Citation
On the tree top

Material Information

Title:
On the tree top children's favorite stories
Creator:
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895
Merrill, Frank T ( Frank Thayer ), b. 1848 ( Illustrator )
Garrett, Edmund Henry, 1853-1929 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D. Lothrop Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891 ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1891 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Text and cuts printed in either red or blue.
General Note:
Fairy tales and children's stories versified by Clara Doty Bates.
Statement of Responsibility:
versified by Clara Doty Bates and others ; illustrated by Frank T. Merrill, Edmund H. Garrett and other well known artists.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026645071 ( ALEPH )
ALG4658 ( NOTIS )
191092013 ( OCLC )

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ON THE TREE-To
“CHILDREN'S FAVORITE STORIES

VERSIFIED BY -

CLARA: DOMY BATES =AND OLHERS



ILLUSTRATED BY

FRANK T. MERRILL, EDMUND H. GARRET?

AND OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS

BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY

- WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIFT.D







COPYRIGHT, 1891,
BY
D. LotHrop Company.



CONTENES:

= ON THE TREE-TOP.

se

THE BEGGAR KING.

Ts

THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

IV.

THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHAN FUNG LOG.

Ve

THE STORY OF MISS MUFFET.

VI.

THE GOLD SPINNER.

Wale

A CHILD'S CALENDAR.

VIII.

THE MISSION TEA PARTY.

IX.

ALADDIN,



La

CONTENTS.
Xx.
THE LOST BELL.

xe

THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.

XII,

THE WOLF AND THE GOSLINGS.,

XIII.

3

TLE URSEL’S MOTHERING SUNDAY,

XIV.

THE FAIRY FLAG.

XV.

WASIS THE CONQUEROR,

XVI.

LITTLE PEACHLING.

XVII.

THE DEACON’S LITTLE MAID.

XVIII.

KING OLEG’S CROWN.



ON His REET On



Rock-a-bye, baby on the tree-top,
~ When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.
When the bough bends, the cradle will fall,

And down will come baby, bough, cradle and all.


















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LE BEGGAR KING.

PIES BiG GAR KiNG,

By Mary E. WILKINs,

ark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark t
Lhe Beggars have come to town,
Some in rags, and some in lags,
And some in velvet gowns.”
























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ALF frantic, down the city streets,
The barking dogs they tore;
The dust it flew, and no man knew
The like of it before.



































The great St. Bernard’s booming bass,
The hound’s sepulchral howl,
The terrier-whelp’s staccato yelp,





















































- And the bull-dog’s massive growl, :
sa
In chorus sounded thro’ the town: ‘i
The windows up they went,
Thro’ every space a gaping face ;
Inquiringly was bent. ely hal.
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— Old Nursery Rhyme.

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The burgher’s daughter clean forgot
Her snood of silk and pearls,

And full of dread, popped out her head,
With its tumbled yellow curls.

A rosebud smote her on the lips:
Down went the rattling blind ;
But still the maid, all curious, staid

And slyly peeped behind.

A handsome lord, with smiling lips,
Leaned from the opposite tower;
Two withered hags, in dirt and rags,

Did from their garret glower.

The tailor left his goose to see,

And got his coat ablaze;
Three peasant maids, with shining braids,
Looked on in wild amaze.



‘The emperor's palace windows high,
All open they were set—

irom the gray stone red jewels shone,
And gold and violet.

The ladies of the emperor’s court
Leaned out with stately grace ;

And each began her peacock fan
‘Yo wave before her face.

“ Hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!” 4
‘The emperor left his throne

4t the uproar, and o’er the floor,
He trailed his ermine gown.

fue dogs press round the city-gates,
The guards they wave them back ;

Ut all in vain with might and main,
Dance round the yelping pack.



fark ! hark! hark! o’er growl and bark
There sounds a trumpet-call !

Now, rat-tat-tat, pray what is that
Outside the city-wall ?



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THE BEGGAR KING.





























Airs from the Beggar’s Opera
On broken fiddles played;

On pans they drum and wildly strum,
Filched from a dairy-maid.

With tenor-whine, and basso-groan,
The chorus is complete ;

And, far and wide, there sounds beside
The tramp of many feet!

“ Hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!”
Ah, what a horrid din!

‘The Beggars wait outside the gate,
And clamor to get in.

A herald to the emperor rode:
“ Save! save the emerald crown!

For, hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!
The Beggars storm the town!”

‘The ernperor donned his clinking mail,
Called out his royal guard,

_ The city-gate, with furious rate,

Went galloping toward.

A captain with a flag of truce
Thus parleyed on the wall:

“\Vhy do ye wait outside the gate,
And why so loudly call?”

He spoke, then eyed them with dismay;
For o’er the valley spread

‘The clamoring crowd, and stern and proud
A king rode at their head.

In mothy ermine he was drest;
As sad a horse he rode,

With jaunty air, quite dédonnaire,
As ever man bestrode.



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The Beggars stumped and limped behind,

With wails and whines and groans —
“ Some in rags, and some i lags,
And some in velvet gots.”

A great court-beauty’s splendid dress
Was there, all soiled and frayed;
The scarf, once bright, a belted knight

Wore at his accolade ;

A queen’s silk hose; a bishop's robe;

A monarch’s funeral-pall ;
The shoes, all mud, a prince-o’-the-blood
_ Had danced in at a ball.

The Beggars stumped and limped along,
Aping their old-time grace :
Upon the wind, flew out behind,

Ribbons of silk and lace.

A wretched company it was
Around the city gate —

The sour and sad, the sick and bad,
And all disconsolate.

But in the wretched company
‘There was one dainty thing:

A maiden, white as still moonlight,
Who rode beside the king.

Her hands were full of apple-flowers
Plucked in the country Janes ;

Her little feet, like lilies sweet,
O’erlaced with violet veins,

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Hung down beneath her tattered dress »
A bank of lilies, showed

Her shoulders fair ; her dusky haw
Down to her girdle flowed.



THE BEGGAR KING.








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Up spoke the haughty Beggar King:
“T want no parleying word !

Bid come to me, right speedily,
The emperor, your Lord!”






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Wide open flew the city-gate !
Out rode the emperor bold ;

His war-horse pranced and lightly danced
Upon his hoofs of gold.

“ Now what wouldst thou, O Beggar King?
What wouldest thou with me?
For all the gold the town doth hold
Would not suffice for thee.”

“ Beholdest thou my daughter dear,
O emperor, by my side?
Though wild the rose, it sweetly grows,
And she shall be thy bride,

“ And thou shalt seat her on thy throne.
When thou thy troth hast pledged,
Her beauty grace with gems and lace,
And robes with ermine edged;

“Or else, on thee, O emperor,
Like locusts we’ll come down!
And naught that’s fair or rich or rare,
We'll leave within the town !

“The children all shall lack for food,
And the lords and ladies pine ;
For we will eat your dainties sweet,
And drink your red old wine!

“Now what say’st thou, O emperor ?—
Wed thou my daughter dear,
To-morrow day, by dawning gray,
Thy borders shall be clear.”

The emperor looked upon the maid:

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oS A is : a / ee Her soft white cheeks grew red.
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THE BEGGAR KING.





The emperor loved her at the sight.
“T take your terms!” cried he;
“Nor wilt thou fear, O maiden dear,

To wed to-night with me?”

























Her long, dark lashes swept her cheek;
“A word she could not find,

For to and fro her thoughts did blow,
Like lilies in a wind.

She toward him reached her little hand,
Then — drew it back again ;

She smiled and sighed —all satisfied,
He grasped her bridle-rein.

Then clattered courtiers thro’ the street,
Fast ran the folk, I ween,

And under feet strewed roses sweet,
And boughs of apple-green.



The emperor, on his gold-shod horse,
Came pacing thro’ the town,

And by his side his timid bride.
Rode in her tattered gown.

A crocus-broidered petticoat,
Robes stiff with threads of gold,

‘The maids found soon, and satin shoon,
And lace in spices rolled.



THE BEGGAR KING.





They led the trembling beggar-maid
All gently up the stair,

fhro’ golden doors with sills of flowers,
Into a chamber fair.



























They loosed from her her faded gear ;
They kissed her gentle face;

From head to feet clad her so sweet
In linen fine and lace ;









They clasped her golden-threaded robe —

“ Darling, thou art so fair!”

With strings of pearls, amid the curls,
They dressed her flowing hair.



































“Now, pardy!” cried the emperor,
“The rose-tree is in flower !
In the world green was never seen

Queen half so sweet before!”

The people, dressed as for a feast,
Thronged round the palace-doors ;
The minstrels sung, the joy-bells rung,

The roses fell in showers.’

The Beggar King looked toward thetown :
“ Farewell, my daughter dear!”
The east was gray — he rode away,

And swallowed down a tear.

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Ee Ba Ee Nie ARN GD SAN ies Ou BtACNEB UR IY ae (oR Ols| Se



“THE ENCHANTED PALE O PBN BWR Y “CROs S:

By Mary E. Wiukins.

“ Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,

To sce an old woman jump on a white horse,

With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,

She shall make music wherever she goes.”
Old Nursery Rhyme.










RAY show the way to Banbury Cross,”
Silver bells are ringing.
“To find the place I'm at a loss,”
Silver bells are ringing.












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“Pass six tall hollyhocks red and white ;
Then, turn the corner toward the right,
Pass.four white roses; turn once more,
Go by a bed of gilly-flower,

And one of primrose ; turn again
Where, glittering with silver rain,

There is a violet-bank; then pass

A meadow green with velvet grass,
Where lively lights and shadows play,
And white lambs frolic all the day,
Where blooming trees their branches toss —
Then will you come to Banbury Cross.”



THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

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The white horse arched his slender neck,
Silver bells are ringing,
Snow-white he was without a speck,
Silver bells are ringing.
An old wife held his bridle-rein,
(The king was there with all his train,)
Her gray hair fluttered in the wind,
Her gaze turned inward on her mind;
And not one face seemed she to see
In all that goodly company.
Gems sparkled on her withered hands ;
Her ankles gleamed with silver bands
On which sweet silver bells were hung,
And always, when she stirred, they rung.























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The white horse waited for the start,
| Silver bells are ringing,

Before him leapt his fiery heart,

8 Silver bells are ringing.

Upon his back the old wife sprung,
Her silver bells, how sweet they rung!
She gave her milk-white steed the rein,
And round they swept, and round again.
A merry sight it was to see,
And the silver bells rang lustily.




The gallant horse with gold was shod ; SS STRETIO <<
So fleetly leapt he o’er the sod, ei \ DSi Ye
He passed the king before he knew: (ey \"y, INST \L/

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THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

























































ALITA E27 |







A pretty sight it was, forsooth,
Silver bells are ringing,

For dame and children, maid and youth,

Silver bells are ringing.

The princess laughed out with delight,

And clapped her hands, so lily-white —

The darling princess, sweet was she

As any flowering hawthorn-tree.

She stood beside her sire, the king,

And heard the silvery music ring,

And watched the old wife o’er the plain

‘Sweep round, and round, and round again

Till, suddenly she slacked her pace,

And stopped before her wondering face,

















And snatched her up before they knew,
Silver bells are ringing,
And with her from their vision flew,
Silver bells are ringing.
The nobles to their saddles spring,
And follow headed by the king!
They gallop over meadows green ;
They leap the bars that lie between;
Thro’ the cool woodland ride they now,
Neath rustling branches, bending low;
The silver music draws them on,
But, when they reach it, it is gone —
The white dew falls, the sun is set,
And no trace of the princess yet.

eB





THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.































Along the beams of moonlight pale,
Siuer bells are ringing,
In violet shadows in the vale,
Silver bells are ringing.
Return with us, oh, gracious king!
This search is but a bootless thing. ©
A spell is Jaid upon our minds,

Our thoughts are tossed as by the winds,
And deeper o’er our senses swells

The music of those silver bells!
Return, oh, king, ere ’tis too late;

The Wise Man by the palace-gate

Will give to thee his kindly aid,

So shalt thou find the royal maid.”





















THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS:



-_—

















CL AD te

They galloped back o’er hill and dale,
’ Silver bells are ringing,
In soft gusts came the southern gale,
Silver bells are ringing.
The trembling king knelt down before
The Wise Man at the palace-door:
“Oh, Wise Man! art thou truly wise —
Find out my child with thy bright eyes !”
“Thy daughter clings to carven stone,
White dove-wings from her shoulders, grown ;
In downy dove-plumes she is drest;
‘They shine like jewels on her breast ;
She sits beneath the minster eaves,
Amongst the clustering ivy leaves.







































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THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



“ She was so full of angel-love,” (eA EO Whse ee ete | A a MEA
Silver bells are ringing, vt Lt \| iis i le PEs = a eo nie,
“They could but make her a white dove,” ; XY / i it. 7G pal
Silver bells are ringing. ~ i | The king stood ’neath the minster-wall, Hare i AN. oy AS Ne
- And loudly on his child did call. tt ti mn
A snow-white dove beneath the eaves,
Looked down from ’mongst the ivy-leaves,
Then flew down to the monarch’s breast,
And, sorely panting there did rest.
Then spake the Wise Man by his side:
“Oh, king, canst thou subdue thy pride
_ And hang thy crown beneath the eaves,
. Amongst the clustering ivy-leaves
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“Tn thine unhappy daughter’s place?”
Silver bells are ringing,
“ She’ll find but thus her maiden-grace,”
Silver bells are ringing.
The jewels in the royal crown,
Out from the dark-green ivy shone!
The white dove softly folds her wings,
Then lightly to the ground she springs—
A lovely princess, sweet the more,
For being a white dove an hour.
They went home through the happy town.
The king forgot his royal crown,
And, soon, beneath the minster-eaves,
‘Twas- hidden by the ivy-leaves.



THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.

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SUEZ BESS EW. ines ca aeI= Se aa Mh





CHANG FUNG LOO.





BY MRS. M. E, BLAKE,

( A name for China, you understand ),
Where the Vangtse Kiang and Hoang Ho {/j
{ Flow from the beautiful Mounts of Snow,

| Where the Pe-la-shu are the favorite trees,

| And tea leaves float on the evening breeze —
| In the province of Kwang Tung, near Chow Choo,
| Lived a wonderful youth named Chang Fung Loo.




















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He was eeu just as a pheenix would be,

| Or anything equally rare to see—

| A blackbird white, or a sunlit night,

il Or a walking fish, or a wingless bird,

i; Or anything else that is quite absurd —

For he was a glutton! Just think of that!

In a country with stomachs so small and nice

jj, That they make a whole meal of one frog —if fat
| Or some infinitesimal grains of rice.

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i l} Ves, he was a glutton. For breakfast he’d eat
(| A couple of dozen of pickled pigs’ feet,
i A gallon or two of elegant stew
“iy Made from the delicate Sho-kia-yu,
| A yard of bread, and a three-quart pot
9 Of ginger preserve, uncommonly hot,
dt And wash it ajl down, as the case might be,
( !

With thirty or forty cups of tea.






‘Perhaps you think he would want no lunch ?
Well, just let me tell you-; he’d swallow a bunch
Of edible birds’ nests, a quarter of hog,

, The ribs and legs of a plump young dog, \ aX ie , :
vv; A bushel of oysters, a score of larks, ofy lod

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THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.

The fins of unlimited numbers ae hanes
And then he’d sit down on the bamboo floor,
} And this terrible boy would cry for more!

It still is a question in my mind whether
If he had not been born with the peacock feather [
| (Which in those barbarous lands of the South
| Is the same as our silver spoon in the mouth)
He would not be whipped till he lost his breath,
Or hung, if you please, or flayed to death,
{ Or banished away, as they sometimes do,
To Sing Chu Ling, or to Yung Chow Foo,

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He wore a big tuby on top of his hat.
ee a ¢ Mm) So, whenever | his son’asked a slave for a dish,
That moment ’twas brought, be it flesh, be it fish ;
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at A me as spoiled as a boy with a pig- tail could be. |

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Day by day his appetite grew,

Day by day the whole year through ;

Till all that he wished, and all that he said,
And all that he thought of, living or dead,
Big or little, or sour, or sweet,

Was just to get something more to eat.

een &

No matter how horrid the kind of beast,
He did not care in the very least ;
But, would stick big pins
In his poor slaves’ shins,
ib Te they were not ready with some new feast —’ .
| Elephants’ trunks and tiger roast,



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THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF 2a no NG LOO:



Boa Constrictor served up on toast,
Walrus haunch and Zebra stew,

| Rump steak cut from the Horned Gnu,
Hippopotamus and pickled Seal,
Rhinoceros baked in cochineal,









Crocodile tails and Camels’ humps, ds
Monkeys cut into strips and lumps, “cs
Neck of Camelopard, spiced and cloved — IF




These were a few of the things he loved.





























It happened — to make my story short —
It happened one day as he went to court,
| Driving his long-tailed ponies four

Up to the emperor’s palace door,

He heard them talk, in a frightened way,
Of a monster seen in Chow Choo bay —

| A horrible thing, all teeth and claws, =
With a pair of tremendous bony jaws,
And a dorsal fin all black and red,













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And a waterspout in a giant head, alr ~ Rey fH
And a scaly length of a mile or more, oN ENS a ey
Hobbling and wriggling along the shore, iT - aS Ny ' Ms \

And a cyclop eye in a horned tail, aN ale a Mi)




) A double head, double dyed, double u (ww) hale.
“My Junk! My Junk!” wasall Chang said, }
4] And flung his whip at a pony’s head.

f “Sound the loud tam-tam! Beat the drum !

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| Bid all my bold retainers come!

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Shout for my brave harpooner bold!

Fling out my sails of cloth of gold! a ene

| Belay the anchor and douse the glib! Out from the shore the good junk sailed,
| 22 sup to-night on that monster's rib!” Her a like dragons’, golden scaled ;

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THE TRAGICAL HISTORY Ur CHANG FUNG LOO.
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j A hundred sailors, by fours and fours,
Rising and falling aboye the oars ;

| A hundred gallant soldiers dressed

} With spear and helmet and shield on breast ;

“jj The brave harpooner with spear so strong,

"| Two'hundred and seventy-five feet long ; _

‘| And Chang himself on the deck — the upper —
Smacking his lips as he thought of supper!










4 “ Avast your helm!” the lookout cried,
E ‘There she blows on the larboard side!”




| Before they could turn, before they could think,
| Before they could even have time to wink,

The sea-serpent rose on his hinder claws,

| He lifted the junk in his terrible jaws,

| And swallowed them /— sailors and soldiers tall,
| Chang, the harpooner, spear and all,

} Mast, and rigging, and keel, and sail,

| | And winked with the eye in his horned tail!







WRLAL A So ITV AK














So Chang, who had gobbled so many a dish,
| Got gobbled at last by a sea-serpent fish.









= Moral. =g
~ ‘The moral —that is if a moral there be — Wj

“=, Is this: that a boy who sets up for a glutton »
~ Must watch, or some still bigger gobbler than he
_, Will get him at last, just as sure as a button.

> BRA






4





THE STORY OF MISS MUFFET.





: WAS a crimson velvet tuffet,
With a golden cord around it,
On which Miss Muffet sat;

Her frock was made of rosy satin,
And she had a wreath of roses
Twisted round her hat.

Roses looked in at the window,
Roses in tall, crystal vases
Stood around the room; F
On Miss Muffet’s cheeks were roses
Vor it was that lovely season
When roses are in bloom.

Miss Muffet had a silver ewer

Chased with wreaths of silver roses.
Full of curds and whey ;

On her knees a silver basin,

’Graved with little knots of rose-buds
‘Tn frosted silver, lay.

Into her little silver basin,
From her little silver ewer,
She poured some curds and whey,
| Then, with a little golden ladle,
Daifitily she fell to eating,
As a lady may.



Pek



‘eg



THE STORY OF MISS MUPEFEE.

A spider swung in through the window,

Dressed in velvet, black and yellow,
On a silken thread

From a spray of Provence-roses ;

He wore a doublet barred with yellow,
And jewels on his head.

Downward climbed he from the roses,
Lightly, on his silken ladder ;
Slyly as a cat
Ran across to poor Miss Muffet,
And beside her, on the tuffct,
Impertinently sat.

All her curds and whey upsetting,
Through the window sprang Miss Muf-
fet
Lightly as a cat —
Her frock of rosy satin tearing,
From her cheeks the roses losing,
And the roses from her hat.

Svea

SSeS

EE

Ri

The Fairy Prince that way was pranc-

ing,
On his milk-white fairy courser,
Out of Fairy-land;
From his jewelled saddle springing,
Up he ran to poor Miss Muffet,
And gently kissed her hand:

“Come with me, my dear Miss Muffet,
For I am the Prince of Faery,

And I'll treat you well ;
Fast we'll fly o’er hill and meadow,
Keeping time unto the jingling

Of a silver bell.

“Come with me, you rosy darling —
In Fairy-land there are no spiders
To frighten you away ;.
| In a grove of fairy roses
| Safely you shall sit to-morrow,
} And feast on curds and whey.





AR TAD BS hoes @ UKeve

OF MISS

MUFFET.,



“Come with me, you rosy beauty!

Naught that has a taint of venom
Enters Fairy-land ;

Fairy guards with spears of crystal,

Sentinels on diamond watch-towers,
At its entrance stand.”

The Prince of Faery caught Miss Muf-
fet.
Like a feather to the saddle,
Half before she knew;
Over hills and velvet meadows,
Silver bells and trumpets sounding,
Merrily they flew.

They came to look for sweet Miss Muf-
fets
They only found a surly spider °
Who on her tuffet sat ;
And by the tree of Provence-roses
Empty lay the silver ewer,
And Miss Muffet’s hat.

They only found some dainty-hoof
prints,
All too fine for mortal courser,
Near them, where they lay:
They only heard a silvery jingling
And a blare of silver trumpets
O’er the fields away.





THE GOLD-SPINNER.



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THE GOLD-SPINNEBR.

4 MILLER had a daughter,
And lovely, too, she was .

Her step was light, her smile was bright

= Her eyes were gray as glass.

(So Chaucer loved to write of eyes

in which that nameless azure lies

So like shoal-water in its hue,

Though all too crystal clear for blue.)

As you would suppose, the miller
Was very proud of her,

And would never fail to tell some tale
As to what her graces were.

On the powdery air of his own mill

Floated the whispers of her skill ;

At the village inn the loungers knew

All that the pretty girl could do,




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Oft in his braggart way
This foolish tale he told,

That his daughter could spin from bits of straw
Continuous threads of gold!

So boastful had he grown, forsooth,
That he cared but little for the truth:

But since this was a curious thing

It came to the knowledge of the king.




ARI EGA Ee PON I RO LAT WIPE BE TSIIATT AAPOR LE OD oe i EMPL






He thought it an old wife’s fable,

But senseless stuff at best ;
Yet, as he had greed, he cried, “ Indeed!

TI will put her powers to test.”
With a wave of his hand, he further said i
That to-morrow morning the clever maid
. Should come to the castle, and he would see

; What truth in the story there might be.

. AAT IAH SOIT 9m an AR ot PED freee eppr minded ‘ EES enn A ALLER ESE ELEN TL CLEATOR ALE ICAL ORBSE Btn AACR BOON





THE GOLD-SPINNER.













eee ee.

i Next day, with a trembling step,
| She reached the palace door,
j _ And was shown into a chamber, where
Was straw upon the floor.
They brought her a chair anda spinning-wheel,
A little can of oil, and a reel;
And said that unless the work was done —
All of the straw into the gold-thread spun —
’ By the time that the sun was an hour high
Next morning, she would have to die.






Down sat she in despair,
Her tears falling like rain:

She had never spun a thread in her life,
Nor ever reeled a skein!

Hark! the door creaked, and through achink,

With droll wise smile and funny wink,

In stepped a little quaint old man,

All humped, and crooked, and browned with
tan.










SIRE sie oH erie ie ace AV ANd ae Al ariee peer aks onSI DUN SOI,




She looked in fear and- amaze
To see what he would do;
He said, “ Little maid, what will you
give
If I'll spin the straw for you?”
Ah, me, few gifts she had in store — d é
A trinket or two, and nothing more! es : (




SRE incataia ne SP








A necklace from her throat so slim
She took, and timidly offered him.

"Twas enough, it seeni2d ; for he sat
At the wheel in front of her,
And turned it three times round and round,
Whirr, and whirr-rr, and whirr-rr-rr —
One of the bobbins was full ; and then,
Whirr, and whirr-rr, and whirr-rr-tr again,

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a TILA BL TIN ETON EAS BITES TATE 9 EON AE BINT AE

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Thi. GOLD-SPINNER.



TURAL SNORTED a a eR SPREE ESR A rte HP RNR












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Until all the straw that had been spread iS
Had been deftly spun into golden thread.

At sunrise came the king
To the chamber, and, behold,
Instead of the ugly heaps of straw
Were bobbins full of gold! Te
This made him greedier than before; \
And he led the maiden out at the door
Into a new room, where she saw
Still larger and larger heaps of straw,
A chair to sit in, a spinning-wheel,
A little can of oil, and a reel ;
And he said that straw, too, must be spun
To gold before the next day’s sun
Was an hour high in the morning sky,
And if ’twas not done, she must die.







“4 Down sank she in despair,
Her tears falling like rain ;

She could not spin a single thread,
She could not reel a skein.

But the door swung back, and through the chink,

With the same droll smile and merry wink,

i
i
The dwarf peered, saying, ‘‘ What will you do |
|



If I'll spin the straw once more for you?”
“Ah me, I can give not a single thing,”
She cried, “except my finger-ring.”
He took the slender toy,
And slipped it over his thumb ;
Then down he sat and whirled the wheel,
Hum, and hum-m, and huni-m-m ;
Round and round with a droning sound,
Many a yellow spool he wound,
Many a glistening skein he reeled ;
And still, like bees in a clover-field,
The wheel went hum, and hum-m and hum-m-m.
Next morning the king came,
Almost before sunrise,
To the chamber where the maiden was,
And could scarce believe lis eyes
To see the straw, to the smallest sh~ods,
Made into shining amber threads.
And he cried, “ When once more I have tried
Your skill fike this, you shall be my bride ;
nn nen nr ee ERSTE RIP iia













For | might search through all my life
Nor find elsewhere so rich a wife.”
.| Then he led her by the hand
| Through still another door,
To a room filled twice as full of straw
As either had been before.
There stood the chair and the spinning-wheel,
/ And there the can of oil and the reel ;
| And as he gently shut her in
He whispered, “ Spin, little maiden, spin.”

Again she wept, and again |
Did the little dwarf appear ;

“What will you give this time,” he asked,

“Tf I spin for you, my dear?”





epee perme

. Alas — poor little maid —alas!
Out of her eyes as gray as glass
Faster and faster tears did fall,
As she moaned, “I’ve nothing to give at all.”
Ah, wicked indeed he looked ;

But while she sighed, he smiled!
*. « Promise,when you are queen,” he said,
“To give me your first-born child!”






























Little she tho’t what that might mean,
Or if ever in truth she should be queen
Anything, so that the work was done—
Anything, so that the gold was spun }

_ She promised all that he chose to ask ;
: ate And blithely he began the task.

BSS
” Round went the wheel, and round,
3 Whiz, and whiz-z, and whiz-z-z !
So swift that the thread at the spindle
point
Flew off with buzz and hiss.

She dozed— so tired her eye'ids were —
To the endless whirr, and whirr, and whirr ;
Though not even sleep could overcome

f The wheel’s revolving hum, hum, hum!
When at last she woke the room was clean,
Not a broken bit of straw was seen ;

But in huge high heaps were piled and rolled
Great spools of gold — nothing but gold!
2 It was just at the earliest peep of dawn,
And she was alone — the dwarf was gone.





THE GOLD-SPINNER.



It was indeed a marvellous thing
For a miller’s daughter to wed a king ;

But never was royal lady seen

More fair and sweet than this young queen.
The spinning dwarr she quite forgor

In the ease and pleasure of her lot ;

And not until her first-born child

Into her face had looked and smiled

Did she remember the promise made;
Then her heart grew sick, her soul afraid.

One day her chamber door
Pushed open just a chink,

And she saw the well-known crooked dwarf,
His wise smile and his blink.

He claimed at once the promised child ;

But she gave a cry so sad and wild

That even his heart was touched to hear ;

And, after a little, drawing near,

He whispered and said: “ You pledged
The baby, and I came; :
But if in three days you can learn
By foul or fair my name —
By foul or fair, by wile or snare,
You can its syllables declare,
Then is the child yours — only then —
And me you shall never see again!”



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ARIK



He vanished from her sight,
And she called her pages in ;
She sent one this way, and one that ;
She called her kith and kin,
Bade one go here, and one go there,
Despatched them thither, everywhere —
That from each quarter each might bring
The oddest names he could to the king.

Next morning the dwarf appeared,
And the queen began to say,
“Caspar,” “ Balthassar,” “ Melchoir” —_
But the dwarf cried out, “ Nay, nay!”
Shaking his little crooked frame,
“That’s not my name, that’s not my name







17?





THE GOLD-SPINNER.







































The second day ’twas the same ;
But the third a messenger

Came in from the mountains to the queen, :
And told this tale to her: und zw H 4 ey Me

That, riding under the forest boughs, Wi

He came to a tiny, curious house ;

Before it a feeble fire burned wan,

And about the fire was a little man ;

In and out the brands among,

Dancing upon one leg, he sung:

“ Jo-day [ll stew, and then [Ul bake,

To-morrow I shall the queen s child take;

How fine that none ts the secret in,

That my name is Rumpelstiliskin L”

The queen was overjoyed,
And when, due time next day,

The dwarf returned for the final word,
She made great haste to say:

“Ts it Conrade?” ‘“No,”—he shook his
head.
.“Ts it Hans? or Hal?” Still “ No,” he said.
* Ts it Rumpelstiltskin ?”’ then she cried.
“ A witch has told you,” he replied, :
And shrieked and stamped his foot so hard
_ That the very marble floor was jarred ;
And his leg broke off above the knee,
And he hopped off, howling terribly.

|
| He vanished then and there,
And never more was seen !
This much was in 4zs dreadful name —
. It saved her child to the queen.
And the little lady grew to be
; So very sweet, so fair to see,
That none could her loveliness surpass ;
And her eyes — they were as gray as glass!





= A CHILD’S CALENDAR.



BY CAROLINE METCALF.









Ee

May ! the leaves are dancing in the sunny air!

Berns uncurl, and blossoms spring up everywhere,

Sweet the breezes blowing where pink may-flowers
hide

Under last year’s leaf-fall on the warm hillside,

L

A PRIL! summer’s coming!
year,

For the snow has melted, and the blue-bird’s here !

iVow begins the

Woolly catkins swinging on the alder-bush
Whisper,

push!”

“Leaves are starting! we can feel them









DLT,
June! why, every June-day is a happy dream!
Buttercups and daisies, strawberries and cream |

Hush! hid in the clover, would you ever think

All that glee could come from just one bobo-

link?



































































































































We
August! fire-flies brighten when the daylight fails ;
In the swampy meadows grow the tall “ cats’-
tails ;”
By the shady brcokside who can feel the heat,

While the water ripples over naked feet ?



BV

July! off at sunrise picking blackberries !



Climbing after birds’-nests up the tallest trees! _
“Helping ” in the haying! On the pond afloat,

Hunting water-lilies in a leaky boat.





Wale
Wild grapes in September tempt to climbs and
leaps ;
In the fragrant orchard apples lie in heaps.
*Round the cider-presses, thronging with the bees,—

“D4n’t it taste like honey, sucked through straws

like these ?”















Vala

Jolly, crisp October! Then the chestnut-burrs
Rattle down like hail-stones if the least wind stirs!
Gold and crimson leaf-showers from the tree-tops fall,

$

Squirrels scamper gaily o’er the old stone wall!













VIII











Gray skies in November bring the first light snow ;
Whirling softly downward. see the white flakes
go!

In dear grandma’s kitchen peering, eager eyes



























































































Spy out “ Suck a turkey! such Thanksgiving

pies!”

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IX.
€ Christmas! ” cries December. “ How the stockings
look
Loaded down with bundles in the chimney-nook! ”
‘Tumbling up at day-break out of downy beds —
“Santa knew we wanted iust these skates and

sleds !”

















































































































































































































xls

February hurries: Only twenty-eight |
Days.of wintry weather! ’Tisn’t long to wait.

Icicles, a-dropping, shattered lie in rows ;

Poor old Winter’s white coat many a brown patch _

shows.





























ree
January’s buried in a great snow-fall ;
On with coat and mittens! out to slide and ball!
Merry sleigh-bells jingle in the frosty air,

And the grand ice-palace rises white and fair.



a











ee
Ay

ve =~ N

XII.

March! has Winter vanished? Hear the river's
rush !

Brooklets run and ripple! Snow is turned te
slush!

Wading through the door-yards, in big rubbez
boots,

You may catch Spring peeping out—in crocus

shoots !





TT Ua (i Pr. Ae

ea



HE war in the East had ended;
Its terrors were past, they said;
There was peace, once more, for the living,
And peace for the valiant dead.

Through the splendid squares of Lucknow
The Highlanders marched again ;

The heroes of fortress and jungle,
Brave Havelock’s peerless men!

Ay! open your gates, O Lucknow ! —
But measure, ye guards, your breath,
As ye think of those days, an hundred,
When Havelock marched with death.





They had freed the beleaguered city,

’ Fought step by step through the vale ; O minaret, tower and shrine!

. And swept from the shore of the Ganges
Forever the Sepoy’s trail.

‘Then welcome them back with rejoicing,

For these are the men who saved you,
Whose glory outlasteth thine !





Through the streets swept the colors of Englana,
Borne proudly aloft on the air;

While the “throne land of Rama” re-echoed
The Christian’s thanksgiving and prayer.







And blithest of all were the pipers,
Their tartan plaids streaming in pride,

As they woke, on the banks of the Goomtee,
The airs of the Doon and Clyde.

‘

Then the heart of one beautiful woman
Was stirred by an impulse sweet,

As she thought of the long, forced marches,

The weary and blood-stained feét ;

Of the pain, the hunger, the thirsting,
The death in the jungle’s gloom ;

The rescue of woman and children,
Threatened with direful doom.











And she said, “I will spread them a banquet,
With a touch of the homeland cheer,

And the welcome their mothers would give them.
Afar in the heatherlands dear,

“ Not for twice twelve months have they tasted
A simple cupful of tea!

[ will serve it to-day for the heroes
Who periled their lives for me!



“ Bid them come to the courts of the Mission |”
Gay awnings were hastily hung ;

While on tripods of curious fashion,
The teakettles merrily swung ;

Swung and sung songs of the homeland; At the old gray gate of the Mission,
T'amiliar and sweet were the tunes, "Neath turret and watchtowers high,

As if winds of the loch and the mountain Where the dusk-eyed Indian Princess
Blew soft through the Indian noons. Had dreamed in the days gone by,





She fastened the tartan of Scotland This fair-faced, brave-hearted woman,
. With the thistle-bloom over her breast ; ize A stranger from lands of the West,
And her own little winsome daughter To thé ancient palace and gardens

In the bonny bright plaid she drest. : Welcomed each war-worn guest.



Served with the grace and the bounty
Of royal féte and of feast, i

To the tattered and smoke-grimed heroes,
In halls of the storied East.

And with Highland bonnets uplifted,
There under the Hindoo palm,

The soldiers of Havelock listened
To the Hebrew’s glorious psalm:

Notr.— This incident was related to the
author by Dr. William Butler, American Mis-
sionary in India during the Sepoy Rebellion.

The event occurred when Havelock’s Bri-
_gade had returned to Lucknow, to take up
their line of march for the Afghan frontier.



And many a battle-scarred soldier
Let fall from a glistening eye

Hot tears on the hand of his hostess
For whom he had thought to die.

“Thou wentest before thy people,
And kings of armies did flee!”

Then merrily under the shadows
They drank of the fragrant tea,

And for her was the Highlander’s blessing
Breathed low in that tenderer scene
When the pipers, proud in their places,
. Played grandly — “God save the Queen!”



ALADDIN.

















































Lovers of stories all!
First, Saxon Edith, of the corn-silk hair,
Growing so strong and tall ;

I SEE a little group about my chair,

Then little brother, on whose sturdy face
Soft baby dimples fly,

As fear or pleasure give each other place
When wonders multiply ;

' Then Gold-locks —summers nine their goldenest
Have showered on her head,
And tinted it, of all the colors best,
' Warm robin-red-breast red ;



Then, close at hand, on lowly haunches set,
With pricked-up, tasseled ear,

Is Tony, little clear-eyed spaniel pet,
Waiting, like them, to hear.

isay Ihave no story —allare told!
Not to be daunted thus,

They only crowd more confident and bold,
And laugh, incredulous.

And so, remembering how, once ona time,
I, too, loved such delights,

I choose this one, and put it into rhyme,
From the “ Arabian Nights.”






A poor little lad was Aladdin !
His mother was wretchedly poor ;
A widow, who ‘scarce ever had in
Her cupboard enough of a store
«, To frighten the wolf from the door.

No doubt he was quite a fine fellow

For the country he lived in == bur ah !
His skin was a dull, dusky yellow,

And his hair was as long as ’twould grow.
(Tis the fashion in China, you know. )

a
ay

But however he looked, or however
He fared, a strange fortune was his.
None of you, dears, though fair-faced and clever,
Can have anything like to this,
So grand and so marvellous it is !

Well, one day — for so runs the tradition —
While idling and lingering about

The low city streets, a Magician
From Africa, swarthy and stout,
With his wise, prying eyes spied him out,



ALADDIN.





























































































































Far down in the earth’s very centre
There burned a strange lamp at a shrine ;
Great stones marked the one place to enter ;
Down under t’was dark as amine;
What further — no one could divine:

And that was the treasure Aladdin
Was sent to secure. First he tore

The huge stones away, for ke had in
An instant the strength of a score ; :
Then he stepped through the cavern-like door.























Tees snd went up to him very politely,
And asked what his namé was and cried:
“ My lad, if I judge of you rightly,

My poor Mustafa !”” — and he sighed.

“Ah, yes, Mustafa was my father,”

Aladdin cried back, “and he’s dead!”
“Well, then, both yourself and your mother
I will cave for forever,” he said,

“And you never shall lack wine nor bread.”

And thus did the wily old wizard _
- Deceive with his kindness the two
For a deed of dark peril and hazard
He had for Aladdin to do,

At the risk of his life, too, he knew.



Down, down, through the darkness so chilly!
On, on, through the long galleries !
Coming now upon gardens of lilies,
And now upon fruit-burdened trees,
Filled full of the humming of bees.

But, ah, should one <5 of his finger
Touch aught as he passed, it was death!
Not a fruit on the boughs made him linger,
Nor the great heaps of gold underneath.
But on he fled, holding his breath,

Until he espied, brightly burning,
_ The mysticai lamp in its place!
He plucked the hot wick out, and, turning,
With triumph and joy in his face,
Set out his long way to retrace.

At last he saw where daylignt shed a
Soft ray through a chink overhead,

Where the crafty Magician was ready
To catch the first sound of his tread.
“Reach the lamp up to me, first! ’ he said.

Aladdin with luck had grown bolder,
And he cried, “ Wait a bit, and we'll see!”
Then with huge, ugly push of his shoulder,
And with strong, heavy thrust of his knee,
The wizard — so angry was he —



ALADDIN.



Po ee

Pried up the great rock, rolled it over
The door with an oath and a stamp ; x
“ Stay there under that little cover, ats
And die of the mildew and damp,”
He shouted, “or give me the lamp!” NAG

Aladdin saw darkness fall o’er him ;
He clutched at the lamp in his hand,
And, happening to rub it, before him
A Genius stood, stately and grand.
Wheuce he came he could not understand.



“T obey you,” it said, “ and whatever

You ask for, or wish, you shall have!
Rub the lamp but the least bit soever, : iki 4
It calls me, for I am its slave!” i iL , ee
Aladdin said, “ Open this cave!”




















He was freed from the place in a minute ;
And he rubbed once again: “ Take me home lee

Home he was. And as blithe as a linnet
Rubbed again for the Genius with: “ Come,

I am dying for food; get me some ! “





Thus at first he but valued his treasure
Because simple wants it supplied.

Grown older it furnished him pleasure ;
And then it brought riches beside ;
And, at last, it secured him his bride.

Now the Princess most-lovely of any
Was Badroulboudour, (what a name!)

Who, though sought for and stied for by many,
No matter how grandly they came,

Yet merrily laughed them to shame,

Until with his riches and splendor,
Aladdin as lover enrollcd!
For the-first thing he did was to send her
Some forty great baskets of gold,
And all the fine gems they would hold.









Then he built hera palace, set thickly
With jewels at window and door ;
And all was completed so quickly
She saw bannered battlements soar
Where was nothing an hour before.





























































































, ALADDIN.




























































S Hig

SCT TE



Him she wedded. They lived without trouble
As long as the lamp was their own ;
But one day, like the burst of a bubble,
The palace and Princess were gone ;
Without wings to fly they had flown !

And Aladdin, dismayed to discover

That the Jamp had been stolen away,
Bent all of his strength to recover

The treasure, and day after day,

He journeyed this way and that way ;

And at last, after terrible hazard,
After many a peril and strife,

He found that the vengeful old wizard,
Who had made the attempt on his life,
Had stolen lamp, princess and wife.

And ever thereafter,

There millions of servants attended,
Black slaves and white slaves, thick as bees,
Obedient, attentive, and splendid
In purple and gold liveries,
Fine to see, swift to serve, sure to please !












—
7

With a shrewdness which would have done credit
To even a Yankee boy, he

Sought the lamp where the wizard had hid it,
And, turning a mystical key,
Brought it forth, and then, rubbing with glee,

“Back to China!” he cried. In a minute
The marvellous palace uprose,

With the Princess Badroulboudour in it

Unruffled in royal repose,
With her jewels and cloth-of-gold clothes ;

And with gay clouds of banners and towers,

With its millions of slaves, white andl black.
It was borne by obedient Powers, 3

As swift as the wind on itsstrack,

And ere one could count ten it was back '

Aladdin

Clung close to the lamp of his fate,
Whatever the robe he was clad in,

Or whether he fasted or ate ;

And at all hours, early and late!

Right lucky was Lord Aladdin!







Tea ANN

wt! WHERE is my bell,” sighed the Brownie, PRE shepherd boy Fritz, next morning,

“My sweet, sweet silver bell,

Driving his wandering sheep

That tinkled and swung from my scarlet cap, ’ Mid the scattered stones of the Giants’ graves,

Now who in the world can tell?”

Saw the pretty plaything peep

e aN the plain in the island of Riigen if! PARKLING among the heather,
i Danced the delicate fairy folk, And fastened it on to himself;
And the tiny bell from the tiny cap For how could he know that the bell belonged
Its curious fastening broke. To an underground little elf?



































; “UT the elf was in such a trouble!

4 Aye wandering up and ‘down,

He was searching here and searching there,
With the tears on his cheek of brown.

* Saw the pre
Syne

a

Decorated

AVES

Steer







Th

TAT SRC EATETRERESE CTY a

RA QR









= “OR while it was missing no slumber
Might visit the fairy’s eyes,
Still must he sleepless fill the air
With mournful wails and cries.

& . WHO has borne off my treasure
0 From the ground where it did lie ?
Is it raven or crow, or jackdaw?
Or magpie noisy and sly?”

ait Ag
ay

mt

HEN he changed his shape to a beautiful
And over the land he flew, (bird,
Over the waters of Raloy,
And the fields of green Unruh,

STE, searched the nests of all the birds,
He talked with them, great and small,
But never a trace of the little bell,
Could the Brownie find at all.

pe the green, green fields of Unruh
Went Fritz to pasture his sheep,

For the place was sunny and fair and still,
And the grass grew thick and deep.

mg

Weg 5 hoy ag
fA
MG WEF

! in i s

e Es









aa

mech w erent,
tae eo hn eT a
1

HE bird flew over. ‘The sheep bells, «|

i Soft tinkling, sounded low ; ; Se

The wee fay thought of his talisman lost, iota, pe aGie
And warbled sad and slow: uae 2




J CERES
‘

Wy



swny

Pe boy looked up and listened :
“ Now what can that queer bird be ?
If he thinks their bells make my cattle so rich,
Why, what would he think of me?”
KN The boy locked upand

\ listened *

yon Ty ric
ny ae hee





‘HEN he drew forth from his pocket
A} The treasure that he had found,
And the magic silver rang out clear
With a keen, delicious sound.

(TBE sprite in the bird’s shape heard it,
And fairly shook with delight,
Dropped down behind a bush near by,
Hid safely out of sight,

“My sheep will flow Sal
its tinkle”

Ni no, for there isn’t another
“= In the whole wide world so fine ;
My sheep will follow its tinkle,

And ask for no other sign.

)

i

PWM EC Bee,

Spee drew off his dress of feathers,
= And took the shape of a crone

Who hobbled up to the shepherd lad,
And spake in a coaxing tone:

(Geo even, good friend, good even !

[<< What a charming bell you ring!

I'd like such an one for my grandson —
Will you sell me the pretty thing?”

MI

LISTEN! Can any sorrow
10) : .
Hold out against such a tone?
The weariest hour ’twill ring away,
And conquer a heart of stone.”









“HE old dame offered him money,
oP A glittering golden heap,
But Fritz stood firm; ‘“‘ Nay, nay,” he said,
“My sweet, sweet bell I’ll keep.”

7 BEN a shepherd staff she showed him,
4} A Most beautiful to see,

Of snow-white wood all wrought and carved:
“Take this and the bell give me.

(

~ ,
QO



8 CO long as you guide your cattle [ E stretched out his hand, and, “ Take it,
With this, you will surely thrive, Mies The bell for the staff,” he cried.
And all good fortune will follow #7; Like a light breeze over the fields. and trees

Wherever your flocks you drive.” The old crone seemed to glide.

4

So mystic, bewitched him quite, i 384" Or as mists with the wind that blend,
So strange and lovely her dazzling smile, 7 And a tiny whir, like a whistle thin,
He was blind in its sudden light. Set all his hair on end.

ayn reached him the stick. Hergesture | 3 HE was gone like the down of a thistle,







nn nn nn a ttc nent:



fen An reno tame eer Ae eR i ESSE EEE NE cg,

ican

“HE staff was his, but the bell was gone, ae he kept his fairy promise,

-- Spirited quite away ; And Fortune to Fritz was kind,
Fritz looked at his prize with doubtful eyes — For all his labors prospered,

But who so glad as the fay? And all things worked to his mind.

pL HEL SUSIE STRAP RA OE GET BALAI:

EFORE he was eighteen, mark you
His flocks were his own to keep,
And soon in the island of Rtigen
He was master of all the sheep.

eT:

£f SEX SETR TES ENL AE TSE e fe
SESS



T last he was able to purchase Now wouldn’t you like, little people,
A Knight’s estate, and became ; Such a fairy treasure to find?
A nobleman stately and gracious, ; Pick up from the grass such a magic bell, -
With a loved and honored name. ' And meet with a Brownie so kind?






STASIS SOLES PERE NE OS EPL OTTER CES SNe BRE





THE





SLEEPING PRINCESS.



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































That in the good king’s royal palace
A Princess had been born.



Made joyful holiday.



Were made by the happy king



Were bid to the christening.

"| And for them the king had seven dishes
Made out of the best red gold,
Set thickly round on the sides and covers
With jewels of price untold.

















When the day of the christening came, the bugles
Blew forth their shrillest notes;

Drums throbbed, and endless lines of soldiers.

Filed past in scarlet coats.

















































































































































HE ringing bells and the booming cannon
Proclaimed on a summer morn

The towers flung out their brightest banners,
The ships their streamers gay,
And every one, from lord to peasant,

Great plans for feasting and er ySuBNIUE

And, to bring good fortune, seven face




































































































































































And the fairies were there the king had bidden,
Bearing their gifts of good —
But right in the midst a strange old woman

Surly and scowling stood.

They knew her to be the old, old fairy,
All nose and eyes and ears,

Who had not peeped, till now, from her dungeon
For more than fifty years.

Angry she was‘to have been forgotten
Where others were guests, and to find

That neither a seat nor a dish at the bancauct

To her had been assigned.





































































To




if Tec fa OM ETT RT i Mt oc
: ie} a a a a oo ce a

il
= YHA Hal iis

Rn ]
a i i Ha oe Uy



CA ne I Mm
eo ie wm) a i q i a i



THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.




































































































































































































































































































































Now came the hour for the gift-bestowing ;
And the fairy first in place BO
Touched with her wand the child and gave her |. Hi
“ Beauty of form and face!”

Fairy the second bade, “‘ Be witty!”
The third said, “ Never fail!” :

The fourth, “Dance well!” and the fifth, ‘“‘O Princess,
Sing like the nightingale!”






















































































|

. a nif

The sixth gave, “Joyin the heart forever!” ij
= But before the seventh could speak,

























































































































































The crooked, black old Dame came forward,
And, tapping the baby’s cheek,





































\
HA
‘You shall prick your finger upon a spindle, | 1
And die of it!” she cried. PT
| All trembling were the lords and ladies,
And the king and queen beside.

i











=

ie
But the seventh fairy interrupted, i
it “Do not tremble nor weep! ~
\\\ That cruel curse I can change and soften,
\\ And instead of death give sleep!

“ But the sleep, though I do my best and kindest,
j Must last for an hundred years !”

On the king’s stern face was a dreadful pallor,
In the eyes of the queen were tears.

“Yet after the hundred years are vanished,” —
The fairy added beside, —

“A Prince of a noble line shall find her,
And take her for his bride.”

















































































































But the king, with a hope to change the future,
Proclaimed this law to be:
That, if inall the land there was kept one spindle,
Sure death was the penalty.



































































































































































































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.







The Princess grew, from her very cradle
Lovely and witty and good ;

And at last, in the course of years, had blossomed
Into full sweet maidenhood.

























































































































































































































































And one day, in her father’s summer palace,
As blithe as the very air,

She climbed to the top of the highest turret,
Over an old worn stair











And there in the dusky cobwebbed garret,
- Where dimly the daylight ‘shone,
A little, doleful, hunch-backed woman
Sat spinning all alone.

































Ke ‘“O Goody,” she cried, “ what are you doing?”
cE) “‘ Why, spinning, you little dunce!”
The Princess laughed : “*’Tis so very funny,
He Pray let me try it once!”













With acareless touch, from the hand of Goody}

She caught the half-spun thread, i A i
And the fatal spindle pricked her finger!
Down fell she as if dead !

























And Goody shrieking, the frightened courtiers
Climbed up the old worn stair

Only to find, in heavy slumber,
The Princess lying there.











They bore her down to a lofty chamber,
They robed her in her best,

And ona couch of gold and purple
They laid her for her rest,





































The roses upon her cheek still blooming,
And the red still on her lips,

While the lids of her eyes, like night-shut lilies,
Were closed in white eclipse.













































































































































































































































































= Then the fairy who strove her fate to alter
From the dismal doom of death,
Now that the vital hour impended,

Came hurrying in a breath.





















































And then about the slumbering palace
The fairy made up-spring

i = : == 4 wood so heavy and dense that never

a = = = Could enter a living thing.







































































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.

And there for a century the Princess
Lay in a trance so deep
‘Yhat neither the roar of winds nor thunder
Could rouse her from her sleep.




























‘Then at last one day, past the long-enchanted
Old. wood, rode a new king’s son,

Who, catching a glimpse of a royal turret
Above the forest dun

(elt in his heart a strange wis. for exploring
The thorny and briery place,

And, lo, a path through the deepest thicket
Opened before his face:



Oh, on he went, till he spied a terrace,
And further a sleeping guard,

And rows of soldiers upon their carbines .
Leaning, and snoring hard.

Up the broad steps! The doors swung backward :
The wide halls heard no tread !
But a lofty chamber, opening, showed him

A gold and purple bed.
He spoke the word, and the spell was scattered,

The enchantment broken through !
The lady woke. “Dear Prince,” shenurmured,
. “How long I have waited for you!”

And there in her beauty, warm and glowing,
The enchanted Princess lay!

While only a word from his lips was needed
To drive her sleep away. Thenat oncethe whole great slumbering palace
Was wakened and all astir ;

Yet the Prince, in joy at the Sleeping Beauty,

Could only look at her.



She was the bride who for years an hundred
Had waited for him to come,

And now that the hour was here to claim her,
Should eyes or tongue be dumb?













The Princess blushed at his royal wooing,

=: Bowed “yes” with her lovely head,

= And the chaplain, yawning, but very lively,
Came in and they were wed!

But about the dress of the happy Princess,
I have my woman's fears —

It must have grown somewhat old-fashioned
In the course of so many years !

































TEES WAGE LE WAND: LIEE, 3G Os LIN GASs

aE OWEOUe AND TPE “GO Sita:



By Ciara Doty Bares.



N old gray goose walked forth with pride, - “You will know him by his voice so hoarse,
With goslings seven at her side; By his paws so hairy and black and coarse.”
A lovely yellowish-green they were, And the goslings piped up, clear and shrill,
And very dear to her. “ We'll take great care, we will.”
She led them to the river’s brink The mother thought them wise, and went
To paddle their feet awhile and drink, | To the far-off forest quite content;
And there she heard a tale that made | But she was scarcely away, before
Her very soul afraid. There came a rap at the door.





eet
2) Sesh»



A neighbor gabbled the story out, ;

How a wolf was known to be thereabout— » \

A great wolf whom nothing could please ,.#& we
As well as little geese.

So, when, as usual, to the wood
She went next day in search of food,

“Open, open, my children dear,”
A gruff voice cried: “your mother is here.”

She warned them over and over, before But the young ones answered, ‘No, no, no,
She turned to: shut the door: Her voice is sweet and low;

“My little ones, if you hear a knock “And you are the wolf —so go away,

At the door, be sure and not unlock, You can’t get in, if you try all day.”

For the wolf will eat you, if he gets in, He laughed. to himself to hear them talk,

Feathers and bones and skin. And wished he had some chalk,





THE WOLF AND

To smooth his voice to a tone like geese;

So he went to the merchant’s and bought a piece,

And hurried back, and rapped once more.
“Open, open the door,

“IT am your mother, dears,” he said.

But up on the window ledge he laid,

In a careless way, his great black paw,
And this the goslings saw.

“No, no,” they called, “that will not co,
Our mother hasqnot black hands like you;
For you are the wolf, so go away,

You can’t get in to-day.”

‘The baffled wolf to the old mill ran,

Axd-whined to the busy miller man:

“T love to hear the sound of the wheel
And to smell the corn and meal.”





THE GOSLINGS.

The miller was pleased, and said “ All right;
Would you like your cap and jacket white?”
At that he opened a flour bin

“And playfully dipped him in.

He floundered and sneezed a while, then, lo,

He crept out white as a wolf of snow.

“T£ chalk and flour can make me sweet,”
He said, “ then I’m complete.”

For the third time back to the house he went,

And looked and spoke so different,

That when he rapped, and “ Opén! ” cried,
The little ones replied, -

_ Ag ae

“Tf you show us nice clean feet, we will.”

And straightway, there on the window-sill

His paws were laid, with dusty meal
Powdered from toe to heel.

Ves, they were white! So they let him in,
And he gobbled them all up, feathers and skin,
Gobbled the whole, as if ’twere fun,

Except the littlest one.



TLE OLE ANDTHE GOSLING S:

An old clock stood there, tick, tick, tick,

And into that he had hopped so quick

The wolf saw nothing, and fancied even
He’d eaten all the seven.







But six were enough to satisfy ; She called out tenderly every name,
So out he strolled on the grass to lie. But never a voice in.answer came,
, And when the gray goose presently Till a little frightened, broad-billed face
f -- Came home—what did she Peered out of the clock-case.
“y f yf, see? :
uy , i), This gosling told his tale with grief,

And the gray goose sobbed in her handkerchief,
And sighed— ‘Ah, well, we will have to go
And let the neighbors know.”











a” rae ot : So down they went to the river’s brim,
. SS, Where their feathered friends were wont to swim,
#y ~ And there on the turf so green and deep
ve : & The old wolf lay asleep.
Alas, the house door open wide, ; He had a grizzly, savage look,
But no little yellow flock inside; And he snored till Ce boughs above him shook.
The beds and pillows thrown about; They tiptoed round him— drew quite near,
The fire all gone out; Yet still he did not hear.
The chairs and tables overset; ‘nen, as the mother gazed, to her
Tle wash-tub spilled, and the floor all wet; It seemed she could see his gaunt side stir—
Aua heze ara there in cinders black, Stir and squirm, as if under the skin.

; 3 Sel
The yreat wolf’s ugly track. Were something alive within !



Le VOL Ly AUN litle (ORO sh Grist:

“Go back to the house, quick, dear,” she said, , “What's this rumbling and tumbling?

“‘ And fetch me scissors and needle and thread. What’s this rattling like bones ?

Pll open his ugly hairy hide, I thought I’d eaten six small geese,
And see what is inside.” But they’ve turned out only stones.”

She snipped with the scissors a criss-cross slit, He bent his neck to lap — instead,

And well rewarded she was for it, He tumbled in, heels over head ;

For there were her goslings—six together — And so heavy he was, as he went down
With scarcely a rumpled feather ! : He could not help but drown !

The wolf had eaten so greedily,
He had swallowed them all alive, you see.
So, one by one, they scrambled out,

And danced and skipped about.



















Then the gray goose got six heavy stones,

And placed them in between the bones;

She sewed him deftly, with needle and thread,
And then with her goslings fled.

‘The wolf siept long and hard and late,
And woke so thirsty he scarce could wait.
So he crept along to the river’s brink

To get a good cool drink.

But the stones inside began to shake,

‘And make his old ribs crack and ache;

And the gladsome flock, as they sped away,
Could hear him groan, and say : —

And after that, in thankful pride,

With goslings seven at her side,

The gray goose came to the river’s brink
Each:day to swim and drink.



















YIWNOY Aw)

By Susan COOLIDGE.

HE long day’s tasks were neatly done,
The milk pail scoured, the milk set by.
And Ursel at the set of sun
Stood wistfully her mistress nigh.

The Dame was stern, the Dame was shrewd,
So all the neighbots were agreed,

Thrifty and sharp in word and mood,
But kindly still and just of deed.

She glanced at Ursel’s braided hair,
She watched the color come and flit

On the young cheek so round and fair,
And well she knew the cause of it.

And smiling at the little maid,

“Vou have worked well and had no play,
And been a steady lass,” she said;

“Now you shall have a holiday.














“TJ mind me how, a lass like you
With such a basket on my arm,

I hied me home, as you shall do
On Mothering Day, to the old farm.

“ And how my mother —rest her soul!
She has been dead these forty years” —

The Dame’s voice shook beyond control,
She could not see the fire for tears.

But little Ursel’s cheeks were red,
Her heart was bounding light and gay ;
“Oh, thank you, thank you, Dame,” she said,
And quietly she stole away.

The morning’s dawn was clear and fair,
And Ursel rose before the sun ;

She neatly bound her long bright hair,
And did her morning tasks, each one.

She made her ready for the road,

She tied her shoes and Sunday hat,
And in a basket she bestowed

The bread-loaf and the butter-pat.

“To-morrow Mothering Sunday is
When children to their parents go,

Each with a gift for her, or his,

And you shall have a gift also.

“The small round cheese I bade you make,
The pat of butter on the shelf,

The crusty loaf you saw me bake —

These you shall carry home yourself.

MN I I

Northward ran Ursel o’er the fell,
Southward the shepherd fleeter yet,
And half-way by a roadside well
The brother and the sister met.

Both clapped their hands in gladsome wise ; | |
Long months had, since they met, gone by; i
Tears shone in Ursel’s happy eyes,
But manly Robin scorned to cry.









The Dame at window overhead

Watched the girl go with joyous speed;
“Mothers are happy folk,” she said,
“Mothers are lucky folk indeed.”

Across the moor four distant miles,
At the same time a lad set forth,

With clean-washed face all lit with smiles ;
He headed south and Ursel north.

His holiday was hard to gain,
His surly master cared no whit
For Mothering Sunday, and in vain
The boy had urged his wish for it;

Until at last the farmer’s wife,

With pity touched, had won consent ;
And glad as never in his life

The shepherd boy arose and went.

He bore no ‘gift, poor little lad,

His wage was naught but clothes and food, -

But mother would, he knew, be glad,
And count his coming as a good.





5 0
ya iM

comer





“Have you no gift for mother brought?”

Ei She asked ; her brother shook his head;
: “Nothing with nothing can be bought, g
a How could I bring one?” Robin said. F













“ You shall share mine then,” Ursel cried,
“Tt shall be gift from both us twain.”

And hand in hand, and side by side,
They hastened on their way again.



They danced adown the lower hill,

Threaded the copse and crossed the brook,
Till Ursel suddenly stood still,

Crying, “O Robin! Robin! Look!”
There, in a sheltered hollow set,

Couched shyly by a mossy stone,
They saw the earliest violet

All purple sweet and fully blown.

“Your gift?” she cried, “and best of all,
The proverb runs, that you could bring:
It says that ‘ Violets shall befall
Him who shall go a-mothering!’”















Their mother at the doorway stood,
Her hearth was swept all cleanly bright,

She looked to moor, she looked to wood,

Shading her eyes against the light.





She saw the youthful figures dawn
Dark shapes against the shining sky,

And as they rapidly came on
Contentment filled the mother’s eye;






And it was, “You have grown, my lass,”
And it was, “welcome home, dear lad,”

As laughing, chattering, in they pass
With lightsome steps and kisses glad.






The yellow simnels shone like gold,
The frumenty was spiced and hot,
The children feasted as of old,

The mother too — though eating not.




Ah! sweet old Mothering Holiday
Which bound the ties of kindred fast,

Lost and forgotten in our day —

What pity that it could not last!






THE FAIRY FLAG
(A Skye Folk-lore Story}

By Mary E. WILKINS.



EYOND the purple gloom of moors,
Beyond the blueness of the sea,
B. yond the range of chalk-white cliffs,
‘The sun was setting peacefully.

The fairy, on a grassy knoll,
Sat dreaming, singing to the cows:
“ Knee-deep in clumps of plumy ferns,
Knee-deep in rustling grasses browse!

“ The chieftain slays his foeman’s clan,
The lady ’broiders in the hall;
L stt here singing to the cows, an, 24 hyp
And am.the gayest one of all! ds I

ed
dhe

“ Now of the clumps of spicy fern,
Now of the juicy grasses taste!”
The fairy wore a grass-green gown,

With golden girdle at her waist;

Her winsome little face upturned,
Her soft gold hair all round her streamed ;
Her small pink cheeks like roses burned,
Her wild blue eyes like jewels beamed.

She struck a little harp o’ pearl,
As to the browsing kine she sung:
All lightly o’er the fairy bridge
Beyond, a bonnie laddie sprung,



He had Prince Charlie’s yellow locks, The fairy lilted loud and sweet,
His gay blue eyes and lovesome way. The laddie turned him round to see;
Macleod’s little son he was — She lifted up her little face,

The castle just beyond him lay. And sweet, and sweet, and sweet, smiled she.



The laddie thro’ the heather ran,
His tartan blowing out behind,
The little fairy, gowned in green,
Wi’ little harp o? pearl, to find.














“ And since you are a mortal bairn,

And yet have shunned me not,” she said,
“A fairy gift I'll give to thee,

To-morrow, when the west is red.

“ And since you have a bonny face,
T’ll give to thee a fairy kiss,

To take the bitter from thy woe,
And add a sweetness to thy bliss.”

She kissed the laddie’s blushing cheek,
And all the air grew sweet around,

As if a million flowers bloomed out —
And than she vanished from the ground.

The western sky all roses was, The flag was green as springtide sward

And round “Macleod’s Maiden’s” feet What time the sun upon it lies,
Foam-wreaths to wreaths of roses turned. And shot with threads of glittering gold,

The fairy lilted loud and sweet; And filled with spots of gold, like eyes.
The laddie o’er the fairy bridge, She put it in the laddie’s hand:

Came running lightly to her side: “Once waved, ’twill bring thee thy cesire,
“ And have you brought the fairy gift And twice, and thrice —but not again;

You promised me last night?” he cried. Then cast it, worthless, in the fire!”



A shadow o’er Ler gown o’ green,
A shadow o’er her winsome face,

A shadow o’er her golden hair,
Came softly creeping on apace.



The fairy through the shadow shone,
And struck her little harp o’ pearl;

Then vanished in the shadow’s heart,
Wi’ golden and wi’ rosy swirl.



The laddie held the fairy flag,
Alone in twilight gray and cold;

And stood and looked, his wond’ring eyes
All filled with dancing motes of gold.



The laddie’s yellow beard had grown ; And alway had the fairy’s kiss,
He’d wedded with a lady fair ; She gave to him so long ago,
And he had got a little son, Added a sweetness to his bliss,

With his same bonnie yellow hair. And ta’en the bitter from his woe.



But never yet the fairy flag
Had waved upon the castle wall;
For with his stalwart arm and sword,
His troubles he had breasted all.











“Oh, where’s my little laddie gone?”
The lady left her ’broidery frame ;

Through every castle window peered,
With tearful eyes, the gentle dame.






i | '
“iH
a
































Macleod called his followers out,
And loud the castle trumpets blew:
“Macleod’s heir is strayed awa’,
And on the heather falls the dew.

« And on the heather falls the dew; - They searched along the chalk-white cliffs,
Shadows are floating o’er the sea. Upon the dizzy hanging paths; ,
Oh, where’s my little laddie gone? — : They sought him on their breezy tops, —

I pray ye bring him back to me uw Along the strips of grassy straths.



They called “Macleod ” down the hill;
They called Macleod” down the vale;

They hailed the shepherd with his flock, ~
The maiden with her milking-pail.










They searched Dunvergan castle thro’;

Each dungeon in the thick stone wall
They peered in — but they only found
The prisoned foemen, grim and tall.












His mother looked out o’er the sea,
To where “ Macleod’s Maidens” stand,

To see, above the foam-wreaths, rise

His yellow head and waving hand.

The laddie came not; and the moon “Bring out, bring out the fairy flag!
’ With all the stars sailed out in sight; - I'll wave it from the topmost tower!
* Macleod’s Tables,” tops of snow, There’ll come no direr need than this—

1”

Were cloth of silver in her light. Macleod’s race has lost its flower





There came a twang o’ pearlie harp,
There came a lilting loud and sweet ;
And softly o’er the fairy bridge
There came the dance o’ slender feet,

There danced along the fairy bridge
A spot 1’ the golden light apace;
The laddie at the castle gate
Stood lifting up his bonnie face.

Macleod waved the fairy flag;
It looked a net of golden wire;
Its streaks of gold and spots of gold,
All linked and curled like tongues of fire.



All day the chief had held the field,
Nor quailed until the sun sank low;

His followers, bleeding, round him lay,
And he was hemmed in by the foe.

“Oh, life is sweet!” Macleod thought
“T love my bairn and lady dear:
Tl] wave again the fairy flag —
Oh, will it bring me succor here!”



“Oh, I ha’ wandered by the burn,
And J ha’ wandered by the glen; .

A little leddy all in green,”
He said, “has led me home again.”

Macleod furled the fairy flag:

“Ye'’ve served me once in blessed stead —
But sorely V’ll be pressed again .

Ere I will wave ye twice!” he said.

Macleod waved the fairy flag —
His foemen reeled back at the sight;
For in their cruel eyes there danced
Great spots and bars of golden light.

There came a twang o’ pearlie harp,
‘There came a lilting loud and sweet:

Macleod’s foemen turned and fled,
The hills all rang with flying feet.



Macleod furled the fairy flag: : The hand that waved the fairy flag,

“Ye’ve served me twice in blessed stead —~ The lips the fairy kissed, are still:
But I shall in the churchyard lie Macleod in the churchyard lies,
Ere I will wave ye thrice!” he said. And deaf to lilting sweet and shrill,

But still his kin in misty Skye
The fairy flag in keeping hold;

And sometime from the castle wall
May flash its spots and bars of gold.






“For if I thrice should wave the flag,
And thrice should get my heart’s desire ;

Next day might come a sorer need,

When it was ashes in the fire.”

Macleod kept his word : he fought But dire indeed shall be the need,

For life on many a bloody plain, And every other hope be slain,
He tossed in peril on the sea, Ere a Macleod of the Isle

Nor waved the fairy flag again. Shall wave the fairy flag again.





; O! all the world I have conquered,”
Glooskap, the Mighty One, ‘said.

Light laughed an Indian woman,

Shaking her dark-braided head,

“Speak not too swiftly, my master,
One still unconquered remains —
Wasis, the Baby, forever
Lord of the mightiest reigns.”

Watching the motes in the sunshine,
Baby sat still on the floor;

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Gazed through the open door.

He who had vanquished the storm-bird,
Binding its wings in the north — °
Ever the wild winds after -
Speeding more gently forth —

He who could fashion the squirrel
Little or great, at his will,

Lord of the bear and the beaver,
Master of good and ill,



A he
































































































































































































































































































































Gazed at the wonderful Baby
Watching the dancing gold,

Wondered what magical weapon
Little brown fingers could hold.

Happy of heart in the sunshine,
Wasis, the wonderful Child,

Sucking the sweets of the maple,
Looked at the stranger and smiled.

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Wife had known never, nor child,










Sweet, then, as ‘mid summer forest
Singeth the wee winter wren,
Spoke unto Wasis, the Strong One,

Master of beasts and men.

Unto the Master’s eyes lifted
Wondering eyes of the child —
Moved in the sunshine no shadow,

Wasis sat silent and smiled.

Then, with a voice as of thunder,
Under a terrible frown —

Knew not the heart’s tender watchwords From the fir-trees of the forest

Wherewith caresses are wiled;

Softly he ‘smiled at the Baby,
Bidding him, gently, come nigh.
Wasis stirred not from the sunshine,
Watching the motes dance by.



Falling the brown cones down —

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Spoke his command o’er and o’er.

Neither the sunshine nor shadow

Changed on the lodge’s bare floor.






But from the brown eyes of Wasis
Rolled the great tears to the floor,

Rose from the red lips, wide-parted,

Mighty-voiced, heart-piercing roar.

Glooskap, the slayer of beaver,

_ Wondering, e’er, more and more,

Wove all the spells of his magic
Wasis, the unsubdued, o’er ;

Singing the strange, wild music
Wherewith he conjured the dead,

Wherewith the dark-hearted spirits

Up from their caverns he led.



>



Smooth grew the cheeks of the Baby,
Dry the bright tears in his eyes ;

Merriest playfellow Glooskap
Seemed unto Wasis, the wise,

Who, as the magic grew wilder,

Still by each spell unbeguiled,
Sucking his sweet maple sugar,
' Looked at the great chief and smiled.

Glooskap, well weary with struggle,
Sat in the low lodge door;

Moved not the shadow of Wasis
Over the sunlit floor.

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Round the red lips of the Baby
Ripples of laughter o’erflowed ;

Gazed he, admiring, at Glooskap,
Goo-goo-ed, and lustily crowed!

Vain was the strength of the giant;
Never a spell could bind

Wasis, the unconquered Baby,
Stronger than sun or wind.

“Well spake the Indian woman.”
Thoughtfully, Glooskap spoke,

Kindling his pipe while the Baby
Smiled at the curling smoke ;

So, since the wor

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——

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“Though of the world I am master,
One still unconquered remains,

Wasis, the Baby, forever

Master of Glooskap reigns.”

Still know the Indian women
Wasis, the wonderful Child,
And, when the Baby cries goo-goo,
Unto contentment beguiled,

Crowing, none knowing the reason,
Softly they say: “ Through his thought

Runneth the time when o’er Glooskap
Mightiest conquest he wrought,”

Nothing unconquered remains
Save only Wasis, the Baby —









mnie lw (Cty SUENIN me i

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T the foot of the Golden Dragon Hill, Oh, the merry old man to the mountain hied,
Long ages ago, in a snug little house Past young rice-fields in the morning sun,

With a roof of dark-brown, velvety thatch, Toward the dark fir-trees on the mountain side,

There lived an old woodman and his spouse. Standing forth in its silence, every one.
One morning, his bill-hook the old man took: From wild came.ias and white plum-trees,

“To the mountain, to cut me a fagot, I’ll hie, In his twinkling old eyes the spider-webs swung:
While you, O Koyo, the linen can wash’ And he merrily brushed by the green bamboos,

In the river which rushes and gurgles by.” With his bill-hook over his shoulder hung.







And a uguisu sang in a tall cherry-tree |
As the smiling old wife to the river-side went: ,
“Oh, red is the sun,” she cheerily sang,

As she patiently over her washing bent. 4



“Oh, red is the sun; and the rice-fields green — f
Now what is that in the river I see?

It’s the rosiest peach in the whole of Japan;
And it’s coming a-floating, a-floating to me

“‘ Now here is a feast for my darling old man,
Oh, the Great Shogun not a finer can get!
Some stewed lily-bulbs, and this beautiful peach,

When he comes from toil, before him I’ll set.”







Scon down from the mountain the old man came,
And fast on his back his fagot was bound,

“Oh, hasten you, husband,” his loving wife cried,
“ And taste this beautiful peach that I found!”



















But just as he took it the peach split in twain,
* And a fat little baby with raven-black hair
‘Was cradled right in the heart of the peach,

And lay a-twinkling and blinking there.

“Oh you brave little boy, you shall be our own son ,
And Momotaro shall have for a name,

Or Little Peachling, since out of a peach,
You dear little fellow, this morning you came.”

The rice-fields blossomed for twenty more years,
While the gurgling old river amongst them ran;

For twenty more years grew the slim bamboo,
And Little Peachling was grown to a man.




“Some millet-dumplings pray make for me,”
To his good foster-mother he said one day,

“And off to the ogres’ castle I’ll go,

And the whole of their treasure will bring away.

“As thick in the ogres’ treasure-vaults
The jewels are lying as sea-shore sands ;

With blue snow-gates on the mountain-top,
The ogres’ castle all proudly stands—




/ eas BS
ia re * With blue snow-gates that are stronger than steel ;
But I will enter, and will bring to you
The wealth from the ogres’ treasure-vaults,

Hung over with pearls, like flowers with dew.”
s I ’

“T have made you the dumplings,” his good mother



said,
“ But I fear lest the ogres should do you a harm.’
' But the Little Peachling danced gayly away,
With the millet-dumplings under his arm.







&

A dog leapt out of a cluster of pines:
“And what have you there, Little Peach-
ling, pray?”
“ The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,
And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”












And the ogres’ castle will help subdue.”
“Well, you can bark at the castle-gate ;
So here is a dumpling, friend dog, for you.”























An ape swung down from a roadside tree:
“ Kia, kia, what have you, I say?”

_“ The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,

And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”

“One of your dumplings pray give to me,
And the ogres’ castle I’ll help subdue.”
“Well, you can climb o’er the castle-wall ;
So here is a dumpling, friend ape, for you.”

“ Ken, ken,” cried a pheasant, “ and what have you
there, ;
Little Peachling, tucked in your girdle, I pray?”
“The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,
And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”

“For one of your dumplings with you I'll go,
And the ogres’ castle will help subdue.”
“Well, you can fly o’er the castle-gate ;
So here is a dumpling, friend pheasant, for you.”

Oh, the castle stood high on the mountain-top,
And over its turrets a hurricane blew;

But up to its terrible blue snow-gates
Little Peachling marched with his retinue.

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Then the ogres swarmed out on the castle-towers,
The drums beat loud, and the trumpets brayed,

And magical arrows came rustling around —
But our brave little rénin was not afraid.

For his pheasant flew over the castle-wall,
And his ape, he undid the castle-gate ;

And brave Little Peachling, with the barking dog,
Marched into the ogres’ castle in state.

His little dog snapped at the ogres’ heels ;
His pheasant picked at their round green eyes;
And his ape tweaked away at the ogres’ locks,
As only an ape can do when he tries,

And the little rénin, sround him he laid,
With his muramasa, so thick and fast, ,
That the king of the ogres was prisoner made ;
And the ogres’ castle was taken at last.

Oh measures of pearls and wedges of gold !
Oh the jars of musk and the coral-bars !
Amber and emeralds, tortoise-shells,
And diamonds shining like strings of stars !

Gold-brocade coats, and wonderful gems
That regulated the green sea-tide !

It’s always the loveliest things in the world
Which the treasure-castles of ogres hide.

With the treasures, the dog, the pheasant and ape,
Little Peachling home to his parents ran ;

And the old wood-cutter and his loving wife
Were the happiest couple in all Japan.





















rh

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ee N this new world, that was waiting when

eS The star in the east shone down
i And lighted the steps of the Magian men
| To the inn in Bethlehem town,




Many a hillside sloped to the sun,
Or dipped to a shining sea,

Fair for God’s presence as ever one
In Judah or Galilee.

Many a soul that was tarrying then,
Till centuries should go by,

To take its place in the line of men,
To the Lord was just as nigh

As John, or Mary, or Lazarus
Who walked with him by the way
For the blessed sign it should be to us
That he walks at our side to-day.




So, lovely with love that hath no compare, | |

The very names grew dear ; :
And Marys and Johns were everywhere,
And Bethels were builded here.



















Deep in the green New England hills,
In a dimple fair to see,

With orchards whose fruitage the summer fills,

Lies a little Bethany.

And looking Eastward between the farms,
As over the river you go,

Stately with elms as the old with palms,

You may see sweet Tericho.































What wonder that Mary, the little maid,
Pondering Bible-lore,

Pictured, wherever her steps had strayed, .
Those marvelous things of yore ?—

That the darksome hollow beyond the bridge
Where the pollard willows stood,

And the steep, rough roadway up the ridge
In the gloom of the hemlock wood,

Should seem like the wayside where the thieves
’ Beset the traveller-man,

And left him, all wounded, upon the leaves,
For the good Samaritan ?

Or the scathed old peartree by the brook,
That the lightning in the night,

When the farmhouse with the thunder shook,

‘Left ghastly and dead and white,

















Should be to her fancy the fig-tree, bare,
Or yielding but bitter and worst,

That the Lord, when he found it fruitless there,

“With an awful withering cursed ?

That, scanning the houses far away
On the hillsides in the sun,

She questioned, many an innocent day,
Which was the very one

Where the brother and sisters sat at meat
With their friend, when the day was low,

And Mary lovingly washed the feet

‘That had journeyed in mercy so?






















She was Deacon Sternbold’s-little maid,
And her mother was kindly true ;

Her primer and hymns to her sire she said,
But her heart the mother knew.

Heiping the dame one Saturday morn
At the churn, all suddenly she

Cried, “ Mother, O I wish I’d been born
Real Mary of Bethany !

“Or I wish that Jesus would walk in here,
And would call me to him, and say,

With his eyes’ great glory upon me, ‘ Dear,

Come sit at my feet all day !’”





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“© And doesn’t he?” answered the mother sweet :
“Can you think it except he say?
To love Him well is tosit at his feet —

To serve Him, to bide alway.

“ Now bring me the tray ; and the spats, and
Cool in the ice-bowl there ; [prints

Then finish the seams of your gown of chintz
That to-morrow you may wear.

“ And if baby wakes from his long, nice nap,
|. Just sing him your little song

While mother’s busy; the work, mayhap,
Won’t need to hinder her long.”

Maid Mary went at the gentle word;
Some beautiful inward smile

Dawning up to her face as if she heard
More than was spoken, the while.








So while she fetched the spats and the prints,
And hastened away to sew

With ready fingers the gown of chintz,
She went as the’angels go.

For the child’s deep heart was beating still
With the joy of that saying sweet:

“To bide with Him is to do His will,
To love Him, to sit at His feet.”









For what could take her with ill surprise,
Or what could provoke a frown,

When she knew the glory of Jesus’ eyes
Was over her, looking down ?

So Saturday’s nightfall folded the hill
And the Day of the Sun broke bright ;
And the good folk gathered, sedate and still,
In the meetinghouse on the height.

With her tender secret in her face, -
Maid Mary sat in the pew;

The Lord who was here in his Holy Place
Had been at home with‘her, too.

| And sitting there by the cradle-side,

When a comrade lifted the latch

| And eagerly signed to the pasture wide,

And whispered, “blackberry patch !”

Softly she shook her delicate head,
But smiled as she did it, too;

| Till the other guessed she must know, instead,

Of some pleasanter thing to do.

‘And when the baby awoke at last,
Fretting with sleepy whim, [ past,

} Though the seam was done, and an hour was

Still she smiled: “I can wait, with Him!”

- | When the older brothers came whooping in —

Roger and roguish Dan —

+ Routing her quiet with rollicking din,

And teasing, as brothers can ;

And father, vexed for a mischief played,
Full hastily called and chid —

, Never a cloud on the face of the maid

The beautiful brightness hid.









And when the people stood up to pray,
As the custom used to be,

She whispered, “ Dear Christ, like yesterday
Make all the to-days for me!”

Ah, many a Mary, merry or staid,
On the hillsides there might be ;

But was not the deacon’s dear little maid
Real Mary of Bethany?











































































































































By Mrs. Louise T. Cralcin.

ROM Finland to Azov, Ochotsk to Obe,
There’s tumult and turmoil on land and on sea:
You’d think all creation was turned upside down —
King Oleg of Russia has lost his gold crown!

They say the King cut off the chancellor’s head ;
They, say the old chamberlain tumbled down dead ;
The guards in the palace, in five minutes’ space,
Were straight to Siberia sent in disgrace !

The fault was not theirs; but, if matters go ill,
"Tis certain that some one must foot up the bill;
If kings can’t be censured for mischief they’ve done!
There must be found shoulders to lay it upon !

Did robbers force open the great castle gate?

Did burglars break in and then stealthily wait,
And, spite of stout bars, iron bolts and steel locks, |
Bear off from the palace King Oleg’s strong box?

Ah, no! Tho’ ’tis treason to say it, I fear,

Nor burglar nor midnight marauder came near,
No robber gained entrance. If truth must be told,
King Oleg himself lost the Dg crown of gold!

A long while ago, on the night of his birth,

Was seen a great comet approaching the earth 5

And now, once again, the astrologers wise

Discover strange portents aloft in the skies. }



The horoscope old they ponder anew,

They find, past a question, the comet is due
About this same season; and with it, ’tis clear,
Misfortune and trouble must surely appear.





He napped and he nodded; but each time he woke,
Straight out of the window his head he could poke.
— It wasn’t so easy to balance that crown!

It seemed ev’ry instant it must topple down,

For each time he twisted his head in the search,

Tho’ too sleepy to know it, the crown gave a lurch.

Now crowns, to look stately, should always stand
square,

For if not, they give one a scandalous air,



King Oleg this comet resolved to espy ;
He held his big spy-glass up close to his eye,
And he sat in his great chair of state upright,
His crown on his head, through the livelong night.













The sensible Queen in her white-ruffled cap

Woke again and again from a warm cosey nap,
“Do take off that big crown, dear Oleg,” she said,
‘And, too, you would be better off in your bed !

“TI never could see why your crown you would wear,
When there’s nobody round but just me to care!”
‘Because you’re a woman ; it’s quite plain to me:
A king wears his crown for his own dignity !”

* * * * * * * * * *

The wind it was high and the night it was cold,

The King felt the frost through his ermine and gold ;

He rubbed his nose smartly, for fear it would freeze,

Then shivered and shook, and then gave a big
sneeze ! :





Ah, fatal that sneeze for the great Russian crown!

It trembled and tottered, and then tumbled down ;

It bumped, and it bounced from the wall to the
ditch,

And fell at the feet of an old wrinkled witch.

Loud sounded the trumpets; the news through the
land

Flew fast, and each courtier in grief wrung his hand.

It was “oh,” it was “ah,” and they tore at their hair.

While Oleg himself was half-crazed with despair.

They summoned the cunning, the star-gazing men,
In hopes by their wisdom to find it again —
Arabian, Persian, Chaldee and Chinese !

As well, for advice, have consulted the geese !

In throngs they came trooping, North, South, East
and West;

Some horoscopes drew, and some quietly guessed.

But each one was round-eyed, and grave as an owl,

And nodded as sagely as that learned fowl.

Quite strange to relate, they at last all agreed,

Then sent to King Oleg their verdict with speed.

To make it more mystic they put it in verse,

And muttered in Sanscrit, “It might have been
worse !

“ When from an old crone comes again your gold crown,
Though all of your courtiers should grimace and frown,

And though humble the goose-girl by whom it was won,

Leight there on the spot she shall marry your son,”



She picked up the glittering circlet of gold:

Her big woollen apron in many a fold

She wrapped round her treasure without
delay, :

And then, undiscovered, soft trotted away.

more

The King then commanded the heralds to stand

And blow from each corner the news thro’ the
land,
That the maids of Russia of every degree,

Might search if they would, all diligently. °







"was strange how thick goose-girls appeared on
each hand!

Old crones, too, for mistresses, came in demand!

Small service they got, when their poor backs were
turned —

To hunt for that crown every girl’s fingers burned.

Meet, n oa

dn ee







Now Drontha and Dwina were fairest by far,

Of all the goose-girls in the lands of the Czar;

They herded their geese on the common all day,

‘And snapped their long whips if the geese dared to
stray.

Of course they both wondered whom fate would decree
To find the gold crown, and a princess to be.

“ I wish some old crone would take me for her maid!”
Sighed Drontha. That instant a voice gruffly said,

.

“A maiden I’m seeking whose tidy and neat,
To milk and make butter, and cut up my peat,
‘To dust and to sweep, and to go to the mill,
And care for my geese when I’m busy or ill.”

Then Drontha said quickly, “Take me for your
maid,

Of hard work I am not in the least afraid.”

For Drontha the oracle kept in her mind,

“For perhaps it is Zwho the crown shall find!”








One morning the crone waked her maid from her
sleep:

“The peat you must cut, you can dust, too, and sweep:

To Novgorod fair I am going to-day,

And mind from the chimney you keep far away.”

The old crone had scarcely gone out of her sight,
When Drontha began to poke round, left and right.
At last she climbed up on the high bacon rack,
And found in the chimney a black sheenskin sack.



























Then quickly she seized it and quicker jumped down ;
She danced high for joy as she felt of the crown ;
With fingers that trembled, the knots she untied,
“Yes wed Prince Imar!” she eagerly cried.

Then safe in her apron the treasure she hid,
And under her jacket the golden crown slid.
She ran down the pathway that led to the.wood,
For close to the forest the King’s castle stood.

Right over the pathway a little gate hung,

And backward and forward it ceaselessly swung.

It creaked and it squeaked, and it mournfully sighed,
It moaned and it groaned, and it plaintively cried;

“Please shut me and latch me, I pray, pretty maid,
It hurts my back badly to swing so,” it said.

’ “The Prince I’m to marry, you’ll just have to swing,

I can’t stop to bother for such a small thing! ”

While crossing the meadow, she met the red cow:
“Pray stop, pretty maiden, and please milk me now!”
“T’m in a great hurry,” replied the rude maid,

“T can’t stop for trifles—the Prince I’m to wed.”

As Drontha came near to the foot of the hill,
She heard _.a low voice from the old water-mill :
“O pray, pretty maiden, just turn my big wheel!
I’m tired of standing here silent and still !”’.

“Indeed I won’t,” Drontha then rudely replied ;
“For a nap in the hopper, I’m going to hide ;
And that is the reason I stopped here to-day —
To marry Prince Imar I’m now on my way.”





































Then into the hopper she gave a gay leap,

She hid in the corn, and she fell fast asieep,

To dream that she sat like a queen on a
throne,

In velvet and jewels that sparkled and shone.



The crone returned home, and at once missed

the sack,
And soon started off on the naughty maid’s track.
She trotted along till she came to the gate,
That, creaking and moaning, swung early and

““O gate o’ mine, O gate o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine ?”

“A rude girl passed an hour ago,
Who left me swinging to and fro.”’

“That’s just my Drontha, the rude, rude maid,
*Twas she, I’m certain,” the old crone said.

“OQ cow o’ mine, O cow o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl 0’ mine?”

“A rude girl passed an hour ago,
Who wouldn’t milk me, that I know.”

‘““That’s just my Drontha, the rude, rude maid!
*Twas she, I’m certain,” the old crone said.
? ?

“QO mill o’ mine, O mill o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?”

“A girl’s in the hopper fast asleep,
Way down in the corn she’s buried deep.”



“ That’s just my Drontha, rude, lazy maid !
*Tis she, I’m certain,” the old crone ‘said.

Then out of the hopper the old woman took her ;
With all of her might and her main she shook her,
Till Drontha the crown dropped in terror and fright,
And ran without stopping till quite out of sight.

bn or :
Tir, \



While round her the geese on one leg stood to rest;

The old woman put the gold crown in the sack,
These words to the goose-herd, the old crone ad:

And hid it again’ by the high bacon rack ;
Then off to the common she went with all speed,
Though sorry was she of a maid to have need.

dressed:

“ A maiden I’m seeking who is tidy and neat,
To milk and make butter, and cut up my peat,
To dust and to sweep, ard to go to the mill,

geese,
Her dinner beside her of black bread and cheese, And care for my geese when I’m busy or ill.”

There Dwina sat knitting and watching her

=











Young Dwina spoke gently : “Your maid I will be;
Your work J’ll endeavor to do faithfully.

I know how to milk, how to dust and to sweep,
And, if busy or ill, your geese I can keep.”




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_The hut Dwina swept and made everything neat ;

She washed up the hearthstones and cut up the peat;

But the fire wouldn’t burn, and the smoke filled the
hut, : :

So her broom-stick she took to clear out the soot.

When lo! from the chimney there came tumbling
down

A black sheepskin sack with King Oleg’s gold crown!

Said Dwina, “This crown to the King ought to go!

My way I can find to the castle, I know!”

She came to the gate that still wearily hung:

“Please latch me. I’m tired, so long have I swung.”

“Yes, that I will gladly,” the young maiden said.

She latched the gate gently, and then onward
sped.



“To Novgorod fair I am going, my dear;
Cut plenty of peat, keep the fire burning clear ;
There’s plenty of sweeping and dusting to-day, fr
But see that you keep from the chimney away.” se























































































































































She met on the meadow the poor lowing cow:

“T wish, pretty maiden, you coudd milk me now !”

“ Indeed I will gladly,” the little maid said.

She filled the big bucket,’ and then onward
she sped..

“She came to the brook, where the old water-mill

Huskily said, “ Please, to start my big wheel.”

“Indeed I will gladly,” the little maid said.

She turned the big wheel, and then onward
she sped.

_ The old crone returned, and of course missed the sack.

She looked at the hearth, she examined the rack ;

The hut was so tidy, so wholesome and sweet,

She said, “One thing’s certain, young Dwina is
neat.



“(© gate o' mine, O gate o’ mine, She came to the castle, and stood there amazed,

Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” For joy bells were ringing, and bonfires blazed ;
Brass bands, too, were playing, and the people who
“Only a lady have I seen, chose,

1?

Who very kind to me has been Were going to court in their best Sunday clothes.

“Oh, that can never be my little maid, And when the old crone said, “What does ihis
She’s only a goose-girl,” the old crone said. mean?”

They shouted “ King Oleg his crown has again!
“O cow o’ mine, O cow o’ mine, Prince Imar, young Dwina, the goose-herd, will wed,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” For that’s what the oracle plainly has said!”



“Only a lady have I seen,
Who very kind to me has been!”



“Oh, that can never be my little maid,
She’s only a goose-girl,” the old crone said.

”

“Ym glad,” said the crone, “and I am not sur

prised
Cam omiminen@ wilco: mice ( She was really a fairy quite closely disguised );
? ? . . .
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” Prince Imar no worthier Princess could find,
ay, }

For Dwina’s obliging, neat, courteous and kind.”
“Only a lady have I seen, 4

Who very kind to me has been!” Her words were the truth, whether fairy or crone;
) For of all the Czars that have sat on the throne, ” ig
“ Oh, that can never be my little maid, Nor annals, nor legends, before then or since,

She's only a goose-girl,” the old crone said. ~ Can tell of a happier Princess and Prince.

~Sby





















Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080503_AAAAZG' PACKAGE 'UF00081084_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-05-04T00:38:25-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:09:54-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298206; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-18T19:21:19-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '842239' DFID 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLD' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00000.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 75db4b2b10a23e5228464f5628e09815
'SHA-1' 2d6021461a9b2534c5082614c3c292f33fc08a35
EVENT '2011-12-07T03:23:22-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'106187' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00000.jpg'
26251119cbbc85cb0ddfbb0b50017408
73c210e6741ed171a7d2f901d9b39b99a80b2f7b
'2011-12-07T03:21:07-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00000.pro'
1eec9c3128a609a330c51a0d093a132c
59a8d82523de7481a890874a943db70c8cd8eb9a
'2011-12-07T03:19:38-05:00'
describe
'24169' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
733162fb4d1c3a203ad59d302ef7c33c
15567d6ed33082fde5baa82627407cac8d60277e
'2011-12-07T03:21:51-05:00'
describe
'20235448' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00000.tif'
b31fc3bf5e2816e092e3ed1c7217f444
d21360e47d48c0be770e331bdf94f68cc3147318
'2011-12-07T03:20:47-05:00'
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00000.txt'
a0d0567ba42d15c486cd921e320a29a1
18380dea3da1f8733a7c08e6890dcefce40b96c7
'2011-12-07T03:22:50-05:00'
describe
'5966' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
9f0e33265561f0f91058942551306f1b
bd0b4f4b74dc8391ffee33d31d7590bc82c20a99
'2011-12-07T03:22:27-05:00'
describe
'875750' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
e436c6585bd0a7dde8046b253125f7ec
8918de73d73c44861b316cb06937878c2b48a416
'2011-12-07T03:22:59-05:00'
describe
'57972' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
504d6e8e144948a357a969dee511a912
64f4f4a2c8c9d8b07937d71c3c17ec7f48152ff6
'2011-12-07T03:19:28-05:00'
describe
'7372' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00001.pro'
a98b33da97246912884bf94295c79dc7
6de8c20b263dd4313ed490797f08b87ca87907ae
'2011-12-07T03:21:20-05:00'
describe
'13913' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e58f264f6b0401391f629d36fe70d1db
76d05b6921a5bf94be0cd2ae92d5af06c8880981
'2011-12-07T03:23:09-05:00'
describe
'21036748' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
3ca94cebccc6918174802922049a7925
da9b3a7cb915bdbbed91e837c893758044d9d3c2
'2011-12-07T03:21:40-05:00'
describe
'828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00001.txt'
ad66c937bb304af6c4674bdd2b58b03f
cdf66af36ee1f723595d1c7fb81064ace2cf6dc7
describe
'3827' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
c5b60fc8a0d8b6d75df29e0ea8d9b636
49e73db551eb764744737a2c053b368f1b638ffd
'2011-12-07T03:22:38-05:00'
describe
'784045' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a4cb6b2662a9dfa40fc315babcfe2bdc
aa801dc93d007782e9ae53388d6c051a33a044b5
'2011-12-07T03:20:05-05:00'
describe
'57323' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
9ec17a9c8edfbc5bf247842bdb76240f
bd26c90a5b0e33b23003254c3a522ee33b8355fe
'2011-12-07T03:20:55-05:00'
describe
'2794' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00002.pro'
923619baff54780b84950a08bd553b2b
b3dbcf041da2aa394fb799ba38e4b40ecc94c264
describe
'13614' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
3d31a0326b6a69e1f146679d627f0088
d4ef2f043d0cb942cb4cf2f80749f805006ef9a7
'2011-12-07T03:22:49-05:00'
describe
'18834740' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00002.tif'
7fd6a8da2588a8610a7647e1013242c2
4ce71fcb389fd36fb0804593701443d5c44d1d22
'2011-12-07T03:23:05-05:00'
describe
'190' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00002.txt'
6face92cd125396f8c434965d755d9c8
fb6c05bfaba4cdd524d8215ad7eced6423dbb121
'2011-12-07T03:21:22-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'3893' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
d004f132ae355a518c65488f8ad30d41
621e12dc79550b3df3d480271ef3010ac607669c
'2011-12-07T03:22:41-05:00'
describe
'783857' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
2cdc5c8dabe6b71e0ec5272dce12095d
9cf59c78034adbc6f1f626ed6c4e0ec975ad3b90
'2011-12-07T03:20:50-05:00'
describe
'53806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
11ceecba625697ca0fbe16b78c08f9b7
425121124d821a565ed19f2df167ba654d1b0d40
'2011-12-07T03:19:34-05:00'
describe
'12092' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
d8f8a52cc477c15efba5851d117ac6f2
0b08640f4d885f30092da7e9dae7d2b8d4fca51a
'2011-12-07T03:20:53-05:00'
describe
'18834036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00003.tif'
473278d168cb29ebc54203cf03d9052a
c2330987e6b024020e8422a549717a801cba27da
'2011-12-07T03:19:32-05:00'
describe
'3326' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
25c97f139b841e54cc88789b81142ab5
606dec4e8cd2cabeb9f62ec1098f59e2929cf4e7
'2011-12-07T03:20:11-05:00'
describe
'766585' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
4a58775a5f1608c2b832fbd37d584962
2f5d1068be691ac2ec140f35c1130d38b44693f2
'2011-12-07T03:20:04-05:00'
describe
'158304' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQME' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
7fef26e8543ba49657c34153f04a6f93
6b4b728a0920fd896eb42ac1e25b69e92d918843
'2011-12-07T03:22:57-05:00'
describe
'35590' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
67e898567285f5d2a7e363a82e8479ef
f4d488cb72032295d3ec158a05a56c8d87a89675
'2011-12-07T03:19:50-05:00'
describe
'18417668' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00007.tif'
e9e7bbf812454c5ef7918e3dbbcb4a58
c0dcc6378e8cfb71060f2989e7d6d13928bb04cf
'2011-12-07T03:21:12-05:00'
describe
'7822' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1f1b5a16fb12854303669e10642c50fc
bbbd392d54e7285dca59021626e46ce9acff2660
'2011-12-07T03:20:27-05:00'
describe
'784051' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
81f40e0f95ffc0175b63e133e4e42cf9
20e8b2a2408e6a1895b61c513e0d0e2341eb310a
'2011-12-07T03:20:23-05:00'
describe
'60779' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c76d601cd3a2320beb756e5d812e5b45
8c90c32f88e22fc1cc2d210631d3eff1cb90ff50
'2011-12-07T03:20:21-05:00'
describe
'6426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00008.pro'
6c8a63f91644f63f6b6d9036329a7101
c52efbd64507d595fcaf18d25d70152249b82b3d
describe
'15193' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQML' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
d7200519d12651b13d34ee0bb2588380
164c1cb967caa98f251a45f315878942d548d82e
'2011-12-07T03:21:18-05:00'
describe
'18834952' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8e7d3cff1227b62c6c0b32a27f6499a7
930d3a516ce1603683e206eb2c9e7fbb4a8b7a67
'2011-12-07T03:23:07-05:00'
describe
'401' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ccb634d1104700abfc0aac6311213fa2
968b5452041b105ccc0797a51b5da97a7036bc8d
describe
'4212' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f3999a145f489bbb490d689b9813a1b4
47ca4f70c2f2dc1f8541eee89c1e5a66c5bbbe8b
'2011-12-07T03:19:52-05:00'
describe
'784038' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
4e041b12db3be5efb116a660c585eb31
c9523482d128e9ccf0fb9a61576d830b83923ca6
'2011-12-07T03:20:29-05:00'
describe
'31201' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
2244a4c4eac8e1811a5f1dc8d0377a42
b6d94d07b404133369c573a72004a833fe979872
'2011-12-07T03:22:05-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00009.pro'
2074a34a12ea8b060fe0b8cdd45ced57
65148eaa19f5e6f8803549a69e7bd6076a575dd6
describe
'6029' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
ed67d9a1521212dd0c05a6d6787b9627
8cbb21ec81a84a387d95e217277bdc0777689496
'2011-12-07T03:20:09-05:00'
describe
'18833264' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
f1201f0451ddf553527902ec95a8e0d4
3d610a4cfab080e8f824cb3c7d5cb3b393c93c2c
'2011-12-07T03:21:02-05:00'
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00009.txt'
ea53a6a3174589312ea5b1512aae22d6
12bb53795bbaf770f66dfe9c77301b71028f554c
'2011-12-07T03:22:21-05:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
de3d4d83416c580e76e0e30ff4b080f1
d932a55408be9f74d70eb7e046811433cc723737
'2011-12-07T03:19:56-05:00'
describe
'769067' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a13b7a979a48320803c4d899e75c67b7
701e7071f3691647c61cf4e1e0ee8b3ddfe09005
describe
'39988' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
fcd4a007f6adac10479ff4cc3bdb3bb2
9c26438f8755197451c57d6fd25db93d1eea40b4
describe
'7163' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00010.pro'
84d8f6c21b6af40fda0e3e3f5c05b351
d1dfdb9afeb3e3c87500827ef4192c32fcafc2a1
describe
'8998' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7342c0cb804ef30877016d911f49998b
a8b40ab86e16fdfcc43f0c4ae430afdcdb9aa2df
'2011-12-07T03:21:26-05:00'
describe
'18474596' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
2e667500b2c0ff8bd2c203789908204b
45f6fc017fb074a7e1fb0d9c3f02cc71dc3bb1fc
'2011-12-07T03:20:56-05:00'
describe
'505' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00010.txt'
97542a87077006ccb8b17a3afb639d62
2d5f38742c6d644983711be95875c3896e08c5e0
'2011-12-07T03:21:09-05:00'
describe
'2702' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
8382aeb4fdf23ef98ab20e23c7c6ac78
8f4a12ffa1d5701de7ecc01d73c63dab98015f2f
'2011-12-07T03:22:15-05:00'
describe
'784050' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQND' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5a42dd6d481196c8f58987cfde240f48
43f5ede5ae16999a27323603d7eef14c8f3a6ee6
'2011-12-07T03:20:07-05:00'
describe
'41312' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
c3996ce4a57e2982e10062ba823e1a10
5ba2e65d131b57b01a9c43a38f281e7c347d3986
'2011-12-07T03:21:28-05:00'
describe
'6976' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cfb2402bf28012a6e20b5dbf04415cd7
e7bb65cd1f1a7a13218fc47a5ffd069d8645e89e
describe
'9146' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
31600058d0698c8ef56cbfef266a0d35
e822dbfb7020d3fd1a65d55344b65803a4944a11
describe
'18833860' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b5c315dc3b3965d1bae830b36cac84ce
e4c6bc8ac263e689a2ab01116741e2e83a62231c
describe
'499' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b8dcb50870677e849f1e489df4a07c6b
8e1b009e3775a8e2722814c234b2f9f68c4dd2a7
'2011-12-07T03:23:11-05:00'
describe
'2659' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
050e8f8e393694291b1d7ef61b0a2597
885d3a8987b22233cce088fb099633b99816300e
'2011-12-07T03:21:21-05:00'
describe
'773358' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
5313f603898fdb1f9d67639725ff8799
e72e416532352d9603e573c5240c3fe5b64727cc
'2011-12-07T03:19:58-05:00'
describe
'124429' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c15e384f7c885c0223771dd5fef62ae0
3dc7e5e4067971a042e539f2a9caa41099e4dc61
'2011-12-07T03:21:03-05:00'
describe
'5971' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
cb990ac250f2ce89bc57244dd33bc71a
b210056bd2d189d0f69fc37faf076cd3beb7cd9e
'2011-12-07T03:19:46-05:00'
describe
'29736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
f4aca6bf7891245501a35294df4a0551
dc6b14018ed6df524a43b62c4f9fe8183acb0ebc
'2011-12-07T03:21:56-05:00'
describe
'18580828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a65f725801e54c567b4ba624e0b4c393
2208cc38b1adab707a67b02408a25577269d67db
describe
'243' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00012.txt'
5cadd7eca54759f454fb048c04d9da06
d67b1b5ef81aed26a0095850fdb11298e2bb7053
describe
Invalid character
'7477' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
14787b7216f9d2e46605d672d1cab516
f432d3cfa6a6df2765d02b719cf7f319c9ae883f
describe
'783806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8c17fa0ac0fc35da72e425eb3d36d721
fee9dd35f03d1020f227ba1595cfd03bf39d8847
describe
'123038' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e8fd18477c4bd7b2d4d3c00c6f570929
04494125dedf3cdf4eaa1fe22b3e99fac1714b9d
'2011-12-07T03:23:24-05:00'
describe
'28511' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
aac8196371f9a80cb9d4bdb1bd179885
889323458e479cc67e53397739b8e2ddc61ce2e9
'2011-12-07T03:21:23-05:00'
describe
'18837444' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7c502caeba68a3d516c85841c0fbc680
5fac9ed48aee5301cb78b49a176e5a19dbcb2e76
'2011-12-07T03:21:05-05:00'
describe
'6985' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
53326285dafc9561812916da80915eda
aa2e55c34ec86cbf8bbde0b75ebf7613ade4e81a
'2011-12-07T03:21:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a1a55257c3741217d4637a4a98101158
2078195e9784d8e2e5e8915f58cafe5406fbb349
'2011-12-07T03:20:16-05:00'
describe
'150221' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
bf3d3a2fd8d0cc221ad6d83a5adc0ac6
73543bb8379f3758903bf3aaa220637c157ee979
'2011-12-07T03:19:53-05:00'
describe
'28144' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7146d7fd55f7b93b9f8905e9ae1aa63a
1ac7a627a15f6a7346b2a0d96c88a81abbaf699e
'2011-12-07T03:20:19-05:00'
describe
'36861' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
1ab61da8131e0ab3a1417cfe5f30fe42
43663645b9e4fa658aeb13b89171c5a534b144da
'2011-12-07T03:19:27-05:00'
describe
'18838456' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
24e59ec06ba4204b0d3d6ce2fcfbb973
f65c890ca9ec68ea14b2e8c9f0fff40ab81342c1
'2011-12-07T03:23:20-05:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
8d9f4bc20e8d7bd7fa407c2e409aede1
abb0dafb4ec1e7092a489b894d985b923c73ba0b
'2011-12-07T03:19:35-05:00'
describe
'8950' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
c1353c25b0abb581c13517848f69053f
c9809afcf05bada2fb2da7a273fd4c8d1ca5970a
'2011-12-07T03:21:42-05:00'
describe
'784049' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8263a69bee50531a8ad986030f971273
769f68cd96fb186a7567eab394ab57a122e1445d
describe
'141326' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c6210f01557e7c46d20040ca06774259
462963ff4e179571365f7bf86fe2284b0376f27b
'2011-12-07T03:22:20-05:00'
describe
'42266' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b73b85b756477f362dc7a29ac0dfdee0
07b26ce0ff8415dfe4d96b7298c91a8128c2c7a1
'2011-12-07T03:22:34-05:00'
describe
'34767' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
58f79b5a537dbf865f7cba500d8ad626
ef6e1825d93e9582b7dff30bd82f0c422c486029
'2011-12-07T03:19:42-05:00'
describe
'18837820' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3544611eaf5196bb6a4cc00a752b49ab
ea41895f2bf8632b397a20505e914ea088fed254
'2011-12-07T03:20:15-05:00'
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6cc7163a7a26b82097bfb554091a27e9
57a312bd377a7fef99ad4609e5b04ff10c509b38
describe
'8242' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
1a2b71177071cd6d4e9b92e7714888ba
c50ee6ba160d163032c7cc11f3991dfeb9247430
describe
'784052' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
956442d0aaace090d731ebb6962dc19d
ffe75d0b9c91720def3f90f386afe9debbbe9457
describe
'147251' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
15f6217e2cd3a2bd10f723187f1b70f0
9718e7e34b84144970061d7211e4f73c69bbb0b0
'2011-12-07T03:22:28-05:00'
describe
'42189' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
193347f171bb439e00f28b8d07d83d6f
342f3ae504fe274b3549085eed99e5d3f68cb058
describe
'35349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQON' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e521637b4f26f5e8649fd2c4336cfda9
34f33e96a2870f8631363a41f76bd90b7fbd46c9
describe
'18837844' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
6aa722f5a0b8914e91e3d61001f15f47
a953f84b09347ba3df3066a806f795378a188be5
'2011-12-07T03:22:53-05:00'
describe
'2577' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
f623cbce40e62ee116594788a901c47e
c38b835a3f50a7693913d543c16caa2e59bf6f59
'2011-12-07T03:22:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8250' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7c3791684347374696f77d338e77c6ca
b43fd309dbc1967c2731bd3ce7bfb7a98b2de750
'2011-12-07T03:22:56-05:00'
describe
'784054' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
352cbae606ebfb247e23382453ce6b21
17242f9535f27b3e27ee53bf5cac07885acb297d
'2011-12-07T03:20:42-05:00'
describe
'149966' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7d4ce781765c58472aee9168ed1eb846
9e53775c42ea58eb5e457fc81e40b814920f5143
'2011-12-07T03:21:54-05:00'
describe
'35258' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7ef9a0afe135fc87c41fb1925c682445
790d48886a357caac1af0a0ea9cc640e04b22792
describe
'37517' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
79332cc9f688125103c98bfdbc484a47
513227d6333e68adcb2a29bfe2b178bdea98878a
'2011-12-07T03:20:01-05:00'
describe
'18838624' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
d9fa10f381cd171d662e666987979163
18442da097b6b891f76ae53bd0298b2fc163972b
'2011-12-07T03:22:16-05:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
cf7f46dd9bae1845dbf0c7de500d792b
f406abbb47bfa0c83bb9da4f9b6c3a46071a0d08
'2011-12-07T03:22:32-05:00'
describe
'9048' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
9d328e22b8b9b63e62c55f294c8225ef
85bc005b64ae084679b5f7497dc7cc05c2419827
describe
'775498' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e4d8824654439bb5e1c791ed6e172c89
c02f8c8752bf6c9b7dbbee4b62578f162b893e96
'2011-12-07T03:19:47-05:00'
describe
'164582' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
384265321761ff611c3a353b21b013bd
f806548c9366718662240ce23ca00168608a4abb
'2011-12-07T03:22:13-05:00'
describe
'17059' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
798909ceaf4628ee70c39c2799941cee
0df03d74319920bfbc50f624184eb91849bcdad3
'2011-12-07T03:22:45-05:00'
describe
'40260' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
4ba3ba6378e1302265da90ff5fe80866
814bd2764a87b44f1a728f1cdc588fc53e058b08
describe
'18633392' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
d44362ee0850f4242191ea9687f2fad8
7ca1bade0681e5a6a1ee43f880f9fa529778625b
'2011-12-07T03:22:43-05:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
796b9249fd5e7d7209c9f04228feeff3
614839a765a4b90602e2dbcb10e179662393e947
describe
Invalid character
'9716' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
e69161f3245a00d7a17e1f7e30b74de8
87a33e70d00e5300f8dd301133efe0d550f425fe
'2011-12-07T03:19:54-05:00'
describe
'784025' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
98db3da000620ad2c05e15ec39668cda
74c39b81c409729248c08310e0c07be63bf6c944
'2011-12-07T03:22:29-05:00'
describe
'149620' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
5cb9b6ac985ce02ede45a18f538d7947
edcd22793a1549ef1da5f0a0d44271b887fa6e6e
describe
'16553' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d0dde7358e122bfb434b50b8ddaa97d3
d1cd18bd1fd5b327443bd205aefd270e7d3cff3e
'2011-12-07T03:22:54-05:00'
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1f294075ed02e30a5b8ba27d422a89d3
2161f5decfe98dfc69f03c4031f9d9fc1c6e39f1
describe
'18837912' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
9990d0158a8d405bd85891b671e97f9c
c6656b50ea5da33490c041a933eb6b6d4337e511
'2011-12-07T03:22:47-05:00'
describe
'769' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ff2c00e18d43943f183f703de7739259
7dd85bce87ed6e6d00644d159f245d5ca346ecc3
describe
Invalid character
'8438' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
619e735cede8683af1a06569e076d614
a089605f058c9ebde85d714627f86462f11f9637
'2011-12-07T03:20:54-05:00'
describe
'784029' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bdc0ce3c49cf3b4f5ed31cbe3068a262
8c6819ef36fced83b2bdf0ff2c81bb591c72d8d2
describe
'140253' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c69cad549c425f16a74c91804d836d23
0b1f603a4b1fd8112cfea85e238a9c6cf52de437
'2011-12-07T03:21:45-05:00'
describe
'40303' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
ffef05b38b871573532cc7ec3963d316
5bdcf2bcc60eba1e3d73bd170e9c3bff41a89cc9
'2011-12-07T03:20:40-05:00'
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6989373a758d8be23c66398dae6400af
81805a7762e22569afeef027c0fb18367887714c
describe
'18837284' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1fd83fc8088c7f29935ec2667a8c3ade
2f4a7ff2b74dd4a5ec203edb8d69449b1fa247ea
'2011-12-07T03:21:53-05:00'
describe
'2120' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f3728cd3a80877c23e57f0eead6bdb5c
0d04cec052cf79182b288cb3d34b7a600c6caa8b
'2011-12-07T03:22:42-05:00'
describe
'7702' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
c66a98cff894bbb5e80134314f7c6c9c
8719502c71a9093dfff053f9a5ca191e10ed696b
'2011-12-07T03:20:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
b0cf7e67963c406a12af959c65996457
69ef63eeea232748925a0dcec8e46a3c30f76524
'2011-12-07T03:19:49-05:00'
describe
'156036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
89101846c333addc5f8492053626970e
c293c66a765a774fc4303e7193e255d3e328ccdf
'2011-12-07T03:23:10-05:00'
describe
'30568' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
83db29e98c8c30cb0c6a1b7b0494ffba
2bccf672c9709e18b4bc1e28ee9e0e748f189a0a
describe
'37174' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cc20e22ba53b0334d0efb049fbe8a379
e2597730d64f078918dc6c5d6b07faba0ad6da98
'2011-12-07T03:19:59-05:00'
describe
'18838260' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
8ed0ca837a4bffa52474969cd0a865f4
c94e94fb709968a5c9da62d9adfbcb5b69586500
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f3403311a5fff15bc69eb994a032a396
75c951b948672131065485c3a80a26cf2268dfb7
describe
Invalid character
'9014' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
cccc9d01bd0077539c3945d81bee9b7a
13479c514c35ed2286b145655d227483db72898a
'2011-12-07T03:22:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
99c2d929715cf804d3db63f1d369dea1
a1aef1a303a34835e382d93f49e45fab53d7eac1
'2011-12-07T03:23:26-05:00'
describe
'159878' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
aadb1bf1006523f4e5ad2af1a69cf791
6626e99057f8bca7372970486377f85a4578ec2d
describe
'32743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
43e70bd503baaa0f3d588b9e751de6a9
925ae37fd5086a1e0ba16b256b5c01bdfe192aa6
describe
'39176' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
13d61d18809a10dce073cd59a62bc8be
7fdcc9811d688b3e4e6c0c5b8f3d175c4399f02c
describe
'18839016' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
71fbe8ed4a8aec5bb5c7960d1196f0ec
b2fb87d8d9eb3f0f4a72454b757a495e98d4b4fa
'2011-12-07T03:21:30-05:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
43b8822635a249ea7b5622a54f4fc443
6bd6a9c3c1da2dc1c08f3a8b04cf58bf3502d4c3
describe
'9785' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ba287a8d076615ebea8f33827aac161c
f0441d869f8857202e2c302b2184e406e1538ed8
'2011-12-07T03:19:31-05:00'
describe
'783786' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
52454fb1efbaf8156e659d99d5d6c430
fd3da45fe8ecaed9685067bc316be2d4ac5de9b4
'2011-12-07T03:21:59-05:00'
describe
'180515' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
548f57c837208e0c17b24d4308de826a
0800ed633ca78e0c5070696990179dd7059e58d9
'2011-12-07T03:20:25-05:00'
describe
'16087' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7812abc8ba50dd3d9b6c8b67e01d4e5c
4e2ba4886394d41e90a49568afff33e1fb1cbd6e
'2011-12-07T03:20:39-05:00'
describe
'41696' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
1ee3d874c358dbc0c1a9011e2f09ecbe
fc33966616792168943b8a3197c3eb73b1a6aed6
describe
'18838544' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
aa7496463b9873706b0f3b4275f0a00f
e8cdd2b62d9bf7b74b4fb146277b5eb4259d1d95
'2011-12-07T03:22:01-05:00'
describe
'745' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
967bd004666aa1382c002746c4833995
45dca5b861ae2895171b9089ff3b1d7f3915e89b
'2011-12-07T03:19:45-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9957' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
817023ca7b2090c3e6916aa9a60d2a69
f517b0f29228f9ef4442cfc93bae33bdc8278688
'2011-12-07T03:21:31-05:00'
describe
'769070' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
8ed29ac48266bea392e59dce4f70aedf
5d608627c7573a2476069c0d9fa6d9c2b1d186c6
describe
'175905' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2485a38f209d515ba86edd09c1b3dba1
a125236f13cf38b363582c03617bad3b15179538
'2011-12-07T03:21:33-05:00'
describe
'13413' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c10274f65117966b611caf89ddc77177
5f90298ab8c2b44307d6afec32be8951387d0d46
'2011-12-07T03:23:01-05:00'
describe
'42517' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
da29e9910c1ba07caa3ec3dec8fd6e1b
ec727ad08e3dfaf16e1b6797081fc6a69496a88d
describe
'18479652' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
817e821ddf1babf1cf1ea34d3ca87073
db04dbdead0f5a3eda9218fc3c03699d994a192d
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
c9f23e35447f972ae5f93d84ee354f46
eed6ed37e902db3a843418eb70c04f30d9fc741e
describe
'9930' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
1d8bfde31337fc6e588be40e789c87a8
0ed46306f47a8d88a408b37ec1fe11885765ae4b
'2011-12-07T03:23:17-05:00'
describe
'784035' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
411538b696b7c63807e601e36847d678
504bc7ab8780d445c58d8f9d5c7f7e78ca040feb
'2011-12-07T03:20:13-05:00'
describe
'166079' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
940a5590e9e43464d03884b3ff641928
3b301a6302a859ea018441b32d5db77090241a25
'2011-12-07T03:21:48-05:00'
describe
'29993' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cd384aff5350563c4c60d52b26b616c6
e20abb3031fba4fad67f499f5be87de13d670041
describe
'39461' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
47982106dcb90a3434398324e14c511e
3c19a98cb18de3bd9ffc60f2f3ec43a25af9e9af
'2011-12-07T03:22:23-05:00'
describe
'18838920' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c92a5162a052006995681207b5a85cfc
190d0d8f3bca5247a6bd3b0e6f8838d320de156c
'2011-12-07T03:19:40-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
943cca65928fb4eb1635c3af3ce8d9d1
cc196819e42da084b45053ae30f697c9768ca42e
'2011-12-07T03:22:30-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9614' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
01346b1d1e62674da5b0912d3bae20f1
972ab798353adaee54e462e23e11a802eec4954f
'2011-12-07T03:23:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
972e3425b183e46b29aeb78563d3356d
2773a7e4168d3f09bc257853b2a43ec56bb12e8d
describe
'172135' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
1f9688770de5b10cbbb2186014c9b361
8162c92b38cf24751f187e964fbf21125124dd1b
'2011-12-07T03:20:51-05:00'
describe
'48882' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c09036e59a613c5e99c46089689eb43a
97b27b97749092ff25ce5c9837783f95faf1ba66
'2011-12-07T03:21:10-05:00'
describe
'43635' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d9a197c94b692d435df2577298a4ac0f
32013ff40f8e306ed5cdf88b0ef60252d3058b9c
'2011-12-07T03:22:39-05:00'
describe
'18840124' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
895576907012dff9ab380138e6f433a2
cb6545c454c42e65bbc1c97d305120c7fc6a8068
'2011-12-07T03:21:32-05:00'
describe
'2714' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a0ea54d03d7d4adf41bd9409ddbcd20b
b8bbaf5a5bbf5293fc9a46fe65d2d3b180cfc723
'2011-12-07T03:22:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10524' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0e84a3b149aa85d5b30ada049a0a71a5
a9657f64d09555f35e25e57aed35bd18cfc39ea3
'2011-12-07T03:23:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
d4abaff4449b5d27d89907d896939135
65ec6c9af3290f6193f1d08865c1544c1ec71fc0
'2011-12-07T03:21:27-05:00'
describe
'169514' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
3dc12e880fe6751bf5903d33bb14aec4
57736f6bd9191d54d195027332f2b08e5856f8d2
'2011-12-07T03:22:11-05:00'
describe
'34270' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
6e109cd652528dbfd19ca99fd1bed637
485ee98599e4119371b7b6bcce6ee21644a4e59d
'2011-12-07T03:23:00-05:00'
describe
'43985' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4ee6d78d5bee7be55c04964dc334ba0f
e0ae4b7e3053663aef2fe57e2f3cf89e5316c613
'2011-12-07T03:20:59-05:00'
describe
'18840476' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
d800512f5af32d6cd6b60143047231d6
af561d927ad5dab0082d5f3969902549f31e3bbc
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8a0b2af0d5153d4dc7e86318ad6cc12d
a4963d1e79bb3616770dfaa5b5b772b9aeeb349f
describe
Invalid character
'10846' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
3be063825ad2786648907776f8a7fffa
6ad8fdf4323766d29d7ab0604ce98e8d0d393a4f
'2011-12-07T03:22:17-05:00'
describe
'783967' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
ee39f1d19e498db2b5dfe86c5832e733
8647831193ddf173fba050a9844cb268ca0e1bdc
describe
'171195' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
7a8431b0674be505db56ebdb5780a4b4
f81a93c65b5e9874a1fb7535b6cb73a91768c06c
describe
'33741' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
27f775901d9d40ddd4c5035e47973d0e
048b9aa531e75b794908fbdf93a3aa5fa569554d
describe
'44434' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
35736c3177dd06971ad6d47de944e895
b341b32b3b815f614357b8a609c9766b2a6d65cb
'2011-12-07T03:19:41-05:00'
describe
'18840612' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
735a15391eae013827d1d1fea797eb50
d444e53e14b17702b8d9c77cce528526c84afc41
'2011-12-07T03:22:33-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
1460292ba4f7b46309e2cf40954dd9b7
73fc562134dd8424b4b470c52a70fde6e24a3796
describe
'10867' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
af8d1baae9694f5888ae142fd4f4f2b6
e5d201991ca4a8bb8af29f3893717ef6d948181c
'2011-12-07T03:22:03-05:00'
describe
'784031' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
960c059ffc4274843f558c4f132aa8cf
bbb977bb93e333cfbd906a7570ddfade29ac86b6
describe
'183789' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
429af0ede71f60ba7633f06211004503
37208a177506d470e3ccd970cffb1f23b85820f0
'2011-12-07T03:21:43-05:00'
describe
'34865' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
97f80234ab83aff37b7e3f56011fe500
d644d9f778cdc783283a68d1e5efbcf0b6dc06ad
describe
'46213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
59f509f5f80e753d040fb60f5f666155
f80e92976ad19faa24864f7af79841684fb8d47e
describe
'18840652' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
88cbc2e191d36ac52a6cfefdaa12245a
85f85d6aea3fdf2356f566f33320a17e582222f6
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
636a115d3b044bf781617dec7e2dfac4
71533f7c081e2973719996668eb584f28205f4e4
describe
'11204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
a8ebdede6830a6eb00e8990ffc4359c3
4c29873c49a376266792bef9622c4aa94c69ab75
describe
'784032' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0fae2b87bcc06f2e932445f309367b55
609b7dae9b8458f9c63f567aed02a38b83e191db
describe
'158743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
dffca5146368dfbf452f4f0b81900bdd
348234efe0564bebe7e6e00bd7ce274c76f0ffa2
'2011-12-07T03:20:12-05:00'
describe
'15507' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
380830a6c65d003345a656ecc7e4a8d2
d1bd73264f589cbd7229899ddec6bc07fa532ef1
describe
'36548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
18cf2f1c426bba5b31839d21d90f5cfa
3d93a092592dfb3cee62c3bd78fea41619c65fb1
describe
'18837932' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
bdefb8ad393d3581b56276f1fb6a8c12
0c6bc096b13fc211e8fa38c3d447df8ebae8bf96
'2011-12-07T03:19:33-05:00'
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a0d17735e9b664267e1b4941073ed6ac
c87f46f8c6b08e4e05090bfa3c0f94923fe17773
describe
Invalid character
'8394' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
baac400ad06e46e7017ace7fb6504d1b
ac79a446bc9d522f385936a660cc76a01e9e4d02
'2011-12-07T03:21:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
4805bed652df80f4e3eb93ab026419f8
55438d3383928b856142e4a254fdad5eef351b17
describe
'142932' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
cc6d0c7d2097c86eaeda5f332b2b55bc
16ba6af849dc74d7e8ef584fddeac90475679bdd
'2011-12-07T03:20:30-05:00'
describe
'27986' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
72b2b20d70317c17e55c4f7b28467fe4
3dfb0b0e7ecc021310d9ced42e2c6ae457f4c106
'2011-12-07T03:21:17-05:00'
describe
'34024' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
86b210973d2b0aa9eb1b849a1166b1ac
22380130d4f803a9262a22d231aaa3d10ba9cbe1
'2011-12-07T03:23:14-05:00'
describe
'18837652' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
33c9aeba5b1bb8f5e75622affbcbce69
9622f23a5df4d7006af9c1b29c9e670d60142397
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5ead207587742dc4c8c5888a6ad33fce
03d9460e8d598e015d9e15189f864dffd6d2c359
describe
Invalid character
'8042' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9f71b4296be332a02a59bf8a26dafe1d
504607b81ce9c5ad4e5bd3b1318b3592cd480df1
describe
'773288' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
2de166605e9007e08b659959cd974d4e
011691a83da018ce14dae865a6e90ae6dcc18747
'2011-12-07T03:21:50-05:00'
describe
'158552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQST' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
eed21cb6bff978a7a3bbf19fe04aca41
2e74d7703abe8183da806f00c0e28fcbb1d08f5a
describe
'25053' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
1a521978f19cec668c9512d7c44bcef5
7661c2f48ca303d3937f94984480b05ae820d714
describe
'37635' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
8895aa1ef412df03fccd104ab2dc5238
1ae41674b1778c73b7ebc7e4a748952640ddc87f
describe
'18581404' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
de495adbbd430a98af2530742b83aefa
86979bfabb74c20c22ee6d7213548ffa661cffb5
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ed2dbd6ee894aca52e807505774ff7a8
aa0925072ff415c7441ed73e8eee9fe8874cdf89
describe
Invalid character
'8885' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
bebd7f90201b687bcd7f20ea91fe59dc
9bf78ae876edf9d7de980c9ef03b918c8cd76121
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
5da7422d25c6e30b74540ca61e620c8f
e50bc1e121db3df9fe73c1c256a53131f76dc9c7
describe
'146887' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1c7b5d56ee021cc114e457db3386c6a6
fad7e4a9ca85f615a42c3ce13f08677726c58f60
describe
'39793' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
d656006ba4e1e6b2a08fc8d6c86824f4
442e62d13a3dcc9b84daf28fdaabde9fb270024b
'2011-12-07T03:19:43-05:00'
describe
'35768' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6ff9f69a849929545d20d7646ad51c66
4a6910612c057f31058ce5043e4fc09286410a8b
'2011-12-07T03:21:04-05:00'
describe
'18838404' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a1bde5b141de3b72a38736a86d870233
7c6d1869e490a5339bfb5156f996c67a1a27eb13
'2011-12-07T03:20:45-05:00'
describe
'1951' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
610aa81575f7ba5360c17d5ebbb3f55e
b60cbe7f321ffac72648d3503de0193d7d931940
'2011-12-07T03:20:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8666' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
074bf7e9ea6e9c323214f9ca302aa891
995b8bb372dfbf3a3fbf978d976ec56de886de6b
'2011-12-07T03:20:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
cd3ce68e3558e47623b9d3dfffd09398
b808bb77319f70326dd95705b9f5bb0721d3eeb8
'2011-12-07T03:21:29-05:00'
describe
'149310' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
035753d25bf8422747880352df8468dc
80cdc7b878c094f3c3e52c84d9eedfc237661bb4
describe
'47315' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4c8d57145cf4d6cd6444e53765ac3a3a
b841c7bc6c1c8d8dcbcd7f295bc31133d14ad4ce
'2011-12-07T03:21:13-05:00'
describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
8deb8a57f71a74303ab815843c7e2ab1
3d58c8344a07315680b2fe5e22e2d15eac6c2860
describe
'18838152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f6f2c6d83c21c87b1f51e53c8295cb74
2ba79f8f0e21051668bf991adcb4bc7b9ded4582
'2011-12-07T03:23:18-05:00'
describe
'2688' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
5f6b0b4917c1912c8eac4a60eb872392
0ae4d2326e6351385df69a6a8f35bc848ad2a76f
describe
'8770' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d4d8240a7f2fb1859227e93d7175b423
61cda6b1b6d5dc07e03a2c3d22e0a0e118cf99af
describe
'784041' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
4f5e01165991a8525392803e408a8584
638c9b4169b1d362f69d93121e1b14fc21b8e368
describe
'154965' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
11c61e1126a6c1aca1a749a0df8f9503
61aa17babe89c056761603a2146147861ba50c8b
'2011-12-07T03:23:25-05:00'
describe
'55200' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
418895d663596fcfdd90565899bf5c8a
90cfdf8fab1f336d4be8edeb43e74e2ebe511e83
describe
'37605' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8cb5a3d448d3f2f63d6bc98d7be02085
85dc8d94b3012fe0e3505a93166f6ebca3719b0a
describe
'18838664' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
d9051e139107502f7e0025563d106eef
bbba1ef7df9dd36e8ae1a21afdb698af930e1e0a
'2011-12-07T03:20:28-05:00'
describe
'3364' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9ae6a23449e482fe8ad1f673d64363d4
05a67e6544364b784d2a87c32cc4bde7dfb01903
describe
Invalid character
'8970' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
43f5f1f52360b160f7d7d79bc609c489
5ce49565fc196510215b182f23599e7c6259af0c
describe
'754079' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
3f3618c99ef2d5bc6e5cb0e67bd10ce4
6ab90671930867117cc35bdb6e1b7d7be7faf74e
'2011-12-07T03:21:14-05:00'
describe
'175664' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d5b797a5b274ef168a7490330dda9c5b
c3a6257371334333e3be47fd3354218914314f6c
describe
'37011' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
f3b7bbd794d8bf187df3ac61f6a87933
fa36f735993737e0da2adcebae64d70ae4fffb89
describe
'42209' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b3e3df7d9e9e4e9b9417a0dc6e5f3680
eff5f1288c2997fb981a2f55e7f9e174534f3c1f
'2011-12-07T03:20:00-05:00'
describe
'18120100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0f9c21d6211b808c6f52fdd9f66c636e
b80c4a56cd2764491962f988bb370a1d5a07eae7
'2011-12-07T03:20:49-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5c75ddd14a3d1d73572aa97378eeac1d
6207862edc3b71bb0a269901bf3f16b152c3c49a
describe
Invalid character
'9883' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0e06de87f112ce8680e7715a6ea4fa23
5a672652ad02d35a51f6dbf8da9d2fe9b99232e4
'2011-12-07T03:22:40-05:00'
describe
'771204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
bb6f8e6d2250bc03126a7ee035f77bb9
fbc5feda952885fb231eb12f5ea89ea4f4af14d4
describe
'158825' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a91caebf43747846e3b2c5fcd830292e
f75931fba470e5be4624a87cd95dba9603f4c707
'2011-12-07T03:21:36-05:00'
describe
'48358' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4981098060b373ef4db907882abc4dae
a70d8e911a34d80ef4f41ad93a78b49e4e68574e
describe
'38659' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
85ae793417c00e81ea33e8f1ab8e1962
c2ff91a30063c0f50b5cf6752fa83967ec52b939
describe
'18530348' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
61782c165102d2dbddc20ce6cb846574
9089dbc469b401dc43cbc9d7f4f0d57502fa4a8a
'2011-12-07T03:22:07-05:00'
describe
'2330' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
13ad8fffcebe87bb5cf7beb903a5edcd
3f14bd0203ae81b66efc5e15bd0a9f71263230d3
describe
'9475' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
7287d05fdf9b3228345db4543694c1c7
b863fc0c4aa5abadf3c69ecf7eb25284ee60b7ea
describe
'786362' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c8632dff286464306fdb91abc32c638d
2789533a45667bda88f73f1b2af00889e4aab6e4
describe
'169135' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
5f1e695cad8b4029033fcdfb0a53c596
27e97246a48ce59189f21020be7e418f601a2775
describe
'36567' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
8404f3880b5941df074d3b60003beb41
618654ca3ff288ce69cb524061b89a2f32790035
describe
'41157' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
400f6a7009fd8b71288169ccb8dbb826
fa6713205ddf7358c5d696bafc1b7531a135be68
describe
'18894516' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
503af9237ac89b51d432512c61280c14
318b71f71e3b56377fdf9f77f7c5e4184d137087
'2011-12-07T03:22:19-05:00'
describe
'1998' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e1601f82dea566e41c0dd86fa97842db
45084d43de0e536731364e3add536220213d57bf
describe
Invalid character
'9626' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
a459b249a5a5ad7bd1b4b2605c8cbc4f
d877ac116ad667a7775837bb0f5a4de8ce4b8ddb
describe
'764756' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
ee4600e41def03034123fd7809e18b41
2521885968599baf651a1f4d3e2262b6809f3d9a
describe
'97413' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
b58f4e992e63ba06ba4df84da61586f5
53ca67a982dc549e2f96279e8aa0ab726509bac4
'2011-12-07T03:20:43-05:00'
describe
'16990' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
bb8395c0ac824c14f385e06f666e5ea4
cb361d62fa617b94cbfefe884a2a123cc38e4edc
describe
'23157' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
af7505ed0c69964440a8bdb03b5e1d79
9b4d6b906548b8ded7298d30b4ee459bba84ee20
describe
'18373748' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
00dfc95d05e3129b0d7fb9ddecfe7635
0d4a7256f88e4acea1a2d2d44c4db50e20e959c7
'2011-12-07T03:23:08-05:00'
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
e4ac24c045eb95ba4824f37e57777d06
62102a03c5ca9f88b903efb19257c3dbb5dc3515
describe
Invalid character
'5940' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d7e21ec09a097f3c80c890d2a38ac1af
c466a8dbf598afbaf9577fa0545e9e49817fe2c2
describe
'783645' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d59d41f23fe05609497c4b03d01b1641
cfb67fee503fbe8b54eb5ff948978ff776036947
describe
'120921' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5f77411472ce03cab0bb2936bbf7a831
29134c4e1bdeb5de82b526bca37dc9a12955b4f5
'2011-12-07T03:22:25-05:00'
describe
'21773' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
dfed631871d35e98cbf37e3f7394d5ba
d64f8699ffedb344e19ad5c90f6dad5fa7a924ce
describe
'29349' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
2fdd2e4585bb85ab70822744b1eb0849
ee2713ef797f1ad4a57d0ea62408175420774c2a
'2011-12-07T03:19:51-05:00'
describe
'18828784' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
56bb779dd8520acfeb8af613490a67a0
18e666dbbfb1c6b7f3174576b88b1acdae133df8
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d99cd71b267a3df83acc527a05674627
d8823703bb2d0e93ea38f303794bb874d2ff9dc6
describe
Invalid character
'7523' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f2bb6a6937896236d265e0c37552d032
41f994a26aee7b6337fc13149aa845593570bab0
'2011-12-07T03:21:11-05:00'
describe
'784053' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4de12ce0ec848e9e347903385c3cc9a7
07a6afa068013999ea68d2820eac3a9558cae70b
describe
'124979' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
6ffadf1dd090047b686382128771a8ad
15bbc976e7912309389867c865adca23f122485a
'2011-12-07T03:22:12-05:00'
describe
'16955' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
11e44831829ba520e2ff32022b841f13
354a60cb6176927ab944098fbe60492100c95b3b
describe
'31033' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c76e36fadf94f18c390b5cc10e6b097c
6836e63208a6d73a527845b0b2cee43cb7b4410e
describe
'18837708' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
8749b37c354d9b77b257d8711fe61b7f
c12cb7596d09878d68b9ff95de4cb76c3d74d410
'2011-12-07T03:21:58-05:00'
describe
'830' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
13dbbf878585f75429301bc1c9ba0155
fe45dfdd5079bfb5bdb67afd073b6b54c740e3e2
describe
Invalid character
'7743' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
2d2e0a8b332404a439a37e42a6dee21e
238f5fd0d3dfe0d80794544293221acd7b8b1454
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
76bb3f1f2bc01ecc6d7e9459b44a73f1
67d327b6583cd47f4c708ff5576544af5ecaaf8a
describe
'169674' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f3e63e77e218e8c465721abe582cad59
141f6f49fdfbf525ecdab5023d4140af4e4ff770
describe
'38130' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
0cf9c00fe9256a7ada829fb855daf4d0
44a4b26038cb36589eda8b75b024bc03e6a5e792
'2011-12-07T03:23:16-05:00'
describe
'18838096' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c5c3944b743bbacede71e2063a3db6e7
861aadbdbf8c539699a3874eb2e2ca458e7b7d98
'2011-12-07T03:22:10-05:00'
describe
'9174' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c80564cd9e7acb307eef8d4abd612fe6
40132b50127aa99d761b070ef55e59d577d31f68
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
9771f492113276baedc06951555c36b1
86924db1f6623387074232bae77240d6d7921760
describe
'31432' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
7bd297aee29b23b17fa4f5d8869fed0e
f65921feb16cca2f8b61a637d54bc2f15ca5a689
describe
'6166' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
dc5432b444e6561b750e1a82157d2501
9974559cbfd07650cbc752bed544ea7e8482ff3b
describe
'18833204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
a46ee54373358a4ecd59acec31f62dad
c1ec5e66283718a3a29eaa986ad9306c9bf8a446
'2011-12-07T03:20:37-05:00'
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
6f9554e213262ef65093b5aaa8c9db16
96540809c0d6090621356d1adae0805255e09286
'2011-12-07T03:22:06-05:00'
describe
'783970' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8a57efa2112f9cde1dae6a5bd873388e
ef033831a034c270968a9d41367b6ac8e1b53109
'2011-12-07T03:20:17-05:00'
describe
'119834' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6c6ec9c56860204fd3378e825a129faf
f72e920bead6c63eff556a38ed9d8c60da01aa69
describe
'22288' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00044.pro'
a76acd6d4a2884938d412a0bc5c99b48
b4d431561bf818d9c163c50001c03a22885c1bdd
'2011-12-07T03:21:37-05:00'
describe
'29800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
a84d9c3510e58e45ba6fb04bf067cab1
924b1c05a47e0612477e7a09fa53e57481d58086
describe
'18837544' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
8aec800ac5ec8ea65d51a8c5fac33889
33abd6f4b49a2ffda0c263c8401312a06e8bbb36
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
de63546eb0132044e4f54a5f5385873a
4de628bb37b828debbf091ae86eeb6f34683a5f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
303ca92d7f5e097afe8e63bceb77076d
fb06b325668c784a376f8ed16875d4419f2fa643
'2011-12-07T03:21:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
fc1a4f78a33b0ef9760068ef98e4bbb8
e6214211e5301885c84a4fb49b14f37b59f193d3
describe
'117911' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a37a9eb34b84ff5cda42b04253b0c093
c59d30f698dfc40380984c711ffa11d7c15a69f1
describe
'24944' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f3713d05efbf4093cb53d1e84ef79241
12a50c39b1b8851eff667cf772fbc433addc1df3
describe
'28308' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
3925f3987db290c1f54ef25dafe2a968
40ba5f2a35bf69e1b5b6172e41eae24602f9dd33
describe
'18837172' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00045.tif'
181f048bc006e1cd84ac95e302cc4d1a
89840074a84048c922594a10227fe3f06d32a2c0
'2011-12-07T03:20:22-05:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
dbe167bfa0509dc059eacd992753f58f
345f9cb89892f5d039eff9442617cf1cd02e2e7a
describe
Invalid character
'6998' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
861c13d05c7e91bfc6d4c63e8b3cdfed
5c9c68109fccf4a5fdd02ad79e38d690fecc6591
'2011-12-07T03:19:55-05:00'
describe
'783935' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
16bb3d0350d904a341784b5da2bc5519
3d5548c40bf6a5cf7d27a0d73bd8f4105b12ad3a
describe
'126694' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
dac895dfeb7bd20b75d37c775f05bfa1
08d764b5763ad1cb46531d9fb951787f33d93f17
describe
'21549' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c048f4fb7bdc0bf9ca617cbbbb22607f
a58e1a982ec0766c9ed485797ff7d82149e4a05a
describe
'30066' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2727bf3d2360d17b9ec7efd4b6bf7c7b
c75d61a4afbaaf426dcd9b1988812b868e38978e
describe
'18837732' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
a2fbacd044157cde16c25e9d9852861d
3e10dcaac166d49b6717500be80c44242b0b5589
'2011-12-07T03:22:46-05:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
0616809ec7bc2215b5bce7d0af43dfeb
aeafcf1de21a4ae04da52501ef43e667558b1e82
describe
Invalid character
'7832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
446cf9a48fe460ec93f510d8760804d2
0b63f6d0c8bd45153e973e633861c7a7d32c30ba
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b73de9a3f9ef9ff36cba3f3aeee1d346
61a89eceebc9eb0ffc3d4f86010274c74c622e55
describe
'134658' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
00e96b40a59858149fda1d2f2d0a7669
24db74811d5069c45ee38921d0e98e4723ba8cc1
describe
'29382' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
fd5dd394954405d3cff93e7a43c53438
f85e72be56a77690117ba05fb64edd87a1784700
'2011-12-07T03:20:32-05:00'
describe
'31674' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
322c3e0075d468a095c82e4a22b56119
493be7f3042fb5786aa5e743ad9134c0d19020a7
'2011-12-07T03:20:57-05:00'
describe
'18837760' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00047.tif'
4aa6d26254e92251ecb279ea64148ef9
e316f57ab8bd3767150f664a101ca9cfc0083f1d
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
3ea91fc1abe652f7ece5ecf4e715bddb
dbd4db64232975ac31fd864a7352530e01d9af6e
describe
Invalid character
'7728' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
85824b183260385950c4e77f60b5bc68
5e8b4d5de7daea35f244711dd478ba8976642075
describe
'783973' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
230c6c8b0e5ded63c5bf8d575719da5e
050b237f06f394550e0ebb8ab1745376e7afcd1f
'2011-12-07T03:21:41-05:00'
describe
'140323' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
cf0b221ae5383e78676486a1a96d5ee9
b12a1d8aa0bda87287e9542d3e9eae708226709c
describe
'20608' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c9f2605a912c5948f4a0b42659642b44
4c05a50af2e42998de0faaa71b03ed8ab9f106e8
describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
06ce2fe2c1289b9bbfc19fa0e75d62a0
2fc3792e9a3607a253b930e6d7d29c23ddaf7fef
describe
'18837736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d01e47809160bac93b1d4753cb671889
f1300667485c6a4bd7a26e50a22b797028df2692
'2011-12-07T03:20:41-05:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00048.txt'
ef47404c68f19324439c218c9ccbe213
9498fe837afdd46b820ab0eec73a393e2291d79a
describe
Invalid character
'7964' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
59bea673d98c9dc7bb9a0e5dde658a08
9a4237849525dfbbae75a70d43fbc27526c2d063
describe
'784036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a4706e1fa22d83c5f8b70507770edf73
b964d8cc3727706733ed1ac9357624bd9a7b2307
describe
'142891' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3c92d89dafaa4aea95f0818ceeb84ddc
5d650f5772d748609e757e7355d0b4be79665629
describe
'25121' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00049.pro'
dc381e09d8051ff3d390bd75bc812ab2
4671d935cba93a6b7918415e55d060268b3ec19c
describe
'34090' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8523c1dbc6744644ea72e8e90051b742
2a165e7cc80ba6cfc3988e708e5fab284a17f82a
describe
'18838804' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3b05f6dc479e3f5a0345566248be3cbe
3de66bf096ce060097edfdd441e521f9f8cd5c8c
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3c63f68c4bbdb68e899603ce63045247
af5717c78639cb4bf04fc519725852042ea39dd8
describe
'8518' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
30642db6b077869357651d64accc2ff8
738f4badbf274f71cfff7be9d88c67e3f8ab9ccf
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2627242ccbf05f0ce676482bb75e6ef4
e0833148e8d48b48b8b52dfc1a4c3c8d9d7c5bc5
describe
'125762' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4bdc8c214f21305e8e138e8f268d865f
ee7a74eb9259a09323a8e458db9c6b2f1407df27
describe
'42603' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00050.pro'
4dd58dbba45771ada71b9cf3c4e8ca51
4f04cb4aed18b8d7e4491219ab3cc58868062422
'2011-12-07T03:19:44-05:00'
describe
'30558' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d8a6dfbb9e7fcdd298afbbaf79f39f6c
32b263eba22d380e7ef8a5a03087032e69a1e7bb
describe
'18837600' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
19d484b0fdacead25c115081e42a771e
6b622c3d424899dfff885581c2c724b3724aa9b8
describe
'1956' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00050.txt'
48386475053fd9421820132013e92750
f78489a979c4439167d75922dbe240f45dcc4f4f
describe
Invalid character
'7777' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d7fc3f697c8d77f1dafb7e84834e49e7
afe441b924fd09238ecd3acbea703db20cd6a08f
describe
'783983' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
0685f756d199d8ea9fe8a047d567b666
3c2b748a13fd3d7ef3b952f3a160fddaadc3fe68
describe
'144210' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b050867cb73eb281251888c418ab9966
73f0ddd4af11095b0de5acbc0e0ba8e6d6e0177a
describe
'55940' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5834a00efed3e3b04d127c858da86a0d
46a7dea6ad09aade7e7b9ea8fafda9f5517f3d17
describe
'34835' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d99756e09e3e94826cb28bd29c1ffee5
2106dbd98b5ac6e4045a2c114c0053c775a230a4
describe
'18837972' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2ff5ff4345580929fdfd1c105e9f7037
442207ceeaa8221f858c7153b82236581e6b7081
'2011-12-07T03:19:36-05:00'
describe
'2814' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00051.txt'
aba3d69341ba1cf19d89fc71f7273ab4
939564b197f6c72624caa5479776e7243c375fa0
describe
'8422' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
198cbe3c2afe8f2945a3858697455bda
1cba7bcea9ae62b125261ada664c23cebec2d94f
'2011-12-07T03:23:19-05:00'
describe
'784195' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
caf262cb92b54b55f253bc553251a1de
4a77e0393d5188f87ce627ee316dbffd07e717ef
'2011-12-07T03:19:29-05:00'
describe
'142592' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
86e95680fc86ae34c8b23ceb7e7dafaf
fbc37b3eaa3c87cc71f4f2e155a9f22fbbd0e920
describe
'39843' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2107323d0ab5e3ae7ee71249ccf4bd66
d78c260e7ec93a82882e37fb6ecbed21aa166158
describe
'34426' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
66d14c853ef1aa0076eb8fcaf8142553
4a195df8a8be144255a174512988ba0f99df3311
'2011-12-07T03:22:44-05:00'
describe
'18840948' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7be5b28f8a7d98b8c1b2b03c538391fa
50db6a18d26e36cb20bba0ee1e5f92825dcad0d0
describe
'2262' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f350fdec71ceef76708916ec4fa2b9e1
ea3917e2ab4c1e4f763cfb61537ec83a1edd0016
'2011-12-07T03:22:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8414' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
f1ddb66068a92d6f0e5cf024fec6250d
2cf9e8b3a531141453d464d46a30cbcc8b8de7c4
describe
'784085' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
038b60a3cae9c8edd4283f35029c2513
a7f53cdae42753bc65d8a2f286e31d979cc8a946
describe
'148884' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8c8fd1c41ee8288f6ed70787f13ad502
179995ca6097ae1b34bfed22c8dbe7fd1e408a52
describe
'39552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9edfb222338751d2bad5beb991a3d200
348f6373471295a4324335ec6344cf51d3c56b8e
describe
'36276' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f122f6b6f7d12aa8fbb5b6d9f97801c8
06f2ab2020b45ddd5ad81e135b8c3a8a7fd79995
describe
'18841344' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
12701f00ccbabfd3e32300f5263b379d
e33a8cefdf6b37fae8d3c76460d70ebf4e60d085
describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8c2b420e925953e0cff1faabf9612cc1
aee000d291b28f628b770d5494bcec14a6c0845a
describe
Invalid character
'8603' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
68bd3e906b2f340867d7b4225a7474da
161b0082e882ac8d3c7cd11c7e150e443002b42d
describe
'784106' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
c35463f72513f860e62a40b15a71db84
bb28fbe227136c8aaea774b23b9113ee338c1243
describe
'132329' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
2ab9b2d275f0f9bc051cc6c1858fb968
eb8994ac3660cf5adfbd6cb3b26dcf782cfab853
describe
'23790' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
873417e7bf4dd260678cec33bbe0645d
3c75006fdcdc559805817d542146b8126a47319c
describe
'33583' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e9b18cdc0cee58c3ba5de8b916c32768
9404ddaa28fc0b3970af2bcc320b77e1ecaa4d75
'2011-12-07T03:19:48-05:00'
describe
'18841552' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
e7835f677238e66a1ff752e344b634cd
2d47fa362e0c71cbc107c23a231807c16d9a15d4
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c60611551429461347b02abf62453a6c
3a2398b9efc03377809cb35c94aaeb8c1baeeb9a
'2011-12-07T03:23:02-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8645' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
7bffa13dc96c3bdae71501f95d9197ee
9a444f834f05cfb68d16acecd0b6e21e5bf17c9f
describe
'784566' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
a5a17b4d32c29871c2d6c7f284fefe68
dbef869e1fce19ae878ab72fa2bd5104d30d9227
describe
'122463' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
26d500e0f62180b1e09c0e42ef77d721
a0aa464954c24660c667a2fd9c8917f9e1fb55f7
describe
'32573' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8886d3d47a73c96a743bc4c219185d6a
acba6ee0b4fd60c43db68d5623f01800863c2133
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c9861e2dcba62f8cb003e31331afb0f2
ef39a6af34c7b623e09d03b0db48b82ce9990271
describe
'18849452' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e9c3df6252b7e79fa2d5221f37ffb5c1
0b7a389b6290295b713ce4f166086c97d4d536b0
'2011-12-07T03:20:58-05:00'
describe
'1651' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
da91c3b708810d1993cbd2874294f60c
694241d8b0cb1fe8395d7823d593ad93e7bd65a0
describe
Invalid character
'7389' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2695d6b872487826e676ea5982f43fc4
8718a691026e15a5f80c081cef6e0cf7c360b210
describe
'784152' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
7ba748e1009133611e3774d63009b7d0
d3cd731815c554ccdcf92105be4220faff624f63
'2011-12-07T03:21:49-05:00'
describe
'127040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4f8f8edc0bb172e2754f1bdee66c2e83
26bae8e03558eea119c41dcce2fd39297ad0cc62
describe
'24066' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
3f8a3523dc3e58e98055f40c0d81362c
d30caaeb258a37372a708038da73e4c02c1383e3
describe
'30346' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
def9aea49dd0b7b7df3dffdeefb69ac9
27c9bc4d1983c7e812632d212725ca9cdee14807
describe
'18840388' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00056.tif'
a241ea38f0bf2c47c83b70dfa7f73d3d
a12a045be3c7feaffb801734dbac2c8910350fb8
'2011-12-07T03:20:34-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
db523ae1a9811723eaa766b2b3df08c9
e30de715806b8663006f819b7749d56fcacf8497
describe
'7100' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
e2c893708159ef4cf7a2876ccb99af59
65dadcdb842f8d3214c9ac5ed9e1d19661412047
'2011-12-07T03:22:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
4c12baa676d183fd524b9c9f7841981d
b6ef9824df057a607ef37cced8b309c849865936
describe
'128438' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
581e3668eeb25e36ced2bf7c935318e7
938e2902006148047120825e88dae69b122babf1
describe
'30672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
31d17fbcfb0d315fe5d249efcf9dde55
1801e7b00a9a24ed0f69cc749be0309dfef93d56
'2011-12-07T03:23:27-05:00'
describe
'32036' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ba1806952307488916b33c05775e2c77
fff545342e9bc53a07b513dc641d16db9496e6cf
describe
'18849848' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
dce442947397d172fe3b7acfeab9ccb2
bdda9619ee563682095d181a8f6d4ffbb82161f2
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
dc19234c27403f9f626ba844b97ddf00
40698d6fe26f1214f9b9837d3d496a22c9add8af
describe
Invalid character
'8230' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
c8f8be2277d7ea81a604c129774cdba6
859c1f80aebc84def5f98fb46ff8243496389e8b
describe
'784172' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
fb6b10a0f1b98b8d893eafbe6e0f9d2a
c76002337fd836b431489743bdcfdd60403a9798
'2011-12-07T03:21:00-05:00'
describe
'127442' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
ebb5c6cfb67862d27f1e359f8a36904f
ec22a701fcf8cb3e119614fe67fd3f66b5031b94
describe
'30255' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
454b47b9453e420a5e7b80e82d976f8c
97fb2e4603c2de54bc410e7244c5ed37f2647ed6
describe
'31535' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
6451a113ec8e3d1c705f0da5b621fb32
0bbaad21094079fa910605a719ffbabe3c761a72
describe
'18840916' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
65d7fb11df64e436530ae7e776c72b10
9a71de0c327af5630c42f4b9dde967827cc869d8
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4d9c7243cddb9f77188f3ccf6a67bba5
81719d169f86667567fc753ef6cde9a0d88442f9
describe
Invalid character
'7983' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
f63847956ebeed96919bbef4eb3f44b5
a0311e78b183ead1fdf983d4998dd02b9fbbbc44
describe
'784555' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
89f85a5935d2a852659b625ba81e3bdd
91a5a017f5a36688340321bc881ff48f945fc565
describe
'136342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
6437323dfc77b52f2780c77bd106d103
5ec823a31345c85ae8ca5fed89664989fdd30ae6
describe
'27961' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
a77059e8394b1cd54bf5ee8461fe97ff
113ad309c2e4c01490ea5f00a46e424349358e29
describe
'33484' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
d6cfec9206a8d197f0b0828a2f3ff6bf
8df6284dabaf1bb95e2cd380838f223c33d82c15
'2011-12-07T03:23:15-05:00'
describe
'18849736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ea06202a4a7534b6aef741592a88f63e
05320ec5d63329a6eca57cabdec55231c2c57930
'2011-12-07T03:22:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5d63252c0a0328232953c53a2a8460be
b8fa215593745de8f2570e6e16f8dd7ca1f135a2
describe
'8189' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAB' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e5ee462470fdc0dabe04b9654a6d29b3
1751831ebe986a03f0988e6dea5c74734a834417
describe
'784169' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAC' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
113a3a3fa03d2f7bb7a8041b5244c994
a365e438954ce7effdcff96f1138d633b9aa428a
describe
'172102' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAD' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
b13c8db83e5c19862d9e66df9047ffd5
b8c3e3803c5a67154fe38de05389a0690536b215
describe
'37859' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAE' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7a9001d678ba212b884f860f8c92615f
dc7c7cce6c70224b65c4645a742f625296a55fd2
describe
'42590' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAF' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1008a2d8e8fc94576bce07385d2b1ec3
cd69ca7c388096428819b8590a4e3aa13373fb45
'2011-12-07T03:22:04-05:00'
describe
'18842280' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAG' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ac25f19679201d49f537f2b59b39fb09
37cb146ac95c3b25a663b4acb4f0d57a787aa51d
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
1d224866bd3f36ceb29e998c49e27037
d2514abdfd77ac5d43353c54caec52ad08c64705
describe
Invalid character
'9990' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAI' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ade18886440f976b31352e62120c3b63
2052987e0e5d970db93017e8fe129e72a0ea1659
describe
'784196' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
853d98cda8c544bd5928395d8af8239a
b6a6489c843a7913c38edf36ba4bffc11e3f76f4
describe
'173326' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
bd3bbfc9780597b64eeea5cb9274b26a
e56ae03c1a2e1960a849cbea9fb11904c9e80cbe
describe
'48057' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAL' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d8e380daf1fd57d7a8fea8fe29042b8e
1a22d5fd98a4393b55af83567b9915e4b3d8c546
describe
'44024' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAM' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c8595b1efc09332269475d3749c340a3
ab92dc2e6395226d5f1cbcc38ec94749cb121da8
describe
'18842240' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
7fa3abecd9534f70e188bcc3fecc8126
acf672a16a5878e8092c674d10d3ba640b25d077
'2011-12-07T03:21:35-05:00'
describe
'2964' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
d5e36d8c849031428101199d53dbc416
7318b76a38c8418f1fbf69e19d47e7d9f3db6667
describe
'10563' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAP' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
f36027f4f090348a6c7ce3978e199e55
7e06c66b1c087f102002c95f05f031625eb7665b
describe
'784556' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1189df104a6e29d5b3057e305a35fac1
96a636437545923650e9aa6765da66e34af1cc00
describe
'163447' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b2ad7cc8cc4306353f12e4f5dcac3552
ad44ec94154ba3b57bbeb67fa71e32123db4b525
describe
'51688' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAS' 'sip-files00062.pro'
01652e6cdeff59c3a00d9d8024335d4e
02746b2c9188ecc12bbe749e4305e08bfd308a0b
describe
'41181' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
627931fc8395984f6e245b481a4f3153
636ac8bfe9ff785636a7d1468e4ba97350c8fc57
describe
'18850632' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAU' 'sip-files00062.tif'
ac4708250e5c41736fec2dddc4a36e4d
c769ca0d359d0b38a2e3018894b3d3e857666b9a
describe
'3491' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
d59b9eec28233e0fec2cb1da4508b99a
4a70c6ec5ff65b00ad7b8fd0fcb67bfd8ece9808
'2011-12-07T03:20:36-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10037' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
92382a573f2af7f00eb2e223be1f4e86
806955365e9afbdc6f779b04e50d4f80a2ca7f8a
describe
'784554' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAX' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
f412e03f8565b1f74ad6ccc8ec0b20ba
e28ef4e0fbe7ad34649e4cc579289c57365a9b69
'2011-12-07T03:22:18-05:00'
describe
'158780' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAY' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
eb0f28376ad8d011122ee1ae62faed58
6d2fb48f9328ab840227eee2ff7133fc0e47a01b
describe
'44885' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1f07f67fc253b5e8109afce9b4147d7e
658d4b7256e3b2be2957bbb93118cbc2d7ed4d67
'2011-12-07T03:20:52-05:00'
describe
'40493' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
33a008840dccd34e9d8c7436ec652993
56e45386b3dc4af7cabb456c8dc6f2b1ed3d5bd7
describe
'18850800' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7eee65f21f0d577af0de9807a9a1c17d
15320272910f8cedd1ec85beddc6d33d603daec6
describe
'2220' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBC' 'sip-files00063.txt'
adbaefa7777d7ce2bf8817856d8b3df4
9f8649338597586a8642c8ff82089928aadc0e95
describe
Invalid character
'9568' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBD' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
d7d437719d93a1e3c84795ec1a054b3b
8597ba89c34b07e6e38e2dae67a00e4f76ceaa58
'2011-12-07T03:22:00-05:00'
describe
'784112' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBE' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
23f1a2fbc5d7d832691e9a2af54696a7
302d87939cc1a7275f82103d020908a1c8f3ade9
'2011-12-07T03:21:24-05:00'
describe
'133671' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
c9e07a829236287de5e0cbcc9e781cf0
7eb991de7f56c546fb806fc0e56925b08c0a7243
describe
'36395' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBG' 'sip-files00064.pro'
b5b5416c33f2c5f1fa079e15f44c51d0
b0a579e38fc7ff73ba7a4fbf54588c4611921836
describe
'33316' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5bcb70c0b01d37e6a87d54315dbdce04
25e31745462e31c75bc099f1137837fafe5146c4
describe
'18841384' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBI' 'sip-files00064.tif'
67f507f1dd2a733274c9f96f56386f02
ddcd7d80f4301f2f325f0c95271add279194f8db
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e279cc01447bd7f0e7f509e9f0a8ce52
036d1c115878496f748553adf49f9e56c3efdc20
describe
'8340' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ac2f7bc94ee83ed9616a3b84d0fadbe3
3a1f9d1a375d1b7cd3104c123a05b7d868f2556f
describe
'784437' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
a55486e1fef2ae67a2ce6c185e909377
2436da3cf1aaffc06e4f81cb468caf2df7b68005
describe
'141644' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBM' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
f9bbc553202315933f7df84ca814eff7
7fd97e7afdbb6fe8fd02bf6dc9cb8014b22b997d
describe
'39396' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBN' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ea403639f84a0dba5cae5b5b08f8d15f
292334278a2c304d1fb8f481774c34f066c848f5
describe
'34607' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
5ec9a5082d69a886e5bb28a7722dfbb2
f5ac42797e9560c959dd10290348846a758671b9
describe
'18850240' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
38179035fe4e8df1571185ba5befbefa
5d0317d1c28977b3af93604c698f58e2b91ff1e5
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
a89dc8f7f4074cbe3175d4c380cf1874
e8e71db5f5db270982d371a987da9e41971bc0e4
'2011-12-07T03:20:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8457' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1bd270778ea55737e56398b7a5f331c3
a5b44176f8c2d0211166733699195e7233772d44
describe
'784201' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
88f80ea537a30f62f3a774c134448593
2577673b9f5898c33a3bd4ca73ac1baf5b324dd0
describe
'150242' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
e0208fda31c5385d3b0692d3424961ef
1191646880f6cc7206894772380d41f67b34a883
describe
'37242' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
aac9794351b4bd0a20c10c45cdb9f4ae
13ca17c3cbf3f42f21ba5eacdb8acc66bb7513f3
describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
9eb712b6b45cfe36cc2251923e28d0ee
05c83cc198f81bb6bd81ee8765651173ecf4d32c
describe
'18842140' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7688fea62f5fa570ae751eafa1b4327f
8d9a9c6dc2a180e23159b938fb22151be5a22d15
'2011-12-07T03:23:23-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
943a4484a6be36041737da95c563029c
91d28b6682cee82a152371ebc7945e82425d58dd
'2011-12-07T03:22:02-05:00'
describe
'9309' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
a49a5391462767aedaa5909434a077aa
12c51939b2f05c88e1a069c6249cf750b919f6b4
describe
'784191' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c58d5961ede14f7c04549ace4190e218
df1c37acced467e10e20f3e24f39b76366f59b4e
describe
'132569' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
7c2044a2923ecd51a55eca00d9a4cfa9
27401d75b60692d580db8d1aa0d4a128f4c66a6f
describe
'37213' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2df5db01e1a8dbf18a436bdfc6e3038a
808e30a260f856289001d8a570e96e440497b765
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d382764d6a8c7b9db29aa23a6de80ce8
54a8ab985525117a130e4fc157b0ccfe29a4dce6
describe
'18840376' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
6e9328a5ec56f466df067e5ab53fba25
f9f626e6cb3ebf01a4e3c1731c8669f938d572fe
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCE' 'sip-files00067.txt'
a43538a0a82f20269ff90a3aba2047f5
a0bac331bf1c4dbc957ff751b57ca91f7d11b1a8
describe
Invalid character
'7261' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCF' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
fc82aff03f90d6d581d71ba396afe82e
ee0c9bf7ac10e2405d8443dd975bb67ab7f56f6b
describe
'784194' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCG' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
75803038d92640e0063fc7578d6f51bb
a5e1a89c634e952e84b360dc4e6195269c31308c
describe
'138397' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCH' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
0faf463fe6699a0826bf40ecd9606b76
4b342f214fa8af964ec383df62b5652eb43ba0ad
describe
'15928' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
2c0173f64ee07c4f5379f2196d12a65b
5f2a300e082843f9dbdc474f5f50eb55fdd21a59
describe
'33548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
f77f3204d60b7f0cfd5a07f7865dd3a9
a25a93bb46a92c558a7c67d6a7ae75df9e498f59
describe
'18841336' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCK' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f76ede0f13414230b0d47cae7570a7c0
e92a19ff840bef73c7ad3ef3b6ed2665f7f2908e
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4f42c5d4c0edd5a09f0d9e93a1a26551
a20212fdf0a7a0a49cbb00d478628fecf865ba06
describe
Invalid character
'8241' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCM' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
94fdf17459648aa074ed39b6e4303502
be573b639573c45179ada736cd129c89121ccc0d
describe
'784547' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
f2af9dd160ee7fac905f0be3f331cc3b
24e3ff01b0e1724b8a9d15ed9956e6508f808a7f
describe
'120648' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCO' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a64f8604ee4c4d08272974bd67d7d1b3
b44f942f532ce7888d05b981d460390f448bcd29
describe
'52910' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCP' 'sip-files00069.pro'
02b0acd2fc8cbcd256596f3992fb2db4
f0a27aff679ae4948ded5046d17170290066b6a3
describe
'31134' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b77b1768285d32ddaa5ab32057debe2e
70ca981e4ca2103cc87df931414e6aa3b4041118
describe
'18849824' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCR' 'sip-files00069.tif'
9f9fb147244139df047f0b8ab2602364
2e8051a9d4d1153aaa76369e8e4f763d7833b58d
'2011-12-07T03:20:44-05:00'
describe
'2343' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
16a022c2ccd258ee56f7070037499b90
ab7b21202589b20df46e368dafe64ec361740674
describe
'7736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCT' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
569547f7b06c7272117f7f6a6e1012f4
83793c6924ed9ea8ef1358c4c4b845636cbc300f
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCU' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5f026011ee3f8b9554aa45deead574fc
bd1e8e60deb176693e726c1c75a8bd4eabd2df22
describe
'150498' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCV' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ff9aa465c5447737585b742a2635a4e2
0be57c5081ef38176504814a2200c8c19a3bc732
describe
'25605' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCW' 'sip-files00070.pro'
923939afac6103c1b873861225adee1f
caee17a7b904eb2144c0aa887878c90d63515d29
describe
'36488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3d2d3cd2855d4ff0d03aed6ba2fd78d8
d04409780ab6afffacd8a7047e0ce31100699514
describe
'18841736' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCY' 'sip-files00070.tif'
03be8590bf2b0aad72fe042ecf531faa
af9c8f5b8a959626a4a63cab46c784913d9f57c4
'2011-12-07T03:23:12-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
6be809906df807e3f8a09ab1a3e1a91a
e7ecf6eaea0cfbbda09dd6b5d3196cfd9822c3ab
describe
Invalid character
'8959' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDA' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7baefc1182a40ca23d15c0aa53517ab1
f358765e48e3b70839edadd3e0a70a14645743aa
describe
'783940' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDB' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
3c98e45e133edd1a6ed0dd13752824bc
36799c57d4a06400cee1b7d2a7ecafaf79e6039a
describe
'150430' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDC' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
12214040f9187035e694761bf7b2dc4c
180c3499bce13238d40b6eeca2684dc296e8384f
describe
'23287' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDD' 'sip-files00071.pro'
8918173b1d89de2c988de0b7c8440e91
4bc916a705c16ac5853ba7006f61cd04aa660217
describe
'35695' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDE' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
10a4a04d264114223b3f46e196ddbb7f
b70d3697e30e1e451b2fc2cd1a783d2a30596dfe
'2011-12-07T03:22:08-05:00'
describe
'18837928' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDF' 'sip-files00071.tif'
82828601bb6605304c284ada22ce56d4
f18ed71461b2f0828189bcd15bc1d6882df7a48c
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDG' 'sip-files00071.txt'
ae49d56767af05d86a3001a99783478f
44108a4d3359c142098d237035de3b4167df267c
describe
'8489' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDH' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
4c35451fe3ae52a22bdea778526cbd60
3871518a8076357d64a7d36593d4eb594557c26a
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
03d3a60c26539743a507a2d11abfdae1
9f7e3d03476101edb6ccf728d77b74986472b0da
describe
'112632' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
25a5aa9c2c631a585069006aa7516766
8db35b7350577ef1509cf2759d3080e0de020ae4
describe
'31238' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e5f3aff37d0d7e71afbef41fcd150ccb
df36c4ac1dd2fb953b31160a4836dd7deffec813
describe
'28209' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2ca07c2fdd72b0d02c7fed065e2cc88c
5c22151a91886c7c975262cb9164815d5a0c9e54
describe
'18837476' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6b3647d7cf5f928684b10b243c2af23c
d257218781842278ba73d1b972d25153ec710a3f
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
21b0d3646ea364804e9e99b9309596d0
b26ff6bf9fb62dda1c11754913c7c5bff65d82cc
describe
Invalid character
'7122' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDO' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
720ebf6864c0aa39e39aef9a42e00f54
afdf4d7657bdb9a00aeb6846fbe2ff3ca1e3790d
describe
'784040' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDP' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d490d4e363b32eaa7c35553054131f14
04ee3de8e29a9bedfb609f8b0278ae3e2fd86284
describe
'135232' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f8e82c59600fbea9bbb8482d0fc9813b
2dd30db23179bc6609296ec07470c0a2e4158c0f
describe
'30163' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDR' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f46bcf61f721e47bd752def22023de99
f607d42755e773c65d59f828e6362bae671eed6f
describe
'33862' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDS' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
47795a6380cce2f2af4f934074fbf450
70169dc430a93e26059000db25647ec465a9821a
describe
'18838488' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
437c7edc4e53ebe27583f65f7d301541
359a28c946b83ef951400deee84586846faa2e1d
'2011-12-07T03:22:22-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
4877dff6d08c960f97d8af2b81b2bd72
8715be333653fce45cde61bcf054c85783a5f36d
describe
'8391' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDV' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
4233243064468a2058228879678a528f
7d83524cdc7812ed44d00a96bc23989cf05c827a
describe
'783981' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDW' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
7aba5d1bb9233c9598f7d2d1313a7431
cf4011cf58c7613dc01dc370ce8b967f5935ea63
describe
'136790' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDX' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
745e766f5f1c5259ddad74e3654cb071
3724976bc41a0d746fbadee563e50d0602cebb8a
describe
'18038' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDY' 'sip-files00074.pro'
4bf8f9768afbd3c344b33de04df4cf64
10f0bdd0372cbd300faf391b1c708f2c39e8e543
describe
'34778' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
aa05b9f1840a2824c1654c56ce010173
a9b1871f7446b6d4654d8abc4979b239841d1833
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREA' 'sip-files00074.tif'
22032b94cd42bac14cc271947e1b850d
23b769ad377e145cae9b314156ed328904cf9fec
'2011-12-07T03:22:26-05:00'
describe
'787' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
b844c62185ccc2876a9cdeb35652e93d
9e6c16b97c00a313bd8c1e89634eb5ce5237f413
describe
Invalid character
'8816' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
58f18ecd3d779c0047ab307dd82bfd4a
7deb025eeb80736425a86b819e4a56d46d25f00a
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARED' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
c74831cfcb9442111c673d4ef329837e
9ff5df0c31b6ae14b5e34522c3e54c50c4fbd6b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
c899744dd74fee1ca3214ba6eac31cde
70cb3fb9098bf375b9f857b31e0a5f0da9d1a27c
describe
'19231' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREF' 'sip-files00075.pro'
cf6356c3b737a369b2f3307d8878f90b
41eab8344511a70a18c516b77035313eea492523
describe
'34017' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREG' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
219f806fe7e9e6f1744daeca355069cc
4fad3322ce7b1af3cea908a2eb781568a17954ba
describe
'18838088' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREH' 'sip-files00075.tif'
d2dcb7063d1b570d3b4409eb49ded0f1
ca78e08c2b078b9a14f629365a0050f3f71879b0
'2011-12-07T03:21:46-05:00'
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREI' 'sip-files00075.txt'
2dd60da04aa81de71315d8409a802838
1d5bed2eae0e7734cbb26ea92a4b40ad76b2e4fb
describe
Invalid character
'8432' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
c93d6bdba420e4ff124d842c057096bf
38c9cc174a25edbefa3a6db061f8f83bd2a39d6f
describe
'784043' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREK' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9e1dde3334311515f0510f0e4451331b
e0137484bb48ad6862fd0b764a874b88ea9d8928
describe
'125925' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
3370a9310ab9a6e0be26d548775f8349
4240af34429031795e85463fd7d055b2a91246bb
describe
'19726' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
9324d82cc0a03bd999085faa327e2d30
5c96f6a6e37f75d43debfeffe6e0f854893c0fc4
describe
'31668' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREN' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
66cd16332dcd2ef495bcb2d6302662b1
d561df3f6ce2e933426264f6129f9728bbf6a6fc
describe
'18838128' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
cf8e2f1468e705066c293868d989e72d
f5ddbf4e1608ad7aaf9c9f9b9274bf67dae63134
'2011-12-07T03:21:15-05:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREP' 'sip-files00076.txt'
7f1625d7be8c14be434234dd1ab2f3a9
0b663704f150c7bad7327a264603625e659952ae
describe
'8084' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
bbc928a001423de7de1b85af424046f5
1e845c72c7f56bfe039c9fc46dd65a6427d9dd83
describe
'783832' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARER' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
ae8fd2f85b28fdae12ffef93fb47a99c
0c7439ce1e6ab4e5fdbc5f2b251fb2bc096a12c4
describe
'124699' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARES' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d11366c2bbcc9c7b9f803e3b5c146b8b
6303b27d9f1b130dff9c0a9683214dc02ccaf059
describe
'33047' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARET' 'sip-files00077.pro'
9e33ba29f591af21f6e94e3cc356e3d0
546c53983406fb17b0610344082e51e098f5b003
'2011-12-07T03:19:37-05:00'
describe
'31998' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
bf6f1bbb31b04b8f7ed6673982d880e1
43b02e6424b05931aab9d9db50c77894521ca878
describe
'18838680' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREV' 'sip-files00077.tif'
0074170aa81fd205e436526eb8f6fb6d
8c0932561f8e8cf8c7f4ca34da9593e313de33a8
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREW' 'sip-files00077.txt'
dbbca55a74b88f64ff4ee51ed6c1b775
3622488a4223cd14f2c36c759571b88c45f7eba5
describe
'8469' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREX' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
5bb167d70b9c47e76b4b5c7c335e4155
6fd635337c0aa463491b5149f97938a19de90034
describe
'783688' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREY' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6e695c0cc33822ec142849752520e949
4dc39fe25f8574e9925cb6053e26c2fc9a747d7b
describe
'129440' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3ac212f8c49577c36e3735d2dec1a770
789d982395848431e3c49467a2538134ca5bdd65
describe
'21928' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFA' 'sip-files00078.pro'
3a10d0a1bd4d196bdd866253c36563f7
6fda8c5ad34e914f5468e881f156ab9228ff3e88
describe
'33092' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFB' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
22db63c4c17fb77267f69e3f30d0a4f9
8025f4e0dbc837dd5143977c9dae7fed59325c51
describe
'18829864' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
998bca464f47c888a784e19e80bc1d74
4f80a1bdfc461bb13cc295af38d5d7287135e5a7
'2011-12-07T03:20:31-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b55d0bdeaadc4413daa00a970531383e
1303733d57c8ad83e846d935602b38caca60497f
describe
'8328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFE' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
bb7ce079676b175c33892a6a8b82aa67
4091fedbc2acaf38ad14e43ab18da9326b975f2d
describe
'784047' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
60c0990c6a70a72ca35a32e8d666bb67
015ab51209076711be6e68e5bbb4b9e51e116395
describe
'152330' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFG' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6a82f16c3ec5fa51914d3171e128dce5
bbb0bc9c7e350797640dea3f0b5298f82e1e3048
describe
'16386' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFH' 'sip-files00079.pro'
2ec1f440aa4cd736fb32c3e808d01b84
39363e173e1040683793ddad825422dd784714d7
describe
'37344' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
77faeace31d303bffa3175c1686cc177
06ad0ecc09c4ebaeac0082c5733127c52232365b
describe
'18839348' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
dca24ba81948034238f19ce3d381e84a
24407e9b8398675903f04ec45bb999b850b757fe
'2011-12-07T03:20:02-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFK' 'sip-files00079.txt'
8494e8ddf0fa22690b32f4fb488c2331
06ed8798fbb66c7d8c9234ce6d6c64bd1718ab8b
describe
Invalid character
'9408' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
d730a69a23758967a1ba67f54fdd5972
2a345cc4beda17e62298007080657adc120e7656
describe
'784004' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
6f3563f775ff2474b15a6cdd53b2278f
3e30ec258baf69d80b14c13fb04a66835189fb96
describe
'182346' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFN' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
94eae71261bf40312c6c925e2a722dcf
1895d4f8bc90cbcaebc0fed1bcbba0f14cd8907d
describe
'40732' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
15dbd3536aff8c60a14e70114c98f47b
b67244b0fab86ed1270738638344fdff6ccc863b
'2011-12-07T03:21:06-05:00'
describe
'18838204' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
751067e6c60cbb4d9733a999666f32a7
ae37fe57e8c0cdc1c3713ef29c59e8ad4545fedd
'2011-12-07T03:21:16-05:00'
describe
'9102' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
d69919574f0cbc9a350f0569dc2825b0
d6c3b9a1de891c98a1d36f157d1885276bedab00
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFR' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7383e0907d2d6a3a42ec1bb8a28566ba
f86b812b0491b85e7975828d305d20b2f16ece65
describe
'33851' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFS' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
5ea6c578b50e68513dd731641b1e257f
533fa0a62c34ff409650b911ffdf62df9ce9ed62
describe
'6749' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f95d5a524b3c0c8155b718e56316babf
027eb84a1a6c712d9e5440de1453f19375c6c670
describe
'18833292' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
1b4376c76748dca508e6ca33f580929b
d555a62c83fd9de68edc2aea299cf563a94c032f
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFV' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
66ac8b40a7bb450773ed66c540c775c4
d9682a9f555852d97ad87561ae2b9fcac316ca8f
'2011-12-07T03:20:26-05:00'
describe
'784046' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
cde24d705232286b34ff8047df0a08d7
2645c66dd18522e872ee2f5eb38682f05880c977
describe
'147836' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFX' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ad950f818756a1d319f5078ad68ea3b1
3c40fe40465997d666d9ab1161a73e7244be843c
describe
'28272' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFY' 'sip-files00082.pro'
dda1deee1d04882bb0e1669a47fcb465
3d45e90285780a9ce6a9b313b9ebbf4c23127c14
describe
'35726' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
c7e5883e1f4996d54eb9e05be63648a3
8648c45b13f868ea51d5d8470d68aaab543bb365
describe
'18838548' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGA' 'sip-files00082.tif'
6b57acdc6fc8a173e1b8ea022d0ae174
d7e50dab8e300ed37ceb1779d24dc65943f08cc5
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGB' 'sip-files00082.txt'
c07025a87eaae3c39dc994b0c8e94b37
aa08af6285bc5bcf71a5fa1560f3283cef81868b
describe
'8881' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGC' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
4e90a5fb23179477da5f4361e8d9ab0d
9a073bd106912b43a1538a7038dd6ba0adf1de9a
'2011-12-07T03:20:20-05:00'
describe
'784014' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGD' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
dab6400d6adba9582b95546b67a3d0cb
e7a53caacb25edd8911e0069db32d42c33853a04
describe
'163593' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGE' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
9d1caf785af841ed1c2de1bea0c1c588
ee76c74955a962bb9cd7ced7a71daeb9f21a244d
describe
'20470' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGF' 'sip-files00083.pro'
c62ea51704ae7776fc923c9a5cbd4afc
ca46d307cad5a6aaf4ae38cb15de9e0a6b774afc
describe
'39346' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGG' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
902dea7950809ba1b4def5b45bd7bf3b
c189225da0f46a6c2526f411eadb60e9a8c5cc0c
describe
'18839364' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGH' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c2554ab7926dcc0f6203b6e2930982b5
54b63102dacba516ab3ce5e766407df0553ccfed
'2011-12-07T03:21:25-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGI' 'sip-files00083.txt'
10d194b8e6625b87cd94e02505c5789f
5a63ecda94ef98612f8a32f77c2564f71edd029e
describe
Invalid character
'9569' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
29ae8aacef337a955965499fcacd5a55
ddbc7ed0ee17780cdd98198d7eee38cbf13e6f80
describe
'784023' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGK' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
320bd5929723a874e87369631397aca2
27f555d4a6f009e6870be2bd3da0a9c030ed1fec
describe
'158500' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGL' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
f478e4d8aad067b2fb0279268bef1991
86c127a019e63e8f6f0fcb23220575f7c870bf9c
'2011-12-07T03:22:36-05:00'
describe
'26981' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGM' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e137fc014dff52fbe2ca27dc3ac875ec
de02bea2f12811e2ce6f98bfcc76ec5191ca6624
describe
'39592' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGN' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c3dc2523af043bb992721154148170d2
56ef5f08350b2037b478c23396c9aa9e5c2078c2
describe
'18839244' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGO' 'sip-files00084.tif'
283b4e04566e145e8fe3ea947665a0db
c50028b51db58d7187c5ca6e01ca0fc8a7c51819
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGP' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cc8a74e52262ef61e8e5d78b6de9b4fa
9ca0f61b891e2080a83db3c02f53781e3be8532a
describe
Invalid character
'9830' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
4d7f83c024c66de0c94e8f2d7fbd8d81
cd9352dc12dde90db8b69ee24a5e703842e3c0b3
describe
'766860' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGR' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
925e0032274ec42312ae2c8d839e847f
957da14679d39ae935e74e1c475120a898075ed0
describe
'177607' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGS' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
fe60369e37bea9ff14768e77ce33f5f8
8e56f5d2c7bad1e158cd4f9fa1dac83e29aef91f
describe
'44684' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGT' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ead9b202a809902076d305e0cd0033ed
bcd69a869e5966a139295728dbfd610b740d4a09
describe
'43216' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGU' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
636aedd2014578c5b6c848baffe2145a
78490047aacb453664a5f8d1e0b91a7f27b14c9b
describe
'18428756' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGV' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f6c6f546c3ff32aee86b2eddefd87386
7c3d2a302b73bbb677bc79f5e66dac9627f2c6c9
'2011-12-07T03:19:30-05:00'
describe
'2145' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGW' 'sip-files00085.txt'
4dd4eb8a13e0259b57ef9c98c302f363
5f367005b8d51e29db7c3e3816fe68d63e1e9540
'2011-12-07T03:21:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10199' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGX' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
417ca6bab171a33c8fe7d871c62a4d80
da55f8479dad6ae4415bfbfc83af8622f71546f4
describe
'784015' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGY' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
fd796edf8ca024695f5a379cdf55da14
e83a191b87943db654414a30b7aaa8be50036cba
describe
'164328' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a853bfca2c4597109b5720330bf55813
4eae97274cdce452a640ecc45c866b3c728ec0ac
describe
'28350' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHA' 'sip-files00086.pro'
7ce1e278886c8300bb179963c21afccb
3c2adc1c9c6292ed1ef5d4fded5f3020ab8dc285
describe
'39463' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
ddbf256ea2da90600e11de68c371ce96
385e7ab3ed1b055faeeefe739efc485bfbed9317
describe
'18838828' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHC' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2552a1cb52ad44f7d4543f7ce03b414d
9a5518043a440b790af0c08bfdbd39d081a36c9e
'2011-12-07T03:19:57-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHD' 'sip-files00086.txt'
b46ad6ad2e50548f8018a8c14713752a
6e6e4a9f3fe35148943ee8117b93664420a90e6c
describe
Invalid character
'9504' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHE' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
8db6537e4c5ac212bdb0483c01258578
5862e969c7d84c3611874dc177169b72ca0c8010
'2011-12-07T03:21:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
64af1a1fde733d330b2b7fa331eaace2
116078a5b9bacaf7170482dcf33e4c27b6468e68
describe
'151448' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHG' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
768adb07b83e968ba71eecd67807b80e
573bd463e8e3f8ea1bffafb48be772ed586c883a
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHH' 'sip-files00087.pro'
e2f7b1a55b569f3ab4718845219980f8
9563ad05b4f0b6c4929c3e42d461d01d9853dcb3
describe
'36134' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHI' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
a7b1788bf44979c56e13c446e66585fc
388232a4dbb8fe35ab03dfea99e02311888b4161
'2011-12-07T03:20:18-05:00'
describe
'18838352' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
3ffe2c2d1a46f05524850245f5a938ef
e3637df9ccc3680e6ab0ab6bff12865b2c1ff844
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f7453dd95828ab5d3585b186416bbed5
29b24d1853f4e96c456756c128f0a67b8c87d94b
describe
Invalid character
'8569' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHL' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
92350f38bbf9d59b9e677b517b06194d
11ce909b44f3f169db9744c54f864902e86af636
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHM' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
58cd65e0e2b43f52984a39aecd663204
0079afc71ad70c26f479d317e2c24756023daa96
describe
'152558' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHN' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
ddf053e97a8a082dd627bf6aea00c0af
a3d5ba3538fd1ee595a09642f6abcdc52990269d
describe
'36482' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHO' 'sip-files00088.pro'
de48c15bc7370485037a011547c5e979
dca469bd728873a260ca68c5ebaa4c6066f54a5f
describe
'37827' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHP' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
74a81fd187e08ac7ffd4954287a2af67
268d04ac1758ab0bc1bcade6a3dfbd2f93c14120
describe
'18839048' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
175908659460f126aebc91005d9674c2
157cae96c6e6b9afc6c4857bfdb9398b083ab8bc
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
01452f75aecb6fc3b8a11cf752dfb0e4
91bdf04bbaa77cb34750ccfb1bff6a20a370973b
describe
Invalid character
'9260' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHS' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
4eb4d049108b2fd42445ee92fd552165
5d710c492f2dcddb6d1297d6ec93a9258633dfd5
describe
'784008' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHT' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
756265ed994693e9852641a44da5e407
f7b9242b6a93417f57f4009c81d70bb5db220e56
describe
'148841' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHU' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9affe78e69054b6ca5c093df6e139df7
9c5c77e761443e3873b773fd2c38d7ed7d0e4289
describe
'25002' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHV' 'sip-files00089.pro'
75d01c5251f461d6ae0fb8d0e313d0ea
38c91040f97df94e367323806cba295398441629
describe
'37058' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHW' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
48b4d100068978f6578e408110440fa7
0a63f10db3a6ab40213c714250263c75c960fa89
describe
'18838564' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHX' 'sip-files00089.tif'
b4f1386c2ca477f10242c5eb851b2910
33725aa3a08ba9813c2856b66272025bc5289d91
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHY' 'sip-files00089.txt'
640410ff8cc2b8e79abc3678b45a9686
bcc2303672e8b3ae67ca275578c77cb73e37aa22
describe
Invalid character
'8822' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
c3f0fd4f9086ea5944f471fd328febf2
33e374a248753edd600fa1706241288c0f72b621
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIA' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d251482b4151bc6030948256b485f050
b4bbd4d2ff68eea040d36af71c18329e2f28bb68
describe
'139522' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIB' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8e75d8478339c6a66543ab67e7797965
efe2a5a0c3d8e5fef132c461d5aac936f21022ed
describe
'24542' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIC' 'sip-files00090.pro'
7e383eca6f5bfed1a1ed5d58170332b4
a297ef381563e03a0117b5c9d1846369c14bdc4a
describe
'33953' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARID' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f2e1d5e5e42e7c9f659e2ad8fbae07e3
987a1527a326e78340df565276c2a89d4879371f
describe
'18837668' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIE' 'sip-files00090.tif'
acc04cd716273d387446add44f13dedc
52edd2c0dcf4c530307ca39dcdaa95e3acbf4924
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c5e1e213b48fce57e2a34340b427ba50
2314ed73ce73f55890991de48a503de9004e6d5e
describe
Invalid character
'7974' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIG' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
6be0e42b7ac94827b4278cd9490baf3c
57ddd9a8aa14cdcc7fdd5a56c2af85f1c51e2551
describe
'783975' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIH' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
cc4483249d70b25bedb5bc908316ae88
c26d28bcb4879e3e86578d03ceb32c83c868b67f
describe
'140543' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARII' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e2014902ea55fa03c203a2e4dbd49be2
9da991685d9303366dec37a80a8acf0acaad62b4
describe
'41614' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c8650e58b87d4a7d6fddbf991f5740c8
6d43e9e3ebf5235246e8a4f143e5bd6ee5963bbb
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIK' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
68098564cbbf8556e064c43726cda30d
696d84fc5fa6e3937c3fe8d9a37034571f582d28
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIL' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d8faec8fd214c2128cf0a84472b9d27b
187a8398406d264941eccb342bfeeb3c20adafac
describe
'2276' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIM' 'sip-files00091.txt'
39ed8d9f80f9fd14bf4c621718fc6423
7da30925150f96eaf585a7210034e01697417d78
describe
'8293' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIN' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
ead2b7336be64e8ffd9a63ee6d2ce42a
ba42ad7fadc824bec1ee253eda5b9b7a2e4f6430
describe
'784028' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIO' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
87eb418ce0a4fe9efcdc444ba039cd89
0e7f8faf50147d07320960f0938cf22b115b00a5
describe
'140851' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIP' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
e0169d14c0473deb754472ba67209aac
f5ee0b2e90557bab283469972961bd14bc814d3b
describe
'41955' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
31ac9384d1aa9d19c46192cc15e84d7f
5e4b12bc42d4079c7f7b987e2bc61d273c19071f
describe
'34480' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIR' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
46e36b431b3af83aea0dfb4d606c2fde
9aefedf7556af4d9fcf5542237505f76e59bc91c
describe
'18838052' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIS' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8898ec25ee637bb3ce59a03eb98ad2e1
660f0638f03a932464bc81f5a8b96b48366d2798
'2011-12-07T03:20:24-05:00'
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2f3e6c880244b3d015966fd37cb6a246
4450aa2d09e4b2c8e74c34976a315bd8b5ce285a
describe
Invalid character
'8353' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIU' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
16f50f232feea8794e767243c5176ff3
1abc5d13e6250a66957f1626192912b2f38b2531
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9a3e97f2c5fec3efe0cece147f9485b7
b1ded14c73dcf6e53c2d92b0e7cb252befc71af2
describe
'150581' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
b117c5500a0c8bfb73290eba7f510e6c
ca080e21e87bea0e7ddca97251c66ed7ad3af635
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIX' 'sip-files00093.pro'
9168c31291ae1b65e20ac3195d6640c8
84cfe8196306875c9c5e6954349b8582cb2b1a95
describe
'36825' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
564432af60eb34253913182946fba746
ed11e38d564fe85565a0c354c0b86127837ccb99
describe
'18838672' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
bbd6c7673c4214b2ab72d0941d310712
250d4c85e2fa52b8d3a4bda85984a7e3d5811dc5
describe
'2523' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJA' 'sip-files00093.txt'
14d1f851dfc1e451ee4f890a7d9e9b2c
72057a2ec5c572a928e173f1845decd83c38c0cb
describe
'9096' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJB' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
11c8bb82e79ed23c7006cb146b70395f
04efba3af0b7793ef3c5c6ae29045e6b4b7fbe25
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
b3b214c00bcda4b0a6c4758bf5afd078
3780c3d259584257b4cacdb4061e6c1970a3e145
describe
'150602' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJD' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
82144b10307e13d9d2eb7446e563d339
d494e38e6cffc4fc16fe9a2dc7c2b330b1c14f9c
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
eeeefe1141fa2bbf6aa87da3410180b4
6fbc46a01fd485ac8467bce04201b964b3272dfa
describe
'37224' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJF' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
60a0fdec0060c30fe2dd31db23900f07
9f3111c493a2f46d0d07a12bd0155bd25322cc11
describe
'18838824' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
19b2eed980d7107d55e2606b6603deeb
ffe0a05044ed710f19fef496253a6ce09bf47559
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJH' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c2d05554e157144ec7d785fcc1253b27
b95d85d453269b3a67a41594da381d6cf02cbf27
describe
'9375' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJI' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
c45bdbfdb6ae9e8aa053941403fbd651
d0f00739643eb09973c15d3f1a20ca5ca00adcc4
describe
'784003' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
8a9c201dd43e3e36cc05c391308e0265
f5a9e0c200faa865ead87227277f62df587013ef
describe
'150072' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJK' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
267c01a61c60ead6207e205834445325
2838fd4bf0bceba3a4dc17f38d820894d755c568
describe
'40618' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJL' 'sip-files00095.pro'
272ee2ea901e6934cd1e5d3a16bb319b
fc7d28ffe713644806f46589989a4284a9df6df0
describe
'37864' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJM' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
b37601e0b3722ad11ce7b4482df1bbc8
a3abf35aa6d7114281259b8065bdc90fddc087ad
describe
'18838992' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJN' 'sip-files00095.tif'
22e6457e0874b8a0c51eeeb6d8c14bd5
688341e9eb5a2ff24a1a734d0a04838f6a6bc70c
'2011-12-07T03:22:35-05:00'
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJO' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f90676e45359c8c5106019347db1749d
74fd39ac1ad46ac9fc50e825b4332f6416ad7b81
describe
'9134' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJP' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
1bd7a9bf6b1bb0be0ceefcf3040c72e8
50ed2cba4442cf187b0becd041728c503c99b27b
describe
'784044' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
a4464eae9e2915a986f5d22e0902754f
68481acd9f40654029698cded09b7fb5652acec8
describe
'135922' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJR' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
3a00dccc1209b9ee457e2a2bf1955e41
b4c76dfd6e3d695494043a0ae1def47d56cdd4ac
describe
'36077' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJS' 'sip-files00096.pro'
d8f23c312e4773baad64feec5a853ef4
c576b6962257e979007fbef14216598bf9f312ec
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
bbb6eaf990cc10ad20de43faff665e98
3d67660d258067f9fc12e3fb433e7b9db78f1372
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8f3abedce2f34fdd57fb201d6b90fb16
eaed927ae920c7a5891271af6fb5184b6d0fe11f
'2011-12-07T03:21:39-05:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJV' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0c022a68669678780a67101cb3250b65
4f63d129ef47026540924e518bb40473858b8e4a
describe
'8593' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8aa1b9ee76d64f0270faa74afe97acd7
e0b714dd3641e06a4e0e430c1b27ec4e4b71305c
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5f557607cd75b1a85c9496d2d5427799
ccc201cb7ade84e36d5a7bd766340c683d1b8ac6
describe
'152157' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
127959c51650f02bd4e9a9f7d6d46bcf
7adb533d8b4d6f341a2cd50773172f2f93781243
describe
'37141' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1491b25892cde36fa860d6667167f354
7e733c313b3875482f3f12eb29966d8d532a6b6b
describe
'37429' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKA' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a319605d4e11c909a9e456fac1b7925a
ba91b1ac532b4a9ddbf8418dc8ad2c68bb09272d
describe
'18838392' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKB' 'sip-files00097.tif'
0d138f0a67d25b87071f098544d9fb7a
302a04e2a5854190c673cb4c2fa5d1608f42664b
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKC' 'sip-files00097.txt'
793215443dd61adf4c5d49710aa54fab
aaccbe95cd61e367bc25e57a425255ae28606fac
describe
'8946' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKD' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
86e4d477e2a8310ec2979af264f81f1e
4c1175fbe657b2e89a5993a65a616015a4b3901f
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKE' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
eaf907248d8f90956784986665acbfa9
41d5e0fe843474c5c35da7279bc7ca7231887660
describe
'128098' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKF' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
2ade20316fc0a1a206d5762f6602c5e7
9347b8201cc8562912dbb02140ea56da5b7442b2
describe
'43218' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKG' 'sip-files00098.pro'
38ca25d7e5a19a7e022aa7fca90bd130
7e36191fdecf2e5413241884d4f5273a552f21ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKH' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
8f47deefa5a67d7129eaf89550ff461e
238ad8f297c49bce362dfdb836da7d6eb8398d4a
describe
'18838308' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKI' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d7cc01e1e3fb854987c6ba21c86a1a7a
0480b61c35288ced28649c6fe5bdea8f1aa87919
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
cc596fccd278cfed23b8369a25c94296
8911b095781b47dfccb33d3d1817172ee040afbe
'2011-12-07T03:23:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKK' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
9ce1d8e54f94c4817830458328702e35
662061d3d109b6578023c94baaf58c31dfb84321
describe
'784012' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKL' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c09cccbbe2745fd9042e7dfed59bc174
366afa8b95a19eb3e896c6da0c6b1b480737f43d
describe
'139697' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKM' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
9c91c7e89bceffd19b11d1816af7ca2e
46dd7a7e08a9e723be8c9a1da8914b8aaa2076ef
describe
'38667' 'info:fdaE20080503_AAAAZGfileF20080504_AAARKN' 'sip-files00099.pro'
0a1147c7bb1b087d1bf73accba6b46f6
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describe
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ON THE TREE-To
“CHILDREN'S FAVORITE STORIES

VERSIFIED BY -

CLARA: DOMY BATES =AND OLHERS



ILLUSTRATED BY

FRANK T. MERRILL, EDMUND H. GARRET?

AND OTHER WELL KNOWN ARTISTS

BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY

- WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIFT.D




COPYRIGHT, 1891,
BY
D. LotHrop Company.
CONTENES:

= ON THE TREE-TOP.

se

THE BEGGAR KING.

Ts

THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

IV.

THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHAN FUNG LOG.

Ve

THE STORY OF MISS MUFFET.

VI.

THE GOLD SPINNER.

Wale

A CHILD'S CALENDAR.

VIII.

THE MISSION TEA PARTY.

IX.

ALADDIN,
La

CONTENTS.
Xx.
THE LOST BELL.

xe

THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.

XII,

THE WOLF AND THE GOSLINGS.,

XIII.

3

TLE URSEL’S MOTHERING SUNDAY,

XIV.

THE FAIRY FLAG.

XV.

WASIS THE CONQUEROR,

XVI.

LITTLE PEACHLING.

XVII.

THE DEACON’S LITTLE MAID.

XVIII.

KING OLEG’S CROWN.
ON His REET On



Rock-a-bye, baby on the tree-top,
~ When the wind blows, the cradle will rock.
When the bough bends, the cradle will fall,

And down will come baby, bough, cradle and all.















f :






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BS Nes Rees =
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LE BEGGAR KING.

PIES BiG GAR KiNG,

By Mary E. WILKINs,

ark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark t
Lhe Beggars have come to town,
Some in rags, and some in lags,
And some in velvet gowns.”
























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ALF frantic, down the city streets,
The barking dogs they tore;
The dust it flew, and no man knew
The like of it before.



































The great St. Bernard’s booming bass,
The hound’s sepulchral howl,
The terrier-whelp’s staccato yelp,





















































- And the bull-dog’s massive growl, :
sa
In chorus sounded thro’ the town: ‘i
The windows up they went,
Thro’ every space a gaping face ;
Inquiringly was bent. ely hal.
( ve iz







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— Old Nursery Rhyme.

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The burgher’s daughter clean forgot
Her snood of silk and pearls,

And full of dread, popped out her head,
With its tumbled yellow curls.

A rosebud smote her on the lips:
Down went the rattling blind ;
But still the maid, all curious, staid

And slyly peeped behind.

A handsome lord, with smiling lips,
Leaned from the opposite tower;
Two withered hags, in dirt and rags,

Did from their garret glower.

The tailor left his goose to see,

And got his coat ablaze;
Three peasant maids, with shining braids,
Looked on in wild amaze.
‘The emperor's palace windows high,
All open they were set—

irom the gray stone red jewels shone,
And gold and violet.

The ladies of the emperor’s court
Leaned out with stately grace ;

And each began her peacock fan
‘Yo wave before her face.

“ Hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!” 4
‘The emperor left his throne

4t the uproar, and o’er the floor,
He trailed his ermine gown.

fue dogs press round the city-gates,
The guards they wave them back ;

Ut all in vain with might and main,
Dance round the yelping pack.



fark ! hark! hark! o’er growl and bark
There sounds a trumpet-call !

Now, rat-tat-tat, pray what is that
Outside the city-wall ?



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THE BEGGAR KING.





























Airs from the Beggar’s Opera
On broken fiddles played;

On pans they drum and wildly strum,
Filched from a dairy-maid.

With tenor-whine, and basso-groan,
The chorus is complete ;

And, far and wide, there sounds beside
The tramp of many feet!

“ Hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!”
Ah, what a horrid din!

‘The Beggars wait outside the gate,
And clamor to get in.

A herald to the emperor rode:
“ Save! save the emerald crown!

For, hark! hark! hark! the dogs do bark!
The Beggars storm the town!”

‘The ernperor donned his clinking mail,
Called out his royal guard,

_ The city-gate, with furious rate,

Went galloping toward.

A captain with a flag of truce
Thus parleyed on the wall:

“\Vhy do ye wait outside the gate,
And why so loudly call?”

He spoke, then eyed them with dismay;
For o’er the valley spread

‘The clamoring crowd, and stern and proud
A king rode at their head.

In mothy ermine he was drest;
As sad a horse he rode,

With jaunty air, quite dédonnaire,
As ever man bestrode.
EVE BE GiGrACRy KEN G::







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The Beggars stumped and limped behind,

With wails and whines and groans —
“ Some in rags, and some i lags,
And some in velvet gots.”

A great court-beauty’s splendid dress
Was there, all soiled and frayed;
The scarf, once bright, a belted knight

Wore at his accolade ;

A queen’s silk hose; a bishop's robe;

A monarch’s funeral-pall ;
The shoes, all mud, a prince-o’-the-blood
_ Had danced in at a ball.

The Beggars stumped and limped along,
Aping their old-time grace :
Upon the wind, flew out behind,

Ribbons of silk and lace.

A wretched company it was
Around the city gate —

The sour and sad, the sick and bad,
And all disconsolate.

But in the wretched company
‘There was one dainty thing:

A maiden, white as still moonlight,
Who rode beside the king.

Her hands were full of apple-flowers
Plucked in the country Janes ;

Her little feet, like lilies sweet,
O’erlaced with violet veins,

+

Hung down beneath her tattered dress »
A bank of lilies, showed

Her shoulders fair ; her dusky haw
Down to her girdle flowed.
THE BEGGAR KING.








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Up spoke the haughty Beggar King:
“T want no parleying word !

Bid come to me, right speedily,
The emperor, your Lord!”






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Wide open flew the city-gate !
Out rode the emperor bold ;

His war-horse pranced and lightly danced
Upon his hoofs of gold.

“ Now what wouldst thou, O Beggar King?
What wouldest thou with me?
For all the gold the town doth hold
Would not suffice for thee.”

“ Beholdest thou my daughter dear,
O emperor, by my side?
Though wild the rose, it sweetly grows,
And she shall be thy bride,

“ And thou shalt seat her on thy throne.
When thou thy troth hast pledged,
Her beauty grace with gems and lace,
And robes with ermine edged;

“Or else, on thee, O emperor,
Like locusts we’ll come down!
And naught that’s fair or rich or rare,
We'll leave within the town !

“The children all shall lack for food,
And the lords and ladies pine ;
For we will eat your dainties sweet,
And drink your red old wine!

“Now what say’st thou, O emperor ?—
Wed thou my daughter dear,
To-morrow day, by dawning gray,
Thy borders shall be clear.”

The emperor looked upon the maid:

| Noy

Ht Meiinss NY She shyly dropped her head ;

Fe hase S a Her apple-flowers fell down in showers,
oS A is : a / ee Her soft white cheeks grew red.
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THE BEGGAR KING.





The emperor loved her at the sight.
“T take your terms!” cried he;
“Nor wilt thou fear, O maiden dear,

To wed to-night with me?”

























Her long, dark lashes swept her cheek;
“A word she could not find,

For to and fro her thoughts did blow,
Like lilies in a wind.

She toward him reached her little hand,
Then — drew it back again ;

She smiled and sighed —all satisfied,
He grasped her bridle-rein.

Then clattered courtiers thro’ the street,
Fast ran the folk, I ween,

And under feet strewed roses sweet,
And boughs of apple-green.



The emperor, on his gold-shod horse,
Came pacing thro’ the town,

And by his side his timid bride.
Rode in her tattered gown.

A crocus-broidered petticoat,
Robes stiff with threads of gold,

‘The maids found soon, and satin shoon,
And lace in spices rolled.
THE BEGGAR KING.





They led the trembling beggar-maid
All gently up the stair,

fhro’ golden doors with sills of flowers,
Into a chamber fair.



























They loosed from her her faded gear ;
They kissed her gentle face;

From head to feet clad her so sweet
In linen fine and lace ;









They clasped her golden-threaded robe —

“ Darling, thou art so fair!”

With strings of pearls, amid the curls,
They dressed her flowing hair.



































“Now, pardy!” cried the emperor,
“The rose-tree is in flower !
In the world green was never seen

Queen half so sweet before!”

The people, dressed as for a feast,
Thronged round the palace-doors ;
The minstrels sung, the joy-bells rung,

The roses fell in showers.’

The Beggar King looked toward thetown :
“ Farewell, my daughter dear!”
The east was gray — he rode away,

And swallowed down a tear.

WAS DMs Lacy syle

ON
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Ee Ba Ee Nie ARN GD SAN ies Ou BtACNEB UR IY ae (oR Ols| Se



“THE ENCHANTED PALE O PBN BWR Y “CROs S:

By Mary E. Wiukins.

“ Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,

To sce an old woman jump on a white horse,

With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,

She shall make music wherever she goes.”
Old Nursery Rhyme.










RAY show the way to Banbury Cross,”
Silver bells are ringing.
“To find the place I'm at a loss,”
Silver bells are ringing.












7:

(rane OS



“Pass six tall hollyhocks red and white ;
Then, turn the corner toward the right,
Pass.four white roses; turn once more,
Go by a bed of gilly-flower,

And one of primrose ; turn again
Where, glittering with silver rain,

There is a violet-bank; then pass

A meadow green with velvet grass,
Where lively lights and shadows play,
And white lambs frolic all the day,
Where blooming trees their branches toss —
Then will you come to Banbury Cross.”
THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

Ale (fil!
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will! Ausifly ; Hil !
Ge Oe alt i lh

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The white horse arched his slender neck,
Silver bells are ringing,
Snow-white he was without a speck,
Silver bells are ringing.
An old wife held his bridle-rein,
(The king was there with all his train,)
Her gray hair fluttered in the wind,
Her gaze turned inward on her mind;
And not one face seemed she to see
In all that goodly company.
Gems sparkled on her withered hands ;
Her ankles gleamed with silver bands
On which sweet silver bells were hung,
And always, when she stirred, they rung.























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The white horse waited for the start,
| Silver bells are ringing,

Before him leapt his fiery heart,

8 Silver bells are ringing.

Upon his back the old wife sprung,
Her silver bells, how sweet they rung!
She gave her milk-white steed the rein,
And round they swept, and round again.
A merry sight it was to see,
And the silver bells rang lustily.




The gallant horse with gold was shod ; SS STRETIO <<
So fleetly leapt he o’er the sod, ei \ DSi Ye
He passed the king before he knew: (ey \"y, INST \L/

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And past his flying shadow flew. ent hy | _ ee KN
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THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.

























































ALITA E27 |







A pretty sight it was, forsooth,
Silver bells are ringing,

For dame and children, maid and youth,

Silver bells are ringing.

The princess laughed out with delight,

And clapped her hands, so lily-white —

The darling princess, sweet was she

As any flowering hawthorn-tree.

She stood beside her sire, the king,

And heard the silvery music ring,

And watched the old wife o’er the plain

‘Sweep round, and round, and round again

Till, suddenly she slacked her pace,

And stopped before her wondering face,

















And snatched her up before they knew,
Silver bells are ringing,
And with her from their vision flew,
Silver bells are ringing.
The nobles to their saddles spring,
And follow headed by the king!
They gallop over meadows green ;
They leap the bars that lie between;
Thro’ the cool woodland ride they now,
Neath rustling branches, bending low;
The silver music draws them on,
But, when they reach it, it is gone —
The white dew falls, the sun is set,
And no trace of the princess yet.

eB


THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.































Along the beams of moonlight pale,
Siuer bells are ringing,
In violet shadows in the vale,
Silver bells are ringing.
Return with us, oh, gracious king!
This search is but a bootless thing. ©
A spell is Jaid upon our minds,

Our thoughts are tossed as by the winds,
And deeper o’er our senses swells

The music of those silver bells!
Return, oh, king, ere ’tis too late;

The Wise Man by the palace-gate

Will give to thee his kindly aid,

So shalt thou find the royal maid.”


















THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS:



-_—

















CL AD te

They galloped back o’er hill and dale,
’ Silver bells are ringing,
In soft gusts came the southern gale,
Silver bells are ringing.
The trembling king knelt down before
The Wise Man at the palace-door:
“Oh, Wise Man! art thou truly wise —
Find out my child with thy bright eyes !”
“Thy daughter clings to carven stone,
White dove-wings from her shoulders, grown ;
In downy dove-plumes she is drest;
‘They shine like jewels on her breast ;
She sits beneath the minster eaves,
Amongst the clustering ivy leaves.







































et
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THE ENCHANTED TALE OF BANBURY CROSS.



“ She was so full of angel-love,” (eA EO Whse ee ete | A a MEA
Silver bells are ringing, vt Lt \| iis i le PEs = a eo nie,
“They could but make her a white dove,” ; XY / i it. 7G pal
Silver bells are ringing. ~ i | The king stood ’neath the minster-wall, Hare i AN. oy AS Ne
- And loudly on his child did call. tt ti mn
A snow-white dove beneath the eaves,
Looked down from ’mongst the ivy-leaves,
Then flew down to the monarch’s breast,
And, sorely panting there did rest.
Then spake the Wise Man by his side:
“Oh, king, canst thou subdue thy pride
_ And hang thy crown beneath the eaves,
. Amongst the clustering ivy-leaves
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“Tn thine unhappy daughter’s place?”
Silver bells are ringing,
“ She’ll find but thus her maiden-grace,”
Silver bells are ringing.
The jewels in the royal crown,
Out from the dark-green ivy shone!
The white dove softly folds her wings,
Then lightly to the ground she springs—
A lovely princess, sweet the more,
For being a white dove an hour.
They went home through the happy town.
The king forgot his royal crown,
And, soon, beneath the minster-eaves,
‘Twas- hidden by the ivy-leaves.
THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.

DOS EE

SUEZ BESS EW. ines ca aeI= Se aa Mh





CHANG FUNG LOO.





BY MRS. M. E, BLAKE,

( A name for China, you understand ),
Where the Vangtse Kiang and Hoang Ho {/j
{ Flow from the beautiful Mounts of Snow,

| Where the Pe-la-shu are the favorite trees,

| And tea leaves float on the evening breeze —
| In the province of Kwang Tung, near Chow Choo,
| Lived a wonderful youth named Chang Fung Loo.




















i
ve



He was eeu just as a pheenix would be,

| Or anything equally rare to see—

| A blackbird white, or a sunlit night,

il Or a walking fish, or a wingless bird,

i; Or anything else that is quite absurd —

For he was a glutton! Just think of that!

In a country with stomachs so small and nice

jj, That they make a whole meal of one frog —if fat
| Or some infinitesimal grains of rice.

en

om

















- NEN LS a 7 7 Fi 5 % | ; = 7 , : si = 5 2



i l} Ves, he was a glutton. For breakfast he’d eat
(| A couple of dozen of pickled pigs’ feet,
i A gallon or two of elegant stew
“iy Made from the delicate Sho-kia-yu,
| A yard of bread, and a three-quart pot
9 Of ginger preserve, uncommonly hot,
dt And wash it ajl down, as the case might be,
( !

With thirty or forty cups of tea.






‘Perhaps you think he would want no lunch ?
Well, just let me tell you-; he’d swallow a bunch
Of edible birds’ nests, a quarter of hog,

, The ribs and legs of a plump young dog, \ aX ie , :
vv; A bushel of oysters, a score of larks, ofy lod

ea oe mena By Sehr xt! (PSP Ke #8

r=3


THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.

The fins of unlimited numbers ae hanes
And then he’d sit down on the bamboo floor,
} And this terrible boy would cry for more!

It still is a question in my mind whether
If he had not been born with the peacock feather [
| (Which in those barbarous lands of the South
| Is the same as our silver spoon in the mouth)
He would not be whipped till he lost his breath,
Or hung, if you please, or flayed to death,
{ Or banished away, as they sometimes do,
To Sing Chu Ling, or to Yung Chow Foo,

W ae a

q
“minh

Sail ao But his father was Kung! And, besides all that,
f dil Ue y
f

He wore a big tuby on top of his hat.
ee a ¢ Mm) So, whenever | his son’asked a slave for a dish,
That moment ’twas brought, be it flesh, be it fish ;
tt

EOE ee

i
(

wy ay ‘And poor Chang in the end, as was likely you see,
at A me as spoiled as a boy with a pig- tail could be. |

S
a









Day by day his appetite grew,

Day by day the whole year through ;

Till all that he wished, and all that he said,
And all that he thought of, living or dead,
Big or little, or sour, or sweet,

Was just to get something more to eat.

een &

No matter how horrid the kind of beast,
He did not care in the very least ;
But, would stick big pins
In his poor slaves’ shins,
ib Te they were not ready with some new feast —’ .
| Elephants’ trunks and tiger roast,



eee

ong
<




THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF 2a no NG LOO:



Boa Constrictor served up on toast,
Walrus haunch and Zebra stew,

| Rump steak cut from the Horned Gnu,
Hippopotamus and pickled Seal,
Rhinoceros baked in cochineal,









Crocodile tails and Camels’ humps, ds
Monkeys cut into strips and lumps, “cs
Neck of Camelopard, spiced and cloved — IF




These were a few of the things he loved.





























It happened — to make my story short —
It happened one day as he went to court,
| Driving his long-tailed ponies four

Up to the emperor’s palace door,

He heard them talk, in a frightened way,
Of a monster seen in Chow Choo bay —

| A horrible thing, all teeth and claws, =
With a pair of tremendous bony jaws,
And a dorsal fin all black and red,













~

RUC



a













=
Sa
i fen ;
pena)








And a waterspout in a giant head, alr ~ Rey fH
And a scaly length of a mile or more, oN ENS a ey
Hobbling and wriggling along the shore, iT - aS Ny ' Ms \

And a cyclop eye in a horned tail, aN ale a Mi)




) A double head, double dyed, double u (ww) hale.
“My Junk! My Junk!” wasall Chang said, }
4] And flung his whip at a pony’s head.

f “Sound the loud tam-tam! Beat the drum !

}
y . HI we a iS
aN We SO
SS
| Bid all my bold retainers come!

: oS "
WR At Ly
Hees
Shout for my brave harpooner bold!

Fling out my sails of cloth of gold! a ene

| Belay the anchor and douse the glib! Out from the shore the good junk sailed,
| 22 sup to-night on that monster's rib!” Her a like dragons’, golden scaled ;

PRY We 46 ES










WR i




















oe


THE TRAGICAL HISTORY Ur CHANG FUNG LOO.
WD LA Gc era DYE es SEK fe ty PLAS

: aN
Ne
se AL ANT

oy























DN













Wea |



j A hundred sailors, by fours and fours,
Rising and falling aboye the oars ;

| A hundred gallant soldiers dressed

} With spear and helmet and shield on breast ;

“jj The brave harpooner with spear so strong,

"| Two'hundred and seventy-five feet long ; _

‘| And Chang himself on the deck — the upper —
Smacking his lips as he thought of supper!










4 “ Avast your helm!” the lookout cried,
E ‘There she blows on the larboard side!”




| Before they could turn, before they could think,
| Before they could even have time to wink,

The sea-serpent rose on his hinder claws,

| He lifted the junk in his terrible jaws,

| And swallowed them /— sailors and soldiers tall,
| Chang, the harpooner, spear and all,

} Mast, and rigging, and keel, and sail,

| | And winked with the eye in his horned tail!







WRLAL A So ITV AK














So Chang, who had gobbled so many a dish,
| Got gobbled at last by a sea-serpent fish.









= Moral. =g
~ ‘The moral —that is if a moral there be — Wj

“=, Is this: that a boy who sets up for a glutton »
~ Must watch, or some still bigger gobbler than he
_, Will get him at last, just as sure as a button.

> BRA






4


THE STORY OF MISS MUFFET.





: WAS a crimson velvet tuffet,
With a golden cord around it,
On which Miss Muffet sat;

Her frock was made of rosy satin,
And she had a wreath of roses
Twisted round her hat.

Roses looked in at the window,
Roses in tall, crystal vases
Stood around the room; F
On Miss Muffet’s cheeks were roses
Vor it was that lovely season
When roses are in bloom.

Miss Muffet had a silver ewer

Chased with wreaths of silver roses.
Full of curds and whey ;

On her knees a silver basin,

’Graved with little knots of rose-buds
‘Tn frosted silver, lay.

Into her little silver basin,
From her little silver ewer,
She poured some curds and whey,
| Then, with a little golden ladle,
Daifitily she fell to eating,
As a lady may.



Pek



‘eg
THE STORY OF MISS MUPEFEE.

A spider swung in through the window,

Dressed in velvet, black and yellow,
On a silken thread

From a spray of Provence-roses ;

He wore a doublet barred with yellow,
And jewels on his head.

Downward climbed he from the roses,
Lightly, on his silken ladder ;
Slyly as a cat
Ran across to poor Miss Muffet,
And beside her, on the tuffct,
Impertinently sat.

All her curds and whey upsetting,
Through the window sprang Miss Muf-
fet
Lightly as a cat —
Her frock of rosy satin tearing,
From her cheeks the roses losing,
And the roses from her hat.

Svea

SSeS

EE

Ri

The Fairy Prince that way was pranc-

ing,
On his milk-white fairy courser,
Out of Fairy-land;
From his jewelled saddle springing,
Up he ran to poor Miss Muffet,
And gently kissed her hand:

“Come with me, my dear Miss Muffet,
For I am the Prince of Faery,

And I'll treat you well ;
Fast we'll fly o’er hill and meadow,
Keeping time unto the jingling

Of a silver bell.

“Come with me, you rosy darling —
In Fairy-land there are no spiders
To frighten you away ;.
| In a grove of fairy roses
| Safely you shall sit to-morrow,
} And feast on curds and whey.


AR TAD BS hoes @ UKeve

OF MISS

MUFFET.,



“Come with me, you rosy beauty!

Naught that has a taint of venom
Enters Fairy-land ;

Fairy guards with spears of crystal,

Sentinels on diamond watch-towers,
At its entrance stand.”

The Prince of Faery caught Miss Muf-
fet.
Like a feather to the saddle,
Half before she knew;
Over hills and velvet meadows,
Silver bells and trumpets sounding,
Merrily they flew.

They came to look for sweet Miss Muf-
fets
They only found a surly spider °
Who on her tuffet sat ;
And by the tree of Provence-roses
Empty lay the silver ewer,
And Miss Muffet’s hat.

They only found some dainty-hoof
prints,
All too fine for mortal courser,
Near them, where they lay:
They only heard a silvery jingling
And a blare of silver trumpets
O’er the fields away.


THE GOLD-SPINNER.



ena nen ont AR an AEE
FT cr eg a ESN ST TE RE ITEMS ITEM THAT PAR PETE MY SOSA VHT BLP BAY SRE INCE Kt andthe yn hn sheen kt a nated EEE





BeecePF CNR RENN SeLET meen ante



THE GOLD-SPINNEBR.

4 MILLER had a daughter,
And lovely, too, she was .

Her step was light, her smile was bright

= Her eyes were gray as glass.

(So Chaucer loved to write of eyes

in which that nameless azure lies

So like shoal-water in its hue,

Though all too crystal clear for blue.)

As you would suppose, the miller
Was very proud of her,

And would never fail to tell some tale
As to what her graces were.

On the powdery air of his own mill

Floated the whispers of her skill ;

At the village inn the loungers knew

All that the pretty girl could do,




rh atean ST



2





saan dns STERN Bala RO gE EOE NOM SETS TITER Hib NE se Seem y





Lae Se MON 9 Soa ey




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Oft in his braggart way
This foolish tale he told,

That his daughter could spin from bits of straw
Continuous threads of gold!

So boastful had he grown, forsooth,
That he cared but little for the truth:

But since this was a curious thing

It came to the knowledge of the king.




ARI EGA Ee PON I RO LAT WIPE BE TSIIATT AAPOR LE OD oe i EMPL






He thought it an old wife’s fable,

But senseless stuff at best ;
Yet, as he had greed, he cried, “ Indeed!

TI will put her powers to test.”
With a wave of his hand, he further said i
That to-morrow morning the clever maid
. Should come to the castle, and he would see

; What truth in the story there might be.

. AAT IAH SOIT 9m an AR ot PED freee eppr minded ‘ EES enn A ALLER ESE ELEN TL CLEATOR ALE ICAL ORBSE Btn AACR BOON


THE GOLD-SPINNER.













eee ee.

i Next day, with a trembling step,
| She reached the palace door,
j _ And was shown into a chamber, where
Was straw upon the floor.
They brought her a chair anda spinning-wheel,
A little can of oil, and a reel;
And said that unless the work was done —
All of the straw into the gold-thread spun —
’ By the time that the sun was an hour high
Next morning, she would have to die.






Down sat she in despair,
Her tears falling like rain:

She had never spun a thread in her life,
Nor ever reeled a skein!

Hark! the door creaked, and through achink,

With droll wise smile and funny wink,

In stepped a little quaint old man,

All humped, and crooked, and browned with
tan.










SIRE sie oH erie ie ace AV ANd ae Al ariee peer aks onSI DUN SOI,




She looked in fear and- amaze
To see what he would do;
He said, “ Little maid, what will you
give
If I'll spin the straw for you?”
Ah, me, few gifts she had in store — d é
A trinket or two, and nothing more! es : (




SRE incataia ne SP








A necklace from her throat so slim
She took, and timidly offered him.

"Twas enough, it seeni2d ; for he sat
At the wheel in front of her,
And turned it three times round and round,
Whirr, and whirr-rr, and whirr-rr-rr —
One of the bobbins was full ; and then,
Whirr, and whirr-rr, and whirr-rr-tr again,

De eeeeeeeneeereerer nine eae tee ES BE NI ELIS ET AT INL TOO BERNE SE BI I LO TET EE DI IE ITE IS TOE VENT OR PLL IEEE NT GEIR AME Bnet TOE ‘i

a TILA BL TIN ETON EAS BITES TATE 9 EON AE BINT AE

Ae
Thi. GOLD-SPINNER.



TURAL SNORTED a a eR SPREE ESR A rte HP RNR












(oe ernprmenree en cerns ery ee aK 3 ae *
“3 eS ARERR I 2 SNARES, C5 SESS ESTE TEN TGS 8 GAT OER TET FST IE SHS
=e

Until all the straw that had been spread iS
Had been deftly spun into golden thread.

At sunrise came the king
To the chamber, and, behold,
Instead of the ugly heaps of straw
Were bobbins full of gold! Te
This made him greedier than before; \
And he led the maiden out at the door
Into a new room, where she saw
Still larger and larger heaps of straw,
A chair to sit in, a spinning-wheel,
A little can of oil, and a reel ;
And he said that straw, too, must be spun
To gold before the next day’s sun
Was an hour high in the morning sky,
And if ’twas not done, she must die.







“4 Down sank she in despair,
Her tears falling like rain ;

She could not spin a single thread,
She could not reel a skein.

But the door swung back, and through the chink,

With the same droll smile and merry wink,

i
i
The dwarf peered, saying, ‘‘ What will you do |
|



If I'll spin the straw once more for you?”
“Ah me, I can give not a single thing,”
She cried, “except my finger-ring.”
He took the slender toy,
And slipped it over his thumb ;
Then down he sat and whirled the wheel,
Hum, and hum-m, and huni-m-m ;
Round and round with a droning sound,
Many a yellow spool he wound,
Many a glistening skein he reeled ;
And still, like bees in a clover-field,
The wheel went hum, and hum-m and hum-m-m.
Next morning the king came,
Almost before sunrise,
To the chamber where the maiden was,
And could scarce believe lis eyes
To see the straw, to the smallest sh~ods,
Made into shining amber threads.
And he cried, “ When once more I have tried
Your skill fike this, you shall be my bride ;
nn nen nr ee ERSTE RIP iia










For | might search through all my life
Nor find elsewhere so rich a wife.”
.| Then he led her by the hand
| Through still another door,
To a room filled twice as full of straw
As either had been before.
There stood the chair and the spinning-wheel,
/ And there the can of oil and the reel ;
| And as he gently shut her in
He whispered, “ Spin, little maiden, spin.”

Again she wept, and again |
Did the little dwarf appear ;

“What will you give this time,” he asked,

“Tf I spin for you, my dear?”





epee perme

. Alas — poor little maid —alas!
Out of her eyes as gray as glass
Faster and faster tears did fall,
As she moaned, “I’ve nothing to give at all.”
Ah, wicked indeed he looked ;

But while she sighed, he smiled!
*. « Promise,when you are queen,” he said,
“To give me your first-born child!”






























Little she tho’t what that might mean,
Or if ever in truth she should be queen
Anything, so that the work was done—
Anything, so that the gold was spun }

_ She promised all that he chose to ask ;
: ate And blithely he began the task.

BSS
” Round went the wheel, and round,
3 Whiz, and whiz-z, and whiz-z-z !
So swift that the thread at the spindle
point
Flew off with buzz and hiss.

She dozed— so tired her eye'ids were —
To the endless whirr, and whirr, and whirr ;
Though not even sleep could overcome

f The wheel’s revolving hum, hum, hum!
When at last she woke the room was clean,
Not a broken bit of straw was seen ;

But in huge high heaps were piled and rolled
Great spools of gold — nothing but gold!
2 It was just at the earliest peep of dawn,
And she was alone — the dwarf was gone.


THE GOLD-SPINNER.



It was indeed a marvellous thing
For a miller’s daughter to wed a king ;

But never was royal lady seen

More fair and sweet than this young queen.
The spinning dwarr she quite forgor

In the ease and pleasure of her lot ;

And not until her first-born child

Into her face had looked and smiled

Did she remember the promise made;
Then her heart grew sick, her soul afraid.

One day her chamber door
Pushed open just a chink,

And she saw the well-known crooked dwarf,
His wise smile and his blink.

He claimed at once the promised child ;

But she gave a cry so sad and wild

That even his heart was touched to hear ;

And, after a little, drawing near,

He whispered and said: “ You pledged
The baby, and I came; :
But if in three days you can learn
By foul or fair my name —
By foul or fair, by wile or snare,
You can its syllables declare,
Then is the child yours — only then —
And me you shall never see again!”



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ARIK



He vanished from her sight,
And she called her pages in ;
She sent one this way, and one that ;
She called her kith and kin,
Bade one go here, and one go there,
Despatched them thither, everywhere —
That from each quarter each might bring
The oddest names he could to the king.

Next morning the dwarf appeared,
And the queen began to say,
“Caspar,” “ Balthassar,” “ Melchoir” —_
But the dwarf cried out, “ Nay, nay!”
Shaking his little crooked frame,
“That’s not my name, that’s not my name







17?


THE GOLD-SPINNER.







































The second day ’twas the same ;
But the third a messenger

Came in from the mountains to the queen, :
And told this tale to her: und zw H 4 ey Me

That, riding under the forest boughs, Wi

He came to a tiny, curious house ;

Before it a feeble fire burned wan,

And about the fire was a little man ;

In and out the brands among,

Dancing upon one leg, he sung:

“ Jo-day [ll stew, and then [Ul bake,

To-morrow I shall the queen s child take;

How fine that none ts the secret in,

That my name is Rumpelstiliskin L”

The queen was overjoyed,
And when, due time next day,

The dwarf returned for the final word,
She made great haste to say:

“Ts it Conrade?” ‘“No,”—he shook his
head.
.“Ts it Hans? or Hal?” Still “ No,” he said.
* Ts it Rumpelstiltskin ?”’ then she cried.
“ A witch has told you,” he replied, :
And shrieked and stamped his foot so hard
_ That the very marble floor was jarred ;
And his leg broke off above the knee,
And he hopped off, howling terribly.

|
| He vanished then and there,
And never more was seen !
This much was in 4zs dreadful name —
. It saved her child to the queen.
And the little lady grew to be
; So very sweet, so fair to see,
That none could her loveliness surpass ;
And her eyes — they were as gray as glass!


= A CHILD’S CALENDAR.



BY CAROLINE METCALF.









Ee

May ! the leaves are dancing in the sunny air!

Berns uncurl, and blossoms spring up everywhere,

Sweet the breezes blowing where pink may-flowers
hide

Under last year’s leaf-fall on the warm hillside,

L

A PRIL! summer’s coming!
year,

For the snow has melted, and the blue-bird’s here !

iVow begins the

Woolly catkins swinging on the alder-bush
Whisper,

push!”

“Leaves are starting! we can feel them






DLT,
June! why, every June-day is a happy dream!
Buttercups and daisies, strawberries and cream |

Hush! hid in the clover, would you ever think

All that glee could come from just one bobo-

link?



































































































































We
August! fire-flies brighten when the daylight fails ;
In the swampy meadows grow the tall “ cats’-
tails ;”
By the shady brcokside who can feel the heat,

While the water ripples over naked feet ?



BV

July! off at sunrise picking blackberries !



Climbing after birds’-nests up the tallest trees! _
“Helping ” in the haying! On the pond afloat,

Hunting water-lilies in a leaky boat.


Wale
Wild grapes in September tempt to climbs and
leaps ;
In the fragrant orchard apples lie in heaps.
*Round the cider-presses, thronging with the bees,—

“D4n’t it taste like honey, sucked through straws

like these ?”















Vala

Jolly, crisp October! Then the chestnut-burrs
Rattle down like hail-stones if the least wind stirs!
Gold and crimson leaf-showers from the tree-tops fall,

$

Squirrels scamper gaily o’er the old stone wall!













VIII











Gray skies in November bring the first light snow ;
Whirling softly downward. see the white flakes
go!

In dear grandma’s kitchen peering, eager eyes



























































































Spy out “ Suck a turkey! such Thanksgiving

pies!”
























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IX.
€ Christmas! ” cries December. “ How the stockings
look
Loaded down with bundles in the chimney-nook! ”
‘Tumbling up at day-break out of downy beds —
“Santa knew we wanted iust these skates and

sleds !”

















































































































































































































xls

February hurries: Only twenty-eight |
Days.of wintry weather! ’Tisn’t long to wait.

Icicles, a-dropping, shattered lie in rows ;

Poor old Winter’s white coat many a brown patch _

shows.





























ree
January’s buried in a great snow-fall ;
On with coat and mittens! out to slide and ball!
Merry sleigh-bells jingle in the frosty air,

And the grand ice-palace rises white and fair.



a








ee
Ay

ve =~ N

XII.

March! has Winter vanished? Hear the river's
rush !

Brooklets run and ripple! Snow is turned te
slush!

Wading through the door-yards, in big rubbez
boots,

You may catch Spring peeping out—in crocus

shoots !


TT Ua (i Pr. Ae

ea



HE war in the East had ended;
Its terrors were past, they said;
There was peace, once more, for the living,
And peace for the valiant dead.

Through the splendid squares of Lucknow
The Highlanders marched again ;

The heroes of fortress and jungle,
Brave Havelock’s peerless men!

Ay! open your gates, O Lucknow ! —
But measure, ye guards, your breath,
As ye think of those days, an hundred,
When Havelock marched with death.





They had freed the beleaguered city,

’ Fought step by step through the vale ; O minaret, tower and shrine!

. And swept from the shore of the Ganges
Forever the Sepoy’s trail.

‘Then welcome them back with rejoicing,

For these are the men who saved you,
Whose glory outlasteth thine !


Through the streets swept the colors of Englana,
Borne proudly aloft on the air;

While the “throne land of Rama” re-echoed
The Christian’s thanksgiving and prayer.







And blithest of all were the pipers,
Their tartan plaids streaming in pride,

As they woke, on the banks of the Goomtee,
The airs of the Doon and Clyde.

‘

Then the heart of one beautiful woman
Was stirred by an impulse sweet,

As she thought of the long, forced marches,

The weary and blood-stained feét ;

Of the pain, the hunger, the thirsting,
The death in the jungle’s gloom ;

The rescue of woman and children,
Threatened with direful doom.











And she said, “I will spread them a banquet,
With a touch of the homeland cheer,

And the welcome their mothers would give them.
Afar in the heatherlands dear,

“ Not for twice twelve months have they tasted
A simple cupful of tea!

[ will serve it to-day for the heroes
Who periled their lives for me!
“ Bid them come to the courts of the Mission |”
Gay awnings were hastily hung ;

While on tripods of curious fashion,
The teakettles merrily swung ;

Swung and sung songs of the homeland; At the old gray gate of the Mission,
T'amiliar and sweet were the tunes, "Neath turret and watchtowers high,

As if winds of the loch and the mountain Where the dusk-eyed Indian Princess
Blew soft through the Indian noons. Had dreamed in the days gone by,





She fastened the tartan of Scotland This fair-faced, brave-hearted woman,
. With the thistle-bloom over her breast ; ize A stranger from lands of the West,
And her own little winsome daughter To thé ancient palace and gardens

In the bonny bright plaid she drest. : Welcomed each war-worn guest.
Served with the grace and the bounty
Of royal féte and of feast, i

To the tattered and smoke-grimed heroes,
In halls of the storied East.

And with Highland bonnets uplifted,
There under the Hindoo palm,

The soldiers of Havelock listened
To the Hebrew’s glorious psalm:

Notr.— This incident was related to the
author by Dr. William Butler, American Mis-
sionary in India during the Sepoy Rebellion.

The event occurred when Havelock’s Bri-
_gade had returned to Lucknow, to take up
their line of march for the Afghan frontier.



And many a battle-scarred soldier
Let fall from a glistening eye

Hot tears on the hand of his hostess
For whom he had thought to die.

“Thou wentest before thy people,
And kings of armies did flee!”

Then merrily under the shadows
They drank of the fragrant tea,

And for her was the Highlander’s blessing
Breathed low in that tenderer scene
When the pipers, proud in their places,
. Played grandly — “God save the Queen!”
ALADDIN.

















































Lovers of stories all!
First, Saxon Edith, of the corn-silk hair,
Growing so strong and tall ;

I SEE a little group about my chair,

Then little brother, on whose sturdy face
Soft baby dimples fly,

As fear or pleasure give each other place
When wonders multiply ;

' Then Gold-locks —summers nine their goldenest
Have showered on her head,
And tinted it, of all the colors best,
' Warm robin-red-breast red ;



Then, close at hand, on lowly haunches set,
With pricked-up, tasseled ear,

Is Tony, little clear-eyed spaniel pet,
Waiting, like them, to hear.

isay Ihave no story —allare told!
Not to be daunted thus,

They only crowd more confident and bold,
And laugh, incredulous.

And so, remembering how, once ona time,
I, too, loved such delights,

I choose this one, and put it into rhyme,
From the “ Arabian Nights.”






A poor little lad was Aladdin !
His mother was wretchedly poor ;
A widow, who ‘scarce ever had in
Her cupboard enough of a store
«, To frighten the wolf from the door.

No doubt he was quite a fine fellow

For the country he lived in == bur ah !
His skin was a dull, dusky yellow,

And his hair was as long as ’twould grow.
(Tis the fashion in China, you know. )

a
ay

But however he looked, or however
He fared, a strange fortune was his.
None of you, dears, though fair-faced and clever,
Can have anything like to this,
So grand and so marvellous it is !

Well, one day — for so runs the tradition —
While idling and lingering about

The low city streets, a Magician
From Africa, swarthy and stout,
With his wise, prying eyes spied him out,
ALADDIN.





























































































































Far down in the earth’s very centre
There burned a strange lamp at a shrine ;
Great stones marked the one place to enter ;
Down under t’was dark as amine;
What further — no one could divine:

And that was the treasure Aladdin
Was sent to secure. First he tore

The huge stones away, for ke had in
An instant the strength of a score ; :
Then he stepped through the cavern-like door.























Tees snd went up to him very politely,
And asked what his namé was and cried:
“ My lad, if I judge of you rightly,

My poor Mustafa !”” — and he sighed.

“Ah, yes, Mustafa was my father,”

Aladdin cried back, “and he’s dead!”
“Well, then, both yourself and your mother
I will cave for forever,” he said,

“And you never shall lack wine nor bread.”

And thus did the wily old wizard _
- Deceive with his kindness the two
For a deed of dark peril and hazard
He had for Aladdin to do,

At the risk of his life, too, he knew.



Down, down, through the darkness so chilly!
On, on, through the long galleries !
Coming now upon gardens of lilies,
And now upon fruit-burdened trees,
Filled full of the humming of bees.

But, ah, should one <5 of his finger
Touch aught as he passed, it was death!
Not a fruit on the boughs made him linger,
Nor the great heaps of gold underneath.
But on he fled, holding his breath,

Until he espied, brightly burning,
_ The mysticai lamp in its place!
He plucked the hot wick out, and, turning,
With triumph and joy in his face,
Set out his long way to retrace.

At last he saw where daylignt shed a
Soft ray through a chink overhead,

Where the crafty Magician was ready
To catch the first sound of his tread.
“Reach the lamp up to me, first! ’ he said.

Aladdin with luck had grown bolder,
And he cried, “ Wait a bit, and we'll see!”
Then with huge, ugly push of his shoulder,
And with strong, heavy thrust of his knee,
The wizard — so angry was he —
ALADDIN.



Po ee

Pried up the great rock, rolled it over
The door with an oath and a stamp ; x
“ Stay there under that little cover, ats
And die of the mildew and damp,”
He shouted, “or give me the lamp!” NAG

Aladdin saw darkness fall o’er him ;
He clutched at the lamp in his hand,
And, happening to rub it, before him
A Genius stood, stately and grand.
Wheuce he came he could not understand.



“T obey you,” it said, “ and whatever

You ask for, or wish, you shall have!
Rub the lamp but the least bit soever, : iki 4
It calls me, for I am its slave!” i iL , ee
Aladdin said, “ Open this cave!”




















He was freed from the place in a minute ;
And he rubbed once again: “ Take me home lee

Home he was. And as blithe as a linnet
Rubbed again for the Genius with: “ Come,

I am dying for food; get me some ! “





Thus at first he but valued his treasure
Because simple wants it supplied.

Grown older it furnished him pleasure ;
And then it brought riches beside ;
And, at last, it secured him his bride.

Now the Princess most-lovely of any
Was Badroulboudour, (what a name!)

Who, though sought for and stied for by many,
No matter how grandly they came,

Yet merrily laughed them to shame,

Until with his riches and splendor,
Aladdin as lover enrollcd!
For the-first thing he did was to send her
Some forty great baskets of gold,
And all the fine gems they would hold.









Then he built hera palace, set thickly
With jewels at window and door ;
And all was completed so quickly
She saw bannered battlements soar
Where was nothing an hour before.


























































































, ALADDIN.




























































S Hig

SCT TE



Him she wedded. They lived without trouble
As long as the lamp was their own ;
But one day, like the burst of a bubble,
The palace and Princess were gone ;
Without wings to fly they had flown !

And Aladdin, dismayed to discover

That the Jamp had been stolen away,
Bent all of his strength to recover

The treasure, and day after day,

He journeyed this way and that way ;

And at last, after terrible hazard,
After many a peril and strife,

He found that the vengeful old wizard,
Who had made the attempt on his life,
Had stolen lamp, princess and wife.

And ever thereafter,

There millions of servants attended,
Black slaves and white slaves, thick as bees,
Obedient, attentive, and splendid
In purple and gold liveries,
Fine to see, swift to serve, sure to please !












—
7

With a shrewdness which would have done credit
To even a Yankee boy, he

Sought the lamp where the wizard had hid it,
And, turning a mystical key,
Brought it forth, and then, rubbing with glee,

“Back to China!” he cried. In a minute
The marvellous palace uprose,

With the Princess Badroulboudour in it

Unruffled in royal repose,
With her jewels and cloth-of-gold clothes ;

And with gay clouds of banners and towers,

With its millions of slaves, white andl black.
It was borne by obedient Powers, 3

As swift as the wind on itsstrack,

And ere one could count ten it was back '

Aladdin

Clung close to the lamp of his fate,
Whatever the robe he was clad in,

Or whether he fasted or ate ;

And at all hours, early and late!

Right lucky was Lord Aladdin!




Tea ANN

wt! WHERE is my bell,” sighed the Brownie, PRE shepherd boy Fritz, next morning,

“My sweet, sweet silver bell,

Driving his wandering sheep

That tinkled and swung from my scarlet cap, ’ Mid the scattered stones of the Giants’ graves,

Now who in the world can tell?”

Saw the pretty plaything peep

e aN the plain in the island of Riigen if! PARKLING among the heather,
i Danced the delicate fairy folk, And fastened it on to himself;
And the tiny bell from the tiny cap For how could he know that the bell belonged
Its curious fastening broke. To an underground little elf?



































; “UT the elf was in such a trouble!

4 Aye wandering up and ‘down,

He was searching here and searching there,
With the tears on his cheek of brown.

* Saw the pre
Syne

a

Decorated

AVES

Steer




Th

TAT SRC EATETRERESE CTY a

RA QR









= “OR while it was missing no slumber
Might visit the fairy’s eyes,
Still must he sleepless fill the air
With mournful wails and cries.

& . WHO has borne off my treasure
0 From the ground where it did lie ?
Is it raven or crow, or jackdaw?
Or magpie noisy and sly?”

ait Ag
ay

mt

HEN he changed his shape to a beautiful
And over the land he flew, (bird,
Over the waters of Raloy,
And the fields of green Unruh,

STE, searched the nests of all the birds,
He talked with them, great and small,
But never a trace of the little bell,
Could the Brownie find at all.

pe the green, green fields of Unruh
Went Fritz to pasture his sheep,

For the place was sunny and fair and still,
And the grass grew thick and deep.

mg

Weg 5 hoy ag
fA
MG WEF

! in i s

e Es






aa

mech w erent,
tae eo hn eT a
1

HE bird flew over. ‘The sheep bells, «|

i Soft tinkling, sounded low ; ; Se

The wee fay thought of his talisman lost, iota, pe aGie
And warbled sad and slow: uae 2




J CERES
‘

Wy



swny

Pe boy looked up and listened :
“ Now what can that queer bird be ?
If he thinks their bells make my cattle so rich,
Why, what would he think of me?”
KN The boy locked upand

\ listened *

yon Ty ric
ny ae hee


‘HEN he drew forth from his pocket
A} The treasure that he had found,
And the magic silver rang out clear
With a keen, delicious sound.

(TBE sprite in the bird’s shape heard it,
And fairly shook with delight,
Dropped down behind a bush near by,
Hid safely out of sight,

“My sheep will flow Sal
its tinkle”

Ni no, for there isn’t another
“= In the whole wide world so fine ;
My sheep will follow its tinkle,

And ask for no other sign.

)

i

PWM EC Bee,

Spee drew off his dress of feathers,
= And took the shape of a crone

Who hobbled up to the shepherd lad,
And spake in a coaxing tone:

(Geo even, good friend, good even !

[<< What a charming bell you ring!

I'd like such an one for my grandson —
Will you sell me the pretty thing?”

MI

LISTEN! Can any sorrow
10) : .
Hold out against such a tone?
The weariest hour ’twill ring away,
And conquer a heart of stone.”






“HE old dame offered him money,
oP A glittering golden heap,
But Fritz stood firm; ‘“‘ Nay, nay,” he said,
“My sweet, sweet bell I’ll keep.”

7 BEN a shepherd staff she showed him,
4} A Most beautiful to see,

Of snow-white wood all wrought and carved:
“Take this and the bell give me.

(

~ ,
QO



8 CO long as you guide your cattle [ E stretched out his hand, and, “ Take it,
With this, you will surely thrive, Mies The bell for the staff,” he cried.
And all good fortune will follow #7; Like a light breeze over the fields. and trees

Wherever your flocks you drive.” The old crone seemed to glide.

4

So mystic, bewitched him quite, i 384" Or as mists with the wind that blend,
So strange and lovely her dazzling smile, 7 And a tiny whir, like a whistle thin,
He was blind in its sudden light. Set all his hair on end.

ayn reached him the stick. Hergesture | 3 HE was gone like the down of a thistle,




nn nn nn a ttc nent:



fen An reno tame eer Ae eR i ESSE EEE NE cg,

ican

“HE staff was his, but the bell was gone, ae he kept his fairy promise,

-- Spirited quite away ; And Fortune to Fritz was kind,
Fritz looked at his prize with doubtful eyes — For all his labors prospered,

But who so glad as the fay? And all things worked to his mind.

pL HEL SUSIE STRAP RA OE GET BALAI:

EFORE he was eighteen, mark you
His flocks were his own to keep,
And soon in the island of Rtigen
He was master of all the sheep.

eT:

£f SEX SETR TES ENL AE TSE e fe
SESS



T last he was able to purchase Now wouldn’t you like, little people,
A Knight’s estate, and became ; Such a fairy treasure to find?
A nobleman stately and gracious, ; Pick up from the grass such a magic bell, -
With a loved and honored name. ' And meet with a Brownie so kind?






STASIS SOLES PERE NE OS EPL OTTER CES SNe BRE


THE





SLEEPING PRINCESS.



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































That in the good king’s royal palace
A Princess had been born.



Made joyful holiday.



Were made by the happy king



Were bid to the christening.

"| And for them the king had seven dishes
Made out of the best red gold,
Set thickly round on the sides and covers
With jewels of price untold.

















When the day of the christening came, the bugles
Blew forth their shrillest notes;

Drums throbbed, and endless lines of soldiers.

Filed past in scarlet coats.

















































































































































HE ringing bells and the booming cannon
Proclaimed on a summer morn

The towers flung out their brightest banners,
The ships their streamers gay,
And every one, from lord to peasant,

Great plans for feasting and er ySuBNIUE

And, to bring good fortune, seven face




































































































































































And the fairies were there the king had bidden,
Bearing their gifts of good —
But right in the midst a strange old woman

Surly and scowling stood.

They knew her to be the old, old fairy,
All nose and eyes and ears,

Who had not peeped, till now, from her dungeon
For more than fifty years.

Angry she was‘to have been forgotten
Where others were guests, and to find

That neither a seat nor a dish at the bancauct

To her had been assigned.





































































To




if Tec fa OM ETT RT i Mt oc
: ie} a a a a oo ce a

il
= YHA Hal iis

Rn ]
a i i Ha oe Uy



CA ne I Mm
eo ie wm) a i q i a i
THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.




































































































































































































































































































































Now came the hour for the gift-bestowing ;
And the fairy first in place BO
Touched with her wand the child and gave her |. Hi
“ Beauty of form and face!”

Fairy the second bade, “‘ Be witty!”
The third said, “ Never fail!” :

The fourth, “Dance well!” and the fifth, ‘“‘O Princess,
Sing like the nightingale!”






















































































|

. a nif

The sixth gave, “Joyin the heart forever!” ij
= But before the seventh could speak,

























































































































































The crooked, black old Dame came forward,
And, tapping the baby’s cheek,





































\
HA
‘You shall prick your finger upon a spindle, | 1
And die of it!” she cried. PT
| All trembling were the lords and ladies,
And the king and queen beside.

i











=

ie
But the seventh fairy interrupted, i
it “Do not tremble nor weep! ~
\\\ That cruel curse I can change and soften,
\\ And instead of death give sleep!

“ But the sleep, though I do my best and kindest,
j Must last for an hundred years !”

On the king’s stern face was a dreadful pallor,
In the eyes of the queen were tears.

“Yet after the hundred years are vanished,” —
The fairy added beside, —

“A Prince of a noble line shall find her,
And take her for his bride.”

















































































































But the king, with a hope to change the future,
Proclaimed this law to be:
That, if inall the land there was kept one spindle,
Sure death was the penalty.
































































































































































































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.







The Princess grew, from her very cradle
Lovely and witty and good ;

And at last, in the course of years, had blossomed
Into full sweet maidenhood.

























































































































































































































































And one day, in her father’s summer palace,
As blithe as the very air,

She climbed to the top of the highest turret,
Over an old worn stair











And there in the dusky cobwebbed garret,
- Where dimly the daylight ‘shone,
A little, doleful, hunch-backed woman
Sat spinning all alone.

































Ke ‘“O Goody,” she cried, “ what are you doing?”
cE) “‘ Why, spinning, you little dunce!”
The Princess laughed : “*’Tis so very funny,
He Pray let me try it once!”













With acareless touch, from the hand of Goody}

She caught the half-spun thread, i A i
And the fatal spindle pricked her finger!
Down fell she as if dead !

























And Goody shrieking, the frightened courtiers
Climbed up the old worn stair

Only to find, in heavy slumber,
The Princess lying there.











They bore her down to a lofty chamber,
They robed her in her best,

And ona couch of gold and purple
They laid her for her rest,





































The roses upon her cheek still blooming,
And the red still on her lips,

While the lids of her eyes, like night-shut lilies,
Were closed in white eclipse.













































































































































































































































































= Then the fairy who strove her fate to alter
From the dismal doom of death,
Now that the vital hour impended,

Came hurrying in a breath.





















































And then about the slumbering palace
The fairy made up-spring

i = : == 4 wood so heavy and dense that never

a = = = Could enter a living thing.




































































































THE SLEEPING PRINCESS.

And there for a century the Princess
Lay in a trance so deep
‘Yhat neither the roar of winds nor thunder
Could rouse her from her sleep.




























‘Then at last one day, past the long-enchanted
Old. wood, rode a new king’s son,

Who, catching a glimpse of a royal turret
Above the forest dun

(elt in his heart a strange wis. for exploring
The thorny and briery place,

And, lo, a path through the deepest thicket
Opened before his face:



Oh, on he went, till he spied a terrace,
And further a sleeping guard,

And rows of soldiers upon their carbines .
Leaning, and snoring hard.

Up the broad steps! The doors swung backward :
The wide halls heard no tread !
But a lofty chamber, opening, showed him

A gold and purple bed.
He spoke the word, and the spell was scattered,

The enchantment broken through !
The lady woke. “Dear Prince,” shenurmured,
. “How long I have waited for you!”

And there in her beauty, warm and glowing,
The enchanted Princess lay!

While only a word from his lips was needed
To drive her sleep away. Thenat oncethe whole great slumbering palace
Was wakened and all astir ;

Yet the Prince, in joy at the Sleeping Beauty,

Could only look at her.



She was the bride who for years an hundred
Had waited for him to come,

And now that the hour was here to claim her,
Should eyes or tongue be dumb?













The Princess blushed at his royal wooing,

=: Bowed “yes” with her lovely head,

= And the chaplain, yawning, but very lively,
Came in and they were wed!

But about the dress of the happy Princess,
I have my woman's fears —

It must have grown somewhat old-fashioned
In the course of so many years !






























TEES WAGE LE WAND: LIEE, 3G Os LIN GASs

aE OWEOUe AND TPE “GO Sita:



By Ciara Doty Bares.



N old gray goose walked forth with pride, - “You will know him by his voice so hoarse,
With goslings seven at her side; By his paws so hairy and black and coarse.”
A lovely yellowish-green they were, And the goslings piped up, clear and shrill,
And very dear to her. “ We'll take great care, we will.”
She led them to the river’s brink The mother thought them wise, and went
To paddle their feet awhile and drink, | To the far-off forest quite content;
And there she heard a tale that made | But she was scarcely away, before
Her very soul afraid. There came a rap at the door.





eet
2) Sesh»



A neighbor gabbled the story out, ;

How a wolf was known to be thereabout— » \

A great wolf whom nothing could please ,.#& we
As well as little geese.

So, when, as usual, to the wood
She went next day in search of food,

“Open, open, my children dear,”
A gruff voice cried: “your mother is here.”

She warned them over and over, before But the young ones answered, ‘No, no, no,
She turned to: shut the door: Her voice is sweet and low;

“My little ones, if you hear a knock “And you are the wolf —so go away,

At the door, be sure and not unlock, You can’t get in, if you try all day.”

For the wolf will eat you, if he gets in, He laughed. to himself to hear them talk,

Feathers and bones and skin. And wished he had some chalk,


THE WOLF AND

To smooth his voice to a tone like geese;

So he went to the merchant’s and bought a piece,

And hurried back, and rapped once more.
“Open, open the door,

“IT am your mother, dears,” he said.

But up on the window ledge he laid,

In a careless way, his great black paw,
And this the goslings saw.

“No, no,” they called, “that will not co,
Our mother hasqnot black hands like you;
For you are the wolf, so go away,

You can’t get in to-day.”

‘The baffled wolf to the old mill ran,

Axd-whined to the busy miller man:

“T love to hear the sound of the wheel
And to smell the corn and meal.”





THE GOSLINGS.

The miller was pleased, and said “ All right;
Would you like your cap and jacket white?”
At that he opened a flour bin

“And playfully dipped him in.

He floundered and sneezed a while, then, lo,

He crept out white as a wolf of snow.

“T£ chalk and flour can make me sweet,”
He said, “ then I’m complete.”

For the third time back to the house he went,

And looked and spoke so different,

That when he rapped, and “ Opén! ” cried,
The little ones replied, -

_ Ag ae

“Tf you show us nice clean feet, we will.”

And straightway, there on the window-sill

His paws were laid, with dusty meal
Powdered from toe to heel.

Ves, they were white! So they let him in,
And he gobbled them all up, feathers and skin,
Gobbled the whole, as if ’twere fun,

Except the littlest one.
TLE OLE ANDTHE GOSLING S:

An old clock stood there, tick, tick, tick,

And into that he had hopped so quick

The wolf saw nothing, and fancied even
He’d eaten all the seven.







But six were enough to satisfy ; She called out tenderly every name,
So out he strolled on the grass to lie. But never a voice in.answer came,
, And when the gray goose presently Till a little frightened, broad-billed face
f -- Came home—what did she Peered out of the clock-case.
“y f yf, see? :
uy , i), This gosling told his tale with grief,

And the gray goose sobbed in her handkerchief,
And sighed— ‘Ah, well, we will have to go
And let the neighbors know.”











a” rae ot : So down they went to the river’s brim,
. SS, Where their feathered friends were wont to swim,
#y ~ And there on the turf so green and deep
ve : & The old wolf lay asleep.
Alas, the house door open wide, ; He had a grizzly, savage look,
But no little yellow flock inside; And he snored till Ce boughs above him shook.
The beds and pillows thrown about; They tiptoed round him— drew quite near,
The fire all gone out; Yet still he did not hear.
The chairs and tables overset; ‘nen, as the mother gazed, to her
Tle wash-tub spilled, and the floor all wet; It seemed she could see his gaunt side stir—
Aua heze ara there in cinders black, Stir and squirm, as if under the skin.

; 3 Sel
The yreat wolf’s ugly track. Were something alive within !
Le VOL Ly AUN litle (ORO sh Grist:

“Go back to the house, quick, dear,” she said, , “What's this rumbling and tumbling?

“‘ And fetch me scissors and needle and thread. What’s this rattling like bones ?

Pll open his ugly hairy hide, I thought I’d eaten six small geese,
And see what is inside.” But they’ve turned out only stones.”

She snipped with the scissors a criss-cross slit, He bent his neck to lap — instead,

And well rewarded she was for it, He tumbled in, heels over head ;

For there were her goslings—six together — And so heavy he was, as he went down
With scarcely a rumpled feather ! : He could not help but drown !

The wolf had eaten so greedily,
He had swallowed them all alive, you see.
So, one by one, they scrambled out,

And danced and skipped about.



















Then the gray goose got six heavy stones,

And placed them in between the bones;

She sewed him deftly, with needle and thread,
And then with her goslings fled.

‘The wolf siept long and hard and late,
And woke so thirsty he scarce could wait.
So he crept along to the river’s brink

To get a good cool drink.

But the stones inside began to shake,

‘And make his old ribs crack and ache;

And the gladsome flock, as they sped away,
Could hear him groan, and say : —

And after that, in thankful pride,

With goslings seven at her side,

The gray goose came to the river’s brink
Each:day to swim and drink.
















YIWNOY Aw)

By Susan COOLIDGE.

HE long day’s tasks were neatly done,
The milk pail scoured, the milk set by.
And Ursel at the set of sun
Stood wistfully her mistress nigh.

The Dame was stern, the Dame was shrewd,
So all the neighbots were agreed,

Thrifty and sharp in word and mood,
But kindly still and just of deed.

She glanced at Ursel’s braided hair,
She watched the color come and flit

On the young cheek so round and fair,
And well she knew the cause of it.

And smiling at the little maid,

“Vou have worked well and had no play,
And been a steady lass,” she said;

“Now you shall have a holiday.











“TJ mind me how, a lass like you
With such a basket on my arm,

I hied me home, as you shall do
On Mothering Day, to the old farm.

“ And how my mother —rest her soul!
She has been dead these forty years” —

The Dame’s voice shook beyond control,
She could not see the fire for tears.

But little Ursel’s cheeks were red,
Her heart was bounding light and gay ;
“Oh, thank you, thank you, Dame,” she said,
And quietly she stole away.

The morning’s dawn was clear and fair,
And Ursel rose before the sun ;

She neatly bound her long bright hair,
And did her morning tasks, each one.

She made her ready for the road,

She tied her shoes and Sunday hat,
And in a basket she bestowed

The bread-loaf and the butter-pat.

“To-morrow Mothering Sunday is
When children to their parents go,

Each with a gift for her, or his,

And you shall have a gift also.

“The small round cheese I bade you make,
The pat of butter on the shelf,

The crusty loaf you saw me bake —

These you shall carry home yourself.

MN I I

Northward ran Ursel o’er the fell,
Southward the shepherd fleeter yet,
And half-way by a roadside well
The brother and the sister met.

Both clapped their hands in gladsome wise ; | |
Long months had, since they met, gone by; i
Tears shone in Ursel’s happy eyes,
But manly Robin scorned to cry.









The Dame at window overhead

Watched the girl go with joyous speed;
“Mothers are happy folk,” she said,
“Mothers are lucky folk indeed.”

Across the moor four distant miles,
At the same time a lad set forth,

With clean-washed face all lit with smiles ;
He headed south and Ursel north.

His holiday was hard to gain,
His surly master cared no whit
For Mothering Sunday, and in vain
The boy had urged his wish for it;

Until at last the farmer’s wife,

With pity touched, had won consent ;
And glad as never in his life

The shepherd boy arose and went.

He bore no ‘gift, poor little lad,

His wage was naught but clothes and food, -

But mother would, he knew, be glad,
And count his coming as a good.





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“Have you no gift for mother brought?”

Ei She asked ; her brother shook his head;
: “Nothing with nothing can be bought, g
a How could I bring one?” Robin said. F













“ You shall share mine then,” Ursel cried,
“Tt shall be gift from both us twain.”

And hand in hand, and side by side,
They hastened on their way again.



They danced adown the lower hill,

Threaded the copse and crossed the brook,
Till Ursel suddenly stood still,

Crying, “O Robin! Robin! Look!”
There, in a sheltered hollow set,

Couched shyly by a mossy stone,
They saw the earliest violet

All purple sweet and fully blown.

“Your gift?” she cried, “and best of all,
The proverb runs, that you could bring:
It says that ‘ Violets shall befall
Him who shall go a-mothering!’”












Their mother at the doorway stood,
Her hearth was swept all cleanly bright,

She looked to moor, she looked to wood,

Shading her eyes against the light.





She saw the youthful figures dawn
Dark shapes against the shining sky,

And as they rapidly came on
Contentment filled the mother’s eye;






And it was, “You have grown, my lass,”
And it was, “welcome home, dear lad,”

As laughing, chattering, in they pass
With lightsome steps and kisses glad.






The yellow simnels shone like gold,
The frumenty was spiced and hot,
The children feasted as of old,

The mother too — though eating not.




Ah! sweet old Mothering Holiday
Which bound the ties of kindred fast,

Lost and forgotten in our day —

What pity that it could not last!



THE FAIRY FLAG
(A Skye Folk-lore Story}

By Mary E. WILKINS.



EYOND the purple gloom of moors,
Beyond the blueness of the sea,
B. yond the range of chalk-white cliffs,
‘The sun was setting peacefully.

The fairy, on a grassy knoll,
Sat dreaming, singing to the cows:
“ Knee-deep in clumps of plumy ferns,
Knee-deep in rustling grasses browse!

“ The chieftain slays his foeman’s clan,
The lady ’broiders in the hall;
L stt here singing to the cows, an, 24 hyp
And am.the gayest one of all! ds I

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“ Now of the clumps of spicy fern,
Now of the juicy grasses taste!”
The fairy wore a grass-green gown,

With golden girdle at her waist;

Her winsome little face upturned,
Her soft gold hair all round her streamed ;
Her small pink cheeks like roses burned,
Her wild blue eyes like jewels beamed.

She struck a little harp o’ pearl,
As to the browsing kine she sung:
All lightly o’er the fairy bridge
Beyond, a bonnie laddie sprung,



He had Prince Charlie’s yellow locks, The fairy lilted loud and sweet,
His gay blue eyes and lovesome way. The laddie turned him round to see;
Macleod’s little son he was — She lifted up her little face,

The castle just beyond him lay. And sweet, and sweet, and sweet, smiled she.
The laddie thro’ the heather ran,
His tartan blowing out behind,
The little fairy, gowned in green,
Wi’ little harp o? pearl, to find.














“ And since you are a mortal bairn,

And yet have shunned me not,” she said,
“A fairy gift I'll give to thee,

To-morrow, when the west is red.

“ And since you have a bonny face,
T’ll give to thee a fairy kiss,

To take the bitter from thy woe,
And add a sweetness to thy bliss.”

She kissed the laddie’s blushing cheek,
And all the air grew sweet around,

As if a million flowers bloomed out —
And than she vanished from the ground.

The western sky all roses was, The flag was green as springtide sward

And round “Macleod’s Maiden’s” feet What time the sun upon it lies,
Foam-wreaths to wreaths of roses turned. And shot with threads of glittering gold,

The fairy lilted loud and sweet; And filled with spots of gold, like eyes.
The laddie o’er the fairy bridge, She put it in the laddie’s hand:

Came running lightly to her side: “Once waved, ’twill bring thee thy cesire,
“ And have you brought the fairy gift And twice, and thrice —but not again;

You promised me last night?” he cried. Then cast it, worthless, in the fire!”
A shadow o’er Ler gown o’ green,
A shadow o’er her winsome face,

A shadow o’er her golden hair,
Came softly creeping on apace.



The fairy through the shadow shone,
And struck her little harp o’ pearl;

Then vanished in the shadow’s heart,
Wi’ golden and wi’ rosy swirl.



The laddie held the fairy flag,
Alone in twilight gray and cold;

And stood and looked, his wond’ring eyes
All filled with dancing motes of gold.



The laddie’s yellow beard had grown ; And alway had the fairy’s kiss,
He’d wedded with a lady fair ; She gave to him so long ago,
And he had got a little son, Added a sweetness to his bliss,

With his same bonnie yellow hair. And ta’en the bitter from his woe.
But never yet the fairy flag
Had waved upon the castle wall;
For with his stalwart arm and sword,
His troubles he had breasted all.











“Oh, where’s my little laddie gone?”
The lady left her ’broidery frame ;

Through every castle window peered,
With tearful eyes, the gentle dame.






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Macleod called his followers out,
And loud the castle trumpets blew:
“Macleod’s heir is strayed awa’,
And on the heather falls the dew.

« And on the heather falls the dew; - They searched along the chalk-white cliffs,
Shadows are floating o’er the sea. Upon the dizzy hanging paths; ,
Oh, where’s my little laddie gone? — : They sought him on their breezy tops, —

I pray ye bring him back to me uw Along the strips of grassy straths.
They called “Macleod ” down the hill;
They called Macleod” down the vale;

They hailed the shepherd with his flock, ~
The maiden with her milking-pail.










They searched Dunvergan castle thro’;

Each dungeon in the thick stone wall
They peered in — but they only found
The prisoned foemen, grim and tall.












His mother looked out o’er the sea,
To where “ Macleod’s Maidens” stand,

To see, above the foam-wreaths, rise

His yellow head and waving hand.

The laddie came not; and the moon “Bring out, bring out the fairy flag!
’ With all the stars sailed out in sight; - I'll wave it from the topmost tower!
* Macleod’s Tables,” tops of snow, There’ll come no direr need than this—

1”

Were cloth of silver in her light. Macleod’s race has lost its flower


There came a twang o’ pearlie harp,
There came a lilting loud and sweet ;
And softly o’er the fairy bridge
There came the dance o’ slender feet,

There danced along the fairy bridge
A spot 1’ the golden light apace;
The laddie at the castle gate
Stood lifting up his bonnie face.

Macleod waved the fairy flag;
It looked a net of golden wire;
Its streaks of gold and spots of gold,
All linked and curled like tongues of fire.



All day the chief had held the field,
Nor quailed until the sun sank low;

His followers, bleeding, round him lay,
And he was hemmed in by the foe.

“Oh, life is sweet!” Macleod thought
“T love my bairn and lady dear:
Tl] wave again the fairy flag —
Oh, will it bring me succor here!”



“Oh, I ha’ wandered by the burn,
And J ha’ wandered by the glen; .

A little leddy all in green,”
He said, “has led me home again.”

Macleod furled the fairy flag:

“Ye'’ve served me once in blessed stead —
But sorely V’ll be pressed again .

Ere I will wave ye twice!” he said.

Macleod waved the fairy flag —
His foemen reeled back at the sight;
For in their cruel eyes there danced
Great spots and bars of golden light.

There came a twang o’ pearlie harp,
‘There came a lilting loud and sweet:

Macleod’s foemen turned and fled,
The hills all rang with flying feet.
Macleod furled the fairy flag: : The hand that waved the fairy flag,

“Ye’ve served me twice in blessed stead —~ The lips the fairy kissed, are still:
But I shall in the churchyard lie Macleod in the churchyard lies,
Ere I will wave ye thrice!” he said. And deaf to lilting sweet and shrill,

But still his kin in misty Skye
The fairy flag in keeping hold;

And sometime from the castle wall
May flash its spots and bars of gold.






“For if I thrice should wave the flag,
And thrice should get my heart’s desire ;

Next day might come a sorer need,

When it was ashes in the fire.”

Macleod kept his word : he fought But dire indeed shall be the need,

For life on many a bloody plain, And every other hope be slain,
He tossed in peril on the sea, Ere a Macleod of the Isle

Nor waved the fairy flag again. Shall wave the fairy flag again.


; O! all the world I have conquered,”
Glooskap, the Mighty One, ‘said.

Light laughed an Indian woman,

Shaking her dark-braided head,

“Speak not too swiftly, my master,
One still unconquered remains —
Wasis, the Baby, forever
Lord of the mightiest reigns.”

Watching the motes in the sunshine,
Baby sat still on the floor;

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Gazed through the open door.

He who had vanquished the storm-bird,
Binding its wings in the north — °
Ever the wild winds after -
Speeding more gently forth —

He who could fashion the squirrel
Little or great, at his will,

Lord of the bear and the beaver,
Master of good and ill,



A he























































































































































































































































































































Gazed at the wonderful Baby
Watching the dancing gold,

Wondered what magical weapon
Little brown fingers could hold.

Happy of heart in the sunshine,
Wasis, the wonderful Child,

Sucking the sweets of the maple,
Looked at the stranger and smiled.

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Wife had known never, nor child,










Sweet, then, as ‘mid summer forest
Singeth the wee winter wren,
Spoke unto Wasis, the Strong One,

Master of beasts and men.

Unto the Master’s eyes lifted
Wondering eyes of the child —
Moved in the sunshine no shadow,

Wasis sat silent and smiled.

Then, with a voice as of thunder,
Under a terrible frown —

Knew not the heart’s tender watchwords From the fir-trees of the forest

Wherewith caresses are wiled;

Softly he ‘smiled at the Baby,
Bidding him, gently, come nigh.
Wasis stirred not from the sunshine,
Watching the motes dance by.



Falling the brown cones down —

Glooskap, the mighty magician,
Spoke his command o’er and o’er.

Neither the sunshine nor shadow

Changed on the lodge’s bare floor.



But from the brown eyes of Wasis
Rolled the great tears to the floor,

Rose from the red lips, wide-parted,

Mighty-voiced, heart-piercing roar.

Glooskap, the slayer of beaver,

_ Wondering, e’er, more and more,

Wove all the spells of his magic
Wasis, the unsubdued, o’er ;

Singing the strange, wild music
Wherewith he conjured the dead,

Wherewith the dark-hearted spirits

Up from their caverns he led.



>



Smooth grew the cheeks of the Baby,
Dry the bright tears in his eyes ;

Merriest playfellow Glooskap
Seemed unto Wasis, the wise,

Who, as the magic grew wilder,

Still by each spell unbeguiled,
Sucking his sweet maple sugar,
' Looked at the great chief and smiled.

Glooskap, well weary with struggle,
Sat in the low lodge door;

Moved not the shadow of Wasis
Over the sunlit floor.

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Round the red lips of the Baby
Ripples of laughter o’erflowed ;

Gazed he, admiring, at Glooskap,
Goo-goo-ed, and lustily crowed!

Vain was the strength of the giant;
Never a spell could bind

Wasis, the unconquered Baby,
Stronger than sun or wind.

“Well spake the Indian woman.”
Thoughtfully, Glooskap spoke,

Kindling his pipe while the Baby
Smiled at the curling smoke ;

So, since the wor

a

——

vena ZA
EO PS

“Though of the world I am master,
One still unconquered remains,

Wasis, the Baby, forever

Master of Glooskap reigns.”

Still know the Indian women
Wasis, the wonderful Child,
And, when the Baby cries goo-goo,
Unto contentment beguiled,

Crowing, none knowing the reason,
Softly they say: “ Through his thought

Runneth the time when o’er Glooskap
Mightiest conquest he wrought,”

Nothing unconquered remains
Save only Wasis, the Baby —






mnie lw (Cty SUENIN me i

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T the foot of the Golden Dragon Hill, Oh, the merry old man to the mountain hied,
Long ages ago, in a snug little house Past young rice-fields in the morning sun,

With a roof of dark-brown, velvety thatch, Toward the dark fir-trees on the mountain side,

There lived an old woodman and his spouse. Standing forth in its silence, every one.
One morning, his bill-hook the old man took: From wild came.ias and white plum-trees,

“To the mountain, to cut me a fagot, I’ll hie, In his twinkling old eyes the spider-webs swung:
While you, O Koyo, the linen can wash’ And he merrily brushed by the green bamboos,

In the river which rushes and gurgles by.” With his bill-hook over his shoulder hung.







And a uguisu sang in a tall cherry-tree |
As the smiling old wife to the river-side went: ,
“Oh, red is the sun,” she cheerily sang,

As she patiently over her washing bent. 4



“Oh, red is the sun; and the rice-fields green — f
Now what is that in the river I see?

It’s the rosiest peach in the whole of Japan;
And it’s coming a-floating, a-floating to me

“‘ Now here is a feast for my darling old man,
Oh, the Great Shogun not a finer can get!
Some stewed lily-bulbs, and this beautiful peach,

When he comes from toil, before him I’ll set.”




Scon down from the mountain the old man came,
And fast on his back his fagot was bound,

“Oh, hasten you, husband,” his loving wife cried,
“ And taste this beautiful peach that I found!”



















But just as he took it the peach split in twain,
* And a fat little baby with raven-black hair
‘Was cradled right in the heart of the peach,

And lay a-twinkling and blinking there.

“Oh you brave little boy, you shall be our own son ,
And Momotaro shall have for a name,

Or Little Peachling, since out of a peach,
You dear little fellow, this morning you came.”

The rice-fields blossomed for twenty more years,
While the gurgling old river amongst them ran;

For twenty more years grew the slim bamboo,
And Little Peachling was grown to a man.




“Some millet-dumplings pray make for me,”
To his good foster-mother he said one day,

“And off to the ogres’ castle I’ll go,

And the whole of their treasure will bring away.

“As thick in the ogres’ treasure-vaults
The jewels are lying as sea-shore sands ;

With blue snow-gates on the mountain-top,
The ogres’ castle all proudly stands—




/ eas BS
ia re * With blue snow-gates that are stronger than steel ;
But I will enter, and will bring to you
The wealth from the ogres’ treasure-vaults,

Hung over with pearls, like flowers with dew.”
s I ’

“T have made you the dumplings,” his good mother



said,
“ But I fear lest the ogres should do you a harm.’
' But the Little Peachling danced gayly away,
With the millet-dumplings under his arm.




&

A dog leapt out of a cluster of pines:
“And what have you there, Little Peach-
ling, pray?”
“ The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,
And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”












And the ogres’ castle will help subdue.”
“Well, you can bark at the castle-gate ;
So here is a dumpling, friend dog, for you.”























An ape swung down from a roadside tree:
“ Kia, kia, what have you, I say?”

_“ The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,

And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”

“One of your dumplings pray give to me,
And the ogres’ castle I’ll help subdue.”
“Well, you can climb o’er the castle-wall ;
So here is a dumpling, friend ape, for you.”

“ Ken, ken,” cried a pheasant, “ and what have you
there, ;
Little Peachling, tucked in your girdle, I pray?”
“The best millet-dumplings in all Japan,
And I’m to the ogres’ castle away.”

“For one of your dumplings with you I'll go,
And the ogres’ castle will help subdue.”
“Well, you can fly o’er the castle-gate ;
So here is a dumpling, friend pheasant, for you.”

Oh, the castle stood high on the mountain-top,
And over its turrets a hurricane blew;

But up to its terrible blue snow-gates
Little Peachling marched with his retinue.

eee — rer i




Then the ogres swarmed out on the castle-towers,
The drums beat loud, and the trumpets brayed,

And magical arrows came rustling around —
But our brave little rénin was not afraid.

For his pheasant flew over the castle-wall,
And his ape, he undid the castle-gate ;

And brave Little Peachling, with the barking dog,
Marched into the ogres’ castle in state.

His little dog snapped at the ogres’ heels ;
His pheasant picked at their round green eyes;
And his ape tweaked away at the ogres’ locks,
As only an ape can do when he tries,

And the little rénin, sround him he laid,
With his muramasa, so thick and fast, ,
That the king of the ogres was prisoner made ;
And the ogres’ castle was taken at last.

Oh measures of pearls and wedges of gold !
Oh the jars of musk and the coral-bars !
Amber and emeralds, tortoise-shells,
And diamonds shining like strings of stars !

Gold-brocade coats, and wonderful gems
That regulated the green sea-tide !

It’s always the loveliest things in the world
Which the treasure-castles of ogres hide.

With the treasures, the dog, the pheasant and ape,
Little Peachling home to his parents ran ;

And the old wood-cutter and his loving wife
Were the happiest couple in all Japan.





















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ee N this new world, that was waiting when

eS The star in the east shone down
i And lighted the steps of the Magian men
| To the inn in Bethlehem town,




Many a hillside sloped to the sun,
Or dipped to a shining sea,

Fair for God’s presence as ever one
In Judah or Galilee.

Many a soul that was tarrying then,
Till centuries should go by,

To take its place in the line of men,
To the Lord was just as nigh

As John, or Mary, or Lazarus
Who walked with him by the way
For the blessed sign it should be to us
That he walks at our side to-day.




So, lovely with love that hath no compare, | |

The very names grew dear ; :
And Marys and Johns were everywhere,
And Bethels were builded here.



















Deep in the green New England hills,
In a dimple fair to see,

With orchards whose fruitage the summer fills,

Lies a little Bethany.

And looking Eastward between the farms,
As over the river you go,

Stately with elms as the old with palms,

You may see sweet Tericho.




























What wonder that Mary, the little maid,
Pondering Bible-lore,

Pictured, wherever her steps had strayed, .
Those marvelous things of yore ?—

That the darksome hollow beyond the bridge
Where the pollard willows stood,

And the steep, rough roadway up the ridge
In the gloom of the hemlock wood,

Should seem like the wayside where the thieves
’ Beset the traveller-man,

And left him, all wounded, upon the leaves,
For the good Samaritan ?

Or the scathed old peartree by the brook,
That the lightning in the night,

When the farmhouse with the thunder shook,

‘Left ghastly and dead and white,

















Should be to her fancy the fig-tree, bare,
Or yielding but bitter and worst,

That the Lord, when he found it fruitless there,

“With an awful withering cursed ?

That, scanning the houses far away
On the hillsides in the sun,

She questioned, many an innocent day,
Which was the very one

Where the brother and sisters sat at meat
With their friend, when the day was low,

And Mary lovingly washed the feet

‘That had journeyed in mercy so?



















She was Deacon Sternbold’s-little maid,
And her mother was kindly true ;

Her primer and hymns to her sire she said,
But her heart the mother knew.

Heiping the dame one Saturday morn
At the churn, all suddenly she

Cried, “ Mother, O I wish I’d been born
Real Mary of Bethany !

“Or I wish that Jesus would walk in here,
And would call me to him, and say,

With his eyes’ great glory upon me, ‘ Dear,

Come sit at my feet all day !’”





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“© And doesn’t he?” answered the mother sweet :
“Can you think it except he say?
To love Him well is tosit at his feet —

To serve Him, to bide alway.

“ Now bring me the tray ; and the spats, and
Cool in the ice-bowl there ; [prints

Then finish the seams of your gown of chintz
That to-morrow you may wear.

“ And if baby wakes from his long, nice nap,
|. Just sing him your little song

While mother’s busy; the work, mayhap,
Won’t need to hinder her long.”

Maid Mary went at the gentle word;
Some beautiful inward smile

Dawning up to her face as if she heard
More than was spoken, the while.








So while she fetched the spats and the prints,
And hastened away to sew

With ready fingers the gown of chintz,
She went as the’angels go.

For the child’s deep heart was beating still
With the joy of that saying sweet:

“To bide with Him is to do His will,
To love Him, to sit at His feet.”






For what could take her with ill surprise,
Or what could provoke a frown,

When she knew the glory of Jesus’ eyes
Was over her, looking down ?

So Saturday’s nightfall folded the hill
And the Day of the Sun broke bright ;
And the good folk gathered, sedate and still,
In the meetinghouse on the height.

With her tender secret in her face, -
Maid Mary sat in the pew;

The Lord who was here in his Holy Place
Had been at home with‘her, too.

| And sitting there by the cradle-side,

When a comrade lifted the latch

| And eagerly signed to the pasture wide,

And whispered, “blackberry patch !”

Softly she shook her delicate head,
But smiled as she did it, too;

| Till the other guessed she must know, instead,

Of some pleasanter thing to do.

‘And when the baby awoke at last,
Fretting with sleepy whim, [ past,

} Though the seam was done, and an hour was

Still she smiled: “I can wait, with Him!”

- | When the older brothers came whooping in —

Roger and roguish Dan —

+ Routing her quiet with rollicking din,

And teasing, as brothers can ;

And father, vexed for a mischief played,
Full hastily called and chid —

, Never a cloud on the face of the maid

The beautiful brightness hid.









And when the people stood up to pray,
As the custom used to be,

She whispered, “ Dear Christ, like yesterday
Make all the to-days for me!”

Ah, many a Mary, merry or staid,
On the hillsides there might be ;

But was not the deacon’s dear little maid
Real Mary of Bethany?








































































































































By Mrs. Louise T. Cralcin.

ROM Finland to Azov, Ochotsk to Obe,
There’s tumult and turmoil on land and on sea:
You’d think all creation was turned upside down —
King Oleg of Russia has lost his gold crown!

They say the King cut off the chancellor’s head ;
They, say the old chamberlain tumbled down dead ;
The guards in the palace, in five minutes’ space,
Were straight to Siberia sent in disgrace !

The fault was not theirs; but, if matters go ill,
"Tis certain that some one must foot up the bill;
If kings can’t be censured for mischief they’ve done!
There must be found shoulders to lay it upon !

Did robbers force open the great castle gate?

Did burglars break in and then stealthily wait,
And, spite of stout bars, iron bolts and steel locks, |
Bear off from the palace King Oleg’s strong box?

Ah, no! Tho’ ’tis treason to say it, I fear,

Nor burglar nor midnight marauder came near,
No robber gained entrance. If truth must be told,
King Oleg himself lost the Dg crown of gold!

A long while ago, on the night of his birth,

Was seen a great comet approaching the earth 5

And now, once again, the astrologers wise

Discover strange portents aloft in the skies. }
The horoscope old they ponder anew,

They find, past a question, the comet is due
About this same season; and with it, ’tis clear,
Misfortune and trouble must surely appear.





He napped and he nodded; but each time he woke,
Straight out of the window his head he could poke.
— It wasn’t so easy to balance that crown!

It seemed ev’ry instant it must topple down,

For each time he twisted his head in the search,

Tho’ too sleepy to know it, the crown gave a lurch.

Now crowns, to look stately, should always stand
square,

For if not, they give one a scandalous air,



King Oleg this comet resolved to espy ;
He held his big spy-glass up close to his eye,
And he sat in his great chair of state upright,
His crown on his head, through the livelong night.













The sensible Queen in her white-ruffled cap

Woke again and again from a warm cosey nap,
“Do take off that big crown, dear Oleg,” she said,
‘And, too, you would be better off in your bed !

“TI never could see why your crown you would wear,
When there’s nobody round but just me to care!”
‘Because you’re a woman ; it’s quite plain to me:
A king wears his crown for his own dignity !”

* * * * * * * * * *

The wind it was high and the night it was cold,

The King felt the frost through his ermine and gold ;

He rubbed his nose smartly, for fear it would freeze,

Then shivered and shook, and then gave a big
sneeze ! :


Ah, fatal that sneeze for the great Russian crown!

It trembled and tottered, and then tumbled down ;

It bumped, and it bounced from the wall to the
ditch,

And fell at the feet of an old wrinkled witch.

Loud sounded the trumpets; the news through the
land

Flew fast, and each courtier in grief wrung his hand.

It was “oh,” it was “ah,” and they tore at their hair.

While Oleg himself was half-crazed with despair.

They summoned the cunning, the star-gazing men,
In hopes by their wisdom to find it again —
Arabian, Persian, Chaldee and Chinese !

As well, for advice, have consulted the geese !

In throngs they came trooping, North, South, East
and West;

Some horoscopes drew, and some quietly guessed.

But each one was round-eyed, and grave as an owl,

And nodded as sagely as that learned fowl.

Quite strange to relate, they at last all agreed,

Then sent to King Oleg their verdict with speed.

To make it more mystic they put it in verse,

And muttered in Sanscrit, “It might have been
worse !

“ When from an old crone comes again your gold crown,
Though all of your courtiers should grimace and frown,

And though humble the goose-girl by whom it was won,

Leight there on the spot she shall marry your son,”



She picked up the glittering circlet of gold:

Her big woollen apron in many a fold

She wrapped round her treasure without
delay, :

And then, undiscovered, soft trotted away.

more

The King then commanded the heralds to stand

And blow from each corner the news thro’ the
land,
That the maids of Russia of every degree,

Might search if they would, all diligently. °




"was strange how thick goose-girls appeared on
each hand!

Old crones, too, for mistresses, came in demand!

Small service they got, when their poor backs were
turned —

To hunt for that crown every girl’s fingers burned.

Meet, n oa

dn ee







Now Drontha and Dwina were fairest by far,

Of all the goose-girls in the lands of the Czar;

They herded their geese on the common all day,

‘And snapped their long whips if the geese dared to
stray.

Of course they both wondered whom fate would decree
To find the gold crown, and a princess to be.

“ I wish some old crone would take me for her maid!”
Sighed Drontha. That instant a voice gruffly said,

.

“A maiden I’m seeking whose tidy and neat,
To milk and make butter, and cut up my peat,
‘To dust and to sweep, and to go to the mill,
And care for my geese when I’m busy or ill.”

Then Drontha said quickly, “Take me for your
maid,

Of hard work I am not in the least afraid.”

For Drontha the oracle kept in her mind,

“For perhaps it is Zwho the crown shall find!”








One morning the crone waked her maid from her
sleep:

“The peat you must cut, you can dust, too, and sweep:

To Novgorod fair I am going to-day,

And mind from the chimney you keep far away.”

The old crone had scarcely gone out of her sight,
When Drontha began to poke round, left and right.
At last she climbed up on the high bacon rack,
And found in the chimney a black sheenskin sack.
























Then quickly she seized it and quicker jumped down ;
She danced high for joy as she felt of the crown ;
With fingers that trembled, the knots she untied,
“Yes wed Prince Imar!” she eagerly cried.

Then safe in her apron the treasure she hid,
And under her jacket the golden crown slid.
She ran down the pathway that led to the.wood,
For close to the forest the King’s castle stood.

Right over the pathway a little gate hung,

And backward and forward it ceaselessly swung.

It creaked and it squeaked, and it mournfully sighed,
It moaned and it groaned, and it plaintively cried;

“Please shut me and latch me, I pray, pretty maid,
It hurts my back badly to swing so,” it said.

’ “The Prince I’m to marry, you’ll just have to swing,

I can’t stop to bother for such a small thing! ”

While crossing the meadow, she met the red cow:
“Pray stop, pretty maiden, and please milk me now!”
“T’m in a great hurry,” replied the rude maid,

“T can’t stop for trifles—the Prince I’m to wed.”

As Drontha came near to the foot of the hill,
She heard _.a low voice from the old water-mill :
“O pray, pretty maiden, just turn my big wheel!
I’m tired of standing here silent and still !”’.

“Indeed I won’t,” Drontha then rudely replied ;
“For a nap in the hopper, I’m going to hide ;
And that is the reason I stopped here to-day —
To marry Prince Imar I’m now on my way.”





































Then into the hopper she gave a gay leap,

She hid in the corn, and she fell fast asieep,

To dream that she sat like a queen on a
throne,

In velvet and jewels that sparkled and shone.
The crone returned home, and at once missed

the sack,
And soon started off on the naughty maid’s track.
She trotted along till she came to the gate,
That, creaking and moaning, swung early and

““O gate o’ mine, O gate o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine ?”

“A rude girl passed an hour ago,
Who left me swinging to and fro.”’

“That’s just my Drontha, the rude, rude maid,
*Twas she, I’m certain,” the old crone said.

“OQ cow o’ mine, O cow o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl 0’ mine?”

“A rude girl passed an hour ago,
Who wouldn’t milk me, that I know.”

‘““That’s just my Drontha, the rude, rude maid!
*Twas she, I’m certain,” the old crone said.
? ?

“QO mill o’ mine, O mill o’ mine,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?”

“A girl’s in the hopper fast asleep,
Way down in the corn she’s buried deep.”



“ That’s just my Drontha, rude, lazy maid !
*Tis she, I’m certain,” the old crone ‘said.

Then out of the hopper the old woman took her ;
With all of her might and her main she shook her,
Till Drontha the crown dropped in terror and fright,
And ran without stopping till quite out of sight.

bn or :
Tir, \



While round her the geese on one leg stood to rest;

The old woman put the gold crown in the sack,
These words to the goose-herd, the old crone ad:

And hid it again’ by the high bacon rack ;
Then off to the common she went with all speed,
Though sorry was she of a maid to have need.

dressed:

“ A maiden I’m seeking who is tidy and neat,
To milk and make butter, and cut up my peat,
To dust and to sweep, ard to go to the mill,

geese,
Her dinner beside her of black bread and cheese, And care for my geese when I’m busy or ill.”

There Dwina sat knitting and watching her

=








Young Dwina spoke gently : “Your maid I will be;
Your work J’ll endeavor to do faithfully.

I know how to milk, how to dust and to sweep,
And, if busy or ill, your geese I can keep.”




oD

i
, (
Y








































































































_The hut Dwina swept and made everything neat ;

She washed up the hearthstones and cut up the peat;

But the fire wouldn’t burn, and the smoke filled the
hut, : :

So her broom-stick she took to clear out the soot.

When lo! from the chimney there came tumbling
down

A black sheepskin sack with King Oleg’s gold crown!

Said Dwina, “This crown to the King ought to go!

My way I can find to the castle, I know!”

She came to the gate that still wearily hung:

“Please latch me. I’m tired, so long have I swung.”

“Yes, that I will gladly,” the young maiden said.

She latched the gate gently, and then onward
sped.



“To Novgorod fair I am going, my dear;
Cut plenty of peat, keep the fire burning clear ;
There’s plenty of sweeping and dusting to-day, fr
But see that you keep from the chimney away.” se























































































































































She met on the meadow the poor lowing cow:

“T wish, pretty maiden, you coudd milk me now !”

“ Indeed I will gladly,” the little maid said.

She filled the big bucket,’ and then onward
she sped..

“She came to the brook, where the old water-mill

Huskily said, “ Please, to start my big wheel.”

“Indeed I will gladly,” the little maid said.

She turned the big wheel, and then onward
she sped.

_ The old crone returned, and of course missed the sack.

She looked at the hearth, she examined the rack ;

The hut was so tidy, so wholesome and sweet,

She said, “One thing’s certain, young Dwina is
neat.
“(© gate o' mine, O gate o’ mine, She came to the castle, and stood there amazed,

Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” For joy bells were ringing, and bonfires blazed ;
Brass bands, too, were playing, and the people who
“Only a lady have I seen, chose,

1?

Who very kind to me has been Were going to court in their best Sunday clothes.

“Oh, that can never be my little maid, And when the old crone said, “What does ihis
She’s only a goose-girl,” the old crone said. mean?”

They shouted “ King Oleg his crown has again!
“O cow o’ mine, O cow o’ mine, Prince Imar, young Dwina, the goose-herd, will wed,
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” For that’s what the oracle plainly has said!”



“Only a lady have I seen,
Who very kind to me has been!”



“Oh, that can never be my little maid,
She’s only a goose-girl,” the old crone said.

”

“Ym glad,” said the crone, “and I am not sur

prised
Cam omiminen@ wilco: mice ( She was really a fairy quite closely disguised );
? ? . . .
Say, have you seen that girl o’ mine?” Prince Imar no worthier Princess could find,
ay, }

For Dwina’s obliging, neat, courteous and kind.”
“Only a lady have I seen, 4

Who very kind to me has been!” Her words were the truth, whether fairy or crone;
) For of all the Czars that have sat on the throne, ” ig
“ Oh, that can never be my little maid, Nor annals, nor legends, before then or since,

She's only a goose-girl,” the old crone said. ~ Can tell of a happier Princess and Prince.

~Sby