Citation
A Jolly trip, or, Where we went and what we saw last summer

Material Information

Title:
A Jolly trip, or, Where we went and what we saw last summer
Added title page title:
Where we went and what we saw last summer
Creator:
Allen, Emory Adams, b. 1853 ( Author, Primary )
E. R. Curtis & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Cincinnati Ohio
Publisher:
E.R. Curtis & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
266 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Sick children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mountains -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Waterfalls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Rivers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Lakes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Cincinnati (Ohio) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- United States ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1891 ( local )
Baldwin -- 1891
Genre:
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in green and some full page illustrations in red.
Statement of Responsibility:
profusely illustrated with beautiful engravings ; by E.A. Allen.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026584280 ( ALEPH )
ALG2120 ( NOTIS )
191092008 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




ldwin Library

i University
| AmB os
S Florida

















ee gee Peles a aie aa nine eto. -

Lee 3 . | PAE ART MUSEUM, CINCINNATL





ae A

@SOLLY TRIP:

Or, WHERE WE WENT AND

Wat We Saw Last SUMMER:



7S

Sena
ety
A ety AN
Ie



te

ZN
ye

PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED WITH BEAUTIFUL ENGRAVINGS.















BY THE EMINENT WRITER,
BoA Ade PEN.

Author of * Golden Gems of Life.? “ Bible Companion,” ** Scenes Abroad,” * History of Civilization.”
“ Labor and Capital,’ * Mother’s Darlings,” ‘* Brothers and Sisters,”? ete.









E. R. Curtis & Co.
CINCINNATI, OHIO:



1891.





COPYRIGHTED, 1891, BY
3. C., FERGUSON, E. A. ALLEN, AND W.H. FERGUSON,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.



PREPACE:

HE plan of this book is so simple that it is not neces-
sary to write a long preface. We believe our country

has as beautiful scenery as there is to be found in any
country. We want to have the reader form one of our
party and visit with us some of these charming resorts.

Although the Alleghanies are not to be classed

amongst the. great mountain systems of the world, yet



in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and even farther south, they
form a range of imposing peaks, and abound in scenes of great beauty.

We first take the reader through this section of the country.
The Falls of Niagara are without a parallel. There are other Falls

having a greater perpendicular descent, but lacking the volume of water
which thunders over Niagara. The Falls must not be overlooked by any
one wishing to see the sights of our country. We have devoted consider-
able space to lake resorts. The scenery is charming, the cities and te-
sorts visited are interesting also from historical considerations. Of course
many volumes could be written without describing all the interesting
scenes of this land. We have tried to present a choice selection of moun-
tain, river, and lake views.

The author is pleased to express his thanks to Mr. C. H. Rembold,
Business Manager of the Cincinnati 7zmes-Star, for many items of infor-
mation about Cincinnati; to Mr. C. B. Ryan, Division Passenger Agent,
for information regarding scenery along the famous Chesapeake & Ohio

Railway; to Mr. Howard Saxby, of Cincinnati, for assistance in arrang-
(iii)



TV PREFACE.

ing matter for the chapter “Along the James;” to Mr. A. A. Schantz, of
the Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company, for valuable aid in pre-
paring matter on Cleveland, Detroit, Put-in-Bay, Mackinac, etc., and the
special permission ‘to use numerous beautiful scenes along the route of
this famous line of steamers; to Messrs. Whalen and McCord, of Cincin-
nati, prominently connected with the C.H.& D.R.R., for valuable sug-

gestions as to the selection of material and illustrations for ‘“‘A Jolly Trip.” :



TABLE OF CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION ......

CHAPTER I.
Cincinnati es Sein a Tate) in a Cat eee a URE ce eee gh EER A Raa CU de aT

CHAPTER II.
dihesHeartvot the vAlleghaniesic ia i iig ais ae hee ison ene pee oe PS G7

Cuaprer III.
Pe Springs Bol Varela aks eee ora Mt ANE iE ie OOS SDR Un Ee Re un seeaateaae GENCE]

CuHapter IV.
Milonga ther’ ates iii Maes ose MeL in oe areata as eee rue LS ei Aca ea ene RO 2

CHAPTER V.
Me al sy ue ite ges aU oat Ey eee Me CSc ees! seein cn dias ott hee EL @)

CHAPTER VI.

Clevelandiand? Detroitys: (oor eck MG ie Si one Aue OE NG Ei) Aaya lei ias oo Ny AE 133
Cuartfer VII.

QnstowMackinaci yn wir ee Ue macs Pag a GEES ORLA Hn tA OO Gn ra pore anh OMT
CuHaprer VIII

Mackinag ecient ee HP ae ee us Ln eee Silty ecu an Mat Rn iMa a ant sun ea) WK)
CHAPTER IX.

Ar Rainys Day es dn pin sau Sa ineantrus SSB Sareea sa USl aise eget cag tease ety 2 tT
CHAPTER X.

Eindeot Vacations awit: cans N SU RS a ou ers ene urea esac cre meen) Reng 317,





FELON Sms CR Woce

, acecodks
SELCELCE CELT LEAL ER RR TTT QR. me PRORAREET CPPTE Rm eC rr eRe



SY
ES LNT



OE PSD DFR.

N

‘o

10.
II.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

19.

CO Rese ON Ste Od



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Fountain Square, Cincinnati,

Art Museum, Cincinnati,
Court-House, Cincinnati,

Music Hall, Cincinnati,
Government Building, Cincinnati,
Bottomless Pit,

Dead Sea,

Echo River,

Mammoth Dome,. .

Chamber of Commerce, Cincinnati,
Washington Hall, . .

Gothic Chapel,

Chesapeake and Ohio Scenery, .
Passenger Car,

Vestibule Train,

Up Among the Mountains,
Dining Car,

Along the Kanawha River,

In West Virginia, . .







PAGE.

. Frontispiece.

19
24
29
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
4I
44
45
47
49
50
52
53



oe
22,
23.
24.
25.
26.
27:
28.
29.
30.
31.
Bak
33.
34.
35-
36.
37.
38.
39:
40.
4l.
42.
43.
44.
45.
40.
47.
48.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Kanawha Falls, . .
Crossing the Alleghanies,

A Mountain Pass, . .
Entering a Tunnel,

A Coal Chute, .

The New River,

Shoo Fly Tunnel,

Mountain Scenery,

River Scenery, .

New River Cliffs, .

Parlor Car,

White Sulphur Springs,
Warm Springs Valley,
Falling Springs Cascade, .
Virginia Scenery, .

Lawn Drive and Cottages, .
Hot Springs, Virginia,
Warm Springs, Virginia,
Cascade, Healing Springs, .
A Quiet Valley,

A Mountain Stream,
Natural Bridge, . .

A Wayside Boulder,
Interior of Car,

General -View of Richmond, .
George Washington,
Washington’s Headquarters, .
General R. E. Lee, .

Lee Monument,

PAGE.
54
56
58
59
60

63
64
68
70
71
72
74
76
8
80
84
82
86
87
88
89
gI
92
93
95
96
97
98



49.
50.
3 51.

62.
53.
54.
55-
56.
57.
58.
59-
6C.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73:
74-
75.
76.
77°

LIST OF LLLUSTRATIONS.

Captain John Smith, .

Old Church Tower, Jamestown, .

Thomas Jefferson, .
Fortress Monroe,

In Fortress Monroe,

Within and About the Fort,
The Big Gun, .

Ericsson, .

An Eighty-ton Gun, .

La Fayette,

Old House, Yorktown, .
Lambert’s Point, Norfolk,. .
Old Virginia Times,
Watermelons are Ripe, .
Ship Under Sail, . .
Oysterman, .

Iron Ship,

Scenes at Old Point, .
Cottages, Old Point, .
Leaving Old Point,

Along the Jersey Shore,
View of the Falls, .

The American Falls, .

Cave of the Winds,

The Cantilever Bridge, .
Garfield Memorial Tomb, .
Cleveland Harbor, .
Interior Garfield Memorial Tomb,

Going to Put-in-Bay,. . - - + + ee ees

PAGE.

99

100
IOI
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
108
109
IIt
112
113
113
113
114
114
I15
116
118

121
122
125
132
135
139
141



78.
79:
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
$7.
88.
89.
go.
gl.
MO?)
93.
94.
95.
90.
97.
098.
99.
100.
IO.
102.
103.
104.
105.

106.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Put-in-Bay, .

Perry’s Cave, .

Dock at Put-in-Bay,

Views at Gibraltar, Put-in- Bay,
Cleveland Harbor at Night, .
Midnight on Lake Erie,
Feeding the Furnaces, .
Steamer City of Cleveland,
Scenes Along the Detroit River, .
Detroit Harbor, .

On Belle Island, .

At St. Clair Flats, .

St. Clair Flats,

ene.

Port Huron,

A Quiet Sail, .

Interior View of Steamer,.
The Oakland Hotel,

A Passing Boat, .

Map of Lake Huron,
Moonlight on the Lake,
Oscoda-au-Sable,

The Gang-Saws, .

In Camp, .

New Friends, .

Tourists, .

The Light-House, .

General View of Mackinac, .

Historic Mackinac,



10

107.
108.
109.
110.
Ilr.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122.
123.
124.
125.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The Grand Hotel, .

Map of Mackinac, .

At Fort Mackinac,

Fort Mackinac,

A Quiet Drive,

Robinson’s Folly,

Water View of the Folly,
Headquarters of the Fur Company,
Books and Strong-Box, . .
Arch Rock from the Beach, .
Observatory, Fort Holmes, .
Old Cottage, Mackinac,
Scott’s Cave,

Chimney Rock, .

Veranda, Grand Hotel, .
Fairy Arch,. .

Plummer’s Lookout, .
Sugar-Loaf Rock, .

Arch Rock, .

Capitol at Washington,
Small View, Arch Rock, .
White House, Washington, .
Pennsylvania Avenue,

On a Trip,

The Thousand Isles, .
Among the Islands,

A Summer Resort,

Down the St. Lawrence,

Steamer and Rapids, .

PAGE.

181
183
185
187
188
189
1gO
192
193
194
196
197
198
199
201
202
203
205
207
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
216
217

218



158.
159.
160.
161.
162.
163.
164.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The Lachine Rapids,
A Steamer, .

View of Quebec,

Death of Wolfe,

Cacouna Bay,. .
Tadousac,

Cape Eternity,

Cape Trinity, .

High Bridge,

In the South Land,
Seminole Indian Camp, . .
Sport in Florida,

A Florida Forest,

Picking Oranges,

A Street in Old Mackinac,
Boating,

Lover’s Leap, .

Scenes on the St. Mary River,

-Canal and Locks,

Below the Rapids, .

A Lake-Side Cottage,

The Fish the Other Fellow Caught,
Boy Fishing,

Morning, Noon, and Night, . .
Boating,

Lady Rowing,

Along the Beach,

Pulpit Rock,

Mount Clemens, .

236
239
241
243
245
246
246

247,

247
248
250

252



165.
166.
167.
168.
169.
170,
171.
172.
173.
174.
175.
176.
U778

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Farewell to Mackinac,
Tourists, .

Along Indian River, .

The Arlington, Petoskey,
Lake Steamers,

A Passing Boat, .
Machinery Hall, Chicago,
Electrical Building,
Agricultural Hall, Chicago, .
Horticultural Building, .
The Velvet Express, .

C. H. & D. Depot, Chicago,

Government Building, Chicago, .

PAGE,
254
256
257
258
259
259
260
261
262
263
264
264
266

nobly





INTRODUCTION.

HIS is how it all happened: Mr. Dupont had had a
talk with Dr. Brown about his only daughter, Alice.
Alice had been working altogether too hard in her
high-school work, and when the spring examinations
were over she was, in fact, about over too. But the
genial old Doctor had declared that all the girl

needed was complete change. “Take her on a good,



long trip, and have as much fun as you can,” was
his advice.
“But I can not very well go and leave my family behind,” expostu-

lated Mr. Dupont.
13



I4 INTRODUCTION.

“Take ’em all!” roared the Doctor. “You have more money now
than you need. Take her mother along to take care of her; take Alfred
for company, and go away and be gone all summer.”

Accordingly Mr. Dupont had gone home and, like a dutiful husband,
had talked with Mrs. Dupont, and the whole affair was arranged. Mrs.
Dupont’s sister, Florence Ashton, Aunt Flo, as the children called her,
whose home was with the Duponts, was to be one of the party. Alfred
gave a wild whoop of joy when he was informed of the proposed trip,
and started out to tell the boys. Alice took only a languid interest in
the proceedings. Miss Ashton, with her good spirits and tact, was sure
of having a good time.

Mrs. Dupont proceeded to get everything in order, while Mr. Dupont
arranged his business and looked up the route. This last, however, was
such a very difficult matter that he finally concluded to go down to
Cincinnati, stay there as long as the party cared to, and then go just
wherever they wanted to.

This is a very simple program, but it bids fair to be an enjoyable
one. So, as they are all ready to start in the morning, we will quietly
arrange to travel with them, and record most faithfully “Where We
Went and What We Saw,” and contribute our share to make this “A
Jolly Trip.”



A JOEY RIC.



CHAPTER: |

CINCINNATI.

City of gardens, verdant parks, sweet bowers ;
Blooming upon thy bosom, bright and fair,
Wet with the dews of spring and summer’s showers,
And fanned by every breath of wandering air;
Rustling the foliage of thy green groves, where
‘The bluebird’s matin wakes the smiling morn,
And sparkling humming-birds of plumage rare,
With tuneful pinions on the zephyrs borne,
Disport the flowers among, and glitter and adorn.
E. A. McLAUGHLIN.

5) F THE train had not been about fifteen minutes late, the
Duponts would certainly have been left. But as it was,



when the conductor shouted “All aboard,” a jolly party
with wraps and light valises were awaiting him. They
were fortunate enough to find good seats. Alfred at once
made friends with the fat passenger, who occupied two
seats on the opposite side of the car. A basket of fruit
formed part of the attraction. The drummer straightened
up his necktie and surveyed himself in the glass when Miss Florence
entered. The motherly old lady, “going to visit her son John,” beamed
pleasantly on them all. Mr. Dupont stepped around with that solemnly
frisky air that business men wear when they are trying to throw off business

worries, but have not quite succeeded.

(15)



16 CINCINNATI.

The trip was not supposed to commence until Cincinnati was reached.
It was shortly after four o’clock in the afternoon when the train rolled into
the Grand Central Depot. :

‘Here is where we get off,” volunteered Alfred, anxious to impress on
his Aunt Florence and Alice that he knew what he was about. The fat
passenger had disappeared in the crowd. The drummer was now all busi-
ness. His trunks had been ordered sent to his hotel, and he was in a hurry
to get to his work. In the depot bells were clanging, engines were blowing
off steam, baggagemen were hustling about with trucks loaded with baggage.
Here a nervous man was excitedly asking about his train, and there the
woman with five children was being helped aboard. A big iron railing at
the end of the depot kept the crowd from getting into the space where the
trains were standing. Butthe gates were open, and the crowds of passengers
just arrived were passing out.

‘This way to the hotel buses.” “ Have a carriage?” “Cab, sir?” “What
house do you wish to go to, sir?” were a few of the many cries that they
heard. But Mr. Dupont was an experienced traveller, and soon the whole
party was at the hotel, and Mr. Dupont was much interested in reading in
the Zzmes-Star all about the great Burkhardt fire.

That night at supper they found that they were hungry—that is, all
except Alice. She had a headache, and felt more like going to bed than any-
thing else; but Alfred probably made up the deficiency. We want the
reader to notice, even if the Duponts do not, two persons eating at the
adjoining table. The older one is Mr. Robert Blanchard, a young doctor.
He has studied altogether too hard, and is going to spend some weeks in
travel for health and pleasure. The young man with him, or perhaps we
had better call him a boy, for he is, just on the dividing line between the two
ages, is his nephew, Bert Arnold, going along for company and bent on see-
ing all there is to be seen, and having as much enjoyment out of his trip as
possible. He is even now sizing up the Duponts and calling his uncle’s
attention to them; and having looked once to please his nephew, Doctor
Blanchard is willing to look a second time to please himself. And we do
not blame him, for the Duponts make an interesting party, especially Miss
Granger and Alice. Well, good-by, Doctor, we will see you later on.

The next morning they were all wanting to see what there was to be seen.

ia



CINCINNATI. 17

“The parks and suburbs of Cincinnati are well worth a visit,” said Mr.
Dupont.

““T would like to see the Art Museum if you can make it convenient,”’
was Mrs. Dupont’s answer.

“Now, Alice, it is your turn,” said Mr. Dupont, turning to Alice.

“T guess I will say the Music Hall,” she replied.

“TI want to see the Zoological Garden,” said Alfred.

“You have nearly exhausted the subject,” said Miss Granger, “‘ but I saw
in the morning’s paper there was to be a concert in Burnet Woods this after-
noon; we ought to go out and see it.”

‘We shall evidently have no trouble in putting in the time,” replied
Mr. Dupont. “Well, get on your wraps. Come, Alfred, we will go and
make arrangements for a rig and we will start out.”

A few minutes later they were on their way to Eden Park to see it and
the Art Museum. They stopped at Fountain Square to see the Tyler
Davidson Fountain, which is one of the sights they had not mentioned.

“Dear me,” exclaimed Alice, pointing to the water in the fountain,
“What makes it so muddy?”

“Oh, the river is on a boom,” said Mr. Dupont, “and it is generally a
little ‘off color’ at such times.”

“Tt must be muddy all the time then, for the O-hi-o is always ‘hi’ in
the middle,” said Miss Florence, with a twinkle in her eye.

~The joke was lost on Alfred, who was busily engaged in watching the
numerous cable and electric cars swinging past the fountain.

Mr. Dupont, besides being a great reader, had an old-fashioned notion
that one of the great objects in travelling was to gather a fund of useful
information. Accordingly while the driver was speeding towards Eden Park,
he told them about the fountain.

This fountain is one of the most beautiful fountains in the world. It
is called the Tyler Davidson Fountain. It is a gift of Mr. Henry Probasco
intended to commemorate his brother-in-law, Mr. Tyler Davidson. The
fountain rises from the center of a circular basin, basin and all being in
the center of an esplanade bordered with trees. The figure at the top is
the Genius of Water, pouring down the welcome rain from the hundreds
of jets in her outstretched fingers. Immediately beneath her is the upper

2



18 CINCINNATI.

basin. The figures are all symbolical of the uses of water. One repre-
sents a husbandman in time of drouth. His dog is panting by his side,
his plow is unused, and he holds a withered shrub in his hand. Another
figure represents a freman appealing for rain. A child taking a bath and a
wearied invalid refreshing himself by a cooling draught are seen on other
sides. On the pedestal, which supports the upper basin, are symbolical
figures to represent the uses of water in steam, manufacturing, navigation,
and fisheries. The little drinking fountains at each corner of the large
basin are beautiful in design and execution.

The conclusion of the Duponts was that Eden Park was pretty nice
when they got there, but the drive thither was not a very pleasant one.

“Took at the blue hills of Kentucky in the distance,” exclaimed Mr.
Dupont.

“Where?” asked Alfred.

“There, away to the South. There is the land of blue-grass and fast
horses.” ‘

“And Daniel Boone and Indian stories,” added Miss Granger.

“Right here at our feet is La Belle Riviere of the French,” said
Alice; and, noticing the inquiring look on Alfred’s face, she told him that
was what the French called the Ohio River. —

“Tndeed, we are on historic ground, and we might as well stop in the
shade of these trees and look at it. Right along this river was waged the
real conflict for the possession of America between the French and the
English; and the Indians made a determined effort to keep this country
for their own use.” It was Mr. Dupont who was speaking for the general
- instruction of the party.

“Ves; I read lots of Indian stories about the Ohio Valley,” remarked
Alfred, with an air of wisdom.

“We don’t want to bother with Indians,” exclaimed Alice. “ Just look
at the reservoir; I wonder if the water from the fountain came out of
that reservoir.”

“T presume it does,” replied her father. “At any rate a large part of
the down town supply is from this reservoir. There is another one on
Third Street, near the pumping station. We must now go and examine
the Art Museum; you see the building on the hill yonder?”











CINCINNATI. 21

The party was very much delighted with all there was to be seen.

“The museum,” they were told, ‘““was rendered possible by the gener-
ous offer of Mr. Charles W. West to give $150,000, provided other citizens
should give as much more. It was located in the park, not only on account
of the beautiful surroundings, but so that the objects of art contained
within its walls should not be injured by the smoke and dirt of the city.”

In the sculpture gallery they found copies of celebrated pieces and casts
of ancient friezes, some of which adorned the Parthenon at Athens. Rare
and curious metal work, and specimens of oriental work.

In the picture gallery, Alice especially was much interested. The
little room devoted to Egyptian antiquities was one of the most interest-
ing of all. “

After looking until they were tired they returned to the hotel for
dinner. Now, while they are eating, we will quietly seat ourselves at
Doctor Blanchard’s table, where be and his nephew are also dining; they
are talking to each other. Listen closely.

“There is that party again, uncle. Their name is Dupont, all except
that young lady at the end—the good-natured one—her name is Granger.
They are travelling for health and pleasure like ourselves.”

The Doctor gazed at his hopeful nephew.

“How did you find out that?’ he queried.

“Why, I saw their names on the register, and heard him” (“‘him” was
a vague reference to Mr. Dupont) “talking to the clerk about what there

»

was to see.”

“Ves; but how did you find out the young lady’s name? What did
you say it was?”

“Oh, all the rest called her Aunt Flo or Sister Flo, and her name is
on the register as Miss Florence Granger. I wonder where they are going
next?”

“T am sure I don’t know, but I haven’t the slightest doubt you will
find out all about it before long,” was the quiet repiy.

Ah, Doctor, why not be honest and own up that you would like to
know yourself, and are in hopes your nephew’s incipient detective powers
will get the desired information someway !

An hour or so later Alfred rushed into the sitting room and shouted:



22 CINCINNATI.

“Hurry up; we want to go out to Burnet Woods this afternoon. Papa
says we have plenty of time, and we are going on the cable cars.”

The ladies had been resting; Alfred had been wandering around
generally, while his papa smoked a cigar. He was anxious to be going
somewhere. :

They took the Vine Street cable. Alfred was so much interested in
the cars that his father stopped at the power house on Mt. Auburn, and
explained to him how the cars were driven.

They were much pleased with Burnet Woods. There was a regular
forest cleared of underbrush; there were hills and ravines, an artificial
lake and winding drives. On the top of the hill was the music stand;
seats were ranged about for the spectators, and a great throng of vehicles
were driving about. People of all description were present. Boys were
racing up and down the side of the hill, and Alfred wished he could play
with them, but his father didn’t want him todoso. And then the music!
It was very nice. A gentleman standing near told Mr. Dupont that there
was a fund from which the musicians were paid to give concerts in the parks,
At Eden Park, too, he told them concerts were given. They had noticed
the music stand and seats in that park in the morning, but did not know
what they were for.

Now we come to the accident. Every trip, to be a good one, must have
some sort of an accident to make it lively, you know. This, however, was
not a very bad accident; only a sprained wrist. It happened this way.
During one of the intermissions Miss Granger wished that she had a good
drink of water.

“Come with me, then,” said Alfred. “There is a spring down below
the hill here, and I saw a lot going down for a drink.”

Nothing loath, Aunt Florence and Alfred started. Now it is easy
enough to go down a good steep hill, provided you don’t get started too
fast. But the hill was slippery, and now was Alfred’s time to take a run
down hill. And someway Miss Granger found herself going faster than she
cared to. A tree stood handily near. She thought she would stop herself
' by running against that. She succeeded, but in the general shake up
she gave her wrist a bad wrench. here was a little scream, a dismayed

















CINCINNATI. 25

exclamation from Alfred, and she was compelled to sit down and rub her wrist
with her uninjured hand.

“Please excuse me, but can I not be of some assistance here?”

It was Doctor Blanchard who was speaking. He and his nephew were
out to the woods also, and had witnessed the accident:

“Tt is only my wrist. I hope I haven’t broken it. But it does hurt
me considerable.”

“As I ama physician, allow me to examine it.”

“No, it is not broken,” said he after a moment, “but you had better
have it wrapped up and have some liniment put on it. Here, Bert, take
your traveller’s cup and bring up some water from the spring.”

And while Alfred and Bert were gone after the water, the Doctor, before
Miss Granger could interfere, had torn his handkerchief in two and was
making a bandage. When the boys returned, the whole party started
back towards the stand, where explanations were made to the surprised
Mr. and Mrs. Dupont and Alice. They recognized Mr. Blanchard as one
of the guests at the hotel.

The Duponts thought it best to start for the city at once to get some
liniment for Miss Granger, and so they left, thanking the Doctor for his
kindness and expecting to see him in the evening. The fact may as well
be mentioned right here that Miss Granger’s wrist was not the only thing
that was injured that afternoon. Something was the matter with the
Doctor’s heart as well.

The next morning found the party all in good spirit, even if Miss
Granger’s wrist was pretty lame. Doctor Blanchard had made a “ professional ”
call the evening before, and they had begun to feel a little acquainted.
Alice had played some for them on the piano in the ladies’ parlor. As
Alfred wanted to see the “Zoo,” they concluded to visit it that morning.
They thought at first of driving out, but being assured that the electric cars
would take them right to the gate, they concluded to go in them. Alfred
thought at first that it was another cable car they were on, but his father
showed him the difference.

“By the way, children,” suddenly exclaimed Mr. Dupont as they passed
the beautiful new court-house, “you have heard me talk about the Cincinnati .
riot. The old court-house standing in this same place was burnt, and



26 ; CINCINNATI.

immensely valuable papers and public records were lost beyond recall. Up.
Court Street here (pointing to the left) you could see for a long while, and
I presume you can yet make out the marks of bullets.”

“What was it all about?” asked Alice.

“It would be too long a story to repeat now. ‘They had a whole jail
full of murderers, and the people were much exasperated by the seeming
failure of justice in not convicting them of their crime; and what started
the riot was an effort to lynch the prisoners.”

Great was Alfred’s surprise when, with a good many jerks, the car came
to a rest on the platform of the inclined plane.



“Are we going to ride up that place?” exclaimed Alice in some alarm,
pointing to the very steep track running up the hill.

But before a reply could be made they had already started, and Alfred
noticed that two good stout wire cables were being used to pull them up.
The view was magnificent. When they were safely on top Mr. Dupont told
them about the terrible accident of a few years previous when the cable
was pulled out of the car and let it down from the very top; but then to quiet
Alice’s fears, he explained that such an accident could not happen now,

owing to new and improved machinery, and many safeguards that the old
plane did not have.



CINCINNATI. . 27

“The suburbs of Cincinnati,” said Mr. Dupont, ‘are upon the bluffs,
and there are four of these inclined planes in use, besides three cable rail-
ways which wind up from the bottoms. We are now on what is known as
Mt. Auburn. When in Eden Park yesterday, you saw Walnut Hills to the
north of us; to the west of the city is Price Hill.”

The ride to the Zoo was greatly enjoyed, and they were on surprised
and delighted with the garden itself. They found it to be a very nice park
with drives and walks. The collection of animals was large and interesting.
There were birds from ostriches to many colored little warblers. Some
seemed to be about all bill, and others seemed to be about all legs, while
others run mostly to tail. Parrots by the score were chattering in their
cages. The party was greatly pleased with the antics of Mr. and Mrs. Pat
Rooney, the chimpanzees. There were graceful giraffes, awkward camels,
sleek-coated tigers, uneasy bears, and good-natured elephants. And, by the
way, Alfred indulged in the luxury of a ride on an elephant’s back. The
antics of the twoesea lions in their big tank or reservoir greatly pleased
them. The name of the big one was Prince, and when the attendant came
to feed them, Prince would come when his name was called, and awkwardly
climb upon the little stone house in the center of the tank, get his fish,
and dive off in the water. There were buffaloes, yaks, llamas, alpaccas, and
many varieties of deer.

They had a delightful morning at the Zoo, and returned to the hotel
for an early dinner. There was some question as to what to do next.

“Tet me see,” mused Mr. Dupont, ‘“‘we won’t care to stay here more
than a day longer, any way. There is the Doctor, he has been here a day
longer than we have. I will ask him where we had better go next.”

Just then the Doctor came sauntering up to the group. They were
all in the parlor. .

-“T thought I would inquire after my patient,” he began, after asking
how they had enjoyed the Zoo. “Iam about ready to leave, and probably
won't see you much more.”

“Going, are you Doctor? Well, we won’t probably be here more than
a day longer ourselves. Which way are you going?”

“We will go East. But over what road, or just where, I have not de-
cided. When will you go?”



28 CINCINNATI.

‘“We have hardly thought yet where we want to go. Perhaps we will
go East too. Will make up our minds to-morrow. Where had we better
go the balance of our stay here?” |

“Suppose you take a drive past the Music Hall, out to Clifton, and if
you get time take a look at Spring Grove Cemetery. It is a beautiful place.”

So this was the program agreed upon. But for some unexplained rea-
son Doctor Blanchard was not in so much of a hurry about going away as
before dinner. He really conldn’t decide which way he wanted to go, so he -
thought he would postpone matters until the next day.

In the meanwhile the Duponts were enjoying their drive. Music Hall
they looked at as they passed by. Mr. Dupont told them about the big
organ. Alice wanted to knew why every city did not build a Music Hall too.

“Cincinnati,” replied Mr. Dupont, ‘‘owes its Music Hall to Mr. Reuben
R. Springer. He was a very wealthy man, and he endowed the College of
Music and built Music Hall. You know I told you about the Art Museum
being principally the gift of Mr. C. W. West. This city has had some
very rich and generous citizens.”

“T think I would have to be pretty rich before I would have enough
to give away to build public buildings,” said Alfred.

“JT don’t think there is much danger of any of our family doing any-
thing of that kind,” dryly remarked Mr. Dupont, “but for all that, it is a
very good disposition to make of money, provided you don’t wrong any
one else by so doing.”

In driving through Clifton, Alfred and Alice amused themselves by
picking out the particular house and grounds they were going to buy for
their own use. There was no disputing that Clifton was an extremely
lovely suburb. At the far end of the drive a particularly fine view was
obtained of Mill Creek Valley, and the little towns placed here and there
rbalysltge

“What a monstrous chimney,” exclaimed Alfred, pointing up the valley.

He referred, as he learned afterwards, to the chimney of the great soap
works at Ivorydale. The entire party were ignorant of the fact that
within a stone’s throw almost of their place were three of the largest
factories in the United States for three acticles of every day use. Soap,

starch, and candles.





POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE, CINCINNATI.



30 CINCINNATI,

Winding down into the valley, the party next visited Spring Grove.

“I think it very appropriate,” said Mrs. Dupont, “that a doctor should
admire a cemetery, and have us visit it.”

But on entering the grounds they had to admit they were beautifully
laid out. They counted no less than five beautiful fountains playing in
the lakes: Swans and various wild water fowl were swimming about
apparently oblivious of the presence of man. They had learned by ex-
perience that they had nothing to fear in the cemetery. The authorities
do not permit them to be disturbed. The drives were beautifully laid out.
The grounds were as neatly trimmed as a lawn, and then there was the
solemn peace and quietude that is always to be found in these last resting
places of the departed.

They saw the graves of soldiers who had commanded armies; of states-
men who had served the nation; of the great and of the lowly, prattling
innocence and senile age. In keeping with the subdued quiet of the place,
Miss Granger quoted Addison’s beautiful lines written in Westminster
Abbey: ;

“When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies;
when I read the epitaph of the beautiful, every inordinate desire forsakes
me; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart
melts with compassion; when I see the tombs of the parents themselves, J
reflect how vain it is to grieve for those we must quickly follow; when I
see kings lying beside those who deposed them, when I see rival wits
placed side by side, or the holy men who divided the world with their
contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the frivol-
ous competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.”

And so with softened feeling they bade good-by to Spring Grove.
Yes, we can bid good-by to the cemetery, good-by to the graves of our loved
ones; but their memory abides with us; their influence, like incense from
an unseen censer, is with us. Who is there that has lost friends—and all
of us have—that does not experience such thoughts as these?

That night after supper Doctor Blanchard and Bert joined the party,



aud when it was found that he was not going until the next day, the con-
versation drifted into a consideration of where they could go for the most
pleasant trip. It was tacitly agreed that they should travel a little ways in



CINCINNATI. an

company. Doctor Blanchard strongly advised that they take the Chesapeake
& Ohio road East. He said that the scenery could not be surpassed, and
that the train service was of the very best. ‘That point virtually decided
on, Mr. Dupont went to the reading room to write a letter and have a
smoke. Bert, Alfred, and Alice went to the museum, and Doctor Blanchard
and Miss Granger went walking. Feeling fatigued, Mrs. Dupont went to
her room. As they all seem to be enjoying themselves we will not bother
them. :

The next morning it looked so much like rain that only Alfred and
his father cared to venture out. They thought they would go down and
take a look at the river and the bridges, and possibly go over into Kentucky.
Though the Ohio was not by any means ata flood, it had a good stage of
water, as there had been heavy rains the week previous. There were a
number of steamboats; some had come from Pittsburg, some from Louisville,
and some from New Orleans. A great big tow of coal barges was passing, bound
down the river. They had come from the Kanawha River in West Virginia.
As Alfred had never seen a suspension bridge he was much interested in
the one joining Cincinnati and Covington. It did look strange to see it
hanging up in mid air. |

After satisfying their curiosity as to the steamboats, Alfred wanted to
cross over on the suspension bridge. It was a long walk, but the day was
cool and they did not mind it. A splendid view was to be had from the
center of the bridge. Up the river was the Louisville & Nashville R. R.
Bridge ; right below them was the Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Bridge. Mr.
Dupont told Alfred that further down the river still was the Cincinnati
Southern Railroad Bridge. Alfred also noticed the ferry-boats flying back
and forth. After strolling around on the Kentucky side until they were
tired, they took the electric cars for Cincinnati. Alfred’s description of
what they had seen made Miss Granger and Alice wish they had gone
along. :
By 1 o’clock the clouds which had been threatening rain all the morn-
ing settled down to business, and an old-fashioned soaking rain was in
progress. A rainy day on an excursion trip! It is a nuisance, ain’t it?
Now at home a rainy day is often a relief, since it gives us the opportunity
to bring up various odds and ends of work that have been accumulating on



32 CINCINNATI.

our hands. But when away on a pleasure trip, and stopping at hotels, it is
another matter. ‘That was the case with our travellers. The stormy after-
noon and evening bid fair to be an unusually long one. In this dilemma
it was Bert who saved the day. They were in the parlor when he made the
remark to his uncle that it was raining about as hard as it was that day they
visited Mammoth Cave.

“But we did not know anything about it,’ he continued, turning to
the others. ‘(We were in the cave all day.”

“Oh, were you at Mammoth Cave?” exclaimed Alice. “I wish it were
not so far away, I would like to see it.

“By the way, Bert,’ said Dr. Blanchard, “why don’t you get your
views and read to us what you wrote about your yisit there? He is keep-
ing a little itinerary of our trip,” he added by way of explanation.

This was not exactly what Bert wanted to do; but it was raining, and
something had to be done to make time pass away; so, after some urging
on the part of the others, Bert produced his journal and the views he had,
and read the following account of their visit to the cave:

MAMMOTH CAVE.

When uncle and I started on this summer’s trip, I put in a good strong
plea to spend at least a day at the cave. I had heard uncle talk about
it, and had read what travellers had to say, and I wanted to see it myself.
Cave City is the place where we stopped to visit the cave. This station
is on the line of the L. & N., or, as we call it in our part of the country,
“The Ellen N.” The entrance to the cave is eight miles from Cave City.
There is a stage road leading over, but it won’t do to say much about the
road. A gentleman making the trip with us said it reminded him of the
camp-meeting song of the colored folks.

“Oh de Jordan am a hard road to trabble.”

But after many a jolt we arrived at our journey’s end, where we found a
most excellent hotel. Of course, it is neither day nor night in the cave
itself, just simply dark, and it is awful dark, but we concluded not to visit
it until the next day.

As Uncle Robert seems to think we must understand all about a
thing before we can enjoy seeing it, he lectured to me on how the cave was



CINCINNATI. 33

formed, and all that. As this did really help me the next day, I will say a
little about it here.

Just imagine you were in a hilly country where there were a lot of
springs. Of course, the water from these springs would flow away in little
streams. Here and there these streams would unite, and finally perhaps
there would only be one pretty good sized creek flowing through the valley
some milesaway. In the course of a good many years these various streams
would wash out each for itself a valley, which would run into each other,
and finally there would be but one. Now we only need imagine that sort of
thing happening under ground; the water from the springs, instead of rising
to the surface, flowing away in little underground streams, which find some
little cracks and fissures in the rocks to follow, to see that in time there would
be formed a cave. We must not imagine a cave to be simply a big hollow
place under the ground. It is simply the channel of an underground
creek which has come winding down from the springs which fed it. It
winds back and forth, twists in and out just the way a river does on the
surface. Here it has washed out a great big roomy place, and there it had
the hardest rocks to flow in, and only a narrow channel is the result. Then
there are every now and then little streams coming in from the sides, just
as there would be on the surface, and these have formed side galleries.

Now the river, which by flowing underground made the Mammoth
Cave, divides into two principal branches about a mile from the entrance.
Following up the old bed of one of these branches, takes us to what is
known as the Short Route, the other is the Long Route. Of course these
rivers have long since abondoned their old channels; but, as every one knows,
on the Long Route we at places still come across a portion of the old creek,
and in some places we know it goes gliding on far below. The reason is
very simple. It empties into the Green River, which runs near by. But in
the course of time the Green River has cut its valley down to a lower level.
When it gets much below its former level, the waters of its underground
tributary will, all of a sudden, find some lower fissure through which they
can flow to join its waters, and the old channel will be left high and dry; and
so it is in the cave itself, some galleries are directly over one below.

Now I don’t know whether this makes it all plain or not, but at any
rate these are the facts; and if you ever go there, you will see that the cave







CINCINNATI.

2

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE



CINCINNATI. 35

is simply an old river valley washed out under ground, winding here and
there. I am afraid to say how many million years Uncle Robert said all
this took, but it must have been awful long.

The next morning Uncle Robert and I formed a part of a party of
eight who entered the cave in charge of an experienced guide, to take the
Long Route. Besides ourselves there
were four gentlemen and two ladies.
We first had put on the suits of clothes
which are kept on hand to visit the
cave. Wecertainly madea funny look-
ing group; the gentlemen had on short
woolen jackets, caps or soft hats, and
overalls. The dress of the ladies could
not be considered fashionable, some-
thing like the old Bloomer costume
Uncle George said, and there was no
end of good-natured bantering of each
other at the strange appearance we
presented.

It would take a whole book to tell
what we saw that day. The first room
we came to is called the Rotunda. It
is said to be directly under the dining
room of the Cave Hotel. Here you
are surprised to find the remains of
vats and pipes, and to learn that during
the war of 18:2 considerable saltpeter
was made here: Slaves worked here



under ground for a year at a time.

BOTTOMLESS PIT.

Oxen were kept here also, and you
can see the tracks of the carts. And there also you can still see the remains of
little cottages, where some poor consumptives, fifteen in number I believe, lived
for some months about fifty yearsago. "he idea was that since the temperature
in the cave is always the same they would be benefited by living in such an
atmosphere.



36 CINCINNATI.

The principal points of interest in the Long Walk are the Bottomless
Pit, Lake Lethe, and Echo River. Of course there are any number of
wonderful rooms. In some cases one is directly over another. One called
Martha’s Vineyard seemed to have its roof literally lined with innumerable
bunches of grapes. ‘The far end of the Route is called Cleveland’s Avenue,
and it is the crowning wonder of the cave. As I don’t know how to de-
scribe it, I will copy the following description for you:

“Cleveland’s Avenue extends in a direct line about two miles. It isa
perfect arch of fifty feet span, and of an average height of ten feet in the
center, just high enough to be viewed at ease in all its parts.. It is in-









































































































































































































































DEAD SEA.

crusted from end to end with the most beautiful formations in every variety
of form. ‘The base of the whole is sulphate of lime, in one part of dazzling
whiteness and perfectly smooth, and in other places crystallized so as to
glitter like diamonds in the light. Growing from this in endless diversj-
fied forms is a substance resembling selenite, translucent, and imperfectly
laminated. Some of the crystals bears a striking resemblance to celery,
and all are about the same length, while others, a foot or more in length,
have the color and appearance of vanilla cream candy; others are in the
form of a rose; others still roll out from the base in forms resembling the
ornaments on the capital of a Corinthian column. Some of the incrusta-



CINCINNATI. a".

tions are massive and splendid; others are as delicate as the lily, or as
fancy work of shell or wood. Here and there, through the whole extent,
you will find openings through the side, into which you may thrust the
person and often stand erect in little grottos, perfectly incrusted with a
delicate white substance, reflecting the light from a thousand glittering
points.”

The Bottomless Pit, which, for a long time marked the end of explora-
tion, is about one hundred and seventy feet deep; a wooden bridge, called
the Bridge of Sighs, leads over it. Lake Lethe is crossed in boats. The



























































































































































































































ECHO RIVER.

water is generally beautifulty clear. It seems that in olden times those who
drank of the waters of Lethe were supposed to forget all their cares and
troubles. But even if you do drink of the waters of this lake, you can not
forget your sore feet and weak knees.

Echo River is reached after crossing the lake. This river is the
descendant of the old river in whose worn-out channels we have been
wandering. It empties into Green River. A rise in Green River causes it
‘to rise also. Flatboats are used to ferry tourists. A gentleman in our

3



38 CINCINNATI.

party quoted some poetry, which I thought very appropriate. Uncle Robert
afterwards showed them to me in a book, and here is the first verse:



MAMMOTH DOME.

“ Sunbeams never, mystic river,
Nor the moonbeams o’er thee quiver ;
Not the faintest starlike gleam
Shines above thy sombre stteam ;
Night-enshrouded river echo,
Mournful dirge so sadly low:
Singing as we gladly go—
O’er thy waters silent flow,
Comes the echo—‘ Lo!’
See the shimmering shadows playing,
Born of torchlight’s fitful swaying,
Cast upon the cavern wall—
Cast o’er Echo River Hall,
Hear the echo call,
Answering echo ‘All!’ ”
I must say that when we reached Washington Hall, near the far end of
the route, that I was very glad to know that there was where we would eat

dinner. Just at that moment sandwiches and cold coffee had a greater









SE, CINCINNATI.



THE COURT HOU



40 CINCINNATI.

attraction for me than anything else. A young merchant from Louisville,
who was one of the crowd, thought it would be a great scheme for the hotel
man to fix up a regular restaurant there. Have electric lights, regular
chairs aud tables, a warm lunch, and couches on which to rest. All that
could be easily done since the room is circular nearly one hundred feet in
diameter; and though the roof is low, it is beautifully vaulted. I thought it
would be immense. Uncle Robert suggested that, if they do that, why not
string electric lights all through the long twisting channels.

But I believe I hit on a scheme better than that. You see when we
get to the end of the Long Route we are nine miles from the cave en-







WASHINGTON HALL.

trance, We have kept up all right coming, because there has been a suc-
cession of surprises, and we were all the time wondering what the next
wonder would be; but when you reach the end, there you are; it is nine
miles back, and the only way to get there is to go back over the same route ©
you have come. You have no idea how awfully tired a fellow feels when
he awakes to that fact. All of a sudden the romance of the cave is gone.
You are ready to call yourself a blooming idiot for coming so far. Well
now at Sandstone Dome, at the very end of the trip, the character of the
stone shows that it must be near the surface of the ground. Why don’t



CINCINNATI. 4I

they make careful surveys, determine where that is, and tunnel down from
the surface? Then we could be pulled up to the top and take the stage back
to the hotel. That is a scheme “as is a scheme.”

I must not forget to mention a romantic yarn that the guide told us of
the Gothic Chapel. That is a room not far from the entrance, near the
Rotunda. It was about a beautiful young lady who promised her dying
mother that she would never wed any man upon the face of the earth, and
if she broke her promise all her fortune would go to another heir. But as
time passed on the hero appeared, and she fell desperately in love, as every
properly behaved young lady should. But what should she do? Break her





































































GOTHIC CHAPEL.

promise to her mother and forfeit her property. Bless you, no. Woman
wit suggested a way out of the difficulty. The wedding party came to
Gothic Chapel, and there, not on the face of the earth, but in its dosom, they
were married, and I suppose lived happily ever afterwards.

We were just able to drag one foot after the other when we reached the
hotel. I did not take the Short Walk. hat is simply the left-hand fork
of the old river; it is only about half as long as the other route, but contains
some very fine rooms. ‘Take it all in all, I count my visit to the cave as
one of the pleasantest days of my life. And I think that every one that can
possibly do so ought to visit it, for it is certainly one of the marvels of this

country.



42 CINCINNATI.

‘“T think we ought to give Bert a vote of thanks,” said Miss Ashton as
he ceased reading. ‘I am sure we all got an excellent idea of his visit to
the cave. And he has given us all a pleasant afternoon in spite of the rain.”

Mr. Dupont and Dr. Blanchard finally decided to leave the following
morning over the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, and make White Sulphur
Springs their next stopping point. This would give them a daylight ride
through the picturesque regions of West Virginia. As the reader is the
mutual friend of both parties, we do not think we are violating any confidence
in glancing at the following entry in the diary of Dr. Blanchard:

“T presume I am making a fool of myself: I have been waiting for a
day or so, because Miss Granger is here. And to-morrow we will travel
together, virtually in the same party. She is a remarkable girl. But what
business have I to be taken up by her? I supposed myself to be invincible,
but I am afraid I am suffering with a case of heart failure. It may be only
brain failure, however.”

It will now be the fair thing to glance at the following in Miss Granger’s
handwriting: —

‘We leave to-morrow, and Doctor Blanchard, whom we have only known
for two days, is to be one of the party for a day or so, anyway. Well, I guess
it won’t make any difference with me. Helen likes him, but she is an old
married woman. I shall go on just as usual, and, of course, treat him with
respect, but that is all.”

We shall see.







Fas

i

Ue
Wes









































































































































































































































































































































THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 45

CHAPTER HS

THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Singing through the Forests,
Rattling over ridges,

Shooting under arches,
Rumbling over bridges,

Whizzing through the mountains,
Buzzing o’er the vale,

Bless me! this is pleasant,

Riding on the rail.
Joun G. SAXE.








morning. The Dupont’s had been called

ae eae NN 66 E. MUST be off,” exclaimed
a HRS Mr. Dupont. ‘Time and
a a XS N tide, and the model rail-
: ie ar a road, wait for no man.”
| i) Ne This was at the hour of seven the next







LW early. Their baggage had been packed,



their traveling wraps were adjusted, and











those who could eat had been to break-















fast; and now they must be going. Doc-



tor Blanchard and Bert had already strolled
on to the depot. There was a bond of
sympathy between these two. Doctor
Blanchard would talk to Bert as if he
were his own age. Like all thoughtful
men he was fond of moralizing, and it was no uncommon thing for him,
to go off into some long talk more to himself than to any one else, but



46 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Bert would gravely listen, and, in truth, he was now so used to it that he
rather enjoyed it. Even now the Doctor was moralizing to his nephew’
on the incidents taking place under their eye in the depot.

“That train,’ he was saying, “that just came in,is a local. It came
from only a few stations out on the road,and is loaded with commuters,
people who do business in the city but live in the suburbs. What a
crowd of them there is! Those young people are clerks, book-keepers,
type-writers, etc., just getting in to their day’s work. It does not take a
very sharp eye to conclude that a suburban train is not a bad place for
a mild flirtation, does it? Well, I ought not to object; I was young
once myself.

“The bells are ringing on the other side now. ‘That puffing, tired, and
dirty-looking engine on the far track is bringing in the Chicago Express.
See! the baggage-men with their trucks are waiting for the baggage, and
one of Uncle Sam’s wagons is waiting for the mail. It is quite a differ-
ent looking crowd that is getting off there. There is a young man who
is in a hurry. Perhaps he wants to catch a train East, or maybe he
wants to do a big amount of business to-day and get back to Chicago to-
night. He is what we call a ‘hustler.’

“That old man getting off? It is hard to make out what he is or what
he means to do. He don’t look quite like a business man. We will say
he is on a visit, because he is looking around as if expecting some one.
Yes, we are right. That young lady calls him father, and is kissing him,
and the little fellow at her side calls him grand-pa. Quite a flight of
years stand between grandfather and grandson. Yet who can tell which
one will be the first to cross the river? Do you notice that group near
the gate, dressed in deep mourning? Well, they are evidently waiting for
the party getting off of the sleeper, also dressed in mourning. There
has evidently been a more significant parting in their lives than any we
see around us. And so it goes—the depot is the epitome of the world;
youth, old age; arrival, departure; joy, sorrow. Oh, well, life itself is
but a journey.”

But at this stage his more practical nephew breaks the half-soliloquy.
“JT say, uncle, why don’t we get aboard and get some good seats? The
others will be down soon.”



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANITES. 47

“All right; come on,” responded his uncle, always ready to please him.
With a few directions from the attendant they were soon standing beside
the train.

“But why do they call it the F. F. V.?” queried Bert.

“Vou will notice that all roads have especial names for their fine
express trains. F.F. V.,in days gone by, meant the ‘First Families of
Virginia.’ The letters now stand for ‘Fast Flying Virginian,’ which is the
name of this train. You must notice what a nice train this is.”

‘“T see,” responded Bert; “all Pullmans; and that is what you call a

Vestibule, is it not?”
“Certainly; vestibuled from

one end to the other. The fact
is, there is not a finer train runs
out of any city than the one we
ride in to-day,” said his uncle.
‘Here they are,” exclaimed
a voice near them, and Alfred
came rushing wp: “Not, dary ant
his rear were the other members
of Mr. Dupont’s party.
“Studying the train, are you?”
said Mr. Dupont, drawing a long
breath. “I declare, I was afraid
we would be left. You don’t
know, Doctor, how much bother
women are in traveling. It is



Se almost impossible to get them
| ready.”

estiDU : “Don’t you believe him, Doc-
tor,” exclaimed Alice with a laugh.
“Papa would stay at the table as if he was afraid he couldn’t get any-
thing more to eat to-day.”

“Well, I wanted my money’s worth,” replied Mr. Dupont. “But let’s
get aboard, or else we will be left in earnest. Not in that car, Doctor;
that is the dining car, and I am not ready for dinner yet. Will you help

Florence, Doctor? Her wrist is lame yet.”



48 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Yes, the Doctor was ferfectly willing to help Florence.

Finally, amidst the ringing of bells, the train started. They went
over the big bridge that Alfred had noticed the day before, and were now
speeding east along the Kentucky shore of the Ohio. While they are
thus hurrying on, let us notice our surroundings a little carefully. There
are all sorts of railroad trains, from the lumbering freight to the flying
express. Now-a-days the leading railroads have one or more express trains
daily, running between terminal points, which they pride themselves on
fitting up as luxuriantly as possible. Such a train is the F.F.V., on
which we have taken passage. There is a richly upholstered Pullman day-
coach, with a smoking compartment at one end. ‘This is slightly differ-
ent from the usual second-class smoking-car, with its hard seats and gen-
erally disagreeable appearance, where you are expected to enjoy your cigar
with the aroma of the stogie, two-fors, or the black clay pipe. That
arrangement is all very nice if you are only used to it, but it has its dis-
advantages.

Following the day-coach is the dining-car, but we won’t venture to
describe that until we are hungry enough to enjoy a good square meal.
‘Then we have a sleeper and a drawing-room car. You see, in effect, this
train is a hotel in rapid motion. ‘There is a couch on which to rest and
sleep. When hungry, slip into the dining-car and take a meal. If you
want to smoke, there is the smoking saloon. If you want to read, there
is a well-stocked library in the drawing-room car, where you can find books
according to your taste—light fiction, romance, or standard literature.
You of course notice that in a vestibule train like this these separate
cars virtually form but one long car. A baby could go with perfect safety
from one car to another. In the old-fashioned trains it was not a very
easy thing to walk, if the train was in rapid motion, but thanks to the
vestibule arrangement. Again, there is much less of the swaying motion,
and so we can walk back and forth with comparative ease.

In the meantime Mr. Dupont, feeling that his weight of responsibility
ended with getting his party on board, had gone to the smoking saloon
and was talking with Col. Jones (remember we are in Kentucky), who is
much interested in the wonderful new town of Aluminia, situated up
among the mountains somewhere.



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES., 49

“Most extraordinary, sir. There is no doubt we will have a popula-
tion of at least ten thousand—sen thousand, sir, in less than three years,

























































































































































































































































































































































































































aoe

SESS
St =

Bee





aie i,

UP AMONG THE MOUNTAINS.



There is one railroad now, and two more are being built. The mineral
resources are marvelous, sir. Millions of tons of the very best iron in the
West in the hills. Coal! simply inexhaustible—cnerhaustible, sir. The
Aluminia Steel and Iron Works, with a capital of $1,500,000, are about to
put up a most extensive plant. A syndicate of New York and London



50 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

capitalists—Vew York and London, sir, are about to make large invest-
ments; zery large. The Company I represent is going to put a large
amount of capital in improving real estate. Prices will advance very fast,
sir. I could dispose of a few lots at a great bargain now, you see;’’—
but at this point, like the esteemed member of the Stanislaus Society,
“subsequent proceedings interest ws no more.” We will leave the genial
Colonel to excite Mr. Dupont’s interest in the new town to his heart’s
content.

Alfred and Bert are ‘

‘chumming” around, first on one side of the car
aud then on the other. The remaining four are seated vzs-a-vzs, and Mr.
Wy Blanchard is interspersing the conversation with

a sort of running comment on the towns they





are passing. He called their attention to Fort
Thomas, on the hills back of New-
port. ‘“Sheridan’s last official act
was in connection with that Fort,”
he said; and thus they rode past
the chain of towns on the Ohio side
of the river during the forenoon.

“There comes papa; I wonder
where he has been all forenoon,” ex-
claimed Alice.
a ee oN ; “Tam glad you are all enjoying
yourselves. I have been talking with
a gentleman. But hadn’t we better
go to dinner now?”
‘6 “Dinner!” exclaimed Miss Flor-
ence. ‘Why, it is most twelve, isn’t
it. How quickly the morning has
gone!”
“Tf we go and take dinner now, when we get through we will be just
entering the picturesque part of Virginia,” said Dr. Blanchard.

What would some of the old-fashioned travelers have thought of a
dining-car? No more of “twenty minutes for dinner,” with the accom-
panying dyspepsia. No; just walk into the finely upholstered dining-car.



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 51

What hotel can beat this arrangement? Comfortable seats, elegant sur-
roundings, daintily spread table, the linen of soft fabric and snowy in
whiteness, the ware of cut glass and china, as pleasing to the eye in design
as their contents are to the palate. Here you can eat at your leisure
while going fifty miles an hour.

“Come, folks, order what you want too,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

_ “Just like an hotel,” said Alice, taking the bill of fare from the waiter.
And, by the way, the waiters look as if they, too, had been freshly polished
and ironed, as well as their white jackets and aprons.

“Come, my dear,” said Mr. Dupont, speaking to his wife, “we are wait-
ing on you; what are you thinking of?”

Mrs. Dupont did not answer this question. We will tell you, but
don’t mention it to any one else.

“I see Doctor Blanchard and Florence are seated by themselves. I
wonder now Oh, well, probably nothing in it. It really wouldn't do,
you know.”



Just so!

“I say, Doc,” called out Mr. Dupont, helping himself to a fresh roll;
“this is an improvement on the old style, eh?”

“Do you mean the dinner or the car, or both?” inquired the Doctor.

“The whole arrangement. Here we are riding along and enjoying a
good dinner at the same time. I wonder what some of the old heathen
would have thought of it?”

“They were as utterly unable to conceive of it as we are to even
imagine the wonderful discoveries of the near future. Just think what
traveling will be when business men are able to leave Cincinnati in the
morning, run over to New York, do their business, and get home for
early tea.” :

“T think,” broke in Florence, “that all the poetry will be gone from
traveling then. But when do you think that era of traveling will be here?”

“Oh, twenty-five or thirty years from now. But perhaps there won’t
be any need for traveling then, at all,” and the Doctor thoughtfully sipped
his coffee.

“No need for traveling! Well, why not?” inquired Mr. Dupont.

“Why, when we get the telephone perfected, and Edison gets his new





THE KANAWHA.



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 53

invention completed, by which you can see clearly all that is going on at
a distance, and so one business man can see and talk with his friend in
New York, there will be no necessity for going there at all,” replied Doc-
tor Blanchard.

“Oh, I see. Well, when that time comes, Doctor, I will be through
with traveling, anyway. In the meantime I want as good a time as can
be had, so please pass the fruit this way.”

Just as they were through
with dinner Doctor Blanchard
called to the boys to look out,
as they were just crossing the
Big Sandy and entering West
Virginia. “All this bottom
land,” said he, “was once sur-



































































































































































veyed by no less a person than
Washington, a century and a
quarter ago. It was granted
by the State of Virginia to
Captain John Savage, and the
men composing his company,
for services during the French
and Indian War. It was known
as the Savage Grant.”

One hundred miles further
on, just as they were beginning
to get a little weary, they en-
tered the part of West Vir-
ginia where the real scenic
glories begin.

EN “This wouldn’t be a bad
IN WEST VIRGINIA. place to stop awhile, would it,
Doctor,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

“T think we could manage to enjoy ourselves pretty well, I am sure.

There seems to be a good hotel, and I believe there ought to be some

fish in that river.”
4.





54 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

d

CRAY worm
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































co

KANAWHA FALLS.

“What river is it?” inquired Florence.

The genial colonel, the same who was interested in booming the town
of Aluminia, but who, for all that, was a pleasant traveling companion, had
been introduced by Mr. Dupont to the entire party, and was the one who
answered the question.

“That is the Kanawha River, and those falls are the somewhat cele-
brated Kanawha Falls. You are right, sir, (speaking to Mr. Dupont) ;



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 55

you could enjoy yourself here very well for a few days. I presume you
think the scenery is pretty good, and the country begins to look rugged;
but we folks are used to it, and it does not seem particularly wonderful
to us. It might not interest you very much, but—well, all this section
along here is familiar ground to me. I put in some months soldiering
here once.”

“Why, tell us about it!” exclaimed Florence. “Indeed, we would like
to hear.” ‘

“Oh, well, it is not so very startling. Let me see; it was just twen-
ty-nine years ago this summer, during the late ‘unpleasantness,’ you know,
when the Confederate forces, under the command of Gen. Loring, forced
the Federal forces, under the command of Lightburn, out of this valley.
There was a good deal of fighting for some days all along this section.
There was a great artillery fight just above here at Gauley Bridge.”

“So you were really a soldier, and were in battle right along here.
You ought to feel proud of it!” said Alice.

‘“Yes, I suppose so,” assented the Colonel; “but I do assure you,
madam, that it was very warm and very dusty, and it did not seem a>
particularly glorious thing then.”

“But, now, really, Colonel, you must have had some adventures here.
Can’t you tell us one?” inquired Florence.

Now the gallant Colonel would cheerfully have jumped off the train
if a lady had requested him to in that way, so he rubbed his forehead
and told them the following.

THE COLONEL’S STORY.

“Tf you noticed, a few miles below here on the bluffs, to the right, you
perhaps saw a few broken-down trees and other evidence that a house
once stood there, with a little orchard about it. At the time in question
a very nice mansion, that is, for this mountain region, stood there. Mr.
Ingham, who was its owner, was respected far and wide. Every one ad-
mired his sturdy frankness and his genial hospitality. He was actually
pained if the passing traveler did not give him a chance to entertain him.

“He had two boys, both fine, manly fellows, just entering manhood as
the war broke out. Now no one could quite understand it, but, in the

























































































EN

Auestanies



























THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES,. 57

course of time, the boys both enlisted, but, unfortunately, on different sides.
Jack Ingham went on a visit to Old Virginia, and, carried away by the
excitement there, enlisted in the Confederate army, while his brother
Charley, staying at home, quite naturally entered the Federal army.

“In the campaign I have reference to, chance had brought it about
that they were to be pitted against each other—Charley being a member
of the Ninth West Virginia Infantry, and Jack a member of the Thirty-
second Virginia, attached to Gen. Loring’s command. So the brothers, one
in blue, the other in gray, were about to meet in conflict within a few
miles of their home. Gen. Loring was, of course, anxious to know the
disposition of the Federal troops, their strength, etc., and at Jack’s own
offer he was sent out scouting. He was thoroughly familiar with the
country, but that very fact probably made him somewhat bold. He actu-
ally went home, but the family had to secrete him, for the Federal forces
were not far away.

“That night the old negro servant was sent to the Federal lines with
an urgent request that Charley Ingham be allowed to come to the house,
as his father was sick. They probably enlarged on the sickness, although
the old man was far from well. The meeting of the two brothers was sure-
ly one of the strange incidents of the war; on opposite sides, yet brothers,
meeting at their home when battle was expected, perhaps on the morning.
However, no battle took place. In the early morning the brothers parted
for their respective commands. The Federals retreated only to return in
triumph a few weeks later. Jack was killed some months later; Charley
survived the war, and is now somewhere in the West.”

A few hours later, when the Colonel had taken his departure, Florence
suddenly inquired, “Which side did the Colonel say he was on in the
war?” No one could answer, and so it remained a mystery to the Duponts
whether the Colonel was one of the pursued, or a pursuer, on that mem-
otable occasion.

Now, how shall we describe the scenery of that wonderful part of
West Virginia we are now entering. A short distance above Kanawha
Falls we come to the junction of the Gauley and New Rivers, which junc-
tion, by the way, forms the Kanawha itself. The New River sweeps down
from the south, from its distant home in North Carolina. No ordinary



QO

5 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

journey has it had. It has wound this way and that, through the mazy
defiles of the Alleghany mountains. In places it has rolled its waters
through narrow cafion valleys whose beetling cliffs rise almost perpendicu-



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A MOUNTAIN PASS.

larly from its banks; here it has placidly rolled along thiough narrow
valleys of great beauty and fertility.

Everywhere the vision is greeted with variety and beauty. Rills meet
in rivulets, and rivulets swiftly swell into rivers, which leap their moun-
tain barriers and quietly subside into the placidity of the plains below.
Mountains rise like little Alps on Alps; glades, those meadows of the



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 59

mountain, freshen the summer atmosphere with delicious coolness; culti-
vated slopes move the imagination as by a wand of enchantment; deep,
winding, fertile valleys lie at the foot of beetling bluffs, full of the fat-
ness of fertility.

Travelers who have wandered in foreign lands and gazed in delight on
the mountain views of Scotland, and viewed with awe the snowy Alps, with
nestling glaciers in their heights, have freely admitted that they have seen











oe
: s —<

ENTERING A TUNNEL.



nothing in their trips abroad to compare with the scenery along the New
River. A story is told of an excited Frenchman, who paid the scenery
the highest compliment he could, when he exclaimed, as the ever-varying
views swept past him: “ Magnzfique!l Zere 1s nossing like 2s in France.”
We may wind around the steep side of a mountain spur, and emerge from
its shadow into a sunlit slope that falls abruptly away at the very edge
of the car, hundreds of feet, and reveals at the bottom of a long and
winding valley a singularly dark stream, whose chocolate-colored waters
contrast while harmonizing with the forest growth that reaches from the
volden sunlight of the mountain top down to the river’s brink. The



60 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

sturdiness of the forests—the hardy vigor of all vegetable life—the munifi-
cence of all visible nature impress the traveler accustomed to see bare
rocks and stinted vegetation amid mountain scenery. There is nothing
of poverty suggested, and no intimation of sterility. Few jutting crags
are seen, unless hewn out of the mountain side in cutting the wild path-
way of the railroad; and no rough rocks, piled heap upon heap, offend
the eye as it sweeps the gracefully rounded knobs.

Well has the historian Bancroft said: “This scenery has a character
of grandeur of its own; and in the wonderful varieties of forest and
lawn, of river and mountain, of nature in her savage wjldness, and
nature in her loveliest forms, presents a series of pictures which no well-
educated American should leave unvisited. We cross the Atlantic in quest
of attractive scenes; and lo! we have at home, alongside of the great iron
pathway, views that excel anything that can be seen among the mountains

of Scotland or in the passes of the Apennines.”

Mr. Dupont and the Colonel were taking an after-dinner smoke.
Even Hawk’s Nest, with all the wild beauty of its surroundings, could not
long divert the Colonel’s attention. Just consider the coal, the timber,

the ore going to waste! But even

he had to admit there was no very

good site for a town in that neigh-
borhood.

“Just look there!” exclaimed

| Alfred, pointing up to the towering























| rocks.
| “Yes,” responded the Doctor,
| “that is Hawk’s Nest. It should, how-
| ever, be called Marshall’s Pillar, in
| honor of Chief Justice Marshall. In
1812 he was sent by the Governor of
Virginia to make a survey of the
-scene. ‘Those cliffs rise nearly per-
| pendicularly from the water’s edge
some twelve hundred feet; and you
must notice the enormous boulders in





TOE

A COAL CHUTE.



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. OI

the river. What an untold number of years must have passed




since the river commenced to wear away this chan-
nel.”



“Tf you don’t head uncle
off,’ laughed Bert, “he will be
giving us a lecture on geology
next,”
“T think we would all like THE NEW RIVER.
to hear it,” remarked Mrs. Dupont. But the Doctor only smiled and
shook his head.
“Aunt Florence, can’t you recite some suitable poem? You have a
supply on hand for almost every occasion and place,” asked Alice.



62 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

“T am afraid my poem will not be more welcome than the Doctor’s

secture,” she replied; “but I do know one very appropriate for this place,

and if the boys won’t object, I will recite it.” :
Of course, no objections were heard and so Miss Granger recited the

following poem:
‘““Nature’s lover, pause to see

Where Kanawha wanders free;
Nature in her wildest mood,

’Mid her grandest solitude,

With her mountains thronged around,
Listening to the torrent’s sound;
Hill and valley, rock and floods,
Waving with eternal woods

Here the earth-cloud lowly creeping,
There along the summit sleeping;
Here the cliff uplifting high

Its bold forehead to the sky,
There, like a gigantic lover,
Bending with devotion over

The coy. river, swift and clear,—
A gay, bounding mountaineer,
Now it bounds away, away,
Sporting with its jewelled spray:
Now it seems to woo your feet,
But, ah! trust not the deceit;
Shrub and pebble though they seem,
Rock and forest guard the stream.
Even the Grecian lovers leap
Never tempted such a steep,
Where the hawkling far below
Nestles ’neath the beetling brow;
While along yon craggy bed
Lurks the vengeful copperhead,
And the avalanche of rock

Poises for an earthquake shock.
All is fresh, sublime, and wild,

As when first by nature piled,
Ere the white man wandered here,
Or the red man chased the deer,—
Naming ere he fled forever,

This his own Romantic River.”















































Ky a





64 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MOUNTAIN SCENERY

Somewhat to her surprise there was a genuine burst of applause when
she had concluded. Even the solemn-looking traveler a few seats in the
rear, whom they all took to be a minister, seemed to be much pleased with
the recital. He introduced himself to the Doctor as Mr. Morgan, and
made known the fact that he had been collecting materials for writing a
history of the country.

“You doubtless are aware,” he said, speaking to the party generally,
“that during the early colonial history of this country this narrow
valley was quite an important one ‘The Shawnees and other Indian



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 65

tribes made use of this valley to come from their home in Ohio and
attack the settlements in Virginia. I am now going to locate the sit-
uation of old Fort Donnelly, where a determined attack was made by
the Indians in 1778.”

The train had now passed Hinton, and they were in the valley of
the Greenbrier. Under the circumstances it is not surprising that Mr.
Morgan was induced to tell the following story of Indian warfare in
Greenbrier Valley. The boys gathered around closely, and as Colonel
Jones had taken his departure at Hinton, Mr. Dupont was present also.

“A century and a quarter ago,” he began, “settlements in Virginia
were very few. There were a few along the Ohio, and a few in this
Greenbrier Valley. Terrible scenes were witnesed here in 1763, when
the Shawnees, under the lead of Cornstalk, raided this part and utterly
destroyed two settlements. In 1778 a strong body of Indians crossed
the Ohio near Point Pleasant, and after besieging the fort at that place,
called Fort Randolph, for nearly a week, moved on up this valley to
try and surprise the settlements in Greenbrier. The commander at the
fort immediately started two of the soldiers over the country to warn
the settlements, but they were discovered and fired on by the Indians,
and so hurried back to the fort. Thereupon two more volunteered
their services. :

“A friendly squaw painted them and dressed them up in true In-
dian style. They had to travel nearly day and night. They reached
Fort Donnelly, about ten miles from the present location of Lewisburg,
just in time, for the Indians were only twenty miles away, preparing
for a general massacre, and the white settlers were totally ignorant of
their danger. Fortunately all succeeded in getting to the fort except
two, who were killed.

“The attack was made just at morning. A white servant opened the
gate of the stockade and went out to get some kindling, leaving the gate
open. He had gone but a little distance before he was shot down, and
the Indians rose from their hiding-places and made a rush for the gate.
They almost succeeded in getting in. Then began a terrible fight. here
were twenty white men against several hundred Indians. The fight waged
all day, but the Indians were compelled to retire. That was the last
serious attack of the Indians in this valley.”



66 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Greenbrier Valley is far different from the rugged sublimity of the
New River cafions, but it has a peculiar beauty of its own. Who has not
heard of the pellucid Greenbrier? Our trains follow the course of the
river and soon begin to climb the flanks of the main chain of the
Alleghanies.

“I think,” said Alice, suddenly looking up from a guide-book she was
studying, “this writer expresses the exact facts of the case, speaking of
this part of the ride: eo

““ Brightly, exultingly, all the way this singing torrent dances on sil-
ver sandals down the glens; now flowing near the windows in long,
placid reaches, broken only by the leap of the shining bass, then hiding
in bloomy thickets to peep from behind the lace veil of some far-off falls.
How grandly the train sweeps along the curves of the stream, the beating
of the engine’s mighty heart keeping time to the rhythm of the rippling
river. Onward and upward it fares; now far above the water, sure-footed
and tireless, seeming almost to swim the air like a gull rounding a head-
land; now tearing through green arcades of graceful birch and tangled
muscadine.’ ”’

“Bravo!” cried the Doctor; “the distant Alleghanies have reminded
me of a poem. I will not undertake to recite it, as Miss Granger did
hers, but with your permission I will read it.”

“By all means let’s have the poem, as the proper complement of my
prose extract,” said Alice.

So the Doctor produced a little book, and read as follows:

“Ye glorious Alleghanies! from this height
I see your peaks on every side arise;
Their summits beneath the giddy sight,
Like ocean billows heaved among the skies.
In wild magnificence upon them lies
The primal forest, kindling in the glow
Of this mild autumn sun with golden dyes,
While, in his slanting ray, their shadows grow
Broad o’er that paradise of vale and wood below.
How beautiful! though fresh from nature’s God

?

They show no footstep of an elder race ;



THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 67

No human hand has ever turned their sod,

Or heaved their massive granite from its place;
The green banks of their floods bear not a trace
Of pomp and power, which have come and gone
And left their crumbling ruins to deface

The virgin earth. Here Nature rules alone;
The beauty of the hill and valley is her own.”

The poet speaks truly. The Alleghanies can not be classed amongst
the formidable mountains of the world, yet that portion of them situated
in Pennsylvania and Virginia, and further south still, is by no means de-
void of scenic grandeur. The far-off peaks peer above the intervening
clouds. The densely wooded flanks afford a pleasing contrast to the quiet
valleys, through which gurgles and plashes some mountain stream on its
way to swell the current of some mighty river. In no place has nature
shown her capriciousness more than in this section of our country. Hills,
ravines, and mountain peaks; height rises on height until the main ridge
is reached. In the years to come, when the charms of American scenery
shall be acknowledged, tourists will not rush -to foreign lands until they
have visited this beautiful section.

Just as the long summer day was drawing to a close, while yet the
western sky was resplendent with the setting sun, the train drew up at
White Sulphur Springs, where they were going to stop for a few days.
A day on a railroad train sometimes takes you quite a long way, as far
as distance is concerned. It may do considerable in other ways as well.
A party traveling together all day, occupying the same car, enjoying the
same scenery, even if strangers in the morning, are acquainted at night,
while mere acquaintances grow intimate.

Now the Doctor and Miss Granger had not been thrown particularly
together during the day. True, they had eaten dinner together, but the
Doctor had been quite as much with Alice as with Florence. Yet, when
he helped her off the train—her lame wrist, you know!—we could not
have explained the peculiar look on their faces, unless we had noticed
that some way their hands had got tangled up in the operation, and there
was just a little pressure given and received. The fact is, Mrs. Dupont,
who was keeping a sisterly eye on Florence, was also noticing these little



68 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

incidents. She had very ambitious plans for Helen. As far as she knew,
Dr. Blanchard was an excellent man, but that must not be thought of.
Why, there was young Frank Gliddon, a rising attorney, with rich father,
besides being comfortably fixed in his own right. He was the one that
Florence must have.

That night Bert noticed his uncle seemed pre-occupied. The fact is,
a verse of poetry was running through Dr. Blanchard’s mind, something
like the following:

“A glance, a smile,—I see it yet!—

A moment ere the train was starting;
How strange to tell!—we scarcely met,
And yet I felt a pang at parting!”

































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































70 NEW RIVER CLIFFS.



THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 71

CHAPTER III.

THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

“There’s not a nook within this solemn pass
But were an apt confessional for one
Taught by his summer spent, his autumn -gone,
That life is but a tale of morning grass
Withered at eve. From scenes of art which chase
That thought away, turn, and with watchful eyes
Feed it ’mid nature’s old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear than glass,
Untouched, unbreathed upon. Thrice happy quest,
If from a golden perch of aspen spray
(October’s workmanship to rival May)
The pensive warbler of the ruddy breast
That moral sweeten by a heaven-taught lay,
Lulling the year, with all its cares, to rest.”
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH.

¢¢ SUPPOSE you call that water pretty
nice, don’t you, Doctor?” inquired Mr.
Dupont, with a quizzical look on his
face, as he slowly sipped a glass the next
morning.

“There are very few people who like
the taste of it, especially at first. But it
is justly famous as a health-giving spring.
Some stubborn diseases are left here,” replied.
the Doctor.

“Yes, I should judge they were lef:





724 ‘THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

right here in the spring. That is probably what makes the water taste

so queer,” responded Mr. Dupont.





The Doctor and Mr. Dupont were taking an early morning stroll, and
were now standing by the dome-crowned pavillion of the spring proper.
A lovely scene was presented to their view. They were still discussing



‘THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 73

the landscape when an elderly gentleman, who was also taking an early
walk, joined in the conversation. He was so well informed, and such a
pleasant conversationalist, that he made a very agreeable companion with
whom to discuss the history of the Springs.

“Years ago” said he, “these Springs were more celebrated than they
are now, though I must say this whole section will undoubtedly grow in
popularity from now on. In the days before the war this was the great
watering place of the South. A large portion of the beauty and fashion
of the Southern States congregated at these Springs during the season.
Statesmen and jewelled dames have thronged these rooms more than once.
Of course the war put an end, for the time being, to all that, but the
beauty of the surroundings and the health-giving waters will always make
this a justly celebrated watering place.”

“T am told,” remarked Mr. ee “that this whole section of coun-
try is celebrated for its springs.”

“Ves, indeed, sir. The general trend of the Alleghanies is from the
northeast to the southwest. ‘This vailey, or succession of valleys, lying on
the west flank of the main ridge, is the location of numerous springs, and
some time, sir, it will be estimated at its true worth. You see, up in Bath
County, not more than forty miles to the northeast, there are thermal
springs, known as the Warm, Healing, Hot, and Bath Alum Springs, while
to the southwest of us,in about the same line, there are the Red Sulphur,
the Salt Sulphur, and the Sweet Springs. Out of the line somewhat are
the Blue Sulphur Springs, about twenty-five miles away. Thus you see
we are just about in the center of the district.”

“T suppose these springs are all slightly different, though we would
naturally think they would be about the same,” said Mr. Dupont.

“Oh, they are decidedly different. The Red Sulphur Springs, in Mon-
roe County, are quite celebrated for their effects on those in the prelimi-
nary grasp of consumption. If a person is generally run down, the Sweet
‘Springs are the place. The springs in Bath County are valuable for other
purposes.”

“You seem to be well acquainted with all this section,” remarked Dr.
Blanchard.

“Indeed, I am. Of late years I come here more from force of habi



7A THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

than anything else. I assure you, sir, memory plays many a strange trick
on me. What a glamour it throws over the past! It repaints its pleas-
ures, blots out its sorrows. At times when I give way to reflection I have
somewhat the same feelings as when I wander in some old churchyard
aud seek to decipher the faint inscriptions on the stones. Ah! the days
of the past, sir. I can recall when I used to visit these places amidst the
élite of Virginia, Carolina,and Maryland. In those days the Sweet Springs,





WARM SPRINGS VALLEY, VIRGINIA.

the White Sulphur, and the Warm Springs of Bath County were the only
places of any note. The White and the Sweet were about on an equality.
And yet among the visitors of those days, how few are now remaining?
I recollect half a dozen, possibly there may be twenty survivors, and such
is life!” ,

“Here they are now,” broke in a merry voice, and Alfred and Bert,
with Alice and Miss Granger, came up. “Papa,I think you and Doctor
Blanchard ought to give an account of yourselves, for slipping off and



THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 75

leaving us to amuse ourselves as best we can,’ exclaimed Alice in a serio-
comic tone.

‘“T judge from your appearance that you have been having a pretty
good time,” said Doctor Blanchard, gazing admiringly on them all in gen-
eral, and, to be candid, on Miss Florence in particular.

~ “Oh, we have been taking a walk. You have no idea what beautiful
scenery there is here,” responded Miss Ashton.

“Who was the gentleman you were talking with as we came up?” in-
quired Alice.

But no one could answer her question, as he had quietly walked away.

Mr. Dupont went up to the hotel to get Mrs. Dupont, and the whole
party strolled on. And while they are enjoying themselves, let us survey
the scene. The valley, in the center of which are he famous springs, is
several miles in length,in a general direction from northeast to south-
west. The location is certainly beautiful. To the north and the east
the Alleghanies tower up in picturesque and winning beauty; to the west
are the Greenbrier hills. The noble spring, which is the center of attrac-
tion, flows about thirty gallons per minute, and the supply is constanily
the same. You notice the tasteful pavillion which is built over it is sup-
ported by twelve Ionic columns, and the dome is surmounted by a statue
of Hygeia, the patron saint of healing, holding in her right hand a cup,
as filled with water, and in her other a vegetable or herb.

Shortly after the mail came in from the West that day, Dr. Blanchard
drew Mr. Dupont to one side. “I have just received a letter,” said he,
“from a Mr. Graham, who is a very wealthy and influential person in my
home town. I was foolish enough to write him, before I left Cincinnati,
that I was coming over to this place. Well, he writes me that he wishes
me to visit the Springs in Bath County, and recommend one of them to
him, as he is advised to visit them for his health. His daughter is to
accompany him. I don’t care anything about going, but I don’t want to
offend him.”

“Well, why not run up there?” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

“Ear—well—I—you know we had about concluded to visit the Natu-
ral Bridge together, and this looks as if I would have to give up that
part of the trip or else disappoint Mr. Graham.”



76 THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

“Oh! I will tell you how to fix it,’ said Mr. Dupont. Supposing we
leave the women folks, and you and I and the boys go on a flying trip
to Bath County. That will give them a good rest. We will hustle
through with it and get back in a day or so. I will fix it with Mrs.
Dupont.”



ROE sate
FALLING SPRINGS, CASCADE, VIRGINIA.

“Tf you will do that it will be just the thing,” responded the Doctor,
“and another time I will be more careful about mixing business with
pleasure.”

So that was the plan agreed upon. But Mr. Dupont, with that
strange blindness of some very smart men who can not see things
happening under their noses, made a.blunder in “fixing it up.”



THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 77

“You see, my dear,” he said to his estimable wife, “one of the
Doctor’s most influential patrons wants him to make a little investigation
for him, and recommend a spring sure to cure the half dozen diseases,
more or less, that have got hold of him. But, to tell you candidly, Helen,
I think the old gentleman’s daughter has a good deal to do with it. She
is to accompany her father. It won’t take us but a day or two.”

“Well, all right, William; we had just as soon stay here for a day or
so. But—that young lady—her father rich, you say?”

“Yes; rich as a lord. She is an only child. Don’t wonder the Doctor
is anxious to accommodate them.”

“Quite natural,” said Mrs. Dupont, absently.

We all know how stories grow by repetition. This is about the way
Mrs. Dupont explained to Florence why Mr. Dupont, the boys, and the
Doctor were going on a side trip to Bath County.

“The father of the young lady that Doctor Blanchard is very attentive
to, and who is a very rich old man, wants him to make a little investigation
for him, and recommenda spring. They will only be gone a little while.”

“I dare say we will have a good time while they are gone,” said Miss
Granger, carelessly.

Probably no one but a sister would have noticed the slight change in
the tone of the voice.

Supper was over, They were admiring the sunset when Mr. Dupont
spoke out with ‘Well, I declare, if there ain’t the Professor, the historian,
you know.”

Sure enough, it was Prof. Morgan, whom they had met on the cars the
day before. They were glad to see him.

“Did you get the information you wanted?” asked Dr. Blanchard.

“Yes, I obtained what I wanted, and so came on up here. Did you
know you were right in the midst of a most interesting place? Before
the whites came here this was a favorite resort of the Indians. In fact,
this was a Shawnee burying ground. I wonder if their ghosts haunt the
place? That mountain to the south, called Kate’s Mountain, commemo-
rates an exploit of an Indian maiden.”

“Professor, can’t you draw on your store of information and give us
some Indian story of this locality,” inquired Mr. Dupont.



















































































































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VIRGINIA SCENERY.



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 79

This request was enthusiastically seconded by all, and so, after a few
modest disclaimers of any especial knowledge on the subject, the Professor
told the following story:

THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

It was many moons ago, long before the pale faces began to covet the
Indian’s hunting grounds, that War-Eagle was chief of the Shawnees.
Then the Shawnees were a mighty people. They held undisputed sway
in all this section of country. Even the mighty Iroquois of the North
respected them; and far to the South their war-parties marched to avenge
any insult. War-Eagle was but young, yet he was mighty in war and in
council. The young braves were anxious to join any expedition that he
led, and the enemies of the Shawnees dreaded his name. He was a cun-
ning hunter as well. There were always provisions and to spare in the
tepee of War-Eagle. When his bow-string twanged, the flying arrow sang
a requiem for the deer at which it was launched.

But the heart of the red-man, however phlegmatic may be his exterior,
is at times responsive to the same chords as his white brother. Running-
Bear, the chief of the Crow clan of the Shawnees, had an only daughter,
White-Fawn. She was as celebrated for her dusky beauty as her father
was for his prowess in war; and who had not heard of Running-Bear?
It was at a great council of the Shawnees, when War-Eagle was present,
that he saw White-Fawn. She moved among the other maidens like a
queen, and superintended the preparation of the green-corn feast, with
which the council was to terminate. War-Eagle saw, and War-Eagle was
conquered. ‘here was the maiden of whom he had dreamed. But, alas!
was it not known that she was to wed the young chief of the Black-
Deer clan? Did her father not so decree it?

And yet the Indian cupid delights to make a general muss, as
much as the cupid who plays such tricks on unsuspecting whites.
Straight as an arrow was War-Eagle. How proud and noble he looked!
When he spoke, what close attention the grave counselors gave him!
She felt sure she would rather mate with him than with Strong-Panther.
Now, those acquainted with Indian lore know that the father had but



80 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

little to say about his own children; for they were not members of the
same clan to which he belonged. So, as her mother and her aunts
sided with White-Fawn in her determination to wed War-Eagle, Running-
Bear had but to submit. Not so Strong-Panther. He felt all the pangs



LAWN DRIVE AND COTTAGES, WARM SPRINGS, VIRGINIA.

of jealousy. At length the demon of murder woke in his l.eart. What
was life without White-Fawn? Either he or War-Eagle must die.
War-Eagle was hunting in the forest; he had just brought a deer
down with his bow, when Strong-Panther was seen approaching him. It
was plain that a mortal conflict was at hand. By tacit consent their bows
were discarded, and with tomahawks the contest was to be decided. Who



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 81

can tell by what intuition it was that White-Fawn felt there was evil for
her and her beloved from Strong-Panther that day? Perhaps her
Totem bird had sounded a note of warning. At any rate, noiselessly but
swiftly had she followed Strong-Panther. And now the fierce conflict
wages. Strong is War-Eagle, but what is his strength compared with that
of his antagonist, wrought to frenzy by insane jealousy. A slight slip,
and cruel fate—War-Eagle was no more. But oh! Strong-Panther, is there
no one to warn you? What whoop is that ringing in his ears? He never
knew. White-Fawn herself had avenged the death of War-Eagle.

The council fires of the Shawnee village burned brightly that night,
but two of its wise ones were away. As is known, women sometimes ad-
dress the council. There was only a slight surprise, therefore, as White-
Fawn entered the circle and commenced to speak. In measured tones she
told what she had seen and done that day. When assembled in council,
the Indians never allow themselves to be surprised at any information
brought to them. So not by movement or gesture was there anything to
denote the startling nature of the story White-Fawn related.

The recital concluded, White-Fawn abruptly left the circle. No one
thought of watching her. Sorrow sometimes drives the stoical Indian to
seek the grim solace of death. But a few minutes elapsed before White-
Fawn was heard singing her death song on the brow of the neighboring
precipice. ;

But when they sought her body they found it not. They discovered,
however, a spring of marvelous healing power. The simple belief of the
Indians was that the Great Spirit, pitying the fate of one so young, had
suddenly changed her to a life-giving fountain. And they do say that at
mystic times and uncanny hours the veil of the past is lifted and the ter-
tified on-looker can see the shadowy outlines of the two chiefs fighting,
and at such times, too, the gurgling spring sounds strangely like the dis-
tant death-song of an Indian brave.

While the Professor was telling his story the full moon had rode up
in the eastern sky. The sharp peaks of the distant mountains were
clearly defined against the moonlit heavens. Only a few of the more ven-
turesome stars had thought it worth while to light their evening fires. In
short, it was just one of those beautiful nights which come like'a benedic-



82 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

tion into our worried lives. Even when away in pursuit of health or
pleasure such evenings are always welcome. ‘The Professor accompanied
Mr. Dupont to the reading-room and joined him in a social smoke.

The Doctor, quite oblivious to the alarming development of “ Mr. Gra-
ham’s daughter” in his case, was at a loss to understand Miss Granger’s
conduct. She was very polite, almost formally so, and as the Doctor ob-



HOT SPRINGS, VIRGINIA.

served, with a sudden twinge at his heart, she seemed to be fully as much
taken up with a young gentleman from Richmond as with himself. He
couldn’t accuse her of flirting, not at all. Prof. Morgan had introduced
the young gentleman. He was a fluent talker, and she and Alice seemed
to be enjoying his society fully as much as if there were no such a person
as Dr. Blanchard in their party. No,she was too tired to go out walking,
so somewhat abruptly Dr. Blanchard excused himself and went to his room.

The next morning was pleasant, and the “for gentlemen only” party,
as Alfred calls it, got off in fine shape.”.



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 83

“We shall expect a good report from you,” said Mrs. Dupont, just as
they were leaving. “I am not sure,” she added “but this is a deep-laid
scheme on your part to go off and have a good time all by yourself. If
you don’t come back in three days, we shall go on our trip.”

“All right. How would it do anyway for us to take different trips,
Doc? I am not sure but we would have better times that way.”

“Tam afraid we would have a pretty dull time,” said the Doctor
gallantly, but inwardly he was fuming because Miss Granger was not
present to see them off. And where was the young lady? ‘aking a walk
with the young gentleman from Richmond.

The Springs in Bath County, to which these gentlemen were bound,
were at that time only accessible by hacks and carriages from Millboro,
but a railroad will very soon be completed from Covington. It is doubt-
ful, however, whether the short cut by railroad will wholly suffice for the
longer one by carriage from Millboro. The road is excellent, the scenery
entrancing, and if the tourist is not fatigued, the drive is exhilarating.
Mr. Dupont was overflowing with good nature. “T tell you, Doc, this is
something like it!” he shouted from the top of the coach. “TI haven’t
had so much fun since I was out on the coast. All we need is to have
some bold highwayman hold us up to complete the scene.” But there was
no danger of highwaymen in that peaceful region, though Dr. Blanchard
suggested that the toll-gate keepers would fill the bill. Their route took
them right past the Bath Alum Springs, but they kept on to Hot Springs,
as they were going to make that resort their headquarters.

“Well, here we are,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont, as the coach rolled up to
the hotel. “Now then, Doc, what is the order of exercises?”

“I think about the first thing is to get something to eat.”

“Second the motion,” called out Bert.

“That suits us all. Traveling is not what it ought to be, unless you
keep within close distance of your base of supplies,” responded Mr. Du-
pont, leading the way to the dining-room.

After supper they had the good luck to meet with THE MAN WHO
BELIEVED IN THE TOWN. We have all seen him. He is to be found
wherever an incipient boom is in process of development. It is he who
meets the new arrival in the extremely crude building temporarily doing



84 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

duty for the elegant “Union Central Depot,” which looks so very nice on
paper. He pilots that arrival around through the underbrush or wheat-
fields and deciphers the legends on the guide posts explaining that this
is the corner of ‘Second Avenue and Third Street West,” where the
“Grand Opera House is to be built.” It was he who had surveyed the



HOT SPRINGS, VA.

new arrivals from a distance, and now sauntered up. Would, however,
that every one of his class had the solid foundation on which to rest his
statements that this one did. He was soon explaining to them all about it.

“This valley, gentlemen, is one of the marvels of this country—one
of its greatest marvels. Not only are the springs wonderfully efficacious
as health-giving springs, but consider the glorious surroundings. We are
right in the heart of the Alleghanies, 2,500 feet above the sea, and you
see the mountain peaks rising for 1,500 feet above us. The scenery is
gorgeous, richly colored, bold, and picturesque; while the climate is simply



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 85

perfect—cool, dry, and invigorating—a tonic in itself, sir. For three gener-
ations this valley has been visited by people from all parts of the United
States, and even from foreign lands. It is steadily rising in popularity
all the time.

“Of course you had a fine ride from Millboro to-day, but the railroad
connecting us with the main line at Covington is now almost completed.
The Southern Improvement Company, appreciating the wonderful attrac-
tions of this valley for the tourist for health and pleasure, have made most
extensive purchases, and mean to Spare no work or money to improve their
property. ‘They will make a veritable paradise out of this valley.”

“How many different springs are there in this section?” broke in Mr.
Dupont.

“There are three principal ones, sir. You are now at the Hot Springs,
you know. Three miles below us are the celebrated Healing Springs. Four
miles above us are the Warm Springs. These resorts are now all under
one general management. Beautiful drives connect them. Excellent hotels
are to be found at all.”

“Fach one has its own especial peculiarity, I suppose,” remarked Dz.
Blanchard.

“Yes, sir; one is better fitted for the curing of some special disease
than the others. But you really ought to consult one of the doctors here
in reference to that. I only want to say that I don’t believe there is any
disease going but what we can knock it at some one of the springs.”

“Old age and all, I suppose,” said Mr. Dupont.

“Yes; old age included, if you only take it in time. ‘The trouble is,
you generally wait too long,” responded the ever-ready talker, with a laugh.

After he had gone, Bert simply remarked that he was “some on the
talk.”

“I should say so,” said Mr. Dupont; “but, Doc, that is what we
came here to find out.”

“Yes, that is true. Well, let us smoke over the question.”

The next day they took a drive around, and Dr. Blanchard made ex-
haustive inquiries and quickly satisfied himself as to which resort would
be the best for a man like Mr. Graham. The letter of information and
advice written, they were ready to return to White Sulphur.



86 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

Now it 1s no use of disguising matters; the simple fact is, Dr. Blanchard
had discovered in his brief absence that he was in love with Miss Ashton.
He smiled grimly to himself when this fact dawned on him. But it was
a delicious sort of a feeling after all. True, he had only known her a
brief time, but this is the age of electricity, and a week now ought to



CASCADE, HEALING SPRINGS, VA.

count for about a year a generation ago. And how about the lady in
the case? Why, to be candid, the same sort of a confession must be made
as to her. But then there was that unfortunate Miss Graham. ‘That set-
tled the matter. She must think no more of Dr. Blanchard. But that did
not prevent her face lighting up with a glow when they returned sooner
than expected from their trip to Bath County, and that glow played sad
havoc with what little independence Dr. Blanchard still possessed.

The next day they resumed their journey east. Natural Bridge was
to be the next point. We all know the stories of wondrous develop-



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 87

ment of towns in the New South. The tide seems to be turning in the
direction of old Virginia now. The tourists passed through Covington,
Low Moor, and Clifton Forge, all situated in the center of a marvel-
ously rich mineral belt. It is in this’ section that new cities spring up
in the course of a few months. Vast manufacturing plants, representing
a capital of many hundred thousand dollars, are to be found, where but















A QUIET VALLEY.

a short time previously there was a wilderness. ‘The station for Natural
Bridge was soon reached, and the party took a coach for the bridge it-
self. The road wound up the mountain side for nearly three miles, and
finally conducted them to a genuine old-fashioned hotel.

While they were resting, the Doctor was seen talking to a young
man, whom they afterwards found was to be their guide.

“Well, come on; if the bridge is not too far, let’s go and see it,”
said Mr. Dupont.

“All right; come on. If not too tired we will walk a short distance,
where we can have a view of the bridge.”

They went but a little distance when the guide said something in



88 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

a low tone to the Doctor, who thereupon pushed aside the branches of
an arbor vite, led the party a few steps forward, and bade them look
down. —





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A MOUNTAIN STREAM.

A succession of shrieks and various exclamations followed thiy com-
mand. Both Alice and Florence hastily returned to the roadway. The
fact was, they were on the bridge,but did not know it! The public
road crosses the bridge, but the chasm is so hidden by the natural para-
pet of rocks and trees that it can not be seen. The passing traveler
would not know he was journeying over one of the greatest curiosities
in the world.





NATURAL BRIDGE. 89



go THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

They then retraced their steps and wound down the ravine. Here a
most beautiful and inspiring view of the bridge is to be had. Look up!

“With admiring eye,
Behold that half ellipse, so light, so high,
Like the clear arch of pure ethereal span
That as his cov’nant God vouchsafed to man.”

“How very sublime!” almost whispered Florence.

Before them was the yawning gorge, rugged and wild, clothed as it
were in sombre shadows, through which the light glanced from the cas-
cades of Cedar Creek. Above, with its outline of tree and rock cutting
sharp against the blue sky, rose the eternal arch. There are few objects
in nature which so entirely fill the soul as this bridge in its unique and
simple grandeur. In consideration of the perfection of its adaptation to
circumstances, the simplicity of its design, the sublimity of its proportions,
the spectator experiences a fullness of satisfaction which familiarity only.
serves to increase; and while that sentiment of awe, inseparable from the
first impression, may be weakened or disappear altogether, wonder and ad-
miration grow with time.

As the objects around became familiar, conversation again became gene-
ral. Alfred wanted to know where it was that Washington wrote his name.
The guide showed them the reputed place, on the right-hand side, but the
longer they looked the more sceptical they became, and finally concluded
that story would have to go, to keep company with the little hatchet and
the cherry tree. Florence observed that for her part she didn’t think a
man like Washington would be apt to attempt such a silly feat. It seems
to detract from the dignity of character of one who wrote his name so
high upon “The steep where Fame’s proud temple shines afar.”

Although they had had a pleasant time at the bridge, yet the Doctor
felt anything but happy. He could not disguise from himself that some-
thing was going wrong. He couldn’t account for Miss Ashton’s manner.
He had given her no cause for offense, as far as he knew. But some-
thing was wrong. The Doctor was a man of action. Great was the
surprise of Mr. Dupont when he announced that evening that he was
going to Washington direct.



THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. QI

‘““A sudden change of program, is it not, Doctor?” asked Mr. Du-
pont. “Why, we all look on you as an old friend now.”

The Doctor looked at Miss Ashton, but she was looking out of the
window and he could not see her face.

“Oh, I don’t know. I have some friends in Washington I want to
see. I may join you again later, if you can give me any dates.”

So Mr. Dupout agreed to write to him, and then for the present the
Doctor and Bert parted company with the Duponts. After thinking mat-
ters over, the latter concluded that they would go to Richmond and Old
Point Comfort. This would give them a chance to see not only a city
famous in the annals of our country, but one of the pushing, growing cities
of the New South: one that is arousing herself to the great possibilities
in store for her.







92 ALONG THE JAMES.

CHAPTER IV.

- ALONG THE JAMES.

UR party had made a flying run to

Richmond, and were now ready to

see some of the sights of that fa-
mous city, and renew the historical associa-
tions always clustering around the James.
“While we don’t want to hurry,” said Mr.
Dupont, “yet it is pretty warm now, and we
must get this part of our trip through with,
and away to cooler places.”



watt ed

This was satisfactory to all, and they were soon taking a ride around
the city. To get a good view of the city they visited the Capitol Square.
This they found to be a lovely little park in the very heart of the city.

“This court-house,” explained Mr. Dupont, “was the capitol of the
Confederate States, and their Congress met here. In the rotunda you will
find probably the best statue of Gen. per not to speak of the
fine equestrian statue you see before us.’

“But just look at the squirrels!” exclaimed Algrea

And no wonder the boy was astonished, for these beautiful little ani-
mals were playing around with the utmost confidence, and one lady was
feeding them peanuts.

From the platform on the roof of the Capitol a magnificent view was
obtained of the city. ‘Like old Rome, Richmond is built on seven hills,”
said Florence.



AS

ENS
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THE WASHINGTON EQUESTRIAN STATUE, RICHMOND, VA.







95

ALONG THE JAMES.

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possession o

in our country’s history—the Colonial period and the days of Washington,



Full Text

ldwin Library

i University
| AmB os
S Florida








ee gee Peles a aie aa nine eto. -

Lee 3 . | PAE ART MUSEUM, CINCINNATL


ae A

@SOLLY TRIP:

Or, WHERE WE WENT AND

Wat We Saw Last SUMMER:



7S

Sena
ety
A ety AN
Ie



te

ZN
ye

PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED WITH BEAUTIFUL ENGRAVINGS.















BY THE EMINENT WRITER,
BoA Ade PEN.

Author of * Golden Gems of Life.? “ Bible Companion,” ** Scenes Abroad,” * History of Civilization.”
“ Labor and Capital,’ * Mother’s Darlings,” ‘* Brothers and Sisters,”? ete.









E. R. Curtis & Co.
CINCINNATI, OHIO:



1891.


COPYRIGHTED, 1891, BY
3. C., FERGUSON, E. A. ALLEN, AND W.H. FERGUSON,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
PREPACE:

HE plan of this book is so simple that it is not neces-
sary to write a long preface. We believe our country

has as beautiful scenery as there is to be found in any
country. We want to have the reader form one of our
party and visit with us some of these charming resorts.

Although the Alleghanies are not to be classed

amongst the. great mountain systems of the world, yet



in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and even farther south, they
form a range of imposing peaks, and abound in scenes of great beauty.

We first take the reader through this section of the country.
The Falls of Niagara are without a parallel. There are other Falls

having a greater perpendicular descent, but lacking the volume of water
which thunders over Niagara. The Falls must not be overlooked by any
one wishing to see the sights of our country. We have devoted consider-
able space to lake resorts. The scenery is charming, the cities and te-
sorts visited are interesting also from historical considerations. Of course
many volumes could be written without describing all the interesting
scenes of this land. We have tried to present a choice selection of moun-
tain, river, and lake views.

The author is pleased to express his thanks to Mr. C. H. Rembold,
Business Manager of the Cincinnati 7zmes-Star, for many items of infor-
mation about Cincinnati; to Mr. C. B. Ryan, Division Passenger Agent,
for information regarding scenery along the famous Chesapeake & Ohio

Railway; to Mr. Howard Saxby, of Cincinnati, for assistance in arrang-
(iii)
TV PREFACE.

ing matter for the chapter “Along the James;” to Mr. A. A. Schantz, of
the Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company, for valuable aid in pre-
paring matter on Cleveland, Detroit, Put-in-Bay, Mackinac, etc., and the
special permission ‘to use numerous beautiful scenes along the route of
this famous line of steamers; to Messrs. Whalen and McCord, of Cincin-
nati, prominently connected with the C.H.& D.R.R., for valuable sug-

gestions as to the selection of material and illustrations for ‘“‘A Jolly Trip.” :
TABLE OF CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION ......

CHAPTER I.
Cincinnati es Sein a Tate) in a Cat eee a URE ce eee gh EER A Raa CU de aT

CHAPTER II.
dihesHeartvot the vAlleghaniesic ia i iig ais ae hee ison ene pee oe PS G7

Cuaprer III.
Pe Springs Bol Varela aks eee ora Mt ANE iE ie OOS SDR Un Ee Re un seeaateaae GENCE]

CuHapter IV.
Milonga ther’ ates iii Maes ose MeL in oe areata as eee rue LS ei Aca ea ene RO 2

CHAPTER V.
Me al sy ue ite ges aU oat Ey eee Me CSc ees! seein cn dias ott hee EL @)

CHAPTER VI.

Clevelandiand? Detroitys: (oor eck MG ie Si one Aue OE NG Ei) Aaya lei ias oo Ny AE 133
Cuartfer VII.

QnstowMackinaci yn wir ee Ue macs Pag a GEES ORLA Hn tA OO Gn ra pore anh OMT
CuHaprer VIII

Mackinag ecient ee HP ae ee us Ln eee Silty ecu an Mat Rn iMa a ant sun ea) WK)
CHAPTER IX.

Ar Rainys Day es dn pin sau Sa ineantrus SSB Sareea sa USl aise eget cag tease ety 2 tT
CHAPTER X.

Eindeot Vacations awit: cans N SU RS a ou ers ene urea esac cre meen) Reng 317,


FELON Sms CR Woce

, acecodks
SELCELCE CELT LEAL ER RR TTT QR. me PRORAREET CPPTE Rm eC rr eRe



SY
ES LNT



OE PSD DFR.

N

‘o

10.
II.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

19.

CO Rese ON Ste Od



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Fountain Square, Cincinnati,

Art Museum, Cincinnati,
Court-House, Cincinnati,

Music Hall, Cincinnati,
Government Building, Cincinnati,
Bottomless Pit,

Dead Sea,

Echo River,

Mammoth Dome,. .

Chamber of Commerce, Cincinnati,
Washington Hall, . .

Gothic Chapel,

Chesapeake and Ohio Scenery, .
Passenger Car,

Vestibule Train,

Up Among the Mountains,
Dining Car,

Along the Kanawha River,

In West Virginia, . .







PAGE.

. Frontispiece.

19
24
29
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
4I
44
45
47
49
50
52
53
oe
22,
23.
24.
25.
26.
27:
28.
29.
30.
31.
Bak
33.
34.
35-
36.
37.
38.
39:
40.
4l.
42.
43.
44.
45.
40.
47.
48.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Kanawha Falls, . .
Crossing the Alleghanies,

A Mountain Pass, . .
Entering a Tunnel,

A Coal Chute, .

The New River,

Shoo Fly Tunnel,

Mountain Scenery,

River Scenery, .

New River Cliffs, .

Parlor Car,

White Sulphur Springs,
Warm Springs Valley,
Falling Springs Cascade, .
Virginia Scenery, .

Lawn Drive and Cottages, .
Hot Springs, Virginia,
Warm Springs, Virginia,
Cascade, Healing Springs, .
A Quiet Valley,

A Mountain Stream,
Natural Bridge, . .

A Wayside Boulder,
Interior of Car,

General -View of Richmond, .
George Washington,
Washington’s Headquarters, .
General R. E. Lee, .

Lee Monument,

PAGE.
54
56
58
59
60

63
64
68
70
71
72
74
76
8
80
84
82
86
87
88
89
gI
92
93
95
96
97
98
49.
50.
3 51.

62.
53.
54.
55-
56.
57.
58.
59-
6C.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73:
74-
75.
76.
77°

LIST OF LLLUSTRATIONS.

Captain John Smith, .

Old Church Tower, Jamestown, .

Thomas Jefferson, .
Fortress Monroe,

In Fortress Monroe,

Within and About the Fort,
The Big Gun, .

Ericsson, .

An Eighty-ton Gun, .

La Fayette,

Old House, Yorktown, .
Lambert’s Point, Norfolk,. .
Old Virginia Times,
Watermelons are Ripe, .
Ship Under Sail, . .
Oysterman, .

Iron Ship,

Scenes at Old Point, .
Cottages, Old Point, .
Leaving Old Point,

Along the Jersey Shore,
View of the Falls, .

The American Falls, .

Cave of the Winds,

The Cantilever Bridge, .
Garfield Memorial Tomb, .
Cleveland Harbor, .
Interior Garfield Memorial Tomb,

Going to Put-in-Bay,. . - - + + ee ees

PAGE.

99

100
IOI
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
108
109
IIt
112
113
113
113
114
114
I15
116
118

121
122
125
132
135
139
141
78.
79:
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
$7.
88.
89.
go.
gl.
MO?)
93.
94.
95.
90.
97.
098.
99.
100.
IO.
102.
103.
104.
105.

106.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Put-in-Bay, .

Perry’s Cave, .

Dock at Put-in-Bay,

Views at Gibraltar, Put-in- Bay,
Cleveland Harbor at Night, .
Midnight on Lake Erie,
Feeding the Furnaces, .
Steamer City of Cleveland,
Scenes Along the Detroit River, .
Detroit Harbor, .

On Belle Island, .

At St. Clair Flats, .

St. Clair Flats,

ene.

Port Huron,

A Quiet Sail, .

Interior View of Steamer,.
The Oakland Hotel,

A Passing Boat, .

Map of Lake Huron,
Moonlight on the Lake,
Oscoda-au-Sable,

The Gang-Saws, .

In Camp, .

New Friends, .

Tourists, .

The Light-House, .

General View of Mackinac, .

Historic Mackinac,
10

107.
108.
109.
110.
Ilr.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122.
123.
124.
125.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The Grand Hotel, .

Map of Mackinac, .

At Fort Mackinac,

Fort Mackinac,

A Quiet Drive,

Robinson’s Folly,

Water View of the Folly,
Headquarters of the Fur Company,
Books and Strong-Box, . .
Arch Rock from the Beach, .
Observatory, Fort Holmes, .
Old Cottage, Mackinac,
Scott’s Cave,

Chimney Rock, .

Veranda, Grand Hotel, .
Fairy Arch,. .

Plummer’s Lookout, .
Sugar-Loaf Rock, .

Arch Rock, .

Capitol at Washington,
Small View, Arch Rock, .
White House, Washington, .
Pennsylvania Avenue,

On a Trip,

The Thousand Isles, .
Among the Islands,

A Summer Resort,

Down the St. Lawrence,

Steamer and Rapids, .

PAGE.

181
183
185
187
188
189
1gO
192
193
194
196
197
198
199
201
202
203
205
207
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
216
217

218
158.
159.
160.
161.
162.
163.
164.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

The Lachine Rapids,
A Steamer, .

View of Quebec,

Death of Wolfe,

Cacouna Bay,. .
Tadousac,

Cape Eternity,

Cape Trinity, .

High Bridge,

In the South Land,
Seminole Indian Camp, . .
Sport in Florida,

A Florida Forest,

Picking Oranges,

A Street in Old Mackinac,
Boating,

Lover’s Leap, .

Scenes on the St. Mary River,

-Canal and Locks,

Below the Rapids, .

A Lake-Side Cottage,

The Fish the Other Fellow Caught,
Boy Fishing,

Morning, Noon, and Night, . .
Boating,

Lady Rowing,

Along the Beach,

Pulpit Rock,

Mount Clemens, .

236
239
241
243
245
246
246

247,

247
248
250

252
165.
166.
167.
168.
169.
170,
171.
172.
173.
174.
175.
176.
U778

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Farewell to Mackinac,
Tourists, .

Along Indian River, .

The Arlington, Petoskey,
Lake Steamers,

A Passing Boat, .
Machinery Hall, Chicago,
Electrical Building,
Agricultural Hall, Chicago, .
Horticultural Building, .
The Velvet Express, .

C. H. & D. Depot, Chicago,

Government Building, Chicago, .

PAGE,
254
256
257
258
259
259
260
261
262
263
264
264
266

nobly


INTRODUCTION.

HIS is how it all happened: Mr. Dupont had had a
talk with Dr. Brown about his only daughter, Alice.
Alice had been working altogether too hard in her
high-school work, and when the spring examinations
were over she was, in fact, about over too. But the
genial old Doctor had declared that all the girl

needed was complete change. “Take her on a good,



long trip, and have as much fun as you can,” was
his advice.
“But I can not very well go and leave my family behind,” expostu-

lated Mr. Dupont.
13
I4 INTRODUCTION.

“Take ’em all!” roared the Doctor. “You have more money now
than you need. Take her mother along to take care of her; take Alfred
for company, and go away and be gone all summer.”

Accordingly Mr. Dupont had gone home and, like a dutiful husband,
had talked with Mrs. Dupont, and the whole affair was arranged. Mrs.
Dupont’s sister, Florence Ashton, Aunt Flo, as the children called her,
whose home was with the Duponts, was to be one of the party. Alfred
gave a wild whoop of joy when he was informed of the proposed trip,
and started out to tell the boys. Alice took only a languid interest in
the proceedings. Miss Ashton, with her good spirits and tact, was sure
of having a good time.

Mrs. Dupont proceeded to get everything in order, while Mr. Dupont
arranged his business and looked up the route. This last, however, was
such a very difficult matter that he finally concluded to go down to
Cincinnati, stay there as long as the party cared to, and then go just
wherever they wanted to.

This is a very simple program, but it bids fair to be an enjoyable
one. So, as they are all ready to start in the morning, we will quietly
arrange to travel with them, and record most faithfully “Where We
Went and What We Saw,” and contribute our share to make this “A
Jolly Trip.”
A JOEY RIC.



CHAPTER: |

CINCINNATI.

City of gardens, verdant parks, sweet bowers ;
Blooming upon thy bosom, bright and fair,
Wet with the dews of spring and summer’s showers,
And fanned by every breath of wandering air;
Rustling the foliage of thy green groves, where
‘The bluebird’s matin wakes the smiling morn,
And sparkling humming-birds of plumage rare,
With tuneful pinions on the zephyrs borne,
Disport the flowers among, and glitter and adorn.
E. A. McLAUGHLIN.

5) F THE train had not been about fifteen minutes late, the
Duponts would certainly have been left. But as it was,



when the conductor shouted “All aboard,” a jolly party
with wraps and light valises were awaiting him. They
were fortunate enough to find good seats. Alfred at once
made friends with the fat passenger, who occupied two
seats on the opposite side of the car. A basket of fruit
formed part of the attraction. The drummer straightened
up his necktie and surveyed himself in the glass when Miss Florence
entered. The motherly old lady, “going to visit her son John,” beamed
pleasantly on them all. Mr. Dupont stepped around with that solemnly
frisky air that business men wear when they are trying to throw off business

worries, but have not quite succeeded.

(15)
16 CINCINNATI.

The trip was not supposed to commence until Cincinnati was reached.
It was shortly after four o’clock in the afternoon when the train rolled into
the Grand Central Depot. :

‘Here is where we get off,” volunteered Alfred, anxious to impress on
his Aunt Florence and Alice that he knew what he was about. The fat
passenger had disappeared in the crowd. The drummer was now all busi-
ness. His trunks had been ordered sent to his hotel, and he was in a hurry
to get to his work. In the depot bells were clanging, engines were blowing
off steam, baggagemen were hustling about with trucks loaded with baggage.
Here a nervous man was excitedly asking about his train, and there the
woman with five children was being helped aboard. A big iron railing at
the end of the depot kept the crowd from getting into the space where the
trains were standing. Butthe gates were open, and the crowds of passengers
just arrived were passing out.

‘This way to the hotel buses.” “ Have a carriage?” “Cab, sir?” “What
house do you wish to go to, sir?” were a few of the many cries that they
heard. But Mr. Dupont was an experienced traveller, and soon the whole
party was at the hotel, and Mr. Dupont was much interested in reading in
the Zzmes-Star all about the great Burkhardt fire.

That night at supper they found that they were hungry—that is, all
except Alice. She had a headache, and felt more like going to bed than any-
thing else; but Alfred probably made up the deficiency. We want the
reader to notice, even if the Duponts do not, two persons eating at the
adjoining table. The older one is Mr. Robert Blanchard, a young doctor.
He has studied altogether too hard, and is going to spend some weeks in
travel for health and pleasure. The young man with him, or perhaps we
had better call him a boy, for he is, just on the dividing line between the two
ages, is his nephew, Bert Arnold, going along for company and bent on see-
ing all there is to be seen, and having as much enjoyment out of his trip as
possible. He is even now sizing up the Duponts and calling his uncle’s
attention to them; and having looked once to please his nephew, Doctor
Blanchard is willing to look a second time to please himself. And we do
not blame him, for the Duponts make an interesting party, especially Miss
Granger and Alice. Well, good-by, Doctor, we will see you later on.

The next morning they were all wanting to see what there was to be seen.

ia
CINCINNATI. 17

“The parks and suburbs of Cincinnati are well worth a visit,” said Mr.
Dupont.

““T would like to see the Art Museum if you can make it convenient,”’
was Mrs. Dupont’s answer.

“Now, Alice, it is your turn,” said Mr. Dupont, turning to Alice.

“T guess I will say the Music Hall,” she replied.

“TI want to see the Zoological Garden,” said Alfred.

“You have nearly exhausted the subject,” said Miss Granger, “‘ but I saw
in the morning’s paper there was to be a concert in Burnet Woods this after-
noon; we ought to go out and see it.”

‘We shall evidently have no trouble in putting in the time,” replied
Mr. Dupont. “Well, get on your wraps. Come, Alfred, we will go and
make arrangements for a rig and we will start out.”

A few minutes later they were on their way to Eden Park to see it and
the Art Museum. They stopped at Fountain Square to see the Tyler
Davidson Fountain, which is one of the sights they had not mentioned.

“Dear me,” exclaimed Alice, pointing to the water in the fountain,
“What makes it so muddy?”

“Oh, the river is on a boom,” said Mr. Dupont, “and it is generally a
little ‘off color’ at such times.”

“Tt must be muddy all the time then, for the O-hi-o is always ‘hi’ in
the middle,” said Miss Florence, with a twinkle in her eye.

~The joke was lost on Alfred, who was busily engaged in watching the
numerous cable and electric cars swinging past the fountain.

Mr. Dupont, besides being a great reader, had an old-fashioned notion
that one of the great objects in travelling was to gather a fund of useful
information. Accordingly while the driver was speeding towards Eden Park,
he told them about the fountain.

This fountain is one of the most beautiful fountains in the world. It
is called the Tyler Davidson Fountain. It is a gift of Mr. Henry Probasco
intended to commemorate his brother-in-law, Mr. Tyler Davidson. The
fountain rises from the center of a circular basin, basin and all being in
the center of an esplanade bordered with trees. The figure at the top is
the Genius of Water, pouring down the welcome rain from the hundreds
of jets in her outstretched fingers. Immediately beneath her is the upper

2
18 CINCINNATI.

basin. The figures are all symbolical of the uses of water. One repre-
sents a husbandman in time of drouth. His dog is panting by his side,
his plow is unused, and he holds a withered shrub in his hand. Another
figure represents a freman appealing for rain. A child taking a bath and a
wearied invalid refreshing himself by a cooling draught are seen on other
sides. On the pedestal, which supports the upper basin, are symbolical
figures to represent the uses of water in steam, manufacturing, navigation,
and fisheries. The little drinking fountains at each corner of the large
basin are beautiful in design and execution.

The conclusion of the Duponts was that Eden Park was pretty nice
when they got there, but the drive thither was not a very pleasant one.

“Took at the blue hills of Kentucky in the distance,” exclaimed Mr.
Dupont.

“Where?” asked Alfred.

“There, away to the South. There is the land of blue-grass and fast
horses.” ‘

“And Daniel Boone and Indian stories,” added Miss Granger.

“Right here at our feet is La Belle Riviere of the French,” said
Alice; and, noticing the inquiring look on Alfred’s face, she told him that
was what the French called the Ohio River. —

“Tndeed, we are on historic ground, and we might as well stop in the
shade of these trees and look at it. Right along this river was waged the
real conflict for the possession of America between the French and the
English; and the Indians made a determined effort to keep this country
for their own use.” It was Mr. Dupont who was speaking for the general
- instruction of the party.

“Ves; I read lots of Indian stories about the Ohio Valley,” remarked
Alfred, with an air of wisdom.

“We don’t want to bother with Indians,” exclaimed Alice. “ Just look
at the reservoir; I wonder if the water from the fountain came out of
that reservoir.”

“T presume it does,” replied her father. “At any rate a large part of
the down town supply is from this reservoir. There is another one on
Third Street, near the pumping station. We must now go and examine
the Art Museum; you see the building on the hill yonder?”


CINCINNATI. 21

The party was very much delighted with all there was to be seen.

“The museum,” they were told, ‘““was rendered possible by the gener-
ous offer of Mr. Charles W. West to give $150,000, provided other citizens
should give as much more. It was located in the park, not only on account
of the beautiful surroundings, but so that the objects of art contained
within its walls should not be injured by the smoke and dirt of the city.”

In the sculpture gallery they found copies of celebrated pieces and casts
of ancient friezes, some of which adorned the Parthenon at Athens. Rare
and curious metal work, and specimens of oriental work.

In the picture gallery, Alice especially was much interested. The
little room devoted to Egyptian antiquities was one of the most interest-
ing of all. “

After looking until they were tired they returned to the hotel for
dinner. Now, while they are eating, we will quietly seat ourselves at
Doctor Blanchard’s table, where be and his nephew are also dining; they
are talking to each other. Listen closely.

“There is that party again, uncle. Their name is Dupont, all except
that young lady at the end—the good-natured one—her name is Granger.
They are travelling for health and pleasure like ourselves.”

The Doctor gazed at his hopeful nephew.

“How did you find out that?’ he queried.

“Why, I saw their names on the register, and heard him” (“‘him” was
a vague reference to Mr. Dupont) “talking to the clerk about what there

»

was to see.”

“Ves; but how did you find out the young lady’s name? What did
you say it was?”

“Oh, all the rest called her Aunt Flo or Sister Flo, and her name is
on the register as Miss Florence Granger. I wonder where they are going
next?”

“T am sure I don’t know, but I haven’t the slightest doubt you will
find out all about it before long,” was the quiet repiy.

Ah, Doctor, why not be honest and own up that you would like to
know yourself, and are in hopes your nephew’s incipient detective powers
will get the desired information someway !

An hour or so later Alfred rushed into the sitting room and shouted:
22 CINCINNATI.

“Hurry up; we want to go out to Burnet Woods this afternoon. Papa
says we have plenty of time, and we are going on the cable cars.”

The ladies had been resting; Alfred had been wandering around
generally, while his papa smoked a cigar. He was anxious to be going
somewhere. :

They took the Vine Street cable. Alfred was so much interested in
the cars that his father stopped at the power house on Mt. Auburn, and
explained to him how the cars were driven.

They were much pleased with Burnet Woods. There was a regular
forest cleared of underbrush; there were hills and ravines, an artificial
lake and winding drives. On the top of the hill was the music stand;
seats were ranged about for the spectators, and a great throng of vehicles
were driving about. People of all description were present. Boys were
racing up and down the side of the hill, and Alfred wished he could play
with them, but his father didn’t want him todoso. And then the music!
It was very nice. A gentleman standing near told Mr. Dupont that there
was a fund from which the musicians were paid to give concerts in the parks,
At Eden Park, too, he told them concerts were given. They had noticed
the music stand and seats in that park in the morning, but did not know
what they were for.

Now we come to the accident. Every trip, to be a good one, must have
some sort of an accident to make it lively, you know. This, however, was
not a very bad accident; only a sprained wrist. It happened this way.
During one of the intermissions Miss Granger wished that she had a good
drink of water.

“Come with me, then,” said Alfred. “There is a spring down below
the hill here, and I saw a lot going down for a drink.”

Nothing loath, Aunt Florence and Alfred started. Now it is easy
enough to go down a good steep hill, provided you don’t get started too
fast. But the hill was slippery, and now was Alfred’s time to take a run
down hill. And someway Miss Granger found herself going faster than she
cared to. A tree stood handily near. She thought she would stop herself
' by running against that. She succeeded, but in the general shake up
she gave her wrist a bad wrench. here was a little scream, a dismayed








CINCINNATI. 25

exclamation from Alfred, and she was compelled to sit down and rub her wrist
with her uninjured hand.

“Please excuse me, but can I not be of some assistance here?”

It was Doctor Blanchard who was speaking. He and his nephew were
out to the woods also, and had witnessed the accident:

“Tt is only my wrist. I hope I haven’t broken it. But it does hurt
me considerable.”

“As I ama physician, allow me to examine it.”

“No, it is not broken,” said he after a moment, “but you had better
have it wrapped up and have some liniment put on it. Here, Bert, take
your traveller’s cup and bring up some water from the spring.”

And while Alfred and Bert were gone after the water, the Doctor, before
Miss Granger could interfere, had torn his handkerchief in two and was
making a bandage. When the boys returned, the whole party started
back towards the stand, where explanations were made to the surprised
Mr. and Mrs. Dupont and Alice. They recognized Mr. Blanchard as one
of the guests at the hotel.

The Duponts thought it best to start for the city at once to get some
liniment for Miss Granger, and so they left, thanking the Doctor for his
kindness and expecting to see him in the evening. The fact may as well
be mentioned right here that Miss Granger’s wrist was not the only thing
that was injured that afternoon. Something was the matter with the
Doctor’s heart as well.

The next morning found the party all in good spirit, even if Miss
Granger’s wrist was pretty lame. Doctor Blanchard had made a “ professional ”
call the evening before, and they had begun to feel a little acquainted.
Alice had played some for them on the piano in the ladies’ parlor. As
Alfred wanted to see the “Zoo,” they concluded to visit it that morning.
They thought at first of driving out, but being assured that the electric cars
would take them right to the gate, they concluded to go in them. Alfred
thought at first that it was another cable car they were on, but his father
showed him the difference.

“By the way, children,” suddenly exclaimed Mr. Dupont as they passed
the beautiful new court-house, “you have heard me talk about the Cincinnati .
riot. The old court-house standing in this same place was burnt, and
26 ; CINCINNATI.

immensely valuable papers and public records were lost beyond recall. Up.
Court Street here (pointing to the left) you could see for a long while, and
I presume you can yet make out the marks of bullets.”

“What was it all about?” asked Alice.

“It would be too long a story to repeat now. ‘They had a whole jail
full of murderers, and the people were much exasperated by the seeming
failure of justice in not convicting them of their crime; and what started
the riot was an effort to lynch the prisoners.”

Great was Alfred’s surprise when, with a good many jerks, the car came
to a rest on the platform of the inclined plane.



“Are we going to ride up that place?” exclaimed Alice in some alarm,
pointing to the very steep track running up the hill.

But before a reply could be made they had already started, and Alfred
noticed that two good stout wire cables were being used to pull them up.
The view was magnificent. When they were safely on top Mr. Dupont told
them about the terrible accident of a few years previous when the cable
was pulled out of the car and let it down from the very top; but then to quiet
Alice’s fears, he explained that such an accident could not happen now,

owing to new and improved machinery, and many safeguards that the old
plane did not have.
CINCINNATI. . 27

“The suburbs of Cincinnati,” said Mr. Dupont, ‘are upon the bluffs,
and there are four of these inclined planes in use, besides three cable rail-
ways which wind up from the bottoms. We are now on what is known as
Mt. Auburn. When in Eden Park yesterday, you saw Walnut Hills to the
north of us; to the west of the city is Price Hill.”

The ride to the Zoo was greatly enjoyed, and they were on surprised
and delighted with the garden itself. They found it to be a very nice park
with drives and walks. The collection of animals was large and interesting.
There were birds from ostriches to many colored little warblers. Some
seemed to be about all bill, and others seemed to be about all legs, while
others run mostly to tail. Parrots by the score were chattering in their
cages. The party was greatly pleased with the antics of Mr. and Mrs. Pat
Rooney, the chimpanzees. There were graceful giraffes, awkward camels,
sleek-coated tigers, uneasy bears, and good-natured elephants. And, by the
way, Alfred indulged in the luxury of a ride on an elephant’s back. The
antics of the twoesea lions in their big tank or reservoir greatly pleased
them. The name of the big one was Prince, and when the attendant came
to feed them, Prince would come when his name was called, and awkwardly
climb upon the little stone house in the center of the tank, get his fish,
and dive off in the water. There were buffaloes, yaks, llamas, alpaccas, and
many varieties of deer.

They had a delightful morning at the Zoo, and returned to the hotel
for an early dinner. There was some question as to what to do next.

“Tet me see,” mused Mr. Dupont, ‘“‘we won’t care to stay here more
than a day longer, any way. There is the Doctor, he has been here a day
longer than we have. I will ask him where we had better go next.”

Just then the Doctor came sauntering up to the group. They were
all in the parlor. .

-“T thought I would inquire after my patient,” he began, after asking
how they had enjoyed the Zoo. “Iam about ready to leave, and probably
won't see you much more.”

“Going, are you Doctor? Well, we won’t probably be here more than
a day longer ourselves. Which way are you going?”

“We will go East. But over what road, or just where, I have not de-
cided. When will you go?”
28 CINCINNATI.

‘“We have hardly thought yet where we want to go. Perhaps we will
go East too. Will make up our minds to-morrow. Where had we better
go the balance of our stay here?” |

“Suppose you take a drive past the Music Hall, out to Clifton, and if
you get time take a look at Spring Grove Cemetery. It is a beautiful place.”

So this was the program agreed upon. But for some unexplained rea-
son Doctor Blanchard was not in so much of a hurry about going away as
before dinner. He really conldn’t decide which way he wanted to go, so he -
thought he would postpone matters until the next day.

In the meanwhile the Duponts were enjoying their drive. Music Hall
they looked at as they passed by. Mr. Dupont told them about the big
organ. Alice wanted to knew why every city did not build a Music Hall too.

“Cincinnati,” replied Mr. Dupont, ‘‘owes its Music Hall to Mr. Reuben
R. Springer. He was a very wealthy man, and he endowed the College of
Music and built Music Hall. You know I told you about the Art Museum
being principally the gift of Mr. C. W. West. This city has had some
very rich and generous citizens.”

“T think I would have to be pretty rich before I would have enough
to give away to build public buildings,” said Alfred.

“JT don’t think there is much danger of any of our family doing any-
thing of that kind,” dryly remarked Mr. Dupont, “but for all that, it is a
very good disposition to make of money, provided you don’t wrong any
one else by so doing.”

In driving through Clifton, Alfred and Alice amused themselves by
picking out the particular house and grounds they were going to buy for
their own use. There was no disputing that Clifton was an extremely
lovely suburb. At the far end of the drive a particularly fine view was
obtained of Mill Creek Valley, and the little towns placed here and there
rbalysltge

“What a monstrous chimney,” exclaimed Alfred, pointing up the valley.

He referred, as he learned afterwards, to the chimney of the great soap
works at Ivorydale. The entire party were ignorant of the fact that
within a stone’s throw almost of their place were three of the largest
factories in the United States for three acticles of every day use. Soap,

starch, and candles.


POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE, CINCINNATI.
30 CINCINNATI,

Winding down into the valley, the party next visited Spring Grove.

“I think it very appropriate,” said Mrs. Dupont, “that a doctor should
admire a cemetery, and have us visit it.”

But on entering the grounds they had to admit they were beautifully
laid out. They counted no less than five beautiful fountains playing in
the lakes: Swans and various wild water fowl were swimming about
apparently oblivious of the presence of man. They had learned by ex-
perience that they had nothing to fear in the cemetery. The authorities
do not permit them to be disturbed. The drives were beautifully laid out.
The grounds were as neatly trimmed as a lawn, and then there was the
solemn peace and quietude that is always to be found in these last resting
places of the departed.

They saw the graves of soldiers who had commanded armies; of states-
men who had served the nation; of the great and of the lowly, prattling
innocence and senile age. In keeping with the subdued quiet of the place,
Miss Granger quoted Addison’s beautiful lines written in Westminster
Abbey: ;

“When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies;
when I read the epitaph of the beautiful, every inordinate desire forsakes
me; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart
melts with compassion; when I see the tombs of the parents themselves, J
reflect how vain it is to grieve for those we must quickly follow; when I
see kings lying beside those who deposed them, when I see rival wits
placed side by side, or the holy men who divided the world with their
contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the frivol-
ous competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.”

And so with softened feeling they bade good-by to Spring Grove.
Yes, we can bid good-by to the cemetery, good-by to the graves of our loved
ones; but their memory abides with us; their influence, like incense from
an unseen censer, is with us. Who is there that has lost friends—and all
of us have—that does not experience such thoughts as these?

That night after supper Doctor Blanchard and Bert joined the party,



aud when it was found that he was not going until the next day, the con-
versation drifted into a consideration of where they could go for the most
pleasant trip. It was tacitly agreed that they should travel a little ways in
CINCINNATI. an

company. Doctor Blanchard strongly advised that they take the Chesapeake
& Ohio road East. He said that the scenery could not be surpassed, and
that the train service was of the very best. ‘That point virtually decided
on, Mr. Dupont went to the reading room to write a letter and have a
smoke. Bert, Alfred, and Alice went to the museum, and Doctor Blanchard
and Miss Granger went walking. Feeling fatigued, Mrs. Dupont went to
her room. As they all seem to be enjoying themselves we will not bother
them. :

The next morning it looked so much like rain that only Alfred and
his father cared to venture out. They thought they would go down and
take a look at the river and the bridges, and possibly go over into Kentucky.
Though the Ohio was not by any means ata flood, it had a good stage of
water, as there had been heavy rains the week previous. There were a
number of steamboats; some had come from Pittsburg, some from Louisville,
and some from New Orleans. A great big tow of coal barges was passing, bound
down the river. They had come from the Kanawha River in West Virginia.
As Alfred had never seen a suspension bridge he was much interested in
the one joining Cincinnati and Covington. It did look strange to see it
hanging up in mid air. |

After satisfying their curiosity as to the steamboats, Alfred wanted to
cross over on the suspension bridge. It was a long walk, but the day was
cool and they did not mind it. A splendid view was to be had from the
center of the bridge. Up the river was the Louisville & Nashville R. R.
Bridge ; right below them was the Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. Bridge. Mr.
Dupont told Alfred that further down the river still was the Cincinnati
Southern Railroad Bridge. Alfred also noticed the ferry-boats flying back
and forth. After strolling around on the Kentucky side until they were
tired, they took the electric cars for Cincinnati. Alfred’s description of
what they had seen made Miss Granger and Alice wish they had gone
along. :
By 1 o’clock the clouds which had been threatening rain all the morn-
ing settled down to business, and an old-fashioned soaking rain was in
progress. A rainy day on an excursion trip! It is a nuisance, ain’t it?
Now at home a rainy day is often a relief, since it gives us the opportunity
to bring up various odds and ends of work that have been accumulating on
32 CINCINNATI.

our hands. But when away on a pleasure trip, and stopping at hotels, it is
another matter. ‘That was the case with our travellers. The stormy after-
noon and evening bid fair to be an unusually long one. In this dilemma
it was Bert who saved the day. They were in the parlor when he made the
remark to his uncle that it was raining about as hard as it was that day they
visited Mammoth Cave.

“But we did not know anything about it,’ he continued, turning to
the others. ‘(We were in the cave all day.”

“Oh, were you at Mammoth Cave?” exclaimed Alice. “I wish it were
not so far away, I would like to see it.

“By the way, Bert,’ said Dr. Blanchard, “why don’t you get your
views and read to us what you wrote about your yisit there? He is keep-
ing a little itinerary of our trip,” he added by way of explanation.

This was not exactly what Bert wanted to do; but it was raining, and
something had to be done to make time pass away; so, after some urging
on the part of the others, Bert produced his journal and the views he had,
and read the following account of their visit to the cave:

MAMMOTH CAVE.

When uncle and I started on this summer’s trip, I put in a good strong
plea to spend at least a day at the cave. I had heard uncle talk about
it, and had read what travellers had to say, and I wanted to see it myself.
Cave City is the place where we stopped to visit the cave. This station
is on the line of the L. & N., or, as we call it in our part of the country,
“The Ellen N.” The entrance to the cave is eight miles from Cave City.
There is a stage road leading over, but it won’t do to say much about the
road. A gentleman making the trip with us said it reminded him of the
camp-meeting song of the colored folks.

“Oh de Jordan am a hard road to trabble.”

But after many a jolt we arrived at our journey’s end, where we found a
most excellent hotel. Of course, it is neither day nor night in the cave
itself, just simply dark, and it is awful dark, but we concluded not to visit
it until the next day.

As Uncle Robert seems to think we must understand all about a
thing before we can enjoy seeing it, he lectured to me on how the cave was
CINCINNATI. 33

formed, and all that. As this did really help me the next day, I will say a
little about it here.

Just imagine you were in a hilly country where there were a lot of
springs. Of course, the water from these springs would flow away in little
streams. Here and there these streams would unite, and finally perhaps
there would only be one pretty good sized creek flowing through the valley
some milesaway. In the course of a good many years these various streams
would wash out each for itself a valley, which would run into each other,
and finally there would be but one. Now we only need imagine that sort of
thing happening under ground; the water from the springs, instead of rising
to the surface, flowing away in little underground streams, which find some
little cracks and fissures in the rocks to follow, to see that in time there would
be formed a cave. We must not imagine a cave to be simply a big hollow
place under the ground. It is simply the channel of an underground
creek which has come winding down from the springs which fed it. It
winds back and forth, twists in and out just the way a river does on the
surface. Here it has washed out a great big roomy place, and there it had
the hardest rocks to flow in, and only a narrow channel is the result. Then
there are every now and then little streams coming in from the sides, just
as there would be on the surface, and these have formed side galleries.

Now the river, which by flowing underground made the Mammoth
Cave, divides into two principal branches about a mile from the entrance.
Following up the old bed of one of these branches, takes us to what is
known as the Short Route, the other is the Long Route. Of course these
rivers have long since abondoned their old channels; but, as every one knows,
on the Long Route we at places still come across a portion of the old creek,
and in some places we know it goes gliding on far below. The reason is
very simple. It empties into the Green River, which runs near by. But in
the course of time the Green River has cut its valley down to a lower level.
When it gets much below its former level, the waters of its underground
tributary will, all of a sudden, find some lower fissure through which they
can flow to join its waters, and the old channel will be left high and dry; and
so it is in the cave itself, some galleries are directly over one below.

Now I don’t know whether this makes it all plain or not, but at any
rate these are the facts; and if you ever go there, you will see that the cave




CINCINNATI.

2

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
CINCINNATI. 35

is simply an old river valley washed out under ground, winding here and
there. I am afraid to say how many million years Uncle Robert said all
this took, but it must have been awful long.

The next morning Uncle Robert and I formed a part of a party of
eight who entered the cave in charge of an experienced guide, to take the
Long Route. Besides ourselves there
were four gentlemen and two ladies.
We first had put on the suits of clothes
which are kept on hand to visit the
cave. Wecertainly madea funny look-
ing group; the gentlemen had on short
woolen jackets, caps or soft hats, and
overalls. The dress of the ladies could
not be considered fashionable, some-
thing like the old Bloomer costume
Uncle George said, and there was no
end of good-natured bantering of each
other at the strange appearance we
presented.

It would take a whole book to tell
what we saw that day. The first room
we came to is called the Rotunda. It
is said to be directly under the dining
room of the Cave Hotel. Here you
are surprised to find the remains of
vats and pipes, and to learn that during
the war of 18:2 considerable saltpeter
was made here: Slaves worked here



under ground for a year at a time.

BOTTOMLESS PIT.

Oxen were kept here also, and you
can see the tracks of the carts. And there also you can still see the remains of
little cottages, where some poor consumptives, fifteen in number I believe, lived
for some months about fifty yearsago. "he idea was that since the temperature
in the cave is always the same they would be benefited by living in such an
atmosphere.
36 CINCINNATI.

The principal points of interest in the Long Walk are the Bottomless
Pit, Lake Lethe, and Echo River. Of course there are any number of
wonderful rooms. In some cases one is directly over another. One called
Martha’s Vineyard seemed to have its roof literally lined with innumerable
bunches of grapes. ‘The far end of the Route is called Cleveland’s Avenue,
and it is the crowning wonder of the cave. As I don’t know how to de-
scribe it, I will copy the following description for you:

“Cleveland’s Avenue extends in a direct line about two miles. It isa
perfect arch of fifty feet span, and of an average height of ten feet in the
center, just high enough to be viewed at ease in all its parts.. It is in-









































































































































































































































DEAD SEA.

crusted from end to end with the most beautiful formations in every variety
of form. ‘The base of the whole is sulphate of lime, in one part of dazzling
whiteness and perfectly smooth, and in other places crystallized so as to
glitter like diamonds in the light. Growing from this in endless diversj-
fied forms is a substance resembling selenite, translucent, and imperfectly
laminated. Some of the crystals bears a striking resemblance to celery,
and all are about the same length, while others, a foot or more in length,
have the color and appearance of vanilla cream candy; others are in the
form of a rose; others still roll out from the base in forms resembling the
ornaments on the capital of a Corinthian column. Some of the incrusta-
CINCINNATI. a".

tions are massive and splendid; others are as delicate as the lily, or as
fancy work of shell or wood. Here and there, through the whole extent,
you will find openings through the side, into which you may thrust the
person and often stand erect in little grottos, perfectly incrusted with a
delicate white substance, reflecting the light from a thousand glittering
points.”

The Bottomless Pit, which, for a long time marked the end of explora-
tion, is about one hundred and seventy feet deep; a wooden bridge, called
the Bridge of Sighs, leads over it. Lake Lethe is crossed in boats. The



























































































































































































































ECHO RIVER.

water is generally beautifulty clear. It seems that in olden times those who
drank of the waters of Lethe were supposed to forget all their cares and
troubles. But even if you do drink of the waters of this lake, you can not
forget your sore feet and weak knees.

Echo River is reached after crossing the lake. This river is the
descendant of the old river in whose worn-out channels we have been
wandering. It empties into Green River. A rise in Green River causes it
‘to rise also. Flatboats are used to ferry tourists. A gentleman in our

3
38 CINCINNATI.

party quoted some poetry, which I thought very appropriate. Uncle Robert
afterwards showed them to me in a book, and here is the first verse:



MAMMOTH DOME.

“ Sunbeams never, mystic river,
Nor the moonbeams o’er thee quiver ;
Not the faintest starlike gleam
Shines above thy sombre stteam ;
Night-enshrouded river echo,
Mournful dirge so sadly low:
Singing as we gladly go—
O’er thy waters silent flow,
Comes the echo—‘ Lo!’
See the shimmering shadows playing,
Born of torchlight’s fitful swaying,
Cast upon the cavern wall—
Cast o’er Echo River Hall,
Hear the echo call,
Answering echo ‘All!’ ”
I must say that when we reached Washington Hall, near the far end of
the route, that I was very glad to know that there was where we would eat

dinner. Just at that moment sandwiches and cold coffee had a greater






SE, CINCINNATI.



THE COURT HOU
40 CINCINNATI.

attraction for me than anything else. A young merchant from Louisville,
who was one of the crowd, thought it would be a great scheme for the hotel
man to fix up a regular restaurant there. Have electric lights, regular
chairs aud tables, a warm lunch, and couches on which to rest. All that
could be easily done since the room is circular nearly one hundred feet in
diameter; and though the roof is low, it is beautifully vaulted. I thought it
would be immense. Uncle Robert suggested that, if they do that, why not
string electric lights all through the long twisting channels.

But I believe I hit on a scheme better than that. You see when we
get to the end of the Long Route we are nine miles from the cave en-







WASHINGTON HALL.

trance, We have kept up all right coming, because there has been a suc-
cession of surprises, and we were all the time wondering what the next
wonder would be; but when you reach the end, there you are; it is nine
miles back, and the only way to get there is to go back over the same route ©
you have come. You have no idea how awfully tired a fellow feels when
he awakes to that fact. All of a sudden the romance of the cave is gone.
You are ready to call yourself a blooming idiot for coming so far. Well
now at Sandstone Dome, at the very end of the trip, the character of the
stone shows that it must be near the surface of the ground. Why don’t
CINCINNATI. 4I

they make careful surveys, determine where that is, and tunnel down from
the surface? Then we could be pulled up to the top and take the stage back
to the hotel. That is a scheme “as is a scheme.”

I must not forget to mention a romantic yarn that the guide told us of
the Gothic Chapel. That is a room not far from the entrance, near the
Rotunda. It was about a beautiful young lady who promised her dying
mother that she would never wed any man upon the face of the earth, and
if she broke her promise all her fortune would go to another heir. But as
time passed on the hero appeared, and she fell desperately in love, as every
properly behaved young lady should. But what should she do? Break her





































































GOTHIC CHAPEL.

promise to her mother and forfeit her property. Bless you, no. Woman
wit suggested a way out of the difficulty. The wedding party came to
Gothic Chapel, and there, not on the face of the earth, but in its dosom, they
were married, and I suppose lived happily ever afterwards.

We were just able to drag one foot after the other when we reached the
hotel. I did not take the Short Walk. hat is simply the left-hand fork
of the old river; it is only about half as long as the other route, but contains
some very fine rooms. ‘Take it all in all, I count my visit to the cave as
one of the pleasantest days of my life. And I think that every one that can
possibly do so ought to visit it, for it is certainly one of the marvels of this

country.
42 CINCINNATI.

‘“T think we ought to give Bert a vote of thanks,” said Miss Ashton as
he ceased reading. ‘I am sure we all got an excellent idea of his visit to
the cave. And he has given us all a pleasant afternoon in spite of the rain.”

Mr. Dupont and Dr. Blanchard finally decided to leave the following
morning over the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, and make White Sulphur
Springs their next stopping point. This would give them a daylight ride
through the picturesque regions of West Virginia. As the reader is the
mutual friend of both parties, we do not think we are violating any confidence
in glancing at the following entry in the diary of Dr. Blanchard:

“T presume I am making a fool of myself: I have been waiting for a
day or so, because Miss Granger is here. And to-morrow we will travel
together, virtually in the same party. She is a remarkable girl. But what
business have I to be taken up by her? I supposed myself to be invincible,
but I am afraid I am suffering with a case of heart failure. It may be only
brain failure, however.”

It will now be the fair thing to glance at the following in Miss Granger’s
handwriting: —

‘We leave to-morrow, and Doctor Blanchard, whom we have only known
for two days, is to be one of the party for a day or so, anyway. Well, I guess
it won’t make any difference with me. Helen likes him, but she is an old
married woman. I shall go on just as usual, and, of course, treat him with
respect, but that is all.”

We shall see.

Fas

i

Ue
Wes






































































































































































































































































































































THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 45

CHAPTER HS

THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Singing through the Forests,
Rattling over ridges,

Shooting under arches,
Rumbling over bridges,

Whizzing through the mountains,
Buzzing o’er the vale,

Bless me! this is pleasant,

Riding on the rail.
Joun G. SAXE.








morning. The Dupont’s had been called

ae eae NN 66 E. MUST be off,” exclaimed
a HRS Mr. Dupont. ‘Time and
a a XS N tide, and the model rail-
: ie ar a road, wait for no man.”
| i) Ne This was at the hour of seven the next







LW early. Their baggage had been packed,



their traveling wraps were adjusted, and











those who could eat had been to break-















fast; and now they must be going. Doc-



tor Blanchard and Bert had already strolled
on to the depot. There was a bond of
sympathy between these two. Doctor
Blanchard would talk to Bert as if he
were his own age. Like all thoughtful
men he was fond of moralizing, and it was no uncommon thing for him,
to go off into some long talk more to himself than to any one else, but
46 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Bert would gravely listen, and, in truth, he was now so used to it that he
rather enjoyed it. Even now the Doctor was moralizing to his nephew’
on the incidents taking place under their eye in the depot.

“That train,’ he was saying, “that just came in,is a local. It came
from only a few stations out on the road,and is loaded with commuters,
people who do business in the city but live in the suburbs. What a
crowd of them there is! Those young people are clerks, book-keepers,
type-writers, etc., just getting in to their day’s work. It does not take a
very sharp eye to conclude that a suburban train is not a bad place for
a mild flirtation, does it? Well, I ought not to object; I was young
once myself.

“The bells are ringing on the other side now. ‘That puffing, tired, and
dirty-looking engine on the far track is bringing in the Chicago Express.
See! the baggage-men with their trucks are waiting for the baggage, and
one of Uncle Sam’s wagons is waiting for the mail. It is quite a differ-
ent looking crowd that is getting off there. There is a young man who
is in a hurry. Perhaps he wants to catch a train East, or maybe he
wants to do a big amount of business to-day and get back to Chicago to-
night. He is what we call a ‘hustler.’

“That old man getting off? It is hard to make out what he is or what
he means to do. He don’t look quite like a business man. We will say
he is on a visit, because he is looking around as if expecting some one.
Yes, we are right. That young lady calls him father, and is kissing him,
and the little fellow at her side calls him grand-pa. Quite a flight of
years stand between grandfather and grandson. Yet who can tell which
one will be the first to cross the river? Do you notice that group near
the gate, dressed in deep mourning? Well, they are evidently waiting for
the party getting off of the sleeper, also dressed in mourning. There
has evidently been a more significant parting in their lives than any we
see around us. And so it goes—the depot is the epitome of the world;
youth, old age; arrival, departure; joy, sorrow. Oh, well, life itself is
but a journey.”

But at this stage his more practical nephew breaks the half-soliloquy.
“JT say, uncle, why don’t we get aboard and get some good seats? The
others will be down soon.”
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANITES. 47

“All right; come on,” responded his uncle, always ready to please him.
With a few directions from the attendant they were soon standing beside
the train.

“But why do they call it the F. F. V.?” queried Bert.

“Vou will notice that all roads have especial names for their fine
express trains. F.F. V.,in days gone by, meant the ‘First Families of
Virginia.’ The letters now stand for ‘Fast Flying Virginian,’ which is the
name of this train. You must notice what a nice train this is.”

‘“T see,” responded Bert; “all Pullmans; and that is what you call a

Vestibule, is it not?”
“Certainly; vestibuled from

one end to the other. The fact
is, there is not a finer train runs
out of any city than the one we
ride in to-day,” said his uncle.
‘Here they are,” exclaimed
a voice near them, and Alfred
came rushing wp: “Not, dary ant
his rear were the other members
of Mr. Dupont’s party.
“Studying the train, are you?”
said Mr. Dupont, drawing a long
breath. “I declare, I was afraid
we would be left. You don’t
know, Doctor, how much bother
women are in traveling. It is



Se almost impossible to get them
| ready.”

estiDU : “Don’t you believe him, Doc-
tor,” exclaimed Alice with a laugh.
“Papa would stay at the table as if he was afraid he couldn’t get any-
thing more to eat to-day.”

“Well, I wanted my money’s worth,” replied Mr. Dupont. “But let’s
get aboard, or else we will be left in earnest. Not in that car, Doctor;
that is the dining car, and I am not ready for dinner yet. Will you help

Florence, Doctor? Her wrist is lame yet.”
48 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Yes, the Doctor was ferfectly willing to help Florence.

Finally, amidst the ringing of bells, the train started. They went
over the big bridge that Alfred had noticed the day before, and were now
speeding east along the Kentucky shore of the Ohio. While they are
thus hurrying on, let us notice our surroundings a little carefully. There
are all sorts of railroad trains, from the lumbering freight to the flying
express. Now-a-days the leading railroads have one or more express trains
daily, running between terminal points, which they pride themselves on
fitting up as luxuriantly as possible. Such a train is the F.F.V., on
which we have taken passage. There is a richly upholstered Pullman day-
coach, with a smoking compartment at one end. ‘This is slightly differ-
ent from the usual second-class smoking-car, with its hard seats and gen-
erally disagreeable appearance, where you are expected to enjoy your cigar
with the aroma of the stogie, two-fors, or the black clay pipe. That
arrangement is all very nice if you are only used to it, but it has its dis-
advantages.

Following the day-coach is the dining-car, but we won’t venture to
describe that until we are hungry enough to enjoy a good square meal.
‘Then we have a sleeper and a drawing-room car. You see, in effect, this
train is a hotel in rapid motion. ‘There is a couch on which to rest and
sleep. When hungry, slip into the dining-car and take a meal. If you
want to smoke, there is the smoking saloon. If you want to read, there
is a well-stocked library in the drawing-room car, where you can find books
according to your taste—light fiction, romance, or standard literature.
You of course notice that in a vestibule train like this these separate
cars virtually form but one long car. A baby could go with perfect safety
from one car to another. In the old-fashioned trains it was not a very
easy thing to walk, if the train was in rapid motion, but thanks to the
vestibule arrangement. Again, there is much less of the swaying motion,
and so we can walk back and forth with comparative ease.

In the meantime Mr. Dupont, feeling that his weight of responsibility
ended with getting his party on board, had gone to the smoking saloon
and was talking with Col. Jones (remember we are in Kentucky), who is
much interested in the wonderful new town of Aluminia, situated up
among the mountains somewhere.
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES., 49

“Most extraordinary, sir. There is no doubt we will have a popula-
tion of at least ten thousand—sen thousand, sir, in less than three years,

























































































































































































































































































































































































































aoe

SESS
St =

Bee





aie i,

UP AMONG THE MOUNTAINS.



There is one railroad now, and two more are being built. The mineral
resources are marvelous, sir. Millions of tons of the very best iron in the
West in the hills. Coal! simply inexhaustible—cnerhaustible, sir. The
Aluminia Steel and Iron Works, with a capital of $1,500,000, are about to
put up a most extensive plant. A syndicate of New York and London
50 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

capitalists—Vew York and London, sir, are about to make large invest-
ments; zery large. The Company I represent is going to put a large
amount of capital in improving real estate. Prices will advance very fast,
sir. I could dispose of a few lots at a great bargain now, you see;’’—
but at this point, like the esteemed member of the Stanislaus Society,
“subsequent proceedings interest ws no more.” We will leave the genial
Colonel to excite Mr. Dupont’s interest in the new town to his heart’s
content.

Alfred and Bert are ‘

‘chumming” around, first on one side of the car
aud then on the other. The remaining four are seated vzs-a-vzs, and Mr.
Wy Blanchard is interspersing the conversation with

a sort of running comment on the towns they





are passing. He called their attention to Fort
Thomas, on the hills back of New-
port. ‘“Sheridan’s last official act
was in connection with that Fort,”
he said; and thus they rode past
the chain of towns on the Ohio side
of the river during the forenoon.

“There comes papa; I wonder
where he has been all forenoon,” ex-
claimed Alice.
a ee oN ; “Tam glad you are all enjoying
yourselves. I have been talking with
a gentleman. But hadn’t we better
go to dinner now?”
‘6 “Dinner!” exclaimed Miss Flor-
ence. ‘Why, it is most twelve, isn’t
it. How quickly the morning has
gone!”
“Tf we go and take dinner now, when we get through we will be just
entering the picturesque part of Virginia,” said Dr. Blanchard.

What would some of the old-fashioned travelers have thought of a
dining-car? No more of “twenty minutes for dinner,” with the accom-
panying dyspepsia. No; just walk into the finely upholstered dining-car.
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 51

What hotel can beat this arrangement? Comfortable seats, elegant sur-
roundings, daintily spread table, the linen of soft fabric and snowy in
whiteness, the ware of cut glass and china, as pleasing to the eye in design
as their contents are to the palate. Here you can eat at your leisure
while going fifty miles an hour.

“Come, folks, order what you want too,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

_ “Just like an hotel,” said Alice, taking the bill of fare from the waiter.
And, by the way, the waiters look as if they, too, had been freshly polished
and ironed, as well as their white jackets and aprons.

“Come, my dear,” said Mr. Dupont, speaking to his wife, “we are wait-
ing on you; what are you thinking of?”

Mrs. Dupont did not answer this question. We will tell you, but
don’t mention it to any one else.

“I see Doctor Blanchard and Florence are seated by themselves. I
wonder now Oh, well, probably nothing in it. It really wouldn't do,
you know.”



Just so!

“I say, Doc,” called out Mr. Dupont, helping himself to a fresh roll;
“this is an improvement on the old style, eh?”

“Do you mean the dinner or the car, or both?” inquired the Doctor.

“The whole arrangement. Here we are riding along and enjoying a
good dinner at the same time. I wonder what some of the old heathen
would have thought of it?”

“They were as utterly unable to conceive of it as we are to even
imagine the wonderful discoveries of the near future. Just think what
traveling will be when business men are able to leave Cincinnati in the
morning, run over to New York, do their business, and get home for
early tea.” :

“T think,” broke in Florence, “that all the poetry will be gone from
traveling then. But when do you think that era of traveling will be here?”

“Oh, twenty-five or thirty years from now. But perhaps there won’t
be any need for traveling then, at all,” and the Doctor thoughtfully sipped
his coffee.

“No need for traveling! Well, why not?” inquired Mr. Dupont.

“Why, when we get the telephone perfected, and Edison gets his new


THE KANAWHA.
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 53

invention completed, by which you can see clearly all that is going on at
a distance, and so one business man can see and talk with his friend in
New York, there will be no necessity for going there at all,” replied Doc-
tor Blanchard.

“Oh, I see. Well, when that time comes, Doctor, I will be through
with traveling, anyway. In the meantime I want as good a time as can
be had, so please pass the fruit this way.”

Just as they were through
with dinner Doctor Blanchard
called to the boys to look out,
as they were just crossing the
Big Sandy and entering West
Virginia. “All this bottom
land,” said he, “was once sur-



































































































































































veyed by no less a person than
Washington, a century and a
quarter ago. It was granted
by the State of Virginia to
Captain John Savage, and the
men composing his company,
for services during the French
and Indian War. It was known
as the Savage Grant.”

One hundred miles further
on, just as they were beginning
to get a little weary, they en-
tered the part of West Vir-
ginia where the real scenic
glories begin.

EN “This wouldn’t be a bad
IN WEST VIRGINIA. place to stop awhile, would it,
Doctor,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

“T think we could manage to enjoy ourselves pretty well, I am sure.

There seems to be a good hotel, and I believe there ought to be some

fish in that river.”
4.


54 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

d

CRAY worm
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































co

KANAWHA FALLS.

“What river is it?” inquired Florence.

The genial colonel, the same who was interested in booming the town
of Aluminia, but who, for all that, was a pleasant traveling companion, had
been introduced by Mr. Dupont to the entire party, and was the one who
answered the question.

“That is the Kanawha River, and those falls are the somewhat cele-
brated Kanawha Falls. You are right, sir, (speaking to Mr. Dupont) ;
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 55

you could enjoy yourself here very well for a few days. I presume you
think the scenery is pretty good, and the country begins to look rugged;
but we folks are used to it, and it does not seem particularly wonderful
to us. It might not interest you very much, but—well, all this section
along here is familiar ground to me. I put in some months soldiering
here once.”

“Why, tell us about it!” exclaimed Florence. “Indeed, we would like
to hear.” ‘

“Oh, well, it is not so very startling. Let me see; it was just twen-
ty-nine years ago this summer, during the late ‘unpleasantness,’ you know,
when the Confederate forces, under the command of Gen. Loring, forced
the Federal forces, under the command of Lightburn, out of this valley.
There was a good deal of fighting for some days all along this section.
There was a great artillery fight just above here at Gauley Bridge.”

“So you were really a soldier, and were in battle right along here.
You ought to feel proud of it!” said Alice.

‘“Yes, I suppose so,” assented the Colonel; “but I do assure you,
madam, that it was very warm and very dusty, and it did not seem a>
particularly glorious thing then.”

“But, now, really, Colonel, you must have had some adventures here.
Can’t you tell us one?” inquired Florence.

Now the gallant Colonel would cheerfully have jumped off the train
if a lady had requested him to in that way, so he rubbed his forehead
and told them the following.

THE COLONEL’S STORY.

“Tf you noticed, a few miles below here on the bluffs, to the right, you
perhaps saw a few broken-down trees and other evidence that a house
once stood there, with a little orchard about it. At the time in question
a very nice mansion, that is, for this mountain region, stood there. Mr.
Ingham, who was its owner, was respected far and wide. Every one ad-
mired his sturdy frankness and his genial hospitality. He was actually
pained if the passing traveler did not give him a chance to entertain him.

“He had two boys, both fine, manly fellows, just entering manhood as
the war broke out. Now no one could quite understand it, but, in the






















































































EN

Auestanies
























THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES,. 57

course of time, the boys both enlisted, but, unfortunately, on different sides.
Jack Ingham went on a visit to Old Virginia, and, carried away by the
excitement there, enlisted in the Confederate army, while his brother
Charley, staying at home, quite naturally entered the Federal army.

“In the campaign I have reference to, chance had brought it about
that they were to be pitted against each other—Charley being a member
of the Ninth West Virginia Infantry, and Jack a member of the Thirty-
second Virginia, attached to Gen. Loring’s command. So the brothers, one
in blue, the other in gray, were about to meet in conflict within a few
miles of their home. Gen. Loring was, of course, anxious to know the
disposition of the Federal troops, their strength, etc., and at Jack’s own
offer he was sent out scouting. He was thoroughly familiar with the
country, but that very fact probably made him somewhat bold. He actu-
ally went home, but the family had to secrete him, for the Federal forces
were not far away.

“That night the old negro servant was sent to the Federal lines with
an urgent request that Charley Ingham be allowed to come to the house,
as his father was sick. They probably enlarged on the sickness, although
the old man was far from well. The meeting of the two brothers was sure-
ly one of the strange incidents of the war; on opposite sides, yet brothers,
meeting at their home when battle was expected, perhaps on the morning.
However, no battle took place. In the early morning the brothers parted
for their respective commands. The Federals retreated only to return in
triumph a few weeks later. Jack was killed some months later; Charley
survived the war, and is now somewhere in the West.”

A few hours later, when the Colonel had taken his departure, Florence
suddenly inquired, “Which side did the Colonel say he was on in the
war?” No one could answer, and so it remained a mystery to the Duponts
whether the Colonel was one of the pursued, or a pursuer, on that mem-
otable occasion.

Now, how shall we describe the scenery of that wonderful part of
West Virginia we are now entering. A short distance above Kanawha
Falls we come to the junction of the Gauley and New Rivers, which junc-
tion, by the way, forms the Kanawha itself. The New River sweeps down
from the south, from its distant home in North Carolina. No ordinary
QO

5 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

journey has it had. It has wound this way and that, through the mazy
defiles of the Alleghany mountains. In places it has rolled its waters
through narrow cafion valleys whose beetling cliffs rise almost perpendicu-



















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A MOUNTAIN PASS.

larly from its banks; here it has placidly rolled along thiough narrow
valleys of great beauty and fertility.

Everywhere the vision is greeted with variety and beauty. Rills meet
in rivulets, and rivulets swiftly swell into rivers, which leap their moun-
tain barriers and quietly subside into the placidity of the plains below.
Mountains rise like little Alps on Alps; glades, those meadows of the
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 59

mountain, freshen the summer atmosphere with delicious coolness; culti-
vated slopes move the imagination as by a wand of enchantment; deep,
winding, fertile valleys lie at the foot of beetling bluffs, full of the fat-
ness of fertility.

Travelers who have wandered in foreign lands and gazed in delight on
the mountain views of Scotland, and viewed with awe the snowy Alps, with
nestling glaciers in their heights, have freely admitted that they have seen











oe
: s —<

ENTERING A TUNNEL.



nothing in their trips abroad to compare with the scenery along the New
River. A story is told of an excited Frenchman, who paid the scenery
the highest compliment he could, when he exclaimed, as the ever-varying
views swept past him: “ Magnzfique!l Zere 1s nossing like 2s in France.”
We may wind around the steep side of a mountain spur, and emerge from
its shadow into a sunlit slope that falls abruptly away at the very edge
of the car, hundreds of feet, and reveals at the bottom of a long and
winding valley a singularly dark stream, whose chocolate-colored waters
contrast while harmonizing with the forest growth that reaches from the
volden sunlight of the mountain top down to the river’s brink. The
60 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

sturdiness of the forests—the hardy vigor of all vegetable life—the munifi-
cence of all visible nature impress the traveler accustomed to see bare
rocks and stinted vegetation amid mountain scenery. There is nothing
of poverty suggested, and no intimation of sterility. Few jutting crags
are seen, unless hewn out of the mountain side in cutting the wild path-
way of the railroad; and no rough rocks, piled heap upon heap, offend
the eye as it sweeps the gracefully rounded knobs.

Well has the historian Bancroft said: “This scenery has a character
of grandeur of its own; and in the wonderful varieties of forest and
lawn, of river and mountain, of nature in her savage wjldness, and
nature in her loveliest forms, presents a series of pictures which no well-
educated American should leave unvisited. We cross the Atlantic in quest
of attractive scenes; and lo! we have at home, alongside of the great iron
pathway, views that excel anything that can be seen among the mountains

of Scotland or in the passes of the Apennines.”

Mr. Dupont and the Colonel were taking an after-dinner smoke.
Even Hawk’s Nest, with all the wild beauty of its surroundings, could not
long divert the Colonel’s attention. Just consider the coal, the timber,

the ore going to waste! But even

he had to admit there was no very

good site for a town in that neigh-
borhood.

“Just look there!” exclaimed

| Alfred, pointing up to the towering























| rocks.
| “Yes,” responded the Doctor,
| “that is Hawk’s Nest. It should, how-
| ever, be called Marshall’s Pillar, in
| honor of Chief Justice Marshall. In
1812 he was sent by the Governor of
Virginia to make a survey of the
-scene. ‘Those cliffs rise nearly per-
| pendicularly from the water’s edge
some twelve hundred feet; and you
must notice the enormous boulders in





TOE

A COAL CHUTE.
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. OI

the river. What an untold number of years must have passed




since the river commenced to wear away this chan-
nel.”



“Tf you don’t head uncle
off,’ laughed Bert, “he will be
giving us a lecture on geology
next,”
“T think we would all like THE NEW RIVER.
to hear it,” remarked Mrs. Dupont. But the Doctor only smiled and
shook his head.
“Aunt Florence, can’t you recite some suitable poem? You have a
supply on hand for almost every occasion and place,” asked Alice.
62 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

“T am afraid my poem will not be more welcome than the Doctor’s

secture,” she replied; “but I do know one very appropriate for this place,

and if the boys won’t object, I will recite it.” :
Of course, no objections were heard and so Miss Granger recited the

following poem:
‘““Nature’s lover, pause to see

Where Kanawha wanders free;
Nature in her wildest mood,

’Mid her grandest solitude,

With her mountains thronged around,
Listening to the torrent’s sound;
Hill and valley, rock and floods,
Waving with eternal woods

Here the earth-cloud lowly creeping,
There along the summit sleeping;
Here the cliff uplifting high

Its bold forehead to the sky,
There, like a gigantic lover,
Bending with devotion over

The coy. river, swift and clear,—
A gay, bounding mountaineer,
Now it bounds away, away,
Sporting with its jewelled spray:
Now it seems to woo your feet,
But, ah! trust not the deceit;
Shrub and pebble though they seem,
Rock and forest guard the stream.
Even the Grecian lovers leap
Never tempted such a steep,
Where the hawkling far below
Nestles ’neath the beetling brow;
While along yon craggy bed
Lurks the vengeful copperhead,
And the avalanche of rock

Poises for an earthquake shock.
All is fresh, sublime, and wild,

As when first by nature piled,
Ere the white man wandered here,
Or the red man chased the deer,—
Naming ere he fled forever,

This his own Romantic River.”












































Ky a


64 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MOUNTAIN SCENERY

Somewhat to her surprise there was a genuine burst of applause when
she had concluded. Even the solemn-looking traveler a few seats in the
rear, whom they all took to be a minister, seemed to be much pleased with
the recital. He introduced himself to the Doctor as Mr. Morgan, and
made known the fact that he had been collecting materials for writing a
history of the country.

“You doubtless are aware,” he said, speaking to the party generally,
“that during the early colonial history of this country this narrow
valley was quite an important one ‘The Shawnees and other Indian
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 65

tribes made use of this valley to come from their home in Ohio and
attack the settlements in Virginia. I am now going to locate the sit-
uation of old Fort Donnelly, where a determined attack was made by
the Indians in 1778.”

The train had now passed Hinton, and they were in the valley of
the Greenbrier. Under the circumstances it is not surprising that Mr.
Morgan was induced to tell the following story of Indian warfare in
Greenbrier Valley. The boys gathered around closely, and as Colonel
Jones had taken his departure at Hinton, Mr. Dupont was present also.

“A century and a quarter ago,” he began, “settlements in Virginia
were very few. There were a few along the Ohio, and a few in this
Greenbrier Valley. Terrible scenes were witnesed here in 1763, when
the Shawnees, under the lead of Cornstalk, raided this part and utterly
destroyed two settlements. In 1778 a strong body of Indians crossed
the Ohio near Point Pleasant, and after besieging the fort at that place,
called Fort Randolph, for nearly a week, moved on up this valley to
try and surprise the settlements in Greenbrier. The commander at the
fort immediately started two of the soldiers over the country to warn
the settlements, but they were discovered and fired on by the Indians,
and so hurried back to the fort. Thereupon two more volunteered
their services. :

“A friendly squaw painted them and dressed them up in true In-
dian style. They had to travel nearly day and night. They reached
Fort Donnelly, about ten miles from the present location of Lewisburg,
just in time, for the Indians were only twenty miles away, preparing
for a general massacre, and the white settlers were totally ignorant of
their danger. Fortunately all succeeded in getting to the fort except
two, who were killed.

“The attack was made just at morning. A white servant opened the
gate of the stockade and went out to get some kindling, leaving the gate
open. He had gone but a little distance before he was shot down, and
the Indians rose from their hiding-places and made a rush for the gate.
They almost succeeded in getting in. Then began a terrible fight. here
were twenty white men against several hundred Indians. The fight waged
all day, but the Indians were compelled to retire. That was the last
serious attack of the Indians in this valley.”
66 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

Greenbrier Valley is far different from the rugged sublimity of the
New River cafions, but it has a peculiar beauty of its own. Who has not
heard of the pellucid Greenbrier? Our trains follow the course of the
river and soon begin to climb the flanks of the main chain of the
Alleghanies.

“I think,” said Alice, suddenly looking up from a guide-book she was
studying, “this writer expresses the exact facts of the case, speaking of
this part of the ride: eo

““ Brightly, exultingly, all the way this singing torrent dances on sil-
ver sandals down the glens; now flowing near the windows in long,
placid reaches, broken only by the leap of the shining bass, then hiding
in bloomy thickets to peep from behind the lace veil of some far-off falls.
How grandly the train sweeps along the curves of the stream, the beating
of the engine’s mighty heart keeping time to the rhythm of the rippling
river. Onward and upward it fares; now far above the water, sure-footed
and tireless, seeming almost to swim the air like a gull rounding a head-
land; now tearing through green arcades of graceful birch and tangled
muscadine.’ ”’

“Bravo!” cried the Doctor; “the distant Alleghanies have reminded
me of a poem. I will not undertake to recite it, as Miss Granger did
hers, but with your permission I will read it.”

“By all means let’s have the poem, as the proper complement of my
prose extract,” said Alice.

So the Doctor produced a little book, and read as follows:

“Ye glorious Alleghanies! from this height
I see your peaks on every side arise;
Their summits beneath the giddy sight,
Like ocean billows heaved among the skies.
In wild magnificence upon them lies
The primal forest, kindling in the glow
Of this mild autumn sun with golden dyes,
While, in his slanting ray, their shadows grow
Broad o’er that paradise of vale and wood below.
How beautiful! though fresh from nature’s God

?

They show no footstep of an elder race ;
THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES. 67

No human hand has ever turned their sod,

Or heaved their massive granite from its place;
The green banks of their floods bear not a trace
Of pomp and power, which have come and gone
And left their crumbling ruins to deface

The virgin earth. Here Nature rules alone;
The beauty of the hill and valley is her own.”

The poet speaks truly. The Alleghanies can not be classed amongst
the formidable mountains of the world, yet that portion of them situated
in Pennsylvania and Virginia, and further south still, is by no means de-
void of scenic grandeur. The far-off peaks peer above the intervening
clouds. The densely wooded flanks afford a pleasing contrast to the quiet
valleys, through which gurgles and plashes some mountain stream on its
way to swell the current of some mighty river. In no place has nature
shown her capriciousness more than in this section of our country. Hills,
ravines, and mountain peaks; height rises on height until the main ridge
is reached. In the years to come, when the charms of American scenery
shall be acknowledged, tourists will not rush -to foreign lands until they
have visited this beautiful section.

Just as the long summer day was drawing to a close, while yet the
western sky was resplendent with the setting sun, the train drew up at
White Sulphur Springs, where they were going to stop for a few days.
A day on a railroad train sometimes takes you quite a long way, as far
as distance is concerned. It may do considerable in other ways as well.
A party traveling together all day, occupying the same car, enjoying the
same scenery, even if strangers in the morning, are acquainted at night,
while mere acquaintances grow intimate.

Now the Doctor and Miss Granger had not been thrown particularly
together during the day. True, they had eaten dinner together, but the
Doctor had been quite as much with Alice as with Florence. Yet, when
he helped her off the train—her lame wrist, you know!—we could not
have explained the peculiar look on their faces, unless we had noticed
that some way their hands had got tangled up in the operation, and there
was just a little pressure given and received. The fact is, Mrs. Dupont,
who was keeping a sisterly eye on Florence, was also noticing these little
68 THE HEART OF THE ALLEGHANIES.

incidents. She had very ambitious plans for Helen. As far as she knew,
Dr. Blanchard was an excellent man, but that must not be thought of.
Why, there was young Frank Gliddon, a rising attorney, with rich father,
besides being comfortably fixed in his own right. He was the one that
Florence must have.

That night Bert noticed his uncle seemed pre-occupied. The fact is,
a verse of poetry was running through Dr. Blanchard’s mind, something
like the following:

“A glance, a smile,—I see it yet!—

A moment ere the train was starting;
How strange to tell!—we scarcely met,
And yet I felt a pang at parting!”



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































70 NEW RIVER CLIFFS.
THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 71

CHAPTER III.

THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

“There’s not a nook within this solemn pass
But were an apt confessional for one
Taught by his summer spent, his autumn -gone,
That life is but a tale of morning grass
Withered at eve. From scenes of art which chase
That thought away, turn, and with watchful eyes
Feed it ’mid nature’s old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear than glass,
Untouched, unbreathed upon. Thrice happy quest,
If from a golden perch of aspen spray
(October’s workmanship to rival May)
The pensive warbler of the ruddy breast
That moral sweeten by a heaven-taught lay,
Lulling the year, with all its cares, to rest.”
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH.

¢¢ SUPPOSE you call that water pretty
nice, don’t you, Doctor?” inquired Mr.
Dupont, with a quizzical look on his
face, as he slowly sipped a glass the next
morning.

“There are very few people who like
the taste of it, especially at first. But it
is justly famous as a health-giving spring.
Some stubborn diseases are left here,” replied.
the Doctor.

“Yes, I should judge they were lef:


724 ‘THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

right here in the spring. That is probably what makes the water taste

so queer,” responded Mr. Dupont.





The Doctor and Mr. Dupont were taking an early morning stroll, and
were now standing by the dome-crowned pavillion of the spring proper.
A lovely scene was presented to their view. They were still discussing
‘THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 73

the landscape when an elderly gentleman, who was also taking an early
walk, joined in the conversation. He was so well informed, and such a
pleasant conversationalist, that he made a very agreeable companion with
whom to discuss the history of the Springs.

“Years ago” said he, “these Springs were more celebrated than they
are now, though I must say this whole section will undoubtedly grow in
popularity from now on. In the days before the war this was the great
watering place of the South. A large portion of the beauty and fashion
of the Southern States congregated at these Springs during the season.
Statesmen and jewelled dames have thronged these rooms more than once.
Of course the war put an end, for the time being, to all that, but the
beauty of the surroundings and the health-giving waters will always make
this a justly celebrated watering place.”

“T am told,” remarked Mr. ee “that this whole section of coun-
try is celebrated for its springs.”

“Ves, indeed, sir. The general trend of the Alleghanies is from the
northeast to the southwest. ‘This vailey, or succession of valleys, lying on
the west flank of the main ridge, is the location of numerous springs, and
some time, sir, it will be estimated at its true worth. You see, up in Bath
County, not more than forty miles to the northeast, there are thermal
springs, known as the Warm, Healing, Hot, and Bath Alum Springs, while
to the southwest of us,in about the same line, there are the Red Sulphur,
the Salt Sulphur, and the Sweet Springs. Out of the line somewhat are
the Blue Sulphur Springs, about twenty-five miles away. Thus you see
we are just about in the center of the district.”

“T suppose these springs are all slightly different, though we would
naturally think they would be about the same,” said Mr. Dupont.

“Oh, they are decidedly different. The Red Sulphur Springs, in Mon-
roe County, are quite celebrated for their effects on those in the prelimi-
nary grasp of consumption. If a person is generally run down, the Sweet
‘Springs are the place. The springs in Bath County are valuable for other
purposes.”

“You seem to be well acquainted with all this section,” remarked Dr.
Blanchard.

“Indeed, I am. Of late years I come here more from force of habi
7A THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

than anything else. I assure you, sir, memory plays many a strange trick
on me. What a glamour it throws over the past! It repaints its pleas-
ures, blots out its sorrows. At times when I give way to reflection I have
somewhat the same feelings as when I wander in some old churchyard
aud seek to decipher the faint inscriptions on the stones. Ah! the days
of the past, sir. I can recall when I used to visit these places amidst the
élite of Virginia, Carolina,and Maryland. In those days the Sweet Springs,





WARM SPRINGS VALLEY, VIRGINIA.

the White Sulphur, and the Warm Springs of Bath County were the only
places of any note. The White and the Sweet were about on an equality.
And yet among the visitors of those days, how few are now remaining?
I recollect half a dozen, possibly there may be twenty survivors, and such
is life!” ,

“Here they are now,” broke in a merry voice, and Alfred and Bert,
with Alice and Miss Granger, came up. “Papa,I think you and Doctor
Blanchard ought to give an account of yourselves, for slipping off and
THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 75

leaving us to amuse ourselves as best we can,’ exclaimed Alice in a serio-
comic tone.

‘“T judge from your appearance that you have been having a pretty
good time,” said Doctor Blanchard, gazing admiringly on them all in gen-
eral, and, to be candid, on Miss Florence in particular.

~ “Oh, we have been taking a walk. You have no idea what beautiful
scenery there is here,” responded Miss Ashton.

“Who was the gentleman you were talking with as we came up?” in-
quired Alice.

But no one could answer her question, as he had quietly walked away.

Mr. Dupont went up to the hotel to get Mrs. Dupont, and the whole
party strolled on. And while they are enjoying themselves, let us survey
the scene. The valley, in the center of which are he famous springs, is
several miles in length,in a general direction from northeast to south-
west. The location is certainly beautiful. To the north and the east
the Alleghanies tower up in picturesque and winning beauty; to the west
are the Greenbrier hills. The noble spring, which is the center of attrac-
tion, flows about thirty gallons per minute, and the supply is constanily
the same. You notice the tasteful pavillion which is built over it is sup-
ported by twelve Ionic columns, and the dome is surmounted by a statue
of Hygeia, the patron saint of healing, holding in her right hand a cup,
as filled with water, and in her other a vegetable or herb.

Shortly after the mail came in from the West that day, Dr. Blanchard
drew Mr. Dupont to one side. “I have just received a letter,” said he,
“from a Mr. Graham, who is a very wealthy and influential person in my
home town. I was foolish enough to write him, before I left Cincinnati,
that I was coming over to this place. Well, he writes me that he wishes
me to visit the Springs in Bath County, and recommend one of them to
him, as he is advised to visit them for his health. His daughter is to
accompany him. I don’t care anything about going, but I don’t want to
offend him.”

“Well, why not run up there?” exclaimed Mr. Dupont.

“Ear—well—I—you know we had about concluded to visit the Natu-
ral Bridge together, and this looks as if I would have to give up that
part of the trip or else disappoint Mr. Graham.”
76 THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA.

“Oh! I will tell you how to fix it,’ said Mr. Dupont. Supposing we
leave the women folks, and you and I and the boys go on a flying trip
to Bath County. That will give them a good rest. We will hustle
through with it and get back in a day or so. I will fix it with Mrs.
Dupont.”



ROE sate
FALLING SPRINGS, CASCADE, VIRGINIA.

“Tf you will do that it will be just the thing,” responded the Doctor,
“and another time I will be more careful about mixing business with
pleasure.”

So that was the plan agreed upon. But Mr. Dupont, with that
strange blindness of some very smart men who can not see things
happening under their noses, made a.blunder in “fixing it up.”
THE SPRINGS OF VIRGINIA. 77

“You see, my dear,” he said to his estimable wife, “one of the
Doctor’s most influential patrons wants him to make a little investigation
for him, and recommend a spring sure to cure the half dozen diseases,
more or less, that have got hold of him. But, to tell you candidly, Helen,
I think the old gentleman’s daughter has a good deal to do with it. She
is to accompany her father. It won’t take us but a day or two.”

“Well, all right, William; we had just as soon stay here for a day or
so. But—that young lady—her father rich, you say?”

“Yes; rich as a lord. She is an only child. Don’t wonder the Doctor
is anxious to accommodate them.”

“Quite natural,” said Mrs. Dupont, absently.

We all know how stories grow by repetition. This is about the way
Mrs. Dupont explained to Florence why Mr. Dupont, the boys, and the
Doctor were going on a side trip to Bath County.

“The father of the young lady that Doctor Blanchard is very attentive
to, and who is a very rich old man, wants him to make a little investigation
for him, and recommenda spring. They will only be gone a little while.”

“I dare say we will have a good time while they are gone,” said Miss
Granger, carelessly.

Probably no one but a sister would have noticed the slight change in
the tone of the voice.

Supper was over, They were admiring the sunset when Mr. Dupont
spoke out with ‘Well, I declare, if there ain’t the Professor, the historian,
you know.”

Sure enough, it was Prof. Morgan, whom they had met on the cars the
day before. They were glad to see him.

“Did you get the information you wanted?” asked Dr. Blanchard.

“Yes, I obtained what I wanted, and so came on up here. Did you
know you were right in the midst of a most interesting place? Before
the whites came here this was a favorite resort of the Indians. In fact,
this was a Shawnee burying ground. I wonder if their ghosts haunt the
place? That mountain to the south, called Kate’s Mountain, commemo-
rates an exploit of an Indian maiden.”

“Professor, can’t you draw on your store of information and give us
some Indian story of this locality,” inquired Mr. Dupont.
















































































































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VIRGINIA SCENERY.
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 79

This request was enthusiastically seconded by all, and so, after a few
modest disclaimers of any especial knowledge on the subject, the Professor
told the following story:

THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

It was many moons ago, long before the pale faces began to covet the
Indian’s hunting grounds, that War-Eagle was chief of the Shawnees.
Then the Shawnees were a mighty people. They held undisputed sway
in all this section of country. Even the mighty Iroquois of the North
respected them; and far to the South their war-parties marched to avenge
any insult. War-Eagle was but young, yet he was mighty in war and in
council. The young braves were anxious to join any expedition that he
led, and the enemies of the Shawnees dreaded his name. He was a cun-
ning hunter as well. There were always provisions and to spare in the
tepee of War-Eagle. When his bow-string twanged, the flying arrow sang
a requiem for the deer at which it was launched.

But the heart of the red-man, however phlegmatic may be his exterior,
is at times responsive to the same chords as his white brother. Running-
Bear, the chief of the Crow clan of the Shawnees, had an only daughter,
White-Fawn. She was as celebrated for her dusky beauty as her father
was for his prowess in war; and who had not heard of Running-Bear?
It was at a great council of the Shawnees, when War-Eagle was present,
that he saw White-Fawn. She moved among the other maidens like a
queen, and superintended the preparation of the green-corn feast, with
which the council was to terminate. War-Eagle saw, and War-Eagle was
conquered. ‘here was the maiden of whom he had dreamed. But, alas!
was it not known that she was to wed the young chief of the Black-
Deer clan? Did her father not so decree it?

And yet the Indian cupid delights to make a general muss, as
much as the cupid who plays such tricks on unsuspecting whites.
Straight as an arrow was War-Eagle. How proud and noble he looked!
When he spoke, what close attention the grave counselors gave him!
She felt sure she would rather mate with him than with Strong-Panther.
Now, those acquainted with Indian lore know that the father had but
80 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

little to say about his own children; for they were not members of the
same clan to which he belonged. So, as her mother and her aunts
sided with White-Fawn in her determination to wed War-Eagle, Running-
Bear had but to submit. Not so Strong-Panther. He felt all the pangs



LAWN DRIVE AND COTTAGES, WARM SPRINGS, VIRGINIA.

of jealousy. At length the demon of murder woke in his l.eart. What
was life without White-Fawn? Either he or War-Eagle must die.
War-Eagle was hunting in the forest; he had just brought a deer
down with his bow, when Strong-Panther was seen approaching him. It
was plain that a mortal conflict was at hand. By tacit consent their bows
were discarded, and with tomahawks the contest was to be decided. Who
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 81

can tell by what intuition it was that White-Fawn felt there was evil for
her and her beloved from Strong-Panther that day? Perhaps her
Totem bird had sounded a note of warning. At any rate, noiselessly but
swiftly had she followed Strong-Panther. And now the fierce conflict
wages. Strong is War-Eagle, but what is his strength compared with that
of his antagonist, wrought to frenzy by insane jealousy. A slight slip,
and cruel fate—War-Eagle was no more. But oh! Strong-Panther, is there
no one to warn you? What whoop is that ringing in his ears? He never
knew. White-Fawn herself had avenged the death of War-Eagle.

The council fires of the Shawnee village burned brightly that night,
but two of its wise ones were away. As is known, women sometimes ad-
dress the council. There was only a slight surprise, therefore, as White-
Fawn entered the circle and commenced to speak. In measured tones she
told what she had seen and done that day. When assembled in council,
the Indians never allow themselves to be surprised at any information
brought to them. So not by movement or gesture was there anything to
denote the startling nature of the story White-Fawn related.

The recital concluded, White-Fawn abruptly left the circle. No one
thought of watching her. Sorrow sometimes drives the stoical Indian to
seek the grim solace of death. But a few minutes elapsed before White-
Fawn was heard singing her death song on the brow of the neighboring
precipice. ;

But when they sought her body they found it not. They discovered,
however, a spring of marvelous healing power. The simple belief of the
Indians was that the Great Spirit, pitying the fate of one so young, had
suddenly changed her to a life-giving fountain. And they do say that at
mystic times and uncanny hours the veil of the past is lifted and the ter-
tified on-looker can see the shadowy outlines of the two chiefs fighting,
and at such times, too, the gurgling spring sounds strangely like the dis-
tant death-song of an Indian brave.

While the Professor was telling his story the full moon had rode up
in the eastern sky. The sharp peaks of the distant mountains were
clearly defined against the moonlit heavens. Only a few of the more ven-
turesome stars had thought it worth while to light their evening fires. In
short, it was just one of those beautiful nights which come like'a benedic-
82 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

tion into our worried lives. Even when away in pursuit of health or
pleasure such evenings are always welcome. ‘The Professor accompanied
Mr. Dupont to the reading-room and joined him in a social smoke.

The Doctor, quite oblivious to the alarming development of “ Mr. Gra-
ham’s daughter” in his case, was at a loss to understand Miss Granger’s
conduct. She was very polite, almost formally so, and as the Doctor ob-



HOT SPRINGS, VIRGINIA.

served, with a sudden twinge at his heart, she seemed to be fully as much
taken up with a young gentleman from Richmond as with himself. He
couldn’t accuse her of flirting, not at all. Prof. Morgan had introduced
the young gentleman. He was a fluent talker, and she and Alice seemed
to be enjoying his society fully as much as if there were no such a person
as Dr. Blanchard in their party. No,she was too tired to go out walking,
so somewhat abruptly Dr. Blanchard excused himself and went to his room.

The next morning was pleasant, and the “for gentlemen only” party,
as Alfred calls it, got off in fine shape.”.
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 83

“We shall expect a good report from you,” said Mrs. Dupont, just as
they were leaving. “I am not sure,” she added “but this is a deep-laid
scheme on your part to go off and have a good time all by yourself. If
you don’t come back in three days, we shall go on our trip.”

“All right. How would it do anyway for us to take different trips,
Doc? I am not sure but we would have better times that way.”

“Tam afraid we would have a pretty dull time,” said the Doctor
gallantly, but inwardly he was fuming because Miss Granger was not
present to see them off. And where was the young lady? ‘aking a walk
with the young gentleman from Richmond.

The Springs in Bath County, to which these gentlemen were bound,
were at that time only accessible by hacks and carriages from Millboro,
but a railroad will very soon be completed from Covington. It is doubt-
ful, however, whether the short cut by railroad will wholly suffice for the
longer one by carriage from Millboro. The road is excellent, the scenery
entrancing, and if the tourist is not fatigued, the drive is exhilarating.
Mr. Dupont was overflowing with good nature. “T tell you, Doc, this is
something like it!” he shouted from the top of the coach. “TI haven’t
had so much fun since I was out on the coast. All we need is to have
some bold highwayman hold us up to complete the scene.” But there was
no danger of highwaymen in that peaceful region, though Dr. Blanchard
suggested that the toll-gate keepers would fill the bill. Their route took
them right past the Bath Alum Springs, but they kept on to Hot Springs,
as they were going to make that resort their headquarters.

“Well, here we are,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont, as the coach rolled up to
the hotel. “Now then, Doc, what is the order of exercises?”

“I think about the first thing is to get something to eat.”

“Second the motion,” called out Bert.

“That suits us all. Traveling is not what it ought to be, unless you
keep within close distance of your base of supplies,” responded Mr. Du-
pont, leading the way to the dining-room.

After supper they had the good luck to meet with THE MAN WHO
BELIEVED IN THE TOWN. We have all seen him. He is to be found
wherever an incipient boom is in process of development. It is he who
meets the new arrival in the extremely crude building temporarily doing
84 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

duty for the elegant “Union Central Depot,” which looks so very nice on
paper. He pilots that arrival around through the underbrush or wheat-
fields and deciphers the legends on the guide posts explaining that this
is the corner of ‘Second Avenue and Third Street West,” where the
“Grand Opera House is to be built.” It was he who had surveyed the



HOT SPRINGS, VA.

new arrivals from a distance, and now sauntered up. Would, however,
that every one of his class had the solid foundation on which to rest his
statements that this one did. He was soon explaining to them all about it.

“This valley, gentlemen, is one of the marvels of this country—one
of its greatest marvels. Not only are the springs wonderfully efficacious
as health-giving springs, but consider the glorious surroundings. We are
right in the heart of the Alleghanies, 2,500 feet above the sea, and you
see the mountain peaks rising for 1,500 feet above us. The scenery is
gorgeous, richly colored, bold, and picturesque; while the climate is simply
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 85

perfect—cool, dry, and invigorating—a tonic in itself, sir. For three gener-
ations this valley has been visited by people from all parts of the United
States, and even from foreign lands. It is steadily rising in popularity
all the time.

“Of course you had a fine ride from Millboro to-day, but the railroad
connecting us with the main line at Covington is now almost completed.
The Southern Improvement Company, appreciating the wonderful attrac-
tions of this valley for the tourist for health and pleasure, have made most
extensive purchases, and mean to Spare no work or money to improve their
property. ‘They will make a veritable paradise out of this valley.”

“How many different springs are there in this section?” broke in Mr.
Dupont.

“There are three principal ones, sir. You are now at the Hot Springs,
you know. Three miles below us are the celebrated Healing Springs. Four
miles above us are the Warm Springs. These resorts are now all under
one general management. Beautiful drives connect them. Excellent hotels
are to be found at all.”

“Fach one has its own especial peculiarity, I suppose,” remarked Dz.
Blanchard.

“Yes, sir; one is better fitted for the curing of some special disease
than the others. But you really ought to consult one of the doctors here
in reference to that. I only want to say that I don’t believe there is any
disease going but what we can knock it at some one of the springs.”

“Old age and all, I suppose,” said Mr. Dupont.

“Yes; old age included, if you only take it in time. ‘The trouble is,
you generally wait too long,” responded the ever-ready talker, with a laugh.

After he had gone, Bert simply remarked that he was “some on the
talk.”

“I should say so,” said Mr. Dupont; “but, Doc, that is what we
came here to find out.”

“Yes, that is true. Well, let us smoke over the question.”

The next day they took a drive around, and Dr. Blanchard made ex-
haustive inquiries and quickly satisfied himself as to which resort would
be the best for a man like Mr. Graham. The letter of information and
advice written, they were ready to return to White Sulphur.
86 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

Now it 1s no use of disguising matters; the simple fact is, Dr. Blanchard
had discovered in his brief absence that he was in love with Miss Ashton.
He smiled grimly to himself when this fact dawned on him. But it was
a delicious sort of a feeling after all. True, he had only known her a
brief time, but this is the age of electricity, and a week now ought to



CASCADE, HEALING SPRINGS, VA.

count for about a year a generation ago. And how about the lady in
the case? Why, to be candid, the same sort of a confession must be made
as to her. But then there was that unfortunate Miss Graham. ‘That set-
tled the matter. She must think no more of Dr. Blanchard. But that did
not prevent her face lighting up with a glow when they returned sooner
than expected from their trip to Bath County, and that glow played sad
havoc with what little independence Dr. Blanchard still possessed.

The next day they resumed their journey east. Natural Bridge was
to be the next point. We all know the stories of wondrous develop-
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. 87

ment of towns in the New South. The tide seems to be turning in the
direction of old Virginia now. The tourists passed through Covington,
Low Moor, and Clifton Forge, all situated in the center of a marvel-
ously rich mineral belt. It is in this’ section that new cities spring up
in the course of a few months. Vast manufacturing plants, representing
a capital of many hundred thousand dollars, are to be found, where but















A QUIET VALLEY.

a short time previously there was a wilderness. ‘The station for Natural
Bridge was soon reached, and the party took a coach for the bridge it-
self. The road wound up the mountain side for nearly three miles, and
finally conducted them to a genuine old-fashioned hotel.

While they were resting, the Doctor was seen talking to a young
man, whom they afterwards found was to be their guide.

“Well, come on; if the bridge is not too far, let’s go and see it,”
said Mr. Dupont.

“All right; come on. If not too tired we will walk a short distance,
where we can have a view of the bridge.”

They went but a little distance when the guide said something in
88 THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

a low tone to the Doctor, who thereupon pushed aside the branches of
an arbor vite, led the party a few steps forward, and bade them look
down. —





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A MOUNTAIN STREAM.

A succession of shrieks and various exclamations followed thiy com-
mand. Both Alice and Florence hastily returned to the roadway. The
fact was, they were on the bridge,but did not know it! The public
road crosses the bridge, but the chasm is so hidden by the natural para-
pet of rocks and trees that it can not be seen. The passing traveler
would not know he was journeying over one of the greatest curiosities
in the world.


NATURAL BRIDGE. 89
go THE PROFESSOR’S STORY.

They then retraced their steps and wound down the ravine. Here a
most beautiful and inspiring view of the bridge is to be had. Look up!

“With admiring eye,
Behold that half ellipse, so light, so high,
Like the clear arch of pure ethereal span
That as his cov’nant God vouchsafed to man.”

“How very sublime!” almost whispered Florence.

Before them was the yawning gorge, rugged and wild, clothed as it
were in sombre shadows, through which the light glanced from the cas-
cades of Cedar Creek. Above, with its outline of tree and rock cutting
sharp against the blue sky, rose the eternal arch. There are few objects
in nature which so entirely fill the soul as this bridge in its unique and
simple grandeur. In consideration of the perfection of its adaptation to
circumstances, the simplicity of its design, the sublimity of its proportions,
the spectator experiences a fullness of satisfaction which familiarity only.
serves to increase; and while that sentiment of awe, inseparable from the
first impression, may be weakened or disappear altogether, wonder and ad-
miration grow with time.

As the objects around became familiar, conversation again became gene-
ral. Alfred wanted to know where it was that Washington wrote his name.
The guide showed them the reputed place, on the right-hand side, but the
longer they looked the more sceptical they became, and finally concluded
that story would have to go, to keep company with the little hatchet and
the cherry tree. Florence observed that for her part she didn’t think a
man like Washington would be apt to attempt such a silly feat. It seems
to detract from the dignity of character of one who wrote his name so
high upon “The steep where Fame’s proud temple shines afar.”

Although they had had a pleasant time at the bridge, yet the Doctor
felt anything but happy. He could not disguise from himself that some-
thing was going wrong. He couldn’t account for Miss Ashton’s manner.
He had given her no cause for offense, as far as he knew. But some-
thing was wrong. The Doctor was a man of action. Great was the
surprise of Mr. Dupont when he announced that evening that he was
going to Washington direct.
THE PROFESSOR’S STORY. QI

‘““A sudden change of program, is it not, Doctor?” asked Mr. Du-
pont. “Why, we all look on you as an old friend now.”

The Doctor looked at Miss Ashton, but she was looking out of the
window and he could not see her face.

“Oh, I don’t know. I have some friends in Washington I want to
see. I may join you again later, if you can give me any dates.”

So Mr. Dupout agreed to write to him, and then for the present the
Doctor and Bert parted company with the Duponts. After thinking mat-
ters over, the latter concluded that they would go to Richmond and Old
Point Comfort. This would give them a chance to see not only a city
famous in the annals of our country, but one of the pushing, growing cities
of the New South: one that is arousing herself to the great possibilities
in store for her.




92 ALONG THE JAMES.

CHAPTER IV.

- ALONG THE JAMES.

UR party had made a flying run to

Richmond, and were now ready to

see some of the sights of that fa-
mous city, and renew the historical associa-
tions always clustering around the James.
“While we don’t want to hurry,” said Mr.
Dupont, “yet it is pretty warm now, and we
must get this part of our trip through with,
and away to cooler places.”



watt ed

This was satisfactory to all, and they were soon taking a ride around
the city. To get a good view of the city they visited the Capitol Square.
This they found to be a lovely little park in the very heart of the city.

“This court-house,” explained Mr. Dupont, “was the capitol of the
Confederate States, and their Congress met here. In the rotunda you will
find probably the best statue of Gen. per not to speak of the
fine equestrian statue you see before us.’

“But just look at the squirrels!” exclaimed Algrea

And no wonder the boy was astonished, for these beautiful little ani-
mals were playing around with the utmost confidence, and one lady was
feeding them peanuts.

From the platform on the roof of the Capitol a magnificent view was
obtained of the city. ‘Like old Rome, Richmond is built on seven hills,”
said Florence.
AS

ENS
SERS
PERS

SS ss
SENSE
=

ane



THE WASHINGTON EQUESTRIAN STATUE, RICHMOND, VA.

95

ALONG THE JAMES.

1

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E WASHINGTON

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death!”

ive me

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and the many other interesting places to be seen here.”

¢

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k Henry sai

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Church, where Patr

1m

Trl

“T can but think of the te

ble battles that have been fought to obta

” said Mrs. Dupont, with a sigh.

1s city,

f th
“True,” responded Mr. Dupont, “but let us remember that older period

possession o

in our country’s history—the Colonial period and the days of Washington,
96 ALONG THE JAMES.

for you must remember he was a Virginian, and, as you all know, Virginia
was called the ‘Mother of Presidents” owing to the large number of our
presidents who were citizens of this State.”

“The people ought to have his little hatchet on exhibition some-
where,” remarked Alice.





WASHINGTON’S HEADQUARTERS, RICHMOND.

“The hatchet seems to have been lost beyond recall,” replied her
father. “But I want you all to notice the evidence of substantial growth
to be found in Richmond to-day. I tell you, folks, here is going to be one
of the great cities of America.”

“What in the world is the driver stopping here for?” broke in Alice,
as the carriage came to a halt before a dilapidated and generally forlorn-
looking house.

“I believe this is the house used as the headquarters of Washington
once on a time. Not a very pretentious-looking place, but I presume it
was a grand building when Washington lived here.”

“I should have thought the curious travelers would have carried the
house off by piecemeal before this time,” said Florence.
ALONG THE JAMES. 2 BOP

‘Perhaps I can explain that,’ replied Mr. Dupont. “Some years ago
I was here on an excursion trip and gave up ten cents to the fellow who
kept this house to show me around. I was especially warned not to take



anything away, but I finally paid the genial brigand five cents to get me
a piece of mortar. ‘The impression was so strong on my mind that he
kept a box full of pieces of mortar to sell to the unwary that I only
carried it about a square when I threw it away. The reason why tourists
98 ALONG THE JAMES.

don’t carry this house away is, I take it, because a full supply of odds and
ends gathered from other sources are provided for them.”

But they found a good deal more than revolutionary relics to look at.
There was the site of Libby Prison—the building itself having been





LEE MONUMENT.

removed to Chicago, where it is proposed to set it up as a gruesome re-
minder of the late unpleasantness. There is also Belle Isle, interesting
from the same cause; the United States custom-house, that once did duty
as the Treasury of the Confederacy; also the house Jefferson Davis re-
sided in, and which was also known as the White House.

Also in the square they had noticed statues of Stonewall Jackson, the
ALONG THE JAMES. 99

gift to Richmond by the British admirers of the gallant general. ‘The
statue to Gen. R. E. Lee was a most noteworthy one. It represents the
great soldier on horseback. Had they had time to visit Hollywood Ceme-



Litt Sgt
PY ES
GY
iggy

TE,

PtH At

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YN

By
tH



tery they would have seen the great granite pyramid which the ladies
have erected to the memory of the fallen soldier.

“I wish,” exclaimed Alice, “that we might take a run to Jamestown.
There we would find something to take us ‘back a long way in history.”

“Jamestown,” said Alfred; “Oh, I know; where Capt. John Smith,
Pocahontas, and all those folks were. Is it far from here?”

“No, not very; but I guess we had better not think of going there,”
replied Mr. Dupont. “It would be an’ interesting place, though.”
100 ALONG THE JAMES.

“Now, papa,” exclaimed Alice, “you have been poking fun at the
little hatchet yarn about Gen. Washington. What do you have to say
about Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas ?”

“Well, you know I do not claim to be an expert in such matters.
Of course there were just such persons as Capt. John Smith, Pocahontas,
and Powhattan, and Smith was taken prisoner by the Indians. But there
are many things about it that are not true. For instance, Powhattan was
not king; nota bit of it. He was simply an Indian Chief, undoubtedly very
influential. Pocahontas might, and very likely did, save Smith’s life, but
then she was not a princess; that is all nonsense. It always amuses me
to read how proud people are to trace their descent back to her. Bless
me, it is nothing to be proud of. She was neither more nor less tham
any other Indian woman, and what is there to be proud about in having
descended from an Indian? I had rather trace my descent back to a
good, honest Englishman or Dutchman.

“But, papa, you must really be careful about talking that way in Vir-
ginia. Are there any ruins at Jamestown?”

“T believe there is the ruined tower of an old church standing there.
You, of course, understand that the church is not a relic of the earliest
period, but is simply a very ancient one.”

At this point Miss Ashton recited a verse of poetry about the ruins

at Jamestown.

One mouldering tower, overgrown with ivy, shows
Where first Virginia’s capitol arose,

And to the tourists’ vision far withdrawn,

Stands like a sentry at the gates of dawn.

he church has perished; faint the lines and dim
Of those whose voices raised the choral hymn.
Go read the record on the mossy stone,

‘Tis brief and sad—oblivion claim its own.

‘THOMPSON’S VIRGINIA.



OLD CHURCH TOWER AT JAMESTOWN.
ALONG THE JAMES. IOI

That afternoon they left for Old Point Comfort. This was their last
tide on the lines of the Chesapeake and Ohio. They could but wonder
that they had not known before of the beautiful scenery and the many



THOMAS JEFFERSON.

points of interest afforded by this line; and not the least interesting of
all was that of the last afternoon. True, there was no striking scenery,
but this was the theater of the great struggle of the civil war. They
were continually passing historical places and hearing historical names.
A gentleman pointed out for them the home of Jefferson—Monticello—and
102 ALONG THE eae

Mr. Dupont reminded the children of the important niche he had filled in
our country’s history.

“We must be nearing salt water; I believe I can smell it in the air,”
said Florence.

She was right; the long stretch of water in the distance, the marshes,
the sluggish rivers—all betrayed the near presence of the restless sea, and







































































































































































































































































































































FORTRESS MONROE.

before long they were at Old Point, and esconsced in the Hygeia, with
Uncle Sam’s wonderful Fortress Monroe right before them.

“How nice it is to sit here and look out on the bay,” said Alice an
hour later. They were then on the great portico of the hotel, and the
light-houses ‘at Cape Heat and Cape Charles were visible in the dis-
tance.

And, indeed: it was nice; and those travelers who rave over the beau-
ties of the Mediterranean shore should know that, when the fading crim-
son glow of sunset makes the shore shadowy and indistinct, and the.
flotilla of white-winged oyster boats, which have dotted the sparkling blue
of the bay like snowy birds, comes tranquilly homeward to the slow dip of
ALONG THE JAMS. 103

oars and the weird, rich singing of the negro boatmen, we have here a
scene that can safely challenge comparison with those of foreign lands.

“You must reflect
that right before us is
that stretch of water
known as Hampton
Roads, and there occur-
red the famous fight be-
tween the Merrimac and
Monitor,” said Mr. Du-
pont.

About the last words
of Alfred that night
were to the effect that he
wanted to visit the fort
the next morning. So,
after breakfast, Mr. Du-
pont led the way to
Fortress Monroe. But
the distance was very
short, and soon the whole
party was standing in
what is the only real
fortress in the United
States. It is named in’
honor of President Mon-
roe. Alice frankly ad-
mitted that she thought

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































an iit
|

ud

ot
Te

3
=
E























































































































































































































































FORTRESS MONROE.

a fort was simply a big, strong building, but here were over sixty acres
inclosed. The fort proper is surrounded by a wide and deep moat, across
which there is but one regular passage-way. "The grounds within are beau-
tifully laid out, shaded with live oaks. And every morning and evening
the band plays most delightfully at guard-mount and dress-parade. Great
piles of cannon-balls were placed here and there about the grounds, and
monstrous cannons were mounted at various places.

7
104 ALONG THE JAMES.

“But, if you want to see guns that are guns, let’s go over to the
water battery. We go across this moat, and here we find the water battery
facing the sea,” said Mr. Dupont.

“I thought the papers were saying we didn’t have any big guns in
this country,” said Florence, surveying the scene.

‘These guns seem pretty big to us, but I suppose they are as nothing
compared with the guns used now-a-days. A few years ago Uncle Sam
had as strong guns as
any one; but now—well,
it makes us blush to
think we could scarcely
defend ourselves against
any modern country,”
replied Mr. Dupont.

“But I suppose it
will not be long before
this will be changed,”
said Alice. ‘I saw in the
paper about a lot of new
guns and ships being
built.”

‘By the way,” said
Mr. Dupont, “let us
make some inquiries
‘where Jefferson Davis
lived when he was a
prisoner here. I suppose





you all know that he







was confined here after



his capture, for a long

WITHIN AND ABOUT THE FORT. time.”

A passing soldier
courteously pointed out to them the little room he occupied. It was one
of those built in the casemate used by the officers at the present time.

In another part of the ground they found some trophies taken in
ALONG THE JAMES. 105

battles; quaint pieces from Mexico captured in the Mexican War; some
pieces that saw duty in the War of 1812. Having inspected the water
battery, they were next taken to see the enormous gun on a platform
overlooking the bay. Alfred thought he could crawl into the gun, but
as it probably would have been a little rough on his clothes he was
not very anxious to try.
































































































































































































ec



























THE BIG GUN.

“Your party has been over looking at the Fort, have you?” ques-
tioned an elderly gentleman with whom Mr. Dupont had been talking in
the morning. ‘I was here once under extremely different circumstances.
It was at the famous combat between the Jounztor and Merrimac, which
took place right out here in the Roads. I don’t think I ever saw a more
gloomy time than Saturday night, March 8, 1862. You see the Merrimac
had come over from Norfolk, sunk the Cumderland, burned the Congress,
run the M/zxnesota aground, and, completely uninjured, had steamed back
for the night. For what we could see, this terrible Merrimac could lay
Fortress Monroe in ruins, steam up the Chesapeake, and have Washing-
ton at her mercy.
106 ALONG THE JAMES.

“But about ten o’clock that night the M/onztor, which had but just
been completed by her inventor, Ericsson, and was on her trial trip, came

into the harbor. She was the queerest-looking thing! You know they said







i Ly
yy 3 S
Liye
Wa

is
oe

ERICSSON.

she was only a cheese-box on a raft; but, bless you, how glad we were to
have her put in an appearance. Well, you ought to have seen it. The next
day the Merrimac came out early, intending to renew her attack, and ex-
pecting to have everything her own way once more, when the little cheese-
box sailed in between the Merrimac and her prey. It seldom falls to the
lot of any one to witness such terrific fighting as then took place. The
battle was an indecisive one, but the Merrimac finally retreated to Nor-
folk.

“Oh, well, time changes. Those ironclads that seemed so terrible
then, would be as mere pigmies, compared with some of the gunboats now
ALONG THE JAMES. 107

afloat. And, for that matter, the same is true of guns. ‘Those eighty-
ton guns were undreamt of then.”

“Well, the whole science of war has changed,’ said Mr. Dupont.
“Now it is largely a question of money; it is only the very richest nations
that can indulge in the luxury of a war. I suppose if Italy had not been
about bankrupt, Uncle Sam would have had to have done more hustling
this last year.”









































































































































































AN EIGHTY-TON GUN.

‘That is true. I think the United States wants to live at peace as far
as she can, but I am glad that Congress proposes to build a navy, and
manufacture a few first-class guns on her own account.”

But while Mr. Dupont and the stranger were talking about the last
war, Alice and Miss Ashton were talking about a little trip to Yorktown.
No sooner was this mentioned than all wanted to go.

“Tt was at Yorktown, Alfred,” said Mr. Dupont, “that the closing
struggle of the Revolutionary War took place. I. have always thought,”
he added, “that we did not give enough credit in this affair, which finally
ended in the surrender of Cornwallis, to La Fayette.”

“T thought Washington engineered the whole thing,” said Alice.

‘Oh, yes, of course Washington did take the final moves which made
it a success. We must not forget, though, that it was La Fayette that
108 ALONG THE JAMES.

Cornwallis was in pursuit
of. He felt so confident of
capturing him that he
wrote home, “the boy can
tiot’ was mistaken. La Fayette
was reinforced, and turned
around and penned him up.
‘Thus the French fleet block-
aded the river, and Wash-
ington arrived on the scene,
and the game was up. In-
stead of Cornwallis hav-
ing the boy, the boy had
him.

“What did they call
him the ‘boy’ for?” quer-
ied Alfred.

“Because he was quite
young, and, compared with
some of the grizzled old











OLD HOUSE, YORKTOWN.





LA FAYETTE.

veterans, he was but a boy; still
we can never repay the debt
we owe him.” —

At Yorktown they were
shown the exact place where
the surrender took place. For
the small price of a quarter
they were permitted to view

a little excavation said to have
been used by Cornwallis as a

Council Chamber during the
siege. It won’t do to go to
moralizing over the matter
any, for there is a second cave
ALONG THE JAMES. 109

about a mile away which is said to have been used for the same purpose.
You can still see the lines of intrenchments that the British cast up
during the siege.

“Helen,” said Miss Ashton to her sister, when they chanced to be

alone that evening, “where do you suppose Dr. Blanchard and Bert are by
this time?”



LAMBERT’S POINT PIER, NORFOLK, VA.

“Vou know he said they were going to Washington; I believe, though,
it will not be long before he will be back to the Springs, especially when
his friend, Mr. Graham, goes there.”

“Tt is singular he did not say more about it, then.”

‘But at this point Mrs. Dupont changed the subject of conversation.
She did not want Florence to be thinking of the Doctor.

In the meantime Mr. Dupont was out on the portico enjoying a social
smoke with his friend, who had such a vivid recollection of the Merrimac
and Monztor.

“Talk about natural advantages! Do you know that right before us
110 ALONG THE JAMES.

is the ideal natural harbor of North America? Yes, sir; Hampton Roads
is only just beginning to be known at its true worth. ‘The water is deep
enough for the largest ship afloat, and the harbor is so large that if the
navies of the world were gathered here they would fill only a part of it.
Why, just look at the railroads centering here! It would not surprise me
to know that the future great city of the Atlantic Coast was going to be
built up around the shores of Hampton Roads.”

“That is a pretty strong statement to make.”

“True; but now just consider the enormous development of the South.
It has no harbor on all the stretch of the Atlantic Coast at all compa-
rable to this. You must go over to Norfolk before you leave, and you will
see some evidence of what I say.”

Accordingly they did take a little trip to Norfolk. Alfred was much
_ interested in watching some immense steamers coaling at Lambert’s Point.

“I never think of Norfolk,” said Florence, “without thinking of that
old piece of poetry in our school-readers, Lake Drummond, you know.
Let’s see; how did it go?

“They made her a grave, too cold and damp

For a soul so warm and true,

And she has gone to the lake of the Dismal Swamp,
Where all night long by a fire-fly lamp

She paddles her white canoe.”

. “Sure enough, the Dismal Swamp is down here near Norfolk some-
where,” said Alice. “Perhaps that explains why there is such an unmerci-
ful lot of lumber around here.”

It is no wonder she spoke of the lumber interest, for it ig indeed
enormous. But the busy scenes on the dock would interest any one.
Long lines of carts and wagons crowd each other from early morning
until the hour of departure, while various descriptions of flat-boats, lighters,
sailing vessels, steamers, and barges occupy every available space around
the steamers and. wharves.

Mr. Dupont, with his customary success in finding out- things, was
talking with a business man whom he chanced to meet.

“Yes, but you ought to see what an immense amount of garden-truck
is shipped from this point—kale, spinach, cabbage, strawberries, and pota-




































































































































































































































































































VIRGINIA TIMES.


II2 : ALONG THE JAMES.

toes. You would think we raised enough around here to supply the
nations.”

‘Not to mention melons; I see you have a few of those,” said Mr.
Dupont, smiling.

“Well, yes, we do raise a few melons around here, to the great de-



WATERMELONS ARE RIPE.

light of our colored population. Don’t you see how good-natured they
look? Give them plenty of melons, and they are all right.”

. “So you went over and took a look at Norfolk, did you?’ was the
greeting of the military gentleman; “and you ought to have taken in
Portsmouth too.” |

“What would we have seen there?”

“You would have seen a nice harbor, and a place of some historical
interest as well. Benedict Arnold had his headquarters there in 1780.
Then there is the United States Navy Yard at the southern end of the
city. The Government has fitted up an enormous dock there, one of the
very best in the United States.”
ALONG THE JAMES. EL3

“We could put in a number of days quite pleasant-
ly here,” remarked Mr. Dupont.
“Bless me, yes. There is
Hampton, one of the very earliest
settled places in this country, where
the Indians feasted Capt. Smith’s
party in 1607.. There is a church



building standing there that was built
more than two hundred years ago. Then
there is Hampton Institute—you ought
to take Alfred over there to see the
young Indians. There is, as you know,
a government school for Indian chil-
dren there, and there is a national sol-
diers’ home.” f
They were looking out on the va-
ried scenes of the Old Point. A heavy
iron steamer was coming into the Roads,
probably bound for Newport News. Nu-
merous oyster crafts were tacking back
and forth across the bay. A great



schooner, under full
sail, was standing
up the bay. The
numerous harbor
lights were lit, and
far off the lghts
on the government
light-houses on the
capes were distinct-
ly visible. It was
one of those beauti-
ful Virginia nights,
and the “Captain,”


II4 ALONG THE JAMES.

as they called him, told them stories of the days of the war, when he
was assigned to duty along these shores to look out for blockade runners.

“That was a queer
kind of life, sir;
nothing very dan-

















































































































































































































































































































































































gerous about it, and









































































































often nothing very



































































































































exciting. But now
and then we would
get a chance to chase

some bold blockade
runner, and, I tell







































you, they were not
to be taken with
their eyes shut. The risks they would run were surprising, but in those
days a cargo of cotton was worth almost its weight in gold. A dark,
stormy night, when you could not see ten feet ahead of you, was a
favorite time with them to make the attempt. Sometimes.the fog would
suddenly lift and we would catch sight of one of these slippery fellows,
perhaps not very far away. But it would be nip.and tuck to come up to
them even then. When we did effect a capture it amounted to some-
thing generally, and we all had a share in the prize money.

“T remember one time, down on the Carolina coast, below here, where
the little gulfs and bays wind in and out, we heard that a ship with a
very valuable cargo was going to come out the first favorable opportunity.
We were all on the watchout, I
assure you. Well, there came on
a dark and rainy night, with a
good breeze blowing, but it sud-
denly died away to a calm, just
before morning. When the day
broke, there was our vessel not
more than five miles away, with
every stitch of canvas set, but no

















































































wind. We thought sure she was


ALONG THE JAMES. 115

ours, and visions of prize money began to dance before us. Just then
there came up one of those blinding fogs that drifted down and shut in
that ship from our sight as
effectually as if the blackest
night had settled down. It
only lasted a few hours, and
there was not very much of
a breeze; but do you know
when it lifted, that ship was
nowhere to be seen? Where
it could have got to was al-
ways a mystery to us. It
could not have sailed away,
and there was nothing to sink
it, but it was gone. Our crew,
always superstitious, you
know, declared that it must
have been the Flying Dutchman instead of a
blockade runner. But I have never ceased to
wonder what did become of it.”

But now Mr. Dupont thought it best to be
on the move again. He had already spent one
: day longer at the Point than he intended to, as
he wanted to visit some of the resorts in the North. Alfred had been
much interested in watching the Old Dominion line of steamers depart on
their regular trips, and it occurred to his father that it would be a good
plan to go to New Vork by that line. This idea found instant favor with
all the party, though Mrs. Dupont was a little afraid of being sick on
the ocean.

Accordingly the Dupont’s were embarked and ready for their flying
trip to New York. ‘hey afterwards looked back on this part of their
trip as one of the pleasantest of all. Great was the interest of Alfred
anl Alice as the ship passed the capes and rose and fell on the long
swell of the Atlantic. We have, however, but little to record, for night
soon came on, and while the passengers slept, the steamer pursued its


116 ALONG THE JAMES.

steadily northern course. Sails had also been raised, and so the next
morning found them parsigs the numerous summer resorts along the Jer-
sey shore, and before noon





















































































































they were at anchor in New























































































































































York bay. Of course a great



































































































































































deal of time could have been
devoted to the sights of New
York, but the party were in























































































a hurry to leave the place,
and that very evening found
them on their way to Niag-
ara Falls, where, as neither
Alfred nor Alice had ever
visited, it was determined to
spend a day or so.

As Miss Ashton very
carelessly left her diary open
right before us, and as it is



naturally expected that we
will record all items of general interest, we feel, under the circumstances,
excusable in reading from it.

“New VYork—We have been on the move quite rapidly of late. We
are all happy to see such manifest marks of improvements in Alice. Dr.
Blanchard and Bert left us at Natural Bridge rather unexpectedly, and yet
I don’t know why we should take any especial interest in them. We met
them perfect strangers in Cincinnati. My lame wrist seemed to bring us
all together. It is true we found them pleasant company, and Mr. Dupont
seemed to be greatly taken up in the Doctor, but it was kind of awkward,
especially*after we learned the object of his trip to Bath County, to have
them with us. But I must say, from what I heard William say about the
trip up to the Warm Springs, he was as much in for it as the Doctor,
and I sometimes have wondered if he didn’t make up considerable of the

story.”




























THE FALLS. 119

CHAPTER V.

THE FALLS.

H, YES,” said Mr. Dupont, as he took his second cup of
coffee the morning following their arrival at the Falls,
‘“as Phineas Fogg would say, we are here, and the next
thing is to have as good a time as possible.”

“And I do hope,” spoke up Mrs. Dupont, “that. Alfred
will be careful and not try any foolhardy experiments,
such as wading in the river, even if it is only a foot or



two.”
But Alfred went calmly on with his breakfast.

A little later Mr. Dupont came in with a bundle of letters. “’They have
been chasing us up for some time. I believe we all have some except Al-
fred, and I declare, Florence, you must relieve Frank Gliddon’s anxiety at
once. Here are no less than four letters from him.” .

“And when you write, don’t say anything about Dr. Blanchard,” advised
Alice.

A toss of the head was the only reply, as Miss Ashton took the
letters, but did not seem to be particularly interested in them.

The intention of the Duponts was to spend some days at the Falls,
and therefore they did not feel under the necessity of hurrying out to
“do” the place in a few hours. They would take their time and make
such little trips as they wanted to.

One great pleasure in these Summer trips is to meet with people with
whom you have struck up an acquaintance. You form an agreeable
acquaintance with a party at one resort, and part from them, never ex-
pecting to see them again. Perhaps a week later you rum across them at
I20 THE FALLS.

another place.’ Thus it was in this case. Mr. Dupont and Alfred had but
barely gone down to mingle with the crowd of tourists always to be found
in the waiting-rooms of the principal hotels at such resorts, when they
heard their names called and found that it was Prof. Morgan who was
greeting theni. ee

“T am glad to see you, Professor,” replied Mr. Dupont, shaking him
by the hand; “where have you been since we left you at White Sulphur?”

“J made quite a visit at Washington and then came on up here. By
the way, I met that other gentleman of your party in Washington, Dr.
Blanchard. I was surprised to meet him there. I thought he was travel- .
ing with you.” . a

“He suddenly changed his mind at Natural Bridge. ‘That makes me
think I must write him. But come up to the ladies’ sitting-room ; they will
be glad to meet you.”

And they were, too. They compared notes as to their routes since
they last met, and again the Professor explained about the pleasant time
he had had with Dr. Blanchard in Washington. “He is a splendid fellow,
well educated, aid every way an agreeable companion. I wanted him ‘to
come up here with me, but he seemed very undecided about something.”

“Probably he has gone back to those wonderful springs in Virginia,”
observed Mrs. Dupont. ‘His great friend, Mr. Graham, was to be there,
. accompanied by Miss Graham, who, I am told, is the real attraction.”

“No, I don’t think he has gone back to Bath County,” replied the
Professor. “He told me all about Mr. Graham. You are certainly mis-
taken about the young lady. I understand she is only a little girl, and I
am sure he cares nothing for her. It was something else that worried
him. I hope he has got it all straightened up by this time.”

The Professor said these words in the most matter-of-fact sort of a way,
just as if he didn’t know anything about the trouble; but, bless his scien-
tific heart, he had found out pretty much the whole secret, and wanted to
do something to help things along. Now, not one word of all this had been
lost on Florence. Dear, dear, what a goose she had been! Well, she would
have William (that is, Mr. Dupont) write Dr. Blanchard at once, as he had
promised to, when they parted at Natural Bridge.

Now, it so happened that the principal of the high-school where Alice
A DAY AT THE FALLS. I21I

attended, had told his scholars on the last day of school that if they took
a summer trip to be sure and write a full account about’ some one place
they visited, and that would do for one of the essays the senior class would
be expected tc prepare during the next year. So Alice wrote out an account
of the day’s ride at the Falls, and here it is.

A DAY AT THE FALLS.

After breakfast we were fortunate enough to meet Prof. Morgan, whom
we had met at White Sulphur, and he went riding with us, and formed a most
pleasing addition to our party. Since the State of New York and the Cana-
dian Government have taken charge of matters at the Falls, much of the old
extortion has disappeared. Formerly you could not get in a good place to
look without paying from fifty cents to a dollar. You had to pay to get into
Prospect Park, the only place on the American side where you could view the
cataract; pay to goon the Island; in fact, it was said you could’ hardly turn
around without its costing you halfa dollar. I suppose it was only lack of
time that prevented them from
extracting a dollar or-so from
the unfortunates that now and
then swept over the Falls.

But'that is past. You are
now free to wander anywhere ©
free of charge. Of course, if
you take a carriage you have
still the satisfaction of paying
a good round price for it, and
it must be said the hotels know
how to charge for very poor ac-
commodations. I think the ma-
jority of guests would enthusi-
astically vote to have the land-
lord dispense with music for
dinner and invest the savings
thus effected in the dinner it-



THE AMERICAN FALLS. self.
I22 ‘ A DAY AT THE FALLS.

However, papa got a great big carriage in which we could all ride,
though he and Alfred sat up with the driver. We -went first to visit the
islands. A nice iron bridge leads to Bath Island, and one a little smaller
from thence to Goat Island. In years gone by an immense paper mill dis-
figured Bath Island, but the government has torn it down. ‘The bridges lead
directly over the rapids that conduct to the American Falls, the Falls them-
selves being perhaps seven hundred feet below. The water is not very deep,
but it goes boiling below. It made my head swim just to look at it from
the carriage. Looking up the river a fine view is obtained of the rapids.
Probably all know that Goat Island divides the tiver into two principal
channels, which give us respectively the Aimerican and the Canadian or
Horseshoe Falls.

Prof. Morgan said that the
Indians used to visit Goat Island,
and even had a burying place
there, but we could not imagine
how they could possibly get
there unless they came up from
below and climbed up the face
of the precipice. They certainly
would not attempt to row across.
He also said that Gen. Putnam
‘visited the island in 1755. Be
all that as it may, the drive
around Goat Island is certainly
one of the most charming you
can imagine. Our driver said
that no wedding tour was con-
sidered a success that did not
take in the Falls. Perhaps that
explains the number of happy-



CAVE OF THE WINDS.

looking couples we saw. |
It seems to me I could stay for hours looking at the rapids on the
Canadian side; and the longer you look the more it grows on you. At
one place I saw an artist at work making a picture of the scene. I envied
A DAY AT THE FALLS. 123

him his work. Of course we wended our way to the northern end of the
island, there to see the Falls. Luna Island is a very small island just to
the east of the main island, and right on the brow of the precipice; that
portion of the Falls is called the Central Falls. ‘The guide told us that
in 1848 a young girl fell into the river from this island, and, with a gentle-
man who sprang to. save her, passed over the Falls.

While talking about accidents, it seems that the old Indian tradition
was that Niagara required two victims a year, and, strange to say, they are’
about that numerous. Some of these accidents were very sad ones. ‘The
only live animals I heard of going over the falls and coming out alive
were a couple of terriers. One or two seekers after notoriety claim to
have gone over in a barrel or swimming suit, but they were unfortunately
not well vouched for, and, as Prof. Morgan says, no one takes much stock
in the stories.

The great point of view is that end of the island towards the Horse-
shoe Falls. A bridge leads out to a little islet, where in former years a
tower called Terrapin Tower stood. The government caused it to be blown
up in 1873, as it was deemed unsafe. Our guide pointed out a rock right
on the verge of the Falls.- A visitor once fell from the bridge leading to
the tower and was swept onto that rock. He was rescued by means of
ropes. It made me shudder. A stairway leads down the face of the cliff
and conducts to the celebrated Cave of the Winds. Here, also, government
has interfered, as it is not deemed safe to go under the Falls. Prof. Tyn-
dal, when he visited the place in 1873, went with his guide nearly to the
center of Horseshoe Falls. I am sure no money would tempt me to do it.

As Iam not a poet, it is no use for me to try and tell you anything
new about Niagara Falls. ‘The first view is exceedingly apt to be disap-
pointing, but you think differently about it before you have been there
very long. Prof. Morgan said that many years ago, when the wind hap-
pened to blow just right, the ice jammed up at the lake entrance of the
river, and actually the river almost ran dry; only a few little streams of
water were going over the cliffs. That must have been an extraordinary
sight. ; 7
We spent some hours on this ride. In the afternoon we all took a
tide down the inclined plane railway, and enjoyed a trip on the Mazd of
I24 A DAY AT: THE FALLS.

the Mist. I suppose it was very fine; at least they all said so; but, to be
honest, I got scared just as we were starting, and was in terror all the way.
In the evening we all went down to Prospect Park to see colored lights
thrown on the waters. You can hardly imagine the beauty of the scene,
as the different colored lights were cast on the foaming waters. This ended
my day at the Falls.

This account was not written for the benefit of the whole party, and,
in fact, they did not understand why Alice was taking more pains than
usual to ask questions. It was but natural that conversation should turn
on their past trip, and more should be said about Dr. Blanchard.

“There,” exclaimed Mr. Dupont, “J meant to have written to the
Doctor this morning; I declare, it is ashame. I believe I will go and
send him a dispatch now.” ;

This was accordingly done. But the next morning back came the
messenger boy. The telegram was undelivered, the party having left the
place, whereabouts unknown.

In the meanwhile, where was the Doctor?

He and Burt had gone directly to Washington. They had visited friends,
examined the city at their leisure, and the doctor had waited several days to
hear from Mr. Dupont. He had finally concluded that it was a case of “out
of sight, out of mind.” Shrugging his shoulders, and lighting a fresh cigar,
he concluded to “accept the situation,” and that afternoon he and Burt had
left for some sea-side resort. But the fact is, the “situation” did not propose
to be taken so easily. He found himself thinking and talking about the
Duponts and—well, you know whom else, and finally concluded that, after a
few weeks, he would write to their home address.

The next day Mr. Dupont, the Professor, and Alfred went out sight-
seeing by themselves, as the ladies preferred to rest in the hotel.

“Tetus go over in Canada,” said Alfred. And, accordingly, they took
a ride over the noble Suspension Bridge. “But I don’t see,” said Alfred,
“why, when they made a bridge, they didn’t make it wide enough for car-
riages to pass both ways.” .

“Just notice how green the water is below us,” said the Professor; “it
must be very deep; probably two or three hundred feet deep. That is what
gives it its peculiar tinge.”














































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































4125

THE CANTILEVER BRIDGE, NIAGARA FALLS,
126 A DAY AT THE FALLS.

On the Canada side the government has taken in hand the same re-
forms as the State of New York. Buildings have been pulled down and
the approaches to the Falls made free. A most excellent view can be had
of the rapids. A few years ago there was quite a respectable museum at
this place, but the curiosities from Egypt and Nineveh did look just a little
out of place in this locality. They passed a great many places where all
sorts of articles were for sale, such as canes, purses, and fans. Alfred thought
that the permanent population of Niagara Falls could be divided into three
groups: one, hotel and boarding-house keepers; the second, hackmen; the
third, those who had curiosities to sell.

“JT think,” said the Professor, “that the grandest of all front views
of the Falls is from this Table Rock. By the way, Alfred, some forty years
ago a tremendous section of this rock, two hundred feet long by sixty
wide, and one hundred feet in thickness, broke off from this ledge and
plunged down into the gulf below. That was a fall of stone worth talk-
ing about, wasn’t it.

“Any one hurt?” asked Alfred.

“An omnibus with its horses was carried down, and of course dashed
to pieces, but no people were killed. A large party had but just left the
place.”

“JT want to have Alfred go down and see the whirlpool rapids,” said
Mr. Dupont.

‘By all means,” replied the Professor. . “I think that is one of the
grandest sights of this whole locality.”

On their way they passed the wonderful cantilever bridge, but recently
completed. Probably but few understand the principle on which it is con-
structed. Certain it is that it comes near to hanging a bridge in the air,
and the non-scientific on-looker would expect the central span to break
of its own weight. The rapids commence just below the bridge. The
fall is rapid and the river is contracted to a very marrow gorge, comse-
quently an immense body of water goes surging. past. No mere descrip-
tion can suffice to describe the scene. Here it was that the celebrated
swimmer, Capt. Webb, lost his life, but several foolhardy persons, in barrels
especially fitted up for the occasion, have made the passage in safety.
The whirlpool itself they found about a mile below the rapids. There is a
PROFESSOR MORGAN’S STORY. 127

very sudden bend of the river at this point, and right in the elbow of
the bend is the whirlpool; logs drawn into the current sometimes float
around for several days before they are released.

On the drive back the Professor explained to Mr. Dupont how it was
that geologists could figure out from the contour. of the gorge some data
from which to estimate the number of thousand years that have passed
since tribes of men first lived on the earth. But, as Alfred could not
understand it, we will simply content ourselves with stating that Mr.
Dupont seemed to be much impressed with what the Professor had to
say on that subject. What did interest Alfred more, was the sight of an
enormous excursion coming in over the Michigan Central, and still more
interested was he to learn that it had started from near home, that is,
from Cincinnati, and was run by the Cincinnati, Hamilton. and Dayton
Railway. Every year, he learned, immense excursions came in over that
road. |

Mrs. Dupont, Florence, and Alice had rested, written letters, and en-
joyed themselves’ in Prospect Park. During their absence Miss Ashton
had written a long letter, amongst the rest, to Frank Gliddon; but though
she had made it as newsy as possible, she did adopt Alice’s advice, and
said nothing about Dr. Blanchard.

That evening, while resting in the Park, with the hoarse roar of the
Falls in their ears, Professor Morgan told them the following:

PROFESSOR MORGAN’S STORY.

As is known, the league of the Iroquois was the most advanced form
of government reached by the Indian tribes north of Mexico. It was really
a wonder in its way, and under its stimulating influence the tribes com-
posing it were rapidly-growing in strength and power. ‘There is no tell-
ing to what degree of civilization. it would have conducted its members had
not the whites appeared on the scene and thus put a period to the rule
of the Indians. At an extremely early date the French were active in
making journeys of discovery and trade in all this section. Not only were
the Franciscan monks actively engaged in missionary expeditions far in
the wilderness, all aflame with an earnest desire to bring these fierce tribes
within the folds of the Church, but ambition had its votaries as well. The
128 PROFESSOR MORGAN’S STORY.

fur-traders, eager in the pursuit of wealth, did not hesitate to plunge into ©
the trackless forest. "There, also, were to be found officers in the service
of the French court who were anxious to plant the lilies of France in
strange places, and thus lay the foundation of an empire which was to
exceed the bounds of the home country. —

Robert Courtney was one of the most active of these old voyageurs.
The Seneca Indians, the foremost tribe of the allied Iroquois, respected
him, and they had adopted him as a member in full standing in one of
their clans. He was rapidly increasing in wealth, for he had great talent
in organizing trade. Far along the shores of Lake Erie his canoes were
to be met at appropriate seasons of the-year, deeply laden with furs. He
was also a diplomat in his way. His influence was great, and always
wielded in the interest of France. The governor-general honored him with
his confidence, sought his advice, and mentioned him in his reports. -

With the ready adaptability of men in his position he had his Indian
wife. She was Falling Snow, daughter of a Seneca chief. With him the
arrangement was simply one of convenience. With her, if not exactly an
affair of love, it was one in which she was proud to be. Had not the
white chief chosen her of all the Seneca maidens ?

But time passed on, and Robert Courtney began to feel that he had
money enough to renounce his half savage: life and return to civilization.
But what about Falling Snow? He did not care about taking his dusky
helpmate to France. Ah, no; there was Mademoiselle Fontain, whom he
felt sure was still waiting for him. But why bother about the matter?
Could he not quietly pack up, go only as if on an important business trip,
and never return? ‘There was no marriage binding on him. With a shrug
of the shoulder the whole matter was decided in his mind. ,

But, now, who can tell all the little details which excited the suspic-
ions of his Indian wife? Was it because of the extensive preparations he
was making? Did he talk in troubled sleep? Certain it is that Falling
Snow was not one whit deceived. She knew that Robert Courtney had
made up his mind to leave her with her people while he went far away |
across the big water, never to return.

But no complaint was uttered. A more stoical look came into her face.
She sat in silent reverie for hours at a time. Their camp was on the
PROFESSOR MORGAN’S STORY. 129

river about ten miles above the Falls. Courtney’s intention was to go
down the river with his well-laden canoe as far as was safe, then make a
portage to still water below the Falls and thence embark again.

The adieus had been said. They had already journeyed to the head of
the rapids above the Falls, about where Chippewa is now. ‘Thoroughly
tired, Courtney slept in his boat, while his helpers were making arrange-
ments to form a temporary camp on the shore. Then it was that a figurc
stealthily emerged from the forest, crept up to the boat in which lay the
sleeping Frenchmen, noiselessly arranged the paddles, pushed off the boat
and stepped in herself. It was Falling Snow, and there journeyed with them
in that boat a third form, invisible to mortal eyes. ‘The tired man slept on.
But a few minutes and already the current makes itself felt. On, on, faster
and faster. ‘The useless oars are thrown far out on the waters. The man
awakes. Better had he slept on, for what a terrible awakening was that.
The “Thunder of Waters” (the Indian meaning of Niagara) was in his
ear; the Falls were just below him, and Falling Snow had avenged the
great wrong, ere it had been consummated.

Thus several days passed at the Falls. There is surely no place
more worthy of a visit in all America. In these days of cheap travel, of
course multitudes flock there every summer, making thus a hurried visit.

‘But happy are they who can spend some days in their visit. Contrary to

what might be supposed, the roar of the Falls is not disquieting to over-
wrought nerves. Chas. Dickens has left on record his impressions, which
are so true that they will bear repetition.

“Tt was not until I came to Table Rock and looked—Great Heavens!
—on what a fall of bright green water; that it came upon me in its full
might and majesty. Then, when I felt how near to my Creator I was
standing, the first effect and the enduring one—instant and lasting—of.
the tremendous spectacle was peace. Peace of mind—tranquility—calm
recollection of the dead; great thoughts of eternal rest and happiness—
nothing of gloom or terror. Niagara was at once stamped upon my heart,
an image of beauty, to remain there changeless and indelible until its
pulses cease to beat forever. * * * I think in every quiet season now,
still do these waters roll and leap, and roar and tumble all day long; still
are the rainbows spanning them a hundred feet below. Still when the
130 PROFESSOR MORGAN’S STORY.

sun is on them do they shine. and glow like molten gold. Still, when
the day is gloomy do they fall like snow or seem to crumble away like
the front of a great chalk cliff, or roll down the rock like dense white
smoke. But always does the mighty stream seem to die as it comes
down, and always from the unfathomable gulf rises that tremendous ghost
of spray and mist which is never laid, which has haunted this place with
the same dread solemnity since darkness brooded on the deep, and that
first flood before the deluge—light—came rushing on creation at the word
of God.”

But our transient tourists soon felt anew the wandering instincts
stirring within them. ‘‘ Where next,’ was in their thoughts. “We ought
to swing around the circle,” declared Mr. Dupont. “And how would it do
to take in the Lakes?”

“Oh, yes,” said Alfred, “Let’s go way up in Michigan; we can have
lots of fun.”

And so,if they did not exactly “fold their tents,” they did fold their
spare clothing, packed their grips and hied themselves to the ‘Forest City,”
where they would exchange the railway for the steamboat.

Professor Morgan again parted company with them, as he was bound
down the St. Lawrence. Well, good-bye, Professor; we shall not see you
again, but we shall yet record what a help he was to but wait until we



come to the proper place.
132





















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































. Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

GARFIELD’S TOMB, LAKE VIEW CEMETERY.
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. 13g

CHAPTER VI.

CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

EK MUST not forget that our story is like one of the
big excursion trains sometimes to be seen—run in two



sections; and just at present writing one of these sec-
tions is some distance from the other. But the train
dispatcher knows just where both sections of a train
are, and so, in our case, we must make inquiries in
regard to number two. The telegraph will not avail
us here, and so, like the followers of Madam Blavatsky,
we will summon up our will-force and project our inner
consciousness out into the cold world in search of the missing ones.
There suddenly looms up before us the pages of a written book. Yes; it
is the journal of Dr. Blanchard, and we will read a few extracts.

“Washington, D. C—Have now been here one week. For some rea-
son have not heard from the Duponts. That settles it, I guess. I must
have made quite a brilliant fool of myself. Well, szc transit. I ought not
to be blamed too much for falling in love with Florence Ashton; who
could help it? I must be traveling on, as it it getting dull for Bert. By
the way, have had the pleasure of meeting Prof. Morgan once more. He
goes to the Falls.”

“New Vork.—Have stopped at several resorts along the Jersey shore.
Cape May is a charming place. I much prefer it to Long Branch. Bert
seems to have enjoyed himself. I might, if I could only forget Miss Ash-
ton. Wonder where they are. To be honest, I have gone around to several
hotels here to see if I could find them. I am afraid I am not very com-

panionable to Bert.”
134 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

“The Thousand Isles, N. Y.—I must confess I am not in a very ami-
able frame of mind. I hurried Bert away from New York, and rushed up
here because I had an insane idea they might be here. I had an idiotic
notion to write the postmaster at her home address for her present ad-
dress.”

‘“T wrote the foregoing yesterday. A happy surprise to-day. I met
the genial Prof. Morgan. He had been with them several days at the
Falls. The lucky fellow! They have gone West. He says they are head-
ing for Mackinac. He says also they made the kindest inquiries for me,
and he thought they had written me, as he knows Mr. Dupont telegraphed
me from the Falls. If it wouldn’t look too much like a simpleton I
would go that way myself. But, of course, under present circumstances,
J ap ae me),

The writing here breaks off abruptly, as if the writer did not quite
know how to end the sentence. Having now allayed our fears as to our
second section, we will now come back from our astral excursion, resume
our. physical bodies, and once more become the veracious chronicler of
this trip. :

Cleveland, the Forest City! What would the struggling settlers of
less than one hundred years ago have said could some power have lifted
the veil of the future and allowed them a glimpse of the city of to-day!
Where then the sluggish stream defiled between its bluff to lazily pour its
muddy waters into the lake is now located one of the finest cities of the
lakes, the second city in Ohio; but it is making such rapid strides in
population and wealth that it seems destined to soon be the first. Our
beautiful view gives us but a faint idea of its crowded harbor. The city
being the center of the vast network of railroads naturally draws to her
wharves a large proportion of the shipping of the lakes. This harbor is
formed wholly of vast and costly piers, and it is not near as capacious as
it should be. The commerce of the lakes has greatly increased of late
years, and Cleveland has experienced her full share. of benefit from the
same.

It so happened that Mr. Dupont had an intimate friend in Cleveland,
Mr. Richards, and though they put up in the hotel on their first arrival
in the city, yet he would not hear to their staying there. He had one
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Special Permission of the Detroit aud Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

VIEW OF CLEVELAND FROM THE LAKE. 135
130 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

daughter, Mary, and so, for a few days, our tourists enjoyed the delights
of home. And it was a welcome change after their long experience at —
hotels, for no hotel can take the place of home.

“Tt seems odd,” exclaimed Alice; “here we have been way off to Old
Point Comfort, New York, and Niagara Falls, and now are within about
two hundred miles of home, but instead of going on home we are only
about half through our trip.”

“Who wants to go home!” declared Alfred ; ‘we have just got to the
nicest part.”

But Alice hastened to declare that she was not the least bit home-
sick. Soon Mr. Richards, Mr. Dupont, and Alfred went out on a little
walk. A carriage had been ordered so that Mary could drive the ladies
around.

Mr. Dupont and Alfred were on the bluff overlooking the lake and
the harbor, when such thoughts as we have given expression to in regard
to the harbor presented themselves.

“What is that great, long bridge?” asked Alfred.

“That is our viaduct,’ responded Mr. Richards. ‘You probably
know,” he continued speaking more particularly to Mr. Dupont, “that
originally the town of Cleveland was situated wholly on the east bank of
the Cuyahoga River. That is the name of the river you see there, Alfred.
On the western bank of the stream there was an independent township
called Brooklyn. And the town that grew up there was called Ohio City.
But in 1854 these two growing cities found that it was to their mutual
advantage to unite in one corporation. ‘That viaduct, you see, is the bridge
uniting these two divisions. It is one of the triumphs of engineering. It
is three-fifths of a mile long, and cost over two million dollars.”

“What alot of money!” ejaculated Alfred; but Mr. Richards only
smiled at the remark.

“You must notice those long piers in the harbor,” continued -Mr.
Richards, ‘and the light-houses.”

“T would like to stay here all day, looking at the lake,” said Alfred.

“You would enjoy a ride on it still better! But now notice our parks ©
before we go home to dinner. This park, right in the center of the city,
is called Monumental Park. I can remember when it was only one good
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. 137

large park, but in 1860 it was divided, by running streets through it, into
four smaller ones.”

“What statue is that?” inquired Alfred.

“That is the statue of Commodore Perry. Did you never read about
him in your history, Alfred?”

“Oh, yes; something about a big victory here, or near here.”

“Well, your father will tell you more about it some other time. This
little marble medallion in front represents the passage of Perry from the
ship Lawrence to the Meagara during the battle.”

That afternoon they all went out to Lake View Cemetery. This gave
them a chance to admire Euclid Avenue, one of the very finest avenues in
the world. Alice spoke of the large number of shade-trees, and was re-
minded by Mr. Richards that Cleveland was also known as “ Forest City?
Lake View Cemetery is five miles out: It is beautifully situated about
one hundred feet above the lake, and commands most extensive views.

Of course the principal object had in mind in visiting Lake View

Cemetery was to see the beautiful memorial tomb of James A. Garfield.
From its terrace and portico, on a clear day, a magnificent panorama of
the City of Cleveland, of wide-spreading forests and fields, and the far-
stretching waters of Lake Erie is obtained. The form of the Memorial
is large and imposing, rising boldly in the air to its summit, one hundred
and eighty feet from the roadway on the east. It is in the shape of a
circular tower, fifty feet in diameter, elevated on broad, high terraces, which
are reached by several flights of wide-spreading steps that form a dignified
approach to the Memorial.
At the base of the tower projects a square porch, decorated externally
with a historical frieze, within easy view from the terrace or the ground
below. This frieze is divided into five panels, containing bas-reliefs which
represent, in a language understood by all, the career of Garfield. Spiral
Stairs, in turrets, on each side of the porch, give access to a balcony which
commands an outlook that delights the beholder.

The tower is crowned with a conical-shaped stone roof, enriched with
bands of sunken tile pattern ornaments. An order of twelve arched niches,
under a boldly designed cornice, enriches the top of the tower. ‘These
niches are to contain /welve colossal statues, allegorical representations of
138 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

the twelve months of the year, suggesting that the memory of Garfield
shall be enduring as time itself. A band of shields, bearing the arms of
the several States of the Union, extends around the tower, just below this
arcade of niches. On the three sides of the porch is placed what is known
as the historical frieze, and has for subjects the career of Garfield as a
teacher, a soldier, a statesman, and as President of the United States, the ©
last one, on the south side, representing his body as lying in state.

In these five panels there are over one hundred and ten figures, all
life-size, and executed in every variety of skill known to the art, both as to
the measure and perfection, being from the lowest to the highest of bas-
reliefs, without, however, making any subject a complete figure, but stand-
ing free, each individual figure having a composition and treatment of its
own. ‘The life of Garfield, not unlike that of many distinguished Ameri-
cans, was full of variety, illustrating many of the prominent characteristics
of our national life, and these the sculptor who modeled this frieze has
skillfully reproduced.

As the children were very anxious to enjoy a ride on the lake, it was
decided to let them go with Mary Richards and Miss Ashton on a little
excursion to Put-in-Bay the following day.

“You need have no fear,” observed Mr. Richards, “in trusting the
expedition to Mary’s care. She knows the way; besides, the company that
ruus the boat on which they will go take such good care of their guests
that even children may, travel with perfect safety.”

“What boat are they to go on?” inquired Mr. Dupont.

‘““We Clevelanders,”’ answered Mr. Richards, “take a just pride in the
Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Company. They run the very
finest and safest boats.on the lakes. Well, they will take one of them.
When you go on up to Mackinac you will, of course, go on one of their
boats, so I need not say more about them.”

‘Now, papa,” said Alfred, “you said you would tell me more about
that statue I saw to-day.”

“Oh, yes; Perry’s statue. You ought to know all about him, especially
if you are going to Put-in-Bay. In our last war with Great Britain one
of the most important battles of the war was fought on Lake Erie by
Commodore Perry. ‘The British had a fleet of ships here that had swept
Hy
el
EI
e
iE
=
EI

TeTATATH

i a h

=o
lu i ‘ait Hu
oo

LCT

Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

INTERIOR OF GARFIELD MEMORIAL.

— nut mT LTTE TT



139
140 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT’.

everything before them. Apparently the lake towns were at their mercy.
Perry built his ships within the land-locked harbor of Erie, in Pennsyl-
vania. When launched and ready for action his fleet was not as strong as
the British. The great battle between the two fleets was fought Septem-
ber 10, 1813, in the vicinity of Put-in-Bay; the bay itself receiving its
name from the fact that after the battle the victorious fleet put in there
to care for the wounded, etc. Well, the result of that battle was a most
wonderful victory for the American fleet. Every one of the British ships
were captured; not one escaped. You can well imagine what joy that
victory brought to all these lake towns.”

That evening Miss Ashton showed her sister a letter from Frank
Gliddon. ‘He says, you see, that a party of them are going to Mackinac,
and he hopes to see me there.”

‘Well, we shall be delighted to see him,” responded Mrs. Dupont.

Miss Ashton made no answer to this, but we can not help reminding
the reader that there may be quite a meeting at Mackinac.

The next day was the young folks’ excursion to Put-in-Bay. “Now
mind, Alfred,” said his mother, just as they were starting, “T shall want
you to give me a full account of your day’s trip to-night.”

They went on the excursion boat Czty of Detrow No. 1, a very swift
boat, carrying no freight, only passengers. They went early, secured good
seats, and had a good view of the harbor. As they steamed out into the
lake, Miss Ashton recited for them a little poem on Lake Erie, which was
so good we here repeat the first verse:

“These lovely shores! how lone and still.
A hundred years ago
The unbroken forest stood above,
The waters dashed below,—
The waters of a lonely sea,
Where never sail was furled,
Embosomed in a wilderness,
Which was itself a world.

A benevolent old gentleman sitting near, remarked to his companion,
“How true that poem, that the young lady recited, is. A most wonderful
transformation scene has been wrought around these shores within the
last century.” ‘The rest of his remarks were lost.
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. I4I

As Alfred had been especially enjoined to give an account of what he
saw, we will take his story of the day.

“We had
just a boss









URN
time to-day.
Mary knew
just where to
go and what
to do. Until
the boat start-
ed, I looked
at the boats
coming and

Bs
TI





























































































going in the
harbor. There

was a mon-































































strous big steamer coming
in, which they said was an







ore steamer from Lake = ie
Superior. Well, we got Se 7,
started about halt past tod

eight. Everything was so





new and strange for me 2





























that I had lots of fun SZ Dy G
looking around the boat.
Some folks were reading. Ni i. *

I shouldn't think they HM en
would want to read in gt Wave : 0

such a place as that! The

rest were talking and walking around. You see some of the funniest
folks. One couple walking around, Aunt Flo said, must be on their wed-
ding trip; at any rate, she hung on to him as if she was afraid he might
get loose. ‘There was another fellow there that had a wonderful ulster
on; the rest of the folks were kind of poking fun at him. Alice said
he was a dude. I think he wanted to be sweet on Alice, but she wouldn’t

have it.
q

142 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

“Tt took about four hours to get to the bay. The boat we were on
just went right along, I tell you. It belongs to the Detroit and Cleve-
land Line, and I heard a man say they had the best and fastest boats on
the lake. "They had dinner on the boat, but, you know, we took our































































































































































WEN SS py pen

WW Ge

. PUT-IN-BAY.

lunch, and so didn’t need any. It looked awful nice though. There
is a whole lot of little islands up there where Put-in-Bay is, and nearly
every island seemed to be just covered with vineyards. Passing near
one island, I saw a boy raking hay. I don’t believe I could work with so
much to see! ‘There were lots of little boats there that Mary called
yachts. She said that Put-in-Bay was one of the greatest places for yachts
in the country. And she showed me from a little map how the islands
were so situated that excursions could come from Detroit, Toledo, San-
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. 143

dusky, or Cleveland. And so no wonder the big crowds we saw! I saw
a boat come from Detroit while we were there; oh, but it was crowded!
ean Sey,
soon our boat



ana a eee

stopped at a
pe orea t,he
dock, and we
all got off.
There was



| another steamer right on the
other side, and lots of little sail-
boats. We rested, and then walked
around. ‘There is a cave on the
island which we visited that has
been known for a long while.
But we all would rather be down
along the shore. A man rowed
us across to an island called Gi-













braltar. It is a great big rock,







rising right up out of the water,













and there is only one side where





you get upon the island. I didn’t























know what Mary wanted to go















































over there for, but on top of the



hill, in a little grove, is a famous
PERRY'S CAVE. house that belongs, or did belong,
to that famous banker, Jay Cooke. I don’t know who he is, but Mary
said he was very famous once. I think he had a monstrous big house,
and a very nice one, too. But you couldn’t have any fun there, unless
you had a boat. We only had about four hours to look around in, before
the steamer started back to Cleveland. I would like to go and stay a
week there, but Mary said I would get tired.”
“Dear me!” exclaimed Miss Ashton, as Alfred ceased speaking, ‘who
would have thought that Alfred could give such a full description. Alice,
you and I must be careful if we don’t want a detailed account of our doings

given to others.”


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Special Permission of tho Detroit and Clereland Steam Navigation

144 DOCK AT PUT-IN-BAY. .
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. I45





VIEWS AT GIBRALTAR, PUT-IN-BAY.

“Now,” said Mr. Dupont
the following morning, “it is
time for us to be on the wing
again, so to-day you see that
everything is all right and we
will finish up our visit in Cleve-
land and start on again.”

“But we want to take the
boat for Detroit,” said Alice.

“Certainly; we will leave on
the Czty of Cleveland to-night,
and will stop a day in Detroit.”

Accordingly that evening
146 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

saw them aboard the steamer, ready to resume their trip. Owing to the
home comforts they had there enjoyed, their stay had been very pleas-
ant, but now the adieus were spoken and they were again on the wing.
The steamer leaves late in the evening, but our party could not think
of retiring. The novelty of the situation kept them on deck, and a fine
view rewarded them.





CLEVELAND HARBOR AT NIGHT.

The twinkling lights of the city and harbor receded in the distance,
the steamer settled down to a measured chug-uh, chug-uh, and the dark
and silent stretches of the gently undulating lake spread away before
them. One by one the decks were deserted; but Mr. Dupont, who had
seen the luggage stowed away in the state-rooms, and had found a quiet
nook outside, placidly smoked on, impressed with his surroundings, until,
with a start, he realized that it was “Midnight on Lake Erie.”

Now, while the silent hours speed away, let us make ourselves
acquainted with this floating palace, which is bearing not only our friends,
but hundreds of others over the silent waters. Some are tourists bent on
pleasure, others in the interest of business. The safety of all depends on
- the watchful care of the officers and crew of the noble boat on which they










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































By Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Stoam Nay

MIDNIGHT ON LAKE ERIE.



CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. 149

have embarked. But let them rest in confidence; their trust is not mis-
placed. The D. & C. Company’ not only pride themselves on their faith-
ful and efficient crews, but have put forth every endeavor. to construct
their boats so as to make them safe as well as luxurious. ‘Their vessels
are built of steel of the strongest pattern, and for additional safeguards
are furnished with water-tight compartments. ‘The boat on which we now
are is three hundred feet long, by seventy-two feet wide. The grand















FEEDING THE FURNACES.

saloon is finished in solid mahogany, and contains a double tier of state-
rooms connected by a broad gallery. It is two hundred and forty feet
in length, and its dome is twenty feet high. It is brilliantly lighted by
electricity. Each of its hundred and forty state-rooms and parlors are also
furnished with electric lights and all. the conveniences for restful sleep.

“Talk about Palace trains and Pullman cars,’ commented Mr. Dupont,
surveying the deserted saloon, “what mode of travel can possibly compare
with this?”

Deep down in the hold, where the furnaces are situated, toiling men
were busy feeding the furnaces which furnish the motive power of this
wonderful mechanism. ‘The heat is stifling, yet these men work on, toss-
ing bushel after bushel of coal into the furnace mouth. Yet this is skilled




































































































































































Special Permission of the Detroit and Cloveland Stoam Navigation Co,

4150 STEAMER CITY OF CLEVELAND.


é CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. I51

labor. Only
years of ex-
perience en-



ables a fireman
to feed a fur-
mace so as to















get the great-















est amount of
caloric out of































the coal. In



























































the en gine-





























room the alert
engineers are
in constant
attendance.
And so, dur-
ing the night
the steamer
holds steadily
on its course,





















































which, for two
or three hours,
isalmostacross

the lake, but
after passing











Point au Pelee
light, it lies
close to the Ca-
nadian shore,
with the nu-
merous islands











of western

ee Lake Erie on
SCENES ALONG THE DETROIT RIVER.
: the south.

In spite of his late hours, Mr. Dupont was one ef the first to rise in







152 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

the morning. They were but just entering Detroit River. And he has-
tened to call the rest, so that all might enjoy the beautiful panorama
that opened before them. ‘The river is from one to three miles wide, and
has a rapid current of dark-green water, whose purity is unsurpassed by
any mountain lake. The river is deep, and at only one place, near Am- |
herstburg, was it necessary for government to improve the channel. Of
course, lake-born as it is, the Detroit River flows steadily on, nevér varying
much in volume. ‘There are some twenty islands lining the channel.
Grosse Isle, the largest, contains thousands of acres. Both the island and
main shores are high and dry, and along the banks can be seen the beau-
tiful summer homes of the wealthy business men of Detroit, and private
steam yachts connect these homes with the city.

Mr. Dupont was chatting with an elderly man about the scen-
ery along the river, the towns on the bank, etc, when he quietly re-
marked, “I never go up this river without thinking of a very exciting
passage I once had. You, of course, remember the attempted rescue of
the prisoners of war on Johnson’s Island in September, 1864. Well, I
happened to be a passenger on the P%zlo Parsons. One of the conspir-
ators came on board at Detroit. ‘Three more boarded us at Sandwich,
right above us here. Then at Amherstburg twenty more came on. board.
Of course I saw them around, but we didn’t think anything about it.
You can imagine how surprised and excited we were, when, just after
leaving Kelly’s Island, the boat was suddenly seized by these twenty-four
men, and was put about for Middle Bass Island. We were landed at Middle
Bass Island. You, of course, know how the scheme failed.”

But now they were approaching Detroit, the ‘City of the Straits.”
Again was. presented to their eyes the picture of a beautiful city and
a busy harbor. ‘Tugs were darting back and forth; a ponderous ferry-boat
was taking across a whole train of cars; a towing steamer, itself heavily
laden with lumber, was bringing in a fleet of no less than three barges,
all loaded with lumber, which but a few weeks previously was embodied
in graceful pines along the northern shores of Michigan. Chicago schoon-
ers, bound for Buffalo, were being convoyed down the straits. One of Uncle
Sam’s trim little revenue cutters was anchored a short distance off the
shore. The whole presented a rare scene of beauty in the early morning
hours.






















































Special Permiesion of the Detroit aud Cleveland Steam Navigation Co,

VIEW OF DETROIT HARBOR. 153,
154 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

As they had staid somewhat longer in Cleveland than he had origi-
nally intended, Mr. Dupont could only stay about one day in Detroit; so
they had to move about lively. After a very brief stop at the hotel they
went out riding. sie

“T believe,” said Miss Ashton, “that the Detroiters modestly claim
that they have the most beautiful city in the United States.”

“T don’t blame them,” exclaimed Alice. ‘What wide streets and
beautiful grounds, and the river must give them any amount of pleasant
excursions.”

“Are we going across the river on this long bridge?” asked Alfred,
as the carriage suddenly turned to the right.

“This is the bridge leading over to
Belle Isle, which is the great Park of
Detroit. It contains nearly seven hun-










dred acres, and is, as you see, laid out in
groves, lawns, artificial lakes, and canals.
The people take a great deal of pride in
its”

“Tust look at those squir-
rels,” shouted Alfred. It is.
a pleasant sight to see these



f vz
< re fEkTY ane



ar

frisky rodents playing around
in the trees. They well know



they are perfectly safe from
attack.

They stopped at the Casi-
no for rest and refreshments.
There Mr. Dupont had the

pleasure of again meeting the

ON BELLE ISLAND. |

gentleman with whom he had talked in the morning. Cards were ex-
changed, and the gentleman was found to be Mr. Roberts, a retired mer-
chant of Cleveland.

“Looking around some, are you?” was his hearty greeting.

“Ves, and I must say there is a great deal to see,” said Mr. Dupont;
‘and Alice, here, thinks Detroit is the nicest place she was ever in.”
CLEVELAND AND DETROIT. Tc



“You will
find a great













































many of that
same opinion,
Miss Alice. But
did you know
that Detroit was
a very old place,
and that «there is
a great deal in



































es its early history
DOM : :
that is of inter-
est?”

‘““T never heard
much about
that,” said Alice.

“T presmnre



not; but no place

Wii) ; ;
Ly) in the United

Py) i) ii
LY yy)
Ziff States presents

YY,
cay

= Zig Ze
AUN A WON SG SG a aa mi Fa ; yy such a series of
\ \ WN WS ye WEL : , 5
\\i c/ eavonirmarereaesy rt yer ae a @ events, interest-
= Se ema TA
We EL Ad A " Z|

SS

ele

ing in them-





selves, and per-
manently affect-





















ing, as they oc-































































































curred, its prog-







ress and pros-
perity. Five
times its flag has



been changed.
First the lily of
France floated
AT St. CLAIR FLATS. over its fortress,

; i ies. . Rush Club House
I, Gunning. 2. The Government Jetties 3. Rushmere Clu ou fled etive ead
4. Star Island Club House. 5. After Muscalonge.






























156 CLEVELAND AND DETROIT.

cross of England, and next the stars and stripes of the United States;
and then again the red cross, and lastly the stars and stripes. Three
different sovereigns have claimed its allegiance, and since it has been
held by the United States its government has been thrice transferred;
twice it has been besieged by the Indians; once captured in war,
and once burned to ‘the ground. Fire has scathed it—the tomahawk,
scalping knife, and war club have been let loose upon it at the hand
of an unrelenting savage foe. It has been the scene of one surrender,
of more than fifty pitched battles, and twelve horrid massacres.”

“Bless me!” exclaimed Florence, as he ceased speaking, “it had its
full share of diseases when young, but it seems to have survived them
all, and is now in a very promising condition.”

That afternoon they all went up to the Flats, as they are called. The
boat steamed up the river, passing Belle Isle, and crossing Lake St. Clair.
Just as they entered the lake one of the passengers called their attention
to Grosse Pointe, one of the aristocratic suburbs of Detroit.

“What are all those buoys and things,” asked Alice.

“Take St. Clair,” replied Mr. Dupont, “‘is so very shallow that steamers
must keep closely to the navigable channel. So there are light-houses,
and light-ships, and light-buoys in abundance.”

“T don’t think it is much of a lake,” said Alfred.

The Flats are simply an immense marsh-like expanse at the upper
end of the lake; only we must understand there is no stagnant water,
_ but abundance of clear running water, and the numerous islands, which
but barely show themselves above the surface of the water, are separated
from each other by narrow channels which wind in and out. The prin-
cipal channel is the boundary line between Canada and the United States.

The talkative young man, Who-know-all-about-it, who is generally a
very pleasant fellow, was, of course, along on this trip, and some way he
had got on.a very easy conversational basis with our party. Just listen
to him:

“This,” he explains to Alfred, “is the United States Ship Canal. You
see the water was so very shallow here that the government had to
dredge out a channel, and those two long dykes keep the silt from
washing in again. Notice how our steamer slows down as we enter the


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SS SS

Bird's Eye View of U, S. Government Canal and the St. Clair Flats. The famous Fishing and Shooting Grounds. Home of the Black Bass and Duck.



1, St. Clair Hunting and Fishing Club, *2, Rushmere Club. 3. Butler's, 4. Star Island Hotel. 5. Boydell's. 6, Peninsular Shooting and Fishing Club. 7, Beder'e.
8. Canadian Club House. 9. North Channel Club House.

Special Permission of the Detroit and Cloveland Steam Navigation Co,

157
158 CLEVELAND AND DFTROIT.

canal. There is a good steep fine awaiting any vessel that undertakes to
go through here at full speed.”

“One would not think” said Mr. Dupont, surveying the scene from
a distance, “that this place would be a very good one for a summer
resort.”

“Oh, but it is a most excellent place! You see, at the proper season
the shooting and fishing is excellent. There are thousands of wild
ducks. Canada keeps all its side as a game preserve, but just notice
some of the club-houses on the American side, and especially notice the
Rushmere and Star Island houses. These resorts are scattered along on
the American side for miles.”

“I should say,” remarked Mr. Dupont, an hour or so later, “that
amongst the great drawing attractions of the Flats must be included
the mosquitoes. They are not only very numerous, but seem to be
peculiarly energetic, and thoroughly understand their business.”





























Special Permiesion of the Detroit and Clovoland Steam Navigation Co,

460 PORT HURON.
ON TO MACKINAC. | I61

> CHAPTER Vil.
ON TO MACKINAC.

OU MUST all try and get a good night’s rest, for we
want to enjoy our ride to-morrow. We shall start for
Mackinac on the steamer Czty of Alpena. Such was
the cheerful “good night” of Mr. Dupont.

‘To Mackinac!” Here was something for them all
to think about. Mr. and Mrs. Dupont were having a
fairly good time. They were enjoying themselves be-
cause their children Ba Rr



were, and especially
thankful were they to see the evident
improvement in Alice. Alfred did not
know very much about Mackinac, but
there was a steamboat ride coming, and
visions of good times floated before him.
Alice had heard so much of this famous
island that she was more than glad to
have a chance to go.
As for Miss Ashton, she knew it
was quite possible she would meet
Frank Gliddon there, but what did she

care for that. ‘True, Frank was an ex-





cellent young man, but what funny
things these hearts of ours are! They absolutely
refuse to open their portals until the one fate
162 ON TO MACKINAC.

has decided on crosses our path. Even Mr. Dupont could but see that
his favorite sister-in-law had been unusually quiet for the last week, but
the dear, blundering man could not guess the secret.

“TLet’s hurry up,” said Alfred the next morning; “ we may get left.”















ua







TE Ms

fine
Mee ey ih



ee It
yO

1S

KK
I A



)

INTERIOR VIEW OF STEAMER.

“There is plenty of time. The steamer does not leave until nine
_ o'clock,” rejoined Mr. Dupont. “Let us eat our breakfast and go on board
in a civilized manner.”

They found the Czty of Alpena with quite a large passenger list
This is one of the regular boats of the D. & C. Company, belonging to
the Lake Huron division. Knowing this fact it is not necessary to add
that it is furnished with all that goes to make a luxurious lake steamer, -
and makes traveling on the water the acme of delightful trips. Amongst
the passengers the Duponts found some people with whom they were
ON TO MACKINAC. 163

slightly acquainted. This is not at all singular, since Detroit is the start-
ing point for the lake part of the excursion to Mackinac. The C., H. &
D. brings people from as far south as Cincinnati to this point.

Once more they steamed out into the river, and once more wended
their way into the shallow St. Clair. Alice stumped them all by asking





ae es meget

THE OAKLAND HOTEL AND HYGIONAMA.

if any one could tell why the lake was named St. Clair, the only one in
the whole series that did not rejoice in an Indian name.

“Tf you know all about it, suppose you tell us,” said her father.

‘Well, I happen to know, because that was in our history last winter.
The very first ship on these lakes was the Greffim, under command of
La Salle, in 1679. Well, they called this Lake St. Clair because they
entered it on the feast-day of St. Clair, about the roth of August.”

“Very much obliged,” said Mr. Dupont. “Well, you see we have now
passed through the canal and are threading our way through the Flats.
We will soon be in St. Clair River, which, in turn, will conduct us ‘to
Lake Huron.” .
164 ON TO MACKINAC.

When the steamer reached the town of St. Clair, Alfred was much
surprised at the immense hotel on the bank. A gentleman standing
near told them that the St. Clair’ Springs were widely known and very
popular, and that the hotel before them was the Oakland Hotel.

“JT wish we had planned to stop there for a few days,” said Mr.
Dupont.



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A PASSING BOAT.

“You certainly would have been very much pleased with your stay.
The walks and drives are very beautiful, and, of course, the boating on
this river is simply immense,” was the reply. .

But the steamer soon departed on its regular trip.

It has been truthfully said that “a lake is a lake, and looks pretty
much the same in one locality as in another.” ‘The charm, then, of lake
travel consists in meeting and passing other craft; scanning the distant
shore with telescope, to make out the bolder details of the coast; station-
ing yourself at the bows, watching the spray and waves thrown up by the
rapidly advancing steamer; or, seated in a comfortable chair in the stern,
watch the restless waters toss up and down in the glittering wake.

‘This river is much like the Detroit River,” said Florence, “but it
is not quite as wide, and there are not so many islands, but what beautiful
resorts along the shore!”

The simple fact is, the whole river is lined with summer resorts, and
every few miles there is a thriving village. The commerce of the river
ON TO MACKINAC. 165

is very large. It has been estimated that the commerce of the lakes is
greater than our entire foreign commerce, and that a vessel passes any
given point every seven minutes. |

Port Huron was reached about the middle of the afternoon. ‘« Sixty-
two miles from Detroit, and all is well,” remarked Mr. Dupont.

“And here is a lot of folks waiting to get on,” added Henry. But
one of the officers of the boat explained that it was an excursion party
from Canada, which was transferred to the boat at this point.

Port Huron is a place of about fifteen thousand inhabitants, and is
an important shipping point both by rail and steamer. Two miles above
are two famous summer resorts, Huronia and Gratiot Beaches. Only this
last spring a tunnel has been completed under the river, connecting Michi-
gan and Canada. It is not only a remarkable piece of engineering, but is
regarded as of international importance as well.

‘Now, folks,” said Mr. Dupont, “you must notice now that we are
just entering Lake Huron, and there is nothing like knowing just where
we are going, and so just look at this rather homely map of our route;
we are now at Gratiot, and you will have a good idea of our general
direction and where we will land. Get it just right, so as to have the
top of the map north. You see the Canadian shore dies away in the dim
distance, but most of the way we shall keep the Michigan shore in sight
on our left.”

When under way, one of the enjoyable incidents of the trip is the
passing of some lumber fleet. Of course every one knows that the main
industry in Northern Michigan is the lumber industry.

Mr. Dupont and Alfred were watching a small steamer, itself heavily
laden with lumber, towing a couple of barges, also loaded, when a gentle-
man, surveying the scene, asked Mr. Dupont if he ever took passage in
such a craft.

“T shall always remember,” he said, “a trip I once took with a friend
of mine from a little place called Thompson, a few miles from Manistique, |
to Detroit.” One who has a story to tell is always welcome at such times,
and soon Mr. Dupont and Alfred were listening to his story.

“Oh, it ain’t much of a story. Myself and friend were at Thompson,
when the proprietor of the mills there offered us passage on his boat to










































































































































































































Special Permission of tho Detroit and Clevoland Steam Navigation Co.

PORT HURON TO MACKINAC.
ON TO MACKINAC, 167

Detroit. More for the novelty than anything else we concluded to go.
There was a steamer and a barge. Of course we went on the steamer.
We were the only passengers on board, and had the only state-room.
Unfortunately the kitchen was right the other side of a rather thin parti-
tion. And this, of course, kept our room decidedly warm. Still, by leaving
the door open we got along all right.

“The second night out I re









member we ran into a fog, and
for an hour or so the whistle had
to be blown every three minutes.
It seemed to me I jumped about
two feet with the first blast. Still
we enjoyed ourselves, and devel-
oped an appetite that was really
wonderful. As our boat could go
a little faster than some others, it was
quite good sport to watch us slowly creep
up and pass some other boat. We were three
days in making the trip.”

“T would like to take just such a trip,” M
declared Alfred. MOONLIGHT ON THE LAKE,

Late in the evening the steamer stopped at Sand Beach. Although
quite dark, yet, by the light of the moon, they could make out the outline
of the harbor of refuge which Uncle Sam has built at this place. The
break-water is more than a mile and a half long, and cost one million
dollars; but in times of severe storms the passing shipping can run in
here and find a secure retreat. Stopping at this point reminded the
gentleman who had been on the lumber raft of another incident in his
life which was not so pleasant to recall. This time it was only Mr. Dupont
who listened to him. Alfred, with the others, was on deck enjoying
the moonlight on the lake.

“Sand Beach,” said the stranger, musingly. “Just twenty years ago,
sir, I was here under vastly different circumstances. It was, as you
know, the year of the great Chicago fire, and the terrible conflagration
in the forests of Michigan. At that time I was working in a shingle

e
168 ON TO MACKINAC.

mill, about ten miles from this place. Two days before the fire reached
us, the foreman and men abandoned the mill, which stood in a little clear-
ing of about ten acres. You see, I had no one depending on me, and I
was just fool enough to think I could some way save the mill. I set to
work as soon as the men had left, and buried all the provisions left in the
house; the knives, belts, and light machinery of the mill, as well as a stove
and a lot of crockery ware. ‘There was plenty of water around the mill,
and I put in my spare time wetting down the house, mill, stock—well,
everything that would burn. I scattered several hundred pailfuls of water
on the ground around the building.

“Well, night came on, and I began to think I would have the laugh
on all the fellows who had gone off and left me, but the conceit was all
taken out of me before long. About ten o’clock the light was so bright
that I could -plainly see everything about me, and there was a terrible
roar in the woods. I had dug a little sort of a weil during the day,
which I had filled with water, besides drenching the ground around. I
had also got a thick plank, some four inches through, which I had sawed
up so as to cover the mouth of the well. By midnight the roaring was
just awful. I could see, for two hours before tho fire reached me, a con-
stant succession of all kinds of animals running across the opening,
hurrying on to escape the fire. Amongst the rest a horse came dashing
up to the house. He seemed to actually implore my assistance; but soon
he dashed off in the opposite direction.

“Then the flame came on. It was not a slow, creeping thing, but
a billowy mass of flame borne on the wings of the wind. I jumped into
my well and closed the door, but before I could close it I saw the
house and mill were roaring masses of flame. It got so hot in the
well I could scarcely breath. I knew the planks were on fire, but I
calculated it would take quite a few minutes for them to burn through,
so I waited until the roaring had passed on a little ways, and then
turned them over and splashed water up against them.

“Well, sir, you can imagine what sort of a night I put in. I dared
not venture out until daylight, and then nothing but soot and ashes
were to be seen. House and mill, leaves, brush and logs were swept
away. Considerable of the property I had buried was saved. My pro-

e
ON TO-MACKINAC. 169

visions were gone, except some beef, which had been as thoroughly

cooked as if in an oven. It was nearly two days before I dared to
pick my way to this place, which had also been burned.”

During the night, while the tourists slept, the steamer, holding on

i ; her tireless way,

had crossed Sag-

asx inaw Bay and

had left Oscoda-

au- Sable be-

hind. This town is noted for its lumber



OSCODA-AU-SABLE.





and salt.

But we are by this time in the lumber regions in
earnest. Amongst the busy towns of northern Michigan
is Alpena. Situated at the head of Thunder Bay, it has
the advantages of possessing a very spacious and a very

we safe harbor, and at the same time, by the numerous branches
ve _ of Thunder River, it has water communication with a large

extent of fees ony These streams, even though not large enough for the
purposes of navigation, can be used to float logs from the interior when
swollen by the winter’s freshets. The result is to make lumbering the
great interest of Alpena. But the pine forests are being rapidly exhausted.
It does not require much. of an expert to see that the time is not far
distant when other industries must take the place of lumbering, or our
lake cities will cease to be the busy places they are at present. ‘The
steamer was approaching Alpena, when the tourists began to make their
appearance on the decks.

The breakfast was eaten in a hurry, because the tourists wanted to
take as much time as they could in viewing. “ Just look at the lumber!”
were the exclamations to be heard on every side. “I have been to this
place before,” said Mr. Dupont, “in the interests of my business, so I
know something about it. It is the greatest lumber port in Michigan.”

“Tt looks like it,” said Alice; “you can smell it’ in the air.” The
fact is, you can not see the city, owing to the enormous stacks of
lumber which line the sides of the river for half a mile or so on

each shore. The waters of the bay are discolored by sawdust, and run-
II
I70 ON TO MACKINAC.

away logs are dancing up and down on the waters. Great rafts are
being towed about by powerful tugs.

The steamer finally came to anchor at her dock. Mr. Dupont found
that the boat would probably stay there an hour or so, and he at once
proposed to his party to get off and take a walk. This was heartily
seconded by all. As Mr. Dupont was acquainted with the superintendent
at one of the mills, they had a good chance to witness a big saw-mill in
full operation.

“Tt is simply surprising how effective they make machinery now-a-
days,” remarked Miss Ashton. “Just look at that log coming up the
chute!” Her remarks
were called out by ob-
serving the ease with
which an enormous pine
was coming up the slide
out of the river. It was
floating placidly in the
stream one moment; the
next, it was riding up to
the second story of the
mill. Arrived at the top,
with scarcely a halt, it
rolled onto a traveling-
carriage. In a very few
seconds a slab had been
taken off of each side,
and it was a nicely
squared log; but the































Gang Saws were waiting







for it, and in less than

THE GANG SAW.

five minutes a load of
nice boards was riding off to the far end of the mill, ready for piling.
In the meanwhile the slabs had been sawed into various lengths; some
were on their way to be made into laths, and the odds and ends were
riding up to the top of the burner, where they were to end their career
in smoke.
ON TO MACKINAC.

They were told that nearly two hundred

handled yearly in Alpena.

Some of the party left the steam-
er at this point, and it was under-
stood they were going to camp out
for a week or so in the neighbor-
hood, and enjoy the fishing. They
looked as if they meant to have a
good time.

The crowded harbor made it nec-
cessary for the steamer to back out,
and a tug assisted in the operation.
But they were soon under headway,
bearing off to the northwest with
Chebogagen as the next stopping-



“has
a we \

















NEW FRIENDS.

171

million feet of lumber were



IN CAMP.

point. By this time the pas-
sengers had become somewhat

generally acquainted. Little

groups of new-formed friends
are to be met with in various
localities, enjoying cozy déte-

‘a-tétes. Some one is playing

the piano, and a group are
singing. Two chess fiends
are hard at it, while a small
audience Btands oS A

at one of the ones

It is, however, on deck that the bheener of
human nature sees most to enjoy. They are all
there! The fat young man with none to molest
Ty eet ON TO MACKINAC.

or make afraid! ‘There is
the couple that reminds us
of Lincoln’s pleasant intro-
duction of himself and wife.
“Here are the long and the
short of it.” The stout,
middle-aged couple “clothed



in purple and fine linen,”
but accompanied by their festive offspring, who generally manages to keep
them in hot water. And there is also the representative of that remark-
able variety of young men who persist in nursing the end of their canes.

Thus the day passed on. Something of interest was always in sight.
Now it was a steamer, then a fleet of lumber boats, or, perhaps, a diminu-
tive tug, most valiantly steaming out into the lake.

From time to time they could detect a light-house standing on some
exposed section of the beach. One rather elderly gentleman studied with
particular care, with the aid of a powerful telescope, the light-houses
as they passed them.

“Naturally,” said he to Mr. Dupont, “I feel an interest in light-
houses, since for some years I was a keeper of one off the southern
coast of Florida.”

“Tt must have been a very lonely life,’ said Florence.

“Ves, indeed, it was lonely. Now and then a storm would liven
things up. By the way, I had quite a little incident happen to me;
would you like to hear it?”

“Just the thing,” rejoined Mr. Dupont. “Tet us get a sheltered
place, where we can look out over the lake, and you tell us about it.”

“Now you must not get your expectation too high; nothing very
startling after all.”

THE LIGHT-HOUSE.

“The light-house of which I had charge was not isolated from the
main land; but the whole country around was a dreary waste. The
pine forests came right down to the water's edge, and a treacherous
ledge of rock extended out into the sea; so it was a dreary, lonely
place. Myself and partner were the only persons in the neighborhood.
ON TO MACKINAC. 173

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































About a mile above us a schooner had gone ashore some years before,
and the body of the ship, still nearly entire, though long since striped
of all that was of value, lay on the beach.

“From the. light-room of the light-house I could plainly see the
wreck, One night, to my great surprise, I distinctly saw a light moving
174 ON HO. MACKINAC.

about the wreck. I did not suppose there was a human being within
a hundred miles of us, but there was the light. I saw it off and on
for several hours, and then it disappeared. I -concluded that some
wandering hunter, or fisher, or, maybe, an explorer, had visited the
wreck, and possibly was staying there over night. I probably would
not have thought much more about it, but the next evening about the
same time there was the light again. As before, it remained in sight
several hours and then disappeared. I was getting fterested, and
when the third night the same record was made I concluded I must
investigate.

“Accordingly I rowed up there the next afternoon. A most curious
sight met my eyes. The entire boarding of what had been the Captain’s
Cabin had been torn out. There were bits of canvas bagging on the
floor, and what excited me more than anything else was a double-
eagle gold piece, which I found among the debrzs on the floor. ‘There
were no footprints on the sand around, and whoever the strange visitor
had been he had come and gone in his boat.

“OF course I was as much mystified as ever when I returned to
the light-house. But nothing more was to be seen of the light, and
I ceased to think about it. The whole thing was suddenly revived
some years later when I was in New York. I was, for mere curiosity, .
looking over a file of newspapers. In one dated some fifteen years
previously I noticed an account of the loss of the coasting brig Wm.
Thompson, that went ashore off Malcom’s Point. ‘That was the wreck
with which I was acquainted. It went on to state that the captain,
whose name was also Thompson, was supposed to have had a great
deal of money, but as nothing was ever found, common opinion must
have been mistaken, unless he had it securely hidden in some place
known only to himself.

“Phat set me to wondering whether some one had not learned his
secret. ‘The article I was reading named a little lake town as his home.
I had a lawyer friend in that town, and I wrote and begged him to
give me as full particulars as possible.

“In due time I received his reply. Capt. Thompson, he said, had
a house there, that he rented out, all but one room, which he kept


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

MACKINAC ISLAND, GEM OF THE STRAITS. 175
176 ON TO MACKINAC.

as his own. Some time after the captain’s death, as no heir appeared,
the house was sold for taxes. The new tenant, after living in the
house about a year, had suddenly left—was gone about two months, and
when he returned, seemed to have all the money he wanted. He accord-
ingly had sold out and left the country. The second new owner
reported finding a secret niche in the walls of the captain’s house,
containing papers and memoranda showing conclusively that he must
have died possessed of a good many thousands of dolfars. The general
opinion was that the man who first bought the house had found this
niche, learned where the money was hidden away, secured it, and was
now enjoying it in some unknown locality. I thought I now under-
stood the whole matter. But, dear me, how many times I had been
near that buried treasure!”

Thus the day wore on. Shortly after dinner the fever that always
attacks passengers on a boat when nearing their journey’s end, broke out.
The cabins were deserted; all were on deck. They were already in the
Straits of Mackinac, and Bois Blanc Island was visible in the distance.
But the boat first stopped at Cheboyagan.

This gave a chance for about half the passengers to inflict on the
other half the exceedingly old and flimsy story as to the origin of the
name of the place, viz.: the chagrin of the chief at the birth of a daugh-
ter instead of a son—a “‘she-boy-again.” It is the firm impression amongst
antiquarians that this story is one of the few that Noah used to enliven
his family during their lonely voyage in the Ark.

“There is Mackinac!” exclaimed Mr. Dupont. .“ Where?” asked all
around him. He pointed in the distance, but though the high grounds
of the island are plainly visible from Cheboyagan, yet a detailed view can
not be obtained until the point of Round Island is passed.

“Where will your party stop?” asked the light-house man of Mr.
Dupont.

“We have already engaged rooms at the Grand,” was the reply.















































































By Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co-

: HISTORIC MACKINAW.—VIEW OF THE STRAITS. oe


MACKINAC. 179

CHAPTER VIII.
“MACKINAC.

“Beauteous Isle! I sing of thee,
Mackinac, my Mackinac.
Thy lake-bound shores I love to see,
’ Mackinac, my Mackinac.
From Arch Rock’s bright and shelving steep,
To western cliffs and Lovers’ Leap,
Where memories of the lost ones sleep,
Mackinac, my Mackinac.
The northern shore trod British foe, ©
Mackinac, my Mackinac.
That day saw gallant Holmes laid low,
Mackinac, my Mackinac.
Now Freedom’s flag above thee waves,
And guards the rest of fallen braves,
“Their requiem sung by Huron’s waves,
Mackinac, my Mackinac.” -—ANONYMOUS.

G)) HEY KNOW how to keep tavern here, that is a fae
Mr. eee placidly sipping his. coffee the fol
morning; “and that is lucky for us, because this is a
pretty important station in our outing, and there is no
use of talking; no mere beauty of scenery can fill a
long-felt want as a good hotel can when you are trav-



eling.”

“That may all be,” responded Mrs. Dupont, “ but
we wouldn’t come rushing up here just to enjoy the
comforts of this hotel, if it wasn’t for the natural surroundings.”


180 MACKINAC.

“They make a nice combination, anyway,” said Alice; “and I am a
good deal like papa. I don’t believe it would be any fun to travel unless
you could have all the comforts of life while on the wing.”

“Oh, you all will agree with me, when you think it over. But now,
as we are to stay here several days, we need not be in a rush to do the
island. Let’s take our time to it.” So saying, Mr. Dupont strolled down
to see if there was any mail for his party.

Yes;

- there was quite a bundle of letters and papers awaiting him, and

they busied themselves for a while in reading and commenting on their
letters.

“Oh, say!” exclaimed Alice; “Susie says that a whole lot of folks we
know are coming up here, and she says Frank Gliddon is one of them.
Didn’t you know that, Aunt Flo?”

“Ves.” Aunt Flo admitted she did know something about it, but she
tried to turn the matter off by ‘‘wondering what road they will come over?”

“Why, of course they will come over the C. H. & D. from Cincinnati,
as that is the most direct route from that section to this wonder country.
When will he be here, Florence?” and Mr. eee beamed benignantly
on his sister-in-law.

“Why, they ought to be here most any time; they are coming directly
through by rail and



“Bless me!” interrupted Mr. Dupont, “if here ain’t a letter from Dr.
Blanchard.”

“Dr. Blanchard!” ejaculated they all.

“Ves; the Doctor himself. It is written from the Thousand Islands,
and says that he and Bert are going on a little excursion down the river.
It seems he never got our telegram, and was quite ignorant of our where-
abouts until he met Prof. Morgan. You know he went there from the
Falls. He says to wire him to Montreal. I must attend to it immediately.
I wish he would run up here,” and Mr. Dupont started at once for the
telegraph office. ;

“But, Aunt Flo, what in the world will you do if Frank .and the
Doctor both put in an appearance? You will have to turn one over to
me, and which one will it be?”

‘Oh, nonsense, Alice; take them both!” replied Flore~re














































Ta eu

Pee Rese a we his



4 Speclal Pormission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

GRAND HOTEL, MACKINAC. 4184
182 MACKINAC.

“One at a time, please. You will see me soothing which ever one
feels cut out. I am going to show myself a good angel.”

“Well, just now let’s go and stroll along the beach,” said Mrs.
Dupont, who was a little worried about the way things were working.

They soon overtook Mr. Dupont, who introduced them to Major
Webb, with whom he was talking. He explained that he had sent a
telegram as requested, but come to look at the letter more closely it
was several days old, and he didn’t much think he would catch the
Doctor at Montreal.

Now it so happened that Major Webb had a hobby, which he was
inclined to take with him wherever he went, but as it was quite an
appropriate hobby for the place in which they were, Mr. Dupont was
glad to have met him. The fact is, the major was a walking encyclo-
pedia on colonial history. He never was so happy as when discussing
some point in history, and Mr. Dupont, who believed the easiest way
of getting knowledge was by conversing, was quite ready to listen.
‘The major, on the other hand, was much gratified to find so good a
listener, so he was already launched on his favorite topic.

“Do you know, Mr. Dupont,’ he was saying, “that this entire
section of country around here is one of the most interesting in all
the United States to the historian of the early period of our country?
Father Marquette, writing in 16609, thus describes it: ‘Michilimackinac is
an island famous in these regions, of more than a league in diameter,
and elevated in some places by such high cliffs as to be seen more
than twelve leagues off. It is situated just in the strait forming the
communication between Lakes Huron and Illinois (Michigan). It is the
key, and, as it were, the gate for all tribes from the South, as the Sault is
for those of the North, there being in this section of country only those
two passages by water, for a great number of nations have to go by
one or the other of these channels, in order to reach the French
settlements.’ ”

‘“1669, eh,” said Mr. Dupont; “that was quite a while ago, wasn’t it?”

“Yes; and to me it is interesting to think that the center of influence
end power for all the interior of what is now the United States, for nearly
two centuries of her brief history, was not the eastern seaboard, but right
here on the Island of Michilimackinac.”












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MACKINAC AND VICINITY. 183
184 MACKINAC.

“What do you call it, Wechzlimackinac ?”

“That is what it was called in all the early works on the subject.
There are two theories as to the derivation of the word. According to
one authority it is derived from the words Michz, meaning great, and
Mackinac, meaning turtle. You see, the shape of the island bears some
resemblance to that of a turtle.. Others say that it was derived from
Michine-mankinonk, meaning the place of giant fairies. According to In-
dian tradition this was a favorite resort for their gendz. Do you know,
sir, that this island was the home of the legends of Hiawatha that Long-
fellow embedied in his charming verse?”

“Why, no; I was ignorant on that subject. I am somewhat at a loss
to understand what made this island such an important place.”

“Just glance at the map I hold in my hand, and you will notice, as
Marquette says, that it is most advantageously situated. You see, the
French, from their possessions in Canada, had ready access to the Great
Lakes. The two important posts in their estimation were the Sault, giving
access to Lake Superior, and this one, commanding the entrance to Lake
Michigan. The settlement at the Sault was started in 1668, that at Michili-
mackinac in 1670; both by Marquette. Did you ever read an account of
his life?”

“IT must confess I know very little about him.”

“Marquette was a Jesuit missionary, but he was one of those whose
life is a beautiful tribute to the worth of Christianity. He might have
passed his life in luxury and ease, but he devoted it to unceasing labor in
the cause of the Church. He lived to carry the Gospel to the Indians.
He spent his life among them, and died at the early age of thirty-eight,
yet he had accomplished a wonderful work. His funeral procession was
one of the most remarkable ones in the annals of this country.”

“Well, let us hear about it.”

‘“Marquette, who had been on a mission to the Illinois Indians, died
on his return trip to Mackinac, and was buried at the mouth of the Mar-
quette River. This was in 1675. About two years later a large party
of the Ojibwas, Ottawas, and Huron Indians went there and prepared his
bones for removal. When all was ready, the funeral fleet of canoes
started for Mackinac. As it advanced it was met by other canoes of.
MACKINAC.











































sented.





said Alice.





































eee
aa > Ee a
: ¢

bi

say

A

4,
MR



AT FORT MACKINAC.

185

plumed and painted warriors. Nearly
every tribe in the North was repre-
He was the first and the
last white man that ever had such a
funeral procession to the grave.”
“But let us go and see some of
the sights that are to be seen here,”

“Certainly,” responded Mr. Du-

pont, always will-
ing to please the
restuian Wiehe te
first?”

“Let's go up
on that big hill
there,” said Al-
fred, pointing to
the fort.

“You will
get a magnificent
view from that
place,” said the
Major.

Accordingly
the whole party
were soon wend-

ing their way up

the steep hill that led to Fort Mackinac, overlooking the town.
: “They ought to have an elevator,” declared Mr. Dupont, as they
toiled up the steps.

But the rest thought that the views repaid them all the trouble.
And they were right. As Schoolcraft wrote long ago, “whenever the
visitor gets on eminences overlooking the lake, he is transported with
sublime views of a most illimitable and magnificent water prospect.

If the poetic muses are ever to have a new Parnassus in America,
186 MACKINAC.

they should inevitably fix on Michili-Mackinac. Hygeia, too, should place
her temple here, for it has one of the purest, driest, clearest, and most
healthful atmospheres.”

“I suppose, Major, this is a tremendously old place,” queried Mr.
Dupont.

“Well, no. This fort has been built only a little over a hundred
years. I should explain that the first settlement in this region was not
on this island, but at the neighboring city of Mackinaw. ‘There was a.
terrible massacre there in 1763, and shortly afterwards the British govern-
ment built a fort here, and for a time old Mackinaw was deserted. When
first built, this fort was enclosed by a palisade of cedar pickets, ten feet
high, intended as a defense against. the Indians. Each picket was pro-
tected at the top by sharp iron prongs and by hooks outside.”

“It all looks like a big park around here,” said Miss Ashton.

“Well, it is a big park,” responded the Major. You see a large part
of the island is owned by the United States government. Of course
there is private ownership as well, but the lines are well defined, and the
government takes good care of its portion. It lays out and builds good
roads to various places of interest.”

“What a good uncle our Uncle Samuel is!” observed Alice. “He
is not only good enough to give us all a farm, but he lays out parks for
us to enjoy ourselves in.”

But by this time the party were getting fatigued, so they returned
to the hotel. There a new surprise awaited them, and yet not a surprise
exactly. The excursion from Cincinnati was in, and, of course, Frank
Gliddon was on hand. Let us at once take an inventory of this young
man. Here he comes. A good-natured young fellow, ain’t he? He knows
them all, and doesn’t need an introduction. Mr. Dupont is unfeignedly glad
to see him; so is Mrs. Dupont; so is Alice; so is Alfred; and so is
We had better not be too sure about the remaining one. She seems to
be cordial enough in her greeting, but there is an undefinable something
about it hard to explain.



“TI was not sure whether you would get here or not,” said Frank to
Mr. Dupont. “You see you folks were moving around in such a zig-zag
sort of a way that I couldn’t tell but I was bound to take in Mackinac


















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Special Permission of tho Detroit and Clevoland Steam Navigation Co.

FORT MACKINAC. 187
188 MACKINAC.

anyway, and I am glad I came. Let’s get some dinner, and then we will
go somewhere.”

And now for a few days the whole party planned to enjoy themselves.
Mr. Dupont proposed to let Frank take care of the young folks, while
he fished or drove around































































with Mrs. Dupont or with







the Major for a com-



















panion. And this was a
most pleasant prospect,
for the drives around the
island are no small part °
of its attractions.

That afternoon they
strolled around, and
finally visited that point
of land known as “ Rob-
inson’s Folly.” It is at
the southeastern angle of
the island. While look-
ing out over the beau-
tiful prospect disclosed
to view at this point—



the gently-undulating
lake melting into the
horizon at the distance; the passing commerce; and the park-like island,—
Miss Ashton told them the following story of the place:

“This place is called Robinson’s Folly, and they say it is because
Robinson, who was a British officer when the flag of St. George waved
over this fort, was foolish enough to build an expensive summer-house
right on the edge of the precipice, where the wearing-away of the rocks
must soon cause it to fall. But the eternal fitness of things calls for a more
romantic solution than that, and so here it is. More than one hundred
years have passed since Le Boeuf was chief of the St. Mary band of the
Chippewas. His people was but a mere remnant of what they had been
in their palmy days. Famine, smallpox, and war had reduced them to a














































































































































































































































































Special Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Stenm Navigation Co,

ROBINSON’S FOLLY. 4189
190 MACKINAC.

feeble band that lived at the Isle des Iroquois, near the Falls of St. Mary.
The grizzled old warrior had but one child, Wintemoyeh. All the beauty
and poetry of the Indian race seemed to have come to their perfection in
her. Savage chiefs and renowned warriors were smitten by her charms.
Even the pale-face chiefs were eager suitors for the hand of this Indian

4












= : ATH eae ea i A fet*
HK







fal! u





























WATER VIEW OF THE FOLLY.

belle. But there was little use for them to press their claims. Her father
hated the English worse than he hated the rattlesnakes that crawled in
the woods. No! he wanted none of them! He had already fixed up a
match for his beloved Wintemoyeh. She should marry Chegoimegon, a
hideous old pagan, who was as ugly and repulsive as she was beautiful,
but he was chief of the most powerful band of the Chippewas; besides
he was already blessed with two extremely ugly old crones for wives.
“No wonder Wintemoyeh was disgusted! Besides when her father’s
decision was announced she was no longer fancy free. Her true lover
had already appeared in the person of the gallant Englishman, Captain
MACKINAC. IQI

Robinson. Love which laughs at bolts and locks, also laughs at differ-
ences of race and language; and knew how to circumvent the wily old
chief.. But what was poor Wintemoyeh to do? he old chief was sick
and apparently dying, and desiring to see her married had already com-
manded the presence of the detested Chegoimegon and had issued order
to prepare the white-dog feast and to have the marriage ceremony pro-
ceed.

“Tn despair Wintemoyeh fled to the arms of her waiting lover, who at
once bore her away to Mackinac. The old chief was all but gone when
the news was conveyed to him. ‘To the unbounded astonishment of all
the terrible tidings did not kill him, not a bit of it. What, Wintemoyeh
disobey him and marry an Englishman! He laid aside his sickness even
as Frederick the Great did, who arose from a sick-bed to lead his armies
into Silesia! Sick and dying?, Not exactly. A few hours later he was
in his canoe rowing in feverish haste to Mackinac. The happy couple
had arrived at the island, and a joyous party was gathered at the Folly
to celebrate the occasion when the canoe of the old chief reached the
island. He crept upon them, and raised his gun, and fired at Captain
Robinson. But although hate had raised him from a sick-bed, it did not
give him steadiness of nerves. He missed his aim, and a terrible hand-
to-hand struggle ensued. Feeling that he was not strong enough to
save himself from being forced over the precipice, the old chief sum-
moned up all his remaining strength, made a wild leap, clasped Winte-
moyeh in his arms, and sprang over the cliff, his exultant war whoop
mingling with her shriek of despair.”

That evening while the young folks were out walking on the beach,
Mr. Dupont and the Major were enjoying a quiet smoke, and, of course, fill-
ing in the time with a talk about old times. The major as usual was
talking about the early history of the island.

“Vou, of course, have noticed that Astor House hotel, but unless you
have investigated it, you probably did not know that was once the head-
quarters of the American Fur Company where the substantial foundation
was laid of the enormous Astor fortune.”

“T believe I did know that, but what about the company?”

“The American Fur Company was one of the most successful com-


























































JOHN J.ASTOR HOUSE

fl) THE OLD HEAD-QUARTER'S.OF AMERICAN FUR COMPANY.

Spocial Permission of the Detroit and Cleveland Steam Navigation Co.

ASTOR HOUSE,
MACKINAC. 193

panies ever organized. It did not get under full operations until after
the war of 1812. The headquarters were here on this island, and that
hotel was their warehouse. The company had their posts all over the
West and Northwest. They had their system of agents and traders. From
all quarters the furs gathered by the trappers and Indians were finally
gathered here and stored in the spacious warehouse, now the hotel, and
here were brought the goods which the company sent out in exchange for
the furs.”

“Things must have been lively here at that time,” broke in Mr.
Dupont.

‘Those were the palmy days of Mackinac. You see the fur trade
necessitated a large force of clerks and the expenditure of much money.
Then the United States government made its annual payment to the Indians
here, and the neighboring tribes assembled by thousands to receive their
stipend. ‘Then again, the vessels sailing up Lake Huron from Detroit, and
destined for Chicago or Milwaukee, made ‘it their custom to put in here





for repairs and supplies. By the way, there




are some very interesting relics down at the WF Sain Incoh, Astor
Z| Original finericarFiur + Co, 52 Saf

old hotel. They are nothing more nor less ACB. Fenton Mackinack Mit,







j i IZ
than the accounts and correspondence (i)
:f



books of the Fur Company from 1815



































to 1836, and the company’s strong-box,







































or safe. In the book is a cor-
respondence with Gen. Winfield
Scott, soon after the battle of
Lundy’s Lane.”

“JT shall go and see them
to-morrow ue

Now, while they were talk-
ing, we have to record a most
interesting circumstance. Our BOOKS AND STRONG-BOX.
second section, to use the illus-
tration we have already employed, has finally put in an appearance, and
Mr. Dupont abruptly stopped talking to stare at a gentleman approach-
ing him. Well, it was Doctor Blanchard.
194

MACKINAC.



ARCH ROCK, FROM THE BEACH.

“T declare,
how do you do,
Dr. Blanchard,”
and he shook
him warmly by
the hand.

Every one
was glad to see
every one else.

‘Bert was not

far behind his
uncle, but where
were the others ?
Mrs. Dupont ex-
plained :

“ Alfred and
Alice have gone
out.walking with
Florence and
Mr. Gliddon.
Mr. Gliddon is
quite a friend
of ours, and is
spending a few
days with us.”

The fact is
the young folks
had been walk-
ing on the beach
and taking a
look at Arch
Rock by moon-
light. This is
one of the fin-
est views on the
MACKINAC. 195

island. Arch Rock is a fine view at any time, but when the moon is
shining at her full, and the fleecy clouds fleck the sky, the effect is
beautiful. No wonder that the Indians thought the island was the home
of powerful fairies! Though a more prosaic age laughs at the beliefs of
the untutored savages, yet we can not deny the bewitching influence of
such a scene as this.

They came in soon afterwards. Alfred was glad to see Burt. Alice
always did like the Doctor, and she hurriedly whispered to Florence that
she must begin the “good angel” part of her program. Miss Ashton was
equal to the emergency, and calmly introduced the Doctor to her friend,
Mr. Gliddon. The Doctor thought he understood things now, and, for the
time being, wished he had staid in Canada.

A crisis in our trip is now at hand. If in Virginia the Doctor had
been somewhat mystified at Miss Ashton’s treatment, it was now the lady’s
turn to be put out. The next day the Doctor was outwardly calm, very
pleasant, and all that, but it was plainly to be seen that he didn’t wish to
intrude. It was only at the invitation of Miss Ashton herself that he
went with them to visit the observatory at Fort Holmes. But he exerted
himself to make it pleasant for all, joked and told stories, but devoted
most of his attention to Alice, while Alice, on her part, could but glance
quizzically at Florence.

“What a splendid place this is for a look-out!” exclaimed Frank.
And well he might say so. The old fort itself stood on the highest point
of land in the island, and from the observatory an extensive view can be
obtained.

“I suppose this fort must be a good deal older than the other one,”
said Alice.

“You are mistaken there” explained Dr. Blanchard, “this fort only
dates from the war of 1812. I happen to have read all about it.”

“It is a rule in our party now, Doctor, that the one who knows about
any place we visit must tell the rest of us all about it,’ said Alice.

“It will not take me very long to tell what I know,” responded the
Doctor. “It seems that when the war of 1812 was declared by some
unaccountable neglect the American commander of Ft. Mackinac was not
informed of it. You must remember that was before the days of tele-


vy
shaved bats

“Fort [[oLMEs





FORT HOLMES, MACKINAC ISLAND.


MACKINAC. 197

graphs and daily papers. A force of British soldiers stationed near De-
tour, on the St. Mary’s River, were at once informed of the fact and
ordered to immediately attack Mackinac. He hurriedly procured a strong
force of Indians, and actually landed on the island before the Americans
had heard one word about the war. Taken entirely by surprise there was
nothing for the Americans to do but to surrender. Thus, without a blow
in its defence, the British captured this fort and island. They naturally
expected an attempt would be made to regain the place, and accordingly
they resolved to erect this fort on the highest point of the island.
Every citizen on the island was compelled to work three days on the fort.
They were very proud of the fort when finished and called it Fort
George.”

“Why, I thought there was'a great battle here. What is that old
battle-ground they are talking about so much?” inquired Florence.

“The battle they talk about was two years later, when the Americans

made an attempt to retake the island. It was fought at the farther end
of the island, and how this fort came to be called Fort Holmes was be-
cause Major Holmes was killed in the battle. ‘The Americans were unsuc-
cessful, but, the war soon ending, the British evacuated the island.”
‘““T suppose some of the build-
ings in the village were standing
at the time of the war,” said
Frank.



“Oh, yes. Some of them,
indeed, are much older than that
date,” was the reply. “There is
one old cottage here that, they
say, is over one hundred years
old. That has seen enough his



COTTAGE AT

( tory for us if it could only speak.”
i) MACKINAC ISLAND

e can not, of course, givé
OVER Ff W : ) Id
too VEARS OLD. in detail the movement of all

the party at all times. Frank
Gliddon and Alicé were boating in the vicinity of the Giant Staircase, when
he broke out with: “I say, Alice, who is this—er—Dr. Blanchard?”
198 MACKINAC.

So Alice told him how he had been with them in the first part of
the trip. She could but smile at his next remark: ‘Well, he seems to
be quite a favorite with your Aunt Florence, anyway.”

“Did you know, papa, there was quite a cave on the north end of



°



















































SCOTT’S CAVE.

this island?” inquired Alfred that evening. “Bert and I went over there °
this afternoon.”

“I believe there is one at the north end—Scott’s Cave, ain’t it,
Major? But you boys ought to have been with us this afternoon. We
found another cave that the Major here said was a good deal more inter-
esting, because it had a history with it. Skull Cave he called it.”

“Well, what is there about it?” asked Bert, turning to Major Webb.

“As the story may interest you boys some, I will telt you about it,”
responded the Major. ‘“‘Let’s go out on the veranda, and get some good

seats. ‘
MACKINAC. ‘199

“We some-









































































































































































































times forget,”
he began, “that
only one hun-
dred and thirty
years ago all









































































































this country
belonged to.
France. But
when what is
known as the
French and
Indian War
came to a close,
France relin-
quished her
claim to this
country to Great
Britain. Some-
how or other
France knew



how to gain
the good will of the Indians much better than the
English. So we can readily see that the Indian
tribes had very little relish for this change of mas-
ters. It was unsafe for the English traders to vent-
ure among them, unless supported by soldiers. But
the fur trade was of great importance, and the tribes
who lived in this section, and who traded at Mack-
inac, soon learned that they must trade with the
English. Alexander Henry was the first English
trader, who arrived at Mackinac in 1761. At first
he was in danger of his life, but a body of English
soldiers arrived the next day. Well, time passed on,
and Henry had inspired such friendly feelings in

CHIMNEY ROCK.
200 MACKINAC.

the mind of a Chippewa Indian named Wa-wa-tam that he was adopted
as his brother. But a terrible storm was brewing, which broke in deso-
lating fury on all the frontier posts of the English. There was living
near Detroit, at this time, an Ottawa chief by the name of Pontiac. He
was one of the most remarkable Indians that ever lived. He could not
but see that his country was gradually but surely passing out of the
hands of its Indian owners, and into the hands of the pale-faces. He
determined to make one grand effort to drive the intruders away. It is
hard for us to rightly estimate the character of such a man as Pontiac.
We must remember the circumstances in which he was placed: the pro-
found ignorance and barbarism of his people, and his own lack of educa-
tion and general information. His plan embraced the. formation of a con-
federacy of all the diverse tribes on the frontier and a simultaneous attack
on the twelve English posts extending from Niagara to Green Bay on
the northwest and to Pittsburg on the southwest. This included, of course,
an attack on Mackinaw. This plot was carried out with such secrecy
that on the same day nine of these posts were captured by the Indians.

“Now let us return to Henry at Mackinac. His Indian brother, Wa-
wa-tam, who, of course, knew of the attack, made most strenuous exertions
to induce him to go away with him, but as he dared not tell him anything
about the proposed plot, naturally Henry did not care to leave Mackinaw ;
but Wa-wa-tam exacted a promise from a chief to save, if possible, Henry’s
life. Well, the attack was made, and a terrible scene took place. It was
really remarkable how Henry’s life was saved. He hid in the attic of a
Frenchman’s house, and one time the Indians were so near his hiding-
place that had they stretched out their hands they would have touched him.
But the next morning he was found, and his captor was just in the act
of killing him when he desisted. Then for a few days he had a terrible
experience. But at the end of that time Wa-wa-tam returned, and suc-
ceeded in having him delivered to him as his brother. Well, not to make
this story too long, Wa-wa-tam brought him to Mackinaw on the main
land, and secreted him in the cave which Mr. Dupont and I visited to-day.
He was concealed there several days. Finally he was smuggled to the
Sault, and thus escaped with his life.”

That evening Frank was smoking on the veranda long after the


Spociol Permission of tho Detroit and Cloveland Steam Navigation Co.

GRAND VERANDA. 201
202

MACKINAC.,





























FAIRY

ARCH, ISLAND OF MACKINAC.

rest had retired.
It was a beau-
tiful night and
the electric
lights of Che-
boygan were
distinctly visi-
ble on the wat-
ery horizon.
Let’s listen
closely and hear
what he says.
“Doctor with
them in Cincin-
nati, eh! Bound
up her wrist
with his hand-
kerchief, did he?
Went over to
White Sulphur
and around with
them,’em—huh.
Well, now, if
Miss Florence.
thinks I am go-
ing to play sec-
ond fiddle to the
Doc, she is mis-
taken, that’s all.
I am not going
to make a fool
of myself just
yet. I will lie
low and see how
the land lies.




























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Special Permission of tho Detroit and Cleveland Stenm Navigation Co.

PLUMMER’S LOOKOUT. 203
204 MACKINAC.

If she and the Doc are going to be miserable for each other, why, I won’t

» Let’s not listen any more.



interfere. If Alice wasn’t so young, now, I
It is quite evident that Frank Gliddon will not make himself miserable
over the result, anyway.

Those travelers who essay to “do” Mackinac in one day can not
rightly judge of its many charms. Only those who loiter along its shady
walks, stroll on its pebbly beach, and admire at leisure its beautiful views
from the bold bluffs, can be said to. have visited Mackinac. The delighted
tourist who lingers thus at this resort discovers some new beauty every
hour of his stay.

“You must come with me to-day. I want to show you one of the
very finest lookouts in this whole island.” It was Dr. Blanchard who was
speaking the following morning.

‘“All right, Doctor; you may be our general manager this morning,”
said Alice.

““All ready, then, for a walk to Plummer’s Lookout” said the Doctor,
and the party was soon on the way.

We must notice, however, the quiet gentleness of Dr. Blanchard. It
is quite evident that his heart is not in the matter. The fact is, he would
gladly have packed his grip and have gone elsewhere, but he finally con-
cluded that it would be better to stay there a few days, and to do his
share in making it a pleasant time.

Plummer’s Lookout they found to be an open space which terminated
in a bold, precipitous bluff over two hundred feet in height. Below a
dense forest extends to the water’s edge. A beautiful prospect was dis-
closed, and the entire party stood in silent enjoyment.

“A penny for your thoughts, Doctor,” exclaimed Alice.

“T? Well, I was thinking of the changing scenes these old cliffs
have witnessed. Two hundred and fifty years ago only bark canoes dot-
ted the surface of the lake. A few years later the songs of the Canadian
voyageur, as he rowed or paddled his large batteau, echoed and re-echoed
around the shores. Now the shrill whistle of the steamer is heard, and,
as you see, the white sails of numerous vessels are spread to the breezes.”

“Well, I wasn’t thinking of anything as nice as that,” said Frank,
with a laugh; “I was thinking what yarns they do tell about the fishing
MACKINAC.











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SUGAR-LOAF ROCK, MACKINAC



ISLAND.



205

around those lit-
tle islands off in
the distance
there. What is
it they call them
—TLes Che-
naux?’ The
English of it, at
any rate, is ‘ The
Snows.’ ”

‘“T was won-
dering what in
the world that
big rock stick-
ing up down

there is,” said
Florence.
“That is

Sugar-Loaf
Rock, and if all
are ready we will
walk down to it.
But we haven’t
heard from Alice
yet. It is your
turn now to tell
your thoughts,”
said the Doctor.

“You will
think that my
thoughts were
awful selfish —
they were all
about myself. I
206 MACKINAC.

was just thinking I haven’t had the headache since I have been here.
I never slept so sound in my life, and, dear me, how I am eating!”

Any one who could contrast the pale and delicate girl of a few weeks
previous with the rosy-faced, handsome young lady standing before them
would quite willingly have understood why Alice was thinking of herself.
Not the least of all the wonderful charms of this favored resort is its
health-giving power.

“This is a pretty respectable rock,” exclaimed Frank, as the party
came up to it. ‘“ How high is it, any way?”

“About one hundred and thirty-five feet,” replied the Doctor. “ You
see it is quite appropriately named Sugar-Loaf Rock. It illustrates in a
very striking way the changes that have come over this island since it
first appeared above the waves of the lake. This rock was once a part
of the main cliff yonder, but you can see how the intervening mass has
been worn away.”

“What wore it away?” queried Alice.

“Well, either the lake was a good deal higher than now, once on a
time, or the island was a good deal lower. Such extensive denudation you
see here and at Arch Rock demand the action of water.”

There is a niche in the side of the rock large enough to admit several
individuals. Only Miss Granger, who stood near the Doctor, heard him
say, as if talking to himself, something about “like the shadow of a great
rock in a weary land,” and she wondered, not without an inkling of the
true cause, what made the undertone of sadness so evident in his voice
and manner.

“Say, let’s go and climb up on Arch Rock. It is not very far away,”
exclaimed Frank, and accordingly the whole pay wended their way
thither.

Arch Rock must be seen to be appreciated. It is a magnificent
natural arch, spanning a chasm eighty feet or more in height and forty
feet in width. The summit of the rock is three feet wide, and one hun-
dred and forty-nine feet above the lake. Frank and Alice went up to the
top, where they enjoyed a most magnificent view. The Doctor and Florence
remained below. Right at the base of Arch Rock there is another arch
known as Maiden Arch. This, however, is but a slight affair.
MACKINAC, 207

According to



geologists who
have examined



























this arch it can









not be expected









to long survive
the wear of the
elements. It is









a calcareous rock
and quite re-
sponsive to the
action of rain and
frosts, which in
that latitude pro-
duce great ray-
ages every year.



















The curve: of
the arch must
soon give away,

































as it is quite fra-



































gile. The same







































is true of the
abutment on
the north side.
Cedars are grow-
ing out of what
appears to be
solid rock. It re-
quires some
steadiness of
nerve to reach
the summitwhich





is only about
three feet wide.

ARCH ROCK, MACKINAC ISLAND.

As it was now nearly noon the party returned to the hotel where
208 MACKINAC.

they found the others awaiting their arrival. The afternoon was spent

quietly, though the boys went fishing.
“We are evidently going to have a storm,” said the Maier that even-

ing. “I have felt it coming on oe day. I don’t think you folks will

do much sight-seeing to-morrow.’
They thought of his words when they heard the wind bide in the

night.













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































210 ©























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































=~ :

SSS :
= == = SSS SSS SS
SS SS
——> — = —SSS
= => SS
=S
= S==X SS

> _ >=











































































aI
Se — —. =——— > F,
= ee
= =————
=

“TREE EAEEER DAD a

THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON.










A RAINY DAY. 21L

CHAPTER IX.

A RAINY DAY.

ES HIS is decidedly wet,” exclaimed Frank the next morn-
ing. “What can we do to-day?”
“We can do the same as they do down South,” re-
plied the Major.
“What is that?”
e Why letit' tain.”
“The laugh is on you Frank, and you had better go and
get candy for the whole crowd,” said Alice. “But just look





out on the lake. See the waves, and how cold it is for
August; ain’t this fire nice, though?”
But the day did SPARS
threaten todraga ~ :
little, and they
were standing around discontent-
edly when Alice made a suggestion.
“No use moping around,” she
declared, “and we can’t, of course,
go out. Now I remember once
before on this trip during a rainy







afternoon Bert read usasplendid account
of his trip to the Mammoth Cave. 3
since then he has been in Washington, and down
the St. Lawrence, and I don’t know where else.
Lets coax him to tell us about it?”

It, however, took considerable more coax-
ing, and Bert finally only consented on the
promise of the Major to tell them about life in SAM /
Florida as his contribution, to render the day enjoyable; thereupon Bert

went and got his journal and a few views,
212 A RAINY DAY.

BERT’S TRIP.

Every one knows all about Washington, and I didn’t think it worth
while to take any great pains with it. I would have liked it better if Con-
gress had been in session. Of course the Capitol is always an interesting
place to visit, even if you have been there before. We were stopping most
of the time with friends of uncle’s, and some way I didn’t have a very good
time. We met Prof. Morgan, who had been with us, as you all know, at
White Sulphur. We all liked him. I used to go up to the White House to
listen to the music. "The President was away, so I didn’t see him, but I en-
joyed looking at the pictures of our famous Presidents, such as Lincoln
and Garfield, and of course Washington. I recalled what Miss Ashton said

























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































WHITE HOUSE.

at Natural Bridge, about his writing his name there, and I am a good deal
of her way of thinking. Of course there are some very nice views in
Washington. I don’t think much of the so-called Washington Monument.
I think the city of Washington itself is his monument. Prof. Morgan was
as good as a book;‘he could tell you stories about early times till you got
tired. Standing at the United States Treasury, you get a splendid view
down Pennsylvania Avenue.

Washington is said to have the finest public buildings of any city in the
world. I know there are some immense big ones. The National Museum
A RAINY DAY. 213

and the Smithsonian are places where you spend a day or so to good ad-
vantage. The museum is as good as a school. The botanical gardens are
fine: Uncle Sam never does any thing by halves, and so he has the best
of whatever he undertakes.

I went down to the Navy Yard one forenoon. ‘There was one of Uncle
Sam’s boats there, and the officer in charge allowed me to go aboard and
examine it. In the Pennsylvania Depot they have a star set in the floor
to indicate the exact spot where Garfield was shot. I can remember how
excited we all were when we heard of it. Seeing that made me think of



















































































































































































































































































































































































PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.

the shooting of Lincoln, and I hunted up the place where that was done,
and the house where he was carried after being shot. In talking about
their deaths, Uncle Robert said that while they were very sad at the time,
yet in one sense they were fortunate in their deaths. "Taken away at the
moment of success, they will forever be thought of in that light.

At this point Bert stopped and explained that he believed he would not
read about his trip along the shore, but would read about down the St.
Lawrence. “That is not so common, you know,” he explained. This was
agreeable to the rest, and so he continued:

‘““In some respects my trip down the St. Lawrence and up the Saguenay
River was the most enjoyable of any part. For some reason uncle went
214 A RAINY DAY.

directly to Kingston, Canada. As we had a daylight ride, I enjoyed the
scenery, but it was not anywhere so grand as that in West Virginia.
Still I would liked to have stopped over in parts of New York. A gentle-
man told me that the
Adirondac region





was nothing com-











pared to what it used































to be. It is a pity
that the Government
did not make a State
park of that section.





































































































































































































































































































































































































“Kingston, as you























































































































































































































































know, is in Canada,
right where the St.
Lawrence leaves the
lake. At its very

























































































































































































































































































































commencement are
the famous Thousand
Islands. Some of
them are of pretty
} ae | good size, but lots of
them are little bits
of things. There
are some eighteen
hundred in all, so the
name ‘Thousand Is-

pay

(i

tug

lands’ is very appro- -
priate. Ishould say
that here was the
Sportsman’s para~
dise. Wild water
fowl of all kinds are



so very abundant that even a poor hunter need have no trouble. And as for
fishing! Well, the fact is, it is not very great fun, because you have to work
so hard taking the big fishes off the hooks!”
A RAINY DAY. 215

“That will do for a fish story,” chuckled the Major.

‘We were told,” continued Bert, “by an old resident that during the
last insurrection in Canada these islands afforded an admirable retreat for
the insurgents, and he mentioned one man in particular who had made
himself particularly obnoxious to the government; but it was almost impossi-
ble to catch him, owing to the many intricate channels where he was per-
fectly at home; and his daughter supplied him with provisions, and rowed



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE THOUSAND ISLES.

him from one retreat to another in the night. Take it altogether it was quite
a romantic yarn.

“But really one who has never visited them has little idea of the romantic
surroundings of these little islands. Here perhaps only a little lane which
winds back and forth between the islets, then a wider stretch of water; nearly
all are heavily timbered, and I can see how it might be difficult to catch one
fully acquainted with them. The islands have, especially of late years,
become very popular as summer resorts. On all of any size you notice

¢
216 A RAINY

DAY.























































































































































































AMONG THE ISLANDS.



tasteful cottages. Thousand
Islands Park is the great
stopping point for tourists.
But then the whole section
is one big picnic ground
now.

“At Kingston, to our
great surprise, we met
Prof. Morgan. I could but
think how funny it was
that we should meet with
him. Perfect strangers,
and yet we had met him at
White Sulphur, Washing-
ton, and now at Kingston.

And it seems that he had been with Mr. Dupont at Niagara. Who knows

but we will meet him again!
‘We took the steamer bound
down the river as we were going
to Quebec and Montreal. What
is popularly known as the Lake
of the Thousand Islands extends
from Kingston to Alexandria
Bay. ‘This last place is a beau-
tiful one, built upon a massive
pile of rocks, and the scenery
is simply grand at this place.
We bid good-by to the Thousand
Islands proper, but there are
still lots of islands in the river.
“Uncle called my attention to
the town of Brockville. There
was nothing very remarkable































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































A SUMMER RESORT.

about the town, but it seems it was named in honor of General Brock,

who was killed in the battle of Lundy’s Lane.
A RAINY DAY. 217

“T suppose you all know that in descending the St. Lawrencé there is
‘a succession of rapids. One of the old French words for rapid is saw?, and
we have kept the word, but added the letter ‘/,) so we have the word sau/t
for the usual word rapid.”

“J understand now,” ejaculated Frank. “He was thinking of Saz/t
St. Marve.” ;

It is, of course, exciting going down the rapids in a steamboat. The
steam is shut off; the water just boils around the boat. The first of these
series of rapids we come to is right below the town of Prescott, and is called
Galop Rapids. This is nothing very exciting, but it makes us all wonder



DOWN THE ST. LAWRENCE.

what the next will be like. We do not have long to wait. The next is
known as the Long Sault. Pronounced the Long'Soo. ‘This is a continuous
rapids of nine miles, divided in the center by an island; the steamers take
the southern channel. The steamer rushes along, the channel is narrow,
and the water just surges and boils.

The pilots have to be picked men; very strong and cool-headed. The
steamer’s head must be kept straight with the channel, for if she diverged
in the least and presented her side she would be capsized. It requires four
men at the wheel and two at the tiller. An idea of the force of the current
may be gained when we consider that a raft of lumber is carried the whole
a

218 A RAINY DAY.

distance of nine miles in forty minutes. It requires nerve for the raftsmen
to manage their unwieldy rafts, and in spite of great courage and skill, loss
of life frequently occurs.

The most formidable rapids in the course is at La Chine, nine miles
from Montreal. Uncle said the English of that name was The Dog Rapids.
I wonder how it ever came to be called by that name? But for those who
don’t stop to bother with the meaning of words it is real pretty Lachine.

It looks sometimes as if you were going right into a rock, but just in
the nick of time the boat takes another shoot. The Lachine Rapids are















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































STEAMER AMD RAPIDS.

the last. There is not very much talking I tell you, but lots of “oh,” and
“ahs,” and “look there;” but most of the time you are holding your breath,
and keeping a firm grip on your chair, as if that would help you in case of
accident. Still there don’t seem to be much real danger; like everything
else, you must get used to it.

There is a canal sround these rapids, which was built by the city of
Montreal. In approaching the city after running the rapids, you come in
A RAINY DAY. 219

sight of the famous Victoria Bridge. I was surprised to learn that here
at Montreal was located one of the longest, largest, and most costly bridges

in the world. It is two miles long. The piers on which the bridge rests

























































































































































THE LACHINE RAPIDS.

had to be made of extraordinary size and strength in order to withstand
the enormous floes of ice that come down the river in the spring. They
are calculated to withstand a pressure of seventy thousand tons of ice.






fi

Puma






At Montreal we changed steamers. I ought to say that the Richelieu

and Ontario Navigation Company is to the St. Lawrence what the D. &
C. Company is to Mackinac. Their boats are all elegant, and it is a pleas-

ure to travel on them.
I4
220 A RAINY DAY.

We stopped at Quebec for two days, as uncle said he wanted me to
see it all, as it was very interesting, from historical considerations. I
hear it is divided into two parts, called the upper and the lower parts respec
tively; sometimes called the old and the new towns. It is a very old place.
Charlevoix laid its foundation in 1608. Quebec is called the Gibraltar of
America, not only because it occupies what is naturally a very strong posi-
tion, but on the heights is located what is said to be the strongest fortress

in America. It is known as the Citadel, and covers forty acres. The pub-









































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































SS

VIEW OF QUEBEC.

lic are permitted to visit it, but it is closed in the forenoon. The view
from the Citadel is remarkably fine, but the favorite promenade is
Durham’s Terrace, which is some two hundred feet above the river. I
might add that the terrace is located on the same site as the old Chateau
of St. Louis, built by Champlain in 1620.

We all know what interest to all Americans at least attaches to Quebec,
because of the famous capture of the city by Gen. Wolf in the French and
Indian war. Both Wolf and Montcalm met their death, and both died a
A RAINY DAY. 221

hero’s death. Inthe public garden in the upper town there is a monu-
ment erected to the united memory of Wolf and Montcalm, besides which
there are monuments where the generals fell. Also you are shown the place
where Montgomery, at a later date, made his unsuccessful attack which
ended in his death.

We have all read of the death of Wolf. The French general did not
dream of sucha thing as an army climbing the steep precipice which pro-



DEATH OF WOLF.

tected his position. But Wolf heard of a but little used path which wound
up the heights, and up that he led his army; the men working desperately
to drag up the cannons and the ammunition.

Great was the surprise of Montcalm when informed that the English
were in battle array on the plains of Abraham. He went out to meet them,
but was defeated, and Quebec passed into the hands of the English.
222

A RAINY DAY.

I had a great desire to see the famous Saguenay River, and so I coaxed
Uncle Robert to take in a trip to that point, although he suggested we

come to Mackinac, (at this point the Doctor was interested in something out



Mu



















































































































































































































































































CACOUNA BAY.

of the window, Florence
glanced at’ the morning pa-
per, and Frank maliciously

‘smiled at them both), but he

good-naturedly consented to
make the trip to the Sague-
nay to pleaseme. In leaving
Quebec by steamer, many in-
teresting sights are to be
seen. The celebrated falls of
Montmorenci were rather dis-
appointing to me. There is
not enough volume of water

passing over them. We pass the island of Orleans, and Grosse Isle, which is

the quarantine station.. Here salt water begins, and we are right at the

head of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Lawrence is a noted summer resort.

directly opposite where is
located also the town of Ta-
dousac. The Saguenay River
is 1n some respects one of the
most remarkable rivers in the
world. It is narrow, but very
deep, and has remarkably high
cliffs or palisades. Uncle told
mea good deal more than I
can remember, but the gist of
it is that a long time ago when
this part of America stood re-
latively at a much higher ele-
vation, and glaciers covered

Cacouna on the south side of the St.
The mouth of the Saguenay River is









































































































TADOUSAC.

the land, this gorge was plowed ont by an old glacier.
A RAINY DAY. 223

I suppose this is quite interesting and scientific, but to be candid I
didn’t understand much about it; but I know the banks are very precipitous

























and the river very deep. At one























































place where the river makes
a little turn there are tremendous
high cliffs on either side; that on





























































































































Mm the north bank is known as Cape
@e Eternity, while that on the south-
ern bank is called Cape Trinity.









I was trying to think of some-

































‘ thing nice to write about the





















































































capes when uncle called my at-

































tention to the following descrip-



tion by Howells:

CAPE ETERNITY. “The rock fully justifies its
attributive height to the eye, which follows the upward rush of the mighty
acclivity, steep after steep, till it wins the cloud-capt summit, when the
measureless mass seems to swing and sway overhead, and the nerves tremble



with the same terror that be- SSS























sets him who looks downward



























from the verge of a lofty prec-
ipice. It is wholly grim and
stern; no touch of beauty re-
lieves the austere majesty of
that point. At the foot of Cape
Eternity the water is of un-
known depth, and it spends a
black expense in the winding
hollow of shores of unimagina-
ble wildness and desolation, and





issues again in its river’s course
around the base of Cape
Trinity. This is yet loftier
than the sister cliff, but it slopes gently backward from the stream, and from
foot to crest it is heavily clothed with a forest of pines.”



CAPE TRINITY.
224 A RAINY DAY.

The captain blew the whistle so as to let us hear the echo, which is
very fine. Our return trip to Quebec was begun the following day, but to
describe that would be simply to tell of these things over again. Arrived
at Quebec, uncle took the railroad and came directly to Mackinac, so that
ends my trip down the St. Lawrence.”

The rain still poured and the winds blew at the close of Bert’s reading.
Frank said the weather clerk had dispatched a September storm just about
a month ahead of time, so as to give them fair warning of his ability in that
direction. The passing boats that they could dimly make out in the dis-
tance seemed to have a discouraged look, and the waves appeared to be
gathering strength to finally clear the lake of all intruding crafts. But
within the hotel it was warm and pleasant.

“Now, Major, it is your turn,” said Alice, who, as Alfred said, was
running things.

So good-naturedly the Major essayed to do his hare in making the
day pass pleasantly.

MAJOR WEBB’S TRAVELS.

Iam afraid I made rather of a rash promise when I agreed to tell
you something about the South, and the longer I listened to Bert the more
dubious I became; but I see there is no very good chance to beg off, so
here goes.

My occupation is that of a civil engineer, and of late years I have
drifted into the South. My first engagement being with the Cincinnati
Southern, where I had especial charge of the High Bridge. Of course you all
know about that, for it seems you come from near Cincinnati. We claim
that is one of the wonders in modern bridge making. ‘The fact is there is
some pretty engineering all along that road. An old lady taking her first
ride convulsively grasped the seat before her as the train shot on a high
bridge, and seemed for the time being to be sailing in mid-air; but she
relaxed her grasp with an intensely relieved expression when the other side
was reached, fervently ejaculating, ‘Lit, thank God.’ One who has gone
over the road can understand her feelings.

But the last few years I have been engaged in Florida. That is a
wonderful State! Not only have they a wonderful supply of tropical fruit,
including alligators, but they have only just discovered that underneath
A RAINY, DAY. 225

the surface of the ground there are great deposits of the very richest fer-
tilizers. Oh, Florida will keep up the procession. The rest of the South
may blow about their cotton, their iron, and what not, but Florida will get

there along with the rest.