Citation
The brown owl

Material Information

Title:
The brown owl a fairy story
Series Title:
Children's library
Creator:
Ford, Ford Madox, 1873-1939
Brown, Ford Madox, 1821-1893 ( Illustrator )
Unwin, T. Fisher ( Thomas Fisher ), 1848-1935 ( Publisher )
Elizabeth Robins Pennell Collection (Library of Congress)
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
T.Fisher Unwin
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
165 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Princesses -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Owls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Magicians -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courtship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1892 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1892
Genre:
Fantasy literature ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Harvey, D.D. Ford,
General Note:
Title and illustrated series title pages printed in red and black
General Note:
Probably published in 1891, as was the American ed. Cf. Harvey.
General Note:
Bound in decorated white cloth with the same pattern on the end papers and all edges.
Funding:
Children's library (London, England) ;
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ford H. Madox Hueffer ; two illustrations by F. Madox Brown.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026820482 ( ALEPH )
ALH2306 ( NOTIS )
10338904 ( OCLC )
49037127 ( LCCN )

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LIBRARY

VOLUME ONE

THE BROWN OWL





THE CHILDREN'S LIBRARY.

THE BROWN OWL.

STORIES FROM FAIRYLAND.

THE CHINA CUP, AND OTHER STORIES.
TALES FROM THE MABINOGION.







THE

BROWN OWL

A Fairy Story

BY

FORD H. MADOX HUEFFER

TWO ILLUSTRATIONS BY
Ff, MADOX BROWN

LONDON
T. FISHER UNWIN
1892









while ago—in fact long

g before Egypt had risen to

power and before Rome or Greece

had ever been heard of—and that was

some time before you were born, you .
know—there was a king who reigned

over a very large and powerful king-

dom.

Now this king was rather old, he
had founded his kingdom himself, and
he had reigned over it nine hundred
and ninety-nine and a half years
already. As I have said before, it was
a very large kingdom, for it contained,
among other things, the whole of the
western half of the world. The rest of
B





20 THE BROWN OWL

the world was divided into. smaller
kingdoms, and each kingdom was ruled
over by separate princes, who, however,
were none of them so old as Inta-
fernes, as he was called.

Now King Intafernes was an ex-
ceedingly powerful magician — that
was why he had remained so long
on the throne; for you must know that
in this country the people were divided
into two classes—those who were magi-
cians, and those who weren’t. The
magicians called.themselves Aristocrats,
and the others called themselves what
they liked; also in this country, as in
all other countries, the rich magicians
had the upper hand over the rest, but
still the others did. not grumble, for
they were not badly treated on the
whole. Now of all the magicians in
the country the King was the greatest,
and no one approached him in magic
power but the Chancellor, who was
called Merrymineral, and he even was
no match for the King.



THE BROWN OWL 3

Among other things King Inta-
fernes had a daughter, who was ex-
ceedingly beautiful—as indeed all prin-
cesses are or ought to be. She hada
very fair face, and a wealth of golden
hair that fell over her shoulders, like a
shining waterfall falling in ripples to
her waist.

Now in the thousandth year of her
father’s reign the Princess was eighteen,
and in that country she was already of
age. Three days before her nineteenth
birthday, however, her father fell sick
and gradually weakened, until at last
he had only strength left to lie in his
royal bed. Still, however, he retained
his faculties, and on the Princess’s
birthday he made all the magicians
file before his bed and swear to be
faithful for ever to the Princess. Last
of all came the Chancellor, the pious
Merrymineral, and as he took the oath
the King looked at him with a loving -
glance and said:

‘Ah! my dear Merrymineral, in



4 THE BROWN OWL

truth there was no need for thee to
have taken the oath, for it is thy
nature to be faithful; and it being thy
nature, thou couldst not but be faith-
ful,’

To which the pious Merrymineral
answered :

‘To such a master and to such a
mistress how could I but be faithful ?’
and to this noble sentiment the three
hundred and forty-seven magicians
could not help according unanimous
applause.

When they were quiet again the
King said :

‘So be it, good Merrymineral, do thou
always act up to thy words. But now
leave, good men all, for I am near my
end, and would fain spend my last
moments with my daughter here.’

Sorrowfully, one by one, the courtiers
left, wishing him their last adieux.
He had been a good king to all, all
through his long reign, and they were
sorry that he had to leave them at last.



THE BROWN OWL 5

Soon they were all gone except the
good Merrymineral, and at last he too
went, his whole frame shaking with
suppressed sobs; his body seemed
powerless with grief, and his limbs
seemed to refuse their functions. The
King looked after him, carefully noticing
whether the door was shut. Then he
spoke :

‘My dear daughter,’ he said, ‘when
Iam gone be kind to every one, and,
above all, cherish the Owl—do cherish
the Owl—promise me to cherish the
Owl.’

‘But how can I cherish the Owl?’
cried the poor Princess; ‘how can I,
unless I know who he is?’

But the King only answered :

‘Dear Ismara, do promise to cherish
the Owl!’

And he said nothing else for a long
time, until at last the Princess saw that
the only way to let him rest in peace
was to promise, and she said:

‘I promise, dear father, but still I



6 THE BROWN OWL

do wish I knew who or what the Owl: -

is that I am to cherish.’

‘You will see that in good time,’
answered the King. ‘Now, my dear
Ismara, I shall die happy, and you
will be safe. If you had not pro-
mised—however, we will let that rest
unsaid. Now wheel the bed to where
I can see out of the window.’

The Princess did as she was told.
Now from this you must not imagine
that she was a very strong princess—
for she was no stronger than most
princesses of her age; but the old
King, who was a very powerful magi-
cian, as I have told you already, made
the bed easy for her to move. He
might have made it move of its own
accord, but he knew that it would
please his daughter to be of service to
him, and so he let her move it.

The view from the window was very
fine. A dark wood grew in the fore-
ground, and far away over the tree-tops
were the blue hills, behind which the



THE BROWN OWL 7

sun was just preparing to retire. And
it seemed angry, the sun, for its face
was dark and clouded, and its beams
smote fiercely on everything, and gilded
the tops of the autumn trees with a
purer gold than their natural tint.

But overhead the clouds spread darkly,
and they reached in a black pall to
the verge of the horizon, forming a black
frame to the red-gold sunset; for only
the extreme west was bright with the
waning light.

The Princess sat on the bed beside
the King, and the dying sun lit them
both and fell with a ruddy glare on
the King’s hard countenance, as if it
knew that his work on earth for the
day, and for ever, was done. ;

‘Is it not grand?’ cried the old
King, as if the glorious sight warmed
his blood again and made him once
more young. ‘And is it not grand to
think of the power that thou hast, my
daughter? If thou but raise thy little
finger armies will move from world’s



8 THE BROWN OWL

end to world’s end. Fleets come
daily from every land for thee alone ;
all that thou seest is thine, and utterly
within thy power. Think of the power, ©
the grand power, of swaying the world.’

But long before he had got thus
far, the Princess was weeping bitterly—
partly at the overwhelming prospect,
and partly from her great grief. She
seized her father’s hand and kissed it
passionately.

‘My father, my father, she cried,
‘say not so; they are all thine, not mine,
for thou livest still, and all is yet well.’

But the old King cut her short:

‘Dost thou see the sun? Look,
its lower rim is already cut by the
mountains. When its disc is hidden
I too shall have joined the majority,
and my soul will have left my body,
and the power will be thine. But
above all cherish the Owl. Never go
out of its sight, for if thou do, some
harm will happen.’

As he stopped speaking a flash of



THE BROWN OWL 9

lightning lit up the sky, and the sullen
roar of distant thunder followed.

From every church in the land the
passing bell tolled forth and the solemn
sounds came swelling on the breeze.
Again came the flash of lightning, and
again the thunder, and now the splash
of falling rain accompanied and almost
drowned the thunder. The sun’s rim
was now almost down.

For the last time the old King kissed
his daughter, as she hung weeping on
his neck. Again the lightning came,
but this time the thunder was drowned
ina more fearful sound. Never before
had the sound been heard, except at
the death of the Princess’s mother.
It was the passing bell of the cathedral
of the town. And as its sound went
forth throughout the whole land men
shook their heads in sorrow, for they
knew that the soul of the good King
had left his body. Through the whole
land the news was known—to every
one except to the Princess,



Io THE BROWN OWL

For she lay on the bed passionately
kissing the dead face—not yet cold in
death—and calling on his name in
vain; for the ears of the dead are
closed ‘to the voice of the charmer,
charm he never so wisely.’

Gradually the voice of the Princess
died away into low sobs and her breath-
ing came more regularly, and in spite
of the tolling of the death-bell she
slept, worn out by her grief. No one
came near her, for at the Court no
one was allowed to enter the royal
presence without a command, what-
ever happened. ~So for a time the
Princess slept on, clasping the still
face to her warm cheek. But at last
the death-cold of the face wakened
her once more to the death-cold of
the world. For a time her wakening ”
dreams refused to let her believe the
worst, but the stern reality forced
itself on her. She raised herself on
her two arms and gazed through the
darkness at the white face that made



THE BROWN OWL It

her shudder when her longing eyes
at last traced out its lines as a flash
of lightning lit it up. She sprang off
the bed with a wild impulse of calling
for help.

But no sooner had she got to the
door and had given the call than she
once more fainted and seemed for a
time lifeless.

When she came to herself again she
was in bed in her own room. It was
still night, and at the side of her bed
a night-light was burning in a glass
shade. She could not understand
what it all meant; but her head did
ache so, and she could not tell why
they were making such a noise at the
far end of the room. For you see she
was lying on her back low down in the
pillows, and so she could not see
beyond the foot of the bed. How-
ever, she raised herself on her elbow
and looked. For a short time she
could see nothing, for the room was
somewhat dark, as the night-light gave



r2 THE BROWN OWL

but little light. But at the other end
of the room a large fire was burning,
and by its light the Princess saw a
. Strange scene.

For in the middle of the floor she
could make out a group of three ladies-
in-waiting, who were struggling with a
large black object—what it was the
Princess could not see, but it seemed
to be attempting to attack the Court
doctor, who was huddled up in a
corner with his umbrella spread out
before him, and he was gradually
sinking down behind it, giving vent
to the most horrible groans and
shrieks for mercy, and calling to the
ladies to keep it off. However, in
spite of their efforts, the ‘thing’ was
gradually drawing them nearer and
nearer to the poor doctor.

But the strangest thing of all was
that the doctor’s face was lit up by
two distinct rounds of light. It was
just as if some one had turned the
light of a bull’s-eye lantern on him,



THE BROWN OWL 13

and this the Princess could not under-
stand at all. However, she lay still
and watched.

The doctor got farther and. farther
behind the umbrella until only his
head appeared over the top of it. At
last he shrieked :

‘ Send for a regiment of Lifeguards—
let them shoot the Owl—it is necessary
for the health of the Princess. Owls
are very bad things to have in bed-
rooms—they bring scarlatina, and they
always carry the influenza epidemic.
Lifeguards, I tell you, send for them.’
But still the ‘thing’ came nearer, and
with an agonised shriek of ‘The Owl!’
he sank altogether under the rim.

This loud cry of ‘The Owl’ roused
the Princess, and she remembered her
promise to cherish the Owl. So. she
called to the ladies-in-waiting, and they,
astonished, let go the thing, and the
Owl immediately flew at the umbrella,
underneath which the doctor was
coiled up, and perched on the top.



14 THE BROWN OWL

The Princess, however, thought it was
rather rash to have promised to cherish
the Owl if it was going to eat up her
physicians in that reckless manner.
However, the Owl did not seem
aggressive, and only seemed as if it
were waiting for further orders. The
Princess determined to see if it would
come when it was called, like a dog.
So she called in a sweet, persuasive
voice :
‘Come here, good Owl.’

Immediately the dark shape of the
Owl flitted noiselessly to her side as
she sat on the bed. The wind of its
flight blew out the flickering night-light
in spite of the glass shade. But the
glittering eyes of the Owl lit up the
whole room, so that there was no need
of light. As it alighted on the bed it
turned its eyes on the Princess as
much as to say, ‘What shall I do
now?’

But the fierce light of the eyes was
softened as it turned to her, as if the



THE BROWN OWL 15

Owl feared to hurt her with the blind-
ing rays.

‘Cherished Owl,’ said the Princess,
‘why didst thou hurt the physician ?’

The Owl shook his head; but the
Princess could not understand whether
he meant that he did not know why
he had hurt him, or if he meant he
had not hurt him. So the Princess
told one of. the ladies-in-waiting to
remove the umbrella from over the
doctor. But this was not so easy as
it sounded, for the doctor held. firmly
on to the handle, and in spite of the
united efforts of the three ladies-in-
waiting he managed to hold on. At
last the Princess lost patience.

‘Go and help them, good Owl,’ she
said ; and the Owl, overjoyed, flew to
the doctor, and seizing the top of the
umbrella flew with it up to the ceiling,
and as the doctor still held on, he
flew round and round, until the doctor,
hitting the top of a cupboard, let go,
and fell in a heap in the middle of



16 THE BROWN OWL

the floor, where he lay half unconscious,
repeating as he sat:

“*Orange juice for influenza; try a
seidlitz powder and a blue pill, and
keep the owls out of the room and
take a warm bath, and—send for the
Lifeguards.’

But the Princess did not seem
inclined to send for them; and in
truth it would have been rather
awkward for the horses to get in, as
the room was on the second floor.

So the Princess told the ladies-in-
waiting to drag him out of the room,
and they obeyed; but as he went
he said: ‘Sleeping in unaired sheets
causes rheumatism, sciatica, pleurisy,
pneumonia and—owls;’ and as the
door closed they heard him say,
‘Gregory powder and Epsom salts.’

The poor Princess, however, began
to weep again, and the Owl sat
perched on the bed-post at her feet,
watching her with his bright eyes.

‘However, after she had cried thus



THE BROWN OWL 17

for a long time, she thought it would
be better to stop her tears, for they
were all in vain, as she knew but too
well.

So she rose from her bed; for you
must know she had only been laid on
her bed when she had fainted, and so
she still had all her clothes on.

Through the -window-blinds the
light of dawn was already beginning to
show itself. So the Princess went to
the window and drew back the curtains,
and let the bright sunlight shine into
the room. A beautiful day was dawn-
ing after the last night’s rain, and the
sun was rising brightly over the edge
of the blue sea. For a moment, as
she looked out, everything was quiet
except the shrill chirp of a solitary
sparrow that seemed to have awakened
too early. From the chimneys of the
red-roofed town below her no smoke
was rising, for all in the town were
asleep still.
= Suddenly, with a rush, the morning

c



18 THE BROWN OWL

breeze came from over the land behind
her, and with the rustle of the wind
everything seemed to wake and come
to life once more. The solitary chirp
of the sparrow was drowned in the
flood of song that poured forth from
the trees in the palace garden, and
with the birds the rest of the living
animals awoke, and from far inland
the lowing. of the cows was borne on
the breeze, and now and again came
the joyful bark of the shepherd’s dog
as it recognised its master’s whistle as
he called it to work again among the
sheep, whose plaintive bleating came
softly, as if from a distance, to the
Princess’s ear.

Everything seemed joyful at the
sight of the beautiful morning except
the Princess, and she felt oh so lonely,
for it seemed as if her only friend had
gone from her for ever. And at the
thought her tears began to flow afresh,
for she felt very lonely, while every-
thing else seemed to rejoice. But as



THE BROWN OWL 19

she leant thus against the window-sill,
with a great lump in her throat and
the hot tears in her eyes, she suddenly
felt a weight on her shoulder and a
rushing wind waved her hair, and as
she turned her head to see what it
was, her face was covered in the soft
brown feathers of the Owl, who had
perched on her shoulder.

The touch of the Owl seemed to
have driven away her grief, and she
felt quite light and joyful in the
beautiful sunshine. For it seemed as
if the Owl had become a companion
to her that would take the place of
her father; so she leaned’ her head
against the Owl, and her golden hair
mixed with the dusky brown feathers,
till each streak of golden hair shone
again in the bright sunlight. And the
Owl.too seemed very happy. So fora
time the Princess stood looking over
the deep-blue sea.

Suddenly, however, a footstep
sounded in the courtyard below, and



20 THE BROWN OWL

the Princess drew back from the
window, for a thought suddenly came
into her head :

‘Oh dear,’ she said, ‘I have been
crying such a lot that my eyes must
be quite red, and my hair is all ruffled.
This will never do.” - And as she
looked in the glass she said, ‘ Ah, just
as I thought. Come, my cherished
Owl, sit there on the crown on the top
of the looking-glass frame and wait
while I wash my hands and face and
make myself tidy.’ .

The Owl did as he was told, and the
Princess began to wash in cold water—
a thing she had never done before—
but she did not like to call to her
ladies-in-waiting, lest they should see
how red her eyes were. So she had
to put up with the cold water, and very
pleasant she found it, for it cleared the
tear-mist out of her eyes and made
her feel quite happy and cheerful
again: ‘And I have heard,’ she
thought to herself, ‘that washing in



THE BROWN OWL 2u

cold water is matchless for the com-
plexion.’

When she had finished washing she
went and combed her hair before the
glass. For she was a very artistic
Princess, and liked looking at beautiful
things, and-so she liked sometimes to
look at herself in the glass. Not that
she was in the least conceited.

So she combed her hair with a gold
comb, and when she had finished
combing it, she put on her gold circlet
as a sign of her rank, and then she
said to the Owl, who had been sitting
patiently on the looking-glass blinking
at her as if: he quite enjoyed himself:

‘Now, cherished. Owl, you may sit
on my shoulder again.’

When the Owl was again in his
place he blinked in the glass at his
own reflection as if the light were too
_ Strong for him, and he shut his eyes
and drew in his neck and lifted up one
foot into his feathers, as ifhe felt quite
happy and comfortable, and the Prin-



22 THE BROWN OWL

cess smiled at his happy look, for she’ ©
seemed quite to have forgotten her
sorrow in the company of the Owl.

So she, with the Owl on her shoulder,
went to the window. Here in the
courtyard already a large crowd had
collected to catch a glimpse of the
Princess if possible, so that it fell
about that when they saw her they
raised a mighty shout of joy and pity:

‘The King is dead, they cried.
‘Long live the Queen!’ And through-
out the city far and wide echoed and
re-echoed the cry: -

‘Long live the Queen’; and it
seemed as if the waves of the sea
murmured the sound. ;

The Princess, however, held out her
little hand to still the tumult, and as if
by magic the cries stopped.

‘Good people all, she said in clear
ringing tones, ‘I thank you for your
good wishes, and I will try always to
be worthy of them as my father was.
For to-day, however, rejoice not;



THE BROWN OWL 23

remember that the great King Inta-
fernes, the founder of the kingdom to
which we all belong, has but just left
the earth—sorrow for him but a short
‘time; joy will come soon enough for
all.’

So the crowd, silent and pensive for
a time, dispersed in groups. More
than one of them asked what had been
perched on the Princess’s shoulder,
and those who had been near enough,
said that it was an owl—though what
it meant they knew not.

‘To me it seemed as if the head of
the old King were looking over his
daughter’s shoulder,’ said one of the
listeners who stood on the outskirts of
the crowd.

But she was only a little hunchback,
and the rich citizens laughed at her,
saying: ‘Tush, child—thy fancy is not
sound! Or else before looking at the
Princess thou didst look at the fierce
sun, and the sun-spots in thy eyes
caused thee to see it thus. It was



24 THE BROWN OWL

but an owl.’ But the little hunchback
held to her own opinion.

But while the Princess stood watch-
ing them depart, a tapping came at
the door, and the Princess cried ‘ Come
in” A page entered and said that the
Chancellor, Merrymineral, was below
and requested audience of the Princess.

‘Let him be shown into the audience
chamber to await me there,’

The page bowed and departed on
his errand, and the Princess went to
another door in the room and down
the staircase that led from it to the
audience chamber, and the Owl re-
mained seated on her shoulder until
they reached the room. When they
got there the Chancellor had not yet
entered, for the staircase from the
Princess’s bedroom to the audience
chamber was much shorter than
that from the entrance hall, and then
you see the Princess was much more
nimble than Merrymineral, who was an
old man, and she ran quickly down-



THE BROWN OWL 25

stairs whilst he walked slowly up.
However at last he entered. As he
came in the Princess said :

‘Good morning, dear Merrymineral.
How is it you are so late? I shall
have to fine you if you keep me
waiting like this again. And now
what do you want with me?’

The good Chancellor received her
laughing reproach with his head bowed
down. He heaved a deep sigh, and
drew his pocket-handkerchief from his
pocket and applied it to his eyes. As
he drew it away the tears could be
seen flowing fast down his withered
cheeks.

‘I came,’ he moaned, ‘to console
you for your great loss. I too,’ he
continued in a voice choked with sobs,
‘T too am an orphan.’

It seemed funny to the Princess to
‘see him weeping thus, and she could
hardly help laughing at him, but her
grief soon came back.

‘Poor Merrymineral,’ she sighed,



26 THE BROWN OWL

‘to you also it must be a sad blow,
for you were always faithful and
attached. But it was fated to happen
thus, and you must really try and be
comforted, for crying will not mend
matters,’

The Chancellor began again :

‘ The beloved King your father’; but
his sobs choked him, and he hid his
face.

‘The beloved King your father,’
echoed a loud voice, exactly mimicking
the tones of the Chancellor, but where
the voice came from no one could tell.
The Chancellor started.

‘Did you say that?’ said the
Princess.

‘Not the second time,’ answered
Merrymineral.

‘Who could it be?’ said the
Princess ; ‘for there is no one in the
room except the cherished Owl; and
you can’t speak, can you, Owl dear?’

The Owl shook his head dismally.
But the change that came over Merry-



THE BROWN OWL 27

mineral was most astonishing as his
eye suddenly lit upon the Owl—for
since his entrance he had not raised
his eyes from the floor, He jumped
backwards over three rows of seats, for
you see the seats in the audience
chamber were arranged in rows, and he
alighted in a sitting posture on the
other side. As he sat on the floor he
looked up at the Owl in a terrified
manner, then threw up his arms and
fainted. The poor Princess did not
know what to do, so she rang a bell
that stood on the table in front of the
throne. Several pages at once came in.

‘Just bring that man to,’ said the
Princess.

The pages bowed low, and went and
shook the Chancellor violently. He
showed no signs of recovering, so one
of the pages turned to the Princess
and said :

‘May it please your Majesty, but the
Chancellor refuses to come to, and we
can’t bring him.’



28 THE BROWN OWL

‘So he refuses to obey my orders,’ .
said the Princess) ‘He must be
punished for this. However, now go
and get a bucketful of water and
pour it on him. Perhaps that will
bring him to.’

Now when she said he was to be
punished, she was only joking, but she
said it very gravely, so that many
people might have thought it was quite
in earnest. Meanwhile the pages de-
parted to fetch the water. They soon
came back and brought a large pail-
ful. : soe

‘You had. better not throw it all
over him,’ said the Princess ; ‘just let
it trickle over his face gently.’

So one of the pages began to do as
he was told, but somehow—either he
had a sudden push, or, as he said after-
wards, the Owl looked at him, and
startled him—he let the pail go, and all
the water and the pail too fell over the
unlucky Chancellor. This really did
bringhim very much to—much too much



THE BROWN OWL 29

to, in fact—for he sprang up in such a
rage that the Princess el wished
herself out of the room.

‘You jackanapes,’ he screamed at
the unfortunate: page;.‘you ape, you
boar, you cow, you clumsy monkey,
T'll be revenged on you.’

But the Princess, who had gained
courage while he was screaming, said:

‘You will not be revenged on
him,’ ;

‘But I shall,’ he said.

‘Indeed you will not,’ said the
Princess, ‘for he did it by my orders.’

‘Oh! he did it by your orders,’ said
the Chancellor; ‘then I’ll be revenged
on you too,’ and he began to move
uncomfortably near to the Princess,
But the three pages threw themselves
on him and tried to drag him back,
but he turned suddenly on them.

‘What,’ he said scornfully, ‘you try
to stop me—ye frogs! Ah! a good
idea—by virtue of my magic power I
command you to turn into water-rats ;



30 THE BROWN OWL

then perhaps the Owl there will eat
you up.’

No sooner said than ae and the
three pages instantly became water-rats,
squattering in the water that was still
in a pool on the floor.

Somehow the Princess did not seem
to be at all frightened at this; she was
only very angry.

‘I thought I told you not to hurt
those pages.’

‘Who cares what you say ?’

‘Dear me,’ thought the Princess,
‘he is getting excessively insolent—I
shall have to be severe with him in a
moment.’ So she said:

‘Turn those pages back again.’

‘T shall not.’

‘Then leave the room.’

‘T shall not.’

The Princess did not know what to
do; he was really very rude, and he
was walking towards her evidently
intending to attack her. When he

was within ten feet of her he stopped
‘ 2)



THE BROWN OWL 31

and though he tried to get nearer he
could not.

‘Ha! ha!’ he cried; ‘you think to
keep me off by magic, but it is not so
easy, I can tell you. By virtue of my
magic power I command you to turn
into a mouse.’

But the Princess, leaning her head
against the soft feathers of the Owl,
only smiled, and did not turn into a
mouse at all,

‘The Chancellor seemed perplexed.

‘Js that not enough for you?’ he
said; ‘I thought I told you to turn
into a mouse.’

But the Princess smiled calmly and
said :

‘Do you suppose I am going to
do anything of the sort—you have
forgotten your manners to speak to
your Queen thus. I believe there is
a fine of five shillings for any one who
speaks to the King or Queen without
saying “‘ Your Majesty.” You had better
pay it, Sir Chancellor, and turn those



32 THE BROWN OWL

pages back again, or I shall have you
turned out of the kingdom.’

But the Chancellor laughed. ‘You
can’t send me out if you wanted to.
Meanwhile I shall not turn those rats
back, for if I am not much mistaken
your Owl there will carry them off.’

It really seemed as if the Owl were
going to obey him, for greatly to the
Princess’s surprise it sprang off her
shoulder and seized the three rats, one
in each claw, and one in its beak—
but it returned at once to her and laid
them squeaking on the table in front
of her—but no sooner did they touch
the table than they turned into men
again just as quickly as they had
become rats) When Merrymineral
saw this he became perfectly frantic,
and tried in vain to get at the Princess
—he even went back a little and tried
to run at her—but it was no use, for
no sooner did he reach a certain spot
than he was suddenly stopped, just as
if he had run against a wall. At last he



THE BROWN OWL 33

became so frantic that the Princess
could stand it no longer. So she
said : ;

‘Will you be quiet, you naughty old
man ?—leave the room or I will send
for the police.’

But Merrymineral answered :

‘Oh, send for the police and the
soldiers and sailors and candlestick-
makers,’

So the Princess rang the bell that
stood on the table: a page at once
appeared at the door.

‘Send for a policeman and ask him
to step this way.’

The page looked astonished, but he
saluted and left the room. Almost
immediately a policeman came in—for
you see there was one always on the
palace steps. He entered the room
with a low bow.

‘Take the Chancellor out of the
room,’ said the Princess, ‘and put him
in prison for three days.’

But the policeman shook his head.

D



34 THE BROWN OWL

‘Excuse me, mum—I mean your
most gracious Majesty—but it is
against the law to imprison a member
of Parliament, much less a chancellor.’

The Chancellor laughed sarcastic-
ally.

‘Oh, is it?’ said the Princess; ‘never
mind, take him into custody ; I depose
him—he is no longer Chancellor.’

Merrymineral looked astonished,
but the policeman cleared his throat
and said :

‘Come, I say, young fellow; will you
go quietly, or shall I make you?’

‘Oh, make me, by all means,’
answered Merrymineral. .

So the policeman advanced and
held out his hand to take him by the
collar, but had no sooner touched
Merrymineral than he fell to the
ground as if he had been thunder-
struck.

The Chancellor smiled. ‘I told
you so,’ he said. :

The Princess was now thoroughly



THE BROWN OWL 35

nonplussed. However, she rang the
bell again. Again the page appeared.

‘Summon the Lords of the Council ;
let them come here at once.’

Almost immediately afterwards the
lords appeared. As they came in each
one bowed profoundly to the Princess.
But in spite of their grave appearance
they could not help looking astonished
at the policeman, who was lying on
the floor, and at the three pages who
were still sitting on the table—for as
they had not yet been told to g0 they
could not depart.

But each one took his seat without
questioning. Last of all came the
Court doctor, who looked in an alarmed
manner at the Owl—nevertheless he
took his seat.

When all was quiet the Princess
began to speak,

‘My lords,’ she said, ‘I have been
obliged to assemble you on the first
day of my reign; but the matter is a-
very grave one. I have found it



36 THE BROWN OWL

necessary to dismiss the Chancellor,
for these reasons: first, he attacked
these three pages who were executing
my bidding ; next, he attacked me; and
lastly, he attacked the law, in the
person of the policeman there, whom
he knocked down. Now I ask your
advice as to how I am to get rid of
him, for he refuses to leave the room
at my command.’

So spoke the Princess, but before any
one could answer Merrymineral spoke:

‘My lords,’ he said, ‘are we, we,
the lords of the kingdom, to be governed .
by this schoolgirl, who is not even a
magician as we are? What good has
she ever done us? What power is to
keep us from deposing her and electing
as a ruler one of ourselves?’ but
before he could finish a perfect uproar
of shouts of rage interrupted him.

The Princess put her fingers in her
ears to keep out the sound, and when
the lords saw that the noise was
annoying her they stopped at once.





THE BROWN OWL 37

When they were quiet the Princess
spoke again :

‘What he has just said is right,’ she
said; ‘I have no right to reign over
you, for I am but a girl, Do ye there-
fore elect a ruler.’

For.a moment all was silence in the
Council, but all eyes were turned on a
lord who stood next to Merrymineral
in rank. He was a portly man, and a
great magician too, though his power
was not quite so great as Merry-
mineral’s. When therefore he saw
that all eyes were turned on him,
Lord Licec, for so he was called,
rose.

‘Your most gracious Majesty,’ he
began, ‘although you had no need to
command us to elect a ruler, we are
of course bound to obey your com-
mands, whatever they are. I therefore
speak, giving my vote, and I believe the
vote of all the rest of the assembly, that
you shall be our ruler according to the
oath which we sware to your father.’



38 THE BROWN OWL

And then turning to the rest of the
assembly he said:

‘Am I not right, my lords?’ and
with one voice they answered :

‘We will die for our Queen Ismara.’

Only one voice objected, but as
that was Merrymineral, no one noticed
him.

So the Princess rose and thanked
them for their confidence in her,
though, to tell the truth, she had
known all along what they would say.
That done she said:

‘And now what are we to do about
turning this man out ? for he refuses to
go of his own accord.’

No one could suggest anything
better than to send for the Lifeguards
and let them carry him off. But
before this was done they decided to
try to persuade him to go. But it was
of no use, for he stood on the spot
where he had stopped, with his arms
folded and his hat on, looking down
at the ground in a brown study, and he



THE BROWN OWL 39

took no notice of anything they could
do, even though they rang the bell close
‘to his ear. Now he did no particular
harm as he stood there, but you see
no one could tell whom he might
attack next. So they determined to
send for the Lifeguards as a last
resource.

So they were sent for, and in a short
time they came, although they left
their horses outside in the courtyard.
Fifty of them were then marched into
the hall and they were ordered to
move the man out. So they divided
into two parties of twenty-five each,
and they put a rope round him, and
each body of twenty-five took an end
of the rope and pulled, but it was no
good, for he took no more notice of
the pulling than if he had been Samson
or any other strong man. So the
fifty gave up the attempt in despair ;
the only thing to do seemed to be
to cut him to pieces. So they drew
their swords and hacked at him,



40 THE BROWN OWL

but it was no use: the swords bent or
broke just as if they had been bul-
rushes or paper, and still Merrymineral
took no notice in particular. So they
gave up the attempt in despair when
they had broken up all their swords.
However, they did not give in, for they
called in the best horseman in the
regiment and told him to charge on
horseback with his lance in rest. So
the soldier rode in on his horse; this
was not so difficult as it may seem, for
the council chamber was on a level
with the ground, and a lane was opened
in between the chairs to where Merry-
mineral still stood with his arms folded.

At the word of command the soldier
rode at full speed towards Merry-
mineral, aiming his lance at the centre
of his face—that is his nose. His
aim was true, and the lance hit fair,
but it might just as well have been
made of macaroni, for it crumbled
just as a stick of that delightful eatable
would do if you ran it against a wall.



THE BROWN OWL 41

The horse, however, swerved just in
time, although it pushed against him
in going by; but even this made no
difference to Merrymineral. As a last
resource they suggested putting a
lighted match under his nose. Whether
this would have succeeded or not I
can’t say. But just at this moment
Merrymineral seemed to wake up
again.

‘Ah,’ he said, ‘I see you have not
yet managed to get me out of the
room, However, as your soldiers
have been practising on me for some
time past, I think it only right that I
should try my hand on them a little.
I used to be thought rather strong in
the arms at one time, and I have cut
down a good many trees in my time.
Just see how you like that,’ he said to
the man on the horse as he swung his
umbrella round his head and brought
it down with a tremendous thwack on
the horse’s side, In fact he hit so
hard that the horse and man were



42 THE BROWN OWL

knocked right through the window into .
the courtyard below. With three more
blows he knocked twenty more of the
men through the same window, and the
rest made their escape as fast as they
could by the door.

‘I-see I have not quite forgotten
how to clear a room yet,’ he said,
as he once more folded his arms in
the same attitude and relapsed into
silence,

‘What am I to do?’ said the poor
Princess, wringing her hands and
almost crying with vexation.

A voice came from the far end of
the room, and every one turned to
see who it might be. And all saw it
was the Court. physician who spoke.
‘If I might be allowed to make a
suggestion,’ he said, ‘I would say that
the best thing your Majesty could do

would be to request that gentleman
who is sitting on your shoulder to turn
him out. From my own experience I
should say he was very competent to



THE BROWN OWL 43

perform such atask. And if I might

be allowed to add yet another sugges-
tion it would be, “to be well shaken

before taken,” as they say in prescrip-

tions.’

As he said this an extraordinary
change came over Merrymineral. He
pressed his hat on his head, put his
umbrella under his arm, and began to
put on his gloves in such a hurry that
he mistook the left for the right hand.
As he did so he said:

‘Do you know, I can’t stop any
longer ; so sorry, but I have an engage-
ment and I am rather in a hurry. |
Good-day.’ And he began to walk
quickly towards the door. But the
Princess had already, whispered to
the Owl, ‘Catch him, dear Owl.’

And however fast he went the Owl
caught him up, and taking him by the

-middle of his coat-tails—and I am
bound to say some of his skin too—he
shook him violently, and flew round
and round the room banging him



44 THE BROWN OWL

violently against any high piece of
furniture that was convenient.

‘Q-o-o-h,’ shrieked the wretched
man, ‘I say, do you know you're
tearing my best coat, and your beak
is awfully sharp? O-o-ouch,’ and he
filled the room with his shrieks, After
they had continued like that for some
minutes the Princess said :

‘T think he has been punished enough
now, Cherished Owl, so let him down.’

The Owl did as he was told, not,
however, without giving him a sly
tweak with his bill that must have hurt
him a good deal.

‘Tl be revenged on you,’ roared
Merrymineral ; ‘you’ve spoilt my Sun-
day coat, and I shan’t be able to afford
another for I don’t know how long.
Tl be revenged on you.’ And he
took .out a red pocket-handkerchief
and began to suage the blood that was
coming from the bite, all the while
abusing the Owl and the Princess and
threatening to be revenged.



THE BROWN OWL 45

‘You had better be quiet and go,’
she said.

‘TI shall not.’

‘Oh, very well,’ she answered,
‘perhaps you would like to try the
Owl again.’

At the same time the Owl gave him
such a look jfrom its gleaming eyes
that he turned first red and then white
with fright. He made a dash for the
window, and he was in such a hurry
that he left his umbrella and one of
his gloves behind him.

He jumped right through the win-
dow high into the air, and as soon as
he got outside, strange to say, he began
to burn furiously, and he went gradually
up into the sky like a fire-balloon—just
as when a piece of tissue paper-is put
on the fire, if you are not careful, it
will fly blazing up the chimney.

They watched him out of sight, and
then the Princess said with a little sigh
of relief :

‘That’s an end of him at last.’



46 THE BROWN OWL

But the Owl shook his head—he
knew better.

When he was thus at last got rid off
the Princess said to the physician :

‘How can we ever thank thee
enough, good doctor, for thy timely
suggestion !”

‘Oh, your Majesty,’ said the blushing
doctor, ‘experience does it; and I
had plenty of that this morning. Do
you know, I think I shall never be free
again from pain—although I have
bathed in opodeldoc and arnica, and
I am clothed from head to foot in
Court plaster,’ -

The Princess smiled and said :

‘T am afraid the Owl is a_little over-
vigorous in such matters; however, I
will give orders to the Court apothe-
cary to supply you with remedies at
my expense until you shall be cured.’
She then said to the three pages who
still sat on the table:

‘I must ask you to depart now as
Parliament cannot carry on business



THE BROWN OWL 47

with strangers-in the house. How-
ever, ye are, I believe, pages; I will
turn over a new leaf and will advance
you each a step in rank. Now, how-
ever, go.’

Thanking her profusely they went.
When they had gone the Princess
turned to the Councillors and said:

‘As there seems no further need to
keep you, I will detain you no longer.’

Having her permission the Coun-
cillors left the hall. Last of all was
Lord Licec, and ‘he remained as it
hesitating whether to go, or to stay and
speak to the Princess. She, noticing
his hesitation, said :

‘Ah, Lord Licec, hast thou some-
thing to ask me?’

The old lord made answer:

‘I would ask your Majesty’s per-
mission to enter the room of the late
King, your Majesty’s father, for, as you
are aware, it is against the law to enter
the royal presence without the royal
permission.’



48 THE BROWN OWL

‘You have my permission of course ;
but ought not some preparations to be
made for the funeral ?’

Lord Licec answered :

‘They are already made. For as
the late King had announced his
intention of dying yesterday at half-
past six P.M., there was ample time.’

' ‘Let us then go together to the
room, my lord,’ said the Princess.

So they went together, the Princess
leaning on Licec’s arm, and the Owl
sitting on her shoulder.

The guards of the room saluted as
they passed in, but what was their
astonishment on entering to find that
the King had disappeared. When they
asked the guards who had come into
the room during the day, they replied
that no one had been near the room
- during their watch, and the guards of
the watch before said exactly the same
thing. All over the palace inquiries
were made, but to no purpose, and the
rumour gradually spread to the town,







Mares



THE BROWN OWL 49

and throngs of anxious citizens flocked
about the palace gates to ask, but
neither they nor any one else ever
heard what had become of him, and it
is my opinion that the King himself is
the only person who knew anything
about it. It came out in the course
of inquiries that. when the attendants

had.rushed in on hearing the Princess’s

call for assistance the night before,
they had not seen the King on the bed,
but in his place had sat an enormous
owl, and this owl had insisted on
accompanying the Princess wherever
she went.

This was the first time that the
Princess had heard of how the Owl
had come to her, but still she had
known all along that the Owl was the
one her father had made her promise
to cherish. But there were ill-natured
people who said that it was not so
very unlikely that the Owl had eaten
the King up, but the Princess only
laughed and said :

E



50 THE BROWN OWL

‘How could the Owl eat a king up
when the poor thing has so little
appetite that it only eats very small
pieces of meat off my golden fork at
dinner ??

And so the Owl remained with the
Princess: during the day it always
sat on her shoulder, or took short
flights round her head, and at night it
slept on the foot of her bed.

So six weeks glided peacefully away,
and everything prospered; but one
day a terrified messenger rode into the
city at full speed, and the message that
he brought was this.

Merrymineral, who, as the Owl had
said, was by no means done with, had
been inciting the people of far-off
lands such as Mesopotamia and Padan-
Aram and Ireland to rebel, and he
was now marching against the Princess
at the head of an immense army,
laying waste the country for miles
around. At the rate he was coming,
however, it would take him a fortnight





THE BROWN OWL 5r

to get near the country round. So
you see there was no immediate
danger ; still an enemy’s army could
not be allowed: to remain in the
country unopposed. So the Princess
gave Lord Licec the order to assemble
the army, and, as you may imagine,
it was an immense one when it did
assemble. I can’t say how large it
was, but if you could have stood on a
hill in the centre of the town you
would have seen nothing for miles
around but shining silk banners and
glistening helmets and lances. Never
before had the world held such an
army, and it never will again, Yet this
army even was hardly as large as that
of the enemy. The command of the
army was given to Lord Licec, for he
was well known to be the most prudent
man in the kingdom.

Three days passed till the last of
the army had started, and all the while
the Princess stood at the window and
watched them march along the wind-



52 THE BROWN OWL

ing street below, and the knights and
men-at-arms were inspired with fresh
courage at the sight of such a princess
as they had to defend, and they
cheered so loud and long that it
seemed like the continual roar of the
sea beating on a rocky shore, some-
times rising, sometimes falling, but
always sounding.

The Princess indeed felt quite.
lonely when they had all gone, even
though their shouts did make her
head ache. However, she consoled
herself by riding all day towards the
army, and returning at night to the
lonely town. So she occupied three
days; and the Owl always flew over
her head, protecting her from the sun
when it was too hot, or else sitting on
her shoulder, or on the horse’s head,
although the horse did not like it at all.

For three days no news came, but
on the fourth as the Princess was
riding out with her ladies-in-waiting
she saw at a great distance in front of



THE BROWN OWL 83

her along the straight white road a
cloud of dust that was coming swiftly
towards her. As it came nearer she
could see the glint of armour, and
soon she could plainly see the form
of an armed knight galloping at full
speed towards them. He cameso fast
that they had to rein their horses to
one side that they might not be run
down. At first he did not seem to
know who the Princess was, or perhaps
he was going so furiously that he
could not see; at any rate he had
almost got past them before he re-
cognised her. As soon as he did,
however, he drew up, but so sudden
was the action that the horse first
sank back on his haunches, and then
bounded so high into the air that
the marks that his hoofs made when
he alighted on the ground again, were
a foot deep in the hard road. As
soon as the plunging of the horse
“stopped and the Princess could make
herself heard she said :



54 THE BROWN OWL

_ ‘What news, Sir Knight, from the
front, that thou ridest in such haste P
‘But bad news, I fear,’ answered the

knight.

‘What say you?’ said the Princess ;
‘bad news, and with such an army as
ye had? has some fresh rebellion
broken out among the men?’

‘No rebellion, but plain fighting has
beaten us—but what can we do
against such foes? This Merrymineral,
alone, rides on a green dragon, and
with one stroke of his sword he kills a
hundred men. Myself I charged him
with my lance, but as it struck his
shield it broke in pieces as if it had
been made of glass: and it was
fortunate for me that my horse carried
me past him before he could strike me,
for I saw him myself cut the Knight of
Pendred in half, as you would cut a
radish. And if we slay a thousand
men during the day he restores them
in the night. So we have gradually
been driven back, till after three days’



THE BROWN OWL 55

fighting the army remains at Arecarp.
Thence I started at eight this morn-
ing to hurry the reinforcements from
Britain and Gaul.’

‘Alas! they are still at three days’
march from here, though they are
marching night and day. But thou
saidst the army was at Arecarp, and
that thou didst start to-day at eight in
the morning. That is‘ impossible.
Arecarp is twenty-four hours’ journey
for a fast horse, and it is now but
twelve o’clock. Not even the horse
that I ride could go faster than that,
though he is said to be the fastest horse
in the world, except Selim, the horse of
the Prince of India. However, no
time is to belost. Sir Knight, will you
escort these ladies back to the town,
and rest for a while?’

‘But what will you do, your
Majesty ?

‘I. must ride forward to Are-
carp.’

‘To Arecarp! Your Majesty, what



856 THE BROWN OWL

will you do there? The battlefield is
no place for a girl.’

‘Nevertheless I must go, for my
place is with the army.’

‘But if you are killed what will
happen to your people without their
Queen ?’

‘What do they do now without
their Queen? Besides once before
the cherished Owl has defeated this
man and he may do it again. If he
does not, no power on earth could
save me from death, for the army is
being gradually defeated.’

‘But your Majesty could send the
Owl in a cage against the enemy.’

‘I promised my father never to go
out of its sight—no, I must go.’

‘I beseech you then, your Majesty,
to allow me to accompany. you, for
the road to the camp is full of
danger.’

‘But your horse is tired, and even if
he were not he could never keep up
with me’



THE BROWN OWL 57

‘But if you will excuse the con-
tradiction, I think I shall.’

‘Well then, have your own way, but
mark me, if you lag behind I shall not
stop. However, we are losing time.
Let us go.’

And they set off—the Princess
ignoring the entreaties of the ladies
that she should not go.

The Princess immediately started at
the full speed of her horse, expecting
that the knight would soon fall behind ;
but no, he galloped at her side as if
the speed were not more than usual,
and his great black charger seemed to
enjoy the exercise as though he had not
already galloped over a hundred miles
that morning, :

The Princess could not understand
how it was, but she thought he would
soon get tired and fall behind, but
an hour passed and he showed no
signs of being fatigued. So she
leant over her horse and whispered
softly in his ear. Instantly the horse



58 THE BROWN OWL

bounded forward more swiftly than
ever—so fast, indeed, that she could
hardly keep her eyes open against the
wind, and her golden crown was
suddenly whisked away, and her
beautiful golden hair streamed far out
behind. Still the knight kept up, and
seemed not the least distressed at the
speed. The Owl meanwhile was fly-
ing far overhead, but she was not at all
surprised at his keeping up, for no-
thing seemed impossible to him. After
they had been riding thus for nearly
two hours they came to a place where
the path was crossed by a river, and
here the Princess thought it advisable
to stop and rest a moment and to let
the horses drink. So she called to
the knight to stop, as she was going
to get off for a moment, and he at
once sprang off his horse, and coming
to her saddle-bow held her stirrup for
her to dismount. When she was off
she leaned against a tree looking at
the horses as they drank eagerly from



THE BROWN OWL 59

the river, and then came out to browse
for a moment on the bank. Then she
went to where the knight’s horse stood,
and patted him on the neck, for you see
he was not a very fierce-looking animal,
and she was not at all afraid of him.

‘He’s a wonderfully swift horse, Sir
Knight,’ she said suddenly, ‘and I
believe there is no other horse in the
world as swift—not even Selim—the
horse I spoke about—that belongs to
the Prince of India.’

The knight nodded.

‘He is a good horse, but he is no
better than Selim, your Majesty, for I
know Selim very well.’

All this while he had kept his vizor
down, and the Princess had been too
polite to ask him to raise it, even
though it was rather rude of him to
keep it down. So she could not tell
who he was. She knew all the knights
of her own kingdom by sight, as well as
most of her allies, for you must know
that a great many foreign princes had



60 THE BROWN OWL

sent her troops to assist her against the
rebel. She looked at the device on
his shield ; it was a crowned tiger, but
that did not help her, for she did not
know whose crest it was. So at last
when she could bear her curiosity no
longer, she determined to ask him.
So she said:

‘Sir Knight, should you think me very
rude if I were to ask you whether you
are under a vow of hiding your face?’

‘I am bound by no such vow; but
why do you ask, your Majesty ?’

‘Because ever since I have seen you
you have kept your vizor down, and I
thought perhaps it was on account of
some such vow,’

-*Oh, I beg your pardon a thousand
times, your Majesty,’ said the knight.

But I did not remember that I had
let it down, for you see I look through
its bars without noticing the difference.
But I hope your Majesty will pardon
the absent-mindedness,’ and he raised
the vizor, at the same time bowing low



THE BROWN OWL 6x

to her. But it was now the Princess’s
turn to be confused, for she saw before
her Sir Alured the Emperor of India,
a prince nearly as powerful as herself.
She blushed with shame and then said:

‘Oh, Sir Knight, I mean your Royal
Highness, it is I who should crave
your pardon, for all the while I have
addressed you as “Sir Knight,” instead
of as “your Majesty.” But I am very
sorry.’

But Sir Alured said:

‘Nay, your Majesty, you have the
right to call me what you will, for I
am always your humble vassal.’

‘My ally, you should say, your
Majesty.’

‘I am always your servant, not your
ally, your Majesty.’

‘Then I fear you will soon be the
vassal of a queen without a kingdom ;
and if this Merrymineral prevail over
me, I fear he will punish you for
having aided me.’

But the Prince said:



62 THE BROWN OWL

‘All is not yet lost, your Majesty,
and whatever happens your Majesty
will always have a protector while I
am alive.’

The Princess smiled.

‘Ah! you mean the cherished Owl.
You will always protect me, won’t you,
Owl?’ she said, looking up at the Owl
who was seated again on her shoulder,
And the Owl nodded his head.

She looked at her watch just then.
‘Why,’ she said, ‘we have been here
just ten minutes, and it is time to start
again, if you are rested sufficiently.’

So he helped her to mount, and
they crossed the river. It was not
very deep, but still she got the skirts
of her dress quite wet, for the water
was high enough for that.

However, the gallop in the hot sun
on the other side soon dried them.

In an hour and a half they were on
the top of a hill from which they could
see the town of Arecarp in the valley.
beneath.



THE BROWN OWL 63

The sun was shining brightly on the
tents of the army as it lay round the
town, and at some distance the camp
of the enemy appeared. But still all
looked peaceful.

The Prince gazed carefully at the
armies. After a moment he said:

‘There has been no fighting since I
left the city this morning, nor has the
position altered at all. I fancy Merry-
mineral has sent ambassadors to de-
mand surrender from Lord Licec.’

The Princess smiled.

‘He will never surrender,’ she said.

‘Nor will any of us, your Majesty,’
added the Prince. ‘However, let us
descend the hill.’

Down the hill the road lay through
a deep gorge, so deep that the sun did
not penetrate it, and it lay in delicious
shade. The sides of the valley were
lined with the silver-barked birch,
below which grew nodding foxgloves,
and as they went slowly down the steep
path, ever and -anon a rabbit would



64 THE BROWN OWL

scuttle out of the grassy track to a safe
distance in front of them, where it sat
on its haunches with its little ears
pricked up, smelling at them anxiously
as they came near again, and then it
would scutter along into the thick rank
grass to its home.

So they went slowly down the path
until they came once more to the level
ground, and they were again able to
gallop on.

Soon they reached the town, and
clattered through the cobbled streets
to the market-place, where Lord Licec
had his head-quarters. But the
market-place was crowded with soldiers
and knights who were bargaining for
food, so that it was by no means easy
to get through the crowd. How-
ever, aS soon as they got near the
place, the soldiers recognised the
Princess and began to cheer, and
immediately an avenue was formed
up to the door of the council-house,
and the Princess rode smiling through



THE BROWN OWL 65

the throng, followed by the
Prince.

The news of her arrival ran through
the whole camp, and immediately such
a shout went up from the men that
the enemy thought they were preparing
for battle, and they made ready to resist
the attack, At the door of the council-
hall Lord Licec was waiting with the
rest of the captains of renown, and they
followed the Princess upstairs to the
council-chamber.

As soon as they were seated the
Princess asked for the latest news.
She was told all that had happened,
and when she had heard it she
dismissed the Lords of the Council,
all except Lord Licec and the Prince
of India, who were to stay and dine
with her, and she gave orders that the
dinner should be brought as soon as
possible, for to tell the truth she felt
‘rather hungry, as she had had nothing
to eat since breakfast-time.

Now when the Princess had finished

F



66 THE BROWN OWL

giving her orders about the dinner,
Licec could not refrain from asking her
why she had come.

‘Was it not rather foolish,’ he said,
‘to hazard your life for nothing? for of
a truth you are :

But the Princess put her finger on
his mouth.

‘I will not be bullied by you, my
lord, even though you are old enough
to be my father. I know what you
were going to say—that the battlefield
is no place for girls. Now I won't be
called a girl, for I’m nineteen, you
know. His Majesty the Emperor of
India there insulted me by calling me
a girl, and I have not forgiven him yet.
Besides you'll spoil my appetite for
dinner if you lecture me. It always
does; so do be quiet now, at any rate
till after dinner.’

So Licec had to be quiet, and they
talked about something else till dinner-
time.

Just as they had finished, a frightful





THE BROWN OWL 67

shouting outside made them drop their
dessert knives and run to the window,
but as the window did not face on to
the street théy could not tell what was
the matter. So the Princess rang the
bell, and when the servant appeared
she asked him what was the cause of
the shouting.

‘May it please your Majesty, am-
bassadors have arrived from the enemy
and would speak to you.’

‘Show them this way and send at
the same time for the Lords of the
Council.’

So the servant went,and in a short
time a heavy stumping was heard on
the stairs. Suddenly the door burst
open and the ambassadors entered.
They were a rather remarkable pair
of ambassadors, although they could
hardly be said to pair well, For the
one was an enormous giant with a
long beard, dressed in leaves mostly,
and so tall that he could not stand up-
right in the room; in his hand he



68 THE BROWN OWL

carried an enormous pole, from the
end of which a spiked ball dangled.
The other, however, was very nearly
his opposite in everything. For he
was very small, a dwarf in fact, and he
was dressed in very tight yellow armour,
and from the top of his helmet a crest
of red roses hung down to his saddle—
for you must know he had insisted on
not getting off his horse, or rather pony,
for that too was very small—in fact it
just fitted the dwarf.

As soon as the Princess had re-
covered from her astonishment, she
rose from her seat and said:

‘Are you the ambassadors from the
rebel Merrymineral ?’

The dwarf replied :

‘IT don’t know anything about the
rebel part of the business, but we are
the ambassadors from Merrymineral,
whom we are bound to serve for a
certain time. But who are you, I
should like to know, and what right
have you to speak to me in this in-



THE BROWN OWL 69

sulting manner? D’you think I’m
here to be insulted by you? If you
think so, I'll tell you point-blank ’m
not—so there.’ And in the rage he
had worked himself into he began to
spur his steed till it jumped off the
floor so high that it knocked his
head against the ceiling.

The Princess was not used to being
treated like that. However she was not
at all angry at it—she only laughed at
his misfortune, which made him all the
more outrageous,

‘How dare you laugh at me?’ he
screamed ; ‘who are you, you minx,
you minx, you lynx—you :

But the Princess did not listen to
him. She turned to the giant, who at —
any rate was quiet, and said:

‘Will you not take a chair until the
Lords of the Council arrive ?’

The giant looked at her in stupid
astonishment.

‘What shall I do with the chair
when I’ve taken it?’ he mumbled.





70 THE BROWN OWL

‘I mean you to sit down on it, of
course,’ said the Princess.

The giant growled out in reply :

‘Well, I never sat on a chair before,
but to please you I will.’

So he sat down, but as he was not
used to sitting on chairs he sat down
on its back; but it was only a small
cane-bottomed chair, and as he was
very big, and the chair was very small,
the result is easily foreseen, for the
chair collapsed under him as if he
had sat on a top-hat, and he reclined
comfortably on the floor, where he
remained for the rest of the time.

‘I think I'll stop where I am,’ he
said, when they offered him a wooden
stool to sit on, ‘for you see I’m not
used to chairs.’ So they let him stop
where he was.

One by one the Lords of the Council
began to arrive; they looked curiously
at the ambassadors but said nothing.
When they were all arrived the Princess
said to the dwarf:



THE BROWN OWL qr

‘Now if you will state your message
we will listen.’

So’ the dwarf snarled in a_bad-
tempered voice :

‘I shan’t tell you—you aren’t the
commander-in-chief of the army, are
you?’

‘No, but I am the Queen of the
Western World.’

‘Oh! you’re the Queen of the
Western World, are you? Well, you
won’t be Queen of the Western World
long, if you don’t mind your P’s and
Q’s. The king Merrymineral sent me
to say that if you don’t marry him and
make him king, he'll kill the lot of
you and make himself king in spite of
you—so there; and I’m to wait for an
_ answer,’

After consulting the Council for a
moment the Princess said :

‘Of course I shan’t marry him—
how could he be so ridiculous as to
think so?’

The dwarf laughed.



72 THE BROWN OWL

‘That’s your answer, is it?’ he said.
‘I thought so. I say, Gog, have you
written it down ?’

But Gog had gone to sleep. So
the dwarf pricked him with the end of
his lance.

‘I say, Gog, he said, ‘she’s given
her answer and you haven’t written
it down, and I’ve forgotten it
already. Just say it over again,
Queen, will you? and not too fast, |
or Gog here will never get it down.’

The giant now drew from his pocket
a very soiled and crumpled halfsheet
of a copy-book and began to write
from the Princess’s dictation.

‘Of course I should not do anything
so——’ Here he stopped.

‘How do you spell “ridiculous” ?’
he said.

‘With two “k’s,” of course,’ said
the dwarf; ‘even I know that, though I
can’t write.’

When he had finished he handed it
to the Princess :



THE BROWN OWL 73

‘Just sign your name, will you?’

The Princess signed her name, but
she could not help seeing that the
writing was very bad and the spelling
was awful.

‘Why didn’t they send some one
who could write better? Why! that
“ry” is more like a “k” than an “r”,’

But the giant shook his head mourn-
fully.

‘ They hadn’t got any one else in the
army who could write except Merry-
mineral, and he was afraid to come.’

‘But weren’t you afraid to come?’
she said.

The giant shook his mace round so
violently that it grazed the helmet of
the dwarf, and cut his crest of roses
off.

‘Whom am I to be afraid of?’ he
growled. ‘I could kill your whole
army single-handed’; and he laughed
loud and long.

But just at this moment the Owl,
that had been siting on the floor



74 THE BROWN OWL

behind the Princess’s chair, flew up on
to her shoulder, and no sooner did the
giant see the Owl than he jumped up
from the floor, where you remember
he was sitting, and he was in such
a hurry that he knocked a hole in
the plaster of the ceiling with his
head.

‘Come, I say, you know,’ he said, ‘1
can fight anything in reason—but I’m
not going to tackle that, you know;
besides, we’re ambassadors; and you
can’t hurt us. I’m going’; and he
rushed out of the room as fast as he
could, and the dwarf followed him as
fast as he could make his horse gallop,
and they never stopped till they reached
the camp of Merrymineral. For they
were very frightened, you see.

After they had gone the Princess
again dismissed the Councillors, and
when they had gone, she said to Lord
Licec and the Prince, who by the bye
still remained :

‘Now let us finish our dessert’— for



THE BROWN OWL 78

the ambassadors had come in right in
the middle of it.

After a moment the Princess said :

‘How absurd of. him to think I
would marry him-——why, he’s old_
enough to be my great-grandfather.’

But suddenly she became grave:

‘But perhaps I ought to have
thought before I gave the answer.
Would it not have been better for my
people if I had consented? for then he
would kill no more of them,’

But the Prince became quite angry
at such an idea. ‘It’s absurd,’ he
said.- ‘Why, as soon as he had married
you and become king he would murder
you and then kill just as many of your
people as he will now; besides, who
knows that we may not still conquer
him P’

The Princess turned to Lord Licec:

‘What do you say, my lord?’ she said.

‘I think just as the Prince of India
—for even if he did not murder you
he would oppress the people without



76 THE BROWN OWL

mercy, and besides, your people would
never allow you to marry him, so that -
is out of the question.’

The Princess gave a sigh of relief.

‘Since you say so, Lord Licec, it
must be right; besides, I don’t think
I could ever marry him—he is such
a very unpleasant sort of man.’

And the Prince answered :

‘You are quite right there’; and he
seemed quite happy again.

Soon after it became evening, and
Lord Licec had to go out to look after
his army, and the Prince too went to
see that his men were all prepared for
any night attack—for his men were right
in the very front of all, and so they
were quite close to the enemy, who
might at any time begin an attack,

So the Princess was left all alone
with the Owl, but she did not feel
lonely with him, for he was very
sociable, and would do anything that
he was told to do. So they played
hide-and-seek till it was too dark to



THE BROWN OWL 77

see any more, and then she went to
bed and slept soundly till the rays of
the sun falling on her face the next
morning woke her up. She was soon
dressed, and when she had finished
she went into the next room, where
she found Lord Licec already awaiting
her.

‘What does your Majesty intend to
do this morning? for I shall not be
with you, as J am going to order the
army to advance to the attack, and
so your Majesty had better stay within
the town for the rest of the day.’

‘Indeed, I shall do nothing of the
sort,’ she answered. ‘I am going to
lead the army to-day to see if we
cannot regain some ground, for I had
rather die fighting than be driven back
like this, so please don’t say I mustn’t
go; besides, the Owl will protect me;
he promised to; didn’t you, Owl?’
and the Owl nodded.

‘But they may shoot the Owl with
their arrows, and then a





78 THE BROWN OWL

‘But the Owl before now has
conquered Merrymineral himself, and
he may still do it. Oh, please don’t
tell me not to go. If you'll only let
me go I'll promise to keep near the
Prince of India, and he'll protect me,
even if the Owl can’t.’

‘But the Prince of India is always
in the thickest of the fight, and you
will be in much greater danger if you
keep near him.’

‘Oh, never mind the danger; do let
me go.’

And she begged so hard that Lord
Licec had to give in. She put on
a breastplate and a sword, but she
would not put on a helmet, for she
said that it made her head ache, and
that no one would know who she was if
she covered her face up. So she only
wore a gold circlet on her head, as
she usually did, and besides this she
carried a silver shield with the royal
crest on it, and a small lance just like
a knight’s spear, only not so heavy, and



THE BROWN OWL 79

thus mounted on her white horse she
rode to the very front of the line of
battle, and there she found the Prince
of India at the head of his men.

They had already furled their tents °
and were quite ready to begin the
battle as soon as the others were ready.

The Prince was very much astonished
when he saw her, for it was the last
place in the world he had expected to
see her in.

‘Do you really mean to say,’ he
exclaimed, ‘that Lord Licec allowed
you to come out to the field of battle?
Why, he must be mad.’

‘Oh no, he’s not,’ answered the
Princess; ‘but you see if I only beg
hard enough he'll let me do whatever
I like, and then I promised to keep
near you, for I thought you would
protect me. However, you don’t
seem very glad to see me—perhaps
you think I shall hinder you—so T’ll
go and ask some one else to take care
of me, as you don’t seem to relish the



80 THE BROWN OWL

task. Good-morning’; and she began
to move off; but she knew very well
that he would not let her go like that,
and to tell the truth she rather hoped
he wouldn’t, for she thought she would
like him to take care of her better
than any one else in the army. Of
course he did stop her and said.

‘Tf you really insist on stopping on
the field no one is more fit to take
care of you than I. So do stop.’

And she allowed herself to be
persuaded to stop with him.

Just as they had managed to arrange
it so, a trumpet blew in the direction of
the town, and immediately troops ot
knights and men-at-arms began to
pour out of the gates, and to form the
line of battle, and as each band of
men came along they cheered long
and loud at the sight of the Princess,
and the Princess felt very happy, for
she liked to know that her people
loved her. Gradually the immense
army came into one long line of .



THE BROWN OWL 8x

glistening steel, and again the trumpets
sounded, and the line began to move
forward like a wave of the sea as it
runs up the smooth sand sweeping all
before it, The smooth plain which
was to form the battlefield was dotted
here and there with troops of cattle
which had come down in the night
from the hills to feed on the long sweet
grass, and they raised their heads in
astonishment at the line of knights
and bowmen that marched slowly
down on them; so they shook their
heads and galloped off straight in
front of the line, with their tails high
in the air, and they were in such
blind haste that they charged right
through the lines of the enemy who
were now approaching, and not only
through them they went, but also
through their camp, tossing the tents
into the air with their horns as they
went by. However, at last they
reached the hills, and did not disturb
the combatants any more.
G



82 THE BROWN OWL

Meanwhile the armies had got quite |
close together—so close indeed that
they could see each other’s faces quite
plainly—but they did not seem par-
ticularly eager to fight. So when
they had got thus far they halted, and
looked at one another.

As yet Merrymineral had not arrived,
for to tell the truth he was never a
very early riser, and he did not see why
he should hurry himself—for you see he
was quite sure of winning the battle
without much trouble.

Just opposite the Princess was the
flower of the enemy, and she recognised
many of the great men of the countries
that had rebelled with Merrymineral.
They did not seem particularly happy
where they were, and especially when
the Princess looked at them they
looked very red and uncomfortable, as
if they did not like it at all,

‘I do believe they’re ashamed ot
themselves,’ she said to the Prince;
and he answered :



THE BROWN OWL 83

‘They certainly look like it.’

‘Do you think,’ she asked, ‘if I
were to go over to them and offer to
pardon them that they would leave
Merrymineral and come on my side?’

The Prince thought a moment.

*T believe they would,’ he said; ‘ only
if I were you I would not go, I should
send an ambassador or a herald.’

But the Princess shook her head.

‘That would never do,’ she said.
‘I’m sure they’d be offended at that.
Why, it would look as if I thought they
were not to be trusted, and besides
they would not hurt me. No, Ill go
to them quite alone.’

But the Prince said:

‘You had better let me go with you,
for if they did attack you it would
be awkward; besides, you know you
promised to keep near me all the
morning, and if you go without me you
will not be keeping your promise, don’t
you see?’

So the Princess said :



84 THE BROWN OWL

‘Well, I suppose you're right, only
you must come alone.’

And as he agreed to this they went
forward. Her own army evidently
did not understand what she meant
to do, nor, for the matter of that, did
the enemy, but as they had neither of
them received the order to commence
fighting they neither of them advanced.

So the Prince and Princess advanced
at a gentle trot until they were quite
close to the others, and the Owl sat on
her shoulder.

When they were quite close the
knights tried to get one behind the
other just as if they had done some-
thing they ought not to have done,
and were each afraid of being punished
first.

In particular the Princess noted the
giant and dwarf, the ambassadors of
the evening before; they tried to
hide themselves behind the others
altogether. For the dwarf this was
easy enough, but for the poor giant, he



THE BROWN OWL 85

could not manage it at all, he was so
very big.

However, she did not look at all
angry, and she only said:

‘Good-morning, my lords.’

And they replied in chorus:

‘Good-morning, your Majesty.’

So she went on:

‘I have come to ask you why you
have assisted my rebellious subject,
and what grievance you have? If
there is any I will try to redress it.’

One of the nobles replied :

“We have no grievances.’

‘Then why have you fought against
me?’

- ‘Because we could not help it, your
Majesty.’

‘But I should have thought you
could have helped fighting.’

‘I mean, your Majesty, that Merry-
mineral threatened to kill us all if we
did not fight,’

‘Then you were not very brave.
But that has nothing to do with it.



86 THE BROWN OWL

What I wish to know is, whether you
will now submit to me again ?’

‘We would most willingly; only
perhaps your Majesty might inflict
some punishment on us for our mis-
deeds.’

But the Princess shook her head.

‘No; I will give you all a free
pardon if you return to your allegiance.’

So the nobles gave a shout of joy,
and they seemed quite happy again.

_ And the Princess too was overjoyed ;
however, she ordered them to go each
knight to his own men and to tell
them what had happened, and to
conduct them to her own army.

So they all went and did as they
were told, and soon the whole army of
Merrymineral melted away, with the
exception of a very few, and these
were mostly the servants of Merry-
mineral himself, and of the giant and
the dwarf, who still remained faithful
to him. However they seemed quite
unhappy about it.



THE BROWN OWL 87

So the Princess turned to them and ~
said : ;

‘And you, sirs, will you not also
join me?’

But the giant shook his head, and
the dwarf said snappishly :

‘Don’t you know we can’t?’ ©

But the Princess answered: —

‘No; I do not know why you can’t.’

So the dwarf snarled :

‘We're bound to serve him for a
certain time, whether we like it or not.
I’m the King of the Underground
Gnomes—we live in tunnels under the
earth, and never come up unless we’re
obliged to.’

And the giant said:

‘Ym the Spirit of the Woods—
that’s why I’m dressed in leaves like
this; and I’m the King of the Foresters,
and we live in trees.’

But just at this moment a frightful
roar came from the camp:

‘Why don’t you begin ?’ it came.

It was so sudden that it quite



88 THE BROWN OWL

startled the Princess, but the giant
shook his head mournfully :

‘He always roars like that when he’s
ina temper. He'll be coming out in
a moment, and won’t there be a row?’

Just then the voice came again.

‘Bring Popfelwuski to the door.’

‘Popfelwuski’s his dragon that he
rides on,’ said the giant.

And then some servants led the
dragon to the door of one of the
tents.

It was a most marvellous-looking
creature, for it had eyes as large as
tea-trays, and they twinkled awfully ;
and it was golden-coloured all over,
and it shone so brightly in the sun
that it made the Princess’s eyes quite
ache to look at it- And it was
growling and prancing and kicking up
the dust, and making more fuss than
fifty horses could have done. Just
then the tent opened and Merrymineral
came out. He looked just as usual,
and had not any armour or weapons



THE BROWN OWL 89

except a huge battle-axe, which must
have weighed nearly a ton, but he
carried it with the greatest ease,
although he was an old man—for he
was over eight hundred years old. He
vaulted on to his dragon’s back with
very great ease, and putting his spurs
to its golden sides made it gallop at a
great rate. As yet he had not seen
what had happened to his army, for he
was rather short-sighted, but when he “
had got within a few yards of where
it ought to have been, he suddenly
stopped as if he were bewildered, but
then his eye fell on the Princess and
he roared out :

‘Oh, it’s you, is it? Tl soon do
for you,’ and he made his dragon fly
towards the Princess at a very great
rate. But precisely the same thing
happened now as had happened once
before, for the dragon came to a
sudden stop as if it had hit against a
wall. The Prince of India did not
understand it at all.



go THE BROWN OWL

‘Had we not better retreat and
join the rest of the army?’ he said.

But the Princess answered :

‘Oh no, we're quite safe here. He
won't be able to get at us. Only
you'd better come a little closer to me,
because he might be able to hit you.’

So the Prince came a good deal
closer, and they sat watching the frantic
efforts of Merrymineral to get at them,
but it wasno use. Suddenly, however,
he changed his mode of attack. He
made his dragon fly high into the air—
so high indeed that it would have been
invisible if its golden coat had not
shone brightly in the sun. It was quite
unpleasant to look at him, for he was
so high up that it made them feel
dizzy as it shone out against the sky,
miles high. Suddenly, however, just
as it was directly over them, it seemed
to be growing larger.

‘I do believe he’s going to drop on
us from above’; and so he was. The
Prince put up his lance that the dragon



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LIBRARY

VOLUME ONE

THE BROWN OWL


THE CHILDREN'S LIBRARY.

THE BROWN OWL.

STORIES FROM FAIRYLAND.

THE CHINA CUP, AND OTHER STORIES.
TALES FROM THE MABINOGION.

THE

BROWN OWL

A Fairy Story

BY

FORD H. MADOX HUEFFER

TWO ILLUSTRATIONS BY
Ff, MADOX BROWN

LONDON
T. FISHER UNWIN
1892



while ago—in fact long

g before Egypt had risen to

power and before Rome or Greece

had ever been heard of—and that was

some time before you were born, you .
know—there was a king who reigned

over a very large and powerful king-

dom.

Now this king was rather old, he
had founded his kingdom himself, and
he had reigned over it nine hundred
and ninety-nine and a half years
already. As I have said before, it was
a very large kingdom, for it contained,
among other things, the whole of the
western half of the world. The rest of
B


20 THE BROWN OWL

the world was divided into. smaller
kingdoms, and each kingdom was ruled
over by separate princes, who, however,
were none of them so old as Inta-
fernes, as he was called.

Now King Intafernes was an ex-
ceedingly powerful magician — that
was why he had remained so long
on the throne; for you must know that
in this country the people were divided
into two classes—those who were magi-
cians, and those who weren’t. The
magicians called.themselves Aristocrats,
and the others called themselves what
they liked; also in this country, as in
all other countries, the rich magicians
had the upper hand over the rest, but
still the others did. not grumble, for
they were not badly treated on the
whole. Now of all the magicians in
the country the King was the greatest,
and no one approached him in magic
power but the Chancellor, who was
called Merrymineral, and he even was
no match for the King.
THE BROWN OWL 3

Among other things King Inta-
fernes had a daughter, who was ex-
ceedingly beautiful—as indeed all prin-
cesses are or ought to be. She hada
very fair face, and a wealth of golden
hair that fell over her shoulders, like a
shining waterfall falling in ripples to
her waist.

Now in the thousandth year of her
father’s reign the Princess was eighteen,
and in that country she was already of
age. Three days before her nineteenth
birthday, however, her father fell sick
and gradually weakened, until at last
he had only strength left to lie in his
royal bed. Still, however, he retained
his faculties, and on the Princess’s
birthday he made all the magicians
file before his bed and swear to be
faithful for ever to the Princess. Last
of all came the Chancellor, the pious
Merrymineral, and as he took the oath
the King looked at him with a loving -
glance and said:

‘Ah! my dear Merrymineral, in
4 THE BROWN OWL

truth there was no need for thee to
have taken the oath, for it is thy
nature to be faithful; and it being thy
nature, thou couldst not but be faith-
ful,’

To which the pious Merrymineral
answered :

‘To such a master and to such a
mistress how could I but be faithful ?’
and to this noble sentiment the three
hundred and forty-seven magicians
could not help according unanimous
applause.

When they were quiet again the
King said :

‘So be it, good Merrymineral, do thou
always act up to thy words. But now
leave, good men all, for I am near my
end, and would fain spend my last
moments with my daughter here.’

Sorrowfully, one by one, the courtiers
left, wishing him their last adieux.
He had been a good king to all, all
through his long reign, and they were
sorry that he had to leave them at last.
THE BROWN OWL 5

Soon they were all gone except the
good Merrymineral, and at last he too
went, his whole frame shaking with
suppressed sobs; his body seemed
powerless with grief, and his limbs
seemed to refuse their functions. The
King looked after him, carefully noticing
whether the door was shut. Then he
spoke :

‘My dear daughter,’ he said, ‘when
Iam gone be kind to every one, and,
above all, cherish the Owl—do cherish
the Owl—promise me to cherish the
Owl.’

‘But how can I cherish the Owl?’
cried the poor Princess; ‘how can I,
unless I know who he is?’

But the King only answered :

‘Dear Ismara, do promise to cherish
the Owl!’

And he said nothing else for a long
time, until at last the Princess saw that
the only way to let him rest in peace
was to promise, and she said:

‘I promise, dear father, but still I
6 THE BROWN OWL

do wish I knew who or what the Owl: -

is that I am to cherish.’

‘You will see that in good time,’
answered the King. ‘Now, my dear
Ismara, I shall die happy, and you
will be safe. If you had not pro-
mised—however, we will let that rest
unsaid. Now wheel the bed to where
I can see out of the window.’

The Princess did as she was told.
Now from this you must not imagine
that she was a very strong princess—
for she was no stronger than most
princesses of her age; but the old
King, who was a very powerful magi-
cian, as I have told you already, made
the bed easy for her to move. He
might have made it move of its own
accord, but he knew that it would
please his daughter to be of service to
him, and so he let her move it.

The view from the window was very
fine. A dark wood grew in the fore-
ground, and far away over the tree-tops
were the blue hills, behind which the
THE BROWN OWL 7

sun was just preparing to retire. And
it seemed angry, the sun, for its face
was dark and clouded, and its beams
smote fiercely on everything, and gilded
the tops of the autumn trees with a
purer gold than their natural tint.

But overhead the clouds spread darkly,
and they reached in a black pall to
the verge of the horizon, forming a black
frame to the red-gold sunset; for only
the extreme west was bright with the
waning light.

The Princess sat on the bed beside
the King, and the dying sun lit them
both and fell with a ruddy glare on
the King’s hard countenance, as if it
knew that his work on earth for the
day, and for ever, was done. ;

‘Is it not grand?’ cried the old
King, as if the glorious sight warmed
his blood again and made him once
more young. ‘And is it not grand to
think of the power that thou hast, my
daughter? If thou but raise thy little
finger armies will move from world’s
8 THE BROWN OWL

end to world’s end. Fleets come
daily from every land for thee alone ;
all that thou seest is thine, and utterly
within thy power. Think of the power, ©
the grand power, of swaying the world.’

But long before he had got thus
far, the Princess was weeping bitterly—
partly at the overwhelming prospect,
and partly from her great grief. She
seized her father’s hand and kissed it
passionately.

‘My father, my father, she cried,
‘say not so; they are all thine, not mine,
for thou livest still, and all is yet well.’

But the old King cut her short:

‘Dost thou see the sun? Look,
its lower rim is already cut by the
mountains. When its disc is hidden
I too shall have joined the majority,
and my soul will have left my body,
and the power will be thine. But
above all cherish the Owl. Never go
out of its sight, for if thou do, some
harm will happen.’

As he stopped speaking a flash of
THE BROWN OWL 9

lightning lit up the sky, and the sullen
roar of distant thunder followed.

From every church in the land the
passing bell tolled forth and the solemn
sounds came swelling on the breeze.
Again came the flash of lightning, and
again the thunder, and now the splash
of falling rain accompanied and almost
drowned the thunder. The sun’s rim
was now almost down.

For the last time the old King kissed
his daughter, as she hung weeping on
his neck. Again the lightning came,
but this time the thunder was drowned
ina more fearful sound. Never before
had the sound been heard, except at
the death of the Princess’s mother.
It was the passing bell of the cathedral
of the town. And as its sound went
forth throughout the whole land men
shook their heads in sorrow, for they
knew that the soul of the good King
had left his body. Through the whole
land the news was known—to every
one except to the Princess,
Io THE BROWN OWL

For she lay on the bed passionately
kissing the dead face—not yet cold in
death—and calling on his name in
vain; for the ears of the dead are
closed ‘to the voice of the charmer,
charm he never so wisely.’

Gradually the voice of the Princess
died away into low sobs and her breath-
ing came more regularly, and in spite
of the tolling of the death-bell she
slept, worn out by her grief. No one
came near her, for at the Court no
one was allowed to enter the royal
presence without a command, what-
ever happened. ~So for a time the
Princess slept on, clasping the still
face to her warm cheek. But at last
the death-cold of the face wakened
her once more to the death-cold of
the world. For a time her wakening ”
dreams refused to let her believe the
worst, but the stern reality forced
itself on her. She raised herself on
her two arms and gazed through the
darkness at the white face that made
THE BROWN OWL It

her shudder when her longing eyes
at last traced out its lines as a flash
of lightning lit it up. She sprang off
the bed with a wild impulse of calling
for help.

But no sooner had she got to the
door and had given the call than she
once more fainted and seemed for a
time lifeless.

When she came to herself again she
was in bed in her own room. It was
still night, and at the side of her bed
a night-light was burning in a glass
shade. She could not understand
what it all meant; but her head did
ache so, and she could not tell why
they were making such a noise at the
far end of the room. For you see she
was lying on her back low down in the
pillows, and so she could not see
beyond the foot of the bed. How-
ever, she raised herself on her elbow
and looked. For a short time she
could see nothing, for the room was
somewhat dark, as the night-light gave
r2 THE BROWN OWL

but little light. But at the other end
of the room a large fire was burning,
and by its light the Princess saw a
. Strange scene.

For in the middle of the floor she
could make out a group of three ladies-
in-waiting, who were struggling with a
large black object—what it was the
Princess could not see, but it seemed
to be attempting to attack the Court
doctor, who was huddled up in a
corner with his umbrella spread out
before him, and he was gradually
sinking down behind it, giving vent
to the most horrible groans and
shrieks for mercy, and calling to the
ladies to keep it off. However, in
spite of their efforts, the ‘thing’ was
gradually drawing them nearer and
nearer to the poor doctor.

But the strangest thing of all was
that the doctor’s face was lit up by
two distinct rounds of light. It was
just as if some one had turned the
light of a bull’s-eye lantern on him,
THE BROWN OWL 13

and this the Princess could not under-
stand at all. However, she lay still
and watched.

The doctor got farther and. farther
behind the umbrella until only his
head appeared over the top of it. At
last he shrieked :

‘ Send for a regiment of Lifeguards—
let them shoot the Owl—it is necessary
for the health of the Princess. Owls
are very bad things to have in bed-
rooms—they bring scarlatina, and they
always carry the influenza epidemic.
Lifeguards, I tell you, send for them.’
But still the ‘thing’ came nearer, and
with an agonised shriek of ‘The Owl!’
he sank altogether under the rim.

This loud cry of ‘The Owl’ roused
the Princess, and she remembered her
promise to cherish the Owl. So. she
called to the ladies-in-waiting, and they,
astonished, let go the thing, and the
Owl immediately flew at the umbrella,
underneath which the doctor was
coiled up, and perched on the top.
14 THE BROWN OWL

The Princess, however, thought it was
rather rash to have promised to cherish
the Owl if it was going to eat up her
physicians in that reckless manner.
However, the Owl did not seem
aggressive, and only seemed as if it
were waiting for further orders. The
Princess determined to see if it would
come when it was called, like a dog.
So she called in a sweet, persuasive
voice :
‘Come here, good Owl.’

Immediately the dark shape of the
Owl flitted noiselessly to her side as
she sat on the bed. The wind of its
flight blew out the flickering night-light
in spite of the glass shade. But the
glittering eyes of the Owl lit up the
whole room, so that there was no need
of light. As it alighted on the bed it
turned its eyes on the Princess as
much as to say, ‘What shall I do
now?’

But the fierce light of the eyes was
softened as it turned to her, as if the
THE BROWN OWL 15

Owl feared to hurt her with the blind-
ing rays.

‘Cherished Owl,’ said the Princess,
‘why didst thou hurt the physician ?’

The Owl shook his head; but the
Princess could not understand whether
he meant that he did not know why
he had hurt him, or if he meant he
had not hurt him. So the Princess
told one of. the ladies-in-waiting to
remove the umbrella from over the
doctor. But this was not so easy as
it sounded, for the doctor held. firmly
on to the handle, and in spite of the
united efforts of the three ladies-in-
waiting he managed to hold on. At
last the Princess lost patience.

‘Go and help them, good Owl,’ she
said ; and the Owl, overjoyed, flew to
the doctor, and seizing the top of the
umbrella flew with it up to the ceiling,
and as the doctor still held on, he
flew round and round, until the doctor,
hitting the top of a cupboard, let go,
and fell in a heap in the middle of
16 THE BROWN OWL

the floor, where he lay half unconscious,
repeating as he sat:

“*Orange juice for influenza; try a
seidlitz powder and a blue pill, and
keep the owls out of the room and
take a warm bath, and—send for the
Lifeguards.’

But the Princess did not seem
inclined to send for them; and in
truth it would have been rather
awkward for the horses to get in, as
the room was on the second floor.

So the Princess told the ladies-in-
waiting to drag him out of the room,
and they obeyed; but as he went
he said: ‘Sleeping in unaired sheets
causes rheumatism, sciatica, pleurisy,
pneumonia and—owls;’ and as the
door closed they heard him say,
‘Gregory powder and Epsom salts.’

The poor Princess, however, began
to weep again, and the Owl sat
perched on the bed-post at her feet,
watching her with his bright eyes.

‘However, after she had cried thus
THE BROWN OWL 17

for a long time, she thought it would
be better to stop her tears, for they
were all in vain, as she knew but too
well.

So she rose from her bed; for you
must know she had only been laid on
her bed when she had fainted, and so
she still had all her clothes on.

Through the -window-blinds the
light of dawn was already beginning to
show itself. So the Princess went to
the window and drew back the curtains,
and let the bright sunlight shine into
the room. A beautiful day was dawn-
ing after the last night’s rain, and the
sun was rising brightly over the edge
of the blue sea. For a moment, as
she looked out, everything was quiet
except the shrill chirp of a solitary
sparrow that seemed to have awakened
too early. From the chimneys of the
red-roofed town below her no smoke
was rising, for all in the town were
asleep still.
= Suddenly, with a rush, the morning

c
18 THE BROWN OWL

breeze came from over the land behind
her, and with the rustle of the wind
everything seemed to wake and come
to life once more. The solitary chirp
of the sparrow was drowned in the
flood of song that poured forth from
the trees in the palace garden, and
with the birds the rest of the living
animals awoke, and from far inland
the lowing. of the cows was borne on
the breeze, and now and again came
the joyful bark of the shepherd’s dog
as it recognised its master’s whistle as
he called it to work again among the
sheep, whose plaintive bleating came
softly, as if from a distance, to the
Princess’s ear.

Everything seemed joyful at the
sight of the beautiful morning except
the Princess, and she felt oh so lonely,
for it seemed as if her only friend had
gone from her for ever. And at the
thought her tears began to flow afresh,
for she felt very lonely, while every-
thing else seemed to rejoice. But as
THE BROWN OWL 19

she leant thus against the window-sill,
with a great lump in her throat and
the hot tears in her eyes, she suddenly
felt a weight on her shoulder and a
rushing wind waved her hair, and as
she turned her head to see what it
was, her face was covered in the soft
brown feathers of the Owl, who had
perched on her shoulder.

The touch of the Owl seemed to
have driven away her grief, and she
felt quite light and joyful in the
beautiful sunshine. For it seemed as
if the Owl had become a companion
to her that would take the place of
her father; so she leaned’ her head
against the Owl, and her golden hair
mixed with the dusky brown feathers,
till each streak of golden hair shone
again in the bright sunlight. And the
Owl.too seemed very happy. So fora
time the Princess stood looking over
the deep-blue sea.

Suddenly, however, a footstep
sounded in the courtyard below, and
20 THE BROWN OWL

the Princess drew back from the
window, for a thought suddenly came
into her head :

‘Oh dear,’ she said, ‘I have been
crying such a lot that my eyes must
be quite red, and my hair is all ruffled.
This will never do.” - And as she
looked in the glass she said, ‘ Ah, just
as I thought. Come, my cherished
Owl, sit there on the crown on the top
of the looking-glass frame and wait
while I wash my hands and face and
make myself tidy.’ .

The Owl did as he was told, and the
Princess began to wash in cold water—
a thing she had never done before—
but she did not like to call to her
ladies-in-waiting, lest they should see
how red her eyes were. So she had
to put up with the cold water, and very
pleasant she found it, for it cleared the
tear-mist out of her eyes and made
her feel quite happy and cheerful
again: ‘And I have heard,’ she
thought to herself, ‘that washing in
THE BROWN OWL 2u

cold water is matchless for the com-
plexion.’

When she had finished washing she
went and combed her hair before the
glass. For she was a very artistic
Princess, and liked looking at beautiful
things, and-so she liked sometimes to
look at herself in the glass. Not that
she was in the least conceited.

So she combed her hair with a gold
comb, and when she had finished
combing it, she put on her gold circlet
as a sign of her rank, and then she
said to the Owl, who had been sitting
patiently on the looking-glass blinking
at her as if: he quite enjoyed himself:

‘Now, cherished. Owl, you may sit
on my shoulder again.’

When the Owl was again in his
place he blinked in the glass at his
own reflection as if the light were too
_ Strong for him, and he shut his eyes
and drew in his neck and lifted up one
foot into his feathers, as ifhe felt quite
happy and comfortable, and the Prin-
22 THE BROWN OWL

cess smiled at his happy look, for she’ ©
seemed quite to have forgotten her
sorrow in the company of the Owl.

So she, with the Owl on her shoulder,
went to the window. Here in the
courtyard already a large crowd had
collected to catch a glimpse of the
Princess if possible, so that it fell
about that when they saw her they
raised a mighty shout of joy and pity:

‘The King is dead, they cried.
‘Long live the Queen!’ And through-
out the city far and wide echoed and
re-echoed the cry: -

‘Long live the Queen’; and it
seemed as if the waves of the sea
murmured the sound. ;

The Princess, however, held out her
little hand to still the tumult, and as if
by magic the cries stopped.

‘Good people all, she said in clear
ringing tones, ‘I thank you for your
good wishes, and I will try always to
be worthy of them as my father was.
For to-day, however, rejoice not;
THE BROWN OWL 23

remember that the great King Inta-
fernes, the founder of the kingdom to
which we all belong, has but just left
the earth—sorrow for him but a short
‘time; joy will come soon enough for
all.’

So the crowd, silent and pensive for
a time, dispersed in groups. More
than one of them asked what had been
perched on the Princess’s shoulder,
and those who had been near enough,
said that it was an owl—though what
it meant they knew not.

‘To me it seemed as if the head of
the old King were looking over his
daughter’s shoulder,’ said one of the
listeners who stood on the outskirts of
the crowd.

But she was only a little hunchback,
and the rich citizens laughed at her,
saying: ‘Tush, child—thy fancy is not
sound! Or else before looking at the
Princess thou didst look at the fierce
sun, and the sun-spots in thy eyes
caused thee to see it thus. It was
24 THE BROWN OWL

but an owl.’ But the little hunchback
held to her own opinion.

But while the Princess stood watch-
ing them depart, a tapping came at
the door, and the Princess cried ‘ Come
in” A page entered and said that the
Chancellor, Merrymineral, was below
and requested audience of the Princess.

‘Let him be shown into the audience
chamber to await me there,’

The page bowed and departed on
his errand, and the Princess went to
another door in the room and down
the staircase that led from it to the
audience chamber, and the Owl re-
mained seated on her shoulder until
they reached the room. When they
got there the Chancellor had not yet
entered, for the staircase from the
Princess’s bedroom to the audience
chamber was much shorter than
that from the entrance hall, and then
you see the Princess was much more
nimble than Merrymineral, who was an
old man, and she ran quickly down-
THE BROWN OWL 25

stairs whilst he walked slowly up.
However at last he entered. As he
came in the Princess said :

‘Good morning, dear Merrymineral.
How is it you are so late? I shall
have to fine you if you keep me
waiting like this again. And now
what do you want with me?’

The good Chancellor received her
laughing reproach with his head bowed
down. He heaved a deep sigh, and
drew his pocket-handkerchief from his
pocket and applied it to his eyes. As
he drew it away the tears could be
seen flowing fast down his withered
cheeks.

‘I came,’ he moaned, ‘to console
you for your great loss. I too,’ he
continued in a voice choked with sobs,
‘T too am an orphan.’

It seemed funny to the Princess to
‘see him weeping thus, and she could
hardly help laughing at him, but her
grief soon came back.

‘Poor Merrymineral,’ she sighed,
26 THE BROWN OWL

‘to you also it must be a sad blow,
for you were always faithful and
attached. But it was fated to happen
thus, and you must really try and be
comforted, for crying will not mend
matters,’

The Chancellor began again :

‘ The beloved King your father’; but
his sobs choked him, and he hid his
face.

‘The beloved King your father,’
echoed a loud voice, exactly mimicking
the tones of the Chancellor, but where
the voice came from no one could tell.
The Chancellor started.

‘Did you say that?’ said the
Princess.

‘Not the second time,’ answered
Merrymineral.

‘Who could it be?’ said the
Princess ; ‘for there is no one in the
room except the cherished Owl; and
you can’t speak, can you, Owl dear?’

The Owl shook his head dismally.
But the change that came over Merry-
THE BROWN OWL 27

mineral was most astonishing as his
eye suddenly lit upon the Owl—for
since his entrance he had not raised
his eyes from the floor, He jumped
backwards over three rows of seats, for
you see the seats in the audience
chamber were arranged in rows, and he
alighted in a sitting posture on the
other side. As he sat on the floor he
looked up at the Owl in a terrified
manner, then threw up his arms and
fainted. The poor Princess did not
know what to do, so she rang a bell
that stood on the table in front of the
throne. Several pages at once came in.

‘Just bring that man to,’ said the
Princess.

The pages bowed low, and went and
shook the Chancellor violently. He
showed no signs of recovering, so one
of the pages turned to the Princess
and said :

‘May it please your Majesty, but the
Chancellor refuses to come to, and we
can’t bring him.’
28 THE BROWN OWL

‘So he refuses to obey my orders,’ .
said the Princess) ‘He must be
punished for this. However, now go
and get a bucketful of water and
pour it on him. Perhaps that will
bring him to.’

Now when she said he was to be
punished, she was only joking, but she
said it very gravely, so that many
people might have thought it was quite
in earnest. Meanwhile the pages de-
parted to fetch the water. They soon
came back and brought a large pail-
ful. : soe

‘You had. better not throw it all
over him,’ said the Princess ; ‘just let
it trickle over his face gently.’

So one of the pages began to do as
he was told, but somehow—either he
had a sudden push, or, as he said after-
wards, the Owl looked at him, and
startled him—he let the pail go, and all
the water and the pail too fell over the
unlucky Chancellor. This really did
bringhim very much to—much too much
THE BROWN OWL 29

to, in fact—for he sprang up in such a
rage that the Princess el wished
herself out of the room.

‘You jackanapes,’ he screamed at
the unfortunate: page;.‘you ape, you
boar, you cow, you clumsy monkey,
T'll be revenged on you.’

But the Princess, who had gained
courage while he was screaming, said:

‘You will not be revenged on
him,’ ;

‘But I shall,’ he said.

‘Indeed you will not,’ said the
Princess, ‘for he did it by my orders.’

‘Oh! he did it by your orders,’ said
the Chancellor; ‘then I’ll be revenged
on you too,’ and he began to move
uncomfortably near to the Princess,
But the three pages threw themselves
on him and tried to drag him back,
but he turned suddenly on them.

‘What,’ he said scornfully, ‘you try
to stop me—ye frogs! Ah! a good
idea—by virtue of my magic power I
command you to turn into water-rats ;
30 THE BROWN OWL

then perhaps the Owl there will eat
you up.’

No sooner said than ae and the
three pages instantly became water-rats,
squattering in the water that was still
in a pool on the floor.

Somehow the Princess did not seem
to be at all frightened at this; she was
only very angry.

‘I thought I told you not to hurt
those pages.’

‘Who cares what you say ?’

‘Dear me,’ thought the Princess,
‘he is getting excessively insolent—I
shall have to be severe with him in a
moment.’ So she said:

‘Turn those pages back again.’

‘T shall not.’

‘Then leave the room.’

‘T shall not.’

The Princess did not know what to
do; he was really very rude, and he
was walking towards her evidently
intending to attack her. When he

was within ten feet of her he stopped
‘ 2)
THE BROWN OWL 31

and though he tried to get nearer he
could not.

‘Ha! ha!’ he cried; ‘you think to
keep me off by magic, but it is not so
easy, I can tell you. By virtue of my
magic power I command you to turn
into a mouse.’

But the Princess, leaning her head
against the soft feathers of the Owl,
only smiled, and did not turn into a
mouse at all,

‘The Chancellor seemed perplexed.

‘Js that not enough for you?’ he
said; ‘I thought I told you to turn
into a mouse.’

But the Princess smiled calmly and
said :

‘Do you suppose I am going to
do anything of the sort—you have
forgotten your manners to speak to
your Queen thus. I believe there is
a fine of five shillings for any one who
speaks to the King or Queen without
saying “‘ Your Majesty.” You had better
pay it, Sir Chancellor, and turn those
32 THE BROWN OWL

pages back again, or I shall have you
turned out of the kingdom.’

But the Chancellor laughed. ‘You
can’t send me out if you wanted to.
Meanwhile I shall not turn those rats
back, for if I am not much mistaken
your Owl there will carry them off.’

It really seemed as if the Owl were
going to obey him, for greatly to the
Princess’s surprise it sprang off her
shoulder and seized the three rats, one
in each claw, and one in its beak—
but it returned at once to her and laid
them squeaking on the table in front
of her—but no sooner did they touch
the table than they turned into men
again just as quickly as they had
become rats) When Merrymineral
saw this he became perfectly frantic,
and tried in vain to get at the Princess
—he even went back a little and tried
to run at her—but it was no use, for
no sooner did he reach a certain spot
than he was suddenly stopped, just as
if he had run against a wall. At last he
THE BROWN OWL 33

became so frantic that the Princess
could stand it no longer. So she
said : ;

‘Will you be quiet, you naughty old
man ?—leave the room or I will send
for the police.’

But Merrymineral answered :

‘Oh, send for the police and the
soldiers and sailors and candlestick-
makers,’

So the Princess rang the bell that
stood on the table: a page at once
appeared at the door.

‘Send for a policeman and ask him
to step this way.’

The page looked astonished, but he
saluted and left the room. Almost
immediately a policeman came in—for
you see there was one always on the
palace steps. He entered the room
with a low bow.

‘Take the Chancellor out of the
room,’ said the Princess, ‘and put him
in prison for three days.’

But the policeman shook his head.

D
34 THE BROWN OWL

‘Excuse me, mum—I mean your
most gracious Majesty—but it is
against the law to imprison a member
of Parliament, much less a chancellor.’

The Chancellor laughed sarcastic-
ally.

‘Oh, is it?’ said the Princess; ‘never
mind, take him into custody ; I depose
him—he is no longer Chancellor.’

Merrymineral looked astonished,
but the policeman cleared his throat
and said :

‘Come, I say, young fellow; will you
go quietly, or shall I make you?’

‘Oh, make me, by all means,’
answered Merrymineral. .

So the policeman advanced and
held out his hand to take him by the
collar, but had no sooner touched
Merrymineral than he fell to the
ground as if he had been thunder-
struck.

The Chancellor smiled. ‘I told
you so,’ he said. :

The Princess was now thoroughly
THE BROWN OWL 35

nonplussed. However, she rang the
bell again. Again the page appeared.

‘Summon the Lords of the Council ;
let them come here at once.’

Almost immediately afterwards the
lords appeared. As they came in each
one bowed profoundly to the Princess.
But in spite of their grave appearance
they could not help looking astonished
at the policeman, who was lying on
the floor, and at the three pages who
were still sitting on the table—for as
they had not yet been told to g0 they
could not depart.

But each one took his seat without
questioning. Last of all came the
Court doctor, who looked in an alarmed
manner at the Owl—nevertheless he
took his seat.

When all was quiet the Princess
began to speak,

‘My lords,’ she said, ‘I have been
obliged to assemble you on the first
day of my reign; but the matter is a-
very grave one. I have found it
36 THE BROWN OWL

necessary to dismiss the Chancellor,
for these reasons: first, he attacked
these three pages who were executing
my bidding ; next, he attacked me; and
lastly, he attacked the law, in the
person of the policeman there, whom
he knocked down. Now I ask your
advice as to how I am to get rid of
him, for he refuses to leave the room
at my command.’

So spoke the Princess, but before any
one could answer Merrymineral spoke:

‘My lords,’ he said, ‘are we, we,
the lords of the kingdom, to be governed .
by this schoolgirl, who is not even a
magician as we are? What good has
she ever done us? What power is to
keep us from deposing her and electing
as a ruler one of ourselves?’ but
before he could finish a perfect uproar
of shouts of rage interrupted him.

The Princess put her fingers in her
ears to keep out the sound, and when
the lords saw that the noise was
annoying her they stopped at once.


THE BROWN OWL 37

When they were quiet the Princess
spoke again :

‘What he has just said is right,’ she
said; ‘I have no right to reign over
you, for I am but a girl, Do ye there-
fore elect a ruler.’

For.a moment all was silence in the
Council, but all eyes were turned on a
lord who stood next to Merrymineral
in rank. He was a portly man, and a
great magician too, though his power
was not quite so great as Merry-
mineral’s. When therefore he saw
that all eyes were turned on him,
Lord Licec, for so he was called,
rose.

‘Your most gracious Majesty,’ he
began, ‘although you had no need to
command us to elect a ruler, we are
of course bound to obey your com-
mands, whatever they are. I therefore
speak, giving my vote, and I believe the
vote of all the rest of the assembly, that
you shall be our ruler according to the
oath which we sware to your father.’
38 THE BROWN OWL

And then turning to the rest of the
assembly he said:

‘Am I not right, my lords?’ and
with one voice they answered :

‘We will die for our Queen Ismara.’

Only one voice objected, but as
that was Merrymineral, no one noticed
him.

So the Princess rose and thanked
them for their confidence in her,
though, to tell the truth, she had
known all along what they would say.
That done she said:

‘And now what are we to do about
turning this man out ? for he refuses to
go of his own accord.’

No one could suggest anything
better than to send for the Lifeguards
and let them carry him off. But
before this was done they decided to
try to persuade him to go. But it was
of no use, for he stood on the spot
where he had stopped, with his arms
folded and his hat on, looking down
at the ground in a brown study, and he
THE BROWN OWL 39

took no notice of anything they could
do, even though they rang the bell close
‘to his ear. Now he did no particular
harm as he stood there, but you see
no one could tell whom he might
attack next. So they determined to
send for the Lifeguards as a last
resource.

So they were sent for, and in a short
time they came, although they left
their horses outside in the courtyard.
Fifty of them were then marched into
the hall and they were ordered to
move the man out. So they divided
into two parties of twenty-five each,
and they put a rope round him, and
each body of twenty-five took an end
of the rope and pulled, but it was no
good, for he took no more notice of
the pulling than if he had been Samson
or any other strong man. So the
fifty gave up the attempt in despair ;
the only thing to do seemed to be
to cut him to pieces. So they drew
their swords and hacked at him,
40 THE BROWN OWL

but it was no use: the swords bent or
broke just as if they had been bul-
rushes or paper, and still Merrymineral
took no notice in particular. So they
gave up the attempt in despair when
they had broken up all their swords.
However, they did not give in, for they
called in the best horseman in the
regiment and told him to charge on
horseback with his lance in rest. So
the soldier rode in on his horse; this
was not so difficult as it may seem, for
the council chamber was on a level
with the ground, and a lane was opened
in between the chairs to where Merry-
mineral still stood with his arms folded.

At the word of command the soldier
rode at full speed towards Merry-
mineral, aiming his lance at the centre
of his face—that is his nose. His
aim was true, and the lance hit fair,
but it might just as well have been
made of macaroni, for it crumbled
just as a stick of that delightful eatable
would do if you ran it against a wall.
THE BROWN OWL 41

The horse, however, swerved just in
time, although it pushed against him
in going by; but even this made no
difference to Merrymineral. As a last
resource they suggested putting a
lighted match under his nose. Whether
this would have succeeded or not I
can’t say. But just at this moment
Merrymineral seemed to wake up
again.

‘Ah,’ he said, ‘I see you have not
yet managed to get me out of the
room, However, as your soldiers
have been practising on me for some
time past, I think it only right that I
should try my hand on them a little.
I used to be thought rather strong in
the arms at one time, and I have cut
down a good many trees in my time.
Just see how you like that,’ he said to
the man on the horse as he swung his
umbrella round his head and brought
it down with a tremendous thwack on
the horse’s side, In fact he hit so
hard that the horse and man were
42 THE BROWN OWL

knocked right through the window into .
the courtyard below. With three more
blows he knocked twenty more of the
men through the same window, and the
rest made their escape as fast as they
could by the door.

‘I-see I have not quite forgotten
how to clear a room yet,’ he said,
as he once more folded his arms in
the same attitude and relapsed into
silence,

‘What am I to do?’ said the poor
Princess, wringing her hands and
almost crying with vexation.

A voice came from the far end of
the room, and every one turned to
see who it might be. And all saw it
was the Court. physician who spoke.
‘If I might be allowed to make a
suggestion,’ he said, ‘I would say that
the best thing your Majesty could do

would be to request that gentleman
who is sitting on your shoulder to turn
him out. From my own experience I
should say he was very competent to
THE BROWN OWL 43

perform such atask. And if I might

be allowed to add yet another sugges-
tion it would be, “to be well shaken

before taken,” as they say in prescrip-

tions.’

As he said this an extraordinary
change came over Merrymineral. He
pressed his hat on his head, put his
umbrella under his arm, and began to
put on his gloves in such a hurry that
he mistook the left for the right hand.
As he did so he said:

‘Do you know, I can’t stop any
longer ; so sorry, but I have an engage-
ment and I am rather in a hurry. |
Good-day.’ And he began to walk
quickly towards the door. But the
Princess had already, whispered to
the Owl, ‘Catch him, dear Owl.’

And however fast he went the Owl
caught him up, and taking him by the

-middle of his coat-tails—and I am
bound to say some of his skin too—he
shook him violently, and flew round
and round the room banging him
44 THE BROWN OWL

violently against any high piece of
furniture that was convenient.

‘Q-o-o-h,’ shrieked the wretched
man, ‘I say, do you know you're
tearing my best coat, and your beak
is awfully sharp? O-o-ouch,’ and he
filled the room with his shrieks, After
they had continued like that for some
minutes the Princess said :

‘T think he has been punished enough
now, Cherished Owl, so let him down.’

The Owl did as he was told, not,
however, without giving him a sly
tweak with his bill that must have hurt
him a good deal.

‘Tl be revenged on you,’ roared
Merrymineral ; ‘you’ve spoilt my Sun-
day coat, and I shan’t be able to afford
another for I don’t know how long.
Tl be revenged on you.’ And he
took .out a red pocket-handkerchief
and began to suage the blood that was
coming from the bite, all the while
abusing the Owl and the Princess and
threatening to be revenged.
THE BROWN OWL 45

‘You had better be quiet and go,’
she said.

‘TI shall not.’

‘Oh, very well,’ she answered,
‘perhaps you would like to try the
Owl again.’

At the same time the Owl gave him
such a look jfrom its gleaming eyes
that he turned first red and then white
with fright. He made a dash for the
window, and he was in such a hurry
that he left his umbrella and one of
his gloves behind him.

He jumped right through the win-
dow high into the air, and as soon as
he got outside, strange to say, he began
to burn furiously, and he went gradually
up into the sky like a fire-balloon—just
as when a piece of tissue paper-is put
on the fire, if you are not careful, it
will fly blazing up the chimney.

They watched him out of sight, and
then the Princess said with a little sigh
of relief :

‘That’s an end of him at last.’
46 THE BROWN OWL

But the Owl shook his head—he
knew better.

When he was thus at last got rid off
the Princess said to the physician :

‘How can we ever thank thee
enough, good doctor, for thy timely
suggestion !”

‘Oh, your Majesty,’ said the blushing
doctor, ‘experience does it; and I
had plenty of that this morning. Do
you know, I think I shall never be free
again from pain—although I have
bathed in opodeldoc and arnica, and
I am clothed from head to foot in
Court plaster,’ -

The Princess smiled and said :

‘T am afraid the Owl is a_little over-
vigorous in such matters; however, I
will give orders to the Court apothe-
cary to supply you with remedies at
my expense until you shall be cured.’
She then said to the three pages who
still sat on the table:

‘I must ask you to depart now as
Parliament cannot carry on business
THE BROWN OWL 47

with strangers-in the house. How-
ever, ye are, I believe, pages; I will
turn over a new leaf and will advance
you each a step in rank. Now, how-
ever, go.’

Thanking her profusely they went.
When they had gone the Princess
turned to the Councillors and said:

‘As there seems no further need to
keep you, I will detain you no longer.’

Having her permission the Coun-
cillors left the hall. Last of all was
Lord Licec, and ‘he remained as it
hesitating whether to go, or to stay and
speak to the Princess. She, noticing
his hesitation, said :

‘Ah, Lord Licec, hast thou some-
thing to ask me?’

The old lord made answer:

‘I would ask your Majesty’s per-
mission to enter the room of the late
King, your Majesty’s father, for, as you
are aware, it is against the law to enter
the royal presence without the royal
permission.’
48 THE BROWN OWL

‘You have my permission of course ;
but ought not some preparations to be
made for the funeral ?’

Lord Licec answered :

‘They are already made. For as
the late King had announced his
intention of dying yesterday at half-
past six P.M., there was ample time.’

' ‘Let us then go together to the
room, my lord,’ said the Princess.

So they went together, the Princess
leaning on Licec’s arm, and the Owl
sitting on her shoulder.

The guards of the room saluted as
they passed in, but what was their
astonishment on entering to find that
the King had disappeared. When they
asked the guards who had come into
the room during the day, they replied
that no one had been near the room
- during their watch, and the guards of
the watch before said exactly the same
thing. All over the palace inquiries
were made, but to no purpose, and the
rumour gradually spread to the town,

Mares



THE BROWN OWL 49

and throngs of anxious citizens flocked
about the palace gates to ask, but
neither they nor any one else ever
heard what had become of him, and it
is my opinion that the King himself is
the only person who knew anything
about it. It came out in the course
of inquiries that. when the attendants

had.rushed in on hearing the Princess’s

call for assistance the night before,
they had not seen the King on the bed,
but in his place had sat an enormous
owl, and this owl had insisted on
accompanying the Princess wherever
she went.

This was the first time that the
Princess had heard of how the Owl
had come to her, but still she had
known all along that the Owl was the
one her father had made her promise
to cherish. But there were ill-natured
people who said that it was not so
very unlikely that the Owl had eaten
the King up, but the Princess only
laughed and said :

E
50 THE BROWN OWL

‘How could the Owl eat a king up
when the poor thing has so little
appetite that it only eats very small
pieces of meat off my golden fork at
dinner ??

And so the Owl remained with the
Princess: during the day it always
sat on her shoulder, or took short
flights round her head, and at night it
slept on the foot of her bed.

So six weeks glided peacefully away,
and everything prospered; but one
day a terrified messenger rode into the
city at full speed, and the message that
he brought was this.

Merrymineral, who, as the Owl had
said, was by no means done with, had
been inciting the people of far-off
lands such as Mesopotamia and Padan-
Aram and Ireland to rebel, and he
was now marching against the Princess
at the head of an immense army,
laying waste the country for miles
around. At the rate he was coming,
however, it would take him a fortnight


THE BROWN OWL 5r

to get near the country round. So
you see there was no immediate
danger ; still an enemy’s army could
not be allowed: to remain in the
country unopposed. So the Princess
gave Lord Licec the order to assemble
the army, and, as you may imagine,
it was an immense one when it did
assemble. I can’t say how large it
was, but if you could have stood on a
hill in the centre of the town you
would have seen nothing for miles
around but shining silk banners and
glistening helmets and lances. Never
before had the world held such an
army, and it never will again, Yet this
army even was hardly as large as that
of the enemy. The command of the
army was given to Lord Licec, for he
was well known to be the most prudent
man in the kingdom.

Three days passed till the last of
the army had started, and all the while
the Princess stood at the window and
watched them march along the wind-
52 THE BROWN OWL

ing street below, and the knights and
men-at-arms were inspired with fresh
courage at the sight of such a princess
as they had to defend, and they
cheered so loud and long that it
seemed like the continual roar of the
sea beating on a rocky shore, some-
times rising, sometimes falling, but
always sounding.

The Princess indeed felt quite.
lonely when they had all gone, even
though their shouts did make her
head ache. However, she consoled
herself by riding all day towards the
army, and returning at night to the
lonely town. So she occupied three
days; and the Owl always flew over
her head, protecting her from the sun
when it was too hot, or else sitting on
her shoulder, or on the horse’s head,
although the horse did not like it at all.

For three days no news came, but
on the fourth as the Princess was
riding out with her ladies-in-waiting
she saw at a great distance in front of
THE BROWN OWL 83

her along the straight white road a
cloud of dust that was coming swiftly
towards her. As it came nearer she
could see the glint of armour, and
soon she could plainly see the form
of an armed knight galloping at full
speed towards them. He cameso fast
that they had to rein their horses to
one side that they might not be run
down. At first he did not seem to
know who the Princess was, or perhaps
he was going so furiously that he
could not see; at any rate he had
almost got past them before he re-
cognised her. As soon as he did,
however, he drew up, but so sudden
was the action that the horse first
sank back on his haunches, and then
bounded so high into the air that
the marks that his hoofs made when
he alighted on the ground again, were
a foot deep in the hard road. As
soon as the plunging of the horse
“stopped and the Princess could make
herself heard she said :
54 THE BROWN OWL

_ ‘What news, Sir Knight, from the
front, that thou ridest in such haste P
‘But bad news, I fear,’ answered the

knight.

‘What say you?’ said the Princess ;
‘bad news, and with such an army as
ye had? has some fresh rebellion
broken out among the men?’

‘No rebellion, but plain fighting has
beaten us—but what can we do
against such foes? This Merrymineral,
alone, rides on a green dragon, and
with one stroke of his sword he kills a
hundred men. Myself I charged him
with my lance, but as it struck his
shield it broke in pieces as if it had
been made of glass: and it was
fortunate for me that my horse carried
me past him before he could strike me,
for I saw him myself cut the Knight of
Pendred in half, as you would cut a
radish. And if we slay a thousand
men during the day he restores them
in the night. So we have gradually
been driven back, till after three days’
THE BROWN OWL 55

fighting the army remains at Arecarp.
Thence I started at eight this morn-
ing to hurry the reinforcements from
Britain and Gaul.’

‘Alas! they are still at three days’
march from here, though they are
marching night and day. But thou
saidst the army was at Arecarp, and
that thou didst start to-day at eight in
the morning. That is‘ impossible.
Arecarp is twenty-four hours’ journey
for a fast horse, and it is now but
twelve o’clock. Not even the horse
that I ride could go faster than that,
though he is said to be the fastest horse
in the world, except Selim, the horse of
the Prince of India. However, no
time is to belost. Sir Knight, will you
escort these ladies back to the town,
and rest for a while?’

‘But what will you do, your
Majesty ?

‘I. must ride forward to Are-
carp.’

‘To Arecarp! Your Majesty, what
856 THE BROWN OWL

will you do there? The battlefield is
no place for a girl.’

‘Nevertheless I must go, for my
place is with the army.’

‘But if you are killed what will
happen to your people without their
Queen ?’

‘What do they do now without
their Queen? Besides once before
the cherished Owl has defeated this
man and he may do it again. If he
does not, no power on earth could
save me from death, for the army is
being gradually defeated.’

‘But your Majesty could send the
Owl in a cage against the enemy.’

‘I promised my father never to go
out of its sight—no, I must go.’

‘I beseech you then, your Majesty,
to allow me to accompany. you, for
the road to the camp is full of
danger.’

‘But your horse is tired, and even if
he were not he could never keep up
with me’
THE BROWN OWL 57

‘But if you will excuse the con-
tradiction, I think I shall.’

‘Well then, have your own way, but
mark me, if you lag behind I shall not
stop. However, we are losing time.
Let us go.’

And they set off—the Princess
ignoring the entreaties of the ladies
that she should not go.

The Princess immediately started at
the full speed of her horse, expecting
that the knight would soon fall behind ;
but no, he galloped at her side as if
the speed were not more than usual,
and his great black charger seemed to
enjoy the exercise as though he had not
already galloped over a hundred miles
that morning, :

The Princess could not understand
how it was, but she thought he would
soon get tired and fall behind, but
an hour passed and he showed no
signs of being fatigued. So she
leant over her horse and whispered
softly in his ear. Instantly the horse
58 THE BROWN OWL

bounded forward more swiftly than
ever—so fast, indeed, that she could
hardly keep her eyes open against the
wind, and her golden crown was
suddenly whisked away, and her
beautiful golden hair streamed far out
behind. Still the knight kept up, and
seemed not the least distressed at the
speed. The Owl meanwhile was fly-
ing far overhead, but she was not at all
surprised at his keeping up, for no-
thing seemed impossible to him. After
they had been riding thus for nearly
two hours they came to a place where
the path was crossed by a river, and
here the Princess thought it advisable
to stop and rest a moment and to let
the horses drink. So she called to
the knight to stop, as she was going
to get off for a moment, and he at
once sprang off his horse, and coming
to her saddle-bow held her stirrup for
her to dismount. When she was off
she leaned against a tree looking at
the horses as they drank eagerly from
THE BROWN OWL 59

the river, and then came out to browse
for a moment on the bank. Then she
went to where the knight’s horse stood,
and patted him on the neck, for you see
he was not a very fierce-looking animal,
and she was not at all afraid of him.

‘He’s a wonderfully swift horse, Sir
Knight,’ she said suddenly, ‘and I
believe there is no other horse in the
world as swift—not even Selim—the
horse I spoke about—that belongs to
the Prince of India.’

The knight nodded.

‘He is a good horse, but he is no
better than Selim, your Majesty, for I
know Selim very well.’

All this while he had kept his vizor
down, and the Princess had been too
polite to ask him to raise it, even
though it was rather rude of him to
keep it down. So she could not tell
who he was. She knew all the knights
of her own kingdom by sight, as well as
most of her allies, for you must know
that a great many foreign princes had
60 THE BROWN OWL

sent her troops to assist her against the
rebel. She looked at the device on
his shield ; it was a crowned tiger, but
that did not help her, for she did not
know whose crest it was. So at last
when she could bear her curiosity no
longer, she determined to ask him.
So she said:

‘Sir Knight, should you think me very
rude if I were to ask you whether you
are under a vow of hiding your face?’

‘I am bound by no such vow; but
why do you ask, your Majesty ?’

‘Because ever since I have seen you
you have kept your vizor down, and I
thought perhaps it was on account of
some such vow,’

-*Oh, I beg your pardon a thousand
times, your Majesty,’ said the knight.

But I did not remember that I had
let it down, for you see I look through
its bars without noticing the difference.
But I hope your Majesty will pardon
the absent-mindedness,’ and he raised
the vizor, at the same time bowing low
THE BROWN OWL 6x

to her. But it was now the Princess’s
turn to be confused, for she saw before
her Sir Alured the Emperor of India,
a prince nearly as powerful as herself.
She blushed with shame and then said:

‘Oh, Sir Knight, I mean your Royal
Highness, it is I who should crave
your pardon, for all the while I have
addressed you as “Sir Knight,” instead
of as “your Majesty.” But I am very
sorry.’

But Sir Alured said:

‘Nay, your Majesty, you have the
right to call me what you will, for I
am always your humble vassal.’

‘My ally, you should say, your
Majesty.’

‘I am always your servant, not your
ally, your Majesty.’

‘Then I fear you will soon be the
vassal of a queen without a kingdom ;
and if this Merrymineral prevail over
me, I fear he will punish you for
having aided me.’

But the Prince said:
62 THE BROWN OWL

‘All is not yet lost, your Majesty,
and whatever happens your Majesty
will always have a protector while I
am alive.’

The Princess smiled.

‘Ah! you mean the cherished Owl.
You will always protect me, won’t you,
Owl?’ she said, looking up at the Owl
who was seated again on her shoulder,
And the Owl nodded his head.

She looked at her watch just then.
‘Why,’ she said, ‘we have been here
just ten minutes, and it is time to start
again, if you are rested sufficiently.’

So he helped her to mount, and
they crossed the river. It was not
very deep, but still she got the skirts
of her dress quite wet, for the water
was high enough for that.

However, the gallop in the hot sun
on the other side soon dried them.

In an hour and a half they were on
the top of a hill from which they could
see the town of Arecarp in the valley.
beneath.
THE BROWN OWL 63

The sun was shining brightly on the
tents of the army as it lay round the
town, and at some distance the camp
of the enemy appeared. But still all
looked peaceful.

The Prince gazed carefully at the
armies. After a moment he said:

‘There has been no fighting since I
left the city this morning, nor has the
position altered at all. I fancy Merry-
mineral has sent ambassadors to de-
mand surrender from Lord Licec.’

The Princess smiled.

‘He will never surrender,’ she said.

‘Nor will any of us, your Majesty,’
added the Prince. ‘However, let us
descend the hill.’

Down the hill the road lay through
a deep gorge, so deep that the sun did
not penetrate it, and it lay in delicious
shade. The sides of the valley were
lined with the silver-barked birch,
below which grew nodding foxgloves,
and as they went slowly down the steep
path, ever and -anon a rabbit would
64 THE BROWN OWL

scuttle out of the grassy track to a safe
distance in front of them, where it sat
on its haunches with its little ears
pricked up, smelling at them anxiously
as they came near again, and then it
would scutter along into the thick rank
grass to its home.

So they went slowly down the path
until they came once more to the level
ground, and they were again able to
gallop on.

Soon they reached the town, and
clattered through the cobbled streets
to the market-place, where Lord Licec
had his head-quarters. But the
market-place was crowded with soldiers
and knights who were bargaining for
food, so that it was by no means easy
to get through the crowd. How-
ever, aS soon as they got near the
place, the soldiers recognised the
Princess and began to cheer, and
immediately an avenue was formed
up to the door of the council-house,
and the Princess rode smiling through
THE BROWN OWL 65

the throng, followed by the
Prince.

The news of her arrival ran through
the whole camp, and immediately such
a shout went up from the men that
the enemy thought they were preparing
for battle, and they made ready to resist
the attack, At the door of the council-
hall Lord Licec was waiting with the
rest of the captains of renown, and they
followed the Princess upstairs to the
council-chamber.

As soon as they were seated the
Princess asked for the latest news.
She was told all that had happened,
and when she had heard it she
dismissed the Lords of the Council,
all except Lord Licec and the Prince
of India, who were to stay and dine
with her, and she gave orders that the
dinner should be brought as soon as
possible, for to tell the truth she felt
‘rather hungry, as she had had nothing
to eat since breakfast-time.

Now when the Princess had finished

F
66 THE BROWN OWL

giving her orders about the dinner,
Licec could not refrain from asking her
why she had come.

‘Was it not rather foolish,’ he said,
‘to hazard your life for nothing? for of
a truth you are :

But the Princess put her finger on
his mouth.

‘I will not be bullied by you, my
lord, even though you are old enough
to be my father. I know what you
were going to say—that the battlefield
is no place for girls. Now I won't be
called a girl, for I’m nineteen, you
know. His Majesty the Emperor of
India there insulted me by calling me
a girl, and I have not forgiven him yet.
Besides you'll spoil my appetite for
dinner if you lecture me. It always
does; so do be quiet now, at any rate
till after dinner.’

So Licec had to be quiet, and they
talked about something else till dinner-
time.

Just as they had finished, a frightful


THE BROWN OWL 67

shouting outside made them drop their
dessert knives and run to the window,
but as the window did not face on to
the street théy could not tell what was
the matter. So the Princess rang the
bell, and when the servant appeared
she asked him what was the cause of
the shouting.

‘May it please your Majesty, am-
bassadors have arrived from the enemy
and would speak to you.’

‘Show them this way and send at
the same time for the Lords of the
Council.’

So the servant went,and in a short
time a heavy stumping was heard on
the stairs. Suddenly the door burst
open and the ambassadors entered.
They were a rather remarkable pair
of ambassadors, although they could
hardly be said to pair well, For the
one was an enormous giant with a
long beard, dressed in leaves mostly,
and so tall that he could not stand up-
right in the room; in his hand he
68 THE BROWN OWL

carried an enormous pole, from the
end of which a spiked ball dangled.
The other, however, was very nearly
his opposite in everything. For he
was very small, a dwarf in fact, and he
was dressed in very tight yellow armour,
and from the top of his helmet a crest
of red roses hung down to his saddle—
for you must know he had insisted on
not getting off his horse, or rather pony,
for that too was very small—in fact it
just fitted the dwarf.

As soon as the Princess had re-
covered from her astonishment, she
rose from her seat and said:

‘Are you the ambassadors from the
rebel Merrymineral ?’

The dwarf replied :

‘IT don’t know anything about the
rebel part of the business, but we are
the ambassadors from Merrymineral,
whom we are bound to serve for a
certain time. But who are you, I
should like to know, and what right
have you to speak to me in this in-
THE BROWN OWL 69

sulting manner? D’you think I’m
here to be insulted by you? If you
think so, I'll tell you point-blank ’m
not—so there.’ And in the rage he
had worked himself into he began to
spur his steed till it jumped off the
floor so high that it knocked his
head against the ceiling.

The Princess was not used to being
treated like that. However she was not
at all angry at it—she only laughed at
his misfortune, which made him all the
more outrageous,

‘How dare you laugh at me?’ he
screamed ; ‘who are you, you minx,
you minx, you lynx—you :

But the Princess did not listen to
him. She turned to the giant, who at —
any rate was quiet, and said:

‘Will you not take a chair until the
Lords of the Council arrive ?’

The giant looked at her in stupid
astonishment.

‘What shall I do with the chair
when I’ve taken it?’ he mumbled.


70 THE BROWN OWL

‘I mean you to sit down on it, of
course,’ said the Princess.

The giant growled out in reply :

‘Well, I never sat on a chair before,
but to please you I will.’

So he sat down, but as he was not
used to sitting on chairs he sat down
on its back; but it was only a small
cane-bottomed chair, and as he was
very big, and the chair was very small,
the result is easily foreseen, for the
chair collapsed under him as if he
had sat on a top-hat, and he reclined
comfortably on the floor, where he
remained for the rest of the time.

‘I think I'll stop where I am,’ he
said, when they offered him a wooden
stool to sit on, ‘for you see I’m not
used to chairs.’ So they let him stop
where he was.

One by one the Lords of the Council
began to arrive; they looked curiously
at the ambassadors but said nothing.
When they were all arrived the Princess
said to the dwarf:
THE BROWN OWL qr

‘Now if you will state your message
we will listen.’

So’ the dwarf snarled in a_bad-
tempered voice :

‘I shan’t tell you—you aren’t the
commander-in-chief of the army, are
you?’

‘No, but I am the Queen of the
Western World.’

‘Oh! you’re the Queen of the
Western World, are you? Well, you
won’t be Queen of the Western World
long, if you don’t mind your P’s and
Q’s. The king Merrymineral sent me
to say that if you don’t marry him and
make him king, he'll kill the lot of
you and make himself king in spite of
you—so there; and I’m to wait for an
_ answer,’

After consulting the Council for a
moment the Princess said :

‘Of course I shan’t marry him—
how could he be so ridiculous as to
think so?’

The dwarf laughed.
72 THE BROWN OWL

‘That’s your answer, is it?’ he said.
‘I thought so. I say, Gog, have you
written it down ?’

But Gog had gone to sleep. So
the dwarf pricked him with the end of
his lance.

‘I say, Gog, he said, ‘she’s given
her answer and you haven’t written
it down, and I’ve forgotten it
already. Just say it over again,
Queen, will you? and not too fast, |
or Gog here will never get it down.’

The giant now drew from his pocket
a very soiled and crumpled halfsheet
of a copy-book and began to write
from the Princess’s dictation.

‘Of course I should not do anything
so——’ Here he stopped.

‘How do you spell “ridiculous” ?’
he said.

‘With two “k’s,” of course,’ said
the dwarf; ‘even I know that, though I
can’t write.’

When he had finished he handed it
to the Princess :
THE BROWN OWL 73

‘Just sign your name, will you?’

The Princess signed her name, but
she could not help seeing that the
writing was very bad and the spelling
was awful.

‘Why didn’t they send some one
who could write better? Why! that
“ry” is more like a “k” than an “r”,’

But the giant shook his head mourn-
fully.

‘ They hadn’t got any one else in the
army who could write except Merry-
mineral, and he was afraid to come.’

‘But weren’t you afraid to come?’
she said.

The giant shook his mace round so
violently that it grazed the helmet of
the dwarf, and cut his crest of roses
off.

‘Whom am I to be afraid of?’ he
growled. ‘I could kill your whole
army single-handed’; and he laughed
loud and long.

But just at this moment the Owl,
that had been siting on the floor
74 THE BROWN OWL

behind the Princess’s chair, flew up on
to her shoulder, and no sooner did the
giant see the Owl than he jumped up
from the floor, where you remember
he was sitting, and he was in such
a hurry that he knocked a hole in
the plaster of the ceiling with his
head.

‘Come, I say, you know,’ he said, ‘1
can fight anything in reason—but I’m
not going to tackle that, you know;
besides, we’re ambassadors; and you
can’t hurt us. I’m going’; and he
rushed out of the room as fast as he
could, and the dwarf followed him as
fast as he could make his horse gallop,
and they never stopped till they reached
the camp of Merrymineral. For they
were very frightened, you see.

After they had gone the Princess
again dismissed the Councillors, and
when they had gone, she said to Lord
Licec and the Prince, who by the bye
still remained :

‘Now let us finish our dessert’— for
THE BROWN OWL 78

the ambassadors had come in right in
the middle of it.

After a moment the Princess said :

‘How absurd of. him to think I
would marry him-——why, he’s old_
enough to be my great-grandfather.’

But suddenly she became grave:

‘But perhaps I ought to have
thought before I gave the answer.
Would it not have been better for my
people if I had consented? for then he
would kill no more of them,’

But the Prince became quite angry
at such an idea. ‘It’s absurd,’ he
said.- ‘Why, as soon as he had married
you and become king he would murder
you and then kill just as many of your
people as he will now; besides, who
knows that we may not still conquer
him P’

The Princess turned to Lord Licec:

‘What do you say, my lord?’ she said.

‘I think just as the Prince of India
—for even if he did not murder you
he would oppress the people without
76 THE BROWN OWL

mercy, and besides, your people would
never allow you to marry him, so that -
is out of the question.’

The Princess gave a sigh of relief.

‘Since you say so, Lord Licec, it
must be right; besides, I don’t think
I could ever marry him—he is such
a very unpleasant sort of man.’

And the Prince answered :

‘You are quite right there’; and he
seemed quite happy again.

Soon after it became evening, and
Lord Licec had to go out to look after
his army, and the Prince too went to
see that his men were all prepared for
any night attack—for his men were right
in the very front of all, and so they
were quite close to the enemy, who
might at any time begin an attack,

So the Princess was left all alone
with the Owl, but she did not feel
lonely with him, for he was very
sociable, and would do anything that
he was told to do. So they played
hide-and-seek till it was too dark to
THE BROWN OWL 77

see any more, and then she went to
bed and slept soundly till the rays of
the sun falling on her face the next
morning woke her up. She was soon
dressed, and when she had finished
she went into the next room, where
she found Lord Licec already awaiting
her.

‘What does your Majesty intend to
do this morning? for I shall not be
with you, as J am going to order the
army to advance to the attack, and
so your Majesty had better stay within
the town for the rest of the day.’

‘Indeed, I shall do nothing of the
sort,’ she answered. ‘I am going to
lead the army to-day to see if we
cannot regain some ground, for I had
rather die fighting than be driven back
like this, so please don’t say I mustn’t
go; besides, the Owl will protect me;
he promised to; didn’t you, Owl?’
and the Owl nodded.

‘But they may shoot the Owl with
their arrows, and then a


78 THE BROWN OWL

‘But the Owl before now has
conquered Merrymineral himself, and
he may still do it. Oh, please don’t
tell me not to go. If you'll only let
me go I'll promise to keep near the
Prince of India, and he'll protect me,
even if the Owl can’t.’

‘But the Prince of India is always
in the thickest of the fight, and you
will be in much greater danger if you
keep near him.’

‘Oh, never mind the danger; do let
me go.’

And she begged so hard that Lord
Licec had to give in. She put on
a breastplate and a sword, but she
would not put on a helmet, for she
said that it made her head ache, and
that no one would know who she was if
she covered her face up. So she only
wore a gold circlet on her head, as
she usually did, and besides this she
carried a silver shield with the royal
crest on it, and a small lance just like
a knight’s spear, only not so heavy, and
THE BROWN OWL 79

thus mounted on her white horse she
rode to the very front of the line of
battle, and there she found the Prince
of India at the head of his men.

They had already furled their tents °
and were quite ready to begin the
battle as soon as the others were ready.

The Prince was very much astonished
when he saw her, for it was the last
place in the world he had expected to
see her in.

‘Do you really mean to say,’ he
exclaimed, ‘that Lord Licec allowed
you to come out to the field of battle?
Why, he must be mad.’

‘Oh no, he’s not,’ answered the
Princess; ‘but you see if I only beg
hard enough he'll let me do whatever
I like, and then I promised to keep
near you, for I thought you would
protect me. However, you don’t
seem very glad to see me—perhaps
you think I shall hinder you—so T’ll
go and ask some one else to take care
of me, as you don’t seem to relish the
80 THE BROWN OWL

task. Good-morning’; and she began
to move off; but she knew very well
that he would not let her go like that,
and to tell the truth she rather hoped
he wouldn’t, for she thought she would
like him to take care of her better
than any one else in the army. Of
course he did stop her and said.

‘Tf you really insist on stopping on
the field no one is more fit to take
care of you than I. So do stop.’

And she allowed herself to be
persuaded to stop with him.

Just as they had managed to arrange
it so, a trumpet blew in the direction of
the town, and immediately troops ot
knights and men-at-arms began to
pour out of the gates, and to form the
line of battle, and as each band of
men came along they cheered long
and loud at the sight of the Princess,
and the Princess felt very happy, for
she liked to know that her people
loved her. Gradually the immense
army came into one long line of .
THE BROWN OWL 8x

glistening steel, and again the trumpets
sounded, and the line began to move
forward like a wave of the sea as it
runs up the smooth sand sweeping all
before it, The smooth plain which
was to form the battlefield was dotted
here and there with troops of cattle
which had come down in the night
from the hills to feed on the long sweet
grass, and they raised their heads in
astonishment at the line of knights
and bowmen that marched slowly
down on them; so they shook their
heads and galloped off straight in
front of the line, with their tails high
in the air, and they were in such
blind haste that they charged right
through the lines of the enemy who
were now approaching, and not only
through them they went, but also
through their camp, tossing the tents
into the air with their horns as they
went by. However, at last they
reached the hills, and did not disturb
the combatants any more.
G
82 THE BROWN OWL

Meanwhile the armies had got quite |
close together—so close indeed that
they could see each other’s faces quite
plainly—but they did not seem par-
ticularly eager to fight. So when
they had got thus far they halted, and
looked at one another.

As yet Merrymineral had not arrived,
for to tell the truth he was never a
very early riser, and he did not see why
he should hurry himself—for you see he
was quite sure of winning the battle
without much trouble.

Just opposite the Princess was the
flower of the enemy, and she recognised
many of the great men of the countries
that had rebelled with Merrymineral.
They did not seem particularly happy
where they were, and especially when
the Princess looked at them they
looked very red and uncomfortable, as
if they did not like it at all,

‘I do believe they’re ashamed ot
themselves,’ she said to the Prince;
and he answered :
THE BROWN OWL 83

‘They certainly look like it.’

‘Do you think,’ she asked, ‘if I
were to go over to them and offer to
pardon them that they would leave
Merrymineral and come on my side?’

The Prince thought a moment.

*T believe they would,’ he said; ‘ only
if I were you I would not go, I should
send an ambassador or a herald.’

But the Princess shook her head.

‘That would never do,’ she said.
‘I’m sure they’d be offended at that.
Why, it would look as if I thought they
were not to be trusted, and besides
they would not hurt me. No, Ill go
to them quite alone.’

But the Prince said:

‘You had better let me go with you,
for if they did attack you it would
be awkward; besides, you know you
promised to keep near me all the
morning, and if you go without me you
will not be keeping your promise, don’t
you see?’

So the Princess said :
84 THE BROWN OWL

‘Well, I suppose you're right, only
you must come alone.’

And as he agreed to this they went
forward. Her own army evidently
did not understand what she meant
to do, nor, for the matter of that, did
the enemy, but as they had neither of
them received the order to commence
fighting they neither of them advanced.

So the Prince and Princess advanced
at a gentle trot until they were quite
close to the others, and the Owl sat on
her shoulder.

When they were quite close the
knights tried to get one behind the
other just as if they had done some-
thing they ought not to have done,
and were each afraid of being punished
first.

In particular the Princess noted the
giant and dwarf, the ambassadors of
the evening before; they tried to
hide themselves behind the others
altogether. For the dwarf this was
easy enough, but for the poor giant, he
THE BROWN OWL 85

could not manage it at all, he was so
very big.

However, she did not look at all
angry, and she only said:

‘Good-morning, my lords.’

And they replied in chorus:

‘Good-morning, your Majesty.’

So she went on:

‘I have come to ask you why you
have assisted my rebellious subject,
and what grievance you have? If
there is any I will try to redress it.’

One of the nobles replied :

“We have no grievances.’

‘Then why have you fought against
me?’

- ‘Because we could not help it, your
Majesty.’

‘But I should have thought you
could have helped fighting.’

‘I mean, your Majesty, that Merry-
mineral threatened to kill us all if we
did not fight,’

‘Then you were not very brave.
But that has nothing to do with it.
86 THE BROWN OWL

What I wish to know is, whether you
will now submit to me again ?’

‘We would most willingly; only
perhaps your Majesty might inflict
some punishment on us for our mis-
deeds.’

But the Princess shook her head.

‘No; I will give you all a free
pardon if you return to your allegiance.’

So the nobles gave a shout of joy,
and they seemed quite happy again.

_ And the Princess too was overjoyed ;
however, she ordered them to go each
knight to his own men and to tell
them what had happened, and to
conduct them to her own army.

So they all went and did as they
were told, and soon the whole army of
Merrymineral melted away, with the
exception of a very few, and these
were mostly the servants of Merry-
mineral himself, and of the giant and
the dwarf, who still remained faithful
to him. However they seemed quite
unhappy about it.
THE BROWN OWL 87

So the Princess turned to them and ~
said : ;

‘And you, sirs, will you not also
join me?’

But the giant shook his head, and
the dwarf said snappishly :

‘Don’t you know we can’t?’ ©

But the Princess answered: —

‘No; I do not know why you can’t.’

So the dwarf snarled :

‘We're bound to serve him for a
certain time, whether we like it or not.
I’m the King of the Underground
Gnomes—we live in tunnels under the
earth, and never come up unless we’re
obliged to.’

And the giant said:

‘Ym the Spirit of the Woods—
that’s why I’m dressed in leaves like
this; and I’m the King of the Foresters,
and we live in trees.’

But just at this moment a frightful
roar came from the camp:

‘Why don’t you begin ?’ it came.

It was so sudden that it quite
88 THE BROWN OWL

startled the Princess, but the giant
shook his head mournfully :

‘He always roars like that when he’s
ina temper. He'll be coming out in
a moment, and won’t there be a row?’

Just then the voice came again.

‘Bring Popfelwuski to the door.’

‘Popfelwuski’s his dragon that he
rides on,’ said the giant.

And then some servants led the
dragon to the door of one of the
tents.

It was a most marvellous-looking
creature, for it had eyes as large as
tea-trays, and they twinkled awfully ;
and it was golden-coloured all over,
and it shone so brightly in the sun
that it made the Princess’s eyes quite
ache to look at it- And it was
growling and prancing and kicking up
the dust, and making more fuss than
fifty horses could have done. Just
then the tent opened and Merrymineral
came out. He looked just as usual,
and had not any armour or weapons
THE BROWN OWL 89

except a huge battle-axe, which must
have weighed nearly a ton, but he
carried it with the greatest ease,
although he was an old man—for he
was over eight hundred years old. He
vaulted on to his dragon’s back with
very great ease, and putting his spurs
to its golden sides made it gallop at a
great rate. As yet he had not seen
what had happened to his army, for he
was rather short-sighted, but when he “
had got within a few yards of where
it ought to have been, he suddenly
stopped as if he were bewildered, but
then his eye fell on the Princess and
he roared out :

‘Oh, it’s you, is it? Tl soon do
for you,’ and he made his dragon fly
towards the Princess at a very great
rate. But precisely the same thing
happened now as had happened once
before, for the dragon came to a
sudden stop as if it had hit against a
wall. The Prince of India did not
understand it at all.
go THE BROWN OWL

‘Had we not better retreat and
join the rest of the army?’ he said.

But the Princess answered :

‘Oh no, we're quite safe here. He
won't be able to get at us. Only
you'd better come a little closer to me,
because he might be able to hit you.’

So the Prince came a good deal
closer, and they sat watching the frantic
efforts of Merrymineral to get at them,
but it wasno use. Suddenly, however,
he changed his mode of attack. He
made his dragon fly high into the air—
so high indeed that it would have been
invisible if its golden coat had not
shone brightly in the sun. It was quite
unpleasant to look at him, for he was
so high up that it made them feel
dizzy as it shone out against the sky,
miles high. Suddenly, however, just
as it was directly over them, it seemed
to be growing larger.

‘I do believe he’s going to drop on
us from above’; and so he was. The
Prince put up his lance that the dragon
THE BROWN OWL QI

might be spiked on it as it fell, But
he might have saved himself the
trouble, for suddenly, when the thing
had fallen to within a few feet of their
heads, it stopped as if it had fallen on
to the roof of a house, and then it
bounced off again like a ball.

But the Princess had shut her eyes,
so she did not see this; but when she
opened them she saw the dragon and
Merrymineral lying on the grass in a
heap where they had fallen.

But he was soon on his feet again,
and again he tried to charge at the
Princess; but it was no use, and he
only tired himself. At last the Prin-
cess began to get tired too, so she
turned to the Prince and said:

‘I think we’ve had enough of this—
don’t you?’

And he replied:

‘Oh, plenty; but I don’t see how
we're to get rid of him, unless I go
out and fight him,’

But the Princess answered :
92 THE BROWN OWL

‘Oh, I don’t think you need do that,
although it’s very good of you to offer
—but you’ve forgotten all about the
Owl. So she took the Owl off her
shoulder, and putting it on the horse’s
head with its face to her she asked it:

‘You can drive him away, can’t
you, dear Owl?’

And the Owl nodded gravely. So
the Princess said:

‘Then I‘ wish you would—only
don’t hurt him; only drive him away.’

As she said this a wonderful change
came over the Owl. It began to grow
bigger and bigger, until it quite covered
them over as it spread its wings to
fly. Merrymineral seemed to know
what was coming, for he drew his
steed’s reins up tight and examined
his stirrups and saddle. And then, as
the Owl flew towards him, he tried to
spur the golden dragon against him ;
but the dragon refused to move, and
at last it turned and bolted with its tail
between its legs, like a whipped dog.
THE BROWN OWL 93

Merrymineral tried hard to stop it,
but he might as well have tried to
stop a mad bull. As he could not
stop, and the Owl was catching him
up, he turned in his saddle and hurled
his heavy battle-axe at the Owl; but
the Owl caught it as it few, and flung
it back with such good aim and force
that it hit the dragon on the back
and cut it clean in half, so that it fell
from under Merrymineral and left him
standing on the ground.

But when he saw that the Owl was
quite close to him, a wonder happened
—for he suddenly caught fire at his
feet and shot up into the air just as
you may have seen a rocket do, and
he shot right away, so that the last
they saw of him was just as he disap-
peared over the mountains. But the
Owl flew back to its mistress quite
small again, and it perched once more
on her shoulder as affectionately as
ever. As to the golden dragon, it had
disappeared altogether—and the funny
94 THE BROWN OWL

part was that nothing was heard of it
ever after, and no one knew how it
had gone—so that the only thing that
remained was the battle-axe, and that
took seven men to lift it. However,
the main thing was that Merrymineral
had departed, and there seemed no
likelihood of his returning.

So you may Imagine how great the
Princess’s joy was.

As soon as he had quite disappeared,
she said :

‘That really does seem to be the
last of him.’

But the Prince shook his head:

‘You never know when that sort of
man will turn up again; and in the
meantime what are we to do with the
giant and the dwarf? I suppose we
had better attack them at once and
get rid of them.’

‘But why?’ asked the Princess.
‘They don’t seem to want to fight
much, and why should we attack them ?
Let us go and ask them to go away
THE BROWN OWL 98

quietly, and I should think they
will,’

So they went up to where the giant
and the dwarf and their forces were
standing.

‘What are you going to do now?’
she asked of them.

‘T don’t know,’ answered the dwarf,
and the giant too shook his head. So
the Princess said :

‘Will you come and join our rejoic-
ings?’

But the dwarf said :

‘No; I must be going back to my
kingdom, or I don’t know what won’t
happen.’

And the giant said:

‘And I'll go too, or they might rebel
there just as your subjects have done.’

So he said good-day, and in three
minutes he had disappeared. The
dwarf too said good-day quite politely
for him, and then he struck the
ground with the point of his lance,
and immediately the earth opened
96 THE BROWN OWL

before him and he marched into the
opening at the head of his troops,
and with their trumpets blowing and
banners waving they disappeared, and
the Princess never saw them nor their
master again—and to tell the truth she
was not very sorry. But the Prince
and Princess marched back to the
town at the head of the army, and
there Lord Licec met them and con-
gratulated the Princess on her success,
and the people shouted for joy, and
the bells pealed gladly. ;

So they marched through the town to
the principal city, from which you may
remember she had set out on the day
before. And there they were received
with even greater joy, and for six
days there was feasting and rejoicing
throughout the whole land, but on
the seventh day, after the Princess had
rewarded the knights who had fought
the best, the army dispersed, and the
town quieted down, and everything
went on just as usual
THE BROWN OWL 97

Only the Prince of India remained
of all the knights who had fought.
He said he was not well, and wanted
a rest before he set out for India, which
was a long way off. So he stopped
and rested, and the winter changed to
summer, and the summer to autumn,
and he was still there, and he did not
seem as if he were likely to go either.
The time slipped away quietly enough,
and no more was heard of Merry-
mineral—not even a word. One day
when the Lords of the Council had
finished sitting for the day, and were
departing, Lord Licec remained, as he
always did when he had anything
private to say to the Princess. So
she said :

‘Well, my lord, what is it that you
wish to tell to me to-day?’

‘I had come, your Majesty, to make
a suggestion to you that it would be
greatly to the good of the nation if
your Majesty would condescend to
think about marrying some one.’

H
98 THE BROWN OWL

The Princess was so startled that
she quite jumped :

‘Marry any one! good gracious me,
whom amI to marry? I don’t know
any one that I like at all,’

Lord Licec stroked his chin :

‘That is rather a drawback,’ he
said ; ‘but I had thought that perhaps
the Prince of India might——’

_ But the Princess interrupted him :

‘Oh, he would never do; besides he
would have to ask. me, and he won’t
do that.’

But it might have been noticed that
she blushed just a little as she said it,
so .that perhaps she was not quite
sincere in what she said. Lord
Licec did not notice that, so he
sald :

‘Well, if he won’t suit, the only
thing to do is to have a tournament,
and then you must marry the winner.’

But she did not seem to like the
idea at all.

‘Suppose the winner should turn
THE BROWN OWL 99

out a hunchback, or a cripple, or a
very hideous man,’ she said.

‘Your Majesty might arrange it so
that the candidates should only be
allowed to tilt if they were sufficiently
handsome.’

She agreed. to the suggestion.

‘I suppose it is the only thing to
do,’ she said; and it was arranged
that in four weeks’ time a grand >
tournament was to take place for the
hand of the Princess Ismara, and that
all the handsome knights in the world
could come if they liked.

As to the Owl, when he was asked
if he liked the arrangement, he gravely
nodded his head; so the Princess felt
quite safe in her choice, and the
Prince of India felt contented also, for
he knew he had a very good chance

‘of winning, unless some knight of

whom he had never heard should
suddenly turn up. He spent the
time in between in practising for the
tournament, and he ordered a new set
Loo THE BROWN OWL

of.armour to be sent to him from
India in time. _

So every one seemed pleased with
the arrangement, except, perhaps, the
ugly knights, but they kept quiet
about it.

The month went away quietly,
except that the town was gradually
filling with knights, who were coming
to take part in the contest. The lists
were erected on a plain just outside the
town-walls, and on the day before the
tournament the free seats were already
filled with people, who had come there
determined to get places even if they
had to wait all day long and had to
sleep there all night. As you may
imagine, the Princess did not get
much sleep that night, for she was
naturally in a great fever of excite-
ment thinking about who the knight
would be. One thing she was sure
about, and that was, that if she did
not like him she would not have
anything to do with him, even if she
THE BROWN OWL TOr

had to forfeit her kingdom. However
that might be, she did not sleep that
night, and on the morrow she felt
quite tired. She dressed herself in
her most splendid robes, and drove
to the lists in a little basket-work
pony carriage drawn by eight little
mouse-coloured ponies. It was a
beautiful day, and the road to the
lists was covered with people who
were going to look on, or to take part
in the tournament, and as she went by
they drew up their horses to bow to
her, for she had specially forbidden
them to cheer—she said it made
her head ache. So she drove down
the hard, white road bowing and
smiling to the people, and they smiled
and. looked glad too, for they were
very fond of their Princess.

After she had gone along thus for
about five minutes she overtook the
Prince of India, who was going the
same way on his famous horse. The
Prince did not seem to see her—in fact
102 THE BROWN OWL

he was engaged in looking very hard
at his spur on the other side.

But the Princess did not mean to
pass him like that, so she said cheer-
fully :

‘Good morning, Prince.’

He looked up quite astonished :

‘Good morning, your Majesty!’ he
said, and he took off his cap and
bowed low in his saddle, for you see
he had not got his armour on—he had
sent it on with his page.

The Princess did not know exactly
what to say next, so for a moment they
were silent, and the Prince trotted
quietly by her side. At last she
said :

‘Are you, too, going to look on at
the tournament ?? ©

The Prince answered :

‘I had purposed taking part in it—
that, ahem !—is if your Majesty thinks
I am sufficiently handsome, and if you
have no other objection.’

' The Princess answered quickly :
THE BROWN OWL 103

‘Oh, no objection at all. I should
like it very much—that is, if you are
content to run the risk of your life for
such a small prize.’

But the Prince only answered :

‘Oh, your Majesty!’ and her Majesty
flushed a little at his reply.

So they went on again in silence, and
the road began to get fuller and fuller
of people, and the Princess had her
time so taken up by managing her
ponies—for she was driving herself, you
know—that she could not say much.

However, just as they reached the
entry she said:

_ ‘By the bye, what seat have you got?’

‘T believe they’ve given me a seat
over on the south side,’ he answered.

‘Dearme, howcarelessofthem. Why,
yow'll have the sun in your face all the
time you're not tilting, and it will give
you such a headache. You'd better
come into the Royal Box—they’ve got
an awning over that, and you'll be able
to see much better. Do come.’
IO4 THE BROWN OWL

So the Prince gave his horse to his
page and went with the Princess and
the Owl—for you must remember that
the Owl was always perched on her
shoulder.

The lists were very gay with horses,
and knights, and heralds, and many
and “great were the knights that in-
tended to tilt. They had come from
the uttermost parts of the world—from
Kensington, from Nubia, from—well,
from everywhere, for you see they did
not get the chance of fighting for a
princess every day. So you may
imagine how many suitors there were.
Nearly a thousand came, but a good
many of them were not considered
handsome enough, so they either went
away in a tiff or else they stayed to
look on. Still it would take a good
three days before the last man had
tilted.

The entrance of the Princess. was
the signal for the music to begin, and
the procession of knights filed past,
THE BROWN OWL 105

each one bowing to the Princess and
making his horse perform feats of skill.
And then the tournament began and
the knights charged each other, each
in their turn, The way they managed
it was for each knight to throw lots for
the order of. their fighting, and then
they were to be divided into two bodies
—the challengers and those to be
challenged ; and as it came to the turn
of each challenger, he rode out and
touched the shield of the knight on the
. other side with whom he wished to fight,
and then the victors were to fight it
out among themselves until they were
all finished except one.

The Prince of India happened to be
one of the challengers, and his turn
did not come until the afternoon. So
during the morning he sat in the Royal
Box talking to the Princess or to the
lords and maids in waiting.

But the Princess did not seem to
enjoy the gentle and joyous passages
of arms at all, for you see she was very
106 THE BROWN OWL

soft-hearted, and did not like to see the
knights knocked off their horses so
very roughly. So, on the whole, she
was not nearly so gay as the Prince,
and indeed, she seemed very unhappy
when he went to put on his panoply as
his turn came near.

However, he soon afterwards came
into the lists dressed in his full armour,
and you may be sure he looked very
splendid, mounted on his black horse—
for his armour was entirely of silver,
and his shield shone so brightly that it
hurt one’s eyes to look at it, and_ his
long plumes floated in the wind a great
many yards behind him.

The spectators cheered him very
much as he caracoled from one end of
the lists to the other, and the Princess
quite brightened up as she saw him.

‘I wonder whose shield he’s going
to touch?’ she said to herself; and
when she saw who it was she said:

‘Good gracious me! he’s challenged
the Knight of Sarragos ; why, he’s the
THE BROWN OWL 107

greatest knight in the world. Oh
dear, I’m sure the Prince will be
beaten.’

However, the knights were now
going each to his own station at
different ends of the lists. The horses
seemed quite as excited as the knights,
and they champed their bits and
foamed and pawed up the ground,
while the heralds read the challenge
from the Prince of India to the Knight
of Sarragos.

It seemed as if the Princess was
right about the strength of the Knight,
for he was of enormous size, and he
looked a veritable pillar of steel as he
saton his horse listening tothe challenge.
However, the trumpets for the charge
sounded, and away went the knights
straight towards each other like arrows,
each one looking along his spear to see
that it was aimed truly for his adversary
—covering himself well with his shield.
They went so fast that they could
- hardly be seen, and the crash when
108 THE BROWN OWL

they met was louder than the loudest
peal of thunder you ever heard.

The Princess shut her eyes at the
sound.- But she could not keep them
shut, for the people were cheering very
loudly. So she opened them reluctantly,
and she seemed quite glad to see that
the Knight of Sarragos had been thrown
from his horse by the shock and was
rolling in the dust. It was -rather odd
that she should be pleased at this,
because as a rule she was sorry for the
conquered knight ; for myself I rather
think she had wanted the Prince to
win all along. Anyhow she con-
gratulated him warmly on his success
when he came back to his seat, and
for the rest of the day she did not
seem much interested in the tilting
although some of it was very good,
too. ;

So the first two days passed away
and nothing particular happened. The
Prince of India took his turn with the
_ rest, till at last the third day came and
THE BROWN OWL Tog

there were only ten knights left. These,
too, the Prince overcame, and it seemed
as if all was over and he had gained the
prize; but while the heralds were still
calling for any one to come and defeat
the Prince, and while every one was
holding their breath in expectation, a
loud blast from a trumpet sounded
through the air, and at the other end
of the lists a knight appeared. He
was a very tall and splendid-looking
knight—for his armour was of gold, and
the crest on his helmet-top was a
dragon carved out of a rose-red ruby of
enormous size; and the point of his
lance was made of one diamond, that
sparkled in the sun a great deal more
brightly than any dewdrop on a spring
morning. And as to handsome, why
he was a perfect blaze of handsome-
ness, so that there could be no objection
to him. Theonly thing was, no one
knew who he was, or where he came
from.

So the Princess beckoned him to
TIO THE BROWN OWL

her, and he came and bowed low in
his saddle.

‘Who are you, Sir Knight?’ she
asked; ‘and where do you come
from ?’

‘Jam the Knight of London, your
Majesty.’

‘London, London ; where’s that P—
I’ve never heard of it.’

‘London is the capital city of
England.’

‘But where zs England ?’ she asked.

‘IT had thought that every one had
heard of England,’ he said. ‘ However,
as no report of England has ever
reached your ears, I will tell your
Majesty. The British Islands, of
which England is one, are a set
of small islands off the west coast of
Europe. They are composed of
England, Scot ;

But here the Princess interrupted
him,

‘I thank you, Sir Knight, for your
information, but just now the tourna-


THE BROWN OWL III

ment is waiting for you, and I am not
very fond of geography lessons,’

The Knight bowed again, and retired
to take up his place in the lists.

‘How very handsome he is!’ said the
Princess to one of her maids in waiting.

And the lady answered :

_ ©Oh, quite too handsome !’

However, by this time both the
. knights were in their places, and the
Princess nodded to the heralds to give
_ the signal.

‘ Laissez aller, they cried, which is
the French for ‘Go.’

And they did go with a vengeance—
they went so fast that they looked all
blurred together like streaks of lightning,
And when they met, it was louder
than thunder, louder than the shock of
avalanches, louder than—well, louder
than everything you ever heard, except
perhaps when some one lets the tea-tray
fall down the kitchen stairs. -

And when the dust cleared up, the
poor Knight of India was rolling on the
112 THE BROWN OWL

ground in a heap, composed of himself
and his horse, But the Princess did
not seem very sorry for him—so wags
the world.

The Knight of London, however, was
seated in his saddle as firmly as if he
were part of it; and as there seemed
nothing else to do, he commanded his
heralds to challenge any one who
should wish to dispute his right to
the victory. But no one came out,
for either there was no one else left, or
else the knights were afraid to enter the
lists against one who had overthrown
. So easily so doughty a knight as the
Prince of India. However that might
be, no one turned up, so the Knight
of London was declared the victor.
The shout that was raised at this
declaration was not very tremendous,
for most of the people liked the Prince
of India, whereas they did not care
much for the new-comer. But he did
not seem to mind it much, and he
went smilingly to the Princess. As he
THE BROWN OWL 113

came before the royal presence he
made his horse kneel, and advance
kneeling, till he was quite close.

Then he said:

‘As no one appears to dispute my
right I believe I am the victor, and
in virtue of that right I claim your
Majesty’s hand.’

But the Princess laughed.

‘Oh, we'll see about that to-morrow ;
there'll be plenty of time then. Mean-
while, this evening we are going to
give a ball at the palace, to which all
who have taken part in the tournament
are invited. Of course you'll come,
won't you?’

‘Of course I will, at your invitation,
your Majesty, but :

What he was going to say was
drowned in an immoderate fit of
laughter, which came from the Prince
of India.

‘Ha! ha! ha!’ he laughed. ‘Can’t
you see who it is you're talking too?
he continued, talking to the Princess.

I


1I4 THE BROWN OWL

The Princess drew herself up.

‘I believe I am talking to the
Knight of London,’ she said severely.

‘The Knight of London! why he’s
no more the Knight of London than
I am. Why, your Majesty must be
blind or mad, or both, not to see who
he is. Blind’s not enough to express
it. You——

But he got no farther, for the
Princess called for the police to arrest
him, but before they could get at him
he had fainted; for the spear of the
Knight of London had gone right
through his side. So the Princess
told the police to lift him up gently
and to carry him to his house in the
town.

But the Knight of London frowned :

‘If I were you, your Majesty, I
should order them to cut his head off
on the first opportunity. To call you
mad and blind—why I’ve never heard
of such a thing.’

But the Princess said °
THE BROWN OWL TI5

‘That would never do. Why, he is an
independent prince, and if I hurt him
it would bring on a war with India,
and goodness knows what else. How-
ever, I’ll have him turned out of the
kingdom as soon as he is well enough
to go. However, I am going back now.
Mind and be in time this evening.’

So he went to doff his armour, and
she drove home once more—this time
without the poor Prince, who was being
carried behind in an ambulance waggon.
The rest of the day passed off somehow,
and the night came at last, as nights are
in the habit of doing, and with the night
came knights—no longer dressed in
steel armour, but gorgeous in velvet
and silk and evening dress. . But, how-
ever gorgeous and fine they might be,
the Knight of London outstripped
them all, in dress, manners, looks, and
everything else, and the Princess said
he had the best step of any one she
had ever known—and she ought to
know, for she danced with him a great
116 THE BROWN OWL

many times. In fact, by the end of
the ball she had forgotten all about
the poor Prince, for the Knight of
London was a most enchanting person
—although one thing did seem strange,
and that was, that the Knight seemed
positively afraid of the Owl; and at
supper-time he actually refused to sit
on the right hand of the Princess
because the Owl was sitting on her
right shoulder.

But the Owl took no notice of him
at all, and never even looked at him,
so she thought it was only a rather
foolish prejudice on his part. How-
ever, the ball came to an end at last,
and the Princess went to bed and
dreamt pleasantly of some one, but
it was not the Prince this time.

And the Prince lay tossing on his
bed only half dreaming, and not
pleasantly, of some one, and it was
the Princess. As for the Knight or
London, nobody knows what he
dreamt about; and, to tell the truth,
THE BROWN OWL II7

nobody cared. But the Owl sat at.
the head of the Princess’s bed, and
slept calmly,—he did not dream ;
owls are not in the habit of dreaming
—they are a good deal wiser.

When the next morning came, the
Knight of London came with it, and
he wanted to know when the Princess
would marry him; but the Princess
put him off—for somehow, although
she liked him very much, she did
not altogether relish the idea ot
matrying so soon. So she told him
that he must wait until the Lords of
the Council had given their consent,
and they were not going to meet till
the next day, so he would have to
wait till then. But the Knight did
not like this at all.

‘ At all events, my dear Princess,’ he
said, ‘you might promise to marry
me, for, after all, I did win the tourna-
ment, you see, and so——’

But the Princess put her hand to
her chin and rubbed it softly as if she
118 THE BROWN OWL

were thinking very deeply—and no
doubt she was—and shook her head
emphatically.

‘No; I can’t promise until the
Council have given their consent, for
you see that would be unconstitutional,
and I can’t be that even for you.’

The Knight seemed quite angry.

‘Bother the unconstitutionality,’ he
said ; ‘ what does the stupid old Council
want to blunder into such matters ?’

But the Princess stopped him:

‘Oh, you mustn’t say that—please
don’t say that,’ she said; ‘it’s not a
stupid old Council, it’s a very nice old
Council,and it’smuchnicer than youare.
When you get angry like that you’re
not at all nice—so just be quiet; now
do.’

And he had to be quiet, for he was
afraid of making her really angry.

She too was afraid she had hurt
his feelings by telling him to be quiet.
So she asked him to join the hunt that
was preparing outside, and he of course
THE BROWN OWL 119

accepted her invitation, for you see
he was only too glad to make it up.
They rode out of the town, and soon
a deer was started, and the chase swept
through the tall trees after it over the
thick carpet of fallen leaves and
between the trunks of the beech-trees.
As a rule the Princess’s horse was
swifter than any of the deer they
started, but this one seemed an excep-
tion to the rule, for it went on at just
the rate she did, keeping always
at the same speed whether she pulled
her horse in or let it go at the
top of its speed. The Princess was
quite annoyed at this. Gradually she
passed all the knights and huntsmen
who were labouring forward at full
gallop, and then she came up with the
hoarse-tongued hounds, who were
running steadily along with their noses
close to the ground. And then she
passed them too, and their deep
mouthing sounded behind, and gradu-
ally the shouts of the huntsmen and
120 THE BROWN OWL

the cries of the dogs and all the sounds
of the chase died away behind, and
still the deer kept steadily forward.
Just at this time she noticed the heavy
gallop of a horse behind her, and
looking round she saw the Knight of
London cantering easily behind. So
she slackened her speed a little to let
him come up, and then she stopped to
let the rest of the chase come up with
her; and when she stopped the deer
stopped too, and nibbled quietly at a
flower that was growing at the foot of
a tree. ,

By this time the Knight had come
up with her, and she said:

‘So here youare. What an annoying
thing that deer is—I can’t catch it up,
do whatever I may,and my horse used
to be thought the fastest in the world,
except one,’ she added, after a
moment.

‘That is strange,’ said the Knight.
‘I used always to think mine the
fastest in the world, and indeed, your
THE BROWN OWL I2I

Majesty, I think it is quite as fast as
yours.’

‘I do believe it is,’ she said. ‘It’s
most annoying ; every second person I
see now has a horse as fast as mine.
However, we'll try a race as soon as
the rest have caught us up.’

Just at that moment a hound’s bay
came from close behind them, and the
deer started off again.

‘There it goes,’ said the Princess ;
and again she started off, and the
Knight kept close beside her. They
went faster than ever, and she could
hardly breathe because of the wind,
but the Knight kept steadily by her
side, and would not be out-distanced.
Just at this moment she happened to
look upwards, and there was the Owl
sailing quietly along just over her
head, flapping his wings lazily as if
there were no need for exertion,
although they were going at such a rate
that the Princess could hardly keep her
eyes Open—just as when you put your
122 THE BROWN OWL

head out of the window of a railway
train that is going pretty fast—a thing,
by the bye, that it is to be hoped you
never do, or you might get your nose
chopped off against a post. When she
looked down from the Owl, to her
surprise the deer had vanished al-
together, and although she rubbed her
eyes she could not see it anywhere;
and although they galloped still farther
on, no deer made its appearance, and
the forest had become dark and thick
and she had never been there before.
So she drew her horse in so suddenly
that its hoofs threw up the copper-
coloured beech-leaves in showers, and
the Knight shot some distance in
advance. However, he turned and
came back. So the Princess said:

‘What are we to do now?’

‘Go back, I suppose,’ he answered.

‘But I don’t know the way,’ she
said, ‘and we are near the country of
the Magi, and they’re the most fright-
ful creatures, who would tear us up and
THE BROWN OWL 123

eat us if they knew where to find
us.’

The Knight smiled :

‘T could save you from them,’ he
said.
But the Princess said reflectively :

‘T don’t know so much about that,
for you see they’re very strong—and
how dark it’s getting; it must be past
five, and it will soon be night.’

I daresay if she had been alone she
would have had a good cry, but that
wouldn’t do before strangers.

It was still getting darker and she
began to feel very uncomfortable, for
the howl of a wolf came down on the
breeze, and a squirrel that had been
searching for nuts darted home to its
hole, scuttling along as fast as it could.

So she said:

‘Come, let us be quick and get away.’

‘Promise to marry me first.’

But she only said :

‘Oh, I'll see about that when we’re
safe—so do come.’
124 THE BROWN OWL

What the Knight would have
answered was never known, for just
then the Owl, who was seated on her
shoulder, gave a mournful ‘Tu-whoo,’
at which the horse of the Knight jumped
back nearly ten feet and almost threw
him with the unexpected shock. But
before she could do anything a hunter
burst from the bushes near at hand
and said:

‘Hurry, Princess, hurry; the Magi
have heard of your whereabouts, and
they are coming at full speed here.
Come, be quick.’

But the Princess said:

‘But what will you do, old man? for
you have no horse.’

But he smiled contemptuously.

‘Horse! I don’t want a horse—why,
I can run as well as any deer. Come,
come.’

And he caught the bridle of her
horse and away they went, and for the
moment she forgot all about the Knight,
for from behind came the sound of
THE BROWN OWL 125

crashing branches, and she knew that
the Magi were following them. But
the old hunter ran in front of the
horse, tugging at the bridle-rein, and
shouting to her to go faster, so she
leant forward and whispered in her
horse’s ear, and it stretched forward
with such speed that it outsped the
wind. Gradually the sounds behind
began to get less and less, and the
wood began to get lighter, and at
last they jumped a little brook, and
were at the end of the forest in a
smooth meadow. Here the old man
stopped.

‘Vou are safe now,’ he said. And
she drew a sigh of relief.

© At last!’ she said; ‘but how can I
reward you, my preserver? Would you
like a lock of my hair, or a purse full
of gold, or a ? well that wouldn’t
do—you see I can’t well offer to marry
you, though that’s what princesses
generally do to their preservers.
You’d better choose something for


126 THE BROWN OWL

yourself. I- will grant it, whatever
it is.’

But the old man shook his head.

‘I want no reward, your Majesty; I
only did my duty. I couldn’t have
done less. See, here come some of
the hunters whom you left behind.’

And just then several of them came
up, and when they saw her they
shouted and blew their horns to let
the others know that the Princess was
found. But the huntsman said :

‘Good-day, your Majesty. I must

2

go.
‘But you haven’t got your reward

yet.’
_ But he shook his head.

‘I want no reward,’ he said; and
before the Princess could say any
more he stepped into the forest and
was seen no more; so she turned her
horse towards the town.

On her way she met the head
huntsman, so she drew rein and
said :
THE BROWN OWL 127

‘Why did you not follow on the
scent of the deer?’

‘Tt lay so thinly, your Majesty, that
the dogs could not follow, and they
soon gave in.’

‘But you should have followed me,
at any rate.’

‘Ah, your Majesty, we might as
well have tried to prove the moon
was made of green cheese. Besides,
your Majesty had one cavalier; and
sometimes two’s company and three’s
none.’

Just at this moment the Princess
remembered the Knight.

‘Good gracious!’ she said, ‘what
has become of the Knight—have none
of you seen him ?’

But none of them had, and although
the question went far and wide no
news came of him, nor could he be
seen anywhere.

‘He must have been caught by the
Magi—if so, he will have been de-
voured to a certainty! Poor Knight!’
128 THE BROWN OWL

The chief huntsman seemed ex-
cited :

‘Your Majesty has not been near
the country of the Magi surely?’ he
said.

‘IT was almost too near, and the
poor Knight has probably been torn to
pieces in trying to drive them back.’

‘Your Majesty should be thankful
that knights are so faithful) said the
chief huntsman; ‘but perhaps, after
all, he has escaped by a different
path,’

But the Princess sighed :

‘T am afraid not,’ she said

However, she rode on to the
town to consult Lord Licec as to what
had better be done. But when she
got there she found that he was out ot
town and would not be back till next
morning. So the poor Princess had
to go back home and wait—but she
looked so pale that her ladies-in-waiting
insisted on sending for the doctor.
He came in a hurry, and asked
THE BROWN OWL 129

her of course what was the matter, and
when she told him he shook his head.

‘I’m afraid he’s got rather a poor
chance, for these Magi haven’t had
a good meal of one of your Majesty’s
subjects for nearly three weeks, and
they were uncommonly hungry. But
if your Majesty will allow me to feel
your pulse, I——’. '

So she gave him her hand, and he
took out his watch and began to
count. ‘One, two, three, four’; but
just then he looked up and saw the
Owl sitting’ on the Princess’s shoulder,
and his hand trembled so much that
he dropped his watch, and it smashed
to atoms on the floor.

‘Oh dear, there goes ten and six-
pence,’ he groaned ‘and I shan’t be
able to get another for ever so long.
D’you know, your Majesty, I think you
are somewhat feverish ; and: you had
better go-to bed. And meanwhile,
the Owl is too exciting for you; if

you could let it be put in a cellar and
K
130 THE BROWN OWL

let it have nothing to eat for, say,
three weeks, perhaps it might not be
so fiery after that.’

The Princess smiled:

‘Perhaps you would like to take
him there yourself,’ she said.

But the doctor said:

‘Good gracious! no. I think he’s
perfectly capable of taking himself
without any assistance, D’you know,
your Majesty, I’ve got a very pressing
case outside ; and if you will excuse me
I will retire.’

And he retired so quickly that he
left his umbrella behind him—for you
see he was very frightened of the Owl.

Acting on his advice the Princess
went to bed, and dismissed her ladies-
in-waiting and told them not to come
to the room again until she called for
them.

And then she lay with her hand
under her head thinking of nothing in
particular, and the Owl sat on the top
of the canopy over her bed.
THE BROWN OWL 131

Suddenly she heaved a deep sigh.
'*T wish I knew what had become
of him,’ she thought to herself.

“You wouldn’t like it if you did
know,’ said a strange cracked voice
that seemed to come from nowhere in
particular. She started up and looked
all round the room, but there was no
one to be seen; so she thought it
was all imagination, and lay down
again. And again she thought to
herself, ‘How I should like to be with
him,’

‘No, you wouldn't,’ said the voice,

‘This time she was sure it came
from the Owl, so she asked quite softly,
‘Did you say that, cherished Owl ?’

And the Owl answered :

‘T did.’

‘But I thought you could not speak,
dear Owl.’

‘Well, you see, I can sometimes—
when it’s necessary.’

‘But how did you know what I was
thinking ?—for I did not speak aloud.’
132 THE BROWN OWL

“Ah! you see, Princess, I can’t tell
you that—it’s quite enough for you
that I can tell.’

‘But why do you say I should not
like to see him ?’

‘Because you wouldn't.’

‘Why? Is he all torn to pieces by
the Magi?’

‘Torn to pieces !—not he,’ laughed
the Owl.

‘Oh! that is good news,’ said she
quite joyfully. ‘Oh! do take me to
him, dear Owl.’

‘Very well, Princess. But I warn
you, you won’t be pleased with what
you see.’ But the Princess was quite
confident.

‘Oh yes, I shall, dear Owl—when
shall we go?’

‘At once, if you like—the sooner
the better.’

‘Oh! you dear Owl. I'll go and
get dressed at once.’

So she ran into her dressing-room
and dressed herself in no time, without .
THE BROWN OWL 133

bothering to call up any of her ladies-
in-waiting about it. Then she went
back to the room where the Owl was
waiting for her.

He was sitting on the floor near
the fire, blinking quietly at the coals,
and he did not at first notice her
entry, so she said:

‘Well, good Owl, shall I send for
the horse?’

‘What for?’ asked the Owl.

‘To ride on, I suppose!’ she
answered.

‘Oh, that’s it, is it? That would
never do. Just get on my back, and
Til see if I can’t carry you somewhat
faster than a horse could.’

So she got on his back, although
she was rather afraid she would crush
him altogether. But somehow, when
she sat down, she sank deep into
his warm feathers,—either she had
grown small, or the Owl had grown
very big all of a sudden. Without
the least shock they passed through
134 THE BROWN OWL

the wall, and out into the clear star-
light.

‘Good Owl,’ said the Princess,
‘you won’t let me fall, will you ?’ for,
to tell the truth, she felt rather afraid
on the whole; but the Owl answered :

‘No, of course not; you’re quite
safe, only you'd better keep close to
me, for we shall go pretty fast, and
the wind will be sharp enough to cut
your hair off.’

So she sat still, protected against
the wind, and looking at the twinkling
stars—for the Owl flew so high that he
almost rubbed some of them out of
their places. :

The wind whistled loud in the
wings of the Owl, but his flight was
so regular that she almost fell asleep,
and was quite happy—for you see
she felt quite safe. Presently the
straight flight of the Owl changed, and
he began to circle round and round,

and then they dropped quickly towards
‘the earth, and the Owl stopped.
THE BROWN OWL 135

‘You can get off now,’ he said, and
she stepped off his back.

‘Take care,’ he said next; and she
rubbed her eyes in astonishment, for
she found herself on the top of a
roof. ; ;

‘I told you you wouldn’t like it
if you came,’ he said. ‘But you'd
better look down below if you want
to see anything that’s going on,’ and
he gravely seated himself on her
shoulder, for he seemed quite small
again. So the Princess looked down,
and she saw at some distance below
a large fire that was blazing in a sort
of courtyard, and then she saw that
it was the battlements of a castle
on which they were standing. Pre-
sently a horrible-looking old witch
came within the glow of the fire—she
was an awful old creature too, and
she almost made the Princess cry out
from fright. She seated herself near
the fire, and began to beat the ground
angrily with the handle of a broom
136 THE BROWN OWL

that she carried, and every now and
then muttered as she did so:

‘How awfully late he iss Why
don’t he come?’ and various other
complaints of his. lateness.

‘But who is he?’ asked the Princess
of the Owl in a whisper.

‘Wait, and you'll see,’ said the
Owl.

Just then something peculiar
happened down below—a couple of
men appeared suddenly. They did
not seem to come from anywhere in
particular, but they were there all the
same. ‘The Princess almost screamed
with astonishment, but she checked
herself in time by stuffing a pocket-
handkerchief into her mouth, for one
of the men whom she saw was the
Knight of London, and the other was
Magog the King of the Magi; and
the Knight of London did not seem~
to be on bad terms with the King of
the Magi.

‘You've come at last,’ growled the
THE BROWN OWL 137

old woman, in a voice something
between the squeaking of a slate-
pencil on a slate and the growling of
a bear with a sore head.

‘I couldn’t come any sooner,
mother,’ said the Knight of London
soothingly ; ‘you see I had to wait for
her to promise to marry me,’

‘Well, has she promised ?’ said the
witch.

‘Not yet.’

‘Then why on earth not?’

‘She said she had to wait for the
consent of the Council.’

‘Why didn’t you eat her?’ said
Magog sleepily; and then, without
waiting for an answer, he curled him-
self up close to the fire and went to
sleep.

But the old witch went on:

‘Well, and what are your plans
now?’

‘I’m going back to-morrow morning,
and I’m going to take old Magog and
pretend that he’s my prisoner of war,
138 THE BROWN OWL

and then the stupid old Council will
say I’ve done a service to the State,
and they will give me the hand of the
Princess for my pains.’

‘But supposing they don’t?’

‘Then I shall cut them all to pieces,
and kill the Princess, and make myself
king by force—for you see nothing can
cut through my armour, except one
thing,’

‘And what’s that?’ asked the
witch.

‘Well, I don’t mind telling you,
mother, because you won’t go and tell
any one—it’s Pager |’

‘That’s a funny sort of thing to cut
through armout.’

‘It may be funny,’ answered the
Knight, ‘ but it’s true all the same, and
if the Prince of India had found it out
I should not be where Tam now; only
he didn’t, you see.’.

‘So much the worse for him,’ said
the witch; ‘but is there nothing at all
but paper that can cut through it?’
THE BROWN OWL 139

- ‘Well, there is one thing that can—
the beak of the Owl, to wit.’

‘Tu-whoo!’ suddenly cried the
Owl.

The effect of this sudden cry was
tremendous. The Knight clung to his
mother, and cried out in a piteous
voice :

‘Oh, mother! mother! it’s the Owl ;

save me!’ ;
_ ‘How on earth can I save you if
you hang on me like this?’ said his
‘mother. ‘Just throw some more wood
on, so that we can see this Owl, and
[ll fling my broom at it, and see if
that won't bring it down.’

But the Princess leant her head to
the Owl, and said:

‘Dear Owl, let's go. I’ve seen
quite enough,’

And the Owl seemed to think the
same, for he said:

‘All right. Just get on my back
again, and we'll go.’

So she did as she was told, and no
140 THE BROWN OWL

sooner had she got on his back than
she fell asleep, and remembered no
more until she found herself lying on
her bed with the early morning sun
shining through the lattice.

She rubbed her eyes in astonish-
ment, and it seemed as if it had been
all a dream. But it all was so clear
on her mind, and besides she had on
her riding-clothes just as she had put
them on to go with the Owl.

To make herself feel more sure she
said tothe Owl:

‘Good Owl, was it a dream ?’

And the Owl shook his head; but
although she asked him several times
to speak she could not get the least
word out of him, although he always
shook his head if she asked him if it
was a dream.

Just then a tremendous noise in
the street made her run to the window,
and there she saw the Knight of
London coming up to the door,
dragging the King of the Magi behind
THE BROWN OWL I4r

him in chains, and the people of the
town were following him in an excited
crowd, which caused all the noise, for
they were naturally very glad to see
their old enemy in chains.

The Knight rode straight up to the
palace door, and when he saw the
Princess at the window he smiled and
said :

“Good morning, your Majesty—you
see I am returned.’

And the Princess said:

‘Good morning, as if she were
very glad to see him, for she had not
yet quite made up her mind about
what she was going to do—for of
course she could not marry him after
what she had seen the night before.
So she drew back from the window to
think about it—for it would never do
to try to get rid of him by force.. At
last she hit upon a plan—she had to
think of it herself—for the Owl would
tell her nothing.

She went to the door of her room,
142 THE BROWN OWL

but there were no guards at the door
—they had run down to see what the
shouting was about. But just then
the doctor came up the stairs:

‘Good morning, your Majesty,’ he
said; ‘have you-had a good night ?’

.*A very good night, thank you,
doctor. But that doesn’t matter just
now. I want the Prince of India,’

‘I beg your pardon,’ said the doctor.

‘I say I want the Prince of India.’

‘The who?’ said the astonished
doctor.

‘The Prince of India.’

‘Then I am afraid he can’t come.
But if the Knight of London would
do——~

‘But he won’t! I want the Prince
of India at once.’ ;

_ ‘I fear your Majesty can’t have him
-at once. You zouldn’¢ have him once,
you know.’

‘But why not?’

‘Because at the present moment he
isn’t well enough to move.’
THE BROWN OWL 143

‘Oh, good gracious !—but why is
that ?’

‘Well, your Majesty, if you’d been
thrown from, your horse with great
violence, and had half a foot of spear
stuck into you, besides being mortified
at your overthrow, perhaps you would
be rather unwell.’

‘Oh, poor fellow, I didn’t know he
was so bad as that. I'll go and see
him at once.’

‘T think your Majesty had better not.’

‘Why not?’

‘Because it might excite him too
much, and besides, what would the
Knight of London ,

But the Princess drew herself up
and said:

‘I beg your pardon, but I must ask
you not to mention that gentleman’s
name, if you please.’

‘“Whe—ew,’ ejaculated the doctor ;
‘what’s in the wind now?’

‘I beg your pardon?’ said the
Princess,


144 THE BROWN OWL

‘I—I only said—it’s an east wind
now, your Majesty.’

Just then a page came running up,
and said that the Knight of London
wished to speak to the Princess.

‘Tell him that I am not quite well
enough to see him now, but I will send
a message to him, if he will stop
a moment. And on your way just
ask Lord Licec to come to me,
please.’

‘Yes, your Majesty,’ said the page,
and he disappeared.

In a moment Lord Licec came.

‘You sent for me, your Majesty, I
believe ?’

‘I did, my lord. It was about this
Knight of London. I have discovered
that he is not what he pretends to be
at all, for he is in league with the
Magi; and this Magog whom he
pretends is his prisoner is really
nothing of the sort. He is one of
his allies, and they are going to break
out and kill me, and every one else,
THE BROWN OWL 148

and make themselves masters of every-
thing.’

‘Oh, my wig!’ suddenly said the
doctor, ‘I hope your Majesty won’t
let them; if you intend to I shall
depart without delay, for I don’t want
to be eaten by this Magog.’

‘That’s just what I wanted to
prevent by begging the Prince of
India to help us; only you said that -
I mayn’t see him, doctor.’

‘Oh! on the contrary, your Majesty,
it would be the best thing in the world
—we'll go at once.’

‘Wait a moment,’ said the Princess,
and turning to Lord Licec she went on:

‘Now I want you to tell him that
the Lords of the Council say that the
last tournament was unfair, because he
came in fresh at the end. And that
if he wants to—to claim his rights, he
must submit to go through another

tournament. Of course he will— -

because he’s quite sure of winning—
but he won’t this time.’
L
146 THE BROWN OWL

‘ Are you quite sure, your Majesty ?’

‘Oh! quite. And as all the knights
who tilted last time are still in the
town, let it take place to-morrow.’

‘Yes, your Majesty.’

‘And if you could keep him out of
the way for a few hours—so that he
‘won’t know what I’m going to do—so
‘much the better.’

‘Tll challenge him to a game of
“ Beggar-my-Neighbour ”—that gener-
ally lasts for a pretty good time.’

‘ That will do; the longer the better.
Now I’m ready, doctor, if you'll conduct
me to the Prince’

So they went out at a back door
for fear the Knight of London should
see them, and they soon reached the
house of the Prince.

At the door was a servant, and they
asked him where the Prince was.

‘In the garden, your Majesty. I
will go and announce your arrival to
him.’

But the Princess said :
THE BROWN OWL 147

‘Oh no! never mind—you needn’t
trouble.’

And they went through into the
garden. On the way the Princess
said to the doctor :

‘I thought you said he was not well
enough to get up?’

‘I did, your Majesty, but he insisted
that he must get up, and be off to
India this afternoon, and he was
excessively violent when I told him he
had better not get up—in fact he—he
kicked me downstairs; and if your
Majesty has no present need of me I
will retire, for to tell the truth he
threatened to have me ducked in a
horsepond if I came near him again—
and he meant it too.’

So the Princess gave him leave to
go—in fact she was rather glad he had
gone ; and she went on walking down
the path. It was one of those old-
fashioned manor-gardens, full of tall
stiff hollyhocks, and damask roses, and
beds of thyme and mint, over which
148 THE BROWN OWL

the bees were humming so loudly that
they could be heard over the whole
garden, As the Princess could not
see him down one path, she turned
“into another alley of stiff holly bushes,
but he was not to be seen down there
either ; however, she walked fast to the
end of it—for you see she was rather
impatient. Now it happened that just
as she turned the corner, the Prince
happened to be coming round too, and
the result was that as they were going
rather fast, and the Prince was the
heavier of the two, the Princess was
thrown back with violence against the
hedge, and she couldn’t help ex-
claiming :

‘Oh!’—for you see he had trodden
on her toe. As for the Prince, he could
scarcely stand—for the shock and the
sight of the Princess together produced
a tremendous effect, as you may
imagine—for she was the last person
he ‘had expected to see.

‘My goodness!’ he said, as soon as
THE BROWN OWL 149

he was able to speak. ‘Your Majesty—
I hope-I haven’t hurt you—I am really
very sorry. I-am very sorry—will you
allow me to help’ you to a seat?
—for I see I have trodden on your
foot.’

Her Majesty said :

~ Oh no! not at all, thank you.’

But all the same she let him give her
his arm, and help her toaseat. It was
a rustic seat—one of those queer seats
made of branches of trees, and it stood
in an arbour formed of rose-bushes, and
there was plenty of room for two; so
she said :

‘Won't you sit down, Prince ?’

But he answered :

‘T really have not the time, your
Majesty. I was just about to start for
India, and if your Majesty has no
further need of me I will go, and send
~ an attendant,’

But she did not seem to hear the last
part of his sentence, for she answered :

‘You were going away without say-
150 THE BROWN OWL

ing good-byetome. Perhaps, however,
-you intended to call as you passed the
palace.’

‘I really had not intended to, your
Majesty, for you seemed to have so
many affairs that I might have in-
terrupted, that I thought it as well to
go without troubling you.’

‘You shouldn’t have thought that.
You see I have had so many affairs of
State occupying me that I could not
possibly get round to call, and you
didn’t choose to come and see me,
which was rather, I think—however,
that doesn’t matter now. I have come
to ask you to stop a little longer—till
the day after to-morrow, if you won’t
stop after that.’

But the Prince shook his head:

‘T have to go immediately ; affairs of
State, you know, demand my presence
in India, and I must go at once, your _
Majesty.’

*Can’t you really stop a little
Prince?’
THE BROWN OWL ISI

‘T really can’t, your Majesty—that
is ;



‘Oh, please do; I'll tell you some-
thing, if you like. I’ve found out who
the Knight of London is.’

‘And then, your Majesty ?’ inquired
the Prince.

‘I don’t know what else. I—TI
thought that would be enough for you.’

‘I don’t understand you, your
Majesty.’

‘IT mean that when I didn’t know he
was a wizard I thought he was very
enchanting; but when I found out he
was an enchanter, I thought you were
enchanter—I mean more enchanting.’

The Prince was just saying :

‘Oh, your Majesty,’ when a peculiar
noise from the back of the arbour
made them both start, and the Princess
jumped up so violently that the Owl,
who had meanwhile gone to sleep, was
nearly shaken off her shoulder.

‘What was that?’ she said.

‘It sounded like somebody laughing,
rsa THE BROWN OWL

or trying to keep from laughing rather.
Just wait a moment, I'll see who it was,’

And he went round behind the
arbour. He soon returned bringing
the doctor with him, and the doctor
did not seem at all happy either.

‘Why,’ said the Princess, ‘I thought
you were going to leave me. How is
it that you came like this behind the
arbour ?’

‘I might just as well ask your
Majesty why you came here.’

‘You might, but it would not be
answering my question.’

‘I happened to come round there,
your Majesty, to read a book in the
shade, and I happened to drop off to
sleep, and the noise you heard was my
snoring.’ t

‘ But how did you know we heard a
noise if you were asleep at the time ?’

‘T—eh—I don’t exactly know, your
Majesty.’

‘It’s quite clear you were listening.
Pll excuse you this time, but if I catch
THE BROWN OWL 153

you eavesdropping again [ll make the
Owl take you up into the sky and drop
you—that may be a drop too much for
you. Youcan go now, but don’t do so
any more.’

But the Prince had still hold of
him.

‘By the bye,’ he said, ‘there’s a
horsepond near here; I think T’ll just
take you there and throw you in,
as I said I would if I caught you
again,’

But the Princess said :

‘Oh, let him go, Prince,’ and the
doctor hurried off at a great rate.

‘T don’t think he’ll come back again
ina hurry,’ said the Prince ; ‘meanwhile,
what about the Knight of London ?’

‘I must get rid of him as soon as I
can, and I want you to help me.’

‘I, your Majesty—but how?’

‘The Council have decided that last
tournament was not fair, because the
Knight came in fresh and you were
already tired out, so they have decided
154 THE BROWN OWL

to have it over again, and you are re-
quested to come and fight—for me.’

‘But what is the use of that? he'll
knock me over just as he did before.’

‘Ohno! he won’t, because I’ve found
out his secret.’ And she told him
about the paper.

At the end the Prince said :

‘Oh! that’s all right then. Tl be
there, your Majesty.’

‘But are you strong enough, do you
think ?’

‘Oh yes, your Majesty.’

‘And the affairs of State can be put
off till the day after to-morrow. I
promise to let you go as soon as
you have got rid of the Knight for
me.’

‘Oh, for the. matter of that, there is
no such great hurry. I really needn’t
go for some time.’

‘But you can go whenever you like,
you know,

‘Thank you, your Majesty.’

‘But—a—I don’t want you to go,
THE BROWN OWL re

you know. In fact I should like you
to stop, very much,’

‘Then Tl stop as long as you like,
your Majesty—for ever, if you like,
your Majesty,

‘IT should like it very much, Be
she answered.

_I don’t exactly know what Haeneued
after that—perhaps you can guess—
but they do say that the Owl, who
chanced -to wake at that moment,
positively blushed ; but then people are
fond of exaggerating, and the Owl did
not seem to object, so I suppose it was
all right; and when the Princess went
back to the palace, the Prince was
quite good-tempered again, whereas
before her visit he had been so angry
that all his servants had left in a body—
however, they came back when they
found he was quiet again.

So the Princess was quite happy
once more, as you may imagine, only
there was one nasty thing she had to
do, and that was to send a note to the
156 THE BROWN OWL

Knight of London thanking him for
having taken prisoner the King of the
Magi, and hoping that he would be
successful at the tournament on the
next day—for you see she was not well
enough to see him, and he was quite
sure of winning, as he had done before,
so he did not mind it very much.

The next day came, and the Princess
was at the lists as before, and the
crowd was just as great too, only there
were very many less knights to fight,
for the Knight of London was the
challenger, and he—well, they had seen
how he had treated the Prince of India,
and they did not care to be tumbled
over in such a very unceremonious
way. However, two or three of the
bravest in the world came and answered
his challenge, but it was no use; they
might just as well not have tried, for
they were thrown from their horses so
violently that they were most of them
seriously hurt. So it seemed as if he
was going to have it all his own way,
THE BROWN OWL 157

for the Prince had as yet not put in an
appearance, and the spectators began
to call for him—for, as I said before,
they liked the Prince better than the
Knight ; although he was so very hand-
some, still there was a something about
him that they did not like at all. But
the Knight had overcome all who had
chosen to come against him, and his
trumpets were sounding the challenge
for the last time, and then their echoes
died away and still no answering
trumpet came, and the Princess was
beginning to feel afraid that he had
gone off to India and left her. But
just as the Knight was advancing to
claim his rights, a trumpet blast rang
out brazen and shrill on the still air,
and the Prince of India rode into the
lists. He was still pale from his illness,
but the people cheered him loudly, and
the Princess gave a sigh of relief, and
quite flushed with joy and excitement.

‘He'll win this time,’ she said to
_Lord Licec, who was standing near her.
158 _THE BROWN OWL

‘I don’t know so much about that,’
he answered, ‘for you see the Knight
of London is in very good form to-
day; and just look at the Prince’s
shield — it’s made of cardboard, I |
should think—yes, it iss Ah—I am
afraid his last defeat has rather turned
his head.’

The Princess smiled and nodded.
Lord Licec thought she was nodding
to him, but she wasn’t; both the
smile and the nod were meant for
quite another person.

However,: the .combatants were
already in their places, so she signed
to the heralds to give the signal.

‘ Laissez aller,’ they cried, and once
again the Knight and Prince charged
each other. This time they did not
go so fast, and the spectators could see
what took place. It was soon over.
The spear of each of the combatants
hit exactly the centre of the other’s
shield. But the spear of the Knight
broke as if it had been made of a bul-
THE BROWN OWL 159

rush. It was not so with the Prince—for
his spear pierced through and through
the seven-fold shield of the Knight,
and the. Knight himself was thrown
right off his horse on to the ground.
He, however, was on his feet in an
instant, and rushed at the Prince, who
leapt off his horse and confronted the
Knight.

The Knight made a pass at the
Prince with his rapier, but the Prince
caught the thrust on his shield, and the
sword came to the same end as the
spear.. The Knight had still his
heavy battle-axe, and he lifted it on high
to swing it down on to the head of
his opponent. The Prince made no
movement to defend himself, and the
axe came full on his crest—through the
crest it hit its way, and through the
steel helmet, but when it got past the
steel it hit on a paper helm below,
and the axe shivered at the touch as
if it had been glass. Then the Prince
caught the Knight by the wrist:
160 THE BROWN OWL

‘Keep still,’ he said, ‘or I run you
to the heart with my paper dagger.’

‘You can’t,’ sneered the Knight.

‘Why not?’

‘Because I’m heartless ; so you can’t
hurt my heart.’

The Prince took no notice of what
hesaid. He had turned to the Princess,
who was clapping her hands for joy—
which was rather an unprincess-like
act; but she couldn’t help it.

‘What shall I do with him?’ he
said.

‘Let him go, I suppose.’

And the Knight was beginning to
walk off as fast as he could. But a
loud and commanding voice came from
behind the Princess, and she looked
behind her suddenly, and she almost
fainted, for a marvellous change had
come over the Owl, and it was still
changing. She rubbed her eyes in
astonishment, and all the people who
could see him did so too, and then a
great shout went up from all of ‘God
THE BROWN OWL 16r

save the King!’ for it was no longer
the Owl they saw—it was the old
King.

‘Stop!’ he cried loudly to the
Knight, who was slinking off—‘you
have not received your reward yet.
Just wait a moment, and to prevent
mistakes just take your ordinary form.’

And again every one present rubbed
their eyes in astonishment—for the
handsome calm face of the Knight
was shrivelling up, and his raven hair
had become an ugly gray, and the
people recognised him too as an old
acquaintance, for he was—who do
you think now? Why, he was Merry-
mineral—it seemed as if that day
gave two instances of old friends with
new faces.

Although he didn’t at all seem to
want to stay, he was obliged to stop at
the King’s voice. So he stood in the
middle of the lists looking very un-
comfortable—for every one was looking"
at him. The King began :

M
162 THE BROWN OWL

‘Now let us see how many crimes
you have committed. You have broken
your oath—isn’t that right ?’

‘Oh! quite correct, your Majesty.’

‘And you have rebelled against
my daughter?’

‘Quite correct, your Majesty.

‘And you have intended to murder
her?’

‘Just so, your Majesty.’

‘And you tried to marry her?’

‘I should have been only too
pleased, your Majesty.’

‘And you don’t repent, do you?’

‘Not at all, your Majesty.’

‘And the right punishment for each
of your crimes is death?’

‘Just so, your Majesty.’

‘But I don’t care to sentence you
to death—it’s not hard enough I
sentence you to live underground for
ten thousand years.’

‘Ten thousand years, your Ma-
jesty !’

‘You can go at once, and if I catch
THE BROWN OWL 163

you above ground—TI shouldn’t like to
be you.’

‘No, your Majesty. Good-day.’

And he kissed his hand to the
Princess, and bowed gallantly to the
Prince of India, and then the ground
gave way under him—and he has never
been heard of since. But the King
turned to the Prince of India and
said :

‘You may go now, Prince.’

The Prince looked astonished.

‘I do not quite understand, your
Majesty,’ he said.

The King looked at him and
said :

‘You seem to be uncommonly hard |
of understanding, cousin of India. I
said, You can go.’

‘But I don’t want to go, your
Majesty,’ the Prince answered, getting
a little red.

‘Oh, don’t you?’ said the King;
‘from what I heard of a certain
pleasant conversation in a certain
164 THE BROWN OWL

summer-house you seemed to have
important affairs of State that demanded
instant attention.’ :

Here the doctor suddenly re-
marked :

‘If you will excuse me, your Ma-
jesty, I beg to differ from you when
you refer to that conversation as
pleasant. I myself heard it, or rather
overheard it, and all I can say is I
thought it most unpleasant,—most.
“That is, if your Majesty will excuse my
remark.’

‘But I won't, said the King
suddenly, ‘I believe it was you that
suggested I should be confined to a
dark cellar for three weeks without
food—eh !’ ;

But the doctor suddenly remembered
that he had an important case that
demanded instant attention.

The King turned to the Princess
and said:

‘Well—I suppose you can settle it
for yourselves, you two, because [’m
THE BROWN OWL 165

going now. I shall come and see you
every seven years. Good-bye.’

And he suddenly turned into the
Brown Owl, and flitted noiselessly off,
before they could say ‘Good-bye,’ or
anything else.

The Prince found that he could
manage to postpone his affairs of State
indefinitely, and in a few days the
Prince and Princess were married and
lived happily ever afterwards.

THE END
Printed by R. & R. Cuark, Edinburgh
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describe
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bcecf7375ffc3b258fb4e1297976807a
3a6f388ea478c25e7e29c6e8a8003506d13cc3e2
'2011-12-11T04:57:04-05:00'
describe
'2822' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABETV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
09ec5490a9b72af556ad3bd63492bc40
e9139b650068f311d9488fdf1d4120f972d2c4ea
'2011-12-11T04:54:26-05:00'
describe
'232878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABETW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0ae3afcce33d15b124d2cd053c009b42
ed2aac2980de76f2389cd53d2c763ec670a3bda9
'2011-12-11T04:56:13-05:00'
describe
'125840' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABETX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
cde8bfb193472fd359f123e03252e7ae
c33de7183af3f8c6fc8e96be58d74fbe637920b9
'2011-12-11T04:54:02-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABETY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
275423f128809f52cb6f76542713ef3d
115dfec6b25358c5977fce3b8cc180bef3882bfa
'2011-12-11T04:53:56-05:00'
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABETZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
88de4cb3825c31fce4dca277e70ce223
8ee6f405387128810cfb113e2aab66dd75207196
'2011-12-11T04:56:01-05:00'
describe
'1884156' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
ed8d3fba69f06607575f4827e8246a41
45a9eef6949d0f0d3f7fddcd7267881ff21cdd77
'2011-12-11T04:54:03-05:00'
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
caca748a676a4fb1759be902d544053e
bb00e6afeabc3962002aa4ec6f142b52145eef9a
'2011-12-11T04:53:48-05:00'
describe
'9008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
46c2c17356ee5679933397dbc31b851f
d52943f6c0dd1d111e152572f54b8464c670e1aa
describe
'232181' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUD' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0e68380f24c83a1ad4a558e69e39b4cf
0199a0f22601da72c98ef593c8dded65e53efb3e
'2011-12-11T04:53:34-05:00'
describe
'46367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8e2e3c0edc82b4ac8383e3c169d4a53e
e1387ef956eedf74390d3187885cfe900696444f
'2011-12-11T04:56:17-05:00'
describe
'3070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
b824323f1c0476e8f40af4c2df9ae3f8
294f11cde5d9bfd5b6a5845a6f771ec5c6858f0c
'2011-12-11T04:55:10-05:00'
describe
'12621' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
ea3c55b7df49ad795b3e4b486cb9c060
836d4b997a50289803bdc1297dbaccc73ed74cb4
'2011-12-11T04:57:26-05:00'
describe
'5597280' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c92b418c86651f744e69b9411938691a
1726f9fcfb953d810a40f5018bed523936419cad
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
3c192cec05bd79706e7e2a620ceb4df9
bf46e21a908cbbdcaa5178635bc544933c0367a3
'2011-12-11T04:56:00-05:00'
describe
'4515' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
e75aa79b62db3447fa7aaa8404463aef
48a841f2099da1ce0210e3fed484da940650fe2e
'2011-12-11T04:54:29-05:00'
describe
'232928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9eb1117384d72c763eb944c6aed283d8
3ecd09ea6d9906a30bdc2dba9d38a9dab78b34c6
'2011-12-11T04:53:33-05:00'
describe
'18898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUL' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
562301ad35be215a9a9b6367c8d30036
8b70a9429d67e2692c554246975feb3778a7cac1
'2011-12-11T04:54:30-05:00'
describe
'4351' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
8d14b40b74b74bef718d6c5f69f58ecb
3a3ce5ec44ed4d30feb37e342592cf6eea2b2cd1
'2011-12-11T04:56:57-05:00'
describe
'1881148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUN' 'sip-files00012.tif'
ae08299d4e7e6a4c1f6cd36ba27655a8
2b3c51538411a34ef7cadc0016cd217f9de4cbf7
'2011-12-11T04:54:42-05:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUO' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
21510907f118d1bcb40dd51d7a5cb8cf
eedfffb013b08827bfcf88e5556d6b9e518c1cdf
'2011-12-11T04:55:54-05:00'
describe
'232882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUP' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d2856da846b35b784cdad6821a183b08
d7ef4164f57cf6d403d3b4deed6b173bfc5f5b49
'2011-12-11T04:56:42-05:00'
describe
'88536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
581f85dd9b17115e8022af1c5f0a6918
6bdd7a79259d9f215821ec2cc396503f399a4cb5
'2011-12-11T04:53:31-05:00'
describe
'14835' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0f441fd5283167ec7a29534c5efbf310
0c2ada71c44359805a7bca43dcbb377372baec4b
'2011-12-11T04:54:53-05:00'
describe
'27585' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
131961423d4b6e275b9c8807c99f53e0
6764d8ec6f125b2a903978868aee56ae83cb4566
'2011-12-11T04:56:39-05:00'
describe
'1883848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
53204601968ef52e5b1202f0d5dce470
628de1c30b0bef01783b26552949888675136d28
'2011-12-11T04:53:27-05:00'
describe
'648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
e48886fe8932fef15d0b47da71056e03
c1796a89128baf925c7ff6a61886938decf340ff
'2011-12-11T04:55:17-05:00'
describe
'8995' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e5a9069eef537db62b47add86fa8d7d3
569fe00a8f796a6801b601510c00e61b3f0ab9c3
'2011-12-11T04:56:20-05:00'
describe
'232898' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d668401b313d770365bfa4b19723042c
dfa0bef21205402b789c12304a72208619f50f77
'2011-12-11T04:56:08-05:00'
describe
'91761' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
050e35c6388ad18cf954ea4351631aa2
a20fd9c04867ae4106651605b87a69a5c1542b66
'2011-12-11T04:56:31-05:00'
describe
'23373' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
eed0022aef75729d664492e8bdd7b86a
685c7ec723751fa8d3aedcff0190118061fe1729
'2011-12-11T04:55:35-05:00'
describe
'29864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5abebfe2d36ab083224556a71dad53f7
46902c39d6069b0412955ea29e8545128a0d1bc1
'2011-12-11T04:55:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c8e373710803343029770c24da45db89
7efd6619fc787a6821f7df7f627ed3f28bdc8822
'2011-12-11T04:55:03-05:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
c7ec46c4c0e93eda5283f745deecb430
7ce28fd9442812797ccd57a86d64d7b7a88cb82f
describe
'9286' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
901c4ad5537898645f3c319c4381027b
0e57ed12557656e534b8d1864494a04ccf811abd
describe
'232927' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
8c104d9c363765c68f32113f8e949859
ce52e1ced80642376ac096c09c958d8c66f5d811
'2011-12-11T04:53:46-05:00'
describe
'90809' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
56d4a1995b9743bece48542720ed6794
1d7f69db2c93f84a22abe69d31b59f4781276272
'2011-12-11T04:53:38-05:00'
describe
'22987' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2622d409579e92fac1a04588ad6b8f27
1735f93f0bc2af724a93980b0925965d7477f44a
'2011-12-11T04:53:26-05:00'
describe
'29380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
907ba2bd2b3c6362c4c97d1d158882f6
793865b96d43fce870a68d28739346f0935e59bd
'2011-12-11T04:54:38-05:00'
describe
'1883744' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
138a9a4149249f763adac92d2dbb86b1
eb6d24f0a64d120d27745649d6e33e419da39bd7
'2011-12-11T04:57:21-05:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
dd3f3e4424903f0fc7ae44601afa4a1a
24f36de262be5ad037d94bf65034d4cff8013f22
'2011-12-11T04:56:36-05:00'
describe
'9713' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5d951107a92aae854b1dc0cccd6fbd30
056cf7cf068e25ac15184b594c9c0be2930f80bd
'2011-12-11T04:55:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
47ca9a7c25a6e61158df6e86fda5364e
81f312a386ebf2728d8d364bbc3c00bdc22ebab7
describe
'82085' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c7c88af1efee9e701829514fc7f05f34
3c7eafeeeaa4f1d6ed20f67f53de6cbc9f24431e
'2011-12-11T04:55:26-05:00'
describe
'21613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
229adf8ebeff619e4ac78a518ac7b31d
3818843e8e27f97445f486dba2966ca65d50c875
'2011-12-11T04:57:29-05:00'
describe
'26980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b3a714269dd56b937b21a67820558f6e
6c89b125b36a9b7c90a60de0ef8734cef472ed0a
'2011-12-11T04:53:37-05:00'
describe
'1883828' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f756f0828ffd0865c60eceac184d30b9
105f9056742cb12d64c52a67fdb0e7747e7d37f4
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
61ad161391f3ff64039c6600e3df3ac8
af0860bef7fea6cc3c15ced5d00a7cc0166a0fd1
'2011-12-11T04:55:14-05:00'
describe
'9099' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4e94a82b169cdfc7a01cd33792a070e5
49f1d875a523269a063dfdc8593041e150fb20b9
'2011-12-11T04:53:52-05:00'
describe
'232923' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
995e5c1ba1d6b4a458de35e72acf6ca6
d4c4b35106bfed4b211bbde0aa3e1f0ae0ecff24
'2011-12-11T04:54:59-05:00'
describe
'83807' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c69c4177a8a52b4ed6c25ba1f2644ecf
c80aec0596b8424a735fcc722f58e443ecdc3fe9
'2011-12-11T04:54:43-05:00'
describe
'20854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9ecb8902552e1c3cd9e8d74294a95345
d28120dc995ab9d00bbb40ef83993fc28f59d68c
'2011-12-11T04:55:39-05:00'
describe
'27376' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8d1e968d5cd0ff8958666dc8fc3a53ed
550ef3c6becff38e571f19a0acb4c4e36136233c
'2011-12-11T04:57:28-05:00'
describe
'1883888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
1fbb66dd836ab8c888a853ceefc90a2d
f4c413f98b52498d5ef61f08ca717c291bf2bdc3
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
23f8e2d84fed6c1819f18fcf1f4a3126
72aa09dc62cf908891d9dd7d831cd844f3b4016f
'2011-12-11T04:57:08-05:00'
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
49da1b2c1f544c62686578776323601c
865a5203640cdd2a068af66a0b5e0a7320e44141
'2011-12-11T04:56:22-05:00'
describe
'232950' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
24ffcd4b9aeae0d385a6504052572f11
ae28a13b7528055503e464d47f795a18137aac31
describe
'88923' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
994f475578aba12267e2197fa6937045
3685fb3177e9d62b1c611e2aef4e9cd0e1c7f65b
describe
'22690' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9e3cce7ec200e61275499d5299769478
998c8ddaacbd66c3cf7b3c02f0d56615f1127fe2
describe
'29304' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
1ab2411e2403da78c3f3b244bd287557
5985e531ae5a9f0312fedbb0949b93a761fe1d9f
describe
'1883940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
cbdd1701e67f8533b2432b55c06f3cf0
07b55cf5b49c7cc3b8979d65c018e690362f4fdc
'2011-12-11T04:55:47-05:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
e82ca84c96dcb00a7752256534f49382
c8f91295736fdf1994e297276ba87a2e0e43af95
'2011-12-11T04:55:16-05:00'
describe
'9659' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
cd351b414f3177c250f35781923d697c
47753c7b2508b107c8f6b743d0d295895d823a8c
'2011-12-11T04:54:35-05:00'
describe
'232866' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
561a939d4fbdf515d400797e6127b042
4667a481038a32483c76c0ddfeb322b901f8ce25
describe
'92626' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d12a3f210dabf5ddaa13b5032e8f0d4b
7042b4b84c482e77e178d7f641458f9a0ea36813
describe
'24113' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
62b5be2c34dcca62d1d8e025780dcb56
be4a8530d8ca445fc15fb3114875f951a874b1ed
'2011-12-11T04:54:28-05:00'
describe
'30807' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
af153e9ad35ef0e8ff7f040b56519978
3f273239cdb4dcf01ac2d7e1cc216c385e723fe0
'2011-12-11T04:56:11-05:00'
describe
'1884028' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e58953a8a15a553eb8838db0eb5fed6b
78ac41f8d716f6297fd4f2fa4a137a6ea0abeceb
'2011-12-11T04:53:50-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
302b98700ff096d1a48fa9037090beb4
c973213c6cfc67bc8dd275a14768e5f302132f23
'2011-12-11T04:55:28-05:00'
describe
'9611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8bdfb4e66b2c00b47e0b4800f77eb16a
8b7d010de8f7034014998f3d3bebeb935d1a6599
describe
'232865' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
9bcfec03d705007bfd1e2d484b019ad6
e307157b735cad0eb9a3214d1f5e1e8433160c84
'2011-12-11T04:54:11-05:00'
describe
'88605' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
93fae44957c377e1ef99d13e6a48cd1c
70ecb14971f83e884a3667457c28d70f11feb434
'2011-12-11T04:55:09-05:00'
describe
'23589' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
589124fd98d26dd7521b00af19ffb90b
204290ae3600d1c41a5ded02d9085520e5c58d6f
'2011-12-11T04:57:30-05:00'
describe
'29047' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
6a504382a158630b5e539318eba79ac2
6a3fced28d2b782c69eee77518719f7148c6e44d
'2011-12-11T04:53:45-05:00'
describe
'1883760' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
d7b5371a8bb40634430e1513112d88c8
4b31b6afb0dba88e3985c7d2a012b51bed5a893f
'2011-12-11T04:56:51-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e54dce12c41de5b5d65d9eb41358d003
616317ac1b1287fd9327643ad379dca8614b42ed
'2011-12-11T04:56:10-05:00'
describe
'9313' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
679e4f2dcd23ebfedcd5f14523b84771
d2f800895258e72ae4ed67c4ea8a1f1b20fecf56
'2011-12-11T04:55:37-05:00'
describe
'232889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cedc31ae46859662a8adf8ab2322dbe5
d15fdfcf61fb6cf941d4a11856b72c23322f4668
'2011-12-11T04:56:40-05:00'
describe
'91843' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
fd0af5b489e51d8657b8ea1f9d4479b8
303a9a01b89a3491e27b60070eef94a2ddd3c7b1
'2011-12-11T04:57:23-05:00'
describe
'23277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
8fdfa2cfd3d29c82169f283f1a461883
c227e743a471c5271a5931673d7b1d98929f97c7
'2011-12-11T04:54:15-05:00'
describe
'29897' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWW' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b3f5dfa55f3e24db4cd8cbe3fc80173a
fa6db4a595e8651fb1a1d67f4757603ec58c6c10
'2011-12-11T04:56:27-05:00'
describe
'1883928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
93ff176202ce0818769380ba587f857d
26134a52dba7efca8fbf7044286f5bc84a9af8f1
'2011-12-11T04:56:04-05:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWY' 'sip-files00021.txt'
c1467a7bca4bab1983b7b558c2f4cc61
84a9f75c9a86cdf02b4aa64b3e080d4d0a7ea2c8
describe
'9640' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
5fe5b26d39f6d8689293f22121be435c
119b1e74ed2ed22aa69056883033d47f9782a96e
'2011-12-11T04:55:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXA' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3de770ab0a2e2e84ab36764b0275d82c
07b72179b4f2ced1745af94e2964015892ef8bd9
describe
'91388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXB' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8920e75cf2131f049f0ccec54dd1803c
6c6251b94e8c9d8c010f4d02bd5e4c47ba6fba9e
'2011-12-11T04:54:41-05:00'
describe
'23241' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXC' 'sip-files00022.pro'
625871298ad03c384bef8711f338b4be
9b1ba3eacb52b68fda37ace337b39858e2ae7368
'2011-12-11T04:55:36-05:00'
describe
'30077' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
3fd1fdba3726f82e43c1098f6c5879ea
ea30814fa10671ab59e3b8104d85f7af29ba2ed2
describe
'1883784' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXE' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a1b0249c79d1e7ed97fbb1e03fc2bed3
19591ede0ec7b856ae31e1d5e7094ca32f28d3a7
'2011-12-11T04:56:25-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXF' 'sip-files00022.txt'
161ad07200752969c2a0778354308395
1743a21ecb7b62be2bb45efa6d136de0eeacacb6
'2011-12-11T04:53:43-05:00'
describe
'9986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
93b4922f9fc335c55c2a815014f1c3aa
e39cfa805e079f9b51b997618bc59f08f682f098
'2011-12-11T04:54:54-05:00'
describe
'232944' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXH' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
70c678451b8136a143f8c3ea83b8365e
9c230207ba7ecbc1465f59bdbbe53b569de59abf
describe
'89507' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
6026c2838f1cc26716ed6cea3d562087
9f73f1d489027dd61a1835e0b18948661b8c6c5f
'2011-12-11T04:56:58-05:00'
describe
'22984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
0ca72295fd91148b7c13e3d09274f4e0
6fae2db6adf1913c478ac78f142f68715aa4a178
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXK' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
eb56ca09fb1fb05613e73d02410c8517
b8cb631f86a8d95aa77344f2484c23d22b18e772
describe
'1883952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXL' 'sip-files00023.tif'
9f42206b84c07a7a7707b9a3c374f189
1a3465d6706437c2120ddde1715ba1086455bfa1
'2011-12-11T04:55:43-05:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXM' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c3dcad1914f9d329e6f025fc5aab5d76
421968b2ec38d7529d2de1dfdca975f59f6b4757
'2011-12-11T04:55:27-05:00'
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXN' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
7dcf6b710269cbf11e337db26ad5460b
78cf5d07997fed30325432d46e1f17db96527ec1
'2011-12-11T04:57:16-05:00'
describe
'232892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXO' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
cf45faeec7529a1c573d25923e85b732
088f1c43fc1d472b02bff9c85b49e68b3296413a
describe
'88467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXP' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2a4e8eedc74b59afd84a6132ab897aa8
834c5d08add3800b08689eb1c78961dbcd2b0781
'2011-12-11T04:55:08-05:00'
describe
'23470' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a26e737aab5dc5ad49c087a2b37163e3
0e6cc7a439d92507b7a2f4e4f7a43a66c649a82c
describe
'28822' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXR' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
712834afc133e62082e516307b6ad854
3d5f8d2380969b562f5bca32e52204ba64814879
'2011-12-11T04:55:52-05:00'
describe
'1884012' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXS' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e8161faf777921f18c24ec3bc5318c3b
bae7f17c05f3b9304d2bc9c5afb08952d04ba12b
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXT' 'sip-files00024.txt'
6104b00374cfcac520c49d74e72053f1
631213a585ee6bb9a096017c1905ae8f471dde9f
'2011-12-11T04:56:30-05:00'
describe
'10131' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
2f76bc6dfaad37033f579694cbd29fc1
4e31b029c7b773486159a5c00034fd82badeb037
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
bd9abfeadb36fffbe06814fe25777c23
f3864b1d8491b7d35d05424e14c0ea716754b3d2
describe
'89567' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXW' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
85ab67c12676ee7fb412f4e0cd5f1327
50897f668a0a220eb86bda7aa24cb7fb5a87d8fa
'2011-12-11T04:53:59-05:00'
describe
'22718' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXX' 'sip-files00025.pro'
51b36f6e9e26daac5c798e7d7173c025
32d74184020a3e5a227b4e907179735150070d97
'2011-12-11T04:56:55-05:00'
describe
'29943' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXY' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8381dbf85dc410ba349874b05972bdf8
e545a91702fdf469c6f5f71b6c2b16e94c832971
'2011-12-11T04:54:19-05:00'
describe
'1884016' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
37cda780d29de3e04e3ef50f4ccaa65f
0fac34fb5d85af71f50e639409891b365fa835f8
'2011-12-11T04:53:19-05:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d96075afac4d0d4b27c2f1be48782aa3
1e4e48894ae5ff8abb75c9f81d3b89d6f8ac78b9
describe
'9815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYB' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
0f033b72e8e67133832dd1d8222379b7
d3114fae1687b8d6171d9d16ade2b9c20f193884
'2011-12-11T04:55:24-05:00'
describe
'232900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYC' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
36bdd08a015a2d492c999a3f39a0b445
9bad86e3861f384711fd1028f1b2cff36b584dcd
'2011-12-11T04:55:38-05:00'
describe
'88148' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYD' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6ce04a6ed19274b843840c93672d72ba
febea7701eabee99314d10937e6c5e941cfa2307
'2011-12-11T04:54:07-05:00'
describe
'23215' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYE' 'sip-files00026.pro'
7ffb8b519d77ce3d8ee8321b87a665a8
7c4420e727e7dcc7143814e96bcc55379566068a
'2011-12-11T04:54:33-05:00'
describe
'29061' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6ebdaf833374902674015521a239580f
0197842f46cc30c756824ef19625f1aa606abe97
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYG' 'sip-files00026.tif'
97e3ec31b5c2dd913ae329fe6fe0ccc5
027c1d9076667557969d5b39c990a8d9c28b1bbb
'2011-12-11T04:54:22-05:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d53a087cb649c71295325c4545915649
bb378dbb21158bb057e8338ebd9fc908a0496835
describe
'9557' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYI' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
b693d5197ac0ae1e094dae6390b509ce
26d731dd88ac4a320ced3e4741a3d302bafab8e8
'2011-12-11T04:55:41-05:00'
describe
'232902' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
206f01978d6a4b88c0c5a6da0e04356e
5eb494911823f7dc5fc4bb03cc6bfd300473a245
'2011-12-11T04:55:45-05:00'
describe
'91033' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYK' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
27920980887a726eac4b3c596f619b66
d7e40257111e10ff5cc087df7395e4b52181c93d
'2011-12-11T04:57:27-05:00'
describe
'23804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
be77e4c69b8975ca08f769dda8439cde
9118a3c18249789f6992e64508eda9e922201cc8
'2011-12-11T04:57:10-05:00'
describe
'29824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYM' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
763c0e6d313256e68e0c94c158ade57f
4bc20d18dac64653f25018d5ec7f296d414f48ad
'2011-12-11T04:56:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYN' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4912a2a865e439d5779c176a2bfa5667
4cfe12af3278983a3b857a660d7e943629d859c8
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYO' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9f03e4146e35eb25b4df2efda9505f21
6dc493ebe529b00a7f4024ffe3977465e5e7b2d2
'2011-12-11T04:54:10-05:00'
describe
'9814' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYP' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4ea81e669fb0058916e3f8382d7a2fb1
3bd2f021076438c98ff0f6ead43bfc25a9a8e63f
describe
'232770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
75290bbb6c24d51a1d63683fb71f5ac2
27b937b314d82b036e6a55725adf624adead4699
'2011-12-11T04:54:50-05:00'
describe
'85973' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYR' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5f04819f8e18fd8e834b492468743996
704950384dfffb1bf9640a9e8cde0c47d604542a
'2011-12-11T04:55:42-05:00'
describe
'22736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYS' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0837d0272fb39540b450d7a26b0e632f
c6938d875455a79dd65157b37a19040e44b144d5
'2011-12-11T04:53:32-05:00'
describe
'28498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYT' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
fc46e8076995d3406c7cbc8826e04061
89c26eb50bd5388b21aa44020b814291de7c8dfc
describe
'1883816' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
4ec93d64507c3606468d184cb3d9e6fe
3387dc8c48773f9942f87699b3e6b90f17da727d
'2011-12-11T04:55:00-05:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9906ced663d3d5cdcdea0e7c1d05e626
19cde480ab037912fc84c86ede233c4b7bf2dde5
describe
'9535' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYW' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
73d30aeb5e9900850a4667d0e0c7d807
f059193fe8a867e42a5902453b8d0e64f912b498
describe
'232948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYX' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d8e75bc26293de335fe573c1a2cd7ed2
ba4c0f97446270e5a2a24bf126f37b4163590173
'2011-12-11T04:55:58-05:00'
describe
'87738' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f460d77739e2a300acb9c7657c1a14cc
d8021b86696d595520a57d965f45885b46c5c12e
describe
'23005' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
645bc0eb02fcbdeaaeeb59bdf4a9a4cf
fe97b79bf5686710a40094d98c6e829d5846d7ef
describe
'27954' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0a49bffe2d90c1e2c0dc5202aa57caca
810f6a86cb92e125e116307b5370b9f61832102a
'2011-12-11T04:57:18-05:00'
describe
'1883824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
69759d3da45d0b6e7f6a3e3d2ab7d174
f511f26b300d0b850b286f61457fedfd52df530c
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZC' 'sip-files00029.txt'
29d1461e175e98022b1822189a5259ff
e4eeba1a29ad2e24c3ea4db8cb887eceff33d7fe
describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZD' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1b867904f745f1baf5dbde59873822bb
a848d4a2225536ede4ab655b78aa90dc8c2dac54
'2011-12-11T04:56:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZE' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
2fe2ea42c4ff2ff433f782e4ff2e6f3e
142a5014fce46c69318199cd216f109e0a507191
'2011-12-11T04:54:31-05:00'
describe
'89589' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZF' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
66e63c679b6e3d1fe0e7a0a2e7974138
bb5f3bc67b86982ef026cfdb20639a448ca8ecae
'2011-12-11T04:55:44-05:00'
describe
'23759' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZG' 'sip-files00030.pro'
199b39674db3b96e57e124da45bb49a7
d7d314f10e3ff3c8c08a0603d59513ccb1499556
'2011-12-11T04:56:24-05:00'
describe
'29216' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZH' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
e126644dc857d348154f7cd75ade9ef4
89a6dd3e7bf39a63f94f03a93d58af154a912556
describe
'1883896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZI' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fd7e627b3cb1b1624fd4cfa230ca389f
e1d507b9d99f8030efe3243995d2b9d75fdf7225
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ba2d6332de8fb390c8ee936f46eeaa34
c945b5869e11ff4d5dd063b2ee6731446001ff88
describe
'9607' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZK' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
fb6ffd6207d4acd937bb58180b1cb5aa
3937bf8c3b9cc956bbb9b04ac08c631cd910bb50
describe
'229194' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9aaaa7efeeac9c5b2fed4049230e5fe7
b53c570c1ff38df9dc2c6b5ec04794239a4334ea
'2011-12-11T04:57:06-05:00'
describe
'89134' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1c528b0bf2c7fe54409b54ff9e7bdbd5
35fe2e0a5b23b28521439882017a2e97e17b09a2
describe
'23348' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZN' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0483bb31e413e69c1db5af7dd7449f13
97289b888686cadf8073770a245a951cdc5e363c
'2011-12-11T04:53:18-05:00'
describe
'29656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZO' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
363d3ed0af9b6e7c11120d97cc7fb96c
ae9435f39177d18fbda07488730f72b3ab364ea2
describe
'1854056' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZP' 'sip-files00031.tif'
9c1df03fcdc49f410adf24ccf162f69e
8b6541f0c62828b3208de57b0a82994650addc1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5892fdcb46a63fb7d1d43f7e30bd1d2e
8fec1a3b8eb010660f2a9fb930acf8d4fb1ca0fc
'2011-12-11T04:53:24-05:00'
describe
'9738' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZR' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9df184a7a24c48be9aba6326d144a950
a516458c0dbd37058a993689584e39ce7b6a9143
'2011-12-11T04:57:13-05:00'
describe
'232946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZS' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
8e68ced1e9498de16ea0e4701e841823
c7e06c3aa2abfd2f71ead17356fb7ac6072d5f91
describe
'85217' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZT' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
50bf8c18262fb1b422cfc67c9d496504
4a8d3042099c7aff1cde6cad7e9571195fd46c85
describe
'23690' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
ca890f02562e0cbaf46c82e4575338bc
c46eb376302a59d30fb4c2ea709201eda2402296
describe
'27423' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
69c3541fe56bbb8d457df098f0858925
ce8db4c492f689ee1c556d860f57db72a82b0b79
'2011-12-11T04:55:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
672bdf8ceb585d6ef2fd216cb7c200d9
aba1ca647ea99c4a64cd4e7a3659d78d201f173f
'2011-12-11T04:54:09-05:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZX' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d17f685c331eb2a2061f4746f56fd474
5f95299e04551a499a98837faae49d68da06be18
describe
'9024' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
d345f12e6c9453ff50626ce8a68e722f
8396c01ba5165d7640b1cc0e731fd21a1d1956d8
describe
'232894' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
7ed9f06b8a595ac4ee54f27c46207ffd
ea357faa38b560f8e7dab4c9971d1bd54d3d1383
describe
'89302' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAA' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2717d7bae1f6ae2cee2ec19fdd2eff47
7e3d39676ef4a989cc195d2362ea9ef632a3c5d7
'2011-12-11T04:56:50-05:00'
describe
'22621' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAB' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8d15fb9c8129074176ed0a1ae61ac8ef
7f60a38f1d3b4cb0e98c4bd832170df59d82ddce
describe
'29143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAC' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
807b899becc62c6c866f9f934d74d357
41e22ebb89903e954fe213f8668f1df3889c67ac
describe
'1883624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAD' 'sip-files00033.tif'
9c9f0a3c452884e5f53c83fb1808fd70
4cfae3df47a9f155d78123b5811b63d19bb0d204
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAE' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c1274161b7fd4d825714607d8d4a2d28
3d96e8b1f0ede44cc74edd322cb223503e1e84e7
'2011-12-11T04:56:32-05:00'
describe
'9252' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
1607a2b41741214bcafc8b244bc16c6c
cb93461850f17902349e01f8d3a8362a5e99d352
describe
'232926' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
4c26ed3b58814940241f962cfce158f7
dc68c39bc06b8acd239081e9c8a7d8968c6a505b
'2011-12-11T04:56:54-05:00'
describe
'86435' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAH' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
9f64b558f559c291511cd612d063c9bb
20ed4958a5bbad83d4100c856faa22ef358b1fa4
'2011-12-11T04:54:55-05:00'
describe
'23375' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAI' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5263b3c9e56c51e566dcfd710e991dce
3e763550b1fdcc90962f7a2a72e2cf7ea8f7eb6a
describe
'28267' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a3c0eda687ab6856a16eb73b64d0f429
33a050b7bb4b48d312b67b23feb4b407c9bcc778
'2011-12-11T04:56:49-05:00'
describe
'1883884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c02f2bf3c8d9c1b91a51190e88e5a066
be85ca45f3291cd86523f14d6d3ea68c4ca9a48b
'2011-12-11T04:53:17-05:00'
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAL' 'sip-files00034.txt'
a2ac51caca093c30aaa27e5ebb385e2f
e5661e91f5a2d397464f3e818d7e2e45e54a20de
describe
Invalid character
'9380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAM' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
83e8ebade1c1d43fd9b22b51fd5f309a
7feaf1a3af198c2f9c79f7402e4f600794cdcf9c
'2011-12-11T04:55:29-05:00'
describe
'232903' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAN' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
e8d772f12497e539163ed8cec5ddb4a5
160e45acc16ac9f267e65e70106cc43d4edc9e91
describe
'86135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAO' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6f5d6ab240eb38806376a07ec143d88d
dfb4b8fb36fecc60423b2bcda96d4841e892801a
'2011-12-11T04:54:00-05:00'
describe
'22525' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAP' 'sip-files00035.pro'
ff51291cf8f95aa708942c69385109d7
dbda47226a2b8210c6e48967e794b54fa171ca3b
describe
'28165' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
99f89a64a8183d2295f90e5f4ef305bf
43f0b4cd43a553d725c202dae4ccdc40cd216fca
'2011-12-11T04:55:55-05:00'
describe
'1883860' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a6781d1a0d567614707934fef2b5a804
e7934f26495489244839e7a75b9cc031f96b5dbe
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAS' 'sip-files00035.txt'
a46829b3b87a4a4e87bdb3d74b708838
5f7fadd748e7dea622f69964b2ca930af6c71b00
'2011-12-11T04:56:07-05:00'
describe
'9716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAT' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
02c6d9de67f5ab904bf425c7f5349161
a764e366ef1ddc7b16edaedded6fb359dea15069
describe
'232938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
67131ee33d4148b20e722edfd5727957
2298cb25b938f0a5e6528a2aba6fb940d08cb9cf
'2011-12-11T04:56:45-05:00'
describe
'89728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAV' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3f52b5f46d70d4e9f8d83a6d004c61cb
ef834016f96d3ccd18f626a382da163e23ef3db0
describe
'23840' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAW' 'sip-files00036.pro'
24dcf2c1e7df2f9d361de4a9cafc801c
d782548afd11653dc6cb96c5a3ab8288e8ee6a1f
'2011-12-11T04:55:50-05:00'
describe
'29332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAX' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
cd24b30781ee7cb7306fe95b62ac550e
51c03fe81b1cb9e018b0c4e07544bb367bcedff2
describe
'1883716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAY' 'sip-files00036.tif'
8a73edd95cac2718f70684cd6271e7ca
8786326ad35b73bdb05e6ee6fbd5e09b780799ff
'2011-12-11T04:53:15-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8b29a762449001d1acf8e71bd0ca6699
a3b07122cba367ba5953d66da28a939f4b5086fc
describe
'9545' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBA' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
ee9c8d35298f10b3b9eebf6bbbf05345
faa46781b5743bd59b81cceff8fa5ef4b6b5dd4f
'2011-12-11T04:54:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBB' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
966ae9a977bc7708f1bd7c9d4d51cacc
bb55d350c91a4053f3c31acd21bbc16644b66bb0
'2011-12-11T04:56:23-05:00'
describe
'84330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBC' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
28ee07e7cd6f5bb6b8e0bc6910463ff1
3eca75bb7a6fdc453780f5c70ac4d3359120168b
'2011-12-11T04:53:47-05:00'
describe
'21863' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBD' 'sip-files00037.pro'
648d97a678d04303c3bf5f3124c55ffc
d005bce36918c3acb4c3bf2463d473daaea6fbe6
describe
'27618' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBE' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
30f931b72f7a5389d04b416aefb8f534
a561214a0f869f25c543f565057ab6cca5338ed8
'2011-12-11T04:54:18-05:00'
describe
'1883812' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBF' 'sip-files00037.tif'
3ec2d247643103c9f6da353d678b7a8c
33034f9e9aaeb7d4070e5b7bd165d2fbe5089d00
'2011-12-11T04:54:34-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a250bae167a23075559361dfa01da842
4e0a2fe060e2ce25980e4b13a623080e698ae7cc
'2011-12-11T04:56:26-05:00'
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBH' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
77307f7e8a503c6bc05dfda348297e44
fcbaddcaf21cb06e001939ab556a6b8980fa9bf0
'2011-12-11T04:56:43-05:00'
describe
'232890' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
3601e2101fba9a21d812de4b94c9a143
540047626e852bcf9bc553f124ca6f6d7fab35ae
'2011-12-11T04:53:16-05:00'
describe
'81298' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
fc6a8814971615c0f617d80c9ca732b1
c64c69901cfdf269a91d50d72c8fa60675cfd361
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBK' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2d3029dfd60fb3640a3d5c6d6bf75524
8b4e9692e695f1080e0d1cd12654abb89fefdc18
describe
'26564' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
f21610c6073dfaf718e13e3c5af5fd73
a61813fe8c5d4cc4a1742e6bf500a2b7867668e4
describe
'1883704' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBM' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8a7c582e8b311ee9c6795342d9f5b02b
a8864ce2d803915539377537b902f67d4e4293e0
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fde0030f20284fb6fbb8f0906ecd1c4c
8a0a87b403490e2cf41be762faaed4b19073f09b
'2011-12-11T04:53:44-05:00'
describe
'9015' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBO' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
49e131cfd642f8fa9eb75ee85e481622
87282df57cef08800b4ca3dfab965d1adadf142a
describe
'232945' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBP' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e7d26a28d0d67268db44ecd35b988a53
9f57a1b5624811ae51047bc17f9e00f10cfd86f0
'2011-12-11T04:54:20-05:00'
describe
'84728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
8c0ec1e7733277f0c70cba9aee66dc01
32db320f8934d9cbf1c5937db4293668ffdf7148
describe
'21861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBR' 'sip-files00039.pro'
ca4c604d9794fcdea8a5354de8633a70
23104804a775ce1ebcba13b23367b087a4e4ac59
describe
'28008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
723743dfad43718cb26a360eaa1cffcc
c4b39f06fd6345c5702a6fe9e77c94f0b467c7f2
'2011-12-11T04:54:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBT' 'sip-files00039.tif'
5e2adde23c6c80c9bdf559d7d70509b4
fdcfc71a13fd0310d2e98b8a51091f5b690d51be
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
945a214d02e7ce1cc41548d62bfc1b47
b3ae652b3208dcfaec2017334a13d1f905abf209
describe
'9140' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e8fdd61f34adfdbdd46e5cc648ccb72b
965e4896375a66502eb7c19b2d717e9cff322fd8
describe
'232939' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3cdf5c0ed0e18f99cbd580fddcfa4fa6
ddec2597a3856032565a68bee04d200ee9ef6ad1
'2011-12-11T04:54:45-05:00'
describe
'87380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBX' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7f7f34a002d2a8876ea3c270ce8499ba
330afb7a872d3b66782e2c26a3e7f97500e53a11
describe
'22907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e0943871f131fc6808bfc1e83513ba78
ca38b64518e6a3454f6b5a6a7335c8096b35204e
describe
'27700' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
d680b17d60fab05f5757ca574b0cabff
b76d912658afaf28eea409a32dce09f3f9afe780
'2011-12-11T04:55:21-05:00'
describe
'1883768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCA' 'sip-files00040.tif'
6d912a52977093a9fc8812a989e83e1f
d2a3918ed66a16e9e6160f57ed8b859ff03b1941
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCB' 'sip-files00040.txt'
c34c542194e6968e3cc46c9cd4ae7d77
accf039799c1b1669512782e7de9ff88ede9a193
'2011-12-11T04:56:21-05:00'
describe
'9275' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCC' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
617115b6c0e1569f4474a587fc5cee09
a8ffb2fdb473b5ee0ef534bd202bb6a24da3d822
describe
'232867' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCD' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
25f3c53d617d919a0284c89236c5b189
30b39fd976b94d0a8530eb1e91328b4071f8a60b
describe
'85119' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCE' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1b42ccb4c06473423f43dda76d4c7ab5
e1b1ec61f48a8dbcf678e8ffebbc0a608925fd4a
describe
'22157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
2b31d0a993c09efedbd929ed371090eb
d18b3ebe753ec38b71b3a8341aad763300f1d85e
describe
'27714' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCG' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
3d6e2431514f8279ab75b9589087ce0a
e0d18254e1e98064ac6357094d587bf9990ea021
describe
'1883740' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCH' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d1bb38711e6c999f69c4ffe940a3c247
164389d062d7b00ec450b2964d9f80b80ee8df9a
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
983d7db0ea72d0ad61d6262ccebb294e
0364435504c3d832a5cb9c2b24c4303229a5a43f
describe
'9063' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
78ce4938f2d90da45bcfac23cfac0191
43ffe06ed76ccefe32d1f7a58280930d6a948b22
'2011-12-11T04:56:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
fc7114e24033b51da8c80387f4f33e75
a924d2d4be7273d5164a1d149767cb483587afc8
describe
'76479' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
89219e29b884806984a3bc52d3a7dffc
0bdb178e69ee78ed06c595a4828ed63ca76d0fe5
describe
'19605' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
761e0e8d735847bb0d2029321ff11e95
37536f12e330710ef1ed2ec540b24b733b7cfa4b
describe
'24566' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
490a33d92f3ae92bd4254069e9b50537
5f70951bea5b8b40000d9b032438be2036e1ea79
describe
'1883644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
e13bb60e36571e0f1e63e9cde36c80e5
478faf0c960773ff7e8f3b28a2e84ba3b6f90d61
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7591163e0aae1a7755b3f81534c67ddf
e0bacb4fd8589df9cd1157b26c73d7f7581faa87
describe
'8794' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
53405768ab6736af5a115d223a91d817
889f64f282ed9565f23e59ceef3202b3e795592b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCR' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
e51d2c73622dacb02d406f81d68a65d1
ec041e1e5a3077c9da4372f53ff119418d4da412
describe
'80608' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCS' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
38f6ef877c3b4b6c5ab2fff61121fc1c
440df4341b79aa71ed462126be388e9146b8a04d
describe
'21182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCT' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b2fbc8ca9337dfe586695bfe936269ae
58e3f12efd87f994b710468095664dca5ba0b3d2
describe
'26930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCU' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
0d379154143f90c95a3af4757a6fae00
765e1e3250da76bc5fee55229bf01deaa03a1cbc
describe
'1883796' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCV' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c0f3b030a1b69dfd0e7ac02243119315
897594e3781a56e29db69c691ffd96928d4710b5
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
40eecdae6d30d34b1ad99b63aab5772b
5c4cc516283eff5765e408cee6d1781a6dec9a8e
'2011-12-11T04:57:19-05:00'
describe
'8918' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCX' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
362c56b6b9b5b8bb34050b4f47ba8047
bda9b3cd0be7853f8070aa0637dbf59ff7aab1b7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
61e78e67c4e4448dc957e10e5ed005cc
fdfcfb8bffbe33816ca62d0d30a2efa831b067bc
describe
'93097' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
4c19d1909647edca2dd1c58125f3c19b
17a762550cf7d4ad9813fe630bcb0e1a3f7fa4df
'2011-12-11T04:54:51-05:00'
describe
'24866' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDA' 'sip-files00044.pro'
dc8ff9396dff7fe2f1d635689603df8a
6ad00bd7522aad00bd833c761031c8f987ca89ec
'2011-12-11T04:55:06-05:00'
describe
'30038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDB' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
65f577f6c3269e36fd2a3b3d9c26c060
eae0a576bed31c110231e3dcedf702af29fa2a75
'2011-12-11T04:56:53-05:00'
describe
'1883976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDC' 'sip-files00044.tif'
f7556171d744bdb8d0d0e054b1b268a3
24bdbf28c9d330f281f89af5458cb74377533cd3
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDD' 'sip-files00044.txt'
4596a370e4056ec72ebb7a7dcd459712
257fda22bf81ef6da84a98c08d56fe6251bac80c
describe
'9887' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
590af85388b7629f359895ef04c3b0ed
198bc98ab28fa1535f8848c4abc4c5f60c14e217
'2011-12-11T04:54:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDF' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
ed96a53a47874c612d071ac39c4fc26c
cd24b519d22e2c27d8cf0095c9e5261b35657835
'2011-12-11T04:56:18-05:00'
describe
'78459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDG' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f1a980801195115163849d750ed5ffe1
f154ba4aa3f63b9ad231b581a911a8be432e401b
'2011-12-11T04:53:40-05:00'
describe
'20013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDH' 'sip-files00045.pro'
723d69ce2e74609fdb1ca773d7d9bc2c
e3b8330d91f522141701d0e1e808d15aaccab7e6
describe
'26038' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDI' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
857aaaea5ee5712f88cadb649abb0056
c31bfac8d2caff262eccff76b60f9689ece31b56
describe
'1883564' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b36f3a6c2747c3259acc5edf5b6fe2b3
0bc4c9f0820afc0138d516c0ac4e93f0f00c8dbe
'2011-12-11T04:54:58-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDK' 'sip-files00045.txt'
34f8bf7b82b592c4c14abc68d5e69c01
e203d01d6872d06d18fc1aec724877ae67f5b7eb
describe
'8619' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDL' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
27b8ee82f23c5f60d9b71a6fe9e95787
1db40f452f6e24ca8a03b7da186e02f1a060129e
describe
'232925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDM' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
18e19e31175c8d11248a9e257b1fa4dc
20e47d5204685a879283a4f29601f2cf48c37f33
describe
'76953' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDN' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
54c4849dfa4060ba8a5d851ed0d795c7
85f186bd091d8aa575f5c20759e374fdfa0bf06d
'2011-12-11T04:53:35-05:00'
describe
'20544' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDO' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d36c3e3c09567c7f1a088e28aa0ec138
1d22857cb2029ef91f97889cb41c287395626971
'2011-12-11T04:55:56-05:00'
describe
'25456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
fe632b512e0d0bcd7b9b3edcd3186b1a
c14a755d9fcb67509dd43c6af19b6decbe0b3956
describe
'1883772' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
012420d4739c1cf60b20cf02dd404f71
8bd28d8555e36de6b94e21984d3b48a1f7a0159e
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDR' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2e14219f9f8aecb4443c632997c81fa9
38e1acabfa9dfacae598a799a0fa9454ffa75e91
describe
'8745' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDS' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
6bf6a8ebaed53d300ce0e521c83ca78d
510295eef89e02be833760ba1bc954e94af35505
'2011-12-11T04:57:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDT' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
a7c36335312406ecfe21eea0d03214db
e5adcc471fe4a150b6ee15c0d5a2504fc754a8e4
describe
'89162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
689e6171963eeead0b72e92a054e1c1c
497b1ad51cfbf3ad7a790de1b5985bbeb1c61153
'2011-12-11T04:56:34-05:00'
describe
'22496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
2ac2c5230a586f7ce73be282bb0f0a93
93063996eb9705585e335ec92e3cd8337308c890
describe
'28723' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDW' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
730f8388aad749dd29d01eef66dac500
cf012dbcaa2b8c7698191f856530f107ea6ae774
'2011-12-11T04:56:16-05:00'
describe
'1883892' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
8cbdbd5fbf5002f3e6bd28e7a71b8c6e
776c33882b3063fc366e41699b46a47cd937688f
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDY' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f2e67c4eb85d2c9c84d4db06de43d2ef
e6715e7290c2e9c32c3a68e19e2818d9c51c6d0a
describe
'9450' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
b4e9a3b15bb5705548cd6ccad8bed68e
4704563aa162199a239b1135fd7abffe5509ca3f
describe
'232924' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEA' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
86655aa5e8f599eb817398d7eb6c3892
0d20c5a78f2cda43e56a20b3fdedf04f01acaabb
describe
'91103' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEB' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
4870c992e30dd18c455c90d824217be9
8fbfd1c4f755a55139342356ebd864a7ffef72a8
describe
'23224' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEC' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b820a5c263ef18612fd6cd883707450f
fdd18d1989a09bd5741aa99576921ae33d06e331
describe
'29728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFED' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
01226144843460593ad44c0808d8e40e
89b8d38ff2b89911a12a5c7a7bec53a8e234fcaa
'2011-12-11T04:56:33-05:00'
describe
'1883876' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEE' 'sip-files00048.tif'
10dbc5fc9ffbf5fcbdfda909f3ed5d8d
36ce231fad0d568e3e8b88f598e333710b1ffa74
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEF' 'sip-files00048.txt'
cb2ded734cf32545eccfab387e016148
eef417f24f42e24faca36dca23d95817badc76d5
describe
'9641' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
9528c3f7144c61feaa7b15310994c2d1
558cbf9b63bfe2c240ec36648834cd29d06c5f66
describe
'232917' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEH' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
847ae886a6b2b88b148747ff36438187
14a9ba0611399720560d979bf1abfca65602b729
describe
'84553' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b32bf645c4c45c648080a1a447f11cee
9ab1332552514eb5be693c9424f5244f04e19db7
describe
'21938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
79969e7c4634323f225dc89980212fbb
032a051f7f543f9a782eed801db980027d311a8a
'2011-12-11T04:53:30-05:00'
describe
'27164' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEK' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
7f00ee68be2921ecdf3f467fabbc075d
076f184ab7936947543f30b5a9b2472fad8395f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEL' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c1e6ebae5e06271e857b48a7d92cf7e6
08461ad931fc6b2f8c3dab7f314a9bc8000db19d
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEM' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ed01a12571a37a004d19e6b54a0b8e22
45b182e4665b41b9f86fa2fc39ea5bc0cf184ba9
'2011-12-11T04:53:42-05:00'
describe
'9106' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
39013ff407298274b1e676435cb4eef3
4d0a566c82f2638ab5d94f5da0767877a9151be5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEO' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ec1d5b95bf9ec231e0196c77ce5b3e5c
b6fef7f18dda56eda57b5106a493c1648da78a93
describe
'86058' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEP' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8a02e427165c9aca02c14eb9037587f0
379c58112fc6a86be598b73cdc76c74629e3eb22
describe
'22003' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
7876e9dec82d6b6ab08536930f16f76e
7cad7709784be213e1e9a3cd2522a22ce7542047
describe
'28366' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFER' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d44427a20037540eb3bb137984f03a6c
185e434f3bf0941359ea0de99a0b734aae2920ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFES' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ff8b3073773126e23dcfacbd9fb95659
d267d27e1edf49617b385f519831c756093a76e5
'2011-12-11T04:56:29-05:00'
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFET' 'sip-files00050.txt'
c4c86d9d9060758063d47fe182bd6504
0cf52b538ff03b477d332e11400882a4c53fb07d
describe
'9381' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEU' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ed265525c7a837e789a3889823e564d3
0375f31ca3565472eff82861821ecc4aea44d900
describe
'232929' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
505668e50a8334c46dbf55d99c2292a4
bcc8fb35a6953635a4312acd1f79348de260e18b
describe
'92753' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEW' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
b4f011da6e2d45980cb4f5e17f3aa651
2820d2cb9a711f26b2171f7ac33e8f52201be0f3
'2011-12-11T04:56:02-05:00'
describe
'22874' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEX' 'sip-files00051.pro'
581a5159ec7de3dd40f091a3b16feeb9
7d453f6dc1b59e9f79aabe0094c238dac8977a68
describe
'30848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEY' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b624fbf44cbbb70dda685d9434e3175d
f14f51391fc7da50ff5552dad2532e44e491ae64
describe
'1884020' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5c6ec34a01fbbc06bda5da7302d157b2
b4a8074614d9083238ca5814c57546645dc6b4ab
'2011-12-11T04:54:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8b3f7234f58928f747f9f1c91ea71c37
12899b6f3825b39897d80050dee996a1bd2f1857
describe
'9554' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFB' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b2dee1d0d06b9f30095fead1111fff97
8f922ba92665686456e9c8c5b94dc18baf3ffcb6
'2011-12-11T04:53:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFC' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
b660ca8cf55c63b4254a570d9b4de796
15bd06b32ef265e93d5b93e7caa8e036b927caa9
describe
'93404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFD' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cf4c3d978779c20cb5f6696c3b9f50cd
fc7b026716544d2c56af85f2ca9c7e514a21f146
describe
'25355' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5e79bd8481650fd7143cf26702b7bb53
f7eecb359d58a0bc26aaaef7f27dae5710eedfe2
describe
'29752' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
6c554c37cdbb7a56734c782147d60718
f06bcf012a26d7944b6c1c8a31917faf61b71d8f
describe
'1883688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFG' 'sip-files00052.tif'
c38fa25404783656b9bd1b1aad98caba
808e5e01875dbf6e6d38b1d03330b921a8740fd6
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f8c4fddbf6c5118dfb505d75ad130780
4c97b2073d31a1039efbb9f9eb33257f2cbc9a07
describe
'9779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFI' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
ea58694db8c65d6c326272b98c70dddc
e1344c83a68c311da85be4f33409bd435d332070
describe
'232910' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
bf350f2b11ec82732261aee1d77bc6bb
99d21c6ce2019dd06e26b9a2ad643b54f52b18f9
describe
'87371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
f3d28e7a7603b814acf8eff5d8f00ec6
f8b62f2ed60705959837e39ca507441ceac7be94
describe
'22519' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFL' 'sip-files00053.pro'
bf7240d0e7c7cf91ddb2d50b0df013a8
e13726a29f0b6827001f04ed85877116bd9b5c2f
describe
'29120' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFM' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
6040fc4914db3d61df078f34547f94c8
1807c2d6f9bc66c66967ff545c4773da478c7e88
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
0f115e9ff0dad08fdc22a9f976ed4cdd
e0ba3d93b58e56989b67e9c95f329cca3e12ff8e
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
c80367458d179bf85b5460bfe9fe35f4
e9ad60034e66998a9a02de35dc4a986266de0dc7
describe
'9339' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
858604f79d0d691cca8741d860acc8f4
aff21979f80a0b474995d74ea33a34bbc35805a6
describe
'232875' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e5b055d8ea48d306d2f2cda92eb28028
5f8da1a7c7c4a8e5d99bfeb49c50d7e20791afc9
describe
'89498' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d24547f6988e88182c8092c83bc742b9
541072372185ab0fbfbf7fec60295a34257777fc
describe
'21958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8612cb468ed22d0fc300bfa856a865be
e89e07176fa0d22afbe37d217246f109c30da6f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a93568bff0914915dbfee4fd0e98fd5b
88a60a5daef5b9c5824cedd64e28f1c82c2c52b2
describe
'1883964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
fbb2926baafdd6128c0d7d47d5c3bb11
166947715910e81aa65f76c89e8a8bffcd7d5f7d
'2011-12-11T04:54:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
34771a23d4005eec109f5df52fc7d0b2
35278384fd0fa5f4ebc5b0087de83a5c3b98fc76
'2011-12-11T04:54:39-05:00'
describe
'9967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
85dbdfff18a197d678e3f62ccb9410d6
189c88b73b6907976da958961a53072fdd967214
'2011-12-11T04:54:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
1a7cfc73ac16229c9b466ca3fabc4439
443e8085550452ea7ba87f4c6702996c9d926276
'2011-12-11T04:55:34-05:00'
describe
'89670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
32232927cdd9c6b5d09872ebf28fc12a
6d5dbd7ba360946c9b00a44e3389b4c2e3f1c5a0
describe
'22684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
9833cdf37a8077a5de26ae97a8e2403f
ddfd91665e4b9e4bcd72a8b066fce9d624efbf88
'2011-12-11T04:57:17-05:00'
describe
'29513' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
03307351e4e86a88d8a973b03f5fcb62
94d9ba66ca5905e0fc818fab68b86dfef270ae50
describe
'1883980' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
83871e519dd9870aa50ba891963cc3ed
9d7ea6c9335b8a190044d27e1d6f76b0e49c2cc5
'2011-12-11T04:55:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
e98951919fa57ad42f9541344b41aa3e
6546bf64a29cd8f10caf72bc1d1bcb1a2cba1f8b
describe
'9596' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ea6a6013761e14d4216fc70e63f1fd30
0ae15166a3e99b751c386cafc677043e638efed2
describe
'232930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
6e1101d90de87970d6eed7ada8fdf282
5f1cb0ba353789069dab7613858eef362652b04b
describe
'87993' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
4a53d71d3df5dbda46d8fbd540e0e153
d4ccbe229f113955b5ec6dd93df85448be49c551
describe
'22418' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f93975883dfd2749ed6c5a3e08cb320e
7eacfc501fb4925f3c67459142071af7f763dfe2
describe
'28447' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
2c69ca92ed44b6085a4b05be927c970c
c52b5a30a46f4ceddf8ebc06cc4d8a3456874c17
describe
'1883792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1217cd56366becac164a6d6fd3e10059
4cb44d2c9e85fbd67e3eb15f4b2bd93b72951bf1
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
462b8ff1f0baa365d4ce18a023410724
d3b79a819cfe51c885b85986566b0c04088da769
describe
'9336' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
8acdabd5bc241dd6c1b392184e00c573
ff77134802a0d94f020f9d53774cf9cff217e365
describe
'232844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
9984f236083ef19e98329d10205bafe3
14640e0a976797b0eb91685ad2af4dda0103f0b1
describe
'82416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d207775f8737d19466dcba14d78ef865
a2233af894b2eafcdb103582f2fe7f57f24907bb
'2011-12-11T04:53:58-05:00'
describe
'20865' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
aa9f48b00033f94bd3ae6a9f46ec91d1
bf4605e25ae0f01cdc48796e0cbdf9c4706632c0
describe
'27215' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ba516f38c48e8637af4fc7f711781cda
bef1c47201099b85dc68e8809601b20912798494
'2011-12-11T04:57:22-05:00'
describe
'1883648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
11634a0b6a559bb498a25278ccf26a6d
82e4b8bfc0b765b9e2f2f87f7eba6a71f61f5054
'2011-12-11T04:57:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
35c2a3b23ba0f521e4b38e139fb7792f
8a1d3649c951ef1c4b986b6e16259fa3b72b50ca
describe
'9005' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7005a7cb8ccf2c54f905d468cd0ebd7e
61a8c86c6ab143dbcb7693959d8fc5a00c5ac84a
describe
'232918' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
e41d43fa313fd6ddb80688f89cebe545
461f385d0f571252fe9e202385d9820f9b66ecfa
'2011-12-11T04:53:25-05:00'
describe
'86111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGT' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5826a0573a4a363691e11a521068c19c
9b22ef7c442a142d3e2cd0b039591fe69b85e089
describe
'21252' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGU' 'sip-files00058.pro'
eba045b0bd2329e414d5f7fb77106f71
8d83c832ff9b3df9223ce95e388bd790190afd42
'2011-12-11T04:53:23-05:00'
describe
'27692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
18a82174d3c9f6f5e941f31ef7f56d32
d612080c7a34fc2796b3b73a9f347b4ef8e4c77d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
62733f1ba6c0c609aa95aeb449faf30b
a8bdd098e37d611e726175ff2c49e05220adf931
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGX' 'sip-files00058.txt'
23514c2c8148790d41d2b0fdadee5a91
f576b78bb26057724bf7389fe9a205d6cbfbc854
describe
'9478' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
1926a989fa03d9bb963a14f0d3e1d2bd
43fe866d4f3c92d571dd1b9afa4bff8228b59d17
describe
'232947' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1234fac3e9d7da51a149692ff6eb4ef4
0391f6b21d32689c85ccf2c827f7395d30781b2b
describe
'85653' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
fc9eb826b0a71694cb58d90fd28494da
3912d7de8fdd2723e0883c5826ff368d9bd430c5
describe
'21531' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHB' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b829137d934f063e459a031949fa9c4e
bf65b21412afe857b228aa04bfa1dbe7a27f49b8
describe
'28251' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
9a62c2dfd50ca9cf99caa45d049e5c16
ce0cc5e701836d5d546825122d628a1c5c2962be
'2011-12-11T04:54:06-05:00'
describe
'1883808' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHD' 'sip-files00059.tif'
91d04388f17cee2894e0b1f029d995a4
d262c3a6e4d77f54947bf9764733b63aadada810
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHE' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1dd9e1e3a1a3e471b936292fd0376409
ecb210e942d569468bbb0b9cb451c80e44472b84
describe
'9346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHF' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
f57cd3ef0af797cf93e09ec2302c4728
e166aec893f747670fc73c15991ae3ea32cc6a23
describe
'232888' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
3fa47470e29c7ac80993d53678585051
b1b4f3e38a851e6a1b5ba19ea174830690642fe5
describe
'87755' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHH' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
defb980d971356ab6b3855b8fb24483a
98edee1330172a2405ba1ac63ca910e28ea39410
describe
'22505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHI' 'sip-files00060.pro'
60a52b903a05baa7a330fe527315693e
1f51fe5ddf4b5edda58fe19301e910a1daddb0b7
describe
'28146' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7650178acd286a24647beee50c31699d
75626b8145816b3011c0117d39397d18b2d85927
'2011-12-11T04:53:29-05:00'
describe
'1883684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a9768e7a151c4f580503345c0649fc3b
af9c4b29fc8622957e05d2470599d0dd6163bd5c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHL' 'sip-files00060.txt'
2189ceec58953bc0b29c1c3ea6006b06
86158f0dcfc95ac1e06920dcd4a986c0d3fe53bd
describe
'9153' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHM' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
05f56b2ef18e64e2c840d4bc5d842117
e1d562b5aec65d5e69c8b0316566905c0d585c59
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
15b74231d61fdc6c59c2c43bb4c89e2b
0729058e7b46bb2eb2b9ed3261ad29576fc91335
describe
'123496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHO' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
114550af4088a2aaf45df6dba735c1a4
04ea3be7f410755f819ec0375c209147027a167f
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHP' 'sip-files00063.pro'
dc52e154fe6179e588bbe3c4c24774aa
3a9a2aee6f4ba8f85ab72ef02f060ebbf8a5bacf
describe
'27860' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
ca13c24969f80c9df9844f8c190d813f
d3609dfd1fff66671c284b8fec60e7cb089b5cca
describe
'1883736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
2e5c0a661453c2fa835da7e53f4c5d4f
eb1b3525a2641b6e2f055e9a6a00d2dfbf70213c
'2011-12-11T04:55:11-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'8539' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHT' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
ab66afcd74ce5cd4f26ce7e84fe7cc40
b8ec6e3ca9071c92ea2e9b0d5497807fb2f32442
describe
'232936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
91f7188908feb69f0bb832834c00d38a
71e0e6c8fad09073cd47273d8f2b53af2f9b347a
describe
'102388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHV' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
65f9c7a9a6ae7ed9a731673f882ddc43
db5c60c7e055dff205ca92c99254afb044b95974
'2011-12-11T04:55:19-05:00'
describe
'23063' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHW' 'sip-files00065.pro'
85702b3f74c1a925af9b62360fdb22fc
eac7cd9fc8bf8a0475c9ffb06bc0272759d6c8e3
'2011-12-11T04:54:27-05:00'
describe
'32068' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHX' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f522c2f9466dbbbdb07ad761dc422829
3d6abbc3895b5a792128dac20a934938c5157338
describe
'1883920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHY' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e07dcb6b18d25f6517e373b0ed09f3fc
f6a12953adc1de83f404963ae76cb335491dd88a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fd2fffb6e1ca9ea5fd03df89c168c938
7e1c8524632a615dc138c4a90f47bfa2ffb34373
describe
'10169' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIA' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
62ce0b9905dbf8c936452fdec434f1c7
3fd40dd8e43bfb68425b4862fee4a5d98647c266
describe
'232905' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIB' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fc9798171ddc77a70bd898e93819ffad
457b0517dfe1b898fc7ba531833c5f0721a274e6
describe
'90060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
aa593618c3cfa05a0bc823a534569870
5f272ffad12cc88dba5fa14832ba690f2e0f38c3
describe
'23276' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFID' 'sip-files00066.pro'
49d7ba36ec4a10d809261ab8a9905d9d
e326181b7550eb0688c7df254e83d7370f8527df
describe
'29734' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIE' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
5fdb3d30675fef100933ad49e101bf8d
a947e29f72359f30ae0fe5e1e110ae070cba9692
describe
'1883936' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
6eee1e885f12636b13fc278341d69ebf
6097eab0606df002e57ba482839242ed6dfb36b3
'2011-12-11T04:53:54-05:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIG' 'sip-files00066.txt'
22859e58b29d9aba5c249b8da3a08505
5c2d095dd18a26037e412600dbaee2baa02cc2c2
describe
'10003' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIH' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e9e7197b319de727a4d8899a221c8f9c
d97151e44fc9b04d7333ebe918355c66192270b1
'2011-12-11T04:57:20-05:00'
describe
'232872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFII' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
edd00a301edbe6955a879b6ac0d4e599
9b5f3b745bbc499df20b7f9f4ab3b68db28816e4
describe
'92531' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a1d90e29526d89386e8cf0a1fd4d0ff1
6a3203e9d25e1b38b2ae22b5756c216624108f7e
'2011-12-11T04:54:36-05:00'
describe
'23439' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
5a860c246330ad0d707cf4ce47fec248
a5add4dd4eb1f950e2874d776fe7a8a895b5c876
describe
'30611' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIL' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
cb6cc8967c2442575cec6fe9a905aa4f
9f574a3e976535dd7be77a0ef393b581c7098316
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
c7371b9b99eb0e6f327991bd7d799754
4c97d50d99519f6b5117f2b7b33d0be668a894f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIN' 'sip-files00067.txt'
e308c4cc11f7c7044f4c15b581c0e8be
3c9c13e59839523e0f4e62e0229a089ab7d1a5e8
describe
'10075' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
584f9d7ab2b006c01ebf8bd925f1966a
31578dcde36734c849a22727fb6f6d4643d68c54
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIP' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0fa4459406e2e1454d7bd500a1ec8104
7c8f2d747459b052a1d5156ce0d53e4290013c06
describe
'91576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
910b30e5cc404e47ab378088b9052eaf
f99d70aa42413f0508445d0c16d6ff56a94ed07a
describe
'24010' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIR' 'sip-files00068.pro'
843ef5957cc408c32d8ae901b7585ad3
14bd4bb2b81b0073991c8efa8da1e1313548edc1
describe
'29887' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
2911a41a66bb5f41224de81a6c8024ee
6de681e45a3335f90e6cf7a9baa6610cd239f401
describe
'1883956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIT' 'sip-files00068.tif'
63153b5a1738b539a6d228c14f5a568d
75a37addfe525639fa154aeb6d232f8d68213413
'2011-12-11T04:54:37-05:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIU' 'sip-files00068.txt'
e492aa844ee66d96a58cfd1c54fa2d67
34b5e4d18063d02f4d15c89d0b7f879d6d383351
'2011-12-11T04:53:39-05:00'
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIV' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
78bee9c80da0f7313bbca979ba15825e
c5c1c6f47b1625e612558f678a17cf21564303af
describe
'232907' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIW' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
316855c6e2532ba861595316f71eae3f
de974e1f74c54343abade9c6051c4b11e762791d
'2011-12-11T04:54:12-05:00'
describe
'90182' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIX' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
50fcffca69ecf0933249c9c7aba04bf6
a6a053c738c3b4d4cec706a0c55b6ecb902e6198
describe
'23450' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIY' 'sip-files00069.pro'
95e39aa1c9dd1b4ccdd852f5629736ab
5e4affb7ef73753c89b8de1c6c9d68288c2127c7
'2011-12-11T04:56:56-05:00'
describe
'29938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
54af690fa4b95c5dfe7f8e9ae6b1ac73
0f74de851aebf061393c300d4b0a330922b935c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJA' 'sip-files00069.tif'
0ada2a6d714e815c7748052c12dfc43b
7e6907e5f8fa35daaf4d18ac5cc82d3e8f189bd2
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJB' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b36bb6057fa66a7d3634ce90a8f42f85
97b655c8cf77583e1556933448da3dccc1ac879c
describe
'9821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJC' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5feea0bcc518159e79ebe3d01dd42287
0ca0542d1ff14a3f3b6714cdd69eb10b0642a16e
describe
'232937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJD' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
81e0b0598446fc245f415101e34952ca
78f910318d36680455880000a1574fd4c85fff17
describe
'88491' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJE' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8f7f96e2f1497f3d2275b8f30ff9d478
df4b2c1457c381d297722798be7ed932ae4d28bb
describe
'23238' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
aa2a589aa6961ded82519754bfa383f8
accd1673e975d690d131aa86a025ec1c33b0b690
describe
'29612' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJG' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
cec3a02d2112aa863e464cae9f80d962
32ddd384595d69d42d0488797a934002953ef828
describe
'1883948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e30db7025032ed4caa57aae025eb76e9
74d2578be3f565cb913e77adf98a0d35e6001bab
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d3f1ac1e1acabd388ff0e284a40312bd
94ad2ee213c3429ecef5fd25e71bd6c5c4c69263
describe
'9895' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
30eb7a816c75881a5ad13c6c912fd0bd
20bd0364935502b1f9c692129a18f1457b98edce
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJK' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a9b9db713d1d0585035c919e01ca619b
b9f543b403e0091686a814bc98b41ce9f2abae4d
describe
'82769' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJL' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8330ca3334fe2013d39492873c8bcc42
291197df7d97c40b97183b43a69a188018d81827
'2011-12-11T04:56:19-05:00'
describe
'21251' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJM' 'sip-files00071.pro'
033583f3480577775f830af44451f475
ebe0b35065c86431bc3e0dfa37f1ad491cbf4a2b
describe
'28176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b6d14a87c6ca5c799689482596f49b71
0d15d1d145e04f82d946b84dfc445b7d41a3ad1d
describe
'1883916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
860f084cbfe2ef2c18647898d6b67cea
2e44574a49cf79e428eb3a3efe7bf7b32aff6718
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
a174a4e45e0234e2059c1825b277bc34
6353122111d25521a17b0d2e165d5a89a7e58314
describe
'9709' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
27669cf7f381361ef05197a6791d811e
2a4c14d56954ae316555dee2bd827a10a6586214
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJR' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a483616e81913077638e209befe4e8f3
3a96e418349e534e879c62a70f8be4911e5bb266
describe
'80406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
86ece9028f7b1004d33ff55c209cd147
e623a8fa4dcf6cc6bd2ebd590c19fa448649edde
describe
'20137' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d2a11fc0dba962e38cee9993f2f067b2
67aae42e051aff2de8e9271c3fed1068355f8fd3
describe
'25756' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
ae6c723e68d227cb8f3e3899fb2f3de9
fefce100b83af40556371a9f3d411d2640763d7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
65547dc9e3a7fef276456de8d8835a7d
aa1f1ad5eb001c5ed74984d317a15b1bcb1b235f
'2011-12-11T04:55:01-05:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
7a471bc9a225d5c020a496e4d2fc2cac
eeeac57c397638c4cc0d60bd5441f456e5a3dbe0
describe
'9107' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
0d8b29800e2547888f421d300637c82b
9eafcae0c6cbbb9ae792ad840048158a77994b64
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
81d2c28e58f140675ddcc1e9d7f087e8
2b12ffb5be52a6a837c6657ebf7b4cae301a23e9
describe
'87155' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
620c1f49942ea3b319eb47e035e4a3d8
f97e7d44fdd226474ad356d009eaa277d312443b
describe
'22689' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
80f3898dac133278aabe12d804f96693
e2390988c8057971009e5f846e5a7f321d3ba387
describe
'28226' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
39442fad0b10ba04bf7ba6f81f3dacd4
86507c8c076ee146719cd4c55da255a45d539dd3
describe
'1883932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f0c955b75a1b13089a8799b9fb3932b6
cfdb79c3e30b27bd7c0ce4e691660d668741e46c
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
06103d6bfb6ebf1ede10e2ee5a1c0905
f5b3a1952c8a512df2386ea2f9c05406fda1601f
'2011-12-11T04:55:25-05:00'
describe
'9610' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
d74ddc9239a857b15248e357f957ae64
5339d3c69a9e80dd741c3f0edc243f960573753f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c8dd9513f9d3adb3e0ca4db8d6cae70b
3576c25bd775114993843316bbaea6df4befdbaf
describe
'92943' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
67ae3ac50680e49341b74e013e362fc1
836e0fedb9a5e13de7fe97440c7b34bbe5115222
'2011-12-11T04:55:18-05:00'
describe
'24225' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
989ff12deaee59a677a59164e006028e
80b21f10c80e93fc2481b213014e6392f0cff4cb
describe
'30969' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d8a7b2431fed5a1f0ca0aa3f14e6434f
b63a8ae4a58d71a05ad59ae0ce2ff65d5c319b37
'2011-12-11T04:55:46-05:00'
describe
'1883880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3c713b06644ffd222d2e4517c36b27f9
27eaff4b57c5c60c10b47ec93bbc2729652b8adf
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
56a7cce46fc51b6c55adbca5236fbabc
9f70b1844ded5cf30ebee062673931c9e8bad1bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
bcbf6a851fce80272c4333e3394ccc43
5a7ac95456791b8d51fcad56c6daef7c1a0b1dc4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
141645563d0345f41e32eed600f6859c
033895963b7a32649b22bf86a3c43696db7b8be1
'2011-12-11T04:57:12-05:00'
describe
'90434' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ad54e628557771c92773da5bc14b025b
ca162872e3fb153247df46b0c81f54921f020b83
describe
'23173' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
4608503beb9edb5543dc0d9aab453dfd
02cab72aac05b41f7f715a055f4a53a9fd4a10e8
describe
'29404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
7e36e8b24808b70ce3cee3233a15cda1
81a2f68d3cc17bc54c6bb371558eed146b16286e
'2011-12-11T04:55:04-05:00'
describe
'1884036' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
71b33c0b1807303658660cfce3ef68ae
044d21c110decc3f74dcaa2a3f4a9babfd6f2922
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
447b16fbf4461889cf07d37587507e84
3208b8463c9aeedbd10c21df2cc0fde766a64650
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
95aa141de451f5f316555c1ee386c878
6cc2f932bcc00169dab3d00ff6952e7eb363ec32
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
8e8341de3eea0dab9f86197e06396037
610c90b5da5bef01607c601a455fc3a739c6e7d0
describe
'90419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
b43427b0140317f1e32eefc9f44c9862
e0e4121b64aea483ddcd5b4392476b2f8f05b652
describe
'23893' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
de9ad82381851b50d747d0be40110a47
de87494164ed9ede2b0403a180cea054d60a9420
'2011-12-11T04:56:06-05:00'
describe
'29004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
a4967ad6876ce540c5d4aba79d492fc4
4f5070a6c45f8628e731643f14a9bf3e6d756ba5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
1554402c6f7bdb65cb4449cb633c30ef
a9b960a276dfa69ed8c7dc2fc838fa1e015a3549
'2011-12-11T04:54:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b727c71ed7ec2808c6de75f156dd601d
3ca69ad1d45451b40af4852b21cd1561b9952a9a
describe
'9604' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
309646c66f21ec8814d307e589f89618
a196f765c518d8ede56234c70415982646bcc2e7
describe
'232884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLA' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
a438047664e20eb42d4044059ac06e2d
1a1e67b77d93a6c1ec14924f15c9a7c744ce9970
describe
'82797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
80a1b4a77fe49605e6963f5de28d69ae
913bc46c86d7eca57aef5821072a86bd471339b5
describe
'21229' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLC' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ea3731121e68bfbee5b8f6b3084ec5bb
32656ecef8228822a190514caee7e07a9c59ec3b
describe
'27086' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
14c760250f55aff28fb17a4baf640b8d
9f933dce2c0f9c40de318546553b6cff8c578d66
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
5117287193e655deb995d01164500f9b
59f9bd562d8d2d5bc6491e40f9d0dcfd823944f7
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLF' 'sip-files00077.txt'
fe8217b4ea92d8e60c72eadebdba5e07
288b0ec3e5cca97f41abd028fe9e24963bcfc726
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLG' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
906bc8109e173f4e676614964f8b67eb
4d0040cba8de0163cc9666071e0ee4caa93edfe9
'2011-12-11T04:54:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
c989eac6940b5bbf348a9646e4c85e78
bb26e2880089618b37e7e21de5b4cbbf958a66d1
describe
'86476' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
15f7d248aa1d0f7df7424a527ec003be
f44aff4cec5a098f0b9ffa8c7996a5e80abe7ae7
describe
'22231' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ee01ea1f6ab16a2aec411eb92d8db735
bb3900393326ad0e329d403a4898caa9dda2f5a1
'2011-12-11T04:53:41-05:00'
describe
'28393' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
eeaea3175da0cceff139b0c7cea0a34d
f9422ae29b38c1d84cd6f2a58fd76ccda39c4f05
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1a73cb4e49c9735125ff5f8b9f2ea119
1555fc3241fb6f99363a1fdc2c01044aacba807a
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLM' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d132aa67ec2d8066e8c09a41e5a5cc33
fb1af7f8ea67ded3be862de556d0497d6217491b
describe
'9371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLN' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
5bcc68d0fc710bf2f9836002bcbdbcca
f459705f4e12df1c764699997d0217c6a7392f9f
describe
'232919' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLO' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
44b34b528876549478001dcd494b7392
b4903b9d259fd71505084f730eb0927a0e45498f
describe
'89126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e5629453a1124ebd186e0b3c998ce3de
b83c489fda4878faf46b5800cc13a7214e9c81ee
describe
'23162' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
d45c241c3d96dfcf72bfb6d2581dd40e
1972196439a37254da2bf2a5415f49cd7bb022b7
describe
'28963' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
0ccde407daed8c30e6087c93910c391b
0c6a72ccd891ef841dcc2b15324d3a77e765ab97
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLS' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9589fa84515252638ad13481469dcb16
755c86018a45004172dc1d4219e20214369ab4b4
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLT' 'sip-files00079.txt'
621c2b270e3292cc3637821732366c96
91b63d7e72bbb591569df8bd3dc96095e0419d4e
describe
'9404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b4e9dce625c3e842fbf7295382b6fdb3
cf780d95f856e56a5c394ac433e0fe082da9e36d
describe
'232913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
1104231cb69428924bad1faaba573a7d
d436057bc41e07bc4c3a57fef84078a63fb75792
describe
'91277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLW' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
a7774aababe699fc1a19f62d3d9b8545
19a3717f27535d71158c74e98a30d1ce3c960498
describe
'23582' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLX' 'sip-files00080.pro'
5bbf1d9f6fd6854f71339a2ea3605e10
b594c71f01be7eb6c7dd0aa3b3516e7354545458
describe
'30149' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7f5607b0788d6d8f5412a62eaf21d7e1
e0ceef8666b9a48ca2505a335a3e355d0abda09e
describe
'1883944' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
e4b6d549f75a2fd58a300a9bdadac500
15bd223e6938c19be4d7d60d439191d01656f233
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
7a816d03cfb0f35289a92e5576203dbb
95f6a5ae4ffe69821e86c7602c4b8b12f9563020
describe
'9823' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMB' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
cbe776a9ac57e42f2eeb2ad6072031a5
c0833b9226a5b418d89352e1dc6cf90b6cfcd8ce
'2011-12-11T04:54:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
64ed041c2f6b246d71c52b9d3ab17223
ec10b116354bc32db0e3fa7055cc6e62b4ff1224
describe
'88836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMD' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
6f6420725117b383e4bafb19c0ff59a6
85b94e2b21a37953484e91bbe955d4534478c7ab
describe
'23204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFME' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e4d84723d17fe8240314eb9bfc5d074e
113d2a76cdd5e3c7894438f5f6861ff7aba666a9
describe
'29467' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMF' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7be0db40c36a3b00a5b87f61b28a66c1
b12175ee2006ada730446472222efd802c9a11d8
describe
'1883972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMG' 'sip-files00081.tif'
a81c6674e6924296d030c5a907a8407f
148d9d790f8883440fc9b253b5979bbc68f5be6f
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMH' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4423eef79a5c52c709d78032a7f3a656
39c5e20661a58523991ffb53839aaa9994fcf24d
'2011-12-11T04:55:05-05:00'
describe
'9776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMI' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
37de47512d8a1de902e77d234a922695
bf1b03af0ae1007af84b9e8a3f01a6c073a2e842
describe
'232916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
650ad67997b3acedba609157682d2856
9cf29cdc81898bdd5a601f19592c1552a943eb51
'2011-12-11T04:56:38-05:00'
describe
'85644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMK' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
889fe8088be037056574e2f3dadc00db
877efabb72f292476b8eda5495ab6b826d75e512
describe
'22311' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFML' 'sip-files00082.pro'
9a58b8a0a1f1abd7349a63549b508ae3
6b5f1f9b8cb55168960a4b299890fe0b9005dec2
describe
'28678' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMM' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
d8bbf60462d1764e37938de796cef2df
dd7ce087ed87a98b35739322397a0d2043226437
describe
'1883988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMN' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3f3d95f43731e0b34f6bc41b51362d35
69510217a6d2bf4fc5754a0fb18280350f7cbbe1
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMO' 'sip-files00082.txt'
9c9c518c4cdedaf9f75b806b96e49ca7
6bd09c2a101cef8d355737dcccd861ce70c8fcfa
describe
'9819' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMP' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
58fb1b51cbd95118239138973a9d2e5f
5560a449aa0a121a302a827c2d061990436a8564
describe
'232870' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f2e57534ae6e1341951afd797a88825d
f4891a890a7ebabb5a31f2d068932226d9e80f98
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMR' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3f8b24e224aa3881147933a865a10407
5ee2ca9129d2918f00159126d114d7c11852bea4
'2011-12-11T04:53:36-05:00'
describe
'22692' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
d4c38e8c79b0cd170434f325237f1ce8
655d3d8532ac8bf6c128a90f00a9500f29c866aa
describe
'29509' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMT' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0015f432dac4d199b7344c4718061470
c77ad21ee3ff089d7c0dd814970ed2a5d05ce8aa
'2011-12-11T04:54:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMU' 'sip-files00083.tif'
1c6b2e6be324e13b2c0d78d52ba7be33
f197c298550fb360f73424564a5324a259ad8b4d
'2011-12-11T04:55:57-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
17d67f259ccd9d03673365830c73a588
d25e59904b7a5a4b6de96b48fe6195ffd55e1f12
'2011-12-11T04:55:13-05:00'
describe
'9698' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
65ee51b72a3940c70031d92c29480f47
f870ed6088937b2cbe86c909fe908f94356233e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6f211aba1464d8cc4ea6a9ba2a43bb8a
a9d6e764942f119cbb7453b2cd0a73cbf155d1ac
describe
'85332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMY' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
580ac67bad70a0ad6e123a459f337c73
0b8073d9fdcafa4a15d03fcbf3ee335908966389
describe
'23236' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
505a7edabdb0da255ebc6cab1f481599
f21d643c30ca3dd5e289820668b584ce655fa0e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNA' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
cba40cf6e1d10a363f58453e68412e01
52d7ee5d4e200063d9aa8bd8b15db2ec0e37dc1c
describe
'1883852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNB' 'sip-files00084.tif'
c75b705e4a596c82d502d6cd2e09fe97
73b4b40f3831d03ba11a657bb09205b2066fffb8
'2011-12-11T04:57:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNC' 'sip-files00084.txt'
ba749137ae8777b9d08d01b321090469
b0f7ee9c9ae3f404638ac7f790caed9d98844dd0
'2011-12-11T04:56:28-05:00'
describe
'9224' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFND' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a301bce3e4c51a9fef6296b589debdb2
8bdb6fa029b65362da08385cc52076b540533403
describe
'232848' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNE' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
7e93daf5bd691cc65098a28c2d0b5d7f
955adde86f83fe3b26e964c857b99b7fac834b69
describe
'84141' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNF' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2bb4a3ca05ceaef9d32074c9d206a3e5
a774ee38050bc4556172c5352a230ec632a88d8e
describe
'21878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNG' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f5207945a6d8646a80c154d02351872a
b7cb12142927fa8656e483482e45528ec4a671c2
describe
'27634' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNH' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
792a94f95a2c0e9fd123444193d796cf
20c5b6c1136d36cb7daf5eece5918ffd6337bde8
describe
'1883844' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNI' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2c0141e334172fb5c06e45a3f3427590
7d7e8a12e5d7581de18844af06a5521c0c8d8291
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00085.txt'
47dceceaff2cb5de4ae9563cd1d4db12
4807e11ca152e565571ba684c2eb89ee17f0feca
describe
'9499' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNK' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f3acde8e87ae0a37dd0afa176d547fa2
d718ff50c0e60d1e396be777a6dd17ffe0b267fc
describe
'232874' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNL' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
58fdeff59564eb741cf3f19bbaa202d7
69271ef4b12054b63cf3d53e99744ad34fe7ca08
describe
'87326' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNM' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a20d6450da83f7dba1dea8a477a60ba9
3c90b3c7a91460a70584eb7078d4749d2b73a746
describe
'22414' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNN' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0daf52cfe57a4fd17cb098a67152c824
f04a354fab207afd993e9ce9380ea9be77695ad8
describe
'28550' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
69392190b2f6d772d4d2b8e0880dc18c
f1d99c7e4d58d3d2d8bc1be2cb340f7097d58ce3
describe
'1883820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNP' 'sip-files00086.tif'
b8f864ce6ef91de5b08e1320546c9878
5831ea8e33565a0ac6ccd263fdcc87556ca36e26
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c618e2cb0c277e440bc7ab1e68f17313
70fb7534f8c5bf7abd31a8c39098d462229a2525
describe
'9524' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNR' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
236bc589072845d5a703fe07b96c79ed
3e88d2c6e78f5678cec6d352822f9a7308e1bf38
'2011-12-11T04:56:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNS' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4fd17871a90697d8513ac9c7091cc335
e4fb3fce4fd65850bb630aca36658ee9317f2b41
describe
'77940' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNT' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
340c3a1958c93a2cb2112f5e60efee2e
880514b4fa9e4ecbe904a8a49e01916b66e842de
'2011-12-11T04:57:25-05:00'
describe
'18727' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNU' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5e9b627d762169eaa2d262667770fe04
fe029e8ca2e4097f61927fe0598bb1d44ac81c4f
'2011-12-11T04:55:32-05:00'
describe
'25510' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNV' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
42d1a1d84cdc4a1d71e204fbfe6b6a52
3aad3ebec653840ae860bf266175bf21e0a8ccd3
describe
'1883660' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNW' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8d841cfc1b3b7437e7c282920803e56f
03a95da30881f902a52bc2bfff2714804762b9f0
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNX' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4d1eee43eec2fe40ab1a3f240411d38b
484afe5ee40ed8177c3014b5223ebb8855a96024
describe
'8927' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNY' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2bd892f954445edc07ae6ad8fa3b4b24
d1d8487a5863fda69daef6986a900dd3095655e3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d0910b51a0b02d3ea8f27e0c73862d22
5d8f72d6903d3f917e094a533a21c2e2b25bed24
describe
'79406' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOA' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
bdbab5391aafede76af238d2d4504201
6e08291649d09ad4bcb7b7f260198e780e251d3e
describe
'20856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOB' 'sip-files00088.pro'
afc2a5da17ebd19660c17ec291c242c4
ca0f0f6fcc75fcbcec3988bf55633490616a95ac
describe
'26697' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOC' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1ebb2dd55bb47d2fd1984993a502554f
ddb891393c30b31971edafa90a81832d0235a1c4
'2011-12-11T04:56:52-05:00'
describe
'1883756' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOD' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0ebea0c883a520f18997bd99050a7770
99bd32bb007722ea24815e59f82b154bc671f91e
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
902a3d56f085e9ef8f5b41303497d5a2
0f9e85a218e4548e21b3d1685878862911c12b21
describe
'9144' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOF' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
655167db5b9237ef93cb198214bb0eff
8945c80fc25d7d7a605cfd595b81a6b04b280662
'2011-12-11T04:57:01-05:00'
describe
'232949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOG' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9806e70daa4346b68271936806719517
ea17d86330aa02085067f7032f49c6b006b7af0f
describe
'78648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOH' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
79ab6635145ea568c36c2b72a0f24c4e
61b001871ef6e6de809c59a0fd83b7960a53f840
describe
'19681' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
57af87796f1cf6d196a7992d8fc49233
578b354cc6410806a572dac5db3fd7c64cc74b84
describe
'25581' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
f88b44df3b701f674ec53e0c904f5110
a14d7158436b0b28e948e37472c96fe67f2a3417
describe
'1883832' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOK' 'sip-files00089.tif'
ee26169de1875dd215e8e9c4f67961a2
5a6dcc343ca64c11182cc4d88bc07da95a088a06
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOL' 'sip-files00089.txt'
a5761dfac951075135a7f6ede9a2e87d
56eb40d96c301bf5bc39d20f1634216a473aaf40
describe
'9184' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOM' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
b7bca988f0dbfdfcf39e2d5831facadb
cbdfc67827fcfe4095c69d7acd497ff7a5866aae
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFON' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
96a200bd6586e081c8e0d9bae8cd7600
f5e56a7ca720ad10e86627ea8263cec1cc5a9d05
'2011-12-11T04:54:48-05:00'
describe
'89983' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
1de8493bad1e616b69f7070beee2d900
beaf12cd1c0ccd3a5b25bf5d90923c83595f7cec
'2011-12-11T04:55:59-05:00'
describe
'22408' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOP' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c916583e9df68f15083278774341ef76
2b267900cec4103cde76d392f2d136dce6e3b08e
describe
'28998' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f3b4007467816bd416b72ecd43a66f0a
0afae2eff3e7dec53b922366fe37ca8f519009b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
015a8f4cbd0b8014777d6861aa6b0087
72502bda113425907428499daa09c5aa1db2666a
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOS' 'sip-files00090.txt'
6de621b44c8cad24ea73a4b3f4b71807
ada030003755ea019c9993c668f72340392bb1a1
describe
'9881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOT' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
5e3101b7dda07e013733f0a4a745bf49
44747e22b637df384288e905708d8bad0f96d4bb
describe
'232792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b389edd65e17049e67dfd75919bff18e
bca2dca2cb245d3dc7ed17041dea8f3b332bd5c2
describe
'87837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOV' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
3eeaa96daa8ba6f1010fecf2d32bf68e
a250cd48b5e943a5bfb676f26c3b35fc775c5f42
describe
'22158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c4e9449dedaf0d6c64268d4d732b0b28
f3e92f41095704c841bfc9939d525c4aaafce665
describe
'28382' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOX' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e26ead6d4b097de85c0d2987d0c74803
5b829be60caeae39183777131ee0cfba00bd2710
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
4492e4b4b36d3041c5a9446654119fa1
9a949cfef026f91e07418ba3dc64b619b7184f17
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
e9feac89371470f16311c8d8022a3465
c5805fd5aebcc454f7aac02da61b55946157a766
'2011-12-11T04:55:48-05:00'
describe
'9710' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPA' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
e703e60144f27574d23dfe066931c549
089bd4d1efaaf9c210166900040a965f098eec11
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPB' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
3581dcd14dc9bca91997fa2eeff3fc67
a9ebd86783a1cda2e3b850392d953ac08410c025
describe
'89356' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8210b1c715ffa0c268a849b8d99c6923
29405d98f9e51705be3397c1e8cefd6c6faa30f4
describe
'23371' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPD' 'sip-files00092.pro'
8350d0ed4200378eea8042962a01a74f
733e5109eaf2c381a1fda58331814233925ceedc
describe
'28736' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
a888c66943448dcd19fbcdf9e7172f38
8f6e84812976f5b0ad0a68f6c7e02835e6470023
describe
'1883984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPF' 'sip-files00092.tif'
684a53180ff60d90e7f524ed3bafc74c
ba1be41faeb9f4afc1af94cf8837af2fcd92da54
describe
'954' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPG' 'sip-files00092.txt'
76724dfe54f3857c2563eb6a150d075a
a4e375f26e76284fe3db1701965c81f302dc87a2
describe
'9919' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPH' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
6774dc291802bce6a6d0f9e878cbd7e8
e7a375600e466edbc9830d324883673ce34d9bbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPI' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c66b4dd0b243f3f1e45fd38c60de93f8
63f2ab2d824869607cc040621f42e6adf350f5e3
describe
'88852' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
d387ba6ef0b56758a9ef32b982073666
1b3e0606a68c0fda789632702bfedcd1592a2b9f
'2011-12-11T04:56:46-05:00'
describe
'22121' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPK' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4f7ca724e896e0292d952ef2dc2ffc6d
f0ff17f96cfb01116df5c7650a6d2a6a25e97051
describe
'29315' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPL' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
941e8723d399443ac7c72eb878f2dbee
19a6c071fc9dcef0daa8565cf77cd057014884d7
'2011-12-11T04:55:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPM' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f10003bcfa992dbfd72b8f3a4f28d509
560b678208f4bd945115729760952c3b1ef0b055
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
deee476071886283daf23da9965cbf2d
3e9dfa173200840223e084d7e4348a1a878187b9
describe
'9614' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPO' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
31644a7a290fdd5cfdfee396edc69471
9b09c9527914b9645684e1eb52b85c506e039ecc
describe
'232864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPP' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
30303ec67699cec7d5af439887cb3320
0525ae42728c121590ca502dceaf2fe1a6bf2839
describe
'88234' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
623751e63624083d080b498b36bd8e1e
244647c921b3633d330cdbad859bd7ba5e65663e
describe
'22537' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPR' 'sip-files00094.pro'
252e261864bf1a95293d810516fe2d86
434e55d1f2bff7f0e190c06d2fa3b8ff08de5be9
describe
'29268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPS' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b12617c127579c91308c5b9b504386ba
162e23ce02b3f548e016684de7540da87224ae19
describe
'1883924' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPT' 'sip-files00094.tif'
78e7de2ecc50853edcb43008f7b87705
1a368c3791f0c827e308b7b2d1c939391c738354
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPU' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b58ea8d295567661792dcfbecabf44fc
5589837f80282c31b4e5ecae3bb4e213615dafcf
describe
'9533' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPV' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
795b9b19d6ee45544335ca7fce6df2af
03b299083183bd739c4d061c179888975550633e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPW' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a0195f9d67c64f77562bebdd61aaa493
d9eb20f3cd591e4c954fc57aea57b59ba602c989
describe
'88842' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c2f49ee7f912719af239bb734d3e92b2
e8198330ae8768f4ac8565d7c95c92784500f81e
describe
'23160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
88c21ba77d2ac276668705d8e73c1bab
5d455fa27bd9b9a79284f326a7842a909b4c6d90
describe
'29354' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
6cc1a7a012b9d11649f85b87e8972aea
12c20fd1e574c9faed21a65869123fa141d5edf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
241431cabd3b943264d689331962ed82
81e71b71815d8fd4ea9ae91f1776b735232027fa
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQB' 'sip-files00095.txt'
cbb0f2f55d997bdd797566d63be3e5ac
3ddb5234a1f6142f9a2585ef4c93f52d4e75339a
describe
'9536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQC' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f3f20d1e242f3bbace51031b3e47e3ca
0d8dc2c1961d01d22baadf9b70494ed6495b31e4
describe
'232921' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQD' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
35b113ee552ceddd92be022c68f8dfbe
ec60d5dc01a0e986387f0a93874e5b8fefa5eb3a
describe
'90502' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQE' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a592bab8128eb8b73336eb0cd128d49c
3dbc73fd346c091ab396595f8a11f5fac0907c73
describe
'24045' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4454ceeacd81c862d081379930834bf3
f5e56c923107bfc5f3fc0831849b71954dd71552
describe
'30071' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQG' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
de49d46b9d10c4c5904003ba8d633dc4
dfbff1b1f0b58d850ab336c8f64738d52a6361cd
describe
'1884004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQH' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8b72e2cdba4be5ddad2609a5466f017a
2042254b390188b2f7449a8b6cf64b7f23ddc096
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4284ec6c4ba437801456169c6bb9e29d
fbf21f4ead196bfb0d1b0bdd87f934cb4361feec
describe
'9569' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0b33cab599d76d5faf989bfebccb0fb5
8bc4fdbc331a9436bee8667d19c1c7fd9636ff50
describe
'232881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQK' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
cf2191667553efbdc111a7867fd00d7a
8b87fff23400fd04de79603828bd28926abdf09e
describe
'90603' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
12ec5912024dea5e4fe8cd8c97477581
bcc19721cfa01fbe62eed3ff3ca1857ec7b12434
describe
'24114' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQM' 'sip-files00097.pro'
d6b12d9d550dde90845d6f1ea6486b2e
92ec641352b90b5dadbbf7902aacd45307d8a844
describe
'30363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQN' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
980bb617a40aaff05d0617e66ca934d8
1e45206bd7e2dec93904b2cf73fd43b3fbf904d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQO' 'sip-files00097.tif'
318e4abb18396edadcddd1f54f980642
8d873f9cace764baeeea04e0d54c0d8a0a90f22c
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQP' 'sip-files00097.txt'
fcaf81eb87010cdd51012240aae7559c
8dfb93a1c00180192d8130e0c5e9ea0bcaad652a
describe
'9720' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
fdcc5949e2a9bbd7cbefa9ade8260717
af95afcb995cb87e57faf4c8956c61c08f2ab7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
3c0a074f76f829a25146cfa7f22e665f
177f32204f5625a6e116105f9d6ed20d724e4325
describe
'90237' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQS' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
45520312b89844e986fc4d9e8f118ab9
27c5bfd424c08a1543109f0eea1ed07863dd5067
describe
'22803' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQT' 'sip-files00098.pro'
c9b0a183bd79be456dd7580c4e160cc4
c5dc4436d58b2c32e0e661dd6706a01a03c496eb
describe
'28923' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQU' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
0b14c17115a052786b04f89465ea371c
02bccf459d53546880ca35e9cff6a1b32c0911e0
describe
'1883672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQV' 'sip-files00098.tif'
940b91a9029f4b95e1a21fa938895282
d4c5908cb5a7bdff563f4f81ae9a8cc94c2b8772
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQW' 'sip-files00098.txt'
9a7c946a02486900841ed8ccdb92102d
f59d9b30b0eccc8186debc0b0b075420687b0e59
describe
'9778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQX' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4df0a43133238a233d058b760f1d0637
479ea62fbe866ba864c98795d8fcda8275328141
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQY' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b22cb700a63c76006771b6a45a14ff8a
226c1c5f04c5c3b53c24fcbfb33d234785c5ed7c
describe
'84048' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e26aafa6da90e8fdf7bc8446e2012a64
d113f0e748f34e65f6ebd2b6078d9c63cc936820
describe
'21464' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRA' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3f9c3b04cbf18fa3ba87155383dcb8d2
ca24dea55dc35b8f60d157f511b0adde72dadf2e
describe
'26800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c3ddb1738ab8ea25a73137099712a0b6
a8ecc24f494b4b27597b92f5a7763ccf1ea0517c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRC' 'sip-files00099.tif'
0163fdc0032aa5d65096a765a7f8267e
4e21ea9d558892f2386ff399971ec70c852595d3
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRD' 'sip-files00099.txt'
7b88e28e97272a9312566506bd263d73
90b85bb697d992449f17004779c197f3c5f5b8e4
describe
'9188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRE' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
8f0f7dc22f5e358e28dd312d8df5d11f
c86aa03abff6440e2ea18322e053883e37afbb19
describe
'232887' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRF' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
4d6ffaa3bce3e6c51c99c3761acfba86
f3ae1141ae357f2a2db4878587f7f8ce2f472fe6
describe
'84013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRG' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
0ff47b30f3da6b8df0b2496ae01c8359
fa4e243d9d65885da4fd31a19c30f9808f38b5cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRH' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ec2ebea9b66dedd625d95b38a7c39ad1
11d84c102a5da9466434925d3fdccc9aa04da156
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
0ec7db924ce185ea124c02e8e90dd1a0
539ad3e7a4b825b849007c2f9dfce2b816d9fe84
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
5611280d6e78f2950aab6d88104848c6
ce75724a8f4c0696e16b4437bfd305f847c7d793
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRK' 'sip-files00100.txt'
f36687f354d168db1d357fb562528a56
2929958c1ee89af88719bce58586413252b4b25a
describe
'9001' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRL' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
dbd068562564082ec815985def3210c6
ae5dcdd96bcbed62eb05879e81cb960c7baee81f
describe
'232943' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRM' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ff78c9338f3b506a194cb9200530614b
5d394aa3e366fcaa569f8ec3a807f203da08437f
describe
'74599' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRN' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
fffbc2e08ae89b20b6e278236f4a1442
580bf23b3b13872ca5e70148c40c1289524a9dee
describe
'19239' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
f3886663a89c12604de63b5182293e14
28ee8cb56a839bcebcbabaaeb663052a9e35308c
describe
'24555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRP' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
4dd7a8c4674f1897a279c6c0e4b2cf2a
9aff9c9e8eabc699edfe1eb7f980d8c536d31b38
describe
'1883712' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
eaeb93c7b7361aecf30a194dac5feb49
af00053eb40d6400753d2926a12e6337bf2a40f4
describe
'821' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRR' 'sip-files00101.txt'
073cf1df28981c716106ac97d81a6329
509469da81397f4652e315968af64096e92358f7
describe
'8677' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRS' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c3953c245e047a3d894dadd5f7552abc
3f23dc5d9cd8dfc57de10b614d327812f4a1bce2
describe
'232935' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRT' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
7306b4e310905a86574ac3d5ace9c71c
003a39656ec4530c0ba9d13b2174aae30e1963b4
describe
'85419' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRU' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
9bd150177da0cf28dc63e21307aa937a
01e3c067bab721e1cd202a0fa4224b212f05aefd
describe
'22395' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
1f5d7d0950ab4505e5a571b9e48f8736
e0b02d061967fba29240a67f0e298402ac8d6111
describe
'28130' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d0068dace92d60b0e5144a440acae421
0060937b05407ce4e954aaa88bef02bc28ff16db
describe
'1883776' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRX' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b7bcb01035dc2d4736cf6a596fa7c50e
e708b02f4cc67be8985067c4bb39fdf68a41dbf7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRY' 'sip-files00102.txt'
6a249295ee5f46285e4d56e06d8e2021
111f10fc1ad7558f3ab2909826a0667bc37dee42
describe
'9571' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
79c8ef196e69a7d8b94aa5bc4a0923b3
0c124e784abe68e372219216f27c5c8205f38704
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b4a8a5d2e2376bac64f3c414a632bc95
8fa8b4b6fc2fd69bf8961686051adb82e3dba994
describe
'76143' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
429761d71a1fba2ecb0d977f23663326
74d08e50edd6f0bc2f2f89e0e7e65bb3cabc61e7
describe
'19797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSC' 'sip-files00103.pro'
9887d0acadc169154b8208ae946bf60d
46693cb5271c0921aecd2d13de0ecf34fc13d93e
describe
'24798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSD' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
bb482a5244d7c9812c07f2da2a320c50
5ca6670d959ed634a11ea70d692f1c3473a63502
describe
'1883668' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
5c9b9fe2f0b0d5768b2fa8b09b0e8be7
6a5d5d4e442b43acec31f89f459da206f847d4f4
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSF' 'sip-files00103.txt'
8661936b25181049448494078cf500a6
9f99488103949284fc733b73b0ceab812e0254b9
describe
'8550' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSG' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
4353988ca476b942a4c7f0c446f2b92f
ccaf069073194affcc9eeef9b4c36be6adcae2bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSH' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6f16fce5c3bcea50db05691be39da571
b24b68e2b6cb24a8c701c0f047b5fe4ae1c8178d
describe
'86250' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSI' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0cb86f3ffe28e5f60fcd001611a90ed6
f9d23435ac506e5cba0b1da479a1690a049c2f58
describe
'22654' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
76559547df08604721dcf1e90e9f4b5f
72a4d6e5cf90c3dd54782087a94f194f8d82fdcf
describe
'28766' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSK' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
0373446be967cf626d3d9e239727b7c9
5b2b538efc90642840831dfee291934e07ea8dad
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSL' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b35c9e47d13d14b03542e088a9099b55
0d15b91ba754dd02b0a273c39ddf7bdefc38eaf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
da7664b4966367d3c949b8918e7e12c2
8076cd34bb00e9e7bf80dedea56c1d80623a29ee
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSN' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
91c550e274ad133ea6a21e6906062a12
bd4d2b579c0fd5287aa1e38eb44344ff78bdeadc
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSO' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
4b92069f134c07b5db562c7db15dd40e
612de72548cd66ea6f0e12ce4db133cc849982a9
describe
'89386' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
e671aa688b52e5d1ad2ae1f69e9aad34
7fa27a415ad37dd905be69aeb52e66e23f808e72
describe
'23542' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4d541dd5c6d22ba12eda83bce021d343
9a95e3b8daf5acc86ae65419266020fe2593f52e
describe
'29579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSR' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
6fe78ecdfd9a2cc6ddd86954d33f797e
a254a9ce8a9a0d7a41ce17fb14543eb9ea922041
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSS' 'sip-files00105.tif'
df6ba0520e79ea4850cf92a0256fd7e8
1436976ddbedcf3faebe2d4dc61ea76af2a65f26
'2011-12-11T04:55:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFST' 'sip-files00105.txt'
0dd9514b267adfb826828814ce16c4f4
53c2a0ad5682be072ece67089f13c9ee357fc181
describe
'9540' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSU' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
1a2db1fbda8d616b3e5fa9eff21bde0a
c5600b4a4e6cb09523b729563491e87e59d19fa3
describe
'232932' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSV' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
2c4b69be94419e004091f831929dd0f4
d0b0444b746e5424ce14717a2ce7144f7c46c46b
describe
'92773' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
b2542badc9e62c44756123c46fe0e739
b12f7ce3f8a750b3fe06e5f0355a53b78eb8e7bd
describe
'23951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSX' 'sip-files00106.pro'
f5347411fda2411e1ae0edecea7efa8e
3188fea558b19ae97cb88b331b8b6c3b3d2ebf13
describe
'29997' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSY' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ccec33fe2636277535fd482a19d8647f
4e32971f9df714552228c427399697f95664b7f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8cd1b16df679da1c9009b62e75327dd6
ab3235422ac706ec09f7f241cba904c3d0f22b4b
'2011-12-11T04:57:05-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTA' 'sip-files00106.txt'
18b260f4b6eb0e9baeeda59ce4cdbbf6
cf5e256af1a23ff31154e303b5cc6abefcb58f37
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTB' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
015d2f0df50e7e7946099c85fe37acb9
89768585b43f5e9b4bd2fd7b360da6421159c5ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
38933c4769977985f633fd9111862958
c50bd7cb5be9e4eb177146b2cbece2b910754012
describe
'84290' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTD' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9d932e3a26da1f47baa91386ee252f7f
a09b590949025e8690906a32649881200fd0b1cd
describe
'22240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
421e3c0657538cb34039143753699e42
56205125ff8068854f05164b2541489d3dc39933
describe
'27561' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTF' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ad1f8a1037e0aa4b73c30596bf97cff8
5316e4715daa8ab66c0c8f30371640091e383cd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1480700b575a261878df9587795118c9
0f2da9ebb278d516235da2d30a4f9153a26d2ca8
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTH' 'sip-files00107.txt'
53ad8cf545525d5ca2c16e5b93d1fab5
2249780652e34b2d1721de17ac89134d7a0535e4
describe
'9253' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c90c14b8ebd47a1410d1937363ad4ab4
d10f394fede09595a7aa0e827e260d21a74ff889
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
5cea52b6f10d21b8e040de4a5de46081
dafdf32b65993e89f65c28fd027c2cb9eaf249a2
describe
'86768' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTK' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
92b5683f745afca52541c14f9f0406a6
a95cb7027ebde2c9603d66602e8330aab2f4ae3f
describe
'23185' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTL' 'sip-files00108.pro'
50086032bb17a8323d3e052ea3c4526c
e0d1d89a1e1e4162dc7caa9ddc76c33baac11ed1
describe
'28264' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTM' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
554a2498414a50ded837a750a41766b5
0e8cc991d47d20b0c3adf07423d8d92a7d57bafa
describe
'1884000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
29246dd2a60fc70e7a6b41a36212e5ca
bc2906299c7a03ff236f16a5e7f2e1fa245402ae
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTO' 'sip-files00108.txt'
72de824c0c7fd16d8e555a2cd2147905
a2d5eeee84241fa88293706e904c200698a9ca5c
describe
'9428' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTP' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
52350c796abc9168ea1ee8251449ac1b
ed22c421838b6d021a92e91e92a6623fa1037f55
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ec768ca7d43b7ab96b5582918b1fbd7b
1c01601d18d4793d9165e74c41325d417e8b9efb
'2011-12-11T04:54:57-05:00'
describe
'93126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTR' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
759cfec66e938e4c55ef46019aff6b7c
2498a778a976b7101bb09c766e905be07d12e86d
'2011-12-11T04:53:21-05:00'
describe
'24151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
f30b4ea8aa74f139a061f025b782e882
f382d768a7d8d97b1ccb29df6175ffbdb58c8297
describe
'30456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
a8bd8973395c5ca92d31b106f4e5c3bc
a8f6c40b4a49021c2dbd95526255e34905c13959
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTU' 'sip-files00109.tif'
3ffa9e39aa823eb379e7f2d023d6acfa
f5ba358d84840de59a6cf03235a0dabfd56ed23e
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
9ae3697b869ff75a0813f63e2a5b7fc1
08784c82b5e6e67add57c8ab879623c9e012ba05
describe
'9764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
9b8efa07749f916e4a99924ef946e7b7
a1b3c5555246f9f36ebfd1f159ab4840bc86f282
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
388215b86f606f7dca4900262268c64d
0a23c96ea198d4fc4ba14bec5bb95bdf4e910caf
describe
'83333' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTY' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
695c110b172ae3887778415156230efd
f2e96070d8e063a7b3baabf6a7a3bce6d1779390
describe
'21375' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
e8e688fdde19860b475d49b52fe6b5e2
e42c1b5dceab8b4062a486bb4086b375725e221e
describe
'27492' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUA' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
b2e9a3a513b665441f65d60b3cbf9277
65fe42d8c92a59af81227910477f1aeeb46e7589
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUB' 'sip-files00110.tif'
ea67c4aa7272ca763ed7ee39c4d49d49
dee678b28c757ef6cc0edf61a23d260daec909b2
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
2afdd04e023d3982164bf78bf0de8c3a
6dcfda1859579ded7e980f756bc08c7ac261dc05
describe
'9295' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUD' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
382bfcdb7fbe5ca2d4b7a75687b391b0
5afd5a0841d42bd5d23dc09cf39c0cc026e27e24
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUE' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
06d6e0e36b6fe3958d84601f8b353715
ab9b630b1fea7e249c5978e8d7f1cac90e7fda49
describe
'74652' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
075a811dceb002867bc498860c5bb9da
5a167b46f510ed91b17e1f5a1fdf9b3c0b58eb95
describe
'18697' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUG' 'sip-files00111.pro'
70245dccf601e78cf6051e15f81cc8fc
b9227450b8c92e6d72bffa788789aa0ac51b6231
describe
'24814' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUH' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
0e62d9675b156b0d61ae9da3c2ab6f37
0a6ebf2cd9512b45d85248dcd86e46f8925df784
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUI' 'sip-files00111.tif'
1acbd37674e36a040b6fae5079565546
dea4486c2860b8721ef35505f28f154b90a655d2
describe
'792' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
22e07fff0473bfa472acfe29ff562e35
82d508eb713e035358049b32197513e345798559
describe
'8505' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUK' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
59462a90682efa98c8ec4a50358f46a0
a361d0808ebc02761ac5965d84348fee4a05cf0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUL' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
59560732b21514fd3017f6c53b73d10a
ae6804f9566dbf2f6293244b9def5e7f4acd4961
describe
'88165' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUM' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
a139d9cc3a0bffb0eecc54e4ff8e2de5
597e8d92a677745643147c654c1395f96bc6e211
describe
'22916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUN' 'sip-files00112.pro'
f4769cfd7af2771cffc1b4a6492ff1f8
a31c7d0c25ff679c77b8a9b0d6e9f364d1cbd07d
describe
'29092' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
2a8fe5dda278c061dc00d433eb4c983d
524ab289e4070092bd31aeec626f8adf4e72055e
'2011-12-11T04:54:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUP' 'sip-files00112.tif'
a780b03dc99e85937de71e2093547175
343a5063ab1162ac1986bbc5d1b75c762d4af660
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4c16fdaed8b428881b04f35c9721d617
953e6567efcf1919491c64095bad448b46001816
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ce4d79edad8c973e8cde96000f807415
d5605162e94a320028cde4aceea63354181495f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
bade4450cd95725248d3550179fd2cca
584a873b085fe35d128008397de8a14555949f49
describe
'89113' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUT' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ec7006bc4b791422f3c30d8ff91afa70
2e38a73863ff207ed565e616e9f96183ae1897ee
describe
'22580' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUU' 'sip-files00113.pro'
2e2bfcc30c7c167f0bc9ffc7f59af1a9
3eb434a66d93476526f17f39c9194ac8273640bc
describe
'29547' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUV' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
60b9ea9582627963a469c9813d50610c
012d3acbe0a787b525ad42d154f1265e67c5a0b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
847d8958172def0683f3186a1f1b8924
4bf6611f7ff1bf26a5be9191809dcb41f7d63ee1
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUX' 'sip-files00113.txt'
d1215ee94d2495be543f4b62d9552215
d8176a1942558834cb42f8eeb66134272060cc20
describe
'10345' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUY' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
3e9ac34e6b8ae636128f24fe64f904f1
433edac063c6bcc5eae0e12c96542f2ad2e4f7aa
describe
'232901' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
cde9fb2cbeb93f770af158301dfd1e20
c527199345494c5a9ffc5bd80323af7ffcf10088
describe
'80532' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVA' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
3235249857da72a8e862c372c1987172
ce0a4d7dee7dcb2228fe3bd8c6ab518bfb7c0b1a
describe
'20454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVB' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ab29a582d2b19bd1f58b4aa5607fe6e8
c6e24fb2c016c0dec7948ce409cb1b18e80334ac
describe
'26479' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c1d0a758238c5f9e4681d6bdcc93ea38
440f02c2baccc701ca95247709a7e73487a42732
describe
'1883664' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVD' 'sip-files00114.tif'
350870ad630df70dc6481cba3eeaca9b
d3cf852482fe909a3c676a1d22f3cad20dbb8186
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
9231df39dbbd2516185a832c4850f099
d3b58cac53809cd589f22d2549a49f9b04807d4e
describe
'8942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4f2e8011992e683f1747a5d19a597f9c
7daad283a5fe045331dba95a28436559911ecfc5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
67af76b2c73a063404c9eb785cc4521b
091790bf06439b159113e37839d3210840946fc8
describe
'89584' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVH' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c69b1e8ce97e3a2cbf882746409b719f
a321a6bf6db37b53dd8a9273a5026b5c9e71c699
describe
'22955' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
35852c1c616d2eb876b2194417da49e3
5c2313172abf8453989044e1e128626e0e6a5450
describe
'29139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
647bd7720242c89f6866583680a7492e
4f7050ff43e31e89e7be539cf7e0dc190b0f9ef4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
c328904b61edbef5035dd7b3037e0e5f
d6d9d64aa34c196a07991f9dd6bb79665d300de2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVL' 'sip-files00115.txt'
7aff41ac0dba04c5fd8add6210472e57
437466de592f9c259ae77fa35eec9e1865494fcb
describe
'9868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVM' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
e9bf6219e85ef7178529d4901836d94e
112667fc8ad93da0fbcf239b5a6d4c577420842f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVN' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
a2496d4a35ac06660108efd138929331
6599b9a8d4680ecba26de6197a3130163e9d3d6c
describe
'87986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
750781603fe472cf1fd548b0e9ccb8cc
9252fef43abcb9bc65fb0a7011fb21ab6e16089c
describe
'22319' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVP' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a109ab23eeeab6e5927d92465b74c7d2
ed35f03d8650ee5f47df499b78f0f31bf61731d1
describe
'28934' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
ba1d106791eac6ba522780a017a8fe7f
9612e3ebe4104f67c555758f232ab005672d6d30
describe
'1883788' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
4de0afe3c1719d68587d1ba98a8cf7b3
71a85bf2fef76f4b4e7df06789e0ce78a90ccd52
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVS' 'sip-files00116.txt'
f8a8c9959f00a5f594b44f4192710ae4
7147658173945d53c4ae3de55b335939498ebc99
describe
'9644' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVT' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
569bf608ab021c7c1af3c98005ad5770
b172aa4d08be4d43be1d232c742598bf3bccd6cb
describe
'232912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVU' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f1d1a0ff76453b9b118b511cb4cfd0cf
d6156379faef2b10c9374e7d94224d0b79556534
describe
'88982' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e6749a5ef3b5fb011b3cc0192a6ff9a4
85e45cc858f2f3bb0b890c925116393a68d36e59
describe
'23458' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVW' 'sip-files00117.pro'
77f74f3752f7470f7d961db44228a76a
2ab8827b92ac0309fa698990b48b3b1e4a89fefc
describe
'28405' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVX' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
27bdd046ffc241a8e7bb714e9aa119df
14959e8757744da72b8174875be0d16d8496b866
describe
'1883800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVY' 'sip-files00117.tif'
541d655e5f40b15c2c3e34febdcff42a
cdcf24c9183f953fdfd9a35b87f9587ea24e5e41
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
4f319eccff2e96f83db7a7cd2a9d0db1
a0b93b2e672fe7b2a8b701b33821cde3b5d996dd
describe
'10070' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWA' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
a49ae511747562ed418aff1190675394
703edd3b7bddc232bebdc0096e9905e8719fc6b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWB' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
012e36af3d3473a6cc09bdc8a5b6aae6
4926017defcf0d34e7ca49dfc46b25ac7ffe54f0
describe
'80460' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c987ee8d78da2ed94b5ad8b8664b3e45
fe4369da8b7589a372802461a58205fce46dcf64
describe
'20363' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
5700c8b120defcee60e1c44d933005e7
819c69527afb3160d3986eae20325c36dad8f5cd
'2011-12-11T04:56:12-05:00'
describe
'26135' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWE' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
42dcd59855cb1a7fca59730bb97acf14
39cc37724fa56e814b42d6348e52ad984b2d9cda
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
44ee311075fda71cb9d90b313d43c5b7
cece45f47bd5ebf46244268f72a10f75e23e68d3
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
a889322067f24665b28535f014cb0c7b
b299021610cd4acc4c1666c386c6c8ce1df982af
describe
'8863' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWH' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7a52cd81f970bed5ee23258189106a2a
0d8c0ea3ad5523cf57808118b8de1d07acbe71a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWI' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
904d404aeaca2184e31eb531a9924838
1c5bab297390b176abd78f66a24115c1adfc16ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
b87f1625bea937a467c3bb0698f4fb61
6adeca1203659a18474be96adc7f8e171372d87d
describe
'23682' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWK' 'sip-files00119.pro'
137c0892b88464d7d5fd142451d4ef6d
3fbe11b23c350f4f40d39ee9c068e91bfe057c96
describe
'28800' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWL' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
befa5acb3617d5f379279d41140a1d3d
c46556404e7e7678d0b333c31354820442882206
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWM' 'sip-files00119.tif'
75b72b53f03be31e4fef0d29342a5480
3dea8a578507db5170f4a98fd85238e65384bc66
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWN' 'sip-files00119.txt'
bab9ce6887ce8431d1ab6a605cdf8bb0
213b3502aedeaa9c3d3c6934113a5c739be4c0d4
describe
'9088' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWO' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
2d6e0cd1ad605d84817f62870b15e65d
b2eaf385d89949a174c5498acfd157d7e53e4cd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWP' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
d6edc567d2d0d4b171fb9616c0727bec
62eebddc212e2e9afd6b2742b4d92980a3382449
describe
'86716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
873424cbcfb1a4495b32b4fc3f2e4670
d68d17b18ea03cd4a8d3ab8f34a03ad229908098
describe
'22285' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWR' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f85544f726f112644384bea15db21673
b0de1aa2ba76441090d8be1900e24e40c5de40f5
describe
'28485' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWS' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3aa1dcf702cff7947cd2cd66895da423
687241c8e72be419f9894885fb1a84edc1dba0f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWT' 'sip-files00120.tif'
abd1ef21c07317d2d9a3ad4ab6c8e254
b1042f8078a1bb0dbc71b7953e9df110997be08a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWU' 'sip-files00120.txt'
7771c1cbf780509c5ffe203286e0acec
bb3f8e60e79d18475fb6f255d92c2f7badb3ecfb
describe
'9575' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWV' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
427081b6806b7a22f957a693c6eb5fee
9d4df69988709f8a005ba6facb7530559d85530e
describe
'232906' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWW' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
00bcd351553f9dce99e01e872c843a84
14f8df63ad35b13ef444d4ff3e05f63d491b7ac9
describe
'93434' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWX' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
3049411312adec7a3d9742e9d9632f02
90b0008f4cd4e1df015e8cb3e06b16eaa7b1c473
describe
'24722' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWY' 'sip-files00121.pro'
a0d5587fea649e33cf5a081b0fcdb0c4
44fb899efe76b41cb572fe2a6340ff821d9b1d06
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
fe2d36c7f7de751e58c02876a6d43b17
c773ef219d78b690e3bc59b42e26a8d86eba3778
describe
'1883912' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
77eb79f671b8318262b7a538e988c9c3
13c986bfae08e9907612db178582a5c9c38700c4
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXB' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0b88db474abf9dc793c2c4e60fd168d7
07b69c450a047eece31d090dc67932bf3b5930ea
describe
'10160' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXC' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
053b088708738531a046a4157ad76ad3
135a5291e7e2a0e0babad921cc910e259552dc2a
describe
'232911' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXD' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
e7da9a82b48eb463812d14c8a68273b8
029ea4d7a71fdf722dc904caf914a23c8958402b
describe
'92541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
86486ef015651cfc07456891b5363ce2
abfd1e0b06fd5e3a113c34bd1377be6ef8083c68
describe
'23901' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9c0b6638628292b9c0651864c897d67d
e1aaec1b2e1e2e4d53f91eeae45825b51afe3355
describe
'29647' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
a298d6746855cbe192826c35e0ae5fbc
68e856378af31641c70a5cbf8b8bfdc241f7136c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ac7ecd2fd7a1d6c4f48db6376abdb539
85ca16676cea3286c8b814281dd347ce34e855f1
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
0956ddaa3de3f590748f01f72ca2a740
4d869dcdca2ec42881eef03801994aafc0d7ca1e
describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
c7034d5e00d9f367bc19385d62dde031
ef1c0893816ce52cad90458411b870a562da2c9f
describe
'232886' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
4064a43db51faab0e60449cc4e0eaf78
96a698e4747f62d005f43ab722f01eb1c2826779
describe
'89815' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
453e7a29595ed8022bb1bc952b00198c
fd8161f71258bc8a77ab0616591941839531027d
describe
'22797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
c822d8b40514ff1d10089ab703ef1367
194390599f825b120dbcdeffa1c6aff366b60b1d
describe
'28157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
735d02378909ab1ffc4de6a16456c08b
f54f4cd232f19ff8b24e868ca974126c77e90a52
describe
'1883900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1f332727608f2dea812907f5b911af0a
d3bcf1e2a8e953205839af05bd1ea8dc30c4180e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
c74e4459bd8baf2635d4c4916cb58e68
21896f4b8f18c71f9d30aaafe35056a42f4000ac
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
989590c8efb0e06398cb7118ba695968
b22f44b57bbadf36ed26d64181a180fb0a3e7d45
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXR' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
5455a3b6d7f91fc025603b6990090497
80879acce5fbb8cfefed1cbdaf426218eca57ed7
describe
'90459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2b3fb97912139af6b14d5828b67f1da4
89ba7079ea854f05d2274c9667e3ac8a2201ce63
describe
'23280' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXT' 'sip-files00124.pro'
29603fb77a2e6446a31cb462d36e3550
ceae3e35099c2f8b85b6fa553fd93c02ec48a5a9
describe
'29861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXU' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
5aa7c157d8142ad20c27672685805ec6
18677eaf5b8d2d5f07d56161814e520c1ff025e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXV' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f91bad1d471dcdf10a294776f93d771e
d299258f1dc4a3700a5af8ce4b7f8e2b29db397a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXW' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d089f01cdfbfabb00df7a7f8e9386af5
e2260dda7fa39acbbcdf75540af31ffbe8b018ca
describe
'9952' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
53c33c14641162ddd9595394cb8ba327
ba8908ae90529d71ad3ad7f5d063f24ff25b6bcb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
2cadc21de4f8e6b9c0b58a080bfcdd20
49c6b0ee357e884377a262aca7d33d0c99a36a13
describe
'92520' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a1e6cec4bb8bceba6964541be56641b0
e30c8a24bff6851250084344ffbee3591e9d36a8
describe
'24206' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
3f32969b145b2dce875c0ef0ade788fc
6a8794dc748428a3c431c0f98a64f211896c2c47
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
b53b0d9fadc8689c087c2dd9258e96f4
5daa4878a76c8b29d2773c6fe03a63b603574379
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3cb3ea3fbd5f3338ec0a091a1a83bea2
bc558b777340c1b141ac24f8b6541461bcb4ed0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYD' 'sip-files00125.txt'
21a6c09a1fb7732dbae5868cf8efadbb
273acc1785feef7484c68cd8198b864704505898
describe
'9243' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
40d0b7fe424c55971ca8a343f7429f46
bee660d4bca7fcd73925f59a9d853ce654f2101e
describe
'232922' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYF' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e9a9b43aec477de8c8129e73366ea19e
ac2489cc85a1ed723ae03cd838097ee89d54c173
describe
'77064' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYG' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
20e0cfb084210c2105de793f26ae6d42
de4314c70990c7b2e2227d1b138c4f4f0c698c4a
describe
'18471' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
de3b8388ecf4a2c1faa8e6e9deb547f0
8dce7878a9b75e65bb2832d9859d070cfbd51666
describe
'24633' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
982f0a5e42d9f9bc589fc3e4c3585afc
1af0914738f2940a75205927f16bfc1b3e65f2fb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6f1f0fdbb99b25ae1241b9ce1625e5b7
577186f532da7a982fbbd5439544b5d30bcc2357
describe
'791' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
603ca31feb42f3c7f1d9bc4dc1bde50b
b12da4cd1e8c2acb970dae0e96c11848b494006e
describe
'8407' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2b0e131a8b12c2eb8e616c04a30147a9
76d54c7b851678b24a2688d7fa66673b90c38dae
describe
'232885' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
57d61fe8f02e1a2e1ebe7c28c4e8e799
a3a2a0855e1da4a1f8d7d24074100571cff2fedf
describe
'91301' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
bca4e76b7e169d6a6948df92fef734fe
3dd52cf2802a523fd6a146810fef76b3ba9362ca
describe
'22455' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
60f730bf067095935a396cb7e8f04253
2e4c23cfcd1259f85ea4b589721afbf43b60cd56
describe
'29060' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
93e987ce14ddec44ff35f793034851d6
0bbcaa80ede97c0675284b675cc8ef72f7b51084
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
f55d158d1336f83aeb10d99b4580fe89
ea048afab85da60722c2ae27310970e1448b01ab
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYR' 'sip-files00127.txt'
13711cfff297cf1a391276cba46ab5ae
2bd8c7a874e698021fe0c36742d8a4dad88b55b1
describe
'9176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
ff5db5821649d76816f52538c38e428e
3c6cd756fcb2ed3340964f812dac54e928e7e710
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
4656872f62f3388c9a755df9a616fdf2
23adf9693014156719b72f7aa6a0c21654627a93
describe
'91400' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
3fd761da1a9493292078d1b55102d7c4
d31513a4958ca563ee7393fabc11140765af0471
describe
'23223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
61ed0355c247b26a32145a49977b8b62
ad6d367a70750077fafc1cd2abd8a005cbd55cf9
describe
'30380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
ca44474ed716741f700b14955190f244
f804bd80bffebecf457750651323b74cdaebfd1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e633b1faad6a59c3ae0b58a2f0bc9052
752bc55b9a896417aa3e32ea3ea87f0eb78ca6d0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ff18ab7c88888f5b54c3ff9195451f00
c9ec4c55ab45f3580324e6c9fdfdcb5a18e5c06d
describe
'9726' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
38ecb1a84f306e2a3355bd09c5d8e1a4
4964f3465265dd5a169ec2ae381b79c6cf0f4e03
describe
'232873' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
7ea4392592194c9ccdb25f066a07b2af
8179b5ba9827a4791ceb533bb560d40c013a897f
describe
'80319' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
169b11f30c7f8708501d6c6f8dccf227
59189f92a59bd8a41a37075a753720c2b4f45d03
describe
'21392' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
d33ac17b2a08b559820e0e8d9db6b2b6
95f461de54579bd1044eb2459f0bab7dee00bf81
describe
'26499' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZD' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
06d777302fa7b943e90bbdb5dcd88093
df1cfd65e714ad66e4c7f135338c9abf4a45a1c2
describe
'1883748' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
ac5ec0bb6d8cdfbcd82ee322c9ff7004
ecb70778d2d1efb12967e212faa327cd8712c275
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
695c398e598221972b88b3bbc1758d2d
1bb2cc7fc5283678b96e3d8d72a7f94e406055a7
describe
'8797' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
a2af038953a7a33c52af7bfa47ff5ed3
980000cd352b0bb439004e8d9040ce7f84ab2957
describe
'232846' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
46979f32eef0e1a831fb9026a0be6702
7f27cc8f5470d5a37d1fb23177478b58d66cfe28
describe
'83290' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
c4af3c35f64ee4b44695aef253649000
1bd18fa2cafd21a4afe3050ac3b16e4e67d1b77f
describe
'20913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
28fdf8c6a35533828241330edef5346b
5d5d59e59aaf6215b0008f5e71a0058b27faa192
describe
'27253' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
88fb5dc9d3093db587e0ef6b9b956c9e
78b41374131e94c3dec6f39f1af20e175811e73c
describe
'1883764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
17b5e6499067ee99428b1c7faa443f33
97ae6525ecb3314e7fc0a297fec84c30c2434bd9
describe
'884' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
60f719cff4cb42b78057aa540028ded3
139c6c641f5fa32e68608cdf83b92ce8a29638d6
describe
'9204' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
407a1a60e3c1060f3b591f77f52eefd2
c0033eef33ef4e4ac1e7b745f44ddf4c77eb8ed9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZO' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
0f2ec21d2b5e750f1765474cad7b1817
355947d323f8c74c6bae181c6fd302d4cc49f2dd
describe
'93335' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
4ae66ad85a47f8652b7a72960c2e7194
c87fc38a36c19a3d8cd78ad46c2e2026b5583623
'2011-12-11T04:57:14-05:00'
describe
'24891' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
a93c9a38ce05437fccbabed2ad69203d
511321a74dce2b80009789634b78e2b1dc5761fb
describe
'31197' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZR' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
fc09ec849a364ee1cf3c1b891d9a90ce
ac876cbe1efdc689ea94877df8750184eebd3d49
describe
'1883992' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
26112d1242e2fea09197d532d4d956bf
59e55ce390b02e0d4cf39321e47df6eb6b2290ad
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZT' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2db5ad82ef029dfb658a475c224dc8fa
bb17706da631602a87581b6363bf9a7d272e0480
describe
'9965' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZU' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
5c5fb9151840bee177a4804f2d8d627d
75df793817b22af498565df2033b1431d1d9219d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
7999a494b7eaf2b40b839fcab964166f
e4a966d69c8aa469d6e7b782038acf0962f6a2ff
'2011-12-11T04:53:53-05:00'
describe
'93194' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
ef0004355dccd1e1300fb9461e30a0b9
f8c4d800a9a6d56c536e542b86c434a60a635139
describe
'23004' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZX' 'sip-files00132.pro'
105aaf2d583f04ea483d548323a08838
ce0720f201e520bfed121bedc76e3bcf7792e855
describe
'31191' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZY' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
07718b90c726bce0009800b543a977a6
90936288ab6794411a23348defe73f120503047f
describe
'1884108' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
635585bb6209cdb27a9ead325615fb9e
9e87927e1a78d3cdd25ddf236527eee2e00a32f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAA' 'sip-files00132.txt'
39734f1c0eb7fe0d5a19ea6fca46cf2b
e7bad0b8902ecb332b566725d3ab03a41cf919a1
describe
'10139' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAB' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
d8894a699fb587b8a5b03d406a82a40e
50a69537b1394e7936f9cf0b5df0e430dad65ab2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAC' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
64a85d9b87d0f3328d44b01a29f9a6d5
cee305321a7c9b3ab9525e88bc87996bc414fd35
describe
'83650' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAD' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
059b5bb33510bd406f9ddd650e2fae92
7d39ca29c88ad7343f22bf14d181105f84ea1723
describe
'22291' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAE' 'sip-files00133.pro'
a3c7c72f0061559dd17f41377d5ad749
a68a5dddeccd20d335a4cfbc0e83f70b74791baf
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAF' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
cd57a9a6ab687ed2ad0a06ac92f05509
d868c13a09e63aeb8c3f5eff09ecb49d084e9a27
describe
'1884096' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAG' 'sip-files00133.tif'
3a03508a223fb4fefd2b3cd5fbf893e8
f5288c815f14193ad2a006d3038544d8ddf478c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAH' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ecf181d27d35ed32a2cef820e9fe884a
d58e5c7725da1bbd01a9b74cbb929957b2962b4e
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAI' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
36168d49641add7aef7b0120dc9f5bf7
3ffe1bad7c237b311ab60e6d8713ff0a285c4cf6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
7c485a84384efbadfddc6f2277c17457
ba10c6952b7e639dcde8321ee3d7f634b50c2141
describe
'86890' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAK' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
7caf9725deee66a857413b48e49b7f59
b48062d708aa71f28642e667d06bf517ec0c8287
describe
'23180' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAL' 'sip-files00134.pro'
72d3e8435334360cde326f4fbd7c18b6
6fc543fe230f769e5c9e4cba4082cc21cc3c388e
describe
'27427' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAM' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
b00b94de59b45b49795e466893b99362
18d006dbd42b68bc9e5c3a5c0c5e059228b8db5d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b6970b79e80339713133c66a9508327d
c3ed025f6adb32dc8efc22c43646b6a6465f5c70
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
fe9445ea67585d60d4220408d06522de
391458433bdcbc2ef7f891468a5fcc1de8e3b2fb
describe
'9566' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAP' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
350e9794b3fe4a429d23c3acba62dba0
a2269296505c11786a5d595208b00022b15380f0
describe
'248119' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
9ab35261a76ca00a33eac1ca9e05da49
4618df2c94f855875a98cda67b5a42beaf41e119
describe
'84937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAR' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
abf7a000f3f9aff8bc25386ce0c7adc6
eb986a6cf1d46710f8a1b9fdf8528bef42972d33
describe
'24589' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
eab411247b2df6bfbb0bc523ee6f5c2b
faca72d1a51b3c257c9d35ca1100bb134f69ddf2
describe
'28764' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAT' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
63e6953f97ebb5de10732faf7c12835a
fb76c6fe34d334eff58be917ee42265b5828cc22
describe
'1999076' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAU' 'sip-files00135.tif'
8feaa0089ba930d5636365f39193e148
28766b4cf72603d99bbb0c130e16f09a13d8c94a
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
cb21622d828189903518308a5abaffc1
5d094a713763cba024ad8bd635809c9f71f7091c
describe
'8639' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
5e9a248dee03df3a2602b9b4fa9260de
dd38c2401dabe1e15fafdf8f0f09aeb42251b9b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
bfeb1d76273cd2148abb2126f860a08a
5c639e3f3457f511d389990ada943e2c86a7d1ac
describe
'88779' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
83ee3f69cba7d15c75182b4e116c617e
170149e2323221121446a92a8745573d896b7b17
describe
'22541' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
8ddf7f21d217430d5487aed6cf970ecb
cfb15b52529d1bd746c4c40cd28d76bc4186e92d
describe
'29071' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBA' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
b57386b30ebe7d206b93aca632cb2426
7e6caeac4803728a8d8694743bef89bb5b62ebd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
b1dd949997672489c0f4057d793af6a3
ca579f9d69f52b45bb494526f9dfaec227160fba
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBC' 'sip-files00136.txt'
32f93e9cf2ae698e0f2d8b4470f7bc02
16a52de16623269c349dd89355d35b1a1f2bdf4a
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBD' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
2f1d14054e3115c9ac0001cb84876cd0
f3d8216e24bb5747c0b5378ba33aa4807d54ec94
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBE' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5694408051e0797e243a151ddefcef55
256cef9692bd20fe9f8d207b5450d03cacb4c1f9
describe
'88767' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
1e854c5536042771017c725ee6f662f3
94da2be0661817338d9f039e11049937c5e2bc8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBG' 'sip-files00137.pro'
7e357b44db85033d5820305d47008d89
4ccdc65386fc7413839e616f3fb6c51796b2c194
describe
'29323' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBH' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
13b60e367137df75cddf7fbc6c418145
a6602720f8e8ab761299b2dfdd4dac1946bcf2a0
describe
'1884008' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBI' 'sip-files00137.tif'
606a20f78cf895c8c4dd04b1be860497
73704e104bbd21c34343d6870c02ec4cf13aa039
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
8b39957a520d7697d40085b289f81159
e23cfde1d5b5f1d262463d29769c44716c708e59
describe
'9703' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBK' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
21493846e419bd62b7fb12d1c8b4baef
ea8a3212aac1e5c925ab31893676128d1d183a0e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBL' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
ece3b63e6c3b7c93dab140fb598f0465
970c647736636644075f0e0ed792e201c49cf74b
describe
'92511' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBM' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e6b887fca2e0dcda79bf7322e702d996
e11499834ba3d5ea47af43f18518a16f10ffc103
describe
'24346' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBN' 'sip-files00138.pro'
4a02f5b0b34ffc46cc70ff279112210d
e39d51f137a2d3eade54fee6caae5db2cf4aa262
describe
'30246' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBO' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
e9ed70d67464662373b5010bc052f399
7140e65df6b26fc4cd772f64ab6ad566cfffe743
describe
'1883872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
299631c1653f08cb6a101dc23a2cbba2
9be3d2403957266b7e47a983afea385b2e71b28e
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00138.txt'
c85ba22b647bfacea1524551486d29f2
4b3a2324295e8fbe44d121c997f4877643afc85c
describe
'9693' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBR' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
00cd25478c5e8281387dca24bd5f70d2
50f5cf34abb967b7038682e27ed6f95116158a34
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBS' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1e430dbb0c9288fce9d5e5911c862516
6efd0a476aac34c890bd18dbd05e7dddcc007dbd
describe
'73759' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBT' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
59561576da808352b2ba25fc7fc7d503
6a1b345b1ee958e7106d9054233c0cb6e5e5719c
describe
'20462' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBU' 'sip-files00139.pro'
3f0f867a1ae0234c5bc4a98e786059e7
6d476f25f6c78812773cab1e69b3c2e35b69a13d
describe
'24213' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBV' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
613faa1e310a09be02c4cbd3a5476acc
51f4b563280e67235d4bc8e8e269c4244913e2e9
describe
'1883536' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBW' 'sip-files00139.tif'
e7c5a23a8a04968b58aa0e2c4d26500f
b58a16e5596323ddccec0113390933e757a492dc
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
130ae543e82f14b85ef7bec1e8de9d00
ea679e820ef33d65bf1fa1fa483a9fdeb14b2070
describe
'8560' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBY' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
59ca59579893bd8b0d9a89b8257706bd
376b432c3b1a69c8b3cedd8e20f4a19e47556a99
describe
'232838' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
6d14b35b76428a9079b962b16b2eb01a
9804a6e18e2099e77ddd32c3547ca1d5368b5c95
describe
'84214' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCA' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
82f1c015b11d1d2e13f1e773aee03cdd
f4bf7b05cedf805a64d18df2e55b2976ad655134
describe
'20706' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCB' 'sip-files00140.pro'
b1e3911d330143e150fa27a206da92c7
bb1902b06c756c560cd3f5871b796155f39e27c6
describe
'26217' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCC' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
8a2843b5e9f37975417770a47aef5306
3cddff6159f9db5235535c10cf57c30769ffa9ba
describe
'1883732' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCD' 'sip-files00140.tif'
38d479261d996eb68063b8414bfcc8d3
06cb06301aec39f9fc319386a001d496581383dc
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCE' 'sip-files00140.txt'
ca77e1902190b9b82f44f274b80cf3e1
897ae84c33b1cc9afa6d3d431902dbe56f1b70c8
describe
'9142' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCF' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
b0a299e7ee4244bab7077b3662b5d28e
632cca5f5f84f07b2574b605809c413f2e8adb32
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCG' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
414c8db3bb51951cbd1a5b0888043e58
0fb99b796a596e6e3887563b270969eee0986b70
describe
'88179' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCH' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
29230d4357f59e881935bf0e1a280a93
8d1c7f5482c655b0ce2081b69ef3b961e01b6ded
describe
'23093' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCI' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a86882bd4197262033ba5bd95758895d
6018c5058608ecfc68fdfe769584db1fe85fa0c9
describe
'28769' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCJ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
78ff59bcc978986b0c5e17373a7b2d81
7f1dd5fce8b7f28ca17036df533f40f3f000c2c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCK' 'sip-files00141.tif'
bec7d02ac5d2218111853feb7e12e6d3
93e2991cf6f32193f2ff4e8ebf868431d9c4164b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCL' 'sip-files00141.txt'
51860b46309bd8ffd0d16bd3768ade08
9747c9bc0fd6e6af474aaa7b3f5d49ad60a8ab6a
describe
'9531' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCM' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
364fe204fa78b940249593d108aaa5d4
5e4a9a5bebfebd15251d1da2e845b6da996e9671
describe
'232854' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCN' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
c38dc87afe8b3ac1e427aa90502c25d2
109194c8d99b16a2f3993e286416b8ed354ac6ae
describe
'75694' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCO' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
cb8f1304f55918809ee83cbf27ec8413
8d03cbc9890b8327e452dfb20d2e834a31bd47c2
describe
'19455' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCP' 'sip-files00142.pro'
b391f40e62fd0e9d1593c01f30dc5f49
5dcdf3dd6d26f4ccfd78495fba78377ee345e3a8
describe
'24302' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCQ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
8cbe5bb41f22cb48c9af9dacfdc58982
6ee36c6e1c623c5c60c3ac475bca930f6dc82280
describe
'1883456' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCR' 'sip-files00142.tif'
44f76beddd1ae1830cb4316952727e86
b447c3801310ec275b21ae8717db9d5bc23bbd77
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCS' 'sip-files00142.txt'
9beaa2b52282d70bac4242462f053b6b
900cf4d39ef445dc70e991d673cc734470c627cf
describe
'8648' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCT' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0a077a858e85e72a7b6c32c071c3409a
3fcb9decf0f6d0fa095c942e9f56092c221d7957
describe
'232880' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCU' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a0e101fbbc56b039c86c89323dd4a4f1
6c9daab3f941d7e867f496de4e956daef2c382c6
describe
'78559' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCV' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
50406fbc29b042a43623585eab7304e2
8c1136d3502772a8eb11c1aab9634b49600caa1a
describe
'19967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCW' 'sip-files00143.pro'
31c5cd20d29d754a4159e8553f7506b0
c98fcace516a226f80ffe43bb4e6340969240e79
describe
'25953' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCX' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
3a91dfeb59fb8226b6fbb67492fad408
53f04172869ca1a810b92fea48af195343cbb979
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCY' 'sip-files00143.tif'
903744356e92d19f1bb8f89b25beced0
353f40854447446b183f8b65754d3dacc0a73c4d
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGCZ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
068c64e508661780f442dcdc32b04e8e
86272272898d5829db94e8e5ac3faeb876b4175b
describe
'8684' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDA' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
d0f71f5f428cd78eec8f1721c1d8c5c0
0cb674571550f65fd7ab75c89cc134395af6fc49
describe
'232934' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDB' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7fefe7456550c4f270b59ab74e2d4b9b
51c69af38283a5ad9f45d61559c25004dacc7207
describe
'83001' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDC' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
b4f63b99ab393fe391298800bfb066dd
5f78431f3398bd4615c20bf1da932c6ce95871c1
describe
'20487' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDD' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2b4d3d28ea8b099ed9e3cc0c9533ecc9
ac532dfb1f6f2dc37dc0541f8d8c4fb3a89ff35f
describe
'27461' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDE' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
67aa43750701ea6d116dd9b3fa536222
d4c0feffdf96baf8b893e7057b8995adc14d5f5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDF' 'sip-files00144.tif'
ceb33159d307102986d4cd9d3897cfbf
5297924ae5c71892a3f17be09447c911548c472a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDG' 'sip-files00144.txt'
a4d09a69d166e82c3b91ca38ef1547d2
9dd2e31a7560c94f574cd45eb24786b1fa085d0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDH' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0fb09e76b485e0aee756f5d7979c1430
0f6266f36ae4288fab1f4a4aa7557aba3e8f9a24
describe
'232915' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDI' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
b1d020d8af7a9780bc7521507705f899
6fa9786708bbe6db6a102104d642644ed2db07be
describe
'89416' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDJ' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d3cb38fd6f84e65fb751d91a07fadf1f
246e01dbefb89f0a33019c92fc3b1b9c55164853
describe
'22937' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDK' 'sip-files00145.pro'
765f1119b75bf2a790b8c0c512b8129f
a169f6a476d8ba0af405015e774b61d88b1d38cb
describe
'30309' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDL' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
43ec0faa666d573c7c051a263b363d7f
d0a1ea3815f051355ce92969214084b979ce26f4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDM' 'sip-files00145.tif'
dd419bad93d334c37053c6f8af6d72a2
9df9928ee1bbbc38b77b0e5c0e1f47d486447971
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDN' 'sip-files00145.txt'
31f2cea8bef72fdf2d940828e08da78f
181a71a0bb1656714f414c4272a95caa786737d1
describe
'9398' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDO' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
250ea6b6e18c6a086436bbb2c9487926
eab8dbcb6aa3fdae96e4710a4416beb7b97d637a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDP' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
095177dbb015ca6fe5bacc47acd95ee8
e757ee93eab314d1b618176ddac3fcbc26a540f0
describe
'84345' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDQ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
eb8c184e61c130e0d1ece05de8238fcc
09a565795874d0e93f3398b20d2d669179f4b9d8
describe
'21942' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDR' 'sip-files00146.pro'
b2d79b576d3cfbbb7730bcf3299de2bd
091ad65764d14bdce28072047f8c62a1f7ac79ac
describe
'27859' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDS' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
328324415eba59ac73d70587d9b1784d
da7a970b586635e6c43fa933dcac55e94eafd918
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDT' 'sip-files00146.tif'
191a4f886e2eba1759e4d3c5af940760
3b701a9557a2dc7a16d70e78e4985db8f89f6d32
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDU' 'sip-files00146.txt'
df677f1478a9a126813ac633292bfe79
a36fd6da9feaf06984cb0cd4bfa0a311a390630a
describe
'9223' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDV' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
e0df3aec48fbd593d28510a9a0eee1e0
8ce3410d871be80accf17c257896a099a3bbbd20
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDW' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
796949bb48a62c36d740bca3678a3fde
412b3808b1be8a8fa9f80b3de1cf0515b3df1eb4
describe
'82627' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDX' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
8ca1389f605e22df5d5e51de07ebf72c
bec3f4c86c308dce918ce693805efb22ce60fc11
describe
'20872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDY' 'sip-files00147.pro'
b8dd6588dd7c9fce61bd15e5625aa092
5544ad28dd9d9390389ca16fb9996f7bbc6be72d
describe
'26331' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGDZ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
f74a623d706a313f109cdc04a3192926
8c47d1071b7070a735c14a27633e405a8fefd363
describe
'1883864' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEA' 'sip-files00147.tif'
02f2a9823e7707bd23db991d7d0b2415
1b7106475b5dfdc30b2ca8c3b91c867d6d19c550
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEB' 'sip-files00147.txt'
55fbd1314d541db1483781cd1d709e0f
97abf808015ee97b4afafcdac42de8613d03a439
describe
'8876' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEC' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
5df2331a87ecd9ed1fe23ef93587f2f6
f1c536fa621a33b612bf394145e2d930ccb9e756
describe
'232861' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGED' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
1cc732fb98722802c90b0060ba8f193a
8170030bebe693d9722b30d3bab8ef9083e6ae57
describe
'71659' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEE' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
c90b4e2fb451d820c61facd0426b9d4c
24fec1d34745d5778997e45006ababa853b5519c
describe
'18354' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEF' 'sip-files00148.pro'
a5eac4032a0e19eeeef6c49a82c33862
1625d28eb48e46605cb6c39950f8dd3f1cf7c9ea
describe
'23126' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEG' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
8cd3e55ebca22fde6adf553385a898e2
fc7178f5b6f6a3a9e02a0670ce075b1f7e9813da
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEH' 'sip-files00148.tif'
5716a788a8fab20c9c8edda04c3aec00
15919737413f82cca0fd6db205d56e58a3998539
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEI' 'sip-files00148.txt'
3c739de71b75969702aea6f5f7bbdce0
f51891e9159c76607fe2480c9ec97e5b84375e1c
describe
'8725' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEJ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
4368a0131e38ae0eedeefd1385f8fe43
9d3040ec1e13b698755f89119a51edcad11c973f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEK' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
dce8ae768df710d4e52dfea02ee7888a
f613e6707a3c046137023f3d2260cd6362daf972
describe
'80235' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEL' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8848e1859cede43949a24b4885d0ac8c
a750ad027cc7aa61a6041641a71d02cb829f373f
describe
'21300' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEM' 'sip-files00149.pro'
72e45d48bec05690804bf3ddc515d076
acd1d8fb9c1152cfa6a2e234cbc64a058b40ced8
describe
'27404' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEN' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
33ac5cee955716df09dbdc76ec385c1b
a4f84d411861d9500f8b15820d451f538372e07c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEO' 'sip-files00149.tif'
30a6aba7b521834adfad5dd9a0b8e009
3d67c08f88e8fd55262d9fc2be3f1fc6ab174030
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEP' 'sip-files00149.txt'
fa09cf49b1ca2635bc7ee0ca5f448928
a71eb7bc210cb1f813fe796df1516eec8ee4233e
describe
'9414' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEQ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a54dcc1c805f42a27f909bd8c78f177f
36cc9558e65506bd745eedcf8391bc464cf19970
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGER' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
4369e24b85661d4a23876c12b9a2e375
49153f53069b6e062e94da6f6e8dbf3c1bc96470
describe
'86483' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGES' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
e0be7ad7c88145424a403823c5541f4e
d30d22444c8c2598c9d7959352bf075a99884282
describe
'22820' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGET' 'sip-files00150.pro'
f9df7555fdce369a6dae40001f7d3065
4cfd06211ac4a478bb6d0429fb4fab269377af95
describe
'27758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEU' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
ee18178fa2e19c76ac5a00f3de6f4afe
e5b34cc8f88badf016d6c8e5353c0c1d9ca93b43
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEV' 'sip-files00150.tif'
764accd5e6ec16c6040018428c1ef15e
77f07628b22e1145a28d97c3a8d6a99b1855708b
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEW' 'sip-files00150.txt'
603d06664022a1e502c27e71781c0c59
1c30586d3a1e4fd8926c31746bbecb5a0bb1d382
describe
'9658' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEX' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
9ab029891bdb949a444013f58f28dcf9
b087a12bd805698098f0dfc74b278999e7b17b11
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEY' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
0dfbbee360cb40526529d94bacfa2937
3d63d1c06cc37eede246f158b686545b6e72190f
describe
'87945' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGEZ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d86bad662bc41cc9abbab6ae524915f2
dbb5488a0cd8e318ea4362cee61f04413fe98481
describe
'23001' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFA' 'sip-files00151.pro'
010ac15c6bf7516391984f6d49800722
11d1a804ad55d1ebfc96ba7f602ecea05c844a36
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFB' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
233a0d219545efabcb3debe50dc3fb80
1dfff480c93648479dc376d0a98c025126ac538d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFC' 'sip-files00151.tif'
3754582b2471a5392990d636715c261d
10901b432151136c98df67f868d9b631327f01be
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFD' 'sip-files00151.txt'
9de5df7810178b46c70b828a24540146
f960c3de1a453b06358b7c9581eb6ca23c7f94e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFE' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
e2661205e7943237b380f460511dfa19
7c7906992d1e0cd93345723ac3d0f5f7c0959093
describe
'232837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFF' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
d803f3009eab4ab8eb07f3b390a440e0
bfe32bd1d36c562ece8436338ae5dbb63b36a6b1
describe
'84244' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFG' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
36f56c08e5f107d63f981af39578da14
1b8067b29d1de95ef146242a837a4b2db5afa10c
describe
'20716' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFH' 'sip-files00152.pro'
a5ed02f688db552d9706b408ecd0916c
a5b1bab872657c684e0c7306d193c50c1f9912ca
describe
'27763' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
89e8863d1ce9eb82b7af22eb62d8f05b
bb13539c094d0965d672bc18bbc5a8f2c2c95bbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFJ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
7b91bbd2d6e8bd71baf98f891ac5a450
6a6cfb5f789ed8e2525452242ae9a0e61aa0012e
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFK' 'sip-files00152.txt'
0be653303c8695f6f22813f62677c36c
f99e6de7c2db53e0a300c325d1d7c34254bbd934
describe
'9311' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFL' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
b958150630e6f3910321b7d499a44bff
b9f1858e98884c74f1838bf3e5d042c88b104aa6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFM' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
91fdcc7bf8314f88c7d8df9f5f3b166f
f8ce24d701a6133b287f385f53f7544cdb898e8c
describe
'76330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFN' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
58aad6696b77a23da58e70b675766684
43eb7ba761ab374b6309584cdc0f7922e5dc9d96
describe
'19750' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFO' 'sip-files00153.pro'
3253582d57eac017f2e0dc4abadee19a
898cee645d04aac9514a83957b02412434098d79
describe
'25475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFP' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
4104adfcee515b78c055d0f565525445
e0414ffd1c619223a8cc525b456a670378b8a110
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFQ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
61e6d04f720f35bd5d660502d099f45b
bd63fc713ae417faf05f2a804dbd1ecb3a6d8cd4
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFR' 'sip-files00153.txt'
397e1951b8bc00e87fee2943a4cc1f7d
93e984e7c6634af4179273ec3057b6a786c92c5f
describe
'8773' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFS' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
d2423ad72c959da2a845173b0fae2244
7babd345bc83e50a4d01283920bad6c0253436d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFT' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
712064aa069011bb037c9f1fd5a8ce9b
4f2eba103be3bb0a120552cb8bd7e72eb7497410
describe
'82964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFU' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
c68875670476d0ddb213aab09ad6c80e
acb4cd077096259d483b56138cc91054827a1a01
describe
'20920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFV' 'sip-files00154.pro'
1ce1af73a8ba1903f7ef15d8a9487827
314d899610187adf38407dabfe8b7dfc90f41db8
describe
'26758' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFW' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
6715e2c7e11f8f3042057818acf9f5ee
d49531002eb7de8529959c7e6feff3a7a21ba750
describe
'1883616' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFX' 'sip-files00154.tif'
e5b4a0b9a61d41f9b5e98d122c7239be
53b0812db9c959de0fb4d725c1de417f2f9768c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFY' 'sip-files00154.txt'
9fa17f8b7d3e294989969f15f1892f24
f981447d38fdb9de7c5c8020f5a8b55366d61b62
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGFZ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
57ae5813237a1ae18e5d1c1db16801a1
eff56f959d35f57ffb1f45a678db6ece008077b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGA' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
7fcfe10fe3c58d3d2d8dce302a9cc9e7
101e31c91d5ba6b63d9ffba537efcaa49ebb6326
describe
'75332' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGB' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
9c4333949ac3a93711d93331051230ba
4a67b873a130ce831d22029c37b317a7ca5d852e
describe
'19509' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGC' 'sip-files00155.pro'
fbd0e562dce38fad793e12d9d822e13c
4aa9f5303302f1274074907f50d88b1704ce0a85
describe
'25255' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGD' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
3d304f72744f9f1b0276af3fc0ced583
0ac70f280e35114a7841699b775dd0af5de226e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGE' 'sip-files00155.tif'
c58a79d5c956b370430743e5cd8747c4
46abe331e6831973b077bd808890fa50e272061a
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGF' 'sip-files00155.txt'
f551d17df0ccc731db41959b6351cb00
d1ba907efadd3f1e6c54ffb55d903fd9d3d12b54
describe
'9071' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGG' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
3a428a2c8acec0e87695853af6f1ffeb
85cbfb615415789e1802175bcd3521b24022ed75
describe
'232843' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGH' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
f12e2959e262f9f3b4a878e93e7207ff
eb4233e92e719a06582d0e8288dcd1cbe00996b7
describe
'87011' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGI' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
46d0c60596f47c0133ac451081329f89
73dd00c3ce32f22bfd4e7b2e1ae4bbe4ef8efd00
describe
'22208' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGJ' 'sip-files00156.pro'
cbd06f877d56e4e4673c0427067d3e2b
ddec68b1a6798bf95d5121845fbc3c5f5a1e106d
describe
'29102' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGK' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
b5af31b0a8b94f78c9b8371ad7cfb547
50ba0e85a794c0633ca4b06bee0e9932a8238039
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGL' 'sip-files00156.tif'
b82c0ff81022ec79fc959037d1891357
36a044a3012254521936f48bc3140fd225108a73
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGM' 'sip-files00156.txt'
a801b60db3eac1f453d01dc46059adbd
1bbee28b2e50445b2dfee208e6cbcc355f49bff9
describe
'9489' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGN' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
5b6566e72dbc7f0615bea03e24a19e1a
e2d804d41ebe6cb322a1047685678e4c71cf1acd
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGO' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9b106a1c46b19b09f8185914dada1aa0
bd3a20c39da4fffd612993d0e7c601f092f180cc
describe
'85215' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGP' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
9fea7c62acaec9a6f9fca2f845938355
21d4d2368870dbece52474e47774c4a233c5f6a6
describe
'21951' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGQ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3caca12f9671307cb5a8d8911045c7b2
159b7dcb65038956ec0e0cbc59b17efcd481d505
describe
'27868' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGR' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
593c758f88feb67d9263a593f895938d
26cda25f885b1421575d4ce30e523b3165db89eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGS' 'sip-files00157.tif'
a64e1887e7cbf7b11094db908f12c249
6f1ef479194cb295a7739d6bc98f642c2607215a
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGT' 'sip-files00157.txt'
e148078129e3a528b5d3e567b76ebace
d8e6011b0088e5c212aaf4d6bdc75a5b85343664
describe
'9722' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGU' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
644367c34b7c5bb75c51f611fb17e1f7
a87c071a8b5abc914441b68156b111c047217ae2
describe
'232941' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGV' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
75422055a222ba6fe2ef48d93df23319
0afac4458f6d8b6095d38af4f2907149f55af0e1
describe
'80172' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGW' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
d0f396b5e408e9b9abaefd320d8b5749
e002f4c7ec9f49a7c2b22afa610005a1cadb6dbd
describe
'19254' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGX' 'sip-files00158.pro'
aa26eede027dab4edb0e6a6df7859d9e
099cb11164f389941c97f3a9da9002e39e6a4577
describe
'25695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGY' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
0d30f3f00cd48c85708acb26304b88a8
20422a36c638140b7e2cdb71e7a90aab71273ba9
describe
'1883636' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGGZ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
d5365c3183de686423450d34d659c4a4
6a2ab9b72ea3fce70219e4ba956213dcb367a909
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHA' 'sip-files00158.txt'
b8c46d2cfad24c9bdfca5da24661cea4
3f54fbdbb12565fbf262ad7a9960fce4e93103e9
describe
'8669' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHB' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
9c3d17c3de9c37a2f842176d5eadafee
62d3fe9ec895801bf2b5ae26ecc7a81b932f99ba
describe
'232778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHC' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
020922b722dcfcadf2950645c2d86878
dd87fa33d40029464d666726487cdf8ebf22f6a8
describe
'75938' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHD' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
3b70fdf622365774907095e424d0a12c
d053d45b900b32e2e018df97ecd53fe3f279b7ee
describe
'19195' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHE' 'sip-files00159.pro'
b98e02914c43d69aba29562f4b69b583
9fbe3f4b825faf32ee84d30ca19ef45138b05de6
describe
'24312' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHF' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
9f91a1dc63619ec9cc5a7c2d809b47be
7e2cea48315e8621ac916c72eec2583c07cddcc6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHG' 'sip-files00159.tif'
06c4f15966c27ac3bf030f7ba4bcefdf
ebd6560ffbaf1dc8eb0413943b39415ce10656fe
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHH' 'sip-files00159.txt'
dd54c614ab7a67c78a8e73766b0fb310
f5ecbfefb96fd170643cb7519452edf9331dccbd
describe
'8673' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHI' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
afba0021952dc385377abeb89cc7b095
446553119180ca06a4f0943b1be250e6b8d124a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHJ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
e9ed83fc8acf8fdd83b3e9bcc09f9d3f
6cd78c99e84507c0bc5e0ac90d7eb5589b7bc509
describe
'82770' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHK' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
2dccde5a2fa73ded85da803c7ab2eddb
fcf4eb11037e5b784ac307432859cbc0c8533534
describe
'21485' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHL' 'sip-files00160.pro'
735c634f2717019c0be33317538bd853
c96c21748a7ba5d4b3c8502efbfb1d01efcf97c1
describe
'27614' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHM' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
4b2a43b290c537b22ebf35b512c923a1
2c6d2d785a8b7d709aabd72b20619cfe95f7d381
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHN' 'sip-files00160.tif'
9c426b33c6a2f85746fa1d352976ae9e
adffde6a83f0984774f723197cea4cf96b636c74
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHO' 'sip-files00160.txt'
cc69ef27ff6a9cbf2a2f9de5f7db083b
3bd2c37c691a42d37d56a1bed8e2ea80093f9cb0
describe
'9334' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHP' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
f2228fdae3b08275897874e969ab50aa
2d1f771bfcbc0c6c54987157eed0f4ab2b17d02e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHQ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
578ba80b1837d0ac6e0cd7c2aeea0d39
bf4c097d1bcd6bdccc2c20aec88176d7562c0353
describe
'85347' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHR' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4eeb114b1413f3ac2949eca991c7e3af
7bf1dd1b9fb89e8b0aaeb9f2b304443fbd9e0f80
describe
'21997' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHS' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4ea7f62160b92e853c7cc464bead4058
0de7653bb1b1bb2812b477baca3c762c5fe34c9a
describe
'28044' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHT' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
ca42c75919f232704484c7cae3826fa2
00aa6535c9ae02c5032601c601c1771fa19349ec
describe
'1883724' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHU' 'sip-files00161.tif'
49cd349dfa510834d6c0d908bc630acb
a8fc96cb6b17c9d8c6ec6a179f783601ec34d716
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHV' 'sip-files00161.txt'
00e05db5ac5d5823d5c28e15e3276630
b7416f68293a5bd30d2aba7b2815e7771fd91247
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
22bc6c851f16f1f727521f4dc341baa9
043d36b99df93f0e8dfa2efeabcec1093274d2d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHX' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
1e104996b624d4bfb60d2088b3d4708c
68f0221c442b1d649a1e2394376d53e5be06757d
describe
'81954' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHY' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
2a6bad16b1fcd6ef0358bb5340776eb8
231694b7a014c301a0b2da948615378facb43835
describe
'21454' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGHZ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
78f44658d2e2cee74281158e21e9309f
99076869e58694c4c00f408048706875ab668909
describe
'26659' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIA' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
0f67c0f06951e67f8da66bff56e08832
22b25befaeb4171285abe06e0b3e6295876bf776
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIB' 'sip-files00162.tif'
821f9a523f892e2f00a0819d948af068
058539bfee5b6de2112e8a04176b4d3edf81cb18
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIC' 'sip-files00162.txt'
38151ead83ebed7d182069ccdf7602e0
0e4d0108180b2f2e841edbbabd48291b6de9a4eb
describe
'9161' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGID' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
a44881374a34e72920797bf52b83122c
09b9848f25ac26896b73302b5399057ad413621c
describe
'232850' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIE' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
9c6a9716f92daf8595262531b2bf0fd3
8988b499f9b9f52a656dd58004f626f6cb1eaece
describe
'84380' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIF' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
7cef4b919f21da627d3c7b6922e19833
64403a4ac97b1f580240c3a791d2b2b807e5acf4
describe
'22113' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIG' 'sip-files00163.pro'
93ad150ac365cf28cb45281c018fdae5
9efd047fd5de0187bcc82b1b590c62bd40e70045
describe
'27748' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIH' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
cfc3324aeccb5522ecfb9a12761ee6fa
377ebfbcdda8034db79dd2de7e706ed0ba181894
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGII' 'sip-files00163.tif'
07e19a1906dcf505632f8f535d339e3f
526549393c9de523b24e429bed586c284b2971a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIJ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
9f2849c8ad7ee378f4abaa87b67dd441
e0337675d36256163da48450561cf3b42c920d77
describe
'9111' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIK' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
53cdf9042b8ffa9048801f6bb2b770e5
97a89efc96c52d216bfc509fce5d62c13250df1a
describe
'232803' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIL' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
f44acc34541e437c1e2a86173e5976b7
9bc58a9b914e16247729fd549aad6edadd22da39
describe
'90228' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIM' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
0ca4c72c0584e6d644880ebf10e804d4
8998460505d942978cbcf8f896a3831a4a6488fb
describe
'23674' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIN' 'sip-files00164.pro'
37dce680ef4519e95620926b7b313e6b
a39d77d8d34f9e8a1dc9433be32250ebd428e0e6
describe
'29151' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIO' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
9274371ab1cf0967e394f443c9ddfa0e
afac130f65d73c97ddcc1c146f1fdc7cd55c37ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIP' 'sip-files00164.tif'
14a375bbc0bd3c2bb854f055464ab824
9d30653ddf7cc4b67282c587df5c5c8136330f71
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIQ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
31eb7cb5b3662d8557cd61d85fff6167
6480469b4f571354da05c02e599077c4c0416aab
describe
'9556' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIR' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
0e7b3cd23f1aa853927a1746360e44a5
627388a415edbc6d3d9070c7610ed89fd3c60b9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIS' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
72eb51c92ac673d3f97d29a6321318f2
289852808296d15376e3636feb204b3cbc11ee1a
describe
'83014' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIT' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
33ea73ebb93bf45dc2709043eaa59df8
77f05dcfb4d7447919d1df20dcdcd64a62465c30
describe
'21688' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIU' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b54cff73193107d598f2163e3d8253aa
a54b4056af8e3761822c56f33f77d36fb132f662
describe
'26323' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIV' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
787e457627d959da88db696d890de814
926a6da353c0ad9c370a24419df05d3495e68a02
describe
'1883640' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIW' 'sip-files00165.tif'
dd36d0fd4846f2908da809504bd2ef67
6e77c2d00ed15d0d96a31d2ee54b9064227cb782
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIX' 'sip-files00165.txt'
ca5161b701f9b906ce7869716b88ae13
1c599c995b045a961cc1072a4bf20e395759779d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIY' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
309a49c794e30fc5d615df9d319ebd7e
f4ec6e2d127627d8eeb485ce44b5d75c5373951b
describe
'232853' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGIZ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
9688f56c0269b2c11061613449e92aeb
e3377542e8a4770c461f2a018aa462604c02a0ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJA' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
02c0841d41edb37af611250c6335f159
642b6ecfcd4a7bdbee7a1ef4d9f0fe1d21b00bea
describe
'21695' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJB' 'sip-files00166.pro'
0dcd8e6f99f0a5a7da98e43c6752052e
768b4713f91dfc5f6b768130088c9246be6115a4
describe
'27013' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJC' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
25dbca2c2e4c83085d0fdeb2017077de
e46a25e79226be3ec098f5134a4cb826b1140ccb
describe
'1883708' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJD' 'sip-files00166.tif'
5dc9f22f595994e36a038cdc4f30386f
9e08d42a39702dca0b400e075c339bbe8c9c7f94
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJE' 'sip-files00166.txt'
9e306d3a6d0096fdc0d4deba21b1e7a6
1f748a136ce5f7323c8c41b82bad099a24a223ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJF' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
db6acd66749dc018404cccbc9efbadbb
39fc321ed9a1a21a75d596b511cff0d18dd73000
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJG' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
dcd102f5b86df86abb4fdfeef1fe3276
72f093fee314e6dc2f8ad0a906cd87dc7f47da49
describe
'83685' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJH' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
3b6419d9ac4b5eb657ac7484e1cbe6f4
01b5c900c4782154da25df7d1f98d88b2f7e0bf2
describe
'21341' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJI' 'sip-files00167.pro'
9eedd9434dc4502e034f2a7d2c62f4cf
7d3d3682f8f176b2f4936d1450b6ed5b8f0bed43
describe
'27544' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJJ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
55a06cfdee25be029900509ed1d9696b
b4e8dc10379e5ed3fb8e420b79e89abe2e7c78e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJK' 'sip-files00167.tif'
a28c5f4637051ac93025a8759908488d
b110959abca021e3fc4abe730284a8bd24758414
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJL' 'sip-files00167.txt'
1036825d66aa93bfefd0abd41a0fb387
f83ff3648ca67cfbb825d769f5fcb420ac5f2c4a
describe
'9508' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJM' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a99afe418b252c1cc3bd9eba5fa401f3
9665afaeb214561e5c2cf6f2ce7fccc8cb300a34
describe
'232802' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJN' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f9d24fca13753558ae5e9a6da52b9951
f2099a481054136965330c7bf7a49029871365ec
describe
'85377' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJO' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
772c2ecc69f36d7c737e8bae6e9355ff
d42ae3a537c0055967268caa23ca0465517bc024
describe
'21777' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJP' 'sip-files00168.pro'
06d79dcac9c026ed1d97b59c0ab28c3b
83f8f8fe58fe592d3294903c66a2c6983a77081c
describe
'27576' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJQ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
cd14b46d05de9e934a4ea705e9e17eea
5f48451e60c2d8929a91a6e6558760871c3473d8
describe
'1883856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJR' 'sip-files00168.tif'
6fcd319f7529d892639a086b136d8cd9
234b4833ec89f3a276a0d85b587123684737f498
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJS' 'sip-files00168.txt'
0c099cf63520dedab5468b5218d47b85
8a2d345c6fbb3f6a80d503203bedc7f6042d9b95
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJT' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
c0da40b1d5ecc810ae5f7896c9542fed
5c6c71ad865499f5481c20068be092f11e8801c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJU' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
aa425df1e09ddd0906cbd63b398cdcb6
528ee8fb458609058c09e3d5d18fd05153f12cdf
describe
'80129' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJV' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
3ca6d3acc33032603a521e7b0833d5b9
2b12d6d5c65989340af15ea2ea5f129cda070bd4
describe
'20858' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJW' 'sip-files00169.pro'
87f8c00836e186cea48a89acf1d5febc
9ae6d01ae6860c9b611ed1af226f1d82296cdff1
describe
'26367' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJX' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
b732bd53cd53ed0c09635740843c3cfa
12520d9c18ef20ba95140558441d21e9d12b7577
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJY' 'sip-files00169.tif'
c9fdb67d90656546139952980539baec
cbed8479d20697cec24f499378d53c5d9d9f7ded
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGJZ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
9e9eea21379d0ab9c7c93058144884b2
8229752e8a6a27500ecd51611e9529eb57fe5651
describe
'8900' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKA' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
29454a60c602c8b2e7312f8968c97608
c338258d0fd8ecab9896ac56d1b877e8b14f0011
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKB' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
ff3839e6ba6af98b242e5ffe7d04cfbd
8c8016e1d7639fb75762a8f09e61dc10c73e3e63
describe
'77798' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKC' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
5ca3fd97306b6e87b3e7b8a772283d0c
13fcb693daa3335a2b616bb329ce7caa42a71c09
describe
'20302' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKD' 'sip-files00170.pro'
a9477a94cbf437218980c24bbc19ff22
a9ca3a642ec1a6e88cf82e7268a45dbf5a6037d7
describe
'25755' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKE' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
a3ba463259d48aaf3220cb648440df4b
c49065f4725224c7dca9189ad2cee537793d4815
describe
'1883836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKF' 'sip-files00170.tif'
bae7bac6fc13291af77d993647d09c3f
76bb042b3a687df22fe03cab46c20c7a119fca31
describe
'837' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKG' 'sip-files00170.txt'
3ca770574928ceeae615f7fed6275398
cdefc434be61d5c7835a1e96053b7c0b7250d224
describe
'8913' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKH' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
c0c249089a9937d713686c26cf6c4c5a
b261bb47436c6cc68d5b932dd4b050261a26d878
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKI' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
9c315fc116e758ea7584a0f0a281b276
cf41fe611497e5818a32a025546af84c9c22d69f
describe
'87967' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKJ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
da03a2390247e8d64e45e28ad355851e
367356d15fc7b6d0273445f19e6ed22ba9d801d3
describe
'22731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKK' 'sip-files00171.pro'
c025c6051df91854d026ffca7becf0fb
a71c7e6073461bf348c9cf22555783950fd48183
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKL' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
e528c9e0645c23481ef8da2396aa2b22
0ff56c261a5f94b8a294c9863a6f12e75b1a9cfb
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKM' 'sip-files00171.tif'
ef4460245fb74a6889b8c57592ca345d
51af1f558a2f0ed80a3a04e17523e83455386701
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKN' 'sip-files00171.txt'
6273828e17a6bc4c590db9c3e69b5bdb
4214d6ad034ba8ba0652c9a535ef644617cc0f32
describe
'10159' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKO' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ef20c8876c02918a66df660063ef3c5b
13d2604adcee51fcaf91db1f4df8663885f84e0d
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKP' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c3292611e3738d3a8aa594c0669873b9
f20cdc19e42c5f5e9e839a77c1b7741de21e8615
describe
'95321' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKQ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
8b3d439cffef62bdd3fbd0ab97342a7f
348719affd9e406994a3ed7acfd1babd58fdf5f6
describe
'24763' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKR' 'sip-files00172.pro'
0155aedb1a4c73469bf68a46033e9563
a73951ce81ddc9f0c1c7847c0166a3eed4de4f2a
describe
'30731' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKS' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
81a82f083eff8e02194938a6efb4880b
5b60083053d542fe27d414bbb2072ea215c4ee3c
describe
'1883968' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKT' 'sip-files00172.tif'
2e51739d895644c356e2fdad114253ba
7944129a4fdceaa8351850f9032059423d122220
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKU' 'sip-files00172.txt'
04dbd1c126a9021cabf908745bc4f48b
6b7198731da184652412eb68f844da03e1a26679
describe
'9909' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKV' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
5a245ddcbce8b7014bf245d2ed0c7e7b
559b5d407e96157a4b1461ee467ac9a663c32ef9
describe
'245240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKW' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
c00283772e197b7c5fb697b9aea254c8
06c91f9397b8d1c02e5ecb15264dd846548ee066
describe
'88856' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKX' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
49d9c7f4ecb659edd3a10eee3efeb4e7
46a70108ce815fd974473decd2330a743bc06fff
describe
'24780' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKY' 'sip-files00173.pro'
f37e481ac0e8e81cd49f7388eb6d4e43
20873b09ba07dfb91010a2582fe9c132da621466
describe
'29249' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGKZ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
c0a95faee0624ee0985a7b0aa4d93009
6ba050b0536f65304fcb5f143a1ce29ee1a1f075
describe
'1975176' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLA' 'sip-files00173.tif'
67a77e46f8d123e1649af503daa15cd8
006ba3362f277082e5456b6ffa1a92fbfe121987
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLB' 'sip-files00173.txt'
f9dd01987274e13bee3a23230f8e6952
470b0de1e43de274cdc7b1a41f1c23dbf982b9ee
describe
'8847' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLC' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
ef2ec661f5897637eb4f076034396836
24c40ebb95904e0f65ed7c2ad9fef15dbfab839f
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLD' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
b9cae652faa80186aa0f54d6a106c952
151ac6f465a51a198ee60eed5d81b2b48c6f0afa
describe
'88672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLE' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
1bb96134ed7d659cf1ac067c2a57422e
ca7566d1ea9a5a6cd95d52f1f45fe7f3e6dbecec
describe
'23099' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLF' 'sip-files00174.pro'
25cdfae0cd6524c00269490b4c3ebc54
2142484197ea3cf8c0571b33cffd372f344d9ef6
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLG' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
344078c628f5bd1b2a5d79d2f437988b
f5b08dadfcc3f86013e1c8f669526a717d29e12b
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
d30a3f5afa7fbcf47d43e1ae437bf43c
f466246c6e8612def391ad2823ded3da40399666
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLI' 'sip-files00174.txt'
0f132f6941aa8d1aa69f081a7332bac3
4648f852b0e90c5b8cba7bc5a8fbc45fe38a5657
describe
'9857' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLJ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
a46eed2e89d59a7da4e93b8b83cdd883
6b39d987b852557849ce7dd8b8598913d2e8bd50
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLK' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
011e48ee23e53fdabe495f6bc978fb0b
2037a97b2f1269f0781ae168fcd04c9bcb60431c
describe
'92917' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLL' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
a0dd2536456f1b2b80750ada59bd3e44
9b361032f954c02b8c586cfd2e2c4c6ead32a376
describe
'23459' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLM' 'sip-files00175.pro'
37d5faa3e03199348f00d3e7a0884047
f53d669ab610979382760cb015bf9f5077248eae
describe
'30597' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLN' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
26fb0c2aefa8335b850238d75a16cf93
edcb640b384e729a170ceb177761813f4010ad08
describe
'1883996' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLO' 'sip-files00175.tif'
2a484c6fa609befd507692798f818c07
33e8635b23a916f84ee2ab2959b814f7dba68e23
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLP' 'sip-files00175.txt'
db7cbf1f5c08579b986f8ed708a6c07c
16fde53b9459318a55f77e97e1ba80fd683d6ddc
describe
'10255' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLQ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
f05e4bd678bbc469928011aa8b64becd
a75a6fd711328b715c45cae45fd9411cc9d3ba4c
describe
'232909' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLR' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b27c5ae15442efab64ca5a25f4d89bc4
0b42a4ab16d18bb962169a8b8a61bad1bf1a52e6
describe
'86307' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLS' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
7a472fd3536d5190477239621329e454
c2d50e525b3b048ccccc382ffcd0d3c565f5a955
describe
'21240' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLT' 'sip-files00176.pro'
f91241638a045cb64ca506e3a181f8b4
a753c1f914e095e8ae575a6c8cd0078b35a4f8e3
describe
'28158' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLU' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b2b68f3e83acb1e178eaf6c1b9993801
304898dfb0090d9afca1fefbb54965edb06644f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLV' 'sip-files00176.tif'
c8fe05397b039e3a52f4ff2e7942e704
74ea321e3b2246856f095b6466ca43666573dd9c
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLW' 'sip-files00176.txt'
d4f58ca70305e9a0dbc51c66f808f1eb
4fb786b71082f571fd659dc05a497ad3b936010e
describe
'9277' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLX' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
b7ad5dee52f57c80f63f784c95d16af9
cdff622e10b637949e938e8e00d4f548e857c364
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLY' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c97db77ebf8ece3d5937814c267e7da6
2ce1dabefbdd3dc7db0351868660394aacfffd0d
describe
'85916' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGLZ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
f1ee34883dc7fb1cbd83707ad8e636b9
16b37f9b5e56dc3479fb8d05792e21cb75cac1a5
describe
'22268' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMA' 'sip-files00177.pro'
bcfd0553176c8b63a3f24ab32e14d3de
aa65f6602f8fe17d507c66933ad8723f67b78bb8
describe
'28059' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
78da44caa783cc6ef83cf0508709d55e
e37ca33bdc6f60e0e4e397f65384102f3edc5b65
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
8febd5cb2f9ae865973edfeb0621d275
9d9242a0bb46ada49adc9eae5417d5f4b0b1b489
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMD' 'sip-files00177.txt'
409e5c50bf336d2ee7f511edda6b32f1
8dc54d06119241e1c53fcd72620d91269284024c
describe
'9372' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGME' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
3a333782c18efaedb31f25c9f55d2f91
b2533a8e8a96f79b7399fc81559133c1d8b43087
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMF' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
ec5180e212badf0d1e01d05e16ba1b2a
a8d24fcc8197f7f77bdbd6232d7584506271e5b1
describe
'74984' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMG' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
f9ba0f9cc886c8a6b0f750cc1d83f6af
2ff141517033f6b5fc37498c98743dcf955c2b24
describe
'18872' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMH' 'sip-files00178.pro'
5bed948ada63ea7c893493ab14385b3e
17a2d5c3319cbde05a7a533bea34ff1903eca475
describe
'24882' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMI' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
2426040d57f2db116dafc38bad48711e
78e7769b85443f846d331a62d7e5558f9d02cd6f
describe
'1883656' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMJ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
d58644888d8c63ed4b5952923fa45dd7
20acec5ef8eff893c46a3f9e1062e3ad495d038b
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMK' 'sip-files00178.txt'
91984cf80ed07a0da52a4b542da3d6b4
f1b16ca65d0fbfd08df481770da5f66489fe8b8f
describe
'8666' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGML' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
e9a29ffa1d234df1872dbe503297a700
a75bbc58f0ab18fc28ba664d2ecb6ccb0d90a877
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMM' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
b0ecee08872b99a7798cd6c7ff82a672
5e4237d7f711a967dc09728bbf0a26aea2151d78
describe
'77469' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMN' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
dcf5cc7048d6133b0540cc21aa98fb09
fdf58b7963724d48f8013763611d52f486570f77
describe
'18579' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMO' 'sip-files00179.pro'
fa7875e2f14d089dedd1e4b86c1ef32d
e1f420f0dd945d68ce89e564c9b2d24c7ab07a7f
describe
'25347' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMP' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
2e8ae59f355ad8fa6b506bc07adb6985
fc9a5be9422bcb26aa17a61082e4f13632fcea0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMQ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
0b85278b6bf8743ef683ba858f5b8eb8
005ca10a12c755c08c926d892a33d2ca711b292c
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMR' 'sip-files00179.txt'
231e76b4a28f487e24348a325a275e82
fc2b41ec2461b831dacff594a3070eb0764246e3
describe
'8670' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMS' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
251edeff5972b306838bb2bda2b30028
96ba79126626ffb9545c562f45221e0780684681
describe
'232896' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMT' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
7a7a4faee1f517d81bbf2cb6e043ae97
78c6bb3f5d7a74bb569a99d4c868a917fc2406ed
describe
'81203' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMU' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ecc33a764bd62913054200a1ca34c1d8
059c78c08f356790ede166c79d6f774b43e52547
describe
'20388' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ac931e18ed4ca0d1000ef7ed804a5701
c7445f9a3aa6e4f8bda057068a8a19549a624cc6
describe
'26426' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMW' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
66d1af5839146f84b09e5ff52703a682
05a46aee650ed63c80510a5456b46cb203f9cc28
describe
'1883752' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMX' 'sip-files00180.tif'
080dcf7647bf754777bddfd50ed2cd7f
f9a9e337174938938500d07c3d32853530a5ef7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMY' 'sip-files00180.txt'
dbd0ec3c24e4bcb4185505dc66cfb9a0
67420b91b7b3948d50b13dda6862304f7451de77
describe
'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGMZ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
3669a85bf98d77b333f421037df1390e
7912fa1f3a9a1c712b67bc83d3242e601b41c590
describe
'232689' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNA' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
11083ddaf723b9a3804a2905a083ab11
b5b8965a49673d85f1791a389268ac4fb83c4dfc
describe
'44352' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNB' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
c502ae4b0833b41a93393783fce87eda
a0a3fe4c6774ef461cb55bf602534e4165e1cdf8
describe
'10195' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNC' 'sip-files00181.pro'
a54ca578a660b1bce966eaebc1d2832f
0b516f8ddbc882d6a23f5bb97107b730caa61647
describe
'13721' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGND' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
7cd1bf58e528d8d5aa392685a526f309
16bfa92732d7bdf24c7d01acfbc56cf46af26034
describe
'1882216' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNE' 'sip-files00181.tif'
6d8125681a964ef427696a0e04d73476
d9a15dae3d668764de0f89f34b347250620509bf
describe
'475' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNF' 'sip-files00181.txt'
e04a07d155a7c3032598c610e420dcb3
cefbb1e774bd4e7bcaa59f53287fa0ab36142dea
describe
'4836' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNG' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
e682f20e8ba7b9f7664e4416f16d9a06
fdd0952cdbb06878135aadc79944bf7f30172cd0
describe
'232920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
71e14fbc4c99967459c8d0270090b2c8
3ffe006e808996dc679faa4ea845225fa25c0821
describe
'13728' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
31cf92900ec7e404faff39a954b4605c
fb6ec49c1b46140739c3d538d3b453bae7b1eb58
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNJ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
9789e0d82368e346421c5f1c4b7353ae
5c6cfbde594a505a45147e3775d6a2a44759a846
describe
'3444' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNK' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
50a0d4ff9175665f2640cbf235ce9977
7c72fa7014f678498bbacacc6bd834b8f02001a2
describe
'1880964' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNL' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1cca4c5bbf2e22a9a05d89f1da71bfc3
b4ff6c96fe1bcdde8605abe23446544c06b7604a
describe
'92' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNM' 'sip-files00183.txt'
134b071c621bd2a617e347b84689afb4
d8110cff909c248097edebc3ae6a528b4108b4ea
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNN' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
8698f4d142957a3aad53dcd9d6fa8b30
3f4130be88af27b201fd8847a64a554bcbbc699a
describe
'246993' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNO' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
b24d73df0006cbd3df737df1c6cc8fa4
ba880a5abc8a7d0c9dcd3db0a06c3b11d5a41ec8
describe
'264672' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNP' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
4ac179ae64dc677d7103480ac5efa694
df7b34ae37a268089d0332b271d93ea260ed1ac2
describe
'72279' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNQ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
ae6f8103f8d96488d526be3c63022980
d2794bd445df59b0eec84c5a34a2c520ea4a7bf2
describe
'5951920' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNR' 'sip-files00186.tif'
ba9df600add7a98bc98dad3bb6b0476a
18990ad85f13272c875907c305bf54b2e4343fe7
describe
'19949' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNS' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
bd0d181434e099472377cd23a0ba09e7
2eff9ccbe46cc9a841572db65b355300f94acf06
describe
'264889' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNT' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
a4f755caa0ef9cec98017ccb37e99006
31e4fed40066237ec0a5318fad0f81369954b65f
describe
'266857' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNU' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
a385c480dd663b526e5e9378347ec320
76122331e7fda949298645bbaaf62b2168354ccb
describe
'71778' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
2aabc0221986da752b26d93be6585491
9a4514d424a391a199c11e68215fbf80a65d6237
describe
'6382188' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNW' 'sip-files00187.tif'
4c8fcf433a388b4b2189e39f41a49701
5af1c7b120334cc85d3bb0632912ce7bcf94808e
describe
'19613' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNX' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
60e4bc8d6a68839da609ace2091993b2
5d8e367eec991a1b7e68aba34137c872a6be9784
describe
'260624' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNY' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
a3ba6f4242467dd62f166dac8d4a4e7d
a5a739a6eedb50a4e8220aaf1deda79df213905b
describe
'232396' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGNZ' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
64d9ee29280d00967c43ec608778841c
684e363acfed943933aada5e0f4dd79cfc18c7d9
describe
'64598' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOA' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
7fa7cfdb15755c43a3364941a23c6e09
24cb0953366d47779b03263d43d6c0a0b9bc45b6
describe
'6279308' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOB' 'sip-files00188.tif'
044be9ca9f458493ea99b4a50c97e30b
98cdb37fa6cf4ee12c81f1449c5518b6229ee100
describe
'17885' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOC' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
8b768e7beeedf4fe170e7cc7945f9400
7684ba746af2422cf70c849f159905b75db04790
describe
'90869' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOD' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
b9d03e2d65414de6dec61ab1d5fe4538
7ce53a2282196a8017d9b986f077e66674b711a6
describe
'77293' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOE' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
e8000cad31d2b04fc0f29b2e1745697e
3df5ec1da9979828006b326d2272a623247c8b11
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOF' 'sip-files00189.pro'
07519f0350c8ca89422b982dc61f6130
06bcd737c9a65b725bb2c068b94294878b4e0525
describe
'21840' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOG' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
bdc03782551ed0485125bb0566932add
1b74afb35dcb4374fa67cbeb2e4349fc79b8151b
describe
'2201496' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOH' 'sip-files00189.tif'
e40a6a777690c11ab66fb2856184b1ca
eb60064f970d35c7d05e2f7e6e1b1b181f49bea2
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOI' 'sip-files00189.txt'
ce305f2ca321326de6deb43294cafa05
d993890c94507fc846b42395b7b0944be0644189
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOJ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
e0ed9891559428bb9512a4f6e65d0d6b
5422bedae11a4860ffe0a5463580b2994fa80bc7
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
9f92551a1f9768665f47ea137c039b08
2375058e4c324c129ac4814ff34feaeb2c52cfd0
describe
'298034' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOL' 'sip-filesUF00081080_00001.mets'
026c69a447ed9d3b54f86edd9f608d23
c288f3db158135dc67840a7cca5427c4b3c9d76e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T12:56:14-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'385659' 'info:fdaE20080511_AAAABUfileF20080512_AABGOO' 'sip-filesUF00081080_00001.xml'
ff8e27a64fd1240a1114377fd3165cdb
c9ee8942509e327155e05e1d19ca70242c7e698e
describe
'2013-12-18T12:56:17-05:00'
xml resolution