11:48-05:00'
describe
'6899080' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ac6571347b905e65f83377cb62035cbe
2a59152cfa40cd840e745e7cc3c95d868983e998
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c76e513eb1650d71199f50fa46058833
9ce024782e6420762f7eea613bc7dd14814c8c39
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
08e7b192ca202234e59afeace9fe1f14
565ef24721ce9f99c53cb4bfe9386ed1408bddf4
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
537b34b896aeb1ba52505cdbfd501435
6e622e6a4670c0a9c16edfce46964e5f0bc50ce1
describe
'49180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
cacc8ed1c97c1d4f0e160b6ac2c315cb
21c97e7ad8860bef27d30c0b51c7d144676c0359
describe
'15354' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1b67178bbd225ad5b68d71874fed810d
1198d1bf1b23746eea7b465e54a209a08110dd67
describe
'13848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
eefa1dbfb09f06fab349136c617f8b71
15af2f88f445194c3c582237b4c4dbfe0a3cdf6f
'2011-12-07T06:13:05-05:00'
describe
'6897576' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4a617f2e9f75c639e55205d057b24ee1
f6b6791a820e58a7ee7c77a05ee9fb22d7c58891
'2011-12-07T06:12:32-05:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a1f8ffc88cb03b6927980eef14db1b1f
76165b1b9fed4556a7a2794c9a27116c1a9247b3
describe
'3613' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
b9cdf2444a3e34a39ebc8f587b3cf016
69cfd9ee5d76008b8987c026714519279bb98c63
describe
'859676' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9ace1e475283d9af5e534a394d4fa23b
55e80bbb68a6c40995350118b18095ef672494ba
describe
'66363' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1e4f9033e83d24d115f60f5d60a95c81
23fe8abca897102644eba003dd3da959170c1769
describe
'18982' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
462a4edd11bf8506e67f0c7a9200d16d
5ce0d720682435848eee866d90262616f863c22b
describe
'18900' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
34d998f67422ed4dd414455514e16523
65b107fb448f958d4f7a2b84a1a55f1db63bca8c
describe
'6898492' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
eb5c554ce5b7dafa743628f17f851d21
ccaf43247ee52a646112becabb740ad968c9c1e3
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
e94bd1b8d378cffe2f2eeb7a35f95078
9a1b3a0dc7e43b1736dfd3f51d785a60414ce648
describe
'4736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e88eab6554e31b90431b55a92513da14
42de633250475125fb1bd2fc6f53202ca900de1c
'2011-12-07T06:12:48-05:00'
describe
'859721' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b61784ba353ef6c11cea51484f7f4c89
33a6ac7d21083ed01d6c7d30ca7a0a1a960ef2ba
'2011-12-07T06:13:21-05:00'
describe
'82214' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
00abf88e19c4a4d708d17426b57fa0d9
293ffb530f5967d114d09ba7220c628c07771860
'2011-12-07T06:11:30-05:00'
describe
'26504' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8bf5b43249c5ed6dc37a6cc7a766120a
b27c2a39fbec35d8e469cef4a2fc8a7f2da035d0
describe
'24488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
5fc4ea9aa9913df47405ac86547d5bc6
26f50e47a2d94ad6a1c7ca63f7455cbac21e0288
describe
'6899500' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5b9c675a4c0b3ae67dccdf1a67eba1c9
d1346fcb55b98ea9f564c3c36309ea4485b4b334
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
a9f45b3ef94f8b991c85c6c85709b87f
79d5c8566022a7a50b8c1f905978a95e71009b49
describe
'6351' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
5bc3294af28733e5a874c3092a23e5f7
17c2baecee38d0d928a0ad2dbc06e04e34078fe9
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
46bb2a63ff52435ddf2ecc4c5294d3a9
088b4c6c738f97223c993715a031de54772f59dd
describe
'54719' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
40d8ffe119ca00e2f4eb2d759ab44aa7
287c13259135bc457bdc6bc6d6ec01c6a44f7042
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
272d9b6c0f22e59ec10625a52da42d7c
c478f1258538cab1170b7403588fb85c84332cd3
describe
'14551' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8724eed5546b7b2e2fb04b929c0ccec6
bb02654e2b02eada9488728c66019d78f806a9cf
'2011-12-07T06:12:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
08ac833b7d24c24d7c903a04aefa807c
af8354d653ac34cbaae719053150ed1485eb34df
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
64c872ba6ac64345b4a06687a06eb8c6
e09935fca3bc329c4b0404be7f50960272ccf153
describe
'4097' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
996e963f3fb2a408f9969a7dc7a170e5
5835b51d2d0eafb38f43938b8e71a73041d6f28f
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
695c3623675c3de0b095a3d8d1c6c38f
aed1ab88897f0edeb91776a527ca5d2287170074
describe
'85858' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
82aab9437c3f41a4bdb72e7b24fc2413
2ab79e0b3578c7a77d571b0a8441c88aa1acada5
describe
'28342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d9b0834d2536406a2ac05dd474b6d769
9305eed11e4c9b7cab080ea9d0a1d54fc99e308b
describe
'26631' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
abda77f66344912b5cc5c5cecd72a71d
d1de987bb77900c37eca57438fbfd7c84bf7a6ec
describe
'6899892' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
879075341b9e02178a1875d5ac3df636
79f2c0ce482fcb3977a9631640835f95fe2e5929
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
9cc5dd79422f8dae47efaba28952a02d
925db4904d95f36bd0122d39fe35067d69c72b83
describe
'6806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
1c72a726199295c369240b7ce0037ec0
52cff4ce569f4bc940b4278d8406392f8e2975d0
describe
'859708' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
bc0231f193dc5b89cd01ced2a5675ef2
68791345602edfbf68a157a372d8530647041590
describe
'88453' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c799fd26ad10b27844e059779b3538e7
aa54acd4f6d6e0cf38eb2bcf1ca08d6f0bba2723
describe
'30664' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
fb9131ee45e5349ab8dcbc42b3a581a8
11aa572d379099f24160a83be8f9769639721beb
describe
'25838' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
ad1a8d8419155c1c6e058e91838b1ac4
0d5eb593658bb278bd933d2e88c8a98f72414539
describe
'6899548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
28bc317534c231cd1a4e461429e82e52
08afd645f71bd780c8d94afab0bfdecd5ca26a72
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
ab73960bde47452ee641ff8bbb8989c8
cf33dd0b1c9ccead6015d55fa9df0cab28aadb04
describe
'6194' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8c43cc1c131fbba06ade590c3299ee90
112b26fe1969219cb9e29007e96f35447b47c47b
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
40ba17dcec2386b7657ed5620171cc6c
51fed92ac166a815119f051716ebdbf3890c4d9b
describe
'68940' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3276c8e96912830daefb13ff619625fc
aa76ac47e49d5acda2be18dafe7405ebaf7d65ae
describe
'22152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
19bc331f1346ee1000bd33c1b2c89d6f
1869018c914112ae508afe605cb75dc6b1b5f7e3
describe
'19224' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
863a9c6724443e323270e038b927f92f
946b682dd6daf02c673f53e2afb988dfb0b3efca
describe
'6898476' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
05a3cb374fb6bbce67ce2069215120b4
56307a39b769a66fee5594617b439efa21801f0c
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5420e3e8d0be918fd73cb255b3083570
06e41a94cfb65927845dab7e2562d7c7e2821196
describe
'5074' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
17d07bd9acdb8894bf1705e62483cfb1
c027b6e2ef8724a9f9cf4169b993aed8c3d5e571
describe
'859529' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
79a13b7ed4d7008f6868182d53d3bb7b
f422bb4d05b10c6a7c3a13340872d47ee6c376b7
describe
'69761' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
4bc3c6f2e0f5a5c257843df7d1ca00de
0e7526cdc2bc4807256d7e6249d797c8bd913a02
'2011-12-07T06:12:55-05:00'
describe
'22703' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2c7f2bcdbbcaa536e063c349d68edf1c
62567e8a3b1671d0836c512b8f22e088d7e3b6fe
describe
'20240' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4d3bc6aed7efea31e936eac7cee01732
b5fde4b9750562e822c4a7009b5bb5533206d821
describe
'6898520' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
86a005ac586950f19407c3c243ad993d
d33780e266405c729527638273750b6f3a9b0639
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
bfa31ffda53e13f9aad90b505331dba0
b4d58490a4c026f6606e22992d8029c7a4ac95cc
describe
'4924' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e34470e05e110ace2f346a9035bb96e2
2680869fb8a14f23c87d9284a67542274af5001c
describe
'859745' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
01c37510536f96e5b2cec32c6215b7fb
c56820706a7768a5729d8bf2ad49ea3545589709
describe
'60145' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1c20fb93a063b28b83b191bd924f90ac
86cbeb8a4692d9d43dee1277c55f49f8016d39e1
describe
'9971' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e592e1efa3ca81fd1e4fef160ff33b92
e6eb5292cf61a0dce52657af9dd49f3bf0fe6b02
describe
'17206' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4ea8f1f2f6cc7bb8d0ba5ee2d9aaaa9c
47fda7a81e4b2de317311fbd84fdb49d4008b2fb
describe
'6898796' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a1a07ea6cc0926a44bfde9d4bae75665
8942497912d5da77b396bfeee2419841691bf13f
describe
'407' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
aeb9957441ec7ca566e3cc7a3272ade9
f065b9763baed033962aba07728ae98196783744
describe
'5160' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
be353c2b423174cfaee7dc8cde8185e3
316ca4486bcd56da36b05969c4f09ce53269f069
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
5f5a08fe242cd53cc8211a9c35e961d1
4e97a5c8454c7ea6088563939ddc57e9815dfe20
describe
'71915' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
4d89f67662ee5747e70014c8b4677b4a
ea71f508179e5eea55b3b2d08292c4bbe15e8b69
describe
'4111' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5d76958db5021a64493ce393a3668b50
8e6619f6e09565e3d289a80286e212f91690f392
describe
'19576' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
5b364685566260c1a12625f841074fd7
165396795e5af04e37c9385455e125ed1ce59171
describe
'6898884' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
230987bb764aa6944ab83c5eb7e75802
cb310de483b23c6e7550fcd9ce43739d75110b5e
describe
'171' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
949a94fa8f35b59c75b4dc2c946b44d3
725dba53071dee44fb421fc1daa1d1ca89b40336
describe
'5166' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a3caf2e266756f9aa056d844646a247a
f817d206071eff595a92c31cf2599d3ac50e6b0b
'2011-12-07T06:11:26-05:00'
describe
'859748' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2af0fe7d4f3d0967a0006a4b1c8f3c6f
7dc68c649401f7dc2e54accc308b0c5dfe29d7a7
describe
'82016' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e94b13c7584209752347fd863da0bf7d
5e6b0dc11df080a98d306b68bfa1757f14c07e89
describe
'27596' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
c1e3f80c948620b7bed8e80b0739b00b
9508baf553a8cdc90178f536077dd1ca124a542a
describe
'24410' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
53062f60ed1c921ba7cf232e9e19c0fd
74606975f554d95b0381aeb0a17944b7e5afd547
describe
'6899564' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
7ee1f28f8260be3c4aecd75f9b8dd78a
98116210464b6ad9add0bffee66c15dbd9182888
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
184b1cb8ea09d5714c706b40af5556af
96c12b3c54d12b6e9b2fdef0d0c27617182ffaec
describe
'6282' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
5672927ac3662e3c727af7c42eff01ff
5dfe25ef95815f6597891410734f1b2460306683
describe
'859733' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
ce285b5b2f3b2ae4375931ed7587664e
ddec09850730c8ae32a996701e916681b93d81f5
describe
'68163' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
fb23be9432753d5f803131d6072f9d4f
1fd715dd0faf2e6651c7edce757bc3e0f9d8da92
describe
'24919' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a37c0aa1712fdd865922500c95c074d5
26e120be839f86f655a6d56a6caa779d119da248
describe
'19771' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ad2ed1fa0160d8f1c0bd3878e9f0b4aa
ae8977f2d83b414dd1e6c172a0a0f6870d75eafe
describe
'6898820' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d0fb8a18671f1ab0d33fddca7d1d0fef
0b19e9f77be22ae24eaf8ec0f7b91f2dc13451b1
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
9b55b403fcd6be71ffc41704bec10060
a9508aed5e1e1bece49089a4071848cc236641cf
describe
'5351' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
8f4c26db7640e5d236556a269988860f
c90d5637fcc7f6a92c8ac49e051adfe14f97db12
describe
'859679' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
8309903081dff20f349bd0863e01a33e
771bb3ce20b256328435836ea7ae9b4ec130646b
describe
'61780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
931fa7d88cec1c62d28a64c89740b3d3
c74a51c7ec8cd2b9446e18be8067aae34185c480
describe
'14166' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
6b29594f81e67fa5e1814a0717777bd5
744e2f0293966a267a792927f7c502199b7418a4
describe
'17627' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
598874e3ee175f9ad8df9f8582078547
cd45ee4145f25b83b583b0fc18f5411a2fb2dc56
describe
'6898396' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
10a1ae57887575144d5c5162e5a9054a
513859385ee1d4c349991dcd74845ce08c2e9775
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
4cb531c984945bfe08644761eeb0116b
240a0634d6e13d8a305978e8faa3247f0e0e98f8
describe
'4845' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
628aa246c588918fb91e501284875365
81835d104b9e388e4eae0f1e87ea3ffa1e773d0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d36ac2cb3a6080867cf181018b0b9cbf
27ef289e741fc3745665bb2850447507f4ea8a90
'2011-12-07T06:13:25-05:00'
describe
'45998' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
e0c3c0215b7a9b610cc6438a470f82de
9d79c36348d3b6b481e24362efb28a2fbf74bc89
describe
'3672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAE' 'sip-files00053.pro'
eecd4d1b499ef928023fb59a6d3e5451
57a86f2c8cd055dabacd4785d3f20be90ace7087
describe
'12788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
df45469925bf0b2f38d714b485e7a187
200959aaa086ba4d49de25d6fb418c9911779ce8
describe
'6897776' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
df4ea189569ed7fb0232bdc94d4cb465
f5c19ec15b78d1157c59c8a61bbaecc0d51a0ebf
describe
'157' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
56b773e5bcc39cd308e923d3a427a453
58f613f462bdbc6dacb8e1c8646bca868a447364
describe
'3689' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
021365430e86ab75b52cfb2b09fb7425
4b172a2b148a641446f6ff302c54b85e77229511
describe
'859724' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
35552cc230b41bf5dfb66b7a62eb86fd
418f028f4e7345514078ffc2a00a4168298e6611
describe
'73625' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d595ae0b82c83366e652585117841480
95412473c832a1d99f4a4b77f191d48a159424e6
describe
'26277' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAL' 'sip-files00054.pro'
343af539a14ff4f9824d15575884310b
8d58c534640fc7d9709eecc7f83224084c84ffbf
describe
'21603' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a32dc1c5c4bef0bdda83628553463fc3
0903603ff169f25b595d96ddc9a6749793017552
describe
'6898868' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1ac5123e866544c98e67d3052868b14d
1a46ad0aa4d9c2f273ff259b1d48161d107346b6
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
041b16ab67317d017fffcc1825fd9f9f
561708a0eaf0ac80b0a81c1e459eaee041f895b9
describe
'5478' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
99499911aea3687a61f24c260195e0e4
1b2ecfdcc81634f6b856ced3e0144714c4ac1bf2
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9470d6d32338c414b9d5630b6c5fe2d0
19f035e84af3280cad448c798f0b135f90727b8e
describe
'93115' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2a5afc73c007dfcd48ed8fd5544553fd
39f0cc9a9b4b011b0086313d0b04c9638285db58
describe
'32250' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
3b2c735bce1c27f5fbaebc290596e9bd
372611c6047b9c096366bf6f263fc3ee99027188
describe
'28021' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
9bc3f0dbfb2107fe8596b7d6204aa915
3756ed6a7ef3e67f61500d855af2958ba30af828
describe
'6899644' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
29a894f2389d9415d5d7ec6d0d88764b
8dfb7ce366dcf767b503609e7f177c7e12ebbcff
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
445481f4e0f00cb06c37cad4c47fda67
79f1301587d2ae1d795fa0134c41e120cc92a6db
describe
'6500' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
b651ad3fbe996b38b0acf1a7a2f73c96
6be94e92bb8574f3e19c2f346c01d697cc7a623e
describe
'859731' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dfe0b0a26612ad3e19071e162de78867
4fefe860220be83a16826c55fbc01e9a89c23927
describe
'88272' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
fbf35b9fb45370cdcf8904bb37ee559d
3b0e43e16baa454021f6c92484c1bcc076ffc15e
describe
'30059' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
df630592fd9bb085981682f3617553d8
1947999a210b7f0530310d8a811a9164ad1aeafe
describe
'26144' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
a6caadb60a7b1fc73f502bb785d4e710
6cf16a941fde337461f061efc2d287d978febc70
describe
'6899524' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c1ee70ad7a16da5e1dc1b7e914b091c2
20d4ada1e49cfb1ee7bebad1cf6feb45dd2510d3
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
bdb2ad32e7b06002db0d39e8f58402fb
b4718226a18a36e137f613a6d7e62e9de90dd43f
describe
'6316' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c13a50a00137156c046c469649f3f758
aa87fd858acb7cb364ecf32753a45176e6a6c59e
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9d0ceba1a4e792cef57ad704d924ad47
e87db7445a9a82e2875933647a3db22862ef655c
describe
'91021' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
57eeed728874d36ff880b4248178c000
29a34f346dcea497cf9c4335bd4a0a4f0450ff2b
describe
'30775' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d2a4ae80274fdb03305a71a4e7022022
d4d1760fec10669675b1d08da09a55d3fba13334
describe
'26818' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
3685c0ac1a4462075d6ea6b638b46922
409deebdad5bbb1a5144139f3d47152003962e6f
describe
'6899600' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
2862940c25043d1a191d71179cb5fe74
0cdadda818606446d40252baeae9c1bb5cf2e699
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9fb71a120cb22884d2e941974512a20f
ee1da4f10cc926f344e0739e2dcc2da534dc8a17
describe
'6397' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
b172834515bcd7c4df5b15b150ce9628
c0f12f9ea945df9acee7530dbb42a2211ee5b980
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
36c3c8b032ce7928fb05217a28f5b39a
9117e52199d5a060448eff06e92342a4736a7300
describe
'94191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
af19412216d2974e1a6a9222a0035fa0
cdc48f8c410e0b0bce8f1526b328317bbfa9bcf9
describe
'32640' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
468cec05261c7177184ed95e6efdd412
53bd74010cb4d662d1711ae564c33433064125a9
describe
'27850' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
e4efcad1c2b8e9f04912bebab6193b99
f6540212901ec097ddd88c1a92a37ca07fc97f76
describe
'6899608' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5bd76d5a593c88989e4287aa45d7c9fd
fbb997e09d1e68e46677f18a648cad41dfbe70ca
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
fcd735c640ac1fb4183c01ac14b56417
3a46c9eed58c29f198319267be3c5968eca8e28d
describe
'6554' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
be0d89bf159b212610b7e2b128282591
d93c7332c570aecfaa95bcc7335b230ec0c31d14
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
90db9010513dfad5a54280957681a313
d6bd0d2537c5d67e04f443afb5667654da4a6a47
describe
'85713' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
4449b436bc866e743896fd84248153f5
707cb694c9296d96eb493084f4732ca55bec3797
describe
'29638' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b80ce92560bec0ee594031f0588f65a2
597fab8eae3aae0207679132881fbf7275e5ab51
describe
'25084' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
bbd73c513e8f5fafab27ccbfc32d8df1
e64f7a326b6161ea409a428c478d27fd6005558d
describe
'6899448' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
a036dd1d5fa4ed61fbd3bd6ec3884822
efccc41c42ab765a61078c09fc038e0369f91f49
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
db65cc3f00f6e1b01dd14ef04c43ca1c
d4301bdcc1a9586443e06974d5c8320cb419463c
describe
'6259' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
dcc9302f3e3889d5b288af17b4f1e2e7
fcee566e52012218a2e57f89a65c5a43bb7037b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a1da7a41ef9e11320a940a09c68e1518
674c12fe3b6525a048900b6a24d9ef38da435a59
describe
'84401' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
71703b8d49c03b5ab9705111c4e655d2
aacd33e7cdadb7239cc08739dbb93d4830dd634c
describe
'29364' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
dad1d9e30ca8c6d762787c97470c5124
1aee17c6847a92d359c4a2363c5e313d15249241
describe
'25101' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
92c7966ef94c406e94b0da988de16900
7711cf5262dd620021c2b2f1734e3fd55cf339a4
describe
'6899372' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3206e890d3c4464ac0a76f0b9c57a6ce
a8c71e805db1363fc493b7338225127cadcdae67
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
08091223a1ebaa5f6351d02670d78302
1f50234fd6968702e9152f8aba27ea27d8f66bde
describe
'6156' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
7a19b13e7d61e558475799fb45837d53
cb66e4daaa2ef99411392222d1bebc6e5a268359
describe
'859730' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0e374444095af35ed13820751ba52d45
695d7c93899a54c4f5e7904a27fcd126b6e55c91
describe
'37667' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8f97db138c49b39b52c68e3253259bf7
3f1545470dca13361b762ba6fb70683827ebc241
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
6574705cbbb9f09c940b4b6a1a7b4725
526ad18667dc096da89c6e763dcdd0fbabc3b2c8
describe
'10828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e4375ebf8fdc92fd49234626983fea69
5314239a6a740604c6f4f1e72dcfa732c9279f5a
describe
'6898532' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
3c4f19ab32d7d46ef27d3c3494ba742c
34efe0eddc8d20e98938ce9c61e72d6981c411ad
describe
'244' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
9c1e3fd64ba988edd583d1d49fa43f3a
6c5e62f8d31af7efd1778f488f0fbe896181cba8
describe
'3183' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
2af68fbb0e97673e41c75f436acb1c09
d50e1cb3da51d7cb90c199d29a8d1b14899bcb73
describe
'859713' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
aa02b196fdcbbd3af1792aad2aabbd46
f7ae308a22144f91df022ad473038695ec6cdf41
describe
'88389' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
5de24bcf2d51cd787566f6150f245948
a23f738ca02e151f80732431e66aafe4ed725130
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
30158c1026e6f9ca2b311b40e7ad8fec
2445f7672b223b4b3e0677609c73edd9018df9da
describe
'26476' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
23585af2806e71589aef59eb4b6b0ea2
94ac07a4d80ce8ca5975c0237d3de5c41b810ca2
describe
'6899560' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
41938914d79b1b7338783d02058be7d9
3fad8b3098854253ba5cf2b8b5c04f705697813d
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
a4b42ce0630eb3af78c9666828bb095b
36b779bb2fabae0a8ca5efc409ae106e7afc3dbb
describe
'6350' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f56f8f03ede3779e5e52284585288386
d2fd02914bcae2671f25a2f1b25a478af2549af5
describe
'859720' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7b75958cda5ee8aad8968f6be6a3a110
b067eb4be59dd858c7b20732161ad583d68f9fb5
describe
'92085' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
53f3782431976639e894acfa0b25aaad
9571f452b93c69788aec8857b7343fd57a5237ea
describe
'31392' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
acc94c3fc202b6baf74991fce2d0432f
bade77479b2c9fd02660be5cad38ba555b33f92e
describe
'27951' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
7ddb14435a850bf01abfb69af1c8bc7e
1d78099606c177eccb99e41ec4bd624dd8b12666
describe
'6899852' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
585fe113c031b06bf3490ee7be630ee5
24c095671cca3cae89ecfc719aabf00a7244855d
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
022f5801e05da5463e925bd6d2b0c45c
3bda2592d67f86045e269cadae285f580895adf1
describe
'6619' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4bf6e8c64611711d48c38b8152f9460b
b123ae751bb922916619e55f76543397ae4fbe25
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
47cb7fbb00cb72e4fd490cc1d1b030b3
ecbc38fe5a2a0a78602175843349f26625b06a94
describe
'84669' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
cc1486604f8f6923147e1a59f600f0ce
0bd6191cdcda7de0e9052fb1681961547ce63ecd
describe
'28324' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
5c0d5ef3a729d8bd02f5c08a3f91a525
0e7afcee3ea6cdfa2f99c987d4bf05c875aab8b2
describe
'24566' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
926fa57d2c30d00ccaf0358b80ff9ecb
3be1b67c04a403e37b1ac4cfcfd4c19f2eef3a32
describe
'6899552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
35f196116c1f13c91dacd35ec0f4b67e
64e1adc3e26da0eff3aa560a6bbc70df1eb51312
'2011-12-07T06:12:13-05:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d77053045d435a0ff69d7473debd81aa
244463227fa0542f1f322477ce7375ac49e8b66a
describe
'6592' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
23b789c051ef948a041b622727df3d3e
15f7851a72d55a030e386224cfc8ea3b540382ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
70bf3977ffb44133390c109116357116
1aaf52e8c3ddcde6d6bd4936b52add1b6a05f78a
describe
'83057' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4d7ceeab3ad8575bbd25cfb1ab429574
b9c4a306aa82150291eca0b8dbeb1e2894b0d958
describe
'27358' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
01e15524f7bc54009e1146dbf650c729
683937c26bd9a771f5f430037cea87c3581edff7
describe
'24700' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d037a91af51bd0867cf691f89762a739
ba9ced9e5fca7de2e3c3bc30a363c3ad9052ca2a
describe
'6899396' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
24e54746020397028ec72022c2c83d63
a232ee7cbd2297c0593597c95bf151db29d0f4f9
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5fb742e0c8198396850ef179e8bed574
759e95b7b2ad1540078a9a15816ad8369218eecf
describe
'6009' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
fed86f108ed02d8b4f86f878ee95a110
16a8693713d99d569a7bcc6dc2d1aa26fafda3ba
describe
'859657' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fa3f0d083cea39ba39699d5a0015a79e
0021c8412a7ca20d071db13a865cb066ed75a4ca
describe
'67834' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1315cd2b784858f62049903c06f061ca
414883ff3a6b0cd6dff64aea8978db9337686967
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
1b3af5413c659ca1edec5303bef35220
c9e8e96d00158141aa14b68d2306f7ef673173d5
describe
'16483' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
652ada5a6f5871af7a10a0dfeab6024d
7b02917b1847b17dc4d5280798e6d2976131033e
describe
'6891812' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5ad1554999274a05cccbeb0444618a25
7cfae02d97f9af98617ab8c4fce17b6718a5069a
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
82aacee55f703f1ca2bd30fd51f67e29
0c4dd7430d879bf87f6b8b10af3a0d8c541e2724
describe
'3922' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b44ed0d92385dde5689e3b02c40528a2
8c51777ede81af7547d69e18da13e2623413ea99
describe
'859689' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c8b5a3a54e641984a189230275082988
0d8c7e3a132ec369c922aab54083174b6f764830
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c179b42b242d1049022b7eca15b330ae
a278f217a05f5d6d66061d7096a4665706dab01e
describe
'26051' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
9d284a71b709ca47f1a8ed4c092cbdcd
30292a51255760c42d7774e609540740021b48d8
describe
'23807' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a91ec8b67ef3367d4b284f7f550c00a7
83a16309dabea09a7df6249f2f229bc8f3796a99
describe
'6899164' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4f036b48f3db5fd47acbca1645dc8d10
8298966e9420e5a5042c03582f08032ca8dcb493
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
fb67ac8d2aedced2989d049d2064a641
b898bba4d30fc0357f7cb74b671c32e6536b7228
describe
'5592' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ec53cfef0f354e5ab2e01f0ecc67355c
d2ffe6c5625120cd109825e890a17d1bc0f6454e
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFED' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a0c4892690f38034a24c81aabcd71005
48bbbd8c55543f99cd76477d1f35bca15fc532ed
describe
'89682' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
0dfd6526705b1b44424bc0e3a3fe9c15
275630bb08a1829609cc046e63f54686873e9d50
describe
'16065' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
5ab1fd3b1d2c81d2b3e5cad0ce3e9527
83a221d700113b0e3fc58ecfd5609e62be21950a
describe
'24574' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c039d9c69ecc02891999a77d28f238cc
9b6d339d1be2a04fc397c8b84274f9cf31f6a060
describe
'6899496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
0205cd4dde529eef34d079d982a95761
f2c43722b1c478f3f35ebbc8d1ca59d4240778fc
describe
'665' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
debb504f3c70f70ab90dd3977c4e50a7
c23077547a09f7389162bf93c3fa1fce4f50b9b0
describe
'6242' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
3025001ca3ab6e6462a9e8b3ffdb9a1f
1d3a9a23f047e811d4c2a9f878b1ba84e47bc51f
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e442bdcb11f64ae4cec7ec831f4f6f67
3137e0a77259340364cb9cefcc09a432a135d371
describe
'82465' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
1b5dbfb680d5d33e09b2e245c69206b7
4b3d5d9b266f977008ac47cee7908e05662c144f
describe
'9811' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
97616d0c1f80a121f336536ffe685db9
7ab76aab7c51e0e2f5dffaa4816fb63d58c3a468
describe
'22822' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
4127075e49693f4c28f9076f432d39be
4f0d8a2df00422952be0b6b7c538e3d972538df1
describe
'6899256' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
833b86dd1ee060a09117df6cb95bc628
b9c1654e828d8b3da795b54b196ba21ba3ded809
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
55dc67474e3d751132960095a76fcfdf
f65b78ac738fe0ec91f326d9fda39ef7708304f0
describe
Invalid character
'5902' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
eb55daebf1f6b368a3f1593c3e2eb765
c82710e344cd9d979a2bcb7be76ffed892bd3156
describe
'859743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFER' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
f995c1364432ea0bd46fcc0983bfdaf6
bdf127085cbbbd26343635146856d1c3b555272e
describe
'78661' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFES' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f351a3100de09645066082ebd1c1ad46
db73ba92f4d762102fd83bd9071a84b411c4771b
describe
'342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFET' 'sip-files00070.pro'
f97bfa2ee84faa11737c716818b74196
0d39e3980e977db78bd1cb328cc03f408760f890
describe
'22872' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cea83808cc5de308b1e233b851f1e28a
58195a90673c3d77b83206c3763ff41b6e70062d
describe
'6899620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6b3a928c66c1d6bf67d2b6371dbe1a91
1a847654a04127f6265ab1c321654117c7846341
describe
'11' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
768d44f609bb5192ecc41440eefd9970
6f6859ce4da2693070764f223813529f0a898a28
describe
'6080' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
a5c1812e9b777c4952f0bd043c1f0917
f460628e7cc95c7d85b4ca6924add5d51557c70e
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c3e045d7c58c811690c074d1a59bb691
a6ea05d9f508e5b6a7e08ba799e8dc32c2072890
describe
'49962' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
9b65b684661e65583530c5d2817c0dc7
189bada10f141481bce6a47c10b50a2423f50362
describe
'12611' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFA' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a31de74340462818de826de182b11dd3
3fce5bedff916e52ab18fc9560408f4c8503624d
describe
'6897336' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFB' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b88d6725fbfd966ff85e4fb4cc587c1d
d4bb9eb80c5d4614e8feaaa6268587ff834fe261
describe
'3320' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
21e911ce325bebb7779f19e5dec82e0a
619f4b5d81e5c02208b875a88ec395fb1b811512
describe
'859725' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
03663c9e930610748cd79c28870e33e5
aa9fc7f762e51f57a1034bcea108b3f7695e0de4
describe
'53806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5048dc56d868335aebe0adeb705acc9a
8e83006b127d25c0421e73815f25cf19a4db0780
describe
'18597' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
177b9651b90cf76bbd45392829d4a1ab
5cdbbe59887dc51586d8931be45d4c230c8e694c
describe
'15640' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
30bb237525c3c841270b536c2be3363e
6ccd8616e607c8bb5b63c68426768a9213626afb
describe
'6898000' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
67017cb15e87b3c661c3445d730963cf
1c2dc7d0bccbb3ac991a24322c660be2797f6ce5
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
a52a771388d42a0790204de5f6a55a55
15d9ad697f689b772325bc492c30bcddff55aa75
describe
'4126' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
05e3a36dfd60fba1e88da1c22c167e93
ca058415331721365a281851fa1c2bf430a408eb
describe
'860112' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8adab7303154409ae4d31e5787408e22
db0aa6349cb8529d4260eec6a00262fbd2cc09dd
describe
'53202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
9b2a1f594132244ba3a738b769af406d
3b96bd73177f9f7812c7c774552521ac5cfa722e
describe
'8674' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
45f1561be545d02c43cba3900d62ef56
3b0ff3f25f0fb02feb33213bb6f53119a1dc83ac
describe
'14223' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4c63fb04eb09fef814c16b310ffa00c5
35dff3525e8a7f62c163c0e02eb33af06a28c79c
describe
'6900804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bcf65ca2127684b2d7baebacb0d242d8
ba16453faa34eb29c49a2033bc96ad51d352d17d
describe
'348' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
bdfb6c67c1e497a364414d717ece31a9
95112942adf6aaac31cc6d50119d1a055e6b6b61
describe
'4000' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9be566155ab9a1109329322eb68d2cf2
9096bf346744e690947de039d486b22dedcce806
describe
'859707' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b596e1b9ee20d7613c7c5d948430bf98
676ac46ad25257ff204a064c41cbc28c22df5c38
describe
'28574' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ccff6ef8fb108ad5db7ace72f7063a8c
5bbd95134f67b9690ba17711c654ce80259dee9f
describe
'6832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
7c9232427ae8c49177af529a15717455
d7b0e8a239dc3ae6060591537e57f2999baa88eb
describe
'6896104' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e7ae355381dba8175834216751d426b7
d754a4cd4fd178332f1a9cf3929ebe2e1df66661
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFV' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
f069987f49c063b216bb8080ac270cbc
fdd35da8ca1763b83aa3d3c1d7c8ac9128d4c5d8
describe
'926885' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFW' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
ab190a7e43b62714a459a0491d7e514b
07ef30e367b78bcd1d5f2db05611f623be75dc68
describe
'51886' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFX' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
11c3985afe90cb98d597450e6188036d
40b156fb24f86d605aebfc197ef7fdf049a9f63d
describe
'12202' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
171e23af8dc6646ddec9eac094475222
8d6306cb4098f7941b0e5ac37dbd6eb0f758251c
describe
'22265968' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
8027d67325e51c0caad61fb8c13ac3a9
90357f4a46e09c4c746d8094a3a2c39c91e52454
'2011-12-07T06:13:15-05:00'
describe
'3333' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFGA' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e87677f10608193cbf8d0bd0553c8e09
d878d4e2314d1892df5b5a58d95165b7d5b30a61
describe
'914348' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAABALfileF20080504_AABFGB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3d0d27c2c85e0cda79679dcbe702dcb9
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describe
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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Why, Jack," said Marjorie, opening' her eyes
very wide, you never was a little girl."
"I mean when your mother was a little girl," I
said, "ever so many years ago-"
Now, Jack !" said Marjorie's mama.
"They used to wear big straw hats, and they called
them 'flats.' And now the rooms that people live
in they call flats.' So that is where the funny part
of this poetry comes in:


" There was a lady lived in a flat.
Just think.of that!
She laughed so much she grew quite fat.
Just think of that!












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MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


-K~-



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"And could you tell
quired.


her,


Miss Frank ?" I in-


"Well," said Frankie, I know that the moon has
something to do with the tide."
"Where does the tide go to, Jack ?" said Marjorie.















CHAPTER VII


HOW MARJORIE WON THE
WHITE SEA-BIRD

HE night after we took the Red Dolly's
picture, there was a party in the hotel,
Sand Marjorie's mama said that she
might go into the parlor and look on,
for a little while. So Marjorie was
S dressed in her prettiest frock, and
went with her mama, and watched the
people dancing. Then she said that she wished
to dance, too. I asked her if she would dance with
me, but she said no, she wished to dance with Lieu-
tenant Smith. Lieutenant Smith is an army officer
who knows Marjorie very well. So I told him to
ask her. But then Marjorie would not dance
with him because, she said, I had told him to ask
her, and that was not the way people did, at all.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"Though her husband was thin
He could not get in,
So he went and kept house in his hat.
Think of that! "







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Well, but you know," said Marjorie, they had
really truly cake and-and things, in that other one,
and ours was only blocks."
"Yes," I said, I know. But any one could have
a tea-party with real cakes. Ours was much nicer
because we made-believe."
Yes," said Marjorie. "And then we did have a
whole box of candy."
Yes," I replied, we did indeed."
"All right," said Marjorie; "then we will put it
in the book. Will you make a picture for it?"
SYes," I said, I will."
And here is the picture on page 1.















CHAPTER IV


ON THE SEA BEACH

NEXT day we all went to the beach in a sail-boat.
And Marjorie ran after the waves and the waves
ran after Marjorie. Then at noon we sat down on
the sand in the shade of some rocks and ate our
luncheon.
"We shall have to wait till the tide goes out
before we can gather any shells," I said.
"Why ?" said Marjorie. Does n't the tide like
you to have them ?"
Frankie laughed at that, but Marjorie did not
see anything to laugh at. Then after a while Frank
and Marjorie went away by themselves and gathered
a great many lovely shells-three handkerchiefs full.
And when they came back Frankie was laughing
again because Marjorie wished to know where the
tide had gone.















CHAPTER V


MARJORIE'S STORY

DON'T think you want to tell me a story,
do you, Jack?" said Marjorie.
It was Marjorie's bedtime, and
Sometimes, as a great treat, I would
tell her a story after her mama had
tucked her in her crib. So I said,
Yes," and told her a little story.
Then Marjorie said she would tell
me a story.
Now," she said, "you listen, and don't you go to
sleep. Are you listening? "
Yes," I said; I am listening."
"Well-l-l," began Marjorie, er, a, once upon a
time there was a, there was a, a a little boy. And
er, a, a-BEAR ate him up/"
My! I said. How dreadful! "








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


thing! The sergeant gave it to me. And I thought
that its skin would make a fine collar for my coat;
then I thought it would make a beautiful muff for a
little girl. Now I will tell you what I will do. I
will get a pillow and lay my head down on it, here,
and you lay your head down on your pillow, and
the one who first goes to sleep gets the bird."
Marjorie laughed, and said, All right."
So I brought the pillow, and we laid our heads
down and shut our eyes very tight. Pretty soon I
opened one eye and looked at Marjorie, and I found
that Marjorie had opened one eye and was looking
at me. So we both laughed and shut our eyes again.
Then, after a while, I opened one eye and looked at
Marjorie. But she did not open her eye this time,
because she was asleep.
And so Marjorie won the white sea-bird.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


And once he made believe to trip over a pin that
was lying on the carpet, which made some ladies
laugh. Now Marjorie does not like to be laughed
at, and when she came back to her seat I saw that
there were tears in her eyes.
Say Thank you' to Mr. Smith, Marjorie," said
her mama.
So Marjorie said Thank you," but so low that
no one heard it.
I think, Mr. Smith," said Marjorie's mama,
smiling, "that it is getting near my little girl's
sleepy time. Come, Marjorie, say 'Good-night,' and
let us go to bed."
Now I fancy that Marjorie may have believed
that she was being punished for not behaving
prettily, while all the time she thought it was
Lieutenant Smith who had not acted nicely. Then
she did not wish to leave the party ,and go to
bed. And she really was tired and sleepy, and,
although we did not know it, she was not very
well. At any rate, Marjorie began to cry in good
earnest.
So then I took the little girl up in my arms,
and said, I '11 tell you what we will do, dear. You
come with me, and I will take you home. And
4







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


Oh-h-h! I tell you!" cried Marjorie, clasping
her hands and opening her eyes very wide.
Well," I said, what is it ?"
"We have a pen and ink," said Marjorie, in a
whisper. "Let's, me and you, write a tea-party
book, Jack."
"Very well," I said, "we will do it, and have it
published."
"And-and-we will make some pictures for it,"
said Marjorie, leaning back and looking at me.
"Of course," said I.
Hey!" shouted Marjorie, jumping down from my
lap and dashing away, "I '11 go and get my pencil
right now."
And that is how Marjorie and I came to write
this story.









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"TO THE RED DOLLY.

" DOLLY dear, last year, when you were new,
You were quite pretty, that is true;
Though now you look so queerly.
Your cheeks were red, and your eyes were blue,
You 'd arms and legs, and feet you had, too.
There were few in the city so pretty as you,
Dolly dear, last year, when you were new;
And Marjorie loved you dearly.
But now your cheek's no longer red;
Your arm is broken, so 's your head;
You 're blind, and bald, and deaf, and lame;
You 're-But Marjorie loves you just the same,
Dolly dear."











ell
'qpffwZy~

/N[?e OFI _,

























CHAPTER II

THE TEA-PARTY

JACK," said Marjorie, I am going to have a tea-
party. Will you come?"
I shall be delighted," I said. Is this the one
that is to be put in the book ?"
Oh !" said Marjorie. "Oh, I never thought of
that! Why, of course. Mama, we are going to have
a tea-party-may I ? And oh, mama, we are going
to put it in the book!"
7









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


MARJORIE GETTING BETTER.


Lady Dolly wears fine clothes and moves her eyes
and cries. When the doctor came, Marjorie con-








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


present for taking it. One of the presents was a cap
for the Red Dolly, a cap which covered .her head,
so that you could not see where it was broken.


THE DOCTOR PRESCRIBES FOR THE LADY DOLLY.


Marjorie was afraid that the Red Dolly would
take the scarlet fever; but I think she must have
had it.
We played that the Lady Dolly took it. The
4*







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


tight, and go to sleep; then you won't know whether
it is light or dark."
Now, although the little girl shut her eyes very
tight, she could not go to sleep. So, when they left
her alone again and shut the door, she covered up
her head in the bedclothes, and trembled so hard
that the bed shook and scared the little mouse half
out of his senses. The child kept thinking of all
the dreadful stories the woman had told her about
the Rag-man, the Giant, and the rest of them, until
she was so frightened that she cried. Then sud-
denly she heard a gentle voice, and then -
Why, then the little girl woke up. Woke up
truly; for she had been only dreaming about the
Strange Land all this time, while she was really in
her little crib at home. And the night-lamp was
burning low, and her own mama was leaning over
her.
"I think," said Marjorie's mama, that the little
girl must have been eating too many nuts and
candies."
Had she, Jack ?" said Marjorie.
I don't know," I said, "but I should n't wonder."








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


"That will be nice," said Marjorie's mama.
Have you got anything for a tea-party?" asked
Marjorie, anxiously.
Well, I am afraid that I have not, Marjorie,
but I will see," said mama, going into the next
room. For you must know that just then we were
living in a hotel and had no pantry nor kitchen to
go to.
Here is only one piece of candy and an apple,"
said mama.
Is that all ?" said Marjorie. But you have got
some sugar, ain't you ?-I mean, are n't you ?"
"'Have n't you,'" said mama.
I meant, 'have n't you,'" said Marjorie.
Yes," said mama, I have some sugar, so we can
have tea, at any rate."
Well, I '11 tell you what we will do," said Mar-
jorie. I will take some of my blocks and play that
they was cakes and things."
"Why, certainly," said mama; that is what we
will do. And now get your little table."
All right," said Marjorie, dragging the table out
from the corner. And now the table-cloth."
"There is a clean towel on the rack in the other
room," said mama.







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


nearer the end of the earth, just then. So she sat
down to see what would happen next.
While she was waiting, a woman came along,
and said, Why, here is a child. I was looking for
a little girl. Are you anybody's little girl?"
The child said she did n't think so.
"How lucky that is!" said the woman. "I will
call you Katie, and take you home with me."
So the child went home with her, and the woman
gave her a bowl of hot bread-and-milk, and then un-
dressed her and put her to bed. While Katie was
lying there, very happy, she began thinking about
all that she had seen that day. And by and by she
asked the woman if that beautiful sun was really all
broken into little bits.
Why," said the woman, "what on earth is the
child talking about ?"
So Katie tried to tell her.
But the woman said crossly, "Goodness me!
Katie, you must not ask so many questions. Little
children should be seen and not heard."
Now, Katie wanted to know very much indeed
about this sun, and the sky, and the trees. She was
sorry that in this Strange Land children must not
ask questions. But she was a good little girl, and
5







MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


then I will tell you what Sergeant Quickstep found
to-day, over at the lighthouse."
Marjorie did not stop crying until she was all
ready for the night. And she had to laugh because
I was so very awkward about putting her to bed;
but at last she was safely tucked into her crib.
Then the tears came again, and she said, "Jack,
SI don't like the way Mr. Smith did, a bit."
But, Marjorie," I said, "was it worth while to cry
about it? Mr. Smith was only playing. You are a
little girl, and you must not expect gentlemen to treat
you as if you were a grown-up lady."
But," said Marjorie, you always say I must be
a lady."
Yes, sweetheart, but while you are little I want
you to be a child lady. Then when you get to be as
big as mama and wear long dresses, the gentlemen
will behave toward you as they do toward other
ladies. So now," I said, what do you think it was
that Sergeant Quickstep found to-day over at the
lighthouse ?"
I don't know," said Marjorie.
Well," I said, he found a lovely white sea-bird.
The lighthouse-keeper told him that it flew so hard
against the lantern last night, that it was killed, poor









MARJORIE AND HER PAPA. 23

"Why," said I, it is this way:


WHERE does the tide go when it goes out?
The Man in the Moon knows pretty well.
In fact, he knows beyond a doubt-
But the Man in the Moon won't tell.

Now when it goes, on tiptoe we
Will search the sands for a lovely shell.
The Man in the Moon will see us, maybe-
But the Man in the Moon won't tell."












ARM!!
:r,_.,T* -
,,5 ~-








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


J the

C ,5


" The king, he saddled his best curlew;
He flew down the wind like mad!
(I think 't was a funny horse, don't you ?
'T was the only kind he had.)











































































MARJORIE WALTZES WITH LIEUTENANT SMITH.








MARJORIE AND HER PAPA.


And why she was out so late at night;
So he climbed up the rocks to see.

"Said the girl, I 'm a fish in the big, salt sea,
I 'm a fish and I live in the water !'
'That 's odd,' thought the crab, as odd as can be!
I am sure it is Mrs. Brown's daughter!'

Then the girl jumped around and tried to behave
Just as the fishes do,
When suddenly up came a great big wave
Arid soaked her through and through.

The old crab laughed and laughed, till he cried,
As the girl ran dripping away;
He laughed till he got a stitch in his side,
Which served him right, I must say."

Marjorie sat thinking for a little while, and then
she said, But the little girl was not really a fish,
was she, Jack ?"
"Oh, no," I said; "she only played she was a
fish."
I think she was a very silly little girl to play she
was a fish and get all wet." Then, after thinking
about it a little longer, Marjorie said, "Jack, won't
you take me out to the beach to-morrow."
"I will see about it," I said.
























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