Citation
Railway stories

Material Information

Title:
Railway stories tales and descriptions for young people
Creator:
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Glasgow ;
Manchester ;
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
48 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's stories
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
England -- Manchester
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede text and on back cover.
Statement of Responsibility:
with forty-five illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026838647 ( ALEPH )
ALH3091 ( NOTIS )
191100934 ( OCLC )

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RAILWAY STORIES.















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THE DRIVER OF THE MAIL.



The Baldwin Library

PRs



RAILWAY STORIES

Zales and Descriptions for Young
People





































































































































































(ZHE FORTH BRIDGE)

WITH FORTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS

LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, Limitren
GLASGOW, MANCHESTER, AND NEW YORK
1891







-s¢ THE - DAY-DAWN - LIBRARY, 2-
NEW LARGE-SIZE VOLUMES.

Crown 4to, 48 pages, Full of Pictures.



PUSSY’S OWN BOOK. DING, DONG, BELL, AND OTHER

CLEVER CATS. NURSERY RHYMES.

DOGGIE’S OWN BOOK. JOHN GILPIN, AND OTHER NURSERY

PET DOGS. | TALES.

HUMPTY DUMPTY, AND OTHER | LITTLE TOM TUCKER, AND OTHER
NURSERY RHYMES. NURSERY RHYMES.

LITTLE JACK HORNER, anpb MY PET'S PRIMER.

OTHER NURSERY RHYMES.

LARGE P R : VS.
TOM, TOM, THE PIPER’S SON, GE PICTURE LESS0Ns



AND OTHER NURSERY RHYMES. LITTLE RED WAISTCOAT.
JACK SPRAT, AND OTHER NURSERY | ELLA AND HER RABBIT.
RHYMES.
RAILWAY STORIES.
TEN LITTLE NIGGERS, anp |
CTHER NURSERY RHYMES. RAILWAY TALES.







THE ENGINE-DRIVER AND THE GUARD.

“RIGHT AWAY!”
the whistle shrieks,
and the train steams
out of the terminus
on its long journey,
under the charge of
its careful driver and
guard. The driver
and guard of a mail,
or an express, train,
have a very anxious
task; they must keep
time to a minute if
possible, but must
also keep a_ sharp
look-out for signals.
The driver must at-
= § tend to his engine,
Tih aA tn watching the indi-

cator, and regulating

it accordingly. The guard has his full share of responsibility.
He has to start the train, which is really under his command ;
to listen to the driver's whistle, and regulate its speed ac-
cordingly, by the use of the brake; to attend to the passengers’
luggage, look after the mails, etc. The engine-driver’s life is
not an easy one; he has to face all weathers, hail, rain, or
storm. In the old engines there was scarcely anything to
shelter him from the drenching shower, or the bitter blast; but
most of those now in use are provided with a hood, or, at
least, a screen, with round glazed peep-holes for him to look
through, so as to protect him as much as possible. If you

have ever taken a railway journey of any distance, you’ have
B

































































































































THE RAILWAY BOOK.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































BRS
Snes



“RIGHT AWAY!”



THE ENGINE-DRIVER AND THE GUARD. 7



most likely become very tired before you reached the end of it;
how, then, must it be for the driver and his mate, the fire-
man, who go over the same ground again and again?
Such a journey is pleasant enough for once in a way to those
who are in the humour to enjoy it. Suppose you are leaving
London by one of the great railways; after passing through the
suburbs with their neat villas and trim gardens, you stop,
perhaps, at a junction, at which several lines meet. Then, on
you go through one of the home counties, with its farms and
gentlemen’s seats—through the valley of the Thames, or the
hills of Kent or Surrey, or the wooded country northwards.
Fields, trees, and hedges fly past, but the distant objects seem
to travel with us. Presently the first important market town
is reached. On, on we go again, passing sleepy villages, now
stopping at some historic town with its castle or abbey, or
ancient city with its cathedral—till we come to some busy
seaport or fashionable watering-place, or great centre of industry.
Then, on once more, over deep streams and under great





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































hills, stopping at a town here and there, until the end of the
journey is reached; and the driver and guard, in whose good
care we have been through it all, are free to take a little
rest.



8 ; _ THE RAILWAY BOOK.





THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE.

ALL large machines are now moved by steam; and folks travel
by steam on land and water. Steam is the vapour which rises
from water at boiling point; you cannot see it when it is quite
pure. Every steam-engine has a furnace and a large boiler, to
convert the water into steam, and a condenser to turn it into
water again. By these means a plate of metal called a piston
is made to move up and down in a cylinder, or large
tube; and to the piston a rod is attached, which turns wheels
or works machines, as the case may be. Several clever men
are said to have thought of the steam-engine, but James Watt
was the first to make it perfect. He was born at Greenock, in
Scotland, and began to study when he was quite a little boy.
His aunt thought he was idle, and one day scolded him because, she



THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE, 9



said, ‘he aul a howiine but te off de lid of the tea-kettle
and put it on again;” but he was trying to learn all he could
about the steam that came from
the spout. found him, when a young man,
sitting by the fire, making a
model engine; he was in high
spirits, for he had just hit upon
the very thing that was wanted |
to complete his great invention. -
Watt’s steam-engine was soon.
applied to boats; and Robert
Fulton, an American, made a
steamboat at New York, named
the Clermont, which went up the River Hudson at the rate of
five miles an hour; and about four years after this steamboats
came into use in Great Britain. Locomotive engines, by which
we now travel by steam
on land, were used for
drawing cars and wagons
in collieries and mines in
the year 1804; but they
were very imperfect. In
1821 George Stephenson
laid out a colliery railway
~ from Stockton to Darling-
ton. George Stephenson
was born near Newcastle-
on-Tyne, and his parents,
who were very poor, were
employed in a colliery.
When he was eight years
old, little George had to work in the fields instead of going to
school ; when he had time he used to make toy engines out of
clay. At the age of fourteen he went to help his father in the

























































































COLLIERY RAILWAY.



10 THE RAILWAY BOOK.





































THE ‘FLYING DUTCHMAN ”—60 MILES AN HOUR.

colliery; and from that time he set himself to study the
stationary steam-engine he had to work; it soon became a pet
to him, and he was never tired of watching it. He learned to
read and write; and worked sums on a slate by the light of the
engine fire. He married when he was twenty years old, and
had one son, Robert. His wife died about a year after Robert
was born, and other troubles fell upon him, so that he became
very poor; but a time soon came when people found how clever
he was at mending steam-engines, and after that he got plenty
of work to do. He took care to send his son to school, and
when Robert grew up, he became as clever as his father, and a
great help to him. In the meantime George Stephenson had
found out how to make a railway-engine that would really
travel. Nobody thought much of it at the time, and Stephen-
son was not rich enough to bring it into notice. But in 1821,



THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE. II



when Mr. Pease was planning a railroad between Stockton and
Darlington, Stephenson went over to see him. Mr. Pease soon
found that he was just the man he wanted; the railroad was
made, and George Stephenson drove the first locomotive. Mr.
Pease had at first thought of using horses; but Stephenson
assured him that his “Killingworth” engine was worth fifty
horses. This engine was adopted, and did its work splendidly ;
it was very ugly and clumsy, but it drew thirty tons at four
miles an hour. Some improvements were made in it, and
next year Stephenson built another, which contained the germ of
all that has since been effected. But his locomotive still attracted
little notice, though Stephenson declared that one day such
engines and railways would be known all over Britain. The
Stockton and Darlington Railway was one of the first examples
of steam locomotion on a railway for passengers. Meanwhile
Stephenson continued to make improvements in his engine, and in
1830, when the Liverpool and Manchester Railway was opened and
a prize of five hundred pounds was offered by the directors for the
best locomotive, Stephenson gained it with the “Rocket.” The
“ Rocket,” which is now in the Patent Museum at South Kensington,
differs very little in appearance from the engines of the present
day, except for its small size; but in the same Museum is a venerable
locomotive, rigged with iron beams and rods, which make it almost
look like a ship. ‘Puffing Billy,” as it was called, planned by
William Headley, the overseer of Wylam Colliery, and built
by Jonathan Foster, the smith, compared with one of the
splendid engines now in use, seems a poor bungling piece of
workmanship. But it did good work in Wylam Colliery
from the day it was set rolling to the time it was taken
off to be placed in the Museum: “There being no material
difference between the cumbrous machines that screamed and
jolted along the coal tram-road in 1815, and the elegant
and noiseless locomotives which now take out the express train,
gliding smoothly and swiftly as a bird through the air.”

e



THE RAILWAY BOOK.

12

























































































































































































































THE GUARD'S BREAKFAST.



13

THE GUARD'S BREAKFAST.













































|; HRISTOPHER HOLMES, the guard
of the early up-train, lives near the
2, small country station at which the

train stops soon after leaving the busy
_ town from which it starts, and his little girl
. Susy brings him his breakfast every morning.
-~ So Susy has soon learned the importance of
keeping time; for, if she were to arrive but
a few seconds late, poor father would have
to go without his breakfast; as the signal
would be down, the whistle would sound, and
the train would be off. Once, and once only,
did Susy fail; there had been some extra work
at home, and Susy had no idea how the
minutes had slipped away, till she heard
her mother call, as she was putting on her
hat, “Come Susy, child, you’ve only five minutes, and I’m
sure you'll never do it!” Poor Susy seized the can, which her
mother held ready, and scampered off as fast as her little feet would
carry her; but alas, it was all of no use; she reached the platform
only “just in time to be too late,” and will never forget her feeling
of dismay as she saw the end of the train as it steamed out of the
station, with father’s face rapidly disappearing from view. The
kind face, however, bore a smile, as father gently shook his head,
as much as to say, ‘‘ You've made a mess of it this time, little
woman, but I know you did your best, and couldn't help it—‘ time
and tide wait for no man!’”

But when Susy got home, her mother was not disposed to
treat the matter so lightly, as she did not like her husband going
without his breakfast. Seeing, however, how much the poor
little girl took her reproof to heart, she said no more. But Susy
took good care never to be late again.





















14

A BRAVE ENGINE-DRIVER.

In the year 1882 an engine-driver named Sieg saved the lives of
more than six hundred passengers by an heroic act of self-
sacrifice. Sieg was driving an engine on the Pennsylvania
Railway, in the United States, at the rate of thirty-five miles
an hour, when the fireman opened the furnace door to feed
the fire. Somehow, it happened that the back draught forced
the flames out so that the car, which is attached to some
locomotives in America, caught fire, and Sieg and his mate
were both driven back over the tender into the passenger portion
of the train, which is not made up of several detached carriages
like ours, but consists of one long continuous car; the engine
was thus left without control, and the train could not be stopped.
Meanwhile the speed increased and the fire with it—threatening
to consume the whole of the train. The passengers were terrified
and helpless—if they jumped off they would be killed, if they
stayed on they would be burned to death. In this terrible crisis
Sieg saw that the only way to save the lives of the passengers
was to go back to the engine and stop the train. So without
_ Shrinking, this brave man rushed through the flames, climbed
back over the tender, reached the engine, and reversed it. When
the train stopped the flames were soon got under, and poor Sieg
was found in the water-tank alive, but so dreadfully injured that
he soon afterwards died.

“Back through the flames the hero rushed,
The flames that will not stay,
Until his face and hair were singed,
His clothes were burned away ;
Reversed the engine with a will,
For which he suffering braved ;
And soon the train was standing still,

Six hundred lives were saved !”



15

A BRAVE ENGINE-DRIVER.











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16 THE RAILWAY BOOK.











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A PLEASANT JOURNEY.



17

TWO JOURNEYS,

Everysopy knows that at times
a railway journey can be very
pleasant—like everything else,
y it depends upon circumstances.
SS There are journeys and journeys.
) The line may pass through a
| lovely country, or traverse a
dreary manufacturing district.
2 The weather may be dull and
















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) My L . mW Ly holiday. In the picture oppo-
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i“ — \SI| site, for instance, is Master

Harry, who is going up to

London for the first time. It is very likely he will be dis-
appointed when he gets there, but what of that? He is
happy enough now; everything is fresh to him; he watches with
keen interest the different objects that are pointed out to him
as the train glides through the fair English country. It is
true that you have not so good an opportunity of enjoying the
scenery as if you were travelling by coach in the old days; but
then you get to your journey’s end quicker, and see more change.
So vain regrets for the good old coaching days do not trouble
Harry; there is no doubt that he is having A PLEASANT JOURNEY.
So was the little boy in the picture above—up to a certain
point. But pleasant journeys may often be spoiled by heedlessness
and disobedience—and this little Davie, I am sorry to say, was
a rather wilful little boy. On this occasion he was travelling
with his mother and his sister Kate. For some time after the
train started Davie played with Kate; but Kate grew tired, so
Davie went to amuse himself at the window. A gentleman who

was in the carriage warned him against the dangerous habit of
. Cc

We
a NE some business, or starting for
y



18 THE RAILIVAY BOOK.



leaning against the door, and drew him away; but while he was
telling Davie’s mother about a poor little girl who had been
killed through this, Master Davie stole back to the window,
when all at once the door flew open, and out he went. His
mother was in a dreadful fright; but the train was slackening
speed, as they were approaching a station. So, when they went
back to look for Davie, they found him alive, sitting on the
ground, but in great pain, for his arm was broken.











































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FELLOW-TRAVELLERS.

English folks, it is said, are very shy and reserved when
travelling together, and generally keep each other at a distance.
Such seems to be the case in the above picture.



19

A START IN LIFE.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MarTHA Pace is a regular country girl, who has not been to
London in all her sixteen years of life, her mother being only
a poor woman who keeps a shop in a small village about four
miles from the station. Martha left school when she was twelve
years old, and has since been employed to help the housekeeper
up at the hall; but being a sensible girl she is anxious to do
something better for herself. So, on receiving a letter from a
cousin, who is lady’s maid in a grand family up in London,
she has made up her mind to take, with the full consent of
her mother, the situation of housemaid in the same establish-
ment, which her cousin is able to offer her. Martha is full

young for the place, but ‘she quite understands its duties, and
G2



20 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



is a good honest girl who will do her best to give satisfaction
in whatever position in life she may be called upon to fill. I
think, however, my young readers will agree with me in saying
that she must lengthen her skirts a little, which are too short
and ‘“‘countrified” for London fashions; but she is a clever girl,
very quick to see things, and will soon alter that. ‘ Mother,”
pleads Martha, as they are waiting for the train—there seems so
much to say in that five minutes—‘‘do promise to write to me
every week!” ‘Why, of course, my dear, you know I will, for
I shall miss you sadly, and don’t know how I shall get on
without you.” ‘‘Oh, Mother,” cries the poor girl, now almost
in tears, ‘pray, don’t say that, or I shall wish I was going to
stay at home after all!” Before Mrs. Page can answer, Ben,
who has been sitting on his sister’s box, and has been greatly
interested in all that has been going on at the station, calls out
‘Now, Patty, look sharp, here she comes!” So, with a last
kiss to mother, and a hug to Ben, she is soon comfortably
seated in a third-class carriage. Mrs. Page notices that the
kind-looking gentleman who has been walking up and down the
platform, after seeing his luggage labelled by the porter, steps
into the same compartment, and hopes he may speak a kind
word now and then to her poor girl, so that she may feel that
she is not quite friendless and alone. So far, Martha has borne
up bravely, but as the guard’s whistle sounds, and the train
slowly steams out of the station, her eyes are full of tears as
she catches a last glimpse of her mother’s kind face. But after
a little while, thanks to her youthful spirits, she cheers up a bit,
and begins to take an interest in the journey, as the train passes
one place after another. At one spot she notices some children
on the bank, and this reminds her of Ben, who, like most boys,
is very fond of watching the trains as they pass, and waving his
handkerchief to the passengers. The gentleman, who proves to
be one of Mrs. Page’s casual customers, is very kind, so the
sad parting is forgotten, and Martha is soon eagerly looking
forward to meeting her cousin at the terminus.





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A START IN LIFE.



22

DANGER.





































































































































































SOMETHING has gone wrong. Perhaps an engine has broken
down, or a truck has run off the line. It is night time, and
the express is due. When it passed the last signal the line
was clear, so it will soon be rushing on at the rate of sixty
miles an hour. What is to be done? A man must be sent
along the line with a red light to stop it if possible. On, on



DANGER! 23

it comes, rushing at full speed through the darkness—the
passengers, some reading, some talking, many sleeping, quite
heedless of the danger ahead. Presently they are startled by a
loud prolonged whistle. The driver has seen the light—not a
moment too soon—and is signalling to the guard to put on
the break with all his might. The guard obeys with a will;
and in a few minutes the train will pull up—panting and
snorting, and almost tearing up the-rails—just in time, and the
terrified passengers will realise that they have had a narrow
escape.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LINE BLOCKED—A SHORT NOTICE TO PULL UP.



TRAVELLING ABROAD.

THIS scene, to begin with, is
not unlike what we often see
at home. The English tourist
looking for a seat, is confronted
by the burly Swiss’. traveller
with his pipe, who awishes to
keep the carriage to. himself
===ii' and his party. But the mili-
tary-looking official with the
long moustache, quietly but
firmly holds open the door, and
“Monsieur” will no doubt be
permitted to enter, and the train
will soon rush on through some
of the wildest and grandest scenery in the world.























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Travelling abroad is, in many respects, different from



TRAVELLING ABROAD. 25



travelling at home. In France passengers are not allowed on
the platform, but are locked in the waiting-room till the train is
ready to start, when they are all let loose to scramble for seats.
In America you can walk from one end of the train to the other,
as the carriages are so connected as to form one long car—so
that folks speak of being oz, not zz, the train—and there is no
first, second, or third class—it is all one. The American loco-
motive, too, is very different from ours. It has a spreading
fan-like funnel to carry off the smoke, as a great deal of wood
is used for fuel; and a “cow-catcher” in front, to ward off stray
cattle. A “cab,” or house, is placed upon the hinder part, for
the protection of the driver and stoker from the weather.

Here is a characteristic scene on the arrival of a train at a
French railway station.























ae

i!















































26

THE LEVEL CROSSING.

_~. ‘PASSENGERS are not allowed to cross
Ad the line.” This notice, which appears at
22% most railway stations, and certainly at all
junctions where passengers have to change
_ trains, must be familiar to everybody. For,
= it generally happens in such cases, that
they have to get to another platform; and
~ some folks in their haste might cross the
line, as a ‘‘short cut,” rather than go up
a number of steps, across a bridge, and down on the other side,
if the dangerous practice were not strictly forbidden by the
railway companies. There are, however, on many of the older
lines, places which are very dangerous, called “level crossings.”
These, it is true, mostly occur where the line crosses quiet
country roads, where there are not many people, the gates being
carefully closed when a train is due; but accidents will some-
times happen. A young lady one day was taking a walk along
a country road and came upon one of these level crossings; and
finding the gates were open and no train in sight, she passed
on. But instead of crossing at once she went a little way along
the bank, attracted by some wild flowers; and when she got
back she did not notice that the line was open and that a train
was signalled, so began to cross. But, unfortunately, at the
first rail the heel of her boot caught in one of the iron plates
that fix the metals to the sleepers, or cross-beams of wood ;
and there she stood quite powerless to extricate herself. Thus
caught in a trap, and getting more and more nervous, she was
trying to unbutton her boot, when, to her horror, she heard, in
the distance, the rumble of the approaching train. At this
terrible juncture she quite lost her presence of mind, and stood,
shrieking, with her hands spread out, as if to ward off the
engine, now fearfully close at hand. The driver saw her danger,
but could not stop. But the pointsman on duty, who also saw









THE LEVEL CROSSING.



































































































































































it, at once rushed forward, and opening his
open the boot, and released its owner, just in
life. It was, however, a narrow escape for both.





pocket-knife, cut
time to save her



28

TWO RAILWAY INCIDENTS.





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































' STRANGE scenes are sometimes witnessed on railway platforms.
The rogue flying from justice, trusting to the speed of the
express to escape, is thwarted by the flashing of the message
along the wires of the telegraph; and just as he is stepping
out of the carriage, luggage in hand, to make off amid the



TWO RAILWAY INCIDENTS. 29



bustle and confusion, he is politely stopped by Mr. Inspector
Bucket! Although he richly deserves the punishment that
awaits him, the scene is a painful one. Let us turn to another.
Two gentlemen with coats and wraps, evidently attired for
a journey, are walking along a busy thoroughfare in the direc-
tion of a neighbouring railway terminus. They are not in so
great a hurry, however, but what they can stop and give some-
thing to the crossing-sweeper, a poor but decent- looking lad,

who, with his little sister, is standing at the corner. ‘‘ Guess
we've no time to lose, anyhow!” cries one. ‘‘ Better take a
hansom.” The sweeper calls a cab, the two friends jump in,



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































and are driven off. The lad looks after them rather wistfully,
for they have liberally rewarded him for his trouble. ‘It’s the
way with them Americans,” says he ; “TI wish—” but he pauses,
for his eye falls upon something heavy that little Annie has



30 THE RAILWAY BOOK,



just picked up. It is a bag of money, which the gentlemen
have dropped in getting into the cab. Jack cannot leave his
sister; so without more ado he catches her up and runs after
the cab as fast as his burden will let him. It has turned the
corner and is out of sight; but he knows its destination, as
he heard it given to the driver, and makes straight for the
station. When he gets there, out of breath and ready to drop,
the officials will not let him pass the wicket. He can scarcely
speak, but showing the bag, and pointing frantically to the train,
he is at last allowed to pass. Rushing along the platform, and
eagerly scanning the faces of the passengers, he at length
recognises the two gentlemen, and is just in time to thrust the
bag into the carriage-window as the guard starts the train.
“Guess, young man, we'll meet you again at that same crossing
before long!” cries one, as the train moves off; ‘‘we shan’t
forget you, or little sister either!”















































LONDON UNDERGROUND RAILWAY—GOWER STREET STATION.

The Underground Railway, which was opened in 1863, and
passes beneath certain streets and roads of London, with their
network of gas-pipes, water-mains, etc., is a noteworthy example
of railway engineering.



31

RAILWAY COMFORTS.





a
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Day Se ae
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NICE sociable couple!” I think
I hear my readers exclaim, as
they glance at the initial. Well,
these two passengers don’t much
look as if they were enjoying
each other's company, truly;
they are in a first-class carriage,
but do not seem able to make
themselves comfortable, all the
same. A long railway journey
is, in any case, very fatiguing ;
perhaps these worthy fellow-travellers are tired, fidgetty, and
just the least bit out of temper. They should remember that
grumbling is of no use, and will not bring them any nearer
to their journey’s end; and that things are a great deal better,
and that much more is done for the comfort of passengers now, |
than in the early days of railway travelling. Oh, those early
days, when many of the third-class carriages were open to all
weathers, and often without seats; or if covered, were without
glass windows, and little better than cattle boxes—hard, rigid,
and springless! Why, even the first-class carriages were small,
close, and stuffy-—very like the old stage-coaches which they had
displaced. Then very few trains carried third-class passengers
at all; for folks who could not afford to travel first or second-
class, the times were few and far between; while for those for
whom the then dear third-class fare was too much, there was the
wretched “parliamentary” train, starting at an uncomfortably early
hour in the morning, and stopping at every station as it crawled
its slow way along. Now, nearly all trains, even the fast onés,
have nice roomy third-class carriages with covered seats and
curtains even; while the first-class compartments are models of









32 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



comfort and easy riding, with cushioned seats, arms to lean upon,
blinds, rugs, and foot-warmers in the Wwinter-time ; so that, if you
feel drowsy, there is nothing to prevent you from taking a nap.
And for those who travel all night there is the luxurious Pullman
sleeping-car, which is also a perfect drawing room by day. Then
at all the stations on the line there are refreshment rooms, and
snug waiting-rooms to screen you from the bleak draughty air of
the platform; and, on long journeys, the train generally stops a
certain time at some large station to allow you to dine—the
dinner being all ready; or you can get a nice lunch to eat as
you go along, neatly packed with knives and forks and napkin,
in a basket, which you send back when done with, from some
station further on.





























































































-PULLMAN DRAWING-ROOM CAR. .



33

THREE LITTLE TRAVELLERS.

(From “The Boys and I,” by Mrs. MOLESWORTH.)

WELL—we were in the train. Our eyes were so red that any
one might have seen something sad had happened to us, but
we didn’t care. Tom’s eyes were the worst of all, and generally
he would do anything rather than let his red eyes be seen; but
to-day he didn’t care; we were too full of being sorry to care
whether people noticed our eyes or not. And at last when
papa had kissed us all three once more for the very last time,
reaching up to the railway-carriage window, and the boys and
1 holding him so tight that he was nearly choked; at last it
was all over, all the last tiny endings of good-byes over, and
we three were—it seemed to us, as far as we could understand
it in our childish way—alone in the world.

There was no one else in the railway-carriage—Pierson, of
course, was with us—she had put off being married for two
months, so that she could see us settled and get the new
nurse into our ways, as she called it; she, too, had been
crying, so that she was quite a fright, for her nose was all
bumpy-looking with the way she had been scrubbing at it and
her eyes. She was very kind to us; she took Racey on her
_knee, and let Tom and me sit close up to her; and if she had
had three arms she would have put one round each of us I
am sure.

‘Poor dears!” she said, and then she looked so very sad
herself that Tom and Racey took to comforting “ev, instead of
expecting her to comfort them. I was sad really—three poor
little things like us going away like that; away from everything
we had ever known, away from our nice bright nursery, where
everything a mother could do to make children happy our mother
had done; away from our dear little cots, where mother used to
kiss us every night; and our little gardens where we had worked

so happily in the summer; away to great big London, where
| D



34 THE RAILWAY BOOK.

among the thousand
faces in the street there
was not one we had
ever seen before.

I thought of all this
in a half-stupid way,
while I sat in the rail-
Way-carriage with my
arm round Tom’s neck
and my head leaning
on Pierson’s shoulder.
We had never cared
very much about Pier-
son, but now that she
was the only thing left
to us, we began to cling
to her very much.

“Tam so glad you've
notgoneaway, Pierson,”
I said, and Pierson
seemed very pleased,
for I didn’t very often
say things like that.

“Poor dear Miss
Audrey,” she said in
return. ‘ Poor dear,”
deemed the only words she could think of to comfort us with.
And then we all grew silent, and after a while it began to get
dark, for the days were short now, and Tom and Racey fell
asleep, just sobbing quietly now and then in their breathing—-
the way little children do, you know, after they have been crying
a good deal; and I sat quite still, staring out at the gloomy-
looking country that we were whizzing through, the bare trees
and dull fields, so different from the brightness and prettiness
of even a flat unpicturesque landscape on a summer day, when



























THREE LILILE TRAVELLERS. 35°



the sun lights up everything, and makes the fresh green look
still fresher and more tempting. And it seemed to me that the
sky and the sun and all the outside things were looking dull
because of our trouble, and that they were all sorry for us, and
there seemed a queer nice feeling in thinking so.

And after a while I began making pictures to myself of
what I would do to please mother while she was away; how I
would be so good to Tom and Racey, and teach them to be so
good too; how I would learn to be always neat, and how I
would try to get on with music, which I didn’t much like,
but which mother was so fond of that she thought I would
get to like it when I was bigger and had got over the worst
part. And then I began thinking of the letters I would write
to mother, and all I would say in them; and I wondered, too,
to myself very much what Uncle Geoff would be like, for I had
not seen him for some time, and I couldn’t remember him
properly at all; and I wondered what his house would be like,
and what sort of a nursery we should have, and what our new
governess would be like, and how everything in our new home
would be. I went on wondering till I suppose my brain got
tired of asking questions it couldn’t answer, and without knowing
that I was the least sleepy, I, too, fell fast asleep!

I was busy dreaming—dreaming that I was on board the
ship with papa and mother, and that Uncle Geoff was a lady
come to see the house; in my dream the ship seemed a house,
only it went whizzing along like a railway, and that he had a
face like Pierson’s, and he would say “ poor dear Miss Audrey,”
when another voice seemed to mix in with my dreaming. A
voice that said—

“Poor little souls—asleep are they—all three? Which of
them shall I look after? Here, nurse, you take the boys,
and I'll lift out Miss Audrey.”

D2



36 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



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THE SEASIDE TRAIN,



37

THE SEASIDE TRAIN.

OW eager are Frank and Harry to spring
out of the train; they can hardly wait
till it stops, although they have been
warned over and over again by their
parents of the dangerous practice of
alighting from a train while it is in
motion. But they are good boys, and a
restraining glance from their kind mother
who is awaiting them is enough to bring
them to their senses. They have, as you
see, just arrived from school, which has
broken up one week later than their sister's.
This is how it is that Rosie has been to the seaside some few
days—her mamma having taken her as soon as her holidays
began. So by this time she feels quite at home, and has found
out the best pools to swim boats in, the best places for shells
and seaweed, and knows all the favourite songs the “niggers”
sing on the sands and on the pier. Rose is naturally very
anxious to tell her brothers all the news, and has been much
excited all the morning; so when the long-expected train at
last steamed into the station, she fairly danced for joy as she
caught sight of Frank’s face at the window of the carriage.
Mamma, however, thinks of the luggage, which is being taken
out of the guard’s van, and tells the children to walk on while
she gets a porter to carry it to their apartments, where a good
dinner is waiting for the hungry boys.







38°

SEEING FRIENDS OFF,



































































VERYBODY, at one time or another,
has to take leave of dear relatives or
friends. “The best of friends must
part,” is an old proverb; and at no
place is it more shown to be true than
at the railway station, where most folks
go to “see friends off.” who are starting
onajourney. Many of these partings are
sad, while others are merry enough. Look
at these young fellows, who have come
to see off an old college chum, who has
run down from town to “look them up.”
This is a merry parting, with nothing in





































































































‘ a _ eh |
ese , ee Saw veh





SEEING FRIENDS OFF, 39













































































































































































































































Mt nS

Hen eS
ma Hp
ay













it but jokes and light-hearted banter. ‘Take care of yourself, old
chap.” “Mind you look us up again soon!” “ 4a revoir ’—and
the train is off. Or, perhaps, a hard-worked young barrister has’



40 THE RAILWAY BOOK.









been spending a few weeks with a friend in the country; the visit
has been a pleasant one, and the guest has thoroughly enjoyed
the change. But, like all things, pleasant or otherwise, it has
come to an end—business calls, and the guest is driven to the



SEEING FRIENDS OFF. 4I



















































































































































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station by his kind host. Both are sorry, but the parting is not
asad one; they will meet again soon; so, with a hearty shake of
the hand, it is over. Then again, a young gentleman, who has



42 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



studied too hard, may be running down for a few days at the
seaside, or up the river; and his anxious mother and sister
accompany him to the station, and see him off without sorrow, as
they know he will soon return in renewed health and spirits.

But it is far different with the poor mother who has come to
see the last of her little sailor-boy before he joins his ship, or with
the country lass in the picture on page 40. This is a scene of
a few years back; the recruiting sergeant has been in the village,
times are bad, and poor Giles has been persuaded to take the
“Queen’s shilling” and enlist for a soldier. So his sister or
sweetheart has come to see him off. Poor lad! all the hard-
ships of asoldier’s life are before him, and he looks sorry enough
now, for all the gay ribbonsin his hat. But he is a fine manly young
fellow, he will soon cheer up, and may some day come back safe
and sound, with the Victoria Cross on his breast. Perhaps, in
this last picture (page 41), we see the saddest of all kinds of
partings. There has been a sudden bereavement, the head of
the family has been taken away, and the once happy home is
broken up. Brother and sister, who have been used to every
comfort, and have never known what it is to work for a living,
must part, to pursue their separate paths—the one as clerk, the
other as governess—to make their way into the world.



AILY, scenes, like those in the picture
opposite, are witnessed at railway stations.
When folks are eagerly expected, the
arrival of the train is keenly watched by
the friends who have come to the station
to meet them. When at length it
steams past the platform, how anxiously
each passenger is watched, as he alights!
And, when found, with what beaming
smiles and warm welcomes are the.
arrivals grected ! |







MEETING FRIENDS AT THE STATION.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MEETING FRIENDS AT THE STATION.

43



44

“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.”


































































































































































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Lie Zo a“ :
Here is a picture of a little girl who has had no one to meet
her at the end of her journey. She has been sent up from the
country in charge of the guard, to be ‘left till called for” in
the waiting-room, just as if she were so much luggage. Poor
little mite!

She sits there very patiently with her basket and
her pretty nosegay, but there is a wistful look in her face, and

she does not seem to care to eat the bun which the kind guard
has given her. She has seen many other children,

fellow
passengers, who have been claimed by their friends, hugged, kissed,
and borne off in high glee.





Lif

|
il

And now that the excitement of
the journey is over, and the vast station is deserted and quiet,

and she is all alone in the great waiting-room, she begins to
wonder if Aer friends have forgotten her.

Let us hope that
they will soon arrive, and put an end to her suspense.



“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.” 45























Seesaw aw: ee
SSeS 1502 SIT TS aw N2US FANT WINNS HINE! Hl i I rE Re AMIR EM SHUSELIDEERR!
paras sires sav OAH OPIATE WN US THA SINT CUNFENTIENMEISHENY iH SEE] ERGOMIRSUCISh:

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































From a Painting by Mr. A. Dixon [By permission of Mr. A. Lucas, Photo.
“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.”



u

TWO KESCUES:







































































































































































































































SS
SS

WS

——



HERE are two pictures of children rescued from fearful injury,
or death, on the line. In the first, a little English country girl,
tired with gleaning in the hot sun, has fallen fast asleep on the
bank, with her sheaf of corn for a pillow, and her legs right across
the rail. On, on comes the train; the driver, on rounding the
curve, comes suddenly on the scene, and takes it all in at a glance, but
it is too late to stop. He blows his whistle as loudly as he can,
but in vain—the little sleeper does not awake. At this juncture,
a brave porter, who also sees the peril she is in, rushes forward
and saves her at the risk of his own life.



TWO RESCUES. 47









































































































































































The other scene is laid in America, as we may easily see by
the wide funnel of the engine, and the huge “ cow-catcher” in
front. This little girl, who has been gathering wild flowers, has.



48 THE RAILWAY BOOK.
also fallen asleep, her hand and arm resting on the rail. But
her faithful doggie is sagacious enough to understand her peril.
So, faithful to the last, he places himself, regardless of the “‘ cow-
catcher,” directly in the way of the train, and by his loud barking,
attracts the driver’s attention to the danger ahead, in time for him
to avert it.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































A RAILWAY ACCIDENT,











| -BNNINGS? EVERY MOTHER’S Book sent post-free on application by letter or post-card _

Direct to A. Fennings, West Cowes, I.W.

“COUGHS, COLDS, BRONCHITIS. 00 NOT LET YOUR CHILD DEN,

5
F E N N I N G S Fennincs’ Children’s Pow ders Pr event Convulsions,

| Uj fe is H E A L E P $5 2 ARE COOLING AND SOOTHING.
SL FENNINGS’

THE BEST REMEDY TO CURE ALL CHIL 1 REN’ S POWDERS
” — Coughs, Col ds, Asthmas, fe, fl For Children Cutting their Tecth.

To prevent Convulsions.
— Sold in Boxes at 1s. 13d. and 2s. 9d. with oe i= (Do noé contain Calomel, Opium, Morphia, nor anythin,
ae Sent post-free for 15 stz ase Direct to A. FENNINGs, injurious to a tender babe.)
> West Cowes, I.W. ° Sold in Stamped Boxes at is..13d. and 2s. 9d. (great
The largest size Boxes, 2s. 94. (35 stamps post-free) Ei saving) with full directions. Sent post-free for 15 stamps. an
contains tar ee times the quantity of the smaller boxes. Read. Pennines’ EVERYBODY'S DOCTOR. Sent () Read Frynincs’ EVERY MOTHER’S BOOK, which
Baas post-free for 13 stamps. Direct to A. FENNINGS, West contains yalnable hints on Feeding, Tee ething, Weaning,
+f Cowes! i. W. Sleeping, etc. Ask your Chemist for a Free Py:

DO NOF UNTIMELY Re |

02

WIHLASL Asva_ af

oe

SORE THROATS CURED WITH ONE DOSE.

FENNINGS’ FEVER CURER! |

BOWHL COMPLAINTS cured with One Dose.
TYPHUS or LOW F#;VER cured with wo Doses.
DYPHTHERIA cured with Three Doses. ‘
SCARLET Fi#VER cured with Four Doses.
CHOLERA cured with Five Doses.
DYSEHNTERY cured with Six Doses,

Sold in Bottles at 1s. 15d. each, with full directions, bu all Ghosts
Read PENNINGS’ EVERYBODY'S DOCTOR. Sent post-free for 13 sbamps.

: Direct to A. FENNINGS, West Cowes, I.W.

SORE ogi
WITH ONE DOSE |:

IS00 ie HLIM |
rs |

AND NOT

FARINACEOUS,

the Heaithfal

Rearing of Hand-Fed
‘Children-and the
Preservation of Infant Life.

il Ih N BLOOD ANE BUN: FORMING ELEMENTS,

6

Ah SAMPLE SENT POST: “FREE ON poo oO Te

G. WIEI..EN,
MARLBORO - ok PECK H/. M,







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'2011-12-07T02:03:37-05:00'
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTN' 'sip-files00004.pro'
27995ed8d19290818bd3f1dec9cb30f9
21c61138b409f52b36451af76301260cfe3c309b
describe
'3187' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTO' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
53680c6192cbae0e73585605050d1d0a
f8fd04de604fbedcf23803b68ce067cbb965f240
'2011-12-07T02:03:04-05:00'
describe
'5865180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTP' 'sip-files00004.tif'
521ce206b8dc4512332e62f4e262e513
70f69493111d2ec7cb79eee8709ac80b1ee5f969
'2011-12-07T02:02:55-05:00'
describe
'49' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
fae50208357a9b278a560f248bb50371
7133f04285f96e61b634fc62d56b40d6fa0987d3
'2011-12-07T02:03:23-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
f05775c2788030168bee3c29b7050675
dbc422669a0c1d528db3701ee5167ad136e2bbac
'2011-12-07T02:02:52-05:00'
describe
'732283' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
5698c5b2f59517bd296f5a3ca6811aa8
fd1a4625a8d9e27b9bbf4bed872109b4a1ce9e39
'2011-12-07T02:04:02-05:00'
describe
'169479' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
2ddac90a2d4fe6de62a707d1e1cc5fce
d325aff73058deb3ef9d454d36c0e2e1b9b39652
'2011-12-07T02:03:30-05:00'
describe
'4220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTU' 'sip-files00005.pro'
f09a60e91727a1e64135a15d7968936a
7d0097141e13088db784c797cebf81a4554c4d26
'2011-12-07T02:02:49-05:00'
describe
'40968' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
680126e3a4711afa2cd7fb8fb8e44f7f
725aab7212b6bf5eaf4e787eb8716b362ed3dd8b
'2011-12-07T02:04:04-05:00'
describe
'5868664' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
f6a5d511a346eb2f042b62e0c2312ff9
53357a35095785431f917a475aa829a47dc99722
'2011-12-07T02:03:14-05:00'
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTX' 'sip-files00005.txt'
f768040125c558a5f190f527706e554e
bfd139a07e507f028a3f89d9b7f7ac2d2083bdf4
'2011-12-07T02:03:52-05:00'
describe
'9896' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTY' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
3e511de8bfb9c5ac68b7bc2948333ab8
26ca7784032ceefc513033953f3c13dcd144ba35
'2011-12-07T02:02:58-05:00'
describe
'731946' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
fd5cd6f780d750174443cffe96ac43d8
dc5e625a3b22733b4191f57519c40e307424f164
'2011-12-07T02:03:00-05:00'
describe
'87841' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUA' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
6270b6392fca47cfdd03e8e9af389b97
bfa403e7898ecac0eef97d6c75b5a7da5c13d51e
'2011-12-07T02:03:33-05:00'
describe
'5993' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUB' 'sip-files00006.pro'
342ecac9ff24be0b41360b647491a7a4
cca34a424589089f61abdd0212d96f068b7a4f15
'2011-12-07T02:03:38-05:00'
describe
'23111' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
bc10afb7e0352a9d26480f37b76b8836
9dd4f9d0fa36f50101840dce3131911c31eb71c2
'2011-12-07T02:03:40-05:00'
describe
'5864624' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUD' 'sip-files00006.tif'
69657210924c745caec84ceeb5c7a670
4c793362a1b0564d396a32c6148cb142e3ce204a
'2011-12-07T02:03:21-05:00'
describe
'273' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUE' 'sip-files00006.txt'
c35207304aba915e930656af628c9906
3077e0962b35d2be8137b14c23fcd1b6ae62b5ee
'2011-12-07T02:03:03-05:00'
describe
'6330' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUF' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e4fb375c4fee5b17b4c32ae5f0beacd8
a7fc1f0ddc28ff656bb3f54ad3979ed94a3a8e27
'2011-12-07T02:04:05-05:00'
describe
'469635' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUG' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
d34c258815da117c85e02dd08b824a8b
70fc32cd3452cca3524210576db116f5760120ac
'2011-12-07T02:03:05-05:00'
describe
'43180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
122184c9669f63b1ff985d1872b2270b
6f95aa3438a4b4eb3b4a230ff6131b4512c34ae7
'2011-12-07T02:02:42-05:00'
describe
'18595' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUI' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7f5be83f76ddacd12dc91d05866b78b5
ab56daa26c2e60d9daa69b76946bf20fe3358eeb
'2011-12-07T02:02:48-05:00'
describe
'13763' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
b1af9bd03d81f046b6bc47a2073d3f5b
4a7098c489c9e58ccd03703fa8fa8fa8e2aba767
'2011-12-07T02:03:15-05:00'
describe
'5866192' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3bdea2d3f12d734b235aff090e6f1bba
b8631c6e826518f742b352127a7bec033a05d36e
'2011-12-07T02:02:40-05:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f30289267d1507b50881b767195e6c1e
18098c169fb88baf81e79a094f10dba0f0593d55
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3879' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUM' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
ed03d565a53b4648b8c4a88666ca87d7
b900cfcf0a1d4a2f79d7ad57418dca251e286922
'2011-12-07T02:04:07-05:00'
describe
'731990' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
332c90184c02414e685dd95963386963
986ba8f8071c58d1791eda4a214cbee4ce13ce2a
'2011-12-07T02:02:45-05:00'
describe
'136239' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUO' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f88953f0f444f7efe4fd7502b64d752e
76d4d926cc244fdbb64022ab23ef0e900abbc792
'2011-12-07T02:03:24-05:00'
describe
'35170' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUP' 'sip-files00008.pro'
5e575c2d289005fd13c6b2dbfc5a5477
82f29cfbf4383c929e533653b6e7e2a9c522dcb6
'2011-12-07T02:03:11-05:00'
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f71495e940832b93da55ddc41ca83501
ce9510ac8cdcb5b39279ec144f713496e22cebb8
describe
'5865424' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUR' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e499e27eec95e6fea9d888e9c6a4b53c
d5adc66c41a9f1bcdbbd38819e846902d8ad046f
'2011-12-07T02:03:19-05:00'
describe
'2136' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUS' 'sip-files00008.txt'
7d59bfff4e888ad3529b2ce4bcc71583
666151f272327fa8b2a51b991d466ecd5af63851
'2011-12-07T02:02:53-05:00'
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUT' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d0a22de59e74a21badc4216884013044
96a5b740fa768577435526bee316a890cbb0a114
describe
'732332' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
28c3b5d5a1e146e1a783fdbfda57b2e0
dc720ccd0e4db2173dca435a889767d4162d510c
describe
'148258' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
1016cc7cd8425b5e6634a95a553e7699
4e3343e4f7d552a7948e6f17bfb0bb6588473f93
'2011-12-07T02:03:51-05:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
30f1ca125147684546333293885944db
245c8934fc68ddb93aa02a0089c76171c832cfac
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
fabb28b9a829a24e126f1a705b59a9eb
f78be4b69195560cd145ad41adf8555526cac1b9
'2011-12-07T02:03:02-05:00'
describe
'5868220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e66eaf1f5f8b0a9ed52a146f79cc8c82
5d8ffeca3cb9e3bbb2dac66fff1a7a16deb532dc
'2011-12-07T02:02:32-05:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
2e99626ad497b9d2221f6671a3183c3d
98fc529211e2c1b5059989813726cd1135d02b4d
'2011-12-07T02:03:20-05:00'
describe
'8418' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVA' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
319061076f2c27fe1f19c5ce62d69a0e
941c4c8f9557369f6e08e0366eadd64a08067f95
describe
'732058' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
deb5340932d8d3480a89b423d9167025
e5fd8b05db4d1875b9353be7be29333196600e80
describe
'130515' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVC' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
82573e3f37a4b5893d1ae3bc1a5e203e
92765323def71cd97e5c05c68338bd381c94703b
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVD' 'sip-files00010.pro'
6ff4f775bc66cb53554502d07ea87ae1
8bba48f93e2bc1c18885fcebd5913befd37d9c42
describe
'36923' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVE' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
bfdcd664778594bff86c726fb5976dd5
48ea570b02765734c86d4a89dbb258c200f6d3f1
describe
'5868264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVF' 'sip-files00010.tif'
397fc8518b771e8b456a69d31d49e70a
4c00b3430efc3b666298f7291d6de36576e62567
'2011-12-07T02:02:43-05:00'
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVG' 'sip-files00010.txt'
7fcb8bad324349e9232cd12b001f9474
53467678d7991cc6dbda1002b131f71955af9699
'2011-12-07T02:02:31-05:00'
describe
'8711' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVH' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
12903fa4e88c4cf4d7531b09d89f0c40
73663d6c537a5a7c01bb40c0cd75ebf5304202c7
describe
'732334' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVI' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
b8efbe0e323f62ac4447d338e495cf93
ba61411235950d9aaa3979d1d8748820007ef47c
describe
'97232' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
5d5255e3cab81e0272954a9d579d6472
8e784d57ccfb81a9c774a8593e24a85616551fa2
describe
'22833' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
0cea3c72176c0693890b332e8d419d54
d0b2c53f5b7539473277e82f77139c9828fef8f4
describe
'27429' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVL' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
66eef4584d22e587e42db794294dc1bf
b3ac8373833b9cc1865568c79055401888a96d8d
'2011-12-07T02:03:13-05:00'
describe
'5867496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVM' 'sip-files00011.tif'
754d72830751c2531d99ebdfa217f843
b4027ded5ff39ed56ef799f9b4e54397202932f9
'2011-12-07T02:03:53-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVN' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a00ba6f87c96d7e2642bf47321c2a796
46396aaa26f3cdd23a8b84c54bd57bdcd48a4c83
describe
'6624' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5af3baa99b463b97b8ae16c3131e4934
5a49bb94df677fb62d3664b7c20fca3d59b261ce
describe
'732342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVP' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2798bccbcd8275b632f5bd1ed56f570c
57a33a8c4337fa0e7b0784e6ffd4241e36b0a608
describe
'147949' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
0960224189355a472b9126ac0b3bf3c5
ff6d379d9fb0fba314c48303574b4504740b8070
'2011-12-07T02:02:30-05:00'
describe
'37530' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVR' 'sip-files00012.pro'
76e9dc357017d7716afe9a6b1079bf66
b0622785d4083ffa3349df6f219b20550744faaf
'2011-12-07T02:03:22-05:00'
describe
'40796' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVS' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
0f0135dffad05ffe9dfc663d42bc0acc
7d980cb9e005fc4679aaea6cb97e7baa98267077
'2011-12-07T02:02:47-05:00'
describe
'5868720' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f98c25b367f7407ca8a245b746b1e818
0e6e55a3d80b41782af50f58dcdb6a5cdc49433c
'2011-12-07T02:03:12-05:00'
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVU' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a2ff57ad7065643191bec8d36d9c9f58
e97de007166908a0f5e9d5e0d2e4350051d6f9c9
'2011-12-07T02:02:54-05:00'
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVV' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
668cdd86f309e0dd3d3bb15118f16356
553b0e191f6353c73ae8fa4ebf38f5ea02f1d363
'2011-12-07T02:03:18-05:00'
describe
'732339' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f1e6303b0f061b097698857b082e32fe
eced3cf00c596474b169e39b6c48e901e265ddf5
'2011-12-07T02:03:35-05:00'
describe
'148820' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVX' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
48a8e4debfdea545e21c58ba13eb3bef
a3d75ca060aa64db480240ac4b07497345286905
describe
'26560' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVY' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9968f3f18b0b2a5486ab49c2369932a4
1026fa312953eaa1571cc746966f973bf6f47129
describe
'38291' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7d9e89997eb90c934393588d7280acce
3ae28bf27d02e6aa3249b779f73bb3877f848a9b
describe
'5868224' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
93cfef1d04dc85aff7674d39829fc637
1a2d2d6e1c278cb149e314635ea8cf4838867362
'2011-12-07T02:03:44-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWB' 'sip-files00013.txt'
02fdee4949984ea104dc6482cd9cd121
545e6a448004036eb3e4380a76d0152fcb822f97
describe
Invalid character
'9079' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWC' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e93328b37b6b1939d0360627951f43fd
a1a27f79790a0bb957d5d9f0a01eb01eb4bb2b73
describe
'732329' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWD' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
38e44f025f4fce239a758fa4d6e3f968
ef920e9412dd8c6130c2b0f9cdcea1d52aa15193
'2011-12-07T02:03:25-05:00'
describe
'145836' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWE' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
82c5bc4588a8d5d6c6e7024c9dcc0e98
ae18597e1c29aade275aab47c3444fa6f70a0e91
describe
'55770' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWF' 'sip-files00014.pro'
d0bbd8e8a7ba5a8b61288ae5b29eb061
a582e64c70a7474f22237bb299b18d984b6f63e3
describe
'42379' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
f098a224e0f734ada7c7fef1ea3a8e3c
919a36209a22bfd00c99d48c39f3e826adbc5036
describe
'5868540' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWH' 'sip-files00014.tif'
128c13d83a2ed4964f25260b83780e15
abb60a1a5c7ccbc3f25f3da79bedaff1ce06eb6e
'2011-12-07T02:03:31-05:00'
describe
'2206' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWI' 'sip-files00014.txt'
1a6c99dfcaf859c6ef955e8578be4784
ff82cf77112e8a7764d43495c3fd4b46c5043a15
'2011-12-07T02:03:09-05:00'
describe
'9596' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
8cb9eeaea8ca306630210f45cf2e3418
82b2d6874e69cce8a60b5513f316dd55e581a20b
'2011-12-07T02:03:36-05:00'
describe
'732344' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
4b9400888d8facad760d6d1dd4d35a4e
ef5271d1bbe6b31608541fb6b898f64427945330
describe
'167529' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWL' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4bb5f97eccf973d75039d76d9effca1c
749b57030228abbc720f89f64318e542d0a8d8af
'2011-12-07T02:02:44-05:00'
describe
'3578' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
f7096c03f17f0e0edd7375aae39f4027
05d7b5148ea4a33ad6f6644b41fe0dca520f618b
describe
'41668' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7b6c93dd726444a10ef9417da09a3e44
643bb6e41c749ef1909bec3ebe6cdb189ecd5f2a
describe
'5868816' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWO' 'sip-files00015.tif'
57a6b1c107ba5126b4dba11e9f2487e2
e27da3738d4d960ba557c67908457cabcf17bbea
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWP' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4d9bbf63b9337c9c0f8b7affc1a7c84a
ef71f94e4e13f31dd2402270885a9cb881fdd953
'2011-12-07T02:03:39-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10035' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
426be3cc4e2d9b1501d23806412fcbab
908e0d0b2060bcaf01c4ebe3cf7bd21708fa9a67
'2011-12-07T02:02:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWR' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
da8baf72125678351363cea35f815080
92440f2fbdfe618f426de39ee400d73339be57eb
describe
'136691' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
7e786ebe15c36cf6ec013c7f5a74e236
640d9804c2b9ea0fc6400db4af0bfaa5e29c9921
describe
'45163' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f6e2eafde4fb05edfea79aad7b44ca68
1fdeab7de0e9357ce9b3c0896450688d98f343eb
describe
'38086' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
244d1178a61d942afa31423540da5f8e
75b7e5f9b87672065fb3a8b16e9e58fd947286b9
'2011-12-07T02:03:07-05:00'
describe
'5865444' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
966afe7aa53bd4805f2e4c3216e1066e
e847d7de9d3c76e6e2f504be4100bcadfc574a86
'2011-12-07T02:03:01-05:00'
describe
'2042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWW' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e2c42e669ccc237aea8d1f9b98983b71
49b94d3ad1b27fada1517ccdf136dcc7f88599ad
'2011-12-07T02:03:57-05:00'
describe
'8572' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
8b41d3bf73b7762dfc608454da7610ae
b173574f9bf0bbef1d706c59e58b653ad2ef408b
describe
'732333' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWY' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
72cba468fca0eb7c05d8d754433a179c
1023bb016e1cf2e20bb37f0afd9a9dfdea625d85
describe
'113881' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7dfd766270e3110a2020fc74e61e61c0
dd1c6a1b28459727048a88efcccc80079f0a979c
describe
'45024' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXA' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0d3c61133fda2640a86157b23dc18d29
95e5d4460a4408f3d8a3888d0c6d4f4d1567f007
'2011-12-07T02:02:39-05:00'
describe
'34375' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXB' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b856a1d646edaadf3bfe55fdb76952c6
7e415e732f91edc7a1cef0e70b82ce0354c189d9
'2011-12-07T02:03:45-05:00'
describe
'5867864' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXC' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1f62c4b711884fbaa93aada74f017734
55928e4b4a871c6dc8e16b15bd7ce3740a292639
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e47232fa0b0da6444521a65f1439b291
0ca75b9b0309e5a1c5abbbbd93b1a9bf09add5c5
describe
'8042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXE' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9cd289be6c3935464ce380caa55700df
78044f87b82aea8ac3f47dc14288d28fcadd4218
describe
'732277' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXF' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
bec9c8167a9dc54fb9a24f27dfbcf162
8078e7e91d10e97670ec70e9bf72cc8859a27d42
describe
'156843' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
4db433a8d572750fa5ae57907f25dce0
eb29424cf2cfdd4d0ee37b56513446c55e3c6fb4
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXH' 'sip-files00018.pro'
17f2ac03cfa61ad2b8806a269f568f9a
006e22ef470a0acce9c1a1f7854d4cde5db2b7ec
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXI' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d11feddba9be75a79cd23e9d7afe8fe9
e4492440fc7a389a3c667c0fed69a8bbe4a9527f
'2011-12-07T02:03:17-05:00'
describe
'5868180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
0a389e39cb9dc840a1ef7a1570627484
3d75b2f88770043ef9332f6f57d1c3e61e360dee
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXK' 'sip-files00018.txt'
821e7925eb6ff3b54b7151f5213691c5
c4a1bfc67cbbab1dfe411547dbaab6726348c055
describe
'8389' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXL' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
a654d0b763a3e42f41fe441353b467b9
493d753835fc210e11a82bedd98cd8b6d6c8c87b
'2011-12-07T02:03:10-05:00'
describe
'732345' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXM' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
062883b716228fd488bf376c21c679d6
816ede42549b410b203acec7268a8ef420dabc0a
describe
'158836' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXN' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
de029114d4cf8a182d2f7936dda29499
be079ba7394a3e7c84181c26f11e8b0b50a4c350
describe
'4196' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXO' 'sip-files00019.pro'
8de94fd5d3d5292e18b699e4539c54f5
a018036f219161cbf66e814178810ecb65d05567
'2011-12-07T02:02:29-05:00'
describe
'37180' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXP' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
ccad499ea8272732965b34bba07fbc7b
e430753b657ac46c8caa30777f12b2d741135255
describe
'5868424' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
920d2530174c4f78f3b89b49f9e332b8
c4de1ca44c1aceaa190cc8436dc4c4baeb72ebc8
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
81d8e3faba15a61c3572d0b9f7118f4b
f20c30f9ff71f3eb079553530e97cdc05fef3dc6
describe
Invalid character
'9042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXS' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
c5bdbb3143acca6e12444f4a221fb2f5
b1fd09a5aed3ff1c907876c4b376d13ccb8cd5c2
describe
'732304' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
369e2f538d236b47516becf57cf63094
f43dfd1fcb93310060ce1bc22f2f5c76fde0a905
describe
'143060' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXU' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5a64076fd743a399744500db50a9bd92
db82c8fc998ce5bff5b26f334949777049977cd7
describe
'43086' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXV' 'sip-files00020.pro'
045dcfa0326d74eb9f5a8fdd289e2407
f619dfebc4c03c11a86a27f083a3c0faf3ce1d37
'2011-12-07T02:03:08-05:00'
describe
'40969' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXW' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f7dd925b1035807ec285b281943efa3f
29558c2001b53695b0006759fffdd0b458637cbb
describe
'5868496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXX' 'sip-files00020.tif'
9c399e80bd71f6a409e81df4197eb508
5a1d7b01aa38fa6a359658b6c674f33daeba5801
'2011-12-07T02:02:56-05:00'
describe
'2190' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXY' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8239e6bd965821b0d1e8595ac44828db
64f0d0daa55e108711577b0f98e757b72f32876d
describe
Invalid character
'9473' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
1ab064734082f6da3c095906567e7d8e
6bafcaa1603bf28a40206f7af4b511aa6a77072b
'2011-12-07T02:02:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYA' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cc7ad3220b3aea19156b9c17376e465a
20ff1f25b5f4e9f4f70ab5bc445921f310cf8de3
describe
'140250' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYB' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
82bbc99e03643a65cd9bc2a0378f77f5
6627f9422f2a3c52a91b8b721672c66375a4de6d
'2011-12-07T02:03:32-05:00'
describe
'18741' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYC' 'sip-files00021.pro'
a134725e554e53ce82f6e35dc1832d6f
01c2fe14c61a2ed46fd2e206fb137bc29a33fdd0
describe
'37961' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYD' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
fac2ad3742ff5d5908fa682e2bf1e8f5
7f96a162f728fb9a97b89c363a4bb58d70533014
'2011-12-07T02:03:46-05:00'
describe
'5868736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYE' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0a0c1487134ee7fda8c45d6ffc91025c
929aae51412878b3b10b25a7cb75c24ad2376c71
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYF' 'sip-files00021.txt'
11f86fb6f30ec64bec72be177b9d264d
a5a6f0a7ce4c4bd165c42462ca119ba2d67ec971
'2011-12-07T02:03:34-05:00'
describe
'9241' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYG' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
48f77ade5e6e2fc74a8dae10daa5312a
64e8cec515fa912cdd98fcecb847fa93eef75ec3
describe
'731985' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
fe2a8d64dd94e9e72519e19d0d9d7133
37b09e1c8b5afdabef4611774d408d0631460c39
describe
'124828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYI' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bc9da65ae10c72fffc5e6307915bc2ab
63791a60763eda0dc869c356384cde9aa38a2446
'2011-12-07T02:03:42-05:00'
describe
'21396' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
652b816ff1495253c2223fbc134bd09e
927b8c64d23076a9db294492d96a25d0e267fe17
describe
'33488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYK' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
8a8a0bf7e3660ad9e045c809ad3d049b
9c8dca0581b26cb6761eb04641f698dc66de97ff
describe
'5865200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
1378f656468b7086efef2ebf898b802c
7b79db0789a83d5f2a1e07eb0eea57827466e512
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1948f5c8e1bbaa3ca24fed30a4ed3235
b02726d640a732830a81a97b233beba013bfce56
describe
Invalid character
'7884' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYN' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
8f0da7617727c80b643b2ff086b297ec
ea58cdfc0cd25f284f25039cbb7776a7f79846c5
describe
'763064' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
1c6ee82840c6690c9f01550ea3131adb
8eea026bc607c2885d419d55740ea7c70dc91ca1
describe
'136032' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYP' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2115db7571b6c1d31b69aa086bde2b77
5331dd6bca122b25d2ce6db746b62c02ab25aeb6
describe
'57983' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
d87ee602636da699f2004327468be255
c687b24e7a4fe83ec25cfc72a0119c49065f81f1
describe
'39735' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYR' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
c071a2eb9a1c711ec15d56663bfb3fd8
64b48f14bdd5a39b4e52ca678f1e33e7e7cf19b8
'2011-12-07T02:03:55-05:00'
describe
'6117512' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
97eb738f8700e661b70092f3b8a42038
1c3a490f5b4d88cae3d36847a174d6df3a72d3b7
describe
'2251' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
7d321c1958a04e86b1dcd69ae48e6b9e
8dc0f899d15158a8be023a3afe1086b7d3be2146
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYU' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
b982fae2906d34c0299dfe887215c6d5
0427e13b5c90e6fb2aba91f93d8791d229fd7b89
describe
'731949' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYV' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
1bd4111ffe2b8c9b3dda8f3beddb75ae
cb6f1b24d2a43548f5444c9b8326a3d5b3b37acc
describe
'198282' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYW' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
915899677c8d274fff079580e090db7d
da4ff874e95fcfd6a2c5437d507a5c61e6e88e71
describe
'4170' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYX' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7aed29d36d61998f4fc5a158a51c6a9a
98aa6162ba980795fc2eecfe6963d2c17870733a
describe
'47498' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
48139dc7647a181f62e1dd4d6f82c20a
48398c2e126306fc0a9ec1d5de1c283fa4f8e87d
describe
'5866352' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e81ba7651ed282f6a832423b0119e586
2bdfb64dd49e2cbb8595990c22bc7c519de11655
'2011-12-07T02:02:46-05:00'
describe
'416' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZA' 'sip-files00024.txt'
d4165b9a9d2d99965278b9186eeedb22
6ccb8de39e16b02a54b6ae1db3d42a273e724d8d
describe
Invalid character
'11286' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZB' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
cb21ea5116fb99ca0a76a3ad127a6add
e36d1b2a2ba9b30f1c5c17a92002295663c8447e
describe
'732208' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZC' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
add9742a0bd7ca69e8d3e27f4426c66b
8d1c20defc793686e8ffdfde877e71934b36c239
describe
'150298' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
73c4f9bddca19eb636a808aa2015f538
a64d421c0080c1efb640f7f18f0d1a64eec07d04
describe
'10018' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZE' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e027f1f892b96b28f950a04d84bad646
f953c6ca52c0708bdcee2102d188d509a9c3f010
describe
'38223' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZF' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f1f8223c4ff6756a74f19429f4baf0c9
3e50e42f8557f83e996f0cf29badecada435e79c
describe
'5868120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZG' 'sip-files00025.tif'
8e9d06c4dcab3185a1f9ccb02d40a5a1
0da01d87b4e0c3fd7d7fd06b002cd64b086c8bc5
'2011-12-07T02:02:50-05:00'
describe
'395' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZH' 'sip-files00025.txt'
609b27e07ad26f95e039ffe3cdea43aa
b706c857807e4b2f68c42771d4fe612c7369ff9e
describe
'9087' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2d8ba79d8c28ce062df521fbb1e1a4c6
a1600f7180f7e368a13e6d6add77c77249c129c4
describe
'761067' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0ff45d73ae6a36a4adf27099f8f0ca00
18b1e1ef978833955534425fbb7ae724ee0df9ce
describe
'145501' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZK' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6ea624c4632251d05fd728970ddcada4
dd9569b455cac28b803cea477986fd219b05ea4c
describe
'16450' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZL' 'sip-files00026.pro'
22778227062d22fe6da142f521886011
7ce551f77effa50c91e884869df7ca9a40c4a468
describe
'37534' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZM' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
74ac33d580fa535187fb378c10d17711
8690d71635f5c9721f1404e04f54d46fdc502530
describe
'6101856' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
5e42286079f139f58dd16962c1fe0dc9
45b3f131dfca1a4920ea2cca20a84985b93ff47c
'2011-12-07T02:02:38-05:00'
describe
'693' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
49132770992b3d0dc439aa71d3cf3ccd
6502c3bfd99708afecc8e1d3c9810dc8c0579627
describe
'8897' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZP' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c51c0206e030bff1e4c2335d35548f7e
bd7d2dfadda4c737d0eda9bac13a816099e52540
describe
'732258' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1d1e15205e4d9aba70d1c5677449489e
63391e5de6e173d1dcd0a310ebfa92a305582f01
describe
'134426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZR' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d71ffb4e41cd20093ca3e7140611038a
556c6502e9c3bbcc0881dee80120b17d21d67046
'2011-12-07T02:03:54-05:00'
describe
'16777' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b91a1c9886423f25d78dd51b4421f742
bc9aeb22a7829db146256a66510fbbe0463bfab8
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZT' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
109ca63c534346c1b05393cbe544d42f
361d56a18dd0c3d1cfad3d72b3fa10269bb508cb
describe
'5868132' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZU' 'sip-files00027.tif'
53fd0efcd715f5cb0b6b450f5d9291c3
92e5f59344b97c8156954b9b513ee174441750be
'2011-12-07T02:03:43-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZV' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4e08dad63351c5528bd5f860768bcc73
c59f9516e459afd996a44adc24eef5865609cc9b
describe
'8437' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZW' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
cb024bbf712b2234805f6fb9d6f73923
f7828c09259a9cf0221ac14fb1b2c9b91ae307b1
describe
'731936' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7c6d79cf8254b4c787956c017d31ead2
bba29de6d26e98084af48cc6ffa6ee5368dbfcf2
describe
'155796' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZY' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
8687061b3a2432020fe3e9b2619e54b0
54ab0b6cf68ff2171c2b9df1040eef774653712f
'2011-12-07T02:03:06-05:00'
describe
'23240' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1fda3eda4e1e4a62562d0d5c3eafd9fd
212044eba35d841465ade350f590939381389540
describe
'42249' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1234b728c39468891881b7627b4535b7
9d9ad30678a4d3c09cbbe1024758f22574a8e45e
describe
'5866064' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00028.tif'
cf06accbddc71e43ffb079934578efde
5429a85dcd89a2f70018d23c18f7eb27afa0ad48
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00028.txt'
85c5784e7836298904f7b207c18d6573
2ee82e27ee6bffb5dacaeaf20d9a05f4b285cfcb
describe
'9838' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
459740b6a2b850ff919a5d9016df4cd0
cd4056e05d4a57b0affe8932cd778f4180743d44
describe
'732318' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f919843932e1949dfd087107ca874e99
99d99f5f8e51593798fea40a872ba55b614f8036
describe
'138416' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a35b9fd36d388a15bb6107a6147531f8
176b2b664c05c2f195409ae658984410699354b9
describe
'51174' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00029.pro'
4c49f0832283fbc15119d970eef91b02
7ef4135bb09a5f91c9f89a491c676a62b46253be
'2011-12-07T02:03:27-05:00'
describe
'40312' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
4f2f645eb2f0defff22c3d4951c00b50
e39cc5627994fd15f14e147a708b07f8ebbe5ffc
describe
'5868352' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
19a017eac82d7602a37da1083613c983
9afc966b5db07cee27d824e814cd42f2ba628efc
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
845a15ca740542a694ad29599be299f7
a4419aada4cecae90bb2d2e6a69ed057cd7d2fce
describe
'8963' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d5d0083e1410f39b6bf4ead602b0a83b
ea3d41303c1fbcec7633454f46f96480db7b4da1
describe
'731980' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
f5bc89250db445f83bd6bebd5fb45aa5
ffd6f3e19c21562c9235602c8948659fa0b2a102
describe
'176294' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
004cbfe833226e43e4efd886457f802a
6841febcb9883a784eab7737ca3c4679f1fbc695
describe
'6818' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00030.pro'
40a5e0a8e48318b92cc79ff07e4f6698
04db5dcb007f7be0b57a86a9167861cfb374b783
describe
'42276' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
431e899588d31961d7fe02c19f271892
44637a87533f40c73184cd06067ae4002a3c4c4e
describe
'5865800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3561d305059ebaf0b4ae1c879d551bcc
a5e87f19eabb619db844684832caa7d020a5c0cd
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a6d0c6429f948e0600d3d4603b8d5770
3d46ca92888e183d300ce47640ea63fbe0bb7dc1
describe
Invalid character
'9876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
5b5b608e03ddcbfb588e9b505f766c1e
08b6006ffddf9dc182524e1ab11b255f57ca4c38
describe
'732250' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6b8d489c63cc897b324e1a9f25043658
43d7b7a7767b236997edf12309909e963feeafd8
describe
'150823' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1083630fbe7c62e1915ed14e96901ff8
182f3054dad29b5934302e759a78745a806694cd
describe
'8970' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b62f1c88a66441aaff7effb31b42f3fb
cfed9423623b03cd33bb866a150e8186b2d17ba8
describe
'37983' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
620fef4ffa16d5c4328f4ee231342790
ca050d025a690310f4e03d1e0b36cd006a4febad
describe
'5868692' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00031.tif'
6c8a0bdcafd876433b215d54604cbdc2
1d0ceb127cdd59715503af7f771fbb11b840fa35
describe
'349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f251bec01c6f712cf16c1c418d9b1f1e
de53523d84493ebe76f7d945e358857f55b12194
describe
'9388' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2b5e21e70e63facd71372c5f9423775c
45656d541987be7b46e3c900c49daf67dd84eb8c
describe
'731926' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
5d1c0cf750758097303a8b91989254a5
e30ed97c92285fed43131216dd39c141b6b81332
describe
'147687' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
ded1a354304303517b95a026e8e66964
aa223386986c2dadb8db2fa10887b127dbbbe955
describe
'25663' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00032.pro'
0939e1f1d4f3746da2d1a983e056204a
6a1e9a3bfbf15a7367635eec21c4c5512302694c
describe
'39650' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1c6d55295c8eba4514a41f89203c7e50
cb0e069ab2173df2e172e4df17f9a13bfcb7f0de
describe
'5865648' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00032.tif'
e6fee7489ce7d360d803597d66c8d60a
e65afe80d1d1fc97f48c25960c4942acb94c743a
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7536ca4b02efa32819d0f0cc3c9b71eb
5f59c7ca1594a6612f125370fe8c0f6f8edb2af9
'2011-12-07T02:04:01-05:00'
describe
'9666' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
550031613348eef7370f3729e930219a
035f86b14cf83d723d88ce391ecbb51dc9705e7e
describe
'732293' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
378af1a00be018f72adc5b76d072f457
693bcf607ab3fc52ffd32f44c7d24737a49313d6
describe
'124270' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a6edbe51a46e52c6e5b47d297ff4ab83
6a428fc3e43a3835bad1f336dee03f98d57f4fa5
describe
'33327' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
f1971de346b98d9ad7dbbea2945ba975
2ce8d6b5c8c1d8fbc7ef7da787aa2a5ceb485fd7
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
b8541ead0e8aba8e1fe7ca5fa7727682
7f9620b1849eff3ba8730384986311c495eef85a
describe
'5868108' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a69240e25126d6a64f7a767aec25ef7c
1953739433349a3c827b99d12232cd42c60364ea
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00033.txt'
5fb6aed52ce54cc1c60c517caa647052
5eb6188e68cde3ae034b5a3b4734a3946db4c506
describe
'7971' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7dc309cf9632e31b92e7d68b856a1b3d
c607eccdb2c441f25d74571a8ff758d6028ab8da
describe
'731968' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0aadced89fc02931a97d21f6433dd52b
9e7cd7cc1b2ea3b1f554e743c7d135d551ae49ac
describe
'137622' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
89ce3b0c3fcde54561f15847a14eaf10
f4e1d92102e744b23139296e9f01e16a899389a2
describe
'42384' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00034.pro'
98d7ec9a447b2d55498faa1a461afeae
200431513408a05c171a3b14c58d6b374b482364
describe
'38966' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4d02007bc330d86290c0291992afc984
d1839bb584d70b8be754b3cd140a2d25768e7766
describe
'5865548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
6c7874a9381b46a2b6c99ab68e710f1a
ec90cc8c60f5939eeaca89a298e0762a487b56d6
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
497fc4c63388f12bd271ab4a57919c1e
c94774726c2165306f111da9bd31af4bca4bdf48
describe
'8967' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
c9a7113729cc2e6bfc43a2a3b4153fe1
4a7f679441ea49e1bedb410dbb109354be6208c7
describe
'732310' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
361805d4f67627b270b6ffbac27031fc
9ba203df6736a1a4a6a9c2f53189dac8ee5ef520
describe
'155375' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a2c8ad16c048b408386d3d20da259da1
c19f3fa2060b326d65af469d6a476bb0e6b1c980
describe
'22317' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
e37759bab261e6f0b7ea642c2b530786
95883d6af6ae9a0dd83d8f0e1d5950202878c8d2
describe
'40208' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
aa29e4326648c3e72faef0b6c195257d
f1f0da1be656a5a6987069caacb5605803ed712a
describe
'5868644' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
43ee46e81e83aa1b79ed1fb3903477b7
67ede39f41deec19e1b4ee578a479d7869f142e0
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
577600fa8b7a31bd584a867b64ec34c4
995f11ac488c584003127656991c2a79c45d86bc
describe
'9563' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
fe8b0dea80af33c2db923341592ba731
386502800e5cd6cfb962793b988d7ad4bacde717
describe
'731962' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
92a0ce6ad7b0de51172eef3877fb3a10
e2cb29fb957895a07d05a2561302755454605648
describe
'123573' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
108d49958cd7a55ae068a3c5018757cd
c54e8a92b2dddfb364592db654c3e4ee1096e04e
describe
'49209' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d827e625763f190d9760428ce93abfcc
97497a0e4649f1f0bca8e472273f98914eb8bdcf
describe
'37630' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
c2278d86e85d30af778650fdc53794dd
7de5ba2a5c1ca8bb5429d57e93f0683c53591b0b
describe
'5865360' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
72884fb20f8f938cd09cf1fdee064fd1
415bbf241ee8a594c9597c96bacb2d8420a71c04
'2011-12-07T02:03:41-05:00'
describe
'1977' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
1cfb6006d1533a47b6f04605fe0fd079
3a17be4cebd8fb66fd8f7d25a5f265e876158079
describe
'8693' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
5062ee13bcde599dfa8ac484a77e7006
cc02df5cfb2df341130ece5bf08a521451c3dd6d
describe
'732264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
27cf6a80e94853600f43c84b4a9eb353
22c07fad3145e9c2b7880f7c2a72012a57dccafc
describe
'150166' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c1d43667e6ca7f7862412ec39a313515
7631cfa3e6630c3f35564c92860e6f136f16c811
'2011-12-07T02:03:56-05:00'
describe
'34356' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
1e5b0ff86882bbaed1f0770e6f2cf317
849f097e5101dee54801942d74cbd876ad117a68
describe
'40757' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7d62da8c1f95dabd0385451fde33427e
2b1f34675d3f49825af8483daee788eb1117a752
describe
'5868560' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0c4bffca3dc9067758ca3786233228ec
a057d203089791cf02b8f2441f941f6d672732d0
'2011-12-07T02:04:03-05:00'
describe
'2168' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a46b6ad3fc9a1f841291f34eb105552e
e2dfdd0d026e94d5884cff1ab5c39ce1a79afb3b
describe
'9486' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d7fa20745b5518f5684f6ff6a458a6d7
8fbd6e398c31cedd48688c992ebed5ed002ef47d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
95e2f164563fadf37b33b0772a424957
31cfdc274b37ba2a4da97b2419b699da4b37364c
describe
'128976' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
79415632a0d768d2bd20d4b0925cc860
ab8c7b3fe4df60352354b4ef1a7cd7ee586ac036
describe
'48727' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6184ebbb4570d7798e8e1e7e4f1e1b14
124dfd08f1f8deaa71567c968d0f05fa6293e33b
describe
'37374' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d11869928f8192321a0eb92b6f8d248e
9b2f4b0c6466273fea33aedf646e8cbaa762a915
describe
'5868044' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
e99330f34dd9bff4383639f97a3514c7
f96253489b31b7b6f8db52878f58fd3cf5aba938
describe
'1981' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
2879e0dcf7ecaebfa1aa87507ed7bc39
1ee22dd63a8120504bd33c0b0d8e74a2c3831306
describe
'8668' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
890b12d1300c0f768d63e08dcc36c1c7
49917a0e96159e30571d8b6a2edd90973ad184dd
describe
'731964' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
c39e1c6ac6113242fe176ff533900b03
29c0f1f17b55b58819f768ef94351320b605b93a
describe
'166000' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
71be91ea4d08024db5ebd226bd2dbe08
c2327cd2af499f54ddf8c5364936b822529ececa
describe
'2124' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0c253dea44043a2c1bc4287c0ed417fd
aec2e30ba764e6d636768656d14f01b5345a1574
describe
'42210' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
747ff29e201be49194f3a25050084ef6
a128a64523ecbe07b6d7287c8c48eef3ffaa5285
describe
'5866040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e75e7ad1b895b4668840593cf765483e
2baffd9bd6d3910664bf4d285bd05b6404bfb839
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00039.txt'
602c14ac79172e9ba150bb6bbdc9d912
dba53820080d86e679875e74aa880b101cf3394a
describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
baf7a367980ac153bfd472f8929477be
cc462ca982951ca923627d992990feca4729b11f
describe
'732337' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
bc77ac7d681b0a9d873ce2ce37d106f5
a048c6d992f222f74b91b471c003a0793264c421
describe
'122953' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b16a25f294551c81358e957bee2e0e8d
6b16b4358d87dd0398178852be36f1dec7a91c46
describe
'35136' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00040.pro'
6ad4d78039d856bde679cf3827cd5448
9033ce9dfadfc626145ce27a46dea9b25f1a1613
describe
'34978' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
33909cf3ed7c39c61c83587bc20b043f
95903215054aae17f81bc37001cdef563d70b904
describe
'5868284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
81bd90d7f803332675b40220e0393149
a9533cb5014cf6caa691ae0e9e71ddd8334ed9ff
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00040.txt'
86df6fd3921ee59a8ab81ea2a5b2665b
3a531a0bd658a7e76e47cbfd8b5f7743cfefeef7
describe
'8511' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
645099cba556251670894c0d0893b2ee
a08abf92fdbc5692b1725e8d3e184614a159211b
describe
'732274' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
51fe1099e9000ab094fc4cd7809ab2e5
2c7a9b1286ac6b72dc72162087a7f6e26d2b53b1
describe
'137665' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
89499463ec9739d8dd6227b841258bde
571b449566b1f2f2b253fe8ec237d69eeb7498bb
describe
'14669' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
cd807cdf54c901211f09cfe3fbd5a32a
426db0eb79b5e71d274ef254d2ec0752db6b9083
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
0bc84628cec814b5b78af447b3a3f5af
41c29eca66a1da490c4c21f848ce61e766eb2703
describe
'5868376' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cf8bd0a7482c53e521187ca2da7ac7ea
c0808eae0cb640d0c38f5def442f29637791ff85
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5dffbea01b1704779fb32f6ce42f70fa
73e794e1597b39851579f392dcf24c0f3e96e92b
describe
'8509' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
56b695d90f29ded9d26ec46ae9c5e9e0
e832a27b733dd5235bd69ddfc4f524cf97ec9959
describe
'732260' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
2e0e86983926b3b48d5964a40c469b95
b49f41500ab7080940b5e400f20c982d9c336253
describe
'170179' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
368e087cf447f230f7756f400eea28a9
619908885123d26b10eaad1aca54160f8df2f183
describe
'14758' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00042.pro'
3e7bf7d1652062b710e76c6c6b262fa2
ee9cd15642cc302c859f6b9f18548a42d760a048
describe
'39573' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
dfe920e268154b5790cca7ca3ff858d9
baac1f60f9f73763424bbc93d98bbbfe9d3ea5ce
describe
'5868228' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6665a7fc8ca422c4059b83360bda7640
c8d00f4de25cb1c5204cb7dbb3e50cf06b955bd9
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2402510b875821c8997b5433f44be904
84ef0959b12c57f99b61958adac30cbb15d0ae92
describe
Invalid character
'8874' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
49786f816dc5075e5f3633668fd00ce6
e58a93198d83520aa8ae5aefc587e796f962bacf
describe
'732192' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a069626a2595804951963371c760aa05
dee59cbc6beb96f5d00c399899069e3614b3934a
describe
'167425' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f5ef77047b084bc4eae899b40f42feb8
edf3be37ad524f88fe7506c2a40a84b1d8334760
describe
'7718' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00043.pro'
19751eae7fb2224689eb144d9b9cf7a6
e7efb2d85dcf078c49ea0a34916d4b25712b8e39
describe
'40594' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
744d68adfc8ea6bc0581d3e766984820
5589b65df5bf62e9bf1fdce2210f914aaf962119
describe
'5881804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00043.tif'
3a9c8f07ec2617bcd61fde430fa9589d
28e396543dd9d43615e1144bdd694cfb4eafdd6b
describe
'376' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUED' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8441eaf343485500564b08e76a5d6ded
e292cac3de1877a7405149da335768258c6881fb
describe
'9583' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b9d7e90841138f6e849e762a7ea49dc0
d7c143b8f52a88ab0e821f8a5492a95f35dcf0b9
describe
'732284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
15654652fb15d62fcda50f8d7e4480c0
b066c11736baf4d6b274c9c712a95223115dda70
describe
'168300' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
ad33a2346737cd9577965d70b2e22e6e
d75ff8497811cbfe78ed6f501a6372bfeb4ded38
describe
'6487' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4105863d7c024956dd1553747e8ca68b
45947257b5da3a8710787513ba2a676d84fa36e2
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
025bd5f784b355664934661c6867991f
9e6b1de39ec69da89e9fd40c0ba1ef84e8005174
describe
'5868604' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e41581d8aade9bff8dc2e62ddeb8cc7f
14b8509e74eaf70233ee681d1ffc9a378ed685bd
describe
'266' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00044.txt'
62c51fcc4b3d741fcce8b632cedb6465
bdae67eedb9f46b55c1e3b3322571357adf975b7
describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEL' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
8ae65ced2866857c57eaf5f96ed36d38
78166960b1d8e28599d1e7f30f862ebcaaf3be20
describe
'732341' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7d351be2d3264a96c1c5d59c37534e07
475eb0521ab8fc9a4b584cd0d791a52c1676ccff
describe
'139365' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
9a5511693803c7cbf92232bdc530988c
b960b659a84b3b44cad0241ca8601090b2ca2f90
describe
'48252' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c1daf473044e46d6895126da438ed505
92ea5fd5d2a426366dae0cf9a56a5a1add5b6060
describe
'39700' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
18843397577ae0f4125bf2d3f44b6605
74bc02fb2e48ff68674f514956ef7c89037daaf4
describe
'5868440' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
727082259504c3b8ea2ef570133389cc
cbebd3fbd8d7559d1d11669f7036efb6b8e30700
describe
'1939' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUER' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e87ffc6d204e0155d09270f85bc60079
5bbb9719af2c90aea87d8fac56a1ad5f07cb94f6
describe
'8866' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUES' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f34c59fe3123c9304c997b6b7b79fb10
c5d31de4b1b71d123a286902120453c29cd7964b
describe
'732328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUET' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
b7f61d7cc10c4993eab2631abec3e536
07a64184ca1d1a079aad05b5070ee98e5e7ccde1
describe
'153275' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
5dda1f416d510831766d2f60e6e0cd5e
fbe6793a536e9057776890d00bd6b33fd180c143
describe
'1953' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e92677bd49d3dc7deebb700b73dadc31
cb2d0a616db20b1dd67ed58b3e972b56c4139bed
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2cfafca1a0bb913594605a32778e91dc
2827e0186aca094fef526b861285b4133872a69f
describe
'5868340' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a78928b3ab527af7e2e6f168acdfb9ff
a9427db6c44c4c5c4599778a3ddcc3fc800dce4a
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
76bff54a573c6c5a8135c05a895defe7
5463919f6e428e18fbd6ef37a43020ef5f28c8ad
describe
'8833' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
28ef68125c2ddeb8e1b0ae3b739f3c0b
eedb8df2808d8639e9c425fdb671f0e45d6372c3
describe
'732320' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
01110cdf4bfefbd6be84b38d6750bba2
dd18a30ff37d8f6a42feed57559f8df01f03a185
describe
'155028' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
bec6aabbec53575377013e634e7abcb9
a39399f37fb227ca9a0ecc7735c6b05d8f572ab0
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0a594c694ec4266095ebbad601abe2e5
9d6e2e252b35682e0d85bbc2b173ba9dee1faecc
describe
'41376' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
8d9593172dbf6991e06e804a97baaf3a
27d12eb4f976818b15f79d8c54cebb2585f275ba
describe
'5868704' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b30e2c5a514c1988fb23a623d945d7a7
fba46d92bdf653f54e91f94c94c1963440aea828
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1cf514631530ff9c9070c58a897f6dbe
0c09afddfc07991691adf46dad8ede62d7160f9c
describe
'9595' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
b96ceda14fc77a001ec6e407eff8f4d4
fd4a706d82fe35e8e768ff2fe07fbbcfb6436811
describe
'732267' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4c63909572b24a1496319c045ee90e10
eeed7ee07ab37ea1955b2bfebbde52ec5d0899b1
describe
'155773' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c051947a7e9f89b5c4e1cf77710a3c0e
0d8991244cd69bf507d983f428423f447997f959
describe
'3632' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
537340e6bde687461933d58d9ceb3f55
3311382b72f8efa37f40e63f761c8f08d9f249dc
describe
'36588' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d5e89078620b32103b9e721f0adfb1f7
53ff19892e358c19bf6d03e397c3b1c6fc29b34d
describe
'5867880' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7dbf4b185c9e56328d1bf3b2564087fe
388b90a282caba5eef8acb8eaec6a815344b99e1
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b7302d2996f2e24e4c3dfb762bc0f1bf
b8e0d22ba6bfd521d4df5916443bffffe9d12971
describe
'8899' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
16aac862054c896d71c21393831887bf
4fa2c2f1133447f05e80a876a6cb0f4711689879
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
62b70318a42a3e58337b9ddb48c6014e
109ba42035e716631bcb0aee3a2435cb6d544d88
describe
'168469' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
432ea33ddc6cf75c05b0d79c6e45fc85
f4881cbd5a30db6cfa45f3e482860aeec645d7bf
describe
'17881' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
80f0ed64554c31a7822a930036f5265a
864ab8a5eb584d7f9270d1cebcc0bddf1a7c7bb0
describe
'42695' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
c59b403d20fa5ccebd7bc380972648b0
ced9dcc3703120aafd39db617cb87eb13cdce786
describe
'5868740' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4a8704f9c2ce10d47324773ed222ff1b
6ae70d71f15ce4d94724ea891408d7e41fa35034
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5a2ca2c99318130d4da0bf6958323906
6b43247f5198103ba9e390b6cbf4c6fe43252c16
describe
'9765' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2d76f48f76e3bb13c5c90511279ea2b9
5e719ebc81f863e6fd9ff57abbce40c1a62d6114
describe
'769438' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4470717a154b6d14d70210ddc60d559d
fbf1233bafef5a130f8af04cc131834bada63d7a
describe
'165828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
26149a8e96b07183db3d32f99912ede8
44dee3be22e86197122f5548c17e1615b22596ed
describe
'10200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7f8289082c7b3db91bc3e9ef873bd622
9c0dfbf10ef31f9f42e608d86d7f4522f251648c
describe
'39832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
64365c1ad6c8cb2a89fb46d6635dedab
d94e50d18873c8971473b649e6c650f5f43ddff1
describe
'6169468' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
1ae07d92e73d195b1afd5d409e2fca6f
35893dd1a769ec16eb4c9b40e68d0f34d6ff2b95
describe
'496' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fa16c492bbd6a5e1d69030f16f514bc5
a4cad3fc9b10dcb561e9d484479a4599109a173d
describe
Invalid character
'8961' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
86cf8daa0cff656e109d34f962a7f96a
e7a9d52375a16af97cf2e6fe4e80dc854e6ce56d
describe
'739206' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
f5d37aa9db197e064c69bb41ad1567e0
4e572aa8b28f66bff03046e3c118e0ebceb1bfac
describe
'152928' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
34e9f085f05ca465cfab6044f92ace53
ee31ae541022248f5634466963520c90ba1dc067
describe
'11168' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00051.pro'
44bb44febec4efaad1df64c716dc8ca0
d0e52e4d07054c5520ce8c9eb11f1916e09e14a1
describe
'38345' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
7fabd649f424275c205ed8239b6ef9b6
3d7795bdd8eb3940e33c3dbd4f7d688ac89d15e5
describe
'5928012' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00051.tif'
7a809a08e3399bc6c553da193ce61288
6ddba16b7167562b305c1e1ee42c20de2da5128d
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a46efd44b8610cc8a16e6a698d988578
53f578236b260c608c50907de15b4e2bbecd3490
describe
'9213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ee73e8e743fb818020b415ef3f47fdc1
c4dfed4807545171917a1c96271c5386c6916b10
describe
'774910' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
361508efda4bc05612f2aaabbd33d86c
ab46101e0c11a616f09712f8783ce31ff2984502
describe
'69977' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a05329a9062cde22d207e060e6ab43f2
745d57231bca7ba9bc493f6e3e143c980731098c
describe
'14697' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6dff52e88f3a5a0231be3a8db988dc43
f5ffa30d0d5d4dad8e7c8af2a371d1206a3def50
describe
'18603564' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
33ce0ebb128887577c343128f67afc11
57bfb37b94945e799e56f389c4d46254edfe2a29
describe
'3709' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
29b5d800baec26d6d34ee0a4402402da
39ce772528e16cc24f8c1ceefb4aae103e7bffa5
describe
'825395' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
ff8ad8c2b7ef2333633476c325b93497
6acf8e6f29816ea886ac934816274586a9121699
describe
'174381' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
bf3e9b088ef4316898bd1921e993d144
606abd828611f71ac97664eb46b2b0ad434b2ad3
describe
'63121' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1c6e74cea6b4ebfd794e8257f8c5e338
edb1259da5b0773ce08877bd4c8e1bdec8bd1970
describe
'45317' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
24a88dac008668b690e761e212800b87
b9ee92bb9f449e1dd4ccd089ea70a1a7d9e4b7a3
describe
'19819616' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZLfileF20080504_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
dd8705eb6859a9fa56f3deb175caac26
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RAILWAY STORIES.












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1D A



THE DRIVER OF THE MAIL.



The Baldwin Library

PRs
RAILWAY STORIES

Zales and Descriptions for Young
People





































































































































































(ZHE FORTH BRIDGE)

WITH FORTY-FIVE ILLUSTRATIONS

LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, Limitren
GLASGOW, MANCHESTER, AND NEW YORK
1891




-s¢ THE - DAY-DAWN - LIBRARY, 2-
NEW LARGE-SIZE VOLUMES.

Crown 4to, 48 pages, Full of Pictures.



PUSSY’S OWN BOOK. DING, DONG, BELL, AND OTHER

CLEVER CATS. NURSERY RHYMES.

DOGGIE’S OWN BOOK. JOHN GILPIN, AND OTHER NURSERY

PET DOGS. | TALES.

HUMPTY DUMPTY, AND OTHER | LITTLE TOM TUCKER, AND OTHER
NURSERY RHYMES. NURSERY RHYMES.

LITTLE JACK HORNER, anpb MY PET'S PRIMER.

OTHER NURSERY RHYMES.

LARGE P R : VS.
TOM, TOM, THE PIPER’S SON, GE PICTURE LESS0Ns



AND OTHER NURSERY RHYMES. LITTLE RED WAISTCOAT.
JACK SPRAT, AND OTHER NURSERY | ELLA AND HER RABBIT.
RHYMES.
RAILWAY STORIES.
TEN LITTLE NIGGERS, anp |
CTHER NURSERY RHYMES. RAILWAY TALES.




THE ENGINE-DRIVER AND THE GUARD.

“RIGHT AWAY!”
the whistle shrieks,
and the train steams
out of the terminus
on its long journey,
under the charge of
its careful driver and
guard. The driver
and guard of a mail,
or an express, train,
have a very anxious
task; they must keep
time to a minute if
possible, but must
also keep a_ sharp
look-out for signals.
The driver must at-
= § tend to his engine,
Tih aA tn watching the indi-

cator, and regulating

it accordingly. The guard has his full share of responsibility.
He has to start the train, which is really under his command ;
to listen to the driver's whistle, and regulate its speed ac-
cordingly, by the use of the brake; to attend to the passengers’
luggage, look after the mails, etc. The engine-driver’s life is
not an easy one; he has to face all weathers, hail, rain, or
storm. In the old engines there was scarcely anything to
shelter him from the drenching shower, or the bitter blast; but
most of those now in use are provided with a hood, or, at
least, a screen, with round glazed peep-holes for him to look
through, so as to protect him as much as possible. If you

have ever taken a railway journey of any distance, you’ have
B






























































































































THE RAILWAY BOOK.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































BRS
Snes



“RIGHT AWAY!”
THE ENGINE-DRIVER AND THE GUARD. 7



most likely become very tired before you reached the end of it;
how, then, must it be for the driver and his mate, the fire-
man, who go over the same ground again and again?
Such a journey is pleasant enough for once in a way to those
who are in the humour to enjoy it. Suppose you are leaving
London by one of the great railways; after passing through the
suburbs with their neat villas and trim gardens, you stop,
perhaps, at a junction, at which several lines meet. Then, on
you go through one of the home counties, with its farms and
gentlemen’s seats—through the valley of the Thames, or the
hills of Kent or Surrey, or the wooded country northwards.
Fields, trees, and hedges fly past, but the distant objects seem
to travel with us. Presently the first important market town
is reached. On, on we go again, passing sleepy villages, now
stopping at some historic town with its castle or abbey, or
ancient city with its cathedral—till we come to some busy
seaport or fashionable watering-place, or great centre of industry.
Then, on once more, over deep streams and under great





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































hills, stopping at a town here and there, until the end of the
journey is reached; and the driver and guard, in whose good
care we have been through it all, are free to take a little
rest.
8 ; _ THE RAILWAY BOOK.





THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE.

ALL large machines are now moved by steam; and folks travel
by steam on land and water. Steam is the vapour which rises
from water at boiling point; you cannot see it when it is quite
pure. Every steam-engine has a furnace and a large boiler, to
convert the water into steam, and a condenser to turn it into
water again. By these means a plate of metal called a piston
is made to move up and down in a cylinder, or large
tube; and to the piston a rod is attached, which turns wheels
or works machines, as the case may be. Several clever men
are said to have thought of the steam-engine, but James Watt
was the first to make it perfect. He was born at Greenock, in
Scotland, and began to study when he was quite a little boy.
His aunt thought he was idle, and one day scolded him because, she
THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE, 9



said, ‘he aul a howiine but te off de lid of the tea-kettle
and put it on again;” but he was trying to learn all he could
about the steam that came from
the spout. found him, when a young man,
sitting by the fire, making a
model engine; he was in high
spirits, for he had just hit upon
the very thing that was wanted |
to complete his great invention. -
Watt’s steam-engine was soon.
applied to boats; and Robert
Fulton, an American, made a
steamboat at New York, named
the Clermont, which went up the River Hudson at the rate of
five miles an hour; and about four years after this steamboats
came into use in Great Britain. Locomotive engines, by which
we now travel by steam
on land, were used for
drawing cars and wagons
in collieries and mines in
the year 1804; but they
were very imperfect. In
1821 George Stephenson
laid out a colliery railway
~ from Stockton to Darling-
ton. George Stephenson
was born near Newcastle-
on-Tyne, and his parents,
who were very poor, were
employed in a colliery.
When he was eight years
old, little George had to work in the fields instead of going to
school ; when he had time he used to make toy engines out of
clay. At the age of fourteen he went to help his father in the

























































































COLLIERY RAILWAY.
10 THE RAILWAY BOOK.





































THE ‘FLYING DUTCHMAN ”—60 MILES AN HOUR.

colliery; and from that time he set himself to study the
stationary steam-engine he had to work; it soon became a pet
to him, and he was never tired of watching it. He learned to
read and write; and worked sums on a slate by the light of the
engine fire. He married when he was twenty years old, and
had one son, Robert. His wife died about a year after Robert
was born, and other troubles fell upon him, so that he became
very poor; but a time soon came when people found how clever
he was at mending steam-engines, and after that he got plenty
of work to do. He took care to send his son to school, and
when Robert grew up, he became as clever as his father, and a
great help to him. In the meantime George Stephenson had
found out how to make a railway-engine that would really
travel. Nobody thought much of it at the time, and Stephen-
son was not rich enough to bring it into notice. But in 1821,
THE STEAM-ENGINE AND THE LOCOMOTIVE. II



when Mr. Pease was planning a railroad between Stockton and
Darlington, Stephenson went over to see him. Mr. Pease soon
found that he was just the man he wanted; the railroad was
made, and George Stephenson drove the first locomotive. Mr.
Pease had at first thought of using horses; but Stephenson
assured him that his “Killingworth” engine was worth fifty
horses. This engine was adopted, and did its work splendidly ;
it was very ugly and clumsy, but it drew thirty tons at four
miles an hour. Some improvements were made in it, and
next year Stephenson built another, which contained the germ of
all that has since been effected. But his locomotive still attracted
little notice, though Stephenson declared that one day such
engines and railways would be known all over Britain. The
Stockton and Darlington Railway was one of the first examples
of steam locomotion on a railway for passengers. Meanwhile
Stephenson continued to make improvements in his engine, and in
1830, when the Liverpool and Manchester Railway was opened and
a prize of five hundred pounds was offered by the directors for the
best locomotive, Stephenson gained it with the “Rocket.” The
“ Rocket,” which is now in the Patent Museum at South Kensington,
differs very little in appearance from the engines of the present
day, except for its small size; but in the same Museum is a venerable
locomotive, rigged with iron beams and rods, which make it almost
look like a ship. ‘Puffing Billy,” as it was called, planned by
William Headley, the overseer of Wylam Colliery, and built
by Jonathan Foster, the smith, compared with one of the
splendid engines now in use, seems a poor bungling piece of
workmanship. But it did good work in Wylam Colliery
from the day it was set rolling to the time it was taken
off to be placed in the Museum: “There being no material
difference between the cumbrous machines that screamed and
jolted along the coal tram-road in 1815, and the elegant
and noiseless locomotives which now take out the express train,
gliding smoothly and swiftly as a bird through the air.”

e
THE RAILWAY BOOK.

12

























































































































































































































THE GUARD'S BREAKFAST.
13

THE GUARD'S BREAKFAST.













































|; HRISTOPHER HOLMES, the guard
of the early up-train, lives near the
2, small country station at which the

train stops soon after leaving the busy
_ town from which it starts, and his little girl
. Susy brings him his breakfast every morning.
-~ So Susy has soon learned the importance of
keeping time; for, if she were to arrive but
a few seconds late, poor father would have
to go without his breakfast; as the signal
would be down, the whistle would sound, and
the train would be off. Once, and once only,
did Susy fail; there had been some extra work
at home, and Susy had no idea how the
minutes had slipped away, till she heard
her mother call, as she was putting on her
hat, “Come Susy, child, you’ve only five minutes, and I’m
sure you'll never do it!” Poor Susy seized the can, which her
mother held ready, and scampered off as fast as her little feet would
carry her; but alas, it was all of no use; she reached the platform
only “just in time to be too late,” and will never forget her feeling
of dismay as she saw the end of the train as it steamed out of the
station, with father’s face rapidly disappearing from view. The
kind face, however, bore a smile, as father gently shook his head,
as much as to say, ‘‘ You've made a mess of it this time, little
woman, but I know you did your best, and couldn't help it—‘ time
and tide wait for no man!’”

But when Susy got home, her mother was not disposed to
treat the matter so lightly, as she did not like her husband going
without his breakfast. Seeing, however, how much the poor
little girl took her reproof to heart, she said no more. But Susy
took good care never to be late again.


















14

A BRAVE ENGINE-DRIVER.

In the year 1882 an engine-driver named Sieg saved the lives of
more than six hundred passengers by an heroic act of self-
sacrifice. Sieg was driving an engine on the Pennsylvania
Railway, in the United States, at the rate of thirty-five miles
an hour, when the fireman opened the furnace door to feed
the fire. Somehow, it happened that the back draught forced
the flames out so that the car, which is attached to some
locomotives in America, caught fire, and Sieg and his mate
were both driven back over the tender into the passenger portion
of the train, which is not made up of several detached carriages
like ours, but consists of one long continuous car; the engine
was thus left without control, and the train could not be stopped.
Meanwhile the speed increased and the fire with it—threatening
to consume the whole of the train. The passengers were terrified
and helpless—if they jumped off they would be killed, if they
stayed on they would be burned to death. In this terrible crisis
Sieg saw that the only way to save the lives of the passengers
was to go back to the engine and stop the train. So without
_ Shrinking, this brave man rushed through the flames, climbed
back over the tender, reached the engine, and reversed it. When
the train stopped the flames were soon got under, and poor Sieg
was found in the water-tank alive, but so dreadfully injured that
he soon afterwards died.

“Back through the flames the hero rushed,
The flames that will not stay,
Until his face and hair were singed,
His clothes were burned away ;
Reversed the engine with a will,
For which he suffering braved ;
And soon the train was standing still,

Six hundred lives were saved !”
15

A BRAVE ENGINE-DRIVER.











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16 THE RAILWAY BOOK.











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A PLEASANT JOURNEY.
17

TWO JOURNEYS,

Everysopy knows that at times
a railway journey can be very
pleasant—like everything else,
y it depends upon circumstances.
SS There are journeys and journeys.
) The line may pass through a
| lovely country, or traverse a
dreary manufacturing district.
2 The weather may be dull and
















J ze 4 wet, or beautifully fine. You



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) My L . mW Ly holiday. In the picture oppo-
yh NE WV 7) a holiday. ep pp
i“ — \SI| site, for instance, is Master

Harry, who is going up to

London for the first time. It is very likely he will be dis-
appointed when he gets there, but what of that? He is
happy enough now; everything is fresh to him; he watches with
keen interest the different objects that are pointed out to him
as the train glides through the fair English country. It is
true that you have not so good an opportunity of enjoying the
scenery as if you were travelling by coach in the old days; but
then you get to your journey’s end quicker, and see more change.
So vain regrets for the good old coaching days do not trouble
Harry; there is no doubt that he is having A PLEASANT JOURNEY.
So was the little boy in the picture above—up to a certain
point. But pleasant journeys may often be spoiled by heedlessness
and disobedience—and this little Davie, I am sorry to say, was
a rather wilful little boy. On this occasion he was travelling
with his mother and his sister Kate. For some time after the
train started Davie played with Kate; but Kate grew tired, so
Davie went to amuse himself at the window. A gentleman who

was in the carriage warned him against the dangerous habit of
. Cc

We
a NE some business, or starting for
y
18 THE RAILIVAY BOOK.



leaning against the door, and drew him away; but while he was
telling Davie’s mother about a poor little girl who had been
killed through this, Master Davie stole back to the window,
when all at once the door flew open, and out he went. His
mother was in a dreadful fright; but the train was slackening
speed, as they were approaching a station. So, when they went
back to look for Davie, they found him alive, sitting on the
ground, but in great pain, for his arm was broken.











































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|

































FELLOW-TRAVELLERS.

English folks, it is said, are very shy and reserved when
travelling together, and generally keep each other at a distance.
Such seems to be the case in the above picture.
19

A START IN LIFE.

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MarTHA Pace is a regular country girl, who has not been to
London in all her sixteen years of life, her mother being only
a poor woman who keeps a shop in a small village about four
miles from the station. Martha left school when she was twelve
years old, and has since been employed to help the housekeeper
up at the hall; but being a sensible girl she is anxious to do
something better for herself. So, on receiving a letter from a
cousin, who is lady’s maid in a grand family up in London,
she has made up her mind to take, with the full consent of
her mother, the situation of housemaid in the same establish-
ment, which her cousin is able to offer her. Martha is full

young for the place, but ‘she quite understands its duties, and
G2
20 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



is a good honest girl who will do her best to give satisfaction
in whatever position in life she may be called upon to fill. I
think, however, my young readers will agree with me in saying
that she must lengthen her skirts a little, which are too short
and ‘“‘countrified” for London fashions; but she is a clever girl,
very quick to see things, and will soon alter that. ‘ Mother,”
pleads Martha, as they are waiting for the train—there seems so
much to say in that five minutes—‘‘do promise to write to me
every week!” ‘Why, of course, my dear, you know I will, for
I shall miss you sadly, and don’t know how I shall get on
without you.” ‘‘Oh, Mother,” cries the poor girl, now almost
in tears, ‘pray, don’t say that, or I shall wish I was going to
stay at home after all!” Before Mrs. Page can answer, Ben,
who has been sitting on his sister’s box, and has been greatly
interested in all that has been going on at the station, calls out
‘Now, Patty, look sharp, here she comes!” So, with a last
kiss to mother, and a hug to Ben, she is soon comfortably
seated in a third-class carriage. Mrs. Page notices that the
kind-looking gentleman who has been walking up and down the
platform, after seeing his luggage labelled by the porter, steps
into the same compartment, and hopes he may speak a kind
word now and then to her poor girl, so that she may feel that
she is not quite friendless and alone. So far, Martha has borne
up bravely, but as the guard’s whistle sounds, and the train
slowly steams out of the station, her eyes are full of tears as
she catches a last glimpse of her mother’s kind face. But after
a little while, thanks to her youthful spirits, she cheers up a bit,
and begins to take an interest in the journey, as the train passes
one place after another. At one spot she notices some children
on the bank, and this reminds her of Ben, who, like most boys,
is very fond of watching the trains as they pass, and waving his
handkerchief to the passengers. The gentleman, who proves to
be one of Mrs. Page’s casual customers, is very kind, so the
sad parting is forgotten, and Martha is soon eagerly looking
forward to meeting her cousin at the terminus.


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A START IN LIFE.
22

DANGER.





































































































































































SOMETHING has gone wrong. Perhaps an engine has broken
down, or a truck has run off the line. It is night time, and
the express is due. When it passed the last signal the line
was clear, so it will soon be rushing on at the rate of sixty
miles an hour. What is to be done? A man must be sent
along the line with a red light to stop it if possible. On, on
DANGER! 23

it comes, rushing at full speed through the darkness—the
passengers, some reading, some talking, many sleeping, quite
heedless of the danger ahead. Presently they are startled by a
loud prolonged whistle. The driver has seen the light—not a
moment too soon—and is signalling to the guard to put on
the break with all his might. The guard obeys with a will;
and in a few minutes the train will pull up—panting and
snorting, and almost tearing up the-rails—just in time, and the
terrified passengers will realise that they have had a narrow
escape.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































LINE BLOCKED—A SHORT NOTICE TO PULL UP.
TRAVELLING ABROAD.

THIS scene, to begin with, is
not unlike what we often see
at home. The English tourist
looking for a seat, is confronted
by the burly Swiss’. traveller
with his pipe, who awishes to
keep the carriage to. himself
===ii' and his party. But the mili-
tary-looking official with the
long moustache, quietly but
firmly holds open the door, and
“Monsieur” will no doubt be
permitted to enter, and the train
will soon rush on through some
of the wildest and grandest scenery in the world.























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WW

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= == =



Travelling abroad is, in many respects, different from
TRAVELLING ABROAD. 25



travelling at home. In France passengers are not allowed on
the platform, but are locked in the waiting-room till the train is
ready to start, when they are all let loose to scramble for seats.
In America you can walk from one end of the train to the other,
as the carriages are so connected as to form one long car—so
that folks speak of being oz, not zz, the train—and there is no
first, second, or third class—it is all one. The American loco-
motive, too, is very different from ours. It has a spreading
fan-like funnel to carry off the smoke, as a great deal of wood
is used for fuel; and a “cow-catcher” in front, to ward off stray
cattle. A “cab,” or house, is placed upon the hinder part, for
the protection of the driver and stoker from the weather.

Here is a characteristic scene on the arrival of a train at a
French railway station.























ae

i!












































26

THE LEVEL CROSSING.

_~. ‘PASSENGERS are not allowed to cross
Ad the line.” This notice, which appears at
22% most railway stations, and certainly at all
junctions where passengers have to change
_ trains, must be familiar to everybody. For,
= it generally happens in such cases, that
they have to get to another platform; and
~ some folks in their haste might cross the
line, as a ‘‘short cut,” rather than go up
a number of steps, across a bridge, and down on the other side,
if the dangerous practice were not strictly forbidden by the
railway companies. There are, however, on many of the older
lines, places which are very dangerous, called “level crossings.”
These, it is true, mostly occur where the line crosses quiet
country roads, where there are not many people, the gates being
carefully closed when a train is due; but accidents will some-
times happen. A young lady one day was taking a walk along
a country road and came upon one of these level crossings; and
finding the gates were open and no train in sight, she passed
on. But instead of crossing at once she went a little way along
the bank, attracted by some wild flowers; and when she got
back she did not notice that the line was open and that a train
was signalled, so began to cross. But, unfortunately, at the
first rail the heel of her boot caught in one of the iron plates
that fix the metals to the sleepers, or cross-beams of wood ;
and there she stood quite powerless to extricate herself. Thus
caught in a trap, and getting more and more nervous, she was
trying to unbutton her boot, when, to her horror, she heard, in
the distance, the rumble of the approaching train. At this
terrible juncture she quite lost her presence of mind, and stood,
shrieking, with her hands spread out, as if to ward off the
engine, now fearfully close at hand. The driver saw her danger,
but could not stop. But the pointsman on duty, who also saw






THE LEVEL CROSSING.



































































































































































it, at once rushed forward, and opening his
open the boot, and released its owner, just in
life. It was, however, a narrow escape for both.





pocket-knife, cut
time to save her
28

TWO RAILWAY INCIDENTS.





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































' STRANGE scenes are sometimes witnessed on railway platforms.
The rogue flying from justice, trusting to the speed of the
express to escape, is thwarted by the flashing of the message
along the wires of the telegraph; and just as he is stepping
out of the carriage, luggage in hand, to make off amid the
TWO RAILWAY INCIDENTS. 29



bustle and confusion, he is politely stopped by Mr. Inspector
Bucket! Although he richly deserves the punishment that
awaits him, the scene is a painful one. Let us turn to another.
Two gentlemen with coats and wraps, evidently attired for
a journey, are walking along a busy thoroughfare in the direc-
tion of a neighbouring railway terminus. They are not in so
great a hurry, however, but what they can stop and give some-
thing to the crossing-sweeper, a poor but decent- looking lad,

who, with his little sister, is standing at the corner. ‘‘ Guess
we've no time to lose, anyhow!” cries one. ‘‘ Better take a
hansom.” The sweeper calls a cab, the two friends jump in,



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































and are driven off. The lad looks after them rather wistfully,
for they have liberally rewarded him for his trouble. ‘It’s the
way with them Americans,” says he ; “TI wish—” but he pauses,
for his eye falls upon something heavy that little Annie has
30 THE RAILWAY BOOK,



just picked up. It is a bag of money, which the gentlemen
have dropped in getting into the cab. Jack cannot leave his
sister; so without more ado he catches her up and runs after
the cab as fast as his burden will let him. It has turned the
corner and is out of sight; but he knows its destination, as
he heard it given to the driver, and makes straight for the
station. When he gets there, out of breath and ready to drop,
the officials will not let him pass the wicket. He can scarcely
speak, but showing the bag, and pointing frantically to the train,
he is at last allowed to pass. Rushing along the platform, and
eagerly scanning the faces of the passengers, he at length
recognises the two gentlemen, and is just in time to thrust the
bag into the carriage-window as the guard starts the train.
“Guess, young man, we'll meet you again at that same crossing
before long!” cries one, as the train moves off; ‘‘we shan’t
forget you, or little sister either!”















































LONDON UNDERGROUND RAILWAY—GOWER STREET STATION.

The Underground Railway, which was opened in 1863, and
passes beneath certain streets and roads of London, with their
network of gas-pipes, water-mains, etc., is a noteworthy example
of railway engineering.
31

RAILWAY COMFORTS.





a
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a nent ie

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WYN E_







NICE sociable couple!” I think
I hear my readers exclaim, as
they glance at the initial. Well,
these two passengers don’t much
look as if they were enjoying
each other's company, truly;
they are in a first-class carriage,
but do not seem able to make
themselves comfortable, all the
same. A long railway journey
is, in any case, very fatiguing ;
perhaps these worthy fellow-travellers are tired, fidgetty, and
just the least bit out of temper. They should remember that
grumbling is of no use, and will not bring them any nearer
to their journey’s end; and that things are a great deal better,
and that much more is done for the comfort of passengers now, |
than in the early days of railway travelling. Oh, those early
days, when many of the third-class carriages were open to all
weathers, and often without seats; or if covered, were without
glass windows, and little better than cattle boxes—hard, rigid,
and springless! Why, even the first-class carriages were small,
close, and stuffy-—very like the old stage-coaches which they had
displaced. Then very few trains carried third-class passengers
at all; for folks who could not afford to travel first or second-
class, the times were few and far between; while for those for
whom the then dear third-class fare was too much, there was the
wretched “parliamentary” train, starting at an uncomfortably early
hour in the morning, and stopping at every station as it crawled
its slow way along. Now, nearly all trains, even the fast onés,
have nice roomy third-class carriages with covered seats and
curtains even; while the first-class compartments are models of






32 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



comfort and easy riding, with cushioned seats, arms to lean upon,
blinds, rugs, and foot-warmers in the Wwinter-time ; so that, if you
feel drowsy, there is nothing to prevent you from taking a nap.
And for those who travel all night there is the luxurious Pullman
sleeping-car, which is also a perfect drawing room by day. Then
at all the stations on the line there are refreshment rooms, and
snug waiting-rooms to screen you from the bleak draughty air of
the platform; and, on long journeys, the train generally stops a
certain time at some large station to allow you to dine—the
dinner being all ready; or you can get a nice lunch to eat as
you go along, neatly packed with knives and forks and napkin,
in a basket, which you send back when done with, from some
station further on.





























































































-PULLMAN DRAWING-ROOM CAR. .
33

THREE LITTLE TRAVELLERS.

(From “The Boys and I,” by Mrs. MOLESWORTH.)

WELL—we were in the train. Our eyes were so red that any
one might have seen something sad had happened to us, but
we didn’t care. Tom’s eyes were the worst of all, and generally
he would do anything rather than let his red eyes be seen; but
to-day he didn’t care; we were too full of being sorry to care
whether people noticed our eyes or not. And at last when
papa had kissed us all three once more for the very last time,
reaching up to the railway-carriage window, and the boys and
1 holding him so tight that he was nearly choked; at last it
was all over, all the last tiny endings of good-byes over, and
we three were—it seemed to us, as far as we could understand
it in our childish way—alone in the world.

There was no one else in the railway-carriage—Pierson, of
course, was with us—she had put off being married for two
months, so that she could see us settled and get the new
nurse into our ways, as she called it; she, too, had been
crying, so that she was quite a fright, for her nose was all
bumpy-looking with the way she had been scrubbing at it and
her eyes. She was very kind to us; she took Racey on her
_knee, and let Tom and me sit close up to her; and if she had
had three arms she would have put one round each of us I
am sure.

‘Poor dears!” she said, and then she looked so very sad
herself that Tom and Racey took to comforting “ev, instead of
expecting her to comfort them. I was sad really—three poor
little things like us going away like that; away from everything
we had ever known, away from our nice bright nursery, where
everything a mother could do to make children happy our mother
had done; away from our dear little cots, where mother used to
kiss us every night; and our little gardens where we had worked

so happily in the summer; away to great big London, where
| D
34 THE RAILWAY BOOK.

among the thousand
faces in the street there
was not one we had
ever seen before.

I thought of all this
in a half-stupid way,
while I sat in the rail-
Way-carriage with my
arm round Tom’s neck
and my head leaning
on Pierson’s shoulder.
We had never cared
very much about Pier-
son, but now that she
was the only thing left
to us, we began to cling
to her very much.

“Tam so glad you've
notgoneaway, Pierson,”
I said, and Pierson
seemed very pleased,
for I didn’t very often
say things like that.

“Poor dear Miss
Audrey,” she said in
return. ‘ Poor dear,”
deemed the only words she could think of to comfort us with.
And then we all grew silent, and after a while it began to get
dark, for the days were short now, and Tom and Racey fell
asleep, just sobbing quietly now and then in their breathing—-
the way little children do, you know, after they have been crying
a good deal; and I sat quite still, staring out at the gloomy-
looking country that we were whizzing through, the bare trees
and dull fields, so different from the brightness and prettiness
of even a flat unpicturesque landscape on a summer day, when
























THREE LILILE TRAVELLERS. 35°



the sun lights up everything, and makes the fresh green look
still fresher and more tempting. And it seemed to me that the
sky and the sun and all the outside things were looking dull
because of our trouble, and that they were all sorry for us, and
there seemed a queer nice feeling in thinking so.

And after a while I began making pictures to myself of
what I would do to please mother while she was away; how I
would be so good to Tom and Racey, and teach them to be so
good too; how I would learn to be always neat, and how I
would try to get on with music, which I didn’t much like,
but which mother was so fond of that she thought I would
get to like it when I was bigger and had got over the worst
part. And then I began thinking of the letters I would write
to mother, and all I would say in them; and I wondered, too,
to myself very much what Uncle Geoff would be like, for I had
not seen him for some time, and I couldn’t remember him
properly at all; and I wondered what his house would be like,
and what sort of a nursery we should have, and what our new
governess would be like, and how everything in our new home
would be. I went on wondering till I suppose my brain got
tired of asking questions it couldn’t answer, and without knowing
that I was the least sleepy, I, too, fell fast asleep!

I was busy dreaming—dreaming that I was on board the
ship with papa and mother, and that Uncle Geoff was a lady
come to see the house; in my dream the ship seemed a house,
only it went whizzing along like a railway, and that he had a
face like Pierson’s, and he would say “ poor dear Miss Audrey,”
when another voice seemed to mix in with my dreaming. A
voice that said—

“Poor little souls—asleep are they—all three? Which of
them shall I look after? Here, nurse, you take the boys,
and I'll lift out Miss Audrey.”

D2
36 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



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THE SEASIDE TRAIN,
37

THE SEASIDE TRAIN.

OW eager are Frank and Harry to spring
out of the train; they can hardly wait
till it stops, although they have been
warned over and over again by their
parents of the dangerous practice of
alighting from a train while it is in
motion. But they are good boys, and a
restraining glance from their kind mother
who is awaiting them is enough to bring
them to their senses. They have, as you
see, just arrived from school, which has
broken up one week later than their sister's.
This is how it is that Rosie has been to the seaside some few
days—her mamma having taken her as soon as her holidays
began. So by this time she feels quite at home, and has found
out the best pools to swim boats in, the best places for shells
and seaweed, and knows all the favourite songs the “niggers”
sing on the sands and on the pier. Rose is naturally very
anxious to tell her brothers all the news, and has been much
excited all the morning; so when the long-expected train at
last steamed into the station, she fairly danced for joy as she
caught sight of Frank’s face at the window of the carriage.
Mamma, however, thinks of the luggage, which is being taken
out of the guard’s van, and tells the children to walk on while
she gets a porter to carry it to their apartments, where a good
dinner is waiting for the hungry boys.




38°

SEEING FRIENDS OFF,



































































VERYBODY, at one time or another,
has to take leave of dear relatives or
friends. “The best of friends must
part,” is an old proverb; and at no
place is it more shown to be true than
at the railway station, where most folks
go to “see friends off.” who are starting
onajourney. Many of these partings are
sad, while others are merry enough. Look
at these young fellows, who have come
to see off an old college chum, who has
run down from town to “look them up.”
This is a merry parting, with nothing in





































































































‘ a _ eh |
ese , ee Saw veh


SEEING FRIENDS OFF, 39













































































































































































































































Mt nS

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ma Hp
ay













it but jokes and light-hearted banter. ‘Take care of yourself, old
chap.” “Mind you look us up again soon!” “ 4a revoir ’—and
the train is off. Or, perhaps, a hard-worked young barrister has’
40 THE RAILWAY BOOK.









been spending a few weeks with a friend in the country; the visit
has been a pleasant one, and the guest has thoroughly enjoyed
the change. But, like all things, pleasant or otherwise, it has
come to an end—business calls, and the guest is driven to the
SEEING FRIENDS OFF. 4I



















































































































































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station by his kind host. Both are sorry, but the parting is not
asad one; they will meet again soon; so, with a hearty shake of
the hand, it is over. Then again, a young gentleman, who has
42 THE RAILWAY BOOK.



studied too hard, may be running down for a few days at the
seaside, or up the river; and his anxious mother and sister
accompany him to the station, and see him off without sorrow, as
they know he will soon return in renewed health and spirits.

But it is far different with the poor mother who has come to
see the last of her little sailor-boy before he joins his ship, or with
the country lass in the picture on page 40. This is a scene of
a few years back; the recruiting sergeant has been in the village,
times are bad, and poor Giles has been persuaded to take the
“Queen’s shilling” and enlist for a soldier. So his sister or
sweetheart has come to see him off. Poor lad! all the hard-
ships of asoldier’s life are before him, and he looks sorry enough
now, for all the gay ribbonsin his hat. But he is a fine manly young
fellow, he will soon cheer up, and may some day come back safe
and sound, with the Victoria Cross on his breast. Perhaps, in
this last picture (page 41), we see the saddest of all kinds of
partings. There has been a sudden bereavement, the head of
the family has been taken away, and the once happy home is
broken up. Brother and sister, who have been used to every
comfort, and have never known what it is to work for a living,
must part, to pursue their separate paths—the one as clerk, the
other as governess—to make their way into the world.



AILY, scenes, like those in the picture
opposite, are witnessed at railway stations.
When folks are eagerly expected, the
arrival of the train is keenly watched by
the friends who have come to the station
to meet them. When at length it
steams past the platform, how anxiously
each passenger is watched, as he alights!
And, when found, with what beaming
smiles and warm welcomes are the.
arrivals grected ! |




MEETING FRIENDS AT THE STATION.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MEETING FRIENDS AT THE STATION.

43
44

“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.”


































































































































































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Lie Zo a“ :
Here is a picture of a little girl who has had no one to meet
her at the end of her journey. She has been sent up from the
country in charge of the guard, to be ‘left till called for” in
the waiting-room, just as if she were so much luggage. Poor
little mite!

She sits there very patiently with her basket and
her pretty nosegay, but there is a wistful look in her face, and

she does not seem to care to eat the bun which the kind guard
has given her. She has seen many other children,

fellow
passengers, who have been claimed by their friends, hugged, kissed,
and borne off in high glee.





Lif

|
il

And now that the excitement of
the journey is over, and the vast station is deserted and quiet,

and she is all alone in the great waiting-room, she begins to
wonder if Aer friends have forgotten her.

Let us hope that
they will soon arrive, and put an end to her suspense.
“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.” 45























Seesaw aw: ee
SSeS 1502 SIT TS aw N2US FANT WINNS HINE! Hl i I rE Re AMIR EM SHUSELIDEERR!
paras sires sav OAH OPIATE WN US THA SINT CUNFENTIENMEISHENY iH SEE] ERGOMIRSUCISh:

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































From a Painting by Mr. A. Dixon [By permission of Mr. A. Lucas, Photo.
“LEFT TILL CALLED FOR.”
u

TWO KESCUES:







































































































































































































































SS
SS

WS

——



HERE are two pictures of children rescued from fearful injury,
or death, on the line. In the first, a little English country girl,
tired with gleaning in the hot sun, has fallen fast asleep on the
bank, with her sheaf of corn for a pillow, and her legs right across
the rail. On, on comes the train; the driver, on rounding the
curve, comes suddenly on the scene, and takes it all in at a glance, but
it is too late to stop. He blows his whistle as loudly as he can,
but in vain—the little sleeper does not awake. At this juncture,
a brave porter, who also sees the peril she is in, rushes forward
and saves her at the risk of his own life.
TWO RESCUES. 47









































































































































































The other scene is laid in America, as we may easily see by
the wide funnel of the engine, and the huge “ cow-catcher” in
front. This little girl, who has been gathering wild flowers, has.
48 THE RAILWAY BOOK.
also fallen asleep, her hand and arm resting on the rail. But
her faithful doggie is sagacious enough to understand her peril.
So, faithful to the last, he places himself, regardless of the “‘ cow-
catcher,” directly in the way of the train, and by his loud barking,
attracts the driver’s attention to the danger ahead, in time for him
to avert it.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































A RAILWAY ACCIDENT,





| -BNNINGS? EVERY MOTHER’S Book sent post-free on application by letter or post-card _

Direct to A. Fennings, West Cowes, I.W.

“COUGHS, COLDS, BRONCHITIS. 00 NOT LET YOUR CHILD DEN,

5
F E N N I N G S Fennincs’ Children’s Pow ders Pr event Convulsions,

| Uj fe is H E A L E P $5 2 ARE COOLING AND SOOTHING.
SL FENNINGS’

THE BEST REMEDY TO CURE ALL CHIL 1 REN’ S POWDERS
” — Coughs, Col ds, Asthmas, fe, fl For Children Cutting their Tecth.

To prevent Convulsions.
— Sold in Boxes at 1s. 13d. and 2s. 9d. with oe i= (Do noé contain Calomel, Opium, Morphia, nor anythin,
ae Sent post-free for 15 stz ase Direct to A. FENNINGs, injurious to a tender babe.)
> West Cowes, I.W. ° Sold in Stamped Boxes at is..13d. and 2s. 9d. (great
The largest size Boxes, 2s. 94. (35 stamps post-free) Ei saving) with full directions. Sent post-free for 15 stamps. an
contains tar ee times the quantity of the smaller boxes. Read. Pennines’ EVERYBODY'S DOCTOR. Sent () Read Frynincs’ EVERY MOTHER’S BOOK, which
Baas post-free for 13 stamps. Direct to A. FENNINGS, West contains yalnable hints on Feeding, Tee ething, Weaning,
+f Cowes! i. W. Sleeping, etc. Ask your Chemist for a Free Py:

DO NOF UNTIMELY Re |

02

WIHLASL Asva_ af

oe

SORE THROATS CURED WITH ONE DOSE.

FENNINGS’ FEVER CURER! |

BOWHL COMPLAINTS cured with One Dose.
TYPHUS or LOW F#;VER cured with wo Doses.
DYPHTHERIA cured with Three Doses. ‘
SCARLET Fi#VER cured with Four Doses.
CHOLERA cured with Five Doses.
DYSEHNTERY cured with Six Doses,

Sold in Bottles at 1s. 15d. each, with full directions, bu all Ghosts
Read PENNINGS’ EVERYBODY'S DOCTOR. Sent post-free for 13 sbamps.

: Direct to A. FENNINGS, West Cowes, I.W.

SORE ogi
WITH ONE DOSE |:

IS00 ie HLIM |
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AND NOT

FARINACEOUS,

the Heaithfal

Rearing of Hand-Fed
‘Children-and the
Preservation of Infant Life.

il Ih N BLOOD ANE BUN: FORMING ELEMENTS,

6

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G. WIEI..EN,
MARLBORO - ok PECK H/. M,